Citation
Quarterly report to the Congress and the East-West Foreign Trade Board on trade between the United States and the nonmarket economy countries

Material Information

Title:
Quarterly report to the Congress and the East-West Foreign Trade Board on trade between the United States and the nonmarket economy countries
Creator:
United States International Trade Commission
United States -- East-West Foreign Trade Board
United States -- Congress. -- House. -- Committee on Ways and Means
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C.
Publisher:
U.S. G.P.O.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Quarterly
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 24 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Commerce -- Periodicals -- United States -- Communist countries ( lcsh )
Commerce -- Periodicals -- Communist countries -- United States ( lcsh )
Genre:
statistics ( marcgt )
federal government publication ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with Mar. 1975; ceased in 1979.
General Note:
Reuse of record except for individual research requires license from LexisNexis Academic & Library Solutions.
General Note:
CIS Microfiche Accession Numbers: CIS 79 H782-34, CIS 79 H782-12, CIS 78 H782-72, CIS 78 H782-64, CIS 78 H782-34, CIS 78 H782-8, CIS 77 H782-95, CIS 77 H782-77, CIS 77 H782-29, CIS 77 H782-27, CIS 75 H782-78, CIS 75 H782-40, CIS 75 H780-16
General Note:
Reuse of record except for individual research requires license from Congressional Information Service, Inc.
General Note:
Description based on: 16th (Dec. 1978)
General Note:
At head of title, Mar. 1975-: Committee print.
General Note:
CIS Microfiche Accession Numbers: CIS 79 H782-34, CIS 79 H782-12, CIS 78 H782-72, CIS 78 H782-64, CIS 78 H782-34, CIS 78 H782-8, CIS 77 H782-95, CIS 77 H782-77, CIS 77 H782-29, CIS 77 H782-27, CIS 75 H782-78, CIS 75 H782-40
Statement of Responsibility:
Committee on Ways and Means, U.S. House of Representatives ; submitted to the Congress by the Vice Chairman, U. S. International Trade Commission.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not subject to copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105.
Resource Identifier:
021345184 ( ALEPH )
24236499 ( OCLC )
75645949 //r82 ( LCCN )
0098-910X ( ISSN )
Classification:
KF49 ( lcc )

Full Text




95th2d Sessiongress } COMMITTEE PRINT { WMCP: 95-90





ON WAYS AND MEANS
*So HO] F REPRESENTATIVES
OcCT 1918



URTE UARTERLY REPORT TO THE
,SS AND THE EAST-WEST
FOREIGN TRADE BOARD ON
TRADE BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND THE
NONMARKET ECONOMY COUNTRIES
SUBMITTED TO THE CONGRESS BY THE
CHAIRMAN, U.S. INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION ON
JUNE 30, 1978








JULY 12, 1978



Printed for the use of the Committee on Ways and Means

U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 30-939 0 WASHINGTON : 1978





























COMMITTEE ON WAYS AND MEANS

AL ULLMAN, Oregon, Chairman JAMES A. BURKE, Massachusetts BARBER B. CONABLE, Ja., New York
DAN ROSTENKOWSKI, Illinois JOHN J. DUNCAN, Tennessee
CHARLES A. VANIK, Ohio BILL ARCHER, Texas
OMAR BURLESON, Texas GUY VANDER JAGT, Michigan
JAMES C. CORMAN, California WILLIAM A. STEIGER, Wisconsin
SAM M. GIBBONS, Florida PHILIP M. CRANE, Illinois
JOE D. WAGGONNER, JR., Louisiana BILL FRENZEL, Minnesota
OTIS G. PIKE, New York JAMES G. MARTIN, North Carolina
J. J. PICKLE, Texas L. A. (SKIP) BAFALIS, Florida
CHARLES B. RANGEL, New York RICHARD T. SCHULZE, Pennsylvania
WILLIAM R. COTTER, Connecticut BILL GRADISON, Ohio
FORTNEY H. (PETE) STARK, California JOHN H. ROUSSELOT, California JAMES R. JONES, Oklahoma ANDY JACOBS, JR., Indiana ABNER J. MIKVA, Illinois MARTHA KEYS, Kansas JOSEPH L. FISHER, Virginia HAROLD FORD, Tennessee KEN HOLLAND, South Carolina WILLIAM M. BRODHEAD, Michigan ED JENKINS, Georgia RICHARD A. GEPHARDT, Missouri JIM GUY TUCKER. Arkansas RAYMOND F. LEDERER, Pennsylvania JOHN M. MARTIN, JR., Chief Counsel J. P. BAKER, Assistant Chief Counsel JOHN K. MEAGHER, Minority Counsel
(II)











LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL


U.S. INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION,
Washington, D.C., June 30, 1978.
Hon. THOMAS P. O'NEILL, Jr., Speaker of the House of Representatives, Washington, D.C.
DEAR MR. SPEAKER: The U.S. International Trade Commission is pleased to submit to the Congress its fourteenth quarterly report on trade between the United States and the nonmarket economy countries as required by section 410 of the Trade Act of 1974. The report is being submitted simultaneously to the East-West Foreign Trade Board.
It is believed that this report will be of particular interest to the Committee on Ways and Means.
Sincerely,
JOSEPH 0. PARKER, Chairman.
















CONTENTS


Letter of transmittal to the Speaker of the House of Representatives from Page the Chairman, U.S. International Trade Commission-------------------III
Introduction------------------------------------------------------- 1
First quarter developments in trade between the United States and the nonmarket economy cutis-------------------3
Changes in U.S. foreign trade statistics in 17-------------16
Trade sceue------------------------17
Nonmonetary gl-----------------------17
Timing of import sttsis-------------------18
Effects on presentation of data in East-West trade reports--------18 U.S. imports of nonmonetary gold from the nonmarket economy countries-. 20 Analyses of imports from the nonmarket economy countries that have a growing significance in U.S. markets:
Unwrought nikl-----------------------22
Structure of the U.S. inuty----------------24
The Soviet nickel idsr------------------25
Aluminum waste and srp-------------------26
U.S. tae------------------------28
U.S. supply and dead------------------28
Soviet supy-----------------------29
Appendix: Leading U.S. imports and exports in trade with the nonmarket economy conre------------------------31
Inde----------------------------------------------52
(V)



















Digitized by the Internet Archive
in 2013













http://archive.org/details/reporttl 4u nit











FOURTEENTH QUARTERLY REPORT ON TRADE BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND THE NONMARKET
ECONOMY COUNTRIES

INTRODUCTION
This report by the U.S. International Trade Commission is made pursuant to section 410 of the Trade Act of 1974 (19 U.S.C. 2440), which requires the Commission to monitor imports from and exports to the nonmarket economy countries (N'ME's), to provide data on the effect (if any) of such imports on U.S. production and employment, and to publish a summary report of the data not less frequently than Once each calendar quarter for Congress and the East-West Foreign Trade Board. This report covers information through the first quarter of 1978.
The nonmarket economy countries for which trade statistics are included in this series of reports are Albania, Bulgaria, People's Republic of China (China), Cuba, Czechoslovakia, German Democratic Republic (East Germany), Hungrary, Mongolian People's Republic, Poland, Romania, the U.S.S.R., and Yugoslavia. At a later date, the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Vietnam, Loas, and Democratic Kampuchea may be included in. this series of reports, pending the development of trade. Most of the countries have not been accorded most-favored-nation (MEN) treatment by the United States during the last 25 years. At the present time, only Poland, Yugoslavia, and Romania receive MEN treatment from the United States.
In the Tariff Schedules of the United States (TS US), the unconditional MFN rates are set forth in duty column 1. The rates applicable to products of designated Communist nations or areas are set fo1rth in duty column 2; for the most part these rates are the original statutory rates enacted in 1930. The rate policy involved was made effective by the President in 1951 and 1952 pursuant to section 5 of the Trade Agreements Extension Act of 1951, which directed the President as soon as practicable to take such action as was necessary to deny the benefit of trade-agreement concessions to imports from certain Communist nations or areas. An examination of the individual items or rate provisions of the TSUS reveals that the rate discrimination involved varies considerably from item to item and sometimes is not p resent at all, as where imports from all sources have been historically free of duty or dutiable at the same rates. It is important, therefore, to look at the particular rate treatment in the TSUS when interest is to be focused onthe actual or potential trade in specific imports.
This report examines the volume of U.S. imports and exports with each of the nonmarket economy countries and the commodity composition of that trade, as well as the balance of U.S. trade with these countries. Detailed dlata are included on the most important U.S. imports and exports in trade with each of the nonmarket economy
(1)





2

countries. One objective of the analysis of detailed U.S. import data is to identify items produced in the United States with which the imported products compete and to assess the economic impact, if any, of such imports on the relevant U.S. industry and on employment within that industry.
This report contains a summary of the changes in U.S. foreign trade classifications and data collection that became effective on January 1, 1978, and includes an analysis of the impact on U.S. imports from the NME's resulting from the decision to include imports of n Onmonetary gold in the trade statistics. Prior to January 1, 1978, statistics on trade in nonmonetary gold were reported separately and thus were not included in the trade (data used in previous reports on U.S. trade with the NME countries. This report also includes analyses of two products-unwrought nickel and aluminum waste and scrap-that have been imported in increasing amounts from the nonmarket countries. The analyses focus on the causes of the increases in imports and the probable effects of these increases on domestic output.













FIRST QUARTER DEVELOPMENT IN TRADE BETWEEN
THE UNITED STATES AND THE NONMARKET ECONOMY COUNTRIES

The value of U.S. trade with the nonmarket economy countries in the first quarter of 1978 was nearly $0.5 billion higher than it was in the previous quarter. Expansions in both exports and imports contributed to the increase, and trade turnover in the first quarter of 1978 was at a higher level than in any single quarter of 1977 (table 1).' A 40-percent increase in exports and a 33-percent rise in imports combined to produce a positive trade balance of $520 million for the United States in the quarter. This was the largest trade surplus that the United States has had with the NME's since the first quarter of 1977.
The importance of NME trade to the United States in comparison with U.S. trade with the world is shown in the last two rows of table 1. The share of total U.S. exports going to the NME's increased by a full percentage point over the share for the fourth quarter of 1977 and exceeded the share of U.S. exports going to the NME's during any quarter in 1977. The share of imports from the NME's, which had varied between 1.1 and 1.2 percent of total U.S. imports (luring 1977, rose to 1.4 percent in the first quarter of 1978.

1 This quarterly report covering the first part of 1978 has had to contend with major changes in the classification of the products traded by the United States. In summary, there is a completely revised 7-digit schedule B for exports classified in the framework of the 7-digit "Tariff Schedules of the United States Annotated" (TSUSA), an expansion of the 7-digit TSUSA import classification by about 2,000 new items, a new 7-digit schedule E for exports, and a revised 7d-digit schedule A for imports. These changes have been incorporated into the report insofar as possible, and descriptive notes indicate where this has occurred. A section of this report discusses these changes in more detail.
Data presented in tables 1 through 7 of this report are not directly comparable with data presented in
-previous quarterly reports because of the decision to include nonmonetary gold in U.S. import and export statistics beginning Jan. 1, 1978. Data for 1977 presented in tables 1, 2, 5, 6, and 7 of this report have been adjusted to include imports of nonmonetary gold. Inclusion of nonmonetary gold in the 1977 statistics raises the level of total imports from the NME's in that year by approximately $213 million. About 95 percent of the gold imported in 1977 from nonmarket economy countries came from the Soviet Union; the remainder was imported from Yugoslavia. Further information concerning recent U.S. trade in nonmonetary gold with the NME countries can be found in the article on this subject contained in this report.
Beginning Jan. 1, 1978, import documents are being tabulated so that goods are counted in the calendar month when they enter the U.S. customs area, rather than in the month when the documents are filed, the so-called date of entry. The date of entry is, on average, 10 days after importation into Lhe U.S. customs area. Data for 1977 contained in this report have not been adjusted to allow for this change in the timing of import document tabulation.
(3)
















30-939 0 78 2





4

TABLE 1.-U.S. trade with the world and with nonmarket economy countries, by
quarters, January-March 1977 through January-March 19781
[Value in millions of U.S. dollars]

1977
19782
January- April- July- October- JanuaryItem March June September December March

U.S. world trade:
Exports--------------- 29,668 31, 763 29, 102 30, 673 30, 965
Imors-------- 35,070 38, 063 37, 154 37, 205 40, 551

Balance------------ -5)402 -6300 -8,052 -6532 -9,586

U.S. trade with nonmarket
economies:
Exports-------------------951 816 539 767 1,074
Imors------------370 460 439 417 554

Balance----------------+581 +356 +100 +350 +520
Trade turnover (exports plus
imors)--------- 1,321 1,276 978 1,184 1,628

NME share of total U.S. trade:
Exports (percent) ----------3. 21 2. 57 1. 85 2. 50 3. 50
Imports (percent)- -- -- -----1. 06 1. 20 1. 18 1. 12 1.40

'Because of the inclusion of nonmonetary gold in the statistics for 1978, data for 1977 have been adjusted by the inclusion of nonmonetary gold to both exports and imports. Therefore, data in this table for 1977 are not comparable with data for 1977 in similar tables in earlier reports. Data on imports for 1977 are not adjusted for date of importation.2 Preliminary.
Source: Data for 1977 are from the U.S. Department of Commerce publication FT990. Exports are from tables 5 and E-3 and include domestic and foreign merchandise and Defense Department military assistance grant-in-aid shipments. Imports are from tables 6B and I-IB and are general imports. Both imports and exports are valued on an f.a.s. basis. Data are preliminary for January-March 1978. NOTrE.-General imports are used in this table to better illustrate the balance-of-trade effects of U.S.-NME trade in the context of balance-of-trade effects of U.S.-world trade. The totals for general imports in this table will not, therefore, correspond with totals for imports for consumption listed in all other tables in the report.






0

TAB3LE 2.-U.S. trade with the world and with the nonmarket economy countries, by
schedule A, B, or E numbers, January-Mlarch 1977 and January-March 19781

U.S. trade (January-March)
With world With NME's
Schedule A,B,
or E number Description 19772 19783 19772 1978 3

Exports (million U.S. dollars)

0, 1 Food, beverages, and tobacco--. 4, 065 4, 389 420 427
2, 4 Crude materials ---------------3, 817 3, 786 182 175
3 Mineral fuels and lubricants. 778 495 18 10
5 Chemicals-----------2, 694 2, 744 45 27
6 Manufactured goods classified
by chief material------------2, 929 2, 746 44 30
7, 8,9 Other manufactured goods and
miscellaneous-------------- 15, 384 16, 234 242 202
Toal----------29,668 30,394 949 1,071
Imports (million U.S. dollar)
011 Food, beverages, and tobacco--. 3, 611 3, 971 76 103
2, 4 Crude materials---------------1, 878 2, 216 28 40
3 Mineral fuels and lubricants 11, 399 10, 356 34 13
5 Chemicals --------------------1,326 1,496 18 31
6 Manufactured goods classified
by chief material------------4, 636 6, 512 92 125
7,8,19 Other manufactured goods and
miscellaneous-------------- 12, 060 16, 001 116 221
Totl-----------34, 909 40, 552 363 531
Percent of total exports
0, 1 Food, beverages, and tobacco-- 13. 7 14. 4 44. 2 58. 5
2, 4 Crude materials----------------12. 9 12. 5 19. 2 16. 3
3 Mineral fuels and lubricants-- 2. 6 1. 6 1. 9 9
5 Chemicals ---------------------9. 1 9.0 4.7 2.5
6 Manufactured goods classified
by chief material-------------9. 9 9.0 4. 6 2. 8
7, 8, 9 Other manufactured goods and
miscellaneous----------------51. 9 53. 4 25. 5 18. 9
Toal-----------100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
Percent of total imports
0, 1 Food, beverages, and tobacco. 10. 3 9.8 20. 9 19. 4
2,Y4 Crude materials----------------5. 4 a. 5 7. 7 7. 5
3 Mineral fuels and lubricants--- 32. 7 25. 5 9. 4 2. 4
5 Chmcl-----------3.8 3. 7 5. 0 5. 8
6 Manufactured goods classified
by chief material -------------13. 3 16. 1 25. 3 23. 5
7,)8,19 Other manufactured goods and
miscellaneous---------34. 6 39. 5 32. 0 41. 6
Total----------100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

1Because of extensive changes in U.S. import and export statistics effective Jan. 1, 1978, only the following comparisons of statistics are possible: (1) U.S. trade with the N ME's on a 1-digit basis in 1977 with U.S. trade with the world on a 1-digit basis in 1977; (2) similarly for 1978; (3) total U.S. trade with the world in 1977 with total U.S. trade with the world in 1978 (import data are not adjusted for date of importation); and (4) similarly for total U.S. trade with the N ME's. Data for 1977 on a 1-digit basis should not be compared with data for 1978 on a 1-digit basis for either U.S. trade 'with the world or for U.S. trade with the NME's
Because of the inclusion of nonmonetary gold in the statistics for 1978, data for 1977 have been adjusted by the inclusion of nonmonetary gold to both exports and imports. Therefore, data in this table for 1977 are not comparable with data for 1977 in similar tables in earlier reports. Data for 1977 are on an SITC revision 1 basis except for the inclusion of nonmonetary gold; data for imports are not adjusted for date of importation.
2 Data for exports from old schedule B, data for imports from old schedule A.
3 Data for exports from new schedule E, data for imports from revised schedule A.
NOTE .-Because of rounding, figures may not add to the totals shown.
Source: Data on U.S. trade with the world for 1977 from U.S. Department of Commerce publication FT990, tables 4 and 3B; data on U.S. trade 'with NME's from the Bureau of East-West Trade. Data for U.S. trade with the world for 1978 are preliminary.





6

Compared with U.S. trade with the world, U.S. trade with the NME'0s is weighted much more heavily toward agricultural items (table 2). U.S. exports to the NME's are particularly dominated by agricultural items, while exports of manufactured goods play a comparatively small role. The share of U.S. agricultural imports of total imports from the NME's is approximately twice as large as the corresponding share of total U.S. imports from the world. U.S. imports from both the world and the NME's are centered in manufactured items. Imports of gold from the NME's accounted for one-third of imports of manufactured items from these countries. In addition, a relatively large proportion of U.S. imports from the NME's are of manufactured goods classified by chief material. In contrast, U.S. imports of mineral fuels, which are a relatively large percentage of U.S. world imports, make up only a minor share of imports from the NME's.
The value of U.S. imports from the NMNE's increased absolutely in all categories of table 2 except mineral fuels and lubricants. The largest increase was in imports of other manufactured goods and miscellaneous articles which resulted from vastly increased imports of gold bullion from the U.S.S.R. Imports of manufactured goods classified by chief material increased absolutely, but declined as a percentage of total imports. Contributing to the increase in this category were imports of unwrought nickel, aluminum waste and scrap, and platinum group metals from the U.S.S.R.; steel plates from Poland and Romania; ferrochromium from Yugoslavia; and the reemergence of unwrought tin, antimony, and tungsten ore from China (table 3).,2 Imp'orts of food items also increased absolutely, but declined slightly relative to total imports. About 40 percent of the food imports came from Poland, where canned hams held their customary first position.
The large increase in the value of U.S. exports to the NME's during the first quarter of 1978 is mainly attributable to the greatly increased value of agricultural exports, in spite of generally low export prices for grains and soybeans. The principal customer for these agricultural products was the Soviet Union, which bought corn and wheat worth $444 million in the first quarter of 1978 compared with purchases totaling $800 million during all of 1977 (table 4). The Soviet Union's grain pulrchases accounted for approximately two-thirds of U.S. exports of food, beverages, and tobacco to the NME's. Other corn or wheat customers included Poland, East Germany, and Bulgaria. Another large group of U.S. agricultural exports consisted of soybeans and soybean oil cake and meal, which were purchased by seven NME countries-the U.S.S.R., Poland, Yugoslavia, Romania, Czechoslovakia, East Germany, and Hungary. Agricultural exports to the NME's, particularly the Soviet Union, will most likely continue at high levels throughout 1978, in view of the disappointing 1977 Soviet o-rain harvest.
Exports of machinery and manufactured goods to the NME's during the first quarter of 1978 fell both absolutely and as a percentage of total U.S. exports, and accounted for less than 20 percent of U.S. exports to the NME's. Much of the decrease is attributable to sharply
2 A discussion of U.S. imports of unwrought nickel and aluminum waste and scrap is presented, later in this report.















C4

cq m





00 00 cq
bc > cq m




r- m cq m

00




6.5 "r cq

cq lf





do










C4
Ln C4-4
ci 00

PIZ 00
44

C"


1.4 V t cq V r- t- C r- "
oo U-; cq





oc
Z i2 cmq OMO Iro W
M
Lm ut












Id4
















00

Qa















7;j 0 4,4 .5

M C



'-4 m -I& lll t- cc



Z-









8




M LCD oo N uj

C-1 cq t- cq



ell N
ho m 00 txf cr; :uj "t



c, cq N
a3 54 m -d4 12 cq UID

'o ut rq 0:)




ul 00 SO T
C;
cq cq tt- cq m to cq t- -4 (D
28 cq t- ;s G 04
e4 oo m
L'i Lee C6
t


osi Z). C4 C4 C






In 03 to Lo ie
0 .10 r- tZ



Piz
ct r- t=
Let U (71,
00



Z
E-4 -6 t)
Z.- 0 C>
R' R 28 1-4 U-1 1-4 c;t
m 00 cq cq (M
06
C4 C4


cl m N m :00 -4 (M M) 38 rr- C4 M
cl "Cr C4 to











C14 :0
R C4
C4 m W
bi) (33
IS

C4




03



03


c;t bb
04 j
w ZS VIC
tw
a)
n
C3

too I
C3., Z ce

C3 z
co
IV 4.
r- 0 E-'o C3S- 'o- s-t E-4
ce Z C3
0 3 o
C, 10 C3
0:4mu2cu:; Z: u

C; cq m t4 v") 00 C)
E-4 z
-4
rn 0
z





9

reduced sales of machinery and transport equipment to the Soviet Union and Yugoslavia. To some extent, this decrease was offset by increases in the value of machinery exports to Poland, Romania, and China. The principal manufactured items exported to the NME's during January-March 1978 included machine tools, tractors and parts, computer equipment, and petroleum extraction machinery.
Figures I and 2, based on data in tables 5 and 6, show the relative shares of U.S. imports and exports from the nonmarket economy countries in the first quarter of 1978, compared with all of 1977. These figures show that the distribution of imports and exports from the various NME's has been relatively stable. The shares of imports from the U.S.S.R, Romania, and Yugoslavia decreased slightly, while Poland, China, and "all other" countries slightly increased their shares. On the export side, the U.S.S.R., China, and "all other" countries increased in relative importance as markets for U.S. goods, while the shares of goods going to Poland, Yugoslavia, and Romania decreased. A point to be noted is the increasing importance of China as a trading partner for the United States, especially in comparison with its position in 1976 and 1977.
The value of U.S. exports of cereals and cereal preparations to the nonmarket economy countries in the first quarter of 1978 was almost 60 percent higher than in the corresponding period of 1977 (table 7). Except for Czechoslovakia, which enjoyed a record harvest in 1977, all of the NME's increased their purchases of U.S. grain, often by a substantial percentage. The Soviet Union, which accounted for about five-sixths of the total U.S. grain exports to the NME's, has already purchased more than half the amount of grain it imported from the United States during all of 1977. Also, for the first time since 1974, the United States received grain orders from China. Because its traditional grain suppliers, Australia and Canada, are suffering from short available supplies, the Chinese placed an order with the United States for 1 million metric tons of grain worth roughly $135 million. The first deliveries were made during the January-March quarter, with the balance to be delivered during the 1978-79 marketing year.
During the first quarter of 1978, there were several developments that may have an impact on U.S.-NME commercial relations. A comprehensive trade agreement between the United States and Hungary was initialed in early March. In mid-May 1978, the resolution was approved by the House of Representatives, but it has yet to be passed by the Senate. Negotiated over several months in 1977 and 1978, the treaty calls for reciprocal MFN treatment in trade as well as detailing many business facilitation measures to be implemented after the agreement is formally signed and passed by both Houses of Congress. Due to restrictive immigration provisions in Hungarian law, a waiver of the provisions of section 410 of the Trade Act of 1974 is necessary to grant MFN treatment. The agreement also contains modifications of "General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade" provisions pertaining to market disruption in order to conform to the requirements of U.S. law.
The granting of reciprocal MFN status should encourage an expansion of United States-Hungarian trade. The provisions of the section on business facilitation promise a greatly improved commercial environment for traders of both countries. These provisions cover commercial offices, information exchange, visa processing, currency transfers, copyrights, patents, and dispute settlement procedures.








10



Figure l.--Relative shares of U.S. imports from the nonmarket economy countries, 1977 and January-March 1978


CHINA CHINA
I1.B L.
U.S.S.R. U.S.S.R.





POLAND
19.7 5 POLAND




ALL OTHER l/ ALL OTHER l/



13.91 X II.2
ROMANIA 19*K ROMANIA
YUGOSLAVLk YUGOSLAVIA

1977 January-March 1978

1/ Czechoslovakia, German Democratic Republic, Hungary, Bulgaria, Albania, Cuba- and Mongolia.

Source: Based on data in table 5.

Note.-Because of rounding, percentages may not add to exactly 100.



Figure 2.--Relative shares of U.S. exports to the nonmarket economy countries, 1977 and January-March 1978

U.S.S.R. U.S.S.R.
E3.0 9 .4.N 7












7.1 X 7.8 5
K.S E; 2ALL OTHER l/ ALL OTHER l/

CHINA
9.1
B.K CHINA 7H
ROMANIAROAI

_.3 X 7.1
POLAND 1 13.1

YUGOSLAVIA POLAND YUGOSLAVIA

1977 January-March 1978

1/ Czechoslovakia, German Democratic Republic, Hungary, Bulgaria, Albania, Cuba, and Mongolia. Source: Based on data in table 6. Note.--Because of rounding, percentages may not add to exactly 100.








11


r- cq OC 't ZZ It if: t- ., I :
M C C Cq Cq 0
- - - ES
C9 r- I- M OC "t I- t- Cq
.42 M t- C
Q







cq






z-: L6

C ce 0


cq Ct T"D C z C ZD C3 Cl
oc C) c*; cq oc
in. Ll Tt oc x V:


C9

f
-14 .='V CC C4



N 00
-t r--o = N z 71' --t N
oc

cll cli
Ite
C9 cq cl
0
C3


C3 0 C; rn in. C3
Lfl 4

Lf-.- knLn. 'n.
C3 C9 N N





I t

Qi C3
I I I i I



tp






4z)








Cl

CID



-4-D





0-0
>
LIS M I
0-4
to
bL
sp
tx tc cd
0






30-939 0 78 3








12


00 OLzomxr- t-wNt-cc -14
c r-, c U-i 00 io = 00 cz N
Lflz 1414 lf VD It:v = N C9 00
.6


00




--4 U U. t- N t- 00 M N -tI4 M m m
to = Cc = 00 me r- r- N r- IM r- tv
9 0 0 1- Ll Cq M IM C N cq C

00 c C4 ItV 00
o

N



-T14 00 CD C t- 0 cc Lo
00 00 00 0 =
-tq m lf" 1.14 Tv t- Cq Vl +- ,
0

m Lr Ll t- m r- cq 4CD
9,00 L3
&on 0 EZ;F



It 00 m m C C9 cq
m 00 M M cq t- 00 M r.-4 r0 ltq = .414 t- m 0 ul c
U. ei, Cr ci, C6 Q
m cq = lt:v Nt C-C "ge N
cq N



kQ
Z 0
1- 00 0 cq 00 M I-r M 00
m oc t- C) t- Ln = fc m 't
4. = 0 -It cq C N

0 00 C9 00 U:) --i t- cq oo M M
a C3

t
W
CS.





ba
t or,
O-Z

bo


42

r
4P
C) C/)
COD W
cc
CP 0
ca
ND r

cs
w
$.cc (P
0 CS

cl
0 W
03
cd
Cd > ci taw
0 4.> *.0
E--4 U o .- *
cd
S-.4-4 cd Cd
E bD c3 4 C9
M bo r. bJD Ca .00 o
ko 4 sz








13


00 M cq 00 CM -414 co cq
cn
cq 100 00 cq
cq
cq







cq U 0 t- -,t cq 00
r-O = I M c 00
00 Lr I r--4 cq 00 lf
00 "-4 cq M "'t 0 cq
M 00 cq
cq m cq 44
cli




it cq 00 00
t- m t- 00 14 cq cq "..4
"-4 cq 00 00 o co r- N
00 0 t- o 00 cq
cq M cq
00 t00

C


0 cq 00 lf t- tD
m It m lf lf N
o t- 11:14 t- 0 = r--4 r--q ca
134
u
N c 1-4
c6
r-4 ".4
r.-4
od
0
0 cq CC C14 1 cfl 00 C-1 C m lf
00 00 1TV cf* 00
t- 00 N t- 11-t C-4 C11

ul t- C) v" C-4





V2
I I I t





>



cd

cd
03
c)

4.4 0 03
C) ;*




ca
C3

cd -+5 ca
cl


C) w
;Z4 z

.-4 ad E-4 E-1 D
1 4 0 cd -a) 'o r- I r
ca bb- U2
7)0
bn (:d ho 0 !5'0
z 5i
03





14

United States-China commercial relations received a boost with the announcement that China is now permitting the registration of U.S. trademarks there, retroactive from January 1978. This decision was in response to notification in October 1976 that Chinese trademarks were already permitted registration in the United States under applicable U.S. law.
In late January, Representative Les AuCoin submitted a bill to the U.S. House of Representatives Banking Subcommittee which would make U.S. Eximbank insurance, guarantees, and supplier credit facilities available to U.S. firms selling plant and equipment to China. Proponents of the bill feel that U.S. goods would be more attractive to Chinese buyers if the United States were able to offer repayment terms more competitive with those offered by major foreign competitors. Under present U.S. laws, China and most Communist countries are denied Eximbank financing as long as they do not meet certain human rights standards. The AuCoin amendment was subsequently approved by the International Trade Subcommittee, but its chance of adoption by the full House or by the Senate is as yet uncertain.
Another first quarter 1978 event was the U.S. International Trade Commission determination on the first petition to be filed under section 406(a) of the Trade Act of 1974. The Commission undertook the investigation to determine with respect to imports of gloves of cotton, without fourchettes or sidewalls, provided for in items 704.40 and 704.45 of the TSUS which are the product of the People's Republic of China, whether market disruption exists with respect to an article produced by a domestic industry. Market disruption has occurred within the meaning of section 406 only if the imports under investigation are:
(1) The product of a Communist country;
(2) Like or directly competitive with a domestically produced
article;
(3) Increasing rapidly, either absolutely or relatively; and
(4) A significant cause of material injury, or threat thereof, to a
domestic industry producing such articles.
On the basis of its investigation, the Commission reported to the President on March 15, 1978, its determination (with two Commissioners dissenting) that market disruption does not exist within the meaning of section 406 of the Trade Act of 1974.
In an attempt to equalize the treatment given to nonmarket economy countries accused of dumping, the U.S. Customs Service, on January 9, 1978, proposed amendments that would modify procedures as they relate to investigations under the Antidumping Act, 1921, as amended, covering merchandise imported from nonmarket economy countries. The amendments would provide that when merchandise from a nonmarket economy country is being compared with the constructed value of merchandise in a selected market economy country or countries, adjustments may be made to reflect differences in economic factors between the nonmarket economy country and the market economy country. Such a procedure would tend to recognize and preserve any relative efficiencies or natural advantages in the nonmarket economy country. The Treasury Department expects that the proposed amendments to the antidumping regulations will be put into final form by the end of June 1978. When the new regulation





15

comes into effect, it could affect U.S. imports of Polish golfcarts and textile machinery, Soviet automobiles, and other manufactured goods that the nonmarket economy countries hope to export in increasing volume to the United States.
There were several developments of interest concerning U.S. consumer goods' exports to the Soviet Union. First, in January, Pepsi Co., Inc., and a group of Soviet officials announced plans for doubling the number of Pepsi-Cola. bottling plants in the Soviet Union to 10. Under a barter agreement signed in 1974, for each liter of Pepsi concentrate imported by the Soviet Union, Pepsi Co. imports a liter of Russian vodka. The agreement stipulates that the U.S. dollars which the Soviets earn on Pepsi Co.'s sales of the Russian vodka in the United States will then be applied toward the purchase of PepsiCola syrup for Pepsi bottlers in the Soviet Union. Pepsi-Cola was the only U.S. consumer product offered to Soviet shoppers until February 1978, when Marlboro cigarettes went on sale in Moscow at $1.42 a pack. The Soviet Union consumes an estimated 380 billion cigarettes per year and offers a potentially vast market for U.S. cigarette manufacturers, should the Marlboros gain acceptance by the Soviet consumer.
Finally, following receipt of a petition on May 3, 1978, the U.S. International Trade Commission instituted three investigations under section 406(a) of the Trade Act of 1974 to determine, with respect to imports of clothespins provided for in items 790.05, 790.07, and 790.08 of the TSUS which are the products of the People's Republic of China, the Polish People's Republic, and the Socialist Republic of Romania, whether'market disruption exists with respect to such articles produced by a domestic industry. In accordance with section 406 (a) (4), the Commission must report to the President by August 3, 1978, its determination with respect to these investigations.











CHANGES IN U.S. FOREIGN TRADE STATISTICS IN 1978
Merchandise export and import statistics of the United States underwent extensive revision and change in January 1978. The major changes were in the classification of the products traded by the United States, in the timing of the tabulation of imports, and in the addition of nonmonetary gold to import and export statistics. These changes were to improve the comparability of U.S. import, export, and production statistics and to adopt revision 2 of the United Nations Standard International Trade Classification (SITC). These changes present significant problems to users of the statistics at all levers of -detail. Time-series analysis, such as this report, is especially difficult because even simple comparisons of data for 1977 and 1978 are difficult to construct and evaluate. Some delays in the availability of data as a result of these revisions have compounded the problem.
This section of the report presents a summary description of the changes in the statistics and a discussion of the effects on certain comparisons of statistics which had become standard for this report, but which are now difficult or impossible.' This problem will continue for the entire year for quarterly reports comparing 1977 and 1978 statistics. Comparisons of statistics over a longer period of time may in some instances never be possible. Ultimately, the closer comparability of import, export, and production statistics will make for a more accurate assessment of the relationships between international trade and domestic production.
In summary, the principal changes effective January 1, 1978, include:
(1) A completely revised 7-digit schedule B for exports, classified
in the framework of the Tariff Schedules of the United
States Annotated (TSUSA);
(2) A new 7-digit schedule E for exports, based on revision 2 of
the U.N.'s SITC;
(3) The addition of about 2,000 new items to the 7-digit TSUSA
import classification;
(4) A revision of the 7-digit schedule A for imports, based on
revision 2 of the U.N.'s SITC;
(5) The addition of nonmonetary gold to import and export
statistics;
(6) A shift in the timing for recording monthly imports so that
goods are now tabulated as of the date of importation rather
than as of the date of entry.
A Department of Commerce publication that provides an introduction to these changes in statistics for U.S. trade with the world is "An Overview of 1978 Changes in U.S. Foreign Trade Classifications and Publications," ER-26, Office of International Economic Research, Industry and Trade Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce, March 1978.
(16)





17

TRADE SCHEDULES
Changes in trade schedules have significantly affected the presentation of data in the report. The new schedule B for exports is perhaps the most fundamental change. All of the classification numbers for each of the 4,000 items of the old 7-digit schedule B are changed. The combination of old items and breakout of new items resulted in only about 1,400 of the 4,000 former 7-digit items retaining the same commodity coverage.
The new schedule B is based on the TSUSA classification and the new 7-digit items cannot be aggregated to provide the more summary comparisons of data that used to be possible in several tables in the report. A new schedule E for exports has been developed that does permit the necessary aggregation to summary groupings such as food and live animals or beverages and tobacco. However, the new schedule E is based on revision 2 of the SJTC, whereas the old schedule B was based on revision 1 of the SITC. Revision 2 of the SITC retains the same 1-digit sections of revision 1, but revision 2 is only roughly comparable with revision 1 even on the 1-digit summary level. When the value of U.S. exports in 1977 for division 8, other manufactured goods, is adjusted for revision 2 of the SITC, there is a 12-percent change in the value of these exports. In division 7, machinery and transport equipment, the change is even larger.
In order to achieve closer comparability between import, export, and production statistics, approximately 2,000 new 7-digit codes have been added to the TSUSA. Only those items which could be changed without congressional approval became effective January 1, 1978. With congressional approval, other changes will become effective January 1, 1979. The deletion of some items and increased breakout of others interfere with time-series comparisons in many instances.
A new 7-digit schedule A import classification has been developed. It is based on revision 2 of the SITC and, for historical analysis, presents the same problems in comparisons with old schedule A as in comparisons of new schedule E for exports with old schedule B.

NONMONETARY GOLD
One of the changes resulting from the adoption of revision 2 of the SITC for U.S. foreign trade statistics is the inclusion of nonmonetary gold. This item had been heretofore excluded from trade totals and reported in separate tables. The inclusion of nonmonetary gold affects trade totals only marginally. The value of exports in 1977 increased by $1 billion to $121.1 billion by including nonmonetary gold; the value of imports increased by $0.9 billion to $147.7 billion. However, the comparability of 1-digit divisions of revision 1 with those of revision 2 is significantly affected because this item is now included in division 9, commodities and transactions not elsewhere classified. The value of exports for division 9 for 1977 increased by 33 percent, primarily as a result of the inclusion of nonmonetary gold. The inclusion of gold can also significantly affect the value of U.S. trade with individual countries, particularly trade with the United Kingdom, Belgium, Canada, Mexico, the Netherlands, Switzerland, and the Soviet Union.2
2 A separate section of the report discusses U.S. imports of gold from the N ME'S.





18

TIMING OF IMPORT STATISTICS
Effective January 1, 1978, import documents are being tabulated so that goods are counted in the calendar month when they enter the U.S. customs area rather than, as in the past, when the import documents were filed-the so-called date of entry. In previous years, those entries filed after the first of any month for goods received in the preceding month were included in the statistics for the month of filing rather than the month of importation.
The Department of Commerce has been able to retabulate trade totals for 1977 on both a date-of-importation and a date-of-entry basis. They calculated that in 1977 an average of $1.8 billion worth of goods per month were recorded a month late. It was not possible to revise totals for earlier years. "Thus, about $2 billion of December 1976 imports, originally included in the January 1977 import value according to the date of entry, have been lost from U.S. imports."

EFFECTS ON PRESENTATION OF DATA IN EAST-WEST TRADE REPORTS
Comparisons of import and export statistics before and after the January 1, 1978, effective date of revision are difficult in some instances and impossible in others because of the changes in classifications. Delays in reporting data were also a problem in this quarterly report. Whenever possible, data for 1977 were adjusted so that comparisons with data for 1978 could be presented. In several instances, adjustments were not possible and comparisons of data for 1977 and 1978 could not be presented.
The most significant omission in the report is that the customary detailed 7-digit presentation of leading items exported to the NME's contained in the appendix to this report covers only the JanuaryMarch 1978 peiiod. The usual comparison with exports of the same items for the comparable period of the preceding year is not possible. The appendix tables for leading imports from the NME's do have quarterly comparisons for many items, but several items could not be compared because of the expanded TSUSA classification. As a result, most of the subtotals of leading, items imported from specific countries in 1977 could not be constructed to compare with respective subtotals for 1978.
In the tables customarily presented in the quarterly review, data for 1977 were adjusted to be comparable with the revised data for 1978. As a result, data on U.S. trade with the world and with the NME's for 1977 presented in this report are not comparable with data for 1977 presented in previous quarterly reports. Nonmonetary gold was added to import and export statistics so that trade totals in this report are generally comparable between 1977 and 1978. Import data for 1977 were not adjusted at this time for the new date of importation tabulations because adjusted data were only available for total imports. On an annual basis, a retabulation of imports on a dateof-importation basis results in a change in the total value of U.S. imports for 1977 of $205 million.
3 "An Overview of 1978 Changes in U.S. Foreign Trade Classifications and Publications," p. 4.





19

In table 2, U.S. trade with the world and with the nonmarket economy countries, 1-digit SITC divisions and totals are presented. As discussed above, the totals are generally comparable. However, the 1-digit divisions are not generally comparable between 1977 and 1978 as explained in footnote 1 to the table. The 1-digit divisions are presented to provide an analysis of the share accounted for by U.S.-NME trade in total U.S. trade in the same quarterly period. Tables 3 and 4, which present 1-digit division breakdowns of import and export statistics for specific NME countries, did not require any adjustment because they present data only for 1978. However, the 1-digit statistics cannot be compared with similar tables in earlier reports because of the adoption of revision 2 of the S1TC.






































30-939 0 78 4










U.S. IMPORTS OF NONMONETARY GOLD FROM THE NON.
MARKET ECONOMY COUNTRIES
The three largest gold producers, accounting for over three-quarters of world gold production, are South Africa, the U.S.S.R., and Canada. These countries are the major suppliers to the U.S. market. Other sources of gold available to the U.S. market, which since 1974 has included private holdings, are sales from Government holdings and auctions from the gold reserves of the International Monetary Fund. Imported gold bullion is in some cases preferred in industry and in jewelry production for its purity. The United States, however, as a producer and a possessor of substantial official gold reserves, is also an exporter of gold. In 1976 the United States imported $331 million worth of gold and exported $375 million worth; in 1977 imports and exports were valued at $674 million and $1.1 billion, respectively.
The sources of imports of gold in U.S. trade are somewhat obscured in U.S. trade statistics. U.S. imports of gold are sometimes recorded from the country of shipment, instead of from the producing country. For example, both South Africa and the U.S.S.R. place a substantial portion of their gold bullion exports through the established gold markets and dealers of London and Zurich, and United States purchases of gold from these markets are recorded as imports from the United Kingdom and from Switzerland. Therefore, the value of both direct and indirect shipments of gold from the U.S.S.R. is not obtainable.
Direct Soviet exports of nonmonetary gold to the United States reached a high of $220 million in 1977, more than doubling the recorded level of total U.S. imports from the U.S.S.R. in that year (table 8). Indirect sales may have added substantially to the total. Trade in nonmonetary gold was not included in U.S. trade statistics before January 1, 1978. In the first quarter of 1978, U.S. imports of Soviet gold valued at $81 million exceeded the value of imports of all other commodities from that country. Beginning with this report, U.S. trade in gold with the U.S.S.R. and the other NME countries will be reported in all trade totals, and gold will be listed with other leading traded commodities in the tables in the appendix.
A number of NME countries besides the U.S.S.R. produce gold, including Yugoslavia, Poland, Romania, and Hungary, and exports of gold have helped reduce these countries' chronic hard-currency trade deficits with the West. Eastern European gold output, however, does not exceed 1 percent of the world total, and is greatly exceeded by the level of Soviet production. Gold is mined throughout the U.S.S.R. Two-thirds of the total output comes from the Soviet far east and east Siberia, with most of the rest found in the Ural Mountains, the Caucasus, and the central Asian republics. Soviet gold output statistics are not published, but estimates for 1976 range between 250 and 420 metric tons, or between one-fifth and one-third of world output, and recent high international prices have encouraged
(20)






21

plans to increase production. Gold output has grown at a steady rate of 3 to 4 percent per annum in recent years, and orders have been placed in several Western countries for advanced mining equipment. Moreover, the U.S.S.R. has substantial gold reserves and domestic consumption of gold does not exceed 100 tons a year. Thus, it is likely that Soviet gold exports to the West will be maintained at the relatively high level of 1977 as long as world prices remain high and the need for hard currency to finance imports from the West continues.

TABLE 8.-U.S. imports of nonmonetary gold, 1975-77, January-M1arch 1977, and January-Mfarch 1978
[In thousands of U.S. dollars]

January-MarchSource 1975 1976 1977 1977 1978

Nonmarket economy countries:
Hungary -------------------------- 10
U.S.S.R-_ 772 11,284 202, 134 114 81,019
Yugoslavia- 7 073 11, 994 11, 244 3, 460 1,148
OtherTotal- 7, 845 23, 238 213, 378 3, 574 82, 167
Allother ----------------- 448, 793 307,779 460,649 76,140 164,941
Total--------456,638 331,017 674,026 79,714 247,108

Source: U.S. Department of Commerce publications FT990 and IM145. 1975-77 data are from tables 5 and
6 of FT990, and 1978 data are from IM145. Both are general imports, and are on a f.a.s. value basis.













ANALYSES OF IMPORTS FROM THE NONMARKET ECONOMY COUNTRIES THAT HAVE A GROWING SIGNIFICANCE IN U.S. MARKETS

UNWROUGHT NICKEL
U.S. imports for consumption of unwrought nickel (TSUSA item 620.0300) increased sharply in the first quarter of 1978, compared with figures for the first quarter of 1977 (table 9). The top three suppliers in 1977-Canada, Norway, and the Republic of the Philippines-continued to hold this position during the first quarter of 1978. However, the Soviet Union, which in 1977 ranked as the eighth largest nickel supplier to the United States, moved up to fourth place behind Norway in the first quarter of 1978. This movement gives the Soviet Union a larger share of the import market than it has had at any time since 1974, a period of record high consumption in the United States. The Soviet share of the value of total United States imports of nickel in 1973-77 and the January-March quarters of 1977 and 1978 was as follows:
Percent oj
Period: market
1973-------------------------------------------2. 7
1974-------------------------------------------8.7
1975-------------------------------------------2.4
1976-------------------------------------------.9
1977-------------------------------------------1.4
January-March1977----------------------------------------.8
1978----------------------------------------3.0
During the first quarter of 1978, 2.8 million pounds of Soviet unwrought nickel valued at $5.5 million were drawn out of warehouses and entered as imports for consumption. These imports had a unit value of $1.95 per pound. However, almost three times this amount of Soviet unwrought nickel actually entered the United States during this period. During January and February 1978, 8.8 million pounds of Soviet unwrought nickel valued at $15.9 million entered the United States and were recorded as general imports.' This is the largest volume of United States imports of nickel from the Soviet Union since 1974. These imports had a unit value of $1.82 per pound.
General imports are a combination of entries for immediate consumption and entries into customs bonded warehouses. These data generally reflect total arrivals of merchandise, whether such merchandise enters consumption channels immediately, or is entered into warehouses under customs' custody to be subse quently withdrawn for consumption or withdrawn for exportation. Imports for consumption are a combina tion of entries for immediate consumption and withdrawals from warehouses for consumption. These data generally reflect the total of commodities entered into U.S. consumption channels.
(22)







23


TABLE 9.-Unwrought nickel: U.S. imports for consumption, by leading sources,
1973-77, January-M arch 1977, and January-Marc7i 1978

JanuaryMarchSource 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 1977 1978

Quantity (thousand pounds)
167,948 180,952 159,968 155,638 123,456 26,739 70,203 Norway ---------------------------- 29,030 33,025 22,359 2 97, 825 34,825 11,253 4,134
Philippines ------------------------- 0 0 6,039 13,943 19, 714 877 6,111
RhodeFia --------------------------- 7,887 3,805 5,533 6,205 8,680 1,892 ---------Australia- 3,949 6,854 5,688 7,369 6,621 1,959 2,530
South Africa ------------------------ 6,074 7,482 6,346 5,322 3,427 73 4 2,636
Finland ---------------------------- 194 730 1,550 1,688 3,835 ---------- 1,168
U.S.S.R ---------------------------- 6,529 22,111 4,934 2,110 3,030 403 2,819
Other ------------------------------- 18,556 19,669 1,751 2,410 2,950 536 1,010
Total- 240,167 274,628 214,168 222,510 206,538 44,393 90,611
Value (thousands of U.S. dollars)
Canada- 237,720 291,207 303,713 323,299 271,756 57,761 143,719
Norway ---------------------------- 43,742 56,343 45,199 59,479 80,619 25,523 8,462
Philippines --------------------------------------------- 10,638 26,743 40,369 1,745 11,068
Rhodesia --------------------------- 10,977 5,629 9,880 11,773 17,459 3,668
Australia --------------------------- 5,613 11,634 11,009 15,649 14,342 4,491 5,158
South Africa ------------------------ 8,605 11,856 10,839 10,402 7,015 1,489 4,556
Finland- 297 1,509 3,052 3,529 6,774 ---------- 2,246
U.S.S.R ---------------------------- 9,224 39,380 9,884 4,084 6,540 800 5,503
27,316 32,784 2,680 4,440 6,708 1,145 1,937
Total- 343,494 450,342 406,894 459,398 451,582 96,622 182,649
Unit value (per pound)
Canada ----------------------------- $1.42 $1.61 $1.90 $2.08 $2.20 $2.16 $2.05
Norway- 1.51 1.71 2.02 2.14 2.31 2.27 2.05
Philippines- 1.76 1.92 2.05 1.99 1.81
Rhodesia --------------------------- 1.39 1.48 1.79 1.90 2.01 1.94 ---------Australia --------------------------- 1.42 1.70 1.94 2.12 2.17 2.29 2.04
South Africa ------------------------ 1.42 1.58 1.71 1.95 2.05 2.03 1.73
Finland ---------------------------- 1.53 2.07 1.97 2.09 1.77 ---------- 1.92
1.41 1.78 2.00 1.94 2.16 1.99 1.95
1.47 1.67 1.53 1.84 2.27 2.14 1.92
Total- 1.43 1.64 1.90 2.06 2.19 2.18 2.02

Source: Compiled from official statistics of the U.S. Department of Commerce.

It is estimated that approximately half of the general imports of
8.8 million pounds during January and February 1978 were carryovers of Soviet nickel deliveries planned for 1977. At least two United States and Canadian producers said that they did not foresee imports of
2
Soviet nickel continuing at this level. No general imports of Soviet nickel were recorded during March or April, but an additional 0.9 million pounds of imports for consumption were reported in April 1978. The influx of Soviet nickel has been noted by United States producers, but no complaints have been filed. According to nickel buyers, importers have been offering Soviet ticket at prices "under $1.95) which is well below the $2-plus list price of the major domestic
producers.' These increases in imports of Soviet nickel are a development that bears watching in the future. Given the current United States market situation described below, these imports could conceivably cause some disturbance in the United States market if the trend in imports of Soviet nickel continues.

2 American Metal Market, May 9, 1978.
3 Ibid.





24

Nickel prices have generally been weak since inventories began to accumulate in the fourth quarter of 1974. Excessive inventories resulted because of a severe decline in consumption beginning in 1975 and because the nickel industry as a whole did not cut back production in response to the decline in consumption. New capacity continued to come on stream during this period, financed by capital investments made during the period of strong demand in the early 1970's. Compounding theyroblem is the fact that new nickel plants have much higher operating costs than do older plants. In September 1977, a Canadian industry analyst estimated that new nickel operations produce at a breakeven point when nickel prices are about $2.20 a pound.' Prices fell below this point in the third quarter of 1977. At the same time, a U.S. industry representative estimated that a price of $3 per pound was necessary in order to provide a reasonable rate of return. He further estimated that by 1982 a typical project would require a price of $4.80 in order to cover capital and operating costs.' For approximately the past year, neither Canadian nor United States producers have been posting list prices in apparent concern that other producers would discount from the posted price in order to sell off excess inventories.
Structure of the U.S. industry
The United States has measured nickel reserves of 200,000 tons out of a world total of 60 million tons. By comparison, Canada has 9.6 million tons, Cuba has 3.4 million tons, and Europe, including the U.S.S.R., has 8.1 million tons of nickel reserves. All of the U.S. nickel reserves are located in States in the Far West. Ocean nodules are a potential source of nickel for the United States, if processing and mining technologies can be developed.
In 1975 and 1976, U.S. production of nickel supplied about 9 percent of domestic demand for primary nickel. There are only two U.S. primary nickel producers of any size-one produces ferronickel and the other nickel metal. Some nickel is also produced in the United States as a byproduct of copper refining. Nickel scrap accounts for about 20 to 30 percent of the total U.S. demand for nickel.
Almost all of the nickel used is in the form of metal, principally in metal alloys. Nickel and iron alloys are used in the production of stainless steel and alloy steel. The nickel adds corrosion resistance, strength, and hardenability, while improving wear resistance, and minimizing cracking and spelling. Nickel also has chemical properties which result in its use in batteries, dyes, and pigments; as a catalyst; and in insecticides. The principal end users of nickel in metal alloys are manufacturers of chemicals and allied products and petroleum refiners, all of whom use nickel alloys primarily in equipment parts exposed to corrosive chemicals.
U.S. demand for nickel essentially follows the business cycle. Demand was strong in 1973 and 1974, reaching 207,600 and 219,000 tons,
4 American Metal Market, Sept. 23, 1977.
5 "The Outlook for Nickel," L. G. Bonar, Amax Nickel, Inc., Sept. 26,1977.





25

respectively, in each of those years. In 1975, U.S. demand slackened to 154,500 tons and has only risen slightly since then. This has resulted in a huge buildup in inventories of nickel which depressed prices and employment in the industry. Yearend nickel inventories increased from 87,300 tons in 1974, to 102,000 tons in 1975, to an estimated 123,400 tons in 1976. The situation was aggravated by the entry of new firms into the industry during the period of strong demand. At present, the industry is operating at between 62 and 65 percent of capaCity.6 In spite of the low-operating rate, the industry does not foresee demand and supply coming into equilibrium until after 1980 when the current excessive inventory is reduced.
The U.S. Bureau of Mines has forecast a 3-percent average annual increase in domestic demand for nickel through the end of the century. However, during the same time period, the average annual growth rate of domestic primary production is expected to be only slightly over 2 percent, unless there is a marked improvement in current technology for obtaining nickel from low-grade ores or from nodules on
7
the sea floor.
Since domestic production of nickel from both primary and secondary sources accounts for less than 40 percent of U.S. demand during peacetime, the United States is necessarily dependent on imports to fulfill the remainder of its needs. Although approximately 70 to 75 percent of United States nickel imports come overland from Canada, wartime conditions could disrupt shipments coming from overseas. To assure a sufficient supply of nickel for defense needs, the U.S. Government b,3-yin stockpiling various forms of nickel when it started accumulating strategic materials after World War IL In February 1971 the nickel strategic stockpile objective was reduced from 55,000 tons to zero, and on July 26, 1972, the President authorized disposal of all nickel held in the national stockpile. The U.S. Government set a new stockpile goal of 204,335 tons of nickel in 1976, but during the first part of 1977, the administration called for a halt to Government stockpile sales and acquisitions until further review. The Congress is currently considering the stockpile needs, but no determination has yet been reached. The Soviet nickel inditstry
The Soviet Union is the world's second largest producer of nickel. In 1975, the Soviet Union's nickel mine production was 168,000 tons, compared with Canada's 270,000 tons, Cuba's 40,000 tons, and the United States' 17,000 tons. Total world production in that year was 898,000 tons. By 1980, Soviet nickel mine producing capacity is expected to reach 200,000 tons out of a world capacity of 1.2 million tons. Except for Poland, which producers 2,000 tons of nickel, the U.S.S.R. and Cuba are the only nonmarket economy countries currently producing nickel.
The main centers of nickel production in the U.S.S.R. are in west Siberia, the Urals, and the Kola Peninsula. The Soviet Union presently has seven nickel smelters in operation. The most important is the complex at Norilsk in west Siberia which in addition to nickel, produces copper, cobalt, platinum group metals, selenium, and other rare metals. Over the past 10 years, the Soviets have invested more
"Nickel, producers wish the future were now," iron Age, Mar. 13, 1978, p. 91.
Bureau of Mines, Nick-,-1977,pp. 17-18.





26

than $1 billion in the metallurgical complex at Norilsk in an effort to expand the copper and nickel industries. The complex presently accounts for 10 percent of Soviet copper production and more than half of the U.S.S.R.'s production of nickel and platinum group metals. By 1980, nickel production at Norilsk is to be increased by almost 80 percent over that of 1975. Finland will provide equipment and technical assistance for part of the new production facilities. Completion of facilities at Norilsk will substantially increase the Soviet Union's productive capacity. One estimate places production of nickel at Norilsk at over 300,000 tons by the mid-19801S.8 This would most likely increase the availability of nickel for export.
The U.S.S.R. is currently financing a $600 million expansion of Cuban nickel production, with output of 90,000 tons per year scheduled for 1985. Two'existing plants are to be renovated, and a new plant with an annual capacity of 30,000 tons of nickel and cobalt went under construction in 1976. The United States has not imported any nickel from Cuba since the beginning of the trade embargo of Cuba in 1962.
ALUMINUM WASTE AND SCRAP
Aluminum waste and scrap (TSUSA item 618.1000) consists of materials and articles of aluminum which are secondhand or waste or refuse, or are obsolete, defective, or damaged, and which are fit only for the recovery of the aluminum content, or for use in the manufacturing of chemicals, and does not include aluminum in unwrought form. New scrap is produced-as a byproduct of primary aluminum production or machine building, whereas old scrap is obtained from the recycling of aluminum products, such as beverage cans. Aluminum waste and scrap imported from the Soviet Union is generally new scrap.
Aluminum waste and scrap is used primarily in the production of castings, which are used extensively in automobiles. Over half of the 100 pounds of aluminum used in the average 1977 model car consisted of casinos. The use of castin(rs in automobiles is expected to increase as automobile producers seek to reduce the weight of cars and increase fuel economy through the increased use of aluminum.
Aluminum waste and scrap from all sources currently enters the United States free of duty under temporary provisions amending the Tariff Schedules. These provisions end on June 30, 1978, and as of that date duties of 0.7 cents per pound will be assessed on imports from column 1 countries and duties of 4 cents per pound on imports from column 2 countries.
8 Alan B. Smith, "Soviet Dependence on Siberian Resource Development," Soviet Economy in a New Perspective, A Compendium of Papers, Joint Economic Committee, U.S. Congress, Oct. 14, 1976, p. 495






27

TABLE 10.-Aluminum waste and scrap: United States imports from the nonmarket
economy countries and Canada, 1975-77, January-March 1977, and JanuaryMarch 1978

January-MarchSource 1975 1976 1977 1977 1978

Quantity (1,000 lb)
U.SS.--------------201352 64, 802 65, 073 1, 362 14, 036
Poan-----------------0 3, 083 1, 786 0 0
Czechoslovakia-------------------0 666 438 0 0
Yuosava---------------0 0 2,)756 0 41
Caad-------------64,479 79, 759 85, 124 16,999 20,095
Total-----------84, 831 148,310 155,1178 18,361 34,172
Oter--------------24,782 23,117 24,611 1,615 8,139

Total, all countries -------109, 613 171, 427 179, 789 19, 976 42, 311
Value (1,0)0 U.S. dollars)
U.S.S.R_-----------4, 044 16, 392 25, 069 537 5,)431
Polnd----------------------860 683- -----Czechoslovakia--------------------180 180
Yugoslavia-------------------1,067 -----------15
Caad-------------17,917 22,259 26,902 4,543 6,746
Toal------------21, 961 39, 691 53, 901 5, 080 12, 192
Othr'---------------o625 6,475 9,267 464 2,826

Total, all countries -------27,586 46, 166 63, 168 5, 544 15, 018
Unit value (cents per pound)
U.SS.----------------19. 9 25. 3 38. 5 39. 4 38. 7
Poland -------------------------------- 27. 9 38.2 2 ------Czechoslovakia------------------------- 27. 0 41. 1
Yugslaia--------------------------38.7 7----------37. 1
Caad---------------27.8 27.9 31.6 26.7 33.8
Othr'----------------22. 7 28. 0 37. 7 28. 7 34. 7

Average, all countries - 25. 2 26. 9 35. 1 27. 8 35. 5
Percent of total imports
U.S.S.R.:
Quntty------------18. 6 37. 8 36. 2 6. 8 33. 2
Vale--------------14. 7 35. 5 39. 7 9. 7 36. 2
All NME's:
Quantity-------------------18. 6 40. 0 39. 0 6. 8 33. 3
Vale--------------14. 7 37. 8 42. 7 9. 7 36. 2

In 1975, there were 7 other suppliers, including West Germany, the United Kingdom, Mexico, and Jamaica. During the 1st quarter of 1978, the number of other suppliers had expanded to 16, including, in addition to the above-named, Venezuela, France, Israel, Costa Rica, Belgium, Panama, and the Dominican Republic. The remaining countries supplied less than 100,000 lb. Source: Compiled from official statistics of the U.S. Department of Commerce.





28

U.S. trade
Canada is the principal supplier of aluminum waste and scrap to the United States (table 10). The Soviet Union has become the second largest source of U.S. im ports of aluminum waste and scrap since it entered the U.S. market in 1975. Imports of this itein from the U.S.S.R. increased from 20.4 million pounds valued at $4 million in 1975, to 64.8 million pounds valued at $16.4 million in 1976, to 65.1 million pounds valued at $25.1 million in 1977. During the same period, total U.S. imports of aluminum waste and scrap rose from 109.6 million pounds valued at $27.6 million in 1975 to 179.8 million pounds valued at $63.2 million in 1977. Thus, on a value basis, the Soviet share of imports increased from less than 15 percent in 1975 to almost 40 percent in 1977. While the Soviet share of U.S. imports decreased slightly to 36 percent in the period January-March 1978, imports in early 1978 were significantly greater thaniDthe comparable period of 1977.
The unit value of imports of aluminum waste and scrap has increased along with the rising value of these imports. In 1975, the unit value of imports of Soviet aluminum waste and scrap was 19.9 cents per pound, well below the average of 25.2 cents per pound for total imports. By 1977, the Soviet product was valued it 38.5 cents per pound, exceeding the average for total imports by more than 3 cents. In general, the rising unit value reflects the increasing cost of energy, since aluminum production is extremely energy intensive.
The remainder of this analysis will be devoted to a discussion of U.S. demand and supply conditions and Soviet supply considerations as they relate to future imports of Soviet aluminum products. U.S. supply and demand
Total U.S. imports of crude aluminum climbed to near-record levels in 1977, while exports were down for the fourth straight year. Imports are expected to account for 17 percent of domestic aluminum consumption by 1980, which is more than double the percentage in 1970.9 However, increased imports from the U.S.S.R. do Dot appear to represent a threat to U.S. producers, at least in the short run, because of the supply- and -demand situation currently existing in the U.S. market.
U.S. aluminum producers reported 1977 as their second-best year ever. The industry entered 1978 operating at about 90 percent of its annual capacity of 5.2 million tons. Capacity utilization is expected to increase to 94 percent in the spring of 1978 with the reactivation Of several smelters in the Pacific Northwest. Drought conditions in the Columbia River Basin in late 1976 had reduced the supply of hydroelectric energy and led to the closure of these smelters. In anticip tion Of a return to normal river conditions by spring 1978, the regional power company has beeD increasing the availability of electric power. The aluminum COMPaDies were able to reactivate 180,000 tons of productioD in October and November 1977 and another 168,000 tons in early 1978. The reactivation of these smelters will result in jobs for 500 aluminum workers.
9 "Lagging domestic capacity means aluminum must be bought overseas," Purchasing, Sept. 13, 1977, p. 177.





29

Aluminum's big three-Aluminum Co. of America, Reynolds Metals Co., and Kaiser Aluminum & Chemical Corp.-posted substantial financial gains in 1977. Although these companies increased aggregate shipments by only 1.8 percent, aggregate net income was up 49 percent and sales volume was up 16 percent. Aggregate shi ments edged up 63,380 tons to a total of 3.75 million tons, while agcrregate profits for the three rose from $263.4 million in 1976 to $393.6 million in 1977 and aggregate sales rose from $6.86 billion to $7.95 billion.10
Several problems face U.S. aluminum producers if they wish to increase capacity further. One is the extremely large cash investment required to increase capacity. It now costs as much as $4,500 to add a single ton of annual capacity. Adding another hotline at an existing smelter can cost $2,000 a ton, compared with only $800 less than 10 y ears ago. In addition, fuel and power costs have more than doubled since the OPEC oil embargo of 1973. Aluminum production is highly energy intensive. Smelters require enormous amounts of electricity, at least 6 kilowatt-hours to produce a pound of metal in the more efficient operations. The Pacific Northwest is the only part of the country where hydroelectric energy can still be produced relatively inexpensively. However, as has been noted,, this area is subject to drought, which can curtail aluminum production.
In early 1978, Chase Econometrics Associates, Inc., released a study which predicted an aluminum shortage in the early 1980's unless investment decisions to increase capacity are made soon. Growth in demand is expected to outstrip growth in production capacity by approximately 300,000 tons. A large percentage of the growth in demand for aluminum is being generated by the U.S. automobile industry's efforts to reduce the weight of cars through the increased use of aluminum. However, the Chase study does not foresee any substantial increases in domestic aluminum capacity in the near future. U.S. producers are unlikely to invest in new capacity until they develop technology which will allow them to cut energy costs. The Chase econometricians also investigated the U.S. industry's concern that governments in developing countries will invest in additional aluminum-producing capacity and then produce in spite of price in order to earn foreign exchange. They concluded that it is unlikely that any substantial increments in capacity will come on stream from developing countries.
Soviet supply
The Soviet Union is the world's second largest producer of aluminum after the United States. The industry bad an estimated capacity of approximately 2.0 million metric tons in 1977, and production is targeted to reach 2.2 million metric tons by 1980. A sizable proportion of the aluminum is produced for export. In each of the 4 years 1973-76, the U.S.S.R. exported over 500,000 metric tons of aluminum. Exports are expected to reach 700,000 metric tons by 1980."
10 "Aluminum producers waste no time in '78," Iron Age, Jan. 30, 1978, p, 41.
11 V. V. Strishkov, "Soviet Union," Mining Annual review-1977, p. 537.





30

Since World War II, the Soviet aluminum industry has increased its expansion into Siberia to take advantage of abundant hydroelectric energy. During the 5-year plan beginning in 1976, all additions to the U.S.S.R.'s aluminum capacity will be located east of the Urals. A French consortium recently concluded an agreement with the U.S.S.R. for the construction of a 1-million-ton-per-year alumina plant at Nikolayev on the Black Sea and a 500,000-ton-per-year aluminum smelter in central Siberia. The Soviets will repay part of the cost by shipping aluminum products to France. Construction of the plants, with the assistance of French experts, began in 1975 and is scheduled to be completed during the current 5-year period.
Continued expansion of the Soviet aluminum industry is constrained by limited exploitable reserves of high-grade bauxite. At present, the Soviet Union mines bauxite in three areas: Boksitogorsk near Takhvin in the Leningrad area; Severoural'sk in the northern Urals, and Arkalyk in the Turgay area of northwest Kazakhstan. The Boksitogorsk deposit, discovered in 1916, was the first Soviet source of bauxite, with modern mining operations getting underway in the early 1930's. This deposit contained relatively small reserves of low-grade bauxite with a high silica content. The bauxite deposits at S~averoural'sk are the Soviet Union's principal source of high-grade domestic bauxite. Although discovered in 1931, their development was hampered for many years by severe flooding problems, and the first large open-pit mine did not begin operation until late 1971. Bauxite mined in the Kazakhstan area is generally of low quality. The highest grade bauxite in the area is expected to be depleted within 20 years, and the remaining reserves are of such inferior quality that they are often regarded outside of the U.S.S.R. as lateritic clay rather than bauxite.
Soviet economic planners have sought to overcome the shortage of domestic bauxite in two ways: (1) Through the use of nonbauxitic raw materials, such as nepheline and alunite, to produce alumina, the intermediate product of aluminum processing; and (2) through steadily increasing imports of both bauxite and alumina from a wide range of foreign suppliers. In 1975, Soviet aluminum output was an estimated 1.7 million tons, with 24 percent deriving from nonbauxitic materials, 40 percent coming from imported raw materials, and only 37 percent from domestic bauxite reserves.'" Technological and economic problems associated with nonbauxitic alumina production make it likely that the Soviets will rely increasingly on imported bauxite in the future. The principal suppliers of bauxite to the Soviet Union have been Hungary, Yugoslavia, Greece, and Guinea. In December 1977, the Soviet Union purchased 25,000 tons of alumina from Guyana for delivery in the first quarter of 1978. This is the first such transaction to take place between the U.S.S.R. and Guyana. The traditional customer for Guyana's bauxite has been the United States.
12 Theodore Shabad, "Raw Material Problems of the Soviet Aluminum Industry," Soviet Economy in a New Perspective, A Compendium of Papers, Joint Economic Committee, U.S. Congress, Oct. 14, 1976. pp. 661-565.









31


r-4 tn Cn -4 0-4 %0 C410%


en C4 U"% Ln Go ;t I 'I'l
fl. Go UN ..4 C4 N m Go
0
C C; C : c
m C4 It %0 0% Ln Cy% C14 cn C4 r C4 -* 0 OD 10
PM14 0 IV 0% U'% 0 .. 4 OD 0 00 C4 U-j -4 641% r co 61% W IV; 11
W w
to 4) o7 C; li V ; 0 1; r.: C;
%n C4 C4
C4


co 0 %D fn 1 0%0 ON I W% fl. VS cn 1- -41 $4 $4
cn %0 0 -4 C) -4 cn .410 -4 I'T 4 Ln C4 rl% 4) m
r fl. C4 rl co C6 4)
'T r- Ln %D a% C4 m S-4 4v 0
cn en %0 en %D %0 C" m
C4 co Ul% ON V"% r-. 'T r LM 00 C4 -4
tn rl cn -4 C4 -4
co
40) "0
Aj
0 tj w
o CY% I U'l 0 --4 .0 00 en '? C4 U'% cn 00 C14 0 00 4 P, WN w w
OD -4 t C*4 %D t%4 WN NO %D 0% V% fn C4 Cn -4 0% %D M (n 4.4
Cli C Oi Cli Oi Ui L'i r, C ?- cl 110.
co o cn r- rn m %10 0% r, r ON CN w w 00 %.0 0
r CP% 0 Ce) en r Ln M Cn T %0 O 0 (n (14 C14 C) ca q)
as co No WN -4 %0 F cn -4 0 r %D %D %C) 1 4 00 M V u C
to ^ -4 0
0 r W*j V'% T T Cn Cn C4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 c 44 to
co 4N CV) 4J 44 .,4
to
I f I I I I I I I I I I I I rA c
r. 0

A
6 44 AJ
CO) 41 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 w m
1 to I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 1 8 a 00
I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 1 0 (L) r40D >b W I >1 I I I I I I I I I I I f I I I I I I C: I I r. 0%
go
1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 w I I co .0 Aj
4-il od C4 co 0 1 Aj I I r, 0
*PM4 = 0.4 40 1 *,4 1 1 C%
to 9: V-4 -.4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 V-4 r .0
to 0 > I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 0% 4)
I I I I I f I I I I w4 -4
1 P4 1 1 aj I I I I I I C) 1 1 .0
1 93 1 1 1 1 1 1 w I I I I I I "D I f to ja '04
PC I a I I I I I I I 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 U 0 le
lw I I I I I I I I C I I I I I I Q I I c W 0
C W I I I I I I I I I I I (A I I I I 1 1 4 1 1 94 c 4-4 0
AJ I > I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I bn 0 0.

C% I 1 0 1 1 4) to 0 0
0 1 1 0 1 1 = u -.4 r.
44 1 IJ ,4 Cn I I I 1 44 1 10 *o4
OP-4 C 1 4 -#4 "..- I I I I I r4 44 CO 0
u 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 9) 1 1 1 1 1 1 C4 1 -4 1-4 Q -,4
r4 1 .0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 .0 to .,4
ri) Ai 41 1 >% -4 1 1 1 AJ I I I 4J I 1 %0 1 00 1 1 CO 1 04 40 to %64 00
w m I to 4) 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 w I I %C) I C: I I I I Z I ai ca ..4 r ,
0 .,4 0 1 1 1 1 cr I C02 U) 1-4 0 0%
64 -P4 1 1 1 1 40 1 4) U 00
u 1 0 1 1 1 crt 1 41 1 1 1 1 1 C03 go
.,I tv a 1 1 4 1 0 1 1 CAP I cc I I I I k I C cc V-4
41 z I I I c I I I r. a I I 1 4) 1 0 -r-l u $4
1 -#4 4) 1 1 1 C6 4) -4 C
60 1 1 1 > w Li 41
I di 1 1 1 ca I 1 1 40 0 ca
AJ I I en 1 0 w I I I w .0 AJ u 4j
.,4 1 44 1 W 4) 1 1 1 u ca 4 ..4
PC 121 > I I I r 9 '44 46
60 vu .100 .0 1 -1, It *a 4) 1 W 2 a 0 -4 C:
w C 1 C6 1 U 1 64 1 Ai I M 0. C .0 1 60 od 0 4) k 0) 0
I DO 0 1 to I I 1 40 1 90 en co cc 1 0 $4 H 44 ra 4
1 u 1 14 1 C4 1 I W I 4 $4 1 0 U Ln -r4 cc 41 (A 0
1 4) 1 cc I r. co u 03 0 1 M 00 a 0 -4 cd E-4 44
W -4 1 4 1 u 1 4 0 4 44 1 ra Go 4) Ai u >
a in I I 1 0 1 1 40) co AJ k -A
-A C4 Lr% k C14 1 V -r4 0 w O-A 4
44 V C: 4) cc %0 0. 4) 0) -A go
4 CC I > -.4 .,4 40 is 44 -.4 (A 0 Aj 10 a* (A "
w (' 0 0 V C: W Ij -.4 -4 fA W 0
v r. .5d 4) 1 0 1 14 1 co 4 w 0. 0. .14 cc 41 4) $4 4) 4
a to u Aj I Aj 1 1) 1 41 cc Aj Z X 41 (a a) 0 14 x
2 C V4 m 1 0 .14 1 > 1 -A > w 0 0) 0--l ca ca m to to Ai I co 4)
IV M r. CO .3d 1 0 1 Aj W Aj t 4 0 0 c c
V-4 39 to 1 .0 ; 00 4 (A 44 U Q AJ
0-4 0 4) Aj -4 AJ V Ai Aj 4) C-4 0
4 V-4 sw 4 0 to u C $4 w 4 41 >%.-4 4 4) w =
0 r4 to 0 r4 a 0 144 a fo to CC Z a Cc to CC W Ca CC Dt a) a c 41
a 0 :) C v C: $4 c z 0 4 41 v v -4 go Aj aj 4) -4 ca 41 .14
0 -A CO 0 '0 4) -A 0 U 0 .0 C -,4 1 0 C6 r. 0 0
v V-4 14 El v S -4 co 41 w 41 -4 H H 44
1-4 4) 0 M 0 co .0 0 ca w k AJ 0 A 14 0
0 0 c la .14 c cc 4 -4 0 C: 44 .14 4 m cc w 4) P-4 >
0 9rd W W 0 M E-4 04 w W E-4 0 Q to 41 0


PC Aj U
-4 9 C14 en 0 0 o 0 It I? r- 0 0 1.0 0 co 0% a cn C4 0 C4 to W 4)
ce to) 41 0 0 V1, m 0 N C4 m 061% 0 uli " 0 kn a co N
41 Z W r4
14 LA 8 C 1; 0 1; cz V; 0 A 0 r: 14 Ice Ai (41 4)
C) t-. IN 0 CN co eq 0 C4 C4 I? N 0 o C4 C4 0 '1 0 .
%D ul %n %D C4 %a 'o r No -.0 V% C6 04 P4








32





Ln C4 C14 m Ln 01 Ln 0 m C*N cq rl r-I M r-4 0*, W r-q 0% r--l
zr 'o \ o 0 -,1 -T LO r- oN Ln r-q 1-4 w -I-r r--i r--4 I,, C7*% 110 cn
Ln -1 04 0 Cn Ln 00 r-4 Cq M r- %D Ln N.0 C-4 0 m 0 -It -:T -It CYN
-z: co r--i OIN 0% 1,, 0% r-- 1.0 cn (01% co I I-- aN aN aN a% -T %.6 cn c,4 6N co -T Ln rl- Ln 11.0 CN %10 ell -T 0*1 Ln
>io ON 11 cl, r-4 a-, m r- cl fl, -T m r-- 01% m CN r-A 0 00 00 r- V Ul)
$4 r-A
r-i 10 co r-A 0 00 00 Ln Ln -11 m m C14 r-q V-7 fl, m r-4
r-- r-4 "-i C4 C- 0
m r-I un Ln

co .. .. .. I. r I. I.

