Citation
News letter

Material Information

Title:
News letter
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Plant Quarantine
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C.
Publisher:
Bureau of Plant Quarantine
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Monthly
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Plants -- Diseases and pests -- Control -- Periodicals -- United States ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began with: no.19 (July 1, 1932)
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Ceased with: no.43 (June 30, 1934)
General Note:
"Not for publication".

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not subject to copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105.
Resource Identifier:
030428081 ( ALEPH )
785785040 ( OCLC )
2012229620 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
News letter
Succeeded by:
Monthly letter of the Bureau of Entomology
Succeeded by:
Blister rust news
Succeeded by:
News letter

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text




NE WS L E T T E R



BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE

UNITED STATES. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE



Number 36 (NOT FOR PUBLICATION) December 1, 1953.

(The contents of this number, unless specifically stated otherwise,
a cover the month of October only)




FOREIGN PLANT QUARANTINES


RECENT ENTOMOLOGICAL INTERCEPTIONS OF INTEREST

Mediterranean fruit fly from Spain.--One hundred and ninety-six living larvae and 3 pupae of Ceratitis capitata Wied. were intercepted at Baltim6re, Md., in 26 peaches in stores from Spain. The vessel on which the infested peaches were found cleared Baltimore for Port Tampa, Fla.

Mediterranean fruit fly larvae in apple,--Four living larvae of Ceratitis
capitata Wied. were intercepted at Philadelphia in one apple in stores from Spain.

Bean pod borer from China.--A larva of Maruca testulalis Geyer was intercepted at Seattle, Wash., in green beans in stores from China. This represents the first record of this pyralid being intercepted from China by inspectors of the
Bureau of Plant Quarantine.

Hemipteron on Inga la'r-4na.--An adult of Macrocephalus gracilis Handle (Phymatidae) was collected on Enga laurina in the field at Aibonito, P. R.

Earwig from Australife- Spongiphora australiana Mjoberg was intercepted at San Francisco with logs in v:rgo from Australia, This earwig is not known to occur in the continental United States.

Weevil larvae from Norway.--Larvae of Cur to micum Lo (Curculionidae)
were taken at New York on filbert nuts in husk in baggage from Norway. The nuts showed numerous exit holes.

Cabbage and cauliflower infested.--Larvae of BTarathp brassicae L. (Noctuidae) were intercepted at Boston on cabbage in stores from the Netnerlands and on leavoq of cauliflower in stores from England and Germany.

Thrips on heather blossoms.--A female of Thrips dilatatus Uz. was intercepted at Philadelphia on heather blossoms in the mail from Scotland. J.'R. Watson, of






-2

Gainesville, Fla., reports that this species is not known to occur in this country*

Bruchid in lentils&-.- lBruchus lentis Frolich* was intercepted at San Fran. cisco in lentils (Lens esculenta) in cargo from:Ita~yo This bruchid is not recorded from the continental United States* It confines itself to lentils, a staple food product*

European corn borer from apno--Larvae of Pyrausta nubilalis Hbn. were in-. te~ic'pt'ed: at' ZtLttl"'- yash., -ih-,r a ,ff -~green corn in ;s-tozes- from' Jpan.

New to National Museum collecti-ono-.-Telephanus diabolicus Neve (Cucujidae)
was takeni at'-Mobilej l. in' banana debris in- cargo frm Nica~raguas W..So Fisher, of the Bureau of Entomologyi. reports that this species is new to the National Museum
collation.

Weevils in paclkinCg material*--The following living weevils were intercepted at Washington, D. Col in moss and other packing material around rose plants in the mail from Czechoslovakia: Aion seniculus. Xby#,. Cpit0orhynchus atomus Boh., .a floralis Payk., Phytobius quadrituberculatus Fab.,and Strophosoma rufipes Steph.

Bark beetle from-the West Indies"&--An adult of Stephanoderes trinitatis Hop1k. (Scolytidae) was taken at Poston on ginger in the mail from Montserrato Lf* W'Blackman "of the Bureau' of Entomolog tat*6s.that $1Wi ber%--L'd'~i ito know to, occur il.this 'Counthry.

Larvae of the vine moth from italy,-..Two living 16'rvae of Polychrosis botrAna Schiff, (Tor ricidae) were intercepted at New York in grapes in baggage froth Italy*! This insect, which is known as. the vine, itioth in Europe'. is Very~ 'i tJj i~us'.to the blossoms and-fruit of~ the grape, A previous interceptin, from' Italy -was made in 1928. It is not recorded from the United States.

Rf3EENT PATHOLOGICAL INTERCEPTIONS OF INTEREST

Ginger diseases*--Some ginger from China, interce pted September 23 at Buffalo, was found to be infected with Ceratostomella sp. Another*1ot of ginger received
a e~dy erirSptmer1,was infected with Staqhyb otrys spe (near, So ay
rogena)o' This.1s our first interception of a Ceratostomel]2 on ginger. 'The only previous interception of :')-achbotrys waTnccu ~OM I~~ii 95

Fungus on kudza)--An interesting fungus foun~ l last July 7, on
kudzu from China, has been determined as Stilbum Hn~'~:.b iss E& K. Cash, of
the Bureau of Plant Industry* This is our first interception of this fungus*

Raphiolepis disease.--A disease found on Reaphiolepis delaccourtii being grown under special peririt at Vashin6,tonp Do 0., has been determined as-Sphaeropsis 'sr. (?s. erioorye) by Miss ]E. K. Cash

Bhamnboo disease.A fungus'in discolored tissue of-beinboo-from 'China, intercepted at New York September 14, 'vAg determined as Acrotliecium bicolor by' Mi'ss Vo K. Charles* This is '-ur first interception of this fungus.








proton disease.--Phyllosticta sp. (not P. portoricensis or P. crotonophila), was Miss Cash's determination of a disease of croton leaves and stems from South Africa intercepted at Philadelphia.

Orchid disease.--Gloeosporium cattleyae was found on Cattleya plants from Venezuela being grown under special permit in Puerto Rico.

Another nema intercepted.--Diseased hyacinth bulbs from Holland, intercepted at New York on October 10, were found to be infestedd with Paraphelenchus maupasio While this is our first interception of this nema, it has been found several times in different parts of the world in several different types of material including coffee trees. Very.little seems to be know n regarding its importance. Dr. Steiner reports that this was an unusually heavy infestation.

COFFEE BERRIES INFESTED WITH FRUIT FLY LARVAE

In spite of the cooperation extended by shipping companies on the Pacific
routes, inspection of Oriental vessels in the port of San Francisco often discloses the presence on board of fruit brought from Hawaii in violation of Quarantine No. 13, which requires that all such fruit shall have been disposed of beyond the 3-mile limit when the ship enters a mainland port. In a recent arrival of this sort from Yokohama via Honolulu the inspector found two avocados of Hawaiian origin in the pantry ice box, which the purser claimed had been overlooked in making his routine inspection. Two branches of coffee berries were also found in the room of the chief cook and a similar branch in the crew's quarters. The berries on
both lots were found to be heavily infested with larvae of the Mediterranean fruit f)ky. The fruit was destroyed on hoard the vessel and the failure of the ship to comply with quarantine regulations was brought to the attention of the steamship line concerned.

ThE GRAF ZEPPELIN BRINGS LIORE PESTS

As an indication of what we might expect in the way of pest-carrying possibilities in the new lighter-than-air type of transport a record was made (S.R.k. 1928, p. 159) of the finding of seven insects and two diseases in flowers in passengers' quarters in the Graf Zeppalin on her premier visit to this country, October 15, 1928. This now famous airship again visited us on August 4, 1929, and again (S.R.A. 1929, rv250) the inspectors looked over flowers in the passengers' quarters and found eight species of thrips. Once more this veteran giant of the air has touched our shores and at Miami, Fla., October 23, 133, plant quarantine inspectors boarded her and again found insects aboard. This time the stowaways were mostly scales on fruit in the crew's quarters,--oranges from Brazil bearing Aspidiotus hederae (oleander scale), Lepidosaphes beckii (purple scale), and Parlatoria sp.; a tangerine, likewise from Brazil, carrying Lepidosaphes beckii; and lemons from Italy affected by the oleander scale.and the purple scale.

No claim is made that the insects or diseases found aboard the airship~in.all three visits were serious pests. The disturbing feature of the whole matter is that on all three occasions there were pests present on the air liner, and if we are to accept these visits as an augury of the role future air traffic may play in trans-








-porting plant :pests the- picture is none 'too reassuringTHE CLOITES ENCLOSE BUT THE NOSE KNOWS

Story-i'ported from Brownsville, Tex., in connection with -a case of seizure and fine.

'"A biis with a number of passengers drove dp and stopped at --the -customs
statioh. Mr. ,Williams6n, our inspector,. boarded the bus while Mr. Eckel, the customs.'ins'pector, was checking the passengers through the open windows along the side of,the busio Neither Mr. Jilliamson's nor Mr. Eckel's inspection revealed anything of a contraband nature. However, when the inspectors met each other af the .eid of the bus, Mr. Eckel complained that he smelled oranges and suggested 'to Mr.' Williamson that they have all of the passengers get out of the bus. Accordingly they so ordered it, and the last person to rise, a fat Mexican woman wearing a voluminous skirt, let a sack .containing two oranges fall from the folds of her dress. It seems that quite a few people can locate the presence of guavas on account of the aroma of the fruit, -and I have heard inspectors say that apples could be detected from the odor they give, but Mr. Eckel's feat of standing on the.6utside of a bus and detecting by scent only the presence of two oranges hidden in the dress of a passenger rates him number one 'with me .as far as sense of smell goes. The anticlimax of this story is that one of the oranges contained seven Anastrepha larvae which are being forwarded."

PASSETGZES BRING FRUIT FLIES TO PROVIDENCE

(As reported from the Boston, Mass., office)

"On Friday, October 20, the French S. S. Sinaia arrived at Providence, R. If, with 88 passengers and a small amount of cargo. There were only 12 interceptions of contraband made in the baggage, 4 of which might reasonably be called hosts for Mediterranean fruit fly--2 from the Azores and 2 from Portugal. All 4 of these inrterceptions were found infested with the friit fly. .

"One interception of particular interest consisted of a basket contaf g 5 quarts of sorbus apples (about 500 fruits) packed in sawdust. I placed this baskit in a" small c 6,rugated box when it was brought back :from Profidencet for examination. When I took the basket out of the box, I noticed larvae*pawling and jumping from the basket. The material was immediately placed in a tight containe in order that there might not be any further' escape. About 30 lefvae were found in the corrugated box and all but 3 of these pupated during the night. W-e went through the sawdust as carefully as we could and obtained 475 larvae and.pupae from this material. There are still about 4 Quarts of the apples to be examined and, we are finding larvaeit- about 90 percent of the material. These sorbus aplles-were -from the Azores.

"There were also 9 quinces, from Portugal, and 7 of these were infested with fruit fly larvae. The infestation per infested unit was as follows: 42, 3tl, 10, 7, 4,' and (;all.liv.ng larvae) A lot of, pomegranates (from Portugal) and a case of 193 apples (from the Azores) were also quite heaviIy ifnfestd









DOMESTIC PLANT QUAdRANTINES


arrangements are being made to place on the quarantine mailing list, airline companies carrying mail or express shipments interstate from regulated areas, as it is found that cut flowers are frequently shipped by this m thod of transportation*

DUTCH ELM DISEASE

A conference at which plant quarantine officers, phytopathologists, foresters, and others, discussed the problems arising from the New Jersey and New York outbreak of the Dutch elm disease was held at '.'Iashington on October 26. At that conference R. Kent Beattie, representing the Bureau of Plant Industry, stated that the number of trees found infected this season up to that time was 603 in New Jersey, 46 in New York, 1 ih Connecticut, 1 in Maryland, and 1 in Ohio; a total of 652. The safeguards employed by the State of New Jersey to keep infected trees from being shipped outside the infected areas, were described by representstives of the New Jersey State Department of Agriculture.

PLANT EXCHANGES

Plant exchanges suggested by tadio are frequently found to be the source of inspiration under which private gardeners arrange to ship narcissus bulbs or other plants in the hope of obtaining new varieties in return. Such shippers are generally unaware of State nursery inspection requirements or special Federal quarantines, A plant distribution agency at Chicago, over Station WLS, is aiding in quarantine enforcement and the prevention of spread of pests by sending letters to prospective shippers containing a statement of the existence of plant shipping regulations and the addresses of officers from whom full information can be secured.

TERMINAL INSPECTION IN PUER1TO RICO

The Territory of Puerto Rico has established terminal inspection of parcelpost shipments of plants and plant products under the provisions of the act of March 4, 1915 (Sec. 596, Postal Laws and Regulations). The inspection service is maintained at San Juan only.

TRANSIT INSPECTION

Office space in the new Post Office Building at Kansas City in Room 412, next to the sorting room, has been provided for the use of transit inspectors.

Two 3tete inspectors are assisting at New York City in checking plant shipments in transit for compliance with State and Federal regulations. It is expected that they will continue workir throughout the winter, making from four to five men available there for the season.

Federal inspection has been discontinued for the season at Kansas City and Omaha, but a State inspector expects to check on shipments at the former point. At Milwaukee also it is expected that a limited amount of State inspection will be carried on.








Day and night tours -being made.by thk Chicago force during the fall season cover 10 mail and express stations and involve inspections from 6:30 a.m. to 2:30 a.m, Freight inspections are made possible through the cooperation of freight agenotesin providing inform ation by telephone of consignmbnts contaiiiing plant material. At the& new Post Office Building 75 percent of' the plant shipments are found at the ",sack* nmp-o" the 6th floor, where the, shipments -may be .examined before they reach the conveyor belts which eventually carry them to the reservoirs where they are separated and dispatched to the State tables, At the Bureau of Plant Quarantine work bench inspection is made of packages which have been held out fof that purpose by postal employees, put in gurneys, and pushed. to the bench from the various chutes."

