az Announcements relating to gypsy moth and brown-tail moth quarantine io. 45) . 3) _ ipa oe
a and brown-tail moth quarantine reguiations modified (B. E. P. by 386, seventh
J POVISION) enn rcs ts se es ee aaa ee gre ee
. Instructions to postmasters - : .. _-_....--- 2.2 2 ee
r : Announcements relating to white-fringed beetle quarantine (No. 72) --__-_----------__--..- seeped
White-fringed beetle quarantine revised. (press notice).2.<25.- 2d 244. o=-e ee
Revision cf quarantine and regulations effective December 28, 1942__._________________.----_
ieee Notice to general public through newspapers: _ 44-2 =~ = 5.42 22 ee ee
mm White-fringed beetle regulations modified (B. E. P. Q. 485, eleventh revision)__________- :
Announcement relating to Mexican borde1 regulations____.__.._....__--_.__-----_-.-_------ BS nd
: Instructions to collectors of customs (T. D. Vy | a oe eee
. Misceliavicous items _ aoe on a ee i = ee a
} ae ty import restrictions, Republic of Argentina (B. E. P. Q. 426, supplement
¥ On €) i denn oe eh eh oe ek ee ee oe oe nd oe ee ee eee
| Plant-quarantine import restrictions, British Congo (B. E. P. Q. 448, supplement No. 1). _-
tf’ List of current ouarantine and other restrictive orders and miscellaneous regulations-__________-
‘Terminal inspection ofplants and plant products_.J. .2ts21222 2:2 JI ee oe eee
4 Plants and plant products addressed to places in California___.._.___._.-_-___-___----------
Ps . California State plant quarantine modified. : 225.12. -.-52_41 ee i 2 ee es
y ts - Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act__...._____.__________.__--_------.-
7 Organization cf the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine ________________-_______----.---.- .
;
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S.R. A.—B. E. P. Q. No. 150. Issued June 1942

United States Department of Agriculture

BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS

JANUARY-MARCH 1942

CONTENTS

Page
Onnrinnneanceotlenouieallannolmeciments:. =.) 8.9.22) oa es 2p PTE a St 232 Se 1
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (No. 48)----_________--_----.------------- 1
Rawiseduarantine on Japanese Deetlei (press notice). =~ --_ =.= 9% - sy= = ese Soe eda 1
IRewision or recllationmenmecuye Ivearen 24, 1047 22 2 ii te ee 2
iotice-to =eneral pubne through newspapersoe s< -2.. Lo. ees eee te be esol 14
Announcements relating to Mexican fruitfly quarantine (No. 64) __-__________---___------------- 5
exacrciirusicilit barvest ex tenged. (press MOLice)=-!2 2! _2-.-"! 55 2243422. $5. ts ees 15
Mexican fruitfly regulations modified—harvesting season extended (B. E. P. Q. 521)______-- 15
Announcement relating to white-fringed beetle quarantine (No. 72) __________--___-------_----- 16

White-fringed beetle administrative instructions modified—treatments authorized (B. E.
ReOMDOsMIOULEMILOVISION) S24. ~29 soe. Ft e- Rue B lye Rees |e a Ape Ds ee bl 16
SNES STROUD TMT we oe ae oe A le Fo ie nh i ew ed Te ee eee eee gine ae eS pe ee 19
Wakeland to head Division of Grasshopper Control (press notice) _-__________--------------- 19
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Cuba (B. E. P. Q. 519, supplement INO: 123 19
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Burma (B. E. P. Q. 520) -__-__-__-____---------------- 20
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Ecuador (B. E. P. Q. 522)_______________- 23
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act__--___.__-__-_-_------------------- 25
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine_________________-__--------------- 27

QUARANTINE AND OTHER OFFICIAL
ANNOUNCEMENTS
ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE
(NO. 48)

REVISE QUARANTINE ON JAPANESE BEETLE
[Press notice ]

Marco 25, 1942.

The United States Department of Agriculture announced today that Japanese
beetle quarantine regulations have been revised, effective March 24, 1942.

Regulated areas have been extended to include relatively small sections in
Maryland, New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia. The new areas
include parts of the counties of Allegany and Washington, Md., the previously
unregulated parts of Carroll, Frederick, and Prince Georges Counties, Md., parts
of Ontario and Monroe Counties, N. Y., Meadville, Pa., Charlottesville, Danville,
Schoolfield, and Front Royal, Va., Paden City, and the magisterial district of
Lincoln in Tyler County, W. Va. These additions to- the regulated area are
made because numbers of beetles were found in these sections by scouts in 1941.

That part of the regulated area from which the movement of fruits and vege-
tables is under regulation—the more heavily infested area—has been extended
to include additional districts in Anne Arundel and Baltimore Counties, Md.,
and in Berks, Cumberland, Lehigh, Northampton, and York Counties, Pa. Char-
lottesville, Va., is now included with Toledo, Ohio, *n1 Winchester, Va., as
isolated regulated points to which fruit and vegetable shipments via refrigerator
car or motortruck may move only under certification. Shippers of cut flowers
located within the regulated area, but outside the heavily infested part, now are
not reauired to obtain certification for their shipments. Soil-free rooted cuttings
and fresh manure are exempt from certification under current regulations.

463802—42—— 1 1



2 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE — [Jan.—Mar.

B. E. P. Q.—Q. 48. Revision of Regulations
Effective March 24, 1942

TITLE 7—AGRICULTURE
CHAPTER IITI—BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE
PArtT 301—DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES

JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE

INTRODUCTORY NOTE

In the current revision of the Japanese beetle quarantine regulations, relatively
small extensions of regulated areas are made in Maryland, New York, Pennsyl-
vania, Virginia, and West Virginia. Additions to the regulated area in Mary-
land include portions of the counties of Allegany and Washington, and the
previously unregulated portions of the counties of Carroll, Frederick, and Prince
Georges. In New York, the town of Manchester, Ontario County, and the town
of Pittsford and village of East Rochester, in Monroe County, are brought under
regulation. Extension of the Pennsylvania regulated area is limited to the city
of Meadville, in Crawford County. The cities of Charlottesville and Danville,
the village of Schoolfield in Pittsylvania County, and the town of Front Royal
in Warren County, Va., are added to the regulated area. The area in Warwick
County, Va., has been slightly increased and described as the magisterial district
of Newport, which includes the Camp Stuart locality heretofore under regulation.
An addition to the West Virginia area was made by the inclusion of the magis-
terial district of Lincoln, Tyler County, and the town of Paden City, in Tyler and
Wetzel Counties.

Areas from which the movement of fruits and vegetables is regulated
(§ 301.48-5) have been further extended to include additional election districts
and towns in Anne Arundel and Baltimore Counties, Md., and Berks, Cumber-
land, Lehigh, Northampton, and York Counties, Pa. Charlottesville, Va., is now
included with Toledo, Ohio, and Winchester, Va., as isolated regulated points
to which fruit and vegetable shipments via refrigerator car or motortruck
may move only under certification.

Soil-free rooted cuttings and fresh manure have been added to the list of
exempted articles, and the special labeling requirements previously prescribed
for containers of certain exempted articles have been removed.

Restrictions on the movement of cut flowers are now confined to shipments
moving from the heavily infested area interstate to points outside the regulated
areas. This heavily infested area (§ 301.485) is that from which the move-
ment of fruits and vegetables is also restricted. This will relieve shippers of
cut flowers located within the regulated area, but outside the heavily infested
portion, from the necessity of obtaining certification for their shipments.

Minor changes have been made in § 301.48-6 relating to the maintenance of a
classified status at an infested nursery or greenhouse.

Authorization for the issuance of permits for the movement via motortruck
of all restricied articles from a regulated area through a nonregulated area
to another regulated area has been restored.

This revision supersedes the rules and regulations supplemental to the revi-
sion of Notice of Quarantine No. 48, which became effective February 12,
1941, as amended by administrative instructions (B. E. P. Q. 513), effective
April 21, 1941.

SUMMARY

Unless a certificate has been issued, these regulations, as now revised, pro-
hibit the interstate movement between June 15 and October 15 (between June
1 and October 15 in the case of Accomac and Northampton Counties, Va.) of
all fruits and vegetables by refrigerator car or motortruck and cut flowers by
any mode of transportation, from the District of Columbia, the State of
Delaware, and parts of Maryland, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and -Virginia, as
defined in § 301.48-5, to or through points outside the regulated areas as
defined in § 301.48—3.

Also restricted in the regulations is the interstate movement of plants, sand,
soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure from any part of the regniated areas to



1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS m

or through any outside point throughout the year unless a Federal permit or
certificate has been obtained. For details and exceptions see §§ 301.48-6 and 7.

Included in the regulated areas are the District of Columbia, the entire States
of Connecticut, Delaware, Massachusetts, New Jersey, and Rhode Island, and
parts of Maine, Maryland, New Hampshire, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania,
Vermont, Virginia, and West Virginia, as described in § 301.48—8.

These regulations also specify the conditions governing the protection of
restricted articles from infestation while in transit (§ 301.48-8), require thor-
ough cleaning of vehicles, containers, and refrigerator cars which have been
used in transportating restricted products (§§ 301.48-—5 and 13), and provide
other safeguards and conditions, as specified in the regulations.

To obtain permits and certificates, address the Bureau of Entomology and
Plant Quarantine, 266 Glenwood Avenue, Bloomfield, N. J., or the nearest
branch office listed in the appendix.

DETERMINATION OF THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE

The Secretary of Agriculture, having determined that it was necessary to
quarantine the States of Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Maryland, Massachu-
setts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Is-
land, Vermont, Virginia, and West Virginia, and the District of Columbia, to
prevent the spread of the Japanese beetle (Popillia japonica Newm.), a danger-
ous. insect new to and not theretofore widely prevalent or distributed within
and throughout the United States, and having given the public hearing required
by law, promulgated the thirteenth revision of Notice of Quarantine 301.48,
part 301, chapter III, title 7, Code of Federal Regulations, and rules and regu-
lations supplemental thereto, governing the movement of (1) fruits and vege-
tables; (2) nursery, ornamental, and greenhouse stock, and other plants; and
(3) sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure, from any of the above-
named States or the District of Columbia, into or through any other State
or Territory or District of the United States, §§ 301.48-1 to 14, inclusive, part
301, chapter III, title 7, Code of Federal Regulations [B. E. P. Q.—Q. 48, effec-
tive on and after February 12, 1941].

I have determined that it is necessary to revise the aforesaid rules and regu-
lations for the purpose of extending the regulated areas owing to the dis-
covery of substantial infestations of the Japanese beetle in additional sections,
and to make other modifications.

ORDER OF THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE

Pursuant to the authority conferred upon the Secretary of Agriculture by
section 8 of the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912, as amended (7
U. S. C. 161), the subpart entitled “Japanese Beetle” of part 301, chapter ITI,
title 7, Code of Federal Regulations [B. E. P. Q.—Q. 48, as revised] is hereby
revised effective March 24, 1942, to read as follows:

SUBPART—JAPANESB BEETLE
QUARANTINE

§ 301.48. Notice of quarantine—Under the authority conferred by section 8 of
the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912, as amended (7 U. S. C. 161), I
do quarantine the States of Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Maryland, Massa-
chusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode
Island, Vermont, Virginia, and West Virginia, and the District of Columbia,
to prevent the spread of the Japanese beetle. Hereafter (1) fruits and vege-
tables; (2) nursery, ornamehtal, and greenhouse stock, and other plants; and
(3) sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure, shall not be shipped, offered
for shipment to a common carrier, received for transportation or transported
by a common earrier, or carried, transported, moved, or allowed to be moved
from any of said quarantined States or District into or through any other
State or Territory or District of the United States in manner or method or
under conditions other than those prescribed in the rules and regulations herein-
after made and amendments thereto: Provided, That the restrictions of this
quarantine and of the rules and regulations supplemental thereto may be limited
to the areas in a quarantined State now, or which may hereafter be, designated
by the Secretary of Agriculture as regulated areas when, in the judgment of
the Secretary of Agriculture, the enforcement of the aforesaid rules and



4 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE — [Jan.—Mar.

regulations as to such regulated areas shall be adequate to prevent the spread
of the Japanese beetle: Provided further, That such limitations shall be con-
ditioned upon the said State providing for and enforcing such control measures
with respect to such regulated areas as, in the judgment of the Secretary of
Agriculture, shall be deemed adequate to prevent the spread of the Japanese
beetle therefrom to other parts of the State: And provided further, That cer-
tain articles classed as restricted herein may, because of the nature of their
growth or production or their manufactured or processed condition, be exempted
by administrative instructions issued by the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology
and Plant Quarantine when, in his judgment, such articles are considered in-
nocuous as carriers of infestation: And provided further, That whenever, in
any year, the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine shall
find that facts exist as to the pest risk involved in the movement of one or
more of the articles to which the regulations supplemental hereto apply, making
it safe to modify, by making less stringent, the restrictions contained in any
such regulations, he shall set forth and publish such finding in administrative
instructions, specifying the manner in which the applicable regulation should
be made less stringent, whereupon such modification shall become effective,
for such period and for such regulated area or portion thereof as shall be
specified in said administrative instructions, and every reasonable effort shall
be made to give publicity to such administrative instructions throughout the
affected areas.’

RULES AND REGULATIONS
Meaning of Terms

§ 301.48-1. Definitions—For the purpose of these regulations the following
words, names, and terms shall be construed, respectively, to mean:

(a) Japanese beetle-—The insect known as the Japanese beetle (Popillia
japonica Newm.), in any stage of development.

(b) Infested, infestation.—The terms “infested,” “infestation,” and the like,
relate to infestation with the Japanese beetle.

(c) Quarantined area.—Any State or District quarantined by the Secretary
of Agriculture to prevent the spread of the Japanese beetle.

(d) Regulated area.—Any area in a quarantined State or District which is
now, or which may hereafter be, designated as such by the Secretary of
Agriculture in accordance with the provisos of § 301.48, as revised.

(e) Fruits and vegetables—For the list of restricted fruits and vegetables
see § 301.48-5.

(f) Nursery and ornamental stock.—Nursery, ornamental, and greenhouse
stock, and all other plants, plant roots, cut flowers, or other portions of plants.

(zg) Sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure.—Sand, soil, earth, peat,
compost, or manure of any kind and as to either bulk movement or in connec-
tion with farm products or nursery and ornamental stock.

(h) Certified sand, soil, earth. peat, compost, and manure.—Sand, soil, earth,
peat, compost, or manure determined by the inspector as uninfested and so
certified.

(i) Certified greenhouse-—A greenhouse or similar establishment which has
complied to the satisfaction of the inspector with the conditions imposed in
§ 301.48-6. This term may apply also to potting beds, heeling-in areas, hot-
beds, coldframes, or similar plots or to storage houses, packing sheds, or
stores treated or otherwise safeguarded in manner and method satisfactory to
the inspector.

(j) Inspector.—An inspector of the United States Department of Agriculture.

(k) Moved interstate.—Shipped, offered for shipment to a common carrier,
received for transportation or transported by a common carrier, or carried,
transported, moved or allowed to be moved from one State or Territory or
District of the United States into or through any other State or Territory or
District.

(1) Certificate—A valid form evidencing compliance with the requirements
of these regulations as to movement of restricted articles to Logan outside the
regulated areas.

(m) Permit.—A valid form authorizing movement of restricted articles from
a regulated area to a restricted destination in a separate regulated area.

1§§ 301.48 to 301.48—-14 inclusive, issued under the authority contained in sec. 8, 39
Stat. 1165, 44 Stat. 250; 7 U.S. C. 161.



1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 5

Limitation of Restrictions

§ 301.48-2. Limitation of restrictions to regulated areas.—Conditioned upon the
compliance on the part of the State concerned with the provisos to § 301.48, the
restrictions provided in these regulations on the interstate movement of plants
and plant products and other articles enumerated in said § 301.48 will be limited to
such movement from the area in such State now or hereafter designated by the
Secretary of Agriculture as regulated areas.

Areas under Regulation

§ 301.48-3. Regulated areas.—In accordance with the provisos to § 391.48, the
Secretary of Agriculture designates as regulated areas for the purpose of these
regulations the States, District, counties, townships, towns, cities, election dis-
tricts, and magisterial districts listed below, including all cities, towns, boroughs,
or other political subdivisions within their limits:

Connecticut.—The entire State.

Delaivare.—-The entire State.

District of Columbia.—The entire District.

Maine.—County of York; towns of Auburn and Lewiston, in Androscoggin
County; towns of Cape Elizabeth, Gorham, Gray, New Gloucester, Raymond,
Scarboro, Standish, and the cities of Portland, South Portland, Westbrook, and
Windham, in Cumberiand County; the city of Waterville, in Kennebec County;
and the city of Brewer, in Penobscot County.

Maryland.—Counties of Baltimore, Caroline, Carroll, Cecil, Frederick, Harford,
Howard, Kent, Montgomery, Prince Georges, Queen Annes, Somerset, Talbot,
Wicomico, and Worcester; the city of Baltimore; the city of Cumberland, the
town of Frostburg, and election districts Nos. 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 11, 12, 138, 14, 22, 23,
24, 26, 28, 29, 31, and 32, in Allegany County; the city of Annapolis, and election
districts Nos. 2, 3, 4, and 5, in Anne Arundel County; election districts of La
Plata (No. 1), Pomonkey (No. 7), and White Plains (No. 6), in Charles County;
election districts of Cambridge (No. 7), Church Creek (No. 9), East New Market
(No. 2), Fork (No. 1), Hurlock (No. 15), Vienna (No. 3), and Williamsburg
(No. 12), in Dorchester County; all of Washington County except the election
districts of Hancock (No.5) and Indian Spring (No. 15).

Massachusetts.—The entire State.

New Hampshire.—Counties of Belknap, Cheshire, Hillsboro, Merrimack, Rock-
ingham, Strafford, and Sullivan ; towns of Brookfield, Eaton, Effingham, Freedom,
Madison, Moultonboro, Ossipee, Sandwich, Tamworth, Tuftonboro, Wakefield, and
Wolfeboro, in Carroll County; towns of Alexandria, Ashland, Bridgewater,
Bristol, Canaan, Dorchester, Enfield, Grafton, Groton, Hanover, Hebron, Holder-
ness, Lebanon, Lyme, Orange, and Plymouth, in Grafton County.

New Jersey.—The entire State.

New York.—Counties of Albany, Bronx, Broome, Chemung, Chenango, Colum-
bia, Cortland, Delaware, Dutchess, Fulton, Greene, Kings, Madison, Montgomery,
Nassau, New York, Oneida, Onondaga, Orange, Otsego, Putnam, Queens, Rens-
selaer, Richmond, Rockland, Saratoga, Schenectady, Schoharie, Suffolk, Sullivan,
Tioga, Ulster, Washington, and Westchester ; towns of Red House and Salamanca,
and the city of Salamanca, in Cattaraugus County; city of Auburn and the towns
of Fleming, Owasco, and Sennett, in Cayuga County; towns of Amherst, Cheek-
towaga, and Tonawanda, and the cities of Buffalo and Lackawanna, in Hrie
County: towns of Columbia, Danube, Fairfield, Frankfort, German Flats, Herki-
mer, Litchfield, Little Falls, Manheim, Newport, Salisbury, Schuyler, Stark,
Warren, and Winfield, and the city of Little Falls, in Herkimer County; town
of Watertown and city of Watertown, in Jefferson County; town of Mount Morris
and village of Mount Morris, in Livingston County; city of Rochester, towns of
Brighton and Pittsford, and village of East Rochester, in Monroe County; town
of Manchester, in Ontario County; towns of Catharine, Cayuta, Dix, Hector,
Montour, and Reading, and the borough of Watkins Glen, in Schuyler County:
towns of Caton, Corning, Erwin, Hornby, and Hornellsville, and the cities of
Corning and Hornell, in Steuben County; towns of Caroline, Danby, Dryden,
Enfi>'d, Ithaca, Newfield, and the city of Ithaca, in Tomnkins County; towns of
Luzerne and Queensbury and the city of Glens Falls, in Warren County.

Ohio.—Counties of Belmont, Carrol, Columbiana, Cuyahoga, Guernsey, Har-
rison, Jefferson, Mahoning, Medina, Portage, Stark, Summit, Tuscarawas, and
Wayne; the city of Coshocton, in Coshocton County; the city of Columbus, and



6 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE — [Jan.—Mar.

villages of Bexley, Grandview, Grandview Heights, Hanford, Marble Cliff, and
Upper Arlington, in Franklin County; townships of Kirtland, Mentor, and Wil-
loughby, and the villages of Kirtland Hills, Lakeline, Mentor, Mentor-on-the-
Lake, Waite Hill, Wickliffe, Willoughby, and Willowick, in Lake County; the
township of Newark and city of Newark, in Licking County; the city of Toledo,
in Lucas County; the township of Madison and the city of Mansfield, in Richland
County; townships of Bazetta, Braceville, Brookfield, Champion, Fowler, Hart-
ford, Howland, Hubbard, Liberty, Lordstown, Newton, Southington, Warren,
Weathersfield, and Vienna, the cities of Niles and Warren, and the villages of
Cortland, Girard, Hubbard, McDonald, Newton Falls, and Orangeville, in
Trumbull County.

Pennsylvania.—The entire State except the townships of Athens, Beaver, Bloom-
field, Cambridge, Conneaut, Cussewago, East Fairfield, East Fallowfield, East
Mead, Fairfield, Greenwood, Hayfield, North Shenango, Pine, Randolph, Rich-
mond, Rockdale, Sadsbury, South Shenango, Spring, Steuben, Summerhill, Summit,
Troy, Union, Venango, Vernon, Wayne, West Fallowfield, West Mead, West She-
nango, and Woodcock, the boroughs of Blooming Valley, Cambridge Springs, Coch-
ranton, Conneaut Lake, Conneautville, Geneva, Linesville, Saegerstown, Spring-
boro, Townville, Venango, and Woodcock, in Crawford County; the townships of
Amity, Conneaut, Elk Creek, Fairview, Franklin, Girard, Greene, Greenfield,
Harborcreek, Lawrence Park, Le Boeuf, McKean, North East, Springfield, Summit,
Union, Venango, Washington, and Waterford, and the boroughs of Albion, Cranes-
ville, East Springfield, Edinboro, Fairview. Girard, Middleboro, Mill Village, North
East, North Girard, Platea, Union City, Waterford, Wattsburg, and Wesleyville,
in Erie County; the townships of Deer Creek, Delaware, Fairview, French Creek,
Greene, Hempfield, Lake, Mill Creek, New Vernon, Otter Creek, Perry, Pymatun-
ing, Salem, Sandy Creek, Sandy Lake, South Pymatuning, Sugar Grove, and West
Salem, and the boroughs of Clarksville, Fredonia, Greenville, Jamestown, New
Lebanon, Sandy Lake, Sheakleyville, and Stoneboro, in Mercer County.

Rhode Island.—The entire State.

Vermont.—Counties of Bennington, Rutland, Windham, and Windsor; and the
town of Burlington, in Chittenden County.

Virginia.—Counties of Accomac, Arlington, Culpeper, Elizabeth City, Fairfax,
Fauquier, Henrico, Loudoun, Norfolk, Northampton, Prince William, Princess Anne,
and Stafford; magisterial districts of Bermuda, Dale, Manchester, and Matoaca,
in Chesterfield County; town of Emporia, in Greensville County; magisterial dis-
trict of Sleepy Hole, in Nansemond County; village of Schoolfield, in Pittsylvania
County; magisterial districts of Hampton, Jackson, and Wakefield, in Rappa-
hannock County; magisterial district of Courtland, in Spotsylvania County;
town of Front Royal, in Warren County; magisterial district of Newport, in
Warwick County; magisterial district of Washington, in Westmoreland County;
and the cities of Alexandria, Charlottesville, Danville, Fredericksburg, Hampton,
Newport News, Norfolk, Petersburg, Portsmouth, Richmond, South Norfolk,
Suffolk, and Winchester. ;

West Virginia.—Counties of Brooke, Hancock, Harrison, Jefferson, Marion,
Monongalia, Ohio, and Taylor; magisterial districts of Arden, Falling Waters,
Hedgesville, and Opequon and the city of Martinsburg, in Berkeley County; the
city of Charleston, in Kanawha County ; magisterial districts of Sand Hill, Union,
Washington, and Webster, in Marshall County; town of Keyser and magisterial
district of Frankfort, in Mineral County; magisterial district of Lincoln, in Tyler
County; town of Paden City, in Tyler and Wetzel Counties ; and the city of Parkers-
burg, and magisterial districts of Lubeck and Tygart, in Wood County.

Changes in Regulated Areas

§ 301.484. Extension or reduction of regulated areas.—The regulated areas
designated in § 301.48-3 may be extended or reduced as may be found advisable by
the Secretary of Agriculture. Due notice of any extension or reduction and the
areas affected thereby will be given in writing to the transportation companies
doing business in or through the States in which such areas are located and by
publication in one or more newspapers selected by the Secretary of Agriculture
within the States in which the areas affected are located.

Movement of Fruits and Vegetables

§ 301.48-5. Restrictions on the movement of fruits and vegetables.—(a) Con-
trol of movement.—(1) Unless a certificate shall have been issued therefor, by an



1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS i

inspector, except as provided in subdivisions (i) to (iv), inclusive, of this section,
no fruits or vegetables of any kind shall be moved interstate via refrigerator car
or motortruck from any of the areas listed below to or through any point outside
the regulated areas:

Delaware.—The entire State.

District of Colunvbia.—The entire District.

Maryland.—Counties of Baltimore, Cecil, Harford, Kent, Queen Annes, Somer-
set, and Worcester; election districts Nos. 8, 4 and 5, in Anne Arundel County;
the city of Baltimore; all of Caroline County except election districts of American
Corners (No. 8), and Hillsboro (No. 6) ; election districts of Cambridge (No. 7),
Hast New Market (No. 2), Hurlock (No. 15), and Williamsburg (No. 12), in
Dorchester County; election districts of Elk Ridge (No. 1), and Ellicott City (No.
2), in Howard County; election districts of Camden (No. 13), Delmar (No. 11),
Dennis (No. 6), Fruitland (No. 16), Nutters (No. 8), Parsons (No. 5), Pittsburg
(No. 4), Salisbury (No. 9), Trappe (No. 7), and Willard (No. 14), and the town
of Salisbury, in Wicomico County.

New Jersey.—Counties of Atlantic, Burlington, Camden, Cape May, Cumberland,
Essex, Gloucester, Hudson, Hunterdon, Mercer, Middlesex, Monmouth, Ocean,
Salem, Somerset, and Union; townships of Lodi, Lyndhurst, Overpeck, Rochelle
Park, Saddle River, and Teaneck, the cities of Englewood, Garfield, and Hacken-
sack, and the boroughs of Bogota, Carlstadt, Cliffside Park, East Paterson, East
Rutherford, Edgewater, Englewood Cliffs, Fair Lawn, Fairview, Fort Lee, Glenn
Rock, Hasbrouck Heights, Leonia, Little Ferry, Lodi, Maywood, Moonachie, North
Arlington, Palisades Park, Ridgefield, Rutherford, Teterboro, Wallington, and
Wood Ridge, in Bergen County; townships of Chatham, Chester, Denville, East
Hanover, Hanover, Harding, Menham, Morris, Morristown, Parsippany-Troy Hills,
Passaic, Randolph, and Washington, and the boroughs of Chatham, Florham Park,
Madison, Mendham, and Morris Plains, in Morris County ; township of Little Falls,
the cities of Clifton, Passaic, Paterson, and the boroughs of Haledon, Hawthorne,
North Haledon, Prospect Park, Totowa, and West Paterson, in Passaic County ;
townships of Franklin, Greenwich, Lopatcong, Mansfield, Phillipsburg, Pohatcong,
and Washington, and the boroughs of Alpha and Washington, in Warren County.

Pennsylvania.—Counties ef Bucks, Chester, Delaware, Lancaster, Montgomery,
and Philadelphia; all of Berks County except the townships of Albany, Bethel,
Centre, Greenwich, Jefferson, Marion, North Heidelberg, Penn, Perry, Tilden,
Tulpehocken, Upper Bern, Upper Tulpehocken, and Windsor, and the boroughs
of Bernville, Centreport, Hamburg, Lenhartsville, Shoemakersville, Strausstown,
and West Leesport ; townships of Lower Allen and Upper Allen, and boroughs of
Lemoyne, Mechanicsburg, and New Cumberland, in Cumberland County; town-
ships of Londonderry, Lower Paxton, Lower Swatara, Susquehanna, and Swatara,
the city of Harrisburg, and the boroughs of Highspire, Middletown, Paxtang, Pen-
brook, Royalton, and Steelton, in Dauphin County; all of Lehigh County except
the townships of Heidelberg, Lowhill, Lynn, Washington, and Weisenberg, and
borough of Slatington; all of Northampton County except the townships of
Bushkill, Lehigh, Moore, Plainfield, Upper Mount Bethel, and Washington, and
boroughs of Bangor, Chapman, East Bangor, Pen Argyl, Portland, Roseto,
Stockertown, Walnutport, and Wind Gap; and the townships of Chanceford,
Conewago, East Hopewell, East Manchester, Fairview, Fawn, Hellam, Hopewell,
Lower Chanceford, Lower Windsor, Manchester, Newberry, Peach Bottom, and
Springetsbury, the city of York, and the boroughs of Cross Roads, Delta, East
Prospect, Fawn Grove, Goldsboro, Hallam, Lewisberry, Manchester, Mount Wolf,
North York, Stewartstown, Wrightsville, Yorkana, and York Haven, in York
County.

Virginia.—Counties of Accomac, Arlington, and Northampton.

Provided, That shipments of fruits and vegetables moving interstate from the
area specified in paragraph (a) (1) of this section to other points in the regulated
area and subsequently diverted to points outside the regulated area, shall be
regarded as direct shipments from the points of origin. As such they require
certification :

Provided further, That the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quar-
antine may by administrative instructions extend or reduce the areas specified in
this section when in his judgment such action is considered advisable.

(i) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of fruits and vege-
tables between October 16 and June 14, inclusive, except that in the case of move-
ment interstate from the following areas, the exemption applies only during the
period from October 16 to May 31, inclusive:

Virginia.—The counties of Accomac and Northampton.



S BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE © [Jan.—Mar.

(ii) No certificate or permit will be required for the interstate movement of
fruits and vegetables when transported by a common earrier on a through bill of
lading either from a point outside the area designated in this section through that
area to another outside point, or from the area designated in this section through
a nonregulated area to another regulated area, except that a certificate is required
for interstate movement from the area specified in paragraph (a) (1) of this
section to Toledo, Ohio, and Charlottesville and Winchester, Va.

(iii) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of fruits and vege-
tables when they shall have been manufactured or processed in such a manner
that in the judgment of the inspector no infestation could be transmitted.

(iv) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of fruits and vege-
tables from the area listed in paragraph (a) (1) of this section to the remainder
of the regulated area, other than as specified in subdivision (ii) of this section.

(b) Conditions of certification.—Certificates may be issued for the interstate
movement of fruits and vegetables between June 15 and October 15, inclusive (or
between June 1 and October 15, inclusive, when consigned from Accomae County
or Northampton County, Va.) under one of the following conditions:

(1) When the fruits and vegetables moving by motortruck have actually been
inspected by the United States Department of Agriculture and found free from
infestation. The number of inspection points for such certification will be limited
and their location determined by shipping needs and furtber conditioned on the
establishment at such points of provisions satisfactory to the inspector for the
handling and safeguarding of such shipments during inspection. Such inspection
may be discontinued and certification withheld by the inspector during periods of
general or unusual flight of the beetles.

(2) When the fruits and vegetables have been handled or treated under the
observation of an inspector in manner and by method to free them from any
infestation.

(8) When the fruits and vegetables have originated outside the areas desig-
nated in this section, and are to be reshipped directly from freight yards, transfer
points, or unloading docks within such areas, under provisions satisfactory to the
inspector for safeguarding of such shipments pending certification and reship-
ment. Certificates on this basis will be issued without inspection only in cases
where, in the judgment of the inspector, the shipments concerned have not been
exposed to infestation while within such freight yards, transfer points, or unload-
ing docks.

(4) When the fruits and vegetables were grown in districts where the fact
has been established to the satisfaction of the inspector that no infestation exists
and are to be shipped directly from the farms where grown to points outside the
areas designated in paragraph (a) (1) of this section, or are shipped from in-
fested districts where the fact has been established to the satisfaction of the
inspector that the Japanese beetle has not begun or has ceased its flight.

(5) When the fruits and vegetables moving via refrigerator car from the area
designated in this section have been inspected and loaded in a manner to prevent
infestation, in a refrigerator car with closed or adequately screened doors and
hatches, which car prior to loading has been determined by an inspector as fumi-
gated or thoroughly swept and cleaned by the common carrier in a manner to rid
it of infestation. During the interval between fumigation or cleaning and load-
ing, such refrigerator car must be tightly closed and sealed. (For further re-
quirements on the cleaning of refrigerator cars, see § 301.48-13. )

(6) When the fruits and vegetables moving via refrigerator car from the area
designated in this section have been fumigated in the car, when deemed necessary
in the judgment of the inspector, and when the doors and hetches of the car have
been tightly closed or adequately screened under the supervision of an inspector.

Movement of Nursery and Ornamental Stock

§ 801 48-6. Restrictions on the movement of nursery and crnamental stock.—
(a) Control of movement.—Nursery and ornamental stock as defined in
§ 301.48-1 shall not be moved interstate from the regulated areas to or through
any point outside thereof, unless a certificate or permit shall have been issued
therefor by the inspector except as follows:

(1) The following articles, because of their growth or production, or their
manufactured or processed condition, are considered innocuous as carriers of
infestation and are, therefore, exempt from the requirements of certification.

(i) True bulbs, corms, and tubers, when dormant, except for storage growth,
and when free from soil; and single dahlia tubers or small dahlia root divisions



1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 9

when free from stems, cavities, and soil. Dahlia tubers, other than single tubers
or small root divisions meeting these conditions, require certification.

(ii) Cut orchids; orchid plants when growing exclusively in Osmunda fiber ;
Osmunda fiber, Osmundine, or orchid peat (Osmunda cinnamomeéa and
O. claytoniana).

(iii) (a) Floral designs or “set pieces,” including wreaths, sprays, casket
covers, and all formal florists’ designs ; bouquets and cut flowers not so prepared
are not exempted; (0) trailing arbutus, or Mayflower (Hpigaea repens), when
free from soil, and when shipped during the period between October 16 and June
14, inclusive.

(iv) (a) Herbarium specimens, when dried, pressed, and treated; (0) mush-
room spawn, in brick, flakes, or pure culture form.

(v) (@) Sheet moss (Calliergon schriberi and Thuridium recognitum) ; (db)
resurrection plant or bird’s-nest moss (Selaginella lepidophylla) ; (¢) sphagnum
moss, bog moss, or peat moss (Sphagnaceae) ; (d@) dyed moss.

(vi) Soil-free dried roots incapabie of propagation.

(vii) Soil-free rooted cuttings.

(2) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of nursery and
ornamental stock imported from foreign countries when reshipped from the
port of entry in the unopened original container and labeled as to each con-
tainer with a copy certificate of the cduntry from which it was exported, a
statement of the general nature and quantity of the contents, the name and
address of the consignee, and the country and locality where grown.

(3) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of soil-free aquatic
plants, and of portions of plants without roots.and free from soil, except that
a certificate is required during the period June 15 to October 15, inclusive (or
between June 1 and October 15, inclusive, when consigned from Accomac County
or Northampton County, Va.), for the movement of cut flowers from the area
designated in § 3801.48-5 interstate to points outside the regulated areas
(§ 301.48-38).

(4) No certificate or permit will be required for the interstate movement of
nursery and ornamental stock when transported by a common carrier on a
through bill of lading either from an area not under regulation through a regu-
lated area, or from a regulated area through a nonregulated area to another
regulated area.

(b) Conditions governing the issuance of certificates and permits.—For the
purpose of certification of nursery and ornamental stock, nurseries, greenhouses,
and other premises concerned in the movement of such stock will be classified
as follows:

(1) Class I.—Nurseries, greenhouses, and other premises concerned in the
movement of nursery and ornamental stock on or within approximately 500
feet of which no infestation has been found may be classified as class I. Upon
compliance with the requirements of paragraph (b) (7) of this section nursery
and ornamental stock may be certified by the inspector for shipment from such
premises without further inspection, and without meeting the safeguards pre-
scribed as a condition of interstate shipment of plants originating in nurseries
or greenhouses of class IIL..

(2) Class I/J.—(i) Nurseries, greenhouses, and other premises concerned in
the movement of nursery and ornamental stock on which either grubs in the
soil or one or more beetles have been found, will be classified as class III,
provided there are maintained on the premises subdivided class I areas, certified
houses, frames, or plots or other certified areas. Such classification will not
be granted to nurseries, greenhouses, and other premises that do not maintain
certified or subdivided areas and require only infrequent certification. Such
classification also may be given to nurseries, etc., where one or more beetles or
grubs are found in the immediate proximity (within approximately 500 feet) of
such nurseries, etc., on adjacent property or properties. In the case of nursery
properties under single ownership and management but represented by parcels
of land widely separated, such parcels may be independently classified either
as class [ or class III upon compliance with such conditions and safeguards as
shall be required by the inspector. Similarly, unit nursery properties, which
would otherwise fall in class III, may be open to subdivision, for the purpose
of rating such subdivisions in classes I or III, when in the judgment of the
inspector such action is warranted by scanty infestation limited to a portion
of the nursery concerned: Provided, That the subdivision containing the infesta-
tion shall be clearly marked by boundaries of a permanent nature which shall
be approximately 500 feet beyond the point where the infestation occurs.

463802—42 2





10 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.—Mar.

(ii) Upon compliance with paragraphs (b) (3), (6), and (7) of this section,
nursery and ornamental stock may be certified by the inspector for shipment
from such premises under any one of the following conditions: (@) That the
roots shall be treated by means approved by the Bureau of Entomology and
Plant Quarantine in manner and by method satisfactory to the inspector; or
(b) in the case of plants in which the root system is such that a thorough in-
spection may be made, that the soil shall be entirely removed from the stock by
shaking or washing; or (c) that it shall be shown by evidence satisfactory to
the inspector that the plants concerned were produced in a certified greenhouse.

(83) Greenhouses of class III may be certified upon compliance with all the
following conditions with respect to the greenhouses themselves and to all pot-
ting beds, heeling-in areas, hotbeds, coldframes, and similar plots;

(i) Ventilators, doors, and all other openings in greenhouses or coldframes on
premises in class III shall be kept screened in manner satisfactory to the in-
spector during the period of flight of the beetle, namely, south of the northern
boundaries of Maryland and Delaware between June 1 and October 1, inclusive,
or north thereof between June 15 and October 15, inclusive.

(ii) Prior to introduction into nurseries or greenhouses, sand, if contaminated
with vegetable matter, soil, earth, peat, compost, or manure taken from infested
locations or which may have been exposed to infestation, must be sterilized or
fumigated under the direction and supervision of, and in manner and by method
satisfactory to, the inspector. If such sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, or manure
is not to be immediately used in such greenhouses, it must be protected from
possible infestation in manner and by method satisfactory to the inspector.

(iii) All potted plants placed in certified greenhouses of class III and all
potted plants to be certified for interstate movement therefrom (a) shall be
potted in certified soil; (0) Shall, if grown outdoors south of the northern
boundaries of Maryland and Delaware at any time between June 1 and October
1, inclusive, or north thereof at any time between June 15 and October 15,
inclusive, be kept in screened frames while outdoors; (c) shall, if grown outdoors
during any part of the year, be placed in beds in which the soil or other mate-
rial shall have been treated in manner and by method approved by the Bureau
of Entomology and Plant Quarantine to eliminate infestation; and (d) shall
comply with such other safeguards as may be required by the inspector.

(4) Cut flowers may be certified for movement either (i) when they have been
inspected by an inspector and found free from infestation, or (ii) when they
have been grown on a class I establishment or in a certified greenhouse of class
III and are transported under such safeguards as will in the judgment of the
inspector prevent infestation. (See also paragraph (a) (8) of this section.)

(5) Nursery and ornamental stock originating on or moved from unclassified
premises may be certified by the inspector under either one of the following
conditions: (i) That the soil shall be entirely removed from the stock, or (ii)
that the roots shall be treated by means approved by the Bureau of Entomology
and Plant Quarantine in manner and by method satisfactory to the inspector,
or (iii) that it shall be shown by evidence satisfactory to the inspector that the
accompanying soil was obtained at such points and under such conditions that
in his judgment no infestation could exist therein.

(6) Nurserymen, florists, dealers, and others, in order to maintain a class III
status, shall report immediately on forms provided for that purpose all their
sales or shipments of nursery and ornamental stock, sand, if contaminated with
vegetable matter, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure both to points outside
the regulated areas and to other classified nurseries or greenhouses within the
regulated area. Certification may be denied to any person who has omitted to
make the report required by this section, and such denial of certification shail
continue until the information so omitted has been supplied.

(7) Nurserymen, florists, dealers, and others, in order to maintain a class I
status, or to maintain in a class III establishment, a class I subdivision, a cer-
tified plot, or a certified greenhouse, (i) shall restrict their purchases or receipts
of nursery and ornamental stock, sand, if contaminated with vegetable matter
soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure, secured within the regulated area and
intended for use on class I or certified premises, to articles which have been
certified under these regulations as to each such article and the said certificate
shall accompany the article when moved; (ii) shall obtain approval of the
inspector before such articles are received on class I or certified premises or are
taken into certified greenhouses; (iii) shall report immediately in writing all
purchases or receipts of such articles secured from within the regulated area for



1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 11

use on such premises; and (iv) shall also report immediately on forms provided
for that purpose all their sales or shipments of such articles both to points out-
side the regulated areas and to other classified nurseries or greenhouses within
the regulated areas. Certification may be denied to any person who has omitted
to make the report or reports required by this section, and such denial of
certification shall continue until the information so omitted has been supplied.

(8) Nursery and ornamental stock imported from foreign countries and not
reshipped from the port of entry in the unopened original container may be
certified for movement under these regulations when such stock has been
inspected by an inspector and found free from infestation.

(9) Nursery and ornamental stock originating outside the regulated areas and
certified stock originating in classified nurseries or greenhouses may be certified
for reshipment from premises other than those on which they originated, under
provisions satisfactory to the inspector for the safeguarding of such stock from
infestation at the point of reshipment and en route and when found advisable by
the inspector after reinspection and determination of freedom from infestation.

Movement of Soil and Similar Materials

§ 301.48—7. Restrictions on the movement of sand, soil, earth, peat, compost,
and manure.—(a) Control of movement.—Sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and
manure shall not be moved interstate from any point in the regulated areas to or
through any point outside thereof unless a certificate or permit shall have been
issued therefor by the inspector, except as follows:

(1) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of (i) fresh
manure; (ii) sand and clay when free from vegetable matter; (iii) greensand
marl; and (iv) such other sands and clays as have been treated or processed
and subsequently handled in such manner that in the judgment of the inspector
no Japanese beetle could exist therein.

(2) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of manure, peat,
compost, or humus (i) when dehydrated, shredded, ground, pulverized, or com-
pressed, or (ii) when treated with crude petroleum or any other product having
high potency as an insecticide.

(3) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of sand, soil, earth,
peat, compost, and manure imported from foreign countries when reshipped from
the port of entry in the unopened original container and labeled as to each con-
tainer with the country of origin, and when the shipment is further protected
in manner or method satisfactory to the inspector.

(4) No certificate will be required for the interstate movement of sand, soil,
earth, peat, compost, and manure when transported by a common carrier on a
through bill of lading either from an area not under regulation through a regu-
lated area, or from a regulated area through a nonregulated area to another
regulated area.

(b) Conditions of certification.—Certificates for the movement of restricted
sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure may be issued under any one of the
following conditions:

(1) When the articles to be moved have originated in districts included in the
regulated area, but in which neither beetles nor grubs in soil have been found.

(2) When the material consists of mined, dredged, or other similar materials,
and it has been determined by an inspector that no infestation could exist therein.

(3) When the material has been removed, under the supervision of an inspec-
tor, from a depth of more than 12 inches below the surface of the ground and
either (i) is to be moved between October 16 and June 14, inelusive, or (ii) is
loaded and shipped at points where it has been determined by an inspector that
no general infestation of adult beetles exists, or (iii) when the cars and loading
operations are protected by screening under the direction of and in manner and
by method satisfactory to the inspector.

(4) When the material has been fumigated with carbon disulfide or otherwise
treated under the supervision of and in manner and by method satisfactory to
the inspector. Such fumigation or treatment will be required as a condition of
certification of all restricted sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure, except
such as is loaded and shipped in compliance with subparagraphs (1), (2), or (3)
of this paragraph.

Protection of Articles in Transit

§ 301.48-8. Conditions governing the protection of restricted articles from in-
festation while in transit.—Fruits and vegetables, nursery and ornamental stock,



12 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE = [Jan.—Mar.

and sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure, moving interstate from or
through the regulated areas to points outside thereof between June 15 and
October 15, inclusive, shall at all times while they are in the regulated areas be
screened, covered, or otherwise protected in manner or method satisfactory to the
inspector for safeguarding the articles from infestation.

Trucks or other road vehicles transporting restricted articles may be sealed by
the inspector at the point of inspection, and all such seals shall remain intact as
long as the vehicle is en route within the regulated area.

Marking and Certification

§ 301.48-9. Marking and certification a condition of interstate transportation.—
(a) Every box, basket, or other container of restricted articles listed in §§ 301.48-5,
6, and 7 shall be plainly marked with the name and address of the consignor and
the name and address of the consignee, and shall have securely attached to the
outside thereof a valid certificate or permit issued in compliance with these regu-
lations. In the case of lot shipments by freight, one certificate attached to one
of the containers and another certificate attached to the waybill will be suflicient.

(b) In the case of bulk carload shipments by rail, the certificate shall accom-
pany the waybill, conductor’s manifest, memorandum, or bill of lading pertaining
to such shipment, and in addition each car shall have securely attached to the
outside thereof a placard showing the number of the certificate or certificates
accompanying the waybill.

(c) In the case of shipment by road vehicle, the certificates shall accompany
the vehicle.

(d) Certificates shall be surrendered to the consignee upon delivery of the
shipment.

Procedure for Applicants

§ 8301.48-10. General conditions governing inspection and issuance of certifi-
cates and permits.—(a) Persons intending to move interstate any of the articles
the movement of which is restricted in §§ 301.48—5, 6, and 7 shall make applica-
tion for inspection and certification as far as possible in advance of the probable
date of shipment, specifying in the application the article and quantity to be
shipped, method of shipment, name and address of the consignor, and name and
address of the consignee.

(b) Applicants for inspection will be required to assemble the articles at such
points as the inspector shall designate and so to place them that inspection may
readily be made; if not so placed, inspection may be refused. All charges for
storage, cartage, and labor incident to inspection, other than the services of the
inspector, shall be paid by the shipper.

(c) Certificates and permits shall be used in connection with the transportation
of only those articles intended to be covered thereby.

(d) Where the apparent absolute freedom from infestation of any of the articles
enumerated cannot be determined by the inspector, certification will be refused.

(e) Permits may be issued for the interstate movement of restricted articles
by truck or other road vehicle from a regulated area through a nonregulated area
to another regulated area, except for the movement of fruits and vegetables as
specified in paragraph (a) (1) (ii) of § 301.48-5.

Certificates May Be Canceled

§ 301.48-11. Cancellation of certificates Certificates issued under these regula-
tions may be withdrawn or canceled by the inspector and further certification
refused, either for any failure of compliance with the conditions of these regula-
tions or violation of them, or whenever in the judgment of the inspector the
further use of such certificates might result in the dissemination of infestation.

Shipments Inspected Hn Route

§ 301.48-12. Inspection in transit.—Any car, vehicle, basket, box, or other con-
tainer moved interstate or offered to a common carrier for shipment interstate,
which contains or which the inspector has probable cause to believe contains
either infestations, infested articles, or articles the movement of which is re-
stricted by these regulations, shall be subject to inspection by an inspector at
any time or place, and when actually found to involve danger of dissemination





1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 13

of Japanese beetle to uninfested localities, measures to eliminate infestation may
be required as a condition of further transportation or delivery.

Cleaning of Vehicles

§ 301.48-18. Thorough cleaning required of trucks, wagons, cars, boats, and
other vehicles and containers before moving interstate.—Trucks, wagons, cars,
boats, and other vehicles and containers which have been used in transporting
any article covered by these regulations within the regulated areas shall not
thereafter be moved interstate until they have been thoroughly swept and
cleaned by the carrier at a point within the regulated area. Refrigerator cars
originating in the area designated in § 301.48—5 into which fruits or vegetables
are to be loaded for interstate movement from any regulated area shall be
thoroughly swept or cleaned or fumigated prior to loading as may be required
by the inspector.

Articles for Hxperimental and Scientific Purposes

§ 301.48-14. Shipments for experimental and scientific purposes.—Articles sub-
ject to restriction in these regulations may be moved interstate for experimental
or scientific purposes, on such conditions and under such safeguards as may be
prescribed by the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine. The container
of articles so moved shall bear, securely attached to the outside thereof, an
identifying tag from the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine showing
compliance with such conditions.

Done at Washington, D. C., this 20th day of March 1942.

Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.

[SEAL] CLAUDE R. WICKARD,
Secretary of Agriculture.

APPENDIX
PENALTIES

The Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912, as amended (7 U. S. C. 161),
provides that no person shall ship or offer for shipment to any common carrier,
nor shall any common carrier receive for transportation or transport, nor shall
any person carry or transport from any quarantined State or Territory or District
of the United States or from any quarantined portion thereof, into or through
any other State or Territory or District, any class of nursery stock or any other
class of plants, fruits, vegetables, roots, bulbs, seeds * * * or any other
article * * * specified in the notice of quarantine * * * in manner or
method or under conditions other than those prescribed by the Secretary of
Agriculture. It also provides that any person who shall violate any of the
provisions of this act, or who shall forge, counterfeit, alter, deface, or destroy any
certificate provided for in this act or in the regulations of the Secretary of
Agriculture shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor and shall, upon conviction
thereof, be punished by a fine not exceeding $500, or by imprisonment not
exceeding 1 year, or both such fine and imprisonment, in the discretion of the
court.

STATK AND FEDERAL INSPECTION-

Certain of the quarantined States have promulgated or are about to promulgate
quarantine regulations restricting intrastate movement supplemental to the
Federal quarantine. These State regulations are enforced in cooperation with
the Federal authorities. Copies of either the Federal or State quarantine orders
may be obtained by addressing the United States Department of Agriculture, 266
Glenwood Avenue, Bloomfield, N. J.

Subsidiary offices are maintained at the following locations:

Connecticut: Agricultural Experiment Station, 123 Huntington Street, New

Haven, Conn.

Delaware: Room 210, New Post Office Building, Dover, Del.
Maryland:

2 Sherwood Avenue, Pikesville, Md.

Washington County Annex Building, Hagerstown, Md.

Room 205, New Post Office Building, Main Street, Salisbury, Md.



14 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE — [Jan.—Mar.

Massachusetts: 144 Woody Street, Waltham, Mass.
New Jersey:
Kotler Building, Main and High Streets, Glassboro, N. J.
P. O. Box 1, Trenton, N. J., or Yardville Road, White Horse, N. J.
New York:
Room 838, 641 Washington Street, New York, N. Y.
Room 200, 2507 James Street, Syracuse, N. Y.
Ohio: 21065 Euclid Avenue, Euclid, Ohio.
Pennsylvania:
Room 303, Post Office Building, Harrisburg, Pa.
6905 Torresdale Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa.
Room 4388-K, New Post Office Building, Pittsburgh, Pa.
Virginia :
Room 217, New Federal Building, Granby Street and Brambleton Avenue,
Norfolk, Va.
17 North Boulevard, Richmond, Va.
West Virginia: 245 West Philadelphia Avenue, Bridgeport, W. Va.
Arrangements may be made for inspection and certification of shipments from
the District of Columbia by calling Republic 4142, branch 2598, inspection house
of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, 224 Twelfth Street SW.,
Washington, D. C.

GENERAL OFFICES OF STATES COOPERATING

Department of Entomology, Agricultural Experiment Station, New Haven,
Conn.

Board of Agriculture, Dover, Del.

State horticulturist, Augusta, Maine.

Department of Entomology, University of Maryland, College Park, Md.

Division of Plant Pest Control, Department of Agriculture, Statehouse, Boston.
Mass.

Deputy commissioner, Department of Agriculture, Durham, N. H.

Bureau of Plant Industry, Department of Agriculture, Trenton, N. J.

Bureau of Plant Industry, Department of Agriculture and Markets, Albany,
N. Y.

Division of Plant Industry, Department of Agriculture, Columbus, Ohio.

Bureau of Plant Industry, Department of Agriculture, Harrisburg, Pa.

Bureau of Entomology, Departnsent of Agriculture, Statehouse, Providence,

I

Entomologist, Department of Agriculture, Montpelier, Vt.

Division of Plant Industry, Department of Agriculture and Immigration,
Richmond, Va.

State entomologist, Department of Agriculture, Charleston, W. Va.

[Copies of the foregoing quarantine were sent +o all common carriers doing business in
or through the quarantined area. ]

AE aes with the Division of the Federal Register March 23, 1942, 11:57 a.m.:7F. R.
2202. ]

NoTIce TO GENERAL Purstic THROUGH NEWSPAPERS

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,
Washington, D. C., March 20, 1942.

Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority con-
ferred on him by the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 19172 as amended (7
U.S. C. 161), has promulgated a revision of the regulations of ti Japanese beet:e
quarantine (Notice of Quarantine No. 48), effective on and after March 24, 1942.
New areas brought within the regulated areas include parts or all of the counties
of Allegany, Carroll, Frederick, Prince Georges, and Washington, Md., parts of
Ontario and Monroe Counties, N. Y., Meadville, Pa., Charlottesville, Danville,
Schoolfield, and Front Royal, Va., Paden City and one district in Tyler County,
W. Va. The area from which the movement of fruits and vegetables by motor-
truck or refrigerator car is regulated (§ 301.48-5) has been extended to include
additional sections in Anne Arundel and Baltimore Counties, Md., and in Berks,
Cumberland, Lehigh, Northampton, and York Counties, Pa. Charlottesville, Va.,
is added as an isolated regulated point to which such fruit and vegetable ship-
ments may move only under certification. Restrictions on eut flowers are now
confined to shipments from the heavily infested area interstate to points outside

ah.





1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 15

the regulated areas. Soil-free rooted cuttings and fresh manure are exempt from
certification. There are other slight modifications. Copies of the revised regula-
tions may be obtained from the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine,
United States Department of Agriculture, Washington.
CLAUDE R. WICKARD,
Secretary of Agriculture.

[The above notice was published in the following newspapers: The Times, Hartford,
Conn., March 31, 1942; the Evening Journal, Wilmington, Del., March 30, 1942; The
Evening Star, Washington, D. C., March 30, 1942; the Press-Herald Portland, Maine,
March 31, 1942; the Baltimore Sun, Baltimore, Md., March 30, 1942; the Post, Boston,
Mass., March 30, 1942; the Union, Manchester, N. H., March 31, 1942; the News, Newark,
N. J., March 30, 1942; the Times, New York, N. Y., March 30, 1942; the Press, Cleveland,
Ohio, March 30, 1942; the Bulletin, Philadelphia, Pa., March 28, 1942; the Bulletin,
Providence, R. I., March 30, 1942; the Free Press, Burlington, Vt., March 31, 1942; the
aoe Richmond, Va., April 7, 1942; the Gazette, Charleston, W. Va.,:March 30,

- -

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO MEXICAN FRUITFLY
QUARANTINE (NO. 64)

TEXAS CITRUS FRUIT HARVEST EXTENDED

[Press notice]

JANUARY 23, 1942.

Under a modification of the Mexican fruitfly Federal quarantine regulations
announced today by the Department of Agriculture, the harvest season for
oranges and grapefruit from the Texas counties of Brooks, Cameron, Hidalgo,
and Willacy has been extended through May 31, for this year, provided condi-
tions of infestation do not necessitate an earlier closing.

The harvest season normally closes, under the regulations, on April 30, except
that the grapefruit harvest in the counties of Dimmit, LaSalle, and Webb ends
with the last day of February. The harvest begins on September 1. The quar-
antine regulations require a fruit-free period between harvests to prevent
fruitfly infestations in the lower Rio Grande Valley. ‘

It is believed that no risk of infestation is involved in this modification, the
Department said, as intensive inspection has resulted in finding no fruitflies
in any stage of development. The longer harvest will, furthermore, provide a
more orderly marketing of this year’s large crop of oranges and grapefruit.

The area under regulation includes the Texas counties of Brooks, Cameron,
Dimmit, Hidalgo, La Salle, Webb, Willacy, and part of Jim Wells County.

Extension of the harvest season, which became effective January 20, under
administrative instructions of the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant
Quarantine, was announced after consultation with the Texas State Department
of Agriculture.

/

BrHIP..Q: 521: Effective January 20, 1942
TITLE 7—AGRICULTURE

CHAPTER III—BurEAU oF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE
Part 301—DoMEsTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES
MEXICAN FRUITFLY REGULATIONS MODIFIED—HARVESTING SEASON EXTENDED

§ 301.64-5d Administrative instructions modifying the restrictions of the
Mexican fruitfly quarantine by extending the harvesting season on oranges and
grapefruit.—Pursuant to the authority conferred upon the Chief of the Bureau
of Entomology and Plant Quarantine by the third proviso of § 301.64, Chapter
Ill, Title 7, Code of Federal Regulations [Notice of Quarantine No. 64], it
having been determined by me that a modification may be safely made without
increasing the risk of spread of the Mexican fruitfly, § 301.645 (a) [para-
graph (a) of regulation 5 supplemental to this quarantine] is hereby modified
effective January 20, 1942, to extend the harvesting season for oranges and



16 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE — [Jan.—Mar.

grapefruit for the Texas counties of Brooks, Cameron, Hidalgo, and Willacy to
the close of May 31 for the year 1942, provided conditions of infestation do not
necessitate an earlier closing date.

The host-free period for oranges and grapefruit, under this modification, will
begin June 1 and continue through August 31, 1942, inclusive, in the above-named
counties.

In the counties of Dimmit, La Salle, and Webb, the grapefruit harvesting
Season closes on February 28, 1942, under the regulations, and the orange
harvesting season closes on April 30 as to these three counties and the portion
of Jim Wells County which is under regulation. No modification is made as to
the harvesting seasons in these counties (7 C. F. R. § 301. 64-9 ; sec. 8, 39 Stat.
1165, 44 Stat. 250; 7 U. S. C. 161).

Done at Washington, D. C., this 17th day of January 1942.

P. N. ANNAND, .
Chief.

[Copies of foregoing instructions were sent to all common carriers doing business in or

through the State of Texas. ]

iis with the Division of the Federal Register January 20, 1942, 2:51 p. m.; 7 F. R.
444. ]

B. E. P. Q. 503, Fourth Revision. Effective January 9, 1942.

ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE
QUARANTINE (NO. 72)

TITLE 7—AGRICULTURE

CHAPTER III—BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE
ParT 301—DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES

WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS MODIFIED—TREATMENTS
AUTHORIZED

Introductory note.—Recent investigational work has shown that it is possible
to destroy all stages of the white-fringed beetles (Pantomorus spp.) in soil,
with either carbon disulphide or methyl bromide applied as a liquid, provided
the temperature of the soil is sufficiently high and the period of exposure is long
enough. The administrative instructions in this circular, specifying the various
authorized methods of treatment of plants in soil, and of potting soil, are
therefore hereby revised by authorizing the above treatment for soil plots, plung-
ing beds, and potting soil (see paragraph (Cc) ).

All treatments apply to the various species of white-fringed beetles.

This circular supersedes all instructions in Circulars B. E. P. Q. 486, 489,
and previous issues of 503.

§ 301.72-5e.2, Administrative instructions—Treaiments authorized.—Pursuant
to the authority conferred upon the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and
Plant Quarantine by paragraph (a) of § 301.72-5, Chapter III, Title 7, Code of
Federal Regulations [Regulation 5 of Notice of ‘Gaarantne No. 72 on account
of the white-fringed beetle], the following methods of treatment are hereby
authorized effective January 9, 1942, when carried out under the supervision of
an authorized inspector of the United States Department of Agriculture.

(a) Plants in pots or in soil balls.

(1) Methyl bromide fumigation at atmospheric pressures.—(i) Fymigation
must be done with methyl bromide at a dosage of 1 pound per 1,000 cubic feet,
including the space occupied by the plants, for a period of 4 hours, the soil
masses and the air in the fumigation chamber to be at a temperature of not
less than 85° F.

(ii) Such fumigation shall apply only to those plants in 3-inch pots or smaller,
or in soil balls not greater than 3 inches in diameter when spherical or thicker
than 3 inches if not spherical, and the plants shall be stacked on racks so that
the gas mixture can have access to all sides of the pots or the soil: balls.

(iii) The fumigation shall be done in a tight chamber with gas-tight doors.

(iv) After the chamber is loaded and closed, the appropriate amount of
methyl bromide shall be volatilized therein, and the air-gas mixture shall be

2 Superseding §§ 301.72—5a and b.



1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 17

circulated by means of a fan or blower throughout the entire 4-hour fumigation
period.

(v) The use of a fumigation chamber, lined with sheet metal throughout and
with a metal-covered door closing against gaskets and held tightly in place by
refrigerator door fasteners, is recommended.

(2) Methyl bromide fumigation under partial vacuum.—(i) Fumigation under
partial vacuum equivalent to at least 24.5 inches of mercury must be done with
a dosage of 4 pounds of methyl bromide per 1,000 cubic feet of chamber space,
including the space occupied by the commodity, with an exposure of 114 hours,
the vacuum to be maintained throughout the entire period.

(ii) The temperature of the soil balis shall be 75° F. or above, and the diam-
eter of the soil balls shall be not greater than 11 inches if spherical, or thicker
than 11 inches if not spherical.

(iii) The fumigant-air mixture shall be circulated in the fumigation chamber
by means of a fan the first 15 minutes of the exposure period to mix the vapor-
ized fumigant thoroughly with the air in the chamber and bring it in contact
with the surface of the soil balis. The soil balls shall be washed with one or
more changes of air at the end of the exposure period.

(iv) A standard vacuum fumigation chamber. which can be closed tight and
will withstand an external pressure of at least one atmosphere is required. A
vacuum pump of sufficient capacity to reduce the pressure within the vacuum
chamber to the equivalent of 3 inches of mercury (a 27-inch vacuum at sea level)
in not more than 20 minutes is necessary.

(3) Methyl bromide solution.—(i) Treatment method.—(Applicable to all
regulated areas.)

(a) The soil balls around the roots of plants must be buried in sand and
plunged in boxes or trays which are watertight and approximately 1 foot deep.

(6) A 2-inch space filled with sand shall be provided between the soil balls.
also above and beneath them.

(c) Such soil balls shali be treated with a solution of methyl bromide and
alcohol at a concentration of 0.3 percent methyl bromide and 0.6 percent dena-
tured ethyl alcohol by volume in water. The solution is to be prepared by first
mixing the methyl bromide and alcohol together and then adding this mixture
to the water and mixing thoroughly.

(d) The aqueous solution of methyl bromide and alcohol shall then be applied
evenly over the surface of the sand around the plants at the rate of 40 gallons
per 100 square feet of surface area by means of a sprinkling can or sprayer.

(ii) Type of material, exposure, and temperature.

(a) In Orleans Parish, including the city of New Orleans, Saint Bernard Parish,
and regulated parts of Jefferson and Plaquemines Parishes, La., the treatment shall
be applied only to plants in soil balls not greater than 7 inches in diameter, nor
greater than 7 inches in thickness when not spherical. After the required dosage
has been applied, the soil balls shall remain embedded in the sand for a period
of 8 hours. The temperature of the soil balls during the treatment shall not be
lower than 65° F.

, (b) In all regulated areas other than Orleans Parish, including the city of New
Orleans, Saint Bernard Parish, and regulated parts of Jefferson and Plaquemines
Parishes, La., the treatment shall be applied to soil balls not greater than 8 inches
in diameter, nor greater than 8 inches in thickness when not spherical. After the
required dosage has been applied, the soil balls shall remain embedded in the
sand for a period of 6 hours. The temperature of the soil balls during the treat-
ment Shall not be lower than 62° F.

(b) Potting soil.

(1) Carbon disulphide fumigation.—(i) Potting soil shall be treated in a con-
tainer with carbon disulphide at a dosage of 2 pounds per cubic yard of soil for
a period of 48 hours.

(ii) The grade of carbon disulphide shall be comparable to U. S. P. grade having
a specific gravity of 1.25 at 68° F.

(iii) The container shall be tight, preferably lined with sheet metal, and shall
have a tight cover or be covered with a tarpaulin immediately after the fumigant
is applied. The container shall not be more than 36 inches deep.

(iv) The soil shall be friable, and wet soil shall not be treated by this method.
The fumigant shall be applied to the soil in holes 3 inches deep, the dosage to
be evenly divided among holes 1 foot apart over the surface of the soil, and the
fumigant shall be covered with soil as soon as it is applied.

(v) The temperature of the soil shall not be lower than 40° F. during the entire
time of treatment.



18 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE — [Jan.—Mar,

(vi) The condition of the soil and the apparatus used and the method of appli-
cation of the fumigant must meet with the approval of an authorized inspector of
the United States Department of Agriculture.

(2) Methyl bromide fumigation.—(i) Potting soil must be treated in a container
with methyl bromide in a dosage of 40 cubic centimeters of methyl bromide per
cubic yard of soil for a period of 48 hours.

(ii) The sides, bottom, and seams of the container shall be tight, preferably
lined with sheet metal, and shall have a tight cover or be covered with a tarpaulin
immediately after the fumigant is applied.

(iii) The temperature of the soil shall not be lower than 40° F. during the entire
time of treatment.

(iv) The condition of the soil and the apparatus used and the method of appli-
eation of the fumigant must meet the approval of an authorized inspector of the
United States Department of Agriculture.

(3) Heat treatment.—(i) Live steam, under pressure of 80 pounds or more per
square inch, shall be applied through a grid of perforated pipes at the bottom of
the sterilizing box or truck body containing the soil, for a period of 45 minutes
or until all parts of the load reach a temperature of 200° F.

(ii) The grids shall be constructed of 1-inch pipes, perforated with holes
vs inch in diameter on the upper side and connecting at one end to a manifold into
which the steam is introduced.

(iii) The layer of soil in the sterilizing box shall not be more than 2 feet, 6 inches
deep.

(4) Methyl bromide and carbon disulphide—(See instructions in para-
graph (c).) ;

(c) Soil plots, plunging beds, and potting soil.

(1) Methyl bromide.——(i) Inject the liquid methyl bromide into the soil at a
depth of 6 inches by means of a hollow needle or other suitable injector at the
rate of 4.7 milliliters per square foot or 7 milliliters per 114 square feet of soil
surface.

(ii) After treatment has been applied to the plot the soil should be covered
with 10- or 15-pound building paper, lapped 4 inches and weighted down so that it
will not be blown off.

(iii) The soil must be at a temperature not lower than 45° F. at a depth of
6 inches when the treatment is applied. At temperatures from 45° to 62° inclusive
the soil must be kept covered for a period of 6 days to insure complete mortality
of all eggs, larvae, pupae, and adults of the insect which may be present in the soil
under treatment. At temperatures above 62° the soil must be kept so covered for
a period of not less than 4 days.

(2) Carbon disulphide—(i) The insecticide shall be applied at the rate of
38 milliliters per square foot of soil surface, the liquid to be poured into holes
at least 6 inches deep and 1 inch in diameter at the top, and covered immediately
with earth.

(ii) After application the plot should be covered with 10- to 15-pound building
paper which shall remain in position for at least 4 days in order to insure complete
mortality of any eggs, larvae, pupae, or adults of white-fringed beetles that may be
present.

(iii) The treatment shall not be applied to soil which is below 80° F. in
temperature at a depth of 6 inches. ‘

(d) Disclaimer.—There has been opportunity to test these treatments on only
relatively few varieties of plants and in authorizing the movement of potted
plants, nursery stock, or soil treated according to the requirements stated above,
it is understood that no liability shall attach either to the United States
Department of Agriculture or to any of its employees in the event of injury to
either plants or operators.

(e) Caution.—(1) Methyl bromide.—(i) Methyl bromide is a gas at ordinary
temperatures. It is colorless and practically odorless in concentrations used for
fumigation of plants or potting soil. It is a poison and the operators should
use gas masks approved by the United States Bureau of Mines for use with
methyl bromide, when exposed to the gas in concentrations used in fumigation,
or while preparing the solution. The plants in the fumigation chamber should
be well aerated by blowing air through them, and the room adequately ventilated
before it is entered. After fumigating the potting soil by methyl bromide the
cover should be removed and the soil allowed to become aerated.

(ii) The method for application of methyl bromide described in paragraph
(c) provides a closed system in which the operator is not exposed to a dangerous
concentration of the gas provided there is no leakage in any exposed portion of



1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 19

the equipment. Extreme care should be exercised to keep all joints of such
apparatus tight and replace any defective parts to prevent accident. The
operator should avoid getting any liquid methyl bromide on his clothing or his
body at any time.

(2) Carbon disulphide.

(i) The vapor of carbon disulphide is inflammable and explosive. At a
temperature of 297° F. it may take fire spontaneously and in the presence of
certain metals, particularly copper, it may ignite at considerably lower tempera-
tures. It must be kept away from fire, and from hot objects such as electric
light bulbs, unprotected brush-type motors, steam pipes, ete. Lighted cigars,
cigarettes, or pipes must never be brought near carbon disulphide.

(ii) Carbon disulphide is a blood poison, but poisoning by this chemical is
rare. Exposure to the vapor may cause giddiness and headache. When these
symptoms develop, the individual should get into the open air.

(7 C. F. R., § 301.72-5; sec. 8, 39 Stat. 1165, 44 Stat. 250; 7 U. S. C. 161)

Done at Washington, D. C., this 6th day of January 1942.

P. N. ANNAND,
Chief.

[Filed with the Division of the Federal Register January 13, 1942, 11:18 a. m.;
"FR. 239.)

MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS
WAKELAND TO HEAD DIVISION OF GRASSHOPPER CONTROL

[Press notice]
FEBRUARY 4, 1942.

The Department of Agriculture today announced creation of the Division of
Grasshopper Control within the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine
to supervise cooperative programs with the States in control of grasshoppers,
Mormon crickets, and chinch bugs. Leader of the new division is Dr. Claude
Wakeland, said Dr. P. N. Annand, Chief of the Bureau.

While programs of control for chinch bugs, Mormon crickets, and grasshoppers
have been in operation for a number of years, this is the first time that the work
has been unified under one division. Headquarters for this division will remain
in Denver, Colo., where they have been since 1940. Doctor Wakeland, who has
had field direction of the cooperative programs of grasshopper and Mormon
cricket control since 1939, was born August 2, 1888, at LaJara, Colo. He at-
tended public school in Denver, graduated from Colorado State College with a
B. S. degree in 1914, received an M. S. from the same institution in 1924, and
in 1934 received a Ph. D. from Ohio State University.

He started active work in entomology with the Colorado Agricultural Experi-
ment Station. In 1920 he was appointed extension entomologist for the Uni-
versity of Idaho, and 1928 was made head of the Department of Entomology at
that University.

In 1938 he was appointed to the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine
ag project leader on Mormon cricket control with headquarters in Salt Lake
City, and the following year was made field director of the combined grasshopper
and Mormon cricket control programs.

B. E. P. Q. 519, Supplement No. 1.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF CUBA

MOopDIFICATION OF RESTRICTIONS AFFECTING BROOMCORN

FEBRUARY 23, 1942.

The Cuban Ministry of Agriculture, in Resolution No. 7, dated January 5, 1942,
authorized for a period of 1 year from that date, the importation into Cuba of
broomeorn (Holcus) plants and parts thereof, raw materials used in the manu-
facture of brooms, when accompanied by a phytosanitary certificate, issued by
a competent official in the country of origin and legalized by a Cuban consul,
stating that the product has been carefully selected and that it is free from
Pyrausta nubilalis (European corn borer) and other insects. Importers will be
required to vacuum fumigate their importations with hydrocyanic acid gas,



20 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE — [Jan.—Mar.

under the supervision of the Plant Quarantine Service, within 10 days after
unloading.

Importations are exempt from these requirements when they comply with
those of Article 7 of Decree No. 2745 (see page 5 of B. E. P. Q. 519).

P. N. ANNAND,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

B. E. P. Q. 520.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, BURMA

JANUARY 13, 1942.

This summary of the plant-quarantine import restrictions of Burma has been
prepared for the information of exporters of plants and plant products to that
country and plant quarantine officials.

The text, which was prepared by Richard Faxon, District Supervisor, Certifi-
cation for Export, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines, consists of digests of
notifications issued by the Agricultural Branch of the Department of Agriculture
and Forests, Rangoon, Burma, on the following dates: December 16, 1940; Janu-
ary 15, February 28, April 24, and June 2, 1941. It was reviewed by the Secretary
to the Government of Burma.

The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct and com-
plete up to the time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used independently
of, nor as a substitute for, the original texts, and it is not to be interpreted as
legally authoritative.

P. N. ANNAND,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.
B. BE. P. Q. 520
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, BURMA

BASIC LEGISLATION
JANUARY 138, 1942.

[DEPARTMENT OF AtRICULTURE AND FORESTS AGRICULTURAL BRANCH, RANGOON,
BurMA. NOTIFICATION No. 377, DECEMBER 16, 1940; NorTIFICcATION No. 138 (Cor-
RIGENDUM ), JANUARY 15, 1941; NOTIFICATION No. 56, FEBRUARY 28, 1941; NoTIFI-
cation No. 89, Aprin 24, 1941; NoriricaTion No. 141, JUNE 2, 1941.]

In accordance with the provisions of the Insects and Pests Act and in super-
session of all previous orders, the Governor makes the following order for the
purpose of prohibiting, regulating, and restricting the import into Burma of the
articles hereinafter specified.

CoNcISE SUMMARY
CERTIFICATE REQUIREMENTS

A Federal certificate is required with all plants, other than fruits and vegetables
intended for consumption, in a prescribed form (page 6). (By definition, “plant”
does not include seeds) (par. 5).

A certificate from the consignor and a Federal certificate in relation to potato
wart disease are required with shipments of potatoes (par. 6).

A special certificate issued by the Entomologist, Burma, is required with plants
used for the purpose of introducing parasitic insects into Burma (pars. 3 and 4).

Two certificates are required with importations of rubber plants (par. 7),
citrus plants (par. 8), and unmanufactured tobacco (par. 9).

A special certificate is required with importations of sugarcane (par. 10).

IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

Cotton, unginned (par. 15 (1)).

Gram (chick pea, Cicer arietinum) (par. 16).

“Mexican jumping bean” (Sebastiania palmeri) (par. 12 (b)).

Sugarcane from the Fiji Islands, New Guinea, Australia, and the Philippine
Islands (par. 10).

nn i it ic er el li



1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 21

IMPORTATION RESTRICTED

Berseem (Egyptian clover) seeds (pars. 12 (a) and 14).

Citrus plants (par. 8).

Coffee plants, seeds, and beans (par. 18).

Cottonseed (pars. 12 (a) and 15 (2)).

Flaxseed (par. 12 (a)).

Hevea rubber plants and seeds (par. 11).

Potatoes (par. 6).

Rubber plants (par. 7).

Sugarcane from countries other than the Fiji Islands, New Guinea, Australia,
and the Philippine Islands (par, 10).

IMPORTATION UNRESTRICTED

Fruits and vegetables intended for consumption.
Roasted or ground coffee (par. 13).

GENERAL REGULATIONS
NOTIFICATION NO. 377

1. Definitions —(i) “Official certificate’ means a certificate granted by the
proper officer or authority in the country of origin. (In the United States the
U. S. Department of Agriculture has been designated by the Burmese authorities
as the proper authority to issue such certificates. )

(ii) “Plant” means a living plant or part thereof, but does not include seeds.

(iii) All provisions referring to plants or seeds shall apply also to all packing
material used in packing or wrapping such plants or seeds.

RESTRICTIONS ON MEANS OF TRANSPORTATION

2. No plant shall be imported into Burma by letter or parcel post, except sugar-
cane for planting intended to be grown under the personal supervision of the
Deputy Director of Agriculture,. East Central Circle, Pyinmana. (See also
par 10.)

3. No plants shall be imported into Burma by air, except those used for the
purpose of introducing living insects accompanied by a special certificate from
the Entomologist, Burma, stating that the plants are imported for such purpose,
and sugarcane for the Deputy Director of Agriculture, East Central Circle,
Pyinmana, if the conditions of paragraph 10 are satisfied.

FUMIGATION REQUIRED

4. No plants, other than fruits and vegetables intended for consumption, pota-
toes, and unmanufactured tobacco, either raw or cured, shall be imported into
Burma by sea, except after fumigation with hydrocyanic acid gas at the port
of Rangoon, except that plants which are used for the purpose of introducing
insect parasites may be imported without fumigation when accompanied by the
required special certificate from the Entomologist, Burma. (Another proviso
relates to rubber plants grown in Sumatra or in the Federated Malay States.)

CERTIFICATE REQUIRED

5. No plants, other than unmanufactured tobacco imported from India, fruits
and vegetables intended for consumption, and potatoes, shall be imported into
Burma by sea unless accompanied by an official certificate that they are free
from injurious insects and diseases. The certificate shall be in the form prescribed,
or in a form as near thereto as may be and supplying all the information called
for in the prescribed form. (See p. 6.)

SPECIFIC RESTRICTIONS
POTATOES

6. Potatoes shall not be imported into Burma by sea or by air, except from
India. unless they are accompanied by—



22 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE — [Jan—Mar.

(a) A certificate from the consignor stating fully in what country, and in
what district of such country, the potatoes were grown and guaranteeing that
wart disease was not known to exist on the farms where the potatoes were
grown; and

(b) An official certificate that no case of wart disease of potatoes has been
known during the 12 months preceding the date of the certificate, within 5 miles
of the place where the potatoes were grown.

RU2BER PLANTS, INCLUDING HEVEA

7. Rubber plants imported into Burma by sea must be accompanied by two
certificates, the form prescribed in paragraph 5 and an official certificate affirming
that the estate from which the plants originated, or that the individual plants,
are free from Fomes lignosus, Sphaerostilbe repens, Dothidella ulei (Melanopsam-
mopsis ulet) (Fusicladium macrosporium), and Oidium heveae.

11.° Hevea rubber plants and seeds shall not be imported into Burma from Amer-
ica or the West Indies except by the Director of Agriculture, Burma.

CITRUS PLANTS AND CUTTINGS

8. No lemon, lime, orange, grapefruit, or other citrus plants, or cuttings thereof,
shall be imported into Burma unless, in addition to the certificate prescribed in
paragraph 5, they are accompanied by an official certificate affirming that they
are free from the Mal Secco caused by Deuterophomu tracheiphila, or that the
disease does not exist in the country in which they were grown.

UNMANUFACTURED TOBACCO

9. Unmanufactured tobacco, either raw or cured, shall not be imported into
Burma by sea unless, in addition to the certificate prescribed in paragraph 5, it is
accompanied by an Official certificate affirming that Ephestia elutella does not
occur in the country of origin.

SUGARCANE

10. Importation of sugarcane into Burma by sea from the Fiji Islands, New
Guinea, Australia, or the Philippine Islands is prohibited absolutely. From other
countries sugarcane may be imported into Burma by sea or by air, only by the
Deputy Director of Agriculture, East Central Circle, Pyinmana, to be grown by
him in quarantine for 1 year, when accompanied by an official certificate stating
that the sugarcare has been examined and found free from cane borers, seale in-
sects, whi‘e flies, root disease (any form), pineapple disease, Ceratostomella para-
dora or Thielaviopsis paradoxa, sereh dwarf disease, leaf scald, and cane gummo-
sis, that it was obtained from a crop which was free from mosaic and streak
diseases, and that the Fiji disease of sugarcane does not occur in the country
of export. .

SEEDS OF FLAX, BERSEEM, AND COTTON

12. (a) Seeds of flax, berseem (Egyptian clover), and cotton shall not be im-
ported into Burma by air, or by letter or parcel post otherwise than by sea.

14. Flaxseed and berseem seed may be imported by sea only under a license
issued by the Director of Agriculture, Burma.

15. (2) Cottonseed may be imported by sea for experimental purposes only by
the Deputy Director of Agriculture, Myingyan Circle, Meiktila, in quantities not
exceeding one hundredweight (112 pounds) in any one consignment, through the
port of Rangoon only, to be fumigated upon arrival with carbon bisulfide.

COFFEE

13. Coffee plants, seeds, and beans shall not be imported into Burma except for
experimental planting purposes by the Director of Agriculture, Burma, or the
Principal Agricultural Officer, Federated Shan States. This prohibition does not
apply to roasted and ground coffee.

°'The numbered paragraphs do not follow in sequence, because an effort has been made
to assemble the paragraphs on “Specific Restrictions’’ in one place, to be followed by the
paragraphs on. ‘‘Prohibitions.”’



1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 23

PROHIBITIONS
MEXICAN JUMPING BEANS

12. (b) The importation of “Mexican jumping beans” (Sebastiania palmeri of
the family Euphorbiaceae) into Burma is prohibited absolutely.

UNGIN NED COTTON
15. (1) Unginned cotton shall not be imported by sea or by air.
GRAM

16. The importation of gram (chick pea, Cicer arietinum) into Burma is pro-
hibited absolutely.
PRESCRIBED FORM OF CERTIFICATE

This is to certify that the plant(s), living plant(s), or plant products, a repre-
sentative sample of the plant(s), living plant(s), or plant products (strike out
the words not applicable) included in the consignment, of which particulars are
given below, were/was thoroughly examined on the_-_---------__----_-____ by

(name) (country of origin)
and found to be healthy, no evidence of the presence of any injurious insect,
pest, or disease [destructive to agricultural or horticultural crops or to trees or
bushes having been found in/on them and that the consignment (including the
packing) covered by this certificate has/has not been treated in the following
SNES R27) go | ies 5 a a
or M1] immediately subsequent
Inspected

Not inspected

to inspection. in the field by a duly authorized inspector on

Number and description of packages____-___________.

Pei TNATKS

Description of plants or plant products or parts thereof_______________________.
eR aRee WMS PECVD AC ee Ee re te ee eed

INC RINT SI SD fa 8 oe ye tee Be, tsbeey ts

PEEEPI OMEE ESS Gl CONSIOMCE foe set el

Name on vesselor particulars of, ropte.:...9220.. hte,

aU ERNE MQ B80 aR ig ee he ee

UNE PNR OL MADE cd on A te

SAMI FCCTLIIVPALGCS) OtiaeNCd nee ot ot et ei

(Give here details of any special certificate or certificates issued in respect of
imports specifically scheduled. )

(According to information received from the Secretary to the Government of
Burma, the standard export certificate, Form EQ-375, will be acceptable on con-
dition that it contains all the information called for in the above form. A state-
ment should be made under “Qualifying Notations” that the certification includes
packing material. In addition, the names and addresses of the shipper and con-
signee should be given in the body of the certificate, along with the date of
Shipment and port or place of entry. In case the certification is in relation to
fumigation, a description of the treatment should be given under “Qualifying
Notations.” )

B. E. P. Q. 522.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF ECUADOR

FEBRUARY 12, 1942.

This digest of the plant-quarantine import restrictions of the Republic of
Ecuador has been prepared for the information of exporters of domestic plants
and plant products to that country, and for plant quarantine officials.



24 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE © [Jan.—Mar.

The circular was prepared by Richard Faxon, District Supervisor, Certification
for Export, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines, from a translation of an Ex-
ecutive Decree of February 15, 1940, and Regulatory Decrees relating to animals
and plants issued November 17, 1925, and January 25, 1926, and reviewed by the
Director General of Agriculture and Animal Industry of Ecuador.

The information in this circular is believed to be correct and sufficiently com-
plete for its purpose up to the time of preparation, but it is not to be interpreted
as legally authoritative.

P. N. ANNAND,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

BASIc LEGISLATION

An Executive Decree of February 15, 1940, established general plant and animal
health regulations, and provided for the establishment of a phytosanitary service
charged with the inspection of plants. This service administers regulations issued
November 17, 1925 (effective January 1, 1926), and January 25, 1926, in relation to
importations of plants and plant products.

CONCISE SUMMARY
IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

Cottonseed, cotton bolls, or raw cotton from countries infested with the cotton
boll weevil (Anthonomus grandis Boh.).

Plants and plant products for planting or propagation in Ecuador from infected
regions.

IMPORTATION RESTRICTED

Hay or straw, live plants, seeds, cuttings, sprouts, buds, grafts, etc., must be
accompanied by a phytosanitary certificate.

Parcel-post shipments of seeds, cuttings, etc., must be certified to be in healthy
condition by the shipper.

Consular visa is required with official phytosanitary certificates and will be
supplied free of charge.

GENERAL REGULATIONS

[Decrees of November 17, 1925, and January 26, 1926]

ARTICLE 1. Relates to animal quarantines.

ArT. 2. The importation is prohibited of hay and straw, live plants, seeds, cut-
tings, sprouts, buds, grafts, etc., which come from disease-infected places. Said
plants and parts thereof, even though they may be shipped in small quantities by
mail, must be accompanied by a certificate issued by an Official Entomologist, or
by the phytosanitary authorities of the country of origin, in which it is stated that
the plants or parts thereof are not infested with any insect or infected by any
fungus disease and that they have been properly disinfected. (See also Revision
of January 25, 1926, regarding parcel-post shipments. )

This certificate must be certified by the Ecuadoran consul in the country of
shipment.

In the particular case of cottonseed, cotton bolls, and raw cotton, the certificate
visaed by the consul must state under oath or formal declaration, that the bolls
or seeds come from a country in which the cotton boll weevil (Anthonomus
grandis Boh.) does not exist.

ArT. 3. The consuls are required to keep close watch of all shipments covered
by these regulations, and to report to the Ministry of Agriculture concerning the
occurrence and disappearance of insect pests and plant diseases in the country
in which they reside, in order to safeguard the interest of Ecuador from pests
which might be imported with restricted material.

ArT. 4. Consular authorities, Customs inspectors, the Smuggling Patrol, and
Postmasters are entrusted with the fulfillment of these regulations, |

ArT. 5. Customs inspectors and postmasters are required to notify the Depart-
ment of Agriculture of all importations of plants, seeds, etc., passing through their
offices, and to send a copy of the certificate accompanying such shipments handled
by them with each notification.



1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 25

REVISION AGREED UPON JANUARY 25, 1926
PARCEL-POST SHIPMENTS

ARTICLE 1. All shipments of seeds, cuttings, shoots, buds, grafts, bulbs, etc., except
cottonseed, cotton bolls, and raw cotton, coming from foreign countries in small
quantities by mail are exempt from the official certification requirement. How-
ever, the foreign shipper of such products must send with each shipment a cer-
tificate in which he testifies as to the healthy condition of the material.

Art. 2. Postmasters are required to send copies of such certificates to the Depart-
ment of Agriculture.

Art. 3. If such certified plant material is found in bad condition, diseased, or
infested with insects by the addressee, he shall notify the Department of Agricul-
ture immediately. In case further examination by Department inspectors con-
firms his report, the result of the inspection will be published in the Official Bulle-
tin of the Department.

ART. 4. In the event that parcel-post packages containing seeds, plants, etc.,
arrive without health certificates of any kind, the postal authorities must advise
the Department of Agriculture, or the nearest plant inspector, by telegraph, giving
necessary details of the shipment and hold same for disposition by the plant-
inspection authorities.

Art. 5. Consular visa required by previous decrees in connection with officia
certificates will be supplied free of charge.

PENALTIES IMPOSED FOR VIOLATIONS OF THE PLANT QUARANTINE
ACT

According to reports received by the Bureau during the period January 1 fo
March 31, 1942. penalties have recently been imnosed by the proper authorities
for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act, as follows

QUARANTINES AFFECTING MEXICAN PRODUCTS

In the case of the United States versus the persons listed below, for attempting
to smuggle in contraband plant material the penalties indicated were imposed by
the United States customs officials at the following ports:















Name Port Contrahand Penalty
IPBOrOeACTINAT . 2 25s) Wek Sok Ue Brownsville, Tex_____- SIAVOCHU OSES ae ee $1
enasAGevessuaviOS==-2 +. =.= =-=|-26<- COs. 2m APs ikehenimoyae ss >) see 1
Miasnettscopar-.2--------%- 1-2-2 done 2 ee [rrr rie eA Be LT 1
JOSCvAMeO MG MILeIneZ-.. 2... 5=...|2---= a Oe et eee tL POTATO CS ieee? oe = Se ee Oh 1
Troe toll eee ees tee ee ee AO! 222. oe os = DID ORALOCS = ae ee ae ee 1
WastEimininnaneel. 222 + = es be ‘Del Wis: Ns Mee ke PEOEAN OCS oie. 8 2 oe eS ee 1
ORD RIONHiO; mete eee Me fe LOR Sale ee ee Anke. ASOT ANT OOS eae oe ee oe hd 2 he 1
Imocente WVitlanvieva. ...-.---...-.2-|----- COse ee = oe es ! ORAM OAS omen be a Ry Oe 8 ee 1
WiisiGastorena..6 7) 2-2 BG Ont soe ee ee Ha OCAd OSes Oe 1
ID ONACIAMOVATANZA. 222s ee} ‘Eagle Basse exces = POTATICLS ES Mier Se pas ee 1
irate OMACOM Lis ee ek SR foe ee aes OISVIAINAS | Sees ese 1
Tibet MeMITeS. ~" 2282 920 ee eee (Oe nie erewne esc iN OLA PES ees eo en 1
rz VvialGgnmagdo> =2- 520.22 te QO re eee. DATA OCS eee es ee 1
PR SSSIOHlemersOnie se. ssn ot ee, SCOP ee ee PWMONATID CG) 55s ses Se ce SL ee 1
PEGA Gr OMIC2 ss Wadaleo, Mexe-.-.- = - = PAV ORAM OS Reis = 2 he ted if
Romana Zamora de Eealomae tw sees Goes + 2 iS 1 orange, and 4 ounces tree seed__ 1
ering @amocno. 22 5 eee oe ens GO meaat ao a Ue feingraesen Bees to ee ee i
RpUAnIn Gr carga ea ee A dome == =. se 1 cutting (ornamental vine) ____- 1
Maree aVETINOZ.~ 92 Po ee GL ee acne LF Mie Se FRED See, Saws es ee 1
[Peer eee ee oe Ree Go = tA eee NATOPANA OSES ey eee ee a 1
TRASH OLEES epee Et en Mua ee fr eet t OVI CHM OS So tae ea eh ee 1
Girmenodnicvies 2.224 oe ee 1s sae owe A PAT er ee Pe eee 1
paVIGISGOslatMas 2 es fle ee Ci ee tac eee MOLAICCSae eo Me 1
EPROM OGG: 85 Ss AN Ose eee. Jd 19 nodes sugarcane, 3 sapotes, 4 1
avocados, 101 coffee berries, 1
pound tree seed, and 1 pound
7 : tree seed in pulp.
BemienoMiarinineat, 2. 2 Ba ee Gok mete eae 8 nodes sugarcane and 1 orange _. 1
Barn bipriande%.s 3 Bo els dies Pe Aer Eye VOCAC OSes et ere | 1
PPE peeieie CECI ee ee a Gao pi a ety NC OISCOC aus eee Pt 1
Ua arch, ee Oe ee Oe Mel Gi sie se ee, Eee ae 1
Goncepeion Salding...8 2.25 s |e, dou = ERG ead & RAM OCAMO ters eee ek Ste 1
RST ARL GHA Tee te See 6 etn 88 Bs | ee Cp Soa Ste oo: TAQRATICD ueeee eG 1
Doreseo. Weartinez.-- > ae LO ee Re Sra OPAC Osean ee) 8 1
Ia pOlite SUares. 25-22 [aa gs dgjsoaeey, say ae ee a Ce et 1



26 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE — [Jan.—Mar.

EE









Name Port Contraband Penalty
Juana Galvan de Garza_____-------- Hidaleo, Plex. 222) 2 avocados... 2. 4 eee $1
Wierta Garew Montini. t _) 4h op 2 le ee eet 1 avocado and 1 mango____-_----- 1
Beneto: Roedrigtiovei:2). s2 Be met ess dowiitons: nyt leyocaiio.._2lbsd 1. tt oe 1
Juang Maldonado... - 5... <2 4=52]-t Moarearito Ramires..-—-- .- 5. -- es tees ee er os 2 SVOCHOOS. S01 eee 1
Mrs. Hi W. Holimon’ 2) "20 474. 28 OL Omes ERE ds Bat I mango). 22 iia Oe eer 1
Francisco Rodriguez_-___------------]----- do: »:tileod_«c}) 4eavocados jis: 28 sate a 1
Alberta To pet « o3- oe es s552 Sl ro Tae eee 2 plants =. ee 1
Maria Ortiz de Maldonada__--_-_-_--_-_]----- Gijset sae An eee 1! SVObRO0S 22 eee eee 1
Wiavia VPemaii 8 6 355.0 8 eo a altg e Got eee ee 1’ plint__--"__.._ -G3 Eee 1
Domingo Garcia..c::)!hhsros fed [el ® Cozrt $32. Fetes 3 avocados.s8i eres 33s: SE 1
Angustine, Rocha......<+~-.5.£8-.-2: Laredo, eke -- 8 = 2-25 14 oranges. _______ SIT 1
Geo> We RUNG. none eae ae WO. eeee oe ee 10 oranges and 8 tangerines_-_-__. . 2
AnGres’Gonzalezt!)s 2). 30s Lilt a ts dot! mE. 3 10 plants=223. 1). =e eee 1
Cecilia Sanchez de Silva_-_-__--------|----- GOT tse 532. Fhe gees 10 oranges!! se2u:: 8 See 1
HearMAacion. HigUerOd = ee a ee ae Col. =. ec eaeeuee 12 sweet limes_.°--. 1" aes “i
Armando. Chapa) 2he Tiare ee aE Goi f-— ae see 1 avocados = ..21i2he eee ae 1
Jesus’ Monhtajario4 4 21 CG OLA RE eee fee 2mameys::..- 24RD res 1







ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY
AND PLANT QUARANTINE

P. N. ANNAND, Chief.

Avery S. Hoyt, Associate Chief.

S. A. RoHWER, Assistant Chief in Charge of Regulatory Work.

F.C. BrsHoprP, Assistant Chief in Charge of Research Work.

W. L. PopHam, Assistant Chief in Charge of Control Operations.

F. H. SpencsEr, Assistant Chief in Charge of Business Administration.

J. C. Hotron, Ayent, Cooperative Field Relations.

Roxra P. Curri£, Hditor.

J. A. Hystop, in Charge, Division of Insect Pest Survey and Information.

J. I. HAMPLETON, in Charge, Division of Bee Culture Investigations.

D. L. VAN DINE, in Charge, Division of Fruit Insect Investigations.

FP. C. CRAIGHEAD, in Charge, Division of Forest Insect Investigations.

W. H. Waite, in Charge, Division of Truck Crop and Garden Insect Investigations.

©. M. PACKARD, in Charge, Division of Cereal and Forage Insect Investigations.

W. HARNED, in Charge, Division of Cotton Insect Investigations.

. C. CusHine, in Charge, Division of Insects Affecting Man and Animals.

A. HAWKINS, in Charge. Division of Control Investigations.

C. RoarK, in Charge, Division of Insecticide Investigations.

F. W. MUESEBECK, in Charge, Division of Insect Identification.

P. CLAUSEN, in Charge, Division of Foreign Parasite Introduction.

B. FRACKER, in Charge, Division of Plant Disease Control.

M. Gappis, in Charge, Division of Domestic Plant Quarantines.

. R. SASscer, in Charge, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines.

I. Burerss, in Field Charge, Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail Moth Control

(headquarters, Greenfield, Mass.).

. G. Brewer, in Field Charge, Japanese Beetle and Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail

Moth Quarantines, and Dutch Elm Disease Eradication (headquarters, Bloom-

field, N. J.)

R. E. McDonarp, in Field Charge, Pink Bollworm and Thurberia Weevil Quar-
antines (headquarters, San Antonio, Tez.).

P. A. Howare, in Field Charge, Mexican Fruitfly Quarantine (headquarters,
Harlingen, Tez.).

CLAUDE WAKELAND, in Field Charge. Grasshopper Control (headquarters, Denver,
Colo.).

A. C. BAKER, in Field Charge, Fruiifly Investigations (headquarters, Mexico City,
Mexico).

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27

U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1942



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LIBRARY
STATE PLANT BOARD

8, R. A.—B. E. P. Q. No. 151 Issued September 1942

United States Department of Agriculture

BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

APRIL-JUNE 1942

CONTENTS

Page
Snr ine Ano OLner oficial-announcements~ +2) 228. 22 te eon lee ek 24
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (No. 48)__---_-_-_-___-----_---_--------- 29

Japanese beetle administrative instructions modified (B. E. P. Q. 499, supplement No. 1,
CHUTL By LSP USA LO AT ey tc SSIS a a RS a he a A i aR 29

Japanese beetle administrative instructions modified (B. E. P. Q. 499, supplement No. 4,
fies tale VASOIa) eeysees eset peepee ees a eS od She sce chee eos ear ree yet TE 2 8 31
Japanese beetle administrative instructions modified (B. E. P. Q. 499, spe INo:5)2-= 32
Announcement relating to nursery stock, plant, and seed quarantine (No. 3 Ti Ret eae eer bs Bk te 33

Additional rae oe for plants imported for propagation purposes (B. ‘Qs 525,
minenaing: e | QUC.cA 2078 mevised)).11)_ Este tee ets Sey t all ge oe ee eee eit i 33
Announcements relating to white-fringed beetle quarantine: GN: 72). 422-26 s2sce 84. onto eae 35
White-fringed beetle quarantine regulations revised (press notice) .__________--_____-__--___- 35
White-fringed beetle quarantine (revision of quarantine and regulations effective May 9, 1942) 35
INoniceto general public'through mewspapers:_._ 2-2 -- 2 42
IBTTALE DONS COL DOSUIMAS LETS see sees nba = Fen eee recat A ke See ee es 42

White-fringed beetle administrative instructions modified; treatment authorized (B. E. P. Q.
Hs mut revision supplement, NO; 1). ford teed 1 Riel. | ey eee oe ee 42
White-fringed beetle administrative instructions modified (B. E, P. Q. 485, ninth revision)__ 43
PrANE PH TICDIEREILOINS cee ee ee yee eee he NE eal ON beter bo oe scence 44
Pace Elawikins retires: (DLeSs/mOLiCe) 2 east. Kanes aielgem 8 oe on Bocce ke ccce neue 44
Walter E. Dove named USDA division chief (press notice) __.__.___--________-.--.--____--- 44

S. B. Fracker named coordinator of insect and disease research; is succeeded by J. F. Martin
(press meee eee See ys ae Se eee ee heat epee 1s ee AEE CTL Te ee EI 45
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Peru (P. Q. O. A. 310, supplement No. 5) _- 45
ie import restrictions, Republic of Colombia (B. E. P. Q. 477, supplement R
a ee ee eee oe eR ee mee oe ee MLO De So ee 4
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine PA CTAB IR Sas Sa Ce A PER 46
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine______________________-_-_-___-_----- 48

QUARANTINE AND OTHER OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE
(NO. 48)

B. E. P. Q. 499, Supplement No. 1, Fifth Revision Effective April 23, 1942
TITLE 7—AGRICULTURE
CuapTerR III—Bureau or ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE
Part 301—DomEstTICc QUARANTINE NOTICES

JAPANESE BEETLE ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS MODIFIED

INTRODUCTORY NOTE

The fumigation of packaged plants to. free them from infestation by Japanese
beetle has heretofore been authorized for treatment by fumigation with methyl
bromide at 67° and 63° F. schedules. Further investigation has shown that
boxed or wrapped plants can be fumigated successfully with methyl bromide for
this insect at all seven of the dosage and temperature schedules authorized for
the treatment of balled and burlapped nursery stock. These instructions are
accordingly revised to provide authorization for the use of any of these schedules
for packaged plants.

§ 301.48-b. Administrative instructions to inspectors on the treatment of nursery
eee fruits, vegetables, and soil, for the Japanese beetle. Treatment authorized.

ursuant to the authority conferred upon the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology

29



YAARALI
IAAOM THAI STATE

30 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

and Plant Quarantine by § 301.48-6, Chapter III, Title 7, Code of Federal
Regulations {regulation 6 of the rules and regulations supplemental to Notice of
Quarantine No. 48], subsection (1) (5) of § 301.48—b! [on page 13 of the mimeo-
graphed edition of circular B. E. P. Q. 499, issued June 9, 1939] is hereby further
modified effective April 23, 1942, to read as follows:

(5) Methyl bromide fumigation

Equipment.—An approved fumigation chamber equipped with vaporizing, air-
circulating, and ventilating systems must be provided.

Application.—After the chamber is loaded, the methyl bromide must be vapor-
ized within it. The air within the chamber must be kept in circulation during
the period of fumigation. At the completion of the treatment, the chamber must
be well ventilated before it is entered and the plants removed. The ventilating
system should also be in continuous operation during the entire period of removal
of the fumigated articles.

(i) Fumigation of plants, with or without soil

Temperatures, periods of treatment, and dosages.—The temperature of the soil
(with bare root stock, the root spaces) and of the air for each type of treatment
must remain throughout the entire period of treatment at the minimum specified
in the following table, or higher:









Dosage Dosage
Period (methyl Period (methyl
Temperature at least of treat- bromide Temperature at least of treat- | bromide
ment per 1,000 ment per 1,000
cubic feet) cubic feet)
Hours Pounds Hours Pounds
Be. 73° Fit 07. sae 24% Tg ieisie Birtesiee serie 3% 2144
2. 67° bse oe 24% 2 GPSS Aes ae Se ee 4 2%
ARTS a eee eS eS 214 21% 100 TE an ee ee ee 4% 21%
AP GOS Bee Soe 3 24%





The foenee shall be for each 1,000 cubic feet including the space occupied by
the load.

Preparation of plants —The treatment is to be applied to plants with bare roots
or in 14-inch pots or smaller, or in soil balls not larger than 14 inches in diameter
nor thicker than 14 inches when not spherical. The soil should not be puddled
or saturated and must be in a condition which in the judgment of the inspector is
suitable for fumigation. The plants should be stacked on racks or separated so
that the gas can have access to both top and bottom surfaces of pots or soil balls.
While not essential that the balls be completely separated from each other they
should not be jammed tightly together.

Packaged plants.—Boxed or wrapped plants in packages not more than 14 inches
in diameter may be fumigated at any one of the above seven temperatures, per-
iods of treatment, and schedules. In order that the fumigant may have access
to the roots and soil masses about the roots, the wrapping shall not be tightly
closed.

Varieties of plants—The list of plants, including greenhouse, perennial, and
nursery-stock types treated experimentally, is subject to continual expansion
and, moreover, is too great to include in these instructions.

The schedule for the fumigation of strawberry plants as specified in subsection
(1) (5) (ii) of § 301.48b [page 14 of the mimeographed edition of circular B. E. P.
Q. 499] remains the same as heretofore. (7 C. F. R. § 301.48; sec 8, 39 Stat. 1165,
44 Stat. 250; 7 U. S. C. 161.)

This supplement supersedes Supplement No. 1, revised, dated August 6, 1941.

Done at Washington, D. C., this 21st day of April 1942.

P. N. ANNAND,

Chief.

1 This section was originally issued as § 301.48a.



1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS a

B. E. P. Q. 499 Effective May 7, 1942
Supplement No. 4, First Revision

TITLE 7—AGRICULTURE
Cuaprer IJJ—Bureav or ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE
Part 301—DomeEstTic QUARANTINE NOTICES
JAPANESE BEETLE ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS MODIFIED

Pursuant to the authority conferred upon the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology
and Plant Quarantine by §301.48-6, Chapter III, Title 7, Code of Federal Regu-
lations [regulation 6 of the rules and regulations supplemental to Notice of Qua-
rantine No. 48 on account of the Japanese beetle], subsections (i) (4), (k) (1),
and (m) (2) of § 301.48b [see pages 6, 8, and 15, respectively, of the mimeographed
edition of circular B. E. P. Q. 499, issued June 9, 1939], are hereby modified,
effective May 7, 1942, to read as follows:

§ 301.48b Administrative instructions to inspectors on the treatment of nursery
products, fruits, vegetables, and soil, for the Japanese beetle

(i) POTTING SOIL
(4) Lead arsenate treatment

Season.—The treatment must be applied before August 1.

Condition and type of soil—The soil must be friable. Wet soil must never be
treated. The treatment is recommended only for soils that are slightly acid or
neutral in reaction. Any type of soil may be treated provided it meets these
requirements.

Dosage.—Two pounds to 1 cubie yard.

Application.—The lead arsenate must be thoroughly mixed with the soil.

Period of treatment.—Plants freed from soil and potted in soil treated in the above
manner, by August 1, may be certified for shipment between the following October
1 and June 15, inclusive.

Handling of potted plants—When plants potted in lead-arsenate-treated soil
are plunged in beds or set in frames exposed to possible infestation, the soil of these
beds or frames must previously have been treated with lead arsenate at the rate
of 1,000 pounds per acre.

Treated plants carried after June 16.—When plants potted in soil treated as
prescribed are carried after June 15, they may be again eligible for certification
between October 1 and June 15, inclusive, of the second year if, on August 1 of
the second year, analyses show the soil to contain lead arsenate at the rate of 2
pounds per cubic yard.

(k) SOIL IN AND AROUND COLDFRAMES, PLUNGING BEDS, AND HEELING-IN AREAS

(1) Lead arsenate treatment

Season.—The treatment must be applied before August 1 if the land is to be
used in the fall.

Condition of soil.—The soil must be friable and in good tilth.

Dosage.—Twenty-three pounds to each 1,000 square feet, or 1,000 pounds per
acre. For subsequent re-treatments, the quantity required to restore a concen-
tration of 1,000 pounds per acre, as determined by chemical analyses, must be
applied, except that deiermination by chemical analyses of a concentration of
900 pounds per acre will be acceptable without re-treaiment.

Application.—The lead arsenaie must be thoroughly mixed and incorporated
with the upper 3 in‘ches of soil.

Period of treatment.—Plants must not be placed on or in the soil thus treated
until after October 1.

(M) TREATMENT OF PLANTS BEFORE DIGGING
(2) Lead arsenate treatment

Season.—Treatment must be applied by July 1. Plants may be certified when
the period of treatment is ecmpleted, and until the following June 15.

Condition of soil—The soil must be friable and in good tilth. This treatment
is recommended only for soils that are slightly acid or neutral in reaction.



32 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

Dosage.—Twenty-three pounds to each 1,000 square feet, or 1,000 pounds per
acre. For subsequent re-treatments, the quantity required to restore a concen-
tration of 1,000 pounds per acre, as determined by chemical analyses, must be
applied, except that determination by chemical analyses of a concentration of
900 pounds per acre will be acceptable without re-treatment.

Period of treatment.—Plants in plots treited initially must not be dug until
October 1; those on re-treated plots may be dug on September 20.

Application.—Lead arsenate must be thoroughly mixed and incorporated with
the upper 3 inches of soil. The ridge of soil between the plants in the rows and
the soil about the base of the plants must be removed to a depth of 2 inches and
placed in the space between the rows of plants. Lead arsenate may be applied
with a suitable distributor or broadcast by hand, before or after the hoeing
operation is completed. Then the soil between the rows of plants must be cul-
tivated three times. On the last cultivation, the cultivator is adjusted in such
a manner that the treated soil is thrown toward the rows of plants. At least
3 inches of treated soil must be placed in the rows about the bases of the plants.

Varieties of plants.—The varieties of plants which have been treated successfully
by this method are given in Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine Circular

—418.

Safety zone.—Same as that prescribed in (k).

Marking.—Same as that prescribed in (k).

(7 C. F. R. § 301.48; sec. 8, 39 Stat. 1165, 44 Stat. 250; 7 U. S. C. 161.)

Done at Washington, D. C., this 2d day of May 1942.

P. N. ANNAND,
Chief.

B. E. P. Q. 499, Effective May 18, 1942
Supplement No. 5

TITLE 7—AGRICULTURE
CuartTeR IIJ—Bureavu or ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE
Part 301—DomeEstTIc QUARANTINE NOTICES

JAPANESE BEETLE ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS MODIFIED

INTRODUCTORY NOTE

Experience and further experiments in paradichlorobenzene fumigation for the
treatment of plants after digging to free them from infestation by Japanese beetle
permit modification of treating requirement approved June 9, 1939, without
increasing risk of spread. The instructions authorizing the use of this method are
accordingly revised to reduce the period of treatment from 5 to 3 days.

Pursuant to the authority conferred upon the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology
and Plant Quarantine by § 301.48—6, Chapter III, Title 7, Code of Federal Regu-
lations [regulation 6 of the rules and regulations supplemental to Notice of Quar-
antine No. 48 on account of the Japanese beetle], paragraph (1) (4) of § 301.48b
[see page 11 of the mimeographed edition of circular B. E. P. Q. 499, issued June 9,
1939] is hereby modified effective May 18, 1942, to read as follows:

§ 301.48b Administrative instructions to inspectors on the treatment of nursery
products, fruits, vegetables. and soil, for the Japanese beetle. * *

TEEATMENT OF Sort ABOUT THE Roots OF PLANTS
(l) TREATMENT OF PLANTS AFTER DIGGING * * *

(4) Paradichlorobenzene fumigation

Season.—The treatment must be applied between October 1 and May 1.

Varieties of plants—Many different kinds of plants have been successfully
treated experimentally. The list of plants which have been treated without
injury is subject to such continual expansion that it cannot be appropriately
included in these instructions. Experience has shown that possible plant injury
is associated at least to some extent with the condition and growth of the plants
at time of treatment. It is suggested, therefore, that trial tests be made before
large numbers of plants are treated.



1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 33

Preparation of plants.—Excess soil should be removed and the mass reduced as
much as possible without injuring the roots. The plant ball should be moist, but
not wet. Pots must be removed from potted plants. When burlap on balled
plant is of coarse weave, it may be left on the balls, but when it is closely woven,
it must be removed.

Preparation of plunging soil.—The paradichlorobenzene must be thoroughly
mixed with a light sandy loam, or sand, which is moist but not wet, and free from
lumps, stones, and debris. It must be mixed immediately before using.

Care of plants during treatment.—If it is necessary to water the plants during the
treatment to prevent desiccation, the operation must be limited to a light syring-
ing, under the supervision of an inspector. During the treating period care should
be used to assure that the natural air movement will aid in reasonably rapid dis-
persal of the fumigant that escapes from the soil to prevent it from being held about
the foliage of the treated plants.

Care of plants after treatment.—It is advisable to avoid excessive watering of the
Pa after treatment in order to permit any residual gas to escape from the plant

alls.

(i) Complete Coverage

Temperature.—The temperature of both the treating soil and the soil ball must
not be less than 50° F. during the period of treatment. ‘To prevent injury to the
plants, it should not go above 65°.

Dosage.—Ten pounds per cubic yard of mixing soil (6 ounces per cubic foot)
for soil balls up to 6 inches in diameter at the narrowest dimension. Twenty
pounds per cubic yard of mixing soil (12 ounces per cubic foot) for soil balls from
6 to 8 inches in diameter at the narrowest dimension.

Application.—Spread a layer of the treated plunging soil on a smooth hard
surface, such as a floor or bench, and then place a row of plants, with the balls
spaced at least 1 inch apart, on this soil. Fill the spaces between the plant balls
with treated soil and cover the plant balls to a depth of l inch. Then place about
1 inch of treated soil against the row of plants. ‘This operation is repeated until
all the plants are plunged.

Period of treatment.—The plants must be left undisturbed for a period of 3 days.

(ii) Side Application

Temperature, dosage, period of treatment.—The various combinations of dosage
and exposure which may be used at different temperatures are given in table 1.
It is desirable to maintain the temperature fairly constant. The temperatures
given at the head of the column in table 1 are the minimum temperatures during
the period of treatment.

* ** * * * * *

Application.—Spread a layer of the treated plunging soil on a smooth hard sur-
face, such as a floor or bench, and then place a row of plants, with the balls spaced
at least 1 inch apart, on this soil. Fill the spaces between the plant balls with
treated soil, taking care not to get the treated soil in contact with the stems of the
plants, and cover the upper side of the plant balls with treated soil to within 2
inches of the stems. Then, place about 1 inch of treated soil against the row of
plants. The operation is repeated until all the plants are plunged.

(7 C. F. R. § 301.48; sec. 8, 39 Stat. 1165, 44 Stat. 250; 7 U.S. C. 161.)

Done at Washington, D. C., this 15th day of May 1942.

P. N. ANNAND,

Chief.

ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO NURSERY STOCK, PLANT,
AND SEED QUARANTINE (NO. 37)

B. E. P. Q. 528, amending P. Q. C. A. 278, revised Effective May 11, 1942
TITLE 7—AGRICULTURE

CuaprerR III—Bureavu or ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE
Part 319—ForEIGN PLANT QUARANTINE NOTICES
ADDITIONAL QUANTITY LIMITS FOR PLANTS IMPORTED FOR PROPAGATION PURPOSES

Chapter III, Title 7, Code of Federal Regulations, § 319.37—14a [P. Q. C. A.
278, Revised, July 14, 1931] is hereby amended effective May 11. 1942, by adding



34 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

the following items to the list of representative genera for which quantity limits
have been determined; and effective July 1, 1942, by increasing by 25 percent
the quantity limitations specified in § 319.37—14a both as to the original list and
as to this supplemental list:

§ 319.37-14a Administrative instructions; limitations on special-permit plant
material entered for propagation purposes under § 319.87-14.



Yearly Yearl
Genus limits Genus limits
UE LOM ee ee ere ae plants _ 100) ||| Dxersms., o.oo bulbs__ 1, 000
Acuathseosio! = S22 LS2ee rs IEE -do_. 7260 || ‘DioSpyroes.2 2.2227 2ib: _ JL ee scions__| 1, 000
Anidantherd: x10 Get ge 4 $1 ie porms:: |) ) 1;000 AGIAN Gin =3 a eee eee CSP ee plants__ 250 || Echinacea____-. 2 ae PA eee ei dois 2 250
A@lumia —~ _..-. Ne cee ee a roots. - 200. || pleased ss 2) oes) oo dp. = 100
Aloe vera (medicinal) __________- plants__ 5;000°|!* Brythrina? st sa AN Lee doi. i 100
Aloe:(ornambntal):: estes 2 Be doz 250%}: Earythueniumes!. 42. 4i- sae bulbs__| 10, 000
Amaryilidaceses.2o) = per genus__ 1,000, || Kuehanise. 5. 22. Bao a Sa 0.5255 500
IRFADGESENS 2 ee plants__ 1O0;:|| Wugente =. an eee plants _- 100
Rromitye = SF" 7 Be See do__- 250 17S angveles) ey ok 2 eee bulbs__| 1, 000
erie Ls Ce eae ee dos TOO | eesti ke ee plants__ 100
Amzione 38, 4s: 9a Be te oes 250sisharquharia. «2-2 2 2 ee ee ee dos 250
AVHOUUISt= <8 ec e oo ee divisions__ 250) || pRiG@nM.o- oe eee ee Ons 250
Asitholyzat -& Ut. Se ree Se a bulbs__ 1O00"}) Wicusite 2k Sel) ke doe 250
Apanogeton: 2)... & 4522 32": 3% plants_ 600 || Galtonias. coe! ue toa i bulbs__| 10,000
BeOMG Ae on 2 02>. oon A te eet a dO 2 O04), Gardenia» ¢ 22.473 | fae plants__| 1,000
RPI ee ng ee ne rie cuttings.“| “2,500 || Gelssorhiza_---__- 2.2 = ke bulbs 1, 000
Atacona ) ULERY Fes plants__ 2 260) || @renipa:!:) il Soc. tee 67 0 Oe ORE plants_- 100
Avisted. atiscy lino yeyi {yeu}: ake bulbs_- 13000 :|)) Gravisias s:i¢ ies le: Bees Arka do___- 250
ATundo: (reed) =. Ss ee plants_- 250))\|\.Gullacnine. =e Sao 2d eee dot 100
ASU OCAGG ex. es = ate = Pa doz ay OOO) | CeySO DMN ees eee Sn eee doa 250
Bapiana svi Sey es 2! bulbs_- 1; 000"|| Haemanthus: 221-8 _ 128s bulbs__ 250
Beers of )tosliiy7_ some iow do__s_}0},000+|| "Haworthiais::22! 22. sch 2 es plants__ 250
BOWS) > fee 2 4s poh eer plants_- HQ0 || tipliconias <2. 26. Uo. ee ene dor + 250
Bougainvilleas --~ ye =e dow 2 250),|| Se opsisess 26: eee a eee doe 250
PGCE ease. eee co 250 || Hermodactylus_._._.-..-_--- Lelie roots--| 1,000
fon SSINSEIN! BE cee s::bulbs__| 10,000 |); Hippeastrums_ 222: us izc2_-heat bulbs _| 5,000
romeliaceae_-_-__.--..---. plants & suc_- 250) +) Homeria.-+-2*s2 322 hae do__.-| 1,000
Bromeliads: 2 = » 2 2 eee plants__ 2250.7) ibe s ote ee 2s eee plants _ 100
Brosimum (breadnut)___-____-____. do*s*) 100 ‘WIsmenet 2.032020). O12 2. eS bulbs__| 10,000
Wrowriea.: 2. 4 a ee ee dos LOO" || Extolivion’== 202 34 eS ee ee do____| 5,000
pravifelsia. (ost te ee a do___- ROOM SEXOES: #22 22% oc oS eee plants_-| 1,000
BrvophylUiias eee ee domes 250) acarand ae =< Ya ee do 100
Bulboctodium 53..3$005444.,5- os eormats| NOPOOO. }| igelans. 82 ee ree 100
Biisera=e4 22a en ae ee plants__ 25 0|| MCE A. ona does 100
Cacttis-tee_ 14). Se a eee dome 5, 000 ||’ Koelreuterias’. 2) feet) Sei do___- 100
Calathea________- » att) ae ‘tubers °2 11.1, 000 ||) Lantamast. 22} sree tssi ees hal do____| 1,000
GalliGar pause he Oe ee en het plants__ 100: || evicocrimum._..¢_ = 45 5 bul bss. 500
CORNING es on ee er do_5 250: || Gomrebite "= 920) one ee plants__| 1,000
OalochortusSs: 54. 3.42 Sees = ke | corms:!} ~ 10,.000' || Lonchocanpus2=-- === stems__| 10,000
Calystegiow.:
@Galycanthuse eo et ee dows 100)|| Miatanthentumee ==.) = ee do. 250
Oamipanilian 3 Seite ei tins. do_22 2504} Mammeats. 4.24 si) 22 lego dass 100
Oampanulalt .38 3.44 tee ed ef dO. 1,000; ||eMlonoifera 72) ef eet: ee dos=- 100
@aragniin-- =. ge ee ee doe TOO | Visi Obese =o eee ee eee dos 250
Cardyelltgae = Sena eee eee _tubers__ 250°)! Marica--U 3s Sb) hee Se 250
CassiaiG_ tesid Sal ee Set plants__ 100:|| Meconopsis- 2:2. 22.5--2- 54 22222. dol) here
Gostriiiniis 2. 4} fe hi be ee doz a2 200,)||\\ Michelia.. c=... }.-4 <.285 6 Sage 100
Glethta.. 22s as ee ee eet ag 100.) Mionarda ==. 252 ee ee doz 250
Cyt Sea are ee eee adoes.= 500" || Wronstera’ 2824 2-402 2)" * eae do. 250
Codiseum'—. 32 Jeena wes doa 100.) IMioraea 2. essai es os teu 3s s2 bulbs! 1, 000
Colocagia_.72 Bene 2 Ee Us tubers__ 15,0007)|) Montrichardia=..-.. 25 sta plants_-
©onyolvulis.: 2S ee plants_-_ 250. WNUNOSOUIS sa = en ee ee (Os = 250
WOT YMG seen ees Oe ne eee dom 250%). Meyricarias = 2-52-25. 3S eae doi 100
Corlarittize-¢ e-- Fo he oe dome 2608) (2 Nandinat 2222222) eee dome 250
COTDTIBE See Co a ete se dorms 2500 Neanthe 2.24. -=252--. 49-2 3 A doe 250
CTANW Ge ee _---hullbs*2 5 000s |@Netiak e222 ee dona 250
Crescentin=-.-*.\ 9522.0 oon tees ae plants__ 250UPNelumpbium=-- = --2 2 Ss 8S > eerie 500
CTO yi 3272 te ee bulbs__ 1,000 |} Nepenthes___.----___- . 2.2 2 ee plants__ 500
Crocosma 8“. 28. 4 5 Ee 5 dor oe: 1, 090) |! Netines 2 2 852 S48 21s A hee bulbs_- 5, 000
CRG. 8.2 oo. et ee ee ee plants__ BOOT NGI ose oe ee ee plants _- 100
Cryptocoryne.....--- 4a ae do_s= 500.1 IWomocharis_2-4 34 4 £8 Wf Bo. do=—= 500
Oureuims: 22-6. eee a ee dome 2501" Ontpnalodes. 2-222 2 soe ee dos 250
Cyeadaceas: «22.232 .ce = 2 dove 22.50): WORHIOSIO 2 tages eee ee dgnses 100
Ly CAN re ee se ee ee ee dost 25035||| Oriurosantiliss =o - =. 2 seen rhizomes__ 1, 000
GDSENE ee ie ee ie ae dosase DBO allie achneniiien. tS oo ee plants__| 5,000
DAB OECIE ss 25. ae, ee ee ee BUCH |e etrege eee oe does i, 000
Dannpie aes es Ek ae Os ee do: = 1000).|| “Pheédranasss 2-2 tee foe hla 500
Date. 2. Pease es tae rem CO 250.) Phaeomeris-2.o2.2. 22 Ak SA plantss2 250
IDRVidis: 5 3. ade: eee ys don: 100" ||) Eollodendtron. 225.2023 aoe OO eee 500
Dianthus. 23. Set edo LOOT NY Pinvise 232 ee ee es eS doce 100
Diesatrams, 5 i a pies. ee as: divisions_- 9503 ee lomionige see s2 fa gece Paha dol22 200
Dieffenbachia. sé o.e5 7 a.ceest-= plants_. 1;000 ||, Polygonatum.-........+. apiece 1375 eed do=2.4 250

2 Per genus,



1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 35







Yearly Yearly
Genus limits Genus limits

RO Lemus tree Als Se ys ed ose ey plants_- 2501)|| Stenoniessone 252 he sewes Lele bulbs_- 5, 000
I RE a Se og don ft ZA a DCL OMI ie nero oe ee eek plants__ 100
Tate eee en ae ee ee GOs. 5. ZOO Ft POUNCIU Zar ae tee ee ee és 250
Ay rtisees tend SPE ee ter a dovitz 250i PSUICCUle nt soa sae se (eee EET ee dos 2250
PIAMOMCdigrem es aes bot uot! wed oo dox#es 1 000n) | abepuiae sre Spice. onl eyes _ see doiass 100
ROG OUV DONS: 5 4.2. Pa eee doze= eM Hy ENS pc et A ok Ea st oh By does 250
RUT eC Kaas eee eee PdOue== ZOOM | PULlanGsiqercs= en ere wae ee aoe: 250
amino ile sit Poo oS bulbs_- P0005) Lree forties: : i382 51) ee esos) douse! 250
Sobizolobiuinics- 2) 312.2. eclei plants_- 100 || Tropaeolum-.-___ 4 Faoan. Bets bey. ord Gos242 250
Pelneinelia es fee FF ee dors 100) || PWaceiniume.-— Ser Aa ae ee dorsae 100
OMNI Se eee ag eo 8 do=-=- Z00ni> VelbHemiia= == 22 a weer ae bulbs__| 1, 000
lle eg LS ae ee doit 42 BOOM Wibisa ge Sosige SII Ce hes 7s tisk. plants __ 100
Dilempeetiess. heed peers oo Lda ye a0s=== 250). || WWiATSZeWicZla ses. 2222 creepy sees | dota 100
DPCM OrE 6 2eP Pe ES do... = Zp) | MCDOVPAUGN eS: | Packs. 4 an bulbs__| 1,000

2 Per genus.

(7 C.F. R. § 319.37-14; sec. 7, 37 Stat. 317; 7 U. S.C. 160.)
Done at Washington, D. C., this 6th day of May 1942.
Avery 8. Hoyt,
Acting Chief.

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE
QUARANTINE (NO. 72)
WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE QUARANTINE REGULATIONS REVISED
[Press notice]

May 12, 1942.

The Department of Agriculture said today that the white-fringed beetle quar-
antine and regulations have been revised, effective May 9, 1942. The regulated
areas in the four quarantined States of Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, and Missis-
sippi have been extended to include new sections in which the beetles have been
found since the original quarantine was put into effect more than 3 years ago.
The newly added sections are for the most part adjacent to the old infested areas,
including the vicinities of Florala, Mobile, and Monroeville, Ala., Pensacola,
Fla., New Orleans, La., and Gulfport and Laurel, Miss.

Part of the area at Monroeville—some 84 square miles—has been released

from quarantine, however, as repeated inspections indicate there are no beetles
there now. Because several communities in the vicinity of Hattiesburg, Miss.,
have been found infested, the regulated areas in that State have been extended
to include parts of the counties of Forrest, Covington, and Lamar, and a small
area in Pearl River County not heretofore under regulation. Parts of Dallas and
Escambia Counties, Ala., and of Iberia and Saint Tammany Parishes, La., are
also brought within the regulated area for the first time.
, Among the commodities placed under regulation throughout the year (unless
exempted by administrative instructions) are grass sod, peanut hay, lily bulbs,
and nursery stock including greenhouse-grown annuals and perennials. All re-
strictions are lifted on the movement of sweetpotatoes, peas, and beans.

There is a new regulation as to the cleaning of railway cars, trucks, and other
vehicles, and another permitting the shipping of live specimens of white-fringed
beetles for scientific or experimental purposes as specifically authorized. ;

B. E. P. Q.—Q. 72 Revision of Quarantine and Regulations
Effective May 9, 1942

TITLE 7—AGRICULTURE
CuapTEerR IJ]—Bureav or ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE
Part 301—DomeEstTIic QUARANTINE NOTICES
SUBPART—WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE QUARANTINE

INTRODUCTORY NOTE

To bring the white-fringed beetle quarantine and regulations in line with cur-
rent information this revision is made to extend the regulated areas in Alabama,
Florida, Louisiana, and Mississippi to inelude several small areas in which infesta-



36 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

tions of the beetles have been found since the original quarantine became effective;
to release an area of approximately 84 square miles in the vicinity of Monroeville,
Ala., where repeated inspections fail to show that the beetles are now present;
to add to the articles that are restricted throughout the year, lily bulbs, grass sod,
peanut hay, and nursery stock including greenhouse-grown annuals and perennials;
to lift the restrictions on sweetpotatoes, peas, and beans; and to make other modi-
fications. A regulation (§ 301.72—8) has been included to require the cleaning
of railway cars, trucks, and other vehicles which have been used for transporting
restricted articles within the regulated area, before such vehicles may be moved
interstate to points outside.

The newly added sections are for the most part adjacent to the old infested
areas in the vicinities of Florala, Mobile, and Monroeville, Ala., Pensacola, Fla..
New Orleans, La., Gulfport and Laurel, Miss., and include also Hattiesburg, Miss..
and several communities in the vicinity thereof. Brought within the regulated
areas, in part, for the first time, are the counties of Dallas and Escambia, Ala.,
the parishes of Iberia and Saint Tammany, La., and the Mississippi counties of
Covington, Forrest, and Lamar. A

Under the authority contained in the Insect Pest Act of March 3, 1905, the inter-
state movement of living white-fringed beetles in any stage of development is
prohibited except when so moved under certification for scientific purposes as
authorized in paragraph (b) of § 301.72-9.

To conform with current nomenclature of the white-fringed beetles, the designa-
tion of the genus is changed from Naupactus to Pantomorus and the restrictions
apply only to species of the subgenus Graphognathus.

Arrangements for inspection may be made by addressing the Bureau of Ento-
mology and Plant Quarantine, P. O. Box 989, Gulfport, Miss., or other field offices
listed in the appendix.

DETERMINATION OF THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE

The Secretary of Agriculture, having given the public hearing required by law
and having determined that it was necessary to quarantine the States of Alabama,
Florida, Louisiana, and Mississippi, to prevent the spread of dangerous infesta-
tions of insect pests, commonly referred to as white-fringed beetles, not theretofore
widely prevalent within and throughout the United States, on December 14, 1938,
promulgated Notice of Quarantine 301.72, part 301, chapter III, title 7, Code of
Federal Regulations, and the regulations supplemental thereto §§ 301.72-1 to
301.72—-9 inclusive, Part 301, chapter III, title 7, Code of Federal Regulations
{B. E. P. Q.—Q. 72, effective on and after January 15, 1939]. At the time the
aforesaid hearing was held, the insect pests known as white-fringed beetles were
classified as species of the genus Naupactus and were so referred to at the hearing
when the importance, status, and habits of these insects were fully covered. This
group of insects has since been reclassified as species of the subgenus Graphognathus
of the genus Pantomorus. It is therefore necessary to revise the quarantine to
adopt current nomenclature for such insect pests, as well as to extend the regulated
areas to cover more recently discovered infestations, and to makeother
modifications.

ORDER OF THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE

Pursuant to the authority conferred upon the Secretary of Agriculture by sec-
tion 8 of the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912, as amended (7 U.S. C.
161) and the Insect Pest Act of March 3, 1905 (7 U.S. C. 141, 148), the subpart
entitled ‘‘White-fringed Beetle’ of part 301, chapter III, title 7, Code of Federal
Regulations [B. E. P. Q.—Q. 72] is hereby revised effective May 9, 1942, to read
as follows:

SuBPART—WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE

QUARANTINE

Authority: §§ 301.72 to 301.72-9 (a), inclusive, (except § 201.72-2a) issued under sec. 8, 39 Stat. 1165, 44 Stat.
0;7 U.S. C. 1940 ed. 161. § 301.72-2a issued under sec. 1, 33 Stat. 1269; 7 U. S. C., 1940 ed. 141. § 301.72-9
(b) issued under sec. 3, 33 Stat. 1270; 7 U. 8. C., 1940 ed. 143.

§ 301.72. Notice of Quarantine.—Under the authority conferred by section 8 of
the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912, as amended (7 U. S. C. 161),
the Secretary of Agriculture quarantines the States of Alabama, Florida, Louisi-
ana, and Mississippi to prevent the spread of dangerous infestations of introduced
species of the genus Pantomorus, subgenus Graphognathus, commonly known as
white-fringed beetles, and under authority contained in the aforesaid Plant
Quarantine Act and Insect Pest Act of March 3, 1905 (7 U.S. C. 141, 148), the



1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS or

Secretary of Agriculture prescribes regulations. Hereafter the following articles
(as specifically named in the regulations supplemental hereto, in modifications
thereof, or in administrative instructions as provided in the regulations supple-
mental hereto), which are capable of carrying the aforesaid insect infestations, viz,
(1) nursery stock and other stipulated plants or plant products; (2) soil inde-
pendent of, or in connection with, nursery stock, plants, or other products; or (3)
other articles as stipulated in § 301.72-38; or (4) live white-fringed beetles in any
stage of development, shall not be transported by any person, firm, or corporation
from any quarantined State into or through any other State or Territory or
District of the United States, under conditions other than those prescribed in the
regulations supplemental hereto: Provided, That the restrictions of this quaran-
tine and of the regulations supplemental hereto may be limited to such areas,
designated by the Secretary of Agriculture as regulated areas, in the quarantined
States, as, in his judgment, shall be adequate to prevent the spread of the said
pest or pests. Any such limitation shall be conditioned, however, upon the
affected State or States providing for and enforcing the control of the intrastate
movement of the restricted articles and enforcing such other control and sanitation
measures with respect to such areas or portions thereof as, in the judgment of the
Secretary of Agriculture, shall be deemed adequate to prevent the intrastate
spread therefrom of said insect infestation: And provided further, That whenever,
in any year, the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine shall
find that facts exist as to the pest risk involved in the movement of one or more
of the articles to which the regulations supplemental hereto apply, making it safe
to modify, by making less stringent, the restrictions contained in any such regu-
lations, he shall set forth and publish such finding in administrative instructions,
specifying the manner in which the applicable regulations should be made less
stringent, whereupon such modification shall become effective, for such period
and for such regulated area or portion thereof as shall be specified in said adminis-
trative instructions, and every reasonable effort shall be made to give publicity
to such administrative instructions throughout the affected areas.

REGULATIONS
Meaning of Terms

§ 301.72-1. Definitions ——(a) The pests.—Species of the genus Pantomorus,
subgenus Graphognathus, commonly known as white-fringed beetles, in any stage
of development.

(b) Regulated area.—Any area in 2 quarantined State which is now, or which
may hereafter be, designated as regulated by the Secretary of Agriculture in
accordance with the provisions of § 301.72, as revised.

(c) Restricted articles—Products or articles of any character whatsoever, the
interstate movement of which is restricted by the provisions of the white-fringed
beetle quarantine, and the regulations supplemental thereto.

(d) Nursery stock.—Forest, field, and greenhouse-grown annual or perennial
plants, for planting purposes.

‘(e) Inspector—Duly authorized Federal plant-quarantine inspector.

(f) Certificate—An approved document, issued by an inspector, authorizing the
movement of restricted articles from the regulated areas.

(g) Limited permit.—An approved document, issued by an inspector, to allow
controlled movement of noncertified articles to designated and authorized proc-
essing plants or for other restricted operations.

(h) Administrative instructions.—Documents issued by the Chief of the Bureau
of Entomology and Plant Quarantine relating to the enforcement of the quarantine.

(i) Infested or infestation.—Infested by white-fringed beetles, in any stage of
development. (See (a) above.)

(j) Infested area.—That portion of the regulated area in which infestation
exists, or in the vicinity of which infestation is known to exist under such condi-
tions as to expose the area to infestation by natural spread of beetles, as deter-
mined by an authorized inspector.

Areas Under Regulation

3 301.72-2. Regulated areas.—The following counties, parishes, cities, and
towns, or parts thereof as described. are designated by the Secretary of Agriculture
as regulated areas:

Alabama.—In Conecuh. Monroe, and Wilcox Counties: The W. % T. 5 N.,
W.%T.8N., all of Tps. 9 and 10 N.. R.9 E.S. % and secs. 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, and

477153—42——2



38 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

17, T. 11 N., R.9 E. All of Tps. 5, 6, 7, 8,9, and 8S. 4% T. 10 N., R. 8 E. Sees.
25, 26, 35, and 36, T. 7 N., and secs. 1 and 2, T.6 N., R. 7 E.; in Covington County:
Sees. 30 and 31, T. 2 N., R. 18 E.; secs. 25, 26, 35, and 36, T. 2 N., R. 17 E.; T. 1
N., Rs. 17 and 18 E. and SE. 4 T. 1 N., R. 16 E., and all area south thereof. to
the Alabama-Florida State line; also all of the town of Opp; in Dallas County:
That area included within a boundary beginning on the Southern Railroad where
it crosses Bougechitto Creek; thence southwest along the Southern Railroad to
Caine Creek; thence southeast along Caine Creek to its intersection with Bouge-
chitto Creek; thence northward along Bougechitto Creek to the starting point;
in Escambia County: Secs. 32, 33, and 34, T. 1 N., R. 8 E., including all of the
town of Flomaton; in Geneva County: Secs. 31, 32, and 33, T. 1 N., R. 19 E., and
all area south thereof to the Alabama-Florida State line, including all of sees.
21 and 28, T. 6 N., R. 19 W.; in Mobile County: That area included within a
boundary beginning at a point where the eastern boundary of the city limits of
Mobile, if extended northward, would intersect the northern boundary of S
1% T. 3 S.; thence west to Chickasaw Creek; thence northwestward along Chicka-
saw Creek to Eight-Mile Creek; thence westerly along Eight-Mile Creek to the
western boundary of R. 1 W.; thence south to [slava Creek; thence easterly
along Eslava Creek to the city limits of Mobile; thence following the city limits
east and north to the starting point, including all of Blakeley Island and the city
of Mobile; also that area included within a boundary beginning at a point where
old Highway 90 crosses Fowl River; thence southwestward along old Highway
90 to the junction of old Highway 90 and the Alabama-Mississippi State line;
thence south along the Alabama- Mississippi State line to the southern boundary
of N. % T. 7 S.; thence east to the SE. corner of sec. 9, T. 7S., R. 3 W.; thence
north to the NE. corner of sec. 4, T. 7S., N. 3 W.; thence east to the point where
the south boundary of T. 6 S. intersects Fowl River; thence northwestward
along Fowl River to the starting point.

Florida.—In Escambia County: All that part lying south of the northern
boundary of T. 1 N., including all of the city of Pensacola, and that part of the
county north of the southern boundary of T. 5 N. and east of the western boundary
of R. 31 W.: in Okaloosa County: T. 5 N., R. 22 W., and secs. 1, 2, and 3, T. 5
N., R. 23 W., and all lands north of both areas to the Florida-Alabama State
line; secs. 7, 8, 9. 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, and 21, T. 3 N., R. 23 W., including all of
the town of Crestview; and secs. 13, 14, 23, 24, T. 3 N., R. 24 W.; in Walton
County: T. 5 N., Rs. 20 and 21 W., and sees. 31, 32, and 33, T. 6 N., R. 19 W.,
and all lands north of both areas to the Florida-Alabama State line; also secs. 1
to 24, inclusive, T. 4 N., R. 19 W.

Louisiana.—All of Orleans Parish, including the city of New Orleans, and all
of Saint Bernard Parish. In East Baton Rouge Parish: All of T. 7S., Rs. 1 and 2
E. and 1 W., including all of the city of Baton Rouge; in Iberia Parish: All of
secs. 24, 37, 38, 39, 53, 55, 56, T. 13 S., R. 5 E., and secs. 46, 55. 56, 57, 58, 59
60, T. 13 S., R. 6 E.; in Jefferson Parish: That part lying north of the township
line between Tps. 14 and 15 S.; in Plaquemines Parish: That part lying north of
the township line between Tps. 15 and 16 S.; in Saint Tammany Parish: All of
sees. 38, 39, and 40, T. 7S., R. 11 E., and secs. 40 and 41, T. 8 Si. ee ee

Mississippi.—In Covington County: All of secs. 28, 29, 32, and 33, oT. Neat Bae
14 W.; in Forrest County: All that part of T. 4 N., Rs. 12 and 13 W. lying west of
Leaf River; all that part of the S. 4% T. 5 N., R. 13 W., lying west of Leaf River;
all of secs. 7, 18, 19, and those parts of secs. 6, 8, 17, and 2G, lying south and
west of old Highway 49, T. 5 N., R. 13 W.; the east %3 and secs. 5 and 8 of T.
5 N., R. 14 W.; those parts of secs. 2, 3, 4, and 5, lying south of Beaverdam Creek,
and all of secs. 8, 9, 10, 11, 14, 15, 16, and 17, T. 1S., R. 12 W.; secs. 9, 10, 15,
16, 21, 22, 27, 28, 33, and 34, T.2 N., R. 12 W.; sees. 2, 3, 4, 9, and 10, and those
parts of secs. 11, 14, 15, and 16, lying north of Black Creek, T;, 1 N., He dagemie:
in Harrison and Stone Counties: That area included within a boundary beginning
at the NE. corner sec. 5, T. 4 S., R. 11 W.; thence west to the NW. corner sec.
2, T. 48., R. 12 W.; thence south to the NE. corner sec. 15, T. 6S. B.. 2
thence west to the NW. corner sec. 16, T. 6 S., R. 12 W.; thence south to inter-
section with Wolf River; thence following a general southwesterly direction aiong
Wolf River to Saint Louis Bay; thence following a general southerly direction
along the east shore of Saint Louis Bay to the Mississippi Sound; thence eastward
along the Mississippi Sound to a point where the east line of sec. 31, T. (OBwete
10 W., would intersect with the Mississippi Sound if extended without change in
direction of said Sound; thence north to Bayou Bernard; thence following a
general northwesterly direction along Bayou Bernard to east line of sec. 22, T.



1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 39

7S., R. 11 W., thence north to intersection with Biloxi River; thence northwest-
ward along Biloxi River to the east line of sec. 5, T. 6 S., R. 11 W.; thence north
to starting point, including all properties extended onto or over the waters of
Mississippi Sound; also all of the town of Wiggins; in Hinds County: E. % T.6N.,
R. 3 W., and W. 4% T. 6 N., R. 2 W.; in Jackson County: That area included
within a boundary beginning at a point where the east line of sec. 19, T.75S., R.
5 W., intersects the Escatawpa River; thence west along said river to the Pas-
cagoula River; thence south along the Pascagoula River to the township line
between Tps. 7 and 8 S.; thence east to the SE corner sec. 31, T.758., R. 5 W.;
thence north to the starting point; in Jones County: Secs. 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21,
22. 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31,32, 33, $4, and 35, T.:9-N:, RR. 11 W.;-sees..2,:3, 4, 5,.6,
7, 8, 9, 16, 17, 18, T. 8. N., R. 11 W.; secs. 13, 14, 24, 25, 35, and 36, T. 9 N., R.
12 W.; and those portions of secs. 23 and 26, T. 9 N., R. 12 W., lying east of Tal-
lahoma Creek; secs. 1, 2, 11, 12, 18, and 14, T. 8 N., R. 12 W.; and secs. 25, 26,
27, 34, 35, and 36, T. 6 N., R. 14 W.; in Lamar County: All of the town of Purvis;
all of secs. 35, 36 ,T. 1 N., R. 15 W., sec. 31, T. 1 N., R. 14 W., and secs. 1 and
2, T.15S., R. 15 W.; in Pearl River County: All of secs. 3, 9, 10, 11, 14, 15, 16,
woe th Wo; all or 1.5.5. bio, W., and h.%.7T.558., R. 17 W.

Articles Prohibited Movement

§ 301.72—-2a. Beetles prohibited shipment.—The interstate shipping of living
species of whitefringed beetles in any stage of development, whether moved inde-
pendent of or in connection with any other article, is prohibited, except as provided
in paragraph (b) of § 301.72-9.

Articles Restricted Movement

§ 301.72-3. Restricted articles.—(a) Movement regulated throughout the year.—
Unless exempted by administrative instructions, the interstate movement of the
following articles from any regulated area is regulated throughout the year:

(1) Soil, earth, sand, clay, peat, or muck, whether moved independent of, or in
connection with or attached to nursery stock, plants, products, articles,
or things.

(2) Potatoes.

(3) Nursery stock.

(4) Grass sod.

(5) Lily bulbs.

(6) Peanut hay.

(7) Compost and manure.

(b) Movement regulated part of the year.—Except as provided in § 301.72-4
hereof, and unless exempted by administrative instructions, the interstate move-
ment from any regulated area of the following products is regulated from June 1
to January 31, inclusive, of any 12-month period:

(1) Forest products such as cordwood, stump wood, logs, lumber, timbers,

posts, poles, and cross ties.
| (2) Hay, other than peanut hay; roughage of all kinds, straw, leaves, and leaf-
mold.

(3) Peanuts in shells, and peanut shells.

(4) Seed cotton, cottonseed, baled cotton lint, and linters.

(5) Used implements, machinery, containers, scrap metal, and junk.

(6) Brick, tile, stone, cinders, concrete slabs, and building blocks.

Conditions of Interstate Movement

§ 801.72—4. Conditions governing interstate movement of restricted articles.—(a)
Certification required.—Restricted articles shall not be moved interstate from a
eee area to or through any point outside thereof unless accompanied by a
valid inspection certificate issued by an inspector: Provided, That certification
requirements as they relate to part or all of any regulated area may be waived,
during part or all of the year, by the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and
Plant Quarantine, on his finding and giving notice thereof, in administrative
instructions, that the State concerned has promulgated and enforced adequate
sanitary measures on and about the premises on which restricted articles originate
or are retained, or that adequate volunteer sanitary measures have been applied,
or that other control or natural conditions exist which have eliminated the risk of
contamination by the pests in any stage of development.



40 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

(b) Use of certificate on shipments.—Every container o/ restricted articles moved
interstate from any regulated area shall have securely attached to the outside
thereof a certificate or permit issued in compliance with these regulations, except
that in the case of shipments in bulk, by common carrier, a master permit attached

to the shipping order, manifest, or other shipping papers, will be sufficient. In -

the case of shipments in bulk by road vehicle other than common carrier, a master
permit shall accompany the vehicle. Master permits shall accompany shipments
to destination and be surrendered to consignees on delivery.

(ce) Movement within contiguous areas unrestricted.—No certificates are required
for interstate movement of restricted articles when such movement is wholly
within contiguous regulated areas.

(d) Articles originating outside the regulated areas.—No certificates are required
for the interstate movement of restricted articles originating outside of the
regulated areas and moving through or from a regulated area, when the point of
origin is clearly indicated, when their identity has been maintained, and when
the articles are protected, while in the regulated area, in a manner satisfactory
to the inspector.

Conditions of Certification

§ 301.72—5. Conditions governing the issuance of certificates and permits.—(a)
Approved methods.—Certificates authorizing the interstate movement of restricted
articles from the regulated areas may be issued upon determination by the in-
spector that the articles are (1) apparently free from infestation; or (2) have
been treated, fumigated, sterilized, or processed under approved methods; or (3)
were grown, produced, manufactured, stored, or handled in such a manner that,
in the judgment of the inspector, no infestation would be transmitted thereby:
Provided, That certificates authorizing the interstate movement of soil, earth,
sand, clay, peat, muck, compost, or manure originating im an infested area may
be issued only when such materials have been treated or handled under methods
or conditions approved by the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant
Quarantine.

(b) Limited permits for manufacturing or processing purposes.—Limited permits
may be issued for the movement of noncertified restricted articles to such manu-
facturing or processing plants, mills, gins, or establishments as may be authorized
and designated by the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine,
for manufacture; processing, treatment, or other disposition. As a condition of
such authorization and designation, persons or firms so designated shall agree in
writing to maintain such sanitary safeguards against the establishment and
spread of infestation and to comply with such restrictions as to their handling
or subsequent movement of restricted products as may be required by the
inspector.

(ec) Dealer-carrier permit.—As a condition of issuance of certificates or permits
for the interstate movement of restricted articles, persons or firms engaged in
purchasing, assembling, exchanging, processing, or carrying such restricted
articles originating or stored in regulated areas, may be required to execute a
signed agreement stipulating that the permittee will carry out any and all con-
ditions, treatments, precautions, and sanitary measures which may be deemed
necessary.

Procedure for Applicants

§ 301.72-6. Assembly of restricted articles for inspection.—Persons intending to
move restricted articles interstate from regulated areas shall make application for
certification as far as possible in advance of the probable date of shipment.
Applications must show the nature and quantity of articles to be moved, together
with their exact location, and if practicable, the contemplated date of shipment.
Applicants for inspection may be required to assemble or indicate the articles to
be shipped so that they may be readily examined by the inspector.

The United States Department of Agriculture will not be responsible for any
cost incident to inspection or treatment other than the services of the inspector.

Certificates and Permits May Be Canceled

§ 301.72-7. Cancelation of certificates or permits.—Certificates or permits issued
under these regulations may be withdrawn or canceled and further certification
refused whenever, in the judgment of the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and
Plant Quarantine, the further use of such certificates or permits might result in the
dissemination of infestation.

aa i



1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 4]

Cleaning of Vehicles

§ 301.72-8. Thorough cleaning required of freight cars, trucks, and other vehicles
before moving tnterstate.—Freight cars, trucks, and other vehicles which have been
used in transporting within the regulated areas any restricted articles, shall not
thereafter be moved interstate from the regulated areas until they have been
thoroughly cleaned by the carrier or owner at a point within the regulated area.

Shipments for Experimental or Scientific Purposes

§ 301.72-9. (a) Articles for experimental or scientific purposes.—Articles sub-
ject to restrictions may be moved interstate for experimental or scientific pur-
poses, on such conditions as may be prescribed by the Chief of the Bureau of
Entomology and Plant Quarantine. The container of articles so moved shall
bear an identifying tag from the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

(b) Beetles for experimental or scientific purposes.—Live white-fringed beetles,
in any stage of development, may be moved interstate for scientific purposes only
under conditions prescribed by the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and
Plant Quarantine. The container of white-fringed beetles so moved shall bear
an identifying tag issued by the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

Done at the city of Washington this 8th day of May 1942.

Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture,

(SEAL) CLAUDE R. WIcKARD,
Secretary of Agriculture.

APPENDIX
PENALTIES

The Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912, as amended (7 U.S. C. 161),
provides that no person shall ship or offer for shipment to any common carrier,
nor shall any common carrier receive for transportation or transport, nor shall
any person carry or transport, from any quarantined State or Territory or District
of the United States, or from any quarantined portion thereof, into or through
any other State or Territory or District, any class of nursery stock or any other
class of plants, fruits, vegetables, roots, bulbs, seeds, or other plant products, or
any class of stone or quarry products, or any other article of any character what-
‘soever, capable of carrying any dangerous plant disease or insect infestation,
specified in the notice of quarantine * * * in manner or method or under
conditions other than those prescribed by the Secretary of Agriculture. It also
provides that any person who shall violate any of the provisions of this act, or
who shall forge, counterfeit, alter, deface, or destroy any certificate provided
for in this act or in the regulations of the Secretary of Agriculture shall be deemed
guilty of a misdemeanor and shall, upon conviction thereof, be punished by a
fine not exceeding $500, or by imprisonment not exceeding 1 year, or both such
fine and imprisonment, in the discretion of the court.

STATE AND FEDERAL INSPECTION

Certain of the quarantined States have promulgated quarantine regulations
restricting intrastate movement supplemental to the Federal quarantine. These
State regulations are enforced in cooperation with the Federal authorities. Copies
of either the Federal or State quarantine orders may be obtained at the office
of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, Room 6, Gates-Cook Build-
ing (Telephone 1591), P.O. Box $89, Gulfport, Miss., or through a White-fringed
Beetle Inspector at one of the following subsidiary offices:

Alabama:
Florala: Hughes Building (Telephone 64), P. O. Box 187.
en? wi Federal Building (Telephone Belmont 3781, Ext. 214), P. O.
Ox :
Monroeville: City Hall (Telephone 90), P. O. Box 169.
Florida:
Pensacola: 18 Federal Building (Telephone 5652), P. O. Box 343.
Louisiana:
New Orleans: 4425 Bienville Ave. (Telephone Audubon 3860), P. O. Box
7086, Sta. G.
Mississippi:
Hattiesburg: 110 Evans Street (Telephone 2686), P. O. Box 988.
Laurel: Civic Center, P. O. Box 546.



42 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

GENFRAL OFFICES OF STATES COOPERATING

Alabama: Chief, Division of Plant Industry, Montgomery.

Florida: Assistant Plant Commissioner, State Plant Board, Gainesville.
Louisiana: State Entomologist, Baton Rouge.

Mississippi: Entomologist, State Plant Board, State College.

NoricE To GENERAL PusBiic THROUGH NEWSPAPERS

UniTEp States DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,
Washington, D. C., May 8, 1942.

Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority con-
ferred by the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912, as amended (7 U. 8. C.
161), has promulgated a revision, effective on and after May 6, 1942, of the
white-fringed beetle quarantine (Notice of Quarantine No. 72) and regulations
supplemental thereto. The purposes of the revision are to extend the regulated
areas to include additional infested sections in Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, and
Mississippi; to release an area in the vicinity of Monroeville, Ala.; to add to the
list of commodities restricted throughout the year lily bulbs, grass sod, peanut
hay, and nursery stock including greenhouse-grown annuals and perennials; to
lift restrictions on sweetpotatoes, peas, and beans; and to require cleaning of
freight cars and other vehicles.

Copies of the quarantine as revised may be obtained from the Bureau of Ento-
mology and Plant Quarantine, Department of Agriculture, Washington.

CLAUDE R. WICKARD,
Secretary.

[The above notice was published in the following newspapers: The Birmingham News, Birmingham,
Ala., May 21, 1942; the Times Picayune, New Orleans, La., May 21, 1942; the News, Jackson, Miss., May
22, 1942; the Florida Times Union, Jacksonville, Fla., May 21, 1942.]

INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS

Post OrricE DEPARTMENT,
Tuirp ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, June 30, 1942.
POSTMASTER:

My Dear Sir: Attention is invited to the inclosed revision of Quarantine Order
No. 72 of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, United States Depart-
ment of Agriculture, on account of the white-fringed beetle, modifying slightly the
area under quarantine and making some changes in the list of restricted articles
and other revisions as indicated. Postmasters in the quarantined areas will please
be governed accordingly. See paragraph 1, section 595, Postal Laws and Regu-
eae ;

ery tru ours
: sl Ramsey S. Buack,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.

B. E. P. Q. 503, Fourth Revision, Effective May 6, 1942
Supplement No. 1
TITLE 7—AGRICULTURE

CuHapTeR IIJ—Bureavu or ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE
Part 301—DomesTIc QUARANTINE NOTICES

WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS MODIFIED;
TREATMENT AUTHORIZED

INTRODUCTORY NOTE

Further investigational work has shown that it is possible to kill all stages of the
white-fringed beetle by methyl bromide fumigation under. partial vacuum applied
at a modified dosage or at a modified temperature under the dosage heretofore



1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 43

authorized. This work has also shown the practicability of applying these treat-
ments to soil masses up to 16 inches in diameter, instead of the maximum 11-inch
diameter required heretofore. The instructions in B. E. P. Q. 503, fourth revision,
which became effective January 9, 1942, are modified accordingly.

The description as to the size requirements of the soil masses has been somewhat
reworded for the purpose of clarification.

§ 301.72—5 (c) § Administrative instructions—Treatments authorized.— Pursuant
to the authority conferred upon the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant
Quarantine by paragraph (a) of § 301.72-5, Chapter III, Title 7, Code of Federal
Regulations [Regulation 5 of Notice of Quarantine No. 72 on account of the white-
fringed beetle], subparagraph (2) of paragraph (a) of § 301.72—5 (c) {page 2 of the
mimeographed edition of circular B. E. P. Q. 503, fourth revision] is hereby
modified effective May 6, 1942, to read as follows:

(2) Methyl bromide fumigation under partial vacuum.—(i) Fumigation under
partial vacuum equivalent to at least 24.5 inches of mercury may be done with a
dosage of either 4 pounds methyl bromide per 1,000 cubic feet, including the space
occupied by the commodity, with an exposure of 1% hours at a temperature of
70° F.; or a dosage of 3 pounds of methyl bromide per 1,000 cubic feet for a period
of 1% hours at a temperature of 75° F. In either case the vacuum shall be main-
tained during the entire period.

(ii) The soil masses shall have a diameter of not more than 16 inches if spherical,
or if not spherical the masses or pots shall be of such size that no point within
them will be more than 8 inches from the nearest point on the surface.

(iii) The soil shall not be wet but shall be in condition satisfactory to the
inspector when treatment is applied.

(iv) The fumigant-air mixture shall be circulated in the fumigation chamber
by means of a fan the first 15 minutes of the exposure period to mix the vaporized
fumigant thoroughly with the air in the chamber and bring it Mm contact with the
surface of the soil balls. The soil balls shall be washed with one or more changes
of air at the end of the exposure period.

(v) A standard vacuum fumigation chamber which can be closed tight and will
withstand an external pressure of at least one atmosphere is required. A vacuum
pump of sufficient capacity to reduce the pressure within the vacuum chamber to
the equivalent of 3 inches of mercury (a 27-inch vacuum at sea level) in not more
than 20 minutes is necessary.

(7 C. F. R. § 301.72-5; sec. 8, 39 Stat. 1165, 44 Stat. 250; 7 U. S. C. 161)

Done at Washington, D. C., this 29th day of April 1942.

P. N. ANNAND,

Chief.

B. E. P. Q. 485, Ninth Revision Effective May 11, 1942 through July 31, 1942
TITLE 7—AGRICULTURE

Cuarter III—Bureauv or ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE
Parr 301—Domestic QUARANTINE NOTICES
WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS MODIFIED

§ 301.72a Administrative instructions; removal of certification requirements for
specified articles.—(a) Pursuant to the authority conferred upon the Chiet of the
Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine by the second proviso of § 301.72,
Chapter III, Title 7, Code of Federal Regulations [Notice of Quarantine No. 72,
on account of the white-fringed beetle], all certification requirements for the inter-
state movement from the regulated areas are hereby waived effective May 11,
maa oe. July 31, 1942, for the following articles and materials enumerated
n 12-3:

(1) Soil, sand, and gravel, as indicated below: (i) Soil, when taken from a depth
of at least 2 feet below the existing surface, and when entirely free from any
surface soil to a depth of 2 feet.

(ii) Sand and gravel when washed, processed, or otherwise treated to the satis-
faction of the inspector.

3 Superseding $§ 301.72-5a and b.



44 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

(2) Articles other than soil: When free from soil and when sanitation practices
as prescribed by the inspector are maintained to his satisfaction, the following
articles are exempt from certification during the period specified above:

(i) Nursery stock, including all annual and perennial plants.

Gi) Hay, including peanut hay, roughage of all kinds, straw. leaves, and leaf-
mold.

(iii) Seed cotton, baled cotton lint and linters, and cottonseed when free from
gin trash.

(iv) Lily bulbs, except when freshly harvested and uncured.

(v) Forest products such as cordwood, stump wood, logs, lumber, timbers,
posts, poles, and cross ties.

(vi) Peanuts in shells and peanut shells.

(vii) Used implements, machinery, and containers.

(viii) Brick, tile, stone, cinders, concrete slabs, and building blocks.

(ix) Potatoes, except locally grown potatoes.

It has been determined that the methods under which such articles and materials
are produced and handled, the maintenance of sanitation practices, or the applica-
tion of control measures and natural conditions, have so decreased the intensity of
infestation in the regulated areas as to eliminate risk of spread of the white-
fringed beetle, thereby justifying the removal of certification requirements as set
forth above.

(b) Except as specified above, the following articles and materials shall remain
under the restrictions of § 301.72—3 throughout the year:

(1) All soil, earth, sand, clay, peat, muck, compost, and manure, whether
moved independent of, or in connection with, or attached to nursery stock, plants,
products, articles, or things.

(2) Grass sod.

(3) Lily bulbs when freshly harvested and uncured.

(4) Scrap metal and junk.

(5) Gin trash.

(6) Locally grown potatoes are under regulation during May, June, and July.

This revision supersedes Circular B. E. P. Q. 485, eighth revision, which became
effective May 1, 1941.

(7 C. F. R., § 301.72; sec. 8, 39 Stat. 1165, 44 Stat. 250; 7 U.S. C. 161).

Done at Washington this Ist day of May 1942.

P. N. ANNAND, Chief.

MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS

L. A. HAWKINS RETIRES
[Press notice]

June 3, 1942.

The United States Department of Agriculture announced today the retirement
of Dr. L. A. Hawkins, veteran of 35 years’ service in the Department. He has
been in charge of the Division of Control Investigations in the Bureau of Ento-
mology and Plant Quarantine since this Division was started. Born in Lamont,
Iowa, he attended public school at Rowley, Iowa, and received his undergraduate
work at Morningside College in that State and his doctor’s degree from Johns
Hopkins University.

&. P. Clausen, head of the Division of Foreign Insect Parasite Introduction,
will take charge of the work of the Division of Control Investigations in addition
to his parasite work until more permanent arrangements are made for the
administration of this activity. Mr. Clausen was born in Randall, Iowa, attended
the Oklahoma A. & M. College and the University of California. During the
first World War he served as 2d Lieutenant, Coast Artillery.

WALTER E. DOVE NAMED USDA DIVISION CHiEF
{Press notice]

JUNE 10, 1942

The United States Department of Agriculture announced today the appoint-
ment of Dr. Walter E. Dove as chief of the Division of Insects Affecting Man
and Animals (Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine), in the absence of
ary C. Cushing, who has joined the military services as Major, Sanitary Corps,

. 5S. Army.

Dr. Dove was born in Hamburg, Miss., and attended public school in Roxie,
Miss. He graduated from the Mississippi State College with B. S. degree, and
received his Ph. D. from Johns Hopkins University. During the last war Dr.



1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 45

Dove was a 2d Lieutenant in the Air Service, serving 13 months in France. In
1931 a paper on the transmission of endemic typhus through the bites of tropical
rat lice, prepared by Dr. Dove and Dr. Bedford Shelmire, was awarded the silver
medal of the American Medical Association. His previous service with the
Bureau embraces a series of responsible assignments in the field of insect research
and control, including the direction of an educational program for the control of
screwworms in livestock in the southern United States and the direction of
grasshopper contro] work in most of the States west of the Mississippi River.
He has recently been in charge of research work on mosquitoes and other insect
pests of man and livestock in the Southeast.

S. B. FRACKER NAMED COORDINATOR OF INSECT AND DISEASE RESEARCH; I£
SUCCEEDED BY J. F. MARTIN

{Press notice]
May 8, 1942.

The United States Department of Agriculture today announced the appoint-
ment of Dr. Stanley B. Fracker as Research Coordinator on the staff of Dr.
EK. C. Auchter, Agricultural Research Administrator. Doctor Fracker will
coordinate research dealing with plant diseases and insects affecting plants and
animals. In addition to his attention to research in these fields, Doctor Fracker
will also review plant pest control programs and will be responsible for Depart-
ment cooperation with industry in insect and plant disease research.

At the same time the Department announced the appointment of Dr. James
Francis Martin to suceed Doctor Fracker as Chief of the Division of Plant Disease
Control, of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.This Division is
responsible for the control and prevention of spread of white pine blister rust
and black stem rust of cereals.

Doctor Fracker was born at Ashton, Iowa. He received the Ph.D. degree
from the University of Illinois in 1915 and has been active in entomological
research and control work for the past 27 years.

In 1915 Doctor Fracker was appointed Assistant State Entomologist and later
was promoted to the position of State Entomologist of Wisconsin. In June,
1927, he entered the Department of Agriculture as Senior Plant Quarantine
Administrator in the Federal Horticultural Board, in charge of Domestic Plant
Quarantines; from 1928 to 1942, he served in the same capacity in the Bureau
of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

Doctor Martin was born in Amherst, Mass., November 17, 1888. He attended
the public schools in Amherst and graduated from the Massachusetts Agricultural
College (now Massachusetts State College) in 1912, and in 1914 received the
degree of M_ S., and in 1915 the degree of Ph.D. from the same institution.

Doctor Martin started his work with the United States Department of Agri-
culture in 1918 working in the parasite laboratory of the gypsy moth investigations.
In 1915 while working as a deputy nursery inspector of the Massachusetts State
Department of Agriculture he discovered the general distribution of white pine
blister rust on native pines in Massachusetts. Doctor Martin has been associated
with white pine blister rust work in the Department of Agriculture since its incep-
tion, and was placed in charge of this work in 1934.

P. Q. C. A. 310, Supplement No. 5
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF PERU
JUNE 1, 1942.
Ex&cUuUTIvVE OrpDERS oF JULY 19, 1941, Lima

REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE IMPORTATION OF COFFEE AND THE INTRODUCTION
OF PARASITIC INSECTS

Orders of the President of Peru dated at Lima, July 19, 1941, prohibit the
importation into Peru of coffee plants, and parts thereof, including the seeds, on
account of the possibility of introducing the coffee berry borer, Stephanoderes
coffeae Hag., and:



46 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

The introduction of parasitic insects shall be effected solely through the tech-
nical staff of the Department of Agriculture and Livestock. A separate authoriza-
tion for each importation of parasitic insects will be required, to be issued by the
Plant Protection Board.

RESTRICTIONS ON THE IMPORTATION OF PLANT MATERIAL BY AIR

The prohibition against the importation of fresh fruits, vegetables, seeds, and
plants by air, as stated in Art. 6, page 5 of P. Q. C. A. 310 still stands. Never-
theless, upon application of the importer, and with the approval of the Plant
Quarantine Service, the Bureau of Agriculture and Livestock may authorize the
entry of such plant material by air, and will issue permits for such importations.
(Letter from Mr. Julio Gaudron, Plant Quarantine Service, Lima, Peru, April 25.
1942.)

P. N. ANNAND,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant uarantine

B. E. P. Q. 477, Supplement No. 2
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF COLOMBIA

JUNE 1, 1942

IMPORTATION OF UNTOASTED CAcAaoO PERMITTED TEMPORARILY
(Decree No. 769 of March 26, 1942)

Foreign Commerce Weekly for May 9, 1942, reports that the importation of
untoasted cacao beans into Colombia is permitted through the ports of Buena-
ventura and Ipiales for 6 months beginning March 26, 1942, according to the
above decree. The cacao beans are subject to sanitary inspection and must be
shipped perfectly dry in double packing of paper or fiber.

P. N. ANNAND,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

PENALTIES IMPOSED FOR VIOLATIONS OF THE PLANT
QUARANTINE ACT

According to reports received by the Bureau during the period April 1 to June

30, 1942, penalties have recently been imposed by the proper authorities for
violations of the Plant Quarantine Act, as follows:

QUARANTINES AFFECTING MEXICAN PRODUCTS

In the case of the United States versus the persons listed below, for attempting
to smuggle in contraband plant material, the penalties indicated were imposed
by the United States customs officials at the following ports:







Name Port Contraband Penalty
Agapita Placincia de Roja___------- Brownsville, Pex. ..-2| Lorange-2 52> eee $1. 00
oaKenaistin 282. $22 tS eee el iio, Mexssae se 5'avocado Seeds: => eee 1. 00
Pablomaarcial S28 35). 2a See a at dot ITS. Fz § idngoes 2) ViewAlias 1.00
MariatMiginai7,-.< 22. 3 - a ees dove.) 2h. Siayocados..£ =! fae eee 1.00
Jose Bropnds. 2) =. > Eagle Pass, Tex_------ J oranve:: ies ee ae 1.00
Pipe 2eQOOE =. . 5S s2en- eee do___________-.-.--|] 14 avocados, 6 mangoes, and 4 1. 00
mameys.

Julia M:- de Riveras - S25 ee do. es OMAN ROSS oe eer eee =. nee 1. 00
Cre Bistds. == > 2 eee tO Pa ee ee hs vocsdoiseede=. ) 8 => - oe 1. 00
Tomas Hourigues*: 21 = Ue 4 sees do 2) AVE) ASS Stee Gol. SrA i veh se ty) a 1.00
Blias Mornchaes:-.. 22. > 2-2 oleae Gers pies 2292s Samoaneoes: 2. -/..2=2t at 52s ee 1. 00
Albert &. Aguilar. ==: = See ee eee 4 IANS eee sos Fe 2s os safe 1. 00
Joo! Meding ©2038. 25 ys-+ 2 bee Sedo 135. Fae oe onan e sles} er ee 1.00
Dorotea Chavez de Barrios __..:---]-.---do__.__--.-_---.--- SOG Ue. ces. 57 Os ee eee 1.00
Triniday Saucedo de Perez EOP aso, Tex ties fark 2 live plants with soil____-_------- . 40
Silvania Zurita de Sandoval________]____-do_______---------| 1 mango__-------- wate _o 003. Fe .10
Felipa Gomez de Zanez_--_--------- HidalgosText-- = Picuthines nett 1.00

90 2 Bede = 8s oe JAMO OE 2 So ee D-DIStS! ton See soe ne ee 1.00
Conpepcion Vasquerz..--2=--.-5-...53|-_-¢ 0022 eee Lmamey: = - 8 oe a ee 1,00
Natalia Guajardo______--_----- ae = |E C05). inismey secede.) soe eee 1.00



1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS AT









Name Port Contraband Penalty
Retusia Castaneda es 22.2 Fs2. 22 Hidalgo Next -2 522. = Ihaviocadorseeds == 35s ee- = 22 - = $1. 00
MrimadaaGonzalezs. 2... -2-5.--..-*|-===-- COS eee ISIN TIO Oe Ses ee nee 1.00
Woncepelonyherezs-22.-=--=2 2-25 -- =| == 2: Const eae Dia VOCHM OSes se. aa) = eee Sere se 1. 06
TESUSMETAUINOL == 9942-22 See foie oe COB ee as ee A QVOCRC OSs Bo eat ee ee Se 1.00
HeniOSMVINTAMt es: see eee ee |e Cpe po eee DAV OCHGOSS Cee hae se ae os 1.00
OsswiboaniG@er. somes Se fe Ae Salone doz ees 3 t sie AtAVOCAU OSES asso tee eee. cee. 1.00
PNDUMCOpReNeZe - ee es eo se Seabee GOntenateet sees s 10M] GINO Ose eas ee ee ck 1.00
INSTI OUEamOSNe n= 9 oes ons eee LO see st || oe GOP oot ee et Sere eee sole) 1.00
Guadalupe Garza Barreire__--------]----- CO eee es Sane ee ae Traviocado:seed 32s sees a 1.00
Namiuel Hariase & ECR SF gy | tees dort # ai arig cr Siolants asa APA 2A 1.00
MMM AC ROMAN a2. 2 ea |laeee GOs pees eee eee DINAN OCS: at Se ee ee eee 1.00
Wianlar Garcia. es... 02ee2 2s Go 44 ALE YT aM OCkd On: =~ see een ce oe 1.00
TIAMAVOanChOr Se. 6 ws eee lee KO ea chain Anca aS AVAN OCRU OSE 4 oe) spa etn ees oe 1.90
TOES curb CSE LOS ee Aa eee GO ee eaere = tee. SHNAN POCSES atest eee 1.00
GristianoeAlaniz:~22 228 25522. Gee GOs ro 5F Suerte DsmMangoes*~ 1. teeta . Ae a 1.00
Maria Victoria M. Martinez. _______]}----- CLO a ise ee EE ae Dnlants. (OWS) pe se ee ee 1.00
Goenmanetociarss=4. 2222s see 32 eee COee ates See 2 ae TOMDIQUESE soe eee et eee 1. 00
Guadalupe Torezse--22.- 2220-12 ee Gosh Pw DANA OCS.2. seu se ue sae Fr ie’ 1. 00
MatianaBustamante.__-.-._een2E) ||223 32 do je. coat plants: + Meets sks fh sey eee | 1. 00
MVianl aes (UGS see = er a le O02 mee SEN lama ON ee Be er 1.00
IMiariauGanclaess-—) 2.02 eee eer | ae COP ee e ee = PS EUE TD LG S eee eee ete a 1.00
Maria Refugio Anzallua_______----_|----- otter ee IOLAN POs IOLA Ae SEE OR 1.00
BGAN ZpPO MOAN Zeer s soeeeseee coe loose GOset B16 38. Stee SaviOcaGdose: --: Sseaeeh Ueeeeurs 1. 00
Josepa sancha, Zamora. --_..-=--..==|-.=2- CoE ee eee 2 OL ANS eR eat ee ee SO 1. 00
IGaKeEy WORE). UE SES ee ee ee ee COR a eee ae ZNMANE OCSitae so nee Oe nee ee 1. 00
CristinaiSanGhezsee 10 228 8 ees eS Le does... 3 Fseat DIAVOCAGOS set 1 sh SO Ss Pe 1.00
DAMasiopROdeCa = seh ess ieee §| oes GOP 5S. rh 2 HA DTICONS=s 5. ko ee ee ae 1.00
MinserArule whilGldS-=. =. 8 et ke GO ee 2 avocado seeds and 10 plants___ 1. 00
Guadelupe Villerale-— =. - 2 =. <2 OMe = see ee LTRS) eee te et eae ee 1.00
films Gonzalez. S88 S52 Us os fA SLOSS Goze io 3 50 Se 1 AVOCROOW ee oe ee 1. 00
RataeleBisPeiVicling-2--— 42-222.) |b Goss} S26 vate ALAVOCRUOS eee set S- aby tariey o 1. 00
SimoniGiilemezs Jn ts. Waredo, Mex... «| Dury FANE S Hey see ees eee 1.00
IRGtCTaS TON Mpeg eee a ee re CO eee ae eee ATOTCHIGED Anlst eee 1.00
RebeccarGarcia.. s=- 22: sate ee Ee do». Ossie 5 MN Tmladioli bulbse—_ 235. :- Se 1.00
Mrs. Josefa Solas Garcia.-_-------_--|----- Gowee -stece et 2 4 ounces miscellaneous seed ____- 1.00
INO DERLONIASSOL=2e eee eee tT 6 (0) Bs See en ee 1eOLCHiGds ANnt=se 2 eee 1.00
Minn eRNASSO6. 2 oe oak ee Saco eae eo Cee eerste (lant ee eee So eee 1.00
JosefiriaulOLnes._.c—s- ee eee SS Goss eae At iingirme y-s- 253 2903 2 ok 4s Ae 1. 00
IVMiariaiasson- 2.2 eee tee Teel to foe (6 Ko eee Se ey RT Sea a 0). ee ee ee pa ue saree hho. 1. 00
IMTpePNMOnANO=s2.- ts. eae OEE a, eis | nS = ORS aot are 1 ee 1.00
WAS SAMA pees foes een ge fens Oe eee 2 oranges, 1 mango, and 4 1. 00
avocados.
WOzZALOMLOLLES.- => eee tee eee 5.8 S| Sie! Go_4 eae aay re A AVOCHCOSS2eee FS hk = sory ee 1.00
JOSela) Ge GQuerlero. 2-2 eae a Ob 2. seeee wee 2BTDIANUS eae oe ee ee 1. 00
eee Alas eee a De G0 Eee ee eee 1 mango and 1 orange__________- 1.00
Guadalupe Diaz oo irs: A eT dois Soe Vant 2 mangoess- siete. Fe meets 1.00
WOZANOMEOMeS tes ee ee ee don eee eet 4:avOCaGd Os) si 2 Sia Ph ceca e lS. 2 1. 00
Belen Trevino Bocanegro-_-_-_-------- Mercedes, Tex__-----_- 2 plgntsian drs CULINGS seas 1.00





ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND
PLANT QUARANTINE

P. N. ANNAND, Chief.

Avery S. Hoyt, Associate Chief.

8S. A. Rouwer, Assistant Chief in Charge of Regulatory Work.

F. C. Bisnopp, Assistant Chief in Charge of Research Work.

W. L. Popuam, Assistant Chief 1n Charge of Control Operations.

F. H. Spencer, Assistant Chief in Charge of Business Administration.

J. C. Houron, Agent, Cooperative Field Relations.

Rouua P. Currie, Editor.

J. A. Hysuop, in Charge, Division of Insect Pest Survey and Information.

J. I. HAMBLETON, 2 Charge, Division of Bee Culture Investigations.

D. L. Van Dinu, in Charge, Division of Fruit Insect Investigations.

F. C. CRAIGHEAD, in Charge, Division of Forest Insect Investigations.

W. H. Waite, in Charge, Division of Truck Crop and Garden Insect Investigations.

C. M. Pacxarp, in Charge, Division of Cereal and Forage Insect Investigations.

R. W. Harnep, in Charge, Division of Cotton Insect Investigations.

W. E. Dove, in Charge, Division of Insects Affecting Man and Animals.

C. P. CuausEeNn, Acting in Charge, Division of Control Investigations.

R. C. Roark, in Charge, Division of Insecticide Investigations.

C. F. W. MuESEBECK, in Charge, Division of Insect Identification.

C. P. CLausEn, in Charge, Division of Foreign Parasite Introduction.

J. F. Martin, in Charge, Division of Plant Disease Control.

B. M. Ganppis, in Charge, Division of Domestic Plant Quarantines.

E. R. Sasscer, in Charge, Division of Foreargn Plant Quarantines.

A. F. Burasss, in Field Charge, Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail Moth Control (head-
quarters, Greenfield, Mass.).

E. G. Brewer, in Field Charge, Japanese Beetle and Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail
Moth Quarantines, and Dutch Elim Disease Eradication (headquarters, Bloom-

eld, N. J.)

RE. McDona.p, in Field Charge, Pink Bollworm and Thurberia Weevil Quar-
antines (headquarters, San Antonio, Tez.).

P. A. Horan, in Field Charge, Mexican Fruitfly Quarantine (headquarters,
Harlingen, Tex.).

CLAUDE WAKELAND, in Field Charge, Grasshopper Control (headquarters, Denver,
Colo.).

A. C. Bakgr, in Field Charge, Fruitfly Investigations (headquarters, Mexico City,
Mexico).

48

U S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1942



Sn, A—b, bP. GO. No. 152 Issued December 1942.

United States Department of Agriculture

BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE



SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS
JULY-SEPTEMBER 1942



CONTENTS

G@uarantine and) other official annotincements.- ~~... 2.222 et L222 le etait tees eli lll.
Announcement relating to gypsy moth and brown-tail moth quarantine (No. 45)_______________
Sheals to head Division of Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail Moth Control in the United States
Department of Agriculture (press notice) - ----_----- Pena, 4 Abeer ete ner teh e ANTS
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (No. 48)___--_-_________-_______-______e
ESI CHLOMSsDORDOS MAS LOLS =) es = ote ee ee ae eee ke oe oe ot lee sept
Japanese beetle administrative instructions modified (B. E. P. Q. 394, second revision)
Beetle restrictions on vegetable and fruit shipments ended for season (press notice)
Administrative instructions modifying the restrictions of the Japanese beetle quarantine by
advancing the date of termination of restrictions on fruit and vegetable shipments under

§ 301.48 of the Japanese beetle quarantine to September 9 for the year 1942 (B. E. P. Q. 524)_
Japanese beetle administrative instructions modified (B. E. P. Q. 499, supplement No. 6) __-
Japanese beetle administrative instructions modified (B. E. P. Q. 499, supplement No. 1,
SERS I OTT A ae A Se eee ee ee ae ee ee See ee oe
Japanese beetle administrative instructions modified (B. E. P. Q. 499, supplement No. 7)
Announcement relating to pink bollworm quarantine (No. 52)_-_-___--.---_---_--_-------__-------
Pink bollworm quarantine regulations modified (B. E. P. Q. 493, second revision)
Announcements relating to white-fringed beetle quarantine (No. 72)_-_____-_--______-_---_---_--
White-fringed beetle regulations modified (B. E. P. Q. 485, tenth revision)
Hearing will consider beetle quarantine for North Carolina (press notice)___-_-________-____-
Notice of public hearing to consider the advisability of revising the white-fringed beetle quar-
SMEMOLVO ANC hI eaN OF by Caroli daa a8 soe es REISS LY Soe ah ee eek at ee ee
Announcements relating to Mexican border regulations______.___-_.--___-_---___-_-_-----------
Wiest eCanBiGniele ntl semen eS eat seer ORE SSP ee ee et he Bp
en mao ier TBPUiavious (Dross NOLICS) 2. 62 2 ae hee noch cae enna omen nen weaee
Mexican border regulations effective September 8, 1942_____..._-.__-____----____-----____--
PVE Sea Mane OMAAILORINe erie. Bi eep yen! I hw sie ie wale) Wye! @ ea ero oO. Jae
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Jamaica, British West Indies (B. P. Q.355, revised, sup-
LOHTE TINO Oe) Packers hn eatin 2 See ee eh i oe Ss he LS Oe ee
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Peru (P. Q. C. A. 310, supplement No. 6)
Tonninininispecon.oL piantsiand plant products. :...22--.---2-225-22-..-$2.--L222--254-2-5--2
PARE PoC y irene ea Tutiy CPL AE TCL TT Oe aie cee a a ee a eS i ee Le eb ee fo
DAOMOUTLALe sD leap CU ATAMGINCS Ht 892 ho 8 nk a ye en we se beens e eee wcnton
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act__-____._....._------------------_-
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine_____.___________._-_-____----_---- ay



QUARANTINE AND OTHER OFFICIAL
. ANNOUNCEMENTS

ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO GYPSY MOTH AND BROWN-TAIL

MOTH QUARANTINE (NO. 45)

SHEALS TO HEAD DIVISION OF GYPSY MOTH AND BROWN-TAIL MOTH CONTROL

IN U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

[Press notice]

Avaust 18, 1942.

The Department of Agriculture today named Ralph A. Sheals as leader of
the Division of Gypsy and Brown-tail Moth Control in the Bureau of Entomology

and Plant Quarantine.

Dr. P. N. Annand, Chief of the Bureau, said that Mr. Sheals will relieve
A. F. Burgess, who has been in field charge of the work on gypsy moth control
since its beginning as a Federal project nearly 35 years ago. By releasing Mr.
Burgess from administrative responsibility the Bureau can take advantage of
his long experience in insect control work by having him review for the Chief
of the Bureau other insect control projects now being carried on. Mr. Burgess

49
495903—42——-_1



50 BOREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE _ [July—Sept.

will also prepare a history of the gypsy moth work in the United States, in
advance of his normal retirement.

Mr. Sheals was born at Brushton, N. Y., on March 26, 1898. His collegiate
training was in forestry with specialization in forest insects. He graduated
from New York State College of Forestry at Syracuse, N. Y., in 1917. His
early association with the Department of Agriculture was with the white pine
blister rust work, extending from 1917 to 1928. Since 1928 he has been associ-
ated with the organization now known as the Bureau of Entomology and Plant
Quarantine. During this period he has been a member of the Division of Domestic
Plant Quarantines, and since 1929 has been Assistant Chief of the Division. His
work with the Division of Domestic Plant Quarantines has included a number
of asSignments and administrative responsibility for activities over a wide
field. He shared in organizing the work of inspection of plants and plant prod-
ucts in transit to assure compliance with quarantines; aided in the direction of
extensive cooperative control campaigns against insect pests and plant diseases
such as grasshoppers, Mormon crickets, chinch bugs, white-fringed beetle, mole
crickets, citrus canker, phony peach, and peach mosaic.





ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE
(NO. 48)

INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS

Post OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, August 20, 1942.
POSTMASTER :

My Dear Sir: Attention is invited to the inclosed copy of the latest revision
of Federal Quarantine No. 48 on account of the Japanese beetle, issued by the
United States Department of Agriculture, which became effective March 24,
1942, and which increases somewhat the area previously under quarantine
and also modifies slightly the restrictions formerly imposed. You will please
be governed accordingly. See paragraph 1, section 595, Postal Laws and
Regulations.

Very truly yours,

RAMSEY S. BLACK,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.

B. E. P. Q. 394, Second Revision. Effective July 20, 1942.
TITLE 7—AGRICULTURE

CHAPTER III—BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE
Part 301—DOoMESTIc QUARANTINE NOTICES

JAPANESE BEETLE ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS MODIFIED

INTRODUCTORY NOTE

In reissuing this circular to replenish the supply no change has been made in
the list of bulbs, corms, and tubers that are exempted from the certification
requirements of the quarantine. Some modifications have been made in the
names, however, principally the common names, in order to bring them into line
with standard plant nomenclature.
~ §3801.48-6a. List of true bulbs, corms, and tubers exempted from Japanese
beetle certification. Under § 301.48-6 [regulation 6 of quarantine No. 48], true
bulbs, corms, and tubers are exempt from Japanese beetle certification when dor-
mant, except for storage growth, and when free from soil. The exemption in-
cludes single dahlia tubers or small dahlia root divisions when free from stems,
cavities, and soil. Dahlia tubers, other than single tubers or small root divisions
meeting these conditions, require certification.

‘4













1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 51

The following list of bulbs, corms, and tubers, issued effective July 20, 1942, is
for the information of inspectors of the Bureau and for the use of shippers
within the regulated areas. The key letter (B) before the name stands for true
bulb, (C) for corm, and (T) for tuber. Plant roots of a bulbous nature not given
on this list are, in most cases, fleshy rhizomes, and are therefore not exempt
from certification. (C) Acidanthera, (T) Alstroemeria, (B) Amaryllis, (C)
Amorphophallus (devilstongue), (B) Anemone nemorosa, A. ranunculoides, A.
deltoidea, (C) Antholyza (madflower), (C) Babiana (baboonroot), (T) Begonia
(tuberous rooted), (T) Boussingaultia (Madeira vine), (C) Brodiaea, (B) Bulb-
ocodium (meadowsaffron), (C) Calochortus (Mariposa-lily or globe-tulip), (B)
Camassia, (B) Chionodoza (glory-of-the-snow), (B) Colchicum (autumn-crocus),
(T) Colocasia (Caladium esculentum and fancy-leaved varieties), (B) Cooperia
(evening-star and rain-lily), (B) Corydalis bulbosa, C. tuberosa, (B) Crinum,
(C) Crocus, (C) Cyclamen, (T) Dahlia (see statement in introductory para-
graph), (C) Dierama (elfinwands), (T) Dioscorea batatas (cinnamon-vine), (T)
Eranthis (winter-aconite), (B) Hrythronium (fawnlily troutlily or dogtooth
violet), (B) Hucharis (Amazonlily), (C) Freesia, (B) Fritillaria (fritillary),
(B) Galanthus (snowdrop), (B) Galtonia (Hyacinthus candicans) (summer-
hyacinth), (C) Gladiolus, (T) Gloriosa rothschildiana, (T) Gloxinia (see Sin-
ningia), (B) Hippeastrum, (B) Hyacinthus (hyacinth, Dutch, and Roman), (B)
Hymenocallis, (B) Iris, bulbous (Dutch, Spanish, and English), (B) Jsmene
(Peruvian-daifodil), (B) Javia, (B) Iwiolirion, (B) Lachenalia (cape-cowslip),
(B) Lapeirousia (Lapeyrousia, Anomatheca), (B) Leucojum (snowflake), (B)
Lilium (ily bulbs, imported and domestic), (B) Lycoris, (B) Milla (Mexican-
star), (B) Muscari (grape-hyacinth), (B) Narcissus (daffodil, jonquil), (B)
(Verine, (B) Ornithogalum (Star-of-Bethiehem), (B) Owalis, (B) Pancratium,
(B) Polianthes (tuberose), (B) Puschkinia, (T) Ranunculus (buttercup), (B)
Scilla (squill, starhyacinth), (T) Sinningia speciosa (Gloxinia), (C) Sparacis
(wandflower), (B) Sprekelia (Aztec-lily, Jacobean lily, St. Jameslily), (B)
Sternbergia, (B) Tigridia (tigerflower or sheliflower), (C) Tritonia (Mont-
bretia), (B) Tulipa (tulip), (B) Vallota (Scarboro-lily), (B) Watsonia (bugle-
lily), (T) Zantedeschia (Richardia) (callalily), and (B) Zephyranthes
(zephyrlily).

(7 C. F. R. § 301.48-6; sec. 8, 39 Stat. 1165, 44 Stat. 250; 7 U. S. C. 161.)

Done at Washington, D. C., this 18th day of July, 1942.

AvERY S. Hoyt,
Acting Chief.

Babes with the Division of the Federal Register July 15, 1942, 11:47 a. m.; 7 F. R.

BEETLE RESTRICTIONS ON VEGETABLE AND FRUIT SHIPMENTS ENDED FOR
SEASON

[Press notice]

SEPTEMBER 11, 1942.

Restrictions on the movement of fruits and vegetables under the Japanese
beetle quarantine regulations have been removed for the season, the United
States Department of Agriculture announced. Restrictions on cut flowers, how-
ever, remain in force through October 15.

Under quarantine regulations, certificates showing freedom from Japanese
beetle are required until October 16 on interstate shipments of fruits and vege-
tables of any kind moved by refrigerator car or motortruck from the areas of
heavy beetle flight. An order issued by the Bureau of Entomology and Plant
Quarantine releases the fruits and vegetables from this requirement 5 weeks
earlier than is provided in the regulations.

The areas of heavy flight include Delaware, the District of Columbia, and
parts of Maryland, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Virginia.

Inspection of fruits and vegetables is necessary only during the period when
the beetles are in active flight, and results of field surveys show that adults of the
Japanese beetle have decreased to a point where it does not seem advisable to
continue the fruit and vegetable inspection and certification requirement the rest
of this season. There is no risk that such products will carry the Japanese beetle
after the active period which is now apparently over throughout the regulated
areas.



52 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE — [July—Sept.

There is still danger, however, that the beetles may be transported in cut
tlowers. Therefore, the restrictions on interstate movement of cut flowers will
remain in full force through October 15.

Restrictions on the movement of nurSery, ornamental, and greenhouse stock
and all other plants (except cut flowers, soil-free aquatic plants, and portions
of plants without roots and free from soil) are in force throughout the year and
are not affected by this order.

B. E. P. Q. 524. Effective September 9, 1942.
TITLE 7—AGRICULTURE
CHAPTER III—BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE
Part 301—DoOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES

ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS MODIFYING THE RESTRICTIONS OF THE JAPANESE
BEETLE QUARANTINE BY ADVANCING THE DATE OF TERMINATION OF RESTRICTIONS ON
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE SHIPMENTS UNDER § 301.48 OF THE JAPANESE BEETLE
QUARANTINE TO SEPTEMBER 9 FOR THE YEAR 1942

It has been determined that the active period of the Japanese beetle in its
relation to fruits and vegetables has already ceased for the present season and
that it is therefore safe to permit the unrestricted movement of fruits and
vegetables from the regulated areas. Therefore, pursuant to the authority con-
ferred upon the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine by
the fourth proviso of § 301.48, Chapter III, Title 7, Code of Federal Regulations
[Notice of Quarantine No. 48 on account of Japanese beetle], it is ordered
that the restrictions on the interstate movement of fruits and vegetables im-
posed by § 301.48-5 of Notice of Quarantine No. 48, revised effective March 24,
1942, be removed effective on and after September 9, 1942. This order advances
the termination of the restrictions as to fruits and vegetables provided for in
§ 301.48-5 from October 16 to September 9, 1942, and applies to this season only.

(7 C. F. R. § 301.48; sec. 8, 39 Stat. 1165, 44 Stat. 250; 7 U. S. C. 161.)

Done at Washington this 5th day of September 1942.
P. N. ANNAND,
Chief.

Pa with the Division of the Federal Register September 9, 1942, 11:08a.m.;7F.R.
GLO:

B. EB. P. Q. 499, Supplement No. 6. Effective September 5, 1942.
TITLE 7—AGRICULTURE

CHAPTER III—BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE
PART 301—DoMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES
JAPANESE BEETLE ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS MODIFIED

Pursuant to the authority conferred upon the Chief of the Bureau of Ento-
mology and Plant Quarantine by § 301.48—6, Chapter III, Title 7, Code of Federal
Regulations [regulation 6 of the rules and regulations supplemental to Notice
of Quarantine No. 48 on account of the Japanese beetle], paragraph (1) of
§ 301.48b [circular B. E. P. Q. 499, issued June 9, 19389] is hereby amended effec-
tive September 5, 1942, by the addition of the following subparagraph:

§ 301.48b. Administrative instructions to inspectors on the treatment of nurs-
ery products, fruits, vegetables, and soil, for the Japanese beetle.

* * * » * * *



1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS bo

TREATMENT OF Sort, ABOUT THE RooTs OF PLANTS

(1) TREATMENT OF PLANTS AFTER DIGGING
* * * * % * *
(6) Ethylene dichloride emulsion dip
(i) Materials:
Potassium hydroxide: C. P.
Aleohol: 190 proof ethyl alcohol.
Oleic acid: crystal white olein.
Ethylene dichloride: commercial.
(ii) Formula:



Pounds
Potassium hydroxide: Wise ey ge aeons. Iompeean eo 2.5
mitdhotse 24 Taal Sieh koh bed awh iet agt ee ol 14.0
i ce ene Pe ae EE ere DG ee ig 6. 0
wlele sein 2. Jeet Te Noor JIL 0 laa ie ht At 17.5
Ethylene’ diehieridess ) fey ose oo eee ea 60. 0

100. 0

1An amount of commercial caustic potash containing an equivalent weight of potassium

hydroxide may be substituted for the C. P. grade. ‘ :
2Completely denatured alcohol (190 proof) may be substituted for the ethyl alcohoi

(190 proof).

(iii) Preparation of dip.—Mix the several ingredients in the order given in
the formula. Dissolve the potassium hydroxide in the alcohol and water, add
the oleic acid, and stir intermittently for about 10.minutes. Compensate for
evaporation loss by the addition of alcohol and water in the ratio given in the
formula. Add the ethylene dichloride and stir.

The emulsible ethylene dichloride shall have a specific gravity of about 1.070
at 25° ©. (77° F.) and contain 60 percent by weight of ethylene dichloride.
It shall be a clear solution that may be readily diluted with water to form a
uniform, stable, milklike emulsion. The product should be kept in gastight
containers in a cool place at a temperature above 4.5° C. (40° F.). At lower
temperatures it will separate into layers, in which case it must be warmed to
room temperature and stirred to restore it to its original and usable condition.

(iv) Caution.—Ethylene dichloride is an inflammable volatile solvent. It.
the emulsible ethylene dichloride, and the ethylene dichloride emulsion should
be kept away from fire, heat, and open flame. They should be used with ade-
quate ventilation and prolonged breathing of the vapor should be avoided.

(v) Season.—The treatment must be applied between October 1 and June 1.

(vi) Temperature.—The temperature of both the dip and the plant balls at
the time of dipping shall not be lower than 45° F. nor higher than 75° F. At
no time thereafter, during the holding period, shall the temperature of the
treated plant balls be lower than 40° nor higher than 80°.

‘(vii) Dosage-——Use at the rate of 1 gailon of the emulsible ethylene di-
chloride in 100 gallons of water. (For convenience in making small quantities
use 40 cubic centimeters in 1 gallon of water.) To prepare the emulsible
ethylene dichloride as a dip, add small quantities of water successively, stirring
continually until a uniform, creamlike emulsion is formed. Dilute this emulsion
with the remainder of the water, stir a few minutes to insure a uniform sus-
pension, and pour into a trough or tank. This dip must be prepared imme-
diately before using.

(viii) Preparation of plants—Plants with root masses or balls up to 10 inches
in diameter at the narrowest dimension may be treated, either bare, wrapped.
or in unglazed clay pots. If wrapped, the wrapping material must be of such
a nature as not to prevent the proper penetration of the emulsion into the root
mass. The plant balls shall be moist but not wet.

(ix) Application—tThe size of the trough or tank (wood or metal) used for
the dipping vat, and the quantity of the emulsion shall be sufficient to provide
a complete coverage of all the plant balls. The plant balls or pots must be
immersed for a period of 10 seconds in the dip. They may be treated either



54 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE _ [July-Sept.

singly or in groups with the balls spaced approximately 44 inch apart in a wire
basket or perforated tray, and arranged so as to permit of rapid penetration
of the emulsion into all of the balls. In any ease the plant balls or tray shall
rest on the bottom of the tank. A sufficient quantity of freshly prepared,
diluted emulsion shall be added to the dip so that the plant balls are completely
covered during the immersion period. To reduce the hazard of plant injury,
not more than the lower \% inch of the plant stems should be immersed during
the treatment. The contents of the trough shall be discarded and the trough
rinsed out 4 hours after charging and/or when the dirt and debris exceed 2
inches in depth. The trough shall be located during plant treatments in a
covered and well ventilated place. On remoyal of balled plants from the dip
they may be allowed to drain into the tank for 1 or 2 minutes and then must
be placed in a compact group either on a bench with a tight bottom and side
walls as high as the plant balls, or on a tight floor of a greenhouse, packing
shed or other enclosed area, and surrounded by wodoen side walls as high as the
plant balls. If they are placed on a dirt floor it must be wet and packed hard
before using. In the case of potted plants any excess emulsion should be
poured from the pot immediately after removing from the dipping vat. All
plants must remain undisturbed for the prescribed 48 hours during which time
excessive ventilation should be avoided. A light spray of water applied to the
tops of the plants during this period may be beneficial.

(x) Period of treatment.—Ten seconds immersion in the dip followed by a
48-hour holding period.

(xi) Varieties of plants—The list of plants which have been successfully
treated in experimental work includes 18 varieties of azaleas, 60 kinds of
greenhouse plants, 48 kinds of perennials, and 28 kinds of trees and shrubs.
The list is subject to expansion and will be furnished on requet.

(7 C.F.R., § 301.48; sec. 8, 39 Stat. 1165, 44 Stat. 250; 7 U.S.C. 161.)

Done at Washington this 4th day of September 1942.

P. N. ANNAND,
Chief.
waa with the Division of the Federal Register September 9, 1942, 11:08 a. m.; 7. F. R.
‘ °

B. E. P. Q. 499, Effective September 18, 1942.
Supplement No. 1, Sixth Revision.

TITLE 7—AGRICULTURE

CuHaPtTerR III—BurREAU oF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE
Part 301—DoMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES

JAPANESE BEETLE ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS MODIFIED

INTRODUCTORY NOTE

Two new schedules for methyl bromide fumigation of potted or bare-rooted
plants are provided in this revision of supplement No. 1. These two treating
schedules, at lower temperatures than have heretofore been authorized, are Nos.
8 and 9 in the table under subparagraph (i). The instructions as to fumigation
of packaged plants are carried forward in this revision of the supplement.

§ 301.48b. Administrative instructions to inspectors on the treatment of
nursery products, fruits, vegetables, and soil, for the Japanese beetle. Treat-
ment authorized. Pursuant to the authority conferred upon the Chief of the
Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine by § 301.48-6, Chapter III, Title 7,
Code of Federal Regulations [regulation 6 of the rules and regulations supple-
mental to Notice of Quarantine No. 48], subsection (1) (5) of § 301.48b [on
page 13 of the mimeographed edition of circular B. E. P. Q. 489, issued June 9,
1939] is hereby further modified effective September 18, 1942, to read as follows:



LIBRARY
STATE PLANT, BOARI

1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS

TREATMENT OF Sor, AnouT THE Roots oF PLANTS
* * * * * * *

(1) TREATMENT OF PLANTS AFTER DIGGING

* * * * % * *

(5) Methyl bromide fumigation

Equipment.—An approved fumigation chamber equipped with vaporizing, air-
circulating, and ventilating systems must be provided.

Application.—After the chamber is loaded, the methyl bromide must be vapor-
ized within it. The air within the chamber must be kept in circulation during
the period of fumigation. At the completion of the treatment, the chamber must
be well ventilated before it is entered and the plants removed. The ventilating
system should also be in continuous operation during the entire period of re-
moval of the fumigated articles. :

(i) Fumigation of plants, with or without soil

(a) Temperatures, periods of treatment, and dosages.—The temperature of
the soil (with bare root stock, the root spaces) and of the air for each type
of treatment must remain throughout the entire period of treatment at the
minimum specified in the following table, or higher :







anes Cee
: (methy s methy
Period of Period of a0
Temperature at least bromide Temperature at least bromide
Zs treatment per 1,000 treatment per 1,000
cubic feet) cubic feet)
Hours Pounds Hours Pounds
HT eifetee tere ee hee 2 21% TAO Roe eee ees ae Ano 4 6
ee On ee 2 eee od 2% 2 Tach ete aee AN ES 44 2%
By GB ie a eee eee 2% DUAR SSA GUNN ee. oe Sse Nae 4 3
Apr tice Hyeeees Se Ste aps 3 DUA OMAR ON Be tele Jee ee 44 3
Doe eee oe So 3 3% 214



The dosage shall be for each 1,000 cubic feet including the space occupied by the
load.

(b) Preparation of plants——The treatment is to be applied to plants with
bare roots or in 14-inch pots or smaller, or in soil balls not larger than 14 inches in
diameter nor thicker than 14 inches when not spherical. The soil should not be
puddled or saturated and must be in a condition which in the judgment of the
inspector is suitable for fumigation. The plants should be stacked on racks or
separated so that the gas can have access to both top and bottom surfaces of pots
or soil balls. While not essential that the balls be completely separated from each
other they should not be jammed tightly together.

(c) Packaged plants.—Boxed or wrapped plants in packages not more than
14 inches in diameter may be fumigated at any one of the above nine tempera-
tures, periods of treatment, and schedules. In order that the fumigant may have
access to the roots and soil masses about the roots, the wrapping shall not be
tightly closed.

(d) Varieties of plants.—The list of plants, iritivaaiiiog greenhouse, perennial,
and nursery-stock types treated experimentally, is subject to continual expansion,
and, moreover, is too great to include in these instructions.

The schedule for the fumigation of strawberry plants as specified in subpara-
graph (5) (ii) of paragraph (1) of § 301.48b [page 14 of the mimeographed
edition of circular B. E. P. Q. 499] remains the same as heretofore.

(7C. F. R. § 301.48; sec. 8, 39 Stat. 1165, 44 Stat. 250; 7 U. S. C. 161.)

See supplement supersedes Supplement No. 1, revised, effective April 23,
1942.

Done at Washington, D. C., this 16th day of September 1942.

P. N. ANNAND,
Chief.

“sett with the Division of the Federal Register September 18, 1942,11:42a.m.:7 F. R.



YAAAALI
5H AO. THAIS ATATS

BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE _ [July—Sept.

B. E. P. Q. 499, Supplement No. 7. Effective September 18, 1942.
TITLE 7—AGRICULTURE

CHAPTER III—BuUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE
ParT 3801—DoMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES

JAPANESE BEETLE ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS MODIFIED

INTRODUCTORY NOTE

Experiments with methyl bromide dissolved in water and applied to specified
soil areas have resulted in the development of new methods for treating the
soil of areas free from plants and of individual items of nursery stock in field
rows. The application of this treatment in meeting the requirements of the
Japanese beetle quarantine must be conducted under the supervision of an
inspector of the Division of Japanese Beetle Control, 266 Glenwood Avenue,
Bloomfield, N. J., and in accordance with detailed instructions furnished by
him.

Pursuant to the authority conferred upon the Chief of the Bureau of Ento-
mology and Plant Quarantine by §§ 301.48-6 and 301.48-7, Chapter III, Title 7,
Code of Federal Regulations [regulations 6 and 7 of the rules and regulations
supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 48], paragraphs (k) and (m) of
§ 301.48b [circular B. E. P. Q. 499, issued, June 9, 1989], as amended, are hereby
further amended effective September 18, 1942, by the addition of the following
subparagraphs:

§ 801.48b Administrative instructions to inspectors on the treatment of nursery
products, fruits, vegetables, and soil, for the Japanese beetle.

* * * * * *
TREATMENT OF SOIL IN ABSENCE OF PLANTS
x * * * * * *
(k) SOILIN AND AROUND COLDFRAMES, PLUNGING BEDS, AND HEELING-IN AREAS
* %* *
(6) Methyl bromide solution

(i) Season.—The treatment can be applied at any time when conditions are
suitable between October 1 and May 15.

(ii) Hquipment.—Equipment includes a gastight drum, complete with spigot
and hose, methyl bromide applicator, collars when necessary, and measuring cans.
Such equipment must be inspected, tested, and approved by an inspector of the
Department before use.

(iii) Preparation of solution.—The solution must be prepared in accordance
with the directions of the inspector.

(iv) Condition and type of soil—Soil of any type may be treated provided the
surface can be pulverized sufficiently to absorb the solution. To prepare a well
pulverized surface, areas to be treated must be leveled and thereafter cultivated
to loosen the soil to a depth of at least 1 inch. The treatment must not be applied
during rain. The surface of wet soil should be tilled, allowed to dry for at least
24 hours, and then pulverized preparatory to treatment.

(v) Dosage and application.—The dosage shall be at the rate of 3 gallons of
solution per 1 square yard. The strength of the solution shall be based on the
minimum soil temperature within the top 6 inches as follows:

Minimum soil temperature in Percentage concentration by volume of
top 6 inches (°F.): methyl bromide
47 to 66, iriclusive.J2 3 2 ee eee 0. 150
57. t0.G7, bvuciuin we: 5 a Ea ee . 100
OS O00 OVeM 2a na et eee ee ee ae eee . 050

The surface must be divided by strings or marks in the soil into units of approxi-
mately 1 square yard. The solution is to be applied uniformly in a crisscross pat-



1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 57

tern to the soil surface from the spout of a sprinkling can or other vessel with
a similar spout, held no more than 6 inches above the soil surface.

(vi) Safety zone.—In addition to the area desired to be certified, a strip 3 feet
wide must be treated around the entire coldframe, plunging bed, or heeling-in
ground. No plants will be certified from this strip. In the case of coldframes,
ete. extending into the ground to a depth of 12 inches or more, no safety zone is
required.

(vii) Marking.—In the case of coldframes, ete., having fixed boundaries, proper
designations will be made on them by the inspector. In all other cases the nursery-
men shall furnish suitable stakes, at least 4 inches square and 30 inches long, to be
placed at the boundaries of the certified plots and marked by the inspector.

(viii) Period of treatment.—The area must remain undisturbed for a period of
48 hours after treatment.

(ix) Alternative treatment—If 1-square-yard collars are used in treating
frames, plunging beds, and heeling-in areas, the dosages and methods of procedure
listed below for treatment of soil about the roots of plants may be used.

* * * * * * *
TREATMENT OF SoIL ABOUT THE Roots OF PLANTS
* * * * % * *

(m) TREATMENT OF PLANTS BEFORE DIGGING
* * * * * * *

(3) Methyl tromide solution—collar treatment

(i) Season.—The treatment can be applied at any time when conditions are
suitable between October 1 and May 15.

(ii) Hquipment.—The equipment required is the same as that under TREAT-
MENT OF SOIL IN ABSENCE OF PLANTS (subparagraph (6) of paragraph
(k)) except that collars are necessary.

(iii) Preparation of solution.—The required solution must be prepared in
accordance with the directions of the inspector.

(iv) Dosage, solution, concentration, and soil temperatures.—The dosage is at
the constant rate of 8 gallons per Square yard. The percentage concentration
of methyl bromide in solution, by volume, is dependent upon the minimum soil
temperature within the top 6 inches, as follows:

Minimum soil temperature in Percentage concentration of
top 6 inches (°F.): methyl bromide
AMG LL ING hIslyC>) 2 titers 4 leno! bac tp ool et Lb 0. 100
we Onesies Fite Danis eto Ries Figs) yest O75
EatOoGe, MMmerIsiye! fic tii Maiti s _ i bie 2) Vance . 050
JSP AL 10a 1s IV) Ue aw reas eee Se LS A . 040
Ri ROGE ies wIMICUIIS DWC pee ene, ee eel So . 025
pieraast Tate Worvest ope 20s uy i oP R te es eh ae centres . 015

(v) Condition and type of soil—There are no limitations so long as there is no
standing water on the area to be treated and all of the solution enters the soil
within 80 minutes after application.

(vi) Preparation of collar areas.—The area must be free from weeds and debris
and must be practically level. Leveling can be expedited by filling in and sub-
sequent tamping to produce a uniformly packed subsurface for the application.
The entire surface of the collar about the plant treated must be loosened to a depth
of linch. The collar should be set so that the solution will not break out beneath
or through it.

(vii) Safety area.—The collar must be of sufficient size so that a safety margin
of soil of at least 2 inches all around remains when the treated nursery stock unit
is dug for balling.

(viii) Withdrawal and application of solution—The solution is to be with-
drawn from the preparation-drum through a hose extending to the bottom of the
dosage-measuring vessel. It must be poured from the open top of the vessel onto
the collar area quickly and without unnecessary splashing. Immediately there-
after the soil within the collar must be smoothed off without splashing so that
the entire surface is uniformly submerged.

(ix) Use period.—If the drum is tightly sealed between dosage withdrawals
the solution may be used at any time within 24 hours after preparation. While
in storage between treatments within this period the drum must be shaded.

495903-—-42——__2



58 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE _ [July—Sept.

(x) Treatment period.—The plants must be dug not less than 20 hours or
more than 48 hours after treatment.

(xi) Plant reactions—The Department’s records on plant reactions to the
treatment are limited. Such information as is available will be supplied on
request to the Division of Japanese Beetle Control. All interested nurserymen
are advised to run test lots of their own stock for observation. So far as
possible, the Department will cooperate in this testing on written request to the
Division of Japanese Beetle Control, 266 Glenwood Avenue, Bloomfield, N. J.

(xii) Precautions.—Directions as to precautions may be obtained from the
above Division and should be observed.

(7 C. F. R. § 301.48; see. 8, 39 Stat. 1165, 44 Stat. 250; 7 U. S. C. 161.)

Done at Washington this 14th day of September 1942.

P. N. ANNAND,
Chief.

: [ co with the Division of the Federal Register September 18, 1942, 11: 42 a.m.;7 F. R,
7381.

ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO PINK BOLLWORM QUARANTINE
. (NO. 52)

B. E. P. Q. 493, Second Revision. Effective October 1, 1942.

TITLE 7—AGRICULTURE
CHAPTER III—BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE
Part 301—DoMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES

PINK BOLLWORM QUARANTINE REGULATIONS MODIFIED

INTRODUCTORY NOTE

The administrative instructions issued May 1, 1940 (Circular B. E. P. Q. 493,
revised) mudified the treatment requirements for the pink bollworm as to
baled lint and linters and products thereof and restored certain requirements
for handling cottonseed in certain counties in northwestern Texas and Lea and
Roosevelt Counties, N. Mex. The present revision does not change the
requirements for these counties.

Continued improvement in seed sterilization and in sanitary measures in force
at gins in the heavily infested area and at oil mills receiving and processing
cottonseed produced in that area, makes it safe to allow linters produced from
sterilized seed in such area to be moved interstate without additional treatment.
The present revision of the administrative instructions therefore removes the
requirement as to fumigation or roller treatment of linters produced from
sterilized seed originating in the heavily infested area. This modification of
the quarantine regulation does not affect the procedure as to handling cottonseed
originating in the heavily infested area as provided in paragraph (b) of
regulation 4 (§ 301.52-4).

§ 301.52-4b. Administrative instructions ; removing the treatment requirements
as to cotton linters produced from sterilized cottonseed in the heavily infested
areas, and extending the area in which baled cotton lint may be moved from
certain lightly infested areas in New Mezico and Texas without treatment.
Pursuant to the authority conferred upon the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology
and Plant Quarantine by the second proviso of § 301.52, Chapter III, Title 7,
Code of Federal Regulations [Notice of Quarantine No. 52, on account of the
pink bollworm], and having determined that facts exist as to the pest risk
involved which make it safe to modify, by making less stringent, the restric-
tions contained in paragraph (a) of § 3801.52-4, notice is hereby given that,
effective October 1, 1942, (a) all restrictions and certification requirements
are hereby waived on the interstate movement from any regulated area of
cotton linters produced from sterilized seed; and (b) all restrictions are hereby





1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 59

waived on the interstate movement of baled cotton lint and products thereof
from the following area:

New Mexico: Lea and Roosevelt Counties.

Texas: Counties of Andrews, Cochran, Concho, Dawson, Ector, Gaines,
Glasscock, Hockley, Howard, Irion, Martin, Midland, Mitchell, Sterling,
Terry, Tom Green, Yoakum, and the regulated parts of Bailey, Coke,
and Lamb Counties:

Provided, (1) That the products have been produced in an authorized oil mill or
gin and subsequently protected from contamination, and (2) that a certificate
of the United States Department of Agriculture has been obtained and attached to
the containers or shipping papers in accordance with the requirements prescribed
in § 801.52-11.

These instructions supersede those in circular B. E. P. Q. 493, dated May 1, 1940.

(7 C. F. R. § 301.52; sec. 8, 39 Stat. 1165, 44 Stat. 250; 7 U. S. C. 161.)

Done at Washington this 28th day of September 1942.
P. N. ANNAND,
Chief

eh with the Division of the Federal Register October 1, 1942, 11:52 a.m.; 7 F. R.



ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE
QUARANTINE (NO. 72)

B. E. P. Q. 485, Tenth Revision. Effective August 3, 1942, through January 31, 1943.

TITLE 7—AGRICULTURE

CHAPTER III—BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE
Part 301—DoMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES
WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE REGULATIONS MODIFIED

§ 301.72a. Administrative instructions; removal of certification requirements
for specified articles. (a) Pursuant to the authority conferred upon the Chief
of the Bureau of Entomolgy and Plant Quarantine by the second proviso of
§ 301.72, Chapter III, Title 7, Code of Federal Regulations [Notice of Quarantine
No. 72, on account of the white-fringed beetle], all certification requirements for
the interstate movement from the regulated areas are hereby waived effective
August 3, 1942, through January 31, 1948, for the following articles and materials
enumerated in § 301.72-3:

(1) Soil, sand, and gravel, as indicated below; (i) Soil, when taken from a
depth of at least 2 feet below the existing surface, and when entirely free from
any surface soil to a depth of 2 feet.

(ii) Sand and gravel when washed, processed, or otherwise treated to the
satisfaction of the inspector.

(2) Articles other than soil: When free from soil and when sanitation practices
as prescribed by the inspector are maintained to his satisfaction, the following
articles are exempt from certification during the period specified above:

(i) Potatoes.

(ii) Lily bulbs, except that freshly harvested or uncured bulbs are not exempt.

(iii) Forest products such as cordwood, stump wood, logs, lumber, timbers,
posts, poles, and cross ties.

(iv) Hay, other than peanut hay; roughage of all kinds, straw, leaves, and
leafmold.

(v) Peanuts in shells, and peanut shells.

(vi) Baled cotton lint, and linters.

(vii) Brick, tile, stone, cinders, concrete slabs, and building blocks.

The intensity of infestations has been greatly reduced by drastic suppressive
measures applied throughout the infested areas. This factor, as well as the
conditions of growth, production, or maintenance of the restricted articles, has
so reduced the danger of dissemination of white-fringed beetles that certifica-
tion of the exempted articles is no longer necessary.



60 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE _ [July-Sept.

(b) Except as specified above the following articles and materials shall
remain under the restrictions of § 301.72-3:

(1) All soil, earth, sand, clay, peat, muck, compost, and manure, whether
moved independent -.of, or in connection with, or attached to nursery stock,
plants, products, articles, or things:

(2) Nursery stock.

(3) Grass sod.

(4) Lily bulbs when freshly harvested and uncured.

(5) Peanut hay.

(6) Seed cotton and cottonseed.

(7) Used implements, machinery, containers, scrap metal, and junk.

This revision supersedes Circular B. E. P. Q. 485, ninth revision, which be-
came effective May 11, 1942.

(7 C. FE. R., § 301.72; sec. 8, 39 Stat. 1165, 44 Stat. 250; 7 U. S. C. 161.)

Done at Washington this 1st day of August 1942.

P, N. ANNAND,
Chief.
{Filed with the Division of the Federal Register August 8, 1942, 12: 06 p. m., 7 F. R. 6179.]



HEARING WILL CONSIDER BEETLE
QUARANTINE FOR NORTH CAROLINA

[Press notice]
SEPTEMBER 25, 1942.

Secretary of Agriculture Claude R. Wickard announced today a public hearing
to consider placing North Carolina under Federal quarantine because of the
recent discovery of infestations of the white-fringed beetle in that State. The
hearing will be held in the auditorium of the Department of Agriculture,
South Building, 14th Street and Independence Avenue, SW., at 10:30 a. m.,
October 15, 1942.

The white-fringed beetles were first reported as occurring in the United
States in 1936, and since 1937 have been known to be present in parts of
Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, and Mississippi. On January 15, 1939, these
States were placed under a Federal quarantine which restricts or prohibits the
interstate movement of soil and certain plants, plant products, and other
articles to points outside the areas regulated by this quarantine.

Surveys to determine whether this insect exists in places not previously known
to be infested have been conducted over wide areas during the past several
years. During the past summer white-fringed beetles were discovered at several
places within and in the vicinities of Atkinson, Burgaw, Goldsboro, and Wilming-
ton, N. C. Farm land, as well as industrial and residential areas, was found
to be infested.

This insect in its various stages may be carried from place to place through
movement of soil and other articles.

Both larvae and adults feed on a wide range of plants. The larvae are
capable of causing serious damage to many field and garden crops, and are
exceedingly destructive to several important crops grown in many sections of
the country. If allowed to spread, this insect may become a serious pest in
agricultural regions of the United States not now infested.



TITLE 7—AGRICULTURE
Cuaptrer III—BurEAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE
Part 301—DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES
WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING TO CONSIDER THE ADVISABILITY OF REVISING THE WHITE-
FRINGED BEETLE QUARANTINE TO INCLUDE NORTH CAROLINA
SEPTEMBER 25, 1942.

The Secretary of Agriculture has information that white-fringed beetles (species
of the genus Pantomorus, subgenus Graphognathus), insect pests dangerous to



[Fi
. 7646.)

1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 61

agriculture, and not heretofore widely prevalent or distributed within and
throughout the United States, but known to be present in Alabama, Florida,
Louisiana, and Mississippi, have been found to exist in the State of North
Carolina.

It appears necessary, therefore, to consider the advisability of revising the
quarantine on account of the white-fringed beetle (7 CFR 301.72 [Notice of
Quarantine No. 72]) to include the State of North Carolina, and of restricting
or prohibiting the movement from that State, or regulated portions thereof, of
(1) soil, sand, clay, peat, or muck, independent of, or in connection with, nursery
stock, plants, or other things; and (2) such other articles or materials as may
be determined to present a hazard in spread of the beetle, including the following:

Nursery stock.

Potatoes.

Grass sod.

Lily bulbs.

Compost and manure.

Forest products such as cordwood, stump wood, logs, lumber, timbers,
posts, poles, and cross ties.

Hay, roughage of all kinds, straw, leaves, and leafmold.

Peanuts in shells and peanut shells.

Seed cotton, cottonseed, baled cotton lint, and linters.

Used implements, machinery, containers, scrap metal, and junk.

Brick, tile, stone, cinders, concrete slabs, and building blocks.

Notice is, therefore, hereby given that, in accordance with section 8 of the
Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315; 7 U.S. C. 161) as amended,
a public hearing will be held before the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quaran-
tine in the auditorium of the Department of Agriculture, Washington, D. C., in
the South Building, Independence Avenue and 14th Street SW., at 10:30 a. m.,
October 15, 1942, in order that any person interested in the proposed quarantine
revision May appear and be heard either in person or by attorney.

GROVER B. HI11,
Acting Secretary.

Filed with the Division of the Federal Register September 25, 1942,11:34a.m.;7F. R.

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO MEXICAN BORDER REGULATIONS
MEXICAN BORDER ACT
[Pustic Law 426—T77TH ConcRESsS]
[CHAPTER 31—2pD SESSION]
[H. R. 4849]
AN ACT

To provide for regulating, inspecting, cleaning, and, when necessary, disinfecting railway
cars, other vehicles, and other materials entering the United States from Mexico.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States
of America in Congress assembled, That to prevent the introduction of insect
pests and plant diseases the Secretary of Agriculture is authorized and directed
to promulgate such rules and regulations as he may deem necessary to regulate
the entry into the United States from Mexico of railway cars and other vehicles
and freight, express, baggage, and other materials which may carry such pests
and to provide for the inspection, cleaning, and, when necessary disinfection of
such vehicles and materials; to carry out the activities required to accomplish
this purpose, the Secretary of Agriculture shall use such means as he may deem
necessary, including construction and repair of buildings, plants, and equipment
for fumigation and disinfection or cleaning of vehicles and materials; the clean-
ing and disinfection of vehicles or materials necessary to accomplish the purpose
shall be carried out by and under the direction of authorized inspectors of the



62 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE _ [July—Sept.

Department of Agriculture, and the Secretary of Agriculture shall make and
collect such charge as will cover, aS nearly aS may be, the average cost of ma-
terials, facilities, and special labor used in performing such disinfection, and
fees so collected shall be covered into the Treasury of the United States as
miscellaneous receipts.

Approved, January 31, 1942.

MEXICAN BORDER REGULATIONS
{Press notice]

SEPTEMBER 4, 1942.

Approval was given by the Secretary of Agriculture today to regulations estab-
lishing inspection and treatment procedures under the Mexican Border Act
approved January 31, 1942, relating to safeguard measures necessary to prevent
the incidental introduction of the pink bollworm of cotton and other insects and
plant diseases into this country from Mexico by means of railway cars and other
vehicles, as well as in cargo, or in waste and debris likely to carry pests.

Authority for inspection and cleaning and for fumigation or other treatment
of these cars, vehicles, and contaminating materials has been granted by Congress
on a yearly basis since 1917, and regulations for carrying out these activities
have likewise been in force since that date. With the enactment of the Mexican
Border Act providing in a permanent manner for these protective functions it has
become necessary to revise existing regulations to bring them under the authority
of the new Act and into accord with its terms. The revision thus accomplished
follows closely in scope and procedure the regulations long effective in this field.

B. E. P. Q.—Mex. Border Regs. ‘ Regulations under the Mexican Border Act, approved
January 31, 1942. Effective September 8, 1942.

TITLE 7—AGRICULTURE
CHAPTER ITI—BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

PART 8320—THE MEXICAN BORDER REGULATIONS

INTRODUCTORY NOTE

Authority to inspect and apply safeguards to railway cars, vehicles, and various
materials entering this country from Mexico has been granted by Congress on an
annual basis since 1917 and regulations covering these activities have likewise
been in force since that date. With the enactment of the Mexican Border Act,
approved January 31, 1942, it has become necessary to revise the existing regula-
tions so as to bring them under the authority of the new act, and into accord with
its terms. The revision thus accomplished follows closely in scope and procedure
the previous regulations, care being taken to avoid encroachment on the field
covered by the Plant Quarantine Act.

ORDER OF THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE

By virtue of the authority vested in the Secretary of Agriculture by the act,
approved January 31, 1942, entitled, “To provide for regulating, inspecting, clean-
ing, and, when necessary, disinfecting railway cars, other vehicles, and other
materials entering the United States from Mexico” (Public Law 426, 77th Con-
gress), I, Grover B. Hill, Acting Secretary of Agriculture, do prescribe and pro-
mulgate the following regulations to be in force and effect on September 8, 1942.

THE MEXICAN BORDER REGULATIONS

AUTHORITY : §$§ 320.1 to 320.9, inclusive, issued under the act approved January 31, 1942,
entitled ‘‘fo provide for regulating, inspecting, cleaning, and, when necessary, disinfecti
railway cars, other vehicles, and other materials entering the United States from Mexico,
(Public Law 426, 77th Cong.).





1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 63

§ 320.1. Administration.—The Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant
Quarantine is charged with the administration of the provisions of this Act and
the regulations in this part concurrently with the Plant Quarantine Act and the
quarantines and orders issued thereunder.

§ 320.2. Regulated vehicles, articles, and materials..—To carry out the purpose
of the aforesaid Act to prevent the introduction of insect pests and plant diseases
these regulations shall apply to railway cars, boats crossing the Rio Grande, air-
eraft, drawn or self-propelled vehicles (such as wagons, carts, trucks, automo-
piles), freight, baggage, containers, and articles or materials which may be con-
taminated with insect pests or plant diseases. These regulations, however, shall
not apply to railway cars, other vehicles, and other materials originating in and
moving directly from the Northern Territory of Baja California, Mexico.

§ 320.3. Definitions.—For the purpose of these regulations the following words,
names, and terms shall be construed, respectively, to mean:

(a) Inspector.—An inspector of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quaran-
tine, United States Department of Agriculture.

(b) Owner or agent.—As used in these regulations this term shall include both
singular and plural and shall denote the person, agent, firm, company, or official,
having responsible custody of railway cars, vehicles, or other materials subject to
these regulations.

(c) Disinfection.—Disinfection as used in these regulations includes any
treatment or process designed to destroy insect pests or plant disease organisms.

(ad) Railway cars.—As used in these regulations shall include all types of cars
commonly employed in the transportation of freight, such as box, flat, tank,
refrigerator, gondola, stock, ete.

(e) Cleaning.—Cleaning as used in these regulations shall mean the removal,
to the satisfaction of the inspector, of matter, other than the cargo and articles
being moved, which may carry insect pests or plant diseases from railway cars,
other vehicles, freight, express, baggage, and other materials,

(f) Other vehicles——As used in these regulations the term ‘other vehicles”
includes means of conveyance other than railway cars, such as aircraft, boats,
automobiles, trailers, trucks, wagons, and carts, ete.

(9g) Other materials —As used in these regulations the term “other materials”
shall include all commodities, articles, and materials which may be the means of
introducing insect pests or plant diseases into the United States.

§ 320.4. Inspection.—As a condition of entry into the United States from
Mexico all articles and materials under these regulations (§ 320.2) shall be
subject to examination by an inspector for the purpose of determining whether
they may enter the United States without risk of introducing insect pests and
plant diseases.

§ 320.5. Railway cars.—When the inspector has determined by examination
that railway cars may enter the United States without risk of introducing
insect pests and plant diseases into the United States, he shall, insofar ag these
regulations may govern, permit their entry. If the examination discloses that
any car is contaminated and would involve risk of introducing insect pests
or plant diseases into the United States, he shall prescribe, as condition of entry,
cleaning, transfer of cargo, or disinfection, or all three. When cleaning alone
has been prescribed and done to the satisfaction of the inspector he shall permit
the entry of the cleaned cars, insofar as these regulations may govern entry.
When disinfection is prescribed the entry of the cars shall be conditioned on
their being fumigated, under the supervision of the inspector, either in a govern-
ment-owned fumigation house or otherwise in a place and by methods prescribed
by the inspector. Immediately upon entry of railway cars for fumigation they
shall be moved by the owner or agent having charge of same directly to the
government-owned fumigation plant, or “spotted” at an approved place and
before placing the cars in the fumigation chambers or “spotting” them for
fumigating the railroad company servicing the cars shall cause the car doors to
be opened and subsequent to fumigation it shall be the responsibility of the
railroad company to remove the cars from the fumigation plant or place where
they have been “spotted” and to close the car doors when the occasion requires.
When the prescribed fumigation has been accomplished in manner required by
the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, the inspector

3? The entry of certain plants and plant products is regulated or prohibited by quarantines
and regulations promulgated under the Plant Quarantine Act as amended.



64 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July—Sept,

shall permit entry into the United States insofar as these regulations may
govern. The inspector may authorize temporary entry of railway cars under
conditions to be prescribed by him for unloading or loading in railroad yards
at the port of entry or for in-transit movement from and to Mexico.

§ 320.6. Vehicles, articles, and materials, other than railway cars and unregu-
lated boats.—When the inspector has determined by examination that vehicles,
other than railway cars and unregulated boats, or any of the various articles
and materials covered by these regulations may enter the United States withort
risk of introducing insect pests or plant diseases, he shall permit their entry
insofar as these regulations may govern. If the examination by the inspector
discloses such regulated vehicles, articles, or materials are contaminated and
would involve risk of introducing insect pests or plant diseases into the United
States, he shall prescribe, as a condition of entry, cleaning, transfer of cargo,
or disinfection, or any or all of these. The cleaning, transfer of cargo and
disinfection shall be earried out under his supervision and to his satisfaction
and until it has been so accomplished, entry into the United States shall be
refused.

§ 320.7. Responsibility for opening and cleaning—The owner or agent in
charge of railway cars, other vehicles, and freight, express, baggage, articles,
or other materials shall open these for inspection as required by the inspector
and provide reasonable access to every part thereof, and when cleaning is
prescribed by the inspector as a condition of entry, shall so open, and clean,
and do any and all things reasonably pertaining thereto as required by the
inspector. All costs incident to entry, opening, and cleaning, except for the
services of the inspector, Shall be paid by the owner or agent in charge.

§ 320.8. Responsibility for disinfection—When disinfection involves fumiga-
tion the inspector will apply the fumigant whether in the houses erected for
the purpose or in the cars themselves. If, in the judgment of the inspector,
fumigation will not provide adequate safeguards against the introduction of
insect pests and plant diseases, he may prescribe another type of disinfection
which shall be applied by the owner or agent under the supervision of the
inspector. Costs incident te such disinfection, other than the services of the
inspector, shall be borne by the owner or his agent, or paid for as prescribed
elsewhere in these regulations.

§ 320.9. Fees for disinfection in government-owned facilities—Prior to entry
of railway cars or other vehicles requiring fumigation in government-owned
facilities as a condition of entry, the owner or agent in charge shall buy fumiga-
tion coupons from the inspector in charge at the port of entry. The price
fixed for these coupons shall represent as nearly as may be, the average cost
of materials, facilities, and special labor used by the Bureau of Entomology
and Plant Quarantine in performing such fumigation. On the basis of the
average cost for such fumigation over a period of years the inspector in charge
shall, until further notice, collect a fee of $4.00 for each coupon sold. Payments
for coupons, if practicable, shall be in the form of postal money orders, or bank
drafts or certified checks drawn on United States banks, drawn to the credit
of the Treasurer of the United States. Payments in United States currency
will be accepted if tendered. All fees so collected by the inspector shali be
promptly turned into the Treasury of the United States as miscellaneous receipts
in accordance with the practices approved by the Secretary of Agriculture.

These regulations shall supersede the Rules and Regulations Prohibiting the
Movement of Cotton and Cottonseed from Mexico into the United States and
Governing the Entry into the United States of Railway Cars and Other Vehicles,
Freight, Express, Baggage, or Other Materials from Mexico at Border Points,
effective July 1, 1917, as amended January 29, 1920 (7 C. F. R. § 320.1 to § 320.6;
39 Stat. 1164) and may be referred to as “The Mexican Border Regulations.”

Done at the city of Washington this 3d day of September 1942.

Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.

GrRovEeR B. HILL,
Acting Secretary of Agriculture.

[Copies of the foregoing regulations were sent to all American diplomatic and consular
officers in Mexico, Guatemala, and El Salvador, through the State Department, and to al?
customs officers through the Treasury sae erica |
a a with the Division of the Federal Register September 4, 1942, 11:14 a.m.; 7 F. R.



1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 65

MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS

B. P. Q. 355, Revised, Supplement No. 4.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, JAMAICA, BRITISH WEST INDIES

SEPTEMBER 11, 1942.

Corton LINT oR SEED—RESTRICTED IMPORTATION PERMITTED

Proclamation No. 34, published in the Jamaica Gazette Supplement of June 29,
1942, prescribed that the importation into Jamaica of cotton lint or seed, or any
part whatever of the cotton plant or of any plant of any species or variety of
Gossypium, is allowed only under permit granted by the Director of Agriculture
and in compliance with the following rules:

1. No consignment of cottonseed may exceed 1 ton in weight.

2. All cottonseed imported into this Island shall be placed in the fumigation
chamber immediately on landing and shall not be removed therefrom until it has
been fumigated for a period of 1 hour with hydrocyanic acid gas at a concentration
of 1 ounce of cyanide for every 300 cubic feet of space.

3. All cottonseed shall before planting be immersed for not less than 3 minutes
in concentrated sulphuric acid or treated with fungicide approved by the Director
of Agriculture.

AveErRY 8S. Hoyt,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

P. Q. C. A. 310, Supplement No. 6.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF PERU

JuLyY 3, 1942.

REGULATING THE CULTIVATION OF FLAX IN PERU AND THE IMPORTATION OF FLAXSEED
[Executive Order of June 3, 1942, Lima]

All seedings of flax for fiber made in certain coastal valleys are restricted
generally to a planting season from May 15 to July 31. (This season is extended
to August 15 in 1942.)

The importation of flaxseed by individuals is prohibited. This can be done only
through the Bureau of Agriculture and Livestock, who will import flaxseed in
quantities not exceeding 1 kilogram upon application by interested farmers. The
flaxseed will be passed upon by the technical services of the Bureau and released
to the farmers concerned if the test proves satisfactory.

AVERY S. Hoyt,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

TERMINAL INSPECTION OF PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS
ARIZONA PLANT QUARANTINE 4
(Amendment of Notice dated November 10, 1941)

Item 6 of the notice of November 10, 1941, published in the Postal Bulletin of
November 17, 1941, relating to Arizona plant quarantines is amended by removing
“Plum trees and parts thereof, except fruit pits” from the prohibited list (column
II) and placing these articles in the restricted list (column III) so that the
amended item will read:



(Column I) (Column ITI) (Column IV)
(6) Arizona, California, | Plum trees and parts thereof, except fruit pits, | Peach mosaic disease.
Colorado, New Mexico, peach and nectarine trees, root stock, grafts,
Oklahoma, Texas, and buds, or other parts capable of propagation, ex-
Utah. cept fruit pits, admitted under proper certifi-

cation from State of origin.



4The Postal Bulletin, Washington, August 17, 1942.



66 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July—Sept.

OREGON STATE PLANT QUARANTINES
(Revision of Notice dated September 11, 1940)
Postal Bulletin 18032—September 17, 1940

Under plant quarantines and regulations issued by the State of Oregon the
shipment into that State of certain plants and plant material known to be hosts
of injurious pests and plant diseases is subject to certain restrictions, or entirely
prohibited.

The following table gives a summary of the Oregon quarantine laws and
regulations, showing the quarantine areas, the plants and plant products affected,
and the pests and diseases of which such plants are known hosts. Under the
provisions of paragraph 2 (b), section 596, Postal Laws and Regulations, post-
masters should not accept such plants and plant products when presented for
mailing in violation of these quarantine laws and regulations, and should invite

the attention of the mailers thereto.

Plants and plant products prohibited or regulated entry into Oregon

Area quarantined

(Column I)

(1) Counties in Oregon:Baker,
Grant, Malheur, Morrow,
Umatilla, Union and Wal-
lowa.

All States except California
and Nevada.

(2) All of the United States
and all counties in Oregon.



(3) Parts of Oregon, Idaho
and Washington:

(Infested Areas)

Counties in Oregon: Benton,
Clackamas, Clatsop, Co-
lumbia, Lane, Lincoln,
Linn, Marion, Multnomah,
Polk, Tillamook, Union,
Washington, Yamhill.

Counties in Idaho; Benewah
and Latah.

Counties in Washington: Clal-
lam, Clark, Cowlitz, Grays
Harbor, Island, Jefferson,
King, Kitsap, Lewis, Ma-
son, Pacific, Pierce, San
Juan, Skagit, Skamania,
Snohomish, Spokane, Thur-
ston, Wahkiakum, What-
com, Whitman.

(4) All of Oregon

(5) Counties in Oregon: Ben-

ton, Clackamas, Clatsop,
Columbia, Douglas, Hood
River, Lane, Linn, Marion,
Multnomah, Polk, Wash-
ington, and Yamhill.

States of Connecticut, Maine,
Massachusetts, New Hamp-
shire, Rhode Island, Ver-
mont, and Washington.

Plants and plant products affected

Acceptance for mail-
ing entirely pro-
hibited from quar-
antined area

(Column II)

Fresh cherry fruit en-

tirely prohibited
shipment from. in-
fested counties in-
tonon infestedcoun-
ties.

Used cherry boxes
also prohibited ex-
cept when steam-
or hot-water treated
and se certified.

Accepted for mailing only when

accompanied with approved
certificate or Oregon permit

(Column ITI)

Potatoes and potato tops require
State -of-origin certificate
showing they were grown and
packed in noninfested areas;
or, screened and packed as
prescribed by Oregon law.

Narcissus bulbs, including daf-

fodils, jonquils, and Chinese
sacred lilies require satis-
factory State-of-origin certifi-
cate as to. . . freedom from
infestation, based on inspec-
tion or treatment.

Fresh cherries may be shipped

into Oregon from noninfested
counties in Idaho and Wash-
ington with inspection certifi-
cate showing growth, packing,
and shipment from a county
free of fruit fiy.

Cherry fruit and used boxes
may be shipped from infested
counties into infested counties
without certification, but are
subject to inspection at desti-
nation.

Gladiolus bulbs accepted for

intrastate shipment only when
accompanied by special gladi-
olus permit.

Poplar and willow trees or parts

thereof capable of propagation
accepted from quarantined
areas when accompanied with
certificate of State of origin
showing they were grown in
county free from satin moth
and not stored where poplar
or willow trees from infested
areas are or have been stored,
or a certificate showing the
trees have been effectively
treated in approved manner.

Plant pests
and diseases

(Column IV)

Colorado po-
tato beetle.

7

Narcissus bulb
fly, eelworm,
or nematode.

Cherry fruit
fly.

Gladiolus
thrips.



Satin moth.





1942]

SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS

67

Plants and plant products prohibited or regulated entry into Oregon—Continued.



Area quarantined

(Column I)

Plants and plant products affected



Acceptance for mail-
ing entirely pro-
hibited from quar-
antined area

(Column IT)

(G)wEniine United States: ss.) -|Sr22eeunsssleteee tess.

—_—_—.



(7) Alabama, Arkansas, Con-

necticut, Delaware, Flor-
ida, Georgia, Illinois, Indi-
ana, Kansas, Kentucky,
Louisiana, Maryland, Mas-
sachusetts, Michigan, Mis-
sissippi, Missouri, New
Hampshire, New Jersey,
North Carolina, New York,
Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode
Island, South Carolina,
Tennessee, Texas, Virginia,
West Virginia, and District
of Columbia.

(8) California, Florida, Lou-
isiana, North Carolina,
South Carolina, Tennessee,
Mexas.. .Viteinva, and
Hawaii.



(9) All States east of and in-

cluding the States of Mon-
tana, Wyoming, Colorado,
and New Mexico.

(10) All of the States and dis-

tricts of the United States
and the following counties
in Oregon: Baker, Crook,
Deschutes, Gilliam, Grant,
Harney, Jefferson, Kla-
math, Lake, Malheur, Mor-
row, Sherman, Umatilla,
Union, Wallowa, Wasco,
‘Wheeler.

(11) Connecticut, Delaware,

Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky,
Maine, Maryland, Massa-
chusetts, Michigan, New
Hampshire, New Jersey,
New York, North Carolina,
Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode
Island, Vermont, Virginia,
West Virginia, Wisconsin.

All varieties and spe-

cies, including the
flowering forms of
the peach, nectar-
ine, almond, apricot,
plum, cherry, choke-
cherry, quince, pear,
and apple trees and

plants and_ parts
thereof and the fresh
fruit.

All trees, plants, cut-

tings, and scions of
the cultivated and
wild filbert and
hazel.

we ee ee a ee ee a ee ee ee eee ee

Stalks, ears, cobs or other parts

Accepted for mailing only when

accompanied with approved
certificate or Oregon permit

(Column IIT)

Grapevines and cuttings ac-

cepted with State-of-origin cer-
tificate that shipment is from
a section free of phylloxera or
certificate that shipment has
been given an approved treat-
ment under the supervision of
a qualified inspector of State
of origin.

Scions or budwood admitted

under Oregon permit from
Nov. 1to Apr.1. Bare rooted
plants allowed entry from
Nov. 1 to Apr. 1 after fumi-
gation as required, provided
with satisfactory State-of-ori-
gin certificate.

Potatoes—accepted only with

certificate of state-of-origin to
show the potatoes and district
where grown are free of infesta-
tion or that the potatoes were
fumigated. ...

Genus rubus, such as black-

berry, dewberry, loganberry,
and raspberry and their horti-
cultural varieties, accepted
under field inspection certifi-
cate of State of origin. ...

or debris (except seed and
shelled grain free from frag-
ment of cob and other plant
debris) of corn, broom corn,
sorghums or Sudan grass; cut
flowers or entire plants of
dahlia, gladiolus (except
corms, bulbs, or tubers with-
out stems) chrysanthemum,
aster; lima beans in the pod,
green shell beans in the pod (of
the variety known as cran-
berry or horticultural); beets
with tops; and rhubarb—ad-
mitted under approved disin-
fection treatment certificate
issued by U. S. Department
of Agriculture or State of
origin.

The following admitted if ac-

companied with certificate of
inspection showing freedom of
infestation: Beans in the pod,
beets with tops, rhubarb (cut
or plants), cut flowers or
entire plants of chrysanthe-
mum, aster, or entire plants of
gladiolus and dahlia.

Plant pests
and diseases

(Column IV)

Grape phyllox-
era.

Oriental fruit

moth.

Potato tuber

moth.

Filbert blight.

Virus diseases

of the genus
FUDUSH oes.

European corn

borer.



68 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July—Sept.
Plants and plant products prohibited or regulated entry into Oregon—Continued.

Plants and plant products affected



, : Plant pests
Area quarantined Acceptance for mail- ae .
ing entirely pro- Accepted for mailing only when | and diseases

ibi ied with approved
hibited from quar- accompanie
antined area certificate or Oregon permit

(Column I) | (Column II) (Column IIT) (Column IV)
(13) California, .Delawargiah see eet en Lae Tomatoes and tomato plants | Tomato pin
Florida, New Mexico, Mis- require certificate pf State of worm..
sissippi, Pennsylvania, Vir- origin showing fruit or plants
ginia, and Hawaii. were grown and shipped from

a free area, or treated with
Oregon approved formula.



(13) All States east of and in- | Chestnut and chin- | Foreign grown chestnuts and | Chestnut

cluding Montana, Wyom- quapin trees, nuts, chinquapins not restricted blight.
ing, Colorado, and New cuttings, grafts, or when reshipped into Oregon
Mexico. scions. in the original unopened con-
tainers.
14) Territory of Hawaii_____- Maunaloa Blowers... 2222. este ee ee ee East Indian

bean borer.

(15). Counties in Arizona: | AD” teces,, , cuttings] o.u4 abe Seen eee eee Peach mosaic.



Apache, Cochise, Coconino, grafts, scions, or
Graham, Maricopa, Pima, buds of the peach
Santa Cruz, and Yavapai. and nectarine, in-

Counties in California: Im- cluding the flower-
perial, Los Angeles, Orange, | ing forms.
Riverside, San Bernardino, |
and San Diego.

Counties in. Colorado: ,.Delta,))| 21) trees, cuttings, = 2.228 2402-422. 5 eee Peach mosaic.
Garfield, Mesa, and Monte- grafts, scions, or
zuma. buds of the peach

Counties in New Mexico: and nectarine, in-

Bernalillo, Dona Ana, Lin- cluding the flower-
coln, Otero, Rio Arriba, ing forms.
Sandoval, Santa Fe, Sierra,
Socorro, Ta0s, and Valencia.
Counties in Oklahoma: Bryan.
Counties in ‘Texas: Bowie,
Brown, Callahan, -Cher-
okee, Comanche, Denton,
Eastland, El] Paso, Erath,
Floyd, Grayson, Gregg,
Hopkins, Jones, Mills, Palo
Pinto, Rusk, San Saba,
Smith, Tarrant, and Wil-
barger.

Counties in Utah: Grand and
Washington.

(16) Alabama, arkansas, | Peach, nectarine, or |_----.--_-------- eee ee Peach yellows,
Connecticut, Delaware, apricot trees; cut- little peach
District of Columbia, tings, grafts, scions, and peach
Florida, Georgia, Indiana, buds, ocr pits, in- rosette.
Kentucky, Maryland, Mas- cluding any trees
sachusetts, Michigan, Mis- budded or grafted
sissippi, New Jersey, New on peach stock or
York, North Carolina, Ohio, peach roots—from
Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, areas where any of
Rhode Island, South Caro- these diseases are
lina, Tennessee, Virginia, known to exist.

and West Virginia.



Shippers desiring Oregon permits must make application therefor direct to
the Division of Plant Industry, State Department of Agriculture, Salem, Oreg.

Postmasters at places in Oregon where State inspection of plants and plant
products is maintained under the Terminal Inspection Act should take the
action prescribed by paragraph 4 (b), section 596, Postal Laws and Regulations,
if parcels sent to such officers for terminal inspection are found to be in violation
of these plant quarantine laws or regulations.





1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 69

PENALTIES IMPOSED FOR VIOLATIONS OF THE PLANT
QUARANTINE ACT

According to reports received by the Bureau during the period July 1 to

September 30, 1942, penalties have recently been imposed by the proper authori-
ties for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act, as follows

QUARANTINES AFFECTING MEXICAN PRODUCTS

In the case of the United States versus the persons listed below, for attempt-
ing to smuggle in contraband plant material, the penalties indicated were
imposed by the United States customs officials at the following ports:





Name Port Contraband BPoRLLY
SUB WE SISCIOS2 2-4 ee ce eet Brownsville, Tex..._| 2 avocados with seed______________ $1
Eusebio Benavides Garza_._.--------]----- RETO m ce sey ahd fyb 5 avocados with seed___________-- 1
@onstancioMiendoza=222-.2-=2-- =: 222s. be ters ee APL MAM ROL uate feet eee 1
Piggalipe Guera..-.--22e_ ly ee eS Came sete eee Pre ae Mer eUPINE OR) oe oem 2 pee ee 1
SURISESY SURG ewes fore pe See de One ee see Se PR IURSE ayant eee Ne 1
DRA VW ETON > eee) edd se 2) Del Rio; Dex2s 22-2 PAIMEN CORSE ees Peed eae ey Tee 1
@andelario Rodriguez.-.-.2-~--s-- +52 _L-- GOn sa eee 2 avocados. - ----- EN pe eee ee 1
WIRE apCIOLEG. ee ee Cen ager ee Stites loca rete oo ot Oe 1
Teresa Torres de Moreno-.-----------|----- On 275 Senile * DAV OCACOSS ee rae Sees nee 1
pAnCIeeii tr? rn tr AS GOms ssa ayes ee ee CO RSP RR RAR Ae Sate See 1
pean OTe pet renee ry nn 5 POE (a (Cea eye ae See GSVOCHd OS cw Pek ae he eee 1
Francisco Mota Rodriguez-_-_-..------|----- (LO Eas Sales FES Yoo MDOGESISUCALCANe: 2 -=— 2 1
Rosa Mild onad Os = oeee= fal eae Tk a See COLES et Se STA VOCHUOSee eee ee ees rn 1
Eustolia Rodriguez Vda. de Garza__- Eagle Pass, Tex_-_-__- ESTO MULTI Seer leary oot A ate Fee 1
OHNO pate eee ee be Ret ans | ed CV Se ators 2 = ZEN AN OCS Seer ae 1
Ramonaseins Guedes. <2. lace eee onte Pe Ge: 1 avocado seed_-_-_._-- oy a ee 1
lois Montalvo diugo 22-2 ses ee Gos sens Nien ARITA OCG Meer emmy en Eee 1
oloresAty ala dear a2 = ee es Os 45 Aeuek lS tee Oitic Seip aero minty eRe Se hse eee 1
yosela Cruz de Valdez. \ou- 222) 2-222 Ls eG ass ef BYDB AUS u erty CR ee eee 1
HB ZA ASiTOC ee ee ee eS Ae TS UE te 4 pomecnanatesses.= = ee es 1
emma GnttOrrae oe. 278s PE Pe Nik GOr 2 LSS. Le Pe DE AepSeer e052 kao a ee 1
Teodora Martinez Herrera ._-.------.|----- Gos Si aeus-nelac SDU DSS Hee aoe Sores ee 1
Virginia Macias de Bosquez_-_-------|_---- (ea ee BLAVOCAMO) SCOUS= a. 5 ot 1
GuadauperGre Wiilths. 9. 2-282 oe sees GOSS Bec ee IS ORAM C Bese co eee ee Se ag 1
pusana Montel vos. 2% 42 22525. £2 32/2! doe ay. Sets Ip each we Ces. Lee ie) hee 1
Ramon Villasenor Careaga_-__--------|_---- COS aA A AVOCAMO Se ree eee a 1
IMR TIRS SDEMOMO es. oe omen oa ean Hidalgo, "Tex.+=.-.. MeIMLAN COGS cate ees oe NI ee 1
Santos Viantimezse=s 2s 2 2 NE ys oa COE see ae TAO DIES Meee eS 2 tank emt eee or 1
Tia) alo) ( Choy Ns / a ays Se a Ae ee | ee GOES . PFET: Dra ee eae Se SER ee 1
GunllermavEerrera.-.=--.--2—---2-22--|---L GOs ee ee ae TP VOINGSE Sees 5am = Neate fa 1
OMIstIN a DOULIOZ. 252 2258 obo a st olii a. a GO se. Se ak BONERS ge ee as ae Ay 1
Miparishomepamma sees 222 oo Ne. Fe es GOSS vemos. oe HIAVOCACOISGCUS 2" eee-2-— se 1
DAM bIALOPNAMIORS hese vista _ Sse 2 Pe Gore es Le SV OCHUOSt ine ewer nn fk 8 |
PODER UO MTA Gers 5S Bee Se ee ae OO. Be a 8 DAVOCAC OSE resus ae Mi ats 7 By as TF on 1
AMOCRIVA Can b Ue a sas. fee et EuNaIEO, exes se sy ORDIANGSE ee ee aes Bee cee 1
Gere we vayInonde seen eee Fe OL eek QATMAN OCS! Aes see ee Se 1
Binlores Balezars Est Aye eek hele a cu Sa Abe ees ISrrane Ores eee eye Se 1
PEE LP MOROU: 4 22 22 toe eee cl DOE See SPOMESPANALRSHeS =! oo ee 1
Bite ae ELOORA S22. Se WE Oe pe ee Sd to LOVE Na Spt, ae eee eae ae ri 1
Poul raNGINeee. Soe Polo. Rees wk 0G Rhee eee DIDlants ees e ees nse Been eS 1
PRO WanuOmEuzeteos Ss i ee COLE Ree ree Odrishipotatoese 242 Sess se 1
PANIES UCLA VIArbING 229222222 cess ce | CO taper SSeS Pee ibsookz ato ee hs ee. 1
IP COUTOR SOLON ewes at a os eee 0 (oper Ss Sale ae as TE SVOCAGON tee een ee igs TF 1
ERICYRCOMEZ) ChALCIA= = 22 eee aca | ose GOh ss eon eee CHT ATO meee Is eS 1
PAINGUIOR GAS TMO Ree eee see WN ose se 2 eee O\pomesnanatesse so = ooo 2 lak 1
VV ame isp ote Cee ee eee GO ea PRN ATC OCS eet eee es SS 1
GenovedaMscamitla == 22 25 2 Gomse Shake Sea PERV OCAUOS see tne eel De 1
Glen iy mnNeke oa as ee Ste Assos see AORN RIP epee Le wie Fo Tt 8? 1
IBeniniminkGastillon ss et ee ate Goss Nate. Fae ak 1 mango, 2 peaches, and 2 apples-___ 1
TEE ELS MILE fo ae eee Gal a a) (ee GOs ey ae ee BIDRACNCSeeet eet a ee eS 1
INBCHmO vrendiola...- so). kee] MOS To. area NS APA OCHMOSH 22s me eel oS Se 1
Ber BEULO Ze 32525 S82 ly lle MO Ae ee. er of te, PEA OCAU OS ae eer ig io Sk 1
Melting Barrientos: +=. .-..-...4=|_-L CORE eee eee Ta 16 pears and 1 avocado seed__--___- 1
FEO PGUOMLANZanOe sa). 25 2 er ot eee COs ree YS ee RAN OLAUOS tere sob Soke ae 1
malcentenVionenOsse 2s 2. 8s ee a ae GONsn Ec hecoh ares 2 avocados and 3 pomegranates-____ 1
HMM ape AnimMen Or. 2 2.522 25 See GOspw penn eet IbAVOCSCO'SeGd | = aoe ew esata eee 1
Guadalipe balomaeets 22-8 les OKC ae a ik eee Seger een 2 pomegranates: ..-2.-.-.-~---.=,.- 1
Lorenzs Martinez2:__-._+.-.......--.|-...- igeye o Sa! oe De PUNNGB 23M 3 oe ee Eee 1
IATIACIOLONE OUCZ ase sno eee ee. S Corea Foe ASV OCACOLSECUS 22 ea ee oe 1
Pot OMMese wees oe el COREL Ue a. 2 peaches and 1 pear_-_-__________- 1
serie MAE erect kt eS CO Rees kee” Pav OCAC ON) 3 See re eee NS 1
SQUMIOWROGIICUEZEe 2 2) see lee GOP ese E ies. Se [slope aieer ea, 208 ae 8 1
Meneonna. | Orrez.- of.) ut GOS ea Grp lambseree toes (ee eee ed eS 1
RAGS OriG@ea aPC Sc oo a se et GOs rs ss TIA VORA OM we eae re ee hs 1
PIBSTACLO DONS nos et bl. Nee Goiesise. soe 2 avocados and 2 peaches___________ 1
MSITUBIVHITOTIGES Se oe eee Se eee CLG ess Fee Ss AVVO COSE eeeeeenae eee fis oe Foe 1
Morentimis Cervantes}. so ahah k ko a ee SHVOCAGOS. = ee eee Se oh il



70 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July—Sept.

Name Port Contraband Penalty









Wann sGASas 2s. a he | eal Oi wee pe te 4 avocados... 2-6 434-0 eee $1
Habs eeIMOriz. +. 2.2 hs. Ge ae ae Ot eee ee S OLanees. ef a 1
Caesario Rios 802...) . - 7B ee Core. Serer Eres st 4 plants. 1.221... 28) . SS ee 1
Victorinia: Vers...-=.~... 22-2 ee |e Gre. ee ee 1 apples * 122-3. 425 3 eee 1
Cirilo Escobeda..-. =... .cas13seeee | eee Gibsie A ths cee ye 1 avocado, 1 quince, and 1 pome- 1
granate.
orenza Gonzales =... 6 eee ee Oa ei et a DS 1 avocado and 3 guavas.__-___-___- 1
Wraria Perez Soliss = Si ek ees Cie eee eee ee ee T peach=2) 4.2. 2e8 ee 1
Manta Briqness £01) Sore Le eeee 2 oa ce doo Cent. tee S applesiit i Lick Jt. eee 1
Francisco Gareiaeas. 4 o=-) een oe ale oe Aout i nsttes. ores 4,oranges.: 22. fe.tiet) eae eee 1
Pelip: Garcial 22. AL sree Ce eee nen ees OO 2c stsssoee 2'oranges.__-_2 4.) ei eee 1
Maria Silvarde Garzaes: 25 2a ane 00.3 See 18 plants: .42 21... oS ee 1
ilia Psparanza ‘Bustillass es dO eee 1 orange and 3 guavas________---_- 1
Seferina, Pena. oss e.. 42 oe an ees Laredo, Tex. .--325:¢ |) pear). 2221 ee ee ut
Belen i. Wompeane ease Eee G0. 222 ee 1 avocado and 17 plants____-_____- 1
Resinoe Sanches ese Se se WOÂ¥S=. =o soe ee Sav0Cad 6s. 2. ee 1
Wicela Vaquera: 9" Se ee alee dot?:- 22a 2 avocados with seed ___.____--=.2. a
Esther Jimtenez- 7 6 Weise tie leh lee GOS. SS e Me 8 plants! ....._.u. 23 ee a;
Mrs; Joseta’ Bde Perales = - = Fe ee dows _22e2).27. 32 plants: _......- =_ 2-2 2
ROM Camano: Wane 2 Ee ees dOsas=. es 3 guavas and 1 plant_____._______- 2
Dank JOHNS. 22a ee ee GOs... es I plants 2.2). eee 5
Francisco Martinez. __-=<._-_-_.-_- nach ea ee C04: 2. 2 ae oO 8VOC&O0S... 2... -. 2.22. 1
Hnriqueba, Vulerrenle ee eee GOSe no ens 2 mangoes! >. --_..--- eee 1
Beatrice Arreaga 2 ee se eee Osh aes 2-2 See S.avocados. !—. 22222425255. 1
Polores: Garcia." 2 ee eee Gow. See oka e L.mango._. nao ee 1
NV CHO Te ONEV AT OS © ges ere | Osos. ae Sap pleS: 2 71 2 ee 1
idiaveinojoss- 2 ea ae ee ee GoS3 Ee Mie 2 ee 2.peaches .- .. 32s Aves 2 1
Braneiscol hs Estradow e222 Bee ee CLOTS AS SOR ese 2 I fUaVea.. . 22 eset ee i
Cirlomaneher aes Fee 8 eee ee GOW. 3. ee es 40 agave plants--__- =.=... pee 2
Belvvedrangss 4 ee CC ee Ue | eee GO 4s ees OG OLANLCS- ef 5c ha ee 1
Ae VASUUCZ. sere eee kee mee Gout Bees Lies 2 DlANtS. 3. 2. 2.5) Nee ee 1
Emilio Dally: =: es eee ae eee GOP tessa eee wee 10‘avocados. .._-__.- 2) See 1
AGelaId a Salinas sess ee een 5 ee alee CQO 2 aaa ee Anodes sugarcane: _._ === ps sees 1
Bilomen’ Pena! 2s 20 ee ee eee G04so ssh see ee I plant) --. -2=2-2-.=_-22 2 =e eee 1
Eva Rodriquez de Salinas_________-_- Tomas Dex = eae 10 plants with! soil. ! 2 2s= saa 3







ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY
AND PLANT QUARANTINE

P. N. ANNAND, Chief.

Avery S. Hoyt, Associate Chief.

S. A. RoHwer, Assistant Chief in Charge of Regulatory Work.

F. C. BrsHoprp, Assistant Chief in Charge of Research Work.

W. L. PopHaAM, Assistant Chief in Charge of Control Operations.

F. H. SPeENcER, Assistant Chief in Charge of Business Administration.

Rouia P. CurRIiE, Hditor.

J. A. Hystop, in Charge, Division of Insect Pest Survey and Information.

J. I. HAMBLETON, in Charge, Division of Bee Culture Investigations.

D. L. VAN DINE, in Charge, Division of Fruit Insect Investigations.

FE. C. CRAIGHEAD, in Charge, Division of Forest Insect Investigations.

W. H. WHITE, in Charge, Division of Truck Crop and Garden Insect Investiga-
lions.

C. M. PacKarp, in Charge, Division of Cereal and Forage Insect Investigations.

R. W. HARNED, in Charge, Division of Cotton Insect Investigations.

W. E. Dove, in Charge, Division of Insects Affecting Man and Animals.

C. P. CLAUSEN, in Charge, Division of Control Investigations.

R. C. Roark, in Charge, Division of Insecticide Investigations.

C. F. W. MuESEBECK, in Charge, Division of Inseet Identification.

C. P. CLAUSEN, in Charge, Division of Foreign Parasite Introduction.

J. RF. Martin, in Charge, Division of Plant Disease Control.

B. M. GAppis, in Charge, Division of Domestic Plant Quarantines.

EK. R. SAsscer, in Charge, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines.

A. F. Burgess, in Field Charge, Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail Moth Control (head-
quarters, Greenfield, Mass.).

E. G. Brewer, in Field Charge, Japanese Beetle and Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail
Moth Quarantines, and Dutch Elin Disease Eradication (headquarters, Bloom-
field, N. J.).

R. E. McDoNaALp, in Field Charge, Pink Bollworm and Thurberia Weevil Quaran-
tines (headquarters, San Antonio, Ter.).

P. A. Horas, in Field Charge, Mexican Fruitfly Quarantine (headquarters,
Harlingen, Tex.). -

CLAUDE WAKELAND, in Field Charge, Grasshopper Control (headquarters, Denver,
Colo.).

A. C. Baker, in Field Charge, Fruitfly Investigations (headquarters, Mexico City,

‘ Mexico).
71

U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 1942





|. Wie occ do ei




i, ie ie =
. 2 j _— tine ee eh iy

Tora cee - aes age

ig

















Aime Haddintinnst to ay
wk W kegerky (0 STRATE Yo rey
< neve ymge Snined or STUD Wee Shane
Wahab a aha lo soa Lalas 2
pS CUE LI, Ger) tai $739,102 i, OSE ad AY a
REMUS A asee aa Woo th.AD aoheauktk ye) oe
whign 3 wi Sc} ae reat Vwi arvAAw MOTB IV ERL it ae
ore A , eROP DGS Ah SMP Seae" Poa. fa aiyeelty we (rs
SaaS Josaseh shee ben Kev. doayt tee Poh, § OAD a a

alk Panis ena 4 warty SUOMA Hip Day Te Leura aqunae tt
erotingtizeent tygen\ doe ly 14 sesteter Ha ero














pharretic hk. hati eed h eaephaos whose LNT iperyig:s 3
ROMO Gta ICL SONTAO'T YO Ieee so
are Hyuk eoeeL ii fp wetcto ether ana J tea
te POV Meigen, ho eter Ne Re MSY Ah a eaul
a COTS Der iL Sie Gn. eh Ws te mynd + it et)

ARYA SRL Fete yA) ehh EMF um
eoetT data ge dd $e, DAY is etev Fh ve folekaic yO RE

nant my onD Hime who" TolanetiC ett ¥ Ae

Aca) JoviacD ho WV THY isto bi G Aol wea; fares joi baal ur
. {abot SVE 2 'e
BOvA Ivso Voth weet bap eljautt sasioanl >, aN veh) bisit Prey 3%
a #tohinsphbrav) otssoihovel Rays yeh mv fiw Tey wont ore

me fie &

moray 0s WH wrod D baw acrowsiot akcrtt tet BPA pet I, 7g
; .(.ca'T Obtolth ent eyite ibne

233) sipbesk> sielleiveuwes alia 't MHNOH HS a\h oyna) hla? a 3 ae

. ‘ aha

UR TOH Le) \orwad tsCuo,i BSD) Son HiohA ar. Ag 3) q

4 nhs Hf avtberph mut) AON Qi BS Nit, yar NON > binky oa a

~

tae? : £27940 Supra ta rAanaerde ae



§. B. A.—B. E. P,Q. No. 153 Issued March 1943

United States Department of Agriculture

BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS

OCTOBER-DECEMBER 1942



CONTENTS
Page
GOisraa ine sor Other, oficial announcements). <2 2b tee ae eee ne ep a eee te 73
Announcement relating to black stem rust quarantine (No. 38) ----.-_---_--_____--_________.__.e
Administrative instructions; classification of barberry and mahonia plants (B. E. P.§Q. 385,
Rema VASIGIN)- thse Brs st pe saleee setts Ba Re Noy fe So Mel A oh el 8 ye dy ca FR
Announcements relating to gypsy motb and brown-tail moth quarantine (No. 45). 74
Gypsy moth and brown-tail moth quarantine regulations modified (B. E. P. Q. 386, seventh 42
MW COLDER ES tek Pte reP A tee Pook a EO LI eee eo sks ee LU MU Bee ee 74
TNE GMUCHLONSLO;DOStMASTEESH sate Alas ER Le, get Ed a a a, 76
Annountéements relating to white-fringed beetle quarantine (No. 72)____________.......__ 6 76
White-fringed beetle quarantine revised (press notice)__-_.-.__-__...0--2- lee 76
Revision of quarantine and regulations effective December 28, 1942.._________________.________ 77
INDiice ie general public. through newspapers.2 22+ = fase be, oes ee. ete ee) 84
White-fringed beetle regulations modified (B. E. P. Q. 485, eleventh revision)_____________ 84
Announcement relating to Mexican border peoueulons See ete: ee) SEO She Esa, 2 See eee eee ee 85
insiienGnusto collectorsiof customs (T) Dis0757) 22 f 22-2 Secale 85

MISC MATIC OUSHIUCMI Se sous 2h Senn eee set OR al Sb le ee Bo SoS het it Le ee ie. 85
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Argentina (B. E. P. Q. 426, supplement No.{7) § 85
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, British Congo (B. E. P. Q. 448, supplement No. 1) 86

List of current quarantine and other restrictive orders and miscellaneous KEgtlavions ss sss pee! 86
Menmiinainispectlon Olplants ano plantiproductsre sees eh os be 93
Plants and plant products addressed to places in California_-_.._..__-____.___)_.) |. 93
GalonmNa Stabe Dla quarantine modined =.) Swe Sy ee ke 94
Penalties umpesed for violations of the:Plant Quarantine Act?) 2). 2s 94
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine______________.__-____________________ 96



QUARANTINE AND OTHER OFFICIAL

ANNOUNCEMENTS
ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO BLACK STEM RUST QUARANTINE
(NO. 38)
B. E. P. Q. 385, Third Revision Effective December 15, 1942

TITLE 7—AGRICULTURE
CHAPTER JIJ—BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE
PART 301—DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES
SUBPART—BLACK STEM RUST (QUARANTINE NO. 88)

ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS; CLASSIFICATION OF BARBERRY AND
MAHONIA PLANTS

-_









INTRODUCTORY NOTE

Under this revision of Circular B. E. P. Q. 385, two species of barberries,
Berberis aemulans and B. dictyophylla var. albicaulis, have been removed from
the list of species which may be shipped into or between the protected States,
inasmuch as recent tests have shown that both aemulans and dictyophylla are
susceptible to the black stem rust. B. bealei (Mahonia) has been added to the
permitted list. The range of this species for satisfactory cultivation, however,
is practically limited to the area south of the protected States.

512242—43-——-1 73



74 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct.—Dec,

Other modifications in the circular are concerned only with improved nomen-
clature, B. thunbergii pluriflora having been eliminated from paragraph (A)
for the reason that it is not in reality a different variety of Japanese barberry ;
B. thunbergii plurifiora erecta has been changed to B. thunbergi f. erecta; and
B. diversifolia has been eliminated from paragraph (B) because it is a synonym
for Mahonia aquifolium.

§ 801.88a. Administrative instructions; classification of barberry and mahonia
plants.—The rules and regulations supplemental to § 301.88 [Notice of Quarantine
No. 38, revised, on account of the black-stem rust, effective September 1, 1937]
provide that no plants, cuttings, stocks, scions, buds, fruits, seeds, or other plant
parts capable of propagation, of the genera Berberis, Mahonia, or Mahoberberis,
“shall be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from any State of the conti-
nental United States or from the District of Columbia into any of the protected
States, namely, Colorado, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri,
Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ghio, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Virginia,
West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming, nor from any one of said protected
States into any other protected State, unless a permit shall have been issued
therefor by the United States Department of Agriculture, except that no re-
strictions are placed by these regulations on the interstate movement either of
Japanese barberry (Berberis thunbergii) or any of its rust-resistant varieties,
or of cuttings (without roots) of Mahonia shipped for decorative purposes and
not for propagation.” (See paragraph (a) of regulation 2 (§ 801.88-2 (a)).)

The protected States referred to under paragraph (B) are the 17 barberry
eradication States named in the regulation quoted above. Barberry and mahonia
plants other than those listed in paragraphs (A) and (B) following may not be
shipped interstate into any of the protected States.

(A) BARBERRIES WHICH MAY BE SHIPPED INTERSTATE TO ANY STATE WITHOUT PERMIT
OR RESTRICTION

Berberis thunbergi, B. thunbergi var. atropurpurea, B. thunbergi var. maai-
mowicei, B. thunbergi var. minor, B. thunbergi f. erecta.

(B) BARBERRIES WHICH MAY BE SHIPPED INTO OR BETWEEN PROTECTED STATES UNDER
FEDERAL PERMIT

Berberis aquifolium (Mahonia), B. bealet (Mahonia), B. beaniana, B. buaxi-
folia, B. candidula, B. chenaulti (hybrid), B. circumserrata, B. concinna, B. dar-
wini, B. edgeworthiana, B. gagnepaini, B. gilgiana, B. julianae, B. koreana, B.
mentorensis, B. nervosa (Mahonia), B. potanini, B. repens (Mahonia), B. san-
guinea, B. sargentiana, B. stenophylia (hybrid), B. triacanthophora, B. verru-
culosa.

Application for permits should be addressed to the Division of Domestic Plant
Quarantines, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, United States De-
partment of Agriculture, Washington, D. C.

(7 CFR § 301.38-2; sec. 8, 39 Stat. 1165, 44 Stat. 250; 7 U. S. C. 161.)

Done at Washington, D. C., this 3d day of December 1942.

P. N. ANNAND,
Chief.

[Filed with the Division of the Federal Register December 10, 1942, 11:06 a. m.; 7

F. R. 10305.]

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO GYPSY MOTH AND BROWN-TAIL
MOTH QUARANTINE (NO. 45)

B. E. P. Q. 386 (7th revision) Effective November 20, 1942
TITLE 7—AGRICULTURE

CHAPTER III—BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE
Part 301—DoMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES
GYPSY MOTH AND BROWN-TAIL MOTH QUARANTINE REGULATIONS MODIFIED

This revision of circular B. E. P. Q. 386 adds to the list of articles exempted
from certification requirements, exfoliated or expanded vermiculite when packaged

——



1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 40

in closed containers, salal (known to the trade as lemon) cuttings, for orna-
mental use, and sawdust and shavings produced under certain prescribed con-
ditions and so identified.

Wintergreen cuttings have been more specifically classified as to species.

§ 301.45a Administrative instructions; articles exempted from restrictions.—
Pursuant to the authority conferred upon the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology
and Plant Quarantine by the second proviso of § 301.45, Chapter III, Title 7,
Code of Federal Regulations (notice of Quarantine No. 45, on account of the
gypsy moth and brown-tail moth), the following articles, the interstate move-
ment of which is not considered to constitute a risk of moth dissemination, are
exempted from the restrictions of the regulations of this quarantine, effective
November 20, 1942.

Acacia cuttings for ornamental use (Acacia spp.).

Banana stalks, when crushed, dried, and shredded.

Birch slabs for use as post cards.

Birch bark when waxed, polished, or otherwise treated to adequately eliminate
all risk of transmitting infestation and when used in the manufacture of novelties.

Box shooks, when newly manufactured and pianed on four sides.

Boxwood cuttings and branches for ornamental use (Bucus sempervirens).

Cable reels, when newly manufactured and empty.

California peppertree cuttings and branches for ornamental use (Schinus
molle).

Clubmoss (sometimes called “ground pine”) (Lycopodium spp.).

Cuttings of woody plants that have been grown in the greenhouse throughout
the year, when labeled on the outside of the container to show that the contents
were greenhouse grown.

Eucalyptus cuttings and branches for ornamental use (HLucalyptus globulus).

Evergreen smilax (Smilag lanceolata).

Fuchsia (Fuchsia spp.).

Galax (Galaz aphylla).

Geranium (Pelargonium spp.).

Heather cuttings for ornamental use (rica spp., Calluna spp.).

Heliotrope (Heliotropium spp.).

Herbarium specimens, when dried, pressed, and treated, and when so labeled
on the outside of each container.

Jerusalem-cherry (Solanum capsicastrum, 8S. pseudocapsicum, S. hendersoni).

Leaves of deciduous or evergreen trees that have been treated or dyed.

Mistletoe (Phoradendron flavescens, Viscum album, ete.

Oregon huckleberry (Vaccinium ovatum).

Partridgeberry (Mitchella repens).

oalal known to the trade as lemon cuttings, for ornamental use (Gaultheria
Shallon).

Sawdust that has been (1) produced in established, nonportable, commercial
sawmills from boards or other timber previously sawed four sides, (2) subse-
quently blown through an air-blast conveyor line having a minimum length of
50 feet and at least one 45° or sharper angle, (3) protected from infestation
prior to shipment, and (4) identified as specified below.

Shavings that have been either (1) produced by planers having 6 or more
blades, or (2) blown through an air-blast conveyor line having a minimum
length of 50 feet and at least one 45° or sharper angle; and in either case pro-
tected from infestation prior to shipment, and identified as specified below.

Invoices and waybills covering bulk carload or less-than-carload shipments of
sawdust or shavings meeting these conditions for exemption shall bear thereon
a notation to the effect that:

“The consignor guarantees that the contents of this shipment have been pro-
duced under conditions which entitle the material to exemption as specified
rf ea Federal gypsy moth quarantine regulations or administrative instructions
thereto.”

Strawberry plants (Fragaria spp.).

Trailing arbutus (Epigaea repens).

Verbena (Verbena spp.).

Vermiculite (variously termed zonolite or mica-gro) when exfoliated or ex-
panded and when packaged in closed containers.

Wintergreen for ornamental use (Gaultheria procumbens, Pyrola spp.). See
also Salal.

Wood flour, pulverized wood, or ground wood sawdust, when processed by
screening or sifting through a screen of at least 30 meshes per inch.



76 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct.—Dee,

These instructions supersede the list of exempted articles contained in B. E.
P. Q. 386, 6th revision, which became effective October 10, 1941.
(7 CFR 301.45; sec. 8, 39 Stat. 1165, 44 Stat. 250; 7 U. S. C. 161.)
Done at Washington this 17th day of November 1942.
Avery S. Hoyt,
Acting Chief.

eed with the Division of the Federal Register November 25, 1942, 11:00 a. m.; 7
F, 82



INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS

Post OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
OFFICE OF THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, December 28, 1942.

MODIFICATION OF RESTRICTIONS OF GYPSY MOTH AND BROWN-TAIL MOTH QUARANTINE
(QUARANTINE NO. 45)

The notice of this Bureau appearing in the PostaL BULLETIN of October 20,
1941, and on pages 23 and 24 of the November 1941 Supplement to the Postal
Guide is amended by adding the following to the list of articles exempted from
plant quarantine restrictions imposed under Quarantine Order No. 45 of the
United States Department of Agriculture on account of the gypsy moth and
brown-tail moth, the interstate movement of which is not considered to constitute
a risk of moth dissemination :

Salal, known to the trade as lemon cuttings, for ornamental use (Gaultheria
shallon).

Sawdust and shavings when accompanied with a statement to the effect that:
“The consignor guarantees that the contents of this shipment have been

produced under conditions which entitle the material to exemption as speci-

fied in the Federal gypsy moth quarantine regulations or administrative

instructions thereto.”

‘Vermiculite (variously termed zonolite or mica-gro) when exfoliated or
expanded and when packaged in closed containers.

Wintergreen for ornamental use (Gaultheria procumbens, Pyrola spp.).

Postmasters will please correct their list of exempted articles and be governed
accordingly. (See par. 1, sec. 595, Postal Laws and Regulations, and article
62 (c), p. 24, of the current Postal Guide, Part I.)

RAMSEY S. BLAck,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE
QUARANTINE (NO. 72)

WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE QUARANTINE REVISED
[Press notice]

DECEMBER 31, 1942.

Quarantine and regulations against the white-fringed beetle have been revised
(effective December 28, 1942) the Department of Agriculture said today.

First found in the United States in 1986 in the Gulf coast area, white-fringed
beetles are potentially serious agricultural pests of South American origin. The
larvae or grubs live in the soil, where they feed on and destroy the roots of such
important food, feed, and fiber crops as peanuts, cotton, and corn. While the
adult beetles are less destructive to crops than the grubs, they feed on a great
variety of plants and cause some damage.

Extensive efforts to suppress beetle populations and prevent damage by this
new pest are conducted cooperatively by the Department and the States. Fed-
eral and State quarantines are enforced to prevent spread of the pest to other
States and to uninfested parts of the States in which the beetle has been found.

The regulations were revised because of the discovery of white-fringed beetle
infestations during the past Summer and fall in the vicinity of Wilmington and



1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 77

other places in New Hanover County, N. C., as well as in the vicinity of Goldsboro,
Wayne County, and in parts of Pender County.

The area regulated by the quarantine is now extended to include parts of these
counties and also several areas in Alabama and Mississippi in which infestations
of the beetles have been found since the quarantine and regulations were last
revised. These include part of Lowndes County, Ala., and part of Jefferson Davis
County, Miss. Minor additions to the quarantined area are made in Dallas
County, Ala., and in six Mississippi counties. No change is made in the regulated
areas in Florida and Louisiana.

Articles brought under restriction for the first time include bulbs, corms,
tubers, and rhizomes of ornamental plants, and moss and. gravel. Other re-
stricted articles and materials that must be certified for movement interstate
from the regulated areas to points outside include soil, nursery stock, hay, pota-
toes, scrap metal, implements, forest products, and building materials.

TITLE 7—AGRICULTURE
CHAPTER III—BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

Part 301—DoMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES

SUBPART—W HITE-FRINGED BEETLE (QUARANTINE NO. 72)

REVISION OF QUARANTINE AND REGULATIONS EFFECTIVE DECEMBER 28, 1942

INTRODUCTORY NOTE

This revision of the quarantine and regulations is made principally because of
the discovery during the past summer and fall of white-fringed beetle infesta-
tions in North Carolina in the vicinity of Wilmington and other places in New
Hanover County, in the vicinity of Goldsboro, Wayne County, and in parts of
Pender County. The regulated area is extended to include parts of the above
counties aS well as several areas in Alabama and Mississippi in which infesta-
tions of the beetles have been found since the quarantine and regulations were
last revised. Brought within the regulated area for the first time are part of
Lowndes County, Ala., and part of Jefferson Davis County, Miss. Minor addi-
tions to the regulated areas are made in Dallas County, Ala., and Forrest, Har-
rison, Jackson, Jones, Pearl River, and Stone Counties, Miss.

All restricted articles are placed under quarantine throughout the year be-
cause of seasonal variation in the development of the pests in the different areas,
the differences in the life history and habits of the various species, and other
biological factors. However, the quarantine provides for modification of cer-
tification requirements as to articles, seasons, or areas through administrative
instructions issued from time to time by the Chief of the Bureau when in
his judgment no hazard of dissemination of the beetles is presented by such
modification. Articles brought under restriction for the first time in this revision
include gravel, moss, and bulbs, corms, tubers, and rhizomes of ornamental plants.
Peanut shells are no longer restricted by these regulations.

Minor modifications have been made in regulations pertaining to limited
permits (paragraph (0b) of § 301.72-5) and to the cleaning of railway cars
(§ 301.72-8).

Arrangements for inspection of the restricted articles may be made by ad-
dressing the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, P. O. Box 989, Gulf-
port, Miss., or other field offices listed in the administrative instructions.

DETERMINATION OF THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE

The Secretary of Agriculture, having given the public hearing required by law
and having determined that it was necessary to quarantine the States of Ala-
bama, Florida, Louisiana, and Mississippi to prevent the spread of infestations
of introduced species of the genus Pantomorus, subgenus Graphognathus, com-
monly known as white-fringed beetles, not theretofore widely prevalent or dis-
tributed within and throughout the United States, on December 14, 1938, pro-



78 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct.—Dee.

mulgated Notice of Quarantine 301.72, part 301, chapter III, title 7, effective
January 15, 19389, with regulations supplemental thereto, and revision thereof,
effective on and after May 9, 1942, governing the movement of live white-fringed
beetles in any stage of development and carriers thereof. The Seeretary of
Agriculture, having given a further public hearing in the matter, has determined |
that it is necessary to revise further the quarantine and regulations for the
purpose of quarantining the State of North Carolina because of the discovery
of substantial infestations of the white-fringed beetle therein.

ORDER OF THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE

Pursuant to the authority conferred upon the Secretary of Agriculture by
section 8 of the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912, as amended (7 U.S. €.
161) and the Insect Pest Act of March 3, 1905 (7 U. S. C. 141, 143), the
subpart entitled ‘“White-fringed Beetle” of part 301, chapter III, title 7, Code
of Federal Regulations [B. E. P. Q.—-Q. 72] is hereby revised effective December
28, 1942, to read as follows:

SUBPART—W HITE-FRINGED BEETLE
(QUARANTINE NO. 72)

Authority: §§ 301.72 to 301.72-9 (a), inclusive (except § 301.72-2a), issued
under sec. 8, 39 Stat. 1165, 44 Stat. 250; 7 U. S. C., 1940 ed. 161. § 301.72—2a issued
under sec. 1, 33 Stat. 1269; 7 U. S. C., 1940 ed. 141. § 301.72-9 (b) issued under
sec. 3, 33 Stat. 1270; 7 U. S. C., 1940 ed. 143.

§ 801.72 Notice of quarantine-—Under the authority conferred by section 8
of the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912, as amended (7 U.S. C. 161), the
Secretary of Agriculture quarantines the States of Alabama, Florida, Louisiana,
Mississippi, and North Carolina to prevent the spread of dangerous infestations
of introduced species of the genus Pantomorus, subgenus Graphognathus, com-
monly known as white-fringed beetles, and under authority contained in the
aforesaid Plant Quarantine Act and the Insect Pest Act of March 3, 1905. (7
U. S. GC: 141, 148), the Secretary of Agriculture prescribes regulations. Hereafter
the following articles (as specifically named in the regulations supplemental
hereto, in modifications thereof, or in administrative instructions as provided in
the regulations supplemental hereto), which are capable of carrying the afore-
said insect infestations, viz, (1) nursery stock and other stipulated plants or
plant products; (2) soil independent of, or in connection with, nursery stock,
plants, or other products; or (3) other articles as stipulated in § 301.72-3; or
(4) live white-fringed beetles in any stage of development, shall not be trans-
ported by any person, firm, or corporation from any quarantined State into or
through any other State or Territory or District of the United States, under
conditions other than those prescribed in the regulations supplemental hereto:
Provided, That the restrictions of this quarantine and of the regulations supple-
mental hereto may be limited to such areas, designated by the Secretary of Agri-
culture as regulated areas, in the quarantined States, as, in his judgment, shall
be adequate to prevent the spread of the said pest or pests. Any such limitation
shall be conditioned, however, upon the affected State or States providing for
and enforcing the control of the intrastate movement of the restricted articles
and enforcing such other control and sanitation measures with respect to such
areas or portions thereof as, in the judgment of the Secretary of Agriculture, shall
be deemed adequate to prevent the intrastate spread therefrom of said insect
infestation: And provided further, That whenever, in any year, the Chief of the
Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine shall find that facts exist as to
the pest risk involved in the movement of one or more of the articles to which
the regulations supplemental hereto apply, making it safe to modify, by making
less stringent, the restrictions contained in any such regulations, he shall set forth
and publish such finding in administrative instructions, specifying the manner in
which the applicable regulations should be made less stringent, whereupon such
modification shall become effective, for such period and for such regulated area
or portion thereof as shall be specified in said administrative instructions, and
every reasonable effort shall be made to give publicity to such administrative
instructions throughout the affected areas. tG



1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 79

REGULATIONS
Meaning of Terms

§ 301.72-1 Definitions—(a) The pests.—Species of the genus Pantomorus,
subgenus Graphognathus, commonly known as white-fringed beetles, in any stage
of development.

(b) Regulated area.—Any area in a quarantined State which is now, or which
may hereafter be, designated as regulated by the Secretary of Agriculture in
accordance with the provisions of § 301.72, as revised.

(c) Restricted articles—Products or articles of any character whatsoever,
the interstate movement of which is restricted by the provisions of the white-
fringed beetle quarantine, and the regulations supplemental thereto.

(d) Nursery stock—F¥orest, field, and greenhouse-grown annual or perennial
plants, for planting purposes .

(e) Inspector—Duly authorized Federal plant-quarantine inspector.

(f) Certificate—An approved document, issued by an inspector, authorizing
the movement of restricted articles from the regulated areas.

(g) Limited permit—An approved document, issued by an inspector, to allow
controlled movement of noncertified articles to designated and authorized des-
tinations for processing or other restricted handling.

(h) Administrative instructions —Documents issued by the Chief of the Bu-
reau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine relating to the enforcement of the
quarantine. .

(i) Infested or infestation.—Infested by white-fringed beetles, in any stage of
development. (See (a) above.)

(j) Infested area—That portion of the regulated area in which infestation
exists, or in the vicinity of which infestation is known to exist under such condi-
tions as to expose the area to infestation by natural spread of beetles, as deter-
mined by an authorized inspector.

,

Areas Under Regulation

§ 301.72-2. Regulated areas.—The following counties, parishes, cities, and
towns, or parts thereof, as described, are designated by the Secretary of Agricul-
ture as regulated areas:

Alabama.—In Conecuh County: W% T. 5 N., R. 9 E., and all of those por-
tions of Tps. 5 and 6 N., R. 8 E. lying in Conecuh County; in Covington County:
Secs. 30 and 31, T. 2 N., R. 18 E.; secs. 25, 26, 35, and 36, T.2N.,R.17E.;T. 1N.,
Rs. 17 and 18 E. and SE \% T.1N., R. 16 E., and all area south thereof to the
Alabama-Florida State line; also all the town of Opp; in Dallas County: That
area included within a boundary beginning on the Southern Ry., where it crosses
Bougechitto Creek; thence SW. along the Southern Ry. to Caine Creek; thence
SE. along Caine Creek to its intersection with Bougechitto Creek; thence north-
ward along Bougechitto Creek to the starting point; all of Tps. 13 and 14 N., R.
11 E., and secs. 1, 12, 13, 24, 25, and 36, T. 14 N., R. 10 E.; in Escambia County:
Secs. 32, 33, and 34, T. 1 N., R. 8 E., including all of the town of Flomaton; in
Geneva County: Secs. 31, 82, and 38, T. 1 N., R. 19 E., and all area south thereof
to the Alabama-Florida State line, including all of secs. 21 and 28, T. 6 N., R. 19
W.; in Lowndes County: W% T. 14 N., R. 12 E.; in Mobile County: That area
included within a boundary beginning at a point where the eastern boundary of
the city limits of Mobile, if extended northward, would intersect the northern
boundary of S14 T.3 S., R. 1 W.; thence west to Chickasaw Creek; thence
northwestward along Chickasaw Creek to Hight-Mile Creek; thence westerly
along Eight-Mile Creek to the western boundary of R. 1 W.; thence south to
Eslava Creek; thence easterly along Eslava Creek to the city limits of Mobile;
thence southeasterly following the city limits east, south, east, and north to
the starting point, including all of Blakeley Island and the city’ of Mobile;
also that area included within a boundary beginning at a point where old
Highway 90 crosses Fowl River; thence southwestward along old Highway 90
to its junction with the Alabama-Mississippi State line; thence south along the
Alabama-Mississippi State line to the southern boundary of N44 T.758., R. 4 W.;
thence east to the SE. corner sec. 9, T. 7 8., R. 3 W.; thence north to the NE.
corner, sec. 4, T. 7 8., R. 3 W.; thence east to the point where the south bound-
ary of T. 6 S. intersects Fowl River; thence northwestward along Fowl River



SO BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [ Oct.—Dee.

to the starting point; in Monroe County: W% T. 8 N., all of T. 9 N. and the
S% T. 10 N., all in R. 9 E.; S% T. 10 N., all of Tps. 7, 8, and 9N., R. 8 B,
and those portions of Tps. 5 and 6 N., R. 8 BE. lying in Monroe County; sees. 25,
26, 35, and 36, T. 7 N., R. 7 E., and secs. 1 and 2, T. 6 N., R. 7 E.; in Wileowr
County: N% T. 10 N. and S% T. 11 N., R. 9 E., and sees. 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, and
ST AALN. RB. 9 EB

Florida.—In Escambia County: All that part lying south of the northern
boundary of T. 1 N., including all of the city of Pensacola, and that part of the
county north of the southern boundary of T. 5 N. and east of the western bound-
ary of R. 31 W.; in Okaloosa County: T. 5 N., R. 22 W., and secs. 1, 2, and 8,
T.5 N., R. 23 W., and all lands north of both areas to the Florida-Alabama State
line; sees. 7, 8, 9, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, and 21, T. 3 N., R. 23 W., including all of the
town of Crestview; and secs. 13, 14, 28, 24, T. 3 N., R. 24 W.; in Walton County:
T. 5 N., Rs. 20 and 21 W., and secs. 31, 32, and 33, T. 6 N., R. 19 W., and all
lands north of both areas to the Florida-Alabama State line; also secs. 1 to 24,
inclusive, T. 4 N., R. 19 W.

Louisiana.—All of Orleans Parish, including the city of New Orleans, and all
of Saint Bernard Parish; in Hast Baton Rouge Purish: All of T. 7 S8., Rs. 1 and
2 E. and 1 W., including all of the city of Baton Rouge; in Iberia Parish: All of
secs. 24, 37, 38, 39, 53, 55, and 56, T. 13 S., R. 5 E., and secs. 46, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59,
60, T. 138 S., R. 6 E.; in Jefferson Parish: That part lying north of the township
line between Tps. 14 and 15 S.; in Plaquemines Parish: That part lying north of
the township line between Tps. 15 and 16 S.; in Saint Tammany Parish: All of
secs. 38, 39, and 40, T. 7 S., R. 11 E., and secs. 40 and 41, T. 8 S., R. 11 E.

Mississippi—tIn Covington County: All of secs. 28, 29, 32, and 33, T. 6 N.,
R. 14 W.; in Forrest County: All that portion of T. 5 N., R. 13 W. lying west
of Leaf River; E% T.5N., R. 14 W. and secs. 5 and 8, T. 5 N., R. 14 W.; all
of T. 4 N., Rs. 12 and 13 W., lying west of Leaf River, and that portion of T. 3 N.,
R. 12 W., lying south and west of Leaf River; that portion of T. 3 N., R. 13 W.,
lying east of U. S. Highway 49, and that portion of T. 2 N., R. 12 W. lying east
of U. S. Highway 49; and secs. 1, 2, 3, 4, 9, 10, and 11 and those portions of secs.
12, 13, 14, 15, and 16 lying north of Black Creek in T. 1 N., R. 12 W.; and E%
T. 1 S., R. 12 W.; in Harrison County: That area included within a boundary
beginning at the NW. corner sec. 26, T. 4 S., R. 12 W., thence south to the NW.
corner sec. 14, T. 6 S., R. 12 W.; thence west to the NW. corner sec. 16, T. 6 S.,
R. 12 W.; thence south to the intersection with Wolf River; thence south-
westerly along Wolf River to Saint Louis Bay; thence south along the east shore .
of Saint Louis Bay to the Mississippi Sound; thence eastward along the Missis-
sippi Sound to a point of intersection with the Bay of Biloxi; thence westerly
along the Bay of Biloxi to the SE. corner sec. 17, T. 7 S., R. 10 W.; thence
north along the section line to the NE. corner sec. 5, T. 7 S., R. 10 W.; thence
west along the section line to Biloxi River; thence northwestward along Biloxi
River to the intersection of the east line of sec. 5, T. 6 S., R. 11 W.; thence north
to the Stone County line; thence west to the starting point including all prop-
erties extending over or into the Mississippi Sound and the Bay of Biloxi;
in Hinds County: B14 T. 6 N., R. 3 W., and W144 T. 6 N., R. 2 W-; in Jackson
County: That area included within a boundary beginning at a point where the
east line of sec. 19, T. 7 S., R. 5 W. intersects Escatawpa River; thence west
along said river to the Pascagoula River; thence south along the Pascagoula
River to the township line between Tps. 7 and 8 S.; thence east to the SE.
corner sec. 31, T. 7 S., R. 5 W.; thence north to the starting point; all that
portion of T. 7 S., R. 9 W. lying in- Jackson County and the W% Tps. 7 and
8 S., R. 8 W.: in Jefferson Davis County: Secs. 1, 2, 11, and 12, T. 7N., R. 19 W.;
secs. 35 and 36, T. 8 N., R. 19 W.; sec. 31, T. 8 N., R. 18 W., and secs. 6 and 7,
T. 7 N., R. 18 W., including all of the town of Prentiss; in Jones County: Secs.
16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33,34, and 35, T.9 N., R. SW
secs. 2, 8, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 16, 17, and 18, T. 8 N., R. 11 W.; secs. 13, 14, 24, 25, 35,
and 36, T. 9 N., R. 12 W.; those portions of secs. 23 and 26, T. 9 N., R. 12 W.,
lying east of Tallahoma Creek; secs. 1, 2, 11, 12, 13, and 14, T. 8 N., R. 12 W.;
secs. 25, 26, 27, 34, 35, and 36, T. 6 N., R. 14 W.; secs. 29, 30, 31, and 32, T. 6 N.,
R. 13 W., and those portions of secs. 28 and 33, T. 6 N., R. 138 W., lying west of
Leaf River: in Lamar County: All of the town of Purvis; all of secs. 35 and 36,
T.1N., R. 15 W.; sec. 31, T. 1N,, R. 14 W., and secs. 1 and 2, T. 1 S., R. 15 W.;
in Pearl River County: All that area included within a boundary beginning at a
point at the northern city limits of Poplarville in sec. 19, T. 2 S., R. 15 W. on
the New Orleans and Northeastern R. R.; thence northeasterly along said rail-



1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 81

road to a point where it intersects the south line of sec. 15, T. 1 S., R. 15 W.;
thence east to the SH. corner sec. 14, T. 1 S., R. 15 W.; thence north to the
Lamar County line; thence west and north along said county line to the NW.
corner sec. 4, T. 1 S., R. 15 W.; thence south to the NW. corner sec. 16, T. 1 S.,
R. 15. W.; thence west to the NW. corner sec. 18, T. 1 S., R. 15 W.; thence south
to the NW. corner sec. 18, T. 2 S., R. 15 W.; thence west to the NW. corner sec.
13, T. 2 S., R. 16 W.; thence south along the section line to a point where it
would intersect the line of the northern boundary of Poplarville if extended
westward; thence east along this line to the starting point; all of T. 5 S.,
R. 16 W., and the E% of T. 5 S., R. 17 W. in Stone County: W1% Tps. 2 and
Peete kd Ws- Secss5,,.6,27, 8) 10,518, 19), 20, T..4.8., R, 11 W.; BY TT 2.8.
R. 12 W., and secs. 3, 4, 5, 8, 9, and 10, T.2S., R.12 W.; E% T.35S., R. 12 W.;
and secs. 1, 2, 11, 12, 13, 14, 23, and 24, T. 4 S:, R. 12 W.

North Carolina.—In New Hanover County: The city of Wilmington; Cape
Fear Township; all that part of Hartnett Township lying west of the Wrightsboro-
Winter Park Road, including all of the town of Winter Park; and that part of
Masonboro Township north of the new road between Sunset Park and Winter
Park; in Pender County: Townships of Burgaw, Caswell, and Rocky Point and
that part of Columbia Township lying south of an imaginary straight line drawn
east and west across the township to connect the northern boundaries of Burgaw
and Caswell Townships; in Wayne County: Goldsboro Township.

Articles Prohibited Movement

§ 301.72-2a. Beetles prohibited shipment.—The interstate shipping of living
white-fringed beetles in any stage of development, whether moved independent
of or in connection with any other article, is prohibited, except as provided in
paragraph (b) of § 301.72-9.

Articles Restricted Movement

§ 301.72-8. Restricted articles Except as provided in administrative instruc-
tions, the interstate movement of the following articles from any regulated area
is regulated throughout the year:

(a) Soil, sand, gravel, clay, peat, or muck, whether moved independent of, or
in connection with or attached to nursery stock, plants, products, articles, or
things.

(b) Compost, manure, moss, and leafmold.

(c) Nursery stock.

(d) Grass sod.

(e) Potatoes.

(f) True bulbs, corms, tubers, and rhizomes of ornamental plants.

(g) Hay.

(h) Peanuts in shells.

(i) Seed cotton, cottonseed, and baled cotton lint and linters.

(j) Serap metal and junk.

,(k) Forest products such as cordwood, stump wood, logs, lumber, timbers, posts,
poles, and cross ties.

(1) Brick, tile, stone, and cinders.

(m) Concrete slabs, pipe, and building blocks.

(n) Implements, machinery, equipment, and containers.

Conditions of Interstate Movement

§ 301.72—-4. Conditions governing interstate movement of restricted articles.—
(a) Certification required.—Restricted articles shall not be moved interstate
from a regulated area to or through any point outside thereof unless accompanied
by a valid inspection certificate issued by an inspector: Provided, That certifica-
tion requirements as they relate to part or all of any regulated area may be
waived, during part or all of the year, by the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology
and Plant Quarantine, on his finding and giving notice thereof, in administrative
instructions, that the State concerned has promulgated and enforced adequate
sanitary measures on and about the premises on which restricted articles originate
or are retained, or that adequate volunteer sanitary measures have been applied,
or that other control or natural conditions exist which have eliminated the risk
of contamination by the pests in any stage of development.

§12242—43-—_2



82 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct.—Dee,

(b) Use of certificate on shipments.—Unless exempted by administrative
instructions, every container of restricted articles moved interstate from any
regulated area shall have securely attached to the outside thereof a certificate
or permit issued in compliance with these regulations, except that in the case
of shipments in bulk, by common carrier, a master permit attached to the
shipping order, manifest, or other shipping papers, will be sufficient. In the
case of Shipments in bulk by road vehicle other than common carrier, a
master permit shall accompany the vehicle. Master permits shall accompany
shipments to destination and be surrendered to consignees on delivery.

(c) Movement within continwous areas unrestricted—No certificates are
required for interstate movement of restricted articles when such movement
is wholly within continuous regulated areas.

(d) Articles originating outside the regulated areas—No certificates are
required for the interstate movement of restricted articles originating outside
of the regulated areas and moving through or from a regulated area, when the
point of origin is clearly indicated, when their identity has been maintained,
and when the articles are protected, while in the regulated area, in a manner
satisfactory to the inspector.

Conditions of Certification

§.301.72-5. Conditions governing the issuance of certificates and permits. (a)
Approved methods.—Certificates authorizing the interstate movement of restricted
articles from the regulated areas may be issued upon determination by the
inspector that the articles are (1) apparently free from infestation; or (2)
have been treated, fumigated, sterilized, or processed under approved methods;
or (3) were grown, produced, manufactured, stored, or handled in such a manner
that, in the judgment of the inspector, no infestation would be transmitted
thereby: Provided, That certificates authorizing the interstate movement of
soil, sand, gravel, clay, peat, muck, or compost, originating in an infested area
may be issued only when such materials have been treated or handled under
methods or conditions approved by the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and
Plant Quarantine.

(b) Limited permits——Limited permits may be issued for the movement of
noncertified restricted articles to destinations and consignees as may be authorized
and designated by the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine
for processing or other handling. As a condition of such authorization and
designation, persons or firms shipping, receiving, or transporting such articles
may be required to agree in writing to maintain such sanitary safeguards against
the establishment and spread of infestation and to comply with such conditions
as to the maintenance of identity, handling, or subsequent movement of restricted
products and cleaning of railway cars, trucks, or other vehicles used in the
transportation of such articles as may be required by the inspector.

(c) Dealer-carrier permit.—As a condition of issuance of certificates or permits
for the interstate movement of restricted articles, persons or firms engaged in
purchasing, assembling, exchanging, processing, or carrying such restricted articles
originating or stored in regulated areas, may be required to execute a signed
agreement stipulating that the permittee will carry out any and all conditions,
treatments, precautions, and sanitary measures which may be deemed necessary.

Procedure for Applicants

§ 301.72-6. Assembly of restricted articles for inspection.—Persons intending
to move restricted articles, the certification of which is required, interstate from
regulated areas shall make application for certification as far as possible in
advance of the probable date of shipment. Applications must show the nature
and quantity of articles to be moved, together with their exact location, and
if practicable, the contemplated date of shipment. Applicants for inspection
may be required to assemble or indicate the articles to be shipped so that
they may be readily examined by the inspector.

The United States Department of Agriculture will not be responsible for any
cost incident to inspection or treatment other than the services of the inspector.

Certificates and Permits May Be Canceled

§ 301.72-7. Cancelation of certificates or permits.—Certificates or permits
issued under these regulations may be withdrawn or canceled and further





1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 83

certification refused whenever, in the judgment of the Chief of the Bureau of
Entomology and Plant Quarantine, the further use of such certificates or permits
might result in the dissemination of infestation.

Cleaning of Vehicles

§ 301.72-8. Cleaning of freight cars, trucks, and other vehicles When in
the judgment of the inspector a hazard of spread of infestation is presented,
thorough cleaning of freight cars, trucks, and other vehicles may be required
before movement interstate to points outside the regulated areas when such
freight cars, trucks, or other vehicles have been used for the transportation of
uncertified restricted articles within regulated areas.

Shipments for Experimental or Scientific Purposes

§ 301.72-9. (a) Articles for experimental or scientific purposes.—Articles
subject to restrictions may be moved interstate for experimental or scientific
purposes, on such conditions as may be prescribed by the Chief of the Bureau
of Entomology and Plant Quarantine. The container of ‘articles so moved Shall
bear an identifying tag from the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

(b) Beetles for experimental or scientific purposes.—Live white-fringed beetles,
in any stage of development; may be moved interstate for scientific purposes
only under conditions prescribed by the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology
and Plant Quarantine. The container of white-fringed beetles so moved shall
bear an identifying tag from the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

Done at the. city of Washington this 28rd day of December 1942.

Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.

[SEAL ] PAUL H. APPLEBY,

Acting Secretary of Agriculture.

APPENDIX
PENALTIES

The Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912, as amended (7 U.S. C. 161), pro-
vides that no person shall ship or offer for shipment to any common carrier, nor
shall any common carrier receive for transportation or transport, nor shall any
person carry or transport, from any quarantined State or Territory or District of
the United States, or from any quarantined portion thereof, into or through any
other State or Territory or District, any class of nursery stock or any other class
of plants, fruits, vegetables, roots, bulbs, seeds, or other plant products, or any
class of stone or quarry products, or any other article of any character whatsoever,
capable of carrying any dangerous plant disease or insect infestation, specified in
the notice of quarantine * * * in manner or method or under conditions
other than those prescribed by the Secretary of Agriculture. It also provides that
any person who shall violate any of the provisions of this act, or who shall forge,
counterfeit, alter, deface, or destroy any certificate provided for in this act or
in the regulations of the Secretary of Agriculture shall be deemed guilty of a
misdemeanor and shall, upon conviction thereof, be punished by a fine not exceeding
$500, or by imprisonment not exceeding 1 year, or both such fine and imprisonment,
in the discretion of the court.

STATE AND FEDERAL INSPECTION

Certain of the quarantined: States have promulgated quarantine regulations
restricting intrastate movement supplemental to the Federal quarantine. These
State regulations are enforced in cooperation with the Federal authorities. Copies
of either the Federal or State quarantine orders may be obtained at the office of the
Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, Room 6, Gates-Cook Building
(Tel. 1591), P. O. Box 989, Gulfport, Miss., or through a White-fringed Beetle
Inspector at one of the subsidiary offices.

GENERAL OFFICES OF STATES COOPERATING
Alabama: Chief, Division of Plant Industry, Montgomery.

Florida: Assistant Plant Commissioner, State Plant Board, Gainesville.
Louisiana: State Entomologist, Baton Rouge.



84 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct.—Dec,

Mississippi: Entomologist, State Plant Board, State College.
North Carolina: State Entomologist, Raleigh.

[Copies of the foregoing quarantine were sent to afl common carriers doing business in
or through the quarantined area.]
“ Sr rosoet the Division of the Federal Register December 24, 1942, 2:43 p. m; 7



NOTICE TO GENERAL PUBLIC THROUGH NEWSPAPERS

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,
Washington, D. C., December 23, 1942.

Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority con-
ferred by the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912, as amended (7 U. S. C.
161), has promulgated a revision, effective on and after December 28, 1942, of the
white-fringed beetle quarantine (Notice of Quarantine No. 301.72) and regula-
tions supplemental thereto. The purposes of the revision are to extend the
regulated areas to include parts of the North Carolina counties of New
Hanover, Pender, and Wayne, and additional infested sections in Alabama and
Mississippi; to add to the list of restricted articles gravel, moss, and bulbs,
corms, tubers, and rhizomes of ornamental plants. Peanut shells are no longer
restricted.

Copies of the quarantine as revised may be sneatned from the Bureau of
Entomology and Plant Quarantine, Department of Agriculture, Washington.

PAuL H. APPLEBY,
Acting Secretary.

[The above notice was published in the following newspapers: The Birmingham News,

Birmingham, Ala., January 5, 1943; the Florida Times Union, Jacksonville, Fla., January

5, 1943; the News, Jackson, ‘Miss.., ‘January 6, 1943; the Observer, Charlotte, N. C., Jan-
uary Ey 1943; the Times Picayune, New Orleans, La., January 6, 1943



B. E. P. Q, 485, Eleventh Revision Effective December 28, 1942
TITLE 7—AGRICULTURE
CHAPTER IJI—BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

PART 301—DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES
WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE REGULATIONS MODIFIED

§ 301.72a Administrative instructions; modification of certification require-
ments for specified articles.—Pursuant to the authority conferred upon the Chief
of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine by the second proviso of
§ 301.72, Chapter III, Title 7, Code of Federal Regulations [Notice of Quarantine
No. 72, on account of the white-fringed beetle], the certification requirements are
hereby modified effective December 28, 1942, through June 15, 1948, for the
interstate movement of the following articles and materials ‘enumerated in
§ 301.72-3:

(a) Certificates may be issued for the interstate movement ‘of the following
materials under the conditions specified below:

(1) Soil, sand, gravel, clay, peat, or muck, when taken from a depth of at
least 2 feet below the existing surface, and when entirely free from any surface
soil to a depth of 2 feet. '

(2) Sand and gravel, when washed, processed, or otherwise treated to the
satisfaction of the inspector.

(b) All certification requirements are waived for the following articles and
materials when free from soil and when sanitation practices are maintained
as prescribed by or to the satisfaction of the inspector:

(1) Potatoes, except that those freshly harvested are not exempt.

(2) True bulbs, corms, tubers, and rhizomes of ornamental plants, except that
those freshly harvested or uncured are not exempt.

‘(3) Hay, except that peanut hay is not exempt.

(4) Seed cotton, cottonseed, and baled cotton lint and linters.

(5) Serap metal and junk.

(6) Forest products such as cordwood, stump wood, logs, lumber, timbers,
posts, poles, and cross ties.

(7) Brick, tile, stone, and cinders.

(8) Conerete slabs, pipe, and building blocks.

(9) Implements, machinery, equipment, and containers.

tte, “it







1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 85

ARTICLES REMAINING UNDER QUARANTINE

(c) Certification is required for the following articles and materials enumerated
in § 301.72-3:

(1) All soil, sand, gravel, clay, peat, or muck, whether moved independent of,
or in connection with, or attached to nursery stock, plants, products, articles or
things.

(2) Compost, manure, moss, and leafmold.,

(3) Nursery stock.

(4) Grass sod.

(5) Potatoes, freshly harvested.

(6) True bulbs, corms, tubers, and rhizomes of ornamental plants, when
freshly harvested or uncured.

(7) Peanuts in the shell.

(8) Peanut hay.

This revision supersedes Circular B. BE. P. Q. 485, tenth revision, which became
effective August 3, 1942.

(7 C. F. R., § 301.72; sec. 8, 39 Stat. 1165, 44 Stat. 250; 7 U. S. C. 161.)

Done at Washington, this 23d day of December 1942.

P. N. ANNAND,
Chief.

[Filed with the Division of the Federal Register December 24, 1942, 2:43 p. m.; 7

F, R. 10905.]

ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO MEXICAN BORDER REGULATIONS
INSTRUCTIONS TO COLLECTORS OF CUSTOMS

REGULATIONS FOR CarRYING INTO EFFECT THE INSPECTION OF AND APPLICATION
or SAFEGUARDS TO RAILWAY CARS, VEHICLES, AND VARIOUS MATERIALS ENTER-
ING THE UNITED STATES FRoM Mexico ('T. D. 50757)

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,
OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONER OF CUSTOMS,
‘Washington, D. C., November 3, 1942.

To Collectors of Customs and Others Concerned:

The appended copy of the Mexican Border Regulations, approved by the Sec-
retary of Agriculture on September 2, 1942, in pursuance of the Mexican Border
Act approved January 31, 1942 (Public Law 426, 77th Congress), entitled, “To
provide for regulating, inspecting, cleaning, and, when necessary, disinfecting
railway cars, other vehicles, and other materials entering the United States
from Mexico,” is published for the information and guidance of customs of-
ficers and others concerned.

These regulations supersede the Rules and Regulations Prohibiting the Move-
ment of Cotton and Cottonseed from Mexico into the United States and Goy-
erning the Entry into the United States of Railway Cars and Other Vehicles,
Freight, Express, Baggage, or Other Materials from Mexico at Border Points,
effective July 1, 1917 ((1917) T. D. 37255), as amended January 29, 1920 (not
published as a Treasury decision).

The number of this Treasury decision should be inserted as a marginal ref-
erence opposite articles 578 (a) and 579 (a), Customs Regulations of 1937.

W. R. JOHNSON,
Commissioner of Customs.
[Then follows the text of the regulations. ]

MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS

B. E. P. Q. 426, Supplement No. 7.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF ARGENTINA

OcTOBER 13, 1942.
PRINTING REQUIREMENTS ON WRAPS OF IMPORTED FRUITS ABOLISHED

A Government Decree of August 22, 1942, abolished the requirements that
waterproof tissue paper wraps of imported apples, pears, oranges, tangerines,

>



86 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct.—Dec.

grapefruit, and lemons must carry the name of the grower, the packing com-
pany, or the exporter, aS well as the country of origin. (See page il,
B. E. P. Q. 426.)
Avery S. Hoyt,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.



B. E. P. Q. 448, Supplement No. 1.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, BELGIAN CONGO

NOVEMBER 30, 1942.
BANANA PLANTS—IMpoRTS SUBJECT TO QUARANTINE PERMIT

The importation of cultivated or wild banana plants into the Belgian Congo
has been made subject to special permit from the Governor General, on sani-
tary grounds, by ordinance No. 207/Agri. of July 16, 1942, published in the
Builetin Administratif du Congo Belge of July 25.

P. N. ANNAND,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

LIST OF CURRENT QUARANTINE AND OTHER RESTRICTIVE ORDERS
AND MISCELLANEOUS REGULATIONS

[The domestic and foreign quarantine and otker restrictive orders summarized herein
are issued under the authority of the Piant Quarantine Act of Aug. 20. 1912, as amended.
The Mexican border regulations and the export-certification regulations are issued under
specific acts of Congress. ]

QUARANTINE ORDERS

The numbers assigned to these quarantines indicate merely the chronological
order of issuance of both domestic and foreign quarantines in one numerical
series. The quarantine numbers missing in this list are quarantines which have
either been superseded or revoked. Tor convenience of reference these quaran-
tines are here classified as domestic and foreign, the domestic quarantines being
divided into (1) those applying primarily to the continental United States and
(2) those applying primarily to shipments from and to the Territories of Hawaii
and Puerto Rico.

DoMESTIC PLANT QUARANTINES
QUARANTINES APPLYING TO THE CONTINENTAL UNITED STATES

Black stem rust.—Quarantine No. 38, revised, effective September 1, 1937:
Prohibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto,
revised, effective September 1, 1937, the movement into any of the protected
States, namely, Colorado, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri,
Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Virginia,
West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming, as well as the movement from any one
of said protected States into any other protected State of the common barberry
(Berberis vulgaris), or other species of Berberis or Mahonia or parts thereof
capable of propagation, on account of the black stem rust of grains. The regula-
tions place no restrictions on the interstate movement of Japanese barberry
(B. thunbergii) or any of its rust-resistant varieties, or of cuttings (without
roots) of Mahonia shipped for decorative purposes and not for propagation,

Gypsy moth and brown-tail moth.—Quarantine No. 45, revised, effective Sep-
tember 29, 1938: Prohibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations sup-
plemental thereto, revised, effective September 29, 1938. the movement interstate
to any point outside of the infested area, or from points in the generally infested
area to points in the lightly infested area, of stone and quarry products, and of
the plants and the plant products listed therein. The regulated area covers
Rhode Island and parts of the States of Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New
Hampshire, and Vermont.

Japanese beetle.-—Quarantine No. 48, revised, effective March 24, 1942: Pro-
hibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto,
revised, effective March 24, 1942, as amended, effective January 14, 1948, the





1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 87

interstate movement of (1) fruits and vegetables; (2) nursery, ornamental, and
greenhouse stock, and other plants; and (3) sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and
manure, from the regulated area to or through any point outside thereof. The
regulated area includes the entire States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Con-
necticut, New Jersey, and Delaware, and the District of Columbia, and portions
of the States of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, New York, Pennsylvania,
Maryland, Virginia, West Virginia, and Ohio.

Pink bollworm.—Quarantine No. 52, revised, effective March 15, 1989: Pro-
hibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto,
revised, effective March 15, 1939, as amended effective February 10, 1943, the
interstate movement from the regulated areas of Texas, New Mexico, and
Arizona, of (1) cotton, wild cotton, including all parts of either cotton or
wild cotton plants, seed cotton, cotton lint, linters, and all other forms of un-
manufactured cotton fiber, gin waste, cottonseed, cottonseed hulls, cottonseed
cake, and meal; (2) bagging and other containers and wrappers of cotton and
cotton products; (38) railway cars, boats, and other vehicles which have been
used in conveying cotton or cotton products or which are fouled with such
products; (4) farm products, farm household goods, farm equipment, and, if
contaminated with cotton, any other articles.

Thurberia weevil. Quarantine No. 61, revised, effective August 1, 1927: Pro-
hibits the interstate movement of Thurberia, including all parts of the plant,
from any point in Arizona and prohibits, except as provided in the rules and
regulations supplemental thereto, revised, effective October 2, 1933, as amended
effective October 22, 1936, the interstate movement from the regulated area of
Arizona of (1) cotton, including all parts of the piant, seed cotton, cotton lint,
linters, and all other forms of unmanufactured cotton lint, gin waste, cottonseed,
eottonseed hulls, and cottonseed cake and meal; (2) bagging and other contain-
ers and wrappers of cotton and cotton products; (8) railway cars, boats, and
other vehicles which have been used in conveying cotton and cotton products, or
which are fouled with such products; (4) hay and other farm products; and
(5) farm household goods, farm equipment, and, if contaminated with cotton,
any other articles.

White-pine blister rust.—Quarantine No. 63, effective October 1, 1926: Prohib-
its, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto, revised,
effective July 1, 1938, the interstate movement from every State in the conti-
nental United States and the District of Columbia of five-leafed pines (Pinus)
or currant and gooseberry plants (fibes and Grossularia), including cultivated
or wild or ornamental sorts.

Mexican fruitfly—Quarantine No. 64, revised, effective October 15, 1937: Pro-
hibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto, re-
vised, effective October 16, 1939, the interstate movement from the regulated area
of Texas of fruits of all varieties.

Duteh elm disease.—Quarantine No. 71, revised, effective October 1, 1941: Pro-
hibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto,
effective October 1, 1941, the interstate movement from the regulated areas in
the States of New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, and Connecticut to or
through any point outside thereof, of elm plants or parts thereof of all species
of the genus Ulmus, irrespective of whether nursery, forest, or privately grown,
including (1) trees, plants, leaves, twigs, branches, bark, roots, trunks, cuttings,
and scions of such plants; (2) logs or cordwood of such plants; and (3) lumber,
crates, boxes, barrels, packing cases, and other containers manufactured in
whole or in part from such plants, unless the wood is entirely free from bark.

White-fringed beetle—Quarantine No. 72, revised, effective December 28, 1942:
Prohibits, except as provided in the regulations supplemental thereto, effective
December 28, 1942, the interstate movement from the regulated areas in the
States of Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, Mississippi, and North Carolina, to or
through any point outside thereof, of (1) nursery stock and other stipulated
plants or plant products; (2) soil, independent of, or in connection with nursery
stock, plants, or other products; or (3) other articles as stipulated in § 301.72-3;
or (4) live white-fringed beetles in any stage of development.



QUARANTINES APPLYING TO THE TERRITORIES OF HAWAII AND PUERTO RICO

Hawaiian fruits and vegetables.—Quarantine No. 13, revised, effective June 1,
aii: Prohibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental
thereto, revised, effective June 1, 1930, as amended effective May 12, 1941, the



88 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct—Dee.

movement from the Territory of Hawaii into or through any other Territory,

State, or District of the United States, of all fruits and vegetables in the natural

or raw State, on account of the Mediterranean fruitfly (Ceratitis capitata) and
the melonfly (Dacus cucurbitae).

Sugarcane.—Quarantine No. 16, revised, effective January 1, 1935: Prohibits
the movement from the Territories of Hawaii and Puerto Rico into or through
any other Territory, State, or District of the United States of canes of sugar-
cane, or cuttings or parts thereof, sugarcane leaves, and bagasse, on account of
certain injurious insects and diseases of sugarcane, except that movement will
be allowed under permit of specific materials on condition that they have been or
are to be so treated, processed, or manufactured that, in the judgment of the
Department, their movement will involve no pest risk.

Sweetpotato.—Quarantine No. 30, revised, effective October 10, 1984: Pro-
hibits the movement from the Territories of Hawaii and Puerto Rico into or
through any other Territory, State, or District of the United States of any vari-
ety of sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas Poir.), regardless of the use for which the
same is intended, on account of the sweetpotato stem borer (Omphisa anasto-
mosalis Guen.) and the sweetpotato scarabee (Huscepes batatae Waterh.).

Banana plants.—Quarantine No. 32, effective April 1, 1918: Prohibits the
movement from the Territories of Hawaii and Puerto Rico into or through any
other Territory, State, or District of the United States of any species or variety
of banana plants (Musa spp.), regardless of the use for which the same is in-
tended, on account of two injurious weevils (Rhabdocnemis obscurus Boisd. and
Metamasius hemipterus Linn.).

Hawaiian and Puerto Rican cotton, cottonseed, and cottonseed products.—
Quarantine No. 47, effective August 15, 1920: Prohibits, except as provided in
the rules and regulations supplemental thereto, effective August 15, 1920, the
movement of cotton, seed or unginned cotton, cottonseed, and cottonseed products,
except oil, from the Territories of Hawaii and Puerto Rico into or through any
other Territory, State, or District of the United States on account of the pink boll-
worm (Pectinophora gossypiella Saund.) and the cotton-blister mite (Hriophyes
gossypii Banks).

United States quarantined to protect Hawaii.—Quarantine No. 51, effective
October 1, 1921: Prohibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations sup-
plemental thereto, effective October 1, 1921, the movement from the United
States to the Territory of Hawaii, as ships’ stores or as baggage or effects of
passengers or crews, of sugarcane, corn (other than shelled corn), cotton, alfalfa,
and the fruits of the avocado and papaya in the natural or raw state, on account
of injurious insects, especially the sugarcane borer (Diatreea saccharalis Fab.),
the alfalfa weevil (Hypera postica Gyll.), the cotton boll weevil (Anthonomus
grandis Boh.), the papaya fruitfly (Torotrypana curvicauda Gerst.), and certain
insect enemies of the fruit of the avocado.

Puerto Rican fruits and vegetables—Quarantine No. 58, revised, effective
January 22, 1941: Prohibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations
supplemental thereto, effective January 22, 1941, the movement from the Terri-
tory of Puerto Rico into or through any other Territory, State, or District of
the United States of all fruits and vegetables in the raw or unprocessed state,
on account of certain injurious insects, including the fruitflies Anastrepha
suspensa (Loew) and A. mombinpraeoptans Sein, and the bean-pod borer Maruca
testulalis (Geyer).

Sand, soil, or earth, with plants from Hawaii and Puerto Rico. Quarantine
No. 60, revised. effective September 1, 1936: Prohibits the movement from the
Territories of Hawaii and Puerto Rico into or through any other Territory, State,
or District of the United States of sand (other than clean ocean sand), soil,
or earth around the roots of plants, to prevent the spread of white grubs, the
Japanese rose beetle, and termites or white ants. Provision is made for the re-
tention of potted plants on board vessels from Hawaii and Puerto Rico when
evidence is presented satisfactory to the plant quarantine inspector that the
soil has been so treated or is so safeguarded as to eliminate pest risk.

FoREIGN PLANT QUARANTINES
Pink bollworm.—Quarantine No. 8, effective July 1, 1918, with revised regula-

tions effective July 1, 1917: Forbids the importation from any foreign locality
and country, excepting only the locality of the Imperial Valley in the State of

ve



1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 89

Baja California, Mexico, of cottonseed (including seed cotton) of all species
and varieties and cottonseed hulls. Seed cotton, cottonseed, and cottonseed hulls
from the Imperial Valley may be entered under permit and regulation.

Seeds of avocado or alligator pear.—Quarantine No. 12, effective February
27, 1914: Forbids the importation from Mexico and the countries of Central
America of the seed of the avocado or alligator pear on account of the avocado
weevil (Heilipus lauri).

Sugarcane.—Quarantine No. 15, revised, effective October 1, 1934: Prohibits
the importation from all foreign countries and localities of canes of sugarcane,
or cuttings or parts thereof, sugarcane leaves, and bagasse, on account of
certain injurious insects and diseases of sugarcane, except that importation will
be allowed under permit of specific materials on condition that they have been
or are to be so treated, processed, or manufactured that, in the judgment of the
Department, their entry will involve no pest risk.

Citrus nursery stock.—Quarantine No. 19, revised, effective September 1, 1934:
Forbids the importation from all foreign localities and countries of all citrus
nursery stock, including buds and scions, on account of the citrus canker and
other dangerous citrus diseases. The term “citrus,” as used in this quarantine,
includes only plants belonging to the tribe Citrinae, subfamily Citratae, of the
family Rutaceae.

Indian corn or maize and related plants.—Quarantine No. 24, effective July 1,
1916, as amended, effective April 1, 1917, and April 23, 1917: Forbids the im-
portation from southeastern Asia (including India, Siam, Indio-China, and
China), Malayan Archipelago, Australia, New Zealand, Oceania, Philippine
Islands, Taiwan (Formosa), Japan, and adjacent islands, in the raw or unman-
ufactured state, of seed and all other portions of Indian corn or maize (Zea
mays L.) and the closely related plants, including all species of Teosinte
(Euchlaena), jobs-tears (Coix), Polytoca, Chionachne, and Sclerachne, on
account of the downy mildews and Physoderma diseases of Indian corn, except
that Indian corn or maize may be imported under permit and upon compliance
with the conditions prescribed in the regulations of the Secretary of Agriculture.

Citrus fruits —Quarantine No. 28, effective August 1, 1917: Forbids the im-
portation from eastern and southeastern Asia (including India, Siam, Indo-
China, and China), the Malayan Archipelago, the Philippine Islands, Oceania
(except Australia, Tasmania, and New Zealand), Japan (including Taiwan
(Formosa) and other islands adjacent to Japan), and the Union of South
Africa, of all species and varieties of citrus fruits, on account of the citrus
canker, except that oranges of the mandarin class (including satsuma and
tangerine varieties) may be imported under permit and upon compliance with
the conditions prescribed in the regulations of the Secretary of Agriculture.

Sweetpotato and yam.—Quarantine No. 29, effective January 1, 1918: Forbids

the importation for any purpose of any variety of sweetpotatoes and yams
(Ipomoea batatas and Dioscorea spp.), from all foreign countries and localities,
on account of the sweetpotato weevils (Cylas spp.) and the sweetpotato scarabee
(Euscepes batatae).
‘ Banana plants—Quarantine No. 31, effective April 1, 1918: Forbids the impor-
tation for any purpose of any species or variety of banana plants (Musa spp.).
or portions thereof, from all foreign countries and localities, on account of the
banana-root borer (Cosmopolites sordidus). This quarantine places no restric-
tions on the importation of the fruit of the banana. (For restrictions on the
entry of the fruit of the banana see quarantine 56.)

Bamboo.—Quarantine No. 34, effective October 1, 1918: Forbids the importa-
tion for any purpose of any variety of bamboo seed, plants, or cuttings thereof
eapable of propagation, including all genera and species of the tribe Bambuseae,
from all foreign countries and localities, on account of dangerous plant diseases,
including the bamboo smut (Ustilago shiraiana). This quarantine order does
not apply to bamboo timber consisting of the mature dried culms or canes which
are imported for fishing rods, furniture making, or other purposes, or to any
kind of articles manufactured from bamboo, or to bamboo shoots cooked or
otherwise preserved.

Nursery stock, plants, and seeds.—Quarantine No. 37, effective June 1, 1919:
Forbids, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto,
revised, effective December 22, 1930, and amended effective December 1, 1938, the
importation of seeds, nursery stock, and other plants and plant products capable
of propagation from all foreign countries and localities on account of certain



90 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct.—Dee.

injurious insects and fungous diseases. Under this quarantine the following
plant products may be imported without restriction when free from sand, soil,
or earth, unless covered by special quarantine or other restrictive orders: Plant
products capable of propagation imported for medicinal, food, or manufacturing
purposes, and field, vegetable, and flower seeds, except seeds of Lathyrus and
Vicia. Cut flowers from the Dominion of Canada are also allowed entry with-
out permit. The entry of the following nursery stock and other plants and seeds
is permitted under permit:

Under regulation 8:

(1) Bulbs, corms, or root stocks (pips) of the following genera: Liliwm (lily),
Convallaria (lily-of-the-valley), Hyacinthus (hyacinth), Tulipa (tulip), Crocus,
Narcissus (daffodil and jonquil), Begonia, and Gloginia; and, until further
notice, Chionodora (glory-of-the-snow), Galanthus (snowdrop), Scilla (squill),
Fritillaria, Muscari (grape-hyacinth), Ivia, and Eranthis (winter aconite).

(2) Cuttings, scions, and buds of fruits or nuts: Provided, That cuttings,
scions, and buds of fruits or nuts may be imported from Asia, Japan, Philippine
Islands, and Oceania (including Australia and New Zealand) under the provi-
sions of regulation 14 only. (Stocks of fruits or nuts may not be imported,
under permit or otherwise.)

(3) Rose stocks, including Manetti, Rosa multiflora (brier rose), and R.
rugosa.

(4) Nuts, including palm seeds for growing purposes: Provided, That such
nuts or seeds shall be free from pulp.

(5) Seeds of fruit, forest, ornamental, and shade trees, seeds of deciduous
and evergreen ornamental shrubs, and seeds of hardy perennial plants: Pro-
vided, That such seeds shall be free from pulp: Provided further, That citrus
seeds may be imported only through specified ports subject to disinfection as
provided in regulation 9: Provided further, That mango seeds may not be im-
ported under permit or otherwise, except from the countries of North America,
Central America, and South America, and the West Indies.

Importations from countries not maintaining inspection of nursery stock,
other plants and parts of plants, including seeds, the entry of which is permis-
sible under this regulation, may be made under permit upon compliance with
these regulations in limited quantities for public-service purposes only, but this
limitation shall not apply to tree seeds.

(6) Materials permitted entry under Quarantine No. 56 for consumption pur-
poses are authorized entry under this regulation for propagation.

Under regulation 14: Provision exists in this regulation for the entry of
most kinds of plants that are not covered by other regulations of this quaran-
tine or by other quarantines. :

Under regulation 15: Provision exists for the entry in unlimited quantities of
most kinds of plants which can be considered as peculiar to or standard produc-
tions of the Dominion of Canada, as opposed to stock imported into the
Dominion from foreign countries and held or grown on there for later sale.

European corn borer.—Quarantine No. 41, revised, effective June 1, 1926:
Forbids, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto,
revised effective March 1, 1933, the importation from all foreign countries and
localities of the stalk and all other parts, whether used for packing or other pur-
poses, in the raw or unmanufactured state, of Indian corn or maize, broomcorn,
Sweet sorghums, grain sorghums, Sudan grass, Johnson grass, sugarcane, pearl
millet, napier grass, teosinte, and jobs-tears, on account of the European corn
borer (Pyrausta nubilalis) and other dangerous insects and plant diseases.

Rice.—Quarantine No. 55, revised, effective November 23, 1933: Forbids the
importation of seed or paddy. rice from all foreign countries and localities ex-
cept the Republic of Mexico, and forbids the importation of rice straw and rice
hulls from ali foreign countries and localities, and seed or paddy rice from the
Republic of Mexico, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemen-
tal thereto, effective July 1, 1933, as amended effective August 1, 1934, on
account of injurious fungous diseases of rice, including downy mildew (Sclero-
spora macrocarpa), leaf smut (Hntyloma oryzae), blight (Oospora oryztorum),
and glume blotch (Melanomma glumarum), as well as dangerous. insect pests.

Fruits and vegetables.—Quarantine No. 56 effective November 1, 1923: For-
bids, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto,
revised, effective December 1, 1936, as amended effective February 27, 1940, the
importation of fruits and vegetables, except as restricted, as to certain countries



1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS QI

and districts, by special quarantines and other orders, and of plants or portions.
of plants used as packing material in connection with shipments of such fruits
and vegetables from all foreign countries and localities other than the Dominion
of Canada, on account of injurious insects, including fruitflies and melonflies
(Trypetidae). Includes and supersedes Quarantine No. 49 on account of the
citrus blacktfly.

Flag smut.—Quarantine No, 59, effective February 1, 1926: Forbids the impor-
tation of all species and varieties of wheat (7'riticum spp.) and wheat products,
unless so milled or so processed as to have destroyed all flag-smut spores, from
India, Japan, China, Australia, Union of South Africa, Italy, and Spain.

Packing materials—Quarantine No. 69, effective July 1, 1933, as amended,
effective July 1, 1983: Forbids the entry from all foreign countries and locali-
ties of the following materials when used as packing for other commodities,
except in special cases where preparation, processing, or manufacture are
judged by an inspector of the United States Department of Agriculture to have
eliminated risk of carrying injurious insects and plant diseases: Rice straw,
hulls, and chaff; cotton and cotton products; sugarcane, including bagasse;
bamboo leaves and small shoots; leaves of plants; forest litter; and soil contain-
ing an appreciable admixture of vegetable matter not therein provided for by
regulation. All parts of corn and allied plants are likewise prohibited except

_ from Mexico and the countries of Central America, the West Indies, and South

America. This quarantine also brings under restriction, involving inspection
at will by the Department but requiring no permit or certificate, the following
when used as packing: Cereal straw, chaff, and hulls (other than rice); corn
and allied plants from Mexico, Central America, the West Indies, and South
America; willow twigs from Europe; grasses, hay, and similar dried plant mix-
tures from all countries ; and authorized soil-packing materials from all countries.
This quarantine does not cover such widely used packing materials as excelsior,
paper, sawdust, ground cork, charcoal, and various other materials which, because
of their nature or process of manufacture, are unlikely to transport plant
parasites,

Dutch elm disease.—Quarantine No. 70, revised, effective January 1, 1935:
Forbids the importation from Europe, on account of a disease due to the fungus
Graphium ulmi, of seeds, leaves, plants, cuttings, and scions of elm or related
plants, defined to include all species and genera of the family Ulmaceae; logs of
elm and related plants; lumber, timber, or veneer of such plants if bark is present
on them; and crates, boxes, barrels, packing cases, and other containers, and other
articles manufactured in whole or in part from the wood of elm or related
plants if not free from bark.

Coffee.—Quarantine No. 73, effective April 1, 1940: Prohibits the importa-

tion into Puerto Rico from all foreign countries and localities of (1) the seeds

or beans of coffee which, previous to importation, have not been roasted to a
degree which, in the judgment of an inspector of the Department of Agri-
culture, will have destroyed coffee borers in all stages, (2) coffee berries or

fruits, and (3) coffee plants and leaves, on account of an injurious coffee insect

known as the coffee berry borer (Stephanoderes [coffeae Hgdn.] hampei Ferr.)
and an injurious rust disease due to the fungus Hemileia vastatrig B. and Br.
Provision is made for importations of samples of unroasted coffee seeds or beans
and for shipments of unroasted coffee seeds or beans in transit to destinations
other than Puerto Rico.

OTHER RESTRICTIVE ORDERS

The regulation of the entry of nursery stock from foreign countries into the
United States was specifically provided for in the Plant Quarantine Act. The
act further provides for the similar regulation of any other class of plants or
plant products when the need therefor shall be determined. The entry of the
plants and plant products listed below has been brought under such regulation.

Nursery stock.—The conditions governing the entry of nursery stock and other
plants and seeds from all foreign countries and localities are indicated above
under “Foreign plant quarantines.” (See Quarantine No. 37.)

Potatoes.—The order of December 22, 1913, and the regulations issued there-
under, revised, effective March 1, 1922, and amended, effective December 1,
1936, restrict the importation of potatoes from all foreign countries and locali-
ties except the Dominion of Canada and Bermuda, on account of injurious



‘92 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct.—Dee.

potato diseases and insect pests. The importation of potatoes is now authorized
from Bermuda, Canada, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Estonia, Latvia, Spain
(including the Canary Islands), and the States of Chihuahua and Sonora, and
the northern territory of Baja California, Mexico.

Cotton and cotton wrappings.—The order of April 27, 1915, and the rules and
regulations isSued thereunder, revised, effective February 24, 1923, amended
effective May 1, 1924, December 15, 1924, December 11, 1937, and July 1, 1938, re-
strict the importation of cotton and cotton wrappings from all foreign countries
and localities, on account of injurious insects, including the pink bollworm.

Cottonseed products.—The two orders of June 23, 1917, and the rules and regu-
lations issued thereunder, effective July 16, 1917, amended, effective August 7,
1925, restrict the importation of cottonseed cake and meal and all other cotton-
seed products except oil from all foreign countries and localities, and the impor-
tation of cottonseed oil from Mexico, on account of injurious insects, including
the pink bollworm: Provided, That these commodities which originate in and
are shipped directly from the Imperial Valley, Baja California, Mexico, may
enter without restriction.

Plant safeguard regulations.—These rules and regulations, revised, effective
December 1, 1932, provide safeguards for the landing or unloading for trans-
‘shipment and exportation and for transportation and exportation in bond of
restricted or prohibited plants and plant products when it is determined that .
Such entry can be made without involving risk to the plant cultures of the
United States and also provide for the safeguarding of such plant material at a
port or within the territorial limits of the United States where entry or landing
is not intended or where entry has been refused.

Rules and regulations governing the movement of plants and plant products
into and out of the District of Columbia—These rules and regulations, revised
effective April 30, 1938, are promulgated under the amendment to the Plant
‘Quarantine Act of May 31, 1920. They provide for the regulation of the move-
ment of plants and plant products, including nursery stock, from or into the
District of Columbia and for the control of injurious plant diseases and insect
pests within the said District.

MISCELLANEOUS REGULATIONS

Mezican border regulations.—These regulations, effective September 28, 1942,
were promulgated under the act approved January 31, 1942, entitled, “To provide
for regulating, inspecting, cleaning, and, when necessary, disinfecting railway
cars, other vehicles, and other materials entering the United States from Mexico”
(Public Law 426, 77th Congress), and supersede the rules and regulations pro-
hibiting the movement of cotton and cottonseed from Mexico into the United
States and governing the entry into the United States of railway cars and
other vehicles, freight, express, baggage, or other materials from Mexico at
border points, promulgated June 23, 1917, and amended effective January 29,
1920. They are designed to prevent the entry of the pink bollworm of cotton,
which is known to exist widely in Mexico. They provide for the examination
of passengers’ baggage, for the disinfection of railways cars and other vehicles,
freight, express, and other shipments, and for the cleaning of domestic cars
handling Mexican freight. All fees collected for disinfecting railways cars and
other vehicles are deposited in the United States Treasury as miscellaneous
receipts.

The inspectors concerned in the enforcement of these regulations at border
points are charged also with enforcement of restrictions on the entry of plants
and plant products under various foreign plant quarantines.

Regulations governing sanitary export certification—These regulations, revised
‘effective September 21, 1936, were promulgated pursuant to authority granted in
the Agricultural Appropriation Act of May 17, 1935 (49 Stat. 268), and repeated
in subsequent appropriation acts. They provide for the inspection and certifica-
tion of domestic plants and plant products intended for export to countries
requiring such certification. All fees collected for this service are deposited in
the United States Treasury as miscellaneous receipts. :



az Announcements relating to gypsy moth and brown-tail moth quarantine io. 45) . 3) _ ipa oe
a and brown-tail moth quarantine reguiations modified (B. E. P. by 386, seventh
J POVISION) enn rcs ts se es ee aaa ee gre ee
. Instructions to postmasters - : .. _-_....--- 2.2 2 ee
r : Announcements relating to white-fringed beetle quarantine (No. 72) --__-_----------__--..- seeped
White-fringed beetle quarantine revised. (press notice).2.<25.- 2d 244. o=-e ee
Revision cf quarantine and regulations effective December 28, 1942__._________________.----_
ieee Notice to general public through newspapers: _ 44-2 =~ = 5.42 22 ee ee
mm White-fringed beetle regulations modified (B. E. P. Q. 485, eleventh revision)__________- :
Announcement relating to Mexican borde1 regulations____.__.._....__--_.__-----_-.-_------ BS nd
: Instructions to collectors of customs (T. D. Vy | a oe eee
. Misceliavicous items _ aoe on a ee i = ee a
} ae ty import restrictions, Republic of Argentina (B. E. P. Q. 426, supplement
¥ On €) i denn oe eh eh oe ek ee ee oe oe nd oe ee ee eee
| Plant-quarantine import restrictions, British Congo (B. E. P. Q. 448, supplement No. 1). _-
tf’ List of current ouarantine and other restrictive orders and miscellaneous regulations-__________-
‘Terminal inspection ofplants and plant products_.J. .2ts21222 2:2 JI ee oe eee
4 Plants and plant products addressed to places in California___.._.___._.-_-___-___----------
Ps . California State plant quarantine modified. : 225.12. -.-52_41 ee i 2 ee es
y ts - Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act__...._____.__________.__--_------.-
7 Organization cf the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine ________________-_______----.---.- .
;
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S.R. A.—B. E. P. Q. No. 150. Issued June 1942

United States Department of Agriculture

BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS

JANUARY-MARCH 1942

CONTENTS

Page
Onnrinnneanceotlenouieallannolmeciments:. =.) 8.9.22) oa es 2p PTE a St 232 Se 1
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (No. 48)----_________--_----.------------- 1
Rawiseduarantine on Japanese Deetlei (press notice). =~ --_ =.= 9% - sy= = ese Soe eda 1
IRewision or recllationmenmecuye Ivearen 24, 1047 22 2 ii te ee 2
iotice-to =eneral pubne through newspapersoe s< -2.. Lo. ees eee te be esol 14
Announcements relating to Mexican fruitfly quarantine (No. 64) __-__________---___------------- 5
exacrciirusicilit barvest ex tenged. (press MOLice)=-!2 2! _2-.-"! 55 2243422. $5. ts ees 15
Mexican fruitfly regulations modified—harvesting season extended (B. E. P. Q. 521)______-- 15
Announcement relating to white-fringed beetle quarantine (No. 72) __________--___-------_----- 16

White-fringed beetle administrative instructions modified—treatments authorized (B. E.
ReOMDOsMIOULEMILOVISION) S24. ~29 soe. Ft e- Rue B lye Rees |e a Ape Ds ee bl 16
SNES STROUD TMT we oe ae oe A le Fo ie nh i ew ed Te ee eee eee gine ae eS pe ee 19
Wakeland to head Division of Grasshopper Control (press notice) _-__________--------------- 19
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Cuba (B. E. P. Q. 519, supplement INO: 123 19
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Burma (B. E. P. Q. 520) -__-__-__-____---------------- 20
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Ecuador (B. E. P. Q. 522)_______________- 23
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act__--___.__-__-_-_------------------- 25
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine_________________-__--------------- 27

QUARANTINE AND OTHER OFFICIAL
ANNOUNCEMENTS
ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE
(NO. 48)

REVISE QUARANTINE ON JAPANESE BEETLE
[Press notice ]

Marco 25, 1942.

The United States Department of Agriculture announced today that Japanese
beetle quarantine regulations have been revised, effective March 24, 1942.

Regulated areas have been extended to include relatively small sections in
Maryland, New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia. The new areas
include parts of the counties of Allegany and Washington, Md., the previously
unregulated parts of Carroll, Frederick, and Prince Georges Counties, Md., parts
of Ontario and Monroe Counties, N. Y., Meadville, Pa., Charlottesville, Danville,
Schoolfield, and Front Royal, Va., Paden City, and the magisterial district of
Lincoln in Tyler County, W. Va. These additions to- the regulated area are
made because numbers of beetles were found in these sections by scouts in 1941.

That part of the regulated area from which the movement of fruits and vege-
tables is under regulation—the more heavily infested area—has been extended
to include additional districts in Anne Arundel and Baltimore Counties, Md.,
and in Berks, Cumberland, Lehigh, Northampton, and York Counties, Pa. Char-
lottesville, Va., is now included with Toledo, Ohio, *n1 Winchester, Va., as
isolated regulated points to which fruit and vegetable shipments via refrigerator
car or motortruck may move only under certification. Shippers of cut flowers
located within the regulated area, but outside the heavily infested part, now are
not reauired to obtain certification for their shipments. Soil-free rooted cuttings
and fresh manure are exempt from certification under current regulations.

463802—42—— 1 1
2 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE — [Jan.—Mar.

B. E. P. Q.—Q. 48. Revision of Regulations
Effective March 24, 1942

TITLE 7—AGRICULTURE
CHAPTER IITI—BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE
PArtT 301—DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES

JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE

INTRODUCTORY NOTE

In the current revision of the Japanese beetle quarantine regulations, relatively
small extensions of regulated areas are made in Maryland, New York, Pennsyl-
vania, Virginia, and West Virginia. Additions to the regulated area in Mary-
land include portions of the counties of Allegany and Washington, and the
previously unregulated portions of the counties of Carroll, Frederick, and Prince
Georges. In New York, the town of Manchester, Ontario County, and the town
of Pittsford and village of East Rochester, in Monroe County, are brought under
regulation. Extension of the Pennsylvania regulated area is limited to the city
of Meadville, in Crawford County. The cities of Charlottesville and Danville,
the village of Schoolfield in Pittsylvania County, and the town of Front Royal
in Warren County, Va., are added to the regulated area. The area in Warwick
County, Va., has been slightly increased and described as the magisterial district
of Newport, which includes the Camp Stuart locality heretofore under regulation.
An addition to the West Virginia area was made by the inclusion of the magis-
terial district of Lincoln, Tyler County, and the town of Paden City, in Tyler and
Wetzel Counties.

Areas from which the movement of fruits and vegetables is regulated
(§ 301.48-5) have been further extended to include additional election districts
and towns in Anne Arundel and Baltimore Counties, Md., and Berks, Cumber-
land, Lehigh, Northampton, and York Counties, Pa. Charlottesville, Va., is now
included with Toledo, Ohio, and Winchester, Va., as isolated regulated points
to which fruit and vegetable shipments via refrigerator car or motortruck
may move only under certification.

Soil-free rooted cuttings and fresh manure have been added to the list of
exempted articles, and the special labeling requirements previously prescribed
for containers of certain exempted articles have been removed.

Restrictions on the movement of cut flowers are now confined to shipments
moving from the heavily infested area interstate to points outside the regulated
areas. This heavily infested area (§ 301.485) is that from which the move-
ment of fruits and vegetables is also restricted. This will relieve shippers of
cut flowers located within the regulated area, but outside the heavily infested
portion, from the necessity of obtaining certification for their shipments.

Minor changes have been made in § 301.48-6 relating to the maintenance of a
classified status at an infested nursery or greenhouse.

Authorization for the issuance of permits for the movement via motortruck
of all restricied articles from a regulated area through a nonregulated area
to another regulated area has been restored.

This revision supersedes the rules and regulations supplemental to the revi-
sion of Notice of Quarantine No. 48, which became effective February 12,
1941, as amended by administrative instructions (B. E. P. Q. 513), effective
April 21, 1941.

SUMMARY

Unless a certificate has been issued, these regulations, as now revised, pro-
hibit the interstate movement between June 15 and October 15 (between June
1 and October 15 in the case of Accomac and Northampton Counties, Va.) of
all fruits and vegetables by refrigerator car or motortruck and cut flowers by
any mode of transportation, from the District of Columbia, the State of
Delaware, and parts of Maryland, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and -Virginia, as
defined in § 301.48-5, to or through points outside the regulated areas as
defined in § 301.48—3.

Also restricted in the regulations is the interstate movement of plants, sand,
soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure from any part of the regniated areas to
1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS m

or through any outside point throughout the year unless a Federal permit or
certificate has been obtained. For details and exceptions see §§ 301.48-6 and 7.

Included in the regulated areas are the District of Columbia, the entire States
of Connecticut, Delaware, Massachusetts, New Jersey, and Rhode Island, and
parts of Maine, Maryland, New Hampshire, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania,
Vermont, Virginia, and West Virginia, as described in § 301.48—8.

These regulations also specify the conditions governing the protection of
restricted articles from infestation while in transit (§ 301.48-8), require thor-
ough cleaning of vehicles, containers, and refrigerator cars which have been
used in transportating restricted products (§§ 301.48-—5 and 13), and provide
other safeguards and conditions, as specified in the regulations.

To obtain permits and certificates, address the Bureau of Entomology and
Plant Quarantine, 266 Glenwood Avenue, Bloomfield, N. J., or the nearest
branch office listed in the appendix.

DETERMINATION OF THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE

The Secretary of Agriculture, having determined that it was necessary to
quarantine the States of Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Maryland, Massachu-
setts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Is-
land, Vermont, Virginia, and West Virginia, and the District of Columbia, to
prevent the spread of the Japanese beetle (Popillia japonica Newm.), a danger-
ous. insect new to and not theretofore widely prevalent or distributed within
and throughout the United States, and having given the public hearing required
by law, promulgated the thirteenth revision of Notice of Quarantine 301.48,
part 301, chapter III, title 7, Code of Federal Regulations, and rules and regu-
lations supplemental thereto, governing the movement of (1) fruits and vege-
tables; (2) nursery, ornamental, and greenhouse stock, and other plants; and
(3) sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure, from any of the above-
named States or the District of Columbia, into or through any other State
or Territory or District of the United States, §§ 301.48-1 to 14, inclusive, part
301, chapter III, title 7, Code of Federal Regulations [B. E. P. Q.—Q. 48, effec-
tive on and after February 12, 1941].

I have determined that it is necessary to revise the aforesaid rules and regu-
lations for the purpose of extending the regulated areas owing to the dis-
covery of substantial infestations of the Japanese beetle in additional sections,
and to make other modifications.

ORDER OF THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE

Pursuant to the authority conferred upon the Secretary of Agriculture by
section 8 of the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912, as amended (7
U. S. C. 161), the subpart entitled “Japanese Beetle” of part 301, chapter ITI,
title 7, Code of Federal Regulations [B. E. P. Q.—Q. 48, as revised] is hereby
revised effective March 24, 1942, to read as follows:

SUBPART—JAPANESB BEETLE
QUARANTINE

§ 301.48. Notice of quarantine—Under the authority conferred by section 8 of
the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912, as amended (7 U. S. C. 161), I
do quarantine the States of Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Maryland, Massa-
chusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode
Island, Vermont, Virginia, and West Virginia, and the District of Columbia,
to prevent the spread of the Japanese beetle. Hereafter (1) fruits and vege-
tables; (2) nursery, ornamehtal, and greenhouse stock, and other plants; and
(3) sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure, shall not be shipped, offered
for shipment to a common carrier, received for transportation or transported
by a common earrier, or carried, transported, moved, or allowed to be moved
from any of said quarantined States or District into or through any other
State or Territory or District of the United States in manner or method or
under conditions other than those prescribed in the rules and regulations herein-
after made and amendments thereto: Provided, That the restrictions of this
quarantine and of the rules and regulations supplemental thereto may be limited
to the areas in a quarantined State now, or which may hereafter be, designated
by the Secretary of Agriculture as regulated areas when, in the judgment of
the Secretary of Agriculture, the enforcement of the aforesaid rules and
4 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE — [Jan.—Mar.

regulations as to such regulated areas shall be adequate to prevent the spread
of the Japanese beetle: Provided further, That such limitations shall be con-
ditioned upon the said State providing for and enforcing such control measures
with respect to such regulated areas as, in the judgment of the Secretary of
Agriculture, shall be deemed adequate to prevent the spread of the Japanese
beetle therefrom to other parts of the State: And provided further, That cer-
tain articles classed as restricted herein may, because of the nature of their
growth or production or their manufactured or processed condition, be exempted
by administrative instructions issued by the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology
and Plant Quarantine when, in his judgment, such articles are considered in-
nocuous as carriers of infestation: And provided further, That whenever, in
any year, the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine shall
find that facts exist as to the pest risk involved in the movement of one or
more of the articles to which the regulations supplemental hereto apply, making
it safe to modify, by making less stringent, the restrictions contained in any
such regulations, he shall set forth and publish such finding in administrative
instructions, specifying the manner in which the applicable regulation should
be made less stringent, whereupon such modification shall become effective,
for such period and for such regulated area or portion thereof as shall be
specified in said administrative instructions, and every reasonable effort shall
be made to give publicity to such administrative instructions throughout the
affected areas.’

RULES AND REGULATIONS
Meaning of Terms

§ 301.48-1. Definitions—For the purpose of these regulations the following
words, names, and terms shall be construed, respectively, to mean:

(a) Japanese beetle-—The insect known as the Japanese beetle (Popillia
japonica Newm.), in any stage of development.

(b) Infested, infestation.—The terms “infested,” “infestation,” and the like,
relate to infestation with the Japanese beetle.

(c) Quarantined area.—Any State or District quarantined by the Secretary
of Agriculture to prevent the spread of the Japanese beetle.

(d) Regulated area.—Any area in a quarantined State or District which is
now, or which may hereafter be, designated as such by the Secretary of
Agriculture in accordance with the provisos of § 301.48, as revised.

(e) Fruits and vegetables—For the list of restricted fruits and vegetables
see § 301.48-5.

(f) Nursery and ornamental stock.—Nursery, ornamental, and greenhouse
stock, and all other plants, plant roots, cut flowers, or other portions of plants.

(zg) Sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure.—Sand, soil, earth, peat,
compost, or manure of any kind and as to either bulk movement or in connec-
tion with farm products or nursery and ornamental stock.

(h) Certified sand, soil, earth. peat, compost, and manure.—Sand, soil, earth,
peat, compost, or manure determined by the inspector as uninfested and so
certified.

(i) Certified greenhouse-—A greenhouse or similar establishment which has
complied to the satisfaction of the inspector with the conditions imposed in
§ 301.48-6. This term may apply also to potting beds, heeling-in areas, hot-
beds, coldframes, or similar plots or to storage houses, packing sheds, or
stores treated or otherwise safeguarded in manner and method satisfactory to
the inspector.

(j) Inspector.—An inspector of the United States Department of Agriculture.

(k) Moved interstate.—Shipped, offered for shipment to a common carrier,
received for transportation or transported by a common carrier, or carried,
transported, moved or allowed to be moved from one State or Territory or
District of the United States into or through any other State or Territory or
District.

(1) Certificate—A valid form evidencing compliance with the requirements
of these regulations as to movement of restricted articles to Logan outside the
regulated areas.

(m) Permit.—A valid form authorizing movement of restricted articles from
a regulated area to a restricted destination in a separate regulated area.

1§§ 301.48 to 301.48—-14 inclusive, issued under the authority contained in sec. 8, 39
Stat. 1165, 44 Stat. 250; 7 U.S. C. 161.
1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 5

Limitation of Restrictions

§ 301.48-2. Limitation of restrictions to regulated areas.—Conditioned upon the
compliance on the part of the State concerned with the provisos to § 301.48, the
restrictions provided in these regulations on the interstate movement of plants
and plant products and other articles enumerated in said § 301.48 will be limited to
such movement from the area in such State now or hereafter designated by the
Secretary of Agriculture as regulated areas.

Areas under Regulation

§ 301.48-3. Regulated areas.—In accordance with the provisos to § 391.48, the
Secretary of Agriculture designates as regulated areas for the purpose of these
regulations the States, District, counties, townships, towns, cities, election dis-
tricts, and magisterial districts listed below, including all cities, towns, boroughs,
or other political subdivisions within their limits:

Connecticut.—The entire State.

Delaivare.—-The entire State.

District of Columbia.—The entire District.

Maine.—County of York; towns of Auburn and Lewiston, in Androscoggin
County; towns of Cape Elizabeth, Gorham, Gray, New Gloucester, Raymond,
Scarboro, Standish, and the cities of Portland, South Portland, Westbrook, and
Windham, in Cumberiand County; the city of Waterville, in Kennebec County;
and the city of Brewer, in Penobscot County.

Maryland.—Counties of Baltimore, Caroline, Carroll, Cecil, Frederick, Harford,
Howard, Kent, Montgomery, Prince Georges, Queen Annes, Somerset, Talbot,
Wicomico, and Worcester; the city of Baltimore; the city of Cumberland, the
town of Frostburg, and election districts Nos. 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 11, 12, 138, 14, 22, 23,
24, 26, 28, 29, 31, and 32, in Allegany County; the city of Annapolis, and election
districts Nos. 2, 3, 4, and 5, in Anne Arundel County; election districts of La
Plata (No. 1), Pomonkey (No. 7), and White Plains (No. 6), in Charles County;
election districts of Cambridge (No. 7), Church Creek (No. 9), East New Market
(No. 2), Fork (No. 1), Hurlock (No. 15), Vienna (No. 3), and Williamsburg
(No. 12), in Dorchester County; all of Washington County except the election
districts of Hancock (No.5) and Indian Spring (No. 15).

Massachusetts.—The entire State.

New Hampshire.—Counties of Belknap, Cheshire, Hillsboro, Merrimack, Rock-
ingham, Strafford, and Sullivan ; towns of Brookfield, Eaton, Effingham, Freedom,
Madison, Moultonboro, Ossipee, Sandwich, Tamworth, Tuftonboro, Wakefield, and
Wolfeboro, in Carroll County; towns of Alexandria, Ashland, Bridgewater,
Bristol, Canaan, Dorchester, Enfield, Grafton, Groton, Hanover, Hebron, Holder-
ness, Lebanon, Lyme, Orange, and Plymouth, in Grafton County.

New Jersey.—The entire State.

New York.—Counties of Albany, Bronx, Broome, Chemung, Chenango, Colum-
bia, Cortland, Delaware, Dutchess, Fulton, Greene, Kings, Madison, Montgomery,
Nassau, New York, Oneida, Onondaga, Orange, Otsego, Putnam, Queens, Rens-
selaer, Richmond, Rockland, Saratoga, Schenectady, Schoharie, Suffolk, Sullivan,
Tioga, Ulster, Washington, and Westchester ; towns of Red House and Salamanca,
and the city of Salamanca, in Cattaraugus County; city of Auburn and the towns
of Fleming, Owasco, and Sennett, in Cayuga County; towns of Amherst, Cheek-
towaga, and Tonawanda, and the cities of Buffalo and Lackawanna, in Hrie
County: towns of Columbia, Danube, Fairfield, Frankfort, German Flats, Herki-
mer, Litchfield, Little Falls, Manheim, Newport, Salisbury, Schuyler, Stark,
Warren, and Winfield, and the city of Little Falls, in Herkimer County; town
of Watertown and city of Watertown, in Jefferson County; town of Mount Morris
and village of Mount Morris, in Livingston County; city of Rochester, towns of
Brighton and Pittsford, and village of East Rochester, in Monroe County; town
of Manchester, in Ontario County; towns of Catharine, Cayuta, Dix, Hector,
Montour, and Reading, and the borough of Watkins Glen, in Schuyler County:
towns of Caton, Corning, Erwin, Hornby, and Hornellsville, and the cities of
Corning and Hornell, in Steuben County; towns of Caroline, Danby, Dryden,
Enfi>'d, Ithaca, Newfield, and the city of Ithaca, in Tomnkins County; towns of
Luzerne and Queensbury and the city of Glens Falls, in Warren County.

Ohio.—Counties of Belmont, Carrol, Columbiana, Cuyahoga, Guernsey, Har-
rison, Jefferson, Mahoning, Medina, Portage, Stark, Summit, Tuscarawas, and
Wayne; the city of Coshocton, in Coshocton County; the city of Columbus, and
6 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE — [Jan.—Mar.

villages of Bexley, Grandview, Grandview Heights, Hanford, Marble Cliff, and
Upper Arlington, in Franklin County; townships of Kirtland, Mentor, and Wil-
loughby, and the villages of Kirtland Hills, Lakeline, Mentor, Mentor-on-the-
Lake, Waite Hill, Wickliffe, Willoughby, and Willowick, in Lake County; the
township of Newark and city of Newark, in Licking County; the city of Toledo,
in Lucas County; the township of Madison and the city of Mansfield, in Richland
County; townships of Bazetta, Braceville, Brookfield, Champion, Fowler, Hart-
ford, Howland, Hubbard, Liberty, Lordstown, Newton, Southington, Warren,
Weathersfield, and Vienna, the cities of Niles and Warren, and the villages of
Cortland, Girard, Hubbard, McDonald, Newton Falls, and Orangeville, in
Trumbull County.

Pennsylvania.—The entire State except the townships of Athens, Beaver, Bloom-
field, Cambridge, Conneaut, Cussewago, East Fairfield, East Fallowfield, East
Mead, Fairfield, Greenwood, Hayfield, North Shenango, Pine, Randolph, Rich-
mond, Rockdale, Sadsbury, South Shenango, Spring, Steuben, Summerhill, Summit,
Troy, Union, Venango, Vernon, Wayne, West Fallowfield, West Mead, West She-
nango, and Woodcock, the boroughs of Blooming Valley, Cambridge Springs, Coch-
ranton, Conneaut Lake, Conneautville, Geneva, Linesville, Saegerstown, Spring-
boro, Townville, Venango, and Woodcock, in Crawford County; the townships of
Amity, Conneaut, Elk Creek, Fairview, Franklin, Girard, Greene, Greenfield,
Harborcreek, Lawrence Park, Le Boeuf, McKean, North East, Springfield, Summit,
Union, Venango, Washington, and Waterford, and the boroughs of Albion, Cranes-
ville, East Springfield, Edinboro, Fairview. Girard, Middleboro, Mill Village, North
East, North Girard, Platea, Union City, Waterford, Wattsburg, and Wesleyville,
in Erie County; the townships of Deer Creek, Delaware, Fairview, French Creek,
Greene, Hempfield, Lake, Mill Creek, New Vernon, Otter Creek, Perry, Pymatun-
ing, Salem, Sandy Creek, Sandy Lake, South Pymatuning, Sugar Grove, and West
Salem, and the boroughs of Clarksville, Fredonia, Greenville, Jamestown, New
Lebanon, Sandy Lake, Sheakleyville, and Stoneboro, in Mercer County.

Rhode Island.—The entire State.

Vermont.—Counties of Bennington, Rutland, Windham, and Windsor; and the
town of Burlington, in Chittenden County.

Virginia.—Counties of Accomac, Arlington, Culpeper, Elizabeth City, Fairfax,
Fauquier, Henrico, Loudoun, Norfolk, Northampton, Prince William, Princess Anne,
and Stafford; magisterial districts of Bermuda, Dale, Manchester, and Matoaca,
in Chesterfield County; town of Emporia, in Greensville County; magisterial dis-
trict of Sleepy Hole, in Nansemond County; village of Schoolfield, in Pittsylvania
County; magisterial districts of Hampton, Jackson, and Wakefield, in Rappa-
hannock County; magisterial district of Courtland, in Spotsylvania County;
town of Front Royal, in Warren County; magisterial district of Newport, in
Warwick County; magisterial district of Washington, in Westmoreland County;
and the cities of Alexandria, Charlottesville, Danville, Fredericksburg, Hampton,
Newport News, Norfolk, Petersburg, Portsmouth, Richmond, South Norfolk,
Suffolk, and Winchester. ;

West Virginia.—Counties of Brooke, Hancock, Harrison, Jefferson, Marion,
Monongalia, Ohio, and Taylor; magisterial districts of Arden, Falling Waters,
Hedgesville, and Opequon and the city of Martinsburg, in Berkeley County; the
city of Charleston, in Kanawha County ; magisterial districts of Sand Hill, Union,
Washington, and Webster, in Marshall County; town of Keyser and magisterial
district of Frankfort, in Mineral County; magisterial district of Lincoln, in Tyler
County; town of Paden City, in Tyler and Wetzel Counties ; and the city of Parkers-
burg, and magisterial districts of Lubeck and Tygart, in Wood County.

Changes in Regulated Areas

§ 301.484. Extension or reduction of regulated areas.—The regulated areas
designated in § 301.48-3 may be extended or reduced as may be found advisable by
the Secretary of Agriculture. Due notice of any extension or reduction and the
areas affected thereby will be given in writing to the transportation companies
doing business in or through the States in which such areas are located and by
publication in one or more newspapers selected by the Secretary of Agriculture
within the States in which the areas affected are located.

Movement of Fruits and Vegetables

§ 301.48-5. Restrictions on the movement of fruits and vegetables.—(a) Con-
trol of movement.—(1) Unless a certificate shall have been issued therefor, by an
1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS i

inspector, except as provided in subdivisions (i) to (iv), inclusive, of this section,
no fruits or vegetables of any kind shall be moved interstate via refrigerator car
or motortruck from any of the areas listed below to or through any point outside
the regulated areas:

Delaware.—The entire State.

District of Colunvbia.—The entire District.

Maryland.—Counties of Baltimore, Cecil, Harford, Kent, Queen Annes, Somer-
set, and Worcester; election districts Nos. 8, 4 and 5, in Anne Arundel County;
the city of Baltimore; all of Caroline County except election districts of American
Corners (No. 8), and Hillsboro (No. 6) ; election districts of Cambridge (No. 7),
Hast New Market (No. 2), Hurlock (No. 15), and Williamsburg (No. 12), in
Dorchester County; election districts of Elk Ridge (No. 1), and Ellicott City (No.
2), in Howard County; election districts of Camden (No. 13), Delmar (No. 11),
Dennis (No. 6), Fruitland (No. 16), Nutters (No. 8), Parsons (No. 5), Pittsburg
(No. 4), Salisbury (No. 9), Trappe (No. 7), and Willard (No. 14), and the town
of Salisbury, in Wicomico County.

New Jersey.—Counties of Atlantic, Burlington, Camden, Cape May, Cumberland,
Essex, Gloucester, Hudson, Hunterdon, Mercer, Middlesex, Monmouth, Ocean,
Salem, Somerset, and Union; townships of Lodi, Lyndhurst, Overpeck, Rochelle
Park, Saddle River, and Teaneck, the cities of Englewood, Garfield, and Hacken-
sack, and the boroughs of Bogota, Carlstadt, Cliffside Park, East Paterson, East
Rutherford, Edgewater, Englewood Cliffs, Fair Lawn, Fairview, Fort Lee, Glenn
Rock, Hasbrouck Heights, Leonia, Little Ferry, Lodi, Maywood, Moonachie, North
Arlington, Palisades Park, Ridgefield, Rutherford, Teterboro, Wallington, and
Wood Ridge, in Bergen County; townships of Chatham, Chester, Denville, East
Hanover, Hanover, Harding, Menham, Morris, Morristown, Parsippany-Troy Hills,
Passaic, Randolph, and Washington, and the boroughs of Chatham, Florham Park,
Madison, Mendham, and Morris Plains, in Morris County ; township of Little Falls,
the cities of Clifton, Passaic, Paterson, and the boroughs of Haledon, Hawthorne,
North Haledon, Prospect Park, Totowa, and West Paterson, in Passaic County ;
townships of Franklin, Greenwich, Lopatcong, Mansfield, Phillipsburg, Pohatcong,
and Washington, and the boroughs of Alpha and Washington, in Warren County.

Pennsylvania.—Counties ef Bucks, Chester, Delaware, Lancaster, Montgomery,
and Philadelphia; all of Berks County except the townships of Albany, Bethel,
Centre, Greenwich, Jefferson, Marion, North Heidelberg, Penn, Perry, Tilden,
Tulpehocken, Upper Bern, Upper Tulpehocken, and Windsor, and the boroughs
of Bernville, Centreport, Hamburg, Lenhartsville, Shoemakersville, Strausstown,
and West Leesport ; townships of Lower Allen and Upper Allen, and boroughs of
Lemoyne, Mechanicsburg, and New Cumberland, in Cumberland County; town-
ships of Londonderry, Lower Paxton, Lower Swatara, Susquehanna, and Swatara,
the city of Harrisburg, and the boroughs of Highspire, Middletown, Paxtang, Pen-
brook, Royalton, and Steelton, in Dauphin County; all of Lehigh County except
the townships of Heidelberg, Lowhill, Lynn, Washington, and Weisenberg, and
borough of Slatington; all of Northampton County except the townships of
Bushkill, Lehigh, Moore, Plainfield, Upper Mount Bethel, and Washington, and
boroughs of Bangor, Chapman, East Bangor, Pen Argyl, Portland, Roseto,
Stockertown, Walnutport, and Wind Gap; and the townships of Chanceford,
Conewago, East Hopewell, East Manchester, Fairview, Fawn, Hellam, Hopewell,
Lower Chanceford, Lower Windsor, Manchester, Newberry, Peach Bottom, and
Springetsbury, the city of York, and the boroughs of Cross Roads, Delta, East
Prospect, Fawn Grove, Goldsboro, Hallam, Lewisberry, Manchester, Mount Wolf,
North York, Stewartstown, Wrightsville, Yorkana, and York Haven, in York
County.

Virginia.—Counties of Accomac, Arlington, and Northampton.

Provided, That shipments of fruits and vegetables moving interstate from the
area specified in paragraph (a) (1) of this section to other points in the regulated
area and subsequently diverted to points outside the regulated area, shall be
regarded as direct shipments from the points of origin. As such they require
certification :

Provided further, That the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quar-
antine may by administrative instructions extend or reduce the areas specified in
this section when in his judgment such action is considered advisable.

(i) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of fruits and vege-
tables between October 16 and June 14, inclusive, except that in the case of move-
ment interstate from the following areas, the exemption applies only during the
period from October 16 to May 31, inclusive:

Virginia.—The counties of Accomac and Northampton.
S BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE © [Jan.—Mar.

(ii) No certificate or permit will be required for the interstate movement of
fruits and vegetables when transported by a common earrier on a through bill of
lading either from a point outside the area designated in this section through that
area to another outside point, or from the area designated in this section through
a nonregulated area to another regulated area, except that a certificate is required
for interstate movement from the area specified in paragraph (a) (1) of this
section to Toledo, Ohio, and Charlottesville and Winchester, Va.

(iii) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of fruits and vege-
tables when they shall have been manufactured or processed in such a manner
that in the judgment of the inspector no infestation could be transmitted.

(iv) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of fruits and vege-
tables from the area listed in paragraph (a) (1) of this section to the remainder
of the regulated area, other than as specified in subdivision (ii) of this section.

(b) Conditions of certification.—Certificates may be issued for the interstate
movement of fruits and vegetables between June 15 and October 15, inclusive (or
between June 1 and October 15, inclusive, when consigned from Accomae County
or Northampton County, Va.) under one of the following conditions:

(1) When the fruits and vegetables moving by motortruck have actually been
inspected by the United States Department of Agriculture and found free from
infestation. The number of inspection points for such certification will be limited
and their location determined by shipping needs and furtber conditioned on the
establishment at such points of provisions satisfactory to the inspector for the
handling and safeguarding of such shipments during inspection. Such inspection
may be discontinued and certification withheld by the inspector during periods of
general or unusual flight of the beetles.

(2) When the fruits and vegetables have been handled or treated under the
observation of an inspector in manner and by method to free them from any
infestation.

(8) When the fruits and vegetables have originated outside the areas desig-
nated in this section, and are to be reshipped directly from freight yards, transfer
points, or unloading docks within such areas, under provisions satisfactory to the
inspector for safeguarding of such shipments pending certification and reship-
ment. Certificates on this basis will be issued without inspection only in cases
where, in the judgment of the inspector, the shipments concerned have not been
exposed to infestation while within such freight yards, transfer points, or unload-
ing docks.

(4) When the fruits and vegetables were grown in districts where the fact
has been established to the satisfaction of the inspector that no infestation exists
and are to be shipped directly from the farms where grown to points outside the
areas designated in paragraph (a) (1) of this section, or are shipped from in-
fested districts where the fact has been established to the satisfaction of the
inspector that the Japanese beetle has not begun or has ceased its flight.

(5) When the fruits and vegetables moving via refrigerator car from the area
designated in this section have been inspected and loaded in a manner to prevent
infestation, in a refrigerator car with closed or adequately screened doors and
hatches, which car prior to loading has been determined by an inspector as fumi-
gated or thoroughly swept and cleaned by the common carrier in a manner to rid
it of infestation. During the interval between fumigation or cleaning and load-
ing, such refrigerator car must be tightly closed and sealed. (For further re-
quirements on the cleaning of refrigerator cars, see § 301.48-13. )

(6) When the fruits and vegetables moving via refrigerator car from the area
designated in this section have been fumigated in the car, when deemed necessary
in the judgment of the inspector, and when the doors and hetches of the car have
been tightly closed or adequately screened under the supervision of an inspector.

Movement of Nursery and Ornamental Stock

§ 801 48-6. Restrictions on the movement of nursery and crnamental stock.—
(a) Control of movement.—Nursery and ornamental stock as defined in
§ 301.48-1 shall not be moved interstate from the regulated areas to or through
any point outside thereof, unless a certificate or permit shall have been issued
therefor by the inspector except as follows:

(1) The following articles, because of their growth or production, or their
manufactured or processed condition, are considered innocuous as carriers of
infestation and are, therefore, exempt from the requirements of certification.

(i) True bulbs, corms, and tubers, when dormant, except for storage growth,
and when free from soil; and single dahlia tubers or small dahlia root divisions
1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 9

when free from stems, cavities, and soil. Dahlia tubers, other than single tubers
or small root divisions meeting these conditions, require certification.

(ii) Cut orchids; orchid plants when growing exclusively in Osmunda fiber ;
Osmunda fiber, Osmundine, or orchid peat (Osmunda cinnamomeéa and
O. claytoniana).

(iii) (a) Floral designs or “set pieces,” including wreaths, sprays, casket
covers, and all formal florists’ designs ; bouquets and cut flowers not so prepared
are not exempted; (0) trailing arbutus, or Mayflower (Hpigaea repens), when
free from soil, and when shipped during the period between October 16 and June
14, inclusive.

(iv) (a) Herbarium specimens, when dried, pressed, and treated; (0) mush-
room spawn, in brick, flakes, or pure culture form.

(v) (@) Sheet moss (Calliergon schriberi and Thuridium recognitum) ; (db)
resurrection plant or bird’s-nest moss (Selaginella lepidophylla) ; (¢) sphagnum
moss, bog moss, or peat moss (Sphagnaceae) ; (d@) dyed moss.

(vi) Soil-free dried roots incapabie of propagation.

(vii) Soil-free rooted cuttings.

(2) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of nursery and
ornamental stock imported from foreign countries when reshipped from the
port of entry in the unopened original container and labeled as to each con-
tainer with a copy certificate of the cduntry from which it was exported, a
statement of the general nature and quantity of the contents, the name and
address of the consignee, and the country and locality where grown.

(3) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of soil-free aquatic
plants, and of portions of plants without roots.and free from soil, except that
a certificate is required during the period June 15 to October 15, inclusive (or
between June 1 and October 15, inclusive, when consigned from Accomac County
or Northampton County, Va.), for the movement of cut flowers from the area
designated in § 3801.48-5 interstate to points outside the regulated areas
(§ 301.48-38).

(4) No certificate or permit will be required for the interstate movement of
nursery and ornamental stock when transported by a common carrier on a
through bill of lading either from an area not under regulation through a regu-
lated area, or from a regulated area through a nonregulated area to another
regulated area.

(b) Conditions governing the issuance of certificates and permits.—For the
purpose of certification of nursery and ornamental stock, nurseries, greenhouses,
and other premises concerned in the movement of such stock will be classified
as follows:

(1) Class I.—Nurseries, greenhouses, and other premises concerned in the
movement of nursery and ornamental stock on or within approximately 500
feet of which no infestation has been found may be classified as class I. Upon
compliance with the requirements of paragraph (b) (7) of this section nursery
and ornamental stock may be certified by the inspector for shipment from such
premises without further inspection, and without meeting the safeguards pre-
scribed as a condition of interstate shipment of plants originating in nurseries
or greenhouses of class IIL..

(2) Class I/J.—(i) Nurseries, greenhouses, and other premises concerned in
the movement of nursery and ornamental stock on which either grubs in the
soil or one or more beetles have been found, will be classified as class III,
provided there are maintained on the premises subdivided class I areas, certified
houses, frames, or plots or other certified areas. Such classification will not
be granted to nurseries, greenhouses, and other premises that do not maintain
certified or subdivided areas and require only infrequent certification. Such
classification also may be given to nurseries, etc., where one or more beetles or
grubs are found in the immediate proximity (within approximately 500 feet) of
such nurseries, etc., on adjacent property or properties. In the case of nursery
properties under single ownership and management but represented by parcels
of land widely separated, such parcels may be independently classified either
as class [ or class III upon compliance with such conditions and safeguards as
shall be required by the inspector. Similarly, unit nursery properties, which
would otherwise fall in class III, may be open to subdivision, for the purpose
of rating such subdivisions in classes I or III, when in the judgment of the
inspector such action is warranted by scanty infestation limited to a portion
of the nursery concerned: Provided, That the subdivision containing the infesta-
tion shall be clearly marked by boundaries of a permanent nature which shall
be approximately 500 feet beyond the point where the infestation occurs.

463802—42 2


10 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.—Mar.

(ii) Upon compliance with paragraphs (b) (3), (6), and (7) of this section,
nursery and ornamental stock may be certified by the inspector for shipment
from such premises under any one of the following conditions: (@) That the
roots shall be treated by means approved by the Bureau of Entomology and
Plant Quarantine in manner and by method satisfactory to the inspector; or
(b) in the case of plants in which the root system is such that a thorough in-
spection may be made, that the soil shall be entirely removed from the stock by
shaking or washing; or (c) that it shall be shown by evidence satisfactory to
the inspector that the plants concerned were produced in a certified greenhouse.

(83) Greenhouses of class III may be certified upon compliance with all the
following conditions with respect to the greenhouses themselves and to all pot-
ting beds, heeling-in areas, hotbeds, coldframes, and similar plots;

(i) Ventilators, doors, and all other openings in greenhouses or coldframes on
premises in class III shall be kept screened in manner satisfactory to the in-
spector during the period of flight of the beetle, namely, south of the northern
boundaries of Maryland and Delaware between June 1 and October 1, inclusive,
or north thereof between June 15 and October 15, inclusive.

(ii) Prior to introduction into nurseries or greenhouses, sand, if contaminated
with vegetable matter, soil, earth, peat, compost, or manure taken from infested
locations or which may have been exposed to infestation, must be sterilized or
fumigated under the direction and supervision of, and in manner and by method
satisfactory to, the inspector. If such sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, or manure
is not to be immediately used in such greenhouses, it must be protected from
possible infestation in manner and by method satisfactory to the inspector.

(iii) All potted plants placed in certified greenhouses of class III and all
potted plants to be certified for interstate movement therefrom (a) shall be
potted in certified soil; (0) Shall, if grown outdoors south of the northern
boundaries of Maryland and Delaware at any time between June 1 and October
1, inclusive, or north thereof at any time between June 15 and October 15,
inclusive, be kept in screened frames while outdoors; (c) shall, if grown outdoors
during any part of the year, be placed in beds in which the soil or other mate-
rial shall have been treated in manner and by method approved by the Bureau
of Entomology and Plant Quarantine to eliminate infestation; and (d) shall
comply with such other safeguards as may be required by the inspector.

(4) Cut flowers may be certified for movement either (i) when they have been
inspected by an inspector and found free from infestation, or (ii) when they
have been grown on a class I establishment or in a certified greenhouse of class
III and are transported under such safeguards as will in the judgment of the
inspector prevent infestation. (See also paragraph (a) (8) of this section.)

(5) Nursery and ornamental stock originating on or moved from unclassified
premises may be certified by the inspector under either one of the following
conditions: (i) That the soil shall be entirely removed from the stock, or (ii)
that the roots shall be treated by means approved by the Bureau of Entomology
and Plant Quarantine in manner and by method satisfactory to the inspector,
or (iii) that it shall be shown by evidence satisfactory to the inspector that the
accompanying soil was obtained at such points and under such conditions that
in his judgment no infestation could exist therein.

(6) Nurserymen, florists, dealers, and others, in order to maintain a class III
status, shall report immediately on forms provided for that purpose all their
sales or shipments of nursery and ornamental stock, sand, if contaminated with
vegetable matter, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure both to points outside
the regulated areas and to other classified nurseries or greenhouses within the
regulated area. Certification may be denied to any person who has omitted to
make the report required by this section, and such denial of certification shail
continue until the information so omitted has been supplied.

(7) Nurserymen, florists, dealers, and others, in order to maintain a class I
status, or to maintain in a class III establishment, a class I subdivision, a cer-
tified plot, or a certified greenhouse, (i) shall restrict their purchases or receipts
of nursery and ornamental stock, sand, if contaminated with vegetable matter
soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure, secured within the regulated area and
intended for use on class I or certified premises, to articles which have been
certified under these regulations as to each such article and the said certificate
shall accompany the article when moved; (ii) shall obtain approval of the
inspector before such articles are received on class I or certified premises or are
taken into certified greenhouses; (iii) shall report immediately in writing all
purchases or receipts of such articles secured from within the regulated area for
1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 11

use on such premises; and (iv) shall also report immediately on forms provided
for that purpose all their sales or shipments of such articles both to points out-
side the regulated areas and to other classified nurseries or greenhouses within
the regulated areas. Certification may be denied to any person who has omitted
to make the report or reports required by this section, and such denial of
certification shall continue until the information so omitted has been supplied.

(8) Nursery and ornamental stock imported from foreign countries and not
reshipped from the port of entry in the unopened original container may be
certified for movement under these regulations when such stock has been
inspected by an inspector and found free from infestation.

(9) Nursery and ornamental stock originating outside the regulated areas and
certified stock originating in classified nurseries or greenhouses may be certified
for reshipment from premises other than those on which they originated, under
provisions satisfactory to the inspector for the safeguarding of such stock from
infestation at the point of reshipment and en route and when found advisable by
the inspector after reinspection and determination of freedom from infestation.

Movement of Soil and Similar Materials

§ 301.48—7. Restrictions on the movement of sand, soil, earth, peat, compost,
and manure.—(a) Control of movement.—Sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and
manure shall not be moved interstate from any point in the regulated areas to or
through any point outside thereof unless a certificate or permit shall have been
issued therefor by the inspector, except as follows:

(1) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of (i) fresh
manure; (ii) sand and clay when free from vegetable matter; (iii) greensand
marl; and (iv) such other sands and clays as have been treated or processed
and subsequently handled in such manner that in the judgment of the inspector
no Japanese beetle could exist therein.

(2) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of manure, peat,
compost, or humus (i) when dehydrated, shredded, ground, pulverized, or com-
pressed, or (ii) when treated with crude petroleum or any other product having
high potency as an insecticide.

(3) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of sand, soil, earth,
peat, compost, and manure imported from foreign countries when reshipped from
the port of entry in the unopened original container and labeled as to each con-
tainer with the country of origin, and when the shipment is further protected
in manner or method satisfactory to the inspector.

(4) No certificate will be required for the interstate movement of sand, soil,
earth, peat, compost, and manure when transported by a common carrier on a
through bill of lading either from an area not under regulation through a regu-
lated area, or from a regulated area through a nonregulated area to another
regulated area.

(b) Conditions of certification.—Certificates for the movement of restricted
sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure may be issued under any one of the
following conditions:

(1) When the articles to be moved have originated in districts included in the
regulated area, but in which neither beetles nor grubs in soil have been found.

(2) When the material consists of mined, dredged, or other similar materials,
and it has been determined by an inspector that no infestation could exist therein.

(3) When the material has been removed, under the supervision of an inspec-
tor, from a depth of more than 12 inches below the surface of the ground and
either (i) is to be moved between October 16 and June 14, inelusive, or (ii) is
loaded and shipped at points where it has been determined by an inspector that
no general infestation of adult beetles exists, or (iii) when the cars and loading
operations are protected by screening under the direction of and in manner and
by method satisfactory to the inspector.

(4) When the material has been fumigated with carbon disulfide or otherwise
treated under the supervision of and in manner and by method satisfactory to
the inspector. Such fumigation or treatment will be required as a condition of
certification of all restricted sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure, except
such as is loaded and shipped in compliance with subparagraphs (1), (2), or (3)
of this paragraph.

Protection of Articles in Transit

§ 301.48-8. Conditions governing the protection of restricted articles from in-
festation while in transit.—Fruits and vegetables, nursery and ornamental stock,
12 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE = [Jan.—Mar.

and sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure, moving interstate from or
through the regulated areas to points outside thereof between June 15 and
October 15, inclusive, shall at all times while they are in the regulated areas be
screened, covered, or otherwise protected in manner or method satisfactory to the
inspector for safeguarding the articles from infestation.

Trucks or other road vehicles transporting restricted articles may be sealed by
the inspector at the point of inspection, and all such seals shall remain intact as
long as the vehicle is en route within the regulated area.

Marking and Certification

§ 301.48-9. Marking and certification a condition of interstate transportation.—
(a) Every box, basket, or other container of restricted articles listed in §§ 301.48-5,
6, and 7 shall be plainly marked with the name and address of the consignor and
the name and address of the consignee, and shall have securely attached to the
outside thereof a valid certificate or permit issued in compliance with these regu-
lations. In the case of lot shipments by freight, one certificate attached to one
of the containers and another certificate attached to the waybill will be suflicient.

(b) In the case of bulk carload shipments by rail, the certificate shall accom-
pany the waybill, conductor’s manifest, memorandum, or bill of lading pertaining
to such shipment, and in addition each car shall have securely attached to the
outside thereof a placard showing the number of the certificate or certificates
accompanying the waybill.

(c) In the case of shipment by road vehicle, the certificates shall accompany
the vehicle.

(d) Certificates shall be surrendered to the consignee upon delivery of the
shipment.

Procedure for Applicants

§ 8301.48-10. General conditions governing inspection and issuance of certifi-
cates and permits.—(a) Persons intending to move interstate any of the articles
the movement of which is restricted in §§ 301.48—5, 6, and 7 shall make applica-
tion for inspection and certification as far as possible in advance of the probable
date of shipment, specifying in the application the article and quantity to be
shipped, method of shipment, name and address of the consignor, and name and
address of the consignee.

(b) Applicants for inspection will be required to assemble the articles at such
points as the inspector shall designate and so to place them that inspection may
readily be made; if not so placed, inspection may be refused. All charges for
storage, cartage, and labor incident to inspection, other than the services of the
inspector, shall be paid by the shipper.

(c) Certificates and permits shall be used in connection with the transportation
of only those articles intended to be covered thereby.

(d) Where the apparent absolute freedom from infestation of any of the articles
enumerated cannot be determined by the inspector, certification will be refused.

(e) Permits may be issued for the interstate movement of restricted articles
by truck or other road vehicle from a regulated area through a nonregulated area
to another regulated area, except for the movement of fruits and vegetables as
specified in paragraph (a) (1) (ii) of § 301.48-5.

Certificates May Be Canceled

§ 301.48-11. Cancellation of certificates Certificates issued under these regula-
tions may be withdrawn or canceled by the inspector and further certification
refused, either for any failure of compliance with the conditions of these regula-
tions or violation of them, or whenever in the judgment of the inspector the
further use of such certificates might result in the dissemination of infestation.

Shipments Inspected Hn Route

§ 301.48-12. Inspection in transit.—Any car, vehicle, basket, box, or other con-
tainer moved interstate or offered to a common carrier for shipment interstate,
which contains or which the inspector has probable cause to believe contains
either infestations, infested articles, or articles the movement of which is re-
stricted by these regulations, shall be subject to inspection by an inspector at
any time or place, and when actually found to involve danger of dissemination


1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 13

of Japanese beetle to uninfested localities, measures to eliminate infestation may
be required as a condition of further transportation or delivery.

Cleaning of Vehicles

§ 301.48-18. Thorough cleaning required of trucks, wagons, cars, boats, and
other vehicles and containers before moving interstate.—Trucks, wagons, cars,
boats, and other vehicles and containers which have been used in transporting
any article covered by these regulations within the regulated areas shall not
thereafter be moved interstate until they have been thoroughly swept and
cleaned by the carrier at a point within the regulated area. Refrigerator cars
originating in the area designated in § 301.48—5 into which fruits or vegetables
are to be loaded for interstate movement from any regulated area shall be
thoroughly swept or cleaned or fumigated prior to loading as may be required
by the inspector.

Articles for Hxperimental and Scientific Purposes

§ 301.48-14. Shipments for experimental and scientific purposes.—Articles sub-
ject to restriction in these regulations may be moved interstate for experimental
or scientific purposes, on such conditions and under such safeguards as may be
prescribed by the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine. The container
of articles so moved shall bear, securely attached to the outside thereof, an
identifying tag from the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine showing
compliance with such conditions.

Done at Washington, D. C., this 20th day of March 1942.

Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.

[SEAL] CLAUDE R. WICKARD,
Secretary of Agriculture.

APPENDIX
PENALTIES

The Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912, as amended (7 U. S. C. 161),
provides that no person shall ship or offer for shipment to any common carrier,
nor shall any common carrier receive for transportation or transport, nor shall
any person carry or transport from any quarantined State or Territory or District
of the United States or from any quarantined portion thereof, into or through
any other State or Territory or District, any class of nursery stock or any other
class of plants, fruits, vegetables, roots, bulbs, seeds * * * or any other
article * * * specified in the notice of quarantine * * * in manner or
method or under conditions other than those prescribed by the Secretary of
Agriculture. It also provides that any person who shall violate any of the
provisions of this act, or who shall forge, counterfeit, alter, deface, or destroy any
certificate provided for in this act or in the regulations of the Secretary of
Agriculture shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor and shall, upon conviction
thereof, be punished by a fine not exceeding $500, or by imprisonment not
exceeding 1 year, or both such fine and imprisonment, in the discretion of the
court.

STATK AND FEDERAL INSPECTION-

Certain of the quarantined States have promulgated or are about to promulgate
quarantine regulations restricting intrastate movement supplemental to the
Federal quarantine. These State regulations are enforced in cooperation with
the Federal authorities. Copies of either the Federal or State quarantine orders
may be obtained by addressing the United States Department of Agriculture, 266
Glenwood Avenue, Bloomfield, N. J.

Subsidiary offices are maintained at the following locations:

Connecticut: Agricultural Experiment Station, 123 Huntington Street, New

Haven, Conn.

Delaware: Room 210, New Post Office Building, Dover, Del.
Maryland:

2 Sherwood Avenue, Pikesville, Md.

Washington County Annex Building, Hagerstown, Md.

Room 205, New Post Office Building, Main Street, Salisbury, Md.
14 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE — [Jan.—Mar.

Massachusetts: 144 Woody Street, Waltham, Mass.
New Jersey:
Kotler Building, Main and High Streets, Glassboro, N. J.
P. O. Box 1, Trenton, N. J., or Yardville Road, White Horse, N. J.
New York:
Room 838, 641 Washington Street, New York, N. Y.
Room 200, 2507 James Street, Syracuse, N. Y.
Ohio: 21065 Euclid Avenue, Euclid, Ohio.
Pennsylvania:
Room 303, Post Office Building, Harrisburg, Pa.
6905 Torresdale Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa.
Room 4388-K, New Post Office Building, Pittsburgh, Pa.
Virginia :
Room 217, New Federal Building, Granby Street and Brambleton Avenue,
Norfolk, Va.
17 North Boulevard, Richmond, Va.
West Virginia: 245 West Philadelphia Avenue, Bridgeport, W. Va.
Arrangements may be made for inspection and certification of shipments from
the District of Columbia by calling Republic 4142, branch 2598, inspection house
of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, 224 Twelfth Street SW.,
Washington, D. C.

GENERAL OFFICES OF STATES COOPERATING

Department of Entomology, Agricultural Experiment Station, New Haven,
Conn.

Board of Agriculture, Dover, Del.

State horticulturist, Augusta, Maine.

Department of Entomology, University of Maryland, College Park, Md.

Division of Plant Pest Control, Department of Agriculture, Statehouse, Boston.
Mass.

Deputy commissioner, Department of Agriculture, Durham, N. H.

Bureau of Plant Industry, Department of Agriculture, Trenton, N. J.

Bureau of Plant Industry, Department of Agriculture and Markets, Albany,
N. Y.

Division of Plant Industry, Department of Agriculture, Columbus, Ohio.

Bureau of Plant Industry, Department of Agriculture, Harrisburg, Pa.

Bureau of Entomology, Departnsent of Agriculture, Statehouse, Providence,

I

Entomologist, Department of Agriculture, Montpelier, Vt.

Division of Plant Industry, Department of Agriculture and Immigration,
Richmond, Va.

State entomologist, Department of Agriculture, Charleston, W. Va.

[Copies of the foregoing quarantine were sent +o all common carriers doing business in
or through the quarantined area. ]

AE aes with the Division of the Federal Register March 23, 1942, 11:57 a.m.:7F. R.
2202. ]

NoTIce TO GENERAL Purstic THROUGH NEWSPAPERS

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,
Washington, D. C., March 20, 1942.

Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority con-
ferred on him by the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 19172 as amended (7
U.S. C. 161), has promulgated a revision of the regulations of ti Japanese beet:e
quarantine (Notice of Quarantine No. 48), effective on and after March 24, 1942.
New areas brought within the regulated areas include parts or all of the counties
of Allegany, Carroll, Frederick, Prince Georges, and Washington, Md., parts of
Ontario and Monroe Counties, N. Y., Meadville, Pa., Charlottesville, Danville,
Schoolfield, and Front Royal, Va., Paden City and one district in Tyler County,
W. Va. The area from which the movement of fruits and vegetables by motor-
truck or refrigerator car is regulated (§ 301.48-5) has been extended to include
additional sections in Anne Arundel and Baltimore Counties, Md., and in Berks,
Cumberland, Lehigh, Northampton, and York Counties, Pa. Charlottesville, Va.,
is added as an isolated regulated point to which such fruit and vegetable ship-
ments may move only under certification. Restrictions on eut flowers are now
confined to shipments from the heavily infested area interstate to points outside

ah.


1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 15

the regulated areas. Soil-free rooted cuttings and fresh manure are exempt from
certification. There are other slight modifications. Copies of the revised regula-
tions may be obtained from the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine,
United States Department of Agriculture, Washington.
CLAUDE R. WICKARD,
Secretary of Agriculture.

[The above notice was published in the following newspapers: The Times, Hartford,
Conn., March 31, 1942; the Evening Journal, Wilmington, Del., March 30, 1942; The
Evening Star, Washington, D. C., March 30, 1942; the Press-Herald Portland, Maine,
March 31, 1942; the Baltimore Sun, Baltimore, Md., March 30, 1942; the Post, Boston,
Mass., March 30, 1942; the Union, Manchester, N. H., March 31, 1942; the News, Newark,
N. J., March 30, 1942; the Times, New York, N. Y., March 30, 1942; the Press, Cleveland,
Ohio, March 30, 1942; the Bulletin, Philadelphia, Pa., March 28, 1942; the Bulletin,
Providence, R. I., March 30, 1942; the Free Press, Burlington, Vt., March 31, 1942; the
aoe Richmond, Va., April 7, 1942; the Gazette, Charleston, W. Va.,:March 30,

- -

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO MEXICAN FRUITFLY
QUARANTINE (NO. 64)

TEXAS CITRUS FRUIT HARVEST EXTENDED

[Press notice]

JANUARY 23, 1942.

Under a modification of the Mexican fruitfly Federal quarantine regulations
announced today by the Department of Agriculture, the harvest season for
oranges and grapefruit from the Texas counties of Brooks, Cameron, Hidalgo,
and Willacy has been extended through May 31, for this year, provided condi-
tions of infestation do not necessitate an earlier closing.

The harvest season normally closes, under the regulations, on April 30, except
that the grapefruit harvest in the counties of Dimmit, LaSalle, and Webb ends
with the last day of February. The harvest begins on September 1. The quar-
antine regulations require a fruit-free period between harvests to prevent
fruitfly infestations in the lower Rio Grande Valley. ‘

It is believed that no risk of infestation is involved in this modification, the
Department said, as intensive inspection has resulted in finding no fruitflies
in any stage of development. The longer harvest will, furthermore, provide a
more orderly marketing of this year’s large crop of oranges and grapefruit.

The area under regulation includes the Texas counties of Brooks, Cameron,
Dimmit, Hidalgo, La Salle, Webb, Willacy, and part of Jim Wells County.

Extension of the harvest season, which became effective January 20, under
administrative instructions of the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant
Quarantine, was announced after consultation with the Texas State Department
of Agriculture.

/

BrHIP..Q: 521: Effective January 20, 1942
TITLE 7—AGRICULTURE

CHAPTER III—BurEAU oF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE
Part 301—DoMEsTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES
MEXICAN FRUITFLY REGULATIONS MODIFIED—HARVESTING SEASON EXTENDED

§ 301.64-5d Administrative instructions modifying the restrictions of the
Mexican fruitfly quarantine by extending the harvesting season on oranges and
grapefruit.—Pursuant to the authority conferred upon the Chief of the Bureau
of Entomology and Plant Quarantine by the third proviso of § 301.64, Chapter
Ill, Title 7, Code of Federal Regulations [Notice of Quarantine No. 64], it
having been determined by me that a modification may be safely made without
increasing the risk of spread of the Mexican fruitfly, § 301.645 (a) [para-
graph (a) of regulation 5 supplemental to this quarantine] is hereby modified
effective January 20, 1942, to extend the harvesting season for oranges and
16 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE — [Jan.—Mar.

grapefruit for the Texas counties of Brooks, Cameron, Hidalgo, and Willacy to
the close of May 31 for the year 1942, provided conditions of infestation do not
necessitate an earlier closing date.

The host-free period for oranges and grapefruit, under this modification, will
begin June 1 and continue through August 31, 1942, inclusive, in the above-named
counties.

In the counties of Dimmit, La Salle, and Webb, the grapefruit harvesting
Season closes on February 28, 1942, under the regulations, and the orange
harvesting season closes on April 30 as to these three counties and the portion
of Jim Wells County which is under regulation. No modification is made as to
the harvesting seasons in these counties (7 C. F. R. § 301. 64-9 ; sec. 8, 39 Stat.
1165, 44 Stat. 250; 7 U. S. C. 161).

Done at Washington, D. C., this 17th day of January 1942.

P. N. ANNAND, .
Chief.

[Copies of foregoing instructions were sent to all common carriers doing business in or

through the State of Texas. ]

iis with the Division of the Federal Register January 20, 1942, 2:51 p. m.; 7 F. R.
444. ]

B. E. P. Q. 503, Fourth Revision. Effective January 9, 1942.

ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE
QUARANTINE (NO. 72)

TITLE 7—AGRICULTURE

CHAPTER III—BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE
ParT 301—DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES

WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS MODIFIED—TREATMENTS
AUTHORIZED

Introductory note.—Recent investigational work has shown that it is possible
to destroy all stages of the white-fringed beetles (Pantomorus spp.) in soil,
with either carbon disulphide or methyl bromide applied as a liquid, provided
the temperature of the soil is sufficiently high and the period of exposure is long
enough. The administrative instructions in this circular, specifying the various
authorized methods of treatment of plants in soil, and of potting soil, are
therefore hereby revised by authorizing the above treatment for soil plots, plung-
ing beds, and potting soil (see paragraph (Cc) ).

All treatments apply to the various species of white-fringed beetles.

This circular supersedes all instructions in Circulars B. E. P. Q. 486, 489,
and previous issues of 503.

§ 301.72-5e.2, Administrative instructions—Treaiments authorized.—Pursuant
to the authority conferred upon the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and
Plant Quarantine by paragraph (a) of § 301.72-5, Chapter III, Title 7, Code of
Federal Regulations [Regulation 5 of Notice of ‘Gaarantne No. 72 on account
of the white-fringed beetle], the following methods of treatment are hereby
authorized effective January 9, 1942, when carried out under the supervision of
an authorized inspector of the United States Department of Agriculture.

(a) Plants in pots or in soil balls.

(1) Methyl bromide fumigation at atmospheric pressures.—(i) Fymigation
must be done with methyl bromide at a dosage of 1 pound per 1,000 cubic feet,
including the space occupied by the plants, for a period of 4 hours, the soil
masses and the air in the fumigation chamber to be at a temperature of not
less than 85° F.

(ii) Such fumigation shall apply only to those plants in 3-inch pots or smaller,
or in soil balls not greater than 3 inches in diameter when spherical or thicker
than 3 inches if not spherical, and the plants shall be stacked on racks so that
the gas mixture can have access to all sides of the pots or the soil: balls.

(iii) The fumigation shall be done in a tight chamber with gas-tight doors.

(iv) After the chamber is loaded and closed, the appropriate amount of
methyl bromide shall be volatilized therein, and the air-gas mixture shall be

2 Superseding §§ 301.72—5a and b.
1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 17

circulated by means of a fan or blower throughout the entire 4-hour fumigation
period.

(v) The use of a fumigation chamber, lined with sheet metal throughout and
with a metal-covered door closing against gaskets and held tightly in place by
refrigerator door fasteners, is recommended.

(2) Methyl bromide fumigation under partial vacuum.—(i) Fumigation under
partial vacuum equivalent to at least 24.5 inches of mercury must be done with
a dosage of 4 pounds of methyl bromide per 1,000 cubic feet of chamber space,
including the space occupied by the commodity, with an exposure of 114 hours,
the vacuum to be maintained throughout the entire period.

(ii) The temperature of the soil balis shall be 75° F. or above, and the diam-
eter of the soil balls shall be not greater than 11 inches if spherical, or thicker
than 11 inches if not spherical.

(iii) The fumigant-air mixture shall be circulated in the fumigation chamber
by means of a fan the first 15 minutes of the exposure period to mix the vapor-
ized fumigant thoroughly with the air in the chamber and bring it in contact
with the surface of the soil balis. The soil balls shall be washed with one or
more changes of air at the end of the exposure period.

(iv) A standard vacuum fumigation chamber. which can be closed tight and
will withstand an external pressure of at least one atmosphere is required. A
vacuum pump of sufficient capacity to reduce the pressure within the vacuum
chamber to the equivalent of 3 inches of mercury (a 27-inch vacuum at sea level)
in not more than 20 minutes is necessary.

(3) Methyl bromide solution.—(i) Treatment method.—(Applicable to all
regulated areas.)

(a) The soil balls around the roots of plants must be buried in sand and
plunged in boxes or trays which are watertight and approximately 1 foot deep.

(6) A 2-inch space filled with sand shall be provided between the soil balls.
also above and beneath them.

(c) Such soil balls shali be treated with a solution of methyl bromide and
alcohol at a concentration of 0.3 percent methyl bromide and 0.6 percent dena-
tured ethyl alcohol by volume in water. The solution is to be prepared by first
mixing the methyl bromide and alcohol together and then adding this mixture
to the water and mixing thoroughly.

(d) The aqueous solution of methyl bromide and alcohol shall then be applied
evenly over the surface of the sand around the plants at the rate of 40 gallons
per 100 square feet of surface area by means of a sprinkling can or sprayer.

(ii) Type of material, exposure, and temperature.

(a) In Orleans Parish, including the city of New Orleans, Saint Bernard Parish,
and regulated parts of Jefferson and Plaquemines Parishes, La., the treatment shall
be applied only to plants in soil balls not greater than 7 inches in diameter, nor
greater than 7 inches in thickness when not spherical. After the required dosage
has been applied, the soil balls shall remain embedded in the sand for a period
of 8 hours. The temperature of the soil balls during the treatment shall not be
lower than 65° F.

, (b) In all regulated areas other than Orleans Parish, including the city of New
Orleans, Saint Bernard Parish, and regulated parts of Jefferson and Plaquemines
Parishes, La., the treatment shall be applied to soil balls not greater than 8 inches
in diameter, nor greater than 8 inches in thickness when not spherical. After the
required dosage has been applied, the soil balls shall remain embedded in the
sand for a period of 6 hours. The temperature of the soil balls during the treat-
ment Shall not be lower than 62° F.

(b) Potting soil.

(1) Carbon disulphide fumigation.—(i) Potting soil shall be treated in a con-
tainer with carbon disulphide at a dosage of 2 pounds per cubic yard of soil for
a period of 48 hours.

(ii) The grade of carbon disulphide shall be comparable to U. S. P. grade having
a specific gravity of 1.25 at 68° F.

(iii) The container shall be tight, preferably lined with sheet metal, and shall
have a tight cover or be covered with a tarpaulin immediately after the fumigant
is applied. The container shall not be more than 36 inches deep.

(iv) The soil shall be friable, and wet soil shall not be treated by this method.
The fumigant shall be applied to the soil in holes 3 inches deep, the dosage to
be evenly divided among holes 1 foot apart over the surface of the soil, and the
fumigant shall be covered with soil as soon as it is applied.

(v) The temperature of the soil shall not be lower than 40° F. during the entire
time of treatment.
18 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE — [Jan.—Mar,

(vi) The condition of the soil and the apparatus used and the method of appli-
cation of the fumigant must meet with the approval of an authorized inspector of
the United States Department of Agriculture.

(2) Methyl bromide fumigation.—(i) Potting soil must be treated in a container
with methyl bromide in a dosage of 40 cubic centimeters of methyl bromide per
cubic yard of soil for a period of 48 hours.

(ii) The sides, bottom, and seams of the container shall be tight, preferably
lined with sheet metal, and shall have a tight cover or be covered with a tarpaulin
immediately after the fumigant is applied.

(iii) The temperature of the soil shall not be lower than 40° F. during the entire
time of treatment.

(iv) The condition of the soil and the apparatus used and the method of appli-
eation of the fumigant must meet the approval of an authorized inspector of the
United States Department of Agriculture.

(3) Heat treatment.—(i) Live steam, under pressure of 80 pounds or more per
square inch, shall be applied through a grid of perforated pipes at the bottom of
the sterilizing box or truck body containing the soil, for a period of 45 minutes
or until all parts of the load reach a temperature of 200° F.

(ii) The grids shall be constructed of 1-inch pipes, perforated with holes
vs inch in diameter on the upper side and connecting at one end to a manifold into
which the steam is introduced.

(iii) The layer of soil in the sterilizing box shall not be more than 2 feet, 6 inches
deep.

(4) Methyl bromide and carbon disulphide—(See instructions in para-
graph (c).) ;

(c) Soil plots, plunging beds, and potting soil.

(1) Methyl bromide.——(i) Inject the liquid methyl bromide into the soil at a
depth of 6 inches by means of a hollow needle or other suitable injector at the
rate of 4.7 milliliters per square foot or 7 milliliters per 114 square feet of soil
surface.

(ii) After treatment has been applied to the plot the soil should be covered
with 10- or 15-pound building paper, lapped 4 inches and weighted down so that it
will not be blown off.

(iii) The soil must be at a temperature not lower than 45° F. at a depth of
6 inches when the treatment is applied. At temperatures from 45° to 62° inclusive
the soil must be kept covered for a period of 6 days to insure complete mortality
of all eggs, larvae, pupae, and adults of the insect which may be present in the soil
under treatment. At temperatures above 62° the soil must be kept so covered for
a period of not less than 4 days.

(2) Carbon disulphide—(i) The insecticide shall be applied at the rate of
38 milliliters per square foot of soil surface, the liquid to be poured into holes
at least 6 inches deep and 1 inch in diameter at the top, and covered immediately
with earth.

(ii) After application the plot should be covered with 10- to 15-pound building
paper which shall remain in position for at least 4 days in order to insure complete
mortality of any eggs, larvae, pupae, or adults of white-fringed beetles that may be
present.

(iii) The treatment shall not be applied to soil which is below 80° F. in
temperature at a depth of 6 inches. ‘

(d) Disclaimer.—There has been opportunity to test these treatments on only
relatively few varieties of plants and in authorizing the movement of potted
plants, nursery stock, or soil treated according to the requirements stated above,
it is understood that no liability shall attach either to the United States
Department of Agriculture or to any of its employees in the event of injury to
either plants or operators.

(e) Caution.—(1) Methyl bromide.—(i) Methyl bromide is a gas at ordinary
temperatures. It is colorless and practically odorless in concentrations used for
fumigation of plants or potting soil. It is a poison and the operators should
use gas masks approved by the United States Bureau of Mines for use with
methyl bromide, when exposed to the gas in concentrations used in fumigation,
or while preparing the solution. The plants in the fumigation chamber should
be well aerated by blowing air through them, and the room adequately ventilated
before it is entered. After fumigating the potting soil by methyl bromide the
cover should be removed and the soil allowed to become aerated.

(ii) The method for application of methyl bromide described in paragraph
(c) provides a closed system in which the operator is not exposed to a dangerous
concentration of the gas provided there is no leakage in any exposed portion of
1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 19

the equipment. Extreme care should be exercised to keep all joints of such
apparatus tight and replace any defective parts to prevent accident. The
operator should avoid getting any liquid methyl bromide on his clothing or his
body at any time.

(2) Carbon disulphide.

(i) The vapor of carbon disulphide is inflammable and explosive. At a
temperature of 297° F. it may take fire spontaneously and in the presence of
certain metals, particularly copper, it may ignite at considerably lower tempera-
tures. It must be kept away from fire, and from hot objects such as electric
light bulbs, unprotected brush-type motors, steam pipes, ete. Lighted cigars,
cigarettes, or pipes must never be brought near carbon disulphide.

(ii) Carbon disulphide is a blood poison, but poisoning by this chemical is
rare. Exposure to the vapor may cause giddiness and headache. When these
symptoms develop, the individual should get into the open air.

(7 C. F. R., § 301.72-5; sec. 8, 39 Stat. 1165, 44 Stat. 250; 7 U. S. C. 161)

Done at Washington, D. C., this 6th day of January 1942.

P. N. ANNAND,
Chief.

[Filed with the Division of the Federal Register January 13, 1942, 11:18 a. m.;
"FR. 239.)

MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS
WAKELAND TO HEAD DIVISION OF GRASSHOPPER CONTROL

[Press notice]
FEBRUARY 4, 1942.

The Department of Agriculture today announced creation of the Division of
Grasshopper Control within the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine
to supervise cooperative programs with the States in control of grasshoppers,
Mormon crickets, and chinch bugs. Leader of the new division is Dr. Claude
Wakeland, said Dr. P. N. Annand, Chief of the Bureau.

While programs of control for chinch bugs, Mormon crickets, and grasshoppers
have been in operation for a number of years, this is the first time that the work
has been unified under one division. Headquarters for this division will remain
in Denver, Colo., where they have been since 1940. Doctor Wakeland, who has
had field direction of the cooperative programs of grasshopper and Mormon
cricket control since 1939, was born August 2, 1888, at LaJara, Colo. He at-
tended public school in Denver, graduated from Colorado State College with a
B. S. degree in 1914, received an M. S. from the same institution in 1924, and
in 1934 received a Ph. D. from Ohio State University.

He started active work in entomology with the Colorado Agricultural Experi-
ment Station. In 1920 he was appointed extension entomologist for the Uni-
versity of Idaho, and 1928 was made head of the Department of Entomology at
that University.

In 1938 he was appointed to the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine
ag project leader on Mormon cricket control with headquarters in Salt Lake
City, and the following year was made field director of the combined grasshopper
and Mormon cricket control programs.

B. E. P. Q. 519, Supplement No. 1.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF CUBA

MOopDIFICATION OF RESTRICTIONS AFFECTING BROOMCORN

FEBRUARY 23, 1942.

The Cuban Ministry of Agriculture, in Resolution No. 7, dated January 5, 1942,
authorized for a period of 1 year from that date, the importation into Cuba of
broomeorn (Holcus) plants and parts thereof, raw materials used in the manu-
facture of brooms, when accompanied by a phytosanitary certificate, issued by
a competent official in the country of origin and legalized by a Cuban consul,
stating that the product has been carefully selected and that it is free from
Pyrausta nubilalis (European corn borer) and other insects. Importers will be
required to vacuum fumigate their importations with hydrocyanic acid gas,
20 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE — [Jan.—Mar.

under the supervision of the Plant Quarantine Service, within 10 days after
unloading.

Importations are exempt from these requirements when they comply with
those of Article 7 of Decree No. 2745 (see page 5 of B. E. P. Q. 519).

P. N. ANNAND,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

B. E. P. Q. 520.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, BURMA

JANUARY 13, 1942.

This summary of the plant-quarantine import restrictions of Burma has been
prepared for the information of exporters of plants and plant products to that
country and plant quarantine officials.

The text, which was prepared by Richard Faxon, District Supervisor, Certifi-
cation for Export, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines, consists of digests of
notifications issued by the Agricultural Branch of the Department of Agriculture
and Forests, Rangoon, Burma, on the following dates: December 16, 1940; Janu-
ary 15, February 28, April 24, and June 2, 1941. It was reviewed by the Secretary
to the Government of Burma.

The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct and com-
plete up to the time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used independently
of, nor as a substitute for, the original texts, and it is not to be interpreted as
legally authoritative.

P. N. ANNAND,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.
B. BE. P. Q. 520
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, BURMA

BASIC LEGISLATION
JANUARY 138, 1942.

[DEPARTMENT OF AtRICULTURE AND FORESTS AGRICULTURAL BRANCH, RANGOON,
BurMA. NOTIFICATION No. 377, DECEMBER 16, 1940; NorTIFICcATION No. 138 (Cor-
RIGENDUM ), JANUARY 15, 1941; NOTIFICATION No. 56, FEBRUARY 28, 1941; NoTIFI-
cation No. 89, Aprin 24, 1941; NoriricaTion No. 141, JUNE 2, 1941.]

In accordance with the provisions of the Insects and Pests Act and in super-
session of all previous orders, the Governor makes the following order for the
purpose of prohibiting, regulating, and restricting the import into Burma of the
articles hereinafter specified.

CoNcISE SUMMARY
CERTIFICATE REQUIREMENTS

A Federal certificate is required with all plants, other than fruits and vegetables
intended for consumption, in a prescribed form (page 6). (By definition, “plant”
does not include seeds) (par. 5).

A certificate from the consignor and a Federal certificate in relation to potato
wart disease are required with shipments of potatoes (par. 6).

A special certificate issued by the Entomologist, Burma, is required with plants
used for the purpose of introducing parasitic insects into Burma (pars. 3 and 4).

Two certificates are required with importations of rubber plants (par. 7),
citrus plants (par. 8), and unmanufactured tobacco (par. 9).

A special certificate is required with importations of sugarcane (par. 10).

IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

Cotton, unginned (par. 15 (1)).

Gram (chick pea, Cicer arietinum) (par. 16).

“Mexican jumping bean” (Sebastiania palmeri) (par. 12 (b)).

Sugarcane from the Fiji Islands, New Guinea, Australia, and the Philippine
Islands (par. 10).

nn i it ic er el li
1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 21

IMPORTATION RESTRICTED

Berseem (Egyptian clover) seeds (pars. 12 (a) and 14).

Citrus plants (par. 8).

Coffee plants, seeds, and beans (par. 18).

Cottonseed (pars. 12 (a) and 15 (2)).

Flaxseed (par. 12 (a)).

Hevea rubber plants and seeds (par. 11).

Potatoes (par. 6).

Rubber plants (par. 7).

Sugarcane from countries other than the Fiji Islands, New Guinea, Australia,
and the Philippine Islands (par, 10).

IMPORTATION UNRESTRICTED

Fruits and vegetables intended for consumption.
Roasted or ground coffee (par. 13).

GENERAL REGULATIONS
NOTIFICATION NO. 377

1. Definitions —(i) “Official certificate’ means a certificate granted by the
proper officer or authority in the country of origin. (In the United States the
U. S. Department of Agriculture has been designated by the Burmese authorities
as the proper authority to issue such certificates. )

(ii) “Plant” means a living plant or part thereof, but does not include seeds.

(iii) All provisions referring to plants or seeds shall apply also to all packing
material used in packing or wrapping such plants or seeds.

RESTRICTIONS ON MEANS OF TRANSPORTATION

2. No plant shall be imported into Burma by letter or parcel post, except sugar-
cane for planting intended to be grown under the personal supervision of the
Deputy Director of Agriculture,. East Central Circle, Pyinmana. (See also
par 10.)

3. No plants shall be imported into Burma by air, except those used for the
purpose of introducing living insects accompanied by a special certificate from
the Entomologist, Burma, stating that the plants are imported for such purpose,
and sugarcane for the Deputy Director of Agriculture, East Central Circle,
Pyinmana, if the conditions of paragraph 10 are satisfied.

FUMIGATION REQUIRED

4. No plants, other than fruits and vegetables intended for consumption, pota-
toes, and unmanufactured tobacco, either raw or cured, shall be imported into
Burma by sea, except after fumigation with hydrocyanic acid gas at the port
of Rangoon, except that plants which are used for the purpose of introducing
insect parasites may be imported without fumigation when accompanied by the
required special certificate from the Entomologist, Burma. (Another proviso
relates to rubber plants grown in Sumatra or in the Federated Malay States.)

CERTIFICATE REQUIRED

5. No plants, other than unmanufactured tobacco imported from India, fruits
and vegetables intended for consumption, and potatoes, shall be imported into
Burma by sea unless accompanied by an official certificate that they are free
from injurious insects and diseases. The certificate shall be in the form prescribed,
or in a form as near thereto as may be and supplying all the information called
for in the prescribed form. (See p. 6.)

SPECIFIC RESTRICTIONS
POTATOES

6. Potatoes shall not be imported into Burma by sea or by air, except from
India. unless they are accompanied by—
22 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE — [Jan—Mar.

(a) A certificate from the consignor stating fully in what country, and in
what district of such country, the potatoes were grown and guaranteeing that
wart disease was not known to exist on the farms where the potatoes were
grown; and

(b) An official certificate that no case of wart disease of potatoes has been
known during the 12 months preceding the date of the certificate, within 5 miles
of the place where the potatoes were grown.

RU2BER PLANTS, INCLUDING HEVEA

7. Rubber plants imported into Burma by sea must be accompanied by two
certificates, the form prescribed in paragraph 5 and an official certificate affirming
that the estate from which the plants originated, or that the individual plants,
are free from Fomes lignosus, Sphaerostilbe repens, Dothidella ulei (Melanopsam-
mopsis ulet) (Fusicladium macrosporium), and Oidium heveae.

11.° Hevea rubber plants and seeds shall not be imported into Burma from Amer-
ica or the West Indies except by the Director of Agriculture, Burma.

CITRUS PLANTS AND CUTTINGS

8. No lemon, lime, orange, grapefruit, or other citrus plants, or cuttings thereof,
shall be imported into Burma unless, in addition to the certificate prescribed in
paragraph 5, they are accompanied by an official certificate affirming that they
are free from the Mal Secco caused by Deuterophomu tracheiphila, or that the
disease does not exist in the country in which they were grown.

UNMANUFACTURED TOBACCO

9. Unmanufactured tobacco, either raw or cured, shall not be imported into
Burma by sea unless, in addition to the certificate prescribed in paragraph 5, it is
accompanied by an Official certificate affirming that Ephestia elutella does not
occur in the country of origin.

SUGARCANE

10. Importation of sugarcane into Burma by sea from the Fiji Islands, New
Guinea, Australia, or the Philippine Islands is prohibited absolutely. From other
countries sugarcane may be imported into Burma by sea or by air, only by the
Deputy Director of Agriculture, East Central Circle, Pyinmana, to be grown by
him in quarantine for 1 year, when accompanied by an official certificate stating
that the sugarcare has been examined and found free from cane borers, seale in-
sects, whi‘e flies, root disease (any form), pineapple disease, Ceratostomella para-
dora or Thielaviopsis paradoxa, sereh dwarf disease, leaf scald, and cane gummo-
sis, that it was obtained from a crop which was free from mosaic and streak
diseases, and that the Fiji disease of sugarcane does not occur in the country
of export. .

SEEDS OF FLAX, BERSEEM, AND COTTON

12. (a) Seeds of flax, berseem (Egyptian clover), and cotton shall not be im-
ported into Burma by air, or by letter or parcel post otherwise than by sea.

14. Flaxseed and berseem seed may be imported by sea only under a license
issued by the Director of Agriculture, Burma.

15. (2) Cottonseed may be imported by sea for experimental purposes only by
the Deputy Director of Agriculture, Myingyan Circle, Meiktila, in quantities not
exceeding one hundredweight (112 pounds) in any one consignment, through the
port of Rangoon only, to be fumigated upon arrival with carbon bisulfide.

COFFEE

13. Coffee plants, seeds, and beans shall not be imported into Burma except for
experimental planting purposes by the Director of Agriculture, Burma, or the
Principal Agricultural Officer, Federated Shan States. This prohibition does not
apply to roasted and ground coffee.

°'The numbered paragraphs do not follow in sequence, because an effort has been made
to assemble the paragraphs on “Specific Restrictions’’ in one place, to be followed by the
paragraphs on. ‘‘Prohibitions.”’
1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 23

PROHIBITIONS
MEXICAN JUMPING BEANS

12. (b) The importation of “Mexican jumping beans” (Sebastiania palmeri of
the family Euphorbiaceae) into Burma is prohibited absolutely.

UNGIN NED COTTON
15. (1) Unginned cotton shall not be imported by sea or by air.
GRAM

16. The importation of gram (chick pea, Cicer arietinum) into Burma is pro-
hibited absolutely.
PRESCRIBED FORM OF CERTIFICATE

This is to certify that the plant(s), living plant(s), or plant products, a repre-
sentative sample of the plant(s), living plant(s), or plant products (strike out
the words not applicable) included in the consignment, of which particulars are
given below, were/was thoroughly examined on the_-_---------__----_-____ by

(name) (country of origin)
and found to be healthy, no evidence of the presence of any injurious insect,
pest, or disease [destructive to agricultural or horticultural crops or to trees or
bushes having been found in/on them and that the consignment (including the
packing) covered by this certificate has/has not been treated in the following
SNES R27) go | ies 5 a a
or M1] immediately subsequent
Inspected

Not inspected

to inspection. in the field by a duly authorized inspector on

Number and description of packages____-___________.

Pei TNATKS

Description of plants or plant products or parts thereof_______________________.
eR aRee WMS PECVD AC ee Ee re te ee eed

INC RINT SI SD fa 8 oe ye tee Be, tsbeey ts

PEEEPI OMEE ESS Gl CONSIOMCE foe set el

Name on vesselor particulars of, ropte.:...9220.. hte,

aU ERNE MQ B80 aR ig ee he ee

UNE PNR OL MADE cd on A te

SAMI FCCTLIIVPALGCS) OtiaeNCd nee ot ot et ei

(Give here details of any special certificate or certificates issued in respect of
imports specifically scheduled. )

(According to information received from the Secretary to the Government of
Burma, the standard export certificate, Form EQ-375, will be acceptable on con-
dition that it contains all the information called for in the above form. A state-
ment should be made under “Qualifying Notations” that the certification includes
packing material. In addition, the names and addresses of the shipper and con-
signee should be given in the body of the certificate, along with the date of
Shipment and port or place of entry. In case the certification is in relation to
fumigation, a description of the treatment should be given under “Qualifying
Notations.” )

B. E. P. Q. 522.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF ECUADOR

FEBRUARY 12, 1942.

This digest of the plant-quarantine import restrictions of the Republic of
Ecuador has been prepared for the information of exporters of domestic plants
and plant products to that country, and for plant quarantine officials.
24 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE © [Jan.—Mar.

The circular was prepared by Richard Faxon, District Supervisor, Certification
for Export, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines, from a translation of an Ex-
ecutive Decree of February 15, 1940, and Regulatory Decrees relating to animals
and plants issued November 17, 1925, and January 25, 1926, and reviewed by the
Director General of Agriculture and Animal Industry of Ecuador.

The information in this circular is believed to be correct and sufficiently com-
plete for its purpose up to the time of preparation, but it is not to be interpreted
as legally authoritative.

P. N. ANNAND,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

BASIc LEGISLATION

An Executive Decree of February 15, 1940, established general plant and animal
health regulations, and provided for the establishment of a phytosanitary service
charged with the inspection of plants. This service administers regulations issued
November 17, 1925 (effective January 1, 1926), and January 25, 1926, in relation to
importations of plants and plant products.

CONCISE SUMMARY
IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

Cottonseed, cotton bolls, or raw cotton from countries infested with the cotton
boll weevil (Anthonomus grandis Boh.).

Plants and plant products for planting or propagation in Ecuador from infected
regions.

IMPORTATION RESTRICTED

Hay or straw, live plants, seeds, cuttings, sprouts, buds, grafts, etc., must be
accompanied by a phytosanitary certificate.

Parcel-post shipments of seeds, cuttings, etc., must be certified to be in healthy
condition by the shipper.

Consular visa is required with official phytosanitary certificates and will be
supplied free of charge.

GENERAL REGULATIONS

[Decrees of November 17, 1925, and January 26, 1926]

ARTICLE 1. Relates to animal quarantines.

ArT. 2. The importation is prohibited of hay and straw, live plants, seeds, cut-
tings, sprouts, buds, grafts, etc., which come from disease-infected places. Said
plants and parts thereof, even though they may be shipped in small quantities by
mail, must be accompanied by a certificate issued by an Official Entomologist, or
by the phytosanitary authorities of the country of origin, in which it is stated that
the plants or parts thereof are not infested with any insect or infected by any
fungus disease and that they have been properly disinfected. (See also Revision
of January 25, 1926, regarding parcel-post shipments. )

This certificate must be certified by the Ecuadoran consul in the country of
shipment.

In the particular case of cottonseed, cotton bolls, and raw cotton, the certificate
visaed by the consul must state under oath or formal declaration, that the bolls
or seeds come from a country in which the cotton boll weevil (Anthonomus
grandis Boh.) does not exist.

ArT. 3. The consuls are required to keep close watch of all shipments covered
by these regulations, and to report to the Ministry of Agriculture concerning the
occurrence and disappearance of insect pests and plant diseases in the country
in which they reside, in order to safeguard the interest of Ecuador from pests
which might be imported with restricted material.

ArT. 4. Consular authorities, Customs inspectors, the Smuggling Patrol, and
Postmasters are entrusted with the fulfillment of these regulations, |

ArT. 5. Customs inspectors and postmasters are required to notify the Depart-
ment of Agriculture of all importations of plants, seeds, etc., passing through their
offices, and to send a copy of the certificate accompanying such shipments handled
by them with each notification.
1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 25

REVISION AGREED UPON JANUARY 25, 1926
PARCEL-POST SHIPMENTS

ARTICLE 1. All shipments of seeds, cuttings, shoots, buds, grafts, bulbs, etc., except
cottonseed, cotton bolls, and raw cotton, coming from foreign countries in small
quantities by mail are exempt from the official certification requirement. How-
ever, the foreign shipper of such products must send with each shipment a cer-
tificate in which he testifies as to the healthy condition of the material.

Art. 2. Postmasters are required to send copies of such certificates to the Depart-
ment of Agriculture.

Art. 3. If such certified plant material is found in bad condition, diseased, or
infested with insects by the addressee, he shall notify the Department of Agricul-
ture immediately. In case further examination by Department inspectors con-
firms his report, the result of the inspection will be published in the Official Bulle-
tin of the Department.

ART. 4. In the event that parcel-post packages containing seeds, plants, etc.,
arrive without health certificates of any kind, the postal authorities must advise
the Department of Agriculture, or the nearest plant inspector, by telegraph, giving
necessary details of the shipment and hold same for disposition by the plant-
inspection authorities.

Art. 5. Consular visa required by previous decrees in connection with officia
certificates will be supplied free of charge.

PENALTIES IMPOSED FOR VIOLATIONS OF THE PLANT QUARANTINE
ACT

According to reports received by the Bureau during the period January 1 fo
March 31, 1942. penalties have recently been imnosed by the proper authorities
for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act, as follows

QUARANTINES AFFECTING MEXICAN PRODUCTS

In the case of the United States versus the persons listed below, for attempting
to smuggle in contraband plant material the penalties indicated were imposed by
the United States customs officials at the following ports:















Name Port Contrahand Penalty
IPBOrOeACTINAT . 2 25s) Wek Sok Ue Brownsville, Tex_____- SIAVOCHU OSES ae ee $1
enasAGevessuaviOS==-2 +. =.= =-=|-26<- COs. 2m APs ikehenimoyae ss >) see 1
Miasnettscopar-.2--------%- 1-2-2 done 2 ee [rrr rie eA Be LT 1
JOSCvAMeO MG MILeIneZ-.. 2... 5=...|2---= a Oe et eee tL POTATO CS ieee? oe = Se ee Oh 1
Troe toll eee ees tee ee ee AO! 222. oe os = DID ORALOCS = ae ee ae ee 1
WastEimininnaneel. 222 + = es be ‘Del Wis: Ns Mee ke PEOEAN OCS oie. 8 2 oe eS ee 1
ORD RIONHiO; mete eee Me fe LOR Sale ee ee Anke. ASOT ANT OOS eae oe ee oe hd 2 he 1
Imocente WVitlanvieva. ...-.---...-.2-|----- COse ee = oe es ! ORAM OAS omen be a Ry Oe 8 ee 1
WiisiGastorena..6 7) 2-2 BG Ont soe ee ee Ha OCAd OSes Oe 1
ID ONACIAMOVATANZA. 222s ee} ‘Eagle Basse exces = POTATICLS ES Mier Se pas ee 1
irate OMACOM Lis ee ek SR foe ee aes OISVIAINAS | Sees ese 1
Tibet MeMITeS. ~" 2282 920 ee eee (Oe nie erewne esc iN OLA PES ees eo en 1
rz VvialGgnmagdo> =2- 520.22 te QO re eee. DATA OCS eee es ee 1
PR SSSIOHlemersOnie se. ssn ot ee, SCOP ee ee PWMONATID CG) 55s ses Se ce SL ee 1
PEGA Gr OMIC2 ss Wadaleo, Mexe-.-.- = - = PAV ORAM OS Reis = 2 he ted if
Romana Zamora de Eealomae tw sees Goes + 2 iS 1 orange, and 4 ounces tree seed__ 1
ering @amocno. 22 5 eee oe ens GO meaat ao a Ue feingraesen Bees to ee ee i
RpUAnIn Gr carga ea ee A dome == =. se 1 cutting (ornamental vine) ____- 1
Maree aVETINOZ.~ 92 Po ee GL ee acne LF Mie Se FRED See, Saws es ee 1
[Peer eee ee oe Ree Go = tA eee NATOPANA OSES ey eee ee a 1
TRASH OLEES epee Et en Mua ee fr eet t OVI CHM OS So tae ea eh ee 1
Girmenodnicvies 2.224 oe ee 1s sae owe A PAT er ee Pe eee 1
paVIGISGOslatMas 2 es fle ee Ci ee tac eee MOLAICCSae eo Me 1
EPROM OGG: 85 Ss AN Ose eee. Jd 19 nodes sugarcane, 3 sapotes, 4 1
avocados, 101 coffee berries, 1
pound tree seed, and 1 pound
7 : tree seed in pulp.
BemienoMiarinineat, 2. 2 Ba ee Gok mete eae 8 nodes sugarcane and 1 orange _. 1
Barn bipriande%.s 3 Bo els dies Pe Aer Eye VOCAC OSes et ere | 1
PPE peeieie CECI ee ee a Gao pi a ety NC OISCOC aus eee Pt 1
Ua arch, ee Oe ee Oe Mel Gi sie se ee, Eee ae 1
Goncepeion Salding...8 2.25 s |e, dou = ERG ead & RAM OCAMO ters eee ek Ste 1
RST ARL GHA Tee te See 6 etn 88 Bs | ee Cp Soa Ste oo: TAQRATICD ueeee eG 1
Doreseo. Weartinez.-- > ae LO ee Re Sra OPAC Osean ee) 8 1
Ia pOlite SUares. 25-22 [aa gs dgjsoaeey, say ae ee a Ce et 1
26 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE — [Jan.—Mar.

EE









Name Port Contraband Penalty
Juana Galvan de Garza_____-------- Hidaleo, Plex. 222) 2 avocados... 2. 4 eee $1
Wierta Garew Montini. t _) 4h op 2 le ee eet 1 avocado and 1 mango____-_----- 1
Beneto: Roedrigtiovei:2). s2 Be met ess dowiitons: nyt leyocaiio.._2lbsd 1. tt oe 1
Juang Maldonado... - 5... <2 4=52]-t Moarearito Ramires..-—-- .- 5. -- es tees ee er os 2 SVOCHOOS. S01 eee 1
Mrs. Hi W. Holimon’ 2) "20 474. 28 OL Omes ERE ds Bat I mango). 22 iia Oe eer 1
Francisco Rodriguez_-___------------]----- do: »:tileod_«c}) 4eavocados jis: 28 sate a 1
Alberta To pet « o3- oe es s552 Sl ro Tae eee 2 plants =. ee 1
Maria Ortiz de Maldonada__--_-_-_--_-_]----- Gijset sae An eee 1! SVObRO0S 22 eee eee 1
Wiavia VPemaii 8 6 355.0 8 eo a altg e Got eee ee 1’ plint__--"__.._ -G3 Eee 1
Domingo Garcia..c::)!hhsros fed [el ® Cozrt $32. Fetes 3 avocados.s8i eres 33s: SE 1
Angustine, Rocha......<+~-.5.£8-.-2: Laredo, eke -- 8 = 2-25 14 oranges. _______ SIT 1
Geo> We RUNG. none eae ae WO. eeee oe ee 10 oranges and 8 tangerines_-_-__. . 2
AnGres’Gonzalezt!)s 2). 30s Lilt a ts dot! mE. 3 10 plants=223. 1). =e eee 1
Cecilia Sanchez de Silva_-_-__--------|----- GOT tse 532. Fhe gees 10 oranges!! se2u:: 8 See 1
HearMAacion. HigUerOd = ee a ee ae Col. =. ec eaeeuee 12 sweet limes_.°--. 1" aes “i
Armando. Chapa) 2he Tiare ee aE Goi f-— ae see 1 avocados = ..21i2he eee ae 1
Jesus’ Monhtajario4 4 21 CG OLA RE eee fee 2mameys::..- 24RD res 1




ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY
AND PLANT QUARANTINE

P. N. ANNAND, Chief.

Avery S. Hoyt, Associate Chief.

S. A. RoHWER, Assistant Chief in Charge of Regulatory Work.

F.C. BrsHoprP, Assistant Chief in Charge of Research Work.

W. L. PopHam, Assistant Chief in Charge of Control Operations.

F. H. SpencsEr, Assistant Chief in Charge of Business Administration.

J. C. Hotron, Ayent, Cooperative Field Relations.

Roxra P. Curri£, Hditor.

J. A. Hystop, in Charge, Division of Insect Pest Survey and Information.

J. I. HAMPLETON, in Charge, Division of Bee Culture Investigations.

D. L. VAN DINE, in Charge, Division of Fruit Insect Investigations.

FP. C. CRAIGHEAD, in Charge, Division of Forest Insect Investigations.

W. H. Waite, in Charge, Division of Truck Crop and Garden Insect Investigations.

©. M. PACKARD, in Charge, Division of Cereal and Forage Insect Investigations.

W. HARNED, in Charge, Division of Cotton Insect Investigations.

. C. CusHine, in Charge, Division of Insects Affecting Man and Animals.

A. HAWKINS, in Charge. Division of Control Investigations.

C. RoarK, in Charge, Division of Insecticide Investigations.

F. W. MUESEBECK, in Charge, Division of Insect Identification.

P. CLAUSEN, in Charge, Division of Foreign Parasite Introduction.

B. FRACKER, in Charge, Division of Plant Disease Control.

M. Gappis, in Charge, Division of Domestic Plant Quarantines.

. R. SASscer, in Charge, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines.

I. Burerss, in Field Charge, Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail Moth Control

(headquarters, Greenfield, Mass.).

. G. Brewer, in Field Charge, Japanese Beetle and Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail

Moth Quarantines, and Dutch Elm Disease Eradication (headquarters, Bloom-

field, N. J.)

R. E. McDonarp, in Field Charge, Pink Bollworm and Thurberia Weevil Quar-
antines (headquarters, San Antonio, Tez.).

P. A. Howare, in Field Charge, Mexican Fruitfly Quarantine (headquarters,
Harlingen, Tez.).

CLAUDE WAKELAND, in Field Charge. Grasshopper Control (headquarters, Denver,
Colo.).

A. C. BAKER, in Field Charge, Fruiifly Investigations (headquarters, Mexico City,
Mexico).

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LIBRARY
STATE PLANT BOARD

8, R. A.—B. E. P. Q. No. 151 Issued September 1942

United States Department of Agriculture

BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

APRIL-JUNE 1942

CONTENTS

Page
Snr ine Ano OLner oficial-announcements~ +2) 228. 22 te eon lee ek 24
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (No. 48)__---_-_-_-___-----_---_--------- 29

Japanese beetle administrative instructions modified (B. E. P. Q. 499, supplement No. 1,
CHUTL By LSP USA LO AT ey tc SSIS a a RS a he a A i aR 29

Japanese beetle administrative instructions modified (B. E. P. Q. 499, supplement No. 4,
fies tale VASOIa) eeysees eset peepee ees a eS od She sce chee eos ear ree yet TE 2 8 31
Japanese beetle administrative instructions modified (B. E. P. Q. 499, spe INo:5)2-= 32
Announcement relating to nursery stock, plant, and seed quarantine (No. 3 Ti Ret eae eer bs Bk te 33

Additional rae oe for plants imported for propagation purposes (B. ‘Qs 525,
minenaing: e | QUC.cA 2078 mevised)).11)_ Este tee ets Sey t all ge oe ee eee eit i 33
Announcements relating to white-fringed beetle quarantine: GN: 72). 422-26 s2sce 84. onto eae 35
White-fringed beetle quarantine regulations revised (press notice) .__________--_____-__--___- 35
White-fringed beetle quarantine (revision of quarantine and regulations effective May 9, 1942) 35
INoniceto general public'through mewspapers:_._ 2-2 -- 2 42
IBTTALE DONS COL DOSUIMAS LETS see sees nba = Fen eee recat A ke See ee es 42

White-fringed beetle administrative instructions modified; treatment authorized (B. E. P. Q.
Hs mut revision supplement, NO; 1). ford teed 1 Riel. | ey eee oe ee 42
White-fringed beetle administrative instructions modified (B. E, P. Q. 485, ninth revision)__ 43
PrANE PH TICDIEREILOINS cee ee ee yee eee he NE eal ON beter bo oe scence 44
Pace Elawikins retires: (DLeSs/mOLiCe) 2 east. Kanes aielgem 8 oe on Bocce ke ccce neue 44
Walter E. Dove named USDA division chief (press notice) __.__.___--________-.--.--____--- 44

S. B. Fracker named coordinator of insect and disease research; is succeeded by J. F. Martin
(press meee eee See ys ae Se eee ee heat epee 1s ee AEE CTL Te ee EI 45
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Peru (P. Q. O. A. 310, supplement No. 5) _- 45
ie import restrictions, Republic of Colombia (B. E. P. Q. 477, supplement R
a ee ee eee oe eR ee mee oe ee MLO De So ee 4
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine PA CTAB IR Sas Sa Ce A PER 46
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine______________________-_-_-___-_----- 48

QUARANTINE AND OTHER OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE
(NO. 48)

B. E. P. Q. 499, Supplement No. 1, Fifth Revision Effective April 23, 1942
TITLE 7—AGRICULTURE
CuapTerR III—Bureau or ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE
Part 301—DomEstTICc QUARANTINE NOTICES

JAPANESE BEETLE ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS MODIFIED

INTRODUCTORY NOTE

The fumigation of packaged plants to. free them from infestation by Japanese
beetle has heretofore been authorized for treatment by fumigation with methyl
bromide at 67° and 63° F. schedules. Further investigation has shown that
boxed or wrapped plants can be fumigated successfully with methyl bromide for
this insect at all seven of the dosage and temperature schedules authorized for
the treatment of balled and burlapped nursery stock. These instructions are
accordingly revised to provide authorization for the use of any of these schedules
for packaged plants.

§ 301.48-b. Administrative instructions to inspectors on the treatment of nursery
eee fruits, vegetables, and soil, for the Japanese beetle. Treatment authorized.

ursuant to the authority conferred upon the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology

29
YAARALI
IAAOM THAI STATE

30 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

and Plant Quarantine by § 301.48-6, Chapter III, Title 7, Code of Federal
Regulations {regulation 6 of the rules and regulations supplemental to Notice of
Quarantine No. 48], subsection (1) (5) of § 301.48—b! [on page 13 of the mimeo-
graphed edition of circular B. E. P. Q. 499, issued June 9, 1939] is hereby further
modified effective April 23, 1942, to read as follows:

(5) Methyl bromide fumigation

Equipment.—An approved fumigation chamber equipped with vaporizing, air-
circulating, and ventilating systems must be provided.

Application.—After the chamber is loaded, the methyl bromide must be vapor-
ized within it. The air within the chamber must be kept in circulation during
the period of fumigation. At the completion of the treatment, the chamber must
be well ventilated before it is entered and the plants removed. The ventilating
system should also be in continuous operation during the entire period of removal
of the fumigated articles.

(i) Fumigation of plants, with or without soil

Temperatures, periods of treatment, and dosages.—The temperature of the soil
(with bare root stock, the root spaces) and of the air for each type of treatment
must remain throughout the entire period of treatment at the minimum specified
in the following table, or higher:









Dosage Dosage
Period (methyl Period (methyl
Temperature at least of treat- bromide Temperature at least of treat- | bromide
ment per 1,000 ment per 1,000
cubic feet) cubic feet)
Hours Pounds Hours Pounds
Be. 73° Fit 07. sae 24% Tg ieisie Birtesiee serie 3% 2144
2. 67° bse oe 24% 2 GPSS Aes ae Se ee 4 2%
ARTS a eee eS eS 214 21% 100 TE an ee ee ee 4% 21%
AP GOS Bee Soe 3 24%





The foenee shall be for each 1,000 cubic feet including the space occupied by
the load.

Preparation of plants —The treatment is to be applied to plants with bare roots
or in 14-inch pots or smaller, or in soil balls not larger than 14 inches in diameter
nor thicker than 14 inches when not spherical. The soil should not be puddled
or saturated and must be in a condition which in the judgment of the inspector is
suitable for fumigation. The plants should be stacked on racks or separated so
that the gas can have access to both top and bottom surfaces of pots or soil balls.
While not essential that the balls be completely separated from each other they
should not be jammed tightly together.

Packaged plants.—Boxed or wrapped plants in packages not more than 14 inches
in diameter may be fumigated at any one of the above seven temperatures, per-
iods of treatment, and schedules. In order that the fumigant may have access
to the roots and soil masses about the roots, the wrapping shall not be tightly
closed.

Varieties of plants—The list of plants, including greenhouse, perennial, and
nursery-stock types treated experimentally, is subject to continual expansion
and, moreover, is too great to include in these instructions.

The schedule for the fumigation of strawberry plants as specified in subsection
(1) (5) (ii) of § 301.48b [page 14 of the mimeographed edition of circular B. E. P.
Q. 499] remains the same as heretofore. (7 C. F. R. § 301.48; sec 8, 39 Stat. 1165,
44 Stat. 250; 7 U. S. C. 161.)

This supplement supersedes Supplement No. 1, revised, dated August 6, 1941.

Done at Washington, D. C., this 21st day of April 1942.

P. N. ANNAND,

Chief.

1 This section was originally issued as § 301.48a.
1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS a

B. E. P. Q. 499 Effective May 7, 1942
Supplement No. 4, First Revision

TITLE 7—AGRICULTURE
Cuaprer IJJ—Bureav or ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE
Part 301—DomeEstTic QUARANTINE NOTICES
JAPANESE BEETLE ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS MODIFIED

Pursuant to the authority conferred upon the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology
and Plant Quarantine by §301.48-6, Chapter III, Title 7, Code of Federal Regu-
lations [regulation 6 of the rules and regulations supplemental to Notice of Qua-
rantine No. 48 on account of the Japanese beetle], subsections (i) (4), (k) (1),
and (m) (2) of § 301.48b [see pages 6, 8, and 15, respectively, of the mimeographed
edition of circular B. E. P. Q. 499, issued June 9, 1939], are hereby modified,
effective May 7, 1942, to read as follows:

§ 301.48b Administrative instructions to inspectors on the treatment of nursery
products, fruits, vegetables, and soil, for the Japanese beetle

(i) POTTING SOIL
(4) Lead arsenate treatment

Season.—The treatment must be applied before August 1.

Condition and type of soil—The soil must be friable. Wet soil must never be
treated. The treatment is recommended only for soils that are slightly acid or
neutral in reaction. Any type of soil may be treated provided it meets these
requirements.

Dosage.—Two pounds to 1 cubie yard.

Application.—The lead arsenate must be thoroughly mixed with the soil.

Period of treatment.—Plants freed from soil and potted in soil treated in the above
manner, by August 1, may be certified for shipment between the following October
1 and June 15, inclusive.

Handling of potted plants—When plants potted in lead-arsenate-treated soil
are plunged in beds or set in frames exposed to possible infestation, the soil of these
beds or frames must previously have been treated with lead arsenate at the rate
of 1,000 pounds per acre.

Treated plants carried after June 16.—When plants potted in soil treated as
prescribed are carried after June 15, they may be again eligible for certification
between October 1 and June 15, inclusive, of the second year if, on August 1 of
the second year, analyses show the soil to contain lead arsenate at the rate of 2
pounds per cubic yard.

(k) SOIL IN AND AROUND COLDFRAMES, PLUNGING BEDS, AND HEELING-IN AREAS

(1) Lead arsenate treatment

Season.—The treatment must be applied before August 1 if the land is to be
used in the fall.

Condition of soil.—The soil must be friable and in good tilth.

Dosage.—Twenty-three pounds to each 1,000 square feet, or 1,000 pounds per
acre. For subsequent re-treatments, the quantity required to restore a concen-
tration of 1,000 pounds per acre, as determined by chemical analyses, must be
applied, except that deiermination by chemical analyses of a concentration of
900 pounds per acre will be acceptable without re-treaiment.

Application.—The lead arsenaie must be thoroughly mixed and incorporated
with the upper 3 in‘ches of soil.

Period of treatment.—Plants must not be placed on or in the soil thus treated
until after October 1.

(M) TREATMENT OF PLANTS BEFORE DIGGING
(2) Lead arsenate treatment

Season.—Treatment must be applied by July 1. Plants may be certified when
the period of treatment is ecmpleted, and until the following June 15.

Condition of soil—The soil must be friable and in good tilth. This treatment
is recommended only for soils that are slightly acid or neutral in reaction.
32 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

Dosage.—Twenty-three pounds to each 1,000 square feet, or 1,000 pounds per
acre. For subsequent re-treatments, the quantity required to restore a concen-
tration of 1,000 pounds per acre, as determined by chemical analyses, must be
applied, except that determination by chemical analyses of a concentration of
900 pounds per acre will be acceptable without re-treatment.

Period of treatment.—Plants in plots treited initially must not be dug until
October 1; those on re-treated plots may be dug on September 20.

Application.—Lead arsenate must be thoroughly mixed and incorporated with
the upper 3 inches of soil. The ridge of soil between the plants in the rows and
the soil about the base of the plants must be removed to a depth of 2 inches and
placed in the space between the rows of plants. Lead arsenate may be applied
with a suitable distributor or broadcast by hand, before or after the hoeing
operation is completed. Then the soil between the rows of plants must be cul-
tivated three times. On the last cultivation, the cultivator is adjusted in such
a manner that the treated soil is thrown toward the rows of plants. At least
3 inches of treated soil must be placed in the rows about the bases of the plants.

Varieties of plants.—The varieties of plants which have been treated successfully
by this method are given in Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine Circular

—418.

Safety zone.—Same as that prescribed in (k).

Marking.—Same as that prescribed in (k).

(7 C. F. R. § 301.48; sec. 8, 39 Stat. 1165, 44 Stat. 250; 7 U. S. C. 161.)

Done at Washington, D. C., this 2d day of May 1942.

P. N. ANNAND,
Chief.

B. E. P. Q. 499, Effective May 18, 1942
Supplement No. 5

TITLE 7—AGRICULTURE
CuartTeR IIJ—Bureavu or ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE
Part 301—DomeEstTIc QUARANTINE NOTICES

JAPANESE BEETLE ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS MODIFIED

INTRODUCTORY NOTE

Experience and further experiments in paradichlorobenzene fumigation for the
treatment of plants after digging to free them from infestation by Japanese beetle
permit modification of treating requirement approved June 9, 1939, without
increasing risk of spread. The instructions authorizing the use of this method are
accordingly revised to reduce the period of treatment from 5 to 3 days.

Pursuant to the authority conferred upon the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology
and Plant Quarantine by § 301.48—6, Chapter III, Title 7, Code of Federal Regu-
lations [regulation 6 of the rules and regulations supplemental to Notice of Quar-
antine No. 48 on account of the Japanese beetle], paragraph (1) (4) of § 301.48b
[see page 11 of the mimeographed edition of circular B. E. P. Q. 499, issued June 9,
1939] is hereby modified effective May 18, 1942, to read as follows:

§ 301.48b Administrative instructions to inspectors on the treatment of nursery
products, fruits, vegetables. and soil, for the Japanese beetle. * *

TEEATMENT OF Sort ABOUT THE Roots OF PLANTS
(l) TREATMENT OF PLANTS AFTER DIGGING * * *

(4) Paradichlorobenzene fumigation

Season.—The treatment must be applied between October 1 and May 1.

Varieties of plants—Many different kinds of plants have been successfully
treated experimentally. The list of plants which have been treated without
injury is subject to such continual expansion that it cannot be appropriately
included in these instructions. Experience has shown that possible plant injury
is associated at least to some extent with the condition and growth of the plants
at time of treatment. It is suggested, therefore, that trial tests be made before
large numbers of plants are treated.
1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 33

Preparation of plants.—Excess soil should be removed and the mass reduced as
much as possible without injuring the roots. The plant ball should be moist, but
not wet. Pots must be removed from potted plants. When burlap on balled
plant is of coarse weave, it may be left on the balls, but when it is closely woven,
it must be removed.

Preparation of plunging soil.—The paradichlorobenzene must be thoroughly
mixed with a light sandy loam, or sand, which is moist but not wet, and free from
lumps, stones, and debris. It must be mixed immediately before using.

Care of plants during treatment.—If it is necessary to water the plants during the
treatment to prevent desiccation, the operation must be limited to a light syring-
ing, under the supervision of an inspector. During the treating period care should
be used to assure that the natural air movement will aid in reasonably rapid dis-
persal of the fumigant that escapes from the soil to prevent it from being held about
the foliage of the treated plants.

Care of plants after treatment.—It is advisable to avoid excessive watering of the
Pa after treatment in order to permit any residual gas to escape from the plant

alls.

(i) Complete Coverage

Temperature.—The temperature of both the treating soil and the soil ball must
not be less than 50° F. during the period of treatment. ‘To prevent injury to the
plants, it should not go above 65°.

Dosage.—Ten pounds per cubic yard of mixing soil (6 ounces per cubic foot)
for soil balls up to 6 inches in diameter at the narrowest dimension. Twenty
pounds per cubic yard of mixing soil (12 ounces per cubic foot) for soil balls from
6 to 8 inches in diameter at the narrowest dimension.

Application.—Spread a layer of the treated plunging soil on a smooth hard
surface, such as a floor or bench, and then place a row of plants, with the balls
spaced at least 1 inch apart, on this soil. Fill the spaces between the plant balls
with treated soil and cover the plant balls to a depth of l inch. Then place about
1 inch of treated soil against the row of plants. ‘This operation is repeated until
all the plants are plunged.

Period of treatment.—The plants must be left undisturbed for a period of 3 days.

(ii) Side Application

Temperature, dosage, period of treatment.—The various combinations of dosage
and exposure which may be used at different temperatures are given in table 1.
It is desirable to maintain the temperature fairly constant. The temperatures
given at the head of the column in table 1 are the minimum temperatures during
the period of treatment.

* ** * * * * *

Application.—Spread a layer of the treated plunging soil on a smooth hard sur-
face, such as a floor or bench, and then place a row of plants, with the balls spaced
at least 1 inch apart, on this soil. Fill the spaces between the plant balls with
treated soil, taking care not to get the treated soil in contact with the stems of the
plants, and cover the upper side of the plant balls with treated soil to within 2
inches of the stems. Then, place about 1 inch of treated soil against the row of
plants. The operation is repeated until all the plants are plunged.

(7 C. F. R. § 301.48; sec. 8, 39 Stat. 1165, 44 Stat. 250; 7 U.S. C. 161.)

Done at Washington, D. C., this 15th day of May 1942.

P. N. ANNAND,

Chief.

ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO NURSERY STOCK, PLANT,
AND SEED QUARANTINE (NO. 37)

B. E. P. Q. 528, amending P. Q. C. A. 278, revised Effective May 11, 1942
TITLE 7—AGRICULTURE

CuaprerR III—Bureavu or ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE
Part 319—ForEIGN PLANT QUARANTINE NOTICES
ADDITIONAL QUANTITY LIMITS FOR PLANTS IMPORTED FOR PROPAGATION PURPOSES

Chapter III, Title 7, Code of Federal Regulations, § 319.37—14a [P. Q. C. A.
278, Revised, July 14, 1931] is hereby amended effective May 11. 1942, by adding
34 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

the following items to the list of representative genera for which quantity limits
have been determined; and effective July 1, 1942, by increasing by 25 percent
the quantity limitations specified in § 319.37—14a both as to the original list and
as to this supplemental list:

§ 319.37-14a Administrative instructions; limitations on special-permit plant
material entered for propagation purposes under § 319.87-14.



Yearly Yearl
Genus limits Genus limits
UE LOM ee ee ere ae plants _ 100) ||| Dxersms., o.oo bulbs__ 1, 000
Acuathseosio! = S22 LS2ee rs IEE -do_. 7260 || ‘DioSpyroes.2 2.2227 2ib: _ JL ee scions__| 1, 000
Anidantherd: x10 Get ge 4 $1 ie porms:: |) ) 1;000 AGIAN Gin =3 a eee eee CSP ee plants__ 250 || Echinacea____-. 2 ae PA eee ei dois 2 250
A@lumia —~ _..-. Ne cee ee a roots. - 200. || pleased ss 2) oes) oo dp. = 100
Aloe vera (medicinal) __________- plants__ 5;000°|!* Brythrina? st sa AN Lee doi. i 100
Aloe:(ornambntal):: estes 2 Be doz 250%}: Earythueniumes!. 42. 4i- sae bulbs__| 10, 000
Amaryilidaceses.2o) = per genus__ 1,000, || Kuehanise. 5. 22. Bao a Sa 0.5255 500
IRFADGESENS 2 ee plants__ 1O0;:|| Wugente =. an eee plants _- 100
Rromitye = SF" 7 Be See do__- 250 17S angveles) ey ok 2 eee bulbs__| 1, 000
erie Ls Ce eae ee dos TOO | eesti ke ee plants__ 100
Amzione 38, 4s: 9a Be te oes 250sisharquharia. «2-2 2 2 ee ee ee dos 250
AVHOUUISt= <8 ec e oo ee divisions__ 250) || pRiG@nM.o- oe eee ee Ons 250
Asitholyzat -& Ut. Se ree Se a bulbs__ 1O00"}) Wicusite 2k Sel) ke doe 250
Apanogeton: 2)... & 4522 32": 3% plants_ 600 || Galtonias. coe! ue toa i bulbs__| 10,000
BeOMG Ae on 2 02>. oon A te eet a dO 2 O04), Gardenia» ¢ 22.473 | fae plants__| 1,000
RPI ee ng ee ne rie cuttings.“| “2,500 || Gelssorhiza_---__- 2.2 = ke bulbs 1, 000
Atacona ) ULERY Fes plants__ 2 260) || @renipa:!:) il Soc. tee 67 0 Oe ORE plants_- 100
Avisted. atiscy lino yeyi {yeu}: ake bulbs_- 13000 :|)) Gravisias s:i¢ ies le: Bees Arka do___- 250
ATundo: (reed) =. Ss ee plants_- 250))\|\.Gullacnine. =e Sao 2d eee dot 100
ASU OCAGG ex. es = ate = Pa doz ay OOO) | CeySO DMN ees eee Sn eee doa 250
Bapiana svi Sey es 2! bulbs_- 1; 000"|| Haemanthus: 221-8 _ 128s bulbs__ 250
Beers of )tosliiy7_ some iow do__s_}0},000+|| "Haworthiais::22! 22. sch 2 es plants__ 250
BOWS) > fee 2 4s poh eer plants_- HQ0 || tipliconias <2. 26. Uo. ee ene dor + 250
Bougainvilleas --~ ye =e dow 2 250),|| Se opsisess 26: eee a eee doe 250
PGCE ease. eee co 250 || Hermodactylus_._._.-..-_--- Lelie roots--| 1,000
fon SSINSEIN! BE cee s::bulbs__| 10,000 |); Hippeastrums_ 222: us izc2_-heat bulbs _| 5,000
romeliaceae_-_-__.--..---. plants & suc_- 250) +) Homeria.-+-2*s2 322 hae do__.-| 1,000
Bromeliads: 2 = » 2 2 eee plants__ 2250.7) ibe s ote ee 2s eee plants _ 100
Brosimum (breadnut)___-____-____. do*s*) 100 ‘WIsmenet 2.032020). O12 2. eS bulbs__| 10,000
Wrowriea.: 2. 4 a ee ee dos LOO" || Extolivion’== 202 34 eS ee ee do____| 5,000
pravifelsia. (ost te ee a do___- ROOM SEXOES: #22 22% oc oS eee plants_-| 1,000
BrvophylUiias eee ee domes 250) acarand ae =< Ya ee do 100
Bulboctodium 53..3$005444.,5- os eormats| NOPOOO. }| igelans. 82 ee ree 100
Biisera=e4 22a en ae ee plants__ 25 0|| MCE A. ona does 100
Cacttis-tee_ 14). Se a eee dome 5, 000 ||’ Koelreuterias’. 2) feet) Sei do___- 100
Calathea________- » att) ae ‘tubers °2 11.1, 000 ||) Lantamast. 22} sree tssi ees hal do____| 1,000
GalliGar pause he Oe ee en het plants__ 100: || evicocrimum._..¢_ = 45 5 bul bss. 500
CORNING es on ee er do_5 250: || Gomrebite "= 920) one ee plants__| 1,000
OalochortusSs: 54. 3.42 Sees = ke | corms:!} ~ 10,.000' || Lonchocanpus2=-- === stems__| 10,000
Calystegiow.:
@Galycanthuse eo et ee dows 100)|| Miatanthentumee ==.) = ee do. 250
Oamipanilian 3 Seite ei tins. do_22 2504} Mammeats. 4.24 si) 22 lego dass 100
Oampanulalt .38 3.44 tee ed ef dO. 1,000; ||eMlonoifera 72) ef eet: ee dos=- 100
@aragniin-- =. ge ee ee doe TOO | Visi Obese =o eee ee eee dos 250
Cardyelltgae = Sena eee eee _tubers__ 250°)! Marica--U 3s Sb) hee Se 250
CassiaiG_ tesid Sal ee Set plants__ 100:|| Meconopsis- 2:2. 22.5--2- 54 22222. dol) here
Gostriiiniis 2. 4} fe hi be ee doz a2 200,)||\\ Michelia.. c=... }.-4 <.285 6 Sage 100
Glethta.. 22s as ee ee eet ag 100.) Mionarda ==. 252 ee ee doz 250
Cyt Sea are ee eee adoes.= 500" || Wronstera’ 2824 2-402 2)" * eae do. 250
Codiseum'—. 32 Jeena wes doa 100.) IMioraea 2. essai es os teu 3s s2 bulbs! 1, 000
Colocagia_.72 Bene 2 Ee Us tubers__ 15,0007)|) Montrichardia=..-.. 25 sta plants_-
©onyolvulis.: 2S ee plants_-_ 250. WNUNOSOUIS sa = en ee ee (Os = 250
WOT YMG seen ees Oe ne eee dom 250%). Meyricarias = 2-52-25. 3S eae doi 100
Corlarittize-¢ e-- Fo he oe dome 2608) (2 Nandinat 2222222) eee dome 250
COTDTIBE See Co a ete se dorms 2500 Neanthe 2.24. -=252--. 49-2 3 A doe 250
CTANW Ge ee _---hullbs*2 5 000s |@Netiak e222 ee dona 250
Crescentin=-.-*.\ 9522.0 oon tees ae plants__ 250UPNelumpbium=-- = --2 2 Ss 8S > eerie 500
CTO yi 3272 te ee bulbs__ 1,000 |} Nepenthes___.----___- . 2.2 2 ee plants__ 500
Crocosma 8“. 28. 4 5 Ee 5 dor oe: 1, 090) |! Netines 2 2 852 S48 21s A hee bulbs_- 5, 000
CRG. 8.2 oo. et ee ee ee plants__ BOOT NGI ose oe ee ee plants _- 100
Cryptocoryne.....--- 4a ae do_s= 500.1 IWomocharis_2-4 34 4 £8 Wf Bo. do=—= 500
Oureuims: 22-6. eee a ee dome 2501" Ontpnalodes. 2-222 2 soe ee dos 250
Cyeadaceas: «22.232 .ce = 2 dove 22.50): WORHIOSIO 2 tages eee ee dgnses 100
Ly CAN re ee se ee ee ee dost 25035||| Oriurosantiliss =o - =. 2 seen rhizomes__ 1, 000
GDSENE ee ie ee ie ae dosase DBO allie achneniiien. tS oo ee plants__| 5,000
DAB OECIE ss 25. ae, ee ee ee BUCH |e etrege eee oe does i, 000
Dannpie aes es Ek ae Os ee do: = 1000).|| “Pheédranasss 2-2 tee foe hla 500
Date. 2. Pease es tae rem CO 250.) Phaeomeris-2.o2.2. 22 Ak SA plantss2 250
IDRVidis: 5 3. ade: eee ys don: 100" ||) Eollodendtron. 225.2023 aoe OO eee 500
Dianthus. 23. Set edo LOOT NY Pinvise 232 ee ee es eS doce 100
Diesatrams, 5 i a pies. ee as: divisions_- 9503 ee lomionige see s2 fa gece Paha dol22 200
Dieffenbachia. sé o.e5 7 a.ceest-= plants_. 1;000 ||, Polygonatum.-........+. apiece 1375 eed do=2.4 250

2 Per genus,
1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 35







Yearly Yearly
Genus limits Genus limits

RO Lemus tree Als Se ys ed ose ey plants_- 2501)|| Stenoniessone 252 he sewes Lele bulbs_- 5, 000
I RE a Se og don ft ZA a DCL OMI ie nero oe ee eek plants__ 100
Tate eee en ae ee ee GOs. 5. ZOO Ft POUNCIU Zar ae tee ee ee és 250
Ay rtisees tend SPE ee ter a dovitz 250i PSUICCUle nt soa sae se (eee EET ee dos 2250
PIAMOMCdigrem es aes bot uot! wed oo dox#es 1 000n) | abepuiae sre Spice. onl eyes _ see doiass 100
ROG OUV DONS: 5 4.2. Pa eee doze= eM Hy ENS pc et A ok Ea st oh By does 250
RUT eC Kaas eee eee PdOue== ZOOM | PULlanGsiqercs= en ere wae ee aoe: 250
amino ile sit Poo oS bulbs_- P0005) Lree forties: : i382 51) ee esos) douse! 250
Sobizolobiuinics- 2) 312.2. eclei plants_- 100 || Tropaeolum-.-___ 4 Faoan. Bets bey. ord Gos242 250
Pelneinelia es fee FF ee dors 100) || PWaceiniume.-— Ser Aa ae ee dorsae 100
OMNI Se eee ag eo 8 do=-=- Z00ni> VelbHemiia= == 22 a weer ae bulbs__| 1, 000
lle eg LS ae ee doit 42 BOOM Wibisa ge Sosige SII Ce hes 7s tisk. plants __ 100
Dilempeetiess. heed peers oo Lda ye a0s=== 250). || WWiATSZeWicZla ses. 2222 creepy sees | dota 100
DPCM OrE 6 2eP Pe ES do... = Zp) | MCDOVPAUGN eS: | Packs. 4 an bulbs__| 1,000

2 Per genus.

(7 C.F. R. § 319.37-14; sec. 7, 37 Stat. 317; 7 U. S.C. 160.)
Done at Washington, D. C., this 6th day of May 1942.
Avery 8. Hoyt,
Acting Chief.

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE
QUARANTINE (NO. 72)
WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE QUARANTINE REGULATIONS REVISED
[Press notice]

May 12, 1942.

The Department of Agriculture said today that the white-fringed beetle quar-
antine and regulations have been revised, effective May 9, 1942. The regulated
areas in the four quarantined States of Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, and Missis-
sippi have been extended to include new sections in which the beetles have been
found since the original quarantine was put into effect more than 3 years ago.
The newly added sections are for the most part adjacent to the old infested areas,
including the vicinities of Florala, Mobile, and Monroeville, Ala., Pensacola,
Fla., New Orleans, La., and Gulfport and Laurel, Miss.

Part of the area at Monroeville—some 84 square miles—has been released

from quarantine, however, as repeated inspections indicate there are no beetles
there now. Because several communities in the vicinity of Hattiesburg, Miss.,
have been found infested, the regulated areas in that State have been extended
to include parts of the counties of Forrest, Covington, and Lamar, and a small
area in Pearl River County not heretofore under regulation. Parts of Dallas and
Escambia Counties, Ala., and of Iberia and Saint Tammany Parishes, La., are
also brought within the regulated area for the first time.
, Among the commodities placed under regulation throughout the year (unless
exempted by administrative instructions) are grass sod, peanut hay, lily bulbs,
and nursery stock including greenhouse-grown annuals and perennials. All re-
strictions are lifted on the movement of sweetpotatoes, peas, and beans.

There is a new regulation as to the cleaning of railway cars, trucks, and other
vehicles, and another permitting the shipping of live specimens of white-fringed
beetles for scientific or experimental purposes as specifically authorized. ;

B. E. P. Q.—Q. 72 Revision of Quarantine and Regulations
Effective May 9, 1942

TITLE 7—AGRICULTURE
CuapTEerR IJ]—Bureav or ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE
Part 301—DomeEstTIic QUARANTINE NOTICES
SUBPART—WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE QUARANTINE

INTRODUCTORY NOTE

To bring the white-fringed beetle quarantine and regulations in line with cur-
rent information this revision is made to extend the regulated areas in Alabama,
Florida, Louisiana, and Mississippi to inelude several small areas in which infesta-
36 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

tions of the beetles have been found since the original quarantine became effective;
to release an area of approximately 84 square miles in the vicinity of Monroeville,
Ala., where repeated inspections fail to show that the beetles are now present;
to add to the articles that are restricted throughout the year, lily bulbs, grass sod,
peanut hay, and nursery stock including greenhouse-grown annuals and perennials;
to lift the restrictions on sweetpotatoes, peas, and beans; and to make other modi-
fications. A regulation (§ 301.72—8) has been included to require the cleaning
of railway cars, trucks, and other vehicles which have been used for transporting
restricted articles within the regulated area, before such vehicles may be moved
interstate to points outside.

The newly added sections are for the most part adjacent to the old infested
areas in the vicinities of Florala, Mobile, and Monroeville, Ala., Pensacola, Fla..
New Orleans, La., Gulfport and Laurel, Miss., and include also Hattiesburg, Miss..
and several communities in the vicinity thereof. Brought within the regulated
areas, in part, for the first time, are the counties of Dallas and Escambia, Ala.,
the parishes of Iberia and Saint Tammany, La., and the Mississippi counties of
Covington, Forrest, and Lamar. A

Under the authority contained in the Insect Pest Act of March 3, 1905, the inter-
state movement of living white-fringed beetles in any stage of development is
prohibited except when so moved under certification for scientific purposes as
authorized in paragraph (b) of § 301.72-9.

To conform with current nomenclature of the white-fringed beetles, the designa-
tion of the genus is changed from Naupactus to Pantomorus and the restrictions
apply only to species of the subgenus Graphognathus.

Arrangements for inspection may be made by addressing the Bureau of Ento-
mology and Plant Quarantine, P. O. Box 989, Gulfport, Miss., or other field offices
listed in the appendix.

DETERMINATION OF THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE

The Secretary of Agriculture, having given the public hearing required by law
and having determined that it was necessary to quarantine the States of Alabama,
Florida, Louisiana, and Mississippi, to prevent the spread of dangerous infesta-
tions of insect pests, commonly referred to as white-fringed beetles, not theretofore
widely prevalent within and throughout the United States, on December 14, 1938,
promulgated Notice of Quarantine 301.72, part 301, chapter III, title 7, Code of
Federal Regulations, and the regulations supplemental thereto §§ 301.72-1 to
301.72—-9 inclusive, Part 301, chapter III, title 7, Code of Federal Regulations
{B. E. P. Q.—Q. 72, effective on and after January 15, 1939]. At the time the
aforesaid hearing was held, the insect pests known as white-fringed beetles were
classified as species of the genus Naupactus and were so referred to at the hearing
when the importance, status, and habits of these insects were fully covered. This
group of insects has since been reclassified as species of the subgenus Graphognathus
of the genus Pantomorus. It is therefore necessary to revise the quarantine to
adopt current nomenclature for such insect pests, as well as to extend the regulated
areas to cover more recently discovered infestations, and to makeother
modifications.

ORDER OF THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE

Pursuant to the authority conferred upon the Secretary of Agriculture by sec-
tion 8 of the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912, as amended (7 U.S. C.
161) and the Insect Pest Act of March 3, 1905 (7 U.S. C. 141, 148), the subpart
entitled ‘‘White-fringed Beetle’ of part 301, chapter III, title 7, Code of Federal
Regulations [B. E. P. Q.—Q. 72] is hereby revised effective May 9, 1942, to read
as follows:

SuBPART—WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE

QUARANTINE

Authority: §§ 301.72 to 301.72-9 (a), inclusive, (except § 201.72-2a) issued under sec. 8, 39 Stat. 1165, 44 Stat.
0;7 U.S. C. 1940 ed. 161. § 301.72-2a issued under sec. 1, 33 Stat. 1269; 7 U. S. C., 1940 ed. 141. § 301.72-9
(b) issued under sec. 3, 33 Stat. 1270; 7 U. 8. C., 1940 ed. 143.

§ 301.72. Notice of Quarantine.—Under the authority conferred by section 8 of
the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912, as amended (7 U. S. C. 161),
the Secretary of Agriculture quarantines the States of Alabama, Florida, Louisi-
ana, and Mississippi to prevent the spread of dangerous infestations of introduced
species of the genus Pantomorus, subgenus Graphognathus, commonly known as
white-fringed beetles, and under authority contained in the aforesaid Plant
Quarantine Act and Insect Pest Act of March 3, 1905 (7 U.S. C. 141, 148), the
1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS or

Secretary of Agriculture prescribes regulations. Hereafter the following articles
(as specifically named in the regulations supplemental hereto, in modifications
thereof, or in administrative instructions as provided in the regulations supple-
mental hereto), which are capable of carrying the aforesaid insect infestations, viz,
(1) nursery stock and other stipulated plants or plant products; (2) soil inde-
pendent of, or in connection with, nursery stock, plants, or other products; or (3)
other articles as stipulated in § 301.72-38; or (4) live white-fringed beetles in any
stage of development, shall not be transported by any person, firm, or corporation
from any quarantined State into or through any other State or Territory or
District of the United States, under conditions other than those prescribed in the
regulations supplemental hereto: Provided, That the restrictions of this quaran-
tine and of the regulations supplemental hereto may be limited to such areas,
designated by the Secretary of Agriculture as regulated areas, in the quarantined
States, as, in his judgment, shall be adequate to prevent the spread of the said
pest or pests. Any such limitation shall be conditioned, however, upon the
affected State or States providing for and enforcing the control of the intrastate
movement of the restricted articles and enforcing such other control and sanitation
measures with respect to such areas or portions thereof as, in the judgment of the
Secretary of Agriculture, shall be deemed adequate to prevent the intrastate
spread therefrom of said insect infestation: And provided further, That whenever,
in any year, the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine shall
find that facts exist as to the pest risk involved in the movement of one or more
of the articles to which the regulations supplemental hereto apply, making it safe
to modify, by making less stringent, the restrictions contained in any such regu-
lations, he shall set forth and publish such finding in administrative instructions,
specifying the manner in which the applicable regulations should be made less
stringent, whereupon such modification shall become effective, for such period
and for such regulated area or portion thereof as shall be specified in said adminis-
trative instructions, and every reasonable effort shall be made to give publicity
to such administrative instructions throughout the affected areas.

REGULATIONS
Meaning of Terms

§ 301.72-1. Definitions ——(a) The pests.—Species of the genus Pantomorus,
subgenus Graphognathus, commonly known as white-fringed beetles, in any stage
of development.

(b) Regulated area.—Any area in 2 quarantined State which is now, or which
may hereafter be, designated as regulated by the Secretary of Agriculture in
accordance with the provisions of § 301.72, as revised.

(c) Restricted articles—Products or articles of any character whatsoever, the
interstate movement of which is restricted by the provisions of the white-fringed
beetle quarantine, and the regulations supplemental thereto.

(d) Nursery stock.—Forest, field, and greenhouse-grown annual or perennial
plants, for planting purposes.

‘(e) Inspector—Duly authorized Federal plant-quarantine inspector.

(f) Certificate—An approved document, issued by an inspector, authorizing the
movement of restricted articles from the regulated areas.

(g) Limited permit.—An approved document, issued by an inspector, to allow
controlled movement of noncertified articles to designated and authorized proc-
essing plants or for other restricted operations.

(h) Administrative instructions.—Documents issued by the Chief of the Bureau
of Entomology and Plant Quarantine relating to the enforcement of the quarantine.

(i) Infested or infestation.—Infested by white-fringed beetles, in any stage of
development. (See (a) above.)

(j) Infested area.—That portion of the regulated area in which infestation
exists, or in the vicinity of which infestation is known to exist under such condi-
tions as to expose the area to infestation by natural spread of beetles, as deter-
mined by an authorized inspector.

Areas Under Regulation

3 301.72-2. Regulated areas.—The following counties, parishes, cities, and
towns, or parts thereof as described. are designated by the Secretary of Agriculture
as regulated areas:

Alabama.—In Conecuh. Monroe, and Wilcox Counties: The W. % T. 5 N.,
W.%T.8N., all of Tps. 9 and 10 N.. R.9 E.S. % and secs. 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, and

477153—42——2
38 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

17, T. 11 N., R.9 E. All of Tps. 5, 6, 7, 8,9, and 8S. 4% T. 10 N., R. 8 E. Sees.
25, 26, 35, and 36, T. 7 N., and secs. 1 and 2, T.6 N., R. 7 E.; in Covington County:
Sees. 30 and 31, T. 2 N., R. 18 E.; secs. 25, 26, 35, and 36, T. 2 N., R. 17 E.; T. 1
N., Rs. 17 and 18 E. and SE. 4 T. 1 N., R. 16 E., and all area south thereof. to
the Alabama-Florida State line; also all of the town of Opp; in Dallas County:
That area included within a boundary beginning on the Southern Railroad where
it crosses Bougechitto Creek; thence southwest along the Southern Railroad to
Caine Creek; thence southeast along Caine Creek to its intersection with Bouge-
chitto Creek; thence northward along Bougechitto Creek to the starting point;
in Escambia County: Secs. 32, 33, and 34, T. 1 N., R. 8 E., including all of the
town of Flomaton; in Geneva County: Secs. 31, 32, and 33, T. 1 N., R. 19 E., and
all area south thereof to the Alabama-Florida State line, including all of sees.
21 and 28, T. 6 N., R. 19 W.; in Mobile County: That area included within a
boundary beginning at a point where the eastern boundary of the city limits of
Mobile, if extended northward, would intersect the northern boundary of S
1% T. 3 S.; thence west to Chickasaw Creek; thence northwestward along Chicka-
saw Creek to Eight-Mile Creek; thence westerly along Eight-Mile Creek to the
western boundary of R. 1 W.; thence south to [slava Creek; thence easterly
along Eslava Creek to the city limits of Mobile; thence following the city limits
east and north to the starting point, including all of Blakeley Island and the city
of Mobile; also that area included within a boundary beginning at a point where
old Highway 90 crosses Fowl River; thence southwestward along old Highway
90 to the junction of old Highway 90 and the Alabama-Mississippi State line;
thence south along the Alabama- Mississippi State line to the southern boundary
of N. % T. 7 S.; thence east to the SE. corner of sec. 9, T. 7S., R. 3 W.; thence
north to the NE. corner of sec. 4, T. 7S., N. 3 W.; thence east to the point where
the south boundary of T. 6 S. intersects Fowl River; thence northwestward
along Fowl River to the starting point.

Florida.—In Escambia County: All that part lying south of the northern
boundary of T. 1 N., including all of the city of Pensacola, and that part of the
county north of the southern boundary of T. 5 N. and east of the western boundary
of R. 31 W.: in Okaloosa County: T. 5 N., R. 22 W., and secs. 1, 2, and 3, T. 5
N., R. 23 W., and all lands north of both areas to the Florida-Alabama State
line; secs. 7, 8, 9. 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, and 21, T. 3 N., R. 23 W., including all of
the town of Crestview; and secs. 13, 14, 23, 24, T. 3 N., R. 24 W.; in Walton
County: T. 5 N., Rs. 20 and 21 W., and sees. 31, 32, and 33, T. 6 N., R. 19 W.,
and all lands north of both areas to the Florida-Alabama State line; also secs. 1
to 24, inclusive, T. 4 N., R. 19 W.

Louisiana.—All of Orleans Parish, including the city of New Orleans, and all
of Saint Bernard Parish. In East Baton Rouge Parish: All of T. 7S., Rs. 1 and 2
E. and 1 W., including all of the city of Baton Rouge; in Iberia Parish: All of
secs. 24, 37, 38, 39, 53, 55, 56, T. 13 S., R. 5 E., and secs. 46, 55. 56, 57, 58, 59
60, T. 13 S., R. 6 E.; in Jefferson Parish: That part lying north of the township
line between Tps. 14 and 15 S.; in Plaquemines Parish: That part lying north of
the township line between Tps. 15 and 16 S.; in Saint Tammany Parish: All of
sees. 38, 39, and 40, T. 7S., R. 11 E., and secs. 40 and 41, T. 8 Si. ee ee

Mississippi.—In Covington County: All of secs. 28, 29, 32, and 33, oT. Neat Bae
14 W.; in Forrest County: All that part of T. 4 N., Rs. 12 and 13 W. lying west of
Leaf River; all that part of the S. 4% T. 5 N., R. 13 W., lying west of Leaf River;
all of secs. 7, 18, 19, and those parts of secs. 6, 8, 17, and 2G, lying south and
west of old Highway 49, T. 5 N., R. 13 W.; the east %3 and secs. 5 and 8 of T.
5 N., R. 14 W.; those parts of secs. 2, 3, 4, and 5, lying south of Beaverdam Creek,
and all of secs. 8, 9, 10, 11, 14, 15, 16, and 17, T. 1S., R. 12 W.; secs. 9, 10, 15,
16, 21, 22, 27, 28, 33, and 34, T.2 N., R. 12 W.; sees. 2, 3, 4, 9, and 10, and those
parts of secs. 11, 14, 15, and 16, lying north of Black Creek, T;, 1 N., He dagemie:
in Harrison and Stone Counties: That area included within a boundary beginning
at the NE. corner sec. 5, T. 4 S., R. 11 W.; thence west to the NW. corner sec.
2, T. 48., R. 12 W.; thence south to the NE. corner sec. 15, T. 6S. B.. 2
thence west to the NW. corner sec. 16, T. 6 S., R. 12 W.; thence south to inter-
section with Wolf River; thence following a general southwesterly direction aiong
Wolf River to Saint Louis Bay; thence following a general southerly direction
along the east shore of Saint Louis Bay to the Mississippi Sound; thence eastward
along the Mississippi Sound to a point where the east line of sec. 31, T. (OBwete
10 W., would intersect with the Mississippi Sound if extended without change in
direction of said Sound; thence north to Bayou Bernard; thence following a
general northwesterly direction along Bayou Bernard to east line of sec. 22, T.
1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 39

7S., R. 11 W., thence north to intersection with Biloxi River; thence northwest-
ward along Biloxi River to the east line of sec. 5, T. 6 S., R. 11 W.; thence north
to starting point, including all properties extended onto or over the waters of
Mississippi Sound; also all of the town of Wiggins; in Hinds County: E. % T.6N.,
R. 3 W., and W. 4% T. 6 N., R. 2 W.; in Jackson County: That area included
within a boundary beginning at a point where the east line of sec. 19, T.75S., R.
5 W., intersects the Escatawpa River; thence west along said river to the Pas-
cagoula River; thence south along the Pascagoula River to the township line
between Tps. 7 and 8 S.; thence east to the SE corner sec. 31, T.758., R. 5 W.;
thence north to the starting point; in Jones County: Secs. 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21,
22. 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31,32, 33, $4, and 35, T.:9-N:, RR. 11 W.;-sees..2,:3, 4, 5,.6,
7, 8, 9, 16, 17, 18, T. 8. N., R. 11 W.; secs. 13, 14, 24, 25, 35, and 36, T. 9 N., R.
12 W.; and those portions of secs. 23 and 26, T. 9 N., R. 12 W., lying east of Tal-
lahoma Creek; secs. 1, 2, 11, 12, 18, and 14, T. 8 N., R. 12 W.; and secs. 25, 26,
27, 34, 35, and 36, T. 6 N., R. 14 W.; in Lamar County: All of the town of Purvis;
all of secs. 35, 36 ,T. 1 N., R. 15 W., sec. 31, T. 1 N., R. 14 W., and secs. 1 and
2, T.15S., R. 15 W.; in Pearl River County: All of secs. 3, 9, 10, 11, 14, 15, 16,
woe th Wo; all or 1.5.5. bio, W., and h.%.7T.558., R. 17 W.

Articles Prohibited Movement

§ 301.72—-2a. Beetles prohibited shipment.—The interstate shipping of living
species of whitefringed beetles in any stage of development, whether moved inde-
pendent of or in connection with any other article, is prohibited, except as provided
in paragraph (b) of § 301.72-9.

Articles Restricted Movement

§ 301.72-3. Restricted articles.—(a) Movement regulated throughout the year.—
Unless exempted by administrative instructions, the interstate movement of the
following articles from any regulated area is regulated throughout the year:

(1) Soil, earth, sand, clay, peat, or muck, whether moved independent of, or in
connection with or attached to nursery stock, plants, products, articles,
or things.

(2) Potatoes.

(3) Nursery stock.

(4) Grass sod.

(5) Lily bulbs.

(6) Peanut hay.

(7) Compost and manure.

(b) Movement regulated part of the year.—Except as provided in § 301.72-4
hereof, and unless exempted by administrative instructions, the interstate move-
ment from any regulated area of the following products is regulated from June 1
to January 31, inclusive, of any 12-month period:

(1) Forest products such as cordwood, stump wood, logs, lumber, timbers,

posts, poles, and cross ties.
| (2) Hay, other than peanut hay; roughage of all kinds, straw, leaves, and leaf-
mold.

(3) Peanuts in shells, and peanut shells.

(4) Seed cotton, cottonseed, baled cotton lint, and linters.

(5) Used implements, machinery, containers, scrap metal, and junk.

(6) Brick, tile, stone, cinders, concrete slabs, and building blocks.

Conditions of Interstate Movement

§ 801.72—4. Conditions governing interstate movement of restricted articles.—(a)
Certification required.—Restricted articles shall not be moved interstate from a
eee area to or through any point outside thereof unless accompanied by a
valid inspection certificate issued by an inspector: Provided, That certification
requirements as they relate to part or all of any regulated area may be waived,
during part or all of the year, by the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and
Plant Quarantine, on his finding and giving notice thereof, in administrative
instructions, that the State concerned has promulgated and enforced adequate
sanitary measures on and about the premises on which restricted articles originate
or are retained, or that adequate volunteer sanitary measures have been applied,
or that other control or natural conditions exist which have eliminated the risk of
contamination by the pests in any stage of development.
40 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

(b) Use of certificate on shipments.—Every container o/ restricted articles moved
interstate from any regulated area shall have securely attached to the outside
thereof a certificate or permit issued in compliance with these regulations, except
that in the case of shipments in bulk, by common carrier, a master permit attached

to the shipping order, manifest, or other shipping papers, will be sufficient. In -

the case of shipments in bulk by road vehicle other than common carrier, a master
permit shall accompany the vehicle. Master permits shall accompany shipments
to destination and be surrendered to consignees on delivery.

(ce) Movement within contiguous areas unrestricted.—No certificates are required
for interstate movement of restricted articles when such movement is wholly
within contiguous regulated areas.

(d) Articles originating outside the regulated areas.—No certificates are required
for the interstate movement of restricted articles originating outside of the
regulated areas and moving through or from a regulated area, when the point of
origin is clearly indicated, when their identity has been maintained, and when
the articles are protected, while in the regulated area, in a manner satisfactory
to the inspector.

Conditions of Certification

§ 301.72—5. Conditions governing the issuance of certificates and permits.—(a)
Approved methods.—Certificates authorizing the interstate movement of restricted
articles from the regulated areas may be issued upon determination by the in-
spector that the articles are (1) apparently free from infestation; or (2) have
been treated, fumigated, sterilized, or processed under approved methods; or (3)
were grown, produced, manufactured, stored, or handled in such a manner that,
in the judgment of the inspector, no infestation would be transmitted thereby:
Provided, That certificates authorizing the interstate movement of soil, earth,
sand, clay, peat, muck, compost, or manure originating im an infested area may
be issued only when such materials have been treated or handled under methods
or conditions approved by the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant
Quarantine.

(b) Limited permits for manufacturing or processing purposes.—Limited permits
may be issued for the movement of noncertified restricted articles to such manu-
facturing or processing plants, mills, gins, or establishments as may be authorized
and designated by the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine,
for manufacture; processing, treatment, or other disposition. As a condition of
such authorization and designation, persons or firms so designated shall agree in
writing to maintain such sanitary safeguards against the establishment and
spread of infestation and to comply with such restrictions as to their handling
or subsequent movement of restricted products as may be required by the
inspector.

(ec) Dealer-carrier permit.—As a condition of issuance of certificates or permits
for the interstate movement of restricted articles, persons or firms engaged in
purchasing, assembling, exchanging, processing, or carrying such restricted
articles originating or stored in regulated areas, may be required to execute a
signed agreement stipulating that the permittee will carry out any and all con-
ditions, treatments, precautions, and sanitary measures which may be deemed
necessary.

Procedure for Applicants

§ 301.72-6. Assembly of restricted articles for inspection.—Persons intending to
move restricted articles interstate from regulated areas shall make application for
certification as far as possible in advance of the probable date of shipment.
Applications must show the nature and quantity of articles to be moved, together
with their exact location, and if practicable, the contemplated date of shipment.
Applicants for inspection may be required to assemble or indicate the articles to
be shipped so that they may be readily examined by the inspector.

The United States Department of Agriculture will not be responsible for any
cost incident to inspection or treatment other than the services of the inspector.

Certificates and Permits May Be Canceled

§ 301.72-7. Cancelation of certificates or permits.—Certificates or permits issued
under these regulations may be withdrawn or canceled and further certification
refused whenever, in the judgment of the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and
Plant Quarantine, the further use of such certificates or permits might result in the
dissemination of infestation.

aa i
1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 4]

Cleaning of Vehicles

§ 301.72-8. Thorough cleaning required of freight cars, trucks, and other vehicles
before moving tnterstate.—Freight cars, trucks, and other vehicles which have been
used in transporting within the regulated areas any restricted articles, shall not
thereafter be moved interstate from the regulated areas until they have been
thoroughly cleaned by the carrier or owner at a point within the regulated area.

Shipments for Experimental or Scientific Purposes

§ 301.72-9. (a) Articles for experimental or scientific purposes.—Articles sub-
ject to restrictions may be moved interstate for experimental or scientific pur-
poses, on such conditions as may be prescribed by the Chief of the Bureau of
Entomology and Plant Quarantine. The container of articles so moved shall
bear an identifying tag from the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

(b) Beetles for experimental or scientific purposes.—Live white-fringed beetles,
in any stage of development, may be moved interstate for scientific purposes only
under conditions prescribed by the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and
Plant Quarantine. The container of white-fringed beetles so moved shall bear
an identifying tag issued by the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

Done at the city of Washington this 8th day of May 1942.

Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture,

(SEAL) CLAUDE R. WIcKARD,
Secretary of Agriculture.

APPENDIX
PENALTIES

The Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912, as amended (7 U.S. C. 161),
provides that no person shall ship or offer for shipment to any common carrier,
nor shall any common carrier receive for transportation or transport, nor shall
any person carry or transport, from any quarantined State or Territory or District
of the United States, or from any quarantined portion thereof, into or through
any other State or Territory or District, any class of nursery stock or any other
class of plants, fruits, vegetables, roots, bulbs, seeds, or other plant products, or
any class of stone or quarry products, or any other article of any character what-
‘soever, capable of carrying any dangerous plant disease or insect infestation,
specified in the notice of quarantine * * * in manner or method or under
conditions other than those prescribed by the Secretary of Agriculture. It also
provides that any person who shall violate any of the provisions of this act, or
who shall forge, counterfeit, alter, deface, or destroy any certificate provided
for in this act or in the regulations of the Secretary of Agriculture shall be deemed
guilty of a misdemeanor and shall, upon conviction thereof, be punished by a
fine not exceeding $500, or by imprisonment not exceeding 1 year, or both such
fine and imprisonment, in the discretion of the court.

STATE AND FEDERAL INSPECTION

Certain of the quarantined States have promulgated quarantine regulations
restricting intrastate movement supplemental to the Federal quarantine. These
State regulations are enforced in cooperation with the Federal authorities. Copies
of either the Federal or State quarantine orders may be obtained at the office
of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, Room 6, Gates-Cook Build-
ing (Telephone 1591), P.O. Box $89, Gulfport, Miss., or through a White-fringed
Beetle Inspector at one of the following subsidiary offices:

Alabama:
Florala: Hughes Building (Telephone 64), P. O. Box 187.
en? wi Federal Building (Telephone Belmont 3781, Ext. 214), P. O.
Ox :
Monroeville: City Hall (Telephone 90), P. O. Box 169.
Florida:
Pensacola: 18 Federal Building (Telephone 5652), P. O. Box 343.
Louisiana:
New Orleans: 4425 Bienville Ave. (Telephone Audubon 3860), P. O. Box
7086, Sta. G.
Mississippi:
Hattiesburg: 110 Evans Street (Telephone 2686), P. O. Box 988.
Laurel: Civic Center, P. O. Box 546.
42 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

GENFRAL OFFICES OF STATES COOPERATING

Alabama: Chief, Division of Plant Industry, Montgomery.

Florida: Assistant Plant Commissioner, State Plant Board, Gainesville.
Louisiana: State Entomologist, Baton Rouge.

Mississippi: Entomologist, State Plant Board, State College.

NoricE To GENERAL PusBiic THROUGH NEWSPAPERS

UniTEp States DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,
Washington, D. C., May 8, 1942.

Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority con-
ferred by the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912, as amended (7 U. 8. C.
161), has promulgated a revision, effective on and after May 6, 1942, of the
white-fringed beetle quarantine (Notice of Quarantine No. 72) and regulations
supplemental thereto. The purposes of the revision are to extend the regulated
areas to include additional infested sections in Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, and
Mississippi; to release an area in the vicinity of Monroeville, Ala.; to add to the
list of commodities restricted throughout the year lily bulbs, grass sod, peanut
hay, and nursery stock including greenhouse-grown annuals and perennials; to
lift restrictions on sweetpotatoes, peas, and beans; and to require cleaning of
freight cars and other vehicles.

Copies of the quarantine as revised may be obtained from the Bureau of Ento-
mology and Plant Quarantine, Department of Agriculture, Washington.

CLAUDE R. WICKARD,
Secretary.

[The above notice was published in the following newspapers: The Birmingham News, Birmingham,
Ala., May 21, 1942; the Times Picayune, New Orleans, La., May 21, 1942; the News, Jackson, Miss., May
22, 1942; the Florida Times Union, Jacksonville, Fla., May 21, 1942.]

INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS

Post OrricE DEPARTMENT,
Tuirp ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, June 30, 1942.
POSTMASTER:

My Dear Sir: Attention is invited to the inclosed revision of Quarantine Order
No. 72 of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, United States Depart-
ment of Agriculture, on account of the white-fringed beetle, modifying slightly the
area under quarantine and making some changes in the list of restricted articles
and other revisions as indicated. Postmasters in the quarantined areas will please
be governed accordingly. See paragraph 1, section 595, Postal Laws and Regu-
eae ;

ery tru ours
: sl Ramsey S. Buack,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.

B. E. P. Q. 503, Fourth Revision, Effective May 6, 1942
Supplement No. 1
TITLE 7—AGRICULTURE

CuHapTeR IIJ—Bureavu or ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE
Part 301—DomesTIc QUARANTINE NOTICES

WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS MODIFIED;
TREATMENT AUTHORIZED

INTRODUCTORY NOTE

Further investigational work has shown that it is possible to kill all stages of the
white-fringed beetle by methyl bromide fumigation under. partial vacuum applied
at a modified dosage or at a modified temperature under the dosage heretofore
1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 43

authorized. This work has also shown the practicability of applying these treat-
ments to soil masses up to 16 inches in diameter, instead of the maximum 11-inch
diameter required heretofore. The instructions in B. E. P. Q. 503, fourth revision,
which became effective January 9, 1942, are modified accordingly.

The description as to the size requirements of the soil masses has been somewhat
reworded for the purpose of clarification.

§ 301.72—5 (c) § Administrative instructions—Treatments authorized.— Pursuant
to the authority conferred upon the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant
Quarantine by paragraph (a) of § 301.72-5, Chapter III, Title 7, Code of Federal
Regulations [Regulation 5 of Notice of Quarantine No. 72 on account of the white-
fringed beetle], subparagraph (2) of paragraph (a) of § 301.72—5 (c) {page 2 of the
mimeographed edition of circular B. E. P. Q. 503, fourth revision] is hereby
modified effective May 6, 1942, to read as follows:

(2) Methyl bromide fumigation under partial vacuum.—(i) Fumigation under
partial vacuum equivalent to at least 24.5 inches of mercury may be done with a
dosage of either 4 pounds methyl bromide per 1,000 cubic feet, including the space
occupied by the commodity, with an exposure of 1% hours at a temperature of
70° F.; or a dosage of 3 pounds of methyl bromide per 1,000 cubic feet for a period
of 1% hours at a temperature of 75° F. In either case the vacuum shall be main-
tained during the entire period.

(ii) The soil masses shall have a diameter of not more than 16 inches if spherical,
or if not spherical the masses or pots shall be of such size that no point within
them will be more than 8 inches from the nearest point on the surface.

(iii) The soil shall not be wet but shall be in condition satisfactory to the
inspector when treatment is applied.

(iv) The fumigant-air mixture shall be circulated in the fumigation chamber
by means of a fan the first 15 minutes of the exposure period to mix the vaporized
fumigant thoroughly with the air in the chamber and bring it Mm contact with the
surface of the soil balls. The soil balls shall be washed with one or more changes
of air at the end of the exposure period.

(v) A standard vacuum fumigation chamber which can be closed tight and will
withstand an external pressure of at least one atmosphere is required. A vacuum
pump of sufficient capacity to reduce the pressure within the vacuum chamber to
the equivalent of 3 inches of mercury (a 27-inch vacuum at sea level) in not more
than 20 minutes is necessary.

(7 C. F. R. § 301.72-5; sec. 8, 39 Stat. 1165, 44 Stat. 250; 7 U. S. C. 161)

Done at Washington, D. C., this 29th day of April 1942.

P. N. ANNAND,

Chief.

B. E. P. Q. 485, Ninth Revision Effective May 11, 1942 through July 31, 1942
TITLE 7—AGRICULTURE

Cuarter III—Bureauv or ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE
Parr 301—Domestic QUARANTINE NOTICES
WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS MODIFIED

§ 301.72a Administrative instructions; removal of certification requirements for
specified articles.—(a) Pursuant to the authority conferred upon the Chiet of the
Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine by the second proviso of § 301.72,
Chapter III, Title 7, Code of Federal Regulations [Notice of Quarantine No. 72,
on account of the white-fringed beetle], all certification requirements for the inter-
state movement from the regulated areas are hereby waived effective May 11,
maa oe. July 31, 1942, for the following articles and materials enumerated
n 12-3:

(1) Soil, sand, and gravel, as indicated below: (i) Soil, when taken from a depth
of at least 2 feet below the existing surface, and when entirely free from any
surface soil to a depth of 2 feet.

(ii) Sand and gravel when washed, processed, or otherwise treated to the satis-
faction of the inspector.

3 Superseding $§ 301.72-5a and b.
44 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

(2) Articles other than soil: When free from soil and when sanitation practices
as prescribed by the inspector are maintained to his satisfaction, the following
articles are exempt from certification during the period specified above:

(i) Nursery stock, including all annual and perennial plants.

Gi) Hay, including peanut hay, roughage of all kinds, straw. leaves, and leaf-
mold.

(iii) Seed cotton, baled cotton lint and linters, and cottonseed when free from
gin trash.

(iv) Lily bulbs, except when freshly harvested and uncured.

(v) Forest products such as cordwood, stump wood, logs, lumber, timbers,
posts, poles, and cross ties.

(vi) Peanuts in shells and peanut shells.

(vii) Used implements, machinery, and containers.

(viii) Brick, tile, stone, cinders, concrete slabs, and building blocks.

(ix) Potatoes, except locally grown potatoes.

It has been determined that the methods under which such articles and materials
are produced and handled, the maintenance of sanitation practices, or the applica-
tion of control measures and natural conditions, have so decreased the intensity of
infestation in the regulated areas as to eliminate risk of spread of the white-
fringed beetle, thereby justifying the removal of certification requirements as set
forth above.

(b) Except as specified above, the following articles and materials shall remain
under the restrictions of § 301.72—3 throughout the year:

(1) All soil, earth, sand, clay, peat, muck, compost, and manure, whether
moved independent of, or in connection with, or attached to nursery stock, plants,
products, articles, or things.

(2) Grass sod.

(3) Lily bulbs when freshly harvested and uncured.

(4) Scrap metal and junk.

(5) Gin trash.

(6) Locally grown potatoes are under regulation during May, June, and July.

This revision supersedes Circular B. E. P. Q. 485, eighth revision, which became
effective May 1, 1941.

(7 C. F. R., § 301.72; sec. 8, 39 Stat. 1165, 44 Stat. 250; 7 U.S. C. 161).

Done at Washington this Ist day of May 1942.

P. N. ANNAND, Chief.

MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS

L. A. HAWKINS RETIRES
[Press notice]

June 3, 1942.

The United States Department of Agriculture announced today the retirement
of Dr. L. A. Hawkins, veteran of 35 years’ service in the Department. He has
been in charge of the Division of Control Investigations in the Bureau of Ento-
mology and Plant Quarantine since this Division was started. Born in Lamont,
Iowa, he attended public school at Rowley, Iowa, and received his undergraduate
work at Morningside College in that State and his doctor’s degree from Johns
Hopkins University.

&. P. Clausen, head of the Division of Foreign Insect Parasite Introduction,
will take charge of the work of the Division of Control Investigations in addition
to his parasite work until more permanent arrangements are made for the
administration of this activity. Mr. Clausen was born in Randall, Iowa, attended
the Oklahoma A. & M. College and the University of California. During the
first World War he served as 2d Lieutenant, Coast Artillery.

WALTER E. DOVE NAMED USDA DIVISION CHiEF
{Press notice]

JUNE 10, 1942

The United States Department of Agriculture announced today the appoint-
ment of Dr. Walter E. Dove as chief of the Division of Insects Affecting Man
and Animals (Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine), in the absence of
ary C. Cushing, who has joined the military services as Major, Sanitary Corps,

. 5S. Army.

Dr. Dove was born in Hamburg, Miss., and attended public school in Roxie,
Miss. He graduated from the Mississippi State College with B. S. degree, and
received his Ph. D. from Johns Hopkins University. During the last war Dr.
1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 45

Dove was a 2d Lieutenant in the Air Service, serving 13 months in France. In
1931 a paper on the transmission of endemic typhus through the bites of tropical
rat lice, prepared by Dr. Dove and Dr. Bedford Shelmire, was awarded the silver
medal of the American Medical Association. His previous service with the
Bureau embraces a series of responsible assignments in the field of insect research
and control, including the direction of an educational program for the control of
screwworms in livestock in the southern United States and the direction of
grasshopper contro] work in most of the States west of the Mississippi River.
He has recently been in charge of research work on mosquitoes and other insect
pests of man and livestock in the Southeast.

S. B. FRACKER NAMED COORDINATOR OF INSECT AND DISEASE RESEARCH; I£
SUCCEEDED BY J. F. MARTIN

{Press notice]
May 8, 1942.

The United States Department of Agriculture today announced the appoint-
ment of Dr. Stanley B. Fracker as Research Coordinator on the staff of Dr.
EK. C. Auchter, Agricultural Research Administrator. Doctor Fracker will
coordinate research dealing with plant diseases and insects affecting plants and
animals. In addition to his attention to research in these fields, Doctor Fracker
will also review plant pest control programs and will be responsible for Depart-
ment cooperation with industry in insect and plant disease research.

At the same time the Department announced the appointment of Dr. James
Francis Martin to suceed Doctor Fracker as Chief of the Division of Plant Disease
Control, of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.This Division is
responsible for the control and prevention of spread of white pine blister rust
and black stem rust of cereals.

Doctor Fracker was born at Ashton, Iowa. He received the Ph.D. degree
from the University of Illinois in 1915 and has been active in entomological
research and control work for the past 27 years.

In 1915 Doctor Fracker was appointed Assistant State Entomologist and later
was promoted to the position of State Entomologist of Wisconsin. In June,
1927, he entered the Department of Agriculture as Senior Plant Quarantine
Administrator in the Federal Horticultural Board, in charge of Domestic Plant
Quarantines; from 1928 to 1942, he served in the same capacity in the Bureau
of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

Doctor Martin was born in Amherst, Mass., November 17, 1888. He attended
the public schools in Amherst and graduated from the Massachusetts Agricultural
College (now Massachusetts State College) in 1912, and in 1914 received the
degree of M_ S., and in 1915 the degree of Ph.D. from the same institution.

Doctor Martin started his work with the United States Department of Agri-
culture in 1918 working in the parasite laboratory of the gypsy moth investigations.
In 1915 while working as a deputy nursery inspector of the Massachusetts State
Department of Agriculture he discovered the general distribution of white pine
blister rust on native pines in Massachusetts. Doctor Martin has been associated
with white pine blister rust work in the Department of Agriculture since its incep-
tion, and was placed in charge of this work in 1934.

P. Q. C. A. 310, Supplement No. 5
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF PERU
JUNE 1, 1942.
Ex&cUuUTIvVE OrpDERS oF JULY 19, 1941, Lima

REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE IMPORTATION OF COFFEE AND THE INTRODUCTION
OF PARASITIC INSECTS

Orders of the President of Peru dated at Lima, July 19, 1941, prohibit the
importation into Peru of coffee plants, and parts thereof, including the seeds, on
account of the possibility of introducing the coffee berry borer, Stephanoderes
coffeae Hag., and:
46 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

The introduction of parasitic insects shall be effected solely through the tech-
nical staff of the Department of Agriculture and Livestock. A separate authoriza-
tion for each importation of parasitic insects will be required, to be issued by the
Plant Protection Board.

RESTRICTIONS ON THE IMPORTATION OF PLANT MATERIAL BY AIR

The prohibition against the importation of fresh fruits, vegetables, seeds, and
plants by air, as stated in Art. 6, page 5 of P. Q. C. A. 310 still stands. Never-
theless, upon application of the importer, and with the approval of the Plant
Quarantine Service, the Bureau of Agriculture and Livestock may authorize the
entry of such plant material by air, and will issue permits for such importations.
(Letter from Mr. Julio Gaudron, Plant Quarantine Service, Lima, Peru, April 25.
1942.)

P. N. ANNAND,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant uarantine

B. E. P. Q. 477, Supplement No. 2
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF COLOMBIA

JUNE 1, 1942

IMPORTATION OF UNTOASTED CAcAaoO PERMITTED TEMPORARILY
(Decree No. 769 of March 26, 1942)

Foreign Commerce Weekly for May 9, 1942, reports that the importation of
untoasted cacao beans into Colombia is permitted through the ports of Buena-
ventura and Ipiales for 6 months beginning March 26, 1942, according to the
above decree. The cacao beans are subject to sanitary inspection and must be
shipped perfectly dry in double packing of paper or fiber.

P. N. ANNAND,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

PENALTIES IMPOSED FOR VIOLATIONS OF THE PLANT
QUARANTINE ACT

According to reports received by the Bureau during the period April 1 to June

30, 1942, penalties have recently been imposed by the proper authorities for
violations of the Plant Quarantine Act, as follows:

QUARANTINES AFFECTING MEXICAN PRODUCTS

In the case of the United States versus the persons listed below, for attempting
to smuggle in contraband plant material, the penalties indicated were imposed
by the United States customs officials at the following ports:







Name Port Contraband Penalty
Agapita Placincia de Roja___------- Brownsville, Pex. ..-2| Lorange-2 52> eee $1. 00
oaKenaistin 282. $22 tS eee el iio, Mexssae se 5'avocado Seeds: => eee 1. 00
Pablomaarcial S28 35). 2a See a at dot ITS. Fz § idngoes 2) ViewAlias 1.00
MariatMiginai7,-.< 22. 3 - a ees dove.) 2h. Siayocados..£ =! fae eee 1.00
Jose Bropnds. 2) =. > Eagle Pass, Tex_------ J oranve:: ies ee ae 1.00
Pipe 2eQOOE =. . 5S s2en- eee do___________-.-.--|] 14 avocados, 6 mangoes, and 4 1. 00
mameys.

Julia M:- de Riveras - S25 ee do. es OMAN ROSS oe eer eee =. nee 1. 00
Cre Bistds. == > 2 eee tO Pa ee ee hs vocsdoiseede=. ) 8 => - oe 1. 00
Tomas Hourigues*: 21 = Ue 4 sees do 2) AVE) ASS Stee Gol. SrA i veh se ty) a 1.00
Blias Mornchaes:-.. 22. > 2-2 oleae Gers pies 2292s Samoaneoes: 2. -/..2=2t at 52s ee 1. 00
Albert &. Aguilar. ==: = See ee eee 4 IANS eee sos Fe 2s os safe 1. 00
Joo! Meding ©2038. 25 ys-+ 2 bee Sedo 135. Fae oe onan e sles} er ee 1.00
Dorotea Chavez de Barrios __..:---]-.---do__.__--.-_---.--- SOG Ue. ces. 57 Os ee eee 1.00
Triniday Saucedo de Perez EOP aso, Tex ties fark 2 live plants with soil____-_------- . 40
Silvania Zurita de Sandoval________]____-do_______---------| 1 mango__-------- wate _o 003. Fe .10
Felipa Gomez de Zanez_--_--------- HidalgosText-- = Picuthines nett 1.00

90 2 Bede = 8s oe JAMO OE 2 So ee D-DIStS! ton See soe ne ee 1.00
Conpepcion Vasquerz..--2=--.-5-...53|-_-¢ 0022 eee Lmamey: = - 8 oe a ee 1,00
Natalia Guajardo______--_----- ae = |E C05). inismey secede.) soe eee 1.00
1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS AT









Name Port Contraband Penalty
Retusia Castaneda es 22.2 Fs2. 22 Hidalgo Next -2 522. = Ihaviocadorseeds == 35s ee- = 22 - = $1. 00
MrimadaaGonzalezs. 2... -2-5.--..-*|-===-- COS eee ISIN TIO Oe Ses ee nee 1.00
Woncepelonyherezs-22.-=--=2 2-25 -- =| == 2: Const eae Dia VOCHM OSes se. aa) = eee Sere se 1. 06
TESUSMETAUINOL == 9942-22 See foie oe COB ee as ee A QVOCRC OSs Bo eat ee ee Se 1.00
HeniOSMVINTAMt es: see eee ee |e Cpe po eee DAV OCHGOSS Cee hae se ae os 1.00
OsswiboaniG@er. somes Se fe Ae Salone doz ees 3 t sie AtAVOCAU OSES asso tee eee. cee. 1.00
PNDUMCOpReNeZe - ee es eo se Seabee GOntenateet sees s 10M] GINO Ose eas ee ee ck 1.00
INSTI OUEamOSNe n= 9 oes ons eee LO see st || oe GOP oot ee et Sere eee sole) 1.00
Guadalupe Garza Barreire__--------]----- CO eee es Sane ee ae Traviocado:seed 32s sees a 1.00
Namiuel Hariase & ECR SF gy | tees dort # ai arig cr Siolants asa APA 2A 1.00
MMM AC ROMAN a2. 2 ea |laeee GOs pees eee eee DINAN OCS: at Se ee ee eee 1.00
Wianlar Garcia. es... 02ee2 2s Go 44 ALE YT aM OCkd On: =~ see een ce oe 1.00
TIAMAVOanChOr Se. 6 ws eee lee KO ea chain Anca aS AVAN OCRU OSE 4 oe) spa etn ees oe 1.90
TOES curb CSE LOS ee Aa eee GO ee eaere = tee. SHNAN POCSES atest eee 1.00
GristianoeAlaniz:~22 228 25522. Gee GOs ro 5F Suerte DsmMangoes*~ 1. teeta . Ae a 1.00
Maria Victoria M. Martinez. _______]}----- CLO a ise ee EE ae Dnlants. (OWS) pe se ee ee 1.00
Goenmanetociarss=4. 2222s see 32 eee COee ates See 2 ae TOMDIQUESE soe eee et eee 1. 00
Guadalupe Torezse--22.- 2220-12 ee Gosh Pw DANA OCS.2. seu se ue sae Fr ie’ 1. 00
MatianaBustamante.__-.-._een2E) ||223 32 do je. coat plants: + Meets sks fh sey eee | 1. 00
MVianl aes (UGS see = er a le O02 mee SEN lama ON ee Be er 1.00
IMiariauGanclaess-—) 2.02 eee eer | ae COP ee e ee = PS EUE TD LG S eee eee ete a 1.00
Maria Refugio Anzallua_______----_|----- otter ee IOLAN POs IOLA Ae SEE OR 1.00
BGAN ZpPO MOAN Zeer s soeeeseee coe loose GOset B16 38. Stee SaviOcaGdose: --: Sseaeeh Ueeeeurs 1. 00
Josepa sancha, Zamora. --_..-=--..==|-.=2- CoE ee eee 2 OL ANS eR eat ee ee SO 1. 00
IGaKeEy WORE). UE SES ee ee ee ee COR a eee ae ZNMANE OCSitae so nee Oe nee ee 1. 00
CristinaiSanGhezsee 10 228 8 ees eS Le does... 3 Fseat DIAVOCAGOS set 1 sh SO Ss Pe 1.00
DAMasiopROdeCa = seh ess ieee §| oes GOP 5S. rh 2 HA DTICONS=s 5. ko ee ee ae 1.00
MinserArule whilGldS-=. =. 8 et ke GO ee 2 avocado seeds and 10 plants___ 1. 00
Guadelupe Villerale-— =. - 2 =. <2 OMe = see ee LTRS) eee te et eae ee 1.00
films Gonzalez. S88 S52 Us os fA SLOSS Goze io 3 50 Se 1 AVOCROOW ee oe ee 1. 00
RataeleBisPeiVicling-2--— 42-222.) |b Goss} S26 vate ALAVOCRUOS eee set S- aby tariey o 1. 00
SimoniGiilemezs Jn ts. Waredo, Mex... «| Dury FANE S Hey see ees eee 1.00
IRGtCTaS TON Mpeg eee a ee re CO eee ae eee ATOTCHIGED Anlst eee 1.00
RebeccarGarcia.. s=- 22: sate ee Ee do». Ossie 5 MN Tmladioli bulbse—_ 235. :- Se 1.00
Mrs. Josefa Solas Garcia.-_-------_--|----- Gowee -stece et 2 4 ounces miscellaneous seed ____- 1.00
INO DERLONIASSOL=2e eee eee tT 6 (0) Bs See en ee 1eOLCHiGds ANnt=se 2 eee 1.00
Minn eRNASSO6. 2 oe oak ee Saco eae eo Cee eerste (lant ee eee So eee 1.00
JosefiriaulOLnes._.c—s- ee eee SS Goss eae At iingirme y-s- 253 2903 2 ok 4s Ae 1. 00
IVMiariaiasson- 2.2 eee tee Teel to foe (6 Ko eee Se ey RT Sea a 0). ee ee ee pa ue saree hho. 1. 00
IMTpePNMOnANO=s2.- ts. eae OEE a, eis | nS = ORS aot are 1 ee 1.00
WAS SAMA pees foes een ge fens Oe eee 2 oranges, 1 mango, and 4 1. 00
avocados.
WOzZALOMLOLLES.- => eee tee eee 5.8 S| Sie! Go_4 eae aay re A AVOCHCOSS2eee FS hk = sory ee 1.00
JOSela) Ge GQuerlero. 2-2 eae a Ob 2. seeee wee 2BTDIANUS eae oe ee ee 1. 00
eee Alas eee a De G0 Eee ee eee 1 mango and 1 orange__________- 1.00
Guadalupe Diaz oo irs: A eT dois Soe Vant 2 mangoess- siete. Fe meets 1.00
WOZANOMEOMeS tes ee ee ee don eee eet 4:avOCaGd Os) si 2 Sia Ph ceca e lS. 2 1. 00
Belen Trevino Bocanegro-_-_-_-------- Mercedes, Tex__-----_- 2 plgntsian drs CULINGS seas 1.00


ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND
PLANT QUARANTINE

P. N. ANNAND, Chief.

Avery S. Hoyt, Associate Chief.

8S. A. Rouwer, Assistant Chief in Charge of Regulatory Work.

F. C. Bisnopp, Assistant Chief in Charge of Research Work.

W. L. Popuam, Assistant Chief 1n Charge of Control Operations.

F. H. Spencer, Assistant Chief in Charge of Business Administration.

J. C. Houron, Agent, Cooperative Field Relations.

Rouua P. Currie, Editor.

J. A. Hysuop, in Charge, Division of Insect Pest Survey and Information.

J. I. HAMBLETON, 2 Charge, Division of Bee Culture Investigations.

D. L. Van Dinu, in Charge, Division of Fruit Insect Investigations.

F. C. CRAIGHEAD, in Charge, Division of Forest Insect Investigations.

W. H. Waite, in Charge, Division of Truck Crop and Garden Insect Investigations.

C. M. Pacxarp, in Charge, Division of Cereal and Forage Insect Investigations.

R. W. Harnep, in Charge, Division of Cotton Insect Investigations.

W. E. Dove, in Charge, Division of Insects Affecting Man and Animals.

C. P. CuausEeNn, Acting in Charge, Division of Control Investigations.

R. C. Roark, in Charge, Division of Insecticide Investigations.

C. F. W. MuESEBECK, in Charge, Division of Insect Identification.

C. P. CLausEn, in Charge, Division of Foreign Parasite Introduction.

J. F. Martin, in Charge, Division of Plant Disease Control.

B. M. Ganppis, in Charge, Division of Domestic Plant Quarantines.

E. R. Sasscer, in Charge, Division of Foreargn Plant Quarantines.

A. F. Burasss, in Field Charge, Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail Moth Control (head-
quarters, Greenfield, Mass.).

E. G. Brewer, in Field Charge, Japanese Beetle and Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail
Moth Quarantines, and Dutch Elim Disease Eradication (headquarters, Bloom-

eld, N. J.)

RE. McDona.p, in Field Charge, Pink Bollworm and Thurberia Weevil Quar-
antines (headquarters, San Antonio, Tez.).

P. A. Horan, in Field Charge, Mexican Fruitfly Quarantine (headquarters,
Harlingen, Tex.).

CLAUDE WAKELAND, in Field Charge, Grasshopper Control (headquarters, Denver,
Colo.).

A. C. Bakgr, in Field Charge, Fruitfly Investigations (headquarters, Mexico City,
Mexico).

48

U S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1942
Sn, A—b, bP. GO. No. 152 Issued December 1942.

United States Department of Agriculture

BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE



SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS
JULY-SEPTEMBER 1942



CONTENTS

G@uarantine and) other official annotincements.- ~~... 2.222 et L222 le etait tees eli lll.
Announcement relating to gypsy moth and brown-tail moth quarantine (No. 45)_______________
Sheals to head Division of Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail Moth Control in the United States
Department of Agriculture (press notice) - ----_----- Pena, 4 Abeer ete ner teh e ANTS
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (No. 48)___--_-_________-_______-______e
ESI CHLOMSsDORDOS MAS LOLS =) es = ote ee ee ae eee ke oe oe ot lee sept
Japanese beetle administrative instructions modified (B. E. P. Q. 394, second revision)
Beetle restrictions on vegetable and fruit shipments ended for season (press notice)
Administrative instructions modifying the restrictions of the Japanese beetle quarantine by
advancing the date of termination of restrictions on fruit and vegetable shipments under

§ 301.48 of the Japanese beetle quarantine to September 9 for the year 1942 (B. E. P. Q. 524)_
Japanese beetle administrative instructions modified (B. E. P. Q. 499, supplement No. 6) __-
Japanese beetle administrative instructions modified (B. E. P. Q. 499, supplement No. 1,
SERS I OTT A ae A Se eee ee ee ae ee ee See ee oe
Japanese beetle administrative instructions modified (B. E. P. Q. 499, supplement No. 7)
Announcement relating to pink bollworm quarantine (No. 52)_-_-___--.---_---_--_-------__-------
Pink bollworm quarantine regulations modified (B. E. P. Q. 493, second revision)
Announcements relating to white-fringed beetle quarantine (No. 72)_-_____-_--______-_---_---_--
White-fringed beetle regulations modified (B. E. P. Q. 485, tenth revision)
Hearing will consider beetle quarantine for North Carolina (press notice)___-_-________-____-
Notice of public hearing to consider the advisability of revising the white-fringed beetle quar-
SMEMOLVO ANC hI eaN OF by Caroli daa a8 soe es REISS LY Soe ah ee eek at ee ee
Announcements relating to Mexican border regulations______.___-_.--___-_---___-_-_-----------
Wiest eCanBiGniele ntl semen eS eat seer ORE SSP ee ee et he Bp
en mao ier TBPUiavious (Dross NOLICS) 2. 62 2 ae hee noch cae enna omen nen weaee
Mexican border regulations effective September 8, 1942_____..._-.__-____----____-----____--
PVE Sea Mane OMAAILORINe erie. Bi eep yen! I hw sie ie wale) Wye! @ ea ero oO. Jae
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Jamaica, British West Indies (B. P. Q.355, revised, sup-
LOHTE TINO Oe) Packers hn eatin 2 See ee eh i oe Ss he LS Oe ee
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Peru (P. Q. C. A. 310, supplement No. 6)
Tonninininispecon.oL piantsiand plant products. :...22--.---2-225-22-..-$2.--L222--254-2-5--2
PARE PoC y irene ea Tutiy CPL AE TCL TT Oe aie cee a a ee a eS i ee Le eb ee fo
DAOMOUTLALe sD leap CU ATAMGINCS Ht 892 ho 8 nk a ye en we se beens e eee wcnton
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act__-____._....._------------------_-
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine_____.___________._-_-____----_---- ay



QUARANTINE AND OTHER OFFICIAL
. ANNOUNCEMENTS

ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO GYPSY MOTH AND BROWN-TAIL

MOTH QUARANTINE (NO. 45)

SHEALS TO HEAD DIVISION OF GYPSY MOTH AND BROWN-TAIL MOTH CONTROL

IN U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

[Press notice]

Avaust 18, 1942.

The Department of Agriculture today named Ralph A. Sheals as leader of
the Division of Gypsy and Brown-tail Moth Control in the Bureau of Entomology

and Plant Quarantine.

Dr. P. N. Annand, Chief of the Bureau, said that Mr. Sheals will relieve
A. F. Burgess, who has been in field charge of the work on gypsy moth control
since its beginning as a Federal project nearly 35 years ago. By releasing Mr.
Burgess from administrative responsibility the Bureau can take advantage of
his long experience in insect control work by having him review for the Chief
of the Bureau other insect control projects now being carried on. Mr. Burgess

49
495903—42——-_1
50 BOREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE _ [July—Sept.

will also prepare a history of the gypsy moth work in the United States, in
advance of his normal retirement.

Mr. Sheals was born at Brushton, N. Y., on March 26, 1898. His collegiate
training was in forestry with specialization in forest insects. He graduated
from New York State College of Forestry at Syracuse, N. Y., in 1917. His
early association with the Department of Agriculture was with the white pine
blister rust work, extending from 1917 to 1928. Since 1928 he has been associ-
ated with the organization now known as the Bureau of Entomology and Plant
Quarantine. During this period he has been a member of the Division of Domestic
Plant Quarantines, and since 1929 has been Assistant Chief of the Division. His
work with the Division of Domestic Plant Quarantines has included a number
of asSignments and administrative responsibility for activities over a wide
field. He shared in organizing the work of inspection of plants and plant prod-
ucts in transit to assure compliance with quarantines; aided in the direction of
extensive cooperative control campaigns against insect pests and plant diseases
such as grasshoppers, Mormon crickets, chinch bugs, white-fringed beetle, mole
crickets, citrus canker, phony peach, and peach mosaic.





ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE
(NO. 48)

INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS

Post OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, August 20, 1942.
POSTMASTER :

My Dear Sir: Attention is invited to the inclosed copy of the latest revision
of Federal Quarantine No. 48 on account of the Japanese beetle, issued by the
United States Department of Agriculture, which became effective March 24,
1942, and which increases somewhat the area previously under quarantine
and also modifies slightly the restrictions formerly imposed. You will please
be governed accordingly. See paragraph 1, section 595, Postal Laws and
Regulations.

Very truly yours,

RAMSEY S. BLACK,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.

B. E. P. Q. 394, Second Revision. Effective July 20, 1942.
TITLE 7—AGRICULTURE

CHAPTER III—BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE
Part 301—DOoMESTIc QUARANTINE NOTICES

JAPANESE BEETLE ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS MODIFIED

INTRODUCTORY NOTE

In reissuing this circular to replenish the supply no change has been made in
the list of bulbs, corms, and tubers that are exempted from the certification
requirements of the quarantine. Some modifications have been made in the
names, however, principally the common names, in order to bring them into line
with standard plant nomenclature.
~ §3801.48-6a. List of true bulbs, corms, and tubers exempted from Japanese
beetle certification. Under § 301.48-6 [regulation 6 of quarantine No. 48], true
bulbs, corms, and tubers are exempt from Japanese beetle certification when dor-
mant, except for storage growth, and when free from soil. The exemption in-
cludes single dahlia tubers or small dahlia root divisions when free from stems,
cavities, and soil. Dahlia tubers, other than single tubers or small root divisions
meeting these conditions, require certification.

‘4










1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 51

The following list of bulbs, corms, and tubers, issued effective July 20, 1942, is
for the information of inspectors of the Bureau and for the use of shippers
within the regulated areas. The key letter (B) before the name stands for true
bulb, (C) for corm, and (T) for tuber. Plant roots of a bulbous nature not given
on this list are, in most cases, fleshy rhizomes, and are therefore not exempt
from certification. (C) Acidanthera, (T) Alstroemeria, (B) Amaryllis, (C)
Amorphophallus (devilstongue), (B) Anemone nemorosa, A. ranunculoides, A.
deltoidea, (C) Antholyza (madflower), (C) Babiana (baboonroot), (T) Begonia
(tuberous rooted), (T) Boussingaultia (Madeira vine), (C) Brodiaea, (B) Bulb-
ocodium (meadowsaffron), (C) Calochortus (Mariposa-lily or globe-tulip), (B)
Camassia, (B) Chionodoza (glory-of-the-snow), (B) Colchicum (autumn-crocus),
(T) Colocasia (Caladium esculentum and fancy-leaved varieties), (B) Cooperia
(evening-star and rain-lily), (B) Corydalis bulbosa, C. tuberosa, (B) Crinum,
(C) Crocus, (C) Cyclamen, (T) Dahlia (see statement in introductory para-
graph), (C) Dierama (elfinwands), (T) Dioscorea batatas (cinnamon-vine), (T)
Eranthis (winter-aconite), (B) Hrythronium (fawnlily troutlily or dogtooth
violet), (B) Hucharis (Amazonlily), (C) Freesia, (B) Fritillaria (fritillary),
(B) Galanthus (snowdrop), (B) Galtonia (Hyacinthus candicans) (summer-
hyacinth), (C) Gladiolus, (T) Gloriosa rothschildiana, (T) Gloxinia (see Sin-
ningia), (B) Hippeastrum, (B) Hyacinthus (hyacinth, Dutch, and Roman), (B)
Hymenocallis, (B) Iris, bulbous (Dutch, Spanish, and English), (B) Jsmene
(Peruvian-daifodil), (B) Javia, (B) Iwiolirion, (B) Lachenalia (cape-cowslip),
(B) Lapeirousia (Lapeyrousia, Anomatheca), (B) Leucojum (snowflake), (B)
Lilium (ily bulbs, imported and domestic), (B) Lycoris, (B) Milla (Mexican-
star), (B) Muscari (grape-hyacinth), (B) Narcissus (daffodil, jonquil), (B)
(Verine, (B) Ornithogalum (Star-of-Bethiehem), (B) Owalis, (B) Pancratium,
(B) Polianthes (tuberose), (B) Puschkinia, (T) Ranunculus (buttercup), (B)
Scilla (squill, starhyacinth), (T) Sinningia speciosa (Gloxinia), (C) Sparacis
(wandflower), (B) Sprekelia (Aztec-lily, Jacobean lily, St. Jameslily), (B)
Sternbergia, (B) Tigridia (tigerflower or sheliflower), (C) Tritonia (Mont-
bretia), (B) Tulipa (tulip), (B) Vallota (Scarboro-lily), (B) Watsonia (bugle-
lily), (T) Zantedeschia (Richardia) (callalily), and (B) Zephyranthes
(zephyrlily).

(7 C. F. R. § 301.48-6; sec. 8, 39 Stat. 1165, 44 Stat. 250; 7 U. S. C. 161.)

Done at Washington, D. C., this 18th day of July, 1942.

AvERY S. Hoyt,
Acting Chief.

Babes with the Division of the Federal Register July 15, 1942, 11:47 a. m.; 7 F. R.

BEETLE RESTRICTIONS ON VEGETABLE AND FRUIT SHIPMENTS ENDED FOR
SEASON

[Press notice]

SEPTEMBER 11, 1942.

Restrictions on the movement of fruits and vegetables under the Japanese
beetle quarantine regulations have been removed for the season, the United
States Department of Agriculture announced. Restrictions on cut flowers, how-
ever, remain in force through October 15.

Under quarantine regulations, certificates showing freedom from Japanese
beetle are required until October 16 on interstate shipments of fruits and vege-
tables of any kind moved by refrigerator car or motortruck from the areas of
heavy beetle flight. An order issued by the Bureau of Entomology and Plant
Quarantine releases the fruits and vegetables from this requirement 5 weeks
earlier than is provided in the regulations.

The areas of heavy flight include Delaware, the District of Columbia, and
parts of Maryland, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Virginia.

Inspection of fruits and vegetables is necessary only during the period when
the beetles are in active flight, and results of field surveys show that adults of the
Japanese beetle have decreased to a point where it does not seem advisable to
continue the fruit and vegetable inspection and certification requirement the rest
of this season. There is no risk that such products will carry the Japanese beetle
after the active period which is now apparently over throughout the regulated
areas.
52 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE — [July—Sept.

There is still danger, however, that the beetles may be transported in cut
tlowers. Therefore, the restrictions on interstate movement of cut flowers will
remain in full force through October 15.

Restrictions on the movement of nurSery, ornamental, and greenhouse stock
and all other plants (except cut flowers, soil-free aquatic plants, and portions
of plants without roots and free from soil) are in force throughout the year and
are not affected by this order.

B. E. P. Q. 524. Effective September 9, 1942.
TITLE 7—AGRICULTURE
CHAPTER III—BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE
Part 301—DoOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES

ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS MODIFYING THE RESTRICTIONS OF THE JAPANESE
BEETLE QUARANTINE BY ADVANCING THE DATE OF TERMINATION OF RESTRICTIONS ON
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE SHIPMENTS UNDER § 301.48 OF THE JAPANESE BEETLE
QUARANTINE TO SEPTEMBER 9 FOR THE YEAR 1942

It has been determined that the active period of the Japanese beetle in its
relation to fruits and vegetables has already ceased for the present season and
that it is therefore safe to permit the unrestricted movement of fruits and
vegetables from the regulated areas. Therefore, pursuant to the authority con-
ferred upon the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine by
the fourth proviso of § 301.48, Chapter III, Title 7, Code of Federal Regulations
[Notice of Quarantine No. 48 on account of Japanese beetle], it is ordered
that the restrictions on the interstate movement of fruits and vegetables im-
posed by § 301.48-5 of Notice of Quarantine No. 48, revised effective March 24,
1942, be removed effective on and after September 9, 1942. This order advances
the termination of the restrictions as to fruits and vegetables provided for in
§ 301.48-5 from October 16 to September 9, 1942, and applies to this season only.

(7 C. F. R. § 301.48; sec. 8, 39 Stat. 1165, 44 Stat. 250; 7 U. S. C. 161.)

Done at Washington this 5th day of September 1942.
P. N. ANNAND,
Chief.

Pa with the Division of the Federal Register September 9, 1942, 11:08a.m.;7F.R.
GLO:

B. EB. P. Q. 499, Supplement No. 6. Effective September 5, 1942.
TITLE 7—AGRICULTURE

CHAPTER III—BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE
PART 301—DoMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES
JAPANESE BEETLE ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS MODIFIED

Pursuant to the authority conferred upon the Chief of the Bureau of Ento-
mology and Plant Quarantine by § 301.48—6, Chapter III, Title 7, Code of Federal
Regulations [regulation 6 of the rules and regulations supplemental to Notice
of Quarantine No. 48 on account of the Japanese beetle], paragraph (1) of
§ 301.48b [circular B. E. P. Q. 499, issued June 9, 19389] is hereby amended effec-
tive September 5, 1942, by the addition of the following subparagraph:

§ 301.48b. Administrative instructions to inspectors on the treatment of nurs-
ery products, fruits, vegetables, and soil, for the Japanese beetle.

* * * » * * *
1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS bo

TREATMENT OF Sort, ABOUT THE RooTs OF PLANTS

(1) TREATMENT OF PLANTS AFTER DIGGING
* * * * % * *
(6) Ethylene dichloride emulsion dip
(i) Materials:
Potassium hydroxide: C. P.
Aleohol: 190 proof ethyl alcohol.
Oleic acid: crystal white olein.
Ethylene dichloride: commercial.
(ii) Formula:



Pounds
Potassium hydroxide: Wise ey ge aeons. Iompeean eo 2.5
mitdhotse 24 Taal Sieh koh bed awh iet agt ee ol 14.0
i ce ene Pe ae EE ere DG ee ig 6. 0
wlele sein 2. Jeet Te Noor JIL 0 laa ie ht At 17.5
Ethylene’ diehieridess ) fey ose oo eee ea 60. 0

100. 0

1An amount of commercial caustic potash containing an equivalent weight of potassium

hydroxide may be substituted for the C. P. grade. ‘ :
2Completely denatured alcohol (190 proof) may be substituted for the ethyl alcohoi

(190 proof).

(iii) Preparation of dip.—Mix the several ingredients in the order given in
the formula. Dissolve the potassium hydroxide in the alcohol and water, add
the oleic acid, and stir intermittently for about 10.minutes. Compensate for
evaporation loss by the addition of alcohol and water in the ratio given in the
formula. Add the ethylene dichloride and stir.

The emulsible ethylene dichloride shall have a specific gravity of about 1.070
at 25° ©. (77° F.) and contain 60 percent by weight of ethylene dichloride.
It shall be a clear solution that may be readily diluted with water to form a
uniform, stable, milklike emulsion. The product should be kept in gastight
containers in a cool place at a temperature above 4.5° C. (40° F.). At lower
temperatures it will separate into layers, in which case it must be warmed to
room temperature and stirred to restore it to its original and usable condition.

(iv) Caution.—Ethylene dichloride is an inflammable volatile solvent. It.
the emulsible ethylene dichloride, and the ethylene dichloride emulsion should
be kept away from fire, heat, and open flame. They should be used with ade-
quate ventilation and prolonged breathing of the vapor should be avoided.

(v) Season.—The treatment must be applied between October 1 and June 1.

(vi) Temperature.—The temperature of both the dip and the plant balls at
the time of dipping shall not be lower than 45° F. nor higher than 75° F. At
no time thereafter, during the holding period, shall the temperature of the
treated plant balls be lower than 40° nor higher than 80°.

‘(vii) Dosage-——Use at the rate of 1 gailon of the emulsible ethylene di-
chloride in 100 gallons of water. (For convenience in making small quantities
use 40 cubic centimeters in 1 gallon of water.) To prepare the emulsible
ethylene dichloride as a dip, add small quantities of water successively, stirring
continually until a uniform, creamlike emulsion is formed. Dilute this emulsion
with the remainder of the water, stir a few minutes to insure a uniform sus-
pension, and pour into a trough or tank. This dip must be prepared imme-
diately before using.

(viii) Preparation of plants—Plants with root masses or balls up to 10 inches
in diameter at the narrowest dimension may be treated, either bare, wrapped.
or in unglazed clay pots. If wrapped, the wrapping material must be of such
a nature as not to prevent the proper penetration of the emulsion into the root
mass. The plant balls shall be moist but not wet.

(ix) Application—tThe size of the trough or tank (wood or metal) used for
the dipping vat, and the quantity of the emulsion shall be sufficient to provide
a complete coverage of all the plant balls. The plant balls or pots must be
immersed for a period of 10 seconds in the dip. They may be treated either
54 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE _ [July-Sept.

singly or in groups with the balls spaced approximately 44 inch apart in a wire
basket or perforated tray, and arranged so as to permit of rapid penetration
of the emulsion into all of the balls. In any ease the plant balls or tray shall
rest on the bottom of the tank. A sufficient quantity of freshly prepared,
diluted emulsion shall be added to the dip so that the plant balls are completely
covered during the immersion period. To reduce the hazard of plant injury,
not more than the lower \% inch of the plant stems should be immersed during
the treatment. The contents of the trough shall be discarded and the trough
rinsed out 4 hours after charging and/or when the dirt and debris exceed 2
inches in depth. The trough shall be located during plant treatments in a
covered and well ventilated place. On remoyal of balled plants from the dip
they may be allowed to drain into the tank for 1 or 2 minutes and then must
be placed in a compact group either on a bench with a tight bottom and side
walls as high as the plant balls, or on a tight floor of a greenhouse, packing
shed or other enclosed area, and surrounded by wodoen side walls as high as the
plant balls. If they are placed on a dirt floor it must be wet and packed hard
before using. In the case of potted plants any excess emulsion should be
poured from the pot immediately after removing from the dipping vat. All
plants must remain undisturbed for the prescribed 48 hours during which time
excessive ventilation should be avoided. A light spray of water applied to the
tops of the plants during this period may be beneficial.

(x) Period of treatment.—Ten seconds immersion in the dip followed by a
48-hour holding period.

(xi) Varieties of plants—The list of plants which have been successfully
treated in experimental work includes 18 varieties of azaleas, 60 kinds of
greenhouse plants, 48 kinds of perennials, and 28 kinds of trees and shrubs.
The list is subject to expansion and will be furnished on requet.

(7 C.F.R., § 301.48; sec. 8, 39 Stat. 1165, 44 Stat. 250; 7 U.S.C. 161.)

Done at Washington this 4th day of September 1942.

P. N. ANNAND,
Chief.
waa with the Division of the Federal Register September 9, 1942, 11:08 a. m.; 7. F. R.
‘ °

B. E. P. Q. 499, Effective September 18, 1942.
Supplement No. 1, Sixth Revision.

TITLE 7—AGRICULTURE

CuHaPtTerR III—BurREAU oF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE
Part 301—DoMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES

JAPANESE BEETLE ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS MODIFIED

INTRODUCTORY NOTE

Two new schedules for methyl bromide fumigation of potted or bare-rooted
plants are provided in this revision of supplement No. 1. These two treating
schedules, at lower temperatures than have heretofore been authorized, are Nos.
8 and 9 in the table under subparagraph (i). The instructions as to fumigation
of packaged plants are carried forward in this revision of the supplement.

§ 301.48b. Administrative instructions to inspectors on the treatment of
nursery products, fruits, vegetables, and soil, for the Japanese beetle. Treat-
ment authorized. Pursuant to the authority conferred upon the Chief of the
Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine by § 301.48-6, Chapter III, Title 7,
Code of Federal Regulations [regulation 6 of the rules and regulations supple-
mental to Notice of Quarantine No. 48], subsection (1) (5) of § 301.48b [on
page 13 of the mimeographed edition of circular B. E. P. Q. 489, issued June 9,
1939] is hereby further modified effective September 18, 1942, to read as follows:
LIBRARY
STATE PLANT, BOARI

1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS

TREATMENT OF Sor, AnouT THE Roots oF PLANTS
* * * * * * *

(1) TREATMENT OF PLANTS AFTER DIGGING

* * * * % * *

(5) Methyl bromide fumigation

Equipment.—An approved fumigation chamber equipped with vaporizing, air-
circulating, and ventilating systems must be provided.

Application.—After the chamber is loaded, the methyl bromide must be vapor-
ized within it. The air within the chamber must be kept in circulation during
the period of fumigation. At the completion of the treatment, the chamber must
be well ventilated before it is entered and the plants removed. The ventilating
system should also be in continuous operation during the entire period of re-
moval of the fumigated articles. :

(i) Fumigation of plants, with or without soil

(a) Temperatures, periods of treatment, and dosages.—The temperature of
the soil (with bare root stock, the root spaces) and of the air for each type
of treatment must remain throughout the entire period of treatment at the
minimum specified in the following table, or higher :







anes Cee
: (methy s methy
Period of Period of a0
Temperature at least bromide Temperature at least bromide
Zs treatment per 1,000 treatment per 1,000
cubic feet) cubic feet)
Hours Pounds Hours Pounds
HT eifetee tere ee hee 2 21% TAO Roe eee ees ae Ano 4 6
ee On ee 2 eee od 2% 2 Tach ete aee AN ES 44 2%
By GB ie a eee eee 2% DUAR SSA GUNN ee. oe Sse Nae 4 3
Apr tice Hyeeees Se Ste aps 3 DUA OMAR ON Be tele Jee ee 44 3
Doe eee oe So 3 3% 214



The dosage shall be for each 1,000 cubic feet including the space occupied by the
load.

(b) Preparation of plants——The treatment is to be applied to plants with
bare roots or in 14-inch pots or smaller, or in soil balls not larger than 14 inches in
diameter nor thicker than 14 inches when not spherical. The soil should not be
puddled or saturated and must be in a condition which in the judgment of the
inspector is suitable for fumigation. The plants should be stacked on racks or
separated so that the gas can have access to both top and bottom surfaces of pots
or soil balls. While not essential that the balls be completely separated from each
other they should not be jammed tightly together.

(c) Packaged plants.—Boxed or wrapped plants in packages not more than
14 inches in diameter may be fumigated at any one of the above nine tempera-
tures, periods of treatment, and schedules. In order that the fumigant may have
access to the roots and soil masses about the roots, the wrapping shall not be
tightly closed.

(d) Varieties of plants.—The list of plants, iritivaaiiiog greenhouse, perennial,
and nursery-stock types treated experimentally, is subject to continual expansion,
and, moreover, is too great to include in these instructions.

The schedule for the fumigation of strawberry plants as specified in subpara-
graph (5) (ii) of paragraph (1) of § 301.48b [page 14 of the mimeographed
edition of circular B. E. P. Q. 499] remains the same as heretofore.

(7C. F. R. § 301.48; sec. 8, 39 Stat. 1165, 44 Stat. 250; 7 U. S. C. 161.)

See supplement supersedes Supplement No. 1, revised, effective April 23,
1942.

Done at Washington, D. C., this 16th day of September 1942.

P. N. ANNAND,
Chief.

“sett with the Division of the Federal Register September 18, 1942,11:42a.m.:7 F. R.
YAAAALI
5H AO. THAIS ATATS

BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE _ [July—Sept.

B. E. P. Q. 499, Supplement No. 7. Effective September 18, 1942.
TITLE 7—AGRICULTURE

CHAPTER III—BuUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE
ParT 3801—DoMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES

JAPANESE BEETLE ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS MODIFIED

INTRODUCTORY NOTE

Experiments with methyl bromide dissolved in water and applied to specified
soil areas have resulted in the development of new methods for treating the
soil of areas free from plants and of individual items of nursery stock in field
rows. The application of this treatment in meeting the requirements of the
Japanese beetle quarantine must be conducted under the supervision of an
inspector of the Division of Japanese Beetle Control, 266 Glenwood Avenue,
Bloomfield, N. J., and in accordance with detailed instructions furnished by
him.

Pursuant to the authority conferred upon the Chief of the Bureau of Ento-
mology and Plant Quarantine by §§ 301.48-6 and 301.48-7, Chapter III, Title 7,
Code of Federal Regulations [regulations 6 and 7 of the rules and regulations
supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 48], paragraphs (k) and (m) of
§ 301.48b [circular B. E. P. Q. 499, issued, June 9, 1989], as amended, are hereby
further amended effective September 18, 1942, by the addition of the following
subparagraphs:

§ 801.48b Administrative instructions to inspectors on the treatment of nursery
products, fruits, vegetables, and soil, for the Japanese beetle.

* * * * * *
TREATMENT OF SOIL IN ABSENCE OF PLANTS
x * * * * * *
(k) SOILIN AND AROUND COLDFRAMES, PLUNGING BEDS, AND HEELING-IN AREAS
* %* *
(6) Methyl bromide solution

(i) Season.—The treatment can be applied at any time when conditions are
suitable between October 1 and May 15.

(ii) Hquipment.—Equipment includes a gastight drum, complete with spigot
and hose, methyl bromide applicator, collars when necessary, and measuring cans.
Such equipment must be inspected, tested, and approved by an inspector of the
Department before use.

(iii) Preparation of solution.—The solution must be prepared in accordance
with the directions of the inspector.

(iv) Condition and type of soil—Soil of any type may be treated provided the
surface can be pulverized sufficiently to absorb the solution. To prepare a well
pulverized surface, areas to be treated must be leveled and thereafter cultivated
to loosen the soil to a depth of at least 1 inch. The treatment must not be applied
during rain. The surface of wet soil should be tilled, allowed to dry for at least
24 hours, and then pulverized preparatory to treatment.

(v) Dosage and application.—The dosage shall be at the rate of 3 gallons of
solution per 1 square yard. The strength of the solution shall be based on the
minimum soil temperature within the top 6 inches as follows:

Minimum soil temperature in Percentage concentration by volume of
top 6 inches (°F.): methyl bromide
47 to 66, iriclusive.J2 3 2 ee eee 0. 150
57. t0.G7, bvuciuin we: 5 a Ea ee . 100
OS O00 OVeM 2a na et eee ee ee ae eee . 050

The surface must be divided by strings or marks in the soil into units of approxi-
mately 1 square yard. The solution is to be applied uniformly in a crisscross pat-
1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 57

tern to the soil surface from the spout of a sprinkling can or other vessel with
a similar spout, held no more than 6 inches above the soil surface.

(vi) Safety zone.—In addition to the area desired to be certified, a strip 3 feet
wide must be treated around the entire coldframe, plunging bed, or heeling-in
ground. No plants will be certified from this strip. In the case of coldframes,
ete. extending into the ground to a depth of 12 inches or more, no safety zone is
required.

(vii) Marking.—In the case of coldframes, ete., having fixed boundaries, proper
designations will be made on them by the inspector. In all other cases the nursery-
men shall furnish suitable stakes, at least 4 inches square and 30 inches long, to be
placed at the boundaries of the certified plots and marked by the inspector.

(viii) Period of treatment.—The area must remain undisturbed for a period of
48 hours after treatment.

(ix) Alternative treatment—If 1-square-yard collars are used in treating
frames, plunging beds, and heeling-in areas, the dosages and methods of procedure
listed below for treatment of soil about the roots of plants may be used.

* * * * * * *
TREATMENT OF SoIL ABOUT THE Roots OF PLANTS
* * * * % * *

(m) TREATMENT OF PLANTS BEFORE DIGGING
* * * * * * *

(3) Methyl tromide solution—collar treatment

(i) Season.—The treatment can be applied at any time when conditions are
suitable between October 1 and May 15.

(ii) Hquipment.—The equipment required is the same as that under TREAT-
MENT OF SOIL IN ABSENCE OF PLANTS (subparagraph (6) of paragraph
(k)) except that collars are necessary.

(iii) Preparation of solution.—The required solution must be prepared in
accordance with the directions of the inspector.

(iv) Dosage, solution, concentration, and soil temperatures.—The dosage is at
the constant rate of 8 gallons per Square yard. The percentage concentration
of methyl bromide in solution, by volume, is dependent upon the minimum soil
temperature within the top 6 inches, as follows:

Minimum soil temperature in Percentage concentration of
top 6 inches (°F.): methyl bromide
AMG LL ING hIslyC>) 2 titers 4 leno! bac tp ool et Lb 0. 100
we Onesies Fite Danis eto Ries Figs) yest O75
EatOoGe, MMmerIsiye! fic tii Maiti s _ i bie 2) Vance . 050
JSP AL 10a 1s IV) Ue aw reas eee Se LS A . 040
Ri ROGE ies wIMICUIIS DWC pee ene, ee eel So . 025
pieraast Tate Worvest ope 20s uy i oP R te es eh ae centres . 015

(v) Condition and type of soil—There are no limitations so long as there is no
standing water on the area to be treated and all of the solution enters the soil
within 80 minutes after application.

(vi) Preparation of collar areas.—The area must be free from weeds and debris
and must be practically level. Leveling can be expedited by filling in and sub-
sequent tamping to produce a uniformly packed subsurface for the application.
The entire surface of the collar about the plant treated must be loosened to a depth
of linch. The collar should be set so that the solution will not break out beneath
or through it.

(vii) Safety area.—The collar must be of sufficient size so that a safety margin
of soil of at least 2 inches all around remains when the treated nursery stock unit
is dug for balling.

(viii) Withdrawal and application of solution—The solution is to be with-
drawn from the preparation-drum through a hose extending to the bottom of the
dosage-measuring vessel. It must be poured from the open top of the vessel onto
the collar area quickly and without unnecessary splashing. Immediately there-
after the soil within the collar must be smoothed off without splashing so that
the entire surface is uniformly submerged.

(ix) Use period.—If the drum is tightly sealed between dosage withdrawals
the solution may be used at any time within 24 hours after preparation. While
in storage between treatments within this period the drum must be shaded.

495903-—-42——__2
58 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE _ [July—Sept.

(x) Treatment period.—The plants must be dug not less than 20 hours or
more than 48 hours after treatment.

(xi) Plant reactions—The Department’s records on plant reactions to the
treatment are limited. Such information as is available will be supplied on
request to the Division of Japanese Beetle Control. All interested nurserymen
are advised to run test lots of their own stock for observation. So far as
possible, the Department will cooperate in this testing on written request to the
Division of Japanese Beetle Control, 266 Glenwood Avenue, Bloomfield, N. J.

(xii) Precautions.—Directions as to precautions may be obtained from the
above Division and should be observed.

(7 C. F. R. § 301.48; see. 8, 39 Stat. 1165, 44 Stat. 250; 7 U. S. C. 161.)

Done at Washington this 14th day of September 1942.

P. N. ANNAND,
Chief.

: [ co with the Division of the Federal Register September 18, 1942, 11: 42 a.m.;7 F. R,
7381.

ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO PINK BOLLWORM QUARANTINE
. (NO. 52)

B. E. P. Q. 493, Second Revision. Effective October 1, 1942.

TITLE 7—AGRICULTURE
CHAPTER III—BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE
Part 301—DoMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES

PINK BOLLWORM QUARANTINE REGULATIONS MODIFIED

INTRODUCTORY NOTE

The administrative instructions issued May 1, 1940 (Circular B. E. P. Q. 493,
revised) mudified the treatment requirements for the pink bollworm as to
baled lint and linters and products thereof and restored certain requirements
for handling cottonseed in certain counties in northwestern Texas and Lea and
Roosevelt Counties, N. Mex. The present revision does not change the
requirements for these counties.

Continued improvement in seed sterilization and in sanitary measures in force
at gins in the heavily infested area and at oil mills receiving and processing
cottonseed produced in that area, makes it safe to allow linters produced from
sterilized seed in such area to be moved interstate without additional treatment.
The present revision of the administrative instructions therefore removes the
requirement as to fumigation or roller treatment of linters produced from
sterilized seed originating in the heavily infested area. This modification of
the quarantine regulation does not affect the procedure as to handling cottonseed
originating in the heavily infested area as provided in paragraph (b) of
regulation 4 (§ 301.52-4).

§ 301.52-4b. Administrative instructions ; removing the treatment requirements
as to cotton linters produced from sterilized cottonseed in the heavily infested
areas, and extending the area in which baled cotton lint may be moved from
certain lightly infested areas in New Mezico and Texas without treatment.
Pursuant to the authority conferred upon the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology
and Plant Quarantine by the second proviso of § 301.52, Chapter III, Title 7,
Code of Federal Regulations [Notice of Quarantine No. 52, on account of the
pink bollworm], and having determined that facts exist as to the pest risk
involved which make it safe to modify, by making less stringent, the restric-
tions contained in paragraph (a) of § 3801.52-4, notice is hereby given that,
effective October 1, 1942, (a) all restrictions and certification requirements
are hereby waived on the interstate movement from any regulated area of
cotton linters produced from sterilized seed; and (b) all restrictions are hereby


1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 59

waived on the interstate movement of baled cotton lint and products thereof
from the following area:

New Mexico: Lea and Roosevelt Counties.

Texas: Counties of Andrews, Cochran, Concho, Dawson, Ector, Gaines,
Glasscock, Hockley, Howard, Irion, Martin, Midland, Mitchell, Sterling,
Terry, Tom Green, Yoakum, and the regulated parts of Bailey, Coke,
and Lamb Counties:

Provided, (1) That the products have been produced in an authorized oil mill or
gin and subsequently protected from contamination, and (2) that a certificate
of the United States Department of Agriculture has been obtained and attached to
the containers or shipping papers in accordance with the requirements prescribed
in § 801.52-11.

These instructions supersede those in circular B. E. P. Q. 493, dated May 1, 1940.

(7 C. F. R. § 301.52; sec. 8, 39 Stat. 1165, 44 Stat. 250; 7 U. S. C. 161.)

Done at Washington this 28th day of September 1942.
P. N. ANNAND,
Chief

eh with the Division of the Federal Register October 1, 1942, 11:52 a.m.; 7 F. R.



ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE
QUARANTINE (NO. 72)

B. E. P. Q. 485, Tenth Revision. Effective August 3, 1942, through January 31, 1943.

TITLE 7—AGRICULTURE

CHAPTER III—BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE
Part 301—DoMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES
WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE REGULATIONS MODIFIED

§ 301.72a. Administrative instructions; removal of certification requirements
for specified articles. (a) Pursuant to the authority conferred upon the Chief
of the Bureau of Entomolgy and Plant Quarantine by the second proviso of
§ 301.72, Chapter III, Title 7, Code of Federal Regulations [Notice of Quarantine
No. 72, on account of the white-fringed beetle], all certification requirements for
the interstate movement from the regulated areas are hereby waived effective
August 3, 1942, through January 31, 1948, for the following articles and materials
enumerated in § 301.72-3:

(1) Soil, sand, and gravel, as indicated below; (i) Soil, when taken from a
depth of at least 2 feet below the existing surface, and when entirely free from
any surface soil to a depth of 2 feet.

(ii) Sand and gravel when washed, processed, or otherwise treated to the
satisfaction of the inspector.

(2) Articles other than soil: When free from soil and when sanitation practices
as prescribed by the inspector are maintained to his satisfaction, the following
articles are exempt from certification during the period specified above:

(i) Potatoes.

(ii) Lily bulbs, except that freshly harvested or uncured bulbs are not exempt.

(iii) Forest products such as cordwood, stump wood, logs, lumber, timbers,
posts, poles, and cross ties.

(iv) Hay, other than peanut hay; roughage of all kinds, straw, leaves, and
leafmold.

(v) Peanuts in shells, and peanut shells.

(vi) Baled cotton lint, and linters.

(vii) Brick, tile, stone, cinders, concrete slabs, and building blocks.

The intensity of infestations has been greatly reduced by drastic suppressive
measures applied throughout the infested areas. This factor, as well as the
conditions of growth, production, or maintenance of the restricted articles, has
so reduced the danger of dissemination of white-fringed beetles that certifica-
tion of the exempted articles is no longer necessary.
60 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE _ [July-Sept.

(b) Except as specified above the following articles and materials shall
remain under the restrictions of § 301.72-3:

(1) All soil, earth, sand, clay, peat, muck, compost, and manure, whether
moved independent -.of, or in connection with, or attached to nursery stock,
plants, products, articles, or things:

(2) Nursery stock.

(3) Grass sod.

(4) Lily bulbs when freshly harvested and uncured.

(5) Peanut hay.

(6) Seed cotton and cottonseed.

(7) Used implements, machinery, containers, scrap metal, and junk.

This revision supersedes Circular B. E. P. Q. 485, ninth revision, which be-
came effective May 11, 1942.

(7 C. FE. R., § 301.72; sec. 8, 39 Stat. 1165, 44 Stat. 250; 7 U. S. C. 161.)

Done at Washington this 1st day of August 1942.

P, N. ANNAND,
Chief.
{Filed with the Division of the Federal Register August 8, 1942, 12: 06 p. m., 7 F. R. 6179.]



HEARING WILL CONSIDER BEETLE
QUARANTINE FOR NORTH CAROLINA

[Press notice]
SEPTEMBER 25, 1942.

Secretary of Agriculture Claude R. Wickard announced today a public hearing
to consider placing North Carolina under Federal quarantine because of the
recent discovery of infestations of the white-fringed beetle in that State. The
hearing will be held in the auditorium of the Department of Agriculture,
South Building, 14th Street and Independence Avenue, SW., at 10:30 a. m.,
October 15, 1942.

The white-fringed beetles were first reported as occurring in the United
States in 1936, and since 1937 have been known to be present in parts of
Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, and Mississippi. On January 15, 1939, these
States were placed under a Federal quarantine which restricts or prohibits the
interstate movement of soil and certain plants, plant products, and other
articles to points outside the areas regulated by this quarantine.

Surveys to determine whether this insect exists in places not previously known
to be infested have been conducted over wide areas during the past several
years. During the past summer white-fringed beetles were discovered at several
places within and in the vicinities of Atkinson, Burgaw, Goldsboro, and Wilming-
ton, N. C. Farm land, as well as industrial and residential areas, was found
to be infested.

This insect in its various stages may be carried from place to place through
movement of soil and other articles.

Both larvae and adults feed on a wide range of plants. The larvae are
capable of causing serious damage to many field and garden crops, and are
exceedingly destructive to several important crops grown in many sections of
the country. If allowed to spread, this insect may become a serious pest in
agricultural regions of the United States not now infested.



TITLE 7—AGRICULTURE
Cuaptrer III—BurEAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE
Part 301—DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES
WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING TO CONSIDER THE ADVISABILITY OF REVISING THE WHITE-
FRINGED BEETLE QUARANTINE TO INCLUDE NORTH CAROLINA
SEPTEMBER 25, 1942.

The Secretary of Agriculture has information that white-fringed beetles (species
of the genus Pantomorus, subgenus Graphognathus), insect pests dangerous to
[Fi
. 7646.)

1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 61

agriculture, and not heretofore widely prevalent or distributed within and
throughout the United States, but known to be present in Alabama, Florida,
Louisiana, and Mississippi, have been found to exist in the State of North
Carolina.

It appears necessary, therefore, to consider the advisability of revising the
quarantine on account of the white-fringed beetle (7 CFR 301.72 [Notice of
Quarantine No. 72]) to include the State of North Carolina, and of restricting
or prohibiting the movement from that State, or regulated portions thereof, of
(1) soil, sand, clay, peat, or muck, independent of, or in connection with, nursery
stock, plants, or other things; and (2) such other articles or materials as may
be determined to present a hazard in spread of the beetle, including the following:

Nursery stock.

Potatoes.

Grass sod.

Lily bulbs.

Compost and manure.

Forest products such as cordwood, stump wood, logs, lumber, timbers,
posts, poles, and cross ties.

Hay, roughage of all kinds, straw, leaves, and leafmold.

Peanuts in shells and peanut shells.

Seed cotton, cottonseed, baled cotton lint, and linters.

Used implements, machinery, containers, scrap metal, and junk.

Brick, tile, stone, cinders, concrete slabs, and building blocks.

Notice is, therefore, hereby given that, in accordance with section 8 of the
Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315; 7 U.S. C. 161) as amended,
a public hearing will be held before the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quaran-
tine in the auditorium of the Department of Agriculture, Washington, D. C., in
the South Building, Independence Avenue and 14th Street SW., at 10:30 a. m.,
October 15, 1942, in order that any person interested in the proposed quarantine
revision May appear and be heard either in person or by attorney.

GROVER B. HI11,
Acting Secretary.

Filed with the Division of the Federal Register September 25, 1942,11:34a.m.;7F. R.

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO MEXICAN BORDER REGULATIONS
MEXICAN BORDER ACT
[Pustic Law 426—T77TH ConcRESsS]
[CHAPTER 31—2pD SESSION]
[H. R. 4849]
AN ACT

To provide for regulating, inspecting, cleaning, and, when necessary, disinfecting railway
cars, other vehicles, and other materials entering the United States from Mexico.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States
of America in Congress assembled, That to prevent the introduction of insect
pests and plant diseases the Secretary of Agriculture is authorized and directed
to promulgate such rules and regulations as he may deem necessary to regulate
the entry into the United States from Mexico of railway cars and other vehicles
and freight, express, baggage, and other materials which may carry such pests
and to provide for the inspection, cleaning, and, when necessary disinfection of
such vehicles and materials; to carry out the activities required to accomplish
this purpose, the Secretary of Agriculture shall use such means as he may deem
necessary, including construction and repair of buildings, plants, and equipment
for fumigation and disinfection or cleaning of vehicles and materials; the clean-
ing and disinfection of vehicles or materials necessary to accomplish the purpose
shall be carried out by and under the direction of authorized inspectors of the
62 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE _ [July—Sept.

Department of Agriculture, and the Secretary of Agriculture shall make and
collect such charge as will cover, aS nearly aS may be, the average cost of ma-
terials, facilities, and special labor used in performing such disinfection, and
fees so collected shall be covered into the Treasury of the United States as
miscellaneous receipts.

Approved, January 31, 1942.

MEXICAN BORDER REGULATIONS
{Press notice]

SEPTEMBER 4, 1942.

Approval was given by the Secretary of Agriculture today to regulations estab-
lishing inspection and treatment procedures under the Mexican Border Act
approved January 31, 1942, relating to safeguard measures necessary to prevent
the incidental introduction of the pink bollworm of cotton and other insects and
plant diseases into this country from Mexico by means of railway cars and other
vehicles, as well as in cargo, or in waste and debris likely to carry pests.

Authority for inspection and cleaning and for fumigation or other treatment
of these cars, vehicles, and contaminating materials has been granted by Congress
on a yearly basis since 1917, and regulations for carrying out these activities
have likewise been in force since that date. With the enactment of the Mexican
Border Act providing in a permanent manner for these protective functions it has
become necessary to revise existing regulations to bring them under the authority
of the new Act and into accord with its terms. The revision thus accomplished
follows closely in scope and procedure the regulations long effective in this field.

B. E. P. Q.—Mex. Border Regs. ‘ Regulations under the Mexican Border Act, approved
January 31, 1942. Effective September 8, 1942.

TITLE 7—AGRICULTURE
CHAPTER ITI—BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

PART 8320—THE MEXICAN BORDER REGULATIONS

INTRODUCTORY NOTE

Authority to inspect and apply safeguards to railway cars, vehicles, and various
materials entering this country from Mexico has been granted by Congress on an
annual basis since 1917 and regulations covering these activities have likewise
been in force since that date. With the enactment of the Mexican Border Act,
approved January 31, 1942, it has become necessary to revise the existing regula-
tions so as to bring them under the authority of the new act, and into accord with
its terms. The revision thus accomplished follows closely in scope and procedure
the previous regulations, care being taken to avoid encroachment on the field
covered by the Plant Quarantine Act.

ORDER OF THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE

By virtue of the authority vested in the Secretary of Agriculture by the act,
approved January 31, 1942, entitled, “To provide for regulating, inspecting, clean-
ing, and, when necessary, disinfecting railway cars, other vehicles, and other
materials entering the United States from Mexico” (Public Law 426, 77th Con-
gress), I, Grover B. Hill, Acting Secretary of Agriculture, do prescribe and pro-
mulgate the following regulations to be in force and effect on September 8, 1942.

THE MEXICAN BORDER REGULATIONS

AUTHORITY : §$§ 320.1 to 320.9, inclusive, issued under the act approved January 31, 1942,
entitled ‘‘fo provide for regulating, inspecting, cleaning, and, when necessary, disinfecti
railway cars, other vehicles, and other materials entering the United States from Mexico,
(Public Law 426, 77th Cong.).


1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 63

§ 320.1. Administration.—The Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant
Quarantine is charged with the administration of the provisions of this Act and
the regulations in this part concurrently with the Plant Quarantine Act and the
quarantines and orders issued thereunder.

§ 320.2. Regulated vehicles, articles, and materials..—To carry out the purpose
of the aforesaid Act to prevent the introduction of insect pests and plant diseases
these regulations shall apply to railway cars, boats crossing the Rio Grande, air-
eraft, drawn or self-propelled vehicles (such as wagons, carts, trucks, automo-
piles), freight, baggage, containers, and articles or materials which may be con-
taminated with insect pests or plant diseases. These regulations, however, shall
not apply to railway cars, other vehicles, and other materials originating in and
moving directly from the Northern Territory of Baja California, Mexico.

§ 320.3. Definitions.—For the purpose of these regulations the following words,
names, and terms shall be construed, respectively, to mean:

(a) Inspector.—An inspector of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quaran-
tine, United States Department of Agriculture.

(b) Owner or agent.—As used in these regulations this term shall include both
singular and plural and shall denote the person, agent, firm, company, or official,
having responsible custody of railway cars, vehicles, or other materials subject to
these regulations.

(c) Disinfection.—Disinfection as used in these regulations includes any
treatment or process designed to destroy insect pests or plant disease organisms.

(ad) Railway cars.—As used in these regulations shall include all types of cars
commonly employed in the transportation of freight, such as box, flat, tank,
refrigerator, gondola, stock, ete.

(e) Cleaning.—Cleaning as used in these regulations shall mean the removal,
to the satisfaction of the inspector, of matter, other than the cargo and articles
being moved, which may carry insect pests or plant diseases from railway cars,
other vehicles, freight, express, baggage, and other materials,

(f) Other vehicles——As used in these regulations the term ‘other vehicles”
includes means of conveyance other than railway cars, such as aircraft, boats,
automobiles, trailers, trucks, wagons, and carts, ete.

(9g) Other materials —As used in these regulations the term “other materials”
shall include all commodities, articles, and materials which may be the means of
introducing insect pests or plant diseases into the United States.

§ 320.4. Inspection.—As a condition of entry into the United States from
Mexico all articles and materials under these regulations (§ 320.2) shall be
subject to examination by an inspector for the purpose of determining whether
they may enter the United States without risk of introducing insect pests and
plant diseases.

§ 320.5. Railway cars.—When the inspector has determined by examination
that railway cars may enter the United States without risk of introducing
insect pests and plant diseases into the United States, he shall, insofar ag these
regulations may govern, permit their entry. If the examination discloses that
any car is contaminated and would involve risk of introducing insect pests
or plant diseases into the United States, he shall prescribe, as condition of entry,
cleaning, transfer of cargo, or disinfection, or all three. When cleaning alone
has been prescribed and done to the satisfaction of the inspector he shall permit
the entry of the cleaned cars, insofar as these regulations may govern entry.
When disinfection is prescribed the entry of the cars shall be conditioned on
their being fumigated, under the supervision of the inspector, either in a govern-
ment-owned fumigation house or otherwise in a place and by methods prescribed
by the inspector. Immediately upon entry of railway cars for fumigation they
shall be moved by the owner or agent having charge of same directly to the
government-owned fumigation plant, or “spotted” at an approved place and
before placing the cars in the fumigation chambers or “spotting” them for
fumigating the railroad company servicing the cars shall cause the car doors to
be opened and subsequent to fumigation it shall be the responsibility of the
railroad company to remove the cars from the fumigation plant or place where
they have been “spotted” and to close the car doors when the occasion requires.
When the prescribed fumigation has been accomplished in manner required by
the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, the inspector

3? The entry of certain plants and plant products is regulated or prohibited by quarantines
and regulations promulgated under the Plant Quarantine Act as amended.
64 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July—Sept,

shall permit entry into the United States insofar as these regulations may
govern. The inspector may authorize temporary entry of railway cars under
conditions to be prescribed by him for unloading or loading in railroad yards
at the port of entry or for in-transit movement from and to Mexico.

§ 320.6. Vehicles, articles, and materials, other than railway cars and unregu-
lated boats.—When the inspector has determined by examination that vehicles,
other than railway cars and unregulated boats, or any of the various articles
and materials covered by these regulations may enter the United States withort
risk of introducing insect pests or plant diseases, he shall permit their entry
insofar as these regulations may govern. If the examination by the inspector
discloses such regulated vehicles, articles, or materials are contaminated and
would involve risk of introducing insect pests or plant diseases into the United
States, he shall prescribe, as a condition of entry, cleaning, transfer of cargo,
or disinfection, or any or all of these. The cleaning, transfer of cargo and
disinfection shall be earried out under his supervision and to his satisfaction
and until it has been so accomplished, entry into the United States shall be
refused.

§ 320.7. Responsibility for opening and cleaning—The owner or agent in
charge of railway cars, other vehicles, and freight, express, baggage, articles,
or other materials shall open these for inspection as required by the inspector
and provide reasonable access to every part thereof, and when cleaning is
prescribed by the inspector as a condition of entry, shall so open, and clean,
and do any and all things reasonably pertaining thereto as required by the
inspector. All costs incident to entry, opening, and cleaning, except for the
services of the inspector, Shall be paid by the owner or agent in charge.

§ 320.8. Responsibility for disinfection—When disinfection involves fumiga-
tion the inspector will apply the fumigant whether in the houses erected for
the purpose or in the cars themselves. If, in the judgment of the inspector,
fumigation will not provide adequate safeguards against the introduction of
insect pests and plant diseases, he may prescribe another type of disinfection
which shall be applied by the owner or agent under the supervision of the
inspector. Costs incident te such disinfection, other than the services of the
inspector, shall be borne by the owner or his agent, or paid for as prescribed
elsewhere in these regulations.

§ 320.9. Fees for disinfection in government-owned facilities—Prior to entry
of railway cars or other vehicles requiring fumigation in government-owned
facilities as a condition of entry, the owner or agent in charge shall buy fumiga-
tion coupons from the inspector in charge at the port of entry. The price
fixed for these coupons shall represent as nearly as may be, the average cost
of materials, facilities, and special labor used by the Bureau of Entomology
and Plant Quarantine in performing such fumigation. On the basis of the
average cost for such fumigation over a period of years the inspector in charge
shall, until further notice, collect a fee of $4.00 for each coupon sold. Payments
for coupons, if practicable, shall be in the form of postal money orders, or bank
drafts or certified checks drawn on United States banks, drawn to the credit
of the Treasurer of the United States. Payments in United States currency
will be accepted if tendered. All fees so collected by the inspector shali be
promptly turned into the Treasury of the United States as miscellaneous receipts
in accordance with the practices approved by the Secretary of Agriculture.

These regulations shall supersede the Rules and Regulations Prohibiting the
Movement of Cotton and Cottonseed from Mexico into the United States and
Governing the Entry into the United States of Railway Cars and Other Vehicles,
Freight, Express, Baggage, or Other Materials from Mexico at Border Points,
effective July 1, 1917, as amended January 29, 1920 (7 C. F. R. § 320.1 to § 320.6;
39 Stat. 1164) and may be referred to as “The Mexican Border Regulations.”

Done at the city of Washington this 3d day of September 1942.

Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.

GrRovEeR B. HILL,
Acting Secretary of Agriculture.

[Copies of the foregoing regulations were sent to all American diplomatic and consular
officers in Mexico, Guatemala, and El Salvador, through the State Department, and to al?
customs officers through the Treasury sae erica |
a a with the Division of the Federal Register September 4, 1942, 11:14 a.m.; 7 F. R.
1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 65

MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS

B. P. Q. 355, Revised, Supplement No. 4.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, JAMAICA, BRITISH WEST INDIES

SEPTEMBER 11, 1942.

Corton LINT oR SEED—RESTRICTED IMPORTATION PERMITTED

Proclamation No. 34, published in the Jamaica Gazette Supplement of June 29,
1942, prescribed that the importation into Jamaica of cotton lint or seed, or any
part whatever of the cotton plant or of any plant of any species or variety of
Gossypium, is allowed only under permit granted by the Director of Agriculture
and in compliance with the following rules:

1. No consignment of cottonseed may exceed 1 ton in weight.

2. All cottonseed imported into this Island shall be placed in the fumigation
chamber immediately on landing and shall not be removed therefrom until it has
been fumigated for a period of 1 hour with hydrocyanic acid gas at a concentration
of 1 ounce of cyanide for every 300 cubic feet of space.

3. All cottonseed shall before planting be immersed for not less than 3 minutes
in concentrated sulphuric acid or treated with fungicide approved by the Director
of Agriculture.

AveErRY 8S. Hoyt,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

P. Q. C. A. 310, Supplement No. 6.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF PERU

JuLyY 3, 1942.

REGULATING THE CULTIVATION OF FLAX IN PERU AND THE IMPORTATION OF FLAXSEED
[Executive Order of June 3, 1942, Lima]

All seedings of flax for fiber made in certain coastal valleys are restricted
generally to a planting season from May 15 to July 31. (This season is extended
to August 15 in 1942.)

The importation of flaxseed by individuals is prohibited. This can be done only
through the Bureau of Agriculture and Livestock, who will import flaxseed in
quantities not exceeding 1 kilogram upon application by interested farmers. The
flaxseed will be passed upon by the technical services of the Bureau and released
to the farmers concerned if the test proves satisfactory.

AVERY S. Hoyt,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

TERMINAL INSPECTION OF PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS
ARIZONA PLANT QUARANTINE 4
(Amendment of Notice dated November 10, 1941)

Item 6 of the notice of November 10, 1941, published in the Postal Bulletin of
November 17, 1941, relating to Arizona plant quarantines is amended by removing
“Plum trees and parts thereof, except fruit pits” from the prohibited list (column
II) and placing these articles in the restricted list (column III) so that the
amended item will read:



(Column I) (Column ITI) (Column IV)
(6) Arizona, California, | Plum trees and parts thereof, except fruit pits, | Peach mosaic disease.
Colorado, New Mexico, peach and nectarine trees, root stock, grafts,
Oklahoma, Texas, and buds, or other parts capable of propagation, ex-
Utah. cept fruit pits, admitted under proper certifi-

cation from State of origin.



4The Postal Bulletin, Washington, August 17, 1942.
66 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July—Sept.

OREGON STATE PLANT QUARANTINES
(Revision of Notice dated September 11, 1940)
Postal Bulletin 18032—September 17, 1940

Under plant quarantines and regulations issued by the State of Oregon the
shipment into that State of certain plants and plant material known to be hosts
of injurious pests and plant diseases is subject to certain restrictions, or entirely
prohibited.

The following table gives a summary of the Oregon quarantine laws and
regulations, showing the quarantine areas, the plants and plant products affected,
and the pests and diseases of which such plants are known hosts. Under the
provisions of paragraph 2 (b), section 596, Postal Laws and Regulations, post-
masters should not accept such plants and plant products when presented for
mailing in violation of these quarantine laws and regulations, and should invite

the attention of the mailers thereto.

Plants and plant products prohibited or regulated entry into Oregon

Area quarantined

(Column I)

(1) Counties in Oregon:Baker,
Grant, Malheur, Morrow,
Umatilla, Union and Wal-
lowa.

All States except California
and Nevada.

(2) All of the United States
and all counties in Oregon.



(3) Parts of Oregon, Idaho
and Washington:

(Infested Areas)

Counties in Oregon: Benton,
Clackamas, Clatsop, Co-
lumbia, Lane, Lincoln,
Linn, Marion, Multnomah,
Polk, Tillamook, Union,
Washington, Yamhill.

Counties in Idaho; Benewah
and Latah.

Counties in Washington: Clal-
lam, Clark, Cowlitz, Grays
Harbor, Island, Jefferson,
King, Kitsap, Lewis, Ma-
son, Pacific, Pierce, San
Juan, Skagit, Skamania,
Snohomish, Spokane, Thur-
ston, Wahkiakum, What-
com, Whitman.

(4) All of Oregon

(5) Counties in Oregon: Ben-

ton, Clackamas, Clatsop,
Columbia, Douglas, Hood
River, Lane, Linn, Marion,
Multnomah, Polk, Wash-
ington, and Yamhill.

States of Connecticut, Maine,
Massachusetts, New Hamp-
shire, Rhode Island, Ver-
mont, and Washington.

Plants and plant products affected

Acceptance for mail-
ing entirely pro-
hibited from quar-
antined area

(Column II)

Fresh cherry fruit en-

tirely prohibited
shipment from. in-
fested counties in-
tonon infestedcoun-
ties.

Used cherry boxes
also prohibited ex-
cept when steam-
or hot-water treated
and se certified.

Accepted for mailing only when

accompanied with approved
certificate or Oregon permit

(Column ITI)

Potatoes and potato tops require
State -of-origin certificate
showing they were grown and
packed in noninfested areas;
or, screened and packed as
prescribed by Oregon law.

Narcissus bulbs, including daf-

fodils, jonquils, and Chinese
sacred lilies require satis-
factory State-of-origin certifi-
cate as to. . . freedom from
infestation, based on inspec-
tion or treatment.

Fresh cherries may be shipped

into Oregon from noninfested
counties in Idaho and Wash-
ington with inspection certifi-
cate showing growth, packing,
and shipment from a county
free of fruit fiy.

Cherry fruit and used boxes
may be shipped from infested
counties into infested counties
without certification, but are
subject to inspection at desti-
nation.

Gladiolus bulbs accepted for

intrastate shipment only when
accompanied by special gladi-
olus permit.

Poplar and willow trees or parts

thereof capable of propagation
accepted from quarantined
areas when accompanied with
certificate of State of origin
showing they were grown in
county free from satin moth
and not stored where poplar
or willow trees from infested
areas are or have been stored,
or a certificate showing the
trees have been effectively
treated in approved manner.

Plant pests
and diseases

(Column IV)

Colorado po-
tato beetle.

7

Narcissus bulb
fly, eelworm,
or nematode.

Cherry fruit
fly.

Gladiolus
thrips.



Satin moth.


1942]

SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS

67

Plants and plant products prohibited or regulated entry into Oregon—Continued.



Area quarantined

(Column I)

Plants and plant products affected



Acceptance for mail-
ing entirely pro-
hibited from quar-
antined area

(Column IT)

(G)wEniine United States: ss.) -|Sr22eeunsssleteee tess.

—_—_—.



(7) Alabama, Arkansas, Con-

necticut, Delaware, Flor-
ida, Georgia, Illinois, Indi-
ana, Kansas, Kentucky,
Louisiana, Maryland, Mas-
sachusetts, Michigan, Mis-
sissippi, Missouri, New
Hampshire, New Jersey,
North Carolina, New York,
Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode
Island, South Carolina,
Tennessee, Texas, Virginia,
West Virginia, and District
of Columbia.

(8) California, Florida, Lou-
isiana, North Carolina,
South Carolina, Tennessee,
Mexas.. .Viteinva, and
Hawaii.



(9) All States east of and in-

cluding the States of Mon-
tana, Wyoming, Colorado,
and New Mexico.

(10) All of the States and dis-

tricts of the United States
and the following counties
in Oregon: Baker, Crook,
Deschutes, Gilliam, Grant,
Harney, Jefferson, Kla-
math, Lake, Malheur, Mor-
row, Sherman, Umatilla,
Union, Wallowa, Wasco,
‘Wheeler.

(11) Connecticut, Delaware,

Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky,
Maine, Maryland, Massa-
chusetts, Michigan, New
Hampshire, New Jersey,
New York, North Carolina,
Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode
Island, Vermont, Virginia,
West Virginia, Wisconsin.

All varieties and spe-

cies, including the
flowering forms of
the peach, nectar-
ine, almond, apricot,
plum, cherry, choke-
cherry, quince, pear,
and apple trees and

plants and_ parts
thereof and the fresh
fruit.

All trees, plants, cut-

tings, and scions of
the cultivated and
wild filbert and
hazel.

we ee ee a ee ee a ee ee ee eee ee

Stalks, ears, cobs or other parts

Accepted for mailing only when

accompanied with approved
certificate or Oregon permit

(Column IIT)

Grapevines and cuttings ac-

cepted with State-of-origin cer-
tificate that shipment is from
a section free of phylloxera or
certificate that shipment has
been given an approved treat-
ment under the supervision of
a qualified inspector of State
of origin.

Scions or budwood admitted

under Oregon permit from
Nov. 1to Apr.1. Bare rooted
plants allowed entry from
Nov. 1 to Apr. 1 after fumi-
gation as required, provided
with satisfactory State-of-ori-
gin certificate.

Potatoes—accepted only with

certificate of state-of-origin to
show the potatoes and district
where grown are free of infesta-
tion or that the potatoes were
fumigated. ...

Genus rubus, such as black-

berry, dewberry, loganberry,
and raspberry and their horti-
cultural varieties, accepted
under field inspection certifi-
cate of State of origin. ...

or debris (except seed and
shelled grain free from frag-
ment of cob and other plant
debris) of corn, broom corn,
sorghums or Sudan grass; cut
flowers or entire plants of
dahlia, gladiolus (except
corms, bulbs, or tubers with-
out stems) chrysanthemum,
aster; lima beans in the pod,
green shell beans in the pod (of
the variety known as cran-
berry or horticultural); beets
with tops; and rhubarb—ad-
mitted under approved disin-
fection treatment certificate
issued by U. S. Department
of Agriculture or State of
origin.

The following admitted if ac-

companied with certificate of
inspection showing freedom of
infestation: Beans in the pod,
beets with tops, rhubarb (cut
or plants), cut flowers or
entire plants of chrysanthe-
mum, aster, or entire plants of
gladiolus and dahlia.

Plant pests
and diseases

(Column IV)

Grape phyllox-
era.

Oriental fruit

moth.

Potato tuber

moth.

Filbert blight.

Virus diseases

of the genus
FUDUSH oes.

European corn

borer.
68 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July—Sept.
Plants and plant products prohibited or regulated entry into Oregon—Continued.

Plants and plant products affected



, : Plant pests
Area quarantined Acceptance for mail- ae .
ing entirely pro- Accepted for mailing only when | and diseases

ibi ied with approved
hibited from quar- accompanie
antined area certificate or Oregon permit

(Column I) | (Column II) (Column IIT) (Column IV)
(13) California, .Delawargiah see eet en Lae Tomatoes and tomato plants | Tomato pin
Florida, New Mexico, Mis- require certificate pf State of worm..
sissippi, Pennsylvania, Vir- origin showing fruit or plants
ginia, and Hawaii. were grown and shipped from

a free area, or treated with
Oregon approved formula.



(13) All States east of and in- | Chestnut and chin- | Foreign grown chestnuts and | Chestnut

cluding Montana, Wyom- quapin trees, nuts, chinquapins not restricted blight.
ing, Colorado, and New cuttings, grafts, or when reshipped into Oregon
Mexico. scions. in the original unopened con-
tainers.
14) Territory of Hawaii_____- Maunaloa Blowers... 2222. este ee ee ee East Indian

bean borer.

(15). Counties in Arizona: | AD” teces,, , cuttings] o.u4 abe Seen eee eee Peach mosaic.



Apache, Cochise, Coconino, grafts, scions, or
Graham, Maricopa, Pima, buds of the peach
Santa Cruz, and Yavapai. and nectarine, in-

Counties in California: Im- cluding the flower-
perial, Los Angeles, Orange, | ing forms.
Riverside, San Bernardino, |
and San Diego.

Counties in. Colorado: ,.Delta,))| 21) trees, cuttings, = 2.228 2402-422. 5 eee Peach mosaic.
Garfield, Mesa, and Monte- grafts, scions, or
zuma. buds of the peach

Counties in New Mexico: and nectarine, in-

Bernalillo, Dona Ana, Lin- cluding the flower-
coln, Otero, Rio Arriba, ing forms.
Sandoval, Santa Fe, Sierra,
Socorro, Ta0s, and Valencia.
Counties in Oklahoma: Bryan.
Counties in ‘Texas: Bowie,
Brown, Callahan, -Cher-
okee, Comanche, Denton,
Eastland, El] Paso, Erath,
Floyd, Grayson, Gregg,
Hopkins, Jones, Mills, Palo
Pinto, Rusk, San Saba,
Smith, Tarrant, and Wil-
barger.

Counties in Utah: Grand and
Washington.

(16) Alabama, arkansas, | Peach, nectarine, or |_----.--_-------- eee ee Peach yellows,
Connecticut, Delaware, apricot trees; cut- little peach
District of Columbia, tings, grafts, scions, and peach
Florida, Georgia, Indiana, buds, ocr pits, in- rosette.
Kentucky, Maryland, Mas- cluding any trees
sachusetts, Michigan, Mis- budded or grafted
sissippi, New Jersey, New on peach stock or
York, North Carolina, Ohio, peach roots—from
Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, areas where any of
Rhode Island, South Caro- these diseases are
lina, Tennessee, Virginia, known to exist.

and West Virginia.



Shippers desiring Oregon permits must make application therefor direct to
the Division of Plant Industry, State Department of Agriculture, Salem, Oreg.

Postmasters at places in Oregon where State inspection of plants and plant
products is maintained under the Terminal Inspection Act should take the
action prescribed by paragraph 4 (b), section 596, Postal Laws and Regulations,
if parcels sent to such officers for terminal inspection are found to be in violation
of these plant quarantine laws or regulations.


1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 69

PENALTIES IMPOSED FOR VIOLATIONS OF THE PLANT
QUARANTINE ACT

According to reports received by the Bureau during the period July 1 to

September 30, 1942, penalties have recently been imposed by the proper authori-
ties for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act, as follows

QUARANTINES AFFECTING MEXICAN PRODUCTS

In the case of the United States versus the persons listed below, for attempt-
ing to smuggle in contraband plant material, the penalties indicated were
imposed by the United States customs officials at the following ports:





Name Port Contraband BPoRLLY
SUB WE SISCIOS2 2-4 ee ce eet Brownsville, Tex..._| 2 avocados with seed______________ $1
Eusebio Benavides Garza_._.--------]----- RETO m ce sey ahd fyb 5 avocados with seed___________-- 1
@onstancioMiendoza=222-.2-=2-- =: 222s. be ters ee APL MAM ROL uate feet eee 1
Piggalipe Guera..-.--22e_ ly ee eS Came sete eee Pre ae Mer eUPINE OR) oe oem 2 pee ee 1
SURISESY SURG ewes fore pe See de One ee see Se PR IURSE ayant eee Ne 1
DRA VW ETON > eee) edd se 2) Del Rio; Dex2s 22-2 PAIMEN CORSE ees Peed eae ey Tee 1
@andelario Rodriguez.-.-.2-~--s-- +52 _L-- GOn sa eee 2 avocados. - ----- EN pe eee ee 1
WIRE apCIOLEG. ee ee Cen ager ee Stites loca rete oo ot Oe 1
Teresa Torres de Moreno-.-----------|----- On 275 Senile * DAV OCACOSS ee rae Sees nee 1
pAnCIeeii tr? rn tr AS GOms ssa ayes ee ee CO RSP RR RAR Ae Sate See 1
pean OTe pet renee ry nn 5 POE (a (Cea eye ae See GSVOCHd OS cw Pek ae he eee 1
Francisco Mota Rodriguez-_-_-..------|----- (LO Eas Sales FES Yoo MDOGESISUCALCANe: 2 -=— 2 1
Rosa Mild onad Os = oeee= fal eae Tk a See COLES et Se STA VOCHUOSee eee ee ees rn 1
Eustolia Rodriguez Vda. de Garza__- Eagle Pass, Tex_-_-__- ESTO MULTI Seer leary oot A ate Fee 1
OHNO pate eee ee be Ret ans | ed CV Se ators 2 = ZEN AN OCS Seer ae 1
Ramonaseins Guedes. <2. lace eee onte Pe Ge: 1 avocado seed_-_-_._-- oy a ee 1
lois Montalvo diugo 22-2 ses ee Gos sens Nien ARITA OCG Meer emmy en Eee 1
oloresAty ala dear a2 = ee es Os 45 Aeuek lS tee Oitic Seip aero minty eRe Se hse eee 1
yosela Cruz de Valdez. \ou- 222) 2-222 Ls eG ass ef BYDB AUS u erty CR ee eee 1
HB ZA ASiTOC ee ee ee eS Ae TS UE te 4 pomecnanatesses.= = ee es 1
emma GnttOrrae oe. 278s PE Pe Nik GOr 2 LSS. Le Pe DE AepSeer e052 kao a ee 1
Teodora Martinez Herrera ._-.------.|----- Gos Si aeus-nelac SDU DSS Hee aoe Sores ee 1
Virginia Macias de Bosquez_-_-------|_---- (ea ee BLAVOCAMO) SCOUS= a. 5 ot 1
GuadauperGre Wiilths. 9. 2-282 oe sees GOSS Bec ee IS ORAM C Bese co eee ee Se ag 1
pusana Montel vos. 2% 42 22525. £2 32/2! doe ay. Sets Ip each we Ces. Lee ie) hee 1
Ramon Villasenor Careaga_-__--------|_---- COS aA A AVOCAMO Se ree eee a 1
IMR TIRS SDEMOMO es. oe omen oa ean Hidalgo, "Tex.+=.-.. MeIMLAN COGS cate ees oe NI ee 1
Santos Viantimezse=s 2s 2 2 NE ys oa COE see ae TAO DIES Meee eS 2 tank emt eee or 1
Tia) alo) ( Choy Ns / a ays Se a Ae ee | ee GOES . PFET: Dra ee eae Se SER ee 1
GunllermavEerrera.-.=--.--2—---2-22--|---L GOs ee ee ae TP VOINGSE Sees 5am = Neate fa 1
OMIstIN a DOULIOZ. 252 2258 obo a st olii a. a GO se. Se ak BONERS ge ee as ae Ay 1
Miparishomepamma sees 222 oo Ne. Fe es GOSS vemos. oe HIAVOCACOISGCUS 2" eee-2-— se 1
DAM bIALOPNAMIORS hese vista _ Sse 2 Pe Gore es Le SV OCHUOSt ine ewer nn fk 8 |
PODER UO MTA Gers 5S Bee Se ee ae OO. Be a 8 DAVOCAC OSE resus ae Mi ats 7 By as TF on 1
AMOCRIVA Can b Ue a sas. fee et EuNaIEO, exes se sy ORDIANGSE ee ee aes Bee cee 1
Gere we vayInonde seen eee Fe OL eek QATMAN OCS! Aes see ee Se 1
Binlores Balezars Est Aye eek hele a cu Sa Abe ees ISrrane Ores eee eye Se 1
PEE LP MOROU: 4 22 22 toe eee cl DOE See SPOMESPANALRSHeS =! oo ee 1
Bite ae ELOORA S22. Se WE Oe pe ee Sd to LOVE Na Spt, ae eee eae ae ri 1
Poul raNGINeee. Soe Polo. Rees wk 0G Rhee eee DIDlants ees e ees nse Been eS 1
PRO WanuOmEuzeteos Ss i ee COLE Ree ree Odrishipotatoese 242 Sess se 1
PANIES UCLA VIArbING 229222222 cess ce | CO taper SSeS Pee ibsookz ato ee hs ee. 1
IP COUTOR SOLON ewes at a os eee 0 (oper Ss Sale ae as TE SVOCAGON tee een ee igs TF 1
ERICYRCOMEZ) ChALCIA= = 22 eee aca | ose GOh ss eon eee CHT ATO meee Is eS 1
PAINGUIOR GAS TMO Ree eee see WN ose se 2 eee O\pomesnanatesse so = ooo 2 lak 1
VV ame isp ote Cee ee eee GO ea PRN ATC OCS eet eee es SS 1
GenovedaMscamitla == 22 25 2 Gomse Shake Sea PERV OCAUOS see tne eel De 1
Glen iy mnNeke oa as ee Ste Assos see AORN RIP epee Le wie Fo Tt 8? 1
IBeniniminkGastillon ss et ee ate Goss Nate. Fae ak 1 mango, 2 peaches, and 2 apples-___ 1
TEE ELS MILE fo ae eee Gal a a) (ee GOs ey ae ee BIDRACNCSeeet eet a ee eS 1
INBCHmO vrendiola...- so). kee] MOS To. area NS APA OCHMOSH 22s me eel oS Se 1
Ber BEULO Ze 32525 S82 ly lle MO Ae ee. er of te, PEA OCAU OS ae eer ig io Sk 1
Melting Barrientos: +=. .-..-...4=|_-L CORE eee eee Ta 16 pears and 1 avocado seed__--___- 1
FEO PGUOMLANZanOe sa). 25 2 er ot eee COs ree YS ee RAN OLAUOS tere sob Soke ae 1
malcentenVionenOsse 2s 2. 8s ee a ae GONsn Ec hecoh ares 2 avocados and 3 pomegranates-____ 1
HMM ape AnimMen Or. 2 2.522 25 See GOspw penn eet IbAVOCSCO'SeGd | = aoe ew esata eee 1
Guadalipe balomaeets 22-8 les OKC ae a ik eee Seger een 2 pomegranates: ..-2.-.-.-~---.=,.- 1
Lorenzs Martinez2:__-._+.-.......--.|-...- igeye o Sa! oe De PUNNGB 23M 3 oe ee Eee 1
IATIACIOLONE OUCZ ase sno eee ee. S Corea Foe ASV OCACOLSECUS 22 ea ee oe 1
Pot OMMese wees oe el COREL Ue a. 2 peaches and 1 pear_-_-__________- 1
serie MAE erect kt eS CO Rees kee” Pav OCAC ON) 3 See re eee NS 1
SQUMIOWROGIICUEZEe 2 2) see lee GOP ese E ies. Se [slope aieer ea, 208 ae 8 1
Meneonna. | Orrez.- of.) ut GOS ea Grp lambseree toes (ee eee ed eS 1
RAGS OriG@ea aPC Sc oo a se et GOs rs ss TIA VORA OM we eae re ee hs 1
PIBSTACLO DONS nos et bl. Nee Goiesise. soe 2 avocados and 2 peaches___________ 1
MSITUBIVHITOTIGES Se oe eee Se eee CLG ess Fee Ss AVVO COSE eeeeeenae eee fis oe Foe 1
Morentimis Cervantes}. so ahah k ko a ee SHVOCAGOS. = ee eee Se oh il
70 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July—Sept.

Name Port Contraband Penalty









Wann sGASas 2s. a he | eal Oi wee pe te 4 avocados... 2-6 434-0 eee $1
Habs eeIMOriz. +. 2.2 hs. Ge ae ae Ot eee ee S OLanees. ef a 1
Caesario Rios 802...) . - 7B ee Core. Serer Eres st 4 plants. 1.221... 28) . SS ee 1
Victorinia: Vers...-=.~... 22-2 ee |e Gre. ee ee 1 apples * 122-3. 425 3 eee 1
Cirilo Escobeda..-. =... .cas13seeee | eee Gibsie A ths cee ye 1 avocado, 1 quince, and 1 pome- 1
granate.
orenza Gonzales =... 6 eee ee Oa ei et a DS 1 avocado and 3 guavas.__-___-___- 1
Wraria Perez Soliss = Si ek ees Cie eee eee ee ee T peach=2) 4.2. 2e8 ee 1
Manta Briqness £01) Sore Le eeee 2 oa ce doo Cent. tee S applesiit i Lick Jt. eee 1
Francisco Gareiaeas. 4 o=-) een oe ale oe Aout i nsttes. ores 4,oranges.: 22. fe.tiet) eae eee 1
Pelip: Garcial 22. AL sree Ce eee nen ees OO 2c stsssoee 2'oranges.__-_2 4.) ei eee 1
Maria Silvarde Garzaes: 25 2a ane 00.3 See 18 plants: .42 21... oS ee 1
ilia Psparanza ‘Bustillass es dO eee 1 orange and 3 guavas________---_- 1
Seferina, Pena. oss e.. 42 oe an ees Laredo, Tex. .--325:¢ |) pear). 2221 ee ee ut
Belen i. Wompeane ease Eee G0. 222 ee 1 avocado and 17 plants____-_____- 1
Resinoe Sanches ese Se se WOÂ¥S=. =o soe ee Sav0Cad 6s. 2. ee 1
Wicela Vaquera: 9" Se ee alee dot?:- 22a 2 avocados with seed ___.____--=.2. a
Esther Jimtenez- 7 6 Weise tie leh lee GOS. SS e Me 8 plants! ....._.u. 23 ee a;
Mrs; Joseta’ Bde Perales = - = Fe ee dows _22e2).27. 32 plants: _......- =_ 2-2 2
ROM Camano: Wane 2 Ee ees dOsas=. es 3 guavas and 1 plant_____._______- 2
Dank JOHNS. 22a ee ee GOs... es I plants 2.2). eee 5
Francisco Martinez. __-=<._-_-_.-_- nach ea ee C04: 2. 2 ae oO 8VOC&O0S... 2... -. 2.22. 1
Hnriqueba, Vulerrenle ee eee GOSe no ens 2 mangoes! >. --_..--- eee 1
Beatrice Arreaga 2 ee se eee Osh aes 2-2 See S.avocados. !—. 22222425255. 1
Polores: Garcia." 2 ee eee Gow. See oka e L.mango._. nao ee 1
NV CHO Te ONEV AT OS © ges ere | Osos. ae Sap pleS: 2 71 2 ee 1
idiaveinojoss- 2 ea ae ee ee GoS3 Ee Mie 2 ee 2.peaches .- .. 32s Aves 2 1
Braneiscol hs Estradow e222 Bee ee CLOTS AS SOR ese 2 I fUaVea.. . 22 eset ee i
Cirlomaneher aes Fee 8 eee ee GOW. 3. ee es 40 agave plants--__- =.=... pee 2
Belvvedrangss 4 ee CC ee Ue | eee GO 4s ees OG OLANLCS- ef 5c ha ee 1
Ae VASUUCZ. sere eee kee mee Gout Bees Lies 2 DlANtS. 3. 2. 2.5) Nee ee 1
Emilio Dally: =: es eee ae eee GOP tessa eee wee 10‘avocados. .._-__.- 2) See 1
AGelaId a Salinas sess ee een 5 ee alee CQO 2 aaa ee Anodes sugarcane: _._ === ps sees 1
Bilomen’ Pena! 2s 20 ee ee eee G04so ssh see ee I plant) --. -2=2-2-.=_-22 2 =e eee 1
Eva Rodriquez de Salinas_________-_- Tomas Dex = eae 10 plants with! soil. ! 2 2s= saa 3




ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY
AND PLANT QUARANTINE

P. N. ANNAND, Chief.

Avery S. Hoyt, Associate Chief.

S. A. RoHwer, Assistant Chief in Charge of Regulatory Work.

F. C. BrsHoprp, Assistant Chief in Charge of Research Work.

W. L. PopHaAM, Assistant Chief in Charge of Control Operations.

F. H. SPeENcER, Assistant Chief in Charge of Business Administration.

Rouia P. CurRIiE, Hditor.

J. A. Hystop, in Charge, Division of Insect Pest Survey and Information.

J. I. HAMBLETON, in Charge, Division of Bee Culture Investigations.

D. L. VAN DINE, in Charge, Division of Fruit Insect Investigations.

FE. C. CRAIGHEAD, in Charge, Division of Forest Insect Investigations.

W. H. WHITE, in Charge, Division of Truck Crop and Garden Insect Investiga-
lions.

C. M. PacKarp, in Charge, Division of Cereal and Forage Insect Investigations.

R. W. HARNED, in Charge, Division of Cotton Insect Investigations.

W. E. Dove, in Charge, Division of Insects Affecting Man and Animals.

C. P. CLAUSEN, in Charge, Division of Control Investigations.

R. C. Roark, in Charge, Division of Insecticide Investigations.

C. F. W. MuESEBECK, in Charge, Division of Inseet Identification.

C. P. CLAUSEN, in Charge, Division of Foreign Parasite Introduction.

J. RF. Martin, in Charge, Division of Plant Disease Control.

B. M. GAppis, in Charge, Division of Domestic Plant Quarantines.

EK. R. SAsscer, in Charge, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines.

A. F. Burgess, in Field Charge, Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail Moth Control (head-
quarters, Greenfield, Mass.).

E. G. Brewer, in Field Charge, Japanese Beetle and Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail
Moth Quarantines, and Dutch Elin Disease Eradication (headquarters, Bloom-
field, N. J.).

R. E. McDoNaALp, in Field Charge, Pink Bollworm and Thurberia Weevil Quaran-
tines (headquarters, San Antonio, Ter.).

P. A. Horas, in Field Charge, Mexican Fruitfly Quarantine (headquarters,
Harlingen, Tex.). -

CLAUDE WAKELAND, in Field Charge, Grasshopper Control (headquarters, Denver,
Colo.).

A. C. Baker, in Field Charge, Fruitfly Investigations (headquarters, Mexico City,

‘ Mexico).
71

U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 1942


|. Wie occ do ei




i, ie ie =
. 2 j _— tine ee eh iy

Tora cee - aes age

ig

















Aime Haddintinnst to ay
wk W kegerky (0 STRATE Yo rey
< neve ymge Snined or STUD Wee Shane
Wahab a aha lo soa Lalas 2
pS CUE LI, Ger) tai $739,102 i, OSE ad AY a
REMUS A asee aa Woo th.AD aoheauktk ye) oe
whign 3 wi Sc} ae reat Vwi arvAAw MOTB IV ERL it ae
ore A , eROP DGS Ah SMP Seae" Poa. fa aiyeelty we (rs
SaaS Josaseh shee ben Kev. doayt tee Poh, § OAD a a

alk Panis ena 4 warty SUOMA Hip Day Te Leura aqunae tt
erotingtizeent tygen\ doe ly 14 sesteter Ha ero














pharretic hk. hati eed h eaephaos whose LNT iperyig:s 3
ROMO Gta ICL SONTAO'T YO Ieee so
are Hyuk eoeeL ii fp wetcto ether ana J tea
te POV Meigen, ho eter Ne Re MSY Ah a eaul
a COTS Der iL Sie Gn. eh Ws te mynd + it et)

ARYA SRL Fete yA) ehh EMF um
eoetT data ge dd $e, DAY is etev Fh ve folekaic yO RE

nant my onD Hime who" TolanetiC ett ¥ Ae

Aca) JoviacD ho WV THY isto bi G Aol wea; fares joi baal ur
. {abot SVE 2 'e
BOvA Ivso Voth weet bap eljautt sasioanl >, aN veh) bisit Prey 3%
a #tohinsphbrav) otssoihovel Rays yeh mv fiw Tey wont ore

me fie &

moray 0s WH wrod D baw acrowsiot akcrtt tet BPA pet I, 7g
; .(.ca'T Obtolth ent eyite ibne

233) sipbesk> sielleiveuwes alia 't MHNOH HS a\h oyna) hla? a 3 ae

. ‘ aha

UR TOH Le) \orwad tsCuo,i BSD) Son HiohA ar. Ag 3) q

4 nhs Hf avtberph mut) AON Qi BS Nit, yar NON > binky oa a

~

tae? : £27940 Supra ta rAanaerde ae
§. B. A.—B. E. P,Q. No. 153 Issued March 1943

United States Department of Agriculture

BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS

OCTOBER-DECEMBER 1942



CONTENTS
Page
GOisraa ine sor Other, oficial announcements). <2 2b tee ae eee ne ep a eee te 73
Announcement relating to black stem rust quarantine (No. 38) ----.-_---_--_____--_________.__.e
Administrative instructions; classification of barberry and mahonia plants (B. E. P.§Q. 385,
Rema VASIGIN)- thse Brs st pe saleee setts Ba Re Noy fe So Mel A oh el 8 ye dy ca FR
Announcements relating to gypsy motb and brown-tail moth quarantine (No. 45). 74
Gypsy moth and brown-tail moth quarantine regulations modified (B. E. P. Q. 386, seventh 42
MW COLDER ES tek Pte reP A tee Pook a EO LI eee eo sks ee LU MU Bee ee 74
TNE GMUCHLONSLO;DOStMASTEESH sate Alas ER Le, get Ed a a a, 76
Annountéements relating to white-fringed beetle quarantine (No. 72)____________.......__ 6 76
White-fringed beetle quarantine revised (press notice)__-_.-.__-__...0--2- lee 76
Revision of quarantine and regulations effective December 28, 1942.._________________.________ 77
INDiice ie general public. through newspapers.2 22+ = fase be, oes ee. ete ee) 84
White-fringed beetle regulations modified (B. E. P. Q. 485, eleventh revision)_____________ 84
Announcement relating to Mexican border peoueulons See ete: ee) SEO She Esa, 2 See eee eee ee 85
insiienGnusto collectorsiof customs (T) Dis0757) 22 f 22-2 Secale 85

MISC MATIC OUSHIUCMI Se sous 2h Senn eee set OR al Sb le ee Bo SoS het it Le ee ie. 85
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Argentina (B. E. P. Q. 426, supplement No.{7) § 85
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, British Congo (B. E. P. Q. 448, supplement No. 1) 86

List of current quarantine and other restrictive orders and miscellaneous KEgtlavions ss sss pee! 86
Menmiinainispectlon Olplants ano plantiproductsre sees eh os be 93
Plants and plant products addressed to places in California_-_.._..__-____.___)_.) |. 93
GalonmNa Stabe Dla quarantine modined =.) Swe Sy ee ke 94
Penalties umpesed for violations of the:Plant Quarantine Act?) 2). 2s 94
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine______________.__-____________________ 96



QUARANTINE AND OTHER OFFICIAL

ANNOUNCEMENTS
ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO BLACK STEM RUST QUARANTINE
(NO. 38)
B. E. P. Q. 385, Third Revision Effective December 15, 1942

TITLE 7—AGRICULTURE
CHAPTER JIJ—BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE
PART 301—DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES
SUBPART—BLACK STEM RUST (QUARANTINE NO. 88)

ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS; CLASSIFICATION OF BARBERRY AND
MAHONIA PLANTS

-_









INTRODUCTORY NOTE

Under this revision of Circular B. E. P. Q. 385, two species of barberries,
Berberis aemulans and B. dictyophylla var. albicaulis, have been removed from
the list of species which may be shipped into or between the protected States,
inasmuch as recent tests have shown that both aemulans and dictyophylla are
susceptible to the black stem rust. B. bealei (Mahonia) has been added to the
permitted list. The range of this species for satisfactory cultivation, however,
is practically limited to the area south of the protected States.

512242—43-——-1 73
74 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct.—Dec,

Other modifications in the circular are concerned only with improved nomen-
clature, B. thunbergii pluriflora having been eliminated from paragraph (A)
for the reason that it is not in reality a different variety of Japanese barberry ;
B. thunbergii plurifiora erecta has been changed to B. thunbergi f. erecta; and
B. diversifolia has been eliminated from paragraph (B) because it is a synonym
for Mahonia aquifolium.

§ 801.88a. Administrative instructions; classification of barberry and mahonia
plants.—The rules and regulations supplemental to § 301.88 [Notice of Quarantine
No. 38, revised, on account of the black-stem rust, effective September 1, 1937]
provide that no plants, cuttings, stocks, scions, buds, fruits, seeds, or other plant
parts capable of propagation, of the genera Berberis, Mahonia, or Mahoberberis,
“shall be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from any State of the conti-
nental United States or from the District of Columbia into any of the protected
States, namely, Colorado, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri,
Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ghio, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Virginia,
West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming, nor from any one of said protected
States into any other protected State, unless a permit shall have been issued
therefor by the United States Department of Agriculture, except that no re-
strictions are placed by these regulations on the interstate movement either of
Japanese barberry (Berberis thunbergii) or any of its rust-resistant varieties,
or of cuttings (without roots) of Mahonia shipped for decorative purposes and
not for propagation.” (See paragraph (a) of regulation 2 (§ 801.88-2 (a)).)

The protected States referred to under paragraph (B) are the 17 barberry
eradication States named in the regulation quoted above. Barberry and mahonia
plants other than those listed in paragraphs (A) and (B) following may not be
shipped interstate into any of the protected States.

(A) BARBERRIES WHICH MAY BE SHIPPED INTERSTATE TO ANY STATE WITHOUT PERMIT
OR RESTRICTION

Berberis thunbergi, B. thunbergi var. atropurpurea, B. thunbergi var. maai-
mowicei, B. thunbergi var. minor, B. thunbergi f. erecta.

(B) BARBERRIES WHICH MAY BE SHIPPED INTO OR BETWEEN PROTECTED STATES UNDER
FEDERAL PERMIT

Berberis aquifolium (Mahonia), B. bealet (Mahonia), B. beaniana, B. buaxi-
folia, B. candidula, B. chenaulti (hybrid), B. circumserrata, B. concinna, B. dar-
wini, B. edgeworthiana, B. gagnepaini, B. gilgiana, B. julianae, B. koreana, B.
mentorensis, B. nervosa (Mahonia), B. potanini, B. repens (Mahonia), B. san-
guinea, B. sargentiana, B. stenophylia (hybrid), B. triacanthophora, B. verru-
culosa.

Application for permits should be addressed to the Division of Domestic Plant
Quarantines, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, United States De-
partment of Agriculture, Washington, D. C.

(7 CFR § 301.38-2; sec. 8, 39 Stat. 1165, 44 Stat. 250; 7 U. S. C. 161.)

Done at Washington, D. C., this 3d day of December 1942.

P. N. ANNAND,
Chief.

[Filed with the Division of the Federal Register December 10, 1942, 11:06 a. m.; 7

F. R. 10305.]

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO GYPSY MOTH AND BROWN-TAIL
MOTH QUARANTINE (NO. 45)

B. E. P. Q. 386 (7th revision) Effective November 20, 1942
TITLE 7—AGRICULTURE

CHAPTER III—BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE
Part 301—DoMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES
GYPSY MOTH AND BROWN-TAIL MOTH QUARANTINE REGULATIONS MODIFIED

This revision of circular B. E. P. Q. 386 adds to the list of articles exempted
from certification requirements, exfoliated or expanded vermiculite when packaged

——
1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 40

in closed containers, salal (known to the trade as lemon) cuttings, for orna-
mental use, and sawdust and shavings produced under certain prescribed con-
ditions and so identified.

Wintergreen cuttings have been more specifically classified as to species.

§ 301.45a Administrative instructions; articles exempted from restrictions.—
Pursuant to the authority conferred upon the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology
and Plant Quarantine by the second proviso of § 301.45, Chapter III, Title 7,
Code of Federal Regulations (notice of Quarantine No. 45, on account of the
gypsy moth and brown-tail moth), the following articles, the interstate move-
ment of which is not considered to constitute a risk of moth dissemination, are
exempted from the restrictions of the regulations of this quarantine, effective
November 20, 1942.

Acacia cuttings for ornamental use (Acacia spp.).

Banana stalks, when crushed, dried, and shredded.

Birch slabs for use as post cards.

Birch bark when waxed, polished, or otherwise treated to adequately eliminate
all risk of transmitting infestation and when used in the manufacture of novelties.

Box shooks, when newly manufactured and pianed on four sides.

Boxwood cuttings and branches for ornamental use (Bucus sempervirens).

Cable reels, when newly manufactured and empty.

California peppertree cuttings and branches for ornamental use (Schinus
molle).

Clubmoss (sometimes called “ground pine”) (Lycopodium spp.).

Cuttings of woody plants that have been grown in the greenhouse throughout
the year, when labeled on the outside of the container to show that the contents
were greenhouse grown.

Eucalyptus cuttings and branches for ornamental use (HLucalyptus globulus).

Evergreen smilax (Smilag lanceolata).

Fuchsia (Fuchsia spp.).

Galax (Galaz aphylla).

Geranium (Pelargonium spp.).

Heather cuttings for ornamental use (rica spp., Calluna spp.).

Heliotrope (Heliotropium spp.).

Herbarium specimens, when dried, pressed, and treated, and when so labeled
on the outside of each container.

Jerusalem-cherry (Solanum capsicastrum, 8S. pseudocapsicum, S. hendersoni).

Leaves of deciduous or evergreen trees that have been treated or dyed.

Mistletoe (Phoradendron flavescens, Viscum album, ete.

Oregon huckleberry (Vaccinium ovatum).

Partridgeberry (Mitchella repens).

oalal known to the trade as lemon cuttings, for ornamental use (Gaultheria
Shallon).

Sawdust that has been (1) produced in established, nonportable, commercial
sawmills from boards or other timber previously sawed four sides, (2) subse-
quently blown through an air-blast conveyor line having a minimum length of
50 feet and at least one 45° or sharper angle, (3) protected from infestation
prior to shipment, and (4) identified as specified below.

Shavings that have been either (1) produced by planers having 6 or more
blades, or (2) blown through an air-blast conveyor line having a minimum
length of 50 feet and at least one 45° or sharper angle; and in either case pro-
tected from infestation prior to shipment, and identified as specified below.

Invoices and waybills covering bulk carload or less-than-carload shipments of
sawdust or shavings meeting these conditions for exemption shall bear thereon
a notation to the effect that:

“The consignor guarantees that the contents of this shipment have been pro-
duced under conditions which entitle the material to exemption as specified
rf ea Federal gypsy moth quarantine regulations or administrative instructions
thereto.”

Strawberry plants (Fragaria spp.).

Trailing arbutus (Epigaea repens).

Verbena (Verbena spp.).

Vermiculite (variously termed zonolite or mica-gro) when exfoliated or ex-
panded and when packaged in closed containers.

Wintergreen for ornamental use (Gaultheria procumbens, Pyrola spp.). See
also Salal.

Wood flour, pulverized wood, or ground wood sawdust, when processed by
screening or sifting through a screen of at least 30 meshes per inch.
76 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct.—Dee,

These instructions supersede the list of exempted articles contained in B. E.
P. Q. 386, 6th revision, which became effective October 10, 1941.
(7 CFR 301.45; sec. 8, 39 Stat. 1165, 44 Stat. 250; 7 U. S. C. 161.)
Done at Washington this 17th day of November 1942.
Avery S. Hoyt,
Acting Chief.

eed with the Division of the Federal Register November 25, 1942, 11:00 a. m.; 7
F, 82



INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS

Post OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
OFFICE OF THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, December 28, 1942.

MODIFICATION OF RESTRICTIONS OF GYPSY MOTH AND BROWN-TAIL MOTH QUARANTINE
(QUARANTINE NO. 45)

The notice of this Bureau appearing in the PostaL BULLETIN of October 20,
1941, and on pages 23 and 24 of the November 1941 Supplement to the Postal
Guide is amended by adding the following to the list of articles exempted from
plant quarantine restrictions imposed under Quarantine Order No. 45 of the
United States Department of Agriculture on account of the gypsy moth and
brown-tail moth, the interstate movement of which is not considered to constitute
a risk of moth dissemination :

Salal, known to the trade as lemon cuttings, for ornamental use (Gaultheria
shallon).

Sawdust and shavings when accompanied with a statement to the effect that:
“The consignor guarantees that the contents of this shipment have been

produced under conditions which entitle the material to exemption as speci-

fied in the Federal gypsy moth quarantine regulations or administrative

instructions thereto.”

‘Vermiculite (variously termed zonolite or mica-gro) when exfoliated or
expanded and when packaged in closed containers.

Wintergreen for ornamental use (Gaultheria procumbens, Pyrola spp.).

Postmasters will please correct their list of exempted articles and be governed
accordingly. (See par. 1, sec. 595, Postal Laws and Regulations, and article
62 (c), p. 24, of the current Postal Guide, Part I.)

RAMSEY S. BLAck,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE
QUARANTINE (NO. 72)

WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE QUARANTINE REVISED
[Press notice]

DECEMBER 31, 1942.

Quarantine and regulations against the white-fringed beetle have been revised
(effective December 28, 1942) the Department of Agriculture said today.

First found in the United States in 1986 in the Gulf coast area, white-fringed
beetles are potentially serious agricultural pests of South American origin. The
larvae or grubs live in the soil, where they feed on and destroy the roots of such
important food, feed, and fiber crops as peanuts, cotton, and corn. While the
adult beetles are less destructive to crops than the grubs, they feed on a great
variety of plants and cause some damage.

Extensive efforts to suppress beetle populations and prevent damage by this
new pest are conducted cooperatively by the Department and the States. Fed-
eral and State quarantines are enforced to prevent spread of the pest to other
States and to uninfested parts of the States in which the beetle has been found.

The regulations were revised because of the discovery of white-fringed beetle
infestations during the past Summer and fall in the vicinity of Wilmington and
1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 77

other places in New Hanover County, N. C., as well as in the vicinity of Goldsboro,
Wayne County, and in parts of Pender County.

The area regulated by the quarantine is now extended to include parts of these
counties and also several areas in Alabama and Mississippi in which infestations
of the beetles have been found since the quarantine and regulations were last
revised. These include part of Lowndes County, Ala., and part of Jefferson Davis
County, Miss. Minor additions to the quarantined area are made in Dallas
County, Ala., and in six Mississippi counties. No change is made in the regulated
areas in Florida and Louisiana.

Articles brought under restriction for the first time include bulbs, corms,
tubers, and rhizomes of ornamental plants, and moss and. gravel. Other re-
stricted articles and materials that must be certified for movement interstate
from the regulated areas to points outside include soil, nursery stock, hay, pota-
toes, scrap metal, implements, forest products, and building materials.

TITLE 7—AGRICULTURE
CHAPTER III—BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

Part 301—DoMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES

SUBPART—W HITE-FRINGED BEETLE (QUARANTINE NO. 72)

REVISION OF QUARANTINE AND REGULATIONS EFFECTIVE DECEMBER 28, 1942

INTRODUCTORY NOTE

This revision of the quarantine and regulations is made principally because of
the discovery during the past summer and fall of white-fringed beetle infesta-
tions in North Carolina in the vicinity of Wilmington and other places in New
Hanover County, in the vicinity of Goldsboro, Wayne County, and in parts of
Pender County. The regulated area is extended to include parts of the above
counties aS well as several areas in Alabama and Mississippi in which infesta-
tions of the beetles have been found since the quarantine and regulations were
last revised. Brought within the regulated area for the first time are part of
Lowndes County, Ala., and part of Jefferson Davis County, Miss. Minor addi-
tions to the regulated areas are made in Dallas County, Ala., and Forrest, Har-
rison, Jackson, Jones, Pearl River, and Stone Counties, Miss.

All restricted articles are placed under quarantine throughout the year be-
cause of seasonal variation in the development of the pests in the different areas,
the differences in the life history and habits of the various species, and other
biological factors. However, the quarantine provides for modification of cer-
tification requirements as to articles, seasons, or areas through administrative
instructions issued from time to time by the Chief of the Bureau when in
his judgment no hazard of dissemination of the beetles is presented by such
modification. Articles brought under restriction for the first time in this revision
include gravel, moss, and bulbs, corms, tubers, and rhizomes of ornamental plants.
Peanut shells are no longer restricted by these regulations.

Minor modifications have been made in regulations pertaining to limited
permits (paragraph (0b) of § 301.72-5) and to the cleaning of railway cars
(§ 301.72-8).

Arrangements for inspection of the restricted articles may be made by ad-
dressing the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, P. O. Box 989, Gulf-
port, Miss., or other field offices listed in the administrative instructions.

DETERMINATION OF THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE

The Secretary of Agriculture, having given the public hearing required by law
and having determined that it was necessary to quarantine the States of Ala-
bama, Florida, Louisiana, and Mississippi to prevent the spread of infestations
of introduced species of the genus Pantomorus, subgenus Graphognathus, com-
monly known as white-fringed beetles, not theretofore widely prevalent or dis-
tributed within and throughout the United States, on December 14, 1938, pro-
78 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct.—Dee.

mulgated Notice of Quarantine 301.72, part 301, chapter III, title 7, effective
January 15, 19389, with regulations supplemental thereto, and revision thereof,
effective on and after May 9, 1942, governing the movement of live white-fringed
beetles in any stage of development and carriers thereof. The Seeretary of
Agriculture, having given a further public hearing in the matter, has determined |
that it is necessary to revise further the quarantine and regulations for the
purpose of quarantining the State of North Carolina because of the discovery
of substantial infestations of the white-fringed beetle therein.

ORDER OF THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE

Pursuant to the authority conferred upon the Secretary of Agriculture by
section 8 of the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912, as amended (7 U.S. €.
161) and the Insect Pest Act of March 3, 1905 (7 U. S. C. 141, 143), the
subpart entitled ‘“White-fringed Beetle” of part 301, chapter III, title 7, Code
of Federal Regulations [B. E. P. Q.—-Q. 72] is hereby revised effective December
28, 1942, to read as follows:

SUBPART—W HITE-FRINGED BEETLE
(QUARANTINE NO. 72)

Authority: §§ 301.72 to 301.72-9 (a), inclusive (except § 301.72-2a), issued
under sec. 8, 39 Stat. 1165, 44 Stat. 250; 7 U. S. C., 1940 ed. 161. § 301.72—2a issued
under sec. 1, 33 Stat. 1269; 7 U. S. C., 1940 ed. 141. § 301.72-9 (b) issued under
sec. 3, 33 Stat. 1270; 7 U. S. C., 1940 ed. 143.

§ 801.72 Notice of quarantine-—Under the authority conferred by section 8
of the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912, as amended (7 U.S. C. 161), the
Secretary of Agriculture quarantines the States of Alabama, Florida, Louisiana,
Mississippi, and North Carolina to prevent the spread of dangerous infestations
of introduced species of the genus Pantomorus, subgenus Graphognathus, com-
monly known as white-fringed beetles, and under authority contained in the
aforesaid Plant Quarantine Act and the Insect Pest Act of March 3, 1905. (7
U. S. GC: 141, 148), the Secretary of Agriculture prescribes regulations. Hereafter
the following articles (as specifically named in the regulations supplemental
hereto, in modifications thereof, or in administrative instructions as provided in
the regulations supplemental hereto), which are capable of carrying the afore-
said insect infestations, viz, (1) nursery stock and other stipulated plants or
plant products; (2) soil independent of, or in connection with, nursery stock,
plants, or other products; or (3) other articles as stipulated in § 301.72-3; or
(4) live white-fringed beetles in any stage of development, shall not be trans-
ported by any person, firm, or corporation from any quarantined State into or
through any other State or Territory or District of the United States, under
conditions other than those prescribed in the regulations supplemental hereto:
Provided, That the restrictions of this quarantine and of the regulations supple-
mental hereto may be limited to such areas, designated by the Secretary of Agri-
culture as regulated areas, in the quarantined States, as, in his judgment, shall
be adequate to prevent the spread of the said pest or pests. Any such limitation
shall be conditioned, however, upon the affected State or States providing for
and enforcing the control of the intrastate movement of the restricted articles
and enforcing such other control and sanitation measures with respect to such
areas or portions thereof as, in the judgment of the Secretary of Agriculture, shall
be deemed adequate to prevent the intrastate spread therefrom of said insect
infestation: And provided further, That whenever, in any year, the Chief of the
Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine shall find that facts exist as to
the pest risk involved in the movement of one or more of the articles to which
the regulations supplemental hereto apply, making it safe to modify, by making
less stringent, the restrictions contained in any such regulations, he shall set forth
and publish such finding in administrative instructions, specifying the manner in
which the applicable regulations should be made less stringent, whereupon such
modification shall become effective, for such period and for such regulated area
or portion thereof as shall be specified in said administrative instructions, and
every reasonable effort shall be made to give publicity to such administrative
instructions throughout the affected areas. tG
1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 79

REGULATIONS
Meaning of Terms

§ 301.72-1 Definitions—(a) The pests.—Species of the genus Pantomorus,
subgenus Graphognathus, commonly known as white-fringed beetles, in any stage
of development.

(b) Regulated area.—Any area in a quarantined State which is now, or which
may hereafter be, designated as regulated by the Secretary of Agriculture in
accordance with the provisions of § 301.72, as revised.

(c) Restricted articles—Products or articles of any character whatsoever,
the interstate movement of which is restricted by the provisions of the white-
fringed beetle quarantine, and the regulations supplemental thereto.

(d) Nursery stock—F¥orest, field, and greenhouse-grown annual or perennial
plants, for planting purposes .

(e) Inspector—Duly authorized Federal plant-quarantine inspector.

(f) Certificate—An approved document, issued by an inspector, authorizing
the movement of restricted articles from the regulated areas.

(g) Limited permit—An approved document, issued by an inspector, to allow
controlled movement of noncertified articles to designated and authorized des-
tinations for processing or other restricted handling.

(h) Administrative instructions —Documents issued by the Chief of the Bu-
reau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine relating to the enforcement of the
quarantine. .

(i) Infested or infestation.—Infested by white-fringed beetles, in any stage of
development. (See (a) above.)

(j) Infested area—That portion of the regulated area in which infestation
exists, or in the vicinity of which infestation is known to exist under such condi-
tions as to expose the area to infestation by natural spread of beetles, as deter-
mined by an authorized inspector.

,

Areas Under Regulation

§ 301.72-2. Regulated areas.—The following counties, parishes, cities, and
towns, or parts thereof, as described, are designated by the Secretary of Agricul-
ture as regulated areas:

Alabama.—In Conecuh County: W% T. 5 N., R. 9 E., and all of those por-
tions of Tps. 5 and 6 N., R. 8 E. lying in Conecuh County; in Covington County:
Secs. 30 and 31, T. 2 N., R. 18 E.; secs. 25, 26, 35, and 36, T.2N.,R.17E.;T. 1N.,
Rs. 17 and 18 E. and SE \% T.1N., R. 16 E., and all area south thereof to the
Alabama-Florida State line; also all the town of Opp; in Dallas County: That
area included within a boundary beginning on the Southern Ry., where it crosses
Bougechitto Creek; thence SW. along the Southern Ry. to Caine Creek; thence
SE. along Caine Creek to its intersection with Bougechitto Creek; thence north-
ward along Bougechitto Creek to the starting point; all of Tps. 13 and 14 N., R.
11 E., and secs. 1, 12, 13, 24, 25, and 36, T. 14 N., R. 10 E.; in Escambia County:
Secs. 32, 33, and 34, T. 1 N., R. 8 E., including all of the town of Flomaton; in
Geneva County: Secs. 31, 82, and 38, T. 1 N., R. 19 E., and all area south thereof
to the Alabama-Florida State line, including all of secs. 21 and 28, T. 6 N., R. 19
W.; in Lowndes County: W% T. 14 N., R. 12 E.; in Mobile County: That area
included within a boundary beginning at a point where the eastern boundary of
the city limits of Mobile, if extended northward, would intersect the northern
boundary of S14 T.3 S., R. 1 W.; thence west to Chickasaw Creek; thence
northwestward along Chickasaw Creek to Hight-Mile Creek; thence westerly
along Eight-Mile Creek to the western boundary of R. 1 W.; thence south to
Eslava Creek; thence easterly along Eslava Creek to the city limits of Mobile;
thence southeasterly following the city limits east, south, east, and north to
the starting point, including all of Blakeley Island and the city’ of Mobile;
also that area included within a boundary beginning at a point where old
Highway 90 crosses Fowl River; thence southwestward along old Highway 90
to its junction with the Alabama-Mississippi State line; thence south along the
Alabama-Mississippi State line to the southern boundary of N44 T.758., R. 4 W.;
thence east to the SE. corner sec. 9, T. 7 8., R. 3 W.; thence north to the NE.
corner, sec. 4, T. 7 8., R. 3 W.; thence east to the point where the south bound-
ary of T. 6 S. intersects Fowl River; thence northwestward along Fowl River
SO BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [ Oct.—Dee.

to the starting point; in Monroe County: W% T. 8 N., all of T. 9 N. and the
S% T. 10 N., all in R. 9 E.; S% T. 10 N., all of Tps. 7, 8, and 9N., R. 8 B,
and those portions of Tps. 5 and 6 N., R. 8 BE. lying in Monroe County; sees. 25,
26, 35, and 36, T. 7 N., R. 7 E., and secs. 1 and 2, T. 6 N., R. 7 E.; in Wileowr
County: N% T. 10 N. and S% T. 11 N., R. 9 E., and sees. 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, and
ST AALN. RB. 9 EB

Florida.—In Escambia County: All that part lying south of the northern
boundary of T. 1 N., including all of the city of Pensacola, and that part of the
county north of the southern boundary of T. 5 N. and east of the western bound-
ary of R. 31 W.; in Okaloosa County: T. 5 N., R. 22 W., and secs. 1, 2, and 8,
T.5 N., R. 23 W., and all lands north of both areas to the Florida-Alabama State
line; sees. 7, 8, 9, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, and 21, T. 3 N., R. 23 W., including all of the
town of Crestview; and secs. 13, 14, 28, 24, T. 3 N., R. 24 W.; in Walton County:
T. 5 N., Rs. 20 and 21 W., and secs. 31, 32, and 33, T. 6 N., R. 19 W., and all
lands north of both areas to the Florida-Alabama State line; also secs. 1 to 24,
inclusive, T. 4 N., R. 19 W.

Louisiana.—All of Orleans Parish, including the city of New Orleans, and all
of Saint Bernard Parish; in Hast Baton Rouge Purish: All of T. 7 S8., Rs. 1 and
2 E. and 1 W., including all of the city of Baton Rouge; in Iberia Parish: All of
secs. 24, 37, 38, 39, 53, 55, and 56, T. 13 S., R. 5 E., and secs. 46, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59,
60, T. 138 S., R. 6 E.; in Jefferson Parish: That part lying north of the township
line between Tps. 14 and 15 S.; in Plaquemines Parish: That part lying north of
the township line between Tps. 15 and 16 S.; in Saint Tammany Parish: All of
secs. 38, 39, and 40, T. 7 S., R. 11 E., and secs. 40 and 41, T. 8 S., R. 11 E.

Mississippi—tIn Covington County: All of secs. 28, 29, 32, and 33, T. 6 N.,
R. 14 W.; in Forrest County: All that portion of T. 5 N., R. 13 W. lying west
of Leaf River; E% T.5N., R. 14 W. and secs. 5 and 8, T. 5 N., R. 14 W.; all
of T. 4 N., Rs. 12 and 13 W., lying west of Leaf River, and that portion of T. 3 N.,
R. 12 W., lying south and west of Leaf River; that portion of T. 3 N., R. 13 W.,
lying east of U. S. Highway 49, and that portion of T. 2 N., R. 12 W. lying east
of U. S. Highway 49; and secs. 1, 2, 3, 4, 9, 10, and 11 and those portions of secs.
12, 13, 14, 15, and 16 lying north of Black Creek in T. 1 N., R. 12 W.; and E%
T. 1 S., R. 12 W.; in Harrison County: That area included within a boundary
beginning at the NW. corner sec. 26, T. 4 S., R. 12 W., thence south to the NW.
corner sec. 14, T. 6 S., R. 12 W.; thence west to the NW. corner sec. 16, T. 6 S.,
R. 12 W.; thence south to the intersection with Wolf River; thence south-
westerly along Wolf River to Saint Louis Bay; thence south along the east shore .
of Saint Louis Bay to the Mississippi Sound; thence eastward along the Missis-
sippi Sound to a point of intersection with the Bay of Biloxi; thence westerly
along the Bay of Biloxi to the SE. corner sec. 17, T. 7 S., R. 10 W.; thence
north along the section line to the NE. corner sec. 5, T. 7 S., R. 10 W.; thence
west along the section line to Biloxi River; thence northwestward along Biloxi
River to the intersection of the east line of sec. 5, T. 6 S., R. 11 W.; thence north
to the Stone County line; thence west to the starting point including all prop-
erties extending over or into the Mississippi Sound and the Bay of Biloxi;
in Hinds County: B14 T. 6 N., R. 3 W., and W144 T. 6 N., R. 2 W-; in Jackson
County: That area included within a boundary beginning at a point where the
east line of sec. 19, T. 7 S., R. 5 W. intersects Escatawpa River; thence west
along said river to the Pascagoula River; thence south along the Pascagoula
River to the township line between Tps. 7 and 8 S.; thence east to the SE.
corner sec. 31, T. 7 S., R. 5 W.; thence north to the starting point; all that
portion of T. 7 S., R. 9 W. lying in- Jackson County and the W% Tps. 7 and
8 S., R. 8 W.: in Jefferson Davis County: Secs. 1, 2, 11, and 12, T. 7N., R. 19 W.;
secs. 35 and 36, T. 8 N., R. 19 W.; sec. 31, T. 8 N., R. 18 W., and secs. 6 and 7,
T. 7 N., R. 18 W., including all of the town of Prentiss; in Jones County: Secs.
16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33,34, and 35, T.9 N., R. SW
secs. 2, 8, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 16, 17, and 18, T. 8 N., R. 11 W.; secs. 13, 14, 24, 25, 35,
and 36, T. 9 N., R. 12 W.; those portions of secs. 23 and 26, T. 9 N., R. 12 W.,
lying east of Tallahoma Creek; secs. 1, 2, 11, 12, 13, and 14, T. 8 N., R. 12 W.;
secs. 25, 26, 27, 34, 35, and 36, T. 6 N., R. 14 W.; secs. 29, 30, 31, and 32, T. 6 N.,
R. 13 W., and those portions of secs. 28 and 33, T. 6 N., R. 138 W., lying west of
Leaf River: in Lamar County: All of the town of Purvis; all of secs. 35 and 36,
T.1N., R. 15 W.; sec. 31, T. 1N,, R. 14 W., and secs. 1 and 2, T. 1 S., R. 15 W.;
in Pearl River County: All that area included within a boundary beginning at a
point at the northern city limits of Poplarville in sec. 19, T. 2 S., R. 15 W. on
the New Orleans and Northeastern R. R.; thence northeasterly along said rail-
1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 81

road to a point where it intersects the south line of sec. 15, T. 1 S., R. 15 W.;
thence east to the SH. corner sec. 14, T. 1 S., R. 15 W.; thence north to the
Lamar County line; thence west and north along said county line to the NW.
corner sec. 4, T. 1 S., R. 15 W.; thence south to the NW. corner sec. 16, T. 1 S.,
R. 15. W.; thence west to the NW. corner sec. 18, T. 1 S., R. 15 W.; thence south
to the NW. corner sec. 18, T. 2 S., R. 15 W.; thence west to the NW. corner sec.
13, T. 2 S., R. 16 W.; thence south along the section line to a point where it
would intersect the line of the northern boundary of Poplarville if extended
westward; thence east along this line to the starting point; all of T. 5 S.,
R. 16 W., and the E% of T. 5 S., R. 17 W. in Stone County: W1% Tps. 2 and
Peete kd Ws- Secss5,,.6,27, 8) 10,518, 19), 20, T..4.8., R, 11 W.; BY TT 2.8.
R. 12 W., and secs. 3, 4, 5, 8, 9, and 10, T.2S., R.12 W.; E% T.35S., R. 12 W.;
and secs. 1, 2, 11, 12, 13, 14, 23, and 24, T. 4 S:, R. 12 W.

North Carolina.—In New Hanover County: The city of Wilmington; Cape
Fear Township; all that part of Hartnett Township lying west of the Wrightsboro-
Winter Park Road, including all of the town of Winter Park; and that part of
Masonboro Township north of the new road between Sunset Park and Winter
Park; in Pender County: Townships of Burgaw, Caswell, and Rocky Point and
that part of Columbia Township lying south of an imaginary straight line drawn
east and west across the township to connect the northern boundaries of Burgaw
and Caswell Townships; in Wayne County: Goldsboro Township.

Articles Prohibited Movement

§ 301.72-2a. Beetles prohibited shipment.—The interstate shipping of living
white-fringed beetles in any stage of development, whether moved independent
of or in connection with any other article, is prohibited, except as provided in
paragraph (b) of § 301.72-9.

Articles Restricted Movement

§ 301.72-8. Restricted articles Except as provided in administrative instruc-
tions, the interstate movement of the following articles from any regulated area
is regulated throughout the year:

(a) Soil, sand, gravel, clay, peat, or muck, whether moved independent of, or
in connection with or attached to nursery stock, plants, products, articles, or
things.

(b) Compost, manure, moss, and leafmold.

(c) Nursery stock.

(d) Grass sod.

(e) Potatoes.

(f) True bulbs, corms, tubers, and rhizomes of ornamental plants.

(g) Hay.

(h) Peanuts in shells.

(i) Seed cotton, cottonseed, and baled cotton lint and linters.

(j) Serap metal and junk.

,(k) Forest products such as cordwood, stump wood, logs, lumber, timbers, posts,
poles, and cross ties.

(1) Brick, tile, stone, and cinders.

(m) Concrete slabs, pipe, and building blocks.

(n) Implements, machinery, equipment, and containers.

Conditions of Interstate Movement

§ 301.72—-4. Conditions governing interstate movement of restricted articles.—
(a) Certification required.—Restricted articles shall not be moved interstate
from a regulated area to or through any point outside thereof unless accompanied
by a valid inspection certificate issued by an inspector: Provided, That certifica-
tion requirements as they relate to part or all of any regulated area may be
waived, during part or all of the year, by the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology
and Plant Quarantine, on his finding and giving notice thereof, in administrative
instructions, that the State concerned has promulgated and enforced adequate
sanitary measures on and about the premises on which restricted articles originate
or are retained, or that adequate volunteer sanitary measures have been applied,
or that other control or natural conditions exist which have eliminated the risk
of contamination by the pests in any stage of development.

§12242—43-—_2
82 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct.—Dee,

(b) Use of certificate on shipments.—Unless exempted by administrative
instructions, every container of restricted articles moved interstate from any
regulated area shall have securely attached to the outside thereof a certificate
or permit issued in compliance with these regulations, except that in the case
of shipments in bulk, by common carrier, a master permit attached to the
shipping order, manifest, or other shipping papers, will be sufficient. In the
case of Shipments in bulk by road vehicle other than common carrier, a
master permit shall accompany the vehicle. Master permits shall accompany
shipments to destination and be surrendered to consignees on delivery.

(c) Movement within continwous areas unrestricted—No certificates are
required for interstate movement of restricted articles when such movement
is wholly within continuous regulated areas.

(d) Articles originating outside the regulated areas—No certificates are
required for the interstate movement of restricted articles originating outside
of the regulated areas and moving through or from a regulated area, when the
point of origin is clearly indicated, when their identity has been maintained,
and when the articles are protected, while in the regulated area, in a manner
satisfactory to the inspector.

Conditions of Certification

§.301.72-5. Conditions governing the issuance of certificates and permits. (a)
Approved methods.—Certificates authorizing the interstate movement of restricted
articles from the regulated areas may be issued upon determination by the
inspector that the articles are (1) apparently free from infestation; or (2)
have been treated, fumigated, sterilized, or processed under approved methods;
or (3) were grown, produced, manufactured, stored, or handled in such a manner
that, in the judgment of the inspector, no infestation would be transmitted
thereby: Provided, That certificates authorizing the interstate movement of
soil, sand, gravel, clay, peat, muck, or compost, originating in an infested area
may be issued only when such materials have been treated or handled under
methods or conditions approved by the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and
Plant Quarantine.

(b) Limited permits——Limited permits may be issued for the movement of
noncertified restricted articles to destinations and consignees as may be authorized
and designated by the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine
for processing or other handling. As a condition of such authorization and
designation, persons or firms shipping, receiving, or transporting such articles
may be required to agree in writing to maintain such sanitary safeguards against
the establishment and spread of infestation and to comply with such conditions
as to the maintenance of identity, handling, or subsequent movement of restricted
products and cleaning of railway cars, trucks, or other vehicles used in the
transportation of such articles as may be required by the inspector.

(c) Dealer-carrier permit.—As a condition of issuance of certificates or permits
for the interstate movement of restricted articles, persons or firms engaged in
purchasing, assembling, exchanging, processing, or carrying such restricted articles
originating or stored in regulated areas, may be required to execute a signed
agreement stipulating that the permittee will carry out any and all conditions,
treatments, precautions, and sanitary measures which may be deemed necessary.

Procedure for Applicants

§ 301.72-6. Assembly of restricted articles for inspection.—Persons intending
to move restricted articles, the certification of which is required, interstate from
regulated areas shall make application for certification as far as possible in
advance of the probable date of shipment. Applications must show the nature
and quantity of articles to be moved, together with their exact location, and
if practicable, the contemplated date of shipment. Applicants for inspection
may be required to assemble or indicate the articles to be shipped so that
they may be readily examined by the inspector.

The United States Department of Agriculture will not be responsible for any
cost incident to inspection or treatment other than the services of the inspector.

Certificates and Permits May Be Canceled

§ 301.72-7. Cancelation of certificates or permits.—Certificates or permits
issued under these regulations may be withdrawn or canceled and further


1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 83

certification refused whenever, in the judgment of the Chief of the Bureau of
Entomology and Plant Quarantine, the further use of such certificates or permits
might result in the dissemination of infestation.

Cleaning of Vehicles

§ 301.72-8. Cleaning of freight cars, trucks, and other vehicles When in
the judgment of the inspector a hazard of spread of infestation is presented,
thorough cleaning of freight cars, trucks, and other vehicles may be required
before movement interstate to points outside the regulated areas when such
freight cars, trucks, or other vehicles have been used for the transportation of
uncertified restricted articles within regulated areas.

Shipments for Experimental or Scientific Purposes

§ 301.72-9. (a) Articles for experimental or scientific purposes.—Articles
subject to restrictions may be moved interstate for experimental or scientific
purposes, on such conditions as may be prescribed by the Chief of the Bureau
of Entomology and Plant Quarantine. The container of ‘articles so moved Shall
bear an identifying tag from the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

(b) Beetles for experimental or scientific purposes.—Live white-fringed beetles,
in any stage of development; may be moved interstate for scientific purposes
only under conditions prescribed by the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology
and Plant Quarantine. The container of white-fringed beetles so moved shall
bear an identifying tag from the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

Done at the. city of Washington this 28rd day of December 1942.

Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.

[SEAL ] PAUL H. APPLEBY,

Acting Secretary of Agriculture.

APPENDIX
PENALTIES

The Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912, as amended (7 U.S. C. 161), pro-
vides that no person shall ship or offer for shipment to any common carrier, nor
shall any common carrier receive for transportation or transport, nor shall any
person carry or transport, from any quarantined State or Territory or District of
the United States, or from any quarantined portion thereof, into or through any
other State or Territory or District, any class of nursery stock or any other class
of plants, fruits, vegetables, roots, bulbs, seeds, or other plant products, or any
class of stone or quarry products, or any other article of any character whatsoever,
capable of carrying any dangerous plant disease or insect infestation, specified in
the notice of quarantine * * * in manner or method or under conditions
other than those prescribed by the Secretary of Agriculture. It also provides that
any person who shall violate any of the provisions of this act, or who shall forge,
counterfeit, alter, deface, or destroy any certificate provided for in this act or
in the regulations of the Secretary of Agriculture shall be deemed guilty of a
misdemeanor and shall, upon conviction thereof, be punished by a fine not exceeding
$500, or by imprisonment not exceeding 1 year, or both such fine and imprisonment,
in the discretion of the court.

STATE AND FEDERAL INSPECTION

Certain of the quarantined: States have promulgated quarantine regulations
restricting intrastate movement supplemental to the Federal quarantine. These
State regulations are enforced in cooperation with the Federal authorities. Copies
of either the Federal or State quarantine orders may be obtained at the office of the
Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, Room 6, Gates-Cook Building
(Tel. 1591), P. O. Box 989, Gulfport, Miss., or through a White-fringed Beetle
Inspector at one of the subsidiary offices.

GENERAL OFFICES OF STATES COOPERATING
Alabama: Chief, Division of Plant Industry, Montgomery.

Florida: Assistant Plant Commissioner, State Plant Board, Gainesville.
Louisiana: State Entomologist, Baton Rouge.
84 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct.—Dec,

Mississippi: Entomologist, State Plant Board, State College.
North Carolina: State Entomologist, Raleigh.

[Copies of the foregoing quarantine were sent to afl common carriers doing business in
or through the quarantined area.]
“ Sr rosoet the Division of the Federal Register December 24, 1942, 2:43 p. m; 7



NOTICE TO GENERAL PUBLIC THROUGH NEWSPAPERS

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,
Washington, D. C., December 23, 1942.

Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority con-
ferred by the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912, as amended (7 U. S. C.
161), has promulgated a revision, effective on and after December 28, 1942, of the
white-fringed beetle quarantine (Notice of Quarantine No. 301.72) and regula-
tions supplemental thereto. The purposes of the revision are to extend the
regulated areas to include parts of the North Carolina counties of New
Hanover, Pender, and Wayne, and additional infested sections in Alabama and
Mississippi; to add to the list of restricted articles gravel, moss, and bulbs,
corms, tubers, and rhizomes of ornamental plants. Peanut shells are no longer
restricted.

Copies of the quarantine as revised may be sneatned from the Bureau of
Entomology and Plant Quarantine, Department of Agriculture, Washington.

PAuL H. APPLEBY,
Acting Secretary.

[The above notice was published in the following newspapers: The Birmingham News,

Birmingham, Ala., January 5, 1943; the Florida Times Union, Jacksonville, Fla., January

5, 1943; the News, Jackson, ‘Miss.., ‘January 6, 1943; the Observer, Charlotte, N. C., Jan-
uary Ey 1943; the Times Picayune, New Orleans, La., January 6, 1943



B. E. P. Q, 485, Eleventh Revision Effective December 28, 1942
TITLE 7—AGRICULTURE
CHAPTER IJI—BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

PART 301—DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES
WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE REGULATIONS MODIFIED

§ 301.72a Administrative instructions; modification of certification require-
ments for specified articles.—Pursuant to the authority conferred upon the Chief
of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine by the second proviso of
§ 301.72, Chapter III, Title 7, Code of Federal Regulations [Notice of Quarantine
No. 72, on account of the white-fringed beetle], the certification requirements are
hereby modified effective December 28, 1942, through June 15, 1948, for the
interstate movement of the following articles and materials ‘enumerated in
§ 301.72-3:

(a) Certificates may be issued for the interstate movement ‘of the following
materials under the conditions specified below:

(1) Soil, sand, gravel, clay, peat, or muck, when taken from a depth of at
least 2 feet below the existing surface, and when entirely free from any surface
soil to a depth of 2 feet. '

(2) Sand and gravel, when washed, processed, or otherwise treated to the
satisfaction of the inspector.

(b) All certification requirements are waived for the following articles and
materials when free from soil and when sanitation practices are maintained
as prescribed by or to the satisfaction of the inspector:

(1) Potatoes, except that those freshly harvested are not exempt.

(2) True bulbs, corms, tubers, and rhizomes of ornamental plants, except that
those freshly harvested or uncured are not exempt.

‘(3) Hay, except that peanut hay is not exempt.

(4) Seed cotton, cottonseed, and baled cotton lint and linters.

(5) Serap metal and junk.

(6) Forest products such as cordwood, stump wood, logs, lumber, timbers,
posts, poles, and cross ties.

(7) Brick, tile, stone, and cinders.

(8) Conerete slabs, pipe, and building blocks.

(9) Implements, machinery, equipment, and containers.

tte, “it




1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 85

ARTICLES REMAINING UNDER QUARANTINE

(c) Certification is required for the following articles and materials enumerated
in § 301.72-3:

(1) All soil, sand, gravel, clay, peat, or muck, whether moved independent of,
or in connection with, or attached to nursery stock, plants, products, articles or
things.

(2) Compost, manure, moss, and leafmold.,

(3) Nursery stock.

(4) Grass sod.

(5) Potatoes, freshly harvested.

(6) True bulbs, corms, tubers, and rhizomes of ornamental plants, when
freshly harvested or uncured.

(7) Peanuts in the shell.

(8) Peanut hay.

This revision supersedes Circular B. BE. P. Q. 485, tenth revision, which became
effective August 3, 1942.

(7 C. F. R., § 301.72; sec. 8, 39 Stat. 1165, 44 Stat. 250; 7 U. S. C. 161.)

Done at Washington, this 23d day of December 1942.

P. N. ANNAND,
Chief.

[Filed with the Division of the Federal Register December 24, 1942, 2:43 p. m.; 7

F, R. 10905.]

ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO MEXICAN BORDER REGULATIONS
INSTRUCTIONS TO COLLECTORS OF CUSTOMS

REGULATIONS FOR CarRYING INTO EFFECT THE INSPECTION OF AND APPLICATION
or SAFEGUARDS TO RAILWAY CARS, VEHICLES, AND VARIOUS MATERIALS ENTER-
ING THE UNITED STATES FRoM Mexico ('T. D. 50757)

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,
OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONER OF CUSTOMS,
‘Washington, D. C., November 3, 1942.

To Collectors of Customs and Others Concerned:

The appended copy of the Mexican Border Regulations, approved by the Sec-
retary of Agriculture on September 2, 1942, in pursuance of the Mexican Border
Act approved January 31, 1942 (Public Law 426, 77th Congress), entitled, “To
provide for regulating, inspecting, cleaning, and, when necessary, disinfecting
railway cars, other vehicles, and other materials entering the United States
from Mexico,” is published for the information and guidance of customs of-
ficers and others concerned.

These regulations supersede the Rules and Regulations Prohibiting the Move-
ment of Cotton and Cottonseed from Mexico into the United States and Goy-
erning the Entry into the United States of Railway Cars and Other Vehicles,
Freight, Express, Baggage, or Other Materials from Mexico at Border Points,
effective July 1, 1917 ((1917) T. D. 37255), as amended January 29, 1920 (not
published as a Treasury decision).

The number of this Treasury decision should be inserted as a marginal ref-
erence opposite articles 578 (a) and 579 (a), Customs Regulations of 1937.

W. R. JOHNSON,
Commissioner of Customs.
[Then follows the text of the regulations. ]

MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS

B. E. P. Q. 426, Supplement No. 7.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF ARGENTINA

OcTOBER 13, 1942.
PRINTING REQUIREMENTS ON WRAPS OF IMPORTED FRUITS ABOLISHED

A Government Decree of August 22, 1942, abolished the requirements that
waterproof tissue paper wraps of imported apples, pears, oranges, tangerines,

>
86 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct.—Dec.

grapefruit, and lemons must carry the name of the grower, the packing com-
pany, or the exporter, aS well as the country of origin. (See page il,
B. E. P. Q. 426.)
Avery S. Hoyt,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.



B. E. P. Q. 448, Supplement No. 1.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, BELGIAN CONGO

NOVEMBER 30, 1942.
BANANA PLANTS—IMpoRTS SUBJECT TO QUARANTINE PERMIT

The importation of cultivated or wild banana plants into the Belgian Congo
has been made subject to special permit from the Governor General, on sani-
tary grounds, by ordinance No. 207/Agri. of July 16, 1942, published in the
Builetin Administratif du Congo Belge of July 25.

P. N. ANNAND,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

LIST OF CURRENT QUARANTINE AND OTHER RESTRICTIVE ORDERS
AND MISCELLANEOUS REGULATIONS

[The domestic and foreign quarantine and otker restrictive orders summarized herein
are issued under the authority of the Piant Quarantine Act of Aug. 20. 1912, as amended.
The Mexican border regulations and the export-certification regulations are issued under
specific acts of Congress. ]

QUARANTINE ORDERS

The numbers assigned to these quarantines indicate merely the chronological
order of issuance of both domestic and foreign quarantines in one numerical
series. The quarantine numbers missing in this list are quarantines which have
either been superseded or revoked. Tor convenience of reference these quaran-
tines are here classified as domestic and foreign, the domestic quarantines being
divided into (1) those applying primarily to the continental United States and
(2) those applying primarily to shipments from and to the Territories of Hawaii
and Puerto Rico.

DoMESTIC PLANT QUARANTINES
QUARANTINES APPLYING TO THE CONTINENTAL UNITED STATES

Black stem rust.—Quarantine No. 38, revised, effective September 1, 1937:
Prohibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto,
revised, effective September 1, 1937, the movement into any of the protected
States, namely, Colorado, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri,
Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Virginia,
West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming, as well as the movement from any one
of said protected States into any other protected State of the common barberry
(Berberis vulgaris), or other species of Berberis or Mahonia or parts thereof
capable of propagation, on account of the black stem rust of grains. The regula-
tions place no restrictions on the interstate movement of Japanese barberry
(B. thunbergii) or any of its rust-resistant varieties, or of cuttings (without
roots) of Mahonia shipped for decorative purposes and not for propagation,

Gypsy moth and brown-tail moth.—Quarantine No. 45, revised, effective Sep-
tember 29, 1938: Prohibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations sup-
plemental thereto, revised, effective September 29, 1938. the movement interstate
to any point outside of the infested area, or from points in the generally infested
area to points in the lightly infested area, of stone and quarry products, and of
the plants and the plant products listed therein. The regulated area covers
Rhode Island and parts of the States of Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New
Hampshire, and Vermont.

Japanese beetle.-—Quarantine No. 48, revised, effective March 24, 1942: Pro-
hibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto,
revised, effective March 24, 1942, as amended, effective January 14, 1948, the


1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 87

interstate movement of (1) fruits and vegetables; (2) nursery, ornamental, and
greenhouse stock, and other plants; and (3) sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and
manure, from the regulated area to or through any point outside thereof. The
regulated area includes the entire States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Con-
necticut, New Jersey, and Delaware, and the District of Columbia, and portions
of the States of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, New York, Pennsylvania,
Maryland, Virginia, West Virginia, and Ohio.

Pink bollworm.—Quarantine No. 52, revised, effective March 15, 1989: Pro-
hibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto,
revised, effective March 15, 1939, as amended effective February 10, 1943, the
interstate movement from the regulated areas of Texas, New Mexico, and
Arizona, of (1) cotton, wild cotton, including all parts of either cotton or
wild cotton plants, seed cotton, cotton lint, linters, and all other forms of un-
manufactured cotton fiber, gin waste, cottonseed, cottonseed hulls, cottonseed
cake, and meal; (2) bagging and other containers and wrappers of cotton and
cotton products; (38) railway cars, boats, and other vehicles which have been
used in conveying cotton or cotton products or which are fouled with such
products; (4) farm products, farm household goods, farm equipment, and, if
contaminated with cotton, any other articles.

Thurberia weevil. Quarantine No. 61, revised, effective August 1, 1927: Pro-
hibits the interstate movement of Thurberia, including all parts of the plant,
from any point in Arizona and prohibits, except as provided in the rules and
regulations supplemental thereto, revised, effective October 2, 1933, as amended
effective October 22, 1936, the interstate movement from the regulated area of
Arizona of (1) cotton, including all parts of the piant, seed cotton, cotton lint,
linters, and all other forms of unmanufactured cotton lint, gin waste, cottonseed,
eottonseed hulls, and cottonseed cake and meal; (2) bagging and other contain-
ers and wrappers of cotton and cotton products; (8) railway cars, boats, and
other vehicles which have been used in conveying cotton and cotton products, or
which are fouled with such products; (4) hay and other farm products; and
(5) farm household goods, farm equipment, and, if contaminated with cotton,
any other articles.

White-pine blister rust.—Quarantine No. 63, effective October 1, 1926: Prohib-
its, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto, revised,
effective July 1, 1938, the interstate movement from every State in the conti-
nental United States and the District of Columbia of five-leafed pines (Pinus)
or currant and gooseberry plants (fibes and Grossularia), including cultivated
or wild or ornamental sorts.

Mexican fruitfly—Quarantine No. 64, revised, effective October 15, 1937: Pro-
hibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto, re-
vised, effective October 16, 1939, the interstate movement from the regulated area
of Texas of fruits of all varieties.

Duteh elm disease.—Quarantine No. 71, revised, effective October 1, 1941: Pro-
hibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto,
effective October 1, 1941, the interstate movement from the regulated areas in
the States of New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, and Connecticut to or
through any point outside thereof, of elm plants or parts thereof of all species
of the genus Ulmus, irrespective of whether nursery, forest, or privately grown,
including (1) trees, plants, leaves, twigs, branches, bark, roots, trunks, cuttings,
and scions of such plants; (2) logs or cordwood of such plants; and (3) lumber,
crates, boxes, barrels, packing cases, and other containers manufactured in
whole or in part from such plants, unless the wood is entirely free from bark.

White-fringed beetle—Quarantine No. 72, revised, effective December 28, 1942:
Prohibits, except as provided in the regulations supplemental thereto, effective
December 28, 1942, the interstate movement from the regulated areas in the
States of Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, Mississippi, and North Carolina, to or
through any point outside thereof, of (1) nursery stock and other stipulated
plants or plant products; (2) soil, independent of, or in connection with nursery
stock, plants, or other products; or (3) other articles as stipulated in § 301.72-3;
or (4) live white-fringed beetles in any stage of development.



QUARANTINES APPLYING TO THE TERRITORIES OF HAWAII AND PUERTO RICO

Hawaiian fruits and vegetables.—Quarantine No. 13, revised, effective June 1,
aii: Prohibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental
thereto, revised, effective June 1, 1930, as amended effective May 12, 1941, the
88 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct—Dee.

movement from the Territory of Hawaii into or through any other Territory,

State, or District of the United States, of all fruits and vegetables in the natural

or raw State, on account of the Mediterranean fruitfly (Ceratitis capitata) and
the melonfly (Dacus cucurbitae).

Sugarcane.—Quarantine No. 16, revised, effective January 1, 1935: Prohibits
the movement from the Territories of Hawaii and Puerto Rico into or through
any other Territory, State, or District of the United States of canes of sugar-
cane, or cuttings or parts thereof, sugarcane leaves, and bagasse, on account of
certain injurious insects and diseases of sugarcane, except that movement will
be allowed under permit of specific materials on condition that they have been or
are to be so treated, processed, or manufactured that, in the judgment of the
Department, their movement will involve no pest risk.

Sweetpotato.—Quarantine No. 30, revised, effective October 10, 1984: Pro-
hibits the movement from the Territories of Hawaii and Puerto Rico into or
through any other Territory, State, or District of the United States of any vari-
ety of sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas Poir.), regardless of the use for which the
same is intended, on account of the sweetpotato stem borer (Omphisa anasto-
mosalis Guen.) and the sweetpotato scarabee (Huscepes batatae Waterh.).

Banana plants.—Quarantine No. 32, effective April 1, 1918: Prohibits the
movement from the Territories of Hawaii and Puerto Rico into or through any
other Territory, State, or District of the United States of any species or variety
of banana plants (Musa spp.), regardless of the use for which the same is in-
tended, on account of two injurious weevils (Rhabdocnemis obscurus Boisd. and
Metamasius hemipterus Linn.).

Hawaiian and Puerto Rican cotton, cottonseed, and cottonseed products.—
Quarantine No. 47, effective August 15, 1920: Prohibits, except as provided in
the rules and regulations supplemental thereto, effective August 15, 1920, the
movement of cotton, seed or unginned cotton, cottonseed, and cottonseed products,
except oil, from the Territories of Hawaii and Puerto Rico into or through any
other Territory, State, or District of the United States on account of the pink boll-
worm (Pectinophora gossypiella Saund.) and the cotton-blister mite (Hriophyes
gossypii Banks).

United States quarantined to protect Hawaii.—Quarantine No. 51, effective
October 1, 1921: Prohibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations sup-
plemental thereto, effective October 1, 1921, the movement from the United
States to the Territory of Hawaii, as ships’ stores or as baggage or effects of
passengers or crews, of sugarcane, corn (other than shelled corn), cotton, alfalfa,
and the fruits of the avocado and papaya in the natural or raw state, on account
of injurious insects, especially the sugarcane borer (Diatreea saccharalis Fab.),
the alfalfa weevil (Hypera postica Gyll.), the cotton boll weevil (Anthonomus
grandis Boh.), the papaya fruitfly (Torotrypana curvicauda Gerst.), and certain
insect enemies of the fruit of the avocado.

Puerto Rican fruits and vegetables—Quarantine No. 58, revised, effective
January 22, 1941: Prohibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations
supplemental thereto, effective January 22, 1941, the movement from the Terri-
tory of Puerto Rico into or through any other Territory, State, or District of
the United States of all fruits and vegetables in the raw or unprocessed state,
on account of certain injurious insects, including the fruitflies Anastrepha
suspensa (Loew) and A. mombinpraeoptans Sein, and the bean-pod borer Maruca
testulalis (Geyer).

Sand, soil, or earth, with plants from Hawaii and Puerto Rico. Quarantine
No. 60, revised. effective September 1, 1936: Prohibits the movement from the
Territories of Hawaii and Puerto Rico into or through any other Territory, State,
or District of the United States of sand (other than clean ocean sand), soil,
or earth around the roots of plants, to prevent the spread of white grubs, the
Japanese rose beetle, and termites or white ants. Provision is made for the re-
tention of potted plants on board vessels from Hawaii and Puerto Rico when
evidence is presented satisfactory to the plant quarantine inspector that the
soil has been so treated or is so safeguarded as to eliminate pest risk.

FoREIGN PLANT QUARANTINES
Pink bollworm.—Quarantine No. 8, effective July 1, 1918, with revised regula-

tions effective July 1, 1917: Forbids the importation from any foreign locality
and country, excepting only the locality of the Imperial Valley in the State of

ve
1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 89

Baja California, Mexico, of cottonseed (including seed cotton) of all species
and varieties and cottonseed hulls. Seed cotton, cottonseed, and cottonseed hulls
from the Imperial Valley may be entered under permit and regulation.

Seeds of avocado or alligator pear.—Quarantine No. 12, effective February
27, 1914: Forbids the importation from Mexico and the countries of Central
America of the seed of the avocado or alligator pear on account of the avocado
weevil (Heilipus lauri).

Sugarcane.—Quarantine No. 15, revised, effective October 1, 1934: Prohibits
the importation from all foreign countries and localities of canes of sugarcane,
or cuttings or parts thereof, sugarcane leaves, and bagasse, on account of
certain injurious insects and diseases of sugarcane, except that importation will
be allowed under permit of specific materials on condition that they have been
or are to be so treated, processed, or manufactured that, in the judgment of the
Department, their entry will involve no pest risk.

Citrus nursery stock.—Quarantine No. 19, revised, effective September 1, 1934:
Forbids the importation from all foreign localities and countries of all citrus
nursery stock, including buds and scions, on account of the citrus canker and
other dangerous citrus diseases. The term “citrus,” as used in this quarantine,
includes only plants belonging to the tribe Citrinae, subfamily Citratae, of the
family Rutaceae.

Indian corn or maize and related plants.—Quarantine No. 24, effective July 1,
1916, as amended, effective April 1, 1917, and April 23, 1917: Forbids the im-
portation from southeastern Asia (including India, Siam, Indio-China, and
China), Malayan Archipelago, Australia, New Zealand, Oceania, Philippine
Islands, Taiwan (Formosa), Japan, and adjacent islands, in the raw or unman-
ufactured state, of seed and all other portions of Indian corn or maize (Zea
mays L.) and the closely related plants, including all species of Teosinte
(Euchlaena), jobs-tears (Coix), Polytoca, Chionachne, and Sclerachne, on
account of the downy mildews and Physoderma diseases of Indian corn, except
that Indian corn or maize may be imported under permit and upon compliance
with the conditions prescribed in the regulations of the Secretary of Agriculture.

Citrus fruits —Quarantine No. 28, effective August 1, 1917: Forbids the im-
portation from eastern and southeastern Asia (including India, Siam, Indo-
China, and China), the Malayan Archipelago, the Philippine Islands, Oceania
(except Australia, Tasmania, and New Zealand), Japan (including Taiwan
(Formosa) and other islands adjacent to Japan), and the Union of South
Africa, of all species and varieties of citrus fruits, on account of the citrus
canker, except that oranges of the mandarin class (including satsuma and
tangerine varieties) may be imported under permit and upon compliance with
the conditions prescribed in the regulations of the Secretary of Agriculture.

Sweetpotato and yam.—Quarantine No. 29, effective January 1, 1918: Forbids

the importation for any purpose of any variety of sweetpotatoes and yams
(Ipomoea batatas and Dioscorea spp.), from all foreign countries and localities,
on account of the sweetpotato weevils (Cylas spp.) and the sweetpotato scarabee
(Euscepes batatae).
‘ Banana plants—Quarantine No. 31, effective April 1, 1918: Forbids the impor-
tation for any purpose of any species or variety of banana plants (Musa spp.).
or portions thereof, from all foreign countries and localities, on account of the
banana-root borer (Cosmopolites sordidus). This quarantine places no restric-
tions on the importation of the fruit of the banana. (For restrictions on the
entry of the fruit of the banana see quarantine 56.)

Bamboo.—Quarantine No. 34, effective October 1, 1918: Forbids the importa-
tion for any purpose of any variety of bamboo seed, plants, or cuttings thereof
eapable of propagation, including all genera and species of the tribe Bambuseae,
from all foreign countries and localities, on account of dangerous plant diseases,
including the bamboo smut (Ustilago shiraiana). This quarantine order does
not apply to bamboo timber consisting of the mature dried culms or canes which
are imported for fishing rods, furniture making, or other purposes, or to any
kind of articles manufactured from bamboo, or to bamboo shoots cooked or
otherwise preserved.

Nursery stock, plants, and seeds.—Quarantine No. 37, effective June 1, 1919:
Forbids, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto,
revised, effective December 22, 1930, and amended effective December 1, 1938, the
importation of seeds, nursery stock, and other plants and plant products capable
of propagation from all foreign countries and localities on account of certain
90 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct.—Dee.

injurious insects and fungous diseases. Under this quarantine the following
plant products may be imported without restriction when free from sand, soil,
or earth, unless covered by special quarantine or other restrictive orders: Plant
products capable of propagation imported for medicinal, food, or manufacturing
purposes, and field, vegetable, and flower seeds, except seeds of Lathyrus and
Vicia. Cut flowers from the Dominion of Canada are also allowed entry with-
out permit. The entry of the following nursery stock and other plants and seeds
is permitted under permit:

Under regulation 8:

(1) Bulbs, corms, or root stocks (pips) of the following genera: Liliwm (lily),
Convallaria (lily-of-the-valley), Hyacinthus (hyacinth), Tulipa (tulip), Crocus,
Narcissus (daffodil and jonquil), Begonia, and Gloginia; and, until further
notice, Chionodora (glory-of-the-snow), Galanthus (snowdrop), Scilla (squill),
Fritillaria, Muscari (grape-hyacinth), Ivia, and Eranthis (winter aconite).

(2) Cuttings, scions, and buds of fruits or nuts: Provided, That cuttings,
scions, and buds of fruits or nuts may be imported from Asia, Japan, Philippine
Islands, and Oceania (including Australia and New Zealand) under the provi-
sions of regulation 14 only. (Stocks of fruits or nuts may not be imported,
under permit or otherwise.)

(3) Rose stocks, including Manetti, Rosa multiflora (brier rose), and R.
rugosa.

(4) Nuts, including palm seeds for growing purposes: Provided, That such
nuts or seeds shall be free from pulp.

(5) Seeds of fruit, forest, ornamental, and shade trees, seeds of deciduous
and evergreen ornamental shrubs, and seeds of hardy perennial plants: Pro-
vided, That such seeds shall be free from pulp: Provided further, That citrus
seeds may be imported only through specified ports subject to disinfection as
provided in regulation 9: Provided further, That mango seeds may not be im-
ported under permit or otherwise, except from the countries of North America,
Central America, and South America, and the West Indies.

Importations from countries not maintaining inspection of nursery stock,
other plants and parts of plants, including seeds, the entry of which is permis-
sible under this regulation, may be made under permit upon compliance with
these regulations in limited quantities for public-service purposes only, but this
limitation shall not apply to tree seeds.

(6) Materials permitted entry under Quarantine No. 56 for consumption pur-
poses are authorized entry under this regulation for propagation.

Under regulation 14: Provision exists in this regulation for the entry of
most kinds of plants that are not covered by other regulations of this quaran-
tine or by other quarantines. :

Under regulation 15: Provision exists for the entry in unlimited quantities of
most kinds of plants which can be considered as peculiar to or standard produc-
tions of the Dominion of Canada, as opposed to stock imported into the
Dominion from foreign countries and held or grown on there for later sale.

European corn borer.—Quarantine No. 41, revised, effective June 1, 1926:
Forbids, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto,
revised effective March 1, 1933, the importation from all foreign countries and
localities of the stalk and all other parts, whether used for packing or other pur-
poses, in the raw or unmanufactured state, of Indian corn or maize, broomcorn,
Sweet sorghums, grain sorghums, Sudan grass, Johnson grass, sugarcane, pearl
millet, napier grass, teosinte, and jobs-tears, on account of the European corn
borer (Pyrausta nubilalis) and other dangerous insects and plant diseases.

Rice.—Quarantine No. 55, revised, effective November 23, 1933: Forbids the
importation of seed or paddy. rice from all foreign countries and localities ex-
cept the Republic of Mexico, and forbids the importation of rice straw and rice
hulls from ali foreign countries and localities, and seed or paddy rice from the
Republic of Mexico, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemen-
tal thereto, effective July 1, 1933, as amended effective August 1, 1934, on
account of injurious fungous diseases of rice, including downy mildew (Sclero-
spora macrocarpa), leaf smut (Hntyloma oryzae), blight (Oospora oryztorum),
and glume blotch (Melanomma glumarum), as well as dangerous. insect pests.

Fruits and vegetables.—Quarantine No. 56 effective November 1, 1923: For-
bids, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto,
revised, effective December 1, 1936, as amended effective February 27, 1940, the
importation of fruits and vegetables, except as restricted, as to certain countries
1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS QI

and districts, by special quarantines and other orders, and of plants or portions.
of plants used as packing material in connection with shipments of such fruits
and vegetables from all foreign countries and localities other than the Dominion
of Canada, on account of injurious insects, including fruitflies and melonflies
(Trypetidae). Includes and supersedes Quarantine No. 49 on account of the
citrus blacktfly.

Flag smut.—Quarantine No, 59, effective February 1, 1926: Forbids the impor-
tation of all species and varieties of wheat (7'riticum spp.) and wheat products,
unless so milled or so processed as to have destroyed all flag-smut spores, from
India, Japan, China, Australia, Union of South Africa, Italy, and Spain.

Packing materials—Quarantine No. 69, effective July 1, 1933, as amended,
effective July 1, 1983: Forbids the entry from all foreign countries and locali-
ties of the following materials when used as packing for other commodities,
except in special cases where preparation, processing, or manufacture are
judged by an inspector of the United States Department of Agriculture to have
eliminated risk of carrying injurious insects and plant diseases: Rice straw,
hulls, and chaff; cotton and cotton products; sugarcane, including bagasse;
bamboo leaves and small shoots; leaves of plants; forest litter; and soil contain-
ing an appreciable admixture of vegetable matter not therein provided for by
regulation. All parts of corn and allied plants are likewise prohibited except

_ from Mexico and the countries of Central America, the West Indies, and South

America. This quarantine also brings under restriction, involving inspection
at will by the Department but requiring no permit or certificate, the following
when used as packing: Cereal straw, chaff, and hulls (other than rice); corn
and allied plants from Mexico, Central America, the West Indies, and South
America; willow twigs from Europe; grasses, hay, and similar dried plant mix-
tures from all countries ; and authorized soil-packing materials from all countries.
This quarantine does not cover such widely used packing materials as excelsior,
paper, sawdust, ground cork, charcoal, and various other materials which, because
of their nature or process of manufacture, are unlikely to transport plