Citation
St. Johns tribune

Material Information

Title:
St. Johns tribune
Place of Publication:
Bunnell, Fla
Publisher:
J.B. Boaz, editor and Propietor
T.H. Lang, associate editor
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Weekly (Published every Friday)
weekly
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bunnell (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Flagler County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Florida -- Bunnell ( fast )
Florida -- Flagler County ( fast )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Flagler -- Bunnell
Coordinates:
29.4658 x -81.2556

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in Jan. 31, 1913?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-69th year, no. 36 (Sept. 3, 1981).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact Digital Services (UFDC@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
33425664 ( OCLC )
95047251 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Palm Coast news
Succeeded by:
Flagler/Palm Coast news-tribune

Full Text











. OUR MOTTO: PULL FOR ST. JOHNS COUNTY OR PULL OT.


AU


VOLUME I NUMBER 40.


BUNNELL, FLA., FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 7,


1913.


SUBSCRIPTION $1.00 A YEAR


LOCAL PARAGRAPHS EARNEST WORKER'S

ABOUTOUR PEOPLE SUPPER A SUCCESS

News of What is Happen- Quite a Nice Sum Cleared
ing in Bunnell Told in by the Ladies TuesParagraphs. - day Evening._


-ir. J. L. Jenkins is busy clearing his ten acre tract just west of Bunnell.
Wilcoxson brothers of near DeLand passed thru Bunnell Friday en route to Palatka.
Messrs Cochran and Moody ar making rapid progress shelling the county road south to the Volusia county line.
The many friends of Mrs. L. R. Bell will learn with regret that she is ill at her home on Railroad Street.
Chairman I. I. Moody attended the meeting of the county commissioners in St. Augustine Tuesday and Wednesday.
Mr. A. T. Boujohn, who owns a nice ten acre farm south of Bunnell arrived Wednesday and will spend the winter here.
M. Stone has purchased the horse and buggy of Dr. L. A. Carter. Dr. Carter will purchase an auto to use in his practice.
Mrs. J. B. Boaz and son, Gerheardt, left Saturday for Birmingham and points in Tennessee where they will visit for a few weeks.
Mr. Grady McCollum, of Hohenwald, Tenn., arrived in Bunnell Thursday and has accepted a position with the Johnson Lumber & Supply Co.
Messu-rnk W. Nix and F. E.


bugbee, M r)are mei rs of tne Bunnell Potato & Supply Co., were in Bunnell Thursday in the interest of the company.
Mr. Ed Johnson is in Jacksonville today for the purpose of purchasing a new boiler for his lumber mill and light plant. The demand on Mr. Johnson for building material has grown to suchan extent that he has to enlarge his plant.
The big canals on the Moody
-road between Bunnell and Ocean City have been completed and the farmers in that section are now
-prepared to take care of all the water that falls. This work was done by the Development company in connection with other canals they have cut in different sections. The company has expended over ten thousand dollars in ditching this summer.


Chili' Adopted by Mr. and
Mrs. P. F. Pellicer.
Mrs. P. F. Pellicer and adopted son, Alma, left Wednesday for a visit to the former's parents at Stark, Florida.
Mr. and Mrs. Pellicer had no children of their own but three years ago went to the orphans home in Jacksonville and selected a baby boy, six weeks old, for future adoption.
Little Alma grow off nicely and is now a well developed and bright eyed boy who is receiving every possible care of his foster parents.
There are numerous children in the care of the Children's Home Society of Jacksonville, which is a state-wide undenominational institution and the splendid example of Mr. and Mrs. Pellicer, in adopting one of the children might ';e followed by our citizens greatly to the aid of the noble men and women who have the care of the home and to the future welfare of the orphans or destitute children of the state.


Under the auspices of the Earnest Workers, composed of Mrs. L. R. Bell, the president, and several young ladies, a splendid oyster supper was served in the front.division of the store room of the Bunnell Meat & Ice Company on Tuesday evening, last. The Earnest Workers were ably assisted by Mrs. W. H. Cochran in the planning for the refreshments and the serving of them.
The ladies were unexpectedly furnished with a lot of fine fish, which were sent in from the canal by Messrs Cochran and Moody, and which were served to the delight of their patrons.
The Earnest workers are to be congratulated on their splendid efforts to furnish the church with an elegant piano and the Tribune is delighted to know that their entertainments are patronized liberally.
At the third quarterly conference of the .church, which was composed of Presiding Elder Blackburn, of Miami, Rev. L. D. Haynes and his local board of stewards, a resolution was passed, thanking Mrs. Bell for her persistent efforts towards canceling the indebtedness of several hundred dollars, which was incurred in the purchase of the piano and the conference was delighted to know that the original amount had been so rapidly re:lucct by the previous substanThe Earnest Workers are contemplating occasional entertainments during the winter, the proceeds of which will be expended in some form of public improvement and will no doubt receive the hearty co-operation of our public spirited citizens.


Rev. Williams of Chiago
Will Locate Here.

Rev. F. M. Williams a retired and well-to-do Baptist minister, of Chicago, formerly general corresponding secretary of the state of Nebraska for his denomination, recently visited Bunnell and selected a pretty site on which to erect his own home,- and also quite a number of lots on which he wishes to erect several neat cottages for renting, besides quite a tract of farm land.
Mr. Williams is interested in pecan culture near Albany, Ga., and came south for the purpose of locating there, but after spending a few days at Bunnell decided to change his plans and expects to come here instead.
Bunnell will welcome Mr. Williams and his family and also the interested friends who contemplate joining them in building their homes in the South.


FOR SALE-Ten acres south of
Bunnell three miles, three acres cleared, all fenced. Good two room house, 18x24 barn, 12x16 hen house. Price $600.00 on terms of one half cash, balance twelve months, or ten per cent. discount for cash. Address J. B. Boaz, Bunnell.


An Apology.
I owe the ladies of Bunnell who were in the sore an apology for acting the way I did at the sale in M. Stone's store.
J. H. COLE.


MANY PYTHIANS il,

MEET HERE IN 9C.

Mohawk Lodge, Knights
of Pythias, Honored
with Dist. Meeting.

At the regular bi-monthly meeting of the Knights of Pythias, Mohawk Lodge had as its vst District Deputy Grand Chancelfor J. E. Lucas, of Palatka.
Mr. Lucas was well pleased with the progress of the local lodge and has called thif district meeting to be held hIere in December. If
Mohawk Lodge is to be
gratulated on receivingsI c early recognition by the superior officers of the state in having the district meeting held here instead of the other older and more populous towns of this section.
Visiting Pyhians will be expected from St. Augustine and Palatka and quite a bit of degree work will be exemplified. The plans of entertainment have not yet been perfected by the local committee but an interesting program may be expected by those who may attend.
Captain Lucas wasinterviewed while here and gave some interesting information as to the charitable work that is being done by the various lodges of the country, and made special mention of the large and valuable home in Wisconsin which is maintained by the order for its dependent brethren and orphans.

Construction of Bridge
Started.
The const uctiun o' bridge across Deep Creek c. St. Augustine Highway is now under way. Mr. Campbell, the contractor, says he expects to close the bridge to traffic in a little over a week's time. But that he will not close the bridge until he has all the lumber on hand so as to rush its construction thru as rapidly as possible. Ai present he is putting in the pil4,g and it is much more of a job th-n he figured it to be. Sonie of the pillars have to be twelve feet long to reach a clay foundation, and he is placing them all on that foundation. The pilhg are all heart cypress and the foundation of the bridge will hive a good substantial base. During the time that the bridge cose l to traffic the public will ltL instructed to use the old creek Ird bak of the David Knight farn, neai- the Diagonal road. T hiL fad' is in good condition, sandottom, and with the present lov/water in the creek, automobiles "vill have no trouble to cross it.
We have just leaned that the bridge will be coj next Monday. This means eat parties-going over the roa must cross Deep creek by theKnight farm.


DRY PETITION TO BE
CONSIDERED LATER

The county coimissioers in session on Tuesay were presented with the jtition to call an election to decle whether the county should vot on the question of making th countV dry. I There was overfour hundred names on the petion. I
After considering the natter the board decide o lay tie matter over until the next neeting of the board in ecember. It will take some te to tr sh out the petition al learrf what nimes are eligiblto be o it and how many will he to ctme oft.


1I


BUNNELL TAX BOOKS

ARE NOWCOMPLETED

Town's Taxable Property
Valued at $180,000
by Tax Assessor.

The tax books for Bunnell for the year beginning October 1st, .1913, have been completed and the taxes are being collected.
The amount of taxable property at a fairly estimated valuation is in round numbers one hundred and eighty thousand dollars, but the board of assessors being guided by the custom of the state and county officers, thought better to place a tax valuation of one third the actual cash values of the property.
- The town council, wishing to conduct the financial affairs as economically as possible, levied a tax of ten mills.
The tax on vacant outlying lots is merely nominal, as each lot was valued for taxation at the exceedingly low amount of $15.00.
The fact that the properties of the Flaglef railway system- and telegraph and telephone , companies cross the town almost diagonally, a neat little sum will be received by the treasury from those sources.
Another source of revenue is the occupations, on which is levied a special tax. Those subject to this tax are merchants, druggists, physicians, real estate men, naval store operators, draymen, liverymen and those of many other occupations, who will contribute to the treasury as they establish their businesses during
"a e'r.

C. F. Hoover Buys Orange
Grove.
Considerable real estate has recently changed hands. One of the most valuable transactions was the transfer of the beautiful orange grove formerly owned by Mr. W. C. McLean, of Vermont, to Mr. C. F. 1-loover of Espanola; with this, grove went the residence and all of its.furniture.


THIS WEEK'S NEWS 15,000 PER MONTH

AT ST. JOHNS PARK! PAID FOR TIES HERE


Paragraphs of . Personal
Mention About the
Perk's Visitors.

Mr. J. E. Pellicer has the finest showing of banana trees in this part of the country.
Ir. P. L. Sutherland from Palatka motored to the Park Tuesday morning on business.
Mr. Noel Nihoul, of Crescent City, spent Sunday at the Park visiting his -parents.
FQund near the Card I-lousea Rosary. Owner will please call at the home of Mrs. 0. Warner.
Miss Ruby Ballentine gave a grand dinner Sunday ffsorne of her friends at the Park-5efore her departure.
Mr. J. Buckles has agreed to plant and take care of 35 acres of .rish potatoes for Mr. E. F. Warner.
We regret to report that Mr. Robert Hamilton had the misfortune-of losing one of his horses Monday afternoon.
Mr. R. C. McCraven has returned to the Park and is back on his old job again as engineer for the Melton Lumber Co.
Wild flowers of all kinds and descriptions can be found all over the country, especially yellow daisies and golden rod.
Holloween night was spent in the old fashion way at the hotel by many of the Park people, playing games and roasting potatoes.
Mrs. W. Miller and daughter, Abberjean, from Crescent City, spent Sunday at the Park as guests or ivir. ann . -L. Warner.
Mr. McNaughton, who.has been in Titusville for the past few months came home for a few days last week and left for Titusville again Tuesday morning.
Mr. Edward Pellicer is building a house on his ten acre tract of land in section 33 and as soon as it is completed he will move his wife and twin babies in their


Mr. Hoover is a recent additon new home.


to the purchasers of property in this section of the state and by his recent purchase of the .grove has clearly demonstrated his confidence in the future advancement of valuations of landed properties here.
Dance at Bunnell Every
Thursday Night.
There will be a dance at the hall in the new Tribune building here every Thursday nightin the future. Large hall with excellent floor and .good music furnished by the Bunnell Cornet Band. We also have a piano and couple of violins to alternate with the band in the playing. Everybody invited. - A small admission will be charged to help defray expenses.
A larger crowd than usual was in attendance last Thtursday evening.

Dance at St.. Johns Park.
There will be a dance. at St. Johns Park to-morrow (Saturday) night. Eve-rybody invited.

The Ladies Aid Society, of St. Johns Park, will give - a bazaar.


Mr. R. E. Buddington, of Palatka, landed at our docks Monday night bringing with him a big lighter for the purpose of getting a load of ties for the Melton Lumber Company.
New fall Irish potatoes are being enjoyed by all of the Park people. There is hardly a farm throughout our sections that has not a fine showing of fall Irish potatoes ready or almost ready for table use.
Mr. J. E. Buckles and sons are all hard at work clearing a two and one-half acre piece of ground north of the house. 'This will be plowed and ready for potatoes at the time the other ground is planted in potatoes for every acre planted in potatoes this year means a hundred dollars profit in the end.
- Miss Ruby Ballentine, who has been visiting her brother, Mr. J. L. Ballentine and family for the past three months is now making her farewell calls for she will leave WVdnesday morning for her home near Live Oak. She will remain there for a month or two, where the wedding will take place


the first week in December. The and then make her future home ladies who are promoting this ba- in Jacksonville or Tampa. zaar will leave nothing undone Mr. and Mrs. C. L. Black gave' to make it a big success ard all a pleasant birthday party for who are contemplat ng making their daughter, Ursula, on SaturChristmas presents are urged to dey, November 1st. All the little wait until they see what this big folks of the neighborhood had an ft sival will have t> offer, for ycu invitation to come and help celemay find right there the-Christ- brate MViss Ursula's sixth bir.h mas .resent you are lokirng fo-. .iay. 'i hey were all there on the,


Getting Out of, Cross Ties
Has Become Paying
Industry Here.

The Flagler system is now purchasing a considerable quantity of cross ties. Indeed, the cutting and delivering of ties has become cjuite a distinct and lucrative business in this immediate vicinity. Mr. G. A. Cain, the inspector. is no\v kept pretty busy in checking the ties of the various contractors and advises that the output is now being taken at the rate of approximately fifteen thousand dollars' worth, per month. This enterprise has been very advantageous to the farmers and laborers of this section, as it has given employment to numerous men and also to teams that would have been partially idle during. the summer months.
Mr. Cain advises that probably a steady demand for ties :will be made by the road and if so there will be a splendid opportunity for the procuring of employment for both men and teams who may wish to occupy the time that can be spared from their farming interests during the coming months of winter and spring.


time appointed and the little ones enjoyed the many games which were selected for them.
Born, to Mr. and Mrs. Hyer on Saturday morning, Nov. 1st, a girl.
Miss Alice Reynolds, who is teaching at Stubs, Fla., came home to spend Saturday and Sunday with her parents, Mr. and lviMs. VV. V. Keynoids.
Rev. Davis and Brother Patison, the presiding elder, came over to the Park Saturday afternoon. Services were held Saturday night and Sunday morning, and many were present at both times. Sunday afternoon the quarterly meeting was held and well attended.
Mr. John.A. Davis, of Kansas City, Mo.,made a short stay at the Park Tuesday accompanied by Mr. Charles H. Hinkson of Oakley, Kansas. These young men were on their vacation and were touring the south. Mr. Davis, while in Florida stopped at the Park to have a look at his ten acre tract of land in section 25.
Mr. M. J. Nugent and wife, of Rossland, Can., arrived at the Park last week and are now very comfortably settled in their home in section 29. Mr. Nugent says, "It is certainly a treat to have the good old summer time at this time of the year for when I left Canada we were having snow storms, in fact it's cold up there nine months out of the year."
Mr. W. A. Warner and family, of Creighton, Neb., are expected down the latter part of the month. He will occupy his home facing the Deen road about one-half mile from town. It is better known as the Card place. Mr. Warner is planning on setting out an orange and grapefruit grove near the house and to put in not less than fifty acres of Irish poLatoes this coming season.
The Ladies Aid Society had a splendid meeting last Thursday afternoon at the home of Mrs. E. F. Warner. The principal and most important business of the afternoon was the election of newofficers.. Mrs. John E. Jones resigned her position as president and Dr. Jennie M. Covert was e* ected to fill her place. The next meeting will be at Mrs .Edward Duienuns.


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OLUMBUS made a wonderful journey of world importance when he
crossed the Atlantic and discovered the new continent. The journey of the replicas of his famous caravels from Chicago to San Francisco, all he way by water via the Panama canal, is in a way as interesting. although, o course, of no historical moment. These ships were brought from Spain twenty years ago for the World's fair at Chicago and have withstood the hands of time so well that they are now on their second journey, manned by Harvard students. The trip will be made through the St. Lawrence river. Atlantic ocean. Panama canal and Pacific ocean. with ciany stops, reaching the Panama-Pacific exposition In time for exhibition.




CBhas. Blum & Co.

CHAS. SILVA, Manager

HASTINGS, FLORIDA


FINE WINES, LIQUORS, CIGARS,
ETC. BLUE RIBBON BEER
ON DRAUGH T

Phone 14 Mail Orders a Specialty
JACKSONVILLE PRICES ON ALL GOODS
J

mmnewnew menw ram mmmm mmemmamrm .5


SEED


: SEED


Mixed Cow Peas at-


: SEED


$2.50 per Bu. delilvered


I.


Whipporwille Cow Peas ----- 2.50 "
Iron Cow Peas----------------2.85 "
Velvet Beans _---_------- _ - 2.25 "
Orange Sorghum Seed----------2.00 "
Amber " "'2.00 "
German Millett----------------2.35 " "
Kaffir Corn.-------------------2.00 "


My seed catalogue is free for the asking. I :am headquarters for all kinds of seed suited to Florida.


C. H. KENNERLY,

The Seedman,


PALATKA.


'FLORIDA


" U

* -


FOR GOOD CYPRESS SHINGLES SEE CODY BROTHERS

at Codyville, IFlorida

Shingles are cheaper than weatherboarding
Why use weatherboarding

Prices and quality guaranteed

Call and see us at Codyville or write us
at Dupont, Florida


Columbus Caravels on Way

From Chicago to San Francis o


I,!Cn't ,b1' American Prees Association.


T 0 train an educated man, one accustomed to having his body obey his
ind, requires a MUCh SHORTER PERIOI) than to train ;n uneducated one. This is recognisd in European countries, wherc all able, sound men serve, and the man from an institution of higher learning is required to serve only a year instead of the two or more years required of the lesser educated.
Obviously it will take longer to tefth what we might call the mechanics of soldiering to the man with a pick. w lihaes to pause for a see011( to think wv~ you qpeak to hin.thian totec them to a ball phi ver. whose mind has been trained to ACT QUICKL AND TO MAIE
THE BODY RESPO-ND INSTANTFLY TO MfENTAL IMFPULSES.
But two ears, we think, is ample to teajb the essentials. I advocate a TIThREE YEAR ENLISTMENT. Iithi t provision that the min who
is certified by his company commander a competent in a lesser time nev take his discharge forthwith and PAS TO THE RESERVES.
I BELIEVE IT WILL ATTRACT TH MOST DESIRABLE CLASS OF
MEN TO THE ARMY, MEN WHO 0t'~ TO PREPARE THEMSELVES TO EE OF SERVICE TO THE COUNTRY IN T1ME OF WAR, CUT WHO CANNOT SPARE THE TIME FCR A LONG ENLISTMENT.
The reservist shtou(ld be assured that lie is to he absolutely free in his movcnients, to come and go as lie wills, oilly keeping in touch with Ili, command by 'reports durimig his period-on the reserve list-five yearswith the exception that he'is to REThERN TO DUTY WITH 11IIS UNIT IN TIME OF WAR, and that lie is to report once in two years fdr physical examination and for not less than five nor more than te, day trtiepiration of his five year 'riod on the reserve list he goes
off the list in favor of younger men who have come in by discharge from the army.



We Can' [ExDed World Peac e

If We break Our Treat-I


Obli a lions

By FRANK B. KELLOGG, President of the American Bar Association

W E CAN HAVE LITTLE INFLUENCE IN THE GREAT MOVEMENT
FOR WORLD PEACE IF WE ARE NEGLECTFUL IN KEEPING OUR OWN TREATY OBLIGATIONS, )FOR THE STABILITY OF INTERNATIONAL LAW AND THE FULFILLMENT OF NATIONAL OLIGATIONS IS AS NECESSARY TO THE PEACE OF THE WORLD cG THE STABILITY AND MAINTENANCE OF LAW AND 'ORDER ARE
NECESSARY TO THE PEACE .AND S"ERITY OF -1OCIETY.
Law is the embodiment of the _if ( t civilization. t hies governitd the relattos of men in the tost pri'Fv'eatd savage statteind it the modern ;tnd(Iihighest developed societN.
Before history recorded and left to stceeding"generalio"tie dolie" 'of men law Nwas the go'1-ing.pw m An contrailing influence of coitunities and nations.. With IeliegI'lItentit ih ilhili titig (i physical and soe1ill conditions, 1u' lies bem keepinltg ptee \vii t hIlie mIareb of 'progress. Its invisible forces JMI NATE ANI) CONTROL NATrI('NS. man in all his relations in soiet'. the trenendoH t reustet toiS of modern c(ononiiclie land the miiutesi details of oir social and idestrialtiifbric.
It is alt pervading an (ever present. \VITHOUT IT TH llE IS NO GOVERNMENT, NO SOCIAL ORDE.P, NO 110E. Its edmiIo
i-stration is the highest and 'noblest duty uof mni to b foi i. its iiitv and stability are necessary to the pelce,i h piness and prosperitv of Ioples. Its corruptioi is the destruction of tIe state ind of the nation.


We Forget That Oui Sailors

Trained In UsefulI Trades


Are


By ROBERT W..-NEESER, Naal Historian
T 'has always 'been a question for debate in -tis country whether the stars and stripes -hould be represented by - large and efficient navy or whether a few units'would not am wkr orr purpose and meet the 'exigencies of' the present 'moment. 'But hune it,$oars to 'have viewed' the matter from a 'broad, unbiased point of view.
Trhe navy 'has EVER 'SEEMED A MEl f 'COLLECTION OF
PIG TING MA CTINS-i. -e., dogs of war vaoiting the command to iruh'forth 'to'combat-a folly, a wanton extrava{'nce. Yet today, when a large part of'the offensive object of thenavny m; scene unnecessary be"canseof'the closer an dMore mntinate relations ovations and the 'h1ighe development of 'mankind the service 'hms 'provedits adaptability to fit into the new order 6f'tlnn and ha come a e national university
-or'thetrtining of citi7yens for our reptiblic. C1
'WHILE PREPARING 'THE 'SHIPS AND THT CREWS FOR THE
[ATIONAL DEFENSE IT GIVES ITS FIFTY - OUSAND ENLISTED kMEN A THOROLfGN PRACTICAL TRAINING IN 1IE USEFUL TRADES OF -PEACE. T4E ~BATTL'ESHIP IS NOT MERE A FIGHTING .MACHINE, BUT IT IS IN -EVERY SENSE A CO LETE AND SPLEN'DIDLY EQUIPPED 'MANUAL TRAINING SCHOC] WHERE MEN ARE 'ENGAGED IN A SCORE OF DIFFERENT OCCI NATIONS 'SPECIALLY FITTING _THEM 'FOR CAREERS IN CIVIL LIFE


Filipino Has Long Be Awake


By the 'Right Rev. CHARLES H. ERENT, 'Prolstant 'Episcopal Bishop of the Philipphies r
'is a mistake to believe that' because the Filipiys have 'been up ani stirring since the American occupation they weIj not awake before. 0
WHILE CHINA WAS STILL IN 3ED AMfIDREAMING THEY
WERE AWAKE. WHAT THE AMERICA 1S HA\ 'E)ONE IS TO GET THE FILIPINOS OUT OF BED. THE' AREIT)[OW INSTRUCTINC THEM HOW TO DRESS THEMSELVESE.
BUT WE MUST BE SOBER ANI PATITT. 'Rome was no
built in a day.


Shorter Enlistment


Would Attract Most Desirable MenleAr-my



By Major Generk LEONARD WOOD, Chief
of Staff of the United States Army


Why Take a

20-Year Policy?

When You Can Take a14,15,16,17,18 or 19 Year Policy with the OLD RELIABLE

Germania Life Insurance Company
of New York
For Rates or Particulars, write or call on Steen Insurance Co., Palatka, Fla.


WHEN YOU D!ANYTjNGIN HARDWARE tfNE I ET US KNOW YOUR WANTS


IF IT-IS WORTHY YCU CAN FND IT HERE IF YOU CAN FIND IT HERE IT IS WORTiY

We carry a full zu on' eto' lute of Wire Fencing, Farming Iiiiplenieats, Stmc's, pies and everything carried in ati up-to-date i'''t'' Vr.
Let es 1; i you'' v a ants. lail orders solicited and given prompt atteiiie'.


Kennery Hardware Co.

Palatka Florida


Look for the Trademark on Crown and Lable


Coca Cola

The Most Healthful and Refreshing Drink Palatka Coca-Cola Bottling Co.
Long Distance Phone 63
EDWARD KUMMER, Proprietor.
Manufacturers of Ginger Ale and Soda Waters


4 .


-


Natural Plant Food

For hundreds of years farmers have known the value of
animal fertilizers and ha7e used them toraise their finest crops.
During recent years scientists have improved on these goods until now the animal products of the Western slaughter-houses
are the finest fertilizers that modern science can make.

By steaming, cooking, drying and grinding, these materials
are thoroughly prepared for plant use. Then. here in Jacksonville, we blend them with the other materials necessary to
make complete fertilizers cf the finest grades.

These animal goods come to us from the farm and we return them to the farm-they are "The Natural Plant Food."


Get Armour Fertilizers
"They Giow Biggest Crops"

Some of our brands are -quick acting so that you can force
such cropsas celery or lettu-e;others act more slowly for such crops as potatoes or corn. They bring profits because they
supply the food your plants need when they need it.

Our free booklet describes these goods fully. Write us
today for your copy.

ARMOUR FERTILIZERSEnrich the Soil - Increase the Yield
Iniprove the Quality


ARMOUR FERTILIZER WORKS JACIKSONVILLE, FLA.







ROWITON' S


Stationery and Book Store

PALATKA, FLORIDA

Solid Gold Jewelry, Watches and Clocks, Alligator Bags and Pocket Books, Booklets, Water-Colored Pictures, Pennants, Sheet Music, Kodaks and Films, Fishing Tackle, Typewriters, Bicycles, Phonographs and Talking Machines, Pianos and Pianolas.

Picture framing our specialty. Mail orders filled promptly.
TJ


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FARMf



FOOLTRY

TO PREVENT HORNS GROWING ARRANGEMENT OF NEST BOX

Operation May Be Performed by Sim-CR
ple and Painless Method-How Canadian Expert Recommends Use of
Caustic Is Applied. Earth or Overturned Sod, Covered
With Straw or Chaff.
(fly R. W. HICKMAN.)
'When circumstances are favorable, A nest can be made out of an old as in the case of farmers who build box about 12 inches square and six up their herds by raising the progeny, inches deep. Professor Graham of the the horns may be prevented from Ontario Agricultural college recomgrowing by a simple and practically mends that "some earth or an overpainless me-hod, and the custom of turned sod be placed in the bottom of preventing the growth of horns is be- the box, taking care to have the corcoming more popular and more gen- ners very full so that no eggs can erally practiced under all conditions. roll out from the hen and get chilled. The calf should be treated not later Next put on about two inches of than one week after its birth, prefer- straw or chaff; and then put a few ably when it is from three to five days earthenware eggs into the nest. Place old. the nest in some pen where nothing
The agent to be used may be either can disturb the hen, and put her on caustic soda or caustic potash, both of after dark. Feed and water must be which may be procured in the drug within easy reach and a dust bath stores in the form of sticks about the should also be convenient. If the thickness of an ordinary lead pencil hen is setting quietly the next day it and five inches long. These caustics will be safe to put the eggs under must be handled with care, as they her." dissolve the cuticle and may make the Another nest box that has given hands or fingers sore. The prepara- considerable satisfaction, is made in tion of the calf consists in first clip- three compartments. A 12 inch board ping the hair from the parts, washing cut in three four foot lengths and one clean with t-ap and warm water, and used for the top, one for the back, thoroughly drying with a towel or and the other for the bottom. The cloth. The stick of caustic should be partitions and ends are made of the wrapped in a piece of paper to protect same material cut in one foot lengths. the hands and fingers. leaving one end Along the front is a four inch strip of the stick uncovered. to keep in the litter. To this is hinged
Moisten the uncovered end slightly a slatted door, which, when opened and rub it on the horn buttons or little forms a platform in front of the nest. points which may be felt on the calf's The work of filling the nests and sethead, first on one side and then the


- \ - 7- '


1-


Arrangement of Nests.
ting the hen can be proceeded with as already described. These boxes may be piled one above the other.
When the hens -are let off the nests
to feed, the doors of the nest boxes should be closed, which compels the Dehorning Cattle, hens to remain on the floor until they
other alternately, two or three times have had a chance to feed. The hens on each, allowing the caustic to dry will not return to the same nests, but after each application. Be very care- this is rather likely to be of benefit ful to apply the caustic to the 'horn than otherwise, All hens do not set button only. If it is brought in con- at exactly the same temperature, and tact with the surrounding skin it will an occasional change averages up the cause pain. P,& very careful also not temperature for all the settings of to have too much moisture on the eggs. stick of ca:stic as it will remove the No hen should be allowed to set, unface.to o~v iuOn ovlerthe les she. is free from lice The inac face. After treatment, keep the calf tionh ofrf b~eird is conduct ve to rapid protected from rain, as water on the multiplication of any lice there may be head after the applicAtion of caustic on her. These will make her irriwill cause if to run down over the face. table and a poor setter. In addition, This must be carefully avoided. Either should she bring off a hatch in such a caustic soda or caustic potash alone, condition, the chicks will be open to without the admixture of other sub- infection. Dust the hen well with stances, answers the purpose very flowers of sulphur or some other insatisfactorily. sect powder before setting, and again
In the very young calf the horn a day or two before the hatch finbutton, or point that will ultimately dishes. develop into a horn, has scarcely any About the seventh day the eggs attachment to the skull, and may be should be tested, the infertile ones refelt as a small button embedded in moved, and the balance put back in the skin. In this early stage it may the nests. After testing it is usually be easily removed with a sharp knife found that the eggs from four hens or 'a pair of scissors, but even then can be put under three. This leaves caustics should be applied to kill any one hen with no eggs, and a new setremaining cell life belonging to this ting can be put under her. geri point, otherwise there may be 1when the chicks arrive two or three some subsequent irregular horn batches can be put with one hen, growth, which is more or less.of a die- which leaves more hens at liberty to figurement. sit, or if there is no more hatching
to be done they can' be put back in the Keeping Quality of Butter. laying pens.
The keeping quality of butter is
governed to a great extent by the method of making. If the cream is properly ripened and churned, th butter evenly salted, it will, under ordinary conditions, retain its good quality for some time, while if the different. processes have been carelessly conducted, the buttermik nct The day before shipping live fowls, thoroughly removed and the salting feed hard grain. not evenly done it will soon begin to g * .
become rancil. 0 Satisfying theappetite adds greatly
to the thrift of the flock.

DAIPY No-es I i -ted that five chickens
will yield a pound of feathers.

Cleaning dropping boards is a chore
The biggest cow is not always the that cannot be done too often. best milker.
ntuber- Whatever interferes with growth reBad sanitary conditions and tards and dishes egg production.
culosis go hand in hand., i * *


. - .. I n col, dap, riny ights close al Only a few weeks of grace if you the ventating wid o
are going to build pr dig a silo. . house.
* * *.
-Plenty of good water and shade will The very first thing to do on noticlengthen out the cows' pasture. g of illness in a bird, is to
** IIng mgns o lns nabri oiso-The safest preservatives for sweet late it. * *
milk are cleanliness and prompt cool- Ty
Ing. The best nest for laying hens is
log. , , * close to the floor, darkened, and easily

Oats and pea hay is a nutritious movable.
and valuab'3 feed, if cut at the right Feed plenty of charcoal, as it is one time. of the best things for keeping the

The tuberculin test. when properly poultry healthy.
applied, has little or no effect on milk Eggs cannot be produced without niproduction. * , ,trogenous food in some shape. Bones
are absolutely essential.
Early rod late milking seems to be
the only satisfactory way of solving **
the. fly problem. y Do not forget that. your fowls need
green food. If it is impossible to give them a change of yard or runs, see
them again as soon as cey are dry that they get some kind of green food .is not a real dairytian. lurig the daily feed.


Girls of Today Left T Themselves


By Mrs. HARRIOT STANTON BLATCH, Preside~nof the Womanf
Political Union

TIIERE is no question that a i ew type of girl has been 6-plved in- thi
country these last few year-1
One great thing that as made for her development is t:; ARTIFICIAL CHECKS HAVI BEEN TAKEN OFF HER. I thinly
an illustration of my idea in t respect is a remark I heard a friend make about a young English gir who had come awkwardly into a room where there were a lot of people. After she had gone out he said: "When she is twenty-one she is going t I -know how to enter a room. Now, wil! she acquire that knowledge by St hpression or by freedom ?" I think the
-English girl is under too great s. ppression, while the American gil-I lhaz liberty of action.
Athletics are having an infl )ce upon the American gT1 and on 1he greater opportunities for education which all classes of -irls is this country enjoy. The girl of today is NOT BEING TAUGI-T THAT SII!,, IS AN INFEIIOR BEING. She is being taught to use her mind and her body to the very best advantage.
The typical American girl of the day as I see her physically is much more lithe and slender than ti girls of other nationalities. I should say her COLORlING [S NOT \ LL I WOULD 'LIKE TO SEE IT.
It is not so rosy as that of the englishh gi'. . Perhaps climate is partly to blame, but not altogether.
I THINK THE TENDENC IN THIS COUNTRY IS TO OVERSTRAIN YOUNG PEOPLE. I LIEVE THAT WITH LIBERTY THERE
HAS NOT COME QUITE A B LANCE OF KNOWLEDGE AND THAT BOYS AND GIRLS ARE LEF TOO MUCH TO THEMSELVES AND DON'T QUITE KNOW HOW TO TAKE CARE OF THEMSELVES.



American Wo ns Voice In


Politics eat Without Vote


By Sir ALFRED GELDER, Member of Parliament, of Hull, England T HE VOICE OF THE AMERICAN WOMAN IN POLITICS WITHOUT
SUFFRAGE IS FAR MORIPOTENT THAN THAT OF HER ENGLISH SISTER WHO IS STRIVING FOR THE BALLOT.
If the wives and mothers of Americans are discreet they will continue to have LARGE INFLUENCE IN POLITICS AND OTHER AFFAIRS. I am in favor of giving women- the right to vote in England, but I am distinctly opposed to the militant methods that are being pursued by our women. Suffrage for women is not a party question., Those who favor suffrage argue that, inasmuch as women already have the right to vote in municipal affairs,-the right should be extended to parliamenitary affairs. I believe this view to be the correct -one. BUT I DEPLOIIE THE VIOLENT METHODS USED BY THE WOMEN.
The better 'class of women in England are opposed to these methods.
There are many sides to the question. The householder, for instance, the woman householder, claims, and with reason, that she is entitled by virtue of her position to a voice in governmental affairs, and the married woman claims an even higher right as the mother of coming generations, and I believe they are both right, but they should be patient.


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1 aint 3iali 01ribunr
BUNNELL, FLORIDA.
J. B. BOAZ---- Editor and Proprietor T. H. LANG --------- Associate Editor

Entered as second-class matter February 6, 1913, at the postoffice at Bunnell, Florida, under Act of
March 3, 1879.


All advertisements will be run until this office is notified to discontinue the same.


PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY




GOVERNOR OPPOSES


SPECIAL SESSION


Florida Executive and Redis.

tricting Law.


THE STATE'S POSITION


Says He Does Not Feel Justified In
Convening Special Session to Car=' rect Error Which Mlay Have Been
Made In Law.

Representative'Claude L'Englc, ati AWa shii gton. 1). C., receehod a 14ttr ifron loverior Trammell, of Fiorida, on Wil(h11 the governor sets himself in dipposition to the planl of the Florida elegation for a special session of the IFlorida legislature to amle1d the re-I 1pistrieting law to provide speciflicltW for the ongressional oloctilois il be ew districts next year. a" (10 ]lot feel justiflol in convein li wllspeiial s'sslon to orreCft an errol lauih lay halve been maide in the
I -Ute Governor Trammell.
lef'It I my opinion that it wiii be t,)a] and regular for a congressman 1, be elected it the 1914 elections t r each of the four districts for li erms of office to begin on March 4, 1915. as provided by the act redisIricting the state, and I do riot deem a special session of the legislature necessary."

FUNERAL OF PARROTT.

Railway Magnate Will Be Buried In
Florida.

With his window racing homewar on a trans-Atlantic steamer from Europe to be present at his funeral in
Jacksonville. Fla., October 23, JackSonille, paill its respects to Joseph R. Parrot-, the dead president of the Florila East coast railway system. with a throng preseiit ait the union depot. The end came to the wellknown rallwav mai at Oxford, Maine. the place of iis birth, and where he usually summered.
That he be buried in Florida. the state of his great activity in rail-1na1 development; wlvl a request of his and lhs is bein,, complied with. le was a-graduat of Yale, a member-of its, boat crew. a lawyer when hie entered professional life'unl for many years the righthand of the late Henry' M. Flagler in matters of railway enterprise. Hr succeededl Mr. Flagler as president 01 the Floria East Coast system, o the demll of tihe latter



LEO M- FRANK IS


DENIED NEW TRIAl



Judge Roan Turns Down Attorneys Motion


UP TO SUPREME COURI

Frank's Counsel Prepares Draft o
Bill of Exceptions Which Will Take the Case to the Highest Court
Tribunal of the State.

Close upon the defeat of. their motion for a new trial, tie attorneys foi Leo M, Frank, couNictOd of the murder of Mary Phagaii. In Atlanta lisi spring. began the draft of the bil of exceptions which will take the caliS to the supreme court of the state.
The inew trial was deniied by .ludg( Roan with the remarkable statement that he himself was not certain o1 Frank's Innocence or guilt.
Indications Were that the arguments before the. supreme .ourt it behalf of a new trial would begin the last week in January or the first it February.
The clerk of the superior court ha ten days In which to make a copy of the record to file with the supremet court. Because of its volume in the Frank trial, he will require all of the time given him by law.
The supreme court, when the appeal is brought to its cognizance, wil place it on its docket to he heard ir January or February, it is believed The decision of the supreme court will be handed down In from line tc six months after the conclusion 01


the arguments.
The arguments. which have grow In intensity as the great murder trial has progressed through its various stages, will reach their climax before the supreme court, as this is regarded as practically the last stand of the lawyers who are fighting for the lif of Frank.


"SOME POTATOES"



Samples of Irish Potatoes raised on Ex-Cov.


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GEORGE FRED WILLIAMS. the newly appointed minister to Greee.'i-, a well known Massachusetts statesman. He served in congress and is a lawyer of prominence. He ran for governor or his state on the Deto ocratic ticket. but was defeated.. Mr. Williams was one of the pro gressive Democrats of his state who supported President Wilson during is. campaign. He has edited citaions of legal cases, and his opilnions are ieceivet] with groat weight by the Massachusetts bar The post pays $10,00.0 a yeat




Colleges the' Battleground of Church



By the Right Rev. DAVID H. GREER, Protestant Episcopal Bishop of New York
THE GREATEST BATTLE OF THE CHURCH IS TO BE FOUGHT IN OUR COLLEGES.
There is an increasing tendency an-ong college men toward lifi belief. In the schools of the country there are hi rre numb ers otf 1,o) ini gi rls Nwho have RECEIVED NO REICIUS DUCAT1() %1'11ATS0 EV E R.


FRAL OF AE TO ELIMINATE


BISHOP KENNEY DICTATOR HUERTA



Solemn Requiem Mass Held Supreme Effort to be Made
- -- I b1 e lTtpat


I I UJ LIULCU 0MULUL
at Cathedral


CHURCHMAN LAID TO REST HELP OF EUROPE WANTED TL

With Eurooean Nations Backing
Sc es of Priests of the Diocese From American Policy, President Wilson
far and a Number of Prelates Believes Hluerta Will Be Forced to
"ere In Attendance - Bishop Retire From Presidency.
rthrup Was Celebrant.To
ed States goverineut has;been (-allI -rossive ceremony marked the hi- tiolell to maintain absolulIC ct Ie ,I-of the late Bishop William J. while the plalls of the Wshicl lan Ce aI. wl:ii was -eld fri tile administration for solving thlt Me[xi('a o l lit JackSI 1111 prtI li are work Oil 011, it Il(Ill addition to s(r If trie ts of ae klolwn flro lially IlforIllial the (1111"(-se ""11(1 fl "" -ar ll I- "o"w0 . iii -eS t asIllIe lle" ol-t is hciII" n" a I'(n-Ier (If lits-in attenlinc'e adlIto Ill1bring about General Vietoit the Iiihol'S fauneral. inclludilln! It. Illo Her'ta'S lerllmnIl t frorm Ih I bishop Northull, of Carlest , provisioilal presitdlncy of Mexico. w111o. was celIObrIlant OfI the maIss, Itt. The 11s" ofuc ess 11aypla1 fol. a coIIlex-.lishop Ilmlig.mlof Ii-lllet.' N. C., Sttiliolml (eletiol tt htIn 11 0
re;11 edathe " s i-ll l-a]t.eR ov . -posed.i ys l ll ll lso Ile O:I, Cath dr al as I il i p nto, I 1 1tp l ee parei patioll I y theil oilt Ofs (l0 Cll rdil hGibbons,sZilid 1 Ocl -slitutin.iutlis the ls, i Illflitd signo, I'sor -lesf abltt, of st. Los Of t1- ll 111ily lliStas goverill ItlI, om CeJ sg the elilliintioll of Iiert . snllue hc
.111 t her f-o n t w11a - master of promi0 isw(11 I 1 t r11, i over tw 1 ex10' tiv n r ~ loi ts, anld GL-and Ia ~ t p orafte :Iin ecton, tho Aiijriai lie (Rogeroand1Ii) (.i- sh0 ('J. J. goverre-ti 111is llo waiting for soll t
Iu wylked after outside orne dcaa ilo his parIlt.
1e S. Shou l d I-ilrta retire ill. c al:1or o
'] ele t.c sthedralewa s divided th into alo Il'(w k i si at hi ltos tyi t tll
seNspq having beeal setli side o it a iltes gliay attempt to of t . tie torv -livesin tlervisi efie IIdS pose the sirutiollthroigo his siccsroaf te tder (If bishot'ssIain wacis hal. lit if the gernmein al mleawe served for-al of the Cth r O -1 illNald by f rta, so hat he ma eile '. as well as for the delegationitoI .sr 11' ter futre lol icofgtl rp-poilted fromll the St. Aigsti e e-Iminiis tratiob, it is pointed out lhamedhop onnIS 11111 Theo i'01 170-wou - lok upon such a p llaiwitioi gatfonl and others attending the flil- :Is anl evidence of tile inlcaptwit y o1 oral -were assigned seats by the 11sh- the provisional authorities to conduct er's- -nI i eeti'on, andli(]u ht comw forth
.It the Conclusion of the qreiiiem with definite proposals to assist in mass the order (If procession was'7habtilittatin- the governmental Inaformied ill front of the Cathedral an cillery of the Country. the cortege proceeded to San IL0renzO ]list now the future policy of the( cemetery, . r the body of ;he be- rus~ted, States is being quietly and in.loved bishop wwas brid to rest. . follmlally made known in l diplomatic


MIAMI FESTIVAL.

Naval Demonstration For Mid-Winter Carnival Likely.

Naval vessels for the winter festival let Miami. Fla., January 5 to 10. 1914. were tentatively promised by Secretary of Navy Daniels in a letter to Representative Claude L'Engle, of Jacksonville, Fla. Daniels said that at this early date it is impossible to promise outright to sell(] vessels to the celebration. but if it caln be arranged certain craft will be assigned.
'The Ileet. which has left for the Mediterranean. w-ill return ill December, and is siheduled to lell v Nell' York for Painma oil jap y (. T Engle will ask that tls date of dop are he a([tanTc(,d So (hat ti'flo ti
"%.1z11k1hOr for twp or th'yee days off I


FLORIDIANS HONORED.

Given4Ifigh^ Honors by Scottish Ritesl
Supreme Council.


e-irtles abi-oat, .and tlle-e are intinatiolls that before mally days foreign; gover'nmce wsgonerally will have been apprised of the American attitude. It is unlikely that there will be any publication of tle American policy until Europe has been formally sounded olt.
what the TTnited States desires, it is believed, is that the powers shall indicate their siipport of its efforts to solve tile problem so that it ma aIpproach the Mexico City lIniiistratioll ill a final effort to soc1re tilt elimination of Huerta. The conference-at \era Cruz between Joh Liuid President Wilson's ipersontial1 represent -. tat-ive, and the Russian, Norwegiar and German ministers.- las not eel; exlIailitl but it is th ugh t 1 be 1 part of the program Cofi listing tle support of foreign governments.

STATE ELECTIONS.~

Massachusetts, New Jersey and Vir.
ginia Name Governors.
Electionlsl vere eld Tilesdy at follows:
Ntass:Ichusletts -- Governor anIIc state officers: I etxi la turle


F'orl-i MasITs w(t ligly oIr- Ne' .lers011b the Sottil sI ' it 0 ItupreliE ture. ('oul uil of tile, -lou thl till .'llI- itil NewV Yolkof the -l'ilet, Stesh ld recently aplll s l. iss1 at Wasbington,. D. C. . luqlb , ine sup
Those elected to the :,'3l (groc senlbly and st

Gray. ltoqlueN '. Itogero, Albert Sth- Mary1h1dnedrand Bruch Weeks. Ktato comopfrol Tios t-se electedi s Klights Com- Ptllisylv11i mand'or of the Court of Ilonor were: rior eollrt. E17il lBe-ilsteil m. resIt . Boydi, 11 1- Kenltlickybert Bradley, Fr'ldl1ri'ck . Fle t legiillure; tw Samiel F. Hall1. Etllld'T K , e- KeefeI meals. Rohlet . Nlsparkmian, August W. N V i:gima- C wvilollorst :wd 11meos L. Young. eta h-4
Third Mas
")LD JOE" TAKES POISON. and tweltieth
- Maryland (list
Jack onville Barber Puts End to His Mullicipal e
Life. mally cities, t
-_tests being hE
"II Hm thie uillekiest maln in the adelphia, Chic worl'" - With these closing words ill a letter to the press. J. M. Fenerstoin. of J.1iksonville. Fla.. better known :s Old oe the barber. drank carbolic acid. in a it of despondency. and was iscovered ded in his room in ia local hotel by a maid.
-11on finding the body apparently lifeless, )r. Simmon s was notified and passeel ilupon the death. A phial . whielh had contained the deadly drlg BOUG was 'ouind near his bed. and from the liosition of the deceased in : sleeping posture. the end came with.opt any violent struggle.

Dade County Votes Dry.
Carnful recapituilation -of the votc in I)aC'e county shows that the "drys"' Noin the election by a majority of BUNNEL] over a I hundred. Rain all day cut dlwn the dry majorulty fully a hal I and e ouraged opponents to extra efforts to get out the wet votes. Miami city and two others were the oill preciN s giving a wet majority. ThI
is the f rst time iui the history of thb: eount j.tht pohb"tonwon-'-1


Key West on Boom.
I-Ion'. George W. Allen, for years collector of (Ilstoms at Key W-st. and oi e of the best known business men in Florida. recently visited Jacksonvilc. "Business is booming down iu the Islaild City. and w'e ea'1't get enough. cigarinakers to meet the demanIds., said Mr. Allen. "Our little town-l it) growing all the time. and we expect a big miaritine impetus fromn the completion of the Panama Canal."


-y-Giovler 11.1 llgli111 1111' 1 () 1 Ii l I it" q. I -11 ate S4-.:Ifor htwonty--finAt

-1iited Statcs senator )11 r.
ia-Two judges s1pe-Two tlcmIlt it 1j11ges 'o constiluCiol uImendovernor and state otlissachusetts, thirteenth h New York an third
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ROUND ABOUT FLORIDA.6

BRAMWELL BOOTH. WILLAM H. TAFT. At a meeting of the ity '-oucll
the entire Issue of $50.000 bonds for
New Sa!vation Army General, Ex-President as He Looks a mluiticipal ice plant an1d munnipal
Who Is on Visit to America. as Smiling Yale Professor. docks was sold to the First National
Bank of Fernandina for $49.125.
John F. Starburg. one of the mioit
highly respected planter of tJasper,
divd at his home two miles northwirest
of that city. IHe leaves a wNife and IC
two dough ters.
Charles N. lShna x and wife. of
A>~" WI I 1 1hiall, N. Y.. are at Palitka and
r. i-thaw will 1ou lt b iln the fil- l.2 rovemnent of a liundred aci i farmil ill
Ioitlv ck. hviich he p ui ras dll 1; lO I

A1ThC om11n Syaford city cowisel the fiian e p o i ll, ifll"t
/ hullkidiig of its w;ter font. 1

bsiieslicentr of fSaifoi for a d
t io @of rive 1 l c .
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MAN (GOES FPFEI: 3 Ilis u~i~ii i
ro it I, e ih ii hill lt t I rn lo
Mother Faints Il Court As Son 14 -h w *-- m Miii ohm] llnt whI
Acquitted.; ,-] he, Tn s ;'iil St.LJknsMP rkFlrid,
Whimen iXvlli (;ofitl. c(li lWid tll] W. i'The .lerlizm. n c is \-llllar- iu T m-1 . Ohas u'ii,-liS.il Th
the 1(.ian o II oIsclri i ie i tze Ira atI biwiomsf n. andwere presidld ivery.
('Vroi: mliiier. W- was il-Ia ld GENE AL AND. . )U IW kyPN I . lEh SiSoiii ii
Gouud t Altouia Il t111 .wasnt e :icT ___m_ Ily thlteciitli n rlsessio-f
qiited by tat kIl lipt it j ui s- Six< vuuul 1 iv-hi iotn'u 1 S u - ti ( ,-illo'n. l- Floitl i ferem o t y . tki - rf Sretry Fol i tlhl llrlill we
deoni la.t .li . id. l-t il l(' 11 12 N. i -nius -\ 4te m l nt erbli l ilA P- e d ee r so h feli hs ea. nd lollig l sprl ",)l ])h-i . ul -l'(fClu l olii 15li-ll l.l 101 Iill sllii. lid l i t . 'fcM lt Sill tll S
above his ailey, wiililho ll i t]iloiintd 01' b lt lof tomii'.i' t hilmei t l aoer dThm Biouty NIa
volue: a Na ili!ia't .II.i V.Mu I l. ). ). ElC~t uiiilteri iid
"G;odil kows I jwils'])t gilt y lol Th111 lters;!te ('u'iviere ilnial i; t:1%-* is sat -Iilla'urs-(1d theit Cofl
thell12 c l e thtoupbloe iwl il and elN -li lluilI '11 w f iot reapyF ls io l l Irs ",It 11


of the murder two yOIS 1brk, don ajs is I0t 1 1hierimiltaitn r a driir thiri itm(St tt rdul int most illentiCa lly thie slimar evident .>iijte t - il tile 111-tm tei. i ii lnli 01g th IL 11
alW~oritl 111 lathi f (h -11 it-i 1 0 ".1 1

Capled from Stwh. Wathel lit en t lary, wer - Fuilsom is senuil a lto l
he was serving i life te.rm, iid is still preseltltle Wltlere. of Ohio. in te rural districts who at large. i1trodued: I bill double all postage 11ave mniIlfst ilteres re
rates to pay for a billion dollar bond .-ri I
17 YEARS IN JAIL. issue for god rois. His hit also a n -I -. j9-tA former issue of the Tii- fact that there are these vacant
._ proposes a li ojobtl at (11.000 a year a1r11ge 1 1ro11 bein for to bune dealt largely with the subject tracts of choice land near yours and
Yet Man Is Believed to Have"'Been In. for Colonel Goethals. as director of ariligea Eilut'a ltitltio ll fol eletit me nocentle road worklltiolll of better drainage. I feel tht our I want you to write me and
docent. t -k. which wil ieet in Key West De- people will co-operate in this impor- know if we cannot induce those of
After serving seventeen years in John Oleijoniak. 53 years 'old- cember 10 for a three-day session. the penitentiary for arson, a man 61 father of t weltv-one chiire. 0co1i- The Board of Trade has appointed a tant work and that soon it will be youracquaintances to take it up as
years old convinced Warden MeKenty, fitted suicide by hanging himself in comuimittee consisting of Charles S. an accomplished fact. they may have a desire to locate in
at Philadelphia, that he was not guilty a police sttioll cell at DIullkirk. -N. Williams. E. 1. Ball fill1 M 1. Gi-, Looking fovard to the undertak- the and in that most
of the crime of which he had been Y. I-i had been al-rested oil a charge I. to arrallge a progrSam to enter-South,theauticonvicted. It was after the parole for of being drunk and abusiing his chil- tain (le guests. Itoeering of a great work we sometimes ful state of the South, our own the prisoner ca.e that he lins*sted dre.fear that it cannot be done and be- Florida.
Frhe prisonera came that be a insistedELAYED
upon having a talk with the warden F-ank J. 'oagland i suing a OPEN'NG DELAYED. . come discouraged before we really I have only twenty acres vacant
before leaving the prison probably for Meaplillis illysiciall for $10.000 be- [t thirty acres in Secrood Warden McKenty refused t. caue Ioagland Claim oil( of his legs Failure of City to Proide Mate-t forth our best efforts. It is not in Section 28 gsoow. Wardsnortri 1ttc d%-so long ago that some of us were in tion 29; none in Section 30 nor 31;
give his nametwo 1110110 tillal it oilit to nance Fund
- ive was convicted in Lancaster. be since the physician performed an doubt about the great Deen road ten acres only in Section 32; ten on. ofsttiniredto aa r. operation. iIoilgland claims the in- Owing to the failure of colincil toLJbeing built through the center of ly in Section33; sixty acres in Seea, of setting fire to a barn." said jured leg is worth $5.000 an inch. provide suileent fulils in the bud -tb Warden McKenty. "Hie got forty years. Eachn of w$e heirs of the (51t1te 61 for maintenlO. t0 11W $250,000 our Colony from East to West,'and tion 34 and so on. There is not a
lie had no money, and his case was ahoIlllt-- ftit sat 1fr1alf"
Adolplius l,-scih. who. accoi-dilIgto St. Lke's H-ostitlal did not 0p(1)at after the road was built sonie of us great deal in any one Section or lopractically undefended. It was simnpl thewill tiled at St Ilouis re to hI IJa-elsonville as had been planned, and
__-as pr whic som e itneolhd tc ~te ~ ~ ' Wt~L~xs~alox~ xte obigToae eecoet
a case in whiich Suime p01r011 hail tc sai s of the tlrlst itti wiich the lpriiilily will remain cioed againn doubted that 'it would ever cality and less close in than fartherb punished. and this poor, illiterat esats oie trm .owill te prob yrs. , be shelled and hardsurfaced. The out away frolm town. I have also
e stilto Is to be f')rilei. Nwill havo :1l1, oitis
ife e'imripsoili-t -ysee i -t-st ..doubting Thomases were put to a few tracts left s Bunnellor more 2l u $1.000 a day. LSt Lke's Ihsluital Assoi tion.U a -rout on the Deen road proposition some of 'em on the shell road beMISSELKN WE. Caspe il eah otor' nnn. Caf-prante corporaton it has been reMISS ELKIN WED. leasedd ml ii otti's 1r5. (l ra ~ceivito cily patients in its oki bufI- and every one is happy in the tweep Bunne.ll and Espanola, and C
___________ toll R. Silulls . awalthy- llcitetC hg(iYltteisii br ,___tamous.-eautyof -rgiia Marris [i his wifl, weire ised to it ii. its a beitAo wi cos I t, thought that we will now have one right alongside-of the Florida East
FamousbBeautyiof VirgniacMarrs cto velpatS.oh0inay er isld
"Billie" Hitt. their home it Wilmette. a faion-!i' siso is nnu as .ilt, .or a of the best public highways in this Coast Railroad. No choicer locaKntlivine Xkins (Intiliter f th(able ubu-sofmChhag-o.thwirbod'I Ita 4,
Katherine Elkin.s. daughter of th .ible suburb of Chicago. Th-ei bud- bo accustoine to receive from to part of the sate-from St. Johns tion anywhere. This land I am
uaeS t Sel BEl1s wi-re talent fluum the 1r11uin i torheelin frt
mae ~itur Stee .Elkins. , ' iS bu.s after he b!aze was extin city. Park through Bunnell to the coast. at from thirty to forty dollitt. a ,ih "I siet W.RAfter our ditches are in and the lars per acre, according to location.
Hitt. W. 0. W. ROUGH RIDERS. i codn
Owing to the suiileniness of th Surrogate o iaLnIII. of New York. - 1 main canal has been finished as now Terms: One-third down and bawhos antair, noctniytio was aitsonddtle last (tl for John Kopfe Jacksonville Camp to ive Log Rll- planned we will look back over the ance in one and two years with six
dress. and the cere ony w- i most iii last Keen at Oroville, Cal. fifteen and initiation.n formal. It is said Mr. Hitt's mother yelts LIig"'. 1ti claim a leg'acy of. $1; .- - accomplishment in very much the per cent terest.
residing in Washington. ). C., was 000 left Lim by his motihr ill 101. - Ja-ksonvile woodmin of tlsame manner as we are now view- This is the time to be thinking
apprised of the mri-iage by tele- For twei itears a l ie loleyh has re- Ii-ed wI ie their 11algroig the building of the Dee road. about setting out orange ad grape grain. The wedding folliul milember amilled unclaiied il the keeliing of i g aii ilitti the tw os u aln it
of both families alld friends unpre. the city chalbelnll. I :vemtti a One of the fF3 It will not seem such a difficult un- fruit groves. This weekIsecuredF
paredI as to gifts. - The will of Aiolph is, filed be a upariuade. led by the First Rgi-dertaking after all. It looks bg from a reliable nursery two thouMir. Hitt met Miss Elkins ill Wash- at St. Iouils for probate. nakes har- mont tliht1 an:i] one battalion of tIl now because we have it before us sand fine trees fo our use here at
ington society about tell year-s ago. itable bejutsts aggrl-(gLting $170.000 Na ition il Guaid -.ayBn gt
andI las been one of lier most detioted to a niler of St. LIunis instiilntionis. h'uollowi-g'. there wll be clowns and it yet undone. By united prices ranging fro- twenty - five
admirIs and pli- the bulk of the estate in every destriptio and two detach- work it will be made easy and cents for one year old buds to fifty
trust. Mi's. illie Bus-l, 'arles nots of oimical featuresfind, fo quickly finished. Our efforts, how- cents for two year. olds. Why not
Wiliam 1).C. Robertson.agede. Nagel . August A. usci al m the first time before th b ever, must be united. It cannot be startA \grove now. There is 'no
Wilia D ( R1 )2n, li - d trustees. oppotir tlt United Rank Mfount -d
was killed by t illinuritd bill 1 1 e tuste a bout L bridge Tr-l to Uhitr R rCi-done single handed or in a. half- better tUme. Ifyou 'cannot afford
Utic. N '1. (ll he armof ouglas Thie oi isoy aotLon on bib] e TiioiipItNo.'- liuniiercomil ii li i of CI
fallig alol-liYs.nottolhateegifamcrn oftl .1(1111 h tToi lhis toopliAI
Iobilsoi. brother-ii-law of Teodol 'cnli i down is not to have an Aie, eonel Jon . as n ''aios Rough hearted way. You who have not to start with ten acres, why not befor Itwenty-five years.l, IloTh ecebulla hadvt-r knwMAD "URerBITEs BoYg
Roosevelt. Robertsoin hias been are- a iboutilie silirill- rkof ent kPeak. 't le reks." yet signed that.petition are holding gin with five acres or even less? In
taker at the Robinson saminer home hilililark that avs the goal of liu the work back. It is important a few years' time these groves, .if
for twenty-five years. The b ii[ d dretis of caravans that crossed the MAD SQUIRREL BITES BOY. that each and every one affected properly taken care of, will be prto'e r its ae and in attempt. -lain-lin'49 hsn't sunk [lInch. in
ing to drive it xvck the mailwas at- the oplinion4 of hesexpets (f til ' I'l- Then Attacks Another Orlando, Fla, - make it a personal matter and see ducing fruit enough to pay you
tacked and cruslied against the side ited .States geoiogical survey. thi lfi- Lad Before Being Shot. [ , to it that there shall be no delay on handsomely for your outlay and be
Ie . ws st arbiter for the nation lit n atters A squirrel.Which havebeenhis account. worth many times the amount of
-taitahious -of this sort. A sil which may ha-e been I have mentioned before the fact the original ipvestment. I will help
Sho InQurre Oer 5-CntLunh.rabid attacked 8-year-old Richard, t
Quarrel Over 15-Cent Lunch. WARTIME BISCUITS. Rogers. grandson of City Clerk C. A. that here and there, scattered over you to get started if you will write
SchuyHer Ilutchens. 25 years old Boone, of Orlando. Fla., and bit the this Colony there are good ten, m and really mean business.
was probably fatally stot by -Loii Virginia Woman Preserves Bread little fellow badly. The lad was it- twenty and forty acre tracts that Another thing and I am done.
Chatwoodl lit I quarrel over 41 15-ceiit Cooked at Petersburg in Sixties. tering Mr. ,Booloe's home with Philipt lunchi at Gadsden, Ail. Chatwood I-- Tlree bluisc'lits. cooked by Lieuten- Frye, tloliltr playmate, when the are vacant and for sae. Some one Now that we have such a good road
fused to pay fill' the 11 lh n whnIl ant riffii. of a Georgia company. squirrel sank its teetthroui11his has fallen down or dropped out and from Bunnell to -the Park I am
liut-hens tied to force him to luy dur-iig tle (lisig days of the Co.l- thimit The had screaie t i the land has reverted to the Com- going to advise all those who come
lie shot I1t(hens, 11e bli taking ef- federacy it a camp li t1near Ietersburg, and shaking thi eillinial offi b rshed infeet near the heart. Chiatwood is il Va., now in tle lossssion of s. *. to the hIuse. pany. These vacant tracts may be here to look over their holdings, or
Jail. .).. Simonson. of Beach. Va.. wh1 The squirrel then leaped for Frye' ,just the lanl you want for your who comes here to stay, to come fE3
prizes them hlighly as war relis. vwere face. but the boy succeeded in tigt-t E01friends and acquaintances to take by way, of Bunnell. It is our purHe Killed Daughter While Hunting. exhibited at the Petersburg Fair just il, it off. It then clawed at the The Sunday outing of Walter II. closer. - si een door until it was shot. up.Why not? If the proposition pose to establish a regular automoRowley. of Pein Yan. N. Y., had a Mrs. imionson is unable to really The head Iwas sent to the State is good enough for you and if you bile service soon, full announcement
:sad ending when the double barreled the nliumber of tile tGeorgia comaniiy. Board of Heath for analysis. are in earnest about it and intend of which will be made in due time.
ducks < l 'itt wei ie a as sitluI but she remes thtLieutenant RtIr Club Aids New Armory. some time to come down here and We have a good hotel at the Park
duk:n1aeKeuaws cieit' riffiui ad a lbrothier'who was sr- Rotary Cu isNwAmr aeti orhms o o h comdto ftuit
ly discharged, killing his only daugh- geait In the 'company, and that thiie Much enthusiasm has been aroused make this your homes, would you for the accommodation of tourists
ter, Ruth. who was enloyhig the stoil was another sergeaniit named Lindsy., in Jaeksoivilhe in behalf of the r not want as many of your friends and guests at reasonable rates, and
with her father -joet fll senrinig u new Nationa (eesN nirhbt. ad army. -Te h-otaly Clb and acquaintances to join you as will do all we can to make you feel
wthefitii.-Sees National Prohibition. Gaf roi'siry.ig lie tay luNas Fn ai[


Er-eyishilI h Fhicago willha.ve a . rge will crush thaeadoptd resoltios binding tiee- possible? t is quite natural and at home on your arrival.
teest ill t ilhilcial Chit a o trai. Enfran chisemet o bes to led thir peonal eorts to right that you should. For this Very truly yours,
tree which will be ci eiin ai atioalProibi ar teltio November 4 for reason I here again mention the E. F. WARNER, President.
Park by the city o Cristmas Ee. tiol. Suffrage and polibition ae bondIssue for armory purposes.
The tree will be. 5 rfeet igh. E..Il( iuindissolubly linked together. With 3
lhlminatedw eletrior these rinl-ing statements. Mis. Lil- New Officers Pension Examiners.
eby colored lights lianA 1. N. Stevens. of Portlattil, Me.. Ill the reorganization if the board
president of the Natiotial Woman's -of U. S. pension examilling surgeons Safe Breakers Get.' Christian Temperance Union in her I for Jacksonvble. Fla., the following!
Professional safe crackers destroy- annual address before the fortieth offieers were elected: Dr. Jay I. pan th Pe safe t.eC.,rs c ulrcivention at Asbury Park, N. J., of Durkee. president. Jacksoaville, Fla.
aniy at; Petland, N. C.. securing $So that orgaiiizatiohn pohited the xxay foi Dr. Robt. J. Evans, Jr., secretary, ii cash, ineiuding funds of the post- tie future struggle of tie member- Jacksonville. Fla. Dr. S. S. S O0 01 I 0 I 0
office. Glycerine was used. sship. tresurer, Jacksonville, Fla. .. .. -


4~


x


*-~1
C-




ii


TO PREVENT HORNS GROWING

Operation May Be Performed by Sim.
pie and Painless Method-How
Caustic 15 Applied.

(By R. W. HICKMAN.)
When circumstances are favorable, as in the case of farmers who build up their herds by raising the progeny, the horns may be prevented from .growing by a simple and practically painless method, and the custom of1 preventing the growth of horns is becoming more popular and more generally practiced under all conditions. The calf should be treated not later than one week after its birth, preferably when it is from three to five days old.
The agent to be used may be either caustic soda or caustic potash, both of which may be procured in the drug stores in the form of sticks about the thickness of an ordinary lead pencil and five inches long. These caustics must be handled with care, as they dissolve the cuticle and may make the hands or fingers sore. The pre'paration of the calf consists in first clipping the hair from the parts, washing clean with ,-ap and warm water, and thoroughly drying with a towel or cloth. The stick of caustic should be wrapped in a piece of paper to-protect the hands and fingers, leaving one end of the stick uncovered. Moisten the uncovered end slightly and rub it on the horn buttons or little points which may be feltaon the calf's head, first on one side and then the


Dehorning Cattle.
other alternately, two or three times on each, allowing the caustic to dry after each application. Be very careful to apply the caustic to the horn button only. If it is brought in contact with the surrounding skin it will cause pain. 36 very careful also not to have too much moisture on the stick of casstic, as it will remove the ir-- n i( piinwp' to run dLow.n over th face. After treatment, keep the calf protected from rain, as water on the head after the application of caustic will cause I' to run down over the face. This must be carefully avoided. Either caustic soda or caustic potash alone, without the admixture of other substances, answers the purpose very satisfactorily,
In the very young calf the horn button, or point that will ultimately develop into a horn, has scarcely any attachment to the skull, and may be felt as a small button embedded in the skin. In this early stage it may be easily removed with a sharp knife or 'a pair of scissors, but even then caustics should be applied to kill any remaining cell life belonging to this germ point, otherwise there may be some subsequent irregular horn growth, which is more or less.of a disfigurement.

Keeping Quality of Butter.
The keeping quality of butter Is governed to a great extent by the method of making. If the cream is properly ripened and churned, the butter evenly salted, it will, under ordinary conditions, retain its good quality for some time, while if the different , processes have been carelessly conducted, the buttermik nct thoroughly removed and the salting not evenly done it will soon begin to become ranciJ.


DAipy NoTt5



The biggest cow is not always the best milker.


Pad sanitary conditions and tuberculosis go band in hand.,

Only a few weeks of grace if you are going to build 4>r dig a silo.
* * *
-Plenty of good water and shade will lengthen out the cows' pasture.

The safest preservatives for sweet milk are cleanliness and promptscooling.

Oats and pea hay is a nutritious and valuab- feed, if cut at the right time.

The tuberculin test, when properly applied, has little or no effect on inilk production.

Early rnd late milking seenis to be tie only satisfactory way of solving the. ry problem. ,

The man who buys cows and sells them again as soon as they are dry is not a real dairytnan.


tFARMt



AOOLTRY


ARRANGEMENT OF NEST BOX


Girls of Today Th(


[Left Too Much tc :mselves


By Mrs. HARRIOT STANTON BLATCH, President of the Woman'F Political Union


CanadinEprReomnsUef
Earth vrtu reorCo ve 0red HEE is no question that a ew type of girl has been olved in thi
Earth SOetrned oC overed T country these last few yea
One great thing that as made for her development is tub
A nest can be made out of an old ARTIFICIAL CHECKS HAU BEEN TAKEN OFF HER. I think
box about 12 inches square and six an illustration of my idea in th respect is a remark I heard a friend inches deep. Professor Graham of the make about a young English gir who had come awkwardly into a roo: Ontario Agricultural college recom- where there were a lot of people. After she had gone out he said: "When mends that "some earth or an over- she is twenty-one she is going t know how to enter a room. Now, will turned sod be placed in the bottom of she q th-t st r i- by freedom?" I think the
the box, taking care to have the cor- seicquir i tknowledrei v >ression, whifee- m"rinkir lhe
ners very full so that no eggs can Enlishirl is under too great pression, while the Aerican irl has
roll out from the hen and get chilled. liberty of action. Next put on about two inches of Athletics are having an infl i ec tiponthe American gi-[ and on ihe straw or chaff; and then put a few greater opportunities for education wiicn all ecisses of girls is this cinearthenware eggs into the nest. Place try enjoy. The girl of today is NOT BEING TAUGHT THAT SIl
the nest in some pen where nothing IS Ak INFERIOR BEING. Shc is being taught to use her mind 1n1
can disturb the hen, and put her on her body to the very best advantage. after dark. Feed and water must be -n
within easy reach and a dust bath Tlhe typical American girl of the day as I see her physically is mclih
should also be convenient. If the more lithe and slender than tli girls of other nationalities. I should hen is setting quietly the next day it say her COLORING IS NOT \LL I WOULI) LIKE TO SEE IT.
will be safe to put the eggs under It is not so rosy as that of the english gi. . Perhaps climate is partly her." to blame, but not altogether.
Another nest box that has given
Anternestisf atn is madein I THINK THE TENDENCY IN THIS COUNTRY IS TO OVERconiderable satisfaction, is made in three compartments. A 12 inch board STRAIN YOUNG PEOPLE. I I ELIEVE THAT WITH LIBERTY THERE
cut in three four foot lengths and one HAS NOT COME QUITE A B LANCE OF KNOWLEDGE AND THAT
used for the top, one for the back, BOYS AND GIRLS ARE LEF TOO MUCH TO THEMSELVES AND
and the other for the bottom. The DON'T QUITE KNOW HOW TO TAKE CARE OF THEMSELVES.
partitions .and ends ard made of the same material cut in one foot lengths. Along the front is a four inch strip to keep in the litter. To this is hinged e
a slatted door, which, when opened A mei canLo n's V oce In
forms a platform in front of the nest. The work of filling the nests and set- Cs
Politics great Without Vote


By Sir ALFRED GELDER, Member of Parliament, of Hull, England

T HE VOICE OF THE AMERICAN WOMAN IN POLITICS WITHOUT SUFFRAGE IS FAR MOR~POTENT THAN THAT OF HER ENGLISH SISTER WHO IS STRIVING FOR THE BALLOT.
If the wives and mothers of Americans are discreet they will continue Tto have LARGE INFLUENCE IN POLITICS AND OTHER AFFAIRS. I am in favor of giving. women the right to vote in England,
but I am distinctly opposed to the militant methods that are being pursued by our women. Suffrage for women is not a party question., Those who favor suffrage argue that, inasnuch as wonien already have the right Arrangement of Nests. to vote in municipal affairs,-the right should be extended to parliamenting the hen can be proceeded with as tary affairs. I believe this viww to be the correct 'one. BUT I DEalready described. These boxes may PLOlE THE VIOLENT METHODS USED BY THE WOMEN.
be piled one above the other. The better lass of women in England are opposed to these methods.
When the hens are let off the nests There are many sides to the question. The householder, for instance, to feed, the doors of the nest boxes the woman householder, claims, and with reason, that she is entitled by should be closed, which compels the 'virtue of her position to a'voice in governmental affairs, and the married hens to remain on the floor until they woman claims an even higher right as the mother of coming generations, have had a chance to feed. The hens and I believe they are both right, but they should be patent. will not return to the same nests, but this is rather likely to be of benefit than otherwise, All hens do not set -at exactly the same temperature, and an occasional change averages up the temperature for all the settings of :
eggs,
o hen should be allowed to set, unless she, is free fron L. The iniac ~ finor thie jiiicondulivei-i a
multiplication of any lice there may be on her. These will make her irri- _ _ _ S
table and a poor setter. In addition, should she bring off a hatch in such a condition, the chicks will be open to infection. Dust the hen well with flowers of sulphur or some other in sect powder before setting, and again I lillUIiD o you w an t Ill1ii! I I
a day or two before the hatch finishes.
About the seventh day the eggs
should be tested, the infertile ones re- Heavy yiel s of
moved, and the balance put back inFancy ota-
the nests. After testing it is usually found that the eggs from four hens can be put under three. This leaves one hen with no eggs, and a new setn.g can be put under her.
When the chicks arrive two or three batches can be put with one hen, which leaves more hens at liberty to sit, or if there is no more hatching,0 to be done they can be put back in the z
- Fertilize igcht.7laying pens.





DULL fNOILS Ideal Pfitato Manure


The day before shipping live fowls, feed hard grain,
*5* * *
Satisfying the appetite adds greatly
to the thrift of the flock. & 1 , a iP

It is estimated that five chickens will yield a pound of feathers.

Cleaningtdroppingboards is a chore that cannot be done too often. a o S u i l
Whatever Interferes with growth re tards and dimishes egg production.

On cool, damp, rainy nights close all Give Ea nne Crops
the ventilating windows of the hen house.

The very first thing to do on notic ingigns of illness in a bird, is to isolate it.

Thetbest nest for laying hens is W ilson Toomer Fer
close to the floor, darkened, and easily movable.

Feed plenty of charcoal, as it is one of the best things for keeping the poultry healthy....

Eggs cannot be produced without nitrogenous food in some shape. Bones are absolutely essential.
22 Jacksonie FIa
Do not forget that your fowls need green food. If it is impossible to give them a change of yard or runs, sea that they get some kind of green food I
during the daily feed.


U


New Line of


Groceries,


Hay&


Grain


at prices that will make you forget the mail order house and trade at home.




The greater part of our stock has arrived and we are prepared to show you the greatest collection of high class groceries ever offered by any store in the state at values that are attractive and numerous.




Remember our goods are all fresh from the factory. No shopworn goods in stock.




Seeing is believing. Call by and take a look and be convinced.




We are.here to serve-you. If you don't see what you want ask for it and if we haven't got it we will get it.




When in town call on us and get acquainted whether you buy or not.


YOURS FOR BUSINESS


TRIBUNE BUILDING


Bunnell


U *1====3==


I






I


Bunnell Meat & Ice Co.


Dealers In


rresh Florida and Western Meats


Ice, Poultry,


sages, Hams, Choice Leaf Lard, Fish and Oysters in Season........


HAVE YOU TRIED OUR


Famous Hastings Brand Hams and Breakfast Bacon?



We Are Here to Serve You. Don't Fail to

Call on Us. We Also Carry Ice and

Cold Drinks---the Coldest in Town.


Bunnell Meat & Ice Co.


Fred R. Kaiser, Jr., Mgr.


BUNNELL, FLORIDA


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a Playwright, a Statesman and a Dress
Designer ,


By PAUL POIRET, French Designer of Clothes
SHE DOMINANT AMERICAN TYPE OF GIRL IS THE PURI-


TAN.
The A merican girl represses her emotions. She never is really natural or impulsive. She thinks about the conventions before she speaks or acts. All her emotions are under cover. 11er life, her acbions, her conversation, are FLA WLESS WELL BED, I R EEPROACITABLE, but they are governed by system and the opinion of the world. She follows the line laid down by her, Puritan ancestors in manners and emotions.
Even in her dregs she is imitative, but not bold. LIKE T ER PURITAN ANCESTORS SHIE WEAIIR S


BOOTH
IARKINGTON


By BOOTH TARKINGTON, Author
'" YPICAL American girl"- is
T an epithet that makes me
feel in a fog-as if I were trying to bretihe within my nose in a plush Cushion.
GIRLS AlE THIRTY NOWADA YS AS WELL AS SEVEN,'EEN. I incline to think there is A NEW STYLE, but onv Irom hearsaV. I have herul. for instance, 'lulian Street speak of specimons iiknown to me. ,l ise Llnch \\Willianishas gone so 'far as to assert that there is a new kimd of girl. clue to a new confrontation with old(1 problems. lie toIl me they Collversed most ilerestivl.


By CHAUNCEY M. DEPEVW, Former Senator From New York THE TYPICAL AMERICAN GIR L


A UN'IFORM. She only 'adopts I what every other woman wears. THE GIRL OF SIXTY YEARS AGO IN THAT SHE 13 MORE ARTIFICIAL. SHE HAS MORE ACBy COSMO HAMILTON, English COMPLISHMENTS, BUT NOT SO
Pl iC VVXht MANY SOLID ACQUIREMENTS.


A


r aywrgn
NICE, 'healthy thing is the American girl of todayCOMPANIONABLE, o u t


The girl who represents-a great many American women in thi, country differs from hlie type of fiftv years ago only in this, that she is


Are Kept on Farms-Hen Must
Have Certain Varieties.

Grain is the staple food for poultry, will be used for that purpose as long as fowls are kept on farms; but hens cannot give good results on graiu4 alone. It is beneficial to thorn, and 'will heat all times relished, but the demands of the hen are sich as to call for a variety. In the shells of eggs, as well as their composition, are several forms of mineral matter and nitrogen, which can*only be partially obtained from grain.
Even though grains carry in composition for a long time, hens will begin to refuse it, as they may be oversupplied from other sources. For this reason they v .ill accept a change'of food which is of itself evidence that the best results for his liens can only be obtained froin a variety of food. Corn and wheat may be used as foodI with advantage, but must be given I as a portion of the ration only, and not made exclusive articles of diet.
In grain the principle articles or elements required to keep ashen in good laying condition are found, and it is for this reason that your hens may continue to lay for some time if only given grain, provided they find theI other elements necessary while -uniig around the farm. But the trouble with this manner of feeding is that it is too uncertain.
You are taking the chance of the lien finding the other elements required. No hen has ever laid an egg unless she has taken into her system elements from the vegetable, animal .and mineral kingdoms. Grain can represent the vegetable kingdom, bugs or insects, the animal, and grit or oyster shell, the mineral. It is absolutely neessary that every hen par-


for any sort of fun that is going, MOR E TRAVELED and HElI take of these elements before she can
NOT INCLINED TO THIN-K HORIZON IS BIIO.ADER. H1er produce a single egg.
OVER MUCH, except about the im- education is on a higher plane, but mediate present, and far more anx- 1 she knows less of domestic accom- HOPPER FOR -LITTLE CHICKS ious to be told that her frock is Plishlents. "perfectly sweet" by other girls Device Illustrated May Be Enlarged
By MEREDITH NICHOLSON, and Used for Older Stock-Con.than to be assured that she looks Novelist struction Is Simple"corkin-" by a man.
Tn fact, the American girl be- PEAKING generally, the Amer- The hopper illustrated below
ican girl seems to me to illus- hold one bushel of feed, and is intend PLEgASANT G ty I T T E R I N' G trate even more striking ed for'growing chicks, though by enthnn her hrothe-rs the changing ten- larging the size it may be used for oldTE IS LIKE today are TAKING LIFE PIETTHE AMERICAN SKYSCRAPER; TY SOBERLY. It is rather the
SHE STANDS OUT AGAINST A fashion to have a SERIOUS INCLEA ATMSPHRE, TRAIHT ERES' T I N LI FE. PcIit ical and
CLEAR ATMOSPHERE, STRAIGHT economical questions interest them, .
AND CLEAN CUT. SHE IS A and they are readinT the serious GOOD GIRL. :books that deal with such matters.





Is Football Injuries and

Worth Deaths

What It a Big rice

Costs. . to'Pay

TO~ l LEY
By Colonel C. P. '' ~~ Superintendent of ]
TflXX1I~I FY Photo by Arnec lWetPon
TOWNSLEes WestoPointiNn.


'XPERIENCE seems to indicate that football is likely to produce more
lasting injuries than riding or gymnastics.
IN 'VIEW OF THE COMPARATIVELY SMALL NUMBER OF 'CADETS WHO PLAY FOOTBALL AND THE VERY HIGH PERCEN-f AGE OF DAYS LOST fIN THE HOSPITAL FROM FOOTBALL INJURIES TO DAYS LOST IN THE HOSPITAL FROM ALL OTHER CAUSES DURING THE FOOTBALL SEASON, FORTY-SIX PER CENT, ALMOST ONE HALF, il REGARD IT AS QUESTIONABLE WHETHER THE VALUE RECEIVED FROM FOOTBALL JUSTIFIED THE RESULTANT. INJURIES.
The man who -has been trained to BOX, WRESTLE, 'FENCE VITH GUN 'OR SABER, RUN, JUMP. VAULT AND. SWIM and knows that his muscles are trained in these and that he has physical en,durance in them, CANNOT FAIL TO Bt A GOOD SOLDIER 1N ,ZHE FIELD OF ACTION.



Official Censor Should See That Our

P s Are ean


By -HENRY CLEWS, Banker, of New York
HEARTILY 'FAVOR TRE APPOINTMENT OF AN OFFICIAL CENSOR IN -THIS COUNTRY WHO WOULD PREVENT THE PRESENTATION ON THE 'STAGE OF PLAYS THAT OFFEND THE SENSE ;OF DECENCY WHICH 'I'S INHERENT IN EVERY MAN AND WOMAN 1WH'OSE MORAL SENSE IS NOT BLUNTED.
As a person cannot touch pitch and not be defiled, in like manner oam: sons and Ibughters cannot witness a vulgar act on the stage without hat ing their sense of modesty soiled 'by contact with the unclean.
I believe the stage could be and should be the great TEACHER Oi MORALITY. Many a man and a woman, too, can look back and remem ber the good 'eed that was planted in dieTi" rjriRf yeaifs ago by son: play tmat was written to, iNKSTRUIT AND ELEVATj AND NO" T3'O DEtH,,ADE.


Dry Mash Hopper.
er stock. It is well, however, to keep the dimensions of the feed opening the same, this opening being specially designed to prevent waste. The -ends are made of one-inch material, and the rest of the hopper of half-inch stuff. Any lumber that Is at 'hand may be used, and the construction is so simple that anyone able to use a hammer and saw can knock one together in a very short time.

FATTEN CHICKENS FOR TABLE

Fowls Should Be Placed In Portable
Pen Without Crowding-Feed
Sparingly for Three Days.

Prepare a portable pen by nailing strips of lumber together to form a frame, and then tacking on pieces horizontally, so as to make an enclosure, leaving sufficient opening to give light"and' ventilation. The pen, writes a Virginia man in the Epitomist, should be floored, and sufficient outlet left for the droppingjp. A roof should be made, and without leaks.
The whole should be made large enough for ample accommodations; depending upon the number of birds to he kept in. Only fowls that are peaceable should be kept together.. Do not overfeed at first; after two or three days give all that they will eat up clean, and be sure to .give water after they have finished eating. Give buttermilk occasionally, as most foy's. like it. Sprinkle sind, gravel or charcoal in the pen occasionally. In from one to two weeks fowls should be in good condition for eating, if Cuere is nothing wrong with them.


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We have a beautiful Ocean Beach

We have excellent Shipping Facilities by Rail and Water


lands iain trunk line of the Florida East Coast Railroad passes through the heart of our colony St. Jo,-, and we have to the-east the Florida East Coast Canal. We ai e hns County, the Banner county of the state, is building Hard Roads Through our Lands. sellin srje but 12 mnjes south of Hastings, Floriid's famous Irishpotato dish-ict,
. tio Is Nlv, were farmn3, are
for ten t.mef- what we ask for ours, and we have ecllyv as good potato soil as Hastings.


YEA.BUNNELL . WILL- RANK WITH LTAST1N{'s \YER A F1W MORE
*T-.RS OF DEVELOPMENT.


who You should buy atlunnol!L ec. use "leme lc sl!'s n u' oul eca e men who s ' d are not promoters, -JUIt men
ili%-ve near you and work for your interests as well as their own. T'he President, Secretary Devereasurer of this company have their home at Eunnel" and a retire to strv. The Punnevl
Bul copment Cfm,,0ran1. r t , opose lad cIII s. 'yu, f me
py is no composed of'Iere La'nd seM1ms. h of men i) are Community
1(ers.
P


yOtIx


You Should -uy a, Farm at Bunell Beeijso


and can secure such choice land at such a reasonable price-only $35.00 an $40.00 an-acre, according to location, on the easy payment plan of 50c hagccre down and 50c an acre each month thereafter,.until the full amount a f;rn been paid- By the time you have completed the monthly payments on
'srm, your land will be -worth

$1"0.00 an Acre

chaiYou should buy a farm at Bunnell because with*every ten acres you purDur3e the Bunnell Development Company will give you a free town lot in
~ont.


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A Portion of the Residence Section of Bunnell as it looks toda.y.


Here VVlargest colony town---BUNNELL ---is up-to-date in every respect. Public have
Church ,ol City Water Works Lumpber Mill
Four Gei Meat Market Barrell and Crate Factory


State Bar? ral Stores Barber Shop
Commodi Masonic Hall
Thorough 's Hotel Cement Sidewalks

Is not this, Equipped Drug Store Shingle Mill


Printing Plant Weekly Newspaper Excellent Doctors Electric Light Plant


Wonder oa Phenomenal snowing for a town scare three -years old? Bunnell is truly called "The' offers such the South." Can you show me another community in the entire state of Florida that
'opportunities as are to be found in the Bunnell-Dtpoht Colony?

Then Where Should You Invest?
Send in yot
ceived the r order for a farm today. Do not put it off. Act now. The sooner your order is reketter location we shall be able to give you.

orour copyrighted book, "A LITTLE FARM--A BIG LIVING."

or further information write to the General Sales Manager,

tofjohns PaA. Verdenius, 108 S. LaSalle St., Chicago, Ill.
tefirst,,
ladies v We Pay a Liberal Commission to Our Buyers who will Act as Our Agents.
zaar I to ma.
who-4 ed'
ChrisL wvait U


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mas _r-


nnell,


0 . Florida.


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Photo (@ by Amn-erican Press Association. 4CHAUNCEY M.
DEPEW


Is the Dominant
~%re eWhyn

Tupe of Y su Reaso s

Amer'4a u should locate at BUNNELL rather


A rinDthan elsewhere Girl Todau?
STAPLE FOOD FOR POULTRY Our location is Ideal

Answered bv Two Authors, Grain Will Be Used as Long as Fowls We have the Vcrv Best So*l


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Stork May Allay Fears of
Invalid Heir



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5HIS is the latest picture of the czarevitch of Russia. heir to the throne.
The lad is still reported to be so sickly that he is usually carried around. anti the people of the empire continue their prayers for his health. Becauseof tlie boy's invalidism Russia learned with joy that the stork was expected a ain to visit the imperial home at Livadia, for they boped the bird would bring another boy .to take the little czareviteb's place in ease of death. Alexis, the only son of Emperor Nicholas, is now in his tenth year, having been born Aug. 12, 1904. . The royal couple have four other children-Olga, born in 1895; Tatiana, horn in 1897; Marie. born in 1899, and Anastasia, boru in 190r.





Striclen and Shackled,


Poland Surely Is


Entitled to' Sympathy




By IGNACE JAN PADEREWSKI, Polish Pianist and Composer

THINK I HAVE THE RIGHT TO ASK AMERICA'S SYMPATHY FOR POLISH FREEDOM. AMERICA SURELY HAS NOT FORGOTTEN PULASKI AND THE OTHER POLES WHO FOUGHT FOR HER INPENDENCE IN THE REVOLUTION.
I do not think that the history of Your people shows any Russian or Prussitn lighting for your indepenidencsc. I have the riight to ask' your sym pa lily for Poland.
Blow 'Ifter blov has fallen upol ou1r stricken race, thunderbolt after itunderbol I. O1 r WHOLE Si lATTER ED COUJNTRY quivers, .2ot itIt fer but wit ; (1 disIn1v.
xih f ea to u ohs . -New lormis of life which had to come, wi ct 0riCnd t to h11( waked limong 1s otl a ti gh t of' dreadful dreams.
The sante wind that bdew to us a hand ful of health grain ias overwhelmed s in a cimiid of cha 11n( si Iigs; the clear flame kindled hr hope of universal justice hi is rathed us fouled hy dark and biackenin Amoke; the LIGHT BI'TEATI[ OF FREEDOM HAS BEEN BORNE
TOWARD US ON C1IOKxING, DEADLY WAVES OF POISONED
- IR
Our hearts are disaraylcd, our mindls disordered. We are bein TAUG T RESPECT FOE ALL THAT IS ANOT ER'S, CONTEMPT
YOR ALL THAT IS OUR OWN.
Our new teaers tre STBHPPI NG US OF FFTIE LAST SuB ED
OF RACIAL INSTINCT, yielding the past 'in prey to aii indrflnite fthire, thrusting-'the heritage of generations into the clntciies of that chaotic ogri whose monstrous form may loom at anv moment above the abyss of tile.




Marriage Certificate by No Means

Is a Fully Paid Up Policy of

Marital Happiness


By the Rev. Dr. MADISON C. PETERS, Baptist Preacher, Lecturer and Writer


OW to he happy gh i . irmingly sugestive
phrase first Used by an English pritiher named Skelton, ineuleates the important antd frequetly forgotten truth that HAPPINESS IN TIIE MARRIED IFE HAS TO BE WORKED
-OR.
THE MARRIAGE CERTIFICATE IS NOT A FULLY PAID UP POLICY OF MARITAL HAPPINESS. THE ONLY WAY TO GET AN ABSOLUTELY- GUARANTEED INSURANCE POLICY ON MATRIMONY IS TO KEEP ON PAYING AT THE HOME OFFICE THE ASSESSMENTS OF' LOVER-LIKE ATTENTION.
Many men gard their appreciation of their wives s thogh it wer TMUSO)Iie secret. Don't let vout' sense di prop rieto (rsh11ip) akc you feel ive youi need not bother to eplIte.


. if wormen would spend as much lime building cages Wter marriage as
they dici in spreading nets before they would keep away the other bird in
the form of d dear charmer.
DON'T BE AFRAID TO PRAISE YOUR UIISIAND. Make
iim feel that you think lie is a good one, and it wil be a strong stimuls to his being so. If yon ire foolish enougli to let Iimii know that he has lost, the name he may soon abaden +k- WIy,


/


Remark abl;Photo of Sinking
Ship a d Escape of Her Crew


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~ A ,-U4t- -'x
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HIS picture is perhapsthe most remarkable er taken of a sinking ship and the mes c if hl crew . It is a wo ti terful picture, a pietnure of a a four mastedi schooner Marjory rowing, an Amerilifetime. It sio s thfirst to her ocean grave about 200 miles off Sandy

Booc. New York, ioit he Atdntic. Captain Walker and his crew of six tire Hook. pNew of, laom time *s I in a lifeboat. A minuteafter they had, shoved
away from the stern the sh disapeared. She had sprung a leak during a gale, and the captain and hl" en probably would never have been heard of if the North German Lloyd I ner Berlin had not passed just at the right molethe th e ot-mra Llasd 'aken from the Berlin. fient.Tile photograph wxas t_________


There Never Was a TimeThat the Stage


Was Better


Than It s Today


By BRANDER MA F IEWS, Academic Critic and Stuc


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dent of


UST. at present we hear 'ome talk about the DECADENCE OF THE
DRAMA, some opin1i expressed that the drama is as bad as At can be. But these views are voiced, I think, largely by those vho FAIL TO CONSIDER TIE STAGE AS A WhOLE and really fix their attention on one or tv )plays unwisely exploited.
THERE CAN BE NO QUESTION THAT THE STAGE TODAY IS FAR BETTER THAN ATI ANY PREVIOUS PERIOD, CERTAINLY OF THE UNITED STATES.

Fifty years ago the daiama of the English language was simoply-conteriptible. There was at that time a sharp division between literattire and tie drinama. So bad '-re coililions then that respecta1)1l people' weire DRIVEN AWAY FROM THIE THEATER except when they wentt to see a great actor-Booth, Kean, Cushman, for example. Ih -those 1ays respectable and discrimination people never went to the theater to see pictures of contenporar. .life, for such pictures were not to be found oit the stage. For pictures rle to conteitiporary life people read novels.
What is particularly hopeful about the playwrights of today is that they are tnot trying to be literary.. Thtey are T1IYlN(; TO flE I'NTElRESTiNG, andi nmllru f them are trying to be iIIlnT-i iFUL. By "literary truth" I do no .imean portrt'aral of the extermil facts of life bt idelity'to the inner lifeand it is this inner lift that teyouna e itei are trying to get. Person ll- I think the dnma will be ,l I E DiMP0hI'TANT THAN trOSI IFICT lION during the le'xt twelnty-five years.
St
+++++.,+++**4*44***
0a
Modern -'raze For Speed Proves i

ThatnWe Have Come to

03e a Bad Lot

By DAN CRAWu ORD, Idealist and Missionary, Vho Recently Completed Twenty-. wo Years of Christianizing Work In Central Africa

IT is the obvious fAet that you are GOING TOO QUICK. You are
cursed with the Ieliri in of speed and a speed along the paths of the
lost vile mitri er-.N:l isiit.
Now, wi hat does 41Ithis invol ve? It means thit if you bolt your foodmost impolitely bolt.Fyour food-you'll disorganize gastronomic functions. Nationally you are I olting terrifically; and you are IN THE THROES OF ECONOMIC 1U_.DI1-ST1ON.'
The old definite 'n of speed hits off the whole situation. For what is speed but A ME CNS BY WHICII YOU MISS AS MUCH AS POSSIBLE BETN IEEN THE POINT OF" DEPARTURE AND THE
POINT OF ARRILVAL? When as a child yoi ate your candies as fast as possible so as t ) get thiem all and quickly, how you longed to have


them back again!
Remerir yPhilippi And if you will nlobihu(l at the cause t' YO&P SPEED Aipation You1 uWill fin At h;ttL IN more thatI the SpCIERICA1
THE OLD 13Bi THE) HASTE. IT'S A LVES. GOOD IDIOM INJR AND MAN IS A BAD I IN OUR CONNOJ DON'T YOU SEE -


thare an omelet without breaking the eggs. cross the crust of tiis planet earth in auto, Miles an hour YOU CANNOT HAVE
07YU],SCE- \ERYTOOs.nAnd too late Piisis rTon-tLIat the scenery profiteth
5HE THAT BELIEVETH SHALL NOT MAKE


p VES YOU ALL A BAD LOT. IT IS '1SEC OSYTA A AXN t SPEECH TO SAY THAT A HASTY ERE I. MORE MEANING THAN WE FANCY F A AN WHO iS SWIFT. WHO IS FAST,


KEEP SUICIDE PACT.


Coupe Thought Death
Out.


Easiest Wa3


..


$25,000 Fire at Sumter.
The main 'building of the Mcfvei Yelverton Furnture
sash, blind and door factory was doe rtroyed by fire at Sumtcr. S. C., re suiting in a loss of aliproxiilately $25, 000. The origin of the blaze is a ns Company
tery, the fire being discovered at G:3( oclock, when it had gained consider able headway. The building was own. PALATKA, FLA.
ed in part by the city.

Pays Troiley- Fare Aftir 7 Years. A letter inclotsi1g 10 cents ir stamps, was reeeivtd by the walkbI Ttansit coripltiy of' Milletown, N ST. AUGUSTINE
Y.-. fi-itnia %out all wt vho i r tet it,11at.i-i rodle twice'tn tettfll ,- car sABSTRACT CO.
'tir IIS go ai) tthlii'conilietor ftti! c to (.ollee(.t her fare. e saidshe WA
coiskeic-tricll ,i Compelte Abs tracts of St.
Wilson I t" Possum From Slave. Johns County Lands. Prsi dent i sol iti lve a ItosTstin fron lohiFrrowof Fa-Telephone192.
lind. N. C'. F-arrotw is aniiageti eniore nian, who once was a sli t. Tb' DEWITT C. REED, Mgr. preshilt It;s-ri.Aigstiea:letterFlr thanks for his gift. St. Augutitne FlQrida


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We are showing the loveliest advance styles you ever saw right now.




T AKE this chic
Butterick design, forinstance. You can have the blouse and tunics in chiffon, the under section of


the skirt in satin and the trimming of swan's-down. We have the exact materials you want for this stunning frock.


OUR BUTTERICK PATTERN DEPARTMENT is showing all the smartest, newest advance styles. Call and get the latest Butterick Fashion Sheet FREE.


Any butterick PI-attern delivered-to you on reCeipt


of price.



iheErnstCo


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.0 Forida
THE S - ORit OF VALUES


Palate


218- 224 Lemon St.


- - -IF- - - -1


New Arrivals





in House Furnishings at this Store, include many new patterns in Velvet and Axminister Art Squares at $20.00 Small Rugs to match priced from $1.25 up to $5.00. Dining Room outfits in Fumed SOak and Mission Finishes. Many beautiful pieces of Bedroom Furniture in Mahogany & Walnut. Several handsome Buck's Ranges.
Several new patterns of Linoleum. And other new fall goods are arriving daily.
Whatever you need for the
home, call here or write for
prices.


I


A double suicitle was bromimilit t( light at Atlanti City wlten the decompose(I boilies of James F. Bly, all IS-y- oIM medical student of i'liiladelphia, ant his 18-year-old briod. were found in the woodIs near Northfield. Bullet wouids in the temples of eliph a revolver containing twc etpiy cliambers lying between them and a iuit, signed by both convincedtl the police that the couple ended theil lives as a result of i suicide plct. Tht note. which was iiithe young man'* hanl writing. read :
"Death is the -asiest way out. Rost will kill herself tirst anil I will follow.'"
their letters found il fly's clothJn lltlO tof iieniial dtohettionto theil wtltwm w ifritids say took ilac last Augst. Tplie couple had be-ul

The .yon'ls fatlwri is %Ilwr J. DyNJ a weilI kiown railroad lua of Altolia, Pa. His wile was he -1giter of Mrs. M. E IlerrIan. of Auait, City.

Negro Saves Sheriff's Life.
The fiitlitii ss o f WilII audley, at old1 negro ployceeholill to Comnty jail at Claytli oil a tu1ider t-ltarg.'
-aved Sholrif Tcal froml being chohm to diatth ,y walttr Ad;Is. %-i ie formerly fit Aiueris. Ua.il, anil tw nmgro prisoners. , rT, iiiiito iy ,ii ShieriffrTefl. taVie hIis tk-ys ind 'staic wits frustrated when, overhc-trl h" Dudley and ret lt' to the slierif




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