Citation
News-herald

Material Information

Title:
News-herald
Uniform Title:
News-herald (Panama City, Fla. : 1970)
Added title page title:
Panama City News Herald
Place of Publication:
Panama City, FL
Publisher:
Halifax Media Group, Tim Thompson - Publisher, Mike Cazalas - Editor
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama City (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Bay County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Florida -- Bay County ( fast )
Florida -- Panama City ( fast )
Genre:
Newspapers. ( fast )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Newspapers ( fast )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Bay -- Panama City

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (May 1, 1970)-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Halifax Media Group, Tim Thompson - Publisher, Mike Cazalas - Editor. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
34303828 ( OCLC )
sn 96027210 ( LCCN )
ocm34303828

Related Items

Preceded by:
Panama City news
Preceded by:
Panama City herald (Panama City, Fla. : 1952)

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Graham gets plum assignment By CHRIS OLWELL 747-5079 | @PCNHchriso colwell@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY — Freshman Rep. Gwen Graham has secured a seat on the House Armed Services Committee, where she will join Republican Jeff Miller from Santa Rosa County. That means the entire Florida Panhandle will represented on the influential committee. Graham, D-Tallahassee, asked to be assigned to the committee because District 2 is home to Naval Support Activity Panama City and Tyndall Air Force Base, two of Bay County’s most important economic drivers. She is among the Democratic minority on the committee, which has about 60 members, according to an unofficial list of members on its website. “The bases in our district provide great economic activity for North Florida,” Graham said. “I’m going to work with Republicans and Democrats to advance our region’s interests and protect the military-related jobs in North Florida.” Bay County Chamber of Commerce President Carol Roberts said having Graham on the committee is most likely a positive development for local military installations. “In my opinion, it is of tremendous benefit to our local military bases,” said Roberts. “We will have a person on the ground there to keep an eye on issues or opportunities affecting the existence of our military bases.” Roberts referred questions to Bay Defense Alliance President Tom Neubauer. Neubauer was meeting with other defense advocates Thursday and was unavailable for an interview. However, he emailed a statement: REP. G WEN G RAHAM Accused killer’s trial approaches By ZACK McDONALD 747-5071 | @PCNHzack zmcdonald@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY — Prosecutors have amended charges against a man accused of a deadly Panama City Beach shooting during a drug deal gone wrong as his court date nears, according to court documents. Meanwhile, a second man charged in connection with the shooting has been hospitalized after an out-of-state car wreck, attorneys reported. Randy Trebor Jackson, 24, was charged with third-degree murder after an alleged robbery scheme for about 2 ounces of marijuana turned deadly in July. Ryan Brooks, 20, was fatally shot multiple times in the Club Apartments parking lot. Since then, the state’s plea offer to Jackson has been revoked and prosecutors have amended his charges as his trial approaches Jan. 26. RANDY JACKSON NATION & WORLD Travel rules with Cuba start easing today A 2 Read by 83,130 people every day Call 850-747-5050 Want to SUBSCRIBE? Young ARTIST What’s INSIDE WEATHER Mostly sunny. High 57, low 39. | B2 BUSINESS A5 CLASSIFIED D1-6 COMICS B7 CROSSWORD B7 DEATHS B3 LOCAL & STATE B1-5 LOTTERY A2 NATION & WORLD A2-4 OUT & ABOUT B8 SPORTS C1-5 TV LISTINGS C6 VIEWPOINTS A6 COM . Facebook.com/ panamacitynewsherald Twitter: @The_News_Herald Social MEDIA By COLLIN BREAUX 747-5081 | @CollinBreaux Cbreaux2@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY — Jackson Morris was worried. They were calling other names, not his. Last year he came in second in MathCounts. But this year his name was the final one called in his category, meaning he won first place for individual seventh-grade competitors. Jackson, from Holy Nativity Episcopal School, was one of dozens of middle school students who competed Thursday in MathCounts, a national middle school coaching and competitive mathematics program that promotes math achievement. At the local competition at Gulf Coast State College, Merritt Brown Middle School swept first place in all three competitions — sixth, seventh and eighth grades. Cylle Rowell, district instructional specialist for math, said about 195 students from eight schools participated. It was the largest number of students she’s seen, Rowell said during the awards ceremony. “I know how difficult some of these tests are,” Rowell told the students who were gathered in a room on the second floor of Gulf Coast, some talking, some on their phones. AW A RDS A DD UP Middle school students compete at MathCounts Top , sixth-grader Justin Hamilton, right, participates in the 2015 MathCounts competition at Gulf Coast State College. Left , a trophy is displayed during the competition. MathCounts is a national middle school coaching and competitive program that promotes math achievement. P hotos by A NDREW W ARDLOW The News Herald BROWSE A RELATED VIDEO AT NEWSHERALD.COM TEAM RANKINGS SIXTH GRADE First: Merritt Brown Middle Second: Surfside Middle Third: Holy Nativity Episcopal SEVENTH GRADE First: Merritt Brown Second: Holy Nativity Third: Surfside EIGHTH GRADE First: Merritt Brown Second: Bay Haven Charter Academy Third: Surfside JOSEPH CANNIZZO SEE GRAHAM | A3 SEE ACCUSED KILLER | A3 SEE MATHCOUNTS | A3 T he News Herald welcomes contributions from teachers and parents of their students’ artwork. S end to Y oung Artist, T he News Herald, 501 W . 11th S t., Panama City 32401. I nclude name, age and school. 75 cents SPORTS Antwain Johnson takes lead role for Malone C1 FRIDAY January 16, 2015 I NSIDE 30A Songwriters Festival returns PANA M ACIT Y. CO M

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Nation & World Florida LOTTERY Setting It STRAIGHT It is the policy of The News Herald to correct all errors that appear in news stories. If you wish to report an error or clarify a story, call 747-5070 or email news@pcnh.com. The News Herald Panama City, Florida dDay, mMonth dDate, yYear 1 To place a classied ad Phone: 850-747-5020 Service hours: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday to Friday To buy a display ad Phone: 850-747-5030 Service hours: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday to Friday To subscribe to The News Herald Phone: 850-747-5050 To get news in the paper • Breaking news Phone: 850-522-5134 or 850-747-5045 • Non-deadline news, press releases Phone: 850-522-5134; Email: pcnhnews@pcnh.com • Letters to the editor Email: nhletters@pcnh.com Mail: Letters to the editor, The News Herald, 501 W. 11th St., Panama City, FL 32401 Note: Include name, address, phone number. • Weddings, engagements, anniversaries, births Email: tgolden@pcnh.com Phone: 850-522-5107 At the ofce: 8 a.m. t o 5 p.m. Monday to Friday, 501 W. 11th St. • Church Calendar Email: pcnhnews@pcnh.com Mail: Church Calendar, The News Herald, 501 W. 11th St., Panama City, FL 32401 • Birthdays Phone: 850-747-5070 Email: pcnhnews@pcnh.com • What’s Happening Email: pcnhnews@pcnh.com To buy a photograph Phone: 850-747-5095 Circulation Directory Tim Thompson , Publisher 850-747-5001, tthompson@pcnh.com Mike Cazalas , Editor 850-747-5094, mmcazalas@pcnh.com Ron Smith , Regional Operations Director 850-747-5016, rsmith@pcnh.com Robert Delaney , Regional Controller 850-747-5003, rdelaney@pcnh.com Vickie Gainer , Regional Marketing Director 850-747-5009, vgainer@pcnh.com Eleanor Hypes , Regional Human Resources 850-747-5002, ehypes@pcnh.com Roger Underwood , Regional Circulation Director 850-747-5049, runderwood@pcnh.com At your service The entire contents of The News Herald, including its logotype, are fully protected by copyright and registry and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without written permission from The News Herald. Published mornings by The Panama City News Herald (USPS 419-560), 501 W. 11th St., Panama City, FL 32401. Periodicals postage paid at Panama City, FL. Postmaster: Send address changes to The News Herald, P.O. Box 2060, Panama City, FL 32402. THE NEWS HERALD Copyright P.O. Box 1940 Panama City, FL 32402 501 W. 11th St. Panama City, FL 32401 Phone: (850) 747-5000 Panama City, FL 32401 Phone: (850) 747-5000 WATS: 1-800-345-8688 Make the Panama City News Herald a part of your life every day. Home delivery: Subscribe to 7-day delivery and get unlimited access to our website and the digital edition of the paper. Customers who use EZ Pay will see, on their monthly credit card or bank statement, the payment has been made to Halifax Media Florida. Online delivery: Take The News Herald with you when you go out of town, or go green by subscribing to an online replica edition of The News Herald and get unlimited access to our website. Go to subscribe.newsherald.com to subscribe to digital only. Delivery concerns: To report a problem with your newspaper delivery, call 850-747-5050 between 6 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday and between 7 a.m. and 11 a.m. Saturday and Sunday. To start your subscription, call our customer service center at 850-747-5050 or toll-free at 800-345-8688. The News Herald also is available at more than 380 stores and news racks throughout Bay, Washington, Holmes, Jackson, Calhoun, Gulf and Franklin counties. Did we miss you? If we missed you, we want to correct the oversight. For redelivery: Call The News Herald at 850-747-5050 between 6 a.m. and 10 a.m. Monday through Friday and 7 a.m. and 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday. Single Copies: Daily, 75 cents; Sunday, $1.50 — Subscribers will be charged an additional $1.00 for the regular Sunday retail rate for the Thanksgiving Day edition of The News Herald. Page A2 | The News Herald | Friday, January 16, 2015 The Associated Press PARIS Kerry arrives, denies trip is apology for march Pledging “to share a big hug with Paris” and show American solidarity with the French people after last week’s deadly terrorist attacks, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry touched down Thursday in the French capital. Kerry arrived in Paris from Sofia, Bulgaria, where he said his trip to France is not an apology for the Obama administration’s failure to send a senior official to last weekend’s unity march. Rather, he said it is to express the “affection” Americans have for France, which has been on edge since the attacks. Kerry will go to a town hall meeting with the mayor of Paris today and express sympathy for the victims of the terror attacks last week. MILAN 2 Italian aid workers freed in Syria Italian officials said two Italian aid workers have been freed in Syria and will return home soon. The premier’s office announced the release of 21-year-old Greta Ramelli, and 20-year-old Vanessa Marzullo, on Twitter. The Foreign Ministry confirmed the news, but was unable to immediately provide details of their release. The women, from the Northern Lombardy region, disappeared in the northern Syrian province of Aleppo in late July or early August. JOHANNESBURG International force mulled to fight Boko Haram As Islamic militants from Boko Haram step up attacks in Nigeria that have led to the slaughter of more civilians, there is increasing talk that international military action, possibly including a multinational force, might be needed to help crush the insurgency in Africa’s most populous country. The debate has taken on new urgency since Jan. 3, when Boko Haram extremists swept into the northeastern town of Baga in Borno state, overran a military base and, according to witnesses, killed hundreds of civilians in the days that followed. It was one of the most brazen assaults since militants kidnapped almost 300 girls last year, setting off an international outcry. LONDON High winds, heavy snow batter Britain Britain and Ireland have been battered by 100 mph winds and heavy snow, stranding some motorists after a major road was closed. The Environment Agency said Thursday that 149 flood alerts and 32 flood warnings had been issued in England and Wales. The Associated Press SAN DIEGO Navy captain pleads guilty in bribery scheme A second Navy captain pleaded guilty to conspiracy to commit bribery Thursday in a massive scheme involving a Malaysian defense contractor accused of bilking the U.S. military out of at least $20 million. Capt. Daniel Dusek entered the plea Thursday in his first appearance in federal court in San Diego and waived his right to present his case before a federal grand jury. His plea came the same day the key figure in the case — defense contractor Leonard Glenn Francis — changed his not-guilty plea. The scandal is considered one of the worst corruption cases to rock the Navy in years. Dusek is the fourth Navy officer charged in the case. All the officers have been accused of providing classified information to the Singapore-based Glenn Defense Marine Asia Ltd., or GDMA, which has provided food, fuel and supplies to U.S. Navy vessels in Asia for 25 years. WASHINGTON Air Force to tap Guard to fill drone pilot shortage The Air Force is taking several steps to fill a significant shortfall in drone pilots, laying out plans to increase incentive pay, bring more National Guard and Reserve pilots onto active duty, and seek volunteers to fill needed slots, Air Force Secretary Deborah Lee James said Thursday. Calling them interim measures, James told reporters they might seek larger retention bonuses for drone pilots, much like the maximum $25,000 stipend that manned aircraft pilots can receive. While the Air Force has long struggled with a shortage of drone operators, the demands of ongoing operations around the world, including persistent airstrikes in Iraq and Syria, have exacerbated the problem. NEW ORLEANS Judge: Oil spilled in Gulf exceeded BP’s estimates A federal judge determined Thursday that more oil than BP estimated spilled into the Gulf of Mexico following a rig explosion in 2010, a decision that could potentially cost the London-based oil giant more than $13 billion. U.S. District Judge Carl Barbier ruled that 3.19 million barrels — just under 134 million gallons — were discharged into the Gulf after a rig explosion at BP’s Macondo well. The number is more than the 2.4 million barrel figure BP had argued for and less than the government’s estimate of about 4.2 million, a figure that could have meant $18 billion in maximum penalties. Those penalties are to be determined in a trial set to open Tuesday. BIENVENIDA! TRAVEL QUESTIONS CAN U.S. CITIZENS VISIT CUBA? The U.S. Treasury’s Ofce of Foreign Assets Control oversees travel to Cuba. There are 12 categories of people who are allowed to visit. They include close relatives of Cubans, academics, those traveling on ofcial government business, those on humanitarian or religious missions, journalists and people on accredited cultural education programs. HOW CAN I BUY A TICKET? Until now, the government has issued licenses to tour operators who then help travelers obtain visas and sell spots on trips to Cuba. Many of them are mom and pop travel agencies in Florida, catering to Cuban-Americans. Others are large tour companies offering weeklong educational trips for $3,000 to nearly $8,000 a person. The new regulations allow travel agents and airlines to sell tickets without the need for a specic license from Ofce of Foreign Assets Control. That means it will be much easier to book a trip and prices should come down signicantly. HOW DO U.S. TRAVELERS BUY GOODS IN CUBA? Banks and credit card companies have been prohibited from doing business in Cuba. That gets lifted in these new rules. But don’t expect to see ATMs or businesses accepting Visa, MasterCard or American Express immediately. Large hotels are likely to be the rst businesses to let travelers swipe to pay but mom and pop restaurants or local shops could take much longer. So travelers — in the near term — still need to bring a lot of cash. WHAT CAN AMERICANS BRING BACK? Authorized visitors can bring home up to $400 worth of goods acquired in Cuba for personal use. This includes no more than $100 worth of alcohol or tobacco products. -The Associated Press AP Photos A new set of U.S. government regulations takes effect today, severely loosening the 50-year travel and trade restrictions for Cuba. WASHINGTON (AP) — Swiftly expanding trade ties with Cuba, the Obama administra tion opened the door to easier travel and a wide range of new export opportunities with the communist island starting today, punching the biggest hole to date in Amer ica’s half-century-old embargo. Less than a month after the Cold War foes agreed to end their enmity, the Commerce and Trea sury departments unveiled new rules Thursday permitting U.S. citizens to visit Cuba without special permits. Most U.S. trav elers still will be required to go on supervised group trips, but now virtu ally any U.S. com pany or organization can offer such trips without the paper work and inspections that discouraged past expansion of travel to Cuba. Some tour operators, already seeing unprecedented interest in legal travel to Cuba, expect some tourists to simply ignore the restrictions. American companies also now will be permitted to export telephones, computers and Internet technology, and to send supplies to private Cuban firms. However, Cuban authorities have said nothing about the restric tions they might impose on U.S. products entering a country that has long frustrated foreign inves tors with red tape and tapped-out infrastructure. The changes are the latest step in President Barack Obama’s plan to rebuild relations with Cuba after a history marred by suspicion, espionage and con flict. The new regu lations come three days after U.S. offi cials confirmed the release of 53 political prisoners Cuba had promised to free. The U.S. is now “one step closer to replacing out-of-date policies,” Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew said Thursday. White House spokes man Josh Earnest said the new rules “immediately enable the American people to provide more resources to empower the Cuban population to become less dependent upon the state-driven economy.” They also allow U.S. citizens to start bringing home small amounts of Cuban cigars, long adored by aficionados but banned under U.S. law. The limit is $100 for alcohol and tobacco products and $400 in total goods. Most U.S. travelers still will be required to go on supervised group trips, but now virtually any U.S. company or organization can offer such trips without the paperwork and inspections that discouraged past expansion of travel to Cuba. Today starts easing of U.S. travel rules involving Cuba N ATI ON B riefs W O RLD B riefs THURSDAY’S NUMBERS Cash 3 (afternoon) .......... 6-8-6 Cash 3 (evening) ............ 8-3-0 Play 4 (afternoon) . ........ 8-6-3-3 Play 4 (evening) .......... . 9-2-9-7 Fantasy 5 . .......... 1-10-17-30-35

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GRAHAM from Page A1 “More than 1/3 of NW Florida’s economy is driven by our military installations. Having two House members represent Florida’s first and second districts on defense committees is a big plus as DoD continues to seek efficiencies and reduce infrastructure,” Neubauer said. Tyndall Air Force Base spokesman Herman Bell said he could not be sure what impact Graham’s appointment might have for the base because the committee, which is charged with funding and oversight of the military and the Department of Defense, is tasked with doing what’s best for the nation, not necessarily what’s best for any particular base. “It’s always good to have your representative on meaningful committees,” Bell said. A public affairs officer at Naval Support Activity Panama City issued a statement from Cmdr. Chris Serow about Graham’s appointment: “We congratulate Representative Graham on her appointment to the House Armed Services Committee,” Serow said. “We look forward to working with Representative Graham as the Navy base proudly celebrates its 70th year of technical excellence and Fleet support here in Panama City, Florida.” ACCUSED KILLER from Page A1 Jackson’s charges were amended Thursday to manslaughter, attempted robbery and third-degree felony murder, all while possessing a firearm. He also faces charges of attempted sale of cannabis and felony possession of a firearm. A jury trial has been scheduled for Jackson. However, on the other side of the gunfire, the case of 26-year-old Joseph Cannizzo has been derailed following a December out-of-state car wreck. According to Dustin Stephenson, Cannizzo’s attorney, he suffered brain and spine injuries in a “dramatic car crash.” The state has extended a plea offer until he is healthy. His next court date was set for April 15. Six people were arrested in the fallout from the shooting at the Club Apartments at 325 Richard Jackson Blvd. early July 10 as three survivors tried to cover their tracks. Cannizzo and Brooks allegedly waited in a green SUV in the Club’s parking lot for Josh Heath Smith to conduct a deal for about 2 ounces of marijuana. Smith’s girlfriend, 17-year-old Alyssa Watford, previously had dated Brooks and arranged the deal, according to Smith’s testimony. Smith, 23, and Jackson allegedly discussed beforehand how they would catch Brooks off guard. Jackson would remain behind in the deeply tinted Kia Forte to get the drop on him, Smith said. But they didn’t anticipate the people they were waiting for also were aiming to rob them, according to law enforcement. After Smith brought the money into Brooks’ green SUV, Cannizzo drew a gun and ordered Smith to drop his pants, where his gun was stored. Brooks then stepped out and walked over to search the Kia. Neither Brooks nor Cannizzo knew Jackson was in the car until gunfire roared from within. Smith ran off as Cannizzo ran to his wounded friend, according to police. Brooks died face down on the asphalt a short time later, and police helicopters began to circle in the night sky. Six people were arrested in connection with the shooting. Watford has pleaded not guilty to principal to attempted robbery. Cannizzo also has pleaded not guilty to principal to robbery with a firearm for allegedly attempting to rob Smith, while his girlfriend 26-year-old Nichole Philbrook has pleaded to three years’ probation for tampering with evidence and trying to cover up for Cannizzo. Clinton Robert Allen, 34, who accepted the alleged murder weapon from Jackson, has pleaded to four years’ probation in exchange for testifying against Jackson. Prosecutors revoked a plea offer of 25 years in prison for Jackson and indicated there would not be another as his January trial approaches. Smith has been moved to another jail for his well-being until then. If he cooperates at trial, he will be sentenced to 10 years in prison. FROM THE FRONT Friday, January 16, 2015 | The News Herald | Page A3 ANDREW WA RDLOW | The News Herald Students take part in the 2015 MathCounts competition at Gulf Coast State College on Thursday. MATHCOUNTS from Page A1 Rowell said “gracious sponsors” help fund the event. The students laughed when Bay District Superintendent Bill Husfelt told them he once had a pocket protector. Husfelt mentioned the detail when talking to the students about the importance of math. To him, the students competing in MathCounts will counter the hacking problems going on in the world. “You guys are really going to be driving the future,” Husfelt said. He said was proud of the students and excited to see how the rest of the day played out. The students received their individual and team awards. They stopped, posed for pictures and shook hands with school officials. Surfside Middle School coach Judy Spires said she and her students practiced at least four days a week for 20 to 25 minutes. They studied a lot of old tests, Spires said, as well as problems on the MathCounts website. Surfside notched second and 10th place in the sixth-grade individual division. “They were great,” Spires said. “I’m extremely proud.” Jackson from Holy Nativity fiddled with the medal around his neck as he talked about the “super exciting” feeling of winning. He said his secondplace finish last year made him want to try his hardest to improve. He was relieved when Rowell called his name. He said his achievement is something he says he can brag to everyone about. “I felt great,” he said. INDIVIDUAL WINNERS SIXTH GRADE First: Cameron Scott, Merritt Brown Second: Michael Graff, Surfside Third: Sarah Leebrick, Merritt Brown SEVENTH GRADE First: Jackson Morris, Holy Nativity Second: Joshua Gruden, Breakfast Point Third: Shaun McDaniel, Merritt Brown EIGHTH GRADE First: Nicolas Anason, Bay Haven Second: John Adams, Merritt Brown Third: Anna Huber, Merritt Brown SP101439 F AITH Every Saturday in The News Herald

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Page A4 | The News Herald | Friday, January 16, 2015 NATIO N & WORLD A A L A S K Hi , I'm Al len Se ar s, St at e of Al as ka Ce rt i ed "T op of th e Wo rld " Sp ec ia lis t. Jo in me and ex per ie nc e Al ask a on my To pra te d "B es t of Al ask a" Cr uise and To ur ! We' ll co mb in e my ex clu si ve 5ni gh t La nd an d Ra il ad ve nt ure wi th Pr in ce ss Cr ui se s' awa rd win nin g "V oy ag e of th e Gl ac ier s" cru ise fo r a com ple te on ce in a li fe ti me Al ask an Ex pe ri e nce . Tr av el wit h fri en ds, ol d and ne w, and di sc ov er wh y th is is Ba y Co un ty 's #1 to ur ! NE RV IG TR AV EL 56 9 Ha rri son Av e. "H ist or ic Do wn tow n" Pa na ma Ci ty 85 076 328 76 | www .n er vig .c om 13 -D AY “B EST OF AL AS KA " JU LY 7t h & JUL Y 21 st TW O PE AK SE AS ON DE PA RTU RE S Yo ur Ch oic e: Ju ly 7t h 19 th or Ju ly 21 st Au g 2n d 105 We st 23rd Street, Panama City , Florida 32405 850.763.4 224 | www . s hop maharajas.com ‘Birdman,’ ‘Budapest’ top Oscar nominees The Associated Press Two extravagant com edies, “Birdman” and “The Grand Budapest Hotel,” dominated nominations for the 87th annual Academy Awards with nine nods each, while “Boyhood” remained the widely acknowledged front-runner. The three films were nominated for best picture on Thursday along with “Whiplash,” ‘‘The Theory of Everything,” ‘‘The Imitation Game,” ‘‘American Sniper“ and “Selma.” The eight films, mostly more mod estly sized movies dwarfed by Hollywood’s stampede of bigger blockbusters at the box office, gave the Oscars a classy if not particularly high-wattage batch of nominees. In Hollywood’s everexpanding industrial complex of awards season, the year’s front-runners — Richard Linklater’s coming of age epic “Boyhood” (six noms) and Alejandro Gon azalez Inarritu’s elegantly shot backstage romp “Bird man (or The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance)” — haven’t been dislodged from their lofty perch, steadily accumulating hardware. The uniquely time-elapse “Boyhood” earned Linklater nominations for best direc tor and screenplay, as well as supporting nods Patricia Arquette and Ethan Hawke. The film, 12 years in the making, landed the latest in a string of awards Sunday at the Golden Globes, taking best drama. But there were other films — “The Grand Buda pest Hotel,” ‘‘American Sniper” and “The Imitation Game” — that came away big winners Thursday, just as others such as “Selma” failed to break through. World War II codebreaker thriller “The Imitation Game,” about pioneering computer scien tist Alan Turing (Benedict Cumberbatch), captured eight nominations, includ ing best actor for Cumber batch. The film’s distributor, the Weinstein Co., has previ ously shepherded prestige British period films (“The King’s Speech”) all the way to best picture. Wes Anderson’s old Europe caper “The Grand Budapest Hotel,” which also won best comedy or musical at the Globes, has emerged as the most unexpected awards heavyweight. It managed nine nominations without a single acting nod and was instead repeat edly cited for Anderson’s meticulous craft in directing, production design, makeup and screenplay. Steve Carell (“Fox catcher”) and Eddie Redmayne (“The Theory of Everything”) rounded out the best actor category. Red mayne, the freckled British actor who stars as Stephen Hawking in the film, said by phone from Los Angeles that he was awakened with the news. David Oyelowo, who stars as Martin Luther King Jr. in “Selma,” was surpris ingly left out of best actor. Ava DuVernay’s civil rights drama, at one point con sidered a major contender, faded even after its late debut. “Selma,” which has been nagged by criticism over its portrayal of Presi dent Lyndon Johnson, man aged just two nominations. (The second was for best song.) The poor showing of “Selma” (and on King’s birthday no less) was strik ing because it followed an Academy Awards led by bestpicture winner “12 Years a Slave” and much chestthumping about Hollywood’s thawing close-mindedness. AP ‘Birdman’ received nine Academy Award nominations Thursday, including Best Picture and a Best Actor nomination for Michael Keaton, front. Belgian police kill 2 in anti-terrorist raid VERVIERS, Belgium (AP) — Belgian security forces killed two terror suspects with links to Syria in a fierce shootout in the eastern city of Verviers on Thursday and arrested another, foiling a major and imminent attack against police buildings, authorities said. The raid came amid an international hunt for pos sible accomplices to attack ers who killed 17 people in France last week before being shot dead by police. Those attacks, by men claiming allegiance to the Islamic State group in Syria and al-Qaida in Yemen, have raised fears around Europe of more attacks. Belgian federal mag istrate Eric Van der Sypt said in Brussels that there was no link at this stage between the Paris attacks and the Belgian operation, which he said is the result of an investigation that has been underway for a few weeks. The suspects immedi ately opened fire on police when they closed in on them near the city’s train station, he said. There was an intense firefight for sev eral minutes on an upper level of a building in Ver viers where the raid took place, which appears to be residential. “These were extremely well-armed men” with auto matic weapons, Van der Sypt said. Police buildings were the target of an attack expected within hours or days, he said. “We still expect a number of arrests,” he said. No police were wounded or killed in the firefight, which occurred at the height of rush hour in a crowded neighborhood. Verviers, a former indus trial town with about 56,000 residents including a large immigrant community, is about 80 miles southeast of the capital, Brussels. The magistrate said more anti-terrorist raids were underway in the Brus sels region, adding that Bel gium’s terror alert level was raised to its second-highest level. The operation was part of an investigation into extremists returning from Syria, authorities said. Witnesses speaking on Belgium’s RTBF radio described a series of explo sions followed by rapid fire at the center of Verviers, near a bakery and in the neighborhood of the train station. Video posted online of what appeared to be the raid showed a dark view of a building amid blasts, gun shots and sirens, and a fire with smoke billowing up. Earlier Thursday, Bel gian authorities said they are looking into possible links between a man they arrested in the southern city of Charleroi for illegal trade in weapons and Amedy Coulibaly, who prosecutors say killed four people in a Paris kosher market last week. AP Special police forces guard a street in Verviers, Belgium, on Thursday. Police blocked a street after security forces took part in anti-terrorist raids. Woman sentenced to 219 years for child incest BAY MINETTE, Ala. (AP) — A judge sentenced an Alabama woman to 219 years in prison Thursday for her role in an incestuous sex ring accused of molest ing children for years. Wendy Holland, 35, showed no emotion as the judge condemned her to what amounts to a life sentence. She must serve at least 50 years in prison before parole consideration, a prosecutor said. Jurors convicted the woman of sodomy, sexual abuse and other charges last month. Another defendant, Wil liam Brownlee, got a 20-year prison sentence. Brownlee, 50, was convicted of sodomy and sexual abuse in the fall. The two were among 11 people charged with sex crimes following the disap pearance in 2012 of a sus pected victim of the ring, 19-year-old Brittney Wood. She remains missing and is presumed dead. Baldwin Council Circuit Judge Jody Bishop gave both Holland and Brownlee the maximum sentence and said each deserved more time. Each still faces addi tional charges involving other alleged victims. In a letter read in court, the underage female victim in both cases said years of abuse left her traumatized. She has a hard time trust ing anyone, gets angry eas ily and rarely feels safe. “I was a little girl being held down and raped,” wrote the victim, who was in court. Authorities said the two were part of a group of rela tives and friends who sexu ally abused children and swapped their own kids for sex for years. Holland is the widow of the alleged leader of the group, Donnie Holland, who was Brittney Wood’s uncle. The teen went miss ing around the time Holland was found with a gunshot to the head; his death was ruled a suicide. Wendy and Donnie Holland’s 22-year-old son Donald Paul Holland Jr. — charged with incest, rape and sexual abuse as another alleged participant in the ring — appeared before the judge in a closed hearing after his mother’s sentencing. He was seen being arrested and led away in handcuffs afterward, but the outcome of his case wasn’t made public because he was handled as a youthful offender following a request by the defense. Even without Brittney Wood to testify, two of her uncles and an older brother already pleaded guilty to sex charges before juries convicted Wendy Holland and Brownlee. In the letter read in court, the underage teen abused by both Holland, a relative, and Brownlee, a family friend, compared her youth to being lost in a maze. AP Wendy Holland, shown here in 2014, was sentenced Thursday to 219 years in prison.

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MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Target is giving up on Canada. More than 17,600 employ ees eventually will lose their jobs when the U.S. discount retailer closes its 133 Cana dian stores after only about two years to cut losses that went as high as a billion dol lars a year. The company didn’t see how to stop the losses before at least 2021, Target Corp. Chairman and CEO Brian Cornell said Thursday. Cor nell said on Target’s corpo rate blog that its Canadian arm was losing money every day. Cornell said the company instead will focus on reignit ing Target’s 1,800-store U.S. business, which has strug gled with sluggish sales since the recession. Exporting Target’s cheap chic across the border seemed like a no-brainer, because for years, droves of Canadians crossed the bor der to shop at its U.S. stores. But problems cropped up almost immediately when it opened more than 100 stores in the first year of its Cana dian expansion. Shoppers complained of shortages of basic consumer goods and complained that prices were too high. They also didn’t find the brands they’d seen and liked in U.S. stores. A weak holiday season that ended 2014 was the last straw. “We missed the mark from the beginning by taking on too much too fast,” Cornell said on the Target blog. Antony Karabus, president of Hilco Retail Consulting in Toronto, praised the move. “Target underestimated that the Canadian consumer is a highly sophisticated consumer who cross-border shops. It also underestimated the fiercely competitive land scape,” Karabus said. “The CEO made the right call.” Some Canadian shoppers were more pointed in their criticism. “Shame on them for open ing here with exorbitant prices compared to the U.S.,” said Lauren Tinto, 35, who runs a store that sells blinds. “They think we’re idiots or something.” Target expects cash costs for the exit to be between $500 million and $600 mil lion, with most of those costs taking place in fiscal 2015 or later. The retailer said it has enough money to fund the costs. The company said it received court approval to voluntarily make about $59 million in cash contributions into an employee trust. The trust would give almost all of Target’s Canada workers at least 16 weeks of compensation, including wages and benefits coverage for employees not needed for the entire winding down of the business. Target Canada stores will stay open during liquidation. In the U.S., Target saw a holiday season that ended better than expected. Fourth-quarter sales at U.S. stores open at least a year rose about 3 percent, the company said Thursday. Its previous outlook was for an approximately 2 percent increase, helped by higher traffic and better-thanexpected online sales. Lagarde: High debt, unemployment threaten global economy, growth WASHINGTON (AP) — Two problems stemming from the 2008 financial crisis — heavy government borrowing and high unemployment — still pose challenges to the global economy and require bold action, the head of the International Monetary Fund said Thursday. Christine Lagarde, IMF managing direc tor, said cheaper oil and strong U.S. growth aren’t enough to counter those threats. “We believe that global growth is still too low, too brittle and too lopsided,” she said in remarks before the Council on Foreign Relations. Europe and Japan potentially face years of slow growth and ultra-low inflation, she said, while the United States “is the only major economy that is likely to buck that trend this year.” Her warnings came after the IMF’s sister organization, the World Bank, on Tuesday lowered its forecast for international growth. The World Bank now expects the global economy to expand 3 percent in 2015, down from a 3.4 percent estimate in June. The bank cuts its forecast because of stagnation in Europe and Japan and slower growth in China. The IMF will issue its own update to its forecasts next week. Cheaper oil should leave consumers in most wealthy nations with more money to spend on other goods, thereby supporting their economies, Lagarde said. But there are downsides as well. Falling gas prices are pushing the 19 European nations that share the euro currency closer to deflation, a destabilizing fall in prices and wages. The threat of deflation in Europe “bol sters the case” for the European Central Bank to provide more stimulus, she said. Next week, the ECB is expected to launch a bond-buying program intended to reduce borrowing costs for businesses, households and governments. While the ECB is acting to ease rates, the U.S. Federal Reserve may raise them later this year, Lagarde said. Those opposing actions could cause widespread volatility in currency values and interest rates. Many companies in developing countries have borrowed in dollars in recent years. Those loans would become harder to repay if the dollar rose in value compared with local currencies those companies do business in. Lagarde also urged governments to take tough steps to restructure their labor mar kets, which in many cases would make it easier to hire and fire workers. “Too many countries are still weighed down by the legacies of the financial cri sis, including high debt and high unemploy ment,” she said. Euro, dollar plunge as Swiss Bank gives up on currency peg LONDON (AP) — Rarely has one statement prompted such a dramatic move in currency markets. The Swiss franc achieved a turbo-charged lift-off Thursday after the country’s central bank bowed to the inevitable and ditched an increasingly expensive policy to limit the export-sapping rise of the currency. Within minutes of the early morning announcement, the currency was a whopping 30 per cent higher against both the euro and the dollar. The decision by the Swiss National Bank, or SNB, to call time on its efforts to prevent the euro from trading below 1.20 francs came amid mounting speculation that the European Central Bank will next week back a big stimulus program that will put more euros in circulation, which would further dilute their value. The peg, which was intro duced in September 2011, was an attempt to halt the rise of the franc — a traditional haven currency for investors — against the euro at a time when the eurozone debt crisis was at its height. The strong franc was then particularly problematic for Swiss exporters, who were forced to drastically cut prices to remain competitive. Thursday’s move prompted a painful 11 percent drop in Switzer land’s stock market as investors took fright at the worsening out look for Switzerland’s traditional exporters, such as those selling chocolate or ski holidays. And as in the eurozone, there’s a growing fear that the country will suffer a sustained period of fall ing prices, or deflation. A stronger currency makes imports cheaper, further dampening inflation — in the year to December, prices fell 0.5 percent. In an effort to contain the franc’s future appreciation and limit any damage to the Swiss economy, the central bank also lowered a key interest rate — what it charges commercial banks to deposit at the bank — to minus 0.75 percent from minus 0.25 percent. The hope is that it dissuades banks from parking their cash at the national bank, opting instead to invest in the Swiss economy. “Switzerland suddenly got a whole lot more expensive,” said Michael Hewson, senior market analyst at CMC Markets. Switzerland stuns currency markets SNOWBIRD WAY OFF TARGET Retailer closing 133 Canadian stores to stem massive losses INTERNATIONAL EXPANSION Target is far from the rst retailer that’s had trouble making its U.S. formula for success work in other countries. Here are some others: BEST BUY: In January 2013, the consumer electronics chain said it would close 15 of its stores in Canada and cut about 5 percent of its workforce in the country as it tries to revamp its strategy there. In November 2011, it said was closing all 11 of its big-box stores in the United Kingdom. Later, it sold its stake in a European joint venture in Europe to its mobile phone retail partner in the region, Carphone Warehouse Group. WAL-MART: The world’s largest retailer, which now operates in 27 countries, rarely acknowledges defeat. But in 2006, the Bentonville, Ark.based discounter threw in the towel in Germany, announcing it would sell its 85 stores to Metro Group, a German retailer. Two months earlier, it sold its stores in South Korea. BIG LOTS: The discounter, based in Columbus, Ohio, said in December 2013 that it would close its Canadian business, which operated almost 80 stores. It had acquired the stores just two years before. TESCO: The U.S. can also prove daunting. Tesco, Britain’s largest retailer by sales, announced in 2013 that it was exiting the U.S. market by selling its Fresh & Easy supermarket chain. Tesco opened the chain just before the start of the Great Recession and misjudged its shoppers. AP A family arrives to shop at a Target store in Toronto on Thursday. More than 17,600 Target employees will lose their jobs when the U.S. discount retailer closes its 133 Canadian stores. CHRI S TINE LAGARDE International Monetary Fund managing director The Associated Press LANSING, Mich. Michigan to force Amazon, other stores to collect sales tax Michigan residents who buy from Amazon.com and other online stores will be forced to pay the state’s 6 percent sales tax starting in October. Gov. Rick Snyder signed laws Thursday saying he will level the playing field for brick-and-mortar businesses already assessing sales tax on customers. Shoppers are supposed to voluntarily pay unassessed taxes on Internet purchases when filing their state tax returns. But few comply. The laws could generate around $60 million a year from Amazon, eBay and other Internet retailers with a “nexus” to Michigan. The Internet sales tax measures aren’t contingent on voters also approving a sales tax increase on the May statewide ballot. Business FOCUS U.S. $1.00 = Canadian $1.1965 U.S. $1.00 = Mexican peso 14.654 U.S. $1.00 = 0.8591 U.S. $1.00 = 0.6585 Foreign exchange (as of 5 p.m. CST) Gold Silver Platinum 1,262.60 16.96 1,258.00 +33.50 +0.11 +33.00 Precious metals (New York spot price) $58.78 -0.50 $137.71 +0.36 $20.49 -0.53 $25.44 -0.17 $28.66 -0.44 $35.64 -0.93 $16.26 -0.77 $15.04 -0.37 $125.71 -0.10 $50.91 -2.08 $8.99 -0.17 $9.66 -0.04 $50.80 +0.61 $36.71 -0.66 $62.22 -0.67 $61.55 +0.12 $41.69 +0.45 $159.66 -0.18 $85.88 -1.19 $33.26 -0.07 $130.14 -0.24 $84.32 -1.05 $102.67 -1.23 $27.41 -0.51 $42.38 -0.18 $73.15 +0.20 $88.96 -0.78 $23.58 -0.20 $178.70 -1.53 $101.01 -1.63 $36.19 -0.16 $154.57 -1.23 $102.49 -1.51 $55.00 -1.81 $91.38 -0.16 $61.88 -0.76 $45.48 -0.47 $92.81 -0.90 $32.40 -0.08 $89.86 -0.13 $104.23 +0.46 $113.52 0.00 $47.10 +0.13 $87.38 +0.77 $94.35 +0.12 $104.46 +1.13 $253.13 -2.43 Darden Rest Gen. Dynamics Hanger Group Hancock Hldg Home Bancshares ITT St. Joe KBR L-3 Comms Hldgs Oceaneering Int. Regions Fin. Sallie Mae Southern Co. SunTrust Rock-Tenn Co. Ingersoll-Rand Engility Holdings Stocks of local interest 3M American Express AT&T Boeing Caterpillar Chevron Cisco Systems Coca-Cola DuPont Exxon Mobil General Electric Goldman Sachs Home Depot Intel IBM J&J JP Morgan McDonald’s Merck Microsoft Nike Pzer Procter & Gamble Travelers Comp United Tech Verizon Walmart Walt Disney United Healthcare Visa The Dow 30 Stocks Close Chg. Chg. . Friday, January 16, 2015 | The News Herald | Page A5 Business Source: Matt Wegner, Financial Advisor, The Edward Jones Co., Panama City 769-1278

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Page A6 | The News Herald | Friday, January 16, 2015 Viewpoints The Graham honeymoon D emocrat Gwen Graham promised much when she ran against incumbent Republican Steve Southerland to be our representative in the U.S. House. Graham said she was tired of the seemingly intractable divide between both parties and promised to support new leadership that would change the atmosphere. In particular she vowed to vote against Nancy Pelosi the former speaker of the House — when the Democrats were in charge — and current minority leader. Graham kept her word in a mostly symbolic gesture and became one of the four Democrats who voted against Pelosi. We doubt there will be any hard feelings in Democrat circles over a politician keeping a campaign promise. Next, Graham said she would reach across the aisle and work with Republicans on a variety of issues including changes to Obamacare. Some scoffed at the idea of the hyper partisan atmosphere changing given just how large the divide has been since President Barack Obama took office six years ago. Here again, Graham has in the first few days of her term, kept her word. She voted with Republicans on changes to the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act, the Keystone Pipeline Bill and is working with them on an environmental bill that both parties say will protect Florida’s Everglades. She did not vote for altering the Affordable Care Act with a bill that would have changed the health insurance threshold for employees from 30 hours a week to 40 hours a week. Despite that no vote it seems clear that Graham is making a good faith effort to work with Republicans on the important issues of the day. What isn’t clear yet is whether any of these efforts will be successful. On Thursday and Friday House and Senate Republicans will take part in an annual retreat. Their mission seems to be finding common ground with themselves as the party has quickly discovered how fractious things can get in the majority. And of course, even if everything goes according to plan, President Barack Obama has his veto pen ready. Still, Graham’s work so far is a solid start to her new life as our representative. Honeymoons never last and we’re certain she will eventually differ with us and her other constituents from time to time. When that happens we hope Graham follows her conscience and does what she believes is best for her constituents. N A TE BEELER | The Columbus Dispatch I t’s easy to “fire” a business that rips you off. Just go to a different one. It’s a lot easier to patronize another business than to get government to fix the problem. But bad businesses and the politicians they own, I mean influence, often don’t want you to have that choice. I’ve written about how taxi companies don’t like competition from ride-sharing services like Uber. Taxi companies, rightly, say it’s unfair that they have to obey all kinds of rules and get complicated licenses that Uber drivers don’t get. Rather than getting rid of the excessive regulations, many local politicians just say that new competition is “unfair” and ban ride-hailing services. They’ve banned Uber in places like Thailand, Spain, Nevada and Massachusetts. But customers like ridehailing services. Uber is a multi-billion dollar business — despite being banned and despite Uber executives doing some sleazy things. Government claims we need all its regulations to keep us from being ripped off. But their endless rules don’t stop rip-offs. For years, Las Vegas tourists have complained that cabbies cheat them by taking them to the strip via a roundabout route. Undercover cops ran tests and found that one in three Vegas taxis break the rules. Firefox founder Blake Ross blogged about this after a cabby ripped him off. Government responded to this problem as governments usually do. It issued complex rules and warnings. Ross calls it a five-part plan: Plan A: people with guns. “Uniformed cops stopped occupied cabs at random and offered to prosecute drivers who were taking inefficient routes ... slowing you down to make sure your driver isn’t slowing you down.” But that didn’t work. The authorities’ chief investigator said only three passengers pressed complaints: “They just wanted to get to their hotels.” Duh. Tourists didn’t want to spend their vacation in court over a $10 rip-off. Plan B: big signs. “Each sign,” writes Ross, “enumerates the proper taxi fares for every conceivable trip ... using approximately twice as many words as it took Ronald Reagan to tear down the Berlin Wall.” And more time. It took the taxicab authority two years to put up the signs. “All things take time in government,” said the administrator. The signs didn’t stop the cheating. So government implemented Plan C: a big online spreadsheet listing bad drivers. That didn’t work either. On to Plan D: a PDF. Bureaucrats love PDF’s. Las Vegas asks you to print out a witness statement for people who have been taken on an overly long route and “complete the sworn affidavit in view of a public notary.” I like how Ross sums up plan D. Just carry “a desktop computer, a printer, envelopes, stamps, a fax machine [and] notary ... note the driver’s full name, permit number and physical appearance. If you don’t have this information memorized for some reason, just ask the driver while you’re locked in the car with him ... explain that you’re trying to have him fired.” Ross actually bothered to try out the government’s complaint system when he was ripped off, but he never heard back from any Vegas official. That’s how government consumer protection typically operates. Finally, Plan E: The Nevada Taxicab Authority “convened a committee.” The committee, according to the Las Vegas Review-Journal, will “draw up guidelines ... for a software ... package designed to let the authority track cab movements.” Nevada estimates that this will cost about $6 million per year, writes Ross, “and you’ll pay for this through an increase in your taxi fares, which are already about double the price of an UberX ride.” But Uber already has a solution if drivers cheat: On the Uber app, customers give that driver just one star. Within hours, Uber adjusts your fare. If the driver scams people again, he’s fired. Simple. Better. That’s the free market. But Vegas officials kicked the company out of town. Government is force. Government can always win, even when it’s wrong. The better option Our V IEW LETTER S PO L ICY: Provide a daytime telephone number and home address for verication purposes. L etters may be edited for space, consistency and clarity. Please limit to 750 words. Send mail to E ditor, P.O. Box 1940, Panama City, F L 32402; or email to nhletters@pcnh.com 49 FORUM R eally, the planet and our grandchildren were the losers in the last election. Other than Congressman Southerland’s defeat, the Republican right was strengthened. Climate science deniers, “I’m not a scientist” wafflers and kick-the-can-down the roaders like Gov. Scott and Sen. Inhofe, R-Okla., all had their power enhanced. Now, Merle Potter writes on Jan. 7, “Man-made climate change not a real problem,” and offers his opinion that climate change is no big sweat. I hope he’s right. But, every climatologist and all the peer reviewed science I can find says carbon release is a significant threat to the climate of the planet as we know it. Check with NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Agency), the IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) or the Florida State University climatologist for real science. The peer reviewed science says 2014 was the hottest year since thermometers were invented. Carbon dioxide is 400 ppm, up from 275 before the industrial revolution. Ocean levels are rising and the oceans are significantly more acidic due to carbon absorption. At current rates, we will cross the 600 to 700 ppm threshold in the next 100 years and there would be a litany of very bad climatic and environmental outcomes. But, don’t worry. Most of these problems won’t really affect us. Because our carbon releases last for hundreds of years in the atmosphere, our carbon footprints will be kicking around and super-heating the planet for our children and theirs long after we’re gone. Let them worry about it, right? It’s not like Earth is a special place or anything. After all, the Kepler telescope recently identified an Earth-like planet in a so-called “Goldilocks” or habitable zone. True, it’s a 1,000 light years away and probably averages a temperature of zero, but, hey, we can heat it up when we get there. Unless moderate Republicans demand responsible planetary stewardship from their political leaders, a future generation may need to book passage. Here’s a suggestion: Let the Republicans have their Keystone pipeline but also secure offsetting compensatory carbon saving policies like the renewal of the 30-percent renewable energy federal tax credit that’s set to expire soon and the acceptance of the Environmental Protection Agency’s proposed CO2 regulations. Solar electric is increasingly price competitive and it would be nice for everyone in the Sunshine State to have rooftop solar. That way Republicans, Democrats, the next generations of humans and Mother Earth all will be reasonably happy! ALV IN PETER S Panama City Salute On Jan. 6, my Dodge pickup experienced a driver’s right front tire blowout in front of the old Kmart on East Tyndall Parkway. Since I was in the passing lane, I immediately pulled into the center turning lane, stopped and put on my emergency flashers. Within minutes, several people stopped their vehicles and asked if they could help. I told them thanks, but I had towing insurance and would call my company to get a tow. After calling, I was put on hold for over 45 minutes as cars continued to avoid my pickup. Then another pickup pulled over and a USAF senior master sergeant, in uniform, on his way home from work, got out and offered to change my tire on the spot. He convinced me to drive my pickup into the Pizza Hut parking lot and before I knew it, he and a retired Navy man, who pulled into Pizza Hut to eat, began working on my vehicle. It was not an easy job, but both people were amazing, even their wives pitched in to console my wife in our situation. I want to personally and publicly thank these people as they acted efficiently and selflessly without regard for their time and would not take any money for their assistance. These individuals displayed the finest attributes our military members are known for. So to Alan, Debra, Troy and Kat, I personally salute you all for what you did for us that day. Thanks again. STEVE H O ER N LE IN Panama City Climate change is a real problem Tim Thompson, Publisher Mike Cazalas, Editor S. Brady Calhoun, Editorial Page Editor 747-5075 | @sbradycalhoun bcalhoun@pcnh.com JOHN ST O SS EL Syndicated Columnist Should gas taxes be raised to pay for infrastructure improvements? WEEKLY QUESTION Last question’s results 43% No 40 votes 57% Y es 54 votes To respond, visit www.newsherald.com Should private walkovers be banned on PCB? R ecently, The Editorial Page editor has become enamored with a waffle cone that can be purchased at a certain old fashioned drive-in eatery. The eatery has new, shiny screens that come to life after an order has been placed and give several options to pay including with a smart phone. While he has successfully purchased items in the past with the phone this particular attempt went awry. First, the editorial page editor waived his phone around near the display and felt just a bit foolish. Then, the screen changed from the amount owed to advertising for more tasty treats. When the car hop arrived she and the editorial page editor found themselves at an impasse on whether or not the delicious waffle cone had, in point of fact, been purchased. Eventually, the manager got involved, the editorial page editor gave up on living in the future and used a debit card and got to work savoring his tasty treat. We have now come to the point in the story where a moral of some kind should be thrust upon the reader. Instead, we offer a quote from Mark Twain. “Persons attempting to find a motive in this narrative will be prosecuted; persons attempting to find a moral in it will be banished; persons attempting to find a plot in it will be shot.” The Old Fashioned

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PA Y NO IN TEREST UN TI L JA N 2O 18 * On pur ch ases made with yo ur Roo ms To Go cr edit ca rd thr ough 1/19 /15. Equa l Monthly Pa yments Req uir ed until Ja nu ar y 2O 18.* Rooms To Go re quir es No Minim um Pur ch ase and No Do wn Pa yment ex cept amo unt eq ual to sa les ta x and deliv er y. *Dur ing the pr omotional pe riod, minim um mon thly pa yments ar e re quir ed, calcula te d by dividing the pur ch ase amou nt by the le ngth of the pr omotion al period .T he pr omot ional perio d will st ar t on the dat e of pur ch ase . Int er est will not acc r ue durin g the pr omotiona l period. If the pur ch ase amount, plus an y ap plicable fe es or ch ar ges is not paid in fu ll by the end of the pr omoti onal period, int er est will be ch ar ged at the APR fo r pur ch ases on an y re maining balances unt il paid in full. Th e curr ent APR fo r pur ch ase s is va riable 28.99%. APR fo r pur ch ase s on ex isting account s ma y va ry betw een 22.99% -28.99 %. If an y re quir ed minim um pa yme nt is 60 da ys past due , the Pe nalty APR, curr ently va riable 29.99% will app l y to re maining balances .T he Pe nalty APR fo r ex isting ac counts ma y va ry betw een 24.99 -29.9 9%. Minim um int er est ch ar ge $2.00. Subje ct to cr edit ap pr ova l. Li mit ed qua ntiti es . Som e di scou nt it ems ma y be so ld out. LA ST 4 DA YS ! ENDS MOND AY , JA NU AR Y 19 TH AT 9PM! & cl ea ra nc e cl ear ance JAN . SALE 5-Pcs ONL Y $ 68 8 CHOO SE FR OM 4 FINI SHES! BEDR OOMS ST ART ING AT $ 688 THE NORI BED RO OM Dr esse r, Mir ro r, Comp let e Que e n Pa nel Be d: He adboa rd , Fo otbo ar d & Wo od Ra ils . Uphols te re d pa nels on he ad boa rd . St or ag e fo otboar d av ailable . CHOO SE FR OM 2 COL ORS! 10983_Gulf_2015_1_16_TD_Y ourChoiceBR NEXT DA Y DELIVER Y av ail able at select ROOMS TO GO KIDS st or es . NEXT DA Y DELIVER Y not av ai la ble at Rooms To Go Outlet Cent ers . Pur ch ase mu st be made bef or e 2pm. Limit ed av ailability on peak da ys .A pplies to in-st oc k mer ch andise only . Some mer ch andise is not on displa y at all st or es . See st or e fo r det ails . DELIVER Y CHARGE ADDITIONAL. REGIONAL PICKUP AVA ILABLE. NO T RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHIC AL ERR ORS . TO LO CA TE A ST ORE NEAR YO U, VISIT US ONLINE AT ROOMST OGO .COM OR ROOMST OGOKIDS .COM Scan to locat e a st or e near yo u. THE GA RDENIA BEDR OOM Dr esser , Mirr or , Complet e Queen Bed: Headboar d, Fo otboar d & Wo od Rails . 2-Dr aw er st ac k ch est av ai la ble . 5-P c s ON LY $ 7 8 8 THE BELCOURT BEDR OOM 6-Dr aw er Dr esser , Mirr or , Complet e Queen Pa nel Bed: Headboar d, Fo otboar d & Wo od Rails .M atc hing pieces av ailable .W hit e or ch err y nish. 5-P c s ON LY $ 7 8 8 Friday, January 16, 2015 | The News Herald | Page A7

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Thanks to the businesses who welcome the snowbirds. People living in campers belong in RV parks, not driveways with no sanitation hookups. Let’s clean up Panama City Beach! The rain day gave me a chance to veg out and rest these creaky bones and achy muscles. Back to the bike and pool tomorrow. No better place for solar power than Florida. In the ’50s, lots of Miami homes had solar water heaters on the roof! P.C. and PCB are even getting too expensive for snowbirds. What happens when we lose their business? How to spell disaster! Drive into road leading to campground at St. Andrews State Park. Sinkholes will swallow you. Just returned from three days in Destin. Love the idea that Destin does not allow golf carts on any roadway. Are you listening, PCB? Blue headlights. Not sure if it was a car coming toward me or a spaceship. Might see flashing lights of all colors next! Rep. Graham is voting like a member of GOP. I did not vote for that action. Trumbull set to seek second term. He’s only been in office for two seconds. We know nothing about him yet. For God’s sake. Wait until we do. Boil water every day now until the powers that be tell us NOT to. That would make much more sense, wouldn’t you say? Nonstop complainers. Everyone has a right to complain if they don’t like something. P.C. isn’t the Valley of the Shangri-La. It has faults. I like rain as we need it. However, it would be nice if it came down as fine drizzle. Not so much that you need to wear a wetsuit and flippers out. Callaway chickens can stay. They are so very grateful, I’m sure. It would be hard for them to balance a chicken coop on their backs. It cost me 850 bucks for an ambulance to Bay Hospital from the Villas, and they still can’t make a profit? What! Readers sound off Squall Line appears daily. Call 850-522-5133, or go to www.newsherald.com and click on the “Squall Live” icon. S quall L ine PANAMA CITY NEWS HERALD FRIDAY January 16, 2015 Section B Local & State Facebook.com/ panamacitynewsherald Twitter: @The_News_Herald www.newsherald.com Legislators hear constituents’ concerns By JOHN HENDERSON 522-5108 | @PCNH john jhenderson@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY — Bay County residents and representatives of a wide range of organizations lobbied Thursday night at the local legislative delegation meeting for their causes and concerns in the upcoming session. The speakers urged legislators to support a wide range of causes, from opposing fracking to banning e-cigarettes to providing state incentives to help bring films to Bay County. State Rep. Brad Drake, R-DeFuniak Springs, State Rep. Jay Trumbull, R-Panama City, and Sen. Don Gaetz, R-Niceville, listened to their concerns at the Bay County Government Center. Several teachers and school administrators complained about Florida’s testing system and assessment process for teachers. “My point is the testing madness, and it’s all computer-based with very few exceptions,” Mosley High School Principal Sandy Harrison said. Rutherford High School Principal Lennis Coy Pilson said his school is losing teachers because of the new requirements. He said he recently lost three teachers who said they couldn’t take it anymore. “Take into consideration all the stresses teachers are under,” he said. After the meeting, Gaetz said he listened to the teachers’ concerns. “I didn’t hear anybody say that they were opposed to measuring student performance or frequent and valid testing,” he said. “But instead, I think we had some very legitimate concerns by teachers and administrators saying, ‘Hey let’s have consistency. Let’s make sure that whatever the measurements of student performance are, that they are consistent from school to school and from county to county and from year to year, and let’s make sure they are understandable.’ My rule is: If you can’t explain it in a PTO meeting in 15 or 20 minutes, it’s probably an education policy that isn’t going to work.” State Attorney Glenn Hess said his office doesn’t have the staff or other resources to store data for three years, as required by public records law if a proposed bill passes He said the videos will be public record and will be requested by defendants. Glenwood wins battle over natural gas station By BEN KLEINE 522-5114 | @BenKleinepcnh bkleine@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY — With a resounding response from Glenwood residents, city officials pledged that they would not place a compressed natural gas station on Redwood Avenue near 11th Street. At a public meeting Thursday night at the A.D. Harris campus on 11th Street, Commissioner John Kady said the commission would not consider the Redwood location without reviewing other locations. At the meeting, City Manager Jeff Brown could only think of one location that would be big enough and on a major thoroughfare: U.S. 98 next to the Red Cross, which also is in Glenwood. “Get Glenwood out of your mind,” Lois Barker said. “The answer is no, no, no!” Brown then said he would not recommend the Redwood location to the commission, leaving the project in limbo. Commissioner Kenneth Brown praised the more than 20 residents who showed up at the meeting to voice their opinion. “You can’t stay home and wait for something to happen,” Kenneth Brown said. “You did this yourselves.” The city had seriously considered putting a natural gas station on Redwood Avenue starting in September. Public works had designated items in the budget specifically for natural gas vehicles. The commission received a plan from Zeit Energy for a $1.5 million station on Sept. 20. The top concern for residents was that having an increase of vehicles on Redwood and 11th Street would endanger children walking in the neighborhood. “We don’t want to put one child — red, yellow, green, black, purple,” William Swift said. “We don’t want to put one child in a position to negotiate 18-wheelers.” P hotos by P ATTI B LAKE The News Herald Above , Isaac Tauaefa with Team Impact smashes a can of soda over the crowd Thursday at St. Andrews Baptist Church. Members of Team Impact performed feats of strength at the church. Right , Kenneth Etta shatters stacks of concrete. Below , Stephen Mackey bends a steel rod over his head. Ipac MAKING AN MLK’s service to be honored at weekend events By AMANDA BANKS and COLLIN BREAUX 522-5118|@pcnhamanda abanks@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY — With Martin Luther King Jr. Day observed Monday, local events are lined up to commemorate the holiday. The Bay County Branch NAACP will host its annual prayer breakfast at 8 a.m. Saturday at Glenwood Community Center in Panama City. The guest speaker will be Reginald James, superintendent of Gadsden County schools. A march will begin at noon at the Bay County Courthouse. On Monday, A-CURE will host its annual festival at McKenzie Park from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. There will be an official program at noon, when elected officials will speak. Vendors, food booths and craft booths also will be featured. Most government offices will be closed Monday for the holiday. Rufus Wood, president of the Bay County Branch NAACP, described King as living a life of “unselfish, unsacrificial service.” “To me, he was a man of love, a man of justice, a man of peace,” Wood said. Wood said King preached a message of non-violence and hoped to be remembered as someone who gave his life in service of others. “So what we have to do is try to make the world a better place,” Wood said. SEE LEGISLATORS | B2 SEE GLENWOOD | B2

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Page B2 | The News Herald | Friday, January 16, 2015 6 a.m Noon 6 p.m Low Hazard Medium Hazard High Hazard Water closed to public Dangerous Marine Life High Low 54/32 54/37 55/30 54/38 55/41 55/33 55/33 58/36 57/35 55/32 58/36 56/33 58/35 59/40 60/41 60/39 58/35 57/39 60/46 62/42 60/47 65/52 Sunshine mixing with some clouds Partly sunny and breezy Partly sunny Partly sunny 57 43 51 49 39 Winds: SE 4-8 mph Winds: WNW 10-20 mph Winds: NW 6-12 mph Winds: W 4-8 mph Winds: N 6-12 mph Blountstown 10.41 ft. 15 ft. Caryville 6.27 ft. 12 ft. Clairborne 35.41 ft. 42 ft. Century 7.50 ft. 17 ft. Coffeeville, AL 22.92 ft. 29 ft. Through 7 a.m. Thu. Apalachicola 3:00p 7:23a 11:20p 5:59p Destin 6:57p 5:08a ----West Pass 2:33p 6:56a 10:53p 5:32p Panama City 6:33p 4:31a ----Port St. Joe 6:24p 3:57a ----Okaloosa Island 5:30p 4:14a ----Milton 9:10p 7:29a ----East Bay 8:14p 6:59a ----Pensacola 7:30p 5:42a ----Fishing Bend 8:11p 6:33a ----The Narrows 9:07p 8:33a ----Carrabelle 1:35p 5:10a 9:55p 3:46p Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. 15 New First Full Last Jan 20 Jan 26 Feb 3 Feb 11 Sunrise today ........... 6:39 a.m. Sunset tonight .......... 5:05 p.m. Moonrise today ........ 2:37 a.m. Moonset today ......... 1:38 p.m. Today Sat. Today Sat. Clearwater 62/48/pc 70/58/pc Daytona Beach 60/46/s 71/54/pc Ft. Lauderdale 71/59/pc 74/63/s Gainesville 59/37/s 67/48/pc Jacksonville 57/37/s 66/46/pc Jupiter 69/58/pc 75/61/pc Key Largo 74/63/pc 75/68/s Key West 74/66/pc 76/69/s Lake City 58/35/s 67/47/pc Lakeland 64/43/pc 70/54/pc Melbourne 65/50/pc 72/54/pc Miami 73/60/pc 76/64/s Naples 70/52/pc 75/60/pc Ocala 61/39/s 69/50/pc Okeechobee 66/48/pc 72/54/pc Orlando 65/46/pc 73/56/pc Palm Beach 70/60/pc 75/64/pc Tampa 64/48/pc 70/58/pc Today Sat. Today Sat. Baghdad 61/39/s 59/40/s Berlin 49/36/pc 42/30/c Bermuda 71/63/sh 67/61/sh Hong Kong 67/55/s 66/54/pc Jerusalem 49/40/sh 48/37/sh Kabul 52/22/s 51/22/pc London 43/30/pc 43/32/pc Madrid 48/27/pc 46/32/pc Mexico City 73/47/pc 73/48/pc Montreal 19/-15/sn 5/5/pc Nassau 80/64/sh 79/65/pc Paris 45/35/pc 43/35/pc Rome 59/53/c 60/46/r Tokyo 51/40/sh 50/36/pc Toronto 21/2/pc 29/25/c Vancouver 47/38/sh 46/42/r Today Sat. Today Sat. Albuquerque 48/27/s 50/27/s Anchorage 39/28/c 34/27/c Atlanta 52/32/s 57/39/s Baltimore 41/17/pc 33/25/s Birmingham 50/28/s 57/37/s Boston 35/9/pc 21/18/pc Charlotte 55/30/s 52/34/s Chicago 30/20/pc 40/30/pc Cincinnati 37/27/c 49/35/s Cleveland 26/7/sf 40/36/pc Dallas 60/39/s 65/37/pc Denver 55/32/pc 48/27/pc Detroit 25/10/pc 36/33/pc Honolulu 79/65/s 80/66/sh Houston 57/36/s 63/42/s Indianapolis 34/24/c 44/31/s Kansas City 53/35/s 51/29/pc Las Vegas 62/40/s 65/44/pc Los Angeles 76/50/s 76/52/pc Memphis 53/34/s 56/37/s Milwaukee 26/20/pc 39/30/pc Minneapolis 29/25/c 39/27/sn Nashville 49/29/s 53/37/s New Orleans 53/37/s 60/45/pc New York City 37/16/pc 28/26/s Oklahoma City 60/37/s 60/33/pc Philadelphia 40/17/pc 32/26/s Phoenix 73/46/s 72/47/s Pittsburgh 30/14/sf 41/37/s St. Louis 47/36/s 55/35/pc Salt Lake City 42/29/pc 44/31/c San Antonio 63/40/s 68/43/pc San Diego 72/52/s 70/51/pc San Francisco 62/51/c 63/52/c Seattle 50/39/sh 49/45/r Topeka 58/35/s 55/30/s Tucson 71/40/s 72/42/pc Wash., DC 45/25/pc 38/32/s Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Gulf Temperature: 57 Today: Wind north at 7-14 knots. Seas 2 feet or less. Visibility clear. Wind northeast 7-14 knots. Seas 2 feet or less. Partly cloudy. Tomorrow: Wind from the southeast at 6-12 knots. Seas 2 feet or less. Visibility generally clear. Mostly sunny today. Winds north 6-12 mph. Partly cloudy tonight. Winds eastnortheast 4-8 mph. High/low ......................... 49/47 Last year's High/low ...... 59/41 Normal high/low ............. 63/42 Record high ............. 74 (1989) Record low ............... 22 (1982) 24 hours through 4 p.m. .. 0.17" Month to date ................... 1.22" Normal month to date ...... 2.28" Year to date ...................... 1.22" Normal year to date ......... 2.28" Average humidity .............. 91% through 4 p.m. yesterday High/low ......................... 50/46 Last year's High/low ...... 59/42 Normal high/low ............. 61/45 Record high ............. 80 (1941) Record low ............... 15 (1964) 24 hours through 4 p.m. .. 0.38" Month to date .................. 0.92" Normal month to date ...... 2.08" Year to date ..................... 0.92" Normal year to date ......... 2.08" Average humidity .............. 90% PANAMA CITY Port St. Joe Apalachicola Tallahassee Perry Quincy Monticello Marianna Chipley DeFuniak Springs Pensacola FORT WALTON BEACH Crestview Destin Carrabelle Mobile Bainbridge Valdosta FLORIDA CITIES City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W WORLD CITIES City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W NATIONAL CITIES City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W TODAY FIVE DAY FORECAST FOR NORTHWEST FLORIDA High Low REGIONAL WEATHER Weather(W): ssunny, pcpartly cloudy, ccloudy, shshowers, tthunderstorms, rrain, sfsnow urries, snsnow, iice. Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows. Shown are today’s noon postions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. TIDES MARINE FORECAST BEACH FLAG WARNINGS The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. 0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High; 11+ Extreme 10 a.m. Noon 2 p.m. 4 p.m. UV INDEX TODAY ALMANAC SUN AND MOON MOON PHASES RIVER LEVELS Offshore Northwest Florida Flood Level Stage Apalachicola Choctawhatchee Alabama Escambia Tombigbee Temperatures Precipitation Panama City Temperatures Precipitation Fort Walton Beach WEATHER GLENWOOD from Page B1 Public Works Director Neil Fravel said the increase in traffic would be nonexistent in the first year of the project. “A lot of solid waste trucks already use Redwood every day,” Fravel said. However, he admitted that the vision of the city is to eventually attract private companies to use the natural gas station, which could include large vehicles. There was some concern about the possibility of an explosion but it paled in comparison to traffic considerations. “Everything man-made has the possibility to fail,” James Barker said. Fravel also stated that a natural gas station is an approved use for that property, which is zoned industrial. If a private company wanted to build one, all they would need is a development order. “I wouldn’t want it next to my house,” Kady said. LEGISLATORS from Page B1 “We do not have the attorneys. We do not have the staff to do this,” Hess said. Doug Kent, director of the Bay County Health Department, urged the legislators to continue to support programs the state is funding that are working, such as one designed to identify and treat people with diabetes or pre-diabetes. He said it is helping many residents. He said there were 4,000 tests taken for blood sugar last year. “We have discovered it is the most preventable disease in our county,” said Kent, who added that 55,000 Bay County residents are either pre-diabetic or diabetic. Brook Bullard, development coordinator for the Anchorage Children’s Home, encouraged legislators to fund $50,000 to help fund a teen homelessness program. “We’re not asking the state to fully fund the program,” Bullard said. “We have skin in the game.” Ringleader of Pensacola rape, murder executed STARKE (AP) — Florida on Thursday executed the ringleader of a 1993 homeinvasion robbery that ended with the murder of a Pensacola banker and the repeated rape of the banker’s wife. Johnny Shane Kormondy, 42, was pronounced dead at 8:16 p.m. at Florida State Prison, about 11 minutes after the lethal injection was administered. Kormondy was the 21st inmate executed under Gov. Rick Scott, the same number executed under former Gov. Jeb Bush. The executions under Bush occurred over his full two terms, while Scott has just begun his second term. The death penalty was reinstated in Florida in 1979. The execution was delayed by two hours after Kormondy’s lawyers filed a last-minute appeal with the U.S. Supreme Court over the type of lethal drugs used. The appeal was denied. Kormondy was convicted of the July 1993 murder of Gary McAdams and the rape of McAdams’ wife, Cecilia, who had just returned home from her high school reunion late in the evening. The couple was confronted just outside their home by Kormondy and two others, who forced their way inside. Kormondy and his accomplices repeatedly raped Cecilia McAdams, and shot Gary in the back of the head. The Associated Press doesn’t usually identify the victims of sexual assault but Cecilia McAdams has spoken publicly about her rape and her husband’s murder. She witnessed Kormondy’s execution Thursday night. “My family and I have waited 21 long years for this day to happen. I have peace, I feel peace. Justice has been served,” she said. “His life can’t replace what we’ve lost, but it was the right thing. He needed to die.” Gary McAdams’ sister, Terri McAdams, echoed those feelings of relief. “I am so glad this journey has come to an end with this monster and I won’t have to be tormented by his face in the newspaper or his face on TV anymore,” she said. J O H NN Y K O RM OND Y

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News Herald staff reports LYNN HAVEN — The Florida Highway Patrol is investigating a Thursday morning crash in which six people were injured after a vehicle overturned near the intersection of Transmitter Road and County 390. No fatalities were reported. However, two passengers suffered serious injuries and all six were taken to a hospital, FHP troopers said. The crash occurred about 8:45 a.m. when Jeremy Revett Boutwell II, 17, of Southport, was driving west on County 390 near Transmitter Road. Boutwell lost control of a 2000 Isuzu Rodeo and hydroplaned into eastbound traffic directly in front of a 1999 Chevrolet Prizm driven by 22-year-old Regina A. Jager, according to the FHP. The side of Boutwell’s vehicle careened into the front of Jager’s vehicle, troopers said. The Isuzu continued to spin before it overturned onto its roof in a ditch. One of Boutwell’s passengers, 19-year-old Jonathan Christopher Carter, and Jager’s only passenger, 21-year-old Victoria Marie Dawson, were taken to a hospital with serious injuries. Boutwell’s other two passengers, 19-year-old Kaitlyn Brooke Jones and 20-year-old Austin Brock Sullivan, suffered minor injuries, the FHP reported. Boutwell and Jager also suffered minor injuries and were taken to a hospital. No charges had been filed as of Thursday evening, but the investigation is continuing. News Herald Writers Collin Breaux and Zack McDonald contributed to this report. LOCAL & STATE Friday, January 16, 2015 | The News Herald | Page B3 Lillian Sowell Knight Lillian Sowell Knight died on Monday, Jan. 12, 2015. Funeral services will begin at 10 a.m. today, Jan. 16, 2015, at Wilson Funeral Home. Interment will follow at Evergreen Memorial Gardens. Those desiring may make memorial donations to Covenant Hospice, 107 W. 19th St., Panama City, FL 32405. Carolyn Pettis Lord, 71, of Panama City, Fla., passed away on Wednesday, Jan. 14, 2015, at her home with her loving husband of 25 years, Bill, and dog, Rambo, by her side. She loved spending time with her family and lived her life dedicated to the Lord Jesus Christ. Carolyn had a passion for living life. She loved the beach, music, and fast cars. She always put others ahead of herself and undoubtedly left this Earth with a full heart. Her spirit will forever live on in all of us. Carolyn was greeted in heaven by her parents, Sam and Evelyn Pettis; her daughter, Carol “Renee” Mears; and grandparents, MK and Cora Sewell and the Rev. Perry and Minnie Pettis. Left to cherish her memory is her husband, Bill Lord; three daughters, Pam Nolen, Verleen Anglin and Melissa Quick and husband, Paul; two sons, Lance Lord and Billy Lord; sister, Linda Hoskins and husband, Ervin; brother, Wayne Pettis and wife, Angie; six grandchildren, Jamie White, Wesley White, Chris Keith, PJ Keith, Kimberly Nolen, and Samantha Anglin; and numerous great-grandchildren, nieces and nephews. Funeral services will begin at 1 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 17, 2015, at Heritage Funeral Home with the Rev. Mack Glover officiating. Her family will receive friends from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. prior to the service. Interment will follow at Parker Cemetery. Those wishing to extend condolences may do so at www.heritagefhllc.com. Heritage Funeral Home & Cremation Services 247 N. Tyndall Parkway Panama City, FL 850-785-1316 Carolyn Pettis Lord 1943 – 2015 CAROLYN LORD DEATHS & FUNERALS Guidelines & deadlines Obituary notices are written by funeral homes and relatives of the deceased. The News Herald reserves the right to edit for AP style and format. Families submitting notices must type them in a typeface and font that can be scanned into a computer. Deadline for obituaries is 3 p.m. daily for the following day’s newspaper. Obituaries may be e-mailed to pcnhobits@pcnh.com or delivered to The News Herald, 501 W. 11th St., Panama City. O nline guest books View today’s obituaries and sign the online guest books of your loved ones at newsherald.com/obituaries Aundrey P. Cowing, 71, a native of Enterprise, Ala., died Tuesday, Jan. 6, 2015. She is survived by three daughters, three sons, two sisters, two brothers, 12 granddaughters, seven grandsons, and a host of relatives and friends. Funeral services will be held at 2 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 17, 2015, at Mt. Olive Missionary Baptist Church. Interment will follow at Hillside Cemetery. Aundrey P. Cowing AUNDREY COWING Mr. Robert Daniel “Dan” Taylor of Panama City Beach, Fla., passed away on Jan. 6, 2015. He is survived by his wife, Treva; his two daughters, Debra Whitaker (Jerry) of Jacksonville, Fla., and Carrie Westmoreland (Barry) of Atlanta, Ga.; his sister, Elizabeth Valdez (Danny) of Tampa, Fla.; his brother, Calvin Taylor of Panama City, Fla.; six grandchildren, Barry Westmoreland, Leann Westmoreland, Christina Whitaker, Brittany Westmoreland, Rachel Whitaker and Ariel Westmoreland; great-grandson, Walker Westmoreland; and many special nieces and nephews. Dan was preceded in death by his parents, Robert and Evelyn Taylor; and many loving relatives and friends. Dan was born in Cullman, Ala., on October, 16, 1938. He graduated from Central High School, Muncie, Ind., in 1956. In 1958, he married his “bride” of 56 years, Treva Cooper. Together they started a fulfilling lifetime journey that led them to creating a beautiful family and a business — Taylor’s Refrigeration & Air Conditioning for 43 years in Panama City Beach, Fla. His business allowed him to development wonderful friendships in the community. Dan enjoyed spending time with his family, fishing (whenever he was not working), square dancing, and traveling to see his daughters and his grandchildren. His greatest joy was helping in the community and being with his family, who loved him dearly. Dan will be terribly missed by his family and friends who will be comforted knowing that his love and the lessons he bestowed on us will remain forever. The family of Dan Taylor wishes to express sincere appreciation for those many acts of kindness, messages of sympathy, words of comfort and visits during the recent loss of our brother, husband, father and grandfather. May God bless all of you. A celebration of Dan’s wondrous life — a Memorial Service — will be held at 4 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 17, 2015, at First Baptist Church – Sunnyside, 21321 Panama City Beach Parkway. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions can be made to First Baptist Church – Sunnyside and/or Covenant Hospice. Robert Daniel ‘Dan’ Taylor ROBERT TAYLOR Edna Margaret Roberts Meek Edna Margaret Roberts Meek passed away on Jan. 9, 2015. Visitation will be held at 1 p.m. Friday, Jan. 16, 2015, at Grace Presbyterian Church, followed by a memorial service at 2 p.m. at the same location. Burial will be in Burlington, Kan. Anyone wishing to make a memorial contribution may send one to Grace Cares Food Bank, care of Grace Presbyterian Church, 1415 Airport Road, Panama City, FL 32405. Wilson Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements. Wilson Funeral Home Family Owned Since 1911 214 Airport Road Panama City, FL 850-785-5272 Daniel ‘Wayne’ Davis Daniel “Wayne” Davis, 76, of Panama City, Fla., died on Jan. 11, 2015. Visitation will be from 6-8 p.m. today, Jan. 16, 2015. Funeral services will begin at 11 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 17, at Wilson Funeral Home. Burial will be at Kynesville Methodist Cemetery following services. Kenneth Stanley Ross, 60, of Panama City Beach, Fla., died Thursday, Jan. 8, 2015. He was born to the late Raymond and Betty Jean Ross on Dec. 30, 1954. Kenny graduated from Bay High School in 1972 and received a BA in journalism from the University of Florida in 1976. Kenny was part owner/ manager of the Boar’s Head Restaurant and Tavern in Panama City Beach for over 30 years. He is survived by his daughter, Lauren Ross; and brother, Barry Ross. A celebration of life in honor of Kenny will be held from 4-6 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 18, 2015, at the Boar’s Head Restaurant, 17290 Front Beach Road, Panama City Beach. In lieu of flowers, those desiring to may make a donation to Covenant Hospice, 107 W. 19th St., Panama City, FL 32405, in memory of Kenny Ross. Wilson Funeral Home Family Owned Since 1911 214 Airport Road Panama City, FL 850-785-5272 Kenneth Stanley Ross 1954 – 2015 KENNETH R OSS Donna Lynn Coleman, loving wife, beautiful mother, wonderful grandmother, and dear friend, passed on Wednesday evening, Jan. 14, 2015, at the age of 68 at her home in Lynn Haven, Fla. Donna’s greatest joy came in spending time with her grandchildren, Jeremy, Caroline, and Nicholas Coleman. Donna excelled at caring for her grandchildren, as she did for her husband, Lynford, and her two sons, Scott and Jeffrey, and the newest family addition, her daughter-in-law, Jessica. Donna’s favorite place to be was at home surrounded by her family; she loved to visit new places and to see the world, but always eagerly anticipated her return home. Donna enjoyed day trips with her grandchildren, visits from her boys, afternoon naps, a hot cup of tea, sharing laughs with good friends, window shopping, and baking sweet treats for her family and friends. She will be greatly missed and fondly remembered. Funeral services will be held at 10 a.m. Monday, Jan. 19, 2015, at Wilson Funeral Home. Interment will follow at Evergreen Memorial Gardens. The family will receive friends at the funeral home on Monday from 9-10 a.m. prior to services. Wilson Funeral Home Family Owned Since 1911 214 Airport Road Panama City, FL 850-785-5272 Donna Lynn Coleman DONNA COLEMAN Jo Ann Watkins A memorial service for Mrs. Jo Ann Watkins, 78, of Panama City, Fla., will begin at 2 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 17, 2015, at the East Congregation of Jehovah’s Witnesses, 8120 E. State 22, Panama City. Southerland Funeral Home is handling arrangements. Calvin C. ‘Gator’ Maddox Mr. Calvin C. “Gator” Maddox, 80, passed away Wednesday morning in a Panama City hospital. A lifelong resident of Wewahitchka, Mr. Maddox served in the U.S. Army and worked for Basic Magnesia for 35 years until his retirement. He was kind, loving, and willing to help whoever needed it. He is preceded in death by his wife, Joyce. Survivors include his children, Mitchell Maddox and wife, Alison, and Marie Maddox Cowan; his grandchildren, Blake and Heather Maddox and Jordan, Natalie, and Ryan Cowan; his sisters, Marilynn Bonneau and Nancy Lunsford and husband, Walt; and many other family members. The funeral service will be held at 2 p.m. CST Monday, Jan. 19, 2015, at First Baptist Church in Wewahitchka conducted by the Rev. Mike Stroud. Interment will follow in Pleasant Rest Cemetery in Overstreet. He will lie in state at the First Baptist Church Family Life Center on from 6-8 p.m. Sunday. Comforter Funeral Home Wewahitchka Branch Chapel 560 S. State 71 Wewahitchka, FL 32465 850-227-1818 Michael Gene Luckie Funeral services for Mr. Michael Gene Luckie, 61, formerly of Wewahitchka, Fla., will begin at 2 p.m. CST Friday, Jan. 16, 2015, at First Baptist Church of Wewahitchka. Visitation will be at the church one hour before services. Interment will follow in Jehu Cemetery. Southerland Funeral Home, Port St. Joe, is handling arrangements. Doris Fussell Doris Fussell, 95, of Panama City, Fla., died Thursday, Jan. 15, 2015. Arrangements will be announced by Kent-Forest Lawn Funeral Home.. Charles Holland Charles Holland, 66, died Wednesday, Jan. 14, 2015. Arrangements will be announced by Kent-Forest Lawn Funeral Home. 6 people injured in early morning crash A NDREW W ARDLOW | The News Herald Emergency crews work the accident scene Thursday morning on County 390 near Transmitter Road near Lynn Haven.

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LOCA L & STATE Page B4 | The News Herald | Friday, January 16, 2015 What’s H A PP E NING TODAY 30 A S O NGWRI T ERS FES T IV A L: All-day event at venues along County 30A in Walton County. Tickets and details: 30ASongWritersFestival.com WIN T ER RESI D EN T S PR O GR A M: Monday through Friday at The Ark, 19208 Hibiscus St., Panama City Beach. Wood Shop – 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.; Sewing/Quilting – 9:30-11:30 a.m. Details: 249-1980 E D UC AT I O N ENC O RE REGIS T R AT I O N: 8 a.m. in the Student Union East Conference Center at Gulf Coast State College, Panama City; doors open at 7 a.m. Details: GulfCoast.edu/EducationEncore or 872-3823 SE A NEE D LES: 10 a.m. at the Panama City Beach Library, 12500 Hutchison Blvd. Details: 233-5055, www.nwrls.com FREE A R T FRI DAY S: 1-6 p.m. at CityArts Cooperative, 318 Luverne Ave. Details: 769-0608, CityArtsCooperative. com R A VEN H. PRICE B OO K SIGNING: 2-5 p.m. at Books By the Sea, 571 Harrison Ave., Panama City. Price will sign copies of her books, “The Conversion” and “The Plan.” D ENNIS ‘M OO NSHINE’ R AD ER: 2 p.m. at Arnold High School Auditorium, 550 Alf Coleman Road, P.C. Beach. Classic country music, old-time rock ‘n’ roll, and homespun comedy; debut of his Gospel CD “Step Into The Water.” Free admission, limited seating. Tickets available at PCB Senior Center and Tourist Development Council. Details: 234-8983 B A LLR OO M DA NCING: 6:30-8:30 p.m. at the Grand Square Hall, 1105 Bob Little Road, Panama City. Details: Dirk Gordon, 277-0566 T E A M IMP A C T : 7 p.m. at St. Andrew Baptist Church, 3010 W. 15th St., Panama City. Details: 850-785-8596 ‘S A I D T HE SPI D ER TO T HE SP Y ’: 7:30 p.m. at Kaleidoscope Theatre, 207 E. 24th St., Lynn Haven. Details and tickets: 265-3226 or kt-online.org S AT CHM O : 7:30 p.m. at The Martin Theatre, 409 Harrison Ave., Panama City. Details: 763-8080 or MartinTheatre.com SAT UR DAY 30 A S O NGWRI T ERS FES T IV A L: All-day event at venues along County 30A in Walton County. Tickets and details: 30ASongWritersFestival.com R A VEN H. PRICE B OO K SIGNING: 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Panama City Market Place, 257 W. 15th St. Price will sign copies of her books, “The Conversion” and “The Plan.” M A R T IN LU T HER KING JR. PR AY ER BRE A KF A S T : 8 a.m. at Glenwood Community Center, 722 E. Ninth Court, Panama City. Details: 763-5381 EMER A L D C OA S T ‘WIN T ER CL A SSIC’ R A BBI T SH O W: 8:30 a.m. at Central Panhandle Fairgrounds, 2230 E. 15th St., Panama City. Details: EmeraldCoastRBA.com or call Ann Roney, 850-867-0817 A RB O R DAY CELEBR AT I O N: 10 a.m. at the Panama City Beach Conservation Park off Grifn Boulevard. Details: 233-5045 FL O RI O P O LIS A NNIVERS A R Y : 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. at Floriopolis, 1125 Beck Ave., Panama City. Details: Facebook. com/Floriopolis FR O ZEN W O N D ERL A N D – A MILI TA R Y A PPRECI AT I O N: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Science and Discovery Center of Northwest Florida in Panama City. Details: 505-660-0057 WIN T ER C OO K O U T A N D CL A SSIC C A R CRUISE-IN: noon to 4 p.m. at Harley-Davidson, 14700 Panama City Beach Parkway. Details: 888-547-2905 B AY C O UN TY GENE A L O GIC A L S O CIE TY : 1 p.m. at the Bay County Public Library, 898 W. 11th St. T E A M IMP A C T : 7 p.m. at St. Andrew Baptist Church, 3010 W. 15th St., Panama City. Details: 850-785-8596 CEN T ENNI A L SIN AT R A : 7:30 p.m. at the Marina Civic Center, 8 Harrison Ave., Panama City. Details and tickets: MarinaCivicCenter.com or 763-4696, ext. 0 ‘S A I D T HE SPI D ER TO T HE SP Y ’: 7:30 p.m. at Kaleidoscope Theatre, 207 E. 24th St., Lynn Haven. Details and tickets: 265-3226 or kt-online.org HA NG -O UT fr ie d Fl ou nd er di nn er lu nc h sp ec ia ls hap py ho ur dr af ts 3 pm 6p m HA NG OU T SE AF OO D PL AT TE R Se af oo d Pe nn e pa st a AL FR EDO $ 13 95 $ 12 95 $ 11 95 $ 8 99 $ 2 00 Ser ve d wi th tw o si de s Fr ie d sh rim p, oy st er s an d fi sh ser ve d wi th fr en ch br ea d TU ES DA Y fr id ay HA NG -O UT HA NG -O UT fr ie d Fl ou nd er $ 13 $ 13 $ 95 $ 85 024 942 64 10 44 0 FR ON T BE AC H RO AD OP EN FO R LU NC H & DIN NE R Tu es da y Th ru Sa tu rd ay 47 dr af t BE ER 35p m wi th pu r ch as e of an y en tr ee 625 W Ba ld wi n Rd , St e B Pa na ma Ci ty , FL 32 40 5 Mo nd ay -F ri da y 5P M10 PM Sa tu rd ay 9A M2P M 85 052 273 37 (P ED S) Ped ia tr ic Ur ge nt Ca re Pr ov id in g Af te rHo ur s Ca re fo r Ch il dr en . 11 338 18 Di re ct ions: Fr om P. C.L @ 2nd re d ligh t in So uthpor t, Tr av el 1 block & turn L on Ma rk et St . Co nt inue Ma rk et St . & turn L on Ra ilr oad Av e. (End of the ro ad) We ar e the gr ey building to yo ur R. EB T La rg e He adOn Sh ri mp Reg. $6.50 LB SALE $5. 50 LB over 10 LB's, $5.00 LB Ready to Co ok La rg e Pe eled & De ve ined SALE $25/BOX Medium/L ar ge He adon Sh ri mp Reg. $5.50 LB SALE $4.50 LB (over 10 LB’ s, $4 LB) EB T Fr i. & Sa t. 8am 4pm Ge ra ld Mi ller Se af ood Va ri et y of Se afo od He ad le ss Sh ri mp To o! 73 28 Ra ilr oad Av e. Ha pp y Ne w Ye ar! 17 Ye ars of Experience Mavis Nowell EACH PROCEDURE $300 LOCA TED AT PA NAMA CITY PLASTIC SURGER Y 850-819-3937 NO TI CE OF PUB LI C HE AR IN G NO TI CE IS HEREBY GIVEN th at th e Ci ty of Pa na ma Ci ty , Flo ri da , pr op os es to ado pt th e fo ll ow in g ord in an ces. e Ci ty Co mmi ss io n wi ll co ns ider th e or din an ces at 8:00 A.M. on Ja nu ar y 27, 2015, at Ci ty Ha ll , 9 Ha rri so n Av en ue , Pa na ma Ci ty . In te re st ed pa rt ies ma y ap pe ar at th e me et in g an d be he ar d wi th re sp ec t to th e pr op os ed or din an ces. e pu bl ic is in vi te d to re vi ew th e pr op os ed or din an ces at th e Pl an nin g an d La nd Us e De pa rt me nt , 9 Ha rri so n Av en ue , Ro om 203, Pa na ma Ci ty , Fl or id a , be tw ee n th e ho ur s of 8:00 am to 5:00 pm , Mo nd ay th ou gh Fr id ay . A pe rs on wh o de cides to ap pe al an y de ci sio n ma de by an y bo ar d, ag en cy , or co un ci l wi th re sp ec t to an y ma tt er co ns ider ed at su ch me et in g or he ar in g wi ll ne ed a re co rd of th e pr oc eed in gs. Fo r su ch pu rp os es, an y su ch pe rs on ma y ne ed to en su re th at a ve rb at im re co rd of th e pr oc eed in gs is ma de , wh ic h in cl udes th e te st im on y an d ev iden ce up on wh ic h th e ap pea l is ba se d. Pe rs on s wi th di sa bi li ti es ne ed in g as si st an ce to pa rt ici pa te in an y of th es e pr oc ee din gs sho ul d co nt ac t Da rl en e Ha ch me iste r, Ci ty Cl er k, at (850) 872-3020 at le as t 48 ho ur s be fo re th e da te of th e sc he du le d he ar in g. _____________________________________________ e fo ll ow in g or dina nc e wil l be pr es en te d fo r an ad opt io n he ar in g: OR DI NA NC E NO . 2545 AN OR DI NA NC E VA CA TIN G AND AB AND ON IN G A PL AT TED RI GHT -O FWA Y AND A UT ILIT Y EA SE MENT NEAR THE NO RT HEA ST CO RNE R OF CA C TUS AV ENUE AND BU SI NESS HI GHW AY 98 IN PA NA MA CIT Y, FLO RID A, AS MO RE PA RT IC UL ARL Y HEREIN AFTER DE SCRIB ED; REP EALIN G ALL OR DI NA NC ES IN CO NFLI CT HEREWITH; PR OV ID IN G FO R THE SE VER AB ILIT Y OF AN Y PA RT OF THIS OR DI NA NC E DE CL ARED INV ALID; AND PR OV ID IN G FO R AN EFFECTIVE DA TE. e fo ll ow in g ord ina nc e wil l be pr es en te d fo r a rs t re adin g: OR DI NA NC E NO . 2548 AN OR DI NA NC E UP DA TIN G THE PO RT MA ST ER PL AN SU B-ELEMENT OF THE CO MP REHENS IVE PL AN OF THE CIT Y OF PA NA MA CIT Y, PR OV ID IN G FO R A REP EALER , PR OV ID IN G FO R SE VER AB ILIT Y AND PR OV ID IN G FO R AN EFFECTIVE DA TE . PUBLIC NO TICE Ci ty of Pa nama Ci ty Bo ar d of Ad justm en t Ag enda Monda y, Ja nuar y 26, 2015 4:00 p. m. Ci ty Co mmi ssion Ch amb ers , Ci ty Hal l 9 Har rison Av enue , Pa nama Ci ty , Fl orida It em On e: Re quest fo r a va ri anc e fr om Se ct ion 104-119(a)(6) of Pa nama Ci ty ’s Land De ve lopmen t Re gula tions to allo w co nstruc tion of an ac ce ssor y struc tur e in the fr on t ya rd of a re siden tial pr oper ty , 413 S. Ma cA rt hur Av enue , Ca ro line and Vi ct or Wh it ehead , ow ner and applican t. Tu e. FO OD -4 -K ID Z Pl ea se Br in g A Ca n of Fo od or C ash Do na ti on ~ Pl us ~ S hoji 's Sp eci al Gu es t Bi ll y Ra de r WHAT’S HAPPENING DEADLINES Saturday and Sunday events: By 5 p.m. Wednesday Monday and Tuesday events: By noon Thursday Wednesday events: By 5 p.m. Monday before Thursday events: By 5 p.m. Tuesday before Friday events: By 5 p.m. Wednesday before Email pcnhnews@pcnh.com with “What’s Happening” in the subject line. Astronauts close to moving into space station for year CAPE CANAVERAL (AP) — An American astronaut and Russian cosmonaut are just two months shy of launching to the International Space Station for an entire year. Already, though, scientists are clamoring for additional long-term subjects. Two people are not enough from a scientific perspective, NASA’s space station program scientist, Julie Robinson, said Thursday. The space agency wants to start collecting data from Scott Kelly and Mikhail Kornienko before making any firm decisions on further one-year missions, she said. NASA and its partners — Russia, Europe, Japan and Canada — are considering as many as 12 one-year test subjects at the space station. All but Russia are new to such long orbital hauls. Space veterans in their 50s, Kelly and Kornienko will rocket into orbit in late March from Kazakhstan and remain aboard the space station until the following March. It will be the first time NASA sends someone into space for 12 months; station stints typically last six months. The Russians are old pros at this, but medical and technological breakthroughs since Russia’s yearlong missions from the 1980s and 1990s means even more will be learned this time around, according to Robinson. The two sides will collaborate on many of the experiments. NASA wants to learn how the body fares after a year in space, before committing to lengthy trips to Mars and elsewhere. Right now, it’s a big question mark as to what happens beyond six months in orbit. “What we don’t know right now is what that sixto 12-month period looks like,” Robinson told reporters. “We’re talking about it scientifically, but we’re not really having deep discussions about it until we have the first information from the first two. If we see something dramatic, that’s going to change how everybody looks at having additional one-year missions.”

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LOCA L & STATE Friday, January 16, 2015 | The News Herald | Page B5 The Associated Press PALATKA 3 dead in murder-suicide outside North Florida restaurant Authorities said three people are dead following a murder-suicide at a North Florida restaurant. Putnam County Sheriff’s Sgt. Hancel Woods said the victims were found dead in the parking lot of Corky Bell’s Seafood and Steaks on Wednesday night. Deputies had responded to reports of gunfire outside the restaurant in East Palatka. Woods said it “quickly unfolded that it was a domestic-related murder-suicide.” The names of the victims have not been released. Customers inside the restaurant were placed on lockdown after the 6:50 p.m. shooting. Deputies walked customers to their cars when the lockdown was lifted about 8:30 p.m. ST. PETERSBURG 2 St. Pete teens charged with raping girl at high school Two teenagers are accused of raping a 15-year-old girl on the campus of Dixie Hollins High School in St. Petersburg. Pinellas County Sheriff’s deputies said the girl reported the crime on Monday. She told them she had been attacked in a room at the school by two students she did not know. Authorities identified the suspects as a 17-year-old and a 15-year-old. The teens were charged Wednesday with sexual battery and taken to the Pinellas County Juvenile Assessment Center. Sheriff’s officials did not say whether the attack occurred during school hours. DAYTONA BEACH Police: Homeless man dies after arrest in Daytona Beach Police said a homeless man has died after being arrested as part of a panhandling crackdown on Daytona Beach’s Boardwalk. Chief Mike Chitwood said police were at the beach Wednesday night in response to complaints about aggressive panhandling near Joe’s Crab Shack. Seven men were arrested, put into a police van and taken to the Volusia County Jail. The Daytona Beach News-Journal reported six men got out of the van at the jail. One man appeared to be sleeping and could not be awakened. Chitwood said a medical issue is suspected in the death of the 46-year-old man. He said the man was habitually arrested for panhandling and having open containers. The Florida Department of Law Enforcement is investigating, authorities said. TALLAHASSEE Gov. Scott wants more money to help charter schools Florida Gov. Rick Scott wants a significant boost in the money going to help fix and build new charter schools. Scott on Thursday announced he will ask state legislators to set aside $100 million in the coming year to help with construction costs. Charter schools receive public money, but the schools are run by private groups. This year, charter schools received $75 million. More than 250,000 students are enrolled in almost 650 charter schools throughout Florida. Scott’s decision to ask for more money comes amid scrutiny of charter schools’ performance. The Naples Daily News reported last year that in the past six years some 14,000 students have had to relocate to new schools, at times mid-year, as a result of charter school closings. Financial problems are the most common reasons for closure. TAMPA Man charged with vandalizing artwork near police HQ A homeless man faces charges after authorities said he splashed paint on a mosaic on the side of the Tampa Police Department parking garage. Forty-nine-year-old Steven Adkins was charged Thursday with felony criminal mischief and possession of cocaine after police found him covered in orange paint that matched the hue splashed on the mosaic in downtown Tampa. Police said Adkins also splashed white paint on the mosaic, which depicts Tampa’s history. NEW SMYRNA BEACH Pilot from fatal plane crash identified as Japanese woman Authorities have identified the pilot who died after her small plane crashed into the water off New Smyrna Beach earlier this week. The Volusia County Sheriff’s Office on Thursday said the pilot was 38-year-old Mihoko Tabata. A preliminary autopsy shows Tabata died Tuesday night from injuries sustained in the crash. Authorities said Tabata is from Japan but had been living in the United States for some time. She came to Volusia County last Saturday. Tabata was the only person aboard the Cessna 152 when it crashed, about a quarter-mile offshore. Tabata had contacted the control tower during her flight to report she was having trouble navigating through the foggy weather. DAYTONA BEACH Battery charge dropped against former wrestler Kevin Nash Prosecutors have decided not to file a domestic battery charge against former professional wrestling star Kevin Nash. Prosecutors said on Thursday they won’t pursue the charge against Nash stemming from a scuffle with his 18-year-old son. An investigation against his son, Tristen, is continuing. Nash and his son were arrested last month on misdemeanor battery charges. Police said Nash got angry when his son arrived home late and intoxicated. Another relative told deputies the teen also shoved his mother. Nash’s attorney said the former wrestler was only defending his wife when he fought with his son. BRADENTON South Florida Museum plans $12 million expansion The South Florida Museum has announced plans for a $12 million expansion. If fundraising is successful, construction will start next year. The museum will add 30,000 square feet to the 60,000-square-foot campus, including four classrooms, an outdoor area for 2to 8-year-olds for hands-on activities, more aquarium tanks to showcase other marine life, a new store and cafe, and a 5,000-square-foot hall for major traveling exhibits that the museum does not now have the capacity to attract. Already the largest natural history and culture museum on Florida’s west coast, the museum attracted almost 70,000 visitors in 2014, including 12,000 students in school groups. PALM COAST Driver dead following crash with school bus A woman is dead following a crash last week with a Flagler County school bus and another car. The Florida Highway Patrol reported 23-year-old ElisaMarie Amber Homan died Tuesday at a Daytona Beach hospital. FHP officials said Homan was trying to make a left turn at a Palm Coast intersection Friday morning when she was rear-ended by another car and pushed into the path of the oncoming bus. Rheumatology E m e r a l d C o a s t Ou r Ad mi ni st er ed Bi ol og ic s In cl ude: We Ac ce pt Mo st In su ra nc es In cl udin g: Is One O f e Ar ea 's Le ad in g Sp ec ia li st s And Is Bo ar d-C er ti ed In Rh euma tol og y An d In te rn al Me dicin e. No w Ac ce pt in g Ne w Pa ti en ts for In fu si on er ap y! 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DIVERSIONS A ces On BRIDGE: B obby W olff Send questions via e-mail to askamy@ tribune.com or by mail to Ask Amy, Chicago Tribune, TT500, 435 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago, IL 60611. Ask AMY Amy Dickinson Advice Columnist SU DO KU History TOD AY Y our HOROS C OPE: Holiday Mathis Page B6 | The News Herald | Friday, January 16, 2015 THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek A: Solution to 1/15/15 Rating: SILVER 1/16/15 1/17/15 Solution to 1/16/15 Rating: GOLD JANRIC CLASSIC SUDOKU Fill in the blank cells using numbers 1 to 9. Each number can appear only once in each row, level ranges from Bronze (easiest) to Silver to Gold (hardest). 2015 Janric Enterprises Dist. by creators.com JANRIC CLASSIC SUDOKU Fill in the blank cells using numbers 1 to 9. Each number can appear only once in each row, level ranges from Bronze (easiest) to Silver to Gold (hardest). 2015 Janric Enterprises Dist. by creators.com Creators Today is Friday, Jan. 16, the 16th day of 2015. There are 349 days left in the year. Highlight in history On Jan. 16, 1865, Union Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman issued Special Field Order No. 15, which decreed that 400,000 acres of land in South Carolina, Georgia and Florida would be confiscated, divided into 40-acre lots and given to former slaves. (The order, which was later revoked by President Andrew Johnson, is believed to have inspired the expression, “Forty acres and a mule.”) On this date 1547– Ivan IV of Russia (popularly known as “Ivan the Terrible”) was crowned Czar. 1920 – Prohibition began in the United States as the 18th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution took effect. 1989 – Three days of rioting began in Miami when a police officer fatally shot Clement Lloyd, a black motorcyclist, causing a crash that also claimed the life of Lloyd’s passenger, Allan Blanchard. The officer, William Lozano, was convicted of manslaughter, but then was acquitted in a retrial. 1991 – The White House announced the start of Operation Desert Storm to drive Iraqi forces out of Kuwait. 2003 The space shuttle Columbia blasted off. The mission ended in tragedy on Feb. 1, when the shuttle broke up during its return, killing all seven crew members. Thought for today “A fanatic is a man that does what he thinks th’ Lord wud do if He knew th’ facts iv th’ case.” From “Mr. Dooley’s Philosophy” by Finley Peter Dunne American humorist (1867-1936). Single woman wonders why she picks duds DEAR AMY: I’m a single, childless woman in my early 30s who seems to always attract the wrong men, and I keep wondering how to break this pattern. I have an advanced degree, a good job and am financially secure. I keep meeting men who appear to have it all together. Before I know it — it is revealed that they do not. Oftentimes they live with relatives (the last guy lived with his mother), they are hung up on an ex-wife or girlfriend, they are often financially irresponsible, and/or have serious emotional issues. As an optimist I tend to believe it will work out in the end. It never does. I am almost always the one who gets dumped. My latest boyfriend of one year broke up with me (via a text message) and already has moved on to another woman. He said I was moving too fast for him, but I thought I was being exceptionally understanding of his situation. I keep wondering how I am single and how this man, a broke divorcee with multiple children (and one nasty temper), has found a relationship already and I can barely make a connection. LOOKING DEAR LOOKING: The vital component of dating a loser — the whipped cream on the relationship sundae, as it were — is to stick with him until he dumps you. I can’t alter the percentage of single guys your age who have done time, live with their moms, don’t actually have jobs or are hung up on their exes. The biggest challenge for natural optimists is the perpetual surprise when things don’t work out. The trick is to run your own life so well that when your dating life isn’t great, you still have the rest of your life — your work, friends, creative interests, personal connections and passions. You still win, because you get to be with you. You should be reserved in your attachments (emotional and sexual) until you know what “baggage” a guy has (stuffed away in a locker at the bus station, no doubt). Ask your smartest friend to be a “wing woman.” And please don’t focus on the relationships your exes bounce into immediately after you. The nearest karaoke bar is full of people who will settle for not-much. DEAR AMY: My husband feels that I am overly generous when I leave a 20 percent tip for satisfactory service and up to 25 percent for extraordinary service. He insists that 15 percent is always a respectable amount to tip servers. We are even farther apart when it comes to tipping valets, housekeeping or drivers. I often resort to picking up the check myself or leaving extra money behind to make up for the difference but feel bad about going behind my husband’s back on this issue. Advice? FORMER SERVER DEAR SERVER: I’m in your camp — but your view, my view or the recommendation of a travel guide is not likely to alter your husband’s practice of tipping at the low edge of the spectrum. He has dug in, so you should carry a wad of singles and $5s and continue to pick up the check if you want to be generous. DEAR AMY: “Downtrodden Daughter” described a situation very close to my own. As with Downtrodden, my mother also seemed irrationally jealous of me. Your mother is supposed to be supportive and proud. I hid my accomplishments for fear of her reaction. BEEN THERE DEAR BEEN THERE: Jealousy toward one’s own children reveals a deep unhappiness on the part of the parent. A Different Deal Every Day $15 $30 50% ARIES (March 21-April 19): You’ll be giving a few directives. It’s better to tell people what to do, and not how to do it. Everyone has a unique method, and you’ll learn by watching what they come up with. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): It’s actually good that people mostly disagree today. If they understood each other too clearly, it would cause grief. The communication of civility mostly lies in body language. GEMINI (May 21-June 21): You crave an aesthetic experience, and yet you also want it to fit into your life in a logical, useful way. CANCER (June 22-July 22): When you largely act out of intuition, your decisions sometimes won’t make sense to other people. Their puzzled faces will pepper your experience, but pay no attention to that. Your intuition could save the day. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): If there is a great deal of petty quarreling, it’s a good indication that the job at hand isn’t big enough. Big challenges have a way of centering people and getting them to focus calmly on what they can do to make things better. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): When you walk around and look at the world, you make connections with people everywhere you go. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23): The rule today is that if you can say it in fewer words, do. People will lose interest very quickly. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21): Your reluctance to make new associations has to do with the hurt of a past experience and a vibe you are getting about a certain person. You can’t put it into words yet, but it’s real, so don’t disregard the feeling. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): You may accidentally attract people who will take advantage of your compassionate nature. Take a step back. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): By nature, you are an executive and a manager, even though your life doesn’t always reflect that part of your talent. Today brings a bit of chaos you’ll enjoy sorting out for someone. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Telephone addiction will cause people to lose opportunities. You’ll be lucky when you’re the one looking up and connecting. It’s really not necessary to pick up every call. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): The main issues have to do with control. There’s a line to walk. If you too often dominate, it’s repellent.

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COMI C S Friday, January 16, 2015 | The News Herald | Page B7

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To submit an item for Out & About, email pcnhnews@pcnh.com or fax to 850-747-5097 Out & About Page B8 | The News Herald | Friday, January 16, 2015 Locals Cole Schneider, left, and Matt Greene co-host the weekly film podcast “Movietown Movie Club.” Each week, they will be sharing their different takes on new movies out in area theaters. For more, visit Movietown Movie Club on Facebook. MO VIETO WN MO VIE CLUB ‘SELMA’ Director: Ava DuVernay Starring: David Oyelowo, Tom Wilkinson, Giovanni Ribisi, Stephen Root, Tim Roth, Oprah Winfrey, Carmen Ejogo Rated: PG-13 (disturbing thematic material including violence, a suggestive moment, and brief strong language) This movie is called “Selma,” NOT “The Martin Luther King Jr. Story,” for a reason. The intensity and significance of the Civil Rights movement is captured all through one seemingly small, but ultimately huge, demonstration. And while King’s a more than prominent part of this story, and is even the de facto protagonist, Selma was a victory for more than one individual, and DuVernay and company know that. With a beautiful lead performance by David Oyelowo, this is stirring and engrossing dramatic filmmaking that humanizes history and an icon, embracing every part of the ugly truth. Selma doesn’t rely on lazy-biopic gimmicks to catch us up to speed. The filmmakers rightly assume a basic knowledge of King and his impact. This gives the story room to breathe, letting the depth of details and emotions hold the screen over dry facts. We get to see the heartbreak of the injustice up-close, the politicking of all reigning parties (including a fascinating look at the White House), the fear and difficulty inherent in true non-violent protests, and the ultimate hope of goals reached. The script has a few dull moments that could’ve hit the editing room floor, and some of the casting could be seen as stereotypes, but there is intentionality to director Ava DuVernay’s subtly dusty yet intensely personal film. Really, it’s hard not to feel personal about “Selma,” given the state of current racial unrest. We are far from past the teachings of Dr. King, but a devastating yet forward-looking film like this can help us learn to see the complexity inherit and necessity in justice. “Selma” isn’t emotionally manipulative; it is emotionally necessary. Rating: 4.5 out of 5 stars Panama City Beach musician Matt Greene, who has a bachelor’s in philosophy from the University of North Florida in Jackson ville, always has enjoyed viewing, debating and critiquing all forms and aspects of film, from foreign films to slapstick comedies. Cole: ‘Selma’ emotionally stirring Matt: ‘Selma’ humanizes history I’m biased in my review of “Selma.” I have artwork in my home supporting Dr. King. He has been a source of spiritual inspiration as well as a challenging ethical figure for as long as I’ve been of age to carry an ethos. As a middle class white man far removed from these events, “Selma” is a platform which demands I identify and empathize with victims of racial prejudice of yesteryear and today. I strive to be like the priest from Boston from the film, willing to answer the call to stand for justice even when it means the forfeiture of his own advantages, to willingly see the world from the eyes of the subjected and stand with them in their struggle. If “Selma” was an otherwise mediocre film it would still have Dr. King going for it. He is a vibrant centerpiece and David Oyelowo portrays him with staggering grace. “Selma,” though, is far more than that. It’s a stylish, stirring take on the events surrounding the march he led from Selma and the political innuendo surrounding it. It’s neither as startling as “12 Years a Slave” nor as richly prescient as “Fruitvale Station,” but it captures a moment in American history invaluable to citizens today, black, white and otherwise. Hopefully people will stand with this film as Americans stood with MLK then and force the hands of big Hollywood studios the way that President Johnson’s hand was forced through the events in a small Alabama town. Rating: 4 out of 5 stars Longtime Panama City resident Cole Schneider, born in Long Beach, Calif., always has pre ferred popcorn and a movie to a long walk on the beach. Author William Kennedy is 87. Author-editor Norman Podhoretz is 85. Opera singer Marilyn Horne is 81. Hall of Fame auto racer A.J. Foyt is 80. Singer Barbara Lynn is 73. Country singer Ronnie Milsap is 72. Singer Katherine Anderson Schaffner (The Marvelettes) is 71. Country singer Jim Stafford is 71. Talk show host Dr. Laura Schlessinger is 68. Movie director John Carpen ter is 67. Actress-dancer-choreographer Debbie Allen is 65. Singer Sade (shah-DAY’) is 56. Rock musician Paul Webb (Talk Talk) is 53. Rhythm-and-blues singer Maxine Jones (En Vogue) is 49. Actor David Chokachi is 47. Actor Richard T. Jones is 43. Actress Josie Davis is 42. Model Kate Moss is 41. Country musician James Young (The Eli Young Band) is 35. Rock musician Nick Valensi (The Strokes) is 34. Actress Renee Felice Smith (TV: “NCIS: Los Angeles”) is 30. NFL quaterback Joe Flacco is 30. Actress Yvonne Zima is 26. HAPPY Birthday BIRTHDAY DEADLINES Tuesday birthdays: noon on Friday before. Wednesday birthdays: noon on Monday before. Thursday birthdays: noon on Tuesday before. Friday birthdays: noon Wednesday before. Email pcnhnews@pcnh.com with “Birthday” in the subject line or drop off current photo and ll out a birthday form at the front desk of The News Herald, 501 W. 11th St. TRIVIA FUN EDITOR’S NOTE: “Trivia Fun” with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a daily feature in The News Herald. Of these, who played forward on two state championship high school basketball teams? Brooke Shields, Queen Latifah, Star Jones, Tara Reid What is the only two-word state that has a twoword state capital city? New Hampshire, New Mexico, West virginia, South Dakota Which country physically has the most active drive-in theaters? Mexico, India, England, USA Where is the Louvre, the most visited museum in the world? Rome, Paris, London, New Orleans When did Jefferson Airplane become Jefferson Starship? 1969, 1974, 1985, 1992 Cows outnumber people in at least how many U.S. states? 0, 2, 9, 14 ANSWERS: Queen Latifah, New Mexico, USA, Paris, 1974, 9 Comments, questions or suggestions? WC@TriviaGuy.com W ILS O N C A SEY Trivia Guy

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Sports PANAMA CITY NEWS HERALD Section C Facebook: tinyurl.com/NHSports Twitter: @NH_Sports www.newsherald.com/sports By JASON SHOOT 747-5069 | @PCNHJasonShoot jshoot@pcnh.com Michael Duderstadt has had an immediate impact on the men’s swimming program at Auburn. Two of his long-time friends also are making their mark at the college level. Duderstadt, a former standout at Mosley and on the Panama City Swim Team, is building on his All-American freshman season during his second year with the Tigers. He has set NCAA provisional marks already in the 100-yard breaststroke, the 200 breaststroke and 200 individual medley. Further more, Dud erstadt has contributed on five different relay teams. Duderstadt is Auburn’s top swimmer in the 100 breaststroke with a top time of 52.54 seconds, as well as the 200 breaststroke with a time of 1:55.06. Those two times each rank third all time in Auburn history. He is the Tigers’ No. 2-ranked swim mer in the 200 IM with a personal-best time of 1:46.98. Those exploits only par tially cover Duderstadt’s contribution to Auburn’s program this season. He ranks second on the team in the 200 freestyle (1:39.56) and fifth in the 100 freestyle (44.87). He has competed on three different relay teams — 200 freestyle, 400 free style and 400 medley — that have qualified for the NCAA Championships. Another Mosley and PCST alum, junior Victo ria Hove, ranked fourth on Alabama’s swim team in 2014 in the 400 IM (4:30.81) and fifth in the 200 IM (2:05.91). If she continues to improve, securing an NCAA provisional mark in the 400 IM is a definite possibility. Hove finished the 400 IM in 4:31.97 during a dual meet against Texas A&M on Jan. 9. She also finished the 200 butterfly with a time of 2:12.89. Jonathan Ratliff, a freshman at Florida State who previously swam at Mosley and for PCST, placed seventh in the 200 butterfly (1:56.52) and eighth in the 1,000 free style (10:07.65) in a dual meet against Florida on Jan. 3. FRIDAY January 16, 2015 5 ’Noles, 4 Gators and 2 ’Canes declare for draft By JASON SHOOT 747-5069 | @PCNHJasonShoot jshoot@pcnh.com Florida State’s recruiting class ranked second-best in the nation in 2012, a collection of 19 players that included Jameis Winston, Eddie Goldman and other highly rated prospects. Five members of that class — Winston, Goldman, Mario Edwards Jr., P.J. Williams and Ronald Darby — have declared their intention to enter this year’s NFL draft. Of the aforementioned 19 players, only eight remain on the FSU roster. Winston’s decision to enter the draft was not unexpected despite his frequent over tures that he intended to remain at the school to continue his respec tive football and baseball careers. His considerable off-the-field troubles aside, Winston looks the part of an NFL quarterback with his prototypical size (6-foot-4, 230 pounds) and abil ity to make all the throws required in a pro-style offense. The Seminoles can expect a massive drop in production at quar terback in 2015. Sean Maguire, who was part of that 2012 recruiting class, does have in-game expe rience. What he doesn’t possess, however, is the ability to carry the offense on the strength of his right arm alone. FSU has a pair of untested quarterbacks, J.J. Cosentino and John Franklin, who could push Maguire in spring practice for the starting role. Still, it is apparent that FSU has a glaring lack of depth at the position. Goldman, a third-team AllAmerican this year, had solidified his status as an every-down defensive tackle and is expected to hear his name called on the draft’s first day. FSU has depth at tackle, but the Seminoles don’t have a player of Goldman’s caliber ready to anchor the line. Nile Lawrence-Stample, Derrick Mitchell, Giorgio Newberry and Derrick Nnadi will be in the mix to start at tackle next fall. Edwards always was an odd fit at defensive end, a 300-pound lineman who never was a threat as a pass rusher but did excel as an edge-set ter against the run. FSU likely will turn to Chris Casher, DeMarcus Walker and Lorenzo Featherston at end next season. By DUSTIN KENT 747-5065 | @PCNHDustinKent dkent@pcnh.com MALONE — For three years, Malone’s Antwain Johnson waited his turn. After breaking into the varsity rotation as a high school freshman, Johnson raised his level of play in the two ensuing seasons, culminat ing with a breakout junior year that saw him average 20 points per game and help lead the Tigers to their 14th state championship. But through all those years, the majority of the eyes of Malone fans and opposition were focused on Chai Baker, who led the Tigers in scoring the past four seasons and etched his name in Tigers lore with a 44-point performance in the title game win over Hamilton County. With Baker graduating and mov ing on to Oregon State, the pressure of being the No. 1 option was passed on to Johnson, and to this point he is handling it brilliantly. The 6-foot-2 senior guard is averaging 28.2 points per game on 51 percent shooting from the field, 39 percent from the 3-point line, and 77 percent from the free-throw line. He also leads the Tigers in rebound ing (9.9 per game) and steals (3.1) and is second in assists (3.6). It’s a remarkable stat line, with Johnson saying that he knew before the season that more would be put on his shoulders after the departure of Baker, who led the team with a 22.7 scoring average last year. “I knew it was going to be tough because we won state last year and we would have a target on our back, and I knew it would be harder with out having Chai there,” Johnson said. “I knew I was going to have to step up. It’s just good because it’s a moment I’ve been waiting for. All these years, all you heard about was Ty (Baker) and Chai and now it’s my time.” While relish ing the opportunity to be the team’s leader, Johnson said his primary focus going into the season wasn’t on gaudy stats. “At first, I wasn’t really expecting (to put up big numbers). I was just trying to win and just play ing that game. That was just the outcome,” Johnson said. “All that stuff is nice to hear about, but at the end of the day I just do it so we can win.” The wins have been coming, too, for the Tigers, who have surpassed the expectations of many to start the season. They are 15-3 and 9-2 in their district, with the only losses coming to 17-1 Paxton and 17-2 Chipley. Johnson said he has enjoyed sur prising people in the win col umn this year just as much as on the stat sheet. “I feel like at the begin ning of the year that no one thought ANTWAIN’S THE ONE Senior Johnson takes lead role for Tigers SEE MALONE | C2 County trio makes splash on college swim scene SEE EARLY ENTRIES | C2 K RISTIE C LOUD | Jackson County Floridan AP Florida guard Michael Frazier II scores against Auburn during the second half on Thursday. UF wins 24th straight SEC game GAINESVILLE (AP) — Dorian FinneySmith scored 14 points, Eli Carter added 12 and Florida beat Auburn 75-55 Thursday night, winning its 24th consecutive Southeast ern Conference game. The Gators (10-6, 3-0 SEC) never trailed in this one, building a double-digit lead early and going up by as many as 24 early in the second half. All 10 regulars scored, with Carter getting most of his in the first 20 minutes and Finney-Smith taking over after the break. Finney-Smith, who was limited in the first half because of foul trouble, scored just about every way imaginable. He had put-backs, tipins, made two 3-pointers and was perfect from the free-throw line. Antoine Mason led Auburn (9-7, 1-2) with 13 points. Cinmeon Bowers added 11 points and 11 rebounds for his 10th double-double of the season. Florida shot 49 percent from the floor and was 7 of 17 from beyond the arc. Mason hit consecutive 3-pointers from the top of the key, cutting Florida’s lead to 63-50 with 5:42 to play. Jordan Granger added another trey from the corner, making it a 10-point game for the first time since midway through the first half. But the Gators held on down the stretch despite struggling from the free-throw line (12 of 18). Florida won its eighth straight in the series EARLY DRAFT ENTRANTS Florida State Seminoles CB Ronald Darby DE Mario Edwards Jr. DT Eddie Goldman CB P.J. Williams QB Jameis Winston Florida Gators DE Dante Fowler Jr. OT D.J. Humphries RB Matt Jones OG Tyler Moore Miami Hurricanes OT Ereck Flowers RB Duke Johnson Inside Cardale Jones staying with Buckeyes C2 The Gators (10-6, 3-0 SEC) never trailed in this one, building a double-digit lead early and going up by as many as 24 early in the second half. SEE G ATORS | C3

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SPORT S Page C2 | The News Herald | Friday, January 16, 2015 KRISTIE CLOUD | The Jackson County Floridan Antwain Johnson looks for a teammate in a game against the Chipley Tigers in Cottondale. we’d be good at all, but these guys have been stepping up and playing good,” he said of his teammates. “The good thing about them is they’ll listen and work hard every day in practice and they’re still learning.” Malone coach Steven Welch said perhaps the most impressive thing about Johnson’s performance this season is his willingness to trust his teammates and not try to force the action even when everyone is looking for him to score. “He’s doing it the right way,” Welch said. “He’s not taking a super high volume of shots. His percentages are great. He’s just playing. It’s not like he’s out there forcing it and trying to prove anything. I’m most proud of the fact that he does have that green light, but he’s not abusing it. He’s just playing ball.” Johnson’s improvement is more than just a result of added respon sibilities. Welch credited his intense work ethic and drive to get better, both of which were demonstrated after a tough home loss to Paxton last season. “Paxton beats us and he goes home, goes outside, and turns the light on in his grandma’s yard and puts up shots until midnight,” Welch said. “That about sums it up for him. He’s that hard of a worker. In the six years I’ve coached him, I’ve never had to tell him to go lift or get some shots up. He’s always the one asking me if he can do that. “This kid is self-motivated, he’s driven, and he’s always trying to prove a point to himself or whoever that he’s good enough. He works his tail off.” That hard work will almost cer tainly land Johnson a college schol arship for next season, with North Alabama and Chattanooga offering him and Chipola putting forward an offer Monday night. Welch said he believes more and better offers will continue to come in. Johnson, who said he always has wanted to go to Miami, isn’t sweat ing out the recruiting process just yet. “I’ve just been playing and I’ll let the chips fall where they fall,” Johnson said. “I’ve always felt like I’ve been able to compete against anyone since I’ve been here. At the end of the day, I just want to work hard and prepare myself for the next level.” Before that day comes, Johnson and the Tigers still have a season to finish and a state crown to defend. Malone may not be considered the favorite to take the title this year, but Johnson said there’s no reason for the Tigers not to believe they can do it again. “Winning state is always the plan at Malone,” he said. “That’s always got to be the big goal. I feel confident, but I know we’ll have to do a lot more and keep getting better every day. We’ve got a little while before the playoffs, but if we keep working then I feel like we’ve got a good chance.” Regardless of how the season ulti mately plays out, Welch said it will be difficult for him to say goodbye to Johnson, who he described as “a coach’s dream.” “He’s a kid who is self-motivated, great in the classroom, can be an honor student, is respectful to his par ents, he works his tail off, and he can play,” Welch said. “I almost get tired of bragging on him because he’s got chinks in his armor like we all do, but I feel privi leged to coach him. He’s a great kid and a great player and I’m going to cry when he graduates. He’s been fun to have around here.” MALONE from page C1 C OLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Quarterback Cardale Jones shocked the col lege football world in three late-season starts leading Ohio State to the national championship. He surprised a packed crowd again on Thursday, declaring at his old high school in Cleveland that he would return to the Buck eyes rather than jump into the NFL draft. “My decision was very simple. I had to talk it over with my family, my friends, my coaching staff,” he said. “I’m going to return next year for school.” That sentence was met with audible gasps in the gymnasium, then applause from students and teachers. Jones, who spent a year at a military school and also had a redshirt season with the Buckeyes, could have turned pro. In his only col lege starts he led Ohio State to wins in the Big Ten title game, the Sugar Bowl and Monday night’s national championship. “It’s everybody’s dream and goal when they play foot ball or any collegiate sport to make it to the next level,” he said, wearing a gray Tshirt with his nickname “12 Gauge” because of his uni form number and shotgunlike arm. “At my point in my career, I feel like it’s best for me to go back to school. One of the most important things for me to do is graduate. “When I make that deci sion to play in the NFL, I want to be done with school. I want to devote all of my time and all my effort to the film room and getting better at playing the quarterback position.” Then, before several hundred people at the Ginn Academy, part of Glenville Academic Campus, he added: “Thank all of you guys for coming out. I don’t know why you guys made it such a big deal.” Two months ago, almost no one knew who Jones was. On Thursday, his deci sion was broadcast live on ESPN. The cable network’s draft guru, Mel Kiper Jr., said Jones could go as high as the second round of the draft. He, like many football experts, believed Jones, who recently became a father, would jump to the pros. “We put everything on a scale for him and education outweighed everything else. This shows the maturity he does have,” said his mentor and high school coach, Ted Ginn. “I’m so proud. He’s a great kid, very intelligent, smart. I think the biggest thing to him was to be able to say to his baby, ‘I went back,’ and to set an example for all kids.” Jones to return for Buckeyes AP Ohio State quarterback Cardale Jones leaves a news conference in Cleveland on Thursday after announcing he would not declare for the 2015 NFL draft. “Winning state is always the plan at Malone. That’s always got to be the big goal. I feel confident, but I know we’ll have to do a lot more and keep getting better every day.” — Antwain Johnson Malone senior guard The Seminoles boasted a talented but young defensive secondary in 2014, but they will be hard-pressed to fill the gaps left by Williams and Darby. Jalen Ramsey seems a sure bet to occupy one cornerback spot, and Marquez White and Trey Marshall will get long looks in the spring at the other. Florida Gators Four Florida players have elected to enter the NFL before their college eligibility was exhausted: defensive end Dante Fowler Jr., offensive tackle D.J. Humphries, offensive guard Tyler Moore and running back Matt Jones. The Gators are positioned well to absorb the losses of Fowler and Jones, but the holes left in the offensive line will be more difficult to plug. Alex McCalister enjoyed a breakout season as a dis ruptive force on the defensive line last season and will supplant Fowler at right end. Kelvin Taylor can expect a more pronounced role at running back with Jones out of the picture. Florida is down to eight scholarship players on the offensive line. Spring practice will be crucial as new head coach Jim McElwain determines who can step in for Humphries and Moore. Miami Hurricanes Only two Miami players elected to enter the draft early, but they are sizable losses for the Hurricanes. Running back Duke Johnson and left tackle Ereck Flowers were cornerstone pieces who won’t be easily replaced. Gus Edwards and Joseph Yearby both averaged more than 5 yards per carry last season and give the Hurri canes a potent 1-2 punch out of the offensive backfield. Miami’s offensive line was facing an overhaul even before Flowers opted to enter the draft. The Hurricanes now will have new starters at three positions on the line with no clear favorite ready to take Flowers’ place at left tackle. EARLY ENTRIES from page C1 Harris’ misdemeanor charge dropped GA I N ES V ILLE — Florida quarterback Treon Harris is no longer facing a misdemeanor charge of driving without a license. The charge was dropped Wednesday, a day before his scheduled arraignment, and Alachua County records show the case closed. Harris’ attorney, Huntley Johnson, says his client recently got his driver’s license, which led to the dismissal. Campus police stopped Harris last month for speeding. Two other Florida players, defensive backs Jalen Tabor and J.C. Jackson, were in the car. According to police, an odor of marijuana emanated from the car and two plastic bags were found inside that appeared to hold a small amount of marijuana. Because the car did not belong to Harris, Tabor or Jackson, police did not charge any of them with possession. Harris was cited for not having a license. Pitt hires Chaney, Harley as assistants P ITTS B UR GH — New Pittsburgh coach Pat Narduzzi has hired Jim Chaney as offensive coordinator and named Rob Hurley as linebackers coach. Chaney spent the last two seasons in the same position at Arkansas, helping the Razorbacks score nearly 32 points a game as the school posted its first winning season since 2011. Chaney will also serve as quarterbacks coach at Pitt. The 53-year-old Chaney’s previous coaching stops include Tennessee, Purdue and the NFL’s St. Louis Rams. Harley spent 2014 as the linebackers coach at Florida International. He worked as a graduate assistant at Michigan State under Narduzzi in 2012 and 2013. The move also reunites Harley with Josh Conklin, named as Pitt’s defensive coordinator last week. Conklin held the same position at FIU. QB Kevin Hogan returning to Stanford ST ANF ORD , Calif. — Stanford quarterback Kevin Hogan will return to school as a fifth-year senior, opting to make one more run with the Cardinal next season instead of entering the NFL draft or pursuing other career paths. Hogan announced his decision via Twitter on Thursday, the final day for underclassman to declare for the draft. The school confirmed he would be back. Hogan’s return should boost Stanford’s chances to contend for the Pac-12 title. It also delays plans for his highly touted backups, freshman Keller Chryst and sophomore Ryan Burns, to take over the position. Hogan helped stabilize the program after Andrew Luck’s departure. C OLLEGE F OOTB ALL BRIEF S

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SPORT S Friday, January 16, 2015 | The News Herald | Page C3 The following is a list of area athletes now playing college basketball. All statistics and records are through Jan. 14, unless noted. Men Ty Baker (Malone), Chipola, So., 6-6, F — Averaging 10 points, 3.6 rebounds, and one steal per game for the Indians (8-12) while shooting 38.4 percent from the 3-point line. Jerodd Blount (Cottondale), LA Trade Tech, So., 6-4, G — Averaging 11.6 points and 3.4 rebounds on 44 percent shooting for Trade Tech (3-14). Austin Boyd (Bethlehem), Faulkner State, Fr., 6-7, C — Averaging 1.2 points and 0.8 rebounds for the Sun Chiefs (10-5). Alex Hamilton (Bay, Chipley), Louisiana Tech, Jr., 6-4, 180, G — Averaging 15.2 points, 2.9 assists, 3.3 rebounds, and 2.1 steals per game while shooting 44.5 percent from the field for the Bulldogs (12-4). Jai Jencks (Rutherford), North Greenville, So., 6-8, 230, F — Averaging 3 points and 2.7 rebounds per game for the Crusaders (8-5). Kruize Pinkins (Marianna, Chipola), San Francisco, Sr., 6-7, 215, F — Averaging 15.4 points and 5.6 rebounds while shooting 52.5 percent from the field and 43.8 percent from the 3-point line for the Dons (8-10). Zachary Reynolds (Gulf Coast), Northern Arizona, Jr., 6-9, 240, F — Averaging 0.5 points and 0.8 rebounds rpg for the Lumberjacks (7-9). Jose Rodriguez (Gulf Coast), Texas Southern, Sr., 6-7, 215, F — Rodriguez is out for the season with a knee injury. Dylan Smith (Gulf Coast), Dalton State, Jr., 6-0, 180, G — Averaging 1.3 points and 0.7 rebounds for the Roadrunners (14-2). Jon Wade (Rutherford), Gulf Coast, So., 6-4, 187, G — Averaging 10.5 points, 3.6 rebounds and 2.1 assists while shooting 43.5 percent from the field and 74.8 percent from the free-throw line for the Commodores (14-6). Chris Walker (Holmes County), Florida, So., 6-10, 220, F — Averaging 5.8 points, 4.1 rebounds, and 1.4 blocks while shooting 50.8 percent from the field for the Gators (9-6). KeKe Williamson (Rutherford), Pensacola State, So., 5-8, 145, G — Averaging 3.8 points, 1.8 assists, and 0.9 steals per game for the Pirates (12-8). Tommy Wade (Bay), North Greenville University, Fr., 6-6, 230, F — Averaging 5 points and 3.2 rebounds per game while shooting 54.3 percent from the field and 77.8 percent from the free-throw line for the Crusaders (8-5). Khaliel Spearman (Rutherford), Gulf Coast, Fr., 6-2, 180, G — Redshirting this season. Alex Brown (Vernon), Louisiana-Monroe, Fr., 6-4, 185, G — Redshirting this season. Women Curteeona Brelove (Malone), VCU, Fr., 6-2, F — Averaging 9 points and 1.8 rebounds per game for the Rams (11-5). Necole Sterling (Gulf Coast), Miami, Sr., 5-10, F — Averaging 5.8 points and 2.1 rebounds while shooting 34.7 percent from the 3-point line for the Hurricanes (13-3). Tamara Taylor (Gulf Coast), USF, Sr., 5-10, G — Averaging 9.4 points and 2.4 rebounds while shooting 44 percent from the field, 40 percent from the 3-point line, and 71.4 percent from the free-throw linell for the Bulls (14-3). Alexis Ware (Mosley), South Carolina-Aiken, So., 5-10, G/F — Averaging 1.4 points, 0.6 rebounds, and 0.3 assists for the Pacers (9-9). Anyone with information on the whereabouts of other area athletes now playing college basketball is asked to call The News Herald at 747-5065 or email Dustin Kent at dkent@pcnh.com. COLLEGE BASKETBALL PERISCOPE and tied Kentucky for the second-longest winning streak in the SEC over the last 50 years. The Wildcats own the league’s modernday record, having won 26 in a row during the 1995-96 seasons. Florida’s fast start had a lot to do with its latest vic tory. The Gators made 10 of their first 17 shots and used a 15-0 run to take a 26-8 lead early. Auburn misfired early and often, missing 14 of its first 17 games. The Tigers had two lengthy field-goal droughts, going 7 minutes without a bucket in the first half and then 10 minutes without a basket later. Florida’s Michael Frazier II, who came off the bench for the third consecutive game, chipped in 11 points and eight rebounds. Kasey Hill added 12 points, seven assists and five rebounds. TIP-INS Auburn: The Tigers haven’t beaten Florida in the regular sea son since 1999 and haven’t won in Gainesville since 1996. ... Auburn fell to 0-5 on the road this season. ... Coach Bruce Pearl is now 8-6 all-time against Florida. Florida: Center Jon Hor ford and walk-on Zach Hodskins returned from suspensions. Both missed the last two games after being suspended for conduct det rimental to the team. ... Freshmen Chris Chiozza and Devin Robin son started their third consecutive game together. ... Florida students had some fun with Auburn’s Mal colm Canada, chanting “U-S-A, U-S-A” every time he touched the ball. UP NEXT Auburn hosts South Carolina on Saturday. Florida plays at Geor gia on Saturday. AUBURN (9-7) Harrell 3-13 0-0 8, Bowers 4-11 3-7 11, Ross-Miller 1-3 3-4 6, Mason 4-7 3-5 13, Granger 1-2 2-2 5, Canada 0-3 2-2 2, Reed 0-1 0-1 0, Shamsid-Deen 1-5 1-2 3, Thompson 2-4 3-3 7, Waddell 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 16-49 17-26 55. FLORIDA (10-6) Hill 5-9 2-2 12, Robinson 1-2 0-0 2, Finney-Smith 4-10 4-4 14, Chiozza 4-6 0-1 9, C. Walker 1-4 0-2 2, Carter 5-9 0-0 12, Murphy 1-3 1-2 3, Frazier II 3-7 4-4 11, Horford 2-5 0-0 5, Kurtz 2-4 1-3 5. Totals 28-59 12-18 75. Halftime—Florida 37-20. 3-Point Goals— Auburn 6-18 (Mason 2-3, Harrell 2-5, RossMiller 1-2, Granger 1-2, Shamsid-Deen 0-2, Thompson 0-2, Bowers 0-2), Florida 7-18 (Finney-Smith 2-3, Carter 2-5, Chiozza 13, Horford 1-3, Frazier II 1-3, Murphy 0-1). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Auburn 35 (Bowers 11), Florida 39 (Frazier II 9). Assists—Auburn 10 (Bowers 4), Florida 14 (Hill 7). Total Fouls—Auburn 17, Florida 20. A,346. G ATORS from page C1 PREP ROUNDUP NBH, Bozeman boys win The News Herald FREEPORT — David Jones had 14 points, five rebounds and four steals as North Bay Haven put forth a solid defen sive effort in a 49-31 win over Freeport on Thursday night in boys high school basketball. Jack Hayes had 13 points and two steals and Mitchell Moss had eight points and four rebounds. The Bucs, 14-6, host Rocky Bayou in a district game at 7 p.m. today. Bozeman 66, Vernon 52 VERNON — Christian Byrd had 26 points and 19 rebounds to lead Boze man. Tyler Melvin added 12 points and six assists and Ryan Peltonen 11 points. The Bucks, 4-14, play at Franklin County tonight in District 4-1A. Girls basketball Mosley 61, Bay 28 PANAMA CITY — Mosley cruised to a District 1-5A win, improving to 19-3 and 8-1 in the process. Hennessey Smith had 10 points, 19 rebounds and five steals, J’nyiah Daniels 14 points, five assists and four steals, J’tayvia Holley 13 points and four rebounds, Kiana Yangson nine points and four steals, Niyah Grady eight points and five rebounds and Nadine Alvarado six points and seven rebounds. Mosley plays at district leader Choc tawhatchee on Saturday. Late results Boys soccer Bay 1, Wakulla 0 PANAMA CITY — Daniel Garcia Duran scored and keeper Whit Taylor made 12 saves for the shutout. Bay pre pares for next week’s district tournament 7 p.m. today at Niceville. The Tornadoes are 8-9-1. In the JV match, Shey Dyer scored for Bay in a 1-1 tie. For the Tornadoes, 5-6-3, Aqualino Angeles made seven saves. ANNOUNCEMENTS Baseball umpires needed The Bay Area Officials Association is looking for anyone interested in umpiring baseball for high school and junior college this coming spring, sum mer and fall. Contact: David Johnson 850-2760800 or Matt Cain 850-814-2473. Callaway baseball registration Registration for Callaway youth baseball, ages 3-14, will be held Jan. 17, 24 and 31 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. on the second floor of the main concessions building at the Callaway Recreational Complex on State 22. Fees (check or cash only) are $55 for ages 7-8, 9-10 and 11-12, and $45 for ages 3-4, 5-6.. Contact: Mike Chapman 850-8194417 (president), Darren Miller 850-319-0289 (Majors vice president). Bear Creek registration Bear Creek Baseball Association will be running spring baseball/softball registrations for boys and girls ages 3-15 every Saturday through Feb. 7. Reg istrations will be from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Registra tions also will be held every Tuesday from 6-7 p.m. starting Jan. 13 through Feb. 10. The park is located at 6010 Jaycee Drive in Youngstown. Contact: Tim 850-258-0577 or 850-571-5295. R.L. Turner registration R.L. Turner is taking registrations fo The Gators (10-6, 3-0 SEC) never trailed in this one, building a double-digit lead early and going up by as many as 24 early in the second half. r the 2015 spring season through Feb. 7 at the following locations: Chapman Park, 2526 Rollins Ave., every Saturday 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; Almega Sports, 2497 State 77 (next to Red Elephant) Monday through Friday 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Saturday 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; Peoples First Insurance, 1002 W 23rd St. (Doral Building on corner of 23rd and Stanford) Monday through Fri day 8 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sports Authority, 325 W 23rd St. Panama City Square, Monday through Sunday 9 a.m.-9:30 p.m. Baseball divisions are ages 4-14. Cost is $55 per child or $50 for additional sib lings. Contact: David Chapman 850-527-6940 or RLTurnerBaseball.com North Florida Fastpitch Association The North Florida Fastpitch Association is begin ning meetings in December and January for fast pitch umpires. Anyone interested in officiating high school and middle school fastpitch softball should contact: Harold Dobbel 866-9077 or at hmjocks2mb@yahoo.com. Holy Nativity 5K Holy Nativity Episcopal School of Panama City is hosting its 13th annual 5K and One-Mile Fun Run on Saturday, Feb. 7 at 8 a.m. Registration begins at 7 a.m. Contact 850-747-0060. Mardi Gras 5K The Mardi Gras 5K run and fitness walk will be held 8 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 14 at Frank Brown Park in Panama City Beach. Entry for the 5K and fitness walk is $20 early and $25 late. Entry for a onemile fun run is $15 early and $20 late. Contact: Joe Edgecombe 850-774-0018, Marty Kirkland 850-265-8439 or register online at active.com Florida Saints openings The Florida Saints men’s semipro football team is looking for players age 17 and older and volun teer coaches for the upcoming season. Contact: David 850-348-1723 or Facebook Florida Saints Saints. No. 6 Tennessee smothers Auburn 54-42 in SEC clash AUBURN, Ala. (AP) — Andraya Carter hit three first-half 3-point ers, scoring 11 points, and No. 6 Tennessee smothered Auburn defensively in a 54-42 victory on Thursday night. The Lady Vols (15-2, 5-0 South eastern Conference) weren’t threatened much in the second half, with both teams matching their season-lows in points. Ten nessee carries an 11-game win streak into Monday night’s game at No. 7 Notre Dame. Jordan Reynolds also had 11 points on 5-of-6 shooting to match her career high for Tennes see, which held its fifth straight opponent below 60 points. Cierra Burdick scored 10 points and Isa belle Harrison had nine points and 11 rebounds after a scoreless first half. Tra’Cee Tanner led the Tigers (9-9, 0-5) with 14 points. Hasina Muhammad, Brandy Montgom ery and Katie Frerking scored eight apiece for Auburn. Carter didn’t score in the sec ond half but had four assists and four steals. The Lady Vols’ leading scorer Ariel Massengale had just five points, seven below her average. But they thrived mainly by keep ing the Tigers, who led by three points 10 minutes into the game, from consistently scoring. Tennessee built a 13-point lead over the first 8 minutes of the sec ond half before Auburn started to cut into it. Frerking hit a 3-pointer after Tanner grabbed an offensive rebound to trim Tennessee’s lead to 42-35 with 10 minutes left. It was as close as Auburn could get and the Tigers would go nearly four minutes without scoring. Auburn was just 19-of-59 shoot ing (32.2 percent). The Lady Vols closed the first half on an 8-2 run to take a 26-18 lead, including two 3-pointers by Carter. The Tigers didn’t score over the final three minutes. No. 20 FSU 58, Pittsburgh 43 TALLAHASSEE — Leticia Romero scored 19 and grabbed seven rebounds, and Shakayla Thomas added 13 and 10 to lead No. 20 Florida State women to a win over Pittsburgh. Romero and Thomas com bined to make 14 of 24 (58.3 per cent) field goals while the rest of the team shot 26.8 percent. Florida State (16-2, 3-1 Atlan tic Coast) shot 46 percent and forced 13 Pitt turnovers in the first half and took a 32-14 lead into halftime. A layup by Yacine Diop gave Pitt (11-5, 1-2) a 4-2 lead, but the Panthers missed their next nine shots and committed six turn overs over the next 8:13 while Florida State rattled off 18-straight points. The Seminoles led by double digits the rest of the way. Diop and Monica Wignot led the Panthers with 10 points apiece. Brianna Kiesel, who came into the game averaging 18.1 points, was limited to six on 3-of-11 shooting. No. 7 Notre Dame 89, No. 12 North Carolina 79 CHAPEL HILL, N.C. — Freshman Brianna Turner had 29 points and a sea son-high 18 rebounds and No. 7 Notre Dame shot 63 percent after halftime to beat No. 12 North Carolina. The 6-foot-3 forward matched her season highs in points and blocked shots with seven for the Fighting Irish (16-2, 4-1 Atlantic Coast Conference). Sopho more Lindsay Allen added a career-best 24 points. Allisha Gray scored 20 points for North Carolina (15-3, 2-2). No. 10 Kentucky 62, Florida 56 LEXINGTON, Ky. — Makayla Epps scored 20 points and kept Kentucky ahead with perfect foul shooting. Epps made all eight of her free throws, including six in the final 3 minutes. She was 6 for 10 from the field and had four assists. Kentucky (15-3, 4-1 Southeastern Conference) rebounded from a 68-60 loss at top-ranked South Carolina on Sunday. Cassie Peoples led Florida (9-9, 1-4) with 12 points. No. 16 Duke 65, Virginia Tech 40 DURHAM, N.C. — Rebecca Greenwell made 4 of 8 3-pointers and finished with 21 points in Duke’s victory over Virginia Tech. The Blue Devils (12-5, 3-1 Atlantic Coast Conference) scored 17 straight points in the first half to take a 30-16 lead with 6:26 left. Vanessa Panousis had 14 points for Virginia Tech (9-9, 0-5). No. 17 Nebraska 73, Penn State 45 LINCOLN, Neb. — Freshman guard Natalie Romero scored a seasonhigh 18 points, making 6 of 11 3-pointers, and Nebraska beat Penn State for its third straight victory. Tear’a Laudermill had 12 points and a career-high five steals for the Cornhusk ers (13-3, 3-2 Big Ten). Candice Agee had 13 points for Penn State (3-14, 0-6). Mississippi 55, No. 18 Georgia 52 OXFORD, Miss. — Erika Sisk hit three straight free throws in the final 28 seconds to lift Mississippi past Georgia. Sisk and Tia Faleru and Sisk each scored 12 points for Mississippi (14-4, 4-1 Southeastern Conference), and Danielle McCray and Gracie Frizzell added 11 each. Erika Ford led Georgia (15-3, 3-2) with 20 points. No. 23 Minnesota 76, Ohio St. 72 COLUMBUS, Ohio — Shae Kel ley had career highs with 29 points and 18 rebounds for Minnesota. Mikayla Bailey added 16 points and 12 rebounds for the Gophers (15-2, 4-1 Big Ten). Kelsey Mitchell hit a schoolrecord nine 3-pointers and had 36 points for Ohio State (11-7, 3-3). No. 25 Syracuse 73, Wake Forest 62 SYRACUSE, N.Y. — Alexis Peter son scored a career-high 32 points, 13 more than her previous best, to lead Syra cuse past Wake Forest. AP Auburn forward Tra’Cee Tanner (44) battles Tennessee center Isabelle Harrison on Thursday. No. 20 FSU runs past Pittsburgh

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STAT SHEET Page C4 | The News Herald | Friday, January 16, 2015 Television Boxing 8 p.m. ESPN2 — Middleweights, Willie Monroe Jr. (18-1-0) vs. Bryan Vera (23-8-0), at Verona, N.Y. Golf Noon ESPN2 — Latin America Amateur Championship, second round, at Buenos Aires, Argentina 6 p.m. GOLF — PGA Tour, Sony Open, second round, at Honolulu 3 a.m. GOLF — European PGA Tour, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates) Championship, third round Men’s college basketball 6 p.m. ESPNU — Iona at Niagara 8 p.m. ESPNU — St. Francis (NY) at Robert Morris Men’s college hockey 6:30 p.m. NBCSN — UConn at Notre Dame Nba 7 p.m. ESPN — Golden State at Oklahoma City 9:30 p.m. ESPN — Cleveland at L.A. Clippers Women’s college basketball 7 p.m. FS1 — Creighton at Providence Ebro Schedule Monday Matinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Parx 11:25 a.m., Aqueduct 11:25 a.m., Gulfstream 11:35 a.m., Santa Anita 2:30 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Sarasota 11:30 a.m., Derby Lane 11:30 a.m., Palm Beach noon. Evening: Greyhound simulcast: Jacksonville 6:30 p.m. Tuesday Matinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Parx 11:25 a.m. Greyhound simulcast: Sarasota 11:30 a.m., Palm Beach noon. Evening: Greyhound simulcast: Derby Lane 6:30 p.m. Wednesday Matinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Aqueduct 11:25 a.m., Tampa Bay 11:30 a.m., Gulfstream 11:35 a.m.. Greyhound simulcast: Sarasota 11:30 a.m., Derby Lane 11:30 a.m., Jacksonville 11:30 a.m., Palm Beach noon. Evening: Greyhound simulcast: Derby Lane 6:30 p.m.,Jacksonville 6:30 p.m. Thursday Matinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Aqueduct 11:25 a.m., Gulfstream 11:35 a.m., Santa Anita 2:30 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Sarasota 11:30 a.m., Palm Beach noon. Evening: Greyhound simulcast: Derby Lane 6:30 p.m., Jacksonville 6:30 p.m. Friday Matinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Aqueduct 11:25 a.m., Tampa Bay 11:30 am., Gulfstream 11:35 a.m., Santa Anita 3 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Sarasota 11:30 a.m., Palm Beach noon. Evening: Greyhound simulcast: Palm Beach 6 p.m. Derby Lane 6:30 p.m., Jacksonville 6:30 p.m., Sarasota 6:30 p.m. Saturday Matinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Aqueduct 11:25 a.m., Tampa Bay 11:30 a.m., Gulfstream 11:35 a.m., Santa Anita 2:30 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Sarasota 11:30 a.m., Jacksonville 11:30 a.m., Derby Lane 11:30 a.m., Palm Beach noon. Evening: Greyhound simulcast: Palm Beach 6 p.m., Jacksonville 6:30 p.m., Derby Lane 6:30 p.m., Sarasota 6:30 p.m. Sunday Matinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Parx 11:25 a.m., Aqueduct 11:25 a.m., Tampa Bay 11:30 a.m., Gulfstream 11:35 p.m., Santa Anita 2:30 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Palm Beach noon, Jacksonville 12:30 p.m. POKER ROOM – (Ext. 180) Open 9 a.m. to 3 a.m. Monday through Friday and 24 hours on weekends and holidays. New Year’s schedule: Open 9 a.m. Monday to 3 a.m. Wednesday. LOCATION – Intersection of State 79 and State 20. INFORMATION – 234-3943. Odds Glantz-Culver line Favorite Open Today O/U Under. at Seattle 7 7 (46) Grn Bay at New Eng. 7 6 (54) Indy NFL Playoffs Divisional Playoffs Conference Championships Sunday, Jan. 18 Green Bay at Seattle, 2:05 p.m.(FOX) Indianapolis at New England, 5:40 p.m.(CBS) Super Bowl Sunday, Feb. 1 At Glendale, Ariz. AFC champion vs. NFC champion, 5:30 p.m.(NBC) NFL draft early entries Nelson Agholor, wr, Southern Cal Jay Ajayi, rb, Boise State Kwon Alexander, LB, LSU Javorius Allen, rb, Southern Cal Arik Armstead, dl, Oregon Deion Barnes, de, Penn State Malcom Brown, dt, Texas Alex Carter, cb, Stanford Sammie Coates, wr, Auburn Tevin Coleman, rb, Indiana Jalen Collins, cb, LSU Landon Collins, s, Alabama Amari Cooper, wr, Alabama Xavier Cooper, dt, Washington State Christian Covington, dt, Rice Ronald Darby, cb, Florida State Mike Davis, rb, South Carolina Stefon Diggs, wr, Maryland Lorenzo Doss, cb, Tulane Mario Edwards Jr., de, Florida State Durell Eskridge, s, Syracuse George Farmer, wr, Southern Cal Ereck Flowers, ot, Miami Dante Fowler Jr., de, Florida Devin Funchess, wr, Michigan Jacoby Glenn, cb, UCF Eddie Goldman, dt, Florida State Melvin Gordon, rb, Wisconsin Dorial Green-Beckham, wr, Oklahoma Deontay Greenberry, wr, Houston Randy Gregory, de, Nebraska Todd Gurley, rb, Georgia Eli Harold, de, Virginia Chris Hackett, s, TCU Eli Harold, de, Virginia Chris Harper, wr, California Dee Hart, rb, Colorado State Braylon Heard, rb, Kentucky Gerod Holliman, s, Louisville D.J. Humphries, ot, Florida Brett Hundley, qb UCLA Danielle Hunter, de, LSU Jesse James, te, Penn State Duke Johnson, rb, Miami Matt Jones, rb, Florida Nigel King, wr, Kansas Tyler Kroft, te, Rutgers Marcus Mariota, qb, Oregon Ellis McCarthy, dl, UCLA Benardrick McKinney, lb, Miss. State Patrick Miller, ol, Auburn Tyler Moore, g, Florida Andrus Peat, ot, Stanford Breshad Perriman, wr, UCF Marcus Peters, cb, Washington Jordan Phillips, dt, Oklahoma Darius Philon, dt, Arkansas Bradley Pinion, p, Clemson Jeremiah Poutasi, ot, Utah Shane Ray, de, Missouri Josh Robinson, rb, Mississippi State Shaq Roland, wr, South Carolina James Sample, s, Louisville Jean Sifrin, te, UMass Donovan Smith, ot, Penn State Noah Spence, de, Ohio State Jaelen Strong, wr, Arizona State Shaq Thompson, lb, Washington Max Valles, lb, Virginia Trae Waynes, cb, Michigan State Leonard Williams, dl, Southern Cal Maxx Williams, te, Minnesota P.J. Williams, cb, Florida State Trey Williams, rb, Texas A&M Jameis Winston, qb, Florida State T.J. Yeldon, rb, Alabama NBA Standings EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L Pct GB Toronto 26 12 .684 — Brooklyn 16 23 .410 10 Boston 13 24 .351 12 Philadelphia 7 31 .184 19 New York 5 36 .122 22 Southeast Division W L Pct GB Atlanta 31 8 .795 — Washington 27 12 .692 4 Miami 17 22 .436 14 Charlotte 15 25 .375 16 Orlando 15 27 .357 17 Central Division W L Pct GB Chicago 26 14 .650 — Milwaukee 21 19 .525 5 Cleveland 19 20 .487 6 Indiana 15 25 .375 11 Detroit 14 25 .359 11 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division W L Pct GB Memphis 27 11 .711 — Houston 27 12 .692 Dallas 27 13 .675 1 San Antonio 24 16 .600 4 New Orleans 19 19 .500 8 Northwest Division W L Pct GB Portland 30 9 .769 — Oklahoma City 18 19 .486 11 Denver 18 20 .474 11 Utah 13 26 .333 17 Minnesota 6 31 .162 23 Pacific Division W L Pct GB Golden State 31 5 .861 — L.A. Clippers 26 13 .667 6 Phoenix 23 18 .561 10 Sacramento 16 22 .421 16 L.A. Lakers 12 27 .308 20 Wednesday’s Games Orlando 120, Houston 113 San Antonio 98, Charlotte 93 Toronto 100, Philadelphia 84 New Orleans 105, Detroit 94 Memphis 103, Brooklyn 92 Washington 105, Chicago 99 Atlanta 105, Boston 91 Denver 114, Dallas 107 Golden State 104, Miami 89 L.A. Clippers 100, Portland 94 Thursday’s Games Milwaukee 95, New York 79 Oklahoma City at Houston, (n) Cleveland at L.A. Lakers, (n) Friday’s Games New Orleans at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. Brooklyn at Washington, 6 p.m. Memphis at Orlando, 6 p.m. Detroit at Indiana, 6 p.m. Atlanta at Toronto, 6:30 p.m. Chicago at Boston, 6:30 p.m. Golden State at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m. Denver at Dallas, 7:30 p.m. Portland at San Antonio, 7:30 p.m. Minnesota at Phoenix, 8 p.m. L.A. Lakers at Utah, 8 p.m. Miami at Sacramento, 9 p.m. Cleveland at L.A. Clippers, 9:30 p.m. Saturday’s Games Indiana at Charlotte, 6 p.m. Philadelphia at Detroit, 6:30 p.m. Atlanta at Chicago, 7 p.m. Golden State at Houston, 7 p.m. Washington at Brooklyn, 7 p.m. Minnesota at Denver, 8 p.m. Portland at Memphis, 8 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Sacramento, 9 p.m. College men’s basketball Thursday’s scores EAST Bryant 81, Wagner 73 George Washington 73, Richmond 70, 2OT James Madison 54, Drexel 35 LIU Brooklyn 71, CCSU 66 Mount St. Mary’s 71, Fairleigh Dickinson 51 Rider 56, Quinnipiac 53 SOUTH Arkansas St. 59, Appalachian St. 50 Austin Peay 69, Tennessee St. 68 Charlotte 73, North Texas 57 Chattanooga 82, Samford 76 E. Illinois 72, E. Kentucky 65 ETSU 83, W. Carolina 76 FIU 66, Marshall 62, OT Florida 75, Auburn 55 Georgia Southern 78, LouisianaLafayette 70 Georgia St. 83, Texas-Arlington 62 Louisiana Tech 74, UAB 71 Louisiana-Monroe 63, Troy 54 Memphis 63, Cincinnati 50 Mercer 67, Furman 64 Middle Tennessee 62, Southern Miss. 61 Morehead St. 91, SIU-Edwardsville 63 Murray St. 92, Belmont 77 Old Dominion 63, Rice 53 Radford 72, Campbell 55 The Citadel 69, Wofford 66 UT-Martin 63, Tennessee Tech 60 W. Kentucky 88, FAU 85, OT MIDWEST Oakland 69, Green Bay 66 Wisconsin 70, Nebraska 55 SOUTHWEST Texas St. 82, South Alabama 71 FAR WEST Arizona 68, Colorado 54 Weber St. 74, N. Arizona 65 College women’s basketball Top 25 fared Thursday 1. South Carolina (17-0) beat Missouri 60-49. Next: at Florida, Monday. 2. UConn (15-1) did not play. Next: vs. South Florida, Sunday. 3. Baylor (15-1) did not play. Next: at Kansas, Saturday. 4. Louisville (16-1) did not play. Next: vs. Virginia, Sunday. 4. Texas (13-2) did not play. Next: vs. Texas Tech, Saturday. 6. Tennessee (15-2) beat Auburn 54-42. Next: at No. 7 Notre Dame, Monday. 7. Notre Dame (16-2) beat No. 12 North Carolina 89-79. Next: vs. No. 6 Tennessee, Monday. 8. Maryland (14-2) beat No. 24 Rutgers 71-59. Next: vs. Illinois, Sunday. 10. Kentucky (15-3) beat Florida 62-56. Next: at LSU, Sunday. 12. North Carolina (15-3) lost to No. 7 Notre Dame 89-79. Next: at Clemson, Sunday. 15. Mississippi State (18-2) lost to LSU 71-69, 2OT. Next: vs. Alabama, Sunday. 16. Duke (12-5) beat Virginia Tech 65-40. Next: vs. Miami, Sunday. 17. Nebraska (13-3) beat Penn State 7345. Next: vs. Purdue, Monday. 18. Georgia (15-3) lost to Mississippi 5552. Next: vs. Vanderbilt, Sunday. 20. Florida State (16-2) beat Pittsburgh 58-43. Next: at Virginia Tech, Sunday. 23. Minnesota (15-2) beat Ohio State 76-72. Next: vs. Indiana, Sunday. 24. Rutgers (12-5) lost to No. 8 Maryland 71-59. Next: at Wisconsin, Sunday. 25. Syracuse (12-5) beat Wake Forest 73-62. Next: at Boston College, Sunday. Thursday’s scores EAST Delaware 64, Hofstra 53 Duquesne 77, Saint Louis 64 Fordham 57, Saint Joseph’s 47 George Washington 59, Rhode Island 49 Quinnipiac 83, Fairfield 43 Syracuse 73, Wake Forest 62 UMass 71, La Salle 68 SOUTH Appalachian St. 70, Arkansas St. 69 Austin Peay 72, Belmont 59 Drexel 49, William & Mary 46 Duke 65, Virginia Tech 40 E. Illinois 68, E. Kentucky 42 Florida St. 58, Pittsburgh 43 James Madison 68, Elon 51 Kentucky 62, Florida 56 LSU 71, Mississippi St. 69, 2OT Louisiana Tech 61, UAB 55 Louisiana-Lafayette 69, Georgia Southern 57 Marshall 67, FIU 61 Miami 79, Clemson 42 Mississippi 55, Georgia 52 Nicholls St. 67, Sam Houston St. 64 Notre Dame 89, North Carolina 79 SIU-Edwardsville 62, Morehead St. 61 Southern Miss. 77, Middle Tennessee 75, OT Tennessee 54, Auburn 42 Tennessee St. 76, Murray St. 72 Texas-Arlington 45, Georgia St. 39 Troy 82, Louisiana-Monroe 77 UT-Martin 79, Tennessee Tech 59 VCU 62, Davidson 53 Vanderbilt 74, Ala.-Huntsville 51 Virginia 68, Boston College 56 W. Kentucky 80, FAU 43 MIDWEST Detroit 70, Ill.-Chicago 65 Michigan St. 63, Illinois 56 Minnesota 76, Ohio St. 72 Nebraska 73, Penn St. 45 Oakland 71, Valparaiso 54 S. Dakota St. 101, Nebraska-Omaha 66 South Dakota 84, N. Dakota St. 69 Wisconsin 65, Purdue 56 Youngstown St. 79, Cleveland St. 65 SOUTHWEST Charlotte 67, North Texas 58 Houston Baptist 58, Cent. Arkansas 37 Lamar 83, SE Louisiana 60 Old Dominion 62, Rice 55 Oral Roberts 84, IUPUI 72 Stephen F. Austin 76, New Orleans 56 Texas St. 63, South Alabama 42 Texas-Pan American 80, Seattle 58 FAR WEST BYU 89, Pacific 72 E. Washington 101, Portland St. 54 Gonzaga 73, Pepperdine 64 S. Utah 68, Idaho St. 59 Saint Mary’s (Cal) 57, San Diego 56 W. Illinois 93, Denver 66 Weber St. 66, N. Arizona 53 NHL Standings EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Tampa Bay 46 28 14 4 60 149 124 Montreal 43 27 13 3 57 115 101 Detroit 44 24 11 9 57 123 109 Boston 45 24 15 6 54 120 114 Florida 42 20 13 9 49 104 117 Toronto 44 22 19 3 47 137 136 Ottawa 43 18 17 8 44 118 119 Buffalo 45 14 28 3 31 82 157 Metropolitan Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA N.Y. Islanders 43 29 13 1 59 134 116 Pittsburgh 42 26 10 6 58 129 100 Washington 43 24 11 8 56 126 106 N.Y. Rangers 41 24 13 4 52 124 101 Philadelphia 45 17 21 7 41 119 134 New Jersey 45 16 21 8 40 101 127 Columbus 41 18 20 3 39 106 134 Carolina 43 14 24 5 33 91 114 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Nashville 42 29 9 4 62 130 94 Chicago 43 28 13 2 58 134 95 St. Louis 44 27 13 4 58 142 110 Winnipeg 45 23 14 8 54 123 112 Colorado 45 19 17 9 47 119 129 Dallas 43 19 17 7 45 132 141 Minnesota 43 19 19 5 43 120 128 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Anaheim 44 28 10 6 62 125 118 Vancouver 42 24 15 3 51 118 109 San Jose 44 23 16 5 51 119 120 Los Angeles 44 20 14 10 50 124 117 Calgary 44 23 18 3 49 127 115 Arizona 43 16 23 4 36 100 143 Edmonton 45 10 26 9 29 101 152 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Wednesday’s Games Montreal 3, Columbus 2 Washington 1, Philadelphia 0 Anaheim 4, Toronto 0 New Jersey 5, Los Angeles 3 Thursday’s Games Boston 3, N.Y. Rangers 0 Minnesota 7, Buffalo 0 Vancouver 4, Philadelphia 0 Ottawa 4, Montreal 1 Tampa Bay 3, Edmonton 2 Colorado 4, Florida 2 Detroit 3, St. Louis 2, OT Winnipeg 2, Dallas 1 Calgary 4, Arizona 1 Toronto at San Jose, (n) Friday’s Games Pittsburgh at N.Y. Islanders, 6 p.m. Vancouver at Carolina, 6 p.m. N.Y. Rangers at Columbus, 6 p.m. Washington at Nashville, 7 p.m. Winnipeg at Chicago, 7:30 p.m. New Jersey at Anaheim, 9 p.m. Saturday’s Games Columbus at Boston, 6 p.m. Philadelphia at Buffalo, 6 p.m. N.Y. Islanders at Montreal, 6 p.m. Carolina at Ottawa, 6 p.m. Nashville at Detroit, 6 p.m. Colorado at Tampa Bay, 6 p.m. Edmonton at Florida, 6 p.m. Toronto at St. Louis, 6 p.m. Washington at Dallas, 7 p.m. Arizona at Minnesota, 8 p.m. Anaheim at Los Angeles, 9 p.m. Calgary at San Jose, 9 p.m. Golf Abu Dhabi Championship At National Course Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates Yardage: 7,583 Par: 72 First Round M. Kaymer, Germany 33-31 T. Pieters, Belgium 32-33 B. Grace, South Africa 31-35 G. Bourdy, France 33-33 T. Hatton, England 34-32 A. Levy, France 33-33 M. Ilonen, Finland 34-32 R. Fowler, USA 34-33 R. McIlroy, N. Ireland 36-31 P. Uihlein, USA 33-34 A. Byeong-hun, South Korea 34-33 A. Noren, Sweden 34-33 R. Karlsson, Sweden 33-34 A. Hansen, Denmark 34-34 N. Colsaerts, Belgium 33-35 M. Nixon, England 35-33 G. Stal, France 32-36 J. Milkha Singh, India 35-33 P. Waring, England 34-34 G. Coetzee, South Africa 33-35 M. Orum Madsen, Denmark 34-34 P. Lawrie, Scotland 35-33 R. Green, Australia 32-36 J. Morrison, England 32-36 Tennis Australian Open Qualifying At Melbourne Park Melbourne, Australia Surface: Hard-Outdoor Men Second Round Marius Copil, Romania, def. Philipp Petzschner, Germany, 6-3, 3-6, 8-6. Alexander Kudryavtsev (13), Russia, def. Blake Mott, Australia, 6-2, 6-4. Omar Jasika, Australia, def. John-Patrick Smith, Australia, 6-7 (5), 6-3, 12-10. Dane Propoggia, Australia, def. James McGee, Ireland, 6-3, 6-4. Andrea Arnaboldi, Italy, def. Adrian Menendez-Maceiras (16), Spain, 6-4, 76 (7). Lukasz Kubot, Poland, def. Aleksandr Nedovyesov (14), Kazakhstan, 6-4, 6-3. Michael Russell, U.S., def. Thiemo de Bakker (21), Netherlands, 4-6, 6-3, 7-5. Hiroki Moriya (28), Japan, def. Enzo Couacaud, France, 3-6, 6-1, 6-2. Laurent Lokoli, France, def. Peter Torebko, Germany, 3-6, 7-6 (3), 6-1. Ruben Bemelmans, Belgium, def. Michael Berrer (10), Germany, 3-6, 7-5, 6-3. Chase Buchanan, U.S., def. Mate Delic (32), Croatia, 4-6, 6-1, 6-4. Illya Marchenko (26), Ukraine, def. Marton Fucsovics, Hungary, 3-6, 6-4, 9-7. Yuichi Sugita (19), Japan, def. Jozef Kovalik, Slovakia, 6-2, 6-1. Yuki Bhambri, India, def. Yoshihito Nishioka, Japan, 7-6 (8), 6-3. Kyle Edmund, Britain, def. Austin Krajicek, U.S., 4-6, 7-6 (4), 6-2. Liam Broady, Britain, def. Jared Donaldson, U.S., 7-6 (4), 6-7 (5), 6-4. Apia International At Olympic Park Tennis Centre Sydney Surface: Hard-Outdoor Singles Men Quarterfinals Mikhail Kukushkin, Kazakhstan, def. Juan Martin del Potro, Argentina, 7-6 (5), 7-6 (3). Leonardo Mayer (5), Argentina, def. Julien Benneteau (4), France, 6-3, 7-6 (4). Viktor Troicki, Serbia, def. Simone Bolelli, Italy, 6-3, 3-6, 7-5. Gilles Muller, Luxembourg, def. Bernard Tomic, Australia, 7-6 (3), 7-6 (13). Women Semifinals Karolina Pliskova, Czech Republic, def. Angelique Kerber (5), Germany, 6-3, 6-2. Petra Kvitova (2), Czech Republic, def. Tsvetana Pironkova, Bulgaria, 7-5, 6-1. ATP World Tour Heineken Open At ASB Bank Tennis Centre Auckland, New Zealand Surface: Hard-Outdoor Singles Quarterfinals Adrian Mannarino, France, def. Alejandro Falla, Colombia, 6-3, 6-1. Lucas Pouille, France, def. Albert RamosVinolas, Spain, 6-3, 6-2. Jiri Vesely, Czech Republic, def. Donald Young, U.S., 6-2, 6-3. Kevin Anderson (4), South Africa, def. Steve Johnson (8), U.S., 6-4, 7-6 (8). WTA Hobart International At The Domain Tennis Centre Hobart, Australia Surface: Hard-Outdoor Singles Second Round Zarina Diyas (2), Kazakhstan, def. Daniela Hantuchova, Slovakia, 7-5, 6-1. Alison Riske (8), U.S., def. Bojana Jovanovski, Serbia, 6-2, 4-6, 6-1. Madison Brengle, U.S., def. Kateryna Kozlova, Ukraine, 6-1, 7-6 (8). Karin Knapp, Italy, def. Casey Dellacqua (1), Australia, 7-5, 2-6, 6-3. Camila Giorgi (3), Italy, def. Kaia Kanepi, Estonia, walkover. Quarterfinals Heather Watson, Britain, def. Roberta Vinci, Italy, 7-6 (0), 6-2. Kurumi Nara, Japan, def. Camila Giorgi (3), Italy, 6-1, 3-6, 6-2. Alison Riske, U.S., def. Zarina Diyas (2), Kazakhstan, 6-3, 6-0. Madison Brengle, U.S., def. Karin Knapp, Italy, 6-7 (3), 6-4, 6-4. Transactions BASEBALL Major League Baseball MLB — Suspended free agent RHP Kameron Loe and free agent OF Terrell Joyce 50 games each under the Minor League Drug Prevention and Treatment Program following a second positive test for a drug of abuse American League CHICAGO WHITE SOX — Agreed to terms with RHPs Javy Guerra, Nate Jones and Hector Noesi on one-year contracts. CLEVELAND INDIANS — Agreed to terms with RHP Carlos Carrasco, 3B Lonnie Chisenhall and LHP Marc Rzepczynski on one-year contracts and RHP Anthony Swarzak on a minor league contract. DETROIT TIGERS — Assigned RHP Luke Putkonen outright to Toledo (IL). HOUSTON ASTROS — Agreed to terms with C Carlos Corporan on a one-year contract. LOS ANGELES ANGELS — Agreed to terms with C Hector Santiago on a oneyear contract. TEXAS RANGERS — Agreed to terms with RHP Neftali Feliz on a one-year contract. TORONTO BLUE JAYS — Agreed to terms with LHP Brett Cecil on a one-year contract and OF Andy Dirks on a minor league contract. National League ATLANTA BRAVES — Agreed to terms with LHP James Russell on a one-year contract. CHICAGO CUBS — Agreed to terms with LHP Felix Doubront on a one-year contract. LOS ANGELES DODGERS — Agreed to terms with OF Chris Heisey on a oneyear contract. MILWAUKEE BREWERS — Agreed to terms with C Martin Maldonado on a twoyear contract. PITTSBURGH PIRATES — Named Tom Prince manager, Kevin Riggs hitting coach, Justin Meccage pitching coach, Dru Scott trainer and Furey Leva strength and conditioning coach for Altoona (EL), Michael Ryan manager of Bradenton (FSL), Brian Esposito manager of West Virginia (SAL), Wyatt Toregas manager of West Virginia (NYP) and Mendy Lopez manager of the Pirates (Dominican). ST. LOUIS CARDINALS — Agreed to terms with RHP Lance Lynn on a threeyear contract and C Tony Cruz and OF Peter Bourjos on one-year contracts. WASHINGTON NATIONALS — Agreed to terms with C Wilson Ramos, 2B Danny Espinosa, C Jose Lobaton and RHP Craig Stammen on one-year contracts. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association NBA — Fined Charlotte G-F P.J. Hairston $5,000 for violating the league’s antiflopping rules for the second time this season. LOS ANGELES CLIPPERS — Acquired G Austin Rivers from Boston for G Chris Douglas-Roberts and a future secondround draft pick. Los Angeles sent G Reggie Bullock to Phoenix and Phoenix sent F Shavlik Randolph to Boston. FOOTBALL National Football League BUFFALO BILLS — Named Dennis Thurman defensive coordinator, Bobby April III linebackers coach, Karl Dunbar defensive line coach, Tim McDonald defensive backs coach, Jason Oszvart assistant strength and conditioning coach, Tony Sparano Jr. tight ends coach, Jeff Weeks assistant defensive line coach and Eric Smith assistant special teams coach. Signed DB Jonte Green and G Darryl Johnson to reserve/future contracts. CAROLINA PANTHERS — Signed WR Mike Brown to a reserve/future contract. CLEVELAND BROWNS — Announced wide receivers coach Mike McDaniel will not return next year. DALLAS COWBOYS — Signed coach Jason Garrett to a five-year contract and defensive coordinator Rod Marinelli to a three-year contract. Named Scott Linehan offensive coordinator and signed him to a three-year contract. Signed OT R.J. Dill and OT Ryan Miller to reserve/future contracts. INDIANAPOLIS COLTS — Placed LB Josh McNary on the commissioner’s exempt list. JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS — Signed FB Greg Jones to one-day contract, who announced his retirement. MINNESOTA VIKINGS — Signed CB Jalil Carter to a reserve/future contract. NEW YORK GIANTS — Named Steve Spagnuolo defensive coordinator and Tim Walton secondary/cornerbacks coach. OAKLAND RAIDERS — Named Jack Del Rio coach. WASHINGTON REDSKINS — Named Bill Callahan offensive line coach. HOCKEY National Hockey League NHL — Fined Anaheim D Sami Vatanen $3,393.82 for elbowing Toronto F David Booth during a Jan. 14 game. ARIZONA COYOTES — Recalled G Mike Lee from Gwinnett (ECHL). COLUMBUS BLUE JACKETS — Placed RW Jack Skille on injured reserve, retroactive to Jan. 9. Recalled LW Josh Anderson from Springfield (AHL). FLORIDA PANTHERS — Reassigned D Shane O’Brien to San Antonio (AHL). NASHVILLE PREDATORS — Recalled G Marek Mazanec from Milwaukee (AHL). Assigned F Kevin Fiala to Milwaukee (AHL). Assigned D Mikko Vainonen to SaiPa (SM-Liiga). COLLEGE MOUNTAIN WEST CONFERENCE — Named Greg Burks coordinator of football officials. BUFFALO — Named Rob Ianello associate head football coach and recruiting coordinator. EAST CAROLINA — Named Dave Nichol offensive coordinator and quarterbacks coach. Promoted Garrett Riley to outside receivers coach, Donnie Kirkpatrick assistant head football coach and Brandon Jones game coordinator. PITTSBURGH — Named Jim Chaney offensive coordinator and Rob Hurley linebackers coach. PROVIDENCE — Named Stephanie Reilly women’s track coach/assistant cross country coach. Area EVENTS In The BLEACHERS SPORTS Briefs On The AIR Girls basketball: Rocky Bayou at North Bay Haven 5:30 p.m., Bozeman at Franklin County 5 p.m., Arnold at Gulf Breeze 6:30 p.m. Boys basketball: Arnold at Rutherford 7 p.m., Bozeman at Franklin County 6:30 p.m., Mosley at Bay 7 p.m. Boys soccer: North Bay Haven at Rutherford 7 p.m., Bay at Niceville 7 p.m. Girls soccer: 2-3A championship at Arnold Palat scores 2 goals, Lightning beat Oilers TAMPA — Ondrej Palat scored a pair of third-period goals, and the Eastern Conference-leading Tampa Bay Lightning beat the Edmonton Oilers 3-2 on Thursday night. Steven Stamkos also scored in his fourth straight game for the Lightning, who overtook the idle New York Islanders atop the East. NBA: Bucks deal Knicks 16th straight loss LONDON — O.J. Mayo scored 22 points, Brandon Knight had 20 points and six steals, and the Milwaukee Bucks routed New York 95-79 on Thursday night, extending the Knicks’ franchise-record losing streak to 16. With the Knicks showing why they have lost 26 of 27 games and are an NBA-worst 5-36, the contest was a poor advertisement for the NBA in its annual London game that showcases its brand overseas. ROCKETS 112, THUNDER 101 HOUSTON — James Harden scored 15 of his 31 points in Houston’s big first quarter against Oklahoma City. Harden came just short of a triple-double with 10 assists and nine rebounds. Trevor Ariza added 17 points and four steals for Houston. The Rockets led 40-18 after one and bounced back after a loss to Orlando on Wednesday night that snapped a four-game winning streak. Golf: Simpson putts to share of lead HONOLULU — Webb Simpson made his debut with a conventional putter Thursday at the Sony Open and might have wished he had used one sooner. One year away from the new rule that outlaws anchored strokes, Simpson ditched his belly putter for a regular one for his 2015 debut and ran off eight birdies over his last 10 holes for an 8-under 62 that gave him a share of the lead with Paul Casey. ABU DHABI HSBC GOLF CHAMPIONSHIP ABU DHABI, United Arab Emirates — Three-time winner Martin Kaymer had 10 birdies in an 8-under 64 to take the firstround lead in the Abu Dhabi HSBC Golf Championship. Lynn gets $22M deal from Cardinals NEW YORK — St. Louis pitcher Lance Lynn was among 21 players who avoided salary arbitration by agreeing to contracts Thursday, reaching a $22 million, three-year deal with the Cardinals. Milwaukee catcher Martin Maldonado agreed to a $1.95 million, two-year contract, and 19 players struck one-year agreements. Among the 175 players who filed for arbitration Tuesday, 149 were on track to swap proposed arbitration figures with their teams today. A majority of those were expected to settle before the exchange. High-profile players still set to swap included pitchers David Price, Stephen Strasburg, Jeff Samardzija, Rick Porcello, Ian Kennedy, Doug Fister and Kenley Jansen.

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Friday, January 16, 2015 | The News Herald | Page C5 In weekend of traditional passers, Wilson stands out RENTON, Wash. (AP) — Of the four quarterbacks still playing on champion ship weekend, Seattle’s Russell Wilson is the outlier in terms of style. Tom Brady, Andrew Luck and Aaron Rodgers all have their quarterbacking foundations built around being pocket passers first. Luck and Rodgers — when healthy — both bring an ele ment of mobility, but it’s not their forte. Wilson? Well, good luck defining the way he operates. “He doesn’t fit the mold of anything I thought pre viously would be a fran chise quarterback. I think he still gets a lot of hate and discredit because we don’t throw the ball that often. However, what he’s asked to do in this offense he does it extremely well,” Seattle wide receiver Doug Baldwin said. Headed into Sunday’s NFC championship game against Green Bay, Wilson’s postseason achievements can’t be disputed even if he doesn’t fit any preconceived notions. After six playoff games — five of them victories — Wilson has the highest passer rating in NFL his tory with a minimum of 150 attempts. Wilson’s mark of 109.6 is at the top. He’s one of five players in league history with a playoff passer rating of 100 or above. The others are: Rodgers, Bart Starr, Kurt Warner and Drew Brees. “I think one of the things that definitely allows me to play well is the guys around me. I’ve got great guys around me, guys that want to work every day, guys that are devoted to being successful and no matter what it takes,” Wilson said. “I think that when you’re in those moments, you either live for them or you fall off.” Last week saw Wilson at his finest. He needed just 22 pass attempts to throw for 268 yards and three touchdowns. He averaged more than 12 yards per pass attempt and threw two of the finest touch passes of his career. He dropped a 16-yard TD into the arms of Baldwin, letting go of the pass before Baldwin even made his break. Then in the second quar ter, Wilson stayed in the pocket and tossed a deep ball to Jermaine Kearse for a 63-yard touchdown that gave the Seahawks a 14-7 lead. “For the most part he knows how to put touch on the ball and a lot of quar terbacks don’t know how to do that,” said Hall of Fame quarterback Warren Moon, who is part of Seattle’s radio broadcast team. “He knows how to make all the differ ent throws. That ball to Jer maine Kearse is the best touch you’ll ever see.” Wilson’s performance against Carolina also coun tered a season where his best games were not at home. In the regular sea son, Wilson threw six touch downs and six interceptions at home versus 14 TDs and one interception on the road. The three touch down passes were a new playoff best and the 268 yards passing his sec ond-best. Wilson’s timing was crisp and his throws came in rhythm. “He gets the advantage that he gives us and kind of the variety of ways that we throw the football,” Seattle coach Pete Carroll said. “It really adds to it, and he’s just kind of taken off with it, and it’s a beautiful part of our game as it starts to emerge.” There also is the matter of how Wilson plays when it matters most. He already owns 14 career comebacks in 54 regular-season and playoff games combined. “Whenever I talk to him, that’s all he talks about, is living for those situations. I don’t know if it all started back in high school or whatever but he just loves the big time of a game. He wants the ball in his hands. I think he would rather be behind sometimes and have the ball in his hands and be able to go down the field and win the football game,” Moon said. After six playoff games — five of them victories — Seattle’s Russell Wilson has the highest passer rating in NFL history with a minimum of 150 attempts. Wilson’s mark of 109.6 is at the top. NFL The Super Patriot FOXBOROUGH, Mass. (AP) — Sometimes Tom Brady sits on the bench after a series and confers quietly with offensive coor dinator Josh McDaniels. Other times he paces the sideline unleashing expletives. From student to screamer and everything in between, the super-com petitive Brady does what ever he can to come out with a win. “I don’t think I ever lose track of plays or things that I need to do to help coor dinate our offense when we’re on the field,” he said Wednesday, talking calmly at a podium. “I just think the emotional part is a really important part for me and I think that’s always been a part of the way that I play.” That emotion is sure to be on display Sunday night when Brady tries to lead the New England Patriots to their sixth Super Bowl in 14 seasons when they host the Indianapolis Colts in the AFC championship game. Passion has been part of Brady’s game throughout his 15-year NFL career. He’s head-butted oppo nents and teammates, trash-talked defenders and yelled at his own players and coaches. This season, lip readers could easily spot the curse word he repeat edly let fly in the waning moments of a loss to the Green Bay Packers. “I need to be emotional out there to play at my highest,” Brady said. “I try to rest up all week and I’m actually pretty mellow most of the time, as you guys know. It’s just for those three hours on Sunday that you get to let it rip, which is really, I think, when you can be yourself.” That’s worked very well. Brady is 160-47 in the regular season and 20-8 in the postseason. He’s thrown for more completions and touchdowns than any other quarterback in postseason history. So if his teammates must listen to his shouting — in frustration or as motivation — it’s a small price to pay for so much success. “That’s just Tom,” defen sive tackle Vince Wilfork said. “Everything he does, he wants it to be perfect. He strives for greatness.” “Tom does whatever he feels he needs to do for us to win,” safety Devin McCourty said. “Nothing Tom does surprises us.” And his intensity is infectious. “When you see Tom do it,” said tight end Rob Gronkowski, a very demon strative player himself, “it definitely gets you going.” Brady may be confident and competitive, but he also gets nervous. With Sunday’s game determining if his season will continue or end, the butterflies should be there. “That’s part of playing sports. Being in a competi tive situation like we are, I don’t think that ever goes away,” he said. “You have your vision of the way you want things to turn out on a particular play or scheme or something like that and if it does, great. If it doesn’t happen the way you want it to, which is most of the time, you’ve got to figure out something to do. “I think that’s where a lot of the nerves come into play, the anxiousness of just the anticipation of what’s going to happen versus what we’ve prepared for.” The Patriots (13-5) are preparing for the Colts (13-6) after overcoming two 14-point deficits to beat the Baltimore Ravens 35-31 in a divisional game. New England routed Indianapolis 42-20 in the regular season, but the Colts are 7-1 since then. “All the games take on a little bit of a different feel,” Brady said. “Any time you play a team a second time around, you hope you can go in there and do a lot of the same things that you were successful with and, obviously, they know that too, so that’s always the chess match.” One thing that won’t change is Brady’s intensity. “He’ll do whatever he can, whatever is in his power, to encourage us to play better, to motivate him self to play better and at the end of the day, for us to win the game,” special teams captain Matthew Slater said. “Whatever that takes, if that’s him yelling at us, going crazy, then so be it.” Why does he behave like that? “My wife asks the same thing. She says, ‘What’s your problem?’ ” Brady said. “But I get pretty edgy. I just think there’s a high level of pressure every week.” There wasn’t much on Wednesday, when he casu ally answered reporters’ questions. But he did slip into his Sunday slang in one unguarded moment when asked about his nerves this week. “Sometimes I’m in a good mood, sometimes I’m in a (expletive) mood — bad mood. Sorry,” he said on live television, then laughed. Then he was told the broadcast might be on a seven-second delay. “Oh, is it?” Brady said. “Good.” Fiery Brady leads New England in AFC title game NFL CONF PICKS 011414 E T Pro Picks: Patriots, Seahawks will advance For the second season in a row both No. 1 seeds – the Seahawks and Patriots – advanced to the conference title games. Seattle will play host to the Packers, while the Colts travel to Foxborough to battle New England. The winners advance to Super Bowl XLIX in Arizona. Barry Wilner, AP Colts QB Andrew Luck is playing perhaps the best of his three pro seasons and Indy’s D has shown up bigtime in the postseason. That being said, other than the Ravens, hardly anyone puts a scare into the favored Patriots at Gillette Stadium. STORYLINE MATCHUP/PICK Green Bay’s D is more efficient with an improved pass rush, and its running game is well-established after early struggles since Seattle romped the Pack 36-16 in the 2014 kickoff game. Seattle’s D is looking just as imposing now as it was a year ago. PACKERS 20 SEAHAWKS 23 COLTS 21 PATRIOTS 31 Total yards Passing yards Rushing yards Total yards Passing yards Rushing yards Seahawks Packers NFL CONFERENCE PLAYOFFS Patriots Colts 386.1 375.8 266.3 305.9 203.1 257.6 119.8 100.8 107.9 406.6 365.5 172.6 Sunday 3:05 p.m. ET FOX Sunday 6:40 p.m. ET CBS at at Avg. per game (reg. season) AP New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady (12) runs through a drill with back-up quarterback Jimmy Garoppolo. AFC champions 2013—Denver 26, New England 16 2012—Baltimore 28, N.England 13 2011—N.England 23, Baltimore 20 2010—Pittsburgh 24, N.Y. Jets 19 2009—Indianapolis 30, New York 17 2008—Pittsburgh 23, Baltimore 14 2007—N.England 21, San Diego 12 2006—Indianapolis 38, N.England 34 2005—Pittsburgh 34, Denver 17 2004—N.England 41, Pittsburgh 27 2003—N.England 24, Indianapolis 14 2002—Oakland 41, Tennessee 24 2001—N.England 24, Pittsburgh 17 2000—Baltimore 16, Oakland 3 1999—Tennessee 33, Jacksonville 14 1998—Denver 23, New York 10 1997—Denver 24, Pittsburgh 21 1996—N.England 20, Jacksonville 6 1995—Pittsburgh 20, Indianapolis 16 1994—San Diego 17, Pittsburgh 13 1993—Buffalo 30, Kansas City 13 1992—Buffalo 29, Miami 10 1991—Buffalo 10, Denver 7 1990—Buffalo 51, L.A. Raiders 3 1989—Denver 37, Cleveland 21 1988—Cincinnati 21, Buffalo 10 1987—Denver 38, Cleveland 33 1986—Denver 23, Cleveland 20, OT 1985—New England 31, Miami 14 1984—Miami 45, Pittsburgh 28 1983—L.A. Raiders 30, Seattle 14 1982—Miami 14, New York 0 1981—Cincinnati 27, San Diego 7 1980—Oakland 34, San Diego 27 1979—Pittsburgh 27, Houston 13 1978—Pittsburgh 34, Houston 5 1977—Denver 20, Oakland 17 1976—Oakland 24, Pittsburgh 7 1975—Pittsburgh 16, Oakland 10 1974—Pittsburgh 24, Oakland 13 1973—Miami 27, Oakland 10 1972—Miami 21, Pittsburgh 17 1971—Miami 21, Baltimore 0 1970—Baltimore 27, Oakland 17 AFL Champions 1969—Kansas City 17, Oakland 7 1968—New York 27, Oakland 23 1967—Oakland 40, Houston 7 1966—Kansas City 31, Buffalo 7 1965—Buffalo 23, San Diego 0 1964—Buffalo 20, San Diego 7 1963—San Diego 51, Boston 10 1962—Dallas 20, Houston 17, OT 1961—Houston 10, San Diego 3 1960—Houston 24, L.A. Chargers 16 NFC champions 2013—Seattle 23, San Francisco 17 2012—San Francisco 28, Atlanta 24 2011—N.Y. Giants 20, San Francisco 17, OT 2010—Green Bay 21, Chicago 14 2009—New Orleans 31, Minnesota 28, OT 2008—Arizona 32, Philadelphia 25 2007—New York 23, Green Bay 20, OT 2006—Chicago 39, New Orleans 14 2005—Seattle 34, Carolina 14 2004—Philadelphia 27, Atlanta 10 2003—Carolina 14, Philadelphia 3 2002—Tampa Bay 27, Philadelphia 10 2001—St. Louis 29, Philadelphia 24 2000—New York 41, Minnesota 0 1999—St. Louis 11, Tampa Bay 6 1998—Atlanta 30, Minnesota 27, OT 1997—Green Bay 23, San Fran 10 1996—Green Bay 30, Carolina 13 1995—Dallas 38, Green Bay 27 1994—San Francisco 38, Dallas 28 1993—Dallas 38, San Francisco 21 1992—Dallas 30, San Francisco 20 1991—Washington 41, Detroit 10 1990—New York 15, San Fran 13 1989—San Fran 30, L.A. Rams 3 1988—San Francisco 28, Chicago 3 1987—Washington 17, Minnesota 10 1986—New York 17, Washington 0 1985—Chicago 24, L.A. Rams 0 1984—San Francisco 23, Chicago 0 1983—Washington 24, San Fran 21 1982—Washington 31, Dallas 17 1981—San Francisco 28, Dallas 27 1980—Philadelphia 20, Dallas 7 1979—L.A. Rams 9, Tampa Bay 0 1978—Dallas 28, L.A. Rams 0 1977—Dallas 23, Minnesota 6 1976—Minnesota 24, L.A. Rams 13 1975—Dallas 37, L.A. Rams 7 1974—Minnesota 14, L.A. Rams 10 1973—Minnesota 27, Dallas 10 1972—Washington 26, Dallas 3 1971—Dallas 14, San Francisco 3 1970—Dallas 17, San Francisco 10 NFL Champions 1969—Minnesota 27, Cleveland Browns 7 1968—Baltimore 34, Cleveland Browns 0 1967—Green Bay 21, Dallas 17 1966—Green Bay 34, Dallas 27 1965—Green Bay 23, Cleveland Browns 12 1964—Cleveland Browns 27, Baltimore 0 1963—Chicago Bears 14, N.Y. 10 1962—Green Bay 16, New York 7 1961—Green Bay 37, New York 0 1960—Philadelphia 17, Green Bay 13 1959—Baltimore 31, New York 16 1958—Baltimore 23, New York 17, OT 1957—Detroit 59, Cleve. Browns 14 1956—New York 47, Chicago Bears 7 1955—Cleveland Browns 38, L.A. 14 1954—Cleve. Browns 56, Detroit 10 1953—Detroit 17, Cleve. Browns 16 1952—Detroit 17, Cleve. Browns 7 1951—L.A. 24, Cleveland Browns 17 1950—Cleveland Browns 30, Los Angeles 28 1949—Philadelphia 14, L.A. 0 1948—Philadelphia 7, Chicago Cardinals 0 1947—Chicago Cardinals 28, Philadelphia 21

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Page C6 | The News Herald | Friday, January 16, 2015 TODAY’S TV LISTINGS FRIDAY MORNING C COMCAST W WOW! S1 DISH NETWORK S2 DIRECTV JANUARY 16 C W S1 S2 7 AM 7:30 8 AM 8:30 9 AM 9:30 10 AM 10:30 11 AM 11:30 12 PM 12:30 WJHG (7) 3 3 7 7 Today Martha Stewart; Manny Pacquiao. (N) Days of our Lives (N) Newschannel 7 at Noon (N) CW (7.2) 99 9 8 8 Intelligence King of the Hill We There Yet? We There Yet? The Steve Wilkos Show (N) Cheaters Cheaters King King Paid Program Steve Wilkos WMBB (13) 2 2 13 13 Good Morning America Kevin O’Leary. (N) Live! With Kelly and Michael The View (N) WMBB Midday News (N) The Chew (N) METV (13.2) 209 133 2 Donna Reed Mary T. Moore The Love Boat Vicki runs away. Perry Mason Quincy, M.E. The Rockford Files Gunsmoke WECP (18) 4 4 4 18 CBS This Morning Bart Scott; George Lucas. (N) Let’s Make a Deal (N) The Price Is Right (N) The Young and the Restless The Insider (N) Bold/Beautiful MNT (18.2) 227 13 The Doctors (N) Jerry Springer (N) The Real (N) The Wendy Williams Show (N) Divorce Court Divorce Court Judge Faith Judge Faith WPGX (28) 8 8 28 28 Paid Program WHADDYADO Fix Your Hair Paying for TV Judge Mathis (N) The People’s Court (N) Maury Prophet Paid Program WFSG (56) 11 11 56 56 Curious Curious Daniel Tiger Daniel Tiger Sesame Street (EI) Dinosaur Train Dinosaur Train Peg Plus Cat Peg Plus Cat Super Why! Thomas & Fr. A&E 34 43 118 265 Bounty Hunter Bounty Hunter Bounty Hunter Bounty Hunter The Critics’ Choice Movie Awards Shipping Wars Shipping Wars Shipping Wars Shipping Wars AMC 30 62 131 254 Paid Program Paid Program The Core () Aaron Eckhart, Hilary Swank. Scientists travel to the center of the Earth. Die Hard 2 () Bruce Willis, Bonnie Bedelia. ANPL 46 69 184 282 The Crocodile Hunter Tanked “Pipe Dreams” Tanked “Saved by the Spell” Tanked “SHAQ-SIZED!” Tanked Ultimate Treehouses BET 53 46 124 329 The Game (:40) The Game “The Big Chill” HusbandsHo. He’s Mine Not Yours () Caryn Ward. A woman hires a temptress to test her lover’s fidelity. Meet the Browns () COM 64 53 107 249 Perricone MD Shaun T’s Com. Central Daily Show South Park South Park South Park (:23) House Party () Kid ’N Play, Full Force. Kroll Show DISC 36 39 182 278 Joyce Meyer Perricone MD I (Almost) Got Away With It I (Almost) Got Away With It I (Almost) Got Away With It I (Almost) Got Away With It Alaska: Most Extreme E! 63 57 114 236 Kardashian Kardashian Kardashian Kardashian E! News Take the Hamptons ESPN 9 23 140 206 SportsCenter SportsCenter (N) (L) SportsCenter (N) (L) SportsCenter (N) (L) SportsCenter (N) (L) SportsCenter (N) (L) ESPN2 47 24 144 209 (5:00) Mike & Mike (N) (L) First Take (N) (L) His & Hers (N) (L) Golf FAM 59 65 180 311 s Show s Show 700 Club Special Programming Gilmore Girls “Partings” Gilmore Girls The Middle The Middle FOOD 38 45 110 231 BISSELL Perricone MD Guilt Free Fry Brunch at Bob. The Kitchen “Brunch It Up” Save My Bakery Chopped Canada Trisha’s Sou. Contessa FS1 24 27 150 219 FOX Sports Live FOX Sports Live MLB Bites Epic Moments College Basketball Utah at Arizona State. The Mike Francesa Show (N) FX 45 51 136 248 (6:30) The Recruit () Al Pacino, Colin Farrell. Death at a Funeral () Keith David, Loretta Devine. Two/Half Men Two/Half Men How I Met How I Met HALL 23 59 185 312 Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls Home & Family Lawrence Zarian; Jessica Parker Kennedy. (N) Home & Family Singer Belinda Carlisle; Max Burkholder. HGTV 32 38 112 229 Flea Market Flea Market Flea Market Flea Market Flea Market Flea Market Flea Market Flea Market House Hunters Hunters Int’l Love It or List It, Too HIST 35 42 120 269 Ancient Discoveries Ancient Discoveries Ancient Discoveries Ancient Discoveries Ancient Discoveries Ancient Discoveries LIFE 56 56 108 252 Unsolved Mysteries Frasier Frasier Frasier Frasier Frasier Frasier How I Met How I Met Grey’s Anatomy SPIKE 28 48 241 241 Body Beast! Paid Program Gangland “Death in Dixie” Gangland “Basic Training” Gangland “Kill ’Em All” Detroit. Gangland “You Rat, You Die” Gangland SUN 49 422 656 Special Oly. Captain’s Florida Sport Ship Shape TV Fins & Skins Sport Fishing Sportsman Sport Fishing Extreme Fishin Reel Animals NHL Hockey SYFY 70 52 122 244 Helix Alan makes progress. Helix Hatake rescues Walker. Helix “Bloodline” Helix “Level X” Helix Alan discovers the truth. Helix “Black Rain” TBS 31 15 139 247 Married... With Married... With Married... With Disturbia () Shia LaBeouf, David Morse. Cleveland American Dad American Dad American Dad American Dad TCM 25 70 132 256 (:15) Siege of the Saxons () Janette Scott. The 7th Voyage of Sinbad () (:45) Flight of the Lost Balloon () Mala Powers. Jack-Giant Kill TLC 37 40 183 280 Say Yes Say Yes My Mom Is Obsessed Hoarding: Buried Alive My 600-Lb. Life “Tara’s Story” What Not to Wear “Janet” What Not to Wear “Liz W.” TNT 29 54 138 245 Charmed (Part 1 of 2) Charmed (Part 2 of 2) Supernatural “Slash Fiction” Supernatural “The Mentalists” Supernatural Bones “Yanks in the U.K.” USA 62 55 105 242 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation CSI: Crime Scene Investigation CSI: Crime Scene Investigation CSI: Crime Scene Investigation CSI: Crime Scene Investigation CSI: Crime Scene Investigation WGN-A 13 239 307 J. Robison Creflo Dollar Blue Bloods “Family Business” Blue Bloods Blue Bloods Blue Bloods “Greener Grass” Blue Bloods “Nightmares” FRIDAY LATE NIGHT C COMCAST W WOW! S1 DISH NETWORK S2 DIRECTV JANUARY 16 C W S1 S2 1 AM 1:30 2 AM 2:30 3 AM 3:30 4 AM 4:30 5 AM 5:30 6 AM 6:30 WJHG (7) 3 3 7 7 (:07) Today Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program Hometime Paid Program Today (N) CW (7.2) 99 9 8 8 Steve Wilkos Key Kingdom Paid Program Top Cooker Paid Program Paid Program Young! Sit & Workout! Stop Anxiety Zumba Barefoot Clean Body Beast! WMBB (13) 2 2 13 13 (:07) The Dr. Oz Show Judge Karen Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program Down Home Open House Storm Stories METV (13.2) 209 133 2 Night Gallery Night Gallery Alfred Hitchcock Hour Thriller “Late Date” F Troop F Troop Gilligan’s Isle Gilligan’s Isle H.R. Pufnstuf Land of Lost WECP (18) 4 4 4 18 Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program CBS This Morning: Saturday MNT (18.2) 227 13 Extra (N) Jewelry Tel. Jewelry Television Jewelry Television Jewelry Television Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program Old House WPGX (28) 8 8 28 28 Friends Friends New Heights Wrestling America Now America Now Paid Program Paid Program HealthFood KeithUrban Cook Top Fix Your Hair WFSG (56) 11 11 56 56 Great Performances at the Met “Le Nozze di Figaro” (Season Premiere) “Le Nozze di Figaro,” set in Spain. Ribbon, Sand Sesame Street (N) (EI) Curious Curious A&E 34 43 118 265 (:01) Criminal Minds (:02) Criminal Minds Perricone MD Buy gold Best Secret!? SkinCare Shark Rocket! bareMin Bounty Hunter Bounty Hunter AMC 30 62 131 254 (10:30) The Green Mile () Halloween () Donald Pleasence, Jamie Lee Curtis. Three Stooges The Rifleman The Rifleman The Rifleman The Rifleman ANPL 46 69 184 282 Treehouse Masters Treehouse Masters Tanked Treehouse Masters Big Cat Diary Big Cat Diary Dogs 101 Irish Wolfhound. BET 53 46 124 329 The Game One Mic Stand The Queen Latifah Show BET Inspiration BET Inspiration COM 64 53 107 249 (:02) Ari Shaffir: Paid Regular Neal Brennan: Women The Meltdown Com. Central NutriBullet Rx Blades/Wild Cook Like a Better H20 Body Beast! Body Beast! DISC 36 39 182 278 Gold Rush: Pay Dirt New P90X 3! Paid Program Cook Like a Body Beast! KeithUrban Healthy New. Paid Program Lose Weight T25 Bodies! Lose Weight E! 63 57 114 236 White Chicks () Shawn Wayans, Marlon Wayans. Perricone MD 1 Min. Makeup Proactiv Plus IT Cosmetics Skincare WEN Hair Care Take the Hamptons ESPN 9 23 140 206 SportsCenter (N) (L) NBA Basketball Cleveland Cavaliers at Los Angeles Clippers. SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter ESPN2 47 24 144 209 (12:30) NFL’s Greatest Games SportsCenter (N) NBA Basketball: Warriors at Thunder NFL Live (N) NFL’s Greatest Games FAM 59 65 180 311 Total Gym Shaun T’s The 700 Club BISSELL Airbrush Nuwave Sexy In 2015! Total Gym 21 DAY FIX Back to the Future FOOD 38 45 110 231 Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Iron Chef America Airbrush Meet the Rx KitchenAid Mix IT Cosmetics Sandwich King Barbecue FS1 24 27 150 219 FOX Sports Live Women’s College Basketball Creighton at Providence. UFC Rising UFC Fighter’s FOX Sports Live FOX Sports Live FX 45 51 136 248 (10:30) Star Trek () Death at a Funeral () Keith David, Loretta Devine. Sexy Face at BISSELL Total Gym T25 Bodies! Buffy the Vampire Slayer HALL 23 59 185 312 Frasier Frasier Frasier Frasier Cheers Cheers I Love Lucy I Love Lucy I Love Lucy I Love Lucy I Love Lucy I Love Lucy HGTV 32 38 112 229 House Hunters Hunters Int’l Love It or List It, Too Paid Program Meet the Rx Forever Young Brainetics Paid Program Shark Rocket! Kitchen Crash. Kitchen Crash. HIST 35 42 120 269 (:01) American Pickers (:04) American Pickers Cook Safe Coin Coin Coin Coin Shark Rocket! Restoration Restoration LIFE 56 56 108 252 (:04) Celebrity Wife Swap (:04) Celebrity Wife Swap 21 DAY FIX Paid Program Free! HairSecrets! Cook Like a 21 DAY FIX Lose Weight Zumba SPIKE 28 48 241 241 Jail Jail Jail Jail Knife Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program Bosley Hair Paid Program Shaun T’s Hot Bodies SUN 49 422 656 NBA Basketball Miami Heat at Sacramento Kings. Stop Anxiety Cook Top Paid Program Paid Program Stop Anxiety Best Secret!? FSU Headlines The Gypsy An SYFY 70 52 122 244 (12:04) Mothman () (:04) Heebie Jeebies () Robert Belushi, Michael Badalucco. Meet the Rx Meet the Rx 12 Monkeys “Splinter” 12 Monkeys “Splinter” TBS 31 15 139 247 (12:00) Bad Boys () Paul Blart: Mall Cop () Kevin James, Jayma Mays. Married... With Married... With Married... With Married... With Married... With Married... With TCM 25 70 132 256 Only-I Laugh I’ll Cry Tomorrow () Susan Hayward, Richard Conte. On Our Merry Way () (:15) Anthony Adverse () Fredric March. TLC 37 40 183 280 Say Yes: ATL Say Yes: ATL New P90X 3! Guilt Free Fry Paid Program No Defrosting Sexy In 2015! Buy gold KeithUrban Remove Hair Lose Weight bareMin TNT 29 54 138 245 Hawaii Five-0 “Hoa Pili” Hawaii Five-0 “Olelo Pa’a” Hawaii Five-0 Hawaii Five-0 “Ho’opio” Law & Order “Illegitimate” Law & Order “Crimebusters” USA 62 55 105 242 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation Law & Order: Criminal Intent Law & Order: Criminal Intent Law & Order: Criminal Intent House “The Social Contract” SkinCare Shark Rocket! WGN-A 13 239 307 Raising Hope Raising Hope 30 Rock 30 Rock Paid Program MeetRx Singsation Paid Program New P90X 3! Perricone MD Easy Nutrition WEN Hair Care FRIDAY AFTERNOON C COMCAST W WOW! S1 DISH NETWORK S2 DIRECTV JANUARY 16 C W S1 S2 1 PM 1:30 2 PM 2:30 3 PM 3:30 4 PM 4:30 5 PM 5:30 6 PM 6:30 WJHG (7) 3 3 7 7 Rachael Ray (N) Mom’s Ever Mom’s Ever The Doctors (N) Family Feud Jeopardy! (N) News Nightly News News Wheel Fortune CW (7.2) 99 9 8 8 Steve Wilkos Paid Program Married... With Married... With The Bill Cunningham Show Engagement Engagement Cops Rel. Cops Rel. King of the Hill Cleveland WMBB (13) 2 2 13 13 General Hospital (N) Hot Bench (N) Hot Bench Dr. Phil (N) The Dr. Oz Show (N) News World News News 13 at 6 Entertainment METV (13.2) 209 133 2 Bonanza “The Countess” The Rifleman The Rifleman Adv-Superman Adv-Superman Emergency! “The Inspection” CHiPs “Concours D’Elegance” M*A*S*H M*A*S*H WECP (18) 4 4 4 18 The Talk (N) The Wendy Williams Show (N) The Meredith Vieira Show (N) The Ellen DeGeneres Show (N) Inside Edition Evening News Jeopardy! (N) Modern Family MNT (18.2) 227 13 Justice for All Justice for All Love-Raymond Family Feud Name Game Name Game Law & Order: SVU Hot, Cleveland Hot, Cleveland Mike & Molly Mike & Molly WPGX (28) 8 8 28 28 Flip My Food Fix It, Finish It The Queen Latifah Show Steve Harvey ThisMinute ThisMinute Judge Judy (N) Judge Judy Big Bang Big Bang WFSG (56) 11 11 56 56 Sesame Street Cat in the Hat Curious Curious Arthur (EI) Odd Squad Wild Kratts WordGirl Martha Speaks PBS NewsHour (N) Rick Steves A&E 34 43 118 265 Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Wild Transport Wild Transport Criminal Minds Criminal Minds “True Genius” AMC 30 62 131 254 Die Hard 2 Kill Bill: Vol. 2 () Uma Thurman. An assassin confronts her former boss and his gang. The Bourne Supremacy () Matt Damon, Franka Potente, Brian Cox. ANPL 46 69 184 282 Treehouse Masters Treehouse Masters Treehouse Masters Treehouse Masters Treehouse Masters Treehouse Masters BET 53 46 124 329 (12:00) Meet the Browns () Tyler Perry, Angela Bassett. Dysfunctional Friends () Stacey Dash, Reagan Gomez-Preston. Welcome Home Roscoe Jenkins () COM 64 53 107 249 Broad City Workaholics Workaholics Workaholics Futurama (:26) Futurama Futurama (:26) Futurama Daily Show South Park South Park (:29) Tosh.0 DISC 36 39 182 278 Alaskan Bush People Alaskan Bush People Alaskan Bush People Gold Rush “Grandpa John” Gold Rush Gold Rush “Parker’s Accident” E! 63 57 114 236 Take the Hamptons Take the Hamptons Take the Hamptons Take the Hamptons Fashion Police E! News (N) ESPN 9 23 140 206 SportsCenter Football Live NFL Insiders (N) (L) NFL Live (N) (L) Around/Horn Interruption SportsCenter (N) (L) NBA ESPN2 47 24 144 209 Golf SportsNation (N) Questionable You Herd Me Olbermann (N) Outside Lines Around/Horn Interruption NFL’s Greatest Games FAM 59 65 180 311 The Middle The Middle Reba Reba Reba Reba Boy Meets... Back to the Future () Michael J. Fox, Christopher Lloyd. FOOD 38 45 110 231 Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Best. Ever. “Best. Pizza. Ever.” Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Am. Diner FS1 24 27 150 219 (12:00) The Mike Francesa Show (N) (L) NASCAR Race Hub America’s Pregame (N) (L) UFC Rising UFC Fighter’s FX 45 51 136 248 How I Met How I Met How I Met How I Met How I Met Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Hancock () Will Smith, Charlize Theron, Jason Bateman. HALL 23 59 185 312 Little House on the Prairie Little House on the Prairie Little House on the Prairie The Waltons (Part 2 of 2) The Waltons “The Calling” The Waltons HGTV 32 38 112 229 Love It or List It, Too Love It or List It, Too Love It or List It, Too Love It or List It, Too Love It or List It, Too Love It or List It, Too HIST 35 42 120 269 Ancient Discoveries Ancient Discoveries Ancient Discoveries Last Stand of the 300 Greek soldiers face the Persian Empire. American Pickers LIFE 56 56 108 252 Grey’s Anatomy Grey’s Anatomy “Desire” Celebrity Wife Swap Celebrity Wife Swap Celebrity Wife Swap Celebrity Wife Swap SPIKE 28 48 241 241 Gangland “Crip or Die” Gangland “Texas Terror” Cops Cops Cops Jail Cops Cops Screams. Cops Cops SUN 49 422 656 NHL Hockey Women’s College Basketball Notre Dame at North Carolina. ACC Access Paradise to Do Florida Triathlon Tampa Bay Rays Encore SYFY 70 52 122 244 Helix “The Reaping” Helix Alan battles The Scythe. The Fifth Element () Bruce Willis, Gary Oldman, Ian Holm. I, Robot () Will Smith. TBS 31 15 139 247 Family Guy King King King Friends Friends Friends Friends Seinfeld Seinfeld Seinfeld Seinfeld TCM 25 70 132 256 (12:30) Jack the Giant Killer (:15) Attack of the 50-Foot Woman () First Men in the Moon () Edward Judd, Martha Hyer. 20 Million Miles to Earth () TLC 37 40 183 280 Say Yes: ATL Say Yes: ATL Say Yes: ATL Say Yes: ATL Say Yes: ATL Say Yes: ATL Say Yes: ATL Say Yes: ATL Say Yes: ATL Say Yes: ATL Say Yes: ATL Say Yes: ATL TNT 29 54 138 245 Bones “Yanks in the U.K.” Bones Bones “The Finger in the Nest” Castle “The Human Factor” Castle “Watershed” Castle “Valkyrie” USA 62 55 105 242 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Modern Family Modern Family WGN-A 13 239 307 Blue Bloods Blue Bloods Blue Bloods “What You See” Blue Bloods “Smack Attack” Amer. Funniest Home Videos Amer. Funniest Home Videos FRIDAY EVENING C COMCAST W WOW! S1 DISH NETWORK S2 DIRECTV JANUARY 16 C W S1 S2 7 PM 7:30 8 PM 8:30 9 PM 9:30 10 PM 10:30 11 PM 11:30 12 AM 12:30 WJHG (7) 3 3 7 7 Constantine (N) (Part 2 of 2) Grimm “Wesenrein” (N) Dateline NBC (N) News Tonight Show-J. Fallon Late Night With Seth Meyers Last Call/Daly CW (7.2) 99 9 8 8 Hart of Dixie (N) Whose Line Masters of Seinfeld Seinfeld Cougar Town Cougar Town Raising Hope Community Community Steve Wilkos WMBB (13) 2 2 13 13 Last-Standing (:31) Cristela Shark Tank (N) (:01) 20/20 News 13 at 10 (:35) Jimmy Kimmel Live (:37) Nightline The Middle The Middle METV (13.2) 209 133 2 Andy Griffith Andy Griffith Hogan Heroes Cheers Odd Couple Odd Couple Carol Burnett Perry Mason Banacek Priceless book disappears. WECP (18) 4 4 4 18 Undercover Boss “EmpireCLS” Hawaii Five-0 “Poina ’ole” (N) Blue Bloods (N) Modern Family Late Show W/David Letterman (:37) The Talk (N) Access H. MNT (18.2) 227 13 Bones Quarantined. Bones Anger Anger Family Guy Family Guy American Dad Dish Nation (N) Bridezillas “Jennifer & Kenya” WPGX (28) 8 8 28 28 World’s Funniest Fails Glee “Jagged Little Tapestry” TMZ (N) Two/Half Men Two/Half Men How I Met Steve Harvey The Queen Latifah Show WFSG (56) 11 11 56 56 Washington Charlie Rose Great Performances at the Met “Le Nozze di Figaro” (Season Premiere) “Le Nozze di Figaro,” set in Spain. (N) Charlie Rose (N) Charlie Rose A&E 34 43 118 265 Criminal Minds Criminal Minds “Snake Eyes” Criminal Minds “Closing Time” (:01) Criminal Minds (:01) Criminal Minds (12:01) Criminal Minds AMC 30 62 131 254 Gladiator () Russell Crowe, Connie Nielsen. A fugitive general becomes a gladiator in ancient Rome. The Green Mile () Tom Hanks, David Morse. ANPL 46 69 184 282 Treehouse Masters Tanked (N) Treehouse Masters (N) Tanked Treehouse Masters Treehouse Masters BET 53 46 124 329 Welcome Home Roscoe It’s a Mann’s World The Game HusbandsHo. HusbandsHo. The Wendy Williams Show (N) (12:05) The Real (N) COM 64 53 107 249 Tosh.0 Kroll Show Broad City Workaholics Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Daniel Tosh: Happy Thoughts Ari Shaffir: Paid Regular (N) Anthony Jeselnik: Caligula DISC 36 39 182 278 Gold Rush: Pay Dirt (N) Gold Rush “Piles of Gold” (N) Alaskan Bush People (N) Gold Rush “Piles of Gold” Alaskan Bush People Gold Rush “Parker’s Accident” E! 63 57 114 236 White Chicks () Shawn Wayans, Marlon Wayans. The Soup (N) The Soup E! News (N) Fashion Police The Soup The Soup ESPN 9 23 140 206 NBA Basketball Golden State Warriors at Oklahoma City Thunder. (N) (L) NBA Basketball Cleveland Cavaliers at Los Angeles Clippers. (N) (L) SportsCenter (N) (L) ESPN2 47 24 144 209 NFL’s Greatest E:60 Profile Boxing Friday Night Fights. (N) (L) SportsCenter (N) (L) SportsCenter (N) (L) NBA Tonight NFL’s Greatest FAM 59 65 180 311 Forrest Gump () Tom Hanks, Robin Wright, Gary Sinise. The 700 Club (N) Boy Meets... Boy Meets... Boy Meets... Boy Meets... FOOD 38 45 110 231 Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive FS1 24 27 150 219 Women’s College Basketball Creighton at Providence. (N) (L) FOX Sports Live (N) (L) FOX Sports Live (N) (L) FOX Sports Live (N) (L) FOX Sports Live FX 45 51 136 248 Star Trek () Chris Pine. Chronicles the early days of the starship Enterprise and her crew. Star Trek () Chris Pine, Zachary Quinto, Leonard Nimoy. HALL 23 59 185 312 The Waltons “The Obsession” The Middle The Middle The Middle The Middle Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls Frasier Frasier HGTV 32 38 112 229 Love It or List It, Too Love It or List It, Too (N) House Hunters Hunters Int’l House Hunters Hunters Int’l Love It or List It, Too House Hunters Hunters Int’l HIST 35 42 120 269 American Pickers American Pickers American Pickers (:03) American Pickers (:01) American Pickers (12:01) American Pickers LIFE 56 56 108 252 Celebrity Wife Swap Celebrity Wife Swap (:02) Celebrity Wife Swap (:02) Celebrity Wife Swap (:02) Celebrity Wife Swap (12:02) Celebrity Wife Swap SPIKE 28 48 241 241 Cops Cops Bellator MMA Championship Tournaments Bellator Top 20 (:15) Cops Cops Cops Jail SUN 49 422 656 (6:00) Tampa Bay Rays Encore Inside HEAT HEAT Live! NBA Basketball Miami Heat at Sacramento Kings. (N Subject to Blackout) (L) HEAT Live! Inside HEAT Inside HEAT SYFY 70 52 122 244 (5:30) I, Robot () 12 Monkeys “Splinter” Helix “San Jose” (N) 12 Monkeys “Splinter” (:04) Helix “San Jose” (12:04) Mothman () TBS 31 15 139 247 Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Bad Boys II () Martin Lawrence. Two detectives battle a drug kingpin in Miami. Bad Boys () TCM 25 70 132 256 The Goodbye Girl () Richard Dreyfuss. Chapter Two () James Caan, Marsha Mason. (:15) Only When I Laugh () Marsha Mason. TLC 37 40 183 280 Say Yes: ATL Say Yes: ATL Say Yes: ATL Say Yes: ATL Secret Wedding Say Yes: ATL Say Yes: ATL Secret Wedding Say Yes: ATL Say Yes: ATL TNT 29 54 138 245 Cold Justice (N) Wake Up Call (N) Cold Justice Wake Up Call Hawaii Five-0 “Pa’ani” Hawaii Five-0 “Na Ki’i” USA 62 55 105 242 Modern Family Modern Family Modern Family Modern Family Modern Family Modern Family Modern Family Modern Family Modern Family Modern Family CSI: Crime Scene Investigation WGN-A 13 239 307 How I Met How I Met How I Met How I Met How I Met How I Met How I Met How I Met Engagement Engagement Parks/Recreat Parks/Recreat

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CLASSIFIEDSFriday, January 16, 2015 | The News Herald | Page D1 Automotive Today NEWS HERALD NEW CARS, CERTIFIED USED CARS, USED CARS, BY OWNER pcautobuy.com CLASSIFIEDS INSIDE 1116606 11 35552

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CLASSIFIEDSPage D2 | The News Herald | Friday, January 16, 2015 Legal #34985 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR BAY COUNTY GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO.14001281CA ONEWEST BANK N.A., Plaintiff, vs. UNKNOWN SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE OF THE NELLIE OLSON LIVING TRUST UTD NOVEMBER 21, 2007; et al Defendant(s), NOTICE OF ACTION CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE TO: SHIRLEY BYRNE AND UNKNOWN BENEFICIARIES OF THE NELLIE OLSON LIVING TRUST, UTD, NOVEMBER 21, 2007. whose residence is unknown if he/she/they be living; and if he/she/they be dead, the unknown defendants who may be spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees, and all parties claiming an interest by, through, under or against the Defendants, who are not known to be dead or alive, and all parties having or claiming to have any right, title or interest in the property described in the mortgage being foreclosed herein. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property: LOT 8, BLOCK 7, OF OAKLAND TERRACE ADDITIONAL, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 43, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on counsel for Plaintiff, whose address is 6409 Congress Avenue, Suite 100, Boca Raton, Florida 33487 on or before 30 days from Date of First Publication of this Notice and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on Plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered againt you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition filed herein. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court at Bay County, Florida, this 12th day of December, 2014. Bill Kinsaul Clerk of the Circuit Court By:Jennifer Sullivan Deputy Clerk Robertson, Anschutz, and Schneid, PL Attorney for Plaintiff 6409 Congress Ave., Suite 100 Boca Raton, FL 33487 Primary Email: mail@ rasflaw.com File No. 14-76765-EIT January 9, 16, 2015 Legal #34987 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR BAY COUNTY GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO.14001423CA ONEWEST BANK N.A., Plaintiff, vs. THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, BENEFICIARIES, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES AND ALL OTHERS WHO MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST IN THE ESTATE OF JEAN T. SMITH A/K/A JEAN THOMAS SMITH, DECEASED; et. al. Defendant(s), NOTICE OF ACTION CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE TO: THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, BENEFICIARIES, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES AND ALL OTHERS WHO MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST IN THE ESTATE OF JEAN T. SMITH whose residence is unknown if he/she/they be living; and if he/she/they be dead, the unknown defendants who may be spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees, and all parties claiming an interest by, through, under or against the Defendants, who are not known to be dead or alive, and all parties having or claiming to have any right, title or interest in the property described in the mortgage being foreclosed herein. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property: The West Half (W1/2) of Lots Ten (10) and Eleven (11) in Block Five (5) in the Southeast Quarter (SE1/4) of Section Thirty-Six (36), Township Three (3) South, Range Fifteen (15) West, according to survey and plat of E.L. Wood in 1913 of the St. Andrews Bay Railroad Land and Mining Company Plat. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on counsel for Plaintiff, whose address is 6409 Congress Avenue, Suite 100, Boca Raton, Florida 33487 on or before 30 days from Date of First Publication of this Notice and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on Plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered againt you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition filed herein. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court at Bay County, Florida, this 24th day of December, 2014. Bill Kinsaul Clerk of Circuit Court By:Jennifer Sullivan Deputy Clerk Robertson, Anschutz, and Schneid, PL Attorney for Plaintiff 6409 Congress Ave., Suite 100 Boca Raton, FL 33487 Primary Email: mail@rasflaw.com January 9, 16, 2015 Legal# 35075 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 2015-18-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF PATSY NELL JORDAN, A/K/A PATSY JORDAN Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Patsy Nell Jordan, A/K/A Patsy Jordan, deceased, whose date of death was December 20, 2014, is pending in the Circuit Court for Bay County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 300 East 4th Street, Panama City, Florida, 32401. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is January 16, 2015 Personal Representative: Dayton Hoyt Lashley 108 Jenks Circle Panama City, FL 32405 Attorney for Personal Representative: H. Cranston Pope, Attorney FL Bar No.: 0582409 Pope & Barloga, P.A. 736 Jenks Avenue P.O. Box 1609 (32402) Panama City, FL 32401 Tele: (850) 784-9174 Fax: (850) 692-6822 E-Mail: hcp@ popebarloga.com Secondary E-Mail: tprater@popebarloga. com January 16, 23, 2015 Legal# 97168 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 03-2013-CA-000412 DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR GSAA HOME EQUITY TRUST 2006-15, Legal# 97150 NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that Panama Mini Warehouses Pursuant to FS 83.806 will sell the contents of the following storage units #8 Heather James, #88 TJ O’Neal and #93 Marquis Tyson. The contents are misc. personal property including household property. Each unit will be available at management’s discretion for sale or disposal on January 30, 2015 at 10:00 AM. Those listed can make payment with cash to recover said contents up until the time mentioned above and all property must be moved from premises that day. Panama Mini Warehouses 1603 W. 15th Street Panama City. FL 32401 (850) 784-0083 Pub: Jan. 9, 16, 2015 1135514 1135513 1135515 Mercedes Roadster Kit Car; 1980 VW chassis. $2900 firm; LTD Crown Victoria 1990, 4dr V8 75k miles, sold locally, immaculate, inside and out. $3900; 1982 AMC Concorde 4dr, 6 cyl 6400 miles. Must see to appreciate. Nice. $3500 850-594-4838 $675 DownPontiac Grand Prix 02. 0% interest. $4200 9a-9p. Daylight Auto Fin 850-215-1769 DLR 1999 Mazda Miata MX-5 , convertible, black on black, AC, 93k miles, exc cond., $4400 obo. Call 850-890-8832 Text FL10427 to 56654 2003 Buick LeSabre, excellent cond, low miles, meticulous mature driver, value priced at $4,395 -850-307-3476 ask for Jack 2005 Corolla 66,300MI very good condition $7,500. 1993 Nissan King Cab 4 Wheel Drive, tow package, low mileage $4,500. Call 638-2213 2011 Nissan Maxima, I owner, only 39k miles, sunroof, leather, pristine cond, value priced at $18,995 850-307-3476 ask for Jack 2012 Nissan Altima Coupe, 1 owner, only 15k miles, leather, sunroof, mint cond, value priced at $17,995 850-307-3476 ask for Jack 2013 Cadillac XTS, 1 owner, only 17k miles, white diamond, mint cond, warranty, value priced at $31,995 850-307-3476 ask for Jack 2013 Chevy Camaro, 1 owner, 20k miles, factory warranty, like new cond, value priced at $22,995 -850-307-3476 ask for Jack Buick Lesabre, 1998, Very clean! Low miles! Low price $3995! Call Chad 850-250-6060 C2 80 Mercedes Benz 1995 4 dr. Good cond. 92,500 miles. Garnet color exterior,tan leather interior and seats. Drive it, you’ll love it. Steers like new. Bilstein shocks work great, Cold air, great heat, new battery & brakes. Almost new tires on front, good tires back. Good spare. 24/28 mpg. Has few minor scratches and dings but runs smooth. Never smoked in. Handles and rides like a Mercedes. Asking $ 2995 Cash. Call 850-640-1056 Chevy Camaro SS, ‘14, sunroof, navi, RS pkg, $35,991! Call 850-250-5981. Chevy Cobalt LS, ‘10, 4-door, auto, 52k miles, $9,991! Call 850-250-5981. Chrysler 300, 2005, white, only 98k miles! Low payments! Call Peter 850-586-4640 Chrysler 300, 2005, white, only 98k miles! Low payments! Call Peter 850-586-4640 Dodge Caravan, 2006, dk blue, 4 quad seating, rear ent, all pwr, cold air, only 70k miles! Nice van! Hurry, only $4988! Gary Fox 338-5257 Dodge Challenger SRT, 2014, orange w/ black stripes, blk lthr, 2600 miles, Like new! Priced to go fast! Under warranty! Call Victor 850-348-1038 For Cars, Trucks, SUVs, & Vans, Call Gary Fox @ Bay Mitsubishi 338-5257! Home of the $9888 OR LESS! Too many to put in the ads! Vehicles come in everyday and I’m HERE FOR YOU! Ford Fusion SE, 2007, silver, grey cloth, all pwr, alloys, Only $6988! Gary Fox 338-5257 Ford Fusion, 2008, Super clean! Only $10,988! Call Todd 252-3234 Ford Mustang Convertible, 2007, blue w/ blue top, auto, all pwr, CD, alloys, all pwr, Only $9888! Gary Fox 338-5257 Ford Mustang, 2007, Excellent condition! $10,988 Call Tony Smith 850-851-6069 Hyundai Elantra, 2006, local trade, white, grey cloth, auto, all pwr, CD, cold air, Only 100k miles! Hurry, $4988! Gary Fox 338-5257 Hyundai Sonata GLS, 2011, pwr w/l, premium cloth, Clean car! $13,988 Call Mike Crilly 850-814-5147 Hyundai Sonata Hybird, 2012, Great MPG!!! 29k miles! Under warranty! $18,988 Call Tony Smith 850-851-6069 Hyundai Sonata Sport, 2015, Starting at $199/month! Brand New! America’s Best Warranty 10yr/100k miles! Great selection while they last! Call Chad 850-250-6060 Infiniti G37 Coupe, ‘08, moonroof, leather, $17,991! Call 850-250-5981. Lincoln Town Car Signature, 2007, lthr, all pwr, sunroof, new tires! $13,988 Call Tony Smith 850-851-6069 Looking to Buy 77-79 Ranchero (burgundy interior preferred). Good straight body, doesn’t have to run. All considered. Please call 850-265-0851, Leave message. Mitsubishi Eclipse Spyder, 2008, Excellent condition! Only $13,495! Call Chad 850-250-6060 New 2015 Mitsubishi Mirage-5dr hatchback, auto, all pwr, CD, smart key, push button start, 100,000 miles warranty & 44MPG! Several to choose from! $15,488 Gary Fox 338-5257 Saturn Ion, 2003, auto, 120k miles, Can be 4-wheel flat towed behind RV! Only $3995! Call Mike Crilly 850-814-5147 SE HABLA ESPANOLPASAPORTE OK NO CREDITO OK TROCAS/CARROS/SUV $300 AL MES EJEMPLOS: 02 Chevy Blazer 03 Chevy Silverado 02 Monte Carlo 04 Ford Explorer 02 Nissan Sentra PLUS 75 MORE DAYLIGHT AUTO FINANCING 2816 WEST HWY 98 PANAMA CITY, FLORIDA 32401 9 AM TO 9 PM 850-215-1769 Subaru Impreza 2.5i, ‘10, AWD, 4-door, must see, $12,991! Call 850-250-5981. Toyota Avalon Limited, 2008, lthr, sunroof, alloys, all pwr, 6disc CD, $16,988 Call Tony Smith 850-851-6069 Toyota Camry LE, 2002, auto, Great MPG! $7995 Call Tony Smith 850-851-6069 Toyota Camry, 2002, only 89k miles, This car will go fast! Nice! Great low price! Call Chad 850-250-6060 Toyota Corolla LE, ‘14, economical, must see, $17,991. Call 850-250-5981. Toyota Matrix, ‘06, auto, must see, $9,991! Call 850-250-5981. Toyota Matrix, ‘09, auto, only 11k miles, $13,991! Call 850-250-5981. Toyota Scion, 2008, Very sporty! Only $11,995! Call Chad 850-250-6060 *Affordable* Auto GlassFree Mobile ServicesLifetime Warrantyaffordable glass.com 850-747-4527 $775 DownFord Explorer 03. 0% interest. $5500 9a-9p. Daylight Auto Finance. 850-215-1769 DLR $975 DownDodge Durango 05. 0% interest. $9500 9a-9p. Daylight Auto Fin 850-215-1769 DLR 2008 Toyota Highlander LTD, White Diamond, low miles, immaculate, value priced at $14,495 850-621-2050 ask for Marty 2011 Cadillac SRX, 1 owner, NAV, Sunroof, factory warranty, excellent cond, value priced at $21,995 850-621-2050 ask for Marty 2011 Ford Expedition King Ranch, DVD, NAV, 1 owner, low miles, mint cond, value priced at $29,995 850-621-2050 ask for Marty 2013 Toyota Highlander, 4x4, only 26k miles, leather, sunroof, factory warranty, value priced at $27,995 850-307-3476 ask for Jack 2014 Nissan Pathfinder SL, only 12k miles, leather, factory warranty, huge savings off new price, only $28,995 -850-307-3476 ask for Jack BMW X3, 2008, blk, loaded! Call Peter 850-586-4640 Cadillac SRX, 2 available! 2012 or 2011, BOTH LOADED! Call Sandro 832-9071 Chevy Traverse LT, ‘14, Certified, auto, V6, like new, $28,991! Call 850-250-5981 For sale by ownerJeep Patrio t Latitude Sport Model 2013 4cyl.2.4 liter engine, AT, 4WD, keyless start & entry, FM radio with mp3 disc, Sirius XM, Bluetooth Wireless, power windows & doors, dual airbags. Excellent condition. $15,000 Call 850-866-8125 txt FL10399 to 56654 GMC Acadia Denali, ‘12, 3rd seat, fully loaded, $36,991! Call 850-250-5981. Ford Escape 2013 White, Newer Body Style. 20k Miles, Ecoboost, Excellent Condition. 16k Warranty and Full maintenance. Grandmas suv 24-30 mpg $18,950 Call 276-8410Text FL10595 to 56654 GMC Yukon XL, ‘08, local trade, beige, must see, $21,992! Call 850-250-5981 GMC Yukon, 2007, tan w/ tan int, 3rd row, Only $15,998! Call Mike Crilly 850-814-5147 Honda Crosstour, ‘10, loaded, must see, $17,995! Call 850-250-5981. Jeep Cherokee, ‘14, local trade, like new, $23,991! Call 850-250-5981. Jeep Grand Cherokee Overland, 2014, Only 1,118 miles! Ecodiesel SUV, lthr, pano roof, htd/cld seats, nav, backup cam, & more! Call Victor 850-348-1038 Jeep Liberty, 2007, white, only 92k miles! LOW PAYMENTS! Call Peter 850-586-4640 Jeep Wrangler Sahara, 2008, 4dr, dark green, hard top, Excellent condition! Must sell! Call Victor 850-348-1038 Nissan Murano, ‘09, V6, local trade, $16,991! Call 850-250-5981. Nissan Rogue, ‘11, power options, nice, $15,991! Call 850-250-5981. Toyota Highlander Sport, 2012, grey, 3rd row, Runs & looks like new! Must sell quick! Trades welcome! Call Victor 850-348-1038 $1275 DownFord F150 X/Cab 03. 0% interest. $7500 9a-9p. Daylight Auto Fin 850-215-1769 DLR $2000 DownChevy Silverado 2006. 0% interest. $9900 9a-9p. Daylight Auto Fin. 850-215-1769 DLR Chevy Colorado Crew Cab, ‘10, leather, like new, $19,991! Call 850-250-5981. Chevy Colorado Crew Cab, 2006, local trade, blk on blk, auto, all pwr, cold air, alloys, bedliner, Beautiful truck! $9888 Gary Fox 338-5257 Chevy Silverado Double Cab Z-71, ‘14, 4WD, auto, V6, $31,991! Call 850-250-5981. Chevy Z71 4x4, 2 available! Leather or cloth! Hurry before your neighbor buys one! Call Sandro 832-9071 Dodge 2500, 2007, 4dr, SLT, 88k miles, Won’t last! Only $22,988! Call Todd 252-3234 Dodge Dakota, 1999, ext cab, local trade, white, grey cloth, all pwr, alloys, bedliner, Nice truck! Only $4500, HURRY! Gary Fox 338-5257 Dodge Ram SLT, 2004, 4dr, Turbo Diesel, 83k miles, $16,998 Call Mike Crilly 850-814-5147 Ford F150 4x4, 2010, maroon, Runs & looks great! Must sell fast! Low price! Call Victor 850-348-1038 Ford F250 Lariat, 2008, only 22k miles, LOADED! A must see! Only $23,988! Call Todd 252-3234 Ford Ranger XLT Supercab, ‘02, auto, V6, $6,994! Call 850-250-5981. Honda Ridgeline Sport, ‘13, 4WD, auto, alloys, $25,991! Call 850-250-5981. Suzuki Equator, 2011, 4dr truck, Lots of extras! Only 5k miles! Priced to sell at $16,988! Call Todd 252-3234 Toyota Tacoma, ‘03, regular cab, must see, $8,992! Call 850-250-5981. Toyota Tundra, 2013, dbl cab, 7k miles, Financing available! Under warranty! $28,988 Call Tony Smith 850-851-6069 1997 Honda Odyssey Mini Van for sale. Runs good but needs muffler. $1000 firm. Call 850-303-3939 Text FL10550 to 56654 Chevy Express Van, ‘09, 15-passenger, 31k miles, $19,991! Call 850-250-5981. Dodge Caravan, 2006, only 74k miles! Low payments! Call Peter 850-586-4640 Dodge Grand Caravan SXT, 2010, 1 owner, grey int, stow-n-go, 4 quad seats, rear air, rear ent, all pwr, auto, sliding doors, lift gate, alloys, All the options! $11,988 Gary Fox 338-5257 Honda Odyssey, 2008, only 84k miles! Excellent condition! Only $12,995! Call Chad 850-250-6060 Ford Econoline 12 Passenger Van, 2014, Great for church or school! Low miles! Better than new! $25,988 Call SAndro 832-9071 Kia Sedona, 2007, Lots of extras! 7 passenger van! Great condition! Only $8995! Call Chad 850-250-6060 Toyota Sienna, 2005, white, tan lthr, Nice van! Lots of room! $6995 Call Mike Crilly 850-814-5147 Harley Davidson Fat Boy, ‘07, customized, must see, $16,990! Call 850-250-5981. Heritage Deluxe 2008 6 speed, 96 cubic 5000/miles with add on 3 wheel kit. $ 11,000 OBO. Call 850-234-7042 Classic 34 HatterasRestored, Twin 2010 Cummins, New Cobia tower, electronics, Capt. maintained, turn key, many more upgrades. Call 850-582-4384 txt FL10622 to 56654 2012 Keystone Montana 5th Wheel Model 3150. No pets / smoking, Excellent Condition. Any reasonable offer will be considered. Never pulled across the hwy, presently in storage in PCB, FL Reduced! 336-385-1245 or 336-977-0710 Need a helping hand? Advertise in the Help Wanted Section in the Classifieds! 747-5020

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CLASSIFIEDSFriday, January 16, 2015 | The News Herald | Page D3 Plaintiff, vs. LARRY R. KING; et al., Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that sale will be made pursuant to an Order or Final Summary Judgment. Final Judgment was awarded on in Civil Case No. 03-2013-CA-000412, of the Circuit Court of the FOURTEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for BAY County, Florida, wherein, DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR GSAA HOME EQUITY TRUST 200615 is the Plaintiff, and LARRY R. KING; SUNRISE BEACH OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF LARRY R. KING NKA CINDY KING; UNKNOWN TENANT #1 THROUGH #4; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS are Defendants. The clerk of the court, Bill Kinsaul will sell to the highest bidder for cash www.bay.real foreclose.com at 11:00 a.m. on February 19, 2015, the following described real property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment, to wit: UNIT 2103 OF SUNRISE BEACH, A CONDOMINIUM, ACCORDING TO THE DECLARATION THEREOF AS RECORDED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 2576, PAGE 241, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA AND AS MAY BE AMENDED FROM TIME TO TIME. TOGETHER WITH ALL OF ITS APPURTENACES ACCORDING TO THE DECLARATION OF CONDOMINIUM. SUBJECT, HOWEVER, TO ALL OF THE PROVISIONS OF THE DELARATION OF CONDOMINIUM. TOGETHER WITH LIMITED COMMON ELEMENT STORAGE SPACE NO. S-087 WHICH IS AN APPURTENANCE TO THE ABOVE UNIT, SUBJECT TO THE TERMS, PROVISIONS AND CONDITIONS OF THE FOREGOING DECLARATION. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court on January 06, 2015. BILL KINSAUL CLERK OF THE COURT By: Virginia Starling Deputy Clerk Aldridge|Connors, LLP Attorney for Plaintiff(s) 1615 South Congress Avenue, Suite 200 Delray Beach, FL 33445 Phone: 561.392.6391 Fax: 561.392.6965 File No. 1113-601051 IMPORT ANT IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACT THE ADA COORDINATOR BY MAIL AT P.O. BOX 1089, PANAMA CITY, FL 32402 OR BY PHONE AT (850)747-5338 AT LEAST SEVEN (7) DAYS BEFORE YOUR SCHEDULED COURT APPEARANCE, OR IMMEDIATELY UPON RECEIVING THIS NOTIFICATION IF THE TIME BEFORE THE SCHEDULED APPEARANCE IS LESS THAN SEVEN (7) DAYS. IF YOU ARE HEARING IMPAIRED, PLEASE CALL 711 OR EMAIL ADAREQUEST @JUD14.FLCOURTS.OR G. Pub: Jan. 16, 23, 2015 Legal# 97186PUBLIC NOTICESTATE OF FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION CONSOLIDATED NOTICE OF INTENT TO ISSUE PERMIT AND AUTHORIZATION TO USE SOVEREIGN SUBMERGED LANDS The Department of Environmental Protection gives notice of its intent to issue a Joint Coastal Permit (File No. 0129413-006-JC) and a Letter of Consent to use sovereign submerged lands for the proposed sand placement activity. The proposed project is to maintain the Panama City Harbor Federal Navigation Project by dredging the sediment deposition basin and the 8.9-mile federal channel. The Grand Lagoon Channel will also be dredged to restore previously authorized depths. Dredging is authorized to the following depths: •Outer Entrance Channel and Sediment Basin to a maximum allowable depth of -42 feet mean lower low water (MLLW), which includes a design depth of -38 feet, plus 2 feet of advanced maintenance and 2 feet of allowable over depth; Entrance Channel through the Inlet to its intersection with the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway to a maximum allowable depth of -40 feet (MLLW), which includes a design depth of -36 feet, plus 2 feet of advanced maintenance and 2 feet of allowable over depth; St. Andrew Bay Channel to Dyers Point to a maximum allowable depth of -38 feet (MLLW), which includes a design depth of -36 feet, plus 2 feet of allowable over depth; and Shoaled portion of the Grand Lagoon Channel to a maximum allowable depth of -12 feet (MLLW), which includes a design depth of -8 feet, plus 2 feet of advanced maintenance and 2 feet of allowable over depth. Beach-compatible dredged material will be placed on the Gulf-front beach and the inlet beach at Gator Lake. Non-beach compatible dredged material will be placed in an existing upland spoil disposal site. The project also includes as-needed maintenance of the existing jetties along the eastern and western sides of the entrance channel. Maintenance activities include placing or reconfiguring rock to a crest width of 15 feet at an elevation of +6 feet MLLW and side slopes of 1: 2 (vertical:horizontal) using a shallowdraft barge and a barge-mounted crane. Maintenance of the east jetty may also include dredging a temporary shallow access channel adjacent to the jetty. Dredged material will be side cast immediately adjacent to the access channel, and placed back into the access channel to pre-dredge elevations immediately following completion of maintenance activities on the east jetty. The project site is located in the federal channel, which runs from the Gulf of Mexico, through St. Andrews Pass, to Port Panama City (Port), in the sediment deposition basin located on the southeast side of the entrance channel and in the Grand Lagoon Channel. The beach placement sites are located in St. Andrews State Park (St. Andrews Bay State Recreation Area). One site is located immediately northwest of the western jetty, fronting the Gulf of Mexico. The other site is located in front of Gator Lake, facing St. Andrews Bay Inlet, Section 22, Township 4 South, Range 15 West. The upland spoil disposal site is located on the Naval Support Activity Panama City Base, Sections 9 and 10, Township 4 South, Range 15 West. The portion of the federal channel from Station 471+66 to approximately Station 235+00, the sediment deposition basin, both jetties, and the beach placement sites are located within St. Andrews Aquatic Preserve, Class III Outstanding Florida Waters (OFW). The portion of the federal channel located landward of Station 235+00, and the Grand Lagoon Channel are located outside of the aquatic preserve in Class III Waters. All activities are located in Bay County. A person whose substantial interests are affected by the Department’s action may petition for an administrative hearing in accordance with sections 120.569 and 120.57, Florida Statutes (F.S.). The petition must contain the information set forth below and must be filed (received by the clerk) in the Office of General Counsel of the Department at 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3000. Because the administrative hearing process is designed to redetermine final agency action on the application, the filing of a petition for an administrative hearing may result in a modification of the permit or even a denial of the application. Under rule 62-110.106(4), Florida Administrative Code (F.A.C.), a person whose substantial interests are affected by the Department’s action may also request an extension of time to file a petition for an administrative hearing. The Department may, for good cause shown, grant the request for an extension of time. Requests for extension of time must be filed with the Office of General Counsel of the Department at 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3000, before the applicable deadline. A timely request for extension of time shall toll the running of the time period for filing a petition until the request is acted upon. If a request is filed late, the Department may still grant it upon a motion by the requesting party showing that the failure to file a request for an extension of time before the deadline was the result of excusable neglect. In the event that a timely and sufficient petition for an administrative hearing is filed, other persons whose substantial interests will be affected by the outcome of the administrative process have the right to petition to intervene in the proceeding. Any intervention will be only at the discretion of the presiding judge upon the filing of a motion in compliance with rule 28-106.205, F.A.C. In accordance with rules 28-106.111(2) and 62-110.106(3)(a)(1), F.A.C., petitions for an administrative hearing by the applicant must be filed within 14 days of receipt of this written notice. Petitions filed by any persons other than the applicant, and other than those entitled to written notice under section 120.60(3), F.S., must be filed within 14 days of publication of the notice or within 14 days of receipt of the written notice, whichever occurs first. Under section 120.60(3), F.S., however, any person who has asked the Department for notice of agency action may file a petition within 14 days of receipt of such notice, regardless of the date of publication. The petitioner shall mail a copy of the petition to the applicant at the address indicated above at the time of filing. The failure of any person to file a petition for an administrative hearing within the appropriate time period shall constitute a waiver of that person’s right to request an administrative determination (hearing) under sections 120.569 and 120.57, F.S. A petition that disputes the material facts on which the Department’s action is based must contain the following information: (a) The name and address of each agency affected and each agency’s file or identification number, if known; (b) The name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner; the name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner’s representative, if any, which shall be the address for service purposes during the course of the proceeding; and an explanation of how the petitioner’s substantial interests are or will be affected by the agency determination; (c) A statement of when and how the petitioner received notice of the agency decision; (d) A statement of all disputed issues of material fact. If there are none, the petition must so indicate; (e) A concise statement of the ultimate facts alleged, including the specific facts that the petitioner contends warrant reversal or modification of the agency’s proposed action; (f) A statement of the specific rules or statutes that the petitioner contends require reversal or modification of the agency’s proposed action, including an explanation of how the alleged facts relate to the specific rules or statutes; and (g) A statement of the relief sought by the petitioner, stating precisely the action that the petitioner wishes the agency to take with respect to the agency’s proposed action. A petition that does not dispute the material facts on which the Department’s action is based shall state that no such facts are in dispute and otherwise shall contain the same information as set forth above, as required by rule 28-106.301, F.A.C. Under sections 120.569(2)(c) and (d), F.S., a petition for administrative hearing must be dismissed by the agency if the petition does not substantially comply with the above requirements or is untimely filed. This intent to issue constitutes an order of the Department. The applicant has the right to seek judicial review of the order under section 120.68, F.S., by the filing of a notice of appeal under rule 9.110 of the Florida Rules of Appellate Procedure with the Clerk of the Department in the Office of General Counsel, 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida 32399 3000; and by filing a copy of the notice of appeal accompanied by the applicable filing fees with the appropriate district court of appeal. The notice of appeal must be filed within 30 days from the date when the final order is filed with the Clerk of the Department. The application and “CONSOLIDATED NOTICE OF INTENT TO ISSUE JOINT COASTAL PERMIT AND AUTHORIZATION TO USE SOVEREIGN SUBMERGED LANDS” and the “DRAFT CONSOLIDATED JOINT COASTAL PERMIT AND INTENT TO GRANT SOVEREIGN SUBMERGED LANDS AUTHORIZATION” can be viewed at the Department’s Internet Web site at: ftp://ftp. dep.state.fl.us/pub/ENV P RMT/bay/pend ing/0129413_%20P anama %20City%20Harbor/ Pub: January 16, 2015 Legal# 97200 NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW PURSUANT TO SECTION 865.09, FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of: McLeod’s Glass & Supply located at 2011 Lisenby Avenue, in the County of Bay, in the City of Panama City, Florida, 32405 intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Panama City, Florida, this 14th day of January, 2015. Christopher B. McLeod Pub: January 16, 2015 Legal# 97188 PUBLIC AUCTION 2003 FORD FOCUS GRAY 1FAFP34333W331898 1998 GMC SIERRA TRUCK WHITE 1GTEC14W5WZ553331 The above listed vehicles will be sold on January 28, 2015 at 2:00 P.M. The location of the vehicles is 1520 Florida Ave., Panama City, FL. Bidding starts at $500.00. Taylor’s Towing reserves the right to reject any bid. Pub: January 16, 2015 Legal #34973 PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF INTENT TO USE UNIFORM METHOD OF COLLECTING NON-AD VALOREM ASSESSMENTS The City Commission of the City of Springfield, Florida (the “Commission”) hereby provides notice, pursuant to Section 197.3632 (3)(a), Florida Statutes, of its intent to use the uniform method of collecting special assessments, sometimes called non-ad valorem special assessments, to be levied upon one or more properties within the City of Springfield upon which a public nuisance is located, to recover the cost of capital improvements and essential services incurred by the City to abate the nuisance in the event the owners or persons interested in the property fail to do so, commencing for the Fiscal Year beginning on October 1, 2014. The Commission will consider the adoption of a resolution electing to use the uniform method of collecting such assessment(s) on the same bill as for property taxes as authorized by Section 197.3632, Florida Statutes, at a public hearing to be held at 5:30 p.m., Monday, February 2, 2015, in the Commission Chambers, Springfield City Hall, 3529 East Third Street, Springfield, Florida. Such resolution will state the need for the levy and will contain a legal description of the boundaries of the real property subject to the levy. The real property subject to the levy is all the property located within the boundaries of the City of Springfield, Florida. The levy will only be made upon a property upon which a public nuisance is located, not abated by the owner after notice and opportunity for hearing, and abated by the City as provided by law. The levy against the property upon which the nuisance is or was located will not exceed the cost of abatement and benefit, as determined by law, necessary to relieve and address the burdens created by such nuisance. Copies of the proposed form of resolution, which contains the legal description of the real property subject to the levy, are on file at the Office of the City Clerk of Springfield, 3529 East Third Street, Springfield, Florida. All interested persons are invited to attend. The public hearing is only being held to determine and preserve the method of collection. In the event any person decides to appeal any decision by the City Commission with respect to any matter relating to the consideration of the resolution at the above-referenced public hearing, a record of the proceeding may be needed and in such an event, such person may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the public hearing is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence on which the appeal is to be based. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing a special accommodation or an interpreter to participate in this proceeding should contact the City Clerk’s Office at (850) 872-7570 at least seven days prior to the date of the hearing. DATED this 5th day of January, 2015. By Order of: CLERK OF THE CITY OF SPRINGFIELD Pub: January 9, 16, 23, 30, 2015 Legal# 35063 NOTICE TO PROPOSERS The City of Callaway requests qualification statements from individuals or firms to provide Engineering Design Services for a Federal Highway Administration funded design and construction of bike lane/sidewalk project on C.R. 22A(Bob Little Rd.) between 7th St. and Cherry St. in Callaway. The funding is obligated through a Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) Local Agency Program (LAP) Agreements identified as FPID #435531-1-38-01. All proposers must be prequalified FDOT design consultants in 3.1 Minor Highway Design. Additional information concerning the proposed services being requested, specific City, State and Federal requirements, and the ranking criteria to be used to evaluate the proposals may be obtained from Catrese Bowley, City Purchaser by fax at (850) 871-2444, phone at (850) 871-6000, or e-mail at cbowley@ cityofcallaway.com. An original and three (3) copies of sealed proposals, marked “SEALED PROPOSAL FOR ENGINEERING DESIGN SERVICESC.R. 22A (BOB LITTLE ROAD) BIKE PATH/ SIDEWALK PROJECT”, must be received by 2:00 PM CST on February 11, 2015, at the City Hall, 6601 East Hwy. 22, Callaway, Florida 32404 Attn: Catrese Bowley, City Purchaser. The City of Callaway supports Equal Employment Opportunity. All questions concerning this project must be in writing and can be sent to Richard DeOcampo by mail at 6601 E. Hwy. 22, Callaway, FL 32404 or by email at deocampo@cityofcallaway.co m. No verbal questions will be addressed. The deadline for receiving questions is February 6, 2015 . Pub: January 16, 17, 18, 2015 Legal# 35059 PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS Florida Department of Transportation Project Bids will be received by the District Three Headquarters until 2:00 P.M. on Thursday, February 12, 2015, for Proposal ID E3O39 Miscellaneous concrete repair in Jackson & Washington Counties. Complete letting advertisement information for this project is available on our website at http://www. dot.state.fl.us/contractsadministrationdistrict3/ or by calling (850) 330-1364. January 16, 23, 2015 Legal# 35065 PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF REQUEST FOR STATEMENTS OF SPECIALIZED QUALIFICATIONS For NEEDS ANALYSIS, CONCEPTUAL DESIGN, LAY-OUT AND PROGRAMMING SERVICES AND FINAL DESIGN, ARCHITECTURAL, ENGINEERING, AND SURVEYING SERVICES Related to the PANAMA CITY BEACH PHASED “SPORTS VILLAGE” PROJECT The PANAMA CITY BEACH CONVENTION AND VISITOR’S BUREAU, INC. (the “CVB”), voluntarily employing aspects of the Consultant’s Competitive Negotiation Act (Section 287.055, Florida Statutes), hereby gives notice that a Request for Statements of Qualifications for professional services is invited from firms or teams qualified by professional training and substantial experience in the development, design and operation of sports villages consisting of, by way of example and not limitation, operationally related sports and entertainment arenas, field houses, training, workout and spa facilities, orthopedic rehabilitation and human performance labs dedicated to wellness and sports medicine, classroom and laboratory spaces for higher education in sports medicine, sports marketing and in the hospitality/tourism industry, sporting grounds such as softball and baseball fields with artificial turf outfields and rectangular fields with artificial turf, and rowing or sculling facilities, whether co-

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CLASSIFIEDSPage D4 | The News Herald | Friday, January 16, 2015 Customer SupportInbound & Outbound Telephone Multi-Media Sales ConsultantThe News Herald is looking for an inbound and outbound telephone multi-media sales consultant in a full-time position. Candidates must be skilled in computer data entry. Attention to detail is important. Must be an above-average speller and be able to proofread for spelling errors. Prior sales, telemarketing, or related experience required. The News Herald offers an excellent benefit package, including medical, dental, vision, life and short/long-term disability insurance, 401(k), vacation and sick leave and paid holidays. Candidates are selected for hire pending a background check and drug screen. Come by The News Herald at 501 W. 11th Street for an application, or send resume to ehypes@pcnh.com Interviews will be scheduled, no phone calls please. Web ID 34310071 EducationMath TeacherAMIKids Panama City Marine Institute (PCMI) is seeking a teacher certified in Math. The successful candidate should have the ability to provide a safe and successful learning environment for troubled youth, ages 14-18, while encouraging social and emotional development through the achievement of academic and personal goals. Must be able to pass a Criminal Background Screening and Motor Vehicle Records Check. You may pick up your application at 200 E. Beach Drive or fax resume to 850-785-6880. You may also apply online at AMIkids.org . EOE Web ID#: 34301715 Logistics/TransportationTemporary Class A CDL Truck DriverThe News Herald is accepting applications for a hardworking, responsible truck driver to load and deliver newspaper bundles to our contractors along with other related duties on a temporary basis. We expect the position to last up to six weeks. Hours are late night to early morning, on a rotating schedule. Applicants must have a valid Class A CDL Florida driver license, a clean driving record, proof of insurance, a current medical card. Come by The News Herald front office located at 501 W. 11th Street Monday -Friday, 8 a.m.5 p.m. for an application or send resume to ehypes@pcnh.com Interviews will be scheduled at a later date. No phone calls please. Equal Opportunity Employer Hiring will be contingent on a criminal background check and drug screen. Web Id 34307617 Text FL07617 to 56654 Medical/HealthBehavior InterventionistAMIkids Panama City Marine Institute (PCMI) is seeking a Behavior Interventionist. The Behavior Interventionist is responsible in supporting classroom management and provides leadership and support to motivate and guide staff and students toward the successful accomplishment of program goals and objectives. They are the first to intervene when a student issue arises. Must be able to pass a Criminal Background Screening and Motor Vehicle Records Check. You may pick up your application at 200 E. Beach Drive or fax your resume to 850-785-6880. You may also apply online at AMIkids.org . EOE Web ID#: 34310905 located on a single campus or on multiple, related campuses. Only firms or closely coordinated teams with sports oriented, specialized expertise in the disciplines of needs and market analysis for sports facilities and activities, preliminary design, programming and operation of varied but operationally related sports facilities and activities, and the architectural and engineering design and specification, of sports facilities, and administration of construction of such facilities need apply. It is anticipated that the Sports Village will be developed in phases, each phase providing facilities for related sports and associated activities, and that the professional services sought will focus initially upon establishing priorities and then developing the first phase to completion. Some phases may not be co-located. No assurance is given that a single firm or team will handle all phases. RFQ Instructions are available from, and sealed Statements of Qualification (SOQ) will be received by the CVB at, the CVB offices located at 17001 Panama City Beach Parkway, Panama City Beach, until 2:30 PM (CST) on February 13, 2015. Submittals will be publicly opened and receipt acknowledged immediately thereafter. The qualifications and other information should be submitted in strict compliance with the directives provided in the RFQ. The CVB is under no obligation; either express or implied, to reimburse responding firms for any expenses associated with preparation and submittal of the Statement of Qualifications in response to this request. In the event of a conflict between the RFQ instructions and this notice, the instructions shall prevail. Statements of Qualification (SOQ) shall be submitted in a sealed envelope or box, plainly marked with respondent’s name, address, date, time of SOQ deadline. A single firm may not participate in more than one team. If the respondent proposes a joint venture, or to use outside professional services for any of the discipline areas, all such information shall be included in the SOQ package. Eight (8) hard copies and one digital copy shall be submitted. The CVB envisions entering into non-exclusive Continuing Master Services Agreements for Services with the successful firm) or team, with specific task authorizations for each proposed project or task being negotiated and approved by the CVB on an as-needed basis with fees for each task order to be determined either on a negotiated stipulated sum, or on a time involved basis at the hourly rates specified in the Master Services Agreement. The SOQ should not address fees or charges. Inquiries regarding this RFQ should be directed to Dan Rowe, CVB President, email drowe@visitpanamacitybeach.com. The CVB reserves the right to accept or reject any and all SOQs in whole or in part, to waive informalities in the RFQ documents, to obtain new SOQs, or to postpone the opening of SOQs, or if unable to negotiate a satisfactory contract to terminate all negotiations under the RFQ and proceed by whatever appropriate means it may elect. Each Statement of Qualifications shall be valid to the CVB for a period of ninety (90) days after opening. The Panama City Beach Convention and Visitors Bureau, Inc., is an Equal Opportunity Employer. January 16, 23, 2015 Legal# 35071 PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the following entitled ordinance shall be presented to the City Commission of the City of Callaway, Florida, for a public hearing and final adoption at its regular meeting to be conducted at 6:00 P.M. on Tuesday, January 27, 2015, at the Callaway Arts and Conference Center, 500 Callaway Park Way, Callaway, FL 32404, to-wit, ORDINANCE NO. 952 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF CALLAWAY, FLORIDA, GRANTING BRIDGE HARBOR COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT DISTRICT’S PETITION TO DISSOLVE; DISSOLVING THE DISTRICT; REPEALING ORDINANCE NO. 847 AND ALL ORDINANCES OR PARTS OF ORDINANCES IN CONFLICT HEREWITH; AND PROVIDING AN IMMEDIATELY EFFECTIVE DATE. If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the City Commission with respect to any matter considered at the meeting, if an appeal is available, such person will need a record of the proceeding, and such person may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Any person requiring a special accommodation at this meeting because of a disability or physical impairment should contact Sandra B. Hirth, the Callaway City Clerk, at City Hall, 6601 Highway 22, Callaway, Florida 32404 or by phone at (850) 871-6000 at least five (5) calendar days prior to the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, and you possess TDD equipment, you may contact the City Clerk using the Florida Dual Party Relay system which can be reached at (800) 955-8770 (Voice) or (800) 955-8771 (TDD). ALL INTERESTED PERSONS desiring to be heard on the adoption of the aforesaid ordinance are invited to be present at the meeting. Copies of the ordinance may be obtained at the office of the City Clerk, Callaway, Florida, at the City Hall. CITY OF CALLAWAY, FLORIDA BY: /s/ Sandra B. Hirth City Clerk Pub: January 16, 2015 ADOPTION:Doctor & Park Ranger (will stay home) Beautiful loving home awaits 1st baby 1-800-552-0045 Expenses Pd FLBar42311 I’m DIVA -I’m LOST Shiney black cat, no front claws, or gps, wearing bright pink collar. Lost near Fairy Ave & 11th St. PLEASE call my humans 348-7300 Lost set of Keys on Tennessee Ave in Lynn Haven. Small multitool attached. If found call 850-596-4507 Found dog in Longpoint area of Parker. Jack Russell Terrier type. Call to identify 871-5672 Found Male Chihuahua in Delwood Estates off 19th St. Call to identify 850-814-1187 AKC Rottweiler PuppiesGerman, ready Jan 5th, $600, call 850-774-1869 Alternative To BoardingHouse N PetSitting Svs. Licensed Bonded 265-0278 HAVANESE PUPS AKC Home Raised. Best Health Guar.262-993-0460www .noahslittleark.com FREE Katz & Kittens! Three free kittens , let phone ring 10 or more times/disabled Veteran. Call from 9 am -6 pm only! Please call Kat Man 850-874-0677. Must have Carrier!! No Boxes!! Free to a Good Home Female Cat, Nuttered, Declawed & Black. Call (912)-464-7445 Text FL10802 to 56654 Free to a Good Home LH Two WeimaranersFree to a better home. Female 8 yr old, male 2 yr old. Please call 850-832-3191 txt FL10753 to 56654 Wood Stove for sale. Made in America Asking $350.00. Please call 850-541-3110 txt FL10865 to 56654 New GE stainless steel electric range, Freestanding with black ceramic tops, $400. Please call 310-343-5887 or 310-713-5164 ACured Split Oak , Any Amount $125 a load Delivered 640-1979 or 319-0866 New Year Special: Split Oak special $65 and up Large truck load. Call 850-866-8673 Oak FirewoodPick Up or Delivery 850-305-1609 ALL-IN-ONE Loft Bed with Trundle.Twin bunk on top. Built in dresser with 8 drawers. Built in bookshelf. Twin trundle underneath. Safety steps and net. TV and Homework station. Crawl space/ Cubby hole behind (ideal play area!) Call for info 678-472-1152 Bedroom furniture: White, 7 drawer dresser with mirror. 2 night stands, white. $250 OBO 850-563-0748 Buy & SellUsed Furniture 850-872-9544 or www .visit second2none.com Browning RiflesBar 7mm Magnum w/ scope, $1400. Bar 300 W.M., w/ scope, $1400. Ruger Model 77 25.06 w/scope & bipod, $625. Weatherby Shotgun 12 GA., O/U Athena Model, Ex Cond., $1200. Thompson Muzzle Loader, 54. Cal., w/shooting supplies in box., $450. Remington Nylon 66 22.Cal Rifle, $300. Call 270-766-2525 Text FL10913 to 56654 Guns, Ammo and AccessoriesGlock, Ruger, Mossberg, & more! North Florida Coins, M-F, 11-5, Sat 9-2 2639-B Lisenby Ave. PC. 850-215-8565. Winchester Rifles2-Pre 64 Model 94’s 30-30 caliber $600 each. 1 Model 94 Take down target style 30-30 w/box, made in 1929 $1250. Model 94XTR 22 Cal. w/scope-new cond. $500. Model 86 40-65 cal. Made in 1890 good cond. $6000. Heckler-koch SL7, .308 cal. Semi Auto w/scope mount, 10 shot mag & ammo $1895. Call 270-766-2525 JetFree Battery Powered Wheel Chair Almost new batteries, $550 OBO. Call 850-625-0753 Text FL11058 to 56654 Burn Barrells , $25/each or 2/$40. Call 624-1729 DIABETIC TEST STRIPS NEEDEDWill buy sealed, unexpired boxes (850)710-0189 Tandem crypt at Kent Forest Memorial ; retails for $13k. Must Sell Call to make Any Offers 850-814-8886 Tanning Bedelectronic bench. 24 bulbs. Personal use only. $300obo. 850-648-6765 or 527-2780 txt FL68418 to 56654 Utility trailer tires & rims 205-75-15. 5 lug white spoke. New. $90 ea or 4 for $350. Also, new 14” $80 each or 4 for $300. Also, new 13” $65 each or 4 for $250. Call 850-624-1729 .Medical/HealthMedical AsstNeeded FTfor busy multi doctors office. Must be a team player, dependable, & able to multi-task. Computer exp & medical terminology required. Fax resume to 850-785-3490Web ID#: 34309005 AccountingAccountantFor a busy medical practice. Must have a B.A. degree in Accounting. Business Accounting experience required CPA Preferred Email resume to: ssullivan@souther northopedic.com Web ID 34310911 Admin/ClericalFront Office StaffNow hiring for front office staff. FT position. For fast paced PC Medical office. Fax resume to 785-2123 Attn: Alisha Web ID#: 34310462 Bldg/Const/Skill TradePaintersRosemary Beach area. Call 850-596-0024 Web Id 34291433 ConstructionLaborerGeneral Contractor seeking laborer for various job duties. Must pass drug test & school board background check. Contact Jeff at 850-544-0352 for interview Web ID#: 34310915 Food Svs/HospitalityFront DeskExperience Preferred!Gulf Crest Condominiums 8715 Surf Drive. Apply Mon-Fri, 8:30-5:00 No Phone Calls Please Web ID#: 34297366 General Boys & Girls Club of Bay County Now Hiring:Teen CoordinatorBoys & Girls Club is now filling one P/T position for afternoon & evenings 24 hrs/wk M-F during school year, F/T during the summer. Must be able to plan, implement & evaluate Teen Center Programs. Apply at 3404 W 19th St P.C., FL.Web ID#: 34310436 HospitalityNAVY BASE HousekeepersTo perform a full range of housekeeping duties for Navy Lodging. Typical schedule is 40 hrs p/wk, to include weekends and holidays. Must hold current driver’s license and be able to pass a background check. Applications available at the NSA-PC Visitors Reception Center, Thomas Drive. For more info call 234-4752. Web ID 34310500 HospitalityFront Desk Clerk NAVY BASEDetail oriented, dependable & courteous team player with excellent customer service skills. 35 -40 hrs p/wk, may include night audit shift, holidays & weekends. Must hold current driver’s license and be able to pass a background check. Applications available at the NSA-PC Visitors Reception Center, Thomas Drive. For more info call 234-4230. Web ID 34310501 Install/Maint/RepairExp Apartment Maintenance PersonMust be professional in appearance, have own tools and truck. Must have experience in all aspects of apartment maintenance including; electric, plumbing, and carpentry. Will check references. Please call 850-763-8980 to apply. Web ID: 34310298 Install/Maint/Repair**Assistant Pressman and Cutter Operator Positions Available**Commercial printing company has opening for an assistant pressman. Experience on large sheetfed Heidelberg equipment requried. 1st Shift Cutter Operator position available. Experience required. 1st Shift. Forward resume or call M-F 7:30-5:30. Paradigm Printing, Inc. 429 Virgil Drive Dalton, GA 30721 706-226-7474 Web ID#: 34310419 Install/Maint/Repair GreenEarth Landscape Services is now hiring a Landscape Intsall Foreman, must have valid driver’s license and 2-4 years experience. Competitive pay and benefits, Apply via fax: 850-249-1986, online at: www .greenearth land scapes.com Web ID#: 34310799 Professional Stump & Tree RemovalPruning & Limb Removal. Complete Tree Removals, Stump Grinding & more.Military & Seniors 10% OFFLicensed & Insured Free Estimates850-225-2686/ 855-0871txt FL95289 to 56654 Farm DirectCentipede, Zoysia, St Augustine and Bermuda We Deliver & Install Call 850-244-6651 Suncoast Sod Farms Text FL01369 to 56654 30 yrs exp Great rates! Ken Wilson Painting Refs -Free Est Lic/Ins 850-368-2710 txt FL96211 to 56654 Johnny on the Spot!One call does it ALL! Maintenance, Repair, Replace, Power Wash. Quality work at affordable prices. Free estimates. 850-240-8950 txt FL94835 to 56654 You call, We haul it all LLLHauling ServicesDemolition, Complete Prop Care, Comm. & Res. Accepts Visa/MC 850-598-5072 Ben’s Concrete Driveway Ripout & Replace Repairs, pool decks, patios sidewalk Free Estimates (850) 218-7942 AffordableHandy HusbandHome Maintenance & Repair: Drywall, Wood Rot, Int./Ext. Painting, All interior ceiling repair and finishing. Licensed 850-678-4761Text FL99400 to 56654 ASAP Concrete , specializing in driveway tear-out and replacement, stamp work, patios and sidewalks, bobcat work, Winter Special -20% off, Free estimates, Licensed & Insured, 850-483-9248 BEN’S CONCRETE DRIVEWAYRIP OUT & REPLACE Repairs*Sidewallks*Po ol*Decks* Patio*Free Estimates* Workmanship & Quality Guaranteed 850-218-7942 If you didn’t advertise here, you’re missing out on potential customers. Park your car in Classified and see it take off in the fast lane! Turn to classified’s Merchandise Columns Our prices are on target for you! 1132326 Epic Multi Restaurant Yard Sale January 17 & 18 € 7am until both days till its all gone!at Spinnaker Beach Club 8795 Thomas Dr, PCB, FL 32408  Kitchen Wares & Equipment  Catering Equipment  Dining Chairs  Furniture  Cash Registers  Sound & Lighting Furniture  Electronics  Tools  Light Fixtures  Antiques  Christmas, Party, Wedding & Home Decor  Glassware  Table TopsAll items are priced to SELL!!!ITEMS INCLUDE: — Weather Permitting — LH 2337 Woodhaven Place Fri. & Sat., Jan. 16 & 17 from 8 to 12 AND Sun., Jan. 18 from 12 to 4Estate SaleQuilts, Blue and Red glass, Fenton glass, 3 sets of China, music boxes, pewter, huge doll collection, antique and new linens, 1950’s tablecloths, vintage clothing, adults, children/babies, vintage hats, some furniture, apron collection, porcelain figures, silhouettes, and much, much more. Prices firm until Sunday. txt FL10812 to 56654 Lynn Haven 1011 Delaware Ave Fri & Sat 8:30am -2:00pm Please no early birds!3 FAMILY YARD SALEText FL10383 to 56654 Lynn Haven 1808 New Jersey Ave. (corner of 19th St & New Jersey Ave) Sat. January 17th 7:00 am -1:00 pmThree Family Garage SaleAd to your spring wardrobe, great bargains for men & women, kitchen appliances, Craft Items. Text FL10289 to 56654 Lynn Haven 2300 Jenks Avenue, Lynn Haven, FL. 32444. Corner of Jenks Avenue and Hwy. 390 behind Tom Thumb store. Saturday, January 17, 7:00 A.M.-12:00 P.M.Multi-Family Yard SaleFurniture, Exercise Equipment, clothes, baby clothes, toys, miscellaneous. Everything must go! Text FL11048 to 56654 Parker: 416 N 9th St, corner of Hickory & 9th Saturday January 17th 8a-12pmMoving SaleKitchen items, girls clothes, women’s shoes, size 6, 6 chair glass dinette, kayak, black entertainment center, various items. Text FL11134 to 56654 Robinson Bayou 2350 Foxworth Dr. Saturday Jan 17 8am-1pmPre Moving SaleJewelry, books, games, antiques, & lots of cool stuff! St Andrews 1424 Beck Ave., Friday & Saturday, the 16th & 17th, 8am-2pmMoving Yard SaleText FL10890 to 56654 Beach East End 5610 South Lagoon Dr., Fri & Sat., Jan 16th & 17th, 7am-11:30amMulti-Family Yard SaleFurniture, Clothes, Home goods, Etc. All Kind of Treasures! Text FL10767 to 56654 Beach West End 17012 Hernando Ave (corner of Hwy. 79 & Hernando Ave., across from the pink Presbyterian Church) Gulf Beach Garden ClubLarge Rummage Sale and VendorsSaturday, January 17th, 8a.-1Text FL10717 to 56654 Beach West End: 271 S. Hwy 79 (Gulf Beach Presbyterian Church) Sat Jan 17, 7am-1pmBig Rummage/ Bake SaleLots Of Items! Text FL10713 to 56654 Callaway929 S. Tyndall Pkwy Boat Race Road and Tyndall Pkwy Saturday Only 8AM -12PMGOOD SHEPHERD LUTHERAN Share Ministry THRIFT SHOPOPENNew and Different Merchandise.. CLOTHING SALE!! Pictures, Desks, Baby clothes, Kid’s Toys, Hospital Bed, Couch, Tables, TVs, Dining Room, China cabinet, Chester drawers, Set, Lamps, Bed Covers, Filing Cabinets, Office Table & Lots More. New Furniture. Free BOOKS! Exercise EquipmentText FL03778 to 56654 Beach East End: 300 Clara Ave Sat 1/17/15 8 a.m -12 p.mChrist Our Savior Lutheran Helping Hands Thrift StoreNew Items In All Rooms! Clothing Room: Mens, Womens, Childrens, Fall clothing. Sweaters, Long Sleeved Shirts and Jackets. Kitchen Room: Dishes, Glassware, Small Appliances, Framed Pictures,CDs, Christmas items. Room 3: Books, Puzzles, Lamps, Chairs, Linens, Childrens books & toys. Come & Browse! txt FL02379 to56654 Beach East End 7107 Beachwood Blvd. Turn North on Wildwood by Taco Bell at foot of Hathaway Bridge. Friday and Saturday Jan. 16th & 17th 8am-12pmLiquidation Ebay & Other ItemsThis Sale is a combination of items collected over the last year from Storage Auctions and E-Bay items that did not sell. It will be run by the Keith of Keith’s Famous Yard Sale and no reasonable offers will be refused. Text FL11045 to 56654 Turn to classified’s Merchandise Columns Our prices are on target for you! If you didn’t advertise here, you’re missing out on potential customers.

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CLASSIFIEDSFriday, January 16, 2015 | The News Herald | Page D5 SalesOutside SalesThe Washington County News is seeking an energetic, outgoing candidate for our Advertising Sales team. The sales position will cater to the health and beauty industry along the Emerald Coast. The position will require you to use consultative selling approach and be responsible for selling advertising solutions from our extensive suite of services -niche glossy magazines, digital and other print platforms. The person will prospect and work with local business owners to develop advertising campaigns that meet their advertising goals and service existing accounts to ensure we are growing their business and helping them reach the growing market segment and at the same time create long lasting relationships. We are looking for a connected, high energy individual who wants to be part of a dynamic sales team. Applicants should be motivated, outgoing, personal, competitive and possess a strong work ethic. Someone who can prepare and conduct presentations and is organized and detail oriented. W e provide: A fun and exciting work environment Base salary, commission, mileage Sales training Medical, dental, vision, life, disability insurance and 401(K) W e Require: Advanced computer and social media skills 2 + Years of B2B sales experience Must have valid driver’s license, proof of insurance and reliable vehicle If you think you are the right candidate for this position, please send your resume to: ehypes@pcnh.com Hiring is contingent on background check and pre-employment drug screening. EOE/DFWP Web ID#: 34305096 SalesSales Support CoordinatorThe News Herald is seeking a Sales Support Coordinator. Ideal candidate will need strong communication skills, and very high attention to detail. Excellent customer service and organizational skills required and must have excellent computer skills. This position will work collaboratively with the assigned team to ensure exceptional customer service to company’s current and prospective advertisers by helping set appointments for sales team and taking calls from clients. Candidates will work with sales team on exciting sales opportunities in The News Herald, on newsherald.com, PanamaCity.com, Monster, Yahoo and Google. Candidates must be process driven and be able to function effectively and independently, with assertive, innovative and persuasive personality to achieve sales objectives on a regular basis. Must be willing to take on other special initiatives. Candidates should have prior experience in a sales environment along with high school diploma or equivalent. The News Herald offers a competitive benefit package including health, dental, life insurance, and 401(k) plan. To apply, send resume to ehypes@pcnh.com Candidate hired pending pre-employment drug screen and criminal background check. Web Id 34294683 Text FL94683 to 56654 Beautiful Canal Front Home in Bay Point$549,000 3 bedroom, 3.5 bath, office/4th bedroom, family room which has attached atrium/ greenhouse and electric fireplace. Large eat-in kitchen has Corian countertops, island and breakfast bar. Master bedroom has vaulted ceiling, leading into master bath with separate sauna/steam shower and jetted tub area. Lofted space above foyer. Laundry room complete with plenty of cabinet storage and sink. Marble floors throughout. Large deck accessible from every room on lower level of house, leading down to 92 feet of boat dock. Attached 2 car garage, security system and central vac. This gently lived in home is a must see! Call 850-235-3500 or email: wallhouseholdceo@hotmail.com to make an appointment to see this property. Logistics/TransportationCIRCULATION DISTRICT MANAGERThe Panama City News Herald has an opening for District Manager. The District Manager oversees independent distributors in the delivery of newspapers to subscribers within a defined geographical area. Individuals will handle route management aspects such as audits, analysis, and contract negotiations. The ideal candidate will have a focus on customer service. High school diploma or equivalent required. Prior newspaper experience in circulation as well as a management background is preferred. Must be able to evaluate current and prospective Independent Contractors and provide feedback and a course of action: Basic computer skills (Excel. Word) a must. Must own and operate a motor vehicle. Must have valid Florida Drivers License, proof of car insurance, and must successfully complete a background check. Must have ability to read and understand a road map. Must be able to work a very flexible schedule. Excellent benefits, drug-free workplace, EOE Send resume to ehypes@pcnh.com or fill out an application at 501 W. 11th Street, Panama City, FL. No phone calls. Web ID#: 34309196 Hospitality Counts Oakes Resort Properties has immediate openings for the following positions: P anama City Beach: Vacation Rental Property Manager Vacation Rental Agent Marketing Manager/Coordinator Long Term Leasing Agent 30 A : Real Estate Administrative Assistant/Vacation Rental Agent Destin/Miramar Beach Surfside Resort: Vacation Rental Property Manager Front Desk Agents All positions require previous hotel, resort, vacation rental or property management experience Send your resume to: Corpfla1@gmail.com 850-636-6700 22901 Panama City Beach Parkway Panama City Beach, FL 32413 EEOC/Drug Free Workplace Web ID#: 34310900 Logistics/Transport25 TRUCK DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW!Learn to drive forNo Experience Needed Earn $900 / wk + Benefits Local CDL Training Apply Today! 1-800-709-7364 Web ID#: 34307000 Logistics/TransportBe Your Own BossDrivers WantedTaxi, shuttle & limo drivers. FT/PT. Usually $100 per day. Call M-F 10-4. 850-233-0029 Web ID#: 34310990 Text FL10990 to 56654 Logistics/TransportCDL Class A Driving Instructors NeededTDI, the nation’s leading truck driving school, is looking for Part Time Instructors for its Milton, FL facility; Excellent pay and benefits! Flexible schedule, excellent working environment. Call 1-888-568-7364, email dabanathie@truckdriverin stitute.com or fax resume to (228) 832-8959. Web ID#: 34310215 Medical/HealthCNA’sStart the New Year off with a wonderful career at Panama City Health & Rehab. Join A Winning Team, Great Benefits Paid Vacation, Paid Holidays, BCBS Medical Insurance, Dental Ins., 401K, Free Uniforms Apply in person at Panama City Health & Rehab 924 W. 13th Street Panama City, FL 32401 Web ID#: 34310640 Medical/HealthBi-Lingual Spanish Speaking LPN, CNA, CMABusy multi-physician practice with high patient volume is looking for an LPN, CNA or CMA with excellent customer service skills. Must be able to multi-task, have good organizational and computer skills, be a good team player, and be able to work in a fast paced environment. OB/GYN experience is a must. Please send your resume to resumes.obgyn@gmail.co m DFWP Web ID 34310292 Medical/HealthEMG/NCV/EEG FT Licensed TechPhysician owned neurology practice in Panama City is seeking FT EMG/NCV/EEG Licensed technologist. Excellent benefits. 3 years experience required. Send resume to: CEO Northwest Florida Surgery Center 767 Airport Road, Panama City, Florida 32405 or fax to (850) 913-9744 EOE Web ID#: 34310800 Medical/HealthFlorida Cancer AffiliatesRN & Medical AssistantFlorida Cancer Affiliates of North Florida is looking to fill 2 positions: Chemotherapy Registered Nurse,Full Time Medical Assistant/ LPN, Part Time. Need sharp, driven, compassionate, and technologically savvy people for growing practice. Please fax applications (attn. Shawn) to: 850-914-0777 Web ID#: 34310885 Medical/HealthMedical ReceptionistFull time, hard working, dependable, team player with excellent communication skills wanted for busy multi-doctors office. Medical office experience in registration, and insurance verification preferred. Fax resume to 785-3490 Web ID#: 34310714 Medical/HealthOffice Asst.Experience preferred. Send resumes to:painpractice@yahoo.comWeb ID#: 34311061 Medical/HealthPediatrics Plus, Inc.A growing pediatrics therapy practice is seeking FT Occupational Therapist & PT Speech Therapist. Fax resume to 872-9558 Web ID#: 34309488 Medical/HealthRN/LPNNeeded for fast paced medical office. Should have good communication skills, as well as energetic & outgoing personality. Send resume to 204 E. 19th St. Panama City FL 32405 or fax to 850-763-4072 Web ID 34310657 OtherCustodianPart-time custodian needed. Experience preferred. Call 850-763-6537 or send resume to laurie@fumc pc.org Web ID#: 34310574 OtherIn-Home Personal SupportsCommunity-Based Options is now hiring FT In-Home Personal Supports assisting adults with developmental disabilities with dressing, meals and daily living activities. The position is a 7 day on/7 day off shift rotation where staff stay overnight with our customer(s). Applicants must have one year experience in related field and pass a level 2 criminal background screening. Please apply in person M-Th 9am-4pm at 284 Forest Park Cir. PC, Fl. 32405 Web ID#: 34311073 OtherRecreation Assistant Navy BaseDuties include answering telephones and to provide information on upcoming events. Knowledge of video gaming helpful, team work ability essential. Pay is $9.50 p/hr. Up to 28 hrs p/wk, to include evenings, weekends & holidays. Apply at the Visitors Reception Center, Thomas Drive Gate. For more info call 234-4632. Web ID#: 34310483 Quality AssuranceQuality Assurance ManagerQuality Assurance Manager for Pipe Fabrication Company. Quality Control Experience with Pipe Welds & ASME Codes REQUIRED. Must have a valid Driver’s License. Apply in person M-F from 8-2 at 6513 Bayline Drive, Panama City, FL 32404 850-763-4834 EOE/ DFWP Benefits Web ID#: 34310060 SalesBubba Hill Auto PlazaSales AssociatePosition available.Must have driver’s license. Call 850-763-9005 or email: salesmanager@bubbahillauto plaza.com or apply online at monster .com . Web ID#: 34310848 Sales/Business DevRoute SalesRoute Sales for dairy wholesale. CDL Class B req. Training provided. FT withbenefits, including retirement! Commission w/ a minimum guarantee. Call 850-478-2363. Web ID#: 34310634 Skilled TradesAluminum Tig & Mig WelderFull time employment. Call 850-872-0559. Web ID#: 34310320 Training/InstructionEnglish Teacher High SchoolKSOD is a K-12 Private School serving students with special educational needs. Interested and qualified applicants are invited to submit their resume to cliff@schoolofdiscovery.ne t. KSOD.ORG Web ID#: 34310860 Cosmetologist Needed Space for rent $450 mo 1709 Beck Ave Call (850) 763-8027 EARN EXTRA INCOMENewspaper Carriers NeededPanama City Beach , Panama City, Bonifay, & ChipleyEmail Jamie Meadors at jmeadors@pcnh.com or call 850-747-5098. Please leave name, contact number, and what area you live in. Web ID#: 34309878 4 Prof. Office Suites for lease in PC @ 651 W. 14th St. 1200-3500 Sq. Ft. 850-527-7339 Beach Office Space800 s.f. off Middle Beach Road $625mo Jane Bondi, Counts Real Estate Group, Inc. (850) 819-4268 Text FL01983 to 56654 Grand Office Bldg for lease. Water view at 1013 Beck Ave. 7600 Sq. Ft. 850-527-7339 Whse w/office & docks 2500-5000-7500 up to 20k sf Various locations in PC area. 785-3031 2 br, 1 ba , W/D hook-up, very clean. $670 mo. Avail Feb 1st. 866-7895 Text FL38733 to 56654 1br, 1ba, quiet area, WD hkup, FP, vaulted ceilings, CH&A, carpet, tile, no pets, $600 mo. 850-871-4235 Text FL09867 to 56654 1-4 Br Apts, Duplex’s & homes. Many locations Some inc water & W/D hkp, $395-$850 mo. No dogs.763-3401 Text FL04830 to 56654 Cottage in the Cove 1 br, 1 ba , unfurnished: $600 per month, furnished $700 per month plus util. Call 850-872-1031 Text FL04989 to 56654 Pet Friendly Apts 2Bdrm $575-$650, 1Bdrm $525-$625 Weekly also avail. TEXT or Call Steve (850) 867-5603 Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. 3 br, 3 ba, $1250 mo 9125 Laird Street. Sunbelt Realty 850-236-0707Text FL 10727 to 56654 Amazing Waterfront 2 Br, 1 Ba Bayview, completely furn, utils incl except elec. $1050 mo + dep. 850-774-4717 Mexico Beach: 2 br, 2 ba TH, with pool use. unfurn. $975 w/o Util or $1250 w/ Util. Yard work incl. (850) 648-6765 or 527-2780 Text FL74952 to 56654 Panama City 3 br, 2 bath , CH&A, stove, fridge, and dish washer. Rent $800/mo + $400/dep. No pets! Call 850-819-0597 txt FL10178 to 56654 St.Thomas Square2br/2ba, unfurnished, all admendities + boat dock. Call 234-9848 Text FL08525 to 56654 3 br, 1 ba . $800 per month + $800 security dep. W/D hookup. No Pets! For more info call, 850-691-8482 or 625-2707 before 8pm 3 br, 2 ba duplex, in Parker, new paint & carpet, no pets, $850 mo. + $500 dep. Call (850) 258-0710 Text FL98335 to 56654 3bd/2ba on canal in Bayou George, 6400 Zinnia Dr, $1000mo, $750dep. 258-7513 Text FL10174 to 56654 Callaway 2/1 conv. to TAFB W/D Hookups no pets $600/mo 785-7341 or 814-3211 Text FL10732 to 56654 Cozy 2 br 1 ba Old Orchard Area. $550 mo + $550 dep. No dogs. 850)769-8496 after 9 Mexico Beach. Long term rental , 2br/2ba. $1500mo includes all utls. Text or call 678-863-3243 Text FL10798 to 56654 2 Br’sStarting at $425 month plus deposit. No pets! Call 850-265-1382 Text FL84350 to 56654 Bayou George 2bd/1ba & 3br/2ba avail clean, quiet, lrg yrd no pets w/s/g incld. 850-265-4043 Lynn Haven 2 & 3 Br’s starting at $540 mnth, W/D Hookup, CH/A, No Pets. 850-624-6552 Southport -3br/2ba double wide. Big front porch overlooking pond with huge workshop. $800/mo + $600 dep. Call 850-960-6004 Text FL10400 to 56654 ! ! ! ! ! ! ! Sell It Today!I BUYHOUSESPretty or Ugly763-7355ibuyhousesprettyorugly.comText FL95981 to 56654 5 BR -2.5 BA with POOL $339K -MLS 627121 2913 Briarcliff Rd PC, FL Holli Persall ,Realtor ERA Neubauer Real Estate 850 866-8195 4br WATERFRONT! Pool, Boat lift, Dock 8412 Lydia LanePCB $799K -MLS 627256 Bayside 3br 3½ ba 811 De Gama Huge Price Reduction! 1,800 sqft, huge yards! MLS 620116 Colleen Dietrich Keller Williams Realty 850-814-7298 DEEP WATERFRONT! Classic Cove home with hardwood floors and lots of charm. 3BR/2BA. Open and airy, overlooks Watson Bayou on high bluff. Huge screen porch, dock area w/4 big boat wet slips. $325,000. Seller moving soon and MOTIVATED!! O’Keefe & Wainwright, Realtors 850-785-8746 Beautiful Executive Home3635 Preserve Blvd 4 br/4 ba in a gated water front community. 4 br/4 ba, 18 ft ceilings, stainless appliances, 3 car garage, pool and covered patio $675,000 MLS 627265 Colleen Dietrich Keller Williams Realty Cell 850-814-7298 Built in 05, this lovely maintained home has 100% financing available through USDA. Victorian styled design with lots of decorator features. 3/2 Tile in LR&Kitchen. Wood floors in M/BR and hallway. Carpet in 2 bedrooms. Storage bldg has elect. Convenient to Tyndall. $131,900 Fran Holt 832-0714 Latitudes Realty For Sale By Owner55 Acre brick Home near Historic Defuniak Springs; Pool, Pecan trees, Spring fed fish pond, 45 miles to beaches and bases. 9379 State HWY 83 North, Defuniak Springs, FL 32433Asking 299k OBO. Call 850-682-7244; forsalebyowner.com HOME FOR SALE BY OWNER 2304 W. Game Farm Rd. Spacious home located close to Lynn Haven & Panama City, 2852 sq. ft. Large Open Concept Kitchen, New Roof, 4br/3.5Ba, separate master suite, $220,000. Call 407-745-1175 Lakefront home w/views of Lake Suzanne along w/100 ft of white sandy beach. Enjoy sunny Fl in your very own lake house w/20 ft of visibility in the warm water to enjoy scuba, snorkeling, & swimming. Home is elevated 50 ft above the lake & offers sunset views of the water from the LR, DR, or the covered porch. Renovated Kitch w/granite counters & new appl. New carpet throughout, remodeled bthrms w/granite, tile floors & new vanities, faucets, etc. Located in Leisure Lakes where community mbrs enjoy trophy size bream and largemouth bass fishing. Owners can enjoy a comm pool, tennis crt, bsktball crt, boat ramps & a gated entrance w/sec. Low HOA fee. MLS #620277 Amanda Corbin, Realtor Prudential Shimmering Sands Realty 850-832-7447 www .SearchP anamaCity Beach.com No Longer AvailableCove 3 br 1 bath home in the Downtown Cove New roof, fresh paint, new bonus room or 4th bdr/office. Natural gas hkups avail and electric hkps in kitchen. Original hardwood floors throughout MLS 619926 $63,000 Athrine Matthews Realtor Prudential Shimmering Sands Realty 624-3187 Price reduced! AC & water heater both less than 3 years old!! Located near TAFB. 3bd/2bth home w/2 car garage, has a split flr plan. Lg screened in back porch, auto irr sys w/sep well, & priv fncd bck yrd. Open LR w/high ceilings & brick FP. Int has been newly painted. Lrg Bdrms, ample storage space, plenty of cabinet space in the Kitch are some of the other things this home has to feature. MLS #623878 Laird Hitchcock, Realtor Prudential Shimmering Sands Realty 850-866-2158 Price Reduced!!!All Brick split 3 bdrm in lovely Camryn’s Crossing. 2 baths, living rm no hassle electric FP, formal dining, breakfast room, open kitchen w/ solid maple wood cabinets, s/steel appliances and wrap around bar. The home has Maple wood floors, Italian tile and carpet & windows have custom blackout shades and plantation shutters. Scrnd back porch overlooking priv fenced bckyard which backs up to a preservation area. MLS 620167 $239,900 Please Call Velma Phillips, Realtor Prudential Shimmering Sands Realty 832-6319 SALE PENDING On N. Lake Caroline!Handsome, all brick(1 owner) 4BR/2BA home w/2400 SF of custom living, 2 gar, cov porches, den w/FP, just needs a few updates & YOU! Quiet lake near Garden Club area. $229,900 O’Keefe & Wainwright, Realtors, 785-8746 SOLDGorgeous Home At End of Cul-De-Sac4br/2ba home built 2010 in Hawks Landing 1856 sqft open fl plan w/granite countertops, crown molding, MB w/ double vanity, garden tub, extend. cov. back patio, outdoor shed, & much more! $269,900 MLS 624541 Mike Werner 814-6266 Keller Williams Realty The HOME that HAS IT ALL -Beautiful DEEDED ACCESS TO THE LAKE & boat dock-shared w/ 2 neighbors only 100 ft from the property. Live close to the conveniences of town with the feeling of so far away. 10 mins from PC Mall & only 23 mins from PCB via HWY 79. Located in Highpnt/Deerpnt. 4Br 3 Ba, Pool w/ Lanai, HT, outside living space w/ bar & grill. 2 garages 1 attached and detached garage/workshop w/loft above. Hope Abbott, 850-596-7653 Keller Williams Success Realty BEST NEW HOME DEALS250’s -270’s Gated community; 3/3.5 Gorgeous BayFront Pool; 2 -Car Garage Close to BayPoint. Owner Fin. Avail. Michael w/Sterling 850-865-8006 Lynn Haven: The Hammocks, TH 3bd/2.5ba 1800sq ft, Perfect condition! $30k in upgrades! 205-223-6279 txt FL10944 to 56654 2bd, Like New Set upinquiet MHP, In beautiful Panama City. Shady lot, 200 ft from pool, $7,850 850-960-8452 GULF FRONT EAST ENDSWEET 60 FT LOT TWO COT T AGES 1755 SQ.FT. ONLY $877,000 J.M.JONES Sterling Realty 850-865-8006 Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium that’s your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when it’s time to buy, it’s the resource on which to rely.

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CLASSIFIEDSPage D6 | The News Herald | Friday, January 16, 2015

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INSIDE UNDERCURRENTS: Back to school time for adult learners | 3 Snowbird calendar of events | 10-11 When art is life, ‘we are the plan’ | 12 Come back home to St. Andrews Coffee House & Bistro | 14 PanamaCity.Com January 16, 2015 Sounds like Paradise Festival returns for sixth season | 8-9

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PAGE 2 PanamaCity.Com Friday, January 16, 2015 ABOUT US CONTENT JAN WADDY 850-747-5072 JWADDY@PCNH.COM CONTENT TONY SIMMONS 850-747-5080 TSIMMONS@PCNH.COM DESIGN KRISTY L. OWENS 850-747-5087 KOWENS@PCNH.COM JAZZ FEST LINEUP The Seabreeze Jazz Festival returns to Panama City Beach on April 22-26 with live performances at the Aaron Bessant Park Amphitheater in Pier Park. Award-winning Canadian guitarist Rob Tardik was just added. Artists to appear also include Brian Culbertson, George Benson, David Sanborn, Al Jarreau, Norman Brown, Kirk Whalum, Rick Braun, Down To The Bone, Mindi Abair and the Boneshakers, Acoustic Alchemy, Euge Groove, The Sax Pack 10th Anniversary feat with Jeff Kashiwa, Steve Cole and Kim Waters, The Rippingtons feat with Russ Freeman, Chuck Loeb, Jeff Lorber, Everette Harp, Ken Ford, Eric Darius, Four 80 East, Althea Rene, Josh Vietti, Matt Marshak, Chris Standring, Marcus Anderson, Urban Jazz Coalition, Ryan Montano and more to come! Tickets: SeaBreezeJazzFestival.com MORE TO CELEBRATE Jae’s Sinful Delights Bakery and Cake Shop’s grand opening is April 30 at the Shoppes at Edgewater, 539 Richard Jackson Blvd., in Panama City Beach. Chef Owner Jae Camino’s signature menu includes Red Beet Velvet Cupcakes, Mojito Cupcakes, Brazilian Coconut Truffles and Gluten-free German Chocolate Cake. HEART The Wilson sisters and their band, Heart, will perform live at the Marina Civic Center in Panama City Feb. 27. Tickets: MarinaCivicCenter.com

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Friday, January 16, 2015 PanamaCity.Com PAGE 3 PANAMA CITY — With Spring Break on the horizon, it’s time for the winter to start winding down — but that just means Education Encore is about to heat up. The winter session of Gulf Coast State College’s adult education program begins Jan. 23, with in-person registration taking place Friday, Jan. 16. As I’ve noted in the past, I have had the pleasure — and the challenge — of teaching a writing course for the program, helping students ranging in age from 30 to 80 and ranging in experience from beginner to retired journalist. I have never yet met someone who is as bad a writer as they think they are, but I have met a few who were much better than they ever suspected. The program, which meets on six consecutive Fridays, offers more than 80 noncredit classes, which are lled on a rst-come, rst-served basis. Doors will open at 7 a.m., and the fee for Panama City participants is $88, which includes four classes on each of the six Fridays. (Classes offered at the GCSC Port St. Joe campus, at a fee of $66, meet each Wednesday for six weeks.) For details on the program and to see a list of classes, visit GulfCoast. edu/EducationEncore, call 872-3823 or e-mail Jim Barr, coordinator of Education Partnerships, at jbarr@ gulfcoast.edu “The goal of Education Encore is to provide a learning environment that is fun, lively and offers diversity, insight and wisdom — in which adults explore new ideas,” Jim said in an email to participants. “If you have been to college, this is an opportunity to re-live the college experience. If you have not attended college, this is an opportunity to live the college experience. Just as exercising the body keeps one physically t, exercising the mind keeps one mentally t.” The program’s motto is “No Stress, No Tests, No Grades, Just Fun,” though some classes (like mine) encourage participants to work on projects throughout the week. (All good writing is re-writing, you know.) Established in 1991, originally designed for retired senior adults, the program and the courses offered have evolved over the years. All ages of adults are welcome, and many of the courses are the result of requests and suggestions from students. Some of the winter courses offered include bridge, quilting, Digital Image Editing, drawing, Heritage Skills for Modern Times, jewelry, Spanish conversation, Birding for Beginners, civil law, Firearms Safety, History and Training of Navy Seals, line dancing, storytelling, Fishing Florida Waters, History of Seminole Tribes, nancial planning, Understanding Islam, Zumba, acrylic painting, photography, sign language, gardening, musical theatre history, sea life, interior decorating, journaling, Tai Chi, aquatic exercise, car maintenance, astronomy, tness, physics, a capella harmony, gourmet cooking, yoga and many more. In fact, writing has been such a popular subject, this year the program will offer four different classes for students to explore. Sherry Anderson will teach Writing Memoirs and Creative Nonction; Pat Sabiston has Journaling: A Powerful Tool to Write a Life Story; Michael Brim offers Fear and Fun of Writing Fiction; and I will be discussing the intersection of Writing and Life. Maybe I’ll see you there? Peace . Back to school time for adult learnersCONTRIBUTED PHO T O Jim Barr, coordinator of Education Partnerships at Gulf Coast State College, poses with Barbara and Stan Guterman, who donated $1,000 to the Education Encore Scholarship Fund. EDU CATI O N E NC ORE When: In-person registration is 8 a.m. Jan. 16; classes are six consecutive Fridays, Jan. 23 through Feb. 27 Where: Gulf Coast State College, 5230 U.S. 98, Panama City What: Non-credit enrichment classes for adults Cost: $88 Details: Online at GulfCoast.edu/EducationEncore; call 872-3823; or email Jim Barr at jbarr@gulfcoast.edu UN DERCURRE NT STony S immons tsimmons@pcnh.com Follow Tony on Twitter @PCTonyS and friend him at Facebook.com/WriterTonySimmons

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CALENDAR SPICE UP YOUR WEEK WITH UPCOMING AREA EVENTS WANT TO BE INCLUDED? Click “Send us your events” at PanamaCity.com or email Jan Waddy, jwaddy@pcnh.com, or Tony Simmons, tsimmons@pcnh.com. Inclusion in this calendar of events, which also appears on the Events page at PanamaCity.com, is at editors’ discretion. WINTER RESIDENT EVENTS: SEE OUR CALENDAR OF FUN FOR FLOCKING SNOWBIRDS ON PAGE 10-11. FRIDAY, JAN. 16 30A SONGWRITERS FESTIVAL: Jan. 16-18; all-day event at venues along County 30A in Walton County. Tickets and details: 30ASongWritersFestival.com AUTHOR RAVEN H. PRICE BOOK SIGNING: 2-5 p.m. at Books By the Sea, 571 Harrison Ave., Panama City. Price, a resident of Leesburg, Ga., will sign copies of her books, “The Conversion” and “The Plan” TEAM IMPACT: 7 p.m. at St. Andrew Baptist Church, 3010 W. 15th St., Panama City. The team of athletes including champion power lifters, former WWE wrestlers and former NFL players perform feats of strength like shattering ve feet of concrete with one blow and snapping baseball bats in half with their bare hands. Details: 850-785-8596 ‘SAID THE SPIDER TO THE SPY’: 7:30 p.m. at Kaleidoscope Theatre, 207 E. 24th St., Lynn Haven. When Augusta borrows her friend’s identity and her beach home, the quiet cottage becomes a den of intrigue and shenanigans in this comedy spy thriller. Details and tickets: 265-3226 or kt-online.org SATCHMO: 7:30 p.m. at The Martin Theatre, 409 Harrison Ave., Panama City. Virtuoso trumpeter Dean Simms leads this band, plays trumpet like the master himself, and matches his singing style, showmanship and persona. Details: 7638080 or MartinTheatre. com SATURDAY, JAN. 17 30A SONGWRITERS FESTIVAL: Jan. 16-18; all-day event at venues along County 30A in Walton County. Tickets and details: 30ASongWritersFestival. com AUTHOR RAVEN H. PRICE BOOK SIGNING: 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Panama City Market Place, 257 W. 15th St., Panama City. Price, a resident of Leesburg, Ga., will sign copies of her books, “The Conversion” and “The Plan.” GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT FARMERS’ MARKET: 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Capt Anderson’s on Thomas Drive. Enjoy the region’s nest makers, bakers and growers at PCB’s year-round farmers’ market. Live music, free tastings and family fun. Details: WaterfrontMarkets.org or 763-7359 ST. ANDREWS WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Smith Yacht Basin beside the Shrimp Boat Restaurant, 12th Street and Beck Avenue. Rain or shine. Vendors, live music, Kids Craft table. Bring a shing pole and stay for the day. Details: HistoricStAndrews.com/market or 872-7208 EMERALD COAST ‘WINTER CLASSIC’ RABBIT SHOW: 8:30 a.m. at the Central Panhandle Fairgrounds, 2230 E. 15th St., Panama City. Details: EmeraldCoastRBA.com or call Ann Roney, 850-867-0817 SEASIDE FARMERS MARKET: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Seaside Amphitheatre. Fresh produce, baked goods, dairy products and other unique offerings, cooking demos and activities. Year-round event. Details: SeasideFL.com ARBOR DAY CELEBRATION: 10 a.m. at the Panama City Beach Conservation Park off Grif n Boulevard in Panama City Beach. Join the PCB Parks and Recreation Department as they plant more than 4000 longleaf and wiregrass seedlings. Bring the family and spend a morning in the forest enjoying a covered wagon ride to the planting sites. Details: 233-5045 FLORIOPOLIS ANNIVERSARY: 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. at Floriopolis, 1125 Beck Ave., Panama City. Ceremonial wine toast at 4 p.m. Specials, refreshments and dropin art projects for everyone all day. Details: Facebook. com/Floriopolis FROZEN WONDERLAND A MILITARY APPR ECIATION: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Science and Discovery Center of Northwest Florida in Panama City. Free admission for military families. Bouncy house, hands on crafts and science experiments. Children are encouraged to wear their favorite “Frozen” costume. Sponsored by Booz Allen Hamilton. Details: (505) 660-0057 WINTER COOKOUT AND CLASSIC CAR CRUISE-IN: noon to 4 p.m. at HarleyDavidson, 14700 Panama City Beach Parkway, Panama City Beach. Live music by Neal James. Details: 888-547-2905 TEAM IMPACT: 7 p.m. at St. Andrew Baptist Church, 3010 W. 15th St., Panama City. The team of athletes including champion power lifters, former WWE wrestlers and former NFL players perform feats of strength like shattering ve feet of concrete with one blow and snapping baseball bats in half with their bare hands. Details: 850-785-8596 CENTENNIAL SINATRA: 7:30 p.m. at the Marina Civic Center, 8 Harrison Ave., Panama City. Details and tickets: MarinaCivicCenter.com ‘SAID THE SPIDER TO THE SPY’: 7:30 p.m. at Kaleidoscope Theatre, 207 E. 24th St., Lynn Haven. Details and tickets: 265-3226 or kt-online.org SUNDAY, JAN. 18 30A SONGWRITERS FESTIVAL: Jan. 16-18; all-day event at venues along County 30A in Walton County. Tickets and details: 30ASongWritersFestival.com GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT FARMERS’ MARKET: 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Capt Anderson’s on Thomas Drive. Enjoy the region’s nest makers, bakers and growers at PCB’s year-round farmers’ market. Live music, free tastings and family fun. Details: WaterfrontMarkets.org or 763-7359 30A FARMERS MARKET: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on North Barrett Square in Rosemary Beach. Each Sunday, join this community event featuring fresh vegetables, fruits, eggs, honey, cheese, preserves, sauces, bread, sweets, prepared foods to go and much more. Details: 30aFarmersMarket.com ‘SAID THE SPIDER TO THE SPY’: 2 p.m. at Kaleidoscope Theatre, 207 E. 24th St., Lynn Haven. Details and tickets: 265-3226 or kt-online.org MONDAY, JAN. 19 LEGENDS TRIBUTE & BENEFIT SHOW: 4 p.m. at Marina Cantina, Panama City Beach. Todd Allen Herendeen and his FTD Band will perform; doors open at 3 p.m. General admission: $10. Raf es for prizes offered. Event bene ts Food4Kidz effort to end child hunger in the local community. Details: (850) 249-KIDZ or Food4Kidz.org TUESDAY, JAN. 20 HISTORY OF ST. ANDREWS BAY SALT WORKS WITH ANN ROBBINS: 2 p.m. at the Bay County Public Library, 898 W. 11th St., in Panama City. All adult residents and visitors are welcome to attend free program. Details: 522-2120 ART EXPERIENCE: 2 p.m. at the Panama City Beach Public Library, 12500 Hutchison Boulevard, Panama City Beach. All adult residents and visitors are welcome to attend free program. Details: 233-5055 PAGE 4 PanamaCity.Com Friday, January 16, 2015 himself, and matches his singing style, showmanship and persona. Details: 7638080 or MartinTheatre. com SATURDAY, JAN. 17 30A SONGWRITERS FESTIVAL: Jan. 16-18; all-day event at venues along County 30A in Walton County. Tickets and details: 30ASongWritersFestival. com AUTHOR RAVEN H. PRICE BOOK SIGNING: 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at ECIATION: ECIATION: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Science and Discovery Center of Northwest Florida in Panama City. Free admission for military families. Bouncy house, hands on crafts and science experiments. Children are encouraged to wear their favorite “Frozen” costume. Sponsored by Booz Allen Hamilton. Details: (505) 660-0057 WINTER COOKOUT AND CLASSIC CAR CRUISE-IN: to 4 p.m. at HarleyDavidson, 14700 Panama City Beach Parkway, Panama City Beach. Live music by Neal James. Details: 888-547-2905 himself, and matches his singing style, showmanship MartinTheatre. SATURDAY, JAN. 17 30A SONGWRITERS Jan. 16-18; all-day event at venues along County 30A in Walton County. Tickets and details: 30ASongWritersFestival. AUTHOR RAVEN H. PRICE BOOK 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at ECIATION: ECIATION: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Science and Discovery Center of Northwest Florida in Panama City. Discovery Center of Northwest Florida in Panama City. Free admission for military families. Bouncy house, Free admission for military families. Bouncy house, hands on crafts and science experiments. Children are encouraged to wear their favorite “Frozen” costume. Sponsored by Booz Allen Hamilton. Details: (505) 660-0057 WINTER COOKOUT AND CLASSIC CAR Panama City Beach Parkway, Panama City Beach. Live music by Neal James. Details: 888-547-2905

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Friday, January 16, 2015 PanamaCity.Com PAGE 5

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CALENDAR SPICE UP YOUR WEEK WITH UPCOMING AREA EVENTS PAGE 6 PanamaCity.Com Friday, January 16, 2015 PENSACOLA CONNECTION: 6:30 p.m. at The Place, 429 Harrison Ave., Panama City. A jazz quartet of North Florida musicians presented by the Gulf Jazz Society. Donation is $10 for GJS members and $12 for non-members. Details and reservations: Larry at 784-2106, Bob at 258-4022 or Judy at 769-5494. THE WELLINGTON INTERNATION UKULELE ORCHESTRA: 7:30 p.m. at the Marina Civic Center, 8 Harrison Ave., Panama City. Details and tickets: MarinaCivicCenter.com or 763-4696 THURSDAY, JAN. 22 POSTCARDS FROM ITALY: 7 p.m. at Arnold High School Auditorium, 550 Alf Coleman Road, Panama City Beach. Experience an insider’s view of southern Italy. Part of Bay County Audubon Society’s lm series. Admission is $7. Drawing for door prizes. Details: 871-1736, or BayCountyAudubon.org ‘SAID THE SPIDER TO THE SPY’ LIBRARY BENEFIT: 7:30 p.m. (doors open at 6:30 p.m.) at the Kaleidoscope Theatre, 207 E. 24th St., Lynn Haven. Proceeds bene t the Bay County branches of the Northwest Regional Library System. Tickets: $25 in advance, $30 at the door; cash or check only; can be purchased in advance at the Bay County Public Library, 898 W. 11th St., Panama City. Enjoy light refreshments and a cash wine bar. Ticket price includes a chance to win raf e prizes; you must be present to win. Ticket also includes a buy one/get one free coupon for up to 10 items at the Read Again Bookstore at the Bay County Public Library. Details: 522-2100 MORGAN TEEL AND PETER CUTTS: 7:30 p.m. at Seaside Theatre, 216 Quincy Circle, Seaside. From London’s Great White wave, playwright and actor Peter Cutts interweaves drama, poetry and music onstage. Morgan Teel will screen an awarded experimental dance video. Tickets: $25 at LoveTheRep.com, Amavida Coffee, or 231-0733. Proceeds support Escape2Create artist residencies and the Seaside Repertory Theatre. JAN. 23 ‘SAID THE SPIDER TO THE SPY’: 7:30 p.m. at Kaleidoscope Theatre, 207 E. 24th St., Lynn Haven. When Augusta borrows her friend’s identity and her beach home, the quiet cottage becomes a den of intrigue and shenanigans in this comedy spy thriller. Details and tickets: 265-3226 or kt-online.org A BAND CALLED HONALEE: 7:30 p.m. at The Martin Theatre, 409 Harrison Ave., Panama City. A modern-day folk trio inspired by the music and legacy of Peter, Paul and Mary. Details: 763-8080 or MartinTheatre.com JAN. 24 GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT FARMERS’ MARKET: 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Capt Anderson’s on Thomas Drive. Enjoy the region’s nest makers, bakers and growers at PCB’s year-round farmers’ market. Live music, free tastings and family fun. Details: WaterfrontMarkets.org or 763-7359 ST. ANDREWS WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Smith Yacht Basin beside the Shrimp Boat Restaurant, 12th Street and Beck Avenue. Rain or shine. Vendors, live music, Kids Craft table. Bring a shing pole and stay for the day. Details: HistoricStAndrews.com/market or 872-7208 SEASIDE FARMERS MARKET: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Seaside Amphitheatre. Fresh produce, baked goods, dairy products and other unique offerings, cooking demos and activities. Year-round event. Details: SeasideFL.com PANAMA CITY GEM AND MINERAL SHOW: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Bay County Fairgrounds, 2230 E. 15th St., Panama City. The show features 18 vendors offering exhibits, minerals, fossils, cabochons, gems, crystals, wire wrapping, lapidary arts, jewelry, beads and silent auction including one grand prize and door prizes. Admission and parking are free. Details: Steve Shipton, 867-0586 AMERICANA MUSIC AT THE LODGE: 6:30-8 p.m. at Camp Helen State Park, 23937 Panama City Beach Parkway, Panama City Beach. Paul Kamm and Eleanore MacDonald perform. Details: 233-5059 or CampHelenFriends@gmail.com ROMANCING ITALY: 7:30 p.m. at the Marina Civic Center, 8 Harrison Ave., Panama City. The Panama City POPS Orchestra presents “The Pines of Rome” by Ottorino Respighi. Details and tickets: PanamaCityPops.org ‘SAID THE SPIDER TO THE SPY’: 7:30 p.m. at Kaleidoscope Theatre, 207 E. 24th St., Lynn Haven. Details and tickets: 265-3226 or kt-online.org LINDA MCRAE: 7:30 at Seaside Theatre, 216 Quincy Circle, Seaside. Canadian singer-songwriter and multiinstrumentalist’s folk/roots music has earned her three platinum records and the 2012 Canadian Folk Music Award’s Album of the Year. Tickets: $25 at LoveTheRep. com, Amavida Coffee, or 231-0733. Proceeds support Escape2Create artist residencies and the Seaside Repertory Theatre. JAN. 25 GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT FARMERS’ MARKET: 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Capt Anderson’s on Thomas Drive. Enjoy the region’s nest makers, bakers and growers at PCB’s year-round farmers’ market. Live music, free tastings and family fun. Details: WaterfrontMarkets.org or 763-7359 PANAMA CITY GEM AND MINERAL SHOW: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Bay County Fairgrounds, 2230 E. 15th St., Panama City. The show features 18 vendors offering exhibits, minerals, fossils, cabochons, gems, crystals, wire wrapping, lapidary arts, jewelry, beads and silent auction including one grand prize and door prizes. Admission and parking are free. Details: Steve Shipton, 867-0586 30A FARMERS MARKET: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on North Barrett Square in Rosemary Beach. Each Sunday, join this community event featuring fresh vegetables, fruits, eggs, honey, cheese, preserves, sauces, bread, sweets, prepared foods to go and much more. Details: 30aFarmersMarket.com ROOTS & WINGS MUSIC FESTIVAL: Noon to 10 p.m. at Roberts Hall, 831 Florida Ave., Lynn Haven. Tickets now on sale: $25 in advance/$30 at the door; limited seating; order now at Squareup. com/market/lucky-mud ‘SAID THE SPIDER TO THE SPY’: 2 p.m. at Kaleidoscope Theatre, 207 E. 24th St., Lynn Haven. Details and tickets: 265-3226 or kt-online.org JAN. 26 ‘HUMAN NATURE’: Solo exhibit by artist Heather Clements in Amelia Center Main Gallery, Gulf Coast State College, Panama City, open regular gallery hours through Feb. 19. Details: GulfCoast.edu/arts or 872-3886 HISTORY OF THE COCA-COLA BOTTLING COMPANY IN BAY COUNTY: 7 p.m. at the Bay County Public Library, 898 W. 11th St., Panama City. Jerry Darnell presentation includes photos, posters, bottles and other memorabilia. Sponsor: the Historical Society of Bay County. Open to the public. Light refreshments will be served. Details: Bob Hurst at 785-6184, Glenda Walters at 832-0840, or BayHistory.org JAN. 29 17TH ANNUAL EMERALD COAST JUBILEE: 6 p.m. Jan. 29-31 at Hiland Park Baptist Church, Panama City with Speaker Steven Kyle and 20 artists over three days, including Michael English, Gold City, Dixie Echoes, Gann Family, Undivided, Mari Harper, Drummonds, Tammy 7:30 p.m. at the Marina Civic Center, 8 Harrison Ave., Panama City. The Panama City POPS Orchestra presents “The Pines of Rome” ‘HUMAN NATURE’: Clements in Amelia Center Main Gallery, Gulf Coast State College, Panama City, open regular gallery hours through Feb. 19. Details: GulfCoast.edu/arts or 872-3886 or 872-3886 HISTORY OF THE COCA-COLA BOTTLING COMPANY IN BAY COUNTY: 17TH ANNUAL EMERALD COAST JUBILEE: p.m. Jan. 29-31 at Hiland Park Baptist Church,

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Kirkland, Lighthouse, Jennifer Strickland and the Jubilee Choir. Tickets: Hiland Park Baptist Church of ce, 785-6530, or www.ecsgma.com 10TH ANNUAL GIRLS GETAWAY 2015: Jan. 29Feb. 1, at Rosemary Beach Town Hall, 48 S. Barrett Square, Rosemary Beach. Presented by the Rosemary Beach Foundation, activities include: songwriter concert with Kaci Bolls and Nicole Witt; book-signing and talk with authors; art workshops; cooking demonstration, Saturday evening party, Sunday brunch, shopping, tour of homes and more. Costs and details: rbfcontact@gmail.com or 850-231-7382 JAN. 30 ‘HUMAN NATURE’: 1-2 p.m. lecture by featured solo artist Heather Clements in Amelia Center room 128, Gulf Coast State College, Panama City; 5-7 p.m. opening reception in the Amelia Center Main Gallery. Exhibit open regular gallery hours through Feb. 19. Details: GulfCoast.edu/arts or 872-3886 ‘WITH A LITTLE TWIST’: 7:30 p.m. at The Martin Theatre, 409 Harrison Ave., Panama City. New York Gilbert & Sullivan Players celebrate the legacy of Gilbert & Sullivan in American musical theater Details: 763-8080 or MartinTheatre.com FOURTH ANNUAL STARS AND GUITARS BENEFIT: 7:30 p.m. at the Marina Civic Center, 8 Harrison Ave., Panama City. All proceeds bene t the Gulf Coast Children’s Advocacy Center. Tickets available through MarinaCivicCenter.com. Details: GulfCoastCAC.org or 872-7760 JAN. 31 GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT FARMERS’ MARKET: 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Capt Anderson’s on Thomas Drive. Enjoy the region’s nest makers, bakers and growers at PCB’s year-round farmers’ market. Live music, free tastings and family fun. Details: WaterfrontMarkets.org or 763-7359 ST. ANDREWS WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Smith Yacht Basin beside the Shrimp Boat Restaurant, 12th Street and Beck Avenue. Rain or shine. Vendors, live music, Kids Craft table. Bring a shing pole and stay for the day. Details: HistoricStAndrews.com/market or 872-7208 SEASIDE FARMERS MARKET: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Seaside Amphitheatre. Fresh produce, baked goods, dairy products and other unique offerings, cooking demos and activities. Year-round event. Details: SeasideFL.com ARBOR DAY CELEBRATION: 10 a.m. at the Panama City Beach Conservation Park off Grif n Boulevard in Panama City Beach. Join the PCB Parks and Recreation Department as they plant more than 4000 longleaf and wiregrass seedlings. Bring the family and spend a morning in the forest enjoying a covered wagon ride to the planting sites. Details: 233-5045 FEB. 1 GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT FARMERS’ MARKET: 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Capt Anderson’s on Thomas Drive. Enjoy the region’s nest makers, bakers and growers at PCB’s year-round farmers’ market. Live music, free tastings and family fun. Details: WaterfrontMarkets.org or 763-7359 30A FARMERS MARKET: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on North Barrett Square in Rosemary Beach. Each Sunday, join this community event featuring fresh vegetables, fruits, eggs, honey, cheese, preserves, sauces, bread, sweets, prepared foods to go and much more. Details: 30aFarmersMarket.com ‘LA BOHEME’: 7:30 p.m. at the Marina Civic Center, 8 Harrison Ave., Panama City. Details and tickets: Panama City Music Association, 236-1260, MarinaCivicCenter.com FEB. 5 KWAME ALEXANDER — CHILDREN’S AUTHOR: 7 p.m. at the Bay County Public Library, 898 W. 11th St., Panama City. Poet, author of 18 books, and founder of two literacy organizations, he conducts writing/ publishing workshops at schools and conferences, has owned several publishing companies, written for the stage and television, recorded a CD, performed around the world, produced jazz and book festivals, hosted a radio show, worked for the U.S. government, and taught high school. Details: BooksAlive.net FEB. 6 SUSAN BOYER — MYSTERY WRITER: 9:30 a.m. at the Panama City Beach Public Library, 12500 Hutchison Blvd. Author of the Liz Talbot “Lowcountry” Series. Details: BooksAlive.net CALENDAR SPICE UP YOUR WEEK WITH UPCOMING AREA EVENTS Friday, January 16, 2015 PanamaCity.Com PAGE 7 • ST. ANDREWS WATERFRONT FARMERS MARKET 1201 Beck Ave., Panama City • GRAND LAGOON WATERFRONT FARMERS’ MARKET 5551 N. Lagoon Drive, Panama City Beach • SEASIDE FARMERS MARKET 2255 E. County Highway 30A, Santa Rosa Beach • 30A FARMERS MARKET N. Barrett Square, Rosemary Beach • LYNN HAVEN FARMERS MARKET Sharon Shef eld Park, 901 Ohio Ave., Lynn Haven

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30A Songwriters Festival returns for sixth season By TONY SIMMONS 747-5080 | @PCTonyS tsimmons@pcnh.com ALONG 30A — I was leaving Hidden Lantern Bookstore and Gallery last January when I heard voices and guitar music carrying across North Barrett Square in Rosemary Beach. I strolled across the way, to the courtyard beside the Summer Kitchen Cafe, where three men prepped for an evening performance. John Oates (half of Hall & Oates) shared a small outdoor stage in front of a couple of dozen empty folding chairs with Josh and Zach Carter. I shot a couple of photos and watched them kidding around about “warming up” in the cold air. That close-up and personal access to amazing artists is the appeal of the 30A Songwriters Festival, which marks its sixth year of intimate concerts at venues across South Walton County along Scenic 30A this weekend. The festival will feature performances from Graham Nash, Indigo Girls, Leon Russell, Jason Isbell, Shawn Mullins, Rodney Crowell, Sara Watkins (of Nickel Creek), Glen Phillips (Toad the Wet Sprocket), Jeffrey Steele, Chely Wright, Bobby Bare Jr., Steve Poltz, Angaleena Presley, Jesse Harris, Mary Gauthier, Hayes Carll, Bob Schneider, Ellis Paul, Allison Moorer, Deana Carter, Luther Dickinson (from Mississippi Allstars) with Amy LaVere, Will Sexton and Cody Dickinson, Peter Karp and Sue Foley, and David Ryan Harris. Playing the 30A Songwriters Festival in 2010 was one of the highlights of the Indigo Girls’ career, according to Emily Saliers. “The venues were packed with musichungry listeners, and all of the artists participating were excited to be there,” she said. “It was inspiring to sing with artists I had never met before but knew of, and I made my manager promise that I would be invited back.” Plus, loads of regional acts will participate, including local favorites The Owsley Brothers, Kyle LaMonica, Boukou Groove and Cody Copeland. All told, more than 150 songwriters will put on more than 200 shows on 25 stages. Festival weekend passes are available for $225 at 30aSongwritersFestival.com and locally on 30A at the Cultural Arts Alliance of ce and at Central Square Records in Seaside. Weekend passes are still available at press time, but may sell out; passes allow rst-come, rst-served access to every of cial festival venue. Day passes will be sold the weekend of the event at festival headquarters and Central Square Records only if weekend passes have not sold out. Special VIP packages, in addition to wine and music dinners are also available online. Shawn Mullins, another returning performer, called the festival “one of the most diverse” of its kind he had ever attended. “The wide range of songwriters performing, the great crowds, the unique venues, and the beautiful location all made for an incredible experience,” he said. Among the VIP shows planned, Graham Nash will have a 30-minute Q&A followed by an autograph session in which he will sign copies of his new book, “Wild Tales,” at Fish out of Water at Watercolor Inn at 11 a.m. Sunday; tickets are $25 (the cost of the book) and are available at 30aSongwritersFestival.com. However, space is limited and tickets may sell out. Jason Isbell will play a solo acoustic show at Grayton Beer Co. on U.S. 98 at 7 p.m. on Sunday; doors open at 6 p.m. Tickets are $60, but you must also have a weekend pass for access. VIP guests will receive free Grayton Beer as well as dedicated shuttle service to and from the Watercolor Publix parking lot. Tickets are limited and may sell out. Festival producer Russell Carter of Russell Carter Artist Management said the excitement along 30A is palpable every January. “The common emotional thread among us all including the musicians, organizers, volunteers, venues, lodging partners, corporate sponsors and most certainly the ticket buyers, is an absolute love for great songwriting and exceptional musical performances,” he said. “We are all moved and informed by musical expressions, showmanship, glamour, humor and outright drama — it is high art on 30A” Here are the venues for the festival (check the festival website for artists and times): At Grayton Beach : Pandora’s, 63 DeFuniak St., (850) 231-4102; and Hibiscus Back Yard of Love, 85 DeFuniak St., (850) 231-2733. At the WaterColor Inn: Fish Out Of Water, 34 Golden Rod Circle; The Gathering Spot and Sushi Bar, 34 Golden Rod Circle; The Lakehouse, 238 WaterColor Blvd.; The BoatHouse, 238 WaterColor Blvd. At Seaside: Central Square Records, 89 Central Square, (850) 231-5669; Bud & Alley’s, 2236 E. County 30A, (850) 2315900; Pizza Bar, 2236 E. County 30A, (850) 231-3113; Seaside Meeting Hall Theatre, 216 Quincy Circle. At Rosemary Beach: Amavida Coffee, 104 North Barrett Square, (850) 213-1965; Summer Kitchen, 60 North Barrett Square, (850) 231-6264; Rosemary Beach Town Hall, South Barrett Square. Along 30A: 723 Whiskey Bravo, 3031 E. County 30A, (850) 213-0015; Old Florida Fish House, 5235 E. County 30A, (850) 5343045; Caliza Restaurant, 23 Nonesuch Way, Alys Beach, (850) 213-5700; Vue on 30A, 4801 W. County 30A, (850) 267-2305; Gulf Place Amphitheater, 45 Laura Hamilton Blvd. in Gulf Place; and The Bowery on 30A, 2052 W. County 30A in Red sh Village, (850) 622-1136. In addition, a retrospective compilation of some of the most memorable artwork during the past seven Digital Graf ti festivals will be featured on the walls of Caliza Pool & Restaurant in Alys Beach during the evenings of the 30A Songwriters Festival. The public will have the opportunity to meet and interact with the awardwinning Digital Gra tti artists during their winter residency in Alys Beach and get a glimpse into their creative process. Meet & Greet sessions will be held Friday, Jan. 16, and Saturday, Jan. 17, from 4:30-6:30 p.m. on the pedestrian paths of Alys Beach. The artists include Sean Capone of Brooklyn, N.Y., Andrew Demirjian of Palisades Park, N.J., Natalie Goldman of LaJolla, Calif., and Shantell Martin of New York, N.Y. PAGE 8 PanamaCity.Com Friday, January 16, 2015 Friday, January 16, 2015 PanamaCity.Com PAGE 9 Sounds like Paradise Who: More than 150 singer-songwriters Where: 25 venues along County 30A in southern Walton County When: 200 shows Friday-Sunday at various times Tickets, times and details: 30ASongWritersFestival.com

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WANT TO BE INCLUDED? Click “Send us your events” at PanamaCity.com or email Jan Waddy, jwaddy@pcnh.com, or Tony Simmons, tsimmons@pcnh.com. Inclusion in this calendar of events, which also appears on the Events page at PanamaCity.com, is at editors’ discretion. FRIDA Y, JAN. 16 EDUCATION ENCO R E R E G I S T R ATION : 8 a.m. in the Student Union East Conference Center at Gulf Coast State College, Panama City; doors open at 7 a.m. More than 80 classes to choose from. Fee for six-week session of up to four classes is $88 total. Details: GulfCoast.edu/EducationEncore or 872-3823 W INTE R R E S IDENT S PR O GR A M: Monday through Friday at The Ark, 19208 Hibiscus St., Panama City Beach. Wood Shop – 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.; Sewing/ Quilting – 9:30-11:30 a.m. Details: 249-1980SATURDA Y, JAN. 17 W INTE R R E S IDENT COO K OUT : Noon to 2 p.m. at Harley Davidson of Panama City Beach, 14700 Panama City Beach Parkway. Enjoy a cookout, live music, shopping and register to win a $250 HarleyDavidson gift card. DENNI S ‘M OON SH INE ’ R ADE R: 2 p.m. at Arnold High School Auditorium, 550 Alf Coleman Road, Panama City Beach. Classic country music, oldtime rock ‘n’ roll, and homespun comedy; debut of his Gospel CD “Step Into The Water.” Free admission, but limited seating. Tickets are available at Panama City Beach Senior Center and Tourist Development Council. Details: 234-8983MONDA Y, JAN. 19 W INTE R R E S IDENT S PR O GR A M: Monday through Friday at The Ark, 19208 Hibiscus St., Panama City Beach. Wood Shop – 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Creative Writing – 9:30-11 a.m. Darts – 7-9 p.m. Details: 249-1980TUESDA Y, JAN. 20 W INTE R R E S IDENT S PR O GR A M: Monday through Friday at The Ark, 19208 Hibiscus St., Panama City Beach. Wood Shop – 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Embroidery on Cards Beginners and Advanced Workshop – 9:30-11 a.m. Memoir Writing – 9:30-11 a.m. Wood Burning – 9:30-11:30 a.m. Line Dancing – 1-2 p.m. Clogging – 2-3 p.m. Details: 249-1980 A R T AT T H E OAT F IELD : 1:30 p.m. at the Panama City Beach Senior Center, 423 Lyndell Lane, Panama City Beach. Theme: “The Gulf Coast.” Today: Heather Parker, acrylic on canvas, “Beachscene.” Costs, supplies and other details: 235-6374 or PCBSC.com TODD ALLEN HERENDEEN LIVE THE LEGENDS SHO W: 7:30 p.m. at Boardwalk Beach Resort Hotel & Convention Center, 9600 S. Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. Admission: $20 for dinner and show; $10 for show only. Doors open at 5 p.m. Details and advance tickets: 234-3484WEDNESDA Y, JAN. 21 W INTE R R E S IDENT S PR O GR A M: Monday through Friday at The Ark, 19208 Hibiscus St., Panama City Beach. Wood Shop – 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.; Miscellaneous Crafts -3 p.m.; Round Dancing – 1-2 p.m.; Square Dancing – 2-3 p; Darts – 7-9 p.m. Details: 249-1980 S ENIO RS S O F TBALL : 1 p.m. each Wednesday through March 11, at Frank Brown Park, 16200 Panama City Beach Parkway, Panama City Beach. Non-competitive softball for ages 55 and older; just bring your glove. Details: 238-0549 S NO W BI R D DANCE : 3-6 p.m. at Boardwalk Beach Resort Hotel & Convention Center, 9600 S. Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. DJ Jim Lawson playing the classics. Admission: $3. Details: 234-3484 R OC K IN CO MP AN Y W INTE R DINNE R/ DANCE P AR T Y: 5-8 p.m. at Marina Cantina, 5550 North Lagoon Drive, Panama City Beach. With radio host Rocky Akins. Details: 249-5500THURSDA Y, JAN. 22 W INTE R R E SIDENTS PR OGR A M: Monday through Friday at The Ark, 19208 Hibiscus St., Panama City Beach. Wood Shop – 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.; Pine Needle Weaving – 10 a.m. to noon; Golf Ball Carving – 1-3 p.m.; 3D Paper Tole Workshop – 1-3 p.m.; Stained Glass – 1:30-3:30 p.m.; Karaoke – 7-9 p.m. Details: 249-1980 SP A GH ETTI DINNE R: 5-7 p.m. at the Panama City Beach Senior Center’s Oateld Center, 423 Lyndell Lane, Panama City Beach. Tickets on sale at the Cypress House, $10. In memory of Jeanette Moore, who started the annual spaghetti dinners. Details: 233-5065 TODD ALLEN H E R ENDEEN LI V E T H E EL V I S SH O W: 7:30 p.m. at Boardwalk Beach Resort Hotel & Convention Center, 9600 S. Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. Admission: $20 for dinner and show; $10 for show only. Doors open at 5 p.m. Details and advance tickets: 234-3484 JAN. 23 EDUCATION ENCO R E : 9 a.m. at Gulf Coast State College, Panama City. First day of winter session. Details: GulfCoast.edu/EducationEncore or 872-3823 W INTE R R E S IDENT S PR O GR A M: Monday through Friday at The Ark, 19208 Hibiscus St., Panama City Beach. Wood Shop – 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.; Sewing/ Quilting – 9:30-11:30 a.m. Details: 249-1980 W INTE R R E SIDENT A PPR ECIATION DA Y: 911 a.m. at the Panama City Beach Convention and Visitors Bureau, 17001 Panama City Beach Parkway. Free admission. Collect information on activities, meet the Visitor Services staff, socialize and enjoy complimentary coffee and donuts. JAN. 24 OPEN HOUSE — WINTER PR OGR AM: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at The Ark, 12908 Hibscus St., Panama City Beach. Demonstrations and displays of classes offered at the Winter Program (pine needle weaving, stained glass, wood burning, etc.);. The wood shop will be open, displaying wood turned bowls and other projects. Details: 249-1980 BEACH BOOGIE DANCE: 6-10 p.m. at the Panama City Beach Senior Center, 423 Lyndell Lane, Panama City Beach. Admission is $15 per person. BYOB. Sponsored by The Women’s Civic Club of PCB. Tickets available at the Lyndell Center MondayFriday. Details: Margaret Ivey, 866-9882 S NO W BI R D C ALENDA R WELCOME WINTER RESIDENTS! PAGE 10 PanamaCity.Com Friday, January 16, 2015

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KENN ON SNOWBIRD CALE ND A R WELCOME WINTER RESIDENTS! JA N . 26 WINT E R R E SID E NTS PROGR A M: Monday through Friday at The Ark, 19208 Hibiscus St., Panama City Beach. Wood Shop – 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Creative Writing – 9:3011 a.m. Darts – 7-9 p.m. Details: 249-1980JA N . 27 WINT E R R E SID E NTS PROGR A M: Monday through Friday at The Ark, 19208 Hibiscus St., Panama City Beach. Wood Shop – 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Embroidery on Cards Beginners and Advanced Workshop – 9:30-11 a.m. Memoir Writing – 9:30-11 a.m. Wood Burning – 9:30-11:30 a.m. Line Dancing – 1-2 p.m. Clogging – 2-3 p.m. Details: 249-1980 A RT A T TH E O A TFI EL D: 1:30 p.m. at the Panama City Beach Senior Center, 423 Lyndell Lane, Panama City Beach. Theme: “The Gulf Coast.” Today: Don Taylor, sketching designs inspired by a favorite photo. Costs, supplies and other details: 235-6374 or PCBSC. com ST. A NDR E WS ST A T E P A RK PROGR A M: 2 p.m. at the Panama City Beach Public Library, 12500 Hutchison Boulevard, Panama City Beach. All adult residents and visitors are welcome to attend free program. Details: 233-5055JA N . 28 WINT E R R E SID E NTS PROGR A M: Monday through Friday at The Ark, 19208 Hibiscus St., Panama City Beach. Wood Shop – 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.; Miscellaneous Crafts –1-3 p.m.; Round Dancing – 1-2 p.m.; Square Dancing – 2-3 p; Darts – 79 p.m. Details: 249-1980 2015 WINT E R R E SID E NT OP E N HOUS E : 1 p.m. at various Sterling Resorts properties including Splash, Sterling Breeze, Calypso Resort and Towers, Sterling Reef, Laketown Wharf, Sterling Beach and Reections at Bay Point with a grand nale Wild West party at Laketown Wharf at 5 p.m. Attendees have a chance at exclusive monthly rates, property tours, prizes and a grand prize of a free three-night stay with Sterling Resorts and a $100 grocery gift card. Details: 866-931-5181 or SterlingResorts.com S E NIORS SOFTB ALL : 1 p.m. each Wednesday through March 11, at Frank Brown Park, 16200 Panama City Beach Parkway, Panama City Beach. Non-competitive softball for ages 55 and older; just bring your glove. Details: 238-0549 ROCKIN COMP A NY WINT E R DINN E R/D A NC E P A RTY: 5-8 p.m. at Marina Cantina, 5550 North Lagoon Drive, Panama City Beach. With radio host Rocky Akins. Details: 249-5500JA N . 29 WINT E R R E SID E NTS PROGR A M: Monday through Friday at The Ark, 19208 Hibiscus St., Panama City Beach. Wood Shop – 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.; Pine Needle Weaving – 10 a.m. to noon; Golf Ball Carving – 13 p.m.; 3D Paper Tole Workshop – 1-3 p.m.; Stained Glass – 1:30-3:30 p.m.; Karaoke – 7-9 p.m. Details: 249-1980JA N . 30 WINT E R R E SID E NTS PROGR A M: Monday through Friday at The Ark, 19208 Hibiscus St., Panama City Beach. Wood Shop – 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.; Sewing/Quilting – 9:30-11:30 a.m. Details: 249-1980FE B . 2 WINT E R R E SID E NTS PROGR A M: Monday through Friday at The Ark, 19208 Hibiscus St., Panama City Beach. Wood Shop – 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Creative Writing – 9:3011 a.m. Darts – 7-9 p.m. Details: 249-1980 Friday, January 16, 2015 PanamaCity.Com PAGE 11

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PAGE 12 PanamaCity.Com Friday, January 16, 2015 By TONY SIMMONS 747-5080 | @PCTonyS tsimmons@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY — Heather Parker relaxed on a couch Friday in the community gallery she founded last year, nursing an aching knee, and musing on the accomplishments of the year and the life that brought her to this place and time. Floriopolis, which is referred to as an “arts and culture metropolis” in historic St. Andrews, opened Jan. 18, 2014, at 1125 Beck Ave. Heather and some of the 100-plus artists who have work in the gallery, as well as students, friends and family, will celebrate the anniversary 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday with free art projects for everyone, live music and a wine toast at 4 p.m. Heather said the past year has been a learning experience. Some plans remain unful lled, but many projects reached fruition and paid off in spectacular ways. “We know what we’re doing now,” she said. “The mission is very solid, the role we’re playing in the community is solid. It See ARTIST 13 FLORIOPOLIS ANNIVERSARY What: Celebrating one year of the gallery and creative community space When: 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday; wine toast at 4 p.m.; My Fever will play in the courtyard Where: 1125 Beck Ave., Panama City Details: Facebook.com/ Floriopolis, or (850) 249-9295 ARTIST’S ARTIST’S ARTIST’S ARTIST’S touch HEATHER PARKER When art is life, ‘we are the plan’ CONTRIBUTED PHOTO Pat Nease tells a tale during the Bay Storytellers Story Slam at Floriopolis in May 2014. ART BY HEATHER PARKER ‘Charlotte’ is acrylic on wood, Heather Parker’s favorite medium.

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Friday, January 16, 2015 PanamaCity.Com PAGE 13 didn’t take as long to ne-tune as I thought. ... What has been great is, people cry when they come in — there’s so much self expression. I’m personally still coming to terms with that.” The gallery’s new exhibit, “Glow,” will be in place through March. Then Floriopolis will host an ongoing project through September called “The Space Between Words,” which will include a short story contest. The winning 2,000word story will be tattooed on 2,000 people — each receiving one word from the tale. October through December, the exhibit will be “Life on the Water,” with an eye toward work the public will want for Christmas gift shopping. “We had great trafc and super sales for the holidays,” Heather said. Heather’s favorite medium is acrylic painting on wood. It has required her to learn about absorption rates, how paint will spread or bleed. The wood grain always becomes part of the work, as she nds hidden shapes in the swirls of dark and light. “I’ve barely painted anything this year, though,” she said. “That’s why I started painting little blocks of wood, something to do rst thing in the morning before I’m even really awake yet.” She “always loved art,” Heather said, but she wasn’t much of a student in her youth, graduating high school only because an administrator liked her. She moved out to live with other students when she was in 10th grade, and paid her portion of rent by selling artwork door to door. “I only went to art classes and on test days,” she said. Later, she worked at the education department of a children’s museum in Virginia. But when her work and her daughter Megan’s kindergarten schedules couldn’t be reconciled, Heather quit and began homeschooling. Selling art to make up for the loss of income led to a position at the Suffolk Museum of Art. “You can use art to teach almost anything,” Heather said. The family moved to Bay County from Virginia in 2000. “We had been doing trade shows a couple of years,” Heather said. “We were tired, we ran out of gas, and our trailer was damaged as we crossed the bridge. ... We sold the trailer and stayed.” Heather has worked for the Junior Museum of Bay County, the YMCA, and the Visual Arts Center of Northwest Florida. Then she and a fellow artist, Xan Miller, opened the CityArts Cooperative downtown. Heather is still involved there via her connection to the Chautauqua Learn & Serve School, where she is the artist in residence. “My time at the Coop helped me gure out what I wanted to do as a person to contribute to the world,” she said, adding that the reactions of people who visit Floriopolis are always positive and personally satisfying. “That might be the best thing that happened to them today.” (Heather will teach art classes at the Panama City Beach Senior Center on Jan. 20, Feb. 17 and March 17. See the Winter Visitors Calendar on Pages 10-11 for details.) Heather’s husband, John, doesn’t like attention, she said, but she credits him with keeping her on track. Not only does he do a lot of the heavy lifting around Floriopolis, as owner of Patriot Tax Solutions he does the books. John’s “a numbers guy,” and each time Heather comes up with another event, project or mission to tackle, John asks her what the plan is. “I know how far out of his comfort zone I push him,” Heather said, such as when she decided to “bomb” downtown with 500 Styrofoam monkeys, or create a transparent plastic giraffe and photograph it visiting locations all over town. Okay, he’d say, what’s the plan? “We are the plan,” she said. ARTIST from page 12 CONTRIBUTED PHOTO Heather Parker works on ‘Three Dog Day,’ nding forms in wood grain. CONTRIBUTED PHOTO Heather Parker poses beside a bus mural she painted for the Junior Museum. CONTRIBUTED PHOTO Visitors work on a group project at Floriopolis in June 2014.

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PAGE 14 PanamaCity.Com Friday, January 16, 2015 By JAN WADDY 747-5072 | @JanWaddy1 jwaddy@pcnh.com ST. ANDREWS — After stepping into St. Andrews Coffee House & Bistro on Friday morning, I quickly found out I was surrounded by family and friends. An area family reunion of sorts, I was greeted by Sydney Price, whose anc, James Pigneri, was in the kitchen. James’ parents, Jim Pigneri and Mary Stone, were talking to customers, when his sister, Jessica Nelson, came to take my order. Jessica, who has been in the medical eld for 12 years, has managed to stay out of the family restaurant business. But that hasn’t kept her from lending her brother a hand since he opened the coffee house Jan. 6. “I haven’t been up this early in years,” admitted their dad, Jim, who retired from the restaurant business nine years ago. Cousins Sean Lyon and Erin Pigneri are carrying on the family tradition that started when Jim and his sister, Mary Lou Parrish, opened Uncle Ernie’s on Bayview Avenue in 1993. Wearing a white apron, Jim came over to adjust the heater, while I tried to wake up with my rst cup of coffee for the day — a large cup of hot coffee with hazelnut syrup. “I told him I would help him out till he got on his feet, but then I’ve got to go back to bed,” Jim added. Former St. Andrews Coffee House owners Ellen Mapelsden and Robbie Fehrenbach, who closed the business Dec. 20, were even helping out by waiting on customers at tables and behind the counter. But their connection to the building, where their Great Uncle Bill Gainer once operated Gainer Brothers’ Grocery, goes beyond the 17 years they ran the coffee house. “I think I’ve found my niche,” said Ellen, who added, “It was just the two of us. I think people are going to like having that extra service.” There were so many people happily willing to take orders, I was overwhelmed with hospitality. Mary was just stopping by to help before her shop, The White Elephant, opened around the corner on W. 12th Street at 10 a.m. “I love this area,” said Mary, who retired from St. Andrews School two years ago after teaching for 25 years. “A lot of these are my customers, too.” A third generation restaurateur, James is staying true to the coffee house’s feel and to the historic area, plus adding a great new menu. “We still want to be a neighborhood gathering place,” Sydney said. “The menu is the same as the decor — we tried to keep half old and half new. A lot of stuff was Robbie and Ellen’s personal items.” James pointed out a few of the changes that have been made — adding a replace, pendulum lights and paneling on the walls. “Product of Columbia” hangs over the replace by the “put and take library,” just above a picture of James Come back home to St. Andrews Coffee House & Bistro St. Andrews Coffee House & Bistro reopened under new ownership this month, offering your favorites, plus more. PLEASE SEE COFFEE | 15MEXICAN EGGS ST. ANDREWS COFFEE HOUSE & BISTRO What: Breakfast, lunch, coffee, fine wine and beer; special events and catering Where: 1006 Beck Ave., St. Andrews Hours: 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday Details: 769-3767

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Friday, January 16, 2015 PanamaCity.Com PAGE 15 and his dad framed on the mantle. Breakfast, served until 10:30 a.m., keeps favorites such as Robbie & Ellen’s Homemade French Toast and adds Big Rose’s Homemade Pancakes — “That’s our grandmother,” Jessica added. I went with the Mexican Scrambled Eggs, sort of a deconstructed version of their Breakfast Burrito. Three scrambled eggs with thick cuts of ham and cheese, tomatoes and fresh cilantro lled most of the plate, some hidden under my English mufn. It was served with a side of black bean corn salsa and fresh jam made by Miss Daisy of Murphy, N.C., who Jim had discovered. Jars of Trafc Jam, Frog Jam, Black Bear Jam also are available. “We have a deli case with deli sliced meats, cheese and grab and go items from the menu — pasta salad, chick pea salad, veggie burgers, fresh jams and jellies,” Sydney added. I was unable to nish my plate, but I would denitely order it again. “I like to have leftovers,” Sydney admitted. The bistro is quickly becoming known for its generous portions and Big Jim’s Famous Home Fries with Onion. The lunch menu is lled with soup and salads, including Syds Chickenless Chicken Salad with mashed chick peas with onions, celery, spicy mustard and mayo on a bed of greens, and Robbie and Ellen’s Cranberry-Pecan Chicken Salad Plate. Customers and family members have raved about the potato and ham soup of the day and the lentil soup, Jim’s recipe. Cold sandwiches include the ABLT with bacon, lettuce, tomato and avocado, and the St. Andrew Shrimp Roll, their version of a New England lobster roll with Gulf shrimp pieces, celery, onion, mayo and bay seasoning, each served on homemade baguettes. Warm up with any of the six hot sandwiches, including the Fish Taco Wrap, Filet Mignon Sandwich and Grilled Portobello. Be sure to check the counter for more homemade pastries, desserts and bread. “For breakfast, we do mimosas and Bloody Marys,” James added. “You can purchase our craft beer in a six-pack and walk out the door with it.” Columbian Supremo, the same coffee Robbie and Ellen used, also is available by the bag. “I’ve been living here for three years, and I love this little neighborhood,” said John Daw, who was talking to Mary while joining a group at a table. “When I do come here, everyone knows everyone. There’s a lot going on; it’s so much more involved.” Katelyn French joined John at the table. “We come over here for meetings. It’s really laid back. Everyone is so friendly here,” said Katelyn, who then noted, “A lot more is on the menu.” COFFEE from Page 14 Miss Daisy makes homemade jams.PHOTOS BY JAN WADD Y | PanamaCity.com St. Andrews Coffee House & Bistro has kept some familiar sights and brought in some new, such as a replace. I enjoyed my cup of coffee by the heater.

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PAGE 16 PanamaCity.Com Friday, January 16, 2015 THE BACKDOOR LOUNGE 7800 W. Hwy 98, Panama City Beach | 850-235-0073 Happy Hour: 9 a.m.-Noon Friday & Saturday : S.O.A.L., 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Sunday: DJ 49.5, 2-6 p.m. Wednesday: Kc Phelps hosting open mic, 10 p.m.-2 a.m. Digital recording available MS. NEWBY’S 8711 Thomas Drive | 850-234-0030 Friday & Saturday: Reasonable Doubt, 9 p.m.-Midnight Sunday: NFL Playoffs on the big screen Tues. & Wed.: Karaoke, 8 p.m.-2 a.m NEWBY’S TOO 44103 Thomas Drive | 850-234-6203 Open everyday 8 a.m. until Happy Hour: Monday-Friday, 8 a.m.-Noon Friday & Saturday: The Panhandlers, 10 p.m.-2 a.m. ThursdaySaturday: Karaoke Mania w/ NIGHT AL & B eer Pong, 8 p.m.-2 a.m. BUZZTIME every day. Sports Bar, Pool, Foosball, Darts, Shuffleboard, Ping Pong & Air Hockey. Smokers Welcome. 5530 N. Lagoon Drive | 850-249-5500 Friday & Saturday: Martino & Tirado, 6-9:30 p.m. Friday: Latin Dance Party, 9:30 p.m.-3 a.m. Sunday & Thursday: Karaoke Snowbird Dance Party w/Michael, 6-10 p.m. Monday: Ric Brigman, 5-9 p.m. Tuesday: Jesse Deese & the Sand Band, 5-9 p.m. Wednesday: Rocky’s Winter DInner Dance Party w/Rocky Akins, 5-9 p.m. Happy hour daily from 3-6 p.m. priced Wine, Beer & Sangria, $5 Margaritas & Select Appetizers www.marinacantinapcb.com The Backdoor Lounge S.O.A.L. S.O.A.L. DJ 49.5 Kc Phelps/Open Mic Nic Birge PCB, FL 235-0073 9 p.m.-1 a.m 9 p.m.-1 a.m 2-6 p.m. 10 p.m.-2 a.m. 10 p.m.-2 a.m. Marina Cantina Martino & Tirado 6-9:30 p.m. Martino & Tirado Karaoke w/Michael Ric Brigman Jesse Deese & the Sand Band Winter Dnner Dance Party Karaoke Dance Party PCB, FL 249-5500 Latin Dance Party 9;30 p.m. 6-9:30 p.m. Snowbird Dance party/6-10 p.m. 5-9 p.m. 5-9 p.m. w/Rocky Akins 5-9 p.m. w/Michael 3-7 p.m. Ms. Newby’s Reasonable Doubt Reasonable Doubt NFL Playoffs Karaoke w/Night Al Karaoke w/Night Al PCB, FL 234-0030 9 p.m.-midnight 9 p.m.-midnight 8 p.m.-2 a.m. 8 p.m.-2 a.m. Newby’s Too The Panhandlers 10 p.m. The Panhandlers 10 p.m. Karaoke w/Night Al PCB, FL 234-6203 Karaoke 8 p.m.-2 a.m. Karaoke 8 p.m.-2 a.m. 8 p.m.-2 a.m. Runaway Island Touch of Class Band NFL Playoffs Karaoke dance party w/Michael Martino & Tirado PCB, FL 634-4884 5-9 p.m. 3-7 p.m. 5-9 p.m. Schooners Terry Brock Duo Terry Brock Duo PCB, FL 235-3555 6:30-10:30 p.m. 6:30-10:30 p.m. Sharky's Clay Musgrave PCB, FL 235-2420 2-6 p.m. VENUE FRIDAY SATURDAY SUNDAY MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY ADVERTISE WITH US Call Marie Forrest at 747-5041 or email mforrest@pcnh.com Deadline is 5 p.m. Monday. 14521 Front Beach Road 850-634-4884 Panama City Beach’s newest Gulf Front Bar & Grill located in the heart of the World’s Most Beautiful Beach serving an array of Gulf favorites along with a few twists to pique the appetite. Come try our great fish tacos, craft beer on draft as well as a great lineup of unique cocktails. The view from our deck is truly unique and beautiful. Enjoy the sunset celebration each afternoon, Escape to the Island! Open Daily at 11a.m. 8 Great Early Bird Specials, 4-7 p.m. Happy Hour everyday till 6 p.m. Friday: All you can eat Fish Fry special 2 for 1 Well Drinks & $2.25 Domestic Draft Touch of Class band live, 5-9 p.m. Sunday: NFL Playoffs Monday: Karaoke w/Michael, 3-7 p.m. Tuesday: Food, Wine & a Good Time Wine & Menu Tasting/Chef Demos 2-5 p.m. Thursday: Italian Night “Pasta, Pasta, Pasta” Martino & Tirado 5-9 p.m. 5121 Gulf Drive | 850-235-3555 Friday & Saturday: Terry Brock Duo, 6:30-10:30 p.m. www.schooners.com Reasonable Doubt 15201 Front Beach Road | 850-235-2420 Open Thursday-Sunday Thursday: Clay Musgrave, 2-6 p.m. www.sharkysbeach.com


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