The Insect pest survey bulletin

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Title:
The Insect pest survey bulletin
Physical Description:
v. : maps ; 26 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Entomology
United States -- Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine
Publisher:
Bureau of Entomology, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
monthly, mar-nov. plus annual[1926-]
monthly, apr.-nov.[ former 1922-1925]
monthly, may-nov.[ former 1921]

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Insect pests -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Entomology -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (May 1, 1921)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Vol. 14, no.9 issued only as a supplement..
Issuing Body:
Vols. for May 1, 1921-1934, issued by the U.S. Bureau of Entomology; 1935- by the U.S. Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.
General Note:
"A monthly review of entomological conditions throughout the United States" (varies slightly).
General Note:
Includes annual summary starting in 1926.
General Note:
Includes some supplements.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 030368280
oclc - 08816534
lccn - sn 86033699
Classification:
lcc - QL1 .I56
System ID:
AA00023228:00065

Full Text








THE INSECT PEST SURVEY

BULLETIN


A periodical review of entomological conditions throughout the United States
issued on the first of each month from March to December, inclusive.


Volume 10 October 1, 1930 Number 8


BUREAU


OF ENTOMOLOGY


UNITED STATES


DEPARTMENT OF


AGRICULTURE


AND


THE STATE ENTOMOLOGICAL

AGENCIES COOPERATING


A" ~













INSECT PEST SURVEY BULLET IUl


Vol. 10 October 1. 1930 No. 8


OUTSTA2TDING ENTO.CLOGICAL FEATUTJS IN THE Uiil11. STATES FOCR SEPTEMBPER, 1930

Grasshoppers still continue to attract considerable attention through-
out the gr-"-.ter part of the country. In mny places the d-'.nage h-s even
increased over th-'t done in August.

Sev--r-1l species of cutvorms Pre reported from the Rocky Mountain and
the .West Coast Sta.tes.

The'fall arm--orm became generally prevalent over the Middle Atl-ntic
States during the month, ,.attracting unusual attention by attacking lavMns
in toTv-ns and cities.

Damage by .7hite grubs is becoming very evident, as the season advances,
in the Centr-al St-"tes from Indiana 7,esttiard to Nebraska, and southward to
Mis souri.

In this number of the Survey Bulletin is a suanrtry of the survey work
on the Hessian fly for the Middle Atlantic, East Central, and Jest Central
States. The Hessian fly situation as a whole is not, alarming. From con-
ditions in southern and west-central Illinois and parts of .Jiissouri and
Indiana, hoa'ever, there is reason to believe th'At unless checked by adverse
weather conditions this insect will be decidedly more troublesome next
year in this region than it has been in several years.

The cotton leaf worm made one of its very extensive north.. rd flights
about the middle of September. The moths were observed in large numbers
in southern M.issouri on September 14. in southern Illinois on September 15,
in the District of Columbia on September 23, in southern Michigan and ITE
York City on September 24, and in Boston, Mass., on September 25.

Codling moth eggs continued hatching during the first two reeks in
September in Illinois, Indiana, *nd Yentuck-y, and moths were still emerging
in centr-l Ohio during the third week of the month.

In the L-ke Region of Ohio late brood of the oriental fruit moth






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seriously dram-.ged late varieties of perches harvested after the middle of
September. To the southward, in Indian,-, Illinois, and ,entucky, infestation
se,;med to be much less serious, particularly in apple, ,nd only moderate
abundance is reported over the lIe'- England and South Atl-ntic regions.

A green stink bug, Chlorochro. sayi Stal, is recorded from the St-.te
of Nebraska for the first time. It was found injuring potatoes in Eimb-ll
County.

The imported cabbage worm is very seriously infesting cabbages in
Illinois, Iowa, and Miinnesota, and rather serious infestations by the
cabbage webworm are reported from North Carolina, Alabama, and ;'iszissip2i.
The cabbage looper is appe-aring in very considerable numbers over the
same region and also northward into Virginia.

The beet leafhopper is abundant in northern Utah and considerable
damage is resulting from the infestation.

The fall webworm is occurring very abundantly throughout the eastern
States from Vermont southward to ilorida ;nd Alabama.

The birch leaf skeletonizer is occurring in a heavy outbreak in
northern Maine and the upper and lower peninsulas of Michigan.

The elm leaf beetle is so prevalent in Connecticut that unsprayed
trees are brown in many parts of the St'te, and it is more prevalent at
Raleigh, N. C., than it has been during the past fifteen years.

In the drought-affected States mosquitoes are unusually prevalent,
perhaps because small streams, having been dried to puddles, afford ex-
cellent breeding places.





OUTSTA.lDIIIG L1ITOIOLOGICAL FEATURES I:: CAIIADA FOR AUGUST AND SFT-,3ER, 19cO

A correction: The outstanding entomological features in Canr-d, in
the August 1 number of the Insect Pest Survey bulletin, referred to July,
1930 instead of AuCust,1930, as published on page 259.

Reports during the past two months indicate a definite up-rd trend
in gra-sshopper populations extending from southern Quebec, thr"u i Ontario
and the Prairie Provinces, to British Columbia. With the exception of
the C'iilcotin ranges, British Coluibi', -io.vever, grasshoppers, in general,
- .ere nowhere sufficiently nuj,1erous to cause serious crop d- mge.

The pale western cut-.'orm continued in severe outbreak form in
Saskatchewn, but the outbreaks of the bertha armyworm which developed in
1929, in "-,itoba and Alberta, completely subsided, and there w"7 no .






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recurrence of damage this season.* -In British Columbia, cut'.orms, generally
speaking, were scarcer and less injurious than for many years .ert.

A r-ther heavy, infestation, of the .-herit stem saWfly occurred in south,
western 1,anitoba and locally in eastern Alberta, and serious damage by this
species was anticipated in sections of Saskatchewan.

.1hite grubs have been on the increaLse for several years in sections
of southern Quebec, -nd a heavy flight of the beetles is forecast in 1931.
Severe damage to field and garden crops was reported from southeastern
Ontario. In British Columbi- this pest 7 as about normal.

The diamond-back moth was prevalent in Saskatchewan and Alberta and
-.'as extraordinarily abundant and destructive in sections of British Columbia.

The European corn borer infestation in the M.aritime Provinces continues
very local and light.

Hornworms ,ere more abundant on tomato and tobacco in southwestern
Ontario than they have been during the past few years. Thelccucnber beetle
was unusually destructive in ITe-i Brunswick. srrpe

A species of grain aphid caused much damage to late sown Oats in sections
of eastern Saskatchewan and locally in western :,anitoba. Aphids of many
species "ere unusually abundant in British Columbia this season, but the
woolly apple aphid -7-s notably scarce. Reports indicate that in most ports
of the Dominion fruit aphids were of comparatively minor importance in
1930, The aple aphid, however, was noted in outbreak numbers in sections
of [e'- Brunswick.

The codling moth was reported as unusually injurious in Ontario and
the Maritime Provinces. An increase also was noted from southern Vr-ncouv.cr
Island. Else7hcre in British Columbia the codling moth was notably scarce.

Fruit injury by the oriental peach moth in southern Ontario is light.

Red spider mites were conspicuously injurious to small fruits in south-
western Ontario and southern Manitoba. Grape and apple leofhoppers increased
in abundance in southern Ontario.

A fruit blight, possibly carried by thrips, caused material damage to
raspberries and loganberrics in coastal sections of 3ritish Columbia.

During the past summer in British Columbia, a u:cd decrease was
noted in the abundance of several species of injurious fruit insects including
the oyster-shell scale, lesser apple rorm, pear slug, peach twig borer, curratt
fruit fly,and the imported current worm,

The European beech bark louse h.s caused the doe-th of many treCs on the
mainl-.nd of Yova Scotia,






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The black headed budworm continued to effect material d.-r=,ie on C:1F:
Breton Island,.. Nova Scotia, and. also wrs rt.Fortedipi outbreak form- on the
British Columbla coast.

Widespread and he.a*vy inf-stationIs of. thw birchx leaf. skeletonizer
occurred in the Maritime Provinces, and southern Quebec. ;..

The fall webworm is present in conspicuous .bundance throughout
eastern Canada, but has shown a, decided dcrc*ase ,.in the Lower Fraser Valley,
British Columbia. .. -

The maple leaf-cutter occurred in greatly reduced nhumb:-rs, compared
with previous years, in Ontario and southern
The' hemlock looper outbreak which developed on th f"i.';trsheds of the
Trinity and Pentecote Rivers on the .north shore of thi St. L.-.rcnce, Quebec,
in 1928-29, subsided entirely in 1930. .;,

A survey of the satin moth in the Maritime Provinces revealed several
sm!nll infestations, of the insect in Westmoreland and Albert Counties, Noe-
Brunswick, in addition to the 'one previously reported'dt Moncton. In
iTov, Scotia, outbreaks were located'at'various points between Anr..polis
and Yarmouth. In British Columbia, this species has continued to spread on
Vancouver Island and in the ,Lower Fras er V-.lley..:.; -.

In general, bark beetles have" shown adecided'increase over large areas
in British Columbia, rnd have- been unusu'uly destructive this sEzmcr.






-5 5-


G E I ; R AL FEEDERS

GRASS-HOPPERS (U`crididae)


South Carolinp


illinois


'ichigan


Einnesota




Uorth Dakota




South Dakota






Iow a


Missouri


:Tebrz ska





Colorado


SI-er:,an (2epttzber 19): Several species of grasshooOers
especially J cl no3-us f1rfr-rubrn' DeG., are very abundant in
Salud.a County.

E. W7. '1:,:Lhall (September 11): The grasshopper menace,
in Butler Co1;nt,, is pronounced in spite of the drought.

-J. -I. 3ig :r ( ( tpr 15): &rasshopers are very
abundant, severely Camaging soybeans ,an. corn.

... -_. .ettit (3ente.bsr): Grasshopper-':, are very abund-.nt
in the north-central part of the State.

-.. .ucules and' assistants (Se-otefber): Grasshoppers,
though quite generally pr.v:lent throughout the State, are
re-oortsd as apnoearin in-srious numbers in Blue Earth,
Carlton, ...o'er, S-ift, .s..in-ton, e. :illcin Counties only.

J. _. iunro (Sept-mber 19): Grasshoppers are moderat-ly
F 2.a nt at Pingrsre, Stutsinn County. 'o reports received
(A4ugust 18 and 20, respectively). Both reports stated that
serious injury .as being done to alfalfa;

H. C. Sev rin (September 1.8): -:lJno-olus differentialis
..Los., IL. bivittatus Say, 2-1. femur-rubrum De-., and _.
mexicanus ,exicanus Sauss. are v.--ry abundant on small grain,
flax, corn, garden truck, hedge plants, and trees. :Host
:ur!.iant in northern Tripp, Gregory, Charles X.ix, Lyman,
Brule, Aurora, h D'nuL l s Counties. :

E. Jacus (-sei.b'r 25):;; brass o per2 are moderately
to very abundant throughout the State. .Lmspecially destructive
to :.'oun alfalfa, clover, gardens, etc. Sev-ral species are
involved, B. differentialis Thot. nd1.. f:ur-,abrun Dec-.,
predominating.. ,

L. Haseman (September $4):. Gras' -. ,rs, differentialis
Thos. end_.. f emur-rubrum DeG., are. vary vbund';-n

:1. H. S eak (.'.&-et 15r-September.`-I); C.%- zzr:_'- e's continued
to bQ injurious in. Qe.rtain parts of.....Bb. "... oyd.
County infestEtion cont._nucd to be s-Vroc: a-iri ..-._ust.
7e,' centers of injury developed in Purnas County and in
southern Gage County..'"....'. "

C. PI. 3illette (Septeb r: 19.): ;-rass':o;.er$ are very
abundant in northeastern' Ooo1arado. :






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Utah


Nevada


Arizona




Oregon


North Dakota


Iowa


Colorado




Nevada
an4.
Gal fo2ni a


California


Delaware


G. F. Knowlton (September 21); Grasshoppers are moderately
to very abundant. They seem to be becoming less abundant
than they wore last month.

G. G. Schweis (September 22): Grasshoppers are very
abundant in -'estern ievada. Considerable damage has been
done to the second crop of alfalfa.

C. D. Lebert (September 25): Grasshoppers are troublesome
only in the northern part of the State at the present time.
They were eating truck near Prescott, rather voraciously
about the 15th of Se-ptember.

D. C. 1Jote ( uCuzt): Grasshoppers are very abundant on
field crops in Lane County.

CUT,'OR'.S (Noctuidae)

J. A. Munro (September 19): Cutworm injury to flax fields
extended through the first week in July at Te-7he, Pembina
County, according to a report received from a 'rm.er of that
vicinity. He states that many fields of flax, which had
been resoown during June on account of previous cutworm
injury, had been seriously injured a second time. He
estimated that cutworms had caused 50 per cent injury to
flax fields in his part of the country. The cutworms were
identified as -uxoa ochrogaster Guen.

H. E. Jaques (Septerber 25): Ten counties report marked
fall activity of cutworms.

C. P. Gillette (September 19): Lycophotia margaritosp
saucia Hbn. is very abundant and injurious to celery in the
Denver area. It is also doing considerable injury to potato
vines in parts of the San Luis Valley.

G. G. Schweis (August 19): Species of Prodenia have been
reported from a wide area, including many counties in Nevada
and eastern California, where they have been reported as
doing damage to alfalfa, potatoes, grapes, and other crops.

C. K. Fisher (August 27): The yellow-striped armyworm
(PIdenia -raeficia Grote) has been doing considerable
doaxkge to baby lima and blackeye beans in the vicinity
of Modesto. .;orms first started in lIfqlfa.

FALL AZMYiVORN (Lnphygm,. {gipgrda S. & A.)

L. A. Ste:.rns (September 15): The fall army-orm w.s
seriously abundant ip certain localities about Felton and
Ccmden, August 20,






-357-


Maryland





District
of
Columbia








Virginia


North Carolina


Georgia


E. N. Gory (September 22): Lanhyma fruginerda is present
in injurious numbers on lawns in Baltimore, on bent grass
in Baltimore County, on barley and wheat for forage in Harford
County, on rye in Montgomery County, and on alfalfa and barley
in Kent County.

U. S. D. A. Press Service (By Dr. '. H. Larrimer)
(Sept'ember 20): The long, dry summer has prevented the growth
of succulent grass in pasture lands and as a result hundreds
of lawns are now being overrun with these caterpillars, not
only in the District of Columbia but throughout nearby
States. Vhat is perhaps more serious economically, this
caterpillar is destroying fall-sown -.heat -.nd other small
grains which have been planted for early fall pasture, because
the long dry season prevented the usual growth of grass in
the pasture lands.

G. E. Gould (September 24): The fall ariyworm has been
exceedingly'abundant this year. The present brood of larvae
commenced to do noticeable damage early in September and since
then reports of damage to many crops have come in from all
parts of eastern Virginia. On the Eastern Shore damage was
observed to Sudan grass and sorghum. Around Norfolk the
larvae have caused damage to rape, kale, broccoli, collards,
turnip salad, savoy cabbage, rutabagas, grass, and garden
peas. In the northern part of Virginia a field was observed
where this insect had destroyed 30 acres of German clover
and had done some damage in 50 acres more.

i7. J. Schoene (September 17): Reports of serious injury
in several counties in eastern and central Virginia have been
received. It seems that the insect is generally distributed.

F. N. Darling (September 15): There is an infestation of
the armyworm in Northampton County, where much damage is being
done,

Evening Star, Washington, D. C. (September 26): The fall
armyworm, after campaigning in nearly every other section of
the State, has crossed Chesapeake Bay and attacked the crops
on the Mastern Shore. G. T. French, State Entomologist, said
yesterday the worm has appeared in large numbers in both
Accomac and :Torthampton Counties, and County Agent 7. E. Strong
of Accomac has written the State Department of Agriculture
that "the armyworm is destroying hundreds of acres of our
fall hay crops such as rye, -heot, and crimson clover."


C. H. Brannon (September 20): This species is continuing
widespread damage over the State.

H. S. Adair (September 25): Larvae were numerous in
Albany and other localities in southern Georgia during July






S-358-


Florida


Alabama


Mississippi


Pennsylvania






West Virginia


Iowa


Uevada




Indiana


and were oQbserved fe'.dinrg on grasses and various field crops.
Moths emerg.2d the latter part of August from material placed
in the insectary and were observed quite numerous in the field
during the latter part of August and the first of September.

J. R. Watson (September 24): The fall armyorm did con-
siderable damage about Raiford.-in September.

J. M. Robinson (September 19): The fall army-ormn started
its injurious work, but a fungus destroyed a large percentage
of the larvae.

R. W. Harned and assistants (September): The southern
grass worm has continued to attract considerable attention
on corn, cotton, soybeans, and grf-.sses of various kinds
during September.

Clay Lyle (September 8): Many fields of hay in Cktibbeha
and surrounding counties have been ruined by the southern
grass wormduring the past week. This seems to be the worst
outbreak of the worms since 1912. ',.here fields of young
corn are located near maadows.that are being cut, the worms
are likely to-move into the corn and destroy it quickly.

;IREP0R;.:S (Elateridae)

C. A. Thomas (September 22): Potatoes in several fields
in Bucks- County were badly injured by lrxvae of Pheletes
agonus Say, during September. At least 20 per cent of the
tubers were bored into by these wireworms and the gro-wers
estimated that they reduced the value of such potatoes by
at least 50 per cent.

L. :". Peairs (September 20): Wireworms are injuring
potatoes in Wood County.

H. E. Jaques (September 25): ;7ire7cr-,s are moderately
abundant in several counties in northeastern Iowa,

G. G. Schweis (September 22): ;.ireworms are modEr.ately
abundant. Doing considerable damage to potatoes.

WHITE GRUBS (Phyllopha,& spp.)

J. J. Davis (September 22): Numerous reports of abundance
and destructiveness of white grubs have been received from
northern Indiana and along the 7est side, north of abcut the
center. The reports indicate a continued southward spread
of this destructive brood of grubs. The majority of inquiries
referred to injury to corn, although some referred to serious
damage to timothy, blue grazs, the turf of golf courses, and
,trawberries and general crops. The drought conditions
intensified injury in some cases.








Illinois


Missouri



Nebraska


Pennsylvania


W. P. Flint (September 15): White-grub injury is becoming
more apparent with the advance of the season. Dcrnz.e is showing
at the present time in many areas where little injury was
noted up to the middle of August. This damage is confined
to the northern half of the State.

H. E. Jaques (September 25): Most of the counties in the
eastern half of the State show moderate to heavy d.:rage to
corn, potatoes, and pastures. The insects are only moderately
abundant in the northwestern white-grub area.

L. Haseman (September 24): White grubs are moderately
abundant. Emergence of adult beetles continued later than
usual this summer.

M. H. Swenk (August 15-September 1).: During the latter
part of August the number of complaints of injury by white
grubs increased greatly. These all related to the part of
the State lying north of the Platte River and east of Holt
and Buffalo Counties. The injury was to hay meadows, lawns
cornfields following grass, and strawberry bods.


CEREAL AND FORAGE-CROP INSECTS

WHEAT

HESSIA, FLY (Phytophaga destructor Say)

C. C. Hill (August 18): The result of the summer survey
for the Hessian fly indicates the following percentages of
infestation in the several counties of this State, as follows:


County


Infestation
(Per cent, .


Adams
Bedford
Berks
Bucks
'ut 1 er
Center
Chester
Clinton
Columbia
Cumberland
Dauphin
Franklin
Fulton
Huntingdon
Indiana
Juniata


County


Infestation
(Per cent)


Lancaster
Lebanon
Lehigh
Lycoming
1iercer
M.aifflin
::ontgomery
Montour
Northampton
Northumberland
Perry
Snyder
Union
,ashington
York


State average........... .................... 2 p


2 per cent






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Maryland


Infestation
(Per cent)


Infectatizn
(Per cent)


Baltimore
Carroll
Cecil
Dorchester


3-
J.
1


7rederick
Montgomery
Queen Anne
;ashington


State average..


Delaware


County


1 per cent


Infestation
(Per cent)


Kent
New Castle


State average ..... ......... ................... 2 per cent


",est Virginia


County


Infestation
(JPcr cent)


Berkeley
Jefferson


State average .....................................


1 p -r cent


Virginia


County


Infestation
(Per cent)


Infestation
(Per cent)


Augusta
Fauquier
Frederick
Hanover
Loudoun
Pittsylvania


Pulaski
Roanoke
:.ockbridge
Rockinghaim
Shenandoah
Smyth


State average..................................... 2 per cent


North Carolina


County


Infestation
(Per cent)


Guilford
Mecklenburg


State average .....................................


2 per cent


T. H. Parks (September 27): Early sown and volunteer heat
in central and northern Ohio was remarkably free from Hessian-
fly eggs during late September. We have not yet visited the
heaviest infested area in our State (Butler Ccunty) to determine
the presence of eggs on the heat there. It is apparent that
the hot, dry weather gave the fly a serious setback.


Ohio


County






w361-


... P. Flint (August).: ..Thu annual survey which was carried
On by the Tatural History Survey cnd the Bureau of -ntomology
has been conrpleted. This year the survey covered 57 counties
and the infestation is about the same as last year uith slight
increase of the fly in parts of the State. Dry weather has
reduced volunteer -"7heat and considerably retarded fly development.


Average per cent
-heat tillers in-
fested b the
Hessian fly


County


Average Zer cent
wheat tillers in-
fested b the
Hessian fly


Adams
Brown
Bureau
Cass
Champaign
Christian
*Clark '
Clinton
Coles
Crawford
DeKalb
De'';itt
Douglas,
Edgar
Edwards
Fulton
Gallatin
Greene
Grundy
.arncock
Hamiilton
Henry
Iroquois
Jackson
Jersey
Kankakee
Knox
LaSalle
Lawrence


23.6
25.0
12.7
10.3
4.1
18.6
16.0
24.0
7.0
44.0
3.5
.5
9.0
.0.
21.0
12.3
10.0
22.3
1.0
11.6
o10.0
4.2
1.0
5.0
38.0
2.0
4.6
6.4
35.0


Lee
Livingston
M-acon
:acoupin
Iadison
:.ason
:;cDonough
,,icLean
1ocnard
.:*Iontgoiury
dOrgan
cloultrie.
Ogle
Perry
Piatt
Roch Island
Saline
Sangamon
Schuyler
Scott
Shelby
St. Clair
Tazewell
Vermillion
warrenn
White
ihiteside
Will


State average...


East-central
States


12.2 per cent


C. M. Packard (July 26): In general, the Hessian fly
infestation in the East Central States was too light to
affect yields. There does not seem to be much danger of
serious infest--tion this fall in the northern part of this
region. h some7-Y.t gr--ater abundance of the fly in the
southern part of Ohio, Indiana, and .1linoic, and in
Kentucky a.nd T-nn-ssee, indic.atcghea.vier infestations.


Illinois


3.5
.3
15.3
35.0
24.0
5.0
11.6
2.6
7.6
38.0
5.0
5.5
5.0
15.0
9.4
6.0
8.0
13.6
25.3
14.3
2.5
20.0
5.0
2.0
8.0
10.0
8.6
1.3






-362-


Number of
localities


Number of
s-mjples


Aver.-age per cent of
culms n tillers
infested


Northern Ohio
Southern Ohio
northern Indiana
Southern Indiana
Southern Illinois
Northern Kentucky
Southern Kentucky
Southern Michigan
Northern Tennessee
Southern Tennessee


*Vest-central
States


*These averages show the infestations present in seeding-
date plots sown in situations particularly favor-ble to
heavy infestation.

J. R. Horton (September): In Missouri the aver:.ge in-
festations ran below 25 per cent of the stems infested.
Only in occasional fields were infestations high encuih
to affect the yield. In Kansas infestations 7-_re quite
generally low, averaging but 10 per cent of the stems in
the eastern portion and 14 per cent in the western portion
of the State. Yields -7ere not measur-bly affected by
the fly except in Hia-L-.tha in the extreme northc,-st portion
and Colby in the extreme northwest portion of the State.
On the other hand Nebraska infestations were in general.
exceptionally high, averaging 41 per cent of the stems
infested. For 7ll pr-ctical purposes the fly is r'bsent
frc..m 01:Ihoma c.xcept in the northeastern portion of the State.
The follo7in; tn.ble ;ives a summary of the season's survey "'cr::


iTumber of
localities


I',uiber of
samples


Avcr-ioe per cent of
culms infested


Southern Missouri
Central Missouri
Yortn'-estern Mlissouri
SSoutheastern Nebr.skt
7'estrn Kansas
Eastern L,-nsas
L'orthern Cl-,.hcm.


Kentucky


'.. Price (20ptcmber 24): Th. Hccsian fly is r:ortci
in the bluegra-ss section. Stubble s'..o--s 10 -nd 12 onr cent
infestation.


Are-,


4
3
40
19
6
2
1

2
4


24
36
71
47
19
14
6
15
14
17


10
18
7
17
47*
15
52*
4
3
2??'


Region


24
49
14
20
32
4d
47













Missouri



Nebr-.ska


Illinois


--363-

H. E. Jr.quei' (September 25): Ten counties in southwestern
Iowa report Hessian flies moderately abundant with a few
scattered reports from other parts of the State.

L. Hasenan (September 24): The Hessian fly is moderately
abundant; infes.t-tions are irregular but, situation alarming
with early -heat seeded or pasture.

M. H. Swenk (September 18): The Hessian fly is moderately
abundant in southeastern Nebraska.

*, FZ;LT JOINT W01M (H.-armolitn. tritici Fitch)

;7. P. Flint (August): The annual heatt joint --orm survey
has been completed. The survey covered 57 counties and
gave the following results:


Average per cent
heartt tillers in-
fested by jointvorm


County


Average per cent
-he!,t tillers jn-
fested by joint'orm


Adams
Brown
Bureau
Cass
Champaign
Christian
Clark
Clinton
Coles
Crawford
DeKalb
De"'itt
Douglas
Edgar
Edwards
Fulton
Galla t in
Greene
Grandy
H.ncock

Henry
Iroquois
Jc cks on
Jersey
Kankakee
Knox
LaSalle
Laurence


2.0
2.0
20.8
.3


0
0
0
0
4.0.
9.0
6
.6

0
8.3
2.0
14,5
0
1.3
0
0
14.6
3.4
.4


Lee
Livingston
Macon
Macoupin
M-.dison
Mason
McPonough
;:cLerji
Menard ,
.ontgomery
iyilo rgan
Ioul t rie
Ogle
Perry
Piatt
Rock Islrnd
S line
S ni-mon
Schuyler-
Scott
Shelby
St. Clair
Tazewell
Vermilion
Warren
'.hit e
,hiteside
Will


County


.5
0
.6
.3
0
0
33.3
0
0
.6
.3
0
0
1.3
.6
8.0
0
0
3.0
.3
0
0
1.6
0
17.0
2.0
9.5
0





















Indiana


Illinois








I oWa
and
:'issouri


'is sour.i





Vermont


Rhode Island


Nc7 Jersey


M.aryland


-.est Virginia


WHEAT STRAo ',;OM. (Harmolita gr-Lndis' Riley)

6. F, Knowlton (August 28): The wheat str:. -orm is very
abundant in some '7heat fields in northern Utah. Species of
Harmolita are also present in b-xley, oats, and rye, but in
much less abundance. (September .21).: The :Theat worm is
P.10 p;revalet in most parts of northern Utah.


CORN

CHINCH BUG (Blissus le-.copterus Say)

J. J. Davis (September 22): The chinch bug is moderately
abundant in the extreme northeastern corner of the State.

W. P.Flint (September 15): Chinch bugs are reported from
several counties in the south and west-centr-l pcrts of the
State. The increase in -'bujndance of chinch bui: this ye-r
has been extremely rapid. They have prob-bly increased
in abundance more rapidly this year than at any time during
the last twenty-five years. Unless checked by -dv-rse 7eather
conditions we would expect commercial injury in sc.'cral
counties next season.

H. E. Jaques (September 25): Chinch bugs vere moderately
abundant in Lee County, Iowa, but otherwise practically
absent in the State. I found them very -%und-nt in Henry
County, Missouri, early in September.

L. HWseman (September 24): The chinch bug is moderately
to very abundant; very abundant on some farms in centrral
belt across State.

CORN EAR i;OBM (Heliothis obsolet: Fab.)

H. L. Bailey (Septembecr 23): The corn ear -worm is
moderately abundant at Moritpelier; plentiful in a small
cornfield in the city,

A. E. Stene (September 18): The corn ear worm is very
abundant.

T. J. Headlee (September 9): The corn ear -orm is
moderately abundant.

E. N. Cory (September 22): The corn ear worm is very
abundant,

L. :'1. Peairs (September 20): The corn ear rorm is very
-bund- t in Yonongolia County, their "ork especi-lly noticeable
in vie" of the short crop.








North Carolina






South Carolina


Florida



Ohio





Illinois


Michigan


!..'i nnesOta


Kentucky


Iowa


Mis souri


Arkansas


,.:ississippi


W. A. Thomas (September 11): The larvae are now extremely
abundant on late tomatoes and beans at Chadbourn. Some plants
were observed today where every tomato fruit had been injured,
many of the young fruit buds destroyed, and some stems eaten
off. The foliage was also injured by the larvae feeding on
leaf and petiole.

P. K. Harrison (September 4): Late corn is quite heavily
infested.

J. R. ;Yatson (September 24): The corn ear worm is feeding
extensively on the seeds of beggar-7ecd, and mining the ground
cherry, Physalis spp.

E. W. Mendenhall (September 23): The corn ear worm is
very bad on sweet corn, in most parts of the State. The
ravages of this pest are quite marked, destroying a large
percentage of the kernels of corn and making the ears
unma rke table.

W. P. Flint (September 15): This insect increased very
rapidly during the last few days of August and the early
part of September. Counts made in sweet corn fields on the
east side of the State showed from 44 to 57 per cent of the
ears infested. Eggs ore very common on Indian mallow.

J. H. Bigger (September 15): The corn err worm is
moderately abundant. Thirty-one per cent infestation in
west-central. Illinois but moderate dan-age done.

R. H. Pettit (September): The corn ear worm is scarce in
general.

A. G. Ruggles and assistants (September): The corn ear
worm is generally scarce throughout the State.

A. Price (September 24): The corn ear worm was present
in 80 out of 100 ears of corn at Springfield.

H. E. Jaques (September 25): The corn ear worm is moderately
abundant in the western half of the State. Winneshiek, Benton,
Mahas':a, and Jefferson Counties also report moderate abundance.
It is very abundant in Henry County, Missouri, in field corn.

L. Haseman (September 24): The corn ear worm is very
abundant, in southern Missouri attacking soybean pods.

D. Isely (September 24): Corn ear worms are very abundant.
The crops attached are corn, soybeans, and cotton.

R. 7'. Harned (September 22): Only two complaints have been
received during the past month.






-3.66-


STALK BORER (Pnpaipem. nebris nitela Juen.)


Indiana






M1ichigan


Iowa


Nebraska


J. J. Davis (September 22): The stalk borer hrs continued
to be commonly referred to in correspondence. Th6 first
pupa '7as received September 2 and all received since that
date (the last, September 17) were pupae. All reports were
of infestation in corn, excepting one received from Otterbein
which was in golden. glow.

R. H. Pettit (September): The stalk borer is very -.buniant
in general.

H. E. Jaques (September 25).: The stalk borer is moderately
abundant in Crawford, Harrison, and Madison Counties.

M. H. Swonk -(August 15-September 1): A few reports of
cornstalks bored by the common stalk borer received during
the last half of August. After August 20 most of the
specimens sent were pupae rather than caterpillars. Other
reports received add Thurston, Colfax, and Merrick Counties
to the list given in my previous report.


SOD .'6,BWORL;S (Crambidae)


Missouri


Florida


Mississippi


L. Haseman (September 24): There has been an epidemic
of close-wing moths, consisting mostly of some three species,
during the last two weeks of September through, central
Missouri. They are attracted in swarms to light on warm
nights.

LESSER CORN STALK BORER (7lnsmopalpus lignossllus Zell.)

J. R. Watson (September 24): The lesser corn stalk borer
has been destroying chufas on the State Farm nt Raiford. .

R. W. Harned (September 22): This insect has attracted
considerable attention during the Ir-st month in various
districts of the State. Specimens collected from copee,
bean, and lima bean plants have been received from Holmes,
Marshall, Tippah, Forrest, and Pike Counties. .


A CER-:.3YCID (Prionus fissicornis Hald.)


M. H. Swenk (August 15-September 1): A cornfield injured
by the larvae of Prionus fissicornis was reported August 25
from Sherm-in County.


CCRJ ROOT .;Oi.' (Di-brotica longicornis Say)


West Virginia


L. !.. Peairs (September 20):
feeding mostly on silks.


Adults are numerous


Tebraska






-367-


indiana




Illinois


Colorado


Louisiana














Oklahoma


J. J. Davis (September 22): Adults of the northern corn
root worm were reported damaging corn at Richmond August 23,
but we have no specific information regarding the exact
nature of the injury.

J. H. Bigger (Septermber 15): The northern corn root w.orm
is scarce. It is appearing in smaller numbers than it has
in at least five years.

COLORADO CR0.T ROOT .0R,; (Diabrotica virgifera Lec.)

C. P. Gillette (September 19): The Colorado root worm is
moderately abundant in northern Colorado and very abundant
in some cases where corn followed corn.


SOYBEA IS

VELV-TBE.'_ T CAiTERPILLAR (Anticarsia p-ermatilis Hbn.)

W. E. Hinds (August 29): This insect is now quite abundant
in the district around ilew Iberia and Jeanerette and ragging
of foliage has occurred in some fields. The outbreak is
generally some two weeks later than that of 1929 and will
be less severe. Moths and larvae occur in some numbers
as far north as Baton Rouge, and probably farther than this.
The soybean crop is being harvested for hay, or turned under,
very generally regardless of worm occurrence, and in the
southern section about 80 per cent of the crop is already
safe from worm injury. I do not anticipate serious da.ir-g,
to the crop except in late-planted beans.



C. F. Stiles (September 22): This insect and the corn
ear worm (Heliothis obsoleta Fab.) have destroyed the soybean
seed crop in most districts of Oklahoma. It first attacks
the small beans and later the leaves.


ALFAL-JA A'7D CLOVER


Wisconsin


J. E. Dudley, Jr. (September 24): Owing largely to
parasites, predators, and possibly drought, the pea aphid
practically disappeared from fields lite in August. Largest
array of natural enemies ever observed, Nabis ferus L.
being the most prevalent species. During the past 10 days
infestation has developed until now from 20 to 50 are
secured in 50 sweeps of a net. Accompanying the rise of the
aphids, there is a falling off of the number of narLturl-1
enemies taken.


PEA APHID (Illinoia pisi Kalt.)






-368-


Anri z ona


Arizona


Mississippi


(Hemiptera)

E. A. McGregor (September 1): Exmin-i-ations of alfalfa
fields near Aztec, where .hu crop is being gro-Th for seed,
developed the fact that the seed yield is beinG materially
reduced through the activities of bugs, of which the
follo'.ving .;ere the more common: Lyus.elisus Van D.,
Ceresa occidentalis Funkh,, Chlorochroa sa. Stal., and
Geocoris punctipes Say.

A THRIPS (::icrothrips pierce M;org.)

E. A. McGregor (September 1): A thrips (probably
Microthrips pierce) v.as exceedingly abund-nt in the alfalfa
flowers at Aztec.

CRICKETS (Gryllus assimilis Fab.)

R. '7. Harned (September 22): Crickets were received
from a correspondent at Greenville, on September 18. He.
reported that these insects appeared there in great numbers
on the night of September 16. One farmer reported that
they were eating alfalfa and another that these crickets
were almost as abundant as the alfalfa seed that he 7as
sowi ng.


FRUIT INSECTS

CGTTC,:' LSAF WOR.. (Alabama argillaccn Hbn.)


Massachusetts



New York



District
of
Columbia

Ohio


Illinois


J. V. Schaffner, jr. (September 26): A heavy flight
of this species arrived in Lowell last evening (September 25)
according to a report accompanied by specimens received today,

G. N. Wolcott (September 25): This is to report the
appearance of large numbers of moths of the cotton caterpillar,
on the warm and rainy night of September 24 at B-rnveld.

G. Myers (September 24): The cotton leaf worm 7ns observed
in great numbers on the buildings and lamp posts in Washington
on the morning of September 24.

T. H. Parks (September 27): These moths have -ppeared in
the Lake Erie peach section and have been puncturing the skin
of ripening pe-ches. The injury is not so serious as during
some years.

S. C. Chandler (September 15): The cotton le-f -.-orm is
found v:ry sc-rce in the cottonfields of Pulaskl:i cnd Alexr-nder
Counties.






.369.-


1ichigan



Missouri


M4ass achus etts




North Carolina


Ohio








Indiana


Illinois


J. P. Flint (September 18): There.is report of a heavy
flight of the cotton leaf caterpillar in southern Illinois
on the night of September 15.

R. H. Pettit (September 25): On the 24th of September a
specimen of the Alabama moth was sent in from Kalamazoo.
This is evidently the first record for Michigan in 1930.

L. Haseman (September 24): During August and September
cotton fields in the cotton-growing counties of southeastern
Missouri were serious damaged by the cotton leaf worm. On
September 14 moths were taken in considerable numbers for
the first time this year at Columbia in codling-moth bait
pans.

CODLING ':OTH (Carpocrpsa pomonella L.)

A. I. Bourne (September 23): The codling moth is
moderately to very abundant. There are a considerable
number of late-season stings. The second brood this year
was larger than normal.

C. H. Brannon (September 3): Damage to apples in the
mountains is exceptionally light this season.

T. H. Pirks (September 27): This insect is much more
serious than usual in our State. LawrEnce County has suffered
most and ir. this county a third brood of codling moth larvae
developed this year and damaged the fruit since August 20.
Moths are still emerging end a sprry program carrying three
cover sprays following the calyx application did not prove
effective in controlling the insect. Elsewhere in the State
the insect is under control but has increased rapidly.

J. J. Davis (September 22): The codling moth problem
is a serious one in southern Indiana.

F. H. Lathrop (Septe.mber 15): In labor-tory studies in-
cluding large numbers of codling moths, the emergence of moths
declined sharply during the first week in September, showing
that the larv-.e are going into winter quarters. This is
confirmed by field obs.rv-tions. Nevertheless, considerable
numbers of newly hatched larvae are still entering the fruit
in the orchards about Vincennes at this date.

P. Flint (September 15): Eggs have been hatching during
the first two weeks of September. Many apple orchards are
showing an unusual amount of damage from very late worms.

S. C. Chandler (September 15): There has been a general
heavy hatch of codling-m:oth -orms in the orchards of southern
Illinois beginning about the 1st of September. Intr,-.nces were
especially noticeable by September 7.




-1) fA


Kentucky





Missouri


Kansas


Arkansas


Alabama


Nevada


*Znshington


Oregon


Connecticut


Delaware


W. P. Flint (SepteMiber 18): On 'eptember 2, 3'r. S-.z_-ra
ex:-mined a number of bands that had been on apple tr-e-s
for ten days in one orchard at Parkersburg. A count revealed
700 larvae and only one pupa, indicating that the worms
are going into hibern-.tion. :Ie-7ly hatched larvae were
entering the fruit in numbers,.

,. A. Price (September 24): Otserv-tions of the cc-linU.
moth at Henderson indicate a decline in emergence of -jaults
since September 1. :um:crs of new entrances were observed
on apples September 17, indicating that moths are still
plentiful in some orchards,

R. M1. Jones (SeptembEr 17): '.7ell sprayed orc-'-rds are
relatively free of worms in south--estern Missouri. Other
orchards show moderate to serious infestations, depending
upon thoroughness .and timeliness of sprays.

L. Baseman (September 24): late worms are'v-?ry abundant.
In' northern Missouri we have had three broods this year
-ith the third-brood worms very -,'bund.int.

P. M. Gilmer (September 19): There has been rather severe
late injury from codling moth in the southern section of the
State during the first half of September. P-rt of this
is without question due to a small fourth brood.

D. Isely (September 24): The codling moth is very -bund-.nt
in northwestern Arkinsas.

0. I. Snapp (September 18): The infestation is heavy
at Fort Payne.

G G. Schweis (September 22): The codling moth is r-rorted
on unsprayed fruit, 90 per cent wormy,-

E. J. Newcomer (September 22): Owing to cooler -5-ther
in June and September, the codling moth infestation is not
so severe this season as it wz.s last year.

D. C. Mvlote (July): !he first generation of codling moths
is about over at Corvallis. Pupae of the second generation
appe-ring.,h (August): The codling moth is moderately
abundant in hillnmette Valley. Peak of second brood just
passed.

EAST-TE TENT CATERPILLAR. (::.,-.lacosom- -ric.n- Fab.)

W. E. Britton (September 24): The e-stern tent caterpillar
is sc-rce.

L. A. Stearns (September 15): In New Castle County the
tent caterpillar was very -bundint, during late August :nd







-371-


early September, on practically all shrubs which they
commonly infest.

Oregon B. G. Thompson (July): The tent caterpillar adults are
very abundant in the Willemette Valley.

APPLE MAC-GOT (Rhagoletis pomonella Walsh)

Ohio T. H. Parks (September 27): The apple maggot was not
so serious as last year in northern Ohio where it w-s an
economic pest in 1928 and 1929. Emergence of flies in
considerable numbers occurred between July 20 and August 9
as determined by R. .i. Dean, who is investig-ting this
insect. Two special sprays were advised during this period.
In the test orchards the apple maggot seems to be well
under control at this writing, owing apparently both to
the spraying and to the adverse weather of the season.
In a few unsprayed orchards the insect is still serious.
No complaints have reached us from localities other than
northern Ohio.

JAPANTESE BEETLE (Popillia "j,2ponica Newm.)

Rhode Island U. S. D. A. Press Service (September 18): During the
present summer, surveys have resulted not only in confirming
the continuation of the infestation at Providence but in the
discovery of additional beetles at ITewport and Westerly.

SHOT-HOLE BORER (Scolytus rugulosus Ratz.)

Ohio T. H. Parks (September 27): Following the serious drought
of midsummer, shot-hole borers are more numerous than usual
in peach, cherry, and even apple trees. In Lorain County,
the beetles were emerging during August from a brush pile
containing prunings of the orchard and were damaging the
near-by young apple trees.

OYSTER-SiELL SCALE (Lepidosaphes ulmi L.)

Minnesota A. G. Ruggles and assistants (September): The oyster-
shell scale is quite generally abundant over the southern
half of the State.

Michigan R. H. Pettit (September): The oyster-shell scale is
moderately abundant in general.

EUROPEA;I RED :TITE (Paratetranychus pilosus C. & F.)

Ohio T. H. Parks (September 27): The European red mite is not
a very serious pest in northern Ohio this year. Well sprayed
orchards are remarkably free from this mite.


.. IKARY






-372-


Georgia


Indiana


Illinois











.:ichigan


Mi s souri


"ississippi


Virginia


Ohio


PEACH

PEACH 0REOR (Aegeri.. -xitio:z-. Say)

A correction: "(July 12)" should be ins-rted after
"recorded today" in the second line of the note by 0. I.
Snapp on the peach borer in the Insect Pest Survey Bulletin,
Vol. 10, No. 6, pr.ge 279.

C. H. Alden (September 20): The pe-ch borer is moderately
abundant. Moths are out and are ovipositing.

0. I. Snapp (September 20): Oviposition in the fields
and insectary is heavy. One female has deposited over
900 eggs.

J. J. Davis (September 22): The peach-tree borer was
reported from W7lkertown and Ligonier during the month.

S. C.Chandler (September 15): Infesta.tion has evidently
not been decreased to any extent by the extremes of heat
of the past suMMer. A recent survey in southern Illinois
peach sections sho-ed from 50 to 90 per cent of the trees
not treated in the past two years to be wormy. By September 3,
84 per cent of the old -orms hnd emerged, 13 per cent were
in the pupal stage, and only 3 per cent were still in the
larval stage. *.'e are recomra.cnding treatment by SeptEmber 20
in this section, this year, which h is a little earlier than
usual.

R. H. Pettit (September): Th, peach borer is vcry obund.nt
in general.

L. Haseman (September 24): The perch borer is moderately
abundant. In central Missouri borers are quite abunjar.t.

P. H. earned and assistants (Septamber): This insect is
quite generally reported throug7:yut the St-te and is very
abundant at rii an. Agricola.

CORI::TkL Fm.:'I :.CT"> (L spevr.'si- iolcst- Busch)

C-. Gould (September 24): Th2 oriental fruit moth is
mod er at ely an undant.

T. H. Parks (September 27): .hilo the infest.-tion in the
Elbcrt' peaches w-s "'*ry light, there h-s developed a late
brood which seriously d-'-.d late vwrictics harvested ift.-r
the middle of September. This st-t.:..:t ap -lies to counties
joining Lke Eric, a.s the crop in -11 other counties was
killed by severe winter tcperature.








-373-


Indiana





Kentucky




Connct icut




Rhode Island


Maryl--nd


rest Virginic



South Carolina


Geor- i ;


F. H. Lathrop (September ]5): Since August 15, the numbers
of oriental fruit moths in peach orchards of Vincennes
have steadily declined. Since September 1 it has been difficult
to find infested tigs. Infestation does Lot seem to be a
serious factor in apple orchards of this section this season.

A. price (September 24): Infestation in apples does not
soem to be severs in the orchards observed in western Kentucky.
However, a cuince tree observed at Henderson bearing about 1
bushel of fruit was heavily infested.

F. G.r"an (September 24): The oriental fruit moth is
reported in Hartford, ,T&' Haven, end ITe London Counties.
tuinces in general, although wormy, show improvement over last
year.

S "- .tene (September 18): The oriental fruit moth
is mod( eratcly abundcaiht.

ICory (August 16): The oriental fruit moth is moderately
abundant, .

L. 1'.. Peairs (Sept-mber DO): The oriental fruit-moth is
moderately abiundnt in the eastern panhandle; distinctly less
numner:ous than in 1929.

A. Lutken (September 19): Th- oriental fruit moth is
moderately abundant in the northwestern part of the State.

0. I. Snap (September 17): ,uince fruit in a dwelling is novi
ieaviiy infested. This insect causes little damage at Fort Valley
in o.c. d.s wler. no fiuit is availa-ble after the harvest of
.Iberta peaches.


3. h. -.Lden (September 20):


Illinois









i4ichigan


F-Le oriental fruit moth is scarce.


2. 0. handler (September 15): In the peach sections from
Centralia south there have been no ne-; entrances into peach
tiigs for a mr:th and scarcely any for two months. Apples in
interplanted orchards or close to peach have shown either
very light cr no infestation. Parasitism was not over 20 per
ceC1t. It is tlought that the extreme L.eat of summer has aided
in the reduction "iich has evidently occurred. To date no
live larvae can be found cocooned on peach trees.

H. Pettit (September): The oriental fruit moth is
moderately abundant in the southeastern part of the State;
not spreading so r'nidly as expected.











''jiji


Georgia










:.ichigan


Minnesota



"'issouri


Mississippi


Utah


-374-
J. .... Robinson (Stptember 19): r.e oriental fruit moth
is moderately abun-i-nt at Auburn.

R. "0. Harned and assistants (September): 1he oriental fruit
moth as reported from Calhoun City, Houston, Y zoo City,
Corinth, kosciusko, ;,eriarjan, and at points in Le Soto, late,
utitman, Panola, Yelobur'h, Grenada, and. ion*-o-. ry Counties.

R. ,i. Harned (September 22): Specimens tentatively identified
as larvae of the oriental fruit moth were collected in peaches
at Guliport. on September 2 and in pears at :.:errill on the same
date.

PLUM CU? JULIO (Conotrachelus rnurh r .: st.)

0. I. Snapp (September 11): Only three adults were captured
during jarring on three one-half days in a numbc-r of reach
orchards at Fort Vallv:. This insect has either left peach
orchards for hibernation or Lhe population is very li'set. "e
are expecting the adult carry-over to be less than usual.
(September 26): Frequent jarrirns in a nxmrier of reach
orchards since September 9 have netted a total of only 9
adults. Evidently they left pe ch orchards in this locality
unusually early for places of hibernation.

R. H. Pettit (September): -.. plumn curculio is very acur.dant
in general.

A. G. Ruf-les and assistants (September): 2he plum curculio
seems to be quite generally scarce over the State, only one
County (Lyon) reporting it as very abundant.

L. Haserman (September 24): Picked arples show their usual
a'hundance of stirgo by the plum curculio.

R. Harned and assistants (SepteT'.er): The plum curculio
is generally reportc- as scarce throughout the State.


PEA

P2ArL LEAF ::.;S:':R kl ':(2riop)hves -.Tri F_-st.)

F. F. Knowlton (Sept-.mbr 21): The pear leaf blister mite
has beencausing some da- ,e at :oosevelt. .e' infestation
on some trees is very heavy.








-375-


CH R1 Y

COZR.Y FRUIT -LY (Rhagoletis cingulata Loew.)

Oregon S.. Jones (July): The cherry fruit fly reached the peak
of emergence at ELene about June 28 and at Tola and Hillcrest
in the Amity section about July 14. The last flies were found
in the Eugene section on July 9 and in the Amity section on
July 20. ":-,fots appeared in cherries at Eugene on July 1.
iviature maggots vere found at Macleay (Marion County) about
July 18. A fev: of the maggots had dropped to the ground at
that time.

D. -C. Motc. (agust): Ad-.lts were still being found in the
field in numbers August 20, as reported by S. C. Jones.


PLUL:

PLL'Ti. GOU0LE. (Anthonomus scutellaris Lee.)

North Dakota J. A. Munro (Sep-otember 19): Specimens of plums showing
injury by the plum gouger were received from Haynes, Adams
County, on September 10. The sender stated that this is
the first year plums have been injured in this way in his
locality.

RED SPIDER (Tetranychus tclarius L.)

Oregon 0. T. IMcWhorter (July): The red spider is very abundant on
prunes and cherries in the :.'iltor.-Fr-e. water district, and
moderately abundant on prunes in the Forest Grove and Salem
district.

A MITE (Eriophves sp.)

Oregon 0. T. McWhorter (July): The rust mite (not yet determined)
is very abundant on prunes in the ':ilton-Frz:ewater district.


BLACKBERRY

A ITE (Ericphyzs !racilis Nalepa)

Oregon D. C. Mote (August): Serious infestation on both Himalaya
and Oregon Evergreen blackberries occurs in western Oregon
apparently caused by the blackberry mite, Eriophyes gracilis
Nalepa. Reported by J. Wilcox.






-376-


GRAPE -._AP:-Pi. ( trythroneura comes Say)


Maryland


..'est Virginia



Ohio


Ohio


',. S. Abbott (September 15): Trhe grape leafhop:r(r is very
abundant on grape foliage at the insecticide testing laboratory.

L. .-. ?cairs (Sctember 20): The grape leaf.ho,..r is
extremely numerous. Along with the drought it has nearly
defoliated the grapevines.

T. H. Parks (September 27): E. comes Say and E. tricincta
Fitch are present in the -usual nu rbtrs and some vineyards
suffered a rather heavy infestation; others are almost fr-.
from attack.

GBAPE BERRY LOTH (Polychrosis viteana Clem.)

T. H. Parks (September 27): Berry-moth injury is present
in the grape belt of northern Ohio, but it is not so serious
as it was one year ago. Encoura:-ing results were secured by
growers who sprayed aE:ainst the first brood during June.


PECAJ

AN APHID (VMyzocellis fumipennellus jZitch)


Georgia





Alabama


Mississippi


Mississippi


H. S. Adair (September 25): Th-. black pecan aphid bigan to
appear in some pi-can orchards in this locality (Albany) in
injurious numbers the latter part of August. Although the
infestation is not so extensive as last year it has done
considerable darm-age by causing the defoliation of pccan trees.

J. M. Robinson (September 19): The black n..cnn aphid is
abundant on pecan foliage at Tuscaloosa, Camp Hill, and
Auburn.

R. .. Harntd and assistants (September): Thc black aohid
is showing up in numbers on pecan at Lucedale and is scarce
at Occ-an Springs.


HI..:.. Y .. C.. C... (L r vri.. c.rv rna Fitch)


R. W. Earned and assistants (Sept-:-mb.r): r-i r'c.-.:n shuck-..ori
is scarce at Ocean Springs and moderately abundar.t in east
Jack'son County.

CIGAR CAS. Z-_:.-_ (Coltoro-hor- fletch rclla Fern.)

R. '. Harncd and assistants (September): The cigar case
bearer is scarce at Ocean Sprir.n!s and vtry abundant in the
vicinity of Pascajoula.





-377-


Mississippi


Mississippi


R. Harned and assistants (September): The pecan leef
case bearer is moderately abundant at Ocean Springs.
Infestation is approximately normal in those pecan orchards
that were examined in Stone County.

E3:-SHOUL-r>T; SHOT-HOLE 3CS'-. (Xylobiopls basilaris Say)

P. . Earned and assistants (September): Abundant in
nursery pecan trees killed by cold last winter at Merrill.


PEC-1.U .II VIL (Balaninus caryae Horn)


Alabama





Georgia



Florida


Mississippi


Alabama


Oregon


Oregon


J. M. Robinson (September 19): Tr., pecan weevil is very
abundant in large pecan groves at Camp Hill.


i.ALifJT
LT CATRRP-LLA- (Datana intezerrima G. & R.)
H. S. Adair (September 25): The walnut caterpillar has
been observed doing some dana-e to pecan trees in this
locality (Albany) during the past few weeks.

J. R. watson (September 24): The walnut defoliator
continues to be abundant.

R. W. Harned and assistants (September): Several colonies
of the walnut caterpillar were observed in one pecan orchard.
The larvae were in their second instar. Several clusters of
eggs were examined and it was found that the hatch was 100 per
cent. A heavier infestation may be anticipated next year,
since the parasitism seems to be low. Tre walnut caterpillar
has been practically absent from the pecan orchards in
southern Mississippi ever since the heavy infestation in 1927.
That year, it will be rcrembtred, wve had three distinct
generations. Thr egg parasitism of the third generation
averaged 92.3 peor cent. Since that time only an occasional
colony has been found.

J. '. Robinson (September 19): The walnut datana is active
and moderately abundant or.n cans at Auburn and Camp Hill.

Ju APHID (Callipterus juglandis Frisch)

B. G. Thompson (July): European walnut aphids are showing up
more numerously than in June but not so numerously as last year.




A LOOPER (Lepidoptera)

D. C. Mote (August): A looper very much resemblinF


,ECA .:. CASE BLAREF (.ALrobasis i ~l., i Le3.)


















t.rizoan






Arizona


California


Floridaz


Miss is sippi


Ellonia ,...i-? EHist. .his been taken in ve localities
in -;,stern Oregon in conei-' rable numbers on cultivated
filberts and w'ild hazelnuts, as reportEI by 3. C. i'.o..pson.




ORJ_'NGE THIiPS (Scirtothnrios citri "Dalton)

r. A. ;IcGregor (September I): in the grapefruit districts of
Arizona (Yum a, Phoenix, *Mesa) injury by the citrus thrips has
been very seve-e. A considerable percentage both of zraef:ruit
end navel oranges in the above localities have been -:Iatrially
lov.-trrc in grade this year, as the rc'.sult of the v.or'- of *-
thrips.

C. oD. eb.rt (Septsmbcr ): Consi crable injury in the nature
of fruit scar is sho;A.in-; up. In many cases the citrus frui-t as
been scarred severely.

cGror (Cptbr ): ..it- the cxc ztion of a few
points in certain hot interior districts, the occurrence of
th, citrus hripsri has been unusually light this season in
southern California.

CLOUrL-.Y -i1 ...HIrFLY (DiaeurodYs citrifolii Yorg.)

G. 3. Herril! (September 27): -Y * c!,ud.y-inged '-itofly
is moderately abundant at 'itra, Gaincsville, Earlton, and
south. it is only during the past fev. years that this species
of whitefly has buen found so far north in Florida.


SOFT SCAL,' (Coccus hcs--rridum L.)


. Harned and assistants (September): '-.is Fc-le is
very abundant on satsmna crn.Tes at '@ricola anr on ornTrcnt.V
plants at Corinth. It is c. ncrally scarce in the G-ulf-:ort-
Ccean Sprin,:-. district.


California


2. A. McGregor (September 1): The exemination of 37 or-".e
groves in fi-e counties of southern California hns brought to
light the fact that t.. citrus mtte .'.urin-: the :---nth of August
was reduced by natural caus,.s to thu, li.:'t.st in-estation
of which we have over been avare. Only 7 mites 'ere obtained
from 740 or'-nce t' ;i-s (units) in th se 37 scac.ttered grves.


...... TE ?rat r-.n, -g,*-, citri c .)










TRUCK-CROP I N S EC TS


VEGETABLE WEVIL (Listroderes obliquus Gyll.)


Mississippi


Illinois


R. P. Colm-er (September 20): Reports of moderate injury
to turnips around Pascagoula and Moss Point have been received.

PARSLEY ST-'.LK dVEEVIL (Listronotus latiusculus Boh.)

J. H. Bigger (September 15): The carrot weevil is abundant
in certain districts in western Illinois where it is increasing
in importance. It destroyed nearly the entire crop of early
carrots.


BLISTLR BEETLE (ieloidae)


Maryland


Indiana


Iowa


INorth Carolina


California


E. -T. Cory (August 16): _picauta marginata Fab. and E.
vittata Fab. are abundant on both the Eastern and a'estern
Shores on potatoes, tomatoes, Swiss clhard, beets, and various
flowers.

E. < iendenhall (Suptember 3): E. pennsylvanica De-. is
very destructive to dahlia and gladiolus flowers at Sidney.

J. J. Davis (September 22): E. pennsylvanica DeG. damaged
potatoes at Lafayette accordinL' to a report received August 29.

11. E. Jaques (September 25): The black blister beetle
(E. rLni.vlranica De'.) is very abundant in Henry County on
asters and garden plants.


STRIPED FLEA BE2ETLE (Phyllotreta vittata Fab.)


J. A. Thomas (September 11): !:-re has bcen considerable
complaint in this section (Chadbourn) recently of serious
flea beetle injury to young turnips. 0bser'.-tions within the
past few days show that this insect is causing a great amount
of damage to practically all cruciferous plants. The plants
are most frequently destroyed just after coming up.

.;DD C...T..RT, BEETLE (Diabrotica balata Lee.)

J. C. .lmure (September 26): This insect ".as first discovered
in California in 1926 or 1927 near San Die;o. It has gradually
spread north but has not become numerous until this year. 'e:r
San Jaun Caristrano it became very numerous by September 1 and
was doing very noticeable Lrr.c to eggplant and peppers.
Cucumbers having becn through harvest and fields plowed under
at this time.





-380-


r'TO _0 TC;..-?o


POTATO L::-:LF? ?. (Z.-c.. r fabae Farr.)


Vermont


South Carolina


Ohio


Indiana



Minnesota




Iowa


Nebraska


H. L. Bailey (September 23): 7r.E *potato leaf.o-0.r is
moderately abundant thr- hout the State but is more plentiful
in the southern and western sections.

J. J. Reid, Jr. (September -): The pootato leIhr.orcr is-very
abundant on fall potato plantings and fall sr.,a beans in the
Charleston area. The insect is present in greater nun.bers
than observed in this section in any previous season. A 5-
acre field on one farm is suffering severely from an attack.
Frr:quent rains have rendered control measures ineffective.
l. adult sta.R of the insect greatly predominates in nu-'bs.rs
in the fields at this date. T.,r-I_-raturcs have tcn too hihe
for rapid potato growth. The insect is much less abundant on
the beans than on the potato plantings. -a ye to the bean
plants does not at the present appear to be serious.

T. H. Parks (September 27): nhc potato lejflopr-Er is mcre
&jbur.dar.t than one y-eal, ago, but not so nummerous as it j.as during
the serious epidemic between 1919 and 1923.

J. J. Davis (Septezibe.r 22): Th:e potato leafhorier vas
responsible for serious hogr-rcui'n of potatoes at Zlkhert and
Lafayette. injury was especially noticeable early in September.

A. G, Pugrles and assistants (September): The potato leaf-
.or.pr is ported as very a'ur..-nt in iTe County and doing
much Cda! az in Carlton County. It appL-rs to be moderately
abundant over the remainder of the State.

H. Z. Jaques (Septemrnber :25): Th. potato leafhurocr is
infesting late potatoes in scattered localities.

A STI::E: _U, (C..:lorochroa sn.-i Stal.)

H[. P. Sw-nk (A-i-ust 15 September 1): iurin- the third v:eek
in Au-gust Professor D. B. ,-helan found this penatomid injuring
potatoes in Xim'he!l County, this being the first record for the
species in the. State.


TCBACCO Vic-L:.: (Protoi e:-rce quincucr:.c:ujl.t- Ha'.'..)


Illinois


Mi. P. Flint (September 15): --is insect is much more abundant
than usual in this section (C0Ej-pairn County).


TOMTO ,.COr. (Proto-arce scxta Johan.)


Alabama


J. M. T.obinson (September 19): The -rdhin-id larvae (southern
tobacco worm) are abundant on tomatoes and tomato foliare in
Auburn and Lee Counties.






-381-


North Carolina


Indiana









Iowa




Mississippi


Illinois


Minnesota


Missouri


Utah


POTA'O TBIR ..,'--.,; (Phthorimae-. onerculella ell .)

C. H. Brannon (September 25): Potatoes sent in from Craven
County heavily infested.

J. J. Davis (September 22): Infested potatoes %,ere received
August 26, our correspondent advising us they were purchased
at Fort gayne,having been shipped there from some point in
Virginia. "'e have a customer in our city who purchased
homegrown potatoes near Nev. Haven, Ind., that had the same
infestation, therefore ve believe that you v:iill find tnis
same trouble right in our home State" the dealer said.

POTATO FJ:- PTL (Eitrix cucumeris Harr.)

H. E. Jaques (September 25): h-.e potato flea beetle is very
abundant in Crawford County.

IN-LEGG EARIG (Anisolabis annullipes Lucas)

H. Dietrich (September 20); Earwigs are very abundant in
stored Irish potatoes and eating out the tubers at Lucedale.


J. H. 3i,.;er (September 15): The imported cabbage worm is
very abundant, and late cabbage being destroyed wholesale.

A. G. Pu.-les and assistants (September): The imported
cabbage worm is reported as very abundant in Blue Earth, '*inona,
Rice, 1Mo-er, and Lyon Counties and in parts of Carlon County.
Over the remainder of the State it is relatively unimportant.

H. E. Jaques (September 25): _1- imported cabbage worm is
very abundant in northern and western Iowa.

L. Haseman (September 24): lhn imported cabbcge worm has
been only moderately abundant since August.

G. F. Knowlton (September 19): Larvae and adults are abundant
at Lehi and Provo.


SO'TI--I: ICAEBACL ,.*-":: (?ieris protodice B. & L.)


Alabama


Mississippi


J. >. Robinson (September 19): 'he southern cabbage worm is
abundant.

R. W. Harned (September 22): Larvae were found seriously
injuring mustard plants at Plantersville, on September 12.


I"y('z-ieris raae L






-382-


CA_- IB-.: - .' 1:C.:.- (Helluls undalis Fa'.)


U7orthl Carolina
and
South Carolina



A'l -b .a




Mississippi


..-..Thomas (September 10): A very serious outbreak has
occurred in many districts of the two Carolinas during the
past three weeks. "ost of the fall turnips in many localities
have been completely destroyed. Some local growers are now
planting for the eighth time ceare of this insect.

J. il. Robinson (September 19): The turnip webworm is
moderately abundant at Auburn, Tuscaloosa, Crossville,
and Andalusia; very active on turnips; larvae present in all
stages.

H. Dietrich (September 20): The imported cabbage webworm is
showing up in considerable numbers on fall plantings of turnips.


CABBAGE LOOPER (Autorrarha brassicae Riley)


Virginia








Alabama


Mississippi


Michigan


G. E. Gould (September 24): Cabasz. loopers are doing
considerable damage to many of the fall crops. All of the
cruciferous crops, such as Savoy cabbage, kale, broccoli, rape,
collards, and rutabagas, show severe injury due to this insect
as well as the diamond-back moth Plutella maculire.nnis Curt.
and the fall armn,worm. Laphygma frugiperda S. & A. A 7-acre
field of garden peas was practically destroyed by the loopers
and fall arn.yzorms. Dart:ge is also reported on snap beans.

J. M. Robinson (September 19): The cabbage looper is
abundant on turnips and cabbage at Au urn.

R. 4. Harned (September 22): Several complaints in regard
to serious injury to turnips, collards, and closely related
plants have been received at this office during the past
week.

TUNRIP .-FMID (Rhonalosi',irum psLudobrassicae Davis)

R. H. Pettit (September): Falz- cabbage aphids are very
abundant in general on cabbage and on radish grov.,n for se-d
in Antrim and Charlevoix Counties.


LE'II BUG (:ur tia histrionics Thn)
xj_J BUG (*:ur,,,.antia histrionica 'ahn)


South Carolina


Missouri



:ississippi


Alfred Lutken (September 19): The harlequin bug is very
abundant in general.

L. Haseman (S.,ptember 24): Late cabbage and turnips in
places in southern Missouri have been seriously dc.-aged during
the month.

R. W. Harned (S:Dtci.ltr 22): Harlequin cabbo.,C bui's were
reported as abiin-iant on collards at Colu.-bus, on Jcptember 4.






-383-


Connecticut



M& ryland

Virginia




Virginia
and
.?est Virginia


West Virginia



Mississippi


Georgia


Alabama


Illinois


.fichigan


Nebraska


H. vj. Harned and assistants ($eptember): Reported as very
abundant at Corinth, McComb, and Mveridian, and at several
points in George, Greene, and Perry Counties.


TEAIrS

I.i5XICAN BE.-IA BEETLE (Epilachna corrurta Muls.)

W. E. Britton (September 24): This insect is nov: distributed
throughout the State. In certain fields considerable injury
has been done.

E. N. Cory (August 16): The :.'.xican bean beetle is scarce.

G. E. Gould (September 24): The Mexican bean beetle is not
so abundant as last year at this time. During September
feeding of the beetles and larvae has become more noticeable,
but very little damage has been reported.

Oliver I. Snapp (September 1):vaThe Mexican bean beetle is
much less abundant at Winchester,/and Yellow Springs, 4. Va.,
than it was in 1928 and in 1929. Undoubtedly the dry season
has contributed to the reduced infestation.

L. M. Peairs (September 20): The Mexican bean beetle is
scarce to moderately abundant in localities reporting it but
is increasing.

R. 'i. Harned and assistants (September): The mexican bean
beetle is unusually scarce throughout the State this year.

C. H. Alden (September 20): The Mexican bean beetle is
scarce. Fe,." on late beans.

J. M. Robinson (September 19): The .exican bean beetle is
scarce at Auburn.

S. C. Chandler (September 15): A survey of the green-bean
trucking area in Union and Pulaski Counties has failed to show
the presence of any :.:xican bean beetles.

R. H. Pettit (September): ThL M1cican bean beetle is scarce
in the southeastern part of the State.

M. H. Swenk (August 15-September 1): Survey vork done by
Prof. Don B. '.helan during the latter half of August shov,;s
bean fields infested not only south of Lyman and south and east
of Morrill, but also north of Morrill and in the vicinity of
Gering. This latter infestation is farther east than any
previously reported in the State.






-3e4-


Colorado


C. P. Gillette (September 19): i'- :-.:e:Lcn bean b.-,-tle is
moderately abundant in --Funeral.


A BZE-iTL. (Anthicus cal iforr.i2us Laf.)


Ohio


West Virginia


7Florida


Ohio


:ilissouri


.est Virginia


Ohio


Illinois


I oa


T. H. Parks (September 27): ITis beetle was collected early
in Auust in Huron County,where approximately 10 -r cent of te
stalks- of navy beans was partially severed about 1 inch a.::ve
the ground. The field was visited Sept-ber 25 and at that
time the beetles had disapprLr.-d, but evidence of their xork
r ..-:. i r, :-d. T-":, county .e,-nt and owner could assign no other
reason for this injury and while they were not observed in the
act of feeding, the beetles were invariably taken in rnumrs
in the soil at the base of the damaged plants.




SPOTTZD CL'3uZD2R BZETLE (Diabrotica c'uodeci-_.2urtate Fab.)

L. M. Peairs (September 20): Injuring blossomns of squ;:".s
and cucumbers quite seriously in small patches.

J. R. 7atscn (Septer-nber 24): Very i.j,.rious to cans,
rrustard, and other plants.

... >. Mendenhall (Scptember 3): Bedtlos are very destructive
on cucumber vines and dahlia flowers.

L. Haseman (September 24): I have ncver seen -iabrstica
12--unctata so abundant.

STPIPED CUCU EE ? LZ.-., (Diabrotica vittata Fab.)

7. . Peairs (Sept,.-7eer 20): Very abundant in .'-- i.
County.

7. H. Parks (September 27): This insect was mich :-or-
abwidant than '.sucl this year in ':oth cucumber and melon
plants. The 'eller Canning Co.-.p.:, locat.d atOak 0 .arbcr,
distribute-cd 27 tons of calcium r:c'nate and -p-sur- :tr-
amon-g their pickle ;rovers >itL e'-celleAt results ga"."-t
t.- beetle. Similar results vere obtsii.v by t. r,.on
Cannin toF"'-,ny at Celina.

J. H. 1i; er (September 15): V-ry,- abundant; lzr'e n .'Y rs .
adults ,r-oer11v to hier .x t.

H. E. Jaques (SeTjtenber 25): aorty T:cr.t in ic'
and ,T. Ion p-tches in soeutl'.actcrn z".- northeasterr counties.

L. Haseman ()epte: ,'er 2) r'- a.b.ndt. I Qavr never
scrin thiem so abundant.





-385.'


Oregon


Missouri


Utah


West Virginia


South Carolina


North Carolina


South Carolina


Utah


5STER1J SPOTTED CUCUi'.ER BEETLE (Diabrotica soror Lec.)
D. C. Mote (Auk.ust): 3. G. Thompson reports t: t this
insect is not so serious as it has been in past years.
In some sections a considerable number are found parasitized
by a dipterous parasite.


SQUASH

SQUASH BUG (Anasa tristis DeG.)

L. Haseman (September 24): Tl-he squash bug has becenwry
abundant in melon, squash, and pumpkin fields in central
Missouri. On September 20 the majority of the bugs were in
the late nyrphal stage with many adults and comparatively
few of the younger nymphs.

G. F. Knowlton (September 21): Squash bugs have caused
considerable injury to squash plants in northern Utah during
the past summer.


PICKLE WORIA (Diaphania nitidalis Stoll)


L. M. Peairs (September 20): The pickle worm is damaging
summer squash in Monongalia County.

Yi. J. Reid, Jr. (September 25): The pickle wvorm has
appeared in large numbers on fall squash plantings. "he
blossoms and young fruit are being attacked. 12-acrc
field on one farm shows an infestation of 75 per cent at
present. Frequent rains have made attempts at control
ineffective.


TUL? ] IP

FALE CHINCH BUG (Nysius ericae Schill.)

C. H. Brannon (September 23): The false chinch bug is
causing damage to turnips in Moore and 'ilson Counties.

P. K. Harrison (September 18): The false chinch bug is
attacking 150 acres of turnip, two 4-acre fields and one 1-
acre field severely at Fairfax.


BEETS

BET LEAFHOFPER (Eutettix tenellus Baker)

G. F. Knowlton (September 21): The beet leafhopper is
abundant in northern Utah, and considerable damage is resultir..
















Pennsylvania


to the sugar-beet crop in most ctAt-growin,7 areas. The
e-a;e i3 not Inform, o'vr, as some .crs are suffering
onlir mod--rate injury, v.hile ot-Lr:.. are quite st.riouaslv affc'..'.

le v.& ...,o )


SPF.I-:GTAILS (Coll ola)

C. A. Thomas (S-,tember 22): Springtails (Achorutes ar-natun
iic.) and (LLridoc- rtus cyaneus Tullb.) have ca:s-. consi&i:rable
injury to growing spawn in ri.us:.room houses in Chester County
this fall.


S.JCAI. BOPR (Digtraea saccharalis Fab.)


Louisiana


Florida


W. 2. Hinds (.iugust 29): 1-7 sugarcane borer is unusually
scarce. :7o field has been found with more than 10 pnr cent
of stalks no,. showing borer burro,'s. Conditions of -xneral
infestation v'ill average only about 2 r. bored in fields examinedd Augut 25 t9o.2 Borer eg&s are
very difficult to find and nearly all /;ere parasitized by
Tr i: Lo. ,ramma. .


F C R 2 S T AN D S _H D I T R E i S _C T S

A CICADA (Tibicen -davisi Sm. & rtb.)
A correction: The nyr hs attacking .oargus plunosus
at Jupiter, Fla., v;ere incorrectly essociatLd v'Wit- the d&alts
of DiceroproCta viridifascia -al-k. (Insect Fest ..rv..y "Illtin,
Vol. 10, p. 509). Adults of Tibicen c'avisi cr..rfsC in
numbers during early September. iym1phs aaJ ny-.i:l1 shells
were determined as this genus by -vis.
J. R. ',atson (Sept.:br 24): 1., fL.'"les of -.bicen d&visi
have been emrcrging inla:'., numbers in the "frnri-is" in
Juitcr, and are depositing eggs in the timbbrs and laths of
th-- IshaI de. 1


FALL .CEL. R 3"{- I .-- a


Vermont


Connecticut


H. L. Bailey (Septmber 23): fall r-bror? -as -..lly
abundant throw-ho :t the State.

'-S.. P. c*-" (Scote,.:" 24): nst r. v r- abun e-stIrn pprt of t-e tate, .uch mor, abundant thn in the
central or w-est:rn p: ts of thu St.- .









Fjr-c:'-- Island


..aryl.and



Pennsylvania




South Carolina


Florida









Maryland


z.-. Stene (Septe zber 18): _he fll -eiLyorn is ve-r,
aburndnt along the roaaszides.

L Ete-rns (S ei-rber 15): In >., Castle county, during
late -:-ust and early Septenber, the ifall wea;1orm ;7as ery
abundant on practically all shrwhbs v:ich they conr.only infest.
-at on zor =ac-t ica)L al shall .. "s

Z. 1 ory ( ugst 16): .all orms are extremely
abundant in 23ltimore, Harford, and Cecil c--nties at -.....
f i. on v;ild cherry, walnut, :ersi_-.cn, and sa:ac

3. A. oas (Se.tember 22): :all webvcr-. hare been very
coszon in Chester :aunty during .;'_gust and Septeber, an-
their webs are to be seen every-.:here on vwild cherry, ant,
pnTr, .sy"'-re, a-ole, and numerous oth-zr trees

r. x. garrisonn (Se pte-_ber 18): T.-e fall -ebor is attackin"
foli=.e of persi:r.on and p-can, at Fairfax.
- J .. -atson (Se'-teker 2-): :-:.. fall 7eb-,-or conti--u:-s to
b abundant. nh- infestation in north--rn F. lorida is tne oea-"it
I h--e ever observed.

J. ::. Lobinson (September 19): The fall web;or is _odcrat ely
abo'ndant on various shade and forest trees.

3AGCC?- : ( -:.. ,i t. t r-:. --.:-: r._f :r-.r iZ Ha..a.)

IT. Cory (A-, st 16): B:--r-s are locally abundant.

'. 'endenhall (September 27): Th.re has been a severe
outbreak of ;: z;orns on -le tree stock in a nursery ne-r
Lancaster (?airfield County). ::-.. bagorm -as cuite tad last
year in the sa.e nursery.


J. r ",' Robinson (September 19):
arcor-:itae at ir--i:.fh^-.


Vermont


Connecticut


,ve b-orm is abundant on


--D 7
--S-- r.. ^ .ni .Zz. -D -^izC (0 ---nisota rubicunda sc.
3-^2I;L-- k.:.::': (:t r:>c-.--- gttiv itza .i'lz.)

--. L. ailey (Septcuber 23): Pupae of the green stri:,i
maple worm vere found in loaf mold in defoliated --le ar s
vTith lar--r number of :'p of --ters-^ zttiv-itt Areas
strip-c' by these insects w-ere scattered triu-.out the southern
part of the State.

.,. -ritton (September 23): A lar--e ?oo'_:nd era of -ae.
ceak, beech, and birch in '.orfoik and Canaan has been -e:tiaiy
1 folipted by H--et roc -0a P-.ttivitta.


-,i aI aba.-:














Vermont


Maine


Maine


1!ichigan


Maine


1Maine


-ZQE-






2'.,r;1" I07d (Stilpnotia salicis L.)

H. L. Bailey (September 25): The satin moth was found as
far north as Bradford in the Connecticut River Valley. 1 o
con-lit. defoliation caused by the larvae v:as noted, ho-.'ever.


BEECH

A SZLF7T0IZER (Psilocorsis fa5inella Cha-c.)

H. B. Peirson (September 25): A beech skeletonizer,
possibly Psilocorsis faginella, is numerous from C&ac Britton
through the Eastern Provinces and Maine to the 1 '>' sa.s-ir-
border. Areas have ben reported v;,her every leaf on every
beech tree is infested.


BIRCH

tCH S -'.LET0LI-.-. (Bucculatrix canadensisella 2L.-.:-.)

H. B. Peirson (September 20): A heavy outbreak is occurring
throughout northern M1aine and it is reported frm. the Eastern
Provinces.

R. H. Pettit (September): Th- birch leaf skeletonizer is
reported from the east coast, lov.er peninsula, and upper
peninsula.

BIRCM iL;J-_..I:I-.: ". Sz ,,LY (Phyllotozma nemraorata Fallen)

H. B. Peirson (Sepitember 25): A general outbreak u-,hich
started three yc.rs ago appears heaviest no-:. Parasitism is
negligable.


A SAWFLY (Yvlot-.a iector-lis Leach)


H. B. Peirson (Sertember 27): This insect has been found
defoliating birch in 7c,- -v sections of Maine.


Illinois


W. P. Flint (Septmber 15): About the usu.! rnunber of r-oorts
of invasions of houses by these insects have been received.


BO[--'Lr. r-'L'G- (Lcrticoris trivittatus Say)







North Lakota


Utah


Connecticut


J. A. Munro (September 19): Boxelder bugs have been
recently noticed as rather numerous in Fargo.

G. F. Knowvlton (September 24): Boxelder u.- are provin-
to be a pest of houses at this season, and many complaints
are being received.


CA.T. ,PC

A --^ U2 (-LYuG (-'e.Kococcus coast;?: i. hu'a .)


E. Britton (September 23): Catalpa trees are severely
infested in sections of the city of 7Te: Haven between Dixwv;ell
Avenue and Goffe Street.


3onr.ncticut



ITorth Carolina


Oregon


Florida


Ve r ) nt


ELM LEAF BEETLE (Galerncella xanthomelaena Schrank)

? L. Britton (Septenber 23): Unsprayed elm trees are
brown in many portions of the State. Condition :7gravated
by drought.

Z. P. :.'tcalf (September 16): The leaf beetle is found to be
abundant at Raleigh, it has been more abundcnt in Ralcigh this
past season than has been noted in the last 15 or 16 years.


*OAK

OAL SPP-.ORI. (_llopia somniaria Hist.)

D. C. Mote (August): ;:ost extensive infestation of recent
years of the oak tree looprer. Practically 100 per cent of
oaks in Yamhill and Polk Counties have been completely
defoliated. Caterpillars 7oing into pupal stage- Sptember
,5. Reported by WV. J. Chamberlin.


PI

A PINE SA'7FLY (iTeodiprion sp.)
(".-odiorion s-.)
J. R. ".atson (September 24): A pine szvwfl, I'v asI sent in
from Perry v'r.ere it was defoliatinig southern longleaf pine
trees.

"''T'S SAFLY (Di2rrio.- abbotii Leach)

H. L. Bailt-y (2entember 23): A'ot' -'fly rortc- '
dama,7ing a whitet e pine plantation at Bart,.,










C[WO 3. ilendenhall (September 26): There has been an outbrec-.
of Abbot's pine sawfly at Sidney (Shelby County), attac'-ir..:
vw'hite pines.

PINE BAFR. APHID (Chermes pinicorticis Fitch)

.innesota H. 0. Putnam (September 8): The woolly aphid is very ab-indant
on ,-rhite pine in Fillmore County.


SPF:UCZ

?7.*. SA.FTFY (.- odiprion abietis Harr.)

a ii ne H. B. Peirson (September 10): The fir s_. fly is reported
in Georgetow-n. Adults are laying egg's in needles of red spruce
and fir.

SPIRUC2 UT,=V[L M.lifR (Taniva albolineana i.'c f.)

Ohio E. .viendenhall (--u.ust 29): -.e spruce nee2-ie miner is
generally infesting the soruce ever., r-:-ens in central .:-.
southern C.io. (September 5): I find snruce needle r.iner
on Posters blue s"e-_ e iv. onu of the nurseries a' Dc-'"-m..

A LLAF MNIMR (Ipinotie navnana Treit.)

iaine H. 3. Peirson (Septe-ber 25): I'.r spruc. .-:b;ocr.. is not so
b.'d as in previous years.


I 7 S -L T S A F Y- E C T I I17 5 R 4E N H 0GU K S I

0 R IT ;-. L E Y T I. L P L T S A .T: D L I NT N S

CI7wJ3 4,'H!ITY (-i:.ieurodes citri kshl.)

Georgia Oliver I. Snapp (September 8): Thr,,- -its are ver Jc''it
nov/. Considerable djT.r:-- has been done to privet and other
plantirn-s around houses, :t Fort Valley.

:Mississippi R. *' Harned and assistants (September): This insect is very
abundant on crer.e myrtle at Luced-le, -"._ on privet at ::atche:.

FLD..ER T;3IPS (Fran3tli'.iella tritici Fitch)

Ohio E. W. MIendenhcll (Septm.,-r 25): T'. rips infestation on
F:ladioli is quite bad. at Painesville, Lake County.


- 20-






-391-


Maine


Virginia


Arizona


Mississippi


Mississippi


ARBORVITAE

ARBORVITAE LEAF MINER (Argyresthia thuiella Pack.)

H. B. Peirson (September 20); The arborvitae leaf miner,
Recurvaria thujaella, is very prevalent in northern Maine.


BAY

LAUREL PSYLLID (Trioza alacris Flor.)

G. E. Gould (September 24): The laurel psyllid has been
reported from bay trees in Norfolk. The damage of this
insect is from the unsightly appearance of the infested tree
rather than any injury to the foliage.


CACTUS

COCHINEAL IiNSECT (Dactylopius tomentosus Lamarck)

C. D. Lebert (September 25): Severe infestations were found
on cholla cactus in two Phoenix cactus gardens. A small
lady beetle was feeding on the scale at both places.


CAINIA

LARGER CANNA LEAF ROLLER (Calpodes ethlius Cramer)

H. Dietrich (September 20): The larger canna leaf roller
is very abundant on cannas at Lucedale.

R. P. Colmer (September 20): The larger canna leaf roller
is very abundant in the vicinity of Pascagoula dand Moss Point.


CAMELLIA

BLACK CITRUS APHID (Toxoptera aurantiae Koch)

H. Dietrich (September 20): Aphids (Toxoptera aurantiae)
are abundant on Camellia japonica in a nursery at Lucedale.


CHRYSAIITHE U. ..

SOD }EB.0RMS (Crambus spp.)


Maryland


E. N. Cory (August 16): Sod webworms injured chrysanthemums
in one greenhouse in Baltimore County in mid-July. These
apparently came in with sod used in preparing the soil that
went into the bed.


















Virginia


-. -

CHRYS'.,T':,..i! LACEBUG (Corvthucha marmorata Uhl.)

R. ,'. Earned (September 22): Chrysanthemum leaves infested
with Corythucha rar.-orata were received from AlliGator on
September 4, and., from Natchez on Septert'b--r 8.




A LACEBUG (Corythucha cydoniae Fitch)

G. E. Gould (Septemter 24): This lacetbug has done considerable
damage to an ornamental Pyracantha or englishh hawthorn in
Norfolk.


HIBI SC.US

LFTTUCE BUG (Corizus hyalinus Fab.)


Mississippi


R. i. Harr.-d (September 22): Specimens were received on
August 23 from Perkinston where they were reported as abundant
on the seed pods of Hibiscus.


IVY

IVY SCALE (Aspidiotus hederae Vallot)


Virginia


G. E. Gould (September 24): The ivy scale is abundant in
Norfolk on English Ivy.


ROSE

ROSE STEi.: GIRDLER (Agrilus viridis L.)


Connecticut


M. P. Zappe (September 24); Borers attacking Rosa rurcsa.
R. multiflora, and R. hugonis; in only 1 case *..ere they attack-
ing tea roses, which are usually free from infestation.
Reported over the entire State more abundantly than ever
before observed in Connecticut.





-393-


I NSECT S ATTACK I NG MAN AND

D 0 1 Z S T I C A N I 1,T A L S



I.:OS'UITOS (Culex spp.).


Maryland


Missouri


General


J. A. Hyslop (September 15): In the southeastern part of
Montgomery County mosquitoes have been more troublesome than
any time in the past 10 years.

E. N. Cory (September 22): Mvosquitoes are very abnormally
abundant, especially Culex spp.

L. Haseman (September 24): A small species of Culex has
been unusually abundant and annoying through August and
September. In the vicinity of Columbia it has been breeding
abundantly in the streams and the adults have migrated into
the city in s.;arms. The small size of the species i'as made
it possible for it to pass through ordinary screens, and it
is therefore particularly annoying at r.iht.


r',G FLE AS (Ctenocephalus cenis Curt.)
CAT FLEAS (Ctenocephalus felis Bouche)


F. C. 3ishopp (September 28): About the usual nr-:,ior of
reports of house infestations of fleas have been received
this season, but the trouble has continued later than
ordinarily, probably owing to the warm ', weather. These reports
emanate mainly from the N1orth Atlantic States, with many from
the vicinity of 1ashington, D. C.


L -. WIZOW (LiWarodectus mactans Fab.)


d .95)sslssppl


P.. P. Colmer (September 20): A child at Lscatavwpa -,as made
ouite sick from the bite of the hourglass spider.


CATTLE

STABLE FLY (Stomoxys calcitrans L.)


General


F. C. Bishopp (September 2 12): Stable flies were observed
to be a severe annoyance to all classes of livestock in the
follow-ing localities: rpr.:ionton, Ogden, Salt Lake Oity, Utah;
Cheyenne W7ells, Colorado; H,-s, 2llsworth,Junction 3cy, "nd
l*anhattan, Kans. In eastern Colorado and western nsas the
stock :exe seen to be buncl-ed fighting stable an'. .:.rn flies
from early morning to sundo:-n, as a result of '.hicL t. '*sx
reduced flesh and a sharp decline in milk flow.







:OSE BOTFLY (Gastrothilus haem.orrhoidalis L.)


General


Maryland


Oregon


F. C. Bishopp (L-.ugust and September): The nose fly in
recent years has extended its range westward across ..cnt&r.a,
northern Idaho, and western Washington. It has also
become well established throughout most of .?yominrF, in
northern Colorado, and in northeastern UtI.


POULTRY

CHICKEN MITE (Dermanyssus gallinae Redi)

R. D. .c-&ne--r (September): Since September 1 there has been
a sharp decline in the number of mites in chicken houses in
Prince Georges County., It is now difficult to find any
infested premises.


WESTERN HEN FLEA (Ceratophyllus niger Fox)


F. C. Bishopu- (.August 30): The hen flea is causi.-.- Much
annoyance to poultry in this section, both on co=nzercial cn2
farm flocks. Apparently egg production and the condition
of the fowls are lowered, and the fleas are also annoyirni
to the people who attend to the poultry.


HOUSEHO LD AZiD STORED-

PRODUCT INSECTS

1I77S (Formicidae)


Mississippi


MI. R. Smith (September 22): .Ir. E. E. Byrd collected
specimens of what is believed to be Tetr-.moriuT. stritiderns
Emery, from the brick ';,ell of a store in the business section
of (rest Point. This is the second time that the s-'ecies has
been recorded from the United States. It was first taken in
this country at New Orleans by L. R. Barber in 1913.(W(heeler,
Jour. Econ. Ent., Vol. 1, pp. 566-570, 1916.) Accordin- to
Wheeler the ant is becoming widely distributed over c11 parts
of the world. G. W. haug states that Tetramoriu- uinc.;se
Fab. is common in the business section of Pascaioula. It
was observed craw..ling over vegetables in many stores there.
Recently we received speci!7ens from Ieely. ir. Haug states
that the crazy ant (Paratr-china loncicornis Latr.) is
unusually common in the business section of Gul'-ort.
Accord i,: to him the ants can be seen infesting: fruits -
veetables in the stores. Thc-y do not seem to infest me tc
especially. Recently J. P. iisl&nko1 has taken this ant at
igi,'ins. This is the first time t -t tLce svtcies .as beenr
recorded from any of our inland towns. native stecits, the





-395"


Mi ississippi


Indiana


i ssouri




Arizona


lion ant (Dorwwyrmex pyramicus Roger) has been complained
of a number of times as infesting houses. The ants are also
of some benefit because the- prey on fall wveb7;orms, corn ear
worms, grass wvorms, etc.

A WOCOD-BORINGO 2EETLL (Platyous compositus Say)

H. Diet'rich (September 20): Platypus compositus is very
abundant in hardwood logs in P-scagoula Svrzn, Geore County.
These logs were cut in the spring, drawn to the bank of Big
Creek, but because of low water were never floated away.

LA?.2 !-'L2 (Dermestes lardarius L.)

J. J. Davis (September 22): The larder beetle vjas reported
very destructive to home-cured hams at Huntington, September 13.

L. Haseman (September 24): Larder beetles have been reported
as very destructive on cured nets recently.

DRIL2D 7Jir BEETLE (Car-oohilus hemioterus L.)

0. D. Lebert (September 25): Numerous on and in some
California peaches at Phoenix store. :.any peaches xverc ret -a -d
and were unsalable.






3 1262 09244 5765"'