$4
I > I I I I I I I I cz I I I I I I I I I I co
I I 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 >-, I I I I I I I I I I C
co
44
1 1 1 co I I I 1 1 1 1 Q I I I I I I I ri) I 1 0
V)
I --I I I I I I
0 1 cn I I I I I a) I I r--l I I I I I I 1 0 1 1 :3

PO I 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 4 1 1 ca I I I I I I 1 (3)
I I I I I 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 a
W 1 4 1 1 1 1 1 44 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 C13 I I
r-i I Q) I I I I I I I I I I I I -H I I Q)
I : I I I I I rio I I Ir- I I I I I p I I r-A
1 0 1 1 1 1 1 (1) 1 1 co I u I I I 1 1 41 1 1 10
P. I I I 1 1 4-) 1 P. I co I I I I I ri) I I -H
1 ca I Fi I 1 1 4 1 :j I I (n
I CO 1 1 $4 1 1 1 CJ I I I I 1 10 1 1 (c
C/) 1 4 1 1 Q) I 1 0 1 1 1 bO I 1 1 4 1 0 1 1 0
1 0 1 1 : bo I "a 1 1 4-) 1 r. I I I 4J I -H Z I 1 0 0 1 1 1 w I -H I I I I
ro I I gk4 -H 1 4-) 1 1 _4 1 r-i I I 1 '0 1 1 1
4 Q) I (U I d 1 0 1 1 u I r--l I I I r. I I I
fa 0 1 0) (1 1 0 1 1 : I "-( I I I cz 1 41 1 1 r-4
r-I -H 1 4 CO I I I a 1 4 1 1 1 1 r. I I ca
r-i 1 4-4 1 60 1 1 0 0 1 I I I rcl I I I CLO I C) 1 1 $4
0 1 "10 1 1 I I I I r. I r= 1 1 4)
tn ti 1 (1) 1 1 W 1 "0 1 1 1 -r-I I : 1 94 0
I H I I I C) -H I r.-I I I > I r--q I I i "U 1 14 1 w
-H 4-4 0) 1 4J I I C:) 4-J I -H I I -rq I (L) I I U r-i I 4.J I tn to
4) 4 1 4) 1 1 (=) U) 1 0 1 1 $4 1 -H I I 0 1 (1) 1
-H r-i CO I C b4 1 -0 1 44 1 1 (2) 1 1 Cn 41
r-q $4
(U (1) 0 &4 ta. CO -r-I I r-4 I rA >
4 44 1 4J I 1 0) 1 0. 4-1 1 4) 1 tv I I Cl) I V-q 0
I-i 1:$ 10 > 1 4.) 1 W I bo I I 4) 1 0 o W cr)
: w w 0 1 z I Ic I 1 0 0 C W 4 M X "0
0 0 cu x x -H 1 0 U I t 1 -0 1 P C:4 V) 0 4J 41 0
41 4-4 41 u I rZ I I I I r. 1 0 -H 0 0 r_ "t -H
m 0 1 r-i 1 -4* 1 (o 1 41 p w 0 0 a) 0 4
r W CO CO 4-4 0 'IZI I I () 41 0 u N 41 4)
4) 0 r-4 r-4 a) 0 41 (1) I r-4 I CO V) -H H 04
41 4-J a In C14 -H a) (n I -H I p 41 4) rz U)
p co (0 tV r:3 4 1 0 1 -W 'V 4) r. 4 4W AJ 14
0 r. 4J U) 4-) 4J (A 4J 4 0) 1 1 0 r= 0 :3 4J 4 4)
0 0 1 4 0 0 I CkO r-4 "0 1 4-4 1 44 CO CO Cj 4J -H 0 -H 41
TI 1 0 0 0 0 w 0 m 1 0 1 0 p r. co CL r.-4
44 4-J > w u 0 1 1 M 44 0 P 0 X $4
41 0 Q ^ rq 0 1 4.J 9: W 41 W co 4-1
0 10 1-4 cc U) ri) i) 4j -rq 1 0 0 0. $4
4 4J 4 -r4 Q) "0 = (U r--i 1 44 1 4-4 W U) 0 0
=1 0 (1) 4 (V u -14 a) I I r= w P W Cl. En
4 1 0 0 U) 0 0 r m 0 > I P. I co 0 Q) 41 X 4J
-H bo rz ca U) w Q 0 1 I r-I 0 .0 Q) :3 -H
S r. r--i (1) (U CO C 4 U) I V) -H "0 -ri r-4 0
0 -H CO 4 4) 00 9 ril Q) 0 1 44 44 (d r-i r-I -r4
Q :3 co >.t P4 4) r. u r. > r I El u co Cd m
0 CO "0 "0 Ej &4 0) -H -rq 0) 4 0 0 tj -r4 4J 4.J U)
ca r-q 4) Q) 0 z -% P c r-4 0 4) C: -H $4 0 0 0 :j
cts 0 4-1 0) r-4 r-f u w .0 U 0 4J "0 U) I U) -H r-4 4.J E-4 &4 co u
w r-4 m .0 r-i r-4 to rl- 10 m w C.) ;: U) 41 F3 -. u -r4 to
r--4 W >i M 0 0 0 W r-4 M 0 AJ 0 0 P CL P 0 0 $4 W 4 -H
4) 0 P 4 X CO 14 0 0) P OJ P 0 0 CO P f-I Q r-4 0
>4 M 04 H 04 P4 0 W
0 (U
u En
Ln 0 0 C) C) C) cy 0 C) 0 0 C) en -T 0 0 0 0 ul 1.0
%D -11 C) 1.0 Cl 0 %D r-4 0 r Ln CN w 0 0 r- N -IT 0
-4r LI) r-q r-4 m r- Ln m CD Ln r-I Ln Ln Ln m . 0
r 4 :1 0 m -It r-i Ln m m m tn m m ON -It w
41 0
ao z C 4 C; 4 C4 4 r4 0 -H
E-4 10 m cn r l (7% -IT -Ir I'D 0% 0 m fl- H %0 o ON m 0 Ln C> r-4 z 41
ri r-q r-q r-q %D f-i r-I 10 r- 1 0 r-q %0 Ln %D %0 P-4 %D m .o m r- co
to u










33






0 1 ON as 0 'D 0 C4 o w 'D U-N 0. urs r- V-) V-N m
11 m 01, Ln CN IT I M U-, %0 'D fl. M CYN
sw cn %0 00 m (7s r- r- V-%
a r- C 11: C C C C7 C le -:r V*- LA- 0 -,t C W- 0
ca rm -11 0,, --T 0 IT r- w 0 cn CO o Ln 0 0 r- CO C
w (n cn w c4 w .o v, r- as -T
I? C14 00 0 11 o r- m VN a m 00 r- r,
Go
1 co
C14
Cs ON tn 0 00 .T Ln CN en CYN %0 1 C4 V% 'D 00 ON
'D I U-'% 4 .T M r- :1- %0 Ln co 4 D -Z
V o UIN U11% 0 UIN C" ON CN Ln Iz r- co
cc 0',-- CY% 0 cn ,I CO 0% 'T P. aN o m m
"D o C7, Z 'D Ln C14 r Vl% U", C, 10 o V% ON -zr 0 rf (7% C% cn Ln %I cr, en LA C>
M en C4

V
00

co 'D o" 0 o 0 0 en CN VN 0% C*l a% 'D Lr o C> V'
IT fl, It %D %10 r O 'l r- .1 VN M %0 1 Cs 0 00 C,4
C: a, D WN 00 %n V-% ON 00 Ln 0 CO o 00 1" U" 'o co
E
4) 00 C C; 1 C7 cl C
Aj r, a, M 0 1 C> Ln (7% r, 'o 0 C
ON W L"N U-1 ,I M 0 0 0 0 f C>
00
f-- CN

f-. 00
1' 10 *1 cn



cu W
It It 11 11
iw I
It It 11 It




..4 cc 41 1 11

cn -a IV
cc 0 1 1 L4
4.4
I e I u I I 1 0

11 2 11 C: 11 M 11 11 11 It 11 It It 11 11 CC,: 11 11 I4 I,,
I 1 04
mr, 1-4 1 14 1 0 1 ID I I I I I I I I I W I 1 '0
0 cps I I I go I t 0 r.
0) -4 1 f I I I i w V
I IU 14
1 60 1 : 4)
0 1 co I > I I o. I 1 10 1
lq I ca I w I o I 1 0 1 m I
Aj cc 1 4) 1 1 1 w I w I I 1 0) 44
I > I v I I u I I I I I I Qj t I I -4
1 14 > I M t I III I I 'A I I I I > rL W
1 cc co I Z) I I I I I td 0 W
1 10 1 --4 1 1 v 1 0 1 v co
44 gs OD 41 V. 1 .0 w I co I I r. I I w I Je 1 1 04 1
C M co I > I I M f I I 1 -114 ca 1 4) Q
v I I 1 11 u > 0
4; (L) I I cu I Aj li 0 -a U)
Aj 0 1 ca ca I I I Ai I I X 1 0) (u tu .0 44 ca
64 -4 1 V Aj I U I I (A I I U I 0 M t
0 Of 1 10 1 IJ I 1 10 1 1 14 1 C IJ (11 El
C w I 1 4) 1 1 3 1 0 v I _j 0 ,o 0
Z Q) 1 00-4 1 1 0 0 1 W 14 ri 4) W
m " N W
L4 w 14 .0 -A
4 1 41 4) 1 1 04 M 4LJ 1 0 -4 -4 C 0 8 0
41 w 1 D I go = 41 ca L4 (V Aj
a) 0 CLO W I 'a 0 1 GO W m Aj W
Ai r-4 r. -4 tzo 1 1 4) x I A -4 0
r f -,4 X I CO 1 44 1 P-4 C 0 I W 6j = -0 W Aj
ca 41 go I bO 44 0 1 00 -M 1 -4 W 0 a) Q
Q I c C 'A 1 V M 3 1 CS 0 -A
C 4V c 1 0.14 1 0 1 60 CA.
cc 0 'Li 4j 00 1 co 0 0 Aj IV 0
V w
41 Ai 0 0) &J w p
0 0 1 v I fA > w 0 0 0 :t Q
I -4 c 0 0 C)o Ai u V)
> I :) -4 41 a
X -Y 41 0 U) 0 1 c ;N 0 0 4)
W W 4J 4 -4 4U I a (A w 0 41 41
,4 0 IV -4 X 31 0 ca Ai c Aj 4) -A 0 0
C a 3 t w 0 d) 4) 0 9) W r E-4 H
41 0 0 C 0 (A
0 4-4 0 Aj 0 to AJ -4
4) -,4 w u .14 40 0 c -4 m 0 0 m 0) u 0 w 0
-4 H 914 CLI 44 a -C rz* U 0 E-4 Q X 04 U CO Ai


0 C4 0 00 LM 0 0 0000 0 0 0 00 C14 0 0 -4
%0 m 0 m D o 0 Coco-oowmoo w
0) 0 4-1 0 L4.% 0 V- Ln Ln 0 a 4 CN r- 0 0 0 Ad
Ai z C-4 C-4 'T Ln o m m
C 1.4 C; 1 1 C 14 1; 1 1
w VIN C14 w o %0 M Ln Ln
%D -4 r M r M o 'T CN --4








34




0 r-I (14 Ln m Ln 0 ON a% 0 --T -It 0-4 fl- 0 P-i m ON r-I r--i 0 -IT
m -It CN % o % o Ln 0 r-q r--q w r- m m f-I %-0 ON Ln %.0 r--l (N 1
%D ON Ln r-I 0 w w P-4 CYN 0 cr% CY% 110 --:r m r-i -11 w w -H
Co C 11 C l C l A C' 'S C' r.: C,7 rZ ; A A 44
r-4 r- r*l --T -H
r- -.T f- 0 r-I m ON r-q m %0 r-q 110 w w m 1-4 cq T-q 0 0 Ln rw a% tn m Ln %D -11 0 m r-4 r-i r-q m %D 110 %D %D Ln Ln tn Ln -IT
0 A A A ^ A A A A A A A
z co ON In r-A m m r
cn P-4 r-q co cr%


r-i
:j
60
ci



1 0



ol I I w I I 'I I I I I I
W I I I 1 0 1 1 W I I I t14 I I I I 1 > I I I I I I C I I I 'I I I CO
I I 1 0 1 1 1 1 r-i 1 1 41 1 1 1 04 1 1 1 0
W I CO I I ca I I I i I I -H 4) 41 1 r-4 I I I rn I I 1 0
0 0 1 1 1 1 I I I
-H 1 0 1 1 4j 1 1 1 1 1 1
1 0 1 1 4 1 N I Q) I I I I 1 1 44
1 04 1 1 U I -H 1 $4 1 1 1 A I I 1 0
tj 0 1 1 Q) I I Co 1 $4 C: I P I I 1 0) 1 1 1
1:4 co 1 14.4 1 (0 1 1 El 1 0 0 1 :J I I 1 0 1 1 1 Cj 0
4) r- I 14 14 1 1 1 4 0 1 41 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 -H 04
04 m 54 p 1 04 0) 0 1 1 bo 1 1 1 1 -H I I I r-4
r-q co 00 0 1 : X I I r. I r-I I 1 1 41 1 1 1 va >b
ja r-I I'-- I m 0 1 1 -H 1 (1) 0 1 to I I I C3 I I 1 :3 r-f
r-i W I Cl. 0) 1 1 r-4 I r. 0 1 U I I I P 1 44 1 P. r-4
4) W 0 (L) I w r I I r-I I -H o I -H I I I Cd I 1 4) co
r 4 w '0 0 4 1 W -H I I -H 1 4 A 1 4j 1 1 1 Ow 1 06 1 Ad p
04 -r-4 fj I P 00 1 1 W I U -,1 1 34 1 1 1 4) 1 I Q)
0 41 0 0 1 0 1 CO -T 1 4) 1 44 1 14 1 W I W
4) 1 04 4j 4 X 1 0 1 > I 1 04 m I
04 >.. -H 4) 1 $4 1 1 C14 1 "o 0 1 0 bo
$4 p r-4 00 1 0 C) 41 1 1 r-4 I A 4) 1 tko I I W -H r-i
4) cc u *-, I co 0 a) I 1 4) 1 > 1 V 1 1 > 0 Cko 41
4 :3 U) 4 r-I 1 4) V) I -ri I u 0 1 -H >lb I -H v m 1 0 0
41 9 0) I 1 .0 r-4 1 4-4 tO 4-J 1 10 4J 1 -H W W 0 r
(30 r-4 U) I A 1 44 A 1 W -H I -H > 04
0 r :J 'o r-I I t% I r-4 M A 1 10 0 01
41 (1) C 0 0 0 44 04 CO 4J 1 0 0 V 1 -0 p 0 a 4) qj
r-I 4J ca 0 CO 4J 60 CO 44 0 (1) 4) 1 Cd 0 -H CO 4 0
tko r-I 4 W 0 ;3 0 -H '0 Z 1 44 r-i 4J H
a) 0 -H m U -H -H Cl. U 44 d) 04 "o
r-4 W 4J A CO 1 1-4 H r-i A .0 CO CO 00 0. 4) 0
$4 0, H -H 0 1 ca r-I -H to rm eko a) ol co P. ca N
0 Cd 0 .0 44 r4 I A -H 0 0 4) -H r-4 (3) El -H
4J 0) U I CO r-4 4) $4 C: r4 C Q CO $4 0 10 5 M
w r-i 0 4) 04 A 1 0 -H 10 0 -H 4 t)O 04 0) 4J
4) 04 0 p 0) 1 0 0 A A A 41 w -H 4.3
A Cc r. 0 M Ok -H ll m w 10 44 "A 0 x
ul 10 4J U >, 4J 44 M bO A 4) CO %Z 4J -0 0 M 04 4)
El 4) rb A 0 4J I CO 0 0) 0 M X 0 -H -H W CO 4) m M
0) 10 M A 1 $4 A 0 -H !4 -H (n x v 0 4)
At p A p U) r-4 I ca -H P u 0 Cho Q) 04 0 r-I 0 -H $4
-H CC 0) 4J Cn 0) 1 0444 a." 0 :1 r4 P r-4 :3 -H 4-4 = 0
0 U .0 r4 4) a) a) U 4 p 0 -r-I ::$ 0 0 U 0. W
00 -H .0 0 4 4 0. (d 4J $4 Q) V) P4 CO X :;
9: 4J 44 -H r 0 0 A 0 0 0 bo 63 4) :3 0
-ri 0 r-4 bo 1 0 >.k co .0 4) 0 0 m
10 0 r. $4 0 A 1 4) bD V4 CO 4) r-i Cj -H 4 r-f r-f
ca 0) 4) W I V C: 0 4.J : : -0 r-4 >-, r-4 4J r. 0 rd cd
0) 4.J $4 P 1 -rq nq co x -H 0 a :j co 44 4-J 4-J 0 :3
U) 10 r-I 0 1 C) A 4 C: (30 Cj Cj 4J 0. cj A 0 0
0 0 0) Q) 4.J I -H W U -H -H -H -H 0) -H -H M 0) E-4 E-4
41 >10 1 4 w Q co va co .0 x bo 41 >% 10 u $4 4-1 4-1 $4 "1
r-I u 4) w w k 1 4 0 r= I C3 54 r-4 0 v-4 .0 P P Cd
0 0 0 0 -H 4 4 4) CO P 0 0 :3 W 0 0 0 0 0 0
1 Q U N 9 P H P M U 0 Pk > 04 : 3: U P4
0 (L)

(D C) 0 04 0 r- 0 0 0 -IT C) C> 0 0 C) 0 Ln 0 %0 0
co r-4 o Ln .4r t m %D o o w Ln Ln r- o --T c-4 cj o %D a% c
E-4 a ul C14 0 r-q -T 0 m Ln Ln Ln m %lo m 0 -.T 0 0
r-4 r-I -.T Ln t M Cn W a M M 0 0 M r-4 0 M r-4 0% ON
0 -rq
0 0 Cl ON C) 04 0 D -,t 1; C4 % 4 ; C: 0 C4 84 Z 41
0 0 C) -4T %0 0% 00 00 %D r- r- m w r- -4T tn r-I m %D r'. to
CA m m m %0 %0 %0 -4t -4r %lD %10 %.D %0 -:r %0 NT -4T -4r %0 %0









35





0 It 00 U"% co %D r- w W
Go It en 0 ON 0 %D r- -4 cn o
M ON C4 C4 cy 4
O Q Ci C I i 0 0
r, c4 a% c% eq v,% oN ON cr, ON __4 Ul 0% %D
Go 0 r- co CP% 00 %D &M M cr% 00
as co M co en a a,
$w rn w
f- cn 4 LA m C4 cn -4 C17 cl; C Cc 0
C



0 co 4 1 co Cq fl- en o a,
%C -D %0 en ul r- .41 Ln Go co co -1-1 crt m
co 4 V.% V,% 00 r 0 C4 w 44
1 c; 4 1-7 _: 1c; C; lw* 0
r- Ln 0 C4 (n ON %V *.D %D Ad
CN e4 en L^ M m 00 4 4 Ln &n LM so -4 go
Q 1-4
_4
117 to
cc 41
C% 4) 0 0
IS 0
.C 0 u w
w in 0 00 0 0 Cl) ON (n co rl VN 0% o Ln w C-4 0 w w C
64 0 %D r C) -14 4m IT %0 ON 44 Ln w 0 0 00 w w 44
ca c C4 fl- C14 D ON oN 0 0 m o 4 4 m 0 a 4 4
Im cc 0 4*4
on 00 CIN %D ON D en D 00 a %0 'T %D 00 -4 1 0 ON *, r_ ID rl 4J 0
r cl ;r Lr% C,4 (7N o en 00 P, %0 o 0 Ch r- V'i co C14 0 cc (L)
lw 0% 00 r- 1.? 00 01 r '.0 'T ()N CYN M W r_ CN as 10 u
-4 o 0
en P, M C14 C14 C%4 --I C% r C 44 '1 to
Aj 44 Ln -4
ca OD $4
Cc

ON 41
1 0
-,4
z x
m 44 Aj
I 1 0 1 Co I I I I I I I I I
W 4) -4 '1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
1 0 1 1 1 1 0 1 0.1% 1 1 W I I I I I 1 4) 1 1 1 go
a 1 1 -,4 1 1 1 1 1 1 14 1 1 1 AJ w 0
.0 $4 S4 I I cc I I I I I I I I I co .0 Ai Ai
1* -4 1 1 I > I I I I I I I I I I I r- 0 4)
1.4 0 1 1 -,4 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
1-4 v I aj 1 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 jw I I I I I I I 1 1
0 od 0 1 to I I f IW I I I I I I C: I I I ON
0 IV w 1 4) 1 1 1 I I I I I I -H I I I
V-4 1 0 1 0. 1 w I I I I V I I I I I > I I I
010 1 1 1 > I I I a I I 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 0
04 r C 1 .0 1 bo 1 0 1 1 1 c 1 0 w I co I I X I c I I u 0 0
1 4) 1 I I I I m I > 0) 1 I I u I I I W m
1 V-4 1 1 1 1 1 1 cc z 4) 4&4 0
f d I I 1 11 11 40 11 Ii. 11 10 11 11 1* 11 1 1 1 1 on 0
f v I 1 1 1 1 1 64 :3 1 Lm I I I I I I I I r4 W
144 1.4 k 1 1 1 C 1 4) 0 1 trp I 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 V Aj 41
I I Ai I bo I I 1 0 1 1 0) 0) 1 1 1 4) 40 (A 0 0
I 1 0 1 C 0 1 "a I I WN I I Ai I I I = v ca -.4 9:
1 41 4) -1 1 C: I I 1 0 1 0%7 1 0 1 "a I 1 0 0 1 1 1 CO -4 41
461 C 1 0 -4 1 1 0 1 1-4 1 0 1 C C4 I I 0 1 1 1 -r4 44 V cc 0
14 0 0 1 0 Ai I I to I w 1 -4 1 z 1 1 c Q I 1 1 -4 4 4) U -.4
0 14 -,4 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 1 w 4) = cc 1 0 1 cc I I 1 .0 40 .,4 .,4
41 1 14 1 1 1 1 0 > u > I 1 41 I I I cc 0 44 44 (30
m 1 4) 1 1 1 1 0 cd 1 4) 1 so c -4 1 1 1 41 ca -k 4 r
1 r4 -4 4J 1 .0 1 1 1 1 = 4) I w > I -A lu 4) 1 1 1 0 4 0) to ch
>lk w -.4 41 2 1 "1 1 1 V (D I Ai (A 1 0 0 1 Ic q w I I I w Q 9) w
lw v Z 0 J3 .0 1 44 1 1 4) AJ I tO W 40 CA *0 C36 M 0) I I co cc
cc 0 (1 w I I I _'d 0) 1 a 4) 'o 4) Aj M 1 1 C co -4
4) 4) 1 1 0 1 4) r. 4) >-.It 4) 1 go 0 1 4) Cc 0 rq U
-4 1 IV 0 'a 1 -4 -H :) 0 Q)- 0 1 4) a I > -4 r4 C
41 1 .0 1 0 ri C I co 0 r I :t --.4 1 to 1 0 03 1 % r 41 M 1-1 w (a I fin 1 .0 CL( ca vo 0) 1
in I Aj 1 3 I c cc 0) > I I m u 44 3t 41
41 0 bo 1 4) 1 *a I cn 0 0 w > I Ai 4) a 1 .4 0 *,4 0
-,4 > 9: 4) -14 1 bo I C 4) 0 1 u co c 0 1 .14 > 0 1 'o 0 44 9 co
V '0 4) m 1 0 W I w lw .,4 w < pi
go -4 11 V 11 JUD Or- W4 11 1. 3: = a 44 1 -*d -,4 1 t4 44 ca Aj Ch
bo .0 -4 'U 'j 'Lj 4) 1 V 1 0-.4 '14 :D $4
0 W c 1 -4 1 14 1 > 0 :) C I C W 44 1 0 0 m 4.j cn 0
lw -4 cc .,4 FA 0 1 0 0 1 4) 0 0 W -4 f 0 Z 0 1 4) -4 to 0 E.4 44
0 -4 4) 'a I V I C LW 0) m I &j -4 1 41 > .,q
a w S B i 4o a) 1 4) -a > i Aj cc i 4 o -4 C: C C 0
V-4 Li 4 I AJ r a t,3 0 Aj Aj 1 0 > 1 C6 13 lw 0 Aj -H -4
Z AJ 0 U r. -,4 1 1.4 C: U 4) 91 0 4) -4 0 1 Q I to 9 4) w "I ca
0 0 0 c w I cc co ai Lj w H to I &J I AJ -,4 Aj a ra (a Aj
.C 44-H ..Q I C6 V 4) CO M 44 0 Aj FA I (A (1) 1 w -,4 (A Oo w 0
(A m 1 0 0 w u -k 4) 1 vi w 1 0 4) .,4 r c6o 41
W 4) 04.4 .0 .0 ci U U4 w c :) C: 4) >.. c m V; C 0 cr% c
Cc -4 0 4 9) 1 Ai
w C Go u m (a 00 0 4) ^.C N C 0 .0 X 4 1 :D 0
461 41 4 4) -4 C13 ._4 m 41 -4 u N C.) -.4 1 rA 44 AJ
go ca to W C > 4) 0) to w w _4 cc 0 0 co ca 0 1 -4 -4 0
.C -4 w v 0 lw c C W u w 0 F3 .,q a a 0 Aj 0 0 C
> Aj 4) 0 -4 5) k C cc 0 Ai 3t 0) a c Aj
bo- .0 -4 m bo W 4) 0 0 4) -4 m C 'Li -k
m C: C 3 .0 m 0 0 c co w c 0 8 H H C: .14 w C13 3t
W 0 0 0' C '0 4) 4) CS -.4 44 -.4 lo 0) Ce H "1 %44
v Ca x fa W M -4 a w w c 3t 0 0 m 0 4)
0 4) 0 0 2 0 14 o Aj 0 w w 0 = w w w 4 0 >
Ad go cn u Z) to CA cn go to co 0) 0
c rA .0
0 14 :1 C13
fA -,4 0 CO
Ln Ln C) 0 0 0 0 0 C4 o 0 0 00 0 M V'i L'I 0 .14 w -14 u a
N ul co CYN 0 0 %D C) m -4 cn C) V-% 'D 04 a 'I C'j V-4 m w w w
cn IV 0 V% U'l -.4 0 WN V) V"% %0 CNJ 4n rl% r- C14 %0 C14 Ln o Ln 10 .0 1:14 IQ N
= z en 00 M M ON -4 en C14 0 %0 M QD C:) m W I
ca -.4 C ra W 8
r, 00 C) C%4 LON 1: Cl4* %.D w "IMI 0)
C) C4 ON Cl) C4 m rl I:r 0 r. 41
r fn r, 06 0-4 .,4








36









U, -IT- wO .4r m' wO 0 10 -T r-4 0%s -z 'J% r-4 wO w r-. m% Ln m
$a a- a% a a a a at a a a a a t a^

00 r-Ir4I









I11 1 I i I I 1 1 11 11 I a
III1I1I1I1I11D11I1I11 0 11
1- lil 1 1 11 lil 1ii t -4II I I
I1 1 I l~ Ill I tII hoI u I It

I V I t It I 1 1 1 1 1 C-) I I Irk I1 11 1 1111111 C I I1 1 l4i1i
1- q 11411)1 1 11 1 1111 4-4 H lil >111 I I 101 o


4I 4) 0 Ij -H I~ W to I I I I I o I 8 I
aH l4t1 11 11 a) . 1 11 11 1
V) 81 1111111a1 I CO-H-4I I I pI11 b
-H 14 1 1111r 1)81 181 1 4A I l ot I I 0 O) 1 11 t u u I u I i u.c I1 1-l 0 I1 4
1H1II1II111101811 4JIW I 1 1 0 1 1 00 ~ ~ 1 1 r-4 I1 11 IIrIp-141 I I a) I U 3- )" .
)1 1 1 1 0~) 11 11 .0P4ca l- I I P. >
P) I1 I(L)1 44 0 0 V. lil 4 1 11*041 w c

0~ 1- 1111 1I~tU CU11 l W 4l-t-4 a I l p4r
0)rI 0) lilt r4 r I l ItI .r=0al I v IUI 4
o1 10c c )0 .U 1 11u1 p~0~ III 0~ 1101 N0 4 0z 1 1 lv-a J 4 0 1 1 0 PI "IUt4QE ) ;
1o11 g1 1 0 -4 41 P l~ 00 I) l 4t I L
a *0 1 1 14 14 W C IIII IboI t l CU P 01))4- 4

0) 0111 40 -4 0 0) r.O.I4C0a.U. 11011 0 rco440 M 4 Qil Ill U 0 r4-SIoC 14-01 0) l4
0 00 Q) 11. 4 p x-4 I0)I r t 1 Q) H 4
0 0111 i010 w 1 14E I I CO M-4 v-4
9: C -1 t 1-. 0 (1) CO~p~ Io U4JC CdQ 0 01 Cl)V
0 r I- luJ 0-H.-4 I) u D ~ ~ d L) -0 Hr-H C m- 14 4
4:I14 Iw- iv- U 4C to 0C0 rX 0t U 0: c
O0-, -H "ia) w.4i r~-i 4i col~i :j L)rw
'C -H IU b -5 0"0C40 O 0 fP CUJ -0 9 WP4 0 -(L Q)U 0U~~- *H0P 0 C01. w -ri 0 r-N4 -4 (j (
"00 U0U pr- 4 I 0CCO-H4-4 IH OCw 00
0 W-J P4 044-4 0 1 wr-qW U W iM04-4 0 > U)E4c
r-4 QU I4 -H C '4J 4 4 41 0 4 0-4 r-4- r- O*I
14 - C J: 4 J0 WP' P.e cU-q 0) V-4O Uc J ~0- co
0) 0I 0 $ .0 -4 id CO -H a CO 0 CO -H l C X 4--40 PH


n 0 C C)0 0 C ) )0 0- 0 U an 0 0 02 r
%. Dt-T%0 ') 0 -It .~0 0 14 mI 0 -4T4LJ%
cc-4" -- L 0t OC0 0O)-T0C1 U)0 CU04-VV t1,0V)C) 41
E1-4 M CD-0t- T-,t 0 r M a0v4CD r. 0 M -t r1 0CSp C 0 -H
00. .w4 a*4- Z~-C 4 -0

')0 -V)C) C)0 C C; 0w-44 v-I0CL r 1; UC
Cv 0r 0C)C)0r a .0 C4 C% 000C a4-T J- D00-4j o
W r-4 -4 r-C-.t r4 -4 -i -i %.D -4- l .0 D i%0 wO-4 CU r-4 % %









37







en.r" f- r2-- 0 % "- %'0 (~~ 1O ^0c ,C
0U?. U% 000- r-~. C4 ".'1 t-4 M0 -.CW'd 0% Cn

w 40% D%o ~ t Nr Le In 0 000 '4- Go V 4 v a awaa a a Ld En L
ca v Pr'-0% O Go -O %0 4 (*en r%. 0to
piC4 c4. C4 *-' T
a, %

"'0 C
1? 00'"' 00' ~ 0% 00 I C)e N 4$
0% 40 0 'D 0 V-4 en -4I IV- 1 r.4 1 -r d' co% en -Io cnt en' V W 0c A
V- 0 fn~--.( ?1 40S 0.V
a: Cb aa a en 0 U0 ID (n%0 G
fa I 1% 0O.7'14 C4aNo0 ~n %D m 0 % -4 vC
0 % f*- -4t-. n V* N I~ tt T INLG-T 4 4 0o

04 0 0'0
sO 00 I


-t gn0% 'D C 0% n r C4 4 0 P0ON' M C C) n'0 '44 Aj'
0 wa a -a a a a a a - 0 0 44
Go 0' 0 0r 2 o OV -- T0 D P -e o 0c 0 &
r N or00 O(n0% r- Cin r- oc 1 0 ON ONC C O *

.- 1' .- w -- 0 4 0 0

U r- 0.L

cI I I I I Ig I I gI I ij r


Li iI Ii il 1 1 g gI gI I' 1 1 -4 0
11 1 g1 gcg I I I I I I I II I I I lII I I w. $- z



Ill > I lii I I t I I -I I II 1 0 4) r
1 0 0 1 1 1 1 11 1 1 1 1~ gil "4(7
*.4u -4 Ij g i1 iii -il4gh i ~~~ "-4 I g l 1-I il I~ gIIg J j ~ ~ V'
S0 0 11 1 Ii gi gil 1 g 0g .0 &JA
-lii 2~ lii11 1 1111 Vt Ii I Ia
> 1 t1I1 1 441 1 i i 1 g g1 t Vt I4 I 1 1 .04
fa ou I1 1 Ii il 11 1 1 i i 1 .0 0 '
0C 10 1 11 1 0 11 VI I II II I0 ICOO IIIwI o a*0 lii CAIII I 16-14 1 1 gil g 1 10.1 41 11 Q r. G
I I 1 1 -. 11 11 1 1 111 1 1061 11 w co4
a I m 1Vi VIII 1 1 1 11 111 1 l' i it I ~ I Aca w4 0.
I v1C I '~ lilt 1 1 1 1 11 2 1 0 l~ 1 14 ON1 J11 1 :
c 1 4 1 1 "011 1 111 1 11 11ON1 l t 1 11 LJ f
1.0 *.4 I C I I V I I1 1 1 1 I'0 I Cl I I I I II I Vc &00 444 I1 '-4 1 1 1 1 1 I0%= u -i r.
I~~~~ 1 11 0 11 1 1 Ai ~ ~ i ,41 w '.4 1 4)coI t I1 1 Iit I- o I I.0 0 0 1 1 1 0 -4 -4 wi AiIX t I II Ii I 1l~ l 0 0 2 mg o co~ w 40
o 41 Li I I V I I I I I I I I I I '- I f -4' 461 o *-4 -4 r-4 -0 0 ) 1:VIIII I Ii g 1 11 1 Li cc L4 L4 I I> go m a 0%
wL O> I 1 0 1 91 ill1 1 111 cc&j4VO 1 0 O 10 CO.O W u4L 0) ~ 44 0 1 C0L IIIt I 111 1 *0 c 0. Il-o
03 a, 0 1 I Ii 12 I 1 O I a, Co f 4-4
41 0. A 1.0 t -41 a4 1i 4 Ql Vi 0 T Q0I VO0 0'-4 wU
EC '-4 01 WLaI 'o I L I I I I I4j /C ~00 .-4q Cg
v o n41r I c V I00 r. 14 1 1 I I aL -.4 l> a, 00&4&
'i' -4 aI Ai I t II -' >N 4V I to 044 :3J..
4) ~ CJ~ 0I'O 0. i >,, 0 r-i I o -4
ui~ C I iv I I -1 0 ILI V t4 40 "4 5 0
W iV t L 0 Li 44 (a I C I to0 1 ) IV I '-d M, -i' ..4 L a 0V) l V1 U t W i I V I 1 0 cca 4-104'
v f Iit0 "a I~.V l Ca -V .C t 41 -4 (:3 ~
4) j 44 I C 1 0vt 044-a C4 1-~ 1 w Ui 0> ''V04- 'C'J- C ICUW (z '4J 1 44 CC C => 0 1'-4 0 r .r
'-44IV00Q 01 t:6 4 1 W -.4 0 w 1 0. 'i 4 -4
:1 -r4 $4 -41 4t0 C '041 Li -4.4. i aj g I a 4,V'-4 cc
r.0 co )VwI r-wC 500. L V3 cm i l .4 0 acc "
=I4 .Ca .> 41 -4 aV w WV c Aj I Lio 4. 0~ 0
44 0- 4 uCIu i IV 0cCVI1 CL V '--4 C O V-~4r'04cI 1 4 .4 4l 0 M =a IA (a- c
01 Q4) a a.-4 nE a- l1.. 0 C 4j rA05. -4fl.J- 04)
-0V V I 2'E wJ -000A0 n-~ 0 0 -C x
A~~r 1 Wi -. i" 4 C.n. f4-4t &U .'
to to 41. 0 a I "., 0'Cc 114 I m 4 o to c- f- 0
c~ cc 4) 1iV 01 to w1 .0 Z jJ =J 0v V V
cc LCjJ I r. .J~ aO Li W ~ ..~& W Ai" 'Aj
V V0a 0 164 = 0' 1 (,V 2 Z 0 0 V. 340LiLi ,4
01O~ 04C f 0 60 I VO 0 0 00 m-I. r- --~ w 1
C. 'a Wi 0 V C o = a A ~ W =4 c
C C 60O0 9)-t0 00 0 la. m~ to0 0O'4 to 4 0 41

0~ 04 V 0a
-4. to.



a5 0 r-0 0O 0 Z P- OCO V- Vr %r OC4C 0

0 0 co 0 C1 14 C14 i 0n '0 MN 0~ I l 0 C'. (N(i
P %Q r. r- r.- %D "o. -' t'c M 0 'T L14 -4








38




0 tn M C4 tn 0 -,t ',0 r--l -,T M tn C4 0 Ln Ln W -,T W r -,T C4
W a Ln -cr %D 0 r-4 r- -.1 r- M M Ln 0 M M %D r-4 W *,0
14 m -z 5 o m i,- a\ o cq r-. m m Z t, m w %.o
00 C4 -T r-4 M CO C> -,t M Cn Cn --r --T CO M 00 00 %.D (14 M Ln -r4
r- r-I Ln cq \.D 0 1-- 00 P- fl- 0 co \ o 00 \-D 0 00 co 1.0 co cn Ln 0
00 m -Z 1,0 Cl M M ',0 Ln C4 r-4 r-i 0 a% W W W r- \D M v-4 w
;4 r-4 ^ ^ ft ^ ^ ^ ^ co
co -It m r-i r-A r-q r-i r-q r-A H "i H
r-I :j r-4 -T r l
0 co
4 o o o

$4
$4
Cd

cd -1-4 1 1 1 t"
0


0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 1 1 1 co
z I W I I I
I > I I I
I I I 1 0 1 1 1 (n I I I I I I I I 1 0 1 1 1 1 41 1 1 1 Q) I I I I I I I I I I I I
I W I I I r I I I I cn I I I 1 "0 1 1 1
-r-i I I 1 1 41 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 I I cl I I I
r-I I I I I
I al I I I 1 :3 1 1 (D I rn I I I I E! I I I I I 1 4) 1 a) I I I
I I I I "o 1 1 4-1 1 1= I I 1 0
bo I I I I r_ I En V) I u I 1 1 r. 44 1 r-i 1 0 1 W I z I I I
w 1 1 4j "o I I I -H I CO I 1 10 m I -H I
.0 4 1 1 1 44 r. I I I r-i I U I U) I CO W I I I I
co 0 CO I I I r-I I -r-I I (U I p 0) 1 C,4 1
r q 4 1 1 1 -rq 4
r-I co
u rA I I I p I I -H I I 1 1 4
> 0) (D i I I I X I w -H 1 0) 1 1 1
I I I ci ci I I I I ci 1 0 cz I r--l I I I
co I I I CIJ 03 1 1 1 ll I r-i I CO I -H 41 1 Aj I I I
In. > CD 1 :3 1 1 1 bo
I I U) p I La 4) a) I I r-q 1 0 1 1 1
0 :) 1 0) -H r-4 I I bo 1 0 I I I I
tio ci 10 4-4 1 r--l 44 U I LO I r- I U) Q) 1 0) 1 1 1 41
u *ri 1 4-1 1 -H I m CLO I w 1 0
1 f I co r-4 I I -H ED p I -H -H 1 $4 1 > cz
I I I CIJ I I X CZ (V I CTJ I M 1 '0 04 1 C 0 -H 0
0 -W -H Iwj I Q) bo > Q) CL. I w I I = In > -0
4-4 4 Q) I > w I tj I "o 10 1 u I co co 0
1 1 M 41 41 1 10 >-. co Itj m 0 1 0 r. U) U) I r-q
1 1 4 rn r. I P 0 P 4-) 0 r-f P I M Co p -H (n "0 m
r-4 I I u :3 :3 1 0 co cd w co r-4 C6 1 0 '0 4,J Q) 0
co I I P -0 0 1 41 4J -H (13 1 co w 4-1 4 N bD
Q) I w -H z r- 1 0 r-4 -H m .0 ca I a 0 u a ca -H ::j
0 Ei 1 0) co -H I Ej -H r--4 r-A 4-1 4J I -rA CO 4J IM. rz
I r= p 1 0 -H : 0 to 0 1 r-A 0 4 -H Q) o
10 1 0 p p (v I p w -0 1 0 0 41 10 4-1 0 4J
0 1 0 0 0 r-i Q) 0 tw r. 1 4-1 0 -H "
Co 1 0 44 44 : r-I 4-4 0 0 C.) I r-4 44 Co r-I
44 r= p 0)
co 0 W 4 -H I CO Q) 0 EA W U) CO 4J
(V P Z 04 4J -rq 4J (D -H P Q. rn 4-J 41
-14 u :3: co p co 0) U : : rZ P 4 4
CC o Q) 44 4-4 44 4-4 0) 0 W rz 0 CJ W 44 :1 0 0 0
o o o 0 04 H
0 -H Cw U) 41
0. P4 M (n 04 P. C 4 r-i Aj J-- LO 0) PLI u x x
(v a) o o 4 r-4 V--q 0) :j u p r--4 CO a) a) r.
-H 0 M M 0 '0 U) M CO Ca 0) C13 C13 04 cn CO Q) 0
0 r--i o CO -H o o tO U 4-) r= 0 bO 4 r-4 r-4 -H
10 00 4 0 9: p 4 0 0 -ri CO 44 r-i to :3 ca co
co 0 u u r-4 44 CO 0 r-q :3 U) 44 4 4.J 4-J
cd a) co -H >, cl P. a) -H ca o o 0 :j
En 0
Q) (U r-q 0 En a) r-I W U) -H P C W W 4J r-4 M P (V E-4 F-I
.0 n >, AJ 4J r-4 4J IJ 4-J U 4J 0. tO 4J -H -0 rz 4J 4J r-4 >'. >-. r. 4 4 0 4J $-4 P W Z 0 4 3 4 00 0 CZ 4 r. U
0 0 -f4 Co M Co Ca Co Ca 0. Q) a) 0 Ct -r-j 0 (V Ca 0) ::1 cd "C
Ln (n > 04 PL4 U U A4 PL4 U) U U P-4 a P4 IL) Z 04
5 W
0 (L)
oo o* o* o* ** o* *o ** o*
4)
r-4 4) 0 0 1.0 C) 0 0 Lr) r 0 Lr) 0 C) 0 C) -11 C) 0 ul) r--l
10 r-4 %0 CD 00 0 -T C14 C) 00 00 00 V) C14 C %D CD m r-4 C> m -zr
Cd 0 0 CN r--4 -:t V) Lr) O -zr GN ul ,D -,T 00 C) Ln r-, c,4 Lr) oo -:r C)
E 4 Ln -t C) % o m -i -q C,4 o -4 CIN cq -,T Lr) C-4 cn 0% Ln 0
0 -r4
C C4 c C4 1; C4 cl; C C z 41
co rl CY) a% 00 a% C14 01% %D m 1.0 r-4 00 r- r- Ln ON 110 r
r-4 r-4 r %D %D .o r-4 10 %0 %0 %o r- %0 110 %0 C14 %D %D %0 %0








39





en cn a, r-. -41 ..4 C4 1 CO
1w M r, 0 r, 'T r.. M M w co
.0 t- C4 C4 VN ,r C4 m "0
cc o r %C I a co
w cri r w f- %0 r, 0% 0 W
C: u $4 rA
go w 0 cn cn z %0 CO cn cn to 0
C4

U W
C-4 1 00 r t-4 00 'T Ch ull ull 'D U M LO
co (7, z 00 U-N r- 00 *0 %0 C4 c" r., t- I -.T (41 Aj
oo co V'i cn -4 Ln r- 'T -1,7 ON %0 ? 9L
1 rl 61% V-1 V. (7s V-% Lr% 'I 'j. r C) C14 C*4 0
F 'D CD Cn 00 W M :T V-% O '1 00 4) cz
ti
w cc
co Aj
ON C 0 0
C ai

Lr) ON r- 0 0 %0 fn r- V*i 00 'T U-N r %0 C) r, 'D Ln
-.4 ull r- 0 %D IT Ui C14 %0 (7s M 0 ON 0 en Ln co r- 4-4
00 (N r. 04 en m 00 C) VII %D 00 (r, 0 D *0 M r- 14-4
to w cn w m 0 44
co 00 %D O's 0 C71, ON ,T C> M 01, L"i %0 r, "0 C) fn 0
>% r 04 aN 0 %C ON u"% M (3N r- 'T 'T Lr% C) ca W
ON %n M 00 0 M r, r r r-- r, r, 0 C-4
1 v C: C cl ll too




WON I I Aj I I I f I I I I I I I I I I I I I r_ Ai 0
ig .4 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0
v I I I 1 0 1 1 1 t I I I I I I I I I I I
aj I I f
.,4 fu
Ai
v I
4) 1 00


14 1 Cc I to 1 1 -4 1 1 1 cc
c6 1 > I I tv I I I &J 0
ca cd 1 0.0 1 v I > I I I I I 1 11 1 6 11 11 11 lr* -0 41
1 0 1 1 1 c 1 0 1 1 1 f v I Aj 1 1 &4 1 1 1 ON
I U I I I to I f I I f Q. Ai "4 1 1 4w 1 1 t
C4 0 1 1 $4 (4 1 > I a I I f 1 -.4 C I I Q. I I 1 .0 Cy (L)
I W t 4 C v)- 1 M I W I I I f 0 r. !;d I I I I 1 -4
1 0 1 c w I la 1 :3 1 1 1 1 co a I 1 0 1 1 1 C .0
v I I A. 1 -4 1 1 1 1 Ai I I co I I I m 8 -4
0 C: CO) I IV I I cc W I I I 'D ai 0 1 1 1 1 0
ad I w I jw Cl) > I I > 1 f 4rr 0 c I I c W
1 1-4 w ".. 0 1 w I I I c I 1 03 C: 44 0
Cl. C14 1 4) 1 _g I I I W I I I I I 1 0 Q.
0 '0 1 4J I LA I I I W I I V I 1 1 4 45
&a r% 4) 1 0 1 4) 41 1 1 1 > to W) I I I I 1 -0 .11 C 41
440% 1 m 1 (30 %D z f 1 00 0 f Ul 1 0 1 1 1 1 4) ca 0 0
P-4
cc 11 1.4 (A 14 Aj
v C 1 0 1 Q> 4) > 1 -4 1 1 0 1 4) n c I I n i i t -4 IA4 cc ca
41 u 0 > 1 -4 40 fa I (A I = ca I = 1-4 1 1 1 -.4 u 4
lw $4 ..4 4 0 I cc AJ W W I I '" 44 I u 0 1 1 1 m CID -4
0 0 Aj 4) fA ) $4 0 w 1 41 a* cc 0 0 > I I I cc ra 44 00
C6Z C6 in (A 4) > V 4) 1 c "4 1 C a > c w cc I I Aj C13 .,4 rV -14 0 4) 1- 1 M = I (v w 0 co I W I 1 0) 1-4 co 0%
r 0 Z 0 1 C 0 &j 1W 1 S ca 0 1 w I cc 4) u 0
14 U :) 0 0 go I Aj to 1 4) 'U -LJ V I Q 0 t4 1 -,4 cc
0 1 Ai c 0 1 Q c 0 C
10. > Ai lw 0) a 00 0 U 0
4w 9: r. V 0 -4 10 C aj 4) C6 1 0 > -4 C 03
&j la M -.4 C cc w = 0. 8 -- (a $a >, I m c o o Aj Ai
-,4 01 go > a Aj CO C C w Ai 1 .0 4% cc
W Ai u v 1 0 Cc Co '.4 C I I cc to v 44 Aj
4) 0 4j u I w 4) to $4 Li Ai 1 -4 0 o .,4
> *0 14 0 1 60 14 C* 0 -4 1 ca m -V 0 SA-4
0 W as I a 44 9: 4) 0 Z 1 d) 4) 14 -4 C
C 0 1 Go 0 w 3 4.4 0 1 3; 0) N 44 fa 0
0 'S 0) tO 1 4) 0) 0 &J 0 1 > 41 as -4 to 4
a 0 .0 Aj -4 0) 1 -4 C: ;&4 64 Cu 0 c 1 0 go C13 Ai w 0
14 1-4 0 -.4 3: 1 S 0 W M In 0 0 1 0 &j P-4 Lv 4"
4) -4 0 tl. 4LJ I rd 41 Aj Aj 4) 4j 4.4 a) &j 1.4 >
a to 10 4-4 0 1 41 r. -4 0 3t (a -.4 0 *A C fa
,-4 %4.4 0 0 0 z r_ -Li .14 0 Aj 4LJ Ca. w 0 -4
44 Ea w "4 cs
2 Li Jldd i u 0) 0 ji V -4
0 0 c 14 1 Aj 0 W 4) 1) 4 Aj ..4 aj V 90 Aj
c cc 0 0 w I bo- to 4) %w w 3t 31 -4 jw -4 go 0
60 0 (a ce ab 0 1 cc %" 0 4) 4 60 Aj
c Q >% 4) bd >4 1 $4 w 4) m CA < C I c
-4 46J 1 40 0 C 0 V W AJ 4) U 0 1 4) Q) -4 E tn Aj ca 4)
W cc I m .01.4 .0 X = 0 C ctl .0 1 1-4 = = -4 0 = C
41 go w W 4) 1 v Im u Ai c Li -4 1 z Aj u cn 4w U U 41
to cc :g > 4 1 V w *a ca kV G3 'o T 0 C13 H 0
.C 0 01 -4 c C 0 v 0 w c V). 4) ca 03
&0 U to C: cc 0 to C w tv AJ -4 Aj &J Ai 31 as v c Aj
4) -4 4) -4 4) $4 v 0 0 W -4 ca AJ -.4
-4 = $4 c 4 3 c 9) 14 cc = co 40 4) ca 40 :3 E-4 .,4 1., 21
c v X Aj 0 4) 0 d) 0- &j > (A *0 CC E-4 %44
= Q w m 0 8 0 0 0 u c q c 0 0 c 0 go Aj 0 IV
90 4J 0 4) -4 0 CO *,4 4) 0 4) 4) 4) (U 14 W -4 >
00 cc 4) 0


in 0 C) a 0 a U, %0 C a 0 Go 0 Aj U
%0 11 0 lzr C14 C14 It 0 um C) vl c %0 -.0 0 C4 m r4 to 4)
tn v 0 Lr% I v'A 0 Ln v,% u,,, C4 %0 Cq z r, vl V as m 04 r- 0 c to N
44 Z ei 1 9 O 1 C C 7 1 4)--, 19
.,4 C4 %0 0 vl 41 C 4 V
Ik 00 r- 0 ( 0 Vl% 0 0 1
000%0 of- Go CO oo -40 00 0 00 00 00 0 r. Aj
M W-1 M 1-4 .,4








40




Ln w %.D 0 a w 0 -.? &n 0 ON
ON r-4 -4r 0 0 0 %o r-q I- CN %D r- 0 cq %.D a Ln 0 1- 0 1%o
$4 ON as M Ln I- -IT u-, 0 -zr o 0 Ln In -Ir r-A tn CN 0 (N -zr r--l
co I
00 0 r: CX^% co 1; C7 4 C7 1; 1 C co- C7 Lr V 0 Ln I,: Is oc; -"H
rl- m I- -IT w C) -* r.-4 %0 --T Ln m w -IT -IT r-4 C7% ON 0 %0 Ln r--q co W
co CN Ln V--l m -IT m m V--f tn P-4 T-4 ON 0 0 w w %D I'D %D Ln Ln Ln
r- $4 r-q a A ^ ^ ft ^ ft a
a% 0 ON ',D 1.0 %0 Ln U) -Z Cn r-4 r-i P-4 0%




to
ci
00
$4


I I I f I I I I 1 0 1 1 1 1 1



0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

$4
I I co I I I I I I I
i rn i w i i i i i i i
I w I I I I I I I



$4 0
0 1 00
rq I I r-I 1 0 1 4) w Cli 4) 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 1
r-i I co I co I I I 1 0 1 10 0) > 4 1 1 1 -H I I I
0 -- I u I I 1 1 41 1 co 9 U) I I I I 1 1
I -H I I I I I k -H 4) ^ 14 1 1 1 co I I
1 $4 44 1 1 1 (1) 1 bO bO 0 P 0 1 1 1 CO Q) I I r-i 1 10 I I 1 0 1 0 -H 4) 1 1 1 0 0 1 1
-rq rn 0 1 1 1 1 -H I bo 0) C to CLO I I I -H I I
rA 0 1 1 1 1 4 1 0 U r 0 1 1 1 to Ic I I
:D 4J 4J I r-I rj) I I I Cj I -H r-I Co Co -H I I I r. Cj I I
P4
rj I I >% I I 1 0 1 > Cd I I tko
0 1 1 Q r I I i El I r 4 0) u 41 1 1 1 to fa I I
4) 1 1 1 0 4) 00 v I I I m 1 1 41
(1) 1 1 (30 1 0) -H SZ r-4 U I I 1 4) 00 1 cd 0
0 U) 1 41 1 60 ul 41 1 1 0 1 0 10 IH 0 1 1 1 (1 9 0) -H
1 tO 1 0 4-J W I I -H I *H W 0 4 1 1 1 0 -H > r
I Z I -H $4 1 1 E 1 10 4) (n 41 0 1 1 1 $4 X 0 co
1 0 1 41 ca p I 1 (1) r-( 4) 44 f I I C U) .0 El
W I r-i 1 04 0 1 ?-4 0 10 IH u tj I I I -H cc 0 0
41 1 1 1 CO 44 -H 0 0 0 -H -44 1 1 CO V. 94 -H
k 1 0) "0 u 10 0 1 0 4J CO 0 4 4J CA 0 1 1 4J -H 'V p
0 1 r-i a) I r. 0 1 u r-4 co r= 04 CO r-4 0, 1 1 Cd 44 4) 0 0)
1 (1) r--l co 14 1 co 04 ca 0 El 0 I I V N 4J
1 w 0 -H I (A 41 co r- 41 co 0 0 0) 1 1 10 -H
1 41 41 >N 1 :$ w 04 :3 4j 4j 4j I U Go
w 0 k 44 1 0 r-q ca td 0 1 -H 41
to ta. El 0) 0 1 0 Cd 10 Cd Q) 1 41 41 w 41
El (1) 0) -H 44 Cd 44 0 1 2 bo IH 0 r-i x
4) u 24 9 o -4 o u ^ -,-4 1 1 r. K 4
41 44 (D M 0 lw tv -H U) 4 4J 1 44 0 -r4 W )4
(a
4J "0 Iri W U 0) 1 4J 10 4J 4) 0)
-H :3 U CO 4) tv >% 1 :3 Z W
bo Cd -H Cd .0 44 $4 0 44 S 4J El r-4 I cd -H 0
u r-4 u 04 0 9: co r: m w 0. w
-H U r-4 04 0 4) 04 M 0. 4j W bo 4j -rA W bo -H 9:
"a 0 41 co r-q 0 (U r-I :1 U 0 cd 4j 93 0 (1)
cd 0 00 -H 10 -H m w w 0 -H u 4-4 10 2t 0
41 -H 41 0) 0. 60 I d 41 A-1 1-4 r-4 03 w
m 0 tko J-. 0 4J r-4 44 0 P '0 Z M 0 Cd CO
I C: 0 0 bo >.. r-4 co :j 0 -H 0 0 be 0) k 0 41 41 m
Cd Vq C: k 4) 0 = 04 C: : 0 0 C: 0) 0 0 0 :3
4) 0 0 10 -H ca r-q > U) 04 m m -H r-4 0 0 -H 41 E-A E--4 w u
'0 41 rq 9: rq S 4J M -0 4J AJ C CO 4 C 0 k -H W
>-, 41 co -ri T-1 -rq 41 : c k 0 0 p k u 41 El 0 -H C13 w Vq
0 0 k k 0 k 0 0 04 0 0 0 0 0 0 Cd $4 0) 010
0 0 0 9 P4 U 1-4 P4 P4 :B: P4 04 U :D 04 0 04
13 4)
0 W
r-4
.0 a 0 0 0 Ch 0 0 C> 0 0 0 CD 0 0 Ull 0 0 Lri 0
0 % 0 -,t C14 C) r-4 0 rq -.t C) 00 r-4 O r-4 M Cn 0 0% Ln 04
r-4 r-4 0 0 Lf) 0 ,D r-4 -T Ln --T U) C4 0 0 C14 a 00 0
0 -;T r-I -41 m C14 r-q r-I cn Ln -T 0 Ln tn m m r-q r-I Ln C14 m
z 0 0
Q) Ln 0 0 I:r NT ON C> r-q -:r 0 0 C) 10 -gr -T C4 C4 0 1 4 0 -ri
4 rl 0 m r- r- 0 C14 C%4 r- 00 tn 1.0 P- r- fl- m f... r, f, z
u r-q cn r-4 ko %10 .Q r-4 Ln %D 14r N-0 %D %D 1 0 -It %D %0%0%0
tn








41






U'- 4% enA 0' .T id -41%o Vl% %D 0 -4I-'. C0%
I P. - r- %C e ~ O'0N 0t'.-. -0 'T 45 n 10 C r c m~'trr 0' ro% V0 ~O0 %C C14 Cl
v 0r7 e 0r-t 0C m t tla'%0(N N m' T
Q 1-0 w


0



co cn IL enC4- F- 0' CA N a''0'0Fco '- w. W .0
r-' 470 P. 0r f -~ 0 1' 0 C4 a 'fO a -i U) 0 Ja'u~~~~~~~cC1 a)~r' (4 ~ u o ~ 0 u

4) 0 0



m0 06 v
I t0 en0e nUSC4r nL^ r 0 -tC n $

1- 00 0Nr1 -c ,r O o TU c ~ T

cc Cc -- - - -- -- - 00 '- o r > 1 0T (7 CO(N a' r--U.) C'- ( ON CN r- 'T -4 't 'm 0
0% ..t-a Wa"0 0%Om ~-- Ooo 0- r,' s c
-n m- C14 04(4C4- - 1 N 1
O- .".4 0
0 -.1 c


-40%F tI Ii I I I I ICI III I Iil I I C. 0
I~ ~ 11 11 I 1 1 I II I I1 I I u'-1 0
-1 ii $ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 c0 r
I t1 1 I-E I~ I I I I I1 111 0 4)
cn1 I f11 11. 1 I I I I I I I1I1I1 I I I -CL U
I2. I I I I l 0 1 i 1 11 11 1 1 111 1 11 E. 'o c
1I 1 11 1 1 11 III11 I I I w1 1 I1 II1 0.0 r
CL I III 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1
1 1 1 1 1I W I I1 I IIt>I I = II 1 1 1 0
I0 0U.I I1I I1I CL1 1 i 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 C 0
11 1 1 >.4 I I I 1 I 0 I I.. I 1 1 f*I-t
1 0 1- 11 11 W 1 11 1 01 1 1 0-i1 1 1 11 c 0
. 0o I3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 r. I I ~ I tI IL 0 r
a 141 1- 0 l l 1 0I I I I I 10.- 1 101 0.0 t 4.IIJ r
> v- 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 II I 1 1 1 -0) r .
00c 0 c-1 1 I hI ll 1 0. 1 1 '-41 lIlIl .0 0'0

a >0.111 CII 1-~o0 1 1 1 1 10 6
.01 > 0 6 11 1 tI 11 00>i i o i i i *0 0
00 CA 1- 1 1CO 1o1V.0 I I14 1 1 1 1 C w.4
gol ti.i 4 Il 1- 1 1 1 1 11 OC .0)
L) -1 00. 11 1 1 01 5-00 CUD It 1 w00> 1 I )0 0. 1
UF- C 1 1 1111 Wi I f 0 V)0 tI 1 041 I x I1 *.4 0j
0 0 .. to 11 1 1 co f I I I 9LII I I --EI1 0)cc 0 0
0-4 > I01111 1- l 1 0 Cd 0C I 1 1~ 1 0 E-~ I4-CQ '
14d. 0- 1 1 1 V41 1 1 110 44. -V4 41 I I I f VI f I I0) W I 1 0 1 r-0, 1 04 .0 *.00 1 1 XI I ~ I I Il 3t I = 1 -9 0 0 4
4J 0. 1~ 11 1 u c I I 1 1 41) WI S 1. 1 4 1 0C .-0 M 4F
v- ca41 -L 4 1 1 i C 0 1 1 1 -.>01w 14- 0 1 0 Ia-. ccI> ag 44c
0)' >. I f ) 1I.-E-.E 1 II r 07 .41 1 I 0-4 l 0 &WOc .0.1- 0 4--1 .-10)- W0W 4. U~. 0 .10 04 f 4
ww 0I 00C I0 0 ) -- I .). --w. CO to
0.0 a- 0I- :) I LI I I "a "o w 0 I 1 1 .j.4I 010 ca4 1.
C3 0-I-0' 11 10. 0 v IV= I I v.oj .4>1->X c.to
0 0 w 01 .1 x I 1(I l O 4- O C ~ :) -4 4 0 0 0" W U 0 -m
ci 0 I 1-4 4 I V C) 'a1- -0-4 l I"40. -J Ul> -4 =
v- > I I i W 1 .0 J0 4) > c I I t-.> 0 U co' (D
4) :3idI0 ->1 00 0. O -OOO 1 1 -04)0 0 o q U 4.4 00 6W (1 1Q I1 A-- =. to -i>> > 0 -4 0 )
M toCL00 w4 t 41> 1 4) 1) I 0 O -4) S -4 c 1
to 8 v >0J.461 1. -Wi t 00 -4 )3 '0V 0-C U4 f -0 1'
c 4 t i e) WI > I co03Wm". I Q0 04) .Jr- -4 n
-0 0"41 40 Q 4( 4CI -04. C %WI C.0"a cc.E40 (o4C CV)0
V 0 -i l'Ci0 W0iL --' 1 4) 1- 0. 1-4 4
0 -1- .0 w > c10 44 0 1 C-- C > 90 -- ~ 0 Cg
00V0 0 -.4 C14 .0 60-.0 -0441 cc.. -4) -,00
w 0C o 0.01 C) 0..o444.4 0 j cc 4j
C; 0 to =It- >0 1AS 03 10 04r- IN 0 0 cc w .0 C1w
1 0 1 0 c -a I a X I Ca 3 t % t 4 C O 0 0 0 4 0 6 0 0 -400 I-4 00w0m 0 --.4C b -1 $* 24 IA- =0a..C
I W 41 40006-1 4)0'W. &J a W VW M -.O 024.40"0a-m
u. Co ..0 1 --4 60A -0 00 C0 C 0 c-' 00 g Z 00.04
.0 W 1 3t .- I 4- c~.E 0 w 0t A 0 C 0.= 0. E.i 4 0 ~
0, 2C C 0 W C 6 :3 4i0.a 0I C w- 4 0 C3 cc
cc' 0 c w V I 0 jA 5-0-WCo. -4- O. --4 C"-13 )JIu-i j> c 00 M0 v .i Ca) Ai0 4)4)c ~-t A-~ -01c-4144 0 toes-4 C0. in4ju .4 -4kE1 4jC-0'JC.00- 0 C' m0r'. 00
&J4- 4) .4 Z0.4 0 a6 0-' 00') w- U 10 4C W 0


?~~~~~~~ ~ ~ ~ ~ &) 4-4 n-C 0 1? 000UN 4g )Q


c<6 0 0-E C14 0c-30 -.? 0-cN. c0 -0 VIr0 .0- 0 4 00
02 0 - a.2- 0 as .T % l4D 0 r CD if%.o 0r' co ..0 c 41N
No'. fl %C. 0 P ,% or 0"61 nI .








42




%D 0 Ln m %D ON -;:r m 0 en I'D w a %10 -T Ln W 0 cn r- tn
19 M $4 w a% %,o m m % o Ln m -o o a -i m w o m
co co Lr C C c; r.: oc r.: C C4 v r :
r- I r- r- r-f w w w 0 -IT -.T -T ON w 110 Ln --T H V-4 CD W P- f-- w %D cn
ON ON 0% Ln r- -,I -,I -'T H T-1 H r- r 0
0 a ft A co
Cd tn en r-4 r-4 Ln r:3
Cd






ca
44
0
ri)

co
ci

I to I I I I I 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 f I I
41 4)

4
u 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 ci I I I ra
W 44 1 1 1 -ri I I I (a
>N co ll: I I
I En I ca I I I -H I I cn I I I > 0 1 1 >-,
I C) 0 1 C-) I I I tho I I I I I -H I I r-I
cc p I I I r. w I -H I I I r. I I r. I I I Z I I r-I
I -H 4-J 1 $4 1 1 1 Q) I 1 1 44 p u I Cd cl
1 x cn 1 41 1 1 1 1 1 I 4) co I -H 4
0 41 10 1 0. 1 bo Ej 1 -'4 (D
co r-q -H
> 0 4-) 1 1 1 co 0 1 C) I I I a) I 1 0 1 I lz I co
0 a I I I I 1 I I 1 0 1 0 1 co I co bo I >
H P4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 : 1 1 4 0 1 0 00
00 -H I I I I bo 0 1 1 1 1 Nt I 1 10 1 1 u -H I r-4
0 U) U I I I I -,t 10 1 $4 4-4 1 41 1 i) 41
.C (U ci I I I I m (v I co I r-4 0 0 0 0
ci I I I > U) co 1 41 1 1 1 U) w Cl. 10 1 0 -H > 4
I -H W C I P I 1 1 $4 U) CU Q) 1 0 4 0 u
1 4 0) 0 1 0 1 1 44 (U W 0 I P. O Q) W
u 1-4 1 '0 () 4J bO 04 1 1 > 4 -H "0 M I co N 10
I 1 0 0 1 1 04 0 "o In w $4 1 u w u 0
0 1 1 Q) r--l 4 P -H "0 1 1 r p = 0) 1 -H r-4 "o -ri
41 1 1 4J 0 0. (D O r. I I W Z V CJ CW I -W -H a) 0 p
r--4 I cri u r-i z 0 1 t t 41 0 0 0 1 0 41 N 41 0
10 co I z -H ca r- 41 1 CU a) (v I S x -ri tat
4) (U 1 P4 0 4-1 -H rn 0) cn r--l CIO v 1 0 w 1 w
Aj 1 U) CO M 4-4 V 4-J r--4 CIJ Q Ctl r. I 4J 4J Q) 4J
p 1 0 Ic v r. r I V 0 M Iz co 1 0 41 p
0 "o 1 4 C) 0) co (D I I a) w I. V) = I co W -H 0
0 a) P4 ci Q 4-1 1 x 4 r--i (U U) 0 ta.
Cd r--l p J -H I -H 0 CO 4J V 41 41 -44 En M 4
4) 0 w 4J a) U) 4 1 1 4j -H Cd Z P. cil (n 4-J d) co 41
0) Z P. 4 CTJ P (U 4.J I U) U CO P Z CO Q) r-4 P 4
cc : : 0 Ej CO M W I Q) CO r. 4J Ia. U CO 4) 0
co CO 44 0 bO 0 0 1 r p -H U) r-q cn x 4J 44 C rn
U -H 4-J -H I -H 4-J _4 ::3 :1 _4 W r-4 V4 X
4-) U) v to z Q (n 'r (n cn ro W 0 -H Q) 0) :=)
-H r-4 w 0 w m p U a) bo P r. -r-i U U 0
H ro 4J r. 10 w co a) 0 10 0 :j -H 4 r. rq -H
bo 0 -H Ct -H P a) 10 U r-i r= -H -H 44 044 U (1) bO Cd Cd w
r: 4 w In 0 P 0 -H 10 ci > 44 r-4 4J 04 r. 0 4-) 4.J U)
0 4J P 4-4 Z -4 U) r. r-j -H CO 4J 0 0 :>% Q) -H 0 0 0 :3
co a) 0 =$ u >.b ca co r--q Cli Pw co r r ^ H E--' (n ci
ca Q) r-4 C) U) I En X a 4-1 C-) -4 P 0) r-q aj -H i) -H ca
4) 'o u 4--) a) U) C." (3) -T-1 (1) U -4 4J V U (n "0 C 4J p -r4
1.4 :>N 0 CO P ::) Cd 0 1:4 W (n M U) 4 0 0 CL, 0 U 4 cl ro
0 0 0 CJ CO r-4 r-A (1) -H -H 0 4 =1 CO 0 0 0 0 (V CTJ U C14 il U U P4 P H H A4 Z H :3. P-4 0
C4 0 ej
r-q ** ** ** ** ** ** ** ** ** u
a 0 0 Ln 0 0 0 0 -IT Co 0 0 r- C) r- C) W Ln 0 0 %-D 0 Ln 1 0 %0 r-I 0 r l 0 0 %.D CN4 -o I'D w -zr m r-4 C14 C14 -zr 0 01% U*) m CN 00 0 r- ON r-q U") -zr C14 r-_ r- C) (14 0 (U 0)
:il
Ln r--q r- 'T Ul) m IT r--4 C14 C14 m r--4 Ln 0 N C-4 0 m Ul) 41 0
r-4 -0 4 0
,a 'a) ; C C; < c; C4 C; r,: ; 0
(Tj J-- 00 C14 00 I'D r r- --T r-f %.0 r-I 00 (ON C14 %0 V) m 00 CD r- 1 0 Z 41
E-4 r-q r-i -T 10 110 t-A V) rl_ %0 %%D -T 1.0 r-4 1 0 C14 Ln %.0 C14 %.0 cd









43






I ~ ~ ~ ~ r 1. I0 w-(' I%4 tAI W % % 1
~.,%D --4* a a -a-a a a-1 a -a
1 1 % 0 rf.-4 ONfn W- 00 M-i '.4 'Ir

04) ('4 C4 %.D 00 *r 0
a,0cn -4 co W A
cc 0 D


-0 El
I % C'4--o0r-- I cis. 1 0~ Io Go $ 0.~.-4 14 .
.0 0 -4 UN (" -41 ~4-41 C14 -4I-4 C-41- El 0a 4- -: ('4 *. 0

0 a .-4 U
5.w -t 144 0a
w 0 0
Zc 40 1
0 I w
07 N l C%%4 A co 000%as-4 a% e00 rrm-Cr---o IDw 11w0 s" w
a L C-t00aC" 0 -0 '0 0 10 0%0''0("10 0w-T-.4 44 4.5
00w o L ,,, i c o m Ln m aSC O ir-'' 0 I 4-4 % A
004


a a 4 0

-t 0 .4- 0
64. 4.4. *..III I 0 4
-,4.0~-~0 1 11 cc%


C6 u a l I I I II IlI lI l~ 0 0 11 w r



w4141 111 1 11 11 1I11 11 1 44 11 1 111 ON 0
141111 11 11 1 11 1 1-1 1 11 11 1 0I>- I I I.5 I I I I I 1.'-4 1 1 1 1 11 .4a
1 1.. -.4 11 1 1 1 111 101 A 0. 45
.4.1 0 14 1 1 00 1.0 1 1.1l11 1 u co r.0
14a '-4 to11 I-4 I 0 11 a I1 I.44 I I I I I i
:) V4 I I u1. 1 I11 .4 1 10 a N r
r. 14 1 "q I I m I I I1 I 12 I1I *I I 1.0 V r-'ca 0 lle I 1 111 1 1 1 1 )1 1 1 111 .0 00
W 1 1 1101 I'-401 1 1.41I1I1 01 1r 11 0 0
0 a c ( 1 01 14 C 1 1 1 1 :l l > 111 It 1 4 1 1 0 0 .a
lCl 14 1 0 1 4 0 1 a l 0--4 0
C:I I 10 IIm11121 1(.04.1 ''V m1 .54 ca c 44 0
Cc0 1*- I I1- 1 > I'V I I. 0 1 0 UU 40 00.
10 1 1 48) -1411 0 l 01 .00 41 c A
1.011~ u1 1 (v to 0 a0 4 0 0 -4 4
41.0 0 I-4'V 141 1 1'4 0. .1 41 *-4 44 CC0
.00 0 1 4 41 11. to1 ~ 0 *0 110 1 1-4 -,4 u _4
-5 ,4 1 >0 1 >1 I I I > (A w )0I1 '- w 1 .0 0 .,j
0A 4.0 1 0 111 .4. co I >0 )1 4 v>.- 0 00 440C
011 1,. 1 -44'V IA 'I'V-.40 al l.% 12 0n 00 414 1 'aI I a1~ I o$Q.1.04 I w W r" W O0
$0 $4 1 en l.. 10 ) 1 41 I ( 0 en I1 w.0010 00 w u -4
44 C: 1loll 1 V :1 14 01 >4 1 Q .4 0.
410: 1-. -~ >11 4 41 0 .0'VW-CO41 .. -4
I.1 1.a1 I I w CL I w a0 0 .0 t4 00. 4 u
1.a~ I0 0 aI I9 I C 3 V 0410I0l w j0. 0 C411A
w pi,41 11 1v04 to,--.4 I 0 u0vc ) 0 04a
0 I 1 l ( I 1 0 >4 1 0 C c 4 ) 4 J l 4 c C O 4 4 0
I 0 1 ) 1I J. > :aC 0 -4N'. 00 -I)
0 I 0 .l 1 0L1 4 0a 1 Ai 4 10 1 > 0-4 oj W -4 c < "
141v ) &j >14 0 0 a2 1 1 0 W .02 0
El I Z45 0 0 1 4 0 I ~0 0 V1 0 4 1 4 M A0 1 '
1 0 I W 041 J m 4JI u4 I Vl 40. a4o1"4en> 4 14 1 1 u1 .1 4 J -1 0 J 1 Q ) 4A 4 M0 4 -4 0
&0 0- &I 4.4 o 0 ~ w0 0 0 1 > W 4 0 4 40
W1 CO r.. 4 0 a-.M.V4 I CO r_ 0. 3 0 'V0 4 4 00 0. XlO 4401.r- 0 l = 0*a- 0.1 a .,Iw 13 (.4 0410
'v I 0. --sa a.24100(0UU)r1 0 1 0 -.4 0 4-A W &J
1 '4 000OCU-4 4 "-4 0o >% Z >% >--4 1 I 4.5 200) x .02c
1 4 r X 20. wa 0 .4 *.0 & 4I1) 0 ja cn m 4 04
-4-d 0 .0 4 1 4J U XV cua 041 -n 140 uA W 41.0 a 3 c a r )a-(0.140ir = -4 c w r. a C:63t wto J 0 ca1a).w 0 W M1 "0 --4 M m 0 0 0 0 M u m A1 4.1 31 0 'o 0 c 4
&4 %4 3 c 00' 4 u' "a 3t -4m 0a3t r 000 w 4 M J
I a- 4a Q nl4 w (a4 (n a. 0 0a w to m 41 -4 r,1~ -14 14
0 !d -A4.-4 M &JC fn- M -4- Cn415.-. C:ccH-44 t" &4J.4.J *.4 bO WC CW 0 C U4 C -,4 -4 4 04


.0- CC 0 .

0( D( n 0AtA10A 1 0 (:) T 0u ) C000 LA) --44. ca )
U) w 0 C)C)V0 'DC0 C' A N0C000 4n0 C) 0.LDr .0C0co41 =) "Z4n10 mM 00 i '0 e'L 0 'N 0- C14 m N 'D en 1-4 W .,f



11 D "rr-f.- ~- IT -4'10 in r 61r, r--''T w r- o 0.-4 -4








44




0 0 M Ln 0 Ln M P-4 -:t 0 ON 110 --T a Ln M -4T m %D
In 0 -zr 0 1 0 -T W Ln 0 fl- V.-I r-4 r- m tn -zr tn P
14 m -41 r-q m w 0 Ln --T 0 C4 CYN CYN %:r %aco w m P w r, m CNI tn 0
r-. P% %0 T 0%
a% %0 --zr m co 0% w
0
z cl:
C4 C4




bo



10





A I I I I I I I I I I I I I I ci I I


cis .0


u u 0
0 V4
co 1 14 1 1 1 1 1 1 W I -H 14 1
I r % I -W I I I I I I 1 :3 -W I
IM ON I u I I I I I 1 1 14 rl
1 w I I I I I I r-q I ri H
Cd I I I f-I I I u I I 1 0 1 1 1 H I 1 0 co
1 1 1 w I I I I I ru I I I to 4) 1 1 1 $4
Au r. 0 1 44 t I I I 1 0) 1 0 1 1 1 V I 1 0)
p 0 -rq I Q) I I I ft I I I U I I I *H I
r-i 44 4J 0) 44 4J bo
44 0) 4 0 1 4-1 -H W
4) 1 P. CO I 1 0 1 44 0 1 1 $4 CO I 1 1 41
$4 -H I 95. 1 1 -H 1 04 I I I :j 9:14 1 1 1 1
41 to W 1 1 M I I 4J I o C6 P 44 0) 1 J36 04 0) 0) 0
:j W o I I a 1 1 2 1 Cc 0) 0 r. I co > u
0 P 44 1 1 4 9 1 1 1 w 0 1 a r I P o
41 1-4 1 1 ca I I -r4 1 0 -H I r. cd I ci a 0)
$4 10 1 1 44 0 4J I CO I w Cd .0 0
0 Q) I I Q 4J 0 CO I 4-J I 4J -H
44 4J I I -H 0 04 0 $4 1 60 0 1 X3 vo 14
41 cd r-4 I 4J 4) 0 cd 1 0 0) 1 0 4) 0 4)
k 10 0 co I to Ei 0) r-i C6 I -H 0 1 W N 4J 04
0 Q) 0 Q) I Ca 04 1 1 H JM4 >4% 0 Q) 1 V4 0. 1 IH
-0 1 r-q -H I I X CO 9: 0 $4 1 W -H I f3 Co $4
co 1 134 :) $4 Cd I CJ = -H M P. I 4J 0 1 4J 4) 4J 4) 0
0 4J 1 04 0) 1 Cd rn > 4 1 44 U* ra 4J p -H 41
0 0 1 14 4) "0 0) (d 41 1 0 4) *H co -ri 0
0 r-q u 0 1 w P Dc
0 0 00 0 0 0 1 V) 41 cc
4J I P -H .0 0 co 0. P u I -H w p 41 co 45
010 *ld 0 w ul -H '0 -H I bO CC 0) 4
4) co r .0 >lb "0 U) 44 >% $4 1 r. >,. C:J, 0
r-j Q -H 0 r-I :J 4 cd t4 0 4 .0 1 -H r-4 m 0. 0. w
hn r-4 0 :j Cd a) 41 rn 0 C.) :3 m P cd >% 0 x
r vq r4 0 P V. 41 :3 4) r-4 -H -10 r-I 0 4) 9: 0 u 0 "A
vi $4 9 -ri $4 Cd U) 0 P4 'V 0 $4 4) -r-I 00 r-4 2t 0
10 0 0 44 4) -H 4J -H 0 .0 U 4J U W rL-4 r-4 r-I rq
cc :j 4) 0 r-4 'o r-i :3 4 -- 4-) Cd *r4 Q) -H r-i Cd Co to
4) 0 cli -H 0 bD >- 0) V4 4J 4 44 CO -Li
0.4 0 V
0 to u u 4)
0 41 (D U a) -H -H 0 41 r-I -H r-4 604 P -H (L) r-4
04 0) W 4J :1 4-J 10 0 0 0 4J 04 r-4 14 -r4
r-4 (1) >% r-4 Cd >% V 4J 4-1 Cd 0 r-4 r-i 0 41 9 0. (d Cd V
4) 0 .14 Ic a 0 Cd 0 0 *H co 04 co 4 0 0
r-4 >4 m En V) u -4 u 1.4 z 44 cn w :3: u u ::D 04
0. .0

Lf) C) a C) 0 0 C) r-q 0 0 110 C) 0 Cl Ln 0 0 00 C 4 %0 -41 1%0 C) 0 Ln C) C14 %D C) r- 00 C) 00 00 0 Ln r-4 fl- -I-r
A r-A tf) c4 %.o 0 r- aN 0 oo -,t 0 r- cn ,o 0 -;r oo r- cn m
:3 0 %.0 in %D % O W 0 (y) C4 r-4 r-4 C14 T C:) r-4 Ln a% 00 Cv) 0
0 0 0 0 0 4 14 14 C C4 41 0
0 -T ** r-4 r-I %D 0 %0 C) -4r r-4 r-4 r-4 Cn 0
M CY) 00 -,t r r-I 00 0 fl- C4 Z CY) rl M M t %.0 r-j r--l r-j Z
r-q r-q rq -gr rl r- -T cn %0 r-I %0 Ln r- -4r --T -.T %0 r- o %D Cd









45





%A C4ON0w 100r-~ c00 -- .0 c00m (n 0,c .4 C 4 0-? I ao C en --4li~ r-.- P o %D 41co

i r.O% C4C4'0. 00D 40' 0D o Q 0 c
P1" 0C e %0 -- c'0 0 ( 0 v.- 0 a
w40 m. 0 GoW C4N fn1 04 C fnl c0 W)*
-j t ; 0 .

'0a

un 0 0 0' 0' en a% -4 n 0 00 1' ~"IN 0- 0Cd4 4 w
ca a %a ON ON 00 a1 a00 e4 C4 0oa

VN z- V" r' 0'r- C4 c c 0 0 of'- 0 w )d
a m0 0' (N( 0% C' C'1 in


z40 0
.C 0 .
(7, ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 0 04) T0 0 %o. or D1%D 0 0' 'C4 -0%0 '(' V4 0%enf 4e4OOO-r- 040 f% -r 4.c j
'0- S4("lC'0O 0%C' e%4 -A 'I co 000 L P.- &4 w -a a a a a a a 0 0 4.4
0o O 0 co %D~ C'dcn c U- 4C~f' 0 r' O 0
%D0 %00"* 4- '0 0 f- r 0% X> -- O' o '0
'j, asa a4 aO '.D 0De n C4 n 1

0 ~- a 44 .,f


0



oJ-~~~~ I t t it i 1 I 11 1 I I I 0. L
I 11 1 1 0 1 w111 I I m0111I *aO c 03 vI C411 It 111 wIi 1 1 1 141 v .
4vll l r.~ I I111 I1 = i CIII .
imo n111 1 I 11 I'M 1 1 11 o
l~ 4)11 1 ~ I I Il I fI I I f I'.
I0 I Il Il f II > I II I I I I I1 II Ut II *4 0

$4 a 11 1 1 1 1 11~ 11 1 I C I F
00 fs 0 w11 11 1 ) I~ il >-11 -I I 0 04
to'" V I I I I I I I I I v I 1 0 I I I I 1 0m I I I I I a
I I I111 0 14 I1 IL I AC I 0 1 -4
0 A 1 11 1 I I l IiI I w too 1 1 1 0 14
l i 11 1 0 1 af 1 1 11 w01I .1 ') 0. 14?-I C 1 1 11 1 ) 1 .11 I 4 I Il wM 0

I0- I1I1 I1 I 1I 1 0 1 I 4 I I t C 1 I l 1"0 0"
01 II liii1 1; 14-I4 I 111El 0) m1I4 11 0' CuJ
C. 1 11 1 11 1 1 -4.1 1 0 1 1 1v0 CI1 Ii 41 1 11 *.44 06C:A
I4 0 1111410111 0 1 1 l141Cl-1 > I I If I I -'v.4 U.0


$4 0. 01 1 '0 41 4) 0 1S 1 0 CI I)wI= 1- 1V 0 1f> I 4 ..40 -4 P44 *M 1 1 1 1 1 1) LI 01 IuI -C 60 VI14)1 t I .0 00.
1. C I Il I I ICl 1Z 9 10 i I I 0 a.I I ZI I I. CC)0 4 004
CL4 I i I II C1 a 1 4I Ii v MI >0 a lI I I L 0 1cc .4F
I0 I It 1S 10161 ) 1 0 110 1 Cu vII( oN1 I. IC I I LII' I cc I ( I M 14 J t 0i 4)0 I' I0II..4)tj O
w N I c11 I wi( w ~ I'4.0 I ob 1. 0 -411wc
ccO 0~ a1 v l'01 I a* IC"1 0 It"'1 1 c 1 0 1 1 .. 1 0 ~ 4J_ 0
o IcaI1 0C 041 a4) > L1 I -4 u w I >-I v w 0 .,4
1 -)J 4 1 1- 1 01 C4) 1 )1 0 -4.0C C: I I > c M .'4C
.4 vs I a -0 1 .0 104 14 1 e I w j-4W 1- 1 0 Z A.4l 0I'00 4X
1., 0 05 C 1 0 c 10 1)100 1- 1 0)',. Q140 iI 14 'MC = c w
W 0. 004.IVCC)6 0 1 WU1 0 1QC Ca 1000 4'- 1 cc4 60 &
w4A 4 -0-.4 8 0 1 v r. I w 1 0 CoG c*0'1M= 1 0 ..
>0 00C )C 0%WI 0 *)I1 I W C Z 4 ~.4 I S 0" 1 VO
0 as A 0 :) O u 1 0 0 .4 al C a0.> I Q 1l 4)4. W C -4
0 ~4 C 0Aj 0 v I cc CC .l'0,444 4 v-4 1 414 0 0
0 *fA WS td 1'0' a -..4 i'0 & 101> I n C '0 04 go ~ M o C-C6
Z 6C 60 0 0a4)-4 &J 1 40 14.11 =~ 4 1 9 0. 0 W0M 0 A ~ 0 4)40 A. 1 c oI I co C: a4)J 4 .1'0 H0J.
0) LI AIM 0 V Q ) -I I I 1 '. 44 -. 0 4) I0 *j W)' 0'>
01 SM4 "0 ). 1.'0. (A x6 1 1.. 0 % 4) 0 C .0 02
2 0 W C4O.'Ma 00j4j1 W-4D1 44 1 u 40 44 c 0 .4 .4
0JC 50 # 00 0 4 4)1 10i o4 v004 (U0 LCc.
I40 1- 9 Q 0-0.4 0 I j ~ O 4) -4 -4 Ai 0 0A
C Z W C a 0.-4'0 W1 0 -,V -.'' 1. 0 wM > 0 CLC .4 w4) 0 fa A 0 41 v I > 00 1.'.0. '-4 0 w 0 4).-4 cc
44) 01" 4) .0 'C 4~ w00Jc Iu 0140 0. 0 14 en .1 C
C 4. 0. N. 14 0b 1~ 0 1. 0 c)1.. j 0.,4 C 3 Cn 0 &4j 0
foC&J 0004 m 1 -4 1. 0. Ai

v ~ ~~~~ Ej 0
t" o.oooo 00 Z40~o 00 0; )~
.C ( .4-~O. .00 V e' 1 0 Oe'10'00 > 0. 0 4) 4)C V ed 01 0.-00u 0'Oid' 0 '0- .430=N4 0 00 0 0 V4CO -N
4) 0 S ?") U~~ CC C -, aN' C U C &j A $4V M 4 fa~ '.4E1f. C-4 S '.4
4;-4c F( ( 0O 0 0 f*N00C w-c c i41-'.ww- I0.(N4
0 W0-' 44 -'.4 8 f'0" -.4 1 4). '0C Ad (N %.o C C.. go








46




ON -:r a m %.0 110 r-4 ON cn ON M fl- fl% %0 f--l W Ln 0 r-I M
ci W Ln M a% -Ir r-q r-4 '10 Ln Cr% -It m f-I C14 C14 Ul) m r-i M -It tn %.D
w Ln M M Cn f-, ON r-I M M U) 0 Ln C4 0 r-i %.0 T M Ln
co 117 V IC7 C C7 Lf 4 cn 4 C Ln^ C r.: c L' c o- r, -:T rl_r- Ln Ln -IT -It cn m m 01% Ln Ln Ln -t -zr M r-I m ON
as W W in -.1 -,t M C4 r-4 r-I r-i r--4 r-4 r-4 r-4 r-4 r-i M r-i (n
f-i
=7 C,7
co eq 0

cl



co


$4
0 4-4
10
co (1)

cd
tri


41
I t I I I I 1 1 4
I I I I I I co I I I I I I I
1 1 44 1 1 1 I I r--f I I Ca 1 4-4 1 1 :j I I I I I I Cd I I rz I I I
to 10 1 1 U I I I I I I 1 0
r--l r. I I -H I I bo I I I I
I t 1 0 1 1 Ca 4 1 1 C: I I I
I I U 0 41 1 1 -H 1 1 1
En rl I t 41 41 cn I I u I I r-4 1 0 1 1 1
1- 0 u I
ct r-i 4j 1
r- I I 0 $4
r- 0 1 CO -H 4 10
C -H 1 $4 4 W I I I U I 1 -4-4 $4 -r-4 I I I
41 1 a) t) r. I I I tv I I a) to 10 1 41 -14 1 1 1
04 1 41 0 -H I I 1 12 1 1 41 P r-i I C-) t) I I I
(d 1 41 Cf) P Q) 0 d) CO 44 1 1
: bo Q) 0 "0 -H r-i a I I
U bO cd I W I r. 0 1 4) 44 1 (V 13. 1 >t 0
CO r 1 -r-q -r-4 I Q) tj CU $4
14 -4 -ri 0
I r 44 1 M r- co 1 0 U) > co
r 1 r-i E 00 1 1 to u I 7R cc 1 0 4-1 0 0 bo
cc I (n
0 1 1 co bo p I Q) co (a 60 1 (0 0 Tj
w I w 0 -H 9 0 m u U) Gi co co ::l 0
1 4 t (n 44 4mJ -H 44 4) 0 4J P lj r-4
1 0 1 1 ca 'o > 4 W 1 0 0 -H 0 1 0 0) q
r-4 41 1 14 r-4 > ::I -H 04 r. I (U 0 cd I W r-4 4) 0
41 CO U 1 (1) CO Cd 4-1 (V 4-) -H I r Cd -H I el 0 N 4J
w 0) cc I r-4 41 Q H M CO >-, 1 0. > 4.J r-4 I P4 Q) C -H
0 14 1 r-4 Cl) x "d 0 > 4-A ca I -H -H () -H I -H 0. : s (a
41 1 0 El (L) r c -H tv 4-. 1 0 41 0) 0 1 :s C13 Q) 4-1
I w C w 10 1 Cr r-4 fn I V 4J 4J 4J W
44 a) 44 44 Q) 44 1 0) :3 r4 44 1 (1) 04 *H 0
CO 0 r-i 0 0 Kj U 0 1 u -H 0 1 4) Q) 04
0 0) rn -H I U) 44 03 u m 0 41
m -H X 4J
41 0 cd r-i co 03 :3 M 0) $4
4 1 co 44 W 44 44 V Q) Cd E! 4-4 0 >% : P 44 -H 0
44 Cj o P 4J 0 4" r-i 0 0 CO r-I M M 41
04 (n co 0 Aj cd r-q C 0. ca Z 0 X -4
r-i cl) -r4 :3 0
2? -H cn M U) U) r. CJ cd 0) cd 0 0) co w 10 44
-ri 0 w 0 "a -H rlll to $4 0 -H r-q r-q
ml 4 0 0 0 0 d r* 44 0 0 r-q 0 M r-4 0 4 CO CU
0 44 p rn 0 0 -H co tH 0) co p 4J 4J 0 :3
co W a w ^ X ej 0 0 U 0 (D 0 0 (n (i
Q) M r--j 0) M Cl) tn 0. a Co U) U) -H LN) 0 -H -H M r-I E-4 E-4 -H (a
4-) 4.J -W W Q) 4.J 4J 4J 4J CO 4J J-- 0 fn 4J w
-Li p p p 0 w >% w p 4 ChO 4 U CO Oj -W C13
0 ca 0 cd co cl r-I X. w Cd cc *H 4 Cd w co Cd C w co 04
En 04 U 44 A4 P4 U En W AW P-4 4 U P4 0 P4 P4 U El
0
U CA
0 0 0 cl) C) co 0 0 0 0 00 C) 0 a 0 -T 0 C 0 Ln %D 0 0 %D --T 00 0 0 0 1 0 %D -j" r %D 0 00 a% -It P-4 %D 4 r-j 04 00 -T C) Zt Ln C4 0 r-i Ln C r- r- 0 W Ln 0 r- Ln r.0 :3 0 Ln m r-i 0 Ln 0 --1 0 r-q Ln 0 r-i 00 C) 0 Ul) w Ln 1-4 0
to q z 0 V4
E-4 a) 4 C4 (: 1 C; C4 L 1 4 1 1 ; C z V
4 00 CN C4 %,D r- %0 -J' C14 M r- %0 Cq v-4 %D 00 %0 r- r-4 0% 04 ca
a r-4 1.0 r-q 1.0%0%0 V) rA -zr %D %D f-I r- %D -:r %0 %0 r- rl% r-I C)
rn I









47






c o .> CO

go r- o 0 0 (N




v *



I? C4 en


C4


e00


0- vO U




Glot l l l t I I I I I C M O C4 - C 0 0r t M r





f l i t i l l l t t -il A I 0 w
I f if.l l l i f i l u l 4 A
0 0) Ill fIii t l t t e ia I I 0


A A Iii i i l f I II I I M) oO
fa I If fIl tIl lIt t i l s I O
w O I f0fl i f i l f i l i f lCAti l1 00 .0 4
cc I l l ff i f I I I > >i. I I M M
w ci l i fwlt i l & S l l l 1 MC ON
as I I>l~ lt I I I 1 -. S *M
It I I l l lI l l :t I l l I I *I O n 0 1


0 f u f l i i o l 1 tI1 0 0 1 1 1 1 I 1 00 O = I 1 -A I l I fI l I e il v l *I I eV4 1 1C
$C IUri r0i l f l i t > 1 1 41w I IIC>O O
f u I I l f li t l ( 1 w c 0 0 I M f f i l f i 140l 1 0 0 1 w c &
C i It i f I I~l > I oW e11 f
1O O0 1 I>eI l 1 1 0 9 1 1 -,- 44 *4


v) wl I M I l l I m 1 )1 I >W e 0 C *IIao&id lIII 1 1 -4 1 .4 C v Cc *
C 0 CC ww 0 e
w 4 C*dG 1 &.1v cu I I I*I >M C1 'MO M M 1 GE-1 0

0 0k QM r. t *00 1-1I r-C 1B 00- -a a O >*M-C c
* d s- MC AS *Owx in 1 >W- I c ag w .-oz 1"

w 0 :) > a MC C e l > I *w ca *4 0 f ) 00 COcm A m w 3; I )W-A 1: 10 0 44 co


tCo C A M WeM lue v A -4 MO*M MCla.O v 13 0 E! ClV* 4.j t #* >

Dg A p 0a x u4t4CC M O C l C C WM 0) 0 10 0 4 c



w* VM -,a LO*r. C w .* OO OMMw.U*VM4


41 0

000 0 -l 0000>c94 0 -O4m *MWeWOcM0- 00 (u- m
mS -oomo4mmoom to .,4o $4 r-- E4H r.as0 4" 04o (a Am oodOOOZ -A -N MagH1&








48




%-D a 0 0 C> 0 %10 0 m W Ln Ln 0 a Ln r-i r-I 0 w tn r-i C% r-q m 0 1- 0 0 110 lZ I- Ln m M 0 ON C14 r- r- Ln -IT --T cq 0 MCA 0"o 0 r-_ollo r-fMmmollocl4 -.TWMO-zrco m w 1.10 U') tn -Ir m m m %.0 %,D r-i Ln ICN %0 Ln M, Cq 1--i r-i r-4 9-4 r-I r-. co
%D r-4 r-I r-i CO
MC'
co




$4
to 00

al
$4 A
r--4 44
W
I (U I I I I I I I I I I I I

co
Q
1 0 C.)

I al I I I I I I I I I I I
4-) 1 1 1 1 1 I I I I I I
4J
r4 0
z I I I I I I I I f-4 I I I I 1 0) 1 r-q I I I
I I co 5 1 C13 1 1 1 1
u 04 1 U I I I I
-H co I I I I I -H I -H I I I 1 0
p r-4 I I I m I z I p I I I I I Aj 0 1 1 1 IW I cr 1 41 1 1 1 I u 04 1 1 1 r I (v ci (i I I I I I (U -H I I I -H I -H a) I I I I
,a r-i I rb 1 1 T-4 o I I I w I w r-q 1 0 1 1
r-I V I Q) 1 44 0) 1 1 1 0 1 0 w I V) I I co
0 0 t > I 4J I I 1 0) 1 -H Co 1 CN 1 1 $4
r-I t -ri I P. 0. 1 1 1 1 >% r--4 I v)- I I ID
1 4-) 1 0) 4) 1 44 r-4 1 44 Ow M I I I r
I co I rb Aj ci I a) I -H 4J 1 14 1 1 4)
cc to 44 1 1 '0 1 P X I I U) I P 10 $4 1 4) 1 0 60
00 cu W 1 Q) I r. 0 (U I I w 1 0 r ca I > I -H
q -rq I r-i I U) 1 1 1 *H I CO P. 1 0 Q) 4 4J
:j Cl) r-4 I I co t I W 1 10 1 1 > co 0
W 1 4-4 1 -0 1 U -tj U r-4 I r. "0 4 10 1 4J 0 tLO
1 0 .0 r-4
o 1 0444 1 C'j I 4J CO r-4 I co a co I r. co v W
4J 1 o I I to 4-) m "-J m w 9Q "o
0 I I CO 4J -H 4-) 0 : W 'o 'o 0
44 bO 4-4 (n I r-A 0 r-i 60 1 4 0 1 W P 0 0 (V Q) 0 -H
r. U 1 04 0) 0 0 1 CO Ei 01 C: C) 4-1 0 N 4j 4
-H -H 44 r= 0 IH I CL 0 Q) -H 44 E U r-4 -H W
$4 4) 1 11:1 4j "o 0. 0 -0 1 4-) U 0 0 t'). CO Co E CO P4
0 I w QJ En 0 C:w 0 -H rz (v 1 "0 0 -H Q) -f p > a) 41
04 co 0) a) cd :3 Q) 1 0 CO > 4J : 4J 4J P
0 r. p 0) v $4 U) rj (D 4-4 V H 0
0 a) IH 10 4 0 W .0 W 4-4 '0 0 44 W 44 4) 0.
10 r-i 4 0 W C U) 0 En 0 (n U) x
0 u P 41 O M -r4 4 (n 4-J 0 w -H 4J (U
4 cl 0 0 -,a -rA :J 0 -H r. 0 -r-f "0 p ca
0 r 0 44 0) ED W :1 W U 44 C3 a) -r4 W rA 0) C: 0 a)
E! 41 "a 4 >% w P 44 0 >-. 14.4 0 P. En
-H bo 0 -H r-i -H ^ tt C13 -ri 0 r-i 0 X X lic:
0 Q) -H CO 0 44 CO U 4) > P 04 X P (0 04 u a) 41
00 -H r-4 0 0 4 0 0 r-q 4J -H W ^ 0 P -H
r p "0 ;4 04 r__i aj CO "0 IJ r4 W U) 44 4J CO U) Q) r--l r-4 :3: 0
-H 0 -H F4 4J 4) :1 4.J a) 4-) Co P: Vq u S cc CS
10 u 4 0 co > 03 0) r-i 41 0 -H -ri r-q -r4 41 r-4 41 41
44 U bO r. 0 4) 0 Cd U 4 CO 44 4) CO r-i 0 0
1 0 0 Q r-4 ci p 4-1 r--i 0 C) cd p p 0 :3
0 r-4 r-4 > -H U -H U -H W >-. U) CO Cn 4 $4 ^ -H U) $4 En u
r-i 41 co p r-4 -H 4-1 -H 4) p z 41 0 w cli w 4) (n
r-4 4J 4.J -H t 4J 4 4J 5 -H "0 p 0) >-, r. -ri
4) co (U co 0 0 a 0 r. a) co r. cl 0 a co Q) "a
cj :E: Cl m u u 4=1 1- 9: P 4 -q w A4 P., 0


Lr) C) 0 0 0 0 0 0 M CD Cl C) 0 0 0 0 C) C) 0
%0 C) 0% OD C14 0 0 Ck P-4 -T %.D N-0 -T r-4 CD Ln OD Ln 0 0
r-4 --T a, Ln r--4 Ul) Lr) m 0 r- 0 r-4 r-4 Ln --T 110 00 Clq r- co 0
.0 :3 0 m r-i m -T cl-I 00 m Ln 00 %D -zr -T Ln Ul) ON %.0 00 Cf) a%
10 z 41 0
4) C C; U 1 U 1; 4 r C; 4 C 0; 1 C4 1 V C 0 VA
m C14 r- 0 cn M m r- r-4 00 0 r- (D %0 C) I'D r- r-q 0% r-q Z 4J
r-4 r-4 %D r-I r- -4t -.1 r- r- %0 r-4 -:r r- %0 1- NO rl r- ND 00 co









49





rn Vl% co CrN
en r 0 Ln
C
00 a% r- 0%
to co C4 1.40%
aj 01. %1 00 m C-)
u 51

%-D C14
$4 ON Ln r-4 00 Ln Ln
ON m 0 CN 44
1 00 co Cl co ^ ^ a -H
0 0 NT r- 47N r-i M 04
r-4 04 r-4 -o N-0
CN C14 co
co


Cd
all

.C W
u
C) Cd
co
co
00 0 C: $4

LW




Ch 11 It 11
4





rn
W 44
0

4 0 En
c to 0 1 1 1 1 1 1
to I I
.0 1 >% 1 1 1 1
v In ca
C: r-q
0 i i i 0
r-4 -H I I W 9)
to 0 41 1 t 0 41 t I
-r4 10 1 1 -H p I I Q)
Q4 1 1 4 co t I bo
44 r- Aj 1 1 -ri I I tj
0% %- c I I I Cd 4
10 P-4 10 U; ci I I cd 1 1 41
0 1 44 1 CC 0
Aj C (j)
0
0 $4 .14 COO > *rl
cs 01 11 11 11 0 0 0 co
z 0 1 1 1 -H a a
4J CO H
0 1 1 -4
I c 41 0) 0
4) w to
Ai > .0 $4 N 41
-,4 CC 1 0-4 0 -H
1 .0 -C 4 0 v Ell
60 41 1 co 0 0 w "
c c 1 0 4-1 k -H 4J
.04 w v 0
10 &j 4) W 4) 44 bO -H 0
40 C: N 44 r-4 10 0 0 04
0 0 1 -M 0 r. -r4 0) x co 4J
03 a to Cd $4 4J (V W
4) AJ
-Li
1 .4 0 M 44 rn 0
14 0 CC 0. cn
bo 03 4) 04 4) X
W 10 4) ::D 0
1 0 10 -H 0 r-4 r-4 rb m
w u 4) mw
60 u co ca
co 4) 0 41 -W 0 :3
0 0) $4 -44 0 0 (A u
$4 -4 r-I m H H -H 0)
0 .0 0 4 -H
C &J Li
0 0 0 OW 4 > co
0 H H 0 co cd co co Od
0 W C14 U Er 4 P4 :3: s
0 4)
u
0 Ln 0 Lf)
C) r- 01% cn
-T 0 CV) 0 0) 0
It 0 Cd 0 0 r- --T Lr) Lr) 4-1 0
cn 0) V% It H a z 0 -H
=) P-4 0%
C4 z 0 Ln L C4 Z 4J
C14 00 00 r-q co
r-I %D %D
cn








50







14 -0

C: u 0 ,0 cq r-,
cc 4) $4 M r-4 r rC m r- Ln W 0 -IT w -IT m %0 r-i r-q 44
00 0 C) r" V) Ln P_ -H
C'i q A q q
W
co
to r-4
00 Q




u tko

cd

cc 4 144

pi OD
r
1>1
w
ca co
co

4)


0) 44 1 1 4J I I I I I I
44




>1
I t i)
I I I
.0 C13 cc 03 1 1 1 1
0 ca I I I bo I I r-4 r-4 I I
ca 0 co 4) 1:4 1 1 1 r. I tv co I I co
.0 V r-4 r 04 1 1 1 -H I u -H 1 1 4
P r-j 0 "o co I I I I I -H $4 1 1 W
0 44 1 #44 CC 1 1 4 4J I
cd bO (L) I 4.j w I I
10 r. -H 1 044 1 44 0 :3 1 1 00
4-J -H r-q 44 0 (1) 1 1
0 4 (1) 4) OW r-I 41
*H (13 p -H o 0 1 (1) 0
ca W r-i 0 44 1 V) 0 a) I
4) 04 : 4 (L) 1 0 'o > I
0 p U 1 0 co
44 -H 93 Cd
C6 $4 .,4 0) (a -4 41 1 (a 0 0
co Ai r-I 4J '1 0 CO $4 1 0 4J 10 u
Z 41 cd 0 (L) 44 5 CO I -H 0 r-I -0
$4 Go Cd 41 04 1 1 (1) 0 4) 0
u 0 44 co "o 41 1 z Ej jz tl 41
co 0 0 0 0 0 "0 1 0 0. 0 -r4
-0 -r4 0 Ai >-, 0 1 -H ul 0 a)
-r4 C Cd 10 co CA cd 1 0 0 a) 41
01 p 10 r I ol 0 4j p 41
Cbe I 4j 0 0 V) I Q 4) C -H 0 r-4 X
.14 0 10 U) 41 41 0*
10 0 4) 44 u 0 4) a) P w X co 41
w -H (D to -H 0 41 4)
p 04 4 0 44 P
0 :j 0 vi 0
W 4J -H P 4-J P r-4 C:k.
w .0 41 U 0) cd M M -H r
0 -H m 4) "o 0 4) (2) 3: 0
eq 0 bo 4J r. -n $4 Cd 'V
co r. -H 0 0 -H r-4 r-4
4) 14 ca W U r-I U 0 0
0 w -W r-q (1) cd -H 41 41 0 :1
v () Q) 0 W U 4J 0 0 w u
.0 0 P-4 W -rq U P E--4 -H Go
cc -0 -H bO 4J -0 0) E! 4) 4 -H
C4 4-) 0 "o C: r4 -r4 04 Q) 0) Cd -0
C14 x 0 W (1) -H 0 r-4 M 4 0 ol
I w :3: F-4 fa 4)
0 0 4)
1 cn
0)
0 0 0 0 0 04 C) 0 0
a) r-4 C) C) 0 C) 0 C14 r-4 -zr C
ca r- ON ON cn GN C) --I C) rl Ln
E-4 CY) r- c1r) m C) 00 -T T 00 ul 41 0
-0 Z 0 -H
01 1; C4 0 0; C 14 C4 'A 14 1 -w
r-4 eq OD r-4 co
cn 4) 0 r- 00 r-A V-4 IT
z















C4
C4


00 r,
w as coo %D -T
v u u1i CIN Ln Ln
0; Q 4 a% m
P. a cl .4 -r4
00 C14 r-I Ln
C14 C4 w
w r-4 r-q


cl
C4 (n
C4 uli

C: cc
cc
>,
w
v co %0 %0
w CN 'D 'D
4-4
00 .0 :1. C, 14
r- .O VIN cl
w r-4
0
11-4
r-q
1 0




u 44
too -r4 1 $4 1 1 0
C: w
0 1 0 1 1
z I I ci
in 1 1 C3 V 00 -r4
%" 1 1 -4 r-q
o I I
I 1 0
cd I I I to co I lz I I :j r-q
-4 1 1 1 c V-4 1 cc 1 1 04 r-4
-4 r-i I I 1 (1) co
0 ci
2 V
0. r-4 co 44 r. I I M
w V
Cd c C 0. X 4) CO I I
0 1 -H to I 1 0)
W >1 r-4 4 1 1 r-4
04 w Q) 0 1 1 04
co 1 0 0
9L ch 1 1:6
0 4) x 0 $4 >
v ca 0 r 1 0
04 C pi 44 0 1 C 0
u -r-i I ci
$4
cc 1 4J 10 41 41
x 06 0) co 41 ITJ w
.,4 V 4 W W 0
0 k d) (0 Cd N 41
0 $4 r 0. *H
$4 0 C) Ch 5 rA
%4
"a p 0)
10 11 It 0 >
lu 11) 1 r-q -H 0 r-4
Aj Aj 41 1:6 ).4
Ld w 4-t M co 41
0 1 0 log
06 1 1 4) W
N 4
-4 0
Aj 0 (v U)
4 4
W 0 1 -4 0
ji 0 m
3
Aj ca CD 0 2$ CO CO
W 4J 0 4J 4J
0 0 cd Q 0 Q 0 0 U) u
(a Aj C M.,4 V 4 E-4 E--4
Cc -.4 E
0 19 -4 =)
1.4 04 to C 0 .0 0 cc "Cl
r.1 W 4 -0 -4 w '1 0
4) = 0 cc cc
W Aj &j
4) 0 0
1
03
41 -.14 0 0
ca cc co v 0 Lt*) C4
(1) r-q
cn r-A r--q 41 0
0 4-4
C) 0 co C..; r Z 41
0 0 E-4 m cc
4) 0 -0 V4 co -.1 raj Z
4
0 C) vi






52

INDEX


Each Quarterly Report to the Congress and the East-West Foreign Trade Board on Trade Between the United States and the Nonmarket Economy Countries contains:
(1) Summary of developments in U.S.-NME trade for that calendar quarter,
with the summary of the fourth quarter as an annual review;
(2) Seven summary tables and two figures describing the value, direction,
composition, and individual country trade shares of U.S.-NME trade
in that calendar quarter;
(3) A series of appendix tables describing the leading items traded by the
United States with each of the 12 NME countries covered, disaggregated to the 7-digit level of the respective import and export
schedules, through the end of that calendar quarter.
Other subjects covered periodically or on an irregular basis are listed below. All page numbers refer to the official USITC publication, with the exception of report number 4. Page numbers for that report refer to the copy published by the U.S. Government Printing Office.
Albania: U.S. imports and exports, annual; No. 1, pp. 42-43 (including table);
No. 5, p. '7; No. 9, p. 72; No. 13, pp. 52-53
Aluminum: U.S. imports and exports; No. 8, pp. 34-37 (including table) Aluminum waste and scrap: U.S. imports; No. 14, pp. 26-30 (including table) Animal and vegetable products: U.S. imports; No. 6, pp. 17-21 (including table) Antimony oxide: U.S. imports from China; No. 6, p. 34; No. 9, p. 33 Aspirin: U.S. imports; No. 6, p. 33 Bicycles: U.S. imports; No. 6, p. 50 Bulgaria: U.S. imports and exports, annual; No. 1, pp. 39-41 (including table);
No. 5, pp. 53-5' (including table); No. 9, pp. 66-70 (including table); No. 13,
pp. 49-52 (including table)
Chemical products: U.S. imports; No. 2, pp. 36-46 (including tables); No. 6, pp.
31-36 (including table)
Chicory roots, crude: U.S. imports; No. 6, p. 21 Chrome ore: U.S. imports from the U.S.S.R.; No. 9, p. 21 Clothespins: U.S. imports; No. 6, pp. 47-49 Clothing: U.S. imports; No. 6, p. 30; No. 8, pp. 25-27 (including table) Clothing, cotton: U.S. imports from China; No. 9, pp. 31-32 Coal:
U.S. exports to Romania; No. 13, p. 35 U.S. imports from Poland; No. 13, p. 28
Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC): No. 9, p. 37; No. 5, p. 32; No. 12, p. 24;
No. 13, pp. 17-18, p. 26, p. 34
Copper conductor, insulated: U.S. imports from Yugoslavia; No. 6, p. 44; No. 7,
pp. 45-49 (including table)
Copper, unwrought: U.S. imports from Yugoslavia; No. 9, p. 40; No. 13, p. 31 Cuba: U.S. imports and exports, annual; No. 1, pp. 44-45, (including table);
No. 5, p. 56; No. 9, p. 71; No. 13, p. 53
Czechoslovakia: U.S. imports and exports, annual; No. 1, pp. 28-31 (including
table); No. 5, pp. 43-45 (including table); No. 9, pp. 53-56 (including table);
No. 13, pp. 37-41 (including table)
Diamonds: U.S. imports from the U.S.S.R.; No. 9, p. 21; No. 13, p. 19 Downs and feathers:
U.S. imports from China; No. 13, p. 22
U.S. imports from Yugoslavia; No. 13, pp. 31-32
Ferroalloys and nonferrous metals: U.S. imports; No. 6, pp. 44-45; No. 7, pp. 37-44
(including tables)
Fibers, flax and hemp: U.S. imports; No. 6, p. 24 Fibrous vegetable materials: U.S. imports from China; No. 6, pp. 23-24 Flax: see Fibers, flax and hemp Footwear:
U.S. imports; No. 2, pp. 18-25 (including tables); No. 6, pp. 51-52; No. 8,
pp. 38-42 (including table)
U.S. imports from Poland; No. 9, p. 34
U.S. imports from Romania; No. 9, p. 48
Footwear, leather welt: U.S. imports from Romania; No. 11, pp. 17-25 (including
tables); No. 13, p. 36






53

Foreign Trade Statistics; changes in 1978: No. 14, pp. 16-19 Gas natural: U.S. imports from the U.S.S.R.; No. 9, p. 18 Generalized System of Preference (GSP): No. 9, p. 41; No. 13, pp. 36-37 German Democratic Republic: U.S. imports and exports, annual; No. 1, pp. 32-35
(including table); No. 5, pp. 49-52 (including table); No. 9, pp. 57-60 (including table); No. 13, pp. 41-46 (including table) Glass, flat: U.S. imports from Romania; No. 5, p. 40 Glass, sheet:
U.S. imports; No. 6, pp. 37-39; pp. 28-33 (including tables)
U.S. imports from Romania; No. 9, pp. 15, 49 Glassware: U.S. imports; No. 6, p. 39 Gloves, cotton work: U.S. imports from China; No. 13, p. 23 Gold coins: U.S. imports from Hungary; No. 1, pp. 36-37; No. 5, p. 46 Gold, nonmonetary: U.S. imports; No. 14, pp. 21-21 (including table) Golf cars: U.S. imports from Poland; No. 3, p. 16; No. 5, p. 32 Grain:
U.S. exports; No. 3, pp. 3-5 (including table); No. 4, pp. 2-4 (including table);
No. 5, pp. 1-4 (including table); No. 6, pp. 1-5 (including table); No. 7, pp. 8-11 (including table); No. 8, pp. 6-8 (including table); No. 9, pp. 11-13 (including tables); No. 12, pp. 11-28 (including tables); No. 13, p. 9
(including table)
U.S. exports to China; No. 9, pp. 27-29
U.S. exports to Czechoslovakia, No. 9, p. 53
U.S. exports to East Germany; No. 9, pp. 57-59; No. 13, p. 41 U.S. exports to Poland; No. 5, p. 31; No. 9, p. 36; No. 13, p. 25
U.S. exports to Romania; No. 8, pp. 12-13; No. 9, p. 50
U.S. exports to the U.S.S.R.; No. 5, pp. 17-18; No. 9, pp. 11-13 (including
table); No. 13, p. 17
Hams, canned:
U.S. imports; No. 6, p. 18; No. 7, pp. 22-28 (including tables)
U.S. imports from Poland; No. 9, p. 34; No. 13, p. 27 Headwear: U.S. imports from China; No. 6, p. 51 Headwear, cotton: U.S. imports; No. 7, pp. 56-59 (including table) Hemp: see Fibers, flax and hemp Hides and skins: U.S. exports; No. 12, pp. 28-35 (including tables) Hops: U.S. imports; No. 7. pp. 29-32 (including table) Hungary: U.S. imports and exports, annual; No. 1, pp. 36-38 (including table);
No. 5, pp. 46-48 (including table); No. 9, pp. 61-65 (including table); No. 13,
pp. 46-49 (including table)
Iridium: see Platinum group metals Iron and steel: U.S. imports; No. 2, pp. 26-35 (including tables) Iron and steel, plates and sheets: U.S. imports from Poland; No. 13, p. 27 Labor content of U.S. exports to the nonmarket economy countries: No. 4, pp. 11-16
(including tables)
Labor content of U.S. importsfrom, the nonmarket economy countries: No. 3, pp. 18-26
(including tables)
Machine tools: U.S. imports and exports; No. 10, pp. 18-54 (including tables) Manganese alloys: see ferroalloys Metals and metal products: U.S. imports; No. 6, pp. 41-46 (including table) Metals) nonferrous, unwrought: U.S. imports from Yugoslavia; No. 13, p. 31 Mongolia: See People's Republic of Mongolia Nickel, unwrought: U.S. imports, No. 14, pp. 22-26 (including table) Nonmetallic minerals and metals: U.S. imports, No. 6, pp. 37-40 (including table) Nuclear reactor parts: U.S. exports to Yugoslavia; No. 21, p. 5; No. 13, p. 30 Osmium: see Platinum group metals Palladium: see Platinum group metals Pantothenic acid: U.S. imports; No. 6, pp. 33-34 People's Republic of China: U.S. imports and exports, annual; No. 1, pp. 10-12
(including table); No. 5, pp. 24-29 (including table); No. 9, pp. 27-33 (including
table); No. 13, po. 19-23 (including table)
People's Republic of Mongolia: U.S. imports and exports, annual; No. 1, pp. 46-47
(including table); No. 5, p. 57; No. 9, p. 72; No. 13, p. 53
Petroleum and petroleum products: U.S. imports from the U.S.S.R.; No. 4, p. 10;
No. 9, pp. 18-20; No. 13, p. 18
Platinum group metals: U.S. imports from the U.S.S.R.; No. 9, p. 20; No. 11,
pp. 33-45 (including tables); No. 13, p. 18
Plywood, birch: U.S. imports from the U.S.S.R.; No. 6, pp. 22-23; No. 7, pp. 33-36
(including table)






54

Poland: U.S. imports and exports, annual; No. 1, pp. 18-20 (including table);
No. 5, pp. 30-33 (including table); No. 9, pp. 34-39 (including table); No. 13,
pp. 23-28 (including table)
Potassium chloride: U.S. imports from East Germany; No. 9, p. 59 Rabbit meat: U.S. imports from China; No. 6, p. 17; No. 9, p. 32 Rhodium: see Platinum group metals Romania: U.S. imports and exports, annual; No. 1, pp. 25-27 (including table);
No. 5, pp. 34-82 (including table); No. 9, pp. 46-52 (including table); No. 13,
pp. 32-37 (including table)
Ruthenium: see Platinum group metals Silicon alloys: see ferroalloys Soybeans:
U.S. exports to Romania; No. 9, p. 50
U.S. exports to Yugoslavia; No. 13, p. 31
Specified products: miscellaneous and nonenumerated products: U.S. imports; No. 6,
pp. 47-52 (including table)
Suits, men's and boys': U.S. imports from Romania; No. 9, p. 48 Sulfonamides: U.S. imports; No. 6, p. 31 Textile fibers and textile fabrics: U.S. imports; No. 6, pp. 26-30 (including table) Textile products: U.S. -imports from Poland; No. 13, p. 27 (including table) Textiles: U.S. imports; No. 2, pp. 03-60 (including tables) Textiles, cotton:
U.S. imports; No. 8, pp. 18-24 (including tables)
U.S. imports from China; No. 6, pp. 26-29 (including table); No. 9, pp. 31-32 Tin: U.S. imports from China; No. 2, p. 47-52 (including table); No. 4, p. 10
(including table); No. 5, p. 25-26; No. 9, p. 31 Tobacco, oriental cigarette leaf:
U.S. imports; No. 11, pp. 46-54 (including tables)
U.S. imports from Bulgaria; No. 9. p. 66; No. 13, pp. 49-51 Tools: U.S. imports; No. 6, pp. 41-44 Tractors, agricultural:
U.S. imports; No. 7, pp. 50-55 (including tables)
U.S. imports from the U.S.S.R.; No. 13, p. 19 Tungsten: U.S. imports from China; No. 5, p. 26 Union of Soviet Socialist Republics: U.S. imports and exports, annual; No. 1,
pp. 13-17 (including table); No. 5, pp. 17-23 (including table); No. 9, pp. 18-26
(including table); No. 13, pp. 9-19 (including table)
Wood and paper: printed matter: U.S. imports; No. 6, pp. 22-25 (including table) Wood furniture: U.S. imports; No. 11, pp. 26-32 (including tables) Woodpulp: U.S. exports; No. 12, pp. 35-44 (including tables) Yugoslavia: U.S. imports and exports, annual; No. 1, pp. 21-24 (including table);
No. 5, pp. 34-37 (including table); No. 9, pp. 40-45 (including table); No. 13,
pp. 28-32 (including table)

0







UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 3 1262 09121 1044




Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID ELIQ7ZEXI_O3RWNS INGEST_TIME 2014-09-10T17:34:45Z PACKAGE AA00023986_00005
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES