Citation
News-herald

Material Information

Title:
News-herald
Uniform Title:
News-herald (Panama City, Fla. : 1970)
Added title page title:
Panama City News Herald
Place of Publication:
Panama City, FL
Publisher:
Halifax Media Group, Tim Thompson - Publisher, Mike Cazalas - Editor
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama City (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Bay County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Florida -- Bay County ( fast )
Florida -- Panama City ( fast )
Genre:
Newspapers. ( fast )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Newspapers ( fast )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Bay -- Panama City
Coordinates:
30.166847 x -85.665513

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (May 1, 1970)-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
34303828 ( OCLC )
sn 96027210 ( LCCN )
ocm34303828

Related Items

Preceded by:
Panama City news
Preceded by:
Panama City herald (Panama City, Fla. : 1952)

UFDC Membership

Aggregations:
Florida Digital Newspaper Library

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Full Text

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** Business .........................D7 Hurricane Heroes ............C1 Local & State ..................D1 Nation & World ..............D3 Viewpoints .....................D6 Weather .........................D4 SATURDAYPartly sunny 75 / 52FRIDAYClouds, sun 76 / 51TODAYMostly sunny 75 / 49 Panama City News Herald Want to subscribe? Call 850-747-5050 Saturday, November 10, 2018 PANAMA CITY @The_News_Herald facebook.com/panamacitynewsherald75 ¢ www.newsherald.com SPECIAL EDITION: HURRICANE MICHAEL 30 DAYS LATER LANDSCAPES AND LIVES FOREVER CHANGED By Katie Landeck@PCNHKatieL klandeck@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY „ Every day in Bay County is a rebel-lion, a rebellion against everything Hurricane Michael was supposed to be.Its the chainsaws that roar to life every morning and hammering of nails as people clear the trees off their roof. Its the children every morn-ing who peer around piles of twisted branches waiting for their school bus. Its the elderly woman clearing brush out of the road, whose car windshield is shattered, but she chooses to instead write over the plastic cover the word perseverance.Ž Its the woman out running with her headphones determined to exercise despite the blocked sidewalks and the hundreds of haulers collecting debris. Its Mayor Greg Brudnicki sitting down with an old friend with a mold problem in the early hours of the morning over breakfast burritos „ before the challenges of finding long-term housing and com-plication of reopening the hospital take over his day „ to offer his friend a place to live. Every act, big or small, is its own rebellion. Every restau-rant and business that opens its doors, every block with power and water, every roof tarped against the fall rains to keep the water out, every dollar spent at local businesses is a rebellion against the devastation, a commitment not to wallow.Not one more thing will be taken, people say, we are going to rebuild better than before.The only question is, what will that look like? At Panama CityHands pressed to his brow, Panama City Manager Mark McQueen takes exactly three seconds to think. Speaking too quickly to himself to finish the words, he runs down his to do list and swirl-ing thoughts. What comes next?Okay,Ž he finishes, pick-ing up one of the three phones front of in him to make what was deemed the most press-ing call.And there are many, many calls to make.In a race against the clock, Panama City is hoping to turn the relatively short recovery process from Hurricane Michael into decades worth of economic development. This is the time, leaders say, to get done all of the things that have been talked about over the years „ improving the water and sewer, redevel-oping the marinas, building premiere parks „ as well as initiatives never before dreamed about like enticing Verizon to build a 5G network or creating a plan that would allow lite rail to one day come to the city. The options are to capitalize on the moment and build a better future than previously dreamed, leaders say, or standby and watch everything the community has worked for slip away as Panama City City Manager Mark McQueen stands Wednesday near an area destroyed by Hurricane Michael in Panama City. The retired two-star general started his new job just two weeks before the storm. [TAMARA LUSH/AP] ENDURING. RESTORING. REBUILDING. Panama City creates plan for the futureFRONT PAGES, B Section „ Page by page, News Herald covers tell the story of what happened as the community started to rebuildHURRICANE HEROES, C Section „ Neighbors helping neighbors, strangers helping strangers, in their own words survivors thank helpers MORE INSIDE Stacy and Kaye Harbin salvage items from around the foundation of their home near 42nd Street in Mexico Beach, Florida after da mage from hurricane Michael on October 24, 2018. [RICHARD GRAULICH/PBPOST.COM] See FUTURE, A21

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** A2 Saturday, November 10, 2018 | The News HeraldPANAMA CITY „ Without even looking at the stats, it's clear Hurricane Michael was a storm for the history books. But let's break down some of the storm's impressive numbers:919 : Millibars, the central pressure, measured in the storm. Average sea-level pressure is 1013.25 millibars 3 : Ranking in the most intense hurricanes on record based on central pressure 73 : hours between Michael forming as a tropical storm and landfall 19 : feet of storm surge initially measured by the US Geological Survey in Mexico Beach 129 : miles per hour of the highest veri“ ed gust so far, taking on Tyndall Air Force base 116 : miles per hour of the highest gust recorded at FSU PC, though there are unveri“ ed reports of 129 mph 2 : miles per hour short of a Category 5 storm Despite these numbers, progress is being made after Hurricane Michael. The following are some of the most important recovery-oriented numbers, as of Nov. 6: 21 : Storm-related casualties reported in Bay County 211 : Citizen information hotline 317,786 : total meals served by the Salvation Army 432,619 total meals served by the Red Cross 36 : Emergency Response Vehicles (ERVs) doing mobile feeding with the Red Cross 445 : total population still living in the shelter 1,560,000 : cubic yards of debris collected total throughout Bay County 725 : number of vessels assessed by the US Coast Guard and FWCRecovery by the Numbers PANAMA CITY „ Volunteers who have served in Panama City and Lynn Haven can help the cities meet their FEMA "deductible" by logging their volunteer hours, donations made and money spent by businesses to help those in need.The Federal Emergency Management Agency will cover most of the cost to clean up and rebuild, but the cities must still pay a percent of the total „ a cost that likely will reach millions of dollars, according to Panama City Commissioner Jenna Haligas. However, the city can reduce the amount it must pay by documenting all the volunteer hours, donations made and money spent by businesses to help those in need, Haligas said.The volunteer hours and money spent for that gas and all the chainsaws ƒ all that can be documented" and put toward that percentage Hali-gas said. And you dont have to live in the city to docu-ment, but the volunteer hours had to be used inside the city limits.ŽTo document volunteer work for Panama City, visit the citys website at www. pcgov.org, then click on the volunteers form listed on the front page.To document volunteer work for Lynn Haven, fill out a FEMA volunteer form, available on the city's Facebook page or request one by emailing Ben Janke Bjanke@cityoflynnhaven.com. If you cannot print and complete the form, or complete the form on your device then please email Janke with your name, phone number, date, the hours volunteered, location, and work performed.How to log volunteer hours and help cities FEMA Disaster Recovery Center8 a.m. to 7 p.m. daily. FEMA is set up at the Bay County Public Library, 898 W. 11th St., to talk with people about their claims or appeals, provide information about housing and rental resource information, referrals to other support agencies, status of applications received by FEMA, crisis counseling, disaster legal services, disaster unemployment and the Small Business Administration.ShelterArnold High School is open as the countys Red Cross shelter and is continuing to accept residents. Cleanup assistanceAffected residents should call Crisis Cleanup at 1-800451-1954 to be matched with volunteers. Potential housingFEMA database to search available units: https:// survey123.arcgis.com/ share/beb1d86dc4054bf78c04514980c940d1Operation Blue RoofTemporary tarps are available by calling 888-ROOF-BLU (888766-3258) or applying in person at the Disaster Recovery Center, the Walmart near Pier Park or the Walmart in Lynn Haven. The program is taking applications through Nov. 11.Legal ServicesLegal Services of Northwest Florida will be available to provide legal information in the following areas: preventing wrongful evictions, assistance with insurance claims, helping residents receive FEMA assistance, challenging scams and contractor fraud, helping residents with public bene“ ts and more. Information on eligibility and areas of law covered are also available at www. LSNF.org.**Finding servicesThe 211 Citizen Hotline continues to receive non-emergency calls. For out-of-state callers, dial 850-248-6099.HOW TO GET HELP HURRICANE MICHAEL | FACTS AND FIGURES

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** The News Herald | Saturday, November 10, 2018 A3

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** A4 Saturday, November 10, 2018 | The News Herald HURRICANE MICHAEL | THE BEGINNINGBy Katie Landeck@PCNHKatieL klandeck@pcnh.comEditors Note: This story was written on Oct. 10.After the anxiety and intensity of a Category 4 hurricane sweeping through, massive disbelief and dull shock are settling in throughout Bay County.The swiftness of the storm and rapid intensity left almost everyone feeling unprepared for what happened. Build-ings people didn't bother, or have the time, to board up were leveled. Communication lines „ including first responders' radios „ have been snapped. Deaths from the storms brute force are being reported.It was rough. We lost a lot we have a lot of properties in St. Andrews that got flattened. What can you do? Its Mother Nature,Ž John McVeigh, a prop-erty owner driving around Panama City Beach after the storm said.On Thomas Drive in Panama City Beach, where the damage was not as severe, it was still everywhere you looked, and the harder you looked the more you saw. Billboards were reduced to twisted metal, a testament to the storms power. Roofs were torn off of buildings, while some buildings just collapsed. Trees were down; power lines were down. Everything was broken, the abnormality was the items that were somehow intact.In Panama City, it smelled like fresh wood because everything had fallen. Everywhere you went, alarms rang endless into the night because theres no one to shut them off, and it didn't matter.The few people who dared to be out on the street were brusquely hurried along by police enforcing the curfew, pointed in the direction of the open shelters.Helplessness is palpable. That's the tone in Panama City tonight. Tomorrow we organize. And then we rebuild because what else can you do?SHOCK SETTLES INBay County Sheriffs Of“ ce deputies Alex Young and Jared Waker watch Hurricane Michael from the Thomas Drive “ re station. [PATTI BLAKE / THE NEWS HERALD] Ferrell Leah and Dewayne McGill help take the inventory out of the Bottle Stopper in Millville after Hurricane Michael on Friday, October 12, 2018. Both workers are concerned about the health of the owner and being able to reopen the liquor store. [JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] Katie Landeck and Patrick McCrelessThe News HeraldEditors note: Versions of these interviews appeared Oct. 12 Corina GambleHaving weathered every other major storm in her home, Corina Gamble was sitting in her favorite recliner in her home Wednesday morning when a ceiling tile fell and hit her on the leg. Water began pouring into her home, but thankfully her bedroom was spared and she retreated into it to spend the night. Her walls, she said, were shak-ing and two large oak trees fell in her yard and on her house.ŽIt sounded like a freight train coming through,Ž she said. I thought we were goners.ŽBut on Thursday morning, she was sitting on her front porch after having swept as much of the water out of her home as she could, while a team of her neighbors took a chainsaw to the trees that encased her home.ŽIve lived here all my life,Ž said Corina Gamble while start-ing to clean up around her home. And Ive never been through anything like this. Its terrible.ŽGamble said that while her home fared better than most she, and many others, were not adequately pre-pared for the storm.ŽWe werent safe at all,Ž she said. Brian ZerrBrian Zerr, owners of Auto ER on 11th Street, took shelter in his shop with seven other people, four cats, three dogs and a parrot, thinking it would be safer than a home because it was up on cinder blocks. The buildings height; however, left it vulnerable to the worst of Michaels winds and the roof was torn off in a matter of seconds.ŽWere determined to re-open,Ž Zerr said. But it probably wont be in this location.ŽA day after Hurricane Michael „ the rst interviews The media keeps saying Bay County is resilient. But this is going to need a miracle worker.ŽWayne Wright, in his friends living room when a tree fell on the home, shown above Wayne Wright was sitting in the living room when this tree fell. [KATIE LANDECK/THE NEWS HERALD]

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** The News Herald | Saturday, November 10, 2018 A5By Eryn Dion and Katie LandeckThe News HeraldPANAMA CITY „ With one last crash, the last video taken inside the intact News Herald building „ a cross between a memorial and a found footage horror movie by Editor Mike CazŽ Cazalas via Facebook Live on the fateful Oct. 10 „ cut to black, ending one era and starting the next.The video ended not a moment too soon.Shortly after, the front doors, under the sheer force of wind and low pressure, blew open, slamming into the glass vestibule and shattering the cage. The combination of water, wind and low pressure created almost a waterfall effect, Cazalas said, like someone had turned on a faucet that was gushing into the building. It was, every-one in the building said later, almost surreal.I was watching from the back of the newsroom, from the door that separates the old and new part of the build-ing, and a maintenance guy next to me said, We have to do something about that!Ž Cazalas remembered. And I was like, no, buddy, we have to get to the back now.ŽOver the next three hours, the building tried to stand up to the bullying brought by Hurricane Michael, but was beat into submission. Literal tons of water pooled on the roof, causing the masonry walls with little reinforcement to buckle and collapse inward, like they were melted in the rain. The drop ceiling fell over the photo department, sports desk and circulation and inches of water soaked into the carpet. The roof ripped off the press room, sending those tons of water pouring into our state-of-the-art press. The damage was so severe, the front part of the News Herald will have to bulldozed and rebuilt, according to Publisher Tim Thompson.But like always, when the 60 mph winds stopped racing through the building, a paper needed to get out.What happened immediately following wasnt something we predicted but we were well aware of our communitys dependency on information and the role we needed to play in the rebuilding effort through our county and surrounding com-munities,Ž said Publisher Tim Thompson.When it all ended, only one of the employees in the building, reporter Genevieve Smith, had a working phone, the sole link to the outside world.Staff was scattered for the storm. Print Managing Editor and Photo Chief Patti Blake had been riding with a Bay County Sheriffs officer before the storm hit, and ended up sheltering with them on the west side of the Hathaway Bridge. Landeck was updating the website until 10 minutes before com-munications went out, using those last minutes to call cor-porate for back up. Reporter Patrick McCreless had been home, waiting to start working once the storm hit. Collin Breaux was at the Emer-gency Operation Center, but the most fortunately placed person was Digital Manager Managing Editor Eryn Dion, who was on a 23 hour train trip „ with wi-fi „ getting ready to take a pre-planned vacation. Dion was one of the first people Smith called.It was a surprise, but I didnt know to be surprised. I didnt know there was no cell service. I didnt know the building had been destroyed,Ž Dion said. More messages started to flow in from Gate-House corporate, and then it sunk in. I was the only one who had contact with you.ŽBefore there was time to take in what had happened, the planning started. Lan-deck, who had gone out with Blake to start reporting, real-ized standing in the middle of Thomas Drive she had just enough service to use Google Hangouts, was able to get in touch with Dion to start piec-ing together if there would be a paper.Yes, Dion said, send me what you can. On the ride back over the bridge, taken in an ambu-lance because it was the only vehicle available, Landeck sent over her first, most raw impressions via Gchat of the damage left by Hurricane Michael, which were sent to our sister paper, the North-west Florida Daily News, for publication, along with what had been sent over ear-lier. The Daily News worked overtime to do what the News Herald staff couldnt, finding a place to get the paper printed, making a budget for content place-ment when Landeck said she couldnt and later on deliver-ing supplies.For the next few days, using Google Hangouts, Smiths phone, Dions convenient location and the Daily News help, a paper was strung together every day and printed in Mont-gomery, though not delivered because roads into Bay County had been effectively shut down. Brutally early deadlines meant waking up at 5 a.m. most days, meeting at Smiths house „ where much of the staff was staying after damage to their homes and for communication „ or in the News Herald parking lot to formulate a plan, then splitting up and hoping someone found enough cell service to send in whatever they reported. In those early days, with conditions still dangerous and not a lot of gas, The News Herald relied on the kindness and dedication of groups like the Bay County Sheriffs Office and Gulf Power to get to where the stories were.The second morning after the storm, I got up at like, 4 a.m. and sat in my car to listen to the radio for a few hours just to know what was going on,Ž said Landeck. And I heard Rick DelaHaya (local spokesperson for Gulf Power). I somehow was able to send a few emails, and he ended up spending the day taking the team where we needed to go, and tried to get us plugged into wifi.ŽWithout Gulf Power, we wouldnt have gotten a paper out that day,Ž she continued. At least, we wouldnt have been able to get to communi-ties like Springfield and Lynn Haven.ŽAnd with virtually no way to submit stories, reporters on the ground relied on those outside, like Dion and the Daily News. Interviews were played to Dion and Daily News reporters on speaker phone as then the audio was transcribed through a fuzzy-at-best connection, reporters hand wrote stories then typed them into Smiths phone to be texted in, and several times Smith had to call the Daily News and dictate entire sto-ries to their reporters on the end of the line.It was like the old days, before cell phones,Ž Smith said.Photos, too large to send through text or Google Hang-outs, were an issue. But early in the morning on Oct. 12, through some clever hotspot usage, our photographers were able to upload their first batch of photos „ finally showing the world what Hur-ricane Michael had wrought on Bay County through the eyes of the local media who, without an office or a press, cell phone service, or even homes in some cases, put out a paper every single day after the storm without missing a beat. Behind us every step of the way was our parent com-pany, GateHouse Media, who ensured we were able to get our paper out and arranged for out-of-town help to give our reporters a (reluctant) break to get their lives back in order.Our parent company, Gatehouse Media, rallied behind the scenes like nothing Ive ever witnessed in my 35 years in his industry,Ž said Thompson. Publishing consistently was a very legiti-mate concern but we were able to print in Montgomery Alabama that first night and for the next nine days before returning to 11th St. In Panama City. Our first few days of operation back were possible because of generator power before moving back to Gulf Power on the day they set for restoring our plant fully.ŽWhile it was certainly hard, nearly impossible at times, and challenging still one month later, not putting out the paper was never an option for the staff.Its our job. Its our job to report the news and it doesnt matter if you have a home or your car is destroyed or you have no electricity or running water,Ž said photographer Joshua Boucher, who worked during and continu-ously after the storm. You need to report the news and nothing can stop that.I feel like I have a covenant with this community that I will give them the news.ŽGET TO THE BACK NOWDaylight streams through holes in the roof on Oct. 13 at the Panama City News Herald in Panama City, Fla. [PATTI BLAKE/THE NEWS HERALD] Panama City News Herald editor Mike Cazalas and reporter Patrick McCreless plan their next move after Hurricane Michael on Wedn esday, Oct. 10. The building suffered damage from the high winds, including losing part of the roof over the printing press. [JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] A Phoenix Restoration Services worker clears rubble on Saturday at the Panama City News Herald in Panama City, Fla. [PATTI BLAKE/THE NEWS HERALD] HURRICANE MICHAEL | THE NEWS HERALD

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** A6 Saturday, November 10, 2018 | The News Herald HURRICANE MICHAEL | HIGH RANKING VISITSBy Jim Thompson Northwest Florida Daily NewsEditors note: A version of this story ran Oct. 16. LYNN HAVEN „ President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump both got a birds-eye and ground-level view Monday of the havoc wreaked by Hurricane Michael as it smashed across the North-east Florida Panhandle and into Georgia last week.Along with Florida Gov. Rick Scott, Federal Emergency Management Association officials and Mayor Margo Anderson, the Trumps toured a neighborhood in the hardhit town of Lynn Haven, where the damaged roofs of many homes were covered with blue tarps. The scent of pine sap from broken trees still filled the air.To see this personally ... total devastation,Ž Trump said as he walked through a residen-tial area along 7th Street. It was almost like a giant tornado „ a really wide tornado.ŽAmong the people the Trumps and Scott visited Monday during their quick tour was Michael Rollins, a white-haired gentleman who rode out the storm with his pets. St and-ing in front of his house, its roof covered with blue plastic, Rollins spent several minutes talking with Trump and the other officials who toured the neighborhood.At one point, Rollins told Trump about the tree that narrowly missed his home when it fell.It just about got it,Ž Trump said.After visiting residents at their homes, the Trumps toured an aid distribution center in Lynn Haven where local volunteers were cooking meals and handing out water. Parked amid the tents pitched across the in-town parking lot was a FEMA vehicle, out-side of which sat a number of FEMA personnel, speaking individually with victims of the hurricane. Asked during his tour of Lynn Haven to compare Hurricane Michael with other recent hurricanes, Trump suggested it was the worst in recent memory.Look behind you,Ž he said, gesturing to the heaps of fallen trees and snapped power lines surrounding the impromptu distribution center. This is incredible.ŽAssessing the federal response to Hurricane Michael thus far, Trump gave high marks to his administration.Were doing a lot ... more than anybody would have ever done,Ž he said.Trump left Lynn Haven with an optimistic thought, saying he expected that it wouldnt take long for people to start rebuilding their homes, busi-nesses and lives.Thirty days, you wont even recognize it,Ž he said.PRESIDENT TRUMP VISITSBy Eryn Dion @PCNHErynDion | edion@pcnh.com Editors note: A version of this story ran on Oct. 26. TYNDALL AIR FORCE BASE „ Standing amid buildings without roofs, trees snapped like matchsticks and a model F-15 sitting upside down, Vice President Mike Pence brought a message to Tyndall Air Force Base Thursday „ that the federal government still supports their mission and is commit-ted to rebuilding the base.We will rebuild Tyndall Air Force Base,Ž Pence told a group of Florida National Guard and Coast Guard per-sonnel on Oct. 25. Fifteen days after the eye of Hurricane Michael passed over the base, Col. Brian Laidlaw said Tyndall personnel and airmen from other nearby bases have made it through 503 buildings „ about half the total number on base „ and what theyve seen so far has been encouraging. No more than 30 percent of those build-ings are a total loss and many critical areas did not receive as much damage as originally thought.Today we have come so much further than I could have ever imagined when I came out of that ride out shelter that night,Ž Laidlaw said.During his visit, Pence received a briefing on the damage and recovery efforts on base, along with the needs Tyndall will have moving for-ward if they are to rebuild. Pence, who toured the area about a week ago with President Donald Trump, said he was impressed and inspired by the progress being made.This is a vitally impor-tant base,Ž he said. And you have proved your mettle once again.ŽAfter the briefing at Tyndall, Pence, along with Second Lady Karen Pence, Sect. Of the Air Force Heather Wilson, Kellyanne Conway, and others from Washington, toured Hiland Park Baptist Church, where they surveyed the sanctuary „ once a focal point for activity in the com-munity that now sits gutted and eerily empty, lit only by a pair of industrial rented lights. The group visited volunteers from the Southern Baptist Convention and also met with members of the Florida National Guard, Coast Guard and military families, where the message of rebuilding Tyndall was met with thunderous applause.The fact that Vice President Pence came down in person to say that makes me the happiest member of Con-gress in the country today,Ž Congressman Neal Dunn said.PENCE TOURS TYNDALLBy Eryn Dion@PCNHErynDion | edion@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY „ Just days after the historic and catastrophic Hurricane Michael tore through the Florida Pan-handle, Gov. Rick Scott was boots on the ground in Panama City and surrounding areas, surveying damage and order-ing the recovery response.On Oct. 13, Scott was touring devastated neighborhoods and ordering the Florida National Guard to airdrop food and supplies to those stranded in Franklin County. Two days later, he was back, this time bringing with him President Donald Trump as they flew over the swaths of damage and tarped roofs before walk-ing through devastated streets in Lynn Haven.An avid supporter of Trump, Scott quickly got the presidents ear, opening the flow of federal resources and disaster assistance. He was a frequent flyer on the phone lines of the Bay County Emergency Operations Center, making almost daily phone calls, according to his schedule.In the coming weeks, Scott would escort a revolving door of high ranking officials, includ-ing Vice President Mike Pence and Secretary of the Air Force Heather Wilson on a tour of Tyndall Air Force Base and Hiland Park Baptist Church, as they were briefed on the extent of the damage and, more impor-tantly, what was needed for recovery. He even spent some of the dwindling hours before the Nov. 6 election at a community BBQ event in Lynn Haven.Gov. Rick Scott shows out for the Panhandle By Ann MeyersGateHouse MediaEditors note: A version of this story first ran on Nov. 1. PANAMA CITY „ The importance of housing for small-business owners was made clear by Hurricane Michael with many distracted for the past three weeks by concerns about where they were going to live or how they were going to repair their damaged homes.Its quite eye-opening to actually experience this. Its almost like being in a war zone,Ž said Ben Carson, U.S. secretary of Housing and Urban Develop-ment, who arrived in Panama City on Oct. 31 to survey damage and tour small businesses with Small Business Administration administrator Linda McMahon. You almost have to think of it the same way in terms of recov-ery,Ž Carson said.He said the recovery would require a coordinated effort among state, local and federal agencies. While some citizens expressed frustration over the process of applying for assistance, Carson applauded the effort.Its never as fast as we would like it to be, but I think the response has been tremen-dous,Ž he said.HUD secretary tours damageHousing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson and Linda McMahon, head of the U.S. Small Business Association, meet with local of“ cials in Millville on Wednesday. [JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] Vice President Mike Pence speaks at Tyndall Air Force Base on Thursday, Oct. 25. [JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] Florida National Guard troops, with Gov. Rick Scott, take cases of bottled water off a helicopter in Franklin County as part of the states hurricane relief response. In addition to water, the state has a large stock of Meals-Ready to Eat to deliver to storm-ravaged areas. [CONTIRUBTED PHOTO] President Donald Trump and “ rst lady Melania Trump hand out water on Oct. 15 in Lynn Haven during a visit to areas affected by Hurricane Michael. Gov. Rick Scott is at right. President Donald Trump, “ rst lady Melania Trump and Florida Gov. Rick Scott, tour a neighborhood affected by Hurricane Michael in Lynn Haven, Fla. [AP PHOTOS/EVAN VUCCI]

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** The News Herald | Saturday, November 10, 2018 A7

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** A8 Saturday, November 10, 2018 | The News Herald HURRICANE MICHAEL | COUNTYBy Katie Landeck @PCNHKatieL klandeck@pcnh.comBAY COUNTY „ In the Bay County water office, things were going roughly to plan as Hurricane Michael altered the landscape. That is, right until the moment the roof blew off and it started raining on all the expensive technology the county uses to make potable water.That was not part of the drill „ so the crew improvised.Grabbing what they could, the crew on duty brought the equipment to a much smaller interior office to set up Opera-tion 2.0 and have a way to get the system back online once the storm quieted.They were dedicated,Ž said Utility Director Ben Blitch said. They knew we had to get it done.ŽBecause the thing about the water system is, if the county doesnt have water, nobody has water. And no matter what other damage there may be, without a system for the county to make potable water, everyone is going to have to boil what comes from their tap.For a moment after the storm „ surveying just the general devastation around him „ Blitch was worried they were going to have a problem.While Operation 2.0 was being set up, miles away at the Emergency Operation Center (EOC) in Southport, utility employees were boarding helicopters to find out what the damage to their system might look like.Immediately, they too found a problem. At the Tyndall wastewater treatment plant that services much of the county, a screen had broken loose and wedged itself into another piece of equipment. If it wasnt removed „ and quickly „ sewage was going to start backing up into peoples homes, Blitch said.When the crew got back to the EOC and explained the problem, some firefighters said they knew how to cut it out, County Manager Bob Majka said, they just needed a ride.They got back in the helicopter and were able to cut it away and get the effluent moving,Ž Majka said.That was the first of a few lucky breaks, Blitch said. The next big break was that while the main pumping sta-tion that allows the county to supply water had significant damage, the smaller station built in a somewhat remote area on the Econfina in 2015 was still working. Better yet, Blitch said, was when they learned the three main pipes the county uses to get water to people were intact.If we had had breaks in those, thats not a go-out-and-fix-it,Ž Blitch said. Thats significant work.ŽThere were plenty of goout-and-fix-it jobs though, and plenty of tasks that used to be a one person job that were suddenly required a four person team with so many sys-tems down, Blitch said.Normally, you can have one guy who sits as a computer and can turn valves on and off,Ž Blitch said. We had to do all that manually ƒ it was at least five or six days we were doing that.ŽSpeeding up the process was the little talked about Florida's Water/Wastewater Agency Response Network (FlaWARN), that sent teams of water/wastewater treat-ment workers to help, just like the linemen that came to Gulf Powers aid.They saved us,Ž Blitch said.A project that seemed like to could take months was suddenly done within weeks.Its dedication. Thats really all it is,Ž Blitch said. The guys knew what they needed to do, and they executed it ƒ We have awesome people.ŽTURNING THE WATER BACK ONBy Katie Landeck @PCNHKatieL klandeck@pcnh.comEditor's Note: Since the storm finding housing solutions has been a top priority of county officials, who are now trying to help connect FEMA with trailer parks with available pads to facilitate FEMA trailers. This story that ran on Nov. 5 is a snapshot of one of the trailer parks in the county and the challenges. CEDAR GROVE „ Its not that bad, Suzanne Buholtz says, as she describes the empty Folgers coffee can shes been using as facilitiesŽ ever since Hurricane Michael ripped off every wall of her trailer and took the roof for good measure.In fact, she says while spin-ning slightly in an old, black office chair shes set up in front of her neon green tent, the whole experience has been fantastic.Ž And shes not being sarcastic.A guy gave me this tent. A lady gave me this canopy. Another person brought me an army cot. People have been really nice,Ž Bulholtz said. Another brought me a nice thick blanket. I had saved a few but this is good. Another person brought me pillows ƒ Ive had three hot meals a day.ŽThe only thing we need is more ice,Ž said her companion Michael Nelson, who was eating a fruit salad with banana, grapes and strawberries before it went bad. The pair said they couldnt afford to evacuate from the home they were sharing at Cedar Grove Mobile Home Park. With no car and a large pitbull, they saw little choice but to stay in place.Their home, however, didnt stay in place around them. Protected primarily by a quilt they were huddling under in Bulholtz bedroom, first the roof blew off and then the walls start collapsing. In a trailer park that was devastated, theres was unequivocally one of the worst.In the end, it was easier to walk out a wall than it was to walk out the door.Michael came in like a wrecking ball,Ž Bulholtz said, surveying the damage.But they still had the same problems they did before the storm „ a large dog, no vehi-cle, and not a lot of money „ so when everyone else fled the trailer park, they asked one of the many volunteers giving out supplies for a tent and became, in some ways, the trailer parks secretaries „ feeding the outdoor cats, shooing trespassers away and keeping tabs on where many of the neighbors were staying.They seemed to figure it was easier to stay put while FEMA and others figure out what their next step is. They have what they need, Bulholtz said, and the weather is cool enough the tent doesnt get unbearably hot. Bulholtz has even returned to working the night shift a nearby Chevron station, which is only open until midnight because of the curfew.Asked where they will live long term, Bulholtz said now, thats the million dollar question,Ž but she also said its one she hasnt given a lot of though to.Not much use in dwelling on it,Ž she said.FEMA, Nelson said, had given him $1,700 in rental assistance for two months, but theres nothing available,Ž he said, and hes not leaving his dog behind. Instead, they seem to con-tent to hold out until the FEMA trailers theyve been hearing rumors about get sorted out, or maybe a larger cash payment so they can get a new trailer or maybe a tiny home.That would be great,Ž Bulholtz said. I dont need a big place to live, Im living in a tent.ŽPair chose to live in tent at trailer parkLEFT: Michel Nelson gestures to the small room where he took shelter during Hurricane Michael on Nov. 4, 2018 at the Cedar Grov e Mobile Home Park in Panama City, Fla. The mobile home park sustained heavy damage from Hurricane Michael which resulted in many residents being displaced after the hurri cane. RIGHT: Suzanne Buholtz eats lunch in a tent outside of her unlivable mobile home with her pet dog Roxy. [PHOTOS BY PATTI BLAKE/THE NEWS HERALD] ABOVE: A mixed pit named Roxy stands next to the trailer that was her former home. LEFT: Brothers, 10-year-old Marvin Guzman and 20-monthold Mateo play tag on the road outside of their home on Nov. 4, 2018 at the Cedar Grove Mobile Home Park. STAYING IN PLACE

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** The News Herald | Saturday, November 10, 2018 A9Hurricane Michael destruction from the air on Oct.18, 2018. [PATTI BLAKE/THE NEWS HERALD] Hurricane Michael destruction from the air on Oct.18, 2018. [PATTI BLAKE/THE NEWS HERALD] Hurricane Michael destruction from the air on Oct.18, 2018. [PATTI BLAKE/THE NEWS HERALD] Hurricane Michael destruction from the air on Oct.18, 2018. [PATTI BLAKE/THE NEWS HERALD] HURRICANE MICHAEL | AERIAL PHOTOGRAPHS

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** A10 Saturday, November 10, 2018 | The News Herald HURRICANE MICHAEL | PANAMA CITYNews Herald StaffEditors note: Versions of these stories ran throughout October.PANAMA CITY „ Kara Rigby stood on Harrison Avenue, near the corner of East 4th Street on Thursday, Oct. 25, her sparkling, gold-sequined shoes a stark contrast to the gloomy, overcast sky and surrounding destruction.Behind the lifelong Panama City resident, a man on a ladder inspected the facade of Vinny and Bays Coffee and Eatery „ one of Rigbys three downtown businesses. Across the street, dehumidifiers pumped air through tubes into the his-toric Martin Theatre, its art deco architecture still intact. In every direction, streets were filled with piles of debris shoveled out of damaged buildings. Where some might despair at the sight of the historic downtown that has struggled to revitalize for years, Rigby saw potential.I think it gives everybody a clean slate to fix things back like they want,Ž Rigby said.More than two weeks had passed since Hurricane Michael slammed into Panama City and caused widespread damage, including the historic downtown. Like Rigby, some downtown shop owners plan to reopen soon or already have reopened. But more so than just digging out of the rubble, some business owners are cautiously optimistic that the destruction could stimulate the downtown redevelopment theyve sought for years.Jim Hayden, owner of The Bagel Maker on West Fourth Street, said that while the hur-ricane caused severe damage, it also had basically washed down-town and freed it for potential redevelopment.Hopefully with an influx of money and influence, we can take what was damaged and rebuild it to make it better,Ž Hayden said, who reopened his business after part of the roof was sucked off and water flowed inside. I just hope nobody goes out of business in the meantime.ŽMatt Wagner, vice president of revitalization programs for Main Street America, said disas-ters like a hurricane can help spur development. Main Street America is a nonprofit that helps revitalize downtowns across the country.When faced with a disaster, it coalesces a community ƒ what you see is a much greater sense of importance for downtowns,Ž Wagner said. Downtowns have historically been the heart of pride for communities.ŽWagner said other downtowns have revitalized themselves after similar disasters, such as the one in Greensburg, Kansas, destroyed by a tornado in 2007.Liane Harding, owner of Main Street Antiques, also saw opportunity when her buildings facade and sign were blown off. I always hated that facade I had,Ž Harding said with a laugh. This is a chance for change.Ž St. AndrewsAgainst all odds, when the winds quieted the Old Sentry was still standing.A mangled mess of snapped tree limbs formed the new landscape of the park. Every single light bulb volunteers have lovingly roped around its branches for a holiday display had burst. The world had changed around it.But the 250-year-old oak tree „ that withstood the Civil War and everything that happened since then „ was still proudly standing at the center of Oaks by the Bay park after Hurricane Michael and even clinging to some of its leaves.This is one of my favorite parts of the area,Ž said Lance Rettig, looking at the tree after the storm. Its amazing its still here.ŽIn a part of town where ceil-ings collapsed, facades crumbled and some buildings fell down, the Spirit of St. Andrews „ once just a clever play on words for Halloween bar crawl that became a rallying cry „was alive and well after the storm.In the week after the storm, business leader Brad Stephens of Sunjammers sold four kayaks, charging customers a service fee of 10 gallons of gas to come pick them up. Supporting local business, he told customers, is how you rebuilt communities. And when it would have been easier to cancel a Halloween event than hold it, the Spirit of St. Andrews was not something to be quelled.Many businesses, now with inhabitable venues, operated by booths on sidewalks on the main avenue in St. Andrews, selling goods, providing crafts and giving out candy to visitors.The purpose of this is to let the community know we are still here,Ž said Ben Liggin, owner of Native Spirit Museum and Gal-lery. Those of us whose stores are destroyed, well be back.ŽLiggins business is one of just a few with a roof intact.According to Liggin, the Keep St. Andrews Salty group, which spearheads the event each year, made the decision to keep the event following the hurricane to help support locals and promote business, despite the destruction.Kathie Smith, owner of Gypsy Beach Treasured Creations in St. Andrews, has considerable damage to her building, but no plans of quitting.This is my business,Ž she said. This is where I belong.Ž MillvilleRoach spray and rodent con-trol to keep pests out of homes with gaping holes, screws to re-attach knobs to cabinets, bits of pipe to reestablish running water, electrical parts to try to turn the power back on „ these were the essentials people were buying from Boyette and Casey as they tried to rebuild their homes.Since 1958, the little hardware store has been seated in the heart of Millville, a holdover from another era.But as owner Lee Casey said, all earthly things must come to an end,Ž and Hurricane Michael convinced Casey „ who had put the store on the market months ago „ this is the time to go out of business.The store itself actually fared well in the storm „ the walls held, the roof stayed put and the inventory stayed on the shelves. But all the damage around Boyette and Casey, for better or worse, created an opportunity for Casey, who said business has seen a slow decline since 2006. A roofing company that specializes in helping low-income residents in disaster areas noticed the building on the market and reached out about buying the property.Theyre a really good bunch of people,Ž Casey said. They specialize in coming into lowincome areas and helping out. There are so many people who arent insured in this area, he will work with.ŽPeople to help Millvilles largely low-income residents repair their homes is exactly what Casey thinks the neighborhood will need to recover long term, but in the short term, the hardware still is still open „ albeit with a going out of business sale of 20 percent off „ doing what it can to help the community push forward.Most of Millville looks like a a war zoneŽ as Ann Bruner, the owner of Genes Oyster Bar put it, but the iconic oyster bar made it through the storm with minimal damage.Across the street, though, so many trees have fallen that when the brush is cleared the oyster bars patrons might have a view of Watson Bayou from the benches outside. Just three doors the other way, the storm savaged the warehouse for the family business Dans Aluminum, which remains open but co-owner Connie Denham said the damage is as bad at it looks.Ž Its a situation that hurts my soul,Ž she said, as she drives down streets shes known her whole life.I know where Im at,Ž she said, but at the same time I dont realize Im on the same road.ŽSPIRIT OF PANAMA CITY BUSINESSES STAYED STRONGDebris is removed from Harrison Avenue in downtown Panama City on Thursday after damage from Hurricane Michael. [RICHARD GRAULICH/PBPOST.COM] Ben Liggin stands outside his shop, Native Spirit Museum and Gallery. Liggin says his store is one of just a few with its roof intact. [GENEVIEVE SMITH/THE NEWS HERALD] By Collin Breaux and Genevieve Smith The News Herald PANAMA CITY „ Boats were smashed, wooden piers erased, and the seawall damaged at he Panama City Marina. It has lost all functionality,Ž Jared Jones, the assistant city manager in Panama City, said, causing the city to close it indefinitely. Right now insurance companies are working with vessel owners to pull boats out,Ž said Jones. Theres an environmental concern with the fuel and oil in the water. Were working with state and national agencies to get it cleaned up.ŽHowever, Jones said the wreckage gives the city an opportunity. Its a tragedy what happened, not just for the marina but for our community as a whole,Ž said Jones. Our community as a whole will never look the same but the silver lining is that there will be a lot of grant money„federal and state„to mitigate these hazards in the future. Maybe looking though that lens gives us a lot of opportunity for the marina.ŽThe St. Andrews Marina fare a little bit better, Jones said, but there were vessels and docks damaged there. Among the damaged was the 141-year-old Governor Stone, a National Historic Landmark, who was found belly up in the marina by volunteers.She still exists „ parts of her,Ž said Kay Cherry, public relations coordinator for the Friends of the Gover-nor Stone group. The hull is still somewhat intact, so the plans right now are to recover the hull as much as we can.ŽThis isnt the first time the Governor Stone has found itself on the wrong side of a hurricane. But for all the times she was sunk and de-masted during hurricanes, there always has been some-one who went out, loaded her up on pine logs and rolled her out of the marsh to rebuild her. This time will be no different.Marinas devastedOnly the hull of the Governor Stone can be seen at the St. Andrews Marina on Oct. 15, after Hurricane Michael, a Category 4 hurricane, struck the Panhandle on Oct. 10. [DOUG ENGLE/OCALA STAR BANNER]

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** The News Herald | Saturday, November 10, 2018 A11 HURRICANE MICHAEL | LYNN HAVENBy Patrick McCreless 522-5118 | @PCNHPatrickM Editors note: This article originally ran on Oct. 12. LYNN HAVEN „ Cassidy Nelson had food to spare and wanted to share it all.The general manager of the Sonnys Real Pit Bar-B-Q near hurricane-ravaged Lynn Haven just didnt know if anyone would show up Friday to eat. He had no reason to worry.Hundreds of people turned out for the free barbecue chicken, ribs and hamburgers cooked in the Sonnys propane-fueled smoker „ all without Nelson telling anybody what he planned to do. Nelsons generosity was a microcosm of the recovery under way in the Lynn Haven area since Hurricane Michael blasted through on Wednesday. From power crews resetting electricity poles to volunteers handing out sup-plies, recovery work and help were everywhere.All of my family is here serving,Ž Nelson said as people lined up for food at a table set up outside Sonnys. I just wanted to help the community.Ž All around the restaurant and up and down Highway 77 through Lynn Haven were signs of destruction and of need.Trees everywhere were snapped and splintered. Power poles were on the ground and many inactive power lines lied along Highway 77 or in the road. Many buildings and businesses were smashed or without roofs. Traffic south into Lynn Haven was bumper-to-bumper as people tried to get into Panama City.The Lynn Haven Good-will lost the entire front of its building. Its supply of clothes still hung neatly on racks and colorful stuffed toys sat on shelves like nothing had happened.Outside of the partially destroyed Lynn Haven City Hall residents waited for promised donated supplies.I heard on the radio there was supposed to be more sup-plies here at noon,Ž Candice Banks said. Theyre supposed to have chainsaws.ŽBanks said her house survived the hurricane, but the trees in her yard werent as lucky.We have nine oak trees down in our yard,Ž Banks said.Further south on Highway 77, Donnie Childree was inspecting the remains of Central Pentecostal Ministries, which he has attended since 1999. The building lost its facade in the hurricane, but its glass doors and frame remained intact.Theyll definitely rebuild,Ž Childree said of the church. The frame is all still fine.ŽCOMING TOGETHER AFTER THE STORMVanilla Loves grandson, Kayza, 3, dashed over to Sharon Shef“ eld Park, which was littered with trees and building debris, to play on a playset which was partially covered with a towering pine tree. She let the boy climb on the jungle gym and swing to give him a sense of normalcy. [CARLOS R. MUNOZ/GATEHOUSE MEDIA FLORIDA] Dr. Reese Harrison, left, a local dentist gets a hug from an emotional Eva Dixon, right, Wednesday, Oct. 17 in Lynn Haven, FL. Dr. Harrison organized a group of locals and formed an area in a parking lot next to City Hall for Hurricane Michael victims to come and try to get back to some sort of normalcy back. People came to get donated clothes, games, books and to get a warm meal in their stomachs. [DOUG ENGLE/OCALA STAR BANNER] A man walks away after receiving a free can of gas Wednesday, Oct. 17 in Lynn Haven, FL. [DOUG ENGLE/OCALA STAR BANNER] Volunteers work on stacking paper goods Wednesday, Oct. 17 in Lynn Haven, FL. Hurricane Michael dest royed City Hall and numerous homes and lives were uprooted, but some were trying to get back to some sort of normalcy. Locals banded together to form an area in a parking lot where people came to get donated clothes, games, books and to get a warm meal in their stomachs. [DOUG ENGLE/OCALA STAR BANNER] TRICK OR TREATStill in the midst of Hurricane Michael recovery, cities like Lynn Haven made Halloween a priority to give some normalcy to children and have an opportunity for positivity. Lynn Haven held their Trunk or Treat event to great success, with many of those in town to help with the recovery effort getting in on the fun. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] By Zack McDonaldThe News HeraldLYNN HAVEN „ Touring the city on a golf cart after Hurricane Michael, Lynn Haven Mayor Margo Anderson saw the immense power of the storm that laid waste to the landscape.Among the downed trees, dangling power lines and peeled apart buildings were a common sight. Almost every one of the more than 8,000 homes in Lynn Haven sustained some degree of damage from the historically unprecedented storm. And at least 250 homes were completely destroyed by the combination of the 155 mph winds and rain, including the home belonging to Andersons mother.Realizing that paying thou-sands of dollars for an insurance deductible would be a key hurdle on the path toward recovery, Anderson sought advice on how to clear the way.The thought is that in the midst of this, if we can help people pay for their insurance deductible and get back on their feet, that will be a huge shot in the arm,Ž Anderson said. It will also encourage people to stay and have hope that we can get past this.ŽAnderson said the idea came from her daughter, Hilary Keeley, who is a lawyer in Jacksonville, and they began working with a Holland and Knight law firm to establish a trust fund at Hancock Whitney Bank to help residents pay their insurance deductibles.Anderson approached the city commission with a proposal to establish the fund, which was unanimously approved by the board. Its called the Lynn Haven Hurricane Relief Trust Fund,Ž although the surround-ing area of Southport will also be able to apply for the funds. The goal is to reach $40 million to help residents begin the pro-cess of rebuilding their homes.Its a lofty goal,Ž Anderson said. But in light of everything weve been through already, Im hopeful we can accomplish it by Christmas.ŽSo far, the fund has had $50,000 contributed to it as of Nov. 5. But the goal is to get tax-deductible contributions from large, national corporations in order to raise the millions of dollars needed to help all home-owners. In the coming week, Anderson has meetings set up with several corporations along those lines, she said.We are very hopeful these nationally known corporations will step up,Ž Anderson said. If we just have a few contribute, we can be well on our way.ŽOnce the trust fund has hit $5 million, Lynn Haven will begin accepting applications to pay for insurance deductibles and up to $5,000 for uninsured homeowners. Anderson said the disaster fund model is similar to that of BPs Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill disaster trust fund, only the application process will much simpler for residents in the area. However, a board „ the Lynn Haven City Commission „ will control dis-bursement of the funds.People are drained and beaten down,Ž she said. And the hope is that this fund will give them another reason to keep fighting.ŽMAYOR SEEKS $40M FOR RELIEF TRUST FUNDLynn Haven Mayor Margo Anderson sings God Bless AmericaŽ during a community BBQ event on Nov.4 at Shef“ eld Park in Lynn Haven, Fla. [PATTI BLAKE/THE NEWS HERALD]

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* * A12 Saturday, November 10, 2018 | The News Herald#850STRONG: COMING TOGETHER AFTER MICHAEL The News Herald | Saturday, November 10, 2018 A13The resiliency of Bay County prevailed as people picked up the piecesMargarite DiSpirito controls traf“ c at the merging intersection of E Business Highway 98 and S Tyndall Pkwy in Parker, Florida on Monday, October 15, 2018. After staying with a friend from church during the storm, she saw the chaotic traf“ c at the intersection and took it upon herself to manage it. [JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] Freddie White Sn. picks up items from his secondhand retail business which suffered severe damage from Hurricane Michael, at the Fifteenth Street Flea Market on Tuesday, October 16, 2018. They could rebuild,Ž he says, in reference to owners of the building, the question is if they will.Ž [JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] Mosley students hold signs supporting Bay District Schools and the area code common in the Hurricane Impacted area before Mosle y plays Pensacola at Tommy Oliver Stadium on Saturday, October 20, 2018. [JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] Residents of Northgate Terrace in Panama City, Florida are lead in prayer by members of The River Church in Tampa on Wednesday, October 17, 2018. Volunteers from the church left at late at night the day of Hurricane Michael made landfall and have partnered with Feed the Hu ngry to provide food and water around the storm affected area. [JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] Spring“ eld mayor Ralph Hammond enters the dest royed Spring“ eld City Hall and Police Department on Thursday, October 18, 2018. The entire building is unusable after Hurricane Michael. [JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] Hamlata Patel uses detached and broken power lines to hang her clothes as her house stands mostly without a roof behind her on Oct.21 in Panama City. The Patel family returned to Panama City after Hurricane Michael to “ nd their home dest royed and looters stealing family jewelry and other items. [PATTI BLAKE/THE NEWS HERALD] Tattoo artist Holly Wouldnt works on an 850Ž hurricane themed tattoo for Kristy Mayo on Oct. 30 at Seventh Seal Tattoo in Panama City, Fla. Wouldnt designed the tattoo and plans to contribute 40 percent of the money she raises from the tattoo to planting new trees in the Panama City area since so many were damaged or dest royed by Hurricane Michael. North Lagoon Navy volunteer Andrews Schicho cuts through a fallen tree with a chainsaw on Oct.22 in St.Andrews. [PATTI BLAKE/THE NEWS HERALD] North Lagoon Navy volunteer Dan Zangari gathers items from a womans closet while helping her pack up her remaining possessions from her hurricane damaged home in Callaway.[PATTI BLAKE/THE NEWS HERALD] EMT Laura Schoonover (right) helps Mike Newburg with a bandage Oct.26 at a free clinic off Belulah avenue at Gore Park in Callaway. [PATTI BLAKE/THE NEWS HERALD] Tiffany Latiolas comforts her daughter, Eva, after drinking a cup of ice water to help cool down in the 80 degree weather Oct.16, 2018 in Callaway, Fla. [PATTI BLAKE/THE NEWS HERALD] Tyler Gay cuts up two trees knocked over by Hurricane Michael in Parker, Florida on Friday, October 19, 2018. Multiple residents on the street made requests on thechainsawarmy.com for help in removing the trees blocking in cars and the road. He uses a hatchet to cut off small limbs and a chainsaw to cut the large ones into manageable pieces. [JOSHUA BOUCHER/ THE NEWS HERALD] Parishioners cry during the “ rst service at First Baptist Church in downtown Panama City since Hurricane Michael on Sunday, October 14, 2018. [JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] Red Cross volunteer Charlotte Hardy organizes clothes on Oct.26 at Bozeman. Hardy has 39 years of experience as a Red Cross volunteer. [PATTI BLAKE/THE NEWS HERALD]

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** A14 Saturday, November 10, 2018 | The News HeraldWith each light extinguished and even the moon reduced to a sliver, a deep darkness washed over the area impacted by the hurricane every night. But then, at first one by one and then all at once, the stars would come out. Normally outshown by the urban glow of streetlights, homes and businesses, the power outage Michael caused had a silver-lining in that it delivered a nightly show of stars. Here are a selection of photos taken by the News Heralds Patti Blake.BEAUTY IN THE DESTRUCTION HURRICANE MICHAEL | THE NIGHT SKYThe night sky shines over a small lake on Oct. 11 in Panama City. Hurricane Michael knocked down power lines in most of Panama City Fla. during the storm. This eliminated normal amounts of light pollution in the area and allowed the night sky to shine over Bay County. [PATTI BLAKE/THE NEWS HERALD] Solar lanterns illuminate the front of a home on Oct. 11 in Panama City. Hurricane Michael knocked down power lines in most of Panama City Fla. during the storm. This eliminated normal amounts of light pollution in the area and allowed the night sky to shine over Bay County. [PATTI BLAKE/THE NEWS HERALD] A palm tree stands above debris and downed trees in Panama City. [PATTI BLAKE/THE NEWS HERALD] A sign stands alone and is surrounded by downed trees from the storm. [PATTI BLAKE/THE NEWS HERALD] Above and below, the Milky Way shines over a broken tree and scattered limbs on Oct. 11 in Panama City. [PATTI BLAKE/THE NEWS HERALD]

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** The News Herald | Saturday, November 10, 2018 A15

