Citation
The Ocaleean ensign

Material Information

Title:
The Ocaleean ensign
Place of Publication:
Ocala, Fla
Publisher:
Student body of the Ocala High School
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Biweekly
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Student newspapers and periodicals -- Florida -- Ocala ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Ocala (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Marion -- Ocala

Notes

Abstract:
Ocala is located in Marion County, Florida, and was selected as the county seat in 1846, shortly after Florida became a state. The name "Ocala" comes from the Timucuan Indians who were the first to inhabit the region and who named it "Ocalim" which means "big hammock." In the 1850s, wealthy farmers from South Carolina settled the area and began to develop plantations. The population soon rose to 1,200-1,500, and Ocala became a leading social and business center in Florida. However, the town suffered during the Civil War when population decreased to about 200. So many of its residents had enrolled in the Confederate Army that plantations were left to grow over with weeds and many businesses were abandoned. After the war, Ocala again prospered thanks to three flourishing industries: steamboats, citrus, and turpentine. Although Jacksonville remained the most popular Florida destination, many visitors boarded steam boats that took them down the St. John's River to nearby Silver Springs. Meanwhile, the citrus industry took off after two Ocala natives confirmed the discovery of phosphate in nearby Dunnellon. The Dunnellon Phosphate Company invested $1.2 million in 8,000 acres of land, making Florida's orange orchards world famous. Finally, the region's turpentine industry also became important, leading to the construction of stills and sawmills, as well as many of the homes that now make up Ocala's historic district. Ocala is located in Marion County, Florida, and was selected as the county seat in 1846, shortly after Florida became a state. The name "Ocala" comes from the Timucuan Indians who were the first to inhabit the region and who named it "Ocalim" which means "big hammock." In the 1850s, wealthy farmers from South Carolina settled the area and began to develop plantations. The population soon rose to 1,200-1,500, and Ocala became a leading social and business center in Florida. However, the town suffered during the Civil War when population decreased to about 200. So many of its residents had enrolled in the Confederate Army that plantations were left to grow over with weeds and many businesses were abandoned. After the war, Ocala again prospered thanks to three flourishing industries: steamboats, citrus, and turpentine. Although Jacksonville remained the most popular Florida destination, many visitors boarded steam boats that took them down the St. John's River to nearby Silver Springs. Meanwhile, the citrus industry took off after two Ocala natives confirmed the discovery of phosphate in nearby Dunnellon. The Dunnellon Phosphate Company invested $1.2 million in 8,000 acres of land, making Florida's orange orchards world famous. Finally, the region's turpentine industry also became important, leading to the construction of stills and sawmills, as well as many of the homes that now make up Ocala's historic district. The Ocaleean Ensign published its first issue on November 8, 1917. It appeared every other Thursday under the direction of students at the local high school. Although it is unclear when Ocala High School first opened its doors, 76 students were reportedly in attendance in 1877. (The school closed in the 1960s and was replaced by Forest High, which is still open today.) The Ocaleean Ensign was entered as second-class matter at the Ocala Post Office and cost $0.05 per copy or $0.75 per year. Miss Anna Belle Wesson was the paper's first editor-in-chief, but within a few days she was succeeded by Miss Rozelle Watson. The paper included sections on current history, music, home economics, as well as an "expression" section that included jokes told by students in class, dances, trips, and other school news. The Ensign also offered two athletic sections, one for boys and one for girls. Reporting focused mainly on the "Wildcats," Florida's well-known girls' basketball team which had a winning record at the time. It also reported on school events including classes offered and exam honor rolls. Also covered in the Ensign was local news in Ocala, as well as news about World War I, with tribute to alumni who had served or were serving in the military at the time. The Ocaleean Ensign was associated with the Ocala Evening Star, whose editors proofread the Ensign's content prior to printing. The Ocala Evening Star also reprinted articles from the Ensign and encouraged its readers to support the "brightest school paper."
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1917?
General Note:
Published every other Thursday during the school year.
Funding:
Funded by NEH in support of the National Digital Newspaper Project (NDNP), NEH Award Number: Project #00110855
Statement of Responsibility:
published by the student body of Ocala High School.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact Digital Services (UFDC@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
876830713 ( OCLC )
2014271550 ( LCCN )
ocn876830713
Classification:
LH1.O33 O332 ( lcc )

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Full Text
OCALEEAN

ENSIGN

OCALA, FLORIDA, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 1918
Vol. 1, No. 7.
5 Cents Per Copy

Honor Roll of Ocala

Graded and High School
The following students were neith neither
er neither absent nor tardy during the first
four months:
Fourth Grade, A
Pinckney Gement, Edward Schler Schler-eth,
eth, Schler-eth, Louise Clement, Francis Lum Lum-mus,
mus, Lum-mus, Adeline Malever, Delzelle Pas Pasteur.
teur. Pasteur. Fourth Grade, B
Jack Igou, Edgar Roberts, Sammy
Savage, Margaret Chace, Netalie
M in shall.
Fifth Grade, A
Louis Knight, Fred . LeSuer, Alice
Cullen, Frances Mclver, Mary Flem Fleming
ing Fleming Rawle, Chivalette Smith.
Fifth Grade, B
George Blowers, Hadly Shaw, Al Albert
bert Albert Bullock, Annie Laurie Boyd,
Marguerite Counts, Nettie Mathews,
Alta Watson, I via Waterman,
Sixth Grade, A
Marjorie Burnett, Mary Carolyn
Logan, Sara Rentz, J. W. Davis, El Elton
ton Elton Henderly, Karl Henderly, John
Troxler.
Sixth Grade, B
Fred Boyd, Charlie Brown, Carolyn
Peyser, Marie Jones, Louie Smoak,
Rae Barchan, Juanita Jones, Grace
Fausett, Marion Hunter, Chester
Robertson, Mabel Priest, Albert
Frampton, Melville Little, Merchel
Roberts.
Seventh Grade, A
Otto Beard, Wallace Canova, J. W.
Crosby, William Hall, Lynn Hollin Hollinrake,
rake, Hollinrake, Francis Pasteur, Lindsay Trox Troxler,
ler, Troxler, Susie May Counts, Mildred Cros Crosby,
by, Crosby, Jessie Dehon, Whildon " Gilmore,
Clifton Sexton.
Seventh Grade. B
Ernest Beaton, Robert Igou, James
Knight, Marion Lummus, Francis
Polly, Sidney Cullen, Minnie Slott,
Sophie Turch, Mary Woods, Brent
Woods, vvrv-.'.T t: ..
Eighth Grade, B
Maudie Blalock, Lyndall Mathews,
Marie Robertson, John Bouvier, Har Harry
ry Harry Holcomb, Ralph Lopez, Harold
Smith.
Eighth Grade, A
Elizabeth Wetherbee, Edith Ed Edwards,
wards, Edwards, Irene Cam, Alma Priest, Law Law-son
son Law-son Cassels, Moultrie Thomas, George
Akin, John Cook, Walter Troxlerr
Ninth Grade
Ralph Cleveland, Duncan Elliott,
Robert Hall, Reginald MacKay, Roy
Priest, J. D. Robertson, Ralph Sim Simmons,
mons, Simmons, Francis Talbott, Lily Clayton,
Alma Hall, Elizabeth Hocker, Mar Marjorie
jorie Marjorie Miller, Hazel McAteer, Mar Marjorie
jorie Marjorie Rogers, Annie Rooney, Rhoda
Thomas, Rose Wolf.
Tenth Grade
Homer A gnew, Marshall Cam, Wel Wel-lie
lie Wel-lie Meffert, Mary Bryce, Lenore Col Colby,
by, Colby, Miriam Connor, Dovie Gates,
Winnie Gordon, Irene Henderly, Lu-
cile Holleman, Estelle McAteer, Helen
Veal.
Eleventh Grade
Allen Hollinrake, Tom Wallis, Ruth
Simmons, Leonard Todd, Sara Hem Hem-don.
don. Hem-don. Twelfth Grade
Reuben Blalock, Harold Talbott,
Leonard Todd, Beatrice Boney, Myr Myrtle
tle Myrtle Brinson, Ann Benton Fuller, Dix Dix-onia
onia Dix-onia Roberts, Rozelle Watson and
Louise Spencer.
The following students did not fall
below 90 per cent in any subpect in
the second quarter's examinations:
Fourth . Grade, A: Louise Clement
88 per cent.; Maude Gary.
Fifth Grade, A: Ted Drake, Louis
Knight, Fred LeSueur, Louise Adams,
Charlotte Chazal,. Alice Cullen, Mary
Fleming Rawle, Frances Mclver,
Pauline Shafer, 95 1-5 per cent. .
Fifth Grade, B: George Blowers,
Albert Bullock, Deward Moxley, Tom
Whiteman, - Louise Adams, Annie
Laurie Boyd, Theresa Condrey, 99 1-5
per cent.; Marguerite Counts, Nettie
Mathews, Elizabeth Murray, Leonora
: Toffaletti.
Sixth Grade, A: Marjorie Burnett,
Mary Carolyn Logan, 99 1-5 per cent.;
Margaret Gerig, Ben Culverhouse.
Sixth Grade, B: Grace Fausett,
Caroline Peyser.
Seventh Grade, A: Reese Hunni Hunni-cutt,
cutt, Hunni-cutt, Mildred Crosby, Janet Culver Culver-house,
house, Culver-house, Jessie Dehon, Cornelia Dozier,
98 per cent.; Mea Dozier Haile.
Seventh Grade, B : Mildred Bullock,
Margaret Hocker, 98 1-5 per cent.;
Minnie Slott, James Knight.
Eighth Grade, A: Lawson Cassels,
Elizabeth Wetherbee, Edith Ed Edwards,
wards, Edwards, 97 5-8 per cent.
Eighth Grade, B: John Bouvier, 97

banter's tSoetrp
' i
, : : -

I.anier's characteristics as a poet
and despite his achievements in prose,
it is as a poet he must be considered
primarily are such as to separate
him from other American makers of
literature. In the first place, his
poetry has the glow and color of the
South; an imagination and rhythm,
which awaken an exultant delight in
the sensative reader. He opened new
possibilities of metrical and stanzaic
arrangements, and therewith revealed
new powers of word use and combi combinations
nations combinations in modem English poetry. In
passing, we might mention one form
of Lanier's work, which, although not
usually associated with him, nor ex extensively
tensively extensively used by him, is, neverthe
less, as clever ast the, works of those
who have made a specialty of it. This
is his humorous verse. The best of
the humorous poems are those in
negro dialect, one of which is "Uncle
Jim's Baptist Revival Hymn," writ written
ten written by Sidney Lanier and his brother,
Clifford. The story is told of a Geor Georgia
gia Georgia farmer, who driven to despera desperation
tion desperation upon rising each morning to find
that despite his f reedmen's hoes and
plows; the grass had quite outgrown
the cotton overnight set the whole
state in a laugh by exclaiming to a
group of his fellow-sufferers: "It's all
stuff about Cincinnatus leaving the
plow to go into politics for patriot-i
ism; he's just a-runnin' from the
mm nil J a 1 1.
grass." mis state 01 tmngs, wnen
the young roots of cotton were strug struggling
gling struggling against the hardier multitudes
of grass suckers is universally de described
scribed described in plantation language by the
phrase "in the grass." Uncle Jim
seems to have seen in it so much re resemblance
semblance resemblance to his own Baptist church,
overrun as it was, by the cares of this
world, that he has written the follow following
ing following hymn:
Ole mas'r blowin' the mornin' horn,
And he's blowed a powerful bias';
Comer Baptis, come hoe- the corn,
Cause ye's mightily in the grass,
Cause ye's mightily in the grass.
The bluejay squealed to the mockin'
bird, "Stop!
Don't you gimme none of your sass,
You better sing a song for the Baptis'
crop
Cause they's mightily in the grass,
Cause they's mightily in the grass."
And the ole crow croak, "Don' work,
no, no."
But the field lark say, "Yaas, yaas."
And I s'spec you mighty glad, you
debblish crow,
That the Baptis's is mightily in the
grass,.. :
That the Baptis's is mightily in the
grass. ,
Lord, thunder us up to th' plowing
ground,
per cent.; . Harry Holcomb, 97 per
cent.
Ninth Grade: Reginald MacKay,
Elisabeth Bennett, Alma Hall, Eliza Elizabeth
beth Elizabeth Hocker, 98 1-3 per cent.; Annie
Rooney. -
Tenth Grade: Virginia Beckham,
Miriam Connor, 96 3-5 per cent.; Sara
Dehon, Winnie Gordon, Lucile Holle Holleman,
man, Holleman, Estelle McAteer.
Eleventh Grade: Allen Hollinrake,
Marquerite Edwards, Sara Herndon,
96 1-2 per cent.
Twelfth Grade: Harold Talbott,
Agnes Burford, 95 2-5 per cent; Dix-
onia Roberts.
The high school pupils whose names
are given above were those who made
an average of 1 per cent or above
in the second quarter's examinations.
MARSHMALLOW ROAST FOR IN INVERNESS
VERNESS INVERNESS BOYS
The boys of the Ocala High school
team entertained the boys of the In Inverness
verness Inverness team at a dance and Marsh Marsh-mallow
mallow Marsh-mallow roast Friday night at Silver
Springs. Dancing was enjoyed thru thru-out
out thru-out the evening and later marshmal marshmal-lows
lows marshmal-lows were toasted by a large bonfire
a very enjoyable evening was spent
and the Inverness boys and the girls
who rooted for them left about ten ten-thirty.
thirty. ten-thirty. -
Freshie. "What keeps us from fall falling
ing falling off the earth when we are up-side
down?"
Teacher. Why, the law of gravity."
Freshie. "But how did we stay on
before the law was passed?"

