Citation
News-herald

Material Information

Title:
News-herald
Uniform Title:
News-herald (Panama City, Fla. : 1970)
Added title page title:
Panama City News Herald
Place of Publication:
Panama City, FL
Publisher:
Halifax Media Group, Tim Thompson - Publisher, Mike Cazalas - Editor
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama City (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Bay County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Florida -- Bay County ( fast )
Florida -- Panama City ( fast )
Genre:
Newspapers. ( fast )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Newspapers ( fast )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Bay -- Panama City

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (May 1, 1970)-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Halifax Media Group, Tim Thompson - Publisher, Mike Cazalas - Editor. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
34303828 ( OCLC )
sn 96027210 ( LCCN )
ocm34303828

Related Items

Preceded by:
Panama City news
Preceded by:
Panama City herald (Panama City, Fla. : 1952)

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SPORTS Malone, Chipley play for state basketball bids C1 75 cents Read by 83,130 people every day Call 850-747-5050 Want to SUB S CRIBE? Young AR TIST What’s INSIDE WEATHER Plenty of sun. High 54, low 42. | B2 EL A NI CE ASA R, A GE 3 First Presbyterian Pre-School BUSINESS A5 CLA SSIFIED D1-6 COMICS C8 CRO SS WORD C8 DEATHS B3 L OCAL & S TATE B1-7 L OTTERY A2 NATION & WORLD A2-7 OUT & ABOUT B8 SP ORT S C1-6 T V LIS TINGS C6 VIEWP OINT S A6 COM . Facebook.com/ panamacitynewsherald Twitter: @The_News_Herald Social MEDIA G reene’s killer gets 20 years Victim’s sister says ‘I wish death on you’ By ZACK McDONALD 747-5071 | @PC N Hzack zmcdonald@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY — Family members of a man left dead for days in the trunk of a car wished death upon the man who shot him several times and placed him there. Darryl Mack, 22, of Panama City, was sentenced Thursday to 20 years in prison for his role in the robbery plot that led to the death of 24-year-old Tavish Greene. Mack accepted the plea offer instead of facing a trial, during which his initial attorney in the case had been ordered to testify against him. If convicted, he could have faced life in prison. Mack accepted the reduced charge from second-degree murder to manslaughter with a firearm. He also was found guilty of robbery and three counts of being a felon in possession of a firearm. During his sentencing, Mack heard from several of Greene’s immediate family who said they were disappointed with the sentence. “I wish death on you every day I wake up,” said Tanisha Greene, Tavish Greene’s sister. “I wish somehow ya’ll would croak over and die. If you die today, I’ll come to your funeral laughing.” Tangela Peterson, Tavish Greene’s mother, brought his infant daughter to meet the man convicted of killing her father. “This girl here will never ever get to know her dad, who he was,” Peterson said. “You get to see her in the flesh. He will never see her.” At one point bailiffs had to calm outbursts from the audience after Mack began to answer their requests for a reason he shot Greene and hid his body in the trunk of a car. “The story they seen is not how it went down,” Mack said. “He did have a hit on his head, but he robbed me. It didn’t go down like that. There was a shootout.” Mack was arrested with Tyricka Woullard, 20, in June. They had fled to Covington, Ga., as police discovered Greene’s body in the trunk of a 2004 Chevrolet Malibu behind an abandoned home on East Eighth Court on July 24. By JOHN HENDERSON 522-5108 | @PC N Hjohn jhenderson@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY BEACH — Revenue for the city for the first four months of the fiscal 2015 has increased more than 14 percent from the previous year, a clear sign that the shoulder season has been a good one, officials say. The city’s revenue sources for October, November, December and January include: business tax receipts, state revenue sharing, the half-cent sales tax, local-option fuel taxes, electricity franchise fees, building permits and utility taxes. The total revenue from those sources for Panama City Beach was $4.207 million for the first four months of fiscal year 2013-14. The amount was $4.812 million for the same months this year. The business tax receipts, which are generated from a tax on purchased goods and are the primary funding source of the city’s general fund budget, have increased 21.8 percent in the same months from last fiscal year. Officials said the numbers are just another sign that Panama City Beach is getting more and more year-round visitors, which is good not only for city coffers but the local economy. “Every year we seem to get a little ahead of last year during the winter season,” City Councilman Rick Russell said at a recent council meeting. “This year, just traffic indicates there is a lot more people (in town).” Jack Bishop, who owns three restaurants on the beach including Harpoon Harry’s that stays open for the winter season, said it’s been a good winter for many restaurants. Harpoon Harry’s opened in January after a renovation and has been doing well, he said. On Thursday, the restaurant was offering a senior snowbird lunch special that was attended by 200 people from Wisconsin. “I’d say that winter has been stronger (for business) than in the past, quite a bit, for all the restau rants (on the Beach),” Bishop said. Pier Park also has done well, general manager Michael Huesser said. D A RR Y L MA CK STINGING SITUATION By COLLIN BREAUX 747-5081 | @PC N HCollinB CollinB@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY BEACH — A wasp infestation has closed the auditorium at Arnold High School. Dancing for Life, an American Cancer Society benefit event sponsored by Fred Astaire Dance Studio, had been scheduled for Thursday in the auditorium, but was postponed after the wasps were discovered. John Haley, Bay District Schools’ executive director of operations, was not sure how long the wasps had been in the auditorium. He learned of the infestation when the Dancing for Life event was postponed. Haley said he visited the auditorium and saw the wasps swarming. He said they were stirred up when the lights were turned on and music played. “They become very visible,” he said. Several dead wasps were on the floor and more were in the fluorescent light fixtures. Haley said he didn’t know whether any students had been stung. He said several pest control companies were contacted about removing wasps. The auditorium will remain closed to all activities until they are gone. Derek Pumphrey, general manager for Brock Lawn and Pest Control, was at the auditorium Thursday afternoon. He said the wasps were newly mated queens that got into the auditorium to hibernate, not to nest. The wasps likely began to wait out the winter when temperatures cooled off in the fall, Pumphrey said. Exterminators inspected the auditorium Thursday to assess the infestation. No extermination work was performed Arnold Principal Keith Bland and theater teacher Kathleen McNulty could not be reached for comment. Camellia Johnson, an instructor at Fred Astaire, said those who have tickets for Dancing for Life should keep them. The event will be rescheduled when the auditorium reopens, she said. Wasps inject painful venom when they sting. People allergic to stings might suffer swelling of the throat, lips and mouth, along with breathing difficulties and hives, according to the U.S. National Library of Medicine. W asps prompt Arnold auditorium to close A sign on an Arnold High School auditorium door announces the auditorium is closed. P hotos by A NDRE W WARDLO W | The News Herald SEE KILLER | A7 “ E very year we seem to get a little ahead of last year during the winter season. T his year, just traffic indicates there is a lot more people (in town).” — City Councilman Rick Russell More visitors to PCB means more revenue for city government SEE PCB VISITORS | A7 BU S INE SS | A5 Beach Chamber honors Thomas FRIDAY February 20, 2015 I N S I D E Women dance into the spotlight P ANAMACI T Y.C O M

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AP A variety of healthy fruits and vegetables are displayed for sale at a market in Washington. A government advisory committee is recommending the first real limits on added sugars, but backs off stricter ones for salt and cholesterol intake. Nation & World Florida LOTTERY Setting It STRAIGHT It is the policy of The News Herald to correct all errors that appear in news stories. If you wish to report an error or clarify a story, call 747-5070 or email news@pcnh.com. The News Herald Panama City, Florida dDay, mMonth dDate, yYear 1 To place a classied ad Phone: 850-747-5020 Service hours: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday to Friday To buy a display ad Phone: 850-747-5030 Service hours: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday to Friday To subscribe to The News Herald Phone: 850-747-5050 To get news in the paper • Breaking news Phone: 850-522-5134 or 850-747-5045 • Non-deadline news, press releases Phone: 850-522-5134; Email: pcnhnews@pcnh.com • Letters to the editor Email: nhletters@pcnh.com Mail: Letters to the editor, The News Herald, 501 W. 11th St., Panama City, FL 32401 Note: Include name, address, phone number. • Weddings, engagements, anniversaries, births Email: announcements@pcnh.com Phone: 850-747-5020 At the ofce: 8 a.m. t o 5 p.m. Monday to Friday, 501 W. 11th St. • Church Calendar Email: pcnhnews@pcnh.com Mail: Church Calendar, The News Herald, 501 W. 11th St., Panama City, FL 32401 • Birthdays Phone: 850-747-5070 Email: pcnhnews@pcnh.com • What’s Happening Email: pcnhnews@pcnh.com To buy a photograph Phone: 850-747-5095 Circulation Directory Tim Thompson , Publisher 850-747-5001, tthompson@pcnh.com Mike Cazalas , Editor 850-747-5094, mmcazalas@pcnh.com Ron Smith , Regional Operations Director 850-747-5016, rsmith@pcnh.com Robert Delaney , Regional Controller 850-747-5003, rdelaney@pcnh.com Vickie Gainer , Regional Marketing Director 850-747-5009, vgainer@pcnh.com Eleanor Hypes , Regional Human Resources 850-747-5002, ehypes@pcnh.com Roger Underwood , Regional Circulation Director 850-747-5049, runderwood@pcnh.com At your service The entire contents of The News Herald, including its logotype, are fully protected by copyright and registry and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without written permission from The News Herald. Published mornings by The Panama City News Herald (USPS 419-560), 501 W. 11th St., Panama City, FL 32401. Periodicals postage paid at Panama City, FL. Postmaster: Send address changes to The News Herald, P.O. Box 2060, Panama City, FL 32402. THE NEWS HERALD Copyright P.O. Box 1940 Panama City, FL 32402 501 W. 11th St. Panama City, FL 32401 Phone: (850) 747-5000 Panama City, FL 32401 Phone: (850) 747-5000 WATS: 1-800-345-8688 Make the Panama City News Herald a part of your life every day. Home delivery: Subscribe to 7-day delivery and get unlimited access to our website and the digital edition of the paper. Customers who use EZ Pay will see, on their monthly credit card or bank statement, the payment has been made to Halifax Media Florida. Online delivery: Take The News Herald with you when you go out of town, or go green by subscribing to an online replica edition of The News Herald and get unlimited access to our website. Go to subscribe.newsherald.com to subscribe to digital only. Delivery concerns: To report a problem with your newspaper delivery, call 850-747-5050 between 6 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday and between 7 a.m. and 11 a.m. Saturday and Sunday. To start your subscription, call our customer service center at 850-747-5050 or toll-free at 800-345-8688. The News Herald also is available at more than 380 stores and news racks throughout Bay, Washington, Holmes, Jackson, Calhoun, Gulf and Franklin counties. Did we miss you? If we missed you, we want to correct the oversight. For redelivery: Call The News Herald at 850-747-5050 between 6 a.m. and 10 a.m. Monday through Friday and 7 a.m. and 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday. Single Copies: Daily, 75 cents; Sunday, $1.50 — Subscribers will be charged an additional $1.00 for the regular Sunday retail rate for the Thanksgiving Day edition of The News Herald. N ATI ON B riefs W O RLD B riefs Page A2 | The News Herald | Friday, February 20, 2015 The Associated Press WASHINGTON Rabbi pleads guilty to taping nude women at bath A prominent Orthodox rabbi acknowledged Thursday that for years he videotaped women at a Jewish ritual bath, recording more than 150 women as they changed clothes and got in and out of a shower. Barry Freundel pleaded guilty to 52 counts of voyeurism during a hearing at D.C. Superior Court. Each count is a misdemeanor punishable by up to a year in jail. Freundel, 63, was a rabbi at the Kesher Israel synagogue in Washington for more than 25 years before his arrest in October. At the time, court documents accused him of setting up a recording device disguised as a digital clock radio in the changing and showering area of The National Capital Mikvah, a ritual cleansing bath affiliated with Kesher Israel that opened in 2005. Police arrested Freundel on Oct. 14 after a person associated with the mikvah discovered the hidden camera. Freundel initially was charged with six counts of voyeurism on accusations of videotaping six women. Then, a search of his home turned up other media storage devices, and prosecutors indicated more women had been taped. Last week, prosecutors told a closed-door meeting of victims that Freundel had taped more than 150 women, although the statute of limitations would bar them from charging Freundel with many of the tapings. Freundel was fired from the synagogue a month after his arrest. NORTH HAVERHILL, N.H. Former exec pleads guilty in fatal 2013 crash A former Fortune 500 executive on Thursday admitted he killed a pregnant woman, her fianc and their fetus in what he called a failed suicide attempt when he drove his pickup truck across a highway median into oncoming traffic. Robert Dellinger pleaded guilty to negligent homicide for the 2013 deaths of 24-year-old Amanda Murphy and 29-year-old Jason Timmons, of Wilder, Vt. He also pleaded guilty to assault for the death of their fetus; Murphy was eight months pregnant. “I’m extremely remorseful to the families, and to my own family, as well. I wish I could have that day over,” Dellinger said in court. Dellinger, 54, of Sunapee, N.H., initially was charged with manslaughter, but that later was upped to second-degree murder. Negligent homicide is a lesser charge. Prosecutors have asked for a 12to 24-year prison term when Dellinger is sentenced in April. Dellinger was a senior vice president and chief financial officer at PPG Industries Inc. when he left in 2011 because of health problems. He also held high-level posts at Sprint Corp., Delphi Corp. and General Electric Co. The Associated Press TORONTO Boy, 3, dies after wandering away in sub-zero temps A 3-year-old Toronto boy died Thursday after wandering away from an apartment building into bitterly cold weather overnight. Police were notified of the boy’s disappearance at 7:30 a.m. by family members who said they woke to find him gone and the front door open. They said they last had seen him in his bed Wednesday night. Security camera video showed the boy, Elijah Marsh, leaving the building about 4 a.m. After a massive search, he was found just after 10 a.m. in a nearby yard. He did not show any vital signs, and was rushed to a hospital. Police announced his death on Twitter. “You see the picture of that beautiful little boy with a nice smile and the video of the child going out into the cold,” Toronto Police Chief Bill Blair said. “It really is a tragic set of circumstances.” Temperatures dipped to as low as minus-20 Celsius (minus-4 Fahrenheit) during the six hours Elijah was outdoors. ISTANBUL U.S., Turkey sign deal to train, arm Syrian rebels Turkey and the United States signed an agreement Thursday to train and arm Syrian rebels fighting the Islamic State group, said the U.S. Embassy in Ankara. The two countries have been in talks about such a pact for several months. The deal was signed Thursday evening by U.S Ambassador John Bass and Turkish Foreign Ministry undersecretary Feridun Sinirlioglu, said Embassy spokesman Joe Wierichs. He gave no further details. Sinirlioglu called the deal “an important step” in the strategic partnership between Turkey and the United States, according to Turkish state-run Anadolu Agency. The Turkish government has said the training by U.S. and Turkish soldiers could begin as early as next month at a base in the central Anatolian city of Kirsehir, and involve hundreds of Syrian fighters in the first year. The U.S. has said the goal is to go after the Islamic State group, but Turkish officials have suggested the trained rebels also could target the Syrian government of President Bashar Assad. With its 750-mile border with Syria, Turkey is a key part of the U.S.-led coalition against the Islamic State group. But negotiations with the U.S. over what to do about the Islamic militants have been fraught with disagreement — with Turkey insisting the coalition needs to also target the Assad government. On Tuesday, Turkish Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu said Turkey expected the trained rebels also will fight the Syrian regime. Turkey already is training Kurdish Peshmerga fighters in Northern Iraq, who have been battling Islamic State militants. WASHINGTON (AP) — An extra cup or two of coffee might be OK after all. More eggs, too. But you definitely need to drink less sugary soda. And, as always, don’t forget your vegetables. Saturated fat still is a problem. Recommendations Thursday from a government advisory committee call for an environmentally friendly diet lower in red and processed meats. But the panel would reverse previous guidance on limiting dietary cholesterol. And it said the caffeine in a few cups of coffee actually could be good for you. The committee also is backing off stricter limits on salt, although it said Americans still get much too much. It’s recommending the first real limits on added sugar, saying that’s especially a problem for young people. The Agriculture and Health and Human Services departments will take those recommendations into account in writing final 2015 dietary guidelines later this year. Eggs are OK The report says dietary cholesterol now is “not considered a nutrient of concern for overconsumption.” This follows increasing medical research showing the amount of cholesterol in your bloodstream is more complicated than once thought. The committee said available evidence “shows no appreciable relationship” between heart disease and how much dietary cholesterol you eat, but it still recommends eating less saturated fat. The panel doesn’t give a specific recommendation for how much cholesterol — or eggs — a person can eat. Watch the added sugar Added sugars should be no more than about 200 calories a day — about the amount in one 16-ounce sugary drink, said the advisory committee, which is made up of doctors and nutritionists. The recommendation is part of a larger push in recent years to help consumers isolate added sugars from naturally occurring ones like those in fruit and milk. Added sugars generally add empty calories to the diet. A softer approach on salt Sodium adds up quickly. A turkey sandwich and a cup of soup can average about 2,200 milligrams. That’s just under the committee’s recommendation of 2,300 milligrams a day for all people, even those most at risk for heart disease. The 2010 dietary guidelines had recommended those at risk for heart disease limit sodium to 1,500 milligrams. The new report said lowering to that amount can still be helpful for some. A hearty endorsement for coffee The report looks at caffeine for the first time, and says coffee is OK — even good for you. The panel says there is strong evidence that 3 to 5 cups a day can be part of a healthy diet, and there’s consistent evidence that it’s even associated with reduced risk of type 2 diabetes and heart disease. The advice comes with some caveats — don’t add calories with cream, milk and added sugars. Eat a plant-based diet The panel recommends eating more vegetables, fruits, whole grains, legumes, nuts and seeds. A plant-based diet is “more health promoting and is associated with less environmental impact” than the current U.S. diet, which is high in meat. SEEKING A HEALTHY DIET? Sugary drinks out; coffee, eggs in THURSDAY’S NUMBERS Cash 3 (afternoon) .......... 2-9-8 Cash 3 (evening) ............ 9-6-3 Play 4 (afternoon) .......... 2-2-4-9 Play 4 (evening) ........... 7-3-0-5 Fantasy 5 ........... 10-11-16-27-33

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LOS ANGELES (AP) — A “superbug” outbreak suspected in the deaths of two patients at a Los Angeles hospital has raised questions about the adequacy of the procedures for disinfecting a medical instrument used on more than a half-million people in the U.S. every year. At least seven people — two of whom died — have been infected by a potentially lethal, antibiotic-resistant strain of bacteria after under going endoscopic procedures at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center between October and January, and more than 170 other patients might have been exposed as well, UCLA said. UCLA said Wednesday that the infections might have been transmitted through at least two contaminated endoscopes that were used to diagnose and treat pancreatic and bile-duct problems. An endoscope — or more specifically in this case, a duodenoscope — is a thin, flexible fiber-optic tube that is inserted down the throat to enable a doctor to examine an organ. The device typically has a light and a miniature camera. “We notified all patients who had this type of proce dure, and we were using seven different scopes. Only two of them were found to be infected. In an abundance of caution, we notified every body,” said UCLA spokes woman Dale Tate. The two devices carried the bacteria even though they had been sterilized according to the manufacturer’s speci fications, UCLA said. “We removed the infected instruments, and we have heightened the sterilization process,” Tate said. On Thursday, the U.S. Food and Drug Administra tion issued an advisory warn ing doctors that even when a manufacturer’s cleaning instructions are followed, infectious germs might lin ger in the devices. Their com plex design and tiny parts make complete disinfection extremely difficult, the advi sory said. Yo u ar e in vi te d To jo in us fo r a Vi ki ng Ri ve rb oa t an d Oc ea n cr ui se pr es en ta ti on . Me et Da vi d Ho lm wo od fr om Vi ki ng Ri ve r Cr ui se s ur sd ay , Fe br ua ry 26 th at 5:30p m Le ar n ab ou t Vi ki ng ’s wo rl d-w ide it ine rar ies 2 FO R 1 Cr ui se Ra te s $150 pe r ca bin on boa rd cr ed it fo r al l at te nd ees RSVP to (850) 763-2876 Ne rv ig Tr av el 569 Ha rris on Av en ue 1129056 Struggling with Pr escription Painkillers? Opiate Dependence? Ma rk F. Mo ra n, M.D . Ge or ge G. Tr ac y, M.D . Ga ry La vi ne , M.D . 1218 Je nk s Av e Pa na ma Ci ty , FL 32401 We can help... Freed om Medical Cl inic Cuba sees Obama terror list vow as healing of wound Contaminated medical tool suspected in ‘superbug’ outbreak HAVANA (AP) — A year after he took office, President Ronald Reagan placed Cuba on a list of state sponsors of terror for backing leftist guerrilla groups in Central and South America. Cuba remained on the list as the Soviet Union fell, Fidel Castro stopped aiding insurgents and the global focus on terrorism turned to the Mideast. For outside observers, Cuba’s place on the list was a Cold War relic that showed the power of the communist government’s enemies in Congress. For Cuba, it became the most potent symbol of what many here call five decades of bullying by the superpower to the north. Now, as the two countries move to end a half-century of acrimony, President Barack Obama has made clear he will take Cuba off the terror list, saying in a televised address on his new Cuba policy late last year that “at a time when we are focused on threats from al Qaeda to ISIL, a nation that meets our conditions and renounces the use of terrorism should not face this sanction.” Cuba’s top diplomat for U.S. affairs heads to Washington next week for a second round of talks on restoring ties. Cubans ranging from President Raul Castro to ordinary citizens describe their country’s removal from the list as one of the most important elements of that detente, one that could help heal a great injustice. In Cuban eyes, they are the victims of terror, not the U.S. For Cubans, the worst act of aggression against the island since its 1959 revolution occurred when 73 people aboard a Cuban passenger flight from Barbados to Havana died in a 1976 bombing blamed on exiles with ties to U.S.-backed anti-Castro groups. Both of the men accused of masterminding the crime took shelter in Florida, where one, Luis Posada Carriles, still lives quietly. “This is a small country and everybody knows somebody who knows someone who was on that plane,” said Juan Carlos Cremata, a film and theater director who was 13 when his father, a 41-year-old airline dispatcher, was killed in what Cubans call “the Crime of Barbados.” “The U.S. is going to show that it’s an intelligent country because the most absurd, the most stupid thing in the world, is to put Cuba on a list of terrorist nations,” Cremata said. Removal from the U.S. list could provide Cuba protection against lawsuits inside the United States because inclusion on it strips countries of important immunities that U.S. courts normally grant to foreign governments. With Cuba and the U.S. moving to tighten trade ties, protecting Cuba and any U.S. corporate partners from lawsuits by people claiming to have been harmed by the Castro government could prove essential. “From the Cuban point of view, resolving this problem of the list also resolves this type of concern,” said Jesus Arboleya, an international relations professor at the University of Havana who served as Cuban consul in Washington from 1979 to 1982. “It isn’t convenient for anyone that they call Cuba a state sponsor of terrorism.” While removal from the terror list would have no direct impact on U.S. sanctions against Cuba, it also could make it easier for international banks to justify doing business with Cuba, said Robert L. Muse, an attorney specializing in U.S. laws on Cuba. The bank that handled transactions for Cuba’s interests section in the U.S. closed its account last year, leaving its diplomats dealing almost exclusively in cash. The ability to reopen a U.S. bank account is one of Cuba’s most urgent demands in the negotiations to reopen embassies. While that decision falls to individual banks, removal from the terror list will make it easier. The other countries on the list are Iran, Sudan and Syria. Removing Cuba requires Obama to send Congress a report certifying the island hasn’t supported international terrorism for the past six months. Forty-five days later, Cuba will be taken off unless the House and Senate pass a joint resolution to block the move. Such a resolution appears highly unlikely. NATIO N & WORLD Friday, February 20, 2015 | The News Herald | Page A3 AP U.S. and Cuban flags hang from a balcony in Old Havana, Cuba, in December. As the two countries move to end a half-century of acrimony, President Barack Obama has made clear he is moving quickly to take Cuba off the list of state sponsors of terror.

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In fact, the y wo rk so fast, thr oughout the whole body , and so effe ctiv ely , tha t most people ar e shock ed when the y r st use them. Harmful “Gunk” and To xins Out, Health, Healing and Ener gy In Man y people ar e surprised to learn that feet ar e a key gate way to better he alth. The Japanese , who enjo y FA R better health than we do as Americans , ha ve kno wn this sec re t for thousands of ye ar s. In fact, the ancient art of foot re e xo logy is based on Japanese healing methods that date back six thousand ye ar s. Ac upuncturists kno w this as we ll and tr eat patients for most of their health pr oblems by starting with the feet. Differ ent parts of the soles of our feet signicantly affect the health of other ar eas of the body . This has been pr ove n again and again by nu mer ous medical studies carried out by wo rld-r eno wned hospitals and un iv er sities . The soles of our feet also pla y an important ro le in our health by be in g at the lo we st point in the body , wher e gr av ity collects harmful, health and ener gy-sapping to xins that ha ve no way to come out. This to xic pur ging happens by gently stimulating the re e xo logy zones on the feet. And ther e’ s no better health “tool” on earth to help yo ur body re mo ve ha r m ful, built-u p che micals , to xic metals , exc ess lymph uid and “gu nk” th an a Deto x Fo ot Pa d. Plus , the y ar e far easier to use than other popular cleansing methods that include fasting, and re medies that violently pur ge the digestiv e sys tem. The y Wo rk While Yo u Sleep so Yo u’ll be Amazed When Yo u Wa ke ! After applying one to the bottom of each foot befor e bed, deto x foot pads go to wo rk as yo u sleep. Then, after a night of dr aw ing out and tr apping unhealth y to xins , what user s see in the morning is shocking. The br ow n, gunk-lled pad is ev idence of what’ s inside yo ur body that needs to come out. Once this harmful buildup is re mo ve d, most people sa y the y feel “invigor ated.” The y ex perience a unique , effectiv e, fu l l body cleansing fr om the inside out that allo ws mor e ener gy and better health immediately . Deto x Fo ot Pa ds ar e all natur al. No chemicals or drugs ar e used. Only healing ingr edients that ar e designed to dr aw th is un wa nted to xic buildup out quickly and then re place it with nutrients that heal yo ur body . Deto x Fo ot Pa ds Offer Fa st, Fu ll Body Health Benets No other cleansing method can offer this impr ove d full body health ove rnight: sw elling pr oblems depr ession When it comes to quality , industry ha ve a re putation for being safe , effectiv e and lled only with natur al, potent ingr edients , instead of ller s. In fact, the y include nine differ ent safe , high-quality , fast-acting natur al ingr edients to dr aw out the wa ste in yo ur body that mak es yo u tir ed, unhealth y and unfocused. Mor e Fo cus , Vitality and Ener gy No Mess , No Hassle.Just Re sults! apply one to the bottom of each foot befor e bed. That’ s it. No mess or hassle it couldn’t be easier . Yo u’ll lo ve wa king up and seeing all the to xins re mo ve d. A fe w things user s notice right away is mor e focus , vitality and e ner gy . Fre e Supply Av ailable Deto x Fo ot Pa ds offer a FREE 1-month supply of their Fo ot Pa ds to r st-time calle rs . Re ader s of thi s paper can call them dir ect ly to ha ve a supply shipped to them 1-80 0-969-9878. Doctor -appr oved Det ox fo ot pa ds ha ve now bee n used by million s of peo ple to impr ove their dai ly health an d ener gy . Yu ck! Af ter jus t one nig h t of use , this is what a Det ox Fo ot Pa d lo oks like . It has collecte d built-up toxic “gunk” that has accum ulated in an d near the lower leg s and fee t, exitin g right thr ough the por es of the fee t into the pad . Mod ern He alth & We llness This Health Fo otpad is so Po we rful it Has Doct or s Ta lkin g Abou t It! Stimu lating the re exology points on the soles of the fee t h elps dr aw out th e harm ful toxins th at ruin go od heal th. Af ter Befor e Ed ge wa te r Be ach & Go lf Resor t | Fo r ex hibit or inf orma tion and adv er tising please co nt ac t: Co ur te sy of Gulf Co ast De rmat olo gy Co ur te sy of An ytime Fi tness Co ur te sy of Bay Medic al Ce nt er Co ur te sy of Bel to ne Hearing Ce nt er Co ur te sy of Ca rd io va scular Institut e Co ur te sy of Spine Ca re P lus Co ur te sy of Eye Ce nter So uth Co ur te sy of All Clear Hearing Co ur te sy of Retina Sp ecialt y Institut e Co ur te sy of Wa te rside Chir opr ac tic Co ur te sy of Gulf Co ast Holistic Co ur te sy of Bay Co unt y Health De pt. Da ve and Bust er ’s Po we r Ca rd and pr iv ate ro om, gi ft car ds to local re staur an ts , health & beaut y gi ft basket , fr ee Gr ande mo vie passes , neck lac e set fr om Fr anc esca ’s and mor e! 2 NIGHT ST AY AT THE RESOR T CO LLEC TION & GOLF FOR 4 AT THE HOMBRE Page A4 | The News Herald | Friday, February 20, 2015 NATIO N & WORLD Tale of 2 nations: Winter weather both toasty, cold WASHINGTON (AP) — It might be hard to believe for a country that’s shivering from Maine to Miami, but 2015 has gotten off to a rather toasty start. Last month was the second warmest January on record globally, behind 2007, with temperatures 1.4 degrees above the average for the 20th century, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Meteorologists calculated that the United States in January was 2.9 degrees warmer than normal, making it the 24th warmest January since 1880. In America, January and the entire winter so far has been a tale of two nations: record hot in the West, bone-chilling cold to the East. While Boston is buried in more than 8 feet of snow, parts of the Pacific Northwest that depend on winter snow have gotten next to nothing. “Winter seems to have completely forgotten about us out here,” said Kathie Dello, deputy director of the Oregon Climate Service at Oregon State University. “If we could find a way of sending that snow out here, we’d really, really appreciate that.” Flowers already have started popping out and the ski industry is desperate, Dello said: “You can’t ski on rain, you can’t ski on dirt.” But you certainly can ski in New England, if you can dig out. California is having its warmest winter on record for a second consecutive year. And for the first time, San Francisco had no rain in January. What’s happened is that high pressure — nicknamed the ridiculously resilient ridge — has parked just west of California with unusually warm ocean water, preventing storms and cold from sneaking into the West, according to NOAA climatologist Jake Crouch. Then the jet stream dips south from Canada, bringing the cold to the Midwest and East and the cold in the East combines with the warm water of the Atlantic to provide big snow in the Northeast, he said. And while it had been chilly in the East and Midwest, up until this week it hadn’t been too record breaking, especially compared to what’s been going on out West, Crouch said. There were 3,499 daily warm temperature records broken in January, compared to 775 cold ones, he said. TransCanada eyes U.S. approval for $600M Upland Pipeline BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — The Canadian company behind the long-delayed Keystone XL oil pipeline will seek U.S. government approval for another pipeline — this one going north. Industry officials in North Dakota said the proposed Upland Pipeline could reduce reliance on the railroads to ship crude following recent concerns about safety. TransCanada Corp.’s proposed $600 million Upland Pipeline would begin near the northwestern North Dakota oil hub of Williston and go north into Canada about 200 miles. At peak operation it would transport up to 300,000 barrels of oil daily, connecting with other pipelines, including the Energy East pipeline across Canada. “We expect Upland and Energy East to play a key role in providing sufficient pipeline capacity to improve supply security for eastern Canadian and U.S. refiners, and reduce the need for foreign imports,” TransCanada said. TransCanada hopes to have the Upland Pipeline operating in 2018, pending approval from the U.S. State Department, North Dakota’s Public Service Commission and Canada’s National Energy Board. The company plans to submit an application to the State Department in the second quarter of this year. TransCanada has been trying for years to get U.S. approval for the 1,179-mile Keystone XL, which would connect Canada’s tar sands to refineries on the U.S. Gulf Coast but has sparked environmental objections. Congress last week approved construction, but President Barack Obama has threatened to veto the measure. TransCanada spokesman Davis Sheremata on Thursday said the company can’t speculate on whether it might run into similar problems with Upland. Company President and CEO Russ Girling last week told analysts and reporters that he hopes the drawn-out Keystone XL process is “an anomaly.”

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OP EN HO US E Su nd ay 2: 00 pm 5: 00 pm A on eof -a -k in d ho me in Ki ng ’s Po in t has fr on ta ge on bo th St . An dr ew ’s Ba y an d th e ba yo u. Al l of yo ur bo at in g ne ed s ar e me t wi th 12 7 fr on ta ge on th e ba y, a bo at li ft an d a doc k on th e ba yo u. Th is qu al it y 5, 60 0sq ua re -fo ot ho me ha s wa te r vi ew s fr om al mo st ev er y ro om an d is a mu st -s ee . ML S# 61 08 58 GE TT IN G TO TH E PO IN T 85 0. 87 2. 82 00 Of ce | 85 0. 819 .8 204 Ce ll l kc @c ol dw el lb an ke rp c .n et Di r: We st on Hw y. 39 0, ri gh t on Fr an kf or d, le ft on 27 th St ., ri gh t on Ki ng s Dr iv e, le ft on 30 th Ct . to dea d en d ho me on th e le ft . Friday, February 20, 2015 | The News Herald | Page A5 Precious metals (New York spot price) Gold Silver Platinum 1,208.20 16.48 1,174.00 -6.10 -0.12 0.00 Business Source: Matt Wegner, Financial Advisor, The Edward Jones Co., Panama City 769-1278 The Dow 30 Stocks Close Chg. Chg. . 3M American Express AT&T Boeing Caterpillar Chevron Cisco Systems Coca-Cola DuPont Exxon Mobil General Electric Goldman Sachs Home Depot Intel IBM J&J JP Morgan McDonald’s Merck Microsoft Nike Pzer Procter & Gamble Travelers Comp United Tech Verizon Walmart Walt Disney United Healthcare Visa $167.09 -0.31 $78.40 -1.38 34.09 -0.40 $153.75 +2.71 $83.30 -1.50 $108.35 -2.09 $29.31 -0.18 $42.11 +0.38 $76.08 -0.23 $89.44 -1.57 $25.01 -0.01 $189.11 +0.44 $110.94 -1.05 $34.21 -0.05 $163.89 +1.70 $100.70 +0.74 $59.23 -0.14 $94.19 -0.39 $58.30 -0.50 $43.50 -0.03 $93.70 +0.08 $34.41 -0.07 $85.21 -1.05 $107.99 +0.01 $122.91 +0.92 $48.91 -0.03 $83.52 -2.77 $103.89 +0.03 $110.03 +0.26 $269.10 -0.02 Stocks of local interest Darden Rest Gen. Dynamics Hanger Group Hancock Hldg Home Bancshares ITT St. Joe KBR L-3 Comms Hldgs Oceaneering Int. Regions Fin. Sallie Mae Southern Co. SunTrust Rock-Tenn Co. Ingersoll-Rand Engility Holdings $62.132 +0.15 $139.51 +0.85 $23.91 +0.01 $29.28 +0.02 $31.32 -0.20 $41.50 +0.43 $17.41 -0.12 $17.89 +0.10 $131.18 +1.60 $52.40 +0.33 $9.53 +0.02 $9.21 -0.02 $46.19 -0.65 $40.67 -0.30 $71.03 +0.21 $67.97 +0.06 $47.25 -0.11 News Herald staff report MIRAMAR BEACH Arbor Wealth hosting investment seminar Arbor Wealth Management, a fee-only registered investment advisory firm, will host a pair of seminars next week to explore the opportunities and risks in 2015 capital markets. Presentations will take place at 10 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. Wednesday in the Arbor Wealth Conference Room in Miramar Beach. Syndicated economic columnist Margaret McDowell will lead the seminar, discussing “Income with Growth” and “Growth with Income” portfolio management styles. Reservations can be made by calling 850-608-6121. Refreshments will be served. Business FOCUS Foreign exchange (as of 5 p.m. CST) U .S. $1.00 = Canadian $1.2493 U .S. $1.00 = Mexican peso 14.997 U .S. $1.00 = 0.8796 U .S. $1.00 = 0.6484 Florida ports want help to lure shipping firms By JIM TURNER The News Service of Florida TALLAHASSEE — The top lobbying group for Florida’s seaports wants the state to establish a marketing campaign to help lure cargo-shipping companies from major ports in other areas of the country. A study released this week by the Florida Ports Council calls for lawmakers to create an advertising effort to entice shipping firms to move cargo through the Sunshine State rather than ports in Savannah, Ga., Houston, New York or even Los Angeles. The council’s study on global-trade opportunities and challenges also wants lawmakers to create incentive programs to attract import-distribution centers as well as export-oriented manufacturing companies. In addition, with the legislative session starting March 3, the study urges lawmakers to remove regulations that slow shipping and to keep money flowing for the ports. “Florida has improved its position as the global pier for the U.S. and is one of the leading states for import and export of goods,” the report said. “However, in this era of global competition for jobs and tax revenues, Florida’s ports must continue to build a competitive logistics infrastructure.” Any marketing plan would have to challenge the ports in New York and Charleston, S.C., which are the key non-Florida ports used to bring imports to Florida from Europe, the report said. Ports in Houston, Savannah, New York and Charleston are major players used by Florida exporters to South America. And ports in Los Angeles, Long Beach and Savannah are top non-Florida ports that Florida importers use for Asian cargo. No estimate has been made on the cost of such a marketing effort. “The study has identified the issues. Now we have to build a marketing program and go after it,” said Florida Ports Council Chairman Val Schwec, the director of the Port of Fernandina. “And it won’t be easy, because other states are trying to keep it or add to theirs.” It remains to be seen how lawmakers will respond. House Transportation & Ports Chairman Pat Rooney, R-West Palm Beach, said lawmakers are “committed to continuing their efforts to capture more cargo activity and increase job opportunities for Floridians.” Rooney has toured a number of the state’s ports, and his subcommittee will take a field trip in March to the Port of Jacksonville, known as JaxPort. Bill Johnson, the incoming chief executive officer of Enterprise Florida, the state’s economic development arm, pointed to a work slowdown on the West Coast because of labor negotiations as an example of an issue Florida can use in its campaign. 40 percent of Wal-Mart U.S. workers to get raises BENTONVILLE, Ark . (AP) — Hoping to shed its reputation for offering little more than dead-end jobs, Wal-Mart, the nation’s biggest private employer, is giving raises to almost a half-million workers and offering what it says are more opportunities for advancement. Wal-Mart said that as part of $1 billion it’s spending to change the way it trains and pays workers, the company will give raises to about 40 percent of its 1.3 million U.S. employees in the next six months. In addition to raises, Wal-Mart said it plans to make changes to how workers are scheduled and add training programs for sales staff so employees can more easily map out their future at the company. “We are trying to create a meritocracy where you can start somewhere and end up just as high as your hard work and your capacity will enable you to go,” CEO Doug McMillon said. Wal-Mart follows other big retailers that have announced plans to increase pay for their workers. Swedish home furnishings retailer Ikea this year gave thousands of workers at its U.S. division a 17 percent average raise to $10.76 an hour. Clothing chain Gap Inc. raised its minimum hourly wage to $9 last year and to $10 this year. Thomas honored by PCB Chamber By VALERIE GARMAN 747-5076 | @valeriegarman vgarman@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY BEACH — Panama City Beach native Mike Thomas has seen the area grow from a sleepy coastal town to the bustling metropolis it is today. Thomas’ commitment to bettering the area as both an elected official and business owner earned him the title of 2014 Pioneer of the Year, the most prestigious honor given out by the Panama City Beach Chamber of Commerce, which hosted its annual awards dinner Thursday night. “I have been blessed to live in the greatest place in the world,” Thomas said during a tearful acceptance speech surrounded by family. “I have enjoyed Panama City Beach.” An Army veteran who served in Vietnam and Panama, Thomas has served on the Bay County Commission for more than a decade, but announced at the event he does not plan to run for re-election. Before serving on the County Commission, Thomas sat on the Panama City Beach Council and was integral in the development of Frank Brown Park and Pier Park. He also sits on the Bay County Tourist Development Council and is a past member of the Bay County Planning Board. Thomas thanked his family, especially his wife, for supporting his years as a politician. Those years saw incredible change in Bay County as a whole, but perhaps most significantly on the Beach, which continues to grow its business community. “Panama City Beach is in a spot right now that I think we’re moving up and doing better,” Thomas said. “Everybody asks us what we want to be. We want to be exactly what we are, and I’m proud to be what we are.” The Panama City Beach Chamber also honored several other members of the local business community at the awards dinner. Darren Haiman received the Chairman’s Award for his leadership in 2014, and passed the torch to new chairman Mike Burke. Jason Crowe was honored as the HYPE (Helping Young Professionals Evolve) Member of the Year and Allison Smith took home the Ambassador of the Year award. Beachy Beach Real Estate owner Karen Smith was honored as 2014’s Small Business Person of the Year for her success in growing her business from three employees after opening soon after the 2010 oil spill to 55 employees today. Smith also serves on the Beach Chamber board and as the president of the nonprofit organization Beach Care Services. Bubba McCants of Counts Real Estate Group received the Humanitarian of the Year award for his commitment to giving back to several charity organizations, including Big Brothers Big Sisters, Beach Care Services, Toys for Kids and Junior Achievement. Also honored was Bubba Waddell, a cherished chamber member of more than 20 years who passed away last year after a long battle with cancer. Waddell was honored with the 2014 President’s Award, given to a member who has made a lasting impression on the Panama City Beach Chamber. “There was hardly ever a Friday morning where the chamber staff wasn’t expecting a smiling face walking through the door carrying a bag of donuts and bagels,” said chamber President Lance Allison, reflecting on Waddell’s unwavering dedication to the organization. “Bubba was a dear friend and will always be considered special to the chamber.” H EATHER L EIPHART | The News Herald Bay County Commissioner Mike Thomas speaks after receiving the Pioneer of the Year Award from the Panama City Beach Chamber of Commerce on Thursday.

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BILL DAY | Cagle Cartoons F or years, people assumed encyclopedias had to be created by professionals. Then Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales attempted to create an encyclopedia without central planners. That sounded like a terrible idea to the old gatekeepers — people who hired experts to carefully fact-check and edit every encyclopedia entry. When they heard that Wales would crowdsource an encyclopedia, one Encyclopedia Britannica editor sneered, “The user who visits Wikipedia is a visitor to a public restroom.” But today, research shows Wikipedia is as accurate as Encyclopedia Britannica. Wikipedia is now the sixth most visited website, and the hardcover Encyclopedia Britannica no longer exists. “It’s a bit sad in a way,” Wales said. “I love Britannica. But I love candles, too, and I sure wouldn’t give up my electric light.” When I say Wikipedia is crowdsourced, I mean that millions of readers edit the entries. Their power to correct things is weighted according to the reputation they acquire from the “crowd.” Without being paid, this army of amateurs takes pride of ownership. They work hard to keep their entries accurate. After model/actress Anna Nicole Smith died, someone changed her Wikipedia entry to something vulgar. It was fixed within minutes. The amateur editors specialize, Wales said. “There is a group of people who say, look, we’ve got all these entries about bridges, we want to make sure they’re all really good, because we love bridges; we’re bridge fanatics. I mean, who knew bridge fanatics exist?” But they do. So do fanatics who want to get things right about Roman history, bacteria, spy novels and so on. That this could be accurate without strict central planning is hard to grasp. Even Wales started out thinking some kind of planner was necessary. He hired a Ph.D. in philosophy to edit a more centralized online encyclopedia, Newpedia. It failed. But Wikipedia, without a central plan — just a few simple ground rules — flourished. Wales likens the lesson to economist Friedrich Hayek’s insights about why decentralized, freemarket decisions are wiser than centralized, socialist planning: The crowd possesses “local knowledge” experts can’t begin to replicate. Many of today’s most popular websites — Google, Indiegogo, Facebook — thrive because they gave more control to users than to the founders. They also help users get things done without relying on gatekeepers at publishing houses, mainstream media or colleges. Defenders of government and central planning often say there are some things we just can’t leave to individuals, things that require government central planning, such as road building. But often that’s not true either. In Britain, a highway was damaged by heavy rains. The local government promised to repair it. “After three weeks, they said it’s going to be three months. After three months, they said a year,” entrepreneur Mike Watts told me. Mike’s wife then told him he should build the road. Although he had no road-building experience, he agreed to try. He went to the local pub and persuaded a farmer to let part of his land be used for the project. Government said it would take a year to rebuild the road. On TV one bureaucrat said, “you can’t just do what you want ... (Everything must) conform to highway standards!” But Mike built his “private road” in just 12 days. He paid for it by collecting a $3 toll. Drivers cheerfully paid because Mike’s road saved them so much time. After Mike started giving interviews about the success of his road, the local government got embarrassed and quickly finished work on its road. Mike had to shut down. He at least managed to break even. Both he and Wikipedia are reminders that human beings can still do great things, big and small, when they stop waiting for permission from above. Gatekeepers not always necessary John Stossel Syndicated columnist Get INVOLVED! U.S. President President Barack Obama The White House 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. NW Washington, D.C. 20500 Phone: 202-456-1414 Email: www.whitehouse.gov/contact U.S. Congress Sen. Marco Rubio U.S. Senate Washington, D.C. 20510 Phone: 202-224-3041 Email: rubio.senate.gov Sen. Bill Nelson U.S. Senate Washington, D.C. 20510 Phone: 202-224-5274 Email: billnelson.senate.gov Rep. Gwen Graham U.S. House of Representatives Washington, D.C. 20515 Phone: 850-785-0812 Email: gwen.graham@mail.house.gov Rep. Jeff Miller U.S. House of Representatives Washington, D.C. 20515 Phone: 202-225-4136 Email: jeffmiller.house.gov L ETTERS PO LI C Y : Provide a daytime telephone number and home address for verication purposes. L etters may be edited for space, consistency and clarity. Please limit to 750 words. Send mail to Editor, P.O. Box 1940, Panama City, F L 32402; or email to nhletters@pcnh.com 49 F ORUM Page A6 | The News Herald | Friday, February 20, 2015 Viewpoints Our V IEW I ’m emailing you regarding the story you posted about Erik Cobb being suspended from teaching at Arnold High School. I had Mr. Cobb for two out of my four years at Arnold and can say that he was among my favorite teachers, if not my absolute favorite. Why? Because he treated me as his equal. I never felt that I was below him, or that what I said wasn’t valid. He was the only teacher to treat me like an adult and seem legitimately interested in what I had to say. I was being expected to move away from home and start a new life at college in less than a year, and he was the only teacher that didn’t require me to ask to go to the bathroom or censor his teaching materials because he thought some students may be too sensitive. You can’t expect students to act like adults if you don’t treat them as such. To the parents who are complaining that his use of language is rubbing off on their children: You obviously don’t know your children. As a previous student of said public high school, your kids have been hearing and saying those words for years. I promise. Not only that, they have full access to the Internet. They have become well accustomed to hearing dirty words. I feel like Cobb is being blamed for parents lashing out over their kids “growing up too fast.” If you have a problem with his teaching style, have your child moved. There are other English teachers. But you will be depriving your kids of an amazing opportunity to learn from an amazing man. Erik Cobb helped me develop into an educated, opinionated, well-spoken adult. I affirmed my core beliefs through discussions held in his classroom. Losing him as a teacher would be a monumental mistake on the part of this school district. J ENN Y GLI SSM A N Panama City Beach Influential teacher I am writing in regards to the news about Bay County teacher Erik Cobb and his recent suspension. I am a former student of Mr. Cobb, and I can say with the utmost confidence that he was the most influential teacher I had during high school. He inspired me to pursue a career in the arts and I earned my B.A. in literature from FSU a few years later. I now work in television production in Los Angeles. Mr. Cobb was distinctly different from all other teachers I had at Arnold. He spoke to students as peers rather than children. Many students were not used to adults treating them this way and took advantage of this freedom. However, the students who were receptive to Mr. Cobb’s avant-garde style of teaching (and there were many of us) succeeded and were inspired by him and the literature he taught in his class. He really knew how to get to the point with unruly students. He didn’t mince words or waste time. I distinctly remember being suspended in Mr. Cobb’s class once, along with four of my classmates, for simply acting like an (expletive). This was the first and only time I was in trouble in those four years at Arnold. I don’t think Mr. Cobb should be fired or should have to resign. He is and was an incredible educator/mentor for Bay County. If the biggest problem Arnold High school students/parents have now is profanity coming from one of the best teachers on the beach, then consider yourselves lucky and toughen up. Cobb is only preparing your students for the real world outside of the idyllic experience that is attending a high school just a mile from the Gulf. Besides, doesn’t the Bay County School Board have anything better to do than prey upon teachers who are actually doing their job well? Cobb hated the indolent and sniveling adolescent mindset just as much as any other selfrespecting adult, though he has continued to work to educate young people in Bay County for years on end without fail. So what if he wrote what he felt to get his point across? Wouldn’t you hope that your child has enough guts to say what they feel as well? H ENR Y T HOMPSON Los Angeles Suspended teacher should be reinstated Tim Thompson, Publisher Mike Cazalas, Editor S. Brady Calhoun, Editorial Page Editor 747-5075 | @sbradycalhoun bcalhoun@pcnh.com Should the county sell land near NSA-PC to the state for $1.3 million?Y E S: 37 % (27 votes)NO : 63% (46 votes) OUR NEW QUESTION: Should Congress authorize more military action against ISIS? To respond, visit www.newsherald.com NEWS HERALD Bears on the highway W here does a 450-pound bear live? Any place it pleases, at least for awhile. That’s not a joke. That’s been the rule — more or less — in the state of Florida for the past few decades as the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission worked to bring Florida’s black bear back from extinction. The rules about killing bears are so strict that FWC encourages people who are attacked to fight them off with rocks, sticks and their (sorry) bare hands. State law does allow someone under attack to shoot and kill a bear, but the person will have to prove that he had no choice, no escape and did not “recklessly and intentionally” place himself or herself in a situation where killing would be the only option. In other words, it just might be easier to defend oneself from shooting a person under the state’s Stand Your Ground law than it is to defend shooting a bear. The good news is that it appears Florida’s rules protecting bears have been an unqualified success as it goes to their population. FWC officials say there are at least 3,000 of them statewide and an official tally is expected later this year. The bad news, as anyone who lives near a bear habitat — or worse, gets between a bear and a trash can — knows, is that they have become an unqualified nuisance. In 2014, wildlife officials received 7,000 calls about bears (257 from Bay County residents). So far in 2015, 19 bears have been euthanized because they were believed to be a threat to humans. Also, four people were attacked by bears in the past 14 months. In what appears to be a response to what Stephen Colbert might have once called “the growing bear threat” the FWC is examining the possibility of allowing a oneweek bear hunt this fall. This would have been unthinkable not that long ago, even if the bear population could sustain a hunt. Most people think of real life, wild bears in the same way they think of teddy bears, Winnie the Pooh and the lazy Baloo. However, the FWC is doing the right thing even if it won’t solve the nuisance problem. Hunters taking bears during hunting season will help manage the population, but it won’t prevent some bears from living near humans and viewing trash day the way we view a trip to the buffet. The solution to the nuisance problem is for humans to secure their trash cans, dog food and other bear treats as best they can. Also, people who move into homes that were recently bear habitats will most likely have to get used to their new neighbors as best they can. The FWC already is doing what it can on that front in the clash between bears and humans. So, while it won’t solve the problem, Florida’s hunters should be permitted to hunt bears. We clearly need some authority in place to prevent bears and any other fish or animal to be hunted into extinction, but if the population of any animal will sustain it, then people who want to should be allowed to hunt it. The reason, for those who need one, is simple. Those who want to hunt or fish in a free country should be allowed to without being harangued by the government or from people who buy their meat in a grocery store. That only makes sense. If the biggest problem Arnold High school students/parents have now is profanity coming from one of the best teachers on the beach, then consider yourselves lucky and toughen up.

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Jo in me and ex per ie nc e Al ask a on my To pra te d "B es t of Al ask a" Cr uise and To ur ! We' ll co mb in e my ex clu si ve 5ni gh t La nd an d Ra il ad ve nt ure wi th Pr in ce ss Cr ui se s' awa rd win nin g "V oy ag e of th e Gl ac ier s" cru ise fo r a com ple te on ce in a li fe ti me Al ask an Ex pe ri e nce . Tr av el wit h fri en ds, ol d and ne w, and di sc ov er wh y th is is Ba y Co un ty 's #1 to ur ! NE RV IG TR AV EL 56 9 Ha rri son Av e. "H ist or ic Do wn tow n" Pa na ma Ci ty 85 076 328 76 | www .n er vig .c om 13 -D AY “B EST OF AL AS KA " JU LY 7t h & JUL Y 21 st TW O PE AK SE AS ON DE PA RTU RE S Yo ur Ch oic e: Ju ly 7t h 19 th or Ju ly 21 st Au g 2n d News Herald le photo Thousands of people enjoyed the beach last summer by Pier Park in Panama City Beach. Statistics show visitation is up during the colder months as well. PCB VISITORS from Page A1 “Pier Park continues to be a popular destination for locals and tourists alike to shop, dine and play,” he said in a prepared statement. “We’re enthusiastic about Panama City Beach’s tourism growth, which is a benefit to the overall success of our property.” More people have been staying in local hotels during the shoulder season. Bed tax collections increased 23.4 percent in October, 4.5 percent in November and 16.45 percent in December from the same months the previous year. “To take a step further back for perspective, in 2009 the collections for October (normalized at a 3 percent collection) were $294,466. In 2015 the collections for October at that same collection rate was $581,399,” David Demarest, public relations manager for the Panama City Beach Convention and Visitors Bureau, wrote in an email. “The bed tax collection is our best way to estimate visitation, so almost double in the past 5 years is pretty amazing.” In a telephone interview, Demarest said he grew up in the area and he remembers when the beach was deserted in the winter. “It used to be in the wintertime you could shoot a cannon down Front Beach Road, so it’s helping businesses stay in business, and it’s helping people stay open year-round, and that is having an effect where it’s giving people more reasons to come down and more reasons to stay,” Demarest said. “I like to look at it from our point of view: We’re boosting tourism. But from a local’s point of view, we’re keeping restaurants open. We’re getting new stores to come here, like the Fresh Market is going to be opening soon, so that’s a big deal. And that’s something you’d never have if you didn’t have these visitation numbers.” He said the CVB has been marketing the Beach to visitors in the fall and winter months. He estimated that more than 40,000 people attended the New Year’s Eve Beach Ball Drop. “Our marketing strategy has been for the fall and winter just to have it stacked with events,” Demarest said. “We want to give people a reason to come to town. The winter visitors have things like the Homecoming Dance, the Senior Prom.” KILLER from Page A1 “My son was so decomposed I couldn’t show his face,” Peterson said during the sentencing. “You put him in the trunk of a car behind an abandoned house in 100-degree weather. Why?” Police said Greene’s death came at the end of a botched robbery involving three conspirators. One of the three accused, 22-year-old Dontavis Thomas, pleaded no contest to being an accessory to Greene’s death. Police said the suspects lured Greene to Woullard’s home at 3710 W. 21st St., where they planned to rob him the morning of July 19. Thomas and Mack allegedly used phone calls and text messages to draw Greene into a trap through Woullard, his ex-girlfriend. The three hid inside, waiting to ambush Greene for money and drugs. Woullard and Mack fled to Georgia the next day, police reported. Thomas remained in Bay County and was arrested shortly after the robbery. Thomas agreed to five years’ probation, punishable by as much as 20 years in prison if he didn’t testify against the co-defendants, according to court documents. In the months that followed Thomas’ plea deal, Timothy Hilley, Mack’s attorney at the time, reported that Mack made a veiled threat on Thomas’ life during a confidential conversation. Prosecutors demanded that Hilley testify in trial against his own client, and Hilley was removed from the case. The day Mack accepted the 20-year sentence, Bay County Judge James Fensom ruled Hilley’s testimony would be admissible in court and jurors would potentially hear a defendants’ own attorney speak against him. According to the terms of his plea deal, Mack could be released in about 16 years. Woullard still faces charges of principal to seconddegree murder and principal to robbery. She was ordered Thursday to undergo competency evaluations before a trial date can be set, according to court records. 1954 Les Paul guitar sells for $335,500 NEW YORK (AP) — The 1954 Les Paul Gibson guitar known as “Black Beauty” has sold at auction for $335,500. Guernsey’s auction house said the six-string instrument with gold-plated hardware set the standard for other Les Paul Gibson guitars. Paul was a jazz, coun try and blues guitarist. He made frequent modifications to his basic guitar over the years, refining the sound. Paul, whose hit songs include “How High the Moon,” played his instru ments in concerts, record ings and on the “Les Paul and Mary Ford” television show. He died in 2009. There was no pre-sale estimate for the “Black Beauty” guitar, and Guern sey’s could not provide the name of the buyer. The auction record for a guitar belongs to the Fender Stratocaster that Bob Dylan played at the 1965 Newport Folk Festival. It sold for $965,000 in 2013. Paul collaborated on his original design with Gibson after the guitar maker approached him about making an electric guitar bearing his name. The auctioneer calls it the most significant electric guitar ever made. Years ago, Paul gave the instrument to his friend, guitar technician and builder Tom Doyle of Wantage, N.J. Guernsey’s president, Arlan Ettinger, said the Les Paul guitar is considered a “Holy Grail” among musi cians because it gave birth to thousands of instruments that bear his name.

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Page A8 | The News Herald | Friday, February 20, 2015

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What happens to all of those really good Squalls that are not printed? Maybe someone could collect them and write a book. Snowbird. Sunbird. Funbird. Whatever you call yourselves we’re just very happy that you all come back year after year. Well, most of us! I’m a sunbird and a funbird. I left the snow behind! South Texas has winter visitors. We call them winter Texans. Makes them sound like homefolk. Boston in P.C.? The lead singer died eight years ago. The band was done 25 years ago. Is this the best we get in P.C.? Got you down as a slight maybe to Boston concert. I hope you aren’t suggesting that none of the other members of the band Boston are relevant since the lead singer died. Boston sold out before and will again, even without your support or leadership. Boston had that one great album. But every single song on the album was great! If they would just play those 11 songs I’d go. Oh, great. Now I have “More Than a Feeling” running repeatedly through my head. I’m saving my ticket money for Spandau Ballet’s Civic Center concert. We don’t need a local residents day for heaven’s sake. We’re lucky enough to live here 365 days a year where others only come for a while. Plenty of sun with a cool breeze on Friday. I’m fine with plenty of sun. However, the cool breeze can go and fly a kite. I mean literally. Dogs leave less mess — and bring more joy — than most human beings on the beach. Dogs? Why not bring your cats to the beach? I can see the ads now. World’s most beautiful litter box! “World’s most beautiful litter box!” That would be during S.B. Readers sound off Squall Line appears daily. Call 850-522-5133, or go to www.newsherald.com and click on the “Squall Live” icon. S quall L ine PANAMA CITY NEWS HERALD FRIDAY February 20, 2015 Section B Local & State Facebook.com/ panamacitynewsherald Twitter: @The_News_Herald www.newsherald.com By ZACK McDONALD 747-5071 | @PCNHzack zmcdonald@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY — A Callaway man who killed a 20-year-old during a botched robbery for 2 ounces of cannabis has been sentenced to 45 years in prison. Randy Jackson, 24, was sentenced Thursday for plotting a robbery scheme that turned into a deadly shooting in July. Ryan Brooks, 20, was shot multiple times in a Panama City Beach apartment complex parking lot before police arrived to find him face down on the asphalt. Judge James Fensom sentenced Jackson to a minimum of 30 years in prison for an attempted robbery with a firearm to be followed by a 15-year stint for manslaughter. During the sentencing, Brooks’ family members asked Fensom to pass down a life sentence on Jackson. They said that since he showed no remorse in the wake of Brooks’ death, they had no remorse for him. “I wish I was one of those parents who could say I was able to find forgiveness,” said Amy McDonald, Brooks’ mother. “But I am not one of those parents.” Jurors found Jackson guilty in January of manslaughter and attempted robbery with a firearm. Six people were arrested in the fallout of the July 10 shooting at the Club Apartments, 325 Richard Jackson Blvd., as the three survivors allegedly tried to cover their tracks. Jackson and 23-year-old Joshua Heath Smith had armed themselves with designs on robbing Brooks of the marijuana. However, they didn’t anticipate that Brooks and Man gets 45 years for drug deal killing RANDY JACKSON SEE KILLING | B3 ANDREW WARDLOW | The News Herald Blake Dumas launches off the top a wave near the Russell-Fields City Pier in Panama City Beach on a chilly Tuesday. Ask surfers whether it’s too cold and they’re likely to answer that they surf anytime there is surf. Waves are forecast to be about 6 feet Saturday, which should make for fun conditions, regardless of the temperature. But if you hit the surf this morning, be prepared. The National Weather Service predicts an early morning low of 26 and an afternoon high of 54. What cold? By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8868 | @ApalachTimes DAdlerstein@starfl.com ST. GEORGE ISLAND — St. George Island residents could experience electrical outages for as long as seven hours today, as work begins to repair a power pole damaged earlier this week. Some sort of vessel, likely a barge, struck the pole in Apalachicola Bay on Tuesday morning, threatening the power supply to St. George Island. Sterling Ivey, a spokesman for Duke Energy, said the company was notified at noon Tuesday that the platform of one of the 130-foot tall concrete poles in the bay had been struck by the watercraft. Divers were in the water Wednesday morning assessing the pole, structure and pad to determine the extent of the damage. Ivey said six generators, capable of providing a total of 12 megawatts, were delivered Wednesday to a staging area on the island. After two days of assessing the situation, Duke officials decided to begin the conversion over to the generators at 9 a.m. today, with the process taking as long as seven hours. “We are going to move power off the transmission line and connect to the island using the generators,” said Ivey. “That’s simply so we can go down into the bay and pull down the broken pole without having an energized line above us. “We have to cut power for a short amount of time while we connect the generators,” he said. “We estimated it will be no more than seven hours, but we believe it will be connected sooner than that. “We basically have to connect individual sections of the island, based on how the circuit runs,” Ivey said. “Some will get power within an hour, some longer than that, and we expect everyone will be connected within the seven-hour time frame.” He said workers will remove the damaged 130-foot tall pole in two sections. “If we’re successful, we’ll place another pole in its place. It will probably take three days to do the work, so customers could likely be served by generators for up to three days,” he said. “We certainly recognize the weather is important, so we’re doing this work during the sunshine, warmer part of the day, and making an effort to minimize outages as much as possible,” he said. He said Duke has a seventh generator on hand, in case one malfunctions. “Residents could have some intermittent outages, but nothing that will exceed this initial outage on Friday,” said Ivey. Bekah Nelson, a spokeswoman for the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, said the investigation as to what happened is ongoing. “Most likely it was a barge that hit it,” she said. “There is one in the area right now. It’s very preliminary. We don’t know at this time who ran in to the power pole.” Vessel damages pole; power outage planned LOIS SWOBODA | The Times This power pole i Apalachicola Bay was damaged by a watercraft Tuesday morning. By BEN KLEINE 522-5114 | @BenKleinepcnh bkleine@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY — During regular drives to downtown, Dutch Sanger saw an empty parking lot and an opportunity at a central location. “There’s so much you can do with that,” said Sanger, the former Downtown Improvement Board director. Sanger has organized The Fest to take place from 6 to 10 p.m. Feb. 27 in the parking lot of Panama City Mall. Sanger hopes to put on the event the fourth Friday of every month and focus on one children’scentered nonprofit organization. This month it is AMI Kids, also known as the Panama City Marine Institute. “We’re pleased to have the opportunity to show what AMI Kids is all about,” AMI Executive Director Ron Boyce said. Sanger said he cannot remember another event near the mall, and said its managers have been excited to work with him to create another marketing opportunity. “What I’m trying to do is create an event about the The Fest to serve different part of P.C. What: The Fest When: 6 to 10 p.m. Feb. 27 Where: Panama City Mall parking lot Cost: Free admission WANT TO GO? SEE FEST | B3

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1135935 Page B2 | The News Herald | Friday, February 20, 2015 6 a.m Noon 6 p.m Low Hazard Medium Hazard High Hazard Water closed to public Dangerous Marine Life High Low 56/49 55/50 56/38 53/46 54/47 55/39 53/34 54/35 51/31 42/29 54/35 54/36 55/33 53/42 54/43 52/39 54/33 54/42 67/56 71/54 66/46 58/40 Clouds and sun; breezy, warmer Clouds and sun, breezy and pleasant Mostly cloudy with a touch of rain Chance for a couple of showers 54 29 49 47 42 Winds: SSE 10-20 mph Winds: S 10-20 mph Winds: N 8-16 mph Winds: NNW 7-14 mph Winds: SE 6-12 mph Blountstown 7.19 ft. 15 ft. Caryville 5.85 ft. 12 ft. Clairborne 35.35 ft. 42 ft. Century 6.55 ft. 17 ft. Coffeeville, AL 12.46 ft. 29 ft. Through 7 a.m. Thu. Apalachicola 4:13a 11:14a 5:19p 11:15p Destin 1:59p 8:11a --4:55p West Pass 3:46a 10:47a 4:52p 10:48p Panama City 1:35p 7:34a --4:18p Port St. Joe 1:26p 7:00a --3:44p Okaloosa Island 12:32p 7:17a 11:24p 4:01p Milton 1:49a 10:32a 4:12p 7:16p East Bay 12:53a 10:02a 3:16p 6:46p Pensacola 12:09a 8:45a 2:32p 5:29p Fishing Bend 12:50a 9:36a 3:13p 6:20p The Narrows 1:46a 11:36a 4:09p 8:20p Carrabelle 2:48a 9:01a 3:54p 9:02p Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. 15 First Full Last New Feb 25 Mar 5 Mar 13 Mar 20 Sunrise today ........... 6:18 a.m. Sunset tonight .......... 5:34 p.m. Moonrise today ........ 7:21 a.m. Moonset today ......... 7:48 p.m. Today Sat. Today Sat. Clearwater 57/43/s 71/57/pc Daytona Beach 52/41/s 74/57/pc Ft. Lauderdale 64/56/pc 74/66/pc Gainesville 54/31/s 73/51/c Jacksonville 48/32/s 70/51/pc Jupiter 63/54/pc 74/65/pc Key Largo 65/56/pc 74/65/c Key West 63/60/s 74/68/pc Lake City 53/32/s 69/50/c Lakeland 57/39/s 74/55/pc Melbourne 58/45/s 74/58/c Miami 65/58/s 75/67/c Naples 64/48/s 75/59/pc Ocala 54/34/s 74/52/pc Okeechobee 61/42/s 73/55/pc Orlando 57/42/s 75/58/c Palm Beach 63/55/pc 74/65/pc Tampa 58/44/s 74/58/pc Today Sat. Today Sat. Baghdad 56/39/r 52/38/sh Berlin 46/36/pc 48/31/c Bermuda 61/54/sh 63/56/c Hong Kong 72/66/c 73/67/r Jerusalem 41/37/r 46/31/sh Kabul 52/40/r 54/40/pc London 45/35/r 45/31/pc Madrid 52/40/c 53/36/pc Mexico City 76/47/pc 78/46/s Montreal 6/-5/sf 20/17/sn Nassau 69/61/pc 77/68/pc Paris 46/35/c 44/31/pc Rome 55/41/s 54/47/c Tokyo 50/37/s 48/44/s Toronto 8/-1/s 26/23/sn Vancouver 49/35/c 51/33/s Today Sat. Today Sat. Albuquerque 70/36/pc 65/36/pc Anchorage 37/33/s 42/35/c Atlanta 41/31/c 56/51/i Baltimore 16/4/s 32/30/sn Birmingham 42/35/i 63/53/sh Boston 17/4/s 30/29/sn Charlotte 29/22/s 43/38/sn Chicago 19/18/sn 32/11/sn Cincinnati 20/17/pc 36/25/sn Cleveland 12/8/pc 33/26/sn Dallas 70/58/c 64/40/r Denver 51/23/pc 31/7/sn Detroit 12/11/pc 33/23/sn Honolulu 78/66/sh 79/68/sh Houston 73/64/c 76/62/sh Indianapolis 20/17/c 34/21/sn Kansas City 42/30/pc 39/12/sf Las Vegas 76/49/pc 71/49/pc Los Angeles 69/55/pc 67/55/pc Memphis 39/36/i 55/33/r Milwaukee 19/18/sn 32/10/sn Minneapolis 25/14/sn 20/-8/pc Nashville 32/30/sn 47/32/r New Orleans 64/57/c 75/60/sh New York City 19/13/s 33/31/sn Oklahoma City 58/37/pc 57/25/c Philadelphia 18/9/s 32/30/sn Phoenix 82/55/pc 81/55/s Pittsburgh 12/7/s 34/33/sn St. Louis 29/27/sn 37/20/sn Salt Lake City 50/34/pc 47/29/sn San Antonio 73/60/c 77/58/c San Diego 65/57/pc 66/58/pc San Francisco 66/51/pc 66/51/pc Seattle 52/39/c 53/35/s Topeka 44/29/pc 41/12/sf Tucson 80/50/pc 78/53/s Wash., DC 20/12/s 36/35/sn Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Gulf Temperature: 57 Today: Wind from the east-southeast at 8-16 knots. Seas 1-3 feet. Visibility clear. Wind southeast 12-25 knots. Seas 2-4 feet. Becoming cloudy. Tomorrow: Wind from the south-southeast at 12-25 knots. Seas 4-8 feet. Visibility generally unrestricted. Cool today with plenty of sun. Winds east-southeast 7-14 mph. Increasing cloudiness tonight; rising temperatures late. High/low ......................... 46/31 Last year's High/low ...... 72/56 Normal high/low ............. 67/47 Record high ............. 78 (1975) Record low ............... 28 (1993) 24 hours through 4 p.m. .. 0.00" Month to date .................. 2.85" Normal month to date ...... 3.38" Year to date ..................... 6.83" Normal year to date ......... 8.27" Average humidity .............. 35% through 4 p.m. yesterday High/low ......................... 45/31 Last year's High/low ...... 70/61 Normal high/low ............. 64/47 Record high ............. 78 (1975) Record low ............... 20 (1958) 24 hours through 4 p.m. .. 0.00" Month to date ................... 1.83" Normal month to date ...... 3.40" Year to date ..................... 5.38" Normal year to date ......... 8.48" Average humidity .............. 34% PANAMA CITY Port St. Joe Apalachicola Tallahassee Perry Quincy Monticello Marianna Chipley DeFuniak Springs Pensacola FORT WALTON BEACH Crestview Destin Carrabelle Mobile Bainbridge Valdosta FLORIDA CITIES City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W WORLD CITIES City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W NATIONAL CITIES City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W TODAY FIVE DAY FORECAST FOR NORTHWEST FLORIDA High Low REGIONAL WEATHER Weather(W): ssunny, pcpartly cloudy, ccloudy, shshowers, tthunderstorms, rrain, sfsnow urries, snsnow, iice. Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows. Shown are today’s noon postions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. TIDES MARINE FORECAST BEACH FLAG WARNINGS The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. 0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High; 11+ Extreme 10 a.m. Noon 2 p.m. 4 p.m. UV INDEX TODAY ALMANAC SUN AND MOON MOON PHASES RIVER LEVELS Offshore Northwest Florida Flood Level Stage Apalachicola Choctawhatchee Alabama Escambia Tombigbee Temperatures Precipitation Panama City Temperatures Precipitation Fort Walton Beach WEATHER

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LOCAL & STATE Friday, February 20, 2015 | The News Herald | Page B3 John Robert Golombek 1918 – 2015 John Robert Golombek was born in Bound Brook, N.J., Dec. 25, 1918, and departed this life Feb. 17, 2015, at the age of 96. John enrolled in the Civilian Conservation Corps at the age of 19, helping to build and improve our national parks during the Great Depression. Mr. Golombek was a veteran of the Second World War, having enlisted in the U.S. Army in August of 1941, four months before the beginning of hostilities. He was a tankman and served with the 1st Armored Division, “Old Ironsides.” He participated in the North African, Sicilian and Italian campaigns, and was awarded the Purple Heart. After the war, he moved to Miami with his wife, Eleanor, where he opened his own air conditioning and heating business. After moving to Panama City, he was employed at the Naval Coastal Systems Laboratory as a mechanical technician. Mr. Golombek was a founding member of Messiah Lutheran Church, Panama City, helping to initiate the Cursillo movement in Bay County. He was preceded in death by his loving wife, Minnie Eleanor Golombek. Survivors include his sister, Helen Lasko of South Carolina, as well as numerous nieces, nephews and many dear friends. Memorialization will be by cremation, with his remains inurned at Barrancas National Cemetery. He was a heroic patriot, a loving husband and a loyal and generous friend. Kent-Forest Lawn Funeral Home 2403 Harrison Ave. Panama City, Fla. 32405 850-763-4694 www.kentforestlawn.com Joseph Daniel Strickland Jr., 44, of Ebro, Fla., formerly of Panama City, passed away on Tuesday, Feb. 17, 2015. Left to cherish his memory is his loving wife of 20 years, Stephanie Strickland; five children, Jessica Abramek, Anthony Garcia, Sara Garcia, Ashley Garcia and Kenneth Garcia; two grandchildren, Grace Garcia and Audrey Garcia; mother, Patsy Mims; father, Joseph Strickland Sr.; brother, Paul Strickland; niece, Janita Mims; and numerous aunts, uncles, cousins and special friends. His family will receive friends from 6-8 p.m., Friday, Feb. 20, 2015, at Heritage Funeral Home. A funeral service will begin at 1 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 21, 2015, at Pine Log Community Church, 11732 Church Road, Ebro, FL 32437, with Rev. Frances Marlow and James Watkins officiating. Interment will follow at Gunlock Cemetery, 2296 Pine Log Road, Ebro FL 32437. Those wishing to extend condolences may do so at www.heritagefhllc. com. Heritage Funeral Home & Cremation Services 247 N. Tyndall Parkway Panama City, Fla. 850-785-1316 Joseph Daniel Strickland Jr. 1971 – 2015 JOSEPH STRICKLAND J R. DEATHS & FUNERALS Guidelines & deadlines Obituary notices are written by funeral homes and relatives of the deceased. The News Herald reserves the right to edit for AP style and format. Families submitting notices must type them in a typeface and font that can be scanned into a computer. Deadline for obituaries is 3 p.m. daily for the following day’s newspaper. Obituaries may be e-mailed to pcnhobits@pcnh.com or delivered to The News Herald, 501 W. 11th St., Panama City. O nline guest books View today’s obituaries and sign the online guest books of your loved ones at newsherald.com/obituaries Josephus ‘Joe’ Leon Gill Jr. Deacon Josephus “Joe” Leon Gill Jr., 65, of Sunny Hill, Fla., died Sunday, Feb. 15, 2015. Funeral services will be held at 11 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 21, 2015, at Holy Temple, 800 E. 8th Court, Panama City, FL 32401 Interment will follow at Hillside Cemetery. The family will receive friends at Pasco Gainer Sr. Funeral Home on Friday, Feb. 20, 2015, from 6-8 p.m. Patrick M. McKessy Patrick M. McKessy, 64, of Panama City, Fla., died on Monday, Feb. 16, 2015. Memorialization will be by cremation. To extend condolences, visit www.heritagefhllc. com. Myron ‘Mike’ Elliott Myron “Mike” Elliott, 57, of Panama City, was freed from his valiant struggle with cancer in the early hours of Ash Wednesday, Feb. 18, 2015. His wife, Tracy, and their children were by his side. Mike was born the son of Hishako and George Elliott on July 2, 1957, at Itazuke AFB, Japan. Mike was a retired U.S. Navy nuclear mechanic. He embarked on a second career as a registered nurse employed at Bay Medical Center until his health forced him to retire He is survived by his loving wife of 20 years, Tracy Elliott; their children, Stephanie Elliott, Elizabeth Elliott, Ethan Elliott, Emily Elliott and Lyra Elliott and grandson, Baby Silas. Mike is also survived by his brothers and sisters, Mary Ryan (Mike), Helen Laughlin (Nick), George Elliott, Henry Elliott (Billie) and a host of other loving relatives and friends. A Celebration of Mike’s Life will be held at 2 p.m. Friday, Feb. 20, 2015, at Kent-Forest Lawn Funeral Home. The family will receive friends one hour prior to services at the funeral home. Expressions of sympathy may be viewed or expressed at www. kentforestlawn.com. Kent-Forest Lawn Funeral Home 2403 Harrison Ave. Panama City, Fla. 32405 850-763-4694 www.kentforestlawn.com Jessica Darlene Williams Jessica Darlene Williams, 61, died Feb. 15, 2015. The family will receive friends at the Wilson Funeral Home on Friday, Feb. 20, from 6-8 p.m. Wilson Funeral Home is in charge of the arrangements. Kelly Michelle Evans 1972 – 2015 Kelly Michelle Evans, 42, of Panama City Beach, Fla., died on Tuesday, Feb. 17, 2015. A memorial service will begin at 6 p.m. this evening, Feb. 20, 2015, at Oasis Worship Center. Those wishing to extend condolences may do so at www.heritagefhbeach.com. Janis A. Friend Janis A. Friend, 78, of Panama City, died Wednesday, Feb. 18, 2015, at Covenant Care. Funeral arrangements are incomplete, and will be announced by Kent-Forest Lawn Funeral Home. Jesse Daniel Bullock Jesse Daniel Bullock, 80, of Panama City, Fla., died on Monday, Feb. 16, 2015. A funeral service will commence at 2 p.m. today, Feb. 20, 2015, at Heritage Funeral Home. Interment will follow at Garden of Memories. To extend condolences, visit www.heritagefhllc. com. George W. Johnson George W. Johnson, 75, calling hours will be held today, Feb. 20, from 4-8 p.m. at the mortuary. The funeral service will be on Saturday, Feb. 21, 2015, at 1 p.m. at the Springfield Community Center, Springfield, Fla. Interment will follow in the Hillside Cemetery. Russell A. Wright Sr. Mortuary entrusted with arrangements. 850-640-2077. Have obituaries emailed to you daily by using our ObitMessenger. It’s free and easy to sign up. 747-5070 • newsherald.com 26-year-old Joseph Cannizzo also allegedly would be aim ing to rob them of their cash at gunpoint. The meeting convened at the Club Apartments where Brooks, Cannizzo and Smith got in Cannizzo’s green SUV to close the drug deal. During the exchange, Cannizzo pulled a gun on Smith and ordered him to take off his pants. Brooks took his gun and walked over to the car Smith arrived in to search it. Neither Brooks nor Cannizzo knew Jackson was in the car until gunfire roared from inside. Cannizzo fired at the car and Jackson sped off, accord ing to investigative reports. Smith escaped through the woods without firing a shot. Brooks died a short time later from multiple gunshot wounds. Cannizzo’s role in the incident is still pending in court. He is accused of attempting to rob Smith at gunpoint before the shooting. Smith is required to testify in the matter and could face 10 years in prison during his sentencing. But a court date remains open-ended, as Cannizzo is undergoing medical treatment from an out-of-state car wreck in December in which he suffered brain and spinal injuries, according to his attorney. Jackson also faces trial in March on a charge of felon in possession of a firearm in connection with the shoot ing. He faces 15 years in prison added to his current sentence if convicted of that charge. KILLING from Page B1 community for the locals,” Sanger said. “To raise aware ness for what we have.” One of the resources Sanger is looking to tap is the local market for live music. Reasonable Doubt and Jake Garrett Band will perform Feb. 27. “We have an abundance of very talented local musi cians,” Sanger said. “I don’t think we realize what we have.” Jake Garrett said he sees The Fest as a new trend for Panama City. “It’s keeping it real for the real community,” he said. The Jake Garrett Band plays mostly original music but plans to work in covers ranging from Tonic to Ted Nugent. Garrett describes the band’s sound as a com bination of Stevie Ray Vaughn, Bon Jovi and Metallica, although it will perform more fan-friendly tunes at The Fest. Reasonable Doubt leader Shawn Perry describes his band’s sound as ’80s, keyboard-heavy rock, with Styx, Rush, Jethro Tull, Badfinger and Blue Oyster Cult likely inspiration for cover songs. “We’re expecting a good crowd and to have a nice opportunity on the first installment,” Perry said. The event will feature about 30 to 40 vendors — some selling jewelry and crafts — and others with food includ ing barbecue and fair fare such as funnel cakes. Sanger said vendors will have an advantage of not being rushed to set up and having more space than at events such as Friday Fest. However, Sanger is not looking to compete with the event he created. The Fest will be at the opposite end of the month and in a different part of town. Sanger said he had about 15 vendors the first Friday Fest, and like that event he hopes the Fest grows over time. “I support them 100 percent,” Sanger said of Friday Fest. “I’m just offering another opportunity for people on this side of the bridge.” FEST from Page B1 From staff reports PANAMA CITY — Police have arrested three teenagers in connec tion with multiple vehicle burglaries, the Panama City Police Department announced Thursday. Christopher Martez Gordan, 18; Datrion T. Hand, 14; and Isiah C. Grady, 16, all of Panama City, were arrested on various charges in the vehicle burglaries. Officers located the suspects after a victim of one burglary reported he had tracked his electronic device to the Royal Arms Public Housing Complex at 1420 Balboa Ave. using a tracking app. On the same night when several west side burglaries were committed, a convenience store on the west side of town captured the males attempting to enter the unattended vehicles of store patrons, police reported. Officers patrolling the Royal Arms complex in search of the suspects observed them acting suspicious. When approached, Grady and Gor dan fled, abandoning a backpack. They were apprehended and the recovered backpack contained several electronic devices stolen during the recent bur glaries with batteries removed by the suspects to avoid being tracked. Police said they believe the three young men and others associated with them are responsible for mul tiple unsolved burglaries in Panama City. Additional criminal charges are pending as the active investigation continues. Gordan was charged with three counts of burglary and three counts of grand theft; Hand was charged with four counts of burglary and four counts of grand theft; and Grady was charged with accessory to burglary and viola tion of probation. Grady was on pro bation for his alleged role in the 2014 shooting death of 17-year-old Curtis Hunt in the 200 block of Kraft Avenue. Anyone having information in this case or others is urged to call the Panama City Police Department, 850-872-3100, or they can report their tips anonymously to CrimeStoppers at 850-785-TIPS. 3 teens arrested in vehicle burglaries TAMPA (AP) — Amid a pro found shift in America’s demo graphics, advocates for seniors pressed Thursday for changes on long-term care, retirement security and elder abuse as the White House launched a series of forums on aging. The session in Tampa was the first of five nationwide that will mold the topics addressed later at the White House Con ference on Aging, a oncea-decade meeting that has led to change on everything from senior housing to Social Security. In opening panels, speak ers focused on four key areas: ensuring that seniors have the financial means to sustain retirement; promoting healthy aging; providing long-term ser vices and supports; and pro tecting older Americans from financial exploitation, abuse and neglect. Participants representing government, academia and social service agencies also came with pet issues of their own, and closed-door after noon meetings were expected to begin generating possible solutions. Geriatric social worker Mon ica Stynchula of St. Petersburg said she hopes for a national caregiver policy to supplement the Family and Medical Leave Act, which she called “grossly inadequate.” “We need something that goes beyond that,” she said. “It’s happening in each of our families today. It’s just too important.” The first White House Con ference on Aging in 1961 helped lay groundwork for Medicare and featured addresses from President Dwight D. Eisen hower and President-Elect John F. Kennedy. Four succeed ing conferences in the decades that followed led to other legis lation affecting seniors and the creation of the Senate Special Committee on Aging. This year’s events come as baby boomers — the 78 mil lion Americans born between 1946 and 1964 — are moving into old age. But decades of stagnancy on key issues facing older adults and the percep tion of a paralyzed Congress left some participants skeptical about what change the White House conference could actu ally stir. Kathy Black, a geriatric social worker and professor at the University of South Flor ida at Sarasota-Manatee who attended the forum, said the conference might be more a symbolic gesture than an agent for change. Aging advocates, she said, are not only dealing with a dysfunctional Washing ton, but a public skeptical of government overreach and a host of other national prob lems that garner more atten tion amid relatively austere budgets. “I don’t have high expec tations about what policy goals might be accomplished for older adults in the next decade,” Black said, “though the needs are great.” Seniors call for action at first of 5 aging forums GAINESVILLE (AP) — A Gainesville man faces DUI manslaughter charges after detectives deter mined his blood alcohol level was more than two times the legal limit when he was involved in a crash that killed his teenage daughter and her friend. The Gainesville Sun reported 40-year-old Jef frey Lee Ertle was arrested Thursday. He was critically injured during the Dec. 13 crash that killed 13-year-old Ashley Ertle and her 15year-old friend Emily Cook. Police said the girls died at the scene and Ertle spent two weeks in a hospital. Police: Dad was driving drunk when crash killed 2 teen girls

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LOCA L & STATE Page B4 | The News Herald | Friday, February 20, 2015 NEW ORLEANS (AP) — A federal judge has rejected an attempt by BP to lower the fines it faces from its catastrophic Gulf of Mexico oil spill in 2010. U.S. District Judge Carl Barbier on Thursday agreed with government lawyers that BP should face paying up to $4,300 for each barrel of oil spilled. BP wanted Barbier to cap the amount at $3,000 per barrel, the same amount set by the Clean Water Act in 1990 for gross negligence fines. But fed eral prosecutors argued that those amounts need to be adjusted for inflation and Barbier agreed. The ruling leaves BP facing up to $13.7 billion in civil fines for the spill. BP spokesman Geoff Morrell said the company disagrees with the decision, “and continue to believe that neither the EPA nor the Coast Guard have the power to independently inflate the maximum pen alty Congress intended. “At the very least, fair notice was never provided as to which of those two agencies possessed the authority to inflate the pen alty amount.” Barbier still has not ruled on how much BP should pay. Attorneys may file briefs in the case as late as April and it remains unclear how soon after that Barbier will rule. Establishing what fine BP should pay is the final act in a long-running civil trial over the company’s Macondo oil well blowout, which killed 11 men and led to oil spewing into the Gulf for 87 days until the well was brought under control. Barbier already has issued key rulings after two earlier phases: that BP acted with “gross negligence” in the disaster, a decision BP is appealing; and that 3.19 mil lion barrels of oil were dis charged. Those two factors could lead to a maximum $13.7 billion fine based on a per-barrel penalty. BP argued against a heavy penalty. It said its response to the spill and cleanup effort was robust, that the economy and envi ronment of the Gulf has recovered strongly and that it already has run up $42 billion in costs includ ing the cleanup, response, settlements with victims and criminal penalties. Also, BP attorneys argued an excessive pen alty would be too much of an economic hardship on BP Exploration and Produc tion, the BP entity deemed responsible for the spill. Government attorneys say a higher-end penalty is called for, given the eco nomic and environmental harm caused by the spill, and they cast doubts about the effect of a high fine on BP Exploration and Production and other BP entities. Rheumatology E m e r a l d C o a s t Ay men A. Kenawy , M.D. Dr . Kenawy Can Help Yo u Manage We Accept Most Insurances Including Visit us at our NEW LOCA TION! (850) 215-6400 www .DrKenawy .com St . An dr ew Ba y Qu il te rs ' Gu il d Pr ou dl y Pr es en ts "Q uil ts fr om th e He ar t" 20 15 Qu il t Sh ow Qu il ts , Si le nt Au ct io n, Qu il t Bo ut iq ue , Se wi ng Ma ch in e Ra e , Ve ndo rs & Dr aw in g Ou r La dy of th e Ro sa ry Ca th ol ic Ch ur ch Co rn er of Ju li e Dr . & Hw y 23 1 Fo ur mi le s nor th o f th e Ma ll Judge rejects BP attempt to reduce fine from oil spill By KELLY HUMPHREY 315-4443 | @Kellyhnwfdn khumphrey@nwfdailynews.com EGLIN AFB — It might have been freezing in the hospital parking lot Thursday morning, but Col. Gianna Zeh’s heart was warm. The commander of the 96th Medical Group had two things to celebrate. In addition to the ribbon-cutting ceremony for the hospital’s expansion, her medi cal center recently was named the best in the Air Force. “I’m very proud and excited to have our people recognized,” Zeh said before the ceremony. “I think it shows that we have our priorities straight, because in the end it’s all about the patients.” Brig. Gen. Lee Payne, the com mander of the Air Force Medical Opera tions Agency, congratulated Zeh and her staff at the ribbon-cutting. “There is a lot of stiff competition out there among our Air Force hospitals, but Eglin came out on top,” he said. Zeh said the enhancements to the hospital was just one reason Eglin was recognized as the best. She also cited a leadership that strives to earn the staff’s and patients’ trust, a culture that encourages people to report prob lems and a process in place to correct mistakes. Ironically, now that the two-year, $67 million project is complete, Zeh soon will leave the 96th Medical Group for a deployment to Afghanistan. “I definitely have mixed emotions,” she said. “I’m really going to miss the people here. This has been the best job I’ve ever had.” Eglin Hospital unveils renovations as best hospital in the Air Force DORAL (AP) — Donald Trump has withdrawn a lawsuit he just filed against city officials in a Miami suburb over noiseordinance violations against his resort. A Trump spokesman was quoted by the Miami Herald on Thursday as saying the lawsuit was being dropped in favor of nego tiations with the city of Doral. Records show that since August, the city’s code-compliance department has issued more than 100 violations to Trump’s resort, Trump National Doral. Trump drops suit over noise ordinance

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LOCA L & STATE Friday, February 20, 2015 | The News Herald | Page B5 From staff and wire reports PANAMA CITY BEACH Health Expo openings available The 2015 Health Expo is on for Thursday, Feb. 26, and there’s still time to be an exhibitor for the annual event at the Edgewater Beach Resort. The Health Expo is free and no registration is required. There will be door prizes, giveaways and speakers as well as free screenings offered at select booths. Door prizes include Dave and Buster’s Power Card, gift cards to local restaurants and a necklace set from Francesca’s. Participants and activities include vision screenings from Eye Center South, hearing screenings from All Clear Hearing, diabetic screenings, free skin checks from Gulf Dermatology and even a Mary Kay booth for a skincare facial or color makeover. If you’d like your business to be represented at this event, please contact Jennifer Bullock at 859-7475015, jbullock@pcnh.com, or Vickie Gainer at 850-7475009, vgainer@pcnh.com. PANAMA CITY Motel hit by robber Police are asking for the public’s help in identifying a robber of a local hotel, according to a Panama City Police Department news release. In the early morning hours on Thursday, a man entered the office of the American Quality Lodge at 4810 W. U.S. 98 and demanded money from the clerk. Fearing for her safety due to threats made by the robber, she complied with his demands, police said. The male left the office in an unknown direction. The Criminal Investigations Unit is actively working leads in the case and asks for the public’s assistance. Anyone having information in this case is urged to call the Panama City Police Department, 850-8723100, or they can report their tips anonymously to CrimeStoppers at 850-785-TIPS. TALLAHASSEE Greyhound injury bill on fast track When Florida senators start the annual legislative session March 3, one of the first issues they will take up is a bill that would require reports to be filed with the state about injuries to racing greyhounds. The Senate has put the measure (SB 2), filed by Sen. Eleanor Sobel, D-Hollywood, atop a list of bills slated to be considered during the first day of session. The bill has been dubbed the “Victoria Q. Gaetz Racing Greyhound Protection Act,” after animal-rights supporter Vicky Gaetz, the wife of Sen. Don Gaetz, R-Niceville. Don Gaetz finished a two-year term as Senate president in November. Under the proposal, injuries to racing greyhounds would have to be reported to the state Division of Pari-Mutuel Wagering within seven days by track veterinarians or owners, trainers or kennel operators, depending on where the injuries occur. The Senate Fiscal Policy Committee voted 9-1 on Thursday to approve the bill, with Sen. Alan Hays, R-Umatilla, the only dissenter. PANAMA CITY BEACH Alan Jackson coming to PCB Country music legend Alan Jackson will headline the Second Annual Chasin’ the Sun Music Festival in Panama City Beach Sept. 26, it was announced on Thursday. The event will be staged at the Aaron Bessant Park Amphitheatre. Celebrating artists who created and continue playing classic beach sounds, the Chasin’ the Sun Festival will take place Sept. 25-26. Jackson will appear in PCB months after his 25th anniversary Keepin’ It Country Tour concludes. He has recorded 15 standalone albums and several Christmas and gospel collections. Jackson has sold more than 81 million albums worldwide and has won several awards, including 17 Academy of Country Music Awards. More acts and general information will be released at a later date. Ge t Yo ur Ti ck et s To da y! – $3 5 & up Pr es en te d by th e Pa na ma Ci ty Mu si c As so ci at io n www .P an ama Ci ty Mu si cA ss oc .o rg No hi dde n ch ar ge s. 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Th e of fe r in cl ud es : 1134189 Do yo u hav e an y of th e fo ll ow in g? 17 Ye ars of Experience Mavis Nowell EACH PROCEDURE $300 LOCA TED AT PA NAMA CITY PLASTIC SURGER Y 850-819-3937 * Pr escription appetite suppr essant * Vi tamin & fat bur ner injections * EKG & blood analysis * Eat wise...dr op a size!” * E-mail: Angela@ re solutionsweightlosscenter .com Resolutions We ight Loss Center 1212 W. 23rd St. Pa nama City , FL 32405 (850) 91 3-0 00 2 MEDIC AL WEIGHT LO SS A R EA Briefs Training exercise sparks wildfire By KELLY HUMPHREY 315-4443 | @Kellyhnwfdn khumphrey@nwfdailynews.com EGLIN AFB — This time, the smoke blow ing south from a test range didn’t come from a prescribed burn. A live-fire training exercise sparked a wildfire on 50 acres of Test Area A-78 north of Navarre on Thursday, and sent large plumes of black smoke over the Florosa area. “This test range is often used for target practice, and one of the targets, apparently a bunch of old creosote-soaked railroad ties, caught on fire during the exer cise,” said Mike Spaits, Eglin Air Force Base’s environmental spokesman. Wildland firefighters had the blaze under control by early afternoon. “The smoke was blowing from the north west, which sent it in the direction of Flo rosa,” Spaits said. “We expect that it should dissipate soon.” The smoke was visible as far away as Fort Walton Beach. TAMPA (AP) — Agriculture Com missioner Adam Putnam has asked the head of the Florida Department of Law Enforcement to review new findings about the former Arthur G. Dozier school for boys, where dozens of bodies have been unearthed, and see whether they warrant more investigation. In a letter dated Wednesday, Putnam — who is one of three members of the Florida Cabinet — cited a recent report by researchers at the University of South Florida. Anthropologists have found the remains of 51 people buried at the school during a dig. That’s 19 more than had been identified by the Florida Department of Law Enforce ment in a 2010 investigative report. The USF researchers also uncovered garbage, syringes, drug bottles and a dog encased in an old water cooler buried in the cemetery. They are trying to identify who was bur ied there and the stories behind how they and others died at the school. The recent report, prepared for the Florida Cabinet, identifies two more people buried in graves, in addition to three who were identified previously. The FDLE, in its 2010 report, said it was unable to substantiate or refute claims that inmate deaths were caused by the school’s staff or that staff members physically and sexually abused them. In the letter to FDLE Commissioner Rick Swearingen, Putnam said the latest report could contain information not avail able to the law enforcement agency when it investigated the Dozier cases in 2009. “I am requesting that the FDLE evalu ate new findings reported by USF to deter mine whether or not there is new evidence that would otherwise warrant additional investigation,” said Putnam, who copied the letter to the other members of the cabinet and the governor. Putnam also asked the FDLE Com missioner to report his findings back to the cabinet. According to researchers, the school underreported deaths; didn’t provide death certificates, names or details in many cases, particularly involving black boys; and simply reported some boys who disappeared as no longer at the school. And many in the Panhandle community don’t want to talk about the school’s dark past. Cabinet member asks FDLE to look at new Dozier findings CAPE CANAVERAL (AP) — A series of upcoming spacewalks at the International Space Station will begin a day late. The first spacewalk by a pair of U.S. astronauts was supposed to occur today. But on Thursday, NASA bumped it to Satur day to complete a spacesuit investigation. The second spacewalk is now Wednes day; the third is March 1. The extensive, outdoor cable-routing work will prepare for the arrival of new commercial crew capsules in 2017. Two critical fan and pump units for the astronauts’ spacesuits failed recently dur ing routine maintenance in orbit. Engineers suspect water seeped into the bearings, causing them to corrode and seize up. Both units were returned to Earth on the Dragon capsule last week. Spare units were put in the spacesuits, and those have checked out. NASA says a pump failure would cut short a spacewalk but not endanger any one. An unrelated problem with the same component led to an astronaut’s neardrowning in 2013. Kenny Todd, a space station manager, said earlier this week that the corrosion is likely the result of frequent water sampling put in place after the 2013 episode. NASA astronauts Butch Wilmore and Terry Virts are the designated spacewalk ers. The space agency would like to pull off all three spacewalks before Wilmore leaves the orbiting lab in mid-March. Private companies SpaceX and Boeing are working on crew capsules — under NASA contract — to ferry U.S. astronauts to and from the space station. NASA lost the ability to launch its own crews when the space shuttles retired in 2011, and is paying Russia for crew transportation. Space station spacewalk postponed

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The Associated Press ORLANDO Universal reverses outside bottle ban Universal Orlando Resort is reversing its policy of banning bottled drinks from being brought into its theme parks from the outside. Universal spokesman Tom Schroder said Thursday the theme park resort has gone back to its original policy of allowing outside drinks such as bottled water into the parks. The outside-drink ban was short-lived, only lasting several days. Schroder said the ban was intended to be temporary as the resort reviewed its procedures. TALLAHASSEE Joint engineering college to remain The two universities in Florida’s state capital will keep running their engineering college together. The Florida Board of Governors voted Thursday in favor of an agreement to keep intact the college. There was a push last year by former State Sen. John Thrasher to have each university set up separate colleges. Thrasher is now FSU’s president. A study ordered by the Florida Legislature, however, found that the price to split the college could be $1 billion. MIAMI New charge filed in sex tourism case A new charge has been brought against a Canadian man accused of traveling to Florida to have sex with someone investigators say he believed was an underage boy. An updated indictment filed Thursday accuses 47-year-old Rene Roberge of Sherbrooke, Quebec, of also planning to travel to San Antonio, Texas, to have sex with a teenage boy. Authorities said Roberge flew to Florida after making contact on the Internet with undercover investigators posing as a 14-year-old boy and his father to arrange a sexual encounter. Agents also allegedly found child pornography on Roberge’s tablet computer. Roberge has pleaded not guilty and could get up to life in prison, but authorities said the case is likely to end in a plea deal. Trial is set for March 23. ORLANDO Man recovering after 2 cars hit him at track Officials said a man is recovering after being hit by two vehicles at Orlando Speed World Dragway. The incident happened Wednesday night. WFTV reported the 29-year-old man was on the track where the “Us Legend Cars” series has been holding races this week. The man, whose name has not been released, was airlifted to a hospital about 7:30 p.m. PALM BAY Mayor stops, helps teen crash victim Police are crediting Palm Bay Mayor William Capote for stopping to assist a teenager who was badly injured in a crash. Palm Bay police spokeswoman Yvonne Martinez said the mayor stopped and rendered aid to the critically injured 15-year-old Monday night. The teen remains in the hospital with broken femur and ankles. Florida Today reported the teenager was riding a motor scooter without lights when he was struck by a Jeep and dragged a short distance. Capote and his wife were returning from dinner when he saw what he thought was debris in the road. 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Gi ve yo ur se lf a FI GH TI NG chanc e LOCA L & STATE Page B6 | The News Herald | Friday, February 20, 2015 TALLAHASSEE (AP) — A shot by some of Florida’s professional sports teams to get millions of dollars in taxpayer help fell short Thursday, but the contest appears far from over. A legislative panel voted to delay ranking four proposals requesting $255 million in tax payer money, saying the crucial decision should instead be made by the entire Florida Legislature when it meets this spring. Rep. Richard Corcoran, chair man of the Legislative Budget Commission, said he remains opposed to all of the proposals. The rankings had been con sidered crucial because law makers did not set aside enough money for all four requests in the first year of a new sports grant program. The state received requests that would help pay for improve ments to stadiums used by the Jacksonville Jaguars, the Miami Dolphins, the fledgling Orlando City Lions soccer team as well as a request to help with improve ments to Daytona International Speedway. The payments would be spread out over anywhere from 15 to 30 years. State economists ranked the request for Daytona last, meaning it would have received nothing this year if legislators had gone ahead and voted. In the past few days, however, supporters of the sports teams had been fearful the budget panel would reject all four requests. Orlando Mayor Buddy Dyer, who showed up to push for the city’s soccer stadium, called the decision to punt until the session starts in March a “good result.” “I’m comfortable that we’ll come to the right place by the end of session,” Dyer said. Still, the delay shows how con tentious subsidies to sports fran chises has become. Corcoran, who is line to become the next House speaker, said he will vote against requests for taxpayer dollars when it comes up during session. “This is a reversed perverse Robin Hood,” Corcoran said. “We’re going to take from the hardworking taxpayers and give it to the rich people.” For the past two decades, Florida taxpayers have paid tens of millions of dollars to turn the state into a sports mecca. The money has paid for repairs, reno vations and construction of sta diums and arenas that are home to professional football, hockey, baseball and basketball teams. The state also has shelled out money to spruce up ballparks used by Major League Baseball teams for spring training. But an effort to aid the Miami Dolphins in 2013 went down to defeat in the waning moments of the legislative session as some lawmakers, especially those from South Florida, questioned the validity of aiding the team owner. Lawmakers last year passed a new law that they said would create a new process intended to protect taxpayers so heavily lobbied projects weren’t the only ones getting help. No money for stadium projects after vote delayed S TATE Briefs

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LOS ANGELES — Not since Pa ul Ne wman ate 50 hard-boiled eg gs in one hour in the 1967 lm, Cool Hand Luk e , has America’ s breakf ast mainstay been the focus of such public attention. If you are one of the 80 million Americans who li ve wi th joint pain and stif fness, here’ s some welcome ne ws to cro w about. Researchers delving into the mysteries of arthritis pain and joint stif fness ha ve disco vered a po werful, pain-relie ving substance in the most unlik ely of places, in the eg gshell of the chick en. Br eakfast Food Surprise While doctors are advising patients that it may be premature to relocate their eg gs from the refrigerator to the medicine cabinet, this miraculous, joint-healing substance may be the drug-free pain breakthrough man y ha ve been seeking. In head-to-head clinical trials, the natural eg gshell compound kno wn as NEM quashed the top-selling US joint pain relief remedy . Pa tented Po we r In fa ct, it wa s so ef fecti ve at numbing joint pain and muscle discomfort that its unique manuf acturing process wa s granted a United States patent, So ho w has the lo wly eg g managed to jump from the frying pan to center stage in the wo rld’ s top research laboratories? The Inside Secr et “The secret is found in the membrane inside the shell, ” says Dr . Jef fre y Nelson, an osteopathic doctor who specializes in joint and connecti ve tissue problems. “This placenta-lik e coating called Natural Eggshell Membrane, or NEM , is the mother lode of the components that mak e up our joints, ” he says. Sor e Joints Sa y ‘A hhh’ “When we consume this nutrient-rich matrix, ” says Dr . Nelson, “we are literally ab sorbing and taking in the construction material needed to reb uild old, age-damaged tissues. ” In controlled studies, participants reported less pain and increased e xibility . Dr . Nelson ow ns v e arthritis treatment centers where patients are treated with cutting edge therapies, including well-researched natural compounds lik e NEM. Not only does Dr . Nelson advise patients to use NEM, he uses it himself. “I can tell you that I personally ha ve been suf fering from chronic lo wer spine discomfort and ha ve been using NEM-containing Restie x daily in place of Motrin and I ha ve lo ve d the results!” Stops Pa in Fast Compared to other natural joint-supporters, the NEM compound wo rks ex ceptionally fa st, says Dr . Nelson. Mounting a fa st and nimble response is something that Dr . Nelson kno ws all about. As an aerospace medical specialist for the United States Air Fo rce from 2004 to 2010, Dr . Nelson managed the NA SA space shuttle emer genc y medical response team in Europe. Pa in-Fr ee, Sev en Da ys? In one randomized, multicenter , doubleblind, placebo-controlled study , the NEM compound yielded “rapid and continuous” pain-relie ving benets in as little as 7-10 days. Tw o rand omized, p la cebo-c on tro lle d cli ni cal trials , one publis hed in th e prest igi ous jour nal Clin ica l Rheu mat ol og y , sho w th at the subst ance not onl y redu ces pain , it can sig ni cant ly impr ove e xib ilit y and mo bil ity , all in as litt le as se ve n days . Do ctor Ne lso n ex pla ins wh y. Joints Swing Fr eely “The membrane is composed primarily of collagen, bu t it does contain super -concentrat ed amounts of glycosaminoglycans and glycoproteins, as well as joint-lubricating substances lik e hy aluronic acid. ” “These joint-repair nutrients are whisk ed at lightning speed throughout the body ,” says Dr . Nelson. “Old, stif f joints tak e in this remarkable joint matrix lik e a dry sponge absorbs wa ter ,” smi les Dr . Nelson. Do the Things Yo u Lo ve In a matter of days, tired, creak y, painful joints are transformed into smooth-e xing, pain-free joints. Da ve B., 61-years-old from Ft. Lauderdale, is li ving proof. “I lik e to chop veg etables; bu t prior to using Restie x, I couldn’ t do it because of the discomfort in my ngers. ” “Since using Restie x, I’ ve bee n able to do more veg etable preparation, and I can, once ag ain, put together a great meal. ” Cr azy for Golf “I lik e to golf as often as I can, ” says Da ve . “It tak es a strong grip to swing through the ball and rotate your lo wer back to exe cute a full swing. ” “I had dif culty in both of these areas with my lo wer bac k, par ticularly in my ngers, and so it limited my golf to maybe onc e ev ery tw o weeks. ” Pla y Pa in-Fr ee “Since using Restie x ,” adds Da ve , “I’ ve been able to golf tw o to three times a week. I ha ve less discomfort in my ngers and certainly in my lo wer back. I can get through a swing a lot quick er without the herk y-jerk y motion. ” “I see other guys my age that are hobbled. The y’ re crippled by aches and discomfort in elbo ws, knees, shoulders, ngers, hands. I don’ t wa nt to be one of those guys. ” “Th anks to Rest ie x ,” sm iles D av e, “I’ ve been abl e to get on the golf cours e tw o to thre e tim es a wee k as oppos ed to once ev ery othe r we ek. ” The pain-relie ving NEM compound is av ailable, prescription-free, in the nutritional supplement, Restie x . Researchers ha ve optimized its health y in ammation-supporting po wers by teaming it with natural joint-soothing botanicals lik e white willo w bark, ginger , turmeric root, and boswellia serrata. Restie x may be the richest source of concentrated, natural pain-relie ve rs found in the mark et today . Str onger Joint Health in Da ys The joint-soothing ingredients in Restie x assist your body in mounting a health y in ammatory response, which, says Dr . Nelson, “helps creates a more suitable en vironment for connecti ve tissue repair and gro wth. ” Gwendy M., a 57-year -old grandmother , doesn’ t mince wo rds when it comes to her health. “A fter four weeks on Restie x ,” she says ex citedly . “What I’ ve ex perienced is virtually a miracle. I ha ve no discomfort in my hip or my shoulder and that wa sn’ t the wa y it wa s before, ” says Gwendy . The little things during the day bothered her . “I ex perienced daily aches and discomfort in reaching, in normal acti vities, with wa lking in my hip. ” Gone... and For gotten! “I am virtually discomfort free, ” says Gwendy . “I go about my daily acti vities, and don’ t ha ve an y problems whatsoe ve r. I don’ t ev en ha ve a little twinge of an ache to remind me that it’ s still there. ” Gwendy laughs and says, “I can actually get up on my ow n from the ground after playing with my grandchildren!” Get a Fr ee 30-Da y Supply Call the toll-free number belo w to see ho w you can reserv e a free 30-day supply (a $59.95 va lue) of the same, patented pain-relief formula recommended by Dr . Nelson. Restie x contains fa st-acting, clinically tested pain-relie ving ingredients that will ha ve you feeling ener gized, pain-free, and as spry as a spring chick en in as little as se ve n days. Get a Fr ee Cop y of ‘Living Pa in-Fr ee, Natur ally’ When you call the toll-free number belo w, ask ho w you can also recei ve a free cop y of the popular 20-page report, Living Pa in-F re e, Natur ally . It’ s a fa ct-pack ed, ho w-to manual for li ving the acti ve lifestyle. Yo u’ ll learn secrets and tips to li ving a more acti ve , pain-free life that ev en your doctor doesn’ t kno w. It’ s a $9.95 va lue. Ask ho w you can get it free of char ge. But don’ t wa it; supplies are truly limited! Call Now , To ll-Fr ee 1-800-973-5379 Surprising compound found in eg gshells tops leading painkiller in study; users report less pain, more joint e xibility in as little as 7-days! Inside th e shell of a chicken egg, sc ientists have discovere d uniqu e joint-healing co mpoun ds. In one st udy , patients using this com pound experien ced “rapid and continu ous” pain-relie ving benets in as little as 7-10 day s! Dr . Jeffr ey S. Ne l son , fo rm er aero spac e phys icia n for NASA ’s Spa ce Shut tle progra m, is see ing ‘out of this worl d’ re sults wi th eggs hel lbase d join t pa in dis cov er y. Popular Breakfast Fo od is Latest Breakthrough in Joint Pain Science News in-depth reporting busine ss food News food News in-depth reporting food in-depth reporting busine ss food busine ss food high scho ol food in-depth reporting food in-depth reporting high scho ol in-depth reporting food in-depth reporting busine ss food busine ss high scho ol busine ss food busine ss local busine ss local busine ss sports News sports News food sports food News food News sports News food News food high scho ol food sports food high scho ol food racing busine ss racing busine ss News scene News News in-depth reporting News scene News in-depth reporting News food scene food News food News scene News food News in-depth reporting food in-depth reporting scene in-depth reporting food in-depth reporting News in-depth reporting News food News in-depth reporting News scene News in-depth reporting food News in-depth reporting News comm muni racing muni racing comm muni comm ty comm ty comm coupons busine ss coupons busine ss local coupons local busine ss local busine ss coupons busine ss local busine ss sports coupons sports News in-depth reporti ng dining dining busines s food local food local food News food News in-depth reporti ng food in-depth reporti ng local in-depth reporti ng local food local in-depth reporti ng local busines s food busines s local dining local dining food hig h school food in-depth reporti ng food in-depth reporti ng hig h school in-depth reporti ng food in-depth reporti ng local in-depth reporti ng local food local in-depth reporti ng local hig h school local food local in-depth reporti ng local busines s food busines s hig h school busines s food busines s local local busines s local busines s sports News sports News dining sports dining food sports food News food News sports News food News food hig h school food sports food hig h school food racing busines s racing busines s scen e local scen e local coupons scen e coupons local coupons local scen e local coupons local News scen e News local News local scen e local News local local in-depth reporti ng local scen e local in-depth reporti ng local News in-depth reporti ng News scen e News in-depth reporti ng News local News local in-depth reporti ng local News local scen e local in-depth reporti ng local News local local food local scen e local food local food scen e food News food News scen e News food News in-depth reporti ng food in-depth reporti ng scen e in-depth reporti ng food in-depth reporti ng local in-depth reporti ng local food local in-depth reporti ng local scen e local in-depth reporti ng local food local in-depth reporti ng local News in-depth reporti ng News food News in-depth reporti ng News scen e News food News in-depth reporti ng News local News local in-depth reporti ng local News local food local in-depth reporti ng local News local scen e local News local in-depth reporti ng local News local food local News local in-depth reporti ng local News local local scen e local comm muni racing muni racing comm muni comm footbal l News footbal l News local footbal l local puzzles dining puzzles dining local puzzles local dining local dining puzzles dining local dining sports puzzles sports dining sports dining puzzles dining sports dining footbal l puzzles footbal l local footbal l local puzzles local footbal l local coupons coupons busines s coupons busines s local coupons local local coupons local busines s local busines s coupons busines s local busines s sports coupons sports Dear News Heral d Reader , As your pr emier loc al media com pany , our mission is to pr ovide you with not only a gr eat pr oduct but also with se rvice that consiste ntly meets or exceeds your exp ectations. Yo ur feedback about our customer service will let us know how well we’r e doing and help us impr ove if we ar en’ t satisfactorily ful lling our mission. Our cus tomer feedback survey should tak e you ve minutes or less to complete. To thank you for your time, ente r your co ntact informat ion at the end of the survey to be en ter ed in to a drawing for a $1 00 Wa lm ar t gi ft car d. No body deli vers like we do . www .sur veym onkey .com /s/SF-NH The su rve y will be ope n th ro ug h Feb rua ry 20, 20 15. OUT & ABOUT Friday, February 20, 2015 | The News Herald | Page B7 TODAY G A R Y P O PE JR. EXHIBIT: The works of local artist Gary Pope Jr. are on exhibit through February during regular hours at the Bay County Public Library, 898 W. 11th St., Panama City. Details: 522-2100 WINTER RESI D ENTS PR O GR A M: Monday through Friday at The Ark, 12908 Hibiscus St., Panama City Beach. Wood Shop – 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.; Sewing/ Quilting – 9:30-11:30 a.m. Details: 249-1980 VIT A : 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at A.D. Harris Learning Village, 819 E. 11th St., Panama City. The IRS-sanctioned program can prepare 2014 tax returns for those who earned $60,000 or less in 2014. Details: 628-4775 SE A NEE D LES: 10 a.m. at the Panama City Beach Library, 12500 Hutchison Blvd., Panama City Beach. Knitting group invites all needle crafters to join in and knit as well as crochet, embroidery and cross-stitch. Details: 233-5055, nwrls.com CHESS: 1 p.m. at the Panama City Beach Library, 12500 Hutchison Blvd., Panama City Beach. Players and boards are welcome. Details: 233-5055, nwrls.com FREE A RT FRI DAY S: 1-6 p.m. at CityArts Cooperative, 318 Luverne Ave. Details: 769-0608, CityArtsCooperative.com SHELLS A N D T A LES FESTIV A L: 4 p.m. EST at Gulf Coast State College Gulf/Franklin campus, 3800 Garrison Ave., Port St Joe. Storytelling Basic Workshop – learn to tell great stories. Details: VisitGulf.com F O URTH A NNU A L GN O A N D BUNC O : 5:30 p.m. registration at Edgewater Beach Resort, 11212 Front Beach Road, Panama City Beach. This girls night out features a fashion show, shopping, prizes and the Bunco dice game. All proceeds benet the Healthy Families program of Life Management Center. Details and early registration: LMCcares.org ZUMB A F O R THE HE A RT: 5:30-7 p.m. at the Panama City Health Club & Spa parking lot, 1598 Balboa Ave., Panama City. Wear red to show support for the American Heart Association; this is an outdoor event, so dress for the weather forecast. Free event; small donations encouraged for the AHA. PlayZone available for non-members for $5 drop-in. Details: 914-FIT or PanamaCityHealthClub.com “LET’S S AY GR A CE:” 6-8 p.m. at Gulf Coast State College, 5230 W. U.S. 98, Panama City, on the third oor of the Advanced Technology Center. Students from the addiction recovery program at Bethel Village Home for Women and Children demonstrate and prepare samples of recipes from their recently published cookbook “Let’s Say Grace,” on sale for $14. Details: Jacqueline Bostick, 769-0783 or pcrmission. org/saygrace B A LLR OO M DA NCING: 6:30-8:30 p.m. at the Grand Square Hall, 1105 Bob Little Road, Panama City. Come enjoy good music on the best dance oor in the area and show your style. $5 per person at the door. Details: Dirk Gordon, 277-0566 FR A NK A N D FRIEN D S MUSIC A L EVENING: 7-9 p.m. at The Ark, 12908 Hibiscus St., Panama City Beach. Music, refreshments and rafe. Details: 249-1980 THE 25TH A NNU A L PUTN A M C O UNT Y SPELLING BEE: 7:30 p.m. at The Martin Theatre, 409 Harrison Ave., Panama City. This Tony Award-winning musical follows six overachieving and awkward adolescents on their quest for the spelling championship of a lifetime. The show invites volunteers from the audience to participate in each performance. Details and tickets: MartinTheatre.com or 763-8080 DA R D EN SMITH: 7:30 p.m. at The Seaside Rep Theatre, 216 Quincy Circle, Seaside. Tickets: $25. Details: LoveTheRep.com THERE’S A BURGL A R IN M Y BE D : 7:30 p.m. at Kaleidoscope Theatre, 207 E. 24th St., Lynn Haven. Complications arise when two unhappily married people simultaneously plan romantic trysts in their “unused” beach house – with someone else, of course. Details and tickets: 265-3226 or kt-online.org “TWELFTH NIGHT:” 7:30 p.m. at the Amelia Center Theatre, Gulf Coast State College, Panama City. Admission: $20 general admission; GCSC students, faculty and staff admitted free with valid ID. Tickets: GulfCoast.edu/arts What’s H A PPENING Saturday and Sunday events: By 5 p.m. Wednesday Monday and Tuesday events: By noon Thursday Wednesday events: By 5 p.m. Monday before Thursday events: By 5 p.m. Tuesday before Friday events: By 5 p.m. Wednesday before Email events to pcnhnews@pcnh.com WHAT’S HAPPENING DEADLINES

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To submit an item for Out & About, email pcnhnews@pcnh.com or fax to 850-747-5097 Out & About Page B8 | The News Herald | Friday, February 20, 2015 “Kingsman” deserves better than listing comparisons of it to other films. So let me get it out of the way: Imagine a cartoonier “Bond” film, influenced by Edgar Wright’s brainy editing, with “Wanted’s” unabashed silliness, “Kill Bill’s” oddly gorgeous violence, and “Guardians of the Galaxy”style comic book humor and you begin to get the picture. Above all, it’s an absolute blast of pure movie fun. Boasting a great cast of perfectly matched characters and actors, kinetic sci-fi action choreography and tons of slyly intentional silliness, “Kingsman” is funny, ultraviolent and bursting with vibrant color. The Kingsman is a secret British organization that combats the biggest of Earth’s threats, and it is currently looking to replace one of its most recent lost members. Its structure has the skin of the ubiquitous YA-novel-turned-film genre, only much rougher. With director Matthew Vaughn at the helm, my fear was that “Kingsman” would be similar to many of his recent efforts: an interesting but ultimately sad miss. Blatant product placement and a couple of too-clever-for-its-own-good jokes aside, this is happily not the case. Led by the classy and surprisingly action-inclined Colin Firth as the elder statesmen of the group, the movie chugs along with inspired verve. It’s also really smart. Themes like the presumptuous danger of playing God and personal honor vs. public persona bring just enough moral complexity to put it above other films of its type. However, the boldly big goofiness that propels the film is never far from sight. “Kingsman” is a super smart action thriller that won’t disappoint anyone wise enough to skip “50 Shades of Grey.” Rating: 4.5 out of 5 stars Panama City Beach musician Matt Greene, who has a bachelor’s in philosophy from the University of North Florida in Jacksonville, always has enjoyed viewing, debating and critiquing all forms and aspects of film, from foreign films to slapstick comedies. 11 346 88 DIREC TIONS : Fr om P. C.L @ 2nd re d ligh t in So uthpor t, Tr av el 1 block & turn L on Ma rk et St . Co nt inue Ma rk et St . & turn L on Ra ilr oad Av e. (E nd of the ro ad) We ar e the gr ey building to yo ur R. EB T EB T Fr i. & Sa t. 8am 4pm Ge ra ld Mi ller Se af ood A V AR IE TY OF SE AF OO D AV AI LA BL E! 73 28 Ra ilr oa d Av e. La rge He adon Sh rimp Reg . $5.99 LB SALE $5 LB 26-30 Co un t (o ve r 10 lbs , $4.50 LB) Re ad y to Cook Pe eled & De ve ined SALE $20/BOX La rge Jumbo He adon Sh rimp Reg . $6.99 LB SALE $6.50 LB 16-18 Co un t (o ve r 10 lbs , $5.99 lb ) La rge He adless Sh rimp Reg . $11.99 LB SALE $9.99 LB 21-25 Co un t Gloria Vanderbilt is 91. Actor Sidney Poitier is 88. Racing Hall of Famer Bobby Unser is 81. Actress Marj Dusay is 79. Jazz-soul singer Nancy Wilson is 78. Singer-songwriter Buffy Sainte-Marie is 74. Movie director Mike Leigh is 72. Actress Brenda Blethyn is 69. Actress Sandy Duncan is 69. Rock musician J. Geils is 69. Actor Peter Strauss is 68. Rock singer-musician-producer Walter Becker (Steely Dan) is 65. Country singer Kathie Baillie is 64. Actor John Voldstad is 64. Newspaper heiress Patricia Hearst is 61. Actor Anthony Stewart Head is 61. Country singer Leland Martin is 58. Actor James Wilby is 57. Rock musician Sebastian Steinberg is 56. Comedian Joel Hodgson is 55. Basketball Hall-of-Famer Charles Barkley is 52. Rock musician Ian Brown (Stone Roses) is 52. Actor Willie Garson is 51. Model Cindy Crawford is 49. Actor Andrew Shue is 48. Actress Lili Taylor is 48. Singer Brian Littrell is 40. Actress Lauren Ambrose is 37. Actor Jay Hernandez is 37. Actress Chelsea Peretti (TV: “Brooklyn Nine-Nine”) is 37. Country musician Coy Bowles is 36. Actress Majandra Delfino is 34. Singer-musician Chris Thile is 34. Actresssinger Jessie Mueller is 32. Actor Jake Richardson is 30. Singer Rihanna is 27. Actor Jack Falahee (TV: “How to Get Away With Murder”) is 26. ILE A N A M A RI A BL A ND 12, Panama City Saturday, Sunday or Monday birthdays: noon on Thursday before. Tuesday birthdays: noon on Friday before. Wednesday birthdays: noon on Monday before. Thursday birthdays: noon on Tuesday before. Friday birthdays: noon Wednesday before. Email pcnhnews@pcnh.com with “Birthday” in the subject line or drop off current photo and ll out a birthday form at the front desk of The News Herald, 501 W. 11th St. BIR THD A Y DEADLINES Happy BIRTHDAY A NN A B A Y PE TT IS 7, Panama City EDITOR’S NOTE: “Trivia Fun” with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a daily feature in The News Herald. Who was quoted, “The difference between genius and stupidity is that genius has its limits”? Twain, Thoreau, Edison, Einstein Which state provided the main setting for older TV’s “Magnum, P.I.”? Florida, New York, Hawaii, California When was the rst-ever telegram that went around the world? 1904, 1911, 1925, 1938 Where is one’s temporal bone located? Knee, Skull, Forearm, Arch of foot In feudal times, what was a serf? Peasant, Prince, Knight, King How many hearts does an earthworm have? 2, 3, 4, 5 ANSWERS: Einstein, Hawaii, 1911, Skull, Peasant, 5 Comments, questions or suggestions? WC@TriviaGuy.com Trivia FUN WILS O N C A SEY Trivia Guy MO VIETOWN MO VIE CLUB Matt: ‘Kingsman’ bursts with clever fun Each week, locals Cole Schneider and Matt Greene share their different takes on new movies out in area theaters. For podcasts and more, visit MovietownMovieClub.com Cole: ‘Kingsman’ capitalizes on cool “Kingsman” is a blast. With “Avengers 2,” “Star Wars 7” and a host of other giant blockbusters set to be released later this year, there’s a great chance this will be my favorite of the year. The combination of constant action, offbeat humor, inventive storytelling, sleek style and surprising substance pummels the audience into a stunned awe. It’s rare for a movie to be this much fun, and especially rare to be this smart at the same time. Think of “Kingsman” as Quentin Tarantino’s “Bond” film or Wes Craven’s popcorn spy flick. It’s hyper-violent and oozes cool, but it knows exactly what it is doing and comments on its own excess in the midst of fulfilling its genre tropes and delivering big metamovie lines. One minute there’s a brilliant action set piece inside a church, and the next minute there’s the most frank, poignant discussion of remote military ethics I’ve seen in film. The tendencies of this kind of movie allow for us to easily let our guard down such that when a cartoon character like the one played by Samuel L. Jackson delivers a quick quip about something intensely serious we don’t bat an eye. It becomes so effective because of the tone presented before and after. There are many of these moments throughout “Kingsman.” I’d rather it would have ended a couple of seconds before it did and would have liked to see some of the visual language match up with the subtext a little more; “Kingsman” isn’t perfect, but most of its flaws become endearing and the whole of the film is downright entertaining. Rating: 4.5 out of 5 stars Longtime Panama City resident Cole Schneider, born in Long Beach, Calif., always has preferred popcorn and a movie to a long walk on the beach. Director: Matthew Vaughn Starring: Colin Firth, Samuel L. Jackson, Michael Caine, Mark Strong, Mark Hamill, Taron Egerton, Soa Boutella Rated: R (sequences of strong violence, language and some sexual content) ‘KING SMAN: THE SECRET SERVICE’ By LOU KESTEN Associated Press When a game has “1886” in the title, you expect to see a few familiar characters: Sherlock Holmes, perhaps, or Jack the Ripper, or Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. You don’t expect the lead to be Sir Galahad. And yet, here the crusty old geezer is starring in “The Order: 1886” (Sony, for the PlayStation 4, $59.99). Turns out King Arthur’s search for the Holy Grail paid off, rewarding some of the Knights of the Round Table with immortality. Galahad is joined by Round Table veteran Sir Perceval, the apparently ageless Marquis de Lafayette and a much younger version of Lady Igraine in a long-running battle against “half-breed” humans who can morph into fierce, feral monsters — werewolves of London, if you will. Meanwhile, a murky rebellion against Queen Victoria is brewing, and the powerful United India Company appears to be up to some shady business. All this comes together in a conspiracy that threatens the stability of the entire world. The gorgeous, sepiatoned images of “The Order” will look familiar to fans of “steampunk” fantasies like Alan Moore’s “The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen” comics or the video games “Dishonored” and “Thief.” Massive airships float through the skies, while the grimy streets are crisscrossed by elevated, electric trains. There’s the usual assortment of desperate orphans, con men and prostitutes, along with the occasional cameo by historical figures like Nikola Tesla and Charles Darwin. The level of creativity isn’t quite sustained by the gameplay. “The Order” is essentially a “Call of Duty”-style shooter, with period-specific firearms supplemented by more fanciful weapons like an electricity-powered arc gun or an explosive thermite rifle. It’s a strictly linear and somewhat oldfashioned experience, alternating hectic firefights with lengthy, non-interactive cut scenes to advance the plot. There are some awkward fistfights to break up the rhythm, as well as a few welcome stealth scenarios that degenerate all too quickly into bullet-riddled chaos. Most of this is quite well-executed: The gun battles are tense and lively, while the dramatic interludes are sharply animated and wellacted. Several scenes, unfortunately, climax with hoary “quick time events” in which you have to press buttons to match onscreen prompts, dissolving the sense of cinematic immersion that the rest of “The Order” works so hard to achieve. This is the first original title from California-based Ready at Dawn Studios, known for portable versions of popular franchises like “Jak & Daxter” and “God of War.” It’s a well-earned leap to a bigger stage, and the developers prove they have the chops. For about eight hours, “The Order: 1886” delivers a convincing alternate London. If there’s a sequel (which the abrupt ending clearly aims at), I’d like “The Order: 1887” to give me more time and freedom to explore its intriguing world. Two-and-a-half stars out of four. Knights of ‘The Order’ battle Victorian monsters GAME REVIEW

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Sports PANAMA CITY NEWS HERALD Section C Facebook: tinyurl.com/NHSports Twitter: @NH_Sports www.newsherald.com/sports FRIDAY February 20, 2015 The News Herald VERNON — Veteran high school football coach Bobby Johns announced his resignation as football coach and athletic director at Vernon High School in a letter forwarded to various media outlets on Thursday morning. Johns coached the Yellow Jackets to an 11-2 record this season, losing to eventual state champion Port St. Joe in the Region 2-1A champi onship game. Vernon was 7-4 and made the playoffs in 2013, Johns’ first year at the school. “At this time I would like to announce that due to health and family consider ations I am resigning at a date to be effective over the next month as the football coach and athletic director at Vernon High School,” Johns wrote. “I will no longer be pursuing a head coaching position.” Johns said that he had spent the past 17 years as a head coach and was looking forward to “another phase of my career.” He hinted that he had an opportunity to become an athletic director and possibly return as an assistant coach at another school. Known for developing his players with a strict weight room regimen, Johns has been a fixture coaching foot ball at smaller-classification Panhandle schools as well as those in Georgia. In 2004, he guided Blountstown to the 1A state championship game, and the next season led the Tigers to the region championship game. They lost only one game in each of those seasons and compiled a lengthy regularseason winning streak. Most recently Johns took over a Yellow Jackets’ pro gram that had won only one game in 2012 and immedi ately turned Vernon into a playoff team. Johns did not rule out the possibility of resuming his career as a head coach. “I also have the oppor tunity to continue working alongside my son as well as work with a former player for whom I have the utmost respect,” Johns wrote. “I will not elaborate on any of the details of the near future or rule out returning as a head coach someday, but at this time I believe there are great possibilities for my family and I moving forward.” Johns’ teams won more than 130 games during his tenure as a head coach. Vernon’s Johns resigns DAYTONA BEACH (AP) — Hendrick Motorsports swept Thursday night’s qualifying races for the Daytona 500, with Dale Earnhardt Jr. and Jimmie Johnson winning their respective duels. The Earnhardt and John son wins were anticlimactic, with the drama saved for Dan ica Patrick’s desperate bid to make Sun day’s opening race. Her second incident with Denny Ham lin in two days led to a frantic effort by her Stewart-Haas Racing crew to make rapid repairs for her to have a shot at mak ing the 500. She restarted 18th with two laps to go and was pushed all the way around Daytona International Speed way by teammate Kurt Busch to finish 10th. It was good enough for her to make the field — Patrick had to finish inside the top 15 of the second duel — but any joy was immediately lost as she confronted Hamlin on pit road. An incident between the two in Wednesday’s practice sent Patrick to her backup car, and she felt Hamlin had spun her Thursday night. Tale of 2 Tigers: Malone, Chipley play for state bids By DUSTIN KENT 747-5065 | @PCNHDustinKent dkent@pcnh.com Malone and Chipley each made it to Lakeland last season, though only one came home happy. Tonight, both will look to make a return trip as they compete in the 1A regional finals. In the Region 1 final, defending state champion Malone (20-8) will try to get back to defend its title by taking a second straight win over Paxton, which the Tigers defeated 65-47 in the District 1-1A champi onship game on Feb. 7. The Bobcats won both regular season meetings against Malone, winning a close one 66-59 in Malone and then blowing out the Tigers 81-53 in Paxton. The third meeting was all Malone, as the Tigers had their way with the Bobcats, using a 20-3 second quarter run to blow the game open and going up by as many as 24 points in the third quarter. Malone certainly hopes the next matchup resembles the last, but Tigers coach Steven Welch said Thursday he couldn’t begin to guess which of the three disparate outcomes tonight’s meeting would most resemble. “There are so many variables in it,” he said. “If we play like we’ve been playing on the defensive end lately, I think we give ourselves a pretty good chance to be all right. At the same time, anything can happen. You can pick up a couple of key fouls; just anything can hap pen to change the game. Going into a game like this, you just want to have your guys mentally pre pared more than anything. “You hope that if adversity comes up, they’ll just respond and keep playing ball. That’s what we’re focusing on, the stuff we can control. We know what Paxton does and they know what we do. At the end of the day, it comes down to who gets rebounds, who makes plays, who makes free throws, and who doesn’t get rattled when some trouble hits.” Malone won its playoff opener Tuesday at home 71-53 over Graceville, with Antwain John son leading the Tigers with 35 points, while junior guard Chan cellor Lockett added 14 points, nine rebounds, seven assists and four steals. The Tigers have been getting quality contributions from their role players of late, but it has been the individual brilliance of the 6-foot-2 senior Johnson that has sparked the excellent postseason run thus far. Johnson scored 43 points in the District 1-1A tournament semifi nal win over Laurel Hill, and then scored 29 in the district title game before adding 35 in the win over Graceville. Malone will likely need him to be just as good in tonight’s game if the Tigers are to move on. Mariota becomes combine’s feature attraction INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Marcus Mariota looked awfully comfortable on center stage Thursday. He had the deliberate walk, the calm demeanor and the perfectly plain answers all down. All the Ore gon quarterback has to do now is prove it will trans late to success in the NFL. The reigning Heisman Tro phy winner spent roughly 15 minutes answering questions Thursday at the NFL’s annual scouting com bine and responded with a no-frills approach that had to impress the decision-makers who are trying to decide who goes No. 1 in April. “As a competitor, any person would tell you that they’re the best,” Mariota said. “I truly believe that in myself. We’ll see whatever decision is made. I’ve got to go in with that mentality.” There are few questions about Mariota’s resume. He threw for 4,454 yards, 42 touchdowns and four intercep tions in 2014, leading Oregon to the national championship game and winning college football’s most prized individual trophy. In 2013, he threw for 3,665 yards with 31 TDs and four interceptions. However, there are concerns about how well the spread offense he thrived in at Oregon will prepare for him for NFL-style offenses. Even Mariota acknowledges there will be challenges in making the transition, things that might not seem so complicated to the aver age fan. “I haven’t huddled in a while,” he said. “It seems like a little detail, but that is kind of a big thing. There are other things as well: Three, five, seven-step drops under cen ter. That’s all stuff I’ve been able to work on the last month.” Mariota was supposed to share the stage with Jameis Winston one more time Thursday. Instead, because of longerthan-anticipated medical exam, Winston’s appearance at Lucas Oil Stadium was delayed until today. That’s when the 2013 Heisman winner from Florida State is now expected to speak. Without Winston around, Mari ota had the white-hot spotlight to himself even if that’s not exactly the way he wanted it. Robert Griffin III and Andrew Luck seemed to enjoy themselves in Indy, Tim Tebow welcomed the attention and Johnny Manziel tried to create a more serious persona. Mariota stuck to his low-key approach. “I guess you could say (the doubts) are a little bit of motiva tion, but it’s not the reason why I’m doing it,” he said. “There’s a purpose (to) why I’m here and why I’m standing in front of you and that’s because I love the game, I want to be part of this game, I want to be part of this game for a long time. My motivation isn’t to prove anybody wrong. My motivation is to make a dream come true.” MAR C US MARIOTA Takes center stage SEE TIGERS | C3 D A Y TONA 500 QUALIFIERS T win wins for Hendrick Earnhardt Jr. and Johnson capture duels DALE E AR NH AR D T JR. Won first duel JI MMY JO HN SO N Won second duel AP Jimmy Johnson takes the checkered flag for a victory in the second duel on Thursday night. SEE D AY T ONA | C2

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Page C2 | The News Herald | Friday, February 20, 2015 Truex hopeful Unlimited effort sign of brighter days DAYTONA BEACH (AP) — Martin Truex Jr. stayed clear of the wrecks that littered the Sprint Unlimited race over the weekend. He was busy enjoying the clear view ahead. “I was just glad that it was in my mirror for once,” he said. Truex wants to put all of 2014 in his rearview mirror following a disappointing debut for Furniture Row Racing. Truex had the worst numbers of his nine-year career and led all of one measly lap. Just one. That stat is a bit of a shocker for a driver with two career wins and one Chase for the Sprint Cup championship berth. His car blew an engine in the Daytona 500, he finished 43rd, and his No. 78 Chev rolet never really got going last season. “A lot of struggles that we had really stem from the begin ning,” FRR general manager Joe Garone said. “It took half the rest of the season to get it turned around.” His performance would turn into the least of Truex’s troubles. His longtime girlfriend, Sherry Pollex, was diagnosed with can cer last summer and she would have various organs removed, including her ovaries, fallopian tubes and part of her stomach. She faces monthly chemotherapy treatments for at least one year. Furniture Row owner Barney Visser told Truex he could sit out the rest of the season and still keep his ride for 2015. Truex, though greatly appreciative, declined the offer. Truex found the track thera peutic and kept him focused on something other than her disease. He never missed a race in a gru eling season where he finished a career-worst 24th in the points standings. “It’s been miserable for a while,” Truex said. “Last year was a tough year for us, on and off the racetrack.” Both sides expected more after a fantastic 2013 for each side made it seem like the new pairing would be an instant hit. FRR, a one-car operation based in Denver, far removed from NASCAR’s North Carolina hub, made the Chase with Kurt Busch. Truex, whose only Cup win had been at Dover in 2007, won at Sonoma and made the Chase. Truex was booted from the Chase, though, in the aftermath of the Richmond scandal. Maybe Daytona can serve as a kickoff to a solid season instead of a sneak preview of more misery ahead on the track. He twice had back-to-back top-10 finishes but was unable to otherwise string together much success. “We had lost a little bit of han dle on the cars and got a little bit behind,” Garone said. “You get caught up thinking maybe it’s our communication, maybe it’s this, maybe it’s that. I think we were wrong at the start of that, putting more emphasis on communica tion and how we were going about racing. In the meantime, our cars were getting a little bit behind.” The team mixed it up in the off season: Furniture Row promoted Cole Pearn from lead race engi neer to crew chief, replacing Todd Berrier. Fast forward to last Saturday night at Daytona International Speedway. Truex led a race-high 29 laps — yes, 28 more than all of last season — before giving it up over the final laps to winner Matt Kenseth. He was frustrated with his lost chance at walking out a winner. But running in front brought with it a feeling of hope. “It’s been a long time really, a couple years, since I had a car that I could make moves like that with,” Truex said. “It’s been a long time really, a couple years, since I had a car that I could make moves like that with.” Martin Truex Jr. AUTO RACING THURSDAY AT DAYTONA AP photos TOP: Richard Petty gives a thumbs up after unveiling a 2015 Ford Mustang GT at Daytona International Speedway on Thursday. The car is produced from a partnership with Petty’s performance company, Petty’s Garage, and Ford. BOTTOM LEFT: Crew members, left, work on Danica Patrick’s car during practice at the speedway. BOTTOM RIGHT: Joey Logano’s helmet rests atop his car during a practice session. DAYTONA BEACH (AP) — Bobby Labonte looks around NAS CAR’s motorhome lot and sees the makeover coming. It was just a few years ago that the place was devoid of children. The playground was empty. There were no toys scattered about. Few, if any, sounds of children echoing across the rows of luxury buses. It was a clear indication how young the sport had become. Now, though, there are kids everywhere. To Labonte, that means change is on the horizon. All those young drivers have grown up, have families and have started getting old, at least by NASCAR standards. Four-time Cup champion Jeff Gordon has already announced that 2015 will be his last as a fulltime driver, and there’s a sense that several others could follow him out the door. “We’re starting to see it cycle through,” Labonte said. Ten Sprint Cup regulars, includ ing Gordon, are at least 36 years old heading into this season. And although salaries are nearly as good as ever and the cars and tracks are certainly safer than ever, there is growing speculation that some of the elder statesmen are closer to calling it quits than outsiders might think. “The trend’s already started,” former NASCAR crew chief and team owner Ray Evernham said. “We’re not going to be able to reverse it. A lot of it’s got to do with the technology of the cars, the fact that these kids are coming younger and younger now. You used to have to have experience and have that book (of knowledge). A guy at 50 could still win races and challenge for championships.” Evernham said that’s not the case anymore. He pointed to tech nological advancements, most nota bly the ability for youngsters to get realistic seat time at every track in state-of-the-art simulators. “People are getting here faster and getting here with more experi ence than they ever could before,” Evernham said. “It’s not a trend the drivers are going to control. It’s going to be like Formula One. At about 35 — and I mean probably within the next 10 years — you’re going to be looking at guys that are 35, 38 years old as being too old in this sport.” Joining Gordon in the over-35 category are Greg Biffle (45), threetime champion Tony Stewart (43), 2003 champion Matt Kenseth (42), Dale Earnhardt Jr. (40), six-time champion Jimmie Johnson (39), reigning champion Kevin Harvick (39), Jamie McMurray (38), Ryan Newman (37) and 2004 champion Kurt Busch (36). “If you look back at NASCAR and all the years they’ve been here, every eight or 10 or 12 years, they have a reshuffling of the people up front,” seven-time champion Rich ard Petty said. “That time’s come now. You’ve got guys 40, 45 years old, and that’s kind of a general age (of retirement).” Sponsors tend to gravitate to younger drivers, always looking to land the next up-and-comer and attract the coveted 18-to-35-year-old audience. And the youngsters are here, ready and waiting for a ride. Kyle Larson landed a full-time spot with Chip Ganassi Racing last season. Chase Elliott, the son of Hall of Fame driver Bill Elliott, will replace Gordon at Hendrick Motors ports in 2016. Ryan Blaney, Ty Dillon, Ben Rhodes and Erik Jones could be next in line for the top teams. “The day and age is changing, and the kids coming in are incred ible,” veteran Joe Nemechek said. “So many guys are good that are coming up.” DAYTONA from Page C1 Like Gordon, other drivers closing in on retirement They had a heated argu ment, with Hamlin at times appearing to try to calm Pat rick, and he finally seemed exasperated when he covered his face with his hands. “He cut across my rear bumper and pulls the back end around,” Patrick said. “I get being close. But he’s been going to my left rear and it just gets it light. I don’t want to have these issues, but if we’re going to have these issues then we’re going to have to deal with them. We can’t be putting ourselves out of our race at someone else’s expense and nothing’s happened to him.” Tony Stewart, her car coowner, entered the fray and seemed to shout at Hamlin. “Tony came down and said, ‘You need to watch the replay,’ which is good to hear. My boss obviously was sitting on the pit box and saw it,” she said. “We’re going to have to figure it out because this isn’t going to end well.” Hamlin was adamant that Patrick’s car was too loose, he didn’t touch her and the spin was an aerodynamic issue. “I try to treat everyone as equal,” Hamlin said. “If you’re in this Cup series, you deserved your way here and you can handle a lot of situa tions. I just got close to her and her car got loose again. I just tried to explain that, ‘Danica, oh, it’s you, I’ve got to stay away 2 feet because your car is loose?’ “We’re trying to move for ward. What are we racing for? Eighth in a twin race? It’s not much, but I guess I just have to give more room because once I get close enough to her, her car just gets out of control.” When Hamlin and Patrick were finally separated, Busch was waiting to congratulate her. He did it by cupping her face with both hands; Busch has been accused by an ex-girl friend of domestic assault, and he has maintained he merely cupped her face. Meanwhile, Hendrick Motorsports has dominated qualifying and will start 1-2-3 in “The Great American Race.” Jeff Gordon and Johnson swept the front row Sunday in the first round of qualifying. Then Earnhardt, the defend ing Daytona 500 winner, won the first duel to take the third starting spot. “We’ve had a great car all week,” Earnhardt said. “I’m so glad to get through the duel in one piece because I know how good this car is. We’re going to have a fun day on Sunday.” Gordon, the four-time NASCAR champion, finished second in the duel and was fol lowed by Joey Logano, Stewart and Clint Bowyer. Johnson easily won the sec ond duel, leading Kyle Busch, Carl Edwards and Greg Biffle across the finish line. Purdy to drive pace car Paralympics bronze medalist Amy Purdy will drive the honorary pace car for Sunday’s Daytona 500. Purdy will drive the new Toyota Camry that was redesigned for 2015. She won her medal in snowboarding in 2014 at the Sochi Paralympics.

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SPORT S Friday, February 20, 2015 | The News Herald | Page C3 “Paxton has some guys with their length that can bother his shots and stuff, but this is one game we kind of go into where I don’t think they have anybody that comes close to him in terms of keeping up with his foot speed and his ability to get off the floor,” Welch said of Johnson. “Hopefully we can get him some good looks in his spots and get him going. We’re definitely going to make an effort to get him loose a little bit.” Paxton, which advanced by earning a 59-39 road win over District 2 champion Cottondale on Tuesday, presents Malone with a matchup prob lem as well in the form of 6-foot-3, 200-pound post player Zac Varnum, who averaged 24.5 points and 11 rebounds against Malone in the two regular sea son meetings. “He’s a beast,” Welch said of the Bobcats’ sopho more. “The thing about him is that, with a lot of big kids, you think if you can get him away from the basket, you’ll be alright. But he’s a good athlete, he can put it on the floor a little bit, his jump shot isn’t bad, and he’s so strong. He’s possibly the strongest player we’ve played against this year. He’s just a good player. He’s definitely a matchup problem for us.” Welch said the key for the Tigers is to control the pace and make it a more open, up-tempo game instead of the more structured, half-court affair that the Bobcats would prefer. But the coach said he is well aware of how diffi cult it is to get Paxton out of its game after facing the Bobcats seven times over the past two seasons. “We understand what we’re up against. This is a very good team. They were pretty much the No. 1-ranked team in 1A the whole second half of the season,” Welch said. “We’ve got our work cut out for us, but the last game definitely gives us a sense of optimism. We have to match that effort to have a chance.” In the Region 2 final, Chipley (25-3) versus West Gadsden (25-2) is a matchup of district champions and a rematch of last year’s regional final won by the Tigers 73-53 in Chipley. This year’s game will be played Greensboro, however, where the District 4 champion Jaguars have not lost this season. After routing Franklin County 59-36 in the district title game, West Gadsden opened up the playoffs with another lopsided victory, defeating Northview 74-44. District 3 champ Chipley topped Northview in its district title game before rolling over Franklin County 85-46 on Tuesday thanks to a dominant sec ond half in which the Tigers outscored the Seahawks 51-19. Trent Forrest scored 32 points in the win after scoring 40 in the district championship game, and the junior guard is averaging 31.6 points per game over his last five outings. The winners of the two regional contests will face off Tuesday in the state semifinals in Lakeland. The other semifinal will come from regional contests between Hamilton County and Hawthorne, and Williston and Crescent City. The 1A championship game will be played Wednesday. TIGERS from Page C1 COLLEGE PARK, Md. (AP) — Melo Trimble scored 26 points, including a pair of pivotal 3-pointers down the stretch, and No. 16 Maryland squeezed past Nebraska 69-65 Thursday night in the first-ever meeting between the teams. Dez Wells and Jake Layman each scored 14 for the Terrapins (22-5, 10-4 Big Ten), who were locked in a tie game with 5:38 left before Trimble took over. After Wells made two free throws, Trimble beat the shot clock with a jump shot from atop the key. The freshman guard connected again from beyond the arc with 2:18 remaining for a 62-54 lead. No. 21 SMU 67, Temple 58 DALLAS — Nic Moore scored 18 points, and SMU rallied from 10 points down in the second half to snap Temple’s seven-game winning streak. Purdue 67, Indiana 63 BLOOMINGTON, Ind. — A.J. Hammons and Isaac Haas combined for 32 points and 13 rebounds, leading Purdue to a victory against Indiana. UCF 69, Tulane 55 NEW ORLEANS — Kasey Wilson scored 20 points, including tying a career-high with five 3-pointers, and added seven rebounds to help lead UCF to a victory over Tulane. Florida Gulf Coast 54, Kennesaw State 53 FORT MYERS — Brett Comer scored 10 of his 16 points in the second half and Jamail Jones sank the winning bucket to lift Florida Gulf Coast to a comeback win over Kennesaw State. North Texas 79, Florida Atlantic 72 BOCA RATON — Colin Voss scored a career-high 22 points and hot-shooting North Texas beat Florida Atlantic. Georgia State 79, South Alabama 51 ATLANTA — R.J. Hunter had 28 points and eight assists, and Marcus Crider scored a careerhigh 21 to lead Georgia State to a win over South Alabama. Jacksonville 83, N. Kentucky 75, OT JACKSONVILLE — Kori Babineaux pumped in 27 points and Marcellous Bell scored 6 of his 15 points in the final half minute of extra time as Jacksonville beat Northern Kentucky. WOMEN No. 6 Tennessee 77, Alabama 56 KNOXVILLE, Tenn. — Ariel Massengale scored 17 points and shot 5 of 11 from 3-point range as No. 6 Tennessee trounced Alabama to continue its domination of this series. No. 4 Notre Dame 71, Georgia Tech 61 ATLANTA — Jewell Loyd scored 31 points and No. 4 Notre Dame survived a scare to beat Georgia Tech for its 11th straight win. No. 8 Louisville 69, Virginia Tech 49 BLACKSBURG, Va. — Shawnta’ Dyer scored 15 points to lead No. 8 Louisville to a vic tory over Virginia Tech. No. 9 Florida State 81, Clemson 38 TALLAHASSEE — Ivey Slaughter had 13 points and 12 rebounds for her sixth doubledouble of the season to help No. 9 Florida State cruise to a victory over Clemson. Morgan Jones added 10 points and seven rebounds for the Seminoles (24-3, 11-2 ACC), who won for the 11th time in 12 games. Florida State, which gave up the fewest points in an ACC game this season, also got its 20th double-digit win. Nikki Dixon scored 16 points for Clemson (9-17, 1-12), which matched the school record with 12 straight losses. Dixon made 5 of 13 shots from the floor, her 23rd double-digit scoring game. However, the rest of the Tigers made just 10 of 40 shots. Florida State shot 28 of 60 (46.7 percent) from the floor. The Seminoles improved to 13-0 at home, the only ACC team that is still unbeaten on its home court. No. 15 Texas A&M 81, No. 11 Kentucky 69 LEXINGTON, Ky. — Courtney Walker scored 19 points and Courtney Williams 16 to lead five Texas A&M players in double figures as the 15th-ranked Aggies cruised past No. 11 Kentucky. No. 17 North Carolina 83, Wake Forest 45 CHAPEL HILL, N.C. — Allisha Gray scored 16 points and No. 17 North Carolina beat Wake Forest. COLLEGE BA SKETBALL AP Maryland guard Melo Trimble drives past Nebraska guard Tarin Smith. Terps top Huskers in first meeting Prep: Dolphins stay perfect with 4-2 win The News Herald TALLAHASSEE — Mosley moved to 4-0 on the season thanks to Thursday’s 4-2 road victory over Chiles, with JJ Bleday starting on the mound and going 5 1/3 innings for the win. Bleday allowed just one earned run on three hits and two walks, while striking out nine Chiles batters. Michael Cullen recorded the final two outs in the bottom of the seventh to get the save. Cullen also led Mosley offen sively, going 2-for-4 with two doubles and two RBI, with Dillon Brown and Gunner Smith each going 1-for-3 with an RBI. Mosley will look to go to 5-0 when it hosts Crestview tonight. PSJ 12, Sneads 5 SNEADS — The Tiger Sharks notched their second victory of the season over the Pirates, with Will Ramsey getting the victory in three innings of relief of starter Cole Cryderman. Ramsey struck out three Sneads batters and also led PSJ offensively with two hits and three RBI. Coy Burke also had three hits and an RBI, with Tony Yowell adding two hits and two RBI. Port St. Joe (2-1) hosts West Gadsden tonight. Softball Arnold 11, North Bay Haven 0 PANAMA CITY BEACH — Emily Sowell led the Mar lins to the win with a five-inning no-hitter, walking just one batter and striking out eight. Sarah Robertson led the way offensively, going 3-for-3 with a double and two RBIs, with Miranda Smith adding an RBI double, and Makena Holloway an RBI single. Arnold (4-0) next hosts Mosley on Tuesday. Holmes County 16, Bethlehem 2 BONIFAY — Sidney Revels pitched a six-inning no-hit ter in the victory for the Blue Devils, allowing two unearned runs on four walks with eight strikeouts. Revels also went 3-for-5 at the plate with two RBI, while Jewel Sellers was 4-for-5 with six RBI. Holmes County (3-1) next plays host to Bethlehem tonight. Tennis Mosley 7-7, Bay 0-0 PANAMA CITY — Mosley blanked Bay in boys and girls. Mosley next plays today in Tal lahassee against Chiles and Lincoln. Results, Mosley players listed first. Girls: Mosley 7, Bay 0 Singles — No. 1: Holly Scott def. Mary Higby 8-1, No. 2: Emily Whitlock def. Anna Joseph 8-3, No. 3: Samantha Snodgrass def. Tara McCormick 8-3, No. 4: Rachel Bates def. Lauren Mapoles 8-0, No. 5: Heidi Nix def. Kaeleigh Starling 8-0. Doubles — No. 1: Scott-Whitlock def. HigbyJoseph 8-3, No. 2: Snodgrass-Bates def. MaplesMcCormick 8-0. Boys: Mosley 7, Bay 0 Singles — No. 1: Daniel Lozier def. Nathan Dykes 8-2, No. 2: Brandon Wachtseitl def. Adam Zawahri 8-1, No. 3: Connor Morrow def. Kevin Healey 8-1, No. 4: Jake Moody def. Ira Webb 8-0, No. 5: Lorenzo Walker def. Brenton Wyatt 8-2. Doubles — No. 1: Lozier-Wachtseitl def. DykesZawahri 8-0, No. 2: Morrow-Moody def. HealeyWebb 8-1. Boys weightlifting Bay 60, Arnold 29 PANAMA CITY — Bay took the team victory over Arnold in Thursday’s home meet. Late results Track and field NBH girls triumph BRISTOL — North Bay Haven won the girls division and the Buc caneers boys were outdistanced by Blountstown in the final events in a six-school track and field meet held Wednesday. The NBH girls totaled 117 points to win easily. The boys had 106 points to place second. Also competing were host Liberty County, Graceville, Frank lin County and Wewahitchka. Results of relays and individual events were not supplied. Foster, Nelson key GC win The News Herald PANAMA CITY — Gulf Coast got a strong pitching performance from starter Matt Foster and big eighth-inning home run by Nick Nelson to take a 6-1 victory over Shel ton State on Thursday. Foster went eight innings to earn the win, giving up just one earned run on two hits and striking out seven to outduel Shel ton State ace Grayson Jones. Gulf Coast led 3-1 in the bottom of the eighth inning when Trevor Davis led off with a triple and scored on a fielder’s choice after a ground ball by Christian Williams. Nick Nelson then provided the big shot for the Commodores with a two-run blast to make it a 6-1 lead. Cameron Ragsdale led Gulf Coast at the plate by going 3-for-3 with an RBI. The Commodores improved to 8-5 with the win and play two more games today, starting with a 10 a.m. start against Shelton State followed by a 3 p.m. game against Wal lace Community College. Wichita State won’t appeal WICHITA, Kan. (AP) — Wichita State won’t appeal an NCAA ruling that it vacate its baseball wins in the 2012 and 2013 sea sons, but the school’s former baseball coach says he’s challenging it on his own. Gene Stephenson told the Wichita Eagle he knows the chances of the NCAA accept ing his appeal are slim, but he said it’s important. University President John Bardo said he disagrees with the punishment but decided it wasn’t in the school’s best interest to appeal. The Shockers won 74 games in the two seasons. The NCAA placed the program on pro bation in January after finding the Shockers in 2012 and 2013 used 21 players who were given improper discounts on non-baseball merchandise from the program’s athletic apparel manufacturer. The school also was placed on one year of probation. COLLEGE BA SEBALL

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STAT SHEET Page C4 | The News Herald | Friday, February 20, 2015 Television Auto racing 10 a.m. FS1 — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, practice for Daytona 500, at Daytona Beach. 11:30 a.m. FS1 — NASCAR, XFINITY Series, practice for Alert Today Florida 300, at Daytona Beach. 1 p.m. FS1 — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, practice for Daytona 500, at Daytona Beach. 2:30 p.m. FS1 — NASCAR, XFINITY Series, final practice for Alert Today Florida 300, at Daytona Beach. 3:30 p.m. FS1 — NASCAR, Truck Series, pole qualifying for Nextera Energy Resources 250, at Daytona Beach. 6:30 p.m. FS1 — NASCAR, Truck Series, Nextera Energy Resources 250, at Daytona Beach. Boxing 8 p.m. ESPN2 — Boxcino, heavyweight quarterfinals: Donovan Dennis (10-1-0) vs. Steve Vukosa (10-0-0); Razvan Cojanu (12-1-0) vs. Ed Fountain (10-0-0); Andrey Fedosov (25-3-0) vs. Nat Heaven (9-1-0); Mario Heredia (9-1-0) vs. Lenroy Thomas (18-3-0), at Verona, N.Y. 9 p.m. SHO — Featherweights, Claudio Marrero (17-1-0) vs. Orlando Rizo (18-5-0); light heavyweights, Humberto Savigne (12-1-0) vs. Craig Baker (15-0-0); welterweights, Sammy Vasquez Jr. (17-0-0) vs. Emmanuel Lartey (17-2-0), at Pittsburgh Golf 9:30 a.m. GOLF — European PGA Tour, Indian Open, second round, at New Delhi (same-day tape) 4 p.m. GOLF — PGA Tour, Northern Trust Open, second round, at Los Angeles 10:30 p.m. GOLF — LPGA, Women’s Australian Open, third round, at Melbourne 4:30 a.m. GOLF — European PGA Tour, Indian Open, third round, at New Delhi (same-day tape) Men’s college basketball 6 p.m. ESPN2 — Cleveland St. at Green Bay 6 p.m. ESPNU — Hartford at Albany 8 p.m. ESPNU — Iona at Marist NBA 7 p.m. ESPN — Cleveland at Washington 9:30 p.m. ESPN — San Antonio at Golden State In The BLEACHERS SPORTS Briefs Ebro Schedule Matinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Parx 11:25 a.m.Greyhound simulcast: Sarasota 11:30 a.m., Derby Lane 11:30 a.m., Palm Beach noon. Evening: Greyhound simulcast: Jacksonville 6:30 p.m. Tuesday Matinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Parx 11:25 a.m. Greyhound simulcast: Sarasota 11:30 a.m., Palm Beach noon. Evening: Greyhound simulcast: Derby Lane 6:30 p.m. Wednesday Matinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Aqueduct 12:20 p.m., Tampa Bay 11:30 a.m., Gulfstream 11:30 a.m.. Greyhound simulcast: Sarasota 11:30 a.m., Derby Lane 11:30 a.m., Jacksonville 11:30 a.m. Evening: Greyhound simulcast: Derby Lane 6:30 p.m.,Jacksonville 6:30 p.m. Thursday Matinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Tampa Bay 11:30 a.m., Gulfstream 11:30 a.m., Aqueduct 12:20 p.m., Santa Anita 3 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Sarasota 11:30 a.m., Palm Beach noon. Evening: Greyhound simulcast: Derby Lane 6:30 p.m., Jacksonville 6:30 p.m. Friday Matinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Tampa Bay 11:30 am., Gulfstream 11:30 a.m., Aqueduct 12:20 p.m., Santa Anita 3 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Sarasota 11:30 a.m., Palm Beach noon. Evening: Greyhound simulcast: Palm Beach 6 p.m. Derby Lane 6:30 p.m., Jacksonville 6:30 p.m., Sarasota 6:30 p.m. Saturday Matinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Tampa Bay 11:30 a.m., Gulfstream 11:30 a.m., Aqueduct 12:20 p.m., Santa Anita 2:30 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Sarasota 11:30 a.m., Jacksonville 11:30 a.m., Derby Lane 11:30 a.m., Palm Beach noon. Evening: Greyhound simulcast: Palm Beach 6 p.m., Jacksonville 6:30 p.m., Derby Lane 6:30 p.m., Sarasota 6:30 p.m. Sunday Matinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Aqueduct 11:45 a.m., Tampa Bay 11:30 a.m., Gulfstream 11:30 p.m., Santa Anita 1 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Palm Beach noon, Jacksonville 12:30 p.m. POKER ROOM – (Ext. 180) Open 9 a.m. to 3 a.m. Monday through Friday and 24 hours on weekends and holidays. New Year’s schedule: Open 9 a.m. Monday to 3 a.m. Wednesday. LOCATION – Intersection of State 79 and State 20. INFORMATION – 234-3943. Auto racing Daytona 500 lineup After Thursday qualifying; race Sunday At Daytona International Speedway Daytona Beach Lap length: 2.5 miles (Car number in parentheses) 1. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 201.293 mph. 2. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 201.135. 3. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet. 4. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 200.187. 5. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 193.241. 6. (19) Carl Edwards, Toyota, 197.837. 7. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 197.968. 8. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 197.477. 9. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 194.995. 10. (78) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet, 190.678. 11. (4) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 197.994. 12. (21) Ryan Blaney, Ford, 193.282. 13. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 199.867. 14. (44) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, 194.978. 15. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 193.133. 16. (66) Mike Wallace, Toyota, 192.509. 17. (40) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 193.299. 18. (51) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 196.532. 19. (35) Cole Whitt, Ford, 194.012. 20. (10) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 197.959. 21. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 198.325. 22. (31) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 198.177. 23. (95) Michael McDowell, Ford, 195.3. 24. (41) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 197.976. 25. (23) J.J. Yeley, Toyota. 26. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 195.346. 27. (46) Michael Annett, Chevrolet, 196.554. 28. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 194.452. 29. (42) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 195.588. 30. (3) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 196.962. 31. (33) Ty Dillon, Chevrolet, 197.507. 32. (17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 196.816. 33. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 197.2. 34. (55) Michael Waltrip, Toyota, 190.517. 35. (20) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 200.214. 36. (83) Johnny Sauter, Toyota, 198.22. 37. (6) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 197.256. 38. (9) Sam Hornish Jr., Ford, 197.243. 39. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 193.357. 40. (47) AJ Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 198.212. 41. (13) Casey Mears, Chevrolet, 197.946. 42. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota. 43. (32) Bobby Labonte, Ford, Past Champion. Failed to Qualify 44. (62) Brian Scott, Chevrolet, 197.828. 45. (29) Justin Marks, Toyota, 194.675. 46. (30) Ron Hornaday Jr., Chevrolet, 190.791. 47. (26) Jeb Burton, Toyota, 195.004. 48. (7) Alex Bowman, Chevrolet, 198.229. 49. (98) Josh Wise, Ford, 193.386. Budweiser Duel 1 Thursday (Start position in parentheses) 1. (25) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 60 laps, 128 rating, 0 points. 2. (1) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 60, 113.8, 0. 3. (10) Joey Logano, Ford, 60, 94.6, 0. 4. (15) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 60, 83.9, 0. 5. (20) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 60, 67.8, 0. 6. (14) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 60, 73, 0. 7. (3) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 60, 99.2, 0. 8. (5) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 60, 86, 0. 9. (23) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 60, 70.2, 0. 10. (22) Cole Whitt, Ford, 60, 65.9, 0. 11. (12) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 60, 84.9, 0. 12. (19) Michael McDowell, Ford, 60, 68.2, 0. 13. (11) J.J. Yeley, Toyota, 60, 46.9, 0. 14. (17) Michael Annett, Chevrolet, 60, 51.8, 0. 15. (18) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 60, 49.8, 0. 16. (4) Ty Dillon, Chevrolet, 60, 53.8, 0. 17. (2) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 60, 108.7, 0. 18. (21) Justin Marks, Toyota, 60, 39.6, 0. 19. (9) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 60, 74.5, 0. 20. (8) Aric Almirola, Ford, 60, 47.9, 0. 21. (24) Ron Hornaday Jr., Chevrolet, 60, 27.3, 0. 22. (7) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 60, 61.8, 0. 23. (13) AJ Allmendinger, Chevrolet, accident, 27, 72.7, 0. 24. (6) Johnny Sauter, Toyota, accident, 27, 33.4, 0. 25. (16) Casey Mears, Chevrolet, engine, 17, 40, 0. Race Statistics Average Speed of Race Winner : 144.462 mph. Time of Race : 1 hour, 2 minutes, 18 seconds. Margin of Victory : 0.165 seconds. Caution Flags : 3 for 13 laps. Lead Changes : 9 among 5 drivers. Lap Leaders : M.Kenseth 1-17, T.Bayne 18, J.Gordon 19-21, J.McMurray 22, J.Gordon 23-24, M.Kenseth 25-34, D.Earnhardt Jr. 35-37, M.Kenseth 38-42, D.Earnhardt Jr. 43-60. Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps Led) : M.Kenseth, 3 times for 32 laps, D.Earnhardt Jr., 2 times for 21 laps, J.Gordon, 2 times for 5 laps, J.McMurray, 1 time for 1 lap, T.Bayne, 1 time for 1 lap. Budweiser Duel 2 Thursday 1. (1) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 64 laps, 138.8 rating, 0 points, $56,726. 2. (2) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 64, 124.9, 0, $41,713. 3. (3) Carl Edwards, Toyota, 64, 109.5, 0, $36,713. 4. (6) Greg Biffle, Ford, 64, 92, 0, $31,713. 5. (5) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet, 64, 103.8, 0, $29,713. 6. (9) Ryan Blaney, Ford, 64, 86.3, 0, $27,313. 7. (20) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, 64, 48.8, 0, $26,213. 8. (23) Mike Wallace, Toyota, 64, 61.7, 0, $25,213. 9. (17) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 64, 68.9, 0, $25,188. 10. (15) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 64, 64.4, 0, $25,163. 11. (13) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 64, 45.3, 0, $25,138. 12. (14) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 64, 62.5, 0, $25,113. 13. (18) David Gilliland, Ford, 64, 60.1, 0, $25,088. 14. (21) David Ragan, Ford, 64, 60.4, 0, $25,063. 15. (4) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 64, 81.6, 0, $25,038. 16. (8) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 64, 59.2, 0, $25,013. 17. (16) Brian Scott, Chevrolet, 64, 62.3, 0, $24,988. 18. (24) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 64, 77.3, 0, $24,938. 19. (10) Michael Waltrip, Toyota, 64, 41.6, 0, $24,913. 20. (11) Bobby Labonte, Ford, accident, 60, 40.9, 0, $24,888. 21. (7) Sam Hornish Jr., Ford, accident, 36, 72.3, 0, $24,838. 22. (19) Jeb Burton, Toyota, accident, 36, 36.2, 0, $24,813. 23. (12) Alex Bowman, Chevrolet, accident, 36, 48.2, 0, $24,763. 24. (22) Josh Wise, Ford, electrical, 1, 24.1, 0, $24,738. Race Statistics Average Speed of Race Winner : 144.724 mph. Time of Race : 1 hour, 6 minutes, 20 seconds. Margin of Victory : 0.125 seconds. Caution Flags : 3 for 12 laps. Lead Changes : 7 among 5 drivers. Lap Leaders : Ky.Busch 1-21, C.Edwards 22, J.Johnson 23, A.Dillon 24, J.Johnson 25-39, M.Truex Jr. 40, J.Johnson 41-64. Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps Led) : J.Johnson, 3 times for 40 laps, Ky.Busch, 1 time for 21 laps, C.Edwards, 1 time for 1 lap, M.Truex Jr., 1 time for 1 lap, A.Dillon, 1 time for 1 lap. NBA Standings EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L Pct GB Toronto 36 17 .679 — Brooklyn 21 31 .404 14 Boston 20 31 .392 15 Philadelphia 12 41 .226 24 New York 10 43 .189 26 Southeast Division W L Pct GB Atlanta 43 11 .796 — Washington 33 21 .611 10 Charlotte 22 30 .423 20 Miami 22 30 .423 20 Orlando 17 39 .304 27 Central Division W L Pct GB Chicago 34 20 .630 — Cleveland 33 22 .600 1 Milwaukee 30 23 .566 3 Detroit 21 33 .389 13 Indiana 21 33 .389 13 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division W L Pct GB Memphis 39 14 .736 — Houston 36 17 .679 3 Dallas 36 19 .655 4 San Antonio 34 19 .642 5 New Orleans 27 26 .509 12 Northwest Division W L Pct GB Portland 36 17 .679 — Oklahoma City 28 25 .528 8 Denver 20 33 .377 16 Utah 19 34 .358 17 Minnesota 11 42 .208 25 Pacific Division W L Pct GB Golden State 42 9 .824 — L.A. Clippers 35 19 .648 8 Phoenix 29 25 .537 14 Sacramento 18 34 .346 24 L.A. Lakers 13 40 .245 30 Wednesday’s Games No games scheduled Thursday’s Games Dallas at Oklahoma City, (n) San Antonio at L.A. Clippers, (n) Friday’s Games Indiana at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. New Orleans at Orlando, 6 p.m. Toronto at Atlanta, 6:30 p.m. Chicago at Detroit, 6:30 p.m. Miami at New York, 6:30 p.m. Phoenix at Minnesota, 7 p.m. Cleveland at Washington, 7 p.m. Houston at Dallas, 7:30 p.m. Denver at Milwaukee, 7:30 p.m. Portland at Utah, 8 p.m. Boston at Sacramento, 9 p.m. San Antonio at Golden State, 9:30 p.m. Brooklyn at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m. Saturday’s Games Oklahoma City at Charlotte, 6 p.m. New Orleans at Miami, 6:30 p.m. Phoenix at Chicago, 7 p.m. Toronto at Houston, 7 p.m. Sacramento at L.A. Clippers, 9 p.m. College basketball Thursday’s men’s scores EAST Bryant 66, Wagner 65 Canisius 69, Siena 63, OT Delaware 70, UNC Wilmington 59 Monmouth (NJ) 63, St. Peter’s 58 Mount St. Mary’s 82, LIU Brooklyn 65 Niagara 55, Fairfield 53 Rider 94, Quinnipiac 83 Sacred Heart 80, Robert Morris 76 St. Francis (NY) 70, Fairleigh Dickinson SOUTH Belmont 66, E. Kentucky 61 Chattanooga 74, Mercer 61 Coastal Carolina 81, Campbell 57 Florida Gulf Coast 54, Kennesaw St. 53 Georgia St. 79, South Alabama 51 Jacksonville 83, N. Kentucky 75, OT Louisiana Tech 83, Charlotte 82, OT Maryland 69, Nebraska 65 Middle Tennessee 90, Marshall 51 North Florida 93, Lipscomb 78 North Texas 79, FAU 72 Old Dominion 64, Southern Miss. 38 SC-Upstate 73, Stetson 54 The Citadel 62, Furman 56, OT Troy 65, Georgia Southern 62 UCF 69, Tulane 55 Wofford 77, UNC Greensboro 62 MIDWEST Dayton 68, Saint Joseph’s 64 Iowa 81, Rutgers 47 N. Dakota St. 57, IUPUI 48 Purdue 67, Indiana 63 SOUTHWEST SMU 67, Temple 58 Thursday’s women’s scores EAST Baruch 65, Mount St. Mary (NY) 35 Elon 74, Northeastern 73 Hofstra 62, Towson 48 La Salle 47, Rhode Island 45 Mount St. Vincent 111, Yeshiva 51 Pittsburgh 68, Virginia 63, OT Quinnipiac 82, St. Peter’s 52 Siena 66, Manhattan 51 Syracuse 73, Boston College 51 SOUTH Bellarmine 61, St. Joseph’s (Ind.) 50 Bethel (Tenn.) 67, Martin Methodist 49 Bryan 71, Union (Ky.) 57 Drexel 63, Coll. of Charleston 52 Florida Gulf Coast 71, Kennesaw St. 60 Florida St. 81, Clemson 38 Freed-Hardeman 77, Lyon 54 Georgetown (Ky.) at Pikeville, ppd. Georgia St. 69, South Alabama 54 Guilford 73, Emory & Henry 71 Jacksonville 76, N. Kentucky 62 James Madison 85, UNC Wilmington 49 LSU 64, Georgia 52 Lee 74, Mississippi College 53 Limestone 57, King (Tenn.) 56 Louisiana Tech 71, Charlotte 61 Louisiana-Lafayette 64, Texas St. 41 Louisville 69, Virginia Tech 49 Loyola NO 66, Mobile 53 Middle Tennessee 74, Marshall 48 NC State 68, Miami 65 New Orleans 76, SE Louisiana 64 North Carolina 83, Wake Forest 45 North Florida 57, Lipscomb 54 Notre Dame 71, Georgia Tech 61 SIU-Edwardsville 77, Austin Peay 62 Southern Miss. 70, Old Dominion 53 Stetson 92, SC-Upstate 66 Tennessee 77, Alabama 56 Texas A&M 81, Kentucky 69 Troy 99, Georgia Southern 93, OT Union (Tenn.) 97, North Alabama 84 Vanderbilt 76, Florida 75, OT W. Kentucky 59, UAB 51 MIDWEST Albion 69, St. Mary’s (Ind.) 61 CS Bakersfield 83, Chicago St. 57 Culver-Stockton 63, Missouri Valley 54 Ferris St. 69, Hillsdale 49 Green Bay 87, Valparaiso 45 IUPUI 76, N. Dakota St. 65 N. Michigan 69, Lake Superior St. 49 North Dakota 76, Portland St. 45 Northwood (Mich.) 96, Michigan Tech 90 Oral Roberts 68, W. Illinois 61 UMKC 62, Seattle 61 Wayne (Mich.) 81, Malone 74 Youngstown St. 79, Milwaukee 73 SOUTHWEST Houston Baptist 67, Incarnate Word 64 LeTourneau 60, Sul Ross St. 57 North Texas 74, FAU 55 Rice 80, FIU 59 Stephen F. Austin 71, Lamar 60 Texas-Arlington 55, Appalachian St. 45 Texas-Dallas 93, Mary Hardin-Baylor 68 UALR 63, Arkansas St. 61 Wayland Baptist 81, John Brown 55 NHL Standings EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Montreal 57 37 16 4 78 152 127 Tampa Bay 60 36 18 6 78 195 160 Detroit 56 32 14 10 74 163 143 Boston 57 28 20 9 65 150 149 Florida 56 25 19 12 62 138 155 Ottawa 56 23 23 10 56 159 160 Toronto 58 23 30 5 51 162 178 Buffalo 57 16 37 4 36 105 195 Metropolitan Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA N.Y. Islanders 59 39 19 1 79 193 165 N.Y. Rangers 56 34 16 6 74 178 141 Washington 59 32 17 10 74 176 147 Pittsburgh 58 32 17 9 73 163 146 Philadelphia 57 24 23 10 58 153 167 Columbus 56 26 27 3 55 149 173 New Jersey 57 22 26 9 53 126 155 Carolina 56 20 29 7 47 127 154 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Nashville 58 39 13 6 84 177 137 St. Louis 57 37 16 4 78 179 141 Chicago 58 35 18 5 75 174 134 Winnipeg 60 30 20 10 70 166 162 Minnesota 57 29 21 7 65 158 154 Dallas 57 27 22 8 62 179 180 Colorado 58 24 23 11 59 150 165 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Anaheim 58 35 16 7 77 170 164 Vancouver 57 33 21 3 69 163 151 Calgary 58 32 22 4 68 168 150 Los Angeles 57 27 18 12 66 159 151 San Jose 59 29 22 8 66 165 170 Arizona 58 20 31 7 47 131 194 Edmonton 59 17 32 10 44 139 199 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Wednesday’s Games Detroit 3, Chicago 2, SO Edmonton 4, Boston 3, SO Ottawa 4, Montreal 2 Minnesota 3, Calgary 2, OT Los Angeles 4, Colorado 1 Tampa Bay 4, Anaheim 1 Thursday’s Games Vancouver 5, N.Y. Rangers 4, SO N.Y. Islanders 5, Nashville 2 Columbus 2, Pittsburgh 1 Washington 5, Winnipeg 1 Buffalo at Philadelphia, (n) Florida at Montreal, (n) San Jose at Dallas, (n) Friday’s Games Vancouver at New Jersey, 6 p.m. Toronto at Carolina, 6 p.m. N.Y. Rangers at Buffalo, 6 p.m. Boston at St. Louis, 7 p.m. Colorado at Chicago, 7:30 p.m. Anaheim at Calgary, 8 p.m. Minnesota at Edmonton, 8 p.m. Saturday’s Games N.Y. Islanders at Washington, 11:30 a.m. Nashville at Philadelphia, Noon Winnipeg at Toronto, 6 p.m. Columbus at Montreal, 6 p.m. Florida at Ottawa, 6 p.m. Carolina at New Jersey, 6 p.m. Anaheim at Edmonton, 6 p.m. Pittsburgh at St. Louis, 7 p.m. Detroit at Dallas, 7 p.m. Tampa Bay at Arizona, 7 p.m. Los Angeles vs. San Jose at Santa Clara, CA, 9 p.m. Golf PGA Northern Trust Scores Thursday Los Angeles Purse: $6.7 million Yardage: 7,349 Par: 71 (35-36) Partial First Round (a-amateur) Retief Goosen 32-34 Vijay Singh 34-32 Nick Watney 30-36 James Hahn 32-34 Daniel Summerhays 34-32 Derek Fathauer 33-33 Carlos Ortiz 31-36 Justin Thomas 33-35 Alex Cejka 31-37 Geoff Ogilvy 32-36 William McGirt 35-33 Pat Perez 32-37 Jordan Spieth 31-38 Brendon Todd 33-36 Morgan Hoffmann 36-33 Ryan Moore 35-34 Graham DeLaet 35-35 K.J. Choi 33-37 Hideki Matsuyama 33-37 Scott Stallings 35-35 J.B. Holmes 36-34 Michael Putnam 34-36 Paul Casey 35-35 Tony Finau 33-37 Alex Prugh 33-37 Danny Lee 36-34 Padraig Harrington 35-35 Angel Cabrera 36-34 Bubba Watson 35-35 Dustin Johnson 33-37 Matt Every 35-35 Matt Jones 35-35 Jason Kokrak 35-36 Gonzalo Fdez-Castano 35-36 Ricky Barnes 35-36 Sergio Garcia 35-36 Fred Couples 35-36 Charl Schwartzel 36-35 Sang-Moon Bae 36-35 D.A. Points 33-38 Jhonattan Vegas 35-36 Erik Compton 33-38 Justin Hicks 36-35 Brian Stuard 36-35 Bryce Molder 34-37 Billy Hurley III 34-37 Charles Howell III 33-38 Jim Furyk 35-36 Seung-Yul Noh 34-37 George McNeill 35-36 Carl Pettersson 35-36 Cameron Tringale 36-35 Charlie Beljan 37-35 Andres Gonzales 33-39 Harris English 34-38 Davis Love III 34-38 Luke Guthrie 38-34 Andrew Svoboda 34-38 Carlos Sainz Jr 36-36 Jonathan Randolph 36-36 Hudson Swafford 36-36 Kevin Streelman 35-37 Ken Duke 35-37 Kenny Perry 37-35 Kevin Na 37-35 Kyle Reifers 33-39 LPGA Australian Open Melbourne, Australia Purse: $1.2 million Yardage:6,741 Par: 73 (35-38) First Round (a-amateur) Ilhee Lee 34-34 Ariya Jutanugarn 35-34 Lydia Ko 34-36 Min Seo Kwak 34-36 Alena Sharp 34-36 Paz Echeverria 34-37 Charley Hull 35-36 Ha Na Jang 35-36 Gwladys Nocera 36-35 Brooke Pancake 34-37 Melissa Reid 34-37 Marina Alex 36-36 Rebecca Artis 35-37 Chella Choi 34-38 Tiffany Joh 34-38 Katherine Kirk 36-36 Jessica Korda 35-37 Min Lee 36-36 Ryann O’Toole 33-39 Marion Ricordeau 36-36 Ayako Uehara 34-38 Mariajo Uribe 33-39 Holly Clyburn 38-35 Julieta Granada 34-39 Rachel Hetherington 35-38 Sydnee Michaels 35-38 Ai Miyazato 35-38 Mika Miyazato 36-37 Ju Young Park 36-37 Sophie Walker 36-37 Karrie Webb 35-38 Amy Yang 36-37 Tennis WTA Dubai Duty Free Championships Thursday At Dubai Tennis Stadium Dubai, United Arab Emirates Purse: $2.513 million (Premier) Surface: Hard-Outdoor Singles Quarterfinals Karolina Pliskova (17), Czech Republic, def. Lucie Safarova (11), Czech Republic, 3-6, 7-6 (5), 6-1. Garbine Muguruza, Spain, def. Carla Suarez Navarro (13), Spain, 6-7 (4), 63, 6-3. Simona Halep (1), Romania, def. Ekaterina Makarova (6), Russia, 6-3, 16, 7-5. Caroline Wozniacki (3), Denmark, def. Flavia Pennetta (10), Italy, 7-5, 6-0. ATP Open 13 Thursday At Palais des Sports Marseille, France Purse: $720,500 (WT250) Surface: Hard-Indoor Singles Second Round Simone Bolelli, Italy, def. Milos Raonic (1), Canada, 6-4, 3-6, 7-6 (3). Dominic Thiem, Austria, def. David Goffin (6), Belgium, 5-1, retired. Gilles Simon (5), France, def. Borna Coric, Croatia, 6-2, 3-6, 6-3. Stan Wawrinka (2), Switzerland, def. Benoit Paire, France, 6-2, 6-3. Jeremy Chardy, France, def. Ernests Gulbis (3), Latvia, 6-3, 6-4. ATP Delray Beach Open Thursday Delray Beach Purse: $549,230 (WT250) Surface: Hard-Outdoor Singles Second Round Donald Young, U.S., def. Alejandro Gonzalez, Colombia, 6-3, 6-2. Alexandr Dolgopolov (3), Ukraine, def. Tim Smyczek, U.S., 6-2, 6-4. Transactions BASEBALL American League DETROIT TIGERS — Agreed to terms with RHPs Angel Nesbitt, Jose Valdez and Drew VerHagen, LHPs Blaine Hardy and Kyle Ryan, C James McCann, INFs Jose Iglesias and Dixon Machado and OFs Wynton Bernard, Daniel Fields and Steven Moya on one-year contracts. KANSAS CITY ROYALS — Agreed to terms with LHP Franklin Morales on a minor league contract. National League LOS ANGELES DODGERS — Agreed to terms with RHP David Aardsma on a minor league contract. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association BOSTON CELTICS — Traded F Tayshaun Prince to Detroit for F Jonas Jerebko and G Gigi Datome. Acquired G Isaiah Thomas from Phoenix for G Marcus Thornton and a 2016 first-round draft pick to Phoenix. DENVER NUGGETS — Traded G Arron Afflalo and F Alonzo Gee to Portland for F Thomas Robinson, F Victor Claver and G Will Barton and a protected 2016 firstround draft pick. Traded C JaVale McGee, a protected 2015 first-round pick and the draft rights for F Chukwudiebere Maduabum to Philadelphia for the draft rights to G Cenk Akyol and cash considerations. GOLDEN STATE WARRIORS — Signed F James Michael McAdoo for the remainder of the season. MIAMI HEAT — Acquired G Goran Dragic and G Zoran Dragic from Phoenix for C Justin Hamilton, F Danny Granger and first-round draft picks in 2017 and 2021. Traded G Norris Cole, F Shawne Williams and C Justin Hamilton to New Orleans for G-F John Salmons. MILWAUKEE BUCKS — Traded G Brandon Knight and G Kendall Marshall and Los Angeles Lakers’ protected 2015 first-round draft pick to Phoenix for G Tyler Ennis and F Miles Plumlee and acquired G Michael Carter-Williams from Philadelphia for draft picks. MINNESOTA TIMBERWOLVES — Traded F Thaddeus Young to Brooklyn for F-C Kevin Garnett. NEW ORLEANS PELICANS — Traded a protected 2016 second-round pick to Oklahoma City for G Ish Smith, a 2015 protected second-round pick, the rights to F Latavious Williams and cash considerations. Waived G Ish Smith. NEW JERSEY NETS — Traded C Kevin Garnett to Minnesota for F Thaddeus Young. NEW YORK KNICKS — Traded G Pablo Prigioni to Houston for G Alexey Shved and second-round draft picks in 2017 and 2019. OKLAHOMA CITY — Traded G Reggie Jackson to Detroit for G DJ Augustin, F Kyle Singler and a 2019 second-round draft pick and Detroit sent a 2017 secondround pick to Utah. Traded C Kendrick Perkins, F Grant Jerrett, the draft rights to Tibor Pleiss and a protected 2017 firstround pick to Utah for C Enes Kanter and F Steve Novak. SACRAMENTO KINGS — Traded G Ramon Sessions to Washington for G Andre Miller. NHL: Late goal lifts Blue Jackets PITTSBURGH — Brandon Dubinsky poked a pass from Matt Calvert past a sprawled Marc-Andre Fleury with 2:17 remaining to lift the Columbus Blue Jackets to a 2-1 win over the Pittsburgh Penguins on Thursday night. Islanders 5, Predators 2 UNIONDALE, N.Y. — Nick Leddy had a goal and two assists, Jaroslav Halak tied the team record for wins in a season, and the New York Islanders cooled off the NHL-leading Nashville Predators. Capitals 5, Jets 1 WASHINGTON — Nicklas Backstrom scored two secondperiod goals and added an assist, Alex Ovechkin added his leagueleading 38th goal and an assist and the Washington Capitals defeated the Winnipeg Jets. Five share Northern Trust lead LOS ANGELES — Retief Goosen and Vijay Singh, among the top five players in the world a decade ago, were part of a five-way tie for the lead in the Northern Trust Open in what amounted to “throwback Thursday” at Riviera. The 51-year-old Singh, who plays the occasional Champions Tour event, picked up four birdies on the back nine for a 5-under 66, his lowest opening round on the PGA Tour since the 2012 McGladrey Classic. Goosen, a two-time U.S. Open champion who turned 47 this month, was slowed by a pair of sloppy bogeys early on the back nine until he made a pair of late birdies to join Singh at 66. Goosen hasn’t won since 2009. The three-time major champion and former world No. 1 has not won since 2008. Pebble Beach runner-up Nick Watney, competing for the fifth straight week, kept up his form with an eagle on the opening hole on his way to a 66. James Hahn and Daniel Summerhays joined them in the lead among early starters Area EVENTS College softball: Gulf Coast at Sun Chief Classic, Gulf Shores, Ala. College baseball: Shelton State at Gulf Coast, 10 a.m., Wallace at Gulf Coast 3 p.m. Softball: Gulf Breeze at Rutherford 6 p.m., Franklin County at Bozeman 6 p.m., North Bay Haven at Bay 6 p.m. Baseball: Rutherford at Arnold 6:30 p.m., Crestview at Mosley 6:30 p.m., Bay at Choctawhatchee 6:30 p.m. Tennis: Rutherford at Walton 3 p.m. On The AIR

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SPORT S Friday, February 20, 2015 | The News Herald | Page C5 The Associated Press Point guards moving quickly made this trade deadline a transition game. Goran Dragic, Michael Carter-Wil liams, Reggie Jackson and Brandon Knight all were dealt Thursday in the final hours that trades were allowed, as a number of teams handed their keys to different drivers. Kevin Garnett also has a new address — his original NBA one. The Timberwolves brought him back to Minnesota by sending Thaddeus Young to Brooklyn. There were so many players on the move in deals agreed to shortly before the 3 p.m. EST deadline that most of the transactions were still awaiting NBA approval hours later. Dragic and Jackson were two play ers to watch on deadline day, because neither was expected to remain with his team after this season. Both their teams opted to move them rather than risk losing them for nothing. Phoenix sent Dragic to Miami, getting two first-round picks and a package of players for the Slovenian, a third-team All-NBA selection last season. The Suns filled his spot by acquiring Knight from Milwaukee in a three-team deal with Philadelphia, which sent Carter-Williams to the Bucks. “I did feel it was time to find a better fit,” Dragic wrote on Twitter, adding “NOW it’s #heatnation time and I’m excited to bring the Dragon’s fire to Miami!!” Zoran Dragic, Goran’s brother, also went from Phoenix to Miami. “We are incredibly pleased to take another step in getting the Miami Heat back to real championship prominence with the acquisition of Goran Dragic,” Heat President Pat Riley said. “Goran is an All-NBA player, including the Most Improved Player last season, and we felt that once he became available, we would do all that we could to acquire him.” Jackson, who began the season replacing an injured Russell West brook, now will step in for the sidelined Brandon Jennings. The Oklahoma City Thunder sent Jackson to Detroit in a three-way trade that included Utah. Even backup point guards seemed in demand, with players such as Isaiah Thomas (Boston), Ramon Sessions (Washington), Andre Miller (Sac ramento), DJ Augustin (Oklahoma City), Norris Cole (New Orleans) and Pablo Prigioni (Houston) getting new homes. Some big guys got in on the little guys’ fun, with Enes Kanter getting his wish to leave Utah when he ended up in Oklahoma City as Kendrick Per kins’ replacement. “It is a rare opportunity to acquire a player like Enes who will be an added dimension to our frontcourt and has his best basketball in front of him,” Thunder general manager Sam Presti said. The flurry of moves ended a busy season of swaps in which contend ers such as Cleveland, Memphis and Dallas refused to wait until the last minute to get their dealing done, hav ing upgraded long ago. Other teams had their chance Thursday, and Portland may have done it with the first completed deal of the day when it acquired Arron Afflalo from Denver. “Arron is a proven winner with playoff experience who will be easily integrated into our culture,” Blazers general manager Neil Olshey said. “He possesses a skill set that comple ments our style of play on both ends of the floor and will make an immediate impact as we continue our playoff push. Among the items of note from deadline day: A ROUND-TRIP BIG TICKET: The 38-year-old Garnett spent his first 12 seasons in Minnesota, where he was nicknamed the Big Ticket. He guided the Timberwolves to the only eight playoff appearances in franchise history and won the MVP while leading them to the Western Conference finals in 2004. He waived his no-trade clause to return, and the Wolves will try to get him to stick around past his 20th season by offering him a twoyear extension in the offseason, a person with knowledge of the team’s thinking said. DEPARTING DENVER: The Nuggets have been one of those teams where good individual talent added up to a collective mess, so they broke it apart Thursday. Port land acquired Afflalo in a five-player deal, upgrading its bench with a player averaging 14.5 points, while Denver also sent JaVale McGee and a first-round pick to Philadelphia. “We’re changing things around because, obvi ously, we weren’t good enough the way we were,” Nuggets coach Brian Shaw said. RACE FOR EIGHTH: The teams bat tling for the final playoff spots in each confer ence were among the busiest. Miami, the current No. 8 in the East, picked up Dragic, while the Nets (Young) and Boston Celtics (Thomas) are close behind and may have upgraded. The Suns will count on Knight to help them try to hold off Oklahoma City and New Orleans, which added point guard help in Jackson and Cole, respectively. OLD RELIABLE: Just starting as Sac ramento coach, George Karl was reunited with one of his favorites from his Denver days. Miller played for Karl from 2003-07 and 2011-13 with the Nuggets. “Adding Andre bolsters our backcourt with one of the most prolific ball distributors in the game,” said Kings general manager Pete D’Alessandro, who worked for the Nuggets during Miller’s time in Denver. PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Terry Porter knew Jerome Kersey was spe cial. There was, of course, the talent on the court, but also something more lasting: the “joy and his smile, the way he embraced life.” Kersey died Wednesday night at 52. The state medical examiner said Thursday a blood clot had traveled from his left calf to his left lung, caus ing a pulmonary thromboembolism. Kersey had minor knee surgery last Friday, but it could not be immedi ately determined if the surgery caused the clot. Porter, one of the great Trail Blaz ers, said he woke up Thursday and “thought it was a bad dream.” “As a teammate he was the best teammate you could have,” said Por ter, his voice trailing, his eyes welling with tears. “He’d run through walls for you. He got every ounce out of his talent that was humanly possible.” A team ambassador, Kersey appeared Tuesday with Porter and former Blazers player Brian Grant at a Portland high school in celebra tion of African-American History Month. Kersey was in the team offices earlier Wednesday and passed out candy to President Chris McGowan’s assistant. “Former athletes don’t always come into the office every day,” McGowan said, “but Jerome certainly did.” Kersey averaged 10.3 points and 5.5 rebounds in 17 NBA seasons with Portland, Golden State, the Los Ange les Lakers, Seattle, San Antonio and Milwaukee. He helped the Blazers reach the NBA Finals in 1990 and 1992, play ing alongside Porter, Clyde Drex ler, Kevin Duckworth and Buck Williams. “He was the greatest guy, the nic est friend, teammate and brother. He was loved by everyone. We will all miss him. He just cared so much,” Drexler told Comcast SportsNet Northwest. “This is unbelievable.” Kersey had his best season in 1987-88, averaging 19.2 points and 8.3 rebounds. Kersey played in 1,153 regular-season games, averag ing 1.9 assists and 1.2 steals. The former Longwood Univer sity star ranks second on Portland’s career games list (831) and rebounds (5,078), third in minutes (21,400) and steals (1,059) and fifth in points (10,067). At 6-foot-7 and 215 pounds, Kersey had a broad smile and warm man ner that made him a fan favorite. Former Blazers broadcaster and fel low team ambassador Bill Schonely recalled the moment he coined the catchphrase “Mercy, mercy, Jerome Kersey.” “I think it was against Chicago, 1990 or maybe it was ‘89, a long time ago. Typical Jerome night. I think it was Terry (Porter) who passed him the ball and of course you knew how fast and how hard he ran,” Schonely said. “He got the ball, dribbled a couple of times and with a two-hander he stuffed that baby and right then I said ‘Mercy, mercy Jerome Kersey,’ and it stuck.” C ONTRIBUTED PHOTO A picture on page D2 of Sunday’s News Herald attributed a buck to the wrong hunter. Wayne Venta shot this buck last week on 20 acres of land off U.S. 231. SETTING IT STRAIGHT AP In 1992, Chicago’s Michael Jordan, right, guards Portland’s Jerome Kersey during Game 6 of the NBA Finals. Point guards on the move GORAN DRAGIC Blazers, fans mourn Kersey’s death at 52 The following is a list of area athletes now playing college basketball. All statistics and records are through Feb. 18, unless noted. Men Ty Baker (Malone), Chipola, So., 6-6, F — Averaging 9.8 points, 3.5 rebounds, and one steal per game for the Indians (10-18) while shooting 33.3 percent from the 3-point line. Jerodd Blount (Cottondale), LA Trade Tech, So., 6-4, G — Averaging 12.7 points and 3.5 rebounds on 48.5 percent shooting from the field, 32.1 percent from the 3point line, and 81.6 percent from the free throw line for Trade Tech (5-21). Austin Boyd (Bethlehem), Faulkner State, Fr., 6-7, C — Averaging 1.3 points and 0.7 rebounds for the Sun Chiefs (18-6). Alex Hamilton (Bay, Chipley), Louisiana Tech, Jr., 6-4, 180, G — Averaging 15.7 points, 2.7 assists, 3.4 rebounds, and two steals per game while shooting 45.2 percent from the field, 31.5 percent from the 3-point line, and 74 percent from the free throw line for the Bulldogs (21-6). Jai Jencks (Rutherford), North Greenville, So., 6-8, 230, F — Averaging 3.6 points and 2.2 rebounds per game for the Crusaders (17-9). Carlos Morris (Apalachicola, Chipola), Minnesota, Jr., 6-5, 180, G — Averaging 11 points, 3.4 rebounds, 2.3 assists, and two steals per game while shooting 44.7 percent from the field, 32.9 percent from the 3-point line, and 71.1 percent from the free throw line for the Gophers (16-11). Kruize Pinkins (Marianna, Chipola), San Francisco, Sr., 6-7, 215, F — Averaging 14.9 points and 5.4 rebounds while shooting 49.4 percent from the field and 41.5 percent from the 3-point line for the Dons (10-16). Zachary Reynolds (Gulf Coast), Northern Arizona, Jr., 6-9, 240, F — Averaging 1.1 points and 2.9 rebounds for the Lumberjacks (13-12). Jose Rodriguez (Gulf Coast), Texas Southern, Sr., 6-7, 215, F — Rodriguez is out for the season with a knee injury. Dylan Smith (Gulf Coast), Dalton State, Jr., 6-0, 180, G — Averaging 1.9 points and 0.4 rebounds for the Roadrunners (22-3). Jon Wade (Rutherford), Gulf Coast, So., 6-4, 187, G — Averaging 11.3 points, 3.8 rebounds and two assists while shooting 42.7 percent from the field and 72.1 percent from the free throw line for the Commodores (19-9). Chris Walker (Holmes County), Florida, So., 6-10, 220, F — Averaging 5.1 points, 3.7 rebounds, and 1.3 blocks while shooting 53 percent from the field for the Gators (13-13). KeKe Williamson (Rutherford), Pensacola State, Soph., 5-8, 145, G — Averaging 5.7 points, 2.9 assists, and 1.1 steals per game for the Pirates (17-10). Tommy Wade (Bay), North Greenville University, Fr., 6-6, 230, F — Averaging 3.9 points and 3.1 rebounds per game while shooting 51.1 percent from the field and 71.4 percent from the free throw line for the Crusaders (17-11). Khaliel Spearman (Rutherford), Gulf Coast, Fr., 6-2, 180, G — Redshirting this season. Alex Brown (Vernon), Louisiana-Monroe, Fr., 6-4, 185, G — Redshirting this season. Women JoJo Booker (Arnold), Gulf Coast, Fr., 5-10, F — Averaging 2.3 points and 2.7 rebounds for the Lady Commodores (17-9). Curteeona Brelove (Malone), VCU, Fr., 6-2, F — Averaging 1.8 points and 1.8 rebounds per game for the Rams (14-12). Khadijah Ellison (Chipola), ECU, Jr., 5-7, G — Averaging 1.8 points, 1.7 rebounds, and 1.5 steals for the Pirates (18-8). Destini Feagin (Gulf Coast), FIU, Jr., 5-10 G — Averaging 7.3 points, 4.1 rebounds, and 1.7 assists for the Panthers (3-20). Dominique Powell (Gulf Coast), Virginia Tech, Jr., 6-3, F — Averaging 2.1 points, 2.8 rebounds, and 0.9 blocks for the Hokies (10-17). Necole Sterling (Gulf Coast), Miami, Sr., 5-10, F — Averaging 6.5 points and 2.4 rebounds while shooting 34.3 percent from the 3-point line for the Hurricanes (18-8). Tamara Taylor (Gulf Coast), USF, Sr., 5-10, G — Averaging 8.3 points and 2.6 rebounds while shooting 40.2 percent from the field, 37.5 percent from the 3-point line, and 70.4 percent from the free throw linell for the Bulls (21-5). Alexis Ware (Mosley), South Carolina-Aiken, So., 5-10, G/F — Averaging 1.4 points, 0.5 rebounds, and 0.3 assists for the Pacers (16-10). Brianna Wright (Chipola), Memphis, Jr., 6-1, F — Averaging 7.4 points and 8.5 rebounds while shooting 49.1 percent from the field for the Tigers (13-12). Anyone with information on the whereabouts of other area athletes now playing college basketball is asked to call The News Herald at 747-5065 or email Dustin Kent at dkent@pcnh.com . COLLEGE BASKETBALL PERISCOPE NBA

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Page C6 | The News Herald | Friday, February 20, 2015 TODAY’S TV LISTINGS FRIDAY MORNING C COMCAST W WOW! S1 DISH NETWORK S2 DIRECTV FEBRUARY 20 C W S1 S2 7 AM 7:30 8 AM 8:30 9 AM 9:30 10 AM 10:30 11 AM 11:30 12 PM 12:30 WJHG (7) 3 3 7 7 Today Giada De Laurentiis; Hilaria Baldwin. (N) Days of our Lives (N) Newschannel 7 at Noon (N) CW (7.2) 99 9 8 8 Intelligence King of the Hill We There Yet? We There Yet? The Steve Wilkos Show (N) Cheaters (N) Cheaters (N) King King Paid Program Steve Wilkos WMBB (13) 2 2 13 13 Good Morning America Neil Patrick Harris; Wolfgang Puck. (N) Live! With Kelly and Michael The View (N) WMBB Midday News (N) The Chew (N) METV (13.2) 209 133 2 Donna Reed Mary T. Moore Daniel Boone “The First Beau” Perry Mason Quincy, M.E. “Even Odds” The Rockford Files Gunsmoke “McCabe” WECP (18) 4 4 4 18 CBS This Morning Film expert Dave Karger. (N) Let’s Make a Deal (N) The Price Is Right (N) The Young and the Restless The Insider (N) Bold/Beautiful MNT (18.2) 227 13 The Doctors (N) Jerry Springer (N) The Real (N) The Wendy Williams Show (N) Divorce Court Divorce Court Judge Faith Judge Faith WPGX (28) 8 8 28 28 Paid Program WHADDYADO Body Beast Paid Program Judge Mathis (N) The People’s Court (N) Maury (N) Prophet Paid Program WFSG (56) 11 11 56 56 Curious Curious Daniel Tiger Daniel Tiger Sesame Street: Cookie Thief Dinosaur Train Dinosaur Train Peg Plus Cat Peg Plus Cat Super Why! Thomas & Fr. A&E 34 43 118 265 Bounty Hunter Bounty Hunter Bounty Hunter Bounty Hunter Criminal Minds Criminal Minds “Empty Planet” Storage-Texas Storage-Texas Storage-Texas Storage-Texas AMC 30 62 131 254 Lose Weight Medicare Three Stooges Assault on Precinct 13 () Ethan Hawke, Laurence Fishburne. The School of Rock () Jack Black, Joan Cusack. ANPL 46 69 184 282 The Crocodile Hunter Dirty Jobs Trains; sausages. Dirty Jobs “Fuel Tank Cleaner” Dirty Jobs Coal mining. Dirty Jobs “Well Digger” Dirty Jobs “Wine Maker” BET 53 46 124 329 Being Mary Jane () Gabrielle Union, Omari Hardwick. The Rosa Parks Story () Angela Bassett, Peter Francis James. Stomp the Yard () Columbus Short. COM 64 53 107 249 Total Gym for P90X3 Com. Central Daily Show Nightly Show South Park South Park House Party () Kid ’N Play, Full Force, Robin Harris. Trading Places DISC 36 39 182 278 Joyce Meyer Lose Weight Klondike Bill finds the murderer. (Part 3 of 3) Alaskan Bush People Alaskan Bush People Alaskan Bush People E! 63 57 114 236 Christina Milian Turned Up Chris. Milian Chris. Milian Chris. Milian Fashion Police Ocean’s Thirteen () George Clooney, Brad Pitt, Matt Damon. ESPN 9 23 140 206 SportsCenter SportsCenter (N) (L) SportsCenter (N) (L) SportsCenter (N) (L) SportsCenter (N) (L) SportsCenter (N) (L) ESPN2 47 24 144 209 (5:00) Mike & Mike (N) (L) First Take (N) (L) His & Hers (N) (L) First Take FAM 59 65 180 311 s Show s Show The Middle 700/Interactive The 700 Club (N) Gilmore Girls Debutante ball. Gilmore Girls The Middle The Middle FOOD 38 45 110 231 Medicare Skincare FeelSexy Brunch at Bob. The Kitchen “Rise and Shine” Save My Bakery Chopped Canada Trisha’s Sou. Contessa FS1 24 27 150 219 FOX Sports Live FOX Sports Live A Perfect Storm NASCAR Racing NASCAR Racing FX 45 51 136 248 Final Destination 5 () Nicholas D’Agosto, Emma Bell. Paranormal Activity () Katie Featherston, Micah Sloat. Two/Half Men Two/Half Men How I Met How I Met HALL 23 59 185 312 Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls Home & Family Actor Abhi Sinha; Harry Wayne Casey. (N) Home & Family Phil Keoghan (“The Amazing Race”). HGTV 32 38 112 229 Extreme Homes Extreme Homes Extreme Homes Extreme Homes (N) House Hunters Hunters Int’l Love It or List It, Too HIST 35 42 120 269 Ancient Impossible Ancient Impossible Ancient Impossible Ancient Impossible Ancient Impossible Ancient Impossible LIFE 56 56 108 252 Unsolved Mysteries Frasier Frasier Frasier Frasier Frasier Frasier How I Met How I Met Grey’s Anatomy “Blink” SPIKE 28 48 241 241 New P90X 3! Body Beast! Gangland “Mile High Killers” Gangland Gangland Women in gangs. Gangland “Dead Man Inc.” Gangland “Gangsta Killers” SUN 49 422 656 Paradise Captain’s Florida Sport Ship Shape TV Fins & Skins Sport Fishing Sportsman Sport Fishing Extreme Fishin Reel Animals Women’s College Basketball SYFY 70 52 122 244 The Twilight Zone “He’s Alive” Killer Mountain () Aaron Douglas, Paul Campbell. Monsterwolf () Leonor Varela, Robert Picardo, Jason London. Hybrid () Justine Bateman. TBS 31 15 139 247 Married... With Married... With Married... With Daredevil () Ben Affleck, Jennifer Garner. Cleveland American Dad American Dad American Dad American Dad TCM 25 70 132 256 Weary River The Big House () Wallace Beery. I Am a Fugitive From a Chain Gang White Heat () James Cagney, Virginia Mayo. Caged TLC 37 40 183 280 19 Kids-Count 19 Kids-Count Separation Anxiety Hoarding: Buried Alive My 600-Lb. Life What Not to Wear “Jessie” What Not to Wear “Alexandra” TNT 29 54 138 245 Charmed Charmed “P3 H2O” Supernatural Supernatural “Croatoan” Supernatural “Hunted” Bones USA 62 55 105 242 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation CSI: Crime Scene Investigation CSI: Crime Scene Investigation CSI: Crime Scene Investigation CSI: Crime Scene Investigation CSI: Crime Scene Investigation WGN-A 13 239 307 J. Robison Creflo Dollar Law & Order “Bad Girl” Law & Order “Damaged” Law & Order “Tabloid” Law & Order “Monster” Blue Bloods “Hall of Mirrors” FRIDAY LATE NIGHT C COMCAST W WOW! S1 DISH NETWORK S2 DIRECTV FEBRUARY 20 C W S1 S2 1 AM 1:30 2 AM 2:30 3 AM 3:30 4 AM 4:30 5 AM 5:30 6 AM 6:30 WJHG (7) 3 3 7 7 (:07) Today Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program Hometime Paid Program Today (N) CW (7.2) 99 9 8 8 Steve Wilkos Key Kingdom Osmonds Focus T25 Paid Program Can’t Sleep? FREE TV! Top Cooker Zumba Stop Anxiety FREE Oven! 21 Day Fix WMBB (13) 2 2 13 13 (:07) The Dr. Oz Show Judge Karen Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program Down Home Open House Storm Stories METV (13.2) 209 133 2 Perry Mason Night Gallery Alfred Hitchcock Hour Thriller “Cousin Tundifer” F Troop F Troop Gilligan’s Isle Gilligan’s Isle H.R. Pufnstuf Land of Lost WECP (18) 4 4 4 18 Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program CBS This Morning: Saturday MNT (18.2) 227 13 Extra (N) Late Night Rocks Gemstone Show Gemstones from around the world. Silver Showcase Jewelry (N) Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program Old House WPGX (28) 8 8 28 28 Friends Friends New Heights Wrestling America Now America Now Paid Program Paid Program Larry King Sp. Paying for TV Pain Free KeithUrban WFSG (56) 11 11 56 56 American Masters Becom-Artist Genealogy Roadshow The This Old House Hour Sesame Street (N) (EI) Curious Curious A&E 34 43 118 265 (:01) Criminal Minds (:02) Criminal Minds SHARK! bareMin Bosley Hair SkinCare T25 Bodies! WEN Hair Care Bounty Hunter Bounty Hunter AMC 30 62 131 254 Tremors () Kevin Bacon, Fred Ward, Finn Carter. The Walking Dead “Them” Comic Men Comic Men The Rifleman The Rifleman The Rifleman The Rifleman ANPL 46 69 184 282 Redwood Kings “Ships Ahoy” Treehouse Masters Insane Pools: Deep End Treehouse Masters Big Cat Diary Big Cat Diary Dogs 101 BET 53 46 124 329 The Game One Mic Stand The Queen Latifah Show (N) BET Inspiration BET Inspiration COM 64 53 107 249 Chris Rock: Kill the Messenger (1:58) Eddie Murphy Raw () Eddie Murphy. New P90X 3! Climax Blazin’ Blades Shaun T’s Body Beast! T25 Bodies! DISC 36 39 182 278 Gold Rush: Pay Dirt New P90X 3! Bosley Hair Cook Like a Meet the Rx Wolfgang Puck Hot Bodies Hot Bodies Paid Program M. Williams Shaun T’s E! 63 57 114 236 (12:30) Hairspray () John Travolta, Nikki Blonsky. WEN Hair Care 1 Min. Makeup DDP Yoga FeelSexy Proactiv Plus Skincare Ocean’s Thirteen () ESPN 9 23 140 206 SportsCenter (N) (L) NBA Basketball Cleveland Cavaliers at Washington Wizards. SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter ESPN2 47 24 144 209 NFL Live (N) NBA Tonight SportsCenter (N) NBA Basketball San Antonio Spurs at Golden State Warriors. Dad’s Dream Dad’s Dream Dad’s Dream Dad’s Dream FAM 59 65 180 311 Sexy In 2015! 21 DAY FIX The 700 Club Airbrush Zumba Brazil Butt Lift Paid Program bareMin T25 Bodies! Dumbo () FOOD 38 45 110 231 Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Iron Chef America Sexy In 2015! Paid Program Sexy In 2015! WEN Hair Care Sandwich King Barbecue FS1 24 27 150 219 FOX Sports Live NASCAR Racing Camping World Truck Series: Nextera Energy Resources 250. The 10 FOX Sports Live FOX Sports Live FX 45 51 136 248 (10:30) Battleship () Paranormal Activity () Katie Featherston, Micah Sloat. Sexy Face at BISSELL Total Gym for T25 Bodies! Moneyball () HALL 23 59 185 312 Frasier Frasier Frasier Frasier Cheers Cheers I Love Lucy I Love Lucy I Love Lucy I Love Lucy I Love Lucy I Love Lucy HGTV 32 38 112 229 House Hunters Hunters Int’l Love It or List It, Too FeelSexy Perricone MD BISSELL Paid Program SHARK! Perricone MD House Crasher House Crasher HIST 35 42 120 269 (12:01) Tombstone () Richard Dix. Amer. Pickers HealthFood Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program T25 Bodies! Mississippi Men “Wild River” LIFE 56 56 108 252 (:04) Preachers’ Daughters (:04) Bring It! Motown 25 Paid Program MeetRx Remove Hair FeelSexy BISSELL Powered! 21 DAY FIX SPIKE 28 48 241 241 Jail Jail Jail Jail Knife Show/Cutlery Corner P90X3 Bosley Hair Total Gym for Hot Bodies SUN 49 422 656 Androzene Make Love More Sex Paid Program Androzene Stop Anxiety KeithUrban Paid Program New P90X3! NoPower? FSU Headlines The Gypsy An SYFY 70 52 122 244 (12:00) Manticore () Jabberwock () Tahmoh Penikett, Kacey Barnfield. Bitten “Committed” Easy Nutrition Focus T25 Sexy In 2015! BISSELL TBS 31 15 139 247 Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man’s Chest () Johnny Depp, Orlando Bloom. Married... With Married... With Married... With Married... With Amer. Funniest Home Videos TCM 25 70 132 256 (12:45) Oliver! () Ron Moody, Oliver Reed, Mark Lester. Rachel, Rachel () James Olson (:15) Speedy () Harold Lloyd. She Done Him TLC 37 40 183 280 Say Yes: Bride Say Yes: Bride Airbrush Derm 21 DAY FIX Juice Cleanse Sexy In 2015! Better H20 Tummy Tuck Remove Hair Fighting Canc. bareMin TNT 29 54 138 245 Hawaii Five-0 “Pale ’la” Hawaii Five-0 A triple homicide. Hawaii Five-0 Hawaii Five-0 “Ho’i Hou” Law & Order “Bad Girl” Law & Order “Damaged” USA 62 55 105 242 Law & Order: Criminal Intent Law & Order: Criminal Intent Law & Order: Criminal Intent Law & Order: Criminal Intent House “Brave Heart” HealthFood 21 Day Fix WGN-A 13 239 307 Raising Hope Raising Hope 30 Rock 30 Rock Law & Order: Criminal Intent Singsation Paid Program T25 Bodies! Paid Program WEN Hair Care Perricone MD FRIDAY AFTERNOON C COMCAST W WOW! S1 DISH NETWORK S2 DIRECTV FEBRUARY 20 C W S1 S2 1 PM 1:30 2 PM 2:30 3 PM 3:30 4 PM 4:30 5 PM 5:30 6 PM 6:30 WJHG (7) 3 3 7 7 Rachael Ray (N) Mom’s Ever Mom’s Ever The Doctors (N) Family Feud Jeopardy! (N) News Nightly News News Wheel Fortune CW (7.2) 99 9 8 8 Steve Wilkos Paid Program Married... With Married... With The Bill Cunningham Show (N) Engagement Engagement Cops Rel. Cops Rel. King of the Hill Cleveland WMBB (13) 2 2 13 13 General Hospital (N) Hot Bench Hot Bench Dr. Phil (N) (PA) The Dr. Oz Show (N) News World News News 13 at 6 Entertainment METV (13.2) 209 133 2 Bonanza “The Deserter” The Rifleman The Rifleman Adv-Superman Adv-Superman Emergency! “The Exam” CHiPs M*A*S*H M*A*S*H WECP (18) 4 4 4 18 The Talk (N) The Wendy Williams Show (N) The Meredith Vieira Show (N) The Ellen DeGeneres Show (N) Inside Edition Evening News Jeopardy! (N) Modern Family MNT (18.2) 227 13 Justice for All Justice for All Love-Raymond Family Feud Name Game Name Game Law & Order: SVU Hot, Cleveland Hot, Cleveland Mike & Molly Mike & Molly WPGX (28) 8 8 28 28 Flip My Food Fix It, Finish It The Queen Latifah Show (N) Steve Harvey ThisMinute ThisMinute Judge Judy (N) Judge Judy (N) Big Bang Big Bang WFSG (56) 11 11 56 56 Sesame Street: Cookie Thief Curious Curious Arthur (EI) Odd Squad Wild Kratts WordGirl Martha Speaks PBS NewsHour (N) Rick Steves A&E 34 43 118 265 Shipping Wars Shipping Wars Shipping Wars Shipping Wars The First 48 The First 48 Criminal Minds Criminal Minds “Alchemy” AMC 30 62 131 254 School Groundhog Day () Bill Murray, Andie MacDowell, Chris Elliott. Jurassic Park () Sam Neill, Laura Dern, Jeff Goldblum. ANPL 46 69 184 282 Ultimate Treehouses Treehouse Masters Treehouse Masters Treehouse Masters Redwood Kings Redwood Kings “Ships Ahoy” BET 53 46 124 329 (11:30) Stomp the Yard What’s Love Got to Do With It () Angela Bassett, Laurence Fishburne. Jumping the Broom () Angela Bassett, Paula Patton. COM 64 53 107 249 (12:31) Trading Places () Dan Aykroyd, Eddie Murphy. (:03) Futurama (:34) Futurama (:05) Futurama (:36) Futurama Nightly Show Daily Show South Park Hot Tub Mach. DISC 36 39 182 278 Alaskan Bush People Alaskan Bush People Alaskan Bush People Alaskan Bush People Alaskan Bush People Gold Rush E! 63 57 114 236 Father of the Bride () Steve Martin, Diane Keaton. Father of the Bride Part II () Steve Martin. Red Carpet A-List Listings E! News (N) ESPN 9 23 140 206 SportsCenter (N) (L) Outside Lines NFL Insiders NFL Live (N) (L) Around/Horn Interruption SportsCenter (N) (L) NBA Countdown (N) (L) ESPN2 47 24 144 209 (12:00) First Take SportsNation (N) (L) Questionable You Herd Me Olbermann (N) Questionable Around/Horn Interruption College Basketball FAM 59 65 180 311 The Middle The Middle Reba Reba Reba Jumanji () Robin Williams, Bonnie Hunt, Kirsten Dunst. Forrest Gump () FOOD 38 45 110 231 Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive FS1 24 27 150 219 NASCAR Racing NASCAR Racing NASCAR Racing NASCAR Race Hub (N) (L) NCWTS Setup NASCAR FX 45 51 136 248 How I Met How I Met How I Met How I Met Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Marvel’s the Avengers () Robert Downey Jr., Chris Evans, Mark Ruffalo. HALL 23 59 185 312 Little House on the Prairie Little House on the Prairie Little House on the Prairie The Waltons “The Beginning” The Waltons “The Pearls” The Waltons “The Victims” HGTV 32 38 112 229 Love It or List It, Too Love It or List It, Too Love It or List It, Too Love It or List It, Too Love It or List It, Too Love It or List It, Too HIST 35 42 120 269 Ancient Impossible Ancient Impossible Ancient Impossible Egypt: Engineering an Empire American Pickers LIFE 56 56 108 252 Grey’s Anatomy Grey’s Anatomy Bring It! Bring It! “Miami Heat Is Back” Bring It! Bring It! SPIKE 28 48 241 241 Gangland Sons of Silence. Gangland “Highway to Hell” Gangland “Deadly Blast” Cops Cops Cops Jail Cops Cops SUN 49 422 656 Women’s College Basketball Women’s College Basketball Mississippi at Auburn. Tampa Bay Rays Encore From Aug. 15, 2014. HEAT Live! Basketball SYFY 70 52 122 244 (12:00) Hybrid () Jabberwock () Tahmoh Penikett, Kacey Barnfield. Monster Ark () Tim DeKay, Renee O’Connor. Cloverfield () TBS 31 15 139 247 Family Guy King King King Friends Friends Friends Friends Seinfeld Seinfeld Seinfeld Seinfeld TCM 25 70 132 256 (12:30) Caged () (:15) Birdman of Alcatraz () Burt Lancaster, Karl Malden. (:45) Cool Hand Luke () Paul Newman, George Kennedy. TLC 37 40 183 280 Say Yes: Bride Say Yes: Bride Say Yes: Bride Say Yes: Bride Say Yes: Bride Say Yes: Bride Say Yes: Bride Say Yes: Bride Say Yes: Bride Say Yes: Bride Say Yes: Bride Say Yes: Bride TNT 29 54 138 245 Bones Bones “The Suit on the Set” Bones Castle “Wrapped Up in Death” Cold Justice Cold Justice USA 62 55 105 242 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Modern Family Modern Family WGN-A 13 239 307 Blue Bloods “Silver Star” Blue Bloods Blue Bloods Blue Bloods Amer. Funniest Home Videos Amer. Funniest Home Videos FRIDAY EVENING C COMCAST W WOW! S1 DISH NETWORK S2 DIRECTV FEBRUARY 20 C W S1 S2 7 PM 7:30 8 PM 8:30 9 PM 9:30 10 PM 10:30 11 PM 11:30 12 AM 12:30 WJHG (7) 3 3 7 7 Saturday Night Live “SNL 40th Anniversary Special” Forty years of “Saturday Night Live.” News Tonight Show-J. Fallon Late Night With Seth Meyers Last Call/Daly CW (7.2) 99 9 8 8 Hart of Dixie “Alabama Boys” Whose Line Whose Line Seinfeld Seinfeld Cougar Town Cougar Town Raising Hope Community Community Steve Wilkos WMBB (13) 2 2 13 13 Last-Standing (:31) Cristela Shark Tank (N) (:01) 20/20 News 13 at 10 (:35) Jimmy Kimmel Live (:37) Nightline The Middle The Middle METV (13.2) 209 133 2 Andy Griffith Andy Griffith Hogan Heroes Twilight Zone Odd Couple Odd Couple Carol Burnett Perry Mason Perry Mason: Maligned Mobster WECP (18) 4 4 4 18 Undercover Boss “Vivint” Hawaii Five-0 “Nnahu” (N) Blue Bloods “In the Box” (N) Modern Family Late Show W/David Letterman (:37) The Late Late Show (N) Access H. MNT (18.2) 227 13 Bones Bones “The Graft in the Girl” Anger Anger Family Guy Family Guy American Dad Dish Nation (N) Bridezillas WPGX (28) 8 8 28 28 World’s Funniest Fails (N) Glee “A Wedding” (N) TMZ (N) Two/Half Men Two/Half Men How I Met Steve Harvey The Queen Latifah Show (N) WFSG (56) 11 11 56 56 Washington Charlie Rose American Masters (N) Integrating Ole Charlie Rose (N) Tavis Smiley Tavis Smiley Washington Charlie Rose A&E 34 43 118 265 Criminal Minds Criminal Minds “No. 6” Criminal Minds (:01) Criminal Minds (:01) Criminal Minds (12:01) Criminal Minds “No. 6” AMC 30 62 131 254 Jurassic Park III () Sam Neill, William H. Macy. (:01) A Nightmare on Elm Street () Jackie Earle Haley. The Walking Dead “Them” Talking Dead ANPL 46 69 184 282 Treehouse Masters Insane Pools: Deep End Treehouse Masters (N) Insane Pools: Deep End Treehouse Masters Treehouse Masters BET 53 46 124 329 (5:00) Jumping the Broom () Being Mary Jane Scandal Scandal The Wendy Williams Show (N) (12:05) The Real (N) COM 64 53 107 249 (6:45) Hot Tub Time Machine () John Cusack. Hot Tub Time Machine () John Cusack, Rob Corddry, Craig Robinson. Kevin Hart: Grown Little Man Chris Rock DISC 36 39 182 278 Gold Rush: Pay Dirt (N) Gold Rush “Frozen Gold” (N) Alaskan Bush People (N) Gold Rush “Frozen Gold” Alaskan Bush People Gold Rush E! 63 57 114 236 Total Divas “Girl Vs. Girl Bye” Total Divas The Soup (N) The Soup E! News (N) Fashion Police The Soup Hairspray () ESPN 9 23 140 206 NBA Basketball Cleveland Cavaliers at Washington Wizards. (N) (L) NBA Basketball San Antonio Spurs at Golden State Warriors. (N) (L) SportsCenter (N) (L) ESPN2 47 24 144 209 College Basketball Boxing Friday Night Fights. (N) (L) SportsCenter (N) (L) SportsCenter (N) (L) NBA Tonight NFL Live (N) FAM 59 65 180 311 (6:00) Forrest Gump () Tom Hanks, Robin Wright. Countdown to the Oscars The 700 Club Gilmore Girls Gilmore Girls FOOD 38 45 110 231 Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives FS1 24 27 150 219 NASCAR Racing FOX Sports Live (N) (L) FOX Sports Live (N) (L) FOX Sports Live (N) (L) FOX Sports Live FX 45 51 136 248 Battleship () Taylor Kitsch, Alexander Skarsgrd. Earth comes under attack from a superior alien force. Battleship () Taylor Kitsch, Alexander Skarsgrd, Rihanna. HALL 23 59 185 312 The Waltons “The Threshhold” The Middle The Middle The Middle The Middle Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls Frasier Frasier HGTV 32 38 112 229 Love It or List It, Too Love It or List It, Too (N) House Hunters Hunters Int’l House Hunters Hunters Int’l Love It or List It, Too House Hunters Hunters Int’l HIST 35 42 120 269 The Real American Sniper Tombstone () Richard Dix, Kent Taylor, Edgar Buchanan. Amer. Pickers (:01) The Real American Sniper (12:01) Tombstone () LIFE 56 56 108 252 Bring It! “Bucking in Bama” Bring It! (N) (:02) Preachers’ Daughters (N) (:02) Bring It! (:02) Bring It! (12:02) Bring It! SPIKE 28 48 241 241 Cops Cops Cops Cops Cops Cops Cops Cops Coaching Bad Coaching Bad SUN 49 422 656 (6:30) NBA Basketball Miami Heat at New York Knicks. (L) HEAT Live! Inside HEAT Inside HEAT to Do Florida NBA Basketball Miami Heat at New York Knicks. SYFY 70 52 122 244 (6:00) Cloverfield () 12 Monkeys “The Red Forest” Helix “M. Domestica” (N) 12 Monkeys “The Red Forest” Helix “M. Domestica” Manticore () TBS 31 15 139 247 Big Bang Big Bang King of the Nerds (N) Yes Man () Jim Carrey, Zooey Deschanel. King of the Nerds Cougar Town Cougar Town TCM 25 70 132 256 Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid () Planet of the Apes () Charlton Heston, Kim Hunter. Easy Rider () Peter Fonda. (:45) Oliver! TLC 37 40 183 280 19 Kids and Counting Love; Lust Style by Jury Style by Jury Say Yes: ATL Love; Lust Style by Jury Style by Jury Say Yes: ATL (12:01) 19 Kids and Counting TNT 29 54 138 245 Cold Justice (N) Law Abiding Citizen () Jamie Foxx, Gerard Butler. Cold Justice Hawaii Five-0 Hawaii Five-0 USA 62 55 105 242 Modern Family Modern Family Modern Family Modern Family Modern Family Modern Family Modern Family Modern Family Modern Family Modern Family Law & Order: Criminal Intent WGN-A 13 239 307 How I Met How I Met How I Met How I Met How I Met How I Met How I Met How I Met Engagement Engagement Parks/Recreat Parks/Recreat

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DIVERSIONS A ces On BRIDGE: B obby W olff Send questions via e-mail to askamy@ tribune.com or by mail to Ask Amy, Chicago Tribune, TT500, 435 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago, IL 60611. Ask AMY Amy Dickinson Advice Columnist Y our HOROS C OPE: Holiday Mathis Friday, February 20, 2015 | The News Herald | Page C7 DEAR AMY: The birth of my children has caused my father and me to reconnect after many years of no contact. During that time, he remarried (for the third time) a very nice lady who has been instrumental in getting us back on speaking terms. She always sends a gift for birthdays and Christmas. My wife and I like her. She likes to refer to herself as “Grandma.” My wife doesn’t mind but it just doesn’t sit well with me. For one thing, I don’t want to confuse our very young kids, and for another, my mother passed away 10 years ago, and I know for a fact if she were here and got wind of this she would be very upset. Mom was a tough, take-no-nonsense fighter and she wouldn’t stand for this. For my father’s wife to call herself “Grandma” seems disrespectful. It took years to get my dad and me to speak. I don’t want to ruin that by insulting his wife, but I also don’t want to confuse our kids or dishonor my mother’s memory. U P S E T S ON DEAR SON : I understand your emotional response to this, but if you are going to stake a claim here, you should leave your children out of it. Many children have two “Grandmas” in their lives (I certainly did), and they aren’t confused in the slightest. Be honest, respectful and transparent. You should say to her, “You are so wonderful to the kids. I’m very grateful. I hope you won’t take offense to this, but it would be easiest on me if the children called you something other than ‘Grandma.’ Honestly it just makes me sad and reminds me that the kids will never know my mom. Please pick something that appeals to you — because I hope they will be addressing you by that name very often and for many years to come.” DEAR AMY: My younger sister is pregnant. Wonderful, right? The only issue is the father might be my fiance’s first cousin. She had unprotected sex with him and her boyfriend the same day. My parents are overjoyed about the pregnancy. My mom said she doesn’t really care who the father is and doesn’t want to talk about it. I am very concerned for a number of reasons. Mostly it’s because I feel the potential fathers and their families deserve to know. I don’t know what to tell my fiance when he asks what is going on — he basically is disgusted with her for being promiscuous. I can’t talk to my sister because she is very immature and probably will just try to ignore the situation. If her boyfriend found out he would break up with her. Please help! S T UC K IN TH E MI DD L E AG A IN DEAR ST UC K : Obviously you are offended by your sister’s behavior, but it seems that you would rather inform others of the consequences of her promiscuity than deal with her. You are only “stuck in the middle” if you put yourself there. You have to imagine that if/when your fiance’s cousin sees evidence that your sister is pregnant, he will do the math and draw his own conclusions. The only person you need to communicate with is your sister. Your entire family seems reluctant to guide, mentor (or judge) her. You should recognize that your job is not to police or to inform on her. Your sister is obviously impervious to good judgment. Be honest about the impact on you (“I’m disappointed and embarrassed by your behavior”), but otherwise, strap in — because you’re about to be an aunt! DEAR AMY: Regarding “Anxious,” the 15-year-old worried about going to summer camp: My youngest kept the remnants of her baby blanket in the bottom of her sleeping bag. No one knew it was there. The other daughter took her favorite books every year. I don’t think she ever read them during her time there. “Anxious” should bring something special from home. C AMP MO M DEAR M O M: I know someone who took her blankie remnants to college. Great suggestion. ‘ Grandma’ honorific offends son-in-lawAR I E S (March 21-April 19): You cannot change another person. However, when you offer your assistance without the expectation that the other person will change, you will make a difference. T AURU S (April 20-May 20): You refuse to see any situation as tragic or futile and are determined to find whatever advantage might exist. G EM INI (May 21-June 21): When you connect with a person as well as you connect with a certain someone, you can communicate profoundly in total silence. Therefore, don’t worry about what you’ll say. CA N CER (June 22-July 22): Fantasies become realities. It happens all the time, so why not for you? Some small occurrence that you wished would happen will materialize in front of your eyes. L E O (July 23-Aug. 22): Needing validation makes you vulnerable. If there are words you long to hear, then hearing them will only weaken you. Be strong on your own, keep your power, validate yourself. V I R GO (Aug. 23S ept. 22): You wish everyone well — yes, every single person. That doesn’t mean you have to like them all. When you don’t expect to have a great affinity for most people you have to deal with, the way becomes smoother. LI BRA ( S ept. 23O ct. 23): Sometimes you feel so connected to nature and the energy of it around you that you wish you could go live in the woods. Appreciating natural beauty makes you more naturally beautiful. S C O RP IO ( O ct. 24N ov. 21): There’s a protocol, but don’t feel overly obligated to follow it. Pretending won’t work today, but doors will open to you when you show who you really are. S A GITT AR I U S ( N ov. 22-Dec. 21): Territorial issues will come up. There’s a lot you can let slide until next week. Everything that irritates you about others can lead you to a better understanding of yourself. CAPR I C O R N (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): You genuinely want to make the world a better place for people, but your methods don’t always project that intent. Let them know that your actions are aimed at the greater good. AQUAR I U S (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): You’ll search for the value in interactions, and it shouldn’t be so hard to find. When you click with people and you are where you belong, the value will be glaringly obvious. P IS CE S (Feb. 19-March 20): Knowing when you’re in over your head is one thing; admitting it is quite another. With a bit of humility, you’ll attract a teacher who is willing to help you in your quest to make more money. (Answers tomorrow) MERCYTIPSYPLACID AFFIRM Yesterday’s Jumbles: Answer: After the White House was completed in 1800, it had a — FIRSTFAMILY Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon. THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words. EVEPE LENTK TAVCIE PANHEP 2015 Tribune Content Agency, LLC All Rights Reserved. Check out the new, free JUSTJUMBLE app Solution to 2/19/15 Rating: SILVER 2/20/15 2/21/15 Solution to 2/20/15 Rating: GOLD JANRIC CLASSIC SUDOKU Fill in the blank cells using numbers 1 to 9. Each number can appear only once in each row, level ranges from Bronze (easiest) to Silver to Gold (hardest). 2015 Janric Enterprises Dist. by creators.com JANRIC CLASSIC SUDOKU Fill in the blank cells using numbers 1 to 9. Each number can appear only once in each row, level ranges from Bronze (easiest) to Silver to Gold (hardest). 2015 Janric Enterprises Dist. by creators.com Creators Today is Friday, Feb. 20, the 51st day of 2015. There are 314 days left in the year. Highlight in history On Feb. 20, 1905, the U.S. Supreme Court, in Jacobson v. Massachusetts, upheld, 7-2, compulsory vaccination laws intended to protect the public’s health. The case involved a Swedish immigrant, Henning Jacobson, who refused to pay a $5 fine for refusing to be vaccinated against smallpox; the court upheld the right of states to penalize individuals who rejected vaccinations, but did not say they could be forcibly vaccinated. On this date 1792 — President George Washington signed an act creating the U.S. Post Office. 1862 — William Wallace Lincoln, the 11-year-old son of President Abraham Lincoln and first lady Mary Todd Lincoln, died at the White House, apparently of typhoid fever. 1915 — The Panama Pacific International Exposition opened in San Francisco. The fair lasted until December. 1938 — Anthony Eden resigned as British foreign secretary following Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain’s decision to negotiate with Italian dictator Benito Mussolini. 1944 — During World War II, U.S. strategic bombers began raiding German aircraft manufacturing centers in a series of attacks that became known as “Big Week.” 1950 — The U.S. Supreme Court, in United States v. Rabinowitz, ruled 5-3 that authorities making a lawful arrest did not need a warrant to search and seize evidence in an area that was in the “immediate and complete control” of the suspect. 1962 — Astronaut John Glenn became the first American to orbit the Earth as he flew aboard Project Mercury’s Friendship 7 spacecraft. Thought for today “The life of the nation is secure only while the nation is honest, truthful, and virtuous.” Frederick Douglass American abolitionist (1817-1895) History TOD AY SU DO KU

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CLASSIFIEDSFriday, February 20, 2015 | The News Herald | Page D1 1132063 Automotive Today NEWS HERALD NEW CARS, CERTIFIED USED CARS, USED CARS, BY OWNER pcautobuy.com CLASSIFIEDS INSIDE 1116606

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CLASSIFIEDSPage D2 | The News Herald | Friday, February 20, 2015 !ActionTree.NetBest Prices in Town Lic/Insured, Firewood Call/Text 850-527-7017 Any Time Tree Removal!Lic./Ins. w/ workers comp. 10% off for Lynn Haven residents for February 850-628-0930Text FL87880 to 56654 Creamer’s Tree ServiceCall Jason @ (850)832-9343 Affordable RoofingFree estimates! 850-596-2138 Lic#RC 29027242Text FL07774 to 56654 Roof RepairsNo job too small. Over 40 years in Bay County License# RC0050734 722-0120 or 257-4482 Variety of Tractor ServicesAt a competitive price. If you are in need of any kind of tractor work call/text Ken at 258-0127 For more information please see my website at www.bwtractor.com Best Oriental Massage Health & Harmony Nice Professional QUALITYTOUCH! 914-9177.Lic #9026 Oriental MassagePanama City Beach Shiatsu/Swedish 850-832-4790 #MA62742 RESTLESS CONSUMER?Call Boomer Pool Service & Pressure Washing 850-640-2154 $2999-NEW METAL ROOF for the Doublewide!! (up to 28x60) Licensed & Insured. Guyson Construction & Roofing (850) 258-5856 CALLTODAYText FL96551 to 56654 Able Lawn SvcW e Show Up! Fall Clean-Ups/ Trimming/Palms/Mulch/Straw 596-4383/258-5072 Text FL97024 to 56654 Complete Lawn Care Senior & Milit ary Disc. Call Steven: 850-624-8798 Cell 850-235-2212 Office Property Clean UpLandscaping, Pavers, Free Estimates. Honest & Dependable 850-358-1417 10% Military DiscountLan’s Massage 2518 Hwy 77 Lynn Haven 890-8482lic#mm32958 .« SEATILE« Tile & Wood All Types of Tiles & Wood Flooring installed. Bath & Kitchens Too! Free Est: Kenneth « 850-532-4251« GIT-R-DONE HANDYMANLicensed, Insured, FREE Estimates, References , Plumbing, Flooring, Decks, Storage Barns, Odd Jobs, Pressure Washing, Painting, & More! Git-R-Done! (850)-687-2510 Home ImprovementsBy Sam Repairs, Doors, Wood Rot, Fences, Paint, Roofs Credit Cards Accepted (850)348-0207 Tier2 BuildingHome remodeling, and handy man services. Call for quote 850-866-6183 txt FL11386 to 56654 Bill W Hash Remodeling/ ConsultingA Master Craftsman w/ 33 yrs exp. Call 850-890-7569 txt FL00734to 56654 CAREGIVERCaring & Compassionate Experienced CNA In Home or Hospital 850-708-5435 RETIRED NURSESWill care for your loved one in your home or hospital setting. Exc ref -Flex sched., 24yrs exp. 850-814-9751 or 850-814-1967 Take Care Of YourLoved Ones In Your Home, Refs, 34 Years Exp, 850-960-1917 Who U Gonna Call? Dust BustersCondos/Rentals/ Maint/Res/1 timers *Licensed* Call Chrystal @ 850-625-4793 or 850-265-6502 WHITE’S CONCRETEServing Bay Est.’94 Licensed/Insured Driveway Specialists 874-1515 / 896-6864 Accept Credit Cards Affordable AdditionsRemodeling, New Construction. Comm/Residential. 850-596-2138 Lic. #CGC 1506283Text FL13739 to 56654 These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. The News Herald Classified 747-5020 1132085 1132040 1134930 1134932 $675 DownPontiac Grand Prix 02. 0% interest. $4200 9a-9p. Daylight Auto Fin 850-215-1769 DLR 2003 Lincoln Town Car, Cartier L , 148k mi, V8, excellent condition., no rust, garage kept, $9.5k. Call 850-230-6875 Text FL13388 to 56654 2005 Cadillac DHS , 120,212 mi, has damaged on drivers front fender & passenger door, $3000 OBO. Call 850-960-9449 Text FL14008 to 56654 2010 Toyota Prius Hybrid, 50 mpg., 4dr. AT, A/C, PW, PDL, Cruise, Exc. Cond. $12,990. 850-265-3535 Bay DLR txt FL12302 to 56654 2009 Mercedes Benz CLK 35015,000 mi, Like new, one owner, retail price $22,500. Asking $20,000. Must see! Make offer! 850-763-1017 txt FL13011 to 56654 2011 Honda Civic EX, 1 owner, 14k miles, sunroof, warranty, like new $14,795, call 850-307-3476 ask for Jack 2011 Infiniti G37, 1 owner, 23k miles, NAV, warranty, mint cond. $25,495, call 850-307-3476 ask for Jack 2012 Acura TL, 1 owner, 26k miles, warranty, excellent cond. $23,495, call 850-307-3476 ask for Jack 2012 Cadillac SRX, Premium, 1 owner, 18k miles, NAV, warranty, excellent cond. $32,995, call 850-307-3476 ask for Jack 2012 Hyundai Sonata GL, 25k miles, silver, one owner, asking $15,895 OBO. Call Brenda 850-358-6878 after 1pm. txt FL14197 to 566654 2012 Lexus IS250, 1 owner, 21k miles, warranty, excellent cond. $26,995, call 850-307-3476 ask for Jack 2012 Lexus IS250, AWD, 1 owner, 17k miles, warranty, NAV, $28,995, call 850-307-3476 ask for Jack 2014 Cadillac SRX, 1 owner, 9k miles, warranty, practically new, $36,995, call 850-307-3476 ask for Jack 2014 Toyota Corolla LE 4dr AT, A/C, PW, PDL, Curise, AM/FM/CD, Bluetooth, 17k miles, $14,990 850-265-3535 Bay DLR txt FL12302 to 56654 Buick LaCrosse CXS, ‘10, white diamond, leather, moonroof, nice, $18,991! Call 850-250-5981 Chevy Camaro SS, ‘14, sunroof, navi, RS pkg, $35,992! Call 850-250-5981 Chevy Cobalt LS, ‘10, 4-door, auto, 52k miles, $8,994! Call 850-250-5981 Chrysler Sebring Conv. 2008. New Body Style. 4 Cylinder, AT/AC, ALL power! Only 50k miles. BEAUTIFUL Car. MUST SEE! $7,995 850-265-3535 Bay DLR txt FL12302 to 56654 Honda Civic EX, ‘07, 4-door, auto, moonroof, $8,991! Call 850-250-5981. Infiniti G37 Coupe, ‘08, moonroof, leather, $17,994! Call 850-250-5981. Kia Rio LX, ‘11, 4-door, pw, pl, low miles, $10,992! Call 850-250-5981 Mercury Grand Marquis GS, ‘99, auto, V8, $4,992! Call 850-250-5981. Poniac Grandam SE 2003, 4dr, 4cyl, 50k orig mi, 1 owner, exc cond., gold, AM stereo w/ CD, PS, PB, cloths seats, cold AC, great heater, lrg trunk, see by appt. Asking $5,000 or negotiable Call (850) 387-6212 or 387-3355 Text FL14048 to 56654 Scion tC, ‘08, panorama sunroof, sharp, $9,991! Call 850-250-5981. SE HABLA ESPANOLPASAPORTE OK NO CREDITO OK TROCAS/CARROS/SU V $300 ALMES EJEMPLOS: 02 Chevy Silverado 03 Chevy Silverado 02 Monte Carlo 04 Ford F150 02 Nissan Sentra PLUS 75 MORE DAYLIGHTAUTO FINANCING 2816 WESTHWY 98 PANAMACITY, FLORIDA32401 9 AM TO 9 PM 850-215-1769 Toyota Camry . 2012; 4dr, 4cyl auto., New body style, power windows, power locks, fog lights, cruise, am/fm/cd. Only 25k mi. Toyota factory warranty. Clean carfax. NADA value $17,200 Selling price $13,995 850-265-3535 BAY DLR txt FL12299 to 56654 Toyota Corolla LE, ‘14, “ECO,” must see, $17,991. Call 850-250-5981. Toyota Matrix XR, ‘08, 5-door, auto, must see, $7,991! Call 850-250-5981. Toyota Matrix, ‘09, auto, only 11k miles, $13,991! Call 850-250-5981. Toyota Solara Convertible 2005; SLE V6 automatic. New body style, All power. Leather. Pearl white with black top. Beautiful car! Only 38k mi. $11,000 850-265-3535 BAY txt FL12301 to 56654 *Affordable* Auto GlassLifetime Warranty affordable glass.com 747-4527 08 Toyota Highlander , Limited, AWD, 3rd row, sunroof, F & R AC, roof rack, tow pkg, 99K mi, one owner, exc. cond., $16,000. 871-1990 Text FL13172 to 56654 $775 DownFord Explorer 03. 0% interest. $5500 9a-9p. Daylight Auto Finance. 850-215-1769 DLR $975 DownDodge Durango 05. 0% interest. $9500 9a-9p. Daylight Auto Fin 850-215-1769 DLR 2009 Jeep Wrangler, 54k miles, new tires/top, excellent cond. $18,995, call 850-307-3476 ask for Jack 2012 Cadillac CTS, 1 owner, 19K miles, NAV, warranty, excellent cond. $24,995, call 850-307-3476 ask for Jack Chevy Equinox LT, ‘11, auto, power options, $15,992! Call 850-250-5981 Ford Explorer XLT, ‘07, auto, V6, must see, $9,991! Call 850-250-5981 GMC Envoy SLE, ‘07, auto, leather, sunroof, $7,991! Call 850-250-5981 Jeep Cherokee, ‘14, local trade, like new, $21,995! Call 850-250-5981 Nissan Murano, ‘09, V6, local trade, $16,992! Call 850-250-598 Nissan Xterra S, ‘12, auto, V6, 24k miles, $19,992! Call 850-250-5981 $1275 DownFord F150 X/Cab 03. 0% interest. $7500 9a-9p. Daylight Auto Fin 850-215-1769 DLR $2000 DownChevy Silverado 2006. 0% interest. $9900 9a-9p. Daylight Auto Fin. 850-215-1769 DLR 2009 Buick Enclave, CXL, sunroof, 3rd seat, immaculate, all service records, $16,995, call 850-307-3476 ask for Jack 2010 Ford Ranger, reg cab, 1 owner, A/T, 26k miles, cruise, value priced $10,995, call 850-307-3476 ask for Jack Chevy Colorado Crew Cab, ‘10, leather, like new, $17,995! Call 850-250-5981 Ford F-150 Regualr Cab 2011, Red, 3.7L V6, A/C, AUTO, Cap, rails, total miles under 6,400, Like new $15,800 Call 850-233-6920 txt FL13575 to 56654 Honda Ridgeline Sport, ‘13, 4WD, auto, alloys, $25,992! Call 850-250-5981. 2000 Ford Windstar 7 passenger, AT, A/C, AM/FM/CD, 3rd row seat, two passenger sliding doors, ONLY 90k miles, local trade $3,600 850-265-3535 BAY txt FL12301 to 56654 Chevy Express Van, ‘09, 15-passenger, 31k miles, $19,992! Call 850-250-5981. 2008 Kawasaki Vulcan 1500 ,Loaded, only 6500mi, $5000 OBO . Call 850-596-9254 txt FL05437 to 56654 Harley Davidson Deuce Softail 20061450 cc’s, $10,000. 850-814-2915 txt FL09041 to 56654 Harley Davidson Low Rider 2008 , $2,000 in extra’s, asking $10,000 OBO. Please call 850-303-3464 txt FL12713 to 56654 Fish in Style2009 Glasstream TORN 228, 200 merc . Dual axel trlr, 96 hrs, $25,500. Call (850)-890-0381 txt FL13997 to 56654 Big Horn 36 ft RE Fifth Wheel, ‘13, 3 slides, upgrades, $57,991! Call 850-250-5981. 1134931

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CLASSIFIEDSFriday, February 20, 2015 | The News Herald | Page D3

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CLASSIFIEDSPage D4 | The News Herald | Friday, February 20, 2015 45529 ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS BID NAME: CITY OF CALLAWAY 7th STREET SIDEWALK CONSTRUCTION Notice is hereby given to all interested persons or firms that sealed bids, submitted in triplicate will be accepted by the City of Callaway located at the City of Callaway, City Hall, 6601 East Highway 22, Callaway, Florida 32404, until 2:00 local time on March 17, 2015 for the following item or items: Construction of approximately 2,590 linear feet of sidewalk from Bob Little Road to SR 30 (U.S. Highway 98) on 7th Street in Callaway, Florida. An electronic copy of the plans and specifications may be obtained free of charge by contacting Jonathan Sklarski, sklarskij@ preble-rish.com. You may obtain a hard copy of the plans and specifications at Preble-Rish, Inc., Attn: Jonathan Sklarski, P.E., 203 Aberdeen Parkway, Panama City, Florida 32405, (850) 522-0644. The cost per set of contract documents is $75.00 and is non refundable. Checks should be made payable to Preble-Rish, Inc. IMPORTANT: Bids shall be submitted in a sealed envelope marked: SEALED BID and identified by the NAME OF THE FIRM, NAME OF THE BID, ALONG WITH DATE AND TIME OF OPENING. A non-mandatory prebid conference shall be held on February 26, 2015 at 9:00 a.m. Central Time, at City of Callaway Conference Center located at 500 Callaway Parkway, off East Hwy. 22. This project is federally funded with assistance from the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) and Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) LAP Agreement Nos. 433565-1-58-01, 4253034-C SPECIAL NOTE: All contractors considering bidding must pay special attention to the Local Agency Program/ Federal-Aid Contract Requirements as required by Federal Regulation FHWA 1273 and other provisions in this program. All bidders and/or subcontractors must be FDOT pre-qualified in accordance with “Section 2 -Proposal Requirements and Conditions” in the FDOT Standard Specifications for Road and Bridge Construction in the following work classes: Grading, Drainage, Portland Cement Concrete, Grassing, Seeding and Sodding and Pavement Markings. EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE/ FAIR HOUSING JURISDICTION Pub: February 20, 21, 22, 2015 35305 NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS Florida Department of Transportation Project Bids will be received by the District Three Headquarters until 2:00 P.M. on Thursday, March 12, 2015, for Proposal ID E3O42-R0 Push Button Sign Repair in Holmes & Walton Counties; E3O44-R0 Primary & Interstate Mowing in Jackson & Washington Counties; E3O45-R0 Thermoplastic in Jackson & Washington Counties. Complete letting advertisement information for this project is available on our website at http:// www.dot.state.fl.us/contractsadministrationdistrict3/ or by calling (850) 330-1364. February 13, 20, 2015 45520 PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS Florida Department of Transportation Project Technical & Price Proposals will be received by the District Three Headquarters until 2:00 P.M. on Tuesday, April 28, 2015, for Proposal ID E3040-RO . This is a Performance Based, Lump Sum, Asset Maintenance Contract for Jefferson, Wakulla, Liberty, Franklin, and Gulf Counties. This contract requires the inspection, management and performance of the maintenance of all components of the transportation facility along all state highways and associated facilities. Complete advertisement information for this project is available on our website at http://www.dot.state.fl. us/contractsadminist rationdistrict3/Asset% 20Maintenance/Asset Maintenance.shtm or by calling (850) 3301363. Pub: Feb. 20, 27, 2015 45527 NOTICE TO PROPOSERS The City of Callaway requests qualification statements from individuals or firms to provide Construction Engineering and Inspection (CEI) Services for a project federally funded with assistance from the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) and the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA). Proposers must be FDOT Prequalified in Work Type 10.1 -Roadway Construction Engineering Inspection. The project includes the construction of approximately 2,590 linear feet of sidewalk from Bob Little Road to SR 30 (U.S. Highway 98) on 7th Street in Callaway, Florida. The work primarily consists of a new ADA compliant pedestrian sidewalk system including concrete sidewalk, gravity wall, crosswalk ramps, pedestrian signalization, pavement markings, imported fill, sod, grassing, MOT and other appurtenances. Additional information concerning the proposed services being requested, specific City, State and Federal requirements, and the ranking criteria to be used to evaluate the proposals may be obtained from Catrese Bowley, Purchaser, by fax at (850) 871-2444, phone at (850) 8716000, or e-mail at cbowley@cityofcallaway.com. An original and three (3) copies of sealed proposals, marked “SEALED PROPOSAL FOR 7TH STREET SIDEWALK CEI SERVICES”, must be received by 2:00 PM CST on March 17, 2015 at the City Hall, 6601 E. Highway 22, Callaway, FL 32404, Attn: Catrese Bowley, Purchaser. The City of Callaway supports Equal Employment Opportunity. A non-mandatory presubmittal conference shall be held on February 26, 2015 at 9:00 a.m. Central Time, at City of Callaway Conference Center located at 500 Callaway Parkway, off East Hwy. 22. All questions concerning this project must be in writing and can be sent to Richard DeOcampo by mail at 6601 E. Hwy. 22, Callaway, FL 32404 or by email at deocampo@cityofcallaway.co m. No verbal questions will be addressed. The deadline for receiving questions is March 13, 2015. Pub: February 20, 21, 22, 2015 45531 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 2014-1249-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF BASSAM ABBASI, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Bassam Abbasi, deceased, whose was found dead on November 5, 2014, is pending in the Circuit Court for Bay County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 300 East 4th Street, Panama City, Florida 32401. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is February 20, 2015. Personal Representative: Nadia Aarab 8700 Front Beach Road Apt. 2202 Panama City Beach, FL 32407 Attorney for Personal Representative: Angela N. Warren FL Bar No.: 0728632 Pope & Barloga, P.A. 736 Jenks Ave. Panama City, FL 32401 (850) 784-9174 awarren@popebarloga.co m tprater@popebarloga. com February 20, 27, 2015 97374 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO.14000672CA WELLS FARGO BANK, NA., AS TRUSTEE, FOR THE CERTIFICATE HOLDERS OF ASSET-BACKED PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-WCW2; Plaintiff, vs. SHANE BEGOS HARNEY, ET.AL. Defendants NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Default Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated February 2, 2015, in the abovestyled cause. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at http://www .bay .realforeclose.co m , on June 2, 2015, the following described property: LOTS 16 AND 17, BLOCK “D”, GULF HIGHLANDS, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOKS, PAGE 79, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA.. Property Address: 110 JEANETTE AVENUE, PANAMA CITY BEACH, FL 32413 ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850)747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. WITNESS my hand on 2nd day of February, 2015. Bill Kinsaul Clerk of Circuit Court By; Kenia Martir Deputy Clerk MARINOSCI LAW GROUP, P.C. Attorney for the Plaintiff 100 WEST CYPRESS CREEK RD, STE 1045 FORT LAUDERDALE, FL 33309 Phone: (954)644-8704; Fax: (954)772-9601 ServiceFL@mIg defaultlaw .co m; ServiceFL2@ mlg defaultlaw .com File No. 14-02348 February 20, 27, 2015 45537 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW PURSUANT TO SECTION 865.09, FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of American Sand & Asphalt Paving located at 2911 S. Highway 77, in the County of BAY, in the City of Lynn Haven, Florida, 32444 intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Panama City, Florida, this 17th day of February, 2015. American Sand & X-Cavation, Inc. February 20, 2015 45541 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 2015-81-CP Division______ IN RE: ESTATE OF JANICE LYNN LINTZ Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Janice Lynn Lintz, deceased, whose date of death was December 8, 2014, is pending in the Circuit Court for Bay County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is P.O. Box 2269, Panama City, FL 32402. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is February 20, 2015. Personal Representative: Wendy K. Walker 13065 Big Indian Road Callisburg, TX 76240 Attorney for Personal Representative: /s/ Miranda Simpson Yancey J. MARK FISHER Florida Bar No. 494992 BENTLEY M. FISHER Florida Bar No. 96791 MIRANDA SIMPSON YANCEY Florida Bar No. 101964 Attorneys for Petitioner Law Office of J. Mark Fisher, P.A. 181 Eglin Parkway NE Fort Walton Beach, FL 32548 (850) 244-8989 jmark@jmarkfisher. com miranda@jmarkfisher. com February 20, 27, 2015 97378 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.:13-1763-CA CHRISTIANA TRUST, A DIVISION OF WILMINGTON SAVINGS FUND SOCIETY, FSB, AS TRUSTEE FOR STANWICH MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST, SERIES 2012-13, Plaintiff, vs. ESTATE OF DENNIS PADGETT; et al, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered on February 2, 2015, in the above-captioned action, the following property situated in Bay County, Florida, described as: LOT 484, OF INLET BEACH HEIGHTS, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, AT PAGE 88, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA. Property Address: 619 Palm Beach Drive, Panama City Beach, FL 32413 shall be sold by the Clerk of Court on the 19th day of March, 2015 online beginning at 11:00am (CST) at www .bay .realforeclose.com , to the highest bidder, for cash, after giving notice as required by section 45.031, Florida Statutes. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. The court, in its discretion, may enlarge the time of the sale, Notice of the changed time of sale shall be published as provided herein. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850)747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. Dated: February 3, 2015. Bill Kinsaul Clerk of Court By: Jennifer Sullivan Deputy Clerk Tamara C. Wasserman, Esq. FL Bar# 95073 email: twasserman@ storeylawgroup.com Storey Law Group, P.A. 3191 Maguire Blvd, Suite 257 Orlando, FL 32803 Phone: 407-488-1225 February 13, 20, 2015 97458 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 15-CP-103 IN RE: ESTATE OF MARIA DOMENICA WOOD A/K/A MARIA DEVITOWOOD Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of MARIA DOMENICA WOOD A/K/A MARIA DEVITOWOOD, deceased, whose date of death was December 31, 2013; File Number 15-CP-103, is pending in the Circuit Court for Bay County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Post Office Box 2269, Panama City, FL 34202. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is: February 20, 2015. Personal Representative ANDREW P. DEVITO 230 Tupelo Road Naples, FL 34108 Derek B. Alvarez, Esq. FBN: 114278 DBA@GendersAlvarez.co m Anthony F. Diecidue, Esq. -FBN: 146528 AFD@GendersAlvarez.co m Whitney C. Miranda, Esq. -FBN 65928 WCM@GendersAlvarez.co m GENDERS | ALVAREZ | DIECIDUE, P.A. 2307 W Cleveland St Tampa, Florida 33609 Phone: (813) 254-4744 Fax: (813) 254-5222 Eservice for all attorneys listed above: GADeservice@GendersA lvarez.com February 20, 27, 2017 97404 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2012-001506-CA U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATE HOLDERS OF THE SARM 2006-1 TRUST FUND, Plaintiff, vs. THOMAS N. LUX, et al. Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered by the Court on February 5, 2015 in Case No.: 2012-001506-CA of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Bay County, Florida in which U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee for the Certificate holders of the SARM 2006-1 Trust Fund is the plaintiff and Thomas N. Lux a/k/a Thomas Nicol Lux, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as Nominee for Countrywide Home Loans, Inc. and Tenant are the defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash online as all Judicial sales are solely auctioned at www . bay .realforeclose.com at 11:00 a.m. Central Time, on the 26th day of March, 2015 , the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment of Foreclosure , to wit: PARCEL 1: A PARCEL OF LAND BEING A PORTION OF LOT 8, BLOCK 1, BEL AIR SUBDIVISION AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGE 28, IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT OF BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: FOR A POINT OF BEGINNING, COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEASTERLY CORNER OF SAID LOT 8, BLOCK 1, SAID POINT BEING THE NORTHWESTERLY INTERSECTION OF TARPON STREET (50 FOOT R/W) AND LYDIA LANE (50 FOOT R/W); THENCE N61°51’12”W ALONG THE NORTHERLY R/W LINE OF SAID LYDIA LANE 36.85 FEET; THENCE DEPARTING SAID NORTHERLY R/W LINE RUN N35°38’ 24”E, 142 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE WATER’S EDGE OF GRAND LAGOON; THENCE EASTERLY ALONG SAID WATER’S EDGE 51 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE WESTERLY R/W LINE OF SAID TARPON STREET AND TO A POINT THAT BEARS N35°38’24”E FROM THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE DEPARTING SAID WATER’S EDGE RUN S35°38’24”W ALONG SAID WESTERLY R/W LINE 150 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Property Address: 8502 Lydia Lane, Panama City Beach, FL 32408 The foreclosure sale can only be canceled by court order. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Witness my hand and seal of this Court on February 9, 2015. Bill Kinsaul Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Virginia Starling Deputy Clerk February 13, 20, 2015 97460 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.:14001172CA PHH MORTGAGE CORPORATION VS. LAQUITA R. GARDNER A/K/A RENEE GARDNER A/K/A LAQUITA RENEE NANCE, et al Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO:LAQUITA R. GARDNER A/K/A RENEE GARDNER A/K/A LAQUITA RENEE NANCE RESIDENT: Unknown LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: 194 CRANE STREET, PANAMA CITY BEACH, FL 32413-2946 YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following described property located in BAY County, Florida: All of Lot 1 and the West 30 feet of Lot 2, Block 10, Bid-A-Wee Beach First Addition according to plat on file in the office of the Clerk of Circuit Court of Bay County, Florida in Plat Book 9 at Page 50. Also an undivided 1/189th interest in the Northerly 3 feet of Lot 6, Block L of Bid-A-Wee Subdivision as per plat of same recorded in the Office of the Circuit Court of Bay County, Florida. has been filed against you, and you are required to serve a copy to your written defenses, if any, to this action on Phelan Hallinan Diamond & Jones, PLC, attorneys for plaintiff, whose address is 2727 West Cypress Creek Road, Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33309, and file the original with the Clerk of the Court, within 30 days after the first publication of this notice, either before or immediately thereafter, otherwise a default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. Bill Kinsaul Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Jennifer Sullivan Deputy Clerk of Court Movant counsel certifies that a bona fide effort to resolve this matter on the motion noticed has been made or that, because of time consideration, such effort has not yet been made but will be made prior to the scheduled hearing. Persons with a disability needing special accommodation in order to access court facilities or participate in a court proceeding at any courthouse or court program, should within two (2) days of receipt of notice, contact Court Administration to request such an accommodation. Please contact the following: Court Administration P.O. Box 1089 Panama City, Florida 32402 Phone: 850-747-5327 Hearing & Voice Impaired: 1-800-9558771 Email: AD A Request@jud14.flcourts. org PH# 46933 February 20, 27, 2015 Legal# 96630 IN THE JUVENILE COURT FOR THE CITY OF BRISTOL, TENNESSEE No. BCJ-15012 STATE OF TENNESSEE DEPARTMENT OF CHILDREN’S SERVICES, PETITIONER vs. Katina Walker 4810 W Highway 98 Panama City, FL 32401 Garrison Price 1101 Nottingham Dr. Greeneville, OH 45331 Tracy Zane Walker Norton, VA RESPONDENTS IN THE MATTER OF: T.M.Z.W. (d.o.b. 3-242001) A Child Under Eighteen (18) Years of Age NOTICE KATINA WALKER The State of Tennessee, Department of Children’s Services, has filed a petition against you seeking to terminate forever your parental rights to T.M.Z.W. It appears that ordinary process of law cannot be served upon you because your whereabouts are unknown. You are hereby ORDERED to appear in the Juvenile Court for the city of Bristol, Tennessee at on the 27th day of May, 2015, at 1:00 o’clock P.M. to personally answer the Petition for Termination of Parental Rights. Failing to appear for the hearing on this date and time, without good cause, pursuant to Rule 39(c)(3) of the Tenn. R. Juv. P. will result in the loss of your right to contest the petition to terminate your parental rights to the child listed above. You may view and obtain a copy of the Petition and any other subsequently filed legal documents at the Bristol City Juvenile Court Clerk’s Office, Bristol, Tennessee. Entered this 27th day of October, 2014. Honorable Randy M. Kennedy Juvenile Court Judge Approved for Entry: Tara C. Thomas, BPR#26025 Attorney for the Tennessee Department of Children’s Services 2555 Plymouth Road Johnson City, TN 37601 (423)854-5111 Publication: Feb. 6, 13, 20, 27, 2015 97464 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.15-000157CA IN RE: FORFEITURE OF: 2008 Dodge Ram Partial Vin#...8S624850 Jason Thompson and Kristi Thompson Owner/Claimant NOTICE OF FORFEITURE PROCEEDINGS TO ALL PERSONS OR ENTITIES HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE ABOVE DESCRIBED PROPERTY which was seized on January 28, 2015, in Bay County, Florida by the Panama City Police Department, who presently has custody of it. YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for forfeiture has been filed against the above described property and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Robert D. Sale, Attorney for the Panama City Police Department, whose address is P.O. Box 426, 602 Harrison Avenue, Suite 1, Panama City, Florida 32402, on or before twenty (20) days from date of first publication of this Notice and file with the Clerk of this Court either before service on attorney for the Panama City Police Department or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. SALE LAW FIRM, P.A. Robert D. Sale P. O. Box 426 Panama City, FL 32402 FL Bar #0044725 Phone: (850)763-7311 E-mail: robertsale@ knology .net ATTORNEY FOR PANAMA CITY POLICE DEPT. February 20, 27, 2015 97466 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW PURSUANT TO SECTION 865.09, FLORIDA STATUES NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of: HILTON Executive Offices located at 13200 Panama City Beach Pkwy, in the County of Bay, in the City of Panama City Beach, Florida, 32407 intends to register the said name with the Divisions of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Panama City Beach, Florida, this 18th day of February, 2015. Hilton Hospitality, LLC Pub: February 20, 2015 97468 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW PURSUANT TO SECTION 865.09, FLORIDASTATUES NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of: K&W Advertising & Marketing located at 2525 Redwood St., in the County of Bay, in the City of Panama City Beach, Florida, 32408 intends to register the said name with the Divisions of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Panama City Beach, Florida, this 18th day of February, 2015. K&W Automotive Enterprises, Inc. Pub: February 20, 2015 97470PUBLIC NOTICEEffective on February 20, 2015 Dr. Michael Adams will be leaving the area. Any patients who have been treated by Dr. Adams can continue their treatment with Dr. Michael McCormick or receive their records from him at 2202 State Avenue, Suite 300, Panama City, FL 32405. Pub: Feb. 20, 27, 2015 March 6, 13, 2015 ADOPTION: TV Producer, Loving Financially Secure Family, Travel Beaches Music await 1st baby.~ Wendi ~ 1-800-552-0045Expenses Pd FLBar42311 Lost Dog2/17/2015 in Garden Club area, 15 lbs Cockapoo, white, answers to Bella. Reward , 850-784-3931 or 850-265-4309 txt FL13977 to 56654 REWARD OFFERED FOR INFORMATION LEADING TO THE ARREST OF THE BURGLAR OR THE KNOWN WHEREABOUTS OF THIS VASE. Also stolen were a black zippered expandable Jimmy Choo leather clutch purse & brown Brighton Cleo leather purse with large bow. Gallé Floor Vase -Tall overlay vase with amber colored cameo decoration of dragonfly in flight over aquatic plants and pond, frosted background shading to blue, signed on the side in cameo Gallé, circa 1900, 23 3/8” tall, 4.5/8” diameter at neck, 5 1/4” base diameter, ¼” rim edge. Items taken from Bay Point Harbour Villas between January 7-12, 2015. Please contact Alan or Kristin Chittick at (850) 238-9897 Matthew 6:19-21This notice is being placed nationwide. TXT FL13660 to 56654 Found Pit Bull/Boxer mixed, approx. 2 yrs old, red/white. Also found an Australian Shepard mixed, approx 1½ yrs. old. Found near Bay Medical. Please call 816-591-4649. txt FL13264 to 56654 Alternative To BoardingHouse N PetSitting Svs. Licensed Bonded 265-0278 Bernina Sewing Machine . Pristine Never used. Serviced 2/5/2015 $475 850-532-8852 Buy & SellUsed Furniture 850-872-9544 or www .visit second2none.com Dining Room Setlike new, table & six chairs w/ China cabinet, $400. Call 850-230-3321 Text FL13728 to 56654 Sleeper SofaExcellent condition, cream & green stripes, $400. Light green. Armoire, $300. Call (937) 477-8698 Text FL13750 to 56654 GUN SHOW N.W. FLORIDA FAIRGROUNDSFeb 21st & Feb 22nd SAT. 9-5 & SUN. 10-4 FREE PARKING Info. (407) 275-7233 floridagunshows.com Text FL13103 to 56654 4 Cemetery Plots for SaleLocated in Evergreen Memorial Gardens. Section 174-D lots 1,2,3, and 4. The are in the Masonic section. You do not have to be a Mason to use the plots. Valued at $3700 each. Will sell for $2400.00 each. Call 850-708-1158 txt FL13021 to 56654 Burn Barrells , $25/each or 2/$40. Call 624-1729 Chattanooga Cane Mill with kettle, call for pricing. Refrigerated draft beer box $600. Antique Coca-Cola clock 2ftx2ft $400. Coin Collection, Make offer Call 850-835-6803 DIABETIC TEST STRIPS NEEDEDWill buy sealed, unexpired boxes (850)710-0189 Tandem crypt at Kent Forest Memoria lretails for $13k. Must Sell Call to make Any Offers 850-814-8886 Utility trailer tires & rims 205-75-15. 5 lug white spoke. New. $90 ea or 4 for $350. Also, new 14” $80 each or 4 for $300. Also, new 13” $65 each or 4 for $250. Call 850-624-1729 How To Make Your Car Disappear... Advertise it for sale in the Auto section of Classifieds! That’s where auto buyers and sellers meet to get the best deals on wheels! The News Herald 747-5020

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CLASSIFIEDSFriday, February 20, 2015 | The News Herald | Page D5 Medical/HealthBay Center Health and Rehab CenterIs looking for top notch Certified Nursing Assistants to join our family of professionals. We are under new administration and are looking for professional, caring individuals to assist in the care for our residents. When visiting the center ask for the Administrator or the Director of Nursing for an immediate interview. Give us a call, we’ll leave the light on for you Bay Center 1336 St. Andrews Blvd. Panama City, FL32405 850-763-3911 Web ID#: 34313586 Food Svs/Hospitality The premier sports bar in Panama needs rock stars and ninjas. Wanted: Valuable cooks, servers, and greeters. Work for an exciting national brand yet locally owned. Good wages, team oriented, health and dental, year-round or seasonal, your choice. Located in Pier Park. Apply in-person or visit www .snagajob.com to get an application. Come train & work for us! Ph: 236-0325. Web ID#: 34311334 Food Svs/HospitalityBud & Alley’s RestaurantNow HiringRated one of Florida’s Top 20 Restaurants and Golden Spoon award winner. Located on the Gulf of Mexico, with a premium clientele and some of the best gratuities on the Gulf Coast. Fun friendly and professional atmosphere Great pay, benefits, & good hoursNow Hiring: ALL POSITIONS Front and Back of the HouseWe are located 25 minutes from PCB & Destin on Hwy 30A, Seaside. Apply in person 11:30a-5pm Ask for a Manager Web ID#: 34312712 Medical/Health Is currently seeking applications for: FT Medical Technologist (Florida License in all areas of the Clinical Lab) Respiratory Therapist Applications available online at: www .nfch.org or send application to DBlount@nfch.org or 850-415-8106 or fax to 850-638-0622 EOE. Smoke Free Campus. Web ID#: 34313813 Text FL13813 to 56654 Medical/HealthMaternal & Child Health Social WorkerExperience pref. 4 year degree social work or related field. Starting salary $30k-$32k with benefits. Send resume to healthystart@comcast.net Web ID#: 34313723 OtherChild and Youth Programs Navy BaseDuties include supervision of children ages 6 weeks-4 in our Child Development program or children 5-18 in our School Age Program. This also involves implementing and leading planned activities. Pay: $11.17 p/hr entry level and 13.68 P/hr target Level. Shift is typically 25 hrs per week. Must be able to successfully pass background check and pass pre-employment drug test, obtain a CDL license and obtain appropriate immunizations. Apply at the Visitors Reception Center, Thomas Drive gate, Navy Base. For more info call 235-5737. Web ID#: 34311504 Other Emerald Falls 8602 Thomas Dr. Cobra Adventure Park 9323 Front Bch Rd.Taking ApplicationsSpring, Summer Full & Part Time Seasonal & Year Round *Shift Supervisors *Ride Attendants *Arcade Attendants *Cashiers *Maintenance Pick up applications at Emerald Falls or Cobra Adventure Park Web ID: 34312108 Bldng Const/Sklld TrdRoofersNeeded. Experience and DL required. Call 850-271-4199. Web ID#: 34313351 Install/Maint/RepairLandscapingNow hiring for experienced only lawncare maintenance crews. Year-round employment. Contact Noles Scapes 850-248-0973 Web ID#34313848 Install/Maint/RepairPlumbers and Helpers1 year new construction exp & clean driving record req. Benefits avail. Will train. Apply in person at Coastal Plumbing at 3411 Hwy 389 Web ID 34313214 Logistics/Transport25 TRUCK DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW!Learn to drive forNo Experience Needed Earn $900 / wk + Benefits Local CDL Training Apply Today! 1-800-709-7364 Web ID#: 34311511 Logistics/TransportCDL Class A Driving Instructors NeededTDI, the nation’s leading truck driving school, is looking for Part Time Instructors for its Milton, FL facility; Excellent pay and benefits! Flexible schedule, excellent working environment. Call 1-888-568-7364, email dabanathie@truckdriverin stitute.com or fax resume to (228) 832-8959. Web ID#: 34312778 Logistics/TransportExperienced CDL Roll-Off DriversCompetitive pay and benefits. Apply in person at Mr. Trash 550 2nd Ave, Panama City Beach, FL. No phone calls. Web ID#: 34313315 Medical/HealthDental AssistantExperienced, outgoing Dental Assistant needed for growing practice. Great opportunity for the right person. Email resume drheidami@gmail.com Web ID#: 34314092 Medical/HealthDental AssistantSpecialty dental office seeking PT CDA. Exp preferred. Pay DOE. Please send or drop off resume to: 1615 Harrison Ave. Web ID#: 34314121 Bldg/Const/Skill TradeExperienced Wood Framers NeededMust have own transportation. Please call 850-896-1135 Web ID#: 34312970 Bldng Const/Sklld TrdsConcrete Restoration/ ConstructionNow hiring Superintendents & Laborers. Pay DOE, Must pass Drug Screen. Apply in person at CEC 13305 PCB Pkwy PCB, FLcoastlinepcb@knology .net Web ID#: 34313118 Business/MgmtFull Time BookkeeperProficient in Quickbooks, AP/AR and inventory. Condo experience a plus. Apply at 8743 Thomas Drive, Summit Condominiums. No phone calls please. Web ID#: 34313953 Customer SupportCashierMust be able to work nights. Must be 18 yrs or older. Retirees are encouraged to apply. Some Maintenance duties req’d. Apply daily, 10:00 am -5:00 pm. No phone calls. Coconut Creek Mini-Golf & Gran Maze. 9807 Front Beach Rd. Web ID#: 34314087 EngineeringLicensed Chief EngineerMonday-Friday, vacatin and holidays. Local work in Panama City, FL. Send resume and salary requirements to: 390 South Tyndall Parkway, PO Box 289 Panama City, FL 32404 Web ID#: 34312939 Food Svs/HospitalityReservationistPart time only. 20 hrs. Afternoons & weekends Pay based on experience. Apply at Joni’s Beach Rentals at 1800 Thomas Dr. Web Id # 34314170 Text FL14170 to 56654 Food Svs/HospitalitySignal Hill GolfSnack Bar AttendantPosition available. Year round employment (Golf Benefits) Apply in person only 9615 Thomas Dr. Web ID#: 34313855 HospitalityHospitality Positions NAVY BASECome join an award winning team! Navy Gateway Inns & Suites is now hiring housekeepers and laundry workers. Detail-oriented, dependable, courteous team players w/ excellent customer service skills to perform a full range of housekeeping duties and linen services. Certification program! Applications are available at Visitor Reception Center at the entrance of the Navy Base on Thomas Drive. Call 850-234-4556 for more information. Web ID 34314034 Install/Maint/RepairApartment Maintenance/ Handyman WantedExperience with carpentry and electrical, must be clean cut with own tools and truck. 850-763-8980 Web ID: 34311948 Install/Maint/RepairCommercial CleanersNow Hiring 2nd Shift Commercial Cleaners Starts: $9 hr Mon-Fri Call Now: Jean (850) 624-9005 MPS Inc. Web ID# 34312193 Install/Maint/RepairMaintenance TechnicianFT Maintenance Tech Needed for Luxury Apartment Community. Must have a working knowledge of all aspects of general maintenance. HVAC or CPO certification a plus. Superior customer service skills & a great attention to detail. Some weekends & after hours on-call required. Must have a valid driver’s license with dependable transportation. Background check & drug test required. Come be a part of a strong team with great bonuses, benefits, & more! Apply in person at 2870 Harrison Ave or email to: mary@arborproperties.c om No Phone Calls!! Web ID# 34313978 .Medical/HealthMedical AsstNeeded FTfor busy multi doctors office. Must be a team player, dependable, & able to multi-task. Computer exp & medical terminology required. Fax resume to 850-785-3490Web ID#: 34313799 Admin/ClericalConstruction BookkeeperGeneral contractor hiring a Full Charge Bookkeeper: Certified Payrolls, AIA Payments, Job Costs, working knowledge of Lien Laws & Notice to Owners, Subcontracts/Purchase Order Contracts & Reconciliations, Human Resources, Filing, POC between field offices and Administration. City, County & State licensing renewals. Send resumes to Blind Box 3660 c/o The News Herald, P.O. Box 1940, Panama City, FL 32402 Web ID 34300486 txt FL13607 to 56654 Bldg Const/Skill TradeAssistant Superintendent, Superintendent, and Project ManagerExcellent opportunities with rapidly growing Panama City construction company. Must have minimum 3 years construction related experience, & extensive knowledge of Word & Excel. Email work history to: builder@knology .net Web ID#: 34313386 Bldg Const/TradesCommerical and Residential Electricians and Experienced HelpersWanted for Santa Rosa Beach, Fort Walton Beach, Panama City Beach . Top wages, Pay DOE, Drug Free Workplace, EOE Complete application online at: gulfatlanticelectric.com or email resume to: info@gulfatlanticelectric.c om Web ID#: 34314057 Bldg Const/TradesElectrical Project Manager WantedWe are currently seeking an experienced electrical project manager. Complete application online at: gulfatlanticelectric.com or email resume to: info@gulfatlanticelectric.c om EOE Web ID#: 34314055 Bldg Const/TradesTig Welders and Pipe Fitters1st Class -$20.00/hour at Pipe Fabrication Company. Apply in person M-F, 8-2 at 6513 Bayline Dr, Panama City, FL 32404 850-763-4834 EOE/ DFWP -benefits. Web ID#: 34313843 Bldng ConstSite Utility Contractor Hiring: Field Supervisors Exp. Pipelayers OperatorsCompetitive pay, excellent benefits including medical, dental, vision & 401K. EOE/Drug free workplace. Applications available at 1002 W. 23rd St. Ste 100 (4th floor) Panama City, FL Web ID#34314095 Classified Advertising works hard ...filling the employment needs of area business firms, helping people to meet their prospective employers, helping people buy and sell all kinds of goods and services, and much more! Nothing works harder than the Classifieds! 747-5020 LH 117 Landings Dr Saturday Feb 21 7am-1pmGarage SaleFurniture and Clothing. txt FL14156 to 56654 Mall Area 1933 Orlando Rd, From mall north on 77 to Baldwin Road. Turn right on Baldwin Rd to Hall Ave. Corner of Hall and Orlando Rd. Fri, Feb 20 & Sat, Feb 21 8:30am-? Craft and scrapbook supplies, tools, collectables, glassware, china, crystal and other household items. Text FL13916 to 56654 Panama City 4520 Brook Forest Dr, Sat., Feb 21st 8am-1pmMoving SaleFurniture, households, Nic Nacs,Crafts, Etc. Text FL14053 to 56654 PC 809 Flight Ave Saturday Feb 21 8am -3pmYard SaleDownsizing, household items, small appliances, water skiis, tow ropes, too much to list!! txt FL14116 to 56654 PCB 13201 Hutchinson Blvd. Friday & Saturday Feb 20th & 21st. 8am-1pmGarage SaleHousehold & office furniture, baskets, ribbons, craft supplies etc Text FL14022 to 56654 PCBThe Glades(Neighborhood Wide) Saturday Feb 21, 8am-??Multi Family SaleToo many things to list. Look for the balloons. txt FL13874 to 56654 Southport 1435 Skunk Valley Rd Sat Feb 21 7am till....Moving SaleEntire Kitchen, Furniture, tools, dog kennels, baby, womens & hunting clothes, household items, coolers and MUCH more. TextFL13924 to 56654 Lynn Haven 1700 Alabama Ave. Lynn Haven, FL32444 Off of 390 Saturday 2/21/2015 9:00 AM -1:00 PMClearance and Yard SaleOutside Clearance Sale at the St. Andrew Bay Thrift Store. Kitchen Items, Clothes, Furniture, Collectibles, Household Items, and Much More txt FL13383 to 56654 Lynn Haven 2624 E 39th Plaza (near Bay Haven) Sat. Feb 21 7a-11Moving SaleEntertainment center, sofa table, end tables, dressers, chairs, toddler bed, gas range, home decor, kids, baby items and MORE. Text FL13984 to 56654 Lynn Haven604 W 3rd st. Sat. Feb 21 8:00-untilTool SaleMechanics, Carpenters, Handymen, •All used-No junk• No clothing or household :Small tools, socket sets, precision, machinists measuring tools, hand tools (all kind), wrench sets, electric drills, drill sets, duct & masking tape, tool boxes, tarps,welders -stick & wire, lig saw, parts washer, metal banding set, extension cords, used plastic storage boxes.txt FL12839 to 56654 Callaway 6320 Hwy 22, Callaway, FL. Across the street from Waste Management. Saturday 2/21/2015 7:00 amChurch/Multi Family Yard SaleRocking chair, high chair, Eddie Bauer Pack-N-Play, baby toys, keyboards/ stands, stage lights, plus size clothing, room decor, lots of items! Text FL14004 to 56654 Cove: 412 South MacArthur Ave, Sat., Feb 21st 8am -12pm Lots & lots of kids clothes, toys & furniture Text FL14017 to 56654 Cove: 619 East 4th Court (Just past CVS) Sat 2/21 7:00 am until 12:00 pmYard SaleMiscellaneous -Come check it out! Text FL14027 to 56654 Forest Park 2406 Lisenby Ave, Corner of Lisenby Ave. andAirport Rd Friday Feb 20 & Saturday Feb 21 10am-5pm10th Bday SaleEverything in store up to 50 % off 100’s of 99 cent items!! txt FL14037 to 56654 Forest Park , 722 Frederick St, Sat., Feb 21st, 7a-12Yard SaleToys, Books, DVDs, TVs, Kids clothes, Dishes, Ping Pong, Poker, Foosball, picnic tables, misc items, power tools, &more. Text FL52353 to 56654 LH: 109 Florida Ave, Saturday, Feb. 21, 8:00am til 11:30amGarage SaleFurniture, antiques, clothes, household items, crafts. txt FL14173 to 56654 Beach East End , 3613 Mariner Dr, near Bay Point. Sat. Only , Feb 21st, 8am-2pm No Early Birds! Antiques, Household goods, Office, Christmas & much more. txt FL14019 to 56654 Beach, Hwy 79Gulf Beach Garden Club Bldg17012 Hernando Ave. (across from “The Pink Church”) Sat Feb 21st 7 am -1 pm Presented by the Women Civic Club of PCB MULTIPLE GARAGE SALE Indoor! Something For Everyone! txt FL14058 to56654 Callaway 124 H.L. Sudduth Dr., Feb 21 & 22, Sat & Sun, 8am-2pmYARD SALEHousehold goods, Clothes, Etc. Text FL13935 to 56654 Callaway929 S. Tyndall Pkwy Boat Race Road and Tyndall Pkwy Saturday Only 8AM -12PMGOOD SHEPHERD LUTHERAN Share Ministry THRIFT SHOPOPENNew and Different Merchandise.. CLOTHING SALE!! Pictures, Desks, Baby clothes, Kid’s Toys, Hospital Bed, Couch, Tables, TVs, Dining Room, China cabinet, Chester drawers, Set, Lamps, Bed Covers, Filing Cabinets, Office Table & Lots More. New Furniture. Free BOOKS! Exercise EquipmentText FL03778 to 56654 200 College Ave and 2nd Ct. in Historic Millville, Saturday Feb 21, 8am-2pm.Moving SaleYard gear, large and small appliances, fishing/tuba furniture, computer, and everything else. txt FL14186 to 56654 8220 Grand Bay Blvd Palm Bay , Saturday 10am-1pmMoving SaleMust sell all contents of house. txt FL14091 to 56654 8821 John Pitts Rd Saturday Feb 21st 7am-11amMoving SaleTools, clothes, shoes, household items, chest freezer, office chairs, grill/smoker, and much more! txt FL13941 to 56654 Bayou George 6336 Pine Tree Trail. North on 231, Right on Pine Tree, immediate Left on Pine Tree Trail. February 20-21, 2015. 10AM-4PM Friday, 8AM-2PM SaturdayMoving Sale Everything Must Go!!Tools, Craftmatic Adjustable bed, desks, kitchenware, automotive, lawn & garden, too much to list. Text FL14054 to 56654 Beach East End: 300 Clara Ave Sat 2/21/15 8 a.m -12 p.mChrist Our Savior Lutheran Helping Hands Thrift StoreNew Items In All Rooms! Clothing Room: Mens, Womens, Childrens, Fall clothing. Sweaters, Long Sleeved Shirts and Jackets. Kitchen Room: Dishes, Glassware, Small Appliances, Framed Pictures,CDs, Room 3: Books, Puzzles, Lamps, Chairs, Linens, Childrens books & toys. Come & Browse! txt FL12685 to56654 If you didn’t advertise here, you’re missing out on potential customers.

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CLASSIFIEDSPage D6 | The News Herald | Friday, February 20, 2015 OPENHOUSEFRIDAY2/20€10-3PM 18912FrontBeachRoad#301(NautilusCondo)€PCBGreatlowdensity,lowrisecondowithbeautifulGulfviews.1,355s.f. condolocatedacrossthestreetfromtheGulf.Tilethroughout,lightand brightwithnewwindows,cathedralce ilings,beachaccess,masterloft, with2bedrooms+den.Dir:Hwy79toFrontBeachRd.GoWtoNautilusCondoonNsideofFrontBeachRd.RobertStalvey® 850-319-4409 1134177 Beautiful Canal Front Home in Bay Point$549,000 3 bedroom, 3.5 bath, office/4th bedroom, family room which has attached atrium/ greenhouse and electric fireplace. Large eat-in kitchen has Corian countertops, island and breakfast bar. Master bedroom has vaulted ceiling, leading into master bath with separate sauna/steam shower and jetted tub area. Lofted space above foyer. Laundry room complete with plenty of cabinet storage and sink. Marble floors throughout. Large deck accessible from every room on lower level of house, leading down to 92 feet of boat dock. Attached 2 car garage, security system and central vac. This gently lived in home is a must see! Call 850-235-3500 or email: wallhouseholdceo@hotmail.com to make an appointment to see this property. SALE PENDING On N. Lake Caroline!Handsome, all brick(1 owner) 4BR/2BA home w/2400 SF of custom living, 2 gar, cov porches, den w/FP, just needs a few updates & YOU! Quiet lake near Garden Club area. $229,900 O’Keefe & Wainwright, Realtors, 785-8746 SOLDGorgeous Home At End of Cul-De-Sac4br/2ba home built 2010 in Hawks Landing 1856 sqft open fl plan w/granite countertops, crown molding, MB w/ double vanity, garden tub, extend. cov. back patio, outdoor shed, & much more! $269,900 MLS 624541 Mike Werner 814-6266 Keller Williams Realty Summerwood3br/2ba, sep office, covered pool, FP, corner lot, $253,900.Call 850-866-7274 Text FL11842 to 56654 WATERFRONT!Almost 1 ACRE on Pratt Bayou. 3BR 2bath. Hardwood floors. Waterviews from master BR, formal dining & eat in kitchen. FP, dbl garage. Boat from your own backyard! $249,000 O’Keefe & Wainwright Realtors 785-8746 BEST NEW HOME DEALS250’s -270’s Gated community; 3/3.5 Gorgeous BayFront Pool; 2 -Car Garage Close to BayPoint. Owner Fin. Avail. Michael w/Sterling 850-865-8006 HUGE WEST END CONDO SPLASH $515,000Three balconies on GULF-Low Floor Never rented, “lock-out’ 2 br/2 ba plus efficiency. 1700 sq. ft w/indoor water park; arcade; Pier Park only 2 mi away. Michael Jones 850-865-8006 or Remy Cooksey 850-814-3344 Large Cul-de-Sac Lot w/ Bay Viewin Dolphin Bay, PCB, $75k. Call 258-7792 for gate code or more info. txt FL13663 to 56654 St Andrews Retired couple wanting to purchase a home building lot (any size) in St. Andrews. Please call 850-547-3877. txt FL13727 to 56654 MH & Lot for Sale1999 16 X 76, 3br/2ba, fully furnished, reduced price for quick sale. Serious inquireies only. $64k Please call 850-814-2726 txt FL14165 to 56654 Great home in Forest Park 3br/2ba Large fenced in yard, all brick & new flooring. Convenient to hospitals & shopping centers. Move in ready! $219,500 MLS # 626046 Kim Carroll, Coldwell Banker Carroll Realty 850-819-8104 HOME FOR SALE BY OWNER Move-In Ready! Spacious home 2852 sq. ft. Large Open Concept Kitchen, New Roof, 4br/3.5Ba, separate master suite, 2304 W Game Farm Rd close to Lynn Haven & Panama City, $220,000 Call 850-588-2562 No Longer AvailableCove 3 br 1 bath home in the Downtown Cove New roof, fresh paint, new bonus room or 4th bdr/office. Natural gas hkups avail and electric hkps in kitchen. Original hardwood floors throughout MLS 619926 $63,000 Athrine Matthews Realtor Prudential Shimmering Sands Realty 624-3187 Price reduced! AC & water heater both less than 3 years old!! Located near TAFB. 3bd/2bth home w/2 car garage, has a split flr plan. Lg screened in back porch, auto irr sys w/sep well, & priv fncd bck yrd. Open LR w/high ceilings & brick FP. Int has been newly painted. Lrg Bdrms, ample storage space, plenty of cabinet space in the Kitch are some of the other things this home has to feature. MLS #623878 Laird Hitchcock, Realtor Prudential Shimmering Sands Realty 850-866-2158 River Front Wewahitchka Located on the Chipola Cutoff. Lg. 2bd/1ba 1 bd has 1 king bed and the 2nd has 2 king size beds, a 23X24 LR w/ a leather sofa, love seat, 2 large recliners, Kit-dining combo, screened porch w/ washer/dryer. All furniture remains w/home. Wood floors through out, A/C heat pump less than a year old, well house w/ a 220’ artesian well, full above ground basement/ workshop, fenced yard, carport, metal roof, boat dock and a private concrete boat ramp. $159,900.00 call 850-826-2381 txt FL13417 to 56654 Built in 05, this lovely maintained home has 100% financing available through USDA. Victorian styled design with lots of decorator features. 3/2 Tile in LR&Kitchen. Wood floors in M/BR and hallway. Carpet in 2 bedrooms. Storage bldg has elect. Convenient to Tyndall. $131,900 Fran Holt 832-0714 Latitudes Realty Callaway 3br/2ba, For sale by OwnerBrick, 1800 sqft, den with fireplace, 12x20 Florida room, large screened room, 14x20 workshop, new cabinets and appliances in 2013, new master bath 2014. Well maintained inside and out. $134,500 Call 850-596-4408 DEEP WATERFRONT! Classic Cove home with hardwood floors and lots of charm. 3BR/2BA. Open and airy, overlooks Watson Bayou on high bluff. Huge screen porch, dock area w/4 big boat wet slips. $325,000. Seller moved and READY!! O’Keefe & Wainwright, Realtors 850-785-8746 Desirable Lynn Haven 3br/2.5ba, Approx 1500sf, 12x20 storage shed in fenced in backyard, freshly painted, Move-In ready! Call Today 850-258-3540 Text FL12175 to 56654 Lakefront home w/views of Lake Suzanne along w/100 ft of white sandy beach. Enjoy sunny Fl in your very own lake house w/20 ft of visibility in the warm water to enjoy scuba, snorkeling, & swimming. Home is elevated 50 ft above the lake & offers sunset views of the water from the LR, DR, or the covered porch. Renovated Kitch w/granite counters & new appl. New carpet throughout, remodeled bthrms w/granite, tile floors & new vanities, faucets, etc. Located in Leisure Lakes where community mbrs enjoy trophy size bream and largemouth bass fishing. Owners can enjoy a comm pool, tennis crt, bsktball crt, boat ramps & a gated entrance w/sec. Low HOA fee. MLS #620277 Amanda Corbin, Realtor Prudential Shimmering Sands Realty 850-832-7447 www .SearchP anamaCity Beach.com ! ! ! ! ! ! ! Sell It Today!I BUYHOUSESPretty or Ugly763-7355ibuyhousesprettyorugly.comText FL95981 to 56654 5 BR -2.5 BA with POOL $339K -MLS 627121 2913 Briarcliff Rd PC, FL Holli Persall ,Realtor ERA Neubauer Real Estate 850 866-8195 4br WATERFRONT! Pool, Boat lift, Dock 8412 Lydia LanePCB $799K -MLS 627256 254 Marlin Dr Bay Point 4br/3ba on beautiful Grand Lagoon open water view & great sunset views. This is a must see! $679,000 MLS #624879 Colleen Dietrich Keller Williams Realty 850-814-7298 3/2.5 Townhouse1 car gar. across street from Navy Base. Pool, Workout room. $140K Call Jennifer Bowman, Prudential Shimmering Sands 850-258-1509 Bayside 3br 3½ ba 811 De Gama Huge Price Reduction! 1,800 sqft, huge yards! MLS 620116 Colleen Dietrich Keller Williams Realty 850-814-7298 Beautiful Executive Home3635 Preserve Blvd 4 br/4 ba in a gated water front community. 4 br/4 ba, 18 ft ceilings, stainless appliances, 3 car garage, pool and covered patio $675,000 MLS 627265 Colleen Dietrich Keller Williams Realty Cell 850-814-7298 Warehousewith spray booth. 3500sf. Fenced lot, large doors. 1412-B Grace Ave., PC, FL. $950/mo. Call 850-763-3965 Whse w/office & docks 2500-5000-7500 up to 20k sf Various locations in PC area. 785-3031 1-4 Br Apts, Duplex’s & homes. Many locations Some inc water & W/D hkp, $425-$895 mo. No dogs.763-3401 Text FL11611 to 56654 Pet Friendly Apts & Townhouses Monthly/Weekly TEXT (850) 867-5603 Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Condo on Front Beach Rd Villas @ Suncrest. Completely furn’d 2 br 2 ba, 1299 sq ft, 3rd (top) fl w/ bal, elev, garage, pool, gym. Washr/Dryr, Lcl tele, internet, basic cbl tv, ht water. Elec incl up to $100 per mo. No smoke/No pets. 1yr lease $1585 per mo + Sec dep. 850-588-6244. txt FL13367 to 56654 The Grand at Bay PointUnit 3604, 3br/3ba condo, den, 2100sf, custom window treatments, sun screens, Long term only $2000/mo. with deposit Call/Text 615-319-5811 3 br, 2 ba, garage, fenced yard 127 Derby Woods Drive., $1175 month, 251-401-8611 3br/2ba Brick home, freshly painted interior and new carpet. Conv. to Downtown and Bay High, Avail. Now! No pets. $900/mo + Sec. Dep. 850-872-3422 txt FL13719 to 56654 For Responsible working male, no drugs or exc drinking env, $90/wk. $25 deposit Call 850-769-8496 2 Br’sStarting at $425 month plus deposit. No pets! Call 850-265-1382 Text FL84350 to 56654 Bayou George 3br/2ba &1br/1ba avail clean, quiet, lrg yrd no pets w/s/g incld. 850-265-4043 Lynn Haven 2 & 3 Br’s starting at $540 mnth, W/D Hookup, CH/A, No Pets. 850-624-6552 Medical/HealthCNA WANTEDTop pay. Great hours. 850-257-5403. Web ID#: 34313675 SecurityNow HiringSecurity Officers and Supervisors. All positions are permanent, year-round. Starting at $9.50 -$14.00/hr. DOE. Call 1-888-948-2738 or 850-563-1022 Web ID#: 34313373 Security/ProtectivePERMANENTL. Lance Security Service is SeekingSecurity Officers$9.00 per hour 850-960-5437 Web ID: 34314113 Skilled TradeDraftsmanDraftsman and/or Draftsman Assistant for Pipe Fabrication company. Familiar with ISOMETRIC drawings, Auto Cad knowledge a MUST. Experience and knowledge of Piping and components a plus. Apply in person M-F between 8-2 at 6513 Bayline Dr, Panama City, FL 850-763-4834 DFWP/ EOE/Benefits Web ID#: 34311506 Skilled TradePainterExperienced Painter at Pipe Fabrication company. Must have a valid Driver’s License. Apply in person M-F from 8-2 at 6513 Bayline Drive, Panama City, FL 32404 850-763-4834 EOE/ DFWP Benefits Web ID#: 34311340 Skilled TradesAlum. WelderMiracle Strip Welding has an opening for a full time Aluminum Welder Fitter. Paid holidays, vacation and sick leave. Must pass welding test. Apply at 7117 McElvey Road in Panama City Beach. Web ID#: 34313599 TransportationDRIVERSCDLLicense, ClassB&A/ Dump Truck/ Cement Tanker. Min 2 years exp required, Clean MVR. Must pass DOTdrug screen & physical. EOE & Drug Free Work Place. Apply in person at 2622 North MacArthur Ave, Panama City, FL Web ID# 34314110 MEDICAL BILLING TRAINEES NEEDED! Become a Medical Office Assistant! NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! Online training can get you job ready! HS Diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! 1-888-528-5547 EARN EXTRA INCOMENewspaper Carriers NeededPanama City Beach , Bonifay, & ChipleyEmail Jamie Meadors at jmeadors@pcnh.com or call 850-747-5098. Please leave name, contact number, and what area you live in. Web ID#: 34312614 4 Prof. Office Suites for lease in PC @ 651 W. 14th St. 1200-3500 Sq. Ft. 850-527-7339 Beach Office Space800 s.f. off Middle Beach Road $625mo Jane Bondi Counts Real Estate Group, Inc. (850) 819-4268 Txt Fl01983 to 56654 Grand Office Bldg for lease. Water view at 1013 Beck Ave. 7600 Sq. Ft. 850-527-7339 Office Space600sf, $550. 1200sf, $950. 2400sf, $2000. 3600sf, $2950. Each per mo. (850)-832-6226 Medical/HealthCertified Medical Coder2 yrs exp. Send resume to CEO 767 Airport Rd. Panama City, FL32405 EOE DFWP Web ID# 34313300 OtherRecreation Aid RV Park Navy BaseDuties involve the inspection, inventory control, quality assurance and preventative maintenance & some cleaning on 8 cabins and 2 bath houses. Pay is $9.50 -$10.00 p/hr, DOE. 30 -40 hours p/wk, may include weekends and holidays. Work day hours 0800-1500 with an hour lunch. No benefits apply. For more info call 234-4091.Customer Service Navy BaseTo perform a full range of duties such as assisting customers in equipment rental and making reservations, refunds and adjustments, and other service related transactions. Pay is 9.50 p/hr. 20-25 hrs per week, include rotating weekends. No benefits apply. Must be at least 18 yrs old and hold a FL driver’s license. 6 mths retail with cash register/Point Of Sale exp. preferred. For more info call 234-4880 All job details and employment applications are available at Visitors Reception Center, Thomas Drive gate. Or fax resume & OF-306 (required & available at: at http://www.opm.gov/forms/Opt ional-forms/) to 234-4334. Web ID#: 34311504 OtherWildlife Technician (OPS)FL Fish & Wildlife Conservation Com. Box-R Wildlife Mgt. Area Franklin County $27,482.52 Annual. Heavy equipment operation, vegetation control, road and facility maintenance, controlled burns, manage public hunts and wildlife surveys. Applications must be completed online at: https://jobs.myflorida.co m/ For additional information contact: Billie Clayton 850-265-3676 EEO/AA Employer Job Closes 02/27/2015 Web ID#: 34313090 Quality AssuranceQuality Assurance Manager/ Assistant ManagerQuality Assurance Manager/ Assistant Manager at Pipe Fabrication Company. Quality Control Experience with Pipe Welds & ASME Codes REQUIRED. Must have a valid Driver’s License. Apply in person M-F from 8-2 at 6513 Bayline Drive, Panama City, FL 32404 850-763-4834 EOE/ DFWP Benefits Web ID#: 34310060 Sales/Business DevCashiers/ Sales ClerksBig Willy’s & Blue Island Now HiringFor Swimwear & Clothing Stores Full & Part Time Great starting pay No exp. necessary we will train Retirees welcome Employee discount Call Terri for appt 850-234-6278 Web ID 34313792Text FL13792 to 56654 Sales/Business DevClassic RentalsNow hiring lot employee. Apply at 13226 Front Beach Rd or call 235-1519 Web Id 34312167 Sales/Business DevExperienced• Managers •Asst Managers •Sales PersonnelHeatwave & Purple Haze Now Hiring FT/PT-year round employment. Great pay. Major medical, vision, and dental. Great work environment. Apply in person 10015 Front Beach Rd 9am-Noon Monday-Friday ONLY!! Or fax resume to 850-234-9911 Web ID#: 34312584 Sales/Business DevHy’s ToggeryAssociates Needed Full Time and Part TimeFor fun fast paced store. Sales exp pref, Flexible schedule req. Apply in person only, at Hy’s Toggery Pier Park next door to Tootsie’s. Web ID#: 34314015 Sales/Business DevRoute SalesRoute Sales for dairy wholesale. CDL Class B req. Training provided. FT withbenefits, including retirement! Commission w/ a minimum guarantee. Call 850-478-2363. Web ID#: 34310634 Customer Support/Client CarePart Time Customer Service RepresentativeThe News Herald is accepting applications for part-time customer service/ sales representatives in our circulation call center team covering two daily papers.If you: Are customer oriented and have a positive attitude Are able to put our subscriber concerns first Are able to respond professionally and pleasantly Can work as a team player Can be flexible in your work schedule -30 hours per week (Position requires weekends 6:00a.m. 11:00a.m)And possess: The ability to communicate effectively by phone. The ability to work in a fast-paced environment Above-average knowledge of computers and data entry Excellent math skills The ability to close a sale.Position Pay:Hourly rate plus bonus on sales/saves. Customer svc call center experience a plus Send resume to:gsullivan@pcnh.com Interviews will be scheduled at a later date. No phone calls. EOE Candidate hired depending background check and pre-employment drug screen. Web ID#: 34313886 Sales/Business DevPart Time Retention/Sales RepThe News Herald is accepting applications for a part-time retention representative to be a part of out circulation call center team covering two daily papers. Applicant must possess: Ability to make customer service the number 1 priority. The ability to communicate effectively by phone. The ability to close a sale. Above-average knowledge of computers and data entry Excellent math skills Work Schedule 1:00-7:00 and Saturday 9:00-3:00; must be flexible Position pays hourly rate plus monthly bonus on retention. Customer svc call center experience a plus. Email resumes to gsullivan@pcnh.com Interviews will be scheduledat a later date. No phone calls.EOE Candidate hired depending background check and pre-employment drug screen. Web ID#: 34313884 Engineering Accepting resumes from qualified applicants for professional and technical positions supporting Navy Mine Counter Measures (MCM)Documentation Specialist Jr. TechnicianCollege degree, certifications, technical knowledge, and experience defined in job description(s) on company website. Submit resume, credentials and (3) professional references to DMR Consulting, Inc. employment@dmrcinc.com . Applicant must be a U.S. Citizen. A government security investigation is required to meet eligibility for access to classified information and potential employment. DMR offers excellent compensation package and benefits for full-time employees: Group Health, Life & Dental, Optional Vision, Short/long term disability insurance, SIMPLE IRA (11) Holidays & (15) days PTO. DMR is Equal Opportunity Employer Web ID#: 34313109 Medical/HealthBay Center Health and Rehab CenterWe are currently taking applications for the position of Payroll Benefits Coordinator at our facility in Panama City, FL. The Payroll/Benefits Coordinator is responsible for overall payroll functions and maintenance or personnel records, including Workers’Compensation, Employee Benefits, FMLAand all leaves. Please call or stop by the facility to complete an application. Bay Center 1336 St Andrews Blvd. Panama City, FL32405 850-763-3911 or forward resume to: BOM@baycenterhealthandrehab.com Bay Center is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Web ID#: 34313586 Real EstateLicensed AgentsPCB Condo Sales LEADS, LEADS, L EADS!!3 High Traffic Beach Front Locations Quick Sales and Closings Life’s ABeach Real Estate 850-249-9140 woodyjunot@lifesabeachrealty .com Web ID#: 34313759 Training/EducationWant to be a CNA/Phlebotomist?Don’t want to wait? Express Training Services now offering our nursing asst. exam prep classes in DESTIN Class for 1 week. 850-502-5521 Military Spouses We Are mycaa certifiedexpresstrainingservices.com Next class starts: : 02/23/2015 8am -4pm Logistics/TransportBe Your Own Boss Drivers WantedTaxi, shuttle & limo drivers. FT/PT. Usually $100 per day. Call M-F 10-4. 850-233-0029 Web ID#: 34314011 Medical/Health Very busy medical office is hiring for the following positions:ReceptionistMedical AssistantMedical Records ClerkAccounts Payable ClerkCompetitive pay and benefits including 401K. Experience preferred.Send resumes to Blind Box 3612 c/o The News Herald, P.O. Box 1940, Panama City, FL 32402 Web ID#: 34313689 Medical/HealthMedical AsstFTMedical Assistant needed Immediately for busy medical practice immediately. Experience in the medical field highly preferred. Competitive salary and benefits available. Please reply with resume and reference to:agha.rheum@gmail.com Web ID#: 34313509 Medical/HealthOrthodontic AssistantDental experience required. Bring resumes to 1328 W 23rd St. PC, Monday -Thursday 8am-12pm & 1-5pm. mhanson359@aol.com Web ID#: 34314100

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PanamaCity.Com INSIDE UNDERCURRENTS: Let us entertain you | 3 Winter Resident Calendar of Events | 10-11 Pig out at Major’s Smokehouse | 12-13 Library hosts visual, performing, literary artists | 15 Leading Ladies Women dance into the spotlight | 8-9 Women make of Shakespeare ‘What You Will’ | 14 February 20, 2015

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PAGE 2 PanamaCity.Com Friday, February 20, 2015 ABOUT US CONTENT JAN WADDY 850-747-5072 JWADDY@PCNH.COM CONTENT TONY SIMMONS 850-747-5080 TSIMMONS@PCNH.COM JAN WADDY | PanamaCity.com Tayyaba Awan, who was scheduled to get her U.S. Citizenship today, dishes out a couple of servings of her Chicken Biryani from the kitchen at Indo-Pak International Food Store, 1504 W. 15th St., in Panama City. “ Most people like extra hot,” said Tayyaba, who made mine with “mild spice,” though I thought it had plenty of heat. The mixed-rice dish is lled with chicken — chunks and bone-in — and lots of spices, such as pods of cardamom. Her father, Malik Awan, added that most people eat it with plain yogurt on the side. Tayyaba uses a whole chicken in a small aluminum tray ($30) of Chicken Biryani, which feeds ve to six people, and three chickens in a large tray ($90) that feeds 20. Tayyaba makes other biryani with lamb or vegetables, as well as chicken korma and kebabs. Indo-Pak also sells a variety of ingredients to make your own Indian-Pakistani dishes. For more information or to place an order to-go, call 481-0337. DESIGN KRISTY L. OWENS 850-747-5087 KOWENS@PCNH.COM ON THE COVER: B ay High School senior Stacy Graham, a student at Tonie’s Dance Workshop, has been dancing since the age of 2. — TERESA TUNO SHARE YOUR PHOTOS Send us your pictures of places you’ve enjoyed in the area, events you’ve attended, parties you’ve crashed — and we’ll share them with the rest of the world. You can email photos to tsimmons@pcnh.com or post them to our Facebook page at Facebook.com/PanamaCityBeachGuide. Let us know about the fun you’re having — don’t keep all the good times to yourself! SCENE AROUND TOWN On the Web: Visit PanamaCity.com to see more photos from events, beach scenes and more.

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Friday, February 20, 2015 PanamaCity.Com PAGE 3 PANAMA CITY — It’s been a good run. It’s about to get better. I’m talking about the big changes coming to this section of the Friday News Herald next week, Feb. 27. Regular readers will have seen the advertisements by now, and we’ve already heard from some of you that the anticipation is exquisite. Some background: PanamaCity.com’s print insert took the place of The Entertainer in October 2011, targeting our arts and entertainment reporting on the city and beaches with particular focus on the events, dining options, attractions and lifestyles that make this a destination site for visitors — and a wonderful place to call home. The change allowed us to update the look and approach of the section, and helped us re-examine the local attractions in a new light. That was fun, and we appreciate you going along for the ride with us. Now, after much deliberation and consideration, we’ve decided to resurrect the familiar name, “Entertainer” (which, let’s be honest, most locals still call the PanamaCity. com section). And we’re going to make it bigger and better than ever — we’re tripling the page count with our debut edition next week, and we’re expanding our coverage to blanket the whole News Herald circulation area. We’ll still bring you articles on local events, artists, performers, attractions, parks and daytrips, and more — everything you need to know, and more that you didn’t even know you needed. We’ll still have our calendar listings, Nightlife, Scene Around Town (and this column, too). But we’re adding some new items you’re going to love. Features Editor Jan Waddy will supplement her restaurant reviews and articles with a weekly Q&A with a local chef, “Chef’s Palate,” which will also include the chef’s favorite recipes. Staffer Jenn Schaefer will contribute a weekly Q&A with a local bartender, “Mixologist,” with a recipe for a signature cocktail. Editor Mike Cazalas will join us for “BayWatch,” a weekly collection of vignettes from his encounters and misadventures around town. And staffer Stephanie Nusbaum will contribute to the mix with her experiences as a “local tourist” and new mom. In addition, this section will be the new home for “Movie Town,” the weekly review column by locals Matt Greene and Cole Schneider, and we will welcome local author Michael Lister back to our pages with his column, “Of Font & Film.” More new content will include “Game On,” which supplies the channels and airtimes for watching the weekend’s televised sports events; “Community Spotlight” will focus on random people we meet in our travels each week; and “What’s Not to Love?” is a photo page contributed by readers. Maybe the biggest new thing is our weekly centerpiece article under the “Beach Insider” banner, which promises beach-related activities for visitors and locals. Check there for the “Beach’s Best Bets.” The old saw goes that everything old is new again, and another one says the more things change, the more they stay the same. Whichever you subscribe to, we think you’re going to like it. Peace . Let us entertain you UNDERCURRENTS Tony Simmons tsimmons@pcnh.com Follow Tony on Twitter @PCTonyS and friend him at Facebook.com/WriterTonySimmons THE KNOW ENTER TA IN ER

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CALENDAR SPICE UP YOUR WEEK WITH UPCOMING AREA EVENTS PAGE 4 PanamaCity.Com Friday, February 20, 2015 WANT TO BE INCLUDED? Click “Send us your events” at PanamaCity.com or email Jan Waddy, jwaddy@pcnh.com, or Tony Simmons, tsimmons@pcnh.com. Inclusion in this calendar of events, which also appears on the Events page at PanamaCity. com, is at editors’ discretion. WINTER RESIDENT EVENTS: SEE OUR CALENDAR OF FUN FOR FLOCKING SNOWBIRDS ON PAGE 10. FRIDAY, FEB. 20 GARY POPE JR. EXHIBIT: The works of local artist Gary Pope Jr. are on exhibit through February during regular hours at the Bay County Public Library, 898 W. 11th St., Panama City. Details: 522-2100 ZUMBA FOR THE HEART: 5:30-7 p.m. at the Panama City Health Club & Spa parking lot, 1598 Balboa Ave., Panama City. Wear red to show support for the American Heart Association; this is an outdoor event, so dress for the weather forecast. Free event; small donations encouraged for the AHA. PlayZone available for non-members for $5 drop-in. Details: 914-FIT or PanamaCityHealthClub.com ‘THE 25TH ANNUAL PUTNAM COUNTY SPELLING BEE’: 7:30 p.m. at The Martin Theatre, 409 Harrison Ave., Panama City. This Tony Award-winning musical follows six over-achieving and awkward adolescents on their quest for the spelling championship of a lifetime. The show invites volunteers from the audience to participate in each performance. Details and tickets: MartinTheatre.com or 763-8080 ‘THERE’S A BURGLAR IN MY BED’: 7:30 p.m. at Kaleidoscope Theatre, 207 E. 24th St., Lynn Haven. Complications arise when two unhappily married people simultaneously plan romantic trysts in their “unused” beach house – with someone else, of course. Details and tickets: 265-3226 or kt-online.org ‘TWELFTH NIGHT’: 7:30 p.m. at the Amelia Center Theatre, Gulf Coast State College, Panama City. Admission: $20 general admission; GCSC students, faculty and staff admitted free with valid ID. Tickets: GulfCoast.edu/arts DARDEN SMITH: 7:30 p.m. at The Seaside Meeting Hall Theatre, 216 Quincy Circle, Seaside. Tickets: $25. Details: LoveTheRep.com SATURDAY, FEB. 21 GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT FARMERS’ MARKET: 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Capt Anderson’s on Thomas Drive. Enjoy the region’s nest makers, bakers and growers at PCB’s yearround farmers’ market. Live music, free tastings and family fun. Details: WaterfrontMarkets.org or 763-7359 ST. ANDREWS WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Smith Yacht Basin beside the Shrimp Boat Restaurant, 12th Street and Beck Avenue. Rain or shine. Vendors, live music, Kids Craft table. Bring a shing pole and stay for the day. Details: HistoricStAndrews.com/ market or 872-7208 SEASIDE FARMERS MARKET: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Seaside Amphitheatre. Fresh produce, baked goods, dairy products and other unique offerings, cooking demos and activities. Yearround event. Details: SeasideFL.com SECOND ANNUAL HAWGS AND HEARTS: riders sign in 9-11 a.m. at Harley-Davidson, 14700 Panama City Beach Parkway, Panama City Beach. At 11 a.m., all kick stands up for a 45minute police-escorted beach ride organized by local motorcycle clubs that brings the riders back to HarleyDavidson for an afternoon barbeque and concert by Heritage. Admission is $15. Details: Monica Lang, regional director of the American Heart Association, 708-5237 17TH ANNUAL MEXICO BEACH GUMBO COOKOFF: 10 a.m. at Sunset Park in Mexico Beach. Gumbo, Brunswick stew, live music, free beads and more. Details: MexicoBeach.com 4TH ANNUAL SEA ART WALK: 10 a.m. at Mexico Beach between Tully’s Bar and Grill and Mango Marley’s. Music by Slim Fatz and more than 20 artists participating in mediums including photography, jewelry, encaustics, ceramics, int knapping and more. Details: email sea.us.net@gmail.com or go to SeagrassArt.com/sea ST. ANDREWS STATE PARK PACK WALK: 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at St. Andrews State Park, 4607 State Park Lane, Panama City Beach. Join the park and Bay County Animal Control for a guided hike along Heron Pond Trail with adoptable shelter dogs. Wellbehaved pet dogs welcome; pets must be on a six foot leash and are not permitted in buildings or on the beaches. Details: 233-5164 or Melissa. Shoemaker@dep.state. .us CLASSICAL GUITARIST PETER FLETCHER: 6 p.m. at the Bay County Public Library, 898 W. 11th St., Panama City. A free concert, part of a nationwide tour. CDs will be available for purchase. Details: 522-2100 or visit NWRLS.com or PeterFletcher.com AMERICANA MUSIC AT THE LODGE: 6:30-8 p.m. at Camp Helen State Park, 23937 Panama City Beach Parkway, Panama City Beach. Granville Automatic performs. Details: 233-5059 or CampHelenFriends@gmail.com THE 25TH ANNUAL PUTNAM COUNTY SPELLING BEE: 7:30 p.m. at The Martin Theatre, 409 Harrison Ave., Panama City. Details and tickets: MartinTheatre.com or 763-8080 ‘THERE’S A BURGLAR IN MY BED’: 7:30 p.m. at Kaleidoscope Theatre, 207 E. 24th St., Lynn Haven. Details and tickets: 265-3226 or kt-online.org ‘TWELFTH NIGHT’: 7:30 p.m. at the Amelia Center Theatre, Gulf Coast State College, Panama City. Admission: $20 general admission; GCSC students, faculty and staff admitted free with valid ID. Tickets: GulfCoast.edu/arts COMEDY NIGHT: 9 p.m. at The Purple Grape, 1121 Beck Ave., in Panama City with Headliner Big Hou featuring Noah White and Dan Luther. Cover: $10. Reservations: 850-249-3232. SUNDAY, FEB. 22 GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT FARMERS’ MARKET: 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Capt Anderson’s on Thomas Drive. Enjoy the region’s nest makers, bakers and growers at PCB’s yearround farmers’ market. Live music, free tastings and family fun. Details: WaterfrontMarkets.org or 763-7359 30A FARMERS MARKET: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on North Barrett Square in Rosemary Beach. Each Sunday, join this community event featuring fresh vegetables, fruits, eggs, honey, cheese, preserves, sauces, bread, sweets, prepared foods to go and much more. Details: 30aFarmersMarket.com THE 25TH ANNUAL PUTNAM COUNTY SPELLING BEE: 2 p.m. at The Martin Theatre, 409 Harrison Ave., Panama City. Details and tickets: MartinTheatre.com or 763-8080

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CALENDAR SPICE UP YOUR WEEK WITH UPCOMING AREA EVENTS Friday, February 20, 2015 PanamaCity.Com PAGE 5 ‘THERE’S A BURGLAR IN MY BED’: 2 p.m. at Kaleidoscope Theatre, 207 E. 24th St., Lynn Haven. Details and tickets: 265-3226 or kt-online.org ‘TWELFTH NIGHT’: 2:30 p.m. at the Amelia Center Theatre, Gulf Coast State College, Panama City. Tickets: GulfCoast.edu/arts AMERICANA CAF SUNDAYS: 3 p.m. at Roberts Hall, 831 Florida Ave, Lynn Haven; doors open at 2:30 p.m. Join Lucky Mud for an open mic showcase of local musicians and concert. Donations appreciated. Details: 722-4915 WINTER TALES: 4 p.m. at Byrne Hall, St. Andrews Episcopal Church, 1602 Baker Court, Panama City. Featuring stories for grown-ups from the area’s favorite storytellers. Free admission. Light refreshments. Details: Pat, 871-0165 MONDAY, FEB. 23 TRIBUTE TO THE LEGENDS OF MUSIC: 4 p.m. at Marina Cantina, Panama City Beach. Featuring Todd Allen Herendeen and his FTD Band. Doors open at 3 p.m. Admission: $10. Raf e for prizes. Proceeds bene t Food4Kidz. Details: (850) 249-5500 or (850) 624-7485 HISTORY OF THE GLENWOOD COMMUNITY: 7 p.m. at the Bay County Public Library, 898 W. 11th St., Panama City. Leon Miller, retired minorities coordinator at Gulf Coast State College, will present the history, along with displays of books, photos and other material from the archives of this historic neighborhood. Sponsored by the Historical Society of Bay County as part of Black History Month. Open to the public. Light refreshment will be served. Details: Bob Hurst at 7856184, Glenda Walters at 832-0840, or BayHistory.org TUESDAY, FEB. 24 AFRICAN/CARIBBEAN DRUM & DANCE PROJECT: 6 p.m. at the Bay County Public Library, 898 W. 11th St., Panama City. Interactive drum and dance performance by Global Arts Society. Sponsored by NW Florida Music Teachers Assoc. Details: 5222118, nwrls.com WEDNESDAY, FEB. 25 IN THE MOOD: 3 p.m. at the Marina Civic Center, 8 Harrison Ave., Panama City. A 1940s musical revue. Details and tickets: MarinaCivicCenter.com or 763-4696 THURSDAY, FEB. 26 ‘REDISCOVERING ANCIENT AMERICA’: 7 p.m. at the Arnold High School auditorium, 550 Alf Coleman Road, Panama City Beach. Presented by lmmaker Gray Warriner as part of the Bay County Audubon Society’s annual Travel Adventure Film Series. Tickets are $7 each, or free for students 18 and younger. Door prizes will be given out. Details: BayCountyAudubon.org or call (850) 871-1736 THE 25TH ANNUAL PUTNAM COUNTY SPELLING BEE: 7:30 p.m. at The Martin Theatre, 409 Harrison Ave., Panama City. This Tony Award-winning musical follows six over-achieving and awkward adolescents on their quest for the spelling championship of a lifetime. The show invites volunteers from the audience to participate in each performance. Details and tickets: MartinTheatre. com or 763-8080 FEB. 27 GARY POPE JR. EXHIBIT: The works of local artist Gary Pope Jr. are on exhibit through February during regular hours at the Bay County Public Library, 898 W. 11th St., Panama City. Details: 522-2100 ‘A HUNDRED INDECISIONS’: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday-Thursday through March 26, Amelia Center Main Gallery, Gulf Coast State College, Panama City. Exhibit of sculptures by Meghan Sullivan, artist in residence. Free admission. Details: GulfCoast.edu/arts or 872-3886 THE FEST: 6-10 p.m. on the fourth Friday of the month through November at the Panama City Mall by J.C. Penney on U.S. 231 with classic and show cars, bike night, eating areas, local bands on stages, kid zone and merchandise; different non-pro t featured each month. Details: 625-2014 TASTE OF THE RACE: 6-8 p.m. in Seaside. Join host Emeril Lagasse and enjoy cuisine and drinks from the Gulf Coast’s best restaurants. Proceeds bene t the Seaside School Foundation. Tickets, $99, are available at TasteOfTheRace.eventbrite.com ‘THE 25TH ANNUAL PUTNAM COUNTY SPELLING BEE’: 7:30 p.m. at The Martin Theatre, 409 Harrison Ave., Panama City. Details and tickets: MartinTheatre.com or 763-8080 ‘TWELFTH NIGHT’: 7:30 p.m. at the Amelia Center Theatre, Gulf Coast State College, Panama City. Admission: $20 general admission; GCSC students, faculty and staff admitted free with valid ID. Tickets: GulfCoast.edu/arts TYLER CAPP & HEATHER ROBB: 7:30 p.m. at The Seaside Rep Theatre, 216 Quincy Circle, Seaside. Tickets: $25. Details: LoveTheRep.com HEART: 8 p.m. at the Marina Civic Center, 8 Harrison Ave., Panama City. Details and tickets: MarinaCivic Center.com or HessEntertain ment.net HEA TING TUNE-UP $ 55 ($99.00 Va lue) *Cannot be combined with any other coupon, discount or of fer . Exp 3/15/15 250-59 72 250-59 72 250-59 72 CALL TODA Y! NOW SER VING PA NAMA CITY & SURROUNDING AREAS! lic #CAC058469

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CALENDAR SPICE UP YOUR WEEK WITH UPCOMING AREA EVENTS FEB. 28 GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT FARMERS’ MARKET: 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Capt Anderson’s on Thomas Drive. Enjoy the region’s nest makers, bakers and growers at PCB’s yearround farmers’ market. Live music, free tastings and family fun. Details: WaterfrontMarkets.org or 763-7359 ST. ANDREWS WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Smith Yacht Basin beside the Shrimp Boat Restaurant, 12th Street and Beck Avenue. Rain or shine. Vendors, live music, Kids Craft table. Bring a shing pole and stay for the day. Details: HistoricStAndrews.com/ market or 872-7208 SEASIDE FARMERS MARKET: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Seaside Amphitheatre. Fresh produce, baked goods, dairy products and other unique offerings, cooking demos and activities. Yearround event. Details: SeasideFL.com ‘HOMETOWN’ BOOK SIGNING: 10 a.m. to noon at Sundog Books in Seaside, featuring author Craig Bush. FLORIDA MOPARS 6TH ANNUAL CAR SHOW: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. rain or shine at TGI Friday’s, 1022 W. 23rd St., Panama City. Open to all makes and models. Entry Fee: $20 ($10 for second car by same owner). Dash plaques and goody bags for rst 100 entries. Great music, cool cars, lots of door prizes, 50/50 raf e. A portion of proceeds bene t the Animal Rescue Center of Bay County. Details: (850) 866-8964, Facebook.com/ FloridaMopars, or email FloridaMopars@ gmail.com. WORLD SWORD SWALLOWERS DAY: 2 p.m. at Ripley’s Believe It or Not, 9907 Front Beach Road, Panama City Beach. Sword swallower Harley Newman performs deathdefying feats in this celebration of the ancient art. Details: 230-6113 THE 25TH ANNUAL PUTNAM COUNTY SPELLING BEE: 7:30 p.m. at The Martin Theatre, 409 Harrison Ave., Panama City. Details and tickets: MartinTheatre.com or 763-8080 WOMEN OF IRELAND: 7:30 at the Marina Civic Center, 8 Harrison Ave., Panama City; presented by the Panama City Music Association. Details and tickets: 763-4696 or MarinaCivicCenter. com ‘TWELFTH NIGHT’: 7:30 p.m. at the Amelia Center Theatre, Gulf Coast State College, Panama City. Admission: $20 general admission; GCSC students, faculty and staff admitted free with valid ID. Tickets: GulfCoast.edu/arts MARCH 1 GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT FARMERS’ MARKET: 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Capt Anderson’s on Thomas Drive. Enjoy the region’s nest makers, bakers and growers at PCB’s year-round farmers’ market. Live music, free tastings and family fun. Details: WaterfrontMarkets. org or 763-7359 30A FARMERS MARKET: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on North Barrett Square in Rosemary Beach. Each Sunday, join this community event featuring fresh vegetables, fruits, eggs, honey, cheese, preserves, sauces, bread, sweets, prepared foods to go and much more. Details: 30aFarmersMarket.com THE WEDDING PARTY: noon to 7 p.m. at the FSU-PC Holley Center, 5605 N. Bay Drive, Panama City. Admission: Free to the event; $10 each for Mother/Daughter Luncheon. Wedding Professionals Exposition 2-5 p.m.; Wedding Planning Seminars 2-5 p.m.; The Engagement Party 5-7 p.m. A portion of proceeds bene t the Rotary Club Of The Emerald Coast. Details: 234-2311 or email dave@djpros.com ‘TWELFTH NIGHT’: 2:30 p.m. at the Amelia Center Theatre, Gulf Coast State College, Panama City. Tickets: GulfCoast.edu/arts AMERICANA CAF SUNDAYS: 3 p.m. at Roberts Hall, 831 Florida Ave, Lynn Haven; doors open at 2:30 p.m. Join Lucky Mud for an open mic showcase of local musicians and concert. Donations appreciated. Details: 722-4915 MARCH 2 ANGELA FRANK EXHIBIT: The works of local artist Angela Frank are on exhibit through March 31 during regular hours at the Bay County Public Library, 898 W. 11th St., Panama City. Details: 522-2100 DR. SEUSS’ BIRTHDAY PARTY: 3-5 p.m. at the Bay County Public Library Youth Services Department, Panama City. Enjoy crafts, games and fun entertainment. Sponsor: Gulf Coast Woman’s Club. Details: 522-2118 MARCH 3 16TH ANNUAL DEATH BY CHOCOLATE: 5-8 p.m. at the Marina Civic Center, 8 Harrison Ave., Panama City. Sample bite-sized desserts from local restaurants and catering services and enter a raf e for a one-of-a-kind jewelry piece from Creative Gems. Tickets are $25 in advance and $30 at the door. Hosted by Emerald Coast Business Women’s Association Inc. Details and tickets: ecbwa.com MARCH 6 ANGELA FRANK EXHIBIT: The works of local artist Angela Frank are on exhibit through March 31 during regular hours at the Bay County Public Library, 898 W. 11th St., Panama City. Details: 522-2100 FIGURATIVE SYMPOSIUM: March 6-8 at Gulf Coast State College, Panama City. Workshops, lectures and discussion panels centering on the gure in clay. Details: GulfCoast.edu/ arts or 872-3886 FOURTH ANNUAL 30A WINE FESTIVAL: 6-9 p.m. at Kelly Green in Alys Beach. The festival kicks off with a night of bourbon, beer and barbecue tastings. Featuring distilleries from across the country, local breweries and barbecue from local pitmasters, attendees can eat and drink while listening to live music from singersongwriter Eric Lindell. Admission is included in the purchase of a weekend pass or individual tickets can be purchased for $60. Details and tickets: 30AWineFestival.com ‘A HUNDRED INDECISIONS’ RECEPTION: 5-7 p.m. at the Amelia Center Main Gallery, Gulf Coast State College, Panama City. Exhibit of sculptures by Meghan Sullivan, artist in residence. Free admission. Details: GulfCoast.edu/arts or 872-3886 ‘ART’: 7:30 p.m. in Suite 15 of the Market Shops at Miramar Beach, 9375 U.S. 98, near the Sandestin entrance. Art Gallery preview at 6:30 p.m. Presented by the not-for-pro t Emerald Coast Theatre Co., starring Jason Hedden, Allen Walker and Don Goodrum. Tickets: $20. Seating is limited. Play is recommended for adult audiences only. Details: emeraldcoasttheatre.org or call (850) 687-1637 PAGE 6 PanamaCity.Com Friday, February 20, 2015 Vendors, live music, Kids Craft table. Bring a shing pole and stay for the day. Details: HistoricStAndrews.com/ market or 872-7208 SEASIDE FARMERS MARKET: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Seaside Amphitheatre. Fresh produce, baked goods, dairy products and other unique offerings, cooking demos and activities. Yearround event. Details: SeasideFL.com ‘HOMETOWN’ BOOK SIGNING: 10 a.m. to noon at Sundog Books in Seaside, featuring author Craig Bush. FLORIDA MOPARS 6TH ANNUAL 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. rain or shine at TGI Friday’s, 1022 W. 23rd St., Panama City. Open to all makes and models. Entry Fee: $20 ($10 for second car by same owner). Dash plaques and goody bags for rst 100 entries. Great music, cool cars, lots of door prizes, 50/50 raf e. A portion of proceeds bene t the Animal Rescue Center of Bay County. Details: (850) 866-8964, Facebook.com/ FloridaMopars, FloridaMopars@ WORLD SWORD SWALLOWERS 2 p.m. at Ripley’s Believe It or Not, 9907 Front Beach Road, Panama City Beach. Sword swallower Harley Newman performs deathdefying feats in this celebration of the ancient art. Details: 230-6113 faculty and staff admitted free with valid ID. Tickets: GulfCoast.edu/arts MARCH 1 GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT FARMERS’ MARKET: 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Capt Anderson’s on Thomas Drive. Enjoy 5605 N. Bay Drive, Panama City. Admission: Free to the event; $10 each for Mother/Daughter Luncheon. Wedding Professionals Exposition 2-5 p.m.; Wedding Planning Seminars 2-5 p.m.; The Engagement Party 5-7 p.m. A portion of proceeds bene t the Rotary Club Of The Emerald Coast. Details: 234-2311 or email dave@djpros.com ‘TWELFTH NIGHT’: Amelia Center Theatre, Gulf Coast State College, Panama City. Tickets: GulfCoast.edu/arts AMERICANA CAF SUNDAYS: at Roberts Hall, 831 Florida Ave, Lynn Haven; doors open at 2:30 p.m. Join Lucky Mud for an open mic showcase of local musicians and concert. Donations appreciated. Details: 722-4915 MARCH 2 ANGELA FRANK EXHIBIT: works of local artist Angela Frank are on exhibit through March 31 during regular hours at the Bay County Public Library, 898 W. 11th St., Panama City. Details: 522-2100 DR. SEUSS’ BIRTHDAY PARTY: County Public Library Youth Services Department, Panama City. Enjoy crafts, games and fun entertainment. Sponsor: Gulf Coast Woman’s Club. Details: 522-2118 MARCH 3 16TH ANNUAL DEATH BY CHOCOLATE: 5-8 p.m. at the Marina

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MARCH 7 GIRL SCOUT RUN: 8 a.m. starting at Trinity Lutheran Church, 1001 W. 11th St., Panama City. The entry fee for the 5K is $20, and includes a race T-shirt and the runner’s choice of a box of Girl Scout cookies. The One Mile entry fee is $15 and includes a race T-shirt. Day-of-race registration begins at 6:30 a.m. at the church; 5K costs $25 and the One Mile fee is $18 but does not include a race T-shirt. Details and registration: GSCFP.org or Active.com GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT FARMERS’ MARKET: 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Capt Anderson’s on Thomas Drive. Enjoy the region’s nest makers, bakers and growers at PCB’s yearround farmers’ market. Live music, free tastings and family fun. Details: WaterfrontMarkets.org or 763-7359 ST. ANDREWS WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Smith Yacht Basin beside the Shrimp Boat Restaurant, 12th Street and Beck Avenue. Rain or shine. Vendors, live music, Kids Craft table. Bring a shing pole and stay for the day. Details: HistoricStAndrews.com/ market or 872-7208 SEASIDE FARMERS MARKET: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Seaside Amphitheatre. Fresh produce, baked goods, dairy products and other unique offerings, cooking demos and activities. Yearround event. Details: SeasideFL.com ‘SPRING FLING, THE CLASSIEST SHOW ON THE BEACH’: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Panama City Beach Senior Center, Lyndell Building, 423 Lyndell Lane, Panama City Beach. Juried art and craft show hosted by the Women’s Civic Club of Panama City Beach. Details: Dottie, 236-0789 or dtgolicz@ knology.net DOGFEST WALK N ROLL: 10 a.m. registration, 11 a.m. program, 11:30 a.m. walk begins at Frank Brown Park, 16200 Panama City Beach Parkway, Panama City Beach. Free admission; donations accepted. Signature event for Canine Companions for Independence Wounded Veteran Initiative. Details: (407) 522-3323 or visit cci.org/dogfestpanamacity ‘ARTISTIC MINDS’ RECEPTION: 57 p.m. at CityArts Cooperative, 318 Luverne Ave., Panama City. The Annual Panama City Artists member show. Open to the public. AMERICANA MUSIC AT THE LODGE: 6:30-8 p.m. at Camp Helen State Park, 23937 Panama City Beach Parkway, Panama City Beach. Scott and Michelle Dalziel perform. Details: 233-5059 or CampHelenFriends@gmail.com ‘ART’: 7:30 p.m. in Suite 15 of the Market Shops at Miramar Beach, 9375 U.S. 98, near the Sandestin entrance. Art Gallery preview at 6:30 p.m. Presented by the not-for-pro t Emerald Coast Theatre Co., starring Jason Hedden, Allen Walker and Don Goodrum. Tickets: $20. Seating is limited. Play is recommended for adult audiences only. Details: emeraldcoasttheatre.org or call (850) 687-1637 MARCH 8 GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT FARMERS’ MARKET: 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Capt Anderson’s on Thomas Drive. Enjoy the region’s nest makers, bakers and growers at PCB’s yearround farmers’ market. Live music, free tastings and family fun. Details: WaterfrontMarkets.org or 763-7359 30A FARMERS MARKET: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on North Barrett Square in Rosemary Beach. Each Sunday, join this community event featuring fresh vegetables, fruits, eggs, honey, cheese, preserves, sauces, bread, sweets, prepared foods to go and much more. Details: 30aFarmersMarket.com FOURTH ANNUAL 30A WINE FESTIVAL: 11:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at Kelly Green in Alys Beach. The festival will come to a close over a seafood sampling from Caliza chef Kevin Korman and Caf Thirty-A chef Ken Duenas paired with Sancerre varietals from select wineries. The third annual Croquet Tournament will take place on Kelly Green and all festival-goers are encouraged to participate and wear their best whites. Details and tickets: 30AWineFestival.com AMERICANA CAF SUNDAYS: 3 p.m. at Roberts Hall, 831 Florida Ave, Lynn Haven; doors open at 2:30 p.m. Join Lucky Mud for an open mic showcase of local musicians and concert. Donations appreciated. Details: 722-4915 MOSCOW CITY BALLET’S ‘CINDERELLA’: 4 p.m. at the Panama City Marina, 8 Harrison Ave., Panama City; presented by the Panama City Music Association. Details and tickets: 763-4696 or MarinaCivicCenter.com ‘ART’: 7:30 p.m. in Suite 15 of the Market Shops at Miramar Beach, 9375 U.S. 98, near the Sandestin entrance. Art Gallery preview at 6:30 p.m. Presented by the not-for-pro t Emerald Coast Theatre Co., starring Jason Hedden, Allen Walker and Don Goodrum. Tickets: $20. Seating is limited. Play is recommended for adult audiences only. Details: emeraldcoasttheatre.org or call (850) 687-1637 MARCH 9 STORIES BY THE SEA: 3:30-4 p.m. Monday through Friday at the Seaside Lyceum Archway. Free admission. Repertory actors present an interactive, one-of-a-kind storytelling experience for children of all ages. Details: LoveTheRep.com ‘THE COMMEDIA ROBIN HOOD’: 5 p.m. each Monday through April 13 at the Seaside Amphitheatre. Tickets: Free; sponsored by the Seaside Merchants. Details: LoveTheRep.com CALENDAR SPICE UP YOUR WEEK Bring Yo ur Guitar! At the foot of Ty ndall Bridge LANDING ST RIP LANDING LANDING LANDING ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING LANDING ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP ST RIP *Disc laimer . Bud and Bud Light only 5 pm 7 pm * HAPPY HOUR DA IL Y 11 am 5 pm $10.00 OFF your next in house Ser vice Call. Coupon must be pr esented and payment made at time of ser vice. Does not apply to Sr . Citizen discount. 15% Of f any an d all parts pur chased at our parts co unter See Tr a and Ch ip for all yo ur nee ds. Plumbing Inc. 1601 Frankfor d Av e. Panam a City Fl. 850-7 85-9227 Ser vicing Bay County since 1974 24 Hr . Ser vice New Construction Remodeling Repair CFC019169 SE HAB LA ES PA O L! An Al te rn at iv e Me di ca l Ap pr oa ch to He al in g th e Bo dy , Mi nd & Sp ir it Tr ea ti ng yo u wi th Lo ve , Re sp ec t, & Co mp as si on In su ra nce s Friday, February 20, 2015 PanamaCity.Com PAGE 7 FOURTH ANNUAL 30A WINE FESTIVAL: 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. in Alys Beach. Wine seminars and tastings throughout the day culminates in a ‘Wine under the Stars’ after party, featuring wine, light bites and live music. Proceeds bene t Children’s Volunteer Health Network. Details and tickets: 30AWineFestival.com

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By JAN WADDY 747-5072 | @JanWaddy1 jwaddy@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY — “Women of Ireland” and Moscow City Ballet’s “Cinderella” showcase ladies in striking lead roles, but it is the hard work that goes on behind the scenes that keeps the tradition dancing. “Women of Ireland,” coming to the Marina Civic Center on Feb. 28, is a full stage concert production of Irish River Dance, Celtic and Irish Songs with a female lineup. The fast-paced musical production features Irish step dancers, ddle players Niamh Fahy and Niamh Gallagher, vocalists The O’Neill Sisters, award winning aeralist Elena Marina, principal dancer Caterina Coyne and about 30 other performers. The O’Neil Sisters (Fiona, Naomi and Evangeline O’Neill) from County Kerry, Ireland, have traveled around the world performing on international stages, but they still call Ireland home. Teresa Kane, dance instructor at the Niall O’Leary School of Irish Dance, Panama City and Southern Region, moved from her hometown of Millstreet, County Cork, Ireland, 21 years ago. “Part of me will always be there,” Kane, 47, admitted. “You can’t appreciate the amount of work that goes into this. People can’t understand the amount of work it takes to get to that level, complete and utter dedication.” She started her dance school in 2004, but she began dancing at age 4 in Ireland. “They start it out in the schools over there, bring in teachers and have them get their students and get them hooked. ... I still remember my teacher, she looked so tall and beautiful,” she said. “I was a singer, an Irish dancer, into acting. I was brought up on stage, (and) love it. That’s what I did and there was nothing here (in Panama City). It’s important to pass it on to kids here, and I want them to continue here to pass it on for generations for years to come.” While in Florida, Kane reconnected with her friend from Ireland and former World Champion Niall O’Leary. “He was a competitor — All-Ireland Champion. I reconnected with him in St. Augustine. He was holding an Irish dance workshop,” she said. O’Leary founded his School of Irish Dance in Dublin in 1995, and with Kane opened the Panama City branch in 2007. Kane now teaches classes every day during the week and sometimes Saturday and Sunday at CityArts Cooperative on Luverne Avenue, where she has been for the last three years. “I put on Irish music, show moves and break it down to where they can understand. Sometimes moves look dif cult in Irish dancing, but you just have to break it down bit by bit,” said Kane, who has 30 students. “It’s my joy; I enjoy doing it. I’m lucky to be able to do this. I have awesome kids, too. ... I have two boys, but I would like to have more. They have it made, not too many boys around, so they can go touring and all that good stuff. Girls ght tooth and nail.” O’Leary comes to Panama City from New York, where he has the largest Irish dance school in the city, once a month to do workshops and help prepare students for national competitions. “Some kids practice all the time. I practiced probably four days a week,” said Kane, whose students range from age 4 to 37. “It’s time for me to step down and for these kids here to get a taste of that, to entertain and be on stage and make people happy. I hope one day they are teaching it.” A mother of four children ages 10 to 21, Kane also hopes her 1-year-old granddaughter, Zoe, will continue dancing in her footsteps. “It works not only your body, but your brain. ... Most of the students who are really good and take it are straight-A students,” she said. “I’ve got steps running through my head constantly. A lot of times you will see Irish dancers dancing with their ngers when they are sitting down.” But Irish dancing focuses on the feet. “It all has to do with your feet,” Kane explained. “It’s how high you can lift, how you cross your feet, point your toe and execute. Sometimes it’s better to dance an easy step well then to dance a hard step and miss it.” She admits it takes discipline and also can come with “sore feet, blisters; breaking in shoes is tough.” But the hard work pays off, with her students bringing home medals and trophies from competitions. One of her Tallahassee students, Rachel Beilling, just got a call from “Lord of the Dance” — created by Irish dancing champion Michael Flatley after he left “Riverdance” in the mid ’90s. Students from the Niall O’Leary School of Irish Dance will perform March 7 at the annual Panama City Highland Games and Scottish Festival on the grounds of Gulf Coast State College. ‘Cinderella’ Stacy Graham, a student at Tonie’s Dance Workshop, will don a royal blue tutu in the lobby of the Marina Civic Center before “Women of Ireland,” inspiring others to continue dancing into next month’s “Cinderella” with the Moscow City Ballet. Both upcoming performances are presented by the Panama City Music Association. “The Music Association has always tried to bring ballet, the symphonies, the musicals and opera, which nobody else has done. We started in ’41,” said Nancy Moore, PCMA board member and former professional dancer. “And everybody loves Cinderella, especially little girls.” Moscow City Ballet, the only ballet company featured at the Olympics in Solchi, Russia, features 42 dancers, principals and soloists who will perform the classic tale. “We want to show the classics are the foundation and roots of all types of performing arts,” said Kenalyn Cromwell, PCMA publicity chair. “We look to educate as well as bring in quality performers.” Young ladies are encouraged to come to Moscow City Ballet’s “Cinderella” in their Cinderella dresses. Graham puts in 12-15 hours of practice each week at the Stanford and Parker studio locations owned by Tonie Bense. “I love watching other performers. With this high caliber, you de nitely learned what to do,” Graham said. “Going to a ballet makes it look so effortless, but when you see what’s going on behind the stage, it really makes you appreciate it so much more.” On Dec. 26, she made an appearance as one of the Russian girls in Moscow Ballet’s “Great Russian Nutcracker” at the Marina Civic Center. Graham has spent recent weekends in her senior year auditioning to be a dance major in colleges throughout the region. “I started doing it at the age of 2. It was kind of an accident — a girl dropped out, and I haven’t stopped since,” said Graham, who has been at Tonie’s since seventh grade. “What I like about doing it in general is the dedication required. It’s really rewarding being on stage. I love performing and I love doing something that brings people joy because I know I get joy watching people dance.” Off the stage, she has taken on leadership roles at Tonie’s, helping with middle school ballet and pre pointe classes. “If you have a good foundation in ballet, you really can do anything. Develop a core and grounding and you will excel. Even hip hop dancers can bene t,” said Graham, who enjoys ballet, lyrical, jazz, pointe, musical theater and tap. “Dance is a really big con dence builder. You kind of have to learn to go with it if you don’t know a combination.” But that doesn’t mean it comes easy. “It’s hard work,” she admitted. “There are times you won’t feel good enough, tall enough. But I always say hard work beats talent when talent doesn’t work hard. If you see yourself being Cinderella with a ballet company one day, you can accomplish it.” Ultimately, Graham wants to have her own performing arts studio. “I play piano and love music. My knowledge of music and dance tie together when I choreograph. I pick up on things. And the reverse is true. When I play piano, I have more emotion to put into the music,” said Graham, who also has seen the bene ts in the classroom. “It helps me in math. I already have a work ethic and it drives me to excel in class.” Graham will do a lyrical solo to “Love Goes On” by David Phelps on April 4 during Bay Education Foundation’s fth annual Arts Alive at Edgewater Beach Resort and Conference Center. PAGE 8 PanamaCity.Com Friday, February 20, 2015 Friday, February 20, 2015 PanamaCity.Com PAGE 9 TERESA TUNO | Contributed Bay High School senior Stacy Graham, a student at Tonie’s Dance Workshop, has been dancing since the age of 2 and plans to continue dancing into college and her career. She will don a tutu in the lobby of the Marina Civic Center before the “Women of Ireland” show Feb. 28 to promote the upcoming Moscow City Ballet’s production of “Cinderella.” Leading Ladies: Women dance into the spotlight LIVE DANCE ‘WOMEN OF IRELAND’: 7:30-10 p.m. Feb. 28 at the Marina Civic Center, 8 Harrison Ave., Panama City; presented by the Panama City Music Association. Details and tickets: 763-4696 or MarinaCivicCenter.com MOSCOW CITY BALLET’S ‘CINDERELLA’: 4-6:30 p.m. March 8 at the Marina Civic Center, 8 Harrison Ave., Panama City; presented by the Panama City Music Association. Details and tickets: 763-4696 or MarinaCivicCenter.com WOMEN OF IRELAND PHOTO COURTESY OF TERESA KANE Teresa Kane teaches Irish dancing at the Niall O’Leary School of Irish Dance, Panama City and Southern Region. Her students perform in area festivals at bring home medals and trophies from competitions. ALSO: Women make of Shakespeare ‘What You Will’ — Page 14

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SNOWBIRD CALENDAR WELCOME WINTER RESIDENTS! PAGE 10 PanamaCity.Com Friday, February 20, 2015 WANT TO BE INCLUDED? Click “Send us your events” at PanamaCity.com or email Jan Waddy, jwaddy@pcnh.com, or Tony Simmons, tsimmons@pcnh.com. Inclusion in this calendar of events, which also appears on the Events page at PanamaCity.com, is at editors’ discretion. FRIDAY, FEB. 20 WINTER RESIDENTS PROGRAM: Monday through Friday at The Ark, 12908 Hibiscus St., Panama City Beach. Wood Shop 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.; Sewing/ Quilting 9:30-11:30 a.m. Details: 249-1980 SNOWBIRD OLYMPICS: 1-3 p.m. at Runaway Island Beachfront Bar & Grill, 14521 Front Beach Road, Panama City Beach. Events include ping pong, trivia, corn hole, card games and more. Guest emcee Jim Lawson. Fish fry at 4 p.m., awards and dancing after. Free to sign up; limited teams. Details: 850-634-4884 FRANK AND FRIENDS MUSICAL EVENING: 7-9 p.m. at The Ark, 12908 Hibiscus St., Panama City Beach. Music, refreshments and raf e. Details: 249-1980 SATURDAY, FEB. 21 CLOTHESLINE ART SALE & EXHIBIT: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Panama City Beach Senior Center’s Oat eld Center, 423 Lyndell Lane, Panama City Beach. Details: 233-5065 SNOWBIRD DANCE: 3-6 p.m. at Boardwalk Beach Resort Hotel & Convention Center, 9600 S. Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. DJ Jim Lawson playing the classics. Admission: $3. Details: 234-3484 MONDAY, FEB. 23 WINTER RESIDENTS PROGRAM: Monday through Friday at The Ark, 12908 Hibiscus St., Panama City Beach. Wood Shop 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.; Creative Writing 9:30-11 a.m.; Darts 7-9 p.m. Details: 249-1980 LOCATION PHOTOGRAPHY: 9 a.m. to noon at the Panama City Beach Chamber of Commerce. Explore the many facets of photography, including travel, animals and birds, and various locations. Participants must furnish their own camera. Instructor: Bonnie Tate. Registration: email Jim Barr at jbarr@ gulfcoast.edu TUESDAY, FEB. 24 WINTER RESIDENTS PROGRAM: Monday through Friday at The Ark, 12908 Hibiscus St., Panama City Beach. Wood Shop 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.; Embroidery on Cards Beginners and Advanced Workshop 9:30-11 a.m.; Memoir Writing 9:30-11 a.m.; Wood Burning 9:30-11:30 a.m.; Line Dancing 1-2 p.m.; Swedish Weaving 1:30-3:30 p.m.; Clogging 2-3 p.m. Details: 249-1980 CHARCOAL PENCIL DRAWING: 1-4 p.m. at Gulf Coast State College, Panama City, Student Union East, Room 243. A guided demonstration of blending and shading with charcoal pencils. Bring a set of charcoal pencils (3 black and 1 white) and drawing or pastel paper, a good white eraser, one kneaded eraser, and stomp/tortillion (rolled paper blender tool). Registration: email Jim Barr at jbarr@gulfcoast.edu. Details: Jennifer Bonaventura at 319-1209 or jennifer@ bonavstudio.com ART AT THE OATFIELD: 1:30 p.m. at the Panama City Beach Senior Center, 423 Lyndell Lane, Panama City Beach. Theme: “The Gulf Coast.” Today: Pat Campbell, watercolor, “Seascape.” Costs, supplies and other details: 235-6374 or PCBSC. com ELDER LAW WITH ATTORNEY JASON WHITE: 2 p.m. at the Bay County Public Library, 898 W. 11th St., Panama City. Part of a new weekly series of programs for adults. All residents and visitors are welcome to attend these free programs. Details: 522-2120 BEACH BOOMERS: LOCAL HISTORY AND GENEALOGY: 2 p.m. at the Panama City Beach Public Library, 12500 Hutchison Blvd., Panama City Beach. Part of a new weekly series of programs for adults. All residents and visitors are welcome to attend these free programs. Details: 233-5055 WINTER RESIDENT GRAND FINALE: 4-9 p.m. at Edgewater Beach and Golf Resort, 11212 Front Beach Road, Panama City Beach. Featuring singing and dance contests. Details: 233-5070 TODD ALLEN HERENDEEN LIVE THE LEGENDS SHOW: 7:30 p.m. at Boardwalk Beach Resort Hotel & Convention Center, 9600 S. Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. Admission: $20 for dinner and show; $10 for show only. Doors open at 5 p.m. Details and advance tickets: 850-866-6901 WEDNESDAY, FEB. 25 WINTER RESIDENTS PROGRAM: Monday through Friday at The Ark, 12908 Hibiscus St., Panama City Beach. Wood Shop 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.; Miscellaneous Crafts 1-3 p.m.; Round Dancing 1-2 p.m.; Square Dancing 2-3 p.m.; Darts 7-9 p.m. Details: 249-1980 SENIORS SOFTBALL: 1 p.m. each Wednesday through March 11, at Frank Brown Park, 16200 Panama City Beach Parkway, Panama City Beach. Noncompetitive softball for ages 55 and older; just bring your glove. Details: 238-0549 SNOWBIRD BINGO: 2-4 p.m. at Sharky’s Beachfront Restaurant, 15201 Front Beach Road, Panama City Beach. Details: 850-235-2420 THURSDAY, FEB. 26 WINTER RESIDENTS PROGRAM: Monday through Friday at The Ark, 12908 Hibiscus St., Panama City Beach. Wood Shop 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.; Pine Needle Weaving 10 a.m. to noon; Golf Ball Carving 1-3 p.m.; 3D Paper Tole Workshop 1-3 p.m.; Stained Glass 1:303:30 p.m.; Karaoke 7-9 p.m. Details: 249-1980 BASIC WIRE WRAPPING TECHNIQUES FOR JEWELRY: 9 a.m. to noon at Gulf Coast State College, Panama City, Student Union East Building, Room 243. Newbie to intermediate. Learn to make scrolls, wrapped loops, beaded wire links, clasp making and more. Techniques will help you make a pendant and nish a bracelet with a handmade clasp. Cost: $28 for a supply kit from instructor Leah Matthews. Registration: email Jim Barr at jbarr@gulfcoast.edu FEB. 27 WINTER RESIDENTS PROGRAM: Monday through Friday at The Ark, 12908 Hibiscus St., Panama City Beach. Wood Shop 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.; Sewing/ Quilting 9:30-11:30 a.m. Details: 249-1980 MARCH 2 WINTER RESIDENTS PROGRAM: Monday through Friday at The Ark, 12908 Hibiscus St., Panama City Beach. Wood Shop 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.; Creative Writing 9:30-11 a.m.; Darts 7-9 p.m. Details: 249-1980 MARCH 3 WINTER RESIDENTS PROGRAM: Monday through Friday at The Ark, 12908 Hibiscus St., Panama City Beach. Wood Shop 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.; Embroidery on Cards Beginners and Advanced Workshop 9:30-11 a.m.; Memoir Writing 9:30-11 a.m.; Wood Burning 9:30-11:30 a.m.; Line Dancing 1-2 p.m.; Swedish Weaving 1:30-3:30 p.m.; Clogging 2-3 p.m. Details: 249-1980 ART AT THE OATFIELD: 1:30 p.m. at the Panama City Beach Senior Center, 423 Lyndell Lane, Panama City Beach. Theme: “The Gulf Coast.” Today: Margrete Vause, watercolor, “Beach Treasures.” Costs, supplies and other details: 235-6374 or PCBSC.com

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SNOWBIRD CALENDAR WELCOME WINTER RESIDENTS! Friday, February 20, 2015 PanamaCity.Com PAGE 11 NUTRITION WITH DR. MARJORIE MOORE: 2 p.m. at the Bay County Public Library, 898 W. 11th St., Panama City. Part of a new weekly series of programs for adults. All residents and visitors are welcome to attend these free programs. Details: 522-2120 BEACH BOOMERS: WOMEN’S HISTORY MONTH: UPPITY WOMEN IN HISTORY: 2 p.m. at the Panama City Beach Public Library, 12500 Hutchison Blvd., Panama City Beach. Part of a new weekly series of programs for adults. All residents and visitors are welcome to attend these free programs. Details: 233-5055 MARCH 4 WINTER RESIDENTS PROGRAM: Monday through Friday at The Ark, 12908 Hibiscus St., Panama City Beach. Wood Shop 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.; Miscellaneous Crafts 1-3 p.m.; Round Dancing 1-2 p.m.; Square Dancing 2-3 p.m.; Darts 7-9 p.m. Details: 249-1980 SENIORS SOFTBALL: 1 p.m. each Wednesday through March 11, at Frank Brown Park, 16200 Panama City Beach Parkway, Panama City Beach. Noncompetitive softball for ages 55 and older; just bring your glove. Details: 238-0549 MARCH 5 WINTER RESIDENTS PROGRAM: Monday through Friday at The Ark, 12908 Hibiscus St., Panama City Beach. Wood Shop 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.; Pine Needle Weaving 10 a.m. to noon; Golf Ball Carving 1-3 p.m.; 3D Paper Tole Workshop 1-3 p.m.; Stained Glass 1:303:30 p.m.; Karaoke 7-9 p.m. Details: 249-1980 TALENT SHOW AND SPRING CONCERT: 6-9 p.m. at the Panama City Beach Senior Center Lyndell Building, 423 Lyndell Lane, Panama City Beach. Detail: PCBSC.com MARCH 6 WINTER RESIDENTS PROGRAM: Monday through Friday at The Ark, 12908 Hibiscus St., Panama City Beach. Wood Shop 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.; Sewing/ Quilting 9:30-11:30 a.m. Details: 249-1980 MARCH 9 WINTER RESIDENTS PROGRAM: Monday through Friday at The Ark, 12908 Hibiscus St., Panama City Beach. Wood Shop 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.; Creative Writing 9:30-11 a.m.; Darts 7-9 p.m. Details: 249-1980 MARCH 10 WINTER RESIDENTS PROGRAM: Monday through Friday at The Ark, 12908 Hibiscus St., Panama City Beach. Wood Shop 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.; Embroidery on Cards Beginners and Advanced Workshop 9:30-11 a.m.; Memoir Writing 9:30-11 a.m.; Wood Burning 9:30-11:30 a.m.; Line Dancing 1-2 p.m.; Swedish Weaving 1:30-3:30 p.m.; Clogging 2-3 p.m. Details: 249-1980 ART AT THE OATFIELD: 1:30 p.m. at the Panama City Beach Senior Center, 423 Lyndell Lane, Panama City Beach. Theme: “The Gulf Coast.” Today: Adriana Saba, watercolor, “Waterlillies.” Costs, supplies and other details: 235-6374 or PCBSC.com WOMEN’S HISTORY MONTH: UPPITY WOMEN IN HISTORY: 2 p.m. at the Bay County Public Library, 898 W. 11th St., Panama City. Part of a new weekly series of programs for adults. All residents and visitors are welcome to attend these free programs. Details: 522-2120 BEACH BOOMERS: SENEGAL BY TAXI WITH VICTOR BREEDON: 2 p.m. at the Panama City Beach Public Library, 12500 Hutchison Blvd., Panama City Beach. Part of a new weekly series of programs for adults. All residents and visitors are welcome to attend these free programs. Details: 233-5055 MARCH 11 WINTER RESIDENTS PROGRAM: Monday through Friday at The Ark, 12908 Hibiscus St., Panama City Beach. Wood Shop 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.; Miscellaneous Crafts 1-3 p.m.; Round Dancing 1-2 p.m.; Square Dancing 2-3 p.m.; Darts 7-9 p.m. Details: 249-1980 SENIORS SOFTBALL: 1 p.m. each Wednesday through March 11, at Frank Brown Park, 16200 Panama City Beach Parkway, Panama City Beach. Noncompetitive softball for ages 55 and older; just bring your glove. Details: 238-0549 MARCH 12 WINTER RESIDENTS PROGRAM: Monday through Friday at The Ark, 12908 Hibiscus St., Panama City Beach. Wood Shop 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.; Pine Needle Weaving 10 a.m. to noon; Golf Ball Carving 1-3 p.m.; 3D Paper Tole Workshop 1-3 p.m.; Stained Glass 1:303:30 p.m.; Karaoke 7-9 p.m. Details: 249-1980 MARCH 13 WINTER RESIDENTS PROGRAM: Monday through Friday at The Ark, 12908 Hibiscus St., Panama City Beach. Wood Shop 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.; Sewing/ Quilting 9:30-11:30 a.m. Details: 249-1980 MARCH 16 WINTER RESIDENTS PROGRAM: Monday through Friday at The Ark, 12908 Hibiscus St., Panama City Beach. Wood Shop 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.; Creative Writing 9:30-11 a.m.; Darts 7-9 p.m. Details: 249-1980 MARCH 17 WINTER RESIDENTS PROGRAM: Monday through Friday at The Ark, 12908 Hibiscus St., Panama City Beach. Wood Shop 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.; Embroidery on Cards Beginners and Advanced Workshop 9:30-11 a.m.; Memoir Writing 9:30-11 a.m.; Wood Burning 9:30-11:30 a.m.; Line Dancing 1-2 p.m.; Swedish Weaving 1:30-3:30 p.m.; Clogging 2-3 p.m. Details: 249-1980 ART AT THE OATFIELD: 1:30 p.m. at the Panama City Beach Senior Center, 423 Lyndell Lane, Panama City Beach. Theme: “The Gulf Coast.” Today: Heather Parker, acrylic on canvas, “Butter ies.” Costs, supplies and other details: 235-6374 or PCBSC.com

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By JAN WADDY 747-5072 | @JanWaddy1 jwaddy@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY — When I pulled up to Major’s Smokehouse at 8 a.m. Wednesday morning, owner Tammy McCollum and employee Jasmine Miller already were pulling pork butts for the day. Major’s doesn’t open for customers until 10:30 a.m., but smoking barbecue and making homemade sides takes time. Tammy already had been at the restaurant, 2701 Lisenby Ave., for an hour. “On the food truck, we do a breakfast burrito,” said Tammy, who has been setting up a food truck at Tyndall Air Force Base for the past two years. “We go out to a secret training site with breakfast, lunch and dinner. ... It’s a quick, fast-paced environment.” But there is no rush inside Major’s, which she opened July 1. The business is named after her son, Major, aka the “Major Sauce Boss.” Though Major has culinary training and is involved with the business, Tammy uses her downhome recipes. And they have kept customers coming back, including recently garnering Major’s a -year exclusive barbecue contract at Tyndall.” “The guys loved it. We just found a groove. We have people who follow us. We move from the ight line to the commissary side to training,” said Tammy, who admitted it was her customers at TAFB who encouraged her to expand her business. Order from the chalkboard menu inside the restaurant, then grab a cup of sweet tea and pull up a stool to the wood barrel tables adorned with pigs. Mason jars lled with grass and rocks hang from a board over the uorescent lights, adding to the character. “All of the pigs, except for Tinker Bell and Wilbur, customers brought in,” Tammy said. Though most of the recipes have evolved from things she has made at home, Tammy adjusts recipes for more widespread appeal when serving them to her customers. “The original baked potato salad had fresh jalapenos in it, but I pulled that from it. I love jalapenos. The mac-n-cheese I make at home also has fresh jalapenos in it,” said Tammy, a North Carolina native who has been in Panama City for 25 years. But the cole slaw was invented on the food truck. She took the notion of a mayonnaise-based and a vinegar-based cole slaw and combined them, then Pig out at Major’s Smokehouse PAGE 12 PanamaCity.Com Friday, February 20, 2015 MAJOR’S SMOKEHOUSE Where: 2701 Lisenby Ave., Panama City Hours: 10:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Saturday Details: 867-5256 or Facebook.com/MajorsSmokehouse JAN WADDY | PanamaCity.com Tammy McCollum opened Major’s Smokehouse on Lisenby Avenue in July, and she continues to operate a food truck at Tyndall Air Force Base. The generous Rib Plate is served with sides of mac-n-cheese with bacon, green beans with pulled pork, and a roll. SEE MAJOR’S | 13

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added a little spice. “I love mayonnaise, and vinegar is from North Carolina. The secret is Sriracha,” Tammy said. “It became Spicy Slaw. I now make 8 quarts a day.” To make your own Spicy Slaw: Combine about 2 cups of shredded cole slaw mix with a dressing mixture of cup mayonnaise, 2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar and 1 tablespoon Sriracha. “Mix it together with love and enjoy,” said Tammy. “If you want it creamier, add more mayo. If you want more heat, add more Sriracha.” All of the meat and sides, except the slaw, get a sprinkle of the “secret dry rub.” She said the seasoning mix is an old Native American recipe — a tribute to her Cherokee heritage. “It’s in the Loaded Potato Salad, the Mac-n-Cheese and the Smoked Chicken Salad,” she said. “We cut our potatoes every morning, make our Pasta Salad and all the sides every morning. I like to use fresh. Every day, we go get cilantro, green onions and chop it all. We make sauce sometimes twice daily. We don’t have fryers in here or a microwave, not even on the truck.” She mainly uses hickory in her smoker, but also throws in pecan and oak. Her brisket has been really popular, which she said she does a little differently — a combination of smoking, then slicing thin and steaming “to let the moisture stay in.” “I have people tell me all the time we have the best chicken salad,” Tammy said. “If you overcook the chicken, it is bitter. If you undersmoke it, not enough avor is on it. The pork butts smoke about 12 hours, and the brisket takes a little longer. The chicken and ribs go about ve to six hours on the smoker.” Tuesday, Tammy had Jasmine as her “taste tester,” trying the same smoked honey corn on the cob that she offers on the truck. It got the thumbs up to go on Wednesday’s menu. When I met my husband for lunch at Major’s earlier this month, he ordered the pulled pork sandwich combo with chips and a drink for $7. I had the rib plate, $10, with sides of mac-n-cheese, green beans, a roll and a drink. “I hate to say this, but I think this is better, juicier than my own pulled pork — a better bark,” Mike admitted. The ribs were so tender the meat was falling off the bone, so I ate them with a fork and knife. “The rib plate usually comes with three bones and two ends, but they vary because of the size. If it’s a smaller pig, we give a little bit more,” Tammy explained. “I really try to give people back what they pay for ... I just want to be fair to people.” Since I had trouble deciding between ribs and pork, I was happy to see bits of pulled pork in green beans. After nding out the Macn-Cheese has bacon in it, it’s no surprise I liked it as much as I did. Warning: If you sit inside, you will leave smelling like smoked barbecue, which could result in more cravings. You will probably have leftovers, as I did, but if not, you can buy it by the pound, pint or quart. Sweet-n-Spicy and Sweet Sauce also is for sale in Mason jars. Major’s Smokehouse will be a vendor at the 2015 Gulf Coast Salute open house and air show from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. April 11-12 at TAFB. Tammy added, “We will be doing our pulled pork and signature Frito boat.” JAN WADDY | PanamaCity.com ABOVE: Order from the chalkboard menu, then pull up a stool to the wood barrel tables adorned with pigs. BELOW: When the weather is nice, enjoy your barbecue outside at the tables off State 390 and Lisenby Avenue.. JAN WADDY | PanamaCity.com The Pulled Pork Sandwich came piled high, and then my husband gave it a drizzle of the Sweet-in-Spicy sauce. Friday, February 20, 2015 PanamaCity.Com PAGE 13 MAJOR’S from Page 12

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PAGE 14 PanamaCity.Com Friday, February 20, 2015 By TONY SIMMONS 747-5080 | @PCTonyS tsimmons@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY — In the days of William Shakespeare, only men were allowed to act in plays, which gave his comedies like “Twelfth Night” a level of farce modern audiences rarely experience. “Twelfth Night; or What You Will” focuses on the misadventures of Viola, a woman who survives a shipwreck and disguises herself as a man, Cesario. In that guise, Viola serves Duke Orsino, with whom she secretly falls in love while helping him woo the widow Olivia, who falls for Cesario. “The hardest part, for me, is trying to learn to walk and have the physicality of a man,” said Lizzie Zinszer, 20, who plays Viola/Cesario in the current production at Gulf Coast State College. “I decided to watch Orsino (Bryan Hibbard) and copy him. ... It’s really fun.” Directed by Rusty Garner, the GCSC Division of Visual and Performing Arts presentation’s leading ladies also include Mallory Champlin as Olivia, Micky Grifth as Feste the Fool, and Samantha Steward as Maria. Performances are 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday, and 2:30 p.m. Sunday at the college’s Amelia Center Theatre in Panama City. Performances continue at 7:30 p.m. Feb. 27 and 28, and 2:30 p.m. March 1. “Working with this whole cast has been wonderful,” Champlin said. “We’ve all grown so close. We hang out on weekends.” Champlin found relatable qualities in the character of Olivia: “We’re a lot alike. She’s very vulnerable at times, but can come across very hard.” Garner, associate professor of Music and founder of the Music Production Technology program at GCSC, has set the action in Prohibition Era Boston, suggesting the ship that wrecked was carrying Canadian whiskey bound for Boston speakeasies. Brian Baillif designed the impressive sets, which use rear projection screens to change locations, and Jason Hedden designed the costumes. “The thing about ‘Twelfth Night’ is, you can take it so many different directions,” Garner said. “We’ve tried to drag every ounce of humor out of it.” To that end, Garner cast Grifth as Feste, a role that is traditionally male. Feste is still addressed as “he” throughout the play, but Garner found the ambiguity intriguing. “In Shakespeare’s time, men played women on stage, so it’s nice to play the guy character,” said Grifth, 19. “He gets to be witty and play music all the time. I’m a licensed fool, so I can say anything I want to say.” The play has numerous musical interludes, for which Garner found appropriate tunes. Zinszer learned to play an autoharp to accompany herself, and Grifth learned ukulele. “I found melodies that were close to those of Shakespeare’s time and brought them into the modern world,” said Garner. “I’ve really enjoyed doing this. It’s the rst comedy I’ve directed in forever. The last six shows I’ve done were dramas.” Women make of Shakespeare ‘What You Will’ ‘TWELF T H N I GH T ’What: Shakespeare’s comedy of mistaken identities When: 7:30 p.m. Feb. 20-21, 27-28; and 2:30 p.m. Feb. 23 and March 1 Where: The Amelia Center Theatre at Gulf Coast State College, 5230 W. U.S. 98, Panama City Tickets: $20; free to GCSC students, faculty and staff with valid ID Details: GulfCoast.edu/arts or 872-3886 PHOTOS BY T ONY SIMMONS | PanamaCity.com

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By TONY SIMMONS 747-5080 | @PCTonyS| tsimmons@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY — Everything is connected — visual, performing and literary arts with science, math, history and more. That’s the stance taken by Regina Burgess, community relations and marketing coordinator for the Northwest Regional Library System. Burgess works out of the Bay County Public Library in Panama City, which has long been a center for all of the arts. “The mission of the library has to do with the community as a whole,” Burgess said. “It has books and computers, yes, but it’s more than that. It has evolved into a community center. ... We want to offer a place to sample everything.” Earlier this month, the library hosted Newbery Medal-winning author Kwame Alexander for a talk and book signing. The children’s wing was packed for the nighttime event, which helped to kick off the annual BooksAlive festival of writers and reading. In January, an exhibit of work by local artist Dorothy “Dedee” Higby adorned the walls. An award-winning artist specializing in watercolor but working in many media, Higby uses her love of color and design to express her artistic vision. “Painting is enormously satisfying,” Higby said. “To be able to communicate emotions and reactions —about a place, owers, a gure — through art is extremely important to me. Many people have told me that viewing my paintings makes them feel good. I hope that will always be true.” Currently, the library is hosting an exhibit of work by local artist Gary Pope Jr. (PopeFineArt.com) as part of Black History Month. “African culture is an important part of my art because my culture is what makes my artwork have meaning to me,” Pope said. “I feel that my culture makes me a better artist because both American culture and African culture in uence me. Both cultures help me as an artist.” Pope likes the audience to “read” his artwork as if he or she is reading a novel, Burgess said: “He wants the audience to not only read his artwork but enjoy it as well. He feels that art is educational, and has a message for all people.” The library is able to offer local artists a place to hang a solo show, Burgess said, adding, “That’s a bene t to both the artist and the library, and there’s usually something for everyone.” Saturday, the halls will ll with music as the New York City-based, awardwinning classical guitarist Peter Fletcher presents a free concert at 6 p.m. Part of a nationwide tour to promote his Edvard Grieg CD, the event will feature selections from the new album, which will be available for purchase. “Peter Fletcher is a true stand-out in the classical guitar world,” Burgess said, adding that he is “in demand as a performer in cultural venues throughout the country.” Fletcher made his New York debut at Carnegie Hall in February 2007, and returned in 2008, 2009 and in 2010 to a sold-out house. He will again perform at Carnegie Hall in April. Music will take on a different rhythm as the Global Arts Society’s African Caribbean Drum and Dance Project presents its interactive drum and dance performance at 6 p.m. Tuesday. Sponsored by the Northwest Florida Music Teachers Association, the event is free and open to the public, and promises fun for all ages. Using a variety of instruments, bodymusic, choreography, vocals and group drumming activities, musicians and dancers build on their natural rhythm sensibilities, according to promotional materials. Attendees will learn basic rhythm and percussion skills and gain consciousness of African and Caribbean Culture through dance. “Dancing and playing music together is a part of community-building,” Burgess said. “The Global Arts Society African Caribbean Drum and Dance Project offers an abundance of opportunities to learn and explore culture through dance and percussion instrumentation.” Library hosts visual, performing, literary artists BAY COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY Where: 898 W. 11th St., Panama City Hours: 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday-Wednesday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday-Saturday, 1-5 p.m. Sunday Details: 850-522-2100 or NWRLS.com UPCOMING EVENTS INCLUDE: • Peter Fletcher concert, 6 p.m. Saturday • Global Arts Society African Caribbean Drum and Dance Project, 6 p.m. Tuesday • The artwork of Angela Frank will be exhibited March 2-31 ARTIST’S ARTIST’S ARTIST’S ARTIST’S touch Friday, February 20, 2015 PanamaCity.Com PAGE 15 GARY POPE

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PAGE 16 PanamaCity.Com Friday, February 20, 2015 THE BACKDOOR LOUNGE 7800 W. Hwy 98, PCB | 850-235-0073 Happy Hour: 9 a.m.-Noon Fri. & Sat. : Dillon Johnson, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Sunday: DJ 49.5, 2-6 p.m. Wednesday: Kc Phelps hosting open mic, 10 p.m.-2 a.m. Thursday: Lingerie Party, 9-10 p.m. Digital recording available MS. NEWBY’S 8711 Thomas Drive | 850-234-0030 Friday & Saturday: Panama Blues Review, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Tuesday & Wednesday: Karaoke w/ Night Al, 8 p.m.-2 a.m. NEWBY’S TOO 4103 Thomas Drive | 850-234-6203 Open everyday 8 a.m. until Happy Hour: Monday-Friday, 8 a.m.-Noon Friday & Saturday: Brujah, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. ThursdaySaturday: Karaoke Mania w/ Night Al & Beer Pong, 8 p.m.-2 a.m. BUZZTIME every day. Sports Bar, Pool, Foosball, Darts, Shuffleboard, Ping Pong & Air Hockey. Smokers Welcome. 5530 N. Lagoon Drive | 850-249-5500 Friday & Saturday: Martino & Tirado, 6-9:30 p.m. Friday: Latin Dance Party, 9:30 p.m.-3 a.m. Sunday & Thursday: Karaoke Snowbird Dance Party w/Michael, 6-10 p.m. Monday: Ric Brigman, 5-9 p.m. Tuesday: Jesse Deese & the Sand Band, 5-9 p.m. Wednesday: Rocky’s Winter DInner Dance Party w/Rocky Akins, 5-9 p.m. Happy hour daily from 3-6 p.m. priced Wine, Beer & Sangria, $5 Margaritas & Select Appetizers www.marinacantinapcb.com The Backdoor Lounge Dillon Johnson Dillon Johnson DJ 49.5 Kc Phelps/Open Mic Lingerie Party PCB, FL 235-0073 9 p.m.-2 a.m. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. 2-6 p.m. 10 p.m.-2 a.m. 9-10 p.m. Hammerhead Fred's Tequila Mockingbird Martino & Tirado PCB, FL 233-3907 5-9 p.m. 5-9 p.m. Marina Cantina Martino & Tirado 6-9:30 p.m. Martino & Tirado Karaoke w/Michael Ric Brigman Jesse Deese & the Sand Band Winter Dnner Dance Party Karaoke Dance Party PCB, FL 249-5500 Latin Dance Party 9;30 p.m. 6-9:30 p.m. Snowbird Dance party/6-10 p.m. 5-9 p.m. 5-9 p.m. w/Rocky Akins 5-9 p.m. w/Michael 3-7 p.m. Ms. Newby’s Panama Blues Review Panama Blues Review Karaoke w/Night Al 8 p.m. Karaoke w/Night Al PCB, FL 234-0030 9 p.m.-1 a.m. 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Fat Tuesday Party 8 p.m.-2 a.m. Newby’s Too Brujah 10 p.m. Brujah 10 p.m. Karaoke w/Night Al PCB, FL 234-6203 Karaoke 8 p.m.-2 a.m. Karaoke 8 p.m.-2 a.m. 8 p.m.-2 a.m. Runaway Island Touch of Class Karaoke w/Michael PCB, FL 634-4884 5-9 p.m. 3-7 p.m. Schooners Acoustix Acoustix PCB, FL 235-3555 7-10:30 p.m. 7-10:30 p.m. VENUE FRIDAY SATURDAY SUNDAY MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY 14521 Front Beach Road 850-634-4884 Panama City Beach’s newest Gulf Front Bar & Grill located in the heart of the World’s Most Beautiful Beach serving an array of Gulf favorites along with a few twists to pique the appetite. Come try our great fish tacos, craft beer on draft as well as a great lineup of unique cocktails. The view from our deck is truly unique and beautiful. Enjoy the sunset celebration each afternoon, Escape to the Island! Open Daily at 11 a.m. 8 Great Early Bird Specials, 4-7 p.m. Happy Hour everyday till 6 p.m. Friday: Snowbird Olympics, DJ Jim Lawson, 2 p.m. Fish Fry Special 2 for 1 Well Drinks & $2.25 Domestic Draft Touch of Class Live, 5-9 p.m. Monday: Karaoke w/Michael, 3-7 p.m. Thursday: Italian Night “Pasta, Pasta, Pasta” 5121 Gulf Drive | 850-235-3555 Friday & Saturday: Acoustix, 7-10:30 p.m. www.schooners.com 8752 Thomas Drive | 850-233-3907 A quaint little bar & grill located on the west end of Thomas Drive serving fresh seafood, steaks, sandwiches & more. New Winter Menu specials Open Thursday & Friday, 4 p.m.; Saturday & Sunday, 11 a.m. Friday: All you can eat Fish Fry special 2 for 1 well and $2.25 Domestic Draft Tequila Mockingbird, 5-9 p.m. Thursday: Marino & Tirado, 5-9 p.m. www.hammerheadfreds.com ADVERTISE WITH US Call Marie Forrest at 747-5041 or email mforrest@ pcnh.com. Deadline is 5 p.m. Monday. Like us on PANAMACITY.COM Jesse Deese & The Sand Band