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** A16 Saturday, November 10, 2018 | The News Herald HURRICANE MICHAEL | SHELTERBy Katie Landeck@PCNHKatieL | klandeck@pcnh.comEditors Note: This story ran on Oct. 14.PANAMA CITY „ In one bed slept a 7-year-old who had the sense to gather up her little brother, mothers purse and her familys medication when the roof peeled off her home.In another bed, a woman whose last remaining piece of furniture is a cherry dresser that somehow survived her apartment collapsing around it played with some children.In a back room, a woman tried to figure out if there was a way to use a rice cooker she grabbed after the front of her home was blown away to cook a meal for her grandkids.About 400 people were still crowded into the emergency shelter set up by the American Red Cross at Rutherford High School on Saturday morning, each with their own story of survival and often times very little left.We have no shoes, no socks,Ž said Aricka Roundtree, who was walking around the shelter in bare feet. We need toothbrushes, socks, even flip flops. We need the bare neces sities.ŽA tense anxiety had settled over the shelter, as people struggled to continue to be patient with the circumstances. The food was edible, but not good, people said. Concerns about medical con-ditions people said were going unaddressed or being mini-mally treated because little was available.Others worried people would start stealing their last possession, despite the Bay County Sheriffs office deputy patrolling. And, despite the port-a-potties, a stench of human waste was starting to percolate through the area.But still, there were plenty of stories of hope as people marveled at what they had been through and small acts of kindness.All my 3-year-old wanted was a truck,Ž Ashley Brown said. And one of the volun-teers found him one.ŽIt was Browns 7-year-old who gathered up her youngest child as the roof tore away from her home in the intense storm.We heard a pop and the water started coming in,Ž Brown said. We tried to get a mattress by the window, but by the time we got the mattress up the roof was lifting up.ŽIt was at that point her daughter showed up, purse in hand, brother by her side ready to take control.She said, Mama, I got it, mama I got it,Ž her grand-mother Roundtree said.They drove to the shelter in the back of a pickup truck like Dukes of Hazzard,Ž Roundtree added, while the winds were still blowing.A few beds over Kayla Cromer and Katelan Moses swore Pierre Guitroz saved their lives when he rounded them up in the middle of the night and got them out of the apartment as the wind tore off parts of their building.Im not going to lie, I tried to run back upstairs because I was scared, but Pierre said no,Ž Cromer said. He said no, were going.ŽCromers car got them all to the shelter, and after that it stopped working.When they walked back the day after the storm to get a change if clothes, the devas-tation was overwhelming.The only thing standing in my house was a wooden cherry dresser,Ž Moses said. Thats the only thing.ŽGuitroz wasnt talkative, instead taking a protective stance to the side, but what he did say was he lived through Katrina and without the water, this is the same.Ž Away from the main room, Yong Herbert was setting up a psuedo-home for her and her grandkids in a class-room. From her home, she had brought coolers full of food as much as she could and she was getting ready to make some chicken soup and hoping to find an outlet for her rice cooker.They love rice,Ž she said, pointing to the two boys who were alternating between playing schoolŽ by doing science and math problems on an off smartboard and playing with a nerf gun.Herbert said she thought her home was going to make it through the storm, especially when all the big trees in her yard fell the right way. But once the trees fell, the wind caught her porch and that was that.We tried to prepare, but you know, you obviously cant beat the Gods,Ž Her-bert said.Adrian Brown, 3, sleeps at the emergency shelter at Rutherford High School after Hurricane Michael on Saturday, October 13, 201 8. As windows broke and the roof peeled away during the storm his 7-year-old sister AEria Brown grabbed him, cellphones and her mothers medication and brought them to a s afe spot under the stairs in their home. Since then they and their mother Ashley Brown have stayed at the emergency shelter. [JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] By Eryn Dion@PCNHErynDion | edion@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY BEACH „ Emergency shelters are generally billed as a place of last resortŽ during a storm, but for hundreds in Bay County, there was nowhere else to go to escape Hurricane Michael or the damage that followed.A total of seven Bay District Schools were at one point shelters or are a shelter now. During the evacuation order, and even during the storm, they rose and fell like domi-noes, opening and closing as others filled up. As of Nov. 6, there are still 445 evacuees living in the long-term shel-ter set up by the Red Cross at Arnold High School „ fewer than predicted, but still a substantial population to find a true long-term solution for.On the heels of the mandatory evacuation order given Monday, as Hurricane Michael had Bay County firmly in its crosshairs, Deane Bozeman School opened, as it usually does in these situ-ations, as the first shelter for the general population, those with special needs, and those with pets. In the last several years, as storms threatened the area, Boze-man was all that was needed for the dozen or so evacuees who didnt feel safe in their homes. Michael; however, changed that. In quick succession, once Bozeman filled, Northside, then Merritt Brown Middle School, then Rutherford High School were converted into shelters. As it became clear that the damage was more severe on the east side of the Hathaway, those shel-ters were moved to schools in Panama City Beach, though not always by choice, like with Rutherford, which was forced to evacuate after their generator started smoking and move to Breakfast Point Academy.As the first wave of shelters in town closed, those populations were moved to Breakfast Point and Surfside Middle School, while Boze-man remained open. But with the population spread over three campuses, the start of school „ and massive cleanup jobs „ looming and dwindling housing options after eviction notices were issues at apartment complex after apartment complex, it became clear that a more stable, long term solution was needed.After scouting local empty big box stores and other locations, the decision was made to allow the Red Cross and FEMA to use Arnold High School as a shelter, with FEMA promising to turn the campus back over to Bay District Schools by Jan. 1. As teachers moved their belongings out of their classrooms on Oct. 29, cots were brought in and the shelter population, at the time over 800, was moved in by the end of the week. Arnold, for all intents and purposes, is a sort of bridge solution until a more permanent housing solution is found.Schools converted into shelters, but long-term solution needed The Army National Guard sets up cots in the Media Center on Oct.29 at Arnold.[PATTI BLAKE/THE NEWS HERALD] Hope from Rutherford High Schools shelterTALES OF SURVIVAL

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** The News Herald | Saturday, November 10, 2018 A17 HURRICANE MICHAEL | SCHOOLSGenevieve Smithgsmith@pcnh.comEditors note: A version of this story ran Oct. 14 PANAMA CITY „ On Sat-urday, administrators from schools spanning all over the county met in Mosley High Schools Media Center to discuss plans for getting students back to school and for attending to students currently living in shelters, which many administrators have been helping to run since they opened.According to Husfelt, the district will begin looking at schools on Monday to determine which campuses are still usable. So far, the district knows that most schools situated in Panama City Beach sustained minimal damage or are damage free. Some schools in town only have damage to one or two building, leaving the rest of campus in working order.Once the district has a better idea of infrastructure status, they will begin creat-ing schedules to best utilize the schools for all students.To accomplish this, Husfelt said they are thinking outside of the box. One possibility in consideration is arranging two schools to utilize one campus by having a morning school and an afternoon school. He has already asked principals to team up and take a look at how a split schedule could operate.Thats not that unusual,Ž said Husfelt. It happens in a lot of places, especially in emergency situations like this.Ž Husfelt says he does antic-ipate more schools to be opened as shelters, but those decisions will be made by EOC. Counseling and medical care is on the way to shelters.Husfelt plans to send ques-tions to both Florida governor candidates to see their plans for best serving our students as they recover from this devastation.The Jinks Middle School gym is missing walls on Oct. 11 in Panama City. [ PATTI BLAKE/THE NEWS HERALD ] Damage is shown at Spring“ eld Elementary School on Tuesday. [JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] By Eryn Dion@PCNHErynDion | edion@pcnh.comLYNN HAVEN „ Well figure it out.That was the phrase du jour Monday on Mosley High Schools campus, and likely many others across Bay District as buses were rolling and students in class once again for the first taste of normalcy since Hurricane Michael devastated the area almost four weeks ago.Thats what we do, we figure it out,Ž said Bullock. Theres a lot of making the best of the situation.ŽStanding at the front of the school to welcome his students back with a smile and hug, Bullock didnt know if Monday felt like the first day of school all over again, or a continuation of where they left off pre-Michael. But what he did know was how much he, and his staff, needed this day to come after the tragedy and turmoil of the past three-plus weeks.As much as their kids and their parents needed school open, so did our teachers,Ž Bullock said. So did I. I needed it too. I needed to see those smiles on those kids faces.Ž Fifteen Bay District schools were back in session Monday with several, like Mosley and Merritt Brown, doubling up. The pair were the only middle and high schools open, with Mowat Middle School, Arnold High School sharing at Surfside Middle School, Rutherford High School shar-ing with Everitt Middle School and Bay High School sharing at Jinks Middle School sched-uled to be back either later this week or early next week. Sev-eral elementary schools also are bunking together, with Parker taking in Patterson students and Callaway taking in Tyndall students.The split schedules at the middle and high school levels are a bit of a new adventure, Bullock said, likening the process to having a roommate.Ž His teachers and staff all have met with the Merritt Brown teachers and staff they will be sharing space with and about midday there essentially will be a gradual change of command, as high school students leave by 12:30 p.m., middle school students arrive by 1 p.m., and high school teachers finish their planning periods by 2 p.m.Haney Technical Center also started back up some programs on Nov. 5.The next wave of schools will open as they can, with all opening their doors by the week of Nov. 12. BACK IN CLASSGym class begins at Mosley High School on Monday. Water damage dest royed the hardwood basketball court, but the old rubber ” oor remained undamaged. [JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] Go Bear“ ns!Ž reads a sign at Mosley High School on Monday. Monday was the “ rst day of the combined Mosley and Merritt Brown Middle School campus, and was celebrated around campus with the new unof“ cial mascot of the Bear“ n, a cross between Mosleys dolphin and Merritt Browns bear. [JOSHUA BOUCHER/ THE NEWS HERALD] DISTRICT REGROUPSSchool, city, county leaders meet to discuss schools future First wave of Bay District students returns to class a er Hurricane Michael

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** By Katie Landeck and Eryn DionThe News Herald Editor's Note: This story is a combination on an Oct. 16 and Oct. 24 story. SPRINGFIELD „ The Springfield City Hall fell down around Mayor Ralph Hammond.Both of the buildings two roof peeled off. Ceil-ings collapsed in every office, including the one where off-duty law enforcement officers were quartered. Every entrance except one was shuttered, Hammond said, and that door was blocked during the storm, trapping them inside the shuddering, shaking building for more than three hours.It wasnt a tornado sound,Ž he said. That banging and beating, and we realized we couldnt get out. There wasnt no place to go anyhow „ this was the safest place to be.ŽEvery city office, includ-ing the police department, maintenance yard and community center, was 100-percent destroyed, Hammond said, along with every computer and every program. It wasn't until two days after the storm, when a News Herald reporter found him assessing the community center that he and Ward 2 Commis-sioner Phillip Dykes were able to start to get the word out about the dire needs of the small city. He hadn't even heard from FEMA yet, he said. Its going to be a while before we can assess the full magnitude of what went on,Ž Dykes said. Its like a bombs been dropped on Springfield. So hang in there, be patient, were all in the same boat.ŽBuildings, businesses and homes were all but flattened, including Bottle Stopper Lounge and Liquor, Dollar General and the Springfield Police Department. People who had lost everything could be seen going in and out of the collapsed Dollar General to get supplies. Firefighters were going into a collapsed Family Dollar, with permission, to get water to bring to people who needed it.Our biggest concern is safety and help,Ž Hammond said. Anybody who knows of anybody that needs to be checked on, please contact the city up here at the community building.ŽAnd if anybody had it, Hammond said, the city was very much in need of gas for their vehicles to continue their search and rescue efforts and prayer.As the reporter was leaving, the city staff all gathered by a flag pole that had somehow made it through the storm for a moment of prayer before moving forward.Days later, Hammond was still at work, and in true form was running the heavy machinery himself at times „ this is a city, after all, where elected officials are known for pitching in for tasks like repairing leaking roofs and running excavators.On this day, he's back in City Hall.The floor squishes and buckles with every step. Insulation hangs from drooping wires, swaying in the breeze like ghosts. Light punctures the gaping holes in the ceiling. Ham-mond stands in the remains of the planning depart-ment, the constant dinging of a malfunctioning alarm bell from a nearby railroad crossing cutting through the silence. When asked what it was like in the building, he pauses for a long moment.I hate to say it,Ž he said. But pure hell.ŽThere is a silver lining though, he said. In an amazing stroke of foresight, the city purchased the property belonging to Springfield Nursery on Transmitter Road about two years ago, when the owners came to them with plans of retirement. With the state planning on widening Highway 22, they were in line to lose the front of their building anyway, Hammond says, and needed to make a move. Now, they just need to make it faster.In one sense, its a blessing,Ž he says. We didnt want to move this way, but wed already started planning.Ž A18 Saturday, November 10, 2018 | The News Herald HURRICANE MICHAEL | SPRINGFIELDITS LIKE A BOMBS BEEN DROPPED ON SPRINGFIELDManagement leaves after checking the safe at the Dollar General store Wednesday October 17, 2018 in Spring“ eld, FL. Hurricane Michael dest royed numerous homes and lives were uprooted, but some were trying to get back to some sort of normalcy. [DOUG ENGLE/OCALA STAR BANNER]2018 Details emerge from hard-hit town By Katie Landeck@PCNHKatieL klandeck@pcnh.comSPRINGFIELD „ Every time Marie Halley tried to talk, she started tear-ing up.She lost her house „ the wind blew out all the windows, the doors, and the majority of the roof „ her pull barn had fallen too, and she didn't have much of a plan for how to move forward. But, that wasnt why she was tear-ing up.She was tearing up because she was so thankful for the group of strangers grilling hot dogs on the side of the road in Springfield, forming a makeshift dis-tribution point just two day after the storm so people could got a hot meal, water, gas and hygiene products.This is the first resource weve had,Ž said Taryn Spencer.Not knowing if they would get turned around at checkpoints, earlier that morning a group of people from Panama City Beach, Caryville, and as far away as Missouri had decided they want to help. They were going to load up their vehicles, drive until they found a place to park, and try to do some good.They ended up in Springfield.We just started 45 minutes ago been like this whole entire time,Ž said Robin Pope, gesturing to the crowd that was spill-ing out into the roadway slowing traffic down. There are people who are hungry and thirsty and giving up hope. I just feel like a little hope is better than none.My community is dev-astated right now, and we need to pull together right now to make sure everyone has what they need, and if you cant do that, you are not a part of the community,Ž Pope said.As they served up hot dog and after hot dog, a steady stream of people thanks and blessed them.Samantha Jones declared I am blessed,Ž as she took the first bite of her hot dog, saying it was her first hot meal since the storm.Ive been devastated. There are no words that could describe what were going through right now,Ž Jones said. We have no water. We have no power. I mean, if you dont have any money, I mean even if we had money we couldnt buy anything. We have no gas. We are like in sur-vival mode. It is just such a blessing to know that there are people out there to really care.ŽI am blessedDenise Conover makes hot dogs to give away for free after Hurricane Michael on Friday, October 12, 2018. [JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] Volunteers serve food in Spring eld

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** The News Herald | Saturday, November 10, 2018 A19 HURRICANE MICHAEL | PARKERBy Eileen KelleyGateHouse MediaEditor's Note: This story originally ran on Oct. 20. PARKER „ At the sound of the diesel engine of an ATV rounding the corner, A.D. Thomas lifts his arm as a way to get the mayors attention. His well-aged hips have left him with a slow and somewhat unsteady gait, that keeps him from walking to the road.Who should I call for help?Ž the 87-year-old disabled vet-eran asked as he began a series of questions and requests for the mayor of Parker, who is sur-veying the Hurricane Michael damage from an ATV. Thomas is worried about gas from a fire pit. Hed also like some help packing up some of the trinkets that he and his wife of 65 years, Anne, collected.For the past four years Anne Thomas has lived at a memory care/assisted-living facility, so it has just been A.D. Thomas and a house full of furniture and trinkets. But the furniture is probably ruined.Anne Thomas dementia already robbed the couple of so much and A.D. Thomas doesnt want a hurricane to rob them of what is left. But it doesnt look good.Where A.D. Thomas goes and if it is with the couples memo-rabilia remains to be seen. The 2,542-square-foot ranch home will have to be demolished, Thomas said.An estimated one-third of the 2,500 or so houses and structures in this tiny 2-square-mile city could meet the same fate, said Rich Musgrave, mayor for more than five years.Musgrave said it could take maybe six months to get Federal Emergency Management trail-ers, if they can get them at all.Its going to be a challenge for them,Ž said Michael Jachles of Parkers residents, a spokes-man on loan to the city from South Florida.People are going to be kind of on their own,Ž the mayor agreed.Musgraves fieldstone home came away with only a few cosmetic issues. He evacuated ahead of the storm and came back to a sight in town that he never could have imagined: The city appears to have been carpet bombed.Old oaks crashed onto homes, carports became unattached debris that the storm's winds wrapped snugly around homes. Windows blew out. Roofs peeled away from the homes they once kept dry.A travel trailer „ lifted from the ground by Michaels fierce winds „ is now perched in a tree across the bayou from Thomas home.Musgrave felt helpless. He couldnt sleep. Faith and family,Ž he kept telling himself.Musgrave might be overwhelmed with the enormity of the challenges ahead for the city, but he also feels a little guilty for his good fortune with his own home while many of his constituents lost everything.I almost feel like we shouldnt be in such good shape,Ž he said.Every structure in Parker was affected in one manner or another by Hurricane Michael and somehow not one person from Parker died.That in itself, said Musgrave, is a blessing. But still, hes con-cerned for the residents with medical issues who might not be able to get medications and help.Thomas is counting his bless-ings. He rode the 155-mph storm out in a recliner in the center of his house.The storm ripped large portions of the roof off his home. Dry wall came crashing down in a jumble of uneven pieces. Rain poured in.More than a week after the storm, water still pushes out from Thomas feet as he walks across the carpeted rooms. Mold grows on the walls.By midday when the sun is overhead just right, Thomas home has an unfamiliar look to it inside: a soft neon blue, thanks to the sun bearing down on tarps draped overhead.Hes hoping he can figure out a way to stay in the town that will for all accounts have to be rebuilt.This is Musgraves third term as mayor. Not once has he been challenged in the election.From here on out and into the foreseeable future, he will be filled with challenges.One of the things I worry about is how are we going to survive as a viable entity?Ž Musgrave said. There are a lot of unknowns right now.ŽHe anticipates the bill to remove the debris will easily top $1 million.There is just so much need and not enough (resources) to fulfill it,Ž Musgrave said.The city has all of 32 employ-ees, that includes nine police officers and four paid firefight-ers „ theres a volunteer fire force more than four times the paid size „ and 13 employees who work in public works.The employees have their own storm-related problems to confront. Thankfully reinforce-ments „ police, public works employees and linemen „ have come to help from across the state to help Parker and the surrounding communities hit hardest by Hurricane Michael.Parkers capital and opera-tions budget is $5 million.Parker and Panama City Beach dont charge ad valorem taxes. Though the idea has been floated in the past only to be beat down by residents who like it that way.A beach town like Panama City Beach, Musgrave said, can make up for no ad valorem taxes because of the money the hotel taxes bring the city.Parker cant boast that. Its hotel is far from high-end and is considered more of a respite for transients.The city is not flush with cash. About 96 percent of the elementary students qualify for free lunches.An enthusiasm and aggres-siveness in obtaining grants has allowed the city to make capital improvements.Musgrave lists the various improvements under his watch and said he is proud that the city has been able to sustain itself.Now he questions if it can without a dedicated revenue stream from property taxes should people stay and rebuild their houses.As it stands now, about half the citys funding comes from utilities „ all knocked out by Hurricane Michael.You do what you can and make happen,Ž Musgrave said.Alice Zimmerman has figured that out. Shes been wading out into Parkers Martin Lake and filling large water bottles with the brown water.This isnt for bathingŽ she said. Its so she can flush a toilet, though Zimmerman said she did see people bathing in the water earlier.Musgrave finishes talking with Thomas about the elderly mans needs, walks down the driveway and climbs back in the ATV.I wish I could give him anything he asks for. Unfortunately, I dont have a magic wand.ŽMAYOR WONDERS, CAN PARKER SURVIVE?Parker Mayor Rich Musg rave updates the citys priority posters in Parker City Hall on Thursday. [JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] Boats intermingled with one another and broken docks in Parker on Thursday. [JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] By Zack McDonaldZMcDonald@pcnh.comEditors note: A version of this story originally ran on Oct. 25. PARKER „ On the path toward addiction recovery, the road has led Joe Courtney into several disaster areas.But none has compared to the destruction visited upon Bay County by Hurricane Michael, he said.Its the worst thing Ive ever seen,Ž Courtney said. You hear about the destruction and try to imagine what its like. But its absolutely the worst thing Ive ever seen.ŽSince 2016, Courtney and Daniel Ross have been traveling into hurricane disaster areas „ like those left by Hurricanes Mat-thew, Harvey and, most recently, Florence „ looking to help survivors. Their cause has grown into a disaster recovery, non-profit mens addiction recovery program called The Recovery Ranch, based out of Santa Ynez, California. So when they saw the destruction left in the wake of Hurri-cane Michael, the 33 men making up the group heeded the call for assistance.We drove around the first day trying to find the most hard-hit spot, where people needed help the most,Ž Courtney said. We pulled in Sunday night, threw up our tents and started cooking.ŽThe group now is firmly stationed at the Parker Recreational Park. At first, curiosity drew sparse crowds and police wondering what the intentions were of the dozens of young men. But in the days that followed, maintaining sobri-ety through helping others and free, hot, fresh meals has garnered them accep-tance in the community.Each day now, they estimate they serve meals and hot coffee to about 1,000 people. Their campgrounds also have become a supply station for free water and cleaning supplies. And in their down time, The Recovery Ranch has been help-ing debris cleanup in the neighborhood.Everybody has an amazing attitude,Ž Courtney said. Despite the tragedy that has happened to them, its awesome to see that a positive attitude has survived.ŽRecovery Ranch ties addiction, disaster recovery in Parker Participants in the Recovery Ranch alcohol and drug abuse program prepare lunch across the street from Parker City Hall on Wednesday. [JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD]

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** By Hannah MorseGateHouse Media FloridaEditors Note: A version of this story ran on Oct. 31PANAMA CITY BEACH „ A rousing Surprise!Ž was shouted from the baby section of a Panama City Beach Walmart, but baby Luke remained sound asleep in his mothers arms. Cozily wrapped in a blanket, the two-and-a-half-week-old baby wore a red onesie that said, Mommys Little Stud Muffin.ŽHis parents, Wilmer and Lorrainda Capps, were caught off guard by about 30 Walmart employees who had gathered around a table decorated with balloons and a cake, as well as such supplies as diapers, wipes and baby food.Two weeks before, The Associated Press shared the Capps story of surviving Hurricane Michael and spend-ing the night in a Walmart parking lot with a week-old baby. Tuesday morning, Walmart and Wyndham Destinations teamed up to provide the family with an extra two-week stay at a Wyndham property, a years supply of diapers, online grocery supplies of up to $500 and a merchandise donation from the Front Beach Road Walmart.Two days after Michael, mother and son were discharged from the hospital, but the family couldnt find a place to stay and the parking lot of the Walmart in Callaway became their refuge for the night. When a security guard at the parking lot approached them, a sleep deprived, Lorrainda worried they would have to leave. Instead, the guard coordinated with Walmart employees staying at a hotel in Panama City Beach. Thats where they met Nick Davis, a truck driver with Walmart.The Capps are now settled in at Wyndham Vacation Resorts in Panama City Beach, where Luke got his first bath.He loved it,Ž Lorrainda said.Wilmer said he just got a new job, and they have guar-anteed housing for another two weeks.Just take it one day at a time. Thats all we can do,Ž he said. A20 Saturday, November 10, 2018 | The News Herald HURRICANE MICHAEL | CALLAWAYBy David Goldman and Jay ReevesThe Associated PressEditors note: A version of this story ran Oct. 19.CALLAWAY „ Their home full of soggy furniture and mosquitoes, Wilmer Capps was desperate to find shelter for his wife and their son, Luke, born just three days after Hurricane Michael ravaged the Panhandle.So Capps, his wife Lor-rainda Smith and little Luke settled in for the longest of nights in the best spot they could find: The parking lot of a Walmart store shut down by the storm.On a starry night, mother sat in the bed of the familys pickup truck; her child sat in a car seat beside her. Dad sat in the dark and pondered how it could be that his sons first night out of a hospital could be spent outside a big-box retailer because of a lack of help.It really upset me, man, because Ive always been the type of person who would help anyone,Ž Capps said in an interview with The Asso-ciated Press, which found the family outside the store Monday night. An AP pho-tographer accompanied them on a journey from the lot to a hospital and met them again at a hotel where donors later provided them a room. Discharged from the hos-pital and unable to find a hotel room nearby, the couple drove back to Florida, where conditions had improved only slightly since Michael.Still unable to stay at their storm-damaged home amid oppressive heat and bugs, Capps settled on the Callaway Walmart parking lot because they were low on gas and were fearful of driving at night with a curfew in place. The store has a reputation for letting travelers sleep in the parking lot overnight, and Capps knew it.Police officers who showed up after the AP photographer escorted them back to Gulf Coast Regional, where workers checked out Luke but couldnt provide a bed for the night, frustrat-ing Capps. Fearful of safety and sanitation problems at a shelter suggested by workers from the Federal Emergency Management Agency, the family returned to the Walmart lot.There, they met a security guard who helped secure them a hotel room in nearby Panama City Beach with air conditioning, water and power Tuesday night. Capps doesnt know how long the aid will last, but he intends to repay the donation.Pulled back from the brink after doubting the kindness of humanity on that night in the parking lot, Capps still has little money and no permanent home. But things are looking up because of the kindness of strangers.These people have been a godsend, because otherwise wed be back in the parking lot tonight,Ž he said.CHILD OF THE STORMWalmart baby showered with needed suppliesLorrainda Smith sits with her 2-day-old son, Luke, on Monday as she contemplates with her husband, Wilmer Capps, right, sleepin g in their truck in a parking lot after their Panama City home was badly damaged by Hurricane Michael and they were told a nearby shelter was closed. Capps said they had no choice but to camp out at the store the night their son Luke was released from an Alabama hospital. [DAVID GOLDMAN/AP] Homeless baby, family shelter at Walmart Wilmer Capps and his wife Lorrainda, holding their two-week-old son Luke, stand with Panama City Beach Walmart employees Tuesday. [MICHAEL SNYDER/GATEHOUSE MEDIA FLORIDA]

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** The News Herald | Saturday, November 10, 2018 A21 HURRICANE MICHAEL | PANAMA CITY BEACHBy Heather Osbourne Northwest Florida Daily NewsEditors Note: This is an excerpt from a story that ran on Oct. 21. PANAMA CITY BEACH „ Debbie Ward had to count with her fingers to figure out just how many days the City Hall employ-ees have worked tirelessly to aid their neighbors across the Hathaway Bridge.Its been 11 days?Ž she asked in disbelief. Weve had different staff going over the bridge every day to help over there. A lot of people who work here live over there. We realize were serving as the hub for the whole county because were the closest place to get supplies.ŽWard said City Hall remained open, working as a shelter for officials who were the first to aid the community after the storm passed. On Oct. 18, City Hall was where public officials met to extend the Panama City Beach curfew and lift the alcohol ban inside the city limits.In the parking lot of City Hall, semi trucks awaited donations to ship off to the other side of the bridge. Volunteers were there also, offering free ice and water.While most City Hall employees had seen the damage of Hurricane Michael firsthand, Ward said she still hasnt gathered up the strength to drive across the bridge. All shed seen so far, she says, were pictures of her Lynn Haven home damaged by Hurricane Michael. Her husband asked her not to go home.Even though I see pic-tures and drone photos, he tells me its just not the same,Ž Ward said. You just dont stop and think about the magnitude of it.ŽWhile some communi-ties and areas of the Beach, such as marinas and east end, suffered damage, for the most part the Beach was spared,Ž Mayor Mike Thomas said. The hotels and condos were flooded with relief workers and people who had lost their homes seeking shelter. Many were flocking to the open stores, such as the Walmart and Target at Pier Park, for supplies or driving through looking for cell phone service.Ann Stewart drove from Port St. Joe to pick up fruits, vegetables and other supplies at Target.Im planning on bring-ing a bunch of supplies to my friends in a trailer in Port St. Joe,Ž Stewart said. All they have down there is canned foods, so Im stocking up on fruits and vegetables to bring over.The biggest thing for us right now is not being able to communicate with people,Ž Stewart contin-ued. The traffic is awful, too. It took me five hours of driving yesterday to get propane and ice. I dont want to complain because I feel really, really grateful. Its just crazy and stressful.ŽWorkers, many of whom live in Panama City, were working to quickly stock shelves and freezers with diary, meats and produce. Hurricane Michael still loomed over the store, evident by the dozens of missing ceiling tiles and signs stating alcohol sales are prohibited.This is our lives right now,Ž said shopper Abby Rice. Even in Target today you see things missing, you see parts that are closed. A lot of the businesses on this end are overwhelmed with people trying to get gas and supplies.ŽLARGELY SPARED Debbie Ward, public information of“ cer for City Hall in Panama City beach, tears up while talking about the devastation in Panama City. [HEATHER OSBOURNE/DAILY NEWS] City Hall in Panama City Beach was at full speed Thursday with public of“ cials meeting to lift the citys alcohol ban. [HEATHER OBSOURNE/DAILY NEWS] Ceiling tiles missing from Target in Panama City Beach. [HEATHER OSBOURNE/DAILY NEWS] By Hannah MorseGateHouse Media FloridaEditor's note: A version of this story ran Nov. 3. PANAMA CITY BEACH „ By a preliminary scan, Hurricane Michael is thought to have siphoned off between 1 million and 2 million cubic yards of sand from Panama City Beach shores. Thats about the carrying capac-ity of between 60,000 and 130,000 dump trucks.Officials are still not yet sure, however, of what the total impact will be.Coastal engineers will conduct a survey on the 18.5-mile stretch of beach. Lisa Armbruster, the beach consultant for the Bay County Tourist Development Council, said the sand will be measured every 1,000 feet, from the dunes to 50 feet of water. The data collected will be compared to the annual survey conducted in May.It will be important to discover how far from the shore the sand was pulled, Armbruster said. If it was taken too far, its unlikely that the tides will bring it back. The results of the survey are expected by the end of this month.Armbruster said beach erosion could have been far worse, but there was about four-and-a-half feet of storm surge on Panama City Beach during the storm. She said the most recent beach nourishment „ a $14.5 million project that scattered 840,000 cubic yards of sand over 3.5 miles last May „ helped.Too soon to tell how much sand Michael took The area under a broken wooden wal kover is severely eroded at St. Andrews State Park. [PATTI BLAKE/THE NEWS HERALD] the area hemorrhages its most valuable resources „ people.Let no good disaster go to waste,Ž McQueen said. A blank slateWhile Mexico Beach was washed away in recording-setting storm surge, Panama City, and much of Eastern Bay County, was blown away on Oct. 10.Two hours of catastrophic, 155 mph winds brought the city to its knees, downing thousand of trees, ripping apart family homes, destroying businesses, taking out infrastructure, creating gaping holes in churches, dismantling piece by piece the things that made Panama City a place people wanted to live. Emerging from the storm, people all over asked themselves how and if they could stay here, what would still be here for them? The answer, leaders say, is a better city.For a long time, people have quietly „ or sometimes loudly „ accused Panama City of standing in the way of its own progress, of not being willing to move forward. Projects, like the long talked about Panama City Marina redevelopment or bike paths, have stagnated.But now, Michael has pushed the city so far for-ward there is no going back.Back doesnt exist,Ž local attorney William Harrison, who has been working with the city for free since the storm, said.The option to postpone work on the marina, which has been ripped to shreds, isnt there anymore. Nor can officials shy away from talks about low income housing. Access to medical treatment has become a top priority. The parks will need attention. Utili-ties can't wait to be fixed. In fact many of the con-versations from before the storm have become almost moot points, as there is no longer an option to keep things how they were. Just a blank slate, McQueen said, a sense of urgency, and an opportunity. The planIf we dont make a plan someone else will make it for us,Ž McQueen said.This is a lesson McQueen knows better than anyone else. As a two-star general in the Army Reserve, hes been the person making the plan for someone else.Thats not what he wants to see happen here.Here, he, Brudnicki and Harrison want to set the model for what recovery looks like, for how to lever-age the hundreds of grants that just became available, and for how to make the most of the attention and federal funds a community has after devastation.That plan started in an afternoon brainstorming session between McQueen, Brudnicki, and Harrison at a conference table in a borrowed Verizon trailer that resulted in a six page document. The plan, they stress, took old compre-hensive plans into account and there will be a period for public comment. But they wanted a start-ing point, and so they developed a 15-point plan, a campaign strategy, for the city meant to look at the key aspects of the city„ utilities, transporta-tion, environment, energy, agriculture, economic development, education, medical, governance, technology, quality of life, housing, life safety, military support and capital improvement „ and set goals for each one.Our goal is to set a stan-dard for others to follow,Ž said Brudnicki. We want people to know we care about them. We dont want flight.ŽSome of the goals are obvious, like aiming to provide excellent police and fire, or promoting col-laborative government, or protecting St. Andrew Bay from runoff. Some points are almost quirky, like establishing a signature seafood to help promote tourism or establishing locations for beehives to help with agriculture. Others are the type of news people have been waiting to hear, like the city wanting to plant 100,000 trees by 2025, plans to improve the park system, and plans to expand, promote and fur-ther incorporate the arts into the area. A lot of them are loftier.Under utilities, the city plans to push for subterranean service „ like in Central Florida „ to try to prevent another Michael. They want to fix the water and sewer system, harden it (its worth noting out of 174 lift stations, only three were functional after the storm), and create something state-of-the-art Theres even a plan to add technology to trash services that would increase efficiencies and possibly encourage recycling. Altogether an impossibility before, but now leaders say this all is in reach.For transportation, the goal is creating a system that encourages bike paths and walking spaces, but also lays the groundwork for infrastructure like high speed rail to come to the county, because if the planning isnt done now, they options might not be there later.To make people want to stay here, the city is con-sidering an unprecedented investment in the schools, including establishing a municipal charter school system with Bay District Schools as a partner. This, Harrison said, could be an opportunity to reduce the red tape teachers face and improve the quality of the education Panama City students are receiving. To make people want to invest here, the city is get-ting ready to pitch making from the Hathaway Bridge to Port St. Joe an Opportu-nity Zone, a program that gives investors preferential treatment for economically stressed communities, to help bring private investors to the area. The city also plans to support estab-lished industry, the medical community, and encourage military support. The goal is to create a thriving economy so people want to live here.And then, theres the challenge of making sure people have a place to live. After Michael, the city wants to eliminate substandard housing units, protect the neighborhoods from blight with strong codes, and make sure there is adequate low-to-mod-erate income housing.Its a big, big plan, but theres never been a better time to do this,Ž McQueen said. ReactionIts highly unusual for a community to have a plan like this one month out from a storm. In fact, the FEMA representative McQueen is working with said hes never seen any-thing like this before. Usually, people are still focused on the day-byday,Ž he told McQueen, while meeting for break-fast in a tent behind a police station one rainy morning.But this is the plan city leaders feel their city needs right now. This is the beginning of the answers to all the questions that have become part of daily conversations about how the city might one day rebuild. It's limited to the city limits, but leaders say there is no reason why others can't copy it. In one-on-one meetings where McQueen has pitched the fundamentals of the plan and taken suggestions, no one has been opposed.The city will be soliciting public input, but time, McQueen said, is not on their side. Theres a finite window where resources will be available. To capitalize on that the goal is to have a plan codified by the beginning of January.We have to be the champions of hope that things are going to be better off,Ž Harrison said. We have to capture hope and aspiration, to get people to say This is the best thing that ever happened to us.Ž FUTUREFrom Page A1

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** A22 Saturday, November 10, 2018 | The News Herald HURRICANE MICHAEL | MEXICO BEACHRuss Bynum Associated PressEditors Note: A version of this story ran on Oct. 14MEXICO BEACH „ Tom Garcia watched in terror as fingers of water pushed inland across the beach and began fill-ing up his home.His wife handed him a drill and Garcia used screws to pin his front and back door shut. But soon the storm surge from Hurricane Michael was up to his chest. His dogs sat on his bed as it floated. He said it took all of his strength to hold his sliding door shut as the waters outside the glass rose higher than those flooding the house.It was life or death,Ž Garcia said through tears Friday as he walked amid the destruction in Mexico Beach.Michael was one of the most powerful hurricanes to ever make landfall in the U.S., and this Gulf Coast community of about 1,000 people was in its bullseye. While most resi-dents fled ahead of the storms arrival, a few stayed to face the hurricane.They barely escaped as homes were smashed from their foundations, neighborhoods got submerged, and broken boards, sheet metal and other debris flew through the air.Hector Morales, a 57-year-old restaurant cook, never even thought about evacuating. He grew up in Puerto Rico, where he said you learn how to sur-vive a storm.Ž His mobile home isnt on the beach. But the canal lined with boat docks behind his home quickly overflowed as the hurricane came inland. Soon, Morales said, his mobile home started floating.The water kept coming so fast, it started coming in from everywhere,Ž he said as he sat outside on a broken set of stairs lying atop a mattress and other storm debris. I had about 3 feet of water in my house. Thats when I decided to jump.ŽHe got through a window of his home on to the top of his car outside when Morales saw two neighbors wading through the rushing surge. He swam out and grabbed a utility pole, then reached out and helped steady the wading couple. They fought their way onto a fishing boat that had been tied to a palm tree and climbed inside.Morales left his neighbors in a bathroom below the boats deck, while he sat in the cap-tains chair. He said they stayed in the boat for six hours before the winds calmed and the surge receded.I lost everything „ my clothes, wallet, credit cards,Ž he said. But I made it.ŽBill Shockey, 86, refused when his daughter pleaded with him to leave Mexico Beach. He said he didnt want to leave behind his collection of Gone with the WindŽ dishes and antique dolls. So he stashed those valuables up high in a closet before heading to his daughters newly built two-story home next door.With a pocket full of cigars and his cat named Andy, Shockey watched the hurricane roll in from an upstairs bedroom. The wind shredded the roof of his single-story home. Water rose nearly to the top of his garage door.Was he scared? Worried, I think, is more like it,Ž Shockey said.His daughters home took in some floodwaters downstairs, but was otherwise unscathed. Shockeys own home of 24 years didnt fare so well, though his collectibles survived.Its a wipe out,Ž he said, adding that he plans to sell his property rather than rebuild. Whenever they want, Im going to move in with my son in Georgia.ŽSURVIVING THE STORM LEFT: Hector Morales sits on a debris pile near his home which was destroyed by Hurricane Michael in Mexico Beach on, Friday, O ct. 12. I have nothing else to do. Im just waiting,Ž said Morales as he wonders what he will do next. I lost everything.Ž [ DAVID GOLDMAN / AP ] RIGHT: Hurricane Michael destruction from the air on Oct.18, 2018. [PATTI BLAKE/THE NEWS HERALD] By Katie Landeck @PCNHKatieL klandeck@pcnh.comEditors Note: A version of this story ran Oct. 17. MEXICO BEACH „ With a chainsaw, Josh Gibbs hacked through what was left of a friends home on a mission he was all but sure was going to be futile „ looking for a missing piece of jewelry.A concrete slab marked where the Mexico Beach townhome used to be, but the building had become part of the communal pile of devas-tation, a whole communitys worth of stuff shaken and jumbled together.The way the debris is, youve got to peel it back layer by layer, the stuff is smashed in so hard,Ž Gibbs said. Its a lost cause.ŽIts a futile effort, but we tried all day,Ž said Jenny Gibbs. For her sake of knowing somebody cared about finding it.ŽAn awful scavenger hunt unfolded in the leveled Mexico Beach in the days after Hurricane Michael as residents sifted through a small community that bore a closer resemblance to a construction landfill than the quaint vacation town, searching for pieces of their old lives. The search was for items as small as jewelry or as big as houses.At first, Mark Drake could find only the porch of his familys vacation home as he watched CNNs aerial foot-age of the disaster zone.My heart just sank,Ž Drake said. But when the helicopter turned around he noticed a building that was the right color 160 yards away, on the other side of the street. I couldnt even (speak), but there was the house.ŽThe vacation home had floated 160 yards in the storm surge, leaving the porch behind and settling in a ditch on the other side of U.S. 98.But for others it wouldnt be that easy. Portraits from peoples homes, childrens toys and other possessions were scattered all throughout town and miles into the fallen pinewood forests out-side the city.The Gibbs committed themselves to helping other locals reclaim their lives. After the futile jewelry search Saturday, Oct. 13, the next day they moved on to helping the owner of Frost Pottery Barn search for whole pots amid the cinder blocks, plywood and other debris.Im sure she has insurance, but like with the girl with the piece of jewelry, she lost everything,Ž Jenny Gibbs said. She just lost her husband about a month ago too, so she just wants to salvage whats saveable.ŽSo despite the sunburns that were forming and despite the fact the stores debris was scattered across multiple blocks, the Gibbs kept going, putting the store back together pot by pot.We are going to be here helping as long as we can,Ž Josh Gibbs said.Neighbors left to sift through the wreckage By Drew Taylor Gatehouse MediaEditors Note: A version of this story ran on Oct. 24. MEXICO BEACH „ Surrounded by the rubble of Mexico Beach, Cori Clark and Bryon Hughes were reminded of how differently they had imagined their new lives together.Clark, a detective with the Panama City Police Department, and Hughes, a firefighter with Mexico Beach Fire Rescue, had spent the last year planning for their wedding after five years together.The wedding was going to take place Oct. 21. The service was going to be held in a beautiful two-story house along the Mexico Beach shore. There was going to be a DJ. There were over 100 people invited.Hurricane Michael changed everything.Once the storm made land-fall on Oct. 10, Clark and Hughes were swept into their jobs, placed at the center of the countys heartbreak. In the middle of so much loss, they decided to not let Hur-ricane Michael take one more thing away.Getting the wedding back together had to be done on the fly. At that point, Mexico Beach had been closed off to incoming traffic due to the storm, but because of the couples emergency responder credentials, they and other friends in the law enforcement and firefighter communities were able to hold the wedding along the beach.Originally, Clark was going to wear the dress her grandmother wore at her own wedding that had been made by her mother. With the dress unreachable yet safe in a nearby shop, Clark wore a $90 dress she bought on Amazon and applied her own makeup.Near the rubble from the house they were almost married in, Clarks father walked her down the jetty to the makeshift altar, to meed Hughes wearing his bunker pants at the end of aisle. By the end, Clark was wearing her Kevlar vest over her wed-ding dress.It kind of, at least for me, took me away from the chaos, so it was nice being normal and out of the uniform for a little bit,Ž Clark said. And I felt really pretty.ŽJustin Lee Richter remem-bers one special moment after the ceremony as he walked behind the couple, passing by the debris of homes and businesses of Mexico Beach. At one point, Richter saw Hughes picked up Clarks wedding dress above the sewage water and debris they walked through.Its an image hell never forget.The stark contrast between the destruction and the beauty of them getting married, it was pretty spe-cial,Ž he said. It was the best wedding Ive been to.ŽPanama City Police Department Det. Cori Clark (left) and Mexico Beach Fire“ ghter Bryon Hughes (right) got married Sunday in Mexico Beach amid the rubble following Hurricane Michael. Photos by wedding photographer Sara Lynsey. Panama City Police Department Det. Cori Clark (center left) and Mexico Beach Fire“ ghter Bryon Hughes (center right) got married Sunday in Mexico Beach amid the rubble following Hurricane Michael. Photos by wedding photographer Sara Lynsey. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTOS] The devastation was total for many Mexico Beach homes. [KATIE LANDECK/THE NEWS HERALD] Better or Worse: First responders marry amid destruction

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** The News Herald | Saturday, November 10, 2018 A23 HURRICANE MICHAEL | LINEMEN AND FIRST RESPONDERSKatie Landeck @PCNHKatieL klandeck@pcnh.comEditors Note: A version of this story first ran on Oct. 14. PANAMA CITY„ A recov-ery effort of unprecedented magnitude was staged out of parking lot trailers, damaged buildings and AT&T burnerŽ cellphones as work began to rebuild Bay County in the wake of Hurricane Michael.The parking lots of the 23rd Street Target and Panama City Mall were full by Oct. 13 with hundreds of vehicles from all over the Southeast „ sheriffs offices, power crews, firefighters, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Com-mission, telecommunications and military„ literally stag-ing an army of aid.At the center of it was the Bay County Sheriffs Department trailer „ a little damaged from fallen storm debris, but still going strong as the hub of law enforcement operations after two days of search-and-rescue efforts.Meetings were continuously being held outside, and officials, such as Florida Chief Financial Officer Jimmy Patronis, who was pushing Verizon to restore service, were in and out.In all, more than 600 offi-cers from across the state staged gathered in the Target parking lot „ the heart of the county and the literal crossroads of the major thoroughfares into Panama City „ providing additional units for presence, patrols and humanitarian assistance. Within 48 hours of the storm, more than 4,400 power crews were mobilized, heading to the area to restore power and bringing with them thousand of utilities poles to replace the ones toppled.All of our crews are out working and customers will be seeing more bucket trucks in the hardest hit areas,Ž said Jeff Rogers, Gulf Power spokes-person, at the time. We also have drones and helos in the air today to provide us with more detailed reports of our system by the end of today.ŽHelp was coming, officials said, it just required some patience.Massive hurricane relief e ort in Bay County LEFT: John Arguello, a Panama City Police Department patrol of“ cer, packs food, sanitation items and water into cars at Sams Club after Hurricane Michael on Friday, October 12, 2018. Sams Club donated the items that will be brought to people in shelters around Bay County. [JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] TOP RIGHT: Lee Majors, 51, a lieutenant with the Leon County Sheriffs Of“ ce salutes the American ” ag after “ xing it to a pole Friday, Oct. 12, 2018 in Mexico Beach, Fla. Residents of the small beach town of Mexico Beach began to make their way back to their homes some for the “ rst time after Hurricane Michael made landfall Wednesday. [CHRIS URSO/TAMPA BAY TIMES VIA AP] BOTTOM RIGHT: Public Service Company of Oklahoma utility trucks deliver utility poles and trucks after Hurricane Michael on Saturday, October 13, 20 18. [JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] By Eryn Dion @PCNHErynDion edion@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY „ Taking in the first glimpses of the tangled, twisted destruction left by Hurricane Michael, it was easy to believe those first, horrified whispers about when power might return.Weeks seemed optimistic. Nearly every power pole was down. The whole infrastruc-ture would need to be rebuilt. A month, at least, seemed more likely. But then, behind the waves of law enforcement and emergency workers were first responders of a different type „ waves of thousands of linemen, called in by Gulf Power and other power companies.All told, crews from 16 states and Canada made the journey to help Gulf Power get back on line, with 3,161 distribution line crew mem-bers, 439 transmission line crew members, 1,246 treetrimming crew members, 4,400 vehicles and 2,204 support personnel spread over six staging sites around the service area.For well over a week after the storm, driving into town down US 231 meant driving past truck after truck after white bucket truck replac-ing poles and infrastructure. The extra traffic, though, was worth it, when the first power restoration estimate maps were released saying lights would be back on in all of Gulf Powers Bay County service by midnight Oct. 24 for those who could receive power, with some areas, like the west end of Panama City Beach, back on line by mid-night Oct. 14 „ just four days after the storm.Its not that those initial whispers were wrong, per se. Over 6,800 power poles needed to be replaced in the storm-ravaged area. They perhaps just didnt take into account the sheer volume of help that would arrive eager to get to work. And on Oct. 23, more than 30 hours before their original estimation time, Gulf Power announced power had been restored to 95 percent of Bay County customers who could receive it.The entire storm restoration team has felt the appreciation and encouragement from the community, and we want to thank each one of our customers for their patience and support as we worked around the clock to restore powerŽ said Stan Connally, chairman, president and CEO of Gulf Power. And that commitment wont stop as we transition our work to customer reconnects and completing the rebuild of the smart-grid infrastructure.ŽGulf Power calls in reinforcements to get power restored early Utility workers install new transformers in the Cove neighborhood of Panama City on Monday, October 22, 2018. [JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] By Zack McDonald The News HeraldEditors note: A version of this story ran Oct. 20.PANAMA CITY „ In the aftermath of the most powerful hurricane in history to make landfall in the Panhandle, about 150 law enforcement officers from the Bay County Sheriffs Office and surrounding departments were left homeless.Of course, that didnt stop them from putting their own lives on hold to work 12-plus hour alpha-bravoŽ shifts in the wake of the storm, acting as everything from law enforcement to emergency medical transportation to de-facto public works, clearing roads and working with city crews.Ive had trouble driving some away,Ž said Bay County Sheriff Tommy Ford, who had about 70 deputies and other employees lose their homes. But thats what keeps me going: their will. Its inspiring.ŽThese officers have risen to the challenge,Ž said Panama City Police Chief Scott Ervin, adding about 40 of his officers lost their homes as well. They have so much passion for this community. Theyre out there helping with whatever they can.ŽAfter the winds died down in the immediate wake of Hurricane Michael, the main duties of officers was search-and-rescue. As they made their way through neighborhoods, they often joined members of the community in clearing the roads of the mas-sive amount of trees felled by the storms almost Category 5 winds.Passing out snacks in the day and hot meals at night from the Bay Count Sher-iffs Office mobile command unit, Chevina Jackson has heard tales of devastation from scores of her fellow employees.Jackson, a victim advocate with BCSO, considers herself fortunate in comparison. Her Lynn Haven home was battered by Hurricane Michael, but not beyond repair. Jack-son said she was lucky to be able to throw some tarps on her roof and return to work 12-hour shifts every day since.My whole neighborhood has started cleaning up, and my house is a wreck,Ž she said with a laugh. But we have a job to do. Of course there is anxiety to get my home in order. But as a first responder, this is what we do.ŽTheir homes destroyed, Bay County law enforcement put their own needs on hold A team with cadaver dogs checks rubble in Mexico Beach on Oct. 15. [PATTI BLAKE/THE NEWS HERALD] AN ARMY OF AID 3 LINEMEN KILLED IN HIT-AND-RUNWAUSAU „Unfortunately, as power crews worked around the clock, tragedy unfolded on Oct. 24. According to the Washington County Sheriffs Of“ ce, the three linemen were hit by a 1997 Ford F-150 towing a U-Haul trailer on State 77 near Talton Drive at 6:42 p.m. as they were working to restore power lost as a result of Hurricane Michael damage. The driver ” ed on foot, but was identi“ ed by a Chipley police of“ cer. Linemen George Cecil, 52, of Cole Rain, North Carolina; and James Ussery, 60, of Chipley, died on scene as a result of their injuries. Ryan Barrett, 22, of Roanoke Rapids, North Carolina, died after being transported to Southeast Alabama Medical Center in Dothan, according to the FHP. John Roland Goedtke is facing felony DUI manslaughter, felony vehicular homicide and felony leaving the scene charges.

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** A24 Saturday, November 10, 2018 | The News Herald

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** The News Herald | Saturday, November 10, 2018 B1 THURSDAYMostly sunny 84 / 67WEDNESDAYPartly sunny 87 / 64TODAYT-shower 87 / 71 Panama City News Herald Want to subscribe? Call 850-747-5050 PANAMA CITY Tuesday, October 16, 2018 @The_News_Herald facebook.com/panamacitynewsherald75 ¢ www.newsherald.comPanhandle lags behind rest of stateBy Gary FineoutThe Associated PressTALLAHASSEE „ Unlike in South Florida, homes in the states Panhandle did not have tighter building codes until just 11 years ago; it was once argued that acres of forests would provide the region with a natural barrier against the savage winds of a hurricane.Many of those structures did not withstand the fury of Hurricane Michael, which slammed into the area last week with winds of up to 155 mph, leaving acres of flattened houses and other buildings in its wake before roaring across the Georgia border inland.Were learning painfully Michael lays bare weaker building codes STORM SCENES | INSIDESEE PHOTOS FROM THE AFTERMATH OF HURRICANE MICHAEL ON PAGES A4-5 INSURANCE, HOUSING HELP AVAILABLE COMMUNITY | A7PRAYERS, THE CALM AFTER MICHAEL AT ST. ANDREW UNITED METHODIST CHURCH See CODES, A3By Jim Thompson and Alicia Adams GateHouse Media FloridaLYNN HAVEN „ Presi-dent Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump both got a bird's-eye and ground-level view Monday of the havoc wreaked by Hurricane Michael as it smashed across the Northeast Florida Panhandle and into Georgia last week.Along with Florida Gov. Rick Scott, Federal Emergency Management Association officials and Mayor Margo Anderson, the Trumps toured a neigh-borhood in the hard-hit town of Lynn Haven, where the damaged roofs of many homes were covered with blue tarps. The scent of pine sap from broken trees still filled the air.To see this personally ... total devastation,Ž Trump said as he walked through a residential area along 7th Street.The storm cut a damaging swath through that section of residential Lynn Haven, where snapped power poles and downed power lines lay along the streets among limbs and vegetation blown off trees by Hurricane Michael, which made landfall Wednesday along the northeastern Gulf Coast.It was almost like a giant tornado „ a really wide tor-nado,Ž the president said in describing the hurricane.Among the people the Trumps and Scott visited Monday during their quick tour was Michael Rollins, a white-haired gentleman who rode out the storm with his pets. Standing in front of his house, its roof covered with blue plastic, Rollins spent several minutes talk-ing with Trump and the other officials who toured the neighborhood.At one point, Rollins told Trump about the tree that narrowly missed his home when it fell.It just about got it,Ž Trump said.Rollins told the Trumps, Scott and the FEMA workers that the city's response to the hurricane has been heartwarming.The whole community has come together,Ž he said.The Trumps arrived at Northwest Florida Beaches International Airport in Panama City on Marine One, the presidential helicopter, President visits PanhandlePresident Donald Trump and “ rst lady Melania Trump hand out water during a visit to areas affected by Hurricane Michael, Monday, Oct. 15, 2018, in Lynn Haven, Fla. Florida Gov. Rick Scott is at right. [AP PHOTO/EVAN VUCCI] President Donald Trump, “ rst lady Melania Trump and Florida Gov. Rick Scott, tour a neighborhood affected by Hurricane Michael, Monday, Oct. 15, 2018, in Lynn Haven, Fla. [AP PHOTO/EVAN VUCCI] See PRESIDENT, A2 After the storm .............A4-5 Comics ..........................B5 Diversions ......................B4 Local & State ...............B1-3 Storm Briefs ...................A6 Weather .........................A8 LOCAL & STATE | B1DEVASTATED TYNDALL IS COMING BACK, GENERAL SAYS LOCAL | B1 Shredded trees, derailed train cars and a sunken trailer are seen Wednesday in the aftermath of Hurricane Michael in Panama Cit y. [AP PHOTO/GERALD HERBERT] SATURDAYMostly sunny 81 / 64FRIDAYNot as warm 80 / 61TODAYClearing 87 / 59 Panama City News Herald Want to subscribe? Call 850-747-5050 PANAMA CITY Thursday, October 11, 2018 @The_News_Herald facebook.com/panamacitynewsherald75 ¢ www.newsherald.comStrongest hurricane to hit the continental US in nearly 50 years pounds PanhandleBy Jay Reeves and Brendan FarringtonThe Associated PressHurricane Michael slammed into the Florida Panhandle with terrifying winds of 155 mph Wednesday, splintering homes and submerging neighborhoods before continuing its destruc-tive charge inland across the Southeast. It was the most powerful hurricane to hit the conti-nental U.S. in nearly 50 years and at least one death was reported during its passage.Supercharged by abnormally warm waters of the Gulf of Mexico, the Category 4 storm crashed ashore in the early afternoon near Mexico Beach, a tourist town about midway along the Panhandle, a 200-mile stretch of white-sand beach resorts, fishing towns and military bases. After it ravaged the Panhan-dle, Michael barreled into south Georgia as a Category 3 hurricane „ the most power-ful ever recorded for that part of the neighboring state.In north Florida, Michael battered the shoreline with sideways rain, powerful Michael slams into Florida coastThe St. Marks River over” ows into the city of St. Marks ahead of Hurricane Michael on Wednesday. [BRENDAN FARRINGTON/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS] More insideMichael hits Bayou George area: Northern Panama City was hit hard by the hurricane with trees and power lines down across the entire neighborhood. A3 Re-entry plan: Many hazards remain and some vital services, such as electricity, water, and fuel may be unavailable. A3 Waiting on the all clearŽ: Approximately 50 emergency strike teams are waiting to swarm Franklin County today. A3 Con” uence of awful factors: Hurricane Michael powered to a record-shattering Category 4 goliath Wednesday with an intensity that trounced some of the most elite cyclones in history. A4Comics ..........................B7 Local & State ..................A3 TV ................................B5 Puzzles ..........................B6 Sports............................B1 Weather .........................A4LIKE AN ATOMIC BOMBA storm chaser climbs into his vehicle to retrieve his equipment Wednesday after Hurricane Michael collapsed a hotel canopy in Panama City Beach. [GERALD HERBERT/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS] See COAST, A6By Wendy Victora and Savannah EvanoffGatehouse Media FloridaHours after Hurricane Michael devastated Bay County and its neighbors to the east, authorities were still trying to grasp the magnitude of destruction.The storm came in squarely on Tyndall Air Force Base with winds of 155 mph, caus-ing severe damage to the base as well as the communities on either side of it.In the immediate after-math, citizens were reporting extensive damage to numer-ous structures, including some that were leveled by the storm.It looks like an atomic bomb had hit our city,Ž said David Barnes, a DJ in Panama City. Damage has been widespread.ŽAmong the heavily Hurricane leaves damage to Bay areaSee DAMAGE, A6 MONDAYSome sun 77 / 64SUNDAYNot as warm 73 / 56TODAYT-shower 84 / 58 Panama City News Herald Want to subscribe? Call 850-747-5050 PANAMA CITY Saturday, October 20, 2018 @The_News_Herald facebook.com/panamacitynewsherald75 ¢ www.newsherald.com VIGILANTES ARRESTED IN MEXICO BEACHINSIDE | A6 INSIDE | A4SWEETBAY CITY SET UP TO AID REPAIR CREWS A look from above ............A5 Comics ..........................B9 Diversions ......................B8 Faith .............................B6 Sports.........................B1-5 Weather .........................B3Sandra Shef“ eld, 72, reacts to her predicament Wednesday, as she uses a washcloth to wipe sweat from her face in her home, which now has no electricity, in the aftermath of Hurricane Michael in Panama City. [GERALD HERBERT/AP] Robert Edmonson rests after pulling a dolly through sand as he helps retrieve belongings from his brother-in-laws destroyed home in Mexico Beach on Thursday. By Jay ReevesThe Associated PressMEXICO BEACH „ Missing relatives and worries that looters are just outside the door. Dirty clothes. Hours-long lines for gasoline, insurance adjusters, food and water. No power, no air conditioning, no schools, no information and little real improvement in sight. Daily life is a series of fears and frustrations, both large and small, for thousands of people living on the edge, more than a week after Hur-ricane Michael flattened thousands of square miles in the hurricane zone of the Panhandle.Erin Maxwell waited in line for fuel for more than an hour Thursday at a gasoline station that never opened.Im tired and want to go to sleep. I dont want to wait in another line,Ž said Maxwell, eyes closed and her head tilted back on the seat.Meanwhile, husband Mickey Calhoun fretted over the fate of his mother, Anita Newsome, 74. The retired sheriffs deputy was last seen when officers took her to a hospital the day before Michael made landfall, her son said.We cant find her or get word anywhere,Ž said an Post Michael: Fear, frustrationBy Eileen KelleyGateHouse MediaPARKER „ At the sound of the diesel engine of an ATV rounding the corner, A.D. Thomas lifts his arm as a way to get the mayors attention. His well-aged hips have left him with a slow and somewhat unsteady gait, that keeps him from walking to the road.Who should I call for help?Ž the 87-year-old disabled veteran asked as he began a series of questions and requests for the mayor of Parker, who is surveying the Hurricane Michael damage from an ATV. Thomas is worried about gas from a fire pit. Hed also like some help packing up some of the trin-kets that he and his wife of 65 years, Anne, collected.For the past four years Anne Thomas has lived at a memory care/assisted-living facility, so it has just been A.D. Thomas and a house full of furniture and trinkets. But the furniture is probably ruined.Anne Thomas dementia already robbed the couple of so much and A.D. Thomas doesnt want a hurricane to rob them of what is left. But it doesnt look good.Where A.D. Thomas goes and if it is with the couples memorabilia remains to be seen. The 2,542-square-foot ranch home will have to be demolished, Thomas said.An estimated one-third of the 2,500 or so houses and structures in this tiny 2-square-mile city could meet the same fate, said Rich Musgrave, mayor for more than five years.Mayor: Can Parker survive?Parker Mayor Rich Musg rave updates the citys priority posters in Parker City Hall on Thursday. [JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] Thousands of people living on edge more than a week after historic hurricaneNews Herald staff reportWEWAHITCHKA „ While Hurricane Michael roared through more than a week ago, the danger from the storm is still very real for those attempting to clean up.Several deaths have been reported in recent days caused by accidents involving Hurricane Michael debris.Former Florida Highway Patrol Cpl. and active FHP reserve member Nick Rivera was killed while clearing debris at his home Thursday morning. 2 killed Thursday clearing Michael debrisMorgan Washington, 4, hoses down a wooden ” ame with a little help from Brad Price during the annual Fire Prevention Fest at Gulf Coast Community College in 2009. Price died Thursday while helping family members clear debris from Hurricane Michael. [NEWS HERALD FILE] We need running water more than anything. To be able to shower after a full day of cleaning would be great.ŽKelli LadikSee DEBRIS, A2 See HURRICANE, A2 See PARKER, A2 Business ........................A9 Diversions .....................C7 Faith .............................B8 Local & State ...............B1-7 Sports.........................C1-5 Viewpoints ...................A10 MONDAYSunny 82 / 60SUNDAYSunny 77 / 67TODAYPartly sunny 71 / 55 Panama City News Herald Want to subscribe? Call 850-747-5050 Saturday, October 27, 2018 PANAMA CITY @The_News_Herald facebook.com/panamacitynewsherald75 ¢ www.newsherald.com SPORTS | C1FSU LOOKS TO MAKE STATEMENT AGAINST CLEMSON LOCAL & STATE | B1AFTER MICHAEL, VOLUNTEERS COME TO MILLVILLES AID DONATIONS POUR IN FOR BAY SCHOOLSLOCAL | B1 Events have a total economic impact of $17 millionBy Ed OffleySpecial to The News HeraldPANAMA CITY BEACH „ Two weeks after Hurricane Michael, life is slowly returning to normal in the beachfront community, but one thing is gone for good: the 2018 fall tourism season.Mayor Mike Thomas announced Thursday morn-ing that city officials have opted to cancel three special tourism events that in a normal year attract tens of thousands of visitors to the beach. They are the 2018 Fall Thunder Beach motorcycle rally, which was to have begun on Wednesday and run through Sunday; the Ironman Florida sports com-petition slated for Nov. 3; and the Emerald Coast Cruisin antique car rally scheduled for Nov. 6-10.We are still not where we can have (special tourist) events yet,Ž Thomas told City Council members during the regular meeting at city hall. The Beach still has too much going onŽ with storm recov-ery efforts.The city plans to resume its fall/winter event sched-ule with the Beach Home for the Holidays event scheduled at Aaron Bessant Park over the Thanksgiving weekend, Thomas said.On paper, the Beach tourism economy appears to be facing a major hit because of the canceled events. In 2017, four events that have been canceled „ Oktoberfest, Thunder Beach, Ironman and Emerald Coast Cruisin „ had a total economic impact of $17 million, said Richard Sanders, Tourist Development Council vice president for sports and special events. For now, the loss of special event revenue to the local economy is being somewhat offset by the army of first PCB o cials cancel 3 events By Katie Landeck522-5114 | @PCNHKatieL klandeck@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY „ Perched high on metal scaffolding, Jimmy Holloway quickly surveys an industrial-sized debris hauler pulling into a makeshift dump site on Redwood Avenue.Broken bits of live oaks that once shaded the Cove and some palm fronds are packed into the truck. Holloway, a debris monitor, estimated the truck is 75 percent full, a number he passes along to be entered into the official paperwork while waving the driver through to dump the latest load.Holloway, who has been commuting daily from Dothan, Alabama, and the rest of the debris removal crew have been working Historic e orts start to remove debris Downtown businesses reopening, hopeful hurricane damage will spur redevelopmentBy Patrick McCreless522-5118 | @PNCHPatrickMPANAMA CITY „ Kara Rigby stood on Harrison Avenue, near the corner of East Fourth Street on Thursday, her sparkling, gold-sequined shoes a stark contrast to the gloomy, overcast sky and surrounding destruction.Behind the lifelong Panama City resident, a man on a ladder inspected the facade of Vinny and Bays Coffee and Eatery „ one of Rigbys three downtown businesses. Across the street, dehumidifiers pumped air through tubes into the historic Martin Theatre, its art deco archi-tecture still intact. In every direction, streets were filled with piles of debris shoveled out of damaged buildings.Where some might despair at the sight of the historic downtown that has struggled to revitalize for years, Rigby sees potential.I think it gives everybody a clean slate to fix things back like they want,Ž Rigby said.More than two weeks have passed since Hurri-cane Michael slammed into Panama City and caused widespread damage, includ-ing downtown. Like Rigby, some downtown shop owners plan to reopen soon or already have reopened. But more so than just digging out of the rubble, some busi-ness owners are cautiously optimistic that the destruc-tion could stimulate the downtown redevelopment theyve sought for years.Rigby said she planned to reopen the coffee shop this weekend.People on social media have been cheering us along,Ž Rigby said of her and other downtown businesses. Theyre saying they cant wait to come visit us again, A CLEAN SLATEDebris is removed from Harrison Avenue in downtown Panama City on Thursday after damage from Hurricane Michael. [RICHARD GRAULICH/PBPOST.COM] See DEBRIS, A2 See EVENTS, A2 See DOWNTOWN, A2 22 DAYS OF HURRICANE MICHAEL

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** PC ADVANCES ON CITY HALL LAWSUIT LOCAL | B1 LOCAL & STATE | B1BAY COUNTY, HURRICANES HAVE LONG RELATIONSHIP Business ........................A11 Diversions ......................C5 Local & State ...............B1-7 Obituaries ......................B3 Sports.........................C1-3 Viewpoints ....................A12 FRIDAYNot as warm 80 / 59THURSDAYPartly sunny 87 / 62TODAYHurricane 83 / 77 Panama City News Herald Want to subscribe? Call 850-747-5050 PANAMA CITY Wednesday, October 10, 2018 @The_News_Herald facebook.com/panamacitynewsherald75 ¢ www.newsherald.com120 mph „ Hurricane Michaels wind speeds as of 4:30 p.m. Tuesday 1 p.m. „ The time the eye of the storm is expected to make landfall today. 35 miles „ The distance outward from the center hurricane force winds will be felt. 9-13 feet „ The worst storm surge predicted by National Hurricane Center, likely between Mexico Beach and Keaton Beach. Six to 9 feet of surge is expected in Bay County. 3 shelters „ The number of shelters open in the county as of 4:30 p.m. Tuesday. One “ lled to capacity. 120,000 „ The number of people under a mandatory evacuation in Bay County. 12 hours „ Length of shifts being worked by “ rst responders. 40 mph „ Sustained wind speed when the Florida Department of Law Enforcement will close DuPont Bridge. Any closure of the Hathaway Bridge will be determined by the Bay County Sheriffs Of“ ce. 911 „ If there is life-threatening damage to your home, such as a downed power line on your home, call 911. Otherwise, email non-lifethreatening damage reports to recovery@baycounty” gov with your name, telephone number, address of damage, picture and time if known. 1-866-966-7226 „ Number to call to report price gouging 10-15 minutes „ If your power is off, Gulf Power says to turn off large appliances and air conditioners and wait 10 to 15 minutes after power has been restored before turning them back on. Also, while Gulf Power knows when your power it out, if you have a question about the outage call 1-800-487-6937. 10-14 inches „ Amount of rainfall possible. 8 Weather Channel reporters „ To cover the storm, the Weather Channel sent Jim Cantore, Chris Bruin, Reynolds Wolf and Alex Wilson to Panama City Beach. In addition, the WC sent Jen Carfagno and Tevin Wooten to Tallahassee and Chris Warren and Mike Bettes to Apalachicola.News Herald staff report By the numbersBy Patrick McCreless522-5118 | @PCNHPatrickM pmccrreless@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY „ Hurricane Michael doesnt scare Fyderrick Bush.The Millville resident and his family loaded about 10, 20-pound bags full of ice from an automated machine on Fifth Street Tuesday afternoon into their car „ part of their preparations to ride out the hurricane set to hit the area today.Im not going anywhere,Ž said Bush, who has lived in the area the past 15 years. I dont run from nothing.ŽThe county issued a man-datory evacuation for much of Panama City and Bay County that began Tuesday morning. And while many motorists clogged streets or packed their cars to evacuate, a quick tour of the city revealed plenty of people who chose to ride out the latest hurricane.Bush said he, his wife Amber and their four children were prepared for the impending hurricane, which could generate flooding and produce winds strong enough to damage homes and uproot trees.MICHAEL BEARS DOWNLocal opinions mixed on evacuatingDavid Hayes boards up a window as Hurricane Michael approaches Tuesday. Hayes says he isnt concerned as much about the smaller windows because they are new and ” ex less than the large living room window. [PHOTOS BY JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] Xavier McKenzie, 7, puts a 20-pound bag of ice into his familys car as Hurricane Michael approaches on Tuesday. Xavier and his family do not live in a storm surge area, so are prepared for possibly losing power and will not evacuate. By Zack McDonald747-5071 | @PCNHzack zmcdonald@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY BEACH „ As thousands of people evacuated Bay County ahead of Hurricane Michael, first responders prepared to stay in place.Most„ if not almost all„ law enforcement, firefighters and hospital personnel began working staggered, 12-hour shifts across the county as the storm tracked toward Bay County.Bay County Sheriffs Office Lt. David Higgins had been on duty Tuesday since 4:30a.m. He said there had been only minor squabbles over gasoline and sparse wrecks leading up to the 6a.m. evacuation. When traffic began thinning and Bay emergency personnel riding out the storm See MICHAEL, A4 See SAFETY, A4 B2 Saturday, November 10, 2018 | The News Herald

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** Shredded trees, derailed train cars and a sunken trailer are seen Wednesday in the aftermath of Hurricane Michael in Panama Cit y. [AP PHOTO/GERALD HERBERT] SATURDAYMostly sunny 81 / 64FRIDAYNot as warm 80 / 61TODAYClearing 87 / 59 Panama City News Herald Want to subscribe? Call 850-747-5050 PANAMA CITY Thursday, October 11, 2018 @The_News_Herald facebook.com/panamacitynewsherald75 ¢ www.newsherald.comStrongest hurricane to hit the continental US in nearly 50 years pounds PanhandleBy Jay Reeves and Brendan FarringtonThe Associated PressHurricane Michael slammed into the Florida Panhandle with terrifying winds of 155 mph Wednesday, splintering homes and submerging neighborhoods before continuing its destruc-tive charge inland across the Southeast. It was the most powerful hurricane to hit the conti-nental U.S. in nearly 50 years and at least one death was reported during its passage.Supercharged by abnormally warm waters of the Gulf of Mexico, the Category 4 storm crashed ashore in the early afternoon near Mexico Beach, a tourist town about midway along the Panhandle, a 200-mile stretch of white-sand beach resorts, fishing towns and military bases. After it ravaged the Panhan-dle, Michael barreled into south Georgia as a Category 3 hurricane „ the most power-ful ever recorded for that part of the neighboring state.In north Florida, Michael battered the shoreline with sideways rain, powerful Michael slams into Florida coastThe St. Marks River over” ows into the city of St. Marks ahead of Hurricane Michael on Wednesday. [BRENDAN FARRINGTON/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS] More insideMichael hits Bayou George area: Northern Panama City was hit hard by the hurricane with trees and power lines down across the entire neighborhood. A3 Re-entry plan: Many hazards remain and some vital services, such as electricity, water, and fuel may be unavailable. A3 Waiting on the all clearŽ: Approximately 50 emergency strike teams are waiting to swarm Franklin County today. A3 Con” uence of awful factors: Hurricane Michael powered to a record-shattering Category 4 goliath Wednesday with an intensity that trounced some of the most elite cyclones in history. A4Comics ..........................B7 Local & State ..................A3 TV ................................B5 Puzzles ..........................B6 Sports............................B1 Weather .........................A4LIKE AN ATOMIC BOMBA storm chaser climbs into his vehicle to retrieve his equipment Wednesday after Hurricane Michael collapsed a hotel canopy in Panama City Beach. [GERALD HERBERT/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS] See COAST, A6By Wendy Victora and Savannah EvanoffGatehouse Media FloridaHours after Hurricane Michael devastated Bay County and its neighbors to the east, authorities were still trying to grasp the magnitude of destruction.The storm came in squarely on Tyndall Air Force Base with winds of 155 mph, caus-ing severe damage to the base as well as the communities on either side of it.In the immediate after-math, citizens were reporting extensive damage to numer-ous structures, including some that were leveled by the storm.It looks like an atomic bomb had hit our city,Ž said David Barnes, a DJ in Panama City. Damage has been widespread.ŽAmong the heavily Hurricane leaves damage to Bay areaSee DAMAGE, A6 The News Herald | Saturday, November 10, 2018 B3

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** People cut away a tree that fell on a truck in Panama City Thursday, one day after the area was pounded by Hurricane Michael. [GERALD HERBERT/AP] SUNDAYMostly sunny 85 / 70SATURDAYMostly sunny 81 / 65TODAYSunny 79 / 59 Panama City News Herald Want to subscribe? Call 850-747-5050 Friday, October 12, 2018 @The_News_Herald facebook.com/panamacitynewsherald75 ¢ www.newsherald.com PANAMA CITY Business ........................ B4 Comics ......................... B8 Food ..............................B3 Health ........................... B2 Nation & World ..............B1 Obituaries ..................... A4 By Katie Landeck, Patrick McCreless and Savannah EvanoffGateHouse Media FloridaPANAMA CITY „ Less than 12 hours after the historic Hurricane Michael ripped a path through Bay County, residents began to emerge, inspect the damage and, in many cases, tally their losses.Ive lived here all my life,Ž said Corina Gamble, who was just starting to clean up around her home. And Ive never been through anything like this. Its terrible.ŽGamble said that while her home fared better than most, she, and many others, were not adequately prepared for the storm.We werent safe at all,Ž she said.Similar scenes played out as the clouds finally broke Thursday morning, illuminating the nearly surreal scene of twisted metal and devastated buildings. Trees, stripped of their leaves, stood at odd angles, giving the impression of an atomic blast.The media keeps saying Bay County is resilient,Ž said Wayne Wright, who was in his friends living room when a tree fell on the home. But this is going to need a miracle worker.Ž Worse than anythingHurricane Michael grew quickly, from a tropical depression to a Category 1 storm in less than 24 hours, then ballooned all the way up to a major Category 4 storm as it raced up from the Caribbean Sea to the Gulf of Mexico.The aerial view of the region revealed a definitive delinea-tion between the areas that were damaged and the areas that weren't.Panama City revealed rows of houses in shambles and streets littered with the frag-ments. Giant trees appeared weightless, lying uprooted sideways on the ground.In Mexico Beach, there was a definitive difference between the inland and beach properties. Most beach properties were destroyed or DEVASTATEDBay County residents begin to pick up pieces after Hurricane MichaelHouses show storm damage from Hurricane Michael in Panama City Thursday. [MICHAEL SNYDER/DAILY NEWS] Dorian Carter looks under furniture for a missing cat after several trees fell on his home during Hurricane Michael in Panama City. [GERALD HERBERT/AP] See HURRICANE, A2 B4 Saturday, November 10, 2018 | The News Herald

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** Comics ..........................B8 Local & State ..................B1 Tyndall news..................A6 Weather .........................B2 MONDAYMostly sunny 87 / 72SUNDAYMostly sunny 86 / 71TODAYMostly sunny 82 / 66 Panama City News Herald Want to subscribe? Call 850-747-5050 Saturday, October 13, 2018 PANAMA CITY @The_News_Herald facebook.com/panamacitynewsherald75 ¢ www.newsherald.com STORM SCENES | INSIDESEE PHOTOS FROM THE AFTERMATH OF HURRICANE MICHAEL ON PAGES A2 AND B6 Jimmy Patronis: Its going to be a while before Bay County has a semblance of normalcyBy Mike Cazalas GateHouse Media FloridaPANAMA CITY „ Bay County and Panama City have been forever changed by Hurri-cane Michael, State Chief Financial Officer Jimmy Patronis said Thursday, and even essential items like power and medical care are going to take time.The damage is so severe and communications so difficult that Patronis, whose family owns Captain Andersons restaurant, said he did not have an accurate number on possible fatalities. But, he said the swath of devastation that stretches from a few miles west of the Hatha-way Bridge to Apalachicola is unfathomable after taking the brunt of a (strong Category 4) storm.The intensity of what Michael did, it was a Category 5 when it hit Bay County, its going to be a while,Ž he said. They did a drone flight over Mexico Beach and its gone. Just gone. It looks like some-one took a shovel and scraped it off the map.ŽSearch and rescue teams under Patronis umbrella of authority had cleared 1,800 homes by days end Thursday, making sure there were no injured inside. But Patro-nis said its not realistic to think that more people didnt perish in the storm.There were 350,000 people in the path of the storm, and there were 6,000 people in shelters,Ž Patronis Scraped o the map Patronis Barren trees line a street damaged by Hurricane Michael in Spring“ eld Thursday evening. [DAVID GOLDMAN/AP] Details emerge from hard-hit townBy Katie Landeck and Annie Blanks GateHouse Media FloridaSPRINGFIELD „ Details are finally beginning to emerge from Springfield, a small Bay County town thats had little to no communication with the outside world since Hurricane Michael ripped through the region on Wednesday.Ward 2 Commissioner Phillip Dykes pleaded with people to be patientŽ as city crews and first responders work to clear the wreckage, open roads and repair downed sewer and power lines.Its going to be a while before we can assess the full magnitude of what went on,Ž Dykes said Friday. Its like a bombs been dropped on Springfield. So hang in there, be patient, were all in the same boat.ŽIts like a bombs been dropped on Spring eldA woman walks through a damaged store in Spring“ eld, one day after Hurricane Michael tore through the area. [DAVID GOLDMAN/AP] By Patrick McCreless522-5118 | @PCNHPatrickMLYNN HAVEN „ Cassidy Nelson had food to spare and wanted to share it all.The general manager of the Sonnys Real Pit Bar-BQ near hurricane-ravaged Lynn Haven just didnt know if anyone would show up Friday to eat. He had no reason to worry. Hundreds of people turned out for the free barbecue chicken, ribs and hamburgers cooked in the Sonnys propane-fueled smoker „ all without Nelson telling any-body what he planned to do. Nelsons generosity was a microcosm of the recovery under way in the Lynn Haven area since Hurricane Michael blasted through on Wednesday. From power crews Lynn Haven pulls togetherHundreds of people stand in line to get food at Sonnys Real Pit Bar-B-Q on Friday in Lynn Haven. [PHOTOS BY PATTI BLAKE/THE NEWS HERALD] Central Pentecostal Ministries sustained heavy damage from Hurricane Michael. Were just trying to get lines in but theres vegetation everywhere. Getting into Lynn Haven is very di cult right now.ŽKimberly Blair, spokeswoman with Gulf Power, said of the destruction left in the wake of Hurricane MichaelSee PATRONIS, A3 See LYNN HAVEN, A3 See TOWN, A3 The News Herald | Saturday, November 10, 2018 B5

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** LOCAL | A16 ST. ANDREW METHODISTPanama City church plans Sunday service TUESDAYT-shower 87 / 71MONDAYSome sun 88 / 72TODAYMostly sunny 87 / 72 Panama City News Herald Want to subscribe? Call 850-747-5050 $1.50 PANAMA CITY Sunday, October 14, 2018 @The_News_Herald facebook.com/panamacitynewsherald www.newsherald.comBay County Sheriffs Of“ ce deputies Alex Young and Jared Waker watch Hurricane Michael from the Thomas Drive “ re station. [PATTI BLAKE / THE NEWS HERALD] STEP BY STEP By Patrick McCreless 522-5118 | @PNCHPatrickMPANAMA CITY „ Chris Fillyaw just wants to get out.Since Tuesday the Panama City man, his brother and his mother have been at Northside Elemen-tary School, set up by the American Red Cross as a shelter for victims of Hur-ricane Michael.He hasnt enjoyed his stay much so far.I was sleeping outside since Tuesday because it was so hot, but then yester-day they told me I couldnt sleep outside,Ž Fillyaw said outside the school Saturday morning. People sweat all night in the hallways ƒ you can just see the beads of sweat on people.ŽFillyaw is one of hundreds of people living in the shelter since the hurricane ripped through Bay County, dam-aging or destroying many homes in its wake. Some residents say the shelter has been poorly staffed so far, with basic necessities like proper food, water, working toilets, beds and medication coming slowly, or not at all.Its unsanitary conditions ƒ unhealthy living conditions, thats what bothers me the most,Ž Residents recount poor conditions at Panama City hurricane shelterNews Herald Staff Report PANAMA CITY „ Power restoration east of the Hath-away Bridge, in Panama City, Callaway, Parker, Lynn Haven, Youngstown and surrounding areas could take weeks, according to Gulf Power.West of the Hathaway Bridge in Panama City Beach, power is estimated to be restored much earlier. The west end of the Beach, west of Highway 79, should have power back on by mid-night Sunday.Panama City Beach and Bay County east of Highway 79 to the Hathaway Bridge should have power back on Gulf Power: Restoration may take weeks in Panama CityRed Cross shelter at Northside Elementary draws complaintsCrews work on power lines along East Cove Drive. [PATTI BLAKE / THE NEWS HERALD] See SHELTER, A3 See POWER, A3Business .......................................................................B9 Diversions ....................................................................B13 Weather .......................................................................A8 B6 Saturday, November 10, 2018 | The News Herald

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** WEDNESDAYPartly sunny 88 / 66TUESDAYT-shower 88 / 73TODAYPartly sunny 88 / 71 Panama City News Herald Want to subscribe? Call 850-747-5050 PANAMA CITY Monday, October 15, 2018 @The_News_Herald facebook.com/panamacitynewsherald75 ¢ www.newsherald.com Business .........................B6 Comics ..........................B8 Diversions ......................B7 Opinion .........................B5 Sports............................B1 Weather .........................A5 By Genevieve Smithgsmith@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY „ The word of the day is hope.It will be weeks, not months, until Bay Countys children are able to return to school after being devastated by Hurricane Michael on Wednesday, according to Bill Husfelt, Superintendent of Bay District Schools.On Saturday, administra-tors from schools spanning all over the county met in Mosley High Schools Media Center to discuss plans for getting students back to school and for attending to students currently living in shelters, which many administrators have been help-ing to run since they opened. I would encourage people to just trust us, that were going to take care of the kids as quickly as we can and make sure that we get them in schools and to the next grade. Thats our main focus right now,Ž he said. Weeks le not monthsBy Katie LandeckNews HeraldPANAMA CITY „ In one bed slept a 7-year-old who had the sense to gather up her little brother, mothers purse and her familys medication when the roof peeled off her home.In another bed, a woman whose last remaining piece of furniture is a cherry dresser that somehow survived her apartment collapsing around it played with some children.In a back room, a woman tried to figure out if there was a way to use a rice cooker she grabbed after the front of her home was blown away to cook a meal for her grandkids. About 400 people were still crowded into the emergency shelter set up by the American Red Cross at Rutherford High School on Saturday morning, each with their own story of survival and often times very little left.We have no shoes, no socks,Ž said Aricka Roundtree, who was walking around the shelter in bare feet. We need toothbrushes, socks, even flip flops. We need the bare necessities.Ž A tense anxiety had settled over the shelter, as people struggled to continue to be patient with the circum-stances. The food was edible, but not good, people said. Concerns about medical con-ditions people said were going unaddressed or being minimally treated because little was available. You cant beat the GodsAdrian Brown, 3, sleeps at the emergency shelter at Rutherford High School after Hurricane Michael on Saturday, October 13, 2018. As windows broke and the roof peeled away during the storm his 7-year-old sister AEria Brown grabbed him, cellphones and her mothers medication and brought them to a safe spot under the stairs in their home. Since then they and their mother Ashley Brown have stayed at the emergency shelter. [JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] Bay District Schools leaders met to discuss logistics for future a er devastation from Hurricane Michael By Patrick McCrelessThe News Herald 522-5118 | @PNCHPatrickMPANAMA CITY „ For the last four days, Kirby Jordan has been the communication lifeline for family and friends to the outside world.Unlike many in the city who have Verizon cell service, down since Hurricane Michael struck on Wednesday, Jordans phone uses AT&T „ a ser-vice thats still been usable, somewhat.Its very congested ƒ I get very slow Internet and sometimes I can get texts,Ž Jordan said of his phone while walking his dogs Boomer and Ruby with his wife on 11th Street Sunday morning, near their Garden Club home. Weve been letting our friends use the phone.ŽSince the hurricane, most cell phone and radio com-munication has been down for residents, first respond-ers and repair crews. The situation has meant little sharing of information between family and friends, but also potential danger for emergency personnel like police who need quick communication to protect the community and each other.Jordan said even with a partially working phone, its remained difficult to get any information about the recovery or what dona-tions or charity services might be available.Weve gotten some information, but not a lot,Ž Jordan said. I think today Im going to get our camper hooked back up and get digital satellite.ŽCommunication, info still scarce after hurricaneThe Jinx Middle School gym is missing walls on Oct. 11 in Panama City. [ PATTI BLAKE/ THE NEWS HERALD ] After Hurricane Michael on Friday, October 12, 2018.[JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] See SCHOOL, A2 See SERVICE, A2 See SHELTER, A2 The News Herald | Saturday, November 10, 2018 B7

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** THURSDAYMostly sunny 84 / 67WEDNESDAYPartly sunny 87 / 64TODAYT-shower 87 / 71 Panama City News Herald Want to subscribe? Call 850-747-5050 PANAMA CITY Tuesday, October 16, 2018 @The_News_Herald facebook.com/panamacitynewsherald75 ¢ www.newsherald.comPanhandle lags behind rest of stateBy Gary FineoutThe Associated PressTALLAHASSEE „ Unlike in South Florida, homes in the states Panhandle did not have tighter building codes until just 11 years ago; it was once argued that acres of forests would provide the region with a natural barrier against the savage winds of a hurricane.Many of those structures did not withstand the fury of Hurricane Michael, which slammed into the area last week with winds of up to 155 mph, leaving acres of flattened houses and other buildings in its wake before roaring across the Georgia border inland.Were learning painfully Michael lays bare weaker building codes STORM SCENES | INSIDESEE PHOTOS FROM THE AFTERMATH OF HURRICANE MICHAEL ON PAGES A4-5 INSURANCE, HOUSING HELP AVAILABLE COMMUNITY | A7PRAYERS, THE CALM AFTER MICHAEL AT ST. ANDREW UNITED METHODIST CHURCH See CODES, A3By Jim Thompson and Alicia Adams GateHouse Media FloridaLYNN HAVEN „ Presi-dent Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump both got a bird's-eye and ground-level view Monday of the havoc wreaked by Hurricane Michael as it smashed across the Northeast Florida Panhandle and into Georgia last week.Along with Florida Gov. Rick Scott, Federal Emergency Management Association officials and Mayor Margo Anderson, the Trumps toured a neigh-borhood in the hard-hit town of Lynn Haven, where the damaged roofs of many homes were covered with blue tarps. The scent of pine sap from broken trees still filled the air.To see this personally ... total devastation,Ž Trump said as he walked through a residential area along 7th Street.The storm cut a damaging swath through that section of residential Lynn Haven, where snapped power poles and downed power lines lay along the streets among limbs and vegetation blown off trees by Hurricane Michael, which made landfall Wednesday along the northeastern Gulf Coast.It was almost like a giant tornado „ a really wide tor-nado,Ž the president said in describing the hurricane.Among the people the Trumps and Scott visited Monday during their quick tour was Michael Rollins, a white-haired gentleman who rode out the storm with his pets. Standing in front of his house, its roof covered with blue plastic, Rollins spent several minutes talk-ing with Trump and the other officials who toured the neighborhood.At one point, Rollins told Trump about the tree that narrowly missed his home when it fell.It just about got it,Ž Trump said.Rollins told the Trumps, Scott and the FEMA workers that the city's response to the hurricane has been heartwarming.The whole community has come together,Ž he said.The Trumps arrived at Northwest Florida Beaches International Airport in Panama City on Marine One, the presidential helicopter, President visits PanhandlePresident Donald Trump and “ rst lady Melania Trump hand out water during a visit to areas affected by Hurricane Michael, Monday, Oct. 15, 2018, in Lynn Haven, Fla. Florida Gov. Rick Scott is at right. [AP PHOTO/EVAN VUCCI] President Donald Trump, “ rst lady Melania Trump and Florida Gov. Rick Scott, tour a neighborhood affected by Hurricane Michael, Monday, Oct. 15, 2018, in Lynn Haven, Fla. [AP PHOTO/EVAN VUCCI] See PRESIDENT, A2 After the storm .............A4-5 Comics ..........................B5 Diversions ......................B4 Local & State ...............B1-3 Storm Briefs ...................A6 Weather .........................A8 LOCAL & STATE | B1DEVASTATED TYNDALL IS COMING BACK, GENERAL SAYS LOCAL | B1 B8 Saturday, November 10, 2018 | The News Herald

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** FRIDAYShowery 84 / 70THURSDAYMostly sunny 84 / 69TODAYPartly sunny 88 / 67 Panama City News Herald Want to subscribe? Call 850-747-5050 PANAMA CITY Wednesday, October 17, 2018 @The_News_Herald facebook.com/panamacitynewsherald75 ¢ www.newsherald.com By Patrick McCreless522-5118 | @PNCHPatrickM pmccreless@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY „ As the city starts restoring basic ser-vices and bringing in supplies for residents after Hurricane Michael, City Manager Mark McQueen is creating a plan for the future.McQueen said such services as garbage pickup are back, five days after the storm hit. Fresh shipments of food and water requested by the city also arrived for residents Monday night. Still, while providing basic needs is the top priority, McQueen has begun gathering area businessmen and developers to plan not just to rebuild the city, but how to make it better and more prosperous.I want to fundamentally take this disaster and make a triumph and set us up for great economic development,Ž McQueen said. My vision is for us to have a com-munity and city thats even greater than before.ŽThe Category 4 hurricane ripped through the city, knocked out power and water, and damaged or destroyed hundreds of homes and businesses.Our priority is to take care of food and water,Ž McQueen said.McQueen said the city requested major shipments of food and water from the Emergency Operations PC sees a city greater than beforeJosh Gibbs pulls a pot out of the crushed remains of Frosts Pottery Garden. [KATIE LANDECK/THE NEWS HERALD] By Katie Landeck522-5114 | @PCNHKatieL klandeck@pcnh.comMEXICO BEACH „ With a chainsaw, Josh Gibbs hacked through what was left of a friends home on a mission he was all but sure was going to be futile „ looking for a missing piece of jewelry.A concrete slab marked where the Mexico Beach townhome used to be, but the building had become part of the communal pile of dev-astation, a whole community worth of stuff shaken and jumbled together.The way the debris is youve got to peel it back layer by layer, the stuff is smashed in so hard,Ž Gibbs said. Its a lost cause.ŽIts a futile effort, but we tried all day,Ž said Jenny Gibbs. For her sake of knowing somebody cared about finding it.An awful scavenger hunt is unfolding in Mexico Beach as residents sift through a community that now bears a closer resemblance to a construction landfill than a quaint vacation town in a search for pieces of their old lives. The search is for items as small as jewelry or as big as houses.At first, Mark Drake could find only the porch of his familys vacation home as he watched CNNs aerial footage of the disaster zone.My heart just sank,Ž Drake said. But when the helicopter turned around PIECE BY PIECE, AND POT BY POTMexico Beach residents searching for everything from jewelry to housesThe devasation was total for many Mexico Beach homes. [KATIE LANDECK/THE NEWS HERALD] AFTER THE STORM | A4COULD REBUILDING RUIN MOMAND-POP MEXICO BEACH? LOCAL & STATE | B1LOOTERS TARGETING HOMES,BUSINESSES, OFFICIALS SAY By Tom McLaughlin315-4435 | @TomMnwfdn tmclaughlin@nwfdailynews.comWith early voting for this years general election less than two weeks away, the supervisors of elections in counties affected by Hurricane Michael are going to have to improvise to get out the vote.Fortunately, according to Okaloosa County Supervi-sor of Elections Paul Lux, the law provides a great deal of leeway which will allow them to do so.Theres a broad range of things the law allows. Its just a matter of everybody making their plan and getting it done,Ž Lux said.Administrative rules writ-ten into state statute provide for emergency contingency planning, said Lux, president of the Florida State Association of Supervisors of Election.Liberty, Calhoun and Gulf counties are on trackŽ to establish voting centers, said Tommy Hardee, the supervi-sor of elections for Madison County. Plans call for the centers to open Oct. 27, the day early voting for the general election is scheduled to commence, and remain so for 12 hours a day through election day on Nov. 6, Hardee said. Voters can cast ballots whenever theyre able to reach a poll-ing center.Hardee said he made a three-hour trip with a Voters will get their say in storm-hit countiesSee SEARCH, A2 See PC FUTURE, A2 See VOTERS, A2Mexico Beach ...............A4-5 Comics ..........................B6 Diversions ......................B5 Local & State ...............B1-4 Storm briefs ....................A3 Weather .........................B2 OFFICIALS: GOING TO BE LONG FIGHT LOCAL | B1 The News Herald | Saturday, November 10, 2018 B9

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** SATURDAYClouds, sun 85 / 60FRIDAYA t-storm 84 / 71TODAYMostly sunny 85 / 68 Panama City News Herald Want to subscribe? Call 850-747-5050 PANAMA CITY Thursday, October 18, 2018 @The_News_Herald facebook.com/panamacitynewsherald75 ¢ www.newsherald.com Birds-eye view ...............A5 Comics ..........................B6 Diversions ......................B5 Local & State ...............B1-3 Sports ...........................B4 Weather .........................B2 SPORTS | B4FSU FOOTBALL RETURNS FRANKLIN SCHOOLS RESUMING ON TUESDAYLOCAL | B1 By Tina HarbuckGateHouse Media FloridaPANAMA CITY „ What usually is a safe haven for charter boats turned out to be a hot spot for disaster.With Hurricane Michael set to hit the Gulf Coast somewhere between Port St. Joe and Panama City, several of the charter boats and headboats took cover in Watson Bayou, while others went to Miller Marine in Southport and a few went even farther to Orange Beach, Alabama, to the west.Capt. Andersons Marina off Thomas Drive in Panama Charter boats su er at hand of MichaelBy Tina HarbuckGateHouse Media FloridaPANAMA CITY „ Greg Abrams Seafood at Tarpon Dock might have lost a few boats at the hands of Hurricane Michael but they are not done fishing and provid-ing the Gulf Coast with fresh seafood.Abrams Seafood, on Beach Drive, has about 16 commer-cial fishing vessels of which the smaller ones went to the Intracoastal Waterway while others anchored and tied off in Fanning Bayou.The boats that took haven in the Intracoastal are fine Its not going to stop us, well be backVessels were stacked on top of vessels in Massalina Bayou near Tarpon Dock in Panama City. [TINA HARBUCK/GATEHOUSE MEDIA FLORIDA] See BOATS, A2 See BACK, A2Many area agencies send updates on their work since hurricane sent city into chaosBy Genevieve Smithgsmith@pcnh.com @PCNHgenevieveLYNN HAVEN „ Its been one week since citizens awoke to a city in chaos. Since then, agencies throughout the community have been working nonstop.Tuesday afternoon, an information-packed press meeting was hosted at Mosley High Schools media center to give updated statuses from different entities in the community and to dispel rumors.The first update came from Superintendent Bill Husfelt.Were not going to hold anybody back this year because of what has hap-pened,Ž he said of the student in Bay District Schools. Were not going to punish any child.ŽHusfelt has assembled a super committeeŽ of community members to focus on tasks such as collecting resources, restoring schools, and communicating to the public.He has identified several points of importance, which include students relocating out of the district, continuing logistical work for dual scheduling on usable campuses, and reopening day cares, which Husfelt said is essential for restoring Husfelt: E orts nonstop to open schoolsSee SCHOOL, A2By Patrick McCrelessThe News Herald 522-5118 | @PNCHPatrickMPANAMA CITY „ Jennifer Laufman might have been thinking about last-minute plans for her wedding Tuesday, were it not for Hurricane Michael.Instead, the registered nurse canceled her wedding and focused on saving medi-cal equipment from areas of Bay Medical Center dam-aged by the storm.I was supposed to get married in November, but I had to cancel because the church was ruined and everyones homes in my fiancs family were ruined,Ž Laufman said. But hey, I have a job and a car thats still working and no water got into my house.ŽLaufman is one of the hun-dreds of medical personnel keeping Bay Medical and nearby Gulf Coast Regional Medical Center open the last five days since the hur-ricane struck and damaged both facilities. And while neither hospital is totally operational yet, both have fully working emergency rooms that have been open since the disaster, ready to treat patients with serious injuries or conditions like a heart attack.We are providing emer-gency services at our main emergency department. ƒ We can handle an influx of patients like normal,Ž said Martha Crombie, spokes-woman for Bay Medical.Crombie said Bay Medical didnt have a timetable yet for when it could fully reopen and accept other patients.But were hoping to have power and water this afternoon,Ž Crombie said Tuesday. Someone remembered we have a well out back that we hooked up to flush toilets.ŽThe hospitalexpects tofully reopen within weeks, according to a Tuesdaynews release from Tennesseebased HCA Healthcare, which owns Gulf Coast,We started making repairs almost immediately after the storm, and well reopen as soon as possible,Ž the press release states.Attempts to reach a Gulf Coast representative for Full emergency services available at hospitalsRx for PC, countySee HOSPITALS, A2Bay Medical Center was damaged by Hurricane Michael as the damage could be seen Tuesday. The category 4 hurricane struck the Panhandle last Wednesday. [DOUG ENGLE/OCALA STAR BANNER] B10 Saturday, November 10, 2018 | The News Herald

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** SUNDAYNot as warm 73 / 54SATURDAYT-shower 85 / 62TODAYA t-storm 84 / 70 Panama City News Herald Want to subscribe? Call 850-747-5050 PANAMA CITY Friday, October 19, 2018 @The_News_Herald facebook.com/panamacitynewsherald75 ¢ www.newsherald.com TEMPORARY ALCOHOL BAN IN PLACELOCAL | B1 AREA BRIEFS | A5DISTRICT: BAY SCHOOLS TO REOPEN BY NOV. 12 By Dan LamotheThe Washington PostTYNDALL AIR FORCE BASE „ Hurricane Michaels surge across Tyndall Air Force Base last week wreaked enough devastation that the service is considering trans-ferring away some airmen and families until the base is rebuilt, military officials said Tuesday.Tyndall suffered a direct hit from the Category 4 storm on Oct. 10, prompting fears that jets that the service could not fly away in advance were destroyed. On Wednesday, the Air Force began allowing families to visit their homes to collect valuables and take photographs, but it is expected to take years for the base to fully recover.Brig. Gen. John Allen Jr., the services director of civil engineers, compared the storms destruction to what Hurricane Katrina caused in 2005 when it ravaged Keesler Air Force Base in Biloxi, Tyndall families fate in limboF-22 Raptors from Tyndall Air Fo rce Base circle the runway at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, in preparation for landing and safe haven on Oct. 9. The F-22 was one of several planes taking safe haven at Wright-Patterson AFB as Hurricane Michael threatened their home station. [WESLEY FARNSWORTH/U.S. AIR FORCE] Tyndall silent on damaged F-22s; no information on number of jets le behindBy Jim Thompson315-4445 | @Jimtnwfdn jthompson2nwfdailynewsTYNDALL AFB „ More than a week after Hurricane Michael made a direct hit on Tyndall Air Force Base, neither the Air Force nor members of Floridas By Zack McDonaldThe News HeraldPANAMA CITY „ At least 15 lives in Bay County were claimed by Hurricane Michael with several of the dead yet to be identified, the 14th Judicial Circuit Medical Examiners Office reported Thursday.Three deaths in adjacent counties also have been attributed to Hurricane Michael, with investigations pending in others.Medical Examiner Dr. Jay Radtke said infrastructure issues in the wake of the storm have hindered investigations. While the MEO maintained generator power during and after Hurri-cane Michael, water and communication issues arose. So far, though, most deaths appear to be medical-related, Radtke said.This is a severe stressor for people,Ž he said. If the storm expe-dited and contributed to their death, we consider that storm-related.ŽRadtke added that of those determined to be a result of the hurricane, at least six people have yet to be identified. Dental records are being inves-tigated to confirm their identities.While Hurricane Michael caused an influx of bodies to the MEO, not all were stormrelated. Some were elderly patients whose deaths coincided with the storm, three were the result of crashes on Interstate 10 and only one has been deemed a Michael slowing process for MEs o ce Lorrainda Smith sits with her 2-day-old son, Luke, on Monday as she contemplates with her husband, Wilmer Capps, right, sleepin g in their truck in a parking lot after their Panama City home was badly damaged by Hurricane Michael and they were told a nearby shelter was close d. Capps said they had no choice but to camp out at the store the night their son Luke was released from an Alabama hospital. [DAVID GOLDMAN/AP PHOTOS] Wilmer Capps takes the temperature of his two-day-old son, Luke, while preparing with his wife Lorrainda Smith to spend the “ rst night out of the hospital in a parking lot in Panama City. By David Goldman and Jay ReevesThe Associated PressPANAMA CITY „ Their home full of soggy furniture and mosquitoes, Wilmer Capps was desperate to find shelter for his wife and their son, Luke, born just three days after Hurricane Michael ravaged the Panhandle.So Capps, his wife Lorrainda Smith and little Luke settled in for the longest of nights in the best spot they could find: The parking lot of a Walmart store shut down by the storm.On a starry night, mother sat in the bed of the familys pickup truck; her child sat in a car seat beside her. Dad sat in the dark and pondered how it could be that his sons first night out of a hospital could be spent outside a big-box retailer because of a lack of help.It really upset me, man, because Ive always been the type of person who would help anyone,Ž Capps said in an interview with The Asso-ciated Press, which found the family outside the store Monday night. An AP pho-tographer accompanied them on a journey from the lot to a hospital and met them again at a hotel where donors later provided them a room.Luke is healthy and so is Smith, his mom. But she said her newborn deserves better than the stormy life hes had so far.We had everything. CHILD OF THE STORMHomeless baby, family nd shelter at WalmartBay school photos ............A7 Comics ..........................B7 Diversions ......................B6 Local & State ...............B1-2 Sports.........................B4-5 Weather .........................B2See JETS, A2 See BABY, A2 See PROCESS, A2 See LIMBO, A2 The News Herald | Saturday, November 10, 2018 B11

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** MONDAYSome sun 77 / 64SUNDAYNot as warm 73 / 56TODAYT-shower 84 / 58 Panama City News Herald Want to subscribe? Call 850-747-5050 PANAMA CITY Saturday, October 20, 2018 @The_News_Herald facebook.com/panamacitynewsherald75 ¢ www.newsherald.com VIGILANTES ARRESTED IN MEXICO BEACHINSIDE | A6 INSIDE | A4SWEETBAY CITY SET UP TO AID REPAIR CREWS A look from above ............A5 Comics ..........................B9 Diversions ......................B8 Faith .............................B6 Sports.........................B1-5 Weather .........................B3Sandra Shef“ eld, 72, reacts to her predicament Wednesday, as she uses a washcloth to wipe sweat from her face in her home, which now has no electricity, in the aftermath of Hurricane Michael in Panama City. [GERALD HERBERT/AP] Robert Edmonson rests after pulling a dolly through sand as he helps retrieve belongings from his brother-in-laws destroyed home in Mexico Beach on Thursday. By Jay ReevesThe Associated PressMEXICO BEACH „ Missing relatives and worries that looters are just outside the door. Dirty clothes. Hours-long lines for gasoline, insurance adjusters, food and water. No power, no air conditioning, no schools, no information and little real improvement in sight. Daily life is a series of fears and frustrations, both large and small, for thousands of people living on the edge, more than a week after Hur-ricane Michael flattened thousands of square miles in the hurricane zone of the Panhandle.Erin Maxwell waited in line for fuel for more than an hour Thursday at a gasoline station that never opened.Im tired and want to go to sleep. I dont want to wait in another line,Ž said Maxwell, eyes closed and her head tilted back on the seat.Meanwhile, husband Mickey Calhoun fretted over the fate of his mother, Anita Newsome, 74. The retired sheriffs deputy was last seen when officers took her to a hospital the day before Michael made landfall, her son said.We cant find her or get word anywhere,Ž said an Post Michael: Fear, frustrationBy Eileen KelleyGateHouse MediaPARKER „ At the sound of the diesel engine of an ATV rounding the corner, A.D. Thomas lifts his arm as a way to get the mayors attention. His well-aged hips have left him with a slow and somewhat unsteady gait, that keeps him from walking to the road.Who should I call for help?Ž the 87-year-old disabled veteran asked as he began a series of questions and requests for the mayor of Parker, who is surveying the Hurricane Michael damage from an ATV. Thomas is worried about gas from a fire pit. Hed also like some help packing up some of the trin-kets that he and his wife of 65 years, Anne, collected.For the past four years Anne Thomas has lived at a memory care/assisted-living facility, so it has just been A.D. Thomas and a house full of furniture and trinkets. But the furniture is probably ruined.Anne Thomas dementia already robbed the couple of so much and A.D. Thomas doesnt want a hurricane to rob them of what is left. But it doesnt look good.Where A.D. Thomas goes and if it is with the couples memorabilia remains to be seen. The 2,542-square-foot ranch home will have to be demolished, Thomas said.An estimated one-third of the 2,500 or so houses and structures in this tiny 2-square-mile city could meet the same fate, said Rich Musgrave, mayor for more than five years.Mayor: Can Parker survive?Parker Mayor Rich Musg rave updates the citys priority posters in Parker City Hall on Thursday. [JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] Thousands of people living on edge more than a week after historic hurricaneNews Herald staff reportWEWAHITCHKA „ While Hurricane Michael roared through more than a week ago, the danger from the storm is still very real for those attempting to clean up.Several deaths have been reported in recent days caused by accidents involving Hurricane Michael debris.Former Florida Highway Patrol Cpl. and active FHP reserve member Nick Rivera was killed while clearing debris at his home Thursday morning. 2 killed Thursday clearing Michael debrisMorgan Washington, 4, hoses down a wooden ” ame with a little help from Brad Price during the annual Fire Prevention Fest at Gulf Coast Community College in 2009. Price died Thursday while helping family members clear debris from Hurricane Michael. [NEWS HERALD FILE] We need running water more than anything. To be able to shower after a full day of cleaning would be great.ŽKelli LadikSee DEBRIS, A2 See HURRICANE, A2 See PARKER, A2 B12 Saturday, November 10, 2018 | The News Herald

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** TUESDAYRain 75 / 63MONDAYPartly sunny 76 / 63TODAYNot as warm 72 / 54 Panama City News Herald Want to subscribe? Call 850„747„5050 $1.50 PANAMA CITY Sunday, October 21, 2018 @The_News_Herald facebook.com/panamacitynewsherald www.newsherald.com By Eryn Dion and Heather Osbourne Gatehouse MediaBAY COUNTY „ The divide between east and west has never been more stark.For years, the gulf between the tourist destination Panama City Beach and its eastern counterpart Panama City has steadily widened, the Hathaway Bridge the crossing point between two cities growing further apart. In the days after Hurricane Michael, the two were no longer different cities, but different worlds entirely, the landscape and lifestyle con-trasting radically within just 15 miles. Here is a tale of two cities, two ways of recovery bisected by the Hathaway Bridge. Wa e House Panama City BeachThe comforting aroma of eggs and bacon frying on the Waffle House grill in Panama City Beach fills the air Thurs-day, as folks pack into the restaurant for a little taste of normalcy.Customers carefully look over pieces of printed-out paper labeled "Limited Menu," the only real evidence that Hurricane Michael sav-aged the coast just a week prior. Dave Rickell, executive vice president of the chain known for staying open during natural disasters, is at the Panama City Beach location that day to oversee operations.Rickell says Waffle House DIFFERENT WORLDSHurricane splits Bay County in halfAaron Gesegnet cooks up hash browns for customers at a Waf” e House in Panama City Beach on Thursday. [HEATHER OSBOURNE/DAILY NEWS] By Eileen KelleyGateHouse MediaCALLAWAY „ The night-mares chase him from his sleep. Hes in a room. George, his brother, is with him. The ceiling begins to bow, then buckle. He freezes. Boom.Tyler Gay was already an insomniac, but how much less sleep he can he take?He crawls out of the front seat of the truck where he has been sleeping nearly every day since Hurricane Michael and feeds an outdoor cat named Darla. Darla hops up onto the truck bed and meanders over supplies Gay gathered for others who are suffering. The cat crawls over the top of the truck and down the windshield, looking in at him.With the cat, he can at least smile about some things. He cant do the same with the reoccurring dream about the ceiling collapsing and his brother. The dreams are partially true and Gays run-ning from them. He is trying to make better memories of Hurricane Michael. € € €Gay doesnt have to be sleeping in a pickup in Callaway, one of the Florida Panhandles many mauled cities dealing with the after-math of the monstrous Category 4 storm that struck Oct. 10. In fact he wasnt even supposed to be here. Gay, 25, had been on vaca-tion in Philadelphia with his girlfriend and her family as Using chain saw, man turns trauma into actionMan picks up chain saw for rst time to help community a er Hurricane Michael LEFT: Carillon Beach emerged from the storm unscathed. [HEATHER OSBOURNE/DAILY NEWS] RIGHT: A partially dest royed unit at the Arbours apartments in Panama City, Florida, on Wednesday, Oct. 17. On Tuesday, Arbours residents were given 72 hours to vacate with wha tever possessions they needed. The management company left a note on residents doors telling them to take out everything salvageable and provide a forwarding address for their security deposits. [JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] See WORLDS, A2 See CHAIN SAW, A4 TRAFFIC WOES PLAGUE BAY COUNTYLOCAL | B1 FIRST RESPONDERS | A11WORKING AROUND THE CLOCKMany rst responders have been putting their own recovery second Local .............................B1 Crosswords ....................B8 Sports ........................C1-8 Hurricane Photos .........D1-4 Viewpoints .....................A9 The News Herald | Saturday, November 10, 2018 B13

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** WEDNESDAYPartly sunny 80 / 62TUESDAYRain 76 / 63TODAYPartly sunny 77 / 62 Panama City News Herald Want to subscribe? Call 850-747-5050 PANAMA CITY Monday, October 22, 2018 @The_News_Herald facebook.com/panamacitynewsherald75 ¢ www.newsherald.com LOCAL | A3GOVERNOR STONE GOES BELLY UP IN STORM, TO BE REBUILT Local ..........................A3-7 Viewpoints .....................A8 Nation & World ............A10 Sports.........................B1-4 TV Listings .....................B5 Weather .........................B6 By Ryan McKinnon GateHouse MediaPARKER „ Mayor Rich Musgraves estimate of how many houses in his town are demolished has been steadily increasing over the last week.Although his initial estimate was that one third of the roughly 2,500 homes in Parker didnt survive the impact of Hurricane Michael, a silent but insidious force is adding to that toll: Mold.I would have probably said just a third if it was wind only, but because of intrusion and mold I would push that up to a half,Ž he said. I wouldnt be surprised if it ends up 60 percent.ŽWith a brief rain on Saturday morning, possible showers forecast for Tuesday and punctured roofs on every block, blue tarps have become a precious commod-ity,Ž Musgrave said.Thousands of homes across the region sustained major structural damage from the storm, but even those that escaped relatively unscathed face the danger of mold, as days without power stretch beyond a week and humidity A slow decay SPORTS | B1NFL IN LONDONChargers withstand Titans late rally, hold on for 20-19 win Jubal and Harmony Spencer, along with their son Jotti (white tee shirt), load their refrigerator onto a trailer as they emptied their Panama City home. The Stuarts have stripped much of their home down to studs in an effort to halt the spread of mold. [RYAN MCKINNON PHOTOS/GATEHOUSE MEDIA] By Ryan McKinnon GateHouse MediaAs images of Hurricane Michaels devastation in Bay County and surrounding areas spread in the days following the storm, groups motivated by compassion began sending supplies to the storm-hit areas.That generosity is appreciated, but the trailer-clogged roads and shipments of used clothing … including used winter jackets … werent what the region needs, county offi-cials say.Bryan Taylor, president of the United Way of Northwest Florida, said he is hoping people can exercise patience before sending supplies to an area still lacking the manpower and infrastructure to distribute and organize those items.If you can be patient as you are generous, we can make it through this wonderfully,Ž Taylor said. We are so grateful for everybodys overwhelming desire to help and contribute and help make things better, but it can unfortunately be very hurtful if it is not managed very well.ŽDonations have piled up at various locations throughout the county, said Joby Smith, the emergency management divi-sion chief for the county. On Saturday, he said with rain in the forecast, county officials are working to find tractor trailers to house the donated items so they arent ruined before they can be sorted and distributed.People wanting to help should donate cash to large-scale relief organizations like the American Red Cross, United Way of Northwest Florida or the Salva-tion Army, Taylor said.The best way to help immediately is through cash donations,Ž Taylor said. I know people dont want to hear that, but Im sorry, its the truth.ŽValerie Sale, public informa-tion officer for Bay County, said county employees are working to provide immediate relief. Donations will be a vital step in the recovery process, but right now the county doesnt have the manpower to sort and dis-tribute goods.Right now our focus is on safety and providing immediate needs for folks, so some of these donations, while really well intentioned, are making that process of recovery a little County works to organize donations Shawn Herring, 47, drags wet carpet out of his Panama Cuty home Saturday afternoon. Mold ups number of uninhabitable homes By Patrick McCreless | 522-5118 | @PCNHPatrickM | pmcreless@pcnh. comPANAMA CITY „ Donald Lyle sat on the porch of his Panama City home as an electrician replaced equipment on his house Friday.Lyle has waited for power to return to his Flower Avenue house since Hurricane Michael hit and knocked down electricity lines across the city and Bay County last week. Without the repairs though, his wait would likely be indefinite.They wont hook up the wires unless the stuff is replaced,Ž Lyle said of Gulf Power, the company spearheading the restora-tion of electricity in the county. Its fixed, so now I just have to wait on the power company.ŽAccording to Gulf Power, the company has made significant progress restoring electricity „ estimating itll restore power to 95 percent of its customers by Oct. 24 or sooner. However, the company warns that some homes have storm damage to their electrical equipment that, if not repaired by a licensed electrician, still wont get power even if nearby lines are restored.If a tree falls on a homes weatherhead that accepts power from the line, we cannot restore power until that is taken care of,Ž said Jeff Rogers, spokesman for Gulf Power. We encourage all our customers to go out and look where their electrical service comes in ƒ look at the meter and at the weatherhead ƒ hire a licensed electrician to get it fixed if needed so that when were able to turn the power back on, youll be ready.ŽTo date, Gulf Power has restored electricity to the majority of cus-tomers but still has about Electricians wantedThomas Greaux an electrician helper with Metro Power out of Santa Rosa, FL., works on attaching a clamp to a new weather head at at Donald Lyles home in Panama City Friday The city would not restore power back to the home until the weather head was replaced because the pole was also bent from a falling tree. [DOUG ENGLE/ OCALA STAR BANNER] Even with the power grid largely restored, many dont have power TRUMP TO SCRAP RUSSIAN ARMS AGREEMENTWORLD| A10 See DECAY, A2See ELECTRICIANS, A2 See DONATE, A2 B14 Saturday, November 10, 2018 | The News Herald

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** Diversions ......................B6 Local & State ..............A3-9 Nation & World ........A10-11 Sports.........................B1-4 TV listings ......................B5 Viewpoints ....................A8 THURSDAYRain 74 / 63WEDNESDAYPartly sunny 80 / 64TODAYA little rain 75 / 63 Panama City News Herald Want to subscribe? Call 850-747-5050 Tuesday, October 23, 2018 @The_News_Herald facebook.com/panamacitynewsherald75 ¢ www.newsherald.com LOCAL & STATE A3VOLUNTEERS HELP CLEAN WRECKED SPAY BAY BUILDING SPORTS | B1BUCKS ARE BACKBozeman carries on, will host South Walton CAUTION URGED FOR INSURANCE CLAIMSLOCAL | A3 PANAMA CITY By Frances Stead Sellers, Kevin Begos and Katie ZezimaThe Washington PostPANAMA CITY „ Business used to be good at Peggy Sue Singletons tiny, white cin-der-block barber shop, where she and a co-worker snipped and buzzed more than 200 heads of hair each week in this seaside city adjacent to a military base.The cinder blocks now are strewn across the parking lot as if bludgeoned by a wreck-ing ball, her parlor a haphazard heap of construction innards: splintered wood, smashed windows, wire. As she sifted through the remains, Singleton salvaged two $500 hair vacuums, a stash of suds from her free beer Fridays,Ž and the sign that once displayed her prices: Haircuts $11; flat tops $13.This is the happy place!Ž the battered white lettering says. Hurricane Michael was the wrecker of this happy place. It hit here more than a week ago, with 155-mph winds that ripped and twisted a wide path through coastal and inland communities, flattening buildings, tearing up roads and knocking out power to entire counties. Michael didnt just break objects, it upended everything. Life in Panama City remains com-pletely disrupted, with many lacking power, running water, reliable cellphone service and access to the internet.This city of 36,000 long has been a gateway to the Gulf, a white-beach playground providing a touch of para-dise along the Panhandle. But residents are now carving out new, unfamiliar existences amid the destruction, driven by the dictates of survival and loss of the staples of modern life. Residents struggling to carve out a new life amid Michaels devastationPeggy Sue Singleton salvages from the ruins of her barbershop a sign that used to show her prices. Only a few words are now leg ible: This is the happy place.Ž [KEVIN BEGOS/THE WASHINGTON POST] Step by step When newer technologies failed, radio worked following Hurricane Michaels devastationBy Ryan McKinnonGateHouse Media FloridaPANAMA CITY „ In the hours following one of the biggest news events in Bay County history, residents had little to no access to news.Hurricane Michaels 155 mile-per-hour winds had toppled power lines, television satellites, radio antennas and crushed newspaper offices. Cellphones were useless across much of the county with spotty-at-best service and no access to internet.It was radio static across the radio dial, Radio crucial after Cat 4 storm By Eryn Dion747-5069 | @PCNHErynDion edion@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY „ For Jinks Middle School Principal Britt Smith, school is a gathering place.A hub of activity for students and the community, a place to gather, where plans are made, achievements won and the future built.There might be no classes, and there might be no gym or portable classrooms, there might be damaged roofs and windows, but Jinks Middle School still is a hub for the community „ a place where people who have nothing can come to receive and a place where people who have something can give back.I am blessed,Ž Smith said, taking a second away from organizing the constant stream of donations and members of the commu-nity needing supplies. The opportunity is there to serve and that is what we need to do.ŽAlmost since the time the storm lifted „ and the devas-tation at Jinks Middle School was revealed to the world through national media „ the parking lot has become a kind of donation central, with people dropping off supplies and volunteers from the com-munity, from Jinks staff and even Jinks students them-selves, organizing them and, when needed, delivering them to those who have no way to get to the school. On Sunday, entire classrooms were filled with goods and then, just as it seemed like there was no more room left, an entire tractor trailer load of goods from Walmart pulled in to cheers.Humbly, Cay Peters picked her way through the offerings, thanking everyone she Jinks Middle School helping rebuild communityPeople displaced from their homes and who have lost their jobs get free food, sanitary items and cleaning supplies at Jinks Middle School on Friday. [JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] See RADIO, A2 See STEP, A2 See JINKS, A2 The News Herald | Saturday, November 10, 2018 B15

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** FRIDAYA little rain 78 / 58THURSDAYRain 72 / 66TODAYWarmer 81 / 66 Panama City News Herald Want to subscribe? Call 850-747-5050 PANAMA CITY Wednesday, October 24, 2018 @The_News_Herald facebook.com/panamacitynewsherald75 ¢ www.newsherald.com INSIDE | A3DURING RECOVERY, DRONES OFFER NEW PERSPECTIVE LOCAL | B1HURRICANE GONE, BUT THE FALLEN TREES WILL REMAIN By Genevieve SmithThe News HeraldPANAMA CITY „ Bay School Board members agreed during an emergency meet-ing at Mosley High School on Tuesday that streamlining the process of getting students back in school is their top priority.To that end, teachers are being asked to return Monday to prepare for the students return Nov. 14, or possibly sooner. That will present chal-lenges for some teachers who are displaced by the storm and who are desperate for flexibil-ity from the district.Our concern is, we have teachers who are living out of the trunks of their cars,Ž said Alexis Underwood, president of Association of Bay County Educators. Underwood said the flexibility the district is granting to principals is com-forting but she still is looking for solutions for military spouses and teachers still without electricity.District officials said they must get schools going again to help employees of businesses return to work. Superintendent Bill Husfelt will meet with teachers today to discuss how the district can continue to support them.We have got to find a happy medium,Ž said Husfelt. If they need to take leave, they can take leave.ŽAnother issue addressed to facilitate reopening the schools included finding rooms to put students in.Schools priority: Reopen early The Bay County Jail is shown Monday after suffering damage during Hurricane Michael. [JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] Katie Greenwood thanks NaKyah Williams, 9, for bringing her food from a Red Cross truck at the Massalina Garden Apartments on Monday. Greenwood is on the board of resident commissioners of the apartments and will live with her daughter temporarily while she evaluates her next step after losing her home after Hurricane Michael. [JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] By Eileen KelleyGateHouse Media FloridaPANAMA CITY „ Amid a crushed water bottle, a sand-wich bun and upside down disaster relief meal box was an assortment of little girls shoes. Size 3.This particular small, well-worn section of grass at an affordable housing complex was a showcase of childhood and chaos: Silver ballet-style flats, chocolate brown thick-padded boots, a Western set in pink and brown and a look-a-like pair of Buster Browns.The dropped shoes were not things isolated here. Throughout the grounds of Macedonia Garden Apart-ments, clothes for all shapes and ages rose from the ground in discarded heaps. A childrens bicycle and a blue stuffed monkey with a shock of bright orange hair would under normal circumstances have been up for grabs.But this is anything but normal. There is a crisis in Panama City. Poor people are sorting through what is salvageable and what they can bring with them when they attempt to start their lives over.For the poor, nowhere to goHousing crisis explodes in Panama City after Hurricane Michaels devastationRosa Perez stands outside her apartment at Macedonia Garden Apartments on Tuesday. Perez, her two children and two others tried to weather Hurricane Michael in the apartment, but as the roof began to collapse ran downstairs to a neighbors apartment. [JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] By Katie Landeck522-5114 | @PCNHKatieL klandeck@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY „ In the hallway, a broken pipe dripped into a yellow mop bucket „ one of the last reminders of the toll Hurricane Michael had taken on the Bay County Jail.Well fix that next week,Ž said Maj. Rick Anglin, who runs the jail. Its not a priority.ŽThe jail „ with its reinforced concrete walls, and backup supplies of water and power „ was one of the safest places to shelter from Michaels 155 mph winds with many staff bringing their families there for safety, but even it didnt come through unscathed.Industrial air conditioning units were knocked off the roof during the storm, scraping the rubber seal that keeps water out and open-ing the duct work to the torrents of rain. The com-bination caused some water to leak into the building, soaking and collapsing the tiles in some office ceilings. And the jail wasnt spared from the countywide issues of downed trees in the nearby woods, collapsed buildings, flipped trailers, loss of power, loss of communication and loss of county water, Anglin said. But the jail was better equipped to deal with those issues than most, with recently purchased chainsaws at the ready to cut their way out, generators on hand to power the essential systems, and a well to supply water. Still, it wasnt perfect.There was water in the jail, but not with enough pressure to flush toilets, meaning staff members „ who were essentially living at the jail following the storm, Anglin said „ had to provide the inmates trash barrels of water with buck-ets to flush toilets. Drinking water also was being provided through 5-gallon coolers.Bay jail almost back to normal after MichaelDiversions....................B5 Local & State.............B1-8 Nation & World............A7 Sports......................C1-4 TV listings...................A8 Viewpoints...................A6 BAY GETTING 5 MEGA VOTING SITES INSIDE | A4 See HOUSING, A2 See JAIL, A2 See SCHOOLS, A2 B16 Saturday, November 10, 2018 | The News Herald

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** SATURDAYMostly cloudy 73 / 58FRIDAYA little rain 78 / 60TODAYRain 72 / 71 Panama City News Herald Want to subscribe? Call 850-747-5050 PANAMA CITY Thursday, October 25, 2018 @The_News_Herald facebook.com/panamacitynewsherald75 ¢ www.newsherald.comAlicia Barnett, a Key SpouseŽ at Eglin Air Force Base, poses with her children and some of the items delivered to the familys home in Crestview as part of Hurricane Michael relief efforts. Barnett was overwhelmed by the response to a Key Spouse initiative on Fa cebook that saw hundreds of packages delivered to the family. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] Diapers were among the hundreds of boxes of Hurricane Michael relief supplies delivered to the Crestview home of Alicia Barnett. The deliveries eventually overwhelmed Barnett, and the Air Force Enlisted Village stepped in to help. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] Air Force spouse Alicia Barnetts hurricane relief e ort goes viralBy Jim Thompson315-4445 | @Jimtnwfdn jthompson@nwfdailynews.comCRESTVIEW „ The first 980 packages were a surprise for Alicia Barnett. And things soon would get even more overwhelming.Like many people, Barnett was struck by the devastation of Hurricane Michael. And, as an Air Force spouse, she was concerned about airmen and families dealing with the near-total destruction of Tyndall Air Force Base.If that had happened to my family, I would have wanted someone to ask what I needed,Ž Barnett said. So, as a Key SpouseŽ at Eglin Air Force Base„ an initiative that supports Air Force families„ Barnett began monitoring social media and reaching out to see what Tyndall families needed.Then, using Facebooks Key Spouse page „ Barnetts husband is Staff Sgt. Benjamin Barnett, an Eglin airfield manager „ Barnett got involved with the creation of gift registries at Target and Amazon. She arranged for deliveries to her home, with plans to distribute donations to Tyndall airmen and fami-lies in the immediate area.I was expecting a couple of people to donate,Ž she said.Then, Barnett got a call from the Post Office. They said, We have eight pallets for you,Ž she said.We have 8 pallets for youBy Sarah LeBlancGatehouse Media FloridaPANAMA CITY „ Panama City is a vacation spot for more than a thou-sand renters. Now, its a logistical nightmare that has left hundreds waiting for answers on when dam-ages to their temporary homes will be repaired. Swendy Elder is a long-term renter who has been living in a Panama City home for more than a year. When she returned home after Hurricane Michael, she found the roof had been damaged,causing leaks into the master bedroom.While she has power, Elder said she waited more than a week for a mainte-nance team to assess her home. She said she contacted the management company repeatedly, but while she waits, leaks caused by the damaged roof are causing mold.Theyre supposed to be managing the property for the owners and the renter, and Im not getting any answers,Ž Elder said.Elder rents through Counts Oakes Resort Properties, an LSI Vaca-tion Rentals company Repair delays stress rentersProperty maintenance sta s working around the clock to assess, repair damage from Hurricane Michael By Zack McDonaldThe News Herald | 747-5071 ZMcDonald@pcnh.comBAY COUNTY „ On one night, a man took aim at his one-time romantic interest and her new boyfriend. On another, a man doused his sister-in-law with lighter fluid and attempted to set her ablaze.In the two weeks in eastern Bay County since Hurricane Michael, the unprecedented storm has stirred up many ugly scenes of domestic violence. Numerous arrests and at least one death have resulted in the community, already robust with domestic violence. And many dark cases might have yet to see the light of day.I think there are several we didnt have the ability to receive,Ž said Bay County Sheriffs Office Investigator Amy Burkette. Because of the lack of communications in those first days, there were even people with serious inju-ries we couldnt hear from. So, its likely there are many more we dont know about.ŽBurkette, of the Domestic Violence Unit, has been on the night patrol for the east side of Bay County since Hurricane Michael swept away the areas utility infrastructure. While water and cellphone service has been widely restored in the area, many homes have yet to receive power. And as a result of the combined conditions, domestic violence has spiked.BCSO Lt. Koren Colbert, supervisor of the Domestic Violence Unit, said the crimes that ensue after a major disas-ter typically occur in phases. First come thefts of resources, then come domestic violence and the final blow to the community comes in the form of scams. In the domestic calls officers haveseen recently, conditions of lacking commu-nication, running water and power have conspired with living in confined quarters with family members, Colbert said.Its the stress,Ž she said. I also think that people think law enforcement is busy with other matters, so they may be more emboldened.ŽDrugs and alcohol often play a factor in the 250 arrests for domestic violence the county averages each month. With the added factors, officers are seeing a month that should outpace that average.In the most recent incident, Charles Bruner, 66, was arrested on charges of aggravated domestic battery, violation of a restraining order and attempted arson. Officials reported Bruner was at his brothers home Sunday night in eastern Bay County when he doused his sister-in-law with Domestic violence surges after Hurricane Michael SPORTS | C1PREP FOOTBALLBay-Mosley game canceled; Arnold will play at PSJ tonight LOCAL & STATE | B1DEVASTATED MEXICO BEACH FORMS WEDDING BACKDROP I was expecting a couple of people to donate... They said, We have eight pallets for you.Ž Alicia Barnett BOYETTE AND CASEY CLOSING ITS DOORS LOCAL | B1 Diversions ......................B6 Local & State ...............B1-4 Nation & World ..............A7 Sports.........................C1-5 TV listings ......................B8 Viewpoints .....................A6See PALLETS, A5 See DELAYS, A5 See VIOLENCE, A5 The News Herald | Saturday, November 10, 2018 B17

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** LOCAL & STATE | B1 GROUP TIES ADDICTION AND DISASTER RECOVERY SUNDAYSunshine 76 / 63SATURDAYInc. clouds 72 / 59TODAYA little rain 78 / 58 Panama City News Herald Want to subscribe? Call 850-747-5050 PANAMA CITY Friday, October 26, 2018 @The_News_Herald facebook.com/panamacitynewsherald75 ¢ www.newsherald.com 3 LINEMEN KILLED IN HIT-AND-RUN LOCAL | B1 LOCAL | B1 COMBINED VAPING, OIL DRILLING BANS DRAW CRITICISM SPORTS | C1DOLPHINS ADVANCE; MARLINS SEASON IS OVER Diversions ......................B7 Local & State ...............B1-6 Nation & World ..........A4-7 Sports.........................C1-5 TV listings ......................C6 Viewpoints .....................A6 By Eryn Dion 747-5069 | @PCNHErynDion edion@pcnh.comTYNDALL AIR FORCE BASE „ Standing amid build-ings without roofs, trees snapped like matchsticks and a model F-15 sitting upside down, Vice President Mike Pence brought a message to Tyndall Air Force Base Thursday „ that the federal government still supports their mission and is committed to rebuilding the base.We will rebuild Tyndall Air Force Base,Ž Pence told a group of Florida National Guard and Coast Guard personnel.Fifteen days after the eye of Hurricane Michael passed over the base, Col. Brian Laidlaw said Tyndall person-nel and airmen from other nearby bases have made it through 503 buildings „ about half the total number on base „ and what theyve seen so far has been encouraging. No more than 30 percent of those buildings are a total loss and many critical areas did not receive as much damage as originally thought.Today we have come so much further than I could have ever imagined when I came out of that ride out shel-ter that night,Ž Laidlaw said.While the base is still seri-ously compromised and the air strip inoperable, Sect. Of the Air Force Heather Wilson said the schoolhouseŽ „ where F-22 pilots from across the country are trained with flight simulators „ should be up and running by the first of the year, with the aircraft flying out of Eglin Air Force Base.Pence: Tyndall will be rebuilt Vice President Mike Pence speaks with children of military families at Hiland Park Baptist Church on Thursday [JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] By Katie Landeck522-5114 | @PCNHKatieL klandeck@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY „ Following Hurricane Michaels devastating effects on Verizons cellphone coverage, company officials have promised Panama City Mayor Greg Brudnicki they will make a $25 million investment in the region.The company, Brudnicki said, has committed to creating a 5G network in Bay County, allowing for download speeds 1,000 times faster than the 4G network that currently is in place. Panama City will be one of five announced Verizon 5G cities, joining Los Angeles, Houston, India-napolis and Sacramento.Verizon bringing 5G cell network to BayBy Patrick McCreless522-5118 | @PCNHPatrickM pmcreless@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY „ Andrew Schicho, a civilian engineer at the Naval Surface Warfare Center, spends some of his off time renovating old homes and flipping them for a profit. His latest project on North Lagoon Drive needed plenty of work, but he was determined to finish the job.Then Hurricane Michael came.The North Lagoon house survived the disaster and Schicho could have again focused on renovating it.NORTH LAGOON NAVY COMES TO THE RESCUENorth Lagoon Navy volunteer Andrew Schicho cuts through a fallen tree in St. Andrews on Monday. [PATTI BLAKE PHOTOS/THE NEWS HERALD] LEFT: North Lagoon Navy volunteer Dan Zangari gathers items from a womans closet while helping her pack up her remaining possessions from her hurricane-damaged home in Callaway. RIGHT: Susan Roy is overcome with emotion while describing the gratitude she felt as volunteers with the North Lagoon Navy nailed a tarp to her hurricane-damaged roof off Bumby Road on Monday. Civilian base engineers, divers jump in to help a er Hurricane MichaelSee PENCE, A2 See RESCUE, A2 See VERIZON, A3 B18 Saturday, November 10, 2018 | The News Herald

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** Business ........................A9 Diversions .....................C7 Faith .............................B8 Local & State ...............B1-7 Sports.........................C1-5 Viewpoints ...................A10 MONDAYSunny 82 / 60SUNDAYSunny 77 / 67TODAYPartly sunny 71 / 55 Panama City News Herald Want to subscribe? Call 850-747-5050 Saturday, October 27, 2018 PANAMA CITY @The_News_Herald facebook.com/panamacitynewsherald75 ¢ www.newsherald.com SPORTS | C1FSU LOOKS TO MAKE STATEMENT AGAINST CLEMSON LOCAL & STATE | B1AFTER MICHAEL, VOLUNTEERS COME TO MILLVILLES AID DONATIONS POUR IN FOR BAY SCHOOLSLOCAL | B1 Events have a total economic impact of $17 millionBy Ed OffleySpecial to The News HeraldPANAMA CITY BEACH „ Two weeks after Hurricane Michael, life is slowly returning to normal in the beachfront community, but one thing is gone for good: the 2018 fall tourism season.Mayor Mike Thomas announced Thursday morn-ing that city officials have opted to cancel three special tourism events that in a normal year attract tens of thousands of visitors to the beach. They are the 2018 Fall Thunder Beach motorcycle rally, which was to have begun on Wednesday and run through Sunday; the Ironman Florida sports com-petition slated for Nov. 3; and the Emerald Coast Cruisin antique car rally scheduled for Nov. 6-10.We are still not where we can have (special tourist) events yet,Ž Thomas told City Council members during the regular meeting at city hall. The Beach still has too much going onŽ with storm recov-ery efforts.The city plans to resume its fall/winter event sched-ule with the Beach Home for the Holidays event scheduled at Aaron Bessant Park over the Thanksgiving weekend, Thomas said.On paper, the Beach tourism economy appears to be facing a major hit because of the canceled events. In 2017, four events that have been canceled „ Oktoberfest, Thunder Beach, Ironman and Emerald Coast Cruisin „ had a total economic impact of $17 million, said Richard Sanders, Tourist Development Council vice president for sports and special events. For now, the loss of special event revenue to the local economy is being somewhat offset by the army of first PCB o cials cancel 3 events By Katie Landeck522-5114 | @PCNHKatieL klandeck@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY „ Perched high on metal scaffolding, Jimmy Holloway quickly surveys an industrial-sized debris hauler pulling into a makeshift dump site on Redwood Avenue.Broken bits of live oaks that once shaded the Cove and some palm fronds are packed into the truck. Holloway, a debris monitor, estimated the truck is 75 percent full, a number he passes along to be entered into the official paperwork while waving the driver through to dump the latest load.Holloway, who has been commuting daily from Dothan, Alabama, and the rest of the debris removal crew have been working Historic e orts start to remove debris Downtown businesses reopening, hopeful hurricane damage will spur redevelopmentBy Patrick McCreless522-5118 | @PNCHPatrickMPANAMA CITY „ Kara Rigby stood on Harrison Avenue, near the corner of East Fourth Street on Thursday, her sparkling, gold-sequined shoes a stark contrast to the gloomy, overcast sky and surrounding destruction.Behind the lifelong Panama City resident, a man on a ladder inspected the facade of Vinny and Bays Coffee and Eatery „ one of Rigbys three downtown businesses. Across the street, dehumidifiers pumped air through tubes into the historic Martin Theatre, its art deco archi-tecture still intact. In every direction, streets were filled with piles of debris shoveled out of damaged buildings.Where some might despair at the sight of the historic downtown that has struggled to revitalize for years, Rigby sees potential.I think it gives everybody a clean slate to fix things back like they want,Ž Rigby said.More than two weeks have passed since Hurri-cane Michael slammed into Panama City and caused widespread damage, includ-ing downtown. Like Rigby, some downtown shop owners plan to reopen soon or already have reopened. But more so than just digging out of the rubble, some busi-ness owners are cautiously optimistic that the destruc-tion could stimulate the downtown redevelopment theyve sought for years.Rigby said she planned to reopen the coffee shop this weekend.People on social media have been cheering us along,Ž Rigby said of her and other downtown businesses. Theyre saying they cant wait to come visit us again, A CLEAN SLATEDebris is removed from Harrison Avenue in downtown Panama City on Thursday after damage from Hurricane Michael. [RICHARD GRAULICH/PBPOST.COM] See DEBRIS, A2 See EVENTS, A2 See DOWNTOWN, A2 The News Herald | Saturday, November 10, 2018 B19

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** TUESDAYSunny 81 / 67MONDAYMostly sunny 82 / 63TODAYSunny; warmer 77 / 65 Panama City News Herald Want to subscribe? Call 850-747-5050 $1.50 PANAMA CITY Sunday, October 28, 2018 @The_News_Herald facebook.com/panamacitynewsherald www.newsherald.com By Ed Offley Special to The News Herald ed_offley@yahoo.comPANAMA CITY BEACH … Two days after the storm, an exhausted City Manager Mario Gisbert slumped in the seat of his parked Ford F-150 truck, awaiting the help of a total stranger to save his city from chaos.It was near midnight on Saturday, Oct. 13. While this beachfront tourist commu-nity had miraculously avoided the destruction that Hurri-cane Michael had wreaked on eastern Bay County, the citys first responders were grap-pling with a total breakdown in communications.Most of their landline phones, computer wi-fi con-nections, cell phones and FM radios were off the grid. By Thursday morning, Gisbert said, We were sending paper messages to other buildings ƒ we did not have any communications.ŽIn event of a post-hurricane emergency, Gisbert said, his police and firefighters would have struggled to carry out an effective response.Initially, the situation did not appear as serious as it turned out to be, Gilbert said. As the storm raged outside on Wednesday, Oct. 10, his Veri-zon cell phone continued to work, and the citys computer system remained intact. But as the storm moved on, first the cell phones and then even the citys FM radios fell silent. Then the next morning, Gil-bert learned that Mayor Mike Thomas and Councilman Hector Solis still had service on their personal AT&T cell phones. He dispatched Plan-ning Board Chairman Mark Sheldon to the Pier Park Wal-Mart, where manager Jennifer Ross was able to pro-vide ten burnerŽ phones that were handed out to key first responders. It was a start, but far from enough.On Saturday, Gisbert called Dennis Langston, a friend of his in the Destin area, who spent the day searching for available cell phones. Langs-ton was finally able to reach the Mary Esther AT&T store, where the assistant manager at 5 p.m. tracked down Chris-tina Proctor, a 32-year-old regional sales manager.A supervisor of six AT&T stores and a dozen authorized dealers in the Florida Panhandle, Proctor was driving to the store in Dothan, Alabama, delivering a shipment of basic prepaidŽ cell phones, when she learned of the dire situ-ation in Panama City Beach.We were very fortunate where we areŽ after the storm, Proctor told The News Herald in a telephone interview on Friday. We wanted to do anything we A citys desperate hunt for cell phonesEileen Kelley Gatehouse Media PANAMA CITY BEACH „ A child rides his bike about 40 feet, turns and gives a few more pushes before it's time to turn around again. He does this over and over, zipping past an open doorway where a man sleeps inside one of a motels run-down units. The beds box spring is directly on the floor. A mattress is turned upright.Many rooms here brim with bulging garbage bags and Rubbermaid storage bins, holding the remnants of what was left after Hurri-cane Michael ravaged homes and upended lives Oct. 10.By a door in one room is a part of a car engine. For many in this post-hurricane world, whats not broken, discolored in black mold or under rubble, suddenly seems irreplaceable and of value.So many now have so little.About half the rooms at the 18-unit Sun…N-Sands Motel „ a place where in the past online Expedia review-ers urged others to stay away „ are occupied by Hurricane Michael survivors.The Federal Emergency Management Association is paying the tab for the emergency housing at this and other available hotels and motels.Before the storm, the motel was for the most part transitional housing for the areas poor and disenfranchised. Now it very much is.Places like this are often referred to as homeless hotels or drug dens.But post-Michael, instead of chaos, there is gratitude by those displaced by the storm: Gratitude at the motels management who A place to goFew options for hurricane survivorsShawn Hewitt in Panama City Beach on Wednesday, October 24, 2018. While he has applied for FEMA housing vouchers and is staying at a hotel with FEMA vouchers available, he is paying cash. [JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] Michelle Patrick in Panama City Beach on Wednesday, October 24, 2018. She is one of the few people to receive a housing voucher for a hotel in Bay County. Jason Mann makes dinner for residents at the hotel he manages on Wednesday, October 24, 2018. FEMA is not reimbursing him for the meals he makes for evacuees. I dont have the heart to say no. I know the situation they are in.ŽNikki Rupp Nation & World..............A4 Local.........................B1-12 Crosswords ...................C8 Sports.........................C1-7 Viewpoints......................D1 TV Listings ...................A12See PHONES, A2 See SURVIVORS, A8 LOCAL | B1OFFICIALS CREATING LONGTERM PLAN FOR SHELTERS ADDITIONAL PATROLS SENT TO BORDER NATION | A4 B20 Saturday, November 10, 2018 | The News Herald

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** WEDNESDAYPartly sunny 82 / 70TUESDAYMostly sunny 80 / 62TODAYMostly sunny 82 / 60 Panama City News Herald Want to subscribe? Call 850-747-5050 PANAMA CITY Monday, October 29, 2018 @The_News_Herald facebook.com/panamacitynewsherald75 ¢ www.newsherald.com SPORTS | C1FSU BASKETBALL TEAM BOASTS DEPTH LOCAL | B1EARLY VOTING UNDERWAY AT SIX LOCATIONS PITTSBURGH MOURNS SHOOTING VICTIMSNATION | A4 By Eryn Dion747-5069 | @PCNHErynDion | edion@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY BEACH „ With more than 800 resi-dents still displaced and living in Red Cross shelters after Hurricane Michael and that number expected to grow, Bay District Schools is offer-ing Arnold High School as a long-term shelter.The move will consolidate the shelters currently set up at Surfside Middle School, Deane Bozeman School and Breakfast Point Academy. Arnold stu-dents will operate on a shared campus with Surfside Middle School, with high school students attending class from 7 a.m. to noon and middle school students attending class from 1 p.m. to 6 p.m. „ the same arrangement as middle and high schools on the east side of the Hathaway Bridge.Bay District Schools is offering Arnold as a shelter to the Red Cross until Dec. 31, but operations may cease prior to that date if the orga-nization can find long-term solutions for those shelter-ing there.Arnold teachers are asked to begin collecting their per-sonal items out of their rooms on Monday, with shelter operations beginning to move in to the building by Monday afternoon.Arnold to act as long-term shelter for displacedBy Zack McDonaldThe News HeraldMEXICO BEACH „ Reduced to little more than rubble and collapsed trees, infighting among officials along the forgotten coast in the wake of Hurricane Michael escalated to the point the sitting city manager attempted to fire the police chief.As the dust settles in the town of Mexico Beach from taking a direct hit from the most powerful storm to hit the Panhandle, numerous outsiders have descended to assist in the recovery effort. But in the immediate after-math, tensions ran high in City Hall.Mexico Beach Police Chief Andrew Kelly said the source of controversy was whether survivors should be removed from the decimated city as rebuilding efforts began. Kelly said, instead, he wanted food dis-tribution stations brought into Mexico Beach so that survivors could begin to piece together their lives. To the people of this town, salvaging a little league picture of their grandson means more than possessions,Ž Kelly said. I thought those people should stay and have food while they begin to put things back together. I made that decision and Id do it again.ŽTensions running high in Mexico BeachThe awning from the Mexico Beach Police and ESU Department in Mexico Beach on Friday, October 26, 2018. [JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] Police Chief Anthony Kelly in Mexico Beach on Friday, October 26, 2018. [JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] Parker Park in Mexico Beach is the temporary home of the citys “ re and police departments on Friday, October 26, 2018. [JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] By Eryn Dion @PCNHErynDion | edion@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY „ The roof may be largely gone, the buildings full of water and the twisting canopy of live oaks that shaded the neighborhoods quiet streets significantly thinner, but school will once again resume at Holy Nativity Episcopal School on Monday, though not at their beloved Cove school campus.The private school will begin classes a full week before some of the lesser damaged public schools open their doors, but Judy Hughes, principal of the pre-K through 8th grade institution, said she and her staff believe the early start is whats best for the students and their parents.Its best for the children, not only to have that routine again, but to see other chil-dren that have been through the same thing,Ž Hughes said. And the parents will see that too.ŽFor now, Hughes said stu-dents will be split between the Holy Nativity Episcopal Church on Bonita Avenue in Panama City and St. Thomas by the Sea Episcopal Church in Laguna Beach for families Holy Nativity students return to school MondayNation & World ..............A4 Viewpoints ....................A6 Local ..........................B1-6 Diversions ......................B7 TV Listings ....................C6 See ARNOLD, A2 See SCHOOL, A2See BEACH, A2 The News Herald | Saturday, November 10, 2018 B21

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** THURSDAYT-storms 79 / 60WEDNESDAYPartly sunny 82 / 70TODAYFog 81 / 60 Panama City News Herald Want to subscribe? Call 850-747-5050 PANAMA CITY Tuesday, October 30, 2018 @The_News_Herald facebook.com/panamacitynewsherald75 ¢ www.newsherald.com By Ed OffleySpecial to The News HeraldNAVAL SUPPORT ACTIV-ITY „ For the past 18 days after Hurricane Michael, Commander Jay Sego and his staff have worked nonstop assessing the storm damage that brought operations at this 657-acre research and development facility to a halt.After obtaining a muster of 100 percent of the commands 2,800 military and civilian employees, inspect-ing each of the bases 221 buildings for wind damage, surveying its water lines for leaks, and counting each of the hundreds of felled trees needing removal, Sego told reporters on Monday there was one final list to review: the many blessings that the base and its people can count.Unlike Tyndall Air Force Base, which sustained major damage to most of its physi-cal infrastructure, NSA-PC avoided the brunt of the storm, Sego said. None of the 49 houses on base sustained serious damage, and the hurricanes wind direc-tion resulted in few breaches in the base perimeter fence because of downed trees. Nevertheless, a number of buildings received moder-ate to severe damage and will require substantial repairs during the months ahead, he said.Sego said it is too early to provide a monetary estimate for the structural damage and economic impact from three weeks of inactivity.With the help of Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 11 based in Gulfport, Mississippi, the bases road network has been cleared of felled trees, and a detailed inspection of the base water system has identified areas needing repair. Likewise, electricity, telephone service and computer network capabilities are returning to normal, Sego said. Families living on base „ who were forced to evacuate along with the rest of the workers „ began returning during the weekend.Commanders of various tenant organizations at the base voiced similar assessments of how the storm disrupted their operations, although the specific impact Navy personnel reporting for dutyNews Herald staff reportPANAMA CITY „ Nine-teen days out from Hurricane Michael, recovery has been a slow but steady process. Heres a look at some of the important numbers related to that effort, as of Monday. For more recovery information, visit www.recoverbaycounty.org.21 „ Number of casualties con“ rmed by the Medical Examiners Of“ ce. 58 „ Number of people arrested by all agencies on suspicion of looting charges. 220 „ Number of people arrested by all agencies for breaking curfew.Hurricane Michael recovery by the numbersBy Zack McDonaldThe News Herald zmcdonald@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY „ Under a mangled metal skeleton that used to be a canopy, dozens of people entered into the Bay County Courthouse on Monday to handle business put on pause by Hurricane Michael.Almost three weeks since landfall of the historic storm temporarily halted operations of the courts throughout the 14th Judicial Circuit, all county and circuit courthouses as of Monday „ with Bay, Gulf and Jackson counties coming online last „ were opening for the first time since undergoing storm repairs and relocations.Now, officials will begin the tedious task of resched-uling hundred of cases that fell with deadlines during the closures.Most of the functions of the courthouses „ property records, traffic citations payments or domestic mat-ters „ are operational. As for criminal and civil hear-ings, though, the state of the current system is less clear. Since each judge is a con-stitutional officer, they are individually determining the priority of each case to schedule hearings. In Bay County, Clerk of Courts Bill Kinsaul said that any confusion can be cleared up by mail or phone.We dont want people to waste gas coming down here,Ž he said. We will notice people of alternate hearings, or they can call and well look at individual cases. Were not going to be levying penalties if they dont make their court appearances. Well get it all caught up and squared away.ŽHis office can be reached at 850-763-9061.Kinsaul said officials are Courthouse reopensHurricane Michael causes limited damage to baseHearings on limited schedule for time beingThe Bay County Courthouse on Monday. [JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] Commander Jay Sego, at podium, addresses reporters on the storm damage to Naval Support Activity-Panama City on Monday morning. With Sego, from left, are Master Chief Mark Kennan, OIC of the Coast Guard detachment Panama City; Capt. Aaron Peters, commander of NSWC Panama City; Commander Sam Bras“ eld, commander of the Naval Diving and Salvage Training Center; and Capt. Jay Young, commander of the Navy Experimental Diving Unit. [ED OFFLEY/THE NEWS HERALD] Business .........................A9 Diversions ......................B6 Local & State ..............A3-6 Obituaries ......................A5 Sports.........................B1-4 Viewpoints .....................A8 SPORTS | B1DARKEST WEEKEND AS STATES 3 NFL, BIG 3 COLLEGE TEAMS LOSE See NAVY, A2 See NUMBERS, A2 See COURT, A2 LOCAL & STATE | A3FLAGS A SYMBOL OF HOPE AFTER HURRICANE MICHAEL MALL SHOPPERS: A WELCOME DISTRACTIONLOCAL | A3 B22 Saturday, November 10, 2018 | The News Herald

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** FRIDAYT-storms 74 / 52THURSDAYT-storms 82 / 67TODAYPartly sunny 82 / 70 Panama City News Herald Want to subscribe? Call 850-747-5050 PANAMA CITY Wednesday, October 31, 2018 @The_News_Herald facebook.com/panamacitynewsherald75 ¢ www.newsherald.com By Hannah MorseGateHouse Media FloridaFishing pole in hand, Paul D. of Panama City doesnt expect to catch anything at St. Andrews State Park.The bait fish leave first,Ž he said, coughing occasionally from a hint of red tide in the air. And, of course, when the bait fish leave, the bigger fish leave. The predators leave.ŽRed tide in Bay County was worse before Hurricane Michael hit three weeks ago. Fish kills were off the charts and the water was discolored.But theres still a hint of it in the Gulf air.St. Andrew Bay is worse off than other parts of Northwest Florida when it comes to red tide. Water samples taken last week off Davis Point and Courtney Point showed that the number of cells of red tide, which forms from the algae Karenia brevis, surpassed one million per liter of water. In high enough concentrations, red tide can lead to respiratory irritation and itchy eyes in humans, as well as fish kills on beaches.Surrounding water samples from Shell Island and Tyndall Air Force Base had between 100,000 and one million K. brevis cells per liter of water.Much of St. Andrews State Park still is recovering from Hurricane Michaels force. The storm hit on Oct. 10, and although the park reopened two weeks later, the campground, boat ramp, Heron Pond trail and more remain closed because of the extensive cleanup needed.The park sustained ecologi-cal damage, with many downed Red tide still high, but improvingThe catch? Most of the sh have goneA dead “ sh lies steps from a beach umbrella at St. Andrews State Park on Monday. [HANNAH MORSE/GATEHOUSE MEDIA FLORIDA] By Genevieve Smithgsmith@pcnh.com @PCNHGenevievePANAMA CITY „ On Monday, Florida State Univer-sity President John Thrasher was on the FSU Panama City campus to welcome students back to class after Hurricane Michael ravaged the town three weeks ago.Thrasher and other top administrators from Tallahas-see spent their visit touring the campus and speaking with students and faculty about their post-storm needs.(We are) so proud of the great work that our administra-tion over here, our faculty, our students have done to bring this campus back,Ž Thrasher said.According to Thrasher, every building on the FSU PC campus has endured some damage, especially from downed trees damaging roofs and causing water intrusion. It took a big effort to get the campus ready for the students to come back but our students are the most important thing over here,Ž said Thrasher. We want to make sure they dont FSU PC welcomes students home after hurricane A for saleŽ sign is missing off a Cherry Street home in the Cove on Sunday after Hurricane Michael battered Bay County. [PATTI BLAKE/THE NEWS HERALD] By Katie Landeck@PCNHKatieL klandeck@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY „ One after the other, the Facebook messages poured in. Two adults and two kids looking! No pets. Under $1200 month for everything;Ž 3 bedroom 2 bath needed. We have guinea pigs and a small dog. No location restrictions. If needed we will even take a 2 bedroom;Ž and We have 3 people, one bathroom is plenty. We also have a cat we are grateful to whatever is available. Pref-erably three beds.ŽEighty-five families who lost everything to Hurricane Michael responded to a post by B Cody Shields, owner of the fledgling company Think Real Estate, where he offered to match the displaced with available rental units. People on both sides of the equation, he wrote, should post what they need or what they have in the comments.What didnt pour in though were posts about available rental units. The list was decidedly lopsided.Im doing my best,Ž Shields said, who noted he has had some successes. But he also reluctantly conceded, yes, its overwhelming.ŽHurricane Michael simultaneously devastated the local real estate market and set the stage for the most robust real estate market the county has seen in years, according to real estate agents.Like ripping o a Band-AidReal estate market expected to take hit from Hurricane Michael, then explodeA home is for sale off Linda Avenue on Sunday in the Cove. [PATTI BLAKE/THE NEWS HERALD] Housing portalFEMA and the state created a portal to identify available housing in Bay County. Landlords are able to put available units for their buildings for potential use by Hurricane Michael survivors who have been displaced. The link for the public is https://survey123.arcgis. com/share/beb1d86dc4054bf78c04514980c940d1Business ........................A11 Diversions ......................C7 Local & State ...............B1-7 Sports.........................C1-5 TV listings ......................C6 Viewpoints ....................A12Thrasher LOCAL & STATE | B1AMID THE RUBBLE, CHURCH FILLS COMMUNITYS NEEDS SPORTS | C1ALABAMA, LSU SET FOR WAR IN BATON ROUGE ON SATURDAY SMALL BUSINESSES GET RECOVERY HELP LOCAL | B1 See RED TIDE, A6 See THRASHER, A6 See REAL ESTATE, A8 The News Herald | Saturday, November 10, 2018 B23

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** B24 Saturday, November 10, 2018 | The News Herald

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** The News Herald | Saturday, November 10, 2018 C1By Katie Landeck The News HeraldIn times of cr isis, a quote from Mr. Rogers often comes to mind. When I was a boy and I would see scary things in the news, my mother would say to me, "Look for the helpers. You will always find people who are helping.Ž he famously said. In these pages, after so much devastation, we wanted to bring you the stories of the helpers, told by those they helped. We hope they inspire you the way they inspired us, and make you proud to be a member of this community. But first, we want to start it off with a thank you to our sister paper the Northwest Florida Daily News, who were our heroes after the storm. When the News Herald lost connection to the outside world, the news team there took over within 10 minutes to make sure, no matter what, there would be a newspaper and the website would have up-to-date information for those who could access it. For days the team there went above and beyond to take care of both the News Herald staff and this community. They did such a good job, that I truly dont know everything they did. But I do know that Editor Jason Blakeney handled brutal press deadlines, coordinating help from other GateHouse Media papers and last minute changes; Managing Editor Wendy Victoria made sure everything was being covered; Online Editor Del Stone kept our website continuously updated; and reporter Heather Osbourne stepped up to the plate in a big way. The entire staff in Fort Walton Beach worked hard and worked overtime to take care of this paper, writing stories, taking dictations, and even sending over a package with supplies, including reporters notebooks, battery packs and plastic for our own staff to start repairing their homes. A big shout out also has to be made to photographers Devon Ravine and Mike Synder, who three weeks after the storm when the Daily News team easily could have said do it yourself,Ž were still braving the traffic to come over here and take photos. The team at The Daily News were our hurricane heroes, and without further ado here are yours.Thank you to the helpers HURRICANE HEROES Reader SubmittedOn the third day of being trapped by 21 downed trees along our driveway, a couple of guys from FEMA and a member of the Mormon Church made their way in on foot to check on us. The following day, a group from a church in Florence, Mississippi showed up with a couple of chainsaws and cleared enough for us to drive under the trees that had snapped and were resting at a 45 degree angle in order to reach our neighbors yard, where we could cut across to their driveway. As a search for ice was paramount by that time, those volunteers were truly a godsend. „ Steve Hough, Southport € € €In my mind, the heroes are the ones who showed up to feed us! Many corporations, including Denny's, Taco Bell, Chick Fil A, and Burger king provided free food for the community and we're forever grateful! My heroes though are the many churches whose members served us hot food, ice water, and a smile. I don't know their names, what churches they belong to, or even what city they came from. I just know they showed up to do God's work, and we'll never forget the many warm, smiling faces. Thank you. „ Gail Beckham, The Cove € € €In the past 25 days my hus-band Eddie Walker had worked tirelessly to help others in every corner of Bay County to chainsaw trees off homes, move debris, create shelters for others, checked constantly on family, co-workers, and neighbors, his children, and myself. He has been kind, level-headed, self-sacrificing, and not stopped working, with the heart of a servant,since this storm hit. He was out with a chainsaw to cut our neighbors from their homes before the rain subsided on October 10th. His goodness and cha-risma have been a shield to our family, who lost a great deal, in moments where laughter didn't seem possible. He's never tired and never forgot-ten to give thanks to the good Lord for all He's done for us. My husband is my hero, and he looks mighty fine covered in "Panama City Snowflakes" (aka wood dust). That is all he will care that I said about him. Thank you. „ Amanda Walker€ € €Fatty Patty on Thomas Dr. They feed the community for free. It was heart/stomach warming to have a hot meal in the morning. Dave Rich € € €I had two heroes my husband James Davis and my son Jay Davis. They worked diligently. First, cutting a path for us to get out of the driveway, then making sure everyone around us was safe and their homes were secured. Working tirelessly cutting trees from our roof, neighbor's roofs, taking care of getting everyone's genera-tors up and running. Taking turns driving out in search of gas, supplies and a working phone to contact loved ones for everyone. Taking supplies and coffee daily to the church where several families had taken shelter. Then, insisting on getting back to work sup-plying what few stores were open had chips to sell. Going out before daylight working where they could and coming back home to more cutting, putting up tarps, taking care of generators for us and others who had to leave for whatever reason. We still have a lot of work to do and they are still going hard at it. Taking care of us and doing what they can for those around us. I am well aware that many others are out there doing the same things in their neighborhoods, but I am blessed beyond measure to have them. Gail Davis € € €My sister Diane Smith came down with food, gas, and water. Enough I shared with friends. She stayed three days and helped with clean up Terry Smith € € €My neighbor, who ran out in the eye of the storm to check on us after our roof flew off. Forever family Diana Hancock € € €My friend Jeff Stone for hooking up my water pump to my generator so we didnt have to move to hotel. My neighbor Mr. Bob and Ms. Julie Sombathy for bringing me gas and ice when we got back to the house and, last but not least, Mr. Marty for putting tarp on my roof out of kindness. Of course many thanks to the linemen that restored power in Northshore Road area. And the people that cleared my driveway off of like four big ole trees. Ami Shingho Rashi € € €Carly Kiser Sostheim. Shes been so selfless through this last few weeks. Shes a super-hero, hands down. Shes fed the community, provided supplies to those in need, and works everyday to find hous-ing for people who need it. She hasnt asked for anything for her family but has given so much to others! Kelsey Kay Paulk € € €My hurricane hero, as well as my everyday hero, is my husband Chris. He has been waking up at 3:30 a.m. and not getting home until 9 p.m. every day since Octo-ber 11th helping restore power to those in Marianna. I am thankful for him and every other lineman risking their lives so we are able to have the luxury of power. -Dani-elle Boobyer € € €Gary Harrelson of Wewahi-tchka. He, with the help of his sons, cleared an uncountable amount of roads and driveways with chainsaws and his tractor clearing way for so many residents to get out of their own yards and make their way out for help Ste-phen Helms € € € My brother, Cody Alexander Vick, is my Hurricane Michael hero. He drove his truck all the way from Birmingham to evacuate my husband, me and all 4 of our dogs. While we were in Birmingham he gave us food and a place to sleep and even drove us back to check on our families and property, and took us back to Birmingham until it was safe to return home. We stayed with there for 2 weeks and when it was time to come back, he drove us home once again. I honestly don't know what I would have done without him and he made this experience as bearable as could have possibly been. Kayleigh Cosson € € €My husband held the front door shut for hours while the rain and wind came in around him. Also after the hurricane turning into a nurse, hooking up oxygen tanks for elderly and carving a way to Stanford Road with his chainsaw for free. Victoria Coatney € € €Pastor Ricky Wade and his wife Kristy from Morristown, Tenn. who just showed up one day and cut down a tree that was across the backyard and another that was leaning in the front. Strangers to us at first but friends when they left. Linda Skeen € € €My personal Hurricane Michael hero is Lennon Thiel from Mexico Beach. She couldnt leave her parents behind, so they weathered the storm only a few blocks from the beach. As soon as she was able to get out and about, she was checking on people throughout the community. Once my parents were able to get to Overstreet, Lennon made sure they knew where to go for daily help with meals. She made sure they had at least one hot meal a day, took them gas for the generator she lent them, and even helped get others to their place to clear the driveway to the house. She is my Hurricane HURRICANE HEROESPeople neighbors say went above and beyond to helpSee HELP, C2Eddie Walker removing yard debris, submitted by Amanda Walker. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO]

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** C2 Saturday, November 10, 2018 | The News HeraldMichael hero and a true rep-resentation of the selflessness of folks along the Forgotten Coast. Christina H Borden € € €After the hurricane there was 10 of us in an extremely damaged home. We had been without food and water for two days. I heard a woman on the radio offer to bring items to anyone in need. She brought us more than I imag-ined and we had our first hot meal in a week because of her. Her name was Alicia and she teaches at Waller Elementary School. She is an angel and I hope she knows how much my family appreciates what she did for us. Ki Lane € € €It was three weeks since the hurricane hit and I still had not heard from my grandparents. Constantly I went onto Panama City Facebook pages looking for someone anyone to help me check on my grandmother when Ang Chapman emerged. Despite her dealing with her home being destroyed she took time out to go to their house. My phone rang and it was Ang telling me my grandma was standing right there and wanted to talk to me. I was so overjoyed and relieved they were okay, and I would have never known if it was not for Ang. Elizabeth Roddey € € €Without question, Cricket Wireless, is a hero for me. I was the worried Mother/ Grandmother over here in Jacksonville while my family rode it out in Callaway. We talked before, during and after the storm came through. My son never lost cell service! We were able to help another worried family trying to reach a neighbor. I was able to talk to my family and friends to relay the latest information that I could find for them. So, hats off to Cricket Wireless for making a huge difference in our lives. „ Patti Greenlee, Jacksonville FL € € €Our neighbors, being mostly complete strangers, gathered the able bodies, trucks and tools that were left. They banded together to clear the debris from the roads, ward off looters, and help each other with food and supplies. An hour after our SOS sign went up after 2 days in, no roof, no gas, no water, no power, no contact with the outside world, and very little food, my cousin Richard Trapp with FWBPD came through (off duty) to rescue my man, my dog, and myself from our neighborhood „ Shareen Davis€ € €Opie, Brittany and Scott from Beachy Beach Realty! They were strangers that showed up with smiles and chainsaws and worked tirelessly cutting up trees for 6 straight hours!! The kindness and compassion shown to us that day will never be forgotten and we will pay it forward! Arlene Clements Christo € € €Christian Burch and Rebecca Oakes Burch for organizing a school supply drive in Virginia. True heroes! Julie Ann Nolan Sombathy € € €My friend Katie Sue and her boyfriend who let my boyfriend, our dog, and I evacuate with them. Meghan Coy € € €12year old Dylan Praeger. He and his family evacuated Tyn-dall to our house. Once safe they continued their journey north but Dylan left one thing behind. His personal work-ing AT&T phone. He left it for 12 different Cove families to share until Verizon pulled their ... ya know. He's a very special young man to many people in our neighborhood. Lonney CJ Johnson € € €William Harrison. His posts were the best source of information. His efforts were incredible. I also want to nominate Alyssa Yarbrough and Ben Hazelkorn for driving all over dangerous roads, and sometimes having to walk inaccessible neighborhoods to check on coworkers and for checking on Julies office for us when we couldnt get there. Cant thank them enough.Bob Sombathy € € €Easy. Margo Deal Anderson. Lynn Haven has never had it better! Scott Baker € € €Neighbors were great. Particularly Tony and Ray, who chainsawed a path out for us. But the angels from the outside were quite remarkable, from Mercy Chefs who fed so many to the deputies and officers from Gulfport and Long Beach MS who cut the huge oak off our sidewalk to all those in between „ hats off! Duane Gorey € € €Kelly Payne is my hurricane Michael hero. He drove from Bonifay Florida to Donald-sonville GA on his motorcycle to pick me up after my work team went on to Tennessee with our patients. He did this the morning after the hurri-cane. Rhonda Lewis € € €The lady walking down our street talking on a phone! We shouted at her from our balcony if we could use her phone.. She was our angel. She had AT&T. My phone had went dead talk-ing to my daughter when the worst of Hurricane Michael was hitting. I hadnt been able to contact her to let her know we were ok and not to come back yet because they werent letting anyone back into Bay County.I dont remember her name but she was from Bay Point and her home had sus-tained substantial damage too but she was out checking on friends and loaning her phone out to strangers. Whoever you are, thank you! Deb Thacker € € €Team A Respiratory Therapy Department during the storm at Bay Medical. They literally risked their lives to relocate critical patients from the ICU's in the new tower down to the recovery room at the height of the storm. Allyson McKay € € €Pike Electric out of Austin, Texas. The had/have an unbe-lievable number of trucks in the area. All their guys worked non-stop, replacing poles and all the wires in our subdivision. They always had a smile and wave for everyone. Our electric was back by the time they estimated it would be. They're a fantastic company with highly professional employees.. Mike Seiler € € €Our son, Jeff Hutchinson came from Bay Minette, Al. to our house in Chipley the day after. We didnt know he was coming since we had no phone service. We had no power. We had trees down in our yard. He showed up with food, chainsaw, generator, and 5 gallon gas cans for chain saw. He stayed with us from Thursday until Sunday. He kept the generator going day and night. He would get up at 2 a.m. to put gas in it. He worked on the downed trees while he was with us. He was a Godsend. June Elenburg Hutchinson € € €Definitely has to be our neighbor Randy Gould and his wife Sarah Stewart for the compassion they had toward all his neighbors, having a cookout and a having a movie night for the whole trailer park. And of course putting together a trunk-a-treat for the kids on Halloween. Not including trap-ping people house for free and lending help to help with trees and debris they definitely dia-monds in the rough. Definitely the type of people you want by your side. Ones who gives the meaning of help the neighbor and spreading love and compassion to everyone he meets and see. Randy and Sarah I'm so glad I got to meet you both.Shreen Richardson Loring € € €My hero is my wife Vickie Martin. She has been and is my inspiration. She helped tarp roofs, cut trees so people could get out of their homes, deliver food, deliver supplies and live with no power, no shower and only her phone for communication. She put all this before getting our home back in order. She helped people she worked with get assistance they might have not gotten otherwise. She is a woman with grit. „ Marty Martin € € €Our Hurricane Michael hero was my special needs granddaughter's bus driver 757 Cliff Hendricks. As soon as his son came and he had a phone he called to check on the girls. When I told him we had a generator but it would only run the freezer, he loaded up his generator and enough gas to last us the 18 days we were without electric and brought it to us. And to see his girls as he calls them. To us, he was our hero because we was wonder-ing what we were going to do. We wouldn't be able to stay in our residence with the girls. „ Mary Love € € €Mrs. Dana Hutchinson from Fountain is our hero. She came day after day with water for my daughters and gas to keep our generator going. If it wasnt for her we would of had to relocate. Also brought us food to keep our bellies full and a window unit to keep my daughter from getting to hot and having seizures Definitely god sent. „ Kimberli Kromer € € €On the afternoon of Hurricane Michael I was with my co-workers and 108 residents. The windows and doors blew out on the north side so we began moving the residents to the south side of the building. Our Administrator, Marianne Martin was in constant motion running back and forth making sure we all were safe. She was doing a headcount of resi-dents and employees. She kept saying"everyone stay safe and I'm not letting anybody get hurt". She kept us all as calm as she could and we hugged and huddled over our residents as the wind and rain came in. She never left until the last resident was safely evacuated. „ Denise Espinosa € € €Alan Smith has driven from Chipley from 4:30 in the morn-ing every day and is up until about 11:30 at night working on donations for the hurri-cane victims. Alan drove from Mexico Beach to Panama City to bring me ice and a grill. Alan had been hit by another car while in his truck. .Alan's truck was completely out of line, but he drove it until it would go no more. Alan has used his other car to transport supplies to the victims and he has worn it out also. I don't know of anyone who's ever done so much so selflessly while his own home has been under devastation as the rest of us have. „ Margie Sappington, € € €Jessica Gyllenskog of Eufaula helped my daughter get the life sustaining medical supplies that she needed. My daughter's regular shipment of supplies was supposed to arrive on 10/ 10, but due to the hurricane, it was sent back to the supplier. Jessica found out about the need and drove to Columbus where she coordinated with Hospice Prog. at the local hospital. She was able to get the exact latex free sup-plies needed. She drove them to our home in Lynn Haven on 10/ 19. This was a lifesaver as my daughter's regular supplies didn't arrive until 10 /31. We are truly grateful to Jessica and Theresa for getting these Rx supplies when no one locally could provide them.Vickii Kaye and Ashlen McWhorter € € €Carly Kiser Sostheim is my hero! Carly and her husband contacted me immediately after the storm. Carly went above and beyond to locate me once she had heard that my home and the majority of my belongings were destroyed. Carly knew that being a single school teacher with a Great Dane and small cat that I was facing a major challenge trying to find a home after the storm. She so selflessly offered me a safe condo for free to stay in for six weeks with my fur babies while I look for a more permanent home. Im eter-nally thankful Ive been able to return to my job, teaching, due to having a condo to live in right now. Jenny Christo € € €My Mom JoAnne Tyran and My Aunt Judi Lundmark. Mom was on the phone as soon as the storm was over to check on everyone. Once she deter-mined everyone that she could find was good she was asking who needs what. By that Sat-urday she had a generator and was doing what she could to help everyone she could. She also purchased a chainsaw. Once she realized stores on the Beach were open she got shop-ping lists from everyone and purchased what she was asked to, never asking to be reim-bursed. My Aunt walked about two miles the morning after the Hurricane thru streets blocked by trees and downed wires and no street signs to get to her son that nobody had heard from. She picked up everyones dirty clothes and drove to Destin and washed and dried and folded clothes for at least nine people. And didn't ask for a penny in return. The Ladies are a shining example of kindness and gener-osity. I want to be them when I grow up, but the reality is I can never match them. „ BobbiJo Whoolery € € €Sams Club. The store was open the day after the storm for cash only essentials like ice, bread, water and can goods. The following day the store was processing credit cards and opened the gas station even with a gaping hole in the roof. This was the sole source of gen-erators, food and gas after the storm on this side of the bridge. I think the management at that store was amazing and the sup-port will never be forgotten. „ Tom Benak, Panama City € € €Scott and Carrie Buchaan. Having just purchased are home in Feb. this year we were in Indiana. Scott and Carrie had evacuated. Upon coming back to their own problems, they immediately removed a major tree top that had penetrated through our bedroom roof, with their own shingles to avert major water damage. This is how I learned the true meaning of the southern life, these people. Betsy Lane. € € €My heroes were my neigh-bors, Ty and Diane Aldridge. My husband is at Clifford Chester Sims nursing home, so after riding out the storm alone, these two heroes took me under their wing. Every morning Diane brought me over a cup of coffee to start the day, they had AT&T, so they shared their phones with all of us that had Verizon and they having a generator, they hosted dinners for me and some of the other neighbors as well! Ty is afraid of heights, but still both of them went up and tarped my roof! They drove me to the nursing home so I could see him. I am so grateful for everything they did but even more than that for the friendship and moral support they have given me Jen Morris€ € €The day after the storm hit, our street was blocked by large trees lying across the roads. About mid-day, our first set of heroes came in the form of the Sheriffs Department with a chainsaw. Although they had the determination and their efforts were valiant, they made little progress, as their chainsaw, was a tad to small for enormous trees. Suddenly, out of nowhere, came this guy driving one of those small Bobcat vehicles. Using the fork lifts, he was able to move the giant trees in no time. Once the way was cleared, he disappeared. Our true hero. Chris Christian € € €My Hurricane Michael heroes are the Team A staff of Ortho/Sur-gical and the rest of Bay Medical! We took care of patients as a team with limited resources while damage was occurring to our hospital and our community. Team A stayed until our patients were safely evac-uated to other hospitals by the amazing EMS personnel that came from all over. We appre-ciate the hospitals that took in our patients and continue to care for them while we rebuild our hospital. We survived the scariest moments, together! #BayMedStrong „ Brittney Reynolds, CN € € €On the morning the storm, Carlena Lungstrum fled Bay County and made her way to Montgomery where she stayed while coordinating with friends in Pensacola to begin collecting donations. Shedrove to Pensacola to pick up donations to then travel to Bay County but was not able to fit the donations in her small car. She immediately when to a local car dealership and traded her paid off vehicle for a 4-wheel drive with towing capabilities. Car-lena ran a neighborhood point of distribution out of a garage. The neighborhood she lives in has a high number of military families that were mandatory evacuated from Bay County and could not immediately return home. She coordi-nated with another resident of Cherokee Heights and together began contacting the families that could not return home to place tarps on roofs with heavy damage. Carlena made 3 more trips to Pensacola and back to run donations back to Bay County. John Paul Oliver € € € My hero was my son's sister, Melinda Wofford. She has shown so much strength through this, going out every day make sure everyone has everything we needed. She had damage to her place but that didn't take her down. She's had to struggle with her insurance company, but she is showing so much strength she has been amazing through all of this I don't think I could had made it through this like she has. „ BJ Franks € € €A selfless former Firefighter from Mississippi named Robby Freeman stayed through the storm at his parents' home so they could evacuate to Alabama. After the storm he helped everyone in the neigh-borhood for almost two weeks. He helped tarp our roof and did tree removal where needed without being asked. Robby is the epitome of a caring and selfless man. He will always be my hero. Without his help we would not have gotten power as soon as we did. „ Anonymous € € €Mark Deaton has done so much in this town. He has cut more trees and cleared property for people for free. Just to help people with no help. They had no idea where to turn or who to ask. Some didn't even want to ask. But he has been a champ. I'm glad to call the man friend since we were in the 3rd grade. Thank you Mark Deaton, you are the man. „ Jimmie Lawson€ € €On Saturday, I went outside to try to work in the yard. My neighbor came over to tell me they were leaving town. They gave me two cans of gas, 2 cases of water, bread, and told me they had extra propane in the garage if I needed it. They gave me a key to their house and said if there was anything I needed go in their house and get it. What a blessing!On my way to put the bread, etc. away, two vehicles pulled into my driveway that I did not recognize. Someone got out of the first vehicle and called my name... to my surprise it was my nephew (a pastor) from New Port Richey, FL. He and another man from his church had come to help us with the clean up. They stayed for three days and managed to remove all the trees and debris from my front yard and remove one tree in the backyard and clean up a lot of debris in the back-yard. They also put a tarp over the side of our house where we lost the siding and water came in and tarped multiple places on the roof. Kim Goebert € € €I would like to thank Mark Deaton and Stephen Smith. These two guys have gone far and beyond. They don't HELPFrom Page C1 See HEROES, C4

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** C4 Saturday, November 10, 2018 | The News Heraldtake money from anyone. They are doing this from the compassion of their hearts. This is their contribution to the county they were raised in. I can't say enough about them. Mark told me about an elderly man who thought that someone had stole his car and trash can. Mark and Stephen started clearing the trees and debris from his yard. His car was covered up in the debris. When they showed the man that the car and trash can was still there, the man face lit up. Mark said this is why we do this. Helping others is our reward. „Valerie Mincey€ € € I have always been a proud Mom of my two sons but here is my chance to let the rest of the world know just how great they truly are. After the storm, Brad Bonewit and Chad Bonewit could have gathered their families and a few things and evacuated this "war-torn" area, but instead they rolled up their sleeves and dug in to help others dig out. Brad rode around all day delivering supplies to those that couldn't get out and were unprepared, while at dusk he set up a generator at our apartment so people could charge their devices and get on his internet to let people know that they were ok. He then would start grilling food given to him by evacuees, just to give neighbors and workers a warm meal to get them through the long, dark nights. Chad found his journey taking him across the bridge, as his apartment took a direct hit and was unliveable. Rather than worrying about what all he just lost, he went out from dawn to dusk with chainsaws and tarps and other supplies. He wasn't looking for the people willing to pay for the help, he went looking for the ones who could not pay a dime. Debi Bonewit € € €The morning after the hurricane, Our daughter, Pamela Bailey and her boyfriend, Rodney Gilmore found themselves trapped on their property by many fallen trees across their quarter mile lane to the house. They had to saw, chop and haul trees to get out. They immediately came to check on us. As her daddy, Buddy Earl Somnitz, is very ill and practically bedridden, they came over every single day, so I could stay to take care of Buddy, bringing gas, water and food. Many times they had to wait in long lines for gas. Pam and Rodney also cut trees off our truck and house, and even build a frame and tarp over the generator in case of rain. Had they not provided the gas to keep the generator going, day and night, for fans to keep Buddy cool and refrigeration to keep his insu-lin cold, I don't think he would have survived, nor I. Pam and Rodney are our heros. „Earl "Buddy" & Martha Somnitz € € €A few days after the storm,we needed boxes to pack up our possessions. I went by the UHaul on 15 Street, the were closed but the two guys working in the back opened the store and gave us boxes. They said they had no way to accept payment and asked us to come back one day and pay. They saved the day for us. „ Fred Engle, Lynn Haven € € €Although I know many nurses worked the storm in the hospitals or facilities, I am very familiar with one group of dedicated staff at Community Health and Rehab. All staff at the facility kept their residents safe from falling glass while windows blew out, ceiling and rain coming into the building, caring for elderly residents on mattresses in closets or bathrooms to keep them safe without any running water or electricity. Staying awake for 72 hours straight without any sleep to make sure their residents were safely evacuated after the storm, sending them out in hopes that others would care for them like the family they are. All the while, not knowing about their own homes or family and friends. Most found their homes gone when they finally got home. But, no elderly person died during their watch. And, with tears in their eyes, they have visited their residents (family members) in their new homes a distance away. „ Sarah Hutchinson € € €Even though an 80 foot tree went through the roof of the house, we are so thankful for living in The Cove.Our wonderful neighbor, David Norton, came to check on us during the eye of the storm. Our neighbors, Shay and Pat Mullins, generously ran a line and shared their generator with us, so I could continue to have an oxygen supply. Russ, working in the dark, installed an air conditioner to ease my discomfort from the heat and humidity. Brenda Smallwood being communications central at all hours of the day and night.And, there was Amos, blue tarping neighbors roofs while his own roof was open to the sky.Im sure there are others, but these are our Heroes of Cherry Street. „Gayle Woody, Linda White € € €Dara Strickland had severe damage to her farm in Bayou George but after making sure her family and animals were safe and secure (her parents lost their home in the storm) she immediately started mobi-lizing her friends outside of the area to bring in necessary sup-plies for not just her but for all of the people in Bay County who had livestock. She also teamed up with two vets to get much needed medical attention for animals injured during the storm as well as took in horses that needed help. That is the kind of person she is, she gives her time and energy to help those who need it and never asks for anything in return. What she did ask for was help for the roof of her barn, not because that's her livelihood but so she could bring in more injured animals that needed help. She is definitely a hurri-cane hero. „Tracy Czerwonky€ € €Jeff and Melanie Payne of Cherokee Heights have been the real heroes of this neighbor-hood. Before even finishing their house's repairs, they helped many tarp up their roofs, rip out carpets, and protect this neighborhood. Afterwards, they have given my wife and I so much insight into what we need to do, they helped in airing out my house until I could come home, organized a list of trust-worthy contractors, assisted in some street clean-up and even coordinated a Halloween block party to help all of us feel at ease. We owe them a ton for helping out this neighborhood. „ Tyler Deeds € € €I am on oxygen 24/7 and when the power went out, Bill and Lea Hill literally saved my life. They pulled up in my driveway, packed up my oxygen equipment and other supplies and told me to get in their car, they were taking me to their house and they would run the generator for as long as needed to keep me breathing. I knew an angel was in our pres-ence. Every 2 hours for several days, Bill was outside filling up the generator with gas ... never really getting any sleep, total concern for my well-being. He and a crew of friends and family showed up with equip-ment, cutting huge trees that laid along a 1- mile dirt road to get me out. There are no words I can say to express my love and gratitude for these neighbors. They were a God-send and I thank them from the bottom of my heart. „ Dan € € €September 21, 2018 was my first challenge, I was on the table of the operation room at Bay Medical, for seven hours undergoing triple bypass. I was released 5 days later to go home, my wife Nancy took care of me, all the needs a person can have she took care of. Then two weeks later that monster approached Panama City, we want to bed like many people did thinking this was only a category 3. At 5:30 a.m. my wifes cell phone was receiving text from her brother, a Captain with the Panama City Fire Department, telling us this was going to hit us at a Cat 4 or higher. Too late to leave, especially in my condition, so we waited, thought we were prepared, WRONG. The first thing that happen was our back French doors that are in our dining room blew completely open busting the frame of the door and busting out glass in our china cabinet, My wife ran to the door, I begged her not to because I could do not any-thing to help. She held those doors slipping on the wet tile floor, getting blown backward on her buttocks several times, for 2 and a half hours until that beast was finally over. Her arms, hips, knees, and shoulders were so bruised for the next week. I ask her why, she told me, that she had to or we would have lost the roof and everything we have ever worked for, and she was not going to let that happen with me in the house. That is why she is MY HERO, I truly do not know how she did it, by the grace of God and adrenaline.We are 63 and 60 years old, but she is my lifesaver in every way and always will be. „ Danny Webb € € €When hurricane Michael tore through the fifty mobile homes here in Greenwood Acres no one was spared. Many of the resources other storm struck communities utilize were not available to the seniors at Greenwood Acres. We have no Facebook page, no community online presence; and our resi-dents are not smart phone or multi-media savvy. Therefore, old-fashioned, word of mouth and door to door outreach has been the key to recovery.A week after the storm it became evident that we needed to have neighborhood community breakfast where the residents could simply sit and share. The local Walmart family helped out with oldfashioned assistance. We want to thank David Henry, the Panama City Beach Walmart Store Manager. It wasnt just your generosity; it was gra-ciousness that Walmart ladies showed while helping get the order processed. They genu-inely cared. Thank you also for allowing me to come before the store opened.On behalf of the entire Greenwood Acres Retirement Community, thank you. „ Mike and Christi Klema ***The Haids family home only had minor damages and they opened their door to numer-ous families in the area whose homes were unhabitable. They provided food and shel-ter to all. John and his electric crew also worked tirelessly to provide electrical service and repair to area residents and to Bay Medical. Its a great pleasure to have such a wonderful neighbor. Thank you Haid family. „ Rob Schroeder, Misty Lane € € €The hero in the Venetian Villa section of town is Matt Weath-ers! He lives on Torino Way. Matt is the owner of Weathers Concrete Company and he had a fairly large front end loader. As soon as the storm was over he got that front end loader out and started clearing Venetian Way so all of us residents could get in and out of our neighbor-hood. Venetian Way is the only road into our neighborhood and without Matts help we would have all been trapped. „ Charles Funk € € €I would like to nominate Mark Deaton as a Hurricane Michael hero. Mark has spent every day since the storm helping friends, strangers and anyone he possibly can. He won't take any money, not even for sup-plies. Mr. Deaton has his own Communications business that he has put on hold so that he can help the citizens of our community. Thank You. „ .Mike Purvis € € €My brother sent me a text message after Michael turned into a Cat 4 advising me to get my animals and evacuate. Also receiving alerts on my phone stating I had one hour. I was prepared to stay but this was not in the plan. In a rush I left my phone and drove to Mobile 12 hrs. later I was in a hotel. Without my phone, I was lost. I started seeing the damage Michael left behind on the news and it showed a clip of the new boat storage building half gone. My brother lives down the road from there, so I feared the worst. Finally after 3 days I made it back to the unknown. I learned he was safe and he had helped people in his building during the storm and after. He made sure I was going to be safe and for that. He's my hero. Ironically his name is Michael. „ Amy Thomas € € €Mark Deaton! Is the most self-less person and has gone above and beyond for his neighbors friends and strangers alike! He is my hero! „ Kara Wheeler € € €We evacuated to Tuscaloosa, AL. My husband was still recovering from openheart surgery just 3 weeks prior to Michaels landfall. Our heroes are Panama City Beach residents, Steve and Rhonda Hoeckley, who headed over to our house the day after the hurricane. For 3 days, (in our absence), in the heat, and with no water or electricity in the house, they went above and beyond by replacing damaged plywood and beams to close the hole in the roof, putting roof-ing felt and tarps on the roof, covering broken windows, rip-ping up carpet, throwing out wet furniture, linens, couches, etc., and picking up and bag-ging a mess of fallen insulation, ceiling, glass, and drywall. We cant thank these angels enough„especially considering the doctors orders that my husband not do any manual labor upon our return. „ Steve and Lori Hunt € € €A short time after Hurricane Michael, Chef Erica Reynolds of An Intricate Chef really stepped up and became one of many heroes for the people of Panama City. Although Chef Reynolds herself faced damages to her own home from Hurricane Michael, she saw a need in her community and took action. Having access to a commercial kitchen with power, she made 100 hot meals and delivered them to families in Glenwood, St.Andrews and the surrounding areas. In a time where she was in need, Chef Reynolds still did what she could to help. CeCe Cudd€ € €Kelly Elrod is the captain of Team RWB, a military support group. She coordinated the chainsaw warriors that worked for 25 days, cutting trees off of home or removing debris from the elderly. She utilized her home to gather gasoline, tarps, water and personal hygiene items for anyone in need. All the supplies were donated by Team RWB members from in State and out of state chapters. Her team gave away tarps and gas for generators. Team RWB All this was done even though her home was gutted by rain, wind and water! Kelly worried more about others more than her own needs. Thus, Kelly is our hero! „ Joe Edgecombe € € €Our Hurricane Michael heroes are my daughter and son in law, Mike and Cam Lindemann. Every other day they made the drive from Pensacola to Panama City Beach to bring supplies to family and friends that couldnt get what they needed. They tirelessly helped family and friends clean up their yards from all the debris and brought medicine and clothing to a few families that were in desperate need of these items. We are very thankful for their love and help during this devastating time! „ Millie West € € €I have a bad feeling.Ž These were the words spoken to my husband October 9, after finding out the hurri-cane headed for our home was projected to possibly a Cat. 3.Ž We discussed evacuating, but with three young children and three dogs, finding a hotel was near impossible. Then we ran across an ad from Native Downs Kennel in Ocala. Having lived in Florida all their lives, they pleaded with Panhandle residents to bring them their petsƒ for free. Without hesi-tation they provided sanctuary to our three beloved dogs, and after the storm when the scope of damage became clear they called and offered to keep our three dogs free of charge however long we needed, no questions asked. They are the reason we evacuated, and took a huge burden off our shoulders when dealing with the aftermath. The staff at Native Downs Kennel are our Hurricane Michael heroes. „ Amanda Dorris € € €Our Hurricane Michael heroes are Mark and Yolanda Salas. While my husband dug one of our employees out of their driveway, I made an order of chainsaws from Birmingham where I had evacuated with our boys. Mark & Yolanda happened to be driving through Tallahassee where we could pick up saws, so they bought a trailer and hauled the delivery to our shop at Sea Breeze Small Engine for the clean up crews and residents desperate to dig out only 2 days after the storm! Can't find better friends than that! Crystal Chaillou € € €When Megin Brooks heard about the devastation from Hurricane Michael, she immediately began fundraising. She rented a truck and brought chainsaws, gas, supplies, water, etc. from Fort Lauderdale. We were given names of families in need in Altha, Blountstown, and other areas. So we took diapers, food, water, etc. to these people. After we ran out of supplies, she went and bought lots of toys, games and crafts with her own money and we then went to pods and loaded up day after day and took supplies to those who couldnt get out. She is my Hurricane Michael Hero.Of course the big heroes are all of the linemen, first respond-ers, those who cooked food and donated supplies and manned the pods!! The Panhandle is forever grateful! Thank you all so very much! Susan Brooks € € €After nearly a month of no help from anyone but my parents and grandma I saw a video on Facebook of the fine folks at Newbys making Christ-mas baskets for children. I emailed to see how I could get a couple for my kiddos because it didn't look like Christmas would be very giving this year. I received a response (which is rare for anyone to respond to anything I ask it seems). The GM and her husband, who probably doesn't know much about me and my boys, decided to help make Christmas great for my family. The amount of effort this woman has put into our Christmas happiness is extraordinary. If it wasn't for Mrs. Lindsey my children wouldn't have anything to open on Christmas. Not only did she help with Christmas coming up she also made sure they had back to school clothes and fully loaded backpacks. Thank you all for restoring my faith in humanity and the positive stories that help the healing!!!! God's speed. Anna Day € € €In troubling times, I was extremely fortunate to have two groups assist with tree removal and debris clean-up. I also received help inside my home with water-damaged areas. The two groups were the Latter Day Saints and Days of Hope. The crews were posi-tive, cheerful and showed compassion. They thanked me for allowing them to help! Although faith-based, neither group attempted to gain patronage. Instead, they offered a brief, uplifting, message/prayer. HEROESFrom Page C2 See HURRICANE, C11

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** The News Herald | Saturday, November 10, 2018 C11Thanks to these two wonderful groups, the road to recover seems much more plausible! Thank you! „ Lois McGill, Pa nama City € € €When our oak tree in the front yard was uprooted during Hurricane Michael, the main water line to to our house was broken. We did not realize it at the time because the corroded pipe looked like the roots of the tree. As with so many residents, we were with-out water since the day of the hurricane. On October 18th, technicians from Key Largo Aqueduct came to investigate a water leak at our house at the meter. They fixed the broken meter and turned the water on only to discover water gushing from the roots of the oak tree. This is when the broken water main was discovered. The technicians from Key Largo Aqueduct could have turned the water off at the meter and left us without water, since it was our responsibility to hire a plumber to get it fixed. Instead, they took the time to put a temporary fix on the broken pipes so that we would have water in our house. Our heroes are the technicians from Key Largo Aqueduct who took the extra time to make our lives easier. „ Mark and Diane Bates € € €Erik White of Seaside Ground Maintenance and crew arrived at my home to remove trees from my driveway and homes in our Deer Point Lake neigh-borhood. These tree angel men worked days to accom-plish this unending task while sleeping in their trucks each night and were a true gift to us all in our neighborhood. „ Pat Varner € € € Our street Parker Drive was blocked with trees and debris after the storm. Our neighbor Gustavo used his equipment & friends to clear the street so my wife could evacuate. He's our hero. „ Jerry Hicks € € €My hero(s) are all of the out-of-state linemen/power-line technicians who worked tire-lessly to restore area electrical power.Their 24/7 restless and efficient skills went a tremen-dous way to lessen residents hardships. „ Fred Apple € € €Our class would like to thank the rescue workers, the National Guard, police officers, firemen and women for helping us find safety after the storm. We would also like to thank the Red Cross volunteers and Salvation Army volunteers for supplying us with food and water. Special thanks to all the electric linemen and women, our family members, service animals and of course Jesus for watching over us and protecting us. „ Mrs. Miners Writing Class. New Horizons Learning Center € € €Denise Whitehurst is my Hurricane Michael hero. She resides in Parker next to my mother where we rode out the hurricane. Denise had the only working phone in the neighborhood. She kept her phone plugged into her SUV leaving her garage open daily for the neighbors to have access to her AT&T phone. It was our only means of contacting family and insurance adjust-ers for many days! Denise was our life saver and even took texts and phone messages and each day walked the dev-astated neighborhood to relay those messages. We thank you Denise Whitehurst. „ Raye Apple € € €My Hurricane Michael hero is our Nephew Jim Ashby. He lives in Bradenton and had major damage from Hurricane Irene last year. His Uncle has Alzheimer's and broke his hip on Oct 11 when he fell while we were delivering a Generator to our daughters. Jim drove up here Saturday Nov.3 and cleared all the debris from our yard, checked areas that needed checked, and drove home Nov 4th. „ Joyce Baumann € € €I would like to thank Bay County Sheriffs Deputy R. Wil-loughby and Pastor Cathy Crider of Fountains Victory Tabernacle. Deputy Willoughby patrols the Fountain, FL area. Almost a week after Hurricane Michael, Bay County had not provided any disaster relief for Fountain. Deputy Willoughby saw our great need and set out to get us some much needed help. He partnered with Pastor Cathy Crider and set up a disaster relief point of distribution. Fountains Victory Tabernacle meeting hall was destroyed by the storm. Pastor Cathy opened her sanc-tuary and allowed it to be used to store disaster relief supplies. Pastor Cathys home had sus-tained tremendous damaged as well. She left the needs of her own home and worked tire-lessly to help our community. There are no words that could truly express our gratitude for Deputy Ryan Willoughby and Pastor Cathy Criders help. „ Jackie Pope € € €My hurricane hero is my dad. My dad Terry Barrett helped fix peoples houses. He hasnt stopped yet, hes probably out doing it now. He doesnt just fix houses, he also builds them. Hes helped so many people after the hurricane. That is why he is my hurricane hero. „ Hallie Barrett, 9 € € € My hurricane hero is me and my family because we donated clothes and then we helped at church. We would help find clothes and toys for the kids and hygiene products. I would also help old people walk around and hold stuff like bread. Me and my family love, love, love to help people. I love to help to help in anyway for anyone. The Foust family will always help. „ Kate Foust, 9 € € €My hurricane hero is my dad, Ted Erdman, because he helped his coworkers in the Coast Guard tarp their houses. He also kept track of everyone he worked with. Also, Dad helped get stuff of their houses and get storage for the stuff. Then, he helped relocate his coworkers that lost their homes. Thats why my Dad is my hurricane hero. „ Cole Erdman, 9 € € €My hero is the electric company because they came from all around the world to get us power. They also work hours trying to fix the power lines. I thought it would take one month, but it only took five days. I am thankful for those who came to fix our commu-nity. „Kaitlin Oros, 9 € € €My hurricane hero is Mrs. PipKorn because she helped the community. She sorted clothes by size for people who dont have any homes or clothes. Mrs. PipKorn was so kind she bought stuff she didnt have to donate. She went to Surfside to donate and give a man some shoes. But he needed work shoes and she didnt have any so she went out and bought some. „Ella Pitt, 9 € € €My hurricane hero is my cousin Laine because he came out and helped. He fixed power lines, he saved people, and no matter what he wouldnt take any money. I am proud to say that Laine Muserr is my cousin because he helped as good as he can so thank you Laine. „ Vega Dogan € € €My hurricane hero is my Uncle Scott because he is helping my house recover. For example the shingles are being replaced, our flooring is being replaced, and our backyard needs to be cleaned up a bit. He also helped get the tree off our roof! He is very kind to be doing this. Our house is getting so much done to it and we are not even able to live in yet, but with his help hopefully we will be able to live in it soon! „ Emma Henson, 9 € € €My hurricane hero is my uncle Scott Dansby because he came down from Lowndes-boro Alabama so he could clean up condos and hotels. He left his family to clean up Panama City Beach. He has been work-ing a lot lately. Also, hes been getting a lot done. I think hes almost free to go back home. Ive been waiting waiting wait-ing to talk to him while hes working. „ Jackson Ross, 9 € € €My hurricane hero is my family because they gave free food out. The free food was sausage, biscuits, muffins, orange juice and lemonade. We had people pull in and eat the free breakfast we cooked. Also my family helped me be safe all the way through the hurricane. „ Jemma Smith, 9 € € €My hurricane hero is Carlyn Minke because she took us in when we had nowhere else to stay. She planned tons of fun stuff for us to do. Although there were only little kids, I still had a blast. I am very thankful for Carlyn. She was so nice about it and tried to take the horrible thoughts off our minds. There was a lot of damage where we live but we were so happy when our house wasnt damaged. „ Jackson Danbury, 9 € € €My Hurricane Michael heroes are my moms friend and my dad because my moms friend allowed us to stay in her condo while the hurricane hit PCB. The next two days my dad went back to PCB and helped out with some stuff at our house and then went to my grandparents house and helped there with the house and roof. Then he came back, and the next day we went back home and worked to fix the fences. „ Max Leonard, 10 HURRICANEFrom Page C4

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** The News Herald | Saturday, November 10, 2018 D1 LOCAL & STATE FAITH | D5$526,000 TOTAL IN GIFTSKOC presents home to Bay priest a er hurricane By Tony Simmons747-5080 | @PCNHTonyS tsimmons@pcnh.comPANAMA CITY „ In Sep-tember, the United Way of Northwest Florida kicked off its annual fundraising campaign by asking community members to write their own stories and learn the stories of others as part of an effort to collect $1.5 million in 2019.United Way President Bryan Taylor said the campaign encourages people to be their own authors, and to be in control of their circum-stances by getting the help they need.In a typical year, United Way gathers donations from workplace campaigns, sponsorships, online dona-tions and special events. The money is given directly to partner agencies in Bay, Cal-houn, Gulf, Holmes, Jackson and Washington counties. The campaign normally would have ended Dec. 31.Then Hurricane Michael hit, and everything changed. Taylor said Wednesday that the annual campaign has been suspended in favor of provid-ing immediate and ongoing relief to hurricane victims.Todonate via text toward the Hurricane Michael Disaster & Relief Fund,text NWFLunitedŽ or Donations to United Way go toward hurricane recoveryUnited Way of Northwest Florida staff and volunteers pose with a truckload of hurricane relief items. [CONTRIBUTED PHOTO] See SERVICE, D2By Katie Landeck@PCNHKatieL | klandeck@pcnh.comBAY COUNTY „ One month after Hurricane Michael devastated the regions housing stock, Bay County officials said they are in a full-court press to bring housing options to the area.Our primary focus is long-term housing, and getting affordable and workforce housing here,Ž County Manager Bob Majka said. We need to get that portion back here.ŽBay County has been approved for direct housing assistance, which includes options such as money to fix houses and trailers, by FEMA and is in the process of getting those programs up and running.Currently, the county and FEMA are vetting trailer parks that have empty existing pads where FEMA trailers could be placed, accord-ing to Majka.We did some research to identify the number of empty exist-ing trailer pads (and) are getting those properties registered to take direct housing,Ž Majka said, adding that FEMA has County seeking sites for FEMA trailers See HOUSING, D2State, U.S. Department of Education o cials visit Bay, Panhandle schoolsBy Genevieve Smithgsmith@pcnh.com | @ PCNHGenevieveSPRINGFIELD „ On Thursday morning, Florida Department of Education Chief of Staff Kathy Hebda and Chancellor Hershel Lyons, and U.S. Depart-ment of Education Assistant Secretary of Elementary and Secondary Education Frank Brogan visited School Avenue in Springfield to observe storm damage and assess the needs of the district.School Avenue is home to Rutherford High School, Everett Middle School and Springfield Elementary School, all of which sustained damage from Hurricane Michael.Its hard to believe the devastation,Ž said Brogan, after finally seeing in person what he said he had been viewing over the television for weeks, describing the infrastructure damage from significant to devastating.Brogan has had ample experience working with recovering school districts around the country after experiencing destructive storms and wildfires.Brogan traveled to the Panhandle to meet with edu-cational leaders to discuss what barriers already have been identified, and to see what kind of support the Department of Education can offer the area to get schools and their campuses back to where they were operating before the storm.I give incredible credit to the leadership of this part of the state for their resilience and flexibility and understanding,Ž he said. People are going to have to be flexible and work together and thats exactly whats happening.ŽAfter viewing the schools in Panama City and hearing form area administrators, the group headed to Jackson County to meet and speak with superintendents from Jackson, Calhoun, Franklin, Gadsden, Gulf, Holmes, Liberty and Washington counties.A very important part of this visit is to also hear from the education leadership as to what kinds of things they might need as they continue to help people get back to a normal existence,Ž said Brogan.It is too soon to know specifics on what sort of resources will be heading into the district to offer this sup-port and how much the area will be awarded monetarily, but Brogan said the process for facilitating funds will begin soon.Once Congress recon-venes, a big part of what they will do is start to look at how they can put the financial packages together through the appropriations process,Ž said Brogan. Much of that will come through the U.S. DOE (Department of Education) for educational purposes, and we will put them into good use in what are called restart and recovery grants.ŽThese grants will be distributed to target identified needs in the educational system to accommodate the unique post-storm situation, Brogan said.In the past, sizable grants have been used for operational purposes. According Hard to believe the de vastationBay District Schools superintendant Bill Husfelt, left, U.S. Department of Education Assistant Secretary Frank Brogan, center, and Rutherford High School Principal Coy Pilson at Rutherford on Thursday. [JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] CELEBRATE COMMUNITY Celebrate Community is a partnership between The News Herald and local businesses to highlight the things that make this area u nique. CE Email story ideas to Jan Waddy at jwaddy@pcnh.com.See VISIT, D2

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** D2 Saturday, November 10, 2018 | The News HeraldRutherford High School Principal Coy Pilson takes a sel“ e with Bay District Schools Superintendant Bill Husfelt, Everitt Middle School Principal Phillip Mullins and representatives from the U.S. Department of Education at Rutherford on Thursday. [JOSHUA BOUCHER/THE NEWS HERALD] 850strongŽ to 41444. Donations also can be made through the web-site, UnitedWayNWFL.org.Taylor said people wanting to help should donate cash to large-scale relief organizations like the American Red Cross, United Way of Northwest Florida or the Salvation Army.The best way to help immediately is through cash donations,Ž Taylor said. I know people dont want to hear that, but Im sorry, its the truth. Organizations that are here helping, organizations that are suffering in town, they need money to stand their operations back up.ŽThe Public Eye Soar projection art festival in downtown Panama City will take donations for the United Way of Northwest Florida during tonights event. The presenter, The Public Eye production company, usually accepts donations to defray the costs of put-ting on the free event, but the organizers wanted to focus on aiding local recovery this year.(United Way was) here before the storm, and theyre certainly not going away any time after the storm,Ž said event co-founder Margaret Potter Webster. They support the agencies that support our community.ŽNiki Kelly, executive director of Girls Inc. of Bay County, one of the United Way of Northwest Florida affiliated agencies, said in a recent Facebook post that United Way is going out of their way to take care of the hard-est hit members of our community.Ž They lost their office in this storm,Ž Kelly added. Many of their employees have severe damage to their homes. And yet they continue to work tirelessly for our community. What-ever old stories you may have heard about other United Ways, that is not our United Way. If you really want to help those in need donate to United Way of North-west Florida.Ž SERVICEFrom Page D1people looking at the sites.An added bonus, he said, is using existing sites likely will lower the cost for taxpayers. Officials have said each FEMA trailer costs about $300,000, despite the fact FEMA buys base model trailers. The site work, including making the pads, drives up the price in addition to wrap-around services the agency provides. Then FEMA is required to return the site to its original state, unless the property owner agrees to leave it as-is, officials have said.Using already existing pads could eliminate much of that labor and potentially speed up the process.Officials also are pursuing new options such as tiny houses.There currently are about 450 people staying at the American Red Cross shelter, and an untold number doubled up in friends and family members homes, living in unsafe houses or living in tents.While the short-term conversations are largely focused on the housing needs right now, Majka said there also are conversations about the long-term and how to prevent a tragedy on this scale again.We are going to be looking at our current building codes,Ž he said.A top priority will be mitigation and risk reduc-tion to hopefully minimize the damage if another storm of this scale whips through the area. Buildings that are more than 51 percent damaged will have to brought up to code. We want to make sure what comes back is more resilient,Ž Majka said. That includes the housing, infrastructure, economy and social ser-vices like the hospitals.Ž HOUSINGFrom Page D1to Brogan, while FEMA handles brick and mortar, infrastructure issues,Ž money through the DOE helps operation needs in schools and school systems.For example, Brogan expects there to be a need to accommodate early childhood programs, many of which have been eliminated after the hur-ricane. New needs are also expected to crop up with the double sessions for middle and high school students using the same facility.A great deal of it is not what we can provide, its what people need,Ž said Brogan. Then, shape those words in a way that will give them not only the dol-lars, but also the flexibility.We are actively engaged in those conversations every day,Ž he said.Visits like this will help the department push the dollars to where they are needed, once they become available.People a lot of times think schools are just where their children go to learn,Ž he said. But oftentimes, they dont really understand what important places they are to entire communities.ŽWhile parents are faced with a variety of tasks to get their own lives back on track, such as dealing with insurance and repairs or even finding new jobs, Brogan said people rely on schools to keep their chil-dren safe.You forget that when your children go off to school to get an education, theyre also cared for and that does allow you to do those things.Ž VISITFrom Page D1United Way of Northwest FloridaWhat: A service organization that supplies resources to other area service organizations; its mission is to enrich lives by fostering and uniting resources with those in need.Ž How to donate: Text NWFLUnited or 850Strong to 41444; or visit the website UnitedWayNWFL.org

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** The News Herald | Saturday, November 10, 2018 D3 6 a.m Noon6 p.m Low Hazard Medium Hazard High Hazard Water closed to public Dangerous Marine Life High Low 56/39 58/44 58/37 59/45 60/47 58/39 59/42 61/42 63/43 54/34 61/43 59/41 63/43 64/46 65/48 65/48 66/46 62/4667/5675/6466/4055/42Times of clouds and sun Cloudy with some rain and a t-storm T-storms possible in the morning Breezy with periods of sun6255615646Winds: ENE 4-8 mph Winds: SSE 8-16 mph Winds: NNW 12-25 mph Winds: N 10-20 mph Winds: NNE 10-20 mphBlountstown 10.17 ft. 15 ft. Caryville 7.99 ft. 12 ft. Clairborne 34.80 ft. 42 ft. Century 6.04 ft. 17 ft. Coffeeville, AL 9.05 ft. 29 ft. Through 7 a.m. Fri.Apalachicola 3:32a 11:43a 7:05p 11:15p Destin 10:57p 9:21a ----West Pass 3:05a 11:16a 6:38p 10:48p Panama City 10:08p 8:56a ----Port St. Joe 9:13p 6:08a ----Okaloosa Island 9:30p 8:27a ----Milton 12:33a 11:42a ----East Bay --11:12a ----Pensacola 11:30p 9:55a ----Fishing Bend --10:46a ----The Narrows 12:30a 12:46p ----Carrabelle 2:07a 9:30a 5:40p 9:02pForecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. 2018FirstFullLastNew Nov 15Nov 22Nov 29Dec 7Sunrise today ........... 6:03 a.m. Sunset tonight .......... 4:49 p.m. Moonrise today ........ 8:44 a.m. Moonset today ......... 7:24 p.m. Today Sun. Today Sun.Clearwater 77/65/pc 80/71/pc Daytona Beach 75/66/pc 77/71/pc Ft. Lauderdale 86/75/pc 84/78/pc Gainesville 70/51/pc 74/62/pc Jacksonville 68/51/pc 70/62/pc Jupiter 85/74/pc 83/76/pc Key Largo 84/76/pc 83/78/pc Key West 85/77/pc 84/79/s Lake City 68/49/pc 69/59/pc Lakeland 80/63/pc 80/69/c Melbourne 82/69/pc 81/74/pc Miami 87/74/pc 85/77/pc Naples 84/69/pc 86/72/pc Ocala 73/53/c 77/62/pc Okeechobee 85/66/pc 82/70/pc Orlando 79/64/pc 79/69/pc Palm Beach 85/75/pc 83/78/pc Tampa 80/64/pc 82/70/c Today Sun. Today Sun.Baghdad 73/55/pc 73/55/s Berlin 57/41/c 55/46/pc Bermuda 77/72/t 76/68/pc Hong Kong 80/73/c 81/73/s Jerusalem 64/52/pc 64/51/pc Kabul 63/40/s 61/40/s London 57/48/t 56/47/sh Madrid 57/53/sh 63/48/pc Mexico City 73/50/pc 74/50/pc Montreal 39/23/sf 32/22/pc Nassau 85/75/pc 86/75/pc Paris 56/51/sh 58/51/sh Rome 68/51/pc 69/51/pc Tokyo 70/58/pc 67/58/pc Toronto 37/27/pc 38/29/c Vancouver 49/35/pc 49/36/pc Today Sun. Today Sun.Albuquerque 55/36/s 55/27/s Anchorage 32/29/pc 39/36/sn Atlanta 51/34/s 53/41/pc Baltimore 44/26/s 48/30/s Birmingham 48/30/s 56/42/c Boston 51/32/pc 45/31/s Charlotte 53/27/s 52/35/s Chicago 32/25/pc 40/24/c Cincinnati 38/21/pc 46/30/pc Cleveland 37/25/pc 41/28/c Dallas 52/43/c 53/41/pc Denver 55/23/s 30/16/sn Detroit 39/26/sn 40/29/c Honolulu 82/70/c 81/72/pc Houston 56/44/c 56/52/r Indianapolis 35/22/pc 43/28/pc Kansas City 37/28/pc 44/23/pc Las Vegas 68/46/s 64/41/s Los Angeles 79/53/s 76/50/s Memphis 43/28/s 49/35/pc Milwaukee 33/25/pc 40/25/c Minneapolis 26/21/pc 31/17/pc Nashville 41/24/s 53/37/pc New Orleans 58/49/pc 63/59/sh New York City 45/34/pc 45/35/s Oklahoma City 49/36/pc 47/33/pc Philadelphia 45/30/s 47/33/s Phoenix 79/54/s 76/48/s Pittsburgh 34/22/pc 41/26/pc St. Louis 37/26/s 45/31/c Salt Lake City 49/29/s 44/24/s San Antonio 53/44/c 57/51/c San Diego 76/54/s 74/56/s San Francisco 68/47/s 71/45/s Seattle 49/36/pc 50/38/pc Topeka 41/27/pc 45/24/c Tucson 77/47/s 72/39/s Wash., DC 47/32/s 49/36/sSundayMondayTuesdayWednesday Gulf Temperature: 74 Today: Wind from the north at 10-20 knots. Seas 2-4 feet. Visibility clear. Wind from the northeast at 8-16 knots. Seas 1-3 feet. Partly cloudy. Tomorrow: Wind from the east-northeast at 6-12 knots. Seas 1-3 feet. Visibility generally unrestricted.Partly sunny today. Winds north-northeast 8-16 mph. Partly cloudy tonight. Winds northeast 6-12 mph.High/low ......................... 78/68 Last year's high/low ....... 70/60 Normal high/low ............. 75/53 Record high ............. 84 (1986) Record low ............... 29 (1976)24 hours through 4 p.m. ... 1.16" Month to date .................. 4.19" Normal month to date ....... 1.12" Year to date ................... 54.04" Normal year to date ....... 53.71" Average humidity .............. 92%through 4 p.m. yesterdayHigh/low ......................... 80/74 Last year's high/low ....... 71/60 Normal high/low ............. 72/56 Record high ............. 82 (1942) Record low ............... 21 (1976)24 hours through 4 p.m. .. 0.03" Month to date .................. 2.40" Normal month to date ....... 1.04" Year to date ................... 50.67" Normal year to date ....... 54.18" Average humidity .............. 87%PANAMA CITY Port St. Joe Apalachicola Tallahassee Perry Quincy Monticello Marianna Chipley DeFuniak Springs Pensacola FORT WALTON BEACH Crestview Destin Carrabelle Mobile Bainbridge ValdostaFLORIDA CITIESCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W WORLD CITIESCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W NATIONAL CITIESCity Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W TODAY FIVE DAY FORECAST FOR NORTHWEST FLORIDAHigh LowREGIONAL WEATHERWeather(W): ssunny, pcpartly cloudy, ccloudy, shshowers, tthunderstorms, rrain, sfsnow ” urries, snsnow, iice. Shown is todays weather. Temperatures are todays highs and tonights lows.Shown are todays noon postions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.TIDESMARINE FORECASTBEACH FLAG WARNINGSThe higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index’ number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High; 11+ Extreme10 a.m.Noon2 p.m.4 p.m.UV INDEX TODAYALMANACSUN AND MOON MOON PHASESRIVER LEVELS Offshore Northwest Florida Flood Level StageApalachicola Choctawhatchee Alabama Escambia Tombigbee Temperatures PrecipitationPanama CityTemperatures PrecipitationFort Walton BeachGuidelines and deadlines Obituaries may be e-mailed to pcnhobits@pcnh.com or delivered to The News Herald, 501 W. 11th St., Panama City. newsherald.com/obituaries. OBITUARIESFrederick Hyatt, 90, of Panama City, Florida, went to be with the Lord on Monday, Nov. 5, 2018. He was born Sept. 13, 1928, in New Harmony, Indiana, and was the second of 10 children. After high school, he enlisted into the Army, Navy, and then the Air Force, in which he served in for more than 20 years. After his father died, he always made sure his mom and siblings were taken care of. After retiring from the Air Force, Fred and his wife, Margie, operated a gas and grocery store in Youngstown, Florida. He served as the City Clerk of Callaway, Florida, and was active in the Lions Club. Many residents of Panama City know Fred as a tax preparer for H&R Block. He was a well-respected tax preparer for 30 years, right up until he went into the hospital. He was preceded in death by his wife, Margie; parents, Paul and Nola Hyatt; sisters, Roberta and Shirley Ann Hyatt; brothers, Kenny and Donnie Hyatt; and son-in-law, Daniel Langston. Those left to cherish Freds memory include his daughter, Teresa Langston; sons, Timothy (Dagmar), Anthony (Toni) and Ronald Hyatt; grandchildren, Bridgett Gibson (Kenneth), Emma, R.J., Bryce, Racheal and Ethan Hyatt; greatgrandchild, Ava Hyatt; sisters, Jean Basham and Linda Brown (Bill); brothers, Paul (Naomi), Charles and Larry (Julie) Hyatt; sistersin-law, Joyce Perdew, Cheryl Mabe (Allen) and Faye Harman; brother-in-law Russell Pfeffer; and numerous nieces and nephews. Serving as pallbearers are Michael Golden, Jerry Perdew, Scott Brown, R.J. Hyatt, Bryce Hyatt and Ethan Hyatt. Funeral services will be at 11 a.m. Saturday, Nov. 10, 2018, at Heritage Funeral Home with the Rev. William Pfeffer officiating. Interment will follow at Evergreen Memorial Gardens. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to the American Cancer Society. Those wishing to extend condolences may do so at www. heritagefhllc.com. Heritage Funeral Home & Cremation Services 247 N. Tyndall Parkway Panama City, FL 32404 850-785-1316 heritagefhllc.comFREDERICK HYATT1928 … 2018Visitation for Glenda M. Bice, 82, who died Nov. 7, 2018, will be from 2-4 p.m. today, Nov. 10, 2018, at the residence of Glenn Bice. Graveside services will begin at 2:30 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 11, 2018, at Buckhorn Cemetery in Wewahitchka, Florida. To extend condolences, visit www. heritagefhllc.com.GLENDA M. BICE Memorialization for Louis P. McCoy, 84, of Panama City, Florida, who died Nov. 6, 2018, will be by cremation. To extend condolences, visit www. heritagefhllc.com.LOUIS P. MCCOYTerrence L. TerryŽ Ramsey, 70, of Niceville, Florida, died Saturday, Oct. 27, 2018.To extend condolences, visit www.mclaughlin-twincities.com.TERRENCE L. TERRY RAMSEYRobert Allen Piatt, 79, of Panama City Beach, Florida, passed away on Monday, Nov. 5, 2018.He was born on Sept. 7, 1939, in Wheeling, West Virginia, to Martin S. and Hilda A. Piatt. He was a staff sergeant for the United States Navy and United States Army.He is survived by his wife, Rosa Marie Piatt of Florida; one son, David Garry Piatt of Pennsylvania; grandchildren, Jessica Piatt, David Piatt II and Andrew Piatt; one brother, Charlies Piatt of Delaware; four sisters, Rose Stillings of Delaware, Mildred Rose (Sketter), Cecelia Bailey of Maryland and Midge Gram of Tennessee; and four stepchildren, Franklin Robinson, Contessa Robinson Webb, Eric and Janell Lott, and Melvin and Rosa Hinton.A celebration of life will be held at 2 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 10, 2018, at AmVets Post 47, 8317 Front Beach Road #14, Panama City Beach, Florida. Wilson Funeral Home Family Owned Since 1911 214 Airport Road Panama City, FL 850-785-5272ROBERT ALLEN PIATT

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** D4 Saturday, November 10, 2018 | The News Herald NATION & WORLD DATELINESMOGADISHU,SOMALIA NEWYORKPipebombsindictmentcarries potentiallifeprisonsentenceThemanaccusedofsendingpipebombstoprominentcriticsofPresidentDonaldTrumpwasindictedFridayonchargescarryingapotentialmandatorypenaltyoflifeinprison.The30-countindictment againstCesarSayocwashandedupinManhattanfederalcourt,whereSayocmadeaninitialappearanceearlierthisweekafterhewasbroughttoNewYork.Sayoc,56,was arrestedOct.26inFloridaonfivechargescarryingapoten-tialsentenceuponconvictionofnearly50years.Ifconvictedofallchargesintheindictment,Sayocwouldfaceamandatorylifeprisonsentence.AuthoritiessaidhesentexplosivedevicestonumerousDemocrats,criticsofTrumpandCNN.MONTGOMERY,ALA.ExecutionsetforAla.inmate convictedofkillingteenAlabamahassetanexecutiondateforaninmatesentencedtodeathforthe1995fatalstabbingofa15-year-oldgirl.TheAlabamaSupreme CourtsetaFeb.7executiondateforDominiqueRay.TiffanyHarvilledisappearedfromherSelmahome onJuly15,1995.Herdecomposingbodywasfoundinafieldamonthlater.Raywasconvictedin1999 afterco-defendantMarcus OwdentestifiedthatRaycut thegirlsthroatafterthey pickedherupfromherhome andrapedher.Owdensaid theyalsotookthegirlspursewhichhad$6or$7init.AjudgesentencedRaytodieafterjurorsvoted11-1torecommendthathereceivethedeathpenalty.URBANA,OHIOShots“redatOhiocollege leadtolockdown,2arrestsGunshotsfiredinsideador-mitoryatasmallliberalarts collegeincentralOhiohaveresultedinalockdownandthearrestoftwostudents.TheUrbanaDailyCitizen reportsUrbanaPoliceChiefMattLingrellsaysnoonewasinjuredTuesdayafternoonatUrbanaUniversity,roughly45mileswestofColumbus.Theschoolwasplacedonlockdownafterpolicearrived.Twostudentswere subsequentlyarrested. Eighteen-year-oldHunter Donnan,ofHuberHeights, hasbeenchargedwithtraffickingmarijuana,and 21-year-oldRyonLucas,of Trotwood,withaggravatedrobbery.Lingrellsaysadditionalchargesarepossible.WAYNESVILLE,N.C.NorthCarolinamanpunches bearinnose;getsbiteonhipNorthCarolinamansayshedukeditoutwithamotherblackbearwhenitcharged himasheworkedinhisdriveway.WLOS-TVinAsheville reports78-year-oldSonny Pumphreywasathishome Tuesdaywhenhenoticedtwobearcubsnearhim.Thosebearsranoff,butthemotherbearsoonshowedup.Pumphreysaidasthe bearpreparedtoattack,he puncheditrightdeadon thepointofthenose.ŽHe saidthebearfellbackdown ontoallfoursandbithiminthehip.Thebearranoffafter Pumphreyswifecameoutofthehouseandfiredashotintotheair.AMMAN,JORDANFloodskill9inJordan,visitor s seekhighgroundinPetraFlashfloodscausedb y heavyrainacrossJorda n killedninepeopleFrida y andforcedhundredsoftour-iststoseekhighergroundi n thekingdomsancientcit y ofPetra,thegovernmen t spokeswomansaid.Abouttwodozenpeopl e werehurtanddozensmor e evacuatedfromtheirhome s inseverallocationsinth e kingdom,asfloodwatersroserapidly.Amateurvideopostedonlin e showedapowerfultorren t rushingthroughthesteep,narrowcanyonthroughwhic h visitorsreachtheTreasury, themainattractioninPetra,anancienttradinghubcarve d fromrose-coloredrock. TheAssociatedPressAgroupofmencarryawayaninjuredcivilianwho waswoundedinabombblastFridayinMogadishu, Somalia.PolicesayfourcarbombsbyIslamic extremistsexplodedoutsideahotelintheSomalia capital,killingatleast20peopleandinjuring17.After thethreeexplosionsinfrontoftheSaha“Hotel,a fourthblasthitasmedicsattemptedtorescuethe injured.Somalisecurityforcesshotdeadfourgunmen whounsuccessfullytriedtostormthehotel.[AP]LONDONJoJohnson,aministerintheBritishgovernment, steppeddownFridaytoprotestPrimeMinisterTheresa MaysBrexitplanandisbackingcallsforasecond referendumonwhetherthecountryshouldleavethe EuropeanUnion.Johnson,youngerbrotherofformer ForeignSecretaryBorisJohnson,saidthewithdrawal agreementbeingdiscussedbyEUandBritishleaders wouldgreatlyweakenBritainandrequirethecountry tofollowEUruleswithouthavinganysay.[AP]CAIROInthisSept.28photo,a“shermanpaddleshisboat pastdestroyedbuildingsonthecoastoftheportcity ofHodeida,Yemen.HundredsofthousandsofYemenis fromtheHodeidaareahavebeenforcedto”eeamid aSaudi-ledcoalitionoffensivetotakethekeyRed SeaportcityfromShiiterebels,theUnitedNations refugeeagencysaidFriday,as“ercebattlescontinue torageinthearea.Some445,000oftheHodeida governoratesresidentshave”edsinceJune.[AP]Abramscampaign triestondanyballots thatcouldhelpher closegapinunsettled raceforgovernorByBillBarrow andJeffMartinTheAssociatedPressATLANTA„Volunteers spreadoutFridaytryingto findanyballotsthatcouldhelpDemocratStaceyAbramsclosethegapagainstRepub-licanBrianKempintheir unsettled,too-close-to-callraceforGeorgiagovernor.Unofficialreturnsshow Kempwithanadvantage, andhesalreadyresignedas secretaryofstatetostarta transitionwiththeblessing oftheoutgoingGOPgovernor,NathanDeal.President DonaldTrumpweighedin withatweetthatsaidKempranagreatraceinGeorgia-hewon.Itistimetomoveon!ŽYetAbrams,whohopestobecomethenationsfirst b lackfemalegovernor,sentoutvolunteersandcampaignstaffinsearchofvotesthat shehopescouldstilltiltthemargintowardher.Inafranticefforttomakesureeverypossiblevote iscounted,dozensofvolunteersconvergedonawarehouse-turned-phone b ankneardowntown.Thegoal:reachvoterswhousedaprovisionalballottomakesuretheytakestepstoensuretheirvote„forAbramsorKemp„iscountedbyFridayevening,thedeadline.HelenBrosnanoftheNationalDomesticWorkersAlliancestoodonachairandshouted,Howmanycalls doyouthinkwecanmake? Canwemakehundredsofcalls?Letsdothis!ŽAmajority-blackcounty withmorethan750,000 residentsinmetroAtlanta,DeKalb,saiditwouldremainopenpastnormalhoursFridaytoaccommodatepro-visionalvoterswhoneeded toprovideidentificationsotheirvotescouldbecounted.ButtwogroupssupportingAbramscalltocountall votes,ProGeorgiaandCareinAction,saidatleast12othercountieshadcertifiedelectionresultsbeforeFriday,amovethatcouldleaveprovisional ballotsuncounted.Thesec-retaryofstatesofficedidnotimmediatelyrespondtoanemailseekingcomment.Abramslawyersareexploringoptionstoensureallvotesarecounted.Hercam-paignleaderssaytheybelievesheneedstopickupabout25,000votestoforcearunoff.Atleast2,000peopleacrossthenationareinvolvedinthateffort,saidstateSen.NikemaWilliams,theGeorgiadirec-torforCareInAction,whichadvocatesformorethan2milliondomesticworkersandcareworkersnationwide. WereinthecradleoftheCivilRightsmovement,the homeofCongressmanJohn Lewiswholiterallybledon thebridgeatSelmatomake surethateverybodyhadtherighttovote,Žshesaid.MarisaFranco,27,sawafriendsFacebookpostabouttheeffort,thenshowedupatthewarehousetovolunteerFridaymorning.Ithinkthatitsreallycentraltodemoc-racythateverybodywhoiseligibletovotecanvoteand hastheleastamountofbar-rierspossible,soImjustheretomakesurethatevery votecounts,Žshesaid. RacesforgovernorandU.S.SenatealsoaretightinFlorida,whichTrumpreferredtoina tweetthatsaid:YoumeantheyarejustnowfindingvotesinFloridaandGeorgia-buttheElectionwasonTuesday?LetsblametheRussiansanddemandanimmediateapologyfromPresidentPutin!ŽTrumpsmessagerefers toallegationsthatRussianinterferencehelpedhimwinin2016,butitwasntclear exactlywhatthepresident meantaboutvotesbeingfound.ReturnsshowKempwith50.3percentofalmost4millionvotes,aroughly63,000-voteleadoverAbrams.Thatsa narrowsum,consideringthenear-presidentialelectionyearturnout,thoughsufficientforthemajorityrequiredforoutrightvictory.TheAssociatedPresshasnotdeclaredawinnerintheraceforGeorgiagovernor.TheAPwillreassesstheraceonTuesday,thedeadlineforcountiestocertifyelectionresultstothestate.Withlegalwranglesopen-ingandAbramsshowingnosignsofconceding,thedis-puteisprolongingabitter contestwithhistorical significanceandnationalpoliticalrepercussions.Abramscampaignmanager,LaurenGroh-Wargo, saidKempwastoblamefor problemsbecausehewasthe secretaryofstate,Georgiastopelectionofficial,andtriedtotampdownminorityvotes.ThesesuppressivetacticsarereminiscentoftheOldSouth,tacticsthathavebeenresurrectedbyBrianKemp,whoforcedthestatetoallowhimtooverseehis ownelection,andhadhim bethedecideronwhowasthewinner,Žshesaid. V olunteerssearchforvotesinGa. HelenBrosnan,oftheNationalDomesticWorkersAlliance,trainsvolunteerswhoareworkingthe phonesFridayinanAtlantawarehouse,wheretheyarefranticallytryingtoreachGeorgianswho votedwithprovisionalballotstomakesuretheirvotesarecounted.[JEFFMARTIN/THEASSOCIATEDPRESS]

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** The News Herald | Saturday, November 10, 2018 D5 FAITHStephanie Nusbaum, Faith editor snusbaum@pcnh.com, 850-747-5073 Calendar submissions: pcnhnews@pcnh.comNews Herald staff reportTo submit items for the Faith Calendar, email pcnhnews@pcnh.com with Faith CalendarŽ in the sub-ject line. Wednesday, Nov. 14JAZZ FOR THE SOUL: Gathering at 6:45 p.m., worship service at 7 p.m. at Gulf Beach Presbyterian Church, 271 S. State 79, Panama City Beach. Come as you are for coffee, conversation, music, prayer and more, all in a casual caf setting. Gathering begins at 6:45 p.m., with worship service at 7 p.m. The jazz service is led by the Rev. Michael Askew with the music of jazz pianist Amanda Matthews. Guest musician will be saxophonist Jeff Peacock. Communion is celebrated at this service. For details, 850-234-3161 Friday, Nov. 16ANNUAL BAPTIST COLLEGE OF FLORIDA HOLIDAY HERITAGE FESTIVAL: 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Historic Heritage Village off Sanders Avenue in Graceville. Enjoy craft demonstrations, cane grinding and syrup making; College Choir and Orchestra in the R.G. Lee Chapel at 9:30 a.m.; demos of pottery, blacksmithing, quilting, soap making, and other crafts. Sample chili, hot dogs, chicken purlieu for sale. Proceeds go to the BCF scholarship fund. For details, 850-263-3261, ext. 416.Wednesday, Dec. 12 SIXTH ANNUAL BETHLEHEM CHRISTMAS VILLAGE: Dec. 12-15 at Capt. Andersons Marina, 5550 N. Lagoon Drive, Panama City Beach. A recreation of the ancient village, with storytellers, re-enactors and choirs sharing the story of the birth of Jesus.FAITH CALENDAR Today I met two people who are staying near me, about 35 miles from Panama City, in places friends or loved ones have made available to them. My family and I were blessed by an angel from Opp, Alabama, who is letting us stay in her cozy bungalow near Seaside. It is the very place we vacationed for a short break this summer, and now temporarily call our home. Today I was heading from ourŽ bungalow to Panama City Beach,looking for a good place to have breakfast. I was going to the VA Outpatient Clinic Im using now since the clinic on Tyndall Air Force Base is shut down from damage. Using my trusty Trip Advisor app, I found a place that was on my way. A mom and pop storefront restaurant, just the kind I like to investigate. So Itook a seat at Jessies Place. I ordered the Big Breakfast. I normally only eat half of what I order and bring the rest to eat later, doubling the blessing. But, half way into this one, I just had to keep eating. After a few minutes, an older distinguished man sat beside me. We struck up a conversation, and among other things I discovered he is, as am I, a Red Cross volunteer and a Rotarian. Russ hails from Brookfield, Connecticut, where he serves as the Housatonic Valley Rotary Club president. Im a member of the downtown Panama City club, and we just happened to have our first gathering at the Shrimp Boat that evening. This was planned as a laidback mixer/social event. The other clubs in Bay County were invited. I thought it perfect and invited him to join us. He immediately agreed, and said he knew where the Shrimp Boat was. Later that evening, when I arrived looking for him, I found him already there, mixing comfortably with those present, like hed always been with us. Russ Cornelius is my Glory Sighting this week, while in a sense representing the many just like him. Like so many who have descended upon our area ransacked by a storm, he was here as a volunteer with the Red Cross. There are literally thousands like him down here. Many have descended on us looking to make some bucks on our misfortune. Many, though, are doing good work, and we need them. They are welcome and many are very helpful, but how can we ever share our gratitude with the thousands who are not just volunteering their time and expertise to help us out, but are spending their own money to do so, asking for nothing? The Red Cross has been here since the beginning and no doubt will be here until the end, however many years that might take. I asked Russ to share his most memorable occasion, thus far. He shared his immense concern for our recovery, and reflected on the long road ahead of us, and the mental and emotional strain we all face. He then shared a moving story, that Im sure is just an example of our many good Samaritans. The Red Cross was touring one of the many trailer parks thatwas torn to shreds, but people were still living in them, as they have no option. The Red Cross helped save a dear lady who was stuck in a trailer, literally, after it was demolished by the storm. She had been stuck in it for a couple days, but they found her in time to save her, and freed her. This reminded me of Al Lanes story at Storquest I shared last week. While the way ahead is hard to even think about, we are making great strides every week, from such help as FEMA, the Salvation Army, the Red Cross, and the list goes on. These organizations are just coming down to help, to give. Theyll give until they are spent. They are helping us find each other, and through them we are given hope that we will recover. If each day is made just a little better and improved from the previous, then each day our hope is strengthened that we will reconstruct our lives, our careers, our homes and our communities. Singing along with Ray Boltz the song comes to mind, Thank you, Russ, for giving to the Lord. I am a life that was changed. We are so glad you came.Ž When you catch a Glory Sighting, let me bring it into the light by sharing it with this column via jack@jackstanley.org, Facebook at ParkerPastor, calling 871-4747 or on the web at mypumc. org. The Rev. Jack Stanley serves as pastor of the UMC of Parker.GLORY SIGHTINGSRed Cross shines glory across Bay County Jack Stanley PR NewswirePANAMA CITY „ A new home for a pastor displaced by Hurricane Michael was part of $526,000 in giving that Knights of Columbus Supreme Knight Carl Anderson distributed on a recent visit to the dev-astated Panhandle.Anderson met with Pensacola-Tallahassee Bishop William Wack to present a gift of $100,000 to help the diocese rebuild or repair churches and schools. He then person-ally delivered a 29-foot camper trailer to the Rev. Anthony Nguyen, pastor of Sts. Peter and Paul Church.Located in Panama City, Sts. Peter and Paul Church is mostly Viet-namese. Fr. Anthony had been sleeping in a classroom inside the parish hall since Hurricane Michael destroyed the rectory last month.It will be nice to have a home to sleep in tonight,Ž said Fr. Anthony.The camper includes a bed and shower, living space and a small kitchen for cooking and eating.Anderson said the gift was appreciated by parishioners as well because it means their pastor will remain nearby.The gift of the camper trailer is an important sign of recovery for the parish families and com-munities of Sts. Peter and Paul,Ž said Anderson. It is the Knights unique mission to serve Catholic religious institutions like Sts. Peter and Paul in such times of disaster.ŽAlong with the presentation of the camper trailer, the Knights of Columbus made several monetary donations to assist Catholics in the area.They included $25,000 to Lovers of the Holy Cross, a religious community of sisters whose convent was decimated during the hurricane, and $10,000 to Catholic in America, a TV station whose operations also were leveled. Singular contributions totaling $345,000 were made to indivi dual parish and school hurricane relief projects.Bishop Wack said the Knights visit and the involvement of Knights volunteers from around Florida and other states has been a critical part of the rebuilding process.For us its important to have not just the local Knights involved, but also Knights from the state and national level as well,Ž said Bishop Wack. Its impor-tant because we feel like were all alone. Its been critical for our morale but also just literally to help us rebuild.ŽProviding relief from natural disasters is a key part of the Knights goal to put their faith into action. Both young and old mem-bers of the Knights and Knights of Columbus insurance agents have been on site since the hur-ricane hit, helping with cooking and distributing food and other supplies to as many as 4,000 people a day.We talk about evangelization all the time, and then it comes to our doorstep,Ž said the Rev. Michael Nixon of the Knights assistance. Fr. Nixon is pastor of St. Dominics Parish in Panama City, which also experienced extensive damage.So far this year, the Knights of Columbus has raised almost $1.2 million for disaster relief in several states. In addition to the efforts in Florida, the Knights responded to the damage caused by Hurricane Florence in Sep-tember to make a donation of $100,000 to the Diocese of Raleigh, North Carolina.Joining Supreme Knight Anderson on the journey was Knights of Columbus Supreme Master Dennis Stoddard and Florida State Deputy Donald Kahrer.KOC presents home to Bay priest after hurricaneDuring the visit, Supreme Knight Anderson and Bishop William Wack of the Diocese of Pensacola-Tallahassee survey some of the damage caused by Hurricane Michael. The Knights made donations of $526,000 to assist with the rebuilding of churches and schools. [PHOTO COURTESY OF KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS]

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** D6 Saturday, November 10, 2018 | The News HeraldWRITE TO US: Letters should not exceed 300 words and include the writers name, address and phone number for veri“ cation. Letters may be edited for clarity and brevity. Guest columns of up to 600 words may be submitted as well. Write: Letters to the editor, The News Herald, 501 W. 11th St., Panama City, FL 32401 Email: pcnhletters@pcnh.com The gunman who killed 12 people at a country music bar in Southern California went on social media during the attack and posted about his mental state and whether people would believe he was sane, a law enforcement official said Friday. Also, one of the possibilities investigators are looking into is whether gunman Ian David Long believed his former girlfriend would be at the bar, the official said. Richard Weber: 307th mass shooting in the United States this year! almost one for every day of this year. Wake up conservatives, theres a massacre coming to your hometown soon! Forget marijuana control, we need to control the tools of death, guns, available on every street corner.Ž During normal business days, Seventh Seal operates by appointments only, which owner Jerry Pipkins said prehurricane, were lined up until February. Now without places to live, many of his regulars are canceling. Without appointments to rely on, Pipkins has no idea what his monthly finances will look like. To supplement, Pipkins has opened the shop to walk-ins, which has inspired a trend „ tattoos to commemorate the disaster. Steve Hough: I dont have a tattoo, and some displayed are not my cup of tea, but I was thinking the other day about a commemorative tattoo in the aftermath of Hurricane Michael. I probably wont follow through, but I hope business is booming.Ž Since 2016, Courtney and Daniel Ross have been t raveling into hurricane disaster areas „ like those left by Hurricanes Matthew, Harvey and, most recently, Florence „ looking to help survivors. Their cause has grown into a disaster recovery, nonprofit mens addiction recovery program called The Recovery Ranch, based out of Santa Ynez, California. Tim Morgan: I am so thankful for this team of men that came to our aide when we needed it the most. Like many Bay Countians, after Michael hit I helped family and neighbors recover from the devastation of Michael. My mission was to help as many people get food and water and other resources as quickly as possible. This team from California provided food every day and always served with gladness and joy. Not only did they serve three meals a day, the food was exceptionally tasty and filling. I am so thankful for them and told them so everyday I saw them. Many in our community deal with addictions and strive one day a a time. These men demonstrated how its done; through service and love and compassion for your fellow man.ŽREADER FEEDBACK ANOTHER VIEWAlmost half of Americans cannot name a single right protected by the First Amendment. We wouldnt expect people to recall all five rights, but here they are: € Freedom of the press. € Freedom of religion. € The right to petition the government to redress grievances. € The right of peaceful assembly. € Freedom of speech. The Freedom Forum has released its annual State of the First Amendment report based on a survey of over 1,000 adults. Here are some of the less-than-encouraging findings: € 40 percent could not name a single freedom protected by the First Amendment. € 36 percent could name one freedom. € 12 percent could name two freedoms. € 8 percent could name three freedoms. € 3 percent could name four freedoms. € And just one person „ out of 1,000 people surveyed! „ could name all five rights. Of those who could name a single freedom, most named freedom of speech.Ž But 9 percent incorrectly named the right to bear arms, which is the Second Amendment. This underscores the need to do a better job of teaching civics and promoting civic education in public schools; its now required by law in Florida, but not in every state. Social media has increased the spread of news and information, but it also has turbocharged the spread of conspiracy theories. Why? Too often theyre more interesting than actual facts. Connecticut teacher Chris Doyle recently wrote in Education Week that too many students are unable to distinguish truth from fiction. Doyle noted that some students have actually asked him whether 9/11 was an inside job; others have wondered whether the Newtown school shooting was a hoax. Despite my efforts to set the record straight,Ž Doyle wrote, my students seem primed to believe anything or nothing may be true.Ž Added Doyle: A post-truth mentality is the toughest problem Ive encountered as a teacher because it portends the end of history, serious thought and democracy.Ž It should be noted that sober objectivity was not exactly common during the founding of our country; there were plenty of untrue rumors about the Founding Fathers „ yet they still supported a free press in America. The alternative „ a press controlled by the government „ is the first step down the road to tyranny. Trump and the likeability factor The Wall Street Journal does not endorse in presidential races, so its interesting to read its opinion section each day in an effort to size up how it regards President Donald Trump. The Wall Street Journal Editorial Board has praised Trumps judicial picks, his tax cuts and his foreign policies „ but it has blasted his chaoticŽ governing style and what it sees as a willingness to fawn over dictators. Its telling that the boards mixed views about Trump mirror many polling stats on the president. Can a president with such a high like his polices „ but not him personallyŽ percentage win re-election, particularly when his first victory was so close?OUR VIEWMany Americans clueless about freedomsAdriana Cohen Syndicated ColumnistNow that Attorney General Jeff Sessions is out at the Department of Justice and President Donald Trump has installed Matt Whitaker „ Sessions former chief of staff „ as his acting replacement, anti-Trump forces are seeing red. Some on the left are accusing the president of firing Sessions to obstruct special counsel Robert Muellers ongoing investigation, while others are saying Whitaker must recuse himself for having expressed opinions about the scope of Muellers probe. Both are false narratives designed to protect and empower the special counsels fanged cabal of Trump-hating prosecutors while also attempting to intimidate the president. Trump would be wise not to take the bait. For starters, the attorney general serves at the pleasure of the president and can be replaced at any time for any reason. Its not unusual for an administration to make staffing changes after midterm elections. Secondly, fair-minded Americans are also questioning the unwieldy scope of the year-and-a-half-long Mueller probe, given that it has strayed far from its original mandate of investigating alleged Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential election by delving into Paul Manaforts business dealings from long ago and other matters that have nothing to do with President Trump or protecting the integrity of future elections. It does not take a lawyer or even a former federal prosecutor like myself to conclude that investigating Donald Trumps finances or his familys finances falls completely outside of the realm of his 2016 campaign and allegations that the campaign coordinated with the Russian government or anyone else,Ž Whitaker wrote in an op-ed for CNN in August 2017. It also doesnt go unnoticed that the special counsels investigation, despite having unlimited resources and turning over every stone, has not produced a scintilla of evidence of Russian collusion with the Trump campaign. Hence, Whitaker and others have naturally questioned whether Mueller and his henchmen are engaging in a political fishing expedition, which some on the left are now saying is grounds for Whitakers recusal „ a ridiculous and partisan notion, given that these are the same Democrats who insisted that Peter Strzok and Lisa Page, who expressed extremely partisan anti-Trump sentiments in a slew of text messages, could do their jobs without letting their political opinions and biases interfere with their duties of overseeing both the Hillary Clinton email investigation and the Trump campaign investigation. Two sets of rules? Clearly. If Strzok, Page, James Comey, James Clapper, John Brennan and other former powerful figures in U.S. intelligence agencies and elsewhere within the Department of Justice were allowed to have partisan opinions, the new acting attorney general should be, too. Then theres the chatter about whether the attorney general should be loyal to the president or not. Democrats and their media lap dogs are trying to have it both ways by insisting that any attorney general in the Trump administration must serve the country and have a fidelity to our laws and not his or her boss. Sounds noble, but the rest of us know that former Attorneys General Eric Holder and Loretta Lynch and other high-ranking officials within the deep state under Democrat Barack Obama were fiercely loyal to him. To think or say otherwise would be disingenuous. With the Mueller probe now squarely back in the spotlight, acting Attorney General Matt Whitaker and the president should stay the course and not accept two sets of rules „ one for them and another for Democratic administrations. Whats good for the goose is good for the gander. Adriana Cohen is a syndicated columnist with the Boston Herald. Follow her on Twitter @AdrianaCohen16. To find out more about Adriana Cohen and read her past columns, please visit the Creators Syndicate webpage at www.creators.com.Whitakers allowed to have an opinion Tim Thompson | Publisher Will Glover | Managing Editor Mike Cazalas | Editor PANAMA CITY VIEWPOINTS

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** The News Herald | Saturday, November 10, 2018 D7 ByMarleyJayTheAssociatedPressNEWYORK„U.S. stocksfellFridayasa combinationofweak economicdatafromChinaanddisappointingearningshurttechnologyandinternetcompanies. Crudeoilpricesfellforthe10thdayinarow. AutosalesinChinafellinOctoberforthefourthmonthinarowandare down13percentfroma yearago,thelatestsign itseconomyisunderpressure.ConcernsaboutChinaseconomyanditstradedisputewiththe U.S.contributedtothe globalstockmarketskid inOctober.Thestocks thatfaredtheworstduringthattimeincludedtechandinternetcompa-niesandretailers,which alltooksharplossesFriday.Chinahasplayedsuchacriticalroleindrivingglobalgrowth,Žsaid KristinaHooper,chie f globalmarketstrategistforInvesco.(Investors)arehavingconcernsthatthesetariffwarsareessentiallygoingtokickChinawhenitsdown.ŽU.S.crudeoilslipped 0.8percenttoextendits losingstreak.Itsfallenforfiveweeksinarowandtumbled21percentsinceOct.3.Energycompanieshavesufferedsteeplossesduringthattime.Weakforecastsfrom companiesincluding videogamecompany ActivisionBlizzardand chipmakerSkyworks Solutionsalsocontrib-utedtoFridaysdecline.TheS&P500index dropped25.82points,or 0.9percent,to2,781.01. TheDowJonesIndustrialAveragefell201.92points,or0.8percent,to25,989.30.TheNasdaqcompos-itesank123.98points,or1.6percent,to7,406.90.TheRussell2000indexo f smallercompaniesgave up28.72points,or1.8percent,to1,549.49. TheLaborDepartmentsaidwholesalepricesin theU.S.jumped,andHoopersaidthatcouldbelinkedtothetariffdisputeaswell.Wholesalepricesrosebythemostinsix yearsinOctoberasgas,food,andchemicalpricesincreased.TheLabor Departmentswholesale priceindexhasclimbed 2.9percentoverthelastyear. Stocks skidas techfalls; oilplunge continues PresidentDonaldTrump,”ankedbyCommerceSecretaryWilburRoss,left,andEnergySecretaryRickPerry, isseenMarch24,2017,intheOvalOf“ceoftheWhiteHouseinWashingtonduringtheannouncingofthe approvalofapermittobuildtheKeystoneXLpipeline.AfederaljudgeinMontanahasblockedconstruction ofthe$8billionKeystoneXLPipelinetoallowmoretimetostudytheprojectspotentialenvironmental impact.[EVANVUCCI/ASSOCIATEDPRESSFILEPHOTO] ByMatthewDalyTheAssociatedPressWASHINGTON„InasetbackfortheTrumpadmin-istration,afederaljudgehas blockedapermitforconstructionoftheKeystoneXL oilpipelinefromCanadaand orderedofficialstoconductanewenvironmentalreview.EnvironmentalistsandtribalgroupscheeredtherulingbyaU.S.districtjudgeinMontana, whilePresidentDonaldTrumpcalleditapoliticaldecisionŽandadisgrace.ŽThe1,184-milepipeline wouldbegininAlbertaand shuttleasmuchas830,000barrelsadayofcrudethroughahalfdozenstatestoterminalsontheGulfCoast.Trumphastoutedthe$8 billionpipelineaspartofhispledgetoachieveNorthAmer-icanenergydominanceŽandhascontrastedhisadministrationsquickapproval oftheprojectwithyearsof delayunderPresidentBarackObama.TheTrumpadministration hasnotsaidwhetheritwould appealthenewruling.The StateDepartmentsaiditwas reviewingthedecision,but declinedfurthercomment,citingongoinglitigation.Thepipelinewasfirst proposedbyCalgary-based TransCanadain2008.Ithas becomethefocalpointofadecade-longdisputethatpitsDemocrats,environmental groupsandNativeAmerican tribeswhowarnofpollutionandincreasedgreenhousegasemissionsagainstbusiness groupsandRepublicanswho cheertheprojectsjobsandpotentialenergyproduction.U.S.DistrictJudgeBrianMorrisputaholdontheprojectlateThursday,rulingthattheStateDepartmenthadnotfullyconsideredpotentialoilspillsandotherimpactsasrequiredbyfederallaw.Heorderedthedepartmenttocompleteanewreviewthataddressesissues thathaveemergedsincethelastenvironmentalreviewwascompletedin2014.Newtopicsincludethe cumulativeeffectsongreenhousegasemissionsof KeystoneXLandarelated pipelinethatbringsoilfromCanada;theeffectsofcurrentoilpricesonthepipelines viability;updatedmodeling ofpotentialoilspills;andthe projectseffectoncultural resourcesofnativetribesand othergroupsalongthepipe-linesroute.Thereviewcouldtakeuptoayeartocomplete.Environmentalistsand NativeAmericangroupshadsuedtostoptheproject,citingpropertyrightsandpossiblespills.BeckyMitchell,chair-womanoftheNorthernPlainsResourceCouncil,aplaintiffinthecase,saidherorganization isthrilledwiththeruling.ThisdecisionsendsTrans-Canadabacktothedrawing board,ŽMitchellsaid,callingtherulingtheresultsofgrass-rootsdemocracyinaction,winningforwaterandpeople.ŽTransCanadasaidinastate-mentthatitwasreviewingthejudges54-pagedecision.Weremaincommittedtobuildingthisimportantenergyinfrastructureproject,ŽTrans-CanadaspokesmanTerryCunhasaid.Environmentalgroupsdeclaredvictoryandpredictedthelong-delayedprojectwillneverbebuilt.Thecourtrulingmakesit clearonceandforallthatits timeforTransCanadatogive upontheirKeystoneXLpipe dream,ŽsaidDougHayes,aseniorattorneywiththeSierraClub,thenationslargestenvi-ronmentalgroup.Thefightovertheprojecthasspannedseveralpresiden-ciesandinvolvedstandoffs betweenprotestersandlawenforcement.Afteryearsoflegalwran-gling,Obamarejectedapermitforthepipelinein2015.The companyrespondedbyseek-ing$15billionindamages.Trumpsignedexecutiveactionstoagainadvancecon-structionoftheprojectin2017. Pipelinesetback MARKETWATCHDow25,989.30201.92 Nasdaq7,406.90123.98 S&P2,781.0125.82 Russell1,549.4928.72 NYSE12,537.5284.52COMMODITIES REVIEWGold1,206.4016.50 Silver14.103.283 Platinum856.0014.30 Copper2.6865.0505 Oil60.190.48ByJoeMcDonaldTheAssociatedPressBEIJING„LuYushan,a retiredsalesman,hasadviceforinvestorsinChinasslump-ingstockmarket:Sell.Lussharessoaredoverthepastdecade.Butthe65-year-oldcashedoutthisyear,drivenawaybyplungingprices, insidertradingscandals,a coolingeconomyandatariffwarwithWashington.Investorsshouldgetout,Ž saidLu,watchingflickeringpricesonawall-mounteddis-playataBeijingbrokerage.Iamherejustforfunandnotto makemoney.ŽPresidentXiJinpingsgovernmentisstruggling,withlimitedsuccess,todispelsuchgloomandtalkstockprices backupwithpromisesoftax cuts,morebanklendingand amediacampaignledbyitseconomyczar.ThebenchmarkShanghaiCompositeIndexsank30per-centfromJanuarythroughmid-October.PricesfellsofarthatChinagaveupitsstatusastheNo.2marketbysharevalueaftertheUnitedStatesanddroppedtothirdplacebehindJapan.Theindexhasgained5percentsincelateOctoberbutistheworldsworstperformerthisyear.Theslumpaddstochallengesforcommunistleaders astheytrytoshoreupeconomicgrowthandcarryonatariffwarwithU.S.PresidentDonaldTrumpoverBeijingstechnologypolicy.Italsoputsakinkinplans forstateindustrytouse sharesalestopaydowna multibillion-dollarmountainofdebtandmodernize.Chinasmarketsareunusualamonglargecountries.Createdtoraisemoneyforstateindustry,theyhaveagrowingnumberofprivatefirmsbut stillaredominatedbygovernmentcompaniessuchas oilgiantPetroChinaLtd.andChinaMobileLtd.,theworldsbiggestphonecarrier.Pricesreacttopolicy changesinsteadofeconomic performance.Conditions abroadhavelittleinfluence becauseChinesemarketsare keptwalledofffromglobal financialflows.Ahandfulof U.S.andEuropeanfinancial firmshavebeengrantedthe statusofdomesticinvestors since2002butthemainclass ofAŽsharesisoff-limitstomostforeigninvestors. Chineseleadersstruggle todispelstockmarketgloom WorldmarketsHowkeyinternationalstock marketsperformed:Amsterdam AEX 0.2% 528.48 529.55 Brussels BEL20 0.1% 3,552.23 3,556.31 Frankfurt DAX 0.0% 11,527.32 11,529.16 HongKong HangSeng -2.4% 26,227.72 25,601.92 London FTSE100 -0.5% 7,140.68 7,105.34Milan FTSEMIB -0.9% 19,429.14 19,258.11 Paris CAC40 -0.5% 5,131.45 5,106.75 Sydney ASXAllOrdinaries -0.1% 6,015.90 6,011.00 Tokyo Nikkei -1.1% 22,486.92 22,250.25 Zurich SwissMarketIndex -0.2% 9,094.90 9,074.03 %change Previousclose Todaysclose BUSINESS WHATTOWATCHFORMONDAY€VeteransDay(observed)„Bondmarket closed.MARKETMOVERS€YelpInc.,down$11.57to $ 31.93: Theonlinereviews companysrevenueand forecastsfellfarshortof WallStreetforecasts. €WaltDisneyCo.,up$2 to$118: Theentertainmentcompanydiscloseda larger-than-expectedpro“t asitsmoviesperformed wellattheboxof“ce.BRIEFCASEWASHINGTONWholesalepricesjump, butpressureslooktameLedbycostliergas,food,andchemicals,U.S.wholesalepricessurged 0.6percentinOctober, thebiggestmonth-to-monthriseinsixyears.Yetexcludingitemsthattendtofluctuatesharplyfrommonthtomonth,inflationpressuresremaintame.Thejumpinthepro-ducerpriceindex,whichmeasurespricesbefore theyreachconsumers, followedasmaller0.2percentincreaseinSep-tember.Comparedwith 12monthsearlier,pro-ducerpricesroseasharp2.9percentinOctober.Butwhenfood,energyandothervolatilecatego-riesareexcluded,so-calledcorewholesalepricesroseonlyamodest0.2percentinOctoberand2.8percentfromayearearlier.BEIJINGChinaautosalesfallin Oct.,deepeningslumpChinasautosalessankforafourthmonthinOctoberasanunexpect-edlypainfulslumpintheglobalindustrysbiggestmarketdeepened.PurchasesofSUVs,sedansandminivanscon-tracted13percentfroma yearearliertojustover2 millionunits,theChinaAssociationofAutoManu-facturersreportedFriday.AutodemandhadbeenforecasttoweakenafterBeijingclampeddownon b anklendinglatelastyeartocooladebtboom.Buttheslumpissharperthanexpected,prompting expectationsregulatorsmighttrytopropupsaleswithtaxcutsorotherincentives.NEWYORKMeredithtosellFortune brandfor$150millionMediaandpublishinggiantMeredithCorp.saysitissellingitsFortune b randfor$150millionincashtoFortuneMediaGroup.Thedeal,subjectto regulatoryapproval,is expectedtoclosebytheendoftheyear.MeredithsaidFridayitwillusetheproceedstopaydowndebt.FortuneMediaGroupisownedoutrightbyThai b usinessmanChatchavalJiaravanon,apartowneroftheinternational conglomerateCharoenPokphandGroup. TheAssociatedPress Montanajudgeorders environmentalreview ofKeystoneXLproject

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** The News Herald | Saturday, November 10, 2018 E1 SPORTS PREP | E2FOOTBALL PLAYOFFSPort St. Joe, Blountstown begin playo quests. See how they fared By Dustin Kent747-5065 | @PCNHDustinKent dkent@pcnh.comMARIANNA „ Ruther-ford and Marianna faced off Friday night for the second week in a row in the first round of the Region 1-4A playoffs at Bulldog Stadium. The Rams were hoping for a different ending in the sequel to last weeks 26-12 Bulldogs victory in the regu-lar season finale. Instead, what they got looked a lot more like a remake. Marianna notched its second straight win over Rutherford 31-20 to advance to the region semifinals. The No. 4 seed Bulldogs improved to 5-5 and will next play top seed Raines on Nov. 16 in Jacksonville. Ruther-fords season ends at 2-7. Damon Rolle was the star for the Bulldogs on Friday night, breaking off three long touchdown runs and finishing with 197 yards on 10 carries. Ahmad Johnson also rushed 11 times for 50 yards and Jeremiah Castro eight times for 37 yards. Montell Bouie was the top ground gainer for the Rams with 51 yards and a touchdown on five attempts. Reggie Tubbs completed 12 of 21 passes for 162 yards and a touchdown, though he also was picked off three times, twice by Jaden Smith. Just as they were in last weeks loss, the Rams errors proved too costly to overcome. A lot of turnovers tonight with the interceptions, some bad snaps,Ž Rutherford coach Loren Tillman said. We were definitely more prepared this week, but Marianna also didnt have to play three ballgames in eight days. Hats off to them, they played really well. (Rolle) is More of the sameRutherfords KJ Williamson blocks Mariannas Brady Donaldson on Friday at Marianna. [PATTI BLAKE/THE NEWS HERALD] The Associated PressSOUTH BEND, Ind. „ Sam Mustipher gets to run out of the home tunnel one final time for No. 3 Notre Dame tonight against Florida State.The graduate center just never thought hed be snap-ping the ball to senior Brandon Wimbush again.With Ian Book nursing an injury, Wimbush is expected to be the starting quarterback when the Fighting Irish (9-0, No. 3 CFP) face the Seminoles (4-5).Coach Brian Kelly indicated Wimbush has been getting the majority of Mustiphers snaps this week with the No. 1 offense and that freshman Phil Jurkovec has increased his work load after Book suffered an upper-body injury while accounting for 399 total yards and a victory-securing touchdown run in Notre Dames 31-21 win last week at Northwestern.The Irish believe they can continue their quest for their first national championship in 30 years with Wimbush running things„ and he is likely to run if he can. Mustipher reminisced this week about Wimbushs breakout performance „ 207 rushing yards and four touchdowns in a 49-20 victory last season at Boston College.(Wimbush) took over that game,Ž Mustipher said. He made some moves Ive never seen a quarterback make in a game. Hes a great player and a great young man. Hell be suc-cessful in whatever he decides to do in life.ŽThe Irish, of course, just want Wimbush to be success-ful against a Seminoles defense that has been stingy against the run.Opponents are averaging just 2.84 yards per carry (sixth-best nationally) and 111.1 yards per game (17th) against end Brian Burns (13.5 tackles for loss) and behemoth tackles Demarcus Teammates support Wimbush as No. 3 Irish welcome SeminolesNotre Dame quarterback Brandon Wimbush looks to throw against Vanderbilt. [AP PHOTO/NAM Y. HUH, FILE] Bulldogs win rematch with Rams, 3120 The News HeraldJAY „ Bozeman surrendered four first-half turnovers and James Eddings had four scoring runs for Jay as the Royals whipped theBucks49-0 on Friday night in the first roundof the Class 1A high school football playoffs.The Bucks were unable to reverse a late-season trend and finished 2-7 with five consecu-tive losses, threesince resuming practice following Hurricane Michael.Jay, 6-4, moved on to meet Vernon next week in a region semifinal.It wasnt so much the fact that Bozeman fell behind by four touchdownsmidway through the second quarter, but how the Bucks faltered that confounded head coach Jason Griffin, whoseteam made a rare postseason football appearance for the school.We gave them the ball inside our 20 three times and gave themeasy scores,Ž Griffin said. It was one of those things where something happens and it just snowballs.ŽAn interception return for a touchdown immediately put Bozeman in a hole. Two lost fumbles, recovered by the Royals Tyler Sorrells and Trace Seib, then led to touchdown runs byEddings. The three turnovers produced a 21-0 defi-cit for the Bucks.Another interception by Jay, the Bucks fourth turnover, resultedin Eddings third TD run, this one from 4 yards and it was 28-0. Eddings fourth TD, a 16-yarder, and Trevor Flow-ers fifth extra point brought on a running clock in the third quarter.Despite the lopsided result, Griffin was steadfast in his praise for his players.What I told the kids was with the adversity they faced,for them to come together and stick it out I couldnt be prouder of a group of young men,Ž Griffin said. They were committed to Bozeman football and to each other.And for them to make the playoffs. This group will always be special to me.ŽJay, Eddings overpower BozemanFlurry of turnovers too much for Bucks to overcome See FSU, E3 See FOOTBALL, E2

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** E2 Saturday, November 10, 2018 | The News HeraldBy Tim CroftThe Port St. Joe Star | 850-227-7827 @PSJ_Star | tcroft@starfl.comPORT ST. JOE „ The Tiger Sharks had by far the larger and more lethal bite Friday night. Port St. Joe dominated the Bulldogs of Liberty County in every way possible on a foot-ball field, putting the game out of reach in the opening period, triggering a running clock by halftime and beginning the Region 2-1A playoffs with a resounding 69-0 victory. The win advances Port St. Joe a matchup next week with either Blountstown or Cotton-dale at Shark Stadium. The teams respective seed-ing, No. 1 Port St. Joe and No 8 Liberty County (2-8), were on full display on a dreary drizzly night, the game starting as the field was still being drained of torrential rain that fell for hours before kickoff. Not that it seemed to have mattered one bit to the Tiger Sharks (9-0) who started ablaze and could have con-tinued adding points if Coach Greg Jordan hadnt called off the heat in the second half. We try to instill in our guys that we expect a certain level of play regardless of the compe-tition,Ž Jordan said. We took care of the football on a wet night, didnt have any penalties and they kind of shot themselves in the foot a little bit. The whole deal was to make it to next week. The level of competition will certainly be different. It should be a great atmosphere and a great game.Ž A microcosm of Fridays contest arrived over a roughly three minute stretch bridging the first and second periods. Already leading 14-0 with 1:30 left in the opening stanza, the Tiger Sharks scored 21 points with just two offensive plays. Khayyan Zacarro rumbled 23 yards for a touchdown after a short Liberty County punt; Joel Bogaert added the extra point. On Liberty Countys second play of the ensuing drive the ball came out and Kendre Gant, who had missed a punt return touchdown earlier after dropping the ball out of bounds, scooped up the fumble and dashed 14 yards to the end zone. Bogaert made it 28-0 and after a Bulldog three-and-out, Kelvin Griffin broke over right tackle, spun away from a tackler who had him by the shoulder pads, and dashed 33 yards for the touchdown. And, to add ice to the out-come, over the final 10 minutes of the half Port St. Joe scored three more times: Gene Quinn took another fumble on a backward pass 21 yards for a touchdown, Caleb Butts scored on a 5-yard run and Aiden Quinn went over from the 4. The Tiger Sharks finished the half with just 16 plays, but 192 yards. Liberty County, which advanced no further than its 31 yard line on offense, its only first down courtesy a Port St. Joe penalty, finished the half with minus-4 net offensive yards. The second half was all run-ning clock. Antwon Jackson dashed 29 yards for a third-quarter touchdown and Octavyous Russ added a 60-yard scoring jaunt. Zacarro opened the scor-ing with a 1-yard run and Josh Butts added a 15-yard touch-down pass to Isaiah Wright in the opening quarter. We started a new season this week,Ž Jordan said. If we do our jobs we have three region games at home, but well take them one at a time. We need to execute and play to the level we are capable of.ŽPort St. Joe demolishes Liberty CountyThe News HeraldBLOUNTSTOWN „ As it turned out, the annual Blountstown-Port St. Joe showdown only was delayed, not discontinued.The Class 1A Panhandle powers will meet next week in a Region 2 semifinal as Blountstown pulled away fromvisiting Cotton-dale 28-6 on Friday night. Coupled with Port St. Joes convincing win over Liberty County, the Tigers and Tiger Sharks again willdecide a region finalist.This years matchup has the added dimension of former Blountstown head coach Greg Jordan, who piloted the Tigers to last years state championship game, now running the Port St. Joe sideline.Blountstown, 8-2,took charge quickly with a first-quarter touchdownin this one, butCottondale was resilient and trailed only 6-0 at halftime, The Hornets, 4-3, then closed within 14-6 in the third quarter by using a timeconsuming ball control offense.Blountstown quarterback Trent Peacock added scoring runs of 26 and 6 yards for his second and third touchdowns of the gameto clinch the outcome. Peacock also had a conversion run and passed to Treven Smith for another conversion.Montavious Brown opened the scoring for the Tigers with a 1-yard plunge. The conversion failed and the Tigers led 6-0 at halftime despite theHornetshaving a whopping 18 minutes and 29 seconds time of possession to 5:31 for Blountstown.Peacock scored his first touchdown on a 19-yard run and passed to Smith to make with 14-0 with 7:48 left in the third quarter. Jalen Reddings 9-yard TD run sliced the lead to 14-6 for Cottondale, but Peacocks late touchddowns left no doubt.Peacock rushed 11 times for 126 yards and completed 5 of 6 passes for 71 more. Redding had 32 carries for 139 yards to pace the Hor-nets and Dalvin Barnes had 14 carries for 45.Alex Sanchez and Zeb Kelley each had 11 tackles and Joseph Rector 10 for Blountstown. Danian St.Fleur and Eriq Hen-dricks each had 6 stops for Cottondale. Vernon 40, Chipley 0VERNON „ It was eerily similar tothe blowout win on Sept. 14. And just as convincing.Vernon, 7-2, continued the momentum first estab-lished when it humbled Chipley on Sept. 14 to earn a Class 1A semifinal berth next week when it hosts Jay. The Yellowjackets prevailed by buildinga 27-0 lead in the first half againstChi-pley, which ended 4-5.At that point, they had outscored their county rival 81-0 over six quarters by adding totheir 54-0manhandling two months ago. Vernon used scoring runs of 22 and 60 yards by Kwan Powell, and an interception return for a touchdown by Elijah Neal to build its cushion.Tyler Watford added ascoring run and Neal had a 60-yardTD receptionto close the scoring. Jefferson County 35, Wewahitchka 16MONTICELLO „ Wewa-hitchkas season ended 5-5 as Jefferson County built a 21-0 lead by halftime.Any chance for the Gators to mount a stunning rally ended shortly after they had scored for the first time. Creed Pariera had a 2-yard touchdown run and Harley Redd added a conversion to close the gap to 21-8 early in the third quarter.Dashon Davis returned the ensuing kickoff 90 yards for a touchdown and Luis Jimenezs extra point rebuilt a three-touchdown edge for the Tigers, 6-4. They added another touch-down before Wewas Cody Lee tallied from 15 yards and Trevor Nunnery passed to Pariera for the conversion. Northview 40, Graceville 14BRATT „ Northview scored in the final minute of the first half on quarterback Shane Hardins 15-yard touchdown pass to open a 26-8 edge.That was significant as it followed a goal-line stand by Graceville on the Chiefs previous possession and returned momentum to the home sideline.Trent Peebles scored on a 3-yard run and Northview blocked a punt for a TD to build a 14-0 spread.Tyler Ray padded the Chiefs lead with a thirdquarter scoring run before Gracevilles Cedric Williams sprinted44 yards for atouchdown. Peebles closed the scoring from 8 yards.Graceville ended 2-7-1. Northview will take a 7-4 record into a 1-1A semifinal vs. Baker.PREP ROUNDUPBlountstown, Vernon advancea heck of a player. When he turns the corner it messes up our angles.Ž Rolles first touchdown came on a third-and-16 play on Mariannas second pos-session, as he picked his way along the left sideline before finding daylight and explod-ing past the Rutherford defense for a 61-yard score to make it 14-0. His second TD came from 53 yards out on the Bulldogs second series of the second half to make it a 24-6 advantage. Rutherford cut into the def-icit when Tubbs hit Janathan Proctor for a 31-yard completion to set up a 30-yard touchdown run by Bouie with 4:24 left in the third quarter, with Antwoine Givens 2-point conversion making it 24-14. After a failed onside kick, Marianna took advantage of the short field and paid it off with a 26-yard TD run by Rolle, the extra point by Victor Debeux making it 31-14 with 56.2 seconds on the third quarter clock. The Rams threatened to answer again with a drive inside the Marianna 25-yard line, but a deep pass down the middle by Tubbs was intercepted by Smith at the goal line and returned 35 yards with 8:02 remaining. Smith picked off Tubbs on Rutherfords next series as well, with the Rams finally adding a late touchdown on a 20-yard strike from Tubbs to Brian Edwards with 5.8 seconds on the game clock. Edwards caught six passes on the night for 64 yards and also had a 78-yard kickoff return touchdown late in the second quarter. Proctor had two grabs for 61 yards. Despite being disappointed with the final result, Tillman said he was grateful that the Rams were able to finish their season on the field, especially against a Marianna squad that was also affected by Hurri-cane Michael. Im still proud of our young men,Ž he said. Both of these communities were really impacted by the storm and both communities can be pleased with the way the boys represented their schools, their communities, and these programs.Ž FOOTBALLFrom Page E1Mariannas Elijah Peterson blocks Rutherfords Montell Bouie on Friday at Marianna. [PATTI BLAKE PHOTOS/ THE NEWS HERALD] Mariannas Brady Donaldson and Carey Grif“ n celebrate a touchdown on Friday at Marianna. Mariannas Ahmad Johnson jumps over Rutherfords Cameron Knapp on Friday at Marianna.

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** The News Herald | Saturday, November 10, 2018 E3 THISWEEKINTHE PLAYERTOWATCH DAndreSwift,RB,Georgia: Ranfora career-high156yardsandtwoTDsto helptheNo.6BulldogsbeatKentucky 34-17. E ASTCONFALL T EAMW-LW-LPFPAHOME AWAY G eorgia6-18-13431484-03-1 K entucky5-27-22221385-12-1 F lorida4-36-32751903-23-0 S outhCarolina4-35-32482233-22-1 M issouri1-45-43222483-22-2 T ennessee1-44-52192403-21-2 V anderbilt1-44-52302263-21-3 WESTCONFALL TEAMW-LW-LPFPAHOME AWAY Alabama6-09-04621274-04-0 LSU4-27-22431505-11-1 Auburn3-36-32551564-21-1 TexasA&M3-35-42632003-11-3 MississippiState2-36-32621115-11-2 OleMiss1-45-43513253-31-1 Arkansas0-52-72373032-40-2 BESTOFTHERESTThisweekendsothertopconferencegames(alltimesEST)KEYSFOR MISSISSIPPISTATE Establishtherun: The Bulldogsaresecondinthe SECinrushingatbetter than230yardspergame. Alabamaissecondinrun defense,allowing102per outing.MSUneedstosustaindrivesandeatupclock tokeepAlabamasexplosive offenseonthesideline. Stoptherun: ItsFootball 101,controlthelineofscrimmageandyouhaveachance towin.TheBulldogsare thirdinrundefense,allowing111yardspergame,while Alabamasgroundgameis pickingupsteam.MSUneeds tokeeptheCrimsonTidefrom beingbalanceonoffense. KEYSFORALABAMA Avoidthehangover: This isthesecondconsecutive physicalgamefortheCrimson Tide,whichiscomingoffabig winatLSU.Thatwasan emotionalvictoryforAlabama,whichcannotafford tooverlookthescrappy BulldogsafterclinchingaspotintheSEC ChampionshipGame. Strikefirst,strikehard, nomercy: Alabamadidnt scoreonitsopeningdrive allseasonlastweekend,but itsoffensehasbeenpretty overwhelmingallseason.The CrimsonTideshouldtryto putMSUinaholeearlyand forcetheBulldogsoutoftheir run-firstcomfortzone. PREDICTION Alabama39,Mississippi State16: TheseBulldogs haveproventhemselvesto becapableofpullingoffthe occasionalupsetandcant becountedout,butAlabamaisplayingonadifferentlevel.TheCrimsonTide putdownLSUandwilldothe sametoMississippiState. G AMEOFTHEWEEK NO.18MISS.ST.(6-3,2-3)ATNO.1ALABAMA(9-0,6-0) W hen: 3:30p.m.ESTSaturday Where: Bryant-DennyStadium,Tuscaloosa,Ala. TV: CBSPOWERRANKINGSBreakingdowntheSEC 1.Alabama(9-0): TheCrimsonTideisthe bestteaminAmerica,buttheStarkville Dogscanbiteinthisschedulespot. 2.Georgia(8-1): Foralltheseasoncraziness,Georgiavs.AlabamaistheSEC ChampionshipGameweallexpectedinthe summer. 3.LSU(7-2): WefoundoutthatCoachO ismorethanjustanickname,itsalsoa scoreboard. 4.MississippiState(6-3): MSUhasbeen movingupquietly,whichishardtodowhen youwearacowbell. 5.Auburn(6-3): CouldtheTigersbesetting upanothermiracleNovember?Roadgames likeGeorgiamakeitharder. 6.Kentucky(7-2): Thebigstageprovedtoo big.Thegoalnowisawarm-weatherbowl. 7.TexasA&M(5-4): Jimbosmakinglotsof moneyandcanaffordtobegenerous,sohe gaveAuburnanentirefootballgame. 8.Missouri(5-4): Mizzouscomputerpro“le hasexceededitswintotalsofar,butdont trytellingthattoFlorida. 9.Florida(6-3): DanMullens“rstyearat FloridaismorphingintoNickSabans“rst yearatAlabama. 10.SouthCarolina(5-3): AtleasttheGamecockswereexcitinglastSaturdaybuta returntodullnesscouldhappenquickly. 11.OleMiss(5-4): TheRebelscantwin becausetheystopnoone„buttheygo downswinging. 12.Tennessee(4-5): TheTennesseevs. Charlottegamehadtobetheworstever seen,ifanyonesawit. 13.Vanderbilt(4-5): TheCommodorescould still“ndthemselvesinabowlgame... 14.Arkansas(2-7): ...socouldtheRazorbacks,iftheybuythemselvessometickets. POWEREDBYWEEKLYE-EDITION: Formorecoverageofcollegefootballaroundthenation„plusin-depthreportsfromallofthe PowerFiveconferences„checkoutthe8-pagee-edition,Varsity,everySaturdayonourwebsite. Lastweek: 1 Lastweek: 3 Lastweek: 2 Lastweek: 5 Lastweek: 8 Lastweek: 4 Lastweek: 7 Lastweek: 10 Lastweek: 6 Lastweek: 9 Lastweek: 11 Lastweek: 12 Lastweek: 13 Lastweek: 14STANDINGSThroughNov.3PASSINGYARDS PlayerYds. JordanTaamu,MISS3,001 DrewLock,MIZZ2,394 TuaTagovailoa,ALA2,361 KellenMond,TA&M2,252 KyleShurmur,VAN2,037 PASSINGTOUCHDOWNS PlayerNo. TuaTagovailoa,ALA27 DrewLock,MIZZ19 JakeFromm,UGA17 FeleipeFranks,FLA16 JordanTaamu,MISS16 RUSHINGYARDS PlayerYds. BennySnellJr.,UK1008 T.Williams,TA&M931 ScottiePhillips,MISS923 NickFitzgerald,MSST839 NickBrossette,LSU702 RECEIVINGYARDS PlayerYds. A.J.Brown,MISS920 JerryJeudy,ALA880 KalijaLipscomb,VAN632 DaMarkusLodge,MISS584 D.K.Metcalf,MISS569 SCORING PlayerPts. ColeTracy,PK,LSU87 R.Blankenship,PK,UGA85 LukeLogan,PK,MISS85 S.Phillips,RB,MISS84 T.McCann,PK,MIZ83 ROUNDINGITOUTThisweekendsothergames SATURDAYTime(ET)MatchupTV NoonVanderbiltatMissouriSECNetwork NoonOleMissatTexasA&MCBS 7:30p.m.#9LSUatArkansasSECNetworkBYTHENUMBERSSECindividualstatisticalleadersthroughNov.3 SOUTHCAROLINA(5-3)AT NO.19ATFLORIDA(6-3) When: NoonSaturday Where: Gainesville,Fla. TV: ESPN Notes: Twoweeksagothese teamsseemedprettyfarapart. Butnow,aftertheGamecockssurvivedashootoutatOleMissand FloridagottrouncedbyMissouri, thisgamehassuddenlybecomea battleforthirdintheSECEast. NO.12KENTUCKY(7-2) ATTENNESSEE(4-5) When: 3:30p.m.Saturday Where: Knoxville,Tenn. TV: SECNetwork Notes: WiththeSECEasttitleoff thetableafterlosingathometo Georgialastweekend,theWildcatsneedtobeonthelookoutfor theroadupsetatTennessee.Even withtheEasthopesgone,theres stillalotlefttobeplayedforinBig BlueNation. AUBURN(6-3)AT NO.5GEORGIA(8-1) When: 7p.m.Saturday Where: Athens,Ga. TV: ESPN Notes: WiththeEastclinched, theBulldogsmustbecautiousto avoidaletdownagainstanAuburn teamthathasnthadthetypeof yearithopedfor.ButtheTigers havereboundedinrecentweeks, leavingtheBulldogsonhighalert tonotoverlookoneoftheirbiggest rivals. CANDOGS HAVEADAY?MISSISSIPPISTATEFACESLONGODDSAS ITFACESAROLLINGTIDEINALABAMA MississippiStatewidereceiverStephenGuidry (1)divesintotheendzoneforatouchdown againstLouisianaTechonSaturdayin Starkville,Miss.[JIMLYTLE/THEASSOCIATEDPRESS] Christmas (6-4, 305), Fredrick Jones (6-2, 304), Marvin Wilson (6-5, 317) and Cory Durden (6-5, 290). The Seminoles have piled up 25 sacks.I dont think their offense is going to change much,Ž Florida State coach Willie Taggart said. They have a capable backup quarterback thats played a lot for them and won some games for them, too.ŽFlorida State has been vulnerable through the air, allowing 282.6 yards per game and Wimbush averaged just 196.3 yards per game while throwing for one score in the three victories before he was replaced by Book, who averaged 301.8 yards and had 15 TD passes in the six victories.Brandon has handled it better than anybody else I know could have being put in that position,Ž said senior wide receiver Miles Boykin, who leads the Irish with 40 receptions for 624 yards and seven touchdowns. I havent seen him hang his head once.Ž TALE OF TWO QBsTaggart has a little quarterback dilemma of his own: whether to start junior Deondre Francois, who has completed nearly 61 percent of his passes for 2,039 yards and 13 touchdowns before leaving the 59-10 Clemson loss with a concussion, or sophomore James Blackman, who replaced Francois and threw for 421 yards and four touchdowns in Florida States 47-28 loss at North Carolina State.Well see on Saturday,Ž Taggart said.Francois, who has been receiving most of the snaps with the No. 1 unit during the open portions of the teams morning practices this week, believes it will be him.Im still the No. 1 guy „ coach Taggart continues to make that clear,Ž Francois said. James understands that, but James is always ready to go if anything hap-pens to me.Ž FSUFrom Page E1

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** E4 Saturday, November 10, 2018 | The News Herald SCOREBOARD Today AUTO RACING 7:55 a.m. ESPNEWS „ Formula One, Heineken Brazilian Grand Prix, practice, at Sao Paolo 9:30 a.m. NBCSN „ NASCAR, Monster Energy Cup Series, Can-Am 500, practice, at Avondale, Ariz. 10:55 a.m. ESPNEWS „ Formula One, Heineken Brazilian Grand Prix, qualifying, at Sao Paolo 11:30 a.m. NBCSN „ NASCAR, X“ nity Series, Whelen Trusted To Perform 200, qualifying, at Avondale, Ariz. 1 p.m. NBCSN „ NASCAR, Monster Energy Cup Series, Can-Am 500, “ nal practice, at Avondale, Ariz. 2:30 p.m. NBC „ NASCAR, X“ nity Series, Whelen Trusted To Perform 200, at Avondale, Ariz. COLLEGE BASKETBALL 3 p.m. FS2 „ Bethune-Cookman at Marquette FSN „ Regional coverage, Evansville at Xavier 5 p.m. FS2 „ CCSU at Georgetown 6 p.m. FSN „ Regional coverage, Miami (Ohio) at Butler 7 p.m. BTN „ Ball St. at Purdue FS2 „ Quinnipiac at Villanova COLLEGE FOOTBALL 11 a.m. ABC „ Wisconsin at Penn State BTN „ Illinois at Nebraska CBS „ Ole Miss at Texas A&M CBSSN „ Lafayette at Army ESPN „ South Carolina at Florida ESPN2 „ Navy at UCF ESPNU „ Tulsa at Memphis FOX „ Ohio State at Michigan State FS1 TCU at West Virginia FSN „ Kansas at Kansas St. SEC „ Vanderbilt at Missouri 2:30 p.m. ABC „ Oklahoma State at Oklahoma BTN „ Michigan at Rutgers CBS „ Mississippi St. at Alabama CBSSN „ New Mexico at Air Force ESPN „ Washington State at Colorado ESPNU „ Virginia Tech at Pittsburgh FOX „ Northwestern at Iowa FS1 „ Baylor at Iowa State 3 p.m. ESPNEWS „ East Carolina at Tulane 6 p.m. CBSSN „ Temple at Houston ESPN „ Auburn at Georgia ESPN2 „ Miami at Georgia Tech ESPNU „ South Florida at Cincinnati 6:30 p.m. FOX „ Texas at Texas Tech NBC „ Florida St. at Notre Dame SEC „ LSU at Arkansas 7 p.m. ABC „ Clemson at Boston College 9:30 p.m. ESPN „ California at USC ESPNU „ Colorado St. at Nevada ESPN2 „ UNLV at San Diego St. GOLF Noon GOLF „ PGA Tour, Mayakoba Golf Classic, third round, at Playa del Carmen, Mexico 3 p.m. GOLF „ Champions Tour, Charles Schwab Cup Championship, third round, at Phoenix 1 a.m. (Sunday) GOLF „ European PGA Tour, Nedbank Golf Challenge, “ nal round, at Sun City, South Africa MIXED MARTIAL ARTS 7 p.m. FS1 „ UFC Fight Night, prelims, at Denver 9 p.m. FS1 „ UFC Fight Night, Chan Sung Jung vs. Yair Rodriguez, at Denver NBA 7:30 p.m. NBA „ Houston at San Antonio SOCCER 6:30 a.m. NBCSN „ Premier League, Cardiff City vs. Brighton & Hove Albion 8:30 a.m. FS2 „ Bundesliga, Hoffenheim vs. Augsburg 9 a.m. NBCSN „ Premier League, Hudders“ eld Town vs. West Ham 11:30 a.m. NBC „ Premier League, Crystal Palace vs. Tottenham FS2 „ Bundesliga, Borussia Dortmund vs. Bayern Munich 9 p.m. FS2 „ Liga MX, Tijuana vs. Monarcas MoreliaON THE AIR ODDS PREGAME.COM LINE NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION TodayAt Toronto 13 218 New York Milwaukee 3 233 At LA Clippers At New Orleans 10 228 Phoenix At Chicago 5 213 Cleveland At Miami Off Off Washington At Memphis 1 209 Philadelphia At Golden State Off Off Brooklyn Houston 1 210 At San Antonio At Dallas Off Off Oklahoma City LA Lakers 5 240 At SacramentoCOLLEGE BASKETBALL TodayFAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG At Duquesne 3 William & Mary At Mississippi 13 W. Michigan At Purdue 14 Ball St At Saint Louis 10 Troy At Xavier 18 Evansville At Butler 16 Miami (Ohio) Oklahoma St 12 At Charlotte N. Iowa 4 At Texas-Arlington At Oregon St 9 Wyoming At Pepperdine 10 Cs Northridge At Portland Off North Texas At UNLV 4 Loyola Marymount Akron 7 Youngstown St Kent St 2 At Cleveland StNATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE TodayFAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG LINE At Buffalo -170 Vancouver +158 At Philadelphia -130 Chicago +120 Nashville -131 At Dallas +121 At Carolina -235 Detroit +215 At Columbus Off NY Rangers Off At Florida -170 NY Islanders +158 At Tampa Bay -300 Ottawa +270 At Boston Off Toronto Off At Pittsburgh -205 Arizona +185 At Montreal Off Vegas Off Calgary -110 At Los Angeles +100COLLEGE FOOTBALL TodayFAVORITE OPEN TODAY O/U UNDERDOG At Houston 7 4 69 Temple Michigan 36 38 47 At Rutgers At Pittsburgh 4 3 54 Va. Tech Clemson 15 19 57 At Boston Col. At Texas A&M 13 12 66 Mississippi Kentucky 3 5 41 At Tenn. BYU 13 13 59 At UMass At Virginia 24 23 60 Liberty Troy +2 1 45 At Ga. Sthrn At Iowa St 14 16 51 Baylor At UCF 25 24 64 Navy At W. Va. 13 11 56 TCU At Georgia Tech 2 3 54 Miami At Kan. St 11 10 47 Kansas At E. Michigan 13 12 43 Akron At Indiana 2 1 56 Maryland SMU 16 19 65 at UConn At Duke 12 10 58 N. Carolina At Oklahoma 17 21 79 Okla. St At Iowa 11 10 43 Nwestern At Cincinnati 7 14 55 S. Florida Ark. St 5 7 60 At CCU At Tulane 14 11 54 E. Carolina At Utah 4 3 53 Oregon Wash. St 4 6 61 At Colorado At Marshall 14 14 41 Charlotte North Texas 12 14 65 At ODU At Cent. Mich. 8 7 51 Bowl. Green At Nevada 12 14 63 Colo. St At Stanford 22 24 61 Oreg. St Middle Tenn. 16 13 48 At UTEP At Georgia 14 14 52 Auburn At Penn St 9 9 53 Wisconsin At Alabama 27 23 52 Miss. St At Air Force 12 13 56 New Mexico At Missouri 15 16 63 Vanderbilt At Nebraska 20 17 69 Illinois Purdue 9 10 59 At Minn. At Memphis 16 17 65 Tulsa At Florida 8 6 54 S. Carolina At Southern Cal 5 4 46 California Texas 1 1 62 At Texas Tech LSU 16 11 48 At Arkansas At Utah St 29 31 65 San Jose St App. St 21 19 46 At Texas State At La.-Lafayette 13 14 69 Ga. St At FAU 15 20 58 W. Kentucky La.-Monroe 3 6 62 At S. Ala. At La. Tech 26 24 52 Rice FIU 12 10 48 At UTSA At Notre Dame 16 16 51 Florida St At UAB 11 11 47 Sthrn Miss Ohio State 5 3 49 At Mich. St At Ariz. St 9 13 61 UCLA At San Diego St 18 23 53 UNLVNATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE SundayFAVORITE OPEN TODAY O/U UNDERDOG At NY Jets 7 7 36 Buffalo Atlanta 3 6 51 At Cleveland New Orleans 3 5 53 At Cincinnati At Tampa Bay 2 3 51 Washington New England 5 6 47 At Tennessee At Green Bay 7 10 47 Miami At Indianapolis 1 3 47 Jacksonville At Chicago 4 6 44 Detroit At Kansas City 15 16 49 Arizona LA Chargers 10 10 50 At Oakland At LA Rams 8 10 50 Seattle At Philadelphia 6 7 43 DallasMondayat San Francisco 3 3 44 N.Y. Giants Updated odds available at Pregame.com PRO FOOTBALL NFL All times Central AMERICAN CONFERENCE EAST W L T PCT. PF PA New England 7 2 0 .778 270 202 Miami 5 4 0 .556 187 225 N.Y. Jets 3 6 0 .333 198 213 Buffalo 2 7 0 .222 96 241 SOUTH W L T PCT. PF PA Houston 6 3 0 .667 216 184 Tennessee 4 4 0 .500 134 141 Jacksonville 3 5 0 .375 134 170 Indianapolis 3 5 0 .375 231 213 NORTH W L T PCT. PF PA Pittsburgh 6 2 1 .722 279 209 Cincinnati 5 3 0 .625 221 237 Baltimore 4 5 0 .444 213 160 Cleveland 2 6 1 .278 190 247 WEST W L T PCT. PF PA Kansas City 8 1 0 .889 327 226 L.A. Chargers 6 2 0 .750 220 180 Denver 3 6 0 .333 205 213 Oakland 1 7 0 .125 141 252 NATIONAL CONFERENCE EAST W L T PCT. PF PA Washington 5 3 0 .625 160 172 Philadelphia 4 4 0 .500 178 156 Dallas 3 5 0 .375 154 151 N.Y. Giants 1 7 0 .125 150 205 SOUTH W L T PCT. PF PA New Orleans 7 1 0 .875 279 218 Carolina 6 3 0 .667 241 232 Atlanta 4 4 0 .500 228 226 Tampa Bay 3 5 0 .375 229 275 NORTH W L T PCT. PF PA Chicago 5 3 0 .625 235 153 Minnesota 5 3 1 .611 221 204 Green Bay 3 4 1 .438 192 204 Detroit 3 5 0 .375 180 210 WEST W L T PCT. PF PA L.A. Rams 8 1 0 .889 299 200 Seattle 4 4 0 .500 188 156 Arizona 2 6 0 .250 110 199 San Francisco 2 7 0 .222 207 239 WEEK 10 Thursdays GamePittsburgh 52, Carolina 21Sundays GamesArizona at Kansas City, Noon Buffalo at N.Y. Jets, Noon Detroit at Chicago, Noon Jacksonville at Indianapolis, Noon Washington at Tampa Bay, Noon New Orleans at Cincinnati, Noon New England at Tennessee, Noon Atlanta at Cleveland, Noon L.A. Chargers at Oakland, 3:05 p.m. Miami at Green Bay, 3:25 p.m. Seattle at L.A. Rams, 3:25 p.m. Dallas at Philadelphia, 7:20 p.m.Mondays GameN.Y. Giants at San Francisco, 7:15 p.m. Open: Minnesota, Denver, Baltimore, Houston WEEK 11 Thursday, Nov. 15Green Bay at Seattle, 7:20 p.m.Sunday, Nov. 18Houston at Washington, Noon Pittsburgh at Jacksonville, Noon Tampa Bay at N.Y. Giants, Noon Dallas at Atlanta, Noon Cincinnati at Baltimore, Noon Carolina at Detroit, Noon Tennessee at Indianapolis, Noon Denver at L.A. Chargers, 3:05 p.m. Oakland at Arizona, 3:05 p.m. Philadelphia at New Orleans, 3:25 p.m. Minnesota at Chicago, 7:20 p.m.Monday, Nov. 19Kansas City vs L.A. Rams at Mexico City, 7:15 p.m. Open: Buffalo, San Francisco, Miami, New England, Cleveland, N.Y. Jets COLLEGE FOOTBALL RESULTSAll times Central (Subject to change)Nov. 6 EASTBuffalo 48, Kent State 14Wednesdays Games MIDWESTMiami (Ohio) 30, Ohio 28 N. Illinois 38, Toledo 15Thursdays Games SOUTHBethune-Cookman 28, NC Central 25, 2OTWake Forest 27, North Carolina State 23Fridays Games EASTLouisville (2-7) at Syracuse (7-2), lateFAR WESTFresno St. (8-1) at Boise St. (7-2), late COLLEGE BASKETBALL MENS BASKETBALL THE AP TOP 25 RESULTS/SCHEDULEAll times CentralThursdays GamesNo games scheduledFriday GamesNo. 2 Kentucky 71, Southern Illinois 59 No. 6 Tennessee 87, Louisiana-Lafayette 65 No. 7 Nevada vs. Paci“ c, late No. 8 North Carolina 116, Elon 67 No. 11 Auburn vs. No. 25 Washington, late No. 12 Kansas State vs. Kennesaw St., late No. 13 West Virginia vs. Buffalo, late No. 14 Oregon vs. Central Washington, late No. 15 Virginia Tech 87, Gardner-Webb 59 No. 18 Mississippi St. vs. Austin Peay, late No. 21 UCLA vs. Long Beach State, late No. 22 Clemson 71, N.C. Central 51 No. 23 LSU vs. UNC Greensboro, lateToda ys GamesNo. 3 Gonzaga vs. Texas Southern, 9 p.m. No. 9 Villanova vs. Quinnipiac at the Wells Fargo Center, 7 p.m. No. 16 Syracuse vs. Morehead State, 6 p.m. No. 19 Michigan vs. Holy Cross, 6:30 p.m. No. 24 Purdue vs. Ball State, 7 p.m. PRO BASKETBALL NBAAll times Central Central CONFERENCE ATLANTIC DIVISION W L PCT GB Toronto 11 1 .917 „ Boston 7 4 .636 3 Philadelphia 8 5 .615 3 Brooklyn 5 6 .455 5 New York 4 8 .333 7 SOUTHEAST DIVISION W L PCT GB Charlotte 6 6 .500 „ Miami 5 5 .500 „ Orlando 5 7 .417 1 Atlanta 3 9 .250 3 Washington 2 9 .182 3 CENTRAL DIVISION W L PCT GB Milwaukee 9 2 .818 „ Indiana 7 5 .583 2 Detroit 6 5 .545 3 Chicago 3 9 .250 6 Cleveland 1 10 .091 8 WESTERN CONFERENCE SOUTHWEST DIVISION W L PCT GB San Antonio 6 4 .600 „ Memphis 6 4 .600 „ New Orleans 5 6 .455 1 Houston 4 6 .400 2 Dallas 3 8 .273 3 NORTHWEST DIVISION W L PCT GB Denver 9 2 .818 „ Portland 9 3 .750 Oklahoma City 7 4 .636 2 Utah 5 6 .455 4 Minnesota 4 8 .333 5 PACIFIC DIVISION W L PCT GB Golden State 10 2 .833 „ L.A. Clippers 6 5 .545 3 Sacramento 6 5 .545 3 L.A. Lakers 5 6 .455 4 Phoenix 2 9 .182 7Thursdays GamesOklahoma City 98, Houston 80 Boston 116, Phoenix 109, OT Portland 116, L.A. Clippers 105 Milwaukee 134, Golden State 111Fridays GamesOrlando 117, Washington 108 Philadelphia 133, Charlotte 132, OT Detroit 124, Atlanta 109 Indiana at Miami, late Brooklyn at Denver, late Boston at Utah, late Minnesota at Sacramento, lateTodays GamesNew York at Toronto, 2 p.m. Milwaukee at L.A. Clippers, 2:30 p.m. Phoenix at New Orleans, 6 p.m. Cleveland at Chicago, 7 p.m. Philadelphia at Memphis, 7 p.m. Washington at Miami, 7 p.m. Brooklyn at Golden State, 7:30 p.m. Houston at San Antonio, 7:30 p.m. Oklahoma City at Dallas, 8 p.m. L.A. Lakers at Sacramento, 9 p.m. PRO HOCKEY NHLAll times Eastern EASTERN CONFERENCE ATLANTIC DIVISION GP W L OT PTS GF GA Tampa Bay 16 12 3 1 25 59 42 Toronto 16 11 5 0 22 57 41 Montreal 16 8 5 3 19 53 51 Boston 15 8 5 2 18 44 39 Buffalo 16 8 6 2 18 49 49 Ottawa 16 6 7 3 15 55 67 Detroit 16 6 8 2 14 43 57 Florida 12 4 5 3 11 38 42 METROPOLITAN DIVISION GP W L OT PTS GF GA Columbus 16 9 6 1 19 52 53 N.Y. Islanders 15 8 5 2 18 47 38 Washington 15 7 5 3 17 53 52 Philadelphia 16 8 7 1 17 53 60 Carolina 16 7 7 2 16 44 48 N.Y. Rangers 16 7 7 2 16 45 50 Pittsburgh 14 6 5 3 15 47 47 New Jersey 14 6 7 1 13 43 49 WESTERN CONFERENCE CENTRAL DIVISION GP W L OT PTS GF GA Nashville 15 12 3 0 24 51 31 Minnesota 15 9 4 2 20 46 41 Dallas 16 9 6 1 19 46 43 Winnipeg 14 8 5 1 17 41 38 Colorado 15 7 5 3 17 53 44 Chicago 16 6 7 3 15 49 60 St. Louis 13 5 5 3 13 46 48 PACIFIC DIVISION GP W L OT PTS GF GA Vancouver 17 10 6 1 21 57 58 Calgary 16 9 6 1 19 54 53 San Jose 16 8 5 3 19 53 50 Edmonton 16 8 7 1 17 45 50 Anaheim 17 7 7 3 17 41 48 Arizona 14 7 6 1 15 41 34 Vegas 16 7 8 1 15 39 45 Los Angeles 15 5 9 1 11 33 49 2 points for win, 1 point for overtime loss. Top 3 teams in each division and two wild cards per conference advance to playoffs. Thursdays Games Vancouver 8, Boston 5 Florida 4, Edmonton 1 Philadelphia 5, Arizona 4, OT Buffalo 6, Montreal 5, OT Vegas 5, Ottawa 3 Tampa Bay 4, N.Y. Islanders 2 Carolina 4, Chicago 3 Dallas 4, San Jose 3 Minnesota 3, Los Angeles 1 Fridays Games Toronto 6, New Jersey 1 Columbus 2, Washington 1 Detroit 3, N.Y. Rangers 2, OT San Jose at St. Louis, late Colorado at Winnipeg, late Minnesota at Anaheim, late Todays Games Chicago at Philadelphia, Noon Vancouver at Buffalo, Noon Nashville at Dallas, 1 p.m. Toronto at Boston, 6 p.m. N.Y. Islanders at Florida, 6 p.m. Arizona at Pittsburgh, 6 p.m. Vegas at Montreal, 6 p.m. Detroit at Carolina, 6 p.m. Ottawa at Tampa Bay, 6 p.m. N.Y. Rangers at Columbus, 6 p.m. Calgary at Los Angeles, 9 p.m. GOLF PGA TOURMAYAKOBA CLASSICFridays leaders at El Camaleon GC at the Mayakoba Resort, Playa del Carmen, Mexico. Purse: $7.2 million. Yardage: 6,987; Par: 71 (36-35) SECOND ROUND Matt Kuchar 64-64„128 Cameron Champ 68-62„130 Danny Lee 65-66„131 Whee Kim 68-63„131 Dominic Bozzelli 64-67„131 Patton Kizzire 65-66„131 Brian Gay 68-63„131 Anirban Lahiri 65-66„131 Richy Werenski 65-66„131 Jonas Blixt 69-63„132PGA TOUR CHAMPIONSCHARLES SCHWAB CUP CHAMPIONSHIPFridays leaders at Phoenix CC, Phoenix. Purse: $2.5 million. Yardage: 6,763; Par: 71 (36-35) SECOND ROUND Paul Goydos 63-65„128 Scott McCarron 65-64„129 Tim Petrovic 63-67„130 Wes Short, Jr. 70-63„133 Duffy Waldorf 68-65„133 Marco Dawson 69-65„134 Vijay Singh 67-67„134 Jerry Kelly 68-67„135 Stephen Ames 68-67„135 Kevin Sutherland 67-68„135LPGA TOURBLUE BAY LPGAFridays leaders at Jian Lake Blue Bay Golf Club, Hainan Island, China. Purse: $2.1 million. Yardage: 6,705; Par: 72 (36-36) (adenotes amateur)Third RoundGaby Lopez 70-71-66„207 Ariya Jutanugarn 69-68-71„208 Sung Hyun Park 73-72-67„212 Sei Young Kim 73-71-68„212 Jennifer Song 70-71-72„213 Chella Choi 70-72-72„214 Danielle Kang 72-74-69„215 Pannarat Thanapolboonyaras 70-76-69„215 Moriya Jutanugarn 70-71-74„215 Celine Boutier 71-72-73„216EUROPEAN TOURNEDBANK CHALLENGE Fridays leaders at Gary Player Country Club, Sun City, South Africa; Purse: $7.5 million. Yardage: 7,831; Par: 72 (36-36) SECOND ROUND Sergio Garcia, Spain 64-71„135 Louis Oosthuizen, South Africa 69-67„136 Mikko Korhonen, Finland 68-70„138 Lee Westwood, England 71-69„140 Aaron Rai, England 72-68„140 Shane Lowry, Ireland 71-69„140 Dylan Frittelli, South Africa 73-67„140 Mike Lorenzo-Vera, France 68-73„141 Matt Wallace, England 69-72„141 Branden Grace, South Africa 70-71„141 AUTO RACING NASCAR MONSTER ENERGY CUPCAN-AM 500Fridays qualifying for Sundays race at ISM Raceway, Avondale, Ariz.(Car number in parentheses)1. (4) Kevin Harvick, Ford, 139.340 mph. 2. (9) Chase Elliott, Chevrolet, 139.152. 3. (17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 139.007. 4. (12) Ryan Blaney, Ford, 138.867. 5. (88) Alex Bowman, Chevrolet, 138.739. 6. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 138.707. 7. (20) Erik Jones, Toyota, 138.344. 8. (42) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 138.259. 9. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 138.254. 10. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 138.249. 11. (21) Paul Menard, Ford, 137.889. 12. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 137.667. 13. (78) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 138.339. 14. (41) Kurt Busch, Ford, 138.180. 15. (3) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 138.069. 16. (14) Clint Bowyer, Ford, 137.878. 17. (6) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 137.767. 18. (10) Aric Almirola, Ford, 137.720. 19. (24) William Byron, Chevrolet, 137.604. 20. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 137.541. 21. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 137.531. 22. (31) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 137.342. 23. (34) Michael McDowell, Ford, 136.815. 24. (47) AJ Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 136.529. 25. (37) Chris Buescher, Chevrolet, 136.664. 26. (19) Daniel Suarez, Toyota, 136.529. 27. (32) Matt DiBenedetto, Ford, 135.916. 28. (13) Ty Dillon, Chevrolet, 135.767. 29. (95) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 135.649. 30. (43) Bubba Wallace, Chevrolet, 135.542. 31. (38) David Ragan, Ford, 135.267. 32. (00) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 134.158. 33. (15) Ross Chastain, Chevrolet, 133.482. 34. (72) Cole Whitt, Chevrolet, 133.328. 35. (23) JJ Yeley, Toyota, 133.284. 36. (97) Tanner Berryhill, Toyota, 132.202. 37. (66) Timmy Hill, Toyota, 131.114. 38. (7) DJ Kennington, Chevrolet, 130.124. 39. (51) Cody Ware, Chevrolet, 0.000.NASCAR CAMPING WORLD TRUCKLUCAS OIL 150Fridays qualifying for Friday night race at ISM Raceway, Avondale, Ariz.(Car number in parentheses)1. (18) Noah Gragson, Toyota, 136.075 mph. 2. (24) Justin Haley, Chevrolet, 135.221. 3. (51) Harrison Burton, Toyota, 134.887. 4. (52) Stewart Friesen, Chevrolet, 134.862. 5. (16) Brett Mof“ tt, Toyota, 134.821. 6. (41) Ben Rhodes, Ford, 134.731. 7. (8) John Hunter Nemechek, Chevrolet, 134.685. 8. (19) Derek Kraus, Toyota, 134.524. 9. (88) Matt Crafton, Ford, 134.399. 10. (4) Todd Gilliland, Toyota, 134.253. 11. (46) Christian Eckes, Toyota, 134.103. 12. (98) Grant En“ nger, Ford, 133.993. 13. (25) Tyler Dippel, Chevrolet, 133.874. 14. (21) Johnny Sauter, Chevrolet, 133.844. 15. (17) Tyler Ankrum, Toyota, 133.794. 16. (2) Sheldon Creed, Chevrolet, 133.705. 17. (13) Myatt Snider, Ford, 133.249. 18. (54) Riley Herbst, Toyota, 132.738. 19. (99) Chase Purdy, Chevrolet, 132.665. 20. (02) Austin Hill, Chevrolet, 132.261. 21. (20) Tanner Thorson, Chevrolet, 131.897. 22. (22) Austin Wayne Self, Chevrolet, 130.719. 23. (87) Joe Nemechek, Chevrolet, 130.714. 24. (15) Stefan Parsons, Chevrolet, 0.000. 25. (3) Jordan Anderson, Chevrolet, 130.648. 26. (38) Landon Huffman, Chevrolet, 130.270. 27. (45) Justin Fontaine, Chevrolet, 130.185. 28. (33) Jason White, Chevrolet, Owner Points. 29. (83) Dawson Cram, Chevrolet, Owner Points. 30. (49) D J Kennington, Chevrolet, Owner Points. 31. (10) Jennifer Jo Cobb, Chevrolet, Owner Points. 32. (63) Jesse Iwuji, Chevrolet, Owner Points.NHRA MELLO YELLO DRAG RACINGNHRA FINALSFriday at Auto Club Raceway, Pomona, Calif. Qualifying will continue today for Sundays “ nal eliminations.Top Fuel1. Leah Pritchett, 3.649 seconds, 329.34 mph. 2. Clay Millican, 3.702, 327.19. 3. Antron Brown, 3.704, 329.50. 4. Steve Torrence, 3.704, 327.35. 5. Blake Alexander, 3.711, 330.88. 6. Billy Torrence, 3.711, 328.86. 7. Doug Kalitta, 3.740, 319.29. 8. Richie Crampton, 3.756, 319.52. 9. Scott Palmer, 3.767, 328.38. 10. Brittany Force, 3.772, 324.28. 11. Tony Schumacher, 3.792, 326.24. 12. Terry McMillen, 3.794, 325.61. 13. Shawn Reed, 3.858, 312.35. 14. Mike Salinas, 4.211, 208.20. 15. Cameron Ferre, 4.946, 144.75. 16. Audrey Worm, 7.731, 92.70.Funny Car1. Tommy Johnson Jr., Dodge Charger, 3.881, 328.54. 2. Jack Beckman, Charger, 3.901, 323.35. 3. Robert Hight, Chevy Camaro, 3.936, 325.69. 4. Tim Wilkerson, Ford Mustang, 3.936, 305.29. 5. Ron Capps, Charger, 3.948, 320.66. 6. Shawn Langdon, Toyota Camry, 3.950, 320.97. 7. Courtney Force, Camaro, 3.965, 316.15. 8. Jim Campbell, Charger, 4.029, 307.30. 9. Ray Martin, Camry, 4.183, 259.31. 10. Bob Tasca III, Mustang, 4.217, 230.06. 11. J.R. Todd, Camry, 4.220, 310.13. 12. Terry Haddock, Mustang, 4.253, 260.56. 13. Matt Hagan, Charger, 4.256, 214.62. 14. Jeff Arend, Chevy Monte Carlo, 4.276, 255.15. 15. Bob Bode, Mustang, 4.346, 205.76. 16. John Force, Camaro, 4.386, 206.54. Not Quali“ ed: 17. Cruz Pedregon, 4.396, 204.14. 18. Jeff Diehl, 4.632, 190.35. 19. Jonnie Lindberg, 5.639, 122.74.Pro Stock1. Jeg Coughlin, Chevy Camaro, 6.527, 211.39. 2. Erica Enders, Camaro, 6.530, 211.39. 3. Jason Line, Camaro, 6.531, 211.56. 4. Tanner Gray, Camaro, 6.537, 209.59. 5. Matt Hartford, Camaro, 6.550, 211.39. 6. Alex Laughlin, Camaro, 6.550, 210.18. 7. Greg Anderson, Camaro, 6.557, 212.09. 8. Bo Butner, Camaro, 6.558, 211.03. 9. Chris McGaha, Camaro, 6.560, 211.89. 10. Drew Skillman, Camaro, 6.562, 211.43. 11. Deric Kramer, Camaro, 6.570, 210.50. 12. Alan Prusiensky, Dodge Dart, 6.590, 209.20. 13. Kenny Delco, Camaro, 6.612, 208.55. 14. Fernando Cuadra, Camaro, 6.615, 209.88. 15. Val Smeland, Camaro, 6.697, 207.27. 16. Joey Grose, Camaro, 6.738, 196.36. Not Quali“ ed: 17. Steve Graham, 7.091, 157.19. 18. Tom Huggins, 7.481, 142.03. 19. Vincent Nobile, 12.494, 71.25.Pro Stock Motorcycle1. Matt Smith, EBR, 6.774, 200.65. 2. Hector Arana Jr, EBR, 6.824, 198.96. 3. LE Tonglet, Suzuki, 6.828, 196.39. 4. Jerry Savoie, Suzuki, 6.848, 194.74. 5. Eddie Krawiec, Harley-Davidson, 6.864, 197.77. 6. Joey Gladstone, Buell, 6.880, 196.30. 7. Chip Ellis, Harley-Davidson, 6.880, 194.80. 8. Hector Arana, EBR, 6.885, 197.57. 9. Scotty Pollacheck, Suzuki, 6.885, 194.49. 10. Andrew Hines, Harley-Davidson, 6.886, 194.60. 11. Ryan Oehler, Buell, 6.893, 196.64. 12. Angelle Sampey, Buell, 6.895, 193.40. 13. Steve Johnson, Suzuki, 6.898, 191.29. 14. Karen Stoffer, Suzuki, 6.952, 191.40. 15. Freddie Camarena, Suzuki, 6.953, 194.86. 16. Katie Sullivan, Suzuki, 6.978, 193.99. Not Quali“ ed: 17. Kelly Clontz, 7.013, 191.57. 18. Anthony Vanetti, 7.074, 188.94. 19. Angie Smith, 7.081, 163.63. 20. Maurice Allen, 7.114, 186.64. 21. Melissa Surber, broke. TRANSACTIONS BASEBALLCOMMISSIONERS OFFICE „ Suspended Oakland RHP Oscar Tovar (Vermont-NYP) 50 games and Pittsburgh RHP Cristian Charle (DSL Pirates 2) and San Diego RHP Heriberto Sosa (DSL Padres) 72 games for violations of the Minor League Drug Prevention and Treatment Program.American LeagueDETROIT TIGERS „ Signed LHPs Liarvis Breto, Eudis Idrogo and Caleb Thielbar; RHPs Johan Belisario, Christian Binford, Anthony Castro, Jose Cisnero, Fernando Perez and Andrew Schwaab; C Chace Numata; and INFs Harold Castro and Pete Kozma to minor league contracts. MINNESOTA TWINS „ Announced the retirement of C Joe Mauer.National LeagueNEW YORK METS „ Announced special assistant to the general manager J.P. Ricciardi has mutually agreed to part ways with the club. PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES „ Signed RHP Jose Guaramaco to a minor league contract.Can-Am LeagueTROIS-RIVIERES AIGLES „ Exercised their 2019 option on OF Javier Herrera.FOOTBALLNational Football LeagueINDIANAPOLIS COLTS „ Wwaived WR Steve Ishmael and RB Robert Turbin. Activated DL Tyquan Lewis from injured reserve. Signed LB Skai Moore from the practice squad. MIAMI DOLPHINS „ Waived LB Martrell Spaight. Signed G Isaac Asiata from the practice squad. NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS „ Released RB Josh Ferguson from the practice squad. Signed WR Damoun Patterson to the practice squad. WASHINGTON REDSKINS „ Waived C Casey Dunn. Signed LB Cassanova McKinzy from the practice squad.Canadian Football LeagueEDMONTON ESKIMOS „ Signed DB Jalen Spencer, WRs Tyler Batson and Miles Shuler, RBs Shaquille Cooper and Jordan Robinson and DL Jamar King, Kelcy Quarles and Shaquille Riddick.HOCKEYNational Hockey LeagueANAHEIM DUCKS „ Reassigned C Sam Carrick and D Andy Welinski to San Diego (AHL). COLORADO AVALANCHE „ Recalled F Travis Barron from Utah (ECHL) to Colorado (AHL). DALLAS STARS „ Placed D John Klingberg and RW Alexander Radulov on injured reserve, Radulov retroactive to Oct. 30. Recalled D Joel Hanley from Texas (AHL). NEW JERSEY DEVILS „ Assigned G Eddie Lack to Binghamton (AHL). Activated F Jesper Bratt from injured reserve. WASHINGTON CAPITALS „ Recalled D Aaron Ness and Jonas Siegenthaler from Hershey (AHL).American Hockey LeagueCOLORADO EAGLES „ Recalled F Caleb Herbert from Utah (ECHL). ROCKFORD ICEHOGS „ Assigned D Neil Manning and Josh McArdle and F Radovan Bondra to Indy (ECHL).ECHLALLEN AMERICANS „ Traded F Jordy Stallard to Indy for the rights to D Garrett Clarke. KALAMAZOO WINGS „ Released F Eric Ylitalo. WICHITA THUNDER „ Released F Colin Jacobs. Signed D Kyle Chatham. WORCESTER RAILERS „ Added G Jason San Antonio as emergency backup.OLYMPIC SPORTSUSA SWIMMING „ Named Simone Manuel and Ryan Murphy ambassadors of the USA Swimming Foundation.COLLEGESNCAA „ Placed BYUs mens basketball program on two-year probation, including 47 vacated wins, for improper bene“ ts involving G Nick Emery. The Associated PressELON, N.C. „ No. 8 North Carolina opened an in-state neighbors arena by putting up some num-bers that will be tough for other teams to surpass.The Tar Heels routed Elon 116-67 on Friday night behind 21 points apiece from Cameron Johnson and freshman Nassir Little. Freshman Coby White added 14 points to help the Tar Heels (2-0) sweep their two-game, season-opening barn-storming tour of regional mid-majors. They beat Wofford 78-67 on Tues-day night in Spartanburg, South Carolina, before having a much easier time against the Phoenix, who christened their new $40 million on-campus arena.The point total matched UNCs highest in 16 seasons under Roy Williams and was the programs most in a decade. North Carolina also scored 116 against UNC Asheville in 2008. It was a nice night for us,Ž Williams said. It was a nice night, I hope, for Elon, except for the score.Ž Little was 9 of 13 while Johnson finished 7 of 11. The Pittsburgh transfer has reached double fig-ures in both games since having offseason hip sur-gery, and had 16 points in the first half.I felt like I was in a good place against Wof-ford, and I felt like I was in a good place today in warm-ups, and that kind of carries on over to the court,Ž Johnson said. Im not thinking about too much „ just playing.ŽSheldon Eberhardt scored 16 points, Steven Santa Ana added 14 and Tyler Seibring finished with 10 for the Phoenix (1-1).North Carolina romps to victory over Elon

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** The News Herald | Saturday, November 10, 2018 E5ARIES (March 21-April 19) „ You can start small or start big and your chances of winning the “ rst time out are the same. It just depends on how many people you want to involve. There's no right answer. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) „ You can't always run away from the thing that's draining your energy. However, if you look for a workaround today, then you're very likely to “ nd a set of alternative behaviors, tools, hacks, rules or procedures to plug the drain. GEMINI (May 21-June 21) „ There are people you want to know, but haven't reached out to yet. There will be an excellent opportunity to say a quick hello, which will be the perfect start to the relationship. CANCER (June 22-July 22) „ Your eyes go where your heart most wants them to go. And that's exactly how it is for that interested party across the room who keeps looking in your direction. Catch the signal. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) „ You'll be getting to know interesting people, and will be intrigued by the minutia of how they live. You'll ask the kind of really good questions that are not too intrusive and yet they crack the story wide open. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) „ Your schedule is “ lling up. Block out sacred time for yourself, or that time will be snatched up. If you're not sure about a commitment, politely decline now. If you let it linger, then it will take up too much mental space. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) „ There've been times when the very thing that was supposed to help you only made things worse. That's why you're now much more selective about accepting help. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21) „ Empathy comes easily to you. You don't even see it as sel” ess because empathy gives you an edge. It lets you see and understand someone else's side. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) „ Good questions, welltimed, can open hearts and minds. It will be as though you've found the secret doorway in what you once assumed was just a wall. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) „ As much as you'd like to go play, you won't feel good about it until a certain project is completed. You're almost to the “ nish line. You can do this. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) „ You'll “ nd it necessary to challenge conventional attitudes, at least in your own head. You have fresh insights to shine on the matter. Work them out on your own before going public. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) „ There's someone who wants your attention and is trying various ways to get it. Are you ” attered? Perhaps you didn't even notice. You are, after all, very involved in what you're doing today .HOROSCOPES BY HOLIDAY MATHIS DIVERSIONSTrivia FunŽ with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country. Comments, questions or suggestions? WC@TriviaGuy.com 1. Surveys show that how many out of 10 Americans use canned beans, chicken or fish as a convenient source of protein? 6, 7, 8, 9 2. Three months after he died (1973), who had the No. 1 hit song of Time in a BottleŽ? Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, Roy Orbison, Jim Croce 3. Whose most popular tourist destination is  Machu PicchuŽ? Ecuador, Shetland Islands, Peru, Costa Rica 4. Whats a small-headed cobra of Australia and New Guinea? Taipan, Stanley, Tartu, Sidon 5. Around baseball circles, whats a whiff? Hot dog, Rundown, Swing and miss, Sacri“ ce 6.  OvineŽ means pertaining to, or like what? Dogs, Cats, Snakes, Sheep ANSWERS: 1. 9, 2. Jim Croce, 3. Peru, 4. Taipan, 5. Swing and miss, 6. SheepTRIVIA BY WILSON CASEY ACES ON BRIDGE: BOBBY WOLFF (Answers Monday) MANLY STASH CUDDLY PONCHO Yesterday’s Jumbles: Answer: After explaining to his parents that he was going to be a mime, they said — YOU DON’T SAY Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAMEBy David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek Unscramble these Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.2018 Tribune Content Agency, LLC All Rights Reserved. Get the free JUST JUMBLE app • Follow us on Twitter @PlayJumble DRAGN EYAHN HERNDC WSODNI SUDOKU DEAR ABBYTime, distance cause fast friends to drift apartDEAR ABBY: Im a 15-yearold girl and a sophomore in high school. Last year I went to school across the country. While I was there, I became best friends with this girl, Amelia.Ž We did everything together, and Amelia even flew back here to visit my family when school ended and I had to go home. It has now been a few months since Ive seen her, and so much has changed. She doesnt make time to text or call me hardly ever, and when she does, its always a quick conversation. Because of the time difference and our schedules, I get that its difficult, but shouldnt she make some time for her best friend? Amelia and I were as close as sisters, and I cant stand the thought of losing her. I have already called her out a few times, and we are good for a few days, but then she goes right back to pretending like I dont exist. Id rather not call her out again. Any thoughts? „ FARAWAY FRIEND IN MARYLANDDEAR FRIEND: Rather than call her out,Ž its time to lighten up. Stop trying to make Amelia feel guilty for not giving you the attention she was able to when you were geographically closer. If theres one thing I have learned about friendships, its that they tend to ebb and flow. Because you now live apart, concentrate on building other relationships with people close by. This doesnt mean you cant remain friendly with Amelia; it simply means you are expecting more from her than shes able to give you.DEAR ABBY: The holidays are approaching, and with them a problem. I recently moved back to my hometown after being away for many years, and I was eagerly looking forward to spending the holidays with my daughter. She has just informed me that shes joining a religion that doesnt celebrate holidays, not even Thanksgiving or birthdays. I would never stand in the way of her chosen path, but Id still like to be able to include her in family get-togethers. I just dont know how. Any suggestions? „ MISSING HER ALREADYDEAR MISSING HER: Although you will no longer be able to celebrate the holidays with your daughter, you and the rest of the family can still see her and socialize. Talk to her about it and let her set the ground rules. As long as you are respectful, Im sure she will be glad to give you suggestions about what you CAN do together. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Contact Dear Abby at www.DearAbby. com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Jeanne PhillipsWORD SCRIMMAGE: JUDD HAMBRICK Wilson CaseyLevel of dif“ culty (Bronze easy, Silver medium, Gold -dif“ cult): Monday Bronze; Tuesday Silver; Wednesday Gold; Thursday Bronze; Friday Silver; Saturday and Sunday Gold. Answer to yesterdays sudoku

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** E6 Saturday, November 10, 2018 | The News Herald COMICS & PUZZLES PEANUTS ZITS FRANK & ERNEST WIZARD OF ID THE BORN LOSER BEETLE BAILEY DILBERT BLONDIE PEARLS BEFORE SWINE FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE PICKLES HAGAR THE HORRIBLE GARFIELD CRANKSHAFT HERMAN PLUGGERS Daily CROSSWORD

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** The News Herald | Saturday, November 10, 2018 E7 SATURDAY MORNING C COMCAST W WOW! S1 DISH NETWORK S2 DIRECTV NOVEMBER 10 C W S1 S27 AM7:308 AM8:309 AM9:3010 AM10:3011 AM11:3012 PM12:30 WJHG (7) 3 3 7 7 (6:00) TodayTailgate WithCue VaporChamp WithinThe VoyagerSaving PetsConsumer 101Naturally, SeoSaving PetsPremier League Soccer: Eagles vs Spurs CW (7.2) 99 9 8 8 Credit?Cooking!Wildlife DocsDid I MentionReady-PetWelc. HomeThis Old H.Hidden HeroesCampmeeting: InspirationHollywoodMyPillow WMBB (13) 2 2 13 13 Good Morning America Jack HannaOcean TreksDr. ScottDr. ScottRock the ParkVaca-CreationCollege Football Wisconsin at Penn State. (N) (L) METV (13.2) 209 133 2 TrackdownTrackdownHave Gun ...Have Gun ...MaverickWagon TrainThe Big Valley The MartyrŽ GunsmokeGunsmoke WECP (18) 4 4 4 18 CBS This Morning: SaturdayLucky Dog (N) Dr. Chris-VetInnovation NatThe InspectorsHope in thePet Vet-TeamCollege Football Mississippi at Texas A&M. (N) (L) MNT (18.2) 227 13 Ocean Mys.Ocean Mys.Outback AdvRock the ParkRock the ParkJewels of theMissing (N) Amer. AthleteThink BigPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid Program WPGX (28) 8 8 28 28 Live Life-WinPaid ProgramPaid ProgramRelief!LifeLockWonderAirbrushedCol. PregameCollege Football Ohio State at Michigan State. (N) (L) WFSG (56) 11 11 56 56 PinkaliciousLove QuiltingSewingIts Sew EasyPainting-TravelKevin BeltonMilk StreetMartha BakesLidias KitchenCook CountryTest K itchenSaras A&E 34 43 118 265 Flipping Vegas Scraps: Parts Uneaten StoryBookedStoryBookedPD CamPD CamPD CamPD CamPD CamPD Cam AMC 30 62 131 254 The RiflemanThe RiflemanThe Rifleman ‰‰‰ Red Dragon (02) Anthony Hopkins, Edward Norton, Ralph Fiennes. ‰‰ Ghost Rider (07) Nicolas Cage. ANPL 46 69 184 282 Animal Cribs Animal Cribs TreehouseTreehouseTreehouseTreehouseTreehouseTreehousePit Bulls and Parolees BET 53 46 124 329 Fresh PrinceFresh PrinceFresh PrinceFresh PrinceFresh PrinceFresh Prince (:03) Martin (:34) Martin (:05) Martin (:35) Martin (:05) Martin (:35) Martin COM 64 53 107 249 70s Show70s Show70s Show70s Show (:15) That 70s Show 70s Show70s Show70s Show70s ShowAustin Powers: Mystery DISC 36 39 182 278 (6:00) Major League Fishing Dirty Jobs Dirty Jobs Dirty Jobs Sponge DiverŽ Dirty Jobs Dirty Jobs Animal RelocatorŽ E! 63 57 114 236 (6:00) ‰‰‚ Sex and the City (08) Sarah Jessica Parker. News Special ‰‚ New Years Eve (11) Halle Berry, Jessica Biel, Jon Bon Jovi. ‰‰‰ The Parent Trap (98) ESPN 9 23 140 206 SportsCenter (N) (L) College GameDay From Alumni Stadium in Chestnut Hill, Mass. (N) (L) College Football South Carolina at Florida. (N) (L) ESPN2 47 24 144 209 (6:00) NFL LiveNFL MatchupSportsCenter (N) (L) SportsCenter (N) (L) SportsCenter (N) (L) College Football Navy at Central Florida. (N) (L) FOOD 38 45 110 231 ContessaGiadas Hol.Trishas Sou.Trishas Sou.Pioneer Wo.Pioneer Wo.The Kitchen (N) Trishas Sou.Trishas Sou.Holiday Baking Championship FREE 59 65 180 311 (6:00) Alvin and the Chipmunks (:10) ‰‰ Alvin and the Chipmunks: The Squeakquel (09) (:15) ‰ Alvin and the Chipmunks: Chipwrecked (11) Jason Lee. Richie-Cmas FS1 24 27 150 219 Turning PointInside SlantMatch DayBundesliga SoccerFootballCollege Football TCU at West Virginia. (N) (L) FX 45 51 136 248 ‰‰‚ Labor Day (13) Kate Winslet, Josh Brolin, Gattlin Griffith. ‰‚ When the Bough Breaks (16) Morris Chestnut, Regina Hall. ‰‰ Ride Along 2 (16) HALL 23 59 185 312 ‰‰‰ The Most Wonderful Time of the Year (08) The Christmas Cottage (17) Merritt Patterson, Steve Lund. The Sweetest Christmas (17) Lacey Chabert, Lea Coco. HGTV 32 38 112 229 Fixer UpperFixer UpperFixer UpperFixer UpperFixer UpperProperty Brothers HIST 35 42 120 269 (6:00) The Curse of Oak IslandThe Curse of Oak Island The Curse of Oak Island The Curse of Oak Island The Curse of Oak Island The Curse of Oak Island LIFE 56 56 108 252 Shark APEXNinja FoodiMakeup!Shark APEXMedicarePerricone MDHappily Ever AfterSugar Daddies (14) Taylor Gildersleeve, Peter Strauss. PARMT 28 48 241 241 Power QuickTry Total Gym ‰‰‰ Creed (15) Michael B. Jordan. Rocky Balboa mentors Apollo Creeds son. ‰‰‰‰ Rocky (76) Sylvester Stallone, Talia Shire. SUN 49 422 656 Fish To Make ONeill OutsideReel AnimalsAddict. Fishingto Do FloridaSports Mag.Football WeekACC AccessCollege Basketball SYFY 70 52 122 244 ‰‰‚ Oculus (13) Karen Gillan, Brenton Thwaites.(:15) ‰‰‰ Hanna (11) Saoirse Ronan, Eric Bana, Cate Blanchett.(:45) ‰‰ Planet of the Apes (01) Tim Roth TBS 31 15 139 247 Love-RaymondFriends Friends Friends ‰‰‰ Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines (03) Nick Stahl(:15) ‰‰‰ X-Men: First Class (11) James McAvoy. TCM 25 70 132 256 ‰‰‰ Battle of the Bulge (65) Henry Fonda, Robert Shaw, Robert Ryan. ‰‰‰ Where Eagles Dare (69) Richard Burton, Clint Eastwood, Mary Ure. Great Escape TLC 37 40 183 280 Trading Spaces Make ThisSay Yes: ATLSay Yes: ATLSay Yes: ATLSay Yes: ATLSay Yes: ATLLong Island Medium Long Island Medium TNT 29 54 138 245 NCIS: New Orleans NCIS: New Orleans ‰‰‚ A Walk Among the Tombstones (14) Liam Neeson, Dan Stevens. ‰‰‚ Unknown (11) Liam Neeson. USA 62 55 105 242 MedicareAirfryer OvenThe Purge A Nation RebornŽ ‰‰‰ Harry Potter and the Sorcerers Stone (01) Daniel Radcliffe, Rupert Grint, Emma Watson. Harry Potter WGN-A 13 239 307 Ring Warriors ‰‰‰‚ Full Metal Jacket (87) Matthew Modine, Adam Baldwin. Cops Cops Cops Cops Cops SATURDAY LATE NIGHT C COMCAST W WOW! S1 DISH NETWORK S2 DIRECTV NOVEMBER 10 C W S1 S21 AM1:302 AM2:303 AM3:304 AM4:305 AM5:306 AM6:30 WJHG (7) 3 3 7 7 Out AmericaForensic FilesWheel FortunePaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramOn the MoneyPaid ProgramPaid ProgramHomeowner CW (7.2) 99 9 8 8 SheriffsSlim CycleRobin WilliamsDermaWandLarry KinDr. HoCop CamCredit?Indoor GrillingSlim CyclePeter PopoffPower Quick WMBB (13) 2 2 13 13 NCIS: N.O. (:35) Madam SecretaryTailgate WithPhilips! (:32) Bucs IAli & DonovanPaid ProgramPaid ProgramHouseSmartsGood Morning America (N) METV (13.2) 209 133 2 Voyage to Bottom of SeaLand of the GiantsSwamp ThingSwamp ThingALFALFALFALFMystery Hnt.Mystery Hnt. WECP (18) 4 4 4 18 RaceWeekForensic FilesPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid Prog ramPaid Program MNT (18.2) 227 13 Paid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramLatiNation (N) Amer. LatinoPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramP. Allen Smith WPGX (28) 8 8 28 28 Xtreme OffTruck TechAmerican Ninja WarriorTwo/Half MenTwo/Half MenThisMinuteThisMinutePaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramRob. Jeffress WFSG (56) 11 11 56 56 NatureIndependent Lens DawnlandŽ The Great British Baking ShowAntiques RoadshowSid ScienceDinosaur TrainSesame StreetDaniel Tiger A&E 34 43 118 265 (11:00) Live PDLive PD: RewindHealthy CookMakeup!Gotham Grill!Credit?Shark APEXNEW SHARKHoarders Tami; GeorgeŽ AMC 30 62 131 254 (12:00) ‰‰‚ Draft Day (14) Kevin Costner. ‰‰ Ghost Rider (07) Nicolas Cage, Eva Mendes, Wes Bentley. (:12) M*A*S*H (:42) M*A*S*H (:12) M*A*S*H (:42) M*A*S*H ANPL 46 69 184 282 Amanda to the RescuePit Bulls and ParoleesPit Bulls and ParoleesPit Bulls and ParoleesTankedTanked BET 53 46 124 329 MartinMartinMartinMartinPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramWalker IIIShowdown of Faith COM 64 53 107 249 South ParkSouth ParkSouth ParkSouth Park (:35) IdiotsitterSex ToysSlim CycleNutritionNew BissellScrubsScrubs DISC 36 39 182 278 Mysteries of the AbandonedMysteries of the AbandonedTrans Am Double DutyŽ Fin ChasersDestroyedSurviving the CutAuction KingsAnglers E! 63 57 114 236 Fifty Shades ‰‰ Fifty Shades of Grey (15) Dakota Johnson, Jamie Dornan, Jennifer Ehle. ‰‰‰ The Other Guys (10) ‰‰‰ The Other Guys (10) Will Ferrell. News Special ESPN 9 23 140 206 (12:30) SportsCenter (N) (L) College Football FinalNFL MatchupCollege Football Auburn at Georgia. NFL MatchupSportsCenter (N) (L) ESPN2 47 24 144 209 Football FinalEarn Every.SportsCenterSportsCenterSportsCenterESPN FCItalian Serie A Soccer FOOD 38 45 110 231 Christmas Cookie ChallengeChristmas Cookie ChallengeTry Total GymDr. Ho Reliev.Shark APEXGotham Grill!KitchenAidNew BissellFarm houseSouthern Heart FREE 59 65 180 311 Makeup!PiYo Workout!Paid ProgramCarol Alt at 57Paid ProgramPaid ProgramPiYo Craze!Z. LevittBobby SchullerSunday MassDecorating Disney FS1 24 27 150 219 UFC Post Fight ShowCollege Football Ohio State at Michigan State. (N Same-day Tape) College Football Texas at Texas Tech. (Taped) FX 45 51 136 248 Baskets (:24) BasketsBetter Things (:41) Better Things (:26) AtlantaRobin WilliamsBaldingBest GiftTry Total GymMike & MollyMike & Molly HALL 23 59 185 312 Christmas at Cartwrights (14) Alicia Witt, Gabriel Hogan. Christmas Cookies (16) Jill Wagner, Wes Brown. A Dream of Christmas (16) Nikki DeLoach, Andrew Walker. HGTV 32 38 112 229 House HuntersHunters IntlLove It or List ItPiYo Craze!Gotham Grill!Yoga Retreat!More HairPerricone MDPerricone MDFixer Upper HIST 35 42 120 269 Born Tough: Inside FordCounting CarsCounting CarsCoinCoinCoinCoinCoinCoinWWI: The First Modern War LIFE 56 56 108 252 (:04) Psycho Prom Queen (18) Zoe McLellan, Allie MacDonald. Shark APEXDermaflashWonder Cook (:32) Cop CamShark APEXPaid ProgramIn TouchTruths That PARMT 28 48 241 241 ‰‰ Rocky IV (85) Sylvester Stallone, Talia Shire, Burt Young. Robin WilliamsSex ToysKnives 2018PiYo Workout!Cop CamShark IONRelieve painAirfryer Oven SUN 49 422 656 After MidnightPostgameCredit?Sex pillsOrganicTummy TuckOrganicPaid ProgramNBA Basketball Washington Wizards at Miami Heat. SYFY 70 52 122 244 ‰‰‰ Hanna (11) Saoirse Ronan, Eric Bana, Cate Blanchett. Twilight ZoneThe Twilight ZonePhilips KitchenLifeLockBest GiftMedicare TBS 31 15 139 247 Iron Man (08) 2 Broke Girls2 Broke GirlsNew GirlNew GirlNew GirlLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-RaymondLove-Raymond TCM 25 70 132 256 (12:30) ‰‰‚ The Illustrated Man (69) ‰‰‚ World Without End (56) Hugh Marlowe. ‰‰‰ Action in the North Atlantic (43) Humphrey Bogart, Raymond Massey. Destinatn TLC 37 40 183 280 American Gypsy WeddingMama MediumSay YesSay YesSay YesSay YesSay YesSay YesSay YesSay Yes TNT 29 54 138 245 (12:00) ‰‰ Point Break (15) NCIS: New OrleansNCIS: New OrleansNCIS: New Orleans ViralŽ NCIS: New OrleansNCIS: New Orleans USA 62 55 105 242 Harry-Phoenix (:34) ‰‰‰ Harry Potter and the Sorcerers Stone (01) Daniel Radcliffe, Rupert Grint, Emma Watson. NCIS: Los Angeles PersonalŽ New BissellJeremiah WGN-A 13 239 307 Elementary BreatheŽ ElementaryCamp MeetingSingsationCredit?LifeLockCatholic MassSearch--WayYour World SATURDAY AFTERNOON C COMCAST W WOW! S1 DISH NETWORK S2 DIRECTV NOVEMBER 10 C W S1 S21 PM1:302 PM2:303 PM3:304 PM4:305 PM5:306 PM6:30 WJHG (7) 3 3 7 7 SoccerGoal ZoneCountdownNASCAR Racing Xfinity Series: Whelen Trusted To Perform 200. (N) (L) Jeopardy! Nightly NewsNewsFootball CW (7.2) 99 9 8 8 KingKingSaving Hope Joel 2:31Ž Elementary Elementary King of the HillKing of the HillClevelandCleveland WMBB (13) 2 2 13 13 College FootballColl. FootballCollege Football Oklahoma State at Oklahoma. (N) (L) Coll. FootballNewsMom METV (13.2) 209 133 2 Bonanza ShanklinŽ RawhideWanted ...Wanted ...The RiflemanThe RiflemanThe Wild, Wild WestWonder Woman WECP (18) 4 4 4 18 College Football Mississippi at Texas A&M. (N) College Football Mississippi State at Alabama. (N) (L) Paid ProgramInside Edition MNT (18.2) 227 13 Paid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramPaid ProgramLast-StandingLast-StandingMike & MollyMike & Molly WPGX (28) 8 8 28 28 College Football Ohio State at Michigan State. College Football Northwestern at Iowa. (N) (L) College ExtraFootball WFSG (56) 11 11 56 56 Old HouseThis Old HseMotorWeek (N) Outside-GregThe Draft NOVA Last B-24Ž The Lawrence Welk ShowFather Brown A&E 34 43 118 265 Live PD Live PD -03.02.18Ž Riding along with law enforcement. Live PD Live PD -11.02.18Ž Riding along with law enforcement. AMC 30 62 131 254 (11:30) ‰‰ Ghost Rider (07) ‰‰‚ The Day After Tomorrow (04) Dennis Quaid, Jake Gyllenhaal, Ian Holm. ‰‰‚ I, Robot (04) Will Smith, Bridget Moynahan, Bruce Greenwood. ANPL 46 69 184 282 Pit Bulls and Parolees Pit Bulls and Parolees Pit Bulls and Parolees Pit Bulls and Parolees Pit Bulls and Parolees Pit Bulls and Parolees BET 53 46 124 329 (:05) ‰‰‚ Jumping the Broom (11) Angela Bassett, Paula Patton, Laz Alonso.(3:55) ‰‰‚ Tyler Perrys Why Did I Get Married Too? (10) Tyler Perry, Sharon Leal. COM 64 53 107 249 Austin Powers: Mystery (:10) ‰‚ The Watch (12) Ben Stiller, Vince Vaughn, Jonah Hill.(:35) ‰‰ Hall Pass (11) Owen Wilson, Jason Sudeikis, Jenna Fischer. DISC 36 39 182 278 Dirty Jobs Dirty Jobs Horse TesterŽ Gold Rush Gold Rush Durt ReynoldsŽ Gold Rush Mysteries of the Abandoned E! 63 57 114 236 (12:00) ‰‰‰ The Parent Trap (98) Lindsay Lohan. ‰‰‰ Pretty Woman (90) Richard Gere, Julia Roberts, Ralph Bellamy. ‰‰‰ Bridesmaids (11) Kristen Wiig. ESPN 9 23 140 206 College FootballScoreboardCollege Football Washington State at Colorado. (N) (L) ScoreboardCollege Football ESPN2 47 24 144 209 College FootballScoreboardCollege Football Purdue at Minnesota. (N) (L) ScoreboardCollege Football FOOD 38 45 110 231 Christmas Cookie ChallengeGingerbread GiantsOutrageous ChristmasKids Sweets ShowdownChristmas Cookie ChallengeChristmas Cookie Challenge FREE 59 65 180 311 (12:20) ‰‰ Richie Richs Christmas Wish (98)(:25) ‰‰‚ Storks (16) Voices of Andy Samberg. ‰‰‰ Meet the Robinsons (07) Voices of Angela Bassett. Nightmre Bfore FS1 24 27 150 219 (11:00) College Football TCU at West Virginia. College Football Baylor at Iowa State. (N) (L) UFC Prefight Show (N) (L) FX 45 51 136 248 (12:00) ‰‰ Ride Along 2 (16) ‰‰‰ Furious 7 (15) Vin Diesel, Paul Walker. A dead mans brother seeks revenge on the Toretto gang. ‰‰‰ World War Z (13) Brad Pitt. HALL 23 59 185 312 Road to Christmas (18) Jessy Schram, Chad Michael Murray. Christmas Joy (18) Danielle Panabaker, Matthew Long. Coming Home for Christmas (17) Danica McKellar. HGTV 32 38 112 229 Property BrothersProperty BrothersProperty BrothersProperty BrothersProperty BrothersProperty Brothers HIST 35 42 120 269 The Curse of Oak Island Counting CarsCounting CarsCounting CarsCounting CarsCounting CarsCounting CarsCounting CarsCounting CarsCounting Cars LIFE 56 56 108 252 Ill Be Watching (18) Janel Parrish, Rob Estes, Michael Welch. My Husbands Secret Wife (18) Helena Mattsson, Josh Kelly. The Sinister Surrogate (18) Kelly Thiebaud, Brian Ames. PARMT 28 48 241 241 (11:00) ‰‰‰‰ Rocky (76) ‰‰‰ Rocky II (79) Sylvester Stallone, Talia Shire, Burgess Meredith. ‰‰ Rocky IV (85) Sylvester Stallone, Talia Shire. SUN 49 422 656 Power of SportsCollege Football Liberty at Virginia. From Scott Stadium in Charlottesville, Va. (N) (L) Inside HEATInside HEATPregame SYFY 70 52 122 244 (11:45) ‰‰ Planet of the Apes (:15) ‰‰‰ Men in Black (97) Tommy Lee Jones, Will Smith.(:15) ‰‰‚ Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides (11) Johnny Depp, Penlope Cruz. TBS 31 15 139 247 (11:15) X-Men: First Class (11) ‰‰‰ Iron Man (08) Robert Downey Jr., Terrence Howard, Gwyneth Paltrow.(:45) ‰‰‰ Iron Man 3 (13) Robert Downey Jr., Gwyneth Paltrow, Don Cheadle. TCM 25 70 132 256 (12:45) ‰‰‰‰ The Great Escape (63) Steve McQueen, James Garner, Richard Attenborough. ‰‰‰‰ The Bridge on the River Kwai (57) William Holden, Alec Guinness, Sessue Hayakawa. TLC 37 40 183 280 Long Island Medium Long Island Medium Mama Medium American Gypsy WeddingAmerican Gypsy WeddingAmerican Gypsy Wedding TNT 29 54 138 245 (11:30) ‰‰‚ Unknown (11) ‰‰ G.I. Joe: Retaliation (13) Dwayne Johnson, Bruce Willis. ‰‰‰‚ Bridge of Spies (15) Tom Hanks, Mark Rylance, Alan Alda. USA 62 55 105 242 (12:28) ‰‰‰ Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets (02) Daniel Radcliffe, Rupert Grint.(:10) ‰‰‰‚ Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban (04) Daniel Radcliffe, Rupert Grint. WGN-A 13 239 307 Blue Bloods Absolute PowerŽ Blue Bloods Blue Bloods Blue Bloods BackstabbersŽ Blue Bloods Cutting LossesŽ Blue Bloods Out of the BlueŽ SATURDAY EVENING C COMCAST W WOW! S1 DISH NETWORK S2 DIRECTV NOVEMBER 10 C W S1 S27 PM7:308 PM8:309 PM9:3010 PM10:3011 PM11:3012 AM12:30 WJHG (7) 3 3 7 7 (6:30) College Football Florida State at Notre Dame. (N) (L) News (:29) Saturday Night Live (N) (L) JaguarsOut America CW (7.2) 99 9 8 8 Family GuyFamily GuyBobs BurgersBobs BurgersClevelandClevelandKing of the HillJerry SpringerMaurySheriffs WMBB (13) 2 2 13 13 College Football Clemson at Boston College. (N) (L) News (:05) Mom (:35) Entertainment Tonight (N) NCIS: N.O. METV (13.2) 209 133 2 Svengoolie The TinglerŽ Lost in SpaceBuck Rogers in 25th CenturyBattlestar GalacticaKolchak: The Night Stalker WECP (18) 4 4 4 18 NCIS Two Steps BackŽ FBI Green BirdsŽ 48 Hours (N) Inside EditionOutdoorsmanLeverage The Runway JobŽ Murdoch Mysteries MNT (18.2) 227 13 Rizzoli & IslesBones The Bod in the PodŽ 2 Broke Girls2 Broke GirlsModern FamilyModern FamilyWipeoutPaid ProgramPaid Program WPGX (28) 8 8 28 28 (6:30) College Football Texas at Texas Tech. (N) (L) Hells Kitchen Hot PotatoŽ Nashville InsiBig BangTMZ (N) WFSG (56) 11 11 56 56 Midsomer Murders (Part 2 of 2) Durrells in CorfuPoldark on MasterpieceAustin City Limits (N) UndergroundA Chefs LifeNOVA Last B-24Ž A&E 34 43 118 265 (:06) Live PD: Rewind (N) Live PD Live PD -11.10.18Ž Riding along with law enforcement. (N) (L) Live PD Riding along with law enforcement. AMC 30 62 131 254 ‰‰‚ Escape Plan (13) Sylvester Stallone, Arnold Schwarzenegger. ‰‰ Road House (89) Patrick Swayze, Kelly Lynch, Sam Elliott. ‰‰‚ Draft Day (14) ANPL 46 69 184 282 Pit Bulls and ParoleesPit Bulls and Parolees (N) Amanda to the RescuePit Bulls and ParoleesPit Bulls and ParoleesPit Bulls and Parolees BET 53 46 124 329 ‰‰‰ Southside With You (16) Tika Sumpter, Parker Sawyers. (:01) BET Presents Love & Happiness: An Obama Celebration (:27) Martin (11:58) Martin (:29) Martin COM 64 53 107 249 ‰‰‰ Dodgeball: A True Underdog Story (04) Vince Vaughn. ‰‰ Hall Pass (11) Owen Wilson, Jason Sudeikis, Jenna Fischer. (:25) South Park The Black Friday TrilogyŽ DISC 36 39 182 278 Mysteries of the AbandonedMysteries of the AbandonedMysteries of the AbandonedMysteries of the AbandonedMysteries of the Abando nedMysteries of the Abandoned E! 63 57 114 236 (5:30) ‰‰‰ Bridesmaids (11) Kristen Wiig. ‰‰‰ Pitch Perfect (12) Anna Kendrick, Skylar Astin, Rebel Wilson. ‰‰ Fifty Shades of Grey (15) Dakota Johnson, Jamie Dornan. ESPN 9 23 140 206 (6:00) College Football Auburn at Georgia. (N) (L) ScoreboardCollege Football California at USC. (N) (L) SportsCenter ESPN2 47 24 144 209 (6:00) College Football Miami at Georgia Tech. (N) (L) ScoreboardCollege Football UNLV at San Diego State. (N) (L) Football Final FOOD 38 45 110 231 Christmas Cookie ChallengeChristmas Cookie ChallengeChristmas Cookie ChallengeChristmas Cookie ChallengeChristmas Cookie Challe ngeChristmas Cookie Challenge FREE 59 65 180 311 Nightmare-Christmas (:15) ‰‰ How the Grinch Stole Christmas (00) Jim Carrey, Jeffrey Tambor, Christine Baranski.(10:55) ‰‰ Call Me Claus (01) Whoopi Goldberg. FS1 24 27 150 219 UFC Fight Night: The Korean Zombie vs. Rodriguez PrelimsUFC Fight Night: The Korean Zombie vs. Rodriguez (N) (L) UFC Post Fight Show (N) (L) FX 45 51 136 248 (5:30) ‰‰‰ World War Z (13) ‰‰‚ Iron Man 2 (10) Robert Downey Jr., Gwyneth Paltrow, Don Cheadle. Mayans M.C. The club has reason to celebrate. American Horror Story HALL 23 59 185 312 Its Christmas, Eve (18) LeAnn Rimes, Tyler Hynes. Marry Me at Christmas (17) Rachel Skarsten, Trevor Donovan. Miss Christmas (17) Brooke DOrsay, Marc Blucas. HGTV 32 38 112 229 Love It or List ItLove It or List ItHouse Hunters Renovation (N) House HuntersHunters IntlLove It or List ItHouse Hunters Renovation HIST 35 42 120 269 Truck Night in America (N) Truck Hunters (N) Born Tough: Inside FordCounting CarsCounting Cars (:03) Truck Night in America (12:03) Truck Hunters LIFE 56 56 108 252 Sorority Stalker (18) Haley Webb, Haley Pullos, Christel Khalil.(:03) Psycho Prom Queen (18) Zoe McLellan, Allie MacDonald.(:01) Sorority Stalker (18) Haley Webb, Haley Pullos. PARMT 28 48 241 241 ‰‰‰ Creed (15) Michael B. Jordan. Rocky Balboa mentors Apollo Creeds son.‰‰‰ Rocky II (79) Sylvester Stallone, Talia Shire, Burgess Meredith. SUN 49 422 656 NBA Basketball Washington Wizards at Miami Heat. (N) (L) PostgameInside HEATInside HEATAfter Midnight with the HEAT From Nov. 10, 2018. SYFY 70 52 122 244 (:15) ‰‰ National Treasure: Book of Secrets (07) Nicolas Cage, Jon Voight, Harvey Keitel. FuturamaFuturamaFuturamaFuturamaFuturamaFuturama TBS 31 15 139 247 Iron Man 3Big BangBig BangBig BangBig BangBig BangFull FrontalFull Frontal ‰‰‰ Iron Man (08) Robert Downey Jr., Terrence Howard. TCM 25 70 132 256 ‰‰‰ Bataan (43) Robert Taylor, George Murphy. ‰‰‰‚ Back to Bataan (45) John Wayne, Anthony Quinn. ‰‰‰ The Threat (49) Michael OShea. Illustrated Man TLC 37 40 183 280 American Gypsy WeddingAmerican Gypsy WeddingAmerican Gypsy WeddingMama MediumAmerican Gypsy WeddingAmerican Gypsy Wedding TNT 29 54 138 245 ‰‰‰ Sully (16) Tom Hanks, Aaron Eckhart, Valerie Mahaffey. ‰‰‰‚ American Sniper (14) Bradley Cooper, Sienna Miller, Jake McDorman. ‰‰ Point Break (15) USA 62 55 105 242 (:10) ‰‰‰ Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire (05) Daniel Radcliffe, Rupert Grint, Emma Watson.(:35) ‰‰‰ Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix (07) Daniel Radcliffe. WGN-A 13 239 307 Blue Bloods Brushed OffŽ Blue BloodsBlue BloodsBlue Bloods Pain KillersŽ Bones The Bod in the PodŽ Bones The Babe in the BarŽ TV LISTINGS

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CLASSIFIEDSE E 8 8 Saturday, November 10, 2018| The News Herald Ferrovial Services North America (FSNA) Bid Solicitation Notice – (Roadside Mowing & Litter Removal)FSNA Client: Florida Department of Transportation Budget Estimate: $920,000 (USD) Contract Days: 730 days (+ Renewal Options) Contract Start Date: 1/1/2019 Description of Work: Roadside Mowing and Litter Removal activities along all State/FDOT road corridors in Okaloosa County and SR 85 in Walton County. Bid Documents: Bid Sheet, Summary of Quantities and Ferrovial Service’s Subcontract Agreement can be obtained in person from FSNA’s Office at 313 W. James Lee Blvd, Crestview, FL 32536 (between 8:00 AM & 4:00 PM CST); or via email by contacting Ranisha Chamberlain, at Ranisha.Castillo@ferrovialservices.com or 850.398.8568. Bid Submittal: Sealed Bid Sheets are to be received by FSNA no later than DECEMBER 5, 2018; 4:00 PM (CST). is currently seeking applicants for our Children’s Services Commmunity Action Team (CAT) for Gulf/Calhoun County. Vacancies include: F/T Program Assistant, Mental Health Counselor, Case Manager, Therapeutic Mentor/Peer, and P/T Nurse (RN or LPN). Also seeking Mobile Crisis Counselors. Florida licensure as a mental health professional under Chapter 490 or 491 required. For more details on this and other positions, please visit us online at: http://lmccares.org/careers/employment opportunities Logistics/TransportNEWSPAPER CARRIERS NEEDED !!!$500 Sign-On Bonus!!!after 90 days The News Herald is seeking individuals interested in providing great service to our customers in the following areas:Panama City and Panama City BeachIndividual must have reliable transportation and be able to work early a.m. hours. This is an independent contractor position with part-time hours and full time earnings with no collecting necessary. Earn above average $’s while being your own boss. Interested parties can contact Jamie at jmeadors@pcnh.com. AVIATION Grads work with JetBlue, United, Delta and others-start here with hands on training for FAA certification. Financial aid if qualified. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 888-242-2649. Appliances For Sale Refrigerator $175, stove $150, washer & dryer $150 Call 850-545-3442 Frigidaire refrigerator 2 yrs old, white, side by side, ice dispenser $375 firm Call 850-217-7979 SAWMILLS from only $4397.00-MAKE & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmill. Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship! FREE Info/DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.co m1-800-567-0404 Ext.300N SALE20% OFF In-StockFURNITURE LAMPS ARTWORKS & S Interiors 8406 PCB Pkwy CAT 420DIT Backhoe A/C, Radio,Pilot Controls, Power Shift Transmission,Extend A Hoe,36 Inch Rear Bucket With Quick Coupler,Front 4 in 1 Bucket. $12,500 Call 334 434 1417. TAT D5C-LGP DOZIER $27,500.(850) 258-6018 10% DISCOUNT CUSTOM ORDER FURNITURE and WINDOW TREATMENTSS & S Interiors 8406 PCB Pkwy CHURCH FURNITURE: Does your church need pews, pulpit set, baptistery, steeple, windows? Big Sales on new cushioned pews and pew chairs. 1-800-231-8360 www.pews1.com Will Pay Cash For Storm Damaged Items:Looking for boat, rv, marine items, outdoor furn, fire pit, floating dock, tools, knick knacks. Don’t just throw it out! Call me, let’s chat. Alex 530-558-9196 $5,000 SIGN ON BONUS!!!Experienced Master Ford/Lincoln Technician NeededWe are a busy Lincoln-Mazda store and need a Master technician to round out our staff! *Must have Master Certification *Great Pay *Great Dealership Group *Family owned and operated Call Bob @ 334-477-9947 or email: bobs@mitchellauto.com General Laborer Carpenter’s HelpersNeed experience with power tools. DL and transportation a plus. Paid weekly. Call 850-625-9010 Panama City law firm is currently seeking aParalegalwith hurricane property insurance claims experience. Full benefits package and salary dependent on experience. Please send resume to P.O. Box 1470, Panama City, FL 32401. BARGAIN CORNER PANAMA CITY NEWS HERALD FREE ADS FOR ITEMS $250 OR LESSUP TO 4 ITEMS PER AD € PRICE MUST BE IN THE AD VIEW ADSONLINEALL WEEK! MAIL TO: THE NEWS HERALD € BARGAIN CORNER € P.O. BOX 1940 € PANAMA CITY, FL 32401PLACE ADS ONLINE AT WWW.NEWSHERALD.COM € CLICK ON CLASSIFIEDSŽ TIRES Four Bridgestone Dueler Alenza All Season Tires 275/60R20. Still decent tread -good condition $120 850-653-6070 Apalachicola 30+ Danielle Steele books, hard and soft cover, $60.00; 20+ Nora Roberts books, hard and soft cover $40.00; 6 containers of hard and soft cover books $50.00. NO HURRICANE DAMAGE.; white Roper Electric Dryer $50.00, guaranteed to work. Call 850-276-0497 Call To Place An Ad In Classifieds. 747-5020 Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium that’s your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when it’s time to buy, it’s the resource on which to rely. SELL ALL YOUR ITEMS through classified.CALL 747-5020 If you didn’t advertise here, you’re missing out on potential customers.

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CLASSIFIEDSThe News Herald | Saturday, November 10, 2018 E E 9 9 NF-1178757 Five Decades.... Three Generations.... One Tradition.2251 West 23rd St. • Panama City, FL 850-250-5981Equal opportunity employer. Drug-free workplace. BILL CRAMER GMBODY SHOPTECHS NEEDED TOP PAY! We are looking to hire 4 Body Shop Techs. Our hurricane list of repairs will make your compensation virtually limited only by your Apply in person to Ricky Caudill or call 850-250-5981 or online at BillCramerGM.com/jobs Class A CDL Truck DriverFull or Part TimeThe News Herald is accepting applications for a hardworking, responsible truck driver to load & deliver newspaper bundles to our contractors along with other related duties. Hours are late night to early morning, on a rotating schedule. Applicants must have a valid Class A CDL Florida driver license, a clean driving record, proof of insurance, a current medical card. Send resume to: sspence@pcnh.com Interviews will be scheduled at a later date. No phone calls please. Hiring will be contingent on a criminal background check and drug screen. Drug-Free Workplace, EOE Production/OperationsSEASONAL / PART-TIME NEWSPAPER INSERTERStanding, bending & lifting required. Must be able to work a flexible schedule including nights and weekends.To apply, send email to: sspence@pcnh.comInterviews will be scheduled at a later time. No phone calls Candidates are hired pending criminal background check and pre-employment drug screen Press OperatorThe News Herald in Panama City, Florida, home of the “World’s Most Beautiful Beaches” is looking for a press operator preferably with at least 2 years of experience using Web Press, must have great work history, be self-motivated, disciplined & be a team player. Ability to use a computer is required. We will train the right person in this rapidly advancing, high tech field. The position is full time & includes night and weekend work. The News Herald offers a competitive benefit package including 401(k), paid vacation and sick leave, medical, dental, vision & life insurance. Send your resume to sspence@pcnh.com Interviews will be scheduled at a later time. No phone calls please. Hiring will be contingent on a criminal background check and drug screen. Drug-Free Workplace, EOE Stock Clerk/ Sales ClerkPart time, All shifts, Apply Mon-Fri between 9am-12noon Shell Port -NW Florida’s Largest Seashell Outlet 9949 Thomas Dr. PCB. Retirees welcome. PCB APARTMENT2 BR / 2 Bath. West End. Pool. $1,000 plus utilities. References. Call Sheila 501-951-6102. Tree Service For HireLarge Hazardous Tree Removal Tree Trimming, Stump Grinding Specializing in Island Work Senior Citizen & Military Discount Fully InsuredDON’T DO ANYTHING UNTIL YOU HEAR MY PRICE!CALL (315)486-7708 Owner: Rodney Percy Lynn Haven, FL Multiple Stump Discount, Uprooted stumps, big or small (size does not matter). Affordable Rates Licensed & Insured All major credit cards accepted. Jason Milford, Owner & OperatorCall 888-500-1080 Or Text 843-271-0504 Family Tree Service & Pro Stump GrindingQuality should never be expensive, it should be expected. Affordable Rates Fully Licensed & Insured Multiple Tree Discounts and Multiple Stump Discount. Jason Milford, Owner & OperatorCall 888-500-1080 Or Text 843-271-0504 FL Lic CGC 1509556The management team of Chase Restoration, Inc. has successfully settled over 10,000 insurance claims from hurricanes Andrew and Katrina through the Los Angeles earthquake to the World Trade Center disaster. Whenever one finds themselves in an emergency situation whether it be medical, financial or legal we should look for the expert in that field. Chase Restoration, Inc. prides itself on being just that. Your construction Insurance claim expert ... let us help you maneuver through the difficult process of negotiating your insurance claim amount, recovering your loss and the restoration of your Home or Business. We are not a Public Adjuster. We are Construction experts with a vast experience in disaster restoration work. Let us help you as your Florida State Licensed General Contractor Today! ~ Veteran Owned and Operated ~CALL (850) 586-1411or visitwww.ChaseRestorationInc.com Mr. Falls Tree Experts *Storm Clean Up *Crane Service *Debris Hauling *Local Crews 1-877-Mr Falls Tree Be GoneTree removal service. Quality dependable work at fair prices. Licensed & insured For a F ree estimate Call ( 850)819-9987 Tree Services Storm Clean UpCoastal Tree Service LLCEmergency Tree Svc Storm Clean Up Crane Service Stump Removal ISA Certified Arborist Licensed & Insured 30 Years of Experience Ins Claims Welcomed 904-434-6427 ETS TREE PRO*Demolition *Bobcat Work *Stump Removal *Bucket/Crane 850-889-TREE(8733) Need help with tree removal, disaster relief, or tarping your roof? CALL Carrick TODAY 386-559-7577 *Affordable pricing *Senior citizen, Law Enforcement, and Veterans Discounts STUMP REMOVALMaddox Tree Service & Stump Removal Affordable Service Free Estimates 7 Days A WeekLic. And Ins.Call Ed Maddox(864) 809-0362 (864) 764-4364 A+TREEREMOVAL & STUMP GRINDINGBest Prices in Town! CALL NOW!!757-793-5353 A1 TREE CRANE Removal ServiceNO MONEY OUT OF POCKET!! We are in your neighborhood helping one house at a time AFTER Hurricane Michael. Please give us a call immediately IF YOU NEED HELP WITH TREE CRANE / REMOVAL TRIMMING OR STUMP GRINDING! WE CAN BILL YOUR INSURANCE COMPANY DIRECTLY!757-793-5353 Anytime Tree Removal!850-265-9794 Best Price Tree ServiceSpecialize in hurricane clean up with tree removal, tree trimming, tree stump removal, and land clearing of trees. Please contact 850-815-1669 for any tree service needs. BJ’S TREE REMOVAL & LOT CLEARING!Fully Licensed Demolition Contractors. Military and senior citizen discounts. Free Estimates! All major credit cards accepted Lic #42-2766168(850) 596-4642 *Expert Staff & Equip *Licensed & Insured *Family Owned & Operated *Crane & Bucket Svcs *Free Estimates *28 Years Experience Call Today! 970-231-9245 www.aandrtreeservices .com 24 Hour Emergency Storm Damage Svc *Bucket Truck & Crane *Stump Removal *Bobcats *Demo Clean-Up *Licensed & Insured No Job Too Big Or Small 706-238-1214 or 706-506-2020 A Family Owned BusinessHIGH LIFE Tree Service*Dangerous Tree Removal *Any type storm damage to trees *Free Estimates *Work with Ins Co.*Immediate Response850-640-1979 or cell 850-319-0866 A. Pearce Tree & Stump Service“We go out on a limb for you!” Lic. & Ins. 850-596-5067 Able Lawn ServiceWe Show Up! Weekly & Bi-Weekly services starting from $35-PCB 596-4383/258-5072 ETS TREE PRO*Demolition *Bobcat Work *Stump Removal *Bucket/Crane 850-889-TREE(8733) Alonzo Caudill Painting, pressure cleaning, and repairs. 30 yrs exp. 850-303-9669 JM PAINTINGAll interior painting, and cabinet painting. 850-460-0607 850-225-4822 Affordable & fast screen or cage repair. Call James at 239-672-3975to set up your free estimate. A+TARPING & ROOFINGCall Us Now Before the Weather Hits!!757-793-5353 ROOF REPLACEMENTShingles/Tile/Metal State Certified Roofing Contractor 850-354-5395 or 850-354-5396 Free Estimates CCC1327534 We will deal with your insurance company directly if requested. Alonzo Caudill Painting, Drywall, Yard Clean-Up, Carpenter Repairs & Pressure Cleaning Licensed & Insured. 850-303-9669 Baum Home Repairs Roofing, Soffit, Fascia, Gutters, Screen Repair, Painting & Plumbing Licensed & Insured Free Estimates 239-778-2104 Don’s Home RepairPainting, Tile, Windows, Doors, General Carpentry, Metal Roofs, Kitchen/Bath, Pressure Washing, Plumbing Demo/Junk. Insured. 850-630-9690 Have It Your Way *Disaster Clean-Up *Tear Outs *Sod *Epoxy floors *Rock/Flower Beds *Gutter/Roof Cleaning*Drainage systems *Lot Clearing *Haul-Offs *Weeding *Tree Trimming *Pressure Washing *Deck Renovations SAVE*SAVE*SAVE 850-303-8526 RICHMOND TREE EXPERTSWe specialize in tree removal and yard cleanup. We are a licensed and insured professional company that makes sure we get the job done! Low priced and based out of Atlanta, we are here in Panama City to help with any debris removal, tree removal or yard cleanup that you may need. Give us a call today for your free estimate (678)-763-5649. Design Construction & Aluminum LLC 850-371-9837 *Home construction *Aluminum Work *Hurricane Damage *Remodeling *Screen rooms *Demolition *Room additions *Pool enclosure *Debris/Tree removal *Kitchen & bath *Carport covers *Bobcat & loader work Lic# CBC1259559 Hurricane Restoration We are custom home builders from south Alabama who understand the devastation caused by hurricane Michael and want to help you rebuild your home. To schedule a quote please call Diversified General Contractors at (334)-493-0562 FL Lic# CGC1511214 Bill W. HashRemodeling & ConsultingMaster Craftsman33 yrs exp. Call 850-890-7569 NEW RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCTION New houses designed & built for you. Sit down with our design team to go over your new home. Floor plans, 3D designs for interiors, kitchens, bathrooms. We handle everything from permitting to closing. Call 850-354-5395 or 850-354-5396 State Certified Building & Roofing Contractor CBC 1250142 CCC 1327534 All Home Repairs & RemodelingWood rot, roofs, repairs, drywall, painting, vinyl, windows, doors, fencing. Licensed & Insured Sam (850)348-0207 Happy HouseDetail CleaningLic, bonded, insured850-258-1204 Residential, Commercial Cleaning. Detail Oriented.850-807-9490 970-690-3810 Duncan Concrete Exp. & Ins. Driveway & Patio Specialist 850-896-1574 1st Choice Home RepairsQuality repairs to your home done right the first time. License, Insured, and Local. Call today 850-737-3001 or 850-737-3000. Accurate Asbuilts & DesignArchitectural CAD Design svcs and plans for those looking to redesign and rebuild. Military Discounts 970-987-4476 douglasburgmann@ gmail.com dcbcaddesigns.com A CLASSIC TOUCHAn Honest Person To Clean Your Home, Office Or Condo, Lic/Ins, 18yrs exp, Free Est Call Lauri 850-774-3977 ABRACADABRA Cleaning Svcs, LLC Licensed, Bonded & Insured Condos, Rentals & Homes, Trustworthy & Efficient Call Phyllis at 731-540-5573. SELL ALL YOUR ITEMS through classified.CALL 747-5020 If you didn’t advertise here, you’re missing out on potential customers. CLOSEOUT HOUSEWARESElectric Can Openers, Toasters, Blenders, etc.REDUCED TO COST!S & S Interiors 8406 PCB Parkway PCB West End:Turtle Cove Semi-Annual Community YARD SALE Sat., Nov. 10 8:00AM -12 NOONGPS: 108 Turtle Cove Panama CityBeach: 155 Seaclusion Circle. South on Nautilus from 98. First Left on Seaclusion. Keep going around to 155 Sat., Nov. 10thMen’s 2X Clothing/CoatsLot’s of Men’s 2XL & XL Outerwear, Leather & Fabric Jackets, Wool Overcoats, pants, shorts, t-shirts. Household Items. 32” Flatscreen, Toaster Oven. Decorator items. CLEARANCE SALEStainless Steel Cookware, Pyrex glassware, corkscrews, veggie peelers, knives, non-stick cookie sheet, and much more. S & S Interiors 8406 PCB Pkwy CLOSE OUT SALE!FIESTA DINNERWAREIn Stock Only REDUCED TO COST S & S Interiors 8406 PCB Pkwy These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. The News Herald Classified 747-5020 Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium that’s your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when it’s time to buy, it’s the resource on which to rely. Spot Advertising works!

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CLASSIFIEDSE E 1 1 0 0 Saturday, November 10, 2018| The News Herald You’ve tasted our delicious home-cooked food and shopped our uniquely stocked gift shop...Now come see why nearly 70,000 employees stay for more than just the biscuits. A career with the #1 rated family dining restaurant in America is closer than you think. We are accepting applications for all positions.Exceptional training & advancement opportunities Up to 3 pay raises in the rst year Flexible schedules Paid vacation, 401 (k) and other great benetsIf unable to stop by, please apply online at:jobs.crackerbarrel.comSearch FL-PANAMACITYWe are a drug-free workplace. EOE.YOUR DESTINATION FOR SUCCESS. CASH/RETAIL SALES ASSOCIATE AND HOSTGET YOUR CAREER COOKIN’PANAMA CITY IS HIRING:520 East 23rd Street, Panama City, FL NF-1190509 Custom quality 3BR/ 2BA home. Pool w/ (3rd) outside bath. Split BR plan, lots of high end features. FP, wet bar, big rooms! Near Pier Park & Beach! $269,000 134 Colina Circle O’Keefe & Wainwright, Realtors (850)785-8746 FOR SALE3024 LAURIE AVE Avenue, Panama City, FL 32408 4112 $249,000 Mls# 676324 ~~~~~~~~~~~ 4112 Appalachee Street, Panama City Beach, FL 32408 6BR/4BA Triplex $647,000 Mls# 677150 ~~~~~~~~~~~Remy OlszewskiBroker SPLASHY BEACH REAL ESTATE 850-814-3344 St. Andrews Charmer 1303 Calhoun Avenue 2BR/2.5BA Newly renovated Price Reduced $166,900 MLS#670029 Laird Hitchcock Hitchcock Real Estate LLC (850)866-2158 NEW & USED PORTABLE BUILDINGS100,000 sq. ft. plus of Modular Building Solutions Temp & Emergency Usage Immediate delivery. Solutions for any need. Portable classrooms, offices, clinics, daycare, guard houses, camps.(469) 614-2781MORGAN BLDGS SYSTEMS Michael Morgan mmorgan @morganusa.com CONDO For SaleIMMEDIATELY AVBL, 2274 sq ft, gorgeous, 3X3, EAST END, Sterling Beach, $695K Michael -Beachy Beach R.E., LLC 850-865-8006 100 Acre State of the Art Horse Farm Over $1,500,000 invested. Completely furnished. Great for campers and/or equipment, etc. Adjacent to Destin and Panama City Beach. Drastically reduced for quick sale. No storm damage! 575,000 firm. Call Agent (850)865-0838 PROPERTY FOR SALEThis property is located at 1809 Ledger Rd Chipley, Fl. 32428. It’s approximately 12 acres and has a Cypress barn that could be modified into a home. Has well and septic tank, fish pond & cypress creek. Asking $135,000. May call for appointments & questions at 850-638-0037. Ask for Robert Watson. You can also email at smithhoward10@gmail.com **NEW** Lg. DBWD mobile home, in quiet MHP, Panama City 200’ from pool. No hurricane damage. $34,962/No Financing Call 850-960-8452 WATERFRONT Protected deep water on Bayou with boat slip to handle over 40’ boat. Unobstructed access to Bay & Gulf. 15 min run to Gulf! Approx. 88x200 tree filled lot. REDUCED $239,900! O’Keefe & Wainwright, Realtors (850)785-8746 Automotive Today 1080471 FINDNEWANDUSEDCARSYOULIKEPartneredwith 2000 Airstream30’ clean bed, dinette, no smoke or pets, $30K Call 850-326-2106 Chipley FOR SALE CAMPERSleeps 6, w/new generator in box. First $5000 850-598-7386 98 National Seabreeze Some damage from hurricane, driveable, 6K Call 850-814-2073 1996 30 ft Class C Georgie Boy. Kohler Generator, new a/c, tires and roof. Satellite tv and radio. Non-smoker, no pets, well kept. $17,500 Call 850-899-8100 1997 Fleetwood Storm 30’ RV in exc. cond. $11,995 Call 941-921-3725 RV 29 ft. FORD4V10 2008 Coachman Concord, 39,000 mi. newly remodeled. Fully furnished. $42,900.Call 937-660-0718 Brand New NEVER USED2018 Airstream Classic 33FB Beautiful, Solar package $114,900 in Davenport, FL just outside Orlando. Call... 850-819-4268 Jay Flight 27RLS 27 ft. bumper-pull travel trailer with rear-living floorplan and single slide. Elite package. Two swivel/rocking chairs, pedestal table with 4 chairs, sofa bed, TV, gas range, outside shower, glass enclosed shower, two a/c units, queen bed, 18’ power awning. Still under warranty. $22,500 pay-off. 601-310-7697 or c.dixon@usm.edu POP UP CAMPEROld but in good condition, sleeps six. Refrigerator, sink, A/C, cords for hookup, recovered cushions, clean. $2,000.00 obo CASH.850-978-2170 850-502-7882 1980 Chevrolet Boom /Crane Truck Series C-70 Air brakes, 427 motor, 10 ton 60’ reach crane $13,900 Call 334-298-4130 PRICE REDUCED2008 Harley Davidson Fat Boy, 8700 miles, 96” motor, 6 spd trans, custom paint, exc cond $7000 or make offer! Call 850-532-5995 DISPLACED BY HURRICANE? 2011 Coachmen Freedom Express, 28 ft., excellent cond., obo, $12K. Electric .leveling sys., sleeps 4, stove, oven, bthrm, slideout. etc. Text John 850-814-4762 No dealers. 1990 Ford Bronco Runs great, 4x4, Eddie Bauer, Lots new parts including A/C, Great gas mileage, A/T, Must sell this week moving. Over 10k inv. On ebay 11k and up. Selling mine for $5,500 or best offer. 386-225-1149 Must See! 2010 Mercedes E350 Loaded $12,900 Call Harry 850-832-7585 2000 Chevrolet S-10 $300 850-865-6150 2007 Toyota Sienna Van bluetooth, leather, automatic sliding doors, camera, navigation,. 8 passenger, one owner, extra clean. $5995. 770-616-7399 If you didn’t advertise here, you’re missing out on potential customers. SELL ALL YOUR ITEMS through classified.CALL 747-5020 If you didn’t advertise here, you’re missing out on potential customers. Need a helping hand? Advertise in the Help Wanted Section in the Classifieds! 747-5020 Spot Advertising works! Call To Place An Ad 747-5020