PHONY PEACE DISEASE

'The Arkansas State Plant Board recently modified Rule 18 relating to phony peach disease and announced that, before issuing permits to nurserymen, located in the infected'States, special' Ihquiry will be made, as .to satisfactory inspection and proper sanitary measures. Alabama end Louisiana have placed new regulations on interstate and intrastate movement of the host plants. In the case of Alabama certification is based on (1) a disease-free county; or (2) mile-radius inspection; or
(3) culling to eliminate borer-infested trees. In Louisiana the destruction of all infected trees in the State is required and certificationfor shippingis based on conditions similar to (2) and (3) above.




DATE SCALE ERADICATION

During the month of October the Webb Subdivision was carefully inspected ani no scale found This planting of 3,285 date palms; varying in height from 10 to 35 feet, was first found infested in July 1929, during the first careful survey of. the Coachella Valley. Two inspections were made in 1929 an'd 307 palms found infested; in 1930,'7 inspections were made and 92-palms found infested; 6 inspections were made in 1931and 2 pAlms found infested; 4 inspections were made'iA..1932 and no scale found; 2 inspections were made in 1933 and-no scale found,:

This planting is in a locality where date plantings are few and widely scattered and the early scale history fairly well known, so an idea of the spread and development of the scale can be obtained. Only 1 plantings, including the Webb Subdivision, within a radius of over 2 miles haVe ever show scale. .:, A few of the offshoots in the original planting of the Narbonne Ranch, a planting of over 3,000 palms about 1 mile east of the Webb'Subdivision, were infested but were cleaned up before there'was much spread within the garden. The U. S. Department of Agriculture has a planting on an Indian Reservation about one-half Mile west of the Subdivision, Several infested offshoots were set in this planting. but,-were cleaned up before any spread occurred. Scale also showed on some of the original offshoots used in' pltting the subdivision but these also::.were cleaned:upearly with ho,great, spread. The 'oGbvernieft plaitih ah4i the Norbonne Ratch may be p4afely eliminated as'cause of: the infest'ition on th subdivision because the infested palms were small and the infestation not severe. Also, the early infestation on -the





-7

subdivision itself may be eliminated as the origin of the present infestation, because there was no indication of deep-seated leaf base, infestation, no very heavily infested palms were found,, had very little leaf base infestatiQ;,p

Two. possiblesources of the infestation remain. The most logical Is the
Churchill planting, located approximately 1 mile southeast of the Webb Subdivision. In the spring of 1923 (approximate date) Mr. Churchill obtained 21 seedling and 8 standard variety palms and planted them on his place. The property from'which Mr. Churchill got his seedling palms was -later found infested. The Churchill property was not inspected until August 1927. At that time several palms were white with scale.L (Theaterm,, "white with scale" is used to describe a very severe' infestation, the natural green color of the foliage being covered by the white of encrusted scale.) ivhen the Churchill -infestation was found it was' immediately treated so no further spread was possible, Lf the Churchill propety was the source of the infestation on the subdivision, it is probable that movement of scale began in 1926 and continued in 1927.

The other possible source is the Graham planting located between 1 and
i1 miles northeaWt of the subdivision. Mr. Graham had several hundred seedling palms i~i:unthinned nurseries, he obtained 11 standard variety offshoots from an infested planting in the spring of 1921. The offshoots were Inspected when moved but showed no scale at the timb. There'was evidently scale on them at the time of the inspection, probably behind the fiber, which spread over the foliage of the palms later, as they were found heavily infested when inspected in May 1926 lae scale *bad spread to the seedling nursery by that time. During the 1929 in&petion another group of seedlings in the mesquite on this place, which had escaped obervation until that time, was found heavily infested.





JAPANESE BEETLE AND EUROPEAN CORN BORER

Exclusive Japanese Beetle Work

Succinit summaries of the results of the canvass and survey during July and Augudt of farms, golf courses, estates, city properties, and cemeteries disclose
some interesting information concerning expenditures for control of the Japanese beetle and actual losses from crop destruction by the insect. Twenty-nine golf clubs reported average annual expenditures of $618 per course for Japanese beetle grub control. These courses reported total expenditures for this purpose of $60,000 over a period of years. The yearly total cost of trapping, spraying, and sod treatment on 19 private estates averages 5l per estate Average annual exSpenditures of $225 per unit were reported by superintendents of 11 cemeteries, parks, and community spraying organizations. In the city block canvass, inquiries were made-of residents in four blocks each in Philadelphia and Trenton, two blocks in Princeton, N. Jn, and one block in Lawvrenceville, N. J. These blocks were selected at random. Expenditures by individual property owners in these blocks average 52.50 per year. Annual expenditures per block were $62.80. Nineteen









growers whose field corn plantings totalled 511 aces supplied statements showing thabt their Qorn erop was injured to the extent of from 3*5 to 80 percent. Their cash losses totalled $2,540, or n average of approximately $5 per acre. Thirteen sweet corn growers with 195 acres of this -crop reported crop losses averaging 35 percent through beetle injury. The average loss per acre was approximately $17.50. Commercial orchardists whose holdings include 37,000 bearing apple trees reported an average fruit injury of 43 percent on 6,300 apple trees of the varieties susceptible to beetle injury. Crop -loss through this,injury amounted to $12,200. Eleven of the 13 reporting orchardists applied sprays secifically for Japanese beetle control at a total cost of $700. The average apple injury per acre was.$123. The average control cost per acre was $7.15* Commercial peach orchards covered in the survey include 10,600 trees of the varieties particularly subject to Japanese beetle injury. The normal yield of theseuvarieties was reduced 27 percent, resulting in loss of sale of 9,100 bushels valued at $12,500. Ten of the 18 orchardists attempted spray control at a total cost:of $712. This was an average injury per acre of $154, anr an average per acre expenditute for control of $8.80. The survey alsq extended to 28 farms, comprising 3,489 acres. Total crop damage sustained by these farmers amounted to $6,130, or an average per farm of. $219. This was an average per acre loss of $1.76. The canvass also included cost of control and crop losses by growers of grapes, raspberries, strawberries, blueberries, and greenhouse-grown roses.

Somewhat of a record was established for quick termination of a prosecution brought under the Plant Quarantine Act for a violation of the Japanese beetle quarantine regulations when on October 23, Lynn F. Stout, of Charlottesville, Va., was fined $10 for illegal transportation of uncertified potted ferns and cut flowers from Chambersburg, Pa., to Charlottesville. On October 1, the defendant was stopped at the Japanese beetle vehicular inspection station on the Maryland-West Virginia line near Williamsport, Md. He was carrying three potted ferns and a large bunch of cut cockscomb. ir. Stout refused to permit the inspector to remove the soil from the ferns and would not return the same to the regulated area or surrender them to the inspector. Despite the inspector's warning, the defendant drove on to his destination with the uncertified plant material. After preparation of the necessary papers, a complaint was filed against the defendant-on October 18 before United States Commissioner Claude R. Yardley, at Charlottesville. .A Deputy Marshal from Roanoke arrested Mr. Stout on October 1.9 and took him before the Commissioner. The defendant was released bn his own recognizance for a hearing in Harrisonburg at
9 o'clock on the morning of October 23. The United States District Court opened its fall term in Harrisonburgon October 23 and Commissioner Yardley had other business there on that day. United States Attorney Shaffer, of the Western District of Virginia, was present at the hearing, at which time the defendant pleaded "guilty." An information prepared for the occasion was then handed to the United States Attorney and the case was taken directly into court and disposed of early in the afternoon. Details of the violation were related to the court by the intercepting inspector. The defendant, in substance, stated that he did not think the quarantine was such a serious matter and thought that the inspector would be "human" and not report him for the violation. Although the fine imposed was quite small, the speed with which the case was terminated should have a good effect on those who learn through the* press of the prosecution.





-9

Activities in classified nurseries greatly increased uring the month of
October, as compared with September. In New Jersey, approximately twice as many plants were certified for shipment to points outside th regulated zone and five times as many shipments were certified for movement between classified dealers within t~e restricted territory. During October, 239 carloads of sand were certified ad compared with 71 carloads in September. Almost twice as many certificates were issued and double the number of inspection calls were made, as compared with September. Larger quantities of plants were certified for movement within the regulated sections than in October 1932. A large nurseryman in southern New Jersey states that their fall business this year is the greatest of any year since 1929. It is reported that an air of optimism seems to pervade the nursery industry. Individual orders are not large, but nevertheless considerable stock is moving and will continue to move through November. Material certified for mail order houses continued to increase in quantity. Shipments from the wholesale seed houses of Philadelphia are also reported as heavier this year than last. Throughout the entire area 3,140,462 plants were certified from Class III establishments for movement to nonregulated territory. In October 1932 there were 1,621,907 plants certified for similar movement. This evidences a considerable increase in volume of trade, since there has been a net increase of only 65 Class III establishments, whereas there was effective on Janupry 1, 1933, an extension of the regulated territory which opened up 46,351. square miles additional within which shipments to individuals or firms other than classified dealers mayr move without certifications.

Before lead arsenate could be sprayed on approximately 5 acres of.backyard
garden areas in.the infested.sections of Erie, Pa., it.was.necessary to remove over
8 tons of refuse, consisting principally-of old tomato vines, cornstalks,-and unripened crops of kohlrabi and endive. Not until late in October did the city experience its first killing frost. Due to the inadvisability of spraying with arsenate of lead the soil in gardens of growing vegetables, application of the poison was necessarily delayed until the gardens could be cleared off. Refuse from over 300 gardens was collected in a 17-ton Government truck and hauled to the city incinerator for burning. Eight laborers for this work were supplied by the Erie County Emergency Relief Board. Rakes used in the clean-up work were loaned by the officer in charge of the county community gardens. The majority of the yards in which the work was performed were in foreign sections of the city. In such cases, men from the crew who spoke the language of the tenant were delegated to explain the work tq 'the individual from whose yard the refuse was to be removed and in which the garden area was to be sprayed. Six days were required for removal of the debris. Six additional days were required for applying the ,lead arsenate. For the first 2 days of treating, a rotary plow:. was 3aed for working the lead arsenate into the upper 3 inches of soil. This worked satisfactorily in large plots, but could not be manipulated in small garden plots surrounded by hedges or fences. Most of the soil insecticide was worked into the soil with hand rakes.

Operation of the mobile patrol of four road inspectors on exit highways at the boundary of the regulated zone in northwestern New York was disc >ntinued on October 16E The State-emraployed road inspectors,were dismissed on that date and the
trucks and roadside equipmrient brought to the New Cuxberland, Pa., warehouse for overwinter storage*. This cooperative road inspection work began on April 12, when four inspectors, three of whom were supplied with Goverment trucks, began part-time






-10.

operations on nine highways. Staggered scheales permitted the inspectors to alternately check west-bound traffic leaving the regulated zone. From early in July until late in September, locations of'Ibur posts were changed t0 intercept' traffic which had been rerouted'to avoid the regularly guarded inspection posts. The post on the Corning city line was in operation during a straight 8-hour shift, on which the inspector alternated his daily' starting hours. When the work was discontinued, 10 roads were being guarded. At the end of October, the personnel at road patrol stations on the Ohio-Pennsylvania, Pennsylvania-West Virginia, Maryland-West Virginia, and Virginia-North Carolina lines, and in Virginia, wasreduced from 53 to 42 men. Relief workers supplied through the Pennsylvania emergeney-relief organization accounted for 10 of the remaining road inspectors*

Lifting of quarantine regulations on the movement of cut flowers was effec-" tive at the close of'October 15, as provided in the regulations. Removal of these restrictions was.not coincident with the lifting of the quarantine on the movement of fruits and vegetables on and after September 15, since cut flowers are still likely carriers, of the adult beetle late in the season. Cut flower inspectors in the wholesale cut flower marts in Philadelphia found the last beetles on cut flowers on October 5. Fewer adult beetles were found in cut flowers toward the latter part of this season than in previous years, although they were found in cut flowers as early as June l1, the effective date of the quarantine on this commodity. Philadelphia cut flower inspectors removed 342 beetles from shipments. offered for inspection during the operation of the seasonal quarantine from June 15 to October 15. Of this total, 129 were removed from roses, 72 from spirea, 25 from dahlias, 19 from euphorbia, 14 from ferns, 11 from primula, l0 from .gypsophila, and the remainder from 24 additional species of cut flowers. Facilitiesfor the Philadelphia cut flower inspection are provided without cost to the Bureau by the two largest wholesale cut flower houses in the city.

Several carloads and a number of truck loads of soil-free nursery stock were shipped under certification from the Philadelphia area during October. Beetles in the open were quite rare during October, but two of.them-were found in a particularly heavily infested region near Narberth, Pao, on October .19. A few of the nurseries started to wash and store their supplies of fruit trees, shrubs, and rose bushes. The majority of this stock will be stored during November, According to a survey in the Philadelphia territory, approximately 500,000 plants will be placed in storage by classified dealers. This total does not ineclude the thousands of dahlia tubers and canna roots to be washed, inspected, and stored for later certification. A survey of 16 wholesale seed houses in Philaw delphia, in connection with State seed certification work, showed an increase in orders over last year. This is especially noticeable in seed orders from South American countries. Several seed houses claim that they have run short of cers tain bulbs. Philadelphia seed houses annually ship thousands of bulbs, corms, and tubers to every State in the Union, and export large quantities of seeds to many foreign countries.

Authority has been granted by So B. Fracker, in charge of enforcement of,
the white-pine blister-rust quarantine, for Japanese beetle inspectors working fromthe Philadelphia district office to certify for movement to designated States shipments of five-leafed pines originA'ting in a nursery establishmont at MOrrisville,






-ll

Pa. Specific instructions for the blister-rust certification work have been Jis. sued to the individual inspectors. WIhre joint Japanese beetle and blister-rust certification is required, certification will be accomplished by the use of a joint certificate stamp legibly impressed on the shipping tag or label or on some conw spicuous portion of the container, the number "63", to indicate the blister-rust quarantine, being inserted in a blank space after "48", which evidences Japanese beetle certification. On shipments requiring only blister-rust certification, the number "48" will be struck out and the figure "63"-inserted. Reports concerning each tree certified under Quarantine No. i3 will be forwarded to the Division of-Domestic Plant Quarantines of the Bureau as the shipments go forward.

Reports received this summer from three separate sources were to the effect that a Japanese beetle is the best bait with which to catch sunfish. Three Delaw. ware River fishermen stated that every sunfish they cleaned this summer contained from six to nine Japanese beetles. Since the past.su.mmer's beetle flight resulted in millions of the insects being afloat on the Delaware River, the present generation of sunfig1 in that stream should be well fed. Several years ago, the largest fish dealer,in'Philadelphia stated that the best food for his small fish consisted of ground Japanese beetles. n. preparing the food, the wings are. removed, after which the .remainder of the inpect is dried in an oven and then ground to a fine powder. The same dealer found that s ne of his larger fish were killed when they swallowed beetles that alighted on the surface of the water in his tanks. It was necessary to screen the tanks during the sunmier, since beetles were numerous in his locality.

After a brief occupancy of office space on the seventh floor of the Custom House in Boston, R. S. Clifton aid the personnel of the Massachusetts district Japanese beetle quarantine office transferred their headquarters to the fourth floor o01 theCustom House. Floor space 70 feet wide and 35 feet long is jointly occupied with the Boston gypsy moth personnel, in charge of H. I. WVinchester. Desk room and file space for an employee of the Bureau of Immigration, Department of Labor, is also provided in one corner ol the office. On two sides of the new office space there are partitioned offices of the Hydrographic Service of the Navy Department. Removal of the Boston quarantine office from 12 South Market Street to the seventh floor of the Custom House was accomplished on September 30, and transfer of the quarters within the Custom House took place on October 31. The Japanese beetle office still retains its old telephone number, Capitol 7487.

Chemical treatments made durim the month of October included carbon disulphide fumigation of 33 field-grown plants. ArranLe-nents were made for similar treatment of 583 additional plants during November if the soil temperature remains above 400 F. Hot-water treatment was given to 273 blueberry plant, which treatment will continue into November. Over 800 cubic yards of potting soil were fumigated or sterilized. Most of this was fumigated with carbon disulphide in the usual air-tight soil boxes. About 40 cubic yards were steam sterilized, and smaller quantities were treated with lead arsenate and flake naphthalene. Surface soil to the extent of 3,352 square feet was treated with carbon disulphide to permit lifting of nursery stock therein, and.376 square feet oi nursery area was poisoned with lead arsenate.


IAE LA NI" )OARO






-12

S-Approval was granted during October for subdivision into Class I and Class II sections of nine unit nursery properties. Class II- subdfVisions, containing infestations, are clearly marked by boundaries of a permanent nature to segregate stock therein from uninfested portions of the premises. Areas within a 500-footradius of the points of infestation are designated as Class III. Under the & splitt classification" provision of the regulations, establishments which otherwis.e would fall in, Class. III'due to the finding of one or a few beetles on the premises are enabled to operate in, a limited portion of the establishment on a Class. I-, or uninfested basis. Of the nurseries subdivisions approved, two are in New York and seven in Pennsylvania.

.Continuous inspection service, requiring the stationing of an inspector at tke-nursery, was rendered at nine nurseries during October. At five New Jersey nurseries, single inspectors were stationed during the month. At one of these nurseries an inspector was occupied most of the month in inspecting 180,000 geranium cuttings which were made soil-free before certification. Two of the larger New Jersey nurseries required two inspectors each. Single inspectors were required in one nursery each in Pennsylvania and Delaware. It is antIcipated that two additional New Jersey establishments will require the services of a full-time inspector for several weeks during November.

Stripping operations at sand pits were supervised during the month at most of the regular sand-shipping establishments. This supervision will continue into November. As provided in the regulations, an inspector supervised the removal of the upper 12 inches of soil from the sand pit or field operation. Supervision is particularly needed in the case of molding sand where only a narrow vein of the desirable sand exists at shallow depths. Regular sand pits frequently uncap considerable areas, requiring continuous presence of an inspector for 3 or 4 days.

What few traps were still in operation at the end of September in a limited number of localities in New Hampshire, Vermont, and New York, and in Erie, Pa., were lifted during the first week in October, repacked, and returned to the New Cumberland, Pa., warehouse. Final tabulations of the season's trapping results were distributed in mimeographed form to the nurserymen, State officials, and others in attendance at the conference to discuss the season's developments in the Japanese beetle situation, held at Washington on October 24.

At the annual conference of the entomological workers of Connecticut, held at the Agricultural Experiment Station at New Haven on October 27, J. P. Johnson, district Japanese beetle supervisor for Connecticut, read two papers, one by L. H. Worthley on "Developments in the Japanese Beetle Situation in 1933", and the other detailing Mr. Johnson's activities in connection with the Japanese beetle and European corn borer in Connecticut during the past year. Including visitors from surrounding States, there were 60 men in attendance at the conference.

Possible quarantine action as a result of this year's trap finds was discussed to the mutual satisfaction of nurserymen and State and Bureau officials in attendance at the combined conference and public hearing held in Washington on October 24. Mr. Hoyt presided. Preliminary to the discussion, Mr. Worthley read a paper on "Developments in the Japanese Beetle Situation in 1933."







Corn Borer Activities

Surveys in Connecticut to ascertain the extent of commercial damage by the European corn borer and the degree of borer population in the State were made under thy supervision of J. P. Johnson, from July into late October. Thirty-nine farms on which were grown 192.5 acres of early sweet corn were visited. Total damage was reported amounting to $11,321.38, or an average of A8.81 per acre. Thirty-seven growers having a total of 2.5 acres of late sweet corn experienced a net loss of $850, or an average of $2b.15 per acre. The borer-population count, made during October, included the same towns in which a similar survey was nmde in 1932o A large increase in borer population was indicated. Jith the exception :of.two-.towns, an average annual increase of 106 percent was observed. The survey was made in sections adjacent tojNew London, Glastonbury, and Milford.





MEXICANi FRUIT FLY

Rainy weather hindered trapping operations considerably during the first part of October. However, by the last of- the month more than 5,000 of the new globe-shaped glass traps were in operation in 466 selected groves throughout: the quarantined area. Since the operation of these traps was new to all of the inspectors, it was necessary to work out a technique of handling. The speed of operating the trapn was increased from about 60 per day per inspector the first few days they were operated to around 100 per day by the end of the month. The greatest obstacle to the handling of the traps was the large numbers of moths which were .attracted to them. In a number of'counts of the insects in the traps made at 2 day intervals, an average of 65 Lepiboptera were taken from each trap. The 9dor emanating froman the decaying bodies of these moths was exceedingly nauseating to the inspectors and in all probability masked the attractiveness of the bait. -A number of ideas were tried out looking to the exclusion of the moths and at the same time not interfering with the rapidity of operating the trap or their effectiveness in catching flies. The simplest method evolved was to insert a semiconeof 1/4-inch hardware cloth in the inverted opening of the trap. The screen was held in place by a wire which was passed through the neck of the trap. In tests made with traps thus equipped, an average of only 5 Lepidoptera were taken per trap, while 18 more Diptera were taken per trap than in unscreened traps. The cost of equipping each trap amounted to only one BOlfcent.
With the exclusion of the moths, the amount of bait required per trap can
be reduced, resulting in a material saving in the cost of operating. Where moths were getting in the traps, it was found that only 10 or 12 traps could be serviced with a gallon of bait; this number can be practically doubled when the moths are excluded.

Very little evidence o: the hurricane of September 4 and 5 remained to be
seen at t,.eend o. the month. Residences and buildinCs' had been repaired and the rubbishb..cleared away. In the drier portions of the Valley the groves had been








pruned and disced, and with the new crop of foliage, it was diff-icult to realize that they had been through the storm. 'However,"waterwqs still stdhding in mahy of the poorer,drained groves and comparatively few had dridd sufficiently to permit .cultural activities to be resumed. Quite a heavy-mortality was observed among the trees in the eastern part of the Valley as a result Of the wet sell

Very little fruit was,shipped during the month. The fruit remaining' on the trees was in a growing condition due to the warm temperatures and abundant moisture in the soil Difficulty was experienced ii finding groves'of seeded fruit that wquld pass the State maturity test, and practically no groves of seedless fruit would neet the requirements. In addition to the scarcity of ripe fruit, the markets were weak, and most growers with commercial quantities of fruit preferred to hold it and gamble on the price going up.. Approximately 140 carloads of fruit were shipped during October, 75 percent of which was moved by truckb Ninety-nine permits were issued for interstate shipments of fruit by truck. These shipments went to 11 different States.

Oranges arriving in Matamoros from the Montemorelos area of Nuevo Leon, Mexico, were found to. be lightly infested with larvae of the fruit fly.





PINK BOLLWORM

A new outbreak Of the pink bollworm was discovered in the western part of
Tegas the latter:part of October# The first specimens were taken on October 17 in trash from a gin in Gaines County. There are four gins in this county and speli.. mens have sincebeen found in trash from all of them. Additional specimens have
been found in gin trash at Shacktown in the northwest part of Dawson County, at Brownfield in Terry County, and at Levelland in Hockley County. Specimens were also taken in-trash at Brownfield froo cotton which was produced in Lea County, N# Mex. As ,ginning was at the peak it was impracticable to install sterilizers to treat the remaining seed. Arrangements were therefore made with'the 24 gins involved at the end of the month to ship all seed to designated'oil mills. Arrangements were made with the 7 oil mills which were designated, to handle the seed in such manner as to avoid spreading the insect. Arrangements were also made with the ginners to ship the baled lint to certain compresses for segregation and compression It is of interest to note that a number of the ginners have had previous experience in operating under the pink bollworm regulations, and they are all giving wholehearted cooperation in handling the situation. It is planned to sterilize all planting seed for the next crop. It is thought that under the above arrangements the situation is being very well taken care of.

During the month of October every possible effort was made to locate any additional infestation of the pink bollworm-in northern Florida 6hd Georgia through the, use o-f gin-trash machines, At the peak of the inspection, nine machines were in operation, a trained pink bollworm inspector being in charge of each machine. A considerable amount of trash was inspected without finding any additional specimens.








Field inspeeti6ns rere also. continued, with a personnel of I Federal and
State inspectors The inspections were, f course, most intensive in the vicinity of gins whre- specimens were found, byt at ;the same time other areas were also covered. It was not until October 27 that specimens were found in the field. On that date 3 pupae and 6 larvae were found in a field 2-1 miles south of Enigma, Geea. On the following day another specimnrfwas found in a field about one fourth mile from the first field. The fact that it took the men so long to locate specimens in the field is a further demonstration of the value of the gin-trash machines in detecting light infestations. At the close of the month there was not a great amount of material left in the fields, but the inspectiorswill be continued as long as practicable.

In the regulated area oT Florida only:281'bales were ginned during th.'monthp All 04 the tiash from this cotton was- run through a gin-trash machine without finding any specimens"of the pink bollworm, There is very little cotton remaining to ,ba ginned, so-that field and gin-trash inspections are just about completed in this area; however, a supply of green bolls hqs been collected for later laboratory in..spection.

The. necesity for concentrating men for inspections in Georgia made it impossible to carry on the daily collection and examination of cotton blooms from the plats. at Chapman Field. Arrangements were made with the Bureau of Plant Industry to collect and destroy all cotton blooms dailyvdhile the inspector is away. The
examination of these blooms will probably be resumed during the coming months.

During-thle month of October gin-trash .inspect ion was carried on in all of
the regulated areast%.. As previously stated, the results were negative in the regulated area of Florida; also in the Salt ,-iver.Valley- and Tucson areas, Ai=zona. Specimens of" 'the pink bollworm were found in each o* the remaining areas. In the ,.Peos Vai1ey6f'Texas and N 1. Mexico the .infestation seems to be heavier this season than ever before, but it ha, not reached the point where any commercial damage is beir6 done-. Irn the remaining areas infestation seems to be about the same as last yaar, or-possiblY lighter in some areas. In the Big Bend area of Texas the number of sppoimens being found in gin trashh4,d increased considerably toward the end of' thp month; howv'rt, n -only one or two fields was the damage very heavy, due to the programcarried. .ut last fall and winter. This program did not include the acreage in R ,ewgter County, and this year the infestation .is very heavy. Counts were recen**ly maide at .8'difereit points in a 20-acre field, which showQd that 53.3 percent. of -the cotton wai nonpickable The owner of t*fs Tield stated that the countZ were very conservative, anJ that if anything wre too low. Earlier in the season. he estimated tht he would -et.from 22 to 25 bales from this acreage, but-he gotonly" 7, and at ,ributed the loss entirely to the pink bollworm. He further stated that the cotton he would ge- was damaged 40 percent in grade and staple. Arrangements have been made to clean up the acreage in Brewster County, which is small, and this work will get under way early in November.

A -,o-al of 844 cars l-es ins-ecte i at the Marf.- road station during C c
from whi.ah 10 J."terceftio'h3 were rade. Of t't.s nu-mer 6 .vre found to be 3 i Ed with the pink bollwora, 32 givingg and 6 Jead irvae being found. It Ls of a .- al interest o nbte that 2 of 0he cars were en route to points in northwest Texa -,








where a considerable amount of cotton." i.grown, and 3 live larvae were found in one and 12 living larvae in another, it is quite possible that this could have been
the means of spreading infestation., One. of. the pthpr interceptions was rather un.ubual 6It consisted of 10 pounds of sged cottondtaken from a Mexican who was riding a burrQ from Ruidosa to Marfal Tex.,.. a. distance of some 60 miles.. The-seed cotton contained 16 living and.1.. dead larvae.





PREVENTING SPREAD OF MOTHS

Gypsy moth training schools were in operation during the greater part of
October in Vermont, Massachusetts, and Connecticut. Additional men were secured through .the National Reemployment Service and by the end of the month a total .of 1,350 men were on gypsy moth work in these States .and in New York. By the, last week in October all training schools had been temporarily discontinued and-the.men transferred to regular scouting work in the barrier zone in southwestern Massach.usetts, northwestern Connecticut, Vermont, and northeastern New York. A large.proportion of the force is now stationed in towns in northern Vermont in order that this territory may. be scouted before, severe winter weather sets in. Although there has already been some .snow, especially in the higher regions of Vermont, the. weather as'a whole has been very favorable for scouting. Weather conditions vary grea ly within a radius of 5 or 6 miles in the mountain regions of northern Vermont T en have found it possible to work in some locations on days when no work douQlde.. carried on in nearby towns because of bad weather# Some difficulty has been experienced in quartering the men in some small towns in northern Vermont as telephone and Christmas tree operators had taken available accommodations.

The scouting work done at Mt. Tabor,.Vt., is being performed under difficult conditiohs. The Mto Tabor woodland district consists of appi-oxlimately 23,i000 acrps and includes 16 mountain peaks and 6 lakes, including Lost Pond. Surrounding Lest Pond is an area of "quick mud", which has the same characteristics as quicksand, It has'been reported that at least one man was drowned in this quick mud, .an- there are stories of severa.1 narrow escapes experienced by hunters Mt. Tabor has:nopassable roads ,entering .the town from the. north, east, or south, and only one road from the west, wh~ch extends eastward about three .quarters of a mile. To ,theerad of the month over 10,000 acres of woodland had been scoutod in this district. It
is expected that scouting work will .be completed .here before Christmas.

It is encouraging to read in the reports .fromscouting supervisors..that the crews are showing a marked improvement. Regardless of the difficulti.es the scouts have experielced.due to the snow and the hilly and rocky conditions which have .cause
numerous minor injuries, they have shown an interest in the work and a desire to learn.

In the Pennsylvania area aplrbximately 475 men were employed on gypsy moth work, about 150 of these being engaged in cutting brush and dead and decayed trees of no commercial value and favored as food by the gypsy moth. Except for a small







-17.

number in training schools, the remainder of the men were engaged in regular scoutin- ork.

The number of men now on gypsy moth scouting work in the Civilian Conservation Corps camps has increased over the Izevious month. Full assignment of men has not as yet been made and a further increase is expected. At the end of the month a total of 384 men were engaged in scoutinF work from five camps in Connecticut, nine in Massachusetts, and one in Vermont. During October, six foremen were appointed by the State Forester of Connecticut for gypsy moth work in the camps in that State.

The Boston quarantine office which has been located at 408 Atlantic Avenue was moved on November 3, and is now located on the 4th floor of the Boston Custom House Building, where quarters are being shared with the Japanese beetle project*

The Franklin County i.R.A. parade was held in Greenfield on November 1,
about 10,O00 marchers participating, All employees of this project stationed in Greenfield took part in this parade, and a large float was prepared arL entered by this project. The truck was covered with pine, balsam, and laurel boughs combined with branches of oak, and presented a rather colorful picture.

The fall meeting of district quarantine inspectors was held at Greenfield on October 27. This meeting, held each ,ear just prior to the start of the Christmas tree and greenery inspection season, is for the purpose of plannin. the inspection work and getting preliminary information on the number of carloads of trees to be shipped during the season. With this information in hand, plans can be made to provide for an extra number of inspectors if found necessary in order to insure satisfactory service to the shippers. Indications are that Christmas tree operators will start cutting later than usual, and for tlis reason it is possible that this may develop a rush at the end of the season to fill orders and may mean that more men for a shorter period of time will be needed for the inspection of the trees. The first Christmas trees for the coming season were inspected on October 28, the trees being cut in central Vermont and shipped to New York.

It is possible that future developments in the shipment of telephone cable reels and wire may have an effect upon the am-ount ol material inspected and certified from the quarantined area. Every year many thousands of these reels are inspected and certified, but it has been reported recently that a fow shipments from wire manufacturing companies have been coming into the quarantined area without being wound on reels. It is understood that this wire is shipped in coils and wrapped in heavy paper. Shipment in this way saves the additional weight of the reels and also avoids the return to the manufacturing company of the empty reels.

People often collect branches with brightly colored autumnleaves for home
decoration, but these last only a short time and are discarded. At certain seasons of the year branches from deciduous trees are prepared by bleaching and then dyeing, Such dyed leaves are used for makir % wreaths and are usually in demand principally for Memorial Day. A recent sh:iprment indicates that florists have devised
a satisfactory metliod of handlin and storing brii-htly colored autunnleaves for late use. An entire truck load of red oak branches of leaves was inspected and certifiec-




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
111it 111 111111 111 1111111111111I1IIII ll III[I~ I[ If
3 1262 092416725
18

recently for shipment to a New York florist. The branches were to be put in a refrigeration plant to remain th:,re' u-ntil-the Ch;istmas.holidays when they WMill be used for decorative purposes. This is the first sizable shipment of this nature
*that has been inspected.

In general, shipment of varif s types of wood for fuel purposes is by carload or truck load* ..About the only exception to this is fireplace wo6d which is often shipped,in much sMaller units. It is probable that such small shipments of fireplace wood are intended solely for what might, be called decorative purposes, as oftentimes people do not desire to have fires in their. fireplaces, but ohly a few logs for the effect. Quite often those who spend vacations in the country before departing for home leave orders for specimen lots of fireplace wood to be
shipped later in the season Quite recently there have been a number of small lots of such wood shipped from one of the localities i the western part of the quarantined area by parcel post. It fs very unusual to -have fuel wood ".ipped in this fmahner.















I .', i



















.,




Full Text

PAGE 1

NE, WS LETTER , .. BUREA.{!_ OF ~LANT Q.UARANTJJ;-JE UNIT'ED STATES, :DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE e=o~=====c=~7~=~===t==~===::ns=======~=dccc==========~=~==•====~======~==========~ Number 36 (NOT FOR PUBLICATI~~) December 1, 1933• .( The contents of this number, unles.s specifically stated otherwise, , cover the month of October only) ' ~=cm==em=co~c~=====•===o=====cc==========~=======~======c===c===============-==== FOREIGN PLANT QUARANTINES . ' . ( . RECElT ENTOMOLOGICAL INTERCEPTIONS OF INTERES~ . . , , Mediterranean fruit fly from Spain.--One hundred and ninety~six living larvae and 3 pupae of Ceratitis ca;gitata Wied. were. intercepted at Baltimore,. Md., in 26 ~eaches in stores from Spain. The vessel on which the infested peac~~s were found cleared Baltimore for Port Tampa, Fla. . Mediterraneen fruit fly larvae in apple8-Four living larvae of Ceratitis capitata Wied. were intercepted at Philadelphia in one a pple in stores fro~ Spain. Bean pod borer from China.--A larva of Maruca testulaiis Geyer was . intercepted at Seattle, Wash., in green beans in stores from China. This represents the first record of this pyralid being intercepted from China by inspectors of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine. Hemipteron on Inga la~_:_:; :ia .-... An adult of Macrocepha lus gracilis Handl • • (Phymatidae) was collected on I nga laurina in the field at Aibonito, P. Re -----Earwig from Austral~~~-"•Spongiphora aust_~alis~ Mjoberg was intercepted at San Francisco with logs iI'v9rgo from Australia~ I'his earwig is not known to occur in the continental United States. Weevil larvae from Norway.--Larvae of Cur~1'] i.o mi cum L;; ( Curculionidae) were taken at New York on filbert nuts in husk in baggage from Norway. The nuts showed numerous exit holes. ' . . Cabbage an d cauliflower infest!:3d.--1rvae of Baratl']._P. __ 1Jrassicae Le (Noctuidae) were intercepted at Boston on cabbage in stores from the Nt:rcnerlands and on leave of cauliflower in stores from England and Gennany . : ; '.'; , Thrips on heather blossoms.--A female of Thrips dilatatus Uz. wa intercep ei at Philadelphia on heather blossoms in the mail from Scotland. J.R. Watson , of R

PAGE 2

• 1\ ' , : Gainesville, Fla •• reports that this species is not known to occur in this country. Bruchid in lentils.--Bruchus lentis Frolich. was intercepted at San Francisco in lentils (Lens esculenta) in cargo ,from:Ttaly~ This bruchid is not re-corded from the continental United States. It confines itself to lentils, a staple food product. . .: , , . . European corn _ _ borer from Japan!--Larvae of Pyrausta nubilalis Hbn. were inw terc e pted' i f t "Sea.'t'tle' , " Wash., . j:n-ears ~ ef green corn in :s-tores fronr {J".a-pan.''" , , . ' ....... = = • • • ~,. • l : • ' : ' ' . . .:. New to Nationa l Museum collection.--Telerhan~ di~bolicus Nev. (Cuc~jidae) was taken a VMobile; ' Alir~ , in banana debris in cargo from Nicaragua. w;:: s. Fisher, of the Bureau of Entomology; • -reports that t ~lis species is new to the National Museum col l e cti oh'• ..... . c • : ' .. , • • ,"" • 0 r , ' . . .,, . , , , "' , . . .• . : .• . ::, ... WeeviJs in packing m aterial.--The following living weevils were intercepted at ~ashington, D. c., in m oss a nd other packing material around rose plants in the mail from Czechoslovakia: .Ap.ion .seniculus. Kby.~.C~irtorhynchus ato~ Boh., .Q.• floralis Payk., Phytobius quadrituberculatus Fab.,and Strophes~ rufipes Steph. Bark beetle from the W ~s t Indie: ~.,-~--An adult of s tephanoderes trini ta tis Hopk. (Sc~lytidae) was take n at Boston on ginger in the mail from Montserrat. M ~ w . 1nackman,o f the Bureau of Entomot~;gy; .states .. :t.ha,t. in.)s 1:Er . ~ -Jfe$..tJ~ .. :L.s not known to occur, iri this c ounitr • . • , . . . . . . ... .. •' ; ; .. Larvae of the vine moth from I1;;al1_.--Two ii vlng n{rvae of .Polychrosis botrana Schiff. (Tortricidae) were intercepted at 1-;e w York in grapes in baggage fro Italy. This insect, wbic h i s known as the vine. nioth in Eur.opE;);. is .:v~ri: : :l;n.Jut _ i041 { . J o the hlossorns a nd fi;ui t o f the grape. A previous interceptidn from It'a.ley was , Ill:B:.d~'.. Jl'l: 1 928. It is not recorded from t h e United States. REGENT PATHOLOGICA L INTERCEP TIO N S -OF INTEREST I Ginger disea~.--S o m e g i nger from China, intercepted Se.ptember .23 at Buffalo, was found to be infected with Ceratostomella sp. Another:iot of ginger received a few clay s earlier, Septem b e r 14, w a s i nfected with Sta9hy • b o tr.yp _ s p . (-near .• ~ rogena). ri1his . i s o u r first interception of l. C eratos+,o~J.-~ ~ : o n ginger. . The .oniy p r evious interception of tachybotrys w a s on cactus f rom ~.T;-:J.' ~ ~-~i.. i n 1915. -!Ungus on h.LLdz ~ )--Jm interesting fungus f::mnd s '-:J..i-:1.:J"i..o last July 7,;.on kudz u f r o m China i has been determined as Stilbum inc~~ x::.~~, : . : ?!!: . 0:y Mis s E. K., Cash, of the Bureau of Plant Industry. T his is our first i n t e r c:eption of this fungus. Jtaphiolepis di_sea~.--A dis.ease foun d on R e ' phiol~pis .. d e1~c~ourtii being grown under specia l peTiai t at Washington , D. C., h a s b een detsrmi n ea. as• Sphaerops is s:r• (? _~ eriobotryae) by Mis s E. K. Cash, . . . ' ... " . , . B amboo ' disease~-A fungus' in d'iscolored tis s u e o f brunboo -fr~m 'China t inter ... cept e d at N e w York Septemb e r 1 4 , -was' determine d a s Acrotn-ec1um bi color by' Mf s s Vo K. -. Charles. This is D u r first i _nter9eptio n of this fungus. '. . t . . _., 1 . •_: 0 ,.. • , • • ' • • : ,# . : :.. : • : • .. .. • ' • • • •• ; • • ' • • • • • • : ~ : • • •••• t ' . .. .... .... --.:: ... : . .... . . . r .. . • i ' .""' .. : . • . . ... ;. , , . . ~ ~" ; . , I I -. ,, , : .. , I • ,,' t .',I)

PAGE 3

.. 3Ciroton dis~a.e.--Phyllosticta sp • . (not P. portoric-ensis or P. crotonophila), was Miss Cash's determination of a disease of croton leaves an d stems from South Africa intercepted at Philadelphia • . , Orchid disease,--Gloeosporiurn oattleyae was found on Cattleya pl~ts from Venezuela being grown under special permit in Puerto Rico. Another nerna intercepted.-wDiseased hyacinth bulbs from Holland, intercepted at New York on October 10, were found to be infested with Paraphelenchus maupasi. While this is our first interception of this nema, it has been found several times in diff~rent parts of the world in several different types of materia~ including coffee trees, Very .little seems to b e k no w n regarding its importance. Dr. Steiner reports that this was an unusually heavy infestation. COFFEE BERRIES INFESTED WITH FRUIT FLY LARVAE In spite of the cooperation extended by shipping companies on the Pacific routes, inspection of Oriental vessels in the port of San Francisco often discloses t,he presenceton board of fruit brought from Hawaii in violation of Quarantine No. 13, which requires that all such fruit shall have been dispos~d of beyond the ' 3 ... mile limit when the ship enters a mainland port, In. a recent arrival of this sort from Yokohama via Honolulu the inspector found two avocados of Hawaiian origin in the pantry ice box, which the purser claimed had been overlooked in making his routine inspection, Two branches of coffee berries wer e also found in the room of the chief cook and a similar branch in the crew's quarters. The berries on both lots were found to be heavily infested with larvae of the Mediterranean fruit fly. The fruit was destroyed on hoard the vessel and the failure of the ship to .. comply with quarantine regulations .was brought to the attention of the steamship line concerned. THE GRAF. ZEPPELIN BRINGS MORE PESTS As an indication of what we might expect in the way of pest-carrying possi bilities in the new l,ighter-than-air type of transport a record was made ( s.R.A, 1928, p. 159) of the finding of seven insects and two diseases in flowers in passengers' quarters in the Graf Zepp.elin on her premier visit to this country , October 15, 1928. This now famous airship again visited us on August 4, 1929, and again ( s.R.A. 1929, 'p~250) th.e inspectors looked over flowers in the passengers' . quarters and found eight species of thrips, Once more t his veteran giant of the air has touched our shores and at Miami, Fla., October 23, 1933, plant quarantine i -:spectors boarded her and again found insects aboard. This time the stQwaways were mostly scales on fruit in the crew's quarters,--oranges from Brazil bearing Aspidiotus hederae (oleander scale), Lepidosap hes beckii (purple scale), and Parlatoria sp,; a tangerine, likewise from Brazil, carrying Lepidosaphes beckii; and lemons from Italy affected by the.oleander scale. and the purple scale. No claim is made that the insects or diseases f ound aboard the airship . in -all three visits were serious pests. The disturbing feature of the whole matter is that on all three occasions there were pests present on the air liner, and if we are to accept these visits as an au gury of the role future air traffic may play in trans -

PAGE 4

"--4-'IHE CLO'Il1ES ENCLOSE BUT '1HE NOSE KNOW S ' -~ • . i• ...... . .. • :E{tory :.:~~~rte d .--froni ' :sro wnsviJ)e;_ Tex., in connec-tio. n .'with; a case of seizure and fine. .: :~. :::..'. _,;~ ~1:iu , s .wit~ 8:. number of "pa_ s ,sengers .. _drov' e 'up arid ' ~ :i;opp ed at--the .. c ._4stoms ~ stcrt:fon, ... :.:. :1'.1r.,-.. ._;fi-lliamson, our inspecto~,. ooa.'.rd~d t nE? b,14s whiie Mr. Ecke ~, the cus toms ._fns,Pectpr~ w1:1s checkil.1. the p assengers thr.ough tbe open windows ' 0;l~ng th. e . side . . ), . . . . \ ~. . . . . . ' . of ,,t _he bus.. Neither _ r v rr. tiilliamson' s no _ r Mr. Eckel ' . s . inspection revealed anything .. .-, I I , 1 • , • • • • • of a contraband n a t1;re._. _However,_ ~p en _ the in~pe.ctors met _each other. at _ th~ ._en,d of the bus, l\tTr. Eckel complained that he smelled ora nges and suggeste a to 11r. Williamson that they have all .of t;he passengers get out of the bus • . Accordingly they so ordered it, and t h e last person to rise,' a fat Mexican wonian wearing a voluminous skirt, , .. le:t .. a ,sack -containing : two _ ora.nges fall from the_ folds of _her dres. $ • It .. s~~~s . -;t"ba~ .. qu .it. e . ff~W-p~ople c .an locate the presenc~ pf ,guavas on account of; , :t ~ . e aroma o . f .the frvi t , . ,and, r he.ve heard insp ectors i,ay tha t ' a pples could be detected from the odor tney.g { y _ e ,: but Mr. Eckel 's feat of standing on. the. 6utsi_ de of a trqs and .detecting by s "cen\ only the pre sence of t w o oranges ,hidd_ e n . fp th~ _ q_ resr:/ ot," a '. passenger rates him. n~ber one. 'with me JlS far as sense .. q f s mell goes~ The arrti climax of this story is t ha t one of theorange_ s contained seven Anastr,epha. larv!;?.e which are .being f orwarded." ... . ._.. . . I' ., ••. t • . PASSE ... TGERS BRING FRU.!T FLIES'. .TO P ROVIDENCE . . ~ . ("As re.ported from th" e B . o"sto ,n,. Mass. ' office) . -.. ' . ; ... "On Friday, October 20, the ]'rench s. s. Sineia arrived at Providenie,"B. I.t with 88 passengers and a s mall a mount of cargo. ,_Thl9re were only 12 interceptions o f contraband made in the bagg age, 4 of which might reasonably be called hosts for . ,Mediterranea n fruit fly. -~2 from the A z,ore . s and ;2 t . r .om Portugal. Al], _ .4 of these in,tercepfions. were f ound infested with t h e frLlit fly.,/ . . _ _.._ • ' • .' • , ..... ~ . • : ; :: ' : ; . j : _I ; . ' . . ;'Ope. inter. cep_t ion o f . particular interest cons i~ted of a ba~k -~t~~-'. : o.I\'t~_J'#'i~ : 5 quart's, or' sorbus apples (about 500 frtiit_s) packed ~n-:sawdust. I pla c ed . ~ . h1s__bas-ke't in: a ; . srrialI_,. copfug a te_ d bo~ when it wa_ s b'rought ~ack :f;f;rom Pr.ovi_ denc.~ : fqr .. e :x~_i-nat ion., Hhe_ n I .took _.the basket ou t of the_ box, I ri6tice.ti -larvae•orawling a , ~d jumping 0fr9m ' the .baske. t • . The material was imrnedia t .ely placed in ,f tigh:t cont"ai"ne~ in order ~ha t ther" e mi . glit, '.'riot ' be ' any f'urt11er' -~~~-ape ~.About 3ti l~~a_ e _ wer~ . _ foUrt _ d in the corrugat e . d box and all 'but 3 of. these piJ,pated, d~ring.th~ __ night_ . w e wer1t:througt .the sawd~st a s car.efully as w e _ cpu ).d an.d obtain-ed 475,. larvae .an, d .Pupae 1r6m. this mate.rial. T l~er e ?re still"about '4 quarts of the apples to be .. examined'ana• we are finding lar:va ~ . ;ih ":i:1bout 90 percent of the m~terial_. 'These sorbus apples .. we r e-,.from the Azores. , •"The;t:E?.:t:were:-.also 9 quinces, from Portugal, and 7 of these were infested with f~uil t -f'.l y . la_rvae. The .infest ation per i nfested unit was as follows: 42, 31, 10, 7, .fi, .-4;; a~d_:;3 ._:.(~1\.,li v,i~~ -~6i:r-~9:.e) •-.:.'. A _ Jo~ .. p~,_J3 i_:ppm< ~ g ~~pa .~~~/ f:r;5,~ --~ -07:,~~ ,a.,7.: ) __ and a case of 193 a11pl e s ( from the Azores) were also quite heavily infested.";

PAGE 5

DOMESTIC PLANT QUARANTINES Arrangements are. being made to place on the quarantine mailing list, airline companies carrying mail or express shipments interstate from regulated nreas, aS" tt is fb~d tmt cut flowers are frequently shipped by this rrBthod of transportation. DUTCH ELM DISEASE A conference at which plant quarantine officers, phytopathologists, foresters, and others, discussed the problems arising from the New Jersey and New York outbreak of the Dutch elm disease was held at ~ashington on Octorer 26. At that conference R. Kent Beattie, representing the Bureau of Plant Industry, stated that the number of trees found infected this season up to that time was 603 in New Jersey, 46 in New York, 1 ih Connecticut, 1 in Maryland, and 1 in Ohio; a total of 652. The safe~ guards employed by the State of New Jersey to keep infected trees from being shipped outside the infected areas, were described by reprcsentstives of the New Jersey State Department of Agriculture. PLANT EXCHANGES Plant exchanges sug gested by radio are frequently found to be the source of inspination under which private gardeners arrange to ship narcissus bulbs or other plants in the hope of obtaining new varieties in return. Such shippers are generally unaware of State nursery inspection requirements or SJBCial Federal quarant1nesc A plant distribution agency at Chicago, over Station WLS, is aiding in quarantine enforcement and the prevention of spread of pests by sending letters to prospective shippers containing a statement of the existence of plant shipping regulations and the addresses of officers from whom full information can be secured.. TERi~INAL INSPlCTION IN PUERTO RICO The Territory of Puerto Rico bas established terminal inspection of parcel post shipments of plants and plant products under the provisions of the act of March 4, 1915 (Sec. 596, Postal Laws and Regulations). The inspection service is maintained at San Juan only. TRANSIT INSPECTION Office space in the new Post Office Building at Kansas City in Room 412, next tot he sorting room, has been provided for the use of transit inspectors. Two 3tate inspectors are assisting at New York City in checking plant ship-ments in transit for compliance with State a nd Federal regulations. It is ex-pected that they will continue working throu ghout the winter, making from four to five men available there for the season. Federal inspection ha.s been discontinued for the season at Kansas City and Omaha, but a State inspector expects to check on shipments at the former point. At Milwaukee also it is expected that a limited amount of State inspection will be carried on.

PAGE 6

Day and night tours -being made , .. by. th~-Ch1_"cag force during the fall see.son cover 10 mail and express stations and involve inspections from 6:30 a.mi to 2:30 a, .m, Fr.eigh, t . ii;J.9p action~ _ !ire m~de poss_ i ble through the cooperation of fl'eight . agen~t~~ -'in p:ryv,i~irig _i!lfoi-rnatior .'by-'t'elephone;-' of consi grunents c-c,ntai-iii"ng plant . matefial • . A t ; ~ he .. _ n~w Pt?1:>t. Offic e Bui1ding 75 percent; of -the :plant i s htpments are . ' fourid 'at the "sack' a : unip" or{ the 6th: floor, where the shipments rn:ay be:: .examined before they reach the conveyor belts which eventually carry them to the reservoirs where they are separated and disp~:l'tched to :the State tablese At the Bureau of Plant ~uar~ntine wor k bench inspection is made of packages which have been held ' ... . . • '"' . . , . out 'for tha t purpose by postal eniployee s , put in gurneys, and' :.pushed. tb the bench fr<:>m the various chutes, . . . . , .. ... • -"\ ' ~ : j • ••• • ' ':, PHONY PEACH DISEASE ' ' . . ... .. The Arkansas State Plan'.t Board ~eceri.tly modi'fied Rule' 18 relating to phoy : peach di_sease _and. announced' 'tha t / l:fef.'ore 1s suing permits to nurserymen located in the infected'states, special' :i'.hqU:iry will be made ; as .to satisfactory .inspeo_tionand proper sanitary measures, Alabama and Louisiana ba've placed new reguJa. tions qn in;-terstate and intrastate movement _of the host plants.. In the case of Alabama cer-• t ification is based on (1) a disease-free county; or (2) mile-radius inspection; or= (3) oull_ing to e _limi~ate borer-i~fested trees.. In Louisiana the destruction of all infected trees in the Stat e is reqttired and certification for shipping is based on conditions sirh . ilaJ:i to (2) !3-n _ d _(3_)' ab~ve. .... l~; \,, : • I , • : ' • • . ' • r • ._ '•' , , • r • I . .. . •----. , ' • t . , ,: : _ '\ ~. . : ; , . • .. : , . : , . . • : :•,,:,• I • : . : I)A.1'.rE SC.ALE ERADICA-'TION . . . . ;, . . . .. . . . .. , , . ,,l, ,,' During the month of Oq_tob,er _ _ the Wel?b Su bdivision was carefully inspected anf no s c a l e foundo This plenting or 3,285 date pa.1:ro~i; varying in height from 10 to i 35 feet, was first found_ i n f est_eq. in July 1929, during the first careful survey of; _ the Coa,chella V~~ley. TWo i n s .pections were 'made in 1929.-antl 307 .pe:1ms,_ found in: fested; ip J,.~30,_7 inspectt~n s _ -we 1 ~ e made ari d 92 palms found. infested; 6 inspections were n:ade in 1 931 and 2 p~ll'ns found i nfested; 4 inspections wE!3re rmde hi . . 1932 and no scale found; 2 inspections were m e.de in 1933 and•n6 -scale-:found., . : . This planting is in a locality where d ate plantings are few and widely scat~ tered a nd the e arly scale h i story fairly well known, so an idea of the spread and : de velopment o f the scale can be ob tained-> Onl y 5 p lantings( ' i1:icluding the W ebb Subdivision, wit hin a r adius o f over 2 miles. h a v e eve r shovm.-scale. " . , . A few ,of the offshoots in the origina~ planting of the Nar b o nne R anch, a planting of over 3,000 palms about 1 mile ~a s t o f t h e vVe b b ' Sub division, were i nfes t .ed -but were. cleaned up b _$fore there' was much s prea d within the garden. Th e U . S., Depart:m$-llt .of Agricul• tur e has a pianting. on. a n l r 1di a h Heservatioii" about one-half mil~ , west. of tAe Sub-d i v i s iono Several infeste d offshoots were set in this pla:uting. but. w _e~E;I _c;teaned up before any s p r ea d oc cu rred . Scale als o s howe d on some of t h e original off-s hoots use_~ 't n--: ~ J~~ti".r1g :the ~u-bd i v-i"sion but these als o::.w.erB ~l. e .an~. d : WP.: early with ho. _ g r eat Sp.rea d ~ . . " Tfre 'Gover n ri1e--:irt p l a :i!J:'t i:n-g, a-h d•,;the N o..r:bonne : Rane.b:-may y . b 9 pa_f:E?Jr-Y k 1irni:r1at ~ ' a ~ 8.-'. ca.h ~ : ~ : ~ 1 :; ' th~ ; ' frrfes'ti:i.t-ion: on the . ' silbi.ii Visio~ b.ecause the infested palms were srra.11 and the infestation not s evere. Also, the early infest~tj_9n o _ n -the

