Citation
News-herald

Material Information

Title:
News-herald
Uniform Title:
News-herald (Panama City, Fla. : 1970)
Added title page title:
Panama City News Herald
Place of Publication:
Panama City, FL
Publisher:
Halifax Media Group, Tim Thompson - Publisher, Mike Cazalas - Editor
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama City (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Bay County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Florida -- Bay County ( fast )
Florida -- Panama City ( fast )
Genre:
Newspapers. ( fast )
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Newspapers ( fast )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Bay -- Panama City
Coordinates:
30.166847 x -85.665513

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (May 1, 1970)-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Halifax Media Group, Tim Thompson - Publisher, Mike Cazalas - Editor. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
34303828 ( OCLC )
sn 96027210 ( LCCN )
ocm34303828

Related Items

Preceded by:
Panama City news
Preceded by:
Panama City herald (Panama City, Fla. : 1952)

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WASHINGTON (AP) — The Republican-led House on Thursday approved a multibillion-dollar defense policy bill despite a White House veto threat. The vote was 270-156, more than enough to sustain a veto. The $612 billion bill — covering new ships, aircraft and pay raises for military personnel — authorizes an increase in spending President Barack Obama had requested, but he strenuously opposes the way Congress did it. Lawmakers increased defense spending by padding a separate war-fighting account with an extra $38.3 billion. That account — for overseas contingency operations — is not subject to spending limits. A vote is scheduled in the Senate next week. The dispute is over whether Congress should break through spending caps when it comes to defense but adhere to them for domestic agencies. Democrats say no. Republicans argue the bill authorizes money for national security amid global threats. Rep. Mac Thornberry, R-Texas, the chairman of the House Armed Services Committee, said the bill is critical. “This is no time for political games,” Thornberry said during House debate. “This is the time to come together and pass a bill that helps provide for the country’s security. ... This is a dangerous world, and it is getting more dangerous by the minute.” Rep. Steny Hoyer of Maryland said using the warfighting account employs a strategy to “sneak around” the ceilings Congress imposed to check spending. Hoyer said the special account is handled on a year-to-year basis. “That’s why the Pentagon is opposed to it,” Hoyer said. “That’s why the joint chiefs believe this is bad fiscal policy for the military. ... Such an approach to funding undermines the Pentagon’s longterm planning process, which is based on multi-year budgets.” The bill maintains restrictions on transferring terror suspects out of the military prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba; provides a 1.3 percent pay increase to service members; authorizes lethal assistance to Ukraine forces fighting Russian-backed rebels; extends the ban on torture to the CIA; and authorizes the president’s request of $715 million to help Iraqi forces fight Islamic State militants. 75 cents Read by 83,130 people every day Call 850-747-5050 Want to SUBSCRIBE? Young ARTIST What’s INSIDE WEATHER Partly sunny and cooler. High 75, low 62. | B2 KIERSTEN SCHMITT, 5TH GRADE Tyndall Elementary School BUSINESS A7 CLASSIFIED C8-12 COMICS B8 CROSSWORD B8 DEATHS B3 DIVERSIONS B7 LOCAL & STATE B1-5 LOTTERY A2 NATION & WORLD A2-5 SPORTS C1-6 TV LISTINGS C7 VIEWPOINTS A6 COM . Facebook.com/ panamacitynewsherald Twitter: @The_News_Herald Social MEDIA House passes defense bill despite Obama’s veto threat FRIDAY October 2, 2015 LOCAL School starts a volunteer program for dads B1 NATION Gunman kills at least 9 at Oregon college A3 Businesses, PCB reach agreement on scooters By JOHN HENDERSON 522-5108 | @PCNHjohn jhenderson@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY BEACH — An agreement between Panama City Beach city staff and scooter rental businesses would allow the businesses to stay open but require some of the larger companies to scale down their inventory. Now it’s up to the Beach Council to decide Thursday whether to approve the ordinance City Attorney Doug Sale is drawing up to reflect the proposal crafted Wednesday afternoon, when city staff met for about two hours at City Hall with scooter rental business owners. The business owners have been livid at the staff for proposing an ordinance to ban twoand threewheel scooters starting Sept. 5, 2017, and immediately prohibit overnight rentals. The City Council balked at approving the law at its last meeting. Instead, council members asked scooter rental owners to meet with staff to try to work something out. “I am convinced to a moral certainty that this council does not want to extinguish rented scooters permanently from this Beach,” Sale said at the opening of Wednesday’s meeting in the council chambers. “I believe that they feel they have no choice because of the excesses. I’m not talking about business practices. I’m not talking about anything except sheer numbers.” City officials have declared scooters a “nuisance.” They say renters, particularly during Spring Break, drive recklessly in groups, block traffic, weave all over the road and drive on sidewalks. After scooter rental businesses made concessions Wednesday, city staff backed off their original proposal. Instead, rental businesses would not be allowed to have more than 60 road-legal vehicles at any location at the beginning of 2018. That means during the next two years, the larger businesses would have to scale back their inventory by 25 percent, a concession city More test scores released Bay District officials discount data, continue FSA criticism By BEN KLEINE 522-5114 | @BenKleinepcnh bkleine@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY — Bay District Schools that struggled under the FCAT continue to struggle under the new system, according to test scores the Florida Department of Education (FDOE) released Thursday. FDOE divided students’ 2015 scores on the Florida Standard Assessment (FSA) and end-ofcourse exams for Algebra, Algebra II and Geometry into four quartiles, which were based on averages throughout the state. As a district, Bay registered about 25 percent in each quartile, with some fluctuations — the largest being 12 percent scoring in the bottom quartile and 36 percent in the top for Algebra II. Multiple schools that have received D or F school grades in past years had higher percentages of students in the bottom group and a lower percentage of students in the top. Elementary schools such as Cedar Grove, Callaway, Lucille Moore, Oakland Terrace, Parker, Springfield and Oscar Patterson ranged between 29 percent and 45 percent of students in the bottom quartile in both math and English language arts. The percentage of those schools’ top-performing students ranged between 4 and 17 percent. Bay District officials discount the validity of the FSA results. They argue the quartile percentages do not yet determine achievement levels — the FCAT produced Levels 1 through 5 — because FDOE has yet to determine the cut-off scores By VALERIE GARMAN 747-5076 | @valeriegarman vgarman@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY — Reducing blight and increasing property values is the core mission of the Panama City Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA), but two of the four city CRA districts saw values decrease this year. However, CRA staff members said they are focused on improving infrastructure to help reverse the trend for the Downtown and Downtown North districts in 2016, each of which saw values decline. “We’re really trying to establish projects infrastructure-wise,” said Assistant City Manager Jeff Tillman, who also acts as the city’s CRA director. “From what COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY Property values drop downtown BILL HUSFELT Bay County Superintendent St. Andrews, Millville districts on the uptick See test scores for every school in Florida at newsherald. com . ON THE WEB Photos by HEATHER LEIPHART | The News Herald Michael Garrobo and Susan Zito stroll through St. Andrews. St. Andrews was one of two community redevelopment districts in Panama City to see property values increase this year. Values also increased in the Millville district, while the Downtown and Downtown North districts saw declines. Below , Chuck Hartzman fishes at the St. Andrews Marina. SEE TEST SCORES | A5 SEE SCOOTERS | A5 SEE PROPERTY VALUES | A4 CHILI VIBRATIONS WORLD MUSIC FESTIVAL ENTERTAINER INSIDE TODAY CHILI VIBRATIONS WORLD MUSIC FESTIVAL ENTERTAINER

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Nation & World Florida LOTTERY Setting It S TR AIGH T A story on page B2 Thursday headlined “Red tide detected in local waters” included a quote from FWC spokeswoman Kelly Richmond that lacked context. The quote, “It’s temporary and it’s just an annoyance,” was in reference to symptoms people experience while in the water or on the beach. The News Herald Panama City, Florida dDay, mMonth dDate, yYear 1 To place a classied ad Phone: 850-747-5020 Service hours: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday to Friday To buy a display ad Phone: 850-747-5030 Service hours: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday to Friday To subscribe to The News Herald Phone: 850-747-5050 To get news in the paper • Breaking news Phone: 850-522-5134 or 850-747-5045 • Non-deadline news, press releases Phone: 850-522-5134; Email: pcnhnews@pcnh.com • Letters to the editor Email: nhletters@pcnh.com Mail: Letters to the editor, The News Herald, 501 W. 11th St., Panama City, FL 32401 Note: Include name, address, phone number. • Weddings, engagements, anniversaries, births Email: announcements@pcnh.com Phone: 850-747-5020 At the ofce: 8 a.m. t o 5 p.m. Monday to Friday, 501 W. 11th St. • Church Calendar Email: pcnhnews@pcnh.com Mail: Church Calendar, The News Herald, 501 W. 11th St., Panama City, FL 32401 • Birthdays Phone: 850-747-5070 Email: pcnhnews@pcnh.com • What’s Happening Email: pcnhnews@pcnh.com To buy a photograph Phone: 850-747-5095 Circulation Directory Tim Thompson , Publisher 850-747-5001, tthompson@pcnh.com Mike Cazalas , Editor 850-747-5094, mmcazalas@pcnh.com Ron Smith , Regional Operations Director 850-747-5016, rsmith@pcnh.com Robert Delaney , Regional Controller 850-747-5003, rdelaney@pcnh.com Vickie Gainer , Regional Marketing Director 850-747-5009, vgainer@pcnh.com Eleanor Hypes , Regional Human Resources 850-747-5002, ehypes@pcnh.com Roger Underwood , Regional Circulation Director 850-747-5049, runderwood@pcnh.com At your service The entire contents of The News Herald, including its logotype, are fully protected by copyright and registry and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without written permission from The News Herald. Published mornings by The Panama City News Herald (USPS 419-560), 501 W. 11th St., Panama City, FL 32401. Periodicals postage paid at Panama City, FL. Postmaster: Send address changes to The News Herald, P.O. Box 2060, Panama City, FL 32402. Copyright Make the Panama City News Herald a part of your life every day. Home delivery: Subscribe to 7-day delivery and get unlimited access to our website and digital edition of the paper. Customers who use EZ Pay will see, on their monthly credit card or bank statement, the payment has been made to Halifax Media Florida. Online delivery: Take The News Herald with you when you go out of town, or go green by subscribing to an online replica edition of The News Herald and get unlimited access to our website. Go to subscribe.newsherald.com to subscribe to digital only. Delivery concerns: To report a problem with your delivery, call 850-747-5050 between 6 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday and between 7 a.m. and 11 a.m. Saturday and Sunday. To start your subscription, call our customer service center at 850-747-5050 or toll-free at 800-345-8688. The News Herald also is available at more than 380 stores and news racks throughout Bay, Washington, Holmes, Jackson, Gulf and Franklin counties. Did we miss you? If we missed you, we want to correct the oversight. For redelivery: Call The News Herald at 850-747-5050 between 6 a.m. and 10 a.m. Monday through Friday and 7 a.m. and 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday. Single Copies: Daily, 75 cents; Sunday, $1.50 — Subscribers will be charged an additional $1.00 for the regular Sunday retail rate for the Thanksgiving Day and other premium day editions. A $4.95 one-time new start activation fee will be added to your subscription price. Page A2 | The News Herald | Friday, October 2, 2015 RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — One per son died Thursday as heavy flooding submerged cars and closed streets in South Carolina, and the drench ing storms were expected to move up the East Coast, a region already swamped by rain. Governors up and down the coast warned residents to prepare. The rains could cause power out ages and close more roads. The approach of Hurricane Joaquin — a major Category 4 storm set to wal lop the Bahamas and move toward the U.S. — could intensify the dam age, but rain is forecast across the region regardless of the storm’s path. “Our state has seen the damage that extreme weather can cause time and time again, and I am urg ing New Yorkers to take precau tions for more heavy storms in the coming days,” Gov. Andrew Cuomo said Wednesday. In Spartanburg, S.C., the heavy rains flooded and closed streets. Several cars were submerged in flash floods. Spartanburg County Coroner Rusty Clevenger said 56-year-old Sylvia Arteaga of Spartanburg died Thursday morning when her car was flooded. She was driving under neath an overpass just outside city limits when her car flooded “to capacity” inside. Meanwhile, Hurricane Joaquin was bearing down on the Bahamas, and forecasters said the storm is likely to strengthen as it makes its way toward the U.S. But no matter which way Joa quin heads, an area of low pressure in the Southeast and a front stalled over the East Coast will pull mois ture from the Atlantic Ocean, caus ing rain over the next few days, said Bruce Terry, lead forecaster for the government’s Weather Prediction Center. The National Weather Ser vice predicts as much as 10 inches for some areas. “The bottom line is, we are expecting very heavy rains all the way from the Carolinas up into New England,” he said. The heaviest rain is expected in wide swaths of North Carolina and Virginia, along with parts of Mary land, Delaware and New Jersey, according to a National Weather Service forecast map. In North Carolina, Gov. Pat McCrory declared a state of emer gency Thursday. Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe declared a state of emer gency Wednesday afternoon, which allows emergency responders to begin to prepare for the storms. He also issued tips to residents, including that “when roads are flooded, turn around and drive to a safe location. “It may save your life.” In New Jersey, Gov. Chris Chris tie also declared a state of emer gency. New Jersey has been hit by intermittent heavy rains and strong on-shore winds the last few days, and that’s expected to continue, especially today and Saturday. NA T I O N Briefs The Associated Press THOUSAND OAKS, Calif. Officials: fire at California Planned Parenthood was arson Authorities said a small fire that damaged a Planned Parenthood facility in Southern California apparently was ignited when someone tossed a container with a flammable liquid through a window. Ventura County Fire Capt. Mike Lindbery said it smelled like gasoline at the scene of the arson late Wednesday in Thousand Oaks. No injuries were reported. Crews arrived to find the building’s sprinklers had extinguished most of the flames. Lindbery says there was more damage from the sprinklers than from the fire itself. PHOENIX Suspect in some Phoenix freeway shootings pleads not guilty A man accused in some of the freeway shootings that put Phoenix drivers on edge for weeks pleaded not guilty Thursday as his defense lawyers questioned the strength of the evidence against him. Attorneys for Leslie Allen Merritt Jr., 21, who was arraigned on 15 felony counts, including aggravated assault and carrying out a drive-by shooting, said outside court that the investigation by state police does not place him at the shooting scenes. Department of Public Safety investigators used ballistics tests to tie Merritt to four of the 11 shootings that occurred on Phoenix-area freeways between Aug. 22 and Sept. 10. SAVANNAH, Ga. Managers of Georgia peanut plant get prison for salmonella Two former managers of a Georgia peanut plant were sentenced to federal prison Thursday for their roles in a deadly salmonella outbreak. A U.S. District Court judge sentenced Daniel Kilgore to six years in prison and gave Samuel Lightsey a three-year prison term. Both men at different times managed Peanut Corporation of America’s southwest Georgia processing plant identified in 2009 as the source of salmonella ultimately blamed for killing nine people and sickening 714. Kilgore and Lightsey both pleaded guilty to charges that they knowingly shipped tainted food to customers and faked the results of lab tests. They testified last year against their old boss, Peanut Corporation owner Stewart Parnell, who was convicted on 67 criminal counts. Last week, Parnell was sentenced to 28 years in prison — the stiffest penalty ever imposed on a U.S. producer in a food-borne illness case. DALLAS Texas police: Teen confesses to stabbing, strangling mother Police say autopsy results show a Houston-area woman was strangled and stabbed more than 20 times and that her 14year-old son has confessed in the killing. Police in La Marque said Thursday the 33-year-old woman was about 5 months pregnant when she was found dead in her home Saturday. Investigators said the teenager has been arrested on a murder charge. They said Thursday he voluntarily confessed to the death. Authorities have not indicated a motive. Flooding kills 1; more rain coming EAST COAST STORMS CALIFORNIA CONTINUES CONSERVATION AMID DROUGHT FRESNO, Calif. (AP) — While rains ood the East Coast, a state ofcial said Californians have surpassed a mandate to save water for a third consecutive month, using almost 27 percent less in August than the same month in 2013. Max Gomberg, a senior climate scientist for the State Water Resources Control Board , said the results meet the 25 percent savings goal set by Gov. Jerry Brown. Gomberg also warned that Californians can’t allow themselves to be distracted by the hype of a coming El Nino weather pattern. He said an El Nino doesn’t guarantee a wet winter for California and urged people to keep saving water. The state reported savings of 27 percent in June and 31 percent in July. “Climate change is not something that’s happening in the future,” Gomberg said. “California is already dealing with the impacts.” INSIDE Hurricane Joaquin strenthens into Category 4 storm; path unclear, B4 AP photos Emergency responders help a family evacuate their home as floodwaters block the road in Harrisonburg, Va., on Tuesday. Below, a police vehicle blocks a flooded road Wednesday in Guilderland, N.Y. THURSDAY’S NUMBERS Cash 3 (afternoon) ........... 1-1-9 Cash 3 (evening) . ........... 2-9-6 Play 4 (afternoon) . ......... 8-1-1-9 Play 4 (evening) .......... . 6-7-4-1 Fantasy 5 . ......... . 3-11-24-25-33

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Jennif er (D ’S ouza) Handy , DO , has joined the pr ac tic e of Ro ger Ga mad , MD , who is no w a par t of the Ba y Me dical Sa cr ed Hear t Ph ys ician Gr oup . To gether , they ar e seeing pa tien ts at 3232 E. 15th St . in Spr ing eld . Sa me -d ay app oin tmen ts ar e av ailable by ca lling (850) 769-1533. 3232 E. 15th St. Pa nama City , FL 324 05 www.ba ymedic al.or g Tw o g rea t fa mi ly pra c ti ce ph ys ic ia ns at on e con ve ni ent loc ati on . Fa mily Medicin e Ba y Medical Sacred Heart STEAKHOUSE & SUSHI BAR 144 23r d St. Panama City , FL 850-215-6288 $10 OFF $10 OFF $2 OFF $2 OFF When you spend $20.00 or more When you spend $20.00 or more Any Lunch Entree Any Lunch Entree Monday-Thursday Dinner Only Monday-Thursday Dinner Only 144 23rd St. Pa nama Cit y Ca nn ot c om bin e with other discou nts. Expir es 10/31/15 144 23 rd St. Pan am a City Cannot co mbin e with other discou nts. Expir es 10/31/15 144 23rd St. Pa nama City Cannot co mbine with oth er disco unts. Ex pir es 10/31/15 144 23rd St . Panama Cit y Ca nn ot c om bin e with other discou nts. Expir es 10/31/15 Sushi Hibachi To kyo Love Boat NATIO N & WORLD Friday, October 2, 2015 | The News Herald | Page A3 Netanyahu: Iran deal ‘makes war more likely’ UNITED NATIONS (AP) — Describing Iran as a “rapacious tiger,” Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu on Thursday condemned the Iran nuclear deal as empowering Tehran to spread further unrest in the Mideast while leav ing the country capable of quickly making an atomic bomb. “This deal doesn’t make peace more likely,” he told world leaders at the U.N. General Assembly. Through releasing billions of dollars in sanctions relief to Iran, he said, “it makes war more likely.” Netanyahu listed what he said were disruptive actions by Iran even as the deal was being negotiated: shipping weapons and proxy fighters to Syria; arms to Yemen and to Hezbollah in Lebanon; sending top Iranian military officers to the Golan Heights, and threatening to topple Jordan’s government. “Iran’s been doing all of this... just in the last six months, when it was try ing to convince the world to remove the sanctions,” Netanyahu said. “Imagine what Iran will do after those sanctions are lifted.” Russia says IS not the only target in Syria MOSCOW (AP) — Rus sian jets carried out a sec ond day of airstrikes in Syria on Thursday, but there were conflicting claims about whether they were targeting Islamic State and al-Qaida militants or trying to shore up the defenses of President Bashar Assad. Russian President Vladi mir Putin denied reports that civilians were killed in any Russian airstrikes. Russian jets appeared primarily to be bombing cen tral and northwestern Syria, strategic regions that are the gateway to Assad’s strong holds in the capital Damas cus and the coast. The United States and allies fear Russia, which has backed the Assad family since the current leader’s father was in power, is using the air campaign as a pretext to go after anti-Assad rebels that include CIA-backed groups. U.S. Sen. John McCain, who chairs the Senate Armed Services Committee, told CNN he “can absolutely confirm to you that they were strikes against our Free Syrian Army, or groups that have been armed and trained by the CIA, because we have communications with people there.” He later said the claim was based on published reports. Russian Defense Minis try spokesman Igor Konash enkov said Russian aircraft damaged or destroyed 12 targets in Syria belonging to the Islamic State group including a command center and two ammunition depots. Officials said, however, that other unidentified groups were being targeted as well. The Britain-based Syr ian Observatory for Human Rights said airstrikes in the central province of Hama on Thursday hit locations of the U.S.-backed rebel group Tajamu Alezzah, as well as the province of Idlib, which is controlled by a coalition of rebel groups that include al-Qaida’s affiliate in Syria, Jabhat al-Nusra. Gunman kills at least 9 at college ROSEBURG, Ore. (AP) — A gun man opened fire at an Oregon com munity college Thursday, killing at least nine people before dying in a shootout with police, authorities said. The killer, identified only as a 20year-old man, invaded a classroom and demanded that people stand up and state their religion before spraying more bullets, one student reported. Authorities shed no light on the gunman’s motive and said they were investigating. Douglas County Sheriff John Hanlin said 10 people were dead and seven wounded after the attack at Umpqua Community College in the small timber town of Roseburg, about 180 miles south of Portland. He did not clarify whether the num ber of dead included the gunman. “It’s been a terrible day,” a grimfaced Hanlin said. “Certainly this is a huge shock to our community.” Kortney Moore said she was in a writing class when a shot came through a window. The gunman entered her classroom and told people to get on the ground. The man then started asking people to stand up and state their religion and opened fire. Hours after the attack, a visibly angry President Barack Obama spoke to reporters, saying the U.S. is becoming numb to mass shootings and that the shooters have “sickness” in their minds. Repeating his support for tighter gun-control measures, he said thoughts and prayers are no longer enough in such situations because they do nothing to stop similar attacks from happening a few weeks or months later. Hanlin said the gunman was killed during an exchange of gun fire with officers. The sheriff did not say whether the shooter was killed by officers or took his own life. “We locked our door, and I went out to lock up the restrooms and could hear four shots from the front of campus,” UCC Foundation Exec utive Director Dennis O’Neill said. The school has about 3,000 stu dents. Its website was down Thurs day, and a phone message left at the college was not immediately returned. Former UCC President Joe Olson, who retired in June after four years, said the school had no formal security staff, just one offi cer on a shift. One of the biggest debates on campus last year was whether to post armed security officers on campus to respond to a shooting. “I suspect this is going to start a discussion across the country about how community colleges prepare themselves for events like this,” he said. Left , authorities move from building to building Thursday to secure the campus at Umpqua Community College after a report of a deadly shooting. Far left , students comfort each other. AP photos

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Page A4 | The News Herald | Friday, October 2, 2015 PROPERTY VALUES from Page A1 we’ve seen in other areas, in other communities, infrastructure projects have really been benefi cial in increasing property values.” The CRA’s Downtown District, which includes the Harrison Avenue corridor, saw values decline about 1 percent this year. The Downtown North District saw values decrease about 3 percent. In downtown Panama City, which has seen its val ues decrease for the last few years, the CRA is mov ing forward with a major project to improve the Har rison Avenue streetscape between Sixth Street (U.S. Business 98) and Govern ment Street. The proj ect will include lighting improvements, parking reconfiguration, signage updates, sidewalk widening and a landscape overhaul to make the corridor more pedestrian-friendly. Tillman said the CRA is launching the design phase for the project and expects to host public input sessions in the coming months. The Downtown North District, which saw the larg est drop in property value this year, includes the Glen wood community and areas surrounding Bay Medical Center Sacred Heart Health System. Tillman said much of the plans on the table for the Downtown North district include land acquisition and property assemblage to encourage business devel opment, especially around the hospital. “We’d really like to see the hospital become an economic generator down there,” Tillman said. “The ability to turn the corner will rely heavily on the hos pital and properties around it.” The Downtown North CRA has about $825,000 set aside to help fund a park ing garage near the hospi tal. Other future projects include lighting improve ments down Martin Luther King Boulevard (State 77) and sidewalk and drainage improvements throughout the district, which is largely residential on the south side. “We do have funding set aside to help support the hospital and a parking garage, but we still have to gauge their interest in that,” Tillman said. “We think that’s a big economic generator in the Downtown North, and we want to sup port them.” The CRA funds projects and operations using Tax Increment Financing (TIF), a method widely used to sub sidize redevelopment efforts and community improve ment projects. Essentially, any property value increase over the “base year values” logged when the CRA was developed is funneled into the CRA instead of the city’s general fund. An uptick in property values in any one district means more revenue to pay for projects for that dis trict, as is the case in the St. Andrews and Millville com munities, which saw values increase this year. “The more property value increases, the more money goes in that trust fund and the more projects the CRA can do to continue to increase that trust fund,” said Jared Jones, pro gram manager for the St. Andrews District. Several infrastructure projects also are on the menu in St. Andrews for the coming year. “If you were to sum up the CRA’s projects this year in three words, it would be infrastructure repeated three times,” said Jones, who cited projects to rede sign the streetscape on 12th Street to improve parking and stormwater. “The big gest issue down there is the parking, but that’s a won derful problem to have.” The district also is see ing business growth. Earlier this year, the CRA board signed off on plans for the popular Mexi can restaurant Los Anto jitos to relocate to the St. Andrews District after it was forced out of its previ ous home on U.S. 98 to make way for the 23rd Street fly over. The restaurant is now under construction on Beck Avenue, with plans to open in January. “We’ve actually seen a lot of movement,” Jones said. By Da mi an We xl er , Fr eelance He alth Repor ter R ec ently, me dical profe ssionals and alternativ e me dicine exp erts ha ve tak en to the air wa ys to rev ea l a simple s ecr et th at am a zed millions who su er wi th digestion nigh tm ar es . And people ha ven’t stopped talk ing about it since . “I’d giv e anything to mak e it stop!” at ’s wh at most people wi ll tell yo u when asked about their digestive pr oblems . “I t’ s ju st hor ri ble sa ys Ralph Bu rns , a for mer digestion victim . I was tor tu re d for years by my Ac id-Re ux . My wi fe su ers wi th digestion pr oblems too . If she ea ts one wr on g thing, she spends ho ur s stuck in the ba thr oom dealing wi th se ve re bouts of constipa tion or diar rh ea .” FD A Wa rns About Po pular Antacids A re cen t FDA warning explained th at excessive use of an tacids could lead to an incr eased ri sk of hip , wr ist , and spine fr actur es . Especially in people ov er the age of 50. So wh en Alo eC ur e was pr esen ted on Na ti on al TV , you can im agine ho w thr ille d people wer e to nd out they could na lly get re lief wi thout ha ving to re ly on ph ar ma ceutical p ro ton pump inhibitors . Bu t no w, your stom ach pr oblems could be ov er by simply dr inking a sm all amoun t of a tasty Aloe Ve ra extr act ever yda y. It ’s as s imp le as th at ! Finally Ther e’ s Hope... At rst , the though t of dr inking al oe ver a migh t ma ke some people back aw ay . Bu t in fa ct , this d eli ci ous “d ig est io n cock tai l” is do in g am azing thin gs for peopl e who su er wi th digestive pr oblems --even if they’ ve ha d them for years . He re ’s ho w it wor k s Stop Stomach Indigestion Yo ur stom ach nat ur ally pr oduces acid so str ong, it can dissolve an alumin um spoon in ju st 30 min utes! And when ex ce ss acid escape s in to your esoph agus , th ro at and stom ach lining, it unleashes the discomfor t of Ac id-Re ux , hear tburn, ulcers and mor e miser y. Ad d the pr oblems of str ess , and “a ll heck br eaks loose .” Dr . Liza Le al, a well kno wn exper t on chr onic pain ma na gemen t explains ... “ e Alo eC ur e can wor k gen uine mir acles . It bu ers high acid levels wi th am azing s peed. So your stom ach feels completely at ease ju st momen ts after dr inking it .” In fact , it could wi pe out stom ach discomfor t and fr an tic ru ns to the ba thr oom . Until Now , Little Could Be Done... Bu t “ Alo eC ur e ca n h el p vir tually an yo ne . Ev en people wi th chr onic stom ach indigestion can star t to feel better ri gh t aw ay ,” sa ys Dr . Le al. And wh at ’s re al ly exciting is Al oe Cu re aid s i n keeping your d i ge st ive tr ac t he al th y, so wi th re gular use i nt estin al distr ess stops coming back. As Ralph Bu rns goes on to sa y, “I kno w Alo eC ur e never claimed to be a substitute for dr ug stor e pr oducts and is only mean t to be a helpful supplemen t. No w though , Alo eC ur e is the only pr oduct I need for all my di ge st io n is su es ” Digestion Defender #1: Balances Stom ach Acid Yo ur rst line of defense is calcium ma la te . is nat ur al acid bu er instan tly sends stom ach acid levels plunging. And holds acid levels do wn so they ar e not li kely to re tu rn ! Digestion Defender #2: Instant, Soothing Relief Alo eC ur e is br imming wi th polys acch ar ides , a “wond er ” com poun d th at ge nt ly coa ts the t hr oa t, es op ha gus and stom ach , car ry ing in st an t re lie f to cells sco rc he d by ex cess aci d. Her e’ s What Doctors Ar e Sa ying! Alo eC ur e is backed by imp or tan t scien ti c stu dies th at co n rm .. . aloe calm s stom ach acid an d allo ws your body to hea l its elf . Dr . Liza Le al, M.D & Chief Me dical O ce r at Me ri di an Me dical. sa ys , “ at ’s wh y I re commend it to pa tien ts who su er fr om bou ts o f h e ar tburn, Ac id-R e ux , ulcers , and ir ri table bo wel syndr ome ... ” Dr . 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(S ee bott om of ar ti cl e) -D oug Je wet t, CEO Am er ican Glob al He al th Gr oup FROM THE FRONT

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NATIO N & WORLD Friday, October 2, 2015 | The News Herald | Page A5 Ca ll us fo r De ta il s 27 7043 3 www .F ar Ho ri zo ns Tr av el .c om 27 Dec to 4 Ja n, 20 16 for passing. The department also has yet to give school districts a timetable for grades. “They released the scores, but it is useless data for the teachers,” said Diane Wishart, president of the Association of Bay County Educators. “It just com pares schools. As a math teacher, (I know) data can be skewed very easily, and I don’t trust the state.” The department decided this past spring that scores for each student would not count against them for demotion, promotion or other means. Husfelt said the cost of the test was about $200 million. “You just think we spend $200 million on an assess ment for our students, but we’re not going to count it against the students because we don’t really believe it’s valid, but we’re going to count it for teacher evaluations and school grades,” Superintendent Bill Husfelt said. “It’s price less. It’s like a credit card commercial.” Husfelt noted that FDOE validated the tests but then sued the testing company, and students encountered numerous technical issues during test time. High school In Algebra I, Bay High, Rutherford, Arnold and Deane Bozeman had 9 percent or fewer students who scored in the top quar tile. The bottom for those schools ranged from 22 to 41 percent. But the high schools fared better in Algebra II and Geometry. In Algebra II, Mosley had only 2 per cent in the bottom quartile and 52 percent at the top. Rutherford had 33 percent in the bottom and 10 per cent at the top, and Bay had 25 percent at the bottom and 9 percent at the top. “Taxpayers should be furious,” Husfelt said. “Tax payers should literally be screaming and yelling, ‘Enough. You need to find a way to not waste so much money.’ ” Husfelt said the district has some leeway to consider how much the value added model (VAM) will be a part of the teacher evaluation process. VAM is a formula that uses tests scores. “We’ll hopefully have the VAMs all settled by Janu ary or February,” Husfelt said. “We’re going to be as flexible and fair to teachers as possible. In that realm of trying to be fair, we shouldn’t use it all.” The Florida Association of School Superintendents still is trying to convince legislators to not use the FSA for school grades or teacher evaluations, Hus felt said. Camilla Hudson, Bay District’s coordinator of assessment and account ability, said the district is analyzing how to compare the latest test data to the data from the FCAT. She advised parents to “look at the results and then put them away” because they have no bearing on the cur rent year. Husfelt did say the dis trict will use test scores for individual students to deter mine positive or negative trends. “These tests were intended for diagnostic pur poses only,” he said. “There are people out there with agendas in regards to pub lic education; it’s a national, concerted effort. There’s people that have pushed for improvement, but it needs to be fair and appropriate.” TEST SCORES from Page A1 SCOOTERS from Page A1 staff agreed would help the larger owners recoup their investment in the scooters. King of Scooters, for example, has 600 scooters. It would have to scale down to 450 in the first year and down to 60 by 2018. There are more than 1,500 registered scooters in the city, and PCB Police Chief Drew Whitman said the sheer number makes it impossible for a police force of 58 to enforce traffic laws. He said officers could han dle it when the number was in the 300 to 400 range. “You guys have already made the first step with your safety vests, your insurance, your safety brochures you’ve given out,” Whitman told the owners. “That has helped. That has cut down on a lot of my problems. But there are way too many scooters out here.” Under the new proposal, existing scooter locations would be grandfathered in, and no new ones would be allowed. The overnight rentals prohibition would apply only to Spring Break. Scooter rental owners asked if the agreement would end talk of shutting them down, but Sale said he could not make that commitment. “First of all, we couldn’t commit even if the council will do this,” Sale said. “But even if the council does do it, they can’t commit not to undo it.” Sale said the new ordi nance would give each business a certain number of city medallions to show the scooters can be driven legally on the road. Those scooters would have to have a city sticker on them to prove they are insured. “It has got to have been inspected to make sure it’s got brakes,” he said. HE A T H ER LEI PHA RT | News Herald le photo Virgil McCranie, right, with California Cycles, advises scooter renters before they head out onto Front Beach Road in Panama City Beach.

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Viewpoints Tim Thompson, Publisher Mike Cazalas, Editor A House leader close to home? LETTERS TO THE Editor T he world has enough real problems without declaring everyone a “victim.” Bill Clinton says Hillary is a victim of a right-wing conspiracy. Lindsay Lohan, when jailed for driving drunk and breaking parole, says she’s a victim of cruel and unusual punishment. Michael Sam says his NFL career would have gone better had he not come out as gay. A Philadelphia dentist caught groping his patients’ breasts said he is a victim of frotteurism, a disease that compels you to fondle breasts. Really. People benefit by playing the victim. Activists look for people they can declare victims, to bring attention to their causes. The New York Times once called the Super Bowl the “Abuse Bowl,” claiming that during the game, many more women are abused than usual because their men get crazed watching violence. CBS called Super Bowl Sunday a “day of dread.” The Boston Globe claimed a study showed calls to anti-violence emergency lines go up 40 percent during the game. Then Ken Ringle of the Washington Post tried to trace those claims. The Globe reporter admitted she never saw the study in question but got the numbers from the left-wing group Fairness and Accuracy in Reporting. FAIR said they got them from a psychiatrist on “Good Morning America.” That psychiatrist referred callers to another psychiatrist, who said, “I haven’t been any more successful than you in tracking down any of this.” The “Super Bowl victim” claim was bunk. Sometimes I feel like a victim. I stutter. Had today’s disability laws existed when I began work, would I have fought to overcome my stuttering? Maybe not. I might have sued my employer, demanding they “accommodate my disability” by giving me a nonspeaking job. Maybe I would have just stopped working and collected a disability check. I also felt like a victim the day I taped a TV report on how pro wrestling is fake, and a wrestler beat me up, hitting me on both ears. Weeks afterward, loud noises hurt my ears. Someone then said that the wrestler’s boss, Vince McMahon, told him to hit me, so I sued McMahon. As part of the lawsuit, McMahon’s lawyers demanded I see a certain doctor, who told me, “Your ear pain is a jurosomatic illness.” “What’s that?” I said. He answered, “Jurosomatic ... like psychosomatic. You hold onto your ear pain because you’re involved in a lawsuit.” I was furious. I screamed at him, “You haven’t even examined me, and you make this accusation?” But guess what. After the World Wrestling Federation settled the lawsuit and paid me, my ear pain slowly went away. Was I holding onto pain because litigation kept reminding me that I was a victim? Maybe. It makes me wonder about those well-intended government programs meant to help the disabled. Social Security disability money used to go to blind people, people in wheelchairs, people clearly disabled. But now billions go to people who say they’re disabled by things like headaches and back pain. Disability payments have increased so much that the program will soon go broke. But the increase in payments makes no sense. Medicine improved since 1990. People do less hard manual labor. There should be fewer disabled people. Why are there more ? Perhaps it’s jurosomatic pain? Or government-handout-omatic pain? Some people are just inclined to complain, and the modern welfare state encourages that. Lawyers made it worse by encouraging people to sue, rather than strive . That changed America. When you reward something, you get more of it. We change people’s character by teaching them that “victimhood” is a way to get attention and moral status. Our ancestors never would have accomplished much if they’d labeled themselves victims. They crossed oceans and the prairie knowing that many people on the journey would die. Some of them really did end up being victims. But they were proud of striving, not proud of being victimized. They accomplished far more because of it. John Stossel is host of “Stossel” on Fox News and author of “No, They Can’t! Why Government Fails — But Individuals Succeed.” Country has too many ‘victims’ Do you think government should be more flexible on the use of golf carts in neighborhoods?YES: 45% NO: 55% OUR NEW QUESTION: Jameis Winston earned his first NFL win. Will he have a great career and buck the trend of former FSU quarterbacks falling short in the pros? To respond, visit www.newsherald.com NEWS HERALD Page A6 | The News Herald | Friday, October 2, 2015 E lected officials deal with a wide range of issues that pass before us in the normal course of governing. Since I certainly cannot be considered an expert in most of these topics, I seek out advice from those having the expertise and background to fully understand and articulate a defensible position on the subject at hand. Given that approach, I am baffled by the issue of guns on campuses. As I understand it, every college president and every individual responsible for campus security is vehemently opposed to this legislation. Yet our representatives seemingly dismiss the knowledge of all these individuals charged with the direct responsibility for safety on our campuses, and act instead in direct opposition. I have yet to hear a valid reason for pushing this legislation forward. I respectfully suggest that the best laws come about when facts outweigh emotion. It certainly appears thus far all we’ve seen is emotion. R IC H MU SGRA VE Parker Sick of money in politics In a recent ABC News article discussing who might replace John Boehner as Speaker of the House, reporter John Parkinson made the following statements: “FUNDRAISING POWERHOUSE: REP. JEB HENSARLING.” “Hensarling is a proven fundraiser.” “Their odds are greater given their less prolific fundraising capabilities.” We have always known about money in politics and shady back-room deals, but those acts have always been condemned, at least in public opinion. Now, the talk of money in politics, and how having money is just about all that matters anymore — this whole idea that it is legitimate enough to be splashed around in news stories as if it was entirely accepted — well, it is just sickening to me! We, as a people, have become so weak and so apathetic as to our role in government, our Founding Fathers are rolling over in their graves, so as not to be forced to look at us! We should be marching on Washington in the hundreds of thousands, demanding campaign finance reform, demanding lobbyists be barred from Washington, demanding legislation that declares corporations are people, and demanding that those in office who take money from foreign nations be relieved of their office and immediately prosecuted. Congress can sit around and cry all they want about not being a co-equal part of government anymore, but the truth is this: It is the people who have been disenfranchised from their legitimate place as head of government! As long as we allow the parties to divide us, nothing will change. We should march to Washington — Republican, Democrat and Independent alike — and demand our place in government be returned to us, or let those in “power” know we will physically toss them out of the Capitol on their ear! Out of 321 million souls, surely we could come up with 1 million willing to surround the Capitol and tell those traitors how it will be! It is not only our right, it is our responsibility! B OBB Y J. B A KE R Panama City Beach A fter running point on the House Republicans’ stunning slaughter — or “shellacking,” as President Barack Obama readily conceded — in the 2010 congressional elections, John Boehner was not just second in line to the presidency early in 2011. Until the Senate fell to the Republicans in 2014, the Ohio Republican was the GOP’s top dog in Washington. Yet being top dog didn’t make Boehner the alpha dog in the Capitol. In a metaphorical sense, the speaker’s gavel frequently appeared shaky in his hands, despite the fact that GOP lawmakers had a large, cohesive majority opposed to Obama’s agenda, and were egged on in that fight by loud and dedicated bands of tea party proponents. Boehner’s luster had worn off just two years later, when 15 GOP lawmakers voted to deny him another term as speaker, and never returned. This year, Boehner faced a wider, more open mutiny. Twenty-five Republicans opposed him continuing as speaker this past January, with 12 of those votes going to Rep. Daniel Webster, a Winter Garden Republican. It was the biggest public revolt against the sitting speaker in more than a century. The conservative dissidents who fought Boehner, at times with nearly as much zeal as was reserved for their Democratic counterparts, got what they wanted last week. He announced he was exiting Congress at the end of the month. Next week the Republicans will choose a new speaker, and California Republican Rep. Kevin McCarthy, the House majority leader, appears to have the inside track. Webster, however, is gamely making a bid. He told the Tampa Bay Times he is “running hard” to overcome McCarthy and any other comers. “I’m working as hard as I can to win it, and I would love to win it, and I want to win it,” Webster told The Hill last week. “I’m in this to win.” Make no mistake. Should he prevail, Webster would not veer very far from the agenda of the tea party followers who helped him soundly defeat Democratic incumbent Alan Grayson in 2010 and the conservative House members who wanted Boehner ousted. His supporters both within Congress and on the outside would expect no less — and neither would his foes, apparently. Since he emerged as a possible successor to Boehner, liberal groups and media sites, have criticized Webster’s positions, painting him as part of the radical Republican fringe. We would ask: if not Webster, which House Republican would these groups accept? The list is very, very short, to be sure. Though still portrayed as a long shot to prevail over McCarthy, Webster might be what the House, and the country, needs right now. Webster is conservative. Staunchly so. But he is also principled, respectful and concerned about the operation and image of Congress as an institution. He has more overall experience in politics and in leadership than McCarthy and has unveiled a plan to flatten what he refers to as the “pyramid of power,” wherein a few top leaders make the decisions. Webster promises to be more inclusive of the rank and file and bring order out of the legislative chaos that reined under Boehner. That alone would be welcome. Webster says he did that after becoming speaker of the Florida House in 1996, the first Florida Republican to hold that post since Reconstruction. Not all Democrats were enamored of his style, but some were impressed. In 1998 Rep. Willie Logan, a black Democrat from Opa-Locka, told the Florida Times-Union that under Webster, “Black members have been given more under the Republican leadership than any Democratic leadership.” The House needs a fresh face, particularly one that can keep the more conservative members in line. Webster might provide both.MI L T PRIGG EE | CagleCartoons.com 49 FORUM LE TT E RS PO L IC Y : Provide a daytime telephone number and home address for verication purposes. L etters may be edited for space, consistency and clarity. Please limit to 750 words. Send mail to E ditor, P.O. Box 1940, Panama City, F L 32402; or email to nhletters@pcnh.com Legislation allowing guns on campuses should die Our V I E W John Stossel Syndicated columnist MI L T PRIGG EE | CagleCartoons.com

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WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. manufacturers expanded at their slowest pace in two years last month, held back by falter ing global growth and cutbacks in oil and gas drilling. The Institute for Supply Management said Thursday its index of factory activity fell sharply to 50.2 in September from 51.1 in August. That is the lowest level since May 2013. Any reading above 50 indicates expansion. New orders and production both fell sharply, and a mea sure of hiring also declined, according to the ISM, a trade group of purchasing man agers. All three measures barely remained in expansion territory. U.S. manufacturers are getting hit by slower growth in China and a stronger dol lar, which makes U.S. goods more expensive overseas. The 15 percent rise in the dollar’s value in the past year also has made imports cheaper com pared with U.S.-made goods. Oil and gas drillers also are cutting back on their orders for steel pipe and other equip ment in the wake of sharply lower oil prices. Sales of existing homes reached an eight-year high in July before slipping in August. Americans also are getting more confident in the econ omy, and consumer spending has been solid. The number of people seeking unemployment benefits is near a 15-year low. Yet China’s factory activity contracted again last month, according to a survey of its purchasing managers. Brad ley Holcomb, chairman of the ISM’s survey committee, said uncertainty around precisely how badly China’s economy is slowing, and about the Fed eral Reserve’s next moves, are weighing on manufacturers. The weakness was wide spread. Only seven industries out of 18 tracked by the index reported growth, including printing, textiles, furniture, food and beverages, paper products and minerals. The 11 that shrank included steel and other metals, clothing, oil and coal products, wood prod ucts, electrical equipment and appliances, machinery, and computers. Manufacturers cut 15,000 jobs last month, the most in five years, payroll services pro vider ADP said Wednesday. Most economists expect U.S. manufacturing will do little for the economy for the rest of the year, with the pos sible exception of automakers. But so far, healthy consumer spending on cars, homes and restaurant meals is offsetting overseas weakness and driv ing modest growth. NEW YORK (AP) — Five years after United Airlines and Conti nental merged, the company’s new CEO declared in a public let ter that the combined company has failed to live up to the expecta tions of both fliers and United’s employees. Just three weeks into the job, CEO Oscar Munoz acknowledged in full-page newspaper ads that “the journey hasn’t always been smooth.” Since the merger, United has been plagued with chronic delays, com puter outages and dis satisfied workers, who have a reputation for taking out their frus trations on fliers. Munoz didn’t offer any hints as to how he will actually fix Unit ed’s many problems except that he will listen to fliers and employees. “We are committed to reearning your trust,” he wrote. The company set up a web site, UnitedAirtime.com , for people to ask questions and provide feedback to the airline. The airline posted a few ques tions and answers in advance of the site’s launch that focus on delayed luggage delivery, aging airplanes that lack Wi-Fi or working TVs and the poor quality of first-class meals. “Let’s be honest, the implementation of the United and Continental merger has been rocky for customers and employees,” Munoz says on a video greeting on the site. “While it’s been improv ing recently, we still haven’t lived up to our promise or our potential.” The Associated Press DETROIT Auto sales jump at Ford, Nissan, Fiat Chrysler Strong consumer demand, easy credit and generous incentives combined for double-digit sales gains at most major automakers in September. Right now, the scandal over emissions cheating at Volkswagen is hurting only the German automaker; VW’s sales were up less than 1 percent over last September. A bigger concern for the industry in the coming months might be an impasse in contract talks between the Detroit automakers and the United Auto Workers, analysts warned. Ford’s U.S. sales grew 23 percent in September, Nissan surged 18 percent and Fiat Chrysler’s U.S. sales jumped almost 14 percent. Sales at General Motors rose 12 percent, Toyota’s 16 percent and Honda’s 13 percent. NEW YORK Dunkin’ to close 100 stores, expects sales to slow Shares of Dunkin’ Brands fell 10 percent Thursday after the company said it expects sales to slow from the previous quarter at its doughnut shops. The company projects customer traffic will slip 0.7 percent in the third quarter. Dunkin’, which also owns Baskin-Robbins, kept its earnings and revenue outlook for the year unchanged. It expects earnings between $1.87 per share and $1.91 per share for the year and revenue to grow 6 percent to 8 percent from the previous year. The company also said Thursday that it plans to close 100 stores in Speedway gas stations this year and next. OMAHA, Neb. ConAgra cuts 1,500 jobs, will move HQ to Chicago ConAgra will cut about 1,500 jobs, or about 30 percent of its global, office-based workforce and move its headquarters to Chicago from Omaha, Neb., the company said Thursday. ConAgra, which makes Chef Boyardee, Slim Jim and Hebrew National hot dogs, said the job cuts exclude plant positions and do not include any impact from the planned sale of its private label operations. It anticipates about $345 million in one-time charges over the next two to three years related to the restructuring. The changes should create about $200 million in cost savings, with more than half of that realized by the end of fiscal 2017, according to ConAgra. The balance should be achieved in the following year. CUPERTINO, Calif. Apples names ex-Boeing CFO to board, diversifying its ranks Apple has filled a void on its board of directors with James Bell, the former chief financial officer for aircraft maker Boeing Co. Bell becomes the only black man on Apple’s board, helping the iPhone and iPad maker diversify its corporate hierarchy. Besides serving as Boeing’s CFO during his 38-year career at the company, Bell was interim CEO in 2005. He fills a vacancy created when J. Crew Group CEO Millard “Mickey” Drexler relinquished his spot earlier this year. Bell also sits on the boards of JP Morgan Chase, Dow Chemical and another technology company, CDW. DETROIT Almost two-thirds of UAW members reject Fiat Chrysler deal Almost two thirds of United Auto Workers at Fiat Chrysler voted to reject a proposed contract agreement with the company. Sixty-five percent of the membership voted against the pact, the union said Thursday, sending UAW leaders scrambling for a Plan B. The rejection is a slap at President Dennis Williams who pitched the deal as a fair way to compensate workers yet keep the company competitive in a global auto market. The union, which represents 40,000 workers at FCA, now can choose to go on strike, return to bargaining with the company to seek a better deal, or shift its talks to General Motors or Ford. Union workers at all three companies have stayed on the job under contract extensions since Sept. 14. Business FOCUS Friday, October 2, 2015 | The News Herald | Page A7 Precious metals (New York spot price) Gold Silver Platinum 1113.50 14.53 904.00 -1.80 0.00 -2.00 Business Source: Matt Wegner, Financial Advisor, The Edward Jones Co., Panama City 769-1278 Foreign exchange (as of 5 p.m. CST) U.S. $1.00 = Canadian $1.3256 U.S. $1.00 = Mexican peso 16.918 U.S. $1.00 = 0.8937 U.S. $1.00 = 0.6608 Nasdaq diary A P NYSE diary Market watch Oct. 1, 2015 Advanced: 1,530 Declined: 1,599 Unchanged: 95 1,163 Advanced: 1,602 Declined: 166 Unchanged: 3.9 b Volume: Volume: 2.1 b Russell 2000 Standard & Poor’s 500 Nasdaq composite Dow Jones industrials 1,097.55 -3.14 16,272.01 4,627.08 6.91 1,923.82 3.79 -12.69 The Dow 30Stocks Close Chg. 3M American Express Apple Inc. Boeing Caterpillar Chevron Cisco Systems Coca-Cola DuPont Exxon Mobil General Electric Goldman Sachs Home Depot Intel IBM J&J JP Morgan McDonald’s Merck Microsoft Nike Pzer Procter & Gamble Travelers Comp United Tech Verizon Walmart Walt Disney United Healthcare Visa $145.89 -1.41 $74.72 -0.24 $109.58 -0.72 $130.61 -0.34 $65.80 -4.40 $78.34 -0.54 $25.73 -0.52 $39.80 -0.32 $48.35 0.15 $74.06 -0.29 $25.19 -0.03 $176.02 2.26 $116.34 0.17 $143.59 -1.38 $30.00 -0.14 $93.17 -0.18 $61.42 0.45 $98.78 0.25 $49.37 -0.02 $44.61 0.35 $114.79 -0.64 $32.72 0.08 $71.95 0.01 $98.86 -0.22 $116.61 0.60 $88.36 -0.63 $42.96 -0.55 $69.99 0.33 $64.27 -0.57 $102.67 0.47 Stocks of local interest AT&T Darden Rest Gen. Dynamics Hanger Group Hancock Hldg Home Bancshares ITT St. Joe KBR L-3 Comms Hldgs Oceaneering Int. Regions Fin. Sallie Mae Southern Co. SunTrust Rock-Tenn Co. Ingersoll-Rand Engility Holdings $32.53 -0.05 $68.42 -0.12 $138.18 0.23 $13.55 -0.09 $27.10 0.05 $40.31 -0.19 $33.34 -0.09 $19.19 0.06 $16.67 0.01 $103.99 -0.53 $39.35 0.07 $9.03 0.02 $7.19 -0.21 $44.19 -0.51 $38.59 0.35 $61.97 0.00 $50.69 -0.08 $26.08 0.30 Business BRIEFS New United CEO acknowledges airline’s failures OS CA R M UNO Z United Airlines CEO NEW YORK (AP) — The battle against credit card fraud is inching forward. As of Thursday, the liability for fraud committed using traditional MasterCard and Visa magneticstripe credit and debit cards will shift from banks to stores. The move is part of a drive by the banks and payment companies to get people to use the new, more secure cards embedded with com puter chips. About half of all global credit card fraud occurs in the U.S. even though the country makes up only about a quarter of all credit card transactions, according to a report by Barclays earlier this month. In part, that’s because a 50year-old technology that relies on a magnetic stripe at the back of the card, has lingered in the U.S. despite being replaced in most of the world. The weakness with this technology is that cards can be easily copied by thieves, leaving people vulnerable to fraud. The biggest difference between the old card and the new ones is the metal chip embedded on the front, which means your personal data is much safer. The chip assigns a unique code to every transac tion made. That means if a thief acquired that code, it couldn’t be used to make another purchase. Chip cards are much harder, if not impossible, to duplicate. That makes them more secure than magnetic cards, which are easily copied. The magnetic strip won’t be disappearing — all chip cards will also come with a strip in case chip readers aren’t available — but you should use the chip reader when possible. Visa and MasterCard set an Oct. 1 deadline for merchants to switch their card machines from accepting magnetic stripe to accepting both chip and tradi tional magnetic stripe-only cards. Retailers can opt to keep using their old magnetic stripe-reading equipment, but they will now be liable for any fraud that occurs at their stores. Banks, who used to cover the costs of fraud, are off the hook. This is known as the liability switch. The national banks are in the process of issuing chip-based debit cards. Most regional and smaller banks will start rolling out these cards to their customers later this year. But the process could take years, and some smaller banks may not replace a customers’ credit card until the current card expires. More secure credit, debit cards launch A Boeing employee works on a horizontal stabilizer for a Boeing 787 Dreamliner at Boeing in Salt Lake City. CAD/USD 1.3256 AUD/USD 1.4217 ZAR/USD 13.926 Euro/USD 0.8937 SF/USD 0.9768 BP/USD 0.6608 RMB/USD 6.3512 Yen/USD 119.89 Rub/USD 65.507 Rupee/USD 65.628 Mexican/USD 16.918 AP photos Elder Brandao, working under ultraviolet lights, glues an outsole to a midsole of the New Balance sneaker at one of company’s manufacturing facilities in Boston. U.S. manufacturing expands — barely

