Citation
A Technology-Based Music Composition Course for Non-Traditional High School Music Students

Material Information

Title:
A Technology-Based Music Composition Course for Non-Traditional High School Music Students
Creator:
Howard, Martha
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, FL
Publisher:
College of Fine Arts; University of Florida
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
Project in lieu of thesis

Thesis/Dissertation Information

Degree:
Master's
Degree Grantor:
University of Florida
Committee Chair:
Bauer, William I.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Harmonic progressions ( jstor )
Music appreciation ( jstor )
Music composition ( jstor )
Music education ( jstor )
Music learning ( jstor )
Music students ( jstor )
Music teachers ( jstor )
Musical rhythm ( jstor )
Popular songs ( jstor )
Teachers ( jstor )

Notes

Abstract:
In today's world, ripe with technology, people experience music in new and exciting ways. Informal music learning happens all around us. Traditional music learning, geared towards students who possess the ability to play an instrument or who have been involved with traditional music education in schools, is changing to meet the needs and interests of a different kind of 21st century non-traditional music learner. Roughly 80% of secondary level students choose to forego the music education in schools that involves performance groups and academic course offerings and focuses on Western classical tradition. The potential for engaging this 80% is real and exciting. Once excluded from a creative process because of the inability to read music and/or play an instrument and a disinterest in traditional music learning, students who desire creative expression through music can find it by means of software and digital sound sources. The purpose of this Capstone Project was to develop a semester-long course for the high school level focusing on music composition and utilizing current technology to engage the roughly 80% of secondary level students who do not choose to participate in traditional school music programs such as band, orchestra, choir, or academic offerings such as classes in general music and/or music appreciation. The author developed a curriculum geared toward these non-traditional music students with the intention of facilitating their participation in music learning and resulting creative expression via the use of current technology that provides opportunities for conceiving, developing, realizing and reflecting upon music. This Capstone Project was developed using a backward design process and includes eight student-centered units that focus on constructivist learning experiences.
General Note:
Music Education terminal project

Record Information

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University of Florida Institutional Repository
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Martha Howard. Permission granted to the University of Florida to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE FOR NON TRADITIONAL HIGH SCHOOL MUSIC STUDENTS By MARTHA HOWARD SUPERVISORY COMMITTEE: DR. WILLIAM I . BAUER, CHAIR DR. AMBER PETERSON, MEMBER A PROJECT IN LIEU OF THESIS PRESENTED TO THE COLLEGE OF THE ARTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF MUSIC UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 2014

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! " ! ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS I would like to thank most sincerely my committee members for their guidance and support with this Capstone Project Ð Dr. William I. Bauer Dr. Amber Peterson I would like to thank all of the course designers and my professo rs at the University of Florida Ð Dr. William Bauer Designer Ð Technology Assisted Music Learning Designer/ Instructor Ð Research in Music Education Dr. D ale Bazan Designer/ Instructor Ð American Vernacular Music Instructor Ð Technology Assisted Music Learning Dr. Vanessa Bond Designer Ð Musics of the World Dr. Timothy Brophy Designer/ Instructor Ð Assessing Music Learning Dr. David Edmund Instructor Ð Historical and Philosophical Foundations of Music Education Mr. Ralph Hay s Designer/ Instructor Ð Approaches to Theoretical Analysis Dr. Charles Hoffer Designer Ð Historical and Philosophical Foundations of Music Education Dr. Matthew Moehle Designer Ð Instructional Design in Music Education Dr. Amber Peterson I nstructor Ð Musics of the World Instructor Ð Instructional Design in Music Education Dr. Keith Thompson Instructor Ð Creative Thinking in Music Designer/ Instructor Ð Psychology of Music

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! # ! Dr. Peter Webster Designer Ð Creative Thinking in Music I would like to thank Phillip Klepacki and Elizabeth Eichinger for their guidance with the UF MUE program. I would like to thank my classmat es at the University of Florida and acknowledge their camaraderie, wit, hu mor, and support. I w ould like to thank my students, who never fail to teach me important things and keep me energized. I would like to thank my husband, Brian, and my children, Merritt and Alexander, for their love and support as I've journeyed through this process; you have helped me believe in myself and trust that what I do is meaningful.

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! $ ! Table of Contents Abstract ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ............ 5 Chapter 1: Introduction ................................ ................................ ................................ ................... 6 Purpose of Project ................................ ................................ ................................ .............. 10 Chapter 2: Review of Literature Non Traditional Music Learners ................................ ................................ ....................... 11 Musical Creativity ................................ ................................ ................................ ............. 14 Composition ................................ ................................ ................................ ...................... 15 Popular Music ................................ ................................ ................................ .................... 17 The Use of Technology to Assist Music Learning ................................ ............................ 18 Chapter 3: Methodology ................................ ................................ ................................ ............... 2 3 Figure 1 Ð Learning Events ................................ ................................ ............................... 25 Chapter 4: Units, Lesson Plans, Assessments, Supplemental Materials ................................ ...... 2 8 Overview of Units ................................ ................................ ................................ ............. 2 9 Unit One Ð Do You Hear What I Hear? ................................ ................................ ............ 3 7 Unit Two Ð Sound and Sense ................................ ................................ ............................ 5 5 Unit Three Ð That's A Sick Beat ................................ ................................ ....................... 6 4 Unit Four Ð Because You Know I'm All About That Bass ................................ ............... 8 1 Unit Five Ð In Perfect Harmony ................................ ................................ ........................ 9 1 Unit Six Ð Can You Play Me A Tune? ................................ ................................ ............ 10 2 Unit Seven Ð Life Is A Song, Love Is The Lyrics ................................ ........................... 11 2 Unit Eight Ð Final Project: Original Song Composition ................................ ................ 12 4 ! References ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ... 13 4 Appendix 1 Ð Technology Information ................................ ................................ ....................... 138

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! % ! Abstract Project in Lieu of Thesis Presented to the Graduate School of the University of Florida In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Master of Music A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE FOR NON TRADITIONAL HIGH SCHOOL MUSIC STUDENTS By Martha Howard December 2014 Chair: Dr. William I. Bauer Major: Music Education In toda y's world, ripe with technology, people experience music in new and exciting ways. Informal music le arning happens all around us. Traditional m usic learning, geared towards students who possess the ability to play an instrument or who have been involved with traditional music education in schools, is changing to meet the needs and interests of a different kind of 21st century non traditional music learner. Roughly 80% of secondary level students choose to forego the music education in schools that involv es performance groups and academic course offerings and focus es on Western classical tradition. The potential for engaging this 80% is real and exciting. Once excluded from a creative process because of the inability to read music and/or play an instrument and a disinterest in traditional music learning, students who desire creative expression through music can find it by means of software and di gital sound sources. The purpose of this Capstone Project was to develop a semester long course for the high school level focusing on music composition and utilizing current technology to engage the roughly 80% of secondary level students who do not choos e to participate in traditional school music programs such as band, orchestra, choir, or academic offerings such as classes in general music and/or music appreciation. The author developed a c urriculum geared toward these non traditional music students wi th the intention of facilitating their participation in music learning and resulting creative expression via the use of current technology that provides opportunities for conceiving, developing, realizing and reflecting upon music. This Capstone Project w as developed using a backward design process and includes eight student centered units that focus on constructivist learning experiences.

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! & ! CHAPTER ONE Introduction Music itself is natural to humanity: no society, tribe or any other social organization has ever been discovered that did not make music. The fact that many people to whom music education has been unavailable, only partially relevant or even antipathetic, have nonetheless learnt to perform and compose to widespread public acclai m is surely cause for celebration. (Green, 2002, p. 99 100) Most people are musically encultured by default (Green, 2002). Music is ubiquitous and, though many do not experience formal music education, informal music learning happens all the time simply by the nature in which we encounter music in so many ways in our society. With the advent of digital technology and the Internet, students are experiencing music in ways we could never imagine only decades ago. Boespflug ( cited in Ro driguez, 2002) referred to these students with instantaneous access to media as representatives of a new era living in "the Internet world of soft boundaries and instant discoveries" (p. 216). The music education game has been permanently changed and req uires teachers to re examine their goals and methodologies. Music has traditionally been taught in many schools in a way that that equates l earning with the acquisition of skills and content knowledge. Educational practices based on instructionism have emphasize d the teaching and assessment of learning regarding discrete facts that are seemingly disconnected from students and unrelated to what they know. In this model, the teacher is considered the all knowing authority that imparts information whi ch students are expected to memorize (Sawyer , 2012 ). In music performance classes directed by the teacher expert at the front of the room , the focus is most often on the development of musical skills and the goal is usually the perfected replication of th e music of others.

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! ' ! Music education of this sort is geared toward students who possess the ability to play an instrument, most of whom have been involved with music education at the primary level, and in most cases read music notation. These students us ually elect to participate in traditional class offerings such as band, orchestra, choir , or academic classes in general music and/or music appreciation . Often successful at the elementary level, these traditional music education methods prove less popular with middle and high school students, as evidenced by a marked drop in enrollment in traditional music courses at this level (Kuhn, 2012). Dammers (2012) reported that roughly 80% of secondary level students do not participate in these types of t radition al music classes . This is alarming for two reasons. Firstly, secondary school music programs must find ways to extend their reach beyond 20% of the school population. Secondly, too many students are missing the opportunity to experience music le arning in school programs that can lead to a stronger, longer connection to arts in education and in society throughout their lives . Contrary to the sage on the stage model of teaching that is so often the basis for traditional music classes , technologic ally supported, student centered coaching utilizing popular music can create a very different music education experience. Boespflug reflected on what he considered to be a "democratic alternative" as such: • The teacher teaches the students, the students te ach each other. • The teacher knows a lot, the students know a lot, and everyone knows something. • The teacher and students think together. • The teacher and student s take turns talking performing, sharing, and listening. • The teacher and students make choices together.

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! ( ! • The teacher performs what she does best, the student performs what he does best, they share what they know, and they create community by working together. • The teacher consults students when designing program s, and the student consults the teacher when designing programs (cited in Rodriguez, 2002. p . 220). The potential for engaging students in a music learning situation such as that which Boespflug has detailed has evolved in recent years and can now be real ized in new, innovative ways through the use of technological tools. Once excluded from a creative process because of the inability to read music and/or play an instrument and a disinterest in traditional music learning , students who desire creative expre ssion through music can find it by means of software and digital sound sources. Music creation tools enable the non traditional music student to experience and enjoy music despite the fact that they often do not possess traditional musical skill or knowle dge. These types of non traditional students often possess, however, a keen interest in music and deep knowledge of vernacular music. Meeting students in the place where they commonly interac t with music Ñ digitally Ñ is key. Music education can and should be about more than just playing what is on the page in the manner dictated by an authority f igure at the front of the room . T hinking in sound, developing creative images, and expressing creative thought through composition results in greater understanding of music (Zerull, 1992). The new National Arts Standards, re imagined in 2014, are an additional impe t us to re evaluate tr aditional music education methods and place a strong er emphasis on creativity (Cris well, 2014). The new Standards address the need to more fully engage students in varied ways and use words such as "imagine," "conceptualize," "generate," and "develop" ( N ational

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! ) ! Core Arts Standards, 2014 ). Teaching methodologies in all disciplines are changing to meet 21 st century learning goals and this needs to be true in music education, as well. The revised National Core Music Standards are presented in an Understanding by Design Framework ( Wiggins and McTighe, 2011) . This matrix delineates artistic literacy and the pathway from philosophical foundations (process components, anchor standards, enduring understanding, and essential questions) to lifelong goal s of arts learning. The revised standards are contained within three major categories under which fall sub categories of active areas of learning: • Music Creating o Imagine o Plan o Make, Evaluate, Refine o Present • Music Performing o Select o Analyze o Interpret o Rehearse, Evaluate, Refine o Present • Music Responding o Select o Analyze o Interpret

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! *+ ! o Evaluate The language used in the revised standards is much more descriptive and active than the original 1994 standards. Instead of directives such as create , perform , and resp ond , the revised standards include verbs such as conceive , develop , realize , interact , and reflect . This illustrates the new , process oriented nature of the revisions and the NCCAS' quest to focus on the organization of material a nd its presentation to students in a way that will encourage their understanding and assimilation of that information . Clearly, these revised standards dictate a move away from behavioristic learning models and encourage more cognitive and constructivist learning objectives ( Na tion al Core Arts Standards, 2014). Purpose of this Project The purpose of this Capstone Project was to develop a semester long course for the high school level . The course focus es on music composition and utiliz es current technology to engage the roughl y 80% of secondary level students who do not choose to participate in traditional school music programs such as band, orchestra, choir, or academic offerings such as classes in general music and/or music appreciation. The author develop ed a curriculum gea red toward these non traditional music students with the intention of facilitating their participation in music learning and resulting creative expression , despite the fact that they may not possess traditional music skills such as mastery over a musical i nstrument or the abi lity to read music notation. The course integrates t he use of current technology that provides opportunities for creating, performing and responding to music. This Capstone Project is student centered and focus es on constructivist learning experiences.

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! ** ! CHAPTER TWO ! "#$%#&!'(!)%*#+,*-+# ! ! Non Traditional Music Learners The traditional model of music education in the United States involves most primary students experiencing music making in their classroom. At middle school, and certainly beyond at the secondary level, it is often the case that students are offered the op portunity to participate in performance based groups such as band, orchestra, or choir in which the goal is to perform as perfectly as possible the music others (Williams & Dammers, 2013). Statistically, only approximately 20% of students will opt for thi s type of music education experien ce in school (Williams, 2012). T h e remaining 80% of students who fall out of music education in their young teens are described as non traditional music learners with the following attributes: 1. Are in the sixth through twelfth grades (middle and high school in the United S t ates of Levels 2 and 3 using the UNESCO standards) 2. Do not participate in traditional performing ensembles 3. Have a music life independent of school music 4. May sing or play an instrument (if so, likely dru ms, guitar or keyboard) 5. May not read music notation 6. May be unmotivated academically or have a history of discipline problems 7. May be a special needs student 8. May aspire to a career in music recording or music industry (Williams, 2012 ) . So what becomes of th ose who fall out of music education in their young teens? Green (2002) wrote of the very small percentage of adults who consider themselves to have been

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! *" ! educated in the area of music while in school and made a distinction between the small percentage of t he population that regularly make music and the very large percentage of the popul ation who regularly listen to music . She also noted that that "sound recording and reproduction, technology, the expansion of the music industry and mass media into major in ternational concerns, and the Internet have made music ever more accessible, widespread and even unavoidable for the listener" (p. 3). Green described "informal music learning practices" (p. 5) of non traditional music learners who are self taught and oft en learn by watching and imitating those around them who play. Music passed on in this manner is most often vernacular . Her research results suggest ed a differentiation between what she refer s to as Ôculture' and Ônature,' both of which come into play wh en examining music learning . This suggested that popular musicians acquire skills and knowledge by a process of osmosis and that these learning e xperiences are more natural than those associated with traditional music education. Green likened it to the way in which a child picks up language in a natural way. Many of the subjects in her research associated disciplined, formal music study with something unpleasant and unlike what they experienced as popular musicians. Contrarily, these same subjects associated non traditional music learning practices with enjoyment. The majority of Green's subjects make no link between any traditional music education in their childhood and the informal popular music learning that took place in their liv es. Bula (2011) confirmed Green's research and wrote of the many students who do not have any interest in traditional music education offerings but do have interest in utilizing technology to create music and develop their creativity. Bula found that stu dents moving from middle to high school are often excluded from music education if they do not elect a specialized traditional music program such as band, orchestra, or chorus courses , which Bula

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! *# ! contended do not address the interest and aspirations of mos t high school aged students . When this happens, these students "are often excluded from music education for the rest of their lives" (p. 5 6 ). Criswell (2014), as well, wrote of the plight of music educators in upper grades who see dwindling enrollment a nd interest in traditional music classes. To combat this trend, many teachers are working to develop classes that appeal to non traditional music learners who feel a strong desire to create and perform music but in a non traditional way. Dorfman (2013) c onducted research that involved students enrolled in such classes that are technology based and in which participants tend not to be those who enroll in performance classes such as band or chorus and have nowhere else to go to experience music learning. T hough perhaps uninformed and inexperienced in the areas of music reading, playing, and performing, these students are often the most creative and enthusiastic and certainly have a lifetime of music listening experience with which to become involved in musi c learning. These students tend to know what they like and why, have strong aesthetic opinions about vernacular music , and possess the ability to think in sound. Likewise, Ruthmann (2007) related his experience of teaching general music at the same tim e the choral and band programs were scheduled. As a result of this scheduling, he often found his class filled with students that did not possess typical music performance skills. In response, Ruthmann successfully implemented a technology based composit ion workshop in which he worked to bridge the disconnect between his students' sonically rich musical world outside of school and more traditional music education programs aimed at students with traditional musical skill sets. The resulting learning envir onment was tailored to student interest and individual needs.

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! *$ ! Musical Creativity Educators understand more than ever the way in which students learn and the importance of creative thinking. Hickey (2001) noted the essential component of active, contextual, student centered learning. Hickey and Webster (2001) claimed, "we are all born with the ability to think, act, and live creatively" and wrote , "releasing creativity can occur in venues such as music composition" (p. 23). The authors detailed the musical creative process involving preparation, incubation, illumination, and verificat ion and emphasized the need to enable and support student creativity. Thinking in sound and exploring multiple musical options is one important way to do so. The authors contended that activities facilitated by technology increase such opportunities for musical creativity and the development of divergent thinking in studen t learners. Aesthetic decision making and judgment, as well, are noted by essential components in musical creativity. Webster (1990) noted that encouraging students to think imaginativ ely about sound can "increase their musical understanding, deepen their aesthetic sensitivity, and uncover new ways for the to understand the s ubtleties of humanness" (p. 21). Dorfman (2013) contended, " t he majority of the creativity that happens in a tra ditional ensemble classÉcomes from the director, not the students " (p. 10). Technology based music instruction allows the freedom to explore, review, and revise creative ideas and offers a setting conducive to the sharing of ideas and peer feedback. In h is research, Williams (2012) focused on the importance of utilizing constructivist learning objects that promote hands on creative activities and the "overriding thread that the teachers stress when describing their work and the of their students is the im portance of keeping music creativity and music understanding at the forefront of the learning objectives" (p. 137).

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! *% ! Wiggins (1999), too, wrote of the traditional set up of teacher as sage on the stage . This model often implies the attitude that students learn by the teacher imparting information and asserted the important concept that students bring to the music classroom a great deal of music knowledge gleaned from their experience as listeners in society. Tapping into their inte rest and experience and offering creative experiences enables students "to articulate and share what they know and understand about music" (p. 31). Webster (2002) also conveyed the importance of a creative process that involved the intent to make a creati ve product, and time and space for exploring and revising creative ideas. Technology based music instruction can be an excellent way to support this process and compliment musical creativity. Bauer (2014) referred to creativity as "a process that takes t ime, preparation and persistence" (p. 50) and outlined effective learning outcomes for musical creativity. Bauer contended that the creative process varies from student to student and that placing constraints on assignments can assist the creative process . Brady (2008) asserted that creativity is a "basic human need" (p. 36) and advocated teaching creativity in music education by focusing on the process of music making rather than the finished product. Through composition and improvisation, students can discover and refine their personal expressive musical language. Brady noted that establishing peer to peer working relationships in a non judgmental environment in which students listen and create will result in creative expression. Composition Composi tion is recognized as an essential component in music education , and music learning is considered incomplete if it does not include some component of creating (Watson, 2011) . Beckstead (2001) discussed music as an aural medium and the importance of offeri ng students learning experiences that encourage their thinking in sound and the exploration and

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! *& ! experimentation in the sonic environment. The author pointed to the way in which technology can facilitate these student experiences and free them from limitat ions imposed by the need to read and write standard notation. He noted students' ability for "constant aural scrutiny and revision" (p. 47). The immediacy of results when composition is aided by technology is a powerful motivator for students. Bissell ( 1998) advocated comp osing in a hands on, technology based learning environment and wrote that such work will "provide a foundation that can prepare students for many types of music study and experience" (p. 36). Mercer (2007) wrote of sample based composition that allows students to create new music by manipulating pre existing sounds. This method of composing enables students to experience creativity without the need for years of early music instruction. Baue r (2014) presented information on the compositional process and ways in which music educators can facilitate student creativity when composing. Bauer pointed out the fact that there are two approaches often used when teaching composition: one is a more t raditional method that involves standard notation and another is a more informal approach that does not. Both methods can make use of technology. The pros and cons of each method were addressed and the aspect of musical literacy and the use of notation w ere discussed. Bauer noted that it is often the case that a large percentage of non traditional music learners respond more positively to the more informal approach to composition without the use of standard notation. Reese (2003) described the teacher as "facilitator" (p. 212) and explored the challenge s of teaching composition. In the safety of a structured environment, teachers can work as coaches to guide student work while they develop technique and skill. Reese advocated the use of open ended sug gestions, rather than directives, when responding to student work and

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! *' ! gauging a student's sensitivity and readiness for critique . Reese described the relationship between student and teachers as "give and take" (p. 218) Popular Music Students are most co mfortable creating music in a style with which they are familiar. Rodriguez (2002) noted that "students imitate much of what they understand from the sound of popular music when they create music, and this actual doing of what they experience as consumers of popular music is a vital and affirming part of the creative process Épopular music reflects what they know about themselves, each other, and their world " ( p . 21) . Utilizing popular music in music education programs can be a means to the end of fostering musical creativity and including the essential component of composition in music education. Emmons summarized ways in which popular music offerings can encourage • Greater participation in school music activities • More meaningful experiences in improvisation and composition for music students • Real life music making experiences similar to those of professional musicians • Greater understanding of music for those interested in a wide variety of styles • High level understanding of music from a great n umber of consumers (see Rodriguez, 2002, p . 173) Popular music is often perceived as being less valid in an educational setting than classical Western European music and lacking "a significant or teachable legacy" ( Rodriguez, 2002, p. 17). Rodriguez poin ted to the important ties popular music has with the political, cultural, social, and economic history of the Unites States and wrote, "students should learn about the relevant history of the sounds and stylesÉ A merican roots music is a collection of

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! *( ! interr elated vernacular traditions that has shaped the forms, rhythms, textures, tonalities, and lyrical themes of pop ular music in the United States and it can and should be studied systematically in music classrooms" (p. 18) . Bula (2011) reported that the majority of students find traditional music education that focuses on Western classical music boring and unenjoyable . Woody (2007) questioned why the content of music curriculum does not reflect ubiquitous popular music and a rgued that, when it is incorporated into traditional performance classes, it is often inauthentic. The use of popular music is a way in which to engage young learners and reach them through music in which they are interested and of which they have an unde rstanding and experience. Woody noted that music learning is most educationally effective when it is ac tively engaging and not passive and that p opular music proves more successful in engaging students. Farish (2009) wrote that popular music "was once a dirty word" (p. 42) in music classrooms and advocated student learning in the medium of popular music. Farish wrote, "young people are often quite sophisticated in their listening and their music is often deeply internalized" (p. 42). Kuhn ( 2012) descr ibed a program in which he in itiated music technology course. He noted that students responded most positively to the use of popular music and that "by deconstructing popular music from their experiences, students not only learn music writing techniques that are immediately usable and relevant, but they are better equipped to handle challenges as they are already intimately familiar with the sounds and styles: (p. 97). This, Kuhn asserted, brings interest, enthusiasm, and relevance to the music the stude nts create. The Use of Technology to Assist Music Learning Technology is ubiquitous and "deeply embedded in the contemporary lexicon of many young people's musical lives" (Wise , Greenwood , & Davis, 2011 , p. 118). Students today have

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! *) ! grown up with a nd are more proficient users of technology than their parents (and, often, their teachers). Music consumption and music making for these young people is unavoidably linked to technology. Utilizing technology in music education, therefore, makes sense and facilitates students' expression of their creativity . Technology can remove limitations faced by non traditional music learners such as lack of ability to read or write music notation, and little to no proficiency on an instrument (Watson, 2011) . In their research, Wise, Greenwood, and Davis (2011) concluded that technology both served and enhanced traditional music learning . Portowitz , Peppler , and Downton (2014) asserted that music education must meet the changing needs of the 21 st century students (p.3) and developed the In Harmony program in which co mputer technology is utilized to enhance learning. The authors' research recognized student preference to engage with current technology when studying music. Technology based music instruction such a s that used in the In Harmony program is a way to work to achieve the goals in our music classrooms as detailed in the National Standards. Technology is a tool that can be adapted to enable a deeper, more experiential process whereby students can create and respond to music. Software p rograms such as GarageBand, Band in a Box, ACID Music Studio, and Rock Rap'n Roll promote music creation by non traditional learners who do not possess music reading, instrument playing, or other traditional skills (Williams, 2012). Criswell (2014) noted the move away from education with the teacher being the center of the process and the highlighted changes in music education "almost entirely due to the explo ding usage of music software and other related technologies" (p. 34). Dorfman (2013) emphasized that at the center of technology based music instruction is the concept that students are enabled to move beyond prescriptive , behaviorist methodologies. I ns tead, they become

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! "+ ! responsible for their own learning by building upon prior knowledge and concepts via constructivist learning experiences. He asserted that music technology is instrumental in introducing, reinforcing, and assessing learning experiences, encourages construction of new knowledge through creativity, and builds upon previous experiences. Webster (1990), as well, noted the benefits of using computers and sound technology to aid in the st imulation of creative thought in our students. K uzmich and Dammers (2013) are in agreement and wrote "technology based music classes allow for active, hands on, individualized engagement in a wide variety of musical styles" (p. 40) and attract non traditional music learners who choose not to participate in per formance classes. Music educators must keep in mind that technology is a means to an end Ñ that of finding ways to teach and students to learn about music. Dorfman (2013) asserted that "technology is an important means by which we can teach music Ñ introduce its concepts, rein force them, provide experience, provide practice, assess and evaluate achievement, structure aesthetic interactions, and do all the educational activities that make learning music a distinct, artful pursuit" (p. 4). Dorfman also noted that students "are s ophisticated technology users outside of the classroom so making use of technology in the classroom make sense" (p. 3). However, educators must remember that essential to technology based music instruction is the content and focus must remain on music lea rning and not the teaching of technology. Freedman (2013) cautioned to remember to "teach music; the technology will follow" (introduction). Bauer (2014) noted that technology "is an integral part of the way much music in today's world is created, perfo rmed, preserved, and consumed" (p.6) and reflected on the way s in which technology can facilitate music learning in schools. Bauer wrote of Mishra and

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! "* ! Koehler's (2006) model of Technological Pedagogical and Content Knowledge (TPACK) as a way to conceptualize the integration of technology in music education. In this model, technology is viewed as a tool and mean s to an end , while also acknowledging the essential ele ment of content knowledge. E qually important is the concept of pedagogical knowle dge and the understanding of principles and practices to effectively guide instruction. Bauer noted that the use of computers can effectively provide opport unities for students to think in sound and develop the es sential skill of audiation and advocated t he use of technological tools that can "serve as a springboard to creativity by helping to generate musical ideas and scaffold students compositions" (p. 65). Agnew (2003) advocated the use of technology in the classroom and pointed to the benefits of the interactive learning environment it can facilitate. Also noted was the fact that technology allows for more individualization of student learning opportunities. Beckstead (2001), as well, contended that technology is a "powerful tool for the majority of students obstructed by limited knowledge of Western notation and access to performing musicians." (p. 48) . A review of literature confirmed that traditional music education experiences, focused primarily on the performance of music of others, engage only approximately 20% of high school students. The remaining 80% opt out of this type of experience due to lack of interest in music learning focused on Western European classical tradition and/or lack of skill necessary to participate in performance groups. Non traditional music learners often have rich musical lives outside of school that include s a deep knowledge of popular music, which has been found to be an effective way to engage their interest and enthusiasm. Their strong desire to create and perfor m music can be addressed by the use of technology that encourages their exploration of

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! "" ! sound and creative expression. This type of music learning involves coaching from the instructor, as opposed to the more traditional sage on the stage format , that faci litates learning experiences rather than strictly imparting information.

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! "# ! CHAPTER THREE ! .#*/'0'1'23 ! ! The methodology utilized to develop this Capstone Project was based on Wiggins and McTighe 's ( 2011) Understanding by Design (UbD) model of instructional design. UbD provided the conceptual framework to develop the u nits, l esson p lans, a ssessments, and s upplemental m aterials . UbD , also known as backward design , has three main stages: 1. Identifying goals, objectives, and anticipated learning outcomes. 2. Determining what will be needed to provide evidence of student learning. 3. Developing learning activities and experiences that will allow students to produce the evidence of learning and meet the learning outcomes. The author began the curriculum design process by identifying desired learning outcomes for each unit. Working backwards, learning activities to support these outcomes were developed. In addition, a culminating project that synthesizes all of the work undertaken over the co urse of the semester was kept in mind. Units and their corresponding lesson plans, learning events, and assessments were developed to support the successful completion of the culminating project. The curriculum developed is focused on engaging the roughly 80% of high school students who do not choose to participate in traditional secondary school music programs in creative musical activities that utilize current technologies. The curriculum is student centered, focused on constructivist learnin g experiences, and geared toward these non traditional music students with the intention of facilitating their participation in music learning and resulting creative expression Ñ despite the fact that they may not possess traditional music skills such as

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! "$ ! mas tery over a musical instrument or the ability to read music notation . The author develop ed units that examine • American vernacular music from past to present • Contemporary recorded sound and popular music • Rhythm and rhythmic devices in popular music • Bass lin es • Harmonic progression • Melody • Song form • Lyric writing Each unit contain s a flow of learning events that are closely aligned with anticipated learning outcomes . I nclude d are content lessons , listening sessions , classroom discussions , journal entries , content driven understanding/skill building activities , podcast and Songshare development , technology tutorials , compositional work , individual coaching sessions with the instructor , work in progress submission , and peer review (see Figure 1). An essent ial component of this curriculum is engaging students in listening to and examining existing American popular music in various styles and from various time periods that demonstrates concepts under consideration in each unit . Recognizing student interest i n and enthusiasm for popular music, musical concepts and specific elements are taught in a way that builds toward a goal of thoug htful, independent learning. Through their active listening, classroom discussion, and written reflection, it is the author's intention that students understand what is considered popular in today's contemporary music market and why, and use this knowledge to create their own original works in similar styles . Listening to material that is

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! "% ! Figure 1 . Learning Events. This figure illustrates the flow of learning events in each o f the units. ,-./0./!1022-.2 ! 132/0.3.4!50223-.2 ! ,67228--9!:32;<223-.2 ! =-<8.76!>./8302! ,-./0./!:83?0.!@.A082/7.A3.4B 5C366!D<36A3.4!E;/3?3/302! F-A;72/!7.A!5-.42G780! :0?06-H90./! I0;G!I
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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! "& ! relevant, compellin g, and motivational allows for deeper understanding and expression ( Dorfman, 2013). Purposive (close listening with the specific aim of learning or putting to use what one hears), attentive (close listening without any specific goal), and distracted (listening without much awareness) listening experiences can contribute to both formal music education as well as informal music learning (Green, 2012). This course utilize s Musical Instrument Digital Interface (MIDI) and Digital Audio Workstations (DAW s ) , bring ing to students the opportunity to experiment with loop based and sample based composition, re mixing , and direct note access with virtual software instru ments. Programs such as Audacity, Incredibox, Soundation, Mixxx, R Tap, and GarageBand are utilized and provide opportunities for students to create, perform and respond to music . Technology based music instruction allows a student to work at an i ndividualized pace and receive a personalized learning experience. By layering learning cycles, students are allowed the freedom to be at different places in a unit concurrently (Dorfman, 2013). Individualized instruction , coaching sessions, collaborat ive group work , and peer reviews are essential components as students create music together and independently. In traditional music education learning is achieved through instruction from the teacher. Non traditional music learners often watch, imitate, and interact with each other in group settings where there might not be a formal instructor present and actively di recting learning. P eer interaction, imitation, and feedback provide unique learning experiences in both casual and organized settings and ar e often effective ways to work collaboratively (Green, 2002). Students submit th eir work to a classroom Virtual Listening Room that provide s an important opportunity for sharing works in progress and enable s a means of offering peer feedback (Ruthmann, 2 007).

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! "' ! Composing music may be daunting and overwhelming to students who have no previous experience or formally developed musical skill or knowledge. Therefore, e nabling parameters such as suggestions about form, meter, texture and harmonic structure ar e utilized. Establishing such parameters and employing constraints help students focus their creative energy and defining a creative path to achieve a somewhat controlled outcome ( Wiggins, 1999; Stokes, 2010) . The nature of composition is that it is not immediate but open ended and requires time and space to incubate (Reese, 2003) . T he design of the course this type of reflective think time built in to it . Included in the design of this curriculum are formative and summative assessmen ts. Contained with in each unit are assessments with evaluative criteria that monitor the progress of student learning as they move through learning events and activities. The course culminates in a final project that serves as a summative assessment of student experience o ver the course of the class.

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! "( ! CHAPTER FOUR ! 45%*!6$#+$%#&7!45%*87!)#88'5!91,587! :88#88;#5*8 7!<-==1#;#5*,1!.,*#+%,18 ! ! The following pages contain an overview of unit design and individual unit designs. Associated lesson plans are described and some samples and assessments are included.

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! "# ! Overview Of Units *These units are designed for a semester long high school level class that meets for 5 45 minute sessions each week. Unit One Ð Do You Hear What I Hear? Objectives/Description Big Ideas Learning Events/Activities Assessment(s ) Notes Unit One is an exploration of American vernacular music from past to present. By the end of this unit, students will understand how popular music communicates the thoughts and experiences of the time period from which it comes. Students will actively listen to examples of music from the past and present and will demonstrate their understanding of concepts under examination by develop ing a Songshare Presentation to present to the class and contribute to the Virtual Listening Room. V ernacular music is the "language of the people" and reflects important events, ind ividuals, and groups in American history. S ongwriters use lyrics, melody, and accompaniment to express themselves and represent the emotions, thoughts, beliefs, and experiences of individuals and sociological groups. T hough popular music has evolved and been significantly impacted as technology has advanced, music of the past and current popular music have much in common. • Lesson : overview of American vernacular music from past to present Activities Ð 1. Class Discussion of topic 2. Listening session 3 . Listening Journal entry • Lesson : Introduction to Listening Journal Entries that will take place each unit • Lesson : Introduction to Songshare Presentation projects that will take place each unit • Tech Tutorial: Audacity • Tech Tutorial: Virtual Listening Room/peer comment protocol • Independent Work : Songshare Presentation (podcast developed with Audacity) • Submissions : Virtu al Listening Room/Peer feedback • Teacher observation of students • Student contribution to classroom discussion • Listening Jou rnal Entry • Songshare Presentations • Virtu al Listening Room submission(s) • Peer feedback (given and received) This unit should initially take approximately three class meetings to introduce the concepts and conduct the Tech Tut orials. However, a mini instruction session and class example Listening Session (followed by a Listening Journal Entry) will start each week off to introduce historical repertoire that is a propos to unit discussion and focus Songshare Presentation projec ts. See Lesson Plan #1 for aural samples to be incorporated into each unit over the course of the semester. ! !

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! $% ! Unit Two Ð Sound and Sense Objectives/Description Big Ideas Learning Events/Activities Assessment(s ) Notes Unit Two is an exploration of contemporary recorded sound and popular music. By the end of this unit, students will understand how elements such as timbre, texture, instrumentation, pitch, and dynamics create sonic events. They will articulate their interpretation of aural examples i n a Listening Journal entry and describe their response to samples in a podcast. Students will utilize software programs to create soundscapes, collages, and short pieces. They will evaluate music created by their peers and offer feedback. P opular music contains sonic events that are created with digital audio. E lements such as timbre, texture, instrumentation, pitch, and dynamics shape the tone and expression of a piece. S ongwriters use sound to express themselves and represent the emotions, thoughts, beliefs, and experiences of individuals and sociological groups. • Lesson : Contemporary recorded sound and popular music; musical elements such as timbre, texture, instrumentation, pitch, and dynamics Activities Ð 1. Class Discussion of topic 2. Listening session 3. Listening Journal entry • Unit Reflection Podcast : How I Hear Timbre, Texture, Instrumentation, Pitch, and Dynamics • Tech Tutorial : Incredibox • Independent Work: Creating Music with Incredibox • Tech Tutorial: Soundat ion • Independent Work : Creating Music with Soundation • Independent Work : Songshare Presentation (podcast developed with Audacity) • Submission s : Virtu al Listening Room/Peer feedback • Teacher observation of students • Student contribution to classroom discussion • Listening Journal Entry • Musical Elements Quiz • Tech Test Incredibox • Tech Test Soundation • Review of Podcast • Virtu al Listening Room submission(s) • Peer feedback (given and received) This unit should take approximately 2 weeks Aural examples to use to illustrate concepts: Turn Down For What (CJ Snake/Lil Jon) Bohemian Rhapsody (Queen) Back to December (Taylor Swift) Somebody That I Used To Know (Gotye) ! !

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! $& ! Unit Three Ð That's A Sick Beat Objectives/Description Big Ideas Learning Events/Activities Assessment(s ) Notes Unit Three is an exploration of rhythm and rhythmic devices popular music. By the end of this unit, students will understand how rhythm functions in music. They will understand concepts regarding tempo, beat, and meter, and rhythmic devices such as syncopation. Students will distinguish between contrasting rhythms in a Mixxx m ashup project that will allow them the opportunity to categorize, combine, manipulate, songs. Students will engage in activities in GarageBand to reproduce rhythms they hear, and create original rhythm compositions. In addition, students will reflect on aural samples and share their thoughts in both classroom discussion and a written Listening Journal entry, Songshare Presen t ation, and Unit Reflection Podcast. Students will begin work on their final project this unit . They will develop two contrasting 8 bar rhythm patterns . This original material will be used in futur e units to further develop their final project. R hythm organizes music. T he beat is the pulse of the rhythm; tempo is the speed of the beat, meter is the grouping of the beats. R hythm can simple or complex but is ever present in pop music D ifferent genres employ different rhythmic patterns and devices. T here are strong, weak, and syncopated (insertion of an impulse or hit at a metrical place that is unexpected Ð off the beat) • Lesson : overview of rhythm and rhythmic devices Activities Ð 1. Class discussion of topic 2. Class rhythm jams 3. Rhythm recreations 4. Group rhythm improvisations 5. Original raps • Tech Tutorial : Mixxx • Independent Work : Mixxx Mashup Project • Unit Reflection Podcast : How I Hear Rhythm • Tech Tutorial : GarageBand (focusing on rhythm) • Independent Work : Songshare Presentation (podcast developed with Audacity) • Independent Work : GarageBand Rhythm Composition Activities 1. Create rhythmic patterns to use in future exercises 2. Creating patterns with each kit instrument (kick, snare, ride, etc.) then put groupings of them together • Submissions : Virtu al Listening Room/Peer feedback • Teacher observation of students • Student contribution to classroom discu ssion • Listening Journal Entries • Rhythm Activities • Rhythmic dictation assessment • Tech Test rhythm • Review of Podcast • Virtu al Listening Room submission(s) • Peer feedback (given and received) This unit should take approximately 2 weeks Aural examples to use to illustrate concepts: I Can't Go Wrong (Phillip Phillips) Sky Full Of Stars (Coldplay) Fireball (Pitbull) We Will Rock You (Queen) I Wanna Hold Your Hand (Beatles) Bang Bang (Jessie J) I Knew You Were Trouble (Taylor Swift) Rather Be (Clean Bandit ) ! !

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! $" ! Unit Four Ð Because You Know I'm All About That Bass Objectives/Description Big Ideas Learning Events/Activities Assessment(s ) Notes Unit Four is an exploration of the bass line. By the end of this unit, students will be able to discern the bass line and bass patterns in popular songs and recognize ways in which the bass line and rhythm of a song work together . They will understand major and minor diatonic scale construction and be able to transfer that understanding to the piano keyboar d. Students will utilize Garage Band to reproduce bass lines they hear and create their own bass line patterns. In addition, students will reflect on aural samples and share their thoughts in a Li stening Journal entry, Songshare Presen t ation, and Unit Reflection Podcast. Students will continue to work on material that will be integrated into their final project . Using the two contrasting 8 bar rhythm patterns written in the previous unit, t hey will develop a bass line for each. This original material will be used in futur e units to further develop their final project. E ach key on the piano keyboard corresponds to a note name. D iatonic scales (major and minor) involve a whole/half note pattern. B ass lines, usually played bass electric bass, low strings, or other low pitched instruments, often utilizes melodic and rhythmic patterns ("riffs"). B ass lines often synchronize with the rhythm of a song and aid in given the song a pulse or "groove." • Lesson : Bass Lines Activities Ð 1. Class Discussion of topic 2. Listening session 3. Listening Journal entry • Lesson : The Piano Keyboard Activities Ð 1. Piano practice • Lesson : O verview of S cale C onstruction Activities Ð 1. Piano practice Ð scales 2. Piano practice Ð bass lines • Unit Reflection Podcast : How I Hear The Bass Line • Tech Tutorial : GarageBand (bass line) • Independent Work : GarageBand Bass Line Compositions Activities Ð 1. Create an 8 bar and 12 bar bass line s over rhythm patterns • Independent Work : Songshare Presentation (podcast developed with Audacity) • Submissions : Virtu al Listening Room/Peer feedback Ongoing work Using the two contrasting 8 bar rhythmic patterns written in the previous unit, students will work to develop b ass lines for these patterns. • Teacher observation of students • Student contribution to classroom discussion • Listening Journal Entries • Piano keyboard quiz • Scale construction quiz • Tech Test bass line replication • Review of Podcast • Virtu al Listening Room submission(s) • Peer feedback (given and received) This unit should take approximately 2 weeks Aural examples to use to illustrate concepts: All About That Bass (Megan Trainor) Never Stop (Safety Suit) I Wish (Stevie Wonder) Straight Up (Paula Abdul) ! !

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! $$ ! Unit Five Ð In Perfect Harmony Objectives/Description Big Ideas Learning Events/Activities Assessment(s ) Notes Unit Five is an exploration of harmonic progression. By the end of this unit, students will be able to discern harmonic progression in popular songs and recognize ways in which the bass line helps to establish this progression. They will understand how to construct triads on the I, IV, V, and vi degree s i n C major and the i, iv, V, and VI degrees in A minor diatonic scales, recognize the quality of each triad (major/minor) and the intervals involved in their construction. Students will be able to transfer that understanding to the piano keyboard and play specified harmonic progressions. They will explore the ways in the use of groups of these triads work to create a harmonic progression and the way in which the bass line often implies this progression. They will utilize GarageBand to reproduce harmonic p rogressions they hear and create their own harmonic progressions. In addition, students will reflect on aural samples and share their thoughts in a Listening Journal entry, Songshare Presentation, and Unit Reflection Podcast. Students will continue to wo rk on material that will be integrated into their final project . Using the two contrasting 8 bar rhythm/bass line patterns written the previous units, t hey will develop a harmonic progressions for each. This original material will be used in futur e units to further develop their final project. The distance between two notes is called an interval. Groups of intervals can create a triad. Triads can be built on the I, IV, V, and vi degree s of both C major and the i, iv, V, and VI degrees in A minor diatonic scales . T riads grouped in patterns create a harmonic progression. H armonic progressions move toward a goal (resolution). The bass line often implies the harmonic progression. • Lesson : Triad Construction Activities Ð 1. Piano practice Ð building triads in C major and A minor • Lesson : Harmonic Progression Activities Ð 1. Piano practice Ð triads on I, IV, V, and vi in C major and i, iv, V, and VI in A minor • Lesson : Overview of Harmonic Progression in Pop Songs Activities Ð 1. Class Disc ussion of topic 2. Listening session 3. Listening Journal entry • Unit Reflection Podcast : How I Hear Harmonic Progression • Tech Tutorial : GarageBand (harmonic progression) • Independent Work : GarageBand Harmonic Progression Compositions Activities 1. recording triads to b uild an 8 bar harmonic progression over a given rhythm track in major and minor • Submissions : Virtu al Listening Room/Peer feedback Ongoing work Using the two contrasting 8 bar rhythmic /bass patterns written in the previous unit s , students will work to develop harmonic progression s for these patterns . • Teacher observation of students • Student contribution to classroom discussion • Listening Journal Entries • Triad Construction Quiz • Harmonic Progression Aural Analysis • Tech T est harmonic progression • Review of Podcast • Virtu al Listening Room submission(s) • Peer feedback (given and received) This unit should take approximately 2 weeks Aural examples to use to illustrate concepts: 4 Chord Song (Axis of Awesome) Pachelbel Ran t (Rob Paravonian) What Makes You Beautiful (One Direction) Never Stop (Safety Suit) ! !

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! $' ! Unit Six Ð Can You Play Me A Tune? Objectives/Description Big Ideas Learning Events/Activities Assessment(s ) Notes Unit Six is an exploration of melody . By the end of this unit, students will be able to discuss melodic construction and will understand steps and skips, passing tones, and neighbor notes. They will have built upon their understanding of intervallic relationships and discovered ways in whic h melodies are develop ed. Students will transfer their new understandings about harmonic progression and make connections to the ways in which melody is supported by harmony. Concepts regarding phrase will examined and students will have an opportunity t o compose short melodies utilizing varied phrase structures . Students will play on the keyboard melodies they hear aurally and utilize GarageBand to record original melodies under prescribed parameters . In addition, students will reflect on aural samples and share their thoughts in a Listening Journal entry, Songshare Presen t ation, and Unit Reflection Podcast. Students will continue to work on material that can be integrated into their final project . They will further develop the two c ontrasting 8 bar rhythm/bass line/harmonic progression patterns written in previous units over which they will add melodies. Melodies are created by grouping pitches and rhyth ms together in thoughtful ways. Melodies can move step wise or utilize skips (intervals). Melodi es work over a harmonic progression. Melodies tend to be built in phrases. • Lesson : Overview of Melody Activities Ð 1. Class Discussion of topic 2. Listening session 3. Listening Journal entry • Lesson : Melody and Melodic Construction Activities Ð 1. Piano practice Ð step and skip patterns • Lesson : Melody and Harmony Working Together • Unit Reflection Podcast : How I Hear Melody • Tech Tutorial : GarageBand (focusing on melody) • Independent Work : GarageBand Melody Composition Activities 1. Melody writing Ð compose melodies within specified parameters . 2. Compose a bass line that works against the given melody. • Submissions : Virtu al Listening Room/Peer feedback Ongoing work Using the two contrasting 8 bar rhythmic/bass line/harmonic progression compositions written in previous unit s , students will work to develop melodies for these patterns. • Teacher observation of students • Student contribution to classroom discussion • Listening Journal Entries • Melody Construction Quiz • Tech Test melody w riting • Review of Podcast • Virtu al Listening Room submission(s) • Peer feedback (given and received) This unit should take approximately 2 weeks Aural examples to use to illustrate concepts: Happy Birthday What Makes You Beautiful (One Direction) Never Stop (Safety Suit) Shake It Off (Taylor Swift) Bang Bang (Jessie J) ! !

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! $( ! Unit Seven Ð Life Is A Song, Love Is T he Lyrics Objectives/Description Big Ideas Learning Events/Activities Assessment(s ) Notes Unit Seven is an exploration of song form and lyric writing. By the end of this unit, students will be knowledgeable about common song forms. Students will explore rhyme scheme and literary devices used in lyric writing. They will understand how songwriters use lyrics to express themselves and represent the emotions, thoughts, beliefs, and experiences of individuals and sociological groups and will experience lyric writing in learning events and activities. Student will write and sing original song lyrics. In addition, students will reflect on aural sam ples and share their thoughts in a Listening Journal entry, Songshare Presen t ation, and Unit Reflection Podcast. Students will continue to work on material that can be integrated into their final project. They will further develop the original music they have composed in previous units and will think about ways in which lyrics can be incorporated into their work. Most pop songs are organized into sections and follow common forms. Lyrics often follow a rhyme scheme. Simile, metaphor, and personification can help bring song lyrics to life. Songwriters use lyrics to express themselves and represent the emotions, thoughts, beliefs, and experiences of individuals and sociological groups. • Lesson : Overview of Song Form Activities Ð 1. Class Discussion of top ic 2. Listening session 3. Listening Journal entry 4. Song Form Mapping • Lesson : Lyric Writing Rhyme Scheme/Literary Devices Activities Ð 1. Class Word Wall of Inspiration 2. Group Rhyme Games 3. Original Lyric Writing • Lesson : Melody and Harmony Work ing Together • Unit Reflection Podcast : How I Hear Lyrics • Tech Tutorial : GarageBand (focusing on form) • Independent Work : GarageBand Top Line Composition Activities 1. Melody writing Ð compose a top line (melody and lyrics) within specified parameters. • Submissions : Virtu al Listening Room/Peer feedback Ongoing work Using the two contrasting 8 bar rhythmic/bass line/harmonic progression /melody compositions written in previous units, students will work to develop lyrics for these patterns. • Teacher observation of students • Student contribution to classroom discussion • Listening Journal Entries • Song Form Mapping Quiz • Lyric Writing Activities • Review of Podcast • Virtu al Listening Room submission(s) • Peer feedback (given and received) This unit should take approximately 3 weeks. Aural examples to use to illustrate concepts: Yesterday (The Beatles) What Makes You Beautiful (One Direction) Shake It Off (Taylor Swift) Firework (Katy Perry) I Lived (One Republic) ! !

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! $) ! Unit Eight Ð Final Project: Or iginal Song Composition Objectives/Description Big Ideas Learning Events/Activities Assessment(s ) Notes Unit Eight is the culmination of this class and contains the final project. By the end of this unit, students will have synthesized what they have learned in previous units to complete a final project that demonstrates the transfer of the knowledge and skills gained in this course. The final project involves the utilization of the technology explored in this class to facilitate the composition of an original song. Students will continue to listen to songs from the past and present to be inspired and informed as they work on their composition and will complete their final Listen ing Journal Entry and Songshare Presentation. GarageBand offers the ability to create music utilizing either pre recorded loops or completely original music written using software instruments. My final project must follow a prescribed form. Rhythm can add structure and interest to my composition. Choices about the music I compose (rhythm, bass line, harmonic progression , and melody) will likely be affected by my lyrics. When writing lyrics, I want to consider rhyme scheme and literary devices that wil l enhance my writing. • Students will work on individual projects to create original music utilizing all they've learned in this course. • Individual coaching sessions will be ongoing to guide student work. • Students will submit their final Listening Journal Entry and Songshare Presentation. • Teacher observation of students • Student contribution to classroom discussion • Listening Journal Entries • Virtu al Listening Room submission(s) • Peer feedback (given and received) • Final Project Summative Ass essment This unit will be the culm inating experience of the class and should take approximately 3 weeks.

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! "# ! Unit One Ð Do You Hear What I Hear? Unit One is an exploration of American vernacular music from past to present . By the end of this unit, students will understand how popular music communicates the thoughts and experiences of the time period from which it comes. Stu dents will actively listen to examples of music from the past and present and will demonstrate their understanding of concepts under examination by developing a Songshare Presentation to present to the class and contribute to the Virtual Listening Room. NOTE: this unit will be ongoing over the course of the semester and its content will be integrated into future units. Established Goals • Critically listen to, evaluate, and respond to songs from various genres and time periods of American vernacular music • Identify characteristics from songs from various genres and time periods and important songs and performers • Make connections to other disciplines to see the way in which songwriters are able to express and represent through art their emotions, though ts, beliefs, and experiences • Feel comfortable and confident about participating in open discussion about the topic Transfer T1 Ð Students will be able to recognize and recall songs from various historical periods in American history and disc uss their significance . T2 Ð Students will recognize that the communication of emotions, thoughts, beliefs, and experiences is important. T3 Ð Students will be able to make connections between music from the past and music that is popular today. T4 Ð Studen ts will be able to communicate their response to their peers' work. Meaning UNDERSTANDINGS Students will understand thatÉ U1 Ð É vernacular music is the "language of the people" and reflects important events, individuals, and groups in American history. U2 Ð É songwriters use lyrics, melody, and accompaniment to express themselves and represent the emotions, thoughts, beliefs, and experiences of individuals and sociological ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS Students will keep consideringÉ Q1 Ð Why are certain songs considered historically significant? Q2 Ð What is a songwriter tryi ng to convey in his/her writing? Q 3 Ð What are some of the elements that contribute to the way in which a song conveys the artist's intent? Q 4 Ð What are the similarities and differences between popular music of the past and the music

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! "$ ! groups. U3 Ð É though popular music has evolved and been significantly impacted as technology has advanced, music of the past and current popular music have much in common. we listen to on the radio today? Q 5 Ð How has technology impacted popular music? Acquisition Students will knowÉ K1 Ð É about significant historical periods and songwriters in American vernacular music. K2 Ð É how to define characteristics in music from various historical periods. K3 Ð É about available technologies for music creation. Students will be skilled atÉ S1 Ð Éidentifying and recalling correctly songs from various time periods and by various songwriters throughout American history. S 2 Ð É aural analysis of elements of recorded music. S 3 Ð É utilizing Google Forms to complete Listening Journal Entries S 4 Ð É developing pod casts with Audacity. S 5 Ð É utilizing the class Virtual Listening Room, uploading submissions, and providing appropriate peer feedback. S 6 Ð É how to share their discoveries and express their musical creativity with available technologies. ! !

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! "% ! Stage 2 Ñ Evidence Performance Tasks Evaluative Criteria (EXPLANATION) Students will be introduced to popular music from different time periods and examine elements such as form and structure, instrumentation, expression and lyric content, performance, and historical significance. Following instruction, a discussion will take place. (INTERPRETATION) Students will complete Listening Journal Entries e ach time they listen to an example shared by the instructor in class. Prompts for the entry will include questions regarding elements such as form and structure, instrumentation, expression and lyric content, and historical significance. Students will us e a Google Form to complete and submit their Listening Journal Entry. (APPLICATION) Students will complete a Songshare Presentation project to be presented in class and shared in the Virtual Listening Room in which they will present a song of their choosi ng that exemplifies elements and characteristics common within the song's genre and time period in which it was written. The presentation will include information on the songwriter(s), significant points about the song's historical or sociological impa ct, the performance (recording technology , etc.), and a personal statement about the student's response to the piece. (PERSPECTIVE) Students will compare and contrast historical examples and current songs to discover similarities and differences between popular music over time. • Demo nstrate understanding of the genre/time period of the song • Describe during class discussion elements of aural examples • Express in c lear, confident, and effective public speaking personal response to music • Evaluate aural examples and make sense of elemen ts • Make meaning of examples and respond thoughtfully in writing in journal entries • Adapt their understanding of elements under discussion and select an appropriate song in a Songshare Presentation • Demonstrates understanding and skill of technological aspects required to develop a pod cast that integrates voice over work • Create a Songshare Presentati o n using Audacity to d emonstrates understanding of the concepts being considered each week and share with the class various of elements under discussion • Compare and contrast the class example(s) and the song selected for the Songshare Presentation • D emonstrates understanding of the genre/time period of both the class example(s) and the song the students chooses to share

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! &' ! (EMPATHY) Students will share their work with the class and offer feedback as projects are shared. • Be open to and cons ider the thoughts of others • Relate their discoveries to the discoveries of other students • Reflect on all the Songshare Presentations and share t houg htful feedback given in a kind a nd respectful manner Stage 3 Ñ Learning Plan Learning Events Progress Monitoring W WhereÉ Instruction : The instructor will give mini sessions that include a selection that demonstrates the concepts under discussion. Listening to these selections will provide students with knowledge about the histo ry of American vernacular music and elements including form and structure, instrumentation, expression and lyric content, and historical significance and musical elements such as melody, rhythm, and harmony. • Teacher observation of students H HookÉ Listening : Students will li sten to a variety o f music from the time periods, genres, and artists. • Teacher observation of students E Equip and ExperienceÉ Discussion: Classroom discussion will provide students with an opportunity to construct meaning about important ideas. Listen and Respond : Students will participate in Listening Sessions and actively listen and respond in writing to aural examples in a Listening Journal Entry. Students Presentations: Students select a song for their Songshare Presentation and create pod casts using Audacity • Student contribution to discussion • Teacher observation of students as they work independently on their Songshare Presentation R RethinkÉ Activity : Listening Journal Entries Activity : Songshare Presentations • Teacher observation of studen ts E evaluateÉ Review : Listening Journal Entry Submissions : Songshare Presentations • Review of Listening Journal entry • Review of Virtual Listening Room

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! &( ! Peer Reviews : Students will provide feedback on peer work via comments in the Virtual Listening Room submission • Review of peer feedback comments T TailorÉ Instructor will observe and evaluate students' work and note need for any individualized instruction or specially tailored exercises . O OrganizeÉ Instructor will organize presentation of material, co ntent instruction, discussions, activities, practice time, and assessments to flow logically and effectively.

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! &) ! Unit One Lesson Plan Descriptions Lesson Plan #1: American Vernacular Music Through History Every week will begin with a mini lesson and listening sessions las ting approximately 1 0 15 minutes during which the instructor will introduce concepts and play a sample song(s). After hearing the instructor's presentation and hearing the sample song( s ), students will be invited to share their thoughts on the subject during a class discussion and by competing a Listening Journal Entry . Prompts will help guide the conversation and personal reflection . Lesson Plan #2: Tech Tutorial: Google Forms This lesson will serve as a Tech Tutorial on Google Forms and the Listening Journal Entries students will be completing each week. Students will have an opportunity to practice with a sample Google Form. *Formative Assessment=Google form quizzes (weekly) Lesson Plan #3: Listening Jou rnal Entries This lesson will serve as an overview of the Listening Journal Entries students will be completing each week. After a mini lesson presentation by the instructor and listening sessions, students will be asked to respond to what they hear by c ompleting a Listening Journal Entry. *Formative Assessment=Review of Listening Journal Entry (weekly) Lesson Plan #4: Tech Tutorial: Audacity This lesson will serve as a Tech Tutorial on the program Audacity. Students will have an opportunity to work the work with program and become familiar with the features that will enable their development of their Songshare Presentations. They will learn how to create voice overs to narrate their work. Saving, exporting as WAV files, and converting those files t o MP3s will be discussed. Lesson Plan #5: Songshare Presentations This lesson will serve as an overview of the Songshare Presentations students will be completing each unit. After a mini lesson presentation by the instructor and listening sessions, students will be asked to select a song appropriate to the discussion and develop a podcast with a voice over narrating their work demonstrating their understanding of the concepts being examined. *Formative Assessment=Review of Songshare Presentation (one per unit) Lesson Plan #6: Tech Tutorial: Virtual Listening Room/peer comment protocol This lesson will serve as a Tech Tutorial on submitting work to the Virtual Listening Room. Students will learn how to upload and save their submissions in the appro priate place in the Virtual Listening Room. In addition, peer feedback guidelines will be reviewed and students will learn how to respond to classmates' work. *Formative Assessment=Review of Peer Feedback ( two per unit)

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! &" ! Unit One Sample Lesson Plan #1: American Vernacular Music Through History • Lesson Description Every week will begin with a mini lesson and listening sessions las ting approximately 1 0 15 minutes during which the instructor will introduce concepts and play a sample song(s). After hearing the instructor's presentation and hearing the sample song( s ), students will be invited to share their thoughts on the subject during a class discussion and by competing a Listening Journal Entry . Prompts will help guide the conversation and personal refl ection . • Essential Questions Ð o What is "vernacular" music? Is this the same as "popular" music? o What significant historical national, sociological, and/or political events were happening during the time period examined? o What individuals or groups were i mpacted by the events? o How did music reflect individuals' or groups' feelings about their emotions, thoughts, beliefs, and experiences? o What were the characteristics of the music of this time period? • Lesson Goals and Objectives Ð At the end of this lesson students will be able to: o Critically listen and respond to songs from various genres and time periods of American vernacular music o Identify characteristics from songs from various genres and time periods and important songs and performers o Feel comfortabl e and confident about participating in open discussion about the topic o Make connections to other disciplines to see the way in which songwriters are able to express and represent through art their emotions, thoughts, beliefs, and experiences o Feel comfortable and confident about participating in open discussion about the topic • Materials Needed Ð to complete this lesson, instructor and students will need: o Classroom setting o Sound source to play MP3s o Smart board (preferred) or computer on which to show YouTube videos o Laptops in class or home computer o Headphones • Learning Events and Activities o P resentation of material by the instructor o Listening Sessions o Classroom discussion o Listening Journal Entries • Lesson Assessment(s) Ð Assessment will be made in the form of:

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! && ! o Teacher observation of students o Student contributions to group discussions o Review of Listening Journal Entries

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! &* ! Unit s One Eight Lesson Plan #1 Supplemental Materials Class Song Examples Unit One Ð Do You Hear What I Hear? Big Ideas Influence Song Samples • Music of the 1900s • Immigrants to the US continued to bring with them their unique cultural identities. These cultural flavors could be seen in music. • African American influenced jazz found a center in New Orleans. • Ragtime a nd its syncopated rhythms was popular. • People were moving off the farms and into the cities. Being in urban surroundings influenced the kind of music they listened to. • African Americans found the own cultural centers in American cities where the pres ence of their music strengthened. • WWI • Dance in America was very popular. Music was written specifically for kinds of dance styles that were popular such as the tango. Some people thought this type of couples dance was scandalous. • Immigrants to the US • Jazz artists (W.C. Handy, Joe King Oliver, Paul Whiteman, Mamie Smith) • Scott Joplin • Americans moving to urban centers • Dance orchestra leaders Alexander's Ragtime Band (Irving Berlin) Listening Journal Assignment : Listen to the example again and complete a Listening Journal Entry. Songshare Presentations Assignment: The class example is demonstrative of music used for dance. Find a current pop song that you feel functions in a similar way and create a Songshare Presentation. Unit Two Ð S ound and Sense Big Ideas Influence Song Samples • Music of the 1920s • The phonograph player was new and people started having them in their home. Music was sold like crazy on records. • The first commercial radio stations were established in the US and live radio broadcasts were in America's living room. • The electronic microphone was invented and it changed the style of singing that was popular The New York Stock Exchange collapsed and the Great Depression began. • "Race Records" were recordings of southern blues (known as "Negro Songs") by and for a black audience. • Hillbilly, the earliest form of country western, developed out of folk songs and was found primarily in that rural south . It was mostly for white singers and a white audience. • "Race Record" artists (Mamie Smith) • Country Blues artists (Blind Lemon Jefferson) • Mississippi Delta Blues artists (Charley Patton, Robert Johnson) • Hillbilly artists (Fiddlin' John Carson, Vernon Dalhart, The Carter Family, Jimmy Rodgers) Blue Yodel No. 2 (Jimmie Rodgers) Listening Journal Assignment : Listen to the example again and complete a Listening Journal Entry. Songshare Presentations Assignment: The class example is demonstrative of music that was influenced by race. Pick a current pop song that you feel expresses issues of race in today's world.

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! &+ ! Unit Three Ð That's A Sick Beat Big Ideas Influence Song Samples • Music of the 1930s • Tin Pan Alley was an area in NYC where most of the songwriters and publishers worked. The Tin Pan Alley Song Form (AABA) became the standard • Different kind of blues, such as delta blues and country blues, were emerging from the jazz craze. • Dance music was still important and newly innovate by Latin Rhythms. • Blues artists (Alberta Hunter, Ethel Waters, Ma Rainey, Bessie Smith) • Dance Bands (Don Azpiazu, Xavier Cugat ) The Peanut Vendor (Don Azpiazu) Listening Journal Assignment : Listen to the example again and complete a Listening Journal Entry. Songshare Presentations Assignment: The class example is demonstrative of music that was influenced by Latin rhythm. Pick a current pop song you feel has been influenced by elements people and/or culture other than the US. Unit Four Ð Because You Know I'm All About That Bass Big Ideas Influence Song Samples • Music of the 1940s • The Swing Era began. Swing was a name given to the kind of jazz that was popular in the dance halls. The Lindy Hop and other dance forms drove what style of music was being played. Latin rhythms in big band were all the rage. • Black and white musicians started to play in big bands together. Previously, performers were segregated. • The radio network became the best way to promote music. Country Western music and "th e singing cowboy" was becoming more popular. It had a clean cut image. • Recording technology enabled "over dubbing" and "punching in" • WWII • "Crooners" (Bing Crosby, Frank Sinatra, Nat King Cole) • Big Band Leaders (Benny Goodman, Glenn Miller, Duke El lington) • Country artists (Roy Acuff, Gene Autry, Sons of the Pioneers) In The Mood (Glenn Miller) Listening Journal Assignment : Listen to the example again and complete a Listening Journal Entry. Songshare Presentations Assignment: The class example is demonstrative of music that was influenced by Latin rhythm. Pick a current pop song you feel has been influenced by elements people and/or culture other than the US. Unit Five Ð In Perfect Harmony Big Ideas Influence Song Samples • Music of the 1950s • Record companies were marketing music to American youth. The taste of teenagers significantly guided what kind of music was popularized. • Top 40 radio programming was new. Only certain songs were put in circulation. This led to payola. • Jazz d eveloped into a new genre called Rhythm and Blues (R&B). • The blues chord progression was still used and a strong back beat was important. • Rock Ôn Roll was born. It was a fusion of R&B and hillbilly (country) and was sometimes referred to as rockabill y. • Record company, A&R, and radio executives • "Big Singers" (Fra nk Sinatra and other crooners) • R&B artists (Louis Jordan, Charles Brown, Muddy Waters, Little Richard) • Rock Ôn Roll artists (Elvis, Chuck Berry, Buddy Holly ) • Vocal harmony groups (The Dominos) • Country Artists (Hank Williams) Rock Around The Cloc k (Bill Haley and the Comets) Listening Journal Assignment : Listen to the example again and complete a Listening Journal Entry. Songshare Presentations Assignment: The class example is demonstrative of the birth of Rock Ôn Roll. Find a current piece that harkens back to this raw rock sound (as opposed to hip hop, EDM, etc.). Discuss what elements from rock you find in a current piece.

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! &# ! • Vocal harmony (doo wop) groups became popular. • Honky Tonk country was popular Broadway musicals were made into films and the "standard" (Tin Pan Alley style of song) was still popular. Unit Six Ð Can You Play Me A Tune? Big Ideas Influence Song Samples • Music of the 1960s • Motown Records was established in Detroit and was primarily and was primarily a label for African American artists that promoted R&B • Soul was a new genre that came out of the black experience and had elements of jazz, R&B, and gospel. • The British Invasion came to America . The Beatles caused a craze and sold millions of records. • New kinds of dancing were popular, such as the twist. • Politics found a way into popular music by way of "protest songs" in urban folk. • Folk Music grew out of Southern Blues. • A countercultu re in America was expressed in Psychedelic Rock and had a strong connection with the use of drugs. • Surf Rock gave a very different, clean cut image to American youth. • Country Western continued to be popular. Nashville emerged as an important center fo r the genre. • Motown artists (The Supremes, Stevie Wonder, The Temptations, The Jackson 5) • Soul artists (Ray Charles, Sam Cooke, James Brown, Aretha Franklin • The Beatles! • Urban Folk artists (Bob Dylan, Woody Guthrie) • Folk artists (Kingston Trio, J oan Baez, Peter, Paul and Mary) • Psychedelic Rock artists (Jimi Hendrix, The Doors, The Byrds, The Grateful Dead) • Surf Rock artists (Beach Boys) • Country artists (Johnny Cash, Patsy Cline, Glen Campbell) I Want To Hold Your Hand (The Beatles) Listenin g Journal Assignment : Listen to the example again and complete a Listening Journal Entry. Songshare Presentations Assignment: The class example is demonstrative of music of the British invasion. Music from the UK is still popular in US today. Select a p iece from a artist from the UK and discuss its impact on music today. Unit Seven Ð Life Is A Song, Love Is The Lyrics Big Ideas Influence Song Samples • Music of the 1970s • The Disco craze hits America. People were turning away from the politically charged, hippie, and psychedelic trends of the 60s. Disco was fun and shiny. • FM radio was more popular than AM radio. There was more diverse programming on radio. New studio recording techniques experimented with in the late 60s (such as on Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band) expanded and allowed for more dramatic sounds, especially in the rock genre. • Hard Rock • Still more R&B • Country Rock brought the country vibe to the mainstream. Artists were • Disco artists (Donna Summer, Bee Gees) • Hard Rock artists (Black Sabbath, Alice Cooper, Led Zeppelin, Ted Nugent) • Country Rock artists (Linda Ronstadt, Emmylou Harris, The Eagles) • Soft Rock artists (The Carpenters, The Osmonds, Barry Manilow) • Hip Hop and Rap artists (Kool Herc, Afrika Bambaataa, Grandmaster Flash) Staying Alive (The Bee Gees) Listening Journal Assignment : Listen to the example again and complete a Listening Journal Entry. Songshare Presentations Assignment: This week we discussed "crossover" artists. Select a song from today that you feel is a crossover song.

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! &$ ! "crossing over" more. • The solo singer/son gwriter was becoming more prominent. • Hip Hop came on the scene and at the center of this new genre was rap. Unit Eight Ð Final Project Big Ideas Influence Song Samples • Music of the 1980s and beyond • MTV changed the face of music by making image and production important. • New digital technology changed everything; CDs were introduced. MIDI recording was used. • Rock took on a new "glam" look • Soft Rock emerged out of the 1970s singer/songwriter genre. • Hip Hop gained popularity. • Pop artists (Michael Jackson, Madonna, Whitney Houston, Lionel Richie. Cyndi Lauper) • Glam Metal artists (Van Halen, Queen, Whitesnake, Aerosmith) • Soft Rock artists (Bruce Springsteen, Stevie Nicks, Suzanne Vega, Tracy Chapman, Tori Amos) Thriller (Michael Jackson) Listening Journal Assignment : Listen to the example again and complete a Listening Journal Entry. Songshare Presentations Assignment: The example this week was a huge video hit as well as recording hit. At this time, video emerged as a force behind the marketing and development of pop music. Select a song that you feel is strongly influenced by the accompanying video. • Music of the 1990s • Teen pop/dance (ÔN Sync, Backstreet Boys) • Hip Hop and Gangta Rap expressed the attitudes and experiences of urban blacks. • Alternative Rock, sometimes called "indie" or "underground" developed in certain cities in the US as a turning away from the commercialism of popular music. • Pop Rock singer/songwriter (revival of 1970s) • Contemporary R&B (sub categories adult contemporary/urban contemporary) • Country continued to popular and had the traditional vein as well as an alternative sound influenced by alternative music of the day. • Teen pop/dance (ÔN Sync, Backstreet Boys) • Hip Hop and Rap artists (MC Hammer, Vanilla Ice, Dr. Dre, Tupok Shakur, Notorious BIG) Alternative Rock artists (Nirvana, Red Hot Chli Peppers, Green Day, REM) • Pop Rock singer/songwriter (Sarah McLa chlan, Edwin McCain, Alanis Morissette, Jewel, Sheryl Crow) • Contemporary R&B artists (Mariah Carey, Whitney Houston, Mary J. Blige, Boyz II Men, Usher) • Country artists (Garth Brooks, Travis Tritt, Shania Twain, LeAnn Rimes) I Want It That Way (Backstreet Boys) Listening Journal Assignment : Listen to the example again and complete a Listening Journal Entry. Songshare Presentations Assignment: This week we talked about hip hop and the way it expresses the attitudes and experiences of urban blacks. Select a song (it can be hip hop or any genre) that you feel effectively expresses the attitudes and experiences of a group. • Music of the 2000s • The popularity of R&B gave way to Hip Hop and rap, which dominating commercial music. The use of auto tune is providing a new color and texture to the sound. • Pop Punk, a fusion of pop and punk, makes the edgier genre OK for generic America and is water ed down for radio. • Emo has emerged from the Alternative scene and is a harder sound with more rock influence. • Hip Hop artists (Eminem, OatKast, Kanye West, Jay Z) • Pop Punk artists (Avril Lavigne, Weezer, Blink 182) • Emo artists (Paramore, Fall Out Boy, Dashboard Confessional ) • Pop artists (Britney Spears, Christina Aguilera, Justin Timberlake, Jennifer Lopez) • Contemporary R&B artists Before He Cheats (Carrie Und erwood) Listening Journal Assignment : Listen to the example again and complete a Listening Journal Entry. Songshare Presentations Assignment: This week's example is demonstrative of the influence of pop in various genres (in this case, country). Select a song from today that you think is pop and discuss why.

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! &% ! • Teen Pop continues to be commercially successful. American Idol and other TV singing competitions has brought the singer/songwriter into our l iving room. • Contemporary R&B is popular. • Country has a distinctly more pop sound. (Beyonce, Usher, Alicia Keys, Janet Jackson) • Country Pop artists (Carrie Underwood, Taylor Swift, Keith Urban)

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! *' ! Unit One Sample L esson Plan #3: Journal Entries • Lesson Description After mini lessons, listening sessions, and class discussion, students will complete a Listening Journal Entry. The student wi ll listen to the example again (on their own time) and complete a Google Form to reflect on the example and respond in writing. This is intended to take approximately 10 15 minutes. • Essential Questions Ð o Does this song example reflect any significant historical national, sociological, and/or political events were happening during the time period examined? Why or why not? o Does this example reflect individuals' or groups' feelings about their emotions, thoughts, beliefs, and experiences during the time period in which it was written ? o What were the characteristics of the music of this t ime period? o What are some of the element that can be heard in this song? o What is my personal response to this song? • Lesson Goals and Objectives Ð At the e nd of this lesson students will be able to: o Reflect in writing their ability to c ritically listen and respond to songs from various genres and time periods of American vernacular music o Reflect in writing ways in which popular songs reflect national, sociol ogical, and/or political events and the expression of individual's or group's feelings about those events o Identify and describe characteristics from songs from various genres and time periods and important songs and performers o Make connections to other dis ciplines to see the way in which songwriters are able to express and represent through art their emotions, thoughts, beliefs, and experiences • Materials Needed Ð to complete this lesson, instructor and students will need: o Classroom setting o Sound source to play MP3s o Laptops in class or home computer o Headphones o Access to the Internet and Google Form • Learning Events and Activities o P resentation of material by the instructor o Listening sessions o Class discussion o Personal reflection and Listening Journal Entry • Lesson Assessment(s) Ð Assessment will be made in the form of: o Teacher observation of student o Student contribution to class discussion

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! *( ! o Teacher review of Listening Journal Entry Assessment will be made on the following points Ð YES NO Participated in Listening Session Participated in Class Discussion Completed a Listening Journal Entry (Google Form) Demonstrated in written responses an understanding of content Instructor's comments:

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! *) ! Unit One Lesson Plan #3 Supplemental Materials Listening Journal Entry http://tinyurl.com/kjpp3s2 Song Title, artist, and year of recording What is your understanding of what is going on in the US at this time (socially, politic ally, entertainment/recreation, etc.)? Do you feel that this song reflects any of those things? Why or why not? Describe elements in the recording that you can hear (instrumentation, rhythm, melody, lyrics, etc . ). Convey your response to this song. How does it make you feel? Do you enjoy it? Why or why not?

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! *" ! Unit One Sample L esson Plan #5: Songshare Presentation • Lesson Description This lesson will serve as an introduction to and overview of the Songshare Presentation project. After mini lessons, listening sessions, and class discussion, and Listening Journal Entries, students will develop a Songshare Presentation. Using Audacity, each student will select a current pop song based on the week's th emes and discussion over which they will record a voice over to illustrate key points. Each student will create one presentation per unit and share it by uploading it to the Virtual Listening Room. In addition to submitting a Songshare Presentation, each student will be required to respond to at least three other classmates' Songshare Presentations in the Virtual Listening Room following appropriate peer comment protocol. This is intended to take approximately one hour of work to develop a Songshare Pres entation and approximately 5 10 minutes to listen and respond to another pod cast. • Essential Questions Ð o How does the selected song illustrate key points under discussion? o What elements stand out aurally? o How does my selection connect to other samples I h ave heard in class? • Lesson Goals and Objectives Ð At the end of this lesson students will be able to: o Utilize Audacity to create a pod cast with voice over o Reflect their ability to c ritically listen and respond to songs from various genres and time period s of American vernacular music o Reflect ways in which popular songs reflect national, sociological, and/or political events and the expression of individual's or group's feelings about those events o Identify and describe characteristics from songs from vario us genres and time periods and important songs and performers o Make connections to other disciplines to see the way in which songwriters are able to express and represent through art their emotions, thoughts, beliefs, and experiences o Respond thoughtfully to peer work. • Materials Needed Ð to complete this lesson, instructor and students will need: o Classroom setting o Sound source to play MP3s o Laptops in class or home computer o Headphones o Audacity o Access to the Internet • Learning Events and Activities o P resentation of material by the instructor o Class listening session and discussion o Journal entry o Appropriate song selection based on prompt

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! *& ! o Songshare Presentation development using Audacity o Virtual Listening Room submission o Peer feedback • Lesson Assessment( s) Ð Assessment will be made in the form of: o Teacher observation of student o Teacher assessment of completed Songshare Presentations o Teacher review of peer feedback in Virtual Listening Room Assessment will be made on the following points Ð YES NO Participated in Listening Session Participated in Class Discussion Selected an appropriate song sample to share Created an Audacity project Imported and manipulated as needed an MP3 Created a narrative voice over Demonstrated an understanding of content Saved work as a WAV file Converted WAV to MP3 Submitted MP3 to the Virtual Listening Room Reviewed and commented on three other peer submissions Instructor's comments:

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! ** ! Unit Two Ð Sound and Sense Unit Two is an exploration of contemporary recorded sound and popular music. By the end of this unit, students will understand how elements such as timbre, texture, instrumentation, pitch, and dynamics create sonic events. They will articulate their inte rpretation of aural examples in a Listening Journal entry and describe their response to samples in a podcast. Students will utilize software programs to create soundscapes, collages, and short pieces. They will evaluate music created by their peers and offer feedback. In addition, students will develop a Songshare Presen tation. This unit will take approximately two weeks. Stage 1 Ñ Desired Results Established Goals • Critically listen to, evaluate, and respond to songs from various genres and time periods of American vernacular music • Identify and discuss characteristics and musical elements in recorded music such as timbre, texture, instrumentation, pitch, and dynamics • Create music utilizing various technologies that incorporates elements tim bre, texture, instrumentation, pitch, and dynamics • Make connections to other disciplines to see the way in which composers are able to express and represent through sound their emotions, thoughts, beliefs, and experiences Transfer T1 Ð Students will be able to recognize and discuss elements in recorded sound such as timbre, texture, instrumentation, pitch, and dynamics. T2 Ð Students will be able to create original music utilizing digital audio. T3 Ð Students will be able to communicate their response to their peers' work. Meaning UNDERSTANDINGS Students will understand thatÉ U1 Ð É popular music contains sonic events that are created with digital audio. U2 Ð É elements such as timbre, texture, instrumentation, pitch, and dynamics shape the tone and expression of a piece. U 3 Ð É songwriters use sound to express themselves and represent the emotions, thoughts, beliefs, and experiences of individuals and sociological groups. ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS Students will keep consideringÉ Q1 Ð What ki nd of sounds do I hear and how are they created? Q2 Ð What technologies are available to me to create my music? Q3 Ð How do composers use different sounds to create mood, emotion, and storytelling? Q 4 Ð What are some of the elements I can use to help sh ape my compositions? Q 5 Ð What technologies are available to me to create my own original music and how do I utilize these programs?

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! *+ ! Acquisition Students will knowÉ K1 Ð É how to define characteristics in music such as timbre, texture, instrumentation, pitch, and dynamics. K 2 Ð É about digital audio. K3 Ð É about available technologies for music creation. Students will be skilled atÉ S1 Ð É aural identification of elements such as timbre, texture, instrumentation, pitch , and dynamics in recorded sound S 2 Ð É developing soundscapes, collages, and short pieces S3 Ð É how to share their discoveries and express their musical creativity with available technologies such as Incredibox and Soundation. Stage 2 Ñ Evidence Performance Tasks Evaluative Criteria (EXPLANATION) Students will be introduced to digital audio and elements such as timbre, texture, instrumentation, pitch, and dynamics used in popular music. (INTERPRETATION) Students will engage in active listening to identify elements in recorded sound and reflect on the quality of those sounds and their response to them. (APPLICATION) Students will learn about digital audio and experience manipulating recorded sound with the programs Incredibox and Soundation. (PERSPECTIVE) Students will listen to aural examples of composers who use sound in interesting ways. (EMPATHY) Students will share their work with the class and offer feedback as projects are • Demonstrate understanding of concepts • Describe during class discussion elements of aural examples • Evaluate and categorize aural examples to gain understanding of elements • Make meaning of and share their response to aural examples • Discover the ways in which technology can assist in creating sound • Organize samples and loops in prescribed ways • Reflect on sonic events and complete a Listening Journal entry • Be open to and consider the thoughts of others • Relate their discoveries to the discoveries of ot her students

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! *# ! shared. • Reflect on others' work and share t houg htful feedback given in a kind a nd respectful manner Stage 3 Ñ Learning Plan Learning Events Progress Monitoring W WhereÉ Instruction : The instructor will introduce content. Topics will include an overview of digital audio and musical elements such as timbre, texture, instrumentation, pitch, and dynamics. Tech tutorials will introduce Incredibox and Soundation. Individual coaching sessions during independent work time will facilitate student compo sition. • Teacher observation of students during instruction and class discussion H HookÉ Listening and Create : Students will listen to a variety o f music and then create their own during independent work sessions (with individual teacher coaching) utilizing Incredibox and Soundation. • Teacher observation of students and interaction with them during individual coaching sessions E Equip and ExperienceÉ Discussion: Classroom discussion will provide students with an opportunity to construct meaning about important ideas. Listen and Respond : Students will participate in Listening Sessions and actively listen and respond in writing to aural examples in a Listening Journal Entry. Present : Students will present a Songshare Presentation Explore : Stude nts will be introduced to technology through class Tech Tutorials • Student contribution to discussion • Teacher observation of students during Tech Tutorials R RethinkÉ Activity : Listening Sessions/Listening Journal entry/Songshare Presentation Activity: Sound Podcast Activity : Tech Tutorials Activity : Creating Music with Inc r edibox Activity : Creating Music with Soundation • Teacher observation of students E evaluateÉ Review : Listening Journal Entry and Songshare Presentation Assessment: musical elements quiz Submissions : podcast and compositions • Review of Listening Journal entry and Songshare Presentation • Review of assessment • Review of Virtual Listening Room

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! *$ ! Peer Reviews : Students will provide feedback on peer work via comments in the Virtual Listening Room submissions • Review of peer feedback comments T TailorÉ Instructor will observe and evaluate students' work and note need for any individualized instruction or specially tailored exercises . O OrganizeÉ Instructor will org anize presentation of material, content instruction, discussions, activities, practice time, and assessments to flow logically and effectively.

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! *% ! Unit Two Lesson Plan Descriptions Les son Plan #1: Contemporary Recorded Sound/Musical Elements This lesson plan is an introduction to the concepts of digital audio and the use of the musical elements of timbre, texture, instrumentation, pitch, and dynamics in popular songs. Students will hear aural examples of these elements, participate in class d iscussion, and respond in writing to prompts in order to demonstrate their growing understanding of the concepts under examination. *Formati ve Assessment=musical elements q uiz . Lesson Plan #2: Podcast Ð How I Hear Timbre, Texture, Instrumentation, Pitch , and Dynamics This lesson will serve as an overview to the planning, design, creation, and presentation of a Podcast utilizing Audacity . Each student will select three songs that demonstrate three different elements of timbre, texture, instrumentation, p itch, and dynamics and discuss their response to those elements. They will incorporate a voice over to narrate their work. Students will save, export, and convert their work and submit it to the Virtual Listening Room. *Formative Assessment=Virtual List ening Room p odcast s ubmission . Lesson Plan #3: Tech Tutorial Ð Incredibox This lesson will serve as a Tech Tutorial on the program Incredibox. Students will have an opportunity to work with program and become familiar with the features that will enable their development of original compositions. Lesson Plan #4 : Creating Music With Incredibox After completing the Tech Tutorial for the software program Incredibox, students will have an opportunity to work independently to create their own music using t he program. Independent coaching sessions with the instructor will help guide their work. They will work within prescribed parameters to complete activities and create 2 pieces. *Formative Assessment=Virtual Listening Room submission and peer feedback . Lesson Plan #5 : Tech Tutorial Soundation This lesson will serve as a Tech Tutorial on the program Soundation. Students will have an opportunity to work with program and become familiar with the features that will enable their development of original compositions. Lesson Plan #6 : Creating Mus ic With Soundation After completing the Tech Tutorial for the software program Soundation, students will have an opportunity to work independently to create their own music using the program. Independent coaching sessions with the instructor will help gui de their work. They will work within prescribed parameters to complete activities and create 3 pieces. *Formative Assessment=Virtual Listening Room submission and peer feedback .

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! +' ! Unit Two Sample Lesson Plan #6: Creating Music With Soundation • Lesson Description After classroom discussion, listening sessions, learning activities, and the Tech Tutorial, students will have an opportunity to work independently to create their own music using the Soundation. They will work within prescribed parameters to complete activities and create 3 pieces. This lesson will take approximately 5 class periods to complete. • Essential Questions Ð o How is digital audio used to create sonic events? o How can I integrate elements such as timbre, texture, instrumentation, pitc h, and dynamics into my compositions? o Where can I find sound sources in Soundation? o How do I create, save and export my work in Soundation? o How do I convert a WAV file to an MP3? o How do I submit my work to the Virtual Listening Room? o What is my response to my peers' work? • Lesson Goals and Objectives Ð At the end of this lesson students will be able to: o Work with digital audio to work with established parameters to create soundscapes, collages, and short pieces o Incorporate elements such timbre, texture, ins trumentation, pitch, and dynamics into their compositions to express creatively their thoughts, emotions, and story telling o Create, save, and export a project in Soundation o Evaluate and respond to peer work o Make connections to aural example they have heard during this unit and the original work they are creatin g • Materials Needed Ð to complete this lesson, instructor and students will need: o Classroom setting o Sound source to play MP3s o Laptops in class or home computer o Headphones o Soundation o Access to the Internet • Learning Events and Activities o Independent work o Individual coaching sessions with instructor o Review of peer work • Lesson Assessment(s) Ð Assessment will be made in the form of: o Teacher observation of students o Interaction during individual coachin g session o Assessment of completed assignments o Review of student peer feedback

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! +( ! Unit Two Lesson Plan # 6 Supplemental Materials Activity #1 Ð Soundation Soundscape In this activity, you will work independently to create a soundscape that utilizes at least five different sounds that you feel work well together. You will save and export your work, convert it to MP3 format, and then submit it to the Virtual Listening Room. You will listen and respond to peer work. Follow these steps: 1. Open a new song and sa ve it with the name with soundscape yourlastname.wav 2. Use only one audio channel. 3. Select at least five sound samples. This is the fun part! Audition sounds to see what sparks your interest. Remember the elements we've studied this unit (timbre, texture, instrumentation, pitch, and dynamics). NOTE: select sounds from the same BPM category. 4. Link the sounds end to end on one channel so that they flow one into the next. 5. Export your work as a WAV file. 6. Save your work in your student file. 7. Using the converter software, convert your project from WAV to MP3. 8. Upload your MP3 to the appropriate section of the Virtual Listening Room. 9. Listen to and comment on at least three classmates' soundscapes, remembering the guidelines for Virtual Listening Room comme nt posting. Assessment will be made on the following Ð YES NO Opened and saved a new song with the title as assigned Used only one channel Selected at least five sounds from the same BPM category Built the soundscape according to parameters given Demonstrated variation in texture, timbre, and/or dynamics Saved work as a WAV file Converted WAV to MP3 Submitted MP3 to the Virtual Listening Room Reviewed and commented on three other peer submissions Instructor's comments:

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! +) ! Activity #2 Ð Soundation Collage In this activity, you will work independently to create a collage that utilizes at least five different sounds that you feel work well together and that create interesting textures when used together. You will save and export your work, convert it to MP3 format, and then submit it to the Virtual Listening Room. You will listen and respond to peer work. Follow these steps: 1. Open a new song and save it with the name with collage yourlastname.wav (if you use the "save as" function, you will have your sounds already in your project and ready to move around!). 2. Create as many audio channels as you need (which will be at least five). 3. Use the five sounds you used in your soundscape; you may add more if you wish. NOTE : select sounds from the same BPM category. 4. Move the sounds in time and layer them in interesting ways. They may be of varying durations and may come in and out as you see fit. 5. Create variation in texture, timbre, and/or dynamics. 6. Export your work as a WAV file. 7. Save your work in your student file. 8. Using the converter software, convert your project from WAV to MP3. 9. Upload your MP3 to the appropriate section of the Virtual Listening Room. 10. Listen to and comment on at least three classmates' collages, remem bering the guidelines for Virtual Listening Room comment posting. Assessment will be made on the following Ð YES NO Opened and saved a new song with the title as assigned Used at least five audio channels Selected at least five sounds from the same BPM category Built the soundscape according to parameters given Demonstrated variation in texture, timbre, and/or dynamics Saved work as a WAV file Converted WAV to MP3 Submitted MP3 to the Virtual Listening Room Reviewed and commented on three other peer submissions Instructor's comments:

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! +" ! Activity #3 Ð Soundation Composition In this activity, you will work independently to create a composition in Soundation. You must utilize 8 different sounds that demonstrate contrast in texture, timbre, pitch and/or dynamics. These sounds may be layered and used simultaneously or may flow in and out of each other. You may trim and/or extend sounds as needed. You are encouraged to utilize FX. You will save and export your work, convert it to MP3 format, and then submit it to the Virtual Listening Room. You will listen and respond to peer work. Follow these steps: 1. Open a new song and save it with the name with composition yourlastname.wav. 2. Create as many audio channels as you need (which will be at least eight). 3. Select at least 8 sounds and move them in time and layer them in interesting ways. They may be of varying durations and may come in and out as you see fit. You may trim or extend sounds if needed. 4. Create variatio n in texture, timbre, and/or dynamics. 5. Export your work as a WAV file. 6. Save your work in your student file. 7. Using the converter software, convert your project from WAV to MP3. 8. Upload your MP3 to the appropriate section of the Virtual Listening Room. 9. Listen to and comment on at least three classmates' compositions, remembering the guidelines for Virtual Listening Room comment posting. Assessment will be made on the following points Ð YES NO Opened and saved a new song with the title as assigned Used multiple audio channels Used at least 8 sounds Built the composition according to parameters given Demonstrated variation in texture, timbre, and/or dynamics Saved work as a WAV file Converted WAV to MP3 Submitted MP3 to the Virtual Listening Room Reviewed and commented on three other peer submissions Instructor's comments:

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! +& ! Unit Three Ð That's A Sick Beat Unit Three is an exploration of rhythm and rhythmic devices in popular music. By the end of this unit, students will understand how rhythm functions in popular music and concepts regarding tempo, beat, and meter, and rhythmic devices such as syncopation. Students will distinguish between contrasting rhythms in a Mixxx mashup proj ect that will allow them the opportunity to categorize, combine, manipulate, songs. Students will engage in activities utilizing the programs R Tap Drums and GarageBand to reproduce rhythms they hear and create original rhythm compositions. In addition, students will reflect on aural samples and share their thoughts in both classroom discussion and a written Listening Journal entry, Songshare Presen t ation, and Unit Reflection Podcast. Students will begin work on their final project this unit. They will develop two contrasting 8 bar rhythm patterns. This original material will be used in future units to further develop their final project. This unit should take approximately two weeks . Stage 1 Ñ Desired Results Established Goals • Critically listen to, evaluate, and respond to songs from various genres and time periods of American vernacular music • Identify and discuss rhythm and rhythmic devices in music • Perform and improvise alone and together rhythmic patterns • Create music utilizing various technologies that incorporates rhythmic devices Transfer T1 Ð Stu dents will be able to recognize, analyze, and discuss rhythm in music. T2 Ð Students will be able to recreate rhythms they hear. T3 Ð Students will be able to create original m usic that features rhythm and rhythmic elements. T4 Ð Students will be able to communicate their response to their peers' work. Meaning UNDERSTANDINGS Students will understand thatÉ U1 Ð É rhythm organizes music. U2 Ð É beat is the pulse of the rhythm. U3 Ð É tempo is the speed of the beat. U4 Ð É meter is the groupings of the beats. ESS ENTIAL QUESTIONS Students will keep consideringÉ Q1 Ð How is rhythm organized? Q2 Ð What is the beat, tempo, and meter of a piece? Q3 Ð How do composers use different kinds of rhythmic devices to add interest to their music? Q 4 Ð What are some of the rhythmic elements I can use to

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! +* ! U5 Ð É rhythmic devices such as downbeats, upbeats, backbeats, pickups, syncopation, triplets and other groupings, strong and weak accents, ostinatos (riffs) and polyrhythms add to the development of music. U6 Ð É different genres employ different kinds of rhythmic patterns and devices. U7 Ð É programs such as Mix x x and GarageBand enable the creation of music that utilizes rhythm. help shape my compositions? Q 5 Ð How different genres of pop music use rhythm? Q 6 Ð What technologies are available to me to create my own original music and how do I utilize these programs? Acquisition Students will knowÉ K1 Ð É how to identify beat, tempo, and meter in music K2 Ð É about rhythmic devices such as downbeat, strong and weak accents, backbeats, pickups, syncopation, hemiola, triplets and other groupings, and ostinatos K3 Ð É a bout available technologies for music creation. Students will be skilled atÉ S1 Ð É aural identification of beat, tempo, and meter in pop music and rhythmic devices. S 2 Ð É reproducing by copying and playing rhythms they hear with R Tap Drums and GarageBand . S 3 Ð É creating original rhythms with R Tap Drums and GarageBand. S 4 Ð É developing mixes with Mixxx software. S5 Ð É how to share their discoveries and express their musical creativity with available technologies such as GarageBand, Mixxx, and R Tap Drums.

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! ++ ! Stage 2 Ñ Evidence Performance Tasks Evaluative Criteria (EXPLANATION) Students will be introduced to the concepts of beat, tempo, and meter and will learn about rhythmic devices such as downbeat, strong and weak accents, backbeats, pickups, syncopation, hemiola, triplets and other groupings, and ostinatos. (INTERPRETATION) Students will engage in active listening to identify rhythmic devices in popular music. They will complete activities that explore rhythm and work together to recreate rhythms they hear and improvise rhythmic patterns. (APPLICATION) Students will learn about beats per minute and create a mash up with the prog ram Mixxx. They will also play, recreate aural samples, and create original rhythms with R Tap Drums and Garage Band. (PERSPECTIVE) Students will listen to aural examples of composers who use rhythm in interesting ways. (EMPATHY) Students will share their work with the class and offer feedback as projects are shared. • Demonstrate understanding of concepts • Describe during class discussion elements of aural examples • Evaluate and categorize aural examples to gain understanding of elements • Make meaning of and share their response to aural examples • Replicate and reproduce in new ways the rhythms heard in aural examples • Construct and perform new rhythms • Discover the ways in which technology can assist in creating sound • Organize and manipulate sound samples • Compose original rhythms and patterns • Reflect on sonic events and complete a Listening Journal entry • Be open to and consider the thoughts of others • Relate their discoveries to the discoveries of other students • Reflect on others' work and share t houg htful feedback given in a kind a nd respectful manner

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! +# ! Stage 3 Ñ Learning Plan Learning Events Progress Monitoring W WhereÉ Instruction : The instructor will introduce content. Topics will include the concepts of beat, tempo, and meter and will learn about rhythmic devices such as downbeat, strong and weak accents, backbeats, pickups, syncopation, hemiola, triplets and other groupings, and ostinatos; and tech tutoria ls to introduce Mix x x and Garage Band . • Teacher observation of students during instruction and class discussion H HookÉ Listening and Create : Students will listen to a variety o f music and then create their own during independent work sessions (with individual teacher coach ing) utilizing Mixxx and Garage Band. • Teacher observation of students and interaction with the m during individual coaching sessions E Equip and ExperienceÉ Discussion: Classroom discussion will provide students with an opportunity to construct meaning about important ideas. Listen and Respond : Students will participate in Listening Sessions and actively listen and respond in writing to aural examples in a Listening Journal Entry. Present : Students will present a Songshare Presentation Explore : Students will be introduced to technology throu gh class Tech Tutorials • Student contribution to discussion • Teacher observation of students during Tech Tutorials R RethinkÉ Activity : Listening Sessions/Listening Journal entry Activity : Group Rhythm Making Activities Activity: Rhythm Podcast Activity : Tech Tutorials Activity : Independent Work (Mixxx and GarageBand Composition projects) • Teacher observation of students E evaluateÉ Review : Listening Journal Entry and Songshare Presentation Tech Test: rhythm Assessment: Rhythmic dictation quiz Submissions : podcast and compositions • Review of Listening Journal entry and Songshare Presentation • Review of assessments • Review of Virtual Listening Room submissions

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! +$ ! Peer Reviews : Students will provide feedback on peer work via comments in the Virtual Listening Room • Review of peer feedback comments T TailorÉ Instructor will observe and evaluate students' work and note need for any individualized instruction or specially tailored exercises . O OrganizeÉ Instructor will organize presentation of material, content instruction, discussions, activities, practice time, and assessments to flow logically and effectively.

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! +% ! Unit Three Lesson Plan Descriptions Lesson Plan #1: Introduction to Rhythm This lesson plan is an introduction to rhythm in music and will consider beat, tempo, and meter as well as rhythmic devices such as downbeats, upbeats, backbeats, pickups, syncopation, triplets and other groupings, strong and weak accents, ostinatos, and p olyrhythms. Students will participate in group activities that explore their growing understanding of rhythm and experiment playing rhythms on the IPad application R Tap Drums. Lesson Plan #2 : Podcast Ð How I Hear Rhythm This lesson will serve as an ove rview to the planning, design, creation, and presentation of a Podcast utilizing Audacity that explores the content of this unit . Each student will select three songs that demonstrate three different elements of rhythm and discuss their response to those rhythms. They will incorporate a voice over to narrate their work. Students will save, export, and convert their work and submit it to the Virtual Listening Room. *Formative Assessment=Virtual Listening Room p odcast submission . Lesson Plan #3 : Tech Tu torial Ð Mixxx This lesson will serve as a Tech Tutorial on the program Mixxx. Students will have an opportunity to work with program and become familiar with the features that will enable their development of original mashups. Lesson Plan #4 : Mixxx Ma shup Project After completing the Tech Tutorial for the software program Mix x x, students will have an opportunity to work independently to create their own mashups using the program. Independent coaching sessions with the instructor will help guide their work. They will work within prescribed parameters to complete activities and create 2 pieces. *Formative Assessment=Virtual Listening Room S ubmission and peer feedback . Lesson Plan #5: Tech Tutorial Ð GarageBand This lesson will serve as a Tech Tutorial on the program GarageBand and will focus on drum samples and rhythm. Stude nts will have an opportunity to work with program and become familiar with the features that will enable their development of original music. *Formative Assessment=Rhythmic Dictation and Replication Activities . Lesson Plan #6 : GarageBand Rhythm Composit ions After classroom discussion, listening sessions, learning activities, and the Tech Tutorial, students will have an opportunity to work independently to create their own music using the GarageBand . Independent coaching sessions with the instructor wil l help guide their work. They will work within prescribed parameters to complete activities and create 2 pieces. Every student will submit their work to the Virtual Listening Room and provide feedback on at least two classmates' pieces. *Formative Asses sment=Virtual Listening Room Submission and peer feedback.

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! #' ! Unit Three Sample Lesson Plan #1: Introduction to Rhythm • Lesson Description This lesson plan is an introduction to rhythm in music and will consider beat, tempo, and meter as well as rhythmic devices such as downbeats, upbeats, backbeats, pickups, syncopation, triplets and other groupings, strong and weak accents, ostinatos, and p olyrhythms. Students will have opportunities to replicate rhythm patterns they hear and utilize the program R Tap Drums to create their own rhythms. • Essential Questions Ð o What is rhythm and how does it organize music? o What is beat? o What is tempo? o What is meter? o How can rhythmic devices be used to create interest? o Can I recreate the rhythms I hear? o Can I examine rhythms of contrasting pieces and make them work together in interesting ways? o What are some ways I can create rhythmic patters with R Tap Drums a nd Garage Band? • Lesson Goals and Objectives Ð At the end of this lesson students will be able to: o Create music utilizing various technologies that incorporates rhythmic devices o Identify and discuss rhythm and rhythmic devices in music o Create and perform rh ythm patterns o Create a mash up of two pieces using Mix x x o Reproduce aural examples of rhythms using R Tap Drums and Garage Band o Save and export a project in Garage Band o Evaluate and respond to peer work o Make connections to aural example they have heard during this unit and the original work they are creating • Materials Needed Ð to complete this lesson, instructor and students will need: o Classroom setting o Sound source to play MP3s o Smart board (preferred) or computer on which to show YouTube videos o Laptops in class or home computer o Headphones o R Tap Drums and GarageBand o MIDI keyboard o Access to the Internet • Learning Events and Activities o Group Rhythm Making Activities o Tech Tutorials (R Tap Drums and GarageBand) o Independent work

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! #( ! o Individual coaching sessions with instructor o Review of peer work • Lesson Assessment(s) Ð Assessment will be made in the form of: o Teacher observation of students o Interaction during individual coaching session o Assessment of completed assignments o Review of student peer feedback

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! #) ! Unit Three Lesson Plan #1 Supplemental Materials What is rhythm? From Encyclopedia Britannica: "Rhythm in music is the placement of sounds in time. In its most general sense rhythm (Greek Rhythmos , derived from rhein , 'to flow") is an ordered alternation of contrasting elements. The notion of rhythm also occurs in other arts (eg. poetry, painting, sculpture, and architecture) as well as in nature (eg. biological rhythms). Rhythm organizes music, especially pop music, in time. BEAT is the pulse of the rhy thm (think of your heartbeat!) TEMPO is the speed of the beat. METER reoccurring pattern of groupings of beats in measures Rhythmic devices (with aural examples): Downbeat the first beat in a grouping (measure) Example: We Will Rock You (Queen ) Strong and weak accents beats are accentuated to add interest to the rhythmic texture of music. Upbeats are usually weak and before or after a strong beat; however, sometimes upbeats are accented for affect (reggae). Example: Turn Down for What (DJ Snake/Lil Jon) Backbeats accented off beats (2 and 4) Example: I Wanna Hold Your Hand (Beatles) Pickup the upbeat before the downbeat Example: This Is How We Do (Katy Perry) chorus Syncopation an unexpected interruption in the rhythm Example: Bang Bang (Jessie J) listen to the contrast of the verse (1 and 2 and), pre chorus (syncopated bass riff), and chorus (both layered) Hemiola cross rhythm groupings such as three against two big in dubstep Example: I Need Air (Magnetic Man) Triplets and other groupings Example: I Knew You Were Trouble (Taylor Swift) Ostinatos/rhythmic riffs reoccurring idea that adds continuity and flow to a piece Example: Rather Be (Clean Bandit)

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! #" ! Let's pick apart a piece: Maps (Maroon 5) Downbeats find the down beat of every grouping of 4 Strong beats clap the groups of 4 strong accents Subdivide (1 and 2 and) find the shorter beats Pickups ("but I wonder") Syncopation ("I was there for youÉ") Backbeat (snare on "oh oh oh" break) Activities Class Rhythm jam 1) Rhythm circle pass, copy, develop rhythms 2) Rhythm groups students play different parts of rhythmic patterns (clapping) 3) Rhythm Improvisation students work in small groups and use their bodies and rhythm instruments to create pieces. 4) Rhythm Recreations students work in small groups to recreate the rhythm they hear in a piece they have selected 5) Original Raps students work t o write a rap over an assigned rhythm (polyrhythms/groups represented in language)

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! #& ! Unit Three Sample Lesson Plan #2: Podcast Ð How I Hear Rhythm • Lesson Description This lesson plan involves the design, creation, and presentation of a Podcast utilizing Audacity . Each student will select three songs that demonstrate three different elements of rh ythm and discuss their response to those rhythms. • Essential Questions Ð o How do I hear rhythm in these songs? o What is beat, tempo, and meter in these songs? o Do I hear any rhythmic devices used to create interest in these songs? o Can I make connections between these selections and other song samples I've heard in class? • Lesson Goals and Objectives Ð At the end of this lesson students will be able to: o Create a podcast using Audacity o Identify and discuss rhythm and rhythmic devices in music o Discuss beat, tempo, meter, and rhythmic devices in their sample selections o Make connections to aural example they have heard during this unit and the original work they are creating • Materials Needed Ð to complete this lesson, instructor and students will need: o Classro om setting o Sound source to play MP3s o Laptops in class or home computer o Headphones o Audacity o Access to the Internet • Learning Events and Activities o Presentation of material by instructor o Class listening session and discussion o Song research and selection o Podc ast development using Audacity Ð follow these steps: 1. Select three songs you feel demonstrate the following: • Beat • Meter • Tempo • Rhythmic devices such as downbeats, upbeats, backbeats, pickups, syncopation, triplets and other groupings, strong and weak accents, ostinatos, and/or polyrhythms 2. Create a new project in Audacity and save it with the title rhythmpodcast yourlastname.wav 3. Import your song samples on three different channels (mute the others when you're not working with them!) 4. Trim your samples to demonstrate the elements under consideration

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! #* ! 5. Create a fourth channel for your voice over. Record narration to describe the examples you are featuring in this podcast and how you feel they demonstrate the elements under consideration. 6. Move your trimmed so ng samples to line up appropriately. 7. Export it as a WAV file. 8. Save your project in your student file. 9. Using the converter software, convert your project from WAV to MP3. 10. Upload your MP3 to the appropriate section of the Virtual Listening Room. • Lesson Asse ssment(s) Ð Assessment will be made in the form of: o Teacher observation of student and interaction with him/her during individual coaching sessions o Teacher assessment of completed podcast Assessment will be made on the following Ð YES NO Selected three samples Opened and saved a new song with the title as assigned Imported samples to three channels Trimmed samples to demonstrate elements Samples demonstrated beat Samples demonstrated tempo Samples demonstrated meter Samples demonstrated rhythmic devices Used a fourth channel to record narration Narration demonstrated an understanding of elements under consideration Saved work as a WAV file Converted WAV to MP3 Submitted MP3 to the Virtual Listening Room Instructor's comments:

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! #+ ! Unit Three Sample Lesson Plan #6: GarageBand Rhythm Compositions • Lesson Description This lesson plan details the independent work students will engage in to create two rhythm pieces with the software program GarageBand . They will work within specified parameters. Each student will submit their work to the Virtual Listening Room and will provide feedback on at least two classmates' pieces. • Essential Questions Ð o How do I create and save a new project in various time signatures and utilizing different beats per minute? o How do I delete/create tracks? o How do I select the appropriate software instrument? o How do I adjust the tempo? o How do I enhance the timing? o How do I copy and paste? o How do I share and export my work? o How do I upload my work to the Virtual Listening Room? • Lesson Goals and Objectives Ð At the end of this lesson students will be able to: o Create music utilizing various technologies that incorporates rhythmic devices o Identify and discuss rhythm a nd rhythmic devices in music o Perform and improvise alone and together rhythm patterns o Create two original rhythm pieces, one in 4/4 and one in 3/4 o S ave, and export a project in GarageBand o Evaluate and respond to peer work o Make connections to aural example they have heard during this unit and the original work they are creating • Materials Needed Ð to complete this lesson, instructor and students will need: o Classroom setting o Sound source to play MP3s o Laptops in class or home computer o Headphones o GarageBand o MIDI keyboard o Access to the Internet • Learning Events and Activities o Creating a new project in GarageBand o Deleting/creating tracks o Assigning software instruments o Adjusting tempo o Recording music according to specified parameters o Saving, exporting, and uploading work o Review of peer work

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! ## ! • Lesson Assessment(s) Ð Assessment will be made in the form of: o Teacher observation of students o Interaction during individual coaching session o Assessment of completed assignments o Review o f student peer feedback Assessment will be made on the following Ð YES NO Rhythm01 Project: Created and titled properly a new GarageBand project. Created the correct number of tracks. Used the correct software instrument(s). Used kick drum for whole notes. Used snare drum for half notes. Used high hat or ride cymbal for quarter notes. Used at least on other instrument on eighth or sixteenth notes. Enhanced timing as needed. Created a 4 bar composition . Cut and pasted to create 8 bars. Exported song as an MP3. Correctly u ploaded the MP3 to Virtual Listening Room. Commented on at least two classmates' pieces. Rhythm0 2 Project: Created and titled properly a new GarageBand project. Created the correct number of tracks. Used the correct software instrument(s). Used kick drum for whole notes. Used snare drum for half notes. Used high hat or ride cymbal for quarter notes. Used at least on other instrument on eighth or sixteenth notes. Enhanced timing as needed. Created a 4 bar composition . Cut and pasted to create 8 bars. Exported song as an MP3. Correctly u ploaded the MP3 to Virtual Listening Room. Commented on at least two classmates' pieces. Instructor's comments:

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! #$ ! Unit Three Lesson Plan # 6 Supplemental Materials GarageBand Rhythm Composition Assignment Sheet Follow these steps to create t wo original rhythm compositions. You will share your work in the Virtual Listening Room and peer review the work of at least tw o other classmates. 1. Rhythm in 4/4 Open up a new project (keyboard collection) in 4/4 at 90 bpm and name title yourname rhythm 01. Make sure "count in" is selected. Delete all of the tracks except one Highlight drum kits and select "pop kit." Create three additional duplicate tracks These four tracks will be: Track 1 Kick* Track 2 Snare* Track 3 High Hat Track 4 Additional rhythm * Note Ð if you prefer to play the kick and snare at the same time, you can put those both on one track . Adjust the tempo to a speed in which you are comfortable working (you can always speed it up to 90 later!) You will create a 4 bar pattern. Follow these steps to create your piece: • Use a kick drum and enter whole notes for each bar • Add snare drum on hal f notes on at least two beats per measure • Add high hat or ride cymbal on quarter notes in each measure • Add some other rhythmic element (toms, ride, crash, shaker, etc.) on eighth and/or sixteenth notes to add interest. This can be repeated in each measure or used selectively anywhere within the 4 bars. After you record each step, open it up to edit it and enhance timing as needed. You are welcome to create additional tracks and add more sounds to this rhythm piece but what is listed above is the minimum expectation.

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! #% ! When you are done with your 4 bars, copy and paste to create 8 bars. Save your work in your student file. Export song Ð share/export song to disc/MP3 encoder high quality/titled the same/to student folder. Upload MP3 to Virtual Listening Room (folder " rhythm01 ") 2. Rhythm in 3/4 Open up a new project (keyboard collection) in 3/4 at 120 bpm and name title yourname rhythm 02. Make sure "count in" is selected. Delete all of the tracks except one Highlight drum kits and select "jazz kit ." Create three additional duplicate tracks These four tracks will be: Track 1 Kick* Track 2 Snare* Track 3 High Hat Track 4 Additional rhythm *note Ð if you prefer to play the kick and snare at the same time, you can put those both on one track . Adjust the tempo to a speed in which you are comfortable working (you can always speed it up to 120 later!) You will create a 4 bar pattern. Follow these steps to create your piece: • Use a kick drum and enter whole notes for each bar • Add snare dr um on half notes on at least two beats per measure • Add high hat or ride cymbal on quarter notes in each measure • Add some other rhythmic element (toms, ride, crash, shaker, etc.) on eighth and/or sixteenth notes to add interest. This can be repeated in eac h measure or used selectively anywhere within the 4 bars. After you record each step, open it up to edit it and enhance timing as needed.

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! $' ! You are welcome to create additional tracks and add more sounds to this rhythm piece but what is listed above is the minimum expectation. When you are done with your 4 bars, copy and paste to create 8 bars. Save your work in your student file. Export song Ð share/export song to disc/MP3 encoder high quality/titled the same/to student folder. Upload MP3 to Virtual Listening Room (folder " rhythm02 ")

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! $( ! Unit Four Ð Because You Know I'm All About That Bass Unit Four is an exploration of the bass line. By the end of this unit, students will be able to discern the bass line and bass patterns in popular songs and recognize ways in which the bass line and rhythm of a song work together. They will understand major and minor diatonic scale construction and b e able to transfer that understanding to the piano keyboard. Students will utilize GarageBand to reproduce bass lines they hear and create their own bass line patterns. In addition, students will reflect on aural samples and share their thoughts in a List ening Journal entry, Songshare Presen t ation, and Unit Reflection Podcast. Students will continue to work on material that will be integrated into their final project. Using the two contrasting 8 bar rhythm patterns written in the previous unit, they will develop a bass line for each. This original material will be used in future units to further develop their final project. This unit should take approximately two weeks . Stage 1 Ñ Desired Results Established Goals • Critically listen to, evaluate, and respond to songs from various genres and time periods of American vernacular music • Understand major and minor diatonic scale construction • Identify notes on the piano keyboard • Identify and discuss bass lines in popular songs • Perform and improvise bass lines • Create music utilizing various technologies that incorporates bass lines Transfer T1 Ð P lay C major and A minor scales on the piano keyboard . T2 Ð Recreate bass lines they hear in popular songs. T3 Ð Compose original bass lines. T4 Ð Students will be able to communicate their response to their peers' work. Meaning UNDERSTANDINGS Students will understand thatÉ U1 Ð É ea ch key on the piano keyboard corresponds to a note name. U2 Ð É d iatonic scale s (major and minor) involve a whole/half note pattern. U3 Ð Ébass lines, usually played bass electric bass, low strings, or other low pitched instruments, often utilizes melodic and rhythmic patterns ("riffs"). ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS Students will keep consideringÉ Q1 Ð What note names correspond to each key on the piano keyboard? Q2 Ð What is the pattern of half/whole steps in major and minor diatonic scales? Q3 Ð Can I hear the bass and discern how it is moving? Are there any reoccurring rhythmic or melodic patterns in that movement? Q 4 Ð Is the bass line working in

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! $) ! U4 Ð Ébass lines often synchronize with the rhythm of a song a nd aid in given the song a pulse or "groove." U5 Ð É programs such as GarageBand enable the creation of music. conjunction with the rhythm? If so, how? Q 5 Ð What technologies are available to me to create my own original music and how do I utilize these programs? Acquisition Students will knowÉ K1 Ð É each key on a piano keyboard has a corresponding note name. K 2 Ð É the whole and half step patterns that make up major and minor diatonic scales. K3 Ð É which instruments are playing the bass line in aural examples. K 4 Ð É that bass lines and rhythmic patterns often work together in pop songs. K5 Ð É about available technologies for music creation. Students will be skilled atÉ S1 Ð É identifying notes on a piano keyboard. S 2 Ð creating the whole and half note patterns of major and minor diatonic scales on a piano keyboard. S 3 Ð É recreating the bass lines they hear in aural examples. S 4 Ð É putting together rhythm and bass patterns. S 5 Ð É writing original bass lines within specified parameters. S6 Ð É how to share their discoveries and express their musical creativity with available technologies such as GarageBand. Stage 2 Ñ Evidence Performance Tasks Evaluative Criteria (EXPLANATION) Students will be introduced to the piano keyboard and understand that each key has a corresponding note name. They will learn the whole/half step patterns of major and minor diatonic scales. Students wi ll engage in discussion regarding bass lines • Demonstrate understanding of concepts by identifying piano keys and playing major and minor scales on the piano • Describe during class discussion elements of aural exa mples

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! $" ! in pop songs. (INTERPRETATION) Students will listen actively to aural examples that demonstrate the use of bass lines and the ways in which bass lines and rhythm often work together. (APPLICATION) Students will complete activities that encourage their understanding of the piano keyboard. The y will create major and minor scales on the keyboard. Students will explore ways in which bass lines make use of the different degrees of a scale (particularly the root and the fifth) and work in GarageBand to both recreate bass lines they hear and write original bass lines within specified parameters. (PERSPECTIVE) Students will listen to aural examples of composers who use bass lines in interesting ways. (EMPATHY) Students will share their work with the class and offer feedback as projects are shared. • Evaluate and categorize aural examples to gain understanding of elements • Make meaning of and share their response to aural examples • Create major and minor scales at the piano keyboard • Replicate and reproduce in new ways bass lines are heard in aural examples • Discover the ways in which technology can assist in creating sound, particularly bass sounds • Compose original rhythms and patterns • Reflect on sonic events • Be open to and consider the thoughts of others • Relate their discoveries to the discoveries of other students • Reflect on others' work and share t houg htful feedback given in a kind a nd respectful manner Stage 3 Ñ Learning Plan Learning Events Progress Monitoring W WhereÉ Instruction : The instructor will introduce content. Topics will include an overview of the piano keyboard and corresponding note names; major and minor scale construction; bass lines in pop songs; tech tutorial on GarageBand ; individual coaching sessions during indepe ndent work time. • Teacher observation of students during instruction and class discussion

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! $& ! H HookÉ Listening and Create : Students will listen to a variety o f music and then create their own during independent work sessions (with individual teacher coaching) utilizing GarageBand . • Teacher observation of students and interaction with them during individual coaching sessions E Equip and ExperienceÉ Discussion: Classroom discussion will provide students with an opportunity to construct meaning about important ideas. Listen and Respond : Students will participate in Listening Sessions and actively listen and respond in writing to aural examples in a Listening Journal Entry. Present : Students will present a Songshare Presentation Explore : Students will be introduced to technology through class Tech Tutorials • Student contribution to discussion • Teacher observation of students during Tech Tutorials R RethinkÉ Activity : Listening Sessions Activity : Piano keyboard activities Activity : Tech Tutorials Activity : Independent Work ( GarageBand Composition projects) • Teacher observation of students E evaluateÉ Review : Listening Journal Entry and Songshare Presen tation Assessment: Piano keyboard quiz Tech Test: bass line Assessment: scale construction quiz Submissions : podcast and compositions Peer Reviews : Students will provide feedback on peer work via comments in the Virtual Listening Room • Review of Listening Journal entry and Songshare Presentation • Review of assessments • Review of Virtual Listening Room submissions • Review of peer feedback comments T TailorÉ Instructor will observe and evaluate students' work and note need for any individualized instr uction or specially tailored exercises . O OrganizeÉ Instructor will organize presentation of material, content instruction, discussions, activities, practice time, and assessments to flow logically and effectively.

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! $* ! Unit Four Lesson Plan Descriptions Lesson Plan #1: Introduction to The Piano Keyboard This lesson will serve as an introduction to the piano keyboard. Students will have an opportunity to explore the keyboard and complete activities that will develop their understanding of note names. *Formative Assessment=piano keyboard quiz Lesson Plan # 2 : Overview of Major and Minor Scale Construction This lesson will be an overview of diatonic scale construction. Students will learn about the whole/half step patterns of both major and minor scales and transfer those patterns to the piano keyboard. They will complete exercises to build skill in scale construction. *Formative Assessment=scale construction quiz . Lesson Plan # 3 : Introduction to Bass Lines This lesson plan is an introduction to bass lines and an exploration of how bass functions in pop songs. Students will consider bass patterns and the way in which bass lines often work in conjunction with the rhythm patters in pop songs. Students will have an opportunity to listen to aural samples to gain insight into bass lines and the ways in which composers use bass to create interest in their music. Lesson Plan #4 : Podcast Ð How I Hear Bass Lines This lesson will serve as an overview to the planning, design, creation, and presentat ion of a Podcast utilizing Audacity that explores the content of this unit . Each student will select three songs that demonstrate three different elements of bass lines and discuss their response to those bass lines. They will incorporate a voice over to narrate their work. Students will save, export, and convert their work and submit it to the Virtual Listening Room. *Formative Assessment=Virtual Listening Room Podcast submission . Lesson P lan #5: Tech Tutorial Ð Garage Band This lesson will serve as a Tech Tutorial on the program GarageBand and will focus on bass samples and bass lines. Students will have an opportunity to work with program and become familiar with the features that will enable their development of original music. *Formative Assessmen t=bass line replication . Lesson Plan #6: Garage Band Bass Line Compositions After classroom discussion, listening sessions, learning activities, and the Tech Tutorial, students will have an opportunity to work independently to create their own music usin g the GarageBand. Independent coaching sessions with the instructor will help guide their work. They will work within prescribed parameters to complete activities and create 2 original bass lines (one in major and one in minor). *Formative Assessment=Vir tual Listening Room Submission and peer feedback .

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! $+ ! Unit Four Sample Lesson Plan #6: GarageBand Bass Line Compositions • Lesson Description This lesson plan details the independent work students will engage in to create four bass line compositions with the software program GarageBand . They will work within specified parameters. Each student will submit their work to the Virtual Listening Room and will provide feedback on at least two classmates' pieces. • Essential Questions Ð o How do I open an exi sting project and save it with a new title? o How do I select the appropriate software instrument? o How do I adjust the tempo? o How do I enhance the timing? o How do I copy and paste? o How do I share and export my work? o How do I upload my work to the Virtual Lis tening Room? • Lesson Goals and Objectives Ð At the end of this lesson students will be able to: o Create music utilizing various technologies that incorporates bass lines o Identify and discuss the interplay between bass lines and rhythm tracks o Create and per form four original bass line compositions o Save and export a project in GarageBand o Evaluate and respond to peer work o Make connections to aural example they have heard during this unit and the original work they are creating • Materials Needed Ð to complete t his lesson, instructor and students will need: o Classroom setting o Sound source to play MP3s o Laptops in class or home computer o Headphones o GarageBand o MIDI keyboard o Access to the Internet • Learning Events and Activities o Manipulate an existing project in GarageBand o Assigning software instruments o Adjusting tempo o Recording music according to specified parameters o Saving, exporting, and uploading work o Review of peer work • Lesson Assessment(s) Ð Assessment will be made in the form of: o Teacher observation of stu dents

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! $# ! o Interaction during individual coaching session o Assessment of completed assignments o Review of student peer feedback Assessment will be made on the following Ð YES NO !"##$%&'()*(+,-.'/01 ,-./.0!1/!.23453/6!-789.:5!1/0!41;.0!1!/.
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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! $$ ! Unit Four Lesson Plan #6 Supplemental Materials GarageBand Bass Line Composition Assignment Sheet Follow these steps to create four bass line compositions over a given rhythm. You will share your work in the Virtual Listening Room and peer review the work of at least two other classmates. 1. Bass line in 4/4 with one p itch Open up the class file "bassline 01" and save as a new project with t he name title yourname bassline 01. Make sure "count in" is selected. Highlight track 1 and select a bass sound you like. Adjust the tempo to a speed in which you are comfortable wo rking (you can always speed it up to 90 later!) Listen to the rock kit rhythm track a few times to get used to it. It's a kick drum track that is 8 bars long. Practice playing your bass along with the kick drum. Use only one pitch Ð C2. When you feel ready, record your bass line to match exactly the rhythm of the kick drum track. Open up your track and enhance the timing. Edit it to correct any errors. Save your work in your student file. Export song Ð share/export song to disc/MP3 encoder high quality/titled the same/to student folder. Upload MP3 to Virtual L istening Room (folder "bassline 01") 2. Bass line in 4/4 with two pitches. Open up the class file "bassline 02" and save as a new project with t he name title yourname bassline 02. Make sure "count in" is selected. Highlight track 1 and select a bass sound you like.

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! $% ! Adjust the tempo to a speed in which you are comfortable working (you can always speed it up to 90 later!) Listen to the rock kit rhythm track a few times to get used to it . It's the same kick drum track that is 8 bars long BUT there are additional parts, too (snare and shaker). Match your bass line with the kick drum. This time you'll be using two pitches Ð C2 and F2. Change pitches every 2 bars . Practice playing your bass along with the rhythm track. When you feel ready, record your bass line to match exactly the rhythm of the kick drum track. Open up your track and enhance the timing. Edit it to correct any errors. Save your work in your student file. Export song Ð share/export song to disc/MP3 encoder high quality/titled the same/to student folder. Upload MP3 to Virtual L istening Room (folder "bassline 02") 3. Bass line in 4/4 with three pitches Ð a 12 bar blues Open up the class file "ba ssline 03" and save as a new project with t he name title yourname bassline 03. Make sure "count in" is selected. Highlight track 1 and select a bass sound you like. Adjust the tempo to a speed in which you are comfortable working (you can always speed it up to 90 later!) Listen to the rock kit rhythm track a few times to get used to it. It's a 12 bar long rhythm pattern. Match your bass line with the kick drum. This time you'll be using three pitches Ð C2, F2, and G2. Change pitches as follows: Bar # Pitch 1 4 C 2

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! %' ! 5 6 F 2 7 8 C 2 9 10 G 2 11 12 C 2 Practice playing your bass along with the kick drum. When you feel ready, record your bass line to match exactly the rhythm of the kick drum track. Open up your track and enhance the timing. Edit it to correct any errors. Save your work in your student file. Export song Ð share/export song to disc/MP3 encoder high quality/titled the same/to student folder. Upload MP3 to Virtual L istening Room (folder "bassline 03") 4. Bass line in 4/4 with three pit ches over a loop sample Open up the class file "bassline 04 rhythm" and save as a new project with t he name title yourname bassline 04. Make sure "count in" is selected. Highlight track 1 and select a bass sound you like. Listen to the rhythm loop track a few times to get used to it. It's a 8 bar long rhythm pattern with a more complex sound than the previous 3 exercises. You are not required to match the kick drum. Create a bass rhythm that is entirely unique! Practice playing your bass along with the rhythm loop. When you fe el ready, record your bass line . Open up your track and enhance the timing. Edit it to correct any errors. Save your work in your student file. Export song Ð share/export song to disc/MP3 encoder high quality/titled the same/t o student folder. Upload MP3 to Virtual Listening Room (fo lder "bassline 04")

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! %( ! Unit Five Ð In Perfect Harmony Unit Five is an exploration of harmonic progression. By the end of this unit, students will be able to discern harmonic progression in popular songs and recognize ways in which the bass line helps to establish this progression. They will understand how to construct triads on the I, IV, V, and vi degrees o f both C major and A minor diatonic scales, recognize the quality of each triad (major/minor) and the intervals involved in their construction. Students will be able to transfer that understanding to the piano keyboard and play specified harmonic progress ions. They will explore the ways in the use of groups of these triads work to create a harmonic progression and the way in which the bass line often implies this progression. They will utilize GarageBand to reproduce harmonic progressions they hear and c reate their own harmonic progressions. In addition, students will reflect on aural samples and share their thoughts in a Listening Journal entry, Songshare Presentation, and Unit Reflection Podcast. Students will continue to work on material that will be integrated into their final project. Using the two contrasting 8 bar rhythm/bass line patterns written the pre vious units, they will develop harmonic progressions for each. This original material will be used in future units to further develop their final project. This unit should take approximately two weeks . Stage 1 Ñ Desired Results Established Goals • Critically listen to , evaluate, and respond to songs from various genres and time periods of American vernacular music • Understand intervallic relationships and the concepts of the root/third/fifth of a chord and the way in which triads are built using these intervals • Construct triads in root position on the I, IV, V, and vi degree s of a C major and the i, iv, V, and V I degrees A minor diatonic scale s , understand the quality triad , and play the m on a piano keyboard Transfer T1 Ð Stu dents will be able to construct triads on the I, IV, V, and vi scale degree s of C major and the i, iv, V, and VI degrees of A minor diatonic scales at the piano keyboard. T2 Ð Students will be able to play I IV V I and I vi IV V I chord prog ressions in C major and i iv V i and i VI iv V i progressions in A minor at the piano keyboard . T 3 Ð Students will be able to identify aurally harmonic progressions heard in pop songs . T 4 Ð Students will be abl e to create or iginal music that utilizes harmonic progressions. T 5 Ð Students will be able to communicate their response to their peers' work. Meaning UNDERSTANDINGS Students will understand thatÉ U1 Ð É the relationship between two pitches is ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS Students will keep consideringÉ Q1 Ð What pattern of half and whole steps am I using to create this triad and how does that

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! %) ! • Recognize harmonic progressions • Identify and discuss harmonic progressions in popular songs • Create music utilizing various technologies that incorporates harmonic progressions called an interval. U 2 Ð É chords are built upon one pitch, called the root . U 3 Ð É triads are built with three pitches that utilize the root, third and fifth of a chord . U4 Ð É triads can be major or minor depending on the interval between the root and the t hird. U 5 Ð É harmonic progressions often involve chords built on the I, IV, V, and vi degrees of the scale in which the song is written. U6 Ð Éharmonic progression provides a framework for songs and a sense of movement toward a resolution. U7 Ð Ébass lines often imply the harmonic progression of a song . U8 Ð É programs such as GarageBand enable the creation of music . pattern affect the quality of the triad? Q2 Ð What are the I, IV, V, and vi scale degrees in this major key? Q3 Ð What are the i, iv, V, and VI scale degrees in this m inor key? Q4 Ð What is the pattern of chords used in this song to create a harmonic progression? Q5 Ð How does the harmonic progression in this song make it feel as if it is building and/or resolving ? Q 6 Ð Does the bass line reinforce the harmonic progr ession ? Q 7 Ð What technologies are available to me to create my own original music and how do I utilize these programs? Acquisition Students will knowÉ K1 Ð É how to identify an interval at the piano keyboard . K2 Ð É how to build a triad using the root, third, and fifth of a chord . Students will be skilled atÉ S1 Ð É playing on the piano keyboard major and minor thirds. S 2 Ð creating major and minor triads. S 3 Ð É playing I IV V I and I vi

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! %" ! K3 Ð É that difference between a major and a minor triad . K 4 Ð É how to identify the I, IV, V, and vi scale degrees in C major and the i, iv, V, and VI scale degrees in A minor. K5 Ð É that bass lines and rhythmic patterns often work together in pop songs. K6 Ð É about available technologies for music creation. IV V I progressions in C major and i iv V i in A minor S 4 Ð É aural identification of harmonic progressions. S 5 Ð É writing harmonic progressions within specified parameters. S6 Ð É how to share their discoveries and express their musical creativity w ith available technologies such as GarageBand. Stage 2 Ñ Evidence Performance Tasks Evaluative Criteria (EXPLANATION) Students will be introduced to the concept of harmonic progression in popular songs and recognize ways in which the bass line often implies this progression . In addition, they will learn about major and minor thirds and how to build a triad. (INTERPRETATION) Students will listen actively to examples of songs that utilize common progressions and write their response to these examples . They will engage in discussion regarding harmonic progression in pop songs. (APPLICATION) Students will complete activities that encourage their understanding of triad construction at the piano keyboard. They will explore ways in which common harmonic progressions make use of t he different degrees of a scale. Students will work in GarageBand to write original harmonic progressions within specified • Demonstrate understanding of concepts • Describe dur ing class discussion elements of aural examples • Evaluate and categorize aural examples to gain understanding of elements • Make meaning of and share their response to aural examples • Describe during class discussion elements of aural examples • Create m ajor and minor triads at the piano keyboard • Play harmonic progressions • Replicate the harmonic progression of an aural example • Compose original harmonic progressions

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! %& ! parameters. (PERSPECTIVE) Students will listen to aural examples of composers who use harmonic progression in interesting ways. (EMPATHY) Students will share their work with the class and offer feedback as projects are shared. • Reflect on sonic events • Be open to and consider the thoughts of others • Relate their discoveries to the discoveries of other students • Reflect on others' work and share t houg htful feedback given in a kind a nd respectful manner Stage 3 Ñ Learning Plan Learning Events Progress Monitoring W WhereÉ Instruction : The instructor will introduce content. Topics will include an overview of harmonic progression; intervals (particularly the major and minor third); triad construction; scale degrees; triads built on specific scale degrees in C major and A minor; the bass line and harmonic progression working together; t he piano keyboard and corresponding note names; major and minor scale construction; bass lines in pop songs; and tech tutorial on Garage Band . • Teacher observation of students during instruction and class dis cussion H HookÉ Listening and Create : Students will listen to a variety o f music and then create their own during independent work sessions (with individual tea cher coaching) utilizing Garage Band. • Teacher observation of students and interaction with them during individual coaching sessions E Equip and ExperienceÉ Discussion: Classroom discussion will provide students with an opportunity to construct meaning about important ideas. Listen and Respond : Students will participate in Listening Sessions and actively listen and respond in writing to aural examples in a Listening Journal Entry. Present : Students will present a Songshare Presentation • Student contribution to discussion • Teacher observation of students during Tech Tutorials

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! %* ! Explore : Students will be introduced to technology through class Tech Tutorials R RethinkÉ Activity : Listening Sessions Activity : Piano keyboard activities Activity : Tech Tutorials Activity : I ndependent Work (Garage Band Composition projects) • Teacher observation of students E evaluateÉ Review : Listening Journal Entry and Songshare Presentation Tech Test: harmonic progression Assessment: triad construction quiz Assessment: harmonic progression aural analysis Assessment: harmonic progression replication Submissions : podcast and compositions Peer Reviews : Students will provide feedback on peer work via comments in the Virtual Listening Room • Review of Listening Journal entry and Songshare Presentation • Review of assessments • Review of Virtual Listening Room submissions • Review of peer feedback comments T TailorÉ Instructor will observe and evaluate students' work and note need for any individualized instruction or specially tailored exercises . O OrganizeÉ Instructor will organize presentation of material, content instruction, discussions, activities, practice time, and assessments to flow logically and effectively.

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! %+ ! Unit Five Lesson Plan Descriptions Lesson Plan #1: Overview of Triads This lesson will be an overview of triad construction and will include a discussion on intervals, particularly major and minor thirds. Students will learn that chords are built upon one pitch (the root) and that triads are built with three pitches (the root, third, a nd fifth). They will learn how to build major and minor triads and will be able to identify both aurally. They will complete exercises at the piano keyboard to reinforce their understanding of concept s and develop skill s . *Formative Assessment=triad cons truction quiz . Lesson Plan #2 : Building Triads on Scale Degrees in C Major and A Minor This lesson will focus on triad construction on the I, IV, V, and vi scale degrees of C major and the i, iv, V, and VI degrees of A minor. Students will play and listen to specified harmonic progressions using these triads and will complete exercises at the piano keyboard to reinforce their understanding of concepts and develop skills. *Formative Assessment= harmonic progression aural analysis Lesson Plan # 3 : Harmonic Progression in Pop Songs This lesson plan is an overview of harmonic progression in pop songs and will focus primarily on progressions involving I, IV, V , and vi chords in major keys and those involving i, iv, V, and VI chords in minor keys . Stu dents will consider the way in which chords are grouped in patterns to create a framework for a song and give the music a sense of movement and resolution. Students will explore ways in which the bass line often help s establish harmonic progression. Students will have an opportunity to listen to aural samples to gain insight into harmonic progressions and the ways in which composers use harmonic progression as a framework for their music. Lesson Plan #4 : Podcast Ð How I Hear Harmonic Progression This lesson will serve as an overview to the planning, design, creation, and presentation of a Podcast utilizing Audacity that explores the content of this unit . Each student will select three songs that demonstrate three different harmonic progressions and discuss their response to those progressions. They will incorporate a voice over to narrate their work. Students will save, export, and convert their work and submit it to the Virtual Listening Room. *Formative Assessm ent=Virtual Listening Room p odcast submission . Lesson P lan #5: Tech Tutorial Ð Garage Band This lesson will serve as a Tech Tutorial on the program GarageBand and will focus on harmonic progression. Students will have an opportunity to work with program and become familiar with the features that will enable their development of original music. *Formative Assessment=harmonic progression replication .

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! %# ! Lesson Plan #6: Garage Band Harmonic Progression Compositions After classroom discussion, listening ses sions, learning activities, and the Tech Tutorial, students will have an opportunity to work independently to create their own music using the GarageBand. Independent coaching sessions with the instructor will help guide their work. They will work within prescribed parameters to complete activities and create 2 original harmonic progressions (one in major and one in minor). *Formative Assessment=Virtual Listening Room s ubmission and peer feedback .

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! %$ ! Unit Five Samp l e Lesson Plan #6 : GarageBand Harmonic Progression Compositions • Lesson Description This lesson plan details the independent work students will engage in to create two pieces with the software program GarageBand that feature harmonic progression . They will work within specified parameters. Each student will submit their work to the Virtual Listening Room and will provide feedback on at least two classmates' pieces. • Essential Questions Ð o How do I open an existing project and save it with a new title? o How do I select the appropriate software instrument? o How do I adjust the tempo? o How do I punch in and out to record new material in conjunction with prerecorded tracks? o How do I add a bass line that works with my harmonic progression? o How do I enhance the timing? o How do I copy and paste? o How do I share and export my work? o How do I upload my work to the Virtual Listening Room? • Lesson Goals and Objectives Ð At the end of this lesson students will be able to: o Create music utilizing various technologies that incorporates melodies o Identify and discu ss harmonic progression in music o Create and perform two original harmonic progression compositions o Save and export a project in GarageBand o Evaluate and respond to peer wor k o Make connections to aural example they have heard during this unit and the original work they are creating • Materials Needed Ð to complete this lesson, instructor and students will need: o Classroom setting o Sound source to play MP3s o Laptops in class or home computer o Headphones o GarageBand o MIDI keyboard o Access to the Internet • Learning Events and Activities o Manipulate an existing project in GarageBand o Assigning software instruments o Adjusting tempo o Recording music according to specified parameters o Saving, exporting, and uploading work o Review of peer work

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! %% ! • Lesson Assessment(s) Ð Assessment will be made in the form of: o Teacher observation of students o Interaction during individual coaching session o Assessment of completed assignments o Review of student peer feedback Assessment will be made on the following Ð YES NO 5",67,-)*( +,-.'/01 ,-./.0!1/!.23453/6!-789.:5!1/0!41;.0!1!/.
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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! ('' ! Unit Five Lesson Plan #6 Supplemental Materials GarageBand Harmonic Progression Composition Assignment Sheet Follow these steps to create two harmonic progression compositions over a given rhythm. You will share your work in the Virtual Listening Room and peer review the work of at least two other classmates. 1. Harmonic Progression in C Major Open up the class file "harmpro01" and save as a new project with the name title yourname harmpro01. Make sure "count in" is selected. Track 1 is a piano and Track 2 is a bass. You will be using both of these tracks to compose over Track 3, which is a prerecorded 8 bar rhythm track. Adjust the tempo to a speed in which you are comfortable working (you can always speed it up later!) Using triad s on the I, IV, V, and vi scales degrees, compose a harmonic progression. You can change chords as often as you like within the 8 bars but you must use all four chords at least once at some point within the 8 bars. When you feel ready, record your harmon ic progression on Track 1. Open up your track and enhance the timing. Edit it to correct any errors. Next step Ð add on Track 2 a bass line that works against your progression. Save your work in your student file. Export song Ð share/export song to disc/MP3 encoder high quality/titled the same/to student folder. Upload MP3 to Virtual Listening Room (folder "harmpro") 2. Harmonic Progression in A minor Open up the class file "harmpro02" and save as a new project with the name title yourname harmpr o02. Make sure "count in" is selected. Track 1 is a piano and Track 2 is a bass. You will be using both of these tracks to compose over Track 3, which is a prerecorded 8 bar rhythm track.

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! ('( ! Adjust the tempo to a speed in which you are comfortable working (you can always speed it up later!) Using triads on the i, iv, V, and VI scales degrees, compose a harmonic progression. You need not use all these chords, but experiment to see how you like grouping them together. When you feel ready, record your ha rmonic progression on Track 1. Open up your track and enhance the timing. Edit it to correct any errors. Next step Ð add on Track 2 a bass line that works against your progression. Save your work in your student file. Export song Ð share/export song to disc/MP3 encoder high quality/titled the same/to student folder. Upload MP3 to Virtual Listening Room (folder "harmpro")

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! (') ! Unit Six Ð Can You Play Me A Tune? Unit Six is an exploration of melody. By the end of this unit, students will be able to di scuss melodic construction and will understand steps and skips, passing tones, and neighbor notes. They will have built upon their understanding of intervallic relationships and discovered ways in which melodies are developed. Students will transfer thei r new understandings about harmonic progression and make connections to the ways in which melody is supported by harmony. Concepts regarding phrase will examined and students will have an opportunity to compose short melodies utilizing varied phrase struc tures. Students will play on the keyboard melodies they hear aurally and utilize GarageB and to record original melodies . In addition, students will reflect on aural samples and share their thoughts in a Listening Journal entry, Songshare Presen t ation, and Unit Reflection Podcast. Students will continue to work on material that can be integrated into their final project. They will further develop the two contrasting 8 bar rhythm/bass line/harmonic progression patterns written in previous units over whi ch they will add melodies. This unit should take approximately two weeks . Stage 1 Ñ Desired Results Established Goals • Critically listen and respond to songs from various genres and time periods of American vernacular music • Identify and discuss melodies in popular songs • Understand devices utilized in melodic construction including steps, skips, passing tones, and neighbor notes • Perform and improvise melodies • Create music utilizing various technologies that incorporates bass lines Transfer T1 Ð Students will be able to recreate melodie s they hear in popular songs. T2 Ð Students will be able to create original melodies. T3 Ð Students will be able to distinguish an implied harmonic progression that would be appropriate for a melody T4 Ð Students will be able to communicate their response to their peers' work. Meaning UNDERSTANDINGS Students will understand thatÉ U1 Ð É m elodies are created by grouping pitches and rhythms together in a thoughtful way. U2 Ð É m elodies can move step wise or utilize skips , and can incorporate passing tones and neighbor notes. ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS Students will keep consideringÉ Q1 Ð How are these grouped together to create this melody ? Q2 Ð Does this melody move step wise or by skips ? Q3 Ð Is there an implied harmonic progression in this melody ? Q4 Ð What is the phrase structure of this melody ?

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! ('" ! U3 Ð É melodies work over a harmonic progression. U4 Ð É melodies tend to be built in phrases. U5 Ð Éprograms such as Garage Band e nable the creation of music . Q 5 Ð What technologies are available to me to create my original music and how do I utilize these programs? Acquisition Students will knowÉ K1 Ð É about devices of melodic construction such as steps, skips , passing tones and neighbor notes . K2 Ð É about phrase structure . K 3 Ð Éthat melody and harmonic progression work together in pop songs. K4 Ð É about available technologies for music creation. Students will be skilled atÉ S1 Ð É recognizing aurally devices of melodic construction such as steps, skips, passing tones, and neighbor notes. S2 Ð Éplaying at the piano keyboard steps, skips, passing tones, and neighbor notes. S3 Ð Érecreating melodies they hear in aural examples. S4 Ð É analyzing melodic phrases . S 5 Ð Éwriting original melodies within specified parameters. S6 Ð É how to share their discoveries and express their musical creativity with available technologies such as GarageBand.

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! ('& ! Stage 2 Ñ Evidence Performance Tasks Evaluative Criteria (EXPLANATION) Students will be introduced to melody and melodic construction. They will learn about devices of melodic construction such as steps, skips, passing tones and neighbor notes . Students will be introduced to melodic phrase structures . (INTERPRETATION) Students will listen actively to aural examples that demonstrate the use of melody , melodic phrase structure, and the ways in which melody and harmony work together. (APPLICATION) Students will complete activities that encourage their understanding of melodic construction . The will create melodies in C major and A minor. Students will work in Garage Band to both recreate melodies they hear and write original melodies within specified parameters. (PERSPECTIVE) Students will listen to aural examples of composers who use melodies in interesting ways. (EMPATHY) Students will share their work with the class and offer feedback as projects are shared. • Describe during class discussion elements of aural examples • Evaluate and categor ize aural examples to gain understanding of elements • Make meaning of and share their response to aural examples • Create melodies in major and minor keys at the piano keyboard • Replicate melodies heard in aural examples • Discover the ways in which technolo g y can assist in creating sound. • Compose original melodies and appropriate accompanimental bass lines. • Reflect on sonic events • Be open to and consider the thoughts of others • Relate their discoveries to the discoveries of other students • Reflect on others' work and share thoughtful feedback given in a kind and respectful manner

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! ('* ! Stage 3 Ñ Learning Plan Learning Events Progress Monitoring W WhereÉ Instruction : The instructor will introduce content. Topi cs will include an overview of melody ; devices utilized in melodic construction including steps, skips, passing tones, and neighbor notes ; melody and harmony working together in pop songs; tech tutorial on Garage Band; individual coaching sessions during independent work time. • Teacher observati on of students during instruction and class discussion H HookÉ Listening and Create : Students will listen to a variety of music and then create their own during independent work sessions (with individual tea cher coaching) utilizing Garage Band. • Teacher observation of students and interaction with them during individual coaching sessions E Equip and ExperienceÉ Discussion: Classroom discussion will provide students with an opportunity to construct meaning about important ideas. Listen and Respond : Stu dents will participate in Listening Sessions and actively listen and respond in writing to aural examples in a Listening Journal Entry. Present : Students will present a Songshare Presentation Explore: Students will be introduced to technology through cl ass Tech Tutorials • Student contribution to discussion • Teacher observation of students during Tech Tutorials R RethinkÉ Activity : Listening Sessions Activity : Piano keyboard activities Activity : Tech Tutorials Activity : Independent Work (Garage Band Composition projects) • Teacher observation of students E evaluateÉ Review : Listening Journal Entry and Songshare Presentation Assessment: Finish the melody quiz Submissions : podcast and compositions Peer Reviews : Students will provide feedback on peer work via comments in the Virtual Listening Room • Review of Listening Journal entry and Songshare Presentation • Review of assessments • Review of Virtual Listening Room submissions • Review of peer feedback comments

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! ('+ ! T TailorÉ Instructor will observe and evaluate students' work and note need for any individualized instruction or specially tailored exercises. O OrganizeÉ Instructor will organize presentation of material, content instruction, discussions, activities, practice time, and assessments to flow logically and effectively.

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! ('# ! Unit Six Lesson Plan Descriptions Lesson Plan #1: Overview of Melody This lesson will be an overview of melody and melodic construction. Students will learn devices used in melodic construction such as steps, skips, passing tones, and neighbor notes . They will complete exercises to reinforce their understanding of the se concept s and develop the skill to transfer that understanding to playing melodies on a piano keyboard. Also considered is melodic phrase constructio n. Lesson Plan # 2 : Melody and Harmony Working Together This lesson plan is an examina tion of the way in which melodies are supported by harmonic progressions and harmonic progressions can influence the construction of a melody. Lesson Plan #3 : Pod cast Ð How I Hear Melody This lesson will serve as an overview to the planning, design, creation, and presentation of a Podcast utilizing Audacity that explores the content of this unit . Each student will select three songs that demonstrate three differen t melodies and discuss their response to those melodies . They will incorporate a voice over to narrate their work. Students will save, export, and convert their work and submit it to the Virtual Listening Room. *Formative Assessment=Virtual Listening Room p odcast submission Lesson P lan #4 : Tech Tutorial Ð Garage Band This lesson will serve as a Tech Tutorial on the program GarageBand and will focus on melody . Students will have an opportunity to work with progr am and become familiar with the features that will enable their d evelopment of original music. Formative Assessment= f inish t he m elody q uiz Lesson Plan #5 : Garage Band Melody Compositions After classroom discussion, listening sessions, learning activitie s, and the Tech Tutorial, students will have an opportunity to work independently to create their own music using the GarageBand. Independent coaching sessions with the instructor will help guide their work. They will work within prescribed parameters to complete activities and create 2 original melodies (one in major and one in minor) over given rhythm tracks. *Formative Assessment=Virtual Listening Room submission and peer feedback .

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! ('$ ! Unit Six Samp le Lesson Plan #5 : GarageBand Melody Compositions • Lesson Description This lesson plan details the independent work students will engage in to create two pieces with the software program GarageBand . They will work within specified parameters. Each student will submit their work to the Virtual Listening R oom and will provide feedback on at least two classmates' pieces. • Essential Questions Ð o How do I open an existing project and save it with a new title? o How do I select the appropriate software instrument? o How do I adjust the tempo? o How do I punch in and out to record new material in conjunction with prerecorded tracks? o How do I enhance the timing? o How do I share and export my work? o How do I upload my work to the Virtual Listening Room? • Lesson Goals and Objectives Ð At the end of this lesson students will be able to: o Create music utilizing various technologies that incorporates melodies o Identify and discuss t he interplay between bass lines, rhythm tracks , and piano tracks that outline harmonic progression o Create four original melodic compositions o Save and export a project in GarageBand o Evaluate and respond to peer work o Make connections to aural example they have heard during this unit and the original work they are creating • Materials Needed Ð to complete this lesson, instructor and students will n eed: o Classroom setting o Sound source to play MP3s o Laptops in class or home computer o Headphones o GarageBand o MIDI keyboard o Access to the Internet • Learning Events and Activities o Manipulate an existing project in GarageBand o Assigning software instruments o Adjusting tempo o Recording music according to specified parameters o Saving, exporting, and uploading work o Review of peer work

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! ('% ! • Lesson Assessment(s) Ð Assessment will be made in the form of: o Teacher observation of students o Interaction during individual coac hing session o Assessment of completed assignments o Review of student peer feedback Assessment will be made on the following Ð YES NO 8'$-9:)* ( +,-.'/01 ,-./.0!1/!.23453/6!-789.:5!1/0!41;.0!1!/.
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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! ((' ! Unit Six Lesson Plan #5 Supplemental Materials GarageBand Melody Composition Assignment Sheet Follow these steps to create three bass line compositions over a given rhythm. You will share your work in the Virtual Listening Room and peer review the work of at least two other classmates. 1. Melody with five pitch es in C major Open up the class file " melody01 " and save as a new project with the name title yourname melody01 . Make sure "count in" is selected. Highlight T rack 1 and select a sound you like. Tracks 2, 3, and 4 are prerecorded and are 8 bars of rhythm, bass, and piano. The harmonic progression is I vi IV V. Adjust the tempo to a speed in which you are comfortable working ( you can always speed it up later!) Using the pitches C4, D4, E4, F4, and G 4, create an 8 bar melody that works over the given harmonic progression heard in the bass and piano that i ncludes • Steps • At least 2 skips • Quarter note motion • Eighth note motion • At least one half note When you feel ready, record your melody on Track 1. Open up your track and enhance the timing. Edit it to correct any errors. Save your work in your student f ile. Export song Ð share/export song to disc/MP3 encoder high quality/titled the same/to student folder. Upload MP3 to Virtual Listening Room (folder " melody01 ")

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! ((( ! 2. Melody in A minor Open up the class file "melody02" and save as a new project with the name title yourname melody02. Make sure "count in" is selected. Highlight Track 1 and select a sound you like. Tracks 2, 3, and 4 are prerecorded and are 8 bars of rhythm, bass, and piano . The harmonic progression is i iv i V Adjust the tempo to a speed in which you are comfortable working (you can always speed it up later!) Using any pitches you wish between A3 and A5 , create an 8 bar melody that works over the given harmonic progression heard in the bass and piano . You may use any variety of r hythmic and melodic devices to make this melody unique and interesting. When you feel ready, record your melody on Track 1. Open up your track and enhance the timing. Edit it to correct any errors. Save your work in your student file. Export song Ð share/export song to disc/MP3 encoder high quality/titled the same/to student folder. Upload MP3 to Virtual Listening Room (folder "melody02 ")

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! (() ! Unit Seven Ð Life Is A Song, Love Is The Lyrics Unit Seven is an exploration of song form and lyric writ ing . By the end of this unit, students will be knowledgeable about common song forms. Students will explore rhyme scheme and literary devices used in lyric writing. They will understand how songwriters use lyrics to express themselves and represent the emotions, thoughts, beliefs, and experiences of individuals and sociological groups and will experience lyric writing in learning events and activities . Student will write and sing original song lyrics. In addition, students will reflect on aural samples and share their thoughts in a Listening Journal entry, Songshare Presen t ation, and Unit Reflection Podcast. Students will continue to work on material that can be integrated into their final project. They will further develop the original music they hav e composed in previous units and will think about ways in which lyrics can be incorporated into their work . This un it should take approximately three weeks . Stage 1 Ñ Desired Results Established Goals • Critically listen and respond to songs from various genres and time periods of American vernacular music • Identify and discuss common song forms in popular songs • Understand rhyme scheme in lyrics • Understand devices utilized in lyric writing such as simile, metaphor, or personification that can bring to life the emotion, action, and imagery contained within lyrics • Understand how songwriters use lyrics to express themselves and represent the emotions, thoughts, beliefs, and Transfer T1 Ð Students will be able to identify common forms in popular songs . T2 Ð Students will be able to distinguish rhyme schemes in song lyrics . T3 Ð Students will be able to employ simile, metaphor, and personification when writing lyrics. T 4 Ð Students will gain insight into events and peoples of the past by listening to the lyrics of songs. T 5 Ð Students will be able to communicate their response to their peers' wo rk. Meaning UNDERSTANDINGS Students will understand thatÉ U1 Ð É most pop songs are organized into sections and follow common forms. U2 Ð É lyrics often follow a rhyme scheme . U3 Ð É simile, metaphor, ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS Students will keep consideringÉ Q1 Ð Can I discern a form in the structure of th is song ? Q2 Ð What is the rhyme scheme in these lyrics ? Q3 Ð How did the songwriter get his meaning across in these words ?

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! ((" ! experiences of individuals and sociological groups • Write a nd sing original song lyrics • Create music utilizing various technologies and personification can help bring song lyrics to life . U4 Ð É people express through lyrics their experiences, opinions, and emotions . U5 Ð Éprograms such as GarageBand e nable the creation of music . Q4 Ð What is the songwriter sharing with me in these lyrics ? Q 5 Ð What technologies are available to me to create my original music and how do I utilize these programs? Acquisition Students will knowÉ K1 Ð É elements of song form such as AABA, verse/chorus, pre chorus, bridge, and coda . K2 Ð É about rhyme scheme . K3 Ð Éabout literary devices such as simile, metaphor, and personification . K 4 Ð É about available technologies for music creation. Students will be skilled atÉ S1 Ð É how to organize their song writing in a form . S2 Ð É writing lyrics utilizing rhyme schemes . S3 Ð É writing lyrics that are developed by the use of literary devices . S4 Ð É how to share their discoveries and express their musical creativity with available technologies such as GarageBand. Stage 2 Ñ Evidence Performance Tasks Evaluative Criteria (EXPLANATION) Students will be introduced to lyric writing and song form. They will learn about rhyme scheme and literary devices that enrich song lyrics . Students will consider how songwriters use lyrics to effectively express their thoughts, feelings, and experience s . (INTERPRETATION) Students will listen actively to aural examples that demonstrate common song • Describe during class discussion elements of aural examples • Evaluate and categorize aural examples to gain understanding of elements • Make meaning of and share their response to

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! ((& ! forms and effective lyrics. (APPLICATION) Students will complete activities that encourage their understanding of song form and lyrics writing melodic construction . The will write a song top line (melody and lyrics) within prescribed parameters . (PERSPECTIVE) Students will listen to aural examples of composers who use form and lyrics in interesting ways. (EMPATHY) Students will share their work wit h the class and offer feedback as projects are shared. aural examples • Complete class/group/individual song mapping and lyric writing activities • Write original lyrics • Reflect on sonic events • Be open to and consider the thoughts of others • Relate their discoveries to the discoveries of other students • Reflect on others' work and share thoughtful feedback given in a kind and respectful manner Stage 3 Ñ Learning Plan Learning Events Progress Monitoring W WhereÉ Instruction : The instructor will introduce content. Topi cs will include an overview of song form ; rhyme scheme; literary devices; form and lyrics working together; expression through lyrics writing in past and present; individual coaching sessions during independent work time. • Teacher observation of students during instruction and class discussion H Hook É Listening and Create : Students will listen to a variety of music and then create their own during independent work sessions (with individual teacher coaching) utilizing GarageBand . • Teacher observation of students and interaction with them during individ ual coaching sessions E Equip and ExperienceÉ Discussion: Classroom discussion will provide students with an opportunity to construct meaning about important ideas. Listen and Respond : Students will participate in Listening Sessions and actively listen and respond in writing to aural examples in a Listening Journal • Student contribution to discussion • Teacher observation of students during Tech Tutorials

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! ((* ! Entry. Present : Students will present a Songshare Presentation Explore: Students will be introduced to technology through class Tech Tutorials R RethinkÉ Activity : Listening Sessions Activity : Song Form Mapping Activity : Lyric Writ ing Activity : Tech Tutorials Activity : Independent Work ( GarageBand Composition projects) • Teacher observation of students E evaluateÉ Review : Listening Journal Entry and Songshare Presentation Assessment: Song Form Mapping Quiz Submissions : podcast and compositions Peer Reviews : Students will provide feedback on peer work via comments in the Virtual Listening Room • Review of Listening Journal entry and Songshare Presentation • Review of assessments • Review of Virtual Listening Room submissions • Review of peer feedback comments T TailorÉ Instructor will observe and evaluate students' work and note need for any individualized instruction or specially tailored exercises. O OrganizeÉ Instructor will organize presentation of material, content instruction, discussions, activities, practice time, and assessments to flow logically and effectively.

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! ((+ ! Unit Seven Lesson Plan Descriptions Lesson Plan #1: Overview of Song Form This lesson is an overview common song forms. Students will learn about the way in which songwriters organize their music for optimal effect. Forms to be considered are AABA, verse/chorus, use of pre chorus and bridge, as well as the intros and codas. They will complete activities to reinforce their understanding of t hese concepts and develop the skill to transfer that understanding to creating their own pieces. *Formative Assessment= s ong form mapping q uiz . Lesson Plan # 2 : Lyrics This lesson plan is an examination of lyric writing. Students will learn about rhyme scheme and literary devices such as simile, metaphor, and personification. Students will complete group and individual activities to reinforce their understanding of these concepts and develop the skill to transfer that understanding to their own lyric wr iting. Lesson Plan #3 : Podcast Ð How I Hear Song Lyrics This lesson will serve as an overview to the planning, design, creation, and presentation of a Podcast utilizing Audacity that explores the content of this unit . Each student will select three song s that demonstrate three different songs highlighting lyrics and discuss their response to those lyrics . They will incorporate a voice over to narrate their work. Students will save, export, and convert their work and submit it to the Virtual Listening Room. *Formative Assessment=Virtual Listening Room p odcast submission . Lesson P lan #4: Tech Tutorial Ð Garage Band This lesson will serve as a Tech Tutorial on the program GarageBand and will focus on song form . Students will have an opportunity to work with program and become familiar with the features that will enable their development of original music. Lesson Plan #5: Garage Band Top Line Compositions After classroom discussion, listening sessions, learning activities, and the Tech Tutorial, students will have an opportunity to work independently to create their own song top line (melody and lyrics) within specified parameters . Independent coaching sessions with the instructor will help guide their work. Student will record their work with GarageBand. *Formative Assessment=Virtual Listening Room s ubmission and peer feedback .

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! ((# ! Unit Seven Sample L esson Plan #2: Lyric Writing • Lesson Description This lesson is an exploration of song lyric writing. After a presentation by the instructor on the t opic, the students will work as a class, in small groups or pairs, and finally alone t o complete activities that develop their understanding of lyric writing and the various devices used to effectively write songs . • Essential Questions Ð o How do lyrics in a song tell me a story, make me think about something, or bring pictures to my mind? o How is a song organized and how do the lyrics and music play into this organization? o What are some traditional structures and forms used in song s that can guide my lyric writing ? o What are rhyme schemes and how do they affect the form of a song? • Lesson Goals and Object ives Ð At the end of this lesson students will be able to: o Critically listen and respond to songs from various genres and time periods of American vernacular music o Discuss theme, perspective, and imagery in lyrics writing and integrate these concepts into the material they write o Identify various song structures and forms o Identify and discuss rhyme schemes in popular songs • Materials Needed Ð to complete this lesson, instructor and students will need: o Classroom setting o Sound source to play MP3s o Laptops in cl ass or home computer o Lyric writing activity sheets o Post in notes • Learning Events and Activities o Presentation by the instructor on the lesson content o L yric writing activities . • Lesson Assessment(s) Ð Assessment will be made in the form of: o Teacher observation of students o Student contributions to class discussion o Student participation in small group activities o Review of completed lyric study sheets

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! (($ ! Assessment will be made on the following Ð YES NO 1. Lyric Writing Word Wall of Inspiration Contributed at least 3 words on post it notes in each category on the word wall. Created at least 4 words combinations to add to the "starting points" category . 2. Lyric Writing Ð Rhyme Games Contributed to class discussion to identify the rhyme scheme use d in examples. 3. Lyric Writing Ð Original Lyrics Wrote a couplet that utilizes pure/full/true rhyme. Wrote a couplet that utilizes echo rhyme. Wrote a couplet that utilizes imperfect/slant/half/near rhyme. Wrote a couplet that utilizes eye rhyme. Wrote a quatrain with the rhyme scheme A, B, A, B that employs simile. Wrote a quatrain with the rhyme scheme A, B, A, B that employs metaphor. Wrote a quatrain with the rhyme scheme A, B, A, B that employs personification. Instructor's comments:

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! ((% ! Unit Seven Lesson Plan #2 Supplemental Materials Lyric Writing Assignment Sheet 1. Lyric Writing Word Wall of Inspiration • As a class we will create a Word Wall of Inspiration with single words, groups of words, and short phrases that illustrate different images, theme, emotions, actions, etc. Using the Post It notes, write down as many words as you like BUT AT LEAST 3 WORDS IN EACH OF THE FOLLOWING CATEGORIES that would be useful when writing about the fo llowing: Imagery (visually descriptive or figurative) Theme (the subject, setting, or perspective) Emotions Actions • All the post it notes will be stuck in the appropriate section on our class room Word Wall of Inspiration. • Now let's break into small g roups or pairs. Review the Word Wall of Inspiration and all those Post It notes. Find ways to combine two or more words that would work well together and write them on a Post It note. CREATE AT LEAST 4 OF THESE COMBINATIONS and add them to the area unde r the heading "Starting Points." • Change groups/partners and brainstorm some lines using simile, metaphor, or personification. Write them on a Post It note and add them to the "Starting Points" section of the Word Wall of Inspiration. Here are some examp les to inspire you: Simile (comparing two unlike things using "like" or "as"): You came in like a wrecking ball I love you like a love song, baby You, with your words like knives It seemed to me that you lived your life like a candle in the wind Metaphor ( a figure of speech in which a word or phrase is applied to an object or action to which it is not literally applicable ): My heart's a stereo Our song is a slammin' screen door You shoot me down but I won't fall, I am titanium Cause baby you're a firework Personification ( giving human quality to something ): Skies are crying I will be rising from the ground like a skyscraper

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! ()' ! She acts like the summer and walks like the rain I've got the eye of the tiger 2. Lyric Writing Ð Rhyme Games First as a class, then working in small groups or pairs, we will complete the activities to explore the following: Pure/Full/True Rhyme (cat/mat, billy/silly, mystery/history) Imperfect/Slant/Half/Near (breath/deaf) Eye Rhyme (similarity of spelling, not sound; love/move) End Rhyme Echo Rhyme (disease/ease) Assonance (vowel sounds/ words that have the same or similar vowel sounds, so it seems like they rhyme; man/prank) Consonance (consonant sounds; limp/lump, bit/bet) Alliteration (repeated initial sound; Peter Piper picke d a peck of pickled peppers) Uncentered Rhyme (in unexpected places) Masculine (one syllable; one two buckle my shoe) Feminine (multiple syllables; dying/flying, generate/venerate) Light (stressed syllable; frog/dialog) Couplets (A,A,B,B,C,C,D,DÉ) Quatrains (A,B,A,B) Let's work together to identify the rhyme scheme used: (from Count On Me Ð Bruno Mars) If you ever find yourself stuck in the middle of the sea I'll sail the world to find you If you ever find yourself lost in the dark and you can't s ee I'll be the light to guide you (from Try Ð Pink) Ever worry that it might be ruined And does it make you wanna cry? When you're out there doing what you're doing Are you just getting by? (from Unconditionally Ð Katy Perry) Unconditional, unconditional ly I will love you unconditionally There is no fear now Let go and just be free I will love you unconditionally

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! ()( ! (from Brave Ð Sara Bareilles) You can be amazing You can turn a phrase into a weapon or a drug You can be the outcast Or be the backlash of som ebody's lack of love (from Payphone Ð Maroon 5) I'm at a payphone trying to call home All of my change I spent on you Where have the times gone? Baby, it's all wrong Where are the plans we made for two? (from Royals Ð Lorde) And we'll never be royals It don't run in our blood, That kind of luxe just ain't for us. We crave a different kind of buzz. Let me be your ruler You can call me queen Bee And baby I'll rule, I'll rule, I'll rule, I'll rule. Let me live that fantasy. Now let's break into small groups or pairs and complete the following: 1. Complete the couplet "Like a river that don't know where it's flowingÉ" (Bruce Springsteen Hungry Heart ) __________________________________ ______________________________ "Did I try in every way to sho w her every dayÉ" (Garth Brooks If Tomorrow Never Comes ) _______________________________________________ _________________ "Every night when everybody has funÉ" (The Beatles Ð It Won't Be Long ) __________________________________ ____________________________ __ "My pockets were full and now my money goneÉ" (M i chael Jackson Ð What Goes Around Comes Around ) __________________________________ ______________________________ "You made a vow that you would ever be trueÉ" (Bill Haley and the Comets Ð Love Letters in the Sand ) __________________________________ ______________________________

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! ()) ! 2. Complete the quatrain: " Just because you think you're so pretty, And just because your momma thinks you're hot, Well, just because you think you've got something That no other g irl has got, É" (Elvis Presley Just Because ) __________________________________ ______________________________ ___ __________________________________________________________ __________________________________ ______________________________ _____ _________________________________________________ __________ I need to go shopping These shoes are all wrong Just look in my closet Not a thing to put onÉ" (Kellie Pickler Things That Never Cross a Man's Mind ) __________________________________ ____________ __________________ __________________________________ ______________________________ __ ____ _ ___________________________ ______________________________ __________________________________ ______________________________ 3. Lyric Writing Ð Original Lyrics Wo rk on your own to complete the following (HEY Ð you might consider writing these with a theme, story, etc. in mind in case you want to use these lines in your final project!) • Write a couplet that utilizes pure/full/true rhyme (such as cat/mat, billy/silly, mystery/history): ________________________________________ ________________________ __________________________________ ______________________________ • Write a couplet that utilizes echo rhyme (such as disease/ease): ____________________________ ______ ______________________________ __________________________________ ______________________________ • Write a couplet that utilizes imperfect/slant/half/near rhyme (such as breath/deaf): __________________________________ ______________________________ _______________________________________________________________ _

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! ()" ! • Write a couplet that utilizes eye rhyme (such as a similarity of spelling, not sound; love/move): __________________________________ ______________________________ __________________________ ________ ______________________________ • Write a quatrain with the rhyme scheme A, B, A, B. You must employ simile (comparing two unlike things using "like" or "as"): __________________________________ ______________________________ ______________________ ____________ ______________________________ ___ _____________________________________________________________ __________________________________ ______________________________ • Write a quatrain with the rhyme scheme A, B, A, B. You must employ metaphor (a figure of speech in which a word or phrase is applied to an object or action to which it is not literally applicable): __________________________________ ______________________________ __________________________________ ______________________________ ______ _____________________________________________ _____________ __________________________________ ______________________________ • Write a quatrain with the rhyme scheme A, B, A, B. You must employ personification (giving human quality to something): ________________________________________________ ________________ __________________________________ ______________________________ __________________________________ ______________________________ __________________________________ ___________________________ ___

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! ()& ! Unit Eight Ð Final Project Unit Eight is the culmination of this class and contains the final project . By the end of this unit, students will have synthesized what they have learned in previous units to complete a final project that demonstrates th e transfer of the knowledge and skills gained in this course . The final project involves the utilization of the technology explored in this class to facilitate the composition of an original song. Students will continue to listen to songs from the past and present to be inspired and informed as they work on their composition and will complete their final Listening Journal Entry and Songshare Presentation. This un it should take approximately three weeks . Stage 1 Ñ Desired Results Established Goals • Critically listen and respond to songs from various genres and time periods of American vernacular music Compose and perform original music and lyrics Transfer T1 Ð Students will synthesize what they have learned in previous units to complete a final project that demonstrates the knowledge and skill gained in this course. T 2 Ð Students will be able to communicate their response to their peers' work. Meaning UNDERSTANDINGS Students will un derstand thatÉ . U1 Ð É GarageBand offers the ability to create music utilizing either pre recorded loops or completely original music written using software instruments. U2 Ð É m y final project must follow a prescribed form. U3 Ð É choices about r hythm, bass, and harmonic progression can add structure to my composition. U4 Ð ÉI need to consider my harmonic progression when I write my melody ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS Students will keep consideringÉ Q1 Ð Should I use loops or start from scratch and write a ll origin al material with software instruments (or a combination of those two things) ? Q2 Ð How can I write my music and lyrics to follow the prescribed form ? Q3 Ð How will my choices about rhythm, bass, and harmonic progression affect the form of my son g ? Q4 Ð Does my harmonic progression work with my melody ? Q 5 Ð What am I trying to say with my lyrics?

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! ()* ! U 5 Ð Éc hoices about the music I compose (rhythm, bass line, harmonic progression, and melody) will likely be affec ted by my lyrics (and visa versa) . U6 Ð Éw hen writing lyrics, I want to consider rhyme scheme and literary devices that will enhance my writing. Q6 Ð Does my music work with my lyrics (and visa versa)? Acquisition Students will knowÉ K1 Ð É how to utilize both loops and software instruments to create individual tracks for rhythm, bass, harmonic progression, and melody. K2 Ð É lyric writing. Students will be skilled atÉ S1 Ð É staying within prescribed parameters. S2 Ð É making appropriate choices regarding rhythm, bass, harmonic progression, and melody S3 Ð É composing music that effectively expresses their lyrics. S4 Ð É how to share their discoveries and express their musical creativity with available technologies such as GarageBand. Stage 2 Ñ Evidence Performance Tasks Evaluative Criteria (EXPLANATION) Students will be introduced to the Final Project. (INTERPRETATION) Students will consider the various elements of their composition (form, rhythm, bass, harmonic progression, melody, and lyrics) and the choices available to them as the work independently (APPLICATION) Students will work independently to • Classroom discussion • Evaluate and categorize aural examples to gain understanding of elements • Make meaning of and share their response to classroom d iscussion and coaching sessions • Work with GarageBand

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! ()+ ! complete their Final Project. (PERSPECTIVE) Students will listen to aural examples of songs. (EMPATHY) Students will share their work with the class and offer feedback as projects are shared. • Reflect on sonic events • Be open to and consider the thoughts of others • Relate their discoveries to the discoveries of other students • Reflect on others' work and share thoughtful feedback given in a kind and respectful manner Stage 3 Ñ Learning Plan Learning Events Progress Monitoring W WhereÉ Instruction : The instructor will introduce content. Topi cs will include an overview of the procedures for the Final Project . • Teacher observation of students during instruction and class discussion H HookÉ Listening and Create : Students will listen to a variety of music and then create their own during independent work sessions (with individual teacher coaching) utilizing GarageBand . • Teacher observation of students and interaction with them during individual coachin g sessions E Equip and ExperienceÉ Discussion: Classroom discussion will provide students with an opportunity to construct meaning about important ideas. Listen and Respond : Students will participate in Listening Sessions and actively listen and respond in writing to aural examples in a Listening Journal Entry. Present : Students will present a Songshare Presentation Explore: Students will work independently on original material • Student contribution to discussion • Teacher observation of students during Tech Tutorials R RethinkÉ Activity : Listening Sessions Activity : Independent Work ( GarageBand Composition projects) • Teacher observation of students E evaluateÉ Review : Listening Journal Entry and • Review of Listening Journal entry and

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! ()# ! Songshare Presentation Submissions : Final Project Peer Reviews : Students will provide feedback on peer work via comments in the Virtual Listening Room Songshare Presentation • Review of Virtual Listening Room submissions • Review of peer feedback comments • Final Project Summative Assessment T TailorÉ Instructor will observe and evaluate students' work and note need for any individualized instruction or specially tailored exercises. O OrganizeÉ Instructor will organize presentation of material, content instruction, discussions, activities, practice time, and assessments to flow logically and effectively.

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! ()$ ! Unit Eight Lesson Plan Descriptions Lesson Plan #1: Final Project This l esson is an overview of the final Project. Students will follow prescribed parameters to compose an original song. They will submit their work to the Virtual Listening Room and provide feedback on at least two of the peers' work. *Summative Assessment=Virtual Listening Room submission and peer feedback/Final Project Summative Assessment Unit Eight Sample Lesson Plan # 1 : Final Project • Lesson Description This lesson is an overview of the final Project. Students will follow prescribed parameters to compose an original song. They will submit their work to the Virtual Listening Room and provide feedback on at least two peers' work . The instructor will provide ongoing coaching to guide and support student work. • Essential Ques tions Ð o Am I going to use loops in my composition, write completely original material, or a combination of both ? o What will the tempo of my song be ? o How will I utilize different sounds in my song ? Will they come from loops or software instruments o How will I utilize rhythm ? o What key will be song be in ? Major or minor? Will my lyrics affect this decision? o What will the harmonic progression of my song be? How many chords will I use? Will they repeat in a pattern? Will that pattern change with the sections of my song form ? o Will I write my lyrics or my melody first ? How will one affect the other ? o What kind of melody do I want? Fast moving, slow, jumpy, high, low ? o Does my melody work with my harmonic progression? o What am I trying to say with my lyrics? Does the music match the emotions/thoughts of this song ? o Should I start with the chorus or the verses? o What are the rhyme schemes in my verses and chorus? D o they affect the form of a song? • Lesson Goals and Objectives Ð At the end of this lesson students will be able to: o Critically listen and respond to songs from various genres and time periods of American vernacular music o Compose and perform original music and lyric s

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! ()% ! • Materials Needed Ð to complete this lesson, ins tructor and students will need: o Classroom setting o Sound source to play MP3s o Laptops in class or home computers o Headphones o MIDI keyboard o GarageBand o Access to the Internet • Learning Events and Activities o Presentation by the instructor on the lesson content o Independent work o Individual coaching sessions with instructor • Lesson Assessment(s) Ð Assessment will be made in the form of: o Teacher observation of students o Student contributions to class discussion o Review of completed Final Project Assessment will be made on the following Ð YES NO Diverse Sounds Instructor's comments: Rhythm Instructor's comments: Bass Line Instructor's comments: Harmonic Progression of at least two different chords Instructor's comments: ! !

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! ("' ! Melody that utilizes at least five different pitches Instructor's comments: Melody recorded on piano on an independent track Instructor's comments: Verse one lyrics Instructor's comments: Verse two lyrics Instructor's comments: Chorus Lyrics Instructor's comments: Additional comments:

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! ("( ! Unit Eight Lesson Plan # 1 Supplemental Materials Final Project Assignment Sheet For your Fin al Project you will compose an original song using GarageBand. Your song must contain rhythm, bass, a harmonic progress ion , melody, and lyrics. It must follow a prescribed form. You are welcome to incorporate what you have written in previous units. Or, if you prefer, you can build upon what you know and start a completely new co mposition from scratch. You have three weeks to complete this project. Your instructor will provide ongoing coaching sessions to help guide your work and provide assistance when needed. You are encouraged to work with your peers to get feedback along th e way. Listen to each other's work s in progress! Upon completion, you will submit your Final Project to the Virtual Listening Room and provide feedback on at least two peers' work. Consider the followingÉ Form The form of your song should follow AT LEAST thisÉ 8 bar first verse Chorus that is either 8 or 16 bars 8 bar second verse Chorus that is either 8 or 16 bars Ébut may also contain optional sections ( in italics ) to create this form : 4 bar introduction 8 bar first verse 8 bar second verse Pre chorus that is either 2 or 4 bars Chorus that is either 8 or 16 bars 8 bar third verse Pre chorus that is either 2 or 4 bars Chorus that is either 8 or 16 bars Bridge that is up to 16 bars Final Chorus that is either 8 or 16 bars You may copy and past e sections to create the form. Sound Your song must contain a variety of sounds (it can't just be piano and vocals, for example). Think back to Unit Two and remember our examination of digital audio and the way in which the choice of sonic events can flav or your composition. Think of songs that inspire you and

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! (") ! ref lect on the ways in which tempo , texture, instrumentation, pitch, and dynamics play a part in those songs. Rhythm Your song must contain rhythm instruments. Think back to Unit Three a nd remember our examination of rhythm and rhythmic devices. What will the tempo and meter of your song be? Do you want a steady, easy beat for your song? Or do you want a harder groove that utilizes syncopation and other rhythmic devices? Think of song s that inspire you and reflect on the ways in which rhythm plays a part in those songs. Bass Your song must contain a bass line (it can come in and out as you wish, but it must be there at some point). Think back to Unit Four and remember our examination of the use of bass. Is the bass line going to be prese nt throughout? How much will the bass line be locked into the rhythm of your composition? Will it follow exactly the harmonic progression? Harmonic Progression Your song must incorporate a harmonic progression that utilizes at least two different chords. Think back to Unit Five and remember our examination of harmonic progression. Will your song going to be in C Major or in A minor? What harmonic progression will you use? Will the chords you choose repeat in a pattern? Will the harmonic progression change with the different sections (i.e. chorus, bridge) or your song? Melody Your song must incorporate a melody that utilizes at least five different pitches a nd you must record your melody played on piano on one track so it can be clearly heard throughout the song . This will be the track that the vocal track follows. Think back to Unit Six and remember our examination of study of melody. Will you write your melody first or your lyrics? How will the construction of your melody affect the lyrics and visa versa ? Should you step, skip, jump, stay neutral with your melody? How will the rhythm of the lyrics affect the rhythm of the melody? How much should you c onsider the harmonic progression and bass line as you write the melody/lyrics? Is your melody singable? Think of songs that inspire you and reflect on the ways in which melody plays a part in those songs. Lyrics Your song must contain lyrics for at leas t two verses and a chorus. You are welcome to write a third verse, a pre chorus, and/or a bridge if you wish. Think back to Unit Seven and remember our examination of lyric writing. What is it you want to say in this song? Do you want to start with a k iller hook? How about the perfect chorus that captures your idea in 4 or 8 lines? What will your rhyme scheme be? How many lines will the verses be? The chorus? Think of songs that inspire you and reflect on the ways in which the lyrics play a part in those songs.

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! ("" ! And two other BIG questionsÉ. TO LOOP OR NOT TO LOOP ? We've learned that GarageBand is a veritable playground of loops with which we can create endless compositions. Manipulating loops to frame your composition with rhythm, harmony , instrumental riffs, and interesting sounds is perfectly OKÉas long as you follow the prescribed form (which will probably involve cutting and pasting) . You may create a framework over which you write your top line if you like. Or, if you prefer, you can use all original material that you record from software instruments. If you choose to work with loops, you will have to consider tempo/BPMs, key, the harmonic progression of the loop and if that works, and how your melody/lyrics will fit over it all. YIK ES! WHAT IF I CAN'T SING? Take a stab at it. This is about your composition, not your performance. Everybody has a voice and can sing, but some people find it easier/more fun than others. If you are having a terrible time and feeling really not good ab out singing, solicit the help of a friend who can sing and loves to do so. It's great to have guest artists on your recordings!

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! ("& ! References Agnew, S (2003). Factors influencing the implementation of technology in the music classroom. (Doctoral dissertation). Retrieved from ProQuest Dissertations and Theses (Accession Order No. 1467773). Bauer, W.I. ( 2014). Music Learning Today: Digital Pedagogy for Creating, Performing, and Responding to Music . Oxford University Press: New York. Beckstead, D. (2001). Will technology transform music education? Music Educators Journal , 87(6), 44 49. Bissell, P. (1998). Tune into technology. Music Educators Journal, 95 (2), 36 41. Brady, T . (2008) Music makers: composing matters Ð creative music in the classroom: linking the artist and the educator . Canadian Music Educator, 50 (2), 34 37 . Bula, J.A. (2011). Technology based music courses and non traditional music students in secondary schools. (Doctoral dissertation). Retrieved from UMI Dissertation Publishing ( UMI No. 3502826). Criswell, C. (2014). Software in the spotlight. Teaching Music, 21 (5), 33 39. Dammers, R. (2012). Tech n ology based music classes in high schools in the United Stat es. Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education, 194 , 73 90 Dorfman, J. (2013) . Theory and Practice of Technology Based Music Instruction . Oxford University Press: New York . Farish, I . (2009) Music makers: songwriters in the school: introduction Ð songwriting and popular music learning practices . Canadian Music Educator, 51 (1), 42 43 . Free d man, B. (2013) . Teaching Music Through Composition. Oxford University Press:

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! ("* ! New York . Gal l, M. and Breeze, N. (2005). Music composition lessons: the multimodal affordances of technology. Educational Review, 57 (4), 415 433. Green, L. ( 2002) . How Popular Musicians Learn: A Way Ahead for Music Education . Ashgate Publishing Limited: England. Hickey, M. (2001). Creativity in the music classroom . Music Educators Journal, 88 (1), 17 18 . Hickey, M. & Webster, P. (2001). Creative thinking in music. Music Educators Journal, 88 (1), 19 23. Kuzmich, J. and Dammers, R. (2013). Technology based music classes: Expanding our reach. School Band & Orchestra, 16 (1), 39 43. Kuh n , W. (April/May 2012). Reaching the other 80% by adding music technology to your curriculum . Triad , 80 (3), 96 98 . Mercer, A. (2007). Sample based music composition for the learner centered music program. Canadian Music Educator, 49 (2), 55. National Core Arts Standards (2014). Dance, media arts, music, theatre and visual arts. Retrieved from http://www.nationalartss tandards.org/ Portowitz, A., Peppler, K., and Downton, M. (2014). In harmony: A technology based

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! ("+ ! music education model to enhance musical understanding and general learning skills. International Journal of Music Education, 32 (2), 242 260 . Reese, S. (2003). Responding to student compositions. In M. Hickey (Ed.) Why and How to Teach Music Compositio n, 211 242. Reston, Virginia: The National Association for Music Education. Ruthmann, A. (2007). The composer's workshop: An approach to c omposing in the classroom. Music Educator's Journal, 93 (4), 38 43. Rodrig uez, C.X. (Ed.). (2004). Bridging the Gap: Popular Music and Music Education . Reston, VI: MENC . Sawyer, K. (2012) . Explaining creativity (2nd Edition). New York: Oxford University Press. Starr, L. & Waterman, C. (2013). American popular music: From minstrelsy to MP3 (4th ed.). New York: Oxford University Press (ISBN: 978 0 19 985911 5). Trustman, D. (2006). Music technology in educat ion. (Doctoral d issertation ) . Retrieved from UMI Dissertation Publishing. (UMI No. 1436957). Watson, S. (2011) Using Technology to Unlock Musical Creativity . Oxford University Press: New York . Webster, P. (2002) Creative thinkin g in music: advancing a model. In T. Sullivan & L. Willingham (Eds.), Creativity and Music Education (16 33). Edmonton, Canada: Canadian Music Educator's Association. Wiggins, G. and McTighe, J. (2011) . The understanding by desi gn guide to creating high quality units . Alexandria: ASCD . Wiggins, J. (1999). Teacher control and creativity. Music Educators Journal . 85 (5),

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! ("# ! 30 35, 44. Williams, D.B. (2012) The non traditional music student in secondary schools of the United States: engaging non partic i pant students in c reati v e music activities through technology. Journal of Music, Technology and Education 4 (2&3). Williams, D. and Dammers, R. (2013). If we build it they will come: Using music technolog y to reach "the other 80%" in secondary school programs. Kansas Music Review . Retrieved from http://kmr.ksmea.org/?issue=201314s& section=articles&page=build . Wilson, D. (2001). Guidelines for coaching st udent composers. Music Educators Journal , 88 (1) , 28 33 . Wise, S., Greenwood, J. and Davis, N. (2011). Teachers' use of digital technology in secondary music education: illustrations of changing classrooms. British Journal of Music Education, 28 (2), 117 134. Woody, R.H. (2007). Popular music in school: remi xing the issues. Music Educators Journal, 93 (4) , 32 37 .

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! ("$ ! Appendix 1 Ð Technology Information ACID Music Studio Description: Prof essional DAW software program by SONY that offers loop based music creations, aud io recording, MIDI production, effects procession, and mixing. Link: http://www.sonycreativesoftware.com/download/trials/musicstudio Platform: PC Price: Free download versions available; u pgrades starting at $29.99 Tutorial(s): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lPFx zyHSGk Audacity Description: Open source cross platform software for recording and editing sounds . Link: http://audacity.sourceforge.net/ Platform: PC and Mac Price: Free Tutorial(s): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lPFx zyHSGk Band in a Box Description: MIDI software that allows for solo musicians to play along with computer generated accompaniments with adjustable elements such as tempo and key. Link: http://www.pgmusic.com/ Platform: PC and Mac Price: base price = $129.00; any upgrades available for various fees Tutorial(s): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NqJagZKgjpk GarageBand Description: Music creation application for recording, arranging, mixing, and sharing music that offers loops and virtual software instruments. Link: http://www.apple.com/ios/garageband/?cid=wwa us kwg features com Platform: Mac and Apple products such as the iPad and iPhone Price: Comes standard as part of iLife Suite; Downloadable application for $4.99 Tutorial(s): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6oqCuER8SrM

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! ("% ! Incredibo x Description: Music creation application that allows for mixing of pre existing sounds. Link: http://www.incredibox.com/ Platform: PC and Mac, all run with Flash, no download needed Price: Free Tutorial(s): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AyL h79cgHM Mixxx Description: Open source cross platform computer program for DJ beatmatching . Link: http://www.mixxx.org/ Platform: PC and Mac Price: Free Tutorial(s): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g8ezCqolx04 R Tap Description: Simulated drum kit application. Link: http://ratatapdrums.com/ Platform: iPhone, iPad, and iPod Touch Price: Free; upgrade for $1.99 Tutorial(s): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7X2WzkV_gDI Rock Rap'n Roll Description: Multimedia computer simulation program designed to introduce students to the manipulation pre existing sounds. Link: http://www.auburn.edu/~wallski/TechnologyPages/RockRapNRoll/ RockRapnRoll.htm Platform: PC and Mac Price: Available through Amazon and EBay, starting at approximately $6.99 Tutorial(s): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k2g1hNFG9og ! !

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A TECHNOLOGY BASED MUSIC COMPOSITION COURSE ! ! (&' ! Soundation Description: Online cross platform music studio with recording, effects, virtual instruments and loops. Link: http://soundation.com/ Platform: PC and Mac Price: Free; upgrade subscription available starting at $4.99 Tutorial(s): https://www.youtube.com/user/SoundationStudio