Citation
Graduate Conducting Recital

Material Information

Title:
Graduate Conducting Recital
Creator:
Gall, Joshua
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, FL
Publisher:
College of Fine Arts; University of Florida
Publication Date:
Physical Description:
Project in lieu of thesis

Thesis/Dissertation Information

Degree:
Master's ( Master of Music)
Degree Grantor:
University of Florida
Committee Chair:
Waybright, David
Committee Members:
Odom, Leslie

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Choirs ( jstor )
Composers ( jstor )
Conducting ( jstor )
Music composition ( jstor )
Music education ( jstor )
Music recitals ( jstor )
Musical bands ( jstor )
Musical performance ( jstor )
Symphonies ( jstor )
Wind instruments ( jstor )

Notes

Abstract:
The repertoire chosen for this Master of Music conducting recital represents a wide range of music both composed and arranged for the professional wind band. Early works by Strauss including his Serenade for Winds, written for thirteen winds, represent some of the earliest offerings for wind instruments in his respective catalog. Serenade for Winds was composed by Strauss when he was just sixteen years old, and remains an important part of the repertoire for wind instruments to this day. Following this early chamber work, Fierlicher Einzug was written for large brass ensemble and percussion, and is a monumental fanfare in the catalog of Strauss. This work has been adapted to versions for full wind band and also large brass ensemble with organ. One of the most prolific contemporary composers for wind band, David Maslanka, composed his short symphony for band, Give Us This Day. This work, in two movements, draws from early Buddhist music and uses the Lord’s Prayer as motivation for the aesthetic surrounding the piece. Works such as this have become important to bands of many ability levels while still playing literature with great musical merit. Frank Ticheli, another contemporary and prolific composer for the wind band was commissioned in honor of James E. Croft, to compose his well-known Symphony No. 2. The finale of this work, “Apollo Unleashed,” which is often used apart from the other movements, shows both the virtuosity and the many different timbres available to composers as part of the wind band medium. Commissions such as this have become the cornerstone of the evolving repertoire. Many original compositions for the wind band have become staples due to their inventiveness and intelligent idiomatic approach to the wind band medium. Another composer who has gained great attraction from the wind band profession due to his approach to scoring in addition to his treatment of folk-songs from around the world is Percy Grainger. The Gum- Suckers March is part of the larger In a Nutshell Suite by Grainger, and represents his clever techniques in orchestration and adaptation of original folk-song material for the wind band. ( en )
General Note:
Instrumental Conducting terminal project

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Joshua Gall. Permission granted to the University of Florida to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
1022120858 ( OCLC )

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! A GRADUATE CONDUCTING RECITAL ! ! By JOSHUA GALL ! SUPERVISORY COMMITTEE: DAVID WAYBRIGHT, CHAIR LESLIE ODOM, MEMBER ! ! A PERFORMANCE IN LIEU OF THESIS PRESENTED TO THE COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF MUSIC UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 2014

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Summary of Performance in Lieu of Thesis Presented to the College of Fine Arts of the University of Florida in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Master of Music A GRADUATE CONDUCTING RECITAL By Joshua Gall May 2014 Chair: David Waybright Major: Music ! The repertoire chosen for this Master of Music conducting recital represents a wide range of music both composed and arranged for the professional wind band. Early works by Strauss including his Serenade for Winds, written for thirteen winds, represent some of the earliest offerings for wind instruments in his respective catalog. Serenade for Winds was composed by Strauss when he was just sixteen years old, and remains an important part of the repertoire for wind instruments to this day. Following this early chamber work, Fierlicher Einzug was written for large brass ensemble and percussion, and is a monumental fanfare in the catalog of Strauss. This work has been adapted to versions for full wind band and also large brass ensemble with organ. One of the most prolific contemporary composers for wind band, David Maslanka, composed his short symphony for band, Give Us This Day. This work, in two movements, draws from early Buddhist music and uses the Lord's Prayer as motivation for the aesthetic surrounding 2

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the piece. Works such as this have become important to bands of many ability levels while still playing literature with great musical merit. Frank Ticheli, another contemporary and prolific composer for the wind band was commissioned in honor of James E. Croft, to compose his well-known Symphony No. 2. The finale of this work, "Apollo Unleashed," which is often used apart from the other movements, shows both the virtuosity and the many different timbres available to composers as part of the wind band medium. Commissions such as this have become the cornerstone of the evolving repertoire. Many original compositions for the wind band have become staples due to their inventiveness and intelligent idiomatic approach to the wind band medium. Another composer who has gained great attraction from the wind band profession due to his approach to scoring in addition to his treatment of folk-songs from around the world is Percy Grainger. The GumSuckers March is part of the larger In a Nutshell Suite by Grainger, and represents his clever techniques in orchestration and adaptation of original folk-song material for the wind band. ! ! ! ! ! 3

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! ! Program A Graduate Conducting Recital Joshua Gall, Conductor Monday December 2, 2013 University Auditorium Serenade in E-flat major, Op. 7 Richard Strauss Feierlicher Einzug Richard Strauss arr. Barton Cummings ! Give Us This Day David Maslanka I. Moderately Slow II. Very Fast Second Suite in F Gustav Holst I. March II. Song Without Words III. Song of the Blacksmith IV. Fantasia on the Dargason Blake Garcia and David Santiago, Guest Conductors Gum-Suckers March Percy Grainger Symphony No. 2 Frank Ticheli III. Apollo Unleashed ! ! ! ! 4

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Serenade for Winds in E-flat Major, op. 7 Richard Strauss Richard Strauss, a prominent German composer and conductor from the Romantic era lived from 1864-1949. Strauss is most known for his work as an opera and tone poem composer with notable compositions such as Also sprach Zarathustra, Der Rosenkavalier, Death and Transfiguration, An Alpine Symphony, and Til Eulenspiegel. His conducting career, mentored by Hans von Bulow, allowed him to hold conducting positions in Vienna, Weimar, Berlin, and Munich. Frequently honored throughout Europe as both a conductor and composer, Strauss was widely recognized as the premier figure in German musical life during the early twentieth century. Born in Munich, Germany, Strauss' initial musical education came from his father and principal horn player at the Court Opera, Franz Strauss. Early influences on Richard came from his exposure to the music of Richard Wagner. Specifically, Wagner's TannhŠuser, Tristan ind Isolde, and Lohengrin became important in Strauss' approach to composition. Strauss had also become an accomplished violinist through his study of the instrument at the Royal School of Music under the tutelage of Benno Walter. In 1881, Strauss composed his popular Serenade for Winds, written for thirteen wind instruments. At the time, Strauss was only sixteen years old and would ultimately wait a year to hear the first performance of this work. Franz Wullner, a court conductor in Munich, premiered the piece on November 27, 1882 for the musicians association Dresden Tonkunstlerverein. 5

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After already having completed several other compositions, Strauss enrolled in the University of Munich in 1882. In his one year tenure at the University, he studied aesthetics, philosophy, the history of art, and Shakespeare. Strauss' Serenade for Winds helped him gain great popularity as a German Romantic composer. This work, along with several other works for piano, was published by Eugen Spitzweg. Spitzweg shared this work of Strauss with his friend and mentor, Hans von Bulow. Bulow's initial reaction to the works for piano was negative. However, Bulow liked the Serenade for Winds and programmed it on an upcoming concert. Franz Mannstadt, Bulow's assistant conductor, conducted Serenade for Winds on a concert with the Meiningen Orchestra. Response from the Serenade prompted Bulow to add it to the touring repertoire list. The popularity of this work eventually led to a commission of Strauss by the Meiningen Orchestra to write his Suite for Wind Instruments in B-flat Major. Feierlicher Einzug Der Ritter Des Johanniter-Ordens Richard Strauss Feierlicher Einzug, a fanfare composed in 1909 as a commission, is a culmination at the end of the nineteenth-century German Romanticism in music. The title of this work can be translated into "Fanfare for the Solemn Procession of the Knights of the Order of St. John." The request for this work came at the request of this society, which was founded in Jerusalem during the first Crusade. Originally scored for fifteen trumpets, four french horns, four trombones, two tubas, and timpani, the reception of this piece encouraged Strauss to later arrange and re-score it for full orchestra with an ad libitum organ and chorus part. The organ part is commonly 6

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performed as part of the standard instrumentation and reinforces much of the writing in the low winds. Unlike many works of this variety, this fanfare begins in a softer, more reverent manner and evenly grows towards the apex of the piece which is more symbolic of most traditional fanfares. As a continued homage to the work of Richard Wagner, the piece utilizes harmony and chordal structure similar to Wagner's Parsifal. Give Us This Day David Maslanka As one of the most prolific contemporary composers for wind band, David Maslanka has been composing for this medium since 1979. Raised by no formally trained musicians, Maslanka entered his public school band experience as a clarinet player and played throughout high school and college. Maslanka enrolled in the Oberlin Conservatory of Music where he pursued music education while studying composition with Joseph Wood. After studying overseas at the Mozarteum in Austria, Maslanka completed his music education degree at Oberlin. After completing his bachelor's degree, Maslanka later enrolled in Michigan State University's combined master s and doctoral program where he would study primarily with renowned composer for the wind band, and later a mentor, H. Owen Reed. Gary Green, Director of Bands at the University of Miami, helped Maslanka become a known name in the world of wind band composers when he was first exposed to A Child's Garden of Dreams A Child's Garden of Dreams was commissioned by John and Marietta Paynter for the Northwestern 7

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University Symphonic Wind Ensemble and premiered in 1982. Green later would commission Maslanka's Symphony No. 3 and Concerto for Trombone and Wind Ensemble. Maslanka wrote a series of compositions for wind ensemble entitled Symphony. Symphony No. 1 was originally for orchestra but the work was never published or performed. A number of his later symphonies were part of commissioning organizations or consortiums. Maslanka composed Symphony No. 2 in 1987, and it was premiered at the CBDNA convention in Illinois that same year. Symphony No. 3 was commissioned by Gary Green while Green was the conductor of the University of Connecticut Symphonic Wind Ensemble in 1991. Jerry Junkin, director of bands at the University of Texas-Austin, later premiered Symphony No. 4 in 1993. Symphony No. 5 and Song Book were premiered in 2000 and 2001. In 2005, Give Us This Day was commissioned by a consortium led by Eric Weirather, Director of Bands at Buena Vista High School. Since 1990, early in his compositional career, David Maslanka has been one of the few composers working solely by commission of ensembles or organizations. The focus of this paragraph strays from the main point of talking about the Symphonies. Give Us This Day was originally inspired by Eric Weirather's exposure to Maslanka's Mass while he was a student at the University of Arizona. Later, Weirather would become the Director of Bands at Buena Vista High School where he had an ensemble, and a budget worthy of commissioning a new work for the wind band by Maslanka. Weirather had Maslanka construct the piece to feature his best instrumentalists which were oboe, bassoon, and clarinet. The work has no significant structure or form and is through-composed at about fifteen minutes long. Split into two movements, "I. Moderately Slow" and "II. Very Fast," the work 8

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exemplifies many of the characteristics of Maslanka's approach to the wind band. Common in many commissioned works, Maslanka used a recognizable theme, in this particular case a chorale throughout part of the second movement. This chorale, Vater Unser in Himmelreich (Our Father in Heaven), by Johann Sebastian Bach, provides a structural foundation for the "very fast" melodic and rhythmic activity throughout the second movement of this work. This chorale also supports Maslanka's Buddhist inspirational impetus for this work which embodies the message from the Lord's Prayer. The Gum-Suckers March Percy Grainger Percy Grainger was born in Australia in 1882 as the only child to John and Rose Grainger. From a young age, Grainger studied piano with his mother, and later would become a virtuosic pianist and composer. By age ten, Grainger had surpassed his mother's teaching ability and began to study with other teachers in Melbourne. As a young, successful pianist, Grainger continued his musical studies at the Hoch Conservatory in Germany. In his six-year tenure there, he continued to develop his skills as a concert pianist while also finding his voice as a composer. Grainger, along with a group of friends who shared their affection of English music and culture started the Frankfurt Group. The Frankfurt Group's goal was to "reduce the sway of Central European traditions over the music of England and Scandinavia," principles that would remain constant in Grainger's compositional output for the rest of his life. After leaving Germany in 1901, Grainger relocated to England where he began his iconic collecting and arranging of deeply cultural folk songs and melodies. Following an inspirational 9

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lecture given by Lucy Broadwood, a pioneer folk-song historian, Grainger collected over 300 songs by recording them onto an Edison wax cylinder as he would travel the country, often by foot. Lucy Broadwood would later contribute "The Lost Lady Found" to Grainger's collection, which was later arranged for wind band as the sixth movement of Lincolnshire Posy. As his reputation grew, he met many of the significant figures in European music, forming important friendships with composers such as Delius and Grieg. In 1914, at the development of World War I, Grainger and his mother moved to the United States. After his unsuccessful attempt to escape the war, Grainger enrolled in the U.S. Army as a bandsman. This would later prove to be Grainger's most significant decision that would affect his compositional approach to the wind band. To join the band program, Grainger taught himself to play the saxophone, and he developed an affinity for the soprano saxophone as he felt that it was most similar to the human voice. In his time as a bandsman with the U.S. Army, Grainger would use the ensemble as a testing ground for his compositional development. After his time in the U.S. Army, Grainger realized that his greatest chance for financial success and personal happiness was to be a composer. He began to employ creative marketing tactics as a concert performer that would guarantee his works for wind band to be played. In a continuation of the attempt to have many people perform his music, Grainger re-scored much of his music for many different instrumental combinations, allowing most conductors a significant number of options on how to perform a piece. In the 1930's, Grainger increasingly assumed the role of educator. His growing interest in school and community ensembles allowed him to arrange and compose works for band more frequently. 10

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In addition to his many arrangements, transcriptions, paraphrases, and editions of other composers' music, Grainger's most significant output were original compositions and folk music settings. The majority of Grainger's works, whether original or settings of folk music, are of smaller scalelasting between two and eight minutes. His larger works such as Danish FolkMusic Suite Lincolnshire Posy and In A Nutshell Suite are longer overall works but are made up of a collection of many smaller pieces. In A Nutshell Suite was published in 1916 following Grainger's arrival in the United States. Each of the four movements is its own unrelated piece, although, the fourth movement, The Gum-Suckers March is often performed on its own. "Gum-suckers" is a nick name for Australians that come from Victoria, the home state of Grainger. The piece, like the suite, is comprised of multiple themes and songs. The first theme was composed at Hill Hall in England and was used in the beginning as well as later in the work. The second theme is based on Grainger's Up-Country Song, which was his own attempt at creating an original folk-like melody, similar to America's iconic voice of folk music, Stephen Foster. This same melody is also used in Grainger's Colonial Song. Symphony No. 2 III. Apollo Unleashed Frank Ticheli Frank Ticheli, born in 1958 in Monroe, Louisiana, is one of the current wind band's most prominent composers. His musical upbringing began in the highly regarded Richardson, TX. After graduating high school, he enrolled in Southern Methodist University to study composition with Jack Waldenmaier and Donald Erb. His interest in graduate studies took him to the 11

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University of Michigan where he later received his master's and doctoral degrees in composition while studying with famous composers, William Albright, Leslie Bassett, and William Bolcom. Ticheli's work as a composer has exceeded far beyond his own compositions. Ticheli's achievements and ultimately his interest in education have allowed him to create opportunities for young composers through composition contests as well as through the study of composition with him. Ticheli is currently the Professor of Composition at the University of Southern California. In addition to his compositional output and outreach for other composers, Ticheli is one of the few contemporary composers that is also revered as a conducting pedagogue. Similar to many other contemporary composers for wind band, Ticheli's output has been greatly enhanced by his commissioned works. Other output includes but is not limited to works for orchestra, chorus, and chamber ensemble. In 2002, the announcement of the retirement of James Croft, Director at Florida State University encouraged the start of the commissioning process for Ticheli's Symphony No. 2. Croft had an affinity for young composers with a fresh voice for the wind band medium and Croft shared with colleagues that if he were to ever have a piece written for him that it would be by Frank Ticheli. Croft's own adaptation of J.S. Bach's chorale, Who Puts His Trust In God Most Just, was taken largely into consideration to use throughout the work after his wife suggested the importance of this chorale to her husband. Written for standard band instrumentation, Symphony No. 2 uses Ticheli's own treatment of traditional symphonic forms to outline each movement. The piece is broken into three separate movements referring to celestial light: Shooting Stars, the Moon, and the Sun. Movement 3, titled Apollo Unleashed is the most varied in its compositional approach. Written 12

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in "Quasi Sonata Form" with an Introduction, Exposition, Development, Varied Recap, and Coda, the third movement is often performed on its own as part of a concert or performance. Most notable for his inclusion of Croft's favorite chorale, Ticheli uses the chorale throughout as a "spiritual anchor, giving a soul to the gregarious foreground events." ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! 13

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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH Joshua Gall is currently a Graduate Teaching Assistant in Instrumental Conducting at the University of Florida where he studies Wind Band Conducting with Dr. David Waybright. Mr. Gall teaches a concert band, serves as an undergraduate conducting mentor, assists with courses in Marching Band Techniques, and works with and writes for the 2013 Sudler Trophy Award Winning Gator Band. He has been involved in the performing arts as a teacher, guest director, adjudicator, composer, arranger, drill writer, program coordinator, and clinician for concert bands, marching bands, and indoor percussion ensembles throughout the United States. Mr. Gall received his Bachelor's Degree in Music Education, graduating Magna Cum Laude, from Virginia Commonwealth University. He studied tuba under Dr. Ross Walter, conducting under the direction of Dr. Terry Austin and Daniel Myssyk, and percussion under Sergeant Major William Messerschmidt of the United States Army Band. Mr. Gall has an extensive background in the marching arts. He participated as a member with the Ten-Time World Champion Cadets Drum Corps for four years and was on staff as a brass specialist for six years. While on staff with The Cadets, Mr. Gall was a teaching specialist for both the Macy's Day Parade in 2005 and President Obama's inauguration in 2008. Since then, he designed for the 2013 DCI Open Class Bronze Medalist, Genesis, and is a Brass Specialist for the Bluecoats. Currently, he serves in the role of guest clinician, program coordinator, music composer and arranger, and drill writer for over ten programs annually and has written over 40 shows receiving medal distinction in BOA (Bands of America), USSBA (U.S. Scholastic Band Association), TOB (Tournament of Bands), and WGI (Winter Guard International). 14

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Mr. Gall has also experienced great success as a teacher in the public schools in Virginia. For four years he was an assistant director in two programs that both received Virginia Honor Band accolades for consistent superior ratings in both concert and marching band assessment. During his four years, he assisted in two Virginia Music Educators in-service conference performances for both High School Wind Ensemble and Elementary School Orff Ensemble. Mr. Gall also serves as Music Director for Music On The River, a middle and high school summer concert band camp in central Virginia. From 2008 to 2011, Mr. Gall served on the National Band Association's William D. Revelli Composition Contest Selection Committee. He is also a contributing member of development for Pyware Drill Design Software. Prior to relocating to Florida, he and his family founded, owned, and operated Real Music Productions, a multimedia recording and production company from Richmond, Virginia that specialized in the recording of the performing arts. During the 12 years of running the company, Mr. Gall oversaw the production of over 4,000 audio and video recordings that were distributed nationally. He was responsible for the production of events such as the Richmond Symphony Concert Series, USSBA National Championships, WGI Regionals, All-Virginia Band and Orchestra Concerts, VBODA State Marching Festival, Atlantic Indoor Association Championships, and approximately seventy other events annually. Mr. Gall' s professional affiliations include Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia, College Band Directors National Association (CBDNA), and Florida Music Educators Association (FMEA). 15


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