Citation
Palatka daily news

Material Information

Title:
Palatka daily news
Uniform Title:
Palatka daily news (Palatka, Fla. : 1919)
Alternate Title:
Daily news
Place of Publication:
Palatka, Fla
Publisher:
Vickers & Guerry
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily (except Saturday and Sunday)[-1994]
Daily (except Sunday)[ FORMER <1919>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Palatka (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Putnam County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Florida -- Palatka ( fast )
Florida -- Putnam County ( fast )
Genre:
Newspapers. ( fast )
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Newspapers ( fast )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Putnam -- Palatka
Coordinates:
29.6474 x -81.6295

Notes

Abstract:
Palatka is located on the upper St. Johns River and serves as the seat of Putnam County, Florida. The town was crossed by a number of railroads--the Florida Southern; the Georgia Southern and Florida; the Jacksonville, the Tampa and Key West; and the St. Augustine and Palatka--and served as a junction for routes continuing to the west and south. 1865-95 is known as the "golden age" for Palatka, when it not only home to these major railroads, but also to seven steamboat lines. Palatka was the major shipping point in Florida for citrus and timber, as well as a popular destination for tourists. On November 7, 1884, a fire devastated Palatka, practically wiping out the entire city. By 1890, Palatka had recovered and reemerged as a "more refined city" with eight first-class hotels and three new residential districts. Unfortunately, the "Great Freezes of 1894-1895" destroyed most of the region's citrus groves. Following this devastation, Palatka could no longer keep up with Jacksonville's rise as an economic center. Although still important, Palatka's railroads could not compete with those in Jacksonville, and Palatka's steamboats operated only during tourist seasons. However, by 1910 the lumber industry had expanded, making Palatka the industrial center it is today. In 1914, H.P. Nerwich began publishing the Palatka Morning Post, which was later purchased by the Palatka Daily News on May 21, 1921. Published by G.M. Guerry and M.M. Vickers, the Daily News, had begun publication in 1919. During its early years, the Palatka Daily News covered national events such as the Women's Rights Movement and the passage of the 19th Amendment, prohibition, and the Ku Klux Klan. Readers were also informed of international affairs such as World War I and the Greco-Turkish War. In 1926, Vickers sold the Daily News to a corporation headed by Clayton C. Codrington of the Deland (Florida) Daily News. In 1958, John H. Perry of Perry Publications purchased both the Palatka Times-Herald and the Palatka Daily News, merging them into one publication. About ten years later, the Palatka Daily News along with the Leesburg (Florida) Daily Commercial, which was also owned by Perry Publications, were privately sold to Gardner Cowles of Indian River Newspapers, Inc. A new editor-publisher, Ed Walthall, replaced the husband-wife team that had run the paper under Perry's management. In 1971, the New York Times purchased both titles. The Palatka Daily News continued as an afternoon paper with a daily circulation of 6,500 until 1994 when it became known simply as the Daily News. As of 2000, the Daily News (more commonly referred to as Palatka Daily News) was owned by Community Newspapers Inc. of Athens, Georgia.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1919.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 107, no. 144 (May 6, 1994).
Funding:
Funded by NEH in support of the National Digital Newspaper Project (NDNP), NEH Award Number: Project #00110855.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact Digital Services (UFDC@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
04402148 ( OCLC )
sn 78001466 ( LCCN )
0163-5050 ( ISSN )
ocm04402148

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Daily news (Palatka, Fla.)

Full Text
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niiniiiiiM
, . .... '
TODAY'S
-
NEWS '
K
TODAY .
Mil I ! I
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THE WEATHER
.
Local Showers
probably to-night
and Sunday

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I

i fjp " '.. VOL. I NO. 7. .
PALATKA ENDORSES JU

PALATKA, FLORIDA, SATURDAY. OCTOBER 18, 1919-

PRICE FIVE CENTS

FOR LOCATION OE SITE

W

TELEGRAM SENT BY BUSINESS
MENS' ASSOCIATION TO CHAM CHAMBER
BER CHAMBER OF COMMERCE WOULD
BE BIG THING FOR PALATKA
JACKSONVILLE ; WILL SEND
SPECIAL TRAIN TO TALLAHAS TALLAHASSEE
SEE TALLAHASSEE FOR HEARING. BEFORE
- COMMISSION MONDAY.

WW

Palatka is idling for Jacksonville to
win the designation, as site for the
. holding of the Centennial celebration
and exposition, ed the " Business'
Men's Association wired endorsement
of this body to the Jacksonville Cham Chamber
ber Chamber of Commerce yesterday so. that
the endorsement , might be used at
Tallahassee Monday when the Centen Centennial
nial Centennial commission finally locates the
site. .;. ' ' ; ..
With such an exposition as the ce ce-tennial
tennial ce-tennial will be located in Jacksonville,
and. running for a period of many
weeks, the benefit to Palatka is ob obvious.
vious. obvious. Thousands of people from

all sections of the country would vis

it the exposition, and many of them

. would make trips to surrounding

towns to see what 7 ida looks like.
Jacksonville ,. Confident.

JACKSONVILLE, Oct. 18. With

' - Palatka's endorsement, added to that
of nearly every other, city 'tin Ifarida,
' especially in the Peninsular Section,
-.. Jacksonville feel confident of winning

the decisio for tine centennial expoei

B -ijon-''iTJiliS.(ifici6ionVwill made

XIonaay At Tallahassee.' . Jar" cf Vct

villa's Hnlecfttanii will leave In a sme-i . .. 1 Jw

cial train for the capital city.
The special train wlil carry a band,
the city council, county commission commissioners,
ers, commissioners, the mayor, city commissioners',
city and county attorneys, representa representatives
tives representatives of practivaHy all civic organi organizations
zations organizations in the city and delegates from
Femandkta, Fart Myers, St. Augusj
tine and several other cities.
The centennial commission will be
presented with a concrete proposiaion.
This board will be shown that Jack Jacksonville
sonville Jacksonville and Duval can raise about
$1,000,000 without further legisla legislation.
tion. legislation. The site which has been se secured
cured secured will also be a factor. This
site contains nearly 800 acres and
stretches from the river across the
northern boundary of the city to the
state fair grounds. The ability to
handle the crowds as to railways,
steamship lines and street car track trackage
age trackage to the fair grounds will be laid
before the commission. The hotel
and boarding (house situation will be
presented by the delegation.
State Wants Jacksonville.
Not only will these facts be pre presented
sented presented to the commissiion in the imost
forceful manner, but the more im important
portant important fact that the entire state
wants Jacksonville selected will be
brought home to the five men who are
to decide the fate of the centennial.
This feature of Jacksonville's case
is expected to overshadow any claims
any other community may make for
the big show. K The fact that cities
"as far apart as Fernandina and Fort
Myers will have delegations present
hacking Jacksonville "fend the further
proof of the desires of the people of
Florida 63-will be shown by tha.hun-

1 1 areas ox telegrams rrom cities ana

towns all over the state will clinch
the argument for the Gateway citty.

X Failure to land the Bair does not
seem possible to those who are ac actively
tively actively engaged in carrying the fight
to the enemy. No stone will be left
jnturned to present the best case

ll 'possible for this city. The commit-

'"tfee named to formulate the concrete

i Wosal of this city will have all de-
I - : 1 Wnn Mw uuvial train

DLU3 til "Vi ..w J-

if m Vsv evenimsa.' Last evening the citi-

! 1 adopted resolutions pledging
A vee. to Jrupport any financial
. iVessary to put the big show

t is will aasure w comm-

A I e neonle of Jacksonville

1 IX jWd able to pay for the

ii -Ve ft i" awarded,

SENATE PLANNING TO

,11

WASHINGTON, Oct. 18 (United

Press.) Adjournment of Congress
November,, tenth provided action on
the Peace Treaty can be speeded up,
was considered by the House Senate
leadrs today. No agreement has
been reached, (however, owing to the

uncertainties with the treaty. . Tex

tual amendments to. the treaty prob

ably will be disposed of within an

other week. Then the fight for the
reservations starts. ' Democrative
leaders appear to . have resigned
themselves to the aceptance of res

ervation to the treaty.

TAFT SEES REACTION

FROM WAR MORALE

AMERICAN PEOPLE BACK
THE DOLDRUMS.

IN

Ascribes It to the Frailty of Human

Nature Coiiraged Word For
Weak.

BALTIMORE, Oct. 18. The moral
tone, the sacrificial spirit of all the
people, which was distinctly elevated

during the war, has suffered a reac

tion, declared former President Taft
:n his address as President of the

Unitarian General ... Conference

today, "and we arpsWafTI

WHERE OUR BRAVE-BOYS SLEEP IN BELLEAU WOOD

m. u.i i "' " ' n , "ir" mil t

How upon row of crosses in the American cemetery In iJelleau Wood, near Chateau Thierry, mute evidence of the
gallant IWes that were laid iliwn so that the worjd nilirli' ' a safe place In which to dwell.

PALMER OPPOSES

CHECK ON ALIENS

COMING INTO U.S

ATTORNEY GENERAL INSISTS
THAT NEW-COMERS SHALL
CULTIVATE THE RIGHT SPIRIT
AGITATION MUST BE ORDER ORDERLYWOULD
LYWOULD ORDERLYWOULD NO LONGER BE
LAND OF THE FREE IF DOORS
CLOSED.

EASTON, Penn., Oct! 18 Attor Attorney
ney Attorney General A. Mitchell Palmer, who
calme here to receive the degree of LL.

-J u. at Lalayette Uollege, piacd himself I. v,

on record as being opposed to restric-guch

SUGAR

CONTRO

L

SHOULD

REMAIN

ASAT PRESENT

WASHINGTON. Oct 18 (United
Press) It, the sugar supply goes
from under-the control of the govern governments
ments governments of the world a shortage is sure
to be felt and jbrices will be high, Di.
Alonzo Baylor told the senate com committee
mittee committee iriveatigiating the sugar situ situation
ation situation today. Dr. Taylor represented
the secretary of agriculture at the
hear.g. " " . The committe is consider considering
ing considering bill which could continue the

equalization . board for .one

old rwwm Af t

(toiu. where pro

gress to better things seems as slow
as it was before the war."

"Wie should not be discouraged,

however," Mr. Taft; added. "It is the

frailty of human nature. It is is to
be found in its inability to maintain
fcr long periods its adherence to the

highest idealK Real progress in the
world is through a course of action
and reaction, . This reaction will be

succeeded again by an onward and

upward movement and we shall find

the world better because of its sac

rifices and the lessons they taught.

We shall not make the same progress
that we hoped for, but we shall1 step
up and on. '
"It is the duty of all those whose
disappointment in the present stage
of affairs is great, to buckle on their
armor and to push toward better
things, to take their places in the
ranks of those who would stir the re religious
ligious religious spirit of the community and
who would preach as part of their
lives the fatherhood of God and the
brotherhood of man, and the willing willingness
ness willingness to sacrifice in order to promote
these great principles of Unitarian
Christianity. Let us hope that this
annual meeting wiU rouse the Uni Unitarians
tarians Unitarians of the country to a irededica-'
tion of themlselvea to the faith which
Gunning preached and to living the
life which Charming lived."
FRENCH HONOR WASHINGTON

Place Two Memorial Tablets In "In "In-'
' "In-' deendenee Room" at Versailles.

PARIS, Oct. 18. In the "Ameri "American
can "American Independence, Room" in the Ver Versailles
sailles Versailles palace two marble tables were
affixed today setting forth in Eng English
lish English and French George Washington's

everlasting glory as a patriotic citi citizen
zen citizen nd leder.
One of the tablets bears an inscrip inscription
tion inscription that the statute now there was
presented to France by the people of
Virginia as a mark of friendship and
esteem for the splendid and oppor opportune
tune opportune services rendered to Virginia and
the other States of the Union by
France in the Wlar of Independence.

items on immigration such as wer:

proposed

xwr. . ttowover,

immigration such as wen Godl ' " . . ires oi pour
in the Senate yesierda bl "LotfeTOK CARA VAN COMING." V j feting a
errhVuwT - r''"' I chn UeiBiion'htW'be6if bet1

GRAFT CHARGED

TO COURIERS 0

F

PEACE MEETINGS

SIX AMERICAN OFFICERS DE

TAINED IN PARIS FOR INQUI

RY EXPENSE ACCOUNTS UN

DER INVESTIGATION AND

GEMS FOUND IN MAIL POUCH

ES COURTS-MARTIAL MAY

RESULT FROM INVESTIGATION

PARJS, Oct. 18 Charges of whole'

sale graft by United States , Army
couriers working for the Ametican

peace delegation have 5rted .fcil.-te-

vesraganion wnicn map .teaa va a ser

ies of courts-martfor.

sisted thatrthose who seek .refuge

within our shores, shall come with
the right spirit and right purpose
and th". who remain shall stay with

inty,. j .become Americans in every

Americans who 'have close to their

hearts the preservation of our liber liberties
ties liberties under the forms fashinoned by
the wisdom of the fathers," he said,
"have felt much concern of late by
reason of the activities of certain
classes of aKens who have taken up
residence in 'this country. How' far
the alien agitator shall be permitted
to advance his menacing propaganda
among a people of whom he has made
himself a part, only to further his de designs
signs designs against our institutions and
laws, is one of the most serious ques questions
tions questions arising out of the unprecedented
war. ' . i i ; -
"Wte Wave been a hospitable peo

ple. In the beginning the strip of

ltand along the eastern coast, from
Massachusetts Ito Georgia, was peo peopled
pled peopled by courageous, freedom-loving
men and women who found here all
the real essentials of life which were
denied them across the seas. In la later
ter later times by reason of the open gen generosity
erosity generosity of the Government the al almost
most almost boundless stretches, of the West
were covered by tha homes of men
who became owners of 'the soil, a
couse and effect never dreamed of in
the Old World, where the land was
only for classes who had held it
throu.'sthe centuries. '
"Th Aew land owners thus found
therns' as important factors in the
life of Vjhe grreat republic under a plan
which was conscientiously designed

to make one great', homogeneous peo people
ple people oult of a population .gathered from

every corner of the globe. No regret

is anywhere expressed for this broad-

minded and faraiglHted policy. But
just to that degree that we have been
generously and unselfishly hospitable

we naturally resent the abuse of that

hospitality.

"We cannot back-track on the poli

cy hallowed by more than a century

of usefulness. Wte cannot be less
willing now than we have always been

that the oppressed of every clime
shall find here a refuge from disorder
and distress. But we can insist with

more emphasis than we have employ

ed heretofore that those who come to

our shores shell come in the right

spirfflt and with the right purpose;

that those who remain shall stay with

the intent to become Americans in

every sense.

"The ingenuity of man has made

YEAR ROUND GOLF CLUB.
St. AUGUSTINE, Oct 18. St. Au Augustine
gustine Augustine is to be supplied with a much
needed institution, an cp-to-date golf
club and course, which will be open
and serviceable to memBera the year
round. With this object in view the
Year Round Golf club hal been organ.

lied.

One Hundred Tourists Leave Chicago

Monday For Florida,

On Mondhy a big motorcade of

more than 100 tourists 'will leave Chi

cago for the trip south, entering Flor

ida ait Jacksonville and ending the

journey at Miami These people of
the modern caravan qggiU take plenty

of time to see the country, making
side trips to points of interest, and
will loaf leisurely into the land of
the summer sun.
The caravan will remain in Miami
for a stay of a week and then will
motor back to New Smyrna and take
the cross-state road there to Tampa
and other points in West Florida, get getting
ting getting away from the state by the way
of PenBacola.

FINS REJECT OVERTURES.

HELSISGFORS, Oct 18 (United
Press) The Finnish parliament re rejected
jected rejected yesterday a peace offer from
the Bolsheviki.

the Atlantic Ocean a mere ditch be between
tween between the continents. But it must al always
ways always be wide enough to permit the
immigrant .as he crosses it to rid
himself, once and for all of the mis misconception
conception misconception of government with which
the old cohditiors1 filled his mind. He
must realize that his revolution has
been fought and won when he sets his
foot on American soil. His time for
the use of force is then behind him;
his time for the use of intelligence has
come. Those who will not come here
in this psitiit, those who will not seek
to promptly learn what democracy
means, those who imagine that a gev gev-ernment
ernment gev-ernment of tk3rpeople is no different
from the rule of kings under a bogus
claim of divine right, should go back
to fight their battles where their foe
is real.
"Not all the disorder in the coun country
try country is created by. tha alien element,
but it is all created by an element
that is un-American. Real Ameri Americans
cans Americans understand that popplar igov igov-errmtent
errmtent igov-errmtent is organized self-restraint in
the common interest I would not
halt any movement designed to bring
batter conditions to any portion of
our, people, but I would use all the
power of the people's government to
make certain such a movement shall
te conducted in the peaceful1 and or orderly
derly orderly way provided by the people for
the.'aocampUalhment of all reform.
That method will avail; it may be

slower than force, but H will be safer

and Us result will be more enduring,

between 75

and 100 officers of lower rank.
Their work has been to carry pouch pouches
es pouches containing communications from
Paris to the various missions main maintained
tained maintained by Americans in scattered
parts of Europe. These trips took
them and are taking them from Paris
to Constantinople, to Vienna, to Bu Budapest,
dapest, Budapest, to Berlin, to Petrograd in
other words, to the capitals of Europe
and return. They enjoyed diplomat diplomatic
ic diplomatic privileges, and neither their pouch pouches
es pouches nor their baggage were subject to
search.
They were and are the only persons
making those tiips under such immu immunities.
nities. immunities. If the charges which have been
made are true these officers have been
abusing their privileges for the pur purpose
pose purpose of personal enrichment There
are stories of many thousand francs
made by cairtrying money under diplo diplo-rmtic
rmtic diplo-rmtic piotection during the time when
the vacillating exchange made this
easy for a man making trips.
Another charge has to do with large
quantities of salvarsan, said to have
been brought from Vienna and Berlin
to Paris and to have found its way to
America. Yet another story is that
these officers brought valuables end
jewelry out of Bolshevist infested
places to Paris. ,.' ,
: Fortunes in Diamonds. '
There is official record of more than
$1,000,000 worth of diamonds being
found in one diplomatic pouch.1 The
officer in charge eoid he had received
them in Budapest for transport, being
assured that the package contained
only papers. The diamonds have
been returned to the sender.
There are stories to the general ef effect
fect effect that officers made use of their
diplomatic privileges to reap rich re rewards
wards rewards for themselves in many wa.ys.
Around the Crillon Hotel it is said
that not only did these couriers make
use fo commercial opportunities which
their work offered, but it is also al alleged
leged alleged that some of their expense ac accounts
counts accounts will not bear the closest scru scrutiny.
tiny. scrutiny. Although on at least some of these
journeys no railroad fare was paid,
officers were allowed 7 cents per mile
for transportation expenses. It is al alleged
leged alleged that some of the accounts list
trips to places which were in addition

tt those actually made by the couriers
Some officers who acted as couriers
heve gone bock to the United States.
Others remain in Paris. Thus it may
be difficult to reach all the sources
of information. It is known that at
least six officers who would otherwise

NEW WHOLESALE

FIRM TO ENTER
PALATKA FIELD

H. M. de MONTMOLUN CO., CAP

ITALIZED AT $50,000 TO DO A
GENERAL HARDWARE AND
MACHINERY BUSINESS IS
PROOF OF PALATKA'S ADVAN ADVANTAGE
TAGE ADVANTAGE AS A DISTRIBUTING
POINT.
Papers of incorporation for the H.

M. de Montmollin Co. have been pre prepared,
pared, prepared, with a capital stock of $50,000
to engage in a general wholesale hard

ware end machinery business, with
Palatka as the distributing point.

With this corporation will be merg

ed the firm of H. M. de Montmollin,

an establishment, that has ben very
successful in Palatka in retail business.

The officers of the new firm will be

H. M. de Montmollin, president; Geo.
E. Ford, vice-president, and E. Rice,

treasurer.

The firm will enlarge the present

quarters occupied by Mr. de Mont

mollin and place travelling men on the

road to cover all territory adjacent
to Palatka and reached by river and
railroad traffic in a radius of a hun hundred
dred hundred miles.

The entry of this firm into the

wholesale distribution business here
is but another indication of the ad advantages
vantages advantages offered by Palatka as a dis distribution
tribution distribution center. It roves the at attractiveness
tractiveness attractiveness of conditions prevailing
for the successful and economical op

eration of a wholesale business.

A full line of hardware, machinery

and general farm supplies will be car-.

TO CALL BONDv ELECTION

School ' BoUnr -rass Kesului.

Vote for $4,000.

--rraeiv isoxp

Alt a special session of the school
board this morning a resolution was
passed favoring an election on No November
vember November 18 to issue $45,000 worth of
bonds for completing the work on the
new school buildings. The bonds will
bear five and a half per cent in ter ter-ent
ent ter-ent end run for a period of thirty thirty-five
five thirty-five years.

VEGETABLE MOVEMENT LIGHT.

Preparations For Heavy Citrus Fruit
Movement Being Made.
PLANT CITY, Oct 18. The fall
vegetable movement is light as usual,
but preparation is being made for a
heavy movement of citrus fruit As As-tivity
tivity As-tivity in and about the packing houses
is increasing, and by the time the
fruit is ready all houses will be in
first-class order for what is expected
to prove the busiest season in the his history
tory history of the industry here. A few
shipments of grapefruit and early
oranges have been made by express
the past few days, but there will be
no movement of note until after the
5th' of November, when the regula regulations
tions regulations as to acidity expire. There is
but littl early fruit here, but the or orange
ange orange crop generally is good, and is
expected to show a considerable in increase
crease increase in yield over last season-.

HAD TOO MUCH BOOZE.
WEST PALM BEACH, Oct. 18.
L. B. Thomas, manager of the West
Falm Beach Fisheries, pleaded guilty
in the county court yesterday to a'

charge of having liquor in his posses

sion end paid a fine of $500 and costs.
C. H, Nesle, Who was . arrested at the.
same time is out on $700 bail to ap appear
pear appear at this term of county court and
answer to a charge of transporting
liquor, the liquor in this case being
that which L. B. Thomas had in his
possession.

PRESIDENT UNCHANGED.
WASHINGTON, Oct 18. ( United
Press.) President Wilson had a good
night it was said at the White House
in advance of the regular statement
from Dr. Grayson.
A statement issued at eleven twen twenty
ty twenty o'clock stated there was no mate- '

rial change noted in his condition. No

new symptoms have developed it was

stated.

have been homo or on their way are
being detained in Paris as material
witnesses in the investigation now un under
der under way.' ' I - ,

i
F '

.,'

. ' VI-"
Mr - i,-
a ;

V

A



1
- -
PALATKA DAILY 'NEWS'.
PAGE NO. 2
SLICKER'S TEARS
GOOD FOR S41
SPECIALS
White Rio
and
Lures "Nice Little' Roll Right Out
of the Grave.
FOR

A

Ome

ga

Flour

This is the Flour the discriminating housewife
wants.. Quality is what counts.
Every Pound Sold With an Absolute
Guarantee. Demand it from
your Grocer.
Distributors for
Lee Puncture Proof
and Regular Tires
If you have never tried a Puncture Proof, do it now.
They save tire worries, hot weather changes
and constant care.

This firm's unblemished reputation for high-class service and fair dealing
behind every transaction with a retailer. We are growing, and will
continue to follow policies which contribute to this growth.
SERVICE COUNTS. WE GIVE IT.
Merry day Grocery

Company

BAD CHECK AND BOGUS DEATH

Habiliment of Mourning and .Trick

Tears Work onSympathy of Chica-1
go Undertakers-Cemetery Lot la Se- j
lected and Cheek for $141.06 la Of-1
fered In Payment of $100 Bill, the

Difference Being Mournful Gentle Gentleman'!
man'! Gentleman'! Profit 1
Around his arm he wore a sable rib-,
band. A shapely -tear, debouching from
the lachrymal duct, oscillated upon an
abutting eyelash as he crossed the
threshold at 1158 North Clark street,
Chieagb, to enter the dimly Illumined
Interior of the mortuary establishment
of D. M. CarrolL ,
Hastily laying aside the box score
final extra, Mr. Carroll arose, tendered
his hand, the while exerting a sympa sympathetic
thetic sympathetic pressure, and In modulated tone
asked :
"May I not offer you a chalrT"

The tear, doubtless obeying the law i
of gravitation, oscillated loose from !
the eyelash and splashed upon Mr. j
Carroll's outstretched hand, just as i
the visitor was preparing to release It I
and accept the proffered chair.

A Funeral la Planned.
"Sir," quavered the visitor, extract extracting
ing extracting a black silk handkerchief from his
black coat and pressing It to either
eye, "My mother has passed away
Mrs. Mary A. Baker. She died at Kan Kankakee.
kakee. Kankakee. I wish her buried In Chicago.
Could I place the case In your hands?"
"Yes, Indeed," murmured Mr. Car Carroll.
roll. Carroll. "Now, the body that will have to
be shipped here."
"Yes, I will assume, full charge,"
said Mr. Carroll. "The cemetery we
must choose a suitable place of Inter
ment. Have you a choice?'
"No, those details one does not
think of them." -
"Well, we will visit Mount Olivet"
There the visitor he was Dr. C. F.
Baker of 7124 Woodlawn avenue, he
said selected a lot gave the grave
digger a cigar and the management a
check for $141.06. The bill being but

$100, be received the change. $41.06,

and departed.
Something la Amiss.

That being last Saturday, a week,
id the body failing to arrive, Mr. Car-

telegraphed Kankakee. He learned
death certificate had been issued

which

TODAY

Best Hams Lb-39c
Picnic Hams Lb. 29c
Cheese, best cream Lb. 45c
Best Coffees Lb. 53c
Christal White Soap 8c
Light House Washing Powder 5c
Safe Home Matches 8c
Atlantic Matches 8c

Give Us Your Orders
Phones 35 and 36.
THE ECONOMY
GROCERY
The Store for Economy

In Economy and in Work Alone Lie the
Salvation of Great Britain
By LORD CUNLIFFE, Director of the Bank of England

The main thing to remember is that we must all work with a ?iew
to making good the wealth we have lost in the last five years.
Those who have been fighting naturally want some relaxation. After
the strain of war they want what is usually called a '"lark." I should be
the la-st man on earth to frown on that spirit. The soldier has well earned
his playtime. But we should never lose sight of the fact that that play playtime
time playtime cannot continue indefinitely.
Remember we have drawn on the future. To win the war the Brit British
ish British government had to pay for it. The government could do this only by
drawing upon the nation's credit.
This the government did by turning itself into the nation's banker,
and by issuing notes against the future. The government had no other
alternative. The issue has little to do with the increased cost of living.
Now that the war is won we have to look to the future. In economy
and in work alone lie our salvation, and unless we economize and work
we shall never again be in the same happy position as we were in 1913.

DISAPPEARING LAKE

Water in It Goea Away About Every
Three or Four Years,
In Georgia near Vlarosta, there is
a lake which disappears every three
or four years and then comes back
again, no matter what the weather is
like.
The lake Is three miles long and
three-quarters of a mile wide, with
an average depth of twelve feet of
water. There are natural subterra subterranean
nean subterranean passages beneath It, through
which the water passes off.
It taites two or three weeks to dis disappear,
appear, disappear, when a mammoth basin Is
left in Its place, which furnishes a
beautiful sandy beach. After a month
or so the water begins to return, and
then in a couple of weeks It Is the
same magnificent stretch of water
as it was before.

FOXES RAISED FOR MARKET

4...fr4. ...i. .. .i.4 44

Stop Paying
House Rent
Own your own home. We have arranged so you
can buy one with the same money that you
would pay for rent.
We have seven dandy bungalows, some
under construction, some finished, all for sale.
Located in Bungalow Park, splendid neighbors,
not too far out, paved streets and' all conveniences.

t

CASH PAYMENT OF $SOO:
REST LIKE RENT

Palatka Development 3
tt Company
i
. life . n

j; H. M. de MONTMOLLIN, President and Manager
i
XZ

Farmer on Island Near Alaska Has
"Herd" Worth $130,000.
Growth of a fox farm on Kukoi Is Island,
land, Island, off the coast of Alaska, from 20
animals to a band estimated to be
worth $130,000, has been described by
Claude Green, a former trapper, pros prospector
pector prospector and miner and now one of the
proprietors of the farm.
The animals are fed a cooked mash
of fish and grain. More than 600
foxes with an average market value of
$185 for each pelt have been raised,
according to Green.

Build 834 New Freight Cars a Day.

Eight hundred and thirty-four new

freigtit cars a day are being placed
In service by the railroad administra

tion, and every effort is being made to
relieve the shortage occasioned by the

movement of fall crops and reviving

business, according to Director General

Hines.

30,000 Germans to Leave for Mexico.

Thirty thousand emigrants are pre

paring to leave Germany for Mexico,
according to Arthur von Magnus, rep

resentative of the German govern

ment, who Is Investigating Mexican
labor conditions which would affect

these newcomers.
O

Sold Car and "Made Up" With Wife.
Because his wife testified that her
husband nsed his automobile for Joy
rides with other women, Wardner

Simpson of Milwaukee, Wis., was told

by the court to sell the car and

"make up" with his wife. He did.

Be Glad.

If you see a man or woman suc successful,
cessful, successful, be glad of it Don't waste

time belittling his success. Use your

fonje trying to equal it

his client had given as the nam 6f OX

deceased. The Mount Olivet manage management
ment management also learned the check was fic fictitious.
titious. fictitious. "But," soliloquized Mr. Carroll, "you
gotta hand it to that bird, at that.
Those trick tears alone are worth the
price of admission, but when, on top
of that, he even takes out the price of
that six cent flor de cabbago he tipped
the grave digger with, I'll tell the
world it's piling Ossa on Pelion in
slicker stuff."

WAR BRIDES ON STRIKE
Sixty Parisian Girla, Divorced, Have
Returned to French Homes.
Sixty Parisian girls have returned to
Prance as divorced wives of former
American soldiers. In addition to the
American way of living, which was dif different
ferent different from that to which they had
been accustomed, they found marked
change in their husbands in the new
home country. It seems the only thing
In the United States which struck them
as wholly aggreeable was the rapid
means of obtaining a divorce.
"I was bored," one girl said in ex

plaining the reason why she had freed
herself, "and I soon became the unhap unhap-piest
piest unhap-piest woman alive. New York Is a
big, sad city, with) no air, no horizon,

awful noise and plenty of dust."

MAN FLEW TO FUNERAL

Traveled 154 Miles in 80 Minutes After

He Had Missed Train.
Unable to make a train from Mar Marshall,
shall, Marshall, Tex., that would get him to St.

Louis, Mo., In time for the funeral of
his brother-in-law, Isaac Marcus hired
an areoplane and an aviator and flew
154 miles to Little Rock, Ark., where

he boarded a train for St. Louis, ar

riving before the services. The flight
was made in one hour and twenty

minutes.

Joyriding Husband Was Poor Sport

Lester Chapman of San Francisco
wasn't a good sport, his wife charges
in her divorce suit. Disguising her
voice she telephoned him, made an ap appointment
pointment appointment and, heavily veiled, went

Joyriding with him. When she un unveiled
veiled unveiled he couldn't see the Joke.

Hog Island Launched 47 Ships in Year.
A world's record for ship produc

tion was established at Hog Island for

the first year of operation. Forty-

seven cargo carriers, aggregating 367,

775 deadweight tons, were sent down

the ways during the year ending Au August
gust August 5.

Saved Life by Jumping Into Well.

Mrs. Abraham Makui, thirty-one

years old, of Amherst, O., saved her
life by jumping into an open well,

when her clothing became ignited, fol

lowing the explosion of kerosene,

which she bad nsed to start a fire.

mm... C 1 J - &

- i.'V

linil-nil'lun n.'''"'" COSt

Bread Rises in Auto on Jhe Way to
the Oven.
To mix a batch of bread six loaves

at her home in Greenwood town township,
ship, township, "raise" it by auto and bake It

in Ulnnmsburg, I'a., was the experience
of Mrs. John Lemon.
Incidentally it exhibits a new possi possibility
bility possibility of the motor car. A neighbor
and Mrs. James Bush of Bloomsburg
both wanted her to go to Bloomsburg.
"But I have my bread mixed and
raising," said the puzzled woman, who
also wanted to make the trip. "I can't

afford to lose It in these davg of the

of living,"" she asserted.

"Bring It along," was the answer,
"and bake it in Bloomsburg." That's
just what she did. She telephoned
Mrs. Rush to have her oven hot, and
the pan of dough was covered with a
clean white cloth and placed in the
front close to the engine as pos possible.
sible. possible. When they got to Bloomsburg
they found the sponge ready for the
oven. Mrs. Lemon declares it was no
"lemon," either, and she says she
never had better bread than this par particular
ticular particular batch.

Fresh chile con-come daily at John
Mallem's place. First street.

Isn't This Fair?
Ask your grocer for
HONEY BOY
(Self Rising)
or
COLONIAL
(Plain)
FLOUR
and if in your opinion this is not the best flour you
1 1 A.1 ' T .

nave ever useu we auinonze mm to return

money willingly.
Florida Grocery
Company
Sole Distributors

" We Sell Merchants Only"

73&

your ii Ml

mm . m

7 1 i

nit

.11 I I-V

II E II Ml

7 'U

Xr
ItBLai
fi



.1

. '
PA'LATK'A DAILY NEWS
PAGE NO. 3

i

Specials This Week

WESTERN MEATs

powerhouse 30c Pound
FLORIDA MEAT :
round or n j
porterhouse 25c round
Fresh shipment of all kinds of Heinz Pickles.
PHONJE 433
We Specialize on Service 2

DIXIE MEAT MARKET

4

STAND ON PEACE PACT

SAY

RESOLUTION OFFERED
HAS NO BACKBONE

Episcopalian will Hav Lively Fight
Charge of Muxzling Free
Speech

A " Deputiei

DETROIT, Mich., Oct .18. De Determined
termined Determined that the triennial general
convention of the Protestant Episco Episcopal
pal Episcopal Church shall take a definite
stand on the League of Nations is issue,
sue, issue, the Southern delegations are
marshalling their forces against the
the resolution adopted by the House

of BishoDS that the United States

enter into "a covenant of nations."
Dr. G. Gordon Smeade, of Jackson,
Miss., characterizing the resolution
which was fathered by Bishop Brew Brewster
ster Brewster of Connecticut, as "spineless,

colorless, and meaningless," declared

today that he would wage a fight to

prevent its adoption in the House of
Deputies. With him are aligned the

Southern delegations, almost solid,

he stated. Dr. Smead has before the

House of Deputies a resolution en endorsing
dorsing endorsing the Ltague of Nations cove cove-nant
nant cove-nant in its present form.

Ostensibly to prevent delay in

legislative action of the House of

Deputies because of the heavy pro-

, iorcy-si

in connection with the visit here of
James Moore Hickson, Church of

England exponent of apostolic heal

ing of disease by ('laying on of

hands."

NEW RADIO CONTROL POLICY

LA LIBRE BELGIQUE

Station to Be Opened to General

PpubliCj Correspondence

WASHINGTON, Oct. 18. A new

policy for control and development

before Congress today by Secretary

Daniels.

It provides for the maintenance of
both naval and private stations, with
the latter under control of a national
radio commission, and proposes toj
open existing tations to general pub public
lic public correspondence at rates to be fix fixed
ed fixed by the Navy Department and Con Congress.
gress. Congress. General public transoceanic
correspondence through naval sta stations
tions stations would not be permitted, how however,
ever, however, except during temporary sus suspension
pension suspension of private service.
Private radio stations would be li licensed
censed licensed by the national radio com commission,
mission, commission, and their corporate affairs,
"apparatus," operators, and trans transition
ition transition rates would be under super super-vison
vison super-vison of he commission, which would

be composed of four members and a

secretary appointed by the President,
with representatives from the Navy,
War, Commerce, and Post Office De

partments. The Secretary would be

an active line officer of the Navy. )

Under. ' Vot bill, aliens or al-

B Don E. Chamberlain.
(United Press Staff Correspondent)
' NEW "YORK, Octl 18. How the

famous mystery .paper of. occupied

Belgium La Libre Belgique (Free

Belgium) deled the German Gov

ernment and told the truth of the

war right under, the nose of the Ger German
man German officials in Belgium, , was told

here today by Pierre Goemaers, one

of its staff of reporters. ' .

Goemaere, who is only 25, ifc-

companfing the Belgium rulers on
their tour of the United States, and

today for the first time he told the
United Press some of its history.

Gomaere, who acted as one of the
twelve contributors bf the famous
newspaper, has written a book on his
ekneciences which is shortly to" be

published. - V

"The Libre Belgique was founded

at the beginning of 1915 by .the ayed
Brussels journalst Victor- Jourdain,
who gathered around him several
devoted collaborators' said Goe-

maere. "Toeether this group of

friends wrote thearticles for the pa

per. To do this they etired with
their chief to a secret chamber,

where an electric bell had been ' in

stalled to warn them of danger.

While waiting to send articles to the

printer, the . wriers hd the ejnu

scripts in the pipes of the radiators.
"The day on which the paper had

to be printed saw' the manuscripts
transferred to the hollow interior of

several walking sticks, and thus were

they transported through the streets.

. "Where was the paper printed? is

a 'question often asked. The Libre
Belgiqque had no less than sixteen
printers (they were al thrown in jail

one after another, so it can be im

agined that the place of publication

changed often. The Germans believ

ed the printing place was in an auto

mobile, but'the Libre Belgiqque was

often printed in the cellar of aban

doned houses or in secret under

ground spot.

"If the work of printing was dan dangerous
gerous dangerous there was another part of the
task of publication even more peril perilous
ous perilous that of distribution. Here is
how managers generally proceeded :
"When the paper had been printed
lfty thousand were run off at a
time they were carried to certain
places known to the men in charge
of distribution. To enter these plac places
es places pass words were required, such as
"For the King," "Praise God,"

"Princess Marie Jose," or "Long

Germans. 'He will return for lunch,
answered the woman. 'We will wait
here,' the detectives said. 'Do not
leave the place.' Then they hid in

the store.

"But the woman had made an

agreement with her husband that if
the Germans ever arrived durng his
absence she would place on the door

the sign: 'Closed.' Without losing

any of her nerve she said to the Ger Germans,
mans, Germans, 'I had better put this sign on
the door, to keep away customers

who may come in and annoy you by
their presence.' The detectives con conferred
ferred conferred and decided it was a splendid

idea. 'But o not budge yourself,'
they said, 'We will put up the sign
ourselves.' And so they did.

"Wren noon came the husband ap

proached his store and seeing the
sign walked nonchalantly down the
street, and was saved.

One day the Germans made a tre

mendous ecort to capture the collab

orators of the Libre Belgique. One

hundred and twenty-two persons

were thrown into prison. Everything

had been disnvoMd. The secret of

fice had bee Ant Anting
ing Anting house an papier.""

"That night the German governor

gave a banquet to celebrate the
death of La Libre Belgique. At des dessert,
sert, dessert, the governor thanked every

body who had anything to do with
the discovery of the paper and its
editor. Then raising his glass, he
said, 'I drink to the end of our night nightmare
mare nightmare and the death of the Libre Bel

gique.'

''But at that moment a German
officer came in and threw a paper on
the festive board. The governor,
consternated, beheld a new issue of
La Libre Belgique, in which appear appeared
ed appeared a photograph of all the detectives
who believed they had discovered the
editors and plant.
"The legend was: 'These men
think they hrve killed La Libre Bel Belgique.
gique. Belgique. As they see, it still exisw
However, ' vhey must not dispair, and

to stimulate tneir zeal, we ocer a
prize of 100,000 marks to anyone of
their number who will come to visit

us in our omce.' "

Add

Style

Quality
Low Price

Bargain

.
4

iuLf
A 4 1
( d n
I Tv 1
vv vL
iU
V
sA,
Sw

9 inch KID BOOT. 1 in. tip,
welt sole, full of snap and
style. Real value $12.50,

OTHERS JUST AS GOOD. SEE THEM.

$10

J. H. HICKENLOOPER

208 LEMON STREET

PHONE SO

Vrani yeifuniSVicliett;'' kpropo',Oi3BnTeB-interet8 could nuV odiaut

there be no debate on trie league oi
Nations was made and approved to

day, 307 to 1U
Presentation of further resolu resolutions,
tions, resolutions, howevor, will be permitted.
Dr. Smeade declared that this ac action
tion action "establishes a dangerous pre-i

cedent in muzzling freedom of
speech" and said the League issue
is above politics "the greatest issue

before the world today, the greatest
document that ever emanated from
the mind of man."
The Board of Missions today asked
the convention to authorize a cam campaign
paign campaign among the church membership
fnr nled?es to finance the church

work extension program, to cost an
undetermined amount that probably
will reach $100,000,000. Considera Consideration
tion Consideration of the detail of the program is
expected to occupy the attention of
the convention several days.
The House of Deputies today au

thorized the appointment of a com

mission to consider fuller recognition

by the Church of "the ministry of

healing an dthe need of its revival,

es from the commission, and all of- i.After tnus obtaining their sup sup-ficers
ficers sup-ficers and directors of private radio the digtributor went about the

companies wouiu navo 10 uB Am.- even more perilous task of giving

"THE NAUGHTY WIFE"

i-3" m IL I '

A small audience witnessed the
presentation of "The Naughty
Wife," aSelwyn production, at The
Arcade last night, despite the rainy

weather. It was an enjoyable enter

tainment, presented by a company

well balanced, but not of particular
brilliance.

The dialogue was clever and kept
those present amused throughout.
Hilary Farrington is a novelist.
When he suddenly discovers hat his

wife has ceased loving him and is
about to elopt with another man he
sets about, in a rather uncommon
and decidedly polite manner to make
things extremely comfortable for

both. This, of course, in the truest
sense of the word. He does not by
any means, proceed to make wifey
see the folly of her way and explain
to her that his work has kept him
from showering all attentions upon
her.
On the contrary, he proceeds in a
most charming manner to suggest all
sorts of nice things for the pre-ar

ranged elopement In fact, he goes

so far as to even suggest that they
give up thir intended journey to

California. The long, tedious train
ride would, in a great measure, erase

all elements of romance from their
journey. He suggests and finally
persuades them to journey in a
motor to his country bungalow and
spend their proposed honeymoon
there, just as he did almost a year
before.
The eloping wife lnds she does not
love the other man, ' a realization
brought about by jealousy, and the
piece ends with all happy.

ST. JAMES METHODIST CHURCH.

Sunday services at St James will
be as follows:
Sunday school at 10:15 a. m., Ed.
M. Earnest, Superintendent. "Friend "Friendship"
ship" "Friendship" class the young men's class class-will
will class-will meet in Tilghman Hall and elect
officers and a teacher for the current
year.
Divine worship at 11:30 a. m. and
8 p. m. Subject for the evening
hour: The Anarchist
The Epworth League will meet at
1:30 p. m. in Tilghman Hall to ar arrange
range arrange their work for the season.
The old former officers and members
are requested to be present on time.
Mid-week service on Wednesday at
8 p. m.
HOWARD DUTILL, Pastor.

Much Cut Up!

One day recently a dilapidated, apa

thetic man entered the office of the
Syracuse Medical college and offered

to sell his body cheap, adding that heW
was out of work and almost dlscoury
aged. "You're almost discouraged, air

you?" rejoined the superintendent.

always tried to change the det

tlon of these unfortunates.

man, If you sold your body t

first chance our students- f

lane me neart ouc ui yuu
Cartoons Magazine.

can citizens. A majority of stock of them tQ the people, To give an idea
each of such companies also would of audacity 0f these distributors
have to be held by Americans -t . ,, t Tem&T that one man in

variably found a way of placing a

SERVICES AT THE FIRST '.P- Copy of the paper on the desk of the

TIST CHURCH AS FOLLOWS:

10:15 A. M. Sunday School meets,
H. M. Fearnside suerintendent, E. H.

Collier assistant.

11:30 A. M. Preaching, The Road

church t0 Greatness.

7:15 P. M. Meeting of the B. Y. P.
U. Mrs. E. H. Collier presiding.

8:15 p. m. Sermon, A Business Talk

tc Young Men and Boys.

Wednesday prayer meeting 8:15 p,

m. Devotional and Bible study.

A cordial invitation is extended to

all to attend these services.
J. F. SAVELL, Pastor.

! J lilt H ! I H ! i H H H : ! I: ! ! ! 1 1 ! I H !

Opened For Business

.

BUICK Service Station and Sales Room, Corner
Tenth and Lemon, opened for business on Mon Monday,
day, Monday, October 13, 1919, with NEW BUICKS on the floor.
First class mechanics, and men to wash and grease cars.
Bring your cars to us and we will take care of your
wants. .
, We have come to your city to stay and will ap appreciate
preciate appreciate your business. We are sure that we can
please you.
This will be the only authorized Buick Service
Station in Putnam County after the above date.

J R. FOWLER
BUICK DEALER

.

German military governor of Brus-

sells, who raged and fumed, but

never found the guilty one. The
distributor learned that at a certain

hour each day the Governor went in into
to into a room adjoining his to dictate

letters. He chose this hour to enter

Wirnnch a window. After several

times, Germanu detectives were But

on the job, but they never succeeded

in catching this man.

The Germans were highly en

raged. Their pride could not sup

port the thought of thus being mock

ed. But the more the lion roared the
more the mouse tickled. Street urch urchins
ins urchins took great deliyht in pinning the

secret paper to the backs of dandy

German omcers.

"When the Libre Belgique had

reached its first anniversary a hu

morous cartoon was published under

the title "The Woe of Lofe." It
showed the German governor seated

in an arm chair, with an air of des

olation. Before him wer ethe records

of all the searches which had been

made to discover the publishers of

La Libre Belgique, also the bills paid
to detectves. Above the governor's
head was the indication of his dream:

an automobile rushing about in a
cloud, with the poor official wringing
his hands and crying: 'For a year

now I have searched for thee night
and day, O beloved, but always thou
hast escaped me.'

"Another time the Libre Belgique

published the portrait the gov

ernor, and under it these words:

'O'ur dear governor has done us the
honor of sending his autographed

photographe, and we thank him
heartily.' The alleged autograph was

as follows: 'I thank you sincerely

for all the compliments you have not
ceased to shower on me, but I ask

you please to treat the animals with
gentleness.'

"I regret not to be able to recount

all the ruses employed by the cour courageous
ageous courageous collaborators of La' Libre

Belgique in the moment when they
were on the verge of ruin through
discovery But I can tell one of the

thousands." One day tne uerman ae ae-tectives
tectives ae-tectives learned that one of the re

porters for the paper lived in a paper
store and, with revolvers in hand,
they burst nto the place. The man's

wife was behind the counter. 'Where

ANNOUNCEMENT

We beg to announce that we have opened our funeral
parlors for business at No. 117 N. Second street and offer
to the people of Palatka and Putnam County unexcelled
service. We have engaged the services of a graduate
embalmer, supply auto hearse service and will make a
specialty of out-of-town orders

THE

NO. 117 N. SECOND ST

11" U

PHONE NO. 64 II V j '

We are pninsiahhuj and careful in
all the tender of service and supply
all necessary equipment for such

service

0YERSTREET

COMPANY

FUNERAL DIRECTORS
PALATKA - - FLORIDA

it
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your nusDana," aemanaea ww
-

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PAG&NO. 4.

PALATKA DAlly NEWS

yalatlm Daily Stems

Published Every Afternoon Except Sunday, at Palatka,
Florida, by
VickersA Guerry.

M. M. Vickers Business Manager.
Goode M. Guerry Editor.
Miss Nellie Lucas . Society Editor.

The management reserves the right to reject all ob objectionable
jectionable objectionable advertising. Rates for advertising space
made known on application.

Subscription prices in advance
One year $5.00 One month 60c
Six months $2.50 One week. . 15c

Telephone 195

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 18, 1919.

.ANNOUNCEMENT.
During the coming week solicitators willil call at ev every
ery every home in Palatka, and every place of business, so soliciting
liciting soliciting subscriptions for the paper. - In the meantime
the paper will continue to be delivered to everyhome with without
out without charge.
Rates of subscriptions will be found on another page.
7 he subscription nil be in advance, or collected weekly.
Wherever a subscriber wishes to take advantage of the
viy low rate offered by the bearer by the month, pay payment
ment payment should be made advance, else the regular subscrip subscription
tion subscription pric o4 fifteen cents per week will be chargd.
The News believes that it has sufficiently indicated
what kind of a paper it will' be to warrant generous pa patronage.
tronage. patronage. The publishers promise that many improve improvements
ments improvements are to be made,-and that additional facilities for

handling will be added just as fast as possible. Scar
city of labor at present has caused delay, in several in

stances, of delivery, but these troubles will soon be

smoothed out. ,

specters in the field service. There is time nough for
the amendment will not go into effect until next Janu January.
ary. January. And Mr. Wilson is an old friend of civil service re reform.

THE PRINTED WORD.

Advertising is one of the greatest forces in the world. OPENING. OF SCHOOLS HELPS

HEALTH CRUSADE JS
ALREADY SUCCESSFUL

WHAT WE MUST PAY FOR.

Secretary Glass issued a statement recently which

few people took the time to digest. It is pertinent in

the light of recent developments.

This statement shows that the expenditures of the

government from the beginning of the war to June 30,

1919, were something moire than thirty-two billion dol

lars,' of wHitah twenty-nine per cent, was raised by taxes
and the balance by borrowing. But not all the war taxes
levied in the last fiscal year had been paid, so when the
accounts are finally cast up it will probably be found

that nearly one third the war cost was met by .taxation,

Probably that is the practicable limit, though at he be beginning
ginning beginning of the war a good many theorists saw no diffi

culty in raising half, or more, of the war costs by taxa

tion. It is doubtful that as much as one-third of the

cost of a four-year struggle, with our scale of expendi expenditure,
ture, expenditure, could profitably be raised by taxation.
The amount borrowed in the period was twenty-three
billion dollars, but a considerable part of that was mere
fiat a book credit obtained by inflation of bank credits.
. C. Miller, of the Federal Reserve Board, has said that
e amount of eovernment naDer carried hv the banks in

way or another and. representing inflation of Jcredit

t be as, murfh. as seven tw' . ' ; f

Advertising has accomplished purposes which no other

agency has been capable of doing. ' (
The printed word reaches farther, is more effective
and brings things to pass more quickly and satisfactory
in 'almost every instance than the spoken jressage.
It is said that the great Liberty loan and various
other war work drive were brought to a satisfactory
conclusion through the printed message in the newspa newspapers
pers newspapers of the country. You will also agree that it is the
only agency that could have accomplished so great a task
in so short a period of time. v
Think of the many millions of dollars that have been

passed along to the aid of Uncle Sam and his great caus

in behalf of humanity. Newspaper advertising played

an important part in every drive; in fact, it may be safe

to say that the newspapers were potent factors in each

and every undertaking looking toward the comfort and
maintenance of our camps and cantonments in this coun country.
try. country. ..

We are aware that there are numberless avenues
I hrough which the public can be reached billboards,
stret .cars, dead walls, perambulators circulars, souve souvenirs,
nirs, souvenirs, and what not, but in the opinion of the merchant
princes of the world these and all secondary to newspaper
advertising. ,
There are. many men in business who do not take

newspaper advertising seriously, to the extent of not em employing
ploying employing it in promoting their enterprises.
Our memory fails to record the great number of bus

iness enterprises which have passed out of existence dur during
ing during th past twenty-five years and whose presence in the

commercial field was little known by the public at large,
consequently their passage into the discard was of little
incment beyond their limited sphere of inactivity. They

did not believe in advetising.

' Carefully selected words of prsuasion or argument
could not induce these men to employ newspaper adver

tising. All they could see was the expense of advr advr-ti!sing.
ti!sing. advr-ti!sing. They could not get the result viewpoint no mat matter
ter matter how one would point out example after example, using

the names of well-known business men who were forging

ahead and actually creating business through their ad advertising
vertising advertising efforts. .
Somebody asked an old Missouri storekeeper why he
didn't put a smalj advertisement in the local newspaper
to advertise a "home blend" of coffee that was particu particularly
larly particularly good. "I don't wana,' he replid lazily. "If, I did,
xolks would pester me all the time to show 'em my goods."
Thus did the old Missouri' storekeeper pay unconscious tri

bute to the business-getting value of advertising.

If a merchant or manufacturer could gather 5,000

or 10,000 or 25,000 prospective buyers into a large audi auditorium
torium auditorium and talk to them daily by word of mouth he

wouild.have no need for advertisements; but he cannot,

so he puts his words in type and talks to these same

prospective buyers each day in the printed messages ;
that you know a advertisements. I '

The newsnaner is alwavs a newer in Jits community. U

i fi . i S L 'it-i , i i. r

eiwrer iot gooa or evil; ana me say riani nere w. me

SPREAD THE DOCTRINE.
Many Counties Already Enlisted in
Work to Bring Health Security
to Individual.
JACKSONVILLE, Oct. 18. (Spe (Special)
cial) (Special) With the opening of the schools
of Florida renewed activities are mak making
ing making the Modern Health Crusaders' in
this state and much interest ia all
ready aroused in the movement.
The Modern Health Crusade has

proved a wonderful factor for good in
many states, and in Florida the fol following
lowing following counties have already been or organized:
ganized: organized: Duval, Hillsborough, Osce Osceola,
ola, Osceola, Dade, Palm Beach, Broward, Vo

lusia, OrangeEscambia, Santa Rosa,

Walton, Gadsden, Leon and Jefferson.
W, I. Williams, Director for the
Modern Hearth Crusade for Florida,
is traveling over the State enlisting
the activities of the various elements,
especially giving his attention to the

work in the schools. The work in
Florida is under the auspices of the
Florida Anti-Tuberculosis Associa Association.
tion. Association. The Modern Health Crusade is bas based
ed based on the performance of eleven
chores to be done each day for fif fifteen
teen fifteen consecutive weeks. With the
completion of seventy-five per cent,
of the chores each week the entrant
becomes a Knight Bannret, and , the
lesser titles are classed according to
t! e number of chores done.
Score cards are provided for the
checking of the record and the per performance
formance performance of each day is thus proper properly
ly properly recorded. The health chores
which Florida children will be re requested
quested requested to perform each day are com comprised
prised comprised in the following:
1. I washed my hands before each
meal today.

2. I washed not only my face by

ears and neck and cleaned my finger
nails today. -.

8. I tried to keep fingers, pencil

and every thing that might be un unclean
clean unclean out of my mouth and nose to-

.day.

4. I drank a glass of water before

(each rtfal and before going to bed,

EAST COAST HOTELS
EXPECT M SEASON
WILL OPEN EARLIER AND CLOSE
LATER THIS SEASON.

Managers of AH Big Hostelries Re Report
port Report Unprecidented Bookings .
All Roads Lead to Florida.

One of the strongest indications
that the approaching winter season
will be a prosperous one is shown in
the announcement made recently of
the opening and closing dates for the
big hotels of the East Coast system.
The 'hotels will open earlier and re

main open longer than' usual this

season, showing that the company is
anticipating a longer and busier sea

son than usual.

Reports from all parts of the state

are that there are more people in

Florida now than ever before at this
time of the year, many winter visit visitors
ors visitors having come down earlier and with
the plan of staying later in the spring
Trains from the east, north and west
coming to Florida are crowded now
and it is expected the winter schedule
of trains will be established earlier
this year by the Florida East Coast
railroad.
The announced opening and 'clos 'closing
ing 'closing dates for the big East Coast ho hotels
tels hotels are as follows:
Alcazar, St. Augustine, opens Dec.
15th; closing date not announced.
Ponce de Leon, St. Augustine, opens
Jan. 6th; closing date not set.
Hotel Ormond, Ormond, opens Jan.
7th; closes April 5th.
Royal1 Poincianna, Palm Beach,
opens Jan. 15th; closes March 25th.
Hotel Breakers, Palm Beach, opens
Dec. 22nd; closes April 5th.
Royal Palm, Miami, opens Jan. 1st;
closes April 1st.
Long - Key Fishing Camp, opens
Jen. 1st; closes April 12th.

As it Happens, seven Diuion dollars is aoout tne am

ount of war taxes paid in the period reviewed by Secre Secretary
tary Secretary Glass or a sum about equal to the probable infla inflation
tion inflation of credit. This inflation undoubtedly imposed a tax
on consumption by raising the prices of commodities. The
nation needed more credit than its savings amounted to
and resorted to an overdraft that reached adversely on
cost of living imposed a heavy tax on consumers, in short
or of the inflation, is more important for the mass of the
people than the proportion between the sums raised by
taxation and by borrowing; in other words, that lower
taxes and no inflation would, in the long run, have made
the war actually less costly to the mass of the people.
And it is most likely that decidedly higher taxes would,
by the burden imposed on production, have made the war
actually more costly to the mass of the people.

' CIVIL SERVICE REFORM."
Every time congress gets a little anxious to do some something
thing something that sounds like business, aside from bickering

for political prestige, it drags out the old straw man,
civil service. In their national platforms both parties
profess a virtuous attachment to the merit system. In
1916 the Republican national platform insisted, with ev-

erv anpearance of solemn earnestness, that the civil ser

vir ft law "be thoroughly and honestly enforced." The

Democratic national platform, with an equal air of sol

emn earnestness, highly resolved "for the rigid enforce

ment of the civil service law."
The War Prohibition bill exempts from the civil ser.

vice law and rules "persons authorized to issue per

mits "and agents and inspectors in the "field service.
To enforce the prohibition amendment will require a
large number of officers. The bill itself appropriates
3,500,000, enough for some thousands of jobs; and there
will be no lack of disposition in future Congresses to
irake fatter appropriations and provide more places for
the spoilsmen. Here os a new region where the old, dis discredited,
credited, discredited, corrupt system of patronage may grow up
again.
Those who are familiar with the workings of prohi prohibition
bition prohibition laws in certain States years ago know what pick pickings
ings pickings for dishonest finders, what rich potentialities of
blackmail, prohibition offers to the men immediately
charged with its enforcement. In Massachusetts, for in instance,
stance, instance, in the '70's, a State constable would tap at the
door of a saloon. The saloon keeper would go out, grease
that itching palm, and continue in business, undisturb undisturbed
ed undisturbed and unafraid. What a system of bribes and black

mail, regular and irregular, must grow up if in forty-eight

States and enforcement of the prohibition amendment
is put into the hands of political appointees, mere hench henchmen!
men! henchmen! Prohibition and patronage would be a combina combination
tion combination to yield big dividends to corruption. Leaving cor corruption
ruption corruption out of the consideration, what does this exemp exemption
tion exemption mean save a premium an incompetency, sheltered
by "influence"?
Both Democrats and Republicans have synically re repudiated
pudiated repudiated their own platforms on civil service reform.
The National Civil Service Reform League, ever vigi vigilant,
lant, vigilant, as it has to be, has asked the President to veto the
War Prohibition bill on the ground of this exemption.
The bill is an impudent and gross attempt to revive in intolerable
tolerable intolerable abuses. The Federal Civil Service Commis Commission
sion Commission is ready provide from its eligible lists honest and
competent men to issue permits and to be agents or in-

try today, the tendency is toward the uplift of humani humanity.
ty. humanity. There are a few newspapers here and there that

continue to show th yellow, streak more or less distinct

ly, but thy are gradually pasing along the road that leads

to oblivion. ,

Weather experts are predicting a cool wave after the

present showers are over. Thn w can bgin to stir in a

littl more pep.

Old time residents of Palatka are marvelling at the
number of strange faces they see on the street now. One
native said that four years ago he could stand on a cor corner
ner corner and tell the name and history of every person pass passing.
ing. passing. Now, he says, he doesn't know twenty percent, of
them.

New York magazines . have resorted to the use of
plates made from photographs of manuscript pages, as a
result of the typographical strike. This may be the
starting of a new departure in the printing business.

Hollister is to have a fair on November 15. This
will be a great opportunity for some conservative citizens
to see just what Putnam county can produce.

The school board has done its part. Now it is up to
the voters to pass the bond issue and provide the new
school buildings with equipment.

No strike here. No trouble of any kind. Every Everybody
body Everybody happy and looking for big things for Florida.

Put on your old suit of optimism and boost.

With rain promised in the next twenty-four hours
we may expect relief from the unseasonable weather.

The Reds might as we! make their national colors
blue now.

If every state in the union acts like Florida about
the leper colony what will become of the poor unfortu unfortunates.
nates. unfortunates. California has provided two refugees from these
people. Can Florida do less than take care of one','
Under government control there is no danger of infec infection,
tion, infection, scientists say.

nq draiiKTio tea, coffee nor ol

jurious drinks today.
5. I brushed my teeth thoroughly
in the morning and in the evening to

day.

6. I played outdoors or with win window
dow window open more than thirty minutes
today.
7. I took ten or more slow deep
breaths of fresh air today.
8. I was ,in bed ten hours or more
lest night and kept my window open.
9. I tried today to sit up and
stand up straifht, to eat slowly, and
to attend to toilet and each need of
my body at its regular time.
10. I tried today to keep neat and

SUWANNEE FAIR TO OPEN
LIVE OAK, Oct 18. With the ex

hibits and attractions seldom equall equalled
ed equalled and never surpassed in the section,
the Suwannee county fair will throw
open its gates on the morning of No November
vember November 11 fully prepared to interest
end entertain the thousands who will
attend the seventh annual fair dur during
ing during the five days. ,, '

00 . '..MTPlJ

SandsBros.
Dealers, Coo tractors and
ELECTRICAL
ENGINEERS "

HI

a Electrical Repair Work Iron
Anywhere lo State.
GASOLINE ENGINES, LAINCH
AND Al'TO Sl'PfLIES.

MARINi
Palatka

HARDWARE
' Florida

Machine Shop
THE MOST COMPLETE AND
BEST EQUIPPED IN THIS
SECTION.
We make . all kinds of Brass Cast Castings
ings Castings and Bearings. Perfect
workmanship, reasonable
prices.

AUTO ACCESSORIES
BATTERIES

LAMPS

Insyde Tires
C. A. AMES

Howell Building

Lemon Street

Have Yon Got
BATTERY
TROUBLES?
We carry a full line of
PREST-O-LITE
BATTERIES
In sizes for every car.
FREE INSPECTION AND DISTILLED
WATER SUPPLIED.
Alljkinds of repairing on batteries,
generators and magnetos.
PUTNAM ELECTRIC
" GARAGE
tin Howell Hotel Building.

SIX NEW BUNGALOWS

The Palatka Development Co. hopes
to complete within the next ten days
six bungalows, several of which ara
ulready spoken for.

cheerful constantly and to be helpful
to others.
11. I took a full bath on each day
of the week that is checked.
Funds are necessary to carry on
such great and important work and
it should be remembered that this
great figtht, like the fight against tu tuberculosis
berculosis tuberculosis derives its funds from the
sale of Red Cross Christmas Seals.

All Fruits in Season
LARGEST SUPPLY OF CIGARS, CIGARETTES AND
TOBACCO. FRESHEST CANDIES, CRACKERS
AND DELICACIES.
Cold Drinks of All Kinds
SWEET MILK FRESH DAILY
BLUE JACKET FRUIT STORE'
Corner Lemon end Second Street B. GORA1LB, Prorrietor

Growers of citrus fruit who are shipping green fruit
to market are dealing more blows at the fruit produced
in Florida. Grapefruit on sale in Palatka now is not
f.t for a hog to eat.

Wjith Florida oranges soon on the market why should
we worry at the scarcity of sugar?

Leesburg friends of Goode M. Guerry have received
the first few issues of his new daily paper, the Palatka
Daily News, and it is a splendid newspaper, carrying
United Press dispatches and made up in such attractive
style that one is bound to become interested at a glance.
If the advertisers will continue to patronize the News as
liberally as Guerry will lavish talent upon the editorial
part of the paper, it will be a splendid success. Lees Leesburg
burg Leesburg Commercial .. . . j

SPECIAL
HASTINGS Pure Pork
SAUSAGE First this season
HASTINGS milk-fed VEAL
When you think of good Eats, think of Cannon's.
Dependable Goods
Lowest Prices
Modern Service
TH05. CANNON
Phone Two-Seven

.f

" SEEDS THAT SATISFY ."-
FRESH GARDEN SEED
Plant It Now
PRATT'S
BABY CHICK FOOD
end
Poultry Remedies
For Quick Service, Phone or See

THE SEEDSMEN
Phone 2 10. 117 Lemon St..
PALATKA, FLA.
THE NEW SEED STORE

LOST On road between Daytona
and Palatka a grip and big box con containing
taining containing wearing apparel. Finder
please notify O. C. Simmons, Micano Micano-py
py Micano-py or Miami, Fla. Will pay for trou trouble.
ble. trouble. 10-17-3t

WANTED Messenger at Western
Union $30.00 per month to boy with.
Bicycle. No objection to good col colored
ored colored boy. Must be above school
ee. tf

WANTED To buy crop on th th-trees
trees th-trees from small orange grove. See
Florida Grocery Co. 10-11-tf

PROFESSIONAL CARD.
DR. E. W. WARREN. :
Res. "Phone 37 Office 'Phone 7t

New 8erw Feetener.
An Australian inventor has patented
a screw fastener for wool bale band'
that enables the bales to be made tight
and permits the use of narrow bands, bands,-thereby
thereby bands,-thereby saving steel.

Orioles.
As for myself I am turned contrac contractor
tor contractor of hammock netting for the orioles
taking my pay In ' notes. I throw
strings out of the window and they
snap them up at once. They sit In
the cherry trees hard by and war warble,
ble, warble, 'Hurry up! hurry up!" I never
found out before Just what they said.
But If you wfll listen you will fin
that this is what they first say. A vol vol-arlsm.
arlsm. vol-arlsm. I admit but native.-LowelL

)

V.
J'



- PAGE NO. 5.
NOTICE OF INTENTION TO AP-
PLY FOR LETTERS PATENT

PALATKA DAILY NEWS

II

TO CAPITAL IS SURE
TALLAHASSEE, Oct 18 (Spe (Spe-ite)
ite) (Spe-ite) The state road department has
received advices announcing that the
Suwannee county $700,000 bond issue
election for road imtprovement, held
last Tuesday was carried by a vote of
4 to 1 in favor of bonds.
This insures, the construction of a
brick or bettor road clear across the
county on etate road No. 1, leading
from Jacksonville to Pensacola, and
is the state road department has al already
ready already arranged for the construction
of a hard surfaced road with brick,
concrete or asphaltic concrete from
Jacksonville to the line between Su Suwannee'
wannee' Suwannee' and Columbia counties, this
means that the road will be paved all
the way to the Suwannee river near
EUaville.
Madison county is the next that

will get in 'line, as the sentiment in .

that county is fast being crystalized
for a road (paved with permanent ma material
terial material across that county. A bond
election will be called very shortly
and htere is little doubt that bonds

will be authorized.

QUARTER MILLION VOTED TO
PUT CITY IN BETTER SHAPE

Women Participate In Election and
Every Item' For Carried Safely

MIAMI, Oct 18. (Special.) Mi Miami
ami Miami voters carried the $248,000 bond
issue by sustaining majorities in the
spedial election held here yesterday,
every item being approved.
The issue includes $70,000 for anew
bridge across .the Miami river, $40, $40,-000
000 $40,-000 for completing . the municipal
ship channel across Biscayne bay,
$15,000 for ciey hospital improve improvements,
ments, improvements, $35,000 for a high pressure
water main system, $15,000 for a po police
lice police signal system, $60,000 for sew sew-sr
sr sew-sr system extensions and connections,
$3,000 for a pavillion in the city cem cemetery
etery cemetery and $10,000 for addition to the
city incinerating plant.
Today's was the first election in
which Miami women participated and
sixty-one of the 259 ballots cast were
those of women vctersJ' Under the

This will bring , charter amendment pased by the 1919

ihe paved road to the Aucilla river lepisfatuire women may vote in munic
between, Madison and Jefferson coun- jp electionss here. '
t'-es. It will then be up to Jeffer- I '

son and Leon counties to raise funds
to meet the requirements of the state
road department to bring the pavsd
road all the way from Jacksonville
to Tallahassee.

BERGER GIVES CITRUS

Do You Know
that we give you, an extremely
large variety of foods, both meats
and vegetables, to choose from,
and that we are always looking
for variety
Our prices, item by item, are
lower than elsewhere and that
we intend to keep them so.

The Brightest, Cleanest, Most
Popular Market in the City
Thos. Cannon

lwooeven

AGN1ESVILLE, Oct. 18. (Spe
cial) The Citrus seminar and live

stock meetings have been far better

ihan expectations, both, from stand-

point of attendance and interest. One
of the outstanding figures of the
seminar meetings has been Dr. 0. F.

Berger, of the bureau of plant indus industry,
try, industry, Washington. Dr. Berger work

ed at the Florida experiment station
some years ago, and he knows the
problems the Florida citrus growers

are up against and he comes back
with many suggestions. His talk
Wednesday night on some views of
fruits as received in the Northern
markets was an eye-opener to many
growers. The address of Wednes Wednesday
day Wednesday night was followed by another
this morning, the subject of the lat

ter being "Causes '-yu. n .citrus

NOTICE is hereby given that we,

the undersigned, will apply to his

Excellency, bidney J. Latts, gover

nor of the State of Florida, for

LETTERS PATENT, to be issued to
H. M. de MONTMOLLIN CO., of

which company the following pro

posed Articles of Incorporation shall
be the Articles of Incorporation.
Said application for the issuance of

said LETTERS PATENT will be

made as aforesaid on the 18th day
of November, A. D. 1919.

This notice is (riven in pursuance

with the Laws of Florida, relative to
Corporations for Profit.

rl. M. deMONTMOLLIN. .
B. C. PEARCE.
GEORGE P. FORD. 1

I

rhone

subject of

samara.

Specials For
Tomorrow

Fresh County Eggs, doz. 60c
Best Creamery Butter, one
pound prints 70c
Sliced Box Bacon, 1 pound
box 65c
Kingan's Pure Lard, lb. 38c
Choice Steak, lb., 20c, 25c,
30c
Pot Roasts, lb., 20c, 25c
Victory Steak, all meat, no
bone, 25c lb.
Sugar cured Ham, to boil,
25c lb.
Pork Sausage, lb. 30c
Fancy Fat Irish Mackerel
Boneless Codfish Middles
OYSTERS
CELERY DILL PICKLES
Head Cheese Liver Pudding
Boiled Ham Chipped Beef
"Churngold" Oleomargarine (the gold of
the churn)
ALL VEGETABLES IN SEASON
You may pay more elsewhere, but you
can buy no better." NUFCED.
Phone Two-Seven provided
you want
QUALITY AND SERVICE

WE WISH TO ANNOUNCE that
our new Fall Goods are arriving
now We have just received some
NEW CROP CEREALS, including
Prepared Buckwheat, Pan Pancake,
cake, Pancake, Graham Flours, Oat Oat-meal.
meal. Oat-meal. Farina anch other
breakfast foods.

go with the above we have a great

vaneiy w

I TV ,

Syrup in Cans

and a splendid line of
Jams and Jellies
ALSO NEW DRIED FRUITS
"The Quality and Quantity
Store."
L. C. STEPHENS
Cer. Kirby and Morris , Phone 84

ii-uits.""Some straight-forward sug

gestions on this subject were given

the growers.
AJt the joint meeting of the semi seminar
nar seminar and livestock round up today, two
splendid talks were, made eacV bring bringing
ing bringing out the importance of dtiry pro products
ducts products in the diet One of the State
College for Wlomen, Tallahassee, the
subject being "Milk for Florida
Homes." The other was by Dr. E.
V. McCoUum of John Hopkins Uni University,
versity, University, Baltimore, ihis subject beinu
' Wlhat constitutes an ideal diet." Dr.
McCullum is one of the best known
men in the -United States in nutri nutrition
tion nutrition work, and has spent the past
twelve years in experimental work
along this line.
The Y. M. C A. auditorium at the
university, where these talks were
made, was filled to overflowing.
A feature of this afternoon session
was the auction sale of two Jersey
bull calves, the autcion taking place
in the auditorium. These calves were
contributed to the Florida Dairy As Association
sociation Association by A. E. Van Epoel of Tam Tampa
pa Tampa and H. S. Pennock, of Jupiter,
one was purchased by Miss Sipprell,
the Putnam county house demonstra demonstration
tion demonstration agent. It brought sixty-five
dollars, the other brought seventy seventy-dollars
dollars seventy-dollars and was purchased by Z. C.
Herlong of Mtcamopy. Alachua coun county.
ty. county. The money secured from sale of
these calves will be used in tick erad eradication
ication eradication extension work and in further furthering
ing furthering the dairy extension work of this
state.
A special program for new growers
and grove help will comprise Friday'3
program.

ARTICLES OF INCORPORATION

OF
H. M. deMONTMOLLIN CO.
The undersigned Incorporators

hereby associate themselves together
for the purpose of forming a corpo corporation
ration corporation under and by authority of
the laws of the State of Florida, and
adopt the following ARTICLES as
their ARTICLES OF INCORPORA

TION:
ARTICLE I.
The name of thi Corporation shall
be "H. M. deMONTMOLLIN CO.,"
and its principal place of business
shall be in the City of Palatka,
County of Putnam, and State of
Florida, with authority and power to
establish such branch offices and
otheiplaces of business in the State
of Florida, and in such other States
of the United States, as it may deem
necessary or advisable.
ARTICLE II.
The general nature of the business,
or businesses, to be conducted and
transacted by this Corporation, shall

De as loliows: The purchasing, hold holding
ing holding leasing, sub-letting, renting and
dealing in property, real, personal
and mixed, of whatsoever nature or
kind, with the right to pledge or
mortgage the same, or an interest
therein; and to improve and con construct
struct construct such buildings as may be de desirable
sirable desirable in connection with its general
business; and with the right to estab establish
lish establish branch businesses, and agenc agencies
ies agencies and sub-agencies, in the State of
Florida, and elsewhere; and to- dis discount
count discount and re-discount its commercial
paper, and to acquire, and hold, and
dispose of, bonds, stocks and securi securities,
ties, securities, of individuals and of other Cor Corporations;
porations; Corporations; and particularly it shall
have the right, and its prinripal bus business
iness business shall be, to deal as manufactur manufactur-er,
er, manufactur-er, broker, factor or merchant, whole whole-sate
sate whole-sate or retail, in general mill sup sup-plies
plies sup-plies and machinery of everf nature,
kind and description, and in farm farming
ing farming implements, tools and accessories, :
and in general hardware, building ,
materials, and plumbiny supplies,
and to act as agent for individuals, I
or corporations, engaged in the same ,
or other lines of business, and to
act as agent and bailee for rail

roads, steamboats, or other manner
of. '"tw.-foi"r' li... rr rr-irni,:,

replied w

cade
m I E x elusive
II ...Home of-

rbeater

J'aramount-Art

..craft rictures-

m

TODAY

"The

Dark

Star"

A PA RAM OUN T-A R TOR A FT
SPECIAL IN SEVEN REELS.
This wonderful play taken from Robert W.
Chamber's novel of the same name. It is
presented by an all star cast, headed by
MARION DAVIES.

ALSO-

FATTY ARBUCKLE in
"The Desert Hero"
T
t
NINE REELS OF SPARKLING ENTER ENTER-;
; ENTER-; TAINMENT AT A PRICE LESS THAN
j EVER SHOWN BEFORE.
. ' MATINEE AND NIGHT
CHILDREN 10c, ADULTS 20c

MONDAY AND
TUESDAY

Two Days

"The
Valley
of the
Giants"
WALLACE IlEID in the
Leading Hole, Supported
by an All-Star Cast.

The Story it by PETER B. KYNE, who know
the Red Wood of California a no other writer
doe, and the character of thi story are known
to him personally. It i itory full of thrill,
love and patho. DON'T FAIL TO SEE IT.
ALSO A HOLMES' TRAVELOGUE

Continuous Performance from 3:30 until 11 P.M.
CHILDREN 10c ADULTS 20c.

i

unaelilmnocenTA "

EMPLOYES TO GET BONUS.

Marshall Field & Co. Will Distribute
- (1,500,000.

CHICAGO, Oct. 18. Onnouncement
was made tonight by Marshall Field
& Co. that for the year 1919 a dis distribution
tribution distribution of extra compensation would
be made to its employes because of
the "high cost of living. The
amount of this bonus, by which emf
ployes of both the wholesale and re retail
tail retail stores receiving up to $2,500 to total
tal total income per year will benefit, will
be about $1,500,000.
It is understood that this is the first
of such announcements for the cur current
rent current yea. by large corporations' or
firms.

It Can Be Done. -"Yen
make $4,000 a year aji an avi aviator.
ator. aviator. And yet people'say you cant live
ob air." Boston Transcript.

5- - '- - ran ran-les;
les; ran-les; and generally to have, exercise
and enjoy, all the privileges, powers
and rights granted by law, or inher inherent
ent inherent in, Or usually exercised by Cor Corporations
porations Corporations for Profit charted by, and
existing under, the laws of the State
of Florida. '
ARTICLE III.
The authoried capital stock of this
Corporation shall be FIFTY THOUS THOUSAND
AND THOUSAND ($50,000.00) DOLLARS, which
shall be divided into Five Hundred
(500) Shares of par value of
ONE HUNDRED ($100.00) DOL DOLLARS
LARS DOLLARS each, which shall be paid in
lawful money of the United States or
in property.
ARTICLE IV.
The term for which this Corpora Corporation
tion Corporation shall exist shall be Ninety-Nine
(99) Years, unless sooner dissolved
in a manner now or which may here hereafter
after hereafter be provided by law.
ARTICLE V.
The business or businesses, of this
Corporation shall be conducted by a
President, a Vice-President, a Treas Treasurer,
urer, Treasurer, and a Secretary, and by a
Board of Directors. The number of
Directors shall not be less than three
nor more than thirteen as may be
fixed from time to time by the By By-Laws.
Laws. By-Laws. The Board of Directors shall
be elected annually by the stockhold stockholders
ers stockholders at the regular annual stock stockholders'
holders' stockholders' meeting, which shall be held
on the second Tuesday in February
of each year, and a President, a
Vice-President, a Secretary and a
Treasurer shall be annually elected
by the Directors, and each of such
officers shall be a stockholder in this
Corporation at the time of the elec election;
tion; election; provided, however, that the of office
fice office of Secretary and Treasurer may

oe neia oy one and the same person

spector xor uw
. L.

frew

f ARTICLE VI.
The highest amoust of indebtedness1
or liability to which this Corporation
can at any time subject itself is fix fixed
ed fixed at FIFTY THOUSAND ($50,000, ($50,000,-00)
00) ($50,000,-00) DOLLARS.
ARTICLE VII.
The names and residences of the
subscribers, and the amount of capi capital
tal capital stock subscribed by each, shall be:
H. M. deMostmollin, Palotko, Flor Florida,
ida, Florida, 280 Shares, $28,000.00
B. C. Pearce, Palatka, Florida, 91
Shares, $9,100.00
George E. Ford, Palatka, Florida,
28 Shares, $2,800.00.
EU;n Rice, Palatka, Florida, 1
Share, $100.00.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, each of
said Incorporator has hereunto in
person subscribed his respective name
and signature by his own hand.
H. M. deMONTMOLLIN.
B. C. PEARCE.
GEORGE E. FORD.
ELLEN RICE.

)

STATE OF FLORIDA,

COUNTY OF PUTNAM. )

Before me, an officer authorized to
take acknowledgments of deeds in
the State of Florida, personally
came, H. M. deMontmollin, B. C.
Pearce, George E. Ford, and Ellen
Rice, to me personally known and

known by me to be the persons

whose names are signed to the fore foregoing
going foregoing ARTICLES OF INCORPORA INCORPORATION
TION INCORPORATION of H. M. deMONTMOLLIN
CO., and each of whom after being
by me first duly sworn, depose and
say, each for himself, that he execut executed
ed executed the same for the purposes there therein
in therein expressed, and each acknowledge

his signature thereto.

during the same time,

tu -rii' a .v-h' iiN wimt:

i.-iT;i.r":" Bs set my hand and

the business of this Corporation until 'SK. L8.?8' J 1 & lkaJ FirldrV

the first regular annual tockhlolders' ' ri' V"' ul
Seeled to" h6ld ffier8 dUly (Notarial Seal) P. B. HUFF,
H. M deMontmollin, President, Notary Public, , State of Florida at
and a Director. U rg ' rim m'oi
B. C. Pearce, Vice-President, 8nd My commionexpiresJulylO, 1921.

a JJirector,

affixed

' GROWERS OPPOSE
I LEPROSARIUM.

George E. Ford, Secretary and
Director.
Ellen E. Rice, Treasurer.

The Diiectors of this Corporation , T . c. .
mv moot do u Rnwi f rnM.. J""" Live Stock Men

often, and at such time and place, as

they shall deem necessary or advis

able, and snail have power and au authority
thority authority to appoint or employ such
agents, servants or employees as
shall seem to them advisable in car

rying on the business, or businesses, 1 k-
t v:. r-.i i ii i it Tnan

ui itiiio vui puiaituu, aiiu biiey Biuiii

in Vote

Gainesville Against One in
Florida.

at

GAINESVILLE, Oct 18. (Spe

cial) By unanimous vote of the more

400 citrus fruft growers and

determine the duties, compensation,, stockmen of the state attending the
and terms o such agents, servants or ormbined citrus seminar and livestock
employees. I roundup t tihe University of Florida
The manner of calling meeting's;, . ... . it:
and the time and place of such meet!hCTe today, the following resolution
ings of the stockholders, except the by Ctornmisskxner of Agriculture W.
stockholders' annual meeting, and of - A. McRae. of Tallahassee, was adop-

jjireciurs, bJiuu ue axea oy wie uy- aj

Vrnnbhn HaM akol irsW-sv hi

Laws

ballot counting one vote for each

shares of stock owned by and ap appearing
pearing appearing in the name of uch stock stockholder
holder stockholder on the books of the com company.
pany. company. Any stockholder may vote
the stock of another stockholder if he

presents to the meeting a proper writ-

"Resolved, that we, the attendants
at the citrus semlilnar and livestock
roundup esyeftmbWd ''alt tGainesville,
October 16, 1919, do most earnestly
protest against leprosarium in Flori

da, and! that we feel the establish

'ZTooElo Z 0Wner 01 We leprosarium in Florida, and that

we feel that it would be a very -great
injustice to our state.
"Resolved further, that a copy of
these resolutions be mailed to our sen senators
ators senators and members of congress and
to Surgeon-General Blue and tihe
committee who has charge of the lo locating
cating locating of the leprosarium."

MOTORCADE TO TAMPA.

facksonville Autoists Considering
Paying South Florida City
Visit.

JACKSONVILLE, Odt. 18. (Spe (Special)
cial) (Special) A motorcade Atom Jacksonville
to Tampa such as the just ended suc successful
cessful successful motorcade from Jacksonville
to Savannah, Ga., is now proposed by
Charles A. Tutewiler, who was chair chairman
man chairman of the arrangements committee
for the Savannah run.
Mr. Tutewfler said this morning,
fololwftng his return from Savannah,
that as a member of the board of gov governors
ernors governors of the Jacksonville Automobile
club, he will bring up the matter be before
fore before the governors at their next meet meeting
ing meeting or possibly at a called meeting.
"As big a success as the, Savannah
trip was" Mr. Tutewiler said "I see
no reason why we should not make
a trip to the South to show to the

'people there that we are really out

after good roads." Mtr. Tutewiler is
very enthusiastic over his suggestion,
which will no doubt meet with gener general
al general approval. Wlhile no plans have
yet been made for the proposed Tam Tampa
pa Tampa motorcade Mr. Tutewiler believes
that some time during November
when the motorists begin arriving in
large numbers, will be an ideal time.

MEDAL FOR GEN. VANDERBILT

New Yorker Honored with Two Oth Oth-er
er Oth-er Officers of the 27th.

WASHINGTON, Oct. 18.To Brig.
Gent Cornelius Vanderbilt has been
awarded the Distinguished Service
Medal for "exceptionally meritorious
and distinguished services as com commanding
manding commanding officer, 102d Engineers, and
as engineer officer of the 27th Divis Division
ion Division "
The Wjar Department also announc announced
ed announced today the award of similar deco decorations
rations decorations to two other officers of the
27th Division, Brig. Gen. Albert H
Blanding of Bartow, Fla., command commanding
ing commanding itlhe 53d Infantry Brigade, and
Colonel Franklin W. Wjard of Albany,.
N. Y.

FISK SAILORS DISPLAY.
Attention of the public is called to
the splendid display of the latest Fisk
Sailors in the windows of my store.
Special sale of these hats will be

conducted on Saturday.

MISS KATE LUCAS.

BIG FIRE AT CHESTER.
CHESTER, SOUTH CAROLINA, Oct
18. (United Press) Fire of unknown
origin this morning caused a- lass
runing into -thousands of dollars when,
the warehouse of the Moffat Wbole
Grocery Company was burned. Short,
ly before noon. The fire was burn burning
ing burning and unchecked.

STREET CAR TIE-UP
KNOXVILLE, Oct. 18. (United
Presa) Knoxvdlle was without
street car service this morning as a
result of Union employees striking..
The men struck last night when the
Company refused to grant a wage increase.

SUGAR FAMINE IN DELAND.
DsLAND, Oct. 18. Within a short
while, unless sugar is received from
some unexpected source, DeLand will
be without sweets. There is practi practi-cnlly
cnlly practi-cnlly no sugar for sale now, almost
every merchant in the city has sold
out.

The Putnam National Bank
of Palatka, Florida
Capital Surplus and Profit Account
$140,000.00
l e
Total Liability to Depositors
$800,000.00

"Our Strength is Our Guarantee" ,

We Solicit Your Account

Safe deposit boxes for rent $3.00 per year.

r

4 I-KMBBBBBMMKaBV

i
V
"i)
(



PAGE NO. 6

PALATKA DAILY NEWS
Service To Grocers
Announcing
Palatka Daily News
Continued and increasing business proves
appreciation of the service we are rendering
the retailers in our territory.
E We are now handling all standard goods
at margins that are a surprise to other
dealers. Our stock is fresh and up-to-the

minute. Prompt shipment, accurate con

signments and fair treatment, our motto.

The Atlantic Grocery Co.

Palatka, Florida

YANKEE MARINE
! HEIR JFSULTAN
Harem He Has Never Seen Is
Part of Estate.

IS ADOPTED BY MORO RULER

Sergt. Robert McLean, While Serving
In the Philippines, Becomes Friend Friendly
ly Friendly With Natives, Learns Language
and Makes Hit With Sultan Ruler
Dies Without Male Heirs and Ser Sergeant
geant Sergeant Inherits Fortune.

Sometimes It's an advantage to fall
heir to property, and then again It
makes a difference just what the prop property
erty property Is. How would you like to wake
up some morning and find that over overnight
night overnight yon had fallen heir to 40 wives 1
Well, that is the situation confront confronting
ing confronting Sergt. Robert McLean of the ma marine
rine marine corps recruiting station, 24 East
Twenty-third street. New York.
Ton see, it all happened this way.
The sergeant who is a "devil dog"
several years' seiwlce, spent twrAk

pines aiVuig the savage Moros whoi lake sach' a 7ancy fo'you, and'3i3( he

lnnamt mat reman. i

ana tma you win nave to pay ms ro ro-nsrnl
nsrnl ro-nsrnl expenses," I pessimistically sug suggested;
gested; suggested; "you know sons have to' do
that many times, and probably adopt adopted
ed adopted sons, too."
"In that case I will sell off the har harem,"
em," harem," laughed the sergeant. "I haven't
been there In six years, and of course
1 huven't the slightest Idea of the
amount of property I am left
"To begin with, the term sultan may
be overestimated In importance; down
there it Is about the same rank as a
mayor here.
"But coming back to my adopted
pater : He lived upon an Island, which
he owned, three miles In circumfer circumference
ence circumference and really, you know, he may
have quite a good deal, for all I know.
"His house was two stories high,
and made of nipa fiber. It was set
upon stilts eight feet high and had 20
rooms. The cows and pigs and chick chickens
ens chickens were kept In the space under underneath
neath underneath the stilts. There were no win

dows of glass, but Instead they are

made of this same nipa fiber, slide up
and down, and are always kept closed
during the rainy seasons.

"And speaking of the harem, they

were off in quarters by themselves,
and during my stay In my adopted

father's house I never set eyes upon
them; so, whether they are as old as
my grandmother or mere flappers. 1

snow not. Some of the native wom wom-'0
'0 wom-'0 are quite pretty." 1

While there he mastered the native
language, and became so friendly with
the native "sultans" that on his de departure
parture departure he was officially adopted by
the sultan of Llang-Llang, a small
island off the Borneo coast.
The "sea soldier" returned to this
country, and his memories of Llang Llang-Llang
Llang Llang-Llang became hazy until the other day,
when he was notified that the old sul sultan
tan sultan had died without a legitimate heir,
and he, the sergeant, had Inherited the
title, with Its accompanying perqui perquisites,
sites, perquisites, which include a healthy harem.
But Sergeant McLean is a good
sport, and he is going right there to
see Just what his property is, wives
and all.
"I have been released from the ma marine
rine marine corps to make the trip," he told

Sergt Robert McLean In Costume of

Moro Sultan.
me at the recruiting station, writes
Fay Stevenson, "and I am going to
tee the thing through. Perhaps the
Old sultan doesn't own a bit of prop property,
erty, property, saving the harem, but I am go going
ing going to investigate.'
May Meet Undertaker's Bill.
"Perhans vou will get down there

legally adopt you, and just what cere

mony did you have to go through?" J
asked.
Old Man With No Sons.
"Well, the sultan was quite an edu educated
cated educated man, and spoke English quite
fluently. I used to visit him at his
home and have long chats with him.
He was eighty years old then; you
see, he must have been nbout eighty eighty-six
six eighty-six when he die I told him all about
America and our ways, and he would
sit and listen for Mnurs.
"I guess he was sort of in his dotage,
for he grew so fond of me that he
said he wanted to make me his legal
son, since he had no legitimate male
heir. I don't really know whether he
had any daughters or not, because
with all his harem, I never saw a
woman about the place.
"I thought he was joking about mak making
ing making me his heir, but one day I received
a summons to come to him at once,
and bring two of my friends along.

"I took Frank Korncum, who was
killed In France, and Sergeant Wal

ter of the marine corps, along with
me. When we reached the sultan's
home we were ushered Into the pub public
lic public hall, which was really only a good good-sized
sized good-sized tent pitched high on stilts. There
I found the sultan looking very state stately
ly stately and Important.
Ceremony of Adoption.
"My friends and I were taken Into
an adjoining room and dressed In long,
flowing robes, and then we were
brought before the sultan, who first
bared his own chest and made a little

slash in it with a Moro krls. Then he

made me open my robe and bare my
chest, and he cut the same sized slash.
Taking a drop of blood from his chest
he mixed it with a drop of my blood,
and from then on I was his adopted
son. I left that next week, and I have
never seen him since."
"And have you ever written to him
at had any word by a friend T" I asked.
"Not a line," was the sergeant's
quick reply. "To tell you the truth, I
had almost forgotten the incident but
now you can just bet your boots I'm
going to see this thing through, and
if he has left things in a bad mlxup
and Is head over heels in debt Til see
him through, some way or other."
"And If he has left you a fortune?"
'Til get it together as quick as I can
and beat it back to little old New
York."
"And what about the harem?"
But Sergeant McLean only arched
his eyebrows. '

Unearth Ancient Tablets.
Workmen engaged in roadmaklng
near the Indian village of Klspiox, B.
C, nine miles from Hazieton, have un unearthed
earthed unearthed a sandstone tablet It is cu curiously
riously curiously engraved and is of considerable
Interest to scientists. The Indians are
unable to trace In the figures any re resemblance
semblance resemblance to any of their totem signs.

On October 11th, The Palatka News began the publication of THE-PA-LATKA
DAILY NEWS, an afternoon newspaper for general circulation.
This edition will carry a full telegraphic service, giving the world's news
'on the day it happens.
It will carry an illustrated service for properly picturizing news events of
the day, as well as a cartoon service and discussion of current topics by
some of the most iminent thinkers of the day.
It will also carry a complete resume of local and state news, especial
attention being paid to local news. It will also include in its news service
a complete daily compendium of socialevents and the movements of people.

Why We Chose The
Afternoon Field

The publishers chose to enter the afternoon field, in preference to the morn morning
ing morning field for reasons that are so obvious that there was no occasion for hesi hesitancy.
tancy. hesitancy. If experience had proven that the morning fields is' the most de desirable
sirable desirable in cities the size of Palatka present conditions here would not have
decided the publishers not to enter that field. But the afternoon field is
the field for the advertiser and the reader locally.
In the United States there are two afternoon papers for every morning paper
In Elorida there are nineteen afternoon papers and eleven morning papers.
In no city is there a morning paper where there isn't an afternoon paper paper-except
except paper-except Palatka.
i
These figures prove that the demand of advertisers is that their store news
shall be circulated on the day it is printed and on the day that current news
haDDenins are chronicled. In lare ranters ,aK: nn1nrinn tho mnmimi

. - o- "Tii nrr . ""i""i6

--i i " 0" ""i, uu ua gciiciai tllUUiailUIi OUlSlQe
the local field.

Seventy-five per cent, of the advertising for local readers in New York and
Chicago is carried by the afternoon papers,
The afternoon paper goes into the home before supper, just when the house housewife
wife housewife is finishing her day's work arid when the husband has come home from
his labors. From it is mapped out tomorrow's purchases, as there is no
time in the morning for wife or husband to look over the morning paper un until
til until after the first rush of activity incident to the starting of the day.

This is the age of speed and people want the news the day it happens,
why the publishers chose to enter the afternoon field.

That's

A Paper For All
Of The People

THE DAILY NEWS will be published in the interest ot all of the people
of Palatka and Putnam County first. Our editorial aims and purposes will
be found on the editorial page. The paper will be all home print and will
issue every day in the week except Sunday. It will be delivered in the city
by carrier and in the county and elsewhere byjmail at the following rates

Per week - - 15c
Per month - - 50c
Three months - $1.50
Six months - - 2.75
One year - - 5.00

If you wishto be a sub subscriber
scriber subscriber to THE PALATKA
DAILY NEWS fill out
the attached coupon and
send or mail to
The Palatka News
Palatka, t
Florida

ICOUPON)

THE PALATKA NEWS,
Palatka, Fla.
Gentlemen :
Enclosed pleat find $ for which please send me THE
PALATKA DAILY NEWS to the below address for
months.
Very truly,

..

Name
Street
Gty..

.; .

State

)
A.



t" V".
PAGE NO. 7

f. - ... i : .-. ; . ; . , ...
I mil i il l - 'T-rw - :. ' ' . .- " ;

' PALATKA UAllJ-t 1NL WO W t
I if tlir .

I I :

I)

STARRING
WALLACE
REID

AN
ALL-STAR
CAST

The Famous Film Which Broke All Records at the Arcade at Jacksonville

for One Week, Will be Shown at the

TRADE w-fc w MARK

ARCADE

THEATER

TRADE,

S1ARR

- TVAO D AVS

MONDAY AaIL TUESDAY

October

9

October

21st

A

In order that every! man, woman and child in Palatka may see this' great pictunzat.on of
Peter B Kyne's novel, it will be shown for two days with prices that will appeal to all.
Beginning at 3:30 each day, the picture will be run continuously until 11 o'clock at n.ght

IT WILL BE SHOWN IN PALATKA CHEAPER THAN IT HAS
nrrcM cunWN ANYWHERE 4WHl kIocVadvl is1

Hi V EjIV DLU1 kJl IV Mil ' . i

DON'T MISS THE OPPORTUNITY TO SEE THIS GREAT P

r4 adrf Uwfer "&'

aTvhed to beet sugar refiners thro. .h nt. A

spector for the United States public

Foti txiviimo rrmn; a r r T

poiuiNiMiNU r Urf I W txAro

t MAKliAKt 1 KUnt

(Written for The United Presi) T

f

Since I have seen this season's coats

I know the reason why

MThey say your tongue is coated

When it's furry feeling, my!

fFor all the stunning coats this year

Are furry 'fur' and nigh
NEW YORK, Oct. 17 When you

lire all wrapped up in one of this Win

er's stunning new wraps you cer cer-ainly
ainly cer-ainly are bound to be some prize

iiackage.

The loveliest ones are fashioned

put of that exquisitely supple velour

fabric family which varies in name

fcnly in the length and thickness of its
file or nap, and is called respective-

y duvetyne, and duvedelyne with a

4ilk finish peachbloom, and cashmer-

ine with a wool finish. In either

ase silk or wool it is bound to be

i quick finish for your bank roll to

ndulge too recklessly in these desira desira-)le
)le desira-)le materials. Evora and fortuna
.re two other soft velvety fabrics

striped in corduroy fashion the evo evora
ra evora vertically and the fortuna diago diago-rtlly.
rtlly. diago-rtlly. Now typically true of any anything
thing anything apertaining to fortuna that it
should go off on the bias rather than
keep to the straight and vertical path.
In combination with these materials
lavish adornment of mole, beaver,
squirrel, sable or grey, Kolinsky car caracul
acul caracul and Australian opposum make of
each mantle a thing of beauty and a
jcy for the cold months of the year.
Many of the coats cling to the cape
or dolman lines and wrap voluminous voluminously
ly voluminously and drapefully about the figure.
One striking exception to this rule
is a taupe duvetyne trimmed in mole.
It is made in rather a basque, effect
with a deep cape collar of mole and
narrow stripe of this neutral toned
fur striping it at close intervals. The
skirt with huge pockets of the mole
is gathered to the barque just below
the natural waist line and shows a

cartridge arrangement of the gath gathers
ers gathers over each hip.
Two startling fearless furless mod models
els models in this season of fur trimmed man mantles
tles mantles is an Anzac peachbloom and a
Fompeian duvetyne'. The first has as
sole trimming a deep cape collar
reaching to the waistline, its entire
surface diamond stitchel in self-toned
silk. This collar, soft and supple,
may be crushed up close and high
about the neck and the face to meet
the fury of wintry blasts and the ap approval
proval approval of the passerby. The deep
cuffs on the sleeves are stitched the
same. More of a mantle than a coat
is the vivid Pompeian duvetyne pick picked
ed picked out here and there with striking
oblong motifs of black chenille.
Far be it from me to give away any
secrets of the trade, but owing to that
strange psychology of the fickle fe female
male female whereby she must neneds have
ever something different and 'new',
little old last year's colors have all
been re-christened with a nice new set
of names. . 1
If milady but guessed that this sea season's
son's season's glowing Pompeian red is only
"last season's Henna camouflaged by
an appellation, she would cast it from
her like an impoverished suitor, but

FRANCE 'COMMEMORATES AMERICA'S ENTRY INTO THE WAR

Kit JA' ,'-

I'resldrnt Poinrnre arrlvinK at the Pointe de Grave for tfle corner-stone-laying ceremonies of the great monument

'to be erected by France In commemoration of America's eatty into the war. The American ambassador tr France,
ilugh Wallace, laid the corner stone. Vl
: U : .

long as ignorance is color blind she
dons Anzac instead of khaki, dragon
fly instead of peacock, victory blue in instead
stead instead of horizon, faison for tobacco
brown, maduro for dark brown and
chandren for mahogany and goes her
way blissfully confident that she is
colored right up to the very latest
tint in the fashionable spectrum and
everything.

COMPOSER DRIVEN TO
DEATH BY GERMANS
Author of "Internationale" a Sui Suicide
cide Suicide in Military Hospital
at Lille.
The tragic death of Adolphe Degey Degey-ter,
ter, Degey-ter, the composer of the "Internation "Internationale,"
ale," "Internationale," who passed away at Lille during
the Gentian occupation, has just be become
come become known to the city.
Degeyter, a man of strong character,
laborious worklngman, had written
several songs which he and his brother-in-law
used to sing.
He made no pretension to being a
musician, but took great pleasure in
playing the bugle.
It was on this instrument that ha
played the famous air which he' wrote
to the words of Eugene Pottler's hymn,
and the first time he sang it was to
some of his comrades In a cabaret at
Lille.
Then his wife died. His brother went
to Paris and passed himself off as the
author of the famous air.
The two misfortunes worked disas disastrously
trously disastrously on Degeyter's mind. He began
to drink heavily and conceived for all
music a dislike so strong that he would
leave a cafe If anyone began to sing
or to play some musical Instrument
Then the Germans came. Degeyter
suffered acutely from having to work
for them on the town water supply.
When the typhus epidemic 'spread he
was ordered to report at the military
hospital, and one day he failed to pre present
sent present himself. The "kommandantur"
Issued a warrant for his arrest In the
evening he hanged himself.
He is "buried In the cemetery near
the hill, where a little wooden cross
with the name "Adolphe Degeyter"
marks the grave of 'the author of the
"Internationale."

Abbreviating Name
The pioneers give up beautiful
names and the portal authorities ab abbreviate
breviate abbreviate them. San Francisco Chivo-Icle.

snwt
New York, formerly Chaplain eratri

""""wui xpeatMonary

It Is a Wise Golfing Community That
Recognizes Its Jjmior Golfers
By CHARLES EVANS, Jr., Former American Amateur Champion

To every one with the bet interests of golf at heart it is gratifying

to note that many of the clubs in the Chicago golf district have been hold

ing junior championships, and that the scores in these events have been

very good. It is a wise golfing community that recognizes the fact that

these junior golfers are our future champions and upon their proper train

ing depends the future of tBe game. Nothing develops a boy's game
fasler and better than tournament competition, and it fiso brings about

a wholesome acquaintance among the sons of members.

The fine work of the youngsters at Pittsburgh shows us what they can

do when given the opportunity, and it ought to stimulate all golf clubs toi

a careful provision of ways and means for the boys' tournaments. ChH

cago clubs have been very generous this year, and I can only suggest that

we ought to have a western intercollegiate championship. It is the yound

college men of the East who are doing part of the good juvenile golf Work
this year. I think the Chicago District Golf association, whose good work

is well known, could well manage to hold a junior championship next year,

There is one warning I give to the junior golfer: More promising

coif careers have been ruined by conceit than anything else. Therefore!

cultivate a certain humility of spirit with your golf. Bemember that your
elders who are sustaining the courses and providing means for you to play,
deserve consideration. See that you never fail to grant it.

First "Flylest Town."
Health authorities of Saranac Lake,
K. Y say this probably is the first
flyless town. Health Officer Trembley
reports, despite unusually hot weather
in June and July, that there are hard hardly
ly hardly any more flies here than most places
in January. It cost $1,000, and was
accomplished by requiring manure to
be screened and frequently removed.

Farmers Used Gas Masks for Grain.
Gas masks are In great demand by
farmers near Valparaiso, Ind., fof
threshing and shipping wheat infected
with Australian "takeall." The grain
Is so saturated with formaldehyde
that the workers cannot stand the
fumes.

Army Buy 900,000 Yard's of Ribbon.
An order by the government tor 900, 900,-000
000 900,-000 yards of ribbon for military deco decorations
rations decorations Is one of the factors that has
led trade to exrect an active ribbon"
gpaxon, according to the annual repor
of the Silk Association of America.

A REAL FARM FOR HOGS OR
DAIRYING.
120 acres; 80 under hog proof fence
and cross fences; 50 under cultiva

tion; flowing well; good five room

house and big barn, together with
outhouses. In heart of famous East
Palatiai-Hastings potato belt; 3 miles

from East Palatka on brick highway.

Ideally situated for livestock, dairy dairying
ing dairying or general farming. Rich,black
potato soil. Price $10,000. Terms.
Fred T. Merrill, Palatka, Fla.

Beat Government
The proper function of a government
la to make It easy for people to do
good and difficult for them to do evil.
Gladstone,

Time.
Time Is a mystery which we have
arbitrarily divided Into a past and. a
future, that we may understand some something
thing something of It. In Itself we may be al almost
most almost certain that it Is but an Immense,
eternal motionless present, In which
all that has taken place Immutably,
In which tomorrow, save in the ephe ephemeral
meral ephemeral mind of man, Is Indistinguish Indistinguishable
able Indistinguishable from yesterday and today. From
"The Double Garden," by Maurice
Maeterlinck.

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PAGE NO. 8.
PALATKA DAILY NEWS

: PALATKA'S PERSONAL AND SOCIAL LIFE
: : 4

E. E. White returned last night
from a business trip down the East
Coast.
Mrs. W. A. Walton and sons,
Weymes and Albert, Mrs. J. E. Lucas
and little daughter, Mary, motored to
Jacksonville this morning to spend
the day. there.
Mr. and Mrs. B. C. Pearce and
Mjss Mildred Pearce motored .to

Jacksonville this afternoon to re

main until Sunday afternoon.
S. C. Warner, of Esperanza, was in
the city yesetrday afternoon.

J. F. Uladney, of Hastings, was
here yesterday afternoon on busi

ness.
R. H. Cooper feturned home Fri

day from a vsit of several days in

Quincy, Fla.

Dr. and Mrs. Wm. F. Blackman, of
Jacksonville, former president of the

Florida Live Stock Association,
stopped a few hours in Palatka to

day, enroute from Jainesville to

Jacksonville.
Misses Clark and Rhodes of San
Mateo are in Palatka shopping today.

Mr. and Mrs. L. Tenny and little
daughter, Charles Anderson and Lew
Barsltow motored to Gainesville today
to attend the football game between
Florida University and Mercer Uni

versity.

Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Wangblicher of

Satsunua are visiting here today.

Mrs. Grover Arnold will leavsfthis

afternoon for Columbus, Ga., where
she will visit her mother for some

time.
I. N. Hall and daughter of Banner,
ville are here today.

Miss Ethel Gillett of Interlachen

v ill return borne today after her stay

of two months in Palatka.

A. Payne end sister, Miss Lula

Payne of Satsuma are in the Gem City

today.

Miss Sarah Bard left this afternoon

fox Welaka where she will spend the

week-end.

D. Bphennon of Springside is in

th city today.

Frank Sands has returned from his

trip to Florahome.

Clay Higginbotham of the Armour

Co leaves this afternoon to spend

Sunday in Gainesville.

Duff McLeod of Welaka waa here

clever suggestions for the year's work

Short addresses were made by two

of the past presidents, Mrs. S. J. Hil-

buro and Mrs. J. L. Dumsford. An

interesting feature of the program
was the part devoted to "vacation

notes," in whioh Mrs. Mann gave a

clever and graphic sketch of her ino
tor trip through the west to Yellow

Stone Park. Mrs. Alston, HAilF

charmed the audience with two beauti

ful vocal numbers. After adjourn

ment, the social committee served the
members with cake and punch.

NO SUGAR IN SIGHT

Palatkan Have Settled Down

Putting Syrup in Coffee

to

Another day has passed and not

a pound of sugar arrived in Palatka
and the scant store on hand has been

practically exhausted in every home.

Syrup ..is now being used in coffee at
the local cafes and, no doubt, in many

homes. Those so fortunate as to
possess a few ounces of sugar are

conserving t as if it were precious in

deed.
Jobbers say there is little chance
of securing sugar in the immedate
future. It was reported here yes

terday that two shiploads had land-

ad in Tampa from Cuba, and a num number
ber number of dealers wired to find out.
They found out the rumor was untrue.

One of the greatest sufferers from

the famine is the Palatka Bakery,

Mr. Whittaker says that unless he

can get some sugar he will have to

shut down his pie and cak edepart edepart-ment
ment edepart-ment as his supply is exhausted. He
has been in communication with all
the large markets but is promised no
relief.

CONTRAC FOR GRADING NEW

PROJECTS TO BE MADE .

Engineer Employed and Everything
Ready to Bridge Sand Beds For Former
mer Former Roads. ,

BIG CRUISERS FOR JAPAN.

Two of 40,000 Tons and 22 Other
Warships on Building Program.

ystrds -syttferhoon. . "... 1
L .Roberts of Putnam Hall is t
business visitor in the Gem City to.
day.

Mrs. John Fink, Mrs. H. Schafer,

and little daughter, Shirley, and Mrs,
Chdever are visitors here this after afternoon
noon afternoon from Nashua.

Lieut, and Mrs. R. H. Spicer will
inrrive this afternoon after spending

several weeks in various eastern ci

t.es, including New York City, and

Laurel, Delaware. They will re

main m Palatka as the guests of

Mrs. Spicer's mother's, Mrs. H. W.
Daugberty for two weeks. Lieut.
Spicer has recently received his re release
lease release from the navy and after his
visit here will accept the position as
Captain upon an ocean steamer run running
ning running between New York and France.
Mr. and, Mrs. E. S. Hubbard, of
Federal Point are visitors here to today.
day. today. Miss Mary Y. Atchinson, and niece,
Irene, are shoppers here today from
Federal Point.
Mrs. J. A. Helms, and sister,' Mrs.
J. Wi. Dietz of New Smyrna are in
Palatka today.
S. C. Stallings returned today from
iiunnell w'here he has been on busi business,
ness, business, and will spend the week-end
hare.
E. E .Wlhte will leave for St. Au Augustine
gustine Augustine this afternoon and remain for
the week-end.
Mr. and Mrs. A. P. DeWolf, of
Crescent City are visitors here today.
H. F. Urie returns this afternoon
from his trip to Fort Pierce where
he visited his sons.

Mrs. Flora Stevenson has returned
home after her visit to friends in

Missouri, and neighboring states.

Frederick Lee Brown, nephew of

Mr. and Mrs. H. F. Urie, arrived this
morning. He will remain here with
Mr. and Mrs. Urie and attend the

Putnam County school.

TOKIO, Oct 18-iAccording to Jap.

anese newspapers, the Government

has decided to build two battle eras

ers and twenty-two other warships
comlmiencing the next fiscal year and
the estimates for these ships will be

submitted to the next eesaku at the

Diet fox approval. The o1

-tern win ne tne 4D,x)0-tn class and
their cost of construction is estimat estimated
ed estimated at 120,000,000 yen (about $60,000, $60,000,-000.)
000.) $60,000,-000.) In addition, there will be three
light cruisers, six destroyers, twelve
submarines and three river gunboats.
The disbursement is to be spread
over three years from the next fiscal
year. The building of two 40,000-ton
battle cruisers is for the purpose of
completing the "eight-and-eight"
squadron which has been decided up upon
on upon by Japan as necessary for the de defense
fense defense of the country.

STARKE, Fla., Qot( 18. At n
meeting of the trustees of Special
Roach .and Bridge District Nol,
Bradford county, held Wednesday af afternoon
ternoon afternoon at the office of the Bank of
Starke it was decided to begin at the

earliest practicable date . to begin

grading on the road from tha Clay

county line east of Starke to Raif ord,

and on the road leading - from the
Santa Fe river road to Brooker.
The trustees at this meeting em employed
ployed employed G. L. Barnard, at present a di

vision engineer for the State Highway

Department, as supervising engineer

for all road work within the district.

Mr. Barnard will enter upon his du duties
ties duties as soon after November 1st as it
is possible for him to be relieved
from his present position. .. First of
all he wUl direct the repair of such
bridges within the district as are now
in bad condition, and look after urgent
road repairs. Wlhen this work is well
in hand he will begin to make the
necessary surveys for the grading of
the roads to Raiford and Brooker. In
the meantime $50,000 worth of the
bonds will be offered for sale and it is
hoped by the trustees thrat every everything
thing everything will be in readiness to let the
grading contracts early in January.

The grading of the roads is prelim

inary to the hard-surfacing,, whioh

will be reached just as soon as con conditions
ditions conditions are ripe for this feature of
the work. -"
While the grading is being done by
the trustees on the Raiford and
Prooker roads the State Highway De Department
partment Department will be grading the . road
north and south across the county,
and it begins to look as if Bradford
county is soon to be numbered among
the counties that have a system of
frrst-cflass roads. 1 '

"SKY PILOT" 18
FIRST IN GREAT
AERO CONTEST

MINEOLA, N. Y. Oct. 18 (United
Press.) Lieutenant Belvin W. May May-nard,
nard, May-nard, the famous sky pilot, won the
transcontinental air race when he ar arrived
rived arrived here from San Francisco at one one-rifty
rifty one-rifty o'clock this afternoon. He
had already won one leg of the race,
reaching San Francisco from Mineo Mineo-la
la Mineo-la ahead of the large field of contes contestants
tants contestants last week. The great shouts
greeted tne preacher aviator when
his plane appeared over the field.
Mrs. Maynard, with her two children,
waited at the edge of the group
around the landing field. Maynard
embraced his wife, kissed her sever several
al several times as the children clamored to
obtain his attention.

FOR ONE AVIATION HEAD. '

Gen. Mitchell Advocates Centralized
Control Criticizes Liberty
, Motor.

We have
tt the goods
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Telephone
n &

"PALATKA

HARMACY
The Good Drug Store

PHOSPHATE MINE RESUMES.

. ... I

jndustr

Si

y.ln 1'olk County To -He In

creased.

WASHINGTON, Oct 18. A. sepa separate
rate separate department to control all Ameri American
can American aviation, military, naval and ci civilian,
vilian, civilian, was advocated by Brigadier

General Mitchell, chief of aviation in
the American Expeditionary Forces,
before the House sub -commit tee in investigating
vestigating investigating aviation expenditures to today.
day. today. This idea was being carried out in

Germany, the committee was told.
' Germany is now developing her air
service up to the minute," the Gen General
eral General said. "WRth her navy destroy destroyed,
ed, destroyed, she is devoting attention to the
creation of a tremendous air fleet."
General Mitchell criticized the Sig Signal
nal Signal Corps for failure to co-operate
with (representatives of the Air De

partment in France, whioh, he charg

ed, caused considerable delay in the
development of an efficient air force.
During April, May, and June, 1917,
the General complained, he could get
no response from Washington to his
requests for funds to conduct investi investigations.
gations. investigations. He Wade recommenda recommendations
tions recommendations for Spads, Brady, and Salmon

IN THE CHURCHES.
Presbyterian Church.
Rev. Donald MacQaeen, D. D., min

ister.
Services 11:30 a. m., and 8:30 p. m.
Subject morning, "The Mian Who
Missed."
Evening, "Caught in the Current."
Sunday school 10:15-a. m., Fred
Merrill superintendent.
Midweek service of prayer, Wednes Wednesday
day Wednesday at 8:30 pi in.
Visitors and strangers are cordklly
invited to worship with us.

BahT'OW, Oct. l&(Special.) The

Export Phosphate Company, whose
mines are located west of town and
whose plant has been shut down for
some time, is preparing to reopen

wiiwi treble the former capacity by
installation of new machinery which

has been purchased.

This company has also added large

ly to its holdings of phosphate land,

to the amount of $2,000,000. Renew

al of work at this plant will mean
employment of about 500 men at an

early date.

Seventh Day Adventists
114 S. 8th Street
Saturday Oct 18, Sabbath School

at 9:30 a. m. Quarterly service at

10:30 a. m.
Sunday night service at 8:15: Sub

ject, "The Language of Miracles," a

combination of the istame topic stud,
died last Sunday night.

Wednesday at 8:15 p. m. prayer

service. ; " . . . . - -.

WE MUST ADVERTISE FLORIDA

WOMAN'S CLUB MEETING.
The opening meeting of the Wo

man's club held in the club house Fri

day, afternoon was well attended, in
spite of the down pour of rain which
beganust at the hour of the meet meeting.
ing. meeting. The house looked exceptionally
lovely decorated in golden rod, golden
glow and ferns, which carried out the
club's solars, green end gold. The
'president's address was delivered in a
charming manner and was full of.

If any country, or section of coun

try could know a year in advance

that the tide of tourist travel would
get most heavily its way, it would be
worth millions to the people of that
country or section.

If any people or ection had a

monopoly of the means of reaching

the possible tourist traveler, for just

one season, that people and section

could ,'retire" after the season's
close and "live happily ever after."

But the tourist traveler himself

does not know where he is going next
season ,or even this season, until

well near to the time for him to

start. Therefore, the wise section

and country has adopted the plan of
appealing to him through pictures,
descriptions and stories from the
mouth of those who have seen and
enjoyed in person the things they

speak of.

inac every pan oi tne world is

appealing strongly to the money

laden American of today, is evident

wnen one dicks up sucn papers as

the New York Times and sees in it

quarter-pages telling you to "Make
Switzerland your headquarters."
"The land of Tell has been renowned

in history and literature for more

thn two thousand years." Quarter

pages bidding us "Visit Brave Bel Belgium.
gium. Belgium. Largest and best steamships;
best hotels; finest trains and auto automobile
mobile automobile rides." Columns beckon
you o'er the pathway of the sun" to

Japan and the Phillipines, Columns
crying, "Ho, for the West Indies."
"Restful days where summer spends

its winter." Advertisements of "all

outside accommodations and electric
fans," for a cruise to Egypt and In

dia, Holland, France, Sweden, Java,

Norway, the Bermudas, South Am.

"" tuumries utaiy and even
Germany) are biddng for the tourist

travel this season.
rttoB IT i ..:.

luiiua ace any warning in

mis: uoes fionda read that the

general advertising the railroad ad

rainsiration is going to. give this
State is not enough, because he rail

way administration is going to give
just as stronsr advertising for Maine

ana California and the Western
Rockies as it is going to give Flori-

iaa:

ii sportentiously "up to" Florida
to meet severe competition foi the
tourist travel this approaching sea sea-sonson.
sonson. sea-sonson. It is absolutely

that Florida present her case so
vividly, so persistently and so attract attractively,
ively, attractively, that there shall be no doubt

in ttve mind of the prospective trav

eler wnere he will go after h

eler after he has once read Florida
story.

xm otaie nas waked up, and is

snowing a rousing aptitude to go af after
ter after its rights. There never wag a
time when Florida needed more bl
the proper kind of advertising plac placed
ed placed in the proper place than this win.

ter. It is the last winter for sevo.l

years that Florida will be practically
"the logical place to go," for, after

mis, travel will be Eeneral nvr ft,

giobe, and the hitherto almot in,.

posible trip around the earth will be

come a comfort and pleasure at fi.

urea easily paid by the average man

or woman or traveling instinct.

fcvery city in Florida needs tn

get busy at once with a publicity
fund sufficient to make it known In

proper manner, and over a territory
which cover the ranges of its draw drawing
ing drawing posibilities. Tampa Tribune.

once

s

.nes, but these vre ignored."" Bu

uenerai rersimng arrived in

France conditions changed.

De Haviland four's and the Liber Liberty
ty Liberty motor were severely criticised by

the aviation chief. "The DeHavi

land four's are not good ships, and
we do not want them," he said. The
Liberty motor, General Mitchell as

serted, was "just a -?ood first at attempt"
tempt" attempt" It was made "by men who
know nothing about the conditions of

war," he continued, "and only in me
dium altitudes is it a good motor.

Methodist Church, Crescent City.
Sunday school at 10:30 a. m., A. E.

Lounds, Superintendent

Preaching 11:30 a. m. and 8 p. m.
Youn are cordially invited to come

and worship with us.

WILLIAM H. FUNK, Pastor.

HOLLISTER TO HAVE FAIR

Splendid Line of Exhibits and Amuse Amuse-ments
ments Amuse-ments November 15.

SHOE PRICES TO STAY HIGH.

Mcfclwain Denies Reports That He

Forecast a Recession.

NEW YORK, Oot 18. J. F. Mc-

Elwain, President of the Boot and

Shoe Manufacturers' Association, last

night gave out this statement:

'My remarks at the Middle States

Shoe Wholesalers' convention in New
York yesterday have been misquoted

m the papers today.

"The fact is that there has been a

decline of opproximately 20 per cent.

in the price of hides from the high

point reached in August, it, howev

er, must be borne in mind that shoe

prices have never reached the high

peak represented by the August price

of hides, and have in reality been
based on hide values no higher, and

in many cases considerably! lower,
than now prevail.

'Shoe factories have today a lar

ger volume of orders on hand than

can be taken care of during the next

three or four months. During that

period they will require a large quan quantity
tity quantity of hides, leather and other sup

plies. Desirable leather is extreme

ly scarce and cannot be quickly ob

tained.

'There is, therefore, no indication

of a recession in the price of shoes
in the near future. It is my opin opinion
ion opinion that shoe prices for Spring will

be no lower than at present."

DR. KUND MEYER DEAD.
LONDON, Oct. 18. Announcement

is maae in Berlin or the death on

Leipsic of Dr. Kuno Meyer, profes

sor of Celtic language and literature
at the University of Berlin.

nn ...wc mvwataon la extended to

every one to attend these services.
L. COPE, Elder.

Hollister is making great prepa preparations
rations preparations for a community fair on Sat Saturday,
urday, Saturday, November 15. There will be
exhibits of agricultural products, live
stock, economics, school exercises,
public addresses, community address addresses
es addresses and judging and awarding of prizes
No admission will be charged to
the fair, and everybody is cordially
invited to be present Ribbons and
prises have been offered for the exhib exhibits
its exhibits and the winners will be included
in the exhibit which the county will
make at the state fair.
- The credit for getting up the fair is
due, largely, to the following commit committee
tee committee C L. Whitehead, C. Brunner,
H. JL Custead, J. D. Livinerton, .and

L. S. Turbyville. f

St Marks Episcopal Church.
Holy Communion at 8: a. m.
. Sunday school at 9:45 ajn.
Morning prayer and sermon
11:00 a. m.
Evening prayer and sermon
8:00 p, m.

Everybody welcome. Come and wor worship
ship worship with us.
J. H. WEBBER-THOMPSON
Rector.

at

at

Profitable Well.
A Pennsylvania corporation that has

been prospecting for petroleum In Co Colombia
lombia Colombia has topped a well that produces
profitably after passing through oll oll-beaiing
beaiing oll-beaiing sunds.

111111
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m.

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:S

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N O T I C E

,'E the undersigned Auto Automobile
mobile Automobile Dealers and and
Garage Men, on and after
November 1st, 1919, will op operate
erate operate our business on a strictly
CASH basis:

E. R. BENEDICT
CENTRAL GARAGE
J. B. DARBY
J. R. FOWLER
FORD SALES CO
PALATKA OAKLAND CO.
PALATKA AUTO & SUPPLY
E. D. SIMS

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BRAIDENTOWN GETS TEACHERS

BRAIDENTOWJN, Oct 18.-iSpe-cial.)
The executive committee of
the Florida State Teachers' Associa Association
tion Association met here today and completed ar arrangements
rangements arrangements for the annual convention
of itfiat body. It will be in session

three days Dec 30 to Jan. 1, inclusive.

It is expected the convention will be

attended by teachers from all parts of
the state. Announcement

gram wUU be mjade later.

A'



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