Lord, pertin up the hoeing fast,

Yea, Lord have mercy on the Baptis'
patch
Cause dey's mightily in the grass,
Cause dey's mightily in the grass.
Lanier, too, had that rare gift, the
ability to write songs. His "Song of
the Chattahoochee River," "A Song
to the Future," and others are not
only to be read but set to music. In
the following lines from the "Song
of the Chattahoochee," notice the
music and rhythm:
Out of the hills of Habersham,
Down the valleys of Hall,
I hurry amain to reach the plain,
Run the rapid and leap the fall
Spht at the rock and together again,
Accept my bed, or narrow, or wide,
And flee from folly on every side
With a lover's pain to attain the plain
Far from the hills of Habersham,
Far from the valleys of Hall.
All down the hills of Habersham,
All through the valleys of Xall,
The rushes cried, abide, abide,
The wilful waterweeds held me thrall,
The laving laurel turned my tide,
The ferns and the fondling grass said,
"Stay."
The dewberry dipped for to work de
lay,
And the little reeds cried, "Abide,
abide,
Here in the hills of Habersham,
Here in the valleys of Hall."
But oh, not the hills of Habersham,
And oh, not the valleys of Hall
Avail: I am fain for to water the
plain.
Downward the voices of Dutv call-
Downward to toil and be mixed with
the main.
The dry fields burn, and the mills are
to turn,
And a myriad flowers mortally vearn.
And the lordly main from beyond the
plain
Calls o'er the hills of Habersham,
Calls through the valleys of Hall.
These gifts and powers, then tech
nical mastery, original thought, and
spiritual perception" and fervor are
to be recognized in his best poems. In
the shorter lyrics these characteristic
qualities shine out. What a knightly
devotion to womanhood is expressed
in "My Springs," as high a strain as
was ever sung to wife:
In the heart of the Hills of Life,
know
Two springs that with unbroken flow
forever pour their lucent streams
Into my soul's far Lake of Dreams,
O Love, O Wife, thine eves are thev .
My Springs from out whose shining
gray
Issue the sweet celestial streams
That feed my life's bright Lake of
ureams.
Oval, and large and passion pure
And gray and wise and honor-sure;
An Interesting Lecture
On Devastated Belgium
(By Major Woods)
A most interesting illustrated lec lecture
ture lecture on "Devastated Belgium," was
given last Wednesday evening by
Major Woods of Chicago, at the Tem Temple
ple Temple theater. The proceeds of this
lecture were donated to the M. C. R.
C. Association.
Mr. W. T. Gary introduced Major
Woods with a short address, which
was followed by a chorus by the St.
Cecilian Glee Club of the O. H. S.
Miss Porter honored the audience with
a vocal solo, "Our Flag Shall Con Conquer."
quer." Conquer." The words and music of this
patriotic song were composed by
Major Woods himself.
In his lecture. Major Woods showed
and explained the life of the Belgian
people, as it was five years ago when
he last visited there. One-unique cus custom
tom custom that they practice, is the use ot
the dog cart. Few horses are seen
driven by the peasants, as the dog
carts are used to carry products to
market. People, who have never seen
these carts, may ask if, the drivei
rides behind such a small animal as
the dog. No, not often, unless he be
a small child and his load light. The
drivers usually walk near the front
of the cart and guide the dogs.
Belgium was a country of beauti beautiful
ful beautiful architecture. The most beautiful
cathedrals and public buildings in the
world were here, but now the same,
sad story is to be told many of the

Soft as a dyine violet-breath,

Yet calmly unafraid of death;
Thronged like two dove-cotes of gray
doves,
With wife's and mother's and poor-
folks' loves.
And home-loves and high glory-loves
And science-loves and story-loves,
And loves for all that God and man,
In art or nature make and plan,
And lady loves for spidery laces,
And 'broideries and supple grace,
And diamonds and the whole sweet
round
Of littles that' large life compound.
And loves for God and God's bare
truth.
And loves for Magdalene and Ruth;
Dear eyes, clear eyes, and rare com complete,
plete, complete, Being neavenly sweet, and earthly
sweet,
marvel that God made you mine
t or when he frowns, 'tis then ye
shine.
Lanier's attitude towards nature
was that of a passionate lover; a pan pan-thiest
thiest pan-thiest who saw God in everything.
The culmination of his art and
thought and spiritual force is found
in the "Hymn of the Marshes." Listen
to the following lines from "The
Marshes of Glynn," and you will see
the reverence:
Glooms of live oaks, beautifully braid braided
ed braided and woven,
In intricate shades of the vines that
, . myriad-cloven,
Clamor to the forks of the multiform
boughs;
Emerald twilights,
Virginal skylights;
Wrought of the leaves to lure to the
whisper of vows,
As lovers pace timidly down the green
colonnades .
Of the dim sweet woods; of the dear
dark woods,
Of the heavenly woods and glades,
That run to the marginal sand-beach
within
The wide-sea marshes of Glynn.
As the marsh-hen secretly builds on
the watery sod
Behold, I will build me a nest on the
greatness of God;
I will fly in the greatness of God as
the marsh-hen flies
In the freedom that fills all the space
'twixt the marsh and the skies:
By so many roots as the marsh-grass
sends in the sod
I will heartily lay me a-hold on the
greatness of God.
Oh, like to the greatness of God is the
greatness within
The range of the marshes, the liberal
marshes of Glynn.
Thus we see that Lanier's poetry
was not confined to one narrow poem,
but consists of many kinds.
M. E., '19.
buildings have been shattered by the
shells of the German guns, but some
have been saved.
In one instance, there was a mas massive
sive massive building of marble and stone,
with hand-carved friezes, which is
occupied by a large brokerage com company.
pany. company. Mr. Woods explained that the
company had grown too large for its
building and had rented business
rooms in the other building. "No,"
he said, "the Belgians are not like
we, Americans, for had this building
been in New York, it would have been
torn down and a ten or twelve-story
building would have taken its place."
This shows their love and apprecia appreciation
tion appreciation of beauty in architecture. Wood
is not used in their buildings, but
stone and cement. They are made to
last thousands of years.
Many pictures were shown of the
Belgian towns after the coming of the
German armies. Nothing remained
but shattered buildings and a few
homeless women or children along
the streets.
Major Woods explained to his au audience
dience audience the great help that the Red
Cross has been to the crippled nation.
They look to it and the Americans as
their only deliverers. America has
witnessed the sad but courageous
struggle of this little country, and
will be to Belgium all that she thinks
our nation is her deliverer from the
Huns.
Harold K., (reciting on Milton, who
lived on Bread street, London): "He
lived on the comer of Bread and
Milk."

Demonstrated Patriotism
In the Ocala High School
A concrete illustration of the war
spirit of our school is to be found in
the War Saving Stamps and Liberty
Bonds which have been purchased by
members of the grammar and high

school grades as well as in the num number
ber number of Red Cross members and the
stars in our Service Flag. The fol following
lowing following is a list of the number of each
in the several grades:
Fourth Grade, A
11 Thrift Stamps, 1 War Saving
Stamp, 4 Liberty Bonds, 8 Red Crosa
members, 6 stars in the Service
Flag.
Fourth Grade, B
11 Thrift Stamps, 1 War Saving
Stamp, 5 Liberty Bonds, 6 Red Cross
members and 3 stars in the Service
Flag.
Fifth Grade, A
9 Thrift Stamps, 3 War Saving
Stamps, 6 Liberty Bonds, 4 Red Cross
members and 6 stars in the Service
Flag.
Fifth Grade, B
5 Thrift Stamps, 4 Liberty Bonds,
6 Red Cross members and 5 stars
in the Service Flag.
Sixth Grade, A
58 Thrift Stamps, 2 War Saving
Stamps, 16 Liberty Bonds.
Sixth Grade, B
58 Thrift Stamps, 1 War Saving
Stamp, 5 Red Cross members, and 6
stars in the Service Flag.
Seventh Grade, A
3 Thrift Stamps, 1 War Saving
Stamp, 5 Liberty Bonds, 7 Red Cross
members and 6 stars on the Service
Flag.
Seventh Grade, B
9 Thrift Stamps, 2 Liberty Bonds,
5 Red Cross members and 16 stars in
the Service Flag.
Eighth Grade, A
63 Thrift Stamps, 4 War Saving
Stamps, 15 Liberty Bonds, 8 Red
Cross members and 1 star on the Ser Service
vice Service Flag.
Eighth Grade, B
3 Liberty Bonds, 4 Red Cross mem members
bers members and 8 stars in the Service Flag.
High School
29 Thrift Stamps, 1 War Saving
Stamp, 28 Liberty Bonds and 23 Red
Cross members.
A Liberty Bond has been purchased
by the grammar and high school and
is to be a permanent nucleus of a
fund for the school library.
This writer should use pen and ink
Printer.
Valentine Party Party-Given
Given Party-Given By Miss Thomas
Miss Rhoda Thomas entertained
sixteen of her boy and girl friends at
a pretty valentine party at her home
last evening, the occasion being her
sixteenth birthday. The dining room
and living room lights were shaded in
red, and many red and white hearta
were used as decorations. Several
valentine games were played and also
progressive conversation. On pretty
heart shaped score cards, the boys
made five-minute dates with each girl
present. They matched hearts for
partners and then went into the din dining
ing dining room, which was a bower of
hearts. Instead of the regular table
covers, at alternate places were largt
red and white hearts, and ropes of
little red and white hearts were
strung from the chandelier to the
comers of the table. The main dec decoration
oration decoration was a large fern, from which
hung many Cupids. Ice cream was
served in heart shaped baskets with
cake and mints.
The hostess then let each guest
cut a slice from the large pink and
white cake and its contents gave
away the heretofore well-kept secret,
that it was the hostess' birthday. Miss
Ruth Simmons cut the ring and so ac according
cording according to tradition will be the little
circle's first bride. Miss Marion Mef Meffert
fert Meffert will be an heiress, and Messrs.
Guy Lane and Harry Holcomb will be
old bachelors. The guests spent the
remainder of the evening taking
flashlight pictures.
Mis3 Thomas' other guests were
Misses Jewel Bridges, Ulainee Bar Bar-nett,
nett, Bar-nett, Lucile Gissendaner, Elizabeth
Hocker, Elisabeth Bennett and Mary
Lane, Messrs. Frank Rentz, Reginald
MacKay, Ralph Cullen, Robert Blow Blowers,
ers, Blowers, Walter Troxler and Walter Har Hardin.
din. Hardin. --
'I haven't slept for days.
"Smatter, sick?"
'Naw, I sleep nights."



7 : '

THE OCALEEAN ENSIGN

CURRENTS HISTORY

'

57 .-

11 ; 9 0 $ 9 9 i

According to reports from Amstei-

Published Every lOlher Thursday by idana tiie GeinZ?$&?T? Flanders
the Student Body of the jare greatly discontented with the

- - j 5T

OCALA HIGH SCHOOL

5 Cents Per Copy.

course taken by the officials against

j strike leaders. In a few cases Belgian
j laborers, forced by the Germans to

Business Manager.

Circulation Manager
Advertising

75 Cents Per Year J work, have been incited by the Ger-

jman soldiers to go on a strike.
STAFF i On the night of February 3rd, a

j bomb was thrown by seme strikers at
Ithe imperial palace in Berlin. Twen

ty-five arrests have been made.
More than 125,000 Chinese art art-helping
helping art-helping the cause of the Allies in
France and Mesopotamia, doing
necessary, if not military, work.

Waldek Zhyszko has won tht
heavyweight , wremtling championship
of the world. Zhyszko is an assumed
name, chosen on account of his real
name of Czganiewicz, being bad to
pronounce. Pathfinder.
Twenty-five per cent of the men
examined for the" draft were found to

physically disqualified, against

thirty-two per cent in our civil war.

The proportion of' disqualifications
was almost exactly thsame , in urban
as in rurT.' communities. ' !
A bill "has "been passecf in Congress
authorizing the . secretary of . war to
provide badges to men of draft age
who' have been exempted 'or1 reje'eted

contracts nave Deen made Dy tne

Editor
Editor-in-Chief Rozelle Watson
T VAitn - Miriam Connor
Literary Editors Anna BfelIe Wesson
Local Editor. ........... .Sidney Perry Perry-Current
Current Perry-Current History Allen Holllnrake
Exchange Editor. . . .Elizabeth Hocker
Music Editor - Agnes Burford
Home Economics. . . .Elizabeth Bennett
Expression Editor ..Beatrice Boney
Boys' Athletics......... Wellie Meffert
Girls Athletics. ...... ..Louise Spencer
Bfuagrers

..Reuben Blalock

...... Callie Gissendaner i be

............ tuen scripting

Harold Klock

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 1918

GRABiMAR' SClIOOL SECTION
, , Reporters . .
8th Grade Marie Robertson
7th Grade A. , . . . . . Cornelia Dozier
7th Grade B. .. ..Margaret Hocker
Ktllth Grade B Annie MacKay
"!- -EXCHANGE CIST -

The Tech, fioston; Ma'ss."1
The Technique, Atlanta, Ga.
The" Oracle Montgomeryy Ala.
The Oracle, Mount Vernon, N. Y.
Saint LucienneJFort, Pierce, Fla.
The Tattler,, Pensacola,,. Fla. .,
The Cocoahut,,.Cocoanut Grove, Fla.
The Washington4 Tiger, Tampa, Fla.
The Fcho, Orlando Fla:. ' v.
The Atfahfa Prep-Prep, vAtlanta,
Ga .". r- ,' - . -
The Florida Flambeau Tallahas-'
see, Fla.
The Florida' Alligator, Gainesville,
Fla. : ' ' ' ' :
The Southern, Sutherland; Fla.
Utolakean, Kissimmee, Fla.
The Stetson Weekly" Collegiate, De-LandFla;1-
' -s ":
The Sun' Dial, Lynchburg, Va. "
The Gopher, Orlando, Fla.
The Rollins ; Sandspur," Winter
Park, Fla.
The Florida Schoolroom, Gaines Gainesville,'
ville,' Gainesville,' Fla;
JSOMS WAYS TO
KILL A SCHOOL PAPER

1. Don't buy a paper borrow your
classmate's be a sponger.
2. Look up the ads. and trade with
the fellow who doesn't advertise be
a chump. ' ' '
3. Nver hand in articles, and be
sureto criticise everything in the
paper be a knocker.
4. If you are a member of the
staff, don't attend to business be a
skirker.
5. Tell you neighbor he can get
more news for Jess money be a
squeeze. .
6. If you can't hustle and make
the paper a success be a corpse.
Exchange.

All the year the different teachers
have been greatly troubled with the
editors of the Ensign. . Having no
regular staff room, we were compelled
to run around from one room to an another
other another with our material. If all the
teachers happened to have business
to transact in their rooms we were
outcasts, and had to do as we
could. Prof. Cassels has generously
donated to us the teachers' rest room"
which we shall use for a staff room.
We are sure that all the high school
teachers will join us in extending to
him our thanks, for they will no long longer
er longer be troubled with us in their rooms.

French to a shipbuilding plaht iri Sa

vanriah " for thfrty'-six steel mine
sweepers to be .completed . within six
months. They will he 150M feet long
1 vr!: r -i MUSIC " .

"Music resembles poetry, in each
are nameless graces "which no meth methods
ods methods Tieaeh and which ; a master-hand
aloW can "reach." ' ? - '
A new interest has been created in
miisicj-and besides the club, a quartet
has"4 been ' organized consisting of
Pari Fausetf, soprano ; Harold Klock
tenor; ! Anna Belle Wessbri alto, and
Robert Blake base. These' "students
all 'have'g'obo! voices a Ad are working
hard to enter the school meet' tq be
held " at Dade5 City1 , soon.' We' expect
them, to enter and to come back with
the vfctbrious laurels. "This quartet
has been asked to ttake 'part In a pa patriotic
triotic patriotic program to be' given ' at " the
WoThaaWs' club on "the sixteenth. On
the fourth at the leqture for the bene benefit?
fit? benefit? :of the 'Red Cross,1 the ' Glee Club
sang .two patriotic ,t songs splendidly,
and added very much to the enjoy
ment of the; program! r
The interest this year in music has
been a great addition to the school
and the 'Glee Club" is in almost con constant
stant constant demand by the different literar
societies. , Soon it is to render some
French songs which are being looked
forward to with a great deal of pleas pleasure.
ure. pleasure. ;
We are glad to see so much interest
taken in the music for as Leland says
"Of "all the arts, great music is the
art to raise the soul above all earthly
storms." " ' "

Qifyt Commercial 33anfe
of cala

Capital Stock, $50,000
21 Commcrctai 3Sanfe

SPECIAL SAVINGS DEPARTMENT
FOUR PER CENT INTEREST COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY

For four Valuables in Our New Absolute
Fire and Burglar-Proof Vaults

&o accounts too large

one too mall

AMATEUR PLAY AT THE
TEMPLE THIS EVENING

There has been a difference of opin opinions
ions opinions as to the cause of Charles Carn Carn-ahan's
ahan's Carn-ahan's absence from school. It has
been suggested that he was at home
recuperating, or perhaps he was prac practicing
ticing practicing on his piccolo, or possibly he is
studying. But the most reliable in information
formation information was obtained from a sug suggestion
gestion suggestion made by Miriam Connor,
something as follows: "Possibly he
'is at home working on his boat since
he said that he would have it in run running
ning running shape by next Friday night."
One of the most interesting pro
grams ever given by the literary so society
ciety society of the O. H. S., was given on
February 4th. The subject was La Lanier
nier Lanier and every number, indeed, did
justice to him, one of the south's tru truest
est truest poets. This program was the
first one held this year and has set a
lively "pace for the other programs to
come up to if possible.
We hope that the students will do
as Mr. Hardin said: "Make the best,
of every opportunity." Time will
soon be here far the term of 1917-18
to close. Let no one live in remorse
in the future because of having
thrown away this year's time.

It is always a pleasure tohelp a
good cause., and the more pleasant the

method the greater the pleasure. One
of the most pleasant ways in which

you can help the great Red Cross
work will be to buy a ticket to the
performance of "Mrs. Briggs of the
Poultry Yard," which will be given at
the Temple by local talent this eve

ning. The play is an improvement
on and a dramatization of the im immortal
mortal immortal narrative of unconscious
humor, "Mrs. Wiggs of the Cabbage
Patch," which shone the face of the
country with smiles a few years ago.

Bri-rgs has thought of several

Mrs.

things .that didn't occur to Mrs.
Wiggs, and will thereby secure u
more efficacious clovehitch on the
tickle boxes of her audience. Some
of our smartest young folks and some
of our smartest folks who are not so
young will be in the caste, but noth nothing
ing nothing will be old, not even the jokes, all
of which will be distinct improve improvements
ments improvements on the seven original funmak funmak-ers
ers funmak-ers thought up by Noah and his sons
in the ark. The costumes will be even
more original than the jokes, and the
combination will have even Coburn's
minstrels beaten more than seven
blocks. Don't miss this occasion ; if
you do you won't get over your disap disappointment
pointment disappointment before the f ourtli of July.
Tickets on sale at the Ccirt Phar Pharmacy
macy Pharmacy and the curtain at the Temple
will rise at 8:30.

What is the matter with the Sen Senior
ior Senior class? They seem to be dead to
the world. Evidently they are not re realizing
alizing realizing that this is their last year in
high school. Let us get some "pep"

in you and have a good time the rest

of the time. Next year we will miss
our old classmates.

Anyone wishing to show his loyal loyalty
ty loyalty to the Ensign may do so by pre presenting
senting presenting any of the following articles
to the staff room: Calendar, Picture,
waste-basket, dictionary, pillow, pen pennant,
nant, pennant, rug or rocking chair.

.... JOKES

"Friends, Romans,1 Countrymen,"
voceriferated the schoolboy in the
oratorical contest, "lend- me your
eas.",,"-. "f " 44 " .- v"
'"Ttfere" commented 'the mother of
a' defeated pupil, sneeringly, "that's
Mr&p Higg's Boy. He Hvouldnt be his
mother'isbn If Ke "wash'tTborrowing
something- ' ' '
Son reaches across the table and
helps himself to the sugar.
Father: "Haven't you a tongue,
son?"
" Son: "Sure, but it's not as long as
my arm."

Sunday School Instructor, "And the
father of the Prodigal Son fell on his.
neck and wept. Now, Alexander
Bonetop; tell the children : why the fa father
ther father wept." .
: Aleck; ."Huh; I giiess you'd' weep
tod, if you fell on your neck."
Caesar's dead and buried,"
And so is Cicefdr
And wherever those' two old gents
. have gone
I wish their works would go. Ex

Smart Freshie "I can tell you how
much water goes over Niagara Falls.

to the quart."

Delighted Senior, "How much?"
Freshie, "Two pints." Ex.
(Continued on Last Page)

THE CANON OF THE YELLOW YELLOW-.
. YELLOW-. . STONE

We stood over the lower falls of
the Yellowstone river. Six feet be below
low below us the current rushed past" as if
wild, to leap over the cliff, and fall
two hundred and fifty feet with a
deafening roar into the canon. The
sun was just "above the horizon and,
as" its slanting rays fell on the sides
of the canon, they seemed' to be high highly
ly highly painted in all shades of red, yellow
and brown.
Firs grow thickly around the top
of each side but only a few were
brave enough to venture over the
edge, and those that did wrapped
their roots around the rocks and held
on for "dear life. Below the rockh
came a long space where nothing but
gravel stayed and where nothing
could maintain a footing, or do ought
but slide into the rushing torrent be below.
low. below. On a high crag to our right was a
large eagle's nest. Even as we watch watched,
ed, watched, an eagle rose from his perch near
the nest and soared out of sight. Di Directly
rectly Directly across from us, only much
higher , was another platform for
sight seeing where a group of tour tourists
ists tourists stood spell bound by the beauty.
In a few minutes, we climbed the
steps to the brink of the canon and
proceeded along the very edge, our
view from here was still more won wonderful,
derful, wonderful, we were looking down on the
canon. It was sublime! the roar of
the water, as it plunged over the cliff,
the turbulent rapids of the river,
and the color of the sides made an
impression never to be forgotten.
E. H.

We Sell Superior Brand Fertilizers
For All Crops
OCALA SEED STORE
W. D. CARN, Prop.
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL
GARDEN, FIELD AND FLOWER
SEED
Farm Tools and Light Hardware
OCALA FLORIDA
Buy and Sell Peanuts, Velvet Beans
and Other Seeds

Druggi

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sis and

Seedsmen ' '
- -)
All kinds of Toilet Articles. Largest
line of Hair Brushes in the City Also
a fine line of Cut Glass. Stationery and
Perfumes: : ". ' : : ' : 'r :
Fresh Garden Seed of all Kinds

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WE DEAL IN ONLY GOOD THINGS TO EAT

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Try the Famous "Royal Scarlet" Canned Goods,-the Best on
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O. K. TEAPOT GROCERY

L. J. BLALOCK

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L. J. BLALOCK & BROTHER
Dealers in " , : f .
FURNITURE
House Furnishings, Sewing Machines
Trunks, Bags, Rugs, Etc.

422 North Magnolia Street .-.

OCALA, FLORIDA I

Wi)t Bcltcatcssnt 3ljop
r f (OCALA HOUSE BLOCK) : A
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Has the Good Things
For the Lunch
bergtftng (gootJ to at

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I r 1 i (J -H- 3 ;nrj Np.?ov? - , ..... , i , ; :

Ocala Photo Go.
H.W. JOHNSON, Prop..
We do First Class Work and
Our Prices are very reasonable.
Send Us your Kodak work
Prompt over ' Satisfaction
Attention f JSHETS ST6R Guaranteed
The
Book
War Boois - "
Service Pins,
Flags, Stationery
yOi r. fZ .,". .. S5: SS-.S'. .O1.
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Will Trade tor All Kinds '
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STUART MULE CO.
McDUFFY'S OLD BARN &
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: AMERICAN FRUIT
! STORE '
Fruits, Vegetables,
Cigars, Tobaccos
: and Cold Drinks
No. 9 N. Magnolia Street
COLD AND HOT DRINKS
FINE BOX CANDIES
FRUITS AND CIGARS

Shop

9: Books, Stationery .
: School Sufrplrk1 'i

At

--,-S u

fj TrqxleIR

PHONE 13
CLAYTON
Cleaning and Pressing
- It may be of interest to the stu student
dent student body that we are soon I lo liave
a male quartet.' The quartet will be
ready to appear in public in about a
month, and will be able to give at
least one encore. Comprising this
quartet are Klock, Wesson, MacKay,
Blake.

:L j - - - ' Creations in J '.
7;' ; '";:": i Z

A CONSERVATION CALENDAR
Monday, well say, is our "heatless
day,"
One cinder, one flicker, one coal,
Tuesday, well this is our "meatless
day,"
One oyster, one herring, one sole.
Wednesday, oh, this is our "wheatles3
day,"
One corncake, one dodger, one
scone.
Thursday, we must have a "sweetless
day,"
One pickle, one lemon, one bone.
Friday will make a good "eatless
day,"
One cheerful and glorious fast.
Saturday, call it a "treatless day,"
For all reciprocities past.
But Sunday, may Hoover forgive us,
we pray,
If we should all happen to feel
A little more hungry than usual to to-day,
day, to-day, And once more eat a square meal.
We are glad that Louise Spencer is
well and at school again.
j ,Mr.?HeywardBridges was a visitor
on the; campus Thursday.
Frederick 4Winer has returned to
school after a few days illness.
Jess Dehon of the seventh grade
has just recovered from a bad case of
measles.
Callie Gissendaner has recovered
from the measles and is again attend attending
ing attending school.
A number of teachers from the
Ocalasqhqqls wentto Mcintosh. Sat Saturday
urday Saturday to attend' the meeting" of the
teachers' association.
The Ensign staff and friends of An An-na
na An-na -Belle Wessbn I sympathized with
herduring her illness and are exceed exceed-ingly
ingly exceed-ingly glad to have her back at school.
Quite' a bit of Interest is being
manifested on the "ad." which ap appeared
peared appeared in the last issue of the En Ensign
sign Ensign from Fishel's store, offering $1
for the best ad., and a number of
answers or applications have been
turned over to the advertising mana manage
ge manage ri"" ?;'l;:0 - .
We have just received a copy of
"The Oracle" of Montgomery, Ala. It
is ; a most interesting school maga magazine
zine magazine in every department.
"The' (Saint Lucienne" of Fort
Pierce is an attractive magazine. The
articles are good and the jokes are
not of the canned variety, though we
would suggest that they have a few
more.
We gladly welcome all exchanges,
whether great or small.
Mr. W. V. Newsom has received a
letter from his brother, George (Tin (Tinker)
ker) (Tinker) Newsomy-f rom-Base 6, wherever
that is, - but presumably in England,
as he 'stated he was now paid off in
pounds instead of dollars. Mr. New Newsom"
som" Newsom" wrote his people some time ago
that he would sail on the 28th and
would enter an English aviatioii
training school, so that is where he
probably is. He said there was an another
other another Ocala boy there, J. D. Metcalf,
formerly with Edward Tucker of this
city. Mr. Newsom stated that his
mechanic told him he could soon take
a flight. - ' ;-
7th Grade B Program for February
15th, 1918
Song, "And -They Called : it -Dixie
Land Class. .
Recitation, "Valentine's ' Love"
Christine Close.
Charade Sidney Cull en and Hugh
Chace. T V t " k 1 "': ' V
Boola Song Annie MacKay, Mai Mai-garet
garet Mai-garet Hocker and Brent Woods. v
Recitation Dorothy Crawford.
Original Valentine; Story Nellie
Old. i'i . ;
Valentine Box Class.
LINCOLNS AND ST; "
VALENTINE'S PROGRAMS
The third division of the Ocala
High School. Literary Society win en entertain
tertain entertain the remainder of the . school
and any visitors who will -honor us
with their presence Friday morning,
Feb. 15th, at 8:15, with the follow following
ing following program: "'"
Patriotic song: Glee Club.
Address on Lincoln: Rev., Stephens.
Essay, "Lincoln's Life and Strug Struggle
gle Struggle for an Education"; Blanche Hor-
reii. ; y ,
Lincoln jokes.
Lincoln's Gettysburg address:
Leonard Todd. '
Essay, "Origin of St. Valentine":
Sarah Dehon.
Valentine song: Glee CIud.
. Recitation: Jewel Bridges.
Distribution of valentines.

TWO MORE DEFEATS
FOR THE O. II. S.

In a very one-sided game in San San-ford
ford San-ford the O. H. S. girls lost by a score
of 50 to 5. It was one-sided because
of the illness of Callie Gissendaner,
on whom the success of the O. H. S.
team seemed to depend.
The O. H. S. girls put up a good
game but lacked confidence in them themselves.
selves. themselves. There was no star playing
done by either side except the work
of Ruth Simmons and Mertie Bla Bla-lock,
lock, Bla-lock, Ocala's guards, who played &
beautiful game and, Cora Lee Lillis,
one of the forwards for Sanford, who
made nearly all the points for that
team.
The line-ups were:
Ocala Forwards, Loureen Spen
cer, Ella Mae Rivers; centers, Kath Kathleen
leen Kathleen Leitner,f Louise Spencer; guards,
Ruth Simmons, Mertie s Blalock. '
I Sanford Forwards, Mae : Thrashei,
Cora 'Lee' Lillis; centers Helen Hand,
Helen rPedk; ? guards, - Ethel Henry,
Dorothy-Rumph., i . '
Mr. Loonis Blitch refereed both
games.?: In' Orlando the . game was
lively,' and-full of "pep," and at the
end of the first ! half the score stood
6' tfc&f'K, iru -
:, ; The'. team work of Orlando's- cen centers,
ters, centers, Annie; Bruce and Sarah ; Davis,
and- the work of . Ruth Simmons and
Mertie 'Blalock' were the; features of ;
the-game. f. -Jt. -.Hi .
The inability of Ocala's forwards . to
makevgoals was. the cause of Ocala's
defeat, -for the ' teams were well
matched and the game was lively to
the end.
' TheTBCOret Orlando; 30; Ocala; 6.
(The Kne-ups were: . , . , , " ;
Orlando Forwards, Ann, Taylor,
Elizabeth Robinson; centers, Annie
Bruce, Sarahs Davis; guards, Hen Henrietta
rietta Henrietta Rock,. Frances Rock
' Ocala-r-Forwards,, Loureen Spencer,
Ella Mae Rivers; centers, , Kathleen
Leitneiy Louise Spencer; guards, Ruth
Simmons, Mertie Blalock. , ,
; ' After the game in Sanford the San Sanford
ford Sanford girls entertained at a .dance at
the? Hotel Cams in honor of the
Ocaiagirls. , Music was furnished by
an orchestra and the dance was full
of "pep," Those girls , who did not
dance had a good time for ,the. San Sanford
ford Sanford girls were lovely, hostesses.
In-- Orlando both teams were en entertained
tertained entertained at a dance at, the home of
Mr. and Mrs. Leroy Giles. , Music was
furnished by a ,Victrola and: punch
was served throughout the evening.,
OCALA HIGH SCHOOL : V"
ORCHESTRA ORGANIZED
Last Wednesday night a jolly
bunch of young people met at Sid Sidney
ney Sidney Perry's home and organized a
music club. The -object of this' club is
to' prepare music-for. the high school,
to broaden our knowledge f music,
to make ourselves , happy and have a
good time, but yet work. We are very
enthusiastic over our work and hope
the orchestra will add some "atmos "atmosphere"
phere" "atmosphere" to the West Coast School Meet
in Dade City, March .1. and 2.
.The members -of this - club are;
Miriam Connor, piano; Margaret Lit Little,
tle, Little, mandolin; Sidney Perry, Lyndal
Mathews and Cevie Roberts, first vio violin;
lin; violin; Ann Benton Fuller and Nat Mayo,
second violin; Dovie Gates, French
alto;- Bessie ' Marshall, trombone;
Mabel Akin, clarinet; Francis Tal Tal-bott,
bott, Tal-bott, cornet; Charles Carnahan, pic piccolo.
colo. piccolo. - '
RED CROSS PLAY
MRS. BRIGGS OF THE POULTRY
YARD
Characters
Mrs. Briggs, (A woman of busi business),
ness), business), Mrs. Alice Van Davis.
Mrs. Briggs' family: Ralf, D. Niel
Ferguson ; Jimmie, ' Wellie Meffert;
Alvira, -Miss, Lucile Gissendaner;
Melissa, Miss Catherine Strunk."
Silas Green, (A near relation), J.
J. Gerig. - 'i.,'- '' 1 -
.Mr, Lee, (A wealthy neighbor), D.
B. Mayo.
- Virginia Lee, (Mr. Lee's daughter),
Miss Beatrice Boney.
v Daisy Thornton, (A friend of Misi.
Lee),. Miss Pearl Fausett.
Mrs. O'Connor," (With no liking for
goats), Miss Carolina. Borden.
Mandy. Bates, (Whose tongue wili
stumble), Miss Alice .Bullock.
The curtain' goes up' promptly at
8:30. " Don't forget the date, Thurs Thursday,
day, Thursday, Feb.. 14th, Temple theater.
The seventh grade has three injur injured
ed injured girls in its room: Clifton Sexton
has a broken arm, Mildred Crosby has
a severe wound in her hand and Cor Cornelia
nelia Cornelia Dozier has a broken finger. AH
are doing well but Clifton.
$1 free for best "ad." submitted ,by
student. Option to accept or reject
any or all "ads." Fishel's Myfavrit
Store. 1-31-tf

Miltiuzxv
Always to be found at

Oc&la House Block
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ICDOHTIIRvT A IT 'TIP

PROPERLY WRITTEN POUCIES PAY

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ESTABLISHED 1885

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OCALA
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Gasoline, Oils and Accessories

Phone Seven-Eight
."". !. st' ..; ..;. ..; yi yl
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Steam Gleaning
; and Pressing

Phone 101
j Ocala Seed Store
FOR RESULTS
PUT YOUR AD. IN

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Opposite Gerig't Drug Store

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The Ensign

si



THE
Ocala

N

aoonai

auk

JOKES
Patsy: "Mr. H does moonlight af affect
fect affect farming?"
Mr. H.: "I don't know, but moon moonlight
light moonlight nights sure have effect on some
people."

Z Invites the Patronage
Z' of the Teachers
! and Pupils of the

Ocala High
School

Capital and
Surplus
$90,000.00

JON. L. EDWARDS
PRESIDENT.

be

Ellen: "No. women should not

brought to the level with men."

Miss Williams: "Why, Ellen, wom

en are just as good as men."

Ellen: "Why, they're ten times

better. The best man on earth is not
as good as the worst woman.'

Athletics.

" 'tt
. . : Be-

Miss W.: "Why is Daniel Webster

likened to a cathedral?"

Tom: "I dunno, unless 'twas be

cause he had such a big 'dome'."

Mr. M. : "Mother, why is Wellie

whistling and singing around the
house so much tonight?"

Mrs. M.: "Why, I think he made

seventy per cent in one of his exami

nations."

Kathleen: "What's the use in
studying about electricity? We don't

need it." '"

Mr. H.: "What is the use in girls

vearing dresses?"

Miss Doke (In Sunday school
class) : "Margaret " Little, can you
tell me where Cain went after he had
killed Abel?"
Margaret L.: "He went to bed."
Miss Doke: "How do you make that
out?"
Margaret I.: "Well, its in the chap chapter
ter chapter that Cain, after he had killed
Abel, went to the land of Nod."

Miss Doke: "If you should say
Misses Brown, there would be two
Brown ladies."

Mr. H., (dscussing electricity):
"Who can explain the word 'am 'ampere'?"
pere'?" 'ampere'?" - ':' ' -
Callie (who lost track of , her book
during examination) : "Wonder what
that has to do with electricity. 'Am 'Amber'
ber' 'Amber' is a certain kind of tobacco."

What was Ruth Simmons crying
for down at Sanford last Friday
night ? "I don't . know."

Charles Carnahan: "If I should
kiss you, would you call for help?"
Miriam C: "Would you need it?"

MOSES
GROCERY CO.

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Phones 209 and 92
Ocala, Florida

CLARKSON
HARDWARE CO.
AGENTS FOR
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VHONE417

Chinese Version of a School Teacher

Teachee, teachee,
All day teachee,
Night markee papee,
Nervee, all creepee,
No one kissee, -No
one huggee;
Poor old maidee,
No one lovee.

Lieut. Blake was running the boys
of Company B through the leg exer

cise, m wtucn tne leg is liitea paral parallel
lel parallel with the hip. On seeing one boy

out of step, Blake blurts out: "Hi,
there, you fellow with both legs up,

put your left leg down."

. BASEBALL

A very important meeting of the j

baseball team was held last week, for
the purpose of electing officers. The
following were elected:
Reuben Blalock manager, Wellie
Meffert secretary, Francis Talbott
custodian. The team this year looks
very promising although there are
only a few of those who played last
year.
Mr. Reuben Blalock, our manager,
has already a long list of games with
the strongest teams of the state. The
opening game will be played with
Starke on March ninth.
Reuben, as we all know, has played
several years on the school team and
we are sure that he will do his best
to turn out a winning team.
1 The boys began practice this week
and if you have not been out so far,
come, if you cannot make the first
team, you can help the other boys get
in shape to win the state champion championship.
ship. championship. - The boys who hope to make the
first team are Moultrie Thomas, Wel Wellie
lie Wellie Meffert, Reuben Blalock, Francis

Talbott, Robert Blake, Harold Klock.
Frederick Winer, Marshall Cam,
Robert Hall, Ralph Cullen, Edward
Chazal, Charles Carnahan, Leonard
Wesson, Regie MacKay, Robert
Smith, Homer Agnew and Leonard
Todd.
Boys show your school spirit come
out to practice and help O. H. S. win
the state championship!
O. II. S. DEFEATED IN A SEC SECOND
OND SECOND GAME WITH ORLANDO
Last Saturday afternoon the O. H.
S. girls were defeated in a second
game by Orlando. The game was not
largely attended, but there was a
great deal of enthusiasm shown by
the crowd present.
Owing to a very incompetent ref referee
eree referee there were but two fouls called

during the whole game, when the
roughness of the visitors should have
caused several players to be disquali disqualified.
fied. disqualified. At the end of the first half the
score was 18 to 1 in favor of Orlando.
In the end the visitors won by a score
of 20 to 15.

The line-ups were:
Orlando Forwards, Ann Taylor,
Elizabeth Robinson; centers, Annie
Bruce, Sarah Davis; guards, Henri Henrietta
etta Henrietta Rock, Frances Rock.
Ocala Forwards, Callie Gissen Gissen-daner,
daner, Gissen-daner, Ella Mae Rivers; centers,
Kathleen Leitner, Louise Spencer;
guards, Mertie Blalock, Ruth Sim Simmons.
mons. Simmons. Referee: Miss Mulholland, from Or Orlando.
lando. Orlando. X

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Use Carter's Bread, Cakes

and Pastries

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This Space Reserved for

FRANK

S

Whers Styles are Shown First

"Edgar?"
"Yes, mother."
"What are you children doing?"
"Playing royalty, I am a Knight oi
the Garter, and Edwin is Saturday."
"That is an odd name for royalty."
"Oh, it is just a nick name on ac account
count account of his title."
"What is his title?"
"Night of the Bath."

Miss W.: "Write a theme on some
man." -. ' ...
Reuben: "I'm going to write on
Klock."
Klock: "I'm going to write on paper."

Miss Carlisle: "Spell mosquito."
Alleyne: "M-u-s-k-a-d-o."

Miss P.: "I want all of you to sing
out but I don't want any of you to
yell even tho' the accoustics is not
good."
Leonard: "The what sticks?"

Wellie: "Mr. Henderson, why don't
you get us some ether so we can look
at it?"
Mr. H.: "Well! Why don't you get
a quart of electricity?"
Wellie: "A quart of liquor's got
just as much life in it."
Mr. H.: "Yes, but it doesn't act the
same way."

The First Baptist Church
Bunyan Stephens, Pastor
Extends a Cordial Invitation to All
to Attend Sunday Services
11:00 a.m. 7:30 p. m.

Some answers received on exam examinations:
inations: examinations: "The spinal cord is situated in the
brain."
"The medulla causes instant death."

Flora: Where are the Samoan Is Islands?
lands? Islands? Flora : Some more Islands are north
of Australia.

Mr. H.: "Why don't you know this
lesson, Irene?"
Irene: "I didn't study it."
Caroline: "Yes, she did, too; she
just told me the answer to the ques question
tion question you asked me." i

ORLANDO BASKETBALL TEAM
DELIGHTFULLY ENTERTAINED
Last Saturday evening the mem members
bers members of the Orlando basketball team
were honor guests at a delightful
dar.ee given by Mr. Robert Hall at
the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs.
R. S. Hall.

The whole lower floor was used by

the merry dancers and a Victrola fur
nished the music.

Those present were: Anne Taylor,
Elizabeth Robinson, Annie Brace, Sa Sarah
rah Sarah Davis, Francis and Henrietta
Rock, Miss Quigg and Miss Mulhol Mulholland
land Mulholland from Orlando; Sarah Dehon, Cal Callie
lie Callie Gissendaner, Marguerite Edwards,
Winnie Flippin, Ethel Home, Virginia
Beckham, Ellen Stripling, Lourine
and Louise Spencer, Miss Florence
Conibear, Miss Marie Pitchford; Len Len-ard
ard Len-ard Wesson, Marshall Cam, Francis
Talbot, Robert and William Hall,
Robert Blake, Homer Agnew, Reu Reuben
ben Reuben Blalock, Tom Wallis, Moultrie
Thomas, Heyward Bridges, John
Batts, William Avera, Holmes Wal Walters,
ters, Walters, Albert Harriss, Leroy Bridges,
Wellie Meffert and Paul Brinson.

iflunroe 65 CfjamMtss
JBattonal 33anfc
&taa, jflodfca

This Bank has purchased an
extra block of LIBERTY
BONDS, in order to sup supply
ply supply those who failed to
get their subscrip subscriptions
tions subscriptions in on time.

Cstairttsheti 1897

OCALA VS. INVERNESS
Last Friday in a fast and exciting
basketball game, the Ocala boys were
defeated by the fast Citrus county
five. At the end of the first half the
score stood 24 to 9 in favor of the
opposing team, but in the last half
the Ocala boys got together and when
the whistle blew at the end of the
game the final count, stood 28 to 23
in favor of Inverness.
The special features of the game
were the guarding of Meffert and
good shooting of Klock and Hall;
while for Inverness the playing of
Hicks and Cornell, and their splendid
team work attracted much attention
and praise.

The line-up was as follows

Inverness
Cornell
Baxly
Hicks
Cornell
Scofield

Forwards:

Center:

Guards:

Ocala
Hall
Klock
Talbott
Wesson
Meffert

House Furnishings
Complete
THEUS BROTHERS
Opposite Ocala National Bank Magmolia Street

You Furnish the BrideWe'll Furnish the House

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see us
For Your Drugs and Seeds
Spring Seed Now Ready

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a?



OCALEEAN

ENSIGN

OCALA, FLORIDA, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 1918
Vol. 1, No. 7.
5 Cents Per Copy

Honor Roll of Ocala

Graded and High School
The following students were neith neither
er neither absent nor tardy during the first
four months:
Fourth Grade, A
Pinckney Gement, Edward Schler Schler-eth,
eth, Schler-eth, Louise Clement, Francis Lum Lum-mus,
mus, Lum-mus, Adeline Malever, Delzelle Pas Pasteur.
teur. Pasteur. Fourth Grade, B
Jack Igou, Edgar Roberts, Sammy
Savage, Margaret Chace, Netalie
M in shall.
Fifth Grade, A
Louis Knight, Fred . LeSuer, Alice
Cullen, Frances Mclver, Mary Flem Fleming
ing Fleming Rawle, Chivalette Smith.
Fifth Grade, B
George Blowers, Hadly Shaw, Al Albert
bert Albert Bullock, Annie Laurie Boyd,
Marguerite Counts, Nettie Mathews,
Alta Watson, I via Waterman,
Sixth Grade, A
Marjorie Burnett, Mary Carolyn
Logan, Sara Rentz, J. W. Davis, El Elton
ton Elton Henderly, Karl Henderly, John
Troxler.
Sixth Grade, B
Fred Boyd, Charlie Brown, Carolyn
Peyser, Marie Jones, Louie Smoak,
Rae Barchan, Juanita Jones, Grace
Fausett, Marion Hunter, Chester
Robertson, Mabel Priest, Albert
Frampton, Melville Little, Merchel
Roberts.
Seventh Grade, A
Otto Beard, Wallace Canova, J. W.
Crosby, William Hall, Lynn Hollin Hollinrake,
rake, Hollinrake, Francis Pasteur, Lindsay Trox Troxler,
ler, Troxler, Susie May Counts, Mildred Cros Crosby,
by, Crosby, Jessie Dehon, Whildon " Gilmore,
Clifton Sexton.
Seventh Grade. B
Ernest Beaton, Robert Igou, James
Knight, Marion Lummus, Francis
Polly, Sidney Cullen, Minnie Slott,
Sophie Turch, Mary Woods, Brent
Woods, vvrv-.'.T t: ..
Eighth Grade, B
Maudie Blalock, Lyndall Mathews,
Marie Robertson, John Bouvier, Har Harry
ry Harry Holcomb, Ralph Lopez, Harold
Smith.
Eighth Grade, A
Elizabeth Wetherbee, Edith Ed Edwards,
wards, Edwards, Irene Cam, Alma Priest, Law Law-son
son Law-son Cassels, Moultrie Thomas, George
Akin, John Cook, Walter Troxlerr
Ninth Grade
Ralph Cleveland, Duncan Elliott,
Robert Hall, Reginald MacKay, Roy
Priest, J. D. Robertson, Ralph Sim Simmons,
mons, Simmons, Francis Talbott, Lily Clayton,
Alma Hall, Elizabeth Hocker, Mar Marjorie
jorie Marjorie Miller, Hazel McAteer, Mar Marjorie
jorie Marjorie Rogers, Annie Rooney, Rhoda
Thomas, Rose Wolf.
Tenth Grade
Homer A gnew, Marshall Cam, Wel Wel-lie
lie Wel-lie Meffert, Mary Bryce, Lenore Col Colby,
by, Colby, Miriam Connor, Dovie Gates,
Winnie Gordon, Irene Henderly, Lu-
cile Holleman, Estelle McAteer, Helen
Veal.
Eleventh Grade
Allen Hollinrake, Tom Wallis, Ruth
Simmons, Leonard Todd, Sara Hem Hem-don.
don. Hem-don. Twelfth Grade
Reuben Blalock, Harold Talbott,
Leonard Todd, Beatrice Boney, Myr Myrtle
tle Myrtle Brinson, Ann Benton Fuller, Dix Dix-onia
onia Dix-onia Roberts, Rozelle Watson and
Louise Spencer.
The following students did not fall
below 90 per cent in any subpect in
the second quarter's examinations:
Fourth . Grade, A: Louise Clement
88 per cent.; Maude Gary.
Fifth Grade, A: Ted Drake, Louis
Knight, Fred LeSueur, Louise Adams,
Charlotte Chazal,. Alice Cullen, Mary
Fleming Rawle, Frances Mclver,
Pauline Shafer, 95 1-5 per cent. .
Fifth Grade, B: George Blowers,
Albert Bullock, Deward Moxley, Tom
Whiteman, - Louise Adams, Annie
Laurie Boyd, Theresa Condrey, 99 1-5
per cent.; Marguerite Counts, Nettie
Mathews, Elizabeth Murray, Leonora
: Toffaletti.
Sixth Grade, A: Marjorie Burnett,
Mary Carolyn Logan, 99 1-5 per cent.;
Margaret Gerig, Ben Culverhouse.
Sixth Grade, B: Grace Fausett,
Caroline Peyser.
Seventh Grade, A: Reese Hunni Hunni-cutt,
cutt, Hunni-cutt, Mildred Crosby, Janet Culver Culver-house,
house, Culver-house, Jessie Dehon, Cornelia Dozier,
98 per cent.; Mea Dozier Haile.
Seventh Grade, B : Mildred Bullock,
Margaret Hocker, 98 1-5 per cent.;
Minnie Slott, James Knight.
Eighth Grade, A: Lawson Cassels,
Elizabeth Wetherbee, Edith Ed Edwards,
wards, Edwards, 97 5-8 per cent.
Eighth Grade, B: John Bouvier, 97

banter's tSoetrp
' i
, : : -

I.anier's characteristics as a poet
and despite his achievements in prose,
it is as a poet he must be considered
primarily are such as to separate
him from other American makers of
literature. In the first place, his
poetry has the glow and color of the
South; an imagination and rhythm,
which awaken an exultant delight in
the sensative reader. He opened new
possibilities of metrical and stanzaic
arrangements, and therewith revealed
new powers of word use and combi combinations
nations combinations in modem English poetry. In
passing, we might mention one form
of Lanier's work, which, although not
usually associated with him, nor ex extensively
tensively extensively used by him, is, neverthe
less, as clever ast the, works of those
who have made a specialty of it. This
is his humorous verse. The best of
the humorous poems are those in
negro dialect, one of which is "Uncle
Jim's Baptist Revival Hymn," writ written
ten written by Sidney Lanier and his brother,
Clifford. The story is told of a Geor Georgia
gia Georgia farmer, who driven to despera desperation
tion desperation upon rising each morning to find
that despite his f reedmen's hoes and
plows; the grass had quite outgrown
the cotton overnight set the whole
state in a laugh by exclaiming to a
group of his fellow-sufferers: "It's all
stuff about Cincinnatus leaving the
plow to go into politics for patriot-i
ism; he's just a-runnin' from the
mm nil J a 1 1.
grass." mis state 01 tmngs, wnen
the young roots of cotton were strug struggling
gling struggling against the hardier multitudes
of grass suckers is universally de described
scribed described in plantation language by the
phrase "in the grass." Uncle Jim
seems to have seen in it so much re resemblance
semblance resemblance to his own Baptist church,
overrun as it was, by the cares of this
world, that he has written the follow following
ing following hymn:
Ole mas'r blowin' the mornin' horn,
And he's blowed a powerful bias';
Comer Baptis, come hoe- the corn,
Cause ye's mightily in the grass,
Cause ye's mightily in the grass.
The bluejay squealed to the mockin'
bird, "Stop!
Don't you gimme none of your sass,
You better sing a song for the Baptis'
crop
Cause they's mightily in the grass,
Cause they's mightily in the grass."
And the ole crow croak, "Don' work,
no, no."
But the field lark say, "Yaas, yaas."
And I s'spec you mighty glad, you
debblish crow,
That the Baptis's is mightily in the
grass,.. :
That the Baptis's is mightily in the
grass. ,
Lord, thunder us up to th' plowing
ground,
per cent.; . Harry Holcomb, 97 per
cent.
Ninth Grade: Reginald MacKay,
Elisabeth Bennett, Alma Hall, Eliza Elizabeth
beth Elizabeth Hocker, 98 1-3 per cent.; Annie
Rooney. -
Tenth Grade: Virginia Beckham,
Miriam Connor, 96 3-5 per cent.; Sara
Dehon, Winnie Gordon, Lucile Holle Holleman,
man, Holleman, Estelle McAteer.
Eleventh Grade: Allen Hollinrake,
Marquerite Edwards, Sara Herndon,
96 1-2 per cent.
Twelfth Grade: Harold Talbott,
Agnes Burford, 95 2-5 per cent; Dix-
onia Roberts.
The high school pupils whose names
are given above were those who made
an average of 1 per cent or above
in the second quarter's examinations.
MARSHMALLOW ROAST FOR IN INVERNESS
VERNESS INVERNESS BOYS
The boys of the Ocala High school
team entertained the boys of the In Inverness
verness Inverness team at a dance and Marsh Marsh-mallow
mallow Marsh-mallow roast Friday night at Silver
Springs. Dancing was enjoyed thru thru-out
out thru-out the evening and later marshmal marshmal-lows
lows marshmal-lows were toasted by a large bonfire
a very enjoyable evening was spent
and the Inverness boys and the girls
who rooted for them left about ten ten-thirty.
thirty. ten-thirty. -
Freshie. "What keeps us from fall falling
ing falling off the earth when we are up-side
down?"
Teacher. Why, the law of gravity."
Freshie. "But how did we stay on
before the law was passed?"

Lord, pertin up the hoeing fast,

Yea, Lord have mercy on the Baptis'
patch
Cause dey's mightily in the grass,
Cause dey's mightily in the grass.
Lanier, too, had that rare gift, the
ability to write songs. His "Song of
the Chattahoochee River," "A Song
to the Future," and others are not
only to be read but set to music. In
the following lines from the "Song
of the Chattahoochee," notice the
music and rhythm:
Out of the hills of Habersham,
Down the valleys of Hall,
I hurry amain to reach the plain,
Run the rapid and leap the fall
Spht at the rock and together again,
Accept my bed, or narrow, or wide,
And flee from folly on every side
With a lover's pain to attain the plain
Far from the hills of Habersham,
Far from the valleys of Hall.
All down the hills of Habersham,
All through the valleys of Xall,
The rushes cried, abide, abide,
The wilful waterweeds held me thrall,
The laving laurel turned my tide,
The ferns and the fondling grass said,
"Stay."
The dewberry dipped for to work de
lay,
And the little reeds cried, "Abide,
abide,
Here in the hills of Habersham,
Here in the valleys of Hall."
But oh, not the hills of Habersham,
And oh, not the valleys of Hall
Avail: I am fain for to water the
plain.
Downward the voices of Dutv call-
Downward to toil and be mixed with
the main.
The dry fields burn, and the mills are
to turn,
And a myriad flowers mortally vearn.
And the lordly main from beyond the
plain
Calls o'er the hills of Habersham,
Calls through the valleys of Hall.
These gifts and powers, then tech
nical mastery, original thought, and
spiritual perception" and fervor are
to be recognized in his best poems. In
the shorter lyrics these characteristic
qualities shine out. What a knightly
devotion to womanhood is expressed
in "My Springs," as high a strain as
was ever sung to wife:
In the heart of the Hills of Life,
know
Two springs that with unbroken flow
forever pour their lucent streams
Into my soul's far Lake of Dreams,
O Love, O Wife, thine eves are thev .
My Springs from out whose shining
gray
Issue the sweet celestial streams
That feed my life's bright Lake of
ureams.
Oval, and large and passion pure
And gray and wise and honor-sure;
An Interesting Lecture
On Devastated Belgium
(By Major Woods)
A most interesting illustrated lec lecture
ture lecture on "Devastated Belgium," was
given last Wednesday evening by
Major Woods of Chicago, at the Tem Temple
ple Temple theater. The proceeds of this
lecture were donated to the M. C. R.
C. Association.
Mr. W. T. Gary introduced Major
Woods with a short address, which
was followed by a chorus by the St.
Cecilian Glee Club of the O. H. S.
Miss Porter honored the audience with
a vocal solo, "Our Flag Shall Con Conquer."
quer." Conquer." The words and music of this
patriotic song were composed by
Major Woods himself.
In his lecture. Major Woods showed
and explained the life of the Belgian
people, as it was five years ago when
he last visited there. One-unique cus custom
tom custom that they practice, is the use ot
the dog cart. Few horses are seen
driven by the peasants, as the dog
carts are used to carry products to
market. People, who have never seen
these carts, may ask if, the drivei
rides behind such a small animal as
the dog. No, not often, unless he be
a small child and his load light. The
drivers usually walk near the front
of the cart and guide the dogs.
Belgium was a country of beauti beautiful
ful beautiful architecture. The most beautiful
cathedrals and public buildings in the
world were here, but now the same,
sad story is to be told many of the

Soft as a dyine violet-breath,

Yet calmly unafraid of death;
Thronged like two dove-cotes of gray
doves,
With wife's and mother's and poor-
folks' loves.
And home-loves and high glory-loves
And science-loves and story-loves,
And loves for all that God and man,
In art or nature make and plan,
And lady loves for spidery laces,
And 'broideries and supple grace,
And diamonds and the whole sweet
round
Of littles that' large life compound.
And loves for God and God's bare
truth.
And loves for Magdalene and Ruth;
Dear eyes, clear eyes, and rare com complete,
plete, complete, Being neavenly sweet, and earthly
sweet,
marvel that God made you mine
t or when he frowns, 'tis then ye
shine.
Lanier's attitude towards nature
was that of a passionate lover; a pan pan-thiest
thiest pan-thiest who saw God in everything.
The culmination of his art and
thought and spiritual force is found
in the "Hymn of the Marshes." Listen
to the following lines from "The
Marshes of Glynn," and you will see
the reverence:
Glooms of live oaks, beautifully braid braided
ed braided and woven,
In intricate shades of the vines that
, . myriad-cloven,
Clamor to the forks of the multiform
boughs;
Emerald twilights,
Virginal skylights;
Wrought of the leaves to lure to the
whisper of vows,
As lovers pace timidly down the green
colonnades .
Of the dim sweet woods; of the dear
dark woods,
Of the heavenly woods and glades,
That run to the marginal sand-beach
within
The wide-sea marshes of Glynn.
As the marsh-hen secretly builds on
the watery sod
Behold, I will build me a nest on the
greatness of God;
I will fly in the greatness of God as
the marsh-hen flies
In the freedom that fills all the space
'twixt the marsh and the skies:
By so many roots as the marsh-grass
sends in the sod
I will heartily lay me a-hold on the
greatness of God.
Oh, like to the greatness of God is the
greatness within
The range of the marshes, the liberal
marshes of Glynn.
Thus we see that Lanier's poetry
was not confined to one narrow poem,
but consists of many kinds.
M. E., '19.
buildings have been shattered by the
shells of the German guns, but some
have been saved.
In one instance, there was a mas massive
sive massive building of marble and stone,
with hand-carved friezes, which is
occupied by a large brokerage com company.
pany. company. Mr. Woods explained that the
company had grown too large for its
building and had rented business
rooms in the other building. "No,"
he said, "the Belgians are not like
we, Americans, for had this building
been in New York, it would have been
torn down and a ten or twelve-story
building would have taken its place."
This shows their love and apprecia appreciation
tion appreciation of beauty in architecture. Wood
is not used in their buildings, but
stone and cement. They are made to
last thousands of years.
Many pictures were shown of the
Belgian towns after the coming of the
German armies. Nothing remained
but shattered buildings and a few
homeless women or children along
the streets.
Major Woods explained to his au audience
dience audience the great help that the Red
Cross has been to the crippled nation.
They look to it and the Americans as
their only deliverers. America has
witnessed the sad but courageous
struggle of this little country, and
will be to Belgium all that she thinks
our nation is her deliverer from the
Huns.
Harold K., (reciting on Milton, who
lived on Bread street, London): "He
lived on the comer of Bread and
Milk."

Demonstrated Patriotism
In the Ocala High School
A concrete illustration of the war
spirit of our school is to be found in
the War Saving Stamps and Liberty
Bonds which have been purchased by
members of the grammar and high

school grades as well as in the num number
ber number of Red Cross members and the
stars in our Service Flag. The fol following
lowing following is a list of the number of each
in the several grades:
Fourth Grade, A
11 Thrift Stamps, 1 War Saving
Stamp, 4 Liberty Bonds, 8 Red Crosa
members, 6 stars in the Service
Flag.
Fourth Grade, B
11 Thrift Stamps, 1 War Saving
Stamp, 5 Liberty Bonds, 6 Red Cross
members and 3 stars in the Service
Flag.
Fifth Grade, A
9 Thrift Stamps, 3 War Saving
Stamps, 6 Liberty Bonds, 4 Red Cross
members and 6 stars in the Service
Flag.
Fifth Grade, B
5 Thrift Stamps, 4 Liberty Bonds,
6 Red Cross members and 5 stars
in the Service Flag.
Sixth Grade, A
58 Thrift Stamps, 2 War Saving
Stamps, 16 Liberty Bonds.
Sixth Grade, B
58 Thrift Stamps, 1 War Saving
Stamp, 5 Red Cross members, and 6
stars in the Service Flag.
Seventh Grade, A
3 Thrift Stamps, 1 War Saving
Stamp, 5 Liberty Bonds, 7 Red Cross
members and 6 stars on the Service
Flag.
Seventh Grade, B
9 Thrift Stamps, 2 Liberty Bonds,
5 Red Cross members and 16 stars in
the Service Flag.
Eighth Grade, A
63 Thrift Stamps, 4 War Saving
Stamps, 15 Liberty Bonds, 8 Red
Cross members and 1 star on the Ser Service
vice Service Flag.
Eighth Grade, B
3 Liberty Bonds, 4 Red Cross mem members
bers members and 8 stars in the Service Flag.
High School
29 Thrift Stamps, 1 War Saving
Stamp, 28 Liberty Bonds and 23 Red
Cross members.
A Liberty Bond has been purchased
by the grammar and high school and
is to be a permanent nucleus of a
fund for the school library.
This writer should use pen and ink
Printer.
Valentine Party Party-Given
Given Party-Given By Miss Thomas
Miss Rhoda Thomas entertained
sixteen of her boy and girl friends at
a pretty valentine party at her home
last evening, the occasion being her
sixteenth birthday. The dining room
and living room lights were shaded in
red, and many red and white hearta
were used as decorations. Several
valentine games were played and also
progressive conversation. On pretty
heart shaped score cards, the boys
made five-minute dates with each girl
present. They matched hearts for
partners and then went into the din dining
ing dining room, which was a bower of
hearts. Instead of the regular table
covers, at alternate places were largt
red and white hearts, and ropes of
little red and white hearts were
strung from the chandelier to the
comers of the table. The main dec decoration
oration decoration was a large fern, from which
hung many Cupids. Ice cream was
served in heart shaped baskets with
cake and mints.
The hostess then let each guest
cut a slice from the large pink and
white cake and its contents gave
away the heretofore well-kept secret,
that it was the hostess' birthday. Miss
Ruth Simmons cut the ring and so ac according
cording according to tradition will be the little
circle's first bride. Miss Marion Mef Meffert
fert Meffert will be an heiress, and Messrs.
Guy Lane and Harry Holcomb will be
old bachelors. The guests spent the
remainder of the evening taking
flashlight pictures.
Mis3 Thomas' other guests were
Misses Jewel Bridges, Ulainee Bar Bar-nett,
nett, Bar-nett, Lucile Gissendaner, Elizabeth
Hocker, Elisabeth Bennett and Mary
Lane, Messrs. Frank Rentz, Reginald
MacKay, Ralph Cullen, Robert Blow Blowers,
ers, Blowers, Walter Troxler and Walter Har Hardin.
din. Hardin. --
'I haven't slept for days.
"Smatter, sick?"
'Naw, I sleep nights."



7 : '

THE OCALEEAN ENSIGN

CURRENTS HISTORY

'

57 .-

11 ; 9 0 $ 9 9 i

According to reports from Amstei-

Published Every lOlher Thursday by idana tiie GeinZ?$&?T? Flanders
the Student Body of the jare greatly discontented with the

- - j 5T

OCALA HIGH SCHOOL

5 Cents Per Copy.

course taken by the officials against

j strike leaders. In a few cases Belgian
j laborers, forced by the Germans to

Business Manager.

Circulation Manager
Advertising

75 Cents Per Year J work, have been incited by the Ger-

jman soldiers to go on a strike.
STAFF i On the night of February 3rd, a

j bomb was thrown by seme strikers at
Ithe imperial palace in Berlin. Twen

ty-five arrests have been made.
More than 125,000 Chinese art art-helping
helping art-helping the cause of the Allies in
France and Mesopotamia, doing
necessary, if not military, work.

Waldek Zhyszko has won tht
heavyweight , wremtling championship
of the world. Zhyszko is an assumed
name, chosen on account of his real
name of Czganiewicz, being bad to
pronounce. Pathfinder.
Twenty-five per cent of the men
examined for the" draft were found to

physically disqualified, against

thirty-two per cent in our civil war.

The proportion of' disqualifications
was almost exactly thsame , in urban
as in rurT.' communities. ' !
A bill "has "been passecf in Congress
authorizing the . secretary of . war to
provide badges to men of draft age
who' have been exempted 'or1 reje'eted

contracts nave Deen made Dy tne

Editor
Editor-in-Chief Rozelle Watson
T VAitn - Miriam Connor
Literary Editors Anna BfelIe Wesson
Local Editor. ........... .Sidney Perry Perry-Current
Current Perry-Current History Allen Holllnrake
Exchange Editor. . . .Elizabeth Hocker
Music Editor - Agnes Burford
Home Economics. . . .Elizabeth Bennett
Expression Editor ..Beatrice Boney
Boys' Athletics......... Wellie Meffert
Girls Athletics. ...... ..Louise Spencer
Bfuagrers

..Reuben Blalock

...... Callie Gissendaner i be

............ tuen scripting

Harold Klock

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 1918

GRABiMAR' SClIOOL SECTION
, , Reporters . .
8th Grade Marie Robertson
7th Grade A. , . . . . . Cornelia Dozier
7th Grade B. .. ..Margaret Hocker
Ktllth Grade B Annie MacKay
"!- -EXCHANGE CIST -

The Tech, fioston; Ma'ss."1
The Technique, Atlanta, Ga.
The" Oracle Montgomeryy Ala.
The Oracle, Mount Vernon, N. Y.
Saint LucienneJFort, Pierce, Fla.
The Tattler,, Pensacola,,. Fla. .,
The Cocoahut,,.Cocoanut Grove, Fla.
The Washington4 Tiger, Tampa, Fla.
The Fcho, Orlando Fla:. ' v.
The Atfahfa Prep-Prep, vAtlanta,
Ga .". r- ,' - . -
The Florida Flambeau Tallahas-'
see, Fla.
The Florida' Alligator, Gainesville,
Fla. : ' ' ' ' :
The Southern, Sutherland; Fla.
Utolakean, Kissimmee, Fla.
The Stetson Weekly" Collegiate, De-LandFla;1-
' -s ":
The Sun' Dial, Lynchburg, Va. "
The Gopher, Orlando, Fla.
The Rollins ; Sandspur," Winter
Park, Fla.
The Florida Schoolroom, Gaines Gainesville,'
ville,' Gainesville,' Fla;
JSOMS WAYS TO
KILL A SCHOOL PAPER

1. Don't buy a paper borrow your
classmate's be a sponger.
2. Look up the ads. and trade with
the fellow who doesn't advertise be
a chump. ' ' '
3. Nver hand in articles, and be
sureto criticise everything in the
paper be a knocker.
4. If you are a member of the
staff, don't attend to business be a
skirker.
5. Tell you neighbor he can get
more news for Jess money be a
squeeze. .
6. If you can't hustle and make
the paper a success be a corpse.
Exchange.

All the year the different teachers
have been greatly troubled with the
editors of the Ensign. . Having no
regular staff room, we were compelled
to run around from one room to an another
other another with our material. If all the
teachers happened to have business
to transact in their rooms we were
outcasts, and had to do as we
could. Prof. Cassels has generously
donated to us the teachers' rest room"
which we shall use for a staff room.
We are sure that all the high school
teachers will join us in extending to
him our thanks, for they will no long longer
er longer be troubled with us in their rooms.

French to a shipbuilding plaht iri Sa

vanriah " for thfrty'-six steel mine
sweepers to be .completed . within six
months. They will he 150M feet long
1 vr!: r -i MUSIC " .

"Music resembles poetry, in each
are nameless graces "which no meth methods
ods methods Tieaeh and which ; a master-hand
aloW can "reach." ' ? - '
A new interest has been created in
miisicj-and besides the club, a quartet
has"4 been ' organized consisting of
Pari Fausetf, soprano ; Harold Klock
tenor; ! Anna Belle Wessbri alto, and
Robert Blake base. These' "students
all 'have'g'obo! voices a Ad are working
hard to enter the school meet' tq be
held " at Dade5 City1 , soon.' We' expect
them, to enter and to come back with
the vfctbrious laurels. "This quartet
has been asked to ttake 'part In a pa patriotic
triotic patriotic program to be' given ' at " the
WoThaaWs' club on "the sixteenth. On
the fourth at the leqture for the bene benefit?
fit? benefit? :of the 'Red Cross,1 the ' Glee Club
sang .two patriotic ,t songs splendidly,
and added very much to the enjoy
ment of the; program! r
The interest this year in music has
been a great addition to the school
and the 'Glee Club" is in almost con constant
stant constant demand by the different literar
societies. , Soon it is to render some
French songs which are being looked
forward to with a great deal of pleas pleasure.
ure. pleasure. ;
We are glad to see so much interest
taken in the music for as Leland says
"Of "all the arts, great music is the
art to raise the soul above all earthly
storms." " ' "

Qifyt Commercial 33anfe
of cala

Capital Stock, $50,000
21 Commcrctai 3Sanfe

SPECIAL SAVINGS DEPARTMENT
FOUR PER CENT INTEREST COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY

For four Valuables in Our New Absolute
Fire and Burglar-Proof Vaults

&o accounts too large

one too mall

AMATEUR PLAY AT THE
TEMPLE THIS EVENING

There has been a difference of opin opinions
ions opinions as to the cause of Charles Carn Carn-ahan's
ahan's Carn-ahan's absence from school. It has
been suggested that he was at home
recuperating, or perhaps he was prac practicing
ticing practicing on his piccolo, or possibly he is
studying. But the most reliable in information
formation information was obtained from a sug suggestion
gestion suggestion made by Miriam Connor,
something as follows: "Possibly he
'is at home working on his boat since
he said that he would have it in run running
ning running shape by next Friday night."
One of the most interesting pro
grams ever given by the literary so society
ciety society of the O. H. S., was given on
February 4th. The subject was La Lanier
nier Lanier and every number, indeed, did
justice to him, one of the south's tru truest
est truest poets. This program was the
first one held this year and has set a
lively "pace for the other programs to
come up to if possible.
We hope that the students will do
as Mr. Hardin said: "Make the best,
of every opportunity." Time will
soon be here far the term of 1917-18
to close. Let no one live in remorse
in the future because of having
thrown away this year's time.

It is always a pleasure tohelp a
good cause., and the more pleasant the

method the greater the pleasure. One
of the most pleasant ways in which

you can help the great Red Cross
work will be to buy a ticket to the
performance of "Mrs. Briggs of the
Poultry Yard," which will be given at
the Temple by local talent this eve

ning. The play is an improvement
on and a dramatization of the im immortal
mortal immortal narrative of unconscious
humor, "Mrs. Wiggs of the Cabbage
Patch," which shone the face of the
country with smiles a few years ago.

Bri-rgs has thought of several

Mrs.

things .that didn't occur to Mrs.
Wiggs, and will thereby secure u
more efficacious clovehitch on the
tickle boxes of her audience. Some
of our smartest young folks and some
of our smartest folks who are not so
young will be in the caste, but noth nothing
ing nothing will be old, not even the jokes, all
of which will be distinct improve improvements
ments improvements on the seven original funmak funmak-ers
ers funmak-ers thought up by Noah and his sons
in the ark. The costumes will be even
more original than the jokes, and the
combination will have even Coburn's
minstrels beaten more than seven
blocks. Don't miss this occasion ; if
you do you won't get over your disap disappointment
pointment disappointment before the f ourtli of July.
Tickets on sale at the Ccirt Phar Pharmacy
macy Pharmacy and the curtain at the Temple
will rise at 8:30.

What is the matter with the Sen Senior
ior Senior class? They seem to be dead to
the world. Evidently they are not re realizing
alizing realizing that this is their last year in
high school. Let us get some "pep"

in you and have a good time the rest

of the time. Next year we will miss
our old classmates.

Anyone wishing to show his loyal loyalty
ty loyalty to the Ensign may do so by pre presenting
senting presenting any of the following articles
to the staff room: Calendar, Picture,
waste-basket, dictionary, pillow, pen pennant,
nant, pennant, rug or rocking chair.

.... JOKES

"Friends, Romans,1 Countrymen,"
voceriferated the schoolboy in the
oratorical contest, "lend- me your
eas.",,"-. "f " 44 " .- v"
'"Ttfere" commented 'the mother of
a' defeated pupil, sneeringly, "that's
Mr&p Higg's Boy. He Hvouldnt be his
mother'isbn If Ke "wash'tTborrowing
something- ' ' '
Son reaches across the table and
helps himself to the sugar.
Father: "Haven't you a tongue,
son?"
" Son: "Sure, but it's not as long as
my arm."

Sunday School Instructor, "And the
father of the Prodigal Son fell on his.
neck and wept. Now, Alexander
Bonetop; tell the children : why the fa father
ther father wept." .
: Aleck; ."Huh; I giiess you'd' weep
tod, if you fell on your neck."
Caesar's dead and buried,"
And so is Cicefdr
And wherever those' two old gents
. have gone
I wish their works would go. Ex

Smart Freshie "I can tell you how
much water goes over Niagara Falls.

to the quart."

Delighted Senior, "How much?"
Freshie, "Two pints." Ex.
(Continued on Last Page)

THE CANON OF THE YELLOW YELLOW-.
. YELLOW-. . STONE

We stood over the lower falls of
the Yellowstone river. Six feet be below
low below us the current rushed past" as if
wild, to leap over the cliff, and fall
two hundred and fifty feet with a
deafening roar into the canon. The
sun was just "above the horizon and,
as" its slanting rays fell on the sides
of the canon, they seemed' to be high highly
ly highly painted in all shades of red, yellow
and brown.
Firs grow thickly around the top
of each side but only a few were
brave enough to venture over the
edge, and those that did wrapped
their roots around the rocks and held
on for "dear life. Below the rockh
came a long space where nothing but
gravel stayed and where nothing
could maintain a footing, or do ought
but slide into the rushing torrent be below.
low. below. On a high crag to our right was a
large eagle's nest. Even as we watch watched,
ed, watched, an eagle rose from his perch near
the nest and soared out of sight. Di Directly
rectly Directly across from us, only much
higher , was another platform for
sight seeing where a group of tour tourists
ists tourists stood spell bound by the beauty.
In a few minutes, we climbed the
steps to the brink of the canon and
proceeded along the very edge, our
view from here was still more won wonderful,
derful, wonderful, we were looking down on the
canon. It was sublime! the roar of
the water, as it plunged over the cliff,
the turbulent rapids of the river,
and the color of the sides made an
impression never to be forgotten.
E. H.

We Sell Superior Brand Fertilizers
For All Crops
OCALA SEED STORE
W. D. CARN, Prop.
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL
GARDEN, FIELD AND FLOWER
SEED
Farm Tools and Light Hardware
OCALA FLORIDA
Buy and Sell Peanuts, Velvet Beans
and Other Seeds

Druggi

TYDINGS & CO.

sis and

Seedsmen ' '
- -)
All kinds of Toilet Articles. Largest
line of Hair Brushes in the City Also
a fine line of Cut Glass. Stationery and
Perfumes: : ". ' : : ' : 'r :
Fresh Garden Seed of all Kinds

in

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When Thinking Give Us a Thought
WE DEAL IN ONLY GOOD THINGS TO EAT

KEEP THE BEST ON THE MARKET AND KEEP IT
IN A SANITARY CONDITION

Try the Famous "Royal Scarlet" Canned Goods,-the Best on
Earth. If Ve Haven't What You Want We'll Get It For You 2

TRY US AND SEE

O. K. TEAPOT GROCERY

L. J. BLALOCK

-
C L BLALOCK

L. J. BLALOCK & BROTHER
Dealers in " , : f .
FURNITURE
House Furnishings, Sewing Machines
Trunks, Bags, Rugs, Etc.

422 North Magnolia Street .-.

OCALA, FLORIDA I

Wi)t Bcltcatcssnt 3ljop
r f (OCALA HOUSE BLOCK) : A
- -
Has the Good Things
For the Lunch
bergtftng (gootJ to at

4,



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I r 1 i (J -H- 3 ;nrj Np.?ov? - , ..... , i , ; :

Ocala Photo Go.
H.W. JOHNSON, Prop..
We do First Class Work and
Our Prices are very reasonable.
Send Us your Kodak work
Prompt over ' Satisfaction
Attention f JSHETS ST6R Guaranteed
The
Book
War Boois - "
Service Pins,
Flags, Stationery
yOi r. fZ .,". .. S5: SS-.S'. .O1.
W Just Received w,
Carload or$
9
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Good
Cotton
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9
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Will Trade tor All Kinds '
of Cattle or Sell Cheap .
STUART MULE CO.
McDUFFY'S OLD BARN &
j , , . OCALA, FLA. , .
. m
: AMERICAN FRUIT
! STORE '
Fruits, Vegetables,
Cigars, Tobaccos
: and Cold Drinks
No. 9 N. Magnolia Street
COLD AND HOT DRINKS
FINE BOX CANDIES
FRUITS AND CIGARS

Shop

9: Books, Stationery .
: School Sufrplrk1 'i

At

--,-S u

fj TrqxleIR

PHONE 13
CLAYTON
Cleaning and Pressing
- It may be of interest to the stu student
dent student body that we are soon I lo liave
a male quartet.' The quartet will be
ready to appear in public in about a
month, and will be able to give at
least one encore. Comprising this
quartet are Klock, Wesson, MacKay,
Blake.

:L j - - - ' Creations in J '.
7;' ; '";:": i Z

A CONSERVATION CALENDAR
Monday, well say, is our "heatless
day,"
One cinder, one flicker, one coal,
Tuesday, well this is our "meatless
day,"
One oyster, one herring, one sole.
Wednesday, oh, this is our "wheatles3
day,"
One corncake, one dodger, one
scone.
Thursday, we must have a "sweetless
day,"
One pickle, one lemon, one bone.
Friday will make a good "eatless
day,"
One cheerful and glorious fast.
Saturday, call it a "treatless day,"
For all reciprocities past.
But Sunday, may Hoover forgive us,
we pray,
If we should all happen to feel
A little more hungry than usual to to-day,
day, to-day, And once more eat a square meal.
We are glad that Louise Spencer is
well and at school again.
j ,Mr.?HeywardBridges was a visitor
on the; campus Thursday.
Frederick 4Winer has returned to
school after a few days illness.
Jess Dehon of the seventh grade
has just recovered from a bad case of
measles.
Callie Gissendaner has recovered
from the measles and is again attend attending
ing attending school.
A number of teachers from the
Ocalasqhqqls wentto Mcintosh. Sat Saturday
urday Saturday to attend' the meeting" of the
teachers' association.
The Ensign staff and friends of An An-na
na An-na -Belle Wessbn I sympathized with
herduring her illness and are exceed exceed-ingly
ingly exceed-ingly glad to have her back at school.
Quite' a bit of Interest is being
manifested on the "ad." which ap appeared
peared appeared in the last issue of the En Ensign
sign Ensign from Fishel's store, offering $1
for the best ad., and a number of
answers or applications have been
turned over to the advertising mana manage
ge manage ri"" ?;'l;:0 - .
We have just received a copy of
"The Oracle" of Montgomery, Ala. It
is ; a most interesting school maga magazine
zine magazine in every department.
"The' (Saint Lucienne" of Fort
Pierce is an attractive magazine. The
articles are good and the jokes are
not of the canned variety, though we
would suggest that they have a few
more.
We gladly welcome all exchanges,
whether great or small.
Mr. W. V. Newsom has received a
letter from his brother, George (Tin (Tinker)
ker) (Tinker) Newsomy-f rom-Base 6, wherever
that is, - but presumably in England,
as he 'stated he was now paid off in
pounds instead of dollars. Mr. New Newsom"
som" Newsom" wrote his people some time ago
that he would sail on the 28th and
would enter an English aviatioii
training school, so that is where he
probably is. He said there was an another
other another Ocala boy there, J. D. Metcalf,
formerly with Edward Tucker of this
city. Mr. Newsom stated that his
mechanic told him he could soon take
a flight. - ' ;-
7th Grade B Program for February
15th, 1918
Song, "And -They Called : it -Dixie
Land Class. .
Recitation, "Valentine's ' Love"
Christine Close.
Charade Sidney Cull en and Hugh
Chace. T V t " k 1 "': ' V
Boola Song Annie MacKay, Mai Mai-garet
garet Mai-garet Hocker and Brent Woods. v
Recitation Dorothy Crawford.
Original Valentine; Story Nellie
Old. i'i . ;
Valentine Box Class.
LINCOLNS AND ST; "
VALENTINE'S PROGRAMS
The third division of the Ocala
High School. Literary Society win en entertain
tertain entertain the remainder of the . school
and any visitors who will -honor us
with their presence Friday morning,
Feb. 15th, at 8:15, with the follow following
ing following program: "'"
Patriotic song: Glee Club.
Address on Lincoln: Rev., Stephens.
Essay, "Lincoln's Life and Strug Struggle
gle Struggle for an Education"; Blanche Hor-
reii. ; y ,
Lincoln jokes.
Lincoln's Gettysburg address:
Leonard Todd. '
Essay, "Origin of St. Valentine":
Sarah Dehon.
Valentine song: Glee CIud.
. Recitation: Jewel Bridges.
Distribution of valentines.

TWO MORE DEFEATS
FOR THE O. II. S.

In a very one-sided game in San San-ford
ford San-ford the O. H. S. girls lost by a score
of 50 to 5. It was one-sided because
of the illness of Callie Gissendaner,
on whom the success of the O. H. S.
team seemed to depend.
The O. H. S. girls put up a good
game but lacked confidence in them themselves.
selves. themselves. There was no star playing
done by either side except the work
of Ruth Simmons and Mertie Bla Bla-lock,
lock, Bla-lock, Ocala's guards, who played &
beautiful game and, Cora Lee Lillis,
one of the forwards for Sanford, who
made nearly all the points for that
team.
The line-ups were:
Ocala Forwards, Loureen Spen
cer, Ella Mae Rivers; centers, Kath Kathleen
leen Kathleen Leitner,f Louise Spencer; guards,
Ruth Simmons, Mertie s Blalock. '
I Sanford Forwards, Mae : Thrashei,
Cora 'Lee' Lillis; centers Helen Hand,
Helen rPedk; ? guards, - Ethel Henry,
Dorothy-Rumph., i . '
Mr. Loonis Blitch refereed both
games.?: In' Orlando the . game was
lively,' and-full of "pep," and at the
end of the first ! half the score stood
6' tfc&f'K, iru -
:, ; The'. team work of Orlando's- cen centers,
ters, centers, Annie; Bruce and Sarah ; Davis,
and- the work of . Ruth Simmons and
Mertie 'Blalock' were the; features of ;
the-game. f. -Jt. -.Hi .
The inability of Ocala's forwards . to
makevgoals was. the cause of Ocala's
defeat, -for the ' teams were well
matched and the game was lively to
the end.
' TheTBCOret Orlando; 30; Ocala; 6.
(The Kne-ups were: . , . , , " ;
Orlando Forwards, Ann, Taylor,
Elizabeth Robinson; centers, Annie
Bruce, Sarahs Davis; guards, Hen Henrietta
rietta Henrietta Rock,. Frances Rock
' Ocala-r-Forwards,, Loureen Spencer,
Ella Mae Rivers; centers, , Kathleen
Leitneiy Louise Spencer; guards, Ruth
Simmons, Mertie Blalock. , ,
; ' After the game in Sanford the San Sanford
ford Sanford girls entertained at a .dance at
the? Hotel Cams in honor of the
Ocaiagirls. , Music was furnished by
an orchestra and the dance was full
of "pep," Those girls , who did not
dance had a good time for ,the. San Sanford
ford Sanford girls were lovely, hostesses.
In-- Orlando both teams were en entertained
tertained entertained at a dance at, the home of
Mr. and Mrs. Leroy Giles. , Music was
furnished by a ,Victrola and: punch
was served throughout the evening.,
OCALA HIGH SCHOOL : V"
ORCHESTRA ORGANIZED
Last Wednesday night a jolly
bunch of young people met at Sid Sidney
ney Sidney Perry's home and organized a
music club. The -object of this' club is
to' prepare music-for. the high school,
to broaden our knowledge f music,
to make ourselves , happy and have a
good time, but yet work. We are very
enthusiastic over our work and hope
the orchestra will add some "atmos "atmosphere"
phere" "atmosphere" to the West Coast School Meet
in Dade City, March .1. and 2.
.The members -of this - club are;
Miriam Connor, piano; Margaret Lit Little,
tle, Little, mandolin; Sidney Perry, Lyndal
Mathews and Cevie Roberts, first vio violin;
lin; violin; Ann Benton Fuller and Nat Mayo,
second violin; Dovie Gates, French
alto;- Bessie ' Marshall, trombone;
Mabel Akin, clarinet; Francis Tal Tal-bott,
bott, Tal-bott, cornet; Charles Carnahan, pic piccolo.
colo. piccolo. - '
RED CROSS PLAY
MRS. BRIGGS OF THE POULTRY
YARD
Characters
Mrs. Briggs, (A woman of busi business),
ness), business), Mrs. Alice Van Davis.
Mrs. Briggs' family: Ralf, D. Niel
Ferguson ; Jimmie, ' Wellie Meffert;
Alvira, -Miss, Lucile Gissendaner;
Melissa, Miss Catherine Strunk."
Silas Green, (A near relation), J.
J. Gerig. - 'i.,'- '' 1 -
.Mr, Lee, (A wealthy neighbor), D.
B. Mayo.
- Virginia Lee, (Mr. Lee's daughter),
Miss Beatrice Boney.
v Daisy Thornton, (A friend of Misi.
Lee),. Miss Pearl Fausett.
Mrs. O'Connor," (With no liking for
goats), Miss Carolina. Borden.
Mandy. Bates, (Whose tongue wili
stumble), Miss Alice .Bullock.
The curtain' goes up' promptly at
8:30. " Don't forget the date, Thurs Thursday,
day, Thursday, Feb.. 14th, Temple theater.
The seventh grade has three injur injured
ed injured girls in its room: Clifton Sexton
has a broken arm, Mildred Crosby has
a severe wound in her hand and Cor Cornelia
nelia Cornelia Dozier has a broken finger. AH
are doing well but Clifton.
$1 free for best "ad." submitted ,by
student. Option to accept or reject
any or all "ads." Fishel's Myfavrit
Store. 1-31-tf

Miltiuzxv
Always to be found at

Oc&la House Block
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1NAU

t Me deice&iJi sw feint

ICDOHTIIRvT A IT 'TIP

PROPERLY WRITTEN POUCIES PAY

INSURANCE AGENCY

ESTABLISHED 1885

Fire, Life, Accident, Bond, Burglary and Plate Glass
ROOMS 24, 25 AND 26 HOLDER BLOCK

OCALA
" " - w - - - - m ' m -
ulm ! ! -.
BLALOCK

IVULGANI

GOODRICH TIRES AI1D TUBES
Gasoline, Oils and Accessories

Phone Seven-Eight
."". !. st' ..; ..;. ..; yi yl
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Ocal

Dry Cleaning
Steam Gleaning
; and Pressing

Phone 101
j Ocala Seed Store
FOR RESULTS
PUT YOUR AD. IN

Affleck Millinery Parlor
Opposite Gerig't Drug Store

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FLORIDA

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107 Ocklawaha Avenue

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Farm Tool and Light Hardware.

The Ensign

si



THE
Ocala

N

aoonai

auk

JOKES
Patsy: "Mr. H does moonlight af affect
fect affect farming?"
Mr. H.: "I don't know, but moon moonlight
light moonlight nights sure have effect on some
people."

Z Invites the Patronage
Z' of the Teachers
! and Pupils of the

Ocala High
School

Capital and
Surplus
$90,000.00

JON. L. EDWARDS
PRESIDENT.

be

Ellen: "No. women should not

brought to the level with men."

Miss Williams: "Why, Ellen, wom

en are just as good as men."

Ellen: "Why, they're ten times

better. The best man on earth is not
as good as the worst woman.'

Athletics.

" 'tt
. . : Be-

Miss W.: "Why is Daniel Webster

likened to a cathedral?"

Tom: "I dunno, unless 'twas be

cause he had such a big 'dome'."

Mr. M. : "Mother, why is Wellie

whistling and singing around the
house so much tonight?"

Mrs. M.: "Why, I think he made

seventy per cent in one of his exami

nations."

Kathleen: "What's the use in
studying about electricity? We don't

need it." '"

Mr. H.: "What is the use in girls

vearing dresses?"

Miss Doke (In Sunday school
class) : "Margaret " Little, can you
tell me where Cain went after he had
killed Abel?"
Margaret L.: "He went to bed."
Miss Doke: "How do you make that
out?"
Margaret I.: "Well, its in the chap chapter
ter chapter that Cain, after he had killed
Abel, went to the land of Nod."

Miss Doke: "If you should say
Misses Brown, there would be two
Brown ladies."

Mr. H., (dscussing electricity):
"Who can explain the word 'am 'ampere'?"
pere'?" 'ampere'?" - ':' ' -
Callie (who lost track of , her book
during examination) : "Wonder what
that has to do with electricity. 'Am 'Amber'
ber' 'Amber' is a certain kind of tobacco."

What was Ruth Simmons crying
for down at Sanford last Friday
night ? "I don't . know."

Charles Carnahan: "If I should
kiss you, would you call for help?"
Miriam C: "Would you need it?"

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Ocala, Florida

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Chinese Version of a School Teacher

Teachee, teachee,
All day teachee,
Night markee papee,
Nervee, all creepee,
No one kissee, -No
one huggee;
Poor old maidee,
No one lovee.

Lieut. Blake was running the boys
of Company B through the leg exer

cise, m wtucn tne leg is liitea paral parallel
lel parallel with the hip. On seeing one boy

out of step, Blake blurts out: "Hi,
there, you fellow with both legs up,

put your left leg down."

. BASEBALL

A very important meeting of the j

baseball team was held last week, for
the purpose of electing officers. The
following were elected:
Reuben Blalock manager, Wellie
Meffert secretary, Francis Talbott
custodian. The team this year looks
very promising although there are
only a few of those who played last
year.
Mr. Reuben Blalock, our manager,
has already a long list of games with
the strongest teams of the state. The
opening game will be played with
Starke on March ninth.
Reuben, as we all know, has played
several years on the school team and
we are sure that he will do his best
to turn out a winning team.
1 The boys began practice this week
and if you have not been out so far,
come, if you cannot make the first
team, you can help the other boys get
in shape to win the state champion championship.
ship. championship. - The boys who hope to make the
first team are Moultrie Thomas, Wel Wellie
lie Wellie Meffert, Reuben Blalock, Francis

Talbott, Robert Blake, Harold Klock.
Frederick Winer, Marshall Cam,
Robert Hall, Ralph Cullen, Edward
Chazal, Charles Carnahan, Leonard
Wesson, Regie MacKay, Robert
Smith, Homer Agnew and Leonard
Todd.
Boys show your school spirit come
out to practice and help O. H. S. win
the state championship!
O. II. S. DEFEATED IN A SEC SECOND
OND SECOND GAME WITH ORLANDO
Last Saturday afternoon the O. H.
S. girls were defeated in a second
game by Orlando. The game was not
largely attended, but there was a
great deal of enthusiasm shown by
the crowd present.
Owing to a very incompetent ref referee
eree referee there were but two fouls called

during the whole game, when the
roughness of the visitors should have
caused several players to be disquali disqualified.
fied. disqualified. At the end of the first half the
score was 18 to 1 in favor of Orlando.
In the end the visitors won by a score
of 20 to 15.

The line-ups were:
Orlando Forwards, Ann Taylor,
Elizabeth Robinson; centers, Annie
Bruce, Sarah Davis; guards, Henri Henrietta
etta Henrietta Rock, Frances Rock.
Ocala Forwards, Callie Gissen Gissen-daner,
daner, Gissen-daner, Ella Mae Rivers; centers,
Kathleen Leitner, Louise Spencer;
guards, Mertie Blalock, Ruth Sim Simmons.
mons. Simmons. Referee: Miss Mulholland, from Or Orlando.
lando. Orlando. X

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Use Carter's Bread, Cakes

and Pastries

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This Space Reserved for

FRANK

S

Whers Styles are Shown First

"Edgar?"
"Yes, mother."
"What are you children doing?"
"Playing royalty, I am a Knight oi
the Garter, and Edwin is Saturday."
"That is an odd name for royalty."
"Oh, it is just a nick name on ac account
count account of his title."
"What is his title?"
"Night of the Bath."

Miss W.: "Write a theme on some
man." -. ' ...
Reuben: "I'm going to write on
Klock."
Klock: "I'm going to write on paper."

Miss Carlisle: "Spell mosquito."
Alleyne: "M-u-s-k-a-d-o."

Miss P.: "I want all of you to sing
out but I don't want any of you to
yell even tho' the accoustics is not
good."
Leonard: "The what sticks?"

Wellie: "Mr. Henderson, why don't
you get us some ether so we can look
at it?"
Mr. H.: "Well! Why don't you get
a quart of electricity?"
Wellie: "A quart of liquor's got
just as much life in it."
Mr. H.: "Yes, but it doesn't act the
same way."

The First Baptist Church
Bunyan Stephens, Pastor
Extends a Cordial Invitation to All
to Attend Sunday Services
11:00 a.m. 7:30 p. m.

Some answers received on exam examinations:
inations: examinations: "The spinal cord is situated in the
brain."
"The medulla causes instant death."

Flora: Where are the Samoan Is Islands?
lands? Islands? Flora : Some more Islands are north
of Australia.

Mr. H.: "Why don't you know this
lesson, Irene?"
Irene: "I didn't study it."
Caroline: "Yes, she did, too; she
just told me the answer to the ques question
tion question you asked me." i

ORLANDO BASKETBALL TEAM
DELIGHTFULLY ENTERTAINED
Last Saturday evening the mem members
bers members of the Orlando basketball team
were honor guests at a delightful
dar.ee given by Mr. Robert Hall at
the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs.
R. S. Hall.

The whole lower floor was used by

the merry dancers and a Victrola fur
nished the music.

Those present were: Anne Taylor,
Elizabeth Robinson, Annie Brace, Sa Sarah
rah Sarah Davis, Francis and Henrietta
Rock, Miss Quigg and Miss Mulhol Mulholland
land Mulholland from Orlando; Sarah Dehon, Cal Callie
lie Callie Gissendaner, Marguerite Edwards,
Winnie Flippin, Ethel Home, Virginia
Beckham, Ellen Stripling, Lourine
and Louise Spencer, Miss Florence
Conibear, Miss Marie Pitchford; Len Len-ard
ard Len-ard Wesson, Marshall Cam, Francis
Talbot, Robert and William Hall,
Robert Blake, Homer Agnew, Reu Reuben
ben Reuben Blalock, Tom Wallis, Moultrie
Thomas, Heyward Bridges, John
Batts, William Avera, Holmes Wal Walters,
ters, Walters, Albert Harriss, Leroy Bridges,
Wellie Meffert and Paul Brinson.

iflunroe 65 CfjamMtss
JBattonal 33anfc
&taa, jflodfca

This Bank has purchased an
extra block of LIBERTY
BONDS, in order to sup supply
ply supply those who failed to
get their subscrip subscriptions
tions subscriptions in on time.

Cstairttsheti 1897

OCALA VS. INVERNESS
Last Friday in a fast and exciting
basketball game, the Ocala boys were
defeated by the fast Citrus county
five. At the end of the first half the
score stood 24 to 9 in favor of the
opposing team, but in the last half
the Ocala boys got together and when
the whistle blew at the end of the
game the final count, stood 28 to 23
in favor of Inverness.
The special features of the game
were the guarding of Meffert and
good shooting of Klock and Hall;
while for Inverness the playing of
Hicks and Cornell, and their splendid
team work attracted much attention
and praise.

The line-up was as follows

Inverness
Cornell
Baxly
Hicks
Cornell
Scofield

Forwards:

Center:

Guards:

Ocala
Hall
Klock
Talbott
Wesson
Meffert

House Furnishings
Complete
THEUS BROTHERS
Opposite Ocala National Bank Magmolia Street

You Furnish the BrideWe'll Furnish the House

C-Ri

Bitting & Company
see us
For Your Drugs and Seeds
Spring Seed Now Ready

Mae

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VULCANIZING
FISEC k HOOD TIRES

Ik-

J .X-
X."
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III
lit
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