PAGE 7

-7-. , . . subdi-''visio:n -itsel. f may bf;) .~lir~J.nated as the origin of the present infestation, be cause there. w~s._ no i;i, dicf~~n, no . very heavily infested .palfllS :~ere., fo .und_,~a.na ve'ry,. little leaf bas,e inf~statioJ.1.: . • • • • • I • •, • . .. I Two. po,ssible s our.cesor the infestation remain. The most logical is the Churchill' ple:nf~ng, iocated approtlma tely 1 mile sQU:t_hea5t. of th: e i ebb subdivision • . In the s-pring of .. 1923 '(approximat~date) Mr. Churchill obtained 21 ~eetlling end 8 standard:var.ie~.Y. pal.ms and piant~d them on his place. ~e. prop_erty from which Mr. Churchill' got . his s~edling palms later found .i-nfested. The Churchill property was not inspected until August 1927. ' At that tilnEl several palms were white with sca.le.i. ( The:;:term,. "wJ;i.i te with scale", is used to describe a yery severe infesta tion, the natural green color of the fol1age being covered by the white of en crustoo scale ... ) Y fuen the Chrchill infestation was found it was# immediately treat:ed so no t;urther spread was possible. 1f the Churchill propeey was the sourcs'of the infestation on tl!e subdivision, it is probable that movement of scale began in 1926 .and oontinued in 1127• ., The o .t.hE}r possible sourc e ts the Graham planting located_ between 1 and l miles northea~t of the subdivision. Mr. Graham ha~ several Hundred seedling palms in :.unt~inned ~urseries. Ee obtained 11 standard variety offshoots from an infested planting in the spring of 1921. The offshoots were inspected when moved but showed no scale at the time. Therewas evidently scale on them at the tims of the: inspection9 probably behind the fiber, which s pread over the foliaga 0f the pal.ms later, as they were found heavily infested when inspected in May 1926 r 1ie scale !hod spread to the seedling nursery by that time, Dtu ing the 1929 inspe~-ci ')n another group of seedl. ings in' ;the' mesquite on this place, which haq escaped o u:.:sr-,a tion until thet tim~, was found heavily infested. JAPANESE BEETLE AND EUROPEAN CORN BORE~ Exclusive Japanese Beetle Work Succin:Lt sUim)'laries of the results of the canvas,s and survey during July a nd August of farms, golf courses, estates, city properties, and cemeteries disclose some interesting in~ormation concerning expenditures fop contrql of the Japanese beetle and actual losses from crop destruction by the insecto Twenty-nine golf clubs reported averag~ annual expenditures of t618 per course for Japanese beetle grub controle These c ourses reported total expenditures for this purpose of $60,000 over a period of years. The yearly total cost of trapping, spraying, and sod treatment on 19 priv~te estates:averages~ 513 per estateb Average annual exw . penditures of $225 per unit were reported by superintendents of 11 cemeteries, parks, and community spraying org~urizatio1Ys. Ln the city block canvass, inquiries were made • of residents -in four blocks each in Philade l phi.a an~ Trenton, two blocks in Princeton, N. J ri, and one l?lock in 'Lawrenceville, N . J Q These blocks were selected at random. Expenditures by individual p roperty owners in these blocks average i2.50 per year. Annual eiperiditures p~ r block were $62.80. Nineteen

PAGE 8

&. . . ) :irow_ers . whose field, oorn ~lan{ings totalled 511 acres supplied statements showing 'tba t th5ir ctorn crop was injured to the ex-ient of from 3.5 to 80 percept_ . Their cash losses totalled $2,540, or qn average. of approximately $5 per acre. Thirteen sweet ... corn growerr. with 195 acres pf-this -crop __ :repo~ted crop losses ;averaging 35 . p e;rcent. throug h beetle injury._ 1'he average l'oss _per acr_ e was approxim~tely ~17 ~50. Commercial orchardists whose holdings include 37,000 bearing apple trees reported an-average fruit injury of-43 perc_ent on 6,300 ap.ple trees of the varieties. -susceptible to beetle injury. . Crop .,loss through this, injury; amoun'ted to $1;2.,,200 .. _ Eleven of the 13 reporti .. ng orcha.rdist& applied sprays. specifically'. for 'Japanese beetle control at_ a total cost .of $700. The average a~ple injury per . a~re was ' $123. The average control cost per acl'.e was $ 7 .15. ' .. Commercial peach 6 . ~(?hards . covered in the survey ~nclude 10,600 trees of the varieties particularly subject. to Japcr'nese beetle injury._ The nonnal yield of these1-varieties was re_duced 27 percent, resulting in loss of sale• of 9,100 bushels valued at $12,500. Ten of the 18 orchardists attempted spray control at a total cost:;of $712! This was an average injury per acre of $154, arm an average per acre .e:ipendi ttjt-~ f'or control of $ 8.80. The survey alsq .extended to 28 fanns, .comprising 3,48q acres. Totai crop damage sustained by these farmers amounted to $6, 130 , or an average p e ~ . farm oJ ~:219. This was an average ,per acre loss of $1.76., , The canvass also incl~ded cost of control and crop losses by growers of grapes, raspberries, strawberries, blu.eberries, and _ greenhouse-groWn roses• So _mewhat of a record w a s established for quick termination of a prosecution brought und~r the Plant Q u arantine Act for a violation of the Japanese beetle quarantine regulations w hen e n October 23.--. Lynn F. Stout, of Charlottesville, Va., was fined $10 for illegal transportation of uncertified potted ferns and cut flowers from Chambersburg, Pa., to Charlottesville. On October 1, the defendant was stop-p e d at the Japanese beetle vehicular inspection station on the Maryland-West Vir-ginia line near Williamsport, Md. He was carrying three potted ferns and a large bunch of cut cockscomb. l vir. Stout refused to penni t the inspector to remove the soil from the ferns and w mld not r_:eturn the same to the regulated area or surrender them t o t h e inspector. Despite the inspector's warning, the defendant drove on to his d estination with t h e uncertified. plant material. After preparation of the necessary papers, a complaint was filed against the defendan~.on.October 18before United States Commissioner Claude R. Yardley, at Chari~ttesvil-le • . _ A Deputy :Marshal from Roanoke arrested -J\1re S tol,lt on October 1-9 a:na. took him be .for. e the Gomtnil:isioner _ . 'Ihe defendant was releas e a on his. own recognizance for a:.hearing, in :Harrisonburg at 9 o'clock on the'.morningor"_october 23. The Unitea. s~ci,tes . District Court opened its fall tenn in Harrisonht.i:r; g . . on O .ctober 23 and Comniissi oner Yardley had other business there on thatday. United States Attorney Shaffer, of. the Western District of Virginia, was present at the hearing, at w hich time the defendant pleade d " guilty." An information prepared for the occasion was then handed t o the United states Attorney and the cas~ was taken directly into court and disposed of early in the afternoon. l)etails of the violation were related tot he court by the inter'cepting inspector. The defendant, in substance, stated that he did not think tho quarantine was such a serious matter and thought that the inspector would be "human" and not report him for the violation. Al thoug h the ftn~ impoJ3.ed. ~a,s qui-t: e sma1r; the speed with which the c . sise Vf8$ j;e:rmina.t'ed-; should. have. ~ go~d effe'ct on .those who learn throug h ,the• pres s o'r_..the pr.osecution.

PAGE 9

-9-Activitt~s in plassified nu~series_ g:p~&tly tncr~ased ~uring the month of October, .as the city incinerator for burntng. Eight laborers for this work were supplied by the Erie County Emergency Relief Board. Rakes used in the clean-up work were loaned by the officer in charge of the county co:rpmuni ty gardens. . The majority of the yards in, which the worli . was performed were in foreign sections of the city. In such cases, men from th~ crew who spoke the languag ,El 0f the tenant were delegated to explain the work ,tQ 1the individual from whose yard the refuse was to be removed and in which the garden area was to be sprayed. Six days were required for removal o f the de-bris. Six ~ddi tional days were required for a pplying the ,lead arsenate. For .the first 2 days of treating, a rotary plo: v was u~ed f o r working the lead arsenate int. o the upper 3 inches of soil. This worked satisfactorily in large plots, but could not be manipulated in small garden plots surrounded by hedges or fences. ~ost of the soil insec.ticide was worked into the soil with hand rakes. . . . Operation of the mobile patrol of four road inspectors on ex;t highways at the boundary of the regulated zone in northwestern. New York was disc.:>ntinued on October 16, The State-employed r.oad inspectors, were dismissed on that date and the trucks and roads~de equipmen t brought to the New Cu~ nberland, Pa., warehouse for overwinter storage • . This cooperative road inspection work began on April 12, when four inspectors, three of who~ were supplied with Government trucks, be gan part-time

PAGE 10

-10., operations on nine highways. Staggered scheo'Ules-perm.ltted the inspectors to alternately check west-bound traffic leaving the,regu1ated zone. From early in July until late in September, locations of :fbur posts were changed to , intercept: traffic: whi ch had bean rerouted' to avoid the regUlarly guarded insp~ction posts. The post on the Corning city line was in operation d~ring a. s -traight 8-hour 'shift, on which the inspector alterna t ed his• daily' start in hours. _ When the work was . discontinued, 10 roaa.s were being guarded. At the end of October, the per-sonnel at road patrol stations on the Ohio ... Pennsylvan:ia, Pennsylvania-West Virginia, Maryland-vvest Virginia,. and Virginia-North Carolina lines, and-in Virginia, was . . reduced from 53 to 42 .men. Relief workers supplied through the Penns.ylvan.ia emergeney-relief organization-accounted for 10 of the remaining road inspectors., Lifting of quarantine regulations on the movement or cut flowers was effective atthe close. of October 15 ~ as :provided in th~ regulations. Removal of . these restrictions was •not coincident with the lifting of the quarantine on the movemant of fruits and vegetables on and after September 15, since cut flowers are still l'ikely carriers-of the adult beetle late in the season. Cut flower inspec-tors in• the wholesale cut flower marts in Philadelphia f0und the last beetles on cu.t flower~ on October 5• Fewer adult beetles were found in out flowers toward the latter part of this season t han in. previous years, although they were found incut flowers as eariy as June 15, the effective date of the qu~rantine on this qom. , modi ty. Philadelphia cut flower inspectors removed 342 beetles from shipments , offered for inspection during the operation of the_ seasonal quarantine from June 15 to October 15. Of t his total , 129 were removed from roses, 72 fromspireat 25 from dahlias, 19 from euphorbia , 14 from ferns, 11 from primula, 10 .from. gyp so-,.• phila, and the remainder from 24 additional species of cut flowers., Facil'i-ties . for the Philadelphia cut flower inspection are provided without cost . to the Bureau by the two l argest wholesale cut flower houses -in the city. Several carloads_ and a number of truck loads of soil-free nursery stock . were shipped under certification :from the Philadelphia area during October • . Beetle$ in the open were c1_1.J i te rare during October,. but two of, them .. were found : . .. in a particularly heavily infested region near Narberth, Pao, on Oct'ob 1er • A .' few of the nurseries started to wash and store their supplies of fruit:trees, , : : :. shrubs, and rose bnshes. The majority of thi s stock will be stored during•Novem.:.. ber. According to a survey in the Philadelphia territory, a pproximately '500,000 plants will be placed in storage by classified dealers. This total does not;in~ elude the thousands of dahlia tubers and canna roots to be was 1ied, inspecte-d;" and:, stored for later dertification. A survey of lb wholesale seed. houses in Phila..d elphia, in connection with State seed certification work, showed an increase. in . . , orders over l ast y ear. This is especially noticeable inseed orders from South Americah c ountries. Several seed h ouses claim that they have runshort of cer~ tain bulbs. Philadelphia seed houses annually ship thousands of bulbs, corms, and tubers t o every State in the Union, and export l arge quantities of seeds to ma11y foreig n c ountries• Authority h a s be e n granted by s. B. Fracker, in charge of enforcemient o . f --the white-pine biister...-rust quarantine, for Japanese b eetle. inspectors working :from: the Philadelphia'district office-to certify.for m ovement t o designated States shipments of five-leafed pines origina' t-ii1 g in a nursery eptablishtilo:.a:.~ at Morri'svi-1-1~, ,

PAGE 11

-11Pa. Specific instructions for the blister-rust certification work have been ia• sued to the individual inspectors. vi/re re join i Japanese beetle and blister-ru~t certification is required, certification will be accomplished by the use of a joint certificate. stan1p leg• i bly impressed on t}?.e shipping tag o~ lab~l or on some eon. spicuous .portion of 'the,oontainer., th~ rtumbifr• 063n, to indica_te ~he blister-rUJ.~t quarantine, being inserted in~ blank.space after. ~48", which evi~ences'Japane~e be13tle c~rtification. On s hipments rQqu.iring only bl1$ter-rust certificatic;,n, the number "48" will be struck out and the figure "b3"-inserted. Reports con• cerning each tree cer'tified under Q,uare11;tine No. 63 will be _ forward~d to the Divi ... sion of Domestic Plant Q~arantin9s of the Bureau : as the shipments go fol'V1ard. • I Reports received this surraner from three separate sources were to the effa~t that a Japanese beetle is the best bait with which to eatchsunfish. Three Dela~ ware Riv .er .fishermen st'ated that every sunfish they cleaned this summer containe~ from six to nine Japanes e bee.tles. Since the past. surmner's be~tle flight resulted in millions of. the insects being afloat on the Delaware River; the prese.tit. gen.~ration of su.nff~tl 'in that' s~ream . should be well fed. Several years ago, the ~rge~t fish d~a:;L er, in_ .. Philadelf)hia s tated that the best food for his small fish consj,sted 0f grq~nd Japane~e beetles. rp. prep~ring the food; the wings are) removed~ after which tpe. _ rema .ind~r of' the i~e~1E is dried in an oven • . and then ground to a .fin~ powder. The same dealer found that s1IT1e of his larger fish were killed when they swallowed beetles that alighted on the surface of the wat .er in his t'anka. It was necessary to ~q~een the tank s during the s unmer, since beetles were numerous in his locality. " -. r after a brief occupancy of office space on the seventh floor of the Custom House -in Boston, R'. s. Clifton and the personnel of the Massachusetts district Japanese bee ~1e quarantine office transferred their headq_uarters to the fourth floor 01 the ~Custom House. Floor space 30 feet wide and 35 feet long is Jointly occupied with the Boston gypsy moth personnel, in charge of H. I. Winchester. Desk room ani file space for an employee of the Bureau of Irrnnigration, Department of Labor, is also prpvided in one corner o i t b ~ office. On two sides of the new office space there are partitioned offices of the Hydrographic Service of the Navy Department. ReI!lPval . of the_ Boston quarantine office from 12 Sou th Market Street to the seventh floor of the Custom House was aecomplished on September 30, and transfer of the quarters within the Custom House took place on October 31. The Japanese be etle o ff'ice still retains its old telephone number, Capitol 7487. Chemical treatments made duriDt . the month of October included carbon disulphide fumigation of 33field-grown plants. Arranc e ments were made for similar treatment of 583 additional plants during N ovember if the soil temperature remains above 40 F. Hot-water treatment was given to 273 blueberry plant~, which treat. ment will continue into November. Over 800 cubic yards of potting soil were fu.m.1• gated or sterilized. Most of this was fumigated with carbon disulphide in the usual air-tight soil boxes. About 40 cubic yards were steam sterilized, and smaller quantities were treated with lead arsenate a n d flake naphthalene. Surface soil to the extent of 3,352 square feet was treated with carbon 4,isulphide to pennit .lifting of nursery stock therein,.t :and.J7~ squa~~ .f~et, o f nursery area wa s poisoned wi_th l1ead arsenate. ,. .. .,.,, . -. •' BRA STATE PLANT BOARD

PAGE 12

-12~. ' .. : • r : . --: J...:pproval was granted during October for s-ubdivision into -'Class I and Clas s I _ J:I _ sections of nine unit nursery properties. Class II-I-subdt v -isions, co'ntainirig in:f;"?stations , are clearly marked .by boundaries of a permanent :nature to s egre:gate s~k .tp.erein from uninfested p,ortions, of the premises. Areas wi'thin a 500-foot: ra, d-ius of the poJnts of inf,sstation are designated as Class-III. Und6tr the:,._ "sp_li t classificat-ion"• provision o f the regrulations, establishments which :otherwis . .e would . f~ll i~ Clas. s . III' due to the finding of one or a few : beetles on the . pr.emises are .enapled to operate .in, a limited portion of the establishment on a Class. I , or uninfest.ed bas is• Of the nurserie& subdivisions approved, two are in N e w York and seven in Pennsylvania. Continuous inspection service, requiring the stationing of an inspector at Urn---nur_sery, was rehdered at nine nurseries during October. At five New Jersey nu:rseries, single inspe 'Ctors were stationed during the month. At one of these nurseries_ an inspect9r was occupied most of the month in inspecting 180,000 gerantum cut~ings which were made s •oil-free before certification. Two of the larger-New Jersey nurseries'required two inspectors each. Single inspectors were requir$d in. one nursery each in Pennsylvania and Delaware. It is anttcipated that two additional New J ersey establishments. will require the.services of a full-time inspector for several weeks during November. Stripping operations at sand.pits were supervised during the month at most of the regular sand-shipping e stablishments. This-supervision will continue into N ovember. As provided in the regulations, an inspector supervised the removal of the uppep 12 inches of soil ' from the sand pit or field operation. supervision is particularly needed in the case of molding sand where only a narrow vein of the desirable sand exists at .shallow depths. Regular sand pits frequently uncap .cons iderabl_ e areas, requiring: continuous presence of an inspecto~ for 3 or 4 days• What few traps were .still in operation at the end of September in a limited number of localities in New .Hampshire, Vermont, and New York, and in Erie, Pa., were lifted during the firs : t w e ek in October, repacked, and returned to the New Cumberland, Pa., w a .rehouse. Final tabulations of the season's trapping results w ere distribute d in mimeo graphed form to the nurserymen, State officials, and others in attendance at the conference to discuss the season's developments in the J apanese be etle situation, held at Washington on Octob e r 24. At the annua l c onference o f the entomolo gical workers of Connecticut, held at the A gricultural Experiment Station at New Haven on Octob e r 27, J.P • . Johnson, district Japa n ese b eetle supervisor for Connecticut, read two pap ers, one by L. He Worthley on "Developments in the Japanese Beetle Situation in 19331t, and the other detailing Mr. Johnsonvs activities in connection with the Ja.panE?se beetle and Euro p ee . n .corn bore r .in Connecticut during the past year. .Including visitors from surro.unding States, there were 6 0 men in attendance at the conference. Possible qu a r ~antine a :ction as a result of this year's trap finds was discusse-d to the mutual satisfaction of nurserymen and State .ano. Bureau officials in attendanc e at the combined conference and p u blic hearing held in Washington on Octob e r 24. M r~ Hoyt presided, Preliminary to the discussion, Mr. Worthle y r ead a paper on "Dev elopments in the Japanese B e etle Situation in 1933•"

PAGE 13

I \ j Corn Borer .A~tivities .-~i+r.veys i:q . Con _nec'~icut to ascertain the extent o'f co \rirnercial d~rage qy the European corn .borer e .nd the degree of ,borer population in the State were _ made under th~ super.v:ision of J. P, .:Jo.hnson, fro'm July into 1ate Octobe r • . 1:rhirty-nine farms on which were grown i92.5 acres of early sweet corri 'were visited. Total dama g e was reporteq ~ounttng _ _ to $11,321.38, or an ave.rage 9f $58.8 1 per .. acre. Thirty.-.seven grow~ _ r s . ~ving ~ total of 32~5 e_cres of late s weet -corn expe~ienced a net loss of t850, or an -average of. $ 2"5.15 per acre. The borer-population count, made during. .October-, included the sam e town9 in w hich a simila.r survey was na de in 1932,. A +~..rge 1 ncr~ase in borer population was 1:ii th the exce12tion . • l . . . o~.~two,.to~ns,an averae e annual increase of 100 pe:r:cent was observed, The survey was _ made in. se.~~i~n~ adj.ec~~t --~o . . N~w London, Glastonbury, and Milford. f a : '1.,' '; ' i ... ,, . . . MEXICAN FBUIT FLY Rainy weathe r hindered trapping operations considerably during the first part of Octcber. However, b y the last o~ t h e month more than 5,000 of the new globe-shaped glass traps w ere in operation in 4 6 6 selected groves throughout: J the quarantined area. Since the operation of these traps w a s new to all of the in-spectors, it was necessary to work out a technique of handling, The speed of operating the traJE was i ncreased from about: 60 per day per inspector the first few days~ ~ey were op~rat~d to around ioo per daY. by the e nd of the month. The greate$t ob~tacle .to the handling o f ~he traps was the large numbers of moths ;,7hich wer.e _ ,attracted to them, In a number 01'1 c ounts of the insects in the traps m~de at intervals, an.~v~rag e of 65 ~epidoptera w ere t aken from ea~h trap . The 9do _ r ema:nating from the decaying bodies of thes e moth9 was exce~dingly nause~ting to the.inspectors-and in all prob a bility masked the attractiveness' bf the , b~it,: A number ;f id~as were tried out looking to the exc~usion of the moths and at the same . t ime not interfering wJ t h the rapidity of operating the trap or their _.effe9tiveness-in catching flies. The simplest m ethod evolved was to insert a semi cone, of 1/ 4-inch hardware cloth in the inverted opeii"ing of the trap. The screen w~s held in place by a wire. which was pass ed throug h the neck of the trap. In test$ mad~ witp traps thus equipped, an averag e of only 5 Lepidoptera were taken per trap, w hile 18 more Dip t era were taken p e ~ trap than i n .unscreened traps. The cost 9f equipping each trap a ounted to only one fu"'J. r cent . With the exclusion of t h e moths, t h e a m ou n t of bait requi~e d per trap can be reduced, resulting. in a rnateriai saving in the cost of operating. N h ere moths . , I ' were getting in the traps, it was found tra.t only 10 or. 12 trap s could be serviced with a gallon of bait; this nu m b e r c a n be practically doubled when the moths are excluded. . ' Y~ry li t1tl:9, evidence o f , the h~rricane. o f September 4 an~ 5 r emained to be seen at t ~ 1~-..encl o ... t h e . m onth. Residences a n d buiJ.dings had b een repaire d a nd the rubpi~.l?-.. :cl.~ared in the drier portions of the yalley _ ~he g r oves had been

PAGE 14

'' -14. pruned and disced,_ and with the: n~w crop. of' : foliage, -it was: di'fficul t to realize that ~hey }?-ad b~en -through the storm. :However,water:wq_ s_.still stand.ing"in inah.y of' :t;he ::tioorer, ~rained groves and _comparatively few tad dried =sufficientlJf to pert mi t .cu-1 tur~l acti vi ti$S to be resumed.;. Quite . a heavy: mortality wai ob:s:erved among the ,.trees in the eastern part of the Valley as a r esult o f the:-wet' soil,, ___ .. _ . . . Very little _fruit, was ,shipped. dtiring the month. The fruit remaining ' on the trees was _in a growing C ondit.ion due to the warm :temperatures -~ind a'bl.i:h-dant moisture in the soil• . Difficulty was S~perienced iri finding grcivei'of &eeded fruit th~t -wquld pass the State maturity test, and practically no grove s of s eedless fruit would .meet the requ,iremen ts • In. addition to the scarcity of' ripe fruit, the markets were weak, and most growers with commercial quantities of fruit preferred to hold it and gamble on the price going up._ App:roximately 140 carloads of fruit were shipped during October, 75 percent of which was moved by truck. Ninety-nine per-mits were issued for interstate shipments of fruit by truck. These shipments went to 11 different States. Oranges arriving in Matamoros from the Montemorelos area of Nuevo L .eon, ' ' Mexico, were found to .. be ligl:.tly infested with larvae of the fruit fly • .. . ' ' • , : PINK BOLLVVORM A new outbreak ,of the pink bollworm was discovered in the western part of Te~ci.s the latter: parto f October• The first specimens were taken on Ocfu ber 17' in trash from a gin in Gaines County. There are four gins in this county and specfmens have since. been found in trash fro m all o f them. Additional specimens have b een found i.n gin trash at Shacktown in the northwest part of Dawson County, at Br_ownfield in Ter. r y County, and at Levelland in Hockley County. Specimens were also take~ in 'trash -at Bro wnfield frorp cotton which was produced in Lea o ounty, N•. Mex, As.ginning was at the peak it was impracticable to install .. sterilizers to tr.:eat the remaining s~ed. . Arrangements were therefore made -With the 24 gins in volved -at. t he end of. :the month to ship all seed to designate.ct oil mills. Arrangements .were made wit_ h -the"7 oil mills which were designated, tohandle the -seed in such manner as to avoid spreading the insect. Arrangements were also made with t:qe ginners to ship t h e baled lint to certain compresses for segregation and compression It is of interest to no.:te that a nUi.71ber of the ginners have had previous' experience in op era~ing under the-pink bollworm regulations, and they are a11 giving wholehearted cooperation in handling the situation. It is plan n~d to sterilize all . planting seed for the next crop. It is thought that under the abov-e arrangements the situation is being very well taken care of. • During the month of October every poss i-ble effort was made -to locate any additional infestation o f . the pink. bollworm;,in northern Fldri da a.hd 'Ge'orgia. thro~gJ:i. ' the:use QJ' gin,~trash rm c-tines. ._.At the peak a'f' th : e 'ini;Jp'. -0tion .. 1i,ine rriachi'nes : w-er ~ : in operation, a traine d pink bollwonn inspector being in charge of each machineo A considerable amount of trash was inspected without finding any additional si:eci mens.

PAGE 15

. . ;, .. """' ' ~ : :': L • :. •. 'I ' .. ,., ... : : : . . .... .. ' . . . ~ .. '-~ ,.-. 1. ~ ., ... ..• '. •~:I..• i •'•• -15":" ... . . . . !": \ • I • I ! . . .... •.,. I • .. . . . ) ,. -. . . . . . . . . . field .Lnspections we!'e a).'.s6 . continu~d, wt' h a ~ersonnel of i6. Federal and St.ate inspee..tors;. "The ins'peqtiQns. w~i;~; : q f e.ourse , most i _ntensive in t "he_ vicinity ~:>f gins ,Wh5.re. specfimens were round,t ~1:\. t .at ~the same tim e other areas were also covered. It was not until October 27 that specimens were found in the field. On that date 3 pupae and 6 larvae were found in a field 2 ~ miles south of Enigma, Ga. On the following day anothe r specime'ti -was found in a field about onf! fourth mile from the first field. The fact tbat it took t h e men so long to locate specimens in the field is a further demonstration of the value o f the gin-trash machines in detecting light infestations. .At the clo_s.e ;of .the month there was not a grea t amount of material left in the fields, but the inspectiomwill be c ont~nued as long as practi~ cable., In the regulateo. a 'rea o"f. Fi.or.ida ~mly.-281: bales were ginned during thS: month, All of t h e t:ras h ' from tt .. is. c o tton w~s run -throug h-a gin-trash machine without finding any specimeNs'. of ' , he pink_ bollwo~~ . Ther.e is very little cot ton remaining to .be ginned, so . ,"'.;_t,a t fiEld n_Iid 'gin-.;.trash ins. p e c t ions are just about completed in this ' . . . . . . ar-ea ; . hQWe:v.er, a supply of green bolls . ha.s b een collected for Ja ter laboratory in.. __ s._pectiqn.. :. 'rbe. neces:s::i ty for con_ce_ntrating _men for inspections in Georgia made it im possible to carry on the daily collection andexamination of cotton blooms from the plats.at Chapman Field. .. rrangeme~ts were made w i t h the _Bur~au of Plant Industry t"o collec. t and. destroy all cotto'n bloomsd~ily m ile t : h • e inspect_ (?r is away• The examination 'Of thes-e b1ooms will probab).y, b~ -resumed durill", 'the cqming m o:qth., _ '" .. . . . . .. . . ' . j . . -, . . . . . . , , Dur-ing , th:e morith _ of Octo_qer gi-tr_ash .inspect ion was carried on in all of . .. . \ ""' . the regulated areas•.. .-.. A-s "9reviously steted, t h e results were negative in the regu-lated area of J'lorida; alsc in_ t h e t -iver.Valle~~artd Tucson areas, A:f~~o~a. SpeciI)'l~ns of'"'the pink bollymrm. w~r~ found. in. e ach 0 1 the: re~i. n i ng areas • . . In the .. P~cas ValJ.e y of:Texas a~d N rz l\1e x ico. t ~ e .infes t ation seems t o be. heavier t _his s eason . thap eve:;.:. befa:rs, but it h a-= _l".10t re.a.c h e ~ :t. e point where any commerci a l damage is bei~ done-. . .[n : t-he 1emai n ~ ; n g a;rea. ~ int;estation seetns to b e ab9ut the same as la st year,, Qr -po_ssib:tY righter in sorrie . : areas• In. the B -ig Bend area 9f ';rexas .,the number of s p~c i _ mens being -fo1:1n'd 1:n .. •gin. ~ras~; lu,ld incrfased C;onsiderably_ towar~ the end or th, ~ , !!l'?nth,; hOW3V'~r. !i.n: only. o:r;i~. o _ r t w . o i, fields was t h s dama g e very heavy, due to the pro~ram, c arr~ed. ,ut las~ fa~land winte~. This = :pro c ram .. did 'not include the acreag e in ~ ::-ew~ter Cour .ty, and. thisyear the ~nfestation-is very heavy. Counts were re-. cen:iy m :i..c..e at J B . differeiit points in a 20-acre fie~d ' w h ich show~.d that 53. 3 per cent of i;he cotton wa::; nonpickable. . The o rn e r : o f ' tb:i'.s 1'iel d . stated .that the count~ wer6_ very conse .. vative, anJ .that if a.nytting w~re too low. Ear:i.ie . r i n the season-he estima~ed t r . .:-t . he v;ou _ l d ___ ,:....,et. fr. from whi.~ h 10 :.r.terce,y~io"rl3 rid.de . Of' t•1--.s num e r 6 ,v,.r e found t~ b0 j ._._ : e.d with the ~tnk bollwor n, 3 2 _.J. ving and 6 .::.ead larvae 'IJeing !.'ound. It is o f :3 ,~ J~ a l interest note tha t 2 o f ~he cars were e n r o u t e to points in northwest Texa,

PAGE 16

where a considerable amount of cotton~:i~. grown, and 3 live larvae were found in one and 12 living 1 arvae in another. it is quite possible that this could have been t~e ~~~: s . of spreadtng infestation., . _._ .O~~. of. the JltP,~. r intercept ions was . : rather un-. u$ }la,.l._: : : . . !t consisted of 10 p9unds~ , of s~, ~ d co. t _ton: ;taken from a Mex-ican .wbo was riding ~ -b:'ro from Ruidosa -bo . .Iv!arfa, Tex9, : a . q .iS:tan. c . e of som e . 60 miles . , : . The seed cojt~m co~tai~ed 16 living and. ~-: dead ;Larvae. . . ,... : . , . : , . ... , > . ~. .' . .,, , ' . .. . -. ' " , / ' . " ' . ' ~ : ... . . ' . t . :, . . . . • . , t ' PREVE11TING. SPRE.A.D OE I\10THS . . #:. . . . . f .. : :: ... I . Gypsy moth training schools were in operation during the greater part of October in Vermont . , Massachu~~tts, anq .Connecticut. .Addi.tional . men were secured throug h _th. e National Reem,.plo.ym.ent. S<;lrv,ice .and by the end of the month a ilo~al .of . ) , 3 . 50 .men were ori : gypsy moth . work _ip: thes~ Stat~s .and _in New Yor~• By the, .las. t . week in Octa 9e~ a1. 1 traJning s/; . ~0~.l_:s . h,a,q 1?~en :t..~PPI'.ar.ily discontinued ,and _..the , men tra:qsferred. to_ r _egula r scouting ; work ,in .tpe .. bar:r i,er zone in southwestern Ma.:\sacll-u-,j, ' • ' • ' . , • • • setts, northwestern Connecticut, Vermont, and no rtheastern New York. 4 large. _proportio n of t h e force is now stationed in t()vms in n orthern Vermont in order that 1 this territory :may_ be spouted befor~ e . seyere wint.er : weather sets in. Al:though there has alread'y been some .snow~ espec,ia~ll~ :in , .the h i ~ :~er-r~gions of Vermont . , the w . e _a!,her as' a whole bas b~en _very favorable for scouting.. vteather c ondi tion;s vary gz:E:a~ly wi thtn a radius o f 5 or, 6 miles fn the montain ~egi?ns o{ northe.rn Vermo.n\~'. . Men h ave.found it possible to work in some locations on days when no work d,ouihq; :qe .. ,,:_. carr'ied on in nearby towns because' of bad weather. Some difficulty has be e n ex-perienced in quc;1rterJng the men i: some sm~ll t.01.~ in -n_<;>r.thern Vermont. as telephone and Christmas tree. operators-had I taken available acoommoda tions. . :,: : ' ' ' . ' ,. ' . ' . .. . The $ :(?OU ting work cione 'at Mtct ; Tabor •.. Vt., .. is, being performed under. dJf.f_ic .ult . condi ti9ns. The Mto Tab .or_ woodland d~strio t cons is ts of approxima:tely 23,-000 acr~s and includes lb mountain peaks and 6 lakes, .including Lost. Pondo Surrounding L0st Pond is, .i:l.n l;:li;ea of ''quick mud"' which has. th~ same ' characteristics as guic~sand. . It. has 'been ~ep_ort!3d. that. at least. o ne ma~ ,.was . drowned in this quick mud, -an~t . hE:re are stories qf s evera_i parrow escapes_ experi~nced by hunterso Mt. Tabor ~s; _ no , , p assable roads .ente~ing .the town from the. n?rth, eas~, or sout~, and only one +-oad from the west, _ wh~ch e xtend,s eastward about 1three._quarters of a _mile • . . To :,tlj:e..--er+d ' . ' ,. . . . . . , . . o f the month over lOs,000 acres,of.woodland had bsen scouted in this district. It: 'is expected tha t .scouting work will .be c 'onipleted .'h~~e be .fore Christmas" .. ' . A : - • , : • • , 1 •• , • • .• ' • • ' ' , • • • i . . : rt is enco1:1ra ging t _ o read in the r~por.ts .from ,scouting ,supervJsor~ .... tpat _the crews ar~ show i ng ,.a marlf:e 'cl im pro. v ement; Reg ardless' of the di fficul ti.E;is the scouts have experiertced. due to the snow and the hilly and rocky condi f ions w hich have cause1 'minor ihjuri-~s' _they h~ve shown an interest in the work .and a desi.re to .... .,. . . , -leain .. . . . . In the Pennsylvania area i3,pprhx'ima tely 475 men were em.plo yed on gypsy moth work, about 150 of these being engaged in cut.ting brush and dead and decayed trees of no commercial value and favored as food by the gypsy moth. Except for a sna 11

PAGE 17

number in training schools, the remain~er of the men were engaged in regular scoutinework. The numbe r of men no w on gypsy moth scouting work in the Civilian Conservation Corps camps has i ncreased over t he previous month. 'Full assignment of men has not as y e t b e en made and a fur ther i ncrease is expected. At the end of the month a total of 384 men were engaged i:r.. scouting work from five camps in Connecticut, nine in I viassachusetts, and one in Vermont. During Oct o b er, six foremen were appointed by t he State Forester of Conn ecticut for gypsy moth work in the camps in that State. The Boston quarantine o ffice which has been located at 408 Atlantic Avenue was moved on N ovember 3, and is now located on the 4th floor of the Boston Cus tom House Building, where quarters are being shared with the Japanese beetle project. The Franklin County N . R.A. parade was held in Greenfield on N ovemrer lt about 10,000 marchers participating. All '31Uployees of this project stationed in Greenfield took part in this parade, and a large float was p repared anl entered by this project. The truck was covered with pine, balsam, and laurel boughs combined with branches of oak, and presented a rathe r colorful picture. The fall meet i ng of district quarantine inspectors was held at Greenfield o n October 27, This meeting, h eld each year just prior to the start of the Christmas • tree and greenery inspection season, is for t h e purpose of planninf the inspection work a nd getting preliminary informati on on the numbe r of carloads of trees to be shipped during the season. With t his infor mation in hand, plans can be made to provid e for an e xtra nu...mber of inspectors if found ne cessar y in order to insure . satisfactory service to the shippers. Indications are that Christmas tree opera~ tors will start cutting late r than usual, and fort .. is reason it is possible that this may develop a rus h at the end o f the season to fill orders an d may mean that more men for a shorter period. of time will be needed for the inspection of the trees. T he first Christmas trees for the coming season were inspected on October 28, t h e trees being cut in central Vennont and shipped to New Yor k . It is possible that future developments in the shipment of telep hone cable reels and wire may have an effect u p on the a mount o f materia& inspected and certified from the quarantine d area. Every year many thousands of these r eels are inspected and certified, but it has been reported recently that a few shipments from wire manufacturing companies hav e been c oming into the quarantined a rea without being w o un d on reels. It is understo o d tha t t h i s wire is s hipp ed in coils and wrapped in heavy paper. Shipment in t his way saves the additional weight of the reels and als o avoids the r eturn to the manufacturing company of the e mpty reels. People often collect branches with brightly colored autumn l eaves for home decoration, bu t these last only a s hort time and are discarded. At certain seasons of the year bra n ches from deciduous trees are p r e pared by bleaching and then dyeing~ Such dyed leave s are used for making w r eaths and are usually in de m and prin cipally for Memoria l Day. A recent s hipment indica t e s that florists have devised a satisfactory met h od of handline: and storing brig h t l y colored au tUIIDleaves for late use. An entire truck load of r ed oak branches of' l eaves was i n s pectea a n d c ertifiec

PAGE 18

. , . . .. , .. . ' . 111111111,~1111~1i111111m~111111111111,~1~ 1111~111111111 3 1262 09241 6725 rec-ently for shipm. en:t . t . o a New York florist. The branches were to be put in a re-frigeration plant to remain th, /r~ unti'1;.,the Cl':i;_stmas. : ho;t,~day _ s wh _en they wi111 be used for decorative purposes. This is the first si . . z .able -~hipiTi~n( t :dr fhi's' : iJ:ature that has• . be e n inspected• " : _. . , . . . : . r , . "' . . . . . • ' IngeneralJ shipment of-varieus types-of wood for.fuel purposes'.is by car-load or truc,k load: ... Ab~ut the only:exception t~ this is fireplace wood which is of-ten.shipped.in mu ch"iim:ialler units~ • . :1t . .-is prob~b,le that sucl1 .sm.i:1.ll .shipments of fireplace .. : wood are _intended sol~ly fo-r what• mig):lt . be ca+led decoreti ve purposes, as oftentimes people do not desir' e tb .. have fires in t11e1r. _ fj_r .eplac1~s,_ but oh-ly a few logs for the effect. Quite often those who spend vacatio:ns in the -country be--fore depart.ing for home leave orders :tor specimen lots of fireplace~ wood to be shipped late_ ~ i . n the season~ . . Q,ui te recently ther_ e have. been a . number of small lots , • I ' .. • • . . • • of such wood shi~ped frqm qn,e of the Iocali ties 1i1:1 ,th~. WE;ist, ern, . part df the quarantined area by parcel post. Tt fs very unusual ~o -have fuel; wood ~sh ~p:ped in this ,manner • . -. . . ... . ' • : •. : ; * * * * * _; # ' • • ., ' J • • : j ' . ' . ,_. • ' , . : ; _ ... ;,• • : • • ;. t .. , . , . i ... ; . , . . • . : . : .... ,. ' ' ._.. . . .,,. • ' ! : ' ' : . t " • • • ' . • ... : .. : . .. ~ . . . . ; ; • t ' . . I ': ... . . . ' ' • . ., . , , : ' ' '• • ' '


xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EHZ0YXYM0_8NI6L0 INGEST_TIME 2014-09-08T21:32:53Z PACKAGE AA00023276_00017
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES