Statutory provisions related to Federal research and development

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Title:
Statutory provisions related to Federal research and development
Series Title:
Serial no. 94-KK
Physical Description:
3 pts. in 2 : ; 24 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States
United States -- Congress. -- House. -- Committee on Science and Technology. -- Subcommittee on Domestic and International Scientific Planning and Analysis
Library of Congress -- Science Policy Research Division
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U.S. Govt. Print. Off.
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:

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Subjects / Keywords:
Research -- Law and legislation -- United States   ( lcsh )
Technology -- Law and legislation -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )

Notes

General Note:
At head of title: Committee print.
General Note:
Includes index.
Statement of Responsibility:
Subcommittee on Domestic and International Scientific Planning and Analysis of the Committee on Science and Technology, U.S. House of Representatives, Ninety-fourth Congress, second session ; prepared by the Science Policy Research Division, Congressional Research Service, Library of Congress ... July 1976.

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University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 025881141
oclc - 02434475
lccn - 76602962
System ID:
AA00024851:00001

Full Text






S ATUORY ROVISIONS RELATED TO







DOMSTC AD INTERNATIONAL
SUETIICPLANNING AND ANALYSIS
OFTH


SCINC AN TECHNOLOGY



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VOLUMEE I









1E N








[COMMITTEE PRINT]



STATUTORY PROVISIONS RELATED TO
FEDERAL RESEARCH AND
DEVELOPMENT


SUBCOMMITTEE ON
DOMESTIC AND INTERNATIONAL
SCIENTIFIC PLANNING AND ANALYSIS OF THE

COMMITTEE ON
SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
NINETY-FOURTH CONGRESS
SECOND SESSION


PREPARED BY THE
SCIENCE POLICY RESEARCH DIVISION CONGRESSIONAL RESEARCH SERVICE
LIBRARY OF CONGRESS


VOLUME I
OF Two VOLUMES Serial KK


bI


JULY 1976
Printed for the use of the Committee on Science and Technology

U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 61-914 WASHINGTON: 1976

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office
Washington, D.C. 20102 Price $10.00
















COMMITTEE ON SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

OLIN E. TEAGUE, Texas, Chairman KEN HECHLER, West Virginia CHARLES A. MOSHER, Ohio
THOMAS N. DOWNING, Virginia ALPHONZO BELL, California
DON FUQUA, Florida JOHN JARMAN, Oklahoma
JAMES W. SYMINGTON, Missouri JOHN W. WYDLER, New York
WALTER FLOWERS, Alabama LARRY WINN, JR., Florida
ROBERT A. ROE, New Jersey LOUIS FREY, JR., Florida
MIKE McCORMACK, Washington BARRY M. GOLDWATER, JR., California
GEORGE E. BROWN, JR., California MARVIN L. ESCH, Michigan
DALE MILFORD, Texas JOHN B. CONLAN, Arizona
RAY THORNTON, Arkansas GARY A. MYERS, Pennsylvania
JAMES H. SCHEUER, New York DAVID F. EMERY, Maine
RICHARD L. OTTINGER, New York LARRY PRESSLER, South Dakota
HENRY A. WAXMAN, California PHILIP H. HAYES, Indiana TOM HARKIN, Iowa JIM LLOYD, California JEROME A. AMBRO, New York CHRISTOPHER J. DODD, Connecticut MICHAEL T. BLOUIN, Iowa TIM L. HALL, Illinois ROBERT (BOB) KRUEGER, Texas MARILYN LLOYD, Tennessee JAMES J. BLANCHARD, Michigan TIMOTHY E. WIRTH, Colorado JOHN L. SWIGERT, Jr., Executive Director HAROLD A. GOULD, Deputy Director PHILIP B. YEAGER, Counsel FRANK R. HAMMILL, Jr., Counsel JAMES E. WILSON, Technical Consultant T. THOMAS RATCHFORD, Science Consultant JOHN D. HOLMFELD, Science Consultant RALPH N. READ, Technical Consultant ROBERT C. KETCHAM, Counsel REGINA A. DAVIS, Clerk MICHAEL A. SUPERATA, Minority Counsel


SUBCOMMITTEE ON DOMESTIC AND INTERNATIONAL SCIENTIFIC PLANNING AND ANALYSIS

RAY THORNTON, Arkansas, Chairman ROBERT A. ROE, New Jersey JOHN B. CONLAN, Arizona
DALE MILFORD, Texas JOHN JARMAN, Oklahoma
JAMES H. SCHEUER, New York GARY A. MYERS, Pennsylvania
HENRY A. WAXMAN, California JEROME A. AMBRO, New York JAMES J. BLANCHARD, Michigan

SUBCOMMITTEE STAFF

JOHN D. HOLMFELD, Science Consultant DARCIA D. BRACKEN, Science Consultant JAMES L. GALLAGHER, Minority Technical Consultant QII)










LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL


HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES,
COMMITTEE ON SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY,
Hon.LINE TEAUEWashington, D.C., July 20, 1976. Chairman, Committee on Science and Technology, House of Representatives,
Washington, D.C.
DEAR MR. CHAIRMAN:
In the 94th Congress, the jurisdiction of the Committee on Science and Technology was increased to include Special Oversight over all Federal research and development activities except those of a military nature. This Special Oversight function includes "the review and study, on a continuing basis, of all laws, programs, and government activities" in this field.
To serve as a starting point for our review and study of the laws dealing with science and technology, our Subcommittee early last year asked the Congressional Research Service to compile a comprehensive survey of all Federal statutory provisions relating to nonmilitary science and technology. Mr. E. Jeremy Hutton of the American Law Division compiled the relevant laws and Mr. William Boesman of the Science Policy Research Division edited them and wrote the brief analysis which serves as an introduction to survey. Ms. Carol Lee McBee, also of the Science Policy Research Division, compiled and edited the index with the assistance of Ms. Carole Hackes of the Committee staff who also prepared the survey for printing.
The texts of the relevant laws were obtained through a computer search using the JURIS computer of the tDepartment ,-of Justice. We are indebted to the Justice Department for their assistance in making this search capability available to the Committee.
A good deal of care was taken by the researchers who compiled this survey. Nevertheless, I am well aware that, as a first effort in this field, the survey may be imperfect. I therefore invite all users of these volumes to submit to the Committee any corrections or suggestions which would improve the survey in the event a corrected and updated version is issued in the future.
I an- pleased to submit this survey to you for the use of the Committee on Science and Technology. I believe that it will provide a solid base for inquiries by our Committee into the nation's laws dealing with Federal research and development activities, and commend it to your attention and to the attention of our colleagues onl the Committee on Science and Technology and in the Rouse of Representatives.
Sincerely,
RAY THORNTON,
Chairman, Subcommittee on Domestic and International
Scientific IPlaiiiiing and Anialysis.
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Digitized by the Internet Archive
in 2013










http://archive.org/details/stprovisiOOu nit









LETTER OF SUBMITTAL


THE LIBRARY OF CONGRESS,
CONGRESSIONAL RESEARCH SERVICE, Washington, D.C., December 23, 1975.
Hon.' RAY THORNTON,
Chairman, Subeommittee on Domestic and International Scientific
Planning and Analysis, Committee on Science and Technology,
U.S. House of Representatives, Washington, D.C.
DEAR MR. CHAIRMAN: I am pleased to transmit this report entitled "iSurvey and Analysis of Federal Statutory Provisions Related to the Authority and Conduct of Non-Military Research and Development," prepared at the request of the Subcommittee on Domestic and International Scientific Planning and Analysis.
The report presents a survey and analysis of the Federal statutory provisions related to non-miitary research and development and the text of the appropriate sections of law through the 93rd Congress. An extensive index to the statutory provisions is also included.
The survey and analysis of the laws was conducted by Mr. William C. Boesman and the index was prepared by Ms. Carol Lee McBee, both of the Science Policy Research Division. Mr. E. Jeremy Hutton of the American Law Division was responsible for interfacing with the computerized JURIS system and for providing printouts of the requisite materials and related expertise.
May I express my appreciation for the opportunity to undertake this assignment.
Sincerely, NORMAN BECKMAN, Acting Director.

MV














CONTENTS


VOLUME I-PARTS I AND II
page
Letter of transmittal ------------------------------------------- II
Letter of Submittal------------------------------------------------ v
Contents------------------------------------------------------- VII
PART I-SURVEY AND ANALYSIS OF THE FEDERAL STATUTORY PROVISIONS
RELATED To RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

Summary -------------------------------------------------------- 3
Introduction ----------------------------------------------------- 5
Survey and analysis--------.,-------------------------------------- 7
Organizational Survey-------------------------------------- 7
Areas of Interest to House Committee on Science and Technology..- 9
Tables of Federal Research and Development Statutes:
1. The Congress, the Judicial Branch, the Executive Office of
the President---------------------------------------- 11
2. Department of Agriculture ------------------------------ 12
3. Department of Commerce ------------------------------- 14
4. Department of Defense Civil --------------------------- 15
5. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare-Health. ---- 15 6. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare-Education--. 17
7. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare-Welfare and
Human Development---------------------------------18s
8. Department of Housing and Urban Development ------------19
9. Department of the Interior ------------------------------ 19
10. Departments of Justice, Labor, and State----------------- 20
11. Department of Transportation --------------------------- 21
12. Atomic Energy Commission and the Energy Research and
Development Administration, Environment Protection
Agency -------------------------------------------- 22
13. Federal Aviation Administration, Federal Communications
Commission, Federal Energy Administration, Federal Maritime Commission, National Academy of Sciences, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, National
Science Foundation ---------------------------------- 23
14. Peace Corps (ACTION), Smithsonian Institution, Veterans
Administration, Community Services Administration------24
15. Coordinated Multiagency Activities---------------------- 25
16. Other Organizations------------------------------------ 25
17. General Government----------------------------------- 27
PART 11-PRovIsIoNs OF THE UNITED STATES CODE THROUGH THE 92D
CONGRESS RELATED TO RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT
U.S.C. Title 2 -The Congress -------------------------------------- 31
U.S.C. Title 5 -Government Organization and Employees ---------------44
U.S.C. Title 7 -Agriculture --------------------------------------- 117
U.S.C. Title 8 -Aliens and Nationality------------------------------ 202
U.S.C. Title 12-Banks and Banking-------------------------------- 226
U.S.C. Title 14-Coast Guard ------------------------------------- 233
U.S.C. Title 15--Commerce and Trade------------------------------- 235
U.S.C. Title 16-Conservation ------------------------------------- 305
U.S.C. Title 17-Copyright ---------------------------------------- 429
U.S.C. Title 18-Crimes and Criminal Procedure ---------------------- 432
U.S.C. Title 20-Education--------------------------------------- 433
U.S.C. Title 21-Food and Drugs----------------------------------- 532
U.S.C. Title 22-Foreign Relations and Intercourse -------------------- 615
U.S.C. Title 23-Highways ---------------------------------------- 659






VIII

Page
U.S.C. Title 28-Judiciary and Judicial Procedure--------------------- 676
U.S.C. Title 29-Labor ------------------------------------------ 677
U.S.C. Title 30-Mineral Lands and Mining------------------------ 698
U.S.C. Title 33-Navigation and Navigable Waters ------------------- 728
U.S.C. Title 35-Patents ----------------------------------------781
U.S.C. Title 36-Patriotic Societies and Observances------------------- 785
U.S.C. Title 40-Public Buildings, Property, and Works --------------- 798
U.S.C. Title 42-The Public Health and Welfare--- ----- .-810
U.S.C. Title 43-Public Lands -------------------------- --------1104
U.S.C. Title 45-Railroads -------------------------------------- 1106
U.S.C. Title 46-Shipping -----------------------------------------1121
U.S.C. Title 47-Telegraphs, Telephones, and Radiotelegraphs ..... ----------1124
U.S.C. Title 48-Territories and Insular Possessions ------------------ 1140
U.S.C. Title 49-Transportation --------------------------- -------1146
U.S.C. Title 50-War and National Defense ------------------------- 1185
VOLUME II--PART III
Contents. -------------------------------------------------------v
PART III-LAws OF THE 93RD CONGRESS, RELATED TO RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT
93RD CONGRESS, 1ST SESSION (1973):
Public Law 93-29 -Older Americans Comprehensive Service Amendments of 1973 (Titles I-III) ---------------- 1193
Public Law 93-29 -Older Americans Comprehensive Service Amendments of 1973 (Titles IV-IX) -------------- 1211
Public Law 93-82 -Veterans Health Care Expansion Act of 1973-- 1233 Public Law 93-83 -Crime Control Act of 1973 .. ------------------. 1253
Public Law 93-86 -Agriculture and Consumer Protection Act of
1973 ------------------------------- ---1279
Public Law 93-87 -Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1973 (Title I) - 1312 Public Law 93-87 -Highway Safety Act of 1973 (Title II) .--------- 1349
Public Law 93-112-Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (Pt. 1) --1365 Public Law 93-112-Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (Pt. 2) ------------1388
Public Law 93-146-Amtrak Improvement Act of 1973 ....- 1408
Public Law 93-151-Amend the Lead Based Paint Poisoning Prevention Act ------------------------------- 1417
Public Law 93-154-Emergency Medical Services Systems Act of
1973...... .........---------------------------- ------ 1422
Public Law 93-203-Comprehensive Employment and Training Act
of 1973 (Titles I-III) --------------------- 1434
Public Law 93-203-Comprehensive Employment and Training Act of
1973 (Titles IV-VI) ---------------------- 1463
Public Law 93-205-Endangered Species Act of 1973 ..-------------- 1486
Public Law 93-222-Health Maintenance Organization Act of 1973-- 1510
Public Law 93-236---Regional Rail Reorganization Act of 1973
(Titles I-II) --------------------------- 1537
Public Law 93-236--Regional Rail Reorganization Act of 1973 (Titles
III-VI) -------------------------------1559
93RD CONGRESS, 2ND SESSION (1974):
Public Law 93-247-Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act-..... ----1581
Public Law 93-270--Sudden Infant Death Syndrome Act of 1974--.. -. --1585
Public Law 93-275-Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 .. ----1588
Public Law 93-282-Comprehensive Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism Prevention, Treatment, and Rehabilitation Act -------------------------------------1607
Public Law 93-288-Disaster Relief Act of 1974 -------------------1621
Public Law 93-296--Research on Aging Act of 1974 ----------------1643
Public Law 93-311-National Commission on Productivity and
Work Quality Act -------------------------1646
Public Law 93-319--Energy Supply and Environmental Coordination
Act of 1974 ----------------------- 1648
Public Law 93-320---Colorado River Basin Salinity Control Act----- 1669
Public Law 93-353-Health Services Research, Health Statistics, and
Medical Libraries Act of 1974-------------- ........... -1679






IX

Public Law 93-354--National Diabetes Mellitus Research and Page Education Act -------------------------- 1691
Public Law 93-366---Amendments to the Federal Aviation Act of
1958 ---------------------------------- 1696
Public Law 93-380---Education Amendments of 1974 ---------------1706
Public Law 93-383-Housing and Community Development Act of
1974 ----------------------------------1836
Public Law 93-409---Solar Heating and Cooling Demonstration Act
of 1974 -------------------------------- 1944
Public Law 93-410---Geothermal Energy Researen, Development,
and Demonstration Act of 1974 --------------1955
Public Law 93-415---Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention
Act of 1974 ----------------------------196b
Public Law 93-428--Egg Research and Consumer Information Act -- 2000 Public Law 93-438-Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 ------------2009
Public Law 93-454---Federal Columbia River Transmission System
Act -----------------------------------2030
Public Law 93-473-Solar Energy Research, Development, and
Demonstration Act of 1974 -----------------2036
Public Law 93-495--Amendments to the Federal Deposit Insurance
Act ..---------------------------------.-- 2044
Public Law 93-496-Amtrak Improvement Act of 1974_------------- 2071
Public Law 93-498-Federal Fire Prevention and Control Act of 1974 2079
Public Law 93-503-National Mass Transportation Assistance Act
of 1974_ -------------------------------- 2084
Public Law 93-516---Amendments to the Rehabilitation Act of 1973
and to the Randolph-Sheppard Act ---------- 2104
Public Law 93-523-Safe Drinking Water Act -------------------- 2121
Public Law 93-535-Establish the Cascade Head Scenic-Research
Area in the State of Oregon ---------------- 2155
Public Law 93-538-Disabled Veterans' and Servicemen's Automobile and Adaptive Equipment Amendments of 1974 ---------------------------------- 2158
Public Law 93-573-Amend Title 17 of the United States Code ---. 2161
Public Law 93-577-Federal Nonnuclear Energy Research and Development Act of 1974 -------------------- 2164
Public Law 93-633-Hazardous Materials Transportation Act ------2181 Public Law 93-640-National Arthritis Act of 1974 ---------------2199
Public Law 39-641-National Health Planning and Resources Development Act of 1974 -------------------- 2207
Public Law 93-644-Headstart, Economic Opportunity, and Community Partnership Act of 1974 ------------2259
AUTHORIZATION AND APPROPRIATIONS ACTS, 93RD CONGRESS, 2ND SESSION (1974): Public Law 93-269-Authorization for Office of Education Available
Until June 30, 1975 ----------------------- 2298
Public Law 93-276-Authorization for the Atomic Energy Commission ----------------------------------2301
Public Law 93-302-Authorization to Carry Out the Peace Corps Act-. 2305 Public Law 93-305-Second Supplemental Appropriations Act, 1974. 2306
Public Law 93-307-Authorization for the Armed Forces during the
Fiscal Year 1974 ------------------------ 2344
Public Law 93-308-Amend Maritime Program Authorization ...------ 2346
Public Law 93-312-Amend the Department of State Authorization
Act of 1973 ----------------------------2347
Public Law 93-316-Authorization for the National Aeronautics and
Space Administration --------------------2349
Public Law 93-321-Joint Resolution for Appropriations for the
Veterans Administration ------------------ 2354
Public Law 93-322-Authorization for Energy Research and Development Activities of Certain Departments - 2355 Public Law 93-324-Joint Resolution on Continuing Appropriations
for the Fiscal Year 1975 ------------------ 2360
Public Law 93-332-Amend the Arms Control and Disarmament Act. 2365
Public Law 93-342-Authorization for the Saline Water Program for
the Fiscal Year 1975 --------------------- 2366
Public Law 93-345-Authorization for Smithsonian Institution------...... 2367
Public Law 93-351-Amend Title VII of the Older Americans Act_. 2368






X

page
Public Law 93-362-Amend the Anadromous Fish Conservation Act- 2370
Public Law 93-365--Authorization for the Armed Forces During the
Fiscal Year 1975 -------------------------2371
Public Law 93-381-Appropriations for the Treasury Department, the United States Postal Service, the Executive Office of the President, and Other Agencies for the Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1975 ---------------------------------2381
Public Law 93-391-Appropriations for the Department of Transportation and Other Agencies --------------2400
Public Law 93-393-Appropriations for Public Works for Water and
Power Development --------------------- 2412
Public Law 93-404--Appropriations for the Department of the
Interior and Related Agencies --------------2423
Public Law 93-413-Authorization for the National Science Foundation --------------------------------2443
Public Law 93-414-Appropriations for the Department of Housing
and Urban Development, NASA, NSF -------2445 Public Law 93-430--Authorization for the Coast Guard ------------2458
Public Law 93-433-Appropriations for the Departments of State, Justice, and Commerce, the Judiciary, and Related Agencies ------------------------2463
Public Law 93-436-Extend the Appropriation Authorization for
Reporting of Weather Modification Activities- 2486 Public Law 93-437-Appropriations for the Department of Defense for
the Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1975________-2487 Public Law 93-448-Joint Resolution Continuing Authorization for
the Fiscal Year 1975 ---------------------2508
Public Law 93-517-Appropriations for the Departments of Labor, and Health, Education, and Welfare and Related Agencies ------------------------2510
ADDITIONAL MATERIALS:
Public Law 93-348-National Research Act ---------------------2531
Public Law 94-282-National Science and Technology Policy,
Organization, and Priorities Act of 1976 -----2544 Public Law 93-126-Department of State Authorization for 1974___- 2559 Index ------------------------------------------------------ 2565





















PART I


SuitvL-Y AwDA-wALysis oir FmEPtAL STATuToRy PRovmows
To RmmRcH AND DEvELopmmNT












SUMMARY
A principal finding of this analysis of Federal statutory provisions involving the authority and conduct of non-military R&D is that such R&D laws are very numerous, cover many subject areas, and apply to most of the major, and many of the minor, agencies and organizations of the Federal Government. Almost 400 specific programs or activities are listed in the accompanying tables. The widespread need for research and development is clearly reflected in Federal legislation, and attests to the importance of science and technology in the management and solution of many national problems.
iFurthermore, most Federal R&D laws appear to relate to "missionor ented" research and development and to be administered by agencies directly involved with specific missions and responsibilities. The major exceptions are laws dealing with the National Science Foundation and the Smithsonian Institution, organizations which have a definite commitment to broad areas of basic research.
Federal R&D laws often direct that several departments or agencies work on different aspects of the same research or development, according to each agency's primary mission or interest. This is exemplified by three laws enacted in the 93d Congress dealing with cooperative R&D efforts in solar and geothermal energy (P.L. 93-409, P.L. 93-410, and P.L. 93-473; see Table 15).
The Federal R&D laws currently in effect indicate a continuing interest by Congress in the ability of the executive organizations to develop the technological capabilities needed for their missions. New R&D laws are enacted to meet newly perceived needs, while many older laws remain on the books and become institutionalized in governmental R&D establishments. Reorganizations occur which shift responsibilities from department to department, but the concept of continuing R&D seems to be permanently a part of the Federal Government.
In short, Federal R&D law is a complex field involving many government departments and agencies in a multitude of subject areas, and involves both basic research and mission-oriented research and development.
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INTRODUCTION
These two volumes include 1) a survey and analysis of the statutes dealing with non-military science and technology, 2) the texts of those statutory provisions dealing with non-military research and development, and 3) a detailed subject index to these statutes. The laws enacted through the 93rd Congress (1973-1974) are included. For the period through the First Session of the 93rd Congress (1973), the texts were ob6incd from the JURTS computer of the Department of Justice. For the Second Session of the 93rd Congress, the relevant public laws are ted directly from copies of the public laws.
The annual auth=on and 'appropriations laws related to research and development of the Second Session of the 93rd Congress complete the text.
The specific information underlying this survey and the analysis of Federal statutory provisions affeelinz'non-military R&D is contained in the 17 tables which follow this discussion. Each table provides a brief description of the R&D prograin or activity found in a particular section or sections of the U.S. Code (through the 92d Congress) or public laws (of the 93d Congress) and lists the organizations involved.
These tables include information on the Congress (the Office of Technology Assessment and the Congressional Research Service), the Judicial Branch (the Federal Judicial Center), the Executive Office of the President, 10 Executive Departments (all except the Department of the Treasury and the Postal Service, but including the civil activities of the Department of Defense), .11 of the more scientifically-oriented independent agencies (from the Federal Aviation Administration to the Veterans Administration), three multiagency organizations recently formed to conduct R&D in solar and
E thermal energy, 21 other organizations, and 14 laws related to
D -that apply generally throughout the Government.
Within Part One, the survey and analysis section is preceded by a brief summary which presents general findings of the analysis, followed by the tables outlined above.. Part Two contains the computer printouts of the relevant provisions of the U.S. Code (through the 92d Congress), wbicb are summarized in the tables and discussed in the survey and analysis section; finally, Part Three contains printouts and copies of the substantive and of the authorization and laws of the 2d session of the 93d Congress. A section with "Additional Materials" contains two Public Laws inadvertently onaitted from the compilation and one major science policy law from the 94th Congress, the "National Science and Technology Policy, Organization, and Priorities Act of 1976" (see p. 2544).
METHOD OF COMPILATION
The computer printout contained in this report was obtained from the JURIS computer system. The JURIS system is a coin uter system of the Department of Justice that includes the U.S.
e as updated through the 92d Congress. JURIS also includes, in Public law form, the statutes of the 93d Congress, ist Session, that is-, 13-L. 93-1 through P.L. 93-245. The computer survey was made by scanning the U.S. Code (through the 92d Congress) and the public
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6

laws of the 93d Congress, 1st Session for the following key words: research, science, sciences, scientific, technology, and technological. These words are marked with a double asterisk in the margin of the computer printout. Thus, the computer printed out all statutory sections (referred to as "items" in the computer listing) in which these key words are found. This raw printout, comprising 1,519 items, was edited to delete those sections that did not actually deal with R&D. The remaining sections were then analyzed for content.
As a result of this section procedure, laws from the following Titles of the U.S. Code were identified and included in the compilation:
Title 2 -The Congress
Title 5 -Government Organization and Employees
Title 7 -Agriculture
Title 8 -Aliens and Nationality
Title 12-Banks and Banking (in regard to housing)
Title 14-Coast Guard
Title 15-Commerce and Trade
Title 16-Conservation
Title 17-Copyright
Title 18-Crimes and Criminal Procedure
Title 20-Education
Title 21-Food and Drugs
Title 22-Foreign Relations and Intercourse
Title 23-Highways
Title 28-Judiciary and Judicial Procedure
Title 29-Labor
Title 30-Mineral Lands and Mining
Title 33-Navigation and Navigable Waters
Title 35-Patents
Title 36-Patriotic Societies and Observances
Title 38-Veterans' Benefits
Title 40-Public Buildings, Property, and Works
Title 42-The Public Health and Welfare
Title 43-Public Lands
Title 45-Railroads Title 46-Shipping
Title 47-Telegraphs, Telephones, and Radiotelegraphs
Title 48-Territories and Insular Possessions
Title 49-Transportation
Title 50-War and National Defense
The public laws enacted during the 93d Congress, 2d Session, that is, those from P.L. 93-246 through 93-649, which are not yet in the JURIS system, were then visually scanned to determine those laws and sections thereof related to the referenced subject.









SURVEY AND ANALYSIS
'U'u

This survey and analysis section is based on the 17 accompanying tables which provide descriptions, in tabular form, of R&D programs and activities, plus the related statutory provisions, for each of 48 organizational groupings and for 14 activities related to R&D that apply generally throughout the Government. The first part of this analysis provides an organizational picture of R&D activity. The second part describes those areas wh ch are of special interest to the House Committee on Science and Technology as a result of the newly assigned responsibility for Special Oversight of all Federal, nonmilitary R&D. ORGANIZATIONAL SURVEY

YWe Congress
Two agencies. of the Congress have responsibilities directly related to R&D. These are the Office of Technology Assessment (OTA) and the ConLyressional Research Service (CRS) (see Table 1). The basic f unction of the OTA "shall be to provide early indications of the probable beneficial and adverse impacts of the applications of technology and to develop other coordinate information which may assist the Congress." The duties of CRS include specific responsibilities related to evaluating legislative proposals and the provision of "such other research and analytical services as the committee considers. appropriate . ." (For the full statutory provisions related to the R&D programs or activities of the organizations discussed herein, see the appropriate code or public law sections set forth in Table 1 and subsequent tables, and refer to the appropriate sections of the code or public laws as reproduced in Parts Two and Three.) 7We Judicial Branch
In the Judicial Branch, only one R&D program or activity was discovered in this survey of the U.S. Code and the public laws of the 93d, Congress. This involved research on the U.S. court system conducted by the Federal Judicial Center (Table 1). The Executive Office of the President
0 In the Executive Office of the President, R&D programs or activities, include the use of research by the Council of Economic Advisors; various research activities of the Office of Economic Opportunity;, activities of the Council on Environmental Quality and the Office of Environmental Quality; activities of the Office of Telecommunications Policy and presidential responsibility regarding the communications satellite system; research on drug abuse prevention and troatuiont by the Special Action Office for Druo, Abuse Prevention; and, under P.L. 93-288, authorization for the I Prasident to establish a program of disaster preparedness that uses the services of all appropriate agencies and includes the application of science, research, and technology (Table 1). In the 94th Congress, an Office of Science and Technology Policy was established to provide advice on all matters in this field.
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8

Departments and Agencies
The R&D activities of the Departments of Agriculture (Table 2), Commerce (Table 3), Health, Education, and Welfare (Table 5, health activities; Table 6, education activities; and Table 7, welfare and human development activities), Housing and Urban Development (Table 8), the Interior (Table 9), and Transportation (Table 11) are so numerous and far-ranging that a quick scanning of these tables may be the the most effective way of appreciating the scope of the R&D activities in these departments. As might be expected, the R&D conducted by each of these departments reflects their basic mission; hence one finds numerous types of agricultural R&D in the Department of Agriculture, and so on.
The civil R&D activities of the Department of Defense are conducted by the Army Corps of Engineers and include R&D activities related to coastal engineering, the maintenance of navigable waters, and saline water research (Table 4). Military R&D is not examined in this survey and analysis.
The Departments of Justice, Labor, and State do not appear to be heavily engaged in R&D. However, the Department of Justice uses scientific data relating to drugs and is responsible for research on law enforcement, the problems of juvenile delinquency, and the causes, prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of criminal offenders (Table 10).
The Department of Labor is involved in research on the needs and abilities of older workers, on occupational safety and health, on ways to increase the effectiveness of the Work Incentive Program, on the evaluation of the unemployment compensation system, on the technological aspects of the manpower development and tramimig program, and on manpower to assist the Nation on expanding work opportunities (Table 10).
The Department of State attempts to promote the exchange of research results between East and West. It supports research related to foreign development assistance, political and social obstacles to foreign economic development, population growth, mutual (foreign) educational and cultural exchange programs, as well as agricultural research and training facilities in tropical and subtropical developing countries. A Bureau of Oceans and International Environmental and Scientific Affairs was established in 1973 (Table 10).
Table 12, 13, and 14 detail the R&D activities of the Atomic Energy Commission (which has become a part of the Energy Research and Development Administration), the Environmental Protection Agency, the Federal Aviation Admi'mistration, the Federal Communications Commission, the Federal Energy Administration, the Federal Maritime Commission, the National Academy of Sciences, the National Aeronautical and Space Administration, the National Science Foundation, the Peace Corps tACTION], the Smithsonian Institution, the Veterans Administration and the Community Services Administration. The R&D activities of these agencies are almost wholly related to their specific agency missions, except in the case of the National Science Foundation, le National Academy of Sciences (an autonomous organization, chartered by the Congress), and the Smithsonian Institution where there is a responsibility to promote and/or conduct basic research on a broad scale without reference to any particular development mission.






9

~Coordin ated 3Iultikzgency Activities
A number of the R&D activities conducted by the various departmnents and agencies are conducted in cooperation with one or more
-other agencies. For example, the Department of Agriculture shares its responsibility for cotton research with the Department of Commerce, and the Department of Commerce shares its responsibility for monitoring and research regarding ocean dumping with the U.S. Coast Guard of the Department of Transportation, and so on. This long-established trend of several departments and agencies coordinating various research aspects of a R&D activity has been continued .in legislation of the 93d Congress. The public laws establishing both the Geothermal Energy Coordination and Management Project (P1L. 93-4 10) and the Solar Energy Coordination and Management
-Project (P.L. 93-473) call for interagency cooperation. In the former
-case the mandate is to the Department of the Interior, NASA, AEC .[now ERDA], and NSF, while in the latter NSF, HUD, the Federal Power Commission, NASA, and AEC [now ERDA] are involved. In addition, P.L. 93-409 established that the research, development, .and demonstrations related to uses of solar heating and cooling will be cooperatively conducted by NASA, HUD, NSF, and the National Bureau of Standards of the Department of Commerce (Table 15). Upon establishment of the Energy Research and Development Administration [ERDA], the energy research and development functions of the projects were transferred to that organization. Commissions and other Organizations
Table 16 lists the R&D activities of 24 commissions and other organizations.
General Government
Table 17 provides a listing of statutory provisions that relate to the Government in general. It includes Civil Service provisions affecting .Scientific positions, special rules administered by the Department of State regardig immigrant aliens with scientific training, foreign fishery research in U.S. waters, copyright laws regarding scientific work, importation of injurious animals and birds for scientific purposes, congressional policy on marine resources and engineering development.
AREAS OF INTEREST TO THE HOUSE COMMITTEE ON SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
The areas in which the House Committee on Science and Technology has an interest are: astronautics and space, civil aeronautics, energy R&D (except nuclear), environmental R&D, and scientific R&D. Each of these is discussed in the following paragraphs.
1. Astronautics and Space. -The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (Table 13) has primary Federal responsibility in astronautics and space research. NASA is also charged with research for the communications satellite sys temn (with the President and the Federal Communications Comiss iion).
2. Civil Aerona tics. -The Departmient of Transportation (Table 11) is responsible for R&D on air navigation facilities and for research ,on aviation navigation and traffic control under the Federal Aviation





10

Administration R&D statute (Table 13). The Federal Aviation Ad-ministration (Table 13) is responsible for R&D on aviation na 'v igation and traffic control, research on aircraft noise and sonic boom, and R&D concerning systems, procedures, facilities, and devices to protect, persons and property against piracy.
The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (Table 13) is charged with general aeronautical research and transonic and supersonic wind tunnel research.
3. N~on-nuclear Energy R&D.-The Department of Agriculture and the Department of the Interior were responsible for research on synthetic liquid fuels (Tables 2 and 9). This has been transferred to. ERDA.
The Department of Housing and Ur 'ban Development (Table 8) has the responsibility to conduct demonstrations regarding the economic and technical feasibility of using solar energy for heating and cooling residential housing.
The Department of the Interior (Table 9) is engaged in energy R&D through its Bureau of Mines, Office of Coal Research (now in ERDA) and the Geological Survey. Additionally, the Department is. responsible for national mining and minerals policy, for research on synthetic liquid fuels (with the Department of Agriculture, Table 2) and lignite coal resources, and for surveys of minerals required for, national industry and defense.
The Department of Transportation, while apparently not concerned with R&D relating to energy supply, is concerned with many aspects. of energy demand and use. Hence, Department of Transportation R&D activities such as highway research and planning, high-speed bus transportation, urban mass transportation, high-speed ground transportation, and the design of intermodal form s of transportation could all lead to R&D efforts on energy use (Table 11).
The Federal Energy Administration (Table 13) has responsibility to, assess and analyze the adequacy of U.S. energy resources.
As noted above, three public laws of the 93d Congress (P.L. 93-409, P.L. 93-410, and P1L. 93-473, Table 15) established cooperative R&D programs for solar and greothermal energy involving, in toto, the Dep~artment, of the Interior, NASA, AEC (now ERDA), NSF, HUD, the Federal Power Commission, and the National Bureau of Standards.
The Bonneville Pow-er Administration and the Tennessee Valley Authority (Table 16) are engaged in certain aspects of energy research.
4. Environmental R &D.-The Council on Environmental Qualityand the Office of Environmental Quality in the Executive Office of the President are responsible for the formulation of national policies to promote improvement in the quality of the environment (Table 1). rThe Department of Agriculture and the Department of the Interiorare involved in research on water salinlity under the Colorado River Basin Salinity Control Act (Tables 2 and 9).
The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration of the Department of Commerce is a maj or organization in environment tal R&D (Trable 3). The Department of Commerce (Table 3) is also involved in research on ( and conservation of) marine mammals (with the Department of the Interior, Table 9), and on estuarine research. It is also responsible for monitoring and research on ocean dumping (with the U.S. Coast Guard of the Department of Transportation, Table 11 and the Environmental Protection Agency, Table 12),, and for research on the long-range effects of pollution, on overfishing,.






11

on man-made changes resulting from ocean dumping, and on en,dangered species (,with the Department of the Interior, Table 9).
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Table 4) performs coastal
-engineering research., and maintains research on the control of aquatic plant growths in navigable waters, on debris reservoirs, and on dredged spoil. The Corps cooperates with the Department of the Interior (Table 9) in Saline water research.
In addition to its extensive general health research, the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare was specifically charged by the 93d Congress to study the chronic health effects of emissions of sulfur oxides from burning coal (Table 5). HEW also performs research in the area of environmental education programs (Table 6).
The Department of the Interior (Table 9) has numerous responsibilities in the area of conservation including national parks, endangered species, fisheries and wildlife, fur seal research, research on coastal water pests, estuarine research, wild and scenic rivers research, marine mammals research (with the Department of Commerce', Table 3) water resources research, and research on solid waste disposal (with the Environmental Protection Agency, Table 12).
The Environmental Protection Agency (Table 12) conducts research on water and air pollution and to monitor and conduct research into effects of ocean dumping (with the Department of Commerce, Table 3, and the U.S. Coast Guard of the Department of Transportation, Table 11). It is also responsible for research on solid waste disposal (with the Department of the Interior, Table 9), on environmental pesticide control, and on noise control.
Congressional' policy regarding the environment is set fourth in the National Environmental Policy nAct (Table 17).
5. Scientific R & D.-The National Science Foundation and the Smithsonian Institution are the two Federal agencies most directly charged with non-mission-oriented, or basic, research (Tables 13 and 14).
In addition, mission-oriented agencies also engage in basic scientific research to varying degrees. For example, the U.S. Coast Guard of the Department of Transportation has a duty to engage in oceanography (Table 11).
The Civil Service Commission has responsibility for laws on the Federal employment of persons for scientific positions in the Federal Government (Table 17).
Table 17 presents a number of laws applying generally to scientific R&D in the Federal Government.

TABLE 1

United States Code or Brief description of the R. & D. program or activity
Public Law 93Congres
2 U.S.C. 471-480 -------Office of Technology Assessment.
2 U.S.C. 166 -----------Library of Congress, Congressional Research Service.
Public Law 93-573 ------ Establish, within the Library of Congress, the National Commission on New Technological Uses of Copyrighted Works.






12

TABLE 1-Continued

United States Code or Brief description of the R. & D. program or activity
Public Law 93Judicial Branch
28 U.S.C. 620 and 624--- Federal Judicial Center research on the U.S. court system.
Executive Office of the President
15 U.S.C. 1023 ---------Use of research by the Council of Economic Advisors.
42 U.S C. 4342-4345----- Establish the Council on Environmental Quality. 42 U.S.C. 4372 ---------Establish the Office of Environmental Quality.
5 U.S.C. App. p. 609_____-Reorganization Plan 1, 1970: Establish the Office of Telecommunications Policy. 47 U.S.C. 701-721 ------- Presidential responsibility regarding communications
satellite system.
21 U.S.C. 1101-1134----- Special Action Office for Drug Abuse Prevention: research on drug abuse prevention and treatment. Public Law 93-288 ------[Sec. 201] Authorize the President to establish a program of disaster preparedness that uses the services of all appropriate agencies, and includes the application of science, research, and technology.

TABLE 2

United States Code or Brief description of the R. & D. program or activity
Public Law 93Department of Agriculture

5 U.S.C. App. p. 509_____-Reorganization Plan IV, 1946: USDA toJcontinuesnow surveys and research on weather.
5 U.S.C. App. p. 520_____-Reorganization Plan 1, 1947: Agricultural research.
functions of the USDA.
7 U.S.C. 154-155 -------Importation of nursery stock plants forscientific
purposes.
7 U.S.C. 228 ----------- Authority related to financing research related to
livestock, meat, etc.
7 U.S.C. 281 -----------Importation of honeybees.
7 U.S.C. 304 and 322.... Agricultural colleges.
7 U.S.C. 361 and 390.... Agricultural experiment stations.
7 U.S.C. 393 -----------Bureau of Animal Industry.
7 U.S.C. 423-424------- Cotton research [with the Department of Commerce].
7 U.S.C. 427 and 4271 --- Declaration of Congressional policy on agricultural research.
7 U.S.C. 439 -----------Operation of Government-owned alcohol plants for
research.
7 U.S.C. 450 -----------Cooperative research projects with States, etc.
7 U.S.C. 602 ----------Production and marketing research projects relating
to fruits, vegetables, and nuts.
7 U.S.C. 1160 ---------- Research related to the purposes of the Sugar Act of
1948.
7 U.S.C. 1292 ----------Research into farm commodities, products, and byproducts.
7 U.S.C. 1606 ----------Research on seeds.
7 U.S.C. 1621-1629------ Research on the marketing, transportation, and distribution of agricultural products.
7 U.S.C. 1704 ----------Foreign currencies received from the sale of agricultural products may be used for agricultural research.
7 U.S.C. 1736 ----------Research on tropical agriculture.
7 U.S.C. 1904 ----------Research on the humane slaughter of livestock.






13

TA~uz 2-Continued

United States Code or Brief description of the R. & D. program or activity
Public Law 93Departmrent of Agriculture-Continued
7 u.s.c. 2101-2119 ------ Research on cotton markets.
7 u.s.c. 2131-2155 ------ Transportation of animals for research and the humane treatment of research animals.
7 U.S.C. 2204----------- General duties of the Secretary of Agriculture regarding research on agricultural and rural development.
7 u.s.c. 2329----------- Register of protected plant varieties.
7 U.S.C. 2611-2618------ Congressional policy on potato research and the role of the Department of Agriculture.
7 u.s.C. 2661-266.5------ Rural development and small farm research and
education.
15 U.S.C. 713C ---------- Transfer of funds from the USDA to the Department
of the Interior for fishery R.&D. 15 U.S.C. 714B--------- Research by the Commodity Credit Corporation
[USDA] on the conservation or disposal of commodities.
16 u.s.C. 560A--------- Use of imported twine for research.
16 U.S.C. 581----------- Research on tree diseases, insects, epidemics.
16 U.S.C. 582A--------- Congressional findings on forestry research.
16 U.S.C. 582A-6 ------- Forestry research.
16 U.S.C. 590----------- Soil erosion research.
16 U.S.C. 1131-1133 ----- National Wilderness Preservation System research [with the Department of the Interior]. 16 U.S.C. 1281 ---------Wild and Scenic Rivers research [with the Department of the Interior].
20 U.S.C. 191 and 193----~ Establish the National Arboretum for research on tree and plant life.
21 U.s.C. 1 13A--------- Establish research laboratories for foot and mouth
and other animal diseases. 21 U.S.C. 114C--------- Cooperation with Western Hemisphere countries
regarding animal disease control. 21 U.S.C. 114E--------- Research on the control and eradication of cattle
grubs.
21 U.S.C. 11411--------- Hog cholera eradication program.
21 U.S.C. 452----------- Use of scientific evidence regarding poultry product
inspection.
30 U.S.C. 321 and 322---~ Research on synthetic liquid fuels [with the Department of the Interior].
35 U.S.C. 164 ----------The Secretary of Agriculture shall conduct research
for the Patent Office if required re plant patents. 40 U.S.C. App. sec. 204- Research on timber development in the Appalachian Region.
42 U.S.C. 1476 and 1483-. Research on adequate farm dwellings and other buildings.
42 U.S.C. 1771 ---------Nutritional research on child nutrition under the
national school lunch program. 48 U.S.G. 1409 M and Q_. Establish agricultural research and extension service in the Virgin Islands.
50 U.S.C. 98F----------Survey mineral and food materials required for national industry and defense [with the Department of the Interior].
Public Law 93-86_______-[Sec. 8091 Research on livestock injury and disease.
[Sec. 8101 Research on wheat and feed grains. Public Law 93-320 ------ [Sec. 2031 Research on salinity under the Colorado River Basin Salinity Control Act [with Department of the Interior].
Public Law 93-428______-Research on egg and egg product production and marketing.
Public Law 93-535 ------ Establish the Cascade Head Scenic-Research Area to encourage the study,. of significant natural areas for research and scientific purposes.






14

TABLE 3

United States Code or Brief description of the R. & D. program or Mtivity
Public Law 93Department of Commerce
5 U.S.C. App. p. 576_____-Reorganization Plan 2, 1965: Establish Environmental Science Services Administration (ESSA); functions subsequently transferred to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). See 5 U.S.C. App. p. 614, below.
5 U.S.C. App. p. 614_____ Reorganization Plan 4, 1970: Establish the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). 7 U.S.C. 423-424------- Cotton research [with the Department of Agriculture].
15 U.S.C. 272 ---------Functions of the Secretary of Commerce regarding
the National Bureau of Standards (NBS). 15 U.S.C. 273-282 ------Functions of NBS; fire research and safety program, and the national hydraulic laboratory. 15 U.S.C. 290 ----------Standard Reference Data Program.
15 U.S.C. 503 ----------Textile research by the Textile Foundation.
15 U.S. 636-639 --------R. & D. related to the Small Business Administration.
15 U.S.C. 1151-1155 ----- Dissemination of R. & D. information by the Departwe ment of Commerce.
15 U.S.C. 1193 and 1201-- Scientific information and research regarding flammability standards.
15 U.S.C. 1351-1361----- State Technical Services and the diffusion and more effective application of science and technology. 15 U.S.C. 1517 ---------Transfer of scientific work to the Department of
Commerce from other departments. 15 U.S.C. 1525 ---------Contracts for research with the Department of
Commerce.
16 U.S.C. 1361-1381----- Research on and conservation of marine mammals [with the Department of the Interior]. 16 U.S.C. 1453 ---------Estuarine research.
33 U.S.C. 883 A and D .... Coast and Geodetic Survey to provide charts for scientific purposes through research. 33 U.S.C. 1121 and 1123-- Sea Grant College program. 33 U.S.C. 1441 ---------Monitoring and research regarding ocean dumping
[with Department of Transportation (U.S. Coast Guard) and the Environmental Protection Agency]. 33 U.S.C. 1442 ---------Research on the long-range effects of pollution, overfishing, and man-made changes of ocean dumping. 33 U.S.C. 1443 ---------Cooperation in research on ocean dumping.
35 U.S.C. Regulations.... U.S. patent policy on research. 40 U.S.C. 759 ----------Research on the science and technology of automated
data processing computer and related systems to assist the General Services Administration in the purchase, lease, and maintenance of such equipment. 42 U.S.C. 3151 ---------Research on economic depression.
42 U.S.C. 3183 and 3185. Research on regional economic development. 49 U.S.C. 1463 ---------Weather Bureau research on meteorology, specifically
regarding safety and efficiency in air navigation. Public Law 93-205. Research on endangered species [with the Department of the Interior].
Public'Law 93-498 ------ Establish the National Academy for Fire Prevention, the National Fire Prevention and Control Administration, and for R&D on fire prevention and control, the Fire Research Center [with HEW].







15

TABLE 4

United States Code or Brief description of the R. & D. program or activity
Public Law 93Department of Defense-Civil Functions
33 U.S.C. 426 ----------Establish the Corps of Engineers coastal engineering
research center.
33 U.S.C. 610 ----------Corps of Engineers research on control of aquaticplant growths on navigable waters. 33 U.S.C. 665 ----------Corps of Engineers research on debris reservoirs.
33 U.S.C. 1165A --------Corps of Engineers research on dredged spil.
42 U.S.C. 1959D --------Cooperation with the Department of the Interior and
other agencies regarding saline water research.


TABLE 5

United States Code or Brief description of the R. & D. program or activity
Public Law 93Department of Health, Education, and Welfare-Health
5 U.S.C. App. p. 548_____-Reorganization Plan 1, 1953: Establish the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare.
5 U.S.C. App. p. 584_____-Reorganization Plan 3, 1966: Transfer the Public Health Service to HEW.
15 U.S.C. 1472 ---------Standards regarding safe household packages for
children.
21 U.S.C. 348-377 ------- Scientific data regarding the evaluation of drugs;
and the use of drugs for research.
21 U.S.C. 1172-1177----- Research related to drug abuse prevention. 21 U.S.C. 1191 ---------Establish the National Institute on Drug Abuse.
22 U.S.C. 2101-2103----- International cooperation in health and medical research.
29 U.S.C. 669 ---------- Research on occupational safety and health [with
the Department of Labor].
29 U.S.C. 671 ---------- Establish the National Institute for Occupational
Safety and Health.
29 U.S.C. 673 and 675--- Research on occupational safety and health [with the Department of Labor].
30 U.S.C. 937 ---------- Research on coal mine health and safety within
HEW's National Institute of Occupational Health and Safety.
30 U.S.C. 951-958 ------- Research on coal mine health and safety [with the
Department of the Interior].
40 U.S.C. App. sec. 202-- Research on the occupational diseases of the Appalachian Region.
42 U.S.C. 210-227A_____-Administration of research in the Public Health Service.
Public Law 93-154 ------[Sees. 1205, 1207, 1209b] Research on emergency medical techniques, methods, devices, and delivery. 42 U.S.C. 241-289G_____-Public Health Service research and investigations generally42 U.S.C. 242 ----------- On narcotics and drugs;
42 U.S.C. 242A ---------- On mental health;
42 U.S.C. 242B--------- -On health facilities and services;
42 U.S.C. 242C------------On uniform information and statistics;
42 U.S.C. 242F---------- On international cooperation in health research.
4 U.S.C. 247C --------- Research on veneral disease prevention and control.
U.S.C. 263_263L ----- Research on electronic product radiation control. 42 U.S.C. 275-279-- -----Establish the National Library of Medicine.
42 U.S.C. 280B-280B-9_- Promote medical research through assistance to medical libraries and library science. 42 U.S.C. 282-286F ----- National Cancer Institute and cancer research.






16

TABLE 5-Continued

United States Code or Brief description of the R. & D. program or activity
Public Law 93Department of Health, Education, and Welfare-health-Continued
42 U.S.C. 287A-287H.... National Heart and Lung Institute and research on heart, blood vessel, lung, and blood diseases. 42 U.S.C. 288-288C -----National Institute of Dental Research. 42 U.S.C. 289A-289C-l- Establish the institutes for reseach on arthritis, rheumatism, digestive diseases, and metabolism, and on neurological diseases and blindness, and authority to establish other institutes for research on other particular diseases.
42 U.S.C. 289D ---------Establish an institute for research on child health and
human disease.
42 U.S.C. 289E--------- Establish an institute for research on general medical
sciences.
42 U.S.C. 289F--------- Establish health research advisory councils or
committees.
42 U.S.C. 289I--------- Establish the National Eye Institute.
42 U.S.C. 291 ----------Research on the use of hospital, clinic, or similar
services facilities, and resources.
42 U.S.C. 292-292J ------ Construction of health research facilities.
42 U.S.C. 293-293E_____-Construction of teaching facilities for medical, dental, and other health personnel.
42 U.S.C. 294 and 294A-- Loans for students in health sciences. 42 U.S.C. 295-295D---- Construction of mental retardation research facilities. 42 U.S.C. 295E-4----- 'Research on computer technology health care. 42 U.S.C. 295F and F-l__ Training of health professions personnel. 42 U.S.C. 295F-2------ Special projects in health sciences.
42 U.S.C. 295H-4------ Training in allied health professions.
42 U.S.C. 296D ---------Research related to education in nursing.
42 U.S.C. 299-299J ------Education, research, training, and demonstrations in heart disease, cancer, stroke, and related disease. 42 U.S.C. 300A--------- Research on family planning and population.
42 U.S.C. 300B-1------ Research on sickle cell anemia.
42 U.S.C. 300C ---------Research on Cooley's anemia.
Public Law 93-222 ------Research on quality assurance programs related to Health Maintenance Organizations. 42 U.S.C. 710 ----------Research related to dental health of children.
42 U.S.C. 712 ----------Research related to maternal and child health services
and crippled children's services.
42 U.S.C. 2661 ---------Research on persons with developmental difficulties.
42 U.S.C. 2688E-------- Research on alcoholism.
42 U.S.C. 2688Q-------- Permission of alcoholics, drug addicts, etc. to be
subjects of research.
42 U.S.C. 3505A-C ------ Population and family planning research.
42 U.S.C. 4551 and 4582- Research on alcoholism and alcohol abuse. 42 U.S.C. 4821 ---------Research on lead-based paint poisoning [with the
Department of Housing and Urban Development]. Public Law 93-151 ------[See. 301] Research on lead-based paint poisoning [with HUD].
Public Law 93-247- ----Research on child abuse and neglect, and the prevention, identification, and treatment thereof. Public Law 93-270 ------Research on the sudden infant death syndrome. Public Law 93-282 ------[Sec. 201] Establish the Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Mental Health Administration.
Public Law 93-296 ------ [See. 3] Establish the National Institute on Aging to conduct research on the process and diseases of the aged.
Public Law 93-319 ------[Sec. 7] Study of the chronic health effects of emissions of sulfur oxides due to energy conversions to burning coal.






17

Thru 5-Continued

United States Code or Brief description of the R. & D. program or activity
Public Law 98Department of Health, Education, and Welfare-Health-Continued
Public Law 93-348 ------Establish a program of awards to assure the continued excellence of biomedical and behavioral research; protect human subjects involved in medical research.
Public Law 93-353 ------Health services research [see 42 U.S.C. 241 and 242].
Public Law 93-354_ -----Establish a National Commission on Diabetes and conduct research on diabetes mellitus. Public Law 93-498 ------Research on burns, treatment of burn injuries, and rehabilitation of victims of fires [with the Department of Commerce].
Public Law 93-640 ------Research on arthritis. Public Law 93-641 ------National health planning and resources development.

TABLE 6

United States Code or Brief description of the R. & D. program or activity
Public Law 93Dep rtment of Health, Education, and Welfare--Education
20 U.S.C. 331-332 -------Educational research and research training.
20 U.S.C. 401 -----------Congressional policy regarding the National Defense
Education Program20 U.S.C. 465 ------------ Financial assistance for education;
20 U.S.C. 511 and 512-_- Language research;
20 U.S.C. 541-562 -------- Research and experimentation on telecommunications and related media, for educational purposes.
20 U.S.C. 731 and 751 --. Construction of higher education facilities needed for increasing the supply of research personnel. 20 U.S. C. 843 ----------Grants for educational materials, facilities, and
services relating to scientific and research activities20 U.S.C. 863-866B ----- Grants to strengthen State and local educational
agencies through educational research; 20 U.S.C. 880B-2 -------- Grants for research on bilingual educational
programs;
20 U.S.C. 887A ---------- Grants for research and demonstration projects
regarding school nutrition and health services; 20 U.S.C. 887B--------- Grants for research and demonstration projects
regarding the education of antisocial, aggressive, or delinquent persons;
20 U.S.C. 887D ---------- Grants for research and demonstration projects
regarding consumer education. 20 U.S.C. 900A-3----_ Ethnic Heritage Program research. 20 U.S.C. 1002 and 1005A_ Educational research to assist in the solution of rural, urban, and suburban problems. 20 U.S.C. 1021-1034----- College library and information sciences. 20 U.S.C. 1052-1056----- Assistance to colleges providing scientific and technical training.
20 U.S.C. 1087 ---------Cooperative education programs.
20 U.S.C. 1091 ---------Education professions development.
20 U.S.C. 1111-1132----- Assistance to teachers, including scientific fields. 20 U.S.C. 1134 ----------Education for the public service.
20 U.S.C. 1135 --------- Improvement of graduate programs.
20 U.S.C. 1171-1176----- International studies and research. 20 U.S.C. 1205 and 1211A_ Basic education for adults. 20 U.S.C. 1205 ---------Research for post-secondary education.
20 U.S.C. 1221E-------- Scientific and research aspects of the Nattonal
Institute of Education.






18

TABLE 6-Continued

United States Code or Brief description of the R. & D. program or activity
Public Law 93Department of Htealth, Education, and Welfare-Edu tion-(ontinued
20 U.S.C. 1281 and 1282- Research and training in vocational education. 20 U.S. C. 1341 ---------Research related to consumer and homemaking
education.
20 U.S.C. 1401-1461----- Research related to education for the handicapped. 20 U.S.C. 1532 ---------Research regarding environmental education programs.
20 U.S.C. 1610 ---------Use of television techniques of research and production for educational television. 21 U.S.C. 1002 ---------Research to support drug abuse educational programs.
Public Law 93-380____ [Sec. 1051 Research in the field of bilingual education.
[Sec. 408] R&D on women's educational equity. [See. 825] Research on crime in elementary and secondary schools.

TABLE 7

United States Code or Brief description of the R. & D. program or activity
Public Law 93Department of Health, Education, and Welfare-Welfare and Human Development
29 U.S.C. 31-37 -------- Research on vocational rehabilitation.
29 U.S.C. 42A ----------Research by the National Center for Deaf-Blind'
Youths and Adults.
42 U.S.C. 626 ---------- Research, training, and demonstration projects
related to child welfare.
42 U.S.C. 1310 --------- Research on (1) the prevention and reduction of
dependency and (2) welfare planning, etc. 42 U.S.C. 3001-3052----- Research on the elderly. Public Law 93-29 -------Research on aging. 42 U.S.C. 3873-3890----- Research on juvenile delinquency prevention and control.
Public Law 93-112 [Sees. 2, 3, 103, 130, 200, 202, 304, 305, 400, 401, 405]'
Research on vocational rehabilitation. Public Law 93-516 ------ Extends authorization of appropriations for vocational rehabilitation research and training. Public Law 93-644 -----Head Start, Economic Opportunity, and Community Partnership Act of 1974.
[Sec. 102] Research on the development of new approaches in overcoming the special problems of low-income persons in becoming fully self-suffieient. [Sec. 402] Drug rehabilitation and alcoholic programs for poor persons.
[See. 522] Research and demonstrations regarding the Headstart programs.
[See. 553] Research and demonstrations regarding the Follow Through programs. [Sec. 805] Research and demonstrations regarding the Native American programs. [See Community Service Administration.]






19

TABLE 8

United States Code or Brief description of the R. & D. program or activity
Public Law 93Department of Housing and Urban Development
12 U.S.C. 1701 ---------Research and technology in housing
12 U.S.C. 1715X --------Advanced housing technology.
20 U.S.C. 801 and 803 --- Research in methods of dealing with community development problems.
40 U.S.C. 461 ----------Research related to comprehensive planning regarding
large area urban and rural development. 42 U.S.C. 3901 ---------Housing and community development technology and
planning.
42 U.S.C. 4511-4523----- Promote the use of new technology in new community development.
42 U.S.C. 4821 ----------Research on lead-based paint poisoning [with HEW].
Public Law 93-151 ------[Sec. 301] Research on lead-based paint poisoning [with HEW].
Public Law 93-383______-[See. 506] R. & D. on farm housing and other dwellings.
[Sec. 608] R. & D. on mobile home construction and safety standards.
[Sec. 809] Establish the non-government National Institute of Building Sciences. [Sec. 814] Demonstrations regarding economic and technical feasibility of using solar energy for heating and cooling residential housing. [Sec. 815] Research and demonstrations to determine housing design, structure, etc. related to the needs of special groups like the elderly and handicapped.


TABLE 9

United States Code or Brief description of the R. & D. program or activity
Public Law 93Department of the Interior
15 U.S.C. 712C ---------Transfer of funds from the USDA to the Dept. of the
Interior for fishery R. & D. 16 U.S.C. 17J2-469H ..- Scientific and other features of National Parks and conservation.
16 U.S.C. 668A-709- --- Research on the conservation of endangered species [Sec. 668aa-668cc-6 is repealed by Public Law 93-205].
Public Law 93-205 Research regarding endangered species [with the Department of Commerce].
16 U.S.C. 742-772 ------- Research on fisheries and wildlife.
16 U.S.C. 1051-1052----- National Fisheries Center and Aquarium research. 16 U.S.C. 1131-1133----- National Wilderness Preservation System research [with the Department of Agriculture]. 16 U.S.C. 1153 and 1185-- Fur seal research. 16 U.S.C. 1201-1205----- Research on coastal water pests. 16 U.S.C. 1212 --------- Investigation of starfish [with the Smithsonian Institution].
16 U.S.C. 1225 ---------Estuarine research.
16 U.S.C. 1281 ---------Wild and Scenic Rivers research [with the Department
of Agriculture].
16 U.S.C. 1333 ---------Scientific recommendations regarding wild horses and
burros.
16 U.S.C. 1361-1381----- Research on and conservation of marine mammals [with the Department of Commerce].






20

TAi 9-Continued

United States Code or Brief description of the R. & D. program or activity
Public Law 98Department of the Interior-Continued
30 U.s.c. 1-16 ---------- Research facilities of the Bureau of Mines, especially
a laboratory for anthracite coal. 30 U.S.C. 21A ---------- National mining and minerals policy, including research.
30 U.S.C. 321 ----------- Research on synthetic liquid fuels [with the Department of Agriculture].
30 U.S.C. 322 ----------- Research on synthetic liquid fuels.
30 U.S. C. 401 and 402 -.- Research on lignite coal resources. 30 U.S.C. 411 ----------- Research on rare and precious metals.
30 U.S.C. 553 ----------- Research on coal mine fires.
30 U.S.C. 661-667 ------- Establish the Office of Coal Research.
30 U.S.C. 801-861 ------- R. & D. programs regarding coal mine health and.
safety.
30 U.S.C. 951-958 ------- Research on coal mine health and safety [with HEW].
42 U.S.C. 1900 and Authority for the Department of the Interior to enter1900B. into contracts for scientific and technological research.
42 U.S.C. 1959-1959C---...- Saline water research.
42 U.S.C. 1959D -------- Cooperation with the Department of Defense and,
other agencies regarding saline water research. 42 IJ.S.C. 1959F-H ------ Saline water research.
42 U.S.C. 1961 ---------- Water resources research program.
42 U.S.C. 1961 A--------- Establish State water resources research institutes.
42 U.S.C. 1961-1l-C-5- Water resources research projects. 42 U.S.C. 3251 and 3253- Research on solid waste disposal [with the Environmental Protection Agency]. 43 U.S.C. 34-42 --------- Establish the Geological Survey.
50 U.S.C. 98F ----------- Surveys of mineral and food materials required for
national industry and defense [with the USDA]. 50 U.S.C. 167A-D ------- Research on helium.
Public Law 93-320----[Sec. 203] Research on salinity under the Colorado River Basin Salinity Control Act [with the USDA]..


TABLE 10

United States Code or Brief description of the R. & D. program or activity
Public Law 93Department of Justice

21 U.S.C. 802-954 ------- Scientific data regarding drugs; and the use of drugs,
for research.
42 U.S.C. 3701-3741----- Research on law enforcement. Public Law 93-83-----Research regarding law enforcement under the Law Enforcement Assistance Administration. 42 U.S.C. 3742 and 3746-. Establish the National Institute of Law Enforcement and Criminal Justice to, among other things,. conduct research.
Public Law 93-415 -------[Sec. 243] Establish the National Institute for JuvenileJustice and Delinquency Prevention for research on the problems of juvenile delinquency. [Sec. 521] Establish the National Institute of Corrections to conduct research on corrections, including causes, prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of criminal offenders.






21

TABLE 10-Continued

United States Code or Brief description of the R. & D. program or activity
Public Law 93Department of Labor

29 U.S.C. 622 ----------Research on the needs and abilities of older workers.
29 U.S.C. 651 and 655_ - Research on occupational safety and health. 29 U.S.C. 669 ---------- Research on occupational safety and health [with
HEW].
29 U.S.C. 673 and 675_ -- Research on occupational safety and health [with HEW].
42 U.S.C. 641 ----------Research on ways to increase the effectiveness of the
Work Incentive Program of the Dept. of Labor. 42 U.S.C. 1106 --------- Research to evaluate the unemployment compensation system.
42 U.S.C. 2571-2623 ----- Research on the technological aspects of manpower development and training program. Public Law 93-203 ------ [Sec. 311, 413b, 503] Research on manpower to assist the Nation on expanding work opportunities [with the National Commission on Manpower Policies].

Department of State

22 U.S.C. 2054 ----------Center for cultural and technical interchange and
research between the East and West. 22 U.S.C. 2167-2180----- Research in foreign development assistance, including library and hospital centers, fish research, desalting plants, telecommunications, etc. 22 U.S.C. 2201 ---------- Foreign economic development research.
22 U.S.C. 2218 ---------Research related to political and social obstacles
to foreign economic development. 22 U.S.C. 2219 ---------Population growth research.
22 U.S.C. 2271 ---------Agricultural research and training facilities in tropical
and subtropical developing countries. 22 U.S.C. 2452-2456----- Science and research regarding mutual (foreign) educational and cultural exchange program. 22 U.S.C. 2655a --------Bureau of Oceans and International Environmental
and Scientific Affairs.

TABLE 11

United States Code or Brief description of the R. & D. program or activity
Public Law 93Department of Transportation

5 U.S.C. App. p. 601_____-Reorganization Plan 2, 1968: Establish the Urban Mass Transportation Administration in DOT. 14 U.S.C. 2, 94, 184, 471 Duty of the U.S. Coast Guard to engage in oceanography; science degrees for the U.S. Coast Guard. 15 U.S.C. 1381 ---------Congressional policy regarding motor vehicle safety
standards.
15 U.S.C. 1392-1431----- R. & 1). regarding motor vehicle safety standards.
15 U.S.C. 1914 --------- Research on motor vehicle bumper standards.
15 U.S.C. 1942 --------- Contract for an Automobile Consumer Information
Study.
23 U.S.C. 101 and 104... Research regarding the Federal-Aid Highway System. 23 U.S.C. 215 ---------- Research regarding the territorial highway development program.
23 U.S.C. 307 ----------General authority for highway research and planning.
23 U.S.C. 322 ---------- Research on ground-level rail-highway crossings.
23 U.S.C. 402-404 ------- Highway safety R. & D.






22

TABLE 11--Continued

TITnited7States Code or Brief description of the R. & D. program or activity
Public Law 93Department of Transportation-Continued
Public Law 93-87 -----[Sec. 1461 Research on high-speed bus transportation.
[Secs. 151 and 206] General authority for highway research and planning.
[Secs. 208,' 220,' 222,' 226, 231] Highway safety R. &D
-33 U.S.C. 1441 ---------- U.S. Coast Guard monitoring and research regarding
ocean dumping [with the Department of Commerce and EPA].
40 U.S.C. App. 40, sec. Research on the Appalachia development highway
201. system.
45 U.S.C. 43 1-440 ------- Research on railroad safety.
45 U.S.C. 545-621 1------- National Railroad Passenger Corporation research
regarding rail passenger service. Public Law 93-146- -- -- --[Sec. 6] Research on rail passenger service. 46 U.S. C. 1455 and 1464 - Research on boating safety. 49 U.S.C. 1303 ---------- R. & D. on air navigation facilities.
49 U.S.C. 1605-1612 ----- R. & D. on urban mass transportation.
49 U.S.C. 1631-1640 ----- R. & D. on high-speed ground transportation.
49 U.S.C. 1651-1657 ----- Establish the Department of Transportation. 49 U.S.C. 1681-1683----- Research on natural gas pipeline safety. 49 U.S.C. 1712-1742----- Research on aviation navigation and traffic control under 49 U.S.C. 1353 [FAA R. & D. statute]. Public Law 93-496 -------[Sec. 17] Study of integrating rail passenger service with other modes of transportation, including busses, with particular attention to the transportation needs of rural areas.
Public Law 93-503- -- ---[Title 11] R. & D. and demonstrations on fare-free urban mass transportation systems. Public Law 93-633- -- ---Transportation safety R. & D.
[Sec. 109] Research, development, demonstration, and training activities 'on the transportation of hazardous materials.
[Sec. 203] Research on railroad safety. [Secs. 302 and 304] Establish the National Transportation Safety Board as an independent agency to, among other things, conduct special studies on safety in transportation.


TABLE 12

United States Code or Brief description of the R. & D. program or activity
Public Law 93Atomic Energy Commission (ABEC) and Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA)
42 U.S.C. 2013-2037 ----- Development and control of atomic energy42 U.S.C. 2051-2053--------Research by the AEC.
42 U.S.C. 2061-2296----- Development and -control of atomic energy.
Public Law 93-43 8----Establish the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.
Public Law 93-577_______-Establish, within ERDA, a comprehensive R. & D.
program on all potentially beneficial energy resources and utilization technologies.






23

T~rnz 12-Continued

United States Code or Brief description of the R. & D. program or activity
Public Lew 93Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)
5 U.S. C. App. p. 582---Reorganization Plan 2, 1966: Reorganization of water pollution control functions. Functions subsequently transferred to EPA. [See 5 U.S.C. App. p. 609, below.]
5 U.-S.C. App. p. 609_____-Reorganization Plan 3, 1970: Establish the Environmental Protection Agency.
7 U.S.C. 136 -----------Environmental pesticide control.
21 U.S.C. 346A --------- Use of scientific data to determine tolerances for pesticide chemicals in agricultural commodities. 33 U.S.C. 1151-1156----Research on pollution control in navigable waters. 33 U.S.C. 1166-1168-----Research on training students regarding water quality control.
33 U.S.C. 1251-1375 ----- Research on water pollution prevention and control. 33 U.S.C. 1441 ---------Monitoring and research regarding ocean dumping
[with the Department of Commerce and DOT (U.S. Coast Guard)].
42 U.S.C. 1857B-----R. &. D. on pollution control42 U.S.C. 1857B-1 ---------On fuels and vehicles;
42 U.S.C. 1857C-2-E -- On air quality, generally;
42 U.S.C. 1857F-1-F-6E-. On emission standards for moving sources; 41 U.S.C. 1857F-9 ---------On aircraft;
42 U.S.C. 1857H-5 and General provisions;
J-2
42 U.S.C. 1858 ------------On noise pollution.
42 U.S.C. 3251 and 3253-. Research on solid waste disposal [with the Department of the Interior].
42 U. S.C. 4901-4917- - --Research on noise control. Public Law 93-523 -- ---Safe drinking water research.
[Sec. 1412(e) (1)] EPA to contract with the National Academy of Sciences to study water contaminant levels.
[Sec. 14421 EPA may conduct research, studies, and demonstrations on the causes, diagnoses, treatment, control, and prevention of physical and mental disease resulting from water contaminants. [Sec. 1444] EPA may make grants for special studies related to providing safe drinking water.

TABLE 13

United States Code or Brief description of the R. & D. program or activity
Public Law 96Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)
49 U.S.C. 1343 and 1353-. R. & D. on aviation navigation and traffic control. 49 U.S C. 1431---------- Research on aircraft noise and sonic boom.
Public Law 93-366----[Sec. 316] R. & D. on systems, procedures, facilities, and devices to protect persons and property against aircraft piracy.
Federal Communications Commission (FCC)
47 U.S.C. 154 and 215..--. Research on telecommunications. 47 U.S.C. 701-721 ------- Research regarding the communications satellite system [with the President and NASA).
Federal Energy Administration (FEA)
Public Law 93-275 ------ Establish the FEA to, among other things, assess and analyze the adequacy of U.S. energy resources. 61-914 0-76---8








TABLE 13-Continued

United States Code or Brief description of the R. & D. program or activity
Public Law 93Federal Maritime Commission
46 U.S.C. 1122 ---------Research on the technological aspects of maritime
cargo carriage.
National Academy of Sciences

36 U.S.C. 251-254 ------- Establish the National Academy of Sciences (grants
congressional charter).
National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)
42 U.S.C. 2451 ---------Congressional policy regarding aeronautical and space
research.
42 U.S.C. 245 1-2473 ----- National Space Program. 47 U.S.C. 701-721 ------- Research regarding the communications satellite System [with the President and the FCC]. 50 U.S.C. 511 and 512..--- Transonic and supersonic wind tunnel research.
National Science Foundation (NSF)
5 U.S.C. App. p. 572 ----- Reorganization Plan 2, 1962: Established the Office of Science and Technology in the Executive Office of the President (later abolished) and reorganized NSF.
5 U.S.C. App. p. 580---- -Reorganization Plan 5, 1965: Reorganize the National Science Foundation.
42 U.S. C. 1861-1882- --Establish the National Science Foundation.

TABLE 14

United States Code or Brief description of the R. & D. program or activity
Public Law 93Peace Corps [ACTION]
22 U.S.C. 2502 and 2514.- Research under the Peace Corps Program.

Smithsonian Institution
16 U.S.C. 1212 ---------Investigation of starfish [with the Department of the
Interior].
20 U.S.C. 50------------ Collection of research specimens belonging to the
United States.
20 U.S.C. 65A-85 ------- Scientific investigations. J
Veterans Administration
38 U.S.C. 216 ----------Research in the field of prosthesis, etc.
38 U.S.C. 632----------- Medical research in the hospital for Philippine Army
veterans.
38 U.S.C. 4101-4114----- Medical research functions of the Department of Medicine and Surgery.
Public Law 93-82- -----Research on sickle cell anemia and me dic al research functions of the Department of Medicine and Surgery.
38 U.S.C. 505 1-5055 ----- Research via shared medical facilities, equipment, and I information.
Public Law 93-538 ------[Sec. 1904] Special emphasis put on prosthetic and orthopedic appliance R. & D. on adaptive automobile equipment and adapted conveyances for disabled veterans.






25

TABLE 14--Continued

'United States Code or Brief description of the R. & D. program or activity
Public Law 93Community Services Administration
Public Law 93-644------- [Sec. 601] Establish the Community Services Administration (currently an independent agency which may become part of HEW under a reorganization plan) to be the successor to the activities of the Office of Economic Opportunity (OEO). [Sec. 746] Evaluation and research on community economic development.
42 U.S.C. 2809 and 2825-. OEO research on special OEO programs. 42 U.S.C. 2833 ---------OEO research on rural poverty.
42 U.S.C. 2977 ---------OEO research on the improvement of OEO information systems.
42 U.S.C. 2984B-------- OEO research on community economic development.

TABLE 15

United States Code or Brief description of the R. & D. program or activity
Public Law 93Coordinated Multiagency Activities
Public Law 93-409----NASA,' HUD, NSF,' Department of CommerceNBS: Research, development, and demonstrations on solar heating and cooling uses. Public Law 93-410 ------ Department of the Interior, NASA, AEC [ERDA], NSF: Establish the Geothermal Energy Coordination and Management Project.' Public Law 93-473 ------ NSF, HUD, Federal Power Commission, NASA, AEC [ERDA]: Establish the Solar Energy Coordination and Management Project;'I and establish the Solar Energy Research Institute to perform R. & D .'

TABLE 16

United States Code or Brief description of the R. & D. program or activity
Public Law 93Other Organizations
40 U.S.C. App. 40, secs. Appalachian Regional Commission: Research on the
102,)302. resources and economic development of the region.
22 U.S.C. 2551-2589----- Arms Control and Disarmament Agency: Research related to arms control and disarmament. Public Law 93-454 ------ Bonneville Power Administration: [Sec. 11] Electrical research.
47 U.S.C. 735 ----------Communications Satellite Corporation (Comsat):
Establish Comsat.
15 U.S.C. 2051 ---------- Congressional policy regarding product-related deaths,
etc.
15 U.S.C. 2053---------- Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC):
Establish the CPSC.
15 U.S.C. 2054-2081 ----- Product safety information and research. 47 U.S.C. 396----------- Corporation for Public Broadcasting: Research on
noncommercial educational television or radio broadcasting.
16 U.S.C. 939----------- Great Lakes Fishery Commission: Research.
I The energy research and development functions were transferred to the Energy Research and Development Administration [E RDA) upon its establishment.





C2

TAIRn- 16-Continued

United States Code or Brief description. of the R. & D. Program or activity
Public Law 93Other Organizations-Continued
16 U.S.C. 987 ----------International Commission on Northwest Atlantic
Fisheries: Research.
16 U.S.C. 1026-1032 ----- International North Pacific Fisheries Commission: Research.
16 U.S.C. 916----------- International Whaling Commission: Regulation of
whaling.
22 U.S.C. 2281 ---------Joint Commissions on (Foreign) Rural Development:
Research on foreign rural development. 16 U.S.C. 1401-1407 ----- Marine Mammal Commission: Research on the conservation of marine mammals. Public Law 93-495 ------ National Commission on Electronic Fund Transfers: Study the development of public or private electronic fund transfer systems. 20 U.S.C. 1502-1505 ----- National Commission on Libraries and Information Sciences (NCLIS): Establish the NCLIS. 15 U.S.C. 1026---------- National Commission on Productivity and Work
Quality: Congressional policy on research,, development, and advanced technology regarding national productivity.
Public Law 93-311----Research to help increase the productivity of the American economy and improve the morale and quality of work of the American worker. 45 U.S.C. 362----------- Railroad Retirement Board: Research on railroad
accidents and disabilities.
42 U.S.C. 2946---------- Small Business Administration: Research regarding
small business in poor urban areas. 16 U.S. C. 831 F, It R_. Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA): Research regarding electric power for agricultural, domestic, and local industry use.
16 U.S.C. 951-961 ------Tuna Commissions: Research.
Public Law 93-236 ------ U.S. Railway Association: Research regarding regional rail reorganization.
48 U.S.C. 1407 B and C__ Virgin Island Corporation: Research regarding the marketing, distribution, and exportation of products and resources of the Virgin Islands.








TABLE 17

United States Code or Brief description of the R. & D. program or activity
Public Law 93General Government
5 U.S. C. 3104----------- Civil Service employment of specially qualified scientific personnel.
5 U.S.C. 3308----------- Educational requirements for Civil Service examination of scientific personnel.
5 U.S.C. 3313----------- Eligibility of applicants for scientific positions (GS-9
or higher).
5 U.S.C. 3325----------- Waiver of competitive examination for scientific
positions.
8 U.S.C. 1101, 1153, Special rules administered by the Department of
1427, 1430, 1434, 1446, State regarding immigrants and aliens with sci1485, 1486. entific training.
16 U.S.C. 1081---------- Foreign fishery research in U.S. waters.
17 U.S.C. 5, 16, 107_____-Copyright laws regarding scientific work. 18 U.S.C. 42 -----------Importation of injurious animals and birds for scientific purposes.
20 U.S.C. 91 -----------Facilities for study research in Government departments and specified governmental collections shall be accessible for scientific investigation. 22 U.S.C. 274-290F ------ U.S. relations with international organizations involved in science, for example, the International Biological Program and UNESCO. 22 U.S.C. 1942---------- Congressional policy regarding scientific interchanges
for development assistance in Latin America. 33 U.S.C. 1101 ---------Congressional policy on marine resources and engineering -development.
42 U.S.C. 1891 and 1892... General authority for Federal agencies to make grants to nonprofit research organizations for basic scientific research.
42 U.S.C. 4331 and 4332--. Congressional policy regarding National Environmental Policy.


























PART II


PROVISIONS OiF U.S. CODE THROUGH THE 92D CONGRESS
RELA~.TED To RESEARCH ANVDDEVELOPMENT














U.S.C. Title 2-The Congress

**4 TEM 58**
00110. 02.004388
2 U.S. ,.. 166. CONGRESSIONAl. &S.EA&QG SERVICE
(A) RESIGNATION OF LEGISLATIVE REFERENCE SERVICE.
THE LEGISLATIVE REFERENCE StRViCE IN THE LIBRARY OF CONGRESS IS HEREBY CONTINUED AS A SEPARATE I.EPAJtMcNT IN THE LIBRARY OF CONGRESS AND IS REDESIGNATED THE *CONGRE, IONAL &SfEARCd SERVICE".
(B) FUNCTIONS AND OBJECTIVES.
IT IS THE POLICY OF COIGRES4 THtAT
(1) THE LIBRARIAN OF CJAGRE>> SHALL, IN EVERY POSSIBLE WAY, ENCOURAGE,
ASSIST, AND PROMOTE THE CONGRESSIONAL RESEARCH SERVICE IN
(A) RENDERING TO CONGRESS TH4 MOST EFFECTIVE AND EFFICIENT SERVICE, (d) RESPONDING MOST EXPEDITIOJiLY, EFFECTIVELY, AND EFFICIENTLY TO THE SPECIAL NEEDS OF CONGRESS, AND
(C) DISCHARGING ITS RESPONSIia-.ITIES TU CONGRESS;
AND
(2) THE LIBRARIAN OF CJVG.ESS SHALL GRANT AND ACCORD TO THE
CONGRESSIONAL RELSARCH SERVICE COMPLETE &E~SEARC INDEPENDENCE AND THE MAXI14UM PRACTICABLE ADMiNISTRATLVE INDEPENDENCE CONSISTENT WITH THESE OBJECTIVES.
(C) APPOINTMENT AND OM PENATtON OF DIRECTOR, DEPUTY DIRECTOR, AND OTHER NECESSARY PERSONNiEL; AININUM GRADE FOR SENIOR SPECIALISTS; PLACEMENT IN GRADES GS-16. 11 AND 18 OF SPECIALISTS AND SENIOR SPECIALISTS; APPOINTMEMI WHifHJUT REGARD TO CIVIL SERVICE LAWS AND POLITICAL AFFILIATION AND ON 4ASIS OF FITNESS TO PERFORM DUTIES.
(1) AFTER CONSULTATION WITH [HE JOINT COMMITTEE ON THE LIBRARY, THE LIBRARIAN OF CONGRESS SHALL APPOINT THE DIRECTOR OF THE CONGRESSIONAL &ESFARCH SERVICE. THE BASIC PAY DF THE DIRECTOR SHALL BE AT A PER ANNUM RATE EQUAL TO THE RATE OF dASIC PAY PRUVIDED FOR LEVEL V OF THE EXECUTIVE SCHEDULE CONTAINED IN SECTION 31o OF TITLE 5.
(2) THt LIBRARIAN OF CONGRESS, UPON THE RECOMMENDATION OF THE DIRECTOR,
SHALL APPOINT A DEPUTY DIkECTUA OF THE CONGRESSIONAL RES.EAR H SERVICE AND ALL OTHER NECESSARY PERSONNEL THEREOF. THE BASIC PAY OF THE DEPUTY DIRECTOR SHALL BE FIXEUJ IN A.GORDANCE WITH CHAPTER 51 (RELATING TO CLASSIFICATION) AND SUBCHAPTE II (RELATING TO GENERAL SCHEDULE PAY RATES) OF CHAPTER 53 OF TITLE :p BUT WITHOUT REGARD TO SECTION 5108(A) OF SUCH TITLt. THE BASIC PAY OF ALL OTHER NECESSARY PERSONNEL OF THE CONGRESSIuNAL &i &BA SERVICE SHALL BE FIXED IN ACCORDANCE WITH CHAPTER 51 (RELATING TO CLASSIFL6ATIONJ AND SUBCHAPTER III (RELATING TO GENERAL SCHEDULE PAY RATES) OF CHAPTER 53 OF TITLE 5, EXCEPT THAT
(A) THE GRADE OF SENIGA SPFIA6LST IN EACH FIELD WITHIN THE PURVIEW OF SUBSECTION (E) OF THIS Sct;TION HALL NOT BE LESS THAN THE HIGHEST GRADE IN THE EXECUTIVE BRANCH OF THE GOVERNMENT TO WHICH RESi&ARC ANALYSIS AND CONSULTANTS, WITHOUT SUPcRVISUkY RESPONSIBILITY, ARE CURRENTLY ASSIGNED; AND
(B) ThE PCSITIONS JF SPE IALIST AND SENIOR SPECIALIST IN THE
CONGRESSIONAL RESEA&"U SEiVI.E tAt BE PLACED IN GS-16, 17, AND 18 OF THE GENERAL SCHEDULE OF SECTION 54i 3F TITLE 5, WITHOUT REGARD TO SECTION


(31)






32


51J8tAJ OF SUCH TITLE, SUBJECT TO THE PRIOR APPROVAL OF THE JOINT COMMITTEE ON THE LIBRARY, UF TriE PLACEMENT OF EACH SUCH POSITION IN ANY OF SUCH GRADES.
(3) EACH APPCINTMENT NADE UNDER PARAGRAPHS (1) AND (2) OF THIS SUBSECTION AND SUBSECTION (E) OF THIS SECTION SHALL BE WITHOUT REGARD TO THE CIVIL SERVICE LAWS, WIElTHOT REGARD TO POLITICAL AFFILIATION, AND SOLELY ON THE BASIS OF FITNESS TO PERFORM THE DUTIES OF THE POSITION.
(0) DUTIES OF SERVICE; ASilS(ANCE TO CONGRESSIONAL COMMITTEES; LIST OF TERMINATING PROGRAMS A'4 SJdJcCTS FOR ANALYSIS; LEGISLATIVE DATA, STUDIES, ETC.; INFORMATION &S.d&QiL DIGEST OF BILLS, PREPARATION;
LEGISLATION, PURPOSE AD EFFcLCT, AND PREPARATION OF MEMORANDA; INFORMATION AND RSfEARk 4.APABILIFY, DEVELOPMENT.
IT SHALL BE THE DUTY OF THE CONGRESSIONAL RESEARCH SERVICE, WITHOUT PARTISAN BIAS
(1) UPUN REQUEST, TO ADVISE ANJ ASSIST ANY COMMITTEE OF THE SENATE OR HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES ANO ANY JOINT COMMITTEE OF CONGRESS IN THE
ANALYSIS# APPRAISAL, AND EVALUATIJN OF LEGISLATIVE PROPOSALS WITHIN THAT COMMITfEE'S JURISDICTION, O, Of Rc-COMMENDATIONS SUBMITTED TO CONGRESS, BY THE PRESIDENT OR ANY EXECUTIVE AGENCY, SO AS TO ASSIST THE COMMITTEE IN
(A) JETERMINING THE ADVISAdILLITY OF ENACTING SUCH PROPOSALS; (d) ESTIMATING THE PRUdADLE RESULTS OF SUCH PROPOSALS AND ALTERNATIVES THERETU; AND
(C) EVALUATING ALTERNiATIV6 METHODS FOR ACCOMPLISHING THOSE RESULTS; 5320J36792 AND, BY PRUVIU14G SUCH OTHER ESEA&R AND ANALYTICAL
SERVICES AS THE 50200019o3
AND, BY PROVIDING SUCH OTHER Eif.,"ARK AND ANALYTICAL SERVICES AS THE COMMITTEE CONSIDERS APPROPRIATE FUR THESE PURPOSES, OTHERWISE TO ASSIST IN FURNISHING A BASIS FOR THE PROPER EVALUATION AND DETERMINATION OF
LEGISLATIVE PROPOSALS AND t:CJMMENDATIONS GENERALLY; AND IN THE
PERFORMANCE OF THIS DU TtHE ERVICE SHALL HAVE AUTHORITY, WHEN SO AUTHORIZED BY A COMMITTEE AND ALGING AS THE AGENT OF THAT COMMITTEE# TO REQUEST OF ANY DEPARTMENT OR AGtNY OF THE UNITED STATES THE PRODUCTION OF SUCH OOKiv, RECORDS# CORRESPONDEN..Et, MEMORANDA, PAPERS, AND DOCUMENTS AS THE SERVIE CONSIDERS NELESSAK, AND SUCH DEPARTMENT OR AGENCY OF THE
JNITEO STATES SHALL COMPLY wlTd SUCH REQUEST; AND FURTHER, IN THE PERFORMANCE OF THIS ANj ANY uTHER RELEVANT DUTY, THE SERVICE SHALL
MAINTAIN CONTINUOLUS LIAISON WITH ALL COMMITTEES;
(2) TO MAKE AVAILABLE TO EA.H COMMITTEE OF THE SENATE AND HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES AND EACH JuINT COMMITTEE OF THE TWO HOUSES, AT THE OPENING OF A NEw CONGRESS, A LIT OF PROGRAMS AND ACTIVITIES BEING CARRIED OUT UNDER EXISTING LAW SCHEDULED Tuo TERMINATE DURING THE CURRENT CONGRESS, WHICH ARE WITHIN THE JURI$SolCTION UF THE COMMITTEE;
(3) TJ MAKE AVAILABLE TO kAtH COMMITTEE OF THE SENATE AND HOUSE OF
REPRESENTATIVES AND EACh JOINT COAMITTEE OF THE TWO HOUSES, AT THE OPENING OF A NEW CONGRESS, A LIST OF SUbJ-CTS AND POLICY AREAS WHICH THE COMMITTEE MIGHT PROFITABLY ANALYZE IN DEPTH;
(4) UPON REQUEST, JR UPON iTS OWN INITIATIVE IN ANTICIPATION OF REQUESTS, TO COLLECT, .wLASSIFY, AND ANALYZE IN THE FORM OF STUDIES,







33


REPORTS, COMPILATIONS, JIGESfS, BULLETINS, INDEXES, TRANSLATIONS, AND OTHERWISE@ DATA HAVING A 6EAkIN4 ON LEGISLATION, AND TO MAKE SUCH DATA AVAILABLE AND SERVICEABLE TO UMI41TTEES AND MEMBERS OF THE SENATE AND HOUSE 0- REPRESENTATIVES AND JOINT COMMITTEES OF CONGRESS;
(5) UPON REQUEST, OK dPON LIS OwN INITIATIVE IN ANTICIPATION OF
REQUESTS, TO PREPARE AN PROVIi E INFORMATION, RFSEARCa. AND REFERENCE MATERIALS AND SERVICES TO COMIT(EES AND MEMBERS OF THE SENATE AND HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES AND JOINT .U4MITTi:ES OF CONGRESS TO ASSIST THEM IN THEIR LEGISLATIVE AND REP4ESENiArDVE FUNCTIONS;
(6) Tj PREPARE SUMMAtLES ANU UIGESTS OF BILLS AND RESOLUTIONS OF A PUBLIC GENERAL NATURE INTKUOJCED IN THE SENATE OR HOUSE OF
REPRESENTATIVES;
(7) UPON REQUEST MADE dY AMY .OMMITTEE OR MEMBER OF THE CONGRESS, TO PREPARE AND TRANSMIT TO SJLr CJMMNTTEE OR MEMBER A CONCISE MEMORANDUM WITH RESPECT TO ONE OR MORE LEGISLATIVE MEASURES UPON WHICH HEARINGS BY ANY COMMITTEE OF THE CONGRESS HAVk aEEN ANNUUNCED, WHICH MEMORANDUM SHALL
CONTAIN A STATEMENT OF THrE PJPj&-E AND EFFECT OF EACH SUCH MEASURE, A DESCRIPTION OF OTHER REVELAtl MEASURES OF SIMILAR PURPOSE OR EFFECT PREVIOUSLYY INTRODUCED IN THE COaiNGRESS, AND A RECITATION OF ALL ACTION TAKEN THERETOFORE BY OR WITHId [HE CONGRESS WITH RESPECT TO EACH SUCH OTHER MEASURE; AND
48) TO DEVELOP AND MAiNTAIN A4 INFORMATION AND RESiFAR CAPABILITY, TO INCLUDE SENIOR SPECIALIST, SPECIALISTS, OTHER EMPLOYEES, AND CONSULTANTS, AS NECESSARY, TO PERFORM THE FJitTIONS PROVIDED FOR IN THIS SUBSECTION.
(E) SPECIALISTS AND aENIOK SPECIALISTS; APPOINTMENT; FIELDS OF
APPOINTMENT.
THE LIBRARIAN OF CONGRESS 14 AJTHORIZED TO POINT IN THE CONGRESSIONAL
RsEARCU SERVICE, UPON THE RECJMMENUATION OF THE DIRECTOR, SPECIALISTS AND SENIOR SPECIALISTS IN THE FOL6UWING BROAD FIELDS:
(1) AGRICULTURE;
(2) AMERICAN GOVERNMENT AND PUdLIC ADMINISTRATION;
(3) AMERICAN PUBLIC LAwn;
(4) CONSERVATION;
(5) EDUCATION;
(6) ENGINEERING AND PJLIC wUoR.S;
(7) HOUSING;
(8) INDUSTRIAL JAGANILATION AND CORPORATION FINANCE;
(9) INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS;
(10) INTERNATIONAL TRAJE AN E,.ONOMIC GEOGRAPHY;
i1k) LABOR AND EMPLOYcNT;
(12) MINERAL ECONOMICS; (13) MONEY AND BANKING; (14) NATIONAL DEFENSE; (L5) PRICE ECONOMICS;
(16) SGIE-bLEA
(17) SOCIAL WELFARE;
(18) TAXATION AND FISCAL PULICi,;
(19) IECHOLY *







34


(20) TRANSPORTATION AN) COMMUNiCATIONS;
(21) URBAN AFFAIRS;
(22) VETERANS* AFFAIRS; AND
(23) SUCH OTHER BROAD FIELDS AS THE DIRECTOR MAY CONSIDER APPROPRIATE.
SUCH SPECIALISTS AND SENadR SPECIALISTS, TOGETHER WITH SUCH OTHER EMPLOYEES OF THE CONGRESSIONAL & .AARGIU SERVICE AS MAY BE NECESSARY, SHALL BE AVAILABLE FOR SPECIAL WORK WITH THE COMMITTEES AND MEMBERS OF THE
SENATE ANJ HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES AND THE JOINT COMMITTEES OF CONGRESS FOR ANY OF THE PUAPUSES OF SUBSECTION (D) OF THIS SECTION.
(F) DUTIES OF DIRECTOR; EsYABLISHMENT AND CHANGE OF RESEARCH AND
REFERENCE DIVISIONS O OfHEA ORGANIZATIONAL UNITS, OR BOTH.
THE DIRECTOR IS AUTHORALED
(1) TO CLASSIFY. ORGAILE, ARRANGE, GROUP, AND DIVIDE, FROM TIME TO TIME, AS HE CONSIDERS ADVISABLE, THE REQUESTS FOR ADVICE, ASSISTANCE, AND OTHER SERVICES SUBMITTE) TO THE CONGRESSIONAL RESEARCH SERVICE BY COMMITTEES AND MEMBERS OF THE SENATE AND HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES AND JOINT COMMITTEES OF CONGReSS, INTO SUCH CLASSES AND CATEGORIES AS HE CONSIDERS NECESSARY TO
(A) EXPEDITE AND FACILITATE THE HANDLING OF THE INDIVIDUAL REQUESTS SUBMITTED BY MEMBERS JF THE SENATE AND HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.
(B) PROMOTE EFFICIENCY IN THE PERFORMANCE OF SERVICES FOR COMMITTEES OF THE SENATt AND HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES AND JOINT COMMITTEES OF CONGRESS, AND
(C) PROVIDE A BASIS FJR THE EFFICIENT PERFORMANCE BY THE CONGRESSIONAL ~LikA"kB SERVICE OF IT. LELIS.ATIVE &EIEARaC AND RELATED FUNCTIONS GENERALLY,
AND
(2) TO ESTABLISH AND CHAN ; FROM TIME TO TIME, AS HE CONSIDERS ADVISAtLE, WITHIN THE COINRESi184AL RESEARCH SERVICE, SUCH RE-SARCH AND REFERENCE DIVISIONS OR OfHER ORGANIZATIONAL UNITS, OR BOTH, AS HE CONSIDERS NECESSARY TO ACOrPLA'SH THE PURPOSES OF THIS SECTION.
(,) dUJGET ESTIMATES.
IN ORDER TO FACILITY TE THE STUDY, CONSIDERATION, EVALUATION, AND DETERMINATION BY THE tJNGREhS OF THE BUDGET REQUIREMENTS OF THE CONGRESSIONAL RESEARU SERVICE FUR EACH FISCAL YEAR, THE LIBRARIAN OF CONGRESS SHALL RECEIVE FROM THE DIRECTOR AND SUBMIT, FOR INCLUSION IN THE BUDGET OF THE UNITED STATES iUVeRNMENT, THE BUDGET ESTIMATES OF THE CONGRESSIONAL Ei .ARLB SERVICE dAHCH SHALL BE PREPARED SEPARATELY BY THE DIRECTOR IN DETAIL FOR EACH FIaAL YEAR AS A SEPARATE ITEM OF THE BUDGET ESTIMATES OF THE LIkARY OF CONGRESS FOR SUCH FISCAL YEAR.
(H) EXPERTS OR CONSULTANTS, INiIVIUUAL OR ORGANIZATIONAL, AND PERSONS AND ORGANIZATIONS WITH SPCLiALIZEJ KNOWLEDGE; PROCUREMENT OF TEMPORARY OR INTERMITT6N ASSISTANCE; LRfRALTS, NONPERSONAL AND PERSONAL SERVICE; ADVERTISEMENT REQUIREMENTS INAPPLICABLE; END PRODUCT; PAY; TRAVELTIME.
(1) THe DIRECTOR OF Tr CON 4RSSIONAL RL ,ARG SERVICE MAY PROCURE THE TEMPORARY OR INTERMITTENT ASSLT ANCE OF INDIVIDUAL EXPERTS OR CONSULTANTS (INCLUJIN, STENOGRAPHIC REPORTERS) AND OF PERSONS LEARNED IN PARTICULAR OR SPECIALIZED FIELDS OF KNUWLEDG- -






35


(A) BY NONPERSONAL SERVICE 6DNfRACT, WITHOUT REGARD TO ANY PROVISION OF LAW REQUIRING ADVERTISIL FUR tGO.TRACT BIDSt WITH THE INDIVIDUAL EXPERT, CONSULTANIt, OR OTHER PERbOUN CONCERNED, AS AN INDEPENDENT CONTRACTOR, FOR THE FURNISHING BY HIM TO THE f.ON;URESSIONAL EARBC SERVICE OF A WRITTEN STUDY, TRiATISE, THEME, ASCOURSEt DISSERTATION, THESIS, SUMMARY, ADVISORY
OPINION, UR OTHER END PRJUCT; 0A
(ii) BY EMPLOYMENT (FU R A PEmIOD OF NOT MORE THAN ONE YEAR) IN THE
CONGRESSIONAL RESfEA&O SEAVICt UF THE INDIVIDUAL EXPERT, CONSULTANT, OR OTHER PERSON CONCERNED, 11 PERiUNAL SERVICE CONTRACT OR OTHERWISE, WITHOUT REGARD TO THE POSITION CLASSIFICATION LAWS, AT A RATE OF PAY NOT IN EXCESS OF HiE PER DIEM ECUIVALENf OF (HE HIGHEST RATE OF BASIC PAY THEN CURRENTLY IN EFFECT FOR THE GENERAL. SCH td.E OF SECTION 5332 OF TITLE 5, INCLUDING PAYMENT OF SUCH RATE FOR 4ECESARV TRAVEL TIME.
(2) THE DIRECTOR OF rTHE CON RQSSIONAL RE&UEA d SERVICE MAY PROCURE BY CONTRACT, WITI-OUT REGARD rU ANY PtUVISION OF LAW REQUIRING ADVERTISING FOR CONTRACT tlODS, THE TEMPORARY (FOR RESPECTIVE PERIODS NOT IN EXCESS OF ONE YEAR) OR INTERMITTENT ASSISTANCs OF EDUCATIONAL, FSFAdgUA OR OTHER ORANILATIONS OF EXPERTS AN' CONSULTANTS (INCLUDING STENOGRAPHIC REPORTERS) AND OF EDUAfLIJN4Lt 4ESA1B & AND OTHER ORGANIZATIONS OF PERSONS LEARNED IN PARTICULAR OR SPECIALIZED FIE LDS OF KNOWLEDGE.
(I) SPECIAL REPORT TJ JOINT COMMITTEE ON THE LIBRARY.
THE DItECTOR OF THE CJOGRES ,4AL &1EA&tC SERVICE SHALL PREPARE AND FILE WITH THE JOINT COMMITTEE UN THE LIBRARY AT THE BEGINNING OF EACH REGULAR SESSION OF CONGRESS A SPARATE AND SPECIAL REPORT COVERING, IN
SUMMARY AND IN DETAIL, ALL PHASES OF ACTIVITY OF THE CONGRESSIONAL
~ESEA&C.U SERVICE FOR THE IMMEDIATELY PRECEDING FISCAL YEAR.
(J) AUTHORIZATION OF APPRUPIAIONS.
THERE ARE HEREBY AUTHORIZED TO BE APPROPRIATED TO THE CONGRESSIONAL
1ESEA&rG SERVICE EACH FISCAL YEAR SUCH SUMS AS MAY BE NECESSARY TO CARRY ON THE WORK OF THE SERVICE.
(AUG. Z, 1946, CH. 753, TITLE &I, SEC. 203(A), (Bt), 60 STAT. 836; OCT. 28t 1949, CH. 782, TITLE XI, SEC. 11061A), 63 STAT. 972; OCT. 26, 1970, PUB. L. 91-510, TITLE Ili SEC. 321(Alt 84 STAT. 1181.)






36


**siTEM 60**
0011.02.00o5929
2 U.S.. 471. CONGRESS INbA. FINDINGS AND DECLARATION OF PURPOSE
THE CONGRESS HEREBY FINS AND DECLARES THAT:
(A) AS TECHOLQ SE .dNlIIJEa TO CHANGE AND EXPAND RAPIDLY, ITS
APPLiCATIuNS ARE(1) LARGE AND GROWING IN SCALE; AND
(2) INCREASINGLY EXTENLVE, PERVASIVE, AND CRITICAL IN THEIR IMPACT, dENEFILIAL AND ADVERSE, LN THE NATURAL AND SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT.
(3) THEREFCRE, IT IS ESSENTIAL THAT, TO THE FULLEST EXTENT POSSIBLE, THE CONSEwUENCES OF L~ECELOIlG&L APPLICATIONS BE ANTICIPATED, UNDERSTOOD, AND CONSIDERED IN DETERMINATION OF PUBLIC POLICY ON EXISTING AND EMERGING NATIONAL PROBLEMS.
(C) THE CONGRESS FURTrtcR FINS THAT:
l(1) THE FEDERAL AGENCIES PRESEirLY RESPONSIBLE DIRECTLY TO THE CONGRESS ARE NUT UESIGNEO TO PRJVIDE ITHE LEGISLATIVE BRANCH WITH ADEQUATE AND TIMELY INFORMATICNt INOtPENDENT.Y DEVELOPED, RELATING TO THE POTENTIAL IMPACf OF I3E:ENLGI.AL APPLICATIONS, AND
(2) THE PRESENT MECHANISMS OF THE CONGRESS DO NOT AND ARE NOT DESIGNED TO PROVIDE THE LEGISLATIVE BRANCH WITH SUCH INFORMATION.
(uD) ACCORDINGLY, IT IS NECESSARY FOR THE CONGRESS TO(1) EQUIP ITSELF WITd NEW AND EFFECTIVE MEANS FOR SECURING COMPETENT, JN6IASEO INFORMATION CON.ERNAiG THE PHYSICAL, BIOLOGICAL, ECONOMIC, SOCIAL, AND POLITICAL EFFECTS OF SUCH APPLICATIONS; AND
(2) UTILIZE THIS INFORMATION, WHENEVER APPROPRIATE, AS ONE FACTOR IN THE LEGISLATIVE ASSESSI4A~NT OF MATTERS PENDING BEFORE THE CONGRESS, PARTICULARLY IN THOSE INSTANCES WHERE THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT MAY BE CALLED UPON TO CONSIDER SUPPORT FJ4t OR MANAGEMENT OR REGULATION OF, LEQGUU1iAL APPLICATIONS.
(PJt. L. 92-484, SEC. 2, JCT. i3, L972t 86 STAT. 797.)

**iTEM 61**
00113.02.005939
2 U.S.L. 472. OFFICE JF IgidnULOGY ASSESSMENT
(A) CREATICN.
IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE FINUAN-S AND DECLARATION OF PURPOSE IN SECTION 471 OF THIS TITLE, THERE IS HcLEBY CREATED THE OFFICE OF ICHNQLOGY ASSES4ENT (HEREINAFTER AcFERREOU (U AS THE "OFFICE*) WHICH SHALL BE WITHIN AND RESPONSIBLE TO [HE -EISLATIVE BRANCH OF THE GOVERNMENT.
(B) COMPOSITION.
THE OFFICE SHALL CONSIST OF A LEibUaLOUQ ASSESSMENT BOARD (HEREINAFTER REFERRED TO AS THE "BOARJ)") WHALH SHALL FORMULATE AND PROMULGATE THE POLICIES OF THE OFFICE, AIU A uliECTOR WHO SHALL CARRY OUT SUCH POLICIES AND ADMINISTER THE OPERATtUNS uF (HE OFFICE.
(C) FUNCTIONS AND DUTIE..
THE BASIC FUNCTION OF fHE OFFICE SHALL BE TO PROVIDE EARLY INDICATIONS OF THE PROBABLE BENEFIG&AL ANt) ADVERSE IMPACTS OF THE APPLICATIONS OF LELULG Y AND TO DEVELOP OTHER COORDINATE INFORMATION WHICH MAY ASSIST






37


THE CONGRESS. IN CAARY1IN JUT SUCH FUNCTION, TtE OFFICE SHALL:
(ij) OENTIFY EXISTItG 04 PROBABLE IMPACTS OF IfEduLO OR
L-EIdLOGALGAL PROGRAMS; *
(2) HERE POSSIBLE, AscEATAIN CAUSE-AND-EFFECT RELATIONSHIPS;
(3) IDcNTIFY ALTERNATIVE LE dWi.JQ &IAL METHODS OF IMPLEMENTING SPECIFIC PROGRAMS;
(4) IDENTIFY ALTERNATIVE PROGRAMS FOR ACHIEVING REQUISITE GOALS;
(5) MAKE ESTIMATES AsJ COMPARISONS OF THE IMPACTS OF ALTERNATIVE METH JS AND PROGRAMS;
(6) PRESENT FINDINGa OF ciMPLETED ANALYSES TO THE APPROPRIATE
LEGISLATIVE AUTHORITIES;
(7) IuENTIFY AREAS HERE 40t.ITIONAL B&ESARCL OR DATA COLLECTION IS REQUIRED TU PROVIDE ADEQJATE iJPORT FOR THE ASSESSMENTS AND ESTIMATES DESCRIBED IN PARAGRAPH ill THOUGH (5) OF THIS SUBSECTION; AND
(8) UNUERTAKE SUCH ADOATIONAL ASSOCIATED ACTIVITIES AS THE APPROPRIATE AUTHORITIES SPECIFIED U4JER JdaECTION (0) OF THIS SECTION MAY DIRECT.
(0) INITIATION OF ASSESMcNf ATIVITIES.
ASSESSMENT ACTIVITIES UJNE4fAEN BY THE UFFICE MAY BE INITIATED UPON THE REQUEST OF:
IL) THE CHAIRMAN OF ANY STANi4G, SPECIAL OR SELECT COMMITTEE OF EITHER HOUSE OF THE CONGRESS, UA OF ANY JOINT COMMITTEE OF THE CONGRESS, ACTING FOR HIMSELF OR AT THE REQUEST JF (HE RANKING MINORITY MEMBER OR A MAJORITY OF THE COMMITTEE MEMBERS;
(2) THE BOARD; OR
(3) THE DIRECTOR, IN GUNSJLfATUN WITH THE BOARD.
IE) AVAILABILITY OF INFURMA[Ic4.
ASSESSMENTS MADE BY THE OFFICE, INCLUDING INFORMATION, SURVEYS,
STUDIES, REPORTS, AND FINGING4S R&E.ATED THERETO, SHALL BE MADE AVAILABLE TO THE INITIATING COMMITTEE UR Ofhe4 APPROPRIATE COMMITTEES OF THE CONGRESS. IN ADDITION, ANY SUCH INFOAMATIO. SURVEYS, STUDIES, REPORTS, AND FINDINGS PRODUCED BY THE OFFICE MAY SE MADE AVAILABLE TO THE PUBLIC EXCEPT WHERE(i) TO DO SO WOULD VIOLATE atCGJITY STATUTES; OR
(2) THE BOARD CONSIDER> IT NECESSARY OR ADVISABLE TO WITHHOLD SUCH INFORMATIUN IN ACCORDANCE diTH UNc OR MORE OF THE NUMBERED PARAGRAPHS IN SECTION 552(8B) OF TITLE 5.
(PUB. L. 92-484, SEC. 3t UJCT. j. 19729 86 STAT. 797.1






38



**LTEM 62**
301L0.02.005949
2 J.S.L. 473. I.ELCi.6X A SE~SMENT BOARD
9A) MEMBERSHIP.
THE dUARO SHALL ,O.SIl f OF THIRTEEN MEMBERS AS FOLLOWS: (1) SiX MEMt3ERS OF THE SENAfE. APPOINTED BY THE PRESIDENT PRO TEMPORE OF THe SENATE, TI-REE FROM THE MAJORITY PARTY AND THREE FROM THE MINORITY P4RTY;
(2) SiX MEMBERS OF THE HUUS OF REPRESENTATIVES APPOINTED BY THE SPEAKER OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESlTArIVES, THREE FROM THE MAJORITY PARTY AND fHAEE FROM THE MINORITY PAKrY; AND
(3) THc DIRECTOR, WH-O HALL NOUT BE A VOTING MEMBER.
(d) EXECUTION OF FUNIDONS OJAING VACANCIES; FILLING OF VACANCIES.
VACANCIES IN THE MEMBESHIP OF THE BOARD SHALL NOT AFFECT THE POWER OF THE REMAINING MEMBERS TO tXECUdE THE FUNCTIONS OF THE BOARD AND SHALL BE FILLED IN THE SAME MANNER AS i4 fHE CASE OF THE ORIGINAL APPOINTMENT.
(CI) CHAIRMAN AND VILE CHAIRMAN; SELECTION PROCEDURE.
THE BJARD SHALL SELEG(. A UttAlkMAN AND A VICE CHAIRMAN FROM AMONG ITS MEMBER.i At THE BEGINNING JF EAH .JNGRESS. THE VICE CHAIRMAN SHALL ACT IN THE PLACE AND STEAD UF Tric CHAIRMAN IN THI ABSENCE OF THE CHAIRMAN. THE CHAIRMANSHIP AND THE VICE ,HAIKMANSHIP SHALL ALTERNATE BETWEEN THE SENATE AND THE HUUSE OF REPRESETIATV .V MITH EACH CONGRESS. THE CHAIRMAN DURING EACH EVEN-NUMBERED CONGAt>S SHALL BE SELECTED BY THE MEMBERS OF THE HOUSE OF REPKEStNTATIVES ON THE dJARU FAUM AMONG THEIR NUMBER. THE VICE CHAIRMAN OURIG EALH CONGRESS SHALL 3E LHOaEN IN THE SAME MANNER FROM THAT HOUSE OF CONGRESS OTHER THAN THE HOUSe OF CONGRESS OF WHICH THE CHAIRMAN IS A MEMBER.
(0) MEETINGS; POWERS oF BOARD.
THE BOARD IS AUTHORIZED TO aft AND ACT AT SUCH PLACES AND TIMES DURING ftE iESSIUNS, RECESSES, A~ai AJJUJAED PERIODS OF CONGRESS, AND UPON A VOTE IF A MAJORITY OF ITS MEMoERSt To REQUIRE BY SUBPENA OR OTHERWISE THE ATTENDANCc OF SUCH WITNESSES ANU iHE PRODUCTION OF SUCH BOOKS, PAPERS, AND JOCUMENrS, TO AOMINISTE H JOATHS AND AFFIRMATIONS, TO TAKE SUCH
TESTIMONY, TO PROCURE 5J;H PRirING AND BINDING, AND TO MAKE SUCH EXPENDITURES, AS IT DEEM) AUVLaABLE. THE BOARD MAY MAKE SUCH RULES RESPECTINu ITS ORGANIZATION ANW PrOCEDURES AS IT DEEMS NECESSARY, EXCEPT THAT NU RECOMMENDATION SHALL dE REPORTED FROM THE BOARD UNLESS A MAJORITY OF THE BOARD ASSENT. SUdPENAS MAY BE ISSUED OVER THE SIGNATURE OF THE CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD OR JF ANY DATING MEMBER DESIGNATED BY HIM OR BY THE 8OARJD, AND MAY BE SERVED dY >,LH PERSON OR PERSONS AS MAY BE DESIGNATED BY SJCH CHAIRMAN OR MEMBER. THE CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD OR ANY VOTING MEMBER THEREOF MAY ADMINISTER JATrS DR AFFIRMATIONS TO WITNESSES. (PJB. L. 92-484, SEC. 4, oCT. 1.,# 1972, 86 STAT. 798.)






39


**ITEM 63**
00110.02.005959
Z U.S.oo 474. DIRECTU4 UF JFFaGE OF IGUHILOGY ASSESSMENT **
1A) APPOINTMENT; TERMN; COMPENSATION.
THE DIRECTOR OF THE OFFICE JF ECUgQGYJ ASSESSMENT SHALL BE APPOINTED **
BY THE BOARD AND SHALL SEAVE FJR A TERM OF SIX YEARS UNLESS SOONER REMOVED BY THE BOARO. HE SHALL 'eCEIdE 4ASIC PAY AT THE RATE PROVIDED FOR LEVEL III OF THE EXECUTIVE SCHEDULE UNDER SECTION 5314 OF TITLE 5.
(6) POWERS AND DUTIES.
IN ADOTION TO THE POdRS AND UJTIES VESTED IN HIM BY THIS CHAPTER, THE DIRECTOR SHALL EXERCISE SUCH PJdcRS AND DUTIES AS MAY BE DELEGATED TO HIM BY THE 80AROD.
(C) DEPUTY DIRECTOR; APPOINTMENT; FUNCTIONS; COMPENSATION.
THE DIRECTOR MAY APPIAT WITH THE APPROVAL OF THE BOARD, A DEPUTY DIRECTOR WHO SHALL PERFORM SJCH FJNCTIONS AS THE DIRECTOR MAY PRESCRIBE AND WHO SHALL BE ACTING I)itCf3R DURING THE ABSENCE OR INCAPACITY OF THE DIRECTOR OR IN THE EVENT JF A VACANCY IN THE OFFICE OF DIRECTOR. THE
DEPUTY DIRECTOR SHALL RECLLVE dASICt PAY AT THE RATE PROVIDED FOR LEVEL IV OF THE EXECUTIVE SCHEDULE JNDER SECTION 5315 OF TITLE 5.
(0) RESTRICTIONS ON JuTSIak EMPLOYMENT ACTIVITIES OF DIRECTOR AND
DEPUTY DIRECTOR.
NEITHER THE DIRECTOR NUA THE DEPUTY DIRECTOR SHALL ENGAGE IN ANY OTHER BUSINESS, VOCATION, OR ENPLOYMiNT THAN THAT OF SERVING AS SUCH DIRECTCR OR DEPUTY DIRECTOR AS THE .ASE MAtY BE; NOR SHALL THE DIRECTOR OR DEPUTY DIRECTOR, EXCEPT WITH THE APPROVAL OF THE BOARD, HOLD ANY OFFICE IN, OR ACT IN ANY CAPACITY FOR, ANY ORGANIZATION AGENCY, OR INSTITUTION WITH WHICH THE OFFICE MAKES ANY i.tNrRACT OR OTHER ARRANGEMENT UNDER THIS
CHAPTER.
(PUB. L. 92-484t SEC. 5, JCT. 1., 1972, 86 STAT. 799.)










































61-914 0 76 4






40


** TrEM 64**
00110.02.005969
2 J.S.L. 415. POWERS JF OFFICE OF TECHWLMX ASSESSMENT
(A) USE OF PJBLIC ANG PRIVATE PERSONNEL AND ORGANIZATIONS; FORMATION OF SPECIAL AD HOC TASK FOCCEa; CONTRACTS WITH GOVERNMENTALt ETC., AGENCIES AND INSTRUMENTALLTIES; ADVANCE, PROGRESS, AND OTHER PAYMENTS; 565010b75 UTILIZATION OF SERViCES OF VOLUNTARY AND UNCOMPENSATED PERSONNEL; UTILIZATION OF SERVICES OF VOLUNTARY AND UNCOMPENSATED P ERSUNNiEL; ACQUISITION, MiOLD~NG, AND DISPOSAL OF REAL AND PERSONAL PROPERTY; PRCMULGATION OF RULe: AND REGULATIONS.
THE OFFICE SHALL HAVE THE AUTHORITY WITHIN THE LIMITS OF AVAILABLE APPROPRIAfIONS, TO DO AL, fHING NECESSARY TO CARRY OUT THE PROVISIONS OF THIS CHAPTER INCLUDING, iOT aITriOUT BEING LIMITED TO, THE AUTHORITY TOL(1) MAKE FULL LSE OF CJMPETENT PERSONNEL AND ORGANIZATIONS OUTSIDE THE OFFICE, PUBLIC OR PRIVATE, AND FiRM SPECIAL AD HOC TASK FORCES OR MAKE OTHER ARRANGEMENTS WHEN APPROPRIATE;
(2) ENTER INTO CONTRACTS UR UTrER ARRANGEMENTS AS MAY BE NECESSARY FOR THE CONDUCT OF THE WORK OF THE OFFICE WITH ANY AGENCY OR INSTRUMENTALITY OF THE UNITED STATES, stITH ANt STATE, TERRITORY, OR POSSESSION OR ANY
POLITICAL SUBDIVISION THeREOF, O WITH ANY PERSONt FIRM, ASSOCIATION, CORPORATION, OR EDUCATIONAL INafIUTION, WITH OR WITHOUT REIMBURSEMENT, WITHOUT PERFORMANCE OR OTHER dNJSt AND WITHOUT REGARD TO SECTION 5 OF TITLE 41;
(3) MAKE ADVANCE# PGGREA$S, AND OTHER PAYMENTS WHICH RELATE TO
LE d iLQQX ASSESSMENT WITHOUT AcGARD TO THE PROVISIONS OF SECTION 529 OF TITLE 31;
(4) ACCEPT AND UTILIZE THE itRVICES OF VOLUNTARY AND UNCOMPENSATED PERSONNEL NECESSARY FOR HrE CUNJJCT OF THE WORK OF THE OFFICE AND PROVIDE FRANSPURTATION AND SUBSISTENCE A4 AUTHORIZED BY SECTION 5703 OF TITLE 5 FOR PERSONS SERVING WITHOUT COMPEN ATION;
(5) ACQUIRE BY PURCHASEe LEAStp LOAN, OR GIFT, AND HOLD AND DISPOSE OF BY SALE, LEASEt OR LOAN, KiAL AND PERSONAL PROPERTY OF ALL KINDS NECESSARY FOR OR RESULTING FROM THL EXERaSE OF AUTHORITY GRANTED BY THIS CHAPTER; ANO
(6) PRESCRIBE SUCH AJLES AND REGULATIONS AS IT DEEMS NECESSARY
GOVERNING THE OPERATION A4) ORGANIZATION OF THE OFFICE.
(d) RECOROKEEPING BY CONTKAkTORS AND OTHER PARTIES ENTERING INTO CONTRACTS AND OTHER ARRA4,EMEN(5 wITH OFFICE; AVAILABILITY OF BOOKS AND IECURDS TO OFFICE AND GUMPTRALLcR GENERAL FOR AUDIT AND EXAMINATION.
CONTRAG"ORS AND OTHER PAKTI-S ENTERING INTO CONTRACTS AND OTHER ARRANGEMENTS UNDER THIS SECTIJON WHICH INVOLVE COSTS TO THE GOVERNMENT SHALL MAINTAIN SUCH BO0 A4dj RELATED RECORDS AS WILL FACILITATE AN
EFFECTIVE AUDIT IN SUCH JrAIl. AD IN SUCH MANNER AS SHALL BE PRESCRIBED BY THE OFFICE, AND SUCH BLOS AND RECORDS (AND RELATED DOCUMENTS AND
PAPERS) SHALL BE AVAILAi.E fu iHE OFFICE AND THE COMPTROLLER GENEPAL OF THE UNITED STATES, OR ANY OF rrTIR DULY AUTHORIZED REPRESENTATIVES, FOR THE PURPOSE OF AUDIT AND EXAMINATA ON.
(C) OPERATION OF LAdURATJ kISt PILOT PLANTS, OR TEST FACILITIES.






41


THE OFFICE, IN CARRYING OUT TtH PROVISIONS OF THIS. CHAPTER, SHALL NOT, ITSELF, OPERATE ANY LAddRATJkicS, PILOT PLANTS, OR TEST FACILITIES.
(0), REQUESTS TO EXECOUTIV APARTMENTS OR AGENCIES FOR INFORMATION, SUGGESTIONS, ESTIMATES, SIATI5fIC4, AND TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE; DUTY OF EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS AND AGNlCIES TO FURNISH INFORMATION, ETC.
THE OFFICE IS AUTHUAILED TO SECURE DIRECTLY FROM ANY EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENr OR AGENCY INFGKMATIrN, SUGGESTIONS, ESTIMATES, STATISTICS, AND TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE FOR riTHE PURPOSE OF CARRYING OUT ITS FUNCTIONS UNDER THIS CHAPTER. EACH SUCH EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT OR AGENCY SHALL FURNISH THE INFORMATION, SUGGESTIONS, ESTIMATES, STATISTICS, AND TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE DIRECTLY TO THE OFFICE UPON ITi REQUEST.
(El REQUESTS TO HEADS OF XE,UTIVE DEPARTMENTS OR AGENCIES FOR DETAIL OF PERSONNEL; REIMBURSEMENT.
ON REQUEST OF THE OFFICE. THE HEAD OF ANY EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT OR AGENCY MAY DETAIL, WITH 0I4 WITHOUtJI REIMBURSEMENT, ANY OF ITS PERSONNEL TO ASSIST THE OFFICE IN GARRYING JUT ITS FUNCTIONS UNDER THIS CHAPTER.
(F) APPOINTMENT AND COMPENSAfIrN OF PERSONNEL.
THE DIRECTOR SHALL, IN AGCRUANCE WITH SUCH POLICIES AS THE BOARD SHALL PRESCRIBE, APPOINT AND FIX THE COMPENSATION OF SUCH PERSONNEL AS MAY BE
NECESSARY TO CARRY OUT Titr PROVISIONS OF THIS CHAPTER. SPUB. L. 92-484, SEC. 6, JUCT. 13, 1972 86 STAT. 799.)


**TEM 65**
04110.J2o.05979
2 U.S.G. 476. TECHNLaY ASSESiMENT ADVISORY COUNCIL *
(A) ESTABLISHMENT; COMPOSIIUloN.
THE OFFICE SHALL ESTABLISH A L EG DQ.WaLG ASSESSMENT ADVISORY COUNCIL (HEREINAFTER REFERRED TO AS T& COUNCIL*). THE COUNCIL SHALL BE COMPOSED OF THE FOLLOWING TWELVE MeftMBERS
(t) TEN MEMBERS FROM THE PUd.ICG TO BE APPOINTED BY THE BOARD, WHO SHALL BE PERSONS EMINENT It JNE OR MORE FIELDS OF THE PHYSICAL, BIOLOGICAL, OR SOCIAL i .L EUi JR ENGINEERING OR EXPERIENCED IN THE ADMINISTRATION OF Ij t iA&. ATIVITIES, OR WHO MAY BE JUDGED QUALIFIED ON THE BASIS OF CONTRIBJiIONS MADE TO EDUCATIONAL OR PUBLIC ACTIVITIES;
(2) THE COMPTROLLER G M ERAL; AND
(3) THk DIRECTOR OF (fdE CiONiReSSIUNAL &ESFARG SERVICE OF THE LIBRARY OF CONGRESS.
tB) DUIIES.
THE CO NCIL, UPON REQUiEST dY THE BOARD, SHALL(i) REVIEW AND MAKE RECOMM8NDATIONS TO THE BOARD ON ACTIVITIES
UNDERTAKEN BY THE OFFICE OR UN THc INITIATION THEREOF IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 472(D) OF THIS TITLE;
(2) REVIEW AND MAKE REUMMENDA(IONS TO THE BOARD ON THE FINDINGS OF ANY ASSESSMENT MADE BY OR FDA THE UFF&CE; AND
(3) UNDERTAKE SUCH ADDITIONAL ELATED TASKS AS THE BOARD MAY DIRECT.
(C) CHAIRMAN AND VICtE CHA' MAN; ELECTION BY COUNCIL FROM MEMBERS APPOINTED FROM PU*BLhI,; [ERMS AND CONDITIONS OF SERVICE.






42


THE COUNCIL BY MAJORIfY VO(Et SHALL ELECT FROM ITS MEMBERS APPOINTED UNDEA SUB4ECTION (A)(1) OF THIS SECTION A CHAIRMAN AND A VICE CHAIRMAN, OHO SHALL SERVE FOR SUCH FIME AN) UNDER SUCH CONDITIONS AS THE COUNCIL MAY PRESCidBE. IN THE ABSEiCE JF THE CHAIRMAN, OR IN THE EVENT OF HIS INCAPACITY, TIE VICE CHAIAmAN SHAi.L ACT AS CHAIRMAN.
10) TEAMS OF OFFICE OF E KIBRS APPOINTED FROM PUBLIC; REAPPOINTMENT.
THE TcRM CF OFFICE OF EACH MEMBER OF THE COUNCIL APPOINTED UNDER SUBSECTION (A)Ill) OF THI4 sECTIJN SHALL BE FOUR YEARS EXCEPT THAT ANY SUCH MEMBER APPOINTED TO FILL A VACANCY OCCURING PRIOR TO THE EXPIRATION OF THE TERM FOR wHICH HIS PREDbudSSOR dWS APPOINTED SHALL BE APPOINTED FOR THE REMAINDER OF SUCH TERM. Nu PtRAGN SHALL BE APPOINTED A MEMBER OF THE COUNCIL UNDER SUBSECTION tAt)(lJ OF THIS SECTION MORE THAN TWICE. TERMS OF THE MEMBERS APPOINTED J'dER AJdiECTIUN (Altl) OF THIS SECTION SHALL BE STAGGERED SO AS TO ESTAoLISH A ROTATING MEMBERSHIP ACCORDING TO SUCH METHOD AS THE BOARD MAY OcVISE.
(E) PAYMENT TO COMPTROLLcR GENERAL AND DIRECTOR OF CONGRESSIONAL
Ei~EA~&Cd SERVICE OF TRAdVEL AND) OTHER NECESSARY EXPENSES; PAYMENT TO MEMBERS APPOINTED FROM PJdBLA JF COMPENSATION AND REIMBURSEMENT FOR
TRAVELt SUBSISTENCE, AND UTHER NECESSARY EXPENSES.
() THtE MEMBERS OF (HE ,J.CIL OTHER THAN THOSE APPOINTED UNDER SUBSECTIDM (A)(I1) OF THIS SECTiuN SHALL RECEIVE NO PAY FOR THEIR SERVICES AS MEMBERS OF THE COUNCIL, BUT aHaLL BE ALLOWED NECESSARY TRAVEL EXPENSES (OR, IN TriE ALTERNATIVE, I4ILEAvE fOR USE OF PRIVATELY OWNED VEHICLES AND A PER DIEM IN LIEU OF SBIalSTcNc AT NUT TU EXCEED THE RATE PRESCRIBED IN SECTIONS 5702 ANC 5704 OF TITLE 2i AND OTHER NECESSARY EXPENSES INCURRED BY THEM I THE PERFORMANCE UF JTiES VESTED IN THE COUNCIL, WITHOUT REGARD TO THE PROVISIONS OF SUBGLHAPTE I OF CHAPTER 57 AND SECTION 5731 OF TITLE 5, AND REGULATIONS PROMULwATED THEREUNUER..
(2) THE MEMBERS OF THE CJUiLIL. APPOINTED UNDER SUBSECTION (A)(1) SHALL RECEIVE ;OMPENSATION FOR EACH DAY ENGAGED IN THE ACTUAL PERFORMANCE OF DJrIES VtSTED IN THE LJJNCIL Af RATES OF PAY NOT IN EXCESS OF THE DAILY EQUIVALENT OF THE HIGHErT RATa OF BASIC PAY SET FORTH IN THE GENERAL SCHEDULE OF SECTION 533iZ(A) OF TITLE ~, AND IN ADDITION SHALL BE REIMBURSED FOR TRAVEL, SJ6SISTENG.E, AND OTHER NECESSARY EXPENSES IN THE MANNER PROVIDED FOR OTHER MEMBERS OF THE COUNCIL UNDER PARAGRAPH (1) OF tHIS SUBSECTICN.
(PUB. L. 92-4849 SEC. 7, CT. 1,, 1972, 86 STAT. 800.)






43


**ITEM 66**
0010o.02.005989
2 U*.*. 477. UTILIZA(LON JF SERVICES OF LIBRARY OF CONGRESS
(A) AUTHORITY OF LIBRAmIAN Ta 4AKE AVAILABLE SERVICES AND ASSISTANCE OF CONGRESSIONAL ~i.A&CU SI: .ICE. *
TO CARRY OUT THE OBJECTIVES JF THIS CHAPTER, THE LIBRARIAN OF CONGRESS IS AUTHORiZED TO MAKE AVAALABLe TJ THE OFFICE SUCH SERVICES AND ASSISTANCE OF THE CONGRESSIONAL EIA&L, SERdICE AS MAY BE APPROPRIATE AND FEASIBLE.
(B) SCUPE OF SERVICES AND ASITANCE.
SUCH SERVICES AND A$ISTANCE MADE AVAILABLE TO THE OFFICE SHALL INCLJUE, dUT NOT BE LIMITED TO, ALL OF THE SERVICES AND ASSISTANCE WHICH THE CONGRESSIONAL UESEAtid SEkVILE IS OTHERWISE AUTHORIZED TO PROVIDE TO THE CONGRESS.
(C SERVICES OR RESPONSIsLIIES PERFORMED BY CONGRESSIONAL U.SARGt SERVICE FUR CONGRESS NOT ALTEReJ JR MODIFIED; AUTHORITY OF LIBRARIAN TO ESTABLISH WITHIN CONGRESSAUNAL &EAE.AR SERVICE ADDITIONAL DIVISIONS, ETC.
NOTHINJ6 IN THIS SECTION SHALL ALTER OR MODIFY ANY SERVICES OR RESPUNSIBLITIES, OTHER THAN TrdSc PERFORMED FOR THE OFFICE, WHICH THE CONGRESSIONAL SESEACJH SERVICE JNJER LAW PERFORMS FOR OR ON BEHALF OF THE CONGRESS. THE LIBRARIAN IS, HOdEVER, AUTHORIZED TO ESTABLISH WITHIN THE CONGRESSIONAL 3,SEAR.LU SERVICE SJwH ADDITIONAL DIVISIONS, GROUPS, OR OTHER ORGANIZATIONAL ENTITIES AS MAY uE NECESSARY TO CARRY OUT TI-E PURPOSE OF THIS CHAPTER.
(0) REIMBURSEMENT FOR ERVI6ES AND ASSISTANCE.
SERVICES AND ASSISTANCE MAjE AVAILABLE TO THE OFFICE BY THE
CONGAESSIJNAL &ES.EARG ,,RVIE IN ACLCOROANCE WITH THIS SECTION MAY BE PROVIDED.wITH OR WITHOUT KEIMBJRScMENT FROM FUNDS OF THE OFFICE, AS AGREED UPON BY THE BOARD AND THE LIBRARIAN OF CONGRESS. (PUB. L. 92-48t4, SEC. 8o dT. 13, 197Z2 86 STAT. 801.)


'**TEM 67**
30110.02.,006009
2 U.S.,. 479. COORDINATI(J 4F ACTIVITIES WITH NATIONAL lghE FOUNDAT I ON
THE OFFICE SHALL MAIn TAIN A CONTINUING LIAISON WITH THE NATIONAL
aLEiRU FOUNDATION WITH RcSPECT Ji(1) GRANTS AND CONT4ACTS FJONULATED OR ACTIVATED BY THE FOUNDATION
WHICH ARE FOR PURPOSES OF lEktfdtU X ASSESSMENT; AND
(Z) THE PROMOTION CF IURJiNATION IN AREAS OF IEUiQLDfi ASSESSMENT, AND THE AVOIDANCE OF U4tECESSARy DUPLICATION OR OVERLAPPING OF RU ~MFA
ACTIVITIES IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF LUNQL jX ASSESSMENT TECHNIQUES AND PROGRAMS.
(PUB*. L. 92-484 SEC. 10tA), OCT. 13, 1972, 86 STAT. 802.)






44



U.S.C. Title 5-Government Organization and Employees

** TEN 68**
00110.02.U06019
2 U.S.C. 480. ANNUAL KhPORt TJ CONGRESS
THE OFfICE SHALL SUBMIf TJ rHE CONGRESS AN ANNUAL REPORT WHICH SHALL INCLJUE, BUT NOT BE LIi4ITEO (Up AN EVALUATION OF IECHNDLOGY ASSESSMENT TECHNIQUE AND IDENTIFICATaUNP INSJFAR AS MAY BE FEASIBLE, OF JECHNOLOGICAL AREAS ANu PROGRAMS REQJIRING FU-TURE ANALYSIS. SUCH REPORT SHALL BE
SUBMITTED NOT LATER THAN 4ARCH 15 iF EACH YEAR. (PJB. L. 92-484, SEC. 11,t OCT. 13, 1972, 86 STAT. 802.)





** ATEM 71**
00110.05.001919
5 U.S.C. 3104. EMPLOYMENT OF >PECIALLY QUALIFIED SIEINTjFI AND PROFESSIONAL PERSONNEL
(A) THE HEAD OF AN AGENCY iAMED BELOW MAY ESTABLISH 1CiMI11 OR
PROFESSIONAL POSITIONS TO CARRY iJT THE SEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT FUNCTIONS OF HIS AGENCY WHICH REQUIRE THE ScRVICES OF SPECIALLY QUALIFIED PERSONNEL WITHIN THE FOLLOWQdING LIMIS:
(1) DEPARTMENT OF THE iNTERAOK NOT MORE THAN 8.
(Z) DEPARTMENT OF AGRIL.LTUAE NOT MORE THAN 20.
(3) DEPARTMENT OF HEALrHe EDjCATIUNt AND WELFARE NOT MORE THAN 13.
(4) DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE NJT MORE THAN 30, OF WHICH AT LEAST 5 ARE FOR THE UNITED STATES PAfENf OFFICE IN ITS EXAMINING AND RELATED
ACTIVITIE>.
(5) REPEALED. PUB. .. 91-375t SEC. 6(C)(5)t AUG. 12, 1970 84 STAT. 776.
(6J UNITED STATES ARMS CONTROL AND DISARMAMENT AGENCY NOT MORE THAN 14.
(7) LloRARY OF CONGRESS$ NOI ~ORE THAN 8.
(8)J NATIONAL AERONAUtiCS AM)J PACE ADMINISTRATION NOT MORE THAN 12.
() WHEN A GENERAL APPKOPRIATION STATUTE AUTHORIZES AN AGENCY NAMED BY THIS SECTION TO ESTABLISH AND FI THE PAY OF SCIENTIFIC OR PROFESSIONAL POSITIONS SIMILAR TO THUjc AUTJRIZED BY THIS SECTION, THE NUMBER OF POSITIONS AUTHORIZED BY Ttl I SE-TiON IS REDUCED BY THE NUMBER OF POSITIONS AUTHORIZED BY THE APPROPRIATION STATUTE, UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFICALLY PROVIDED. THIS SUBSECTION OO$ AOT APPLY TO THE NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION.
(Ci THE HEAD OF EACH AGENCY AJTHORIZEO TO ESTABLISH AND FIX THE PAY OF POSITIONS UNDER THIS .SECTION ANJ SECTION 5361 OF THIS TITLE SHALL SUBMIT TO CONGRESS NOT LATER THAN OECM.B6ER 31 OF EACH YEAR (OR IN THE CASE OF THE ADMINISTRATOR OF THE NATIONAL AcRONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION NOT LATER THAN FEBRUARY 1 OF cAw.d YEAR), A REPORT SETTING FORTH
(lb THt NUMBER OF THESE POSITIONS ESTABLSIHED IN HIS AGENCY DURING THAT CALENDAR YEAR (OR IN THE CASc jF THE NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE
A






45


ADMINISTRATION DURING THE PREVIOUS CALENDAR YEAR); AND
12) THE NAME, RATE OF PAY, ANO DESCRIPTION OF THE QUALICATIONS OF EACH INCUMBENT, TOGETHER WITH A STATEMENT OF THE FUNCTIONS PERFORMED BY EACH. WHEN THE HEAD OF SUCH AN AGENCY CONSIDERS FULL PUBLIC REPORT ON THESE ITEMS DETRIMENTAL TO THE NATIONAL SECURITYe HE MAY OMIT THE ITEMS FROM HIS ANNUAL REPORT ANOtD, INSTEAD, PetiS.NT THE INFORMATION IN EXECUTIVE SESSION OF SUCH COMMITTEE OF A HOUSE OF CONGRESS AS THE PRESIDING OFFICER THEREOF MAY DESIGNATE.
(PUB. L. 49-554i SEPT. 6, 1966v di STAT. 415; PUB. L. 90-83, SEC. 1(7)9 SEPT. 11, 1967, 81 STAT. 196; PUB. L. 91-375, SEC. 6(C)(5), AUG. 12t 4970, 84 STAT. 776.)



**iTEM 72**
00110.05.002069
5 U.S.L. 3338. COMPETITIVE SERVICE EXAMINATIONS EDUCATIONAL REQUIREMENTS PROHIBITED EXCEPTIIJNS
THE CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSIOr OR OTHER EXAMINING AGENCY MAY NOT PRESCRIBE A MINIMUM E&JLATIO4AL REQUIREMENT FOR AN EXAMINATION FOR THE COMPETITIVE SERVICE EXCEPT wHEN (HE COMMISSION DECIDES THAT THE DUTIES OF A S~LMJEIIELC TECHNICALt UR PRUFESSIONAL POSITION CANNOT BE PERFORMED BY AN INDIVIDUAL WHO DOES NOT HAVE A PRESCRIBED MINIMUM EDUCATION. THE COMMISSION SHALL MAKE THft REASDN4 FOR ITS DECISION UNDER THIS SECTION A PART OF ITS PUBLIC RECORDS.
(PUB. L-. u9-554, SEPT. 6, 1966t 8J STAT. 419.-






46


***TEM 73**
00110.05.002119
SU.S.C 3313. COMPEriTIVE SERVICE REGISTERS OF ELIGIBLES
THE NAMES OF APPLICANTS WHJ HAVE QUALIFIED IN EXAMINATIONS FOR THE
COAPEfITIVE SERVICE SHALL dE ENTEKED ON APPROPRIATE REGISTERS OR LISTS OF ELIGItLES IN THE FOLLOhWIN JRL LR
(1) FOUK Si.ENU15 EL AND PRUUFEijUNAL POSITIONS IN GS-9 OR HIGHER, IN THE ORDER OF THEIR RATINGS, I~4,LUOLN3 POINTS ADDED UNDER SECTION 3309 OF THIS TITLE; AND
(2) FOR ALL OTHER POSIIONS(A) DISABLED VETERANS WHO HAVE A COMPENSABLE SERVICE-CONNECTED LISA6ILITV OF 1 PERCENT OR MURes IN ORDER OF THEIR RATINGS, INCLUDING POINTS ADDED UNDER SECTION 3304 OF THIS TITLE; AND
(8) REMAINING APPLICANYS, IN THE ORDER OF THEIR RATINGS, INCLUDING POINTS AL)uED UNDER SECTION 3309 JF THIS TITLE. THE NAMES OF PREFERENCE ELIGIBLES SHALL BE ENrtEO AHcAD OF OTHERS HAVING THE SAME RATING.
(PJB. L. d9-554, SEPT. 6, 1966, 8. STAT. 420.)



*,TEM 74**
00110.05.002249
5 U.S.C. 3325. APPOINfMNT) hi SQL"EIEL AND PROFESSIONAL POSITIONS
(A) POSITIONS ESTABLISrt)L UNGJEr SECTION 3104 OF THIS TITLE ARE IN THE COMPETITIVE SERVICE. HOCWEdR, APPOINTMENTS TO THE POSITIONS ARE MADE WITHOUf COMPETITIVE EXAMINATION J.4 APPROVAL OF THE QUALIFICATIONS OF THE PROPOSED APPOINTEE BY THr LIViL SERVICE COMMISSION OR ITS DESIGNEE FOR THIS PURPOSE.
Id) THIS SECTION DES NOT APPo. TO POSITIONS ESTABLISHED UNDER SECTION 3134(A)(7J OF THIS TITLE.
(P!JB. L. 69-554 SEPT. 6, .906. 84 STAT. 423.)






47



**iTEM 102**
00110.05.U 06649
5 U.S.L;C. APPX. P 509, EORa PLAN NO. IV 1940--- REORGANIZATION PLAN NO. IV OF 1940
EFF. JUNE 30, 1940, 5 F.R. 2'.i, 54 STAT. 1234 BY ACT JUNE 4, 1940, CH. 231v SEC. 4, 54 STAT. 231
PREPARED BY THE PRESL)ENr A4NJ TRANSMITTED TO THE SENATE AND THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES IN CUJNGRES> A>SEt4MdLED, APRIL 11, 1940, PURSUANT TO THE PROVISIONS OF THE REORGANIZATIUJN ACT OF 1939, APPROVED APRIL 3, 1939.
DEPARTMENT OF STATE
SEC. 1. TRANSFER OF OuMINIAN i;USTOMS RECEIVERSHIP
THE FUNCTIONS OF THE UIVISIUN OF TERRITORIES AND ISLAND POSSESSIONS IN THE DEPARTMENT OF THE INTEkIJR RELATING TO THE DOMINICAN CUSTOMS
RECEIVERSHIP ARE TRANSFERReD TO THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE AND SHALL BE ADMINISTERED BY THE SELAETARV JF STATE OR UNDER HIS DIRECTION AND SUPERVISIuN BY SUCH AivetNY IN THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE AS HE SHALL DESIGNATE.
DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY
SEC. 2. APPROVAL OF COMPROMIScS
THE FUNCTIONS OF THE ATTORNEY GENERAL RELATING TO THE APPROVAL OF COMPROMISES MADE IN ACCOADANCe AITH THE PROVISIONS OF SECTION 7 OF THE FEDERAL ALCOHOL ADMINISTRATION ACT (SECTION 207 OF TITLE 27) ARE TRANSFERRED TO THE SECRETARY OF (fHE TREASURY, TO BE EXERCISED BY HIM OR JNDER HIS DIRECTION AND JPERVISLON SY SUCH OFFICER IN THE DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY AS HE SHALL OESISjATO: PROVIDED, THAT EXCLUSIVE JURISDICTION TO COMPROMISE CASES ARISING IUEt THE FEDERAL ALCOHOL ADMINISTRATION ACT (SECTIONS 201-212 OF TITLE 114 WHICH ARE PENDING BEFORE THE COURTS OR MMICH HAVE BEEN OR MAY HEKEAFTcR iE REFERRED TO THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FOR ACTION SHALL BE VESfU IN fHe ATTORNEY GENERAL, AND MAY BE EXERCISED BY HIM OR BY ANY OFFICER IN THrLe DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE DESIGNATED BY HIM.
DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE
SEC. 3. CISBURSEiAtNT fJ-ALTIONS OF UNITED STATES MARSHALS
ALL FUNCTIONS RELATING ftU O&58ASEMENT BY UNITED STATES MARSHALS WHICH WOULD OTHERWISE BECOME FJNCTIJNS OF THE TREASURY DEPARTMENT ON JULY 1, 1940, BY VIRTUE OF THE PKUVIStu~a OF EXECUTIVE ORDER NO. 6166 OF JUNE 10, 1933, AS AMENDED, ARE TRANSFERRED TO AND VESTED IN THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE TO BE EXERCISED St UNIito STATES MARSHALS UNDER THE SUPERVISION OF THE ATTORNEY GENERAL IN ACCO.OANCE WITH EXISTING STATUTES PERTAINING TO SUCH FUNCTIONS: PROVIDEUt THAT THE ATTORNEY GENERAL SHALL FURNISH THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY, WHEN REQUESTED 6Y HIM9 SUCH INFORMATION AS THE TREASURY DEPART1ENT MAY REQUIRE WITH RESPECT TO THE AMOUNTS OF MONEY RECEIVED AND DISBURSED 6Y MAsSHALS AND THE PROCEDURE FOLLOWED IN CONNECTION THEREWITH: PROVIDED FURTHER, THAT UPON THE REQUEST OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY, AND wliH THE APPROVAL OF THE ATTORNEY GENERAL, THE FACILITIES OF THE UcPARM4ENT OF JUSTICE MAY BE UTILIZED IN THE
DISBURSEMENTS, OR AIDING IN THc DISBURSEMENT OF PUBLIC MONEYS OF THE UNITED STATES AVAILABLE FUR EXPEvDITURE BY ANY AGENCY OF THE 'GOVERNMENT.
POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT






48


3EC. 4. FUNCTICNS OF POSTAL USBURSEMENTS
ALL FUNCTIONS RELATING, (J Tr. aISBJRSEMENT OF THE POSTAL REVENUES AND ALL OTHER FUNDS UNDER ThE JJrlIauL.TION O(F THE POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT AND THE PUST,4ASTER GENERAL ,AN ITr BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF THE POSTAL SAVINGS SYSTEM WHCH WOJLO OTHERASE bE.UME FUNCTIONS OF THE TREASURY DEPARTMENT ON JJLY I, 1940, BY VIRTjc UF tXcWUTIVE ORDER NO. 6166 OF JUNE 10, 1933, AS AMENDED, ARE TRANSFERRED ru A4o) VESTED IN (A) THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF THE POSTAL SAVINGS SYSTEM AS T0 PJSTAL SAVINGS DISBURSEMENTS, AND (B) THE POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT A TO ALL OTHER DISBURSEMENTS INVOLVED, AND SUCH FUNCTIONS SHALL BE EXtdCISEd BY POSTMASTERS AND OTHER AUTHORIZED DISdURSING AGENTS CF THE POST OFFiCE DEPARTMENT AND OF THE POSTAL SAVINGS SYSTEM IN ACCORDANCE WITH tXISlDNo STATUTES PERTAINING TO SUCH FUNCTIONS: PROVIDEDt THAT THE POSTrMASTER GcNERAL SHALL FURNISH TO THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY, WHEN REQUtETED 6Y HIM, SUCH INFORMATION AS THE TREASURY EPARTMEN[ MAY REQUIRE wiTH KtSPECT TO THE AMOUNTS OF MONEY RECEIVED AND DISdJRSED BY THE POST OFFICE OcPARTMENT, ITS POSTMASTERS AND OTHER FISCAL OFFICERS, AND THE PROCEOJRE Fui.LjowEO IN CONNECrION THEREWITH: PROVIDED FJRTHER, THAT UPON REQUEST uF fr- SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY, AND WITH THE APPROVAL OF THE POSTMASTER GeItAL, THE FACILITIES OF THE POST OFFICE
0EPAR fMENf MAY BE UTILiLE I A THE DISBURSEMENT, OR AIDING IN THE OSUdRSEMENT, OF PUBLIC MONEY OF THE UNITED STATES AVAILABLE FOR EXPEvoITUkE BY ANY AGENCY OF TH GOVERNMENT .
SEC. 5. TRANSIt~R OiF INTERBUILDING MESSENGER FUNCTIONS
(A) EXCEPT AS PROHIBITED dY ACTION 1338(B) OF THIS TITLE, THE FUNCTION OF REGULAR INTEABUILDING MESSENGER SERVICE (INCLUDING THE TRANSPORTATION OF MtAIL) AND THE FUNCTION OF IASPORTATION OF MAIL BETWEEN GOVERNMENT AGENCIES AND THE CITY PjuT JFFitEt NOW EXERCISED IN THE DISTRICT OF COL4I81A oY AGENCIES OF THE GOVERNMENT, ARE TRANSFERRED FROM SUCH AGENCIES T3 ANU LONSOLICATED IN rHE POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT AND SHALL BE ADMIIS TERED BY THE POSTMASTER GENERAL UNDER SUCH RULES AND REGULATIONS AS THE PRESIDENT SHALL PRESLRISE: PROVIDED, THAT THIS SECTION SHALL NOT APPLY TO THE TRANSPORTATION OF AUJNEYS AND SECURITIES BY ARMORED TRUCK OR dY OTHER SPECIAL SERVICES, OR iU MESSENGER SERVICE BETWEEN CONTIGUOUS dUILOINGS.
(d) THE DIRECTCR OF THc BJRcAJ OF THE BUDGET MAY WAIVE THE TRANSFER OF ANY MJTUR VEHICLE COMING WIfHIN rHE PURVIEW OF SECTION 14 OF THIS PLAN WHERE HE FINDS THAT THE RTfENfIo, OF SUCH VEHICLE IS ESSENTIAL TO THE PERFORMANCE OF FUNCTIONS OTHER THAN THOSE TRANSFERRED BY THIS SECTION.
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTEitiR
SEC. 6. CERTAIN FUNCTiGNS JF THE SOIL CONSERVATION SERVICE TRANSFERRED THE FJNCTIOAS OF THE SOIL 0OdERVATION SERVICE IN THE DEPARTMENT OF
AGRICULTURE WITH RESPECt TO UI AND MOISTURE CONSERVATION OPERATIONS CONLJCTED ON ANY LANDS JiGER THE JURISDICTION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF THE iNTtIUR ARE TRANSFERRED rJ(0 THE DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR AND SHALL BE AL)MINIs4TERED UNDER THE DiRECTLON AND SUPERVISION OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTIRIJR ,HROUGH SUCH AGG Y Ort AoENCIES IN THE DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR AS THE SEtRETARY SHALL CEaIGNAfE.
DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE






49



SEC. 1. TRANSFER OF G ,VIL AERONAUTICS AUTHORITY
(REPEAL.ED. PJB. L. 85-126, TIT.E XIV, SEC. 1401(C), AUG. 239 1958, 72 STAr. 806.)
SEC. 8. TRANSFER OF 4EATHEK 6JREAU
THE WEATHER BUREAU IN THE OcPAkTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AND ITS FUNCTIONS ARE TRANSFERRED TO THE DEPARTMINk OF COMMERCE AND SHALL BE ADMINISTERED UNDER THE DIRECTION AN) SUPERVISION OF THE SECRETARY OF COMMERCE:
PROVIDED, THAT THE DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MAY CONTINUE TO MAKE SNOW SURVEYS AND TO CONDUCT &SfSAd CONCERNING: (A) RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN
WEATHER AND CROPS, td) LOON%-RANGE WEATHER FORECASTING, AND (C) RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN WEATHER AND SOIL EROSION.
DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
SEC. 9. TRANSFER OP i%.RTAaN FUNCTIONS RELATING TC ENFORCEMENT OF WAGE PAYMENTS UN PUBLIC CONSTRUCTION
THE FUNCTIONS CF THE Se;RETAtY OF THE TREASURY AND THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR JNDER SECTION 2 JF THi AkT OF JUNE 13, 1934, ENTITLED "AN ACT TO EFFECTUATE THE PURPOSE OF GErFAtN STATUTES CONCERNING RATES OF PAY FOR LABOR, BY MAKING IT UNt.AFU. (0 PREVENT ANYONE FRCM RECEIVING THE COMPENSATION CCNTRACTED FuA THtREJNDER, AND FOR OTHER PURPOSES" (48 STAT. 948) (SECTION 276C OF TITLE *O, PUBLIC BUILDINGS, PROPERTY, AND WORKS), ARE TRANSFERRED TO THE SE6RETAAF JF LABOR AND SHALL BE ADMINISTERED BY HIM OR UNDER HIS DIRECTION AND SUPiat&SION BY SUCH AGENCY IN THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR AS THE SECRETARY SHtALL DcSINATE.
UNLYTED STATES MARITIME CUMMISSUN
SEC. 1 TRANSFER OF VAJfIGAL SCHOOL FUNCTIONS
THE FUNCTIONS OF THE ScIRETAiY UF THE NAVY WITH RESPECT TO FURNISHING, MAINTAINING, AND REPAIRIA, VESSELa FOR THE USE OF STATE MARINE OR NAUTICAL SCHOOLS AND WITH RESPECT TO ADMINSTERING GRANTS OF FUNDS FOR THE SUPPORT JF SUCH SiHOOLS ARE TRANSFERRED fJ AND SHALL BE ADMINISTERED BY THE UNITED STATES MARITIME COMMISSION. JURtSDICTION OVER VESSELS, APPAREL, CHARTS, BOOKS, ANu INSTRUMENTS NUJ LUANEd TO STATE MARINE OR NAUTICAL SCHOOLS IS TRANSFERRED FROM THE SE.RETA JF THE NAVY TO THE UNITED STATES MARITIME COMMISSION. (FJNCTIONS AND JJIASDICTION OF MARITIME COMMISSION OUTLINED IN THIS SECTICN TRANSFERRED TU ,UMMANDANT OF U. S. COAST GUARD FOR DURATION OF WORLD WAR Ili SEE EX. URD. NO. 9083.)
FEDERAL SECURITY AGENCY
SEC. 11. TRANSFER OF CERT414 INTERIOR DEPARTMENT INSTITUTIONS (A) SAIN( ELILABETHS -OSPITAL
SAINT ELIZABET-S HOSPITAL AN (HE DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR AND ITS FUNCTIONS ARE TRANSFERREu To TH FEDERAL SECURITY AGENCY AND SHALL BE ADINISTEkED UNDER THE OAECTIUN AND SUPERVISION OF THE FEDERAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATOR. THE ANNUAl. REPORT REQUIRED TO BE SUBMITTED TO THE CONGRESS BY THE SUPERINTENDENT OF THe HOSPITAL SHALL 3E SUBMITTED THROUGH THE FEDERAL SECURITY AOMINI4TRATuR. THE ANNUAL REPORT REQUIRED TO BE FURNISHED TO THE SECRETARY OF TH INTERIOR BY THE BOARD OF VISITORS SHALL aE FURNISHED TO THE FEDERAL SEUIfY ADMINISTRATOR.
(d) FRkEDMEN'S HOSPITAL
FREEDMtN'S HOSPITAL IN THE DEPARTMENTT OF THE INTERIOR AND ITS FUNCTIONS






50



ARE TRANSfERRED TO THE FEuERAL tGCURITY AGENCY AND SHALL BE ADMINISTERED JNDEA THE DIRECTION AND SJPEARViSIJN OF THE FEDERAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATOR.
IC) HOwARD UNIVERSITY
THE FUNCTIONS OF THE OtPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RELATING TO THE AL)MIA'ISTRATION OF HOWARv UNAIEASITY ARE TRANSFERRED TO THE FEDERAL SECURITY AGENCY AND SHALL BE ADMINISTERED UNDER THE DIRECTION AND SUPERVISION OF THE FEDERAL SEU;JKITY ADMINISTRATOR. THE ANNUAL REPORT REQUIRED (0 BE FURNISHED fU THr- SicGRETARY OF THE INTERIOR BY THE PRESIDENT AND DIRECTORS OF THE UNIVERSITY SrALL BE FURNISHED TO THE FEDERAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATOR. THE OFFICE OF cOUCATION SHALL CONTINUE TO MAKE ITS INSPELTIO1S OF AND REPORTS J1 THE AFFAIRS OF HOWARD UNIVERSITY IN ACCORUANCE WITH THE PROVIMiONS OF EXISTING LAW.
(D0) CO.LUMBIA INSTITUTIONS FLR THE DEAF
THE FUNCTIONS OF THE UEPATM4ENT OF THE INTERIOR RELATING TO THE
ADMINISTRATION OF THE COLJMdI1A INaTITUTION FOR THE DEAF ARE TRANSFERRED TO THE FEDERAL SECURITY AGENtY 44u HALL BE ADMINISTERED UNDER THE DIRECTION AND SUPERVISION OF THE FEUEiRAL >EwURITY ADMINISTRATOR. THE ANNUAL REPORT REQ)UiatD U10 BE FURNISHED fU THE SlcRETARY OF INTERIOR BY THE PRESIDENT AND DIRECTORS OF THE INSTITUflUN %HA.L SE FURNISHED TO THE FEDERAL SECURITY ADLMINISTRATOR AND THE ANNUAi. REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF THE INSTITUTION TO THE CO(,ESS SHALL BE SUBMITTED THROUGH THE FEDERAL
SECURITY ADMINISTRATOR.
(E) FEvERAL SECURITY AJAINIj(tRTOR
THE FUNCTIONS TRANSFE44c f[HIS SECTION SHALL BE ADMINISTERED UNDER THE OsREL.TION AND SUPEAVil tIl JF THE FEDERAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATOR THROUGH SuCH OFFICERS OF SUdDI~ViIUNS OF THE FEDERAL SECURITY AGENCY AS THE ADNINLSTRATOR SHALL DeSIGNATE.
SEG. Iz. TRANSFER OF FUJO) ANDJ DRUG ADMINISTRATION
THE FOUD AND DRUG AkDM4NISTAT&ON IN -THE DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AND ITS FUNCTIONS, EXCEPT THoSE FUNGiIONS RELATING TO THE ADMINISTRATION OF THE INSECICIDE ACT OF 1910 ANJ THE NAVAL STORES ACT (FORMER SECTIONS
121-134 OF TITLE 7 AND ScLTIONS 91-99 OF TITLE 7), ARE TRANSFERRED TO THE FEL)ERAL SECURITY AGENCY ANDU SHALL BE ADMINISTERED UNDER THE DIRECTION AND SUPERVISIUN-OF THE FEDERA. SJrIiY ADMINISTRATOR. THE CHIEF OF THE FOOD A'NUD JJG ADMINISTRATION HALL HEiEAFTER BE KNO4N AS THE COMMISSIONER OF FOUO AND RUGS.
GENERAL PROVISIONS
SEC. 13. TRANSFER Ji- FUNCTIONS OF HEADS OF DEPARTMENTS
EXCEPT AS OTHERWISE PRJVIDEd I, THIS PLAN, THE FUNCTIONS OF THE HEAD OF ANY UcPAkTMENT RELATING Fo THE ADMINISTRATIONN OF ANY AGENCY OR FUNCTION fRANiFERRED FROM HIS DEPARIMEN( dt THIS PLAN ARE TRANSFERRED TO, AND SHALL BE EXERCISED BY, THE rEAD OF THE DEPARTMENT OR AGENCY TO WHICH SUCH TRANSFERRED AGENCY OR FU4iTAdN IS TRANSFERRED BY THIS PLAN.
ScC. 14. TRANit ER OF RECORDSt' PROPERTY, AND PERSONNEL
EXCEPT AS OTHERWISE PRJVIDED 14 THIS PLAN, ALL RECORDS AND PROPERTY (IvCLUDINu OFFICE EQUIPMENT) OF (IE SEVERAL AGENCIES, AND ALL RECORDS AND PROPERTY USED PRIMARILY IN THE AJ4INISTRATION OF ANY FUNCTIONS TRANSFERRED BY THIS PLAN, ANC ALL PcRSJoiNE.s USED IN THE ADMINISTRATION OF SUCH






51


AGENCIES AND FUNCTIONS tiNCLUGIN4 OFFICERS WHOSE CHIEF DUTIES RELATE TO SUCH ADMINISTRATION AND mHOSE OFFICES ARE NOT ABOLISHED) ARE TRANSFERRED TO THE RESPECTIVE AGENCIES CON LR4EDs FOR USE IN THE ADMINISTRATION OF THE AGENCIES AND FUNCTIONS TRANSFERREO BY THIS PLAN: 548032305 PROVIDED,
THAT ANY PERSONNEL TRANSFERRE Ti ANY AGENCY BY THIS SECTION 548032306 PROVIDED, THAT ANY PERSONNEL TRAISFERRED TO ANY AGENCY BY THIS SECTION FOUND 8Y THE HEAD OF SJCH AE~C4GY TO BE IN EXCESS OF THE PERSONNEL
NECESSARY FOR THE ADMINASTRATIO1 OF THE FUNCTIONS TRANSFERRED TO HIS AGENCY SHALL BE RETRANSFERAED JNUcR EXISTING LAW TO OTHER POSITIONS IN THE GOVERNMENT SERVICE, OR SEPARATED FROM THE SERVICE SUBJECT TO THE
PROVISIONS OF SECTION A,(A) UF THE REORGANIZATION ACT OF 1939.
SEC. 1>. TRANSFER OF FUNDS
SO MUCH OF THE UNEXPENUtEd SAA,4GES OF APPROPRIATIONS, ALLOCATIONS, OR OTHER FUNDS AVAILABLE FOR THc JSE OF ANY AGENCY IN THE EXERCISE OF ANY FUNCTION TRANSFERRED BY THiS PLAN, OR FOR THE USE OF THE HEAD OF ANY AGENCY IN THE EXERCISE OF ANY FJNTION SO TRANSFERRED, AS THE DIRECTOR OF THE BUREAU OF THE BUDGtT WITH THE APPROVAL OF THE PRESIDENT SHALL
DETERMINE, SHALL BE TRANSFE4REJ TO THE AGENCY CONCERNED FOR USE IN CONNECTION WITH THE EXcRCISc JF THE FUNCTION SO TRANSFERRED. IN
DETERMINING THE AMOUNT TO dE TRANaFERRED THE DIRECTOR OF THE BUREAU OF THE BUDGET MAY INCLUDE AN ANGJNT T. PROVIDE FOR THE LIQUIDATION OF OBLIGATIONS INCURRED AGAINST SUCH APPAJPRIATIbNSt ALLOCATIONS, OR OTHER FUNDS PRIOR TO THE TRANSFER: PROVIDE, THAT THE USE OF THE UNEXPENDED BALANCES OF
APPROPRIATIONS, ALLOCATIONSt, O JTHER FUNDS TRANSFERRED BY THIS SECTION SHALL BE SUBJECT TO THE PROVISIONa OF SECTION 4(0)(3) AND SECTION 9 OF THE REORGANIZATION ACT OF 1934.
MESSAGE OF THE PRESIdENT TJ THE CONGRESS OF THE UNITED STATES:
ONE YEAR AGO THE CONGRESS L)ARECTED THE PRESIDENT TO INVESTIGATE THE ORGANILATiON OF THE EXECUtIVE ESTABLISHMENT AND TO SUBMIT PLANS FOR SUCH TRANSFERS, CONSOLIDATIONb ANU ABOLITIONS OF AGENCIES AS WERE FOUND NECESSARY AND DESIRABLE.
SHORTLY THEREAFTER I SJ~MITTEJ REORGANIZATION PLAN NO. I WHICH IMPROVED THE OVER-ALL MANAGEMENT OF THE EXECUTIVE BRANCH. THIS WAS FOLLOWED BY REORGANIZATION PLAN NO. 11 WHA~H EFFECTED A BETTER ALLOCATION OF CERTAIN AGENCIES AND ACTIVITIES AMONG 04PARTMENTS. ALTHOUGH THESE TWO PLANS HAVE BEEN IN EFFECT LESS THAN A tEAR, THEIR BENEFITS HAVE ALREADY BEEN
GRATIFYING. I HAVE FJUNU THc TASK OF COORDINATING THE WORK OF THE EXECUTIVE BRANCH LESS 01FFIJL(. MANY IMPROVEMENTS IN SERVICE HAVE
OCCURRED, AND SUBSTANTIAL ECUNUMIcS HAVE RESULTED.
REORGANIZATION PLAN NO. I1it 4ECENTLY SUBMITTED, IS A THIRD STEP WHICH
dILL 14PRJVE INTRADEPARTKcNTAL MANAGEMENT THROUGH INTERNAL ADJUSTMENT IN CERTAIN AGENCIES.
I AM NOW PROPOSING A FOURTH R~cJRGANIZATION PLAN WHICH PROVIDES FOR A NUMBER OF INTERDEPARTMENTAL RE ORGANIZATIONS. THESE CHANGES ARE DESIGNED TO INCREASE EFFICIENCY 14t THE ADMINISTRATION OF GOVERNMENT SERVICES BY A MORE LOGICAL GROUPING OF CERTAIN FUNCTIONS AND BY A FURTHER REDUCTION IN THE NUMBER OF INDEPENDENT AGENCIES REPORTING DIRECTLY TO THE CHIEF EXECUTIVE.







52


AGGCCORDINGLY, I AM TRAAMMITTINi HEREWITH REORGANIZATION PLAN NO. IV, WHICt AFTER INVESTIGATIU.t I HAVE PREPARED IN PURSUANCE OF SECTION 4 OF THE REORGANIZATION ACT JF 1949 (PUdLIC, NO. 19, 76TH CONG., 1ST SESS.I APPROVED APRIL 3, 1939; AND I UaELARE WITH RESPECT TO EACH REORGANIZATION MADE IN THIS PLAN, THAT I HAVE FOUND SUCH REORGANIZATION NECESSARY TO ACCOMPLISH ONE jR MORE uF THE ?JRPOSES OF SECTION I1A) OF THE ACT:
1. TO REDUCE EXPENDITURES; 2. TO INCREASE EFFICIENCY;
3. TO CONSOLIDArE AE~CIES ACCORDING TO MAJOR PURPOSES;
4. TO REDUCE THE NUM4ER iF AGENCIES BY CONSOLIDATING THOSE HAVING SIMILAR FUNCTIONS AND BS ABULaHING SUCH AS MAY NOT BE NECESSARY;
5. TO ELIMINATE OVtERLAPPING AND DUPLICATION OF EFFORT.
THE PLAN I NOW TRAMMIT I SHALL DESCRIBE BRIEFLY AS FOLLOWS:
DEPARTMENT OF STATE
THE DOMINICAN CUSTOMS RkCEIVER4HIP IS TRANSFERRED TO THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE FROM THE DIVISION OF TERRITORIES AND ISLAND POSSESSIONS IN THE DEPARTMENt OF THE INTERI a. THilE STATE DEPARTMENT IS THE MOST APPROPRIATE AGENCY TO SUPERVISE THIS ACTIVITY WHICH INVOLVES RELATIONS WITH A FOREIGN
GOVERNMENT.
TAEASUAY DEPARTMENT
THE PLAN TRANSFERS TO tiHE ScCRerARY OF THE TREASURY THE FUNCTION OF THE ATTORNEY GENERAL OF APPROVING; OUT-OF-COURT SETTLEMENTS TECHNICALLY TERMED COMPROMISES OF CASS ARISING UNDER THE FEDERAL ALCOHOL
ADMINISTRATION ACT WHICH HAVE tU, PRIOR TO COMPROMISE, BEEN REFERRED TO THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FOR PROaECUTION. THE PRESENT REQUIREMENT THAT THE ATTORNEY GENERAL APPKUVE AL. COMPROMISES RESULTS IN A CUMBERSOME, TIME-CONSUMING PROCEDURE WHICH THc SMALL AMOUNTS INVOLVED DO NOT WAPRANT. THE PROPOSED HANDLING WILL BE SIMPLERr LESS LIKELY TO CAUSE DELAY, AND CONSISTENT WITH THE PROGeoURE NUd FOLLOWED IN COMPROMISES ARISING UNDER OTHER ACTS WHICH THE TREASURY DEPARTMENT ADMINISTERS.
DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE
EXECUTIVE CRDER NO. o166, I4UED JUNE 20t 1933, PROVIDED FOR THE
CENTRALIZATION OF THE DIdJRSEMiN( FUNCTION IN A DIVISION OF DISBURSEMENT IN THE TREASURY DEPARTMENT. THE RESULTING INCREASE IN EFFICIENCY HAS AMPLY UEM14NSTRATED THE WISDOM OF CENTRALIZING DISBURSEMENT WORK. IN EFFECTUATING THE PLAN, WoEVER, I HAVE FOUND IT NECESSARY TO POSTPONE ITS APPLICATION TO UNITED STAiTES MA4SriALS BECAUSE OF THE UNUSUAL CHARACTER OF THEIR DISBURSING WORK l4 SEvIr4N THE COURTS. EXPERIENCE INDICATES THAT THIS ARRANGEMENT SHOULD dE CONTiNUED. I AM PROPOSING, THEREFORE, THE
PERMANENT TRANSFER OF THE GISB4SLMENT FUNCTION OF UNITED STATES MARSHALS FRGM THc TREASURY DEPARTAENfi TO THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE.
PUST OFFICE DEPARTMENT
IT HAS ALSO BEEN FOUND) DESLAdLE TO CONTINUE PERMANENTLY IN THE POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT THE DISURScME4r OF POST OFFICE FUNDS. THE SPECIAL CHARACTER OF THE WORK OF THiS JEPARTMENTt INVOLVING DISBURSEMENTS IN
THOUSANDS OF POST OFFICES THROUGHuJT THE NATION, REQUIRES HERE, AS WELL AS IN THE CASE OF THE UNITED STATa MARSHALS, A DEPARTURE FROM THE SOUND THEORY OF CENTRAL DISBURalNG. fITH ITS FAR-FLUNG FACILITIES. THE POST






53



OFFICE DEPARTMENT IS BETTER E4JIPPED TO CARRY ON THIS WORK THAN THE
)IVISION UF DISBURSEMENT.
ANOTHER PROPOSAL AFFECTING THE POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT RELATES TO THE TRANSPORTATION OF MAIL ANU OfHEk MATERIAL BETWEEN DEPARTMENTS. IN THE EARLY COLONIAL DAYS, THE iNTER.HAGE OF CORRESPONDENCE AND MESSAGES WAS BY THE SIMPLE HAND-TO-HAND McTHOD. WRAOUALLY A MORE SYSTEMATIC DEVICE BECAME NECESSARY TO TRANSPORT MESSA4Eae WITH THE RESULTANT EVOLUTION OF THE
POSTAL SERVICE. BUSINESS AND PRIVATE CITIZENS IN GENERAL HAVE MADE USE OF THAT SERVICE, AND TODAY WE HAVE IN OUR POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT THE MOST EFFICIENT ORGANIZATION OF ITS KIND IN THE WORLD. HOWEVER, HERE IN THE CAPITAL CITY, THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT, INSTEAD OF UTILIZING FULLY THE
RESOURCES OF THE POST OFFicE DEPATMENT TO MAINTAIN ITS MAIL AND MESSENGER SERVICE, HAS PERMITTED A MLkUTIPLICITY OF INTERDEPARTMENTAL MESSENGER SERVICES, EACH SERVING ITS O W, DEPARTMENT, BUREAU OR AGENCY. THIS
DUPLICATION OF SERVICES IS JNtGONOMICAL AND RESULTS IN A CONSTANT
CRISSCROSSING AND OVERLAPPiNG JF PERSONNEL AND EQUIPMENT, ALL ENGAGED IN A COMMON ACTIVITY. I AM SJAE THAT THE AVERAGE CITIZEN IN WASHINGTONt AS WELL AS OFFICIALS OF THL vUVEANMcNT ITSELF, HAVE WONDERED AT THIS PARADOX WHEREBY THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT I FAILING TO MAKE THE FULLEST USE OF ONE OF ITS OWN1 AGENCIES WHICH IS SPtCIALLY EQUIPPED TO RENDER A SIMPLE, GENTRALIZcD SERVICE FOR ALL THE O[HER AGENCIES. THIS REORGANIZATION PLAN PROPOSES TO 00DO EXACTLY THAT; i46432422 TO PROVIDE FOR THE TRANSPORTATION OF MAIl, uOCUMENTS, PACKA%.ES, AND 548032423 TO PROVIDE FOR THE TRANSPORTATION OF MAIL, DUJLUMENTS, PACKAGES, AND SIMILAR MATERIAL BETWEEN ALL BUILDINGS OCCUPIED BY GOVirN4ENT OFFICES ON A REGULARLY SCHEDULED
BASIS OF SUFFICIENT FAEQUEr.Y TO MEET THE REASONABLE AND NORMAL
REQUIREMENTS OF THESE OFFICES ANJ TO REDUCE TO A MINIMUM THE CONSTANT DISPATCHING OF MESSENGERS Ji SJ-C(ALLEO URGENT AND EMERGENCY ERRANDS. THIS SERVICE wILL BE AVAILAdLE 0N A REIMBURSEMENT BASIS TO THE AGENCIES
EXEMPTED tY THE REORGANIZATION AGf.
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOK
I PROPOSE TO TRANSFER TO THE AtPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR THE ACTIVITIES OF THE SOIL CCNSERVAT dN SliVICE RELATING TO SOIL AND MOISTURE CONSERVATION ON LANDS UNLoD Re THE JJRISDICTION OF THE INTERIOR DEPARTMENT. WITH RESPECT TO PRIVATE LANOS, [Hc SOIL-CONSERVATION WORK OF THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT IS PRIMARILY OF A C4SULTATIVE CHARACTER AND CAN BEST BE CARRIED 09 BY THE OEPARTMcNT OF ARICULTURE THROUGH THE COOPERATION OF THE FARMERS THROUGHOUT THE CJJNTRY. IN THE CASE OF FEDERAL LANDS, THIS WORK INCLUDES THE ACTUAL APPLICATION SY THE GOVERNMENT OF SOIL-CONSERVATION PRACTICES AND IS AN APPRJPRIATE FUNCTION OF THE AGENCY ADMINISTERING THE LAND.
DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
ONE OF THE PURPOSES OF THE AEJRGANIZATION ACT IS TO REDUCE THE NUMBER 3F ADMINISTRATIVE AGENCItS ANU [HEREBY SIMPLIFY THE TASK CF EXECUTIVE MANAGEMENT. WE HAVE MADc 4JdSTANTIAL PROGRESS TOWARD THIS OBJECTIVE UNDER PREVIOUS REORGANIZATION PLANS. AM NOW PROPOSING ANOTHER STEP IN THIS DIRECTION BY PLACING THE LVIL AERONAUTICS AUTHORITY WITHIN THE FRAMEWORK OF THE DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE. AbORGANIZATION PLAN NO. III# WHICH DEALS






54


WITH INTRADEPARTMENTAL CHANGES, 04AWS A MORE PRACTICAL SEPARATION BETWEEN THE FUNCTIONS OF THE AJMINISITATOR AND THE CIVIL AERONAUTICS BOARD. IN PLAN IV# WHICH IS CCNCERNEO WITN INTERDEPARTMENTAL REORGANIZATION, I AM BRINGING THE AUTHORITY IN~U THE OcPARTMENTAL STRUCTURE. THE ADMINISTRATOR WILL REPORT TO THE SECRETARY OF CJOMMERCE. THE FIVE-MEMBER BOARD, HOWEVER, WILL PERFORM ITS RULE-t4AKING, AJJUDICATIVE, AND INVESTIGATIVE FUNCTIONS INDEPENDENT OF THE OEPARTMtENT. AN THE INTEREST OF EFFICIENCY IT WILL BE SUPPLIED dY THE DEPARTMENT WIFH BUDGETING ACCOUNTING, PROCUREMENT, AND OTHER OFFICE SERVICES. A4 A KtSJLT OF THE ADJUSTMENTS PROVIDED IN PLANS III AND IV, I BELIEVE THE CIVIL AERONAUTICS BOARD WILL BE ABLE EFFECTIVELY TO CARRY FORWARD THE IMPJ4TANT WORK OF ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION HERETOFORE PERFORMED BY THE AIR SAFETY dUARD. IN ADDITION TO THE EFFECTIVE AND COOROINAT:D DISCHARGE JF AfCiAuENT INVESTIGATION WORK WHICH THIS TRANSFER WILL FACILITATE, ECONOMIES 14 ADMINISTRATION WILL BE POSSIBLE.
THE IMPORTANCE OF THe WEATHER BUREAU'S FUNCTIONS TO THE NATION'S COMMERCE HAS ALSO LED TO THE DECISION TO TRANSFER THIS BUREAU TO THE DEPARTMENT OF CCOMERCE. THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE AVIATION INDUSTRY HAS IMPOSED JPON THE WEATHER BUREAU A MAJOR RESPONSIBILITY IN THE FIELD OF AIR TRANSPORTATION. THE TRANSFER TJ THE DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE, AS PROVIDED IN THIS PLAN, WILL PERMIT BETTER COORDINATION OF GOVERNMENT ACTIVITIES RELATING TO AVIATION AND TO GuMMERCE GENERALLY, WITHOUT IN ANY WAY LESSENING THE BUREAU'S COUTRIBrldN TO AGRICULTURE.
DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
THE PLAN TRANSFERS TO THE SECRETARY OF LABOR THE FUNCTIONS OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY AND THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR RELATING TO THE ENFORCEMENT OF THE MINIIMJM-,dAGE PROVISIONS IN CONTRACTS FOR FEDERAL CONSTRUCTION. THE SECRETARY OF LABOR IS RESPONSIBLE BY LAW FOR THE DETERMINATION OF THE PREVARIIL4G WAGE RATES INCLUDED IN GOVERNMENT CONTRACTS AND SHOULD PRUPERLY HAVE COMPLETE RESPONSIBILITY FOR THEIR
ENFORCEMENT.
U4ITE) STATES MARITIME COMMi.SSON
I PROPOSE TO TRANSFER TO (HE UNITED STATES MARITIME COMMISSION THE FUNCTIONS OF THE SECRETARY OF THE NAVY RELATING TO STATE MARINE AND NAUTICAL SCHOOLS. THESe SCHOOLS ARE DEVOTED TO TRAINING YOUNG MEN FOR JUNIOR OFFICER POSITIJuS IN (HE MERCHANT MARINE. THE GENERAL
RESPONSIBILITY FOR DEVELOPiNG FACILITIES FOR THE TRAINING OF MERCHANT MARINE PERSONNEL IS VESTco IN (HE MARITIME COMMISSION. THE PROPOSED TRANSFER WILL THUS PERMIT CLOSER DUOROINATION OF THE NAUTICAL SCHOOLS WITH THE TRAINING WORK OF THE MARITIME COMMISSION.
FEDERAL SECURITY AGENCY
THE FtDERAL SECURITY AGENCY HAS AS ITS MAJOR PURPOSES THE PROMOTION OF SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC SECURITY, Ei)JCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY, AND THE HEALTH OF THE CITIZENS. THE FUNCTION JF SAINT ELIZABETHS HOSPITAL, FREEDMEN'S
HOSPITAL, HOWARD UNIVERSITY, AND LOLUMBIA INSTITUTION FOR THE DEAF PLAINLY COME SQUARELY WITHIN THESe PURPOSES. CONSEQUENTLY, I FIND IT NECESSARY AND DESIRABLE IN PURSUANGE OF THE OBJECTIVES OF THE REORGANIZATION ACT TO TRANSFER TO THE FEDERAL SECURITY AGENCY THE RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE INTERIOR DEPARTMENT RELATING ft THESE INSTITUTIONS. THE WORK OF SAINT










ELILABETHS HOSPITAL AN) FREEDM1NeS HOSPITAL IS MUCH MORE AKIN TO THE ACTIVITIES OF THE PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE rN THE FEDERAL SECURITY AGENCY THAN TO THOSE OF ANY OTHER FEDsRAL ESTABLISHMENT. SIMILARLY, HOWARD UNIVERSITY AND COLUMBIA INSTITUTljN FOR THE DEAF CAN DERIVE MORE BENEFIT FROM ASSOCIATION WITH THE OFFICE OF EDUCATION IN THE FEDERAL SECURITY
AGENCY THAN WITH ANY OTHER FEDERAL ORGANIZATION.
I FURTHER PROPOSE TO (AANSFER TO THE FEDERAL SECURITY AGENCY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION 4LTH THE EXCEPTION OF TWO ACTIVITIES INTIMATELY RELATED TO THE WORK OF THE DEPARf4ENT OF AGRICULTURE. THE WORK OF THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION IS UNRELATED TO THE BASIC FUNCTIONS OF THE DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. THERt WAS# HOWEVER, NO OTHER AGENCY TO WHICH THESE FUNCTIONS MORE APPROPRAATcLY BELONGED UNTIL THE FEDERAL SECURITY AGENCY WAS CREATED LAST YEAR. I NOW BELIEVE THAT THE OPPORTUNITY FOR THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION f3 DEVELOP ALONG INCREASINGLY CONSTRUCTIVE LINES LIES IN THIS NEW AGENCY. THERE IS ALSO NEED FOR COORDINATION OF
CERTAIN 3F ITS FUNCTION WIIFT (HOSE OF THE PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE. TO
ACCOMPLISH THESE OBJECTIVE, THE PLAN ESTABLISHES THE ADMINISTRATION AS A SEPARATE UNIT wITHIN THE FEDERAL SECURITY AGENCY.
ECONOMIES
FUNCTIONS MAY BE TRANSFERRED JR CONSOLIDATED UNDER THIS REORGANIZATION ACT, BUT THE ABOLITION OF FUNTIJIS IS PROHIBITED. CONGRESS ALONE CAN CURTAIL OR ABOLISH FUNCTILOiS NU4 PROVIDED BY LAW. SAVINGS MUST COME FROM ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES rICH LOAPRISE ONLY A SMALL FRACTION OF FEDERAL EXPENDITURES. THIS PrtCLUUES THE MAKING OF LARGE REDUCTIONS IN
EXPENDITURES THROUGH REUaGANILATAUN PLANS. THE MAJOR ACHIEVEMENTS IN
REORGANIZATIONS UNDER THIS FORMULA MUST INEVITABLY BE FOUND IN IMPROVED MANAGEMENT AND MORE EFFECTIVE SERVICE. HOWEVER, SOME SAVINGS IN
ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES dLL BE POSSIBLE UNDER THIS PLAN. I ESTIMATE THE IMMEDIATE ANNUAL SAVINGS AT APPAIWIMATELY $300,000.
FUTURE REORGANIZATION NEEDS
THE REORGANIZATION PLANS THJS FAR SUBMITTED 00DO NOT EXHAUST THE
TRANSFERS, CONSOLIDATIONs, AND AtOLITIONS THAT MAY BE NECESSARY AND DESIRABLE. SOME CHANGES THAT NJW APPEAR TO HAVE MERIT REQUIRE FURTHER STUDY. IT IS THE RESPJNSIBILiTY OF THE PRESIDENT AS CHIEF EXECUTIVE TO SEE THAT NEEDED ADJUSTMENTS AND IMPROVEMENTS IN ADMINISTRATIVE ORGANIZATION ARE PADE. BUT THIa HE CANNOT ADEQUATELY ACCOMPLISH WITHOUT PROPER STATUTORY AUTHORITY. (HE PRESENT REORGANIZATION ACT ENTIRELY EXEMPTS SUME 21 ADMINISTRATIVE AGENCIES FROM CONSIDERATION. FURTHERMORE THIS ACT EXPIRES ON JANUAk 20, 141.
I STRONGLY RECOMMEND THE REeNALTMENT OF THE REORGANIZATION ACT, WITHOUT EXEMPTIONS. THE STRUCTURE A~D MANAGEMENT OF OUR GOVERNMENT, LIKE THE ACTIVITIES AND SERVICES IT PERFuRMS, MUST BE KEPT ABREAST OF SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC CHANGE.
FRANKLIN 0. ROOSEV
THE WHITE HOUSE, APRIL 11, L94J.




























61-914 O 76- 5






56



**iTEM 105**
03110.05.0U06689
5 U.S.. APPX. P 520, 4 6JRG PLAN NO. 1 1947 --- REORGANIZATION PLAN NO.
1 OF 1947
12 F.R. 4534, 61 STAT. 951.
PREPARED BY THE PRESIdeNT AN) TRANSMITTED TO THE SENATE AND THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES IN CLUNGRESS ASSEMBLED, MAY lt 1947, PURSUANT TO THE PROVISiUNS OF THE REORGANALATIJN AiT OF 1945, APPROVED DECEMBER 20, 1945.
PART I. PRESIDENT ANU UEPARiMcNT OF JUSTICE
SEC. 101. FUN.TIJN.) JF THE ALIEN PROPERTY CUSTODIAN
(A) EXCEPT AS PROVIDED 4Y SJdStCTION (B) OF THIS SECTION, ALL FUNCTIONS VESTED t LAW IN THE ALIEN PkUPERTY CUSTODIAN OR THE OFFICE OF ALIEN PROPERTY CUSTODIAN ARE TiRASFtRRcUD TO THE ATTORNEY GENERAL AND SHALL BE PERFORMED BY HIM OR, SJOJkCT TJ HIS DIRECTION AND CONTROL, BY SUCH OFFICERS AND AGENCIES OF THE UEPARTHENT OF JUSTICE AS HE MAY DESIGNATE.
(8)i THE FUNCTIONS VESTIh BY LAW IN THE ALIEN PROPERTY CUSTODIAN OR THE OFFICE OF ALIEN PROPERTY 4JSTOJiAs WITH RESPECT TO PROPERTY OR INTERESTS LOCATED IN THE PPILLIPPINES JR dHICH WERE SO LOCATED AT THE TIME OF
VESTING II OR TRANSFER TO AN OFFL.ER Ok AGENCY OF THE UNITED STATES UNDER THE TRADL)ING WITH THE ENERGY ACf, AS AMENDED (SECTION 1 ET SEQ. OF APPENDIX TO TITLE 501, ARE TRANSFERRED fU THE PRESIDENT AND SHALL BE PERFORMED BY HIM ORK SuBJECT TO HIS tLREGILJN AND CONTROL, BY SUCH OFFICERS AND AGENCIES AS HE MAY DESIGNATE.
SEL. 102. APPROVAL OF AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ORDERS
THE FUNCTION OF THE PRESIULO1T WITH RESPECT TO APPROVING DETERMINATIONS OF THE StCRETARY OF AGRi~JLTUt aN CONNECTION WITH AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ORDERS, iJDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING AGREEMENT ACT OF 1937, AS AMENDED (SECTION 608C (9) OF TITLE 7), IS ABOLISHED.
PART II. DEPARTMENT OF THE TRcASURY
SEL. 241. CONTRACT SETTLEMENT FUNCTIONS
THE FUNCTIONS OF THE DiAECTJA JF CONTRACT SETTLEMENT AND OF THE OFFICE OF CONTRACT SETTLEMENT ARE TRANSFERRED TO THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY AND SHALL BE PERFORMED BY HIM OR, SUBJECT TO HIS DIRECTION AND CONTROL, BY SJCH OFFICERS AND AGENCIES OF rtdc DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY AS HE MAY DESIGNATE. THE CONTRACT SETTLEMENT ADVISORY BOARD CREATED BY SECTION 5 OF THE CONTRACT SETTLEMENT ALT OF A944 (58 STAT. 649) (SECTION 105 OF TITLE 41) AND THE APPEAL BOAR) ESTALISHiED UNDER SECTION 13(D) OF THAT ACT ARE TRANSFERRED TO THE DEPARTMETr UF THE TREASURY: PROVIDED, THAT THE
FUNCTIONS OF THE BOARDS SHAL. dc PERFORMED BY THEM, RESPECTIVELY, UNDER SUCH CONDITIONS AND LIMITATIUN Aa MAY NOW OR HEREAFTER BE PRESCRIBED BY LAW. THE OFFICE OF CONTRACT ScrTsEMENT IS ABOLISHED.
SEC. 2,2. NATIONAL PRJHIdITIO,4 ACT FUNCTIONS
THE FUNCTIONS OF THE ATTORNcY GENERAL AND OF THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE WITH RESPECT TO (A) THE DETcRMiNATION OF INTERNAL REVENUE TAXES AND PENALTIES (EXCLUSIVE CF THE UEiERMINATION OF LIABILITY GUARANTEED BY PERMIT BONDS) ARISING Or OF VIOLATION OF THE NATIONAL PROHIBITION ACT (SEE NUTt TO SECTION 1 OF TITLE !7) OCCURRING PRIOR TO THE REPEAL OF THE EIGHTENTH AMENDMENT TO rE COiST&TUTION# AND (B) THE COMPROMISE, PRIOR TO






57


REFERENCE TO THE ATTORNEY GENEKRAi. FOR SUIT, OF LIABILITY FCR SUCH TAXES AND PENALTIES, ARE TRANSFERREO TJ THE COMMISSIONER OF INTERNAL REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASJAY: PROVIDED, THAT ANY COMPROMISE OF SUCH
LIABILITY SHALL BE EFFECTED IN 4G.ORDANCE WITH THE PROVISIONS OF SECTION 3761 OF (HE INTERNAL RtVENI CJE. ALL FILES AND RECORDS OF THE
DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE JSEU PRA4ARILY IN THE ADMINISTRATION OF THE FUNCTIONS TRANSFERRED BY THE PAiOISIONS OF THIS SECTION ARE HEREBY MADE AVAILABLE TO THE COMMI$SIGNEk OF INTERNAL REVENUE FOR USE IN THE ADMINISTRATION OF SUCH FUN,TIONS.
PART III. DEPARTMENT OF AGKICJLTURE
SEC. 301. AGRICULTURAL R&ES&&.A FUNCTIONS
THE FUNCTIONS OF Tr4 FOLLOWING AGENCIES OF THE DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, NAMELY, THE adUREAJ OF ANIMAL INDUSTRY, THE BUREAU OF DAIRY INDSTRY, THE BUREAU JF P.AT INDUSTRY# SOILS, AND AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING, THE BUREAU OF ENTUMUL.UGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE, TIE BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL AND INDUSTRIAL CHEMtSTRY, THE BUREAU OF HUMAN NUTRITION AND HOME ECONOMICS, THE OFFICE OF EXPERIMENT STATIONS, AND THE AGRICULTURAL RE.SEA&C t.ENTER, TOGETHER WITH THE FUNCTIONS OF THE AGRICULTURAL &R.EA&Qj. ADMINISTRATOR, ARE TRANSFERRED TO THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE AND SHALL BE PERFORMED BY THE SECRETARY JiR, SUBJECT TO HIS DIRECTION AND CONTROL, BY SUCH OFFICERS AND AGENCIES UF [HE DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AS HE MAY
DESIGNATE.
PART IV. FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSJ4ANCE CORPORATION
SEC. 4J1. CREDIT UNIJN FUNCTIJNS
THE FUNCTIONS OF Trt FAKM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION AND THE GOVERNOR THEREOF UNDER THE FEDERAL CREDIT JNION ACT, AS AMENDED, TOGETHER WITH THE FUNCTIONS OF THE SECRETARY 3F AGRICULTURE WITH RESPECT THERETO, ARE TRANSFERRED TO TIE FEDijRAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION.
PAR" V. WAR ASSETS AMNISIRAION
SECS. 501, 502. REPeALED. JUNE 30, 1949, CH. 288, TITLE VI, SEC. 6021A)(til 63 STAT. 399, RENUJM8ilRED SEPT. 5, 19509 CH. 849, SEC. 6(A),
(B), 64 STAT. 583.
PART VI. GENERAL PROVISIUNi
SEC. 601. TERMINATION JF FjNi[IONS
NOTHING CONTAINED IN THIS. RcJR.ANIATION PLAN SHALL BE DEEMED TO EXTEND THE DURATION OF ANY FUNCfIGLUN *EtUND THE TIME WHEN IT WOULD OTHERWISE EXPIRE AS PROVIDED BY LAW.
SEC. o02. TRANSFER OF RE.JRDS, PROPERTY, PERSONNEL, AND FUNDS
THERE ARE HEREBY TRAafERREt) TO THE RESPECTIVE AGENCIES IN WHICH
FUNCTIONS ARE VESTED PUASUANT TO (HE PROVISIONS OF THIS PLAN, TO BE USED, EMPLOYED, AND EXPENDED IN CUNNtGTON WITH SUCH FUNCTIONS, RESPECTIVELY, OR IN WINDING UP THE AFFAIR OF AGtNCIES ABOLISHED IN CONNECTION WITH THE
TRANSFER OF SUCH FUNCTION, (L) TiE RECORDS AND PROPERTY NOW BEING USED OR HELD IN CONNECTION WITH SUGH FJN ACTIONS, (2) THE PERSONNEL EMPLOYED IN CONNECTION WITH SUCH FJN.TIt N, ANJ (3) THE UNEXPENDED BALANCES OF APPROPRIATIONS, ALLUCATIuNS, UR OTHER FUNDS AVAILABLE OR TO BE MADE AVAILABLE FOR USE IN CONNECTION WdiTH SUCH FUNCTIONS.
SEC. 603. EFFECTIVE DATE






58



THrE PROVISIONS OF THIS PLAN SHALL TAKE EFFECT ON JULY It, 1947, UNLESS A LATER DATE IS REQUIRED dY THE PROVISIONS OF THE REORGANIZATION ACT OF 1945.
MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT TJ THE CONGRESS OF THE UNITED STATES:
I AM TRANSMITTING HErEWITHr REORGANIZATION PLAN NO. 1 OF 1947. THE PROVISIONS OF THIS PLAN AE DESIGNED TO MAINTAIN ORGANIZATIONAL
ARRANGEMENTS WORKED OUT UNDER Al(dRITY OF TITLE I OF THE FIRST WAR POWERS ACT. THe PLAN HAS A TWJFULD OBJECTIVE: TO PROVIDE FOR MORE ORDERLY fRANSIfION FROM ,AR TO PEALETI4E OPERATION AND TO SUPPLEMENT MY PREVIOUS ACTIONS LOOKING TOWARD) THE TERMINATION OF WARTIME LEGISLATION.
THE FIRST WAR POWERS ALT PROVIDES THAT TITLE I
SHALL REMAIN IN FORCE DURING THE CONTINUANCE OF THE PRESENT WAR AND FOR SIX MONTHS AFTER THE TERMANATIU,4 JF THE WAR, OR UNTIL SUCH EARLIER TIME AS THE CONGRESS BY CONCURRENT RE.ULJTION OF THE PRESIDENT MAY DESIGNATE. JPON THE TERMINATION OF T41S TITLc ALL CHANGES IN THE ORGANIZATION OF ACTIVITIES AND AGENCIES EFF.TcDL) UNDER ITS AUTHORITY EXPIRE AND THE FUNCTIONS REVERT TO THEIA PREVIOUS LOCATIONS UNLESS OTHERWISE PROVIDED BY LAW.
ALTUGEfHER NEARLY 135 tXECUTIVt ORDERS HAVE BEEN ISSUED IN WHOLE OR IN PART UNDER TITLE I OF THE FIRST WAR POWERS ACT. THE INTERNAL ORGANIZATION OF THE WAR AND NAVY L)EPARjAE,4rS HAS BEEN DRASTICALLY OVERHAULED UNDER THIS AUTHORITY. MOST OF THE EMERGLNC1Y AGENCIES, WHICH PLAYED SO VITAL A POLE IN THE SUCCESSFUL PROSECJ[ION JF (HE WAR, WERE BASED IN WHOLE OR IN PART JPON THIS TITLE. WITHOUT THE AdILiTY, WHICH THESE PROVISIONS AFFORDED, TO ADJUST THE MACHINERY OF GOVERNMtiNT TO CHANGING NEEDS, IT WOULD NOT HAVE BEEN POSaIBLE TO DEVELOP THE iF- ECTIVE, HARD-HITTING ORGANIZATION WHICH PRODJCED VICTORY. THE OA4ANIZATION OF WAR ACTIVITIES HAD TO BE WORKED OUT STEP BY STEP AS THE WAR PRJGRAM JNFOLDED AND EXPERIENCE POINTED THE WAY. THAT WAS INEVITABLE. THE PROd.EMS AND THE FUNCTIONS TO BE PERFORMED WERE LARGELY NEW. CONDITIONS LHANGeD .ONTINUALLY AND OFTEN RADICALLY. SPEED OF ACTION WA4 ESSENTIAL. BU" WITH THE AID OF TITLE I OF THE FIRST WAR POWERS ACT, IT WAS POSSIBLE T GEAR THE ADMINISTRATIVE MACHINERY OF THE
GOVERNMENT TO HANDLE THE ENURIUJS LOAD THRUST UPON IT BY THE RAPIDLY EVOLVING WAR PROGRAM.
SINCE VJ-DAY THIS 4ANE AUtHORITY HAS BEEN USED EXTENSIVELY IN DEMOBILIZING WAR AGENCIES AND Rd.UNVERTING THE GOVERNMENTAL STRUCTURE TO PEACETIME NEEDS. THIS PRUCESS H4S BEEN LARGELY COMPLETED. THE BULK OF TEMPORARY ACTIVITES HAVE CEASED AND MOST OF THE CONTINUING FUNCTIONS TRANSFERRED DURING THE MAR HAVE ALREADY BEEN PLACED IN THEIR APPROPRIATE PEACETIME LOCATIONS.
THE ORGANIZATIONAL AUJJUTMEITS WHICH SHOULD BE CONTINUED ARE
ESSENrIALLY OF TwO TYPES: FIRSf, CHANGES IN THE ORGANIZATION OF PERMANENT FJNCTIOL)S, WHICH 1AVE DEMiNSTRATEO THEIR ADVANTAGE DURING THE WAR YEARS. SECOND, TRANSFERS OF CONfNUING, ACTIVITIES WHICH WERE VESTED BY STATUTE IN TEMPORARY WAR AGENCIES adT HAVE 4INCE BEEN MOVED BY EXECUTIVE ORDER UPON
THE TERMINATION OF THESE GENCLES.
IN MOST CASES THE ACflUN NE;EiSARY TO MAINTAIN ORGANIZATIONAL GAINS
MADE UiuER TITLE I OF THE FIRST WAR POWERS ACT CAN BEST BE TAKEN BY THE







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SIMPLIFIED PROCEDURE AFFJAGED dY (HE REORGANIZATION ACT OF 1945, THE FIRST PURPOSE UF WHICH WAS TO FAGLLITATE THE ORDERLY TRANSITION FROM WAR TO PEACE. ALL OF THE PROVISIONS OF (HIS PLAN REPRESENT DEFINITE IMPROVEMENTS IN ADMINISTRATION. SEVERAL ARE ESSENTIAL STEPS IN DEMOBILIZING THE WAR EFFORT. THE ARRANGEMENTS THEY PROVIDE FOR HAVE BEEN REVIEWED BY THE
CONGRESS IN CONNECTION WITH APPROPRIATION REQUESTS. SINCE THE PLAN DOES NOT CHANGE EXISTING ORGANIZATION, SAVINGS CANNOT BE CLAIMED FOR IT. HOWEVER, INCREASED EXPEN$ AND DISRUPTION OF OPERATIONS WOULD RESULT IF THE PRESENT ORGANIZATION WERE rERMINATED AND THE ACTIVITIES REVERTED TO THEIR FORMER LOCATIONS.
IN ADDITION TO THE MAfERS DEALT WITH IN THIS REORGANIZATION PLAN AND IN REORGANIZATION PLAN NU. 2 UF 1947, THERE ARE SEVERAL OTHER CHANGES IN ORGANILATION MADE UNDER fITLE I OF THE FIRST WAR POWERS ACT ON WHICH
ACTION SHuULD BE TAKEN BEFORE [NE TERMINATION OF THE TITLE. THE PROPOSED LEGISLATION FOR A NATIONAL DEFENSE ESTABLISHMENT PROVIDES FOR CONTINUING THE INTERNAL ORGANIZATIONAL ARRANGEMENTS MADE IN THE ARMY AND NAVY
PURSUANT TO THE FIRST WAR POWERS ACT. I HAVE ON SEVERAL OCCASIONS
RECOMMENDED THE CREATION JF A SINGLE AGENCY FOR THE ADMINISTRATION OF THE HOUSING PROGRAMS. SINCE SECTION 5(E) OF THE REORGANIZATION ACT OF 1945 MAY CAST SOME DOUBT ON MY AUTrIORITY TO ASSIGN RESPONSIBILITY FOR THE LIQUIDATION OF THE SMALLER WAA PuANTS CORPORATION BY REORGANIZATION PLAN, I- RECUMALND THAT THE RECONSTRUCTION FINANCE CORPORATION BE AUTHORIZED BY LEGISLATIuN TO CONTINUE TO LIQJiUATE THE AFFAIRS RELATING TO FUNCTIONS TRANSFERRtD TO IT FAtUM rHe SMALLER WAR PLANTS CORPORATION.
IT IS IMPERATIVE THAT TITLE I OF THE FIRST WAR POWERS ACT REMAIN EFFECTIVE UNTIL ALL OF TiIESE ,ATIERS HAVE BEEN DEALT WITH. AN EARLIER TERMINATION OF THE TITLE WOULD) )ETROY IMPORTANT ADVANCES IN ORGANIZATION AND IMPAIi THE ABILITY OF THE eXE UTIVE BRANCH TO ADMINISTER EFFECTIVELY SOME OF THE MAJOR PROGRAM OF (HE GOVERNMENT.
I HAVE FOUND, AFTER IIVEST1ATLUN, THAT EACH REORGANIZATION CONTAINED IN THIS PLAN IS NECESSARY TO ACC oMPLISH ONE. OR MORE OF THE PURPOSES SET FORTH IN SECTION 2(A) JF THE RcORGANIZATION ACT OF 1945. EACH. OF THESE
REORGANIZATIONS IS EXPLAINED) BELOW.
FUNCTIONS OF THE ALIEN PROPERTY CUSTODIAN
THE REORGANIZATION PLAN PROVIDES FOR THE PERMANENT LOCATION OF THE
FUNCTIONS VESTED BY STATJEE IN THE ALIEN PROPERTY CUSTODIAN AND THE OFFICE OF ALIEN PROPERTY CUSTODIAN. IN 1934 THE FUNCTIONS OF THE ALIEN PROPERTY CUSTODIAN WERE TRANSFERRED TJ TriE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE, WHERE THEY REMAINED UNTIL 1942. BECAUSE OF THE GREAT VOLUME OF ACTIVITY RESULTING FROM WORLD WAR II, A SEPARATE OFFICE OF ALIEN PROPERTY CUSTODIAN WAS CREATED BY EXECUTIVE ORDER NO. 9495 OF MARCH 11, 1942. THIS OFFICE WAS
TERMINATED BY EXECUTIVE ORDER NJ. 9788 OF OCTOBER 14, 1946, AND THE FUNCTIONS OF THE OFFICe AND JF THE ALIEN PROPERTY CUSTODIAN WERE
TRANSFERRED TO THE ATTORNEY GENERAL EXCEPT FOR THOSE RELATING TO PHILLIPPINE PROPERTY. THE LAGEk WERE TRANSFERRED SIMULTANEOUSLY TO THE PHILLIPPINE ALIEN PROPERTY ADIN4TRATION ESTABLISHED BY EXECUTIVE ORDER NO. 9789.
WHILE THE TRADING Wi(H THE E,4EMY ACTt AS AMENDED AT THE BEGINNING OF






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TrHE WAR, AUTHORIZED THE PRE1SIJEt TO DESIGNATE THE AGENCY OR PERSON IN WHICH ALIEN PROPERTY SHtUOLD VeST AND TO CHANGE SUCH DESIGNATIONS, SUBSEQUENT LEGISLATION rHAS LOUGEJ CERTAIN FUNCTIONS IN THE ALIEN PROPERTY CUSTODIAN AND THE OFFICE OF ALI.E, PROPERTY CUSTODIAN. SIMILARLY, THOUGH THE PHILLAPPINE PROPERTY ACT VESTED IN THE PRESIDENT THE THEN EXISTING ALIEN PROPERTY FUNCTIONS AS rO PHILLIPPINE PROPERTY, CERTAIN FUNCTIONS AFFECTING SUCH PROPERTY HAVL 4INCE BEEN ESTABLISHED WHICH HAVE BEEN ASSIGNED oY STATUTE TO Ti ALIti PROPERTY CUSTODIAN.
IN ORUER TO MAINTAIN rHE CITING ARRANGEMENTS FOR THE ADMINISTRATION OF ALIEN PROPERTY AND TO AVOID THE CONFUSION WHICH OTHERWISE WOULD OCCUR ON THE TERMINATION OF (ITLE a UF THE FIRST WAR POWERS ACT, THE
REORGANIZATION PLAN TRANSi- RS TO fHE ATTORNEY GENERAL ALL FUNCTIONS VESTED BY LAW IN THE ALIEN PROPERTY GUSfDIAN AND THE OFFICE OF ALIEN PROPERTY CUSTODIAN EXCEPT AS TO PHILLIPPINc PROPERTY. THE FUNCTIONS RELATING TO PHILLIPPItNE PROPERTY ARE TRANSI-EARED TO THE PRESIDENT, TO BE PERFORMED BY SUCH OFFICER OR AGENCY A HE MAY DESIGNATE, THUS PERMITTING THE CONTINUED ADMINISTRATION OF THESE FUNCGTiDNa THROUGH THE PHILLIPPINE ALIEN PROPERTY
ADMINISTRATION.
APPROVAL OF AGRICULTURAL AAoKCTING ORDERS
SECTION 8C IF THE AGRICJLTJRAL MARKETING AGREEMENTS ACT OF 1937 PROVIDES (HAT MARKETING uRDERa OF THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE MUST IN CERTAIN CASES BE APPROVED oY THE PRESIDENT BEFORE ISSUANCE. IN ORDER TO RELIEVc THE PRESIDENT OF AN JNIcLESSARY BURDEN, THE RESPONSIBILITY FOR' APPROVAL WAS DELEGATED i0 THt Ei;ONOMIC STABILIZATION DIRECTOR DURING THE WAR, AND WAS FORMALLY TRANS EitEu TO HIM BY EXECUTIVE ORDER NO. 9705 OF MARCH 15, 1946. SINCE [HE JELKETARY OF AGRICULTURE IS THE PRINCIPAL ADVISER OF THE PRESIDENT IN t4ATTERS RELATING TO AGRICULTURE, AND SINC& FINAL AUTHORITY HAS BEEN SSiGNLE TO THE SECRETARY BY LAW IN MANY MATTERS OF EQUAL OR GREATER IMPUr(ANGtit THE REQUIREMENT OF PRESIDENTIAL APPROVAL OF INDIVIDUAL MARKETING UJERS MAt WELL BE DISCONTINUED. ACCORDINGLY, THE PLAN AdOL&SHES THE FUNCTAUN JF (iHE PRESIDENT RELATIVE TO THE APPROVAL OF SUCH URDEAS.
CUNTRALT SETTLEMENT FJNiTIO-4S
ftie OFFICE OF CONTRAE SEI(TLcm4ENT WAS ESTABLISHED BY LAW IN 1944 AND SHORTLY THEREAFTER WAS P,..ACE 6V STATUTE IN THE OFFICE OF WAR MOBILIZATION AND REGONVERSICN. THE PRINCIPAL PURPOSES OF THE OFFICE OF CONTRACT SETTLEMENT HAVE BEEN TO PRESCRIBE THE POLICIES, REGULATIONS, AND
P ROCEUJRES GOVERNING THE SETTtiMcNT OF WAR CONTRACTS, AND TO PROVIDE AN APPEAL BOARD TO HEAR AND c cADE APPEALS FROM THE CONTRACTING AGENCIES IN THE SETTLEMENT OF CONTRACTS. A REMARKABLE RECORD HAS BEEN ACHIEVED FOR THE RAPID SETTLEMENT OF WAR .ONTRACTS, BUT AMONG THOSE WHICH REMAIN ARE SOME OF THE LARGEST AND MOST COMPLEX. CONSIDERABLE TIME MAY BE REQUIRED TO COMPLETE THESE CASES AND OI>PUxE OF THE APPEALS.
THOJGH THE FUNCTIONS OF THE OFFICE OF CONTRACT SETTLEMENT CANNOT YET BE TERMINArEU, IT IS EVIDENT THAT THEY NO LONGER WARRANT THE MAINTENANCE OF A SEPARAfE OFFICE. FOR THIS REASON, EXECUTIVE ORDER NO. 9809 OF DECEMBER 12, 1946b TRANSFERRED THE FUNCiaOS OF THE DIRECTOR OF CONTRACT SETTLEMENT TO THt SECRETARY OF THE TREASJARt AND THOSE OF THE OFFICE OF CONTRACT






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SETTLEMENT TO THE DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY. AS THE CENTRAL FISCAL AGENCY OF THE EXECUTIVE 6RANH THE TREASURY DEPARTMENT IS CLEARLY THE LOGICAL ORGANIZATION TO C.AaRY TO .ONCLUSION THE OVER-ALL ACTIVITIES OF THE CONTRACT SETTLEMENT PROGrAm. THE PLAN CONTINUES THE PRESENT ARRANGEMENT AND ABOLISHES THE OFFICE OF ;ONTRACT SETTLEMENT, THEREBY AVOIDING ITS REESTABLISHMENT AS A SEPARATE AGENCY ON THE TERMINATION OF TITLE I OF THE FIRST WAR POWERS ACT.
NATIONAL PROHIBITION AT FUNCTIONS
THE ACT OF MAY 27, 1930 (4o STATE. 427h, IMPOSED UPON THE ATTORNEY GENERAL CERTAIN DUTIES RESPECTING ADMINISTRATION AND ENFORCEMENT OF THE NATIONAL PROHIBITION ACT. BY EXECUTIVE ORDER NO. 6639 OF MARCH 10, 1934, ALL OF THE POWERS AND DUTIES OF THE ATTORNEY GENERAL RESPECTING THAT ACT, EXCEPT THE POWER AND AUTHORITY (0 DETERMINE AND TO COMPROMISE LIABILITY FOR TAXES AND PENALTIES* MERE fRAASFERREO TO THE COMMISSIONER OF INTERNAL REVUE. THE EXCEPTED FUNCTIUNS, HOWEVER, WERE TRANSFERRED SUBSEQUENTLY TO THE COMMISSIONER OF ANTERAAL REVENUE BY EXECUTIVE ORDER NO. 9302 OF FEBRUARY 9, 1943, ISSUED UNDER TrIlE AUTHORITY OF TITLE I OF THE FIRST WAR POWERS ACT, 1941.
SINCE THE FUNCTIONS OF JETE&RMNING TAXES AND PENALTIES UNDER VARIOUS STATUTES AND OF COMPROMISE OF &.LAcILITY THEREFOR PRIOR TO REFERENCE TO THE ATTORNEY GENERAL FOR SJIT ARc WELL-ESTABLISHED FUNCTIONS OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INTERNAL REVENJE. THIS MINOR FUNCTION UNDER THE NATIONAL PROHIBITIJN ACT IS MORE APPROPRIATELY PLACED IN THE BUREAU OF INTERNAL REVENUE THAN IN ThE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE.
AGRICULTURAL RESFARC FJNCTIONS
BY EXECUTIVE ORDER NO. 9069 OF FEBRUARY 23, 1942, SIX LE EARCH BUREAUS, THE OFFICE OF EXPERIMENT STATiLN4, AND THE AGRICULTURAL RESUEaC CENTER WERE CONSOLIDATED INTO AN A RIi.ULTURAL RESEgARL ADMINISTRATION TO BE ADMINISTERED BY AN OFFICER DESIGNATED BY THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE. THE CONSTITUENT BUREAUS AND AGcNCIES OF THE ADMINISTRATION HAVE, IN
PRACTICE, RETAINED THEIR SEPARAfE IDENTITY. THIS CONSOLIDATION AND CERTAIN TRANSFERS OF FJNCTIONS BETWEEN THE CONSTITUENT BUREAUS AND
AGENCIES HAVE ALL BEEN RECOGNILEi AND PROVIDED FOR IN THE SUBSEQUENT
APPROPRIATION ACTS PASSE BY THE CONGRESS.
BY THE PLAN THE FUNCTIONS OF THE EIGHT RESEARCH BUREAUS AND AGENCIES WHICH ARE PRESENTLY ,uSOLIUA[ED INTO THE AGRICULTURAL RFSEA RCH ADMINISTRATION ARE TRANSPERREd TO THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE TO BE PERFORMED BY HIM OR UNIeR HIS DIRECTION AND CONTROL BY SUCH OFFICERS OR AGENCIES OF THE DEPARTMENT iF AGRICULTURE AS HE MAY DESIGNATE.
THE BENEFITS WHICH HAVE BdcEN DERIVED FROM CENTRALIZED REVIEW,
COORDINATION, AND CONTROL OF E.FUA&G PROJECTS AND FUNCTIONS BY THE AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH ADMINISTRAIOR HAVE AMPLY DEMONSTRATED THE LASTING VALUE OF THIS CONSOLIDATION. BY TRANSFERRING THE FUNCTIONS OF THE
CONSTITUENT BUREAUS ANC AGENCItS i o THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE, IT WILL BE POSSIBLE TO CONTINUE THIi CONSOLIDATION AND TO MAKE SUCH FURTHER
ADJUSTMENTS IN THE ORGANALATIJN JF AGRICULTURAL RFSARCH ACTIVITIES AS FUTURE CONDITIONS MAY REQUIRE. THIS ASSIGNMENT OF FUNCTIONS TO THE
SECRETARY IS IN ACCORD WITH THt SJUNO AND LONG-ESTABLISHED PRACTICE OF THE






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CONGRESS 3F VESTING SUBSTANTIVE FJNCTIONS IN THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE RATHER THAN IN SUBORDINATE OFFICERS OR AGENCIES OF THE DEPARTMENT.
CREDIT UNION FUNCTIONS
THE PLAN MAKES PERMANENT THE TRANSFER OF THE ADMINISTRATION OF FEDERAL FUNCTIONS WITH RESPECT TJ CREJIr JNIONS TO THE FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION. THESE FUN.TION~S, ORIGINALLY PLACED IN THE FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION, WERE TRAjiSFE;AREJ TO THE FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION BY EXECUTIVE GADER NO. 9148 OF APRIL Z7t 1942. MOST CREDIT UNIONS ARk PREDOMINANTLY JRdAN INaTITUTIONS, AND THE CREDIT-UNION PROGRAM BEARS VERY LITTLE RELATION TU THE FUNCTIONS OF THE FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION. THE SUPERVISION OF CREDIT UNION FITS IN LOGICALLY WITH THE GENERAL BANK SUPERVISORY FUNCTIONS OF THE FEDERAL DEPOSITT INSURANCE CORPORATION. THE FEDERAL DEPU4IT INSURANCE CORPORATION SINCE 1942 HAS SUCCESSFULLY ADMINISTERED THE GREUIT-UNION PROGRAM, AND THE SUPERVISION OF CREDIT-UNION EXAMINERS hAb SEEl IlTEGRATED INTO THE FIELD AND DEPARTMENTAL ORGANIZATION OF THE CORPORATIOi. IN THE INTERESTS OF PRESERVING AN ORGANIZATIONAL ARRANGEMETr WHILH OPERATES EFFECTIVELY AND ECONOMICALLY, THE PROGRAM SHOULD REMAIN AN ItS PRESENT LOCATION.
WAR ASSETS ADMINISTRATION
THE PRESENT ORGANIZATION FUR THE DISPOSAL OF SURPLUS PROPERTY IS THE PRODUCT OF 2 1/2 YEARS OF PRACTICAL EXPERIENCE. BEGINNING WITH THE
SURPLUS PROPERTY BOARD IN CHARGE OF GENERAL POLICY AND A GROUP OF AGENCIES DESIGNATED BY IT TO HANDLE THk DiSPOSAL OF PARTICULAR TYPES OF PROPERTY, THE RESPONSIBILITY FOR MU f O- (HE SURPLUS DISPOSAL HAS GRADUALLY BEEN DRAWN TOGETHER IN ONE AGENCY THe WAR ASSETS ADMINISTRATION HEADED BY A SINGLE ADMINISTRATOR. EXPERIENCE HAS DEMONSTRATED THE DESIRABILITY OF CENTRALIZED RESPONSIBILITY IN ADMsNISTERING THIS MOST DIFFICULT PROGRAM.
THE REORGANIZATION PLAN diWJL CONTINUE THE CENTRALIZATION OF SURPLUS DISPOSAL FUNCTIONS IN A SINGLE AGENCY HEADED BY AN ADMINISTRATOR. THIS IS ACCOMPLISHED BY TRANSFERRING fHE FUNCTIONS, PERSONNEL, PROPERTYe RECORDS, AND FUNDS OF THE WAR ASStTS ANMI ISTRATION CREATED BY EXECUTIVE ORDER TO THE STATUTORY SURPLUS PROPERTY ADMINISTRATION. IN ORDER TO AVOID
CONFUSION AND TO MAINTAIN THE iUN(INUITY OF OPERATIONS, THE NAME OF THE SURPLUS PROPERTY ADMINISTRATIjN IS CHANGED TO WAR ASSETS ADMINISTRATION.
BECAUSE THE PLAN COMBINES IN OE AGENCY, NOT ONLY THE POLICY FUNCTIONS NOW VESTED BY STATUTE IN THE SuRPLUS PROPERTY ADMINISTRATOR, BUT ALSO THE IMMENSE DISPOSAL OPERATIONS NUW CONCENTRATED IN THE TEMPORARY WAR ASSETS ADMINISTRATION, I HAVE FUUND if NECESSARY TO PROVIDE IN THE PLAN FOR AN ASSOCIATE WAR ASSETS ADMAiNISTRATJR ALSO-APPOINTED BY THE PRESIDENT WITH THE APPROVAL OF THE SENATE. IT IS ESSENTIAL THAT THERE BE AN OFFICER WHO CAN ASSIST THE ADMINISTRAfUR IN (HE GENERAL MANAGEMENT OF THE AGENCY AND WHO CAN TAKE OVER THE JARECTAJN OF ITS OPERATIONS IN CASE OF THE ABSENCE OR DISABILITY OF THE ADMINISTRAfJOR OR OF A VACANCY IN HIS OFFICE.
HARRY S. TRUMAN.
THE WHITE HOUSEt MAY Is 1947.






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**LTEM 110**
00110.05.006989
5 U.S.C. APPX. P 548, AEORG PLAN NU. 1 1953 --- REORGANIZATION PLAN NO.
1 OF 1953
EFF. APR. 11, 1953, j.8 F.. 2053, 67 STAT. 631 PREPARED BY THE PRESIDENT AND TRANSMITTED TO THE SENATE AND TO THE HOUSE OF
REPRESENTATIVES IN CONGRe-S ASSE1ILED, MARCH 12, 1953, PURSUANT TO THE PROVISIONS OF THE REORGANIZATION ACT OF 1949, APPROVED JUNE 20, 1949, AS AMENDED (SEE SECTION 901 if SE. JF THIS TITLE).
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE
SEC. 1. CREATION OF O-PARTHtENf; SECRETARY
THERE IS HEREBY ESTAOLISHE A~ EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, WHICH SHALL BE KNOWN AS THE DEPARTMENT UF HEALTr, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE (HEREAFTER IN THIS REORGANIZATION PLAN AdFERAED TO AS THE DEPARTMENT). THERE SHALL BE AT THE HEAD OF THE DEPARTMENT- A SECRETARY OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE (HEREAFTER IN THIS REORGANIZATION PLAN REFERRED TO AS THE SECRETARY), WHO SHALL BE APPOINfEJ BY THE PRESIDENT BY AND WITH THE ADVICE AND CONSENT OF THE SENATE, AND WdO SHALL RECEIVE COMPENSATION AT THE RATE NOW OR HEREAFTER PRESCRIti BY LAw FOR THE HEADS OF EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS. THE DEPARTMENT SHALL BE AJMINI TRED UNDER THE SUPERVISION AND DIRECTION OF THE SECRETARY.
SEC. 2. UNDER SECRETARY ANU AaSISTANT SECRETARIES
THERE SHALL BE IN THE DtPAATMENT AN UNDER SECRETARY OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE ANJ TWO ASSISTANT SECRETARIES OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE, EACH OF WHOM SHALL E APPOINTED BY THE PRESIDENT BY AND WITH THE ADVICE AND CONSENT OF THE SENATE, SHALL PERFORM SUCH FUNCTIONS AS THE SECRETARY MAY PRESCRIBE, AND SHAL. RECEIVE COMPENSATION AT THE RATE NOW OR HEREAFTER PROVIDED BY LAd FOR J104 SECRETARIES AND ASSISTANT SECRETARIES, RESPECTIVELY, OF EXECUTIVi UEPARM ENTS. THE UNDER SECRETARY (OR, DURING THE ABSENCE OR DISABILITY OF THE UNDER SECRETARY OR IN THE EVENT OF A VACANCY IN THE OFFICE OF JNoER SECRETARY, AN ASSISTANT SECRETARY
DETERMINED ACCORDING TO SJH O4EA AS THE SECRETARY SHALL PRESCRIBE) SHALL ACT AS SECRETARY DURING THE AdScNCE OR DISABILITY OF THE SECRETARY OR IN THE EVENT OF A VACANCY IN THE uFF&CE OF SECRETARY.
SEC. 3. SPECIAL ASSISTANT
(SECTION PROVIDED FOR THE APPOINTMENT OF SPECIAL ASSISTANT TO THE SECRETARY (HEALTH.AND MEL)DICAL AFFaIRS), AND WAS REPEALED BY PUB. L. 90-83, SEC. 10(Ci), SEPT. 11, 19%7, 81 STAT. Z24.)
SEC. 4. CCMMISSIONER JF SO.IAL SECURITY
THERE SHALL BE IN THE JePARIME. T A COMMISSIONER OF SOCIAL SECURITY WHO SHALL dE APPOINTED BY TrHE PRESI DNT BY AND WITH THE ADVICE AND CONSENT OF THE SENATE, SHALL PERFORM SUCn FUNCTIONS CONCERNING SOCIAL SECURITY AND PUBLIC WELFARE AS THE SECRETARY MAY PRESCRIBE, AND SHALL RECEIVE
COMPENSATION AT THE RATE NUOW OR HtREAFTER FIXED) BY LAW FOR GRADES GS-18 OF THE GENERAL SCHEDULE ESTAdLISHEU dY THE CLASSIFICATION ACT OF 1949, AS
AMENDED (CHAPTER 51 ANJ SUBIjAPTER Ill OF CHAPTER 53 OF THIS TITLE).
SEC. 5. TRANSFERS TC THE OcPAKTMENT
ALL FUNCTIONS OF THE FCL)EKAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATOR ARE HEREBY






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TRANSFERRED TO THE SECRETARY. ALL AGENCIES OF THE FEDERAL SECURITY
AGENCY, TOGETHER WITH THEIR RESPECTIVE FUNCTIONS, PERSONNEL, PROPERTY, RECORDS, AND UNEXPENDED BALANCta UF APPROPRIATIONS, ALLOCATIONS, AND OTHER FUNDS (AVAILABLE OR TO bE MtADc AVAILABLE), AND ALL OTHER FUNCTIONS, PERSONNEL, PROPERTY, REIURDS, ANU UNEXPENDED BALANCES OF APPROPRIATIONS, ALLOCATIONS, AND CTHER FJNOS (AVAILABLE OR TO BE MADE AVAILABLE) OF THE FEDERAL SECURITY AGENCY ARE HtREBY TRANSFERRED TO THE DEPARTMENT.
SEC. 6. PERFORMANCE OF FUN IuNS OF THE SECRETARY
THE SECRETARY MAY FROM TAME TO TIME MAKE SUCH PROVISIONS AS THE SECRETARY DEEMS APPROPRIATE AJTrIJRIZING THE. PERFORMANCE OF ANY OF THE FUNCTIONS OF THE SECRETARY BY ANY OTHER OFFICER, OR BY ANY AGENCY OR EMPLOYEE, OF THE DEPARTMENT.
SEC. 7. ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICe
IN THE INTEREST OF ECGUNOMY ANJ EFFICIENCY THE SECRETARY MAY FROM TIME TO TIME ESTABLISH CENTRAL AUJMiNISTRATIVE SERVICES IN THE FIELDS OF PROCUREMENT, BUDGETING, AGGCUUNTING, PERSONNEL, LIBRARY, LEGAL, AND OTHER SERVICES AND ACTIVITIES G9MMON TO THE SEVERAL AGENCIES OF THE DEPARTMENT;
AND THE SECRETARY MAY EFFECT S0Crt TRANSFERS WITHIN THE DEPARTMENT OF THE PERSONNEL EMPLOYED, THE PROPERTY AND RECORDS USED OR HELD, AND THE FUNDS AVAILABLE FOR USE IN CONNECrION WITH SUCH ADMINISTRATIVE-SERVICE ACTIVITIES AS THE SECRETARY MAY DEEM NECESSARY FOR THE CONDUCT OF ANY SERVICES SO ESTABLISHED: PRJ/IJED# THAT NO PROFESSIONAL OR SUBSTANTIVE FUNCTION VESTED BY LAd IN ANY OFFICER SHALL BE REMOVED FROM THE JURISDICTION OF SUCH OFFICER UNDE4 THIS SECTION.
SEC. 8. ABOLITIONS
THE FEDERAL SECURITY AGENCY (EXCLUSIVE OF THE AGENCIES THEREOF
TRANSFERRED BY SEC. 5 OF THIS AttaGANIZATION PLAN)t THE OFFICES OF FEDERAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATOR AN) ASSISTANT FEDERAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATOR CREATED dY REORGANIZATIdN PLAN .t. I 453 STAT. 1423) THE TWO OFFICES OF ASSISTANT HEADS OF THE FEoERAL St.JRITY AGENCY CREATED BY REORGANIZATION PLAN NO. OF 1946 (60 iTAT. 1495) AND THE OFFICE FOR COMMISSIONER FOR SOCIAL SECURITY CREATED dY SEnfIJN 701 OF THE SOCIAL SECURITY ACT, AS AMENDED t64 STAT. 558) tFORtLR SECTION 901 OF TITLE 42), ARE HEREBY ABOLISHED. THE SECRETARY SHALL MAKE SUCH PROVISIONS AS MAY BE NECESSARY IN ORDER TO WINO UP ANY uUTSTAtOLNG AFFAIRS OF THE AGENCY AND OFFICES ABOLISHE) BY THIS SECTION WHi .H ARE NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR IN THIS REORGANIZATION PLAN.
SEC. 9. INTERIM PROVISIONS
THE PRESIDENT MAY AUTHORIst (HE PERSONS WHO IMMEDIATELY PRIOR TO THE TIME THIS REORGANIZATION PLAN IAkES EFFECT OCCUPY THE OFFICES OF FEDERAL SECURI fY ADMINISTRATOR, AS41fANT FEDERAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATOR, ASSISTANT HEADS OF THE FEDERAL SECURITY AGENCY, AND COMMISSIONER FOR SOCIAL SECURITY TO ACT AS SE.RETARYe UNDER SECRETARY, AND ASSISTANT
SECRETARIES OF hEALTH, )UCATIOt, AND WELFARE, AND AS COMMISSIONER OF SOCIAL SECURITY, RESPtLTIVELY, UNTIL THOSE OFFICES ARE FILLED BY
APPOINTMENT IN THE MANNEa POUVIDED BY SECTIONS t1, 2, AND 4 OF THIS REORGANIZATION PLAN, BUT iOT Fik A PERIOD OF MORE THAN 60 DAYS. WHILE SO ACTING, SUCH PERSONS SHA.LL. RtCEAVE COMPENSATION AT THE RATES PROVIDED BY






65


THIS REOR~ANIZATIGN PLAN FOR THE OFFICES THE FUNCTIONS OF WHICH THEY
PERFORM.
MESSAGE OF TIE PRESjUENT Ta THE CONGRESS OF THE UNITED STATES:
I TRANSMIT HEREWITH RE)RGANALATION PLAN NO. 1 OF 1953, PREPARED IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE PROVISIONS OF THE REORGANIZATION ACT OF 1949, AS AMENDED.
IN MY MESSAGE OF FEBRdARY 4. 1953, I STATED THAT I WOULD SEND TO THE CONGRESS A REORGANIZATION PLAV LOFINING A NEW ADMINISTRATIVE STATUS FOR FEDERAL ACTIVITIES IN HEALTH, xaJUCATION, AND SOCIAL SECURITY. THIS PLAN CARRIES OUT THAT INTENTION 6Y i.REATING A DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE AS ONE OF THtI EXECJfiVE DEPARTMENTS OF THE GOVERNMENT AND BY TRANSFERRING TO IT THE VAALIOUS UNATS O0 THE FEDERAL SECURITY AGENCY. THE DEPARTMENT WILL BE HEALc) BY A SECRETARY OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE, WHO WILL BE ASISTEj dt AN UNDER SECRETARY AND TWO ASSISTANT SECRETARIES.
THE PURPOSE OF THIS PLAN IS TO IMPROVE THE ADMINISTRATION OF THE VITAL HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND SOCIAL-E.UMITY FUNCTIONS NOW BEING CARRIED ON IN THE FEDERAL SECURITY AGENCY 8Y GIVING THEM DEPARTMENTAL RANK. SUCH ACTION IS DEMANDED BY THE IMPCRTANGE ANO MAGNITUDE OF THESE FUNCTIONS, WHICH AFFECT TH WELL-BEING OF Mi.LIUNS OF OUR CITIZENS. THE PROGRAMS CARRIED ON BY THE PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICe INCLUDE, FOR EXAMPLE, THE CONDUCT AND PROMOTION OF BESMAU 14[O THE PREVENTION AND CURE OF SUCH DANGEROUS AILMENTS AS CANCER AND HEART OLSEASE. THE PUBLIC 'HEALTH SERVICE ALSO
ADMINISTERS PAYMENTS TO THE STATES FOR THE SUPPORT OF THEIR HEALTH SERVICES AND FOR URGENTLY NEEO J HOSPITAL CONSTRUCTION. THE OFFICE OF EDUCATION COLLECTS, ANALYLES, AD DISTRIBUTES TO SCHOOL ADMINISTRATORS
THROUGHOUT THE COUNTRY INFOKfA(LUN RELATING TO THE ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT OF EDUCATIONAL SYTJi4S. AMONG ITS OTHER FUNCTIONS IS THE PROVISION OF FINANCIAL HELP TO SCHOOL DISTRICTS BURDENED BY ACTIVITIES OF THE UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT. STATE ASSISTANCE TO THE AGED, THE BLIND, THE TOTALLY DISABLED, AN) OUPcNDENT CHILDREN IS HEAVILY SUPPORTED BY GRANTS-IN-AID ADMINISTERED THROUGH THE SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION. THE OLD-AGE AND SURVIVORS INSOUiJANCE SYSTEM AND CHILD DEVELOPMENT AND WELFARE PROGRAMS ARE ACUITIUNAL RESPONSIBILITES OF THAT ADMINISTRATION. OTHER OFFICES OF THE FEO~RAL SEdRITY AGENCY ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR THE CONDUCT UF FEDERAL VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION PROGRAMS AND FOR THE ENFORCEMENT OF FOOD AND DKdG LAwS.
THERE SHOULD BE AN UNREMITTING EFFORT TO IMPROVE THOSE HEALTH, EDUCATION AND SOCIAL-SECURITY PROGRAMS WHICH HAVE PROVED THEIR VALUE. I
HAVE ALREADY RECOMMENDED THE EAP*NSION OF THE SOCIAL-SECURITY SYSTEM TO COVER PERSONS NOT NOW PAJfECTED, THE CONTINUATION OF ASSISTANCE TO SCHOOL DISTRICTS WHOSE POPULATiN HAS ddEN GREATLY INCREASED BY THE EXPANSION OF DEFENSE ACTIVITIES, AN THE [RENGTHENING OF OUR FOOD AND DRUG LAWS.
BUT GOJD INTENT AND FIgH PUKPUSE ARE NOT ENOUGH; ALL SUCH PROGRAMS DEPEND FOR THEIR SUCCESS UPON EFFICIENT9 RESPONSIBLE ADMINISTRATION. I
HAVE REi.ENTLY TAKEN ACTIuN TO ASSURE THAT THE FEDERAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATOR'S VIEWS ARE GIVEN PROPER CONSIDERATION IN EXECUTIVE COUNCILS BY INVITING HER TO ATTEND MELTINGi OF THE CABINET. NOW THE ESTABLISHMENT






66


OF THE N-W DEPARTMENT PRdVIDi:J FOR IN REORGANIZATION PLAN NO. 1 OF 1953 WILL .IVE THE NEEDED ADDITIONAL. *ASSURANCE THAT THESE MATTERS WILL RECEIVE FULL CONSIDERATION THEY UcSERVE AN THE WHOLE OPERATION OF THE GOVERNMENT.
THIS IEED HAS LONG dEEM R GOGNIZED. IN 1923, PRESIDENT HARDING
PROPOSED A DEPARTMENT OF ELUCA(IUl ANU WELFARE, WHICH WAS ALSO TO INCLUDE HEALTH FUNCTIONS. IN 1924, fHE JOINT COMMITTEE ON REORGANIZATION
RECOMMENDED A NEW DEPARfMENT SAiMILAR TO THAT SUGGESTED BY PRESIDENT HARDING. IN 1932, ONE UF PRESENT HOOVER'S REORGANIZATION PROPOSALS CALLED FJR THE CONCENTRATION oJF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND RECREATIONAL ACTIVITIES IN A SINGLE EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT. THE PRESIDENT'S COMMITTEE ON ADMINISTRATIVE 4ANAGEMENr IN L931 RECOMMENDED THE PLACING OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND SOCIAL-SEIURIff FUNCTIONS IN A DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE. THIS RECOMMENATIiN MAS PARTIALLY IMPLEMENTED IN 1939 BY THE CREATION OF THE FEDERAL SeLURIfY AGENCY BY WHICH ACTION THE CONGRESS INDICATED ITS APPROVAL OF THE bROUPING OF THESE FUNCTIONS IN A SINGLE AGENCY. A NEW DEPARTMENT COULL) NOT BE PROPOSED AT THAT TIME BECAUSE THE REORGANIZATION ACT OF 1934 PRJRIldiED THE CREATION OF ADDITIONAL EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS. IN 1949t THE MISSION ON ORGANIZATION OF THE EXECUTIVE BRANCH OF THE GOVERNMENT PRUOPJaE THE CREATION OF A DEPARTMENT FOR SOCIAL SECURITY AND EDUCATION.
THE PRtSENT PLAN WILL MAKE ir POSSIBLE TO GIVE THE OFFICIALS DIRECTING THE DEPARTMENT TITLES INDIGATIVE OF THEIR RESPONSIBILITIES AND SALARIES COMPARABLE TO THOSE REGtiVED SY THEIR COUNTERPARTS IN OTHER EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENS. AS THE J4OER 4eGAETARY OF AN EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, THE
SECRETARY'S PRINCIPAL ASSA'fANI dILL BE BETTER EQUIPPED TO GIVE LEADERSHIP IN THE DEPARTMENT'S ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT ACTIVITIES, FOR WHICH HE WILL BE PiIMARILY RESPONSIBLE. THE PLAN OPENS THE WAY TO FURTHER
ADMINISTRATIVE IMPROVEMENT BY AJTHORIZING THE SECRETARY TO CENTRALIZE SERVICES AND ACTIVITIES COMMON To THE SEVERAL AGENCIES OF THE DEPARTMENT. IT ALSO ESTABLISHES A UNIFORM METHOD OF APPOINTMENT FOR THE HEADS OF THE THREE MAJOR CONSTITUENT AGENCI-S. AT PRESENT, THE SURGEON GENERAL AND THE COMMISSIONER OF ECUCATIO, ARE APPOINTED BY THE PRESIDENT AND CONFIRMED BY THE SENATE# WHILE THE COMMISSIONER FOR SOCIAL SECURITY IS APPOINTED BY THE
FEDERAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATOR. HEREAFTER, ALL THREE WILL BE PRESIDENTIAL APPOINTEES SUBJECT TO SENATE CUNFiRMATION.
I BELIEVE, AND THIS PLAN AEFL.ECTS MY CONVICTION, THAT THESE SEVERAL FIELDS OF FEDERAL ACTIVITY SHJUL.D CONTINUE WITHIN THE FRAMEWORK OF A SINGLE DEPARTMENT. THE PLAN AT THE SAME TIME ASSURES THAT THE OFFICE OF EDUCATION AND THE PUBLIC. HEALTH SERVICE RETAIN THE PROFESSIONAL AND SUBSTANTIVE RESPONSIBILITIES VLSiED BY LAW IN THOSE AGENCIES 0R IN THEIR HEADS. THE SURGEON k4ERA.1e THE COMMISSIONER OF EDUCATION, AND THE COMMISSIONER OF SOCIAL SECURITY WILL ALL HAVE DIRECT ACCESS TO THE SECRETARY.
THERE SHOULO BE IN THE DEPARTMENT AN ADVISORY COMMITTEE CN EDUCATION, MADE UP OF PERSONS CHOStN BY [HE SECRETARY FROM OUTSIDE THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT, WHICH WOULD ADViSE THE SECRETARY WITH RESPECT TO THE
EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS OF THE DEPARTMENT. I RECOMMEND THE ENACTMENT OF LEGISLATION AUTHORIZING THE DlEFAAfAL OF THE EXPENSES OF THIS COMMITTEE.






67


THE GCREATiON OF SUCH A CJIIITTLhE AS AN ADVISORY BODY TO THE SECRETARY WILL HELP INSURE TPE MAINTENANiC OF RESPONSIBILITY FOR THE PUBLIC EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM IN STATE AND LOCAL GOVEiNMENTS WHILE PRESERVING THE NATIONAL INTEREST IN EDUCATION THRuUGH APPROPRIATE FEDERAL ACTION.
AFTER INVESTIGATION I HAVE FOUND AND HEREBY DECLARE THAT EACH
REORGANIZATION INCLUDED IN REORGANIZATION PLAN NO. 1 OF 1953 IS NECESSARY TO ACCOMPLISH ONE OR MORE UF THE PURPOSES SET FORTH IN SECTION 2(A) OF THE REORGANIZATION ACT OF 1949, A. AMENDED. I HAVE ALSO FOUND AND HEREBY
DECLARE THAT BY REASON iF THESE REORGANIZATIONS, IT IS NECESSARY TO INCLUDE IN THE REORGANILArIN PLAN PROVISIONS FOR THE APPCINTMENT AND COMPENSATION OF THE NEW OFFIGExi SPECIFIED IN SECTIONS It 2, 3t AND 4 OF THE REORGANIZATION PLAN. THE AATES OF COMPENSATION FIXED FOR THESE
OFFICERS ARE, RESPECTIVEL, THUSE WHICH I HAVE FOUND TO PREVAIL IN RESPECT OF COMPARABLE OFFICERS IN fHE EXECUTIVE BRANCH OF THE GOVERNMENT.
ALTHOUbH THE EFFECTIiG UF TrE REORGANIZATIONS PROVIDED FOR IN THE REORGANIZATION PLAN WILL NOT 1d ITSELF RESULT IN IMMEDIATE SAVINGS, THE IMPROVEMENT ACHIEVED IN ADMINISTRATION WILL IN THE FUTURE ALLOW THE PERFORMANCE CF NECESSARY SEVI.,ES AT GREATER SAVINGS THAN PRESENT OPERATIONS WOULD PERMIT. Ai IfEMILATION OF THESE SAVINGS IN ADVANCE OF ACTUAL EXPERIENCE IS NOT PRALTLAOLE.
DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER.
THE WHITE HOUSE, MARCH i2. 1953.






68



*,*iTEM 113**
0011J.J5.007169
5 U.S.L. APPX. P 572, itGRG PLaN NO. 2 1962 --- REORGANIZATION PLAN NO
2 JF 1962
EFF. JUNE 8, 1962, 27 F.R. 5419 76 STAT. 1253 PREPARED BY THE PRESIDENT AND TRANSMITTED TO Ir a SENATE AND THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES IN CONGRESS ASSEMBLED MAKGH 2V, L962, PURSUANT TO THE PROVISIONS OF THE AEORGA4IZATION ACT OF 1949 63 STAT. 203, AS AMENDED (SEE SECTION 901 ET SEQ. OF THIS TITLE).
CERTAIN SUljgE AGENCItS ANJ FJNCTIONS
PART I. OFFICE OF U aEL ANU LI .LUQL OG
SECTION 1. OFFICE OF %GjEti 4ND IEUNULOGY.
THERE iS HEREBY ESTABLISHED 14 THE EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT THE OFFICt OF SGCIENF.E ANWlu IdALQLiAXY. HEREAFTER IN THIS PART REFERRED TO AS THE OFFICE.
SEC. 2. DIRECTOR AND DEPUTY
(A) THERE SHALL BE AT THE HEAD uF THE OFFICE THE DIRECTOR OF THE OFFICE JF Al ggE AND IgGUjQLQtL& HEREAFTER IN THIS PART REFERRED TO AS THE DIRECTOR. THE DIRECTOR HALL 6E APPOINTED BY THE PRESIDENT BY AND WITH THE ADVICE AND CONSENT OF THE SENATE.
(d) THERE SHALL BE IN THilE OFFICE A DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF THE OFFICE OF S.LENLE AND I Cdb ~LOX.LO a vH SHAL, BE APPOINTED BY THE PRESIDENT BY AND IfTH THE ADVICE AND CONTENT JF THE SENATE. THE DEPUTY DIRECTOR SHALL
PERFORM SuCH FUNCTIONS AS THE diRECTOR MAY FROM TIME TO TIME PRESCRIBE AND SHALL ACT AS DIRECTOR DJKING fHE ABSENCE OR DISABILITY OF THE DIRECTOR OR
IN THE EVENT OF VACANCY It THE OFFICE OF DIRECTOR.
(C) NO PERSON SHALL WriTE HLoiNG OFFICE AS DIRECTOR OR DEPUTY DIRECTOR ENGAGE IN ANY OTHER BUSIN.jS, WJCATION, OR EMPLOYMENT. (AMENDED PUB. L. 88-426, TITLE III, SEC. 033(4iJ) AUG. 14, 1964, 78 STAT. 427.)
SEC. 3. TRANSFER AND PERF-MANCE OF FUNCTIONS
(A) THERE ARE HEREBY rAANSFERKED FROM THE NATIONAL UUigE FOUNDATION TO THE DIRECTOR:
(1.) SO MUCH OF THE FJNLT4UN5 CONFERRED UPON THE FOUNDATION BY THE PRUVISIONi OF SECTION 3JA)(1I OF THE NATIONAL SLEL.E FOUNDATION ACT OF 1950 (42 J.S.C. 1862(A)(~1J AS 4ILL ENABLE THE DIRECTOR TO ADVISE AND ASSIST THE PRESIDENT IN A HIEVIiG COORDINATED FEDERAL POLICIES FOR THE PROMOTION OF EASIC itiiAAd, AND EDUCATION IN THE SLfELEN.A
(2) THE FUNCTIONS CONFERRED uPJN THE FOUNDATION BY THAT PART OF SECTION 3(A)t(b) OF THE NATIONAL "LEd" FUJN)ATION ACT OF 1950 (42 U.S.C. 1862(A)( 6)) wHICH READS AS FOL.wWS: "f) EVALUATE SCLjT1EIG EA$EaGI PROGRAMS JNDERTAKEN BY AGENCIES OF THE IDOtRAL GOVERNMENT."
(a) IN CARRYING OUT fHE FJNC(IONS TRANSFERRED BY THE PROVISIONS OF
SECTION 3(A) OF THIS RujRGAN1LAION PLAN, THE DIRECTOR SHALL ASSIST THE PRESIDENT AS HE MAY REQUEST 4ITH RESPECT TO THE COORDINATION OF FEDERAL
C.LfEdLLEIL AND I EUiQLQ&,AL FJNTIONS AND AGENCIES.
(C) THE DIRECTOR MAY FGOM TtME TO TIME MAKE SUCH PROVISIONS AS HE DEEMS APPROPRIATE AUTHORIZING THE PkRrORMANCE OF ANY OF HIS FUNCTIONS BY ANY OTHER OFFICER, OR BY ANY EMPLOYEE OR AGENCY, OF THE OFFICE.






69


SEC. 4. PERSONNEL
THE DIRECTOq MAY APPOINT EMPLOYEES NECESSARY FOR THE WORK OF THE OFFICE UNDER THE CALSSIFIED CIVIL SERVICE AND FIX THEIR COMPENSATION IN
ACCORDANCE WITH THE CLASSAFICAVIU4 LAWS.
PART 11. NATIONAL CLEA FUUIDATION
SECTION 21. EXECUTIVE GCUMMrTIE
(A) THERE IS HEREBY ESTABLItHEJ THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE OF THE NATIONAL
S.QLEAG dOARD, HEREAFTE IN THAS PART REFERRED TO AS THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE, WHICH SHALL BE C OMPSEJ OF FIVE VOTING MEMBERS. FOUR OF THE MEMBERS SHALL BE ELECTED AS HEREAFTER PROVIDED. THE DIRECTOR PROVIDED FOR INECTED AS 22 OF THIS REO4GAIZATION PLAN, EX OFFICIO, SHALL BE THE FIFTH MLcMBER AND THE CHAIRMAN OF THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE.
(B) AT ITS ANNUAL MEETING HELD IN 1964 AND AT EACH OF ITS SUCCEEDING
ANNUAL MEETINGS THE NATIONAL a(E f BOARD, HEREAFTER IN THIS PART REFERRED TO AS THE BOARD SHALL ELECT TWO OF ITS MEMBERS AS MEMBERS OF THE EXECdTIVE COMMITTEEP AND THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE MEMBERS SO ELECTED SHALL HOLD OFFICE FOR TWO YEARS FRUM THt DATE OF THEIR ELECTION. ANY PERSON WHO HAS BEEN A MEMBER OF THE EXt UTIVE COMMITTEE (ESTABLISHED BY THIS
REORGANIZATION PLAN) FOR SIX CONSECUTIVEE YEARS SHALL THEREAFTER BE INELIGIBLE FOR SERVICE AS A MEA4BER THEREOF DURING THE TWO-YEAR PERIOD FOLLOWING THE EXPIRATION UF SUCH SIXTH YEAR. FOR THE PURPOSES OF THIS SUBSECTION, THE PERIOD BEiWEEN ANt TWO CONSECUTIVE ANNUAL MEETINGS OF THE 80ARD SHALL BE DEEMED TO BE ONE YtAR.
(C) AT ITS FIRST MEETING HELD AFTER THE EFFECTIVE DATE OF THIS SECTION THE 6OARD SHALL ELECT FuUR OF iTS MEMBERS AS MEMBERS OF THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. AS CESIGNATU BY THE BOARDe TWO OF THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE MEMBERS SU ELECTED SHALL HULD UFFACE AS SUCH MEMBERS UNTIL THE DATE OF THE ANNUAL MEETING LOF THE auJARU HELJ IN 1964 AND THE OTHER TWO MEMBERS SO ELECTED SHALL HOLD SUCH UFFILE UN(IL THE ANNUAL MEETING OF THE BOARD HELD IN 1965.
(J) ANY PERSON ELECTED AS A MEAGER OF THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE TO FILL A
VACANCY OCCURRING PRIOR TU IHE EXPIRATION OF THE TERM FOR WHICH HIS PREDECESSOR WAS ELECTED SHALL BE ELECTED FOR THE REMAINDER OF SUCH TERM.
(E) rHE FUNCTIONS CONFERREU JPUN THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE NOW EXISTING
JNDER THE PROVISIONS Of- THE NATIONAL ILLEbiE FOUNDATION ACT OF 1950 SECTIONN L861 Er SEQ. OF TITLE +a, BY THE PROVISIONS OF SECTION 6 OF THE NATIONAL GCLENGCE FOUNDATION ACf OF 1950 (42 U.S.C. 1865) OR OTHERWISE, ARE HEREBY TRANSFERRED TO THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE ESTABLISHED BY THE PROVISIONS OF THIS PART; AND) Fri AUTHORITY OF THE NATIONAL SLCi"C BOARD TO ASSIGN ITS POWERS AND FUtCTIONS TO THE NOW-EXISTING EXECUTIVE
COMMITTEE, AND STATUTORY LIMITATIONS UPON SUCH ASSIGNMENTe SHALL HEREAFTER 3E APPLICABLE TO THE EXECUTIVE COAMtITTEE ESTABLISHED BY THE PROVISIONS OF THIS PART.
SEC. 22. DIRECTOR
(A) tHERE IS HEREBY ESTAaLISHcD IN tHE NATIONAL ,CAti, FOUNDATION A
NEW OFFICE WITH ThE TITLE aF GIkATOR OF THE NATIONAL SCE~INg FOUNDATION. THE DIRECTOR OF THE NATtUNAL AifaCE FOUNDATION, HEREAFTER IN THIS PART REFERRED TO AS THE DIREtTU t SHALL BE APPOINTED BY THE PRESIDENT BY AND






70


dITHTHE ADVICE AND CONSENT OF THt SENATE. BEFORE ANY PERSON IS APPOINTED AS DIRECTOR THE PRESIDENT SHALL AFFORD THE BOARD AN OPPORTUNITY TO MAKE RECOMMENDATIONS TO HIM WlTH RESPECT TO SUCH APPOINTMENT. THE DIRECTOR SHAL. SERVE FOR A TERM OF SIA YEARS UNLESS SOONER REMOVED BY THE PRESIDENT. THE DIRECTOR SHALL MvUT ENGAGE IN ANY BUSINESS, VOCATION OR EMPLOYMENT OTHER THAN THAT OF SERVING AS SUCH DIRECTOR# NOR SHALL HE, EXCEPT WITH THE APPROVAL OF THE BOARD, HOLD ANY OFFICE IN# OR ACT IN ANY CAPACITY FOR, ANY ORGANILATIJNt AGENCY, OR INSTITUTION WITH WHICH THE FOUNDArION MAKES ANY CONTRACr jR OTHER ARRANGEMENT UNDER THE NATIONAL GLEC.E FOUNDATION ACT OF 195J (SECTION 1861 ET SEQ. OF TITLE 42).
(B) EXEPT TO THE EXfENT IN.,UNSISTENT WITH THE PROVISIONS OF SECTION 23(1)(21 OF THIS REORGANIZATION PLAN, ALL FUNCTIONS OF THE OFFICE OF DIRECTOR JF THE NATIONAL aLE ME FOUNDATION ABOLISHED BY THE PROVISIONS OF 23(A)(2) THEREOF ARE HEREdY TRANSFERRED TO THE OFFICE OF DIRECTOR
ESTA8LISHkD BY THE PRJVISIUIS OF SUBSECTION (A) OF THIS SECTION.
(Ci THE DIRECTOR, EX UFFIlIO, SHALL BE AN ADDITIONAL MEMBER OF THE BOARD AND, EXCEPT IN RESPET JF COMPENSATION AND TENURE, SHALL BE COORDINATE WITH OTHER MEMdtRS OF THE BOARD. HE SHALL BE A VOTING MEMBER OF THE BOARD AND SHALL 6L ELI4ILE FOR ELECTION BY THE BOARD AS CHAIRMAN OR VICE CHAIRMAN OF THE sUARD. (AMENDED PUJB. L. 88-4269 TITLE III, SEC. 305141t), AUG. 14, 1964, 7d STA(. 427.)
SEC. 2-. ABOLITIONS
(A) THE FOLLOWING AGENtIES NJo EXISTING UNDER THE NATIONAL SC IEN FOUNDATION ACT OF 1950 (SEC(ION 1861 ET SEQ. OF TITLE 42), ARE HEREBY ABOLISHED:
(A) THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE OF THE NATIONAL SIfjECL BOARD (SECTION 6 OF ACT; 42 U.S.C. 1e65).
(2) THE OFFICE OF DIRELrfUR JF THE NATIONAL &.LL.Cg FOUNDATION (SECTIONS
2 AND 5 OF ACT; 41 U.S.C. 186it, 8641).
(B) THERE ARE ALSO HERE3Y AnOLiSHED:
(1) THE FUNCTIONS CONf-ERRED JPON THE NATIONAL CIl bGE BOARD BY THAT PART UF SECTION 6(A) OF THE NATIUAL SQLEUE FOUNDATION ACT OF 1950 (42 U. S.C. 1865(A)) WHICH REACS "THE tiBRD IS AUTHORIZED TO APPOINT FROM AMONG ITS INEMERS AN EXECUTIVE 6.OMMIffEE".
(2) THE FUNCTIONS OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE NATIONAL SEIECE FOUNDATION PROVIDE FOR IN SECTION 4tA) AND 51A) OF THE NATIONAL ,CIggE FOUNDATION ACT OF 1950 (42 U.S.C. 1863, &864(A)) WITH RESPECT TO SERVING AS A NONVJTING MEMBER OF THE BUAAD AND HIS FUNCTIONS WITH RESPECT TO SERVING AS A NONVOTING MEMBER OF THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE PROVIDED FOR IN SECTION 6(B) OF THAT ALT (42 J.S.C. Id o 8)J.
13) SO MUCH OF THE FUNCTIONS CONFERRED UPON DIVISIONAL COMMITTEES BY THE PROVISIONS OF SECTION d(D) Or THE NATIONAL SLENCg FOUNDATION ACT OF 1950 (42 U.S.C. 186510)) AS wUNSISTS OF MAKING RECOMMENDATIONS TOt AND ADVISING AND CONSULTING WiTH, fhE 8OARD.
(C) THE PROVISIONS OF SECLrTINS 23(A)(1) AND 23B)(1) HEREOF SHALL BECOME EFFECTIVE ON THE DATE OF THE FIRST MEETING OF THE BOARD HELD AFTER THE EFFECTIVE CATE OF TIHE OTHER PROVISIONS OF THIS REORGANIZATION PLAN.
PAR( lil. TRANSITIONAL PROVISIONS






71


SECTION 31. INCIDENTAL TRANiFLRS
(A) $J MUCH OF THE PERSONAL, PROPERTY, RECORDS, AND UNEXPENDED
BALANCES OF APPROPRIATIONS, ALLOCATIONS, AND OTHER FUNDS EMPLOYED, HELD, USED, AVAILABLE, OR TO BE MAUE AVAILABLE, IN CONNECTION WITH THE FUNCTIONS TRANSFERRhO BY THE PROVISIONS JF SECTION 3 OF THIS REORGANIZATION PLAN AS THE DIRECTOR OF THE BUREAU OF THE BUDGET SHALL DETERMINE SHALL BE TRANSFERRED TO THE OFFICE OF aLjiQE AND iCH OLOnX AT SUCH TIME OR TIMES AS THE SAID DIRECTOR SHALL DIRECT.
(8) SUCH FURTHER MEANS RE AND DISPOSITIONS AS THE DIRECTOR OF THE BUREAU OF THE BUDGET SHALL DEEN rJ BE NECESSARY IN ORDER TO EFFECTUATE THE TRANSFERS PROVIDED FOR IN SUBa CrION (A) OF THIS SECTION SHALL BE CARRIED OUr IN SUCH MANNER AS NtE SMALL DIRECT AND BY SUCH AGENCIES AS HE SHALL DESIGNATE.
SEC. 32. INTERIM OFFICERS
(A) THE PRESIDENT MAY AUTHOULc ANY PERSON WHO IMMEDIATELY PRIOR TO THE EFFECTIVE DATE OF PART I OF THIS REORGANIZATION PLAN HOLDS A POSITION IN THE EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIjENT TO ACT AS DIRECTOR OF THE OFFICE OF SEig4C AND .hOLOGY UNTIL THE OFFICE OF DIRECTOR IS FOR THE FIRST TIME FILLED PURSUANT TO THE PKUVISIUNS OF THIS REORGANIZATION PLAN O BY RECESS APPOINTMENT, AS THE CASE MAY BE.
(8) THE PRESIDENT MAY 4UTHOmIZe-ANY PERSON WHO IMMEDIATELY PRIOR TO THE EFFECTIVE DATE OF SECTIOt 22 Jf [HIS REORGANIZATION PLAN HOLDS ANY OFFICE EXISTING UNDER THE PROVI.OiONS OF THE NATIONAL SLtgC FOUNDATION ACT OF 1950 (SECTION 1861 ET SEJ. OF TITLE 42) TO ACT AS DIRECTOR OF THE NATIONAL SLLENCE FUUNDATION UNTIL FHE JFFiCE OF DIRECTOR IS FOR THE FIRST TIME FILLED PURSUANT TO THE PROVISIONS OF THIS REORGANIZATION PLAN OR BY RECESS APPOINTMENTe AS THE CASE MfAY B
(C) THE PRESIDENT MAY AUTHURtlE ANY PERSON WHO SERVES IN AN ACTING CAPACITY UNDER THE FRGAUING PROVISIONS OF THIS SECTION TO RECEIVE THE
COMPENSATION ATTACHED TO THE oFFICE IN RESPECT OF WHICH HE SO SERVES.
SUCH COMPt;NSATIONt IF AUTIHORIZ.Uot SHALL BE IN LIEU OF, BUT NOT IN ADDITION TO, OTHER .COMPENSATION FROM TrHEI JNITED STATES TO WHICH SUCH PERSON MAY BE ENTITLED.
MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT TO THE CONGRESS OF THE UNITED STATES:
I TRANSMIT HEREaITH REiRGANALATION PLAN NO. 2 OF 1962, PREPARED IN
ACCORDANCE WITH THE -PROVI$IONb DP THE REORGANIZATION ACT OF 1949, AS AMENDED, AND PROVIDING FO. CERfAIt REORGANIZATIONS IN THE FIELD OF 1EF AND ILGSMQLIlaG
PART I OF THE REORGANIZATION PLAN ESTABLISHES THE OFFICE OF IE.tCE AND TElCH1aLnX AS A NEW UNIt WITHIN THE EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT; PLACES AT THE HEAD THEIR jF A DIRECTOR APPOINTED BY THE PRESIDENT BY AND dIrH THE ADVICE AND CONSENT DF [Hr SENATE AND MAKES PROVISION FOR A DEPUTY DIRECTOR SIMILARLY APPOINrEO; AND TRANSFERS TO THE DIRECTOR CERTAIN FUNCTIONS OF THE NATIONAL.jLjf FOUNDATION UNDER SECTIONS 3(A)(1) AND 3( A(64 OF THE NATIONAL ,.LE,,E FUU.JUDATION ACT OF 1950.
THE NEw ARRANGEMENTS INiGORPJRA[KED IN PART I OF THE REORGANIZATION PLAN dILL CONSTITUTE AN IMPORTANT DOV,.OPMENT IN EXECUTIVE BRANCH ORGANIZATION FOR SQLfi~j AND-TEQHl JNJER THOSE ARRANGEMENTS THE PRESIDENT WILL
























61-914 0 76 6







72



HAVE PERMANENT STAFF RESOURCe.1 ,APABLE OF ADVISING AND ASSISTING HIIM ON ~4ATTERS OF NATICNAL POLi(;Y AFFECTED BY OR PERTAINING TO 5LIE.C~ AND LFCH LGX.. CONSIiUERI14h, TH .iAPID GROWTH AND FAR-REACHING SCOPE OF FE0EiAL AiTIVITIES IN L~~bL A~v IiQG'Qnl~a., IT IS IMPERATIVE THAT THE P RESI DENT HAVE ADEQUATE STAFF- SUPPORT IN DEVELOPING POLICIES AND EVALLDATIN,. PROGRAMS IN OkiJER fJ AiSSURE THAT &LLEf&f AND 7jLHNUgOX AR E USED MOST EFFECTIVELY IN THE iNTLRESTS OF NATIONAL SECURITY AND GENERAL WELFARE*
TO TH14 END IT IS CIJMTEMPLA1Ia0 THAT THE DIRECTOR WILL ASSIST THE PRESIDENT IN UISCHARGIN4 THE RESPONSIBILITY OF THE PRESIDENT FOR THE PROPER COuROI KATICN OF FEDERAAL L61EDIL AND ILH l X FUNCTIONS. MORE PARTICJLARLY, IT IS EXPE(;fEU THAT HE WILL ADVISE AND ASSIST THE PRESIDENT AS TrtE PRESIDENT MAY RE~ircST wjilt RESPECT TU
(1,) MAjiOR POLICIES, PLANS# AND PROGRAMS OF SUUC AND I~ftjQLQGX OF THE VARIJUS AGENCIES JF THi FEDERAL GOVERNMENT, GIVING APPROPRIATE EMPHASIS TO TlE AELATIuNSIt) iuF SLLEWfCE AND IL gl.Qfx TO NATIONAL SECURITY AND FOREIGN PUi.iC.Yt AwOu MEASURES FOR FURTHERING SIFJC.L AND IE~fULQ~ll IN THE NATION. -*
(2h ASSESSMENT OF SELe.(.1Ea iLAhtUELL AND TECHNICAL DEVELOPMENTS AND PROGRAMS IN RELATION TO TIIEIR IMPACT ON NATIONAL POLICIES*
(3) RtVIEW, INTEGRATj.Ns AND ,UORD1NATION OF MAJOR FEDERAL ACTIVITIES
IN &CLUWC.& AND If QtL"LJt GI1iG DUE CONSIDERATION TO THE EFFECTS OF SUCH ACTIVITIES ON NON-FEDERAL RE$OUUR;S AND INSTITUTIONS.
(4~j ASSURING THAT GJJLJ W-~4 RELATIONS EXIST WITH THE NATION'S
iC~IE1LUEi AND ENGINEEiNG 4.UAMUNITIES SO AS TO FURTHER IN EVERY A PPRJPRI ATE WAY THEIR PARTtLUATION IN STRENGTHENING MIEhM AND lf.ddQll IN THE UNITED 4TATE4 ANI) THE FREE WORLD.**
(5) SUCH OTHER MATTEKS CiliuiANT WITH LAW AS MAY BE ASSIGNED BY THE PRESIDENT TO THE OFFICE.
THEt EVER-GROWING SIG.'*.&EICA.*Cr_ ANL) COMPLEXITY OF FEDERAL PROGRAMS IN
SCUNfLCL ANDO 1"dMafliX~ HAVc iN RL(ENT YEARS NECESSITATED THE TAKING OF SEVERAL STEPS FOR IMP ..VING TH URGANILATIONAL ARRANGEMENTS OF THE EXECJTIVE- BRANCH IN RELAiTbUN TO SLift" AND **HNL~Y
(i.) THE NATIONAL 1"tL t-D~js4DATIUN WAS ESTABLISHED IN 1950. THE FOUNDAT1Oa4 WAS CREATED TO McET A WIDELY. RECOGNIZED NEED FOR AN ORGANILATION TO DEVELOP Aa14JD Ewk~.jkAGE A NATIONAL POLICY FOR THE PROMOTION JF 3ASIC &SEARUJ AND EOUCATIuN IN THE RrjFhJCEiS TO SUPPORT 8ASIC &i"&B.Cj& TO EVALUATE ij4f&Aj~ Pt GRAMS UNDERTAKEN BY FEDERAL AGENCIES, AND TO PERFORM RELATED FJN JItJJS.
(Z) ThiE OFFICE OF T~t SP6,A6 ASSISTANT TO THE PRESIDENT FOR UIFNCF AND LE dUG.OGX WAS ESTABLISHED sIN 1957. THE SPECIAL ASSISTANT SERVES AS CHAIRMAN UF BOTH THE PijE$IDtNTfS UULEfL ADVISORY COMMITTEE AND THE F EDERAL COUNCIL FOR S~fa~ AND ICftWLQX& MENTIONED BELOW.*~
(3) AT THE SAME TIME# THE a IEJWJF ADVISORY COMMITTEE, COMPOSED OF EMINENT ?*JN-GOVEAKMENT SC.ENTITS AND ENGINEERS, AND LOCATED WITHIN THE OFFICE OF DEFENSE MOBILIZATION# WvAS RECONSTITUTED IN THE WHITE HOUSE OFF14; AS THE PRESIDENT'S "IAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE.
(t4i THE FEDERAL COUNC16. FOR !kEL AND Li ADUQUX.. COMPOSED OF POLICY *






73


OFFICIALS OF THE PRINCIPAL AGtNGsES ENGAGED IN SCIENTIFiLLC AND TECHNICAL ACTIVITIES, WAS ESTABLISitj IN 1929.
THE NATIONAL SLJ.E~ FOJNL)ir ION HAS PROVED TO BE AN EFFECTIVE INSTRUMENT FOR ADMINISTERiNG SaAu6E PROGRAMS IN SUPPORT OF BASIC RESEARE AND EDUCATION IN THE = tLaFe ANu HAS SET AN EXAMPLE FOR OTHER AGENCIES THROUGH THE ADMINISTRATIONi OF ATS JWN PROGRAMS. HOWEVER, THE FOUNDATION, BEIN, AT THE SAME ORGANIZAfIdAL LEVEL AS OTHER AGENCIES, CANNOT
SATISFACTORILY COORDINATE FE)EJEAL AighGE& POLICIES OR EVALUATE PROGRAMS OF OTHER AGENCIES. ~LL POLIiEa, TRANSCENDING AGENCY LINES, NEED TO BE COORDINATkD AND SHAPE AT fih LEVEL OF THE EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT DRAWING UPON MANV SOURCESS BOTH WITHIN AND OUTSIDE OF GOVERNMENe. SIMILARLY, STAFF EFFORTS AT THAT HIGHER LEVEL ARE REQUIRED FOR THE EVALUATION OF OVERNMEvT PROGRAMS IN ASLgE AND Igt~H, LQQX.
THUS, THE FURTHER STEPS COMTAtNED IN PART I OF THE REORGANIZATION PLAN ARE NOW NEEDED IN ORJcR TU MEET MOST EFFECTIVELY NEW AND EXPANDING REQUIREMENTS BROUGHT AdJfT BY THE RAPID AND FAR-REACHING GROWTH OF THE GOVERNMENT'S 3EiEARLd AAM DEVcLOPMENT PROGRAMS. THESE REQUIREMENTS CALL FOR fHE FURTHER STRENGTH ING UOF Atltgl ORGANIZATION AT THE PRESIDENTIAL LEVEL ANJ FOR THE ADJUSTMENT UF THE FOUNDATION'S ROLE TO REFLECT CHANGED CONDITIONS. THE FOUNDATAUN W &.L CONTINUE TO ORIGINATE POLICY PROPOSALS AND RECOMMENDATIONS CONCERNING (He SUPPORT OF BASIC ELgEAJI AND EDUCATION IN THE iLLELES& AND THE NcW ckFIE WILL LOOK TO THE FOUNDATION TO PROVIDE
STUDIES AND INFORMATION iN WHlGH SOUN) NATIONAL POLICIES IN ,LLERGE AND tCHOLOYI CAN BE BASED.
PART I OF THE REORGANLATION P.AN WILL PERMIT SOME STRENGTHENING OF THE STAFF AND CONSULTANT REUJRCCS 1JW AVAILABLE TO THE PRESIDENT IN RESPECT OF ,iULrLLIF AND TECHNICAL FACTORS AFFECTING EXECUTIVE BRANCH POLICIES AND WILL ALSC FACILITATc COMMUNICATION WITH THE CONGRESS.
PARTY II-OF THE REORGAN"iLATIUN PLAN PROVIDES FOR CERTAIN REORGANIZATIONS
WITHIN THE NATIONAL L.LEICL -#UUNDATION WHICH WILL STRENGTHEN THE CAPABILITY OF THE DIRECTOR JF THE FOUNDATION TO EXERT LEADERSHIP AND OTHERWISE FURTHER THE EF+CTICNcSS OF ADMINISTRATION OF THE FOUNDATION. SPECIFICALLY:
(L) THERE IS ESTABLISHED 4 NeW OFFICE OF DIRECTOR OF THE NATIONAL
SQLt, FuNDATIJN AND THAT 0 1iCfGR, EX OFFICIO, IS MADE A MEMBER OF THE NATIONAL "IENCE BOARD ON A BAS*S COORDINATE WITH THAT OF CTHER BOARD
MEMBERS.
(2) THERE IS SUBSTITUTE) FJ4 (HE NOW-EXISTING EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE OF
THE NATIONAL SU1iEN BJARD A 4EW EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE COMPOSED OF THE *
DIRECTOR OF THE NATIONA. i ScI6E FOUNDATION, EX OFFICIO, AS A VOTING MEMBER AN) CHAIRMAN OF Trd COMMITTEE, AND OF FOUR OTHER MEMBERS ELECTED BY THE NATIONAL ..ENCE dUARD FK UM AMONG ITS APPOINTIVE MEMBERS.
(3) COMMITTEES ADVISOAr TO cACd OF THE DIVISIONS OF THE FOUNDATION WILL MAKE THEkIR RECOMMENOATIUNS TO If"t DIRECTOR ONLY RATHER THAN TO BOTH THE DIRECTOR AND THE NATIONAL QLSCUE dOARD.
AFTER INVESTIGATION I HAVE FOUND AND) HEREBY DECLARE THAT EACH
REORGANIZATION INCLUDED i, RE ciaAIZATION PLAN NO. 2 OF 1962 IS NECESSARY TO ACCOMPLISH ONE OR MORE oF THE PURPOSES SET FORTH IN SECTION 2(A) OF THE






74


REORGANIZATION ACT OF 1949, AS AMcNDEO.
I HAVE FOUND AND HEREBY DEiLAAE THAT IT IS NECESSARY TO INCLUDE IN THE REORGANIZATION PLAN# BY REASON UR REORGANIZATIONS MADE THEREBYt PROVISIONS FOR THE APPOINTMENT AND LUIMPENSATION OF THE DIRECTOR AND DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF THE OFFICE OF IEALFE AND L L NQtaX AND OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE
NATIONAL JQiU" FOUNDATION. THc RATE OF COMPENSATION FIXED FOR EACH OF
THESE OFFICERS IS THAT WHICH I HAVE FOUND TO PREVAIL IN RESPECT OF
COMPARABLt OFFICERS IN THE EXECUTIVE BRANCH OF THE GOVERNMENT.
THE FUNCTIONS ABOLISHEd BY IHE PROVISIONS OF SECTION 23(8) OF THE REORGANIZATION PLAN ARE PiOVIDED FOR IN SECTIONS 4(A), 5(Alt 6(A)t 61B)l AND 8(DJ OF THE NATION L ISQUi FOUNDATION ACT OF 1950.
THE TAKING EFFECT OF THE REORGANIZATIONS INCLUDED IN THE REORGANIZATION PLAN WILL PROVIDE SOUND 34GANIATLUNAL ARRANGEMENTS AND WILL MAKE POSSIBLE MO E EFFECTIVE AND EFFICIENT ADMINISTRATION OF GOVERNMENT PROGRAMS IN
.LE LCrE AND IEGJE1LOlxa IT Is, HOWEVER, IMPRACTICABLE TO ITEMIZE AT THIS TIME THE REDUCTIONS IN EXPcNDITURES WHICH IT IS PROBABLE WILL BE BROUGHT ABOUT dY SUCH TAKING EFFECT.
I RECOMMEND THAT THE LuNGR$SS ALLOW THE REORGANIZATION PLAN TO BECOME EFFECTIVE.
JOHN F. KENNED
THE WHITE HOUSE, MARCH 29, 1964.
AMENDMENTS BY PUB. L. 90-40, l JULY 18, 1968, 82 STAT. 360, INTENDED TO CONTINUE IN EFFECT THE EXISTING OFFICES, PROCEDURES, AND ORGANIZATION OF THE NATIONAL IUNdEUF FOUNDATION A PROVIDED BY CHAPTER 16 (SECTION 1861 ET SEQ.o) OF TITLE 42, THE PUdLI, HEALTH AND WELFARE# PART II OF REORG. PLAN NO. Z OF 1962, AND REOR. PLAN i.U 5 OF 1965, BUT ON AND AFTER JULY 18, 1968, PART II OF REORG. PLAN NJ. Z OF 1962, AND REORG. PLAN NO. 5 OF 19659 AS BEING uF NC FORCE OF AFFECft AND NOTHING IN PUB. L. 90-407 AS ALTERING OR AFFECTING ANY TRANSFERS OF FUNCTIONS MADE BY PART I OF REORG. PLAN NO. 2 OF 96, SEE SECTION 1 OF PJ6. L. 90-4079 SET OUT AS CONTINUATION OF EXISTING OFFICES, PROCEDJRES, AND ORGANIZATION OF THE NATIONAL 1EENCE FOUNDATION NOTE UNDER SECTION .do2 OF TITLE 42, THE PUBLIC HEALTH AND WELFARE.






75


**iTEM 114**
00110.05.007199
5 U.S.C. APPX. P 5?6, AEURG PL4N NO. 2 1965 --- REORGANIZATION PLAN NO.
2 OF 1965
EFF. JULY 13, 1965, 30 F.K. 8819, 79 STAT. 1318. PREPARED BY THE PRESIDENT AND TIANSMITTEU TO [HE SENATE AND THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES IN CONGRESS ASSEMBLED MAY 1., 1965, PURSUANT TO THE PROVISIONS OF THE REORGANIZATION ACT OF 1949t 63 SfAT. 203, AS AMENDED (SEE SECTION 901 ET SEQ. OF TiIS TITLE).
ENVIRONMENTAL SLlLf.NE ,ERVIES ADMINISTRATION9 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE *
SECTION 1. TRANSFER JF FUNL.TIONS
ALL FUNCTIONS VESTED dY LAd 14 THE WEATHER BUREAU, THE CHIEF OF THE WEATHER BUREAU THE COST ANO GEU-TIC SURVEY, THE DIRECTOR OF THE COAST AND GEODETIC SURVEY, AND ANY OFFICER, EMPLOYEE, OR ORGANIZATIONAL ENTITY OF THAT BUREAU O0 SURVEY, ANU 4of HERETOFORE TRANSFERRED TO THE SECRETARY OF COMMERCE, HEREINAFTEA REFLtRED TO AS THE SECRETARY, ARE HEREBY TRANSFERRED TO THE SECRETARY.
SEC. 2. ABCLITICNS
(A) THE OFFICES OF DIECTO4 JF THE COAST AND GEODETIC SURVEY, DEPUTY DIRECTOR JF THE COAST AND t7EODErl. SURVEY, AND CHIEF OF THE WEATHER BUREAU ARE HEREBY ABOLISHED. THE StRcTARY SHALL MAKE SUCH PROVISIONS AS HE SHALL UEEM TO BE NECESSARY RESPcGTING THE WINDING UP OF ANY OUTSTANDING AFFAIRS OF THE OFFICERS dHUSE OFFICES ARE ABOLISHED BY THE PROVISIONS OF THIS SECTION.
(B) THt ABOLITIONS EFFcTED SY THE PROVISION OF SUBSECTION (A) OF THIS SECTION SHALL EXCLUDE rrE Ad DLITION OF RIGHTS TO WHICH THE PRESENT
INGUMBENT4 OF THE ABOLISHED DEF16ES WOULD BE ENTITLED UNDER LAW UPON THE TERMINATIUN OF THEIR APPGiNTMEafS.
SEC. 3. ENVIRoJM Nf AL SQLE, SERVICES ADMINISTRATION
(A) THE COAST AND GEO UETIG SJAVEY AND THE WEATHER BUREAU ARE HEPEBY CONSOLIDATED TO FORN A i AwENwY IN THE DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE WHICH SHALL BE KNCWN AS THE ENVIAUNMENTAL ILEN E SERVICES ADMINISTRATION, HEREINAFTER REFERRED TO AS THE Al41INISTRATION.
(8) THE SECRETARY SHALL FRJM iIME TO TIME ESTABLISH SUCH CONSTITUENT
ORiGANILATIONAL ENTITIES jF THE ADMINISTRATION, WITH SUCH NAMES, AS HE SHALL DETERMINE.
SEC. 4. OFFICERS OF TrE AD&MiNSTRATION
(A) THERE SHALL BE AT THlE itAU OF THE ADMINISTRATION THE ADMINISTRATOR
OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL SfLE&E ScRVA.CES ADMINISTRATION, HEREINAFTER REFERRED TO AS THE ADMINISTRATOR. THE ADMINISTRATOR SHALL BE APPOINTED BY THE PRESIDENT BY AND WITH THE AJVI.E AND CONSENT OF THE SENATE. HE SHALL PERFORM SUCH FUNCTIONS AS THE SECRETARY MAY FROM TIME TO TIME DIRECT.
18) (1) THERE SHALL BE IN THE ADMINISTRATION A DEPUTY ADMINISTRATOR OF
THE ENVIRONMENTAL LIAEM SERVICEai ADMINISTRATIONt HEREINAFTER REFERRED TO AS THE DEPUTY ADMINISTRATOR, WHLJ HALL BE APPOINTED BY THE PRESIDENT BY AND WITH THE ADVICE ANO CONSENT OF THE SENATE, SHALL PERFORM SUCH
FUNCTIONS AS THE SECRETARY MAY F JM TIME TO TIME DIRECT, AND, UNLESS HE IS COMPENSATED IN PURSUANCE OF THE PROVISIONS OF PARAGRAPH (2), BELOW, SHALL







76


RECEIVE CUMPENSATION IN ACJURJANC WITH THE CLASSIFICATION ACT OF 1949, AS AMENDED CHAPTER 51 ANu SU3,,HAPTER III OF CHAPTER 53 OF THIS TITLE).
(2) THe OFFICE OF DEPJTY ADMINASTRATOR MAY BE FILLED AT THE DISCRETION OF THE PRESIDENT BY APPOINTMENf (jY AND WITH THE ADVICE AND CONSENT OF THE SENATE) FROM THE ACriVE LIS[ OF COMMISSIONED OFFICERS OF THE
ADMINISTRATION IN WHICH CASE THE APPOINTMENT SHALL CREATE A VACANCY ON THE ACTIVE LI>T AND WHILE HOLUIN (HE OFFICE OF DEPUTY ADMINISTRATOR THE
OFFICER SHALL HAVE RANK, PAY AND ALLOWANCES NOT EXCEEDING THOSE OF A VICE AOMIRAL.
(C) fHE DEPUTY ADMINISi'RATOik J. SUCH OTHER OFFICIAL OF THE DEPARTMENT JF CJkiERGE AS THE SECREiARY zHA6L FRUM TIME TO TIME DESIGNATE SHALL ACT AS ADMINISTRATOR DURING THe AdSENCE OR DISABILITY OF THE ADMINISTRATOR OR IN THE EVENT OF A VACANCY IN THE OFFICE OF ADMINISTRATOR.
(0) AT ANY ONE TIME, ONE PRiNCiPAL CONSTITUENT ORGANIZATIONAL ENTITY OF THE ADMINISTRATION MAY, IF THE SECRETARY SO ELECTSt BE HEADED BY A COMMISSIOvED OFFICER OF THE AOMINiSTRATIONt WHO SHALL BE DESIGNATED BY THE SECRETARY. SUCH DESIGNATION OF AN OFFICER SHALL CREATE A VACANCY ON THE ACTIVE LIST AND WHILE SErwING JNDLR THIS PARAGRAPH THE OFFICER SHALL HAVE RANK, PAY AND ALLOWANCE, NUT EXCEEDING THOSE OF A REAR ADMIRAL (UPPER
HALF).
(E) ANY COMMISSIONED jFFICEI UF THE ADMINISTRATION WHO HAS SERVED AS DEPUTY ADMINISTRATOR OR HAS StkVeD IN A RANK ABOVE THAT OF CAPTAIN AS THE HEAD OF A PRINCIPAL C Tsf'UENT ORGANIZATIONAL ENTITY OF THE
ADMINISTRATION, AND IS RcfIREU WHILE SO SERVING DR IS RETIRED AFTER THE COMPLETION OF SUCH SERViE WHAtLE SERVING IN A LOWER RANK OR GRADE, SHALL BE RETIRED WITH THE RANK, PAY ANJ ALLOWANCES AUTHORIZED BY LAW FOR THE HIGHEST kJRADE AND RANK HELJ dY HIM; BUT ANY SUCH OFFICER, UPON
TERMINATIuN OF HIS APPJaNTMENT IN A RANK AbOVE THAT OF CAPTAIN, SHALL, UNLESS APPOINTED OR ASSIGNED TU 4OME OTHER POSITION FOR WHICH A HIGHER RANK OR GRADE IS PROVIDEDs REvER( TO THE GRADE AND NUMBER HE WOULD HAVE OCCUPIED HAD HE NOT SERVED IN A RANK ABOVE THAT OF CAPTAIN AND SUCH OFFICER SHALL BE AN EXTRA NU4tE, IN THAT GRADE. (AS AMENDED PUB. L. 90-83, SE,.. 10(C), SEPT. 11, 1967t 81 STAT. 224.)
SEC. 5. AUTHORITY OF TIHE SELRcTARY
NUTHIN. IN THIS REOPGANILATI4i PLAN SHALL DIVEST THE SECRETARY OF ANY FUNCTION VESTED IN HIM dY LAW U4 SY REORGANIZATION PLAN NO. 5 OF 1950 (64 STAT. 12b3) OR IN ANY MANNER UtRJGATE FROM ANY AUTHORITY OF THE SECRETARY THEREUNDER .
SEC. 6. PE4SONNEL, PRiJPERTY, RECORDS AND FUNDS
(A) THE PERSONNEL (INCLUDING COMMISSIONED OFFICERS) EMPLOYED IN THE COAST AND GEODETIC SURVEY, THE PcRSONNEL EMPLOYED IN THE WEATHER BUREAU, AND THE PROPERTY AND RECJKOS HELd OR USED BY THE WEATHER BUREAU OR THE COAST AND GEODETIC SURVEY SHALL dE DEEMED TO BE TRANSFERRED TO THE
ADMINISTRATION.
(B) UNEXPENOED BALANCEi OF APPKUPRIATIONS, ALLOCATION, AND OTHER FUNDS AVAl ABLE OR TO BE MAdE AVAILABLE IN CONNECTION WITH FUNCTIONS NOW ADMINISTERED BY THE WEATtR dUREJU OR BY THE COAST AND GEODETIC SURVEY SHALL BE AVAILABLE TO THE AUNLMNISTRATION HEREUNDER IN CONNECTION WITH






77


THOSE FUNLTICNS.
(C) SUCH FURTHER MEA4URE4 AD DISPOSITIONS AS THE DIRECTOR OF THE BUREAU OF THE BUDGET SHALL UEEM fj BE NECESSARY IN ORDER TO EFFECTUATE THE FOREGOING PROVISIONS OF TrtI> SCLTTUN SHALL BE CARRIED OUT IN SUCH MANNER AS HE SHALL DIRECT AlU Y >UCH AGENCIES AS HE SHALL DESIGNATE.
SEC. 7. INTERIM OFFI-,iKS
(A) THE PRESIDENT MAY ATHOKILC ANY PERSON WHO IMMEDIATELY PRIOR TO THE EFFECTIVE DATE OF THIS REUKGA ILATION PLAN HELD A POSITION IN THE EXECUTIVE BRANCH OF THE GOVEANMcNT TO ACT AS ADMINISTRATOR UNTIL THE
OFFICE OF ADMINISTRATOR IS FOU THE FIRST TIME FILLED PURSUANT TO THE PROVISIONS OF THIS REOFG;ANILATIOU PLAN OR BY RECESS APPOINTMENT, AS THE CASE MAY LiE.
(d) THE PRESIDENT MAY SIMILARLY AUTHORIZE ANY SUCH PERSON TO ACT AS DEPUfY ADMINISTRATOR.
(C) THE PRESIDENT MAY AUTHJRLZE ANY PERSON WHO SERVES IN AN ACTING CAPACITY UNDER THE FOREvJING PROVISIONS OF THIS SECTION TO RECEIVE THE COMPENSATION ATTACHED TO THE OFFICE AN RESPECT TO WHICH HE SO SERVES. SUCH COMPLNSATI3 4, IF AUTNJiRIZcL, SHALL BE IN LIEU OF, BUT NOT IN ADDITION TO, UTHER COMPENSATION FRJM THE UiITED STATES TO WHICH SUCH PERSON MAY BE ENTITLED.
MESSAGE OF THE PRESLUENT fO THE CONGRESS OF THE UNITED STATES: I TRANSMIT HEREWITH atORGAN14ATION PLAN NO. 2 OF 1965# PPEPARED IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE PROVi UiN Jf THE REORGANIZATION ACT OF 1949, AS AMENUEo AND PROVIDING FUR THE REuRGANIZATION OF TWO MAJOR AGENCIES OF THE DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE: THE WEATHER BUREAU AND THE COAST AND GEODETIC SURVEY.
THE REORGANIZATION PLAN 0ON>OLiUATES THE COAST AND GEODETIC SURVEY AND THE WEATHER BUREAU TO FURM A NEW AGENCY IN THE DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE TO BE KNOWN AS THE ENVIRONMENTAL a.LLtC SERVICES ADMINISTRATION. IT IS THE INTENTION OF THE SECRETARY UF LuMMERCE TO TRANSFER THE CENTRAL RADIO PROPAGATION LABORATORY JF THIE NATIONAL BUREAU OF STANDARDS TO THE ADMINISTRATION WHEN THE AEOKChAlIZATION PLAN TAKES EFFECT. THE NEW
ADMINISTRATION WILL THEN PROVi E A SINGLE NATIONAL FOCUS FOR OUR EFFORTS TO DESCRIbE, UNDERSTAND, A.rO P E .CT THE STATE OF THE OCEANS, THE STATE OF THE LOWER AND UPPER ATM SPHERc AND THE SIZE AND SHAPE OF THE EARTH.
ESTABLISHMENT OF THE AJM&AhITRATION WILL MARK A SIGNIFICANT STEP FORWARu IN THE CONTINUAL SEARCH at THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT FOR BETTER WAYS TO MEET THE NEEDS OF THE NATION FOR ENVIRONMENTAL IENCE SERVICES. THE ORGANIZATA.ONAL IAPROVEMENtrS MAu POSSIBLE BY THE REORGANIZATION PLAN WILL ENHAMGE OUR ABILITY TO DEVELOP A4 ADEQUATE WARNING SYSTEM FOR THE SEVERE HAZARDS UF NATJRE FOR HURR.A,4ES, TORNADOES, FLOODS, EARTHQUAKES, AND SEISMIC SEA WAVESt WHICH HAVE PkU4 O SO DISASTROUS TO THE NATION IN RECENT YEARS. THESE IMPROVEMENTi WILL PERMIT US TO PROVIDE BETTER ENVIRONMENTAL
INFORMATION TO VITAL SEME14TS U F THE NATION'S ECONOMY TO AGRICULTURE, rRANSPORTATIONP COMMUNICAFIONas AND INDUSTRY, WHICH CONTINUALLY REQUIRE INFORMATION ABOUT TFE PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT. THEY WILL MEAN BETTER SERVICES TO OTHER FEDERAL DEPARiMENTS AND AGENCIES TO THOSE THAT ARE .CONCERNED WITH THE NATIONAL EFEN4E, THE EXPLORATION OF OUTER SPACE, THE






78


MANAGEMENT OF OJR MINERAL ANJ AATER RESOURCES, THE PROTECTION OF THE PJBLIC HEALTH AGAINST ENVRUNMl rAL POLLUTION, AND THE PRESERVATION OF OUR WILDERNESS AND RECREATION AREAS.
THE NtW ADMINISTRATION dLL BRING TOGETHER A NUMBER OF ALLIED JLELEk, DISCIPLINES fIAT AKE t.ONCERNEO WITH THE PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT. THIS INTEGRATION WILL BETTEm tABLE US TO LOOK AT MAN'S PHYSICAL
NVIRONMEN f AS A LIHiLLELG UrLE AND TO SEEK TO UNDERSTAND THE INTE;(ACTIJNS AMONG AIR, iEA, AND EARTH AND BETWEEN THE UPPER AND LOWER ATMOSPHERE. IT WILL FACiLIfA[E [HE DEVELOPMENT OF PROGRAMS DEALING WITH THE PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT AN d WiLL PERMIT BETTER MANAGEMENT OF THESE PRiGAAMS. IT WILL ENHANC UU CAPAPBILITY TO IDENTIFY AND SOLVE IMPORTANT LONG-RANGtL Sjc.LE.EIQ ANU LEdtid L Qa(AL PROBLEMS ASSOCIATED WITH THE PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT. THE bE ADMINISTRATION WILL, IN CONSEQUENCE,
PROMOTE A FRESH SENSE OF %iLEALL LQ DEDICATION, DISCOVERY, AND CHALLENGE, 4HICH ARE ESSENTIAL IF ok AAE 1J ATTRACT SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS OF CREATIVITY AND TALENT TO FEDERAL EMPLOYMENT IN THIS FIELD.
TiE RtORGANIZATION PLAN PRJVIdES FOR AN ADMINISTRATOR AT THE HEAD OF THE ADMINISTRATION, AND FOR A uEPjfY ADMINISTRATOR, EACH OF WHOM WILL BE APPOINTED BY THE PRESIDENT BY AND WITH THE ADVICE AND CONSENT OF THE SENATE. AS AUTHORIZEu SY THE CIVIL SERVICE AND OTHER LAWS AND
REGULATIONS, SUBORDINATE JFFICcAS OF THE ADMINISTRATION WILL BE APPOINTED BY THE SECRETARY OF COMMEALE, JA BE ASSIGNED BY HIM FROM AMONG A CORPS OF COMMISSIONED OFFICERS. IHE AjMI.ISTRATION WILL PERFORM SUCH FUNCTIONS AS THE AEARErARY OF COMMERCE MAY UE.EGATE OR OTHERWISE ASSIGN TO IT AND WILL
BE UNUER HIS DIRECTION AND CN(ROL.o
CJMMIS$IONED OFFICERS OF iTHE COAST AND GEODETIC SURVEY WILL BECOME COMMISSIONED OFFICERS OF THLt ADMINISTRATION AND MAY SERVE AT THE DISCRETION OF THE SECRETARY OF t.UMMERCE THROUGHOUT THE ADMINISTRATION. THE REURGANIZATION PLAN AJTHORILLa THE PRESIDENT AT HIS DISCRETION TO FILL THE OFFICt OF DEPUTY AD4,NISTArji BY APPOINTMENT9 BY AND WITH THE ADVICE AND CONSENT OF THE SENAYEt FROM THE ACTIVE LIST OF COMMISSIONED OFFICERS OF THE ADMINISTRATION.
THE REORGANIZATION PLAN TKANa FITTED HEREWITH ABOLISHES AND THUS EXCLUDES FROM THE CONSOLIUATIOrj M-NTIONED AbOVE THE OFFICES OF (1) CHIEF OF THE WEATHER BUREAU, PRoVIJEU FjRA IN THE ACT OF OCTOBER 1, 1890 (15 U.S. C. 312); (2) DIRECTOR UF TH CJAST AND GEODETIC SURVEY, PROVIDED FOP IN THE ACTS JF JUNE 4, 192U, ANu FLbRUARY 16, 1929, AS AMENDED (33 U.S.C. 352, 852A) ; AND (3) DEPUTY 0IECTOR OF THE COAST AND GEODETIC SURVEY, PROVIDED FOR IN THE ACT UF JA0JA4RJ 19, 1942, AS AMENDED (33 U.S.C. 8528).
AFTER INVESTIGATION, I HAVE FOJND AND HEREBY DECLARE THAT EACH REORGANIZATION INCLUDED IN REORtGiANIZATION PLAN NO. 2 OF 1965 IS NECESSARY TO ACCOMPLISH ONE OR MORE OF THE PJRPOSES SET FORTH IN SECTION 2(A) OF THE REORGANIZATION ACT OF 1949, AS AMENDED. I HAVE ALSO FOUND AND HEREBY
DECLARE THAT BY REASON JF THE IcJRGANIZATIONS MADE BY THE REORGANIZATION PLAN, IT IS NECESSARY IL INCLUDE IN THE PLAN PROVISIONS FOR THE
APPOINTMENT AND CGMPENSATIUN jF THE OFFICERS OF THE ADMINISTRATION SET FORTH IA SECTION 4 OF Trc id~aA4ILATION PLAN. THE RATE OF COMPENSATION FIXEd FOR EACH OF THESE JFFICEAS IS THAT WHICH I HAVE FOUND TO PREVAIL IN






79


RESPECT OF COMPARABLE OFFiCLGERS IN THE EXECUTIVE BRANCH OF THE GOVERNMENT.
IN ADDITION TO PERMITTING i MORE EFFECTIVE MANAGEMENT WITHIN THE
DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE, THE NtA ORGANIZATION WILL ULTIMATELY PRODUCE ECONOMIES. THESE ECONOMIES WILL isE OF TWO TYPES. THE FIRST, AND PROBABLY THE MOST SIGNIFICANT, 1I THt SAVINGS AND AVOIDANCE OF COSTS WHICH MILL RESULT FROM THE SHARING UF .UMPLEX AND EXPENSIVE FACILITIES SUCH AS
SATELLITES, COMPUTERS, CUMMUNIATiON SYSTEMS, AIRCRAFT, AND SHIPS. THESE ECONOMIES WILL INCREASE lN Sa 6NIFICANCE AS DEVELOPMENTS IN ,TiFNCE AND IERUMLtSI BRING INTO IING STALL MORE ADVANCED EQUIPMENT. SECOND, INTEGRATION OF THE EXISTING HIEAdJwUARTERS AND FIELD ORGANIZATIONS WILL PERMIT MORE EFFICIENT UTALILATION OF EXISTING ADMINISTRATIVE STAFFS AND THEREBY PRODUCE FUTURE LUNOUMIEi. IT IS, HOWEVER, IMPRACTICABLE TO
SPECIFY OR ITEMIZE AT TH14 TIMf THE REDUCTIONS OF EXPENDITURES WHICH IT IS PROBABLE dILL BE BROUGHT AB UT 3Y THE TAKING EFFECT OF THE REORGANIZATIONS INCLUDED IN THE REORGANILAfIGN PLAN.
I RECOMMEND THAT THE CONGRESa ALLOW THE ACCOMPANYING REORGANIZATION
PLAN TO BECOME EFFECTIVE.
LYNDON 8. JOHNS
THE WHITE HOUSE, MAY 1.t J19oS.







80



**ITEM 116**
0011J.05.007229
5 U.S.C. APPX. P 580, QEuRG PLAN NU. 5 1965 --- REORGANIZATION PLAN NO.
5 JF 1965
EFF. JULY 279 1965, 11 F.K. 9355, 79 STAT. 1323. PREPARED BY THE PRESIDENT AND TRANSMITTED To THE SENATE AND THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES IN CJNGREbS ASSEMBLED, MAY 21, 1965, PURSUANT TO THE PROVISIONS OF THE lEOR4ANIZATION ACT OF 1949, 63 STAT. 203, AS AMENDED (SEE SECTION 901 ET SEQ. OF THIS TITLE$.
NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION
SECTION 1. ABOLITION OF COMMITTEES
THERE ARE HEREBY ABOLISHED ALL FUNCTIONS OF THE DIVISIONAL) COMMITTEES PROVIDED FUR IN SECtICN d OF THE NATIONAL SjL;t1LU FOUNDATION ACT OF 1950 (64 STAT. 152; 42 U.).C. Lubl1, ALL FUNCTIONS WITH RESPECT TO THE APPOINfMENT OF COMMITTEES IO4Ei THAT SECTION, AND ALL COMMITTEES NOW EXISTING UNDER THAT SETIUN.. THE DIRECTOR OF THE NATIONAL ULIENLE FOJNUATION SI-ALL MAKE SJCH PRuVISIUNS AS HE SHALL DEEM NECESSARY
RESPECTINa, THE WINDING JP OF ANt OUTSTANDING AFFAIRS OF THE COMMITTEES ABOLISHED BY THE SECTIGN.
SEC. 2. AUTHORITY TC GELEGATE
THE DIRECTOR OF THE NATIONAL SQLENCE FOUNDATION MAY FROM TIME TO TIME MAKE SUCH PROVISIONS A4 HE SHALL DEEM APPROPRIATE AUTHORIZING THE PERFaRMANE BY ANY OTHEA 3FFIG.ER, OR BY ANY AGENCY OR EMPLOYEE, OF THE NATIONAL xLCEULE FOJNDATIUdi OF ANY' OF HIS FUNCTIONS (INCLUDING FUNCTIONS DELEGATED TO HIM BY THE NAfIONAL iLLESLE BOARD).
MESSAGE OF THE PRESiUENT TO THE CONGRESS OF THE UNITED STATES:
I TRANSMIT HEREWITH RcUKGANIZAfION PLAN NO. 5 OF 1965, PREPARED IN ACCOROANCi WITH THE PRJVISIiNS JF THE REORGANIZATION ACT OF 1949, AS AMENDEs AND PROVIDING FOR LEATAIN REORGANIZATIONS RELATING TO THE NAfIUNAL 4giggg FOJNDATIuO.
THE PLAN CONTAINS TWO kEDR4AN*lATION MEASURES. FIRST, ALL COMMITTEES PROViotD FOR I SECTIN a OF THE NATIONAL &CLEGCg FOUNDATION ACT OF 1950 WOULO E AdOLISHED. THAT S)cGTiUN PROVIDES THAT THERE SHALL BE A COMMITTEE FiR EALH DIVISION OF THE FOJNDATIuNt HAVING NOT LESS THAN FIVE MEMBERS WHO ARE APPOINTED BY THE NATILAAL aLENfC BOARD FOR 2-YEAR TERMS. SECTION 8, AS AFFECTED BY SECTION 3(8)(31 OF REORGANIZATION PLAN NO. 2 OF 1962 (76 STAT. 12>S), DIRECTS EAGH, SUCH 6UMMITTEE TO MAK E RECOMMENDATIONS TO AND ADVISE ANO CONSULT WITF (HE JIAECTOR OF THE NATIONAL SULEgGg FOUNDATION WITH RESPECT TO MATTER> RELATING TO THE PROGRAM OF ITS DIVISION. ORIGINALLY THE FOUNDATION HA) THAEE SUCH COMMITTEES, CORRESPONDING TO ITS THREE IViSIONS. WITH frlt LufU4TH OF THE FOUNDATION, FIVE ADDITIONAL JIVISIUNS HAVE BEEN EWTAdL)HEJ; CONSEQUENTLY THE FOUNDATION, IN
ACCORDANCE WITH Tl*E REQJIRE4ENT OF SECTION 8, NOW HAS EIGHT DIVISIONAL COMMITTEE>. THIS MULTIPLILATALN IN THE NUMBER OF COMMITTEES HAS PROVED CJMtERSOMt. FOR EXAMPLEt fHRtE COMMITTEES ARE NOW CONCERNED WITH SQLUILEL PERSONNEL ANC iOOCAfiMU MATTERS INSTEAD OF THE ORIGINAL ONE COMMITTEE, EVEN THOUGH 04c COMMITTEE IS ALL THAT IS REQUIRED TO MEET THE FOJNUATION*S NEEDS IN TI-is AREA. THE ELIMINATION OF THE VARIOUS STATUTORY






81


DIVISIONAL COMMITTEES WILL SIPLtFY THE STRUCTURE OF THE FOUNDATION AND
IMPROVE ITS ADMINISTRATION.
THE SECOND REORGANILATIUN MEASURE CONTAINED IN THE ACCOMPANYING
REORGANIZATION PLAN WOJL0 -tNPMER THE DIRECTOR OF THE NATIONAL ALLENCE FOUNDATION TO DELEGATE FUALTIici VESTED IN HIM BY LAW OR DELEGATED TO HIM BY THE NATIONAL SULNCE OARUJ. THE EXPANDING RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE
FOUNDATION AND TIE DIREZ.TOK INuJICATE THAT IT IS NECESSARY THAT THE DIRECTOR CLEARLY HAVE SUtH AUTHORTY.
JPON THE TAKING EFFECT OF THE REORGANIZATION PLAN, THE NATIONAL q1EAhFi F FOUNUAJION WILL ISTITUTE SUCH NEW ARRANGEMENTS, IN LIEU OF TIE DIVISIONAL COMMITTEES NOW REQUIRED BY LAdW, AS IT DEEMS APPROPRIATE. SUCH NEW ARRANGEMENTS MAY INCLUDE THE ESTABLISHMENT OF COMMITTEES UNDER SECTION 6 OF THE NATIONAL SCIEU FUUNJATIUl ACT OF 1950 AND SUCH OTHER DEVICES FOR OBTAINING ADVICE AS MAY sE AVAILABLE TO THE FOUNDATION.
AFTER INVESTIGATION, I HAVE FOUND AND HEREBY DECLARE THAT EACH REORGANIZATION INCLUDED IN THE REJRGANIZATION PLAN TRANSMITTED HEREWITH IS NECESSARY TO ACCOMPLISH ONE D4 tJRE OF THE PURPOSES SET FORTH IN SECTION 2(A) OF THE REORGANIZATION ACT aF 1949 AS AMENDED.
THE REORGANIZATION PLAN WILL PERMIT MORE EFFECTIVE MANAGEMENT OF THE
AFFAIRS OF THE NATIONAL ,,Lti. FOUNDATION. IT IS, HOWEVER,.IMPRACTICABLE TO SPECIFY OR ITEMIZE AT THIS Tift THE REDUCTIONS OF EXPENDITURES WHICH IT IS PROBAdLE WILL BE dROUGHT ABOUT BY THE TAKING EFFECT OF THE
REORGANIZATIONS INCLUDED IN THE RcORGANIZATION PLAN.
THE STATUTORY AUTHORITY FDA (HE EXERCISE OF CERTAIN FUNCTIONS WHICH
WOULO BE ABOLISHED BY SECTION I UF THE REORGANIZATION PLAN IS CONTAINED IN SECTION 8 OF THE NATIONAL SfiUdg FOUNDATION ACT OF 1950, 64 STAT, 152.
I RECOMMEND THAT THE CUNGRcSS ALLOW THE REORGANIZATION PLAN TO BECOME
EFFECTIVE.
LYNDON 8. JOHNS
THE WHITE HOUSE, MAY 21t 19o .
AMENDMENTS BY PUB. L. 90-4UIt JULY 18t 1968t 82 STAT. 3603 INTENDED TO CONTINUE AN EFFECT THE ExISTIN, OFFICES, PROCEDURES, AND ORGANIZATION OF THE NATIONAL SCIEUIE.FOUNMATION As PROVIDED BY CHAPTER 16 (SECTION 1861 ET SEQ.J OF TITLE 42, THE PUdLC HEALTH AND WELFAREP PART II OF PEORG. PLAN NO. 2 OF 1962, AND REOR4. PLAN NO. 5 OF 1965, BUT ON AND AFTER JULY 18, 1968, PART II OF REORG. PLAN 40. 2 OF 1962, AND REORG. PLAN NO. 5 OF 1965t AS 6EING OF NO FORCE JR AFFECT, AND NOTHING IN PUB. L. 90-407 AS
ALTERING OR AFFECTING ANt TRA4AF=RS OF FUNCTIONS MADE BY PART I OF REORG. PLAN NO. 2 OF 1962, S t SE TioN 16 OF PUB. L. 90-407, SET OUT AS
CONTINUATION OF EXISTING JFFItES~, PROCEDURES, AND ORGANIZATION OF THE NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION NUTc UNLER SECTION 1862 OF TITLE 42t THE PUBLIC HEALTH AND WELFARE.






82


**LTEM 117**
0 110. 35.007249
5 U.S.G. APPX. P 582, kEORG PLAN NO. 2 1966 -- REORGANIZATION PLAN NO.
2 OF 1966
EFF. 4AY 10, 1966, F.t. 6857, 80 STAT. 1608 PREPARED BY THE PRESIDENT AND TRANSMITTED r THt SENATE AND THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES IN CONGRESS ASSEMBLED FEaRUARY 28t 1966t PURSUANT TO THE PROVISIONS OF THE REORGANIZATION ACT OF 1949, 63 STAT. 203, AS AMENDED (SEE SECTION 901 ET SEQ. OF THIS TITLE).
WATER POLLUTION CONTROL
SECTION 1. TRANSFERS Uf FUNpiAJNS AND AGENCIES.
(A) EXCEPT AS OTHERWI4E PROVIJED IN THIS SECTION, ALL FUNCTIONS OF THE SECRETARY OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE UNDER THE FEDERAL WATER POLLUTION CONTROL ACT, AS AMIENtED, HEREINAFTER REFERRED TO AS THE ACT (33 U.S.C. 4*6 ET SEQ.) (NoW COVERED BY SECTION 1151 ET SEQ. OF TITLE 331, INCLUDING ALL FUNCTIONS it OTHER OFFICERS, OR OF EMPLOYEES OR AGENCIES, OF THAT DEPARTMENT UNDER THE ACT, ARE HEREBY TRANSFERRED TO THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR.
(8) THE FEDERAL WATEr PJaLJTION CONTROL ADMINISTRATION IS HEREBY TRANSFERRED TO THE DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR.
(C) (1i THE WATER POLLUTION CUiTROL ADVISORY BOARD, TOGETHER WITH ITS FUNCTIuNS, IS HERERBY T4ANSFkRi0o TO THE DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR.
(2) THE FUNCTIONS OF THE 5ERETARY OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE (INCLUDING THOSE OF HIS JESIGAIEE) UNDER SECTION 9 OF THE ACT (33 U.S.C. SEC. 1159) SHALL BE QEEEd (0 iE HEREBY TRANSFERRED TO THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR.
(3) THE SECRETARY OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE SHALL BE AN ADDITIONAL MEMBER OF Tft SAID djOARD AS PROVIDED FOR BY SECTION 9 OF THE ACT (33 U.S.C. SEC. 119J ANO AS MODIFIED BY THIS REORGANIZATION PLAN.
(D) (1) THE HEARING BOARDS PROVIDEU FOR IN SECTIONS I0(C)(4) AND 10 (F) OF THE ACT (33 U.S.C. SEC. J60(CJ(4),(F)) INCLUDING ANY BOARDS SO
PROVIDED FOR WHICH MAY a IN EXISTENCE ON THE EFFECTIVE DATE OF THIS REORGANIZATION PLAN, TOGErH wdIrd THEIR RESPECTIVE FUNCTIONS, ARE HEREBY TRANSFERRED TO THE DEPARTMENT OF fHE INTERIOR.
(2) THE FUNCTIONS OF THE 4AGETARY OF HEALTH, EDUCATIONt AND WELFARE JNDER THE SAID SECTIONS OtClth) AND 10(FI (33 U.S.C. SEC. 11601C)(t4)
(F)) SHALL BE DEEMED TO 6E HEAEBM TRANSFERRED TO THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIORR.
(3) THE SECRETARY OF THE ANTERIOR SHALL GIVE THE SECRETARY OF HEALTH, EDUCATION# AND WELFARE JPPORfUNiTY TO SELECT A MEMBER OF EACH HEARING BOARD APPOINTED PURSUANT fU SE~rIiNS 10(C)(4) AND 10(F) OF THE ACT (33 U. S.C. SEC. 1160(C)(4), (FJJI A MODIFIED BY THIS REORGANIZATION PLAN:
(E) THERE ARE EXCEPTED FaUM TH4 TRANSFERS EFFECTED BY SUBSECTION (A) OF THIS SECTION (1) THE FUNCTIONS JF THE SECRETARY OF HEALTHt EDUCATION, AND WELFARE JNDER CLAUSE (2) OF THE SECOND SENTENCE OF SECTION 1(8) OF THE ACT, AND E2) SO MUCH OF THE FUNCTIONS OF THE SECRETARY OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE U4)tR SwTION 3(B)(2) OF THE ACT (33 U.S.C. 1153
(8)(2)) AS RELATED TO PUB.IaC HcALTH ASPECTS.






83


(FI THE FUNCTIONS OF THE SURGEON GENERAL UNDER SECTION 2(K) OF THE WATEA QUALITY ACT OF 19@5 (79 SiAT. 905) 133 U.S.C. SECb 1152 NOTE) ARE TRANSFERRED TO THE SECRETARY OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE. WITHIN 90 DAYS AFTER THIS REORGANIZATION PLAN BECOMES EFFECTIVE, THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR AND THE SECRETARY OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE SHALL PRESENT TO THE PRESIDENT FOR HIS APPROVAL AN INTERDEPARTMENTAL AGREEMENT PROVIDING IN DETAIL FOR THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE CONSULTATIONS PROVIDED FOR BY SAID SECTION 2(K). SUGH INTERDEPARTMENTAL AGREEMENT MAY BE
MODIFIED FROM TIME TO TIME BY THE TWO SECRETARIES WITH THE APPROVAL OF THE PRESIDENT.
(G) THE FUNCTIONS OF THE SEGREfARY OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE JNUER SECTIONS 2t8), (C), AND (Gj OF THE WATER QUALITY ACT OF 1965 (33 U. S.C. SEC. 1152 NOTE) A~ HEREBY TRANSFERRED TO THE SECRETARY OF THE
INTERIOR: PROVIDED, THAT THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR MAY EXERCISE THE AUTHORITY TO PROVIDE FURTHER PtRIODS FOR THE TRANSFER TC CLASSIFIED POSITIONS IN THE FEDERAL WATEA POLLUTION CONTROL ADMINISTRATION OF COMMISSIONED OFFICERS OF THE PJdLtC HEALTH SERVICE UNDER SAID SECTION 2(B) UNLY WITH THE CONCURRENCE OF THE SECRETARY OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE.
(HJ THc FUNCTIONS OF THE 4ECAETARY OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE UNDER THE FOLLOWING -PtJVISIUNS OF LAW ARE HEREBY TRANSFERRED TO THE SECRETARY OF T-E INTERIOR:
(1) SECTION 702(A) OF THE HJUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT ACT OF 1965 (79 STAT. 490) (42 U.S.C. SEC. 310 Z(AJ).
(2) SECTION 212 OF THE APPALACHIAN REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT ACT OF 1965 (79 STAT. 16) (40 U.S.C. APP.J.
43) SECTION 106 OF THE POSLiC WORKS AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ACT OF
1965 (79 STAT. 554) (42 J.S.C. SEs. 3136).
SEC. 2. ASSISTANT SECRETARY DOF THE INTERIOR
THERE SHALL BE IN THE DcPAATMENT OF THE INTERIOR ONE ADDITIONAL ASSISTANT SECRETARY OF THE INTcRIOR, WHO SHALL BE APPOINTED BY THE PRESIDENT, BY AND WITH THE AJVIGe AND CONSENT OF TIE SENATE, WHO SHALL, EXCEPT AS THE SECRETARY OF THE WNfERIOR MAY DIRECT OTHERWISE, ASSIST THE SECRETARY IN THE DISCHARGt OF THE FUNCTIONS TRANSFERRED TO HIM HEREUNDER, WHO SHALL PERFORM SUCH OTHER O UTiES AS THE SECRETARY SHALL FROM TIME TO TIME PRESCRIBE. (AS AMENDED PJd. L. 90-83, SEC. 10(C), SEPT. 11, 1967, 81 STAT. 224.)
SEC. 3. PERFORMANCE OF TRANSFeRRED FUNCTIONS
THE PROVISIONS OF SECTIONS Z A4U 5 OF REORGANIZATION PLAN NO. 3 OF 1950 (64 STAT. 1262) SHALL BE APPLI ABLE TO THE FUNCTIONS TRANSFERRED HEREUNDER TO THE SECRETARY OF THE INTEkIoR TO THE SAME EXTENT AS THEY ARE APPLICABLE TO THE FUNCTIONS TRANSFtR4ED TO THE SECRETARY THEREUNDER.
SEC. 4. INCIDENTAL PAUVISIUNS
(A) SO MUCH OF THE PERSUNEL, PROPERTY, RECORDS, AND UNEXPENDED BALANCES OF APPRJPRIATISe AL.UCATIONS, AND OTHER FUNDS, EMPLOYED, USED, HELD, AVAILABLE, OR TO bE MADE AVAILABLE IN CONNECTION WITH THE FUNCTIONS TRANSFERRED TO THE SECRETARY UF THE INTERIOR OR THE DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR oY THIS REORGANIZATION PLAN AS THE DIRECTOR OF THE BUREAU OF THE






84


BUDGET SHALL DETERMINE SNALL BE TRANSFERRED TO THE DEPARTMENT OF THE. INTERIOR AT SUCH TIME OR TAMES AS THE DIRECTOR SHALL DIRECT.
(B) SUCH FURTHER MEASURES AND DISPOSITIONS AS THE DIRECTOR OF THE BUREAU OF THE BUDGET SHALL DEEM To BE NECESSARY IN ORDER TO EFFECTUATE THE TRANSFERS REFERRED TO IN~SBSSE;TIJN (A) OF THIS SECTION SHALL BE CARRIED OUT IN SULH MANNER AS HE SHALL DIRECT AND BY SUCH AGENCIES AS HE SHALL DESIGNATE.
(C THIS RECRGANIZATIOG PLA4 SHALL NOT IMPAIR THE TRANSFER RIGHTS AND BENEFITS OF COMMISSIONED JFFICEAS OF THE PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE PROVIDED BY SECTION 2 OF THE WATER QUALIl T AC" OF 1965.
SEC. 5. ABOLITICN OF OFFICE
(A) THERE IS HEREBY ABULISHte THAT OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE THE INCUMBENT OF WHICH IS ON DATE OF THE TRANSMITTAL OF THIS REOKGANI4ATiON PLAN TO THE CONGRESS THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AM O WELFARE DESIGNATED BY THE SECRETARY OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE UNJER THE PROVISIONS OF SECTION 1(B) OF THE ACT.
(a) THE SECRETARY OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE SHALL MAKE SUCH PROVISION AS HE SHALL DE~M TO BE NECESSARY RESPECTING THE WINDING UP OF ANY OUTSTANDING AFFAIRS OF iHE ASSISTANT SECRETARY WHOSE OFFICE IS ABOLISHED BY SUBSECTION (AJ OF THAS SECTION.
MESSAGe OF THE PRE iENT ro THE CONGRESS OF THE UNITED STATES:
I (RANSMIT HEREWITH KiURGAN1LATION PLAN NO. 2 OF 1966, PREPARED IN ACCORDANCt WITH THE PRJVISION, OF THE REORGANIZATION ACT OF 1949, AS AMENDED, AND PROVIDING FOR KEO4GANILATION OF CERTAIN WATER POLLUTION CONTROL FUNCTIONS.
THIRTY-FIVE YEARS AGO JUSTICE LIVER WENDELL HOLMES SAID: "A RIVER IS MORE THAN AN AMENITY9 IT IS A irEASURE."
ONLY RECENTLY HAS THE TRUrH JF THIS OBSERVATION ENTERED THE PUBLIC CONSCIENCE. FOR WE NOW AtOGN14E THAT THE NATION'S RIVERS, FAR FROM BEING TREASURED, HAVE BEEN CARELESSLY NEGLECTED FOR TOO LONG.
TODAY WE FACE A HARSH REALITY. OUR WATERS ARE BURDENED WITH BLIGHT. WE KNOW THAT EVERY RIVER SYSTEM IN AMERICA SUFFERS FROM SCME DEGREE OF POLLUTION. THIS MENACE aS GCAING MORE SERIOUS WITH EVERY PASSING DAY.
WE HAVt JUST BEGUN TO TAKE THt STEPS TO CLEAN AND RESTORE OUR WATERS.
THE TASK IS IMMENSE. THE JJUR4EY WILL BE LONG.
IF OUk NEW PROGRAMS ARE (3 SUCCEED ME MUST COMBINE OUR EFFORTS FEDERAL, STATE, LOCAL, A~D PRIVAft IN NEW AND CREATIVE PARTNERSHIPS.
THE ATTACK AGAINST WATtAK POLLUTION SHOULD BE UNIFIED AND COORDINATED.
IT SHOULD BE CARRIED FUORWARJ AS AN INTEGRAL PART OF COMPREHENSIVE
PLANNING FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF RLVER BASINS.
BUT, pMUST IMPORTANTLY, THE GUVcRNMENT*S MANAGEMENT STRUCTURE MUST BE STRENGTHENED AND RESHAPco TJ 4EET THE CHALLENGES THAT LIE AHEAD.
IN MY FEBRUARY 23 MESSAGE ON (HE QUALITY OF OUR ENVIRONMENT I STATED: ".. ~WE MUST REORGANILE TH FtEDERAL EFFORT. IN THE PAST, THE FEDERAL ANTI-POLLUTION EFFORT HAS 96EN ORGANIZATIONALLY SEPARATE FROM WATER CONSERVATION AND USE PRCAMS.
"ONE AGENCY SHOULD ASSUME LEADERSHIP IN OUR CLEAN WATER EFFORT.






85


"THAT AGENCY SHOULu di THE DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR."
THE DEPARTMENT OF THE INTER1D0, FOR MANY YEARS, HAS BEEN CONCERNED WITH THE COMPREHENSIVE MANAGEMENT A4U DEVELOPMENT OF THE NATION'S WATER
R. ESOURCES.
Ir PLANS, CONSTRUCTS, AND UPtkiAIES MULTIPLE-PURPOSE WATER AND RELATED LAND RESOURCES, PROJECTS.
IT CARKIES ON B.ESEARC AND DEVELOPMENT ON THE REMOVAL OF MINERALS FROM WATER.
IT ADMINISTERS THE WATER RESUUACES BESEARtH ACT.
THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR ALSO SERVES AS CHAIRMAN OF THE WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL RESPONSIBLE FJR COORDINATING RIVER BASIN PLANNING. UNDER THE CLEAN RIVERS RErJURATIO4 ACT OF 1966 AND OTHER LEGISLATION WHICH I HAVE RECENTLY PROPOSED, THE aECtETARY WILL BECOME THE FOCAL POINT FOR
FEDERAL EFFORTS IN THIS A4EA.
IT IS WISE MANAGEMENT TO PLAw.E JNDER HIS CONTROL THE RELATED RESOURCES AND AUTHORITY NOW IN THE JEPARIMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE.
THE REORGANIZATION PLAN MAINTAINS A PROPER AND EFFECTIVE ROLE FOR THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTHt cdGJCATON, AND) WELFARE WITH RESPECT TO THE HEALTH ASPECTS OF POLLUTION. AT THE ,AMt TIME IT PLACES IN THE DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ALL OF THE NElcSSAR TJiOLS TO MOVE FORWARD THE DRIVE TO CLEAN AMERICA'S WATERS.
THE REORGANIZATION PLAN HiERi-dlTH TRANSMITTED WILL TRANSFER TO THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR THE iJNCTIONS OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE JNDER THE FEDERAL WATER POLLUTION CONTROL ACT EXCEPT FJR RESPONSI8ILIfIES RLATING TO PUBLIC HEALTH FOR WHICH THE
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDU"ATIO4, 4ND WELFARE HAS SPECIAL COMPETENCE. THAT DEPARTMENT WILL rETAIN RiSPONSidI,.ITY UNDER SECTION 3(B) OF THE ACT FOR ADVISING ON PUBLIC HEALTH QUEaTIjNS INVOLVED IN DETERMINATIONS BY FEDERAL AGENCIES UF THE NEED FOR AN) VALUJ OF THE INCLUSION OF STORAGE FOR WATER QUALITY CONTROL IN FEDcRAL RE4ERVUIRS. THE FEDERAL WATER POLLUTION
CONTROL ADMINISTRATION W3JLD t TRANSFERRED TO THE DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR.
THE SECRETARY OF THE INTURIJR IN ADMINISTERING THE ACT WILL ALSO BE REQUIRED TO CONSULT WITH THE SECRETARY OF HEALTH9 EDUCATION, AND WELFARE ON PUdLIC HEALTH ASPECT RELATALNG TO WATER POLLUTION. THIS CONSULTATIVE RESPONSIBILITY IS NOW VESTED 14 THE SURGEON GENERAL BY SECTION 2(K) OF THE WATER QUALITY ACT OF 1965. THE PLAN TRANSFERS THAT RESPONSIBILITY TO THE SECRETARY OF hEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE.
THE WATER POLLUTION iJUNTRUL ADVISORY BOARD AND THE HEARING BOARDS PROVIDED FOR IN THE ACT WUULU dE TRANSFERRED TO THE DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, TOGETHER WITH frEIR REPECTIVE FUNCTIONS. THE REORGANIZATION
PLAN ALSO MAKES THE SECRETARY Ji- HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE A MEMBER OF THE AuVISORY BOARD ANU GIVcS HIM THE OPPORTUNITY TO SELECT A MEMBER OF
EACH HEARING BOARD.
THE REORGANIZATION PLAN WOJLO IN NO WAY IMPAIR THE RIGHTS AND BENEFITS OF COMMISSIONED OFFICERS JF THE PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE WHO MAY TRANSFER TO THE WATER POLLUTION CONTAJL A14INiSTRATION.
THE REORGANIZATION TO di AC.JMPLISHED BY THE PLAN TRANSMITTED HEREWITH






86


WILL ENABLE THE FEDERAL GOVERi4MENT TO ORGANIZE FOR ACTION AGAINST POLLJTIUN ON A RIVER 8ASAN BAbI UNDER THE UNIFIED LEADERSHIP OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR.
AFTER INVESTIGATION, I H4Vi- FOUND AND HEREBY DECLARE THAT EACH
REORGANIZATION INCLUDED IN rTHlE ACCUMPANVYING REORGANIZATION PLAN IS NECESSARY TO ACCOMPLISH ONE OR MORE OF THE PURPOSES SET FORTH IN SECTION 2(A) OF THE REO~RANIZATIUN ACT JF L949, AS AMENDED. I HAVE ALSO FOUND AND HEREY UELLARE THAT IT S NL,.ASARY TO INCLUDE IN THE ACCOMPANYING REORGANIZATION PLAN, BY REASON OF THE REORGANIZATIONS MADE THEREBY, PROVISION FOR- THE MEMBERiHIP JF THE SECRETARY OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE ON THE WATER POLLUfLiui CONTROL ADVISORY BOARD AND FOR THE APPOINfMENT AND COMPENSAf[UlUt uF AN ADDITIONAL ASSISTANT SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. THE RATE OF CJMPENSATIjN FIXED FOR THAT OFFICER IS THAT WHICH I HAVE FOUND TO PREVAIL IN RESPLT OF COMPARABLE OFFICERS IN THE EXECUTIVE
BRANCH UF THE GOVERNMENT.
THE REORGANIZATIONS PRJVIUEJ FJR IN THE REORGANIZATION PLAN TRANSMITTED HERE4ITH WILL PRODUCE SIuNIFICLAN( LONG-RANGE SAVINGS AND ECONOMIES BY REASON OF THE EFFICIEN.LES iN ORGANIZATION AND IN THE ELIMINATION OF DUPLICATION OF EFFORT IT SILL dilG ABOUT. IT IS, HOWEVERP IMPRACTICABLE TO SPECIFY OR ITEMIZE AT (IlIS T1Mi THE REDUCTIONS OF EXPENDITURES WHICH IT IS PROBAbLLE WILL BE BOUGHT ABOUT BY THE TAKING EFFECT OF THE
REORGANILATIONS INCLUDED IN TH ORGANIZATION PLAN.
I RECOMMEND THAT THE CONGRESS ALLOW THE ACCOMPANYING PLAN TO BECOME EFFECTIVE.
LYNDON B. JOHNSON.
THE WHITE HOUSE, FEBRUJAY 2d. 1966.






87


**ITEM J18**
0011J.05.007259
5 U.S.C. APPX. P 584, %EORG PLAN NO. 3 1966 --- REORGANIZATION PLAN NO.
3 OF 1966
EFF. JUNE 25, 1966, 31 F.R. 8855, 80 STAT. 1610 PREPARED BY THE PRESIDENT AND TRANSMITTED ft Tti SENATE AND THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES IN CONGRESS ASSEMBLED, APRIL d5, 1966t PURSUANT TO THE PROVISIONS OF THE REORGANIZATION ACT OF 1949, 63 STAT. 203, AS AMENDED (SEE SECTION 901 ET SEQ. OF THIS TITLE).
PJdLIC HEALTH SERVICE
SECflIN 1. TRANSFER Oe FUJNfTIjNS
(A) EXCEPT AS OTHERhIsE PRJVIJE) IN SUbSECTION (B) OF THIS SECTION, THERE ARE HEREBY TRANSFLRED t j THE SECRETARY OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE (HEREINAFTER REFEtiRE (f AS THE SECRETARY) ALL FUNCTIONS OF THE PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, JF (Hd SURGEON GENERAL OF THE PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, AND OF ALL OTHER OFFICERS AND EMPLOYEES OF THE PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, AND ALL FUNCTIiiS OF ALL AGENCIES OF OR IN THE PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE.
(8) THIS SECTION SHALL NOT APPLY TO THE FUNCTIONS VESTED BY LAW IN ANY ADVISORY COUNCIL, BOARD, JA COMAMITEE OF OR IN THE PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE WHICH IS ESTABLISHED BY LAW La IS REQUIRED BY LAW TO BE ESTABLISHED.
SEC. 2. PERFORMANCE OF TRA4 FERRED FUNCTIONS
THE SECRETARY MAY FRJ4 TIM TJ TIME MAKE SUCH PROVISIONS AS HE SHALL UEEN APPROPRIATE AUTHOR14ING TH PERFORMANCE OF ANY OF THE FUNCTIONS TRANSFERRED TO IMN BY THE PRUVIIONS OF THIS REORGANIZATION PLAN BY ANY OFFICER, EMPLOYEE, OR AEi4CY JF THE PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE OR OF THE EPArTMENT OF HEALTH, ECJATIcd, AND WELFARE.
SEC. 3. ABOLITIONS
(A) THE FOLLOWING AGENCIES OF THE PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE APE HEREBY ABOLISHED:
(L) THE BUREAU OF MEULCAL SERVICES, INCLUDING THE OFFICE OF CHIEF OF
THE BUREAU OF MEDICAL SEAVIC.ES.
(2) THE BUREAU OF STATE SEiVI.ES, INCLUDING THE OFFICE OF CHIEF OF THE BUREAU OF STATE SERVICES.
(3) THE AGENCY DESIGNATED Ai THE NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (42 U.S. C. 203)t INCLUDING THE OFFICE OFUP )IRECTOR OF THE NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (42 U.S.C. 2)6(6) udT EXCLUDING THE SEVERAL R ESE&&C INSTITUTES IN ** THE AGENCY DESIGNATE) AS THE NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH.
(4) THE AGENCY DESIGNATE) A4 THE OFFICE OF THE SURGEON GENERAL (42 U.S. C. 20311t), TOGETHER WITH THE JFFiCE HELD BY THE DEPUTY SURGEON GENERAL (42 U.S.C. 206(A)I.
(8) THE SECRETARY SHALL MAKa SUCH PROVISIONS AS HE SHALL DEEM NECESSARY RESPECTING THE WINNING JP OF As*Y OUTSTANDING AFFAIRS OF THE AGENCIES ABOLISHED BY THE PROVISIONS OF THIS SECTION.
StC. 4. INCIDENTAL TAANFEAS
AS HE MAY DEEM NECESSARY IN UAJER TO CARRY OUT THE PROVISIONS OF THIS REORGANIZATION PLAN, THE >ERETARY MAY FROM TIME TO TIME EFFECT TRANSFERS WITHIN THE DEPARTMENT OF HEA.rTH, EDUCATIONt AND WELFARE OF ANY OF THE


























61-914 0 76 7







88


RECORUS, PROPERTY, PERSONNEL AND JlEXPENDED BALANCES (AVAILABLE OR TO BE MAL)E AVAILABLE) OF APPRJPKIArTuit, ALLOCATIONS, AND OTHER FUNDS OF THE DEPARTMENT WHICH RELATE TJ FUN lilS AFFECTED BY THIS REORGANIZATION PLAN.
McSSAG OF THE PRESS ttNT Tj THE CONGRESS OF THE UNITED STATES:
I TRANSMIT HEREWITH REURwANILATIONPLAN NO. 3 OF 1966, PREPARED IN
ACCOROANCE WITH THE REORGANILAtILJ ACT OF 1949, AS AMENDED, AND PROVIDING FOR REORGANIZATION OF ritALiH FUNCTIONS OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH,
EDOJCATION, AND WELFARE.
I
TODAY WE FACE NEW CHALLENGE AND UNPARALLELED OPPORTUNITIES IN THE FIELO OR HEALTH. BUILAJii U~ rrnE PROGRESS OF THE PAST SEVERAL YEARS, WE HAVE TRULY BEGUN TO MATCH iTH ACHIEVEMENTS OUR MEDICINE TO THE NEEDS OF OJR PEiPLk.
THE FASK AHEAD IS IMMENSE. AS A NATION, WE WILL UNCEASINGLY PURSUE OUR &ESEAiLoi AND LEARNING, OUR TRAINING ANO BUILDING, OUR TESTING AND TREATMENT. BUT NOW OUR ( UCN.EKN 4JST ALSO TURN TO THE ORGANIZATIN OF OUR FEDERAL HEALTH PROGRAMS.
AS CITiZENS AE ARE EMiITLEJ fu0 THE VERY BEST HEALTH SERVICES OUR
RESOUJ GES CAN PROVIDE.
AS TAXPAYERS, WE DEMAND (Hr MOST EFFICIENT AND ECONOMIC HEALTH ORGANIZATIONS THAT CAN BE JEVI! b.
I ASK CONGRESS TO APPROVc A KdJRGANIZATION PLAN TO BRING NEW STRENGTH fU THE ADMINISTRATION OF -EURAL dcALTH PROGRAMS.
I PROPOSE A SERIES OF ,HANGe> iN THE ORGANIZATION OF THE PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE THAT 4ILL BRING TO ALL AMERICANS A STRUCTURE MODERN IN DESIGN, MORE EFFICIENT IN OPERATING A U dETTER PREPARED TO MEET THE GREAT AND
GROWING NtEDS OF THE FUTUE. (HR JUGH SUCH IMPROVEMENTS WE CAN ACHIEVE THE FULL PROMISE OF THE LAiUMARK HcALTH LEGISLATION ENACTED BY THE 89TH CONGRESS.
I 00 NOT PROPOSE TFEat CrAi LS LIGHTLY. THEY FOLLOW A PERIOD OF CAREFUL OklLIBERATION. FUk MANY MuNTHS THE SECRETARY OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE AND THE SURGnaUN GcNEKAL HAVE CONSULTED LEADING EXPERTS IN THE NATION PHYSICIANS, AoMlNIGTRAfURS, SCIENTISTSt AND PUBLIC HEALTH SPECIALISTS. rHEY HAVE CONFIRMED MY BELIEF THAT MODERNIZATION AND REORGANIZATION OF THE PUBLIC HcAL(H SERVICE ARE URGENTLY REQUIRED AND LONG OVERDUE.
II
THL PUBLIC HEALTH SERGCLE IS AM OPERATING AGENCY OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE. IT IS THE PRINCIPAL ARM OF THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENi IN THE FIELD OF HEALTH. ITS PROGRAMS ARE AMONG THOSE MOST VITAL TO OUR WELL-8EING.
SINt;E 1953 MORE THAN 20 NEW PRoGRAMS HAVE BEEN PLACED IN THE PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE. ITS BUDGkT UVII, iHE PAST 12 YEARS HAS INCREASED TENFOLD FROM $250 MILLION TO $2.4 6ILLiUN.
TUUAY THE ORGANIZATLur OF (HE PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE IS CLEARLY OBSOLETE. THE REQUIREMENf THAT NeW AND EXPANDING PROGRAMS BE ADMINISTERED THROUGH AN ORGANIZATIONA. STRJLTJRE ESTABLISHED BY LAW MORE THAN TWO DECADEs AGO STANDS AS A MAJOR u&siACLE TO THE FULFILLMENT OF OUR NATION'S