Citation
News-herald

Material Information

Title:
News-herald
Uniform Title:
News-herald (Panama City, Fla. : 1970)
Added title page title:
Panama City News Herald
Place of Publication:
Panama City, FL
Publisher:
Halifax Media Group, Tim Thompson - Publisher, Mike Cazalas - Editor
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama City (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Bay County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Florida -- Bay County ( fast )
Florida -- Panama City ( fast )
Genre:
Newspapers. ( fast )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Newspapers ( fast )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Bay -- Panama City

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (May 1, 1970)-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Halifax Media Group, Tim Thompson - Publisher, Mike Cazalas - Editor. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
34303828 ( OCLC )
sn 96027210 ( LCCN )
ocm34303828

Related Items

Preceded by:
Panama City news
Preceded by:
Panama City herald (Panama City, Fla. : 1952)

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LOCAL & STATE Bay’s unclaimed property worth $8 million B1 Read by 83,130 people every day Call 850-747-5050 Want to SUB S CRIBE? Young AR TIST What’s INSIDE WEATHER Thick clouds today. High 70, low 61. | B2 A N S LEE T R A NUM, A GE 8 North Bay Haven Charter Academy BUSINESS A5 CL A SSIFIED D1-4 COMICS B7 CROSSWORD B7 DEATHS B3 L OCAL & S TATE B1-5 L O TTERY A2 NATION & WORLD A2-7 OUT & ABOUT B8 SPOR T S C1-6 TV LIS TING S C8 VIEWPOINT S A6 COM . Facebook.com/ panamacitynewsherald Twitter: @The_News_Herald Social MEDIA TRAGEDY IN MINU T ES Children, grandchildren mourn fire victim By VALERIE GARMAN 747-5076 | @valeriegarman vgarman@pcnh.com YOUNGSTOWN — William Berger awoke from a deep sleep early Wednesday to find his mobile home ablaze and his 88-year-old father trapped inside. “It all broke out so fast,” Berger said Thursday. “I tried to get in there to him and I couldn’t. I couldn’t get to him because the fire had already spread.” Berger’s father, Arnold Berger Sr., was killed in the fire, which engulfed the home he spent 20 years building at 9236 Chevy Lane in Youngstown, and also took the lives of his five beloved dogs. “My dad was a stubborn old man he built that house over a 20-year period,” Berger said. “He tried to save his house but the fire got him. He was going to go down with his house.” Although no definitive cause of the fire has been released, officials suspect either a wood stove or an electric heater caused the blaze, which all but leveled the house. The Florida State Fire Marshal’s Office is investigating. William Berger, the youngest of Berger’s 12 children, was his father’s caregiver as he battled early stages of dementia. He said his father will be remembered by loved ones for his caring heart, strong work ethic and love of animals, fishing and music. He was a carpenter and an avid guitar player, and often performed on a stage he built in the home’s bar room, which was set up for a New Year’s Eve family get-together that never happened. Following the tragedy, Berger’s children and grandchildren expressed their love for him on Facebook. Grandson Will Griffin wrote, “He was one of the hardest workers I knew and will always be a part of me. I’m thankful for the moments we spent together. I couldn’t ask for a better grandfather you will never be forgotten.” Berger’s daughter Tammy Kitchens also honored her father on social media. “To my dad, Arnold Carl Berger Sr., we love you so much,” Kitchens wrote. “You left this earth with everything you built around you. May you rest in peace.” Since the fire, William Berger has been staying with friends and will begin to clean up the property in the coming weeks. “It was a lot of memories that just went up in flames,” he said. By JOHN HENDERSON 522-5108 | @ P CNHjohn jhenderson@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY BEACH — City Manager Mario Gisbert said he couldn’t help but notice how packed restaurants along Front Beach Road were this holiday week, which is not normally considered the busy season. “There were three restaurants that I drove past that were completely and utterly full,” he said. One of those businesses was Diego’s Burrito Factory and Margarita Bar. “It’s been pretty steady,” manager Omar Taleb said. More visitors are coming to Panama City Beach during the fall and winter shoulder season and are spending money at local businesses such as Diego’s, figures show. That’s bolstering the local economy and the primary revenue source to the city’s budget — the 1 percent sales tax on hotels, food and merchandise. Tax revenues for Panama City Beach, which does not have a property tax, were up 6.4 percent in November compared to the same month in 2013, increasing from $355,000 to $378,000. The city’s tax revenues increased about 22 percent last October compared to the same month in 2013, from $524,000 to $640,000, and sales tax revenues were up about 21 percent in last September compared to the September 2013, from $568,000 to $688,000. Gisbert said he believes the increases are tied to many factors. F ACEBOOK Arnold Berger Sr., who died in a Wednesday morning fire in his Youngstown home, is shown with three of his dogs. A father and son were inside their mobile home that caught fire at 9236 Chevy Lane in Youngstown early Wednesday. William Berger escaped the blaze but his father, Arnold Berger Sr., 88, died after being trapped inside. HEATHER LEIPHART | The News Herald Panama City Beach’s ‘slow’ season speeding up More high-profile events have boosted number of visitors, tax revenue Pier Park’s beach ball drop and reworks display draws thousands on New Year’s Eve. IN S IDE | B 1 SEE ‘SLOW’ SEA SON | A7 Clerks have duty to issue licenses, judge rules MIAMI (AP) — A federal judge said Florida’s county court clerks have a legal duty to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples, but he stopped short of ordering them to do so. U.S. District Judge Robert Hinkle issued a ruling Thursday in Tallahassee federal court responding to requests to clarify his previous order that Florida’s samesex marriage ban was unconstitutional. He stayed that order, but the stay is scheduled to expire at the end of the day Monday. The association representing county clerks said the ruling applies only to Washington County, where a lawsuit filed by two men became a key basis for Hinkle’s order. Gay rights groups said Hinkle’s order applies statewide. Hinkle warned Thursday that clerks who don’t start issuing the licenses when the stay expires could face future lawsuits or other legal consequences. “History records no shortage of instances when state officials defied federal court orders on issues of federal constitutional law. Happily, there are many more instances when responsible officials followed the law, like it or not. Reasonable people can debate whether the ruling in this case was correct and who it binds. There should be no debate, however, on the question whether a clerk of court may follow the ruling, even for marriage-license applicants who are not parties to this case,” Hinkle wrote. Hinkle said while his order doesn’t require a clerk to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples, “the Constitution requires the clerk to issue such licenses.” The National Center for Lesbian Rights and American Civil Liberties Union in Florida cheered Hinkle’s ruling Thursday. “We expect all clerks to respect the ruling. But if not, we are committed to ensuring marriage equality in all 67 counties in Florida and we would like to hear from any couples that are wrongfully denied a license after the stay expires,” G AY MARRIA GE “ M y office will not stand in the way as clerks of court determine how to proceed.” — Pam Bondi Florida attorney general SEE GA Y MARRIAGES | A7 75 cents SP O R T S | C 1 Oregon, Ohio State roll to FBS title game IN SI DE Dancing like no one is watching P ANA M AC I T Y. CO M FRIDAY January 2, 2015

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Nation & World Florida LOTTERY The News Herald Panama City, Florida dDay, mMonth dDate, yYear 1 To place a classied ad Phone: 850-747-5020 Service hours: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday to Friday To buy a display ad Phone: 850-747-5030 Service hours: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday to Friday To subscribe to The News Herald Phone: 850-747-5050 To get news in the paper • Breaking news Phone: 850-522-5134 or 850-747-5045 • Non-deadline news, press releases Phone: 850-522-5134; Email: pcnhnews@pcnh.com • Letters to the editor Email: nhletters@pcnh.com Mail: Letters to the editor, The News Herald, 501 W. 11th St., Panama City, FL 32401 Note: Include name, address, phone number. • Weddings, engagements, anniversaries, births Email: tgolden@pcnh.com Phone: 850-522-5107 At the ofce: 8 a.m. t o 5 p.m. Monday to Friday, 501 W. 11th St. • Church Calendar Email: pcnhnews@pcnh.com Mail: Church Calendar, The News Herald, 501 W. 11th St., Panama City, FL 32401 • Birthdays Phone: 850-747-5070 Email: pcnhnews@pcnh.com • What’s Happening Email: pcnhnews@pcnh.com To buy a photograph Phone: 850-747-5095 Circulation Directory Tim Thompson , Publisher 850-747-5001, tthompson@pcnh.com Mike Cazalas , Editor 850-747-5094, mmcazalas@pcnh.com Ron Smith , Regional Operations Director 850-747-5016, rsmith@pcnh.com Robert Delaney , Regional Controller 850-747-5003, rdelaney@pcnh.com Vickie Gainer , Regional Marketing Director 850-747-5009, vgainer@pcnh.com Eleanor Hypes , Regional Human Resources 850-747-5002, ehypes@pcnh.com Roger Underwood , Regional Circulation Director 850-747-5049, runderwood@pcnh.com At your service The entire contents of The News Herald, including its logotype, are fully protected by copyright and registry and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without written permission from The News Herald. Published mornings by The Panama City News Herald (USPS 419-560), 501 W. 11th St., Panama City, FL 32401. Periodicals postage paid at Panama City, FL. Postmaster: Send address changes to The News Herald, P.O. Box 2060, Panama City, FL 32402. THE NEWS HERALD Copyright P.O. Box 1940 Panama City, FL 32402 501 W. 11th St. Panama City, FL 32401 Phone: (850) 747-5000 Panama City, FL 32401 Phone: (850) 747-5000 WATS: 1-800-345-8688 Make the Panama City News Herald a part of your life every day. Home delivery: Subscribe to 7-day delivery and get unlimited access to our website and the digital edition of the paper. Customers who use EZ Pay will see, on their monthly credit card or bank statement, the payment has been made to Halifax Media Florida. Online delivery: Take The News Herald with you when you go out of town, or go green by subscribing to an online replica edition of The News Herald and get unlimited access to our website. Go to subscribe.newsherald.com to subscribe to digital only. Delivery concerns: To report a problem with your newspaper delivery, call 850-747-5050 between 6 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday and between 7 a.m. and 11 a.m. Saturday and Sunday. To start your subscription, call our customer service center at 850-747-5050 or toll-free at 800-345-8688. The News Herald also is available at more than 380 stores and news racks throughout Bay, Washington, Holmes, Jackson, Calhoun, Gulf and Franklin counties. Did we miss you? If we missed you, we want to correct the oversight. For redelivery: Call The News Herald at 850-747-5050 between 6 a.m. and 10 a.m. Monday through Friday and 7 a.m. and 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday. Single Copies: Daily, 75 cents; Sunday, $1.50 — Subscribers will be charged an additional $1.00 for the regular Sunday retail rate for the Thanksgiving Day edition of The News Herald. Page A2 | The News Herald | Friday, January 2, 2015 NATION & WORLD Briefs The Associated Press CAMDEN, N.J. Mom, girls forced to jump from burning home Several police officers formed a human net to catch a woman and her two young daughters as they jumped from their burning home in southern New Jersey. Camden County police said the fire on Atlantic Avenue in Camden was reported about 4:15 p.m. Wednesday, when residents notified two officers who happened to be on patrol in the area. They told them the woman and her children, ages 4 and 7, were trapped on the home’s second floor. Two other police officers soon arrived at the home, and all four gained entry by kicking open the front door. They tried to find the family, but thick smoke and heavy flames hampered their efforts. One officer collapsed and was helped out of the home as another officer shouted for the mother to take her children to a rear window, police said. Six other county officers who had responded to the scene circled beneath the window and locked arms, creating a human net. They encouraged the mother and her daughters to jump and safely caught all three. The woman and her children remained hospitalized in critical condition Thursday with undisclosed injuries. Their names were not released. CHATHAM, Mass. Police officer runs over man lying in road A police officer responding to an emergency call early New Year’s Day ran over and apparently killed a college lacrosse player lying in a road, authorities said. Police said they don’t know why Garrett Gagne was in the road or what his condition was before he was struck at 4 a.m. in Chatham. The officer, who has not been identified, immediately stopped and called for help when he realized he had hit Gagne, police said Thursday. State and local police are investigating. Gagne, 22, was a senior government major and lacrosse player for St. Lawrence University. Police said he was from Longmeadow in western Massachusetts and was in Chatham, on Cape Cod, to celebrate New Year’s Eve with friends. The Canton, N.Y., university set up a memorial website to Gagne on Thursday. In a statement, St. Lawrence President William Fox said the school will hold a tribute for him when classes resume. SHANGHAI 36 dead, 47 injured in New Year’s stampede Grieving relatives identified the bodies of loved ones a day after a stampede during New Year’s celebrations along Shanghai’s historic waterfront area killed 36 people. Some families lashed out at authorities, accusing them of being unresponsive to their plight and failing to prevent the disaster. The chaos began about a half-hour before what was supposed to be a joyful celebration of the start of 2015. In the end, dozens were dead and 47 people were hospitalized, including 13 who were seriously injured, according to the Shanghai government. Some of the victims had suffocated, said Xia Shujie, vice president of Shanghai No. 1 People’s Hospital. Seven of the injured had left hospitals by Thursday afternoon. The stampede’s cause still was under investigation. It happened at Chen Yi Square in Shanghai’s old riverfront Bund area, famed for its art deco buildings from the 1920s and 1930s. Throngs of people often jam the area during major events. JERUSALEM Israel’s Netanyahu wins Likud party primary Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu won the backing of his hard-line Likud party in its primary and will lead it into general elections this March, Israeli media reported Thursday. With most of the ballots cast Wednesday counted, Israeli media said Netanyahu had won the support of about 75 percent of electors, giving him an unassailable lead over challenger Danny Danon, a former deputy defense minister. Some 100,000 Likud members were eligible to vote in the poll. IF NOT HILLARY, WASHINGTON (AP) — In Washington, in Iowa, in New Hampshire, really in any place that’s already talking about the 2016 campaign for president, just about everyone expects Hillary Rodham Clinton to run for president. But is it possible that Clinton might not give a White House campaign another try? “It would be shocking,” said Tad Devine, a Democratic strat egist who is advising Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, a potential challenger. But what if? Such a decision would set off a chaotic shuffle in the Democratic Party as candi dates now considered long-shots become instant contenders and politicians now planning to skip the race give it a new look. Here’s a look at some whose political fortunes and plans for 2016 could change if Clinton decides to pass on the race. JOE BIDEN In any other year, the sitting vice president would have an inside track to the nomination. But Clinton’s dominant standing within the party has marginal ized Biden in early 2016 discus sion. In a Clinton-free campaign, the veteran of runs for president in 1988 and 2008 would be an early front-runner. ELIZABETH WARREN The Massachusetts sena tor is a favorite of liberal activ ists, some of whom are trying to “draft” her into running for president — even though she repeatedly has said she is not. Warren’s populist economic approach and calls to rein in Wall Street resonate with many Democrats disappointed by the midterm elections and the gap between the wealthy and the poor. If Clinton decides not to run, Warren is sure to face pres sure to fill the void. MARTIN O’MALLEY The outgoing Maryland gov ernor has been a workhorse surrogate for fellow Demo crats, trying to build a network of financial donors — only to be effectively frozen by Clinton. Even without Clinton in the field, the Republicans’ defeat of his hand-picked successor in Mary land — and sagging poll ratings at the end of his term — would complicate his campaign. JIM WEBB The former Virginia senator would bring a bipartisan record to the campaign: he served as President Ronald Reagan’s Navy secretary. He is an accom plished author and decorated veteran, still carrying shrapnel from his service in the Vietnam War. Independent and at times unpredictable, his foreign pol icy outlook and outsider status could shake up the primary with or without Clinton. BERNIE SANDERS Few Democrats expect the independent senator from Ver mont to make much of an impact if he runs against Clinton, but that has not stopped Sanders from courting college students and liberals in Iowa and New Hampshire. He has maintained a large email distribution list, giving him a way of reaching activists, but still is more likely to shape the debate than com pete for delegates no matter what Clinton does. ANDREW CUOMO When former New York Gov. Mario Cuomo declined to seek the White House in 1991 after a lengthy deliberation, the vacuum helped a relativelyunknown Arkansas governor named Bill Clinton. If Hillary Rodham Clinton decides not to run, it could give his son, cur rent New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo, an opening to jump into a race he does not plan to con test. The second-term governor has built a record of accom plishments on marriage equal ity, gun control and, last month, banned hydraulic fracturing in New York — a move cheered by environmentalists. TIM KAINE The Virginia senator has big-time credentials: He’s a Spanish-speaking former Catholic missionary, Harvard Law graduate, former mayor of Richmond, Va., and the exgovernor of the state. Kaine quickly embraced candidate Barack Obama and found him self on the short-list for vice president. Instead, Obama put him in charge of the Democratic National Committee and Kaine later succeeded Webb in the Senate. He has backed the proClinton Ready for Hillary super PAC and would get a serious look if Clinton took a pass. THEN WHO? Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton speaks Dec. 4 at the Massachusetts Conference for Women in Boston. AP WEDNESDAY’S NUMBERS Cash 3 (afternoon) .......... . 5-1-9 Cash 3 (evening) ............. 6-1-1 Play 4 (afternoon) . ........ 2-6-6-5 Play 4 (evening) .......... . 5-4-6-9 Fantasy 5 . .......... 7-15-25-27-36 Powerball ... 17-27-37-40-53 (35) x2 Florida Lotto ... . 6-10-14-16-47-51 x4 THURSDAY’S NUMBERS Cash 3 (afternoon) ........... 1-5-1 Cash 3 (evening) ............ . 0-4-1 Play 4 (afternoon) . ......... 7-3-9-1 Play 4 (evening) ........... 1-7-5-9 Fantasy 5 . ......... . 10-13-14-21-34

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A A L A S K Le t me sh ow yo u th e Al ask a th at I lo ve ! My escor te d to ur wi l l ta ke yo u from th e lu sh fo re st s of So ut he ast ern Al ask a, qu ai n t to wn s, Humpb ac k and Gra y Wh ale s, be au ti fu l gla cie rs and fj or ds ; to th e op en tu ndr a of in te ri or Al ask a, hom e of De na li Na ti on al Pa rk wi th it s un sp oi le d be au ty , gri zz lies and cari bou! Hu nd reds of yo ur friend s and nei ghbor s ha ve jo ine d me sin ce 19 91 on th is wo nder fu l ad ve nt ure and ha ve re turn ed hom e wi th un fo rge tt able me mo rie s and va lued ne w friend sh ips. NE RV IG TR AV EL 56 9 Ha rr is on Av e. "H is to ri c Do wn tow n" Pa na ma Ci ty 85 076 328 76 | www .n er vig .c om Pl ea se jo in St at e of Al as ka Ce rt i ed “T op of th e Wo rl d” Sp ec ia li st , Al le n Se ar s, fo r a Sp ec ia l Pr es en ta ti on on Al as ka Tr av el : NATIO N & WORLD Friday, January 2, 2015 | The News Herald | Page A3 SURABAYA, Indonesia (AP) — A passenger aboard AirAsia Flight 8501 became the first victim of the crash to be returned to her family Thursday, one of many pain ful reunions to come, as search crews struggled against wind and heavy rain to find more than 150 people still missing. Hayati Lutfiah Hamid’s identity was confirmed by fingerprints and other means, said Col. Budiyono of East Java’s Disaster Victim Iden tification Unit. Her body, in a dark polished casket topped with flowers, was handed over to her family at a brief ceremony at a police hospital in Surabaya, the Indonesian city where the plane had taken off. A family member cried as she put both hands on the coffin. After a Muslim cleric said a prayer for the deceased, the cas ket was immediately taken to a village and lowered into a muddy grave, following Muslim obliga tions requiring bodies to be buried quickly. An imam said a simple prayer as about 150 people gath ered in the drizzling rain, and red flowers were sprinkled over the mound of wet dirt with a small white tombstone. Flight 8501 crashed into the Java Sea on Sunday with 162 peo ple aboard. Eight bodies have been recovered, including one brought Thursday to Pangkalan Bun, the nearest town to where the wreck age was spotted Tuesday. In the thick of Indonesia’s rainy season, the weather has frequently prevented helicopters and divers from operating while strong sea currents have kept debris moving. Singapore’s navy sent in an unmanned underwater vehicle capable of surveying the sea bed to try to help pinpoint the wreckage and the all-impor tant “black boxes” — the flight data recorder and cockpit voice recorder. Indonesian equipment in the search includes a mine sweeper, a private survey ship that specializes in sea mapping and a vessel that can conduct 3-D imaging and detect pings from the black boxes. Aircraft capable of detecting metal also were deployed. First body from AirAsia crash ID’d; eighth body recovered NEW YORK (AP) — Even as same-sex marriage edges closer to becoming legal nationwide, gay rights advocates face other chal lenges in 2015 that may not bring quick victories. In Congress, for example, liberal Democrats plan to introduce civil rights bills in the House and Senate that would outlaw a broad range of discrimination against lesbians, gays, bisexuals and transgender people. However, Republicans will control both chambers in the new Congress, and there is no sign that GOP leaders will help the bills advance. Absent such a federal law, activ ists will seek to pass more non discrimination laws at the state and local levels, but some efforts are meeting resistance. A conser vative-led coalition in Houston is trying to overturn a gay rights ordi nance approved by the city council in May, while a similar ordinance passed in August by the city coun cil in Fayetteville, Arkansas, was repealed by voters on Dec. 10. The Fayetteville vote was close — the repeal side got 52 percent of the votes — and the issue is expected to resurface. “Both sides have reason to con tinue on,” said Mayor Lioneld Jor dan, who supported the ordinance. “What we have to do is pull every body together and see what can be worked out.” Another contentious issue is the ban on transgender people serving in the military. Outgoing Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel has sug gested the policy be reviewed but gave no timetable, and advocacy groups are increasingly vocal with their impatience. “There is no valid reason that our transgender troops should con tinue to be prohibited from serving openly and honestly,” said Ashley Broadway of the American Mili tary Partner Association, which represents partners, spouses and families of LGBT service members. Friction over transgender rights also is surfacing in school policies, as evidenced by a contro versy in Gloucester, Va. Officials at Gloucester’s high school allowed a transgender boy — who was born female — to use the boys’ rest room, sparking complaints that led the county school board to reverse the decision. The board adopted a policy on Dec. 9 that restricts male and female restrooms to students with “corresponding biological genders” and says transgender students could use an “alternative private facility.” The American Civil Liberties Union subsequently filed a com plaint with the departments of Jus tice and Education alleging that the new policy is discriminatory and violates federal law. However, Alliance Defending Freedom, a conservative legal advocacy group, commended the Gloucester school board and circu lated a proposed “model policy” for other districts that would restrict transgender students’ use of com munal restrooms. The group said it would consider offering free legal defense to districts whose use of the proposed policy was challenged in court. “No policy should be tailored to a few students at the expense of all the others,” said ADF Senior Counsel Kevin Theriot. School sports teams also are a source of contention. In Minnesota, Republican Rep. Joyce Peppin sug gested closer legislative oversight of the Minnesota State High School League after its approval in early December of a policy letting trans gender athletes play on teams that best align with their gender identity. Several other states have adopted similar policies. Concern over the challenges facing transgender youth has inten sified in recent days as authorities in Ohio investigate the apparent suicide of Leelah Alcorn, a 17-yearold transgender girl from Kings Mills. She was struck by a truck while on foot early Sunday. A post on Tumblr, attributed to Alcorn and mentioning plans for suicide, recounts years of despair, coupled with pessimism about the future. “The life I would’ve lived isn’t worth living in,“ the post said. “I’m never going to be happy with the way I look or sound. ... There’s no way out.“ Accounts of Alcorn’s death prompted appeals from LGBT activists for greater understanding and acceptance of young people who convey that they are trans gender. Some studies have shown that the rate of suicide attempts among transgender teens is far higher than for other youths. All those developments are unfolding amid fast-paced changes related to same-sex marriage, which is now legal in 35 states. Sev eral cases from states that still ban gay marriage have advanced to the U.S. Supreme Court, which could decide during a Jan. 9 conference to hear one or more of them this term. Given the possibility of a high court ruling in June legalizing gay marriage nationwide, some con servatives are pushing to enact state-level “religious freedom“ bills designed to give more legal protections to people who might be accused of discrimination for actions they took in accordance with religious beliefs. A bill recently introduced in South Carolina says no court employee could be required to issue a marriage license to a samesex couple if that would violate a “sincerely held religious belief.“ In Indiana, a broader bill is being drafted that supporters say would protect business people who refuse to serve same-sex couples on the basis of their religious faith. The ACLU has launched a national campaign to oppose such laws, hoping to replicate the out come in Arizona last winter when Republican Gov. Jan Brewer vetoed a bill to expand religious exemptions after a national back lash from business leaders, gay rights groups and others. Eunice Rho, advocacy and pol icy counsel at the ACLU’s national office, anticipates a wide range of religious exemption laws to be introduced in 2015. Beyond marriage, challenges ahead for gay rights groups AP Supporters of Arkansas’ law banning same sex marriage, top, hold a rally Nov. 19 at the Arkansas state Capitol in Little Rock, Ark., as protestors carry flags and shout. AP Arthur Lampitt and his wife, Betty, of Granite City, Mo., show off the 1963 Thunderbird turn signal that was embedded in Arthur’s arm for 51 years. The 7-inch turn signal was embedded in his arm during a traffic accident that broke Lampitt’s hip, drawing attention away from the arm, which healed. CREVE COEUR, Mo. (AP) — Fiftyone years ago, Arthur Lampitt of Granite City, Illinois, smashed his 1963 Thunderbird into a truck. This week during surgery in suburban St. Louis, a 7-inch turn signal lever from that T-Bird was removed from his left arm. Dr. Timothy Lang removed the lever Wednesday during a 45-minute operation. Lampitt, now 75, is recovering at home. The 1963 accident broke Lampitt’s hip, drawing attention away from the arm, which healed. A decade or so ago, his arm set off a metal detector at a courthouse. An X-ray showed a slender object the length of a pencil, but since it caused no pain or hardship, Lampitt was told to let it be. He was moving concrete blocks a few weeks ago when the arm began to hurt for the first time. “Everything was fine until it started to get bigger,” Lampitt’s wife, Betty, said. “The arm started bulging.” Lampitt decided to have surgery. He initially wasn’t sure what was in the arm. He wondered if perhaps a medical instrument had been left during the emergency room visit in 1963. He unearthed a collection of old photos of the mangled Thunderbird taken by a friend at the scene. He noticed the metal blinker lever was missing from the left side of the steering column. He figured that was it, and surgery at City Place Surgery Center in Creve Coeur, Mo., confirmed it. “Seven inches long,” Lang told Betty. “Oh, my God,” Betty said. Lang said a protective pocket grew around the lever. “We see all kinds of foreign objects like nails or pellets, but usually not this large, usually not a turn signal from a 1963 T-Bird,” Lang said. “Something this large often gets infected.” Lampitt said he wasn’t sure what he would do with the lever — maybe make a key chain out of it. “We’ll figure out something, I am sure,” he said. “ We see all kinds of foreign objects like nails or pellets, but usually not this large, usually not a turn signal from a 1963 T-Bird. Something this large often gets infected.” — Dr. Timothy Lang 51 years after wreck, 7-inch car part found in man’s arm

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Page A4 | The News Herald | Friday, January 2, 2015 NATIO N & WORLD WELCOME, 2015! People photograph fireworks as they celebrate in Red Square in Moscow. Below , fireworks explode over the Opera House and the Harbour Bridge during celebrations in Sydney, Australia. Thousands of people crammed into Lady Macquaries Chair look-out to see the new year in and watch the annual fireworks show. Fireworks explode behind a replica of the Eiffel Tower at the Paris Las Vegas resort during a celebration on the Las Vegas Strip in Las Vegas. AP Photos Colorful bursts of fireworks explode along the 605-foot height of the Space Needle during the “T-Mobile New Year’s Eve at the Needle” event in Seattle. The show lasted eight minutes and was set to a musical score. U.S., world ring in new year

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Friday, January 2, 2015 | The News Herald | Page A5 Business NEW YORK (AP) — Uber, Facebook, Instagram — sure, they’ve been all the rage, but as 2014 winds down, we’re all ready for something fresh. Here are a few up-and coming apps and startups to watch in 2015. Twin Oaks Farm opens farm stand in Grayton By SHELBY DESOTO 654-8445 SDeSoto@waltonsun.com GRAYTON BEACH — Even though it’s barely been a month, Twin Oaks Farm owner Renee Savary said she is pleased with the success of her new farm stand in Grayton Beach. “We were looking for an outlet that was easier for people to reach us,” she said. “Everyone has been very positive. We get people who know us from the farmer’s market and new people who didn’t know about us before.” Twin Oaks Farm got started about seven years ago when Savary was in search of “real food with no additives or preservatives.” Savary built the 94-acre farm in Bonifay and wanted to make sure everything from her chickens to the fruits and vegetables were all natural. “We are a USDA-certified organic farm. We have inspections every year,” she said. Twin Oaks has been selling produce at the Seaside Farmer’s Market since the farm has been in business, and Savary said it made sense to take the next step by opening the farm stand. She said she wanted to give people direct access from the farm to what they eat. Located off Logan Lane, the farm stand is open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. every day to make it easier for people to buy there. The farm stand offers many of Twin Oaks’ homemade and fresh items, from strawberry and peach preserves to potatoes and homemade soaps. The homemade foods vary daily, depending on what is available and in season. “The biggest thing is our organic soy-free eggs,” employee Dawn Barone said. Barone said their whole chickens and the preserves are the most popular. The farm also has an apiary, or bee farm, that allows it to produce honey beeswax to make lip balm. Both are available at the farm stand. The stand also offers some togo items and even frozen meals to go. “Our frozen meals are all made with meat from the farm. It’s better because people know it comes from our farm,” Savary said. The farm stand is a work in progress, Savary said, but she plans to remain a regular vendor at the Seaside farmer’s market and have the farm stand as a permanent location. She also plans to add different soups in the summer and other new items that are limited at the farmer’s market. The soup of the day always is posted on the farm’s Facebook page, www.facebook.com/TwinOaksFarm, along with updates when new items are added to the menu. To learn more about Twin Oaks farms, visit www.twinoaksfarm.net . EU hoping the only way is up in 2015 BRUSSELS (AP) — Beset by critics and buffeted by economic woes, European Union chiefs might have been forgiven for thinking that at least Pope Francis would apply some balm for the New Year in his address to the EU parliament. Not so. Even the pontiff spoke of a continent that was “elderly and haggard” facing a world which “regards it with aloofness, mistrust and even, at times, suspicion.” Little wonder many in Europe hope that 2015 is the year the fortunes of the 28-nation bloc bottom out and things finally look up again. Certainly, the EU has the zest and energy brought by a new team, headed by the no-nonsense Donald Tusk. He is expected to add visibility to the EU presidency as he takes over from the colorless Herman Van Rompuy. The new president of the EU’s executive, Jean-Claude Junker, replaces the long-serving Jose Manuel Barroso. Junker, a former Luxembourg prime minister, says his “last chance Commission” needs to streamline bureaucracy to connect with its half billion citizens. But the best-laid schemes were already starting to unravel with the approach of the new year. Two weeks ago, Greek Prime Minister Antonis Samaras promised Greece would not “gamble” with its recovery from financial crisis. Now the country at the heart of the EU’s economic woes has done exactly that. On Monday, parliament failed to approve a new president, forcing the government to call early elections for Jan. 25 — a poll that could re-ignite Europe’s sovereign debt crisis. An election that may bring to power leftists opposed to Greece’s harsh bailout conditions could dampen the enthusiasm generated by a December EU summit that created a strategic investment fund to kick-start the EU’s sluggish economies and generate job growth. Instead of plotting a bright future, the EU could soon be plodding through one crisis after another again. “Europe doesn’t move in giant leaps. It moves forward, muddling through,” said Hendrik Vos, the University of Ghent’s EU expert. A few years ago, Greece was in such deep financial trouble that many feared it would be kicked out of the club of countries that use the euro currency. The crisis spawned the memorable term “Grexit.” But Vos believes the EU is no more likely to take the radical step of kicking Greece out in 2015 than it was at the height of the crisis in 2012. In fact, the eurozone gained a new member Thursday as Lithuania became the 19th European nation to use the common euro currency. This year “Brexit” might be a key phrase. Britain, which still uses its own currency, has always been an uneasy partner within the EU, but now the Eurosceptic UKIP party is soaring in popularity. That is pushing British Prime Minister David Cameron into a more anti-EU, antiimmigrant stance ahead of Britain’s national election in May. In order to retain power, Cameron’s Conservatives may be tempted to harden their pledge to hold a referendum on pulling out of the EU in 2017. Since Britain has stayed out of the euro currency, cutting it free might be a less tricky option than kicking Greece out of the euro. But to lose such a huge economy, home to London, one of the world’s great financial centers, would be a devastating blow to EU prosperity and prestige. Despite their differences, many Europeans realize a united front can be useful, especially when facing a formidable foe such as Russian President Vladimir Putin — whose annexation of Crimea from Ukraine last year has brought a new Cold War with the West. ‘Where we grow real food’ PHOTOS BY SHELBY DESOTO| The Walton Sun Homemade preserves are just some of the items for sale at the Twin Oaks farm stand in Grayton Beach. The farm also produces its own honey. Money from sales goes back to support the apiary. SNAPPY APPS FOR 2015 TELL A STORY Instagram, which is owned by Facebook Inc., now has 300 million users — more than Twitter. Scrolling through its snapshot feeds gives users a quick glimpse into the lives of friends and strangers. (At least the parts that include empty beaches, cappuccinos with perfect foam hearts and smiling babies in clean clothes.) Its simplicity is part of its appeal. But what if you want to tell a longer story? Enter Storehouse, a mobile app that promises to let you share “your stories, as they happen.” Instead of sharing oneoff photos, Storehouse lets users combine photos, videos and words to share anything from a detailed recipe to travel memories or a firstperson documentary on the Yakuza. Storehouse was founded by Mark Kawano, who previously worked at Apple as a User Experience Evangelist, helping developers design iOS and Mac apps. “Writers always had a great platform for blogging,” Kawano said recently. “But that hasn’t happened with photographers yet.” Other photo apps, he said, are basically just status updates in a visual form. Storehouse hopes to change that. is part of its appeal. But what if you want to tell a longer story? a mobile app that promises to let you developers design iOS and TELL A STORY COOK A MEAL Food-ordering apps such as Seamless have made it easy to order in. And if you want to venture outside, OpenTable and smaller competitors such as Reserve help you quickly book a table with their smartphone apps. But if you’d rather give your loved ones the personal touch, new DIY services will provide carefully measured ingredients and detailed recipes for even the clumsiest of cooks. Sites such as HelloFresh, Plated and Blue Apron deliver weekly boxes of raw ingredients — even including spices and, at least in the case of HelloFresh, water. The only things you’re assumed to have in your pantry are salt, pepper, oil and possibly butter. An upcoming “family plan” box for Blue Apron, for example, features chicken under a “brick” with rosemary, roast potatoes and broccolini; New England-style shrimp rolls with warm potato and kale salad; fresh pappardelle Bolognese with romaine, celery and apple salad and two-cheese pizza with iceberg chopped salad. The meals are quick to prepare, so if you’re tired of takeout and live in their delivery location, these services could spice up your diet. Or maybe help with that “eathealthy” New Year’s resolution? The only things you’re assumed to have in your pantry are salt, pepper, oil and possibly butter. An upcoming “family plan” box for Blue Apron, for example, features chicken under If you haven’t heard of Uber, you must never leave your house or watch the news. Many people also are familiar with Uber’s smaller rival Lyft, which burnishes its kinder, gentler image by slapping huge pink mustaches on the front of its cars. But more companies are queuing up to squire you around town. In 10 cities in the U.S., you can order up a Sidecar. The service differentiates itself by letting passengers input their destinations when they book rides and sort drivers based on price, shortest ETA and favorites. In Los Angeles, there’s also Opoli, which lets drivers bid for your ride so you can decide which one to go with. You can pick your vehicle, too, and make a reservation. Opoli also allows its drivers to work for competitors. Opoli doesn’t take a commission on a fare; its drivers pay a subscription fee to use the service. You’ve heard of WhatsApp, the almost free messaging app that Facebook paid $22 billion for this year. And there’s Facebook’s own messaging tool, which was the year’s most-downloaded app (likely because you had to download it if you wanted to message people using Facebook). That’s all so 2014. Why message people you know when you could instead check out Ethan, a messaging app that lets you do just one thing — message a guy named Ethan. He “may message you time to time” but cautions that he “can’t respond when he’s asleep.” Nothing if not honest, Ethan doesn’t want you to message him in an emergency, and will advise you not to fall in love with him. But want to plan a dinner-and-movie night? No problem. “Should I get Italian or Chinese for dinner?” (Answer: Italian) and “Gonna watch a movie on Netflix, what should I go for?” (Answer: “The Room.”) input their destinations when they book rides and sort drivers based on price, shortest ETA and favorites. In Los Angeles, there’s also Opoli, which lets drivers bid for your ride so you can decide which one to go with. You can pick your vehicle, too, and make a reservation. Opoli also allows its drivers to work for competitors. Opoli doesn’t take a commission on a fare; its drivers pay a subscription WhatsApp, the almost free messaging app that Facebook paid $22 billion for this year. And there’s Facebook’s own messaging tool, which was the year’s most-downloaded app (likely because you had to download it if you wanted to message people using Facebook). message people you know when you could instead check out CHIT CHAT HAIL A RIDE

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Get INVOLVED! U.S. President President Barack Obama The White House 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. NW Washington, D.C. 20500 Phone: 202-456-1414 Email link: www.whitehouse. gov/contact U.S. Congress Sen. Marco Rubio U.S. Senate Washington, D.C. 20510 Phone: 202-224-3041 Email link: rubio.senate.gov Sen. Bill Nelson U.S. Senate Washington, D.C. 20510 Phone: 202-224-5274 Email link: billnelson.senate.gov Rep. Steve Southerland U.S. House of Representatives Washington, D.C. 20515 Phone: 202-225-5235 Email link: southerland.house.gov Rep. Jeff Miller U.S. House of Representatives Washington, D.C. 20515 Phone: 202-225-4136 Email link: jeffmiller.house.gov Florida Legislature Gov. Rick Scott The Capitol Tallahassee, FL 32399 Phone: 850-488-4441 Email: rick.scott@eog.myorida.com Sen. Don Gaetz 4300 Legendary Drive, Suite 230 Destin, FL 32541 Phone: 1-866-450-4366 Email: gaetz.don.web@senate.gov Page A6 | The News Herald | Friday, January 2, 2015 Viewpoints With correct choices, 2015 holds promise T he old year has passed, we say, and a new one has dawned, yet in life there never is an old year that we can throw away as we throw away the old calendar. The life of one year flows on into the new. What we were yesterday is an index of what we shall be tomorrow. However, New Year’s resolutions have their place in our lives, when they reflect our retrospective view of what has been good and what has been bad in the experiences of the recent past and what we hope to make of the days that lie ahead. Humans are self-conscious creatures. We can take knowledge of our situation, appraise the direction in which we are traveling and, if we are wise, plan a future course that takes advantage of past lessons learned and promises a safe continuance of our adventure. Like mariners consulting their charts and compasses after passing through a storm, this is a time for setting our course anew. Knowing the conditions that might menace their course, if those mariners are wise they will devise ways to meet the challenges and successfully berth their craft at the end of their voyage. Human beings, moreover, have a will — a self-determining faculty, a capacity for choice. If it is true that we know better than we do, the reason for our failure often is that we fail to exercise the supreme endowment given us to determine our destiny. Unless fortified by will, New Year’s resolutions, like wishful thinking, get us nowhere. For the people who fortify their resolutions with will and chart their life course by the Golden Rule, the year ahead — 2015 — will hold promise. D AR Y L C AGL E | CagleCartoons.com N o wonder Cuba wallows in poverty. Last week, the New York Times reported the Castro brothers opened a special business zone where foreign companies “would be given greater control over setting wages at factories. ... (P)roposals would be approved or rejected within 60 days.” What? If I want to give someone a raise, I have to wait up to two months for government approval! That’s absurd. Yet the Times said the zone offers “big incentives for investors.” How clueless can their writers be? Their own article acknowledges, “A year later, the Cuban government has yet to announce a single foreign investment.” Duh. The article went on to say that “according to many economists, President Obama’s plan to allow more interaction between the two countries may not be the lifeline Cuba is hoping for — unless Cuba overcomes its resistance to change.” No kidding! I suppose Times reporters need to consult economists to learn that entrepreneurs don’t like having to beg dictators for permission to try something new. After all, back in America, Times editors demand increased regulation of almost every business. I’ve learned to expect economic cluelessness from the Times, but what was different for me last week was that I was on vacation, and my hotel produced a short version of the Times every day called the TimesFax. It gave me a new reason to laugh — and scream. I flipped to a Fax page and read, “Firing of VA Clinic Chief Is Upheld.” A judge ruled that Sharon Helman, director of the Veterans Affairs health care system in Phoenix, “could be fired for accepting more than $13,000 in airline tickets and other gifts.” What? Taking gifts is the scandal? She’s not fired because of her falsified waiting lists for treatment? Because thousands of veterans at her facilities were cruelly lied to and then denied medical care? No, “the department had not provided sufficient evidence to justify firing Ms. Helman for the manipulation of waiting lists.” At least the Times got the bureaucracy’s rules correct. If you work for government, no matter how incompetent you are — even if you do cruel, selfish things that may have killed people — you can’t get fired unless an “administrative judge” rules that all arcane civil service due process protections have been honored. You can be fired only if you step outside the bureaucracy’s rules and happen to get caught, say, taking obvious bribes like eight-night stays at Disneyland from a company that wants to do business with your agency. Nowhere does the Times article address the elephant in the room: No organization can do anything efficiently, or even reasonably, unless workers can be fired. Government workers’ special “protections” are a reason taxes are high, bridges fall down, public schools decay, the CDC loses Ebola samples and so on. But Times writers constantly call for more government, “job protections,” etc. Few of them have ever run a business or invented something new themselves. If they had, they might understand this obvious cause of government failure. But they don’t. They are oblivious. Finally, there was one cheerful headline, “Inroads Against Climate Change.” Here I thought a writer might acknowledge that modern industrial civilization brings benefits. The reporter said, “Saving forests ... will require producing food much more intensively, on less land.” Yes, but that’s already happened! Modern industrial agriculture produces more food on less land, so America now has more forest than a hundred years ago. Will the Times report that? No, the article was the usual leftist mix of support for “government leaders” pushing “sustainable practices.” The writer also ignored how fracking has lowered America’s greenhouse gas emissions. I used to get angrier about such clueless reporting because when I worked at ABC News, editors based entire shows on silly ideas from the Times. Now we have more sources of news, so one newspaper doesn’t matter as much. Thank goodness. Ignorance forever Our V IEW L E TT E RS POLIC Y : Provide a daytime telephone number and home address for verication purposes. Letters may be edited for space, consistency and clarity. Please limit to 750 words. Send mail to E ditor, P.O. Box 1940, Panama City, FL 32402; or email to nhletters@pcnh.com 49 F ORUM By WILL DURST Syndicated columnist H ey guys. Did this whole crazy holy daze madcap bedlam thing sneak up on you this year, making the world speed up like a maglev bullet train going downhill lit by a strobe, like it did us? There’s a perfectly reasonable explanation. In 2014, Thanksgiving fell on Nov. 27: making it a mere 28 days between the turkey and the tree. Next year the gap grows by a day; then two days for leap year, until way way in the future, Year of Our Lord 2018, we’re talking maximum separation: 33 days. And you can bet those extra five days will seem a blessed eternity, especially to our poor bedraggled brothers and sisters employed in the online retail industry. Let the drone-ducking commence. So while we salute all you incredibly stalwart consumers for navigating Demolition Derby parking lots in the honorable quest of sinking heavily into debt to celebrate the birth of that Jewish hippie kid, let us also take this time to offer up to the least deserving of us, our annual scathingly incisive yet perennially trenchant, WILL DUR$T’$ 2014 XMA$ GIFT WI$H LI$T. These are the presents that folks presumably did not receive wrapped in brightly colored packages under dangerously parched fir trees, but most certainly deserved. Barack Obama A Kevlar bubble, as he will now be taking shots from many vantages. CNN Something to talk about other than ISIS and Ebola. And not ISIS infected with Ebola. Alec Baldwin An unlimited refillable prescription for Xanax in a carrying case suitable for travel. Fox News Hard evidence that the credit card used to pay for the rental car that took terrorists to the American Embassy in Benghazi has been traced to a shell corporation whose CEO is Hillary Clinton’s chief of staff. Democrats in Congress Scuba gear until they learn to grow gills for breathing underwater. Republicans in Congress Enough rope to tie up Obama’s agenda for two years, but not enough to hang themselves with. Ted Cruz A money order in the exact amount of a one-way ticket on the clue train. Harry Reid A big old Lazy-Boy recliner so at least he can be comfortable doing nothing. Malaysian Airlines A name change. Jeb Bush A name change. Mitch McConnell An oilcan. Elizabeth Warren A lingering bug to hit Hillary Clinton clearing the Democratic field for 2016. Joe Biden A lingering bug to hit Hillary Clinton and Elizabeth Warren clearing the Democratic field for 2016. Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul More Republicans to support his run for the Presidency and less Democrats. House Speaker John Boehner A gift certificate good for one surgical procedure to remove that unsightly Tea Party growth clinging to his back. Medical science to study Dick Cheney’s heart. George Bush’s brain. And Barack Obama’s leadership skills. Shia LaBoeuf A muzzle. Permanent. Steel. Welded with titanium rivets. Miley Cyrus A sponsorship deal with any designer who can provide actual clothes. Bill Cosby Harry Potter’s invisibility cloak. Fidel Castro A tricked out 2015 Ford F-150 to replace that 59 Chevy. The gifts they really should have gotten Tim Thompson, Publisher Mike Cazalas, Editor S. Brady Calhoun, Editorial Page Editor 747-5075 | @sbradycalhoun bcalhoun@pcnh.com Do you plan to make a New Year’s resolution? WEEKL Y QUESTION Last question’s results 40% Naughty 24 votes 60% Nice 36 votes To respond, visit www.newsherald.com Have you been naughty or nice this year? JOHN ST O SS EL Syndicated Columnist

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NATIO N & WORLD Friday, January 2, 2015 | The News Herald | Page A7 P A TTI BL A KE | News Herald le photo Casey James performs at the Gulf Coast Jam in August in Panama City Beach. City and tourism officials say events such as the Gulf Coast Jam and baseball tournaments are raising the national profile of the area, and in turn drawing more visitors during the off-season months. ‘SLOW’ SEASON from Page A1 “Little by little, the national media is putting us on the map for something other than Spring Break — the Ball Drop (on New Year’s Eve), Gulf Coast Jam, our baseball tournaments, ‘Biggest Loser,’ our concerts that we’re having out here — all those things,” he said. “When somebody hears about us in California and puts us in a geographic location, that helps us. The colder the winter up north, that helps us. A 75-degree day on Dec. 29, that helps us.” He said the Bay County Tourist Development Council has the temperature of Panama City Beach posted on a sign at an airport in Tennessee. “They’ll look up and say, ‘Wow. It’s 75 degrees over there, and you can get direct flights,’ ” Gisbert said. Tourist Development Council Director Dan Rowe said the seventh annual New Year’s Eve Beach Ball Drop at Pier Park has brought many of the visitors to town in recent days. “We’ve really been focused on building (visitation) around the New Year’s holiday so people get away right after Christmas and come in and have a big time,” he said. The event attracted 7,500 people its first year. This year’s event was expected to draw about 44,000. “It’s really grown tremendously and helped all of our businesses,” Rowe said. He added that the hotel stays are only a third of the visitors’ expenditures, as they also spend money to eat out and visit attractions. “It really does have a ripple effect,” he said. Rowe said people are finding out that the beach is a great place to visit every day of the year, but they’re not forgetting the area’s winter residents. “We’re also focused on (entertaining) winter residents with all the events we do for them,” he said. David Demarest, public relations manager with the Tourist Development Council, said the council has pushed the shoulder season in its recent advertising campaign, not only in the Northeast but markets with flights to Panama City, such as Nashville, Tenn., Atlanta and Birmingham, Ala. “We’re also going into Texas,” he said. “We have more flights going there.” More people have been staying in hotels, too, according to the latest numbers. Tax revenues on motel stays increased more than 23 percent last October compared to October 2013, from $785,184 to $968,998. Demarest said there are now many events that attract visitors to the beach in the fall and winter months. “Even three or four years ago we didn’t have a lineup of fall events,” he said. “Now, you look at the fall and something is going on every day or every weekend. The idea really is giving people an excuse to come to the beach at a time when they traditionally might not have. The hope is when they see how awesome it is they’ll come back.” GAY MARRIAGES from Page A1 said Daniel Tilley, an attorney on LGBT rights for the ACLU of Florida. An Associated Press survey of Florida’s county clerks last week found that an overwhelming majority didn’t plan to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples starting Tuesday until they had further legal clarity. Attorney General Pam Bondi said she was pleased the court had offered “addi tional guidance” to clear up confusion surrounding his previous order. “My office will not stand in the way as clerks of court determine how to proceed,” she wrote in an email. While awaiting Hinkle’s clarification, a handful of Florida county clerks said they would stop offering courthouse wedding cere monies, partly to avoid per forming those ceremonies for same-sex couples. The clerks of court in Duval, Clay and Baker counties said they would have no choice but to issue marriage licenses to samesex couples when Florida’s ban on same-sex marriage expired. However, they decided to end all court house weddings to avoid performing those ceremo nies for same-sex couples, among other reasons. The clerks in Santa Rosa and Okaloosa counties also made similar announcements. Duval County Clerk of Courts Ronnie Fussell said none of his staff members who currently officiate at wedding ceremonies felt comfortable performing same-sex weddings. “It was decided as a team, as an office, this would be what we do so that there wouldn’t be any discrimination,” Fussell said. “The easiest way is to not do them at all.” Ex-NY Gov. Cuomo, famed for oratory, dies A L BANY, N.Y. (AP) — Mario Cuomo, a son of Italian immigrants who became an eloquent spokesman for a generation of liberal Democrats during his three terms as governor of New York but couldn’t quite bring himself to run for president, has died. He was 82. Cuomo died Thursday of natural causes due to heart failure at his home, the same day his son Andrew started his second term, according to a statement released by the governor’s office. He was surrounded by his family. Cuomo loomed large in New York politics as governor from 1983 through 1994 and became nationally celebrated for his ability to weave the story of his humble upbringing with ringing calls for social justice. But he also was known for the presidential races he stayed out of in 1988 and 1992. In 1991, Cuomo left a plane idling on the tarmac at the Albany airport rather than fly to New Hampshire and jump into the battle for the presidential nomination at the last minute. He left the door open for a lesserknown governor, Bill Clinton of Arkansas. Mario Cuomo’s big political break came in 1982 when, as New York’s lieutenant governor, he won the Democratic nomination for governor in an upset over New York Mayor Ed Koch. He went on to beat conservative millionaire Republican Lewis Lehrman. His reputation for eloquence was secured at the 1984 Democratic National Convention when he delivered his “Tale of Two Cities” keynote address, in which he told of the lessons he learned as the son of a grocer in New York City. “I watched a small man with thick calluses on both his hands work 15 and 16 hours a day,” Cuomo told the crowd. “I saw him once literally bleed from the bottoms of his feet — a man who came here uneducated, alone, unable to speak the language — who taught me all I needed to know about faith and hard work by the simple eloquence of his example.” The electrified delegates in San Francisco cheered, “Mario! Mario! Mario!” and some wondered whether they had chosen the wrong presidential candidate in Walter Mondale. Cuomo was an unusually cerebral politician, giving to musing at length about anything from fiscal policy to the Jesuit philosopher Pierre Teilhard de Chardin. 40th List of Words: Ban ‘bae,’ ‘foodie,’ ‘takeaway’ from lexicon D ET RO IT (AP) — Hey, bae: It’s time again for a curated list of words and phrases that those with a linguistic skill set wish they could hurl into the polar vortex. The 40th annual List of Words to be Banished from the Queen’s English for Misuse, Overuse and Uselessness includes “bae,” most commonly used as a term of endearment, along with “curated,” ‘‘skill set,” ‘‘takeaway” and “polar vortex.” The latter refers to the frigid Arctic blast that gripped the nation last winter. The list, released Wednesday, consists of a dozen terms compiled by northern Michigan’s Lake Superior State University based on submissions received throughout 2014 from members of the public. It joins an archive of more than 800 entries created in 1976 by a former public relations director who started with phrases that annoyed him and his friends. There’s nothing binding about this tongue-in-cheek decree, even if the people behind the nominations would ban the words if they were the kings — or queens — of speech. “A pretentious way of saying ‘selected,’ ” said Kristi Hoerauf of San Francisco, in support of her proposed banishment of “curate/ curated.” ‘‘It’s enormously overused.” Other words on the list include “hack,” ‘‘foodie,” ‘‘swag” and “cra-cra” as a stand-in for crazy. Also submitted for sanction are “enhanced interrogation,” ‘‘friend-raising” (a prelude or alternative to a fund-raising campaign) and the suffix “-nation,” used to make words such as “Packer Nation” or “Cubs Nation.” “I’m not aware of any team or mascot that has the carrying capacity to be a nation,” submitted Kelly Frawley of Waunakee, Wis., despite her devotion to college and professional sports in her state. Some words take their sweet time making this Hall of Semantic Shame: “Swag,” for instance, is a perennial nominee that finally made the list this year. Jeff Drake of Saint Albans, W.Va., said swag is “neither useful nor fancy,” whether describing droopy clothing or a “free gift,” a term that was banned in 1988. Then there’s the call to ban “bae,” which might not make Pharrell Williams too, um, happy. The multitalented entertainer dropped a single in 2014 called “Come Get it Bae.”

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Bay Page A8 | The News Herald | Friday, January 2, 2015

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When the little pop-up asks if John McCain is a conservative, what they’re really asking is for your name and email address. Are PC commissioners blaming loss of Bennigan’s & World Market on lowincome residents too? Bennigan’s & World Market moving to PCB — saw that one coming! Who’s next? Did it ever occur to anyone that not all of us want to have to drive to Pier Park for everything? I’m fed up of things moving from the mall. Bragging about your resolution is annoying. Not nice. Seems like every store owner is shutting down and headed to Pier Park. Are we sure we want to spend all that money on the Marie Hotel? It wasn’t the gun’s fault. Yea, right. Move to the beach and, me a city dweller, will NEVER visit you again! Lost me as a customer. Every year I make a resolution to NEVER make resolutions. I keep them every year! My expenses increased $90 a month (power, water, health, trash, cable, prop tax). My salary increased $45 a month. Goodbye middle class! This Michigan Snowbird is disgusted — so much garbage on the way in along U.S. 98 fromState 331 to the Hathaway! What gives? If it takes you an hour to get ready, then you’re not as cute as you think you are. OK now GOP ... let’s get down to REAL business. Ahhh, one year closer to President Hillary! I hope Obama does every thing he can to upset every right winger on the planet till 2017. There isn’t a more deserving bunch. Why should we the on the other side of the bridge have to travel down to Pier Park for everything? It’s getting to be ridiculous. We matter! Readers sound off Squall Line appears daily. Call 850-522-5133, or go to www.newsherald.com and click on the “Squall Live” icon. S quall L ine PANAMA CITY NEWS HERALD FRIDAY January 2, 2015 Section B Local & State Facebook.com/ panamacitynewsherald Twitter: @The_News_Herald www.newsherald.com News Herald staff report PANAMA CITY BEACH — Five business professionals from the Naval Surface Warfare Center Panama City (NSWC PC) volunteered last month to teach 125 fifth-grade students for the Junior Achievement (JA) program at Breakfast Point Academy. Junior Achievement’s core purpose is to inspire and prepare young people to succeed in a global economy. NSWC PC Public Affairs Officer Jeff Prater described the Dec. 18 event as a great hands-on activity that Navy professionals introduce to students to illustrate how learning, especially in the science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) disciplines can be fun and rewarding with respect to their future education and careers. “The Junior Achievement Our Nation elementary program is structured to present business information to students using ageappropriate and fun learning activities,” Prater said. “Practical exercises like how to introduce yourself and identifying personal characteristics and skills help students to better understand the world’s business needs.” Prater said students are split into groups and work together to seek solutions on how they can meet the demands of the job market, Thousands enjoyed an early beach ball drop on New Year’s Eve at Pier Park. Thousands enjoyed an early beach ball drop on New Year’s Eve at Pier Park. Dreama Creamer plays in a mist of bubbles. MARLENE PAIGE, JUNIOR ACHIEVEMENT | Special to The News Herald Pictured above are Naval Surface Warfare Center Panama City employees who served as instructors for the Junior Achievement program Dec. 18 at Break fast Point Academy. From left are Don Bickford, Jodi Hendrix, Matt Kopp, Amanda Davis and Jeff Prater. SEE NAVY VOLUNTEERS | B2 Bay’s unclaimed property worth $8 million By CHRIS OLWELL 747-5079 | @PCNHchriso colwell@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY — The state is holding on to more than $8 million in unclaimed property that belongs to people, businesses, groups and governments in and around Bay County. The city of Panama City already has gone through the process to claim some $10,000 worth of property, mostly insurance payment refunds, said City Clerk Darlene Hachmeister, who worked on the claims process. “It was pretty easy,” she said of the process. Thousands of people who live or once lived in Bay County have unclaimed property, but virtually every municipality in the county has unclaimed property, too, according to data provided by the Florida Department of Financial Services. Lynn Haven, Springfield, Callaway, Mexico Beach and Panama City Beach also have unclaimed property held by the state. Even the disbanded city of Cedar Grove and the Bay County Tax Collector have unclaimed property. Both hospitals have unclaimed property, as does The News Herald. Almost 29,000 pieces of unclaimed property are valued at $50 or more in Bay County, and some people and businesses have more than one unclaimed item. The most valuable claim is worth $172,429.09, and there are two other claims worth more than $100,000. About 1,200 claims are worth $1,000 or more. Florida has returned more that $900 million worth of unclaimed property since January 2011. Property can be claimed at any time, and the state will return property at no cost. Anyone can search for property at www.fltreasurehunt.org. Claims also can be filed through the site. The state requires certain documentation be filed with the claim before the property is returned. ON THE WEB Find a list of all unclaimed Bay County property at newsherald.com. Navy volunteers speak to Junior Achievement students A couple is surrounded in stage lights during a concert at Pier Park. A couple is surrounded in stage lights during a concert at Pier Park. A man wears a New Year’s hat in a crowd before a beach ball drop. Photos by PATTI BLAKE | The News Herald Bringing in the New Year

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Page B2 | The News Herald | Friday, January 2, 2015 6 a.m Noon 6 p.m Low Hazard Medium Hazard High Hazard Water closed to public Dangerous Marine Life High Low 66/60 67/61 67/58 67/63 67/62 67/61 69/58 69/60 67/57 54/48 69/59 68/59 71/58 69/61 70/62 69/61 71/59 70/61 74/65 70/47 59/42 57/40 Cloudy and breezy; a p.m. t-storm Rain Partly sunny and cooler Turning cloudy 70 55 67 63 61 Winds: SSE 10-20 mph Winds: W 8-16 mph Winds: NNE 10-20 mph Winds: NE 6-12 mph Winds: SE 6-12 mph Blountstown 13.20 ft. 15 ft. Caryville 10.06 ft. 12 ft. Clairborne 37.80 ft. 42 ft. Century 13.76 ft. 17 ft. Coffeeville, AL 30.47 ft. 29 ft. Through 7 a.m. Thu. Apalachicola 4:17p 8:44a --7:52p Destin 8:03p 6:20a ----West Pass 3:50p 8:17a --7:25p Panama City 7:39p 5:43a ----Port St. Joe 7:30p 5:09a ----Okaloosa Island 6:36p 5:26a ----Milton 10:16p 8:41a ----East Bay 9:20p 8:11a ----Pensacola 8:36p 6:54a ----Fishing Bend 9:17p 7:45a ----The Narrows 10:13p 9:45a ----Carrabelle 2:52p 6:31a 11:18p 5:39p Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. 15 Full Last New First Jan 4 Jan 13 Jan 20 Jan 26 Sunrise today ........... 6:39 a.m. Sunset tonight .......... 4:54 p.m. Moonrise today ........ 3:07 p.m. Moonset today ......... 4:10 a.m. Today Sat. Today Sat. Clearwater 79/66/pc 81/68/c Daytona Beach 77/65/pc 81/66/c Ft. Lauderdale 82/72/pc 82/73/pc Gainesville 73/60/pc 81/63/c Jacksonville 69/57/pc 80/63/c Jupiter 81/71/pc 82/72/pc Key Largo 81/74/pc 81/75/pc Key West 82/74/pc 82/75/s Lake City 72/60/pc 80/63/c Lakeland 81/65/pc 82/66/c Melbourne 81/69/pc 82/70/c Miami 83/73/pc 83/73/pc Naples 83/68/pc 84/69/pc Ocala 77/62/pc 82/64/c Okeechobee 81/67/pc 82/68/pc Orlando 82/68/pc 83/68/c Palm Beach 81/73/pc 81/73/pc Tampa 80/68/pc 82/69/c Today Sat. Today Sat. Baghdad 68/45/s 65/45/pc Berlin 44/33/r 39/33/pc Bermuda 71/64/pc 73/66/pc Hong Kong 65/58/s 67/61/s Jerusalem 53/41/pc 52/41/c Kabul 50/22/pc 46/20/s London 50/37/pc 51/32/r Madrid 55/27/pc 55/30/pc Mexico City 71/42/s 71/42/pc Montreal 19/1/s 18/14/c Nassau 84/70/pc 83/70/pc Paris 49/33/r 54/38/r Rome 51/37/s 57/43/pc Tokyo 44/35/pc 47/35/pc Toronto 31/17/sf 36/34/c Vancouver 40/30/sh 42/33/c Today Sat. Today Sat. Albuquerque 35/17/sn 37/14/pc Anchorage 22/12/s 20/10/s Atlanta 52/48/r 58/56/c Baltimore 45/28/pc 41/38/r Birmingham 51/48/r 66/53/t Boston 39/22/s 33/31/c Charlotte 54/43/r 51/47/r Chicago 30/23/pc 35/28/i Cincinnati 37/30/pc 56/46/r Cleveland 33/24/pc 44/43/r Dallas 39/36/r 50/30/c Denver 35/13/s 31/3/sn Detroit 33/21/pc 37/35/sn Honolulu 77/62/t 75/62/sh Houston 53/52/r 59/40/r Indianapolis 34/27/pc 49/36/r Kansas City 36/27/pc 36/6/i Las Vegas 45/29/s 50/31/s Los Angeles 61/43/s 62/46/s Memphis 45/44/r 65/41/t Milwaukee 29/22/pc 32/26/sn Minneapolis 24/16/s 28/-1/c Nashville 42/40/r 62/48/r New Orleans 73/64/r 75/57/t New York City 40/30/s 40/39/c Oklahoma City 34/31/i 37/17/c Philadelphia 43/29/s 43/42/r Phoenix 53/34/pc 54/36/s Pittsburgh 35/24/s 42/39/r St. Louis 39/34/c 45/31/r Salt Lake City 29/20/pc 34/22/c San Antonio 46/41/r 64/37/s San Diego 61/43/s 62/45/s San Francisco 56/42/s 58/44/s Seattle 43/36/c 45/39/c Topeka 38/27/pc 35/8/sn Tucson 46/27/s 51/29/s Wash., DC 48/35/pc 44/43/r Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Gulf Temperature: 61 Today: Wind east-southeast 8-16 knots. Seas 2 feet or less. Visibility clear. Wind east-southeast 10-20 knots. Seas 1-3 feet. A shower late. Tomorrow: Wind from the south-southeast at 10-20 knots. Seas 2-4 feet. Visibility under 2 miles in an afternoon shower or thunderstorm. A thick cloud cover today. Winds east-southeast 6-12 mph. A brief shower late tonight. Winds east-southeast 6-12 mph. High/low ......................... 63/45 Last year's High/low ...... 56/49 Normal high/low ............. 63/42 Record high ............. 80 (1972) Record low ............... 20 (1984) 24 hours through 4 p.m. .. 0.00" Month to date .................. 0.00" Normal month to date ...... 0.14" Year to date ..................... 0.00" Normal year to date ......... 0.14" Average humidity .............. 94% through 4 p.m. yesterday High/low ......................... 58/46 Last year's High/low ...... 59/48 Normal high/low ............. 61/45 Record high ............. 78 (1972) Record low ................. 9 (1984) 24 hours through 4 p.m. .. 0.00" Month to date .................. 0.00" Normal month to date ...... 0.16" Year to date ..................... 0.00" Normal year to date ......... 0.16" Average humidity .............. 81% PANAMA CITY Port St. Joe Apalachicola Tallahassee Perry Quincy Monticello Marianna Chipley DeFuniak Springs Pensacola FORT WALTON BEACH Crestview Destin Carrabelle Mobile Bainbridge Valdosta FLORIDA CITIES City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W WORLD CITIES City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W NATIONAL CITIES City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W TODAY FIVE DAY FORECAST FOR NORTHWEST FLORIDA High Low REGIONAL WEATHER Weather(W): ssunny, pcpartly cloudy, ccloudy, shshowers, tthunderstorms, rrain, sfsnow urries, snsnow, iice. Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows. Shown are today’s noon postions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. TIDES MARINE FORECAST BEACH FLAG WARNINGS The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. 0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High; 11+ Extreme 10 a.m. Noon 2 p.m. 4 p.m. UV INDEX TODAY ALMANAC SUN AND MOON MOON PHASES RIVER LEVELS Offshore Northwest Florida Flood Level Stage Apalachicola Choctawhatchee Alabama Escambia Tombigbee Temperatures Precipitation Panama City Temperatures Precipitation Fort Walton Beach WEATHER HEAT H ER LEI PH ART | The News Herald Casey Hall holds her son, Bryson Lee Hall, the first Bay County baby of the new year, at Gulf Coast Regional Medical Center on Thursday. Bryson was born at 3:07 a.m., weighs 6 pounds, 6 ounces and was 18 inches long. Mother and baby are doing well. FIRST BAY COUNTY BA B Y O F 2015 NAVY VOLU N TEERS from Page B1 including high-growth, high-demand jobs and how those concepts affect the United States’ ability to compete economically with other countries. Prater described Junior Achievement’s Our Nation workshop as a learning approach that helps students better understand concepts related to the globalization of business and, from the Navy’s perspective, the importance of learning STEM and someday working for the Navy. AREA & STATE Briefs From staff and wire reports CA LL A W AY T raffic signal maintenance work scheduled The Florida Department of Transportation will conduct traffic signal maintenance next week on U.S. 98 between Tyndall Drive and Transmitter Road. Drivers should expect to encounter lane closures at intersections in the area between 7 p.m. and 6 a.m. Monday through Friday. The work schedule depends on the weather. For more information, visit the FDOT Facebook page at www.facebook.com/MyFD OTN WF L or follow the department on Twitter at @myfdot . TA MP A Woman hit by stray New Y ear’s bullet Police said a 20-year-old woman waiting to see New Year’s fireworks at a Florida theme park was struck in the leg by a stray bullet fired from somewhere outside the park. Authorities said no one else was hurt in or around Busch Gardens and the injury wasn’t life-threatening. Lt. John Preyer of the Tampa Police said Kaitlyn Jacobs of Seminole felt a sudden pain in her lower left leg 10 minutes before midnight, apparently the victim of a shot fired in celebration elsewhere. Jacobs was treated at a hospital and released. She told the Tampa Bay Times that her injury was a “freak accident.” Park spokesman Travis Claytor told The Tampa Tribune that the fireworks were delayed a few minutes but resumed once Jacobs was off park grounds. M IA M I Publix offers insurance benefits to married same-sex couples The Publix grocery store chain now offers employee insurance benefits to same-sex couples legally married in other states. The Lakeland-based company told employees this week that beginning Thursday, Publix would expand coverage for its health, dental and vision benefit plans to associates married in any state where same-sex marriages are legal. Publix owns almost 2,000 grocery stores in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Tennessee, North Carolina and South Carolina.

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LOCAL & STATE Friday, January 2, 2015 | The News Herald | Page B3 Kenneth Shaffer, 82, of Panama City, passed away Tuesday, Dec. 30, 2014, at his home. On Christmas day 1951 Kenneth married the only woman he ever loved, Carol Monast. He joined the Air Force where he served in Germany as a radio operator. In 1961 the family relocated from Pennsylvania to Florida where he went to work at Sears. He rose through the ranks until his retirement after 33 years of service. Kenneth enjoyed Monday at Bonefish and his weekly Methodist Men’s Club Breakfasts as well as trips to Biloxi and the occasional “friendly” poker game. His greatest enjoyment came from his family and helping others. Kenneth was very community oriented, and was affiliated with many organizations and their boards. These include the Panama City Housing Authority, Family Services, United Way, Red Cross, Girls Club, Heart Association, Optimist Club, FSU-PC, Code Enforcement, Lucille Moore PTA, Junior Major League, Clear Light Halfway House, Forest Park UMC Men’s Club and the Sears Retirees. Kenneth was also very active politically with the Young Republicans as well as helping with numerous campaigns. He was preceded in death by his one true love and wife of 57 years, Carol Monast Shaffer; his parents, Alvin Adam Shaffer and Ellen Catherine Shaffer; his brothers, Alvin and Donald Shaffer and his sister, Ann Kelley. Survivors include his children, Ken and Donna Shaffer, Eileen and Barry Van Boxtel, and Amy and Richard Hernandez; his brothers, Bill and Richard Shaffer; a sister, Carolyn Purvin; his grandchildren, Jared Hernandez, Ellen and Tony Evans, Erica and Lacy Dunn, Rachel and Shawn Boden, Brad Van Boxtel and Michael Van Boxtel; his greatgrandchildren, Kaitlyn, Ethan, Carter, and Cooper Evans, Xander and Parker Dunn, Dakota, McKynzi, MaryJane and Jameson Boden; his faithful dogs Fanny and Molly and countless friends and people whose lives he touched. A Celebration of Life Service will begin at 11 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 3, 2015 at the Kent-Forest Lawn Funeral Home Chapel with Dr. John Friedman officiating. The family will receive friends at the funeral home Friday evening, Jan. 2, 2015, from 6 to 8 p.m. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to Covenant Hospice, 107 W. 19th St., Panama City, FL 32405 or to a favorite charity in Ken’s name. Kent-Forest Lawn Funeral Home 2403 Harrison Ave. Panama City, Fla. 32405 850-763-4694 www.kentforestlawn.com Kenneth Shaffer KENNETH SHAFFER Grace Stephens Helms Grace Stephens Helms, 95, of Panama City died Wednesday, Dec. 24, 2014. Graveside funeral services will be held at 10 a.m. on Friday, Jan. 2, 2015, in Evergreen Memorial Gardens. Affordable Funeral Care is entrusted with arrangements. Clayton E. VanTassel Clayton E. VanTassel, 89, of Panama City, died on Tuesday, Dec. 30, 2014. Memorialization will be by cremation and no services will be held. Wilson Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements. Marjorie Goff Sasser Renshaw Ms. Marjorie Goff Sasser Renshaw passed away at home in Panama City, Fla., on Dec. 31, 2014. Born Marjorie Mae Cliatt[GG1] in Bainbridge, Ga., she lived there until moving to Havana, Fla., in 1929. She and her first husband, James (Jim) Fletcher Goff, an Army pilot from Monticello, Fla., were married in 1942. After WWII, they moved with their young daughter, Patricia, to Miami where their family grew to include Carol, Gayle and Jimmy. Following Jim’s sudden death in 1961, she began work as a secretary for the Mayor of Miami and subsequently worked for the City of Miami in various administrative and managerial positions for 23 years. In 1978, she married Leslie Sasser with whom she enjoyed 23 wonderful years. In the 1990s they moved from Miami to their vacation home in Mexico Beach, Fla. Following his death in 2001, she moved into the Mathison Retirement Community in Panama City, Fla. There she thrived, participating in activities and making many new friends. In fact, one of her new friends became a very dear friend and the following year at age 80, she married Dan Renshaw. They shared 3 years of late life joy before he passed on. Marjorie is now at peace after a remarkable Christian life filled with hard work, family, friends and church. In addition to her husbands, she was preceded in death by her brother, Bert; daughter Pat; and son, Jimmy. She is survived by her daughters, Carol Cathey (Al) of Mexico Beach, and Gayle Goff (John Sohl) of Potomac Ma.; grandchildren, Brian and Lee (Lyndsey) Cathey and Christina, Meili and Lia Sohl; great grandchildren, Caitlin, Braden, and Wyatt Cathey; beloved stepchildren and step grandchildren; and numerous dear friends among the residents and staff at Mathison and elsewhere. The family is deeply grateful to the Mathison Community, Covenant Hospice and Emerald Coast Fellowship for their loving care. Services will be held at Southerland Funeral Home on Friday, Jan. 2, 2015 at 1 p.m. followed by a reception at Mathison Retirement Community. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Covenant Hospice, 107 West 19th Street, Panama City, FL 32405 or Emerald Coast Fellowship Church, 4102 West Highway 390, Lynn Haven, FL 32444. Condolences may be submitted or viewed at www.southerlandfamily. com. Southerland Family Funeral Homes 100 E. 19th St. Panama City, Fla. 32405 850-785-8532 Marion Twiss Riemer Marion Twiss Riemer, 91, of Lynn Haven died on Monday, Dec. 29, 2014. Funeral services will be held at 10 a.m. on Friday, Jan. 2, 2015, at Northside Baptist Church. Interment will be held in Lynn Haven Cemetery. The family will receive friends from 9 a.m. until service time at the church. Southerland Family Funeral Home is entrusted with arrangements. Fredrick Jackson Fredrick Jackson, 67, of Mary Esther, Fla., died Saturday, Dec. 27, 2014. A graveside service will be held, today, Jan. 2, 2015, at 11 a.m. at Hillside Cemetery, 1407 Flowers Ave., Panama City, FL 32401. Rev. Parnell Smith Sr. is officiating. Ed Herman Lovelace Rev. Ted Herman Lovelace, 69, of Port St. Joe, died on Monday, Dec. 29, 2014. The family will receive friends from 9-10 a.m. (CST), Friday, Jan. 2, 2015, at Heritage Funeral Home Chapel. Funeral services will follow at 10 a.m. (CST). A graveside service will follow at 3 p.m. (CST) in Elizabeth Chapel Cemetery in Pace, Fla. Those wishing to extend condolences may do so at www.heritagefhllc. com. Mrs. Poshie Stinson Comer, 95, of Panama City, Fla., passed this life on Dec. 23, 2014. Public visitation will be held on Friday, Jan. 2, 2015, from 1-8 p.m. at the funeral home. Funeral services will be held on Saturday, Jan. 3, 2015, at 1 p.m. at St. John Missionary Baptist Church with Delwynn G. Williams, Senior Pastor/ Teacher, officiating. Interment will follow at Hillside Cemetery. The body will lie in state one hour prior to funeral services at the church. Battle Memorial Funeral Home 1123 Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd. Panama City, Fla. 32401 850-763-4951 www.BattleFuneralHome.com Poshie Stinson ComerPO S HIE COMER Joseph “Joe” Rogers, 86, of Lynn Haven, Fla., passed away peacefully in his home surrounded by his family on Tuesday, Dec. 30, 2014. He was born March 15, 1928, in Sweet Water, Ala., to Perry and Ennis Rogers. He was the first principal of Northside Elementary School where he worked for 16 years before retiring in 1984. He was a member of the St. Andrew United Methodist Church and the Fidelis Sunday School Class. He was preceded in death by his wife, Betty Walters Rogers; and a sister, Sue Belle Smith. He is survived by three children, Sheila Rogers Pridgeon (Cleve); Joseph D. “ Joey” Rogers (Carol); Walter “Chip” Rogers; 6 grandchildren, Julie Clampitt (David); Michael D’Aoust (Mary); Elizabeth Rogers, Kate Rogers, Joseph Rogers, Joshua Rogers (Jessica); 6 greatgrandchildren, Maddie and Mollie Clampitt, Corinne and Nathan D’Aoust, Kaden and Karder Rogers and a brother-inlaw, Buddy Smith. Funeral services will be held on Saturday Jan. 3, 2015, at 11 a.m. in the Wilson Funeral Home Chapel with Rev. Craig Brannon officiating. The family will receive friends at the funeral home on Saturday from 10-11 a.m. prior to the service. Interment will follow in the Evergreen Memorial Gardens. Those desiring may make memorial contributions to the St. Andrew United Methodist Church 2001 W. 11th St., Panama City, FL 32401, Emerald Coast Hospice, 421 W. Oak Avenue, Panama City, FL 32401 or your favorite charity in memory of Joe Rogers. Wilson Funeral Home Family Owned Since 1911 214 Airport Road Panama City, Fla. 850-785-5272 Joseph RogersJO S E P H R OGER S Patricia Ann Posey Thacker, 76 of Panama City, passed beyond this life on Wednesday, Dec. 31, 2014, at her home, surrounded by her family. The Thacker and Posey families want to thank all of Pat’s friends and loved ones who have been so supportive and loving during her long struggle. Pat is preceded in death by her father, Horace Posey; her brothers, Jim Posey and Horace Junior Posey; her son, Bob Wheaton; brother In-law, Johnny O. Phillips; nephew, Daniel Phillips. She is survived by her husband, Hugh Thacker, daughter, Charissa Thacker; mother, Nell Posey; brother, Bill Posey (Debra), sister, Sherry Posey Phillips, nieces Robyn Posey Parnell (Mark) and Jennifer Phillips Green (John); nephews, Jason Posey, Stephen Phillips and Jamie Posey; great-nieces, Danielle Green and Kaylee Green; and many cousins and extended family. And her beloved kitty-cat, KiKi. Services will be held 2:30 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 3, 2015 at Kent-Forest Lawn Funeral Home. John Shaffer will be officiating. Private family interment will be held Monday, Jan. 5, 2015, at Evergreen Memorial Gardens. In lieu of flowers, a donation to the wonderful people at Emerald Coast Hospice would be greatly appreciated. Kent-Forest Lawn Funeral Home 2403 Harrison Ave. Panama City, Fla. 32405 850-763-4694 www.kentforestlawn.com Patricia Ann Posey ThackerPATRI C IA T HA CK ER Mother Mattie Stell Watson Rogers, 83, of Port St. Joe, Fla., passed this earthly life on Dec. 28, 2014. Public visitation will be held on Friday, Jan. 2, 2015 from 1-8 p.m. at the funeral home. Funeral services will be held on Saturday, Jan. 3, 2015 at 11 a.m. E.S.T. at Zion Fair Missionary Baptist Church, Port St. Joe, Fla., with Rev. Wilson Hall, Pastor and Rev. Rawlis Leslie, Presiding. Interment will follow at Pleasant Grove Missionary Baptist Church Cemetery, Enterprise, Ala. The body will lie in state one hour prior to funeral services at the church. Battle Memorial Funeral Home 1123 Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd. Panama City, Fla. 32401 850-763-4951 www.BattleFuneralHome.com Mattie Stell Watson RogersM ATTIE R OGER S Yasuko Fujita Donahue, 86, of Panama City, Fla., passed away Monday, Dec. 29, 2014, at a local hospital. Mrs. Donahue met her husband, David, in Tokyo, Japan, while he was serving in the Air Force. Yasuko was a resident of Panama City for over 46 years and her family was the most important thing in her life. Yasuko is preceded in death by her loving husband, David E. Donahue, of 51 years. She is survived by her three sons, George E. Donahue (Roz), Michael A. Donahue and Thomas R. Donahue (Pam); three daughters, Linda Derby (Danny), Doris D. Moon (Tom) and Nancy Janos (Paris); one sister, Masako Oguchi (Mamoru); eight grandchildren; Derrick Derby (Brandi and daughters Taylor and Cameron), Darren Donahue, Kaleigh Donahue, Harrison Moon, Hayden Moon, Marie’ Donahue, David Donahue, and Nikko Janos; and four-legged friend and companion, Hunter. Graveside services will be held at 2 p.m. Friday, Jan. 2, 2015, at Evergreen Memorial Gardens. Family will receive friends 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Friday, Jan. 2, 2015, at Kent-Forest Lawn Funeral Home. Kent-Forest Lawn Funeral Home 2403 Harrison Ave. Panama City, Fla. 32405 850-763-4694 www.kentforestlawn.com Yasuko Fujita DonahueYA S U K O DONAHUE Jerry Williams 1945 – 2014 Jerry L. Williams, of Lynn Haven died Friday Dec. 26, 2014. Memorial service will be at 2 p.m. on Saturday, Jan. 3, 2015, at Grace Presbyterian Church. Followed by a celebration of life in the social hall. Those desiring may make memorial donations to Grace Cares at Grace Presbyterian Church. DEATHS & FUNERALS Guidelines & deadlines Obituary notices are written by funeral homes and relatives of the deceased. The News Herald reserves the right to edit for AP style and format. Families submitting notices must type them in a typeface and font that can be scanned into a computer. Deadline for obituaries is 3 p.m. daily for the following day’s newspaper. Obituaries may be e-mailed to pcnhobits@pcnh.com or delivered to The News Herald, 501 W. 11th St., Panama City. O nline guest books View today’s obituaries and sign the online guest books of your loved ones at newsherald.com/obituaries Deputies: F lorida man decapitates mother with ax OLDSMAR (AP) — A Florida man is charged with first-degree murder after his mother was found decapitated outside their home on New Year’s Eve. According to the Pinellas County Sheriff’s Office, Mario Gomez called 911 on Wednesday evening and told dispatchers that his brother Christian had killed their mother and cut off her head. Deputies found Maria SuarezCassagne’s body outside the Oldsmar home, near some garbage cans. Sheriff Bob Gualtieri said Thursday that Gomez had planned his mother’s murder for two days. Gomez was upset with his mother because she wanted him to move boxes around the house, and he was jealous of the attention Suarez-Cassagne paid to his brother, Gualtieri said. The 23-year-old attacked his mother in the garage with an ax, severing her head, Gualtieri said. Gomez then allegedly dragged his mother’s remains from the garage to the garbage cans. Gualtieri told reporters that the crime was one of the worst his department had ever seen. Gomez then fled the scene, but he was arrested a few blocks away after another 911 call reported a suspicious person riding a bicycle in the area. Gomez confessed to killing his mother, Gualtieri said. Investigators recovered the ax. Mario Gomez, 27, was not injured. According to the sheriff’s office, Gomez had been diagnosed with schizophrenia and previously was held under the Baker Act. Gomez also had other arrests in Pinellas County for loitering and prowling, resisting an officer without violence and disorderly conduct. Pinellas County jail records did not show whether Gomez had an attorney. CHRI S TIAN JO S E G OMEZ

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LOCA L & STATE Page B4 | The News Herald | Friday, January 2, 2015 625 W Ba ld wi n Rd , St e B Pa na ma Ci ty , FL 32 40 5 Mo nd ay -F ri da y 5P M10 PM Sa tu rd ay 9A M2P M 85 052 273 37 (P ED S) Ped ia tr ic Ur ge nt Ca re Pr ov id in g Af te rHo ur s Ca re fo r Ch il dr en . PU BL IC NO TI CE Th e Ba y Co un ty Pl an nin g Com mi ss io n wi ll ho ld a Pu bl ic H ear in g in ac co rda nc e wi th Se ct io n 20 6 of th e La nd De ve lop me nt Re gu la ti ons in or de r to co nsi de r th e fo ll ow in g de scri be d or di na nc es to am en d th e Ba y Co un ty Fu tu re La nd Us e Ma p, th e Ba y Co un ty Com pr eh en si ve Pl an , th e Ba y Co un ty La nd De ve lop me nt Re gu la ti ons , an d th e Ba y Co un ty Zo ni ng Ma p. Th e he ari ng wi ll be he ld o n Ja nu ar y 15 , 20 15 at 1: 30 PM in th e Com mi ss ion Me et in g Ro om of th e Ba y Co un ty Go ve rn me nt Ce nt er , 84 0 We st 11 th St re et , Ro om 10 40 , Pa na ma Ci ty . Al l in te re st ed pe rs ons ar e in vi te d to at te nd an d to pr es en t ve rb al or wr it te n sta te me nt s. To en sur e wr it te n co mm en ts ar e pr ov id ed to th e Com mi ss ione rs in a ti me ly ma nne r, co mme nt s ar e en co ur ag ed to be re ce iv ed in ou r of c e by 4: 00 PM , Ja nu ar y 8, 20 15 . An y an d al l co mm en ts re ce iv ed be fo re th e he ar in g wi ll be fo rw ar de d to th e Comm is sio ne rs . Th e or din an ce s ma y be in spe ct ed by th e pu bl ic du ri ng no rm al wo rki ng hou rs (M -F , 8: 00 -5 :0 0) at th e Ba y Co un ty Com munit y De ve lop me nt Dep ar tm en t, Pl an ni ng an d Zo nin g Di vi si on (8 50 -2 48 -8 25 0) , 84 0 We st 11 th St re et , Ro om 23 50 , Pa na ma Ci ty , FL 32 40 1. Wr it te n sta te me nt s ma y al so be ma il ed to th is ad dr es s in adv an ce of th e me et in g in or de r to be co nsid er ed at th e me et in g. Wr it te n st at em en ts can al so be fa xe d to (8 50 ) 24 882 67 or emai le d to pl an nin g@ ba yc ount y . go v. An y pe rs on wi sh in g to ap pe al an y de ci sio n ma de by th e Ba y Co un ty Bo ar d of Co unt y Co mm is si one rs co nc er nin g th es e or din an ce s wi ll ne ed a re co rd of th e pr oc ee di ng s re su lt in g fr om th is pu bl ic he ar in g fo r th at pur pos e, su ch pe rs on ma y ne ed to en su re th at a ve rb at im re co rd of th e pr oc eed in g is mad e, wh ich re co rd in cl ude s th e te st im on y an d ev ide nc e up on wh ich th e ap pe al is to be ba se d. Ad di ti on al ly , an y pe rs on wi sh in g to se ek re vi ew of an y de ci si on mad e re ga rd in g thi s am en dm en t wi ll ne ed to ac qu ire sta nd in g. In or de r to ha ve st an din g to re qu es t a fo rm al adm in is tr at iv e he ar in g ch al le ng in g a pla n am en dm en t, pe rs ons mu st ha ve su bm it te d oral or wr it te n co mm en ts , re co mme nda ti ons , or ob je ct io ns to Ba y Co un ty du ri ng pu bl ic he ar in g. Ba y Co un ty adhe re s to th e Am er ic an s wi th Di sa bi li ti es Ac t an d wi ll ma ke re as on abl e mod i ca ti ons fo r ac ce ss to th is me et in g up on re qu es t. Pl eas e cal l th e Pl an nin g Di vi si on to mak e a re qu es t of thi s nat ur e. Re qu es ts mu st be re ce iv ed at le as t 48 ho ur s in adv an ce of th e me et in g in or de r to al lo w ti me to pr ov id e th e re qu es te d se rv ic e. It em # 1: Th e Com mi ss io n to co nd uc t a qu as iju di cia l pu bl ic he ar in g (P Z1 416 1) to co nsi de r a re qu es t to tr an sp or t, st o re , an d de pl oy o ys te r sh el ls fo r us e in re st or in g sh el l sh habit at in We st Ba y. Re qu ir es a Con di ti on al Us e Pe rm it . Pr op er ty lo ca te d on th e no rt h sid e of Bu cha na n St re et (a t 17 11 Bu cha na n St re et ), abo ut 16 5 fe et ea st of its int er se ct io n wi th An de rs on Av en ue , So ut hp or t ar ea . (D is tr ic t IV .) Pu bl ic No ti ce Ci ty of Pa na ma Ci ty Pl ann in g Bo ard Mo nd ay , Ja nu ar y 12 , 20 15 4: 00 PM Ci ty Co mmiss io n Ro om , Ci ty Hal l 9 Ha rr is on Av enu e, Pa nama Ci ty , FL 1. Re qu es t fo r la rg esc al e la nd us e am en dm en t an d re zo nin g fr om Ge ne ral C omme rc ia l2 to Ur ba n Re side nt ia l1 fo r a pr op er ty lo ca te d on th e eas t side of Fr an kf or d Av en ue at 21 st St re et , Pa na ma Ci ty Ho us in g Au th or it y, ow ne r, Se an Mc Ne il , app li can t. 2. Ap pr ov al of na l pl a t fo r r st ph as e of th e Sw ee tB ay de ve lop m en t, lo ca te d on th e fo rm er ai rp or t sit e (3 12 7 Li se nb y Av en ue ), St . An dr ew Ba y La nd Co mp an y, ow ne r an d ap pl ic an t. 3. Te xt am en dm en t to th e Ci ty ’s Co mp re he nsi ve Pl an , up dat in g El em en t 5A , Po rt Ma st er Pl an Su bEl em en t, Po rt Pa na ma Ci ty , ap pl ic an t. By TOM McLAUGHLIN 315-4435 | @TomMnwfdn tmclaughlin@nwfdailynews.com Archie Hauck, who was serving a 20-year Florida prison sentence for a probation violation that included committing murder in Alabama, will never be tried for the actual homicide. Hauck killed himself Dec. 26 at the Blackwater Correctional Facility in Santa Rosa County. Bill Bishop, the chief assistant state attorney in Okaloosa County, confirmed the suicide but prison officials wouldn’t provide details. Okaloosa County Circuit Court Judge John Brown sent Hauck to prison for 20 years in early 2014 for violating probation on an aggravated assault charge adjudicated in 2009. Prosecutors alleged that Hauck had violated the probation by killing Nancy Craycraft in December 2012 and disposing of her body in a remote wooded area in Baldwin County, Ala. Brown sentenced Hauck to a maximum five years on each of four violations: absconding, using drugs, murder and tampering with evidence. He was transferred from the Okaloosa County Jail to the Santa Rosa County prison on June 18, jail officials said. Bishop said before the hearing on the probation violation that it was the state’s plan to “seek a very lengthy prison sentence” while Baldwin County deputies built a case for murder against Hauck. Craycraft’s sister, Rose Perry, said in an email that a Baldwin County grand jury was going to be asked in January to indict Hauck. Baldwin County State Attorney Hallie Dixon could not be reached for comment. The Baldwin County’s Sheriff’s Office declined to release details concerning grand jury proceedings. Sheriff’s Office spokesman Anthony Lowery did say Hauck’s death does not mean the Craycraft murder investigation will be closed immediately. “There is still an open, active investigation into this homicide,” Lowery said. Craycraft, 55, was last seen Oct. 19, 2012, in Hauck’s company at Chan’s bar in Pensacola, according to media accounts from that time. Her car was found just over the state line two days after she disappeared, and bones determined to be Craycraft’s remains were discovered Dec. 17 by a teenager riding his four-wheeler. The state of decomposition and that the bones were scattered hindered the homicide investigation, but Assistant State Attorney John Molchan put together a circumstantial case strong enough to persuade Brown that Hauck had violated his probation. Murder suspect commits suicide in prison Archie Hauck died as the investigation was underway in Baldwin County, Ala. ARCHIE HA UCK By TRISTA PRUETT 315-4445 | @tristapnwfdn tpruett@nwfdailynews.com S ANTA ROSA BEACH — Grace Scar brough wanted to do the South Walton Fire District’s first Polar Plunge last year. Unfortunately, the now-10-year-old said she got sick and couldn’t. So to ring in 2015, she and 10-year-old Han nah Buchanan decided to take a dip in the Gulf of Mexico on New Year’s Day. “It just seemed like a good way to start the year,” Grace said. Both girls thought the plunge went well and wanted to do it again next year. “I couldn’t feel my legs when I got out,” Grace noted. “Next time, I want it to be colder,” Hannah added. The plunge is a fundraiser for the fire dis trict. Fire officials asked for a $20 donation that benefits the committee that purchases items for fire safety educational programs. Fire District spokesman Sammy Sanchez estimated that 200 people turned out for the plunge, many more than the 50 or so who par ticipated last year. Winter visitors joined locals for the chilly dip in the Gulf. “It was something fun to do for the new year,” said Liz Kayzar of Wauwatosa, Wis. Kayzar said she didn’t participate in the polar plunges in Wisconsin because of the cold. “This is crazy,” she said. “It was hilarious.” the plunge Locals, visitors kick off new year by taking dip in Gulf TAKING Photos by DEVON RAVINE | Daily News Sporting a glue-on mustache, Amy Rino of Santa Rosa Beach takes pictures of her “Stashing through the Sand” teammates before Thursday’s second annual Polar Plunge at Ed Walline Park. Below, participants in the South Walton Fire District’s second annual Polar Plunge take to the Gulf of Mexico on Thursday afternoon at Ed Walline Park in Santa Rosa Beach.

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LOCA L & STATE Friday, January 2, 2015 | The News Herald | Page B5 LIVE OAK (AP) — On a sticky hot Sunday in August 1952, a wealthy black woman named Ruby McCollum walked through the “colored entrance” of a doctor’s office in the small North Florida town of Live Oak and fatally shot a white doctor, state Sen.-elect Clifford Leroy Adams. Prosecutors told the all-white, all-male jury that McCollum shot the doctor after an argument over a $116 bill. Yet she was the wife of a prominent businessman who ran a gambling outfit, and she was carrying about $1,800 in her purse on the day she shot him. She testified that Adams, the son of a powerful political family who was known around town for caring for the poor, had forced her into a long sexual relationship that resulted in an unwanted child, and that she shot him in self-defense. The case is the focus of a new documentary titled “You Belong To Me,” which compiles a decade of research and interviews with family members, reopening old wounds in this small Southern town nestled amid farm country. The slaying stirred racial tensions in Jim Crow-era Suwannee County, when robed Ku Klux Klansmen regularly marched through Main Street in a show of force and lynchings were common in the Deep South. “Both families were negatively affected by this tragedy. A doctor and a wealthy powerful couple in town were gone in a flash,” said Eric Musgrove, a local historian and court clerk who give talks on the case to schools and other groups. McCollum was found guilty and sentenced to death at her first trial but later avoided execution by winning an insanity plea. She eventually was moved to a state mental hospital. In 1974 she was freed after the state’s high court found her legally insane, meaning her sentence was commuted. She died in 1992. The sordid tale of sex, race and violence has inspired others to tell McCollum’s story, with different conclusions about her motivations. William Bradford Huie’s book “The Crime of Ruby McCollum” inspired the new documentary. In his telling, McCollum’s relationship with Adams was consensual, and she became a drug addict and killed him after losing her mind. McCollum had been receiving injections of some kind of intoxicating substance from Adams, but it was unclear whether she sought them out or he used the drugs to take advantage of her. Huie’s conclusion didn’t seem right to the documentary’s producer Jude Hagin, a Florida film commissioner who discovered Huie’s book 14 years ago. Family members told Hagin and the film’s researchers that McCollum was well-educated and prosperous and that the family believed the doctor had used drugs to control her. “I could not wrap my head around the story, that a woman of Ruby McCollum’s stature ... would see anything that could be a good future for her to have a sexual relationship with a white doctor,” Hagin said. “I wanted to get family members on both sides to tell their side of the story,” Hagin said. Trial transcripts from 1952 show Ruby told jurors that she felt pressure to do what Adams told her to do, though the jury was told to disregard much of her testimony after the judge allowed dozens of objections from prosecutors. “I was just so worried, I had to either yield or maybe die, I suppose that was what would happen,” Ruby McCollum testified, according to trial transcripts. The film’s researchers also found that Adams had a dark side that jurors never saw. In Live Oak, he was a respected doctor who helped the poor — but records show he forged letters of recommendations to get into medical school. Also, McCollum testified that Adams had a friend deliver the baby they had together and that she never received a birth certificate. He needed to hide the baby because it was around the time he was running for state senate. Sam McCollum Jr., one of McCollum’s children, told the filmmakers that a white doctor in the Jim Crow-era South was akin to a “God in the community.” In the black community, the McCollum case was spoken of only in whispers, said Tameka Hobbs, a history professor at Florida Memorial University who grew up in Live Oak. Rheumatology E m e r a l d C o a s t Ou r Ad mi ni st er ed Bi ol og ic s In cl ude: We Ac ce pt Mo st In su ra nc es In cl udin g: Is One O f e Ar ea 's Le ad in g Sp ec ia li st s And Is Bo ar d-C er ti ed In Rh euma tol og y An d In te rn al Me dicin e. No w Ac ce pt in g Ne w Pa ti en ts for In fu si on er ap y! St at e-O fe-A rt In fu si on Su it e (850 ) 215-6400 3890 Je nks Av en ue, Ly nn Hav en, FL 3244 4 Mon day Thur sd ay: 8: 00 am – 5:00 pm | Frida y: 8:00 am – 12: 00 pm Ba ld wi n 26t h St Je nk s Av e Di re ct ions: Fr om P. C.L @ 2nd re d ligh t in So uthpor t, Tr av el 1 block & turn L on Ma rk et St . Co nt inue Ma rk et St . & turn L on Ra ilr oad Av e. (End of the ro ad) We ar e the gr ey building to yo ur R. EB T XLa rg e Jumb o He adOn Sh ri mp 10-15 Count NOW $6.99 LB La rg e He adOn Sh ri mp Reg. $6.50 LB SALE $5.50 LB over 10 LB's, $5.00 LB Ready to Co ok Pe eled & De ve in ed SALE $20/BOX Medium/L ar ge He adon Sh ri mp Reg. $5.50 LB SALE $4.50 LB (over 10 LB’ s, $4 LB) EB T Fr i. & Sa t. 8am 4pm Ge ra ld Mi ller Se af ood Va ri et y of Se afo od He ad le ss Sh ri mp To o! 73 28 Ra ilr oad Av e. Ha pp y Ne w Ye ar! WOW ! 17 Ye ars of Experience Mavis Nowell EACH PROCEDURE $300 LOCA TED AT PA NAMA CITY PLASTIC SURGER Y 850-819-3937 * Pr escription appetite suppr essant * Vi tamin & fat bur ner injections * EKG & blood analysis * Eat wise...dr op a size!” * E-mail: Angela@ re solutionsweightlosscenter .com Resolutions We ight Loss Center 1212 W. 23rd St. Pa nama City , FL 32405 (850) 91 3-0 00 2 MEDIC AL WEIGHT LO SS No ti ce of Pub li c He ar ing NOTI CE IS HEREB Y GI VE N th at th e Ci ty of Pa nam a Cit y, Fl or id a, pr op os es to ad op t th e fo ll ow in g ord in anc es . Th e Cit y Co mmi ss io n wi ll co ns ider th e or din an ces at 8: 00 A. M. on Ja nu ar y 13 , 20 15 , at Cit y Ha ll , 9 Ha rr is on Av enue , Pa nam a Cit y. Int er es te d pa rt ie s ma y ap pea r at th e me et in g an d be he ar d wi th res p ec t to th e pr op os ed or din an ces . Th e pub li c is inv it ed to re vi ew th e pr op ose d or din an ces at th e Pl an ni ng an d La nd Us e De pa rt me nt , 9 Ha rr is on Av en ue , Roo m 20 3, Pa nama Cit y, Fl or id a, be tw een th e hou rs of 8: 00 am to 5: 00 pm, Mo nda y th oug h Fr id ay . A pe rs on wh o de cid es t o ap pea l an y de ci sio n mad e by an y boar d, ag ency , or co un ci l wi th res p ec t to an y ma tt er co nsi der ed at suc h me eti ng or he ar in g wi ll nee d a rec or d of th e pr oc eed in gs. Fo r suc h pur pose s, an y su ch pe rs on ma y ne ed to en sure th at a ve rb ati m rec or d of th e pr oc ee din gs is mad e, wh ic h in cl ud es th e tes ti mo ny an d ev ide nce up on wh ich th e ap pea l is ba se d. Pe rs on s wi th di sa bi li ti es nee din g as sis ta nce to par ti ci pa te in an y of th ese pr oc eed in gs sho ul d co nt ac t Dar le ne Ha ch me is te r, Cit y Cl er k, at (8 50 ) 87 230 20 at le as t 48 hou rs be fo re th e da te of th e sc hed ul ed he ar in g. The fo ll o win g or dinan ce s wi ll be pr es en te d fo r an ad op ti on he ar ing : OR DI NA NC E NO . 25 44 .1 AN OR DIN AN CE AM EN DING TH E FU TU RE LA ND US E MAP OF TH E CI TY TO RE FL EC T A LA ND US E DE SIG NA TI ON OF RES ID EN TI AL FO R PR OP ER TY LO CA TE D ON TH E NOR TH SI DE OF TU PE LO DR IVE BE TW EEN FR AN KF OR D AV EN UE AN D BAS SW OOD ST RE ET , PA NA MA CI TY , FL OR ID A, PR OV ID ING FOR A RE PE AL ER , PR OV IDI NG FOR SE VE RA BIL IT Y, AN D PR OV ID ING FOR AN EF FE CTIV E DA TE . OR DI NAN CE NO . 25 44 .2 AN OR DIN AN CE ZO NI NG PR OP ER TY LO CA TE D ON TH E NOR TH SI DE OF TU PE LO DR IVE BE TW EEN FR AN KF OR D AV EN UE AN D BA SS WO OD ST RE ET , PA NA MA CI TY , FL OR ID A, H AV ING AP PR OX IM AT EL Y 2. 25 AC RE S, RE SI DE NTI AL -1 PR OV ID ING FOR A RE PE AL ER , PR OV IDI NG FOR SE VE RA BIL IT Y AN D PR OV ID ING FOR AN EF FE CTI VE DA TE . OR DI NAN CE NO . 25 46 .1 AN OR DIN AN CE AM EN DI NG TH E FU TU RE LA ND US E MAP OF TH E CI TY TO RE FL EC T A LA ND US E DE SIG NA TI ON OF UR BA N RE SI DE NTI AL FOR PR OP ER TY LO CA TE D AT TH E NOR TH EA ST CO RN ER OF CA CTU S AV EN UE AN D BUSI NES S HI GH WA Y 98 , PA NA MA CI TY , FL OR ID A, PR OV ID ING FOR A RE PE AL ER , PR OV IDI NG FOR SE VE RA BIL IT Y, AN D PR OV IDI NG FOR AN EF FE CTIV E DA TE . OR DI NAN CE NO . 25 46 .2 AN OR DIN AN CE ZO NI NG A PA RC EL OF PR OP ER TY LO CA TE D AT TH E NOR TH EA ST CO RN ER OF CA CTU S AV EN UE AN D BU SINE SS HI GH WA Y 98 , PA NA MA CI TY , FL OR ID A, H AV ING AP PR OX IM AT EL Y 0.6 3 AC RE S, URB AN RE SI DE NTI AL -2 , PR OV IDI NG FOR A RE PE AL ER , PR OV IDI NG FOR SE VE RA BIL IT Y AN D PR OV IDI NG FOR AN EF FE CTIV E DA TE . OR DI NAN CE NO . 25 47 .1 AN OR DIN AN CE AM EN DING TH E FU TU RE LA ND US E MAP OF TH E CI TY TO RE FL EC T A LA ND US E DE SI GN AT IO N OF GE NER AL CO MMER CI AL FOR PR OP ER TY LO CA TE D AT TH E NOR TH EA ST CO RN ER OF CA CTU S AV EN UE AN D BU SINE SS HI GH WA Y 98 , PA NAMA CI TY , FL OR ID A, PR OV ID ING FOR A RE PE AL ER , PR OV IDI NG FOR SE VE RA BIL IT Y, AN D PR OV IDI NG FOR AN EF FE CTIV E DA TE . OR DI NAN CE NO . 25 47 .2 AN OR DIN AN CE ZO NI NG A PA RC EL OF PR OP ER TY LO CA TE D AT TH E NOR TH EA ST CO RN ER OF CA CTU S AV EN UE AN D BU SINE SS HI GH WA Y 98 , PA NA MA CI TY , FL OR ID A, H AV ING AP PR OX IM AT EL Y 0. 20 AC RE S, GE NER AL CO MMER CI AL -2 , PR OV IDI NG FOR A RE PE AL ER , PR OV ID ING FOR SE VE RA BIL IT Y AN D PR OV IDI NG FOR AN EF FE CTIV E DA TE . The fo ll o win g or di nan ce wi ll be pr es en te d fo r a r st re ad ing : OR DI NAN CE NO . 25 45 AN OR DIN AN CE VA CA TI NG AN D AB AN DO NI NG A PL AT TE D RI GH TOFWA Y AN D A UT IL IT Y EA SEMEN T NE AR TH E NOR TH EA ST CO RN ER OF CA CT US AV EN UE AN D BU SINE SS HI GH WA Y 98 IN PA NAMA CI TY , FL OR ID A, AS MOR E PA RT IC UL AR LY HER EIN AF TE R DE SCR IBE D; RE PE AL ING AL L OR DIN AN CES IN CO NF LI CT HER EW IT H; PR OV IDI NG FOR TH E SE VE RA BIL IT Y OF AN Y PA RT OF TH IS OR DI NAN CE DE CL AR ED IN VA LI D; AN D PR OV IDI NG FOR AN EFF EC TIV E DA TE . Th e Ci ty Co mmi ss ion wi ll co nsi der th e fo ll ow in g re que st: LE VE L 3 DE VE LO PMEN T OR DER RE VI EW FOR 49 0 HAR RI SON AV EN UE , MAR IE HO TE L ON E, LT D. , OW NER , SE AN MC NEIL, AP PL IC AN T. Jim Crow-era shooting revisited in new documentary AP Suwannee County court clerk and local historian Eric Musgrove stands in front of the county courthouse in Live Oak. Both families were negatively affected by this tragedy. A doctor and a wealthy powerful couple in town were gone in a flash.” — Eric Musgrove Historian and court clerk Judge: Florida’s health care for needy kids violates U.S. laws MIAMI (AP) — A federal judge has ruled that Florida’s health care system for impoverished and disabled children violates several U.S. laws. In a ruling Wednesday, U.S. Circuit Judge Adalberto Jordan said lawmakers had for years set the state’s Medicaid budget at an artificially low level, causing pediatricians and other specialists for children to opt out of the insurance program for the needy. Jordan said that amounted to rationing of care and exacerbated a shortage of pediatricians, particularly in rural areas. The Miami Herald reported that in a statement responding to Jordan’s ruling, the Agency for Health Care Administration said the judge’s “outdated observations pertain to a Medicaid program that no longer exists,” and Florida’s new Statewide Medicaid Managed Care program is “cost-effective and a working success.”

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DIVERSIONS A ces On BRIDGE: B obby W olff It’s hero time for this alienated dad DEAR AMY: My 18-year-old daughter has barely communicated with me in four years, since her mother and I divorced. Before the divorce we had a good relationship. I was a supportive Dad, attending all her sports and events. Her mother and I had an acrimonious divorce, which involved parental alienation by her mother toward me. Her mother would not agree to joint custody and allowed our daughter to decide when she would see me. I tried the courts, but they were futile. Before leaving for college our daughter agreed to text and email with me while she is away, which she did until I asked to visit her on parents’ weekend. I notified my daughter a month in advance that I would like to come visit her. She finally agreed to see me for a hug and a hello, at the eleventh hour, but when asked to go have a cup of coffee she ran away crying. Since then she has stopped all communication again. Her mother and I had set up college funds to pay for her and her brothers’ education. At this point I am thinking of cutting off the college money, of which I have sole control. What is your opinion? SAD DAD DEAR SAD: I can well imagine how painful this is for you. This also is frustrating and infuriating. Unethical parents who engage in a campaign of alienation set it up as a power play and they place their children in untenable circumstances. I’m asking you to see this from your daughter’s point of view. She is behaving as if she is afraid of having a relationship, and imagine how highstakes this is for her — if she is close to you, she risks losing her mother. If you withdraw all funds, you essentially will be punishing your daughter for her mother’s choices and also confirming her lack of trust in you. It’s hero time. Rise to this difficult challenge not to give up on your daughter. If you turn the heat down on the relationship, she will soften, the tension will lessen, and she will eventually inch closer to you. It is completely reasonable to ask her to keep in touch through text and email. Keep your responses low-key, positive and loving. You are going to have to take the lead and rebuild a broken relationship from scratch. Don’t go in for the hug until you achieve a handshake. DEAR AMY: I am a 51-year-old man with no children. About four months ago, I became involved with a 27-yearold woman who teaches at the same college I do. We clicked immediately. We share the same passions and interests and love being around each other. We both agree this is the best and healthiest relationship of our lives. Right now the age difference hasn’t really been an issue, especially since we are both fit, active people. The problem is that we both sense that as we progress the age difference will become a factor, especially if we wanted to raise a family (and even if we did not). We don’t dwell too much on the future because we are very happy with what we have now. At the same time, we dread the idea that at some point we may have to give up this wonderful relationship. What should we do? FRETTING DEAR FRETTING: What you should do is to love each other well, for as long as you are able. You are smart people. You have done the math. A 24-year age difference is significant, but even the most age-perfect pairings bring significant challenges. You can overcome many things, but you cannot beat the clock. The pressure you feel is doubled for your partner, and she ultimately might decide she is not up to the challenge. Life presents imponderable opportunities for failure; my advice is to grab your moments of grace and enjoy them while they last. Send questions via e-mail to askamy@ tribune.com or by mail to Ask Amy, Chicago Tribune, TT500, 435 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago, IL 60611. Ask AMY Amy Dickinson Advice Columnist SU DO KU Solution to 1/1/15 Rating: SILVER 1/2/15 1/3/15 Solution to 1/2/15 Rating: GOLD JANRIC CLASSIC SUDOKU Fill in the blank cells using numbers 1 to 9. Each number can appear only once in each row, level ranges from Bronze (easiest) to Silver to Gold (hardest). 2015 Janric Enterprises Dist. by creators.com JANRIC CLASSIC SUDOKU Fill in the blank cells using numbers 1 to 9. Each number can appear only once in each row, level ranges from Bronze (easiest) to Silver to Gold (hardest). 2015 Janric Enterprises Dist. by creators.com Creators ARIES (March 21-April 19): You’re looking for a bit of surprise in your relationships. You’ll be attracted to people who know how to behave themselves and yet, every so often, choose not to. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Each person you talk to — and you’ll talk to many in your current outgoing mood — is a chance to influence and be influenced. You’ll be changed by the people you meet, and you’ll change them right back. GEMINI (May 21-June 21): Stay focused when the afternoon brings useless distractions. Don’t pay attention just because “they” think it’s important. You’re among “them,” but you’re not one of them. CANCER (June 22-July 22): Your fantasies about what you’ll be able to achieve will prove to be well within reason, especially since you’re taking the time to ready yourself for high output and maximum production. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): If multitasking really does exist, listening cannot be one of the tasks. Listening requires full attention. When you give it a fraction of attention, mistakes happen that will set you back. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): You have love in your life. This contributes to your attitude of enthusiasm. Your soul will thrive. You feel grateful, and you thank people who may or may not deserve it. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23): Seek connections with greatness. Great people encourage you to be great, too. Limit your time with anyone who can’t get behind your dreams — the condition is unlikely to change. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21): You’re principled, but in some situations, if you don’t bend to accommodate the different personalities of your group, you’re not going to be a part of what’s going forward. Step back for perspective. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Life feels like doing a push-up today — when you’re doing it right, there is no part of the exercise that’s not work. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Your habit of putting things in a favorable light will make you a valued friend and a well-paid employee. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Remember those plans you wrote down only a few weeks ago? Well, your soul is already leading you in a different direction. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Underused talents will now get a workout. It’s better to apply your passion to a project than to a person. THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek History TODAY Today is Friday, Jan. 2, the second day of 2015. There are 363 days left in the year. Highlight in history On Jan. 2, 1965, New York Jets owner Sonny Werblin signed University of Alabama quarterback Joe Namath to a contract reportedly worth $427,000. On this date 1788 — Georgia became the fourth state to ratify the U.S. Constitution. 1893 — The U.S. Postal Service issued its first commemorative stamp to honor the World’s Columbian Expedition and the quadricentennial of Christopher Columbus’ voyage. 1900 — Secretary of State John Hay announced the “Open Door Policy” to facilitate trade with China. 1921 — Religious services were broadcast on radio for the first time as KDKA in Pittsburgh aired the regular Sunday service of the city’s Calvary Episcopal Church. 1935 — Bruno Hauptmann went on trial in Flemington, N.J., on charges of kidnapping and murdering the 20-month-old son of Charles and Anne Lindbergh. (Hauptmann was found guilty, and executed.) 1942 — The Philippine capital of Manila was captured by Japanese forces during World War II. 1955 — The president of Panama, Jose Antonio Remon Cantera, was assassinated. 1960 — Sen. John F. Kennedy of Massachusetts launched his successful bid for the presidency. Thought for today “You are not very good if you are not better than your best friends imagine you to be.” Johann Kaspar Lavater Swiss theologian (1741-1801) Y our HOROSCOPE: Holiday Mathis Page B6 | The News Herald | Friday, January 2, 2015 SUBSCRIBE TODAY WE DELIVER CALL US AT 850.747.5050 OR VISIT US ONLINE AT WWW.NEWSHERALD.COM

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COMI C S Friday, January 2, 2015 | The News Herald | Page B7

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Happy BIRTHDAY Country musician Harold Bradley is 89. Singer Julius La Rosa is 85. Former House Speaker Dennis Hastert is 73. TV host Jack Hanna is 68. Actress Wendy Phillips is 63. Actress Gabrielle Carteris is 54. Movie director Todd Haynes is 54. Retired MLB All-Star pitcher David Cone is 52. Actress Tia Carrere is 48. Actor Cuba Gooding Jr. is 47. Model Christy Turlington is 46. Actor Taye Diggs is 44. Rock musician Scott Underwood (Train) is 44. Rock singer Doug Robb (Hoobastank) is 40. Actor Dax Shepard is 40. Actress Paz Vega is 39. Country musician Chris Hartman is 37. Ballroom dancer Karina Smirnoff (TV: “Dancing with the Stars”) is 37. Rock musician Jerry DePizzo Jr. (O.A.R.) is 36. Rhythm-and-blues singer Kelton Kessee (IMX) is 34. Actress Kate Bosworth is 32. Actor Peter Gadiot (TV: “Once Upon a Time in Wonderland”) is 30. Jazz singer-musician Trombone Shorty is 29. BIRTHDAY DEADLINES Tuesday birthdays: noon on Friday before. Wednesday birthdays: noon on Monday before. Thursday birthdays: noon on Tuesday before. Friday birthdays: noon Wednesday before. Email pcnhnews@pcnh.com with “Birthday” in the subject line or drop off current photo and ll out a birthday form at the front desk of The News Herald, 501 W. 11th St. What’s HAPPENING TODAY FREE A RT FRI DAY S: 1-6 p.m. at CityArts Cooperative, 318 Luverne Ave. Details: 769-0608, CityArtsCooperative.com SA T U R DAY ST. A N D REWS W A TERFR O NT F A RMERS M A RKET: 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Smith Yacht Basin beside the Shrimp Boat Restaurant, 12th Street and Beck Avenue. Rain or shine. Vendors, live music, kids craft table. Bring a shing pole and stay for the day. Details: HistoricStAndrews.com/ market or 872-7208 GR A N D L A G OO N W A TERFR O NT F A RMERS’ M A RKET: 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Capt Anderson’s on Thomas Drive. Enjoy the region’s nest makers, bakers and growers at PCB’s yearround farmers’ market. Live music, free tastings and family fun. Details: WaterfrontMarkets.org or 763-7359 SE A SI D E F A RMERS M A RKET: 8 a.m. to noon Saturdays, Labor Day to Memorial Day, in Seaside off County 30A. Details: SeasideFarmersMarket. wordpress.com L U CK Y P U PP Y RESC U E: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., 7228 Boatrace Road in Callaway. “Paws Day” children’s event. Horse rides for the kids. Hamburgers, hotdogs and “spaygetti.” Donations appreciated. Details: Terri Mattson, 814-6500 HIST O R Y T OU R: 10 a.m. at Camp Helen State Park, 23937 Panama City Beach Parkway, Panama City Beach. Tour is free with the paid park admission of $4 per vehicle. Led by Gloria Turner. Come learn the park’s history. Details: 233-5059 A RTISTS IN A CTI O N: 1-6 p.m. at CityArts Cooperative, 318 Luverne Ave. Free. Details: 769-0608, CityArtsCooperative.com FREE WINE T A STING: 1-4 p.m. every Saturday at Carousel Supermarket, 19440 Front Beach Road in Panama City Beach. Details: 234-2219 SU N DAY 30 A F A RMERS M A RKET: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on North Barrett Square in Rosemary Beach. Each Sunday, join this community event featuring fresh vegetables, fruits, eggs, honey, cheese, preserves, sauces, bread, sweets, prepared foods to go and much more. Details: 30aFarmersMarket.com GR A N D L A G OO N W A TERFR O NT F A RMERS’ M A RKET: 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Capt Anderson’s on Thomas Drive. Enjoy the region’s nest makers, bakers and growers at PCB’s yearround farmers’ market. Live music, free tastings and family fun. Details: WaterfrontMarkets.org or 763-7359 GR A N D SQ UA RE R OU N D S: 2:30-5:30 p.m. at Grand Square Hall, 1105 Bob Little Road, Springeld. Ballroom dance lesson until 3:30 p.m., followed by dancing. $10 per couple. Details: 265-9488 or 814-3861 SN O WBIR D DA NCE: 3-6 p.m. at Boardwalk Beach Resort Hotel & Convention Center, 9600 S. Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. DJ Jim Lawson playing the classics. Admission: $3. Details: 234-3484 A MERIC A N A C A F S U N DAY S: 3:30 p.m. Roberts Hall, 831 Florida Ave, Lynn Haven. Join us for an open mic showcase of local musicians from 2-3 p.m. before the concert. Donations appreciated. Details: 722-4915 H OO P DA NCE CL A SS: 6-7 p.m. at CityArts Cooperative, 318 Luverne Ave., Panama City, with Heather Clements. Beginners welcome; hoops available to borrow or buy. Details: 769-0608 MO N DAY W A TERC O L O R & A CR Y LICS: 12:30-2:30 p.m. at the Palms Conference Center, 9201 Front Beach Road, Panama City Beach. Details: 541-3867 B AY B OO MERS A CTIVIT Y PR O GR A M: 1-4 p.m. at the Bay County Council on Aging, 1116 Frankford Ave., Panama City. Learn to play Mexican Train Dominoes and hand and foot card games. Details: Robin Khalidy at 769-3468 IRISH STEP DA NCE: 4 p.m. at CityArts Cooperative, 318 Luverne Ave. with Teresa Kane. Details: 769-0608, CityArtsCooperative.com ME D IT A TI O N & CHI TR A INING CL A SS: 6:15-7:15 p.m. at The Zen Center, 3901 W. County 390 next to Dragon Dojo Martial Arts, with Brother Monk Dorje Jangbu Bodhisattva. Details: 248-8997 P A N A M A CIT Y B O P A N D SH A G CL U B: 7-7:30 p.m. social dance lessons followed by open dance until 9 p.m. at Grand Square Hall, 1105 Bob Little Road, Panama City. Details: Gloria, 234-5605, or Barbara, 319-9751 TU ES DAY PLEIN A IR T U ES DAY S: 9 a.m. to noon with Beach Art Group. Plein air painting focuses on learning to use and incorporate natural lighting. Bring your paints for a casual art session at a different location every week; arrive when you like and leave when you’re ready. Check BeachArtGroup. com for this week’s location and more information. A RT T U ES DAY S: 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Art sessions and studio tours in historic St. Andrews. Details: 249-9295, painterparker.com SC U LPT U RE CL A SS: 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Visual Arts Center. Details: 769-4451 B AY B OO MERS A CTIVIT Y PR O GR A M: 1-3 p.m. at the Bay County Council on Aging, 1116 Frankford Ave., Panama City. Beginner line dancing starts at 1 p.m., intermediate at 2 p.m. Details: Robin Khalidy, 769-3468 BE A CH B OO MERS: 2 p.m. at the Panama City Beach Public Library, 12500 Hutchison Blvd., Panama City Beach. Learn new skills and nd information about local spots with this free program hosted by the library. “Nutrition for Seniors with the UF/IFAS Extension Ofce.” Details: 233-5055 HOW TO SUBMIT TO WHAT ’ S HAPPENING Email pcnhnews@pcnh.com with “What’s Happening” in the subject line. Saturday, Sunday, Monday and Tuesday events: By 5 p.m. Wednesday before Wednesday events: By 5 p.m. Monday before Thursday events: By 5 p.m. Tuesday before Friday events: By 5 p.m. Wednesday before TRIVIA FUN EDITOR’S NOTE: “Trivia Fun” with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a daily feature in The News Herald. When two words are combined to form a single word, what’s the new word called? Pantomime, Orison, Portmanteau, Astern Which state has the U.S.’s only state capital city beginning with three consonants? South Dakota, Rhode Island, Illinois, West Virginia In Norway and Sweden, a distance of how many kilometers is most commonly referred to as a mile? 1, 5, 10, 20 What was Air Force One’s nickname under President JFK? Ossie, Patriot, Showboat, Caroline Which TV “Bonanza” character rode a horse called Chub? Ben, Adam, Little Joe, Hoss Humans ordinarily have how many permanent teeth? 32, 36, 40, 44 ANSWERS: Portmanteau, Illinois, 10, Caroline, Hoss, 32 Comments, questions or suggestions? WC@TriviaGuy.com WILSON CASEY Trivia Guy To submit an item for Out & About, email pcnhnews@pcnh.com or fax to 850-747-5097 Out & About Page B8 | The News Herald | Friday, January 2, 2015 “Into the Woods” is a novel concept: flesh out the ubiquitous fairy tales we all know, throw them together, and give them more humanity, humor and honesty than they’ve ever had. It’s an idea that could garner quirky praise or tiresome groans. “Into the Woods” gets a bit of both. Starting as a stage production (probably a more fitting medium for the story), Rob Marshall’s film adaptation suffers from some pretty weak direction and some identity problems, but otherwise reads like an odd, imperfect little gem. It’s old timey fun, with bombastic sets, well-pitched over-thetop performances and a light tone. So even though it’s a bit muddy, “Into the Woods” manages to find its footing in simply being good-natured fun. The plot is all the stories we grew up with cleverly woven into one comedicmusical epic. Red Riding Hood, Cinderella, Jack and the Beanstalk, and Rapunzel intertwine, full of great and inspired selfawareness, questioning the overly simple morals we seem to force out of possibly more complex narratives. The result is unique and unpredictable, supported by a fantastic cast (Anna Kendrick as a flaky Cinderella and Chris Pine as dim-wittedly pompous Prince Charming stand out). Throw in some truly genius Sondheim songs, it’s hard to swallow that this didn’t end up better than it is. Unfortunately, director Marshall doesn’t quite have control of his material. There is a lot to juggle, and while the shrewd writing mostly shines through, many of the vignettes and characters aren’t handled with enough style or grace. One can’t help but wonder what a more sophisticated auteur-director could do with the amazing source material. Still, “Into the Woods” is a decent amount of affable fun. Rating: 3 out of 5 stars Panama City Beach musician Matt Greene, who has a bachelor’s in philosophy from the University of North Florida in Jacksonville, always has enjoyed viewing, debating and critiquing all forms and aspects of film, from foreign films to slapstick comedies. Locals Cole Schneider, left, and Matt Greene co-host the weekly film podcast “Movietown Movie Club.” Each week, they share their different takes on new movies out in area theaters. For more, visit Movietown Movie Club on Facebook. MOVIET O WN MOVIE CLUB ‘INTO THE WOODS ’ Director: Rob Marshall Starring: Anna Kendrick, Johnny Depp, Chris Pine, Meryl Streep, Emily Blunt, Christine Baranski, James Corden, Lucy Punch, Tracey Ullman Rated: PG (thematic elements, fantasy action and peril, and some suggestive material) Cole: ‘Into the Woods’ starts strong Matt: ‘Into the Woods’ weaves fairy tales Disney’s “Into the Woods” is a brisk, fun, funny adventure with music that pops, characters you want to see, and performers you want to see playing them. At least the first half is. The front of the movie sings as it utilizes an old fairy-tale ticking clock; the back of the movie is clunky, aimless and surprisingly tiresome. “Into the Woods” is a Stephen Sondheim (“Sweeney Todd”) musical modestly adapted for the screen. Many of the performances are adequate, but it is James Corden and Emily Blunt who sustain the picture with great ease. The baker and his wife are at the center of the many strands of fairy-tales after a witch (Meryl Streep) curses their family and begins their quest. Corden and Blunt are as easy to like as any in Hollywood. Others have moments of fun, notably Chris Pine as some mix of Cinderella’s Prince Charming and Beauty and the Beast’s Gaston. It’s a role limited in scope (all characters are treated as archetypes rather than full-bodied characters), but rich in comic brilliance. It’s a bummer the film isn’t better. At the midpoint it seemed that an extended resolution was going to bring to the forefront some fairy-tale subversions it hinted at in the beginning (nay, it’s mere existence promises this), but instead the tone darkens to no end. We are left in the same place we began and in a more dour place than we were halfway through. It’s not that there aren’t enjoyable moments in the last hour, there just aren’t nearly enough. It’s still undeniable that of the major Christmas Day releases, the best place to go is “Into the Woods.” Rating: 3 out of 5 stars Longtime Panama City resident Cole Schneider, born in Long Beach, Calif., always has preferred popcorn and a movie to a long walk on the beach.

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Sports PANAMA CITY NEWS HERALD Section C Facebook: tinyurl.com/NHSports Twitter: @NH_Sports www.newsherald.com/sports FRIDAY January 2, 2015 COLLEGE FOOTBALL MARLINS CHRISTMAS CLASSIC Peach Bowl TCU 42, Mississippi 3 Fiesta Bowl Boise State 38, Arizona 30 Orange Bowl Georgia Tech 49, Mississippi State 34 WEDNESDAY GAMES TODAY’S GAMES Armed Forces Bowl Pittsburgh (6-6) vs. Houston (7-5), 11 a.m. (ESPN) TaxSlayer Bowl Iowa (7-5) vs. Tennessee (6-6), 2:20 p.m. (ESPN) Alamo Bowl UCLA (9-3) vs. Kansas State (9-3), 5:45 p.m. (ESPN) Cactus Bowl Oklahoma State (6-6) vs. Washington (8-5), 9:15 p.m. (ESPN) PAGES C2, 3, 5 Michigan State rallies; Auburn falls in OT PAGE C7 The Cannon County girls and Webster County boys claim basketball titles at Arnold. NFL PAGE C6 • Playoff Pro Picks Durkin, Gators focused on Birmingham Bowl By ROBBIE ANDREU Halifax Media Services BIRMINGHAM, Ala . — With his coaching experi ence in the NFL, one of Will Muschamp’s priorities when he came to Florida was to instill a professional atmosphere and attitude in the football program. He apparently succeeded. It’s been evident since he’s been fired. During this difficult transition between head coaches, at a time when most the remaining assis tants will be moving on in just a few days, the Gators and their coaches have somehow blocked out all the potential distractions and locked in on getting ready for one last game this season. They have been profes sional in their approach to Saturday’s Birmingham Bowl game against East Carolina, interim head coach D.J. Durkin said. “Our kids have done a phenomenal job with that,” Durkin said. “I’m very thankful to them for that. You could easily see that going a couple of different directions, and they haven’t let it. They’ve responded and practiced and played and met and done every thing we’ve asked, just like we’re going to go play for a championship. That says a lot about our kids and our staff as well. Those guys have handled it really well. We have a good group of people to work with around us.” Durkin was asked why he thinks the players have taken the approach they have in a situation where indifference was ripe for taking over. “It’s easy. Your team mates,” he said. “That’s what matters, the guys you play with, you go to battle with. That’s why you play this game, that’s why you do what you do. Those guys feel that accountability toward their teammates. They’re Buckeyes stun Crimson Tide NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Cardale Jones came through again at the Sugar Bowl. Eze kiel Elliott ran all over mighty Alabama. And Urban Meyer’s quest to turn Ohio State into SEC North is one victory away from a national championship. Jones turned in another savvy performance in his sec ond college start and Elliott ran for 230 yards, leading the Buckeyes to a 42-35 upset of top-ranked Alabama in the Col lege Football Playoff semifinal Thursday night. Rallying from a 21-6 deficit, the Buckeyes (13-1) advanced to play Oregon in the Jan. 12 national championship game at Arlington, Texas. The Ducks routed defend ing national champion Florida State 59-20 in the other semifinal at the Rose Bowl. Jones threw for 243 yards, including a 47-yard touchdown to Devin Smith that put the Buckeyes ahead for good early in the third quarter. He also ran for 43 yards and converted a crucial third-down play with a spinning, 1-yard dive and Ohio State clinging to a 34-28 lead. On the next play, Elliott took a handoff, broke one feeble attempt at a tackle, and was gone for an 85-yard touchdown that essentially clinched the vic tory with 3:24 remaining. Alabama (12-2) was denied a shot at its fourth national title in six years, though the Tide didn’t go down quietly. Blake Sims threw a 6-yard touchdown pass to Amari Cooper with 1:59 remaining. The Buckeyes recov ered the onside kick, but Ala bama got it back one more time after some questionable clock management by Ohio State. The Tide’s final shot ended when Sims’ desperation heave into the end zone was inter cepted as time ran out. Duck domination PASADENA, Calif. (AP) — Touchdown. Turnover. Touchdown. Turnover. Touchdown. And on it went for Oregon. Marcus Mariota and the Ducks are built for speed and in a flash they turned the first College Foot ball Playoff semifinal game into a Rose Bowl rout. The Ducks dusted Florida State 59-20 on Thursday and now it’s on to Texas to try to win their first national championship. “It’s incredible. I’m so proud of these guys right here,” Mariota said. “We’ve got one more to take care of.” The second-seeded Ducks (13-1) scored six straight times they touched the ball in the second half, with five of the touchdowns covering at least 21 yards and the last four com ing after Florida State turnovers. In a span of 12:54 on the game clock, the score went from 25-20 to 59-20. “A lot of fun,” said Oregon coach Mark Hel frich of the Ducks’ run, “but at the same time these guys were able to retain a tremendous focus.” In the matchup of Heisman Trophy winners, Jameis Winston matched Mariota’s numbers, but the Seminoles were no match for the Ducks. The Pac-12 champions will play Ohio State, a 42-35 winner over Alabama in the Sugar Bowl semifinal, on Jan. 12 in Arlington, Texas. Third-seeded Florida State’s winning streak ends at 29. In Win ston’s first loss as a college starter, maybe his last game in college, he threw for 348 yards and turned the ball over twice. “I think what he did as a com petitor and what he does with his teammates, he’s one of the great players in not only college football, but college football his tory to me,” Florida State coach Jimbo Fisher said. “It was a tough day out there.” Mariota was mostly brilliant again. Directing the Ducks’ warpspeed, hurry-up offense, the junior passed for 338 yards and two touchdowns. When he sprinted for a 23-yard touchdown with 13:56 left in the fourth quarter it made the score 52-20 and it made the Ducks the first team to reach 50 points in Rose Bowl history. This was game No. 101. “The longer you go, the stron ger you get,” said Ducks safety Erick Dargan, who forced a fumble and intercepted a pass. “We went longer and we stayed stronger. Everyone kept demanding more out of each other.” The Ducks fans spent much of the final quarter mockingly doing the Seminoles’ warchant and tom ahawk chop. After it was over the players sported T-shirts that read “WON NOT DONE.” Outback Bowl Wisconsin 34, Auburn 31, OT Cotton Bowl Classic Michigan State 42, Baylor 41 Citrus Bowl Missouri 33, Minnesota 17 Rose Bowl Oregon 59, Florida State 20 Sugar Bowl Ohio State 42, Alabama 35 THURSDAY GAMES AP Florida’s interim head football coach D.J. Durkin watches practice. SEE GATORS | C2 “They’ve responded and practiced and played and met and done everything we’ve asked, just like we’re going to go play for a championship.” D.J. Durkin Florida interim coach Oregon streaks past mistake-prone FSU AP Oregon linebacker Justin Hollins forces a fumble by Florida State running back Dalvin Cook during the second half of the Rose Bowl on Thursday. The Ducks sported T-shirts after the game that read “WON NOT DONE.” SEE ROSE BOWL | C5 AP Ohio State players celebrate a touchdown by defensive lineman Steve Miller (88) in the Sugar Bowl on Thursday night.

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Page C2 | The News Herald | Friday, January 2, 2015 not going to let outside cir cumstances change that feeling.” The players say it’s not just talk. During this potentially divisive season, the Gators have somehow managed to stick together and stay focused on get ting ready to play. This game will be no different, they say. “We’re a close-knit team,” junior defensive end/outside linebacker Dante Fowler Jr. said. “That’s just us, that’s our mentality and our compet itive nature. We just love to go out there and play football, and that’s what we’re going to do.” The players say the coaches have played a huge role in keeping every one together and keeping the focus on preparing for this game just like any other. Even though Durkin and most of the remain ing assistants likely will be taking new jobs elsewhere in the coming weeks, they have created an atmo sphere of normalcy around the program. “They’ve coached us like they’re going to be here for the next 10 years,” sophomore wide receiver Ahmad Fulwood said. “So much respect to those guys because they could easily give up on us, but they’re not going to do that. They’re going to try to get us this ‘W’ for the whole program, us included. “They’ve been 100 per cent (professional).” Fulwood said nothing has changed under Dur kin. Practices, meetings, weight-lifting sessions — all the same. “No change at all,” he said. “I mean it’s (all run the same way). “Coach Durkin is han dling it really well. He’s handling it like a profes sional and he’s doing what he has to do to get us pre pared to get us to play ECU and get a win for us.” Sophomore safety Keanu Neal said no one has been more focused on that task at hand than Dur kin. This will be his first game as a head coach. “I think he’s an amaz ing coach,” Neal said. “I hate that he’s leaving, but it is what it is, it’s part of the business. But he’s been the same. He’s been coaching his tail off, like he would have if he had a job. I’m surprised that he’s doing that. He’s really doing a good job.” The players also say the seniors and other vet erans on the team, includ ing Fowler, who is leaving early for the NFL draft, have been strong leaders and kept everyone focused and unified through a tough time. “The seniors, like the coaches, they’ve been han dling themselves profes sionally as well,” Fulwood said. “They’ve been han dling it like this is just as important to them as it is to the younger guys who are going to be here next year. So they’ve been han dling it really well. They’ve been keeping us focused as well. “I guess it’s a situation we’re in right now. I can’t speak for those guys. All I can do is tell you is what I see. They’re keeping us on point from a leader ship perspective, handling us like we have to move forward.” That’s the plan now. Try to win this last game and then start moving for ward with new head coach (Jim McElwain) and a new coaching staff. “The most important right now is not to take a step back, but keep mov ing forward,” Fulwood said. “That’s what we’re going to do.” FLORIDA from page C1 Florida expected to grab Shannon as assistant coach GATORS’ NOTEBOOK By ROBBIE ANDREU Halifax Media Services BIRMINGHAM, Ala. — Although there is no official word yet from Florida, former Miami head coach Randy Shannon is expected to be named the Gators’ linebackers coach and recruiting coordinator, according to sources in Arkansas. Shannon’s hiring will not be announced by Florida until the deal is done. Shannon has been the Razor backs’ linebackers coach and asso ciate head coach the past two years under Bret Bielema. Before that, he spent a year on the TCU staff as linebackers coach. Shannon, 48, was the head coach at Miami from 2007-10. He was the Hurricanes’ defensive coordinator for four years before being named coach. Shannon, who played line backer at Miami and with the Dal las Cowboys, spent three years on the Miami Dolphins coaching staff (1998-2000). With Shannon’s expected hire, new Florida coach Jim McElwain’s staff is now at three, with the hir ing of Mississippi State defensive coordinator Geoff Collins and for mer Michigan offensive coordina tor Doug Nussmeier the past two weeks. T wo starters out UF will be without two senior starters for Saturday’s Birmingham Bowl, interim coach D.J. Durkin announced Wednesday. Defensive tackle Darious Cummings and standout returner Andre Debose did not make the trip to Birmingham. Cummings was ruled out of the game due to a violation of team rules, while Debose, a sixth-year senior, made the deci sion he did not want to play in the game, thus ending his Florida career, Durkin said. “Andre was kind of a decision he made and mutual agreement of, you know, he’s moving on with his career,” Durkin said. “Andre, he’s been here six years and done a lot of great things for the Gators. And he and I have a good relationship. We’ve been here. We joke he’s as old as some of the coaches and we’ve been here a long time together. Sometimes things just work out that way and he’ll be just fine and so will the Gators.” Durkin said every player has an option whether or not to play, but that Debose is the only one to make the decision not to. “You know, there’s free will in life. Every one has an option not to play, really,” Durkin said. “They could all say they’re not going to play. But that’s the great part about it. We’ve got a great locker room full of guys that want to play and they love playing with one another and competing.” ‘D’ should stay strong All-SEC defensive end/outside line backer Dante Fowler Jr., who is leaving early for the NFL draft, said the defense will be just fine next season without him. “So many talented players in the sec ondary, that speaks for itself,” Fowler said. “Antonio (Morrison), you know, just a lot of young guys. Caleb Brantley is looking good. Alex McCalister is just a special pass rusher. You know, no knock at all.” McCalister has seen extensive playing time behind Fowler this season, and actually has more sacks than Fowler. Fowler said his understudy is just scratching the surface of his potential. “It’s crazy, just night and day to see how he is,” Fowler said. “He’s a guy who really wants to learn and really wants to get better. He’s really long, so he’s learning how to play with his long body. Once he really breaks in like how he is and breaks his body in and gets bigger, he’s going to be something to be reckoned with.” Head coach material From what he’s seen in practice over the past few weeks, Fowler said Durkin will make an excellent head coach one day. “Everything’s the same (in practice). We’re having a lot of fun,” Fowler said. “This is a great time for Durkin to work on his head coaching skills because he’s a great coach and I’m pretty sure he’s going to have an opportunity to be a school’s head coach really soon, so I’m pretty sure he’s handling it the right way.” Durkin said he appreciates Fowler’s endorsement. “Well, I hope Dante’s an AD one day then,” Durkin said. Durkin said this has been a good experience. “Obviously, when you go through it, it forces you to think through things differ ently as a head coach that you haven’t had to do before,” he said. “Some of the dayto-day decisions you never really thought of before. So, absolutely, it’s been a great experience and I’m very thankful for it.” ‘Champ in touch Several of the players said Wednesday that fired head coach Will Muschamp has stayed in touch with them. Muschamp is now the defensive coordinator at Auburn. “Yeah. I actually talked with ’Champ on Saturday,” Fowler said. “Auburn is playing in the Outback Bowl in Tampa, so I was down there and I got to run into him and talk to him. Just to see smiles on his face, yeah (he’s happy). Seeing him happy and things like that, that’s all that matters. He’s still hanging in there.” Sophomore wide receiver Ahmad Fulwood said Muschamp has called or texted many of the players over the past few weeks. “Pretty much the whole team he’s reached out to,” Fulwood said. “He’s tried to text or call us. It was an emotional time for all of us, including him, but it’s the name of the game. It’s a business. So much luck to him, good luck to him at Auburn and I hope everything goes out well for the rest of us. “I’ve never experienced this before, but in the recruiting business they say don’t go to a school because of a coach. But ’Champ was the guy that brought me here. I loved him to death, but he’s no longer here any more and there’s not much I can do about it.” Fulwood said Muschamp has delivered a message to his former players. “We’re all good kids. Keep focused,” Fulwood said. “Don’t let what’s going on outside of us reflect and hinder us as a team, so that’s pretty much what he kind of said.” TODAY’S BOWL PREVIEWS Iowa (7-5) vs. Tennessee (6-6), at Jacksonville, 2:20 p.m. CST today (ESPN) Line: Tennessee by 3 Series record: Tied 1-1 What’s at stake Iowa is looking for its first bowl victory since 2010. Tennessee, seeking its first bowl win since 2008, is trying to avoid a sixth consecu tive losing season. Key matchup Iowa left tackle Brandon Scherff vs. Tennessee defensive end Derek Barnett. A finalist for the Outland Trophy and the most deco rated player on the team, Scherff is widely considered a first-round pick in April’s NFL draft. Barnett set a school record for true freshmen with 10 sacks and 20 tackles for a loss. Players to watch Iowa: QBs Jake Rudock and C.J. Beathard will play in the first quarter. The Hawkeyes haven’t revealed who will start, but the decision could set the stage for 2015. Rudock is a junior with 16 touchdown passes and five interceptions this season. Beathard is a sophomore with seemingly more natural ability. Tennessee: Sophomore QB Josh Dobbs is 3-1 since taking over the starting job, and the Vols are averaging 35 points and 424 yards with him at the helm. He has 1,470 yards of total offense and 14 touch downs (eight passing, six rushing). Facts and figures Teams playing for the first time since the 1987 Kickoff Classic in East Rutherford, New Jersey, where Tennessee won 23-22. ... Iowa is 11-12 all-time against Southeastern Conference teams, including 4-3 in bowl games. ... Iowa coach Kirk Ferentz was an assistant with the Hawkeyes the last time they played in Jacksonville (1983). ... Ten nessee making its sixth appearance in the TaxSlayer Bowl, formerly called the Gator Bowl. The Vols are 3-2 in Jacksonville, with their last appearance being a 45-23 victory over Virginia Tech in 1994. ... Vols are 18-11 all-time against teams from the Big Ten. ... Officials expecting about 60,000 for the game, with the majority Tennessee fans. Houston (7-5) vs. Pittsburgh (6-6), at Fort Worth, Texas, 11 a.m. CST today (ESPN) Line: Pittsburgh by 3. Series record: Tied 1-1. What’s at stake In a game featuring interim coaches for both teams, Pittsburgh needs to win the bowl for a winning season — just like last year, when the Panthers won the Little Caesars Bowl for a winning record. This is Houston’s fourth appearance in the 12-year-old Armed Forces Bowl. Key matchup The contrasting running games. Pittsburgh has ACC player of the year James Conner, who ran for 1,675 yards and set an ACC record with 24 rushing touchdowns even while hindered by a hip injury the last two games. Houston has a running quarterback with Greg Ward Jr. (1,736 yards passing, and 481 yards rushing), along with their combo of junior running backs Kenneth Farrow and Ryan Jackson, who have combined for 1,531 yards with 17 touchdowns and eight 100-yard rushing games. Players to watch Houston: Senior linebacker Efrem Oliphant has 130 tackles, 3 sacks and two interceptions this season. He had multiple tackles in nine games this season. Pittsburgh: Sophomore quarterback Chad Voytik has passed for 2,011 yards and 15 touchdowns, and rushed for 426 yards and three more scores. Facts and figures The Armed Forces Bowl is being played on the TCU campus for the 10th time. The bowl temporarily moved to the SMU campus in 2010 and 2011 while TCU’s stadium went through a total renovation. ... The Cougars are 9-12-1 in bowl games, Houston is 13-17. ... Pitt is in a bowl for the seventh consecutive season. ... Houston has 58,223 total yards since 2006, a total surpassed only by Oregon’s 58,884. ... Pitt has an FBS-high 81 underclassmen (53 freshmen, 28 sophomores). ... The bowl was played before Christmas from 2003-06, and after Christmas since then, including New Year’s Eve from 2007-09. This is the first time for the game to be played in January. No. 14 UCLA (9-3, No. 14 CFP) vs. Kansas State (9-3, No. 11 CFP), 5:45 p.m. CST today (ESPN) Line: UCLA by 1. Series record: Tied 1-1. What’s at stake The winner of this game will probably finish the season in the top 10, if only because No. 7 Mississippi State, No. 9 Ole Miss and No. 10 Arizona all have lost already. Key matchup UCLA defensive backs coverage on Tyler Lockett. The Bruins have shut down top-flight receivers like USC’s Nelson Agholor (three catches and 24 yards) and Colorado’s Nelson Spruce (six passes, 63 yards). Lockett, meanwhile, has four straight games of 100 yards or more in receiving and had games with 14 catches against Baylor and 196 yards against TCU. Players to watch Kansas State: Curry Sexton is K-State’s overlooked receiver compared to Lockett, but he needs 45 more yards to join Lockett with 1,000 yards receiving. UCLA: The spotlight on the Bruins offense settles on quarterback Brett Hundley, but running back Paul Perkins led the Pac-12 in rushing with 1,381 yards on six yards a carry, and he played big in a big game this season (190 yards rushing against Oregon). Another 26 yards gives him the third-best rushing season in school history. Facts and figures The Wildcats could give coach Bill Snyder a .500 win-loss percent age in bowl games; he’s 7-8 in bowls. . Mora is the first coach at UCLA to have three straight seasons of at least nine wins. . Both Snyder and Mora have coached teams in the Alamodome. Snyder’s K-State lost to Purdue in the 1998 Alamo Bowl and Mora’s Atlanta Falcons defeated New Orleans when the Saints vacated their home because of Hur ricane Katrina in 2005. Oklahoma State (6-6) vs. Washington (8-5) at Tempe, Ariz., 9:15 p.m. CST today (ESPN) Line: Washington by 6 1/2. Series record: Tied 1-1. What’s at stake Washington is trying to cap a successful first season under coach Chris Petersen. Oklahoma State is attempting to build confidence toward next season after barely becoming bowl eligible with a young team. Key matchup Oklahoma State’s offensive line vs. Washington’s pass rush. The Huskies have one of the most aggressive, disruptive defenses in the nation, led by three firstteam All-Americans. The Huskies were third nationally with 3.77 sacks per game and outside linebacker Hau’oli Kikaha led the country with 18 sacks. OSU’s line has allowed 37 sacks, so protecting freshman QB Mason Rudolph will be paramount. Players to watch Oklahoma State: Rudolph. The freshman was thrust into the spotlight in November, when he replaced Daxx Garman and has overcome a few freshman mistakes with some big plays. He solidified his place in the eyes of OSU fans by leading a late comeback in a win over rival Oklahoma to make the Cowboys bowl eligible in the final game of the regular season. Washington: RB/LB Shaq Thompson. The multi-talented junior may be the most dynamic player in the country, with four touchdowns on defense and two more on offense. The first-team All-American was a full-time running back for three games in late October and November, then went back to the defensive side exclusively for the final three games. Wherever he plays, he’s sure to have an impact. Facts and figures Oklahoma State will play in its school-record ninth consecutive bowl. ... Washington QB Cyler Miles has thrown for 2,129 yards with 16 touchdowns and three interceptions. ... The Cowboys will play without RB/PR Tyreek Hill, who was dismissed from the team after being arrested and charged with punching and choking his pregnant girlfriend. ... Huskies coach Chris Petersen has the most wins (eight) of any first-year coach in school history. PEACH BOWL Atlanta Dec. 31 OUTBACK BOWL Tampa, Fla. Jan. 1 SUGAR BOWL New Orleans Jan.1 ORANGE BOWL Miami Dec. 31 GODADDY BOWL Mobile, Ala. Jan. 4 COTTON BOWL Arlington, Texas Jan. 1 BIRMINGHAM BOWL Birmingham, Ala. Jan. 3 GATOR BOWL Jacksonville, Fla. Jan. 2 ROSE BOWL Pasadena, Calif. Jan. 1 FIESTA BOWL Glendale, Ariz Dec. 31 FBC BOWL LOGOS 2 12094 : College football bowl logos; 1c; stand-alone; staff; E T A 1 p.m. Jan. 12 CACTUS BOWL Tempe, Ariz. Jan. 2 These logos are provided to you for use in an editorial news context onl y . Other uses, including as a linking device on a W eb site, or in an advertising or promotional piece, may violate this entity ’ s trademark or other intellectual property rights, and may violate your agreement with A P . ALAMO BOWL San Antonio Jan. 2 ARMED FORCES BOWL Ft. Worth, Texas Jan. 2 FOSTER FARMS BOWL Santa Clara Dec. 30 CITRUS BOWL Orlando, Fla. Jan. 1 PEACH BOWL Atlanta Dec. 31 OUTBACK BOWL Tampa, Fla. Jan. 1 SUGAR BOWL New Orleans Jan.1 ORANGE BOWL Miami Dec. 31 GODADDY BOWL Mobile, Ala. Jan. 4 COTTON BOWL Arlington, Texas Jan. 1 BIRMINGHAM BOWL Birmingham, Ala. Jan. 3 GATOR BOWL Jacksonville, Fla. Jan. 2 ROSE BOWL Pasadena, Calif. Jan. 1 FIESTA BOWL Glendale, Ariz Dec. 31 FBC BOWL LOGOS 2 12094 : College football bowl logos; 1c; stand-alone; staff; E T A 1 p.m. Jan. 12 CACTUS BOWL Tempe, Ariz. Jan. 2 These logos are provided to you for use in an editorial news context onl y . Other uses, including as a linking device on a W eb site, or in an advertising or promotional piece, may violate this entity ’ s trademark or other intellectual property rights, and may violate your agreement with A P . ALAMO BOWL San Antonio Jan. 2 ARMED FORCES BOWL Ft. Worth, Texas Jan. 2 FOSTER FARMS BOWL Santa Clara Dec. 30 CITRUS BOWL Orlando, Fla. Jan. 1 PEACH BOWL Atlanta Dec. 31 OUTBACK BOWL Tampa, Fla. Jan. 1 SUGAR BOWL New Orleans Jan.1 ORANGE BOWL Miami Dec. 31 GODADDY BOWL Mobile, Ala. Jan. 4 COTTON BOWL Arlington, Texas Jan. 1 BIRMINGHAM BOWL Birmingham, Ala. Jan. 3 GATOR BOWL Jacksonville, Fla. Jan. 2 ROSE BOWL Pasadena, Calif. Jan. 1 FIESTA BOWL Glendale, Ariz Dec. 31 FBC BOWL LOGOS 2 12094 : College football bowl logos; 1c; stand-alone; staff; E T A 1 p.m. Jan. 12 CACTUS BOWL Tempe, Ariz. Jan. 2 These logos are provided to you for use in an editorial news context onl y . Other uses, including as a linking device on a W eb site, or in an advertising or promotional piece, may violate this entity ’ s trademark or other intellectual property rights, and may violate your agreement with A P . ALAMO BOWL San Antonio Jan. 2 ARMED FORCES BOWL Ft. Worth, Texas Jan. 2 FOSTER FARMS BOWL Santa Clara Dec. 30 CITRUS BOWL Orlando, Fla. Jan. 1 PEACH BOWL Atlanta Dec. 31 OUTBACK BOWL Tampa, Fla. Jan. 1 SUGAR BOWL New Orleans Jan.1 ORANGE BOWL Miami Dec. 31 GODADDY BOWL Mobile, Ala. Jan. 4 COTTON BOWL Arlington, Texas Jan. 1 BIRMINGHAM BOWL Birmingham, Ala. Jan. 3 GATOR BOWL Jacksonville, Fla. Jan. 2 ROSE BOWL Pasadena, Calif. Jan. 1 FIESTA BOWL Glendale, Ariz Dec. 31 FBC BOWL LOGOS 2 12094 : College football bowl logos; 1c; stand-alone; staff; E T A 1 p.m. Jan. 12 CACTUS BOWL Tempe, Ariz. Jan. 2 These logos are provided to you for use in an editorial news context onl y . Other uses, including as a linking device on a W eb site, or in an advertising or promotional piece, may violate this entity ’ s trademark or other intellectual property rights, and may violate your agreement with A P . ALAMO BOWL San Antonio Jan. 2 ARMED FORCES BOWL Ft. Worth, Texas Jan. 2 FOSTER FARMS BOWL Santa Clara Dec. 30 CITRUS BOWL Orlando, Fla. Jan. 1 COLLEGE FOOTBALL Tennessee’s Dobbs poses problems for Iowa defense JACKSONVILLE (AP) — When asked about Ten nessee’s Josh Dobbs, Iowa coach Kirk Ferentz recalled facing two other mobile quarterbacks this season. “You want the bad news? Maryland and Minnesota come to mind right away,” Ferentz said. Maryland’s C.J. Brown accounted for 219 yards, including 99 rushing, in a 38-31 victory over the Hawkeyes in October. Three weeks later, Minne sota’s Mitch Leidner threw for four touchdowns and ran for 77 yards in a 51-14 win against Ferentz’s team. Now, the Hawkeyes (7-5) will try to deal with Dobbs in the TaxSlayer Bowl today. Dobbs has won three of four games since taking over the starting job in November, helping the Volunteers (6-6) make their first bowl game since 2010. “Hopefully we’ll do a lit tle better job defending the quarterback,” Ferentz said. Since coming off the bench against Alabama in late October, Dobbs has eight touchdown passes, six rushing scores and victories against South Carolina, Ken tucky and Vanderbilt. Dobbs might not have the passing skills of injured starter Justin Worley, but he brings an added dimen sion to the attack. He has 91 carries for 393 yards in five games. JOS H D OBBS

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Friday, January 2, 2015 | The News Herald | Page C3 COLLEGE FOOTBALL Missouri runs away from Minnesota in fourth quarter ORLANDO (AP) — When Missouri played its best this season, the Tigers stopped the run or ran well them selves. Minnesota found out what happens when the Tigers are success ful at both. Marcus Murphy ran for 159 yards, Russell Hansbrough added 114 yards and a touchdown and No. 16 Missouri beat Minnesota 33-17 on Thursday in the Citrus Bowl. “We took advan tage of some criti cal turnovers. It’s 23 (wins) — the best back-to-back seasons in Missouri his tory,” Tigers coach Gary Pinkel said. “You’re always judged when you have the most adversity and how you respond. And we did.” Missouri (11-3) also got a big day out of its defense, which held one of the nation’s top rushing offenses to 106 yards on its way to winning its third straight bowl game and reaching 11 victories for the fourth time in school his tory. Minnesota entered the game averaging nearly 225 yards on the ground. The Tigers forced three turnovers, led by game MVP Markus Golden, who finished with 10 tackles, a sack and a fumble recovery. It helped Missouri’s offense settle in after from some early miscues. “It’s a blessing to be a part of this team. Just to be out here playing,” Golden said. “One of the best days of my life.” Minnesota (8-5) trailed 19-17 entering the fourth quarter, but Missouri pulled away on Hansbrough’s 78yard touchdown run and Maty Mauk’s 7-yard scoring pass to Bud Sasser. Mauk settled down to throw two TD passes after interceptions on the Tigers’ first two possessions. Minnesota quarterback Mitch Leidner was 21 of 31 for 258 yards and a touch down, but was under con stant pressure in the second half. Missouri 0 10 9 14 Minnesota 7 0 10 0 First Quarter Minn—Williams Jr. 20 run (Santoso kick), 5:42. Second Quarter Mo—FG Baggett 21, 6:39. Mo—Sasser 25 pass from Mauk (Baggett kick), 1:04. Third Quarter Mo—FG Baggett 33, 13:03. Minn—M.Williams 54 pass from Mi.Leidner (Santoso kick), 11:48. Mo—Mauk 18 run (pass failed), 9:16. Minn—FG Santoso 38, 7:22. Fourth Quarter Mo—Hansbrough 78 run (Baggett kick), 9:22. Mo—Sasser 7 pass from Mauk (Baggett kick), 4:51. A,624. Mo Minn First downs 18 19 Rushes-yards 45-337 33-106 Passing 97 267 Comp-Att-Int 12-19-2 22-33-0 Return Yards 8 10 Punts-Avg. 4-40.5 5-40.8 Fumbles-Lost 0-0 5-3 Penalties-Yards 2-15 6-45 Time of Possession 30:05 29:55 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING —Missouri, Murphy 12-157, Hansbrough 15-114, Mauk 11-38, Brantley 1-19, Witter 2-12, Webb 10, Team 3-(minus 3). Minnesota, Cobb 21-81, Williams Jr. 1-20, Maye 2-15, Mi.Leidner 9-(minus 10). PASSING —Missouri, Mauk 12-19-2-97. Minnesota, Mi.Leidner 21-31-0-258, Cobb 1-1-0-9, Maye 0-1-0-0. RECEIVING —Missouri, Sasser 7-68, Murphy 2-16, Brown 1-14, Culkin 1-1, White 1-(minus 2). Minnesota, M.Williams 7-98, Cobb 4-33, Maye 3-75, Fruechte 314, Plsek 2-13, Edwards 1-21, Mi.Leidner 1-9, Thomas 1-4. ARLINGTON, Texas (AP) — Connor Cook and the Michigan State Spartans want to have a different role in the playoff talk next season. With their big comeback finish in the Cotton Bowl, the No. 7 Spartans could be set up as a viable champi onship contender next sea son, after their only losses this season were to playoff teams. Michigan State scored three touchdowns in the fourth quarter on New Year’s Day to beat playoffsnubbed and No. 4 Baylor 42-41 in the highest-scoring Cotton Bowl ever. “For us to win in such an emotional and dramatic fashion like you just saw out there, really just I think with all the guys coming back, all the juniors, really just makes us feel good and brings us closer together,” said Cook, who threw a 10-yard TD pass to Keith Mumphery with 17 seconds left. Michigan State (11-2), which won the Rose Bowl as Big Ten champions last season, has won four con secutive bowl games after trailing in each of them at halftime. The Spartans’ only two losses this season were to Pac-12 winner Oregon and Big Ten champ Ohio State. Down 41-21 going into the fourth quarter, Michigan State got the winning touch down after Marcus Rush blocked Chris Callahan’s 43-yard field goal attempt with 1:05 left. “It’s just sort of crazy,” coach Mark Dantonio said. “I really probably can’t put it into words. We just kept pace. We didn’t panic.” When two-time Big 12 champ Baylor got the ball back for one last try, Bryce Petty was sacked on consecutive plays before Riley Bullough’s clinching interception. That was quite a final defensive stand under coordinator Pat Narduzzi, who after 11 seasons and two schools with Dantonio is leaving the Spartans to take over as head coach at Pittsburgh. Narduzzi will be about 20 miles away toay to watch the Panthers play Houston in the Armed Forces Bowl on the TCU campus. The Cotton Bowl was the lead-in game Thursday to the two national semifinals that Baylor (11-2) hoped to be part of instead — though that doesn’t matter now. “We’ve played a lot of really good games over the last seven seasons. Won a lot of really good games. And this is one of the tougher non-wins that I’ve ever experienced,” Bay lor coach Art Briles said. “It’s got nothing to do with the big picture. The small picture right now is letting a game get away from us today.” Petty completed 36 of 51 passes for a Cotton Bowlrecord 550 yards and three touchdowns, two to speedy freshman KD Cannon and the other to 390-pount backup guard LaQuan McGowan in the third quarter for a 41-21 lead. Baylor had 583 total yards, even with minus-20 yards rushing. Jeremy Langford ran for 162 yards and three touchdowns for the Spar tans. Cook was 24-of-42 passing for 314 yards and two touchdowns with two interceptions. Langford’s 1-yard plunge with 4:55 left got the Spar tans to 41-35, a play after Cook’s 10-yard scramble that was initially ruled a touchdown before a replay review. Callahan had a 46-yard field goal attempt that ricocheted off the right upright to start the fourth quarter. Michigan State then got Cook’s 8-yard TD pass to tight end Josiah Price and recovered an onside kick. Cook threw a 39-yard pass on the first play after the recovery, but was scrambling to avoid pres sure on the next when threw an awkward pass right to linebacker Taylor Young, who ran 84 yards to the end zone. Young’s apparent touch down was wiped out by an illegal block, pushing Baylor back to its 43. After Petty’s fourth-down incompletion, Michigan State went 60 yards for Langford’s final score. “You hate to ‘if’ it, but if you don’t hit the upright, if you don’t get a field goal blocked, if you don’t have an offensive facemask, if you don’t get a penalty on an interception return, then I think we feel a lot different right now,” Briles said. Baylor was fifth in the final College Football Play off rankings, a spot ahead of Big 12 co-champion TCU, which the Bears beat 6158 in October with its own 21-point comeback in the fourth quarter. The Horned Frogs won their bowl game hand ily, beating Mississippi 42-3 in the Peach Bowl on Wednesday. Cannon, already with a 49-yard TD catch, split two Michigan State defend ers and was in a full sprint when he reached out with both hands and made a fin gertip grab near the 35. He gathered the ball in and ran to the end zone to finish a 74-yard TD before Callahan added another field goal for a 34-14 lead early in the third quarter. Cannon finished with eight catches for 197 yards. Corey Coleman had seven catches for 150 yards, including a 53-yard score on a throw from fellow receiver Jay Lee. “When you’re down like that against a potent offense that’s pretty much scoring at will, it doesn’t really look too good,” Cook said. “It’s just a true statement never to give up.” Michigan St. 14 0 7 21 Baylor 14 10 17 0 First Quarter MSU—Langford 2 run (Geiger kick), 12:27. Bay—Cannon 49 pass from Petty (Cal lahan kick), 8:56. MSU—Shelton 11 run (Geiger kick), 5:06. Bay—Coleman 53 pass from Lee (Cal lahan kick), 2:32. Second Quarter Bay—Petty 1 run (Callahan kick), 8:13. Bay—FG Callahan 25, 3:14. Third Quarter Bay—Cannon 74 pass from Petty (Cal lahan kick), 14:32. Bay—FG Callahan 46, 11:23. MSU—Langford 2 run (Geiger kick), 6:50. Bay—McGowan 18 pass from Petty (Callahan kick), 4:03. Fourth Quarter MSU—Price 8 pass from Cook (Geiger kick), 12:09. MSU—Langford 1 run (Geiger kick), 4:55. MSU—Mumphery 10 pass from Cook (Geiger kick), :17. A,464. MSU Bay First downs 29 25 Rushes-yards 46-238 22-(-20) Passing 314 603 Comp-Att-Int 24-42-2 37-52-1 Return Yards (-1) 68 Punts-Avg. 3-39.7 1-48.0 Fumbles-Lost 1-0 1-0 Penalties-Yards 7-75 11-105 Time of Possession 36:42 23:18 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING —Michigan St., Langford 27-162, Hill 7-26, Lippett 1-19, Shelton 2-11, Cook 6-11, Geiger 1-6, Kings Jr. 1-4, Team 1-(minus 1). Baylor, Linwood 11-26, Chan 1-(minus 2), Jefferson 2-(minus 2), Team 1-(minus 6), Petty 7(minus 36). PASSING —Michigan St., Cook 24-422-314. Baylor, Petty 36-51-1-550, Lee 1-1-0-53. RECEIVING —Michigan St., Lippett 5-74, Mumphery 4-87, Burbridge 4-57, Price 3-27, Kings Jr. 3-19, Langford 2-7, Lyles 1-21, Shelton 1-17, D.Williams 1-5. Baylor, Goodley 9-93, Cannon 8-197, Coleman 7-150, Norwood 6-64, Lee 237, C.Fuller 2-25, McGowan 1-18, Linwood 1-14, Armstead 1-5. A NEW YEAR’S SPARTY ATLANTA — Bo Wallace spent far too much of his final game on his back, courtesy of the TCU pass rush. Wallace threw three interceptions and was sacked five times as No. 9 Mississippi was overwhelmed in its 42-3 loss to No. 6 TCU in the Peach Bowl on Wednesday. Wallace leaves Ole Miss with career records for total yards, plays, 300-yards games and completion percent age. He also leaves with the sting of a loss in which the Rebels were held to 9 yards rushing and 129 total yards. “It’s pretty obvious that I didn’t want to go out this way,” Wallace said. “I didn’t want the seniors to go out this way. Really, we had a chance to help next year’s team in the preseason rankings and that was important to me.” Ole Miss (9-4) couldn’t keep pace with the Horned Frogs, who rode three touchdown passes from Trevone Boykin and a dominant defense to the lopsided win. Wallace and the Rebels had a poor start and never recovered. On the third play of the game, Wallace’s pass over the middle was intercepted by Chris Hackett. Two plays later, TCU led 7-0. The rout was on. With 2 minutes remaining in the half, Wallace tried to avoid a safety when he threw a short desperation pass in the end zone. The ball was caught by TCU defensive end James McFarland for a touchdown and a 28-0 halftime lead. “The first half was like a straight punch in the mouth,” said Ole Miss tight end Evan Engram. Ole Miss ranked first in the nation with its average of only 13.8 points allowed. Turnovers and TCU’s quickstrike offense were too much to overcome. The Rebels avoided the shutout when Gary Wun derlich kicked a 27-yard field goal with 7:18 remaining. No. 10 Georgia Tech 49, No. 8 Mississippi State 34 MIAMI GARDENS — Justin Thomas ran for three touchdowns and threw for another, and Georgia Tech rushed for 452 yards to beat Mississippi State in the Orange Bowl. Thomas ran for 121 yards and threw for 125. Synjyn Days rushed for 171 yards and three scores, including a 69-yarder that defused Mississippi State’s comeback bid. No. 10 Georgia Tech (11-3) earned its first Orange Bowl victory in 63 years. The Yellow Jackets improved to 2-8 in bowl games in the past 10 seasons. No. 8 Mississippi State (10-3) lost three of its final four games after being ranked No. 1 for five consecutive weeks. After Mississippi State scored on a Hail Mary pass, the Yellow Jackets bounced back with touchdowns on their first four possessions of the second half. No. 21 Boise State 38, No. 12 Arizona 30 GLENDALE, Ariz. — Jay Ajayi ran for 134 yards and three touchdowns and No. 21 Boise State made a late defensive stand to hold off No. 12 Arizona in the Fiesta Bowl. Boise State (12-2) raced to a 21-0 lead in the opening 10 minutes behind a string of big plays before allowing Arizona to claw its way back. The Wildcats marched quickly down the field in the closing sec onds, but Kamalei Correa sacked Anu Solomon at the 10 on the final play. Grant Hedrick threw for 309 yards and a touchdown, helping the Broncos cap a successful first season under coach Bryan Harsin with their third Fiesta Bowl victory. Mississippi mud Rebels, Bulldogs routed in bowl games AP Ole Miss quarterback Bo Wallace is hit in the end zone while throwing a pass that would be intercepted by Texas Christian. Michigan State rallies over Baylor in Cotton Bowl AP Michigan State wide receiver Keith Mumphery catches the game-winning touchdown pass with 17 seconds left in the fourth quarter. RU SSE LL H ANS B R OUG H Missouri running back WEDNESD AY G AMES Baylor was fifth in the final College Football Playoff rankings, a spot ahead of Big 12 co-champion TCU, which the Bears beat 61-58 in October with its own 21-point comeback in the fourth quarter. The Horned Frogs won their bowl game handily, beating Mississippi 42-3 in the Peach Bowl on Wednesday.

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STAT SHEET Page C4 | The News Herald | Friday, January 2, 2015 LeBron sidelined for next 2 weeks CLEVELAND — LeBron James of the Cleveland Cavaliers is expected to miss the next two weeks because of a strained left knee and back problem. James underwent a physical and an MRI on Wednesday, and was eventually diagnosed with the strains in his knee and lower back. The Cavs said Thursday he will be treated with “anti-inflammatories, rehabilitation, training room treatments and rest.” James has missed Cleveland’s last two games. If the two-week estimate proves correct, it will be the longest stretch of games James has missed in his NBA career. He missed five straight early in the 2007-08 season. The NBA’s four-time MVP is averaging 25.2 points this season, second best in the league. It’s a tumultuous time for the Cavaliers, who are still dealing with the aftereffects of losing center Anderson Varejao for the season. They’ve looked both brilliant and baffling at times in James’ first year back with the club after his four-year stint with the Miami Heat. Rose leads Bulls over Nuggets CHICAGO — Derrick Rose scored 13 of his 17 points in the fourth quarter, and the Chicago Bulls beat the Denver Nuggets 106-101 on Thursday night. Jimmy Butler scored 26 for Chicago, and Pau Gasol added 17 points, nine rebounds and a career-high nine blocks. The late surge by Rose lifted the Bulls to their 11th win in 13 games. The 2011 NBA MVP missed his first eight shots, including all seven in a scoreless first half, but the point guard dominated down the stretch, coming up with one big basket after another. Braves trade Carpenter, Shreve NEW YORK — The New York Yankees have bolstered their bullpen by acquiring David Carpenter and Chasen Shreve in a trade with the Atlanta Braves. Carpenter went 6-4 with three saves and a 3.54 ERA in 65 games with Atlanta last year. Shreve made his major league debut in July, and the left-hander allowed one earned run in 12 1/3 innings covering 15 games. The Braves received minor league left-hander Manny Banuelos in the deal. Banuelos went 2-3 with a 4.11 ERA in 26 games over three stops last season, finishing with Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre. Carpenter made his major league debut with Houston in 2011. The 29-year-old righty is 11-10 with a 3.62 ERA in 188 career games. Jets head to Seattle to interview for coach NEW YORK — Seattle defensive coordinator Dan Quinn and former Buffalo head coach Doug Marrone are on the New York Jets’ early list of candidates owner Woody Johnson will interview to replace the fired Rex Ryan. Johnson was set to fly to Seattle on Thursday night, along with consultants Ron Wolf and Charley Casserly, to meet this weekend with Quinn and Seahawks assistant head coach/offensive line coach Tom Cable for the Jets’ vacant head coaching position. Marrone became a prime candidate for the Jets when he abruptly stepped down Wednesday night as Bills coach. Television College football 11 a.m. ESPN — Armed Forces Bowl, Houston vs. Pittsburgh, at Fort Worth, Texas 2:20 p.m. ESPN — TaxSlayer Bowl, Iowa vs. Tennessee, at Jacksonville 5:45 p.m. ESPN — Alamo Bowl, Kansas St. vs. UCLA, at San Antonio 9:15 p.m. ESPN — Cactus Bowl, Washington vs. Oklahoma St., at Tempe, Ariz. Men’s college basketball 7 p.m. ESPNU — Florida St. at Mississippi St. 9 p.m. ESPNU — Southern California vs. Utah, at Salt Lake City 9 p.m.FS1 — UCLA at Colorado Prep football 3 p.m. ESPN2 — Under Armour All-America Game, Team Highlight vs. Team Armour, at St. Petersburg Women’s college basketball 6:30 p.m. FS1 — Marquette at Georgetown Ebro Schedule Monday Matinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Parx 11:25 a.m. Greyhound simulcast: Sarasota 11:30 a.m., Derby Lane 11:30 a.m., Palm Beach noon. Evening: Greyhound simulcast: Jacksonville 6:30 p.m. Tuesday Matinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Parx 11:25 a.m. Greyhound simulcast: Sarasota 11:30 a.m., Palm Beach noon. Evening: Greyhound simulcast: Derby Lane 6:30 p.m. Wednesday Matinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Tampa Bay 11:25 a.m., Aqueduct 11:30 a.m., Gulfstream 11:35 a.m.. Greyhound simulcast: Sarasota 11:30 a.m., Derby Lane 11:30 a.m., Jacksonville 11:30 a.m., Palm Beach noon. Evening: Jai-alai 6 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Jacksonville 6:30 p.m. Thursday Matinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Aqueduct 11:25 a.m., Gulfstream 11:35 a.m., Santa Anita 2:30 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Sarasota 11:30 a.m., Jacksonville 11:30 a.m., Palm Beach noon. Evening: Greyhound simulcast: Derby Lane 6:30 p.m. Friday Matinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Aqueduct 11:25 a.m., Tampa Bay 11:30 am., Gulfstream 11:35 a.m., Santa Antia 2:30 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Sarasota 11:30 a.m., Palm Beach noon. Evening: Greyhound simulcast: Palm Beach 6 p.m. Derby Lane 6:30 p.m., Jacksonville 6:30 p.m., Sarasota 6:30 p.m. Saturday Matinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Aqueduct 11:25 a.m., Tampa Bay 11:30 a.m., Gulfstream 11:35 a.m., Santa Anita 2:30 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Sarasota 11:30 a.m., Jacksonville 11:30 a.m., Derby Lane 11:30 a.m., Palm Beach noon. Evening: Greyhound simulcast: Palm Beach 6 p.m., Jacksonville 6:30 p.m., Derby Lane 6:30 p.m., Sarasota 6:30 p.m. Sunday Matinee: Thoroughbred simulcast: Parx 11:25 a.m., Aqueduct 11:25 a.m., Tampa Bay 11:30 a.m., Gulfstream 11:35 p.m., Santa Anita 2:30 p.m. Greyhound simulcast: Palm Beach noon, Jacksonville 12:30 p.m. POKER ROOM – (Ext. 180) Open 9 a.m. to 3 a.m. Monday through Friday and 24 hours on weekends and holidays. New Year’s schedule: Open 9 a.m. Monday to 3 a.m. Wednesday. LOCATION – Intersection of State 79 and State 20. INFORMATION – 234-3943. Odds Glantz-Culver Line FAVORITE LINE O/U UNDERDOG College football Today Armed Forces Bowl At Fort Worth, Texas Pittsburgh 3 (53) Houston TaxSlayer Bowl At Jacksonville Tennessee 3 (51) Iowa Alamo Bowl At San Antonio UCLA 1 (59) Kansas St. Cactus Bowl At Tempe, Ariz. Washington 6 (56) Oklahoma St. Saturday Birmingham (Ala.) Bowl Florida 6 (56) East Carolina Sunday GoDaddy Bowl At Mobile, Ala. Toledo 3 (67) Arkansas St. NFL Playoffs Saturday FAVORITE LINE O/U UNDERDOG at Carolina 5 (38) Arizona at Pittsburgh 3 (46) Baltimore Sunday at Indianapolis 3 (49) Cincinnati at Dallas 7 (48) Detroit NFL Playoffs Wild card playoffs Saturday Arizona at Carolina, 3:35 p.m.(ESPN) Baltimore at Pittsburgh, 7:15 p.m.(NBC) Sunday Cincinnati at Indianapolis, 1:05 (CBS) Detroit at Dallas, 3:40 p.m.(FOX) Divisional Playoffs Saturday, Jan. 10 Baltimore, Indianapolis or Cincinnati at New England, 3:35 p.m.(NBC) Arizona, Detroit or Carolina at Seattle, 7:15 p.m.(FOX) Sunday, Jan. 11 Arizona, Dallas or Carolina at Green Bay, 12:05 p.m.(FOX) Indianapolis, Cincinnati or Pittsburgh at Denver, 3:40 p.m.(CBS) Coaching changes ATLANTA — Mike Smith (fired, Dec. 29) BUFFALO — Doug Marrone (opted out, Dec. 31) CHICAGO — Marc Trestman (fired, Dec. 29) N.Y. JETS — Rex Ryan (fired, Dec. 29) OAKLAND — Dennis Allen (fired, Sept. 29); Tony Sparano, interim (Sept. 30) SAN FRANCISCO — Jim Harbaugh (mutual agreement, Dec. 28) NFL Draft-Early entries Jay Ajayi, rb, Boise State Sammie Coates, wr, Auburn Tevin Coleman, rb, Indiana Mike Davis, rb, South Carolina Durell Eskridge, s, Syracuse Ereck Flowers, ot, Miami Devin Funchess, wr, Michigan Melvin Gordon, rb, Wisconsin Randy Gregory, de, Nebraska Todd Gurley, rb, Georgia Eli Harold, de, Virginia Duke Johnson, rb, Miami Tyler Kroft, te, Rutgers Donovan Smith, ot, Penn State Jaelen Strong, wr, Arizona State Leonard Williams, dl, Southern Cal College football Bowl schedule Saturday, Dec. 20 New Orleans Bowl Louisiana-Lafayette 16, Nevada 3 New Mexico Bowl At Albuquerque Utah State 21, UTEP 6 Las Vegas Bowl Utah 45, Colorado State 10 Famous Idaho Potato Bowl At Boise Air Force 38, Western Michigan 24 Camelia Bowl At Montgomery, Ala. Bowling Green 33, South Alabama 28 Monday, Dec. 22 Miami Beach Bowl Memphis 55, BYU 48, 2OT Tuesday, Dec. 23 Boca Raton Bowl Marshall 52, Northern Illinois 23 Poinsettia Bowl At San Diego Navy 17, San Diego State 16 Wednesday, Dec. 24 Bahamas Bowl At Nassau Western Kentucky 49, Central Michigan 48 Hawaii Bowl At Honolulu Rice 30, Fresno State 6 Friday, Dec. 26 Heart of Dallas Bowl Louisiana Tech 35, Illinois 18 Quick Lane Bowl At Detroit Rutgers 40, North Carolina 21 St. Petersburg (Fla.) Bowl N.C. State 34, UCF 27 Saturday, Dec. 27 Military Bowl At Annapolis, Md. Virginia Tech 33, Cincinnati 17 Sun Bowl At El Paso, Texas Arizona State 36, Duke 31 Independence Bowl At Shreveport, La. South Carolina 24, Miami 21 Pinstripe Bowl At Bronx, N.Y. Penn State 31, Boston College 30, OT Holiday Bowl At San Diego Southern Cal 45, Nebraska 42 Monday, Dec. 29 Liberty Bowl At Memphis, Tenn. Texas A&M 45, West Virginia 37 Russell Athletic Bowl At Orlando, Fla. Clemson 40, Oklahoma 6 Texas Bowl At Houston Arkansas 31, Texas 7 Tuesday, Dec. 30 Music City Bowl At Nashville, Tenn. Notre Dame 31, LSU 28 Belk Bowl At Charlotte, N.C. Georgia 37, Louisville 14 Fosters Farm Bowl At Santa Clara, Calif. Stanford 45, Maryland 21 Wednesday, Dec. 31 Peach Bowl At Atlanta TCU 42, Mississippi 3 Fiesta Bowl At Glendale, Ariz. Boise State 38, Arizona 30 Orange Bowl At Miami Gardens Georgia Tech 49, Mississippi State 34 Thursday, Jan. 1 Outback Bowl At Tampa Wisconsin 34, Auburn 31, OT Cotton Bowl Classic At Arlington, Texas Michigan State 42, Baylor 41 Citrus Bowl At Orlando Missouri 33, Minnesota 17 Rose Bowl At Pasadena, Calif. Playoff semifinal: Oregon 59, Florida State 20 Sugar Bowl At New Orleans Playoff semifinal: Alabama (12-1) vs. Ohio State (12-1), (n) Friday, Jan. 2 Armed Forces Bowl At Fort Worth, Texas Pittsburgh (6-6) vs. Houston (7-5), 11 a.m.(ESPN) TaxSlayer Bowl At Jacksonville Iowa (7-5) vs. Tennessee (6-6), 2:20 p.m.(ESPN) Alamo Bowl At San Antonio UCLA (9-3) vs. Kansas State (9-3), 5:45 p.m.(ESPN) Cactus Bowl At Tempe, Ariz. Oklahoma State (6-6) vs. Washington (8-5), 9:15 p.m.(ESPN) Saturday, Jan. 3 Birmingham (Ala.) Bowl Florida (6-5) vs. East Carolina (8-4), Noon(ESPN2) Sunday, Jan. 4 GoDaddy Bowl At Mobile, Ala. Toledo (8-4) vs. Arkansas State (7-5), 8 p.m.(ESPN) Saturday, Jan. 10 Medal of Honor Bowl At Charleston, S.C. American vs. National, 1:30 p.m. Monday, Jan. 12 College Football Championship At Arlington, Texas Sugar Bowl winner vs. Rose Bowl winner, 7:30 p.m.(ESPN) Saturday, Jan. 17 East-West Shrine Classic At St. Petersburg East vs. West, 3 p.m.(NFLN) NFLPA Collegiate Bowl At Carson, Calif. National vs. American, 3 p.m.(ESPN2) Saturday, Jan. 24 Senior Bowl At Mobile, Ala. North vs. South, 3 p.m.(NFLN) Late Wednesday No. 6 TCU 42, No. 9 Mississippi 3 Mississippi 0 0 0 3— 3 TCU 14 14 14 0 First Quarter TCU—Green 31 pass from Listenbee (Oberkrom kick), 14:00. TCU—Green 15 run (Oberkrom kick), 6:23. Second Quarter TCU—Doctson 12 pass from Boykin (Oberkrom kick), 11:00. TCU—McFarland 0 interception return (Oberkrom kick), 2:00. Third Quarter TCU—Listenbee 35 pass from Boykin (Oberkrom kick), 13:37. TCU—Doctson 27 pass from Boykin (Oberkrom kick), 13:09. Fourth Quarter Miss—FG Wunderlich 27, 7:18. A,706. Miss TCU First downs 10 24 Rushes-yards 37-9 42-177 Passing 120 246 Comp-Att-Int 11-27-3 27-37-3 Return Yards 39 7 Punts-Avg. 8-43.1 4-42.3 Fumbles-Lost 2-1 2-1 Penalties-Yards 6-44 5-55 Time of Possession 25:00 35:00 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING —Mississippi, Wilkins 4-61, Mathers 7-26, Kincade 3-5, Walton 8-3, Wallace 14-(minus 14), Team 1-(minus 72). TCU, Green 18-68, Boykin 10-65, T.Johnson 8-31, Hicks 4-6, Murphy 1-4, Echols-Luper 1-3. PASSING —Mississippi, Wallace 10-233-109, Kincade 1-3-0-11, Team 0-1-0-0. TCU, Boykin 22-31-3-187, Kohlhausen 45-0-28, Listenbee 1-1-0-31. RECEIVING —Mississippi, Pack 4-55, Core 3-28, Engram 1-11, Mathers 1-11, Adeboyejo 1-10, Walton 1-5. TCU, Doct son 6-59, Listenbee 3-44, Slanina 3-16, D.Porter 3-15, Green 2-46, E.Porter 2-20, Gray 2-18, Moore 2-12, Gilbert 1-8, D.White 1-8, Story 1-2, Boykin 1-(minus 2). No. 10 Georgia Tech 49, No. 8 Mississippi State 34 Mississippi St. 0 20 0 14 Georgia Tech 14 7 21 7 First Quarter GaT—Days 3 run (Butker kick), 12:38. GaT—Waller 41 pass from Thomas (But ker kick), 1:37. Second Quarter MSSt—FG Sobiesk 32, 12:57. MSSt—Prescott 5 run (Sobiesk kick), 9:53. MSSt—FG Sobiesk 30, 5:12. GaT—Thomas 13 run (Butker kick), :29. MSSt—F.Ross 42 pass from Prescott (Sobiesk kick), :00. Third Quarter GaT—Days 69 run (Butker kick), 14:05. GaT—Thomas 32 run (Butker kick), 7:58. GaT—Thomas 15 run (Butker kick), 4:17. Fourth Quarter MSSt—D.Wilson 7 pass from Prescott (Sobiesk kick), 14:53. GaT—Days 4 run (Butker kick), 11:54. MSSt—D.Wilson 12 pass from Prescott (Sobiesk kick), 2:20. A,211. MSSt GaT First downs 33 26 Rushes-yards 33-152 61-452 Passing 453 125 Comp-Att-Int 33-51-1 7-12-1 Return Yards 51 0 Punts-Avg. 1-51.0 3-33.7 Fumbles-Lost 1-1 1-0 Penalties-Yards 5-40 3-45 Time of Possession 25:13 34:47 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING —Mississippi St., J.Robinson 13-75, Prescott 15-47, Shumpert 4-25, Lewis 1-5. Georgia Tech, Days 21-171, Thomas 14-121, Laskey 10-63, Perkins 759, Hill 5-23, Bostic 2-15, Andrews 1-1, Team 1-(minus 1). PASSING —Mississippi St., Prescott 3351-1-453. Georgia Tech, Thomas 7-12-1125. RECEIVING —Mississippi St., D.Wilson 9-105, Morrow 6-117, F.Ross 6-102, Lewis 5-63, M.Johnson 3-36, R.Johnson 2-17, Walley 1-7, F.Brown 1-6. Georgia Tech, Waller 5-114, Summers 2-11. No. 21 Boise State 38, No. 12 Arizona 30 Boise St. 21 10 7 0 Arizona 7 10 10 3 First Quarter Boi—Ajayi 56 run (Goodale kick), 13:18. Boi—Anderson 57 pass from Hedrick (Goodale kick), 9:17. Boi—Ajayi 16 run (Goodale kick), 5:12. Ari—Solomon 1 run (Skowron kick), 1:23. Second Quarter Boi—Ajayi 1 run (Goodale kick), 11:56. Ari—Wilson 1 run (Skowron kick), 8:03. Ari—FG Skowron 42, :30. Boi—FG Goodale 36, :03. Third Quarter Ari—FG Skowron 24, 9:11. Boi—Deayon 16 interception return (Goodale kick), 1:57. Ari—Grant 51 pass from Solomon (Skow ron kick), :41. Fourth Quarter Ari—FG Skowron 32, 6:11. A,896. Boi Ari First downs 22 29 Rushes-yards 34-162 56-157 Passing 309 335 Comp-Att-Int 24-35-1 28-50-2 Return Yards 46 33 Punts-Avg. 9-47.6 7-43.1 Fumbles-Lost 2-1 0-0 Penalties-Yards 6-72 6-55 Time of Possession 29:01 30:59 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING —Boise St., Ajayi 22-134, Hed rick 8-29, McNichols 2-4, Williams-Rhodes 2-(minus 5). Arizona, Wilson 19-86, JonesGrigsby 14-39, Solomon 23-32. PASSING —Boise St., Hedrick 24-34-1309, Sperbeck 0-1-0-0. Arizona, Solomon 28-49-2-335, Team 0-1-0-0. RECEIVING —Boise St., Sperbeck 12199, Ajayi 5-(minus 1), Anderson 3-80, Roh 2-9, Ware 1-17, Huff 1-5. Arizona, C.Jones 8-117, Griffey 6-66, Grant 4-69, Jones-Grigsby 4-40, Hill 3-25, Neal 1-7, Johnson 1-6, Bondurant 1-5. NBA Standings EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L Pct GB Toronto 24 8 .750 — Brooklyn 15 16 .484 8 Boston 11 18 .379 11 New York 5 29 .147 20 Philadelphia 4 26 .133 19 Southeast Division W L Pct GB Atlanta 23 8 .742 — Washington 22 9 .710 1 Miami 14 19 .424 10 Orlando 13 22 .371 12 Charlotte 10 23 .303 14 Central Division W L Pct GB Chicago 23 10 .697 — Cleveland 18 14 .563 4 Milwaukee 17 16 .515 6 Indiana 12 21 .364 11 Detroit 8 23 .258 14 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division W L Pct GB Memphis 23 8 .742 — Houston 22 9 .710 1 Dallas 23 10 .697 1 San Antonio 20 14 .588 4 New Orleans 16 16 .500 7 Northwest Division W L Pct GB Portland 26 7 .788 — Oklahoma City 16 17 .485 10 Denver 13 20 .394 13 Utah 11 21 .344 14 Minnesota 5 25 .167 19 Pacific Division W L Pct GB Golden State 25 5 .833 — L.A. Clippers 22 11 .667 4 Phoenix 18 16 .529 9 Sacramento 13 19 .406 13 L.A. Lakers 10 22 .313 16 Wednesday’s Games Boston 106, Sacramento 84 Indiana 106, Miami 95 L.A. Clippers 99, New York 78 Houston 102, Charlotte 83 San Antonio 95, New Orleans 93, OT Milwaukee 96, Cleveland 80 Oklahoma City 137, Phoenix 134, OT Thursday’s Games Chicago 106, Denver 101 Sacramento at Minnesota, (n) Friday’s Games Brooklyn at Orlando, 6 p.m. Cleveland at Charlotte, 6 p.m. Dallas at Boston, 6:30 p.m. Detroit at New York, 6:30 p.m. Houston at New Orleans, 7 p.m. Washington at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m. Indiana at Milwaukee, 7:30 p.m. Philadelphia at Phoenix, 8 p.m. Atlanta at Utah, 8 p.m. Toronto at Golden State, 9:30 p.m. Memphis at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m. Saturday’s Games Charlotte at Orlando, 6 p.m. Boston at Chicago, 7 p.m. Miami at Houston, 7 p.m. Utah at Minnesota, 7 p.m. Washington at San Antonio, 7:30 p.m. Memphis at Denver, 8 p.m. Atlanta at Portland, 9 p.m. Philadelphia at L.A. Clippers, 9:30 p.m. Leaders Through Dec. 31 Scoring G FG FT PTS AVG Harden, HOU 31 260 260 858 27.7 James, CLE 29 256 171 731 25.2 Davis, NOR 31 294 165 753 24.3 Bryant, LAL 29 235 184 698 24.1 Anthony, NYK 30 270 135 717 23.9 Wade, MIA 25 227 111 580 23.2 Aldridge, POR 29 263 122 663 22.9 Curry, GOL 30 244 108 684 22.8 Grifn, LAC 33 288 163 746 22.6 Lillard, POR 33 244 144 723 21.9 Butler, CHI 30 211 201 652 21.7 Bosh, MIA 25 195 108 534 21.4 Thmpson, GOL 29 219 90 611 21.1 Irving, CLE 30 224 127 625 20.8 Gay, SAC 30 221 149 623 20.8 Lowry, TOR 32 228 149 661 20.7 Ellis, DAL 33 268 108 681 20.6 Gasol, MEM 31 228 166 624 20.1 Hayward, UTA 32 204 150 614 19.2 Nowitzki, DAL 31 207 126 579 18.7 FG Percentage FG FGA PCT Wright, BOS 112 153 .732 Jordan, LAC 133 188 .707 Chandler, DAL 130 191 .681 Zeller, BOS 108 171 .632 Howard, HOU 133 223 .596 A. Johnson, TOR 121 210 .576 Davis, NOR 294 520 .565 Stoudemire, NYK 148 265 .558 Favors, UTA 187 339 .552 Valanciunas, TOR 138 258 .535 Rebounds G OF DF TT AVG Jordan, LAC 33 140 312 452 13.7 Drummond, DET 31 154 243 397 12.8 Chandler, DAL 32 131 251 382 11.9 Randolph, MEM 26 97 200 297 11.4 Vucevic, ORL 29 88 239 327 11.3 Gasol, CHI 29 71 250 321 11.1 Aldridge, POR 29 80 230 310 10.7 Duncan, SAN 29 77 233 310 10.7 Davis, NOR 31 84 243 327 10.5 Love, CLE 31 58 255 313 10.1 Assists G AST AVG Wall, WAS 31 320 10.3 Lawson, DEN 31 318 10.3 Rondo, DAL 28 284 10.1 Paul, LAC 33 310 9.4 Curry, GOL 30 230 7.7 Lowry, TOR 32 245 7.7 James, CLE 29 221 7.6 Carter-Williams, PHL 23 169 7.3 Holiday, NOR 32 232 7.3 Teague, ATL 28 196 7.0 College basketball Men’s top 25 fared Thursday 1. Kentucky (13-0) did not play. Next: vs. Missisippi, Tuesday. 2. Duke (12-0) did not play. Next: vs. Boston College, Saturday. 3. Virginia (12-0) did not play. Next: at Miami, Saturday. 4. Wisconsin (13-1) did not play. Next: at Northwestern, Sunday. 5. Louisville (12-1) did not play. Next: at Wake Forest, Sunday. 6. Villanova (13-0) did not play. Next: at Seton Hall, Saturday. 7. Gonzaga (13-1) did not play. Next: at Portland, Saturday. 8. Arizona (12-1) did not play. Next: vs. Arizona State, Sunday. 9. Iowa State (10-1) did not play. Next: vs. South Carolina, Saturday. 10. Utah (10-2) did not play. Next: vs. Southern Cal, Friday. 11. Texas (11-2) did not play. Next: at Texas Tech, Saturday. 12. Maryland (13-1) did not play. Next: vs. Minnesota, Saturday. 13. Kansas (10-2) did not play. Next: vs. UNLV, Sunday. 14. Notre Dame (13-1) did not play. Next: vs. Georgia Tech, Saturday. 15. St. John’s (11-2) did not play. Next: vs. Butler, Saturday. 16. Wichita State (11-2) did not play. Next: vs. Illinois State, Saturday. 17. West Virginia (12-1) did not play. Next: at TCU, Saturday. 18. Oklahoma (9-3) did not play. Next: vs. No. 22 Baylor, Saturday. 19. North Carolina (10-3) did not play. Next: at Clemson, Saturday. 20. Ohio State (11-3) did not play. Next: vs. Illinois, Saturday. 21. Washington (11-1) did not play. Next: at California, Friday. 22. Baylor (11-1) did not play. Next: vs. No. 18 Oklahoma, Saturday. 23. Northern Iowa (11-2) lost to Evansville 52-49. Next: vs. Loyola of Chicago, Sunday. 24. Colorado State (14-0) did not play. Next: at New Mexico, Saturday. 25. Georgetown (8-4) did not play. Next: vs. Creighton, Saturday. Men’s scores SOUTH Belmont 78, SE Missouri 77 Freed-Hardeman 80, Benedictine Springfield 65 UT-Martin 84, Crowley’s Ridge 61 MIDWEST E. Illinois 61, Tennessee Tech 59 Evansville 52, Northern Iowa 49 SIU-Edwardsville 73, Jacksonville St. 57 FAR WEST BYU 81, Santa Clara 46 E. Washington 84, Weber St. 78 North Dakota 67, Montana St. 60 Pacific 77, Loyola Marymount 63 Women’s scores EAST Morgan St. 54, UMBC 46 MIDWEST E. Illinois 67, Tennessee Tech 59 Michigan 89, Penn St. 53 Minnesota 81, Purdue 68 Northwestern 68, Wisconsin 46 Ohio St. 85, Rutgers 68 FAR WEST Montana 64, N. Colorado 58 N. Arizona 64, Sacramento St. 60 NHL Standings EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Tampa Bay 39 24 11 4 52 127 100 Montreal 37 24 11 2 50 100 86 Detroit 38 20 9 9 49 108 95 Toronto 38 21 14 3 45 128 114 Boston 38 19 15 4 42 101 103 Florida 35 16 10 9 41 82 93 Ottawa 36 15 14 7 37 97 99 Buffalo 38 14 21 3 31 76 128 Metropolitan Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Pittsburgh 37 23 9 5 51 111 87 N.Y. Islanders 37 25 11 1 51 117 103 Washington 37 19 11 7 45 108 96 N.Y. Rangers 35 20 11 4 44 107 89 Columbus 35 16 16 3 35 89 110 Philadelphia 37 14 16 7 35 103 113 New Jersey 39 13 19 7 33 83 111 Carolina 37 10 23 4 24 73 100 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Chicago 38 25 11 2 52 119 81 Nashville 36 24 9 3 51 106 78 St. Louis 37 22 12 3 47 108 93 Winnipeg 38 19 12 7 45 96 92 Dallas 36 17 14 5 39 108 118 Minnesota 35 17 14 4 38 100 98 Colorado 37 14 15 8 36 96 112 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Anaheim 39 24 9 6 54 107 104 Vancouver 35 21 11 3 45 103 94 San Jose 38 20 13 5 45 104 96 Calgary 39 21 15 3 45 114 103 Los Angeles 38 18 12 8 44 103 94 Arizona 37 14 19 4 32 86 121 Edmonton 38 8 22 8 24 82 131 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Wednesday’s Games Toronto 4, Boston 3, SO N.Y. Islanders 5, Winnipeg 2 Tampa Bay 5, Buffalo 1 N.Y. Rangers 5, Florida 2 Pittsburgh 2, Carolina 1 Columbus 3, Minnesota 1 Detroit 3, New Jersey 1 San Jose 3, Anaheim 0 Dallas 6, Arizona 0 Colorado 4, Philadelphia 3, OT Calgary 4, Edmonton 3, OT Thursday’s Games Washington 3, Chicago 2 Los Angeles at Vancouver, (n) Friday’s Games Florida at Buffalo, 6 p.m. Montreal at New Jersey, 6 p.m. Tampa Bay at Pittsburgh, 6 p.m. Philadelphia at Carolina, 6 p.m. Toronto at Minnesota, 7 p.m. Edmonton at Colorado, 8 p.m. N.Y. Islanders at Calgary, 8 p.m. St. Louis at Anaheim, 9 p.m. Saturday’s Games Ottawa at Boston, Noon Nashville at Los Angeles, 3 p.m. Philadelphia at New Jersey, 6 p.m. Buffalo at N.Y. Rangers, 6 p.m. Montreal at Pittsburgh, 6 p.m. Toronto at Winnipeg, 6 p.m. Minnesota at Dallas, 7 p.m. Columbus at Arizona, 7 p.m. Detroit at Vancouver, 9 p.m. St. Louis at San Jose, 9:30 p.m. Transactions BASEBALL Frontier League FLORENCE FREEDOM — Signed 1B Rob Kelly and RHP Chuck Weaver to contract extensions. Signed RHP Ethan Gibbons. SOUTHERN ILLINOIS MINERS — Exercised the 2015 contract options on OF Aaron Gates, RHP Anthony Montefusco, LHP Hunter Ackerman, RHP James Bierlein, OF Jay Austin, INF Marquis Riley, LHP Matt Bywater, OF Matt Howard, RHP Miguel Ramirez, LHP James Woods, and OF Tyler Booth. On The AIR Area EVENTS Girls basketball: North Bay Haven at Franklin County tournament, Bay at Port St. Joe tournament Boys basketball: Choctawhatchee at Mosley 5:30 p.m. In The BLEACHERS SPOR TS Briefs

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Friday, January 2, 2015 | The News Herald | Page C5 Gordon runs wild in OT win over Auburn TAMPA (AP) — Wisconsin hoisted Barry Alvarez into the air for one more victory ride. The school’s career victory leader called it quits — again — after the 17th-ranked Badgers took down No. 19 Auburn 34-31 in overtime in the Outback Bowl on Thursday. It took a strong farewell per formance by Melvin Gordon, a 25-yard field goal in overtime, and Alvarez’s steady leadership in the wake of the abrupt departure of former coach Gary Andersen to get the job done. “I’ve had a couple of those, and I like them,” Alvarez, the school’s athletic director for the past 11 years, said after being doused with a sports drink and carried off the field after stopping a fourgame skid in bowl games. “It’s a little uncomfortable afterwards, but I like them. And it’s special for those seniors. It meant a lot to them. They won a lot of games here,” Alvarez added. “They haven’t won a lot of bowl games. So they put a lot into it, they bought into it, they gave us strong leadership when it was needed, and now they can enjoy it.” Wisconsin improved to 9-4 in bowl games coached by Alvarez. He led the Badgers to 118 victo ries over 16 seasons before retir ing in 2005, and has answered a plea from players to return to the sideline twice in the last three seasons to guide the team in a January game after losing their coach — first Bret Bielema to Arkansas and then Andersen to Oregon State. “Let me make something clear: I didn’t want to coach these guys. I initially said I’d feel uncom fortable doing that again when they asked me. They asked me to sleep on it, that they would come back,” Alvarez said, adding that he eventually agreed because “it’s still about the kids or we wouldn’t have jobs.” And now that he’s done it, and tasted winning again? “That’s it,” Alvarez said with out hesitation. “No mas.” Gordon ran for an Outbackrecord 251 yards and three touch downs. Rafael Gaglianone kicked the winning field goal on the open ing possession of OT, enabling the Badgers (11-3) to rebound from a 59-0 loss to Ohio State in the Big Ten championship game. It was also a bounce-back outing for Gordon, who carried 34 times and scored on runs of 25, 53 and 6 yards to threaten Barry Sanders’ FBS single-season rush ing record. He also joined the Hall of Famer and Central Florida’s Kevin Smith as the only players to rush for at least 2,000 yards while also scoring 30 touchdowns in the same season. The Wisconsin star, who has already declared he will skip his final season of eligibility to enter the NFL draft, finished with 2,587 yards in 14 games — second most in FBS history. Sanders gained 2,628 in 11 games for Oklahoma State in 1988, when the NCAA did not include bowl results in a player’s season or career totals. Gordon finished with 29 rush ing TDs, 32 overall. He conceded that he was motivated to do well, in part, by an Auburn player who questioned whether the Wiscon sin running back would be as successful if he played in the SEC. “It had me a little fired up, I’m not going to lie. I had to bite my tongue a little bit when I heard it,” Gordon said. “But there’s backs out there that’s going to challenge you, and you’ve just got to step up to the plate, and I think I did that.” Nick Marshall threw for two touchdowns for Auburn, which also got a pair of TDs on the ground from Cameron Artis-Payne. AP Wisconsin’s Melvin Gordon finished the season with 29 rushing TDs, 32 overall. Auburn 7 7 3 14 0 Wisconsin 7 0 14 10 3 First Quarter Wis—Clement 7 pass from Stave (Gaglianone kick), 11:10. Aub—Artis-Payne 2 run (Carlson kick), 2:16. Second Quarter Aub—Louis 66 pass from Marshall (Carlson kick), 8:01. Third Quarter Wis—Gordon 25 run (Gaglianone kick), 12:09. Aub—FG Carlson 51, 9:32. Wis—Gordon 53 run (Gaglianone kick), :20. Fourth Quarter Aub—Uzomah 20 pass from Marshall (Carlson kick), 11:21. Wis—Gordon 6 run (Gaglianone kick), 7:58. Aub—Artis-Payne 2 run (Carlson kick), 2:55. Wis—FG Gaglianone 29, :07. Overtime Wis—FG Gaglianone 25. A,023. Aub Wis First downs 21 31 Rushes-yards 43-219 54-400 Passing 216 121 Comp-Att-Int 16-23-0 14-27-3 Return Yards 0 0 Punts-Avg. 4-45.8 3-26.3 Fumbles-Lost 0-0 0-0 Penalties-Yards 9-75 3-28 Time of Possession 26:56 33:04 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING —Auburn, Artis-Payne 26-126, Louis 3-41, Grant 5-30, Marshall 7-18, Bray 1-5, Team 1-(minus 1). Wisconsin, Gordon 34-251, Clement 15-105, Doe 2-39, Rushing 1-16, D.Watt 1-2, Stave 1-(minus 13). PASSING —Auburn, Marshall 15-22-0-217, Uzomah 1-1-0-(minus 1). Wisconsin, Stave 1427-3-121. RECEIVING —Auburn, Bray 5-63, Coates 4-24, M.Davis 2-21, Louis 1-66, Uzomah 1-20, ArtisPayne 1-18, Ray 1-5, Marshall 1-(minus 1). Wis consin, Erickson 4-38, Arneson 2-33, Fumagalli 2-18, Clement 2-11, Gordon 2-2, Doe 1-10, Fred rick 1-9. BADGERS 34, TIGERS 31 TAMPA (AP) — Incoming Auburn defensive coor dinator Will Muschamp got an eyeful in the Tigers’ latest loss. Melvin Gordon ran for an Outback Bowl-record 251 yards and three touchdowns, and Rafael Gaglia none kicked a 25-yard field goal in overtime to give the 18th-ranked Wisconsin Badgers a 34-31 victory over the No. 19 Tigers on Thursday. Auburn fired defensive coordinator Ellis Johnson after yielding 539 yards to Alabama and finishing ninth in the SEC in total defense, and wasted no time in hiring the former Florida coach to lead the Tigers defense next season. Muschamp was on the field before the game and wearing headphones in the coaches box during it, but not working while interim defensive coordinator Charlie Harbison led the unit against Wisconsin. “He was listening and observing,” Auburn head coach Gus Malzahn said. “He’s trying to get to know our guys and see how they react. He’s going to get our defense going.” Gordon scored on runs of 25, 53 and 6 yards, bouncing back from a subpar performance in the Big Ten championship game to threaten Barry Sanders’ FBS single-season rushing record. “Before you play a guy, you’d be like ‘you’ve got to show me’ and today he showed us that he’s one of the best running backs in the country,” Auburn cornerback Trovon Reed said. The Wisconsin star, who has already declared he’ll skip his final season of eligibility to enter the NFL draft, finished with 2,587 yards in 14 games. Muschamp gets close look in Tigers’ loss PEACH BOWL Atlanta Dec. 31 OUTBACK BOWL Tampa, Fla. Jan. 1 SUGAR BOWL New Orleans Jan.1 ORANGE BOWL Miami Dec. 31 GODADDY BOWL Mobile, Ala. Jan. 4 COTTON BOWL Arlington, Texas Jan. 1 BIRMINGHAM BOWL Birmingham, Ala. Jan. 3 GATOR BOWL Jacksonville, Fla. Jan. 2 ROSE BOWL Pasadena, Calif. Jan. 1 FIESTA BOWL Glendale, Ariz Dec. 31 FBC BOWL LOGOS 2 12094 : College football bowl logos; 1c; stand-alone; staff; E T A 1 p.m. Jan. 12 CACTUS BOWL Tempe, Ariz. Jan. 2 These logos are provided to you for use in an editorial news context onl y . Other uses, including as a linking device on a W eb site, or in an advertising or promotional piece, may violate this entity ’ s trademark or other intellectual property rights, and may violate your agreement with A P . ALAMO BOWL San Antonio Jan. 2 ARMED FORCES BOWL Ft. Worth, Texas Jan. 2 FOSTER FARMS BOWL Santa Clara Dec. 30 CITRUS BOWL Orlando, Fla. Jan. 1 COLLEGE FOOTBALL The first playoff game at college football’s highest level, the type of postseason game fans have longed for forever, looked like it would be a classic for about two and a half quarters. Under a cloudless sky, on a chilly day in Pasadena, the Rose Bowl featured the third matchup of Heisman Tro phy winners and a couple of quarterbacks who could be vying to be the first overall pick in April’s NFL draft. On the same field where Florida State erased an 18-point deficit against Auburn to win the national title last year, the Seminoles trailed at half for the sixth time this season. And then the hole got deeper. Seminoles freshman Dalvin Cook was stripped by Derrick Malone Jr. with Florida State in Oregon ter ritory. The Ducks quickly flipped the field and Royce Freeman scored his second touchdown of the day from 3 yards out to make it 25-13. Helfrich had called the Seminoles “unflappable” during the week leading up to the Rose Bowl — and they showed it on the next drive. Winston threw an 18-yard touchdown pass to freshman Travis Rudolph to make it 25-20 Oregon with 8:07 left in the third. Then the Ducks took off. Mariota zipped a pass to Darren Carrington for a 56-yard touchdown pass. Then another fumble by Cook, and the wave of big plays and points the Ducks do better than any team in the country started rumbling. Mariota hit Carrington for a 30-yard touchdown and the Rose Bowl, filled mostly with green and yellow, was rumbling, too. With the sun just about set behind the San Gabriel mountains, the Ducks put the ’Noles away. On fourth-and-5 in Ore gon territory, Winston had lots of time but couldn’t find a receiver. He was flushed from the pocket and as he loaded to throw his foot slipped and the ball popped out of his hands. “It kind of looked like he slipped on a banana, like in cartoons,” Oregon line backer Torrodney Prevot said. The fumble bounced into Tony Washington’s arms and the defensive end went 58 yards for a score. “It was just a crazy play,” Winston said. The wave had washed over Florida State. Florida State had not lost since Nov. 24, 2012, to Flor ida. Winston had never lost a college start in 26 tries. Turnovers were a prob lem all year for Seminoles, who came into the game 84th in the nation in turnover margin (minus-3), and in the playoff it was ultimately what doomed them. “We beat ourselves,” Win ston said. “We were never stopped at all.” Winston, whose two years at Florida State have been filled with spectacular play on the field and controversy off, still has two years of eli gibility left, but he has noth ing left to prove. Mariota and the Ducks are moving on, with a chance to add the biggest prize of all — the only significant one missing — to their trophy case. Streamers unhappy BRISTOL, Conn. — Fans looking to watch the Rose Bowl on their tablets or computers got an error message during the first half instead of the WatchESPN stream. The cable network’s online feed of the first College Football Playoff game went down Thursday night, leaving anyone looking to watch the game anywhere besides a tele vision out of luck. The stream appeared to begin working again for at least some users during halftime. ESPN spokesman Josh Krule witz says the network is sorry for the inconvenience. He said dur ing the third quarter of the Rose Bowl that the issues appeared to be largely resolved. ROSE BOWL from page C1 Florida State 3 10 7 0 Oregon 8 10 27 14 First Quarter FSU—FG Aguayo 28, 9:06. Ore—Freeman 1 run (French pass from Alie), 6:55. Second Quarter Ore—FG Schneider 28, 10:12. FSU—FG Aguayo 26, 5:18. Ore—Tyner 1 run (Schneider kick), 2:18. FSU—K.Williams 10 run (Aguayo kick), :36. Third Quarter Ore—Freeman 3 run (Schneider kick), 11:54. FSU—Rudolph 18 pass from Winston (Aguayo kick), 8:07. Ore—Carrington 56 pass from Mariota (Schneider kick), 6:43. Ore—Carrington 30 pass from Mariota (Schneider kick), 4:21. Ore—Washington 58 fumble return (kick blocked), 1:36. Fourth Quarter Ore—Mariota 23 run (Schneider kick), 13:56. Ore—Tyner 21 run (Schneider kick), 10:13. A,322. FSU Ore First downs 28 30 Rushes-yards 39-180 45-301 Passing 348 338 Comp-Att-Int 29-48-1 26-36-1 Return Yards 0 0 Punts-Avg. 4-33.5 2-38.5 Fumbles-Lost 7-4 2-1 Penalties-Yards 6-48 6-50 Time of Possession 32:43 27:17 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING —Florida St., D.Cook 15-103, K.Williams 12-80, R.Green 2-7, Pender 25, Winston 8-(minus 15). Oregon, Tyner 13-124, Mariota 8-62, Freeman 12-44, Benoit 4-40, Bassett 4-25, Nelson 0-14, Marshall 1-0, Team 1-(minus 2), Lockie 2-(minus 6). PASSING —Florida St., Winston 29-451-348, Maguire 0-3-0-0. Oregon, Mariota 26-36-1-338. RECEIVING —Florida St., Rudolph 696, Greene 6-59, Wilson 5-72, K.Williams 5-59, D.Cook 3-24, Lane 2-22, Stevenson 1-12, O’Leary 1-4. Oregon, Carrington 7165, Baylis 6-73, Marshall 5-20, Nelson 4-40, Stanford 2-21, Freeman 2-19. DUCKS 59, SEMINOLES 20 PEACH BOWL Atlanta Dec. 31 OUTBACK BOWL Tampa, Fla. Jan. 1 SUGAR BOWL New Orleans Jan.1 ORANGE BOWL Miami Dec. 31 GODADDY BOWL Mobile, Ala. Jan. 4 COTTON BOWL Arlington, Texas Jan. 1 BIRMINGHAM BOWL Birmingham, Ala. Jan. 3 GATOR BOWL Jacksonville, Fla. Jan. 2 ROSE BOWL Pasadena, Calif. Jan. 1 FIESTA BOWL Glendale, Ariz Dec. 31 FBC BOWL LOGOS 2 12094 : College football bowl logos; 1c; stand-alone; staff; E T A 1 p.m. Jan. 12 CACTUS BOWL Tempe, Ariz. Jan. 2 These logos are provided to you for use in an editorial news context onl y . Other uses, including as a linking device on a W eb site, or in an advertising or promotional piece, may violate this entity ’ s trademark or other intellectual property rights, and may violate your agreement with A P . ALAMO BOWL San Antonio Jan. 2 ARMED FORCES BOWL Ft. Worth, Texas Jan. 2 FOSTER FARMS BOWL Santa Clara Dec. 30 CITRUS BOWL Orlando, Fla. Jan. 1 Winston’s woes part of FSU’s loss PASADENA, Calif. (AP) — If Jameis Winston heads to the NFL as everybody expects, the Florida State quarterback will remember the Rose Bowl as the site of his greatest college achievement and his most disappointing day. Just under a year after the Seminoles won the national championship on the same hallowed turf, Winston lived a night mare against Oregon on Thursday. Winston threw an interception and lost a comical fumble during the Seminoles’ disastrous second half in their 59-20 loss to the Ducks in the first College Football Playoff semifinal. The 2013 Heisman Trophy winner was outplayed by current trophy-holder Mar cus Mariota, but Winston only deserved a portion of the blame for the thorough thrashing received by the Seminoles, who allowed the most points in the 101-edition history of the Granddaddy of Them All. Yet the stark reality of this defeat was obvious while Winston trudged off the field: He had lost a football game as the starting quarterback for the first time since Nov. 25, 2011, in his senior year of high school. Winston was unbeaten over the last two years for the majority of Florida State’s 29-game winning streak, which came to a crashing end in Arroyo Seco. Winston went 29 of 45 for 348 yards, regularly showing off his pinpoint throw ing ability and football smarts during early drives. But the Ducks ran away when Florida State committed turnovers on four consecutive drives in the second half — an interception and a fumble by Win ston sandwiched between two fumbles by freshman running back Dalvin Cook. With the Seminoles desperately trying to hang in after falling behind 39-20, Win ston scrambled, slipped and fumbled late in the third quarter, losing the ball over his head as he lost his footing while attempt ing to pass. While Tony Washington scooped it up and scored, the Internet went to work immortalizing Winston’s awkward turn over in endless loops online. Two plays later, Winston’s pass was tipped at the line of scrimmage and inter cepted by Erick Dargan at midfield. Ore gon drove for yet another score, and the Seminoles were irretrievably behind. Winston didn’t look shaken, but he obvi ously felt the pressure that he handled so impressively last season against Auburn, culminating in his last-minute winning TD drive. While the Ducks’ lead mounted, coach Jimbo Fisher was caught on television telling his quarterback to “calm ... down, or you’re going to the bench.” Winston began the week with a rela tively clear mind after a season full of off-the-field distractions and troubles. Last month, Winston was cleared of violating Florida State’s student code of conduct surrounding an alleged sexual assault two years ago, likely clearing him to play for a second straight national title. AP FSU’s Jameis Winston fumbles during the second half on Thursday.

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SPORT S Page C6 | The News Herald | Friday, January 2, 2015 Playoff picks: Find the right road team The Associated Press After a strong finish to the regular season, Pro Picks hopes to peak in the postseason. So the search begins for Best Bets and Upset Specials. We can’t see all four home teams defending their turf this weekend, so which of the visitors will sneak away with a victory and head to the divisional round? Actually, with the exception of the Lions, we could see any of the underdogs coming through. Our focus, though, turns to a team with an awful recent playoff record. Yes, the Bengals (10-5-1, No. 9 AP Pro32) are in the playoffs for the fourth straight year. And, no, they didn’t win any postseason matches in those three previous trips. Indeed, they have not won a playoff game since the 1990 sea son. Yet ... Cincinnati is a 3 1-2-point underdog at AFC South winner Indianapolis (11-5, No. 8 AP Pro32) on Sunday. For the Bengals to defy history, they’ll need to pressure Andrew Luck, who led the league with 40 touchdown passes. Luck torched the Bengals for 344 yards and two touchdowns in a 27-0 romp in October. Yet ... Plus, the Bengals don’t have much of a pass rush, ranking 20th against the pass and managing a league-low 20 sacks. Indy is solid at protecting Luck. “Suppressing Andrew Luck is going to be kind of hard,” safety Reggie Nelson said. “He always starts off kind of slow and the scary thing is, he can always get his team going. The key for us as a secondary is not giving up deep balls, and we’ve given up a couple of those the last couple of games.” And yet ... The Colts have not shown much down the stretch. Their running game ranges from stagnant to nonexistent, which will allow Cincy to gear up for the air game. Their defense is incon sistent and they’re not a great home team. Besides, we need to pick a road team, so ... Upset Special: Ben gals, 27-23 No. 7 Detroit (plus 7) at No. 4 Dallas, Sunday Neither side inspires much confi dence when it comes to the postseason. The Lions (11-5) rarely make it, and then go out right away. Dallas (12-4) has been a shell of the franchise that Tom Landry and then Jimmy Johnson coached. History won’t matter in this one. Even with Ndamukong Suh cleared to play after his one-game suspension was changed to a $70,000 fine, Detroit’s defense will get burned by Tony Romo, DeMarco Murray, Jason Witten and Dez Bryant. No contest. BEST BET: Cowboys 33-17 No. 10 (tie) Arizona (plus 6) at No. 13 Carolina, Saturday It’s a shame the Cardinals (11-5) have been so damaged by injuries because they have been among the feel-good stories of 2014. But with Ryan Lindley at quarterback if Drew Stanton can’t get back from his knee surgery, and with so many backups playing elsewhere, it’s dif ficult to envision them getting past the Panthers (7-8-1). Yes, Carolina is only the second divi sion winner in NFL history with a losing record, but it won its final four games and has shown some nice balance on offense and defense. A team hosting the Super Bowl in its own stadium won’t happen this season. Panthers, 20-16 No. 10 (tie) Baltimore (plus 3) at No. 6 Pittsburgh, Saturday Nasty. Vicious. Brutal. And highly entertaining. This might be the best rivalry in the NFL, and when these teams collide in the playoffs, well, the intensity is ratcheted up. Simply, these AFC North teams don’t like one another. Never have, never will. Pittsburgh (11-5) won the division, but one of its key performers, RB Le’Veon Bell, is battling a knee injury. That places more emphasis on QB Ben Roethlis berger throwing to the sensational Antonio Brown. And against the week secondary of the Ravens (10-6), that could be decisive. ... Steelers, 31-24 2014 RECORD: Against spread: This week (11-4); Season (128-116-5). Straight up: This week (11-4); Season (169-85-1). Best Bet: 7-10 against spread, 10-7 straight up. Upset special: 9-8 against spread, 7-10 straight up. Editor’s Note: It is mandatory to include all sources that accompany this graphic when repurposing or editing it for publication NFL WC PICKS 123114 : Graphic shows AFC and NFC team matchups and E T A 4 p.m. NFL wild-card weekend: Let the road to the Super Bowl begin The Panthers kick things off, hosting the Cardinals while the other NFC game will feature the Lions traveling to Dallas to face the Cowboys. In the AFC, the Ravens visit the Steelers in an all-AFC North showdown, and the Bengals head to Indianapolis to take on the Colts. Barry Wilner, AP Arizona has been so damaged by injuries, it’s difficult to envision them getting past the Panthers. Carolina is only the second division winner in NFL history with a losing record, but won its final four games, showning nice balance on offense and defense. STORYLINE MATCHUP/PICK One of the Steelers’ key performers, RB Le’Veon Bell, is battling a knee injury, placing more emphasis on QB Ben Roethlisberger to throw to the sensational Antonio Brown. And against the week secondary of the Ravens, that could be decisive. The Bengals are in the playoffs for fourth straight year. They didn’t win any postseason matches in those three previous trips. They’ll need to pressure Andrew Luck, who led the league with 40 TD passes. Colts have not shown much down the stretch. Even with Ndamukong Suh cleared to play after his one-game suspension was changed to a $70,000 fine, Detroit’s defense will get burned by Tony Romo, DeMarco Murray, Jason Witten and Dez Bryant ... no contest. CARDINALS 16 at PANTHERS 20 BENGALS 27 at COLTS 23 RAVENS 24 at STEELERS 31 LIONS 17 at COWBOYS 33 SAT. SUN. PRO PICKS WINTER CLASSIC Capitals trip Blackhawks WASHINGTON (AP) — The Winter Clas sic began with perhaps a bit too much sun. By the end, seat cushions were falling from the sky. The latest NHL outdoor game had a cliff hanger ending Thursday, with Troy Brou wer scoring with 12.9 seconds remaining to give the Washington Capitals a 3-2 win over the Chicago Blackhawks in the league’s annual showcase. Many of the 42,832 fans at Nationals Park celebrated by flinging their commemorative red cushions high into the air, an excla mation point to an event that helped vali date the nation’s capital as an established hockey town. The seventh Winter Classic featured a replica of the Capitol in center field, through which the players entered the ballpark. They stood on a sheet of blue ice meant to represent the Reflecting Pool during the nation anthem, then faced off under a gorgeous blue sky — too gorgeous, if truth be told. The sun’s glare on the white ice of the main rink made it difficult to see the puck, and Capitals defenseman Karl Alzner made good on his plan to play the game wearing sunglasses. The teams switched sides at the 10-min ute mark of the first period to even things out as the shadows from the stands began to cover the rink. It seemed totally unfair when Patrick Sharp launched a sun-toshade slap shot that beat goalie Braden Holtby on a power play for Chicago’s first goal. The NHL considered delaying the start, concerned that the sunny skies would com promise ice conditions and player safety, but the go-ahead was given after the pre game skate. There was more incentive than usual this year to start on time: A lengthy post ponement would have put the Classic headto-head with the first semifinal of the new College Football Playoff. Eric Fehr, whose goals can be few and far between when he is covered by a roof, became the unlikely career leader in out door NHL hockey with the game’s opening goal. Fehr turned into an instant Capitals leg end when he scored twice in the rain dur ing the 2011 Winter Classic win over the Pittsburgh Penguins at Heinz Field, and his breakaway in the first period on Thursday added to the disproportionate Jan. 1 out put for someone who averages about eight goals per season. Alex Ovechkin, the player most respon sible for the sport’s rising popularity in D.C. over the last decade, made it 2-0 with his first outdoor goal, knocking in a rebound and prompting chants of “O-vee!” from seats that usually echo with cheers for Nationals stars Stephen Strasburg and Bryce Harper. Fehr wasn’t all perfect. In the second period, he lost track of Brandon Saad, who made a beeline toward the net and took a feed from Jonathan Toews to tie the score at 2. AP The Washington Capitals celebrate the winning goal by Troy Brouwer against the Chicago Blackhawks on Thursday. COLLEGE BASKETBALL ROUNDUP GAINESVILLE (AP) — Florida guard Eli Carter probably will play against defend ing national champion Connecticut after all. Minutes after coach Billy Donovan said Thursday that Carter was doubtful for the Final Four rematch on Saturday between two struggling teams, the 6-foot-2 junior practiced fully on his sprained left foot. Carter re-injured his foot during Tues day’s loss at Florida State and missed practice Wednesday. It was the same injury that prompted him to sit out four games earlier this season. Carter spent much of Wednesday in the training room, causing Donovan to think he would miss another practice Thursday. But Carter ended up joining his teammates on the floor. “These decisions, once the doctor and trainers clear him to go, it’s kind of on him how he feels,” Donovan said before practice. “When he was cleared to play (earlier), he elected not to. He didn’t think he could. He felt like it was still bother ing him. From our standpoint right now, whenever the doctors clear him to play, he’s going to be cleared. ... That’s a deci sion Eli’s got to make.” Carter is averaging 6.7 points this sea son. However, he scored 29 in the first two games before getting hurt. The former Rutgers transfer missed most of last season while recovering from a broken right leg. He also missed a fifth game this year while recovering from strep throat. Florida and UConn will meet for the third time in the last 13 months. The Hus kies won both previous matchups, includ ing in a national semifinal in north Texas in April. Nine months later, both teams look to be in jeopardy of getting back to the NCAA tournament. The Gators (7-5) have lost each meaningful matchup this season, and the Huskies (6-5) have dropped five of their last eight. Thursday games Eastern Washington 84, Weber State 78 CHENEY, Wash. — Tyler Harvey hit 7 3-point ers to score a career-high 39 points and Eastern Washington’s defense took over down the stretch to open Big Sky Conference play with a win over defending champion Weber State. The Eagles (10-4) held the Wildcats (5-7) without a field goal from the 5:57 mark until Ryan Richardson’s 3-pointer with seven seconds left. Parker Kelly’s only basket of the game, a 3 from the left corner, put EWU ahead 77-75 with 1:45 left. Drew Brandon followed with a steal and dunk and then the Eagles hit 5 of 6 free throws in the last 32 seconds. Richardson hit six 3s for a career-high 22 points and Jeremy Senglin had 17 points, 9 rebounds, 7 assists and three steals for the Wildcats. BYU 81, Santa Clara 46 SANTA CLARA, Calif. — Chase Fischer and Tyler Haws scored 14 apiece, and Kyle Collinsworth had 15 rebounds and six assists to lead BYU to a win over Santa Clara. BYU (12-4, 2-1 West Coast Conference) opened the game with a 12-1 run and Santa Clara (6-8, 1-2) never got closer than eight from there. Jared Brownridge hit a 3-pointer to pull Santa Clara within 14-6 with 14:38 left in the half, but BYU scored 22 of the next 24 to open up a 28-point lead about 7 minutes later. The Cougars turned 12 Santa Clara turnovers into 20 points and held a 45-28 rebounding edge. Santa Clara made just 17 of 56 (30 percent) field goals, including 6 of 23 from 3-point range, and 6 of 15 free throws. Eastern Illinois 61, Tennessee Tech 59 CHARLESTON, Ill. — Chris Olivier scored a career-high 22 points and Dylan Chatman hit a pair of free throws with 2 seconds left to help Eastern Illinois rally to beat Tennessee Tech in the Ohio Val ley opener for both teams. Reggie Smith hit a 3 with 2:13 left to give Eastern Illinois (7-6) a 55-52 lead. Charles Jackson’s free throws with 17 seconds to play capped a 7-0 run by Tennessee Tech (8-6) and made it 59-55. Smith hit another 3-pointer with 11 seconds remaining and, after a Tennessee Tech turnover, Olivier made the first of two free throws, tying the game at 59. Chatman was fouled after grabbing the offensive rebound on the second free throw and made the clinching free throws. Pacific 77, Loyola-Marymount 63 LOS ANGELES — David Taylor hit five 3-pointers and scored a career-high 20 points to lead Pacific to a win over Loyola-Marymount. Gabriel Aguirre came off the bench to hit 5 of 7 field goals and 5 of 6 free throws to match his career high of 15 points for the Tigers (9-6, 1-2 West Coast Conference). Taylor hit 7 of 11 shots, including 5 of 8 behind the arc, as Pacific shot 57.4 percent (27-47). Evan Payne kept the Lions (4-10, 0-2) in striking distance by scoring 19 of his 27 points in the second half, hitting 5 of 6 shots and eight of his perfect 10-10 from the line. However, Pacific, which led 36-27 at halftime, shot 67 percent after the break. LMU was within five before Taylor and Alex Kobre made back-to-back 3s for a 53-42 lead with 12:15 left and the Lions couldn’t stop the Tigers down the stretch. North Dakota 67, Montana State 60 BOZEMAN, Mont. — Quinton Hooker scored 16 points to lead North Dakota past Mon tana State in the Big Sky opener for both teams. Carson Shanks added 12 points and Lenny Antwi scored 10 for North Dakota (5-7). Belmont 78, SE Missouri 77 NASHVILLE, Tenn. — Craig Bradshaw scored 25 points and Reece Chamberlain had 10 points, nine rebounds and nine assists to help Belmont hold off a late rally by Southeast Missouri State for a win in the Ohio Valley opener for both teams. Bradshaw made 10 of 15 field goals, including 5 of 6 from 3-point range, and Evan Bradds added 14 points for Belmont (9-5). The Bruins took a 76-68 lead with 5:10 remain ing on a 3 by Bradshaw. Both teams went scoreless over the next 2:40, before J.J. Thompson made a pair of free throws for Southeast Missouri State (6-8). SIU-Edwardsville 73, Jacksonville State 57 EDWARDSVILLE, Ind. — Rozell Nunn led a balanced attack with 16 points and SIU-Edwards ville opened Ohio Valley Conference play with a win over Jacksonville State. Michael Messer and Kris Davis added 13 points apiece for the Cougars (5-7) and Keaton Jackson had 10 points, eight rebounds and three blocks. Nunn had seven rebounds and three assists. Edwardsville shot 54 percent from the field. Many of the 42,832 fans at Nationals Park celebrated by flinging their commemorative red cushions high into the air, an exclamation point to an event that helped validate the nation’s capital as an established hockey town. UF’s Carter cleared to play

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Friday, January 2, 2015 | The News Herald | Page C7 Boys Results Monday Columbia Central 50 Wren 34 Webster County 59, University School 44 Cannon County 66, Marshall County 55 Arnold 55, Moore County 48 Results Tuesday Marshall County 74 Wren 31 University School 55, Moore County 43 Cannon County 64, Columbia Central 54 Webster County 70, Arnold 57 Results Wednesday Seventh place: Moore County 47, Wren 42 Fifth place: Marshall County 57, University School 55 Third place: Columbia Central 55, Arnold 45 Championship: Webster County 69, Cannon County 52 Girls Results Monday Archbishop McCarthy 49, LaVergne 31 Cannon County 51, Wren 34 University School 55, Mosley 35 Moore County 57, Arnold 36 Results Tuesday Wren 52, LaVergne 27 Mosley 64 Arnold 28 Cannon County 48, Archbishop McCarthy 32 Moore County 34, University School 27 Results Wednesday Seventh place: LaVergne 49, Arnold 34 Fifth place: Wren 65, Mosley 47 Third place: University School 54, Archbishop McCarthy 34 Championship: Cannon County 24, Moore County 22 Cannon County girls win low-scoring title game By JASON SHOOT and DUSTIN KENT The News Herald PANAMA CITY BEACH — This is the end result when seemingly every shot is a contested one. Cannon County was for tunate to escape with a 24-22 win over fellow Tennessee school Moore County in the girls’ championship game at the Marlin Christmas Clas sic at Arnold on Wednesday night. The Lionettes carried a 14-11 lead into the final quarter and thwarted Moore County’s best efforts to steal a victory late. Autumn King made a pair of free throws with just over two minutes left in the contest to give Cannon County a 24-20 lead. The Raiderettes halved that gap with Makayla Ray’s two free throws with 1:51 remaining. Moore County eventually got the ball back with 19 seconds left, but Katie Thomas misfired on a 3-point attempt with 3 seconds on the clock. King, the only player in the game to score in dou ble figures, finished with 10 points and eight rebounds for the Lionettes, who forced 20 turnovers to counter their subpar shoot ing performance. Both teams made 20 percent of their field-goal attempts. Cannon County made only 8 of 40 shots from the field, including 1 for 13 on shots beyond the arc, and Moore County was just 5 for 25. Third place University School 54, Archbishop McCarthy 34 Brianna Porter would not be held in check a sec ond consecutive day. After being held to mod est production in Tues day’s semifinals, Porter led University School with 23 points, 14 rebounds and three blocked shots to propel the Tigers to a third-place finish. Porter converted 9 of 15 shots from the floor, and eight of her rebounds came on the offensive end as University enjoyed a 14-1 advantage on secondchance points. In addition to her shot-blocking presence in the paint, Porter also provided two steals. The Tigers led 11-3 after the first quarter. Archbishop was able to trim its deficit to 21-15 at halftime, but Uni versity outscored the Lady Mavericks 33-19 in the sec ond half to pull away. Casey Sommer and Rea gan McCray paced Arch bishop with 12 and 10 points, respectively. Fifth place Wren 65, Mosley 47 Mosley’s promising start surrendered to Nakol Franks and Wren, which outscored the Dolphins 41-18 in the middle two quarters to take command of the game. Mosley, 16-3, jumped ahead early and led 17-10 going into the second quarter. The lead vanished quickly, however, as Wren battled back to take a 31-25 lead at halftime. The Golden Hurricanes unleashed a 21-2 run on both ends of halftime to take control. Franks led the Wren comeback with 24 points and 10 rebounds, and she aided her team with five four assists and five steals. Teammate Danielle Groves amassed 17 points and 10 rebounds, and Wren fin ished with a 39-26 edge on the boards. J’Niyah Daniels knocked down three 3-pointers en route to a team-high 18 points for Mosley. Kiana Yangson and Hennessey Smith each added nine points and four rebounds. Seventh place LaVergne 49, Arnold 34 LaVergne used a 20-0 first-half run to blow open the game with Arnold and take a 30-10 halftime lead. The Marlins never got closer than 15 points the rest of the way. It was a performance that Marlins coach Ray Ezell said was disappoint ing in a way that no other has been this year. “That was a team that I thought we were better than, and that’s the first time this year I think we’ve lost to a team that I thought we were better than,” Ezell said. “But we played three games in a row with seven (players) on the bench, so endurance came into play. “We played a team that was quicker than us and quickness is not our asset. Their defensive pressure took us out of any halfcourt flow.” The Marlins, 4-11, had 25 turnovers in the game and struggled to get the ball past halfcourt whenever junior guard Jazlin Jones wasn’t in the game. Jones had 19 points and six rebounds to lead Arnold, while Lilyann Rob inson added 11 points and 13 rebounds before fouling out. Jones and Robinson combined for 30 of the 34 Marlins’ points after scoring all 28 in the team’s 36-point loss to Mosley on Tuesday. Miesha Lane led the Wolverines with 13 points, with Shenice Hart adding 10 points and six rebounds, and Brianna Chapman eight points. Brandi Davis scored seven. MARLINS CLASSIC H EATHER L EIPHART | The News Herald Moore County’s Makayla Ray (3) and Chrissy Lockhart, right, battle Cannon County’s Erin McReynolds for the basketball during the girls championship game of the Marlins Christmas Classic on Wednesday night. The Lionettes carried a 14-11 lead into the final quarter and thwarted Moore County’s best efforts to steal a victory late. SCORES Webster County’s Zac Shoulders drives past Cannon County’s Jacob Nave. R oland leads Webster C ounty to title By JASON SHOOT and DUSTIN KENT The News Herald PANAMA CITY BEACH — Crunch time was Mason Roland time in the boys championship game of the Marlin Christmas Classic basketball tournament Wednesday night. Roland put on a show from the point guard position when it mattered most, and Webster County put away Cannon County with a dominant fourth quarter in a 69-52 victory in the title game at Arnold. Roland scored 15 of his 20 points in the second half, and his playmaking ability down the stretch proved to be the differ ence. Webster County entered the final quarter holding a 47-45 lead, and Roland and Max McMain provided the scoring punch necessary to put the game out of reach. McMain, who led all scorers with 22 points, hit a fadeaway from the low block for a 52-45 edge with 6 minutes left. The Trojans pushed their lead to 58-47 with Roland’s circus shot and ensuing three-point play with 4 minutes left. Jacob Nave had 21 points and eight rebounds for Cannon County, which seemingly trailed by one or two possessions for three straight quarters before fading over the final 8 minutes. Josh Ruehlen contributed with 14 points. Zac Shoulders scored 15 of his 19 points in the first half for Webster County, which led 35-33 at halftime. Third place Columbia 55, Arnold 45 Arnold gave away its lead almost as fast as the Marlins could build it, and Columbia’s Ashanta Brown tossed in a teamhigh 17 points for the victorious Lions. Arnold, 9-5, blitzed the Lions with an 11-2 run in the first quar ter on its way to a 20-11 lead after the first eight minutes. The Mar lin offense endured a power out age over the next two quarters, however, as Columbia turned its nine-point deficit into a 42-29 lead going into the final quarter. Brown also hauled down a game-high 13 rebounds for Columbia, and teammate Bran don Levier chipped in with 14 points and a pair of 3-pointers. Jawuan White scored 14 points, grabbed 11 rebounds and swiped three steals for Arnold, which scored two points in the third quarter after trail ing just 31-27 at halftime. Chris Shorter added nine points, six rebounds and three steals. Fifth place Marshall County 57, University School 55 D.J. Pigg’s 3-pointer out of the corner with 15 seconds left lifted Marshall County to the win after the Marshals allowed their earlier advantage slip away. Marshall County led for most of the contest before University School battled back in the fourth quarter to take a brief lead. With his team trailing late, Pigg’s 3-point attempt rattled around the rim before falling through to give the Marshals a two-point win. Pigg was contained for most of the game after firing in a tour nament-record 38 points and 10 3-pointers against Wren. Collin Travis and Mason Woo ten more than picked up the slack, though, and combined for 37 points and 17 rebounds for Marshall County. Tevin Burdette led Univer sity School with 24 points, and Michael Becker had nine points and six rebounds. Seventh place Moore County 47, Wren 42 Jordan Barrier led Moore County with 12 points and Ryan Northcutt added 11 points. OJ Hurst led the way for Wren with 11 points. Wren held an 11-10 lead after one quarter, but Moore County surged ahead 21-18 at halftime and took a 34-29 edge into the fourth quarter. Moore’s lead was trimmed to one at 42-41 in the final minute, but the Hurricanes were unable to get the go-ahead bucket and the Raiders pulled away. HEATHER LEIPHART | The News Herald Webster County’s Max McMain led all scorers with 22 points against Cannon County.

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FRIDAY MORNING C COMCAST W WOW! S1 DISH NETWORK S2 DIRECTV JANUARY 2 C W S1 S2 7 AM 7:30 8 AM 8:30 9 AM 9:30 10 AM 10:30 11 AM 11:30 12 PM 12:30 WJHG (7) 3 3 7 Today Winter getaways; purging clutter. (N) Days of our Lives (N) Newschannel 7 at Noon (N) CW (7.2) 99 9 8 8 Intelligence King of the Hill We There Yet? We There Yet? The Steve Wilkos Show (N) Cheaters Cheaters King King Paid Program Steve Wilkos WMBB (13) 2 2 13 Good Morning America (N) Live! With Kelly and Michael The View WMBB Midday News (N) The Chew METV (13.2) 209 133 2 2 Donna Reed Mary T. Moore The Love Boat Perry Mason Quincy, M.E. The Rockford Files Gunsmoke “The Intruder” WECP (18) 4 4 4 18 CBS This Morning Journalist Dennis Berman. (N) Let’s Make a Deal (N) The Price Is Right (N) The Young and the Restless The Insider (N) Bold/Beautiful MNT (18.2) 227 13 The Doctors Jerry Springer (N) The Real The Wendy Williams Show Divorce Court Divorce Court Judge Faith Judge Faith WPGX (28) 8 8 28 Paid Program WHADDYADO Paid Program Paid Program Judge Mathis The People’s Court Maury Prophet Paid Program WFSG (56) 11 11 56 Curious Curious Daniel Tiger Daniel Tiger Sesame Street (EI) Dinosaur Train Dinosaur Train Peg Plus Cat Peg Plus Cat Super Why! Thomas & Fr. A&E 34 43 118 265 Bounty Hunter Bounty Hunter Dog the Bounty Hunter Dog the Bounty Hunter Dog the Bounty Hunter Dog the Bounty Hunter Dog the Bounty Hunter AMC 30 62 131 254 Paid Program Fighting Canc. The Walking Dead “Still” The Walking Dead “Alone” The Walking Dead The Walking Dead “Us” The Walking Dead “A” ANPL 46 69 184 282 Whale Wars Whale Wars Whale Wars “Setting the Trap” Whale Wars Whale Wars Whale Wars BET 53 46 124 329 Hit the Floor Hit the Floor “Passing” Hit the Floor Hit the Floor Hit the Floor “Shattered Glass” Hit the Floor “Blow Out” COM 64 53 107 249 Paid Program Shaun T’s Com. Central Kroll Show Kroll Show Kroll Show Kroll Show Kroll Show Kroll Show Broad City Broad City Broad City DISC 36 39 182 278 Joyce Meyer Lose Weight Edge of Alaska Edge of Alaska Alaskan Bush People Alaskan Bush People Alaskan Bush People E! 63 57 114 236 Kardashian Kardashian Kardashian Kardashian Kardashian Kardashian ESPN 9 23 140 206 SportsCenter SportsCenter (N) (L) SportsCenter (N) (L) SportsCenter (N) (L) College Football: Lockheed Martin Armed Forces Bowl ESPN2 47 24 144 209 (5:00) Mike & Mike (N) (L) First Take (N) (L) SportsCenter (N) (L) SportsCenter (N) (L) FAM 59 65 180 311 The Middle The Middle The Middle 700/Interactive The 700 Club (N) Back to the Future Part II () Michael J. Fox, Christopher Lloyd. Matilda FOOD 38 45 110 231 BISSELL Paid Program Paid Program Brunch at Bob. The Kitchen “Quick and Easy” Save My Bakery Trisha’s Sou. Contessa Chopped FS1 24 27 150 219 FOX Sports Live FOX Sports Live MLB Lineup Epic Moments Bull Riding Monster Jam Monster Jam FX 45 51 136 248 (6:00) Footloose () Kenny Wormald. Total Recall () Colin Farrell, Kate Beckinsale, Jessica Biel. How I Met How I Met How I Met How I Met HALL 23 59 185 312 Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls Home & Family Matthew Moy; Lorenzo Lamas. (N) Home & Family Megan Follows; Trista Sutter. HGTV 32 38 112 229 Extreme Homes Extreme Homes Extreme Homes Extreme Homes (N) House Hunters Hunters Int’l Property Brothers HIST 35 42 120 269 Restoration Restoration Restoration Restoration Restoration Restoration Restoration Restoration Restoration Restoration Counting Cars Counting Cars LIFE 56 56 108 252 Wife Swap “Martin/Vallone” Wife Swap Wife Swap No rules; structure. Wife Swap “Jones/Martinson” Wife Swap “Tassie/Tyson” Celebrity Wife Swap SPIKE 28 48 241 241 Body Beast! NutriBullet Cops Cops Cops Cops Jail Jail Cops Cops Cops Jail SUN 49 422 656 Special Oly. Captain’s Florida Sport Ship Shape TV Fins & Skins Sport Fishing Sportsman Sport Fishing Extreme Fishin Reel Animals Winterfest Boat Parade SYFY 70 52 122 244 Z Nation “Fracking Zombies” Z Nation “Philly Feast” Z Nation “Full Metal Zombie” Z Nation Z Nation “Resurrection Z” Z Nation TBS 31 15 139 247 Friends Friends Old School () Luke Wilson, Will Ferrell, Vince Vaughn. Cleveland Cleveland American Dad American Dad American Dad American Dad TCM 25 70 132 256 Big-Hearted The Winning Ticket () (:45) The Irish in Us () James Cagney. (:15) Mama Steps Out () Guy Kibbee. Hideaway () Fred Stone. Beloved Brat TLC 37 40 183 280 What Not to Wear “Minda” What Not to Wear “Alexandra” What Not to Wear “Nakiya T.” What Not to Wear What Not to Wear “Andrea Y.” What Not to Wear TNT 29 54 138 245 Charmed Charmed Supernatural Supernatural Supernatural “The End” Bones A man is found dead. USA 62 55 105 242 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation CSI: Crime Scene Investigation CSI: Crime Scene Investigation CSI: Crime Scene Investigation CSI: Crime Scene Investigation CSI: Crime Scene Investigation WGN-A 13 239 307 J. Robison Creflo Dollar Blue Bloods “Hall of Mirrors” Blue Bloods Blue Bloods Blue Bloods “Working Girls” Blue Bloods “Mother’s Day” FRIDAY LATE NIGHT C COMCAST W WOW! S1 DISH NETWORK S2 DIRECTV JANUARY 2 C W S1 S2 1 AM 1:30 2 AM 2:30 3 AM 3:30 4 AM 4:30 5 AM 5:30 6 AM 6:30 WJHG (7) 3 3 7 (:07) Today Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program Hometime Paid Program Today (N) CW (7.2) 99 9 8 8 Steve Wilkos Key Kingdom Foreigner Body Beast! Paid Program Paid Program Anti-Aging Jeggings! Stop Anxiety Satisfy Her Body Beast! 21 Day Fix WMBB (13) 2 2 13 (:07) The Dr. Oz Show Judge Karen Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program Down Home Open House Storm Stories METV (13.2) 209 133 2 2 Night Gallery Night Gallery Alfred Hitchcock Hour Thriller F Troop F Troop Gilligan’s Isle Gilligan’s Isle H.R. Pufnstuf Land of Lost WECP (18) 4 4 4 18 Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program CBS This Morning: Saturday MNT (18.2) 227 13 Extra (N) Late Night Rocks (Joined in Progress) Colored loose gemstones. (N) Color Jewelry Crush (N) Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program Old House WPGX (28) 8 8 28 Friends Friends New Heights Wrestling America Now America Now Paid Program Paid Program HealthFood Paid Program Larry King Sp. Paid Program WFSG (56) 11 11 56 Billy Joel: Library of Congress Performance at White House Ribbon, Sand The This Old House Hour Sesame Street (EI) Curious Curious A&E 34 43 118 265 (:01) Criminal Minds (:02) Criminal Minds “Proof” SkinCare T25 Bodies! Joint Relief Cook Top Shark Paid Program Bounty Hunter Bounty Hunter AMC 30 62 131 254 The Walking Dead “Self-Help” The Walking Dead The Walking Dead “Crossed” The Walking Dead “Coda” The Rifleman The Rifleman The Rifleman The Rifleman ANPL 46 69 184 282 Whale Wars “Target Acquired” The Cove () Whale Wars Big Cat Diary Big Cat Diary Dogs 101 “Designer Dogs” BET 53 46 124 329 The Real The Queen Latifah Show BET Inspiration BET Inspiration COM 64 53 107 249 (:02) The Comedy Central Roast David Spade: My Fake Com. Central NutriBullet Blades/Wild Cook Like a NutriBullet Paid Program T25 Bodies! DISC 36 39 182 278 Gold Rush BATMAN Meet the Rx Cook Like a Cooking Made M. Williams Bosley Hair KeithUrban Airbrushed Top Cooker Lose Weight E! 63 57 114 236 Sex & the City Sex & the City Sex and the City (Part 1 of 2) Paid Program 1 Min. Makeup Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program Paid Program E! News ESPN 9 23 140 206 (12:45) SportsCenter (N) (L) SportsCenter NFL Matchup College Football: Chick-fil-A Peach Bowl NFL Matchup SportsCenter ESPN2 47 24 144 209 College Football: Lockheed Martin Armed Forces Bowl SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter SportsCenter E:60 Profile NFL Live FAM 59 65 180 311 Sexy In 2015! Shaun T’s The 700 Club BISSELL Paid Program Paid Program Airbrush Total Gym Cook Like a Hook () FOOD 38 45 110 231 Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Iron Chef America Airbrush Easy Nutrition Belly Too Big? Paid Program Sandwich King Barbecue FS1 24 27 150 219 FOX Sports Live College Basketball UCLA at Colorado. UFC Tonight FOX Sports Live FOX Sports Live FX 45 51 136 248 Colombiana () Zoe Saldana, Jordi Moll, Lennie James. Justified Sexy Face at BISSELL Total Gym T25 Bodies! Buffy the Vampire Slayer HALL 23 59 185 312 Frasier Frasier Frasier Frasier Cheers Cheers I Love Lucy I Love Lucy I Love Lucy I Love Lucy I Love Lucy I Love Lucy HGTV 32 38 112 229 House Hunters Hunters Int’l Love It or List It, Too Beach Body Diets 2.0 Belly Fat? Easy Nutrition T25 Bodies! Paid Program Bath Crashers Bath Crashers HIST 35 42 120 269 (:01) American Pickers (:04) American Pickers Cook Top Coin Coin Coin Coin HealthFood Ancient Aliens LIFE 56 56 108 252 (:04) Celebrity Wife Swap (:04) Big Women: Big Love Jeggings! bareMinerals Free! EasePain Zumba BISSELL Lose Weight 21 DAY FIX SPIKE 28 48 241 241 Cops Jail Jail Jail Knife Show/Cutlery Corner Bosley Hair Cook Like a Paid Program T25 Bodies! SUN 49 422 656 Paid Program Make Love Paid Program Satisfy Her Stop Anxiety Androzene Paid Program Paid Program Joint Relief Best Secret!? FSU Headlines The Gypsy An SYFY 70 52 122 244 (11:30) The Revenant Phantom Racer () Greg Evigan, Adam Battrick, Nicole Eggert. Z Nation “Puppies and Kittens” Meet the Rx Focus T25 Cook Top Meet the Rx TBS 31 15 139 247 Sherlock Holmes-Game Drive () Ryan Gosling, Carey Mulligan. Married... With Married... With Married... With Married... With Married... With Married... With TCM 25 70 132 256 Bells Are Ringing () Judy Holliday, Dean Martin. (:15) Four for Texas () Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, Anita Ekberg. Hollywood Canteen () Robert Hutton. TLC 37 40 183 280 Say Yes: ATL Say Yes: ATL Airbrush Bosley Hair Paid Program Juice Cleanse HairSecrets! Total Gym KeithUrban Remove Hair Lose Weight NutriBullet TNT 29 54 138 245 The Help () Viola Davis. An aspiring writer captures the experiences of black women. Hawaii Five-0 “Ohuna” Law & Order “Invaders” Law & Order “Fame” USA 62 55 105 242 (12:00) The Dilemma () Law & Order: Criminal Intent Law & Order: Criminal Intent Law & Order: Criminal Intent Law & Order: Criminal Intent SkinCare MeetRx WGN-A 13 239 307 Raising Hope Raising Hope 30 Rock 30 Rock Motown 25 MeetRx Singsation Paid Program Joint Relief Paid Program Larry King Sp. Paid Program FRIDAY AFTERNOON C COMCAST W WOW! S1 DISH NETWORK S2 DIRECTV JANUARY 2 C W S1 S2 1 PM 1:30 2 PM 2:30 3 PM 3:30 4 PM 4:30 5 PM 5:30 6 PM 6:30 WJHG (7) 3 3 7 Rachael Ray Andy Griffith Andy Griffith The Doctors Family Feud Jeopardy! (N) News Nightly News News Wheel Fortune CW (7.2) 99 9 8 8 Steve Wilkos Paid Program Married... With Married... With The Bill Cunningham Show Engagement Engagement Cops Rel. Cops Rel. King of the Hill Cleveland WMBB (13) 2 2 13 General Hospital (N) Hot Bench Hot Bench Dr. Phil The Dr. Oz Show News World News News 13 at 6 Entertainment METV (13.2) 209 133 2 2 Bonanza “The Secret” The Rifleman The Rifleman Adv-Superman Adv-Superman Emergency! (Part 2 of 2) CHiPs “Suicide Stunt” M*A*S*H M*A*S*H WECP (18) 4 4 4 18 The Talk The Wendy Williams Show The Meredith Vieira Show The Ellen DeGeneres Show Inside Edition Evening News Jeopardy! (N) Modern Family MNT (18.2) 227 13 Justice for All Justice for All Love-Raymond Family Feud Name Game Name Game Law & Order: SVU Hot, Cleveland Hot, Cleveland Mike & Molly Mike & Molly WPGX (28) 8 8 28 Flip My Food Fix It, Finish It The Queen Latifah Show Steve Harvey ThisMinute ThisMinute Judge Judy Judge Judy Big Bang Big Bang WFSG (56) 11 11 56 Sesame Street Cat in the Hat Curious Curious Arthur (EI) Odd Squad Wild Kratts WordGirl Martha Speaks PBS NewsHour (N) Rick Steves A&E 34 43 118 265 Wahlburgers Wahlburgers Wahlburgers Wahlburgers Wahlburgers Wahlburgers Wahlburgers Wahlburgers Criminal Minds “The Stranger” Criminal Minds AMC 30 62 131 254 The Walking Dead The Walking Dead “Strangers” The Walking Dead The Walking Dead “Slabtown” The Walking Dead “Self-Help” The Walking Dead ANPL 46 69 184 282 Whale Wars Whale Wars “Never Say Die” Whale Wars “Counterstrike” Whale Wars “Target Acquired” Whale Wars The armada appoints four new captains. BET 53 46 124 329 (:06) Hit the Floor “Isolation” (:13) Hit the Floor “Playing Dirty” (:19) Hit the Floor “Unguarded” (:24) Hit the Floor “Steal” Hit the Floor “Sudden Death” Hit the Floor COM 64 53 107 249 Broad City Broad City Broad City (:25) Futurama Futurama (:26) Futurama Futurama (:26) You Don’t Mess With the Zohan () Adam Sandler, John Turturro. DISC 36 39 182 278 Alaskan Bush People Alaskan Bush People Gold Rush “Cursed Cut” Gold Rush “Goldzilla” Gold Rush “Gold Blooded” Gold Rush E! 63 57 114 236 Get Him to the Greek () Jonah Hill, Russell Brand, Elisabeth Moss. I Love You, Man () Paul Rudd, Jason Segel, Rashida Jones. E! News (N) ESPN 9 23 140 206 College Football (:20) College Football TaxSlayer Bowl -Iowa vs. Tennessee. (N) (L) College Football: Valero Alamo Bowl ESPN2 47 24 144 209 SportsCenter (N) (L) NFL Insiders (N) (L) High School Football Under Armour All-American Game: Team Armour vs. Team Highlight. (N) NFL Live (N) FAM 59 65 180 311 (12:30) Matilda () Mara Wilson. Home Alone 2: Lost in New York () Macaulay Culkin, Joe Pesci. Hocus Pocus () Bette Midler, Sarah Jessica Parker. FOOD 38 45 110 231 Chopped Chopped Chopped Chopped Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive FS1 24 27 150 219 Inside Monster Jam UFC Presents UFC Count. UFC Tonight NASCAR Race Hub America’s Pregame (N) (L) Basketball FX 45 51 136 248 How I Met How I Met How I Met How I Met How I Met Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Eagle Eye () Shia LaBeouf, Michelle Monaghan, Rosario Dawson. HALL 23 59 185 312 Little House on the Prairie Little House on the Prairie Little House on the Prairie The Waltons The Waltons “The Rebellion” The Waltons HGTV 32 38 112 229 Property Brothers Property Brothers Property Brothers Property Brothers HGTV Dream Home 2015 Love It or List It, Too HIST 35 42 120 269 Counting Cars Counting Cars Counting Cars Counting Cars Counting Cars Counting Cars Counting Cars Counting Cars Counting Cars Counting Cars American Pickers LIFE 56 56 108 252 Celebrity Wife Swap Celebrity Wife Swap Celebrity Wife Swap Celebrity Wife Swap Celebrity Wife Swap Celebrity Wife Swap SPIKE 28 48 241 241 Jail Cops World’s Wildest Police Videos World’s Wildest Police Videos Cops Cops Cops Jail Jail Cops SUN 49 422 656 P1 Powerboat Series The Florida Keys: Real Blue ACC Access Bowl Preview Powerboating Inside Rays to Do Florida Lightning Live! NHL Hockey SYFY 70 52 122 244 Z Nation “Zunami” Z Nation Z Nation “Going Nuclear” Z Nation “Sisters of Mercy” Z Nation “Murphy’s Law” Z Nation “Doctor of the Dead” TBS 31 15 139 247 Family Guy King King Friends Friends Friends Friends Seinfeld Seinfeld Seinfeld Seinfeld TCM 25 70 132 256 (12:45) Beloved Brat () Joy of Living () Irene Dunne. (:45) Penrod’s Double Trouble () Daughters Courageous () John Garfield. TLC 37 40 183 280 Say Yes: ATL Say Yes: ATL Say Yes: ATL Say Yes: ATL Say Yes: ATL Say Yes: ATL Say Yes: ATL Say Yes: ATL Say Yes: ATL Say Yes: ATL Say Yes: ATL Say Yes: ATL TNT 29 54 138 245 Bones “The Girl in Suite 2103” Bones “The Girl With the Curl” Bones Castle “Undead Again” Castle “Always” Castle “After the Storm” USA 62 55 105 242 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Modern Family Modern Family WGN-A 13 239 307 Blue Bloods “Old Wounds” Blue Bloods “Scorched Earth” Blue Bloods Blue Bloods Amer. Funniest Home Videos Amer. Funniest Home Videos FRIDAY EVENING C COMCAST W WOW! S1 DISH NETWORK S2 DIRECTV JANUARY 2 C W S1 S2 7 PM 7:30 8 PM 8:30 9 PM 9:30 10 PM 10:30 11 PM 11:30 12 AM 12:30 WJHG (7) 3 3 7 Grimm “Highway of Tears” Dateline NBC Intruders break into a family’s home. News Tonight Show-J. Fallon Late Night With Seth Meyers Last Call/Daly CW (7.2) 99 9 8 8 Whose Line Whose Line Penn & Teller: Fool Us Seinfeld Seinfeld Cougar Town Cougar Town Raising Hope Community Community Steve Wilkos WMBB (13) 2 2 13 Last-Standing (:31) Cristela Shark Tank (Part 2 of 2) (:01) 20/20 News 13 at 10 (:35) Jimmy Kimmel Live (:37) Nightline The Middle The Middle METV (13.2) 209 133 2 2 Andy Griffith Andy Griffith Hogan Heroes Cheers Odd Couple Odd Couple Carol Burnett Perry Mason McMillan and Wife WECP (18) 4 4 4 18 Undercover Boss “Maaco” (N) Hawaii Five-0 (N) Blue Bloods (N) Modern Family Late Show W/David Letterman Late Late Show/Ferguson Access H. MNT (18.2) 227 13 Bones Suspects. Bones “The Man in the Wall” Anger Anger Family Guy Family Guy American Dad Dish Nation (N) Bridezillas Scheduling conflict. WPGX (28) 8 8 28 Brooklyn Nine Brooklyn Nine Glee ” TMZ (N) Two/Half Men Two/Half Men How I Met Steve Harvey The Queen Latifah Show WFSG (56) 11 11 56 Washington Charlie Rose Billy Joel: Library of Congress Performance at White House Charlie Rose (N) Tavis Smiley Washington Charlie Rose A&E 34 43 118 265 Criminal Minds “Big Sea” Criminal Minds Criminal Minds (:01) Criminal Minds “Proof” (:01) Criminal Minds “Big Sea” (12:01) Criminal Minds AMC 30 62 131 254 The Walking Dead “Crossed” The Walking Dead “Coda” The Walking Dead The Walking Dead “Strangers” The Walking Dead The Walking Dead “Slabtown” ANPL 46 69 184 282 Whale Wars “The Devil’s Den” Whale Wars (N) Whale Wars (N) Whale Wars “The Devil’s Den” Whale Wars Whale Wars BET 53 46 124 329 Hit the Floor Honey 2 () Katerina Graham, Randy Wayne, Seychelle Gabriel. The Wendy Williams Show The Wendy Williams Show The Real COM 64 53 107 249 Billy Madison () Adam Sandler, Darren McGavin. Jackass 3.5 () Johnny Knoxville, Bam Margera. Borat: Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit DISC 36 39 182 278 Gold Rush: Pay Dirt (N) Gold Rush “Parker’s Accident” (:01) Alaskan Bush People (:02) Gold Rush (:03) Alaskan Bush People (12:04) Gold Rush: Pay Dirt E! 63 57 114 236 Take the Hamptons Take the Hamptons The Soup (N) The Soup E! News (N) Take the Hamptons The Soup Sex & the City ESPN 9 23 140 206 College Football Valero Alamo Bowl -Kansas State vs. UCLA. (:15) College Football TicketCity Cactus Bowl -Oklahoma State vs. Washington. (N) (L) SportsCenter ESPN2 47 24 144 209 NBA Coast to Coast (N) (L) E:60 Profile E:60 Profile SportsCenter (N) (L) SportsCenter (N) (L) SportsCenter NBA Tonight FAM 59 65 180 311 Twilight () Kristen Stewart, Robert Pattinson, Billy Burke. The 700 Club Halloweentown () Debbie Reynolds, Judith Hoag. FOOD 38 45 110 231 Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive FS1 24 27 150 219 Women’s College Basketball Hoops Extra College Basketball UCLA at Colorado. (N) (L) FOX Sports Live (N) (L) FOX Sports Live (N) (L) FX 45 51 136 248 X-Men Origins: Wolverine () Hugh Jackman, Liev Schreiber, will.i.am. X-Men Origins: Wolverine () Hugh Jackman, Liev Schreiber, will.i.am. HALL 23 59 185 312 The Waltons “The Elopement” The Middle The Middle The Middle The Middle Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls Golden Girls Frasier Frasier HGTV 32 38 112 229 Love It or List It, Too Love It or List It, Too (N) House Hunters Hunters Int’l House Hunters Hunters Int’l Love It or List It, Too House Hunters Hunters Int’l HIST 35 42 120 269 American Pickers American Pickers American Pickers (:03) American Pickers (:01) American Pickers (12:01) American Pickers LIFE 56 56 108 252 Celebrity Wife Swap Celebrity Wife Swap (:02) Celebrity Wife Swap (:02) Big Women: Big Love (:02) Celebrity Wife Swap (12:02) Celebrity Wife Swap SPIKE 28 48 241 241 Cops Cops Cops Cops Cops Cops Cops Cops Cops World’s Wildest Police Videos Cops SUN 49 422 656 NHL Hockey: Lightning at Penguins Lightning Live! Lightning Ins. Lightning Inside Orange Inside Orange NHL Hockey Tampa Bay Lightning at Pittsburgh Penguins. SYFY 70 52 122 244 WWE SmackDown! XXX () Danny Trejo. A spy tries to stop an anarchist with weapons. The Revenant () David Anders. TBS 31 15 139 247 Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Sherlock Holmes () Robert Downey Jr., Jude Law, Rachel McAdams. Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows TCM 25 70 132 256 The Odd Couple () Jack Lemmon, Walter Matthau. The Out-of-Towners () Jack Lemmon, Sandy Dennis. Come Blow Your Horn () Frank Sinatra, Lee J. Cobb. TLC 37 40 183 280 Say Yes: ATL Say Yes: ATL Say Yes: ATL Say Yes: ATL New Body, New Style (N) Say Yes: ATL Say Yes: ATL New Body, New Style Say Yes: ATL Say Yes: ATL TNT 29 54 138 245 Castle Wake Up Call (N) The Help () Viola Davis. An aspiring writer captures the experiences of black women. Wake Up Call USA 62 55 105 242 Modern Family Modern Family Modern Family Modern Family Modern Family Modern Family Modern Family Modern Family Benched Benched The Dilemma () WGN-A 13 239 307 How I Met How I Met How I Met How I Met How I Met How I Met Engagement Engagement Parks/Recreat Parks/Recreat Parks/Recreat Raising Hope Page C8 | The News Herald | Friday, January 2, 2015 TODAY’S TV LISTINGS

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CLASSIFIEDSFriday, January 2, 2015 | The News Herald | Page D1 Automotive Today NEWS HERALD NEW CARS, CERTIFIED USED CARS, USED CARS, BY OWNER pcautobuy.com CLASSIFIEDS INSIDE 1116606 11 3349 6

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CLASSIFIEDSPage D2 | The News Herald | Friday, January 2, 2015 34837 PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF INTENT TO USE UNIFORM METHOD OF COLLECTING NON-AD VALOREM ASSESSMENTS The City Commission of the City of Callaway, Florida (the “Commission”) hereby provides notice, pursuant to Section 197.3632(3)(a), Florida Statutes, of its intent to use the uniform method of collecting special assessments, sometimes called non-ad valorem special assessments, to be levied upon one or more properties within the City of Callaway upon which a public nuisance is located, to recover the cost of capital improvements and essential services incurred by the City to abate the nuisance in the event the owners or persons interested in the property fail to do so, commencing for the Fiscal Year beginning on October 1, 2014. The Commission will consider the adoption of a resolution electing to use the uniform method of collecting such assessment(s) on the same bill as for property taxes as authorized by Section 197.3632, Florida Statutes, at a public hearing to be held at 6:00 o’clock p.m., Tuesday, January 13, 2015, in the Commission Chambers, Callaway Arts & Conference Center, 500 Callaway Park Way, Callaway, Florida. Such resolution will state the need for the levy and will contain a legal description of the boundaries of the real property subject to the levy. The real property subject to the levy is all the property located within the boundaries of the City of Callaway, Florida. The levy will only be made upon a property upon which a public nuisance is located, not abated by the owner after notice and opportunity for hearing, and abated by the City as provided by law. The levy against the property upon which the nuisance is or was located will not exceed the cost of abatement and benefit, as determined by law, necessary to relieve and address the burdens created by such nuisance. Copies of the proposed form of resolution, which contains the legal description of the real property subject to the levy, are on file at the Office of the City Clerk of Callaway, 6601 East Highway 22, Callaway, Florida. All interested persons are invited to attend. The public hearing is only being held to determine and preserve the method of collection. In the event any person decides to appeal any decision by the City Commission with respect to any matter relating to the consideration of the resolution at the above-referenced public hearing, a record of the proceeding may be needed and in such an event, such person may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the public hearing is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence on which the appeal is to be based. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing a special accommodation or an interpreter to participate in this proceeding should contact the City Clerk’s Office at (850) 871-6000 at least seven days prior to the date of the hearing. DATED this 9th day of December, 2014. By Order of: CLERK OF THE CITY OF CALLAWAY December 19, 26, 2014 January 1, 9, 2015 34887 PUBLIC NOTICE DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY Proposed Flood Hazard Determinations for the Unincorporated Areas of Bay County, Florida, and Case No. 14-04-AA70P. The Department of Homeland Security’s Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) solicits technical information or comments on proposed flood hazard determinations for the Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM), and where applicable, the Flood Insurance Study (FIS) report for your community. These flood hazard determinations may include the addition or modification of Base Flood Elevations, base flood depths, Special Flood Hazard Area boundaries or zone designations, or the regulatory floodway. The FIRM and, if applicable, the FIS report have been revised to reflect these flood hazard determinations through issuance of a Letter of Map Revision (LOMR), in accordance with Title 44, Part 65 of the Code of Federal Regulations. These determinations are the basis for the floodplain management measures that your community is required to adopt or show evidence of having in effect to qualify or remain qualified for participation in the National Flood Insurance Program. For more information on the proposed flood hazard determinations and information on the statutory 90-day period provided for appeals, please visit FEMA’s website at www.fema.gov/plan/prevent/fh m/bfe, or call the FEMA Map Information eXchange (FMIX) toll free at 1-877-FEMA MAP (1-877-336-2627). December 26, 2014 January 2, 2015 34929 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION Case No. 2014-001223-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF PAMELA SUZANNE PARKER Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Pamela Suzanne Parker, deceased, whose date of death was May 6, 2014, is pending in the Circuit Court for Bay County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 300 East 4th Street, Panama City, Florida 32401. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against the decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against the decedent’s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.302 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is December 26, 2014. Personal Representative Christopher Martin Parker 1000 Montage Way, Apt. 4205 Atlanta, Georgia 30341 Todd C. Brister FL Bar No.: 24522 P.O. Box 1759 Panama City, FL 32402 Tel. (850) 215-7885 Fax (850) 215-0379 tbrister@knology.net 34907 PUBLIC NOTICE The Gulf Coast State College Foundation, Inc. Golfing Event Committee will meet on Thursday, January 8, 2015, in the Student Union West Building, 3rd Floor, Room 302, at 11:30 a.m. at Gulf Coast State College. CONTACT PERSON: Margie Mazur, Executive Director Pub: January 2, 2015 1135514 1135513 1135515 2007 Nissan Altima , One owner, loaded, excellent condition contact 850-708-5950 for details. Text FL09758 to 56654 Chevy Camaro, 2011, auto, V6, non-smoker, In the wrapper! $18,998 Call Tony Smith 850-851-6069 Infiniti G37 Coupe, ‘08, moonroof, leather, $17,991! Call 850-250-5981. Chrysler 200 LX, 2013, auto, 33k miles, Looks new inside & out! Only $14,998! Call Constantine 850-250-7523 Chrysler 200 LX, 2014, silver/blk, under warranty! $14,988 Call 785-1591, ask for Charlie Ford Fusion SE, 2007, silver, grey cloth, all pwr, alloys, Only $6988! Gary Fox 338-5257 Ford Fusion, 2014, Under warranty! Alloys, all pwr, Great car! $18,988 Call Tony Smith 850-851-6069 Ford Mustang Convertible, 2007, blue w/ blue top, auto, all pwr, CD, alloys, all pwr, Only $9888! Gary Fox 338-5257 Honda Accord Coupe, 2011, local trade, non-smoker, red, blk int, all pwr, auto, alloys, Great on gas! Hurry, won’t last! $10,988 Gary Fox 338-5257 Hyundai Genesis, 2015, black, LOADED! Under warranty! Beautiful luxury car! Call Victor 850-348-1038 Kia Forte, 2013, silver, 20k miles, Excellent gas saver! Still under warranty! Must Sell! Call Victor 850-348-1038 Kia Optima, 2014, Bluetooth, 23k miles, alloys, Under warranty! $15,998 Call Tony Smith 850-851-6069 Lincoln MKZ, 2010, 38k miles, 27MPG, red, moonroof, Nice! $19,998 Call 785-1591, ask for Charlie Lincoln Town Car Signature, 2007, lthr, all pwr, non-smoker, Must See! $11,988 Call Tony Smith 850-851-6069 Mazda CX7, 2010, blk/blk, sunroof, tow pkge, 68k miles. $13,988 Call 785-1591, ask for Charlie Mercedes Benz GLK350, 2012, white, 29k miles, Still under warranty! LOADED! Call Victor 850-348-1038 Mercury Grand Marquis, 2003, local trade, non-smoker, white/tan bottom, tan int, all pwr, Last of the RWD cars! Only $4988! Gary Fox 338-5257 Mitsubishi Mirage ES, 2014, only 6100 miles! Auto, LOADED! Save! $11,995! Under warranty! Call Pat Collins 624-0648 New 2015 Mitsubishi Mirage-5dr hatchback, auto, all pwr, CD, smart key, push button start, 100,000 miles warranty & 44MPG! Several to choose from! $15,488 Gary Fox 338-5257 Subaru Impreza 2.5i, ‘10, AWD, 4-door, must see, $11,991! Call 850-250-5981 Toyota Camry SE, 2013, auto, V6, sunoof, nav, backup cam, $20,998 Call Tony Smith 850-851-6069 Toyota Corolla S, 2013, auto, 18k miles, GREAT MPG! Financing available! $12,988 Call Tony Smith 850-851-6069 Toyota Matrix, ‘06, auto, must see, $9,991! Call 850-250-5981. Toyota Scion TC, 2008, Great MPG! Maroon/blk, Nice Car! $9988 Call 785-1591, ask for Charlie Toyota Yaris, 2009, sedan, local trade, silver, grey cloth, auto, all pwr, Great on Gas! $6988 Gary Fox 338-5257 Cadillac Escalade, ‘09, AWD, luxury pkg, loaded, $27,993! Call 850-250-5981. Chevy Tahoe LT, 2005, local trade, blk, tan lthr, 3rd row, dual air, all pwr, alloys, Nice SUV! Hurry, only $7888! Gary Fox 338-5257 Chevy Tahoe LT, 2007, Super clean! LOADED! $13,995 Call Pat Collins 624-0648 Ford Escape XLT, 2012, white/tan, only 22k miles, Nice SUV! $17,988 Call 785-1591, ask for Charlie Ford Explorer, ‘14, loaded, local trade, $32,991! Call 850-250-5981. GMC Acadia SCT, 2008, bench seats, LOADED!! 3rd row, only 59k miles, Only $15,988! Call Todd 252-3234 GMC Acadia SLE, ‘12, 3rd seat, auto, V6, $22,992! Call 850-250-5981. GMC Yukon SLE, ‘01, auto, V8, all power, $6,991! Call 850-250-5981. GMC Yukon XL, ‘08, local trade, beige, must see, $25,992! Call 850-250-5981. Honda CRV LX, 2011, only 29k miles, Great condition! Only $16,988! Call Constantine 850-250-7523 Hummer H2, 2003, blk, brown lthr, Excellent condition! Must sell ASAP! Call Victor 850-348-1038 Hummer H3, 2006, Great looking vehicle! Priced to sell at only $15,998! Call Todd 252-3234 Hyundai Tucson, ‘11, must see, $14,994! Call 850-250-5981. Jeep Cherokee, ‘14, local trade, like new, $23,991! Call 850-250-5981 Kia Sportage, 2010, white, tan cloth, auto, all pwr, alloys, CD, Beautiful SUV! $10,988 Gary Fox 338-5257 Lexus RX 350 2011 Beautiful white in color. Tan leather, sunroof Mint condition! $24,900 Call 850-819-2535 Text FL89360 to 56654 Lexus RX350, ‘10, dual dvd’s, leather, loaded, $25,991! Call 850-250-5981 Lincoln MKX, 2010, 1 owner, LOADED! Great condition! Only $19,988! Call Constantine 850-250-7523 Lincoln Navigator, 2005, local trade, nav, moonroof, rear ent, pwr running boards, park assist. A real deal at ONLY $8998! Call Pat Collins 624-0648 Mazda Tribute, 2011, Nice SUV! Low miles! Great condition! Only $13,988! Call John 850-326-3847 Nissan Xterra, 2010, V6, 59k miles, maroon, Runs Excellent! 1 owner, no accidents! Call Victor 348-1038 2001 Ford F350 , 4 wheel drive, diesel, 6 speed transmission, straight drive. crew-cab w/work bed, rebuilt rear end, used everyday, $8000 obo. Call 850-763-3098 Cadillac Escalade, ‘09, AWD, luxury pkg, loaded, $29,993! Call 850-250-5981. Chevy Colorado Crew Cab, ‘10, leather, like new, $19,991! Call 850-250-5981. Chevy Silverado Crew Cab Z-71, ‘05, 4WD, auto, V8, $16,990. Call 850-250-5981 Dodge Ram TRX Quad Cab, 2010, only 58k miles, Priced to sell at $21,988! Call Todd 252-3234 Dodge Ram, 2008, low miles, Good condition! Just $9988! Call John 850-326-3847 Ford Explorer XLT, ‘04, auto, power options, $8,992! Call 850-250-5981. Ford F250 Supercrew 4x4, 2006, Lariat, Turbo diesel, LOADED! Park assist, custom wheels, SHARP! $19,988 Call Pat Collins 624-0648 Ford F-350 King Ranch Crew Cab, ‘15, leather, loaded, $56,991! Call 850-250-5981 Ford Ranger XLT Supercab, ‘02, auto, V6, $7,991! Call 850-250-5981. Honda Crosstour, ‘10, loaded, must see, $19,993! Call 850-250-5981. Nissan Titan King Cab SE, ‘04, 4WD, 53k miles, $15,991! Call 850-250-5981 Ram 1500 Laramie, 2008, reg cab, 1 owner, V6, only 60k miles! Beautiful truck! Hurry, won’t last! $7988 Gary Fox 338-5257 Ram 2500 Turbo Diesel, 2006, Crew Cab, low miles! Extra clean! $22,990 Call Pat Collins 624-0648 Ram 3500 Quad Cab, 2003, Dually diesel, SLT, red, blk cloth, all pwr, non-smoker, Beautiful Truck! Hurry! $15,888 Gary Fox 338-5257 Toyota Pickup, ‘03, regular cab, must see, $9,992! Call 850-250-5981 Toyota Pickup, ‘03, regular cab, must see, $9,992! Call 850-250-5981 Toyota Tundra 4x4, 2012, Crew Cab, 25k miles, red, Like new! Priced to go! Excellent condition! Under warranty! Call Victor 850-348-1038 Toyota Tundra Crew Cab, 2010, lt tan, tan cloth, auto, all pwr, CD, alloys, only 50k miles! Beautiful truck! $18,988 Gary Fox 338-5257 Chrysler Town & Country, 2011, Only 44k miles! Local trade! Nice! Priced to sell at $21,988 Call Todd 252-3234 Chrysler Town & Country, 2014, LOADED! Stow-n-Go, lthr, all pwr, backup cam, $23,998 Call Tony Smith 850-851-6069 Harley Davidson Fat Boy, ‘07, customized, must see, $16,990! Call 850-250-5981 Boat Slips, protected area, W/E, dock side, $175, Small slips $99 . 850-303-4611 Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium that’s your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when it’s time to buy, it’s the resource on which to rely. $2999-NEW METAL ROOF for the Doublewide!! (up to 28x60) Licensed & Insured. Guyson Construction & Roofing (850) 258-5856 CALLTODAYText FL96551 to 56654 Any Time Tree Removal!Lic./Ins. w/ workers comp. 10% off for Lynn Haven residents for DECEMBER 850-628-0930Text FL87880 to 56654 Creamer’s Tree ServiceCall Jason @ (850)832-9343 Property Clean UpLandscaping, Pavers, Free Estimates. Honest & Dependable 850-358-1417 Newly Opened Lan’s Massage 2518 Hwy 77 Lynn Haven 890-8482lic#mm32958 Oriental MassagePanama City Beach Shiatsu/Swedish 850-832-4790 #MA62742 RESTLESS CONSUMER?Call Boomer Pool Service & Pressure Washing 850-640-2154 FREEAppliance removal Discount Small Hauling. Buy Unwanted Vehicles 850-527-3035 Able Lawn SvcW e Show Up! Fall Clean-Ups/ Trimming/Palms/Mulch/Straw 596-4383/258-5072 Text FL97024 to 56654 Complete Lawn Care Senior & Milit ary Disc. Call Steven: 850-624-8798 Cell 850-235-2212 Office .« SEATILE« Tile & Wood All Types of Tiles & Wood Flooring installed. Bath & Kit-chens Too! Free Est: Kenneth « 850-532-4251« Home Repairs Any Job Large or Small Kitchens, Baths, New Installs, Paint, Tile, & Woodrot. Free Estimates Robert 850-832-7972 WHITE’S CONCRETEServing Bay Est.’94 Christmas Special 874-1515 / 896-6864 Accept Credit Cards Bill W Hash Remodeling/ ConsultingA Master Craftsman w/ 33 yrs exp. Call 850-890-7569 txt FL00734to 56654 CAREGIVER AVAILABLE Mature lady, 20 years of experience, local, excellent references. Dependable, honest, caring, patient centered Call 773-369-7910 or 850-236-6654 If you didn’t advertise here, you’re missing out on potential customers. Need a helping hand? Advertise in the Help Wanted Section in the Classifieds! 747-5020

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CLASSIFIEDSFriday, January 2, 2015 | The News Herald | Page D3 Customer SupportCustomer Care CenterDo you have a warm smile, friendly voice, enjoy helping people, talking on the phone & using computers? If so, this full-time position is just for you! If interested, please come by & fill out an application. No phone calls please. Benefits Include: 401K, Group Medical Insurance, Paid Holidays and Vacations plus more Bill Cramer Chevrolet Cadillac Buick GMC. 2251 W 23rd St, Panama City, FL DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE, DMV CHECK AND EOE. Web ID: 34309714 Customer SupportPermanent Part-time Customer Service Representative 28 Hours per WeekThe News Herald is accepting applications for a part-time Circulation Customer Service Representative. Position pays minimum wage plus performance bonus. Applicants must possess: the ability to communicate effectively by phone and in person very strong computer and data entry skills experience with Microsoft Excel general math skills ability to make customer service the number 1 priority. able to be flexible with work schedule, weekends and holidays a must Send resumes to gsullivan@pcnh.com or applications taken at 501 W. 11th Street. Interview to be scheduled at a later date. No phone calls. Candidate hired pending criminal background check and pre-employment drug screen. Web Id 34304833 Food Svc/HospitalityPita Pit in Pier Park is NOW HiringManager and PT Crew MembersManager needs restaurant and management experience. Visit location for application and Email Resume to: ericwoliver12@gmail.com Web ID#: 34309833 December 26, 2014 January 2, 2015 97024 IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF THE 14TH JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No. 14-1861DR Division: ___ Gilbert LFuller, Petitioner and Antolin Celso Martinez, Respondent AMENDED NOTICE OF ACTION FOR TEMPORARY CUSTODY TO: Antolin Celso Martinez Last Known Address: Panama City, FL 32404 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Temporary Custody has been filed against you and that you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Gilbert LFuller whose address is 6325 Letohatchee St, Panama City, FL32404 on or before January 26, 2015, and file the original with the clerk of this Court at 533 E. 11th St, Panama City, FL 32401 before service on Petitioner or immediately thereafter. If you fail to do so, a default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the petition. Dated: December 16, 2014. Bill Kinsaul Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Eva Thomas Deputy Clerk Dec. 19, 26, 2014 Jan. 2, 9, 2015 34953 NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE Property of the following tenants will be sold for cash to satisfy rental items in accordance with Florida Statutes, Self Storage Act, Section 83.801 et seq. All items will be sold or otherwise disposed. Sale will be conducted at Bay Mini Storage, 1816 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach, FL 32408 on January 20, 2015, at 9:00 AM. All goods will be sold in “AS IS” condition, all items or spaces may not be available at time of sale. Unit #/Name/Items: 148Curtis Flower Household 208Scott Clark Household 208 -Stephan Trelea Vehicle, 2009 SHEN Motorcycle, Vin# L8YTCKPB29Y010259 225Michael Herthel Household 222Tabitha Honeycutt Household 59Isaac Holmes III Household Pub: Jan. 2, 9, 2015 Found in Parker on Ethlyn Rd. Small female Scottish wire haired terrier; 8-10 lbs, gray around the muzzle. Broken red halter. Call to identify 850-871-4527. Alternative To BoardingHouse N PetSitting Svs. Licensed Bonded 265-0278 HAVANESE PUPS AKC Home Raised. Best Health Guar.262-993-0460www .noahslittleark.com Hot Springs Hot TubSeats 4-5, like new, w/ cover & steps, $4200 obo. Call 850-238-0557 Text FL09892 to 56654 Moving Now!White Side by Side GE frig, 36W 33D 68.5Hi, x-cond, ice maker, dispenser, $325 obo . Camphor chest, very ornate, like new $265 obo. Four Poster queen mattress & box strings, x-cond, $450 obo. Antique Shift robe, 71W 82Hi 22D, rare, must sell, $2450 obo . Teak Wood, table, 30x30, x-quality, $450 obo . 4 Draw Cherry Wood locking file cab, almost new, $280 obo . New Cherry bilateral file cab, still in box, $280 obo. Top brand, white loveseat, needs cleaning, not torn or worn, $145 obo.Call (850) 819-1740 ASeasoned Christmas Special: Split Oak special $65 and up Large truck load. Call 850-866-8673 Oak FirewoodPick Up or Delivery 850-305-1609 Buy & SellUsed Furniture 850-872-9544 or www .visit second2none.com Guns, Ammo and AccessoriesGlock, Ruger, Mossberg, & more! North Florida Coins, M-F, 11-5, Sat 9-2 2639-B Lisenby Ave. PC. 850-215-8565. 10,000lb GVW tag along trailer , dual axel, 16x79.5 deck, light fixtures & ramps, $2850. Call 850-892-0767 Text FL09834 to 56654 Burn Barrells , $25/each or 2/$40. Call 624-1729 Cemetery Plot in the devotion section for sale at Evergreen Garden, $3999. Call 850-215-5175 Text FL09771 to 56654 Tandem crypt at Kent Forest Memorial ; retails for $13k. Must Sell Call to make Any Offers 850-814-8886 Utility trailer tires & rims 205-75-15. 5 lug white spoke. New. $90 ea or 4 for $350. Also, new 14” $80 each or 4 for $300. Also, new 13” $65 each or 4 for $250. Call 850-624-1729 Administrative/ClericalOffice AsstFor busy doctor’s office, will train. Send resume to P.O. Box 1960, Lynn Haven, FL 32444 Web ID#:34305591 Admin/ClericalDental Office Front DeskOur fast-paced dental office, on the Beach is looking for that perfect someone to join our front office staff. Position includes ans phones, scheduling app, filing ins, etc. Must be organized & focused. Full time, paid holidays and vacation. 401k offered as well as other bonus opportunities. Dental Experience req Email Resumes to:P arkwaydental@knology .n et Web ID#:34309925 Customer Service Enjoy meeting people and having fun? If so, Dodge’s of Panama City wants you! Looking forHost/ Hostess@ $8.55/hr Must pass a drug screen Apply online at:Dodgessouthernstyle.c om/careers Web ID#:34309765 Food Svs/HospitalityHiring Cook & BakerFull Time/ Part Time, Day shift. Apply in person-only. Somethin’s Cookin’ 93 East 11th Street, Web ID#: 34309779 Logistics/Transport25 TRUCK DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW!Learn to drive forNo Experience Needed Earn $900 / wk + Benefits Local CDL Training Apply Today! 1-800-709-7364 Web ID#: 34307000 Medical/HealthCNA’sA Skilled Nursing & Rehabilitation Facility dedicated to excellent patient care has openings for all shifts. Applicants must also be able to work designated weekend shifts. Benefits include: * Shift Differential * Uniform Allowance * Vacation Pay * 401k * BCBS Health Dental, Vision, Disability and Life Insurance Background Check & Drug Screening Required Applications are available: Mon-Fri 8am-5pm Please No Phone Calls. Apply in Person at: 3611 Transmitter Rd Panama City, FL 32404 Web ID 34309945 Medical/HealthPediatrics Plus, Inc.A growing pediatrics therapy practice is seeking FT Occupational Therapist & PT Speech Therapist. Fax resume to 872-9558 Web ID#: 34309488 Wave Runner Rental Concession Stands For lease for 2015 on PCB. Must have own wave runners, excellent income opportunity. 850-527-6829, Call10-5 Text FL09673 to 56654 EARN EXTRA INCOMENewspaper Carriers NeededPanama City Beach , Panama City, Bonifay, & ChipleyEmail Jamie Meadors at jmeadors@pcnh.com or call 850-747-5098. Please leave name, contact number, and what area you live in. Web ID#: 34309878 Beach Office Space800 s.f. off Middle Beach Road $625mo Jane Bondi, Counts Real Estate Group, Inc. (850) 819-4268 Text FL01983 to 56654 Whse w/office & docks 2500-5000-7500 up to 20k sf Various locations in PC area. 785-3031 1 br, 1 bath , 724 Helen Ave. $500 mo & $300 deposit utilities incl’d. No pets! 850-532-8263 Text FL09775 to 56654 Millville -325 N Center Ave. Fri 1/2/2015 and Sat 1/3/2015 7am to 12pmYard Sale/ Moving SaleFurniture, Clothes, Dishes, Lots of Other Stuff!! Text FL09883 to 56654 St Andrews 1905 Chestnut Ave. Sat 1/3/2015 7am tillCarport SaleNever worn mens winter coats, sports team jackets, jerseys, mens tennis shoes, lots of DVD’s and CD’s, watches, comic books, mens and womens clothes. Too Much To List. Text FL09870 to 56654 Callaway929 S. Tyndall Pkwy Boat Race Road and Tyndall Pkwy Saturday Only 8AM -12PMGOOD SHEPHERD LUTHERAN Share Ministry THRIFT SHOPOPENNew and Different Merchandise.. CLOTHING SALE!! Pictures, Desks, Baby clothes, Kid’s Toys, Hospital Bed, Couch, Tables, TVs, Dining Room, China cabinet, Chester drawers, Set, Lamps, Bed Covers, Filing Cabinets, Office Table & Lots More. New Furniture. Free BOOKS! Exercise EquipmentText FL03778 to 56654 Callaway 1222 Babby Lane, Saturday Jan 3rd 7am-2pmSuper Big Yard SaleText FL09889 to 56654 THINKING OF HAVING A GARAGE SALE?Give the News Herald classified department a call and you’re in Business! Aquick, convenient call connects you to a whole community of customers eager to examine the items you wish to see clothes, bikes, baby items, tools, you name it! Place your ad today, it’s easy, it’s economical and it’s fun! Who says you can’t mix business with pleasure? Call Classified today 747-5020. SELL ALL YOUR ITEMS through classified.CALL 747-5020

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CLASSIFIEDSPage D4 | The News Herald | Friday, January 2, 2015 Beautiful Canal Front Home in Bay Point$549,000 3 bedroom, 3.5 bath, office/4th bedroom, family room which has attached atrium/ greenhouse and electric fireplace. Large eat-in kitchen has Corian countertops, island and breakfast bar. Master bedroom has vaulted ceiling, leading into master bath with separate sauna/steam shower and jetted tub area. Lofted space above foyer. Laundry room complete with plenty of cabinet storage and sink. Marble floors throughout. Large deck accessible from every room on lower level of house, leading down to 92 feet of boat dock. Attached 2 car garage, security system and central vac. This gently lived in home is a must see! Call 850-235-3500 or email: wallhouseholdceo@hotmail.com to make an appointment to see this property. 1 br 1 ba , Newly remodeled apartment located of Stamford Rd, All new appliances including dishwasher and washer/ dryer. Deck off of the bedroom with storage room. Large privacy fenced yard great for pets. All utilities furnished including cable. Avail Jan 1st $1000 mo Call 850-394-7185 2613½ N Cedar Ln . 3br, 2ba, Lg apt, $285 wk. includes util No Pets, No Deposit call 850-258-1889 txt FL09782 to 56654 1br, 1ba, quiet area, WD hkup, FP, vaulted ceilings, CH&A, carpet, tile, no pets, $600 mo. 850-871-4235 Text FL09867 to 56654 1br, 1ba, St. Andrews, Small Pets ok. W/D hk-ups, 850-527-6879 Text FL08770 to 56654 Pet Friendly Apts 2Bdrm $575-$650, 1Bdrm $525-$625 Weekly also avail. TEXT or Call Steve (850) 867-5603 Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Duplex , 2 or 3br/2ba Very Clean, Carport, Near Mall, Very Nice Area $850mo + dep; 850-960-6039 txt FL09897 to 56654 Snowbirds Welcomed 3bd/2ba at Regency Towers. Newly Remodled, Avail Jan, Call Owner @ 850-785-4493 or Email rt1224pcb@mindspring.com 3 br, 2 bath Brick, CH&A, No pets! $850 $900/mo Call 871-4827 Text FL09886 to 56654 3br, 1ba, 239 Center Ave, quiet neighborhood. $750/mo. 850-819-6645 Text FL09757 to 56654 ForestPark home, 3 br, 2 ba, 1,600 sf, 2 cg, fenced back yard, w/d hookup, $1150 mo./ $950 sec. dep. Non Smokers, No pets Call 628-0129 For Responsible working male, non-alcohol/ drug environment, $90 weekly. $25 deposit Call 850-769-8496 Bayou George 2bd/1ba & 3br/2ba avail clean, quiet, lrg yrd no pets w/s/g incld. 850-265-4043 Bonifay: 4bd/2ba, Double Wide, large shaded lot, near the school in Bonifay. Avail now, $600mo Call: 850-699-9464 Text FL99320 to 56654 Lynn Haven 2 & 3 Br’s starting at $540 mnth, W/D Hookup, CH/A, No Pets. 850-624-6552 ! ! ! ! ! ! ! Sell It Today!I BUYHOUSESPretty or Ugly763-7355ibuyhousesprettyorugly.comText FL95981 to 56654 3 br 3 ½ baCompletely Renovated1,360 Sqft.Nice open floor plan. $215,000 MLS #624668 Colleen Dietrich 850-814-7298 3,155 SqFt 4BR/3BA all brick home on 1 Acre with screened inground pool & Media room w/ 100” screen Surround Sound. 840SqFt Workshop w/electricity. Must See! $389k MLS621422 Bonnie Milstead, CRS, GRI Prudential Shimmering Sands Realty Call 850-814-3423 Under Contract Bayside 3br 3½ ba Huge Price Reduction! 1,800 sqft, huge yards! MLS 620116 Colleen Dietrich 850-814-7298 DEEP WATERFRONT! Classic Cove home with hardwood floors and lots of charm. 3BR/2BA. Open and airy, overlooks Watson Bayou on high bluff. Huge screen porch, dock area w/4 big boat wet slips. $325,000. Seller moving soon and MOTIVATED!! O’Keefe & Wainwright, Realtors 850-785-8746 Built in 05, this lovely maintained home has 100% financing available through USDA. Victorian styled design with lots of decorator features. 3/2 Tile in LR&Kitchen. Wood floors in M/BR and hallway. Carpet in 2 bedrooms. Storage bldg has elect. Convenient to Tyndall. $131,900 Fran Holt 832-0714 Latitudes Realty For Sale By Owner3bd 3ba, 55 Acre brick Home near Historic Defuniak Springs; Pool, Pecan trees, Spring fed fish pond, 45 miles to beaches and bases. 9379 State HWY 83 North, Defuniak Springs, FL 32539Asking 299k OBO. Call 850-682-7244; forsalebyowner.com Hammocks, brick 3/2. Wood, Tile, Carpet, Open living area, High ceilings, Scrnd porch, Elec. fireplace, fenced, $225K. 850-832-9540 HOME FOR SALE BY OWNER 2304 W. Game Farm Rd. Spacious home located close to Lynn Haven & Panama City, 2852 sq. ft. Large Open Concept Kitchen, New Roof, 4br/3.5Ba, separate master suite, $220,000. Call 407-745-1175 Lakefront home w/views of Lake Suzanne along w/100 ft of white sandy beach. Enjoy sunny Fl in your very own lake house w/20 ft of visibility in the warm water to enjoy scuba, snorkeling, & swimming. Home is elevated 50 ft above the lake & offers sunset views of the water from the LR, DR, or the covered porch. Renovated Kitch w/granite counters & new appl. New carpet throughout, remodeled bthrms w/granite, tile floors & new vanities, faucets, etc. Located in Leisure Lakes where community mbrs enjoy trophy size bream and largemouth bass fishing. Owners can enjoy a comm pool, tennis crt, bsktball crt, boat ramps & a gated entrance w/sec. Low HOA fee. MLS #620277 Amanda Corbin, Realtor Prudential Shimmering Sands Realty 850-832-7447 www .SearchP anamaCity Beach.com No Longer AvailableCove 3 br 1 bath home in the Downtown Cove New roof, fresh paint, new bonus room or 4th bdr/office. Natural gas hkups avail and electric hkps in kitchen. Original hardwood floors throughout MLS 619926 $63,000 Athrine Matthews Realtor Prudential Shimmering Sands Realty 624-3187 On N. Lake Caroline!Handsome, all brick(1 owner) 4BR/2BA home w/2400 SF of custom living, 2 gar, cov porches, den w/FP, just needs a few updates & YOU! Quiet lake near Garden Club area. $229,900 O’Keefe & Wainwright, Realtors, 785-8746 Price reduced! AC & water heater both less than 3 years old!! Located near TAFB. 3bd/2bth home w/2 car garage, has a split flr plan. Lg screened in back porch, auto irr sys w/sep well, & priv fncd bck yrd. Open LR w/high ceilings & brick FP. Int has been newly painted. Lrg Bdrms, ample storage space, plenty of cabinet space in the Kitch are some of the other things this home has to feature. MLS #623878 Laird Hitchcock, Realtor Prudential Shimmering Sands Realty 850-866-2158 Price Reduced!!!All Brick split 3 bdrm in lovely Camryn’s Crossing. 2 baths, living rm no hassle electric FP, formal dining, breakfast room, open kitchen w/ solid maple wood cabinets, s/steel appliances and wrap around bar. The home has Maple wood floors, Italian tile and carpet & windows have custom blackout shades and plantation shutters. Scrnd back porch overlooking priv fenced bckyard which backs up to a preservation area. MLS 620167 $239,900 Please Call Velma Phillips, Realtor Prudential Shimmering Sands Realty 832-6319 SOLDGorgeous Home At End of Cul-De-Sac4br/2ba home built 2010 in Hawks Landing 1856 sqft open fl plan w/granite countertops, crown molding, MB w/ double vanity, garden tub, extend. cov. back patio, outdoor shed, & much more! $269,900 MLS 624541 Mike Werner 814-6266 Keller Williams Realty The HOME that HAS IT ALL -Beautiful DEEDED ACCESS TO THE LAKE & boat dock-shared w/ 2 neighbors only 100 ft from the property. Live close to the conveniences of town with the feeling of so far away. 10 mins from PC Mall & only 23 mins from PCB via HWY 79. Located in Highpnt/Deerpnt. 4Br 3 Ba, Pool w/ Lanai, HT, outside living space w/ bar & grill. 2 garages 1 attached and detached garage/workshop w/loft above. Hope Abbott, 850-596-7653 Keller Williams Success Realty St. Andrews Bay3br 3ba Waterfront Condo, fully furnished 1453 sqft located in Magnolia Bay Club Gated community Exercise rm, Clubhouse, Covered parking. Visit, www.magbaypcb.comemail c ondo@magbaypcb.comor Call 786-207-2933 BEST NEW HOME DEALS250’s -270’s Gated community; 3/3.5 Gorgeous BayFront Pool; 2 -Car Garage Close to BayPoint. Owner Fin. Avail. Michael w/Sterling 850-865-8006 Beautiful waterfront neighborhood in gated community. 87X180 lot sits on the corner so you can have a drive way tucked away on the side which makes for a beautiful front yard. $55,000 MLS #618028 Collen Dietrich Cell 850-814-7298 Office 850-249-0313 Wewahitchka 1 Acre of Waterfront property 1/2 mile to Lands Landing, inside city limits, close to schools. Asking $60k OBO, Call 706-566-6277. Beautiful Waterfront neighborhood in gated community. 87X180 lot sits on the corner so you can have a drive way tucked away on the side which makes for a beautiful front yard. $55,000 MLS 618028 Colleen Dietrich Cell 850-814-7298 2bd, Like New Set upinquiet MHP, In beautiful Panama City. Shady lot, 200 ft from pool, $7,850 850-960-8452 GULF FRONT EAST ENDSWEET 60 FT LOT TWO COT T AGES 1755 SQ.FT. ONLY $877,000 J.M.JONES Sterling Realty 850-865-8006 Turn to classified’s Merchandise Columns Our prices are on target for you!

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PanamaCity.Com January 2, 2015 INSIDE Undercurrents: A new year promises new experiences | 2 Winter Guest Calendar | 9 Travel the world with Audubon film series | 10 Scampy’s opens Panama City location | 11 Dancing like no one is watching

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PAGE 2 PanamaCity.Com Friday, January 2 , 2 015 ABOUT US CONTENT JAN WADDY 850-747-5072 JWADDY@PCNH.COM CONTENT TONY SIMMONS 850-747-5080 TSIMMONS@PCNH.COM DESIGN JENNIFER SCHAEFER 850-522-5184 JSCHAEFER@PCNH.COM PA N AMA CIT Y B E A C H — Last week, as you might recall, I lamented the same-old sameold that seems so evident when you take that end-of-year look back. T he same events, the same stories, the same fodder for columns. T his week, I hope to show you how short-sighted a retrospective can be — and in the process, challenge all of us to embrace a new year with an appetite for new experiences. It’s about having fun, you know. S ure, there also will be a sense of deja-vu, especially if you read last week’s column. •For instance, as I mentioned previously, I’m really looking forward to this year’s B ooks Alive event, scheduled for Feb. 7 at Florida S tate U niversity-Panama City. T he keynote speaker will be B ill Curry, two-time S uper B owl Champion football player and former NCAA football coach; children can also attend a special presentation at the B ay County Public Library with children’s author Kwame Alexander. O ther featured authors announced so far include S usan M. B oyer, O livia de B elle B yrd, Carolyn Newton Curry, Chervis Isom, Paul Leonard, Carolyn Maull McKinstry, Mary Alice Monroe, Patricia Moore-Pastides, Michael Morris, and Marjory Wentworth. B ooks Alive is free to the public. For details, visit B ooksAlive.net •David Agosta, a fan of old scitelevision, said he has high hopes for a 2015 CreativeCon in Panama City. ( T he event moved from the downtown library to Gulf Coast S tate College in 2014; no word yet on when or if it will return in the new year.) “Hope they get ‘Automan’ Chuck Wagner, to appear,” David added. “He lives in Pensacola, so the distance isn’t far.” • T hose rhythmic folks with Panama City B elly Dance chimed in to laud 2014’s inaugural Public Eye S oar digital art festival hosted by the Public Eye at CityArts Cooperative, and to hope they host it again for 2015. T he event participants projected interactive video and artwork on downtown buildings, along with live music and other fun activities. •“I’m not so much into country music, but I’m curious to see what’ll happen with Alan Jackson coming to the Chasin’ the S un Music Festival this year,” said David Demarest, public relations manager with the Panama City B each Convention and Visitors B ureau. I think David Demarest may be onto something there. Maybe the important thing is to be open to new experiences in the new year. (Like when you were a kid and your dad told you that your tastes would change when you got older — he was right about broccoli but not shrimp. S o maybe not everything will suit you, but you get the idea.) What are you looking forward to this year? What looks kind of different, but intriguing, in the future? Drop me a note or comment on the online version of this column at PanamaCity.com, and let us know what you foresee. Just remember to take the time to have some fun in 2015. Peace . A new year promises new experiences UNDERC U RRENTST ony S immons tsimmons@pcnh.com Follow T ony on T witter @PC T ony S and friend him at Facebook.com/Writer T ony S immons PUBLIC E YE SO AR ON T H E CO V E R: Lee Ann Leonard, belly dancing instructor — Contributed photo | The News Herald

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Friday, January 2, 2015 PanamaCity.Com PAGE 3 CALENDAR SPICE UP YOUR WEEK WITH UPCOMING AREA EVENT S WANT TO BE INCLUDED? C lick “Send us your events” at P anama C ity.com or email Jan W addy, jwaddy@pcnh.com, or T ony Simmons, tsimmons@pcnh.com. I nclusion in this calendar of events, which also appears on the E vents page at P anama C ity. com, is at editors’ discretion. WINTER RESIDENT E VENT SSEE OUR C ALENDAR OF FUN FOR FLO C KING SNO W BIRD S ON PAGE 9. SATURDAY, JAN. 3 GRAND LAGOON W ATERFRONT FAR M ER S’ M ARKET : 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at C apt A nderson’s on T homas Drive. Enjoy the region’s nest makers, bakers and growers at PCB’s yearround farmers’ market. Live music, free tastings and family fun. Details: W aterfrontM arkets.org or 763-7359 S T . ANDRE WS W ATERFRONT FAR M ER S M ARKET : 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Smith Y acht Basin beside the Shrimp Boat R estaurant, 12th Street and Beck A venue. R ain or shine. V endors, live music, K ids C raft table. Bring a shing pole and stay for the day. Details: HistoricStA ndrews.com/ market or 872-7208 S EA S IDE FAR M ER S M ARKET : 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Seaside A mphitheatre. Fresh produce, baked goods, dairy products and other unique offerings, cooking demos and activities. Y earround event. Details: SeasideFL.comTUESDAY, JAN. 6 PLEIN AIR PAINTING : 9 a.m. to noon at Zen G arden, 707 R ichard Jackson Blvd., P anama C ity Beach. H osted by Beach A rt G roup. Details: BeachA rtG roup.com C A M P H ELEN S TATE PARK / EDEN GARDEN S S TATE PARK : 2 p.m. at the Bay C ounty P ublic Library, 898 W . 11th St., in P anama C ity. A ll adult residents and visitors are welcome to attend free program. Details: 522-2120 J A ZZ Q UARTET : 6:30 p.m. at T he P lace, 429 Harrison A ve., P anama C ity. Featuring utist Dr. Jill W ofsey, bassist Steve G ilmore, pianist and trumpeter G eorge P etropolous and drummer C harles P agano. P resented by the G ulf Jazz Society. Donation is $10 for GJS members and $12 for non-members. Details and reservations: Larry at 784-2106, Bob at 258-4022 or Judy at 769-5494 JAN. 9 ‘S AID T H E S PIDER TO T H E S PY ’: 7:30 p.m. at K aleidoscope T heatre, 207 E . 24th St., Lynn Haven. W hen A ugusta borrows her friend’s identity and her beach home, the quiet cottage becomes a den of intrigue and shenanigans in this comedy spy thriller. Details and tickets: 265-3226 or ktonline.org T H E ALLEY C AT S: 7:30 p.m. at T he M artin T heatre, 409 Harrison A ve., P anama C ity. Featuring A merica’s premier doo-wop ensemble singing songs of the 1950s and s. Details: 763-8080 or M artinT heatre.com T H E BIG DIRTY 3: 8 p.m. to midnight at A&M T heatre, 563 Harrison A ve., P anama C ity. T wo-night music festival featuring these bands: O vid’s W ithering, T he O ffer, Sunghosts, T he T hieving Hand, E theorist, T he Sun A lso R ises, K ofty, Beaten Broken Beautiful, A Solid Foundation, R ainey’s R evenge, Savior/Self, G ift Shop G irls, Backhoe, M y Brother: T he O cean. A dmission: $10 at door per night; $15 for twoday pass at door. Details: Facebook. com/A rtA ndM usicT heatre TO MC AT J OE : 9 p.m. at M osey’s, 425 G race A ve., P anama C ity. N o cover. Details: Facebook. com/M oseysDowntown JAN. 10 A M ERI C ANA M U S I C AT T H E LODGE : 6:30-8 p.m. at C amp H elen State P ark, 23937 P anama C ity Beach P arkway, P anama C ity Beach. Brian Smalley performs. Details: 233-5059 or C ampH elenFriends@gmail.com ‘S AID T H E S PIDER TO T H E S PY ’: 7:30 p.m. at K aleidoscope T heatre, 207 E . 24th St., Lynn Haven. Details and tickets: 265-3226 or kt-online.org T H E BIG DIRTY 3: 8 p.m. to midnight at A&M T heatre, 563 Harrison A ve., P anama C ity. Second night of music festival. Details: Facebook. com/A rtA ndM usicT heatre JAN. 11 ‘S AID T H E S PIDER TO T H E S PY ’: 2 p.m. at K aleidoscope T heatre, 207 E . 24th St., Lynn Haven. Details and tickets: 265-3226 or kt-online.org JAN. 13 H I S TORY OF S T . ANDRE WS BAY S ALT W ORK S W IT H ANN ROBBIN S: 2 p.m. at the P anama C ity Beach P ublic Library, 12500 Hutchison Boulevard, P anama C ity Beach. A ll adult residents and visitors are welcome to attend free program. Details: 233-5055 ‘S I S TER A C T ’ T H E M U S I C AL : 7:30 p.m. at the M arina C ivic C enter, 8 Harrison A ve., P anama C ity. Details and tickets: M arinaC ivicC enter.com or 763-4696 JAN. 16 ‘S AID T H E S PIDER TO T H E S PY ’: 7:30 p.m. at K aleidoscope T heatre, 207 E . 24th St., Lynn Haven. W hen A ugusta borrows her friend’s identity and her beach home, the quiet cottage becomes a den of intrigue and shenanigans in this comedy spy thriller. Details and tickets: 265-3226 or ktonline.org S AT CHM O : 7:30 p.m. at T he M artin T heatre, 409 Harrison A ve., P anama C ity. V irtuoso trumpeter Dean Simms leads this band, plays trumpet like the master himself, and matches his singing style, showmanship and persona. Details: 763-8080 or M artinT heatre.com JAN. 17 30 A S ONG W RITER S FE S TI V AL : Jan. 17-19; all-day event at venues along C ounty 30A in W alton C ounty. T ickets and details: 30ASongW ritersFestival. com FRO Z EN W ONDERLAND A M ILITARY APPR E C IATION : 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Science and Discovery C enter of N orthwest Florida in P anama C ity. Free admission for military families. Bouncy house, hands on crafts and science experiments. C hildren are encouraged to wear their favorite “Frozen” costume. Sponsored by Booz A llen Hamilton. Details: (505) 660-0057 C ENTENNIAL S INATRA : 7:30 p.m. at the M arina C ivic C enter, 8 Harrison A ve., P anama C ity. Details and tickets: MICHAEL OSBOURNE PHOTOGRAPHY | Special to the N ews H eraldT he O ffer will perform on Jan. 9 at the A&M T heatre’s Big Dirty

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CALENDAR SPICE UP YOUR WEEK WITH UPCOMING AREA EVENT S PAGE 4 PanamaCity.Com Friday, January 2, 2015 P anama C ity M usic A ssociation, 236-1260 ‘S A I D TH E SPI DER TO TH E SPY’: 7:30 p.m. at K aleidoscope T heatre, 207 E . 24th St., Lynn Haven. Details and tickets: 265-3226 or kt-online.org JAN. 18 30 A SO N GW R IT ER S F E STIV AL : Jan. 17-19; all-day event at venues along C ounty 30A in W alton C ounty. T ickets and details: 30ASongW ritersFestival. com ‘S A I D TH E SPI DER TO TH E SPY’: 2 p.m. at K aleidoscope T heatre, 207 E . 24th St., Lynn Haven. Details and tickets: 265-3226 or kt-online.org JAN. 19 30 A SO N GW R IT ER S F E STIV AL : Jan. 17-19; all-day event at venues along C ounty 30A in W alton C ounty. T ickets and details: 30ASongW ritersFestival. com JAN. 20 HISTO R Y OF ST. ANDRE WS B A Y S AL T WO R KS WITH ANN R OBBI N S: 2 p.m. at the Bay C ounty P ublic Library, 898 W . 11th St., in P anama C ity. A ll adult residents and visitors are welcome to attend free program. Details: 522-2120 TH E W ELL I N GTO N I N T ERNA TIO N UKU LELE O R CH E ST RA : 7:30 p.m. at the M arina C ivic C enter, 8 H arrison A ve., P anama C ity. Details and tickets: M arina C ivic C enter.com or 763-4696 AR T E XP ER I EN C E : 2 p.m. at the P anama C ity Beach P ublic Library, 12500 H utchison Boulevard, P anama C ity Beach. A ll adult residents and visitors are welcome to attend free program. Details: 233-5055 JAN. 22 ‘S A I D TH E SPI DER TO TH E SPY’ L IB RAR Y B ENE FIT: 7:30 p.m. (doors open at 6:30 p.m.) at the K aleidoscope T heatre, 207 E . 24th St., Lynn Haven. P roceeds benet the Bay C ounty branches of the N orthwest R egional Library System. T ickets: 25 in advance, $30 at the door; cash or check only; can be purchased in advance at the Bay C ounty P ublic Library, 898 W . 11th St., P anama C ity. Enjoy light refreshments and a cash wine bar. T icket price includes a chance to win rafe prizes; you must be present to win. T icket also includes a buy one/get one free coupon for up to 10 items at the R ead A gain Bookstore at the Bay C ounty P ublic Library. Details: 522-2100 JAN. 23 ‘S A I D TH E SPI DER TO TH E SPY’: 7:30 p.m. at K aleidoscope T heatre, 207 E . 24th St., Lynn Haven. W hen A ugusta borrows her friend’s identity and her beach home, the quiet cottage becomes a den of intrigue and shenanigans in this comedy spy thriller. Details and tickets: 265-3226 or ktonline.org A B AND C ALLED HO NALEE : 7:30 p.m. at T he M artin T heatre, 409 Harrison A ve., P anama C ity. A modern-day folk trio inspired by the music and legacy of P eter, P aul and M ary. Details: 763-8080 or M artinT heatre.com JAN. 24 P ANA M A CITY G E M AND MI NERAL SHOW: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Bay C ounty Fairgrounds, 2230 E . 15th St., P anama C ity. T he show features 18 vendors offering exhibits, minerals, fossils, cabochons, gems, crystals, wire wrapping, lapidary arts, jewelry, beads and silent auction including one grand prize and door prizes. A dmission and parking are free. Details: Steve Shipton, 867-0586 B EACH BOOGI E DAN C E : 6-10 p.m. at the P anama C ity Beach Senior C enter, 423 Lyndell Lane, P anama C ity Beach. A dmission is $15 per person with setups and hors d’oeuvres provided. B YO B. Sponsored by T he W omen’s C ivic C lub of PC B. T ickets available at the Lyndell C enter M onday-Friday. Details: M argaret I vey, 866-9882 A M ER IC ANA MUSIC A T TH E L O D G E : 6:30-8 p.m. at C amp H elen State P ark, 23937 P anama C ity Beach P arkway, P anama C ity Beach. P aul K amm and E leanore M acDonald perform. Details: 233-5059 or C amp H elenFriends@ gmail.com R OM AN CI N G IT AL Y: 7:30 p.m. at the M arina C ivic C enter, 8 H arrison A ve., P anama C ity. T he P anama C ity POP S O rchestra presents “ T he P ines of R ome” by O ttorino R espighi. Details and tickets: P anama C ity P ops.org ‘S A I D TH E SPI DER TO TH E SPY’: 7:30 p.m. at K aleidoscope T heatre, 207 E . 24th St., Lynn H aven. Details and tickets: 265-3226 or kt-online.org JAN. 25 P ANA M A CITY G E M AND MI NERAL SHOW: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Bay C ounty Fairgrounds, 2230 E . 15th St., P anama C ity. T he show features 18 vendors offering exhibits, minerals, fossils, cabochons, gems, crystals, wire wrapping, lapidary arts, jewelry, beads and silent auction including one grand prize and door prizes. A dmission and parking are free. Details: Steve Shipton, 867-0586 R OOTS & WI N GS MUSIC F E STIV AL : N oon to 10 p.m. at R oberts H all, 831 Florida A ve., Lynn H aven. T ickets now on sale: $25 in advance/$30 at the door; limited seating; order now at Squareup.com/market/lucky-mud. ‘S A I D TH E SPI DER TO TH E SPY’: 2 p.m. at K aleidoscope T heatre, 207 E . 24th St., Lynn H aven. Details and tickets: 265-3226 or kt-online.org JAN. 26 ‘HUM AN NA TU RE ’: Solo exhibit by artist H eather C lements in A melia C enter M ain G allery, G ulf C oast State C ollege, P anama C ity, open regular gallery hours through Feb. 19. Details: G ulfC oast.edu/arts or 872-3886JAN. 27 ST. ANDRE WS ST A T E P AR K: 2 p.m. at the P anama C ity Beach P ublic Library, 12500 Hutchison Boulevard, P anama C ity Beach. A ll adult residents and visitors are welcome to attend free program. Details: 233-5055 JAN. 29 10TH ANN U AL GI RL S G E T A W A Y 2015: Jan. 29-Feb. 1, at R osemary Beach T own H all, 48 S. Barrett Square, R osemary Beach. P resented by the R osemary Beach Foundation, activities include: songwriter concert with K aci Bolls and N icole W itt; booksigning and talk with authors; art workshops; cooking demonstration, Saturday evening party, Sunday brunch, shopping, tour of homes and more. C osts and details: rbfcontact@ gmail.com or (850) 231-7382 JAN. 30 ‘HUM AN NA TU RE ’: 1-2 p.m. . lecture by featured solo artist H eather C lements in A melia C enter room 128, G ulf C oast State C ollege, P anama C ity; 5-7 p.m. opening reception in the A melia C enter M ain G allery. E xhibit open regular gallery hours through Feb. 19. Details: G ulf C oast.edu/arts or 872-3886 ‘WITH A L ITT LE TWIST’: 7:30 p.m. at T he M artin T heatre, 409 Harrison A ve., P anama C ity. N ew Y ork G ilbert & Sullivan P layers celebrate the legacy of G ilbert & Sullivan in A merican musical theater Details: 763-8080 or M artinT heatre.comFEB . 1 ‘ LA BOH E M E ’: 7:30 p.m. at the M arina C ivic C enter, 8 Harrison A ve., P anama C ity. Details and tickets: P anama C ity M usic A ssociation, 236-1260 GRAHAM NASH WILL PERFORM A T THIS YEAR’S 30A SONGWRITERS FESTIV AL

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CALENDAR SPICE UP YOUR WEEK WITH UPCOMING AREA EVENT S Friday, January 2, 2015 PanamaCity.Com PAGE 5 FEB. 6 ST. ANDRE WS M ARD I G RA S: 4 p.m. in downtown St. A ndrews. C hildren’s M ardi G ras P arade and P et P arade. T he St. A ndrews Outdoor Festival with vendors and live music continues after the parades until 10 p.m. Details: P am G eorge, K rewe of St. A ndrews public relations chair, pam@ gulfworldmarinepark.com or 258-4654 ‘TH ERE ’S A B U R G LAR I N MY BED ’: 7:30 p.m. at K aleidoscope T heatre, 207 E . 24th St., Lynn Haven. C omplications arise when two unhappily married people simultaneously plan romantic trysts in their “unused” beach house – with someone else, of course. Details and tickets: 265-3226 or kt-online.org FEB. 7 ST. ANDRE WS M ARD I G RA S: 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. in downtown St. A ndrews. P arade starts at 2 p.m. V endors and live music at the festival. P arade starts at 2 p.m. Details: P am G eorge, K rewe of St. A ndrews public relations chair, pam@ gulfworldmarinepark.com or 258-4654 A M ER IC ANA MUSIC A T TH E L O D G E : 6:30-8 p.m. at C amp H elen State P ark, 23937 P anama C ity Beach P arkway, P anama C ity Beach. T he N ew 76ers perform. Details: 233-5059 or C amp H elenFriends@gmail.com ‘TH ERE ’S A B U R G LAR I N MY BED ’: 7:30 p.m. at K aleidoscope T heatre, 207 E . 24th St., Lynn H aven. Details and tickets: 2653226 or kt-online.org RA V E O N ! TH E B U DD Y HO LL Y E XP ER I EN C E : 7:30 p.m. at T he M artin T heatre, 409 H arrison A ve., P anama C ity. Buddy H olly interpreter, Billy M c G uigan, a dead-ringer for the legendary rocker, is backed by the R ave O n Band. Details: 763-8080 or M artin T heatre.com FEB. 8 ‘TH ERE ’S A B U R G LAR I N MY BED ’: 2 p.m. at K aleidoscope T heatre, 207 E . 24th St., Lynn H aven. Details and tickets: 2653226 or kt-online.org FEB. 10 WI N T ER RE SI DEN T S EN IO R P R OM: at E dgewater Beach & G olf R esort, 11212 Front Beach R oad, P anama C ity Beach. A fun tradition for winter residents to get out their dancing shoes. T he 2015 theme is “ U nder the Starry Skies.” Details: V isit P anama C ityBeach.com FEB. 13 PC B M ARD I G RA S AND MUSIC F E STIV AL : Feb. 13-14 at P ier P ark, 600 P ier P ark Drive, P anama C ity Beach. A dmission: Free. E njoy parades, pirates, music, food and M ardi G ras festivities in a family-friendly environment. Details: V isit P anama C ityBeach.com or D YK rewe. org ‘TH ERE ’S A B U R G LAR I N MY BED ’: 7:30 p.m. at K aleidoscope T heatre, 207 E . 24th St., Lynn H aven. C omplications arise when two unhappily married people simultaneously plan romantic trysts in their “unused” beach house – with someone else, of course. Details and tickets: 265-3226 or kt-online.org WI NDB O RNE ’S TH E MUSIC OF TH E EA G LE S: 7:30 p.m. at the M arina C ivic C enter, 8 H arrison A ve., P anama C ity. T he P anama C ity POP S perform with W indborne lead singer T erry Brock. Details and tickets: P anama C ity P ops.org TH E BR ITISH I N V A SIO N T R I B UT E : 7:30 p.m. at T he M artin T heatre, 409 H arrison A ve., P anama C ity. H ear live performances of songs from classic British groups T he Beatles, T he Zombies, T he M oody Blues, Dave C lark Five and H erman’s H ermits; then memorable hits by A merican groups like T he M onkees, T he T urtles, T he M amas & T he P apas, and T ommy James & T he Shondells. Details: 763-8080 or M artin T heatre.com FEB. 14 PC B MARD I G RAS AND MUSIC F E STIV AL : Feb. 13-14 at P ier P ark, 600 P ier P ark Drive, P anama C ity Beach. A dmission: Free. E njoy parades, pirates, music, food and M ardi G ras festivities in a family-friendly environment. Details: V isit P anama C ityBeach.com or D YKrewe. org ‘TH ERE ’S A B U R G LAR I N MY BED ’: 7:30 p.m. at K aleidoscope T heatre, 207 E . 24th St., Lynn Haven. Details and tickets: 265-3226 or kt-online.org FEB. 15 ‘TH ERE ’S A B U R G LAR I N MY BED ’: 2 p.m. at K aleidoscope T heatre, 207 E . 24th St., Lynn Haven. Details and tickets: 265-3226 or kt-online.org COYOT E U N IO N & MY F E V ER : 9 p.m. at M osey’s, 425 G race A ve., P anama C ity. N o cover. Details: Facebook. com/M oseysDowntown FEB. 16 TO N Y BENNE TT: 6:30 p.m. at the M arina C ivic C enter, 8 H arrison A ve., P anama C ity. Details and tickets: M arina C ivic C enter. com or 763-4696 ext. 0 FEB. 20 ‘TH ERE ’S A B U R G LAR I N MY BED ’: 7:30 p.m. at K aleidoscope T heatre, 207 E . 24th St., Lynn Haven. C omplications arise when two unhappily married people simultaneously plan romantic trysts in their “unused” beach house – with someone else, of course. Details and tickets: 265-3226 or kt-online.org FEB. 21 A M ER IC ANA MUSIC A T TH E L O D G E : 6:30-8 p.m. at C amp H elen State P ark, 23937 P anama C ity Beach P arkway, P anama C ity Beach. G ranville A utomatic performs. Details: 233-5059 or C ampH elenFriends@gmail.com ‘TH ERE ’S A B U R G LAR I N MY BED ’: 7:30 p.m. at K aleidoscope T heatre, 207 E . 24th St., Lynn Haven. Details and tickets: 265-3226 or kt-online.org FEB. 22 ‘TH ERE ’S A B U R G LAR I N MY BED ’: 2 p.m. at K aleidoscope T heatre, 207 E . 24th St., Lynn Haven. Details and tickets: 265-3226 or kt-online.org FEB. 25 I N TH E MOO D : 7:30 p.m. at the M arina C ivic C enter, 8 H arrison A ve., P anama C ity. A 1940s musical revue. Details and tickets: M arina C ivic C enter.com or 763-4696 FEB. 27 TH E F E ST: 6-10 p.m. on the fourth Friday of the month through N ovember at the P anama C ity M all by J. C . P enney on U .S. 231 with classic and show cars, bike night, eating areas, local bands on stages, kid zone and merchandise; different nonprot featured each month. H EAR T: 8 p.m. at the M arina C ivic C enter, 8 H arrison A ve., P anama C ity. Details and tickets: M arina C ivic C enter.com or H ess E ntertainment.net FEB. 28 WOM EN OF I RELAND : 7:30 at the M arina C ivic C enter, 8 H arrison A ve., P anama C ity. Details and tickets: P anama C ity M usic A ssociation, 236-1260MAR CH 7 GI RL SCOUT R U N : 8 a.m. starting at T rinity Lutheran C hurch, 1001 W . 11th St., P anama C ity. T he entry fee for the 5 K is $20, and includes a race T -shirt and the runner’s choice of a box of G irl Scout cookies. T he O ne M ile entry fee is $15 and includes a race T -shirt. Day-of-race registration begins at 6:30 a.m. at the church; 5 K costs $25 and the O ne M ile fee is $18 but does not include a race T -shirt. Details and registration: G S C F P .org or A ctive.com A M ER IC ANA MUSIC A T TH E L O D G E : 6:30-8 p.m. at C amp H elen State P ark, 23937 P anama C ity Beach P arkway, P anama C ity Beach. Scott and M ichelle Dalziel perform. Details: 233-5059 or C ampH elenFriends@gmail.comMAR CH 8 MOSCOW CITY BALLE T’S ‘CI NDERELLA ’: 4 p.m. at the P anama C ity M arina, 8 Harrison A ve., P anama C ity. Details and tickets: P anama C ity M usic A ssociation, 236-1260MAR CH 13 ‘TH E D IXI E SWIM C L U B ’: 7:30 p.m. at K aleidoscope T heatre, 207 E . 24th St., Lynn Haven. Five college swim team members meet at the beach for four reunions over 33 years, supporting and relying on each other through life’s challenges. Details and tickets: 2653226 or kt-online.org

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BELLY DANCE CLASSES Panama City Belly Dance When: Thursdays from Jan. 8 to Feb. 12; two sessions available: 6:30-7:30 p. m. or 7:40-8:40 p.m. Where: CityArts Cooperative, 423 Luverne Ave., Panama City Who: Instructor Jamie Sasser Price: $60 per student (6 one-hour sessions) What: Starting from scratch, learn how to do belly dance movements that will then be turned into a slow, slinky choreography. No experience required. Details: Facebook.com/panamacity. bellydance, email frogz13@bellsouth. net, or call 252-3652 or 819-9228 Twisted Sisters When: Beginner belly dancing classes kick off Jan. 7 and continue every Wednesday at 6 p.m. Where: Studio by the Sea, 7328 Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach Who: Instructor Lee Ann Leonard Price: $6 per person per class; earn rewards/prizes based on the number of classes completed Details: Drop by the studio or call 867-7209 BELLY DANCE GROUPS Dancing Divas Who: A Red Hat group of women 45 and older who perform throughout the year at community events, nursing homes and retirement centers; usually open to new members Details: TheDancingDivas.net or on Facebook: The Dancing Divas; email FLDancingdivas@gmail.com, or call Rita Miller at 819-3567 or Gloria Taft at 896-1197 Gypsy Parvana Who: Professional belly dance troupe that performs at parties, restaurants, festivals and other events; no classes currently scheduled Details: GypsyParvana.com, Facebook.com/GypsyParvana. BellyDance or 819-7416 By TONY SIMMONS 747-5080 | @PCTonyS tsimmons@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY — Kira Burdeshaw uses words like “ooey-gooey” to describe the movements of her performance art, revealing that the allure of belly dance is to express joy, to have fun, to build camaraderie and sisterhood. “With belly dance, there was a stigma attached because of the way it was introduced into the United States,” said Kira, an instructor with Panama City Belly Dance. “It was considered lascivious. People giggled about it behind closed doors.” She said some of the stigma arose from the portrayal in lms of women dancing suggestively for “a gaggle” of men. Historically, she explained, belly dancing was done only among groups of women, “not for the eyes of men.” “We have put our American spin on it, but when we perform in public we’re not trying to sexualize it,” Kira said. “We try to show the social aspect, and that we don’t have to be ashamed of our bodies.” Kira got interested in belly dance about 10 years ago, after a health issue that prompted her to seek a way to exercise. That year, at the Festival of Nations in downtown Panama City, she saw a woman dancing so gracefully that she wanted to learn to dance like her. “Belly dance is low-impact and teaches the body coordination and uidity,” Kira said. “It lengthens and strengthens core muscles through isolations and extension of movement. Most importantly, belly dance creates a supportive network, within which women are encouraged to embrace their individual uniqueness and beauty.” She has been teaching beginners for about seven years now, as well as taking workshops and studying other types of dance. Panama City Belly Dance offers beginner level sessions several times a year. No experience is needed, and Kira says any woman, of any body type, at any age, can bene t from belly dancing. “It makes my day,” Kira said. “They come in so shy at rst, and start learning movements. When they nish a long shimmy or learn a bit of choreography, they jump up and down with excitement. It doesn’t matter how old we get, we’re still the 4-year-old in the ballerina costume, saying ‘Daddy, Mommy, look at me dance!’” The students come from all walks of life, have all different body types, and have diverse life experiences, Kira said: “One is a two-time colon cancer survivor, some have survived domestic abuse, some have incredible weight loss stories, some are just simply moms that want to feel pretty again. ... We’re always pushing ourselves to learn as much as possible. Relax, and realize everybody is in the same boat. We’re all learning.” New students invariably are selfconscious about trying to dance among a group of strangers. But Kira tells students not to worry: “We are inherently sel sh creatures. Nobody is looking at you or any of the others in the class. They’re too busy looking at themselves in the mirror or trying to follow the instructor.” Panama City Belly Dance has been a staple of the dance community in the Florida Panhandle for more than 10 years, Kira said. In recent months, PCBD members have performed in downtown Panama City at Friday Fest, the Harem of Horror and CityArts Cooperative block party; and in Panama City Beach at the Pirate Festival in Pier Park and the Buddy Walk at Frank Brown Park. “For many students, (these events are) the rst time they have had enough con dence to ‘put themselves out there’ or to consider themselves ‘good enough or pretty enough’ to ask other people to watch them perform,” Kira said. “This is a huge step for them.” Other dance groups often join forces for these events, including Gypsy Parvana and Dancing Divas, the latter being a group of older women who dance several times a month at area nursing homes. “They don’t t the typical mold,” Kira said. “They’re not svelte, but they have all this experience and emotion they portray.” PCBD will host a fairy tale-themed “Once Upon a Time Ha a” on March 14 at CityArts Cooperative, 318 Luverne Ave., Panama City. On May 9, the group will join a world-wide “Shimmy Mob” to mark International Belly Dance Day; women all over the world will dance the same choreography that day, Kira said, and money raised by dancers’ registrations will go to local women’s shelters. “A ‘ha a’ is usually an event put on by belly dancers, for belly dancers, although we encourage the public to come and be a part of the fun as well. They are fun, and a bit more informal than some of the other types of shows and appearances we perform at,” Kira said. “These themed belly dance events give our students and professional dancers a chance to break away from traditional music and integrate styles and nuances they may not otherwise have the opportunity to experience.” Kira has been working at the Science and Discovery Center for 15 years, starting as a volunteer. She originally contacted the center about hosting meetings of the Bay County Reptile and Amphibian Society, a group she led at the time, and the museum turned out to be “a good t.” She helped set up an alligator exhibit and ended up an employee. She has also been known to dance with a snake, mixing two of her joys, but she said that depends on “ideal circumstances” like temperature, the audience and her snake’s mood. “I like the opportunity to teach the public about reptiles,” she said. “This is a gentle animal. I get to teach about reptiles and belly dance — both of which are highly misunderstood.” By LEE ANN LEONARD Special to PanamaCity.com PANAMA CITY BEACH — Reactions to the discovery that I belly dance are fairly predictable. Eyes widen, nervous giggles ensue and good-natured jokes follow. Sometimes women express interest in learning the craft, but also fear at the prospect of exposing their bellies. The latter always surprises me, given that we live in a beach town. I suspect the reason so many react this way is because they think there is something slightly naughty about belly dancing. Perhaps it’s the skimpy costumes and bare midriffs, or maybe it’s the sensual movements. Certainly, the version of belly dance that many Americans see in movies and in some restaurants contributes to its portrayal as a sexy dance performed mainly by women for men. But if you’ve ever been fortunate enough to witness a belly dancer like national superstar Zoe Jakes perform, you may see belly dancing like I do — as an art form. Like most women, these artists participate in the torso-driven dance simply because it’s fun, and they get to perform interesting moves — not necessarily because they feel sexier while doing so. That is the conclusion of a recent study on “Sex Roles” and body images of people who belly dance in their spare time. The study, led by Marika Tiggemann of Flinders University in Australia, found that the activity gives women a sense of ownership about their bodies. Researchers also concluded that the belly dancers surveyed had fewer hang-ups about their bodies and fewer self-objectifying thoughts when compared to women in the study who had never belly danced before. In addition to these bene ts, creative types are drawn to the freedom of expression that belly dancing allows. Unlike other more rigid dance forms like ballet, there is no universally recognized naming scheme for the movements and, because the centuries old dance has been in uenced by so many different cultures, few hard and fast rules apply. Belly dance choreographers frequently merge contemporary dance styles like hip-hop with more traditional belly dance moves to create dynamic, unique routines. While a variety of different belly dance styles exist, they all continue to share most of the original characteristics that help distinguish belly dance from other dance forms. These characteristics include isolations, layered movements, shimmies, undulations and snake arms. Belly dancing’s bene ts to the body, like improved exibility, stamina and core strength, are obvious. Less celebrated are the activity’s bene ts to the mind. As someone who lost her mother to Alzheimer’s disease, I continually research preventative measures. Nearly every article and study published touts exercise, challenging the mind by learning new skills, plus social support and interaction as critical components in Alzheimer’s prevention. Belly dancing offers all of these bene ts. Learning new steps and remembering complex choreography is an energizing brain booster often enjoyed in a supportive sisterhood. Cast off your preconceived notions and inhibitions, and try something fun and exotic. The ancient art form of belly dance promises to transform you even as it continually evolves as an art form. Panama City Beach resident Lee Ann Leonard has studied belly dancing for more than four years. She is the founder of Twisting Sisters Belly Dancers (TwistingSisters. com) and teaches beginner belly dancing classes at Studio by the Sea in Panama City Beach. PAGE 6 PanamaCity.Com Friday, January 2, 2015 Friday, January 2, 2015 PanamaCity.Com PAGE 7 By TONY SIMMONS other people to watch them perform,” Dancing like no one’s watching ARTIST’S ARTIST’S ARTIST’S ARTIST’S touch Dancer unveils benefits to body, mind LEE ANN LEONARD KIRA BURDESHAW Contributed photos Contributed photos

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CALENDAR SPICE UP YOUR WEEK WITH UPCOMING AREA EVENT S PAGE 8 PanamaCity.Com Friday, January 2, 2015 MAR CH 14 FOU R T H ANN U AL C ELE B RA T E T HE AR TS: 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at H arley-Davidson, 14700 P anama C ity Beach P arkway, P anama C ity Beach. Local artist’s market and celebrity fashion show benefiting Beach C are Services. Details: email@ ceruleaninteriors.com or marta. rose@ferman.com ‘T HE D IXI E SWIM C L UB’: 7:30 p.m. at K aleidoscope T heatre, 207 E . 24th St., Lynn Haven. Details and tickets: 2653226 or kt-online.orgMAR CH 15 ‘T HE D IXI E SWIM C L UB’: 2 p.m. at K aleidoscope T heatre, 207 E . 24th St., Lynn Haven. Details and tickets: 2653226 or kt-online.orgMAR CH 16 ‘J E KY LL & H Y DE ,’ T HE MUSIC AL : 7:30 p.m. at the M arina C ivic C enter, 8 Harrison A ve., P anama C ity. Details and tickets: M arinaC ivicC enter.com or 763-4696MAR CH 20 ‘T HE D IXI E SWIM C L UB’: 7:30 p.m. at K aleidoscope T heatre, 207 E . 24th St., Lynn Haven. Five college swim team members meet at the beach for four reunions over 33 years, supporting and relying on each other through life’s challenges. Details and tickets: 2653226 or kt-online.orgMAR CH 21 ‘T HE D IXI E SWIM C L UB’: 7:30 p.m. at K aleidoscope T heatre, 207 E . 24th St., Lynn Haven. Details and tickets: 2653226 or kt-online.orgMAR CH 22 ‘T HE D IXI E SWIM C L UB’: 2 p.m. at K aleidoscope T heatre, 207 E . 24th St., Lynn Haven. Details and tickets: 2653226 or kt-online.org MAR CH 27 T HE F E ST: 6-10 p.m. on the fourth Friday of the month through N ovember at the P anama C ity M all by J.C. P enney on U.S. 231 with classic and show cars, bike night, eating areas, local bands on stages, kid zone and merchandise; different non-prot featured each month. ‘T HE D IXI E SWIM C L UB’: 7:30 p.m. at K aleidoscope T heatre, 207 E . 24th St., Lynn Haven. Five college swim team members meet at the beach for four reunions over 33 years, supporting and relying on each other through life’s challenges. Details and tickets: 2653226 or kt-online.orgMAR CH 28 ‘T HE D IXI E SWIM C L UB’: 7:30 p.m. at K aleidoscope T heatre, 207 E . 24th St., Lynn Haven. Details and tickets: 2653226 or kt-online.orgMAR CH 29 ‘T HE D IXI E SWIM C L UB’: 2 p.m. at K aleidoscope T heatre, 207 E . 24th St., Lynn Haven. Details and tickets: 2653226 or kt-online.orgAPRIL 11 GU L F CO A ST S AL UT E : A pril 1112 at T yndall A ir Force Base. T he A ir Show and O pen H ouse will feature the U .S. A ir Force T hunderbirds’ grace and jaw-dropping aerial maneuvers, joined by the U .S. A rmy G olden K nights. A lso on site are numerous ground displays and aerial attractions, food and games. A dmission and parking are free. N o coolers (unless needed for medical reasons), pets, weapons, knives, glass bottles or containers will be allowed. Details: G ulf C oastSalute.com APRIL 12 GU L F CO A ST S AL UT E : A pril 1112 at T yndall A ir Force Base. T he A ir Show and O pen H ouse will feature the U .S. A ir Force T hunderbirds’ grace and jaw-dropping aerial maneuvers, joined by the U .S. A rmy G olden K nights. A lso on site are numerous ground displays and aerial attractions, food and games. A dmission and parking are free. N o coolers (unless needed for medical reasons), pets, weapons, knives, glass bottles or containers will be allowed. Details: G ulf C oastSalute.comAPRIL 16 C EL TIC WOM AN : 7:30 p.m. at the M arina C ivic C enter, 8 H arrison A ve., P anama C ity. Details and tickets: M arina C ivic C enter.com or 763-4696WEDNESDA Y , APRIL 22 S EA B REE Z E J A ZZ F E STIV AL : 6:3010 p.m. on the Solaris Dinner Y acht launching from Lighthouse M arina, 5325 N orth Lagoon Drive, P anama C ity Beach. Jazzy Dinner C ruise hosted by Brian C ulbertson. Details and tickets: SeabreezeJazzFestival. com THURSDA Y , APRIL 23 S EA B REE Z E J A ZZ F E STIV AL : 10:30 a.m. on the Solaris Dinner Y acht launching from Lighthouse M arina, 5325 N orth Lagoon Drive, P anama C ity Beach. Jazzy Lunch C ruise hosted by E ric Darius. G ates open at 3 p.m. at A aron Bessant P ark in P anama C ity Beach with a line-up including R yan M ontano, U rban Jazz C oalition, T he R ippingtons and E uge G roove. Seabreeze A fter P arty A ll-Star Jam starts at 10:30 p.m. at P ompano Joe’s in P ier P ark hosted by E ric Darius. Details and tickets: SeabreezeJazzFestival.comFRIDA Y , APRIL 24 S EAB REE Z E J A ZZ F E STIV AL : gates open at 3 p.m. at A aron Bessant P ark. Line-up includes Down to the Bone, Ken Ford and G eorge Benson. Seabreeze A fter P arty A llStar Jam starts at 10:30 p.m. at P ompano Joe’s in P ier P ark hosted by E uge G roove. Details and tickets: SeabreezeJazzFestival.com CEL TIC W OMAN WILL BE A T THE MARINA CIVIC CENTER ON APRIL 16.

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WANT TO BE INCLUDED? Click “Send us your events” at PanamaCity.com or email Jan Waddy, jwaddy@pcnh.com, or Tony Simmons, tsimmons@pcnh.com. Inclusion in this calendar of events, which also appears on the Events page at PanamaCity. com, is at editors’ discretion. SUNDAY, JAN. 4 S NO W BI R D DANCE : 3-6 p.m. at Boardwalk Beach Resort Hotel & Convention Center, 9600 S. Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. DJ Jim Lawson playing the classics. Admission: $3. Details: 234-3484TUESDAY, JAN. 6 TODD ALLEN H E R ENDEEN LI V E T H E LE G END S SH O W: 7:30 p.m. at Boardwalk Beach Resort Hotel & Convention Center, 9600 S. Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. Admission: $20 for dinner and show; $10 for show only. Doors open at 5 p.m. Details and advance tickets: 234-3484WEDNESDAY, JAN. 7 S ENIO RS S O F TBALL : 1 p.m. each Wednesday through March 11, at Frank Brown Park, 16200 Panama City Beach Parkway, Panama City Beach. Noncompetitive softball for ages 55 and older; just bring your glove. Details: 238-0549 S NO W BI R D DANCE : 3-6 p.m. at Boardwalk Beach Resort Hotel & Convention Center, 9600 S. Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. DJ Jim Lawson playing the classics. Admission: $3. Details: 234-3484 R OC K IN CO MP ANY W INTE R DINNE R/ DANCE P AR TY : 5-8 p.m. at Marina Cantina, 5550 North Lagoon Drive, Panama City Beach. With radio host Rocky Akins. Details: 249-5500 JAN. 9 W INTE R R E S IDENT APPR ECIATION DAY : 9-11 a.m. at the Panama City Beach Convention and Visitors Bureau, 17001 Panama City Beach Parkway. Free admission. Collect information on activities, meet the Visitor Services staff, socialize and enjoy complementary coffee and donuts. JAN. 10 W ELCO M E S NO W BI R D S DANCE : 7-10 p.m. at the Panama City Beach Senior Center’s Lyndell Building, 423 Lyndell Lane, Panama City Beach. Details: 236-3033 JAN. 11 S NO W BI R D DANCE : 3-6 p.m. at Boardwalk Beach Resort Hotel & Convention Center, 9600 S. Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. DJ Jim Lawson playing the classics. Admission: $3. Details: 234-3484 JAN. 13 AR T AT T H E OAT F IELD : 1:30 p.m. at the Panama City Beach Senior Center, 423 Lyndell Lane, Panama City Beach. Theme: “The Gulf Coast.” Today: Margrete Vause, watercolor “Beachside Breakers.” Costs, supplies and other details: 235-6374 or PCBSC.com H O M ECO M IN G DANCE AND S OCIAL : 4-9 p.m. at Boardwalk Beach Resort Hotel & Convention Center, 9600 S. Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. Details: 233-5070 JAN. 14 S ENIO RS S O F TBALL : 1 p.m. each Wednesday through March 11, at Frank Brown Park, 16200 Panama City Beach Parkway, Panama City Beach. Noncompetitive softball for ages 55 and older; just bring your glove. Details: 238-0549 S NO W BI R D DANCE : 3-6 p.m. at Boardwalk Beach Resort Hotel & Convention Center, 9600 S. Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. DJ Jim Lawson playing the classics. Admission: $3. Details: 234-3484 R OC K IN CO MP ANY W INTE R DINNE R/ DANCE P AR TY : 5-8 p.m. at Marina Cantina, 5550 North Lagoon Drive, Panama City Beach. With radio host Rocky Akins. Details: 249-5500 JAN. 15 O P EN H OU S E & DANCE LE SS ON : 7-9 p.m. at the Grand Square Hall, 1105 Bob Little Road, Panama City. Free admission. A modern beginner square dance lesson starts at 7 p.m. No previous dance experience necessary, just wear comfortable clothes and shoes. Refreshments will be available. Details: 871-2955 or 265-9488 JAN. 17 W INTE R R E S IDENT COO K OUT : Noon to 2 p.m. at Harley Davidson of Panama City Beach, 14700 Panama City Beach Parkway. Enjoy a cookout, live music, shopping and register to win a $250 Harley-Davidson gift card. DENNI S ‘M OONSH INE ’ R ADE R: 2 p.m. at Arnold High School Auditorium, 550 Alf Coleman Road, Panama City Beach. Classic country music, old-time rock ‘n’ roll, and homespun comedy; debut of his Gospel CD “Step Into The Water.” Free admission, but limited seating. Tickets are available at Panama City Beach Senior Center and Tourist Development Council. Details: 234-8983 JAN. 20 AR T AT T H E OAT F IELD : 1:30 p.m. at the Panama City Beach Senior Center, 423 Lyndell Lane, Panama City Beach. Theme: “The Gulf Coast.” Today: Heather Parker, acrylic on canvas, “Beachscene.” Costs, supplies and other details: 2356374 or PCBSC.com TODD ALLEN H E R ENDEEN LI V E T H E LE G END S SH O W: 7:30 p.m. at Boardwalk Beach Resort Hotel & Convention Center, 9600 S. Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. Admission: $20 for dinner and show; $10 for show only. Doors open at 5 p.m. Details and advance tickets: 234-3484 JAN. 21 S ENIO RS S O F TBALL : 1 p.m. each Wednesday through March 11, at Frank Brown Park, 16200 Panama City Beach Parkway, Panama City Beach. Noncompetitive softball for ages 55 and older; just bring your glove. Details: 238-0549 S NO W BI R D DANCE : 3-6 p.m. at Boardwalk Beach Resort Hotel & Convention Center, 9600 S. Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. DJ Jim Lawson playing the classics. Admission: $3. Details: 234-3484 R OC K IN CO MP ANY W INTE R DINNE R/ DANCE P AR TY : 5-8 p.m. at Marina Cantina, 5550 North Lagoon Drive, Panama City Beach. With radio host Rocky Akins. Details: 249-5500 JAN. 22 SP A GH ETTI DINNE R: 5-7 p.m. at the Panama City Beach Senior Center’s Oateld Center, 423 Lyndell Lane, Panama City Beach. Details: 233-5065 TODD ALLEN H E R ENDEEN LI V E T H E EL V I S SH O W: 7:30 p.m. at Boardwalk Beach Resort Hotel & Convention Center, 9600 S. Thomas Drive, Panama City Beach. Admission: $20 for dinner and show; $10 for show only. Doors open at 5 p.m. Details and advance tickets: 234-3484 S NO W BI R DC ALENDA R WELCOME WINTER RESIDENTS! Friday, January 2, 2015 PanamaCity.Com PAGE 9 The Snowbird Welcome Dance is 7-10 p.m. Jan. 10 at the Lyndell Building.

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By TONY SIMMONS &47-5080 | @PCTonyS tsimmons@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY BEACH — The 46th annual Travel Adventure Film Series hosted by the Bay County Audubon Society opens Tuesday at Arnold High School’s auditorium. All three films in this year’s series are full-length and are introduced and discussed by their creators. The films include: •“Glacier Park to the Canadian Rockies” by John Hood, Tuesday, Jan. 6. Take the back roads to follow the Rockies from Glacier Park, Mon. to Jasper, Alberta, exploring the natural wonders along the way. The lm includes native wildlife such as Glacier big horn sheep, grizzly bears, mountain goats, black bears, deer and birds. •“Postcards from Italy” by Steve McCurdy, Jan. 22. An insider’s look at southern Italy — from the island of Sicily to the mountain top towns of Irsina and Matera, from the island of Procida to the larger cities of Naples and Rome. It is a collection of vignettes and travel experiences that will unveil places you may know, introduce you to people you may have met, and document life in Italy in a way you have never before seen. •“Rediscovering Ancient America” by Gray Warriner, Feb. 26. Travel across the US and back in time to rediscover amazing accomplishments and surprising connections of ancient natives. Around 1600 BC, Louisiana’s Poverty Point became the first planned city in the Americas; around the time of Christ, Ohio’s Hopewell culture moved thousands of tons of earth to build giant geometric earthworks in the forms of squares, circles, and octagons dwarfing England’s Stonehenge. Learn about these and so much more. All films will show at 7 p.m. at the auditorium, 550 Alf Coleman Road, Panama City Beach. Tickets are $7 each, or free for students 18 and younger; season tickets are $20. Door prizes will be given out at each film. This is the BCAS’s only fundraising activity for the year. Proceeds from ticket sales will be used for our “many and varied activities,” BCAS spokesman Richard Ingram told The News Herald last year, including education programs in Bay County schools, to promote wildlife protection and rehabilitation, conservation education and land preservation. BCAS meets at 7 p.m. on the second Monday of each month at the Science and Discovery Center of Northwest Florida, 308 Airport Road, Panama City. The next meeting is Jan. 12, and Neil Lamb will present a program on “Birding in New South Wales, Australia.” Meetings are open to the public, and visitors are welcome. For more information on the group, visit BayCountyAudubon.org or call 871-1736. TRAVEL ADVENTURE FILM SERIES Who: Hosted by the Bay County Audubon Society Where: Arnold High School Auditorium, 550 Alf Coleman Road, Panama City Beach When: “Glacier Park to the Canadian Rockies” Tuesday, Jan. 6; “Postcards from Italy” Jan. 22; and “Rediscovering Ancient America” Feb. 26; all films start at 7 p.m. Cost: $7 per person; free to students; season tickets $20 Details: BayCountyAudubon.org Travel the world with Audubon film series PAGE 10 PanamaCity.Com Friday, January 2, 2015 Contributed photos

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Friday, January 2, 2015 PanamaCity.Com PAGE 11 By JAN WADDY 747-5072 | @JanWaddy1 jwaddy@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY — The Pierson family, who owns Scampy’s Seafood & Steaks in Panama City Beach, has opened a second smaller Scampy’s location in town. “These are a lot of our most popular items from the beach,” said Steve Pierson, who is running the Panama City location. Menu Favorites include Rib Eye Steak and Snow Crab Legs. Scampy’s Limited, 2621 W. 23rd St., opened about a month ago in the former home of Lenny’s Sub Shop. The Piersons were Lenny’s franchisees, but decided to take the building in a new direction with the fast-casual concept. This isn’t the rst time Scampy’s has had a Panama City location though. In the s, the Piersons also had a Scampy’s at 23rd Street and Jenks Ave. Unlike the Scampy’s at 4933 Thomas Drive, which Steve’s brother, Fred Pierson, runs, the new Scampy’s Limited is only full-service at the oyster bar, which also serves draft beer, bottled beer and wine (including wine-based daiquiris). Oysters are available on the half shell or in seven baked varieties. “We get oysters where we can from the Gulf,” said Fred, who added, “Right now, they are coming out of Texas.” But they always go local when possible. “One thing we try to keep what we sell on the seafood side from local Gulf waters,” Steve said. “We have a weekly wholesale sh of the week at the beach, but here we just have the Mahi-Mahi.” The Mahi-Mahi Fish Tacos are one of Steve’s favorites: Budweiser beer battered Mahi-Mahi topped with cheddar, cabbage and fresh pico de gallo with white and chipotle sauces in a our tortilla. Other fried seafood at Scampy’s is done in their own breading. Seafood also is available grilled or blackened. I sat at the bar and watched my Cheesy Jalapeno Oysters being topped with cheddar, Romano, Parmesan, butter and a jalapeno slice before being put into the oven. The fresh jalapeno added a nice crunch to the oyster, but still wasn’t too spicy. “I like the Rockefeller too, but these are newer, so I’ve been eating these more,” Steve admitted. Other appetizers include Fried Dill Pickles and Gator Bites. The Seafood Gumbo, loaded with Andouille sausage, shrimp and sh, is the same recipe that has been served since the original location opened. The beach location goes through nearly 30 gallons a week in season. Customers can walk up and order from the menu at the counter and be out within 20 minutes. A sauce bar in the back features salad dressing, tartar and cocktail sauces. “Hopefully by the time you get back to the table, we will bring the food out to you,” Steve said. “We get pretty busy at lunch.” Daily lunch specials, served from 10:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., include Taco Tuesday and Friday Fish Fry. The basket comes with a drink for $6.99. Saturday’s Dirt Burger special is named for the special seasoning mix, that Steve said, “looks like dirt.” The menu also includes 10 items under $10, from the Shrimp Platter to the Shrimp Scampy Platter, and a variety of other entrees, sandwiches and wraps. “These are family recipes that have been used throughout the years. Steve does a lot. Fred does a lot. And this is an accumulation of different cooks we have had over the years,” said family patriarch, Fred Pierson. The restaurant business brought him to the area from Missouri in 1969, and the weather has kept him here. All four of his sons have been involved in restaurants throughout the years. Scampy’s in Panama City Beach has been closed since mid-November for remodeling, updates and to change the color scheme to match the new location. Scampy’s opens PC location SCAMPY’S LIMITED What: Fast-casual seafood restaurant; oyster bar; drivethrough Where: 2621 W 23rd St., Panama City Hours: 10:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. daily Details: 215-1118 P hotos by JAN WADDY | PanamaCity.com The oyster bar at Scampy’s Limited is full-service with baked oysters, such as the Cheesy Jalapeno, as well as draft beer, bottled beer and wine. Scampy’s Limited offers daily lunch specials, such as Taco Tuesday, with a drink for $6.99. The Pierson family, who owns Scampy’s Seafood & Steaks in Panama City Beach, has opened a smaller location in Panama City. Scampy’s Limited opened about a month ago at 2621 W. 23rd St., the former location of Lenny’s Sub Shop, after remodeling. Fred Pierson, front, and his brother Steve Pierson sit at the oyster bar at the newest Scampy’s restaurant in Panama City.

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THE BACKDOOR LOUNGE 7800 W. Hwy 98, Panama City Beach | 850-235-0073 Happy Hour: 9 a.m.-Noon Sunday: DJ 49.5, 2-6 p.m. Wednesday: Kc Phelps hosting open mic, 10 p.m.-2 a.m. Thursday: Nic Birge, 10 p.m.-2 a.m. Digital recording available MS. NEWBY’S 8711 Thomas Drive | 850-234-0030 Sunday, Monday, & Thursday: Football on the big screen Friday & Saturday : Heritage, 10 p.m.-2 a.m. Tuesday & Wednesday: Karaoke w/ NIGHT AL , 8 p.m.-2 a.m. NEWBY’S TOO 4103 Thomas Drive | 850-234-6203 Open everyday 8 a.m. until Happy Hour: Monday-Friday, 8 a.m.-Noon Friday & Saturday: SUS Mathers, 10 p.m.-2 a.m. ThursdaySaturday: Karaoke Mania w/ NIGHT AL & B eer Pong, 8 p.m.-2 a.m. BUZZTIME every day. Sports Bar, Pool, Foosball, Darts, Shuffle board, Ping Pong & Air Hockey. Smokers Welcome. 5530 N. Lagoon Drive | 850-249-5500 Friday & Saturday: Martino & Tirado, 6-9:30 p.m. Friday: Latin Dance Party, 9:30 p.m.-3 a.m. Sunday & Thursday: Karaoke Snowbird Dance Party w/Michael, 6-10 p.m. Monday: Ric Brigman, 5-9 p.m. All you can eat sh fry Tuesday: Jesse Deese & the Sand Band, 5-9 p.m. Taco Tuesday, Buy 1 Taco Plate get the second half off Wednesday: Rocky’s Winter DInner Dance Party w/Rocky Akins, 5-9 p.m. Snowbird Buffet Happy hour daily from 3-6 p.m. priced Wine, Beer & Sangria, $5 Margaritas & Select Appetizers www.marinacantinapcb.com AD VERTISE WITH US Call Marie Forrest at 747-5041 or email mforrest@ pcnh.com Deadline is 5 p.m. Monday. 5121 G ulf Drive | 850-235-3555 Friday & Saturday: Barry Fish Duo, 6:3010:30 p.m. www.schooners.com PAGE 12 PanamaCity.Com Friday, January 2, 2015 VENUE FRIDAY SATURDAY SUNDAY The Backdoor Lounge DJ 49.5 Kc Phelps/Open Mic Nic Birge PCB, FL 235-0073 2-6 p.m. 10 p.m.-2 a.m. 10 p.m.-2 a.m. Marina Cantina Martino & Tirado 6-9:30 p.m. Martino & Tirado Karaoke w/Michael Ric Brigman Jesse Deese & the Sand Band Winter Dnner Dance Party Karaoke Dance Party PCB, FL 249-5500 Latin Dance Party 9;30 p.m. 6-9:30 p.m. Snowbird Dance party/6-10 p.m. 5-9 p.m. 5-9 p.m. w/Rocky Akins 5-9 p.m. w/Michael 3-7 p.m. TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY MONDAYMs. Newby’s Heritage Heritage Football on Big Screen Football on Big Screen Karaoke w/Night Al Karaoke w/Night Al Football on Big Screen PCB, FL 234-0030 9 p.m.-1 a.m 9 p.m.-1 a.m. 8 p.m.-2 a.m. 8 p.m.-2 a.m. Newby’s Too SUS Mathers 10 p.m.-2 a.m. SUS Mathers 10 p.m.-2 .m. Karaoke w/Night Al PCB, FL 234-6203 Karaoke 8 p.m.-2 a.m. Karaoke 8 p.m.-2 a.m. 8 p.m.-2 a.m. Schooners Barry Fish Duo Barry Fish Duo HERITAGE B AND 8-11 p.m. 8-11 p.m.


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