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Bay Page A8 | The News Herald | Friday, October 2, 2015 NATIO N & WORLD

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By BEN KLEINE 522-5114 | @BenKleinepcnh bkleine@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY BEACH — On Wednesday, Bay Dis trict Schools had an initiative encouraging fathers to take their children to school. Hutchison Hutchison Beach Elementary took the initiative a step further, kick ing off the new Watch D.O.G.S. (Dads of Great Students) pro gram, through which fathers can volunteer at the school. Michael Jones was one of those fathers. He had a full schedule of activities Tuesday, including assisting students in the car area when they arrived at school, patrolling hallways, and volunteering in the school’s store to help them pick out items to pur chase for Habit High Five, a program that allows students to build up points through Prison guard conspiracy trial looms By ZACK McDONALD 747-5071 | @PCNHzack zmcdonald@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY — — The trial of a prison guard accused of conspiring to attack an inmate is approaching. Christopher Blake Christmas, 32, is scheduled to go before a jury Oct. 19 in U.S. District Court, accord ing to court records. Judge Robert Hinkle agreed to move the trial back from September after attorneys said they needed more time to prepare. Christmas was one of five Florida Department of Corrections (DOC) officers indicted on charges of violat ing 31-year-old Jeremiah Tatum’s rights not to suffer cruel or unusual punishment at the Northwest Flor ida Reception Center (NWFRC) in Washington County during an act of jailhouse retaliation. Christmas originally was set to plead guilty but reversed the course of the case in June when he decided to go to trial. All the former prison guards but Christmas have pleaded guilty to the charges. William Francis Finch, Robert Lewis Miller, James Fletcher Perkins and Dalton Edward Riley have admitted to accepting orders from former Capt. James Kirkland before slamming Tatum to the ground face first and then falsifying reports of the incident. Kirkland died from a self-inflicted The Zombie Apocalypse is here and they arrived in mini-vans. This town is full of idiot drivers. Someone arrested every 45 seconds for marijuana in the U.S. Complete waste of police time and taxpayer money. Legalize it now! School test scores look abysmal. Competent teachers, involved parents and responsible students are nonexistent in Bay County schools. Red tide causing all sorts of problems. Crimson Tide may have a hand in it, seeing as the colors are very similar. That’s my reason for it. If you can’t squall intelligently on a subject, pretend to be mute. Sex and drugs at two local fire stations. Where there is smoke, there is fire; just ask the firemen. Hi, new neighbor with the three huge, non-stop barking dogs who jump and climb over your fence and chase little kids — not prudent! I am amazed that the lawyers have not been able to figure out who they can sue over red tide. The trolls are rabid. It’s unfortunate.They ignorantly kill our community and commerce. Every “read” matters when an opportunity chooses. Wonder whatever happened to autumn? Seems like it’s jumping from blazing hot summers to cool winters again this year. If you must take your dogs to the beach, keep them under control and clean up their mess. We pray the Russians won’t take advantage of our leadership void. RESTORE funds are extortion monies. Nothing more, nothing less. Readers sound off Squall Line appears daily. Call 850-522-5133, or go to www.newsherald.com and click on the “Squall Live” icon. S quall L ine PANAMA CITY NEWS HERALD FRIDAY October 2, 2015 Section B Local & State Facebook.com/ panamacitynewsherald Twitter: @The_News_Herald www.newsherald.com CH R ISTOPHE R B LAKE C H R ISTMAS Pleaded innocent WILLIAM F R AN C IS FIN C H Pleaded guilty R O B E R T LEWIS MILLE R Pleaded guilty JAMES FLET C HE R PE R KINS Pleaded guilty EDWA R D DALTON R ILEY Pleaded guilty JAMES KI R KLAND Died before indictment SEE TRIAL | B3 Photos by P ATTI B LAKE | The News Herald Volunteer Ian Kepran swings on the monkey bars with fifth-grader Nicole Balabagno. More than 50 fathers at Hutchison Beach Elementary School are participating in a volunteer program called WATCH D.O.G.S (Dads of Great Students). The school hopes the program will help provide more male role models for students. Below , Kepran plays four-square with Mimi Deip. Men sought in attempted armed robbery By ZACK McDONALD 747-5071 | @PCNHzack zmcdonald@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY — Police are searching for three men in connection with an attempted armed robbery of a convenience store that was thwarted when a clerk wrestled a handgun away from one of them, according to the Panama City Police Department. Officers were called to the Panama City Market at 2007 E. 11th St. about 12:30 a.m. Thursday for a robbery that had just occurred. The store clerk told officers three white men entered the store moments earlier. One of them drew a gun but the clerk said he was able to wrestle it away before the men fled, police said. PCPD reported the clerk told officers he grabbed the gun and a struggle ensued. He and the would-be robber ended up on the ground fight ing until the clerk wrestled the gun away, police reported. The men fled in a dark-col ored passenger car last seen heading north on Sherman Avenue toward 15th Street. PCPD recovered video from the incident. Police described the main suspect as white, about 6 feet tall with a stocky build and blond hair. He was wearing a white T-shirt and blue jeans. Police did not report any injuries to the clerk, who declined to comment later. Anyone with information in the case is asked to call the PCPD at 850-872-3100 or CrimeStoppers at 850-785TIPS (8477). Father figures Hutchison Elementary starts volunteer program for dads SEE PROGRAM | B3 Feds, pharmacies grapple with pain pill dilemma Some patients forced into early hospice care or even suicide By DARA KAMT he News Service of Florida TALLAHASSEE — Susan Langs ton wiped away tears as she spoke of a 40-year-old woman who had struggled with cancer for a decade before a Fort Myers pharmacy refused to fill a prescription for pain medication. The prescription was rejected because it was written by a doctor at the Cleveland Clinic, a facility 100 miles away from the woman’s home and where she sought cancer treatment after her own doctors told her she was going to die. But, according to the chain pharma cy’s policies, the prescription was flagged because it wasn’t ordered by the woman’s regular doctor, the woman traveled a long distance to obtain the prescription and it came from South Florida, a part of the state once considered the pill-mill capital of the nation. According to Langston, the phar macist quit. The cancer patient’s plight is one of many stories Langston has fielded in her job as the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) diversion program manager in the Miami office. “This girl is being labeled a drug seeker, a doctor shopper. She went to a different doctor. She got a dif ferent pain medicine. She drove a long distance, and she paid cash. But she also walked in there with a bald head to a pharmacist that N E W S H ERALD FILE PHOTO Some Florida patients are caught in the crosshairs of a state and national crackdown on prescription pill abuse that’s morphed into a dreaded “pharmacy crawl” by people suffering from cancer, chronic pain and other illnesses but who can’t get their doctors’ orders for pain medications filled.SEE PILL DILEMMA | B5

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NOTI CE OF PU BL IC HE AR ING NO TI CE IS HER EB Y GI VE N th at th e Cit y of Pa na ma Cit y, Fl or id a, pr op ose s to ad op t th e fo ll ow in g ord in an ces . Th e Cit y Co mmi ss io n wi ll con sider th e or di na nc es at 8: 00 A. M. on O ct ob er 1 3, 2 01 5, a t C it y H al l, 9 H ar ri s on A ve nu e, P an am a Cit y. I nt er es t ed p a r ti es ma y ap pear at th e me et in g an d be he ard wit h resp ec t to th e pr op ose d or di na nc es. Th e publ ic is inv it ed to r ev iew th e pr op os ed or din an ce s at th e Pl an nin g and La nd Us e De par tm en t, 9 Ha rr is on Av en u e, Ro om 20 3, Pa na m a Cit y, Fl or id a, be tw een th e hou rs of 8: 00 am to 5: 00 pm, Mo nd ay th oug h Fri da y. A pe rs on wh o de cid es to ap peal an y de ci sio n ma de by an y board , ag en c y, or co un ci l wi th re spec t to an y ma tt er con si der ed at suc h me eti ng or he ar in g wi ll ne ed a recor d of th e pr oc eed in gs . Fo r suc h pur pose s, an y suc h pe rs on ma y ne ed to en s ur e th at a ve rb at im recor d of th e pr oc eed in gs is mad e, wh ich in clu de s th e tes ti mo ny an d ev i den c e up on wh ich th e ap p e a l is ba se d. Pe rs on s wit h di sa bi li ti es ne ed in g as sis ta nc e to p ar ti cip at e in an y of th es e pr oc eed in gs sho u ld co nt ac t Da rl ene Ha ch mei st er , Cit y Cl er k, at (8 50 ) 87 230 20 at le as t 48 hou rs be for e th e da te of th e sc hed ul ed he ar in g. Th e fo ll ow in g or di nan ces wi ll be pr e sent ed for an ad op ti on he ar in g : OR DI NAN CE NO . 25 67 A N OR DI NAN CE AD OP TI NG TH E 20 15 WA TE R SUP PL Y FA CIL ITI ES WO RK PL AN ; AN D AM EN DI NG TH E UT IL ITI ES EL EMEN T OF TH E CO MPR EH ENSI VE PL AN OF TH E CI TY OF PA NAMA CI TY , FL OR ID A, TO IN CO RP OR AT E TH E WA TE R SU PPL Y FA CIL ITI ES WO RK PL AN BY REF ERENC E; PR OV I DIN G FO R A REPE AL ER ; PR OV IDI NG FO R SE VE RA BI LIT Y; AN D PR OV IDI NG FO R AN EF FE CT I VE DA TE . OR DI NAN CE NO . 25 71 AN OR DI NA NC E ZO NING A PA RC EL OF PR OPER TY LOC AT ED AT 80 7 / 809 CH ERR Y STR EE T, PA NAMA CI TY , FL OR ID A, HA VI NG AP PR OX IM AT EL Y 1. 3 AC RE S, UR BA N RE SI DE NT IA L2 , PR OV IDI NG FO R A REPE AL ER , PR OV IDI NG FO R SE VE RA BI LIT Y AN D PR OV IDI NG FO R AN EF FE C TI VE DA TE . OR DI NA NC E NO . 25 72 .1 AN OR DI NAN CE AM EN DI NG TH E FU TU RE LA ND US E MAP OF TH E CI TY TO REF LE CT A LA ND US E DE SI GN AT IO N OF GENER AL CO MMER CI AL FO R PR OPER TY LO CA TE D AT 18 16 DA NF OR D AV EN UE , PA NAMA CI TY , FL OR ID A, PR OV IDI NG FO R A RE PE AL ER, PR OV IDI NG FO R SE VE RA BI LI TY , AN D PR OV IDIN G FO R AN EF FE CT IV E DA TE . OR DI NAN CE NO . 25 7 2.2 AN OR DI NA NCE ZO NIN G A PA RC EL OF PR OPE RT Y LO CA TE D AT 18 16 DA NF OR D AV EN UE , PA NAMA CI TY , FL OR ID A, HA VI NG AP PR OX IM AT EL Y 0.6 0 AC RE S, GENER AL CO MME RC IA L2, PR OV IDIN G FO R A REPE AL ER, PR OV IDI NG FO R SE VE RA BI LIT Y AN D PR OV IDIN G FO R AN EF FE CTIV E DA TE . OR DI NAN CE NO . 25 73 .1 AN OR DI NAN CE AM END ING TH E FU TU RE LA ND US E MAP OF T HE CI TY TO REF LE CT A LA ND US E DE SI GN AT IO N OF MI XE D US E FO R PR OPERT Y LOC AT ED ON BA LD WI N ROA D WE ST OF ST AT E AV EN UE , PA NAMA CI TY , FL OR ID A, PR OV IDI NG FO R A RE PE AL ER, PR OV IDI NG FO R SE VE RA BI LI TY , AN D PR OV IDIN G FO R AN EF FE CT IV E DA TE . OR DI NAN CE NO . 25 73 .2 AN OR DI NAN CE ZO NIN G A PA RC EL O F PR OPE RT Y ON BA LD W IN ROA D WE ST OF ST AT E AV EN UE , PA NAMA CI TY , FL OR ID A, HA VI NG AP PR OX IM AT EL Y 0. 91 AC RE S, MI XE D US E2, PR OV IDI NG FO R A REPE AL ER , PR OV IDI NG FO R SE VE RA BI LI TY AN D PR OV IDIN G FO R AN EF FE CTIV E DA TE . Th e fo ll ow in g or di n a nc e wi ll be p re se nt ed for a r st re ad ing : OR DI NAN CE 25 75 AN OR DI NAN CE VA CA TI NG AN D AB AN DO NI NG AN AL LE Y EA SE MEN T LOCA TE D ON TH E PR OPERT Y LOC AT ED AT 80 7/ 809 CH ERR Y STR EE T, PA NAMA CI TY , FL OR ID A, AS MORE PA RTI C UL AR LY HERE IN AF TE R DE SC RI BE D; RE PE AL ING AL L OR DI NAN CE S IN CO NF LI CT HE RE WI T H; PR OV IDIN G FO R TH E SE VE RA BI LIT Y OF AN Y PA RT OF TH IS OR DI NAN CE DEC LA RE D IN VA LI D; AN D PR OV IDIN G FO R AN EF FE CT I VE DA TE . Page B2 | The News Herald | Friday, October 2, 2015 6 a.m Noon 6 p.m Low Hazard Medium Hazard High Hazard Water closed to public Dangerous Marine Life High Low 74/58 74/61 71/59 75/62 75/63 73/61 71/61 70/61 72/61 64/57 72/62 70/61 74/63 76/62 75/61 76/62 76/61 75/62 75/62 76/63 80/62 81/63 Partly sunny with a passing shower Partly sunny with a passing shower Partly sunny and pleasant Nice with periods of sun 75 67 73 70 62 Winds: NNW 7-14 mph Winds: NW 7-14 mph Winds: NNW 7-14 mph Winds: NNE 7-14 mph Winds: N 7-14 mph Blountstown 2.48 ft. 15 ft. Caryville 10.34 ft. 12 ft. Clairborne 35.49 ft. 42 ft. Century 6.28 ft. 17 ft. Coffeeville, AL 1.94 ft. 29 ft. Through 7 a.m. Thu. Apalachicola 6:16a 12:57a 9:22p 2:16p Destin 1:02a 12:09p ----West Pass 5:49a 12:30a 8:55p 1:49p Panama City 12:38a 11:32a ----Port St. Joe 12:29a 10:58a ----Okaloosa Island --11:15a ----Milton 3:15a 2:30p ----East Bay 2:19a 2:00p ----Pensacola 1:35a 12:43p ----Fishing Bend 2:16a 1:34p ----The Narrows 3:12a 3:34p ----Carrabelle 4:51a 12:03p 7:57p 11:24p Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. 15 Last New First Full Oct 4 Oct 12 Oct 20 Oct 27 Sunrise today ........... 6:36 a.m. Sunset tonight .......... 6:27 p.m. Moonrise today ...... 10:24 p.m. Moonset today ....... 11:22 a.m. Today Sat. Today Sat. Clearwater 85/72/pc 81/74/pc Daytona Beach 83/67/pc 83/66/pc Ft. Lauderdale 89/73/c 87/72/pc Gainesville 80/62/t 76/61/pc Jacksonville 75/63/sh 76/61/pc Jupiter 88/71/c 87/70/s Key Largo 88/77/c 86/77/pc Key West 88/79/c 85/78/pc Lake City 77/61/pc 73/62/pc Lakeland 87/67/pc 82/69/pc Melbourne 86/70/c 85/69/pc Miami 91/73/c 87/72/pc Naples 87/76/c 85/75/pc Ocala 81/62/pc 77/64/pc Okeechobee 87/67/c 84/67/pc Orlando 86/68/pc 84/68/pc Palm Beach 87/72/c 86/72/s Tampa 86/71/pc 82/72/pc Today Sat. Today Sat. Baghdad 107/79/s 108/78/s Berlin 66/41/s 67/48/pc Bermuda 83/77/pc 83/77/sh Hong Kong 89/80/pc 90/79/pc Jerusalem 81/65/s 84/67/s Kabul 83/53/s 82/46/s London 65/45/pc 61/44/pc Madrid 77/54/pc 77/57/pc Mexico City 71/45/t 74/47/pc Montreal 55/38/pc 54/39/pc Nassau 87/76/t 88/75/pc Paris 66/47/s 69/47/pc Rome 71/57/t 72/56/pc Tokyo 79/64/pc 76/63/s Toronto 56/42/pc 54/47/c Vancouver 60/48/r 64/49/s Today Sat. Today Sat. Albuquerque 86/56/s 81/56/s Anchorage 46/40/r 48/39/r Atlanta 63/58/t 62/60/r Baltimore 54/48/r 59/54/r Birmingham 65/57/sh 66/59/pc Boston 55/48/r 55/49/sh Charlotte 58/54/r 62/60/r Chicago 60/48/pc 59/51/c Cincinnati 62/47/r 58/52/r Cleveland 60/46/c 55/49/r Dallas 81/55/s 80/58/s Denver 73/45/t 63/43/c Detroit 61/45/pc 57/50/r Honolulu 86/75/pc 86/77/c Houston 83/56/s 82/58/s Indianapolis 63/48/pc 58/51/sh Kansas City 65/43/pc 66/44/c Las Vegas 88/68/s 90/68/s Los Angeles 85/65/s 85/65/s Memphis 72/56/pc 70/57/s Milwaukee 58/47/pc 58/49/c Minneapolis 61/41/s 61/41/s Nashville 61/52/r 62/56/sh New Orleans 80/64/s 78/64/s New York City 55/49/r 56/54/r Oklahoma City 71/48/c 70/52/c Philadelphia 55/50/r 58/55/r Phoenix 97/68/s 95/71/s Pittsburgh 63/44/c 54/50/r St. Louis 66/51/s 67/52/pc Salt Lake City 65/51/r 68/50/s San Antonio 90/63/s 87/61/s San Diego 79/68/pc 78/69/s San Francisco 73/57/s 66/57/s Seattle 63/51/sh 66/52/pc Topeka 66/43/pc 66/45/c Tucson 96/65/s 92/69/s Wash., DC 56/50/r 61/57/r Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Gulf Temperature: 80 Today: Wind from the north at 8-16 knots. Seas 2-4 feet. Visibility less than 2 miles in an afternoon shower; otherwise, clear. Tomorrow: Wind from the north-northwest at 8-16 knots. Seas 2-4 feet. Visibility less than 2 miles in a shower; otherwise, clear. Partly sunny and cooler today with a passing shower. Winds north 8-16 mph. Partly cloudy tonight. Winds northnorthwest 7-14 mph. High/low ......................... 80/71 Last year's High/low ...... 85/68 Normal high/low ............. 85/66 Record high ............. 91 (1994) Record low ............... 44 (1993) 24 hours through 4 p.m. .. 0.00" Month to date .................. 0.00" Normal month to date ...... 0.15" Year to date ................... 35.87" Normal year to date ....... 49.14" Average humidity .............. 82% through 4 p.m. yesterday High/low ......................... 80/70 Last year's High/low ...... 85/70 Normal high/low ............. 83/68 Record high ............. 94 (1986) Record low ............... 37 (1967) 24 hours through 4 p.m. .. 0.00" Month to date .................. 0.00" Normal month to date ...... 0.20" Year to date ................... 40.94" Normal year to date ....... 49.53" Average humidity .............. 78% PANAMA CITY Port St. Joe Apalachicola Tallahassee Perry Quincy Monticello Marianna Chipley DeFuniak Springs Pensacola FORT WALTON BEACH Crestview Destin Carrabelle Mobile Bainbridge Valdosta FLORIDA CITIES City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W WORLD CITIES City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W NATIONAL CITIES City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W TODAY FIVE DAY FORECAST FOR NORTHWEST FLORIDA High Low REGIONAL WEATHER Weather(W): ssunny, pcpartly cloudy, ccloudy, shshowers, tthunderstorms, rrain, sfsnow urries, snsnow, iice. Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows. Shown are today’s noon postions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. TIDES MARINE FORECAST BEACH FLAG WARNINGS The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. 0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High; 11+ Extreme 10 a.m. Noon 2 p.m. 4 p.m. UV INDEX TODAY ALMANAC SUN AND MOON MOON PHASES RIVER LEVELS Offshore Northwest Florida Flood Level Stage Apalachicola Choctawhatchee Alabama Escambia Tombigbee Temperatures Precipitation Panama City Temperatures Precipitation Fort Walton Beach WEATHER

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LOCA L & STATE Friday, October 2, 2015 | The News Herald | Page B3 Kathy C. Flores Kathy C. Flores, 64, of Panama City, Fla., died Thursday, Oct. 1, 2015. Arrangements are incomplete and will be announced by KentForest Lawn Funeral Home. Deacon Edward Charles Sims, 64 of Panama City, Fla., passed away on Sept. 19, 2015. Calling hours for Deacon Sims will be held on Friday, Oct. 2, 2015, at Greater Faith F.B. Church 1904 E. 9th St., Panama City, FL 32401 from 6 p.m. until 8 p.m. The Funeral Service will be held at Neal Temple F.B. Church 900 East 11th St., Panama City, FL 32401 on Saturday, Oct. 3, 2015 at 11 a.m. Interment will follow in the Hillside Cemetery. He is survived by his wife, Christine Sims, his daughter, Janelle Parrish, sons, LeVeone Parrish, Micheal Parrish, six grandchildren, his mother, Katie Lee Sims, five sisters, Arrie Kirkland, Christine Dunklin, Matharine Jones, Lucky Naylor, and Rochelle Williams; five brothers, Alex Sims, Jr., Robert Sims, Terry Sims, Willie Sims, and Samuel Sims. He was preceded in death by his father, Alex Sims, Sr. Edward Charles “MC” will be greatly missed by family and friends. “The Right Choice.” Russell A. Wright, Sr. Mortuary 1547 Lisenby Avenue Panama City, FL 32405 (850) 640-2077 is in charge of the arrangements. Email condolences can be sent to rawsrmort@ comcast.net. Visit our website: www. russellawrightsrmortuary. com Edward Charles Sims DEATHS & FUNERALS Guidelines & deadlines Obituary notices are written by funeral homes and relatives of the deceased. The News Herald reserves the right to edit for AP style and format. Families submitting notices must type them in a typeface and font that can be scanned into a computer. Deadline for obituaries is 3 p.m. daily for the following day’s newspaper. Obituaries may be e-mailed to pcnhobits@pcnh.com or delivered to The News Herald, 501 W. 11th St., Panama City. Online guest books View today’s obituaries and sign the online guest books of your loved ones at newsherald.com/obituaries Mieko Benge Mieko Benge, 65 of Panama City, died Sunday, Sept. 27, 2015. Friends will be received Friday from 6–9 p.m. at the Kent-Forest Lawn Funeral Home. Inurnment will take place privately in KentForest Lawn Cemetery. EDWARD CHARLES SIMS JoAnn Rogers Reinardo ‘Ray’ Garcia Huguette Seror Hatchell Dudley Huguette Seror Hatchell Dudley, 89, of Lynn Haven, Fla., died on Monday, Sept. 28, 2015. A memorial will be held at 10 a.m., Friday, Oct. 2, 2015, in the Chapel at Heritage Funeral Home. A reception will follow immediately after the service at the Panama Country Club in Lynn Haven. To extend condolences, please visit www.heritagefhllc.com. Reinardo “Ray” Garcia, 64, of Panama City died Wednesday, Sept. 30, 2015. Funeral services will be held at 7 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 3, 2015, at Southerland Family Funeral Home Chapel. The family will receive friends from 4-8 p.m. on Saturday at the funeral home. Ms. JoAnn Rogers, 76, of Panama City, FL, died Tuesday, Sept. 22, 2015. Funeral services will be held today, Oct. 2, 2015, at 11 a.m. at Mt. Olive Missionary Baptist Church, 719 E 13th Ct, Panama City, FL. Interment will follow at the Hillside Cemetery. The remains will lie in state one hour prior to Funeral Services. Battle Funeral Home is entrusted with arrangements. Emma ‘Kitty’ Leamon Jordan Emma “Kitty” Leamon Jordan, 90, of Southport, FL, died Monday, Sept. 28, 2015. Celebration of Life will be held at 11 a.m. Friday, Oct. 2, 2015 at Kent-Forest Lawn Funeral Home. Interment will follow at Forest Lawn Memorial Cemetery. Family will receive friends 68 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 1, 2015 at Kent-Forest Lawn Funeral Home. Today HURRICANE OPAL AERIAL PHOTO EXHIBIT: At the Bay County Public Library, 898 W. 11th St., Panama City. Details: 522-2100, NWRLS. com PICKLEBALL: 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Frank Brown Park, 16200 Panama City Beach Parkway, Panama City Beach. $3 fee includes nets, balls and paddles. Details: Carl, 314-304-6032 SENIOR ACTIVITIES: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Panama City Beach Senior Center, 423 Lyndell Lane, Panama City Beach. Classes offered throughout the week on a variety of activities including yoga, strength and chair exercises, carving, cribbage, bocce, card games and more. Details and schedule: 236-3038 ADULT LITERACY CLASS: 10 a.m. at the Bay County Public Library, 898 W. 11th St., Panama City. Reading classes with pronunciation. Details: 5222100, NWRLS.com SEA NEEDLES: 10 a.m. at the Panama City Beach Library, 12500 Hutchison Blvd., Panama City Beach. Knitting group invites all needle crafters to join in and knit as well as crochet, embroidery and cross-stitch. Details: 233-5055, NWRLS. com START HERE GO ANYWHERE: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Gulf Coast State College, 5230 W. U.S. 98, Panama City, in the Amelia Center Main Gallery. An exhibit of art created by alumni of Gulf Coast’s visual arts program including works of sculpture, ceramics, photography, painting, drawing, mixed media and animation. Exhibit remains open during gallery hours through Oct. 8. Details: Pavel Amromin, pamromin@gulfcoast.edu or 872-3886 ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE: 1 p.m. at the Panama City Beach Library, 12500 Hutchison Blvd., Panama City Beach. Intermediate level with conversation and pronunciation. Details: 2335055, NWRLS.com FLEET RESERVE ANNUAL TURKEY SHOOT: 5-9 p.m. at 2117 Wilkinson Ave., Panama City Beach. Details: 234-5521 FREE ART FRIDAYS: 1-6 p.m. at CityArts Cooperative, 318 Luverne Ave. Details: 7690608, CityArtsCooperative.com 19TH ANNUAL FLORIDA SCALLOP AND MUSIC FESTIVAL: 5-9 p.m. Friday and 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday at George Core Park in Port St. Joe with headliner Phil Vassar, artsand-craft vendors and food carts lined up along Miss Zola’s Drive. Scallops sold in 5-pound bags for $40. Friday lineup: Bo Spring Band at 5 p.m., Amanda Cook and Kennesaw Ridge at 6:30 p.m. and John King at 8 p.m. Saturday schedule: Thirty Three at noon ET, CrossRoads at 12:30 p.m., Buddy Hamm and Mark Swindel at 2 p.m. , Konkrete Soul at 3:30 p.m., Charlie and Dana Black at 6:30 p.m. and Vassar at 8 p.m. Tickets: $5 Friday and Saturday until 5 p.m.; $10 after 4 p.m. Saturday; VIP tickets available. Admission free for ages 6 and younger and active military personnel with vaild I.D. Details: ScallopFest.com DANCING THROUGH LIFE UNAFRAID: 6-8 p.m. at FSU Panama City’s Holley Lecture Hall, 4750 Collegiate Drive, Panama City. Featuring world-champion dancers Eric Luna and Georgia Ambarian. The event is free and open to the public. To RSVP, call 770-2301. FRIDAY FEST: 6-10 p.m. the first Friday of each month through November along Harrison Avenue in downtown Panama City with bands, classic cars, extended business hours and vendors. Details: PCFridayFest. com BALLROOM DANCING: 6:30-8:30 p.m. at the Grand Square Hall, 1105 Bob Little Road, Panama City. For all levels, beginners and up. Come enjoy good music on the best dance floor in the area. $5 per person at the door. Details: Dirk Gordon, 277-0566 Saturday HURRICANE OPAL AERIAL PHOTO EXHIBIT: At the Bay County Public Library, 898 W. 11th St., Panama City. Details: 522-2100, NWRLS. com COMMUNITY YARD SALE : 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at St. Andrews Bay Center, 1700 Alabama Ave. Lynn Haven. Space available to rent. GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT FARMERS’ MARKET: 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Capt Anderson’s on Thomas Drive. Enjoy the region’s finest makers, bakers and growers at PCB’s year-round farmers’ market. Live music, free tastings and family fun. Details: WaterfrontMarkets.org or 763-7359 ST. ANDREWS WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Smith Yacht Basin beside the Shrimp Boat Restaurant, 12th Street and Beck Avenue. Rain or shine. Vendors, live music, Kids Craft table. Bring a fishing pole and stay for the day. Details: HistoricStAndrews.com/ market or 872-7208 10TH ANNUAL TICKLED PINK POKER RUN: Registration is 8:30-10 a.m. at the Barn at Wicked Wheel Bar and Grill, 10025 Hutchison Blvd., Panama City Beach. Breast cancer awareness poker run. First bike out at 9 a.m. with stops throughout Bay County before meeting back up at the Barn at 2:30 p.m. Raffle drawing at 3 p.m. Details: thunderangelspc@gmail. com or 265-9691 GRAND BOULEVARD FARMERS’ MARKET AT SANDESTIN: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at 600 Grand Blvd., Miramar Beach. SEASIDE FARMERS MARKET: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Seaside Amphitheatre. Fresh produce, baked goods, dairy products and other unique offerings, cooking demos and activities. Year-round event. Details: SeasideFL.com ART ON THE SPOT: 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. at Floriopolis, 1125 Beck Ave., Panama City. Drop-in anytime to do a quick art project. All ages. Donations welcome. BLESSING OF THE ANIMALS: 10 a.m. at St. Andrews Episcopal Church, 1608 Baker Court, Panama City. The blessing is held in the pet garden between the two office complex buildings. The church invites everyone to bring pets for blessing. Details: 763-7636 CHILI VIBRATIONS WORLD MUSIC FESTIVAL: Gates open at 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday at Aaron Bessant Park for International Chili Cook-Off. (Spinnaker Beach Club hosts a Vibe Pre-Party on Friday with Yamadeo at 8 p.m.) Saturday lineup: El Dub at noon, Heritage at 1:30 p.m., Hor!zen at 3:45 p.m., The Wailers at 6 p.m., and Rebelution at 8:15 p.m. (Sway Jah Vu plays at the after-party at 10 p.m. at Spinnaker.) Sunday lineup: Sway Jah Vu at 11 a.m., Leilani Wolfgramm at 1 p.m., Rootz Underground at 3:15 p.m., G-Love and Special Sauce at 5:30 p.m. (Spinnaker’s after-party features Heritage at 8 p.m.) Details: Chilivibrations.com GET TO KNOW FTA HIKE: 10 a.m. at Conservation Park, 100 Conservation Drive, Panama City Beach. Join the Florida Trail Association for a leisurely hike open to all levels of hikers to learn about the park, the FTA and the Florida Trails. Details: PanhandleFTA@gmail.com HURRICANE OPAL: TWENTY YEARS LATER: 11 a.m. at the Bay County Public Library, 898 W. 11th St., Panama City. WJHG Meteorologist Tyler Allender discusses Hurricane Opal as the library observes the 20th anniversary of this devastating storm. Details: 5222100, NWRLS.com ARTISTS IN ACTION : 1-6 p.m. at CityArts Cooperative, 318 Luverne Ave. Free. Details: 769-0608, CityArtsCooperative.com FREE WINE TASTING: 1-4 p.m. every Saturday at Carousel Supermarket, 19440 Front Beach Road in Panama City Beach. Details: 234-2219 FLEET RESERVE ANNUAL TURKEY SHOOT: 5-9 p.m. at 2117 Wilkinson Ave., Panama City Beach. Details: 234-5521 LIFE ON THE GAY LIST: 8 p.m. at the Martin Theatre, 409 Harrison Ave., Panama City. Jason Dottley, star of “Sordid Lives: The Series” star and threetime Top 25 Billboard recording artist, presents his debut one-man show about life when you’re gay, divorced and over 30. Details and tickets: LifeOnTheGayList.com Sunday HURRICANE OPAL AERIAL PHOTO EXHIBIT: at the Bay County Public Library, 898 W. 11th St., Panama City. Details: 522-2100, NWRLS.com GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT FARMERS’ MARKET: 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Capt Anderson’s on Thomas Drive. Enjoy the region’s finest makers, bakers and growers at PCB’s year-round farmers’ market. Live music, free tastings and family fun. Details: WaterfrontMarkets.org or 763-7359 30A FARMERS MARKET: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on North Barrett Square in Rosemary Beach. Each Sunday join this community event featuring fresh vegetables, fruits, eggs, honey, cheese, preserves, sauces, bread, sweets, prepared foods to go and much more. Details: 30aFarmersMarket.com COASTAL FARMERS MARKET: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at WaterColor Inn & Resort, 34 Goldenrod Circle, Santa Rosa Beach. CHILI VIBRATIONS WORLD MUSIC FESTIVAL: Gates open at 10 a.m. at Aaron Bessant Park for International Chili Cook-Off. Sunday lineup: Sway Jah Vu at 11 a.m., Leilani Wolfgramm at 1 p.m., Rootz Underground at 3:15 p.m., G-Love and Special Sauce at 5:30 p.m. (Spinnaker’s after-party features Heritage at 8 p.m.) Details: Chilivibrations.com NATIONAL LIFE CHAIN: 2-3 p.m. in the Hobby Lobby parking lot, 820 W. 23rd St., Panama City. Join Saint Dominic Catholic Church and other area churches for a quiet, peaceful and prayerful public display of pro-life witnessing. Signs provided starting at 1:45 p.m. Details: Veronica Kemeny, 890-2047 GRAND SQUARE ROUNDS: 2:30-5:30 p.m. at Grand Square Hall, 1105 Bob Little Road, Springfield. Ballroom dance lesson until 3:30 p.m., followed by dancing. $10 per couple. Details: 265-9488 or 814-3861 AMERICANA CAF SUNDAYS: 4 p.m. concert with touring singer/songwriters at Roberts Hall, 831 Florida Ave, Lynn Haven; hosted by Lucky Mud. Come early for open mic session at 3 p.m.; doors open at 2:30 p.m. Donations appreciated. Details: 722-4915 HOOP DANCE CLASS: 6-7 p.m. at CityArts Cooperative, 318 Luverne Ave., Panama City, with Heather Clements. Beginners welcome; hoops available to borrow or buy. Details: 769-0608 What’s HA PP EN I N G Saturday and Sunday events: By 5 p.m. Wednesday Monday and Tuesday events: By noon Thursday Wednesday events: By 5 p.m. Monday before Thursday events: By 5 p.m. Tuesday before Friday events: By 5 p.m. Wednesday before Email events to pcnhnews@pcnh.com WHAT’S HAPPENING DEADLINES gunshot wound before he could be indicted in the case. The arrests of the officers stemmed from an Aug. 5, 2014, incident when Tatum was left severely injured. Prosecutors claim Kirkland sought retaliation for a pre vious incident when Tatum deflected pepper spray onto him. Kirkland organized an incident in which Tatum was again sprayed, and Kirkland called in a five-man extradi tion team to escort him to a decontamination shower, prosecutors allege. As the guards equipped themselves for the extradition, Kirkland allegedly told them he would say that Tatum spit on him. That allegedly led to the beat ing “to teach him a lesson,” according to court records. Video from the prison showed Finch and Riley slamming Tatum’s face to the concrete floor while Tatum’s hands were restrained behind his back and his ankles restrained. The three other officers then jumped on Tatum and pinned him to the ground, according to arrest records. Christmas said he didn’t hear the orders to attack Tatum and that he helped restrain his legs because “that’s my job.” TRIAL from Page B1 good habits. During Jones’ cafeteria assistance, school staff intro duced him as a superhero and he received an ovation from the student body. Jones was off work from Tyndall Air Force Base, where he works in law enforcement in a civilian capacity. He previously worked as a chief of police in the Navy for 24 years. He said he plans to volunteer at Hutchison Beach Elementary weekly. “The principal here had plans to execute this program for the betterment of parents and children,” Jones said. “I could see it in the first day. I could see how kids responded to me.” Chris Clements, who has a third-grade son, Jayden, at Hutchison Beach Elementary, had a similar schedule Wednesday, and he wants to try to volunteer on a monthly basis. Normally he helps his son with homework and attends after-school activities, but events during school hours were difficult to attend because of work. “I never volunteered before at either one of my kids’ schools,” he said. “I’m trying to be with them more.” The idea — the first for a Bay District school, according to Hutchison Beach Elementary — came from Principal Glenda Nouskhajian and Assistant Administrator Chris Coan with a goal of increasing overall parental involvement but exposing children to more male role models. Counting himself, Coan could only think of six male staff members at Hutchison Beach Elementary. The program has already been a success in attracting volunteers. Nouskhajian said 53 dads have signed up to vol unteer and that does not count dads who may volunteer on a regular basis. The school had a large turnout at an open house — more than 60 percent of the school population. “It did not fizzle out,” Coan said. Nouskhajian said other Bay District Schools, including C.C. Washington and Rosenwald, are contemplating their own Watch DOGS programs. Jones is taking his role as a volunteer seriously, already looking to be a mentor. He asked several students what they wanted to be when they grow up and then advised them to give back half of their allowance for college. “Every time your mother gives you money, give half of it back,” he said. “You’ve got to take school seriously.” Jones praised Nouskhajian leading by example because that is one of his top values, something he took away from his father who was a pastor. He wants to continue to set an example for kindergartner Christian, 4-year-old Justin and 1-year-old Jasmine. “Kids do what they see,” he said. “If they see daddy sitting back at home, eating Pop-Tarts and playing video games, they’ll see that as OK.” A new dad will be at the school Monday and Watch D.O.G.S. will continue at the school periodically throughout the year. PROGRAM from Page B1

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LOCA L & STATE Page B4 | The News Herald | Friday, October 2, 2015 We ’ve been where you want to go!! CRUISE ABOARD THE Tw o trips: July 5-17 & July 19-31, 2016 Fly to Seattle, Sail fr om Va ncouver , Visit Ketchikan, Juneau, Skagway , Glacier Bay , College Fjor d Whittier , Anchorage, Ta lkeetna, Denali National Park, Fairbanks. INCLUDES AIR, TRANSFERS, 7 NIGHT CRUISE, 5 NIGHTS HOTEL, ALASKA RAILROAD, TOURS IN SEA TTLE, ANCHORAGE, TA LKEETNA, DENALI, WILDLIFE TOUR, FA IRBANKS, RIVERBOA T DISCOVER Y. Fly to Seattle, Sail fr om V ancouver , Visit Ketchikan, Juneau, Ha pp y Bi rt hd ay to ou r Mo ther ! ME RL E RE DM O N Oc tob er 2, 19 24 – Ap ril 4, 20 06 TH E DA Y GO D TO OK YO U HO ME A mi lli on ti me s I’ ve ne ed ed yo u A mi ll io n ti me s I’ ve cr ie d, If lo ve al on e co u ld ha ve sa ve d yo u Yo u ne ve r wo ul d ha ve di ed . In li fe I lo ve d yo u de ar ly , In de at h I lo ve yo u s ti ll . In my he ar t yo u ho ld a pl ac e, No on e el se ca n ev er ll . It br ok e my he ar t to lo se yo u, Bu t yo u di dn ’t go al on e Pa rt of me we nt wi th yo u, Th e da y Go d to ok yo u ho me . We lo ve & mi ss yo u ve ry mu ch ! Re ne e Ki na rd & Fa mi ly DIREC TIONS : Fr om P. C.L @ 2nd re d ligh t in So uthpor t, Tr av el 1 block & turn L on Ma rk et St . Co nt inue Ma rk et St . & turn L on Ra ilr oad Av e. (E nd of the ro ad) We ar e the gr ey building to yo ur R. EB T EB T Fr i. & Sa t. 8am 4pm Ge ra ld Mi ller Se af ood 73 28 Ra ilr oa d Av e. Caught in the wild....Not Pond-raised Sa ve Ev en Mo re On La rg er Or ders CH EA P WO W Me dium to La rg e He adon Sh rimp SAL E $4 00 LB (26-30 co un t) (O ve r 10 LBS, $3.00 LB) Lo ca l Me dium -L ar ge He adless Sh rimp SA LE $6 9 9 LB (O ve r 10 LB's , $5.99 LB) (O ve r 15 LB's , $4 .99 LB) WO W Jumb o He adon Sh rimp SALE $4 99 LB (16-20 co un t) SHRIMP PRICES HA VE DROPPED!! Fill Yo ur Fr eezers While They Last! 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We also offer Mini Blinds, To p Tr eatment & Draperies CI ND Y CA RT ER OW NE R “O ne Qu ick Phone Call An d We ’r e On Ou r Wa y!” 785-8140 621 McK enzie Ave. Pa nama City , FL 2-3 Day Se rv ice!! “W e’ re Fa st ” 75% OFF We Ma nu fa ctu re & In st all Ve rt ic al Bl in ds, 2" Wo od & Fa ux wo od, Sh ut te rs & Dr ap er ies 18 Ye ars of Experience Mavis Nowell EACH PROCEDURE $300 LOCA TED AT PA NAMA CITY PLASTIC SURGER Y 850-819-3937 From Staff Reports MARIANNA Man faces drug charge after manhunt Deputies have arrested a man for cocaine possession after a more than three-hour manhunt, according to the Jackson County Sheriff’s Office. Daquin Simmons, 37, was arrested early Thursday on charges of narcotics possession and battery on a law enforcement officer, JCSO reported. A deputy responded to a call for a welfare check about 10:55 p.m. Wednesday at Simmons’ home on Bumpnose Road. He allegedly saw what appeared to be cocaine on a table in the master bedroom and tried to arrest Simmons, according JCSO. Simmons allegedly pushed the deputy against a wall and ran from the home. A canine helped search for Simmons, who was caught 3 hours later in a wooded area near Valley View Road, JCSO reported. BAY COUNTY Shellfish harvest area closed due to red tide The Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services has temporarily closed Shellfish Harvest Area Sections 1 and 2 in East Bay because of red tide. The closure began at sunset Thursday for the harvest of oysters, clams and mussels. It is based on a change in conditions specifically required under the Biotoxin Contingency Plan. Water samples will continue to be collected and analyzed until the sample results conform to the management plan. The public will be notified when the area will be reopened. A 24-hour pre-recorded message on the opening and closing of shellfish areas is available by calling 850-236-2000. PANAMA CITY 2 road projects to affect traffic State road crews will begin work on two major roads in the coming days that will slow traffic, according to the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT). A crew will video and clean a pipe under the 15th Street turn lane between Jenks and Florida avenues today and Monday. Drivers will encounter minor traffic impacts from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m., according to the FDOT. Also, the southbound outside lane of State 77 near County Roads 388 and 2300 in Southport will be closed today through Oct. 9 as crews haul material to the area of the weighin-motion site, FDOT said. Lane closures will be in effect from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. The work schedule depends on the weather. TALLAHASSEE Bristol man sentenced for domestic violence A Bristol man has been sentenced to 12 years in federal prison after a domestic violence incident crossed several state lines, according to the U.S. Attorney’s Office. Robert W. McCandless, 38, was sentenced Thursday on charges of interstate domestic violence and interstate violation of a protection order, the U.S. Attorney’s Office announced. During his guilty plea hearing, McCandless admitted to violating a protection order by entering the victim’s home Jan. 16. He and the victim had lived together previously for about five years and had two children. After assaulting and strangling the victim with a communications cord, McCandless forced her and their children to travel with him out of Florida. About eight hours later, law officers arrested McCandless and rescued the victim and her children on Interstate 95 in South Carolina. The woman received medical treatment for injuries consistent with strangulation. PANAMA CITY BEACH Boil water notice rescinded The precautionary boiled water notice on Big Daddy Drive and Sunrise Drive on Panama City Beach has been lifted. The notice was rescinded after the repair of a water main and the satisfactory completion of a bacteriological survey showed the water is safe to drink. Residents who have questions can call 233-5100. PANAMA CITY Man pleads no contest to extortion charge A man who threatened to expose an extramarital affair of an acquaintance if he didn’t help him move to a new apartment has pleaded no contest to extortion, according to court records. Carl Joseph Coronna, 52, was sentenced to three years’ probation Thursday after his plea, court records indicated. Coronna was arrested in June after he threatened to “destroy” an acquaintance by revealing an extramarital affair to the acquaintance’s wife, business associates and social media networks if he didn’t help Coronna move to a new apartment, the Bay County Sheriff’s Office reported. Coronna also laid out deadlines for when he wanted his conditions met, BCSO reported. In addition to three years’ probation, Coronna was ordered to not have contact with the victim or his family. A R EA Briefs Hurricane Joaquin could threaten U.S. ELEUTHERA, Bahamas (AP) — Hurricane Joaquin unleased heavy flooding as it roared through sparsely populated islands in the eastern Bahamas on Thurs day as a Category 4 storm, with forecasters warning it could grow even stronger before carving a path that would take it near the U.S. East Coast. The storm battered trees and buildings as surging waters reached the win dows of some homes on Long Island in the Bahamas and inundated the airport runway at Ragged Island. There were no immediate reports of casualties, accord ing to Capt. Stephen Russell, the director of the Bahamas National Emergency Man agement Agency. The National Hurricane Center in Miami says the Cuban government has issued a tropical storm warn ing for several provinces. Prime Minister Perry Christie said he was amend ing laws to mandate evacua tions because some people were refusing to move into shelters. “We do not know the impact of 130 miles an hour on those areas,” he said, referring to the hurricane’s winds. “We know it’s a hor rific kind of experience.” Christie and other top-ranking officials also deflected accusations that the government was not prepared and that residents were not properly advised. The storm is expected to move near or over por tions of the central Bahamas overnight. People on the island of Eleuthera braced for the approaching storm late Thursday as they hauled sandbags and boarded up businesses. “It’s going to be a scary storm,” said 42-year-old con struction worker Jason Petty as he pointed at towering clouds gathering in the dis tance as the sun went down in Eleuthera. “It looks nice now, but later on it’s going to be terrible, just terrible.” Petty was helping friend Demetrius Johnson, owner of Majestic 9 barber shop, prepare for the storm. Johnson had been sharing pictures of the damage in Acklins and other islands through Whatsapp as he waited for the storm. The storm was predicted to turn to the north and northwest toward the United States on Friday, but fore casters were trying to deter mine how it might affect the U.S. East Coast, which was already suffering flooding and heavy rains from sepa rate storms. “There’s still a distinct possibility that his could make landfall somewhere in the U.S.,” said Dennis Felt gen, a meteorologist and hu rricane center spokesman.K AITLIN M C K EO W N | The Daily Press via AP Airmen and volunteers place sandbags outside of a building at Langley Air Force Base Thursday afternoon as heavy rain falls in Hampton, Va.

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LOCA L & STATE Friday, October 2, 2015 | The News Herald | Page B5 she’s been going to for 10 years, who knows she’s none of those. And that’s awful. That’s not what we’re about. No one has ever got ten in trouble with the DEA in Florida from filling a can cer person’s prescription,” an emotional Langston said in an extended interview this week via Skype with The News Service of Florida. Florida patients like the Fort Myers woman are caught in the crosshairs of a state and national crack down on prescription pill abuse that’s morphed into a dreaded “pharmacy crawl” by people suffering from cancer, chronic pain and other illnesses but who can’t get their doctors’ orders for pain medications filled. Pharmacists blame an overzealous Drug Enforce ment Administration for the problem. Doctors — and the DEA — point the finger back at the pharmacists charged with filling prescriptions or at the corporations that have developed check lists to screen out dubious patients. Meanwhile, some patients are checking into hospice care early — or even com mitting suicide — in search of relief. Considering changes The dilemma has reached such proportions that the Florida Board of Pharmacy is considering changes to its rules regulating the dis pensing of pain medications, switching from a focus on detecting fraudulent pre scriptions to ensuring that legitimate patients get the drugs they need. But most of the play ers involved in Florida say the proposed rule change, scheduled for a vote Monday by a pharmacy board com mittee, alone will likely do lit tle to alleviate the situation. The rule change won’t have any effect on the policies of corporations like Walgreens and CVS, or on the policies of distributors who control the supply of drugs that flow into pharmacies. “So it doesn’t really mat ter what the state of Florida says, or the DEA, or anyone else, as long as the corpo ration says, this is what we think,” Langston said. Pharmacy chains won’t reveal their checklists for which patients pass muster. When asked whether CVS has such a policy, company spokesman Mike DeAngelis referred to guide lines laid out in an industry paper released this sum mer, endorsed by more than a dozen associations rep resenting doctors’ groups, chain pharmacies, pharma cists and distributors. The “Stakeholders Chal lenges and Red Flag Warning Signs Related to Prescribing and Dispensing Controlled Substances” includes myriad items related to how people behave when they present prescriptions to be filled, as well as to the prescrip tions themselves. One trig ger is whether the patient “presents prescriptions for highly abused controlled substances,” something common for patients with chronic pain or cancer. “Our corporate office will look into any complaint we receive from a patient who believes they are being denied a legitimate prescrip tion, but our pharmacists do a great job in using their pro fessional judgment to deter mine whether a controlled substance prescription was issued for a legitimate pur pose,” DeAngelis said in an email. One major concern for pharmacists involves an unwritten “30 percent rule” — the amount of pharma cies’ prescription drug orders made up of controlled substances — that many believe triggers scrutiny by the DEA. But Langston denied that such a rule exists. “There’s no number, officially, that triggers anything,” she said. DEA probes are sparked by a “totality of circum stances,” Langston said. “Volume, amount ordered, amount received by a phar macy is only one of those cir cumstances. But we know that volume alone does not always tell the whole story. We’re very aware of that,” she said. Langston is frustrated at the blame being placed on her agency. “We want all pharmacists, patients, doctors and the public to know that the DEA does not want to interfere in any way with legitimate medical care. That would be morally wrong. We want legitimate patients to get the help and the medications that they need,” she said. But a report from the U.S. Government Accountability Office this summer, based on surveys with industry professionals and DEA offi cials, found that over half of DEA registrants — pharma cies and distributors have changed certain business practices based on the result of the agency’s enforcement actions. More than half of distribu tors have placed stricter lim its on quantities of controlled substances that their cus tomers can order, the report found. And more than half of individual pharmacies and chain pharmacies reported the stricter limits “have lim ited to a ‘great’ or ‘moderate extent,’ their ability to supply drugs to those with legiti mate needs,” according to the report. In contrast, DEA officials “said they generally did not believe that enforcement actions have negatively affected access.” Cardinal Health, one of the country’s largest dis tributors, referred questions about its policies to June tes timony from one of the com pany’s top executives at the Florida Board of Pharmacy’s Controlled Substances Stan dards Committee. The DEA has instructed distributors not to ship sus picious orders to pharmacies and to report them to the fed eral authorities. Failure to do so could result in the loss of the distributors’ DEA regis tration, Gary Cacciatore, the company’s vice president of regulatory affairs, told the committee. Cardinal Health has placed “individualized limits on each controlled substance drug family,” imposed limits on particular drug strengths within a drug family and scrutinizes the drugs that the DEA has identified as being widely diverted, such as oxycodone and alpra zolam, he said. “These factors and many others play a role in our deci sions to service customers and in setting limits on the distributions of controlled substances,” Cacciatore said. The DEA’s actions may have had an even greater impact on the behavior of distributors and pharma cies in Florida. In a 2012 settlement agreement, Cardinal Health was banned from shipping and selling narcotics from its Lakeland facility for two years. Walgreens agreed to a historic $80 million pen alty in 2013 related to dis pensing of highly addictive narcotics. And, earlier this year, CVS agreed to pay $22 mil lion in fines after DEA inves tigators revealed employees at two of the chain’s San ford stores were doling out controlled substances without legitimate prescrip tions. Three years ago, federal authorities stopped the stores from dispensing a number of highly addic tive controlled substances, including oxycodone. According to the Govern ment Accountability Office report, the number of DEA complaint investigations jumped nationally from 907 in 2009 to 1,428 in 2013, as state and federal authorities grappled with a prescription drug-abuse epidemic that earned Florida the dubious distinction as the epicenter of the problem. At the urging of Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi in 2011, state lawmakers imposed strict regulations on doctors and pharmacies about dispensing highly addictive pain medications. The effort was aimed at shutting down rogue clinics that had popped up in areas like South Florida and had drawn addicts and traffick ers from states hundreds of miles away. The law barred doctors from dispensing powerful narcotics from their offices, and shuttered almost all of the pill mills where doctors wrote hundreds of prescrip tions for pain medications each day. But the pill-mill problem hasn’t gone away, Langston said. “Those same lines of people — those people shooting up in their cars, urinating, buying and sell ing urine, buying and sell ing pills — they ended up at pharmacies,” she said. While most pharmacists turned those patients away, “We had a lot of bad phar macists that turned a blind eye,” Langston said. “When you have people shooting up in your parking lot, there’s a problem. These aren’t cancer patients or surgery patients doing this. And it’s awful that people like that are having to suf fer,” she said. Langston said she was in a pharmacy earlier this month when a homeless man paid $800 in cash for powerful narcotics. That pharmacy is now under investigation, she said. She watched as the man placed the $20 bills into stacks on the counter. “It was really sad. I couldn’t believe that phar macist took that money,” she said. The DEA has no control over pharmacies’ pricing of drugs, Langston said. “They can charge what they want. That’s not against the law. But when a pharma cist will do that, it’s very tell ing. Very telling,” she said. Sw in g by th e Fa ir Mo nd ay oc to be r 5 TH th ru Sa tu rd ay oc to be r 10 TH Ca len da r of ev ents fo r ce nt ra l pa nh and le fa ir in ba y co un ty , in c. MOND AY , OC TO BE R 5t h Gr an d Op enin g Pa y On e Pr ic e EA CH ad mi tta nc e $1 0. 00 . Op en 6: 00 p. m. TU ES DA Y, OC TO BE R 6t h Pa y On e Pr ic e Da y EA CH ad mi tta nc e $1 0. 00 . Op en 6: 00 p. m. WE DN ES DA Y, OC TO BE R 7t h Se nio r Ci ti ze n Da y. Ov er 55 ad m it te d fr ee . Al l ot he rs $1 0.0 0 ea ch . Op en 2: 00 P. M. Ri de s op en at 6: 00 PM Sen ior Ci ti ze ns mu st pu rc has e $1 0.0 0 ti ck et to ri de TH URS DA Y, OC TO BE R 8t h Sch oo l Da y Op en 4: 00 p. m. Al l st ud en ts ad mi tt ed fr ee , ea ch Ad ul t $5 .0 0. Arm ba nd s av ail abl e unt il cl os in g fo r $2 0.0 0. (w it h sp ec ia l ti ck et $1 5.0 0) FRI DA Y, OC TO BE R 9t h Sch oo l Da y Op en 4: 00 p. m. Al l st ud en ts ad mi tt ed fr ee , ea ch Ad ul t $5 .0 0. Arm ba nd s av ail abl e unt il cl os in g fo r $2 0.0 0. (w it h sp ec ia l ti ck et $1 5.0 0) SA TU RD AY , OC TO BE R 10 th Op en 2: 00 p. m. $5 .0 0 ea ch ad mi tt an ce . $2 0.0 0 Arm ba nd s av ai la bl e unt il cl os in g. AL L TI ME S AR E CE NTR AL TI ME Al l bu il di ng s cl os e at 10 :0 0 p. m. Mi dw ay cl os es when cr ow d le ave s The dilemma has reached such proportions that the Florida Board of Pharmacy is considering changes to its rules regulating the dispensing of pain medications, switching from a focus on detecting fraudulent prescriptions to ensuring that legitimate patients get the drugs they need. PILL DILEMMA from Page B1 State Senate could drop Confederate flag from seal By BRANDON LARRABEE The News Service of Florida TALLAHASSEE — State senators are scheduled next week to begin con sidering whether to keep the Confed erate flag on the Senate’s official seal, another sign of a growing national tide against icons of the South’s rebellion in the 1860s. The Senate Rules Committee will meet Oct. 8 to begin re-examining the chamber’s emblem. Under Senate rules, the seal includes “a fan of the five flags which have flown over Flor ida” — those of the United States, Con federate States of America, France, Great Britain and Spain. But there has been a growing back lash against Confederate symbols since June, when a man with white supremacist views opened fire at an African-American church in Charles ton, S.C., and killed nine people. Since then, Southern states including Flor ida have wrestled with how to rec oncile past commemorations of “the lost cause” with shifting feelings about race and the meaning of the Civil War. While many Southerners view displays of the Confederate banner as recognition of their ancestors’ military service and sacrifice, Afri can-Americans and others see it as an endorsement of the brutal, slavedriven economy that was a central issue in the war. Senate President Andy Gardiner, R-Orlando, and Senate Minority Leader Arthenia Joyner, D-Tampa, requested in June the committee consider whether the seal should be changed. In a memo, Gardiner did not specifically point to the Confeder ate flag, but wrote about how views on symbols can transform over time. “The current Senate seal and coat of arms were first adopted in rule in 1973,” Gardiner wrote. “Florida has certainly changed a great deal since the early s. Just as our state seal has been revised over time, I believe a peri odic review of our legislative insig nia would be beneficial.” THE SEAL OF T HE F LORIDA S T A T E SENA T E

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Page B6 | The News Herald | Friday, October 2, 2015 HEADER

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DIVERSIONS Friday, October 2, 2015 | The News Herald | Page B7 Country singer-musician Leon Rausch (Bob Wills and the Texas Playboys) is 88. Retired MLB All-Star Maury Wills is 83. Movie critic Rex Reed is 77. Singer-songwriter Don McLean is 70. Cajun/country singer Jo-el Sonnier is 69. Actor Avery Brooks is 67. Fashion designer Donna Karan is 67. Photographer Annie Leibovitz is 66. Rock musician Mike Rutherford (Genesis, Mike & the Mechanics) is 65. Singer-actor Sting is 64. Actress Lorraine Bracco is 61. Country musician Greg Jennings (Restless Heart) is 61. Rock singer Phil Oakey (The Human League) is 60. Rhythm-and-blues singer Freddie Jackson is 57. Singer-producer Robbie Nevil is 57. Retro-soul singer James Hunter is 53. Former NFL quarterback Mark Rypien is 53. Rock musician Bud Gaugh (Sublime, Eyes Adrift) is 48. Folk-country singer Gillian Welch is 48. Country singer Kelly Willis is 47. Actor Joey Slotnick is 47. Rhythm-and-blues singer Dion Allen (Az Yet) is 45. Actresstalk show host Kelly Ripa (TV: “Live with Kelly and Michael”) is 45. Singer Tiffany is 44. Rock singer Lene Nystrom is 42. A ces On BRIDGE: B obby W olff SU DO KU Solution to 10/1/15 Rating: SILVER 10/2/15 10/3/15 Solution to 10/2/15 Rating: GOLD JANRIC CLASSIC SUDOKU Fill in the blank cells using numbers 1 to 9. Each number can appear only once in each row, level ranges from Bronze (easiest) to Silver to Gold (hardest). 2015 Janric Enterprises Dist. by creators.com JANRIC CLASSIC SUDOKU Fill in the blank cells using numbers 1 to 9. Each number can appear only once in each row, level ranges from Bronze (easiest) to Silver to Gold (hardest). 2015 Janric Enterprises Dist. by creators.com Creators (Answers tomorrow) UNITYVIDEO ELICITFISCAL Yesterday’s Jumbles: Answer: They got the painting appraised because they — VALUED IT Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon. THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words. VOABE GANTW NNALID MURAAT 2015 Tribune Content Agency, LLC All Rights Reserved. Check out the new, free JUSTJUMBLE app Answer here: Saturday, Sunday or Monday birthdays: noon on Thursday before. Tuesday birthdays: noon on Friday before. Wednesday birthdays: noon on Monday before. Thursday birthdays: noon on Tuesday before. Friday birthdays: noon Wednesday before. Email pcnhnews@pcnh.com with “Birthday” in the subject line or drop off current photo and ll out a birthday form at the front desk of The News Herald, 501 W. 11th St. BIRTHDAY DEADLINES Happy B IR TH D AY Couple locked in abusive marriage need to separate DEAR AMY: My husband “Steve” and I have been married for eight years, and together for a total of 12. He’s 31; I’m 28. Five years ago I cheated on him with my best friend. My husband found out about it and I came clean about everything. I haven’t seen or been in touch with the other person since then. For the past five years my life has been a living hell. Steve goes through my phone, texts, calls, emails, social media and mail. I just ignore this because I have nothing to hide. If I’m talking on the phone I’m instantly accused of talking to “my boyfriend.” He has been emotionally and verbally abusive, and has been physically abusive twice. When I suggested marriage counseling he said I “wasn’t worth it, never have been and never will be.” He’s “thrown me out” on numerous occasions and then once I pack up my personal belongings he becomes loving and caring toward me. Two weeks ago he sent me a text saying I had two hours to get home or he was throwing all of my stuff in the front lawn. When I got home he had all of my stuff packed. I moved out. Steve and I have talked, but he still refuses marriage counseling. He wants me to move back in, says he loves me and doesn’t want me to leave. He said he will give me a month to move back in or he’s filing for divorce. I don’t know what to do. I’ve lost all but one of my friends and have lost contact with most of my family because of Steve, so I don’t have many people to talk to. I know the easiest thing would be to go back to him, but I just feel in a few months everything will go back to the way it was.W A LKING O N EGGSH E LLSDEAR WA LKING : Please, stay away. Do not return to this relationship. Your husband has locked you into a classic cycle of abuse, manipulation, rage and blame. This will continue until you figure out how to stay permanently away from him. If you give in to “Steve’s” emotional manipulation and return to cohabit with him, he may likely raise the stakes during the next cycle. This is dangerous. You already have lost friends and family members due to their frustration watching helplessly while you stay in an abusive relationship. Divorce and distance — not couples’ counseling — is the answer for you two. You should definitely pursue counseling on your own. DEAR AMY: I am one of those who gets tongue-tied and intimidated about what to say to someone who is grieving the loss of a loved one. For too long I have procrastinated on writing a note to the point of doing nothing. I saved all the notes that I received when my Mom died and I sometimes refer to those for inspiration when I have to write a note to a friend who is grieving. You have discussed some of the bad, inadvertent things people say, such as “Don’t feel guilty,” “Everything happens for a reason” and “It’s not your fault.” I think readers need more concrete directions of real words to say. You have a terrific audience and if you asked them to provide the nice things that people have said when they are grieving, you will get some fabulous responses that the rest of us can use.R EADER DEAR READER : Great idea. I will share “real words” from others. DEAR AMY: One thing you missed in your answer to “Waiting for the Dough,” the legal assistant whose boss never paid her on time. She’s acting as an administrative assistant and has been for 10 years. She isn’t an independent worker and she has no other clients. It is absolutely illegal for her boss to pay her as an independent contractor. She’s an employee and the boss owes all sorts of back taxes and penalties. If she ever wants to rock the boat, she can file a complaint with her local department of labor.EVIL H R LADYDEAR L ADY : Many responses echo yours. Thank you. Send questions via email to askamy@ tribune.com or by mail to Ask Amy, Chicago Tribune, TT500, 435 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago, IL 60611. Amy Dickinson Ask Amy EDITOR’S NOTE: “Trivia Fun” with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a daily feature in The News Herald. What type of business meeting is one without laptops, cell phones, or PDAs? Wireless, Topless, Bruncher, Eyeballer Of these whose nicknames include it as the “Centennial S tate”? Colorado, New Mexico, Nevada, OregonWhat is L ondon’s street of newspapers called? Lobster, Fleet, Headliner, Slick Who was famous for his ballerina paintings? DeLucca, Degas, Dunsmore, Dotsh What is America’s all-time favorite colored popsicle? Blue, Green, Orange, WhiteH elminthophobia a fear of? Toast, Worms, Moths, BearsA NS WER S : Topless, Colorado, Fleet, Degas, Orange, WormsComments, questions or suggestions? WC@TriviaGuy.com Trivia FU N WILSON CASEY Trivia Guy History T OD AY Today is Friday, Oct. 2, the 275th day of 2015. There are 90 days left in the year.Highlight in history On Oct. 2, 1985 — Actor Rock Hudson, 59, died at his home in Beverly Hills, California, after battling AIDS.On this date 1780 — British spy John Andre was hanged in Tappan, New York, during the Revolutionary War. 1835 — The first battle of the Texas Revolution took place as American settlers fought Mexican soldiers near the Guadalupe River; the Mexicans ended up withdrawing. 1890 — Comedian Groucho Marx was born Julius Marx in New York. 1919 — President Woodrow Wilson suffered a serious stroke at the White House that left him paralyzed on his left side. 1944 — German troops crushed the two-month-old Warsaw Uprising, during which a quarter of a million people had been killed. 1955 — The suspense anthology “Alfred Hitchcock Presents” premiered on CBS-TV. 1967 — Thurgood Marshall was sworn as an associate justice of the U.S. Supreme Court as the court opened its new term. 1975 — President Gerald R. Ford formally welcomed Japan’s Emperor Hirohito to the United States during a ceremony on the South Lawn of the White House.Thought for today “There’s one way to find out if a man is honest — Ask him. If he says ‘yes’ you know he is a crook.” G roucho Marx 1890-1977 Y our HOROS C OPE: Holiday MathisFR I DAY, OCT. 2, 2015 AR I E S (March 21-April 19): Your current inner circle is so demanding that you’re hesitant to make efforts to establish new friendships. However, the benefits to widening that circle will be numerous and definite. TAURU S (April 20-May 20): Retrospect makes the good times seem better and the bad times seem worse. However you’re thinking about it now, don’t act on those sentimental feelings you’re having. G EM INI (May 21-June 21): You think you’re not ready, but it’s time, so just do it. Maybe it’s something to do with your gravity-defying air-sign-ness, but quite often, when you fail, you fail upward. CA N CER (June 22-July 22): Yes, what happens to you is far less important than what you take from the experience. Then again, the takeaway has a tendency to get delayed like mismarked mail. L EO (July 23-Aug. 22): While the benefits to working with a crack team are enormous, the best way to earn a place in such a group is by putting in the kind of solitary practice and study time that you’ll put in today. VI R G O (Aug. 23S ept. 22): Too much generosity and agreeableness can actually work against a relationship. It is possible to take too much responsibility or give way more than the other person, thus stunting the relationship. Lopsided wheels don’t roll. LI BRA ( S ept. 23-Oct. 23): The need for balance and justice will once again compel you to make gestures of diplomacy. S CORP I O (Oct. 24N ov. 21): Learning to be a leader who can inspire and motivate others is among the most valuable skills you can pick up these days. S A GI TTAR I U S ( N ov. 22-Dec. 21): Recent changes that your loved one has made will really take some getting used to. Then again, others have had to get used to all the changes you’ve made along the way, too. CAPR I COR N (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Some have a loneliness about them that never seems to abate. Even through smiles, conversation and laughter, loneliness remains the ghosted image over their being. AQUAR I U S (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): The critics are out today, and they’ll join the trolls under the bridge to add just enough validity to comments to make for a barbed landing. P IS CE S (Feb. 19-March 20): You might notice that you’ve come full circle, and though it comes with a twinge of mixed emotion, you can take heart that it’s not the end of the journey. MILDRED E . GRADY 96, Panama City BRY C E H ART 18, Panama City

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Page B8 | The News Herald | Friday, October 2, 2015 COMI C S

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Sports PANAMA CITY NEWS HERALD Section C Facebook: tinyurl.com/NHSports Twitter: @NH_Sports www.newsherald.com/sports PITTSBURGH (AP) — Josh Scobee couldn’t. Twice. Justin Tucker could. Twice. The big-legged Baltimore kicker hit a 42-yard field goal to tie the Pitts burgh Steelers in the final seconds of regulation and made a 52-yarder with 5:08 left in overtime to give the Ravens a 23-20 victory Thursday night. Scobee had two chances to give the Steelers some cushion late in the fourth quarter only to pull both kicks wide left. The second miss gave the Ravens (1-3) enough time to put Scobee well within range to send the game to an extra period. Pittsburgh then twice opted to go for it on fourth down in Bal timore territory in overtime rather than send Scobee out for a long attempt into the tricky wind at the open end of Heinz Field. Michael Vick, starting in place of injured Ben Roethlisberger, was stopped on fourth-and-2 at the 39 and later overthrew Antonio Brown on fourth-and-1 from the 33. Neither Vick or Scobee would get a third shot. Joe Flacco led the Ravens to the 35 and Tucker’s winner was never in doubt. Justin Forsett ran for 150 yards for the Ravens. Flacco threw a touchdown pass and did just enough late to help Baltimore end the worst start in fran chise history. Vick threw for 124 yards and a score and Le’Veon Bell ran for 129 yards and a touch down by the Steelers (2-2) bumbled late. For most of the night, it appeared Pittsburgh would survive. The Steelers sacked Flacco five times, forced a pair of turnovers and twice stopped the Ravens on fourth downs in the fourth quarter to seem ingly seize control only to have Scobee let Baltimore back in it. By KEVIN BROCKWAY The Gainesville Sun GAINESVILLE — A last-second field goal attempt sails wide right. A ball slips out of the quarterback’s hand on a potential tying drive in the closing seconds. A two-year starting quar terback is off target throughout the game. Good fortune has played a role in Florida’s 4-0 start this season. The Gators have won their last three games by a touchdown or less in a fashion causing some to wonder if there’s a rabbit’s foot attached to new coach Jim McElwain’s keychain. “It’s a lot better than the alterna tive,” McElwain said of UF’s close wins. Yet the Gators have found a way to make their own breaks. For example, freshman receiver Antonio Callaway’s 63-yard TD catch-andrun to put the Gators up 28-27 in the closing minutes against Ten nessee would not have happened if teammate Brandon Powell had not taken out two Vol defenders with a block downfield. Pressure from Florida defensive line man Joey Ivie caused East Carolina quarterback Blake Kemp to lose the ball in the closing seconds. A strong By PAT McCANN 747-5068 pmccann@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY — After tonight, the District 1-5A football race could have a decided Bay County tilt. Or conceivably it could see Pensacola alone in first place with all other schools in the grouping already having suffered a defeat. Mosley (3-1, 1-0) plays at Arnold (1-4, 0-1) in what must be termed an elimination game for the host Marlins. A defeat would leave Arnold chasing an improbable scenario to even gain a shootout possibility for the district’s runner-up berth in the postseason. Meanwhile, Bay (4-0, 1-0) risks its No. 9 state ranking against visiting Pensacola (3-2, 0-0) at Tommy Oliver Stadium. Both games kick off at 7 p.m., with the Tornadoes celebrating Homecoming. Mosley opened 1-5A with a win on the road against defending district champion West Florida. The Dolphins would like nothing better than to solidify their chance to return to the playoffs by defeating a county rival. The matchup also is crucial to the Dolphins, who are the only local team that has to play two district games in Pensacola during the regular season. Then again, tonight’s outcomes are critical to every school in the entire district. Be st Rid e is yo ur ca r se ar ch Co mma nd Ce nt er . Fr om Be st Ri de .c om yo u ca n br ow se ove r 6 mi lli on ne w an d pr e-o wne d ve hi cle s, cr ea te sh op pi ng li st s of yo ur po te nt ia l pu rc ha se s, tr ac k price ch an ge s, an d ke ep up to dat e wi th ne w li st in gs . Wh en yo u ar e re ad y to pu rch as e, Be st Rid e. co m co nne ct s yo u wi th tr ust ed au to mo ti ve de al er s in yo ur hom et ow n. We ma ke it si mpl e fo r yo u to nd yo ur Be st Ri de . TH E SM AR TE ST , EA SI ES T WA Y TO FI ND A CA R Yo ur Ca r Se ar ch CO MM AN D CE NT ER aw ai ts ... FRIDAY October 2, 2015 All times 7 p.m. unless noted Mosley at Arnold Pensacola at Bay Rutherford at Walton North Bay Haven at Cottondale Bozeman at Blountstown Chipley at Franklin County 6:30 p.m. Graceville at Sneads West Gadsden at Liberty County 6:30 p.m. Vernon at Wewahitchka Marianna at East Gadsden 6:30 p.m. TODAY’S GAMES Ole Miss at Florida Saturday 6 p.m., CDT on ESPN Ravens rally late, win in overtime AP Baltimore Ravens kicker Justin Tucker, kicks the game-winning field goal in overtime Thursday. 1-5A on display Mosley at Arnold Some high school teams don’t react favorably coming out of a bye week. For Mos ley, head coach Jeremy Brown said, the difference was the Dolphins went into theirs on an emotional high from defeat ing West Florida. “I think the game before sets the tone,” Brown said. “I think an open week can be good, or can be bad. It’s how you approach it.” Brown said that his staff doesn’t go overboard emphasizing district impli cations to play ers. He said he’s more con cerned with “playing a really good Arnold football team that probably should have beat us last year.” “We just want to go out there and get a win,” Brown said. “That being said, in a fiveteam district, if you can get to 2-0 you feel like you’ve got a chance.” Pensacola at Bay The team records definitely favor Bay. Pensacola gets the nod on strength of schedule having played up in class three times and been competitive in losses to Pine Forest and Tate, Class 6A teams that have com bined to lose only two games. The determining factor in this district collision, how ever, very well could be which Tornadoes’ ballclub takes the field. Will it be the one that turned back a very talented Rickards’ team in a kickoff classic, demol ished Ruther ford and then bolted to a 24-3 lead at Arnold, or the one that has been outscored 32-15 in the past 5 quarters? Bay coach Jimmy Lon gerbeam thinks he knows the answer to that question. “We’ve tweaked a little bit what we’re doing offensively to make it easier on the kids up front, and I think that’s going 3 county football teams featured here tonight JI MMY D A NI E L Returns from Week 2 injury D A NI E L GH A N T Out for the season with back injury SEE MOSLEY-ARNOLD | C4 SEE TORNADOES | C4 23 20 BALTIMORE PITTSBURGH COLLEGE FOOTBALL CINCINNATI 34, MIAMI 23 Bearcats claw ’Canes AP Cincinnati’s Hayden Moore was 22 of 33 for 279 yards and two touchdowns against Miami on Thursday. Inside STAT SHEET | C6 FSU counting on receivers | C2 Tide vs. Dawgs Playoff fever Georgia, Chubb brace for Bama’s run defense | C3 Yankees clinch wild card playoff spot C5 N o. 25 Gators making the breaks SEE GATORS | C4 CINCINNATI (AP) — Hayden Moore threw two touchdown passes and ran for another score in his starting debut, and Cincinnati’s struggling defense held on for a 34-23 victory over Miami on Thurs day night to end the Hurricanes’ streak of 10 straight wins over the Bearcats. The redshirt freshman fol lowed up the best passing game in Cincinnati history with a solid performance. The Bearcats (3-2) surged ahead 14-3 and overcame a scoreless third quarter behind Moore, who was 22 of 33 for 279 yards with an interception. Moore filled in with Gunner Kiel sidelined by a neck injury suf fered during a 53-46 loss at Mem phis a week earlier. Moore took over in that game and threw for a school-record 557 yards with four touchdowns and two interceptions in only three quarters. Miami (3-1) was coming off a 36-33 win over Nebraska that fea tured five field goals by Michael Badgley. He made three more Thursday but missed from 51 and 53 yards as Cincinnati ends 10-game drought against Miami SEE BEAR CATS | C5

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SPORT S Page C2 | The News Herald | Friday, October 2, 2015 No. 11 FSU looking to stretch field with receivers TALLAHASSEE (AP) — Through three games, Florida State’s receivers have mirrored the rest of the offense — stretches of good play but generally inconsistent. After being off last week, the 11th-ranked Seminoles feel that some of the things holding the passing game back have been rectified heading into Saturday’s game at Wake Forest. “The chemistry has been there the past couple weeks. It was off at the beginning of the season but we should be good going into this game,” said Jesus “Bobo” Wilson, who was the only return ing receiver with extensive playing time. Coach Jimbo Fisher is still looking for a receiver to fill the void left by Rashad Greene, who was the pro gram leader in career yards and receptions. Travis Rudolph, who has drawn comparisons to Greene because of his ath leticism, leads the team in receptions (14) and is sec ond in yards (132). Wilson leads the team in receiving yards (138) and is second in receptions with 10. Everett Golson has struggled with accuracy the past two games but has also been plagued by drops. Florida State has five drops, which is tied for fourth in the Atlantic Coast Confer ence, according to STATS. There were two drops in the Sept. 18 game at Bos ton College that could have gone for big yardage. Inexperience and drops have also contributed to a lack of big plays in the pass ing game. The Seminoles, who were in the top 20 in plus-20 and plus-30 pass plays last season, have only nine receptions of 20 yards or more and two of 30 or more. Playing young receiv ers has also meant there hasn’t been much depth at the position. Kermit Whit field has emerged as the third receiver but is also the main kick returner. Ermon Lane, George Campbell and Ja’Vonn Harrison are also on the depth chart but haven’t seen much game time as they have been inconsistent in practice. “We’re just OK so far,” said Fisher in assessing the group. “I’m not disap pointed but there is room to grow.” The one area that Fisher has been pleased in with the receivers has been run blocking. Three of Dalvin Cook’s six touchdowns can be cred ited due to key late blocks downfield. “Every receiver can run routes and catch passes but you have to got to do the things that really matter like blocking and everything,” Rudolph said. The Seminoles (3-0 over all, 1-0 ACC) are hoping to see gains in their passing game on Saturday. Wake Forest (2-2, 0-1) has allowed 10 receptions of 20 yards or more, which is tied for fifth most in the conference. In last year’s 42-3 win, Rudolph had his first touchdown on a 59-yard reception. In the past three games, the Seminoles have outscored the Demon Dea cons 154-6. “This is the week a lot of us can get big plays. We just have to execute,” Wil son said. “They run a lot of Cover 3 and man which should open things up for us this week.” The Seminoles got off to a quick start against Boston College as they completed five passes on the opening drive for 50 yards. But the rest of the game it was 14 of 19 for 69 yards. With heavy rain expected to impact Saturday’s game due to Hurricane Joaquin, Florida State has spent most of the week practicing with wet balls with all the skill position players. “They’re a different team than they were a year ago, but talent-wise they’re as good a team as we’ll face all year,” Wake Forest coach Dave Clawson said of Flor ida State. “Their quarterback has not turned the ball over yet this year. He’s very wellschooled in the offense. He has a rocket for an arm. He’s very dangerous when the play breaks down.” FSU at Wake Forest on Saturday, 2:30 p.m. CDT on ESPN The Associated Press Thoughts turned to childhood as the Miami Dolphins reminisced about the last time they played a football game at 9:30 in the morning. Jarvis Landry said he was 11, and his team won. Reshad Jones said he was a 6-year-old in Pop Warner. And Brent Grimes? “I don’t think I ever did it,” Grimes said. “It’ll be a little weird.” The alarm will sound early Sunday for the Dolphins, and not just because they kick off against the New York Jets in London at 2:30 p.m. local time, which is 9:30 a.m. in Miami and New York. With a 1-2 record and three con secutive lackluster performances, the Dolphins desperately need to get going. “We feel the urgency,” quarterback Ryan Tannehill said. “We’re at a criti cal point in our season.” Here are things to know about the 100th meeting in a rivalry that enters its 50th season: EARLY START: Both teams have spent months planning for the challenges of a game five time zones to the east. The Jets (2-1) retained a sleep therapist to help players adjust. They were given light-blocking glasses and a Litebook to provide additional light in the early morning. “I think a lot of (these) things are odd because you don’t do it on a normal basis,” tackle D’Brickashaw Ferguson said. “You don’t normally wear blue blockers or have (artificial) sunlight while you are eating breakfast. But we don’t normally play in London.” The Dolphins had the longer flight — 8 hours — and players wore compression sleeves on the plane. They’re taking a two-game losing streak to London for the second year in a row. In 2014 they came home rejuvenated by a 38-14 victory over Oakland. “Looks like history is trying to repeat itself,” Jones said. It should be noted, however, that the 2014 game kicked off at 6 p.m. London time. SLOW STARTS : The early start is a par ticular concern for the Dolphins because they haven’t been ready at the beginning of their first three games. In the opening quarter they’ve been out scored 27-3 and outgained 467-108. Last week they gave up 270 yards in the first half of a 41-14 loss to the Buffalo Bills. “We’ve got to play a 60-minute football game,” Philbin said. “We really haven’t done that.” TAKING IT AWAY: New York’s formula for success has been to cause a league-high 11 turnovers. The Jets had five takeaways in each of their two victories, but just one in last week’s loss to Philadelphia. They were focused this week on getting back to making things tough on offenses by taking the ball away from them. New York has seven fumble recoveries and four interceptions, and also is first in the NFL in red-zone defense by allowing just one TD in six opposing possessions inside the 20-yard line. APPLYING PRESSURE : Even with the addition of $114 million tackle Ndamukong Suh, Miami’s defensive front has been less than stout. The Dolphins have one sack in 94 pass plays, worst in the NFL. They’ve been outrushed 435-218, also last in the league. New York’s pass protection has been solid, with Ryan Fitzpatrick sacked only twice in 118 pass plays. STICKING WITH FITZ: The Jets have no quarterback controversy — yet. Coach Todd Bowles made it clear the starting job still belongs to Fitzpatrick, even though Geno Smith has been fully cleared to play after missing several weeks when his jaw was broken by a punch from then-teammate Ikemefuna Enemkpali. AP Miami Dolphins defensive tackle Ndamukong Suh follows a play against the Washington Redskins. Early wake-up call for Dolphins, Jets ANNOUNCEMENTS The News Herald will publish announce ments of area interest concerning meetings or events. An-nouncements, which must be dated and contain contact information, can be mailed to the Sports De-partment, P.O. Box 1940, Panama City, FL 32402, faxed to the Sports Department at 747-5097 or emailed to sports@pcnh.com. Events that require entry fees or registration costs that don’t benefit charities or go toward the oper ating expenses of youth leagues or school booster clubs, or toward the purchase of trophies and awards are not eligible, and must run as an advertisement. Advocates for Children golf Advocates for Children, supporting Guardian ad Litem, is holding its inaugural “I Am For The Child” golf tournament. It will be held 12:30 p.m., Oct. 16 at Holiday Golf Club in Panama City Beach. Entry Fee is $100 per person with prizes for first-, secondand third-place teams. Lunch and dinner are pro vided. All proceeds benefit children who have been removed from their homes because of abuse or neglect. Contact: www.birdeasepro. com/advocates, or 747-5180. Tricker Trek run The Tricker Trek annual Halloween run will be 8 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 31. Registra tion is 6:30 a.m. with the 5K and 10K at 8 a.m. and Fun Run at 9:30 a.m. Registration is $20 early, $25 late and no T-shirt $15. Kids 16-under is $15. Costumes are encouraged and there will be a contest. Contact: Gumby 850-271-5896 or Joe 850-774-0018. NWF Officials meeting The Northwest Florida Officials Associa tion will hold weekly meetings at MLK center 6 p.m. Wednesday until Oct. 29. Anyone who wants to officiate high school basketball can attend for on and off the court instruction. Contact: Fred Mosley 850-960-0172. The Associated Press With a NASCAR championship defense at stake, Kevin Harvick tried to spin Dover as just another race. He even compared the pressure ahead to a walk in the park. Win at Dover and the back-to-back bid is alive. Fall short, and Harvick likely could be relegated to a spoiler role for the rest of NASCAR’s playoffs. Harvick has two wins and a series-best 18 top fives, but is mired at 15th in the 16-driver Chase for the Sprint Cup championship field. The Stewart-Haas Racing driver has gone from boom to bust in the Chase, finishing 42nd in the Chase opener at Chicagoland and 21st last week at New Hampshire. Ahead is the concrete mile track at Dover where Harvick is 0 for 29. “I like these types of situations,” Harvick said Thursday. “I think they’re different and fun and it’s all in the approach and how you react to them.” Harvick has had the No. 4 Chevy up against the wall before — he was eighth out of eight teams and had to win last season at Phoenix International Raceway to advance into the championship finale. He won the race, then won it all the next week when his second straight checkered flag gave him the highest finish among four championship drivers to earn the crown. Under NASCAR’s playoff format, the bottom four drivers in the Chase field are eliminated after Dover. He’ll earn an automatic berth into the championship round with a victory. Joe Gibbs Racing drivers Denny Hamlin and Matt Kenseth have secured the first two spots. It was only three weeks ago when a confident Harvick said of the JGR drivers, “We’re going to pound them into the ground.” So far Harvick has taken a beating on the track, and dished one out in the motorhome. Harvick was unwilling on Thursday to discuss if he’s talked with Jimmie Johnson in the wake of their post-race skirmish at Chicagoland. Kyle Busch, Paul Menard, Harvick and Clint Bowyer are the final four drivers on the brink of elimination. They would advance with a victory, but Johnson stands at the No. 1 contender in their way at Dover, where he has a track-record 10 victories. Harvick was runner-up to Johnson in May in the first Dover race. Good, though probably not good enough on Sunday. “I know the Gibbs guys are fast, but watching practice, he’s really embarrassing the (heck) out of everybody,” Chase driver Dale Earnhardt Jr. said Thursday. “It’s going to be a shame more than anything because he’s got the potential to win the whole thing.” The surprise isn’t that Harvick is in this precarious posi tion because poor finishes can happen to any driver. The surprise is that a championship team, with an ace crew chief in Rodney Childers, has watched gambles on tire and fuel strategy backfire in each race. At Chicagoland, Johnson connected with Harvick and created a tire rub on the SHR Chevy. The call was made for Harvick to stay out instead of making a pit stop for tires and falling a lap down. Harvick spun and hit the wall, ending his race and sparking a confrontation with Johnson. Harvick thought he had enough fuel to last all 300 miles at New Hampshire, only to lose the lead with three laps left when the Chevy was dry and tumbled to 21st. Childers said Sunday that data showed Harvick had enough fuel and it should have been a “non-issue.” “It looks like for some reason it must not have got full on our last pit stop of the race or the fuel cell bladder is com ing apart,” he said. “If anything showed we were taking a chance, we would have pitted.” Harvick defended both calls. On tires: “The tire rub is hard to see and I think with the smoke going away, you obviously didn’t know it was as bad as it was.” On fuel: “It shouldn’t have even been close with the pace that we had to run and the mileage that we had gathered from everything that we had in the pit box. I don’t think anybody views last week as a risk, just for the fact that the mileage wasn’t even close.” Harvick would love to repeat, not just for himself, but for his friend and team owner Tony Stewart. Stewart announced this week he will retire from Sprint Cup racing after the 2016 season. Harvick was one of the people Stewart had confided in about his decision to call it quits. “I haven’t really known how to react to it, just for the fact that it’s real now,” he said. Harvick has title defense on line KEVIN HARVIC K Defending champ No. 15 in 16-driver Chase

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Friday, October 2, 2015 | The News Herald | Page C3 COLLEGE FOOTBALL Things to watch this week in the Southeastern Conference: GAME OF THE WEEK : No. 13 Alabama at No. 8 Geor gia: It’s hard to imagine Alabama falling out of playoff contention in the first week of October, but a second loss this season certainly would put the Crimson Tide’s title hopes in se serious jeopardy. Georgia has a chance to solidify its status as a legitimate playoff contender while making a major statement for the beleaguered East Division if it can win this interdivisional rematch. MATCHUP OF THE WEEK : No. 3 Mississippi’s receivers vs. No. 25 Florida’s secondary: The Ole Miss offense, which is averaging more than 54 points per game, is led by a talented group of five receivers who all stand at least 6-foot-2. Laquon Treadwell leads the Rebels with 22 catches while Quincy Adeboyejo has five touchdowns. Florida will counter with an athletic secondary led by cornerback Vernon Hargreaves III. Hargreaves leads the team with two interceptions. NUMBERS GAME : Geor gia’s Nick Chubb has rushed for at least 100 yards in 12 straight games, the longest active FBS streak and one shy of Herschel Walker’s school record. ... Ten nessee opponents are convert ing just 26.2 percent of their third-down situations but are 9 of 10 in fourth-down conversion attempts. ... No. 9 LSU is out scoring teams 35-0 in the first quarter and 45-6 in the first half. ... Georgia quarterback Grey son Lambert is 33 of 35 for 476 yards and five touchdowns over his last two games. He ranks second nationally in completion percentage and third in pass ing efficiency. ... LSU’s Leonard Fournette is the nation’s lead ing rusher with 210.3 yards per game. LSU is about to face Eastern Michigan, which has the nation’s lowest-ranked run defense. The Eagles are allowing 373.3 yards rushing per game. UPSET WATCH : Georgia is a two-point favorite over Ala bama, which enters a game as an underdog for the first time since 2009. The last time it was an underdog, Alabama trounced Florida 32-13 in the 2009 SEC championship game. ... Florida is a 7 -point underdog against No. 3 Ole Miss. The higherranked team has lost three of the last four meetings between these two teams. IMPACT PERFORMER: Mississippi State’s Dak Prescott has thrown 191 straight passes without an interception, which is the longest current streak in the nation and sixth longest in SEC history. Prescott completed 20 of 26 passes for 268 yards and two touchdowns against the Aggies last season in Starkville and the 21st-ranked Bulldogs could use a similar performance when they travel to No. 14 Texas A&M on Saturday. A look at things to watch in the Atlantic Coast Conference for Week 5: GAME OF THE WEEK : No. 6 Notre Dame at No. 12 Clemson. Two undefeated teams with designs on crashing the College Football Playoff meet in a pseudo-ACC game. New Irish QB DeShone Kizer makes his first road start at Clemson’s Death Valley, but Notre Dame is just 2-5 against ranked teams on the road under Brian Kelly. The Tigers have the nation’s ninth-best defense, allowing 260 yards per game, but this will be their toughest test so far. Clemson coach Dabo Swinney joked that “I do think it’s a little unfair that they brought the Pope into town just in time for the Clem son game.” BEST MATCHUP: Duke run defense vs. Boston Col lege’s rushing offense. The Blue Devils shut down optionoriented Georgia Tech last week, holding the Yellow Jack ets to their fewest yards rushing since 2013 with eight tackles for losses while taking the early lead in the Coastal Division. The Eagles rank 26th nation ally, averaging 231 yards rush ing, but will be without leading rusher Jon Hilliman, who had foot surgery earlier this week. QB Troy Flutie — the nephew of 1984 Heisman Trophy winner Doug Flutie — is expected to make his second career start. INSIDE THE NUMBERS : Only three ACC teams have two or fewer turnovers all sea son, and they’re all undefeated: North Carolina State (4-0) and Florida State (3-0) have only one apiece while Miami (3-0) has two. At the other end of the spectrum, Louisville (10) and Virginia (9), the only ACC teams with losing records, have the league’s most giveaways. LONG SHOT: This might be North Carolina’s best chance to claim its first win at Georgia Tech since 1997. The Tar Heels, 8-point underdogs, have reeled off three straight lopsided wins mostly against lesser competition. They’re fac ing a Yellow Jackets team that suddenly appears vulnerable after losses to Notre Dame and Duke. Distancing his current team from its recent history, UNC coach Larry Fedora says “the 2015 team hasn’t ever lost in Atlanta.” PLAYER TO WATCH: Louisville has yet another quarterback, and it’s freshman Lamar Jackson. He ran for 184 yards in last week’s 45-3 win against Samford, the third-best single-game total for a quarter back in league history as well as a school record. He also threw for one touchdown and ran for two. Jackson heads the depth chart for Saturday’s trip to N.C. State and is the third different quarterback to start for the Cardinals this season. TUSCALOOSA, Ala. (AP) — Ala bama coach Nick Saban believes Georgia’s Nick Chubb and Sony Michel stack up well against any tail back tandem in college football. For his part, Chubb figures the Tide has “probably the best (front) seven in America.” Those two groups will col lide — a few dozen times, probably — Saturday when the eighth-ranked Bulldogs host Alabama. Maybe the game will come down to former ACC quarterbacks Greyson Lambert of Georgia and Jake Coker of Alabama. Receivers like the Bulldogs’ Malcolm Mitchell and Bama’s ArDar ius Stewart will have their say, too. But the Southeastern Conference’s No. 2 rushing offense against the top run defense clearly is the most com pelling matchup to watch. It’s strength versus strength, literally. “The whole goal in running the football, up front anyway, is to get movement,” Georgia coach Mark Richt said. “Get guys moved back or get them moved sideways or some thing, but get them off the spot, get them out of their gap. “But these guys are very big and strong and physical and they’re good fundamentally. It’s hard to move them.” Alabama (3-1, 0-1 SEC) is allowing opponents to gain only 2.0 yards per carry, while Chubb is averaging four times that. The Tide has allowed just two rushing touchdowns, Chubb has scored six. His 599 yards trails only LSU’s Leonard Fournette in the SEC while Alabama has given up all of 227 in four games. Chubb also has reached triple digits in rushing yards in 12 straight games. It’s a streak Alabama would like to end. “If that’s one of his goals, I hope he gets his goals, but it’s going to be very tough against our front,” said linebacker Reggie Ragland, one of the stars of Alabama’s front seven. The Tide’s starting defensive front averages 313 pounds, but Saban and defensive coordinator Kirby Smart can send in reinforcements without much dropoff. Defensive line backups include three former five-star prospects. Third-teamer Da’Shawn Hand has 2 1/2 sacks while defensive end Jona than Allen, listed as a second-teamer, leads the team with three. The up tempo styles that Alabama has faced since the opener against Wisconsin can limit Alabama’s defen sive subbing. “For the last three weeks we haven’t played against that kind of team, so we’re looking forward to the challenge of trying to get back to being able to play that kind of football,” Saban said. Chubb, however, predicts the Bull dogs will speed things up more often for this game. Georgia has plenty of backfield depth, too, in what Saban calls as strong a running team as the Tide has faced in a while. Sony Michel has four rushing touchdowns and Keith Marshall three. Chubb and Michel have gotten the bulk of the carries, and Saban called them as good as any tailback duo in the nation. “There’s no question in my mind about that,” he said. Alabama’s run-stoppers will face the league’s No. 3 rusher, Arkansas’s Alex Collins, the following week. A month later, Fournette and LSU come to town. The Associated Press The first sort’em out Satur day of the college football season is here and no team is facing more pressure than No. 13 Alabama. The Crimson Tide risks being sorted right out of the College Football Playoff race by Georgia. Five games match ranked teams Saturday, including the Tide visiting No. 8 Georgia. Three more games match an undefeated team against a ranked team, including No. 1 Ohio State at Indiana. Most of the teams involved in the feature games have yet to lose, so they have a little slack if they slip up. Then there’s Alabama. Two weeks removed from getting beaten at home by Mis sissippi, another loss would put the Tide’s hopes of reaching the College Football Playoff for the second straight season in critical condition. Yes, Georgia fans will not be pleased if the Tide beats the Bulldogs between the hedges at Sanford Stadium, but the SEC East should still be theirs for the taking. A similar story can be told for No. 6 Notre Dame and No. 12 Clemson. Huge game in Death Valley, but not an elimination game. Still, the margin between who is in and who gets left out could be determined this weekend. And we should get a better idea of which teams are truly playoff contenders. The picks: MARQUEE MATCHUPS No. 3 Mississippi (minus 7) at No. 25 Florida Rebels Land Shark D could be doing the chomping against the Gators ... OLE MISS 31-13. No. 6 Notre Dame (pick’em) at No. 12 Clemson Irish cannot win the ACC, but they could do some serious damage to its playoff hopes ... NOTRE DAME 27-24. No. 13 Alabama (plus 2) at No. 8 Georgia For those who find spread football appalling, Tide’s defensive line vs. Bull dogs offensive line is old-school fun ... GEORGIA 24-21. No. 21 Miss. St. (plus 6) at No. 14 Texas A&M Neither team has been able to run it much so it’s likely Dak Prescott vs. Kyle Allen for the win ... TEXAS A&M 38-28. No. 23 West Virginia (plus 7) at No. 15 Oklahoma Sooners QB Baker Mayfield against maybe the best secondary in the Big 12 ... OKLAHOMA 31-23. PLUCKY UNDERDOGS No. 1 Ohio State (minus 21) at Indiana How good are the undefeated Hoo siers? We’re about to find out ... OHIO STATE 42-20. No. 5 Baylor (minus 17) vs. Texas Tech at Arlington, Texas Can Red Raiders be ready for another race after sprinting with TCU last week? ... BAYLOR 58-38. Arizona (off) at No. 18 Stanford No LB Scooby Wright (foot) for Wildcats and maybe no QB Anu Solo mon (concussion) ... STANFORD 28-17. Iowa (plus 6) at No. 19 Wisconsin Teams play for the Heartland Tro phy, a big bronze bull — of course ... WISCONSIN 27-17. Kansas State (plus 8) at No. 20 Oklahoma State Bill Snyder’s team looking to quietly improve to 5-0 ... UPSET SPECIAL, KANSAS STATE 28-24. CONFERENCE CALLS Purdue (plus 21) at No. 2 Michigan State Spartans have been outgained on the season, an ominous sign for a team ranked so highly ... MICHIGAN STATE 38-21. Texas (plus 15) at No. 4 TCU The brutal losses are piling up on Texas and the schedule provides no breaks ... TCU 48-31. Arizona State (plus 13) at No. 7 UCLA Sun Devils season is quickly slipping away. Do they put up a fight or pack it in? ... UCLA 38-21. Wake Forest (plus 19) at No. 11 Florida State Good week for Seminoles QB Ever ett Golson to get his act together ... BEST BET, FLORIDA STATE 37-14. Minnesota (plus 4) at No. 16 Northwestern Wildcats LB Anthony Walker an early contender for Big Ten defensive player of the year ... NORTHWEST ERN, 23-14. No. 22 Michigan (minus 16) at Maryland How good are the Wolverines? Bet ter question might be how bad are the Terps? ... MICHIGAN 35-14. Washington State (plus 19) at No. 24 California If you love spread offenses and passes, enjoy ... CALIFORNIA 45-28. TWITTER REQUESTS Arkansas (plus 6) at Tennesse e Misery Bowl. The winner’s fans will still be pretty miserable, too ... TENNESSEE 24-17. Oregon (minus 7) at Colorado The Ducks have outscored the Buffs by an average of 54-10 in last four meet ings ... OREGON 45-28. Houston (minus 6) at Tulsa American Athletic Confer ence bonkers game of the week ... HOUSTON 48-38. Nebraska (minus 6) at Illinois Lose to the Illini and the honeymoon ends for Huskers fans and new coach Mike Riley ... NEBRASKA 35-24. Last week’s record: 17-5 straight; vs. 10-9-2 vs. spread. Overall: 58-19; 41-32-3. Upset specials: 2-2. Best bets: 0-3. SEC THIS WEEK ACC THIS WEEK C OLLEGE FOO TB ALL PICKS Georgia, Chubb brace for Bama’s beefy run-stoppers AP Georgia running back Nick Chubb runs for a touchdown against Southern. KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — The reputations of Arkansas and Ten nessee suggest a contrast in styles between the Razorbacks’ smash mouth approach and a school that bills itself as Wide Receiver U. It hasn’t worked out that way this season. After four games, Tennessee has more carries and yards rushing than the Razorbacks. Arkansas’ Drew Mor gan has twice as many catches and three times as many yards receiving as any of Tennessee’s wideouts. Those unusual trends may help explain why both teams has failed to live up to expectations after opening the season in the Top 25. Arkansas (1-3, 0-1 SEC) has run the ball more often lately, while Tennessee (2-2, 0-1) wants its receivers more involved. “I’m sure the receivers are prob ably a little frustrated,” Tennessee offensive coordinator Mike DeBord said. “If I was a receiver, I would be too, because they’re competitors and they want the ball. Everyone wants the ball. That day is coming. We’re going to get the ball to them.” Arkansas has operated the most run-oriented attack in the South eastern Conference during Bret Bielema’s three-year coaching ten ure, but a foot injury to running back Jonathan Williams has hindered the Razorbacks this year. Arkansas had 53 passes and just 31 carries Sept. 12 in a 16-12 loss to Toledo. Bielema insisted afterward the Razorbacks would return to their power-running roots. In its last two games, Arkansas has run the ball 85 times with 46 passes. In a 28-21 overtime loss to Texas A&M last week, Arkansas ran the ball on 62.7 percent of its snaps. “We kind of maintained and con tinued to build our identity that I think we’ll have to have to win in the SEC, as far as being able to run the football and have some efficiency,” Bielema said. Arkansas ranks third nationally in time of possession and has punted just seven times, clear evidence that the Razorbacks still like to run the ball. Tennessee coach Butch Jones said he’s reminded his offense that Arkansas’ approach limits the num ber of drives for each team. Stats indicate role reversal for Vols, Razorbacks

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Page C4 | The News Herald | Friday, October 2, 2015 SPORTS PCST makes a splash The News Herald PANAMA CITY BEACH — The host Panama City Swim Team Tsu namis got the 2015-2016 Short Course season off to a fast start with five new team records at the Speedo Beach Blast held Sept. 25-27 at the Aquatics Center. The meet featured just under 500 athletes from across Florida, Ala bama, Tennessee, and Kentucky. Area Tallahassee Aquatic Club won the team title, followed by PCST and Coast Aquatics. For the Tsunamis, Hannah Reth erford accounted for three new team records in girls 17-over in the 50 backstroke, 50 butterfly and 100 IM. Natalie McKenzie, 11, set a new girls 11-12 200-yard backstroke standard and was a member of the record-setting girls 11-12 200 med ley relay along with teammates Isa Gobel, Hannah Johnson, and Paige Sondgeroth. PCST swimmers Shane McEliece (10) and Spencer Sehlhorst (14) were high point runners-up for their age groups. Other Tsunamis winning events and their age included: Alexa Wistrcill (7), Annie McKenzie (8), Ella Hicks (10), Colin McEliece (11), Sondgeroth (12), Gobel (12), Jared Shanks (13), Taylor Warren (13), Maddie Camp bell (14), Ben Hicks (14), Sehlhorst (14), Molly Grace Bradford (15), Nico Gobel (15), Elizabeth Fisher (16), Logan Flitcraft (16), Shane Williams (16), Kari Troia (16), Retherford (17) and Alyssa Hurst (18). C ONT R IB U TE D PHOTO The record-setting girls 11-12 200 medley relay, from left to right: Isa Gobel, Paige Sondgeroth, Natalie McKenzie, Hannah Johnson. Arnold is trying to end a threegame slide, so in many instances Marlin head coach Josh Wright said the focus is more internal, rather than on the upcoming opponent. “We’re more concerned with ourselves,” Wright said. “We know they’re going to have their bag of tricks, but they’ve tended to stumble in games against us with their wrinkles and then gone back to their basics. “We have to get better. More solid. More certain about how to be successful. We’ve got to lock things in and hang our hat on that identity. That’s what we’ve lacked. Being able to protect the passer and defensively take away the big play.” Both teams should be health ier than in recent weeks. Wright said that left tackle Shaun Ken ney is back to 100 percent, and Trentin Lewis will play after being sidelined since early in the Bay game. Defensive end Branson Stuckey remains a game-time decision, however, and Wright said that receiver/defensive back Trever Kilcrease has practiced in pain since suffering a sideline hit against Choctawhatchee last week but is determined to see action. Mosley welcomes the return of running back Jimmy Daniel, who has played sparingly since an ankle injury in Week 2. Also back are Chris Creel and Dylan Rodri guez, who both suffered hand inju ries in the kickoff classic. Mosley’s young backfield of sophomores Destin Coates and John Miller, along with veteran Ezra Gray has been more than capable in Daniel’s absence, but the senior was an 1,000-yard rusher in 2014. “Jimmy and Ezra did a great job in the spring with those guys bringing them through,” Brown said. “Destin Coates has run the ball well and John Miller was a guy coming in as a sophomore we weren’t really sure where he fit in. He’s prepared himself in a way he expected to be on the field.” The Dolphins also were buoyed by junior quarterback Peyton Cal houn bouncing back from a rough outing against Leon to pass for 160 yards at West Florida. “It was huge, we converted some third downs and were able to do some stuff on early downs,” Brown said. “What we did a good job with West Florida was our pass protection. It helped give Peyton more time with his reads. Everybody always points a finger at the quarterback or receiver, but when you don’t protect it makes it hard.” Wright is more than familiar with that assessment as quar terback Cody Saunders, despite already passing for more than 1,000 yards, has been forced to improvise all to often. “He’s had to scramble a lot and throw up some maybes,” Wright said. “I think we lack a little bit of size up front and don’t yet have the complementing o-line play. “Our key to success is take away the big play, contain what they do and just string together efficient series. Not depend on the big play, but have efficient series on offense and not make any mistakes.” Brown said that the last high school quarterback he’s coached against who threw the ball as well as Saunders was former Florida State and West Virginia quarter back Clint Trickett. “What Cody brings to the table is that with a set of legs,” Brown said. “It’s almost like option responsibility where everybody has an assignment. We need to need great eye discipline. The toughest thing is we don’t have anybody to simulate that (run ning and passing ability) in practice.” Arnold could say the same about Mosley’s proficiency on onside kicks that has produced five successful recoveries. One way to combat that is prevent the Dolphins from scoring quite as often. “We just have to find four more points,” Wright said, refer ring to last season’s 13-10 loss to Mosley. to help us play a little bit faster,” he said. “The poten tial is here, we just have to keep playing. “I know I say this all the time, but these kids are really mature. They don’t get flustered one way or the other. The last two weeks we had end-of-the-game situations and we’ve found a way to make a play, and last week we had to do it twice (after a penalty on a conversion pass). That’s different than the way it’s been.” Bay must find a way to slow a balanced Tigers’ offense without defensive standout Daniel Ghant, who was lost for the sea son in the 15-13 win against Washington with a back injury. Longerbeam said that senior Ta’Varrius Bel ton will start at cornerback and sophomore Jakell King has been getting game reps all season. Ghant is the secondleading tackler on a unit that has allowed only six touchdowns in four games. Pensacola counters with quarterback Sederick Smith, who completed 14 of 19 passes for 205 yards and two touchdowns last week in a 26-0 win over Pensacola Catholic. Carlos Brown is a rushing threat and Calif Gossett and De’Andrew Norman are among a group of capable receivers. Longerbeam said that Pensacola is comparable in approach and athletes on offense as Tallahas see Rickards, which Bay defeated 13-12 in a kickoff classic. “They are, high tempo, no huddle,” Longerbeam said. “I think that is a good comparison with their skill, size and speed, and what they do offensively is a lot like Rickards. “But I think their strength is their defense. It’s really fast and they have a couple of DBs about 6-1 and 6-2. That’s the big gest we’ve faced.” Bay’s strength also has been its defense that not only is experienced, but deep and capable of mak ing big plays. “I don’t think that has let us down,” Longerbeam said. “I think we’ll be ready to play. We haven’t been perfect any night, but have found a way to win. I don’t think we’ve had a game where we put all three phases together yet. But I think the kids under stand that and have each other’s back. “This will be the best team we’ve played so far. Very athletic. It’s a big game to see who we are.” The Tornadoes offen sively continue to be led by running back Raekwon Webb. The three-year standout has rushed for 503 yards and scored eight of Bay’s 14 touchdowns. Quarterback Justin Davis has passed for 226 yards and scored four rushing touchdowns. The defense is paced by Jona than Echols’ 43 tackles. Linebacker Joseph Boehm has 33, noseguard Daryl Wilson 32 and defensive back Damius Johnson 31. “Our kids are starting to get enough confidence where they’re finding ways to win,” Longerbeam said. “I think we’ve still got a ways to go. We’ve got areas we’ve got to work on, but then again, you don’t want to peak too early.” TORNADOES from Page C1 MOSLEY-ARNOLD from Page C1 GATORS from Page C1 Florida pass rush (six sacks) resulted in Kentucky quarterback Patrick Towles throwing 16 incompletions. McElwain said Florida has shown poise and togeth erness in tight situations. “There’s not a bunch of guys griping,” McElwain said. “They’re focused on what do I have to do on the next play to win. I’ve seen that. There’s no sense of panic. “Guys are in it together, they’re rooting for each other. They like to see the success on both sides of the ball. We’ve just got to continue to support those habits.” That attention to detail lacked at times last sea son, when Florida went 2-3 in games decided by a TD or less. Some notable gaffes included tight end Tevin Westbrook dropping a sure-fire touchdown late in a 30-27 loss to LSU and Kyle Christy having a punt blocked late which allowed South Carolina to rally and tie the Gators in regulation. The Gators eventually lost 23-20 to the Gamecocks. Early this season, Flor ida is avoiding those men tal breakdowns. “All we need is our confidence up,” Florida junior defensive lineman Alex McCalister said. “I know we’ve got the talent. We’ve got the coaches. We do the right thing as far as practice and preparation. We just need to prove to our selves that we can do it.” McElwain is trying to continue to stress the details in practice this week heading into No. 25 Flori da’s showdown with No. 3 Ole Miss at The Swamp. Whether it’s a block down field or a precise route run by a receiver, little things can make a difference. “Here’s the good thing about that, when they do do it, then they’re able to see it and they’re able to visual ize it and see it on video,” McElwain said. “That then says, you know what, that reinforces the positive in the behav ior you’re looking for. And yet, when things don’t go well sometimes in prepa ration and then it shows up on Saturday you’re able to refer back and hopefully you learn that lesson.” McElwain described UF’s preparation for Ole Miss as mixed this week. The Gators have had to deal with some players ail ing with a flu bug that’s hit a handful of players on the team. McElwain felt the team lacked energy on Tues day, but played with good focus. On Wednesday, the focus level wasn’t where it needed to be early in prac tice, but picked up as drills progressed. The following is a list of area athletes now playing college or professional football. Statistics and team records are through Sept. 30, unless noted. Offense Takoda Carmichael (Arnold), West Florida, OL, Fr., 6-4, 262 — Carmichael is redshirting this season. Torri Cotton (Arnold), North Carolina Central, RB, Fr., 5-8, 160 — Cotton hasn’t played for the Eagles this season. D allas D avis (Rutherford), South Alabama, QB, Fr., 6-2, 210 — Davis was 2 for 2 for 12 yards in a 63-13 loss to North Carolina State. For the season, he has completed 5 of 7 passes for 54 yards and a touchdown for the Jaguars (2-2). Mark Grant (Mosley), West Alabama, PK, Jr., 5-7, 160 — Grant hasn’t kicked this season for the Jaguars. Kekoa Haina-Scott (Bay), Newport News Apprentice, OL, Fr., 6-1, 265 — Haina-Scott has started all four games at center for the Builders (0-4) this season. Lorenzo Hernandez (Bay), Warner University, TE, Fr., 6-0, 235 — Hernandez hasn’t played for the Royals this season. Xavier Longerbeam (Bay), Florida A&M, QB, Fr., 6-2, 185 — Longerbeam hasn’t played for the Rattlers this season. T.J. Lowder (Bay), Florida Tech, WR, Sr., 5-11, 190 — Lowder had two catches for 36 yards and a touchdown in a 55-48 loss to North Alabama. Lowder has 22 catches for 261 yards and two touchdowns on the season for the Panthers (1-3). Jacob Martinez (Bozeman), Buffalo, WR, Fr., 6-2, 182 — Martinez had no catches in a 24-21 loss to Nevada. Martinez has five catches for 52 yards and a touchdown this season for the Bulls (1-2). He has also returned five kicks for 92 yards and one punt for 86 yards and a touchdown. Austin Peffers (Arnold), West Florida, K, Fr., 5-10, 150 — Peffers is redshirting this season. Jovanni Perea (Arnold), Wilmington College, WR, 5-8, 140 — Perea had one punt return for 9 yards in a 31-9 loss to Otterbein. For the seasons, Perea has returned two kickoffs for 16 yards and one punt for nine yards for the Fightin’ Quakers (1-2). Travion Turrell (Bay), Limestone College, WR, Fr., 5-7, 150 — Turrell returned three kickoffs for 22 yards and two punts for 8 yards in a 46-22 loss to Lenoir-Rhyne. For the season, Turrell has six kick returns for 88 yards and two punt returns for 8 yards for the Saints (1-2). Defense Stephen Benedik (Arnold), Lyon, DB, Fr., 5-7, 170 — Benedik had nine tackles, seven solo, in a 51-10 loss to South Dakota School of Mines and Tech. Benedik has 33 tackles, 19 solo, on the season for the Scots (0-4). Chandler Burkett (Bozeman), Maryland, DL, Fr., 6-3, 240 — Burkett didn’t play in a 45-6 loss to West Virginia. For the season, he has one tackle for loss and a sack for the Terrapins (2-2). Caleb Clayton-Molby (Arnold), UNC-Charlotte), LB, Sr., 6-2, 238 — Clayton-Molby had six tackles, four solo and two tackles for loss, a sack, and a forced fumble in a 17-7 loss to Florida Atlantic. He has 16 tackles, 10 solo, with one sack, a forced fumble, and a recovered fumble for the 49ers (2-2) this season. Javien Elliott (Rutherford), FSU, DB, Sr., 5-11, 176 — The Seminoles were off last week. For the season, Elliott has two tackles and a forced fumble this season for the Seminoles (3-0). D ondrell Harris (Rutherford), Troy, DB, So., 5-11, 185 — Harris hasn’t recorded a tackle in three games for the Trojans (1-2) this season. R eakwon Jones (Mosley), Indiana, LB, Fr., 6-2, 218 — Jones has not played for the Hoosiers (4-0) this season. Michael Mosley (Arnold), Catawba, DL, Fr., 6-2, 235 — Mosley has not played for the Indians (2-2) this season. Banton Price (Mosley), Faulkner University, DL, So., 6-1, 250 — Price had five tackles, one solo, and 1.5 tackles for loss in 44-0 win over Georgetown (Ky.). For the season, Price has 11 tackles, two solo, two tackles for loss, and one fumble recovery for the Eagles (3-0). Calvin Pryor (Port St. Joe, Louisville), New York Jets (National Football League), DB, second year, 6-2, 213 — Pryor had five tackles, two solo, in a 24-17 loss to Philadelphia. For the season, Pryor has 20 tackles, 13 solo, a pass deflection, an interception, and a forced fumble for the Jets (2-1). Khyri Thornton (Bay, Hargrave Military, Southern Mississippi), New England Patriots, DL, second year, 6-3, 324 —Thornton was signed by the New England Patriots from their practice squad to the active roster Thursday. He has yet to play in a game this season. Anyone with information on the whereabouts of other area athletes now playing college or professional football is asked to call The News Herald at 747-5065 or e-mail sports@pcnh.com. W ALLACE CR EWS | Special to the News Herald Tennessee had four fumbles against Florida on Saturday and lost one. COLLEGE/PRO FOOTBALL PERIS C OPE

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Friday, October 2, 2015 | The News Herald | Page C5 SPORTS STANDINGS AND BOXES NL standings East Division W L Pct GB x-New York 89 70 .560 — Washington 81 78 .509 8 Miami 69 90 .434 20 Atlanta 64 95 .403 25 Philadelphia 62 97 .390 27 Central Division W L Pct GB x-St. Louis 100 59 .629 — y-Pittsburgh 96 63 .604 4 y-Chicago 94 65 .591 6 Milwaukee 68 91 .428 32 Cincinnati 63 96 .396 37 West Division W L Pct GB x-Los Angeles 89 70 .560 — San Francisco 83 76 .522 6 Arizona 77 81 .487 11 San Diego 74 85 .465 15 Colorado 66 92 .418 22 x-clinched division y-clinched wild card Wednesday’s Games Pittsburgh 8, St. Louis 2, 1st game Philadelphia 7, N.Y. Mets 5 St. Louis 11, Pittsburgh 1, 2nd game Chicago Cubs 10, Cincinnati 3 Tampa Bay 6, Miami 4 Atlanta 2, Washington 0 Arizona 3, Colorado 1 Milwaukee 5, San Diego 0 San Francisco 5, L.A. Dodgers 0 Thursday’s Games Philadelphia 3, N.Y. Mets 0 Chicago Cubs 5, Cincinnati 3 L.A. Dodgers 3, San Francisco 2 San Diego 3, Milwaukee 1 Tampa Bay 4, Miami 1 Washington 3, Atlanta 0 Colorado at Arizona, (n) Friday’s Games Cincinnati (Sampson 2-6) at Pittsburgh (Liriano 12-7), 6:05 p.m. Miami (Nicolino 4-4) at Philadelphia (Harang 6-15), 6:05 p.m. Washington (G.Gonzalez 11-8) at N.Y. Mets (Syndergaard 9-7), 6:10 p.m. St. Louis (Jai.Garcia 10-5) at Atlanta (Teheran 10-8), 6:35 p.m. Chicago Cubs (Arrieta 21-6) at Milwaukee (A.Pena 2-0), 7:10 p.m. Houston (Keuchel 19-8) at Arizona (R.De La Rosa 14-8), 8:40 p.m. San Diego (C.Kelly 0-1) at L.A. Dodgers (A.Wood 11-12), 9:10 p.m. Colorado (K.Kendrick 6-13) at San Francisco (Heston 12-10), 9:15 p.m. Saturday’s Games Colorado at San Francisco, 3:05 p.m. Cincinnati at Pittsburgh, 6:05 p.m. Miami at Philadelphia, 6:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee, 6:10 p.m. St. Louis at Atlanta, 6:10 p.m. Washington at N.Y. Mets, 6:10 p.m. Houston at Arizona, 7:10 p.m. San Diego at L.A. Dodgers, 8:10 p.m. Sunday’s Games Cincinnati at Pittsburgh, 2:05 p.m. Colorado at San Francisco, 2:05 p.m. Miami at Philadelphia, 2:05 p.m. St. Louis at Atlanta, 2:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee, 2:10 p.m. Houston at Arizona, 2:10 p.m. San Diego at L.A. Dodgers, 2:10 p.m. Washington at N.Y. Mets, 2:10 p.m. End of Regular Season AL standings East Division W L Pct GB x-Toronto 92 67 .579 — New York 87 72 .547 5 Baltimore 78 81 .491 14 Boston 78 81 .491 14 Tampa Bay 78 81 .491 14 Central Division W L Pct GB x-Kansas City 91 67 .576 — Minnesota 83 76 .522 8 Cleveland 78 80 .494 13 Chicago 74 84 .468 17 Detroit 73 85 .462 18 West Division W L Pct GB Texas 86 72 .544 — Houston 84 75 .528 2 Los Angeles 83 75 .525 3 Seattle 75 84 .472 11 Oakland 66 93 .415 20 x-clinched division Wednesday’s Games Toronto 15, Baltimore 2, 1st game Minnesota 7, Cleveland 1, 1st game Boston 9, N.Y. Yankees 5, 11 innings Oakland 8, L.A. Angels 7 Tampa Bay 6, Miami 4 Baltimore 8, Toronto 1, 2nd game Cleveland 10, Minnesota 2, 2nd game Texas 6, Detroit 2 Kansas City 5, Chicago White Sox 3, 10 innings Houston 7, Seattle 6 Thursday’s Games Baltimore 6, Toronto 4 N.Y. Yankees 4, Boston 1 Tampa Bay 4, Miami 1 Minnesota 4, Cleveland 2 L.A. Angels at Texas, (n) Kansas City at Chicago White Sox, (n) Friday’s Games N.Y. Yankees (L.Severino 5-3) at Baltimore (W.Chen 10-8), 6:05 p.m. Boston (Owens 4-3) at Cleveland (Tomlin 6-2), 6:10 p.m. Toronto (Buehrle 14-7) at Tampa Bay (E.Ramirez 11-6), 6:10 p.m. L.A. Angels (Weaver 7-12) at Texas (M.Perez 3-6), 7:05 p.m. Detroit (Simon 13-11) at Chicago White Sox (Sale 12-11), 7:10 p.m. Kansas City (C.Young 11-6) at Minnesota (E.Santana 7-4), 7:10 p.m. Houston (Keuchel 19-8) at Arizona (R.De La Rosa 14-8), 8:40 p.m. Oakland (Brooks 2-4) at Seattle (Iwakuma 9-5), 9:10 p.m. Saturday’s Games Kansas City at Minnesota, 12:05 p.m. L.A. Angels at Texas, 12:05 p.m. Toronto at Tampa Bay, 5:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Baltimore, 6:05 p.m. Boston at Cleveland, 6:10 p.m. Detroit at Chicago White Sox, 6:10 p.m. Houston at Arizona, 7:10 p.m. Oakland at Seattle, 8:10 p.m. Sunday’s Games L.A. Angels at Texas, 2:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Baltimore, 2:05 p.m. Boston at Cleveland, 2:10 p.m. Detroit at Chicago White Sox, 2:10 p.m. Houston at Arizona, 2:10 p.m. Kansas City at Minnesota, 2:10 p.m. Oakland at Seattle, 2:10 p.m. Toronto at Tampa Bay, 2:10 p.m. End of Regular Season Wild card glance AMERICAN LEAGUE W L Pct WCGB y-New York 87 72 .547 — Houston 84 75 .528 — Los Angeles 83 75 .525 Minnesota 83 76 .522 1 Thursday’s Games N.Y. Yankees 4, Boston 1 Minnesota 4, Cleveland 2 L.A. Angels at Texas, (n) NATIONAL LEAGUE W L Pct WCGB y-Pittsburgh 96 63 .604 — y-Chicago 94 65 .591 — z-clinched playoff berth Thursday’s Games Chicago Cubs 5, Cincinnati 3 Thursday’s boxes Yankees 4, Red Sox 1 Boston New York ab r h bi ab r h bi Betts cf 4 0 2 1 Gardnr cf-lf 4 0 1 0 BrdlyJr lf 3 0 0 0 Rfsnyd 2b 4 1 1 1 Bogarts ss 2 0 0 0 ARdrgz dh 3 0 1 0 T.Shaw 1b 4 0 1 0 Noel pr-dh 0 0 0 0 RCastll rf 4 0 0 0 Beltran rf 4 1 1 1 Craig dh 4 0 1 0 Hethctt cf 0 0 0 0 Marrer 3b 3 1 1 0 CYoung lf-rf 3 0 1 0 S.Leon c 4 0 1 0 JMrphy c 2 1 0 0 Rutledg 2b 4 0 1 0 Bird 1b 4 1 1 1 Gregrs ss 2 0 1 0 B.Ryan 3b 3 0 1 1 Totals 32 1 7 1 Totals 29 4 8 4 Boston 000 010 000 New York 020 000 11x DP—Boston 2, New York 2. LOB—Bos ton 8, New York 6. 2B—C.Young (20). HR—Refsnyder (2), Beltran (19), Bird (11). SB—Gregorius (5). CS—Noel (1). IP H R ER BB SO Boston R.Hill L,2-1 6 4 2 2 3 6 Machi 1 2 1 1 0 2 Hembree 1 2 1 1 2 0 New York Sabathia W,6-10 5 6 1 1 3 3 Warren H,3 3 1 0 0 1 3 Betances S,9-13 1 0 0 0 0 2 Umpires—Home, Todd Tichenor; First, Tim Timmons; Second, Mike Everitt; Third, Tim Welke. T:10. A,033 (49,638). Cubs 5, Reds 3 Chicago Cincinnati ab r h bi ab r h bi Fowler cf 4 2 1 0 Bourgs lf-cf 5 1 2 1 AJcksn rf 3 2 1 3 Votto 1b 5 0 2 1 StCastr 2b 4 0 0 0 Phillips 2b 5 0 2 1 Rizzo 1b 4 0 1 1 Bruce rf 4 0 1 0 Denor lf 4 0 1 1 Frazier 3b 4 0 0 0 J.Baez 3b 4 0 2 0 Suarez ss 4 1 2 0 Schwrr c 4 0 1 0 Brnhrt c 4 1 2 0 Hamml p 2 0 0 0 T.Holt cf 2 0 0 0 Coghln ph 1 0 0 0 Badnhp p 0 0 0 0 Grimm p 0 0 0 0 Matths p 0 0 0 0 Rodney p 0 0 0 0 RCarer ph 1 0 0 0 Richrd p 0 0 0 0 MParr p 0 0 0 0 Cahill p 0 0 0 0 Duvall ph 1 0 0 0 Strop p 0 0 0 0 Lornzn p 0 0 0 0 LaStell ph 1 0 0 0 JoLam p 1 0 1 0 HRndn p 0 0 0 0 Boesch lf 3 0 0 0 ARussll ss 3 1 1 0 Totals 34 5 8 5 Totals 39 3 12 3 Chicago 003 020 000 Cincinnati 000 000 300 E—Hammel (2), A.Russell (13). DP— Chicago 2, Cincinnati 1. LOB—Chicago 5, Cincinnati 9. 2B—Rizzo (38), J.Baez (6), Bourgeois (5), Phillips (19), Bruce (34), Jo.Lamb (1). HR—A.Jackson (1). SB—Phillips (22). IP H R ER BB SO Chicago Hammel W,10-7 5 5 0 0 0 5 Grimm 1 1 0 0 0 0 Rodney .2 2 3 0 0 1 Richard 0 1 0 0 0 0 Cahill H,2 .1 1 0 0 0 1 Strop H,27 1 1 0 0 0 3 Rondon S,29-33 1 1 0 0 0 0 Cincinnati Jo.Lamb L,1-5 4 .2 5 5 5 3 6 Badenhop 1 .1 2 0 0 0 2 Mattheus 1 0 0 0 0 1 M.Parra 1 0 0 0 0 2 Lorenzen 1 1 0 0 0 1 Richard pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. WP—Hammel. Umpires—Home, Bill Miller; First, Jim Wolf; Second, Doug Eddings; Third, Adrian Johnson. T:55. A,352 (42,319). Phillies 3, Mets 0 New York Philadelphia ab r h bi ab r h bi KJhnsn 2b 4 0 2 0 Galvis 2b 4 0 0 0 Tejada ss 4 0 1 0 OHerrr cf 4 0 1 0 Confort lf 3 0 0 0 Altherr lf 3 0 0 0 Stauffr p 0 0 0 0 Francr rf 3 1 1 0 DHerrr ph 1 0 0 0 Ruf 1b 3 1 1 2 DAlvrz p 0 0 0 0 Asche 3b 3 0 0 0 Famili p 0 0 0 0 JWllms p 0 0 0 0 Cuddyr 1b 4 0 0 0 LuGarc p 0 0 0 0 Niwnhs rf 4 0 3 0 Ruiz c 3 0 1 0 Campll 3b 4 0 0 0 CdArnd ss 3 0 0 0 Plawck c 2 0 0 0 Eickhff p 1 0 0 0 Lagars cf 3 0 0 0 ABlanc 3b 1 1 1 1 Glmrtn p 1 0 0 0 YongJr ph-lf 2 0 0 0 Totals 32 0 6 0 Totals 28 3 5 3 New York 000 000 000 Philadelphia 000 200 01x DP—Philadelphia 1. LOB—New York 6, Philadelphia 3. 2B—Nieuwenhuis 2 (9), O.Herrera (28), Francoeur (16). HR—Ruf (12), A.Blanco (7). SB—Ruiz (1). S—Eickhoff. IP H R ER BB SO New York Gilmartin L,3-2 5 3 2 2 1 3 Stauffer 2 1 0 0 0 2 D.Alvarez .2 1 1 1 0 1 Familia .1 0 0 0 0 1 Philadelphia Eickhoff W,3-3 7 4 0 0 1 10 Je.Williams H,4 1 1 0 0 0 1 Lu.Garcia S,2-4 1 1 0 0 0 0 PB—Ruiz. Umpires—Home, Hunter Wendelstedt; First, Marvin Hudson; Second, David Rackley; Third, Bob Davidson. T:23. A,238 (43,651). Nationals 3, Braves 0 Washington Atlanta ab r h bi ab r h bi Rendon 3b 4 0 0 0 Bourn lf 4 0 1 0 TTurnr 2b 4 0 0 0 Maybin cf 4 0 2 0 Harper rf 4 0 1 1 Markks rf 4 0 1 0 Werth lf 4 0 1 0 AdGarc 3b 4 0 2 0 CRonsn 1b 4 1 1 1 Swisher 1b 3 0 0 0 Dsmnd ss 4 0 1 0 Moylan p 0 0 0 0 MTaylr cf 4 0 0 0 Mrksry p 0 0 0 0 WRams c 3 0 2 0 Burawa p 0 0 0 0 Difo pr 0 1 0 0 DCastr ph 1 0 0 0 Loaton c 0 0 0 0 Cunniff p 0 0 0 0 Strasrg p 2 0 0 0 JPetrsn 2b 3 0 0 0 Treinen p 0 0 0 0 ASmns ss 4 0 1 0 dnDkkr ph 0 0 0 0 Bthncrt c 2 0 0 0 YEscor ph 0 1 0 0 Lvrnwy c 1 0 0 0 Rivero p 0 0 0 0 Weber p 2 0 0 0 FFrmn 1b 1 0 0 0 Totals 33 3 6 2 Totals 33 0 7 0 Washington 010 000 020 Atlanta 000 000 000 E—W.Ramos (6), Ad.Garcia (9). DP—Washington 1. LOB—Washington 4, Atlanta 8. HR—C.Robinson (9). SB—Maybin (23). IP H R ER BB SO Washington Strasburg W,11-7 6 6 0 0 1 7 Treinen H,9 1 1 0 0 1 0 Rivero S,1-2 2 0 0 0 0 2 Atlanta Weber L,0-3 7 5 1 1 0 10 Moylan 0 1 1 0 0 0 Marksberry 0 0 1 0 1 0 Burawa 1 0 0 0 0 2 Cunniff 1 0 0 0 0 0 Moylan pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Marksberry pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Umpires—Home, Sam Holbrook; First, Marty Foster; Second, Mike Muchlinski; Third, Mark Wegner. T:47. A,790 (49,586). Twins 4, Indians 2 Minnesota Cleveland ab r h bi ab r h bi Dozier 2b 4 0 1 0 JRmrz 2b 4 0 0 0 Mauer 1b 4 1 1 0 Lindor ss 4 0 0 0 Sano dh 4 0 0 0 Kipnis dh 4 0 1 0 Plouffe 3b 2 0 1 1 CSantn 1b 4 0 0 0 Nunez pr-3b 0 1 0 0 Chsnhll rf 3 0 1 0 ERosar lf 4 1 1 0 AAlmnt cf 4 1 2 0 TrHntr rf 3 0 0 1 RPerez c 4 1 2 2 Buxton cf 0 0 0 0 Mrtnz lf 2 0 0 0 A.Hicks cf-rf 3 0 0 0 Urshela 3b 3 0 1 0 KSuzuk c 2 0 0 0 DaSntn ph 0 1 0 0 Hrmnn c 0 0 0 0 EdEscr ss 3 0 1 1 Totals 29 4 5 3 Totals 32 2 7 2 Minnesota 000 100 012 Cleveland 000 000 200 E—Jo.Ramirez (11). DP—Minnesota 1, Cleveland 3. LOB—Minnesota 3, Cleve land 5. 2B—Mauer (34), Plouffe (35), Edu.Escobar (31), Kipnis (43), Urshela (8). HR—R.Perez (7). S—M.Martinez. SF—Tor.Hunter. IP H R ER BB SO Minnesota Duffey 6 .1 6 2 2 1 6 May .2 0 0 0 0 1 Perkins W,3-5 1 0 0 0 0 0 Jepsen S,15-20 1 1 0 0 0 2 Cleveland Bauer 7 2 1 1 3 3 B.Shaw BS,4-6 .1 2 1 1 1 0 Allen L,2-5 1 .2 1 2 0 0 0 WP—Allen. Umpires—Home, Brian O’Nora; First, Mark Ripperger; Second, Alan Porter; Third, Jeff Kellogg. T:47. A,644 (36,856). Padres 3, Brewers 1 Milwaukee San Diego ab r h bi ab r h bi Gennett 2b 4 0 2 0 Myers lf 2 0 0 0 HPerez 3b 4 0 2 0 Amarst lf 1 0 0 0 JRogrs 1b 4 0 0 0 Spngnr 2b 3 1 2 1 KDavis lf 4 0 0 0 Solarte 3b 4 1 2 2 DoSntn cf 4 0 0 0 Gyorko ss 3 0 0 0 Maldnd c 4 0 1 0 Wallac 1b 3 0 0 0 M.Reed rf 3 0 1 0 UptnJr cf 4 0 1 0 YRiver ss 3 0 0 0 DeNrrs c 1 1 1 0 Jngmn p 1 0 0 0 Kenndy p 1 0 0 0 Lohse p 0 0 0 0 Gale ph 1 0 0 0 SPetrsn ph 1 1 1 1 Kelley p 0 0 0 0 CJimnz p 0 0 0 0 Benoit p 0 0 0 0 LSchfr ph 1 0 0 0 Kimrel p 0 0 0 0 Barrios p 0 0 0 0 Jnkwsk rf 2 0 0 0 Totals 33 1 7 1 Totals 25 3 6 3 Milwaukee 000 001 000 San Diego 002 100 00x DP—Milwaukee 3, San Diego 1. LOB—Milwaukee 5, San Diego 6. HR— S.Peterson (2), Solarte (14). CS—Upton Jr. (3). S—Kennedy. IP H R ER BB SO Milwaukee Jungmann L,9-8 3 4 3 3 4 2 Lohse 2 2 0 0 2 1 C.Jimenez 2 0 0 0 1 1 Barrios 1 0 0 0 0 1 San Diego Kennedy W,9-15 6 5 1 1 0 11 Kelley H,7 1 1 0 0 0 2 Benoit H,28 1 1 0 0 0 1 Kimbrel S,39-43 1 0 0 0 0 2 Jungmann pitched to 1 batter in the 4th. WP—Jungmann, Kennedy. PB— De.Norris. Umpires—Home, Carlos Torres; First, Laz Diaz; Second, Jeff Nelson; Third, Cory Blaser. T:05. A,129 (41,164). Rays 4, Marlins 1 Miami Tampa Bay ab r h bi ab r h bi DGordn 2b 4 0 0 0 Jaso dh 5 1 2 0 Yelich lf 3 0 0 0 SouzJr rf 5 1 2 0 Prado 3b 3 0 0 0 Longori 3b 5 2 2 2 Bour 1b 4 0 0 0 Sizemr lf 4 0 2 1 Ozuna cf 4 1 1 0 Mahtok lf 0 0 0 0 Realmt c 4 0 1 0 Arencii c 4 0 2 1 Telis dh 4 0 1 0 Loney 1b 4 0 3 0 Rojas ss 2 0 0 0 TBckh ss 4 0 0 0 ISuzuki rf 2 0 1 1 Kiermr cf 4 0 3 0 Frnkln 2b 4 0 0 0 Totals 30 1 4 1 Totals 39 4 16 4 Miami 000 010 000 Tampa Bay 101 000 20x E—Sizemore (2), Arencibia (1). DP— Miami 1. LOB—Miami 6, Tampa Bay 11. 2B—Longoria (35), Kiermaier (25). HR—Longoria (21). CS—D.Gordon (19). SF—I.Suzuki. IP H R ER BB SO Miami Fernandez L,6-1 6 11 2 2 0 9 Barraclough .1 3 2 2 0 0 Dunn .2 2 0 0 0 1 B.Morris 1 0 0 0 0 0 Tampa Bay Odorizzi W,9-9 7 4 1 0 2 7 Cedeno H,20 1 0 0 0 1 1 Bxberger S,41-47 1 0 0 0 0 1 Umpires—Home, Ben May; First, Phil Cuzzi; Second, Tony Randazzo; Third, Gerry Davis. T:29. A,657 (31,042). Dodgers 3, Giants 2 Los Angeles San Francisco ab r h bi ab r h bi Crwfrd lf 4 0 0 0 Tmlnsn 2b 4 0 2 1 Torreys 3b 0 0 0 0 MDuffy 3b 4 0 0 0 HKndrc 2b 4 1 2 0 Posey 1b 4 0 0 0 AGnzlz 1b 4 0 1 1 Byrd rf 4 0 0 0 Ethier rf 3 1 1 1 Wllmsn lf 3 0 0 0 CSeagr ss 4 0 1 0 De Aza ph 1 0 0 0 Utley 3b 3 0 0 1 JrPrkr cf 3 1 1 0 Jansen p 0 0 0 0 TBrwn c 3 0 0 0 Grandl c 3 0 0 0 Noonan ss 2 0 0 0 KHrndz cf-lf 4 0 0 0 Pagan ph 1 1 1 1 BrAndr p 3 1 1 0 Romo p 0 0 0 0 Hatchr p 0 0 0 0 THudsn p 0 0 0 0 Pedrsn cf 0 0 0 0 Affeldt p 0 0 0 0 Frndsn ph 1 0 1 0 Vglsng p 1 0 0 0 Osich p 0 0 0 0 BCrwfr ph-ss 1 0 0 0 Totals 32 3 6 3 Totals 32 2 5 2 Los Angeles 012 000 000 San Francisco 000 000 020 E—H.Kendrick (5). DP—San Francisco 1. LOB—Los Angeles 7, San Francisco 3. 2B—H.Kendrick (21), Tomlinson (5). 3B—Ethier (7). SF—Utley. IP H R ER BB SO Los Angeles Andersn W,10-9 7 .2 4 2 2 0 3 Hatcher H,13 .1 1 0 0 0 0 Jansen S,35-37 1 0 0 0 0 0 San Francisco T.Hudson L,8-9 2 .1 3 3 3 2 1 Affeldt .2 1 0 0 0 1 Vogelsong 4 1 0 0 0 6 Osich 1 1 0 0 1 1 Romo 1 0 0 0 1 1 Umpires—Home, Ed Hickox; First, Paul Nauert; Second, Dana DeMuth; Third, Mike Estabrook. T:33. A,027 (41,915). Orioles 6, Blue Jays 4 Toronto Baltimore ab r h bi ab r h bi Pompy cf 4 1 3 0 Reimld cf-lf 5 0 1 1 Pnngtn lf 2 0 0 0 GParra lf-rf 4 1 1 0 Goins ss 2 0 0 0 MMchd 3b 4 3 3 3 Carrer rf 4 0 1 2 C.Davis dh 2 1 1 0 Colaell dh 4 1 2 0 Schoop 2b 0 0 0 0 Hague 1b 3 0 0 0 Janish 2b 4 0 1 1 Thole c 4 0 1 0 Pearce 1b 4 1 1 1 Kawsk 3b 3 1 1 1 JHardy ss 3 0 0 0 Barney 2b 4 0 0 0 Flahrty rf 3 0 0 0 Jo.Diaz ss-lf 3 1 1 1 Lough cf 0 0 0 0 Joseph c 3 0 0 0 Totals 33 4 9 4 Totals 32 6 8 6 Toronto 000 100 300 Baltimore 310 011 00x DP—Baltimore 2. LOB—Toronto 7, Baltimore 12. 2B—Pompey (7), Carrera (8), Colabello (19), C.Davis (29), Pearce (12). HR—M.Machado 2 (33). SB— M.Machado 2 (20). CS—Pompey (1). IP H R ER BB SO Toronto Hutchison L,13-5 1 4 3 3 1 1 Francis 2 .2 2 1 1 3 3 Schultz 1 .1 1 1 1 2 0 Jenkins 1 .2 1 1 1 2 0 Loup 0 0 0 0 0 0 Tepera .1 0 0 0 0 0 Aa.Sanchez 1 0 0 0 0 1 Baltimore T.Wilson 1 1 0 0 2 1 McFarlnd W,1-2 4 5 1 1 0 2 Givens 1 0 0 0 0 3 Brach .2 2 3 3 1 1 Matusz 0 1 0 0 0 0 O’Day H,17 1 .1 0 0 0 0 2 Britton S,35-39 1 0 0 0 0 1 Matusz pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Loup pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. HBP—by Loup (G.Parra), by Hutchison (Schoop), by O’Day (Hague), by Brit ton (Jo.Diaz). WP—Francis, Schultz, McFarland. Umpires—Home, Rob Drake; First, Joe West; Second, Kerwin Danley; Third, D.J. Reyburn. T:12 (Delay: 3:25). A,257 (45,971). MLB ROUNDUP Yankees clinch playoff spot NEW YORK (AP) — The New York Yankees clinched an AL wild-card spot Thursday night, ending a two-year absence from the postseason by beat ing the Boston Red Sox 4-1. Carlos Beltran and rookies Greg Bird and Rob Refsnyder all homered for the Yankees in the franchise’s 10,000th regular-season win. CC Sabathia (6-10) won for the sec ond time since the All-Star break. Putting behind the venerated gen eration of Derek Jeter and Mariano Rivera, the Yankees open the playoffs with a winner-take-all game on Tues day, most likely against Houston or the Los Angeles Angels. New York had failed to reach the playoffs in consecutive years for the first time since its 1982-93 drought, just before the start of a golden age that included five World Series titles and seven AL pennants from 1996-2009. Cubs 5, Reds 3 CINCINNATI — Austin Jackson hit a three-run homer, Anthony Rizzo added an RBI double and the Chicago Cubs kept alive their slim hopes for home-field advantage in the wild-card game with a victory over the Cincinnati Reds. Chris Denorfia also drove in a run and the Cubs overcame two errors to move within two games of idle Pittsburgh in the race for home field in Wednesday’s NL wildcard playoff game. Both teams have three to play — Chicago in Milwaukee and the Pirates against the Reds in Pittsburgh. Twins 4, Indians 2 CLEVELAND — Pinch-runner Eduard Nunez scored from third base on a wild pitch and Torii Hunter hit a sacrifice fly in the ninth inning to give Minnesota a victory over the Cleveland Indians, moving the Twins a little closer to an AL wild-card spot. Facing a crushing loss, the Twins scored a run in the eighth to tie it and then two unearned runs in the ninth off Cody Allen (2-5) to pull within one game of idle Houston for the sec ond wild-card berth with three games left. Rays 4, Marlins 1 ST. PETERSBURG — Jake Odorizzi allowed one run over seven innings as the Tampa Bay Rays beat Jose Fernandez and the Miami Marlins to complete a three-game sweep. Nationals 3, Braves 0 ATLANTA — Clint Robinson hit a home run and Stephen Strasburg continued his strong September to help the Washington Nationals beat the Atlanta Braves. the Hurricanes repeatedly failed to reach the end zone. Trailing by 11 points, the Hurricanes went for it on fourth-and-goal from the 5 instead of taking the field goal. Brad Kaaya’s pass was incomplete with 4:41 left. Kaaya finished 24 of 39 for 255 yards without a touchdown or interception. Tion Green’s 41-yard run then put Cincinnati in posi tion to finish it off. Green had 90 yards on 15 carries. Moore got off to a solid start, leading the Bearcats to a 27-20 halftime lead. He completed his first three passes as Cincinnati pulled ahead 14-3, the first time the Hurri canes had trailed this season. After five straight comple tions, he threw an interception — hung the ball in the air too long — that set up a Miami touchdown. The Bearcats had 300 yards in the first half, with Moore throwing for a touchdown and scoring on a 1-yard sneak. The main point of emphasis for Cincinnati was avoid ing turnovers. Cincinnati led the nation in turnovers coming into the game with nine interceptions and five fumbles. Miami has been among the best at forcing turnovers. Aside from Moore’s first-quarter interception, the Bearcats avoided the big mistake. BEARCATS from Page C1 Mosley boys win at Hombre The News Herald PANAMA CITY BEACH — Ryland Spitzer, Steven Johnson, and Gavin Livingstone finished in a three-way tie for the top score in a nine-hole Bay County boys tour nament Thursday at Hombre Golf Club, with Mosley tak ing the team title by 11 strokes over runner-up Bay. Scores: Mosley 154 — Ryland Spitzer 36, Alex Gann 38, Chip Vickers 40, Gene McGuire 40, Bailey Paulk 46. Bay 165 — Steven Johnson 36, Levi Kirk 39, Spencer Sandlin 42, David Chapman 48, Matthew Bruhn 50. Arnold 179 — Gavin Livingstone 36, Cole Reed 47, Dominic Canfora 47, Ben Bradford 49, Carson Walters 52. NBH 199 — Jay Lynch 47, Ethan Hatcher 49, Mason Bonono 50, Danny Eurich 53. Rutherford 215 — Wade Bailey 49, Stephen Martin 51, Josh Broxson 56, Joseph Boyd 59. Volleyball Mosley 3, Rutherford 0 SPRINGFIELD — Mosley won 25-5, 25-11, 25-11 to improve to 14-6 overall and 4-0 in District 1-5A. Kenley Adams led the Dolphins with nine kills to go with 14 assists, 12 service points, and four aces, while T’ara Ceasar had seven kills, nine digs, and five blocks. Josie Williams also had seven kills and Lauren Mask had three. Kiana Yangson had eight digs, 15 service points and a team-high four aces, with Savannah Gibbs contributing 13 assists, 15 service points, and four digs. Savannah Stanton had eight service points, two aces, and two kills, and McKenzie Harley had four digs. Mosley next plays Monday at Arnold against Taylor County, Ky. Rutherford is home Monday for Port St. Joe. Chiles 3, Arnold 2 PANAMA CITY BEACH — Chiles took the five-set vic tory 25-21, 22-25, 21-25, 25-22, 15-8 to improve to 13-7 on the season, while Arnold fell to 10-6. Eden Hawes led the Marlins with 16 kills to go with a block, two aces, and 27 digs, with Casey Justice adding 14 kills, four aces, and 18 digs, and Gabby Fisher five kils, two blocks, and five aces. Gabby Crowley led the way with 35 assists to go with five kills and 10 digs, with Sydney Painter adding five blocks. The Marlins next play home Monday against Taylor County (Ky.). Chipley 3, Bay 0 PANAMA CITY — Chipley won the match 25-17, 25-18, 25-19 to improve to 9-2 on the season, while Bay dropped to 5-13. The Tornadoes next play Mosley at home Tues day. Chipley is away against Holmes County on Monday. Late results JV Football Mosley 44, Bay 13 PANAMA CITY — Mosley rolled to a 37-6 halftime lead while pushing its record to 3-1. Jarkeiss Bass-Morrisey scored on 9and 11-yard runs, Drew Yeager on 2and 6-yard runs, Michael Maddox a 2-yard run and Isiah Har rell contributed a safety in the first-half blitz. Bass-Morrisey added his third TD, from 15 yards, and Conner Cunningham made all six extra-point kicks. Bay dropped to 0-4. Mosley plays at Arnold at 6 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 8. PREP ROUNDUP Pensacola State evens season series with GC The News Herald PENSACOLA — Pensacola State evened its season series with Gulf Coast on Thursday night, winning 3-0 in a Panhandle Conference volleyball matchup. The Lady Pirates won 25-22, 25-17, 25-20 to improve to 13-7 overall and 1-1 in conference play, while the Lady Commodores dropped to 7-11 and 1-1. Gulf Coast had won the first meeting in four sets Sept. 16 in Panama City, but Pensacola State’s victory evens the season series at 1-1 and creates a best-of-three scenario to make the state tournament. There are three scheduled meetings remaining this season, with two set to be played in Panama City, includ ing the next one Oct. 14. The first team to win three conference games advances to the state tournament. Gulf Coast will return home Monday to face Jefferson Davis at 6 p.m.

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Page C6 | The News Herald | Friday, October 2, 2015 STAT SHEET Bruins owner talks pros, cons of expansion Boston Bruins owner Jeremy Jacobs says both groups hoping to land an NHL expansion team made impressive presentations at the recent league meetings. Jacobs said on Thursday that the Quebec bid has more history and a more passionate fan base behind it. But he said it might make more sense to go with Las Vegas because the Western Conference already has two fewer teams. Jacobs says he doesn’t “know if there’s a will” among the existing owners to expand. The NHL took applications for expansion franchises this summer and got two bidders. The Quebec Nordiques moved to Denver in 1995 and became the Colorado Avalanche. A team in Las Vegas would be the gambling city’s first major pro sports team. Both cities have already built arenas in the hopes of landing a team. NHL Commissioner Gary Bettman has said there is no definite timeline for expansion. Women’s tourney back to Saturday start The NCAA women’s basketball tournament is reverting to its old format. The tournament will have first-round games on Saturday and Sunday this season a year after moving them up a day to begin on Friday. Regional semifinals will also be on Saturday and Sunday. The move to begin the tournament on Friday was originally made to help improve attendance, which had become stagnant over the past few years. The change in days and the top 16 seeds hosting lifted attendance to its second-highest total since 2004, but viewership on ESPN was down. Golf: Mullen, Dunne take share of lead Jimmy Mullen and Paul Dunne both marked their professional debuts with an 8-under 64 to grab a share of the lead after the first round of the Alfred Dunhill Links Championship. Mullen and Dunne went pro after helping Britain and Ireland beat the United States in the Walker Cup last month but looked like seasoned veterans at Kingsbarns. Dunne started with a bogey on the 10th hole, but then had a hole-in-one on the par-3 15th to get his round going. He added another six birdies, including three straight from the second. Gibson leads Web.com Tour Finals finale Rhein Gibson shot a 7-under 63 on Thursday to take a one-stroke lead in the Web.com Tour Finals-ending Web.Com Tour Championship. The 29-year-old Australian had eight birdies and a bogey on TPC Sawgrass’ rain-soaked Dye’s Valley Course. The tournament is the fourth and final event in the series for the top 75 players from the Web.com Tour money list, Nos. 126-200 in the PGA Tour’s FedEx Cup standings and non-members who earned enough money to have placed in the top 200 had they been eligible to receive points. The top 25 players on the Web.com Tour regularseason money list earned PGA Tour cards. They are competing against each other for tour priority, with regular-season earnings counting in their totals. The other players are fighting for 25 cards based on series earnings. TELEVISION Auto racing 10 a.m. NBCSN — NASCAR Sprint Cup Series, practice, at Dover, Del. 12:30 p.m. NBCSN — NASCAR XFINITY Series, practice, at Dover, Del. 2:30 p.m. NBCSN — NASCAR Sprint Cup Series, qualifying, at Dover, Del. College football 6 p.m. NBCSN — Columbia at Princeton 6 p.m. ESPN2 — Memphis at South Florida 9:15 p.m. ESPN2 — UConn at BYU Golf 1 a.m. ESPN2 — Asia-Pacific Amateur Championship, second-round, at Hong Kong 7 a.m. GOLF — Alfred Dunhill Links Championship, secondround, at Scotland 2 p.m. GOLF — Web.com Tour Championship, secondround, at Ponte Vedra Beach Major League Basbeball 6 p.m. ESPN — L.A. Angels at Texas 8:30 p.m. MLB — Houston at Arizona Soccer 1:30 p.m. FS1 — Bundesliga, Mainz at Darmstadt 98 RADIO High school football 7 p.m. — WTKP-FM 93.5 – Mosley at Arnold Ebro Schedule Monday Matinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Parx 11:55 a.m., Finger Lakes 12:10 p.m., Delaware 12:10 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Palm Beach noon. Evening: Greyhound simulcast: Derby Lane 6:30 p.m., Jacksonville 6:30 p.m. Tuesday Matinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Parx 11:55 a.m., Finger Lakes 12:10 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Palm Beach noon. Evening: Greyhound simulcast: Derby Lane 6:30 p.m. Wednesday Matinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Saratoga 11:25 a.m., Delaware 12:15 p.m., Del Mar 4 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Derby Lane 11:30 a.m., Jacksonville 11:30 a.m., Palm Beach noon. Evening: Greyhound simulcast: Derby Lane 6:30 p.m., Jacksonville 6:30 p.m. Thursday Matinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Gulfstream 12:15 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Palm Beach noon. Evening: Greyhound simulcast: Derby Lane 6:30 p.m., Jacksonville 6:30 p.m. Friday Matinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Belmont 11 a.m., Churchill 11:45 a.m., Gulfstream 12:15 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Palm Beach noon. Evening: Greyhound simulcast: Palm Beach 6 p.m., Derby Lane 6:30 p.m., Jacksonville 6:30 p.m. Saturday Matinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Belmont 11 a.m., Churchill 11:45 a.m., Monmouth 11:50 a.m., Gulfstream 12:15 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Derby Lane 11:30 a.m., Jacksonville 11:30 a.m., Palm Beach noon. Evening: Greyhound simulcast: Palmm Beach 6 p.m., Derby Lane 6:30 p.m., Jacksonville 6:30 p.m. Sunday Matinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Belmont 11 a.m., Churchill 11:45 a.m., Monmouth 11:50 a.m., Parx 11:55 a.m., Gulfstream 12:15 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Palm Beach noon, Jacksonville 12:30 p.m. POKER ROOM – (Ext. 180) Open 9 a.m. to 3 a.m. Monday through Friday and 24 hours on weekends and holidays. New Year’s schedule: Open 9 a.m. Monday to 3 a.m. Wednesday. LOCATION – Intersection of State 79 and State 20. INFORMATION – 234-3943. Odds Pregame.com Line NFL Sunday NY Jets +1 1 (41) Miami at INDY 8 9 (48) Jacksonville at ATLANTA 3 6 (47) Houston Carolina 2 3 (39) at TAMPA BAY at BUFFALO 5 5 (46) NY Giants Oakland 2 3 (45) at CHICAGO Philadelphia 2 3 (45) at WASH at CINCINNATI 3 4 (44) Kan. City at SAN DIEGO 6 8 (45) Cleveland Green Bay 6 8 (48) at SAN FRAN at DENVER 5 6 (43) Minnesota at ARIZONA 4 6 (42) St. Louis at N ORLEANS 7 5 (OFF) Dallas Monday at SEATTLE 9 10 (43) Detroit College Football Friday Memphis 10 8 (62) at S FLORIDA Temple 23 23 (44) at CHARLOTTE at BYU 19 18 (44) UCONN Saturday at GEORGIA TECH 12 7 (62) N Carolina at PENN ST 24 25 (47) Army Bowling Green 6 8 (68) at BUFFALO Toledo 9 6 (53) at BALL ST at APPAL ST 16 25 (53) Wyoming Ohio 4 3 (44) at AKRON at KENT 10 10 (48) Miami(Ohio) at IOWA ST 14 16 (59) Kansas at MICH ST 27 21 (55) Purdue at UMASS +3 3 (56) FIU at N’WESTERN 6 4 (40) Minnesota at NC STATE 5 4 (47) Louisville at OKLAHOMA 9 7 (59) West Virginia at WISCONSIN 9 6 (44) Iowa at VA TECH 4 4 (47) Pittsburgh at TEXAS A&M 5 6 (61) Mississippi St UCF PK 3 (44) at TULANE W Kentucky 5 7 (72) at RICE at OKLA ST 3 8 (50) Kansas St Houston 9 7 (81) at TULSA at UCLA 13 13 (60) Arizona St at STANFORD 17 14 (63) Arizona at TCU 18 15 (71) Texas at NAVY 6 5 (50) Air Force at GEORGIA PK 2 (55) Alabama Mississippi 6 7 (51) at FLORIDA at DUKE 6 6 (36) B. College Nebraska 7 6 (57) at ILLINOIS Ohio State 19 21 (67) at INDIANA No Illinois 2 2 (52) at C MICHIGAN at BAYLOR 12 17 (89) Texas Tech at BOISE ST 23 24 (53) Hawaii Oregon 12 7 (70) at COLORADO at CALIF 12 19 (70) Wash St at AUBURN 20 20 (56) San Jose State at ARK ST 20 20 (65) Idaho at LA TECH 16 18 (60) La-Lafayette at MID TENN 4 1 (50) Vanderbilt at MISSOURI 3 2 (41) S Carolina at LSU 45 44 (57) E Michigan at MARSHALL 18 18 (53) Old Dominion at TENN 7 6 (56) Arkansas East Carolina 6 5 (67) at SMU at S MISS 12 16 (65) North Texas at TROY 2 6 (62) South Alabama Georgia Southern 5 6 (50) at LA-MONROE Florida St 18 19 (45) at WKE FOREST Michigan 11 16 (43) at MARYLAND at UTAH ST 7 4 (49) Colorado St UTSA 2 3 (58) at UTEP at CLEMSON +2 PK (54) Notre Dame at NEW MEXICO 15 12 (69) N Mexico St at NEVADA 12 6 (58) UNLV at SAN DIEGO ST 9 9 (54) Fresno St Updated odds available at Pregame.com NFL Standings AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PA New England 3 0 0 1.000 119 70 Buffalo 2 1 0 .667 100 68 N.Y. Jets 2 1 0 .667 68 41 Miami 1 2 0 .333 51 74 South W L T Pct PF PA Indianapolis 1 2 0 .333 56 80 Jacksonville 1 2 0 .333 49 91 Houston 1 2 0 .333 56 60 Tennessee 1 2 0 .333 89 77 North W L T Pct PF PA Cincinnati 3 0 0 1.000 85 56 Pittsburgh 2 1 0 .667 76 52 Cleveland 1 2 0 .333 58 72 Baltimore 0 3 0 .000 70 84 West W L T Pct PF PA Denver 3 0 0 1.000 74 49 Oakland 2 1 0 .667 77 86 San Diego 1 2 0 .333 66 83 Kansas City 1 2 0 .333 79 89 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PA Dallas 2 1 0 .667 75 75 N.Y. Giants 1 2 0 .333 78 72 Washington 1 2 0 .333 55 59 Philadelphia 1 2 0 .333 58 63 South W L T Pct PF PA Carolina 3 0 0 1.000 71 48 Atlanta 3 0 0 1.000 89 72 Tampa Bay 1 2 0 .333 49 80 New Orleans 0 3 0 .000 60 84 North W L T Pct PF PA Green Bay 3 0 0 1.000 96 68 Minnesota 2 1 0 .667 60 50 Detroit 0 3 0 .000 56 83 Chicago 0 3 0 .000 46 105 West W L T Pct PF PA Arizona 3 0 0 1.000 126 49 St. Louis 1 2 0 .333 50 67 San Francisco 1 2 0 .333 45 93 Seattle 1 2 0 .333 74 61 Today Baltimore at Pittsburgh, (n) Sunday, Oct. 4 N.Y. Jets vs. Miami at London, 8:30 a.m. Oakland at Chicago, Noon Jacksonville at Indianapolis, Noon N.Y. Giants at Buffalo, Noon Carolina at Tampa Bay, Noon Philadelphia at Washington, Noon Houston at Atlanta, Noon Kansas City at Cincinnati, Noon Cleveland at San Diego, 3:05 p.m. Green Bay at San Francisco, 3:25 p.m. St. Louis at Arizona, 3:25 p.m. Minnesota at Denver, 3:25 p.m. Dallas at New Orleans, 7:30 p.m. Open: New England, Tennessee Monday, Oct. 5 Detroit at Seattle, 7:30 p.m. College football AP Top 25 schedule Saturday No. 1 Ohio State at Indiana, 2:30 p.m. No. 2 Michigan State vs. Purdue, 11 a.m. No. 3 Mississippi at No. 25 Florida, 6 p.m. No. 4 TCU vs. Texas, 11 a.m. No. 5 Baylor vs. Texas Tech at Arlington, Texas, 2:30 p.m. No. 6 Notre Dame at No. 12 Clemson, 7 p.m. No. 7 UCLA vs. Arizona State, 6:30 p.m. No. 8 Georgia vs. No. 13 Alabama, 2:30 p.m. No. 9 LSU vs. Eastern Michigan, 6 p.m. No. 11 Florida St. at Wake Forest, 2:30 p.m. No. 14 Texas A&M vs. No. 21 Mississippi State, 6:30 p.m. No. 15 Oklahoma vs. No. 23 West Virginia, 11 a.m. No. 16 Northwestern vs. Minnesota, 11 a.m. No. 18 Stanford vs. Arizona, 9:30 p.m. No. 19 Wisconsin vs. Iowa, 11 a.m. No. 20 Oklahoma State vs. Kansas State, 3 p.m. No. 22 Michigan at Maryland, 7 p.m. No. 24 California vs. Washington State, 3 p.m. Standings ATLANTIC COAST CONFERENCE Atlantic Division Conference All Games W L PF PA W L PF PA Clemson 1 0 20 17 3 0 110 37 Florida St. 1 0 14 0 3 0 107 30 Syracuse 1 0 30 17 3 1 131 78 NC State 0 0 0 0 4 0 185 48 B College 0 1 0 14 3 1 117 31 Wake Forest 0 1 17 30 2 2 99 78 Louisville 0 1 17 20 1 3 117 88 Coastal Division Conference All Games W L PF PA W L PF PA Duke 1 0 34 20 3 1 136 46 Miami 0 0 0 0 3 0 125 53 N. Carolina 0 0 0 0 3 1 155 59 Pittsburgh 0 0 0 0 2 1 93 71 Va. Tech 0 0 0 0 2 2 145 104 Virginia 0 0 0 0 1 3 92 153 Ga. Tech 0 1 20 34 2 2 176 80 Saturday, Oct. 3 Pittsburgh at Virginia Tech, 11 a.m. Louisville at NC State, 11:30 a.m. Florida St. at Wake Forest, 2:30 p.m. Boston College at Duke, 2:30 p.m. North Carolina at Georgia Tech, 2:30 p.m. Notre Dame at Clemson, 7 p.m. BIG 12 CONFERENCE Conference All Games W L PF PA W L PF PA Okla. St. 1 0 30 27 4 0 155 62 TCU 1 0 55 52 4 0 204 113 Baylor 0 0 0 0 3 0 192 69 Kansas St. 0 0 0 0 3 0 103 36 Oklahoma 0 0 0 0 3 0 124 65 W. Virginia 0 0 0 0 3 0 130 23 Iowa St. 0 0 0 0 1 2 71 68 Kansas 0 0 0 0 0 3 75 123 Texas Tech 0 1 52 55 3 1 215 144 Texas 0 1 27 30 1 3 116 141 Saturday, Oct. 3 Texas at TCU, 11 a.m. Kansas at Iowa St., 11 a.m. West Virginia at Oklahoma, 11 a.m. Baylor vs. Texas Tech at Arlington, Texas, 2:30 p.m. Kansas St. at Oklahoma St., 3 p.m. BIG TEN CONFERENCE East Conference All Games W L PF PA W L PF PA Penn St. 1 0 28 3 3 1 102 65 Indiana 0 0 0 0 4 0 153 128 Michigan St. 0 0 0 0 4 0 133 83 Ohio St. 0 0 0 0 4 0 138 49 Michigan 0 0 0 0 3 1 111 38 Maryland 0 0 0 0 2 2 118 131 Rutgers 0 1 3 28 2 2 127 92 West Conference All Games W L PF PA W L PF PA Iowa 0 0 0 0 4 0 151 71 Northwestern 0 0 0 0 4 0 100 35 Illinois 0 0 0 0 3 1 137 76 Minnesota 0 0 0 0 3 1 77 74 Wisconsin 0 0 0 0 3 1 131 38 Nebraska 0 0 0 0 2 2 145 106 Purdue 0 0 0 0 1 3 121 141 Saturday, Oct. 3 Iowa at Wisconsin, 11 a.m. Army at Penn St., 11 a.m. Purdue at Michigan St., 11 a.m. Minnesota at Northwestern, 11 a.m. Ohio St. at Indiana, 2:30 p.m. Nebraska at Illinois, 2:30 p.m. Michigan at Maryland, 7 p.m. PACIFIC-12 CONFERENCE North Conference All Games W L PF PA W L PF PA Stanford 2 0 83 55 3 1 120 78 California 1 0 30 24 4 0 183 89 Wash. St. 0 0 0 0 2 1 85 72 Oregon St. 0 1 24 42 2 2 92 105 Oregon 0 1 20 62 2 2 170 163 Washington 0 1 24 30 2 2 117 63 South Conference All Games W L PF PA W L PF PA UCLA 1 0 56 30 4 0 151 72 Utah 1 0 62 20 4 0 155 75 Southern Cal 1 1 73 55 3 1 187 70 Colorado 0 0 0 0 3 1 143 66 Arizona 0 1 30 56 3 1 193 121 Ariz. St. 0 1 14 42 2 2 100 111 Saturday, Oct. 3 Arizona St. at UCLA, TBA Arizona at Stanford, TBA Washington St. at California, 3 p.m. Oregon at Colorado, 9 p.m. SOUTHEASTERN CONFERENCE East Conference All Games W L PF PA W L PF PA Florida 2 0 42 36 4 0 134 73 Georgia 2 0 83 34 4 0 182 54 Kentucky 2 1 56 49 3 1 96 82 Missouri 0 1 13 21 3 1 83 50 Tennessee 0 1 27 28 2 2 165 99 South Carolina 0 2 42 78 2 2 90 105 Vanderbilt 0 2 30 58 1 3 89 79 West Conference All Games W L PF PA W L PF PA Mississippi 2 0 70 53 4 0 219 77 LSU 2 0 66 40 3 0 100 64 Texas A&M 1 0 28 21 4 0 166 88 Mississippi St 1 1 36 30 3 1 132 59 Alabama 0 1 37 43 3 1 143 70 Arkansas 0 1 21 28 1 3 105 92 Auburn 0 2 30 62 2 2 88 106 Saturday, Oct. 3 Arkansas at Tennessee, TBA Mississippi St. at Texas A&M, TBA South Carolina at Missouri, 11 a.m. Alabama at Georgia, 2:30 p.m. San Jose St. at Auburn, 3 p.m. E. Michigan at LSU, 6 p.m. Mississippi at Florida, 6 p.m. Vanderbilt at Middle Tennessee, 6 p.m. E. Kentucky at Kentucky, 6:30 p.m. MAJOR INDEPENDENTS All Games W L PF PA Notre Dame 4 0 164 79 BYU 2 2 91 107 Army 1 3 124 112 Friday’s Games UConn at BYU, 9:15 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 3 Army at Penn St., 11 a.m. Notre Dame at Clemson, 7 p.m. NBA Preseason glance Thursday’s Games No games scheduled Friday’s Games Denver at L.A. Clippers, 9:30 p.m. Saturday’s Games Charlotte at Orlando, 6 p.m. New Orleans at Indiana, 6 p.m. Auto racing Sprint Cup schedule Challenger Round Oct. 4 AAA 400, Dover, Del. Contender Round Oct. 10 Bank of America 500, Concord, N.C. Oct. 18 Hollywood Casino 400, Kansas City, Kan. Oct. 25 Alabama 500, Talladega Eliminator Round Nov. 1 Goody’s Headache Relief Shot 500, Martinsville, Va. Nov. 8 AAA Texas 500, Fort Worth Nov. 15 Quicken Loans Race for Heroes 500, Avondale, Ariz. Championship Round Nov. 22 Ford EcoBoost 400, Homestead x-non-points race Sprint Cup standings 1. Matt Kenseth, 2,099. 2. Denny Hamlin, 2,093. 3. Carl Edwards, 2,089. 4. Joey Logano, 2,089. 5. Jimmie Johnson, 2,083. 6. Ryan Newman, 2,074. 7. Kurt Busch, 2,073. 8. Brad Keselowski, 2,072. 9. Martin Truex Jr., 2,071. 10. Jeff Gordon, 2,068. 11. Jamie McMurray, 2,058. 12. Dale Earnhardt Jr., 2,057. 13. Kyle Busch, 2,056. 14. Paul Menard, 2,056. 15. Kevin Harvick, 2,034. NHL Schedule Wednesday, Oct. 7 Montreal at Toronto, 6 p.m. N.Y. Rangers at Chicago, 7 p.m. Vancouver at Calgary, 9 p.m. San Jose at Los Angeles, 9:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 8 Winnipeg at Boston, 6 p.m. Ottawa at Buffalo, 6 p.m. Philadelphia at Tampa Bay, 6:30 p.m. Edmonton at St. Louis, 7 p.m. Carolina at Nashville, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh at Dallas, 7:30 p.m. Minnesota at Colorado, 8 p.m. Friday, Oct. 9 Winnipeg at New Jersey, 6 p.m. N.Y. Rangers at Columbus, 6 p.m. Toronto at Detroit, 6:30 p.m. Chicago at N.Y. Islanders, 6:30 p.m. Arizona at Los Angeles, 9:30 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 10 Tampa Bay at Buffalo, Noon Montreal at Boston, 6 p.m. Ottawa at Toronto, 6 p.m. Philadelphia at Florida, 6 p.m. Columbus at N.Y. Rangers, 6 p.m. New Jersey at Washington, 6 p.m. Detroit at Carolina, 6 p.m. Edmonton at Nashville, 6 p.m. St. Louis at Minnesota, 7 p.m. N.Y. Islanders at Chicago, 7:30 p.m. Dallas at Colorado, 8 p.m. Calgary at Vancouver, 9 p.m. Pittsburgh at Arizona, 9 p.m. Anaheim at San Jose, 9:30 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 11 Montreal at Ottawa, 6 p.m. Monday, Oct. 12 Tampa Bay at Boston, Noon Winnipeg at N.Y. Islanders, Noon Columbus at Buffalo, 2 p.m. Florida at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. Vancouver at Anaheim, 9 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 13 Nashville at New Jersey, 6 p.m. Winnipeg at N.Y. Rangers, 6 p.m. Montreal at Pittsburgh, 6 p.m. San Jose at Washington, 6 p.m. Florida at Carolina, 6 p.m. Tampa Bay at Detroit, 6:30 p.m. Edmonton at Dallas, 7:30 p.m. St. Louis at Calgary, 8 p.m. Vancouver at Los Angeles, 9:30 p.m. Golf Alfred Dunhill Links Championship At St. Andrews and Carnoustie, Scotland c-Carnoustie (Championship Course): 7,412 yards, par-72 k-Kingsbarns Golf Links: 7,150 yards, par-72 s-St. Andrews (Old Course): 7,307 yards, par-72 Purse: $4.8 million First Round Jimmy Mullen 32-32k Paul Dunne 31-33k Kristoffer Broberg 32-32s Soren Kjeldsen 34-31k Richard Bland 32-33k Anthony Wall 34-31k Marcus Fraser 33-33k Stephen Gallacher 34-33s Moritz Lampert 31-36k Garth Mulroy 31-36k Fabrizio Zanotti 34-33k Alexander Levy 31-36k Peter Lawrie 34-33k Felipe Aguilar 34-33s James Morrison 31-36k Florian Fritsch 34-34s Martin Kaymer 34-34c Adrian Otaegui 32-36k Sam Hutsby 34-34k Mark Foster 34-34s Paul Peterson 33-35k Graeme McDowell 34-34c Raphael Jacquelin 34-34k David Drysdale 35-33s Chris Stroud 35-33c Marc Warren 35-33c Nathan Holman 35-33k Ross Fisher 33-35s Thorbjorn Olesen 35-33c Other Americans Scott Piercy 34-35c Peter Uihlein 34-35s Brooks Koepka 37-35c David Lipsky 35-37k Stewart Cink 38-35c Erik Compton 39-35c John Daly 37-37s Ollie Schniederjans 36-39k Sean O’Hair 38-38c Pat Perez 39-39c U.S. Senior Amateur Thursday At Hidden Creek Golf Club Egg Harbor Township, N.J. Yardage: 6,864; Par: 71 Championship Chip Lutz, Reading, Pa. (144), def. Tom Brandes, Bellevue, Wash. (144), 5 and 3. U.S. Senior Women’s Amateur Thursday At Hillwood Country Club Nashville, Tenn. Yardage: 5,857; Par: 72 Semifinals Pamela Kuong, Wellesley Hills, Mass. (159), def. Tama Caldabaugh, Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla. (159), 21 holes. Karen Garcia, Cool, Calif. (161), def. Sue Cohn, Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. (157), 1 up. Championship Karen Garcia, Cool, Calif. (161), def. Pamela Kuong, Wellesley Hills, Mass. (159), 1 up. Tennis Malaysian Open Thursday At Putra Stadium Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Purse: $937,835 (WT250) Surface: Hard-Indoor Singles Second Round Feliciano Lopez (2), Spain, def. Mischa Zverev, Germany, 6-3, 7-6 (4). Vasek Pospisil (8), Canada, def. Marcos Baghdatis, Cyprus, 7-6 (2), 3-6, 6-3. Mikhail Kukushkin, Kazakhstan, def. Radu Albot, Moldova, 6-3, 6-2. Grigor Dimitrov (4), Bulgaris def. Joao Sousa, Portugal, 2-6, 6-3, 6-4. David Ferrer (1), Spain, def. Radek Stepanek, Czech Republic, 7-5, 6-3. Doubles Quarterfinals Raven Klaasen, South Africa/Rajeev Ram (1), U.S., def. Rameez Junaid, Australia/ Jonathan Marray, Britain, 7-6 (7), 6-4. Treat Huey, Philippines/Henri Kontinen (2), Finland, def. Santiago Gonzalez, Mexico/Philipp Petzschner, Germany, 6-2, 4-6, 10-8. Andre Begemann, Germany/Artem Sitak (4), New Zealand, def. Philipp Oswald, Austria/Adil Shamasdin, Canada, 6-4, 6-7 (2), 10-8. Shenzhen Open Thursday At Longgang Sports Center Shenzhen, China Purse: $607,940 (WT250) Surface: Hard-Outdoor Singles Second Round Chung Hyeon, South Korea, def. Aljaz Bedene (7), Britain, 6-2, 6-0. Adrian Mannarino (5), France, def. Yan Bai, China, 7-5, 7-6 (7). Guillermo Garcia-Lopez (4), Spain, def. Lukas Rosol, Czech Republic, 6-4, 6-3. Marin Cilic (2), Croatia, def. John Millman, Australia, 6-3, 4-6, 6-3. Doubles Quarterfinals Jonathan Erlich, Israel/Colin Fleming, Britain, def. Matthew Ebden, Australia/Jiri Vesely, Czech Republic, 6-3, 6-3. Chris Guccione, Australia/Andre Sa (3), Brazil, def. Sergey Betov, Belarus/Mikhail Elgin, Russia, 6-3, 6-2. Gong Mao-Xin, China/Michael Venus, New Zeala nd, def. Julian Knowle/Oliver Marach (4), Austria, 6-3, 7-5. Dongfeng Motor Wuhan Open Thursday At Optics Valley International Tennis Center Wuhan, China Purse: $2.212 million (Premier) Surface: Hard-Outdoor Singles Quarterfinals Garbine Muguruza (5), Spain, def. Anna Karolina Schmiedlova, Slovakia, 6-2, 6-2. Angelique Kerber (6), Germany, def. CoCo Vandeweghe, U.S., 6-3, 3-1 retired. Roberta Vinci (15), Italy, def. Karolina Pliskova (8), Czech Republic, 7-6 (2), 6-3. Venus Williams, U.S., def. Johanna Konta, Britain, 6-4, 3-6, 7-5. Doubles Second Round Martina Hingis, Switzerland/Sania Mirza (1), India, def. Klaudia Jans-Ignacik, Poland/Anastasia Rodionova, Australia, 6-3, 6-2. Chan Hao-ching/Chan Yung-jan (4), Taiwan, def. Lyudmyla Kichenok/Nadiya Kichenok, Ukraine, 6-4, 6-2. Julia Goerges, Germany/Karolina Pliskova, Czech Republic, def. Anabel Medina Garrigues/Arantxa Parra Santonja, Spain, 6-3, 6-4. Quarterfinals Irina-Camelia Begu/Monica Niculescu, Romania, def. Garbine Muguruza/Carla Suarez Navarro (7), Spain, walkover. Andrea Hlavackova/Lucie Hradecka (6), Czech Republic, def. Gabriela Dabrowski, Canada/Alicja Rosolska, Poland, 6-4, 6-3. Chan Hao-ching/Chan Yung-jan (4), Taiwan, def. Julia Goerges, Germany/ Karolina Pliskova, Czech Republic, 6-2, 6-2. Martina Hingis, Switzerland/Sania Mirza (1), India, def. Raquel Kops-Jones/Abigail Spears (5), U.S., 6-2, 6-2. Transactions BASEBALL Major League Baseball MLB — Suspended New York Mets RHP Hansel Robles three games and fined him an undisclosed amount for intentionally throwing a pitch in the head area of Philadelphia’s Cameron Rupp during a Sept. 30 game. National League ATLANTA BRAVES — Promoted John Coppolella to general manager. SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS — Announced the retirement of LHP Jeremy Affeldt. Atlantic League AL — Approved a franchise based in New Britain, Conn. to begin play in April, 2016. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association CHICAGO BULLS — Signed G Stefhon Hannah. GOLDEN STATE WARRIORS — Announced coach Steve Kerr will take a leave of absence to recover from back surgery. Named Luke Walton interim coach. Women’s National Basketball Association CONNECTICUT SUN — Announced the resignation of coach Anne Donovan. FOOTBALL National Football League CLEVELAND BROWNS — Named Paul Dunn assistant offensive line coach. Signed OL Erle Ladson to the practice squad. Released QB Matt Blanchard from the practice squad. DENVER BRONCOS — Agreed to terms with OT Tyler Polumbus a one-year contract. Released S Josh Bush. KANSAS CITY CHIEFS — Released WR Fred Williams from the practice squad. Signed WR Kenny Cook to the practice squad. MINNESOTA VIKINGS — S Brock Vereen to the practice squad. NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS — Acquired DL Akiem Hicks from New Orleans for TE Michael Hoomanawanui. Signed DL Khyri Thornton from the practice squad. Signed DB Brandon Dixon, OL Sean Hickey, WR Austin Hill and LB Eric Martin to the practice squad. TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS — Signed RB Mike James to the practice squad. Released LB Orie Lemon from the practice squad. HOCKEY National Hockey League CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS — Recalled F Brandon Mashinter and D Ville Pokka from Rockford (AHL). DETROIT RED WINGS — Assigned G Jared Coreau to Grand Rapids (AHL). MINNESOTA WILD — Claimed LW Chris Porter off waivers from Philadelphia. NASHVILLE PREDATORS — Assigned F Cody Bass to Milwaukee (AHL). SOCCER Major League Soccer FC DALLAS — Promoted Luchi Gonzalez to academy director. COLLEGE ALBANY (NY) — Announced the resignation men’s associate head basketball coach Chad O’Donnell. HOLY CROSS — Named Parker Hansen director of ticket sales and operations. IOWA — Signed wrestling coach Tom Brands to a three-year contract extension through 2019-20. LEES-MCRAE — Named Brian Jorgensen assistant cycling coach. TCU — Reinstated senior DE Mike Tuaua and freshman WR Andre Petties-Wilson from suspension. VANDERBILT — Named Darshawn McClellan player development assistant for men’s basketball. In The BLEACHERS SPORTS Briefs On The AIR

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FRIDAY MORNING C COMCAST W WOW! S1 DISH NETWORK S2 DIRECTV OCTOBER 2 C W S1 S2 7 AM 7:30 8 AM 8:30 9 AM 9:30 10 AM 10:30 11 AM 11:30 12 PM 12:30 WJHG (7) 3 3 7 7 Today Jeff Daniels; Lilliana Vazquez. (N) NewsChannel 7 at 11am (N) Days of our Lives (N) CW (7.2) 99 9 8 8 Intelligence Cops Rel. The Steve Wilkos Show The Steve Wilkos Show (N) Crazy Talk (N) Crazy Talk (N) Cheaters (N) Cheaters Paid Program Fighting Canc. WMBB (13) 2 2 13 13 Good Morning America Ken Jeong; Malala Yousafzai. (N) Live! With Kelly and Michael The View WMBB Midday News (N) The Chew “Super Shortcuts” METV (13.2) 209 133 2 Daniel Boone Perry Mason Matlock “The Parents” Quincy, M.E. The Rockford Files Gunsmoke “Hawk” WECP (18) 4 4 4 18 CBS This Morning Morgan Freeman. (N) Let’s Make a Deal (N) The Price Is Right (N) The Young and the Restless News at Noon Bold/Beautiful MNT (18.2) 227 13 Extra (N) Dish Nation (N) Jerry Springer (N) The Real (N) The Wendy Williams Show (N) The Meredith Vieira Show (N) Judge Faith Judge Faith WPGX (28) 8 8 28 28 Paid Program Coolest Places Paid Program Real Estate Judge Mathis (N) The People’s Court (N) Maury (N) Prophet Paid Program WFSG (56) 11 11 56 56 Curious Curious Daniel Tiger Daniel Tiger Sesame Street (EI) Dinosaur Train Dinosaur Train Peg Plus Cat Peg Plus Cat Super Why! Thomas & Fr. A&E 34 43 118 265 Parking Wars Bounty Hunter Bounty Hunter Bounty Hunter Dog the Bounty Hunter Criminal Minds Criminal Minds “Outfoxed” Criminal Minds ” AMC 30 62 131 254 Medicare ID Theft The Sum of All Fears () Ben Affleck, Morgan Freeman. (:45) Tremors 2: Aftershocks () Fred Ward, Michael Gross. ANPL 46 69 184 282 The Crocodile Hunter Dirty Jobs Dirty Jobs “Tofu Maker” Dirty Jobs “Cricket Farmer” Dirty Jobs “Worm Grunter” Dirty Jobs BET 53 46 124 329 Martin Martin Martin Martin Martin Martin Martin Martin Martin Martin Martin Martin COM 64 53 107 249 Medicare Football Daily Show Nightly Show (:02) Mallrats () Shannen Doherty, Jeremy London. (:10) My Super Ex-Girlfriend () Uma Thurman. DISC 36 39 182 278 Joyce Meyer PiYo Workout! Edge of Alaska Edge of Alaska “The Breakup” Edge of Alaska Edge of Alaska Bering Sea Gold “I Quit!” E! 63 57 114 236 Kardashian Kardashian Kardashian Kardashian Kardashian E! News ESPN 9 23 140 206 SportsCenter SportsCenter (N) (L) SportsCenter (N) (L) SportsCenter (N) (L) SportsCenter (N) (L) SportsCenter (N) (L) ESPN2 47 24 144 209 (5:00) Mike & Mike (N) (L) First Take (N) (L) His & Hers (N) (L) First Take FAM 59 65 180 311 Dawson’s Creek The Middle 700/Interactive The 700 Club (N) Boy Meets... Boy Meets... Last-Standing Last-Standing Last-Standing Last-Standing FOOD 38 45 110 231 Medicare KitchenAid Paid Program Dinner Sandwich King Rewrapped Save My Bakery Chopped Canada Trisha’s Sou. Contessa FS1 24 27 150 219 FOX Sports Live SportsMoney World Endurance Highlights World Cup FOX Sports Live The Herd FX 45 51 136 248 (6:00) Big Mommas: Like Father, Like Son () Grown Ups 2 () Adam Sandler, Kevin James, Chris Rock. Two/Half Men Two/Half Men How I Met How I Met How I Met HALL 23 59 185 312 Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls Home & Family Actors Seamus Dever and Jon Huertas. (N) Home & Family Actor Albert Tsai (“Dr. Ken”). HGTV 32 38 112 229 Extreme Homes Extreme Homes Extreme Homes Extreme Homes House Hunters Hunters Int’l House Hunters House Hunters HIST 35 42 120 269 Secret Access: UFOs on the Record Hangar 1: The UFO Files Hangar 1: The UFO Files Ancient Aliens Ancient Aliens LIFE 56 56 108 252 The Fantasia Barrino Story: Life Is Not a Fairy Tale () Aaliyah: The Princess of R&B () Alexandra Shipp. Whitney () Yaya DaCosta, Arlen Escarpeta, Yolonda Ross. SPIKE 28 48 241 241 21 DAY FIX FanDuel Gangland The Outlaws. Gangland Gangland “Valley of Death” Gangland “Killing Snitches” Gangland “Skinhead Assault” SUN 49 422 656 ACC Access Florida Sport Ship Shape TV Sport Fishing Fishing Flats Sport Fishing Sportsman Extreme Lunch With the Rays SYFY 70 52 122 244 (6:30) Ghost Town () Jessica Rose. The Mothman Prophecies () Richard Gere, Laura Linney, Will Patton. The Apparition () Ashley Greene, Sebastian Stan. TBS 31 15 139 247 Married... With Married... With Married... With King King King Cleveland Cleveland American Dad American Dad American Dad American Dad TCM 25 70 132 256 (6:45) Alias Jesse James () The Facts of Life () Bob Hope. (:15) Bachelor in Paradise () Bob Hope, Lana Turner. (:15) Critic’s Choice () TLC 37 40 183 280 Quints Quints Quints Quints Quints Quints What Not to Wear (N) What Not to Wear (N) What Not to Wear (N) TNT 29 54 138 245 Charmed “Dream Sorcerer” Supernatural Supernatural Supernatural “Sin City” Supernatural Bones “The Truth in the Myth” USA 62 55 105 242 Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU WGN-A 13 239 307 J. Robison Creflo Dollar Law & Order “Marathon” Law & Order “Patsy” Law & Order “Blood Money” Law & Order “Sundown” Blue Bloods “Greener Grass” FRIDAY LATE NIGHT C COMCAST W WOW! S1 DISH NETWORK S2 DIRECTV OCTOBER 2 C W S1 S2 1 AM 1:30 2 AM 2:30 3 AM 3:30 4 AM 4:30 5 AM 5:30 6 AM 6:30 WJHG (7) 3 3 7 7 (:07) Today Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program Big Deal Paid Program Today (N) CW (7.2) 99 9 8 8 King Key Kingdom Lost Episodes! Fighting Canc. Airbrushed Best Cook Clean Zone 21 Day Fix Body Beast Free TV! Paid Program Cook Top WMBB (13) 2 2 13 13 Judge Karen Open House Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program Open House Down Home Good Morning America (N) METV (13.2) 209 133 2 Perry Mason Night Gallery Alfred Hitchcock Hour Thriller F Troop F Troop Welcome Back Welcome Back H.R. Pufnstuf Land of Lost WECP (18) 4 4 4 18 Ac. Hollywood The Insider (N) Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program CBS This Morning: Saturday MNT (18.2) 227 13 Tosh.0 Uniquely Gemstones Show JTV’s Decadent Diamonds Jewelry Show JTV’s 22nd Birthday Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program Old House WPGX (28) 8 8 28 28 Two/Half Men How I Met Paid Program Paid Program Friends Friends Make $$ in Real Estate Locally Make $$ in Real Estate Locally Real Estate Paid Program WFSG (56) 11 11 56 56 Performance at White House POV Chinese artist Ai Weiwei. Antiques Roadshow The This Old House Hour Sesame Street (EI) Curious Curious A&E 34 43 118 265 (:01) Criminal Minds (:02) Criminal Minds Shark! Lost Episodes! Medicare More Sex IT Cosmetics Derm Bounty Hunter Bounty Hunter AMC 30 62 131 254 Jackie Chan Jackie Chan’s Project A 2 () Jackie Chan, Maggie Cheung. CSI: Miami “Cheating Death” The Rifleman The Rifleman The Rifleman The Rifleman ANPL 46 69 184 282 To Be Announced Tanked: Unfiltered Tanked Tanked Big Cat Diary Big Cat Diary My Cat From Hell BET 53 46 124 329 Martin Martin Martin Martin Martin Martin Martin Martin Martin Martin Martin Martin COM 64 53 107 249 Good Old South Park South Park South Park (:05) Triptank Com. Central FanDuel Grave Diggers Free Money Paid Program Football FanDuel DISC 36 39 182 278 Bering Sea Gold: Dredged Up Body Beast! NutriBullet RX Best Cook! Sexy Abs! Derm Paid Program Cook/Pro Medicare Paid Program Guilt Free Fry E! 63 57 114 236 (12:30) Evan Almighty () Steve Carell. The Soup Try Total Gym 1 Min. Makeup FeelSexy Try Total Gym Try Total Gym Cindy’s Skin House of DVF ESPN 9 23 140 206 SportsCenter (N) (L) College Football Memphis at South Florida. (N Same-day Tape) SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter (N) (L) ESPN2 47 24 144 209 Golf Asia-Pacific Amateur Championship, Third Round. From Hong Kong. (N Same-day Tape) First/Re-Take Inside NFL Live (N) Inside NFL Live FAM 59 65 180 311 21 DAY FIX WEN Hair Care The 700 Club Sexy 3 Weeks Clean up Fall Breaking News Medicare Makeup! Medicare Another Cinderella Story () FOOD 38 45 110 231 Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Iron Chef America Coffee Bar Paid Program KitchenAid Click Cut Done BestMade Guy’s Big Bite FS1 24 27 150 219 FOX Sports Live UFC Tonight UFC Weigh-In UFC Countdown FOX Sports Live FOX Sports Live FX 45 51 136 248 (10:30) Spider-Man 3 The Bastard Executioner “A Hunger/Newyn” How I Met Wolfgang Puck BISSELL: Try Total Gym Top Cooker Buffy the Vampire Slayer HALL 23 59 185 312 Frasier Frasier Frasier Frasier Cheers Cheers I Love Lucy I Love Lucy I Love Lucy I Love Lucy I Love Lucy I Love Lucy HGTV 32 38 112 229 House Hunters Hunters Int’l Tiny House Tiny House Clean up Fall Paid Program Rocket! NutriBullet RX Coffee Bar Derm House Hunters Renovation HIST 35 42 120 269 (:04) Ancient Aliens (:04) Ancient Aliens Best Cook Coin Collecting with Mike Mezack Coffee! Going Medieval LIFE 56 56 108 252 The Jacksons: Next The Jacksons: Next IT Cosmetics Green Tea SkinCare Paid Program EXTRACT! Coffee! Clean up Fall PiYo Workout! SPIKE 28 48 241 241 Jail Jail Jail Jail Knife Show/Cutlery Corner Transform Body Beast Medicare FanDuel SUN 49 422 656 After Midnight With the Rays Paid Program Grow Hair Paid Program Paid Program Special Oly. Ins. Lightning FSU Headlines Destination SYFY 70 52 122 244 Dominion “Sine Deo Nihil” Hellhounds () Scott Elrod, James A. Woods, Amanda Brooks. Twilight Zone Twilight Zone Coffee! Football Best Cook! ID Theft TBS 31 15 139 247 (12:00) Father of the Bride () Father of the Bride Part II () Steve Martin. Married... With Married... With Married... With Married... With Seinfeld Seinfeld TCM 25 70 132 256 (12:30) The House of Seven Corpses () House of Dark Shadows () Jonathan Frid. MGM Parade Sabotage Agent () Robert Donat, Valerie Hobson. TLC 37 40 183 280 What Not to Wear Makeup! Buy gold 21 DAY FIX Paid Program Flat Tummy Paid Program PiYo Workout! 21 DAY FIX 21 DAY FIX BISSELL: TNT 29 54 138 245 Hawaii Five-0 Hawaii Five-0 “Huaka’I Kula” Hawaii Five-0 “Kahu” Hawaii Five-0 “Kapu” Law & Order “Grief” Law & Order “Faccia a Faccia” USA 62 55 105 242 (11:30) Safe Haven () Law & Order: Criminal Intent Law & Order: Criminal Intent Law & Order: Criminal Intent White Collar Shark! Nutri Ninja! WGN-A 13 239 307 Engagement Engagement Raising Hope Raising Hope Law & Order: Criminal Intent Paid Program Camp Meeting Medicare Paid Program Coffee Bar FRIDAY AFTERNOON C COMCAST W WOW! S1 DISH NETWORK S2 DIRECTV OCTOBER 2 C W S1 S2 1 PM 1:30 2 PM 2:30 3 PM 3:30 4 PM 4:30 5 PM 5:30 6 PM 6:30 WJHG (7) 3 3 7 7 Rachael Ray (N) Andy Griffith Andy Griffith The Doctors (N) Family Feud Jeopardy! (N) News Nightly News News Wheel Fortune CW (7.2) 99 9 8 8 Cook Top Paid Program Engagement Engagement The Bill Cunningham Show (N) King of the Hill Cleveland American Dad American Dad Family Guy Family Guy WMBB (13) 2 2 13 13 General Hospital (N) Hot Bench (N) Hot Bench (N) Dr. Phil (N) The Dr. Oz Show (N) News World News News 13 at 6 Entertainment METV (13.2) 209 133 2 Bonanza “Denver McKee” The Rifleman The Rifleman Emergency! Emergency! “The Tycoons” CHiPs “Overload” M*A*S*H M*A*S*H WECP (18) 4 4 4 18 The Talk (N) Millionaire Millionaire Family Feud Family Feud The Ellen DeGeneres Show (N) Jeopardy! (N) Local 18 News Evening News Inside Edition MNT (18.2) 227 13 Justice for All Justice for All Divorce Court Divorce Court Law & Order: Criminal Intent Law & Order: Criminal Intent Name Game Name Game Mike & Molly Mike & Molly WPGX (28) 8 8 28 28 Flip My Food Fix It, Finish It Crime Watch Daily (N) Steve Harvey (N) ThisMinute ThisMinute Judge Judy (N) Judge Judy Big Bang Big Bang WFSG (56) 11 11 56 56 Sesame Street Cat in the Hat Curious Curious Arthur (EI) Odd Squad Wild Kratts WordGirl Martha Speaks PBS NewsHour (N) Dropping Back A&E 34 43 118 265 Criminal Minds “The Tribe” Criminal Minds “No Way Out” Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Criminal Minds “Outfoxed” Criminal Minds ” AMC 30 62 131 254 Pet Sematary () Dale Midkiff, Fred Gwynne. Cujo () Dee Wallace, Danny Pintauro. Stephen King’s Thinner () Robert John Burke. ANPL 46 69 184 282 Dirty Jobs “Concrete Finisher” To Be Announced BET 53 46 124 329 Martin Martin Martin Martin Martin Martin Martin Martin Martin Martin Martin Martin COM 64 53 107 249 Ex-Girlfriend South Park South Park South Park South Park South Park Futurama (:22) Futurama Nightly Show Daily Show (5:56) A Haunted House DISC 36 39 182 278 Bering Sea Gold Bering Sea Gold Bering Sea Gold “Payback” Bering Sea Gold Bering Sea Gold “Girl Drama” Bering Sea Gold “The Quest” E! 63 57 114 236 Sex & the City Sex & the City Sex & the City Sex & the City Sex & the City Sex & the City Evan Almighty () Steve Carell, Morgan Freeman. E! News (N) ESPN 9 23 140 206 Football Live NFL Insiders (N) (L) NFL Live (N) (L) Questionable Around/Horn Interruption SportsCenter (N) (L) Baseball Tonight (N) (L) ESPN2 47 24 144 209 (12:00) First Take SportsNation (N) (L) His & Hers Baseball Ton. Outside Lines Around/Horn Interruption College Football FAM 59 65 180 311 The Middle The Middle The Middle The Middle Reba Reba Reba Reba Practical Magic () Sandra Bullock, Nicole Kidman. FOOD 38 45 110 231 Chopped “Firefighter Chefs” Chopped “Hot Stuff” Chopped “Tendon Intentions” Chopped “Rock Stars” Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive FS1 24 27 150 219 Match Day Bundesliga Soccer SV Darmstadt 98 vs F.S.V. Mainz. (N) (L) UFC Weigh-In (N) (L) UFC Tonight MLB Whiparound (N) (L) FX 45 51 136 248 How I Met Mike & Molly Mike & Molly Anger Anger Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Just Go With It () Adam Sandler, Jennifer Aniston, Nicole Kidman. HALL 23 59 185 312 Little House on the Prairie Little House on the Prairie Little House on the Prairie The Waltons “The Go-Getter” The Waltons The Waltons “The Hawk” HGTV 32 38 112 229 House Hunters House Hunters House Hunters House Hunters House Hunters House Hunters House Hunters House Hunters House Hunters House Hunters House Hunters House Hunters HIST 35 42 120 269 Ancient Aliens Ancient Aliens Ancient Aliens Ancient Aliens Ancient Aliens Ancient Aliens LIFE 56 56 108 252 Tyler Perry’s the Family That Preys () Kathy Bates. Bring It! “Pom Pom Panic” Bring It! “Tick, Tick, Boom!” Bring It! “Summer Slam” Step It Up SPIKE 28 48 241 241 Gangland “Hate Nation” Gangsters: Most Evil Gangsters: Most Evil Cops Cops Cops Jail Cops Cops SUN 49 422 656 Starting Gate (N) (L) Golf the World Golf Dest. Golf Life Golf-America Destination Reel Animals Inside HEAT Rays Live! MLB Baseball SYFY 70 52 122 244 House of Bones () The Last Exorcism () Patrick Fabian, Ashley Bell. The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy () Mos Def TBS 31 15 139 247 Family Guy Family Guy New Girl New Girl Friends Friends Friends Friends Seinfeld Seinfeld Seinfeld Seinfeld TCM 25 70 132 256 (12:15) Critic’s Choice A Global Affair () Bob Hope. I’ll Take Sweden () Bob Hope. (:15) Boy, Did I Get a Wrong Number! () Bob Hope. TLC 37 40 183 280 What Not to Wear (N) What Not to Wear (N) What Not to Wear (N) What Not to Wear (N) What Not to Wear (N) What Not to Wear (N) TNT 29 54 138 245 Bones Bones Bones “The Hole in the Heart” The Island () Ewan McGregor. A mercenary pursues two clones on the run in 2019. USA 62 55 105 242 Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU WGN-A 13 239 307 Blue Bloods Blue Bloods “Nightmares” Blue Bloods Blue Bloods Blue Bloods Person of Interest FRIDAY EVENING C COMCAST W WOW! S1 DISH NETWORK S2 DIRECTV OCTOBER 2 C W S1 S2 7 PM 7:30 8 PM 8:30 9 PM 9:30 10 PM 10:30 11 PM 11:30 12 AM 12:30 WJHG (7) 3 3 7 7 The Player “Pilot” Dateline NBC The death of an FBI agent’s wife. (N) News Tonight Show-J. Fallon Late Night With Seth Meyers Last Call/Daly CW (7.2) 99 9 8 8 Masters of Masters of America’s Next Top Model (N) Seinfeld Seinfeld Cougar Town Cougar Town Raising Hope Community Community King WMBB (13) 2 2 13 13 Last-Standing (:31) Dr. Ken Shark Tank (N) (:01) 20/20 (N) News 13 at 10 (:35) Jimmy Kimmel Live (:37) Nightline The Middle Judge Karen METV (13.2) 209 133 2 Andy Griffith Andy Griffith Happy Days Laverne Hogan Heroes Hogan Heroes Carol Burnett Perry Mason Perry Mason: Ruthless Reporter WECP (18) 4 4 4 18 The Amazing Race (N) Hawaii Five-0 “Lehu a Lehu” Blue Bloods “Absolute Power” Modern Family Late Show-Colbert Late Late Show/James Corden Modern Family MNT (18.2) 227 13 Bones Bones 2 Broke Girls 2 Broke Girls Anger Anger Hot, Cleveland Hot, Cleveland Bridezillas “Gabrielle & Kym” WPGX (28) 8 8 28 28 Grandfathered The Grinder Scream Queens “Chainsaw” Two/Half Men TMZ (N) Crime Watch Daily Steve Harvey The People’s Court WFSG (56) 11 11 56 56 Washington Charlie Rose Performance at White House POV Chinese artist Ai Weiwei. Charlie Rose (N) Tavis Smiley Tavis Smiley Washington Charlie Rose A&E 34 43 118 265 Criminal Minds “Retaliation” Criminal Minds “Parasite” Criminal Minds “Public Enemy” (:01) Criminal Minds (:01) Criminal Minds (12:01) Criminal Minds AMC 30 62 131 254 The Shining () Jack Nicholson. A haunted hotel menaces a couple and their psychic son. Fear the Walking Dead Jackie Chan’s Project A () ANPL 46 69 184 282 Tanked: Unfiltered (N) (:01) Tanked (:02) Tanked (N) (:05) Tanked (:06) Tanked (12:07) Tanked: Unfiltered BET 53 46 124 329 Martin Martin Martin Martin Martin Martin Martin Martin Martin Martin Martin Martin COM 64 53 107 249 (5:56) A Haunted House Futurama Futurama Moonbeam South Park Archer Archer Triptank (N) A Good Old Fashioned... () Tyler Labine DISC 36 39 182 278 Bering Sea Gold: Dredged Up Bering Sea Gold (N) Edge of Alaska (N) Bering Sea Gold Edge of Alaska Bering Sea Gold “The Quest” E! 63 57 114 236 Total Divas “Some Like It Hot” Total Divas “Return of the Ex” The Soup (N) Issues E! News (N) The Soup Kardashian Evan Almighty ESPN 9 23 140 206 MLB Baseball Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim at Texas Rangers. (N Subject to Blackout) (L) SportsCenter (N) (L) SportsCenter (N) (L) SportsCenter (N) (L) ESPN2 47 24 144 209 (6:00) College Football Memphis at South Florida. (N) (L) (:15) College Football Connecticut at BYU. (N) (L) (12:15) Baseball Tonight (N) FAM 59 65 180 311 Practical Grease () John Travolta, Olivia Newton-John, Stockard Channing. The 700 Club You Again () Kristen Bell, Jamie Lee Curtis. FOOD 38 45 110 231 Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive FS1 24 27 150 219 UFC Reloaded “UFC 184: Ronda Rousey vs. Cat Zingano” Ronda Rousey against Cat Zingano. FOX Sports Live (N) (L) Countdown to Kickoff FOX Sports Live (N) (L) FX 45 51 136 248 Spider-Man 3 () Tobey Maguire, Kirsten Dunst. Peter Parker falls under the influence of his dark side. Spider-Man 3 () Tobey Maguire, Kirsten Dunst, James Franco. HALL 23 59 185 312 The Waltons “The Stray” The Middle The Middle The Middle The Middle Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls Frasier Frasier HGTV 32 38 112 229 Tiny House Tiny House Tiny House Tiny House House Hunters Hunters Int’l House Hunters Hunters Int’l Tiny House Tiny House House Hunters Hunters Int’l HIST 35 42 120 269 Ancient Aliens Ancient Aliens (N) (:03) Ancient Aliens (:03) Ancient Aliens (:01) Ancient Aliens (12:01) Ancient Aliens LIFE 56 56 108 252 Bring It! (N) Step It Up “Fake Sweat” (N) The Jacksons: Next The Jacksons: Next (:02) Bring It! (12:02) Step It Up SPIKE 28 48 241 241 Cops Cops Cops Cops Cops Cops Cops Cops Cops Cops Jail Jail SUN 49 422 656 (6:00) MLB Baseball Toronto Blue Jays at Tampa Bay Rays. Rays Live! Baseball Begin Auburn Foot Ins. Lightning After Midnight With the Rays SYFY 70 52 122 244 Men in Black II () Tommy Lee Jones, Will Smith. Z Nation “Batch 47” (N) Continuum “Zero Hour” (N) Z Nation “Batch 47” Continuum “Zero Hour” TBS 31 15 139 247 2 Broke Girls 2 Broke Girls Big Bang Big Bang The Pacifier () Vin Diesel, Lauren Graham, Faith Ford. Cougar Town Cougar Town Father of the Bride () TCM 25 70 132 256 Two on a Guillotine () Connie Stevens, Dean Jones. House on Haunted Hill () The Haunting () Julie Harris, Claire Bloom. House-7 TLC 37 40 183 280 What Not to Wear (N) First Swipe First Swipe Sex in Public WhatSheSaid First Swipe First Swipe Sex in Public WhatSheSaid What Not to Wear TNT 29 54 138 245 The Sorcerer’s Apprentice () Nicolas Cage, Jay Baruchel. Alice in Wonderland () Johnny Depp, Mia Wasikowska. Hawaii Five-0 “Wahine’inoloa” USA 62 55 105 242 Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Modern Family Modern Family Modern Family Safe Haven () Josh Duhamel. WGN-A 13 239 307 Person of Interest Person of Interest Person of Interest How I Met How I Met How I Met How I Met Parks/Recreat Parks/Recreat TODAY’S TV LISTINGS Friday, October 2, 2015 | The News Herald | Page C7

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CLASSIFIEDSPage C8 | The News Herald | Friday, October 2, 2015 47771 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Case No: 2015-4431TD NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN: DUNDEE LIEN INV LLC, the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate Number: 4431 Year of Issuance: May 27, 2011 Parcel ID#: 23025-000-000 Description of Property: 11 4S 14W-23-118C1 BEG 655’ S & 420’ W OF NE COR OF NE1/4 TH S 100’ W 72‘ N 100‘ TH E 72’ TO BEG ORB 1353 P 1864 ORB 1934 P 133 Name in which assessed: WAYNE R VAUGHAN, SHARON E VAUGHAN All said property being in the County of Bay, State of Florida. Unless said certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder, on December 8, 2015; 10:00 AM at the North Front Door of the Bay County Courthouse. Dated this 29th day of September, 2015 BILL KINSAUL Clerk of the Court and Comptroller Bay County, Florida By: Teresa Childers Deputy Clerk WARNING! There are unpaid taxes on property which you own or have legal interest. The property will be sold at public auction at the north front door of the Bay County Courthouse at 10:00 AM on the 8th day of December, 2015 unless the back taxes are paid. To receive the payoff amount for the taxes owed contact the Bay County Tax Collector, Panama City, Florida, telephone number (850) 248-8514. To receive further information, contact the Clerk of the Court and Comptroller at the Bay County Courthouse, 300 E 4th St #101, Panama City, Florida, telephone Number (850) 763-9061, Ext 3. To make payment, please contact the office of the Tax Collector, telephone number. Pub: October 2, 9, 16, 23, 2015 47717 NOTICE OF PUBLIC AUCTION Pursuant F.S. 328.17, United American Lien & Recovery as agent w/ power of attorney will sell the following vessel(s) to the highest bidder. Inspect 1 week prior @ marina; cash or cashier check; 18% buyer prem; all auctions are held w/ reserve; any persons interested phone: 954563-1999 Sale Date October 23 2015 @ 10:00 am 3411 NW 9th Ave #707 Ft Lauderdale FL 33309 V12317 1996 Maxum FL7703GT Hull ID#: BL2B57MSA696 in/outboard pleasure gas fiberglass 25ft R/O Lawrence Fisher Lienor: Bayside Marina of PCB LLC 6327 Big Daddy Dr Panama City Beach V12318 1995 Proline FL4025DK Hull ID#: PLCWF295E595 in/outboard pleasure gas fiberglass 25ft R/O Hosey K Stilley Lienor: Bayside Marina of PCB LLC 6327 Big Daddy Dr Panama City Beach V12319 2006 Century FL6964NE Hull ID#: CEB057CCK506 outboard pleasure gas fiberglass 20ft R/O Edward West Edge Jr Lienor: Bayside Marina of PCB LLC 6327 Big Daddy Dr Panama City Beach Licensed Auctioneers FLAB422 FLAU765 & 1911 Pub: Oct. 2, 9, 2015 47775 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Case No: 2015-4430TD NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN: DUNDEE LIEN INV LLC, the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate Number: 4430 Year of Issuance: May 27, 2011 Parcel ID#: 23013-000-000 Description of Property: 11 4S 14W -11-118C1 BEG 427’ W & 755’ S OF NE COR OF SEC TH W 415’ S 130’ E 415’ N 130’ TO BEG LESS 30’ RW ON S SIDE & LESS PCLS ORB 1353 P 1864 ORB 1934 P 133 Name in which assessed: WAYNE R VAUGHAN, SHARON E VAUGHAN All said property being in the County of Bay, State of Florida. Unless said certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder, on December 8, 2015; 10:00 AM at the North Front Door of the Bay County Courthouse. Dated this 29th day of September, 2015 BILL KINSAUL Clerk of the Court and Comptroller Bay County, Florida By: Teresa Childers Deputy Clerk WARNING! There are unpaid taxes on property which you own or have legal interest. The property will be sold at public auction at the north front door of the Bay County Courthouse at 10:00 AM on the 8th day of December, 2015 unless the back taxes are paid. To receive the payoff amount for the taxes owed contact the Bay County Tax Collector, Panama City, Florida, telephone number (850) 248-8514. To receive further information, contact the Clerk of the Court and Comptroller at the Bay County Courthouse, 300 E 4th St #101, Panama City, Florida, telephone Number (850) 763-9061, Ext 3. To make payment, please contact the office of the Tax Collector, telephone number. Pub: October 2, 9, 16, 23, 2015 47773 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Case No: 2015-4428TD NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN: DUNDEE LIEN INV LLC, the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate Number: 4428 Year of Issuance: May 27, 2011 Parcel ID#: 23003-000-000 Description of Property : 11 4S 14W -1-118C1 NE1/4 OF NE1/4 LESS PCLS ORB 1353 P 1864 ORB 1934 P 133 Name in which assessed: WAYNE R VAUGHAN, SHARON E VAUGHAN All said property being in the County of Bay, State of Florida. Unless said certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder, on December 8, 2015; 10:00 AM at the North Front Door of the Bay County Courthouse. Dated this 29th day of September, 2015 BILL KINSAUL Clerk of the Court and Comptroller Bay County, Florida By: Teresa Childers Deputy Clerk WARNING! There are unpaid taxes on property which you own or have legal interest. The property will be sold at public auction at the north front door of the Bay County Courthouse at 10:00 AM on the 8th day of December, 2015 unless the back taxes are paid. To receive the payoff amount for the taxes owed contact the Bay County Tax Collector, Panama City, Florida, telephone number (850) 248-8514. To receive further information, contact the Clerk of the Court and Comptroller at the Bay County Courthouse, 300 E 4th St #101, Panama City, Florida, telephone Number (850) 763-9061, Ext 3. To make payment, please contact the office of the Tax Collector, telephone number. Pub: October 2, 9, 16, 23, 2015 47781 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 2015 CP 836 IN RE: ESTATE OF TIMOTHY RAY SMITH a/k/a TIMOTHY R. SMITH a/k/a TIM R. SMITH a/k/a TIM SMITH Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Timothy Ray Smith, deceased, whose date of death was October 29, 2014, is pending in the Circuit Court for Bay County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 300 East 4th Street, Panama City, Florida 32401. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court ON OR BEFORE THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN FLORIDA STATUTES SECTION 733.702 WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is October 2, 2015. Personal Representative: Tavares Smith 130 Lake Ada Circle Sanford, Florida 32773 Attorney for Personal Representative: James M. Miller, Esq. FL Bar No. 405220 Law offices of James M. Miller PO Box 950880 Lake Mary, Florida 32795-0880 Pub: Oct. 2, 9, 2015 47779 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR BAY COUNTY CASE NUMBER: 2015-945-CA IN RE: FORFEITURE OF: $10,992.00 U.S. CURRENCY NOTICE OF FORFEITURE PROCEEDINGS TO ALL PERSONS who claim an interest in the above-described property, which was seized on or about July 31, 2015, in Panama City Beach, Bay County, Florida. Said property is in the custody of the Panama City Beach Police Department. Any owner, entity, bona fide lienholder, or person in possession of the property when seized has the right to request an adversarial preliminary hearing for a probable cause determination from the Circuit Court within 15 days of initial receipt of notice, with proper notice to Kevin D. Obos, Harrison Sale McCloy, Post Office Drawer 1579, 304 Magnolia Avenue, Panama City, Florida 32402. A Petition for Final Order of Forfeiture has been or will be filed in the above styled Court. HARRISON SALE McCLOY Kevin D. Obos FL Bar No. 0571660 P.O. Drawer 1579 Panama City, FL 32402 Tele: (850) 769-3434 Fax: (850) 769-6121 ATTORNEYS FOR PANAMA CITY BEACH POLICE DEPARTMENT Pub: Oct. 2, 9, 2015 99184 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, JUVENILE DIVISION, FOR THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, BAY COUNTY, STATE OF FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2013-DP-0208-A Division: A IN THE INTEREST OF: Z. M. G. DOB: 04/30/2001 MINOR CHILD NOTICE OF ACTION (SEC. 39.801 (b) FS) The State of Florida to WENDELL EVANS, who might also be under the alias of WARDELL EVANS, prospective father of the child, Z. M. G. , whose last known residence and address is 1000 Burton Avenue, Apt. 3, Cincinnati, OH 45229. You are hereby notified that a Petition under oath has been filed in the above styled Court concerning Termination of Parental Rights in the case of Z. M. G. , a child, for placement with a licensed child placing agency or the Department for the purposes of subsequent adoption. You are hereby noticed that an Advisory Hearing will be held before the Honorable Brantley S. Clark, Jr., Judge of the Circuit Court, Fourteenth Judicial Circuit, at the Bay County Juvenile Justice Courthouse, 533 E. 11th Street, Panama City, Florida 32401, on the 4th day of November, 2015 , at the hour of 9:00 a.m., C.T. FAILURE TO PERSONALLY APPEAR AT THE ADVISORY HEARING CONSTITUTES CONSENT TO THE TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS OF THIS CHILD. IF YOU FAIL TO APPEAR ON THE DATE AND TIME SPECIFIED, YOU MAY LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS AS A PARENT TO THE CHILD NAMED IN THE PETITION. BILL KINSAUL, Clerk of Circuit Court By: Viola Cushman Deputy Clerk Sept. 18, 25, 2015 Oct. 2, 9, 2015 99240 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 13001103CA PNC BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff, vs. TIMOTHY D. CILBRITH A/K/A TIMOTHY CILBRITH A/K/A TIM D. CILBRITH A/K/A TIM CILBRITH; SUPAPRON VILAIRAT; PNC BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATON, AS SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO NATIONAL CITY BANK; UNKNOWN TENANTS, Defendant(s). AMENDED NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 15, 2015, and entered in 13001103CA of the Circuit Court of the FOURTEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for Bay County, Florida, wherein PNC BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION is the Plaintiff and TIMOTHY D. CILBRITH A/K/A TIMOTHY CILBRITH A/K/A TIM D. CILBRITH A/K/A TIM CILBRITH; SUPAPRON VILAIRAT; PNC BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATON, AS SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO NATIONAL CITY BANK; UNKNOWN TENANTS are the Defendant(s). Bill Kinsaul as the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at www .bay .realforeclose.com , at 11:00 AM, on October 15, 2015 , the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 1, BLOCK “I”, HIDDEN PINES PHASE VII, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 19, PAGE 2, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 21st day of September, 2015. Bill Kinsaul As Clerk of the Court By: Jennifer Sullivan As Deputy Clerk IMPORT ANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850)747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. ADA Coordinator P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, Florida 32402, Phone: 850-747-5338 Fax: (850) 747-5717, Hearing Impaired: Dial 711, Email: AD A Request@jud14.flcourts. org Submitted by: Robertson, Anschutz & Schneid, P.L. Attorneys for Plaintiff 6409 Congress Ave., Suite 100, Boca Raton, FL 33487 Phone: 561-241-6901 Fax: 561-997-6909 File No. 13-08114-MaM Pub: Sept. 25, 2015 October 2, 2015 99236NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALEProperty of the following tenants will be sold for cash to satisfy rental items in accordance with Florida Statutes, Self Storage Act, Section 83.801 et seq. All items will be sold or otherwise disposed. Sale will be conducted at Bay Mini Storage, 1816 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach, FL 32408 on October 20, 2015 at 9:00 AM. All goods will be sold in “AS IS” condition, all items or spaces may not be available at time of sale. Unit #/Name/Items: #31 Linda Mitchell Household #35 Darren Woodin Household #36 Wendy Windham Household #106 Bruce Sawyer Household #219 Janet Houston Household #125 Richard Coogan Household Pub:October 2, 9, 2015 99246 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR BAY COUNTY GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 15000905CA GREEN TREE SERVICING LLC, Plaintiff, vs. THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, BENEFICIARIES, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES AND ALL OTHERS WHO MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST IN THE ESTATE OF OTHO WINTON EDWARDS A/K/A OTHO W. EDWARDS A/K/A O.W. EDWARDS A/K/A OTHO WINTO EDWARDS, III A/K/A OTHO WINTON EDWARDS, III, DECEASED. et. al. Defendant(s), NOTICE OF ACTION CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE TO: THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, BENEFICIARIES, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES AND ALL OTHERS WHO MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST IN THE ESTATE OF OTHO WINTON EDWARDS A/K/A OTHO W. EDWARDS A/K/A O.W. EDWARDS A/K/A OTHO WINTO EDWARDS, III A/K/A OTHO WINTON EDWARDS, III, DECEASED whose residence is unknown if he/she/they be living; and if he/she/ they be dead, the unknown defendants who may be spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees, and all parties claiming an interest by, through, under or against the Defendants, who are not known to be dead or alive, and all parties having or claiming to have any right, title or interest in the property described in the mortgage being foreclosed herein. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property: LOT 13, BLOCK “N”, HOLIDAY BEACH UNIT 4, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 10, PAGE 63, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on counsel for Plaintiff, whose address is 6409 Congress Avenue, Suite 100, Boca Raton, Florida 33487 on or before 30 days from Date of First Publication of this Notice and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on Plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition filed herein. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court at Bay County, Florida, this 18th day of September, 2015. BILL KINSAUL CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY: Debbie Roberson DEPUTY CLERK Robertson, Anschutz, and Schneid, PL Attorney for Plaintiff 6409 Congress Ave., Suite 100 Boca Raton, FL 33487 PRIMARY EMAIL: mail@rasflaw .com File No. 14-88040-CrR Sept. 25, Oct. 2, 2015 99286 Public Notice Notice of Funding Availability City of Panama City SHIP Program The City of Panama City has available funding under Florida’s State Housing Initiative Partnership (SHIP) Program for fiscal year 2015-16. Pursuant to Florida Statute 420.9075(3)(b), the availability of these funds must be advertised as follows: Fiscal year 2015-16 funds are estimated to be approximately $176,982. The program is open to eligible applicants who reside or wish to reside within the jurisdiction of the City of Panama City. Activities to be undertaken include OwnerOccupied Housing Rehabilitation/Repair, Purchase Assistance (Down Payment & Closing Costs), Foreclosure Prevention, and Emergency Assistance. At a minimum, thirty percent (30%) of available funding will benefit very low-income families, thirty percent (30%) low-income families, and thirty percent (30%) moderate-income families. The maximum housing value limitation for program participation shall be $150,000 for new and existing homes. SHIP funds may not be used to purchase or repair mobile, modular or manufactured homes. The program shall comply with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, and applicants will not be discriminated against on the basis of race, creed, religion, color, age, sex, familial status, national origin or handicap in the selection of recipients of contracts or assistance under the SHIP program. Application Cycle: Beginning November 2, 2015 and ending November 6, 2015, Monday through Friday. Persons or families wishing to apply for these funds may obtain an application between the hours of 10:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m. at 2629 W. 10th St., PC, FL 32401. Applications should be returned to 2629 W. 10th St., P.C., FL, no later than 3:00 p.m. Friday, November 6, 2015. Applications will not be accepted after this time. For information regarding this program you may call Community Development at (850)872-7230. Pub: October 2, November 1, 2, 5, 2015 99292 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE No.: 14-000626-CA OCWEN LOAN SERVICING, LLC Plaintiff, vs. ANTHONY L. ROBINSON, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ANTHONY L. ROBINSON; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE OF SALE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated September 11, 2015, and entered in Case No. 14-000626-CA of the Circuit Court of the 14th Judicial Circuit in and for Bay County, Florida, wherein OCWEN LOAN SERVICING, LLC, is Plaintiff and ANTHONY L. ROBINSON, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ANTHONY L. ROBINSON; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2, are Defendants, the Bay County Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash via online auction at www .bay .realforeclose.com at 11:00 A.M. Central Time (12:00 p.m. Eastern Time) on the 26th day October, 2015 , the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: Lot 6, in Block F, of Tidewater Estates, according to the Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 9, at Page 38, of the Public Records of Bay County, Florida. Located: 6418 Zinnia Street Panama City, Florida 32404 and all fixtures and personal property located therein or thereon, which are included as security in Plaintiff’s mortgage. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus funds from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated at Panama City, Bay County, Florida, this 28th day of September, 2015. Bill Kinsaul Clerk of said Circuit Court By:Sharon Chambers Deputy Clerk Clarfield, Okon, Salomone, & Pincus, P.L. Attorney for Plaintiff 500 S. Australian Ave., Suite 730 West Palm Beach, FL 33401 (561)713-1400 pleadings@cosplaw .com October 2, 9, 2015 99288 Public Notice Notice of Funding Availability Bay County SHIP Program Bay County has available funding under Florida’s State Housing Initiative Partnership (SHIP) Program for fiscal year 2015-16. Pursuant to Florida Statute 420.9075(3)(b), the availability of these funds must be advertised as follows: Fiscal year 2015-16 funds are estimated to be approximately $667,803. The program is open to eligible applicants who reside or wish to reside within the jurisdiction of Bay County. Activities to be undertaken include Owner-Occupied Housing Rehabilitation/Repair, Purchase Assistance (Down Payment & Closing Costs), Foreclosure Prevention, and Emergency Assistance. At a minimum, thirty percent (30%) of available funding will benefit very low-income families, thirty percent (30%) low-income families, and thirty percent (30%) moderate-income families. The maximum housing value limitation for program participation shall be $160,000 for new and existing homes. SHIP funds may not be used to purchase or repair mobile, modular or manufactured homes. The program shall comply with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, and applicants will not be discriminated against on the basis of race, creed, religion, color, age, sex, familial status, national origin or handicap in the selection of recipients of contracts or assistance under the SHIP program. Application Cycle: Beginning November 2, 2015 and ending November 6, 2015, Monday through Friday. Persons or families wishing to apply for these funds may obtain an application between the hours of 10:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m. at 2629 W. 10th St., PC, FL 32401. Applications should be returned to 2629 W. 10th St., P.C., FL, no later than 3:00 p.m. Friday, November 6, 2015. Applications will not be accepted after this time. For information regarding this program you may call Community Development at (850)872-7230. Pub: October 2, November 1, 2, 5, 2015 99294 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW PURSUANT TO SECTION 865.09, FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of: Jimmy D’s Bar-B-Q located at 1431 Martin Luther King Blvd, in the County of Bay, in the City of Panama City, Florida, 32401 intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Panama City, Florida, this 30th day of September, 2015. John P Christensen Pub: October 2, 2015 Mock Jurors Neededfor feedback in upcoming court case, Oct 14th and Nov 11th (can only serve one of these dates and MUST BE NEW), from 9 am-4 pm, pays $20/hr served, must be at least 18 y/o, live in Bay Co, and have a valid FL driver’s license, email admin@trialsmart.com for more info. TOGETA BETTERJOB , become a better reader.Free tutoring for adults. Call Literacy Volunteers of Bay County Public Library.872-7500

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CLASSIFIEDSFriday, October 2, 2015 | The News Herald | Page C9 Bay HYUNDAIMITSUBISHILINCOLN CHRYSLERJEEPDODGERAM ComejointhelargestandbusiestdealershipinBayCounty! Wearelookingtohire4salesconsultantsforourNewandUsedDepartments. Joinourteamandbeabletosellfromthelargestselectionofvehiclesinthearea. Noexperiencenecessary.Wewilltrainyou! Greatincomepotential,amazingbeneitsandpaidvacation! Pleaseapplyinperson: BayCars-UsedCarSuperCenter 615W.15thStreet,PanamaCity,FL32401 Formoreinformationcontact: GlenGainer(850)785-1591orDarrylColona(850)832-2370 1137026 Business DevelopmentCampaign SpecialistLocal Non-profit is searching for a full time Campaign Specialist. This position is responsible for developing and implementing fundraising strategies that create growth in donor involvement and investment. This position requires a combination of responsibilities including tasks related to administration, data maintenance, finance, fundraising, marketing and relationship building. Bachelor’s degree preferred, but not required. Requirements include advanced computer skills in Microsoft computer applications, valid driver’s license with clean driving record and reliable transportation. Must be available for some after-hours events. Candidate must be able to pass a drug test and background check. Graphic design experience using Adobe Creative Suites is desirable, but not required if the applicant has the desired personality and passion. The ideal candidate will be comfortable with public speaking, organized, outgoing, able to successfully prioritize several concurrent activities and have excellent communication skills. This is a high-energy, full-time position, located in Panama City, with outreach to several neighboring counties. Please send resume and cover letter to: Blind Box 3676 c/o The News Herald, P.O. Box 1940, Panama City, FL 32402 or email to SpecialistOpening@gmail.com Application deadline is October 9, 2015. Monster.com Web ID:34332048 Install/Maint/RepairPress OperatorThe News Herald in Panama City, Florida, home of the “World’s Most Beautiful Beaches,” is looking for an entry-level press operator. No experience is necessary, but must have great work history, be self-motivated, disciplined and be a team player. Ability to use a computer is helpful. We will train the right person in this rapidly advancing, high tech field. The position is full time and includes night and weekend work. The News Herald offers a competitive benefit package including 401(k), paid vacation and sick leave, medical, dental, vision and life insurance. Send your resume to ehypes@pcnh.com . Interviews will be scheduled at a later time. Drug-Free Workplace, EOE Web ID#: 34331104 Production/OperationsEarn Extra Money For The HolidaysSeasonal PART-TIME Newspaper Inserter Standing, bending & lifting required Assignment will be from mid-October through December. Must be able to work a flexible schedule including nights and weekendsApply at The News Herald, 501 W. 11th StreetPanama City.Interviews will be scheduled at a later time No phone calls Candidates are hired pending criminal background check and pre-employment drug screen . Web Id 34332327 Property ManagementFront Desk AgentsCounts Oakes Resort Properties has immediate openings for full time and part time FRONT DESK AGENTS at SURFSIDE RESORT in Miramar Beach. Must be available to work nights and weekends. Previous resort, hotel or vacation rental operations experience required. Apply in person at Surfside Resort 1096 Scenic Gulf Drive Miramar Beach, FL 32550 or Send your resume to: dbrambley@surfsideresort.com 850-837-4700 EEOC/Drug Free Workplace Web ID#: 34332634 SalesCALLCENTER Inside SalesThe News Herald is looking for highly motivated Inside Sales Representatives who are customer service champions for inbound and outbound calls. Required Skills: * Excellent computer skills to include use of internet and Microsoft Office. *Type 40 wpm. *Ability to handle heavy flow of inbound calls *Time management & organization skills *Excellent verbal/written communication skills *Must be detail oriented and work as a team player to ensure customer service excellence. *Strong work ethic & capacity to thrive in a professional team environment. The News Herald offers an excellent benefit package, including medical, dental, vision, life and long-term disability insurance, 401(k) options, vacation and sick leave and select paid holidays. Please send resumes to: ehypes@pcnh.com Web ID#: 34331361 SalesMulti-Media Advertising Sales Exciting Opportunity!!Find out why our team loves their job. Is it the exciting environment, the revenue rewards, the great benefits, or all of the above? The Panama City News Herald is adding talented & motivated multi-media sales professionals to our advertising team. This position includes developing, presenting and closing sales for new and existing customers; providing advertising solutions to include print and digital to meet business customer needs that span all categories of small to medium local businesses. Presentations are made via in-person sales calls in the respective territories located in Panama City and sorrounding areas. We are seeking strong sales minded individuals who are able to manage multiple tasks, prospect for new business & offer excellent customer service. Requires valid driver’s license. We offer base salary + commission and benefits, paid vacation, medical insurance, dental insurance, vision/hearing insurance, group life insurance, flexible spending accounts, 401K and more! Qualified applicants can apply by e-mailing resume & cover letter to ehypes@pchn.com The News Herald encourages applications from those with diverse backgrounds. The News Herald is a drug free environment Web ID#: 34331343 ADOPTION:Affectionate, Devoted Family Successful Business Owner, Stay-Home Mom Joyfully awaits miracle baby. ~Expenses Paid~ 1-800-552-0045FLBar42311 Found Dog in St Andrews. Young red nose Pit/ Lab mix male. Call 913-1741 Alternative To BoardingHouse N PetSitting Svs. Licensed Bonded 265-0278 MUST LOVE LABS2 black labs, 1 male, 1 female. About 1 year old. Needs large fenced in yard & to stay together. Please call 866-0001 11TH Annual Arts/Crafts Festival Will be held Nov. 14, 2015 at the Shaddai Shrine Center at 1119 W. 19th St., Panama City. Vendors wanted. For information call Beth Guy at 785-8775. Leave message and call will be returned within 24 hours. Text FL31654 to 56654 Buy & SellUsed Furniture 850-872-9544 or www .visit second2none.com Tanya’s GardenOn Hwy 77 Fresh Fruits & Vegetables -Shell Peas, & Lady Finger Peas (850)785-5621 Cancer-Free 8-Yr, Stage-4 survivor tells her story surviving 22-tu-mors in 2007. www.MexicanCancerCli nic.Inf Cemetery SpaceAt Evergreen Memorial Cemetery Garden of The Last Supper, $2,200. Can be used for 1 casket or 2 urns. Call 850-527-5574 txt FL32581 to 56654 DIABETIC TEST STRIPS NEEDEDWill buy sealed, unexpired boxes (850)710-0189 Perennial Peanut BermudaGood Hay, barn stored, heavy bales, $8. In Altha, 850-762-8340 or 561-793-1210 Text FL32639 to 56654 Admin/ClericalGeneral Office ManagerFor small survey firm. Must be fluent in Quickbooks and have basic computer skills and be able to interact with public. Call 265-4800, ask for Bill. Web ID#: 34332155 Banking/RE/Mortgage Innovations Federal Credit Union is seeking motivated, ambitious and member service oriented individuals with excellent organizational and customer service skills. If you have a positive attitude, a high standard of integrity, and you are a team player, we would like to talk with you about becoming a part of the exciting success and growth of this dynamic and innovative full service financial institution. We currently have openings for:FSR(Teller/ Loan Positions) Please submit your resume to: Innovations FCU, PO Box 15529, Panama City, Florida 32406 Attn: Human Resources. Or email us atHR@innovationsfcu.org Web Id#: 34332364 Bldg Const/TradesCivil EngineerMust have 5 years experience. Panama City area. Email resume to: csi@graceba.net Web ID#: 34332509 Install/Maint/RepairMaintenance PersonGulfgate Condominium 850-234-3623 EOE / DFWP Web ID#: 34332229 Install/Maint/RepairCarpenterWith benefits. 5 years documented exper. in the field. To Apply, go to: www .bay .k12.fl.us , Employment Opportunities, Support. For additional assistance call 850-767-4231. Deadline to apply is: 4:30pm on 10/06/2015 Web ID#: 34332691 Install/Maint/RepairHousekeeperLocal Vacation Rental Business located in Mexico Beach looking for Housekeeper. Flexible hours and days -applicant will need to accommodate schedule of guests for duties. Pay is negotiable. Primarily interested in independent contractors. MUST have references and be able to pass a criminal background check. Submit resumes and 3 references to seasthedayflorida@ gmail.com or contact 678-521-4399 for more information Web ID# 34331902 Install/Maint/RepairJanitorial TechniciansNeeded Immediately!Must have a valid drivers license, pass background check and be able to work some weekends and/or nights. EOE. Pick up applications at 1814 Beck Ave, Panama City, FL 32405 Web ID#: 34331915 Medical/HealthLPN or Medical AssistantFull-time, Mon-Fri Salary DOE Email resume toRebecca@ecgastro.com Web ID#: 34332473 Install/Maint/RepairProduction Worker/AssemblerMedical device manufacturing company in West PCB seeking a dedicated full time production worker/ assembler. High School diploma or higher required. Mfg. experience preferred. Must pass drug screening and background check. Send resume by fax 850-233-3658 or email danielle@opticalintegrity .c om . No calls please. Web ID#: 34330212 Logistics/TransportATTENTION!Driver Trainees Needed Now!No experience necessary Needs entry-level semi drivers. Premium equipment & excellent benefits. Call Today! 1-800-709-7364 Web ID#: 34331923 Logistics/TransportClass ACDL DriversNeeded Immediately For Local Hauling Dump Trailer ExperienceMossy Head & Surrounding Areas$1000 Retention Bonus*Home Nights Apply online:www .perdidotrucking.com 251-470-0355Web ID#: 34332378 Logistics/Transport The Panama City News Herald is in need of aSingle Copy Independent ContractorFor Panama City Beach and Lynn Haven/ Southport area. This person will deliver papers to our coin operated racks as well as our inside store locations. Must have a dependable vehicle, and be able to work early hours 7 days a week. This is a good opportunity for someone wanting to earn extra cash. Must pass credit check. Come by 501 W. 11th St. in Panama City & complete an application or email: tmcafee@pcnh.com Web ID#: 34332311 Medical/HealthFront Office CoordinatorNeeded full time for family oriented medical practice. Mature, multitasking person with front office experience required. Insurance and coding knowledge a plus. Please fax resume and cover letter to: 850-914-2553. Web ID# 34331830 Medical/HealthDental AssistantOur growing dental office has an opening for an experienced Dental Assistant. We can offer you a great salary in a warm and caring atmosphere. If you would like to work in an environment where you can grow with an energetic team, “we need you”. Please call Sarah @ 850-230-3364 or fax your resume to 850-233-9434 Web ID#: 34332173 Text FL32173 to 56654 Medical/HealthFT Medical ScribeNeeded in outpatient practice. Must be proficient typist and medical experience highly recommended. Competitive salary and benefits offered. Must start immediately. Please send resume to agha.rheum@gmail.com Web ID#: 34332290 Medical/HealthMedical BillerMust be proficient in MediSoft, electronic billing, Availity and ICD 10 codes. Fax resume to 850-769-1178. Web ID#: 34332388 Medical/HealthOffice Asst.Experience preferred. Send resumes to:p ainpractice@yahoo.com Web ID#: 34320815 Medical/HealthOffice ManagementFor new DME company. Must have DME experience. Full time with benefits. Email resume to: dawn@pcsurgery.org Web ID#34332534 Text FL32534 to 56654 Project/Program MgmtExecutive DirectorThe Homeless & Hunger Coalition of NWFL is seeking an Executive Director for immediate hire. FT without benefits, pay DOE. Submit resume to: homeless.coalition.nwfl@g mail.com Monster.com Web ID#: 34331761 Pro Painting Wall repair, press. wash., carpentry, painting. References, lic. & ins. 850-624-3691 Text FL32028 to 56654 Plumbing RepairsLICENSED -INSURED REASONABLE Evenings & Weekends850-387-1400CFC1429357 $2999-NEW METAL ROOF for the Doublewide!! (up to 28x60) Licensed & Insured. Guyson Construction & Roofing (850) 258-5856 CALLTODAYText FL96551 to 56654 Affordable RoofingFree estimates! 850-596-2138 Lic#RC 29027242Text FL30012 to 56654 Any Time Tree Removal!Lic./Ins. w/ workers comp. 850-628-0930Text FL15239 to 56654 Creamer’s Tree ServiceCall Jason @ (850)832-9343 Able Lawn SvcW e Show Up! Lawn Service Starting at $35 596-4383/258-5072 Text FL97024 to 56654 Precision Mowing Mow, weed-eat, edge, blow. Small trees and shrubs. Professional equipment, exceptional work. Free estimates. 850-890-4434 Text FL27760 to 56654 Thompson Lawn CareStarting at $25. 850-303-3737 Best Oriental Massage Health & Harmony Nice Professional QUALITYTOUCH! 914-9177.Lic #9026 Oriental MassagePanama City Beach Shiatsu/Swedish 850-832-4790 #MA62742 Bay Area PaintersBest rates: Pressure wash, Int/Ext painting. Free est. Call Jordan at 850-319-1275. Caudill PaintingInt/Ext Painting, Repairs & Pressure Cleaning. Lic & Ins 303-9669 / 265-8987 Alonzo Caudill Painting, Drywall, Yard Clean-Up, Carpenter Repairs & Pressure Cleaning Lic & Ins. 303-9669 or 265-8987 Have It Your Way Int/Ext Painting, Clean-Ups/Sod, Epoxy floors, Rock/Flower Beds. Lot Clearing, Pressure Washing. Save 10%-20% Service Calls 850-303-8526 Roy Smiley Jr Home Repairs Any Job Large or Small Kitchens, Baths, New Installs, Paint, Tile, & Woodrot. Free Estimates Robert 850-832-7972 Complete Lawn Care Senior & Milit ary Disc. Call Steven: 850-624-8798 Cell 850-235-2212 Office Lawns ‘R’UsAllow us to take care of all your service needs! Yard maintenance & grooming, yard cleanup, debris removal, pressure washing & sod. Licensed & Insured. 850-960-2033 or 850-319-9032 CaregiverMature, experienced caregiver has flexible schedule available. Light housekeeping and meal preparation. Available for overnight and transportation service. For kind, competent and reliable care, please call 850-257-1561 SEATILE Tile & Wood All Types of Tiles & Wood Flooring installed. Bath & Kitchens Too! Free Est: Kenneth « 850-532-4251« BJ’s Home Maintenance & Handyman Services Is your house letting you down? Let BJ give you a lift. Over 30 yrs experience. 850-381-3443 Duncan ConcreteExp. & Ins. Driveway & Patio Specialist 850-896-1574 WHITE’S CONCRETEServing Bay Est.’94 Licensed/Insured Driveway Specialists 874-1515 / 896-6864 Accept Credit Cards PADGETT CONSTRUCTION, LLC 20 YEARS EXP. SPECIALIZING IN VINYL SIDING, WINDOW AND DOOR REPLACEMENT, SCREEN ROOMS, CARPORTS, AND PATIO COVERS. LIC AND INSURED. 850-527-6295 Affordable AdditionsRemodeling, New Construction. Comm/Residential. 850-596-2138 Lic. #CGC 1506283Text FL30013 to 56654 Bill W Hash Remodeling & Consulting Master Craftsman w/ 33 yrs exp. Call 850-890-7569 txt FL00734to 56654 We Buy Cars Transmission plus850-249-0440 ACLASSIC TOUCH AHonest Person To Clean Your Home, Office Or Condo, Lic/Ins, 15yrs exp, Free Est Call Lauri 774-3977 txt FL22867 to56654 Cuzzin Jim’s LLCConcrete & Black Topping Driveways & Parking Lots. Installed & Repaired Seal Coating Pavers Installed Pressure Washing drives, decks & patios. Call 850-319-1678 Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium that’s your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when it’s time to buy, it’s the resource on which to rely. If you didn’t advertise here, you’re missing out on potential customers. SELL ALL YOUR ITEMS through classified.CALL 747-5020

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CLASSIFIEDSPage C10 | The News Herald | Friday, October 2, 2015 Medical/HealthARNP/PAEstablished medical practice. Seeking Part Time Nurse Practitioner or Physician Assistant to join our team. Competitive salary DOE. Email CV to:nowhiring301@gmail.com Web ID#: 34332473 OtherArea ManagerNeeded for petroleum company for Bay County and surrounding areas. Experience needed. Call 850-584-6666 or email resume to dougeverett@wareoil.com Web ID#: 34332397 Text FL32397 to 56654 Sales/Business DevSales AssociateBattery Source is seeking a motivated Sales Associate in the Panama City area. Duties include sales and installation of automotive and specialty batteries, and sales and minor repair of golf cars. Prior experience in retail is preferred. Apply in person at Battery Source at 2402 Hwy 77 North, or email P anamaCity27@batterysource.com Monster.com Web ID#: 34332697 VisitEnter The Web ID To View More Information On All Of Our Help Wanted Ads Sales/Business Dev.General ManagerFull time with benefits. General bookkeeping, merchandising and marketing skills required. Email resume:erin@classiccarpets.coEOE & DFWP Web ID#: 34331927 SecurityUnarmed Security Officer$9.85/hr, D License Required. Benefits avail. Apply online at www .yaleenforcement.com , email T allahasseeJobs@yaleen forcement.com , or call 1-888-925-3363 ext. 2949 Web ID#: 34332175 AIRLINE CAREERS begin hereGet FAA approved Aviation hands on training. Financial Aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-741-9260 www.FixJets.com MEDICAL BILLING TRAINEES NEEDED! Train to become a Medical Office Assistant! No Experience needed! Online training gets you job ready ASAP! HS Diploma/ GED & PC/Internet needed! (888)374-7294 Distributors NeededMartin’s famous potato breads and rolls is seeking distributors for the Destin, marketing areas. Investment required. Financing Available Call Philip @ 850-294-9922 Taking bids for house keeping, 32 units at the Summit Condominiums 8743 Thomas Dr. PCB. Will be required to have a 1 million dollar general liability insurance policy, workers comp insurance, and bond. See Tom Lewis for other details. 4 Prof. Office Suites for lease in PC @ 651 W. 14th St. 1200-3500 Sq. Ft. 850-527-7339 3602 E. 15th St (Next to Subway, across from Honda) 1500sqft w/ plenty of parking. Please call Travis Walker @850-215-4410Text FL32033 to 56654 Grand Office Bldg for lease. Water view at 1013 Beck Ave. 7600 Sq. Ft. 850-527-7339 Whse w/office & docks 2500-5000-7500 up to 20k sqft 850-785-3031panamacitywarehouse.netBrokers Protected Lynn H Adorable, cozy, clean, Furn 1 person apt, no pets. w/s/g pd $585mo. 850-265-4535 Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. 1 br, large Florida room. Screened porch. Emerald Point Resort. Gated Water front. Furnished pools, hot tub, exercise room. Exc condition $800 a month 850-249-0377 2 br, 1 bath , 520 James Ave. $260 per wk & $200dep, utilities incl’d. No pets! 850-532-8263 Text FL09775 to 56654 1334 Lincoln Dr., 3br/1ba , $275 a wk + $200dep, utilities incld 850-532-8263 Text FL20237 to 56654 Homes for Rent Retired Military, DoD & Tyndall Contractors On Base housing at Tyndall AFB is now available! 2 BR $1165 3 BR $1255 Utilities included Contact Balfour Beatty at 844-334-0962 for more information Roommate Needed for a quiet mature home in Lynn Haven. Call 850-832-8361 Text FL25657 to 56654 Lynn Haven 2 & 3 Br’s starting at $640 mnth, W/D Hookup, CH/A, No Pets. 850-624-6552 Springfield 2br/1ba CH&A, W/D hookup, fenced yard, NO PETS, $600mo/ $400dep 872-9242 or 774-5872 ! ! ! ! ! ! ! Sell It Today!I BUYHOUSESPretty or Ugly763-7355ibuyhousesprettyorugly.comText FL95981 to 56654 3 BR -3.5 BA LAKE POWELL $435K -MLS 632121 22912 Ann Miller Rd PCB, FL (near 30-A) Holli Persall ,Realtor ERA Neubauer Real Estate 850 866-8195 WATERFRONT! 1.55 acres Beautiful lot! 1110 Germaine St., Parker, $345K MLS 633508 $268.9k, 805 Kristanna Dr, Candelwick/ Northshore area 4br/2ba, pool + glassed FL room, new carpet & tile. Call Jan @ 850-819-5857 Text FL32570 to 56654 2907 W 21st CtMLS #633424 $165K St Andrews Spacious 4 Br, 2 Ba Brick home on corner lot. Very open floor plan. Sunken Living Rm. Tile and Carpet. Fenced yard Lrge storage bldg w/ carpot. RV Parking. Fran Holt, Broker/Associ Latitudes Realty 850-832-0714 Emerald Point Resort 41WHAT A GREAT DEAL! This 1bd/2ba modular home, furnished and equipped, move in ready! Gated community resort near navy base w/ lots of amenities. HOA $490 quarterly. A must see! $87,500 Valerie Holt-Broker LH Waterfront 3/2 , 202 Virginia Ave, New master suite, pool, boat lift, $349k. 532-8263 Text FL30063 to 56654 REDUCED!! Open Saturday8am -11am 2620 Briarcliff Rd 2600 sq. Immaculate home CALL 960-2502 kmiller@kmiller .biz Coldwell Banker Carroll LYNN HAVENQuality Built ALL BRICK 3BR 2BA home located on 125 x 126 corner lot.. 3 CAR GARAGE.. Large LR w/ Fireplace leads to 34x12 scrnd Porch.. Large master w/ BIG walk-in Cl. Perfect family home! Reduced $196,900 Call today! O’Keefe & Wainwright, Realtors Call Karen with any Questions 814-8746 Lynn Haven TH$184,900 MLS#630932 Lovely 3BR/2BA in The Meadows. Breakfast bar, garden tub, private overlook of small lake & Nature Walk Golf Course. Velma Phillips, Realtor 832-6319Prudential Shimmering Sands Realty Many financing options incl 100% is available! Home is in immaculate condition located in a cul-de-sac in Cedar’s Crossing subdivision. Custom kitchen w/SS appliances, FP. ADT security system. 2 car garage; priv. fence & spacious patio. Priced to sell quickly! MLS # 633733 Hope Abbott, Call now 850-596-7653 Keller Williams Success Realty Reduced, 40 Acres in Rolling Pines w/fishing pond. 3br/3ba Custom home, F/P, newer Roof, many upgrades. Worth the drive. MLS 613310 $399,900 Call 866-2158 Laird Hitchcock Realtor Prudential Shimmering Sands Realty Panama City: 221 W 33rd PL. Sat, Oct 3rd, 8-?Yard SaleText FL32526 to 56654 PCB: 313 Moonlight Bay Dr (Back Beach Rd, enter Colony Club/ Holiday Golf across from Goodwill) Saturday & Sunday (Oct 3rd & 4th) 8-3pmAnnual Garage SaleToo Much To List. Even have muscle cars!! PCB : 6909 Sunset Ave. (Off Thomas Dr. ) Oct 2nd & 3rd, 7am-2pm.MULTI FAMILY YARD SALEHome decor/household items/adult clothing. Too much to list, must see! Text FL32447 to 56654 Port St. Joe : 1405 Constitution Dr. Oct 2nd, 3rd & 4th, 8am-4pm.Huge Garage/ Porch/Yard SaleTeardrop camper, leaded glass light fixtures, 4FT ceiling medallion, grandfather clock, collectibles, statues, large bronze naked lady table, antiques, wheelchair, coat/hat rack, bar, Large “Venus” & “David” wall hangings, microwave, pedastels, drift wood, rice cooker, fish plates, wicker chairs & table, lamps, serving cart, rugs, oyster rake, organ, many more great items. Rain or Shine. Text FL 32309 to 56654 Pretty Bayou : 2568/2564/2560 Michigan Court at Michigan Ave. Sat Oct 3rd, 7am-12pm. 3 FAMILY YARD SALE Antiques, ceramics, china, collectibles, q & med sized clothing, 5ft C.I. Chimenea, jewelry, J.D. 23” mower, new photo art, silverware, books, and household. Large variety of items for you. No early sales. Canceled if rain. Text FL32684 to 56654 Southport : 1112 5th St. Oct 2nd & 3rd, 7am -?HUGE YARD SALEText FL32574 to 56654 Springfield :4117 Sue Lane. Oct 2nd & 3rd, 7am-3pm YARD SALE! Furniture, refrigerator, clothes, and misc. Text FL32537 to 56654 The Cove. 322 S Mac Arthur Ave. Sat 10/3 7am till?Multi Family SaleFurniture, Treadmill & misc household items Westville, FL 1738 Hwy 179A Thursday-Saturday 8am-2pmPK’s Estate SalesCrystal, Kitchen appliance, Crafting items & Lots of brand new items. txt FL32349 to 56654 Panama City 107 Oakwood Drive. Friday & Saturday 7am3 Family Garage SaleTools, clothes, kitchen ware sets, dishes, cups, pots & pans, sheet sets, what nots, all kind of household things. Priced to sell. Come & browse around. Text FL32451 to 56654 Panama City 3420 Hillcrest Dr. Fri & Sat., Oct 2&3, 7am-11amYard SaleHousewares, books, Christmas decor, Golf clubs, Chairs, Baking items, home decor & more!! txt FL32610 to56654 Panama City 3527 E 13th Ct. Sat 10/3, 7am -noonMoving Sale Panama City 5008 Pretty Way. Sat., Oct 3rd, 7 am until?GARAGE SALEClothes, shoes, paint, pictures, Etc. Text FL31861 to 56654 Panama City , 1200 Kristanna Dr. Saturday Oct. 3rd 7am-11amGarage SaleCar seats, car speakers, household items, furniture, costume jewelry, bedding, women clothing, Men Columbia shirts & more. Text FL03869 to 56654 PC, 3913 Pisa Dr Sat., 10/03 8am-until No Early Birds PleaseAztec VillaCommunity Wide Yard Saletxt FL02507 to 56654 PCB East End: 5723 Sunset Ave Saturday ONLY 8-1GIGANTIC CRAFTERS SALEA good mixture of unique finds that can be turned into a crafters dream project. Along with some garage sale items. Vendors welcomed. Too many items to list. This is not your average garage sale. Everything will be fairly priced so that you can make a profit. You’ll have to see it to beleive it! Text FL32690 to 56654 PCB : 13217 Petunia St Oct 2nd & 3rd, 8am-until. No early birds.Yard Sale!Restaurant equip, portable A/C unit, Oreck air purifiers, mens Levi’s, + large variety & good deals on quality items. Text FL32482 to 56654 PCB : 2604 Willow Oak Court. October 2nd & 3rd, 7:30am-3pm.Huge Yard Sale!!Freezer, fridge, lamps, misc. Text FL32355 to 56654 Fountain: 21312 Hightower Rd. Friday and Saturday 7am-?Barn SalePolaris four wheeler, smale bulldozer w/trailer, furniture items, cages, tools, lots of misc. Text FL32637 to 56654 Graceville 5089-B Peanut Rd. October 2nd & 3rd, 7am-?? Appliances, furniture, outside tools, dishes, clothes, etc. Everything must go!! txt FL31737 to 56654 Kingspoint : 3314 Harbour Place Sat Oct 3rd, 7am-11amHuge Yard Sale!!Kitchen & household goods. No early birds. Text FL32408 to 56654 Lynn Haven 1017 Georgia Ave. Sat., Oct 3rd, 7am-12pmMulti-Family Yard SaleChildren, junior & adult designer clothes, designer purses & shoes, furniture, household items, toys, bikes, Etc. Text FL32431 to 56654 Lynn Haven , 903 Minnesota Ave, Sat 10/3, from 7:00 am-12:00 pmYard SaleAntique glassware, oak armour, clothes, misc. Text FL32623 to 56654 Lynn Haven : 1005 Berwick Cir. Sat Oct 3rd, 7am-12pm.Multi Family Huge SaleFurniture, baby furniture, kids clothes (0 to 5 yrs) & household. Text FL32709 to 56654 Lynn Haven: 2331 Briarwood Pl. Sat 7:30a.m.-11:00a.m.Garage SaleGeneral household items plus small furniture! text FL29779 to 56654 Lynn Haven: 810 Texas Ave. Sat, 10/3 6amGarage/ Moving SaleHousehold, baby, toys, and so much more! Text FL32588 to 56654 Mexico Beach 1501 Hwy 98, Friday & Saturday, October 2nd & 3rd 8am-1pmMoving SaleMost of everything goes! Lamps, furniture, beds & household items. Text FL31892 to 56654 Millville : 215 Sherman Ave. Oct 3rd, 7:30am-?GARAGE SALEText FL32511 to 56654 Callaway: 626 Tate Dr Fri & Sat Oct 2nd &3rd, 8am -1pmYard SaleLots of good stuff. Cook Bayou Marina :11722 Bay Vista Road, Route 22 to 2297 Sat 8-2pmCommunity Yard SaleGrills, smokers, crock pots, fishing pools/reels, boat supplies. For info 874-8300 Text FL32554 to 56654 COVE: 523 Bunkers Cove Road. Friday and Saturday, 7am til 1pmAt Chet’s Place “FINALLY!”Fishing Tackle, Tools & Stuff You Really Need!! Will Trade, Talk, & Sell! Bring your guns, knives and ammo. I have what you can’t live without. —-WE TRADE—Forest Park 3306 FLA Ave. Between Baldwin Rd. and Hwy 390. 7am-1pmTODAY!!Bakers rack, gas grill, George Foreman grills, ladies clothes (14&16), shoes (6&7), purses, dishes, lots & lots of stuff. Text FL32589 to 56654 Forest Park: 1113 Lindenwood Dr, Fri/Sat, 2nd & 3rd 8am -5pmHuge SaleVintage/antique items, collectibles, Pyrex, carnival glass, tins, dolls, kit/hh, holiday, home, floral decor, linens, toys, legos, MORE! CASH ONLYText FL32677 to 56654 Callaway929 S. Tyndall Pkwy Boat Race Road and Tyndall Pkwy Saturday Only 8AM -12PMGOOD SHEPHERD LUTHERAN Share Ministry THRIFT SHOPOPENCLOTHING SALE!! Pictures, Desks, Baby clothes, Kid’s Toys, Hospital Bed, Tables, TVs, China cabinet, Chest of drawers, Lamps, Bed Covers, Office Table, gas range, dishwasher, gas dryer and electric dryer and over the stove microwave. Free BOOKS! Exercise Equipment Fresh Produce on-siteText FL24088 to 56654 Callaway: 602 S Tyndall Parkway, S. of Hickory, across from First Presbyterian Church. Saturday, October 3, 7AM -2PMFUNDRAISER/ YARD SALESupport our local LMT, Deborah Toole; recently diagnosed with liver failure. Lots of furniture, TV’s, baby items & miscellaneous. Hot dogs & bake sale. All proceeds go directly to help with medical expenses. Text FL32341 to 56654 Callaway; 504 Tracey Dr. (Off Old Bicycle)Sat. 10/3, 8am -2pmYard SaleFurniture, sports collectibles, home decor knick knacks, framed pictures, rugs & more Beach East End: 300 Clara Ave Sat 10/03/15 8 a.m -12 p.mChrist Our Savior Lutheran Helping Hands Thrift StoreNew Items In All Rooms! Clothing Room: Shoe Sale . Purses, jewelry, shoes & pillows! Kitchen Room: Picture Sale.Dishes, Glassware, Small Appliances, Framed Pictures & CDs Room 3: Books, lamps, Kitchen & Bedroom linens, puzzles, Dining table w/2 chairs, 4 padded dining chairs. Come Browse! Text FL26330 to 56654 Beach West End 217 Summer Breeze Rd (8 am) Oct 2nd & 3rd & (8 am)Oct 9th & 10thMoving SaleEverything Must Go (Golf cart included) Beach West End : 17104 Inca Ave. Sat Oct 3rd, 7am-?MULTI FAMILY & ESTATEWide variety of household items and exercise equipment. Text FL32636 to 56654 Callaway 808 N. Fox Ave. Off Wewa Hwy 22, 1/2 mi behind elem. school. Oct 2nd & 3rd, Fri & Sat., 7am-2pmIn House & Yard SaleKitchen appliances, Victorian style China set & couch, Corelle dish set, Corningware, plastic ware sets, a special Christmas room, nice women tops (2xl&3xl), Etc. Text FL32479 to 56654 Bayou George: 6814 Adams Rd HWY 2301 1 mile off 231 -corner of Adams Rd & Addison Rd. Friday 10/2, 7am-4pm Sat 10/3, 7am-4pmHuge Multi Family Garage & Yard SaleTools, electronics, lawn mowers, sm engine, clothing -men, women & children, toys, cookbooks, plus lots more! Text FL04578 to 56654 Bayou George : Littleton Rd. Oct 2nd & 3rd, 8am-2pm.HUGE SALERefrigerator, jewelry case, knives, horse tack, fishing items, DVD’s, glassware, tools. Way too much to list! Text FL32564 to 56654 Beach East End 2511 Thomas Dr. Saturday 7am-NoonMuti Family Yard Sale Beach East End Gibbs Village 6200 N Lagoon Dr. Friday, Saturday & Sunday 8am-?Community Yard SaleAbig variety of items available. Beach East End : 116 Rusty Gans Drive. Off of North Lagoon Drive October 3rd, 8amMulti Family Yard SaleFurniture and household items. Text FL32227 to 56654 SELL ALL YOUR ITEMS through classified.CALL 747-5020 Turn to classified! You can bank on our bargains!

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CLASSIFIEDSFriday, October 2, 2015 | The News Herald | Page C11 Waterfront HomeOne of a kind! Custom built home in Kings Point. This 5600 sq. ft. home has so much to offer. If you’re looking for top quality construction this is a must see. There are just too many great features to list. MLS #610858 Kim Carroll, Coldwell Banker Carroll Realty 850-819-8104 OPEN HOUSE 3005 Fairmont Dr., PC, FL 32405 Saturday, October 3rd, 2015 10:00am-2:00pm Property Management Lynn Keller 850-248-0048 or 850-819-1815 Hammocks3br/2.5ba Town home w/ bonus rm, screened in back patio, 1575 sqft, $164,500. Call 850-814-6131 Text FL32698 to 56654 Small Lot of land with all utilities. Call 229-560-0791 txt FL32559 to 56654 Price Reduced for Quick Sale3 Bed/2 Bath mobile home in Bayou George area on a good sized lot. $29,999. Motivated seller. 850.249.0526. 1145812 1145811 1145813 1145814 Automotive Today 1116606 FINDNEWANDUSEDCARSYOULIKEPartneredwith 2009 Infiniti G37, NAV, LTHR, low miles, new tires, sunroof, exceptionally clean offer, value priced at $16,995, call Jack 850-307-3476 2011 BMW 328i, NAV, sunroof, soft leather interior, only 55K miles, exceptional cond., value priced at $18,995, call Jack 850-307-3476 2011 Buick regal CXL, gorgeous 1 owner, LTHR interior, 30K miles, certified warranty, value priced at $16,995, call Jack 850-307-3476 2012 Cadillac CTS, AWD, 1 owner, 35K miles, new tires, factory warranty, exceptional cond., value priced at $22,995, call Jack 850-307-3476 2013 Buick Lacrosse CXL, like new 1 owner, only 11K miles, soft leather interior, certified warranty, value priced at $23,995, call Jack 850-307-3476 2013 KIA Soul, 1 owner, only 14K miles, exceptional cond., super fuel economy, value priced at $12,995, call Jack 850-307-3476 Buick Verano, ‘14, Certified, leather, like new, #277, $19,991! Bill Cramer GM, Panama City 850-250-5981. Buick Park Avenue 2001 ,same owner est Dec ‘01, white w/ grey leather, always garaged, 87,464mi, $5900. 850-872-3991 Text FL32054 to 56654 Chevy Aveo, 2009, only 78k miles, clean! Local trade! Only $6995! Call Todd 252-3234 @ Bay Cars Chevy Camaro LT, 2014, only 11k miles, local trade, Still in the wrapper! Only $25,998! Call Todd 252-3234 @ Bay Cars Chevy Cobalt LT, 2008, blue cloth, auto, rear spoiler, alloys, 2dr coupe, Great MPG! $5488 Gary Fox 338-5257 @ Bay Cars Chevy Cruze LT, 2014, Ecotech, white or grey, 17-18k miles, Call Doug Dennis 850-527-3546 @ Bay Cars Chevy Impala, ‘04, auto, low miles, must see, #284, $6,991! Bill Cramer GM, Panama City 850-250-5981. Chevy Spark LT, ‘15, Certified, auto, like new, #274, $13,991! Bill Cramer GM, Panama City 850-250-5981. Chrysler 300, 2011-2014, V6 and Hemi’s! Many colors to choose from! Low miles! Call Doug Dennis 850-527-3546 @ Bay Cars Chrysler 300C, 2005, local trade, Hemi V8, sunroof, nav, lthr, all pwr, chrome wheels, Beautiful car! Hurry, $9988! Gary Fox 338-5257 @ Bay Cars Chrysler PT Cruiser, ‘02, only 81k miles, must see, #271, $4,991! Bill Cramer GM, Panama City 850-250-5981. Dodge Avenger, ‘14, auto, power options, #531, $13,995! Bill Cramer GM, Panama City 850-250-5981. Dodge Charger R/T, 2011, orange, only 42k miles, Excellent condition! Trades welcome! Call Victor 850-348-1038 @ Bay Cars For Cars, Trucks, SUVs, & Vans, Call Gary Fox @ Bay Mitsubishi 338-5257! Home of the $9888 OR LESS! Too many to put in the ads! Vehicles come in everyday and I’m HERE FOR YOU! Gary Fox 338-5257 @ Bay Cars Ford Focus SE, 2014, auto, all pwr, Only 14k miles! Under warranty! Great on Gas! Only $13,888! Gary Fox 338-5257 @ Bay Cars Ford Focus SES, 2010, local trade, blk/blk, auto, all pwr, rear spoiler, alloys, Nice car! $6488 Gary Fox 338-5257 @ Bay Cars Ford Fusion, 2014, several to choose from! Call Doug Dennis 850-527-3546 @ Bay Cars Honda Civic LX, 2009,4dr, local trade, non-smoker, auto, all pwr, CD, Only 55k miles! Hurry, won’t last! $10,998 Gary Fox 338-5257 @ Bay Cars Jaguar S-Type ‘02Low mileage, extra clean, Leather, Moonroof, Will sacrifice at $3,900 obo. Call (850) 240-2762 Text FL32023 to 56654 Kia Forte, 2010, only 71k miles, 4dr, Good Gas Saver! Must go! Call Victor 850-348-1038 @ Bay Cars Kia Soul Wagon 2013, 6spd, standard shift transmission, AC, AM/FM/CD, pwr w/l, bluetooth, only 7,160mi, NADA value $13,400, Sale price $9,995. 850-265-3535. Bay Auto Outlet Lincoln MKS, 2011, local trade, pearl white, ivory lthr, all pwr, ALL THE OPTIONS! Beautiful car! Hurry! $14,888 Gary Fox 338-5257 @ Bay Cars Lincoln Town Car, 2003, sunroof, lthr, all pwr, auto, Nice! Only $5888! Gary Fox 338-5257 @ Bay Cars Mazda CX-9 Grand Touring, ‘12, leather, 24k miles, #674, $27,991! Bill Cramer GM, Panama City 850-250-5981. Mazda Miata MX5 Convertible, 2003, local trade, silver, cloth int, auto, cold air, CD, alloys, Beautiful Car! $5988 Gary Fox 338-5257 @ Bay Cars Mercedes SL500, 2004, Only 78k miles! Beautiful! Must see! Only $14,998! Call Todd 252-3234 @ Bay Cars Mini Cooper Countryman, 2014, 36k miles, 4dr, roof rack, Excellent running and looking condition! Call Victor 850-348-1038 @ Bay Cars New 2015 Mitsubishi Mirage-5dr hatchback, auto, all pwr, CD, smart key, push button start, 100,000 miles warranty & 44MPG! Several to choose from! $13,888 Gary Fox 338-5257 @ Bay Cars Nissan Sentra, 2013, silver, 55k miles, Only $10,998! Call Peter 850-586-4640 @ Bay Cars Nissan Versa, 2013, only 55k miles, Great car! 40MPG! Only $9988! Call Todd 252-3234 @ Bay Cars Pontiac Montana SV6, 2006, local trade, silver, grey cloth, 4 quad seating, rear bench seat, rear ent, pwr sliding doors, alloys, only 90k miles! $5988 Gary Fox 338-5257 @ Bay Cars Pontiac Vibe GT 2003, same as Toyota Matrix, 4dr hatchback, 4cyl, 6spd stick shift, AM/FM/CD, pwr w/l, cruise, alloy wheels, clean carfax, extra clean, $3995. Call 850-265-3535. Bay Auto Outlet SE HABLA ESPANOLPASAPORTE OK NO CREDITO OK TROCAS/CARROS/SU V $300 ALMES EJEMPLOS: 02 Monte Carlo 02 Chevy Blazer 01 Ford F150 02 Dodge Ram PLUS 75 MORE DAYLIGHTAUTO FINANCING 2816 WESTHWY 98 PANAMACITY, FLORIDA32401 9 AM TO 9 PM 850-215-1769 Toyota Corolla, 2005, only 37k miles, lthr, sunroof, Excellent condition! $8,000 Call Peter 850-586-4640 @ Bay Cars Toyota Solara Convertible, ‘08, leather, power seats, 6CD, $14,991! Bill Cramer GM, Panama City 850-250-5981. Toyota’s, Nissan’s, & Hyundai’s! Great prices! Great Gas Savers! Call Doug Dennis 850-527-3546 @ Bay Cars Volkswagen Golf TDI, ‘12, auto, power options, spoiler, #035, $17,990! Bill Cramer GM, Panama City 850-250-5981. Volkswagen Jetta, 2009, 2.5L, silver, 85k miles, Only $8998! Call Peter 850-586-4640 @ Bay Cars *Affordable* Auto GlassLifetime Warranty affordable glass.com 747-4527 $595 Down02 Ford Escape 3-row’s. 0% interest. $5,900 9a-9p. Daylight Auto Fin. 850-215-1769 DLR $695 Down03 Dodge Durango 3-row’s. 0% interest. $5,500 9a-9p. Daylight Auto Fin. 850-215-1769 DLR $795 Down02 Chevy Silverado x/cab. 0% interest. $8,500 9a-9p. Daylight Auto Fin. 850-215-1769 DLR 2013 Cadillac SRX, gorgeous 1 owner well maintained, 19K miles, NAV, Warranty, value priced at $32,995, call Jack 850-307-3476 2008 Honda CRV EX, has NAV, LTHR seating, sunroof, 58K miles, new brakes, immaculate cond., value priced at $14,995, call Jack 850-307-3476 2008 Nissan Pathfinder, V6, auto, exceptionally clean local trade, good records, value priced at $12,995, call Jack 850-307-3476 2011 Cadillac SRX, 60K miles, NAV, LTHR interior, fantastic cond., powertrain warranty, value priced at $22,995, call Jack 850-307-3476 2011 GMC Acadia SLT, 1 owner, only 13K miles, NAV, leather interior, certified warranty, value priced at $27,995, call Jack 850-307-3476 BMW X3 35i, ‘11, AWD, leather, loaded, #027, $23,990! Bill Cramer GM, Panama City850-250-5981. Buick Enclave, ‘11, Certified, leather, loaded, #263, $28,992! Bill Cramer GM, Panama City 850-250-5981. Cadillac SRX, ‘11, leather, loaded, #800, $26,991! Bill Cramer GM, Panama City 850-250-5981. Chevy Equinox 2LT, ‘09, auto, V6, 53k miles, #284, $6,991! Bill Cramer GM, Panama City 850-250-5981. Dodge Journey, 2012, grey, 38k miles, Only $15,998! Call Peter 850-586-4640 @ Bay Cars Ford Expedition, 2011-2015, many colors, 6 to choose from! Nice! Call Doug Dennis 850-527-3546 @ Bay Cars Ford Explorer, 2011-2015, Loaded! Many colors to choose from! Call Doug Dennis 850-527-3546 @ Bay Cars GMC Acadia SLT, ‘14, leather, auto, V6, 2 to choose, $33,493! Bill Cramer GM, Panama City 850-250-5981. Hummer H2 SUT, 2005, Great condition! Looks & runs great! Only $18,998! Call Todd 252-3234 @ Bay Cars Hyundai Santa Fe, 2009, local trade, silver, auto, all pwr, alloys, CD, Nice SUV! Hurry, $7888! Gary Fox 338-5257 @ Bay Cars Jeep Patriot Sport, ‘14, power options, just arrived, #282, $16,991! Bill Cramer GM, Panama City 850-250-5981. Jeep Patriot, 2010, local trade, silver, grey cloth, auto, cold air, CD, only 80k miles, Nice SUV! $11,888 Gary Fox 338-5257 @ Bay Cars Jeep Wrangler Unlimited, 2013, 26k miles, Great condition!! Won’t last! Only $31,998! Call Todd 252-3234 @ Bay Cars Kia Sportage LX, ‘08, low miles, must go, #279, $8,991! Bill Cramer GM, Panama City 850-250-5981. Mazda CX-9 Grand Touring, ‘12, leather, 24k miles, #674, $27,991! Bill Cramer GM, Panama City 850-250-5981. Mitsubishi Outlander Sport, 2014, silver, 1 owner, black int, auto, CD, alloys, only 10k miles! Under warranty! Beautiful SUV! $17,888 Gary Fox 338-5257 @ Bay Cars Toyota 4 Runner 2014 SR51 owner, new cond., 14,100mi, $29,500. 850-628-2751 Text FL30241 to 56654 2014 Chevy Silverado 3500 HD Dually, Crew Cab, 4x4, LTHR, 1 owner, 11K miles, warranty, save thousands at $45,995, call Jack 850-307-3476 Chevy Silverado 2500HD Ext. Cab, ‘03, V8, nice truck, #096, $9,991. Bill Cramer GM, Panama City 850-250-5981. Chevy Silverado Crew Cab LS, ‘06, 4WD, auto, V8, #756, $16,991! Bill Cramer GM, Panama City 850-250-5981 Chevy Silverado Crew Cab LS, ‘13, Certified, auto, V8, power options, #196, $27,995! Bill Cramer GM, Panama City 850-250-5981. Chevy Silverado, 2013, Great truck! Won’t last! Only $15,998! Call Todd 252-3234 @ Bay Cars Chevy Silverado, 2013, reg cab, only 16k miles! Call Peter 850-586-4640 @ Bay Cars Ford F150 Platinum, 2011, 31k miles, V6, maroon, auto, running boards, nav, htd/cld seats, and more! Call Victor 850-348-1038 @ Bay Cars Honda Ridgeline, 2014, only 8k miles, Like new! Excellent condition! Trades welcome! Call Victor 850-348-1038 @ Bay Cars Nissan Titan Crew Cab XE, ‘10, auto, V8, must see, #268, $22,992! Bill Cramer GM, Panama City 850-250-5981. Ram 1500, 2007, quad cab, V6, 88k miles, Call Peter 850-586-4640 @ Bay Cars Ram 1500, 2008, quad cab, 4.7L, black, Only $14,998! Call Peter 850-586-4640 @ Bay Cars Toyota Tacoma, 2013, king cab, only 28k miles, Excellent condition! Must go! Call Victor 850-348-1038 @ Bay Cars Toyota Tundra CrewMax, ‘14, 4WD, leather, loaded, #127, $43,991! Bill Cramer GM, Panama City 850-250-5981. Chrysler Town & Country Limited, ‘10, lth, stow-n-go, dvd, #124, $16,991! Bill Cramer GM, Panama City 850-250-5981. Chrysler Town & Country, 2009, stow-n-go, DVD, LOADED! Won’t last at $11,988! Call Todd 252-3234 @ Bay Cars Chrysler Town & Country, 2014-2015, many colors, all low miles, 9 to choose from! Call Doug Dennis 850-527-3546 @ Bay Cars Dodge Grand Caravan, 2010, only 76k miles, $13,998 Call Peter 850-586-4640 @ Bay Cars Dodge Grand Caravan, 2015, Call Doug Dennis 850-527-3546 @ Bay Cars Hunter Cherubini 25ft 1974 SailboatClean sturdy boat, perfectly good sails, Honda 9.9 4-stroke motor, with low hours, $3800. Located at the Downtown Marina. Call Mindy 850-387-5220 Text FL31947 to 56654 Damon Daybreak 32ft Class A RV, 2006 New tires, new antenna, new flat screen & sun visor. $40,000 OBO Serious Buyers ONLY.850-319-7737 Text FL32342 to 56654 06-39L Discovery Diesel Pusher. 4 slides, outside kitchen and entertainment center. $70,000. 850-624-1308 If you didn’t advertise here, you’re missing out on potential customers.

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CLASSIFIEDSPage C12 | The News Herald | Friday, October 2, 2015 1138714

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Issue No. 32 • October 2, 2015 CONCERT ENTERTA IN ER BIG BAD VOODOO DADDY Contemporary swing revival band kicks off Bay Arts series | 8 New Centre for the Arts hosts first concert | 2 6 spots for Sushi Rolls | 10-11 Chili Vibrations World Music Festival | 19 ‘Walk into the Wild’ at St. Andrews State Park | 23

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INSIDE CONTENT JAN WADDY 850-747-5072 JWADDY@PCNH.COM CONTENT TONY SIMMONS 850-747-5080 TSIMMONS@PCNH.COM DESIGN KRISTY L. OWENS 850-747-5087 KOWENS@PCNH.COM ABOUT US 2 • The ENTERTAINER Friday, October 2, 2015 PEOPLE Undercurrents ..................................... 4 Seen-On-Scene ..................................... 6 What’s Not To Love ................................... 16 Community Spotlight ................................... 18 GO & DO Calendar of Events ............................. 33-37 Walk in the Park ............................. 23-24 Life on the Gay List ................................... 28 Movietown Reviews ................................... 32 FOOD & DRINK Meet the Mixologist ................................... 14 Side Dish with Jan ............................. 12-13 Chef’s Palate ..................................... 9 ARTS & ACTS Big Bad Voodoo Daddy ..................................... 8 Nightlife ................................... 22 BEACH INSIDER Chili Vibrations ................................... 19 By TONY SIMMONS 747-5080 | @PCNHTonyS tsimmons@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY — The new Panama City Centre for the Arts is wasting no time establishing itself as a venue different from its predecessor by hosting a concert next week. “We want to bring as many people into the Centre for the Arts as we can,” said Bay Arts Alliance Executive Director Jennifer Jones. “This concert not only allows us to present an exceptional artist but it will introduce that audience to a venue they may not have previously explored.” Bay Arts Alliance, which now manages the building formerly known as the Visual Arts Center of Northwest Florida, will host singer/ songwriter Keith Sewell in concert for one night only, Oct. 9. The independent recording artist has made a career of music for more than 25 years and is currently lead guitarist/mandolin player for Lyle Lovett. He is music director for The Dixie Chicks, and has also toured with Ricky Skaggs, Sam Bush, Jerry Douglas, Earl Scruggs and many more. “The concert is the rst performance offering under the management of Bay Arts Alliance to have all of the arts in this extremely versatile venue,” Jones said. “The main gallery offers a capacity similar to that of the Backstage Pass series and allows us to take advantage of these rare opportunities when they present themselves. ... We want to leverage every opportunity to make Panama City and Bay County an Arts (with a big ‘A’) community.” Doors will open for the show at 6 p.m. Oct. 9, and the concert — Sewell’s rst in Panama City — will begin at 7 p.m. General seating admission is $20 each, and the space is limited to 200 guests. Proceeds will bene t Bay Arts Alliance’s Arts in Education programming. Tickets went on sale Sept. 29, and may be purchased in advance by calling 850-6403670 or visiting the Centre for the Arts, 19 E. Fourth St., Panama City. “We’re really excited because it’s our rst in-house concert and will provide people a sneak preview of the new center even before our of cial grand opening on Oct. 16,” said Lindsey BaileyKafonek, the Exhibit and Education coordinator for the Centre. Raised in the small Texas town of Duncanville, Sewell says he was “born with bluegrass in his blood.” His grandfather, Kenny Sewell, was a ddler with the celebrated Shady Grove Ramblers. The edgling Keith followed in his granddaddy’s footsteps, taking up the ddle at the tender age of 3 and traveling to bluegrass festivals far and wide to compete. He soon expanded his talents to include the vestring banjo, mandolin and then the guitar, which he considers his primary instrument. Sewell moved to Nashville shortly after high school and began a quest that has produced for him a succession of careers as an artist/songwriter, musical director and sideman. It was Ricky Skaggs who gave Sewell his start with his country band when Keith was just 19 years old. He played in Kentucky Thunder for 7 years, and toured with the Dixie Chicks on their last two world tours (2003 and 2006). Skaggs has recorded six of Keith’s songs, including his 1991 Top 20 hit “From the Word Love” for the album “My Father’s Son.” His songs also have been recorded by a number of eclectic artists ranging from Montgomery Gentry and Steve Wariner to Sonja Isaacs and BR-549. New Centre for the Arts hosts first house concert KEITH SEWELL IN CONCERT When: 7 p.m. (doors open at 6 p.m.) | Where: Panama City Centre for the Arts, 19 E. Fourth St., Panama City Cost: $20, limited to the first 200 guests | Details and Tickets: call 850-640-3670, or visit the Centre ARTS & ACTS ARTIST’S ARTIST’S ARTIST’S ARTIST’S tuc

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Friday, October 2, 2015 The ENTERTAINER • 3 Local Of ce

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Friday, October 2, 2015 4 • The ENTERTAINER PEOPLE PANAMA CITY BEACH — I set up three lawn chairs in front of our house Sunday night and positioned them to face the glowing blotch oating overhead, where the full moon’s glow struggled to pierce the cloud cover. We hoped to glimpse the supermoon and the “blood moon” effect of the total lunar eclipse. Clouds moving in opposing directions, depending on their altitude, worked to obscure our view — a condition made all the more frustrating by the open gaps showing black space and sparkling stars at the wrong angle from our position below to allow a view of the moon. Occasionally, a piece of moon would peek from behind a passing veil of vapor, but only for a moment. Blue light ickered through the neighbor’s blinds and dogs yapped from somewhere beyond the surrounding trees. I listened for coyote howls, but heard none. Strangely, I offered no howls of my own, and never once wondered about werewolves; I’d almost think I must be growing up, if I didn’t know better. I did, however, think about the silly warnings I’d seen posted on Facebook about the “Blood Moon!” event, as well as the exhortations from various world religious leaders not to panic. Apparently, some people actually thought a full moon/eclipse augured the end of the world; I would have thought that kind of superstition had died out long ago. But then I see the sort of things that become viral on Facebook — please stop sharing that blasted privacy notice thing! — or that become points of contention between otherwise “enlightened” and educated persons, and can’t help but accept that we, as a species, will believe almost anything. I mean, there are some things “I want to believe,” as Special Agent Fox Mulder’s of ce poster used to declare. But I don’t want to be stupid about it. Apropos of Mulder, my son tossed in the metaphorical towel early on, returning indoors to continue his binge-watching of “The X-Files” on Net ix as he anticipates the revival of the series early next year. I suspect he’s genetically predisposed to enjoy that kind of thing, and I know which of his parents is to blame. Meanwhile, cloud-watching and eclipse-waiting, it seems, is an old-person’s game. My wife and I persisted in our quest for another half-hour or so, as she experimented with different settings on her camera and I experimented with magical cloudbursting spells. Surely, just the right gesture and exhortation — “Expelliarmus!” perhaps, or “Rain, rain, go away!” — would pierce the veil in time to see the moon blush in humiliation over all this misdirected attention. The wife was less amused by my silliness than I was, I suspect, but more patient than she might have been in earlier years. A lunar halo effect, perhaps, though it may be that she allowed me some leeway because our pearl anniversary was the next day and a dozen roses had mysteriously materialized on the dining table earlier in the afternoon. But try as I might, I failed to dissolve the cloud cover with either magic or telekinesis. Whether that’s a testimony to the strength of the tropical weather pattern or an indictment of the weakness of frequency or amplitude in my brainwaves — you can decide. Peace . Forecast for a Blood Moon: Cloudy with a chance of snark Undercurrents TONY SIMMONS Co me in to se e, sme ll an d ta st e ou r lo ca ll y ro as te d Am av id a co ee an d fr es h ba ke d go od ne ss . Sa ve 20% o yo ur to ta l pu rc ha se of $10 or mor e w he n yo u br in g th is ad in to th e Pa na ma Ci ty Ma ll wi th yo u! Coffee, Community & Homemade Goodness (850) 81 8 0044 face boo k/t he wo ma nt ob la me 76 1 co upo n of fe r pe r vi si t MI LA N JE WE LE RS Si nc e 19 95 Gam ma Au to ma tic So li d fo rg ed TI 99 0 FT 99 0f t De pt h Te st ed Ne ve r Da rk Il lu mi na tio n 850 -9 14 -2 26 6 /3 19 -4 23 1 RE AC TO R WA TC H 85 091 4226 6 / 31 942 31 Back or Sciatic Pain? Ha ve yo u be en su ff er in g wi th ba ck or sc ia ti c pai n th at in te rf er es wi th th e si mp le th in gs like ca ri ng for yo ur ki ds or gr an d ki ds , pla yi ng go lf , do in g ya rd wo rk or ev en si tt in g, st an di ng or sl ee pi ng ? Ar e yo u t ir ed of ta ki ng me di ca ti on or ar e yo u con sid er in g su rg er y? I ha ve he lp ed th ous an ds of pa ti en ts JUST LI KE YO U end th ei r pai n an d su ff er in g. Ca ll no w fo r a FR EE co nsu lt ati on to se e if on e of ou r ca re pla ns ca n he lp yo u. Ca ll Dr . Jo n She rm an , D. C. fo r a FR EE CO NS UL TAT IO N to ge t th e an sw er s an d th e re su lt s yo u ha ve been wai ti ng for . Don 't suff er an y lo ng er ! Ca ll no w an d en d th e di sc om fo rt ! 249 -9 35 5

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Friday, October 2, 2015 The ENTERTAINER • 5

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Friday, October 2, 2015 6 • The ENTERTAINER PEOPLE SHARE YOUR PHOTOS Send us your pictures of places you’ve enjoyed in the area, events you’ve attended, parties you’ve crashed — and we’ll share them with the rest of the world. You can email photos to tsimmons@pcnh.com or post them to our Facebook page at Facebook.com/PanamaCityBeachGuide. Let us know about the fun you’re having — don’t keep all the good times to yourself! On the Web: Visit NewsHerald.com to see more photos from events, beach scenes and more. SEEN-ON-SCENE F un at the Circus

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Friday, October 2, 2015 The ENTERTAINER • 7

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Friday, October 2, 2015 8 • The ENTERTAINER Friday, October 2, 2015 ARTS & ACTS By TONY SIMMONS 747-5080 | @PCNHTonyS tsimmons@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY — The Bay Arts Alliance 2015-16 Presenting Arts Series kicks off Thursday with Big Bad Voodoo Daddy performing live at the Marina Civic Center. The band was formed in Ventura, Calif., in 1989 by Scotty Morris, and named after an autograph Morris received from Texas blues guitar legend Albert Collins at one of Collins’ concerts. “He signed my poster, ‘To Scotty, the big bad voodoo daddy,’” Morris explained. “I thought it was the greatest name I had ever heard on one of the greatest musical nights of my life. So when it came time to name this band, I didn’t really have a choice. I felt like it was handed down to me.” Other members of the band include Kurt Sodergren, Dirk Shumaker, Andy Rowley, Glen “The Kid” Marhevka, Karl Hunter, Joshua Levy, Anthony Bonsera Jr., and Alex Henderson. Together for more than two decades, the contemporary swing revival band has appeared in concert venues across the world, sold millions of records, and had their music appear in hundreds of movies and television shows. Big Bad Voodoo Daddy has achieved sold out concerts from the Hollywood Bowl to Lincoln Center, appearances with many of the country’s nest symphony orchestras, and television appearances ranging from “Dancing with the Stars” to Superbowl XXXIII. The show begins at 7:30 p.m. Thursday. Tickets are on sale now, ranging from $25-$45 each, and are available via MarinaCivicCenter. com, at the box ofce at 8 Harrison Ave. in Panama City, or by calling 850-763-4696. Tickets for the multi-show series are still available, starting at $190. The remaining shows in the series include: • “ Letters Home ,” 7:30 p.m. Nov. 10, a theatrical production that puts the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq frontand-center by bringing actual letters written by soldiers in the Middle East to life. The Grifn Theatre Co. national touring production will feature actor Christian Kain Blackburne performing a letter written by U.S. Marine Lance Corporal Matthew Webster. The play is inspired by the New York Times article, “The Things They Wrote,” and the HBO documentary “Last Letters Home.” Individual show tickets are $20-$25. • “ The Producers ,” 8 p.m. Jan. 2, 2016, is the Mel Brooks classic musical about a mousy accountant and a scheming Broadway producer. Individual show prices not yet announced. • “ 42nd Street ,” 7:30 p.m. Jan. 18, is the quintessential backstage musical comedy, featuring some of the greatest songs ever written, such as “We’re in the Money,” “Lullaby of Broadway,” and “I Only Have Eyes for You,” as well as the title song. • Yanni in Concert , 8 p.m. Feb. 19, brings the internationally loved instrumental performer to the local stage. Fans will witness Yanni and a backing group of world-class musicians performing his greatest hits and best-loved melodies. Ticket prices (not yet on sale) will range from $65 to $110. • “ Million Dollar Quartet ,” 7:30 p.m. March 28, is a Tony-award winning Broadway musical inspired by a legendary jam session. On Dec. 4, 1956, four rock ’n’ roll icons — Elvis Presley, Johnny Cash, Jerry Lee Lewis and Carl Perkins — gathered at Sun Records in Memphis. This production dramatizes that meeting and features many of their most famous songs. Bay Arts Alliance, which manages the Marina Civic Center as well as the Panama City Centre for the Arts, has as its mission providing opportunities for cultural enrichment in the community through broadbased educational experiences and quality performances. For more information, visit BayArts.org. Big Bad Voodoo Daddy kicks off Bay Arts series BIG BAD VOODOO DADDY What: Contemporary swing revival band out of California | When: 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 8 | Where: Marina Civic Center, 8 Harrison Ave., Panama City Cost: $25-$45 each; series tickets also on sale | Details and Tickets: MarinaCivicCenter.com, at the box office, or call 850-763-4696 YANNI BIG B AD V OODOO DADDY

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Friday, October 2, 2015 The ENTERTAINER • 9 Chef’s Palate Want to participate? Readers can nominate a local chef, or chefs can participate with their own answers by contacting Jan Waddy at 850-747-5072 or Jwaddy@pcnh.com. FOOD & DRINK Michael Chang Restaurant: Sake House II, 1012 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach Age: 63 Hometown: Chang was born in Taipei, Taiwan, but he has been in the U.S. for 36 years, 14 in Panama City. Culinary School: Chang was taught in Ft. Lauderdale by master sushi chefs from Japan. After a long workday, what do you eat? “Me and my wife usually cook and eat in the restaurant, but maybe at home have some Cabernet with chocolate to give us a treat, relax.” What’s your guilty (food) pleasure? “I eat everything healthfully, lean. Maybe I drink a cup of soda a week or bottle of beer a day, but want to make my body healthy so make sure balance is right.” What’s your favorite avor combination? “ Raw sh and nigiri, yellow n tuna sashimi over sticky sushi rice, and cold sake — milky sake, but not too much.” Besides your restaurant, where do you go out to eat? “We don’t go to many. My wife and I eat at home, but sometimes with a friend for a cocktail, maybe at Firey.” What are your pet peeves in the kitchen? “People come in during busy hour and (there’s) not time to check inventory. I like to keep an eye on the kitchen at all times, but nothing really bothers me.” If you could choose, what would be your last meal? “ Easy — like a rice cooked in water, our breakfast, with pan fried scallion and eggs and Japanese pickle.” He explained the dish is not a soup, but just “watery rice.” The Japanese pickle is a cucumber marinated with yellow Japanese radish and other ingredients for a different avor — “old fashioned style.” The recipe is just one of many that have been passed down in his family. “During World War II, when Japanese took over our country, my mother worked as a housekeeper (for a Japanese family),” said Chang, who added his father was a carpenter. JAN WADDY | The News Herald

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Friday, October 2, 2015 10 • The ENTERTAINER FOOD & DRINK COMPILED BY JAN WADDY AND JENN SCHAEFER | PHOTOS C ONTRIBUTED AND BY JAN WADDY AND JENN SCHAEFER We are eating our way through town, so you can go and savor the area’s top bites. The Entertainer publishes semi-regular lists of restaurant eats in a variety of categories. If you don’t see your go-to food, your fave already could be in the works. Check out our favorite burgers on Nov. 6. Share food indulgences with Jan, jwaddy@pcnh.com, or Jenn, jschaefer@pcnh.com. 6 SP OTS FO R SUSHI ROLLS SLAMMIN’ S ALMON C RAB AND TUNA TO W ER: $12, SLAMMIN’ S ALMON: $14 FI R EFLY, 535 N. R . Jackson Blvd., P anama City Beach The crab and tuna tower has fresh ahi tuna, jumbo lump crab meat, cucumber, avocado and mango; $12. “Slammin’ Salmon is Atlantic salmon, krab, applewood smoked bacon, avocado topped with strawberries, green apple and red onion; $14. Firey won rst for sushi in The News Herald’s 2015 Best of Bay R eaders’ Choice Awards. CRAB AND TUNA TOWER

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Friday, October 2, 2015 The ENTERTAINER • 11 FOOD & DRINK DIRTY OLD MAN ROLL, $17.95 OSAKA, 15533 Panama City Beach Parkway, Panama City Beach The Dirty Old Man roll is a California roll topped with a spicy mixture of raw chunks of tuna, salmon, yellowtail and krabstick and scallions. The Unagi roll (barbecue eel and avocado) and the Dancing Shrimp roll (shrimp tempura, spicy tuna, dynamite, krabmeat salad, cream cheese and asparagus, rolled inside out with sesame seeds then battered and fried) are served with eel sauce and spicy mayo. SU S H I BU RRITO , $13.95 WH OL E; F R E NCH ROLL , $8.95; A NGE L R OLL , $14.95 SAKE HOUSE II, 1012 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach Sushi Chef/owner Michael Chang specializes in traditional sushi, but also puts his spin on fusion cuisine with popular specials, such as the Sushi Burrito: Shrimp tempura, spicy tuna, spicy Krab meat, asparagus and jalapeno in a pink soy wrapper with four kinds of special sauce, $13.95 for whole or $9.95 for half. The French Roll is smoked salmon, cream cheese, Japanese pickle, avocado and tempura ake rolled in a crepe with spicy mayo and eel sauce; $8.95. The Angel Roll is cream cheese, asparagus and shrimp tempura topped with a slice of tuna and spicy krab under a bed of tempura ake; $14.95.THE S WEET HE ART ROLL: $11.95 SHAN KISHI, 13800 Panama City Beach Parkway, Panama City Beach The Sweet Heart Roll, one of 15 Special Rolls, is lled with spicy tuna crunchy with fresh tuna on top; $11.95. Shan Kishi, which also has an all-you-can-eat sushi special, won second in the 2015 Best of Bay. P A C IFI C ROLL : $8.50 SAKURA, 2411 Road 77, Lynn Haven Shrimp tempura roll with spicy krab meat on top DIRTY OL D MAN ROLL SU S HI BURRITO AN D A NGEL R OLL FRENCH ROLL 2012 R OLL, $12.95; P ANAMA CITY R OLL, $11.95; CRAZY ROLL, $6.95 FIN’S JAPANESE SUSHI & GRILL, 732 W. 23rd St., Panama City 2012 Roll, $12.95 (shrimp tempura, snow crab, seaweed salad, and avocado wrapped with soy paper and topped with spicy crawsh); Panama City Roll, $11.95 (Krab meat tempura, with cream cheese and grilled covered with white tuna and mango miso sauce); and Crazy Roll, $6.95 (Shrimp tempura, avocado, cucumber, tobiko, spicy mayo)

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Friday, October 2, 2015 12 • The ENTERTAINER FOOD & DRINK PANAMA CITY BEACH — After cruising the seas and serving awardwinning dishes in Mississippi, Kay Parker Shafer is back home in Florida sharing her culinary adventures at Sisters of the Sea Grille & Grog. The Panama City native opened her latest restaurant, 9952 Hutchison Blvd., on Aug. 28 with Gene Coleman. Coleman is in the process of relocating from his hometown of Biloxi, Miss., where Shafer still owns Shady’s Global Grille near Keesler Air Force Base. Shafer is now serving her same award-winning recipes at Sisters. “I was a competition chef for a few years for the American Culinary Federation — two gold, a silver and a bronze,” said Shafer, whose Gris Gris Gumbo won Best Gumbo at the Biloxi Seafood Festival — beating out casino chefs. The spicy Gumbo Gris Gris starts with a dark roux with lled with chicken and Conecuh sausage, celery and plenty of okra — with fried shrimp on top and a scoop of rice in the middle. “I hate mushy shrimp,” Shafer said. Though it would have never occurred to me to fry the shrimp, they were a wonderful contrast of texture and added a delicious depth of avor to the dish. The Sirens’ Song, a rich broth with steamed mussels, shrimp and scallops, took the Best of Show at the Mississippi Gulf Coast-based Chefs of the Coast, and her warm Fried Strawberries with whipped cream won a media people’s choice award in Biloxi, Miss. (On Monday, one customer ordered the Southern Sweet for an entree.) “I have been cooking my whole life,” said Shafer, who grew up in the Cove neighborhood of Panama City and remembers being inspired by Better Homes & Gardens recipes. “I used to make my momma drive to Sunshine store in the Cove. I was a weird kid. I would go to someone’s house to visit and instead of looking for toys or something on the TV, I would ask, ‘Y’all got any cookbooks?’” Shafer, Bay High Class of ’79, has recruited seven other born and raised locals for the rest of her crew. “For us it’s not really work but a little family reunion every day,” said Shafer, whose brother, Tom Parker, runs the day shift at Capt.’s Table in St. Andrews. “I have been really wanting to move back home for the past few years, part of getting older and realizing material things don’t matter; it’s relationships and the beauty of the area. Apparently it takes leaving 30 years to realize that. They truly are the world’s most beautiful beaches and the people are just as beautiful inside and out.” One of the gray walls inside her mermaid-themed restaurant is lined with black and white framed photos “mostly from the ‘60s, old Florida stuff,” and colorful views of local waters. Shafer’s father, Bill Parker, was one of the original owners of Miracle Strip Amusement Park in Panama City Beach. She has renamed one of her best-sellers Sisters of the Sea making big splash Side Dish JAN WADDYPLEASE SEE SIDE DISH | 13 JAN WADDY | The News Herald Pull up a seat at the bar underneath the driftwood pendant lighting and get to know Sisters of the Sea Grill and Grog. The inside of Sisters of the Sea is lled with plenty of Panama City nostalgia from owner Kay Shafer, whose dad, the late Bill Parker, was one of the original owners of Miracle Strip Amusement Park in Panama City Beach. Above: Kay Shafer’s Upside Down Oysters Rockefeller — inspired by her love of oysters Rockefeller and the idea of Pineapple Upside Down Cake, features fried oysters as the star on a bed of creamed spinach with shaved Parmesan. Below: Save room for a sweet Southern nish with Fried Strawberries.

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Friday, October 2, 2015 The ENTERTAINER • 13 FOOD & DRINK The Starliner after the park’s original wooden rollercoaster from 1963. The po’boy is lled with tender smoked brisket, caramelized onions and smoked gouda pressed on French Bread. Grab extra napkins for dipping The Starliner in warm debris gravy made from the end cuts of the brisket, an amazing ride you won’t want to end. “We rub our special seasoning (with smoked paprika) all over the brisket and slow smoke it for 14 hours, then nish it in the oven for three hours on low. It makes it tender. ... I know seafood is the thing here but if you’re a local you can’t eat that every day,” Shafer said. A creamy side of potato salad was sprinkled with her special seasoning blend. “The potato salad is made with Yukon Gold potatoes with a little skin left on, heavy cream, garlic and real butter. It’s not that hard to make, you just have to love it,” Shafer said. The lunch menu, created with locals in mind, is served from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday. Entrees, $7.99 each, include Half Starliner and Tater Salad, Half Shrimp Po’Boy and cup of Gumbo, Sea Goddess Salad with grilled chicken, Smothered Chopped Steak with mashed potatoes and gravy, Chicken Fried Chicken with mashed potatoes and gravy, Chicken Lickin’ Sandwich with slaw, Bowl of Gumbo Gris Gris and side salad, and Chicken Pesto Pasta. “It’s just the right amount of food, all cooked fresh,” Shafer said. Though Coleman had visited Panama City Beach as a teenager, he admits the local tour is so different. “I came in high school during Spring Break, but now I am seeing it through her eyes,” he said. For those looking for a fried seafood party, Shafer included Beach Party on the menu. “We do have a big seafood platter, because so many friends come down and want that but so many times there are not a lot of choices with it. We allow people to choose shrimp, scallops, oysters, sh, crab claws. You get to invite whoever you want to the party, just two or up to four for a monster platter,” Shafer said. Her Upside Down Oysters Rockefeller was inspired by her love of oysters Rockefeller and the idea of pineapple upside down cake. She lets fried oysters take center stage on a bed of creamed spinach with shaved Parmesan. “I love oysters Rockefeller but sometimes the oysters are hidden under all that stuff,” she said. “It’s my personality to push the envelope.” Shafer also carries select local craft beers on tap and a selection of wine — ranging from $5 to $8 a glass and $18 to $30 a bottle — “To me, this is opening up my house and I want to serve you something nice.” Panama City native Kay Parker Shafer, center, opened Sisters of the Sea with Gene Coleman of Biloxi, Miss., where Shafer also has a restaurant. All seven of Shafer’s employees at Sisters, including server Evelyn Simpson, are Panama City area natives. P hoto by JAN WADDDY | The News Herald SISTERS OF THE SE A GRILLE & GROG What: Beach casual restaurant serving award-winning seafood and New American cuisine; dine-in or carry-out Where: 9952 Hutchison Blvd., Suite 200, Panama City Beach | Hours: 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Sunday through Thursday and 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Friday and Saturday Details: 850-708-1890 or Facebook.com/SistersOfTheSeaPCB for complete menu and lunch specials JAN W ADDY | The News Herald The Starliner , named after the Miracle Strip’s original wooden rollercoaster from 1963, is served with potato salad and a Florida basket of crackers. Filled with tender smoked brisket, caramelized onions and smoked gouda pressed on French Bread with debris gravy, the Starliner is an amazing ride.C ONTRIBUTED PHOTO Homemade lump crab cakes are served on a bed of angel hair pasta topped with Gulf shrimp in a lemon butter and roasted garlic sauce. SIDE DISH from Page 12 Sisters of the Sea Grille & Grog is located between the Dollar Tree and Beach Medical Express in the shopping center at 9952 Hutchison Blvd., Panama City Beach.

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Friday, October 2, 2015 14 • The ENTERTAINER FOOD & DRINK Who’s your favorite potion pourer? Do you know of some funky concoction we should feature? If you know a bartender who spills the best Sazerac or makes a margarita like no other email their info to jschaefer@pcnh.com and we’ll send someone over to Meet the Mixologist. Meet the mixologist Jana Morgan Years bartending: Over a decade Bar location: Diego’s Burrito Factory, 15514 Front Beach Road, Panama City Beach Do you have another job or what was your last job? Also works as a realtor. Favorite drink to make: Jalapeno Margarita. What’s the most sold drink in the bar? The Pineapple Margarita When someone says “surprise me,” what’s your go-to drink? Depends on what liquor they like, if they like sweet, spicy, tangy, then take it from there. Have you created your own concoction? No, but I love to add Sriracha to the Jalapeno Margarita. Which cocktail do you dread making? Mojitos; I only like to make them when we are slow and I can dedicate enough time to do it perfectly. What is the strangest drink a customer has ever ordered? Bitters on the rocks, however, it is a remedy for indigestion. When do you know when a customer has had too much? They call me the wrong name. DRINK SPECIALS: $5 House margaritas all day, every day Skinny Margarita INGREDIENTS Patron Silver Tequila Agave nectar Fresh orange juice Fresh lime juice Fresh lemon juice Sugar free Triple Sec Jalapeno margarita INGREDIENTS Patron Silver Grand Marnier Muddled jalapeno Orange slice Diego’s margarita mix HOW DID THEY TASTE? Skinny Margarita: Delicious, can even tell it’s “skinny.” Jalapeno Margarita: Just like a margarita, but with a hint of jalapeo. Add hot sauce and it’s also really good, like a margarita version of a Bloody Mary. — Jenn Schaefer P hotos by HEATHER LEIPHART | The News herald

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Friday, October 2, 2015 The ENTERTAINER • 15 Ba y Co un ty ’s Pr em ie r Ja zz Fe st iv al Fr i. , Oc t. 9t h & Sa t. , Oc t 10 th A FR EE MU SI CA L CE LE BR AT IO N IN TH E PA RK In hi st or ic St . An dre ws Fr i. , 6: 30 to 9: 30 p. m. & Sa t 12 :3 0 to 7: 30 p. m. CONTRIBUTED PHOTOThe PCMA Special Events committee is shown after the David Seering/Steve Gilmore performance at Harbour Village on Sept. 20. From left are Steve Gilmore, Mary Darrah, David Seering, Ann Logue Todd, Amy Fletcher, Gigi Zimmerman and Carole Wilson. SCENE AROUND TOWN

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Friday, October 2, 2015 16 • The ENTERTAINER PEOPLE (850) 763-4224 105 W 23r d St., Panama City , FL 32405 www .ShopMaharajas.com WHAT’S NOT TO LOVE? SHARE THE LOVE To submit a picture of a romantic or fun-filled moment of you, your family or your loved ones enjoying Bay County’s outdoors send it to jwaddy@pcnh.com with information about the picture and we will do our best to publish it. Debra Jenkins submitted this sunset photo of the beach behind Schooners on Sept. 20 during Lobster Fest. Patrick Stewart proposed to Michaelean Dyer on the beach at Rick Seltzer Park. Kristie Ksionsk Thalacker shared these photos of her family enjoying a Panama City Beach vacation on Sept. 17.

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Friday, October 2, 2015 The ENTERTAINER • 17 ONL Y THE PERFECT CUT CAN UNLEASH A DIAMOND’S BRILLIANCE. HEAR TS ON FIRE STORES, AUTHORIZED RET AILERS, HEAR TSONFIRE.COM

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Friday, October 2, 2015 18 • The ENTERTAINER PEOPLE COMMUNITY SPOTLIGHT Want to be in the Spotlight? Email your answers to our questions along with your photo to tsimmons@pcnh.com and jwaddy@pcnh.com Name: Evelyn Simpson Age: 50something Occupation: Server at Sisters of the Sea Grille & Grog in Panama City Beach Where you grew up: Mostly Panama City Favorite local place to eat/ favorite dish: I like Outback. ... Steak is usually what I get — medium. Favorite hangout: Newby’s in Panama City Beach What you do for fun: I just like nature and anything to do with nature. Name: Katie Grant Age: 36 Occupation: Volunteer Developer at AmeriCorps Goodwill GoodWorks! at the Goodwill Career Training Center Where you grew up: England, Upstate New York, and Guam were a few of my favorite places. Favorite local place to eat/favorite dish: Bangkok Thai Restaurant/ Massaman Curry Favorite hang-out: Any coffee shop or nice park What you do for fun: Bike rides, crafts, make green tea and coffee scrubs, and cook Name: Timothy Guerra Age: 28 Occupation: Cook at Schooners in Panama City Beach Where you grew up: Houston, Texas Favorite local place to eat/ favorite dish: Diego’s Burrito Factory in Panama City Beach/Burrito Favorite hangout: If anything, it’d have to be Howell Tackle ... or the County Pier. What you do for fun: I fish.

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Issue No. 32 • October 2, 2015 Chili Vibrations World Music Festival By JAN WADDY 747-5072 | @PCNHJanWaddy jwaddy@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY BEACH — Chili Vibrations World Music Festival is back this weekend with Rebelution and G. Love and Special Sauce combined with an International Chili Society Cook-off in Aaron Bessant Park. “A ticket gets you into everything. We are making extra, so everybody gets chili,” said Beach Arts Coalition founder Mike Frimet of Hmx Productions, who is organizing the festival again this year. “Justin Buxton of Finn’s Island Style Grub won the chili category last year and will be vending.” The ICS sanctioned event with cash prizes and trophies is a quali er for the 2016 World Championships. The competition “has blown up,” Frimet said, so they have narrowed it down to just red chili and salsa this year, forgoing the chili verde. Chili samples will be available for purchase during the event, a fundraiser for the BAC — a non-pro t Frimet started in 2013 to put money back into the arts community. “We changed it to ‘world’ music festival because we are hoping to branch out, not just reggae. G. Love is bringing a little soul,” said Frimet, who likes “old-school roots.” This year’s festival is all day Saturday and Sunday, but Spinnaker is getting things started Friday with a Vibe Pre-Party at 8 p.m. featuring Yamadeo from 10 p.m. to 3 a.m. (Spinnaker also is hosting after parties at 10 p.m. Saturday with Sway Jah Vu and 8 p.m. Sunday with Heritage going on stage at 10 p.m.) Social media surveys taken after last year’s festival requested the return of Hor!zen, a reggae/hip hop blend from brothers Nasur and Zech Wolfgramm, and Rootz Underground, so CHILL BE ACH INSIDER PLEASE SEE CHILI VIBRATIONS | 20 NATASHA JASPERSON | Contributed photo ROOTZ UNDERGROUND

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Friday, October 2, 2015 20 • The ENTERTAINER BEACH INSIDER Friday, October 2, 2015 The ENTERTAINER • 21 BEACH INSIDER CHILI VIBRATIONS WORLD MUSIC FESTIVAL What: El Dub, Heritage, Hor!zen, The Wailers, Rebelution, Sway Jah Vu, Leilani Wolfgramm, Rootz Underground and G-Love and Special Sauce; International Chili Cook-Off When: Gates open at 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday Where: Aaron Bessant Park, 600 Pier Park Drive, Panama City Beach Tickets: $39 for Saturday general admission ($100 for VIP); $35 for Sunday general admission ($75 for VIP); $59 for general admission weekend pass ($159 for Advance VIP Weekend Pass with Reserved parking, private bathrooms with AC, food from local favorites, two complimentary drinks per day, reserved VIP viewing, TVs for Game Day); ages 11 and younger are free Local ticket outlets: Spinnaker Beach Club & Paradise Grill, 8795 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach; Little Village in St. Andrews, 2808 W. 12th St., Panama City; Frimet to Z Auto Center, 18100 Panama City Beach Parkway, Panama City Beach Details: ChiliVibrations.com WEEKEND MUSIC SCHEDULE Saturday Noon: El Dub 1:30 p.m.: Heritage 3:45 p.m.: Hor!zen 6 p.m.: The Wailers 8:15 p.m.: Rebelution Sunday 11 a.m.: Sway Jah Vu 1 p.m.: Leilani Wolfgramm 3:15 p.m.: Rootz Underground 5:30 p.m.: G. Love and Special Sauce Frimet is giving the crowd what it wants. The Destin-based favorite Heritage also is returning. Saturday begins with El Dub, and The Wailers open for Rebelution. Sunday performers include Sway Jah Vu and Leilani Wolfgramm. Rootz Underground, which represents Jamaica’s more contemporary reggae scene, opens for G. Love and Special Sauce. G. LOVE AND SPECIAL SAUCE An alternative hip-hop band from Philadelphia with a laid back blues vibe, G. Love and Special Sauce features G. Love, aka Garrett Dutton on vocals, guitar and harmonica, Jeffrey Clemens on drums and Jim Prescott on upright bass. “Jim, Jeff and I, we all really enjoy each other as people more than we ever did. On the bus, it’s tough love. You can get at each other like brothers would, but you really do love each other and have a good time,” G. Love said. “At this point, we have dedicated our lives to this.” The band is releasing its 10th studio album, “Love Saves The Day,” on Oct. 30 on Brush re Records. The album features guest performers Los Lobos guitarist David Hidalgo, Lucinda Williams, Citizen Cope, Ozomatli, DJLogic, Money Mark, Zach Gill and Adam Topol. G. Love feels this album is the most true to the band’s roots. “There are songs on certain records where we were trying to play catch up with whatever was hot that year. We are more authentic nowadays, making raw music and not worrying about making a commercial hit,” he said. “We have learned to embrace the music and do our original sound no one else has ever duplicated.” Originally formed in the ‘90s, the band released their self-titled debut with the single “Cold Beverage” in 1994 on Okeh Records. The next year’s follow-up album, “Coast to Coast Motel,” did not sell as well as the rst, though many consider it a stronger album. G. Love said the second album was an overreaction to the direction hip-hop was headed with synthesized sound they didn’t want to be part of — “... man, we’re blues.” “Then we went back to hip hop, but we’ve always straddled the two sides. It’s a bit of a balancing act. I think the last seven years, we have realized our sound,” G. Love said. “These days, after so many records out, music really has to be real, come from a real place. I don’t try to push it right now when I write for the band, it has to happen it a real way. Take a breath and let the writing stuff happen naturally. The other night I was woken up out of bed with a song I had to write.” One thing he has worked on is strengthening his vocals. “I do a vocal lesson before every show with a coach, Donna Newman, on the phone every day. In almost two years, I’ve done 400 half-hour phone lessons. It’s helped me to warm up before the show. I used to come off stage every night and not be able to talk,” he said. “We are closing in on 5,000 shows, doing about 100 to 250 shows a year. I do love it. I love it so much that when I’m off the road, I book myself shows.” Touring has de nitely changed over 23 years: “I don’t have to stop and go to a pay phone to call my girlfriend. Now she can bug you nonstop,” G. Love admitted. “Communication is a game changer. Touring can be isolating in a way.” But some things haven’t changed. “If I have a show at night, the full day is an emotional rollercoaster. I still get stage-fright, nervous during the day,” he said. “There’s a lot of mental and emotional work that goes into a show, regular stuff like remembering words, but sometimes it’s worse than others. “Last night, I was co-headliner with my idol, John Hammond, my musical father, in an acoustic show in New York City. I put so much weight on it and worked myself up. .... But stage fright can be positive, give you an edge, tension, then you get on stage and release. It’s like an after-school special. Once I get up there I have to let it y, not hold back. Stop being nervous and start playing.” G. Love will be among friends at Chili Vibrations. “I know all those guys,” he said. “We’ll bring a little bit of blues with the hip-hop. It’s going to be a hell of a dance party.” CHILI VIBRATIONS from Page 19 P hotos above by KURT LISCHKA | MoonCreekStudios.com P hotos above by KURT LISCHKA | MoonCreekStudios.com P hotos above by NATASHA JASPERSON | Contributed photo

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Friday, October 2, 2015 22 • The ENTERTAINER GO & DO The Backdoor Lounge Kc Phelps/Open Mic PCB, FL 235-0073 10 p.m.-2 a.m. Buster's Beer & Bait Coffee Black Ben Walker Roy Hill Sarah Moranville Open Mic w/KC & PCB, FL 234-9250 6-10 p.m. 9:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m. 6-10 p.m. 6-10 p.m. Richard Del Val 7-11 p.m. Hammerhead Fred's Family Karaoke PCB, FL 233-3907 6-10 p.m. Ms. Newby’s Sean Flood 5-9 p.m. C2 & The Brothers Reed C2 & The Brothers Reed Clay Musgrave 8 p.m.-midnight Karaoke w/Night Al Jazzmasters PCB, FL 234-0030 Ben Loftin Band 9 p.m.-1 a.m. 9 p.m.-1 a.m. 9 p.m.-1 a.m Karaoke 9 p.m.-1 a.m. 9 p.m.-1 a.m. 8 p.m.-midnight Newby’s Too El Dub 9 p.m.-1 a.m. El Dub 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Salsa Dance Night Karaoke w/Night Al PCB, FL 234-6203 Karaoke 8 p.m.-2 a.m. Karaoke 8 p.m.-2 a.m. 8 p.m.-midnight 8 p.m.-2 a.m. Schooners The Fabulous Expressions The Fabulous Expressions Football on the Big Screen Football on the Big Screen Barry & Greg PCB, FL 235-3555 9 p.m.-12:30 a.m. 9 p.m.-12:30 a.m. 6:30-10:30 p.m. Sharky's Clay Musgrave Clay Musgrave Clay Musgrave Karaoke Clay Musgrave PCB, FL 235-2420 5-9 p.m. 5-9 p.m. 5-9 p.m. 6-10 p.m. 5-9 p.m. Spinnaker Yamadeo 10 p.m.-3 a.m. Sway Jah Vu 10 p.m.-3 a.m. Heritage 10 p.m.-3 a.m. PCB, FL 234-7882 Karaoke 10 p.m.-3 a.m. Karaoke 10 p.m.-3 a.m. Karaoke 10 p.m.-3 a.m Rockstar Lip Sync Throwdown Ladies Night 10 p.m.-Close Rockstar Lip Sync Throwdown Midnight 1 a.m. Midnight 1 a.m. The Front Porch Neal James PCB, FL 238-2771 6-9 p.m. Willy's Live @ Pineapple Willy's Latitude 29 PCB, FL 235-1225 8 p.m. VENUE FRIDAY SATURDAY SUNDAY MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY THE BACKDOOR LOUNGE 7800 W. Hwy 98, PCB | 850-235-0073 Happy Hour: 9 a.m.-Noon Wednesday: KC Phelps hosting open mic, 10 p.m.-2 a.m. Digital recording available MS. NEWBY’S 8711 Thomas Drive | 850-234-0030 Friday: Ben Loftin Band, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Saturday & Sunday: C2 & The Brothers Reed on the patio, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Friday: Sean Flood at the Office, 5-9 p.m. Tuesday: Clay Musgrave at The Office, 8 p.m.-midnight Tuesday & Wednesday: Karaoke w/Night Al, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Thursday: Jazzmasters on the patio, 8 p.m.-midnight NEWBY’S TOO 4103 Thomas Drive | 850-234-6203 Open everyday 8 a.m. until Happy Hour: Monday-Friday, 8 a.m.-Noon Friday & Saturday: El Dub, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. ThursdaySaturday: Karaoke in “The End Zone” w/ NIGHT AL , 8 p.m.-2 a.m. Tues.: Salsa Dance Night, 8 p.m.-midnight Catch every NFL game & watch your favorite College team at “The End Zone” non-smoking Sports Bar. BUZZTIME every day. Sports Bar, Pool, Foosball, Darts, Shuffleboard, Ping Pong & Air Hockey. Smokers Welcome. 5121 Gulf Drive | 850-235-3555 Friday & Saturday: The Fabulous Expressions, 9 p.m.-12:30 a.m. Sun. & Mon.: Football on the 150” Big Screen Thursday: Barry & Greg, 6:30-10:30 p.m. www.schooners.com 15201 Front Beach Road | 850-235-2420 Open Every Day w/Happy Hour, 2-5 p.m. Thursday-Sunday: Clay Musgrave, 5-9 p.m. Wednesday: Karaoke www.sharkysbeach.com 8795 Thomas Drive | 850-234-7882 Paradise Grill open Daily at 11 a.m. Friday-Sunday: Chili Vibrations Friday: Chili Vibrations Kick-Off Party Yamadeo, 10 p.m.-3 a.m. Saturday: Sway Jah Vu, 10 p.m.-3 a.m. LADIES NIGHT, 10 p.m.-Close Sunday: Chili Vibrations after party Heritage, 10 p.m.-3 a.m. Friday & Sunday: Rockstar Lip Sync Throwdown, Midnight-1 a.m. Friday-Sunday: Karaoke, 10 p.m.-3 a.m. www.spinnakerbeachclub.com 5900 Thomas Drive, PCB | 850-234-9250 Happy Hour: Monday – Friday, 3-7 p.m. Friday: Coffee Black, 6-10 p.m. Saturday: Ben Walker, 9:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m. Tuesday: Roy Hill, 6-10 p.m. Wednesday: Sarah Moranville, 6-10 p.m. Thursday: HOOT NIGHT – O pen Mic w/KC Phelps and Richard Del Val, 7-11 p.m. All music will be outside weather permitting Veteran owned and operated 8752 Thomas Drive | 850-233-3907 Saturday: Family Karaoke, 6-10 p.m. www.hammerheadfreds.com Call Marie Forrest at 747-5041 or email mforrest@pcnh.com. Deadline is 5 p.m. Monday. ADVERTISE: THE FRONT PORCH 6804 Thomas Drive | 850-238-2271 99c Draft Everyday Saturday: Neal James, 6-9 p.m. jbdtech.net/tacfoods/ @ Pineapple Willy’s 9875 S. Thomas Drive | 850-235-1225 Friday: Latitude 29 Showtime for all bands is 8 p.m. www.pineapplewillys.com

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Friday, October 2, 2015 The ENTERTAINER • 23 GO & DO By TONY SIMMONS 747-5080 | @PCNHTonyS tsimmons@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY BEACH — The public is invited to enjoy the early days of autumn in a pair of walking trail events on Saturday at St. Andrews State Park and the Panama City Beach Conservation Park. State Park Wilderness Walks The Friends of St. Andrews State Park is hosting “Walk Into the Wild,” which includes free entry into the park for participants, as well as guided walks, talks and more. All walks, tram and shuttle boat rides are free for participants, though donations to Friends of St. Andrews State Park will be accepted. “We will be able to accommodate a limited number of people, so I would like to encourage people to arrive early,” said Anne Ake, Friends president. “The park opens at 8 a.m., and the walks are scheduled to begin at 8:45. People will be transported to the various trails by tram.” Guided interpretive walks for small groups will be at 8:45, 9:45 and 10:45 a.m., exploring the varied habitats within the park: • Naturalists and lmmakers Elam and Nic Stoltzfus will lead a photography walk at Gator Lake; ‘Walk into the Wild’ at St. Andrews State Park MELISSA SHOEMAKER | Park Services Specialist Judith Scott, a volunteer naturalist who does programs in St. Andrews State Park on ‘Native Plants as Food and Medicine,’ as well as edible insects, will be among those leading interpretive walks Saturday. ‘WALK INTO THE WILD’ What: Guided tours of habitats | When: 8:45 a.m. Saturday | Where: St. Andrews State Park, 4607 State Park Lane, Panama City Beach Cost: Free entry to the park for participants | Details and Tickets: Email anneake2@gmail.com or call 850-265-6879 PLEASE SEE WILD | 24

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Friday, October 2, 2015 24 • The ENTERTAINER GO & DO • Judith Scott will point out “plants that are yummy and bugs you could eat in a pinch” for those survivalists in the crowd; • Walk the beach with Scott Jackson and hear the tale of St. Andrew Bay turtles; • Join Mary Jo and Norm Capra to stroll amongst (and learn to identify) the birds that live in the park; and, • Michelle Duncan will pull a seine to expose what lies beneath the surface of the park’s waters. At 11:45 a.m., Park Manager Brian Addison will talk about what it takes to keep a state park running smoothly, and the Friends of St. Andrews State Park will provide a short introduction to their organization. At noon, you can bite into a delicious pasta and salad lunch from The Olive Garden. Lunch is free for members of the Friends organization, including those who sign up at the event; all others are asked to provide a $10 donation ($5 for children under 12 years old) to cover the cost of lunches. Because of walking group size limits, participants are encouraged to preregister on the website FriendsOfStAndrews.org to have rst choice of walks and to be served rst at lunch. Those who register at the park (beginning at 8 a.m.) will be assigned to walks on a space-available basis, and lunch will be served until the food runs out. After lunch, participants are invited to take the shuttle boat to Shell Island to hear more about dunes, birds and turtles and to enjoy the pristine habitat. The Friends organization will have a tent set up to display photos, information and membership brochures. Participants are encouraged to bring their cameras and to enter their photos into a contest to be included in the Friends’ next publication. The weekend’s adventures actually begin the night before, as the Friends of St. Andrews State Park will show the documentary lm, “Coastal Dune Lakes,” by Elam and Nic Stoltzfus at 6:30 p.m. Friday at the park’s Campground Amphitheatre. Cinematographer Elam Stoltzfus has been documenting the coastal dune lakes of Northwest Florida since 2007. An Emmy award-winning lmmaker, he has produced six documentaries featuring Florida’s natural beauty. In 2013, Elam and his son Nic began work on a feature-length lm, as well as a coffee-table book, focused on the coastal dune lakes. Over the course of a year and a half, the fatherson duo met with scientists, businesspeople, residents and visitors all working on conserving the lakes. They traveled from Northwest Florida to New South Wales, Australia, to gain a wider global perspective on coastal dune lakes and how they work. Since its release earlier this year, the lm has been shown on Public Television stations across the United States and has won four Telly awards. The associated book received a President’s Book Award from the Florida Author and Publishers Association. “Enjoy the lm and, if you want to talk to the lmmakers afterwards, Nic and Elam will be available to answer any questions you may have,” Ake said. Conservation Park Hike The Florida Trail Association will lead a hike starting at 10 a.m. at Conservation Park, 100 Conservation Drive, Panama City Beach. The “leisurely hike” is open to all levels of hikers, and will provide information about the park, the FTA and the Florida Trails. For more information, email PanhandleFTA@gmail.com The Panhandle Chapter of the Florida Trail Association formed in 1982 to serve the central and western region of the Panhandle (west of the Apalachicola River). Today the chapter serves six counties between the Choctawhatchee and Apalachicola rivers, and is divided into three sections: the Pine Log Section, the Econna Section, and the Chipola Section. The rst major job of the Panhandle Chapter, in the late 1980s, was to build eight miles of wilderness trail through Pine Log State Forest. In the late 1990s, the group constructed 18 miles of wilderness trail through the Econna Creek Water Management Area. Since then, the Chapter built and maintains the Altha and Hinson Trails, and adopted the Blountstown Greenway. Some of the Chapter’s most popular annual activities are the Hike to the Springs, the Pine Log Gathering, the Moonlight Hike, and the Econna Flower Hike, which is held every April at the height of the mountain laurel and wild azalea bloom. $10.00 OFF your next in house Ser vice Call. Coupon must be pr esented and payment made at time of ser vice. Does not apply to Sr . Citizen discount. 15% Of f any and al l parts pur chased at our par ts count er See Tr a and Ch ip for all yo ur nee ds. Plumbing Inc. 1601 Frankfor d Av e. Panam a City Fl. 850-7 85-9227 Ser vicing Bay County since 1974 24 Hr . 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Friday, October 2, 2015 26 • The ENTERTAINER K E E P I I T F U N K Y N G K E E P I I T F R E S H N G When the po wer of lo ve ove rc omes the lo ve of po wer ,t he wo rld will kno wp eace. ~Jimi Hendrix St .A nd r ew ’s Ep is co pa lC hu rc h 16 08 Ba ke rC t. wi ll ho st THE BL ES SI NG OF THE AN IM AL S Sa tu rd ay ,O ct ob er 3, at 10 :0 0A .M .a tt he pe tg ar de n (b et we en th et wo o ce bu il di ng s) ,A ND ag ai no n Su nd ay ,O ct ob er 4d urin g eF ea st of St .F ra nc is at th e 10 :0 0A .M .w or sh ip se rv ic e. Al la re in vi te dt ob rin gt he ir pe ts fo rb le ss in g. Pl ea se le as ho rc ra te pe ts . Fo rm or ei nf o, ca ll th ec hu rc ho c ea t8 50 -7 63 -7 63 6. Co me Di sc ove r Hi st or ic St . An dr ew s! Vi si t Hi st or ic St . An dr ew s, 2 mi le s ea st of th e Ha th aw ay Br id ge , on Hw y 98 th en so ut h on Be ck Av en ue .

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Friday, October 2, 2015 The ENTERTAINER • 27 Co me Di sc ov er Hi st or ic St . An dr ew s! Vi si t Hi st or ic St . An dr ew s, 2 mi le s ea st of th e Ha th aw ay Br idg e, on Hw y 98 th en so ut h on Be ck Av en ue . Ba y Co un ty ’s Pr em ie r Ja zz Fe st iv al Fr i. , Oc t. 9t h & Sa t. , Oc t 10 th A FR EE MU SI CA L CE LE BR AT IO N IN TH E PA RK In his to ri c St . An dre ws Fr i. , 6: 30 to 9: 30 p. m. & Sa t 12 :3 0 to 7: 30 p. m.

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Friday, October 2, 2015 28 • The ENTERTAINER GO & DO Jon Wilson’ s Roo ng LLC Fa mil y Tr adition Fo r Ov er 30 Ye ar s 850-381-5573 LIC. #R C29027552 850-913-1900 LLC 10 % Of f All Ne w Shut ter s! 850-913-1900 Pa nels Ba hamas Ac co rd ions Co lonials Li ve En ter ta in ment Footbal l Spec ials B E S T B U R G E R S O N T H E B E A C H F RONT P ORCH Th e $ 10 2 Burgers Basket Fr ies Pitcher of Beer or Soda Pitcher of Beer or Soda Pitcher of Beer or Soda $ 18 $ $ 8 Pc Win g s B asket Frie s Pitcher of Beer or Soda By TONY SIMMONS 747-5080 | @PCTonyS tsimmons@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY — Jason Dottley, a dance and pop hit and a star of “Sordid Lives: The Series,” is bringing his national comedy tour to the Martin Theatre on Saturday. The one-man show, “Life on the gAy-List,” will include special appearances by local talent and will be hosted by Tam Taylor from Fox’s reality series “Gears.” The show will benet the community also, as a portion of the proceeds with be donated to Pride of the Panhandle. Doors open at 7 p.m. and the show begins at 8 p.m. General admission is $10; VIP tickets (which include a celebrity meet-and-greet after the show) are $27.50. Because of adult content, no one under age 18 will be admitted. Discounts are available for seniors, students and military. To purchase tickets, visit LifeOnTheGayList.com or Tix.com, or call 1-800-504-4849. Dottley, variously called “the poster boy for gay marriage” and “public face of gay divorce,” covers NSFW topics such as dating when you’re over 30, divorced and gay; mis-sexting Lance Bass and other celebrity misadventures; heartbreak and 21-year-olds; lessons learned from Delta Burke; why on Earth he kissed Perez Hilton; sneaking seles at Paris Hilton’s apartment in Ibiza; accidental water sports, and every regrettable decision in between. Dottley grew up in Mississippi and moved to Central Florida in high school, where he rst began dabbling in performing at a community theater. After high school, he spent a semester at the University of Mississippi before packing his bags and moving to Hollywood. In 2008, he played a role in the TV series “Sordid Lives,” a spin-off of a play and an independent lm by the same name with a cult following in the gay community. The next year, he recorded his rst record, “Party Round the World,” a dance pop track featuring Debby Holiday that peaked at number 19 on Billboard’s Dance/Club Play chart. His subsequent records landed in the top 30 of Billboard’s dance charts, as well. However, he left Hollywood during his much publicized divorce to seek some peace and quiet in Panama City Beach, where his mother lives. He stayed longer than he initially expected, helping to care for his grandmother, who was undergoing chemotherapy. One day, sitting in a minivan near the intersection of Thomas Drive and U.S. 98, he wrote a dance tune that became the hit single “It’s Our Night.” After meeting with Bay County’s lm commissioner, Julie Gordon, about lming a feature in the area in 2016, the idea for an on-screen acting workshop was born. That’s where Dottley found local actor Joseph Corcoran, who will perform a dramatic monologue as part of Saturday’s opening acts. “Joseph is that rare talent who is destined for so much greatness,” said Dottley. “I have the honor of saying I produced Octavia Spencer in her rst play in LA before she won the Oscar for Best Actress in ‘The Help,’ and I produced and cast Tony winner Levi Kreis in multiple projects before his Tony win. I have an eye for the supertalented, and this young man’s got it.” Rounding out the opening acts, Lyndsey K. Taylor will provide “tour de force drag performances.” She is also the special guest at Splash Bar, which is hosting the ofcial After-Party where Dottley will perform his new single “Cocaine and Whiskey.” “I’m oored, so grateful and can’t believe I just saw another dream realized,” Dottley said on his Facebook page (OfcialJDot) after the single was recently added to the rotation at Island 106 FM. Dottley is vague about whether he plans to perform “Cocaine and Whiskey” at the Martin: “My show is comedy, it’s not about my music. But I keep getting asked to sing and this is a very special show, so I guess you’ll just have to come and nd out.” One-man show expands roster for ‘homecoming’ LIFE ON THE GAY-LIST Who: Jason Dottley Where: The Martin Theatre, When: 8 p.m. Saturday Tickets: $10-$27.50, available at Tix.com, 1-800-504-4849, or LifeOnTheGayList.com

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Friday, October 2, 2015 30 • The ENTERTAINER GO & DO COLLEGE FOO TBALL AND NFL HEADQUAR TERS EVER Y LIVE GAME EVER Y SUND AY 275 South Hwy 79 PA NAMA CITY BEACH 850-24 9-7200 SEE ALL THE LISTINGS ONLINE @ NEWSHERALD.COM GAME ON ! GET YOUR HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL All times CDT HEY FOOTBALL FANS! Show us your team spirit by sharing photos from the big game —— in the crowd or on the eld. Email photos to jwaddy@pcnh.com or tsimmons@pcnh.com, and you just might see them published here next week. Friday, Oct. 2 6:30 p.m. Chipley at Franklin County 6:30 p.m. West Gadsden at Liberty County 6:30 p.m. Marianna at East Gadsden 7 p.m. Mosley at Arnold 7 p.m. Pensacola at Bay 7 p.m. Rutherford at Walton 7 p.m. North Bay Haven at Cottondale 7 p.m. Bozeman at Blountstown 7 p.m. Graceville at Sneads 7 p.m. Vernon at Wewahitchka 7 p.m. Niceville at Fort Walton Beach 7 p.m. Choctawhatchee at Crestview HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL All times CDT All times CDT NFL All times CDT Sunday, Oct. 4 8:30 a.m. N.Y. Jets vs. Miami at London Noon Oakland at Chicago Noon Jacksonville at Indianapolis Noon N.Y. Giants at Buffalo Noon Carolina at Tampa Bay Noon Philadelphia at Washington Noon Houston at Atlanta Noon Kansas City at Cincinnati, 3:05 p.m. Cleveland at San Diego 3:25 p.m. Green Bay at San Francisco 3:25 p.m. St. Louis at Arizona 3:25 p.m. Minnesota at Denver, 7:30 p.m. Dallas at New Orleans Open: New England, Tennessee Monday, Oct. 5 7:30 p.m. Detroit at Seattle Thursday, Oct. 8 7:25 p.m. Indianapolis at Houston Vernon quarterback Kody Hagan

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Friday, October 2, 2015 The ENTERTAINER • 31 GO & DO COLLEGE FOOTBALL All times CDT Friday, Oct. 2 6 p.m. NBCSN Columbia at Princeton 6 p.m. ESPN2 Memphis at South Florida 9:15 p.m. ESPN2 UConn at BYU Saturday, Oct. 3 11 a.m. SEC Net South Carolina at Missouri 11 a.m. ESPN Iowa at Wisconsin 11 a.m. ESPNews UCF at Tulane 11 a.m. ABC Texas at TCU 11 a.m. ESPNU Army at Penn State 11 a.m. ESPN2 Purdue at Michigan State 11 a.m. FS1 West Virginia at Oklahoma 2:30 p.m. ESPN2 Texas Tech vs. Baylor or Ohio State vs. Indiana 2:30 p.m. ESPNU North Carolina at Georgia Tech 3 p.m. ESPNews East Carolina at SMU 3 p.m. FS1 Kansas State vs. Oklahoma State 6 p.m. ESPN2 Arkansas at Tennessee 6 p.m. ESPNU Eastern Michigan at LSU 6:30 p.m. SEC Net Mississippi State at Texas A&M 6:30 p.m. SEC Net Eastern Kentucky at Kentucky 6:30 p.m. FOX Arizona State at UCLA 6:30 p.m. NBCSN William Mary at Delaware 7 p.m. ABC Notre Dame at Clemson 9 p.m. ESPN Oregon at Colorado 9:15 p.m. ESPN2 Hawaii at Boise State No. 11 FLORIDA STATE (3-0) vs. Wake Forest (2-2) 2:30 p.m. Saturday ESPN No. 13 ALABAMA (3-1) vs. No. 8 Georgia (4-0) 2:30 p.m. Saturday CBS No. 25 FLORIDA (4-0) vs. No. 3 Mississippi (4-0) 6 p.m. Saturday ESPN AUBURN (2-2) vs. San Jose State (2-2) 3 p.m. Saturday SEC Network All times CDT 6 p.m. NBCSN Columbia at Princeton 6 p.m. ESPN2 Memphis at South Florida 11 a.m. SEC Net South Carolina at Missouri 11 a.m. ESPN Iowa at Wisconsin 11 a.m. ESPNU Army at Penn State 11 a.m. ESPN2 Purdue at Michigan State 11 a.m. FS1 West Virginia at Oklahoma 2:30 p.m. ESPN2 Texas Tech vs. Baylor or Ohio State vs. Indiana 2:30 p.m. ESPNU North Carolina at Georgia Tech 3 p.m. ESPNews East Carolina at SMU 3 p.m. FS1 Kansas State vs. Oklahoma State 6 p.m. ESPN2 Arkansas at Tennessee 6 p.m. ESPNU Eastern Michigan at LSU 6:30 p.m. SEC Net Mississippi State at Texas A&M 6:30 p.m. SEC Net Eastern Kentucky at Kentucky 6:30 p.m. FOX Arizona State at UCLA 6:30 p.m. NBCSN William Mary at Delaware 7 p.m. ABC Notre Dame at Clemson 9 p.m. ESPN Oregon at Colorado 9:15 p.m. ESPN2 Hawaii at Boise State No. 25 FLORIDA vs. No. 3 Mississippi (4-0) 6 p.m. Saturday AUBURN vs. San Jose State (2-2) 3 p.m. Saturday SEC Network 6 p.m. ESPN2 Memphis at South Florida 11 a.m. SEC Net South Carolina at Missouri 11 a.m. ESPN2 Purdue at Michigan State 11 a.m. FS1 West Virginia at Oklahoma or Ohio State vs. Indiana 2:30 p.m. ESPNU North Carolina at Georgia Tech 3 p.m. FS1 Kansas State vs. Oklahoma State 6 p.m. ESPNU Eastern Michigan at LSU 6:30 p.m. SEC Net Mississippi State at Texas A&M 6:30 p.m. SEC Net Eastern Kentucky at Kentucky 6:30 p.m. NBCSN William Mary at Delaware No. 25 vs. No. 3 Mississippi (4-0) 6 p.m. Saturday AUBURN vs. San Jose State (2-2) 3 p.m. Saturday Iowa running back Jordan Canzeri

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Friday, October 2, 2015 32 • The ENTERTAINER GO & DO Matt: ‘Intern’ charms “The Intern” is like a mild salsa: lling, healthy and satisfying without a whole lot of avor or fear of heartburn. Luckily, that potential blandness is rendered effective through some gentle melancholy, soft humor, and genuinely entertaining performances throughout. Instead of another shallow dramedy, we’re presented with properly complex adult issues, like aging, loneliness, marriage, and career, told with sincerity and a healthy amount of Hollywood heart. The tone can be summed up in one word: cute. Sure, it’s a comedy, but its jokes don’t really inspire uproarious guffaws as much as they do crooked, polite grins. This isn’t an altogether bad thing, as we watch the blossoming friendship between distraught internet mogul Anne Hathaway and her aged apprentice, Robert De Niro. Their relationship at times feels a bit forced, overly quirky and predictable. While this renders the movie a little long (2 solid hours), the centering presence of the surprisingly likable De Niro pushes this above your average PG-13 comedy. Director Nancy Meyers has always made movies whose highest aspiration seems to be “pleasantness” (“The Holiday,” “The Parent Trap”). Up until now, I’ve yet to nd her slight brand of grown-up humor appealing. “The Intern” isn’t much different in spirit, yet somehow it works. Sure, it was a bit awkward at times, like a person acting too young for their age, but along with the gentle jokes and personal drama, there are actually some nice visual ourishes in the crisp editing and directing. Much like last month’s pop hit, “The Intern’s” inoffensive brand of entertainment will fall right off your brain when you leave, yet be catchy and familiar enough to divert you during its runtime. Rating: 3 out of 5 stars Panama City Beach musician Matt Greene, who has a bachelor’s in philosophy from the University of North Florida in Jacksonville, always has enjoyed viewing, debating and critiquing all forms and aspects of lm, from foreign lms to slapstick comedies. Cole: ‘Intern’ works Hollywood almost never lacks subtlety and it’s often frustrating watching something predictably sweet and good happen on screen as an unwelcomed fantasy masquerading as realistic optimism. Perhaps part of what makes “The Intern” tolerable is that it makes no claim to be anything more than fantasy while still retaining an edge absent from most Hollywood-fare. Following 70 year-old Ben (Robert De Niro) as he begins an internship at a local internet startup company run by precocious young Jules (Anne Hathaway). Jules is overwhelmed by the growth of the company and overwhelming to all those around her. Good natured Ben struggles to nd his footing, eventually nding purpose as a calming inuence to Jules. At various points it’s a notso-subtle yet consistent lm about women in the workplace and a marginally funny lm about generational differences, but also a sound lm about condent people responding to situations taking them out of their comfort-zones. The always present feminism both serves and detracts from the lm, but ultimately settles in as an ally allowing for some surprising moments of tenderness. It is troubling to have a movie so outwardly consumed with social concerns to be so blindingly white. The business at the center of the lm has over 200 employees and it seems all escaped the grasp of afrmative action. Comically, “The Intern” hits its mark more often than not. Their workplace looks like Pinterest threw up and millennials were hired to swim in its mess. Ben is certainly a sh out of water. Dramatically, “The Intern” has more bite than expected and seems as honest as a lm like this can be expected to be, aided by its superior acting. Rating: 3 out of 5 stars Longtime Panama City resident Cole Schneider, born in Long Beach, Calif., always has preferred popcorn and a movie to a long walk on the beach. 1654 E. 5t h St reet | Pa na ma Ci ty , FL 32401 850747-4999 | www .W ats on -L an di ng s. co m WE AR E OP EN FO R BU SI NE SS! ! Winter Specials Limited Time Only 18' to 23', $10 a foot We ek ly Hu rr ic an e Ra te s Av ai la bl e Ac cep ti ng Bo at s Up To 32 Fe et Ac cep ti ng Bo at s Up To 12 ,0 00 Po un ds RV & Jet Ski Storage Av ailable WA TS ON LA ND IN GS MA RI NA AN D DR Y BO AT ST OR AG E COLE SCHNEIDER & MATT GREENE MOVIETOWN MOVIE CLUB Each week, locals Cole Schneider and Matt Greene share their different takes on new movies out in area theaters. For podcasts and more, visit MovietownMovieClub.com To adver tise in this publication, Please Call: Tr isha Golden 850-747-5039 MOVIETOWN: ‘Intern’ ‘THE INTERN’ Director: Nancy Meyers Starring: Robert De Niro, Anne Hathaway, Rene Russo, Nat Wolff, Adam Devine, Andrew Rannells, Reid Scott Rated: PG-13 (some suggestive content and brief strong language)

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Friday, October 2, 2015 The ENTERTAINER • 33 Friday, October 2, 2015 MON-SUN 11AM-10PM FRI & SA T 11AM-10:30PM SUP ER KING BUF FET DINE IN CARR Y OUT CA TERING WE SER VE FRE SH AND HIGH QU ALITY FOOD EVER YD AY ! WINE BEER SA KE AVA ILABLE ALL YO U CA N EA T BA NQUET RO OM FOR PA RT IES AND ENTER TA INING NEEDS HIB AC HI GRILL SEAFOOD SUSHI BA R 9802 Fr ont Beach Rd PCB, FL 850-23 8-8589 (Next to Wo nderW orks) NO W OPEN! Online Or der JinJin88pcb.com Fo r Deliv er y, Please Call: 850-238-8589 Come And Experience the Brand New Chinese Buf fet Restaurant in PCB CALENDAR WANT TO BE INCLUDED? Email Jan Waddy, jwaddy@pcnh. com, or Tony Simmons, tsimmons@ pcnh.com. Inclusion in this calendar of events is at editors’ discretion. FRIDAY, OCT. 2 H URRI C ANE O P AL AERIAL PH OTO E XH IBIT : at the Bay County Public Library, 898 W. 11th St., Panama City. Details: 522-2100, NWRLS.com S TART H ERE G O ANY WH ERE : 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Gulf Coast State College, 5230 W. US 98, Panama City, in the Amelia Center Main Gallery. An exhibit of art created by alumni of Gulf Coast’s visual arts program including works of sculpture, ceramics, photography, painting, drawing, mixed media and animation. Exhibit remains open during gallery hours through Oct. 8. Details: Pavel Amromin, pamromin@ gulfcoast.edu or 872-3886 DANC ING T H ROU GH LIFE UNAFRAID : 6-8 p.m. at FSU Panama City’s Holley Lecture Hall, 4750 Collegiate Drive, Panama City. Featuring world-champion dancers Eric Luna and Georgia Ambarian. The event is free and open to the public. To RSVP, call 770-2301. FRIDAY FE S T : 6-10 p.m. the rst Friday of each month through November along Harrison Avenue in downtown Panama City with bands, classic cars, extended business hours and vendors. Details: PCFridayFest.com 19 T H ANNUAL FLORIDA SC ALLO P AND M U S I C FE S TI V AL : 6-10 p.m. ET Friday and noon to 10 p.m. ET Saturday at George Core Park in Port St. Joe with headliner Phil Vassar, arts-and-craft vendors and food carts lined up along Miss Zola’s Drive. Scallops will be sold in 5-pound bags for $40. Friday lineup: Bo Spring Band at 6 p.m. ET, Amanda Cook and Kennesaw Ridge at 7:30 p.m. ET and John King at 9 p.m. ET. Saturday schedule: Thirty Three at noon ET, CrossRoads at 1:30 p.m. ET, Buddy Hamm and Mark Swindel at 3 p.m. ET, Konkrete Soul at 4:30 p.m. ET, Charlie and Dana Black at 7:30 p.m. ET and Vassar at 9 p.m. ET. Tickets: $5 Friday and Saturday until 5 p.m.; $10 after 5 p.m. ET Saturday; VIP tickets available. Admission free for ages 6 and younger and active military personnel with vaild I.D. Details: ScallopFest.comSATURDAY, OCT. 3 G RAND LA G OON W ATERFRONT FAR M ER S M AR K ET : 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Capt Anderson’s on Thomas Drive. Enjoy the region’s nest makers, bakers and growers at PCB’s yearround farmers market. Live music, free tastings and family fun. Details: WaterfrontMarkets.org or 763-7359 S T . ANDRE WS W ATERFRONT FAR M ER S M AR K ET : 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Smith Yacht Basin beside the Shrimp Boat Restaurant, 12th Street and Beck Avenue. Rain or shine. Vendors, live music, Kids Craft table. Bring a shing pole and stay for the day. Details: HistoricStAndrews.com/market or 872-7208 10 T H ANNUAL TI CK LED P IN K P O K ER RUN : registration is 8:30-10 a.m. at the Barn at Wicked Wheel Bar and Grill, 10025 Hutchison Blvd., Panama City Beach. Breast cancer awareness poker run. First bike out at 9 a.m. with stops throughout Bay County before meeting back up at the Barn at 2:30 p.m. Rafe drawing at 3 p.m. Details: thunderangelspc@gmail. com or 265-9691 A W ALK IN T H E P AR K: 8:30 a.m. at St. Andrews State Park in Panama City Beach. Free park entry for participants. Take a guided interpretive walk or photography walk; hear presentations by Park Manager Brian Addison and local naturalists; enjoy lunch for $10, or $5 for children under 12 (free to members of Friends of St. Andrews State Park, including those who join today). Details: 850-265-6879 S ALT AIR FAR M ER S M AR K ET : 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. the rst and third Saturday of each month at City Commons Park, Port St. Joe. Fresh produce, seafood, cheeses and more; handmade arts and crafts. Details: VisitGulf.com or 404-906-2637 GO & DO

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Friday, October 2, 2015 34 • The ENTERTAINER CALENDAR SPICE UP Y O UR WEEK WITH UPC O MING AREA EVENT S GO & DO Se a Dr ag on Pir at e Cr uise $ 1 OFF Adult Ti ck et Sea Dragon Pirate Cruise ARRH MA TEY! Yo ung & Old, The Pirate Cr uise TM has Somethi ng fo r Eve ry one! Cr uise Aw ay i nto the Fa ntasy Wo rld of Fr iendly Sw ashbucklers & Pirates! THE GREA TES T SIGHTSEE ING AD VENTUR EE VER! Located on Gra n d Lagoon in the Lighthouse Marina 850.234.7400 Yo ung & Old, The Pirate Cr uise Cr uise A wa y into the F antasy W orld of THE GREA TES T SIGHTSEE ING 850.234.7400 ARRH MA TE Y! G RAND BOU LE V ARD F AR M ER S M AR K E T A T S ANDE STI N : 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at 600 G rand Boulevard, M iramar Beach. S EA SI DE F AR M ER S M AR K E T: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Seaside A mphitheatre. Fresh produce, baked goods, dairy products and other unique offerings, cooking demos and activities. Y ear-round event. Details: SeasideFL.com B LE SSI N G OF TH E AN IM AL S: 10 a.m. at St. A ndrews E piscopal C hurch, 1608 Baker C ourt, P anama C ity. T he blessing is held in the pet garden between the two ofce complex buildings. T he church invites everyone to bring pets for blessing. Details: 763-7636 CHI L I VIB RA TIO N S WO RLD MUSIC F E STIV AL : G ates open at 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday at A aron Bessant P ark for I nternational C hili C ook-Off. (Spinnaker Beach C lub hosts a V ibe P reP arty on Friday with Y amadeo at 8 p.m.) Saturday lineup: E l Dub at noon, H eritage at 1:30 p.m., H or!zen at 3:45 p.m., T he W ailers at 6 p.m., and R ebelution at 8:15 p.m. (Sway Jah V u plays at the after-party at 10 p.m. at Spinnaker.) Sunday lineup: Sway Jah V u at 11 a.m., Leilani W olfgramm at 1 p.m., R ootz U nderground at 3:15 p.m., G -Love and Special Sauce at 5:30 p.m. (Spinnaker’s after-party features H eritage at 8 p.m.) Details: C hilivibrations.com G E T TO K N OW FT A HIK E : 10 a.m. at C onservation P ark, 100 C onservation Drive, P anama C ity Beach. Join the Florida T rail A ssociation for a leisurely hike open to all levels of hikers to learn about the park, the F TA and the Florida T rails. Details: P anhandleF TA @gmail.com GCSC AL UM N I PIC N IC: 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the clubhouse of T opsail H ill P reserve State P ark in Santa R osa Beach. T ickets: $10 each (must be purchased by Sept. 30); children 5 years and younger are free. State park admission fee is $6 per vehicle. Details and tickets: contact Loel Davenport at 850-873-3583 or visit G ulf C oast.edu/alumni HU RR IC ANE OP AL 20TH ANN IV ER S AR Y P RE S EN T A TIO N : 11 a.m. at the Bay C ounty P ublic Library, 898 W . 11th St., in P anama C ity. Featuring W J HG M eteorologist T yler A llender. V iew aerial photos of Opal’s aftermath on display in the library throughout October. Details: NWR LS.com 19TH ANN U AL F L O R I DA SC ALL OP AND MUSIC F E STIV AL : N oon to 10 p.m. ET at G eorge C ore P ark in P ort St. Joe with headliner P hil V assar, arts-and-craft vendors and food carts lined up along M iss Zola’s Drive. Scallops will be sold in 5-pound bags for $40. Saturday schedule: T hirty T hree at noon ET , C ross R oads at 1:30 p.m. ET , Buddy H amm and M ark Swindel at 3 p.m. ET , K onkrete Soul at 4:30 p.m. ET , C harlie and Dana Black at 7:30 p.m. ET and V assar at 9 p.m. ET . T ickets: $5 until 5 p.m. ET ; $10 after 5 p.m. ET . A dmission free for ages 6 and younger and active military personnel with vaild I .D.Details: ScallopFest.com L IF E O N TH E G A Y L IST: 8 p.m. at the M artin T heatre, 409 H arrison A ve., P anama C ity. Jason Dottley, star of “Sordid Lives: T he Series” star and three-time T op 25 Billboard recording artist, presents his debut one-man show about life when you’re gay, divorced and over 30. Details and tickets: LifeOn T he G ayList.com L Y ND S E Y K T A Y L O R : 8 p.m. to 4 a.m. at Splash Bar, 6520 T homas Drive, P anama C ity Beach. A lso featuring R aven Samore, A manda Black, C hina M oon and the ofcial after-party for Jason Dottley’s “ M y Life on the g A y List.” Shows at midnight and 2 a.m. Details: SplashBarFlorida.com or 236-3450SUNDA Y , OCT . 4 G RAND LA GOO N W A T ER F R O N T F AR M ER S M AR K E T: 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at C apt A nderson’s on T homas Drive. E njoy the region’s nest makers, bakers and growers at PC B’s yearround farmers market. Live music, free tastings and family fun. Details: W aterfront M arkets.org or 763-7359

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Friday, October 2, 2015 The ENTERTAINER • 35 CALENDAR SPICE UP Y O UR WEEK WITH UPC O MING AREA EVENT S Friday, October 2, 2015 GO & DO NE ED A BA BY SI TT ER FO R YO UR KI DS ? BR IN G TH EM TO MO NK EY BU SI NE SS ! Lo ca te d in Pi er Pa rk Ou r ne w Ca me ra Sy st em le ts yo u wa tc h yo ur ki ds wh il e yo u' re ou t. We ca n wa tch yo ur ki ds for an hou r or th e wh ole da y! Open E ver y Da y 1 1am 10pm 680 4 Tho mas D r. , Pan ama City Bea ch, FL 850 -23 8-22 71 www .th e-fr ont -po rc h.c om Li ve En ter ta in ment B E S T B U R G E R S O N T H E B E A C H F RONT P O RCH Th e Blue Plate Specials $ 6.50 Ever yday Meatloaf Mashed Po tatoes with Brown Gravy Green Beans & a Roll Countr y Fried Steak Mashed Po tatoes with White Gravy , Corn Hamburger Steak Grilled Onions Brown Gravy Corn on the Cob Po rk Chops Macaroni & Cheese, Pe as Fish & Chips Beef Ti ps with Rice Creamed Corn, Fried Po tatoes Pinto Beans & Rice Cornbread, Collard Greens, Sausage MOND AY TUESD AY WEDNESD AY THURSD AY FRID AY SA TURD AY SUND AY Hamburger Steak Grilled Onions Brown Gravy Corn on the Cob Po rk Chops Macaroni & Cheese, P eas Pinto Beans & Rice Cornbread, En ter ta in ment En ter ta in ment En ter ta in ment 30 A F AR M ER S M AR K E T: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on N orth Barrett Square in R osemary Beach. E ach Sunday, join this community event featuring fresh vegetables, fruits, eggs, honey, cheese, preserves, sauces, bread, sweets, prepared foods to go and much more. Details: 30aFarmersM arket.com W A TER COL OR CO AST AL F ARMERS MARKET: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. in W aterC olor. CHILI VIBRA TIONS WORLD MUSIC FESTIV AL: G ates open at 10 a.m. at A aron Bessant P ark for International C hili C ook-Off. Sunday lineup: Sway Jah V u at 11 a.m., Leilani W olfgramm at 1 p.m., R ootz U nderground at 3:15 p.m., G-Love and Special Sauce at 5:30 p.m. (Spinnaker’s after-party features H eritage at 8 p.m.) Details: C hilivibrations.com ‘ A MOTHER ’S WORDS TO THE WORLD ’: N oon to 3 p.m. at the Baptist C enter, 123 K raft A ve., P anama C ity. A uthor Jeffery P . A ndler will release the new book about the life of his mother, V ada L. A ndler, who was director of the Bay Harbor Baptist C enter from the 1960s until her death in 2009. Books will be given away free; donations will be accepted. R efreshments will be served. Details: JeffA ndlerM inistries.org AMERIC ANA C AFE SUNDA YS: 3 p.m. open mic, 4 p.m. touring musicians concert, at R oberts Hall, 831 Florida A ve., Lynn Haven. A dmission: $5. Details: 850722-4915 or 850-774-3561, or LuckyM udM usic.comMONDA Y , OCT . 5 C EN T RAL P AN H ANDLE F A I R : 6 p.m. at the Bay C ounty Fairgrounds, 2230 E . 15th St., P anama C ity. T he fair is open through Oct. 10. T onight: the grand opening. A dmission is $10 for all. Enjoy rides, exhibits, food and more. Details: BayFairgrounds.com TUESDA Y , OCT . 6 P LE I N A I R TU E S DA Y: 9-11 a.m. at a different location each week. Free admission. Beginners to experienced learning from each other as they paint outdoors. For each week’s location, check Beach A rt G roup’s Facebook page, email beachartgroup@att.net or call H elen at 850 541-3867 L Y NN H A V EN F AR M ER S M AR K E T: 10 a.m. until dusk at Shefeld P ark in Lynn Haven with fresh seasonal produce, plus honey, jelly, baked goods, plants and handcrafted items for cooking. Details: LynnHavenM ainStreet.com or 265-2961 A UTHO R TIM D O R S E Y: 1 p.m. at the P anama C ity Beach P ublic Library, 12500 Hutchison Blvd.; 5:30 p.m. (EDT ) at the C orinne C ostin G ibson M emorial P ublic Library, 110 Library Drive in P ort St. Joe; and 7 p.m. at the Bay C ounty P ublic Library, 898 W . 11th St., P anama C ity. H e will have books and other Serge-related items available for purchase. Details: NWRLS.com C EN T RAL P AN H ANDLE F A I R : 6 p.m. at the Bay C ounty Fairgrounds, 2230 E . 15th St., P anama C ity. T he fair is open through Oct. 10. A dmission is $10 for all. Enjoy rides, exhibits, food and more. Details: BayFairgrounds.comWEDNESDA Y , OCT . 7 CENTRAL P ANHANDLE F AIR: 2 p.m. at the Bay C ounty Fairgrounds, 2230 E . 15th St., P anama C ity. T he fair is open through Oct. 10. Senior citizen day: free entry for those 55 and older; must purchase ticket to ride. A dmission is $10 for others. Enjoy rides, exhibits, food and more. Details: BayFairgrounds.com OP EN ST A G E N IGHT: 8 p.m. to 4 a.m. at Splash Bar, 6520 T homas Drive, P anama C ity Beach. H osted by R aven Samore with Special G uest every week. Shows at 11:30 p.m. and 1 a.m. Beats by DJ AMA XX. Details: SplashBarFlorida. com or 236-3450

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Friday, October 2, 2015 36 • The ENTERTAINER CALENDAR SPICE UP Y O UR WEEK WITH UPC O MING AREA EVENT S GO & DO Al co ho l Of fe ns es D. U. I. Of fe ns es Dr ug Of fe ns es As sa ul t an d Ba tt er y Tr af c Of fe ns es THURSDAY, OCT. 8 C ENTRAL P ANHANDLE F A I R : 4 p.m. at the Bay C ounty Fairgrounds, 2230 E . 15th St., P anama C ity. T he fair is open through Oct. 10. School day: all students admitted free; armbands available for $20. A dult admission is $5. E njoy rides, exhibits, food and more. Details: BayFairgrounds.com BIG B AD VOO D OO DADDY : 7:30 p.m. at the M arina C ivic C enter, 8 H arrison A ve., P anama C ity. T he swing, jazz and rock group is on a mission to revitalize A merica’s original art form and bring joy to audiences around the world. Details and tickets: M arina C ivic C enter.com or 763-4696 J E FF B LA CK: 7:30 p.m. at T he R epertory T heatre, 216 Quincy C ircle in Seaside. T ickets: $25. Details: Love T he R ep.comO C T. 9 HURR ICANE OP AL AER I AL P H O T O E X H IBI T : at the Bay C ounty P ublic Library, 898 W . 11th St., P anama C ity. Details: 522-2100, NWR LS.com C ENTRAL P ANHANDLE F A I R : 4 p.m. at the Bay C ounty Fairgrounds, 2230 E . 15th St., P anama C ity. T he fair is open through Oct. 10. School day: all students admitted free; armbands available for $20. A dult admission is $5. E njoy rides, exhibits, food and more. Details: BayFairgrounds.com PI RATES OF THE H IG H SEAS F EST IV AL : 4 p.m. at P ier P ark in P anama C ity Beach. Featuring live entertainment, kids’ parade, kids’ costume contest and more and closing with a reworks show 8:30 p.m. Details: V isit P anam C ityBeach.com WI NE TAST I N G: 5-7 p.m. at Somethin’s C ookin’, 93 E . 11th St., P anama C ity with complimentary wine and hors d’oeuvres. Details: 769-8979 15 TH ANNUAL J A ZZ B Y THE B AY : 6:30-9 p.m. at Oaks By the Bay in St. A ndrews with V ictor P ayano T rio and K elly-Scott Sextet; presented by G ulf Jazz Society. K E I TH SE W ELL AND F A MI LY I N CO N C ERT : 7 p.m. (doors open at 6 p.m.) at the P anama C ity C entre for the A rts, 19 E . Fourth St. in P anama C ity. Bay A rts A lliance hosts the independent recording artist and songwriter, who is currently lead guitarist/mandolin player for Lyle Lovett as well as music director for the Dixie C hicks. General seating admission benets B AA ’s A rts in E ducation programming; tickets are $20, limited to the rst 200 guests, available by phone at 850-640-3670 or at the C entre for the A rts. SE CO ND ANNUAL A P ALA C H OK T OB ER F EST : kicks off with live music and festivities at Oyster C ity Brewery in A palachicola, including the tapping of the Oyster C ity Oktoberfest Beer. A portion of proceeds benet A palachicola River K eeper. T ime T B A . Details: A palachOktoberfest.comO C T. 10 PI RATES OF THE H IG H SEAS F EST IV AL : festivities start at 7 p.m. with the R un for the T reasure 5 K at St. A ndrews State P ark and continuing at P ier P ark with live entertainment throughout the day. A t 2:30 p.m., the P irates of Dominique Y oux defend against the I nvasion of P anama C ity Beach followed by the parade at 5 p.m. and reworks at 8:30 p.m. Details: V isit P anama C ityBeach.com RUN FO R THE TREASURE 5K/F UN RUN : 5 K at 7:30 a.m., 10 K at 8 a.m., Fun R un at 9 a.m. at St. A ndrews State P ark, 4607 State P ark Lane, P anama C ity Beach. G RAND LA GOO N W ATER F R O NT F AR M ERS MAR K ET : 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at C apt A nderson’s on T homas Drive. E njoy the region’s nest makers, bakers and growers at PC B’s yearround F ARMER S market. Live music, free tastings and family fun. Details: W aterfront M arkets.org or 763-7359 ST . ANDRE W S W ATER F R O NT F AR M ERS MAR K ET : 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Smith Y acht Basin beside the Shrimp Boat R estaurant, 12th Street and Beck A venue. R ain or shine. V endors, live music, Kids C raft table. Bring a shing pole and stay for the day. Details: HistoricStA ndrews. com/market or 872-7208

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Friday, October 2, 2015 The ENTERTAINER • 37 CALENDAR SPICE UP Y O UR WEEK WITH UPC O MING AREA EVENT S Friday, October 2, 2015 GO & DO PA NAMA CITY BEACH 850-24 9-7200 850-24 9-7200 SECOND ANNU AL AP ALA CHOKTOBERFEST: 8 a.m. (EDT ) at Bowery Station in A palachicola, with the 5K Brat T rot run/walk; “Blues in the Lot” with live music and barbecue is noon to 5 p.m. (EDT ) to benet the A palachicola V olunteer Fire Dept.; festivities continue at 6 p.m. (EDT ) with Dirty Bird & T he Flu on stage. A portion of proceeds benet A palachicola R iverKeeper. Details: A palachOktoberfest.com GRAND BOULE V ARD F ARMERS MARKET A T SANDESTIN: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at 600 G rand Boulevard, M iramar Beach. SEASIDE F ARMERS MARKET: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Seaside A mphitheatre. Fresh produce, baked goods, dairy products and other unique offerings, cooking demos and activities. Y ear-round event. Details: SeasideFL.com T ADPOLE’S BIKE R UN: 11 a.m. at Harley-Davidson, 14700 P anama C ity Beach P arkway, P anama C ity Beach. Bike ride, bike wash, rafe and 50/50 drawing and food and drinks. P resented by the Buffalo Soldiers. 15TH ANNU AL JAZZ BY THE B A Y: 12:30-7:45 p.m. at Oaks By the Bay in St. A ndrews with N orthwest FL State C ollege Big Band, Kelly-Scott Sextet, Jill W ofsey Quartet, Bob M aksymkow Quartet and G eorge P etropolis Quintet; presented by G ulf Jazz Society. CENTRAL P ANHANDLE F AIR: 2 p.m. at the Bay C ounty Fairgrounds, 2230 E . 15th St., P anama C ity. T he fair is open through Oct. 10. A dmission is $5; armbands available for $20. Enjoy rides, exhibits, food and more. Details: BayFairgrounds. com CITY AR TS STREET P AR TY: 6-9 p.m. at C ityA rts C ooperative, 423 Luverne A ve., P anama C ity. Details: C ityA rtsC ooperative.com JA YCEES HA UNTED HOUSE: 7 p.m. at P anama C ity M arine Institute, downtown P anama C ity. Details: PCFLJaycees.com OCT . 11 PI RA T E S OF TH E HIGH S EA S F E ST: Oct. 9-11 in P ier P ark for weekend of pirate-themed activities and events for the whole family. Details: V isitP anamaC ityBeach.com G RAND LA GOO N W A T ER F R O N T F AR M ER S M AR K E T: 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at C apt A nderson’s on T homas Drive. Enjoy the region’s nest makers, bakers and growers at PCB’s year-round F ARMERS market. Live music, free tastings and family fun. Details: W aterfrontM arkets.org or 763-7359 30 A F AR M ER S M AR K E T: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on N orth Barrett Square in R osemary Beach. E ach Sunday, join this community event featuring fresh vegetables, fruits, eggs, honey, cheese, preserves, sauces, bread, sweets, prepared foods to go and much more. Details: 30aFarmersM arket.com W A T ER CO L O R CO A ST AL F AR M ER S M AR K E T: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. in W aterC olor. S E CO ND ANN U AL AP ALA CHOKTOB ER F E ST: N oon to 9 p.m. (EDT ) at Bowery Station in A palachicola, with nonstop music from seven bands on two stages. A portion of proceeds benet A palachicola R iverKeeper. Details: A palachOktoberfest.com PI RA T E S OF TH E HIGH S EA S F E STIV AL : festivities start at 1 p.m. in G rand Lagoon, with a vendor village, boat show and kids’ shing tournament at C apt. A nderson’s M arina, live entertainment at T reasure I sland M arina, a P irate Flotilla in G rand Lagoon at 5:30 p.m. and a nal reworks show at 7:15 p.m. Details: V isit P anama C ityBeach.com A M ER IC ANA C A F E SU NDA YS: 3 p.m. open mic, 4 p.m. touring musicians concert, at R oberts Hall, 831 Florida A ve., Lynn Haven. A dmission: $5. Details: 850722-4915 or 850-774-3561, or LuckyM udM usic.com

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Friday, October 2, 2015 38 • The ENTERTAINER Bay

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Friday, October 2, 2015 The ENTERTAINER • 39 Visit Enter The Web ID To View More Information On All Of Our Help Wanted Ads Accounting Tax Preparers No experience necessary. Free training program. Employment opportunities upon completion. 4 locations, call today 850-630-0520 Web ID#: 34332438 Banking/RE/Mortgage Innovations Federal Credit Union is seeking motivated, ambitious and member service oriented individuals with excellent organizational and customer service skills. If you have a positive attitude, a high standard of integrity, and you are a team player, we would like to talk with you about becoming a part of the exciting success and growth of this dynamic and innovative full service financial institution. We currently have openings for: FSR (Teller/ Loan Positions) Please submit your resume to: Innovations FCU, PO Box 15529, Panama City, Florida 32406 Attn: Human Resources. 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Visit Enter The Web ID To View More Information On All Of Our Help Wanted Ads Accounting Tax Preparers No experience necessary. Free training program. Employment opportunities upon completion. 4 locations, call today 850-630-0520 Web ID#: 34332438 Banking/RE/Mortgage Innovations Federal Credit Union is seeking motivated, ambitious and member service oriented individuals with excellent organizational and customer service skills. If you have a positive attitude, a high standard of integrity, and you are a team player, we would like to talk with you about becoming a part of the exciting success and growth of this dynamic and innovative full service financial institution. We currently have openings for: FSR (Teller/ Loan Positions) Please submit your resume to: Innovations FCU, PO Box 15529, Panama City, Florida 32406 Attn: Human Resources. Or email us at HR@innovationsfcu.org Web Id#: 34332364 Install/Maint/Repair Janitorial Technicians Needed Immediately! Must have a valid drivers license, pass background check and be able to work some weekends and/or nights. EOE. Pick up applications at 1814 Beck Ave, Panama City, FL 32405 Web ID#: 34331915 Install/Maint/Repair Maintenance Person Gulfgate Condominium 850-234-3623 EOE / DFWP Web ID#: 34332229 Logistics/Transport ATTENTION! Driver Trainees Needed Now! No experience necessary Needs entry-level semi drivers. Premium equipment & excellent benefits. Call Today! 1-800-709-7364 Web ID#: 34331923 Logistics/Transport Class ACDL Drivers Needed Immediately For Local Hauling Dump Trailer Experience Mossy Head & Surrounding Areas $1000 Retention Bonus *Home Nights Apply online: www .perdidotrucking.com 251-470-0355 Web ID#: 34327244 Medical/Health FT Medical Scribe Needed in outpatient practice. Must be proficient typist and medical experience highly recommended. Competitive salary and benefits offered. Must start immediately. Please send resume to agha.rheum@gmail.com Web ID#: 34332290 Medical/Health Medical Asst PTfor busy doctors office in Chipley. Must be a team player, dependable, able to multi-task. Computer exp & med term & able to triage to get patient ready to see physician req. Fax resume 850-785-3490 or email: hiringmedassit@gmail.com Web ID#: 34332407 Medical/Health Medical Biller Must be proficient in MediSoft, electronic billing, Availity and ICD 10 codes. Fax resume to 850-769-1178. Web ID#: 34332388 Security Unarmed Security Officer $9.85/hr, D License Required. Benefits avail. Apply online at www .yaleenforcement.com , email T allahasseeJobs@yaleenforce ment.com , or call 1-888-925-3363 ext. 2949 Web ID#: 34332175 Classifieds work! To Advertise Call Jessica at 850-747-5019 • David at 850-747-5013 Just Posted! 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Friday, October 2, 2015 40 • The ENTERTAINER

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Issue No. 32 • October 2, 2015 CONCERT ENTERTA IN ER BIG BAD VOODOO DADDY Contemporary swing revival band kicks off Bay Arts series | 8 New Centre for the Arts hosts first concert | 2 6 spots for Sushi Rolls | 10-11 Chili Vibrations World Music Festival | 19 ‘Walk into the Wild’ at St. Andrews State Park | 23 Take one. It’s FREE!

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Friday, October 2, 2015 20 • The ENTERTAINER BEACH INSIDER Friday, October 2, 2015 The ENTERTAINER • 21 BEACH INSIDER CHILI VIBRATIONS WORLD MUSIC FESTIVAL What: El Dub, Heritage, Hor!zen, The Wailers, Rebelution, Sway Jah Vu, Leilani Wolfgramm, Rootz Underground and G-Love and Special Sauce; International Chili Cook-Off When: Gates open at 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday Where: Aaron Bessant Park, 600 Pier Park Drive, Panama City Beach Tickets: $39 for Saturday general admission ($100 for VIP); $35 for Sunday general admission ($75 for VIP); $59 for general admission weekend pass ($159 for Advance VIP Weekend Pass with Reserved parking, private bathrooms with AC, food from local favorites, two complimentary drinks per day, reserved VIP viewing, TVs for Game Day); ages 11 and younger are free Local ticket outlets: Spinnaker Beach Club & Paradise Grill, 8795 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach; Little Village in St. Andrews, 2808 W. 12th St., Panama City; Frimet to Z Auto Center, 18100 Panama City Beach Parkway, Panama City Beach Details: ChiliVibrations.com WEEKEND MUSIC SCHEDULE Saturday Noon: El Dub 1:30 p.m.: Heritage 3:45 p.m.: Hor!zen 6 p.m.: The Wailers 8:15 p.m.: Rebelution Sunday 11 a.m.: Sway Jah Vu 1 p.m.: Leilani Wolfgramm 3:15 p.m.: Rootz Underground 5:30 p.m.: G. Love and Special Sauce Frimet is giving the crowd what it wants. The Destin-based favorite Heritage also is returning. Saturday begins with El Dub, and The Wailers open for Rebelution. Sunday performers include Sway Jah Vu and Leilani Wolfgramm. Rootz Underground, which represents Jamaica’s more contemporary reggae scene, opens for G. Love and Special Sauce. G. LOVE AND SPECIAL SAUCE An alternative hip-hop band from Philadelphia with a laid back blues vibe, G. Love and Special Sauce features G. Love, aka Garrett Dutton on vocals, guitar and harmonica, Jeffrey Clemens on drums and Jim Prescott on upright bass. “Jim, Jeff and I, we all really enjoy each other as people more than we ever did. On the bus, it’s tough love. You can get at each other like brothers would, but you really do love each other and have a good time,” G. Love said. “At this point, we have dedicated our lives to this.” The band is releasing its 10th studio album, “Love Saves The Day,” on Oct. 30 on Brush re Records. The album features guest performers Los Lobos guitarist David Hidalgo, Lucinda Williams, Citizen Cope, Ozomatli, DJLogic, Money Mark, Zach Gill and Adam Topol. G. Love feels this album is the most true to the band’s roots. “There are songs on certain records where we were trying to play catch up with whatever was hot that year. We are more authentic nowadays, making raw music and not worrying about making a commercial hit,” he said. “We have learned to embrace the music and do our original sound no one else has ever duplicated.” Originally formed in the ‘90s, the band released their self-titled debut with the single “Cold Beverage” in 1994 on Okeh Records. The next year’s follow-up album, “Coast to Coast Motel,” did not sell as well as the rst, though many consider it a stronger album. G. Love said the second album was an overreaction to the direction hip-hop was headed with synthesized sound they didn’t want to be part of — “... man, we’re blues.” “Then we went back to hip hop, but we’ve always straddled the two sides. It’s a bit of a balancing act. I think the last seven years, we have realized our sound,” G. Love said. “These days, after so many records out, music really has to be real, come from a real place. I don’t try to push it right now when I write for the band, it has to happen it a real way. Take a breath and let the writing stuff happen naturally. The other night I was woken up out of bed with a song I had to write.” One thing he has worked on is strengthening his vocals. “I do a vocal lesson before every show with a coach, Donna Newman, on the phone every day. In almost two years, I’ve done 400 half-hour phone lessons. It’s helped me to warm up before the show. I used to come off stage every night and not be able to talk,” he said. “We are closing in on 5,000 shows, doing about 100 to 250 shows a year. I do love it. I love it so much that when I’m off the road, I book myself shows.” Touring has de nitely changed over 23 years: “I don’t have to stop and go to a pay phone to call my girlfriend. Now she can bug you nonstop,” G. Love admitted. “Communication is a game changer. Touring can be isolating in a way.” But some things haven’t changed. “If I have a show at night, the full day is an emotional rollercoaster. I still get stage-fright, nervous during the day,” he said. “There’s a lot of mental and emotional work that goes into a show, regular stuff like remembering words, but sometimes it’s worse than others. “Last night, I was co-headliner with my idol, John Hammond, my musical father, in an acoustic show in New York City. I put so much weight on it and worked myself up. .... But stage fright can be positive, give you an edge, tension, then you get on stage and release. It’s like an after-school special. Once I get up there I have to let it y, not hold back. Stop being nervous and start playing.” G. Love will be among friends at Chili Vibrations. “I know all those guys,” he said. “We’ll bring a little bit of blues with the hip-hop. It’s going to be a hell of a dance party.” CHILI VIBRATIONS from Page 19 P hotos above by KURT LISCHKA | MoonCreekStudios.com P hotos above by KURT LISCHKA | MoonCreekStudios.com P hotos above by NATASHA JASPERSON | Contributed photo

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Friday, October 2, 2015 40 • The ENTERTAINER


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