Plant-quarantine import restrictions of the Republic of Germany

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Title:
Plant-quarantine import restrictions of the Republic of Germany
Series Title:
B.E.P.Q.
Physical Description:
15 p. : 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Strong, Lee A
United States -- Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine
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U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
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Subjects / Keywords:
Plant quarantine -- Law and legislation -- Germany   ( lcsh )
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federal government publication   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )

Notes

General Note:
Cover title.
General Note:
"June 26, 1936."
General Note:
Superseding B.P.Q.-302, Revised.
General Note:
"Lee A. Strong, Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine."

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University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 030433205
oclc - 786044943
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AA00023382:00001

Full Text
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LIBRARY
STATE PLANT BOARD


I/
A -


UITITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine
Washington, D. C.


B. P. p. .- 405
Superseding B. P. Q.- 302, Revised


PLANT QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS

OF THE


REPUBLIC OF GERMAYIY


June 26, 1936.








UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine
Washington, D. C.



B. E. P. Q.--405 June 26, 1936
Superseding B. P. Q.-302, Revised



PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS

OF THE

REPUBLIC OF GERMANY


A revision of Circular B.P.,q.-302, Revised, became necessary
because the original San Jose scale decrees of the German Empire have
been superseded by the decree of November 3, 1931, and its regulatory
order of November 26, 1931, and subsequent amendatory orders, restrict-
ing or prohibiting the importation of plants from the United States,
among other countries, to prevent the introduction of San Jose scale
and the apple maggot, and providing for the entry of fresh fruits from
the United States if found free from San Jose scale (Aspidiotus perni-
ciosus Comst.) and the apple ma.,got or fruit fly (Rhagoletis pomonella
Walsh).

This revised summary was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, Plant
Quarantine Inspector, in Charge of Foreign Information Service, Division
of Foreign Plant Quarantines, from his translations of the original
texts, and reviewed by the German Ministry of Nourishment and Agriculture
for the information of nurserymen, plant quarantine officials, and
others interested in the exportation of plants and plant products from
the United States to Germany.

The information contained in this circular is believed to be
correct and complete up to the time of preparation, but it is not
intended to be used independently of, nor as a substitute for, the
original texts; and it is not to be interpreted as legally authorita-
tive. The German texts should be consulted.




LEE A. STRONG,
Chief. Bureau of Entomology and Plant Q antine.








PLANT QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS

OF SE

REPUBLIC OF GERANY



OBJECTS OF THE GERMAN PLANT QUARANTINE DECREES-!


The plant quarantine import restrictions of the Republic of
Germany are designed to prevent the introduction into and distribu-
tion in Germany of phylloxera (Phylloxera (vastatrix) vitifoliae
Fitch), San Jose scale (Aspidiotus perniciosus Comst.), apple maggot
or fruit fly (Rhagoletis pomonella 7alsh), Colorado potato beetle
(Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say), potato wart (Snchytrium endobioticum
(Schilb.) Perc.), European cherry fruit fly (Rhagoletis cerasi L.),
carnation leaf roller (Tortrix pronubana Hbn.), injurious diseases
and pests of flower bulbs and tubers, of conifers, of plants and
parts of plants of the genus Ulmusi of the southern cottonwood (Popgus
canadensiss) deltoides. Marshall), md' of Azalea indica L.


Introductory Remarks

Whereas the following summary includes references to the
entire body oC the effective plant quarantine. import restrictions of
the Republic of Germany, only the texts of the legislation affecting
plants end plant products of the United States, either alone or among
those of other countries, are included in this publication. References
affecting, products of the United States are indicated in the summary
by asterisks.



SIJLLA RY


Importation Prohibited

* GRAPEVINE STOCKS AND ALL PARTS OF THE GRAPEVINE: Importation prohibit-
ed from any country to prevent.the introduction of phylloxera
(Decree of Oct. 31, 1879, 1md subsequent orders; R. G. Bl. p.
303, etc.) See page 5.

* LIVING DICTOTYLEDONOUS TREES and shrubs of all species, except cacti:
Importation prohibited from the United States and certain other
countries to prevent the introduction of San Jose scale







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(Aspidiotus perniciosus Comst.) (Decree of Nov. 3, 1931, and
Circular of Nov. 26, 1931, as subsequently amended; R. G. B1.
p. 303 etc.) See pages 6 and. 9.
* POTATOES FROM THE UNITED STATES: Importation prohibited to prevent
the introduction of the Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa
decemlineata Say). (Decree of Feb. 26, 1875, and subsequent
orders; R. G. Bl. 135, etc.) See page 11.

POTATOES, TOMATOES, EGGPLANTS, strawberries, rooted vegetables, bulbs,
tubers, rhizomes, and other subterranean parts of plants;
peelings and refuse of such products; sacks and other materials
that have been used for packing or preserving such products:
Imoortation and transit of the products from FRANCE prohibited.
(Decree of Feb. 23, 1932; R. G. Bl. I: 13, 1932, p. 91.)

* SEEDS OF SCOTCH PINE (Pinus sy-lvestris L.), and NORWAY SPRUCE (Picea
excelsa Link.): Importation prohibited from any country, to
prevent the introduction of diseases of those trees. (Decree
of Feb. 28, 1929; R. G. Bl. I: 11, 1929, p. 76.) See page 13.


* PLANTS



* ROOTED





* ROOTED


of the following genera from any country: Fir (Abies), spruce
(Picea), pine (Pinus), Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga), and hemlock
(Tsuga). (Decree of June 3, 1930; R. G. Bl. I: 20, 1930, p.
188.) See page 11.

CARNATIONS, cuttings and cut flowers from any country: Importa-
tion prohibited to prevent the introduction of the carnation
leaf roller (Tortrix pronubana Hbn.) (Decree of Mar. 28, 1929;
R. C-. Bl. I: 15, 1929, p. 83.) Entry of carnation cut flowers
prohibited from March 15 to November 30 of each year. (Decree
of Sept. 30, 1932; R. G. 31. I1. 68, 1932, p. 492.) See page 13.

PLANTS OF THE GENUS ULMUS, and of the southern cottonwood
(Populus canadensiss) deltoides Marshall), and parts thereof
from any country: Importation prohibited to prevent the intro-
duction of pests and diseases of those plants. (Decree of Feb.
2, 1932; R. G. 31. I: 10, 1932, p. 63.) See pages 12 and 13.


LIVING PLANTS and fresh parts thereof from Portugal, Rumania, and
Yugoslavia (Decree of July 11, 1933, as amended; R. G. Bl. I,
p. 468; R. Z. B31., p. 353, etc.)

WILD PLANTS: Importation prohibited of those named in articles 4 and
5 of the Decree of March 18, 1936. See page 14.



LIBRARY
pTATE PLANET BOARL







Importation Restricted


* DECIDUOUS PLANTS AND PARTS THEREOF, not specifically prohibited:
Each shipment must be accompanied by a certificate affirming
the noninclusion of plants of Ulmus and Populus deltoides
or parts thereof (Decree of Feb. 2, 1932; R. G. Bl. 1: 10,
1932, p. 63.) See pages 12 and 13.

CONIFEROUS PLANTS AND PARTS THEREOF, not specifically prohibited:
Each shipment must be accompanied by a certificate affirming
the noninclusion of plants of Abies, Picea, Pinus, Pseudotsuga,
Tsuga, or parts thereof. (Decree of June 5r 1930; R. G. Bl.
I: 20, 1930, p. 18S.) See pages II and 12.

ROOTED PLANTS, the importationof which is not prohibited by special
decrees, as indicated above: Shipments of restricted plants,
only through authorized customs offices, from countries:

1. Adhering to the International Phylloxera Convention, are
to be accompanied by a shipper's declaration of origin
and a certificate affirming freedom of the shipment from
phylloxera. (Decree of July 4, 1883.)
2. Not adhering to the International Phylloxera Convention,
are to be accompanied by a shipper's declaration:
(a) Obligating himself to' pay the cost of inspection
for phylloxera, and

(b) Commissioning the consignee or other person
authorized by the shipper, and living in Germany,
to pay that cost. (Notice of Aug. 23, 1887; R. G.
Bl. p. 431). Shipments are subject to thorough
inspection for freedom from grapevine roots or
other parts of the grapevine, and from phylloxera,
on arrival. (Decree of Apr. 7, 1887; R. G. Bl.
p. 155.) The fee for the inspection of rooted plants
is at the rate of 0.01 Reichsmark per 1 kilogram
net weight, the minimum fee for any shipment being
1 Reichsmark. (Decree of July 5, 1930; R. G. Bl.
p. 203.)

CACTI, TREES, SHRUBS, PLANTS, and parts thereof not included among
dicotyledonous treTs and shrubs (except when prohibited by
other regulations) Shipments subject to thorough inspec-
tion for San Jose scale on arrival (Decree of Nov. 3, 1931,
-and circular of Nov. 26, 1931, as amended; R. G. BI. I; 74,
1931, p. 670, etc., and Rundschreiben des R.M. f. E. u. L.
an Landerregierutgen vom 26 Nov. 1931, II: 41258.) See page
..9, Class B.
1. See the decree of June 3, 1930, pp. 11-12; decree of Mar. 2S, 1929,
p. 13; decree of Feb. 2, 1932, p. 13; and decree of Mar. 18, 1936,
p. 14.







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AZALEA INDICA, plants of, from any source: Each shipment must be
accompanied by a certificate issued by competent authority
affirming freedom from specified pests and diseases. (Decree
of Nov. 9, 1932; R. G. BI. I: 75, 1932, p. 528.)

* FRESH FRUITS from certain countries must be imported in the original
pack only, and are subject to inspection for San Jose scale
(Aspidiotus perniciosus Comst.), and apple maggot (Rhagoletis
pomonella Walsh) on arrival at the port of entry. (Decree of
Nov. 3, 1931, circular of Nov. 26, 1931, decree of July S,
1932, etc.) See page 7.
* FRESH CHERRIES FROM ANY SOURCE: To prevent the introduction of the
European cherry fruit fly (Rhagoletis cerasi L.), each shipment
must be accompanied by a certificate issued by competent au-
thority affirming freedom from that pest. (Decree of Apr'. 27,
1929; R. G. Bl. I, 1929, p. 92.) See page l14.

POTATOES from countries other than the United States and France: To
prevent the introduction of potato wart (Synchytriumn endobio-
ticum (Schilb.) Perc.), each shipment must be accompanied by a
certificate affirming freedom from that disease. (Decree of
Mar. 7, 1930; R. G. Bl I: 6, 1930.)

FRESH VEGETABLES OF ALL KINDS, aerial parts of plants, except fruits,
from FRANCE, whose entry and transit are not prohibited by
article 1 of the decree of February 23, 1932 (see list under
"Importation prohibited"), may be imported from March 15 to
November 15 of each year under certificate of origin in un-
infested land and phytosanitary certificate. (Decree of Feb.
23, 1932; R. G. Bl. I; 13, 1932, p. 91.)

* SUBTERRANEAN PARTS OF PLANTS, SEEDS (except those of Pinus sylvestris
and Picea excelsa), TROPICAL FRUITS, CEREALS, AND VEGETABLES
for food and other purposes (including fresh mushrooms). (De-
cree of Nov. 17, 1934; Z 1101-681 II; see p. 10), drugs and
raw materials for technical and medicinal purposes, from
the United States, except as prohibited by other regulations,
are not restricted by the decree of November 3, 1931, and the
circular of November 26, 1931, as amended. (See p. 9, Class
C.) However, subterranean parts of plants, with the same
exceptions, are subject to the phylloxera restrictions, and
bulbs, cornms, and tubers also are subject to the certification
requirements of the decree of July 7, 1930; R. G. Bl. I: 24,
1930, p. 204.) See page 9, Class C.






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PHYLLOXERA RESTRICTIONS

Importation of Grapevines Prohibited

In accordance with the provisions of the International
Phylloxcra Convention of Berne, November 3, 1S91, the importation
into Germany is prohibited of grapevine stocks and all parts of the
grapevine, especially of branches and foliage.


Importation of Grapes Permitted

Table grapes may be imported when packed without grapevine
leaves in boxes, cases, baskets, or well-headed barrels, easy to
inspect.
Wine grapes and grape marc may be imported only when packed
in tightly closed barrels. (Decree of Oct. 31, 1979; R. G. Bl. p.
303; and decree of July 4, 1883; R. G. Bl. p. 153, etc.)


Shipper's Declaration and Phylloxera Certificate Required

Shipments of rooted plants and parts thereof, other than
grapes, the entry of which is not prohibited by the San Jose scale
and apple ma-,got and other special quarantines, must be accompanied
by a shipper's declaration of origin and by a phylloxera certificate
issued by a competent authority of the country of origin, as follows:

The shipper's declaration shall:

1. Affirm that the entire contents of the shipment
proceed from his establishment;

2. Indicate the receiving point and address of the
consignee;

3. Affirm that no grapevines are included in the shipment;

4. State whether the shipment contains plants with earth
on the roots;

5. Bear the signature of the shipper.

The phylloxera certificate shall affirm:

1. That the plants were taken from ground separated from
grapevine stocks by at least 20 meters, or by some
obstacle to the roots deemed sufficient by competent
authority;






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2. That the ground itself contains no grapevines;

3. That the place has not been used as a depot for
that plant;

4. That if stocks infested with phylloxera have been
grown there, their complete extirpation had been
affected by repeated toxic applications and by in-
vestigations for a period of three years, thus in-
suring the complete destruction of phylloxera and
roots. (Decree of July 4, 1883, and subsequent
orders; R. G. Bl. p. 153, etc.)


RESTRICTIONS TO PREVENT THE INTRODUCTION
OF SAN JOSE SCALE AND APPLE MACGOT

The original San Jose Scale Decree of February 5, 1898, pro-
hibited the importation into Germany of all living plants or parts
thereof from the United States, but the Edict of May 8, 1907, now
superseded by the decree of November 3, 1931, as amended, and the
circular of November 26, 1931 (Reichsgesetzbl. I: 74, 1931, p. 670,
and Rundschreiben des R. M. f. E. u. L. an die Landerregierungen vom
26 Nov. 1931, II: 41258), group plants into Class A, entry absolutely
prohibited; B, importation conditional; and C, importation unrestrict-
ed; and they prescribe that fresh fruits may be imported only when
found free from San Jose scale and apple maggot.

Decree of November 3, 1931, to Prevent the Introduction
of San Jose scale (Aspidiotus perniciosus Comst.),and
apple maggot (Rhagoletis pomonella Walsh) (R. G. Bl. I, p.
670; R. Z. Bl..p. 362)7 as amended by those of July 8, 1932
(R. G. Bl. I p. 351; R. Z. Bl. p. 270), and April 20, 1933
(R. G. Bl. p. 230; R. Z. Bl. p. 277).


Importation of Living Plants Prohibited from Certain Countries

Article 1. (1) To prevent the introduction of San Jose
scale, (Aspidiotus perniciosus Comst.), the importation is prohibited,
until further notice, of living plants and fresh parts thereof from
America, Australia (including New Zealand and Tasmania), Austria,
China, Hawaii, Hungary, India, Mesopotamia (Iraq), and the Union
of South Africa.

(2) The same prohibition applies to the containers and
articles of any kind that have served for packing or storing such
plants or parts of plants.







-7-


Provision for Entry Subject to Inspection

(3) The Federal Minister of Nourishment and Agriculture, in
cooperation with the Federal Minister of Finance, may prescribe that
the importation of living plants and fresh parts thereof from the
countries named in paragraph 1, against which the suspicion of San
Jose scale exists, be permitted through certain customs offices and
on condition that an inspection of the shipment at the port of entry,
at the expense of the interested person, reveals no infestation or
suspicion of infestation by that pest.


Fresh Fruits May Be Imported
Only through Authorized Ports and in Original Packages

Art. 2. (1) Fresh fruits (deciduous) and fresh refuse of
fruits,1 that originate in the countries named in paragraph 1 of
article 1, until further notice, may be imported only through customs
offices designated by the Federal Government, in the original
packages alone, and only on condition that as a result of an inspec-
tion of the shipment for San Jose scale at the port of entry, at
the expense of the interested person,- and in the case of those origi-
nating in the United States and Canada, also for the apple maggot
(Rhagoletis pomonellaa Walsh), no infestation or suspicion of infesta-
tion is found.
(See also Regulations under part II, decree of Nov. 3, 1931,
on the entry of dried fruits, and the so-called southern fruits and
on the inspection of imported fruits, p. 10.)

Note 1. The regulations on the irmportation of fresh fruits
and refuse thereof apply also to the importation of nuts, oranges,
mandarins, lemons, and other citrus fruits. Both mature nd immature
(ripe and unripe) nuts arc to be inspected if green husks still adhere
to them. (R. F. M. of Mar. 15, 1934, Z 1101-216 II; R. Z. Bl. p* 168 -
R. F. M. of Mar. 27 and Apr. 9, 1934, Z 1101-246 II. 275 II; R. Z. Bl.
p. 212, 244 R. F. M. of July 4, 1934, Z 1101-483 II.)

Note 2. The importation of fresh fruits and fresh refuse
thereof from Austria and Hungary is permitted in bulk also, on condi-
tion that the shipments are accompanied by certificates of origin and
health issued by the official plant protection service of the country
of origin and the other conditions of the decree of November 3, 1931,
are complied with. The said certificate must affirm that the shipment
was inspected and found free from San Jose scale, and that in the
locality in which .the shipment originated San Jose scale had not
hitherto appeared. (R. F. M. of Aug. 8, 1932, Z 1101 833 II. On
the importation of such consignments from Hungary, the railroad cars





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Exceptions Provided For

Art. 3. (1) The Federal Minister of Nourishment and Agricul-
ture can permit exceptions to the provisions of articles 1 and 2
under necessary safeguards.



REGULATIONS UNDER THE DECREE OF NOVEMBER 3, 1931.

(Circular of Nov. 26, 1931, II 41259)


I. Importation of Living Plants and Fresh Parts of Plants

Classification of Plants for Imoortation

Living plants and fresh parts thereof are divided into three
groups according to their species:

(Note 2 cont'd from p. 7).
containing the goods must bear on each side door an unbroken seal
with the impression "MA. Kir. Novenyvedelmi Szolgalat Budapest".

As for consignments of fruit declared to be of origin in a
European country, the country of origin must always be established,
according to the provision of Part II, No. 5 of the Anleitung ftlir
die Zollabfertigung.

Note 1. No restrictions apply under these regulations, apart
from the cases covered by article 4 and those covered by the circular
of January 31, 1934 II/Z 242, to:

(a) The importation of bouquets and cut flowers (not
potted plants) brought in by travellers, not for com-
mercial purposes (R. F. M. Apr. 19, 1934, Z 1101-161
II; R. Z. Bl. p. 267);

(b) The importation of funeral wreaths, bouquets, and cut
flowers (not potted plants) which are brought in
personally for the decoration of graves and coffins,
family reunions, religious festivals, and the like.
(R. F. M. of Apr. 19, 1934, Z 1101 161 II; R. Z.
B3. p. 267.);

(c) The importation of blackberries, bilberries, rasp-
berries, red whortleberries and wild strawberries in
restricted frontier traffic from Austria, Poland, and
Czechoslovakia (R. F. M. of Aug. 29, 1932, Z 1101 -
911 II; of Oct. 2, 1933, Z 1101- 308 II; and of
Feb. 5, 1934, Z 1101 53 II.







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1. Plants and parts of plants that are unconditionally
excluded from importation (A);

2. Plants and parts of plants whose importation is condi-
tionally permitted (B);

3. Plants and parts of plants that may be imported without
restriction (C).


Dried Plants are Classed as Living Plants

Plants and parts of plants in the dry state also are to be
regarded as fresh and are to be treated as living plants.


The Three Classes of Plants

A. Those unconditionally excluded from importation are living
dicotyledonous trees and shrubs of all kinds (except cacti); also
seedlings and plants, as well as parts thereof, such as twigs, scions,
layers, cuttings, etc. In this group are included all deciduous
fruit trees and shrubs, as well as nut and ornamental trees and shrubs
of all kinds.

B. The importation is to be permitted, insofar as other
regulations do not prohibit (for example, the prohibition of importa-
tion of conifers, rooted carnations, and carnation cuttings), of
cacti, as well as plants not included among dicotyledonous trees
and shrubs and parts thereof, on condition that they are not packed
with plants of class A, and that inspection by a technical official
at the port of entry does not establish any infestation or suspicion
of the infestation with San Jose scale.

C. Importation unrestricted: Until further notice (except as
prohibited by other regulations (for example, importation of potatoes
and diseased flower bulbs and tubers is prohibited) all subterranean
parts of plants, all kinds of seeds (except those prohibited by special
quarantines, tropical fruits (except citrus fruits) cereals, and
vegetables for food and as luxuries, drugs and technical raw material
for medicinal purposes, and raw material for technical manufacture.

Shipments that include plants of the different groups are
subject, in their entirety, to the conditions of the most restricted
group.

For plants of group A the right is reserved, in individual
cases, for special reasons, to permit exceptions to the import prohi-
bition, when guaranties are given against the introduction of San
Jose scale.








- 10 -


The provisions of these regulations apply to living plants and
fresh parts thereof, but not to fruit, brought in as baggage by
passengers (travelers).


Fresh Mushrooms Placed in Class C

The Order of November 17, 1934; Z 1101 681 II, prescribes
that fresh mushrooms are to be regarded as vegetables for food purposes
in the sense of group C of the circular of November 26, 1931. Conse-
quently that product is exempt from the import prohibitions of the
decree of November 3, 1931, as amended.


Importation Permitted only through Authorized Ports

The importation of living plants and fresh parts thereof,
insofar as it is permitted, may be affected only through customs
offices that have been authorized for the entry of fruit.*

II. Importation of Fresh Deciduous Fruits and Fresh Refuse
of Such Fruits.


Inspection of Imported Fruits

The inspection of imported fruits for the presence of San Jose
scale (As-pidiotus perniciosus Comst.) and apple maggot (Rhagoletis
pomonella Walsh) is to be carried out in accordance with "Instruc-
tions for the Inspection of Plants, Fruits, and Potatoes on Entry",
as presented in the circular of July 1, 1931 Ii 40305. The inspec-
tion may be entrusted only to technical specialists who have had
thorough instruction in the microscopic characteristics of San Jose
scale.


Dried Fruits Unrestricted

Dried fruits of any kind, and dried refuse of fruits, regard-
less of the degree of desiccation, are not subject to tho provisions
of this decree, nor do they apply to fruit brought in by passengers
as baggage for their own needs during the journey (as amended by the
circular of Jan. 31, 1934 11/2,242).

* The list of authorized ports is too long for inclusion in this
circular.











The so-called southern fruits, including raisins, pineapples,
bananas, etc., are not to be regarded as fruit in the sense of this
decree. Citrus fruits are now placed under the same restrictions as
deciduous fruits.



COLORADO POTATO BEETLE QUARANTINE

(Decree of Feb. 26, 1975)


Importation from the United States into Germany is prohibited
of potatoes, potato peelings, and other potato refuse, as well as of
sacks and other containers that have been used for packing potatoes.
This prohibition does not apply to potatoes carried on vessels as
ships stores.


The importation of dried potatoes also is prohibited. (Order of
Mar. g, 1900.)

The importation of sweet potatoes is not restricted. (Order of
Aug. 19, 1906.)

The importation and transit of living Colorado potato beetles,
at any stage of their life history, are prohibited. The M1inister of
Nourishment and Agriculture can permit exceptions from this prohibi-
tion (Decree of Oct. 7, 1932; R. G. Bl. I: 69, 1932, p. 496.)

Importation must be made through authorized ports. (Decree of
May 20, 1935; R. M. Bl. p. 518). Art. 3 of the decree of July 5, 1930;
R. ;'. Bl. page 203, referring to fees for the inspection of rooted
plants, potatoes, and fruits on importation is applicable as follows:
The fee for the inspection of cherries is at the rate of 0.003 Reichs-
mark per 1 kilo net weight, the minimum fee for any shipment being 1
Reichsmark.



IMPORTATION OF CONIFEROUS PLANTS RESTRICTED


The entry of coniferous plants of the following genera is pro-
hibited until further notice: Abies (fir), Picea (spruce), Pinus
(pine), Pseudotsuga, and Tsuga, or parts thereof.


- 11 -





- 12-


The entry of other coniferous plants will not be allowed un-
less they are packed separately or mixed only with each other, and
unless the invoice is accompanied by a certificate issued by a com-
petent official of the plant protection service of the country of
origin, affirming, in the German language, that the shipment covered
by the certificate has been thoroughly inspected by him and found
free from plants of the above-mentioned genera or of parts thereof.
The Minister of Nourishment and Agriculture can permit exceptions to
this prohibition. Transit shipment under customs supervision is per-
mitted. (Decree of June 3, 1930, R. G. Bl. I, No. 20, 1930, p. 189.)

(The phrase "The entry of other coniferous plants will not be
allowed unless they are packed separately or mixed with each other"
is understood to mean that coniferous plants, other than those named
above, will not be permitted entry unless those of a single genus are
packed by themselves, or unless those of several genera, other than
those named above, are packed together. In other words, coniferous
plants of the genera above named, and nonconiferous plants, may not
be included in any shipment of coniferous plants offered for importa-
tion under the provisions of this decree.)



IMPORTATION OF FLOWER BULBS AND CORMS RESTRICTED


The entry of flower bulbs and corms is not allowed, unless
each shipment is accompanied by a certificate issued by a competent
official of the plant protection service of the country of origin,
affirming, in the German language, that the shipment has been thoroughly
inspected by him and found free from the following plant diseases or
insect pests: Yellow disease (Bacterium IPseudomonas hyacinthi Wakk.)
Sclerotinia rot (Sclerotinia bulborum (Wakk.) Rehm.) black rot of
bulbs (Sclerotium) Rhizoctonia tuliparum (Kleb.) Vlietzel and Arthur),
fire disease (Botrytis 1parasitical tulipae (Lib.) E. F. Hopkins),
Penicillium rot (Penicillium sp.), eelworm disease of bulbs (Anguil-
lulina JTylenchiusl dipsaci (Kuhn) Cerv. and v. Ben.), greater and
lesser narcissus flies (Merodon spp. and -hwmerus spp.), and the bulb
mite (Rhizoglyphus (echinopus) hyacinthi Bvd.)

Transit through Germany under customs supervision is permitted.
(Decree of July 7, 1930; B. G. Bl. I; 24, 1930., p. 204.)



IMPORTATION OF ELM AUD SOUTHERN POPLAR PROHIBITED


The importation of rooted plants of the genus Ulmus and of
the Canadian poplar (Populus Icanadensisl deltoides Marshall), as well






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as of cuttings, scions, grafts, and other fresh parts of such plants,
is prohibited until further notice.

The importation of other deciduous plants than those named in
article 1, or cuttings, scions, grafts, and other fresh parts thereof,
is permitted only when the consignment is accompanied by a certificate
in the German language and that of the country of origin, affirming
that the shipment was inspected and that it does not contain plants
or parts thereof above mentioned.

The Imperial Minister of Agriculture can make exceptions to
these provisions.

The direct transit of the above mentioned plants and their
parts is permitted under customs supervision. (Decree of Feb. 2,
1932; R. G. Bi. I: 10, 1932, p. 63.)



IMPORTATION OF PINE AND SPRUCE SEEDS PROHIBITED


The importation into Germany of pine and spruce seeds and of
pine and spruce cones containing seeds (Tariff No. 95) is prohibited
as of March 15, 1929. (Decree of Feb. 29, 1929; R. G. Bl. I: 11, 1929,
p. 76.)

Amended by the Decree of September 13, 1929 (R. G. Bl. I: 35,
1929, p. 147), to prohibit the importation into Germany of seeds,
and of cones containing seeds of the Scotch pine (Pinus sylvestris L.)
and of the Norway spruce (Picea excelsa Link) only; Provided that
these seeds may be imported into Germany, in exceptional cases, if the
importer has obtained an import permit from the German Minister of
Agriculture. Until further notice, no permit is required to import
the seeds of other species of pine or spruce (Pinus or Picea).



IMPORTATION OF CARNATIONS PROHIBITED


To prevent the introduction of the Carnation leaf roller (Tor-
trix pronubana Hbn.), the entry of rooted carnations and carnation
cuttings is prohibited until further notice. The entry of cut flowers
of carnations also is prohibited from March 15 to November 30 of each
year.

The Federal Minister of Nourishment and Agriculture can permit
exceptions to this prohibition.








The unrestricted transit through Germany of the above-named
plants under customs supervision is permitted. (Decrees of Mar. 28,
1929; R. G. Bl. I: 15, 1929, p. 93. Decree of Sept. 30, 1932; R. G.
B1. I: 68, 1932, p. 492.)



IMPORTATION OF FRESH CHERRIES RESTRICTED


The importation of fresh cherries attacked or.suspected of being
attacked by the maggot of the European cherry fruit fly (hagoletis
cerasi L.) is prohibited until further notice. Shipments of this fruit
must be accompanied by a certificate of origin issued by the communal
authorities of the place of origin and 6y a sanitary certificate issued
by a competent official of the plant protection service of the country
of origin, vouching for the freedom of the fruit from the maggot of
the cherry fruit fly. Shipments will be inspected at the port of entry.
Transit shipment through Germany under Customs supervision is permitted.
(Decree of Apr. 27, 1929, R. G. Bl. I, 1929, p. 92.)



IMPORTATION OF WILD PLANTS PROHIBITED

(Decree of Mar. 18, 1936; R. G. B31. No. 25, Mar. 23, 1936)

The object of this decree is to protect wild plants and animals
from wanton destruction or injury. Article 6 prescribes as follows:

Art. 6. It is forbidden to carry, to send, to hold for sale,
to import or export, to turn over to ethers, to acquire, to take in
custody, or to deal in plants and parts of plants of the protected species
named in article 4 or of the fresh or dried protected plant parts named
in article 5.


Fully Protected Plants Named in Article 4

1. Pteretis struthiopteris Struthiopteris germanica, ostrich fern
2. Phyllitis scolopendrium Nevrman Scolopendrium vulgare Smith,hartstongue
3. Osmunda regalia L., royal fern
4. Stipa pennata L., feather grass
5. Lilium martagen L., turban or turk's cap lily
6. Fritillaria meleagris L., snakeshead
7. Narcissus peudonarcissus L., common daffodil
8. Orchids, adder's grass, Orchidaceae of the following genera and
species: Cypripedium calceolus L., Cephalanthera, Nigritella,
Platanthera, Ophrys, Limodorum abortivum (L.) Swartz, Orchis




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

15 3 1262 09242 0156


9. Dianthus caesius Smith, ,Cheddar pink
10. Anemone nrcissiflora L., narcissus-flowered alemone
11. Anemone alpine L., alpine anemone including.the yellow subspecies,.
A. sulphurea L. U
12. Anemone silvestris L., wood anemone
13. Aquilegia spp., all native species
14. Pulpatilla spp., all native species
15. Adonis vernalis L*.., spring adonis
16. Nymphea alba L., white waterlily
17. Dictamnus albus L., white dittany
18. Daphne spp., all native species
19. Eryngium maritimum L., sea holly
20. gYclmen europeum L., European cyclamen
21. Primula auricula L.
22. Digitalis arabigua Murr. and D. lutea L., .foxgloves
23. Gentiana acaulis L., *G. clusii P. & S., G. kochiana P. & S.,
G. ciliata I, G. pneumonanthe L., G. lutea L.
24. Leontopodium alpinum L., edelvweiss


Partially Protected Plants Named in Article 5

The underground parts (rhizomes, bulbs) or the rosettes of wild
plants of the following species:

1. Convalaria majalis L., lily-of-the-valley
2. Scilla- spp., all native species of squill
3. Muscari spp., all native species of grape hyacinth
4. Galanthus nivalis L., snowdrop
5. Leucojum vernum L., spring snowflake
6. Gladiolus spp., all native species
7. Helleborus niger L., christmas .;ose
8. Saxifraa spp., all rosette-bearing species of saxifrage
9. Primula spp., all native species of primrose.