Citation

Material Information

Title:
Graduate Piano Recital
Creator:
Cestaro, Melinda J
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, FL
Publisher:
College of Fine Arts; University of Florida
Publication Date:
Physical Description:
Project in lieu of thesis

Thesis/Dissertation Information

Degree:
Master's ( Master of Music)
Degree Grantor:
University of Florida
Committee Chair:
Orr, Kevin
Committee Members:
Ellis, Laura
Richards, Paul

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Fugues ( jstor )
Graduates ( jstor )
Keyboard music ( jstor )
Melody ( jstor )
Music education ( jstor )
Music recitals ( jstor )
Musical performance ( jstor )
Musical rhythm ( jstor )
Piano sonatas ( jstor )
Preludes ( jstor )

Notes

Abstract:
At 5:30pm on March 31, 2014, Melinda Cestaro presented a graduate piano recital in the University of Florida Music Building Room 101 recital hall. The program opened with J.S. Bach’s Prelude and Fugue in E-flat Minor, BWV 853, from Book 1 of the Well-Tempered Clavier. The prelude’s pensive melody has a vocal quality, and the three-voice fugue presents the subject brilliantly in rhythmic variations, inversion, and augmentation. A set of four Debussy preludes followed: “Les collines d’Anacapri” and “Minstrels” from Book 1, and “Bruyères” and “General Lavine – eccentric” from Book 2. Each of the preludes portrays its own character represented by the title, which Debussy interestingly includes at the very end of each piece, rather than at the top of the first page. The second half of the program began with Beethoven’s Sonata No. 31 in A-flat Major, Op. 110. Composed in 1821, this second-to-last of his 32 piano sonatas reflects Beethoven’s own life in a turbulent story of triumph and defeat, where triumph ultimately wins. Lyrical melodies and a sense of tranquility pervade the first movement, Moderato cantabile, molto espressivo, while the abrupt and lively second movement, Allegro molto, prepares us for the final movement. The third movement begins with a recitative-like passage, leading to the first arioso in A-flat 3 minor. Ringing A flats transform into a fugue subject of ascending fourths in A-flat major, only to be defeated again by a second, more breathless arioso—this time a half step lower in G minor. The second arioso ends with sonorous G major chords, leading to the inversion of the fugue subject and a return to “light” in a jubilant, homophonic finale. The recital concluded with three of Rachmaninoff’s Moments musicaux, Op. 16: Allegretto in E-flat minor, Adagio sostenuto in D-flat major, and Presto in E minor. The outer two works are etude-like studies reminiscent of Chopin and present an exemplary challenge in balance, while the Adagio sostenuto provides respite from the energy of the other two. The program explored a generous variety of style and texture within the piano repertory, spanning centuries from baroque to impressionism. ( en )
General Note:
Music Performance terminal project

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Melinda Cestaro. Permission granted to the University of Florida to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
1048000136 ( OCLC )

Downloads

This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

A GRADUATE PIANO RECITAL By MELINDA CESTARO SUPERVISORY COMMITTEE: KEVIN ORR, CHAIR LAU RA ELLIS, MEMBER PAUL RICHARDS, MEMBER A PERFORMANCE IN LIEU OF THESIS PRESENTED TO THE COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA IN PARTIAL FULFILL MENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF MUSIC UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 2014

PAGE 2

2 Summary of Performance in Lieu of Thesis Presented to the College of Fine Arts of the University of Florida in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Master of Music A GRADUATE PIANO RECITAL By Melinda Cestaro May 2014 Chair: Kevin Orr Major: Music At 5:30pm on March 31, 2014, Melinda Cestaro presented a graduate piano recital in the University of Florida Music Building Room 101 recital hall. The program opened with J.S . Bach's Prelude and Fugue in E flat M inor, BWV 853 , from Book 1 of the Well Tempered Clavier. The prelude's pensive melody has a vocal quality, and the three voice fugue presents the subject brilliantly in rhythmic variations, inversion, and augmentation. A set of four Deb u s sy preludes followed: " Les collines d'Anacapri " and " Minstrels " from Book 1, and " Bruyres " and " Gene ral Lavine Ð eccentric " from Book 2. Each of the preludes portrays its own character represented by the tit le, which Debussy interestingly includes at the very end of each piece, rather than at the top of the first page. The second half of the program began with Beeth oven's Sonata No. 31 in A flat M ajor, Op. 110. Composed in 1821, this second to last of his 32 piano sonatas reflects Beethoven's own life in a turbulent story of triumph and defeat, where triumph ultimately wins . Lyrical melodies and a sense of tranquility pervade the first movement, Moderato cantabile, molto espressivo , while the abrupt and lively second movement, Allegro molto , prepares us for the final movement. The third movement begins with a recitative like passage, leading to the first ar ioso in A flat

PAGE 3

3 minor. Ringing A flats transform into a fugue subject of ascending fourths in A flat major, only to be defeated again by a second, more breathless arioso Ñ this time a half step lower in G minor. The second arioso ends with sonorous G major chords, leading to the inversion of the fugue subject and a return to "light" in a jubilant, homophonic fina le. The recital concluded with three of Rachmaninoff's Moments m usicaux , Op. 16: Allegretto in E flat m inor, Adagio sost enuto in D flat major, and Presto in E minor. The outer two works are etude like studies reminiscent of Chopin and present an exemplary challenge in balance, while the Adagio sostenuto provides respite from the energy of the other two . The program explored a generous variety of style and texture within the piano repertory, spanning centuries from baroque to impressionism.

PAGE 4

4 PROGRAM A Graduate Piano Recital Melinda Cestaro, piano March 31, 2014 Ð 5:30pm MUB 101 Prelude and Fugue in E flat minor, BWV 853 Johann Sebastian Bach (1685 1750) Preludes, Book 1 Claude Debussy V. Les collines d'An acapri (The Hills of Anacapri) (1862 1918) XII. Minstrels Preludes, Book 2 V. Bruyres (Heather/town in Eastern France) VI. General Lavine Ð eccentric Intermission Sonata No. 3 1 in A flat major, Op. 110 Ludwig van Beethoven (1770 1827) I. Moderato cantabile molto espressivo II. Allegro molto III. Adagio ma non troppo -Fuga: Allegro ma non troppo -L'istesso tempo di Arioso -L'istesso tempo della Fuga poi a poi di nuovo vivente Moments musicaux , Op. 16 Serge Rachmaninoff II. Allegretto (1873 1943) V. Adagio sostenuto IV. Presto This recital is presented i n partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree Master of Music in Piano Performance. Melinda Cestaro is from the studio of Dr. Kevin Orr.

PAGE 5

5 PROGRAM NOTES J.S. Bach's Prelude and Fugue in E flat minor, BWV 853, is the eighth of 24 preludes an d fugues from Book 1 of his Well Tempered Clavier, completed in 1722. Beginning with C major, the Well Tempered Clavier approaches all 24 major and minor keys in ascending chromatic or der, and serves as both a teaching tool for young students and an intens e study for advanced keyboard players. Similar ideas circulated in music history before this, but Bach was one of the first to organize 24 successive pieces to be played in the then fairly new 12 note tuning system of well temperament. The prelude of this piece is vocal in character, with various angular leaps and intervals such as tritones that give the hint of sighs of despair Ñ a feeling that pervades the movement. The three voice fugue is also highly emotional, and displays Bach's mastery of counterpoint with great success. Bach treats the subject Ñ which co nsists of a rising fifth, step wise motion, and a rising fourth Ñ brilliantly, in almost every possible variation. After the initial subject entrances, Bach presents the subject in rhythmic variation, in its inversion, and finally in augmentation. There are numerous instances of stretto throughout the movement as well, where subject entries overlap between voices. Bach's treatment of the subject and his frequent use of large, falling intervals and chromaticis m vividly portray the profound sense of grief throughout the entire piece. Following in the footsteps of Bach's Well Tempered Clavier Ñ and Chopin's preludes from the 19th century Ñ Debussy's preludes are also in a group of 24, in two books of 12. Unlike Bac h and Chopin though, these preludes do not move through an o rganized sequence of key signa tures. Instead, each of the preludes portrays its own character represented by the title, which

PAGE 6

6 Debussy interestingly indicates in the score at the very end of each p iece, rather than at the top of the first page. For Debussy, this odd placement of titles is uni que to his preludes. This meth od perhaps allows the pianist, or listener, to first develop his own interpretation of the music. Debussy's earlier titled movemen ts within larger works such as Estampes and Images (with ti tles written at the beginning of each piece in these cases) prov e his fondness for extra musical association. Books 1 and 2 were published separately, in 1910 and 1913, respectively. Both books of preludes portray Debussy's important contribution to musical impressionism, with wonderful variations in layers, colors, and textures. "Les collines d'Anacapri" Ñ the Hills of Anacapri Ñ is likely a reference to the village of the same name o n the Italian isl and of Capri. "Minstrels" portrays a troup e of musical clowns, who Debus sy may have seen performing near the Grand Hotel, Eastbourne, UK during his stay in the summer of 1905. "Bruyres" may refer to the town of the same name in France, bu t also literally translates to "heathers," perhaps revealing inspiration from the purp le flower blowing in the wind. "General Lavine Ð eccentric" comments on Edward Lavine, who, according to Roy Howat (editor of the Preludes volume of the " C omplete Works of Claude Debussy " ) was an American clown Debussy saw in Paris. Lavine was billed as " General Ed Lavine, the Man Who has Soldiered All His Life." Howat suggests that the opening melody portrays Lavine's puppet like gait, while the middle section may allude to part of Lavin e's act that included tightrope juggling. The middle section also intere stingly, albeit wildly, quotes "Camptown Races" Ñ another influence of comic Americana. In 1819, the Berlin publisher Adolf Schlesinger asked Beethoven to write three piano sonatas. Th ese three sonatas would be the last piano sonatas Beethoven ever wrote, comprising

PAGE 7

7 the trio of Op. 109 111. This period was a turbulent one in Beethoven's lif e, where he struggled with ill ness and custody battles over his nephew Karl. These instances may a ccount for some of the introspection found in Beethoven's late period works. Composed in 1821, Op. 110 is the second to last of his 32 piano sonatas, and reflects Beethoven's own life in a powerful story of triumph and defeat, where triumph Ñ or perhaps resu rrection Ñ ultimately wins. Lyrical melodies and a sense of tranquility pervade the first movement, which is in simple sonata allegr o form. The ab rupt and lively second movement is a scherzo and trio, with rhythms that allude to a gavotte. The melody of this movement, however, oddly begins on beat three, fighting the otherwise apparent connection to the dance. The second movement ends with a rather unstable left hand arpeggio, leading into a recitative, which opens the third and final movement. The recitative is followed by a lamenting arioso in A flat minor. Ringing A flats then transform into a three voice fugue with a subject of ascending fourths in A flat major, only to be defeated again by a second, more breath less arioso Ñ this time a half step lower in th e key of G minor. Th e second arioso ends with sono rous G major chords, which lead to the inversion of the fugue subject in G major. Beethoven then treats the fugue in augmentation, diminution, double diminution, and stretto, wh ich soon builds to a return t o "light" in a jubilant, homophonic finale. Rachmaninoff was one of the last great composers of Russian Romanticism. His set of six Moments musicaux , composed in 1896, represents a maturity in his piano composition skills and sets a precedent for his lat er piano works, such as the Preludes and the ƒtudes tableaux Ñ with layered textures and difficult figuration. The title, translated as "Musical Moments," may have been in spired by Schubert's 1828 set of six Moments musicaux and the 19th century tradition o f other short, generally intimate solo piano works. All three of these selections are in

PAGE 8

8 ternary form. The outer two works are etude like studies reminiscent of Chopin. These two works present an ex emplary challenge in balance, while the Adagio sostenuto p rovides respite from the energy of the other two. The melody of the Allegretto was revised in 19 40, but its quick stepwise move ments with rapid inner figuration create an overall feeling of yearning and urgency. The Adagio sostenuto could be likened to the oasis of the set, with a calming left hand pattern that alludes to a barcarolle. The Presto calls to mind Chopin's "Revolutionary" etude, with its swift left hand runs and resonant right hand melody. The brief moments of call and response between hands af ter the initial melody are borrowed from one of Rachmaninoff's own early fugues.

PAGE 9

9 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH A native of New York, Melinda Cestaro is currently pursuing a Master of Music in piano performance at the University of Florida, where she st udies with Kevin Orr and holds a piano assistantship. In May of 2012, she graduated summa cum laude from the University at Albany, State University of New York, where she received a Bachelor of Arts in music with a conc entration in piano performance. Her m ajor teacher was Duncan Cumming. During her time in Albany, she had numerous solo performance opportunities, performed chamber music and accompanied vocalists, was a member of the University Chamber Singers, and was a music theory assistant for three year s. From 2009 to 2012, she served as pianist and co director of the college choir at the Church of St. Vincent de Paul in Albany . She received the Andrea Hanan Music Scholarship in 2009, the Douglas Malcom Hastings Award in 2012, and was inducted into Phi B eta Kappa in 2011. She has also participated in the A tlantic Music Festival in Maine and the University of Florida International Piano Festival. Cestaro currently maintains her own private studio in Gainesville , and has also taught privately in Albany and Westchester, NY for many years. Her assistantship duties at the University of Florida include teaching multiple sections of class piano to undergraduates, teaching private piano lessons to vocal majors , and accompanying the women's chorale . She also recen tly developed an interest in organ, and after beginning studies in the fall of 2013 with Laura Ellis, has already served as a substitute church organist on numerous occasions. Cestaro hopes to establish a teaching career after continued studies in piano pe rformance and pedagogy at the doctoral level.


xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EIMV9Q33M_UZ2CKT INGEST_TIME 2016-04-21T20:42:31Z PACKAGE AA00025539_00001
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES


xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EB72YCNJV_4GOSYF INGEST_TIME 2016-04-19T22:35:45Z PACKAGE AA00025539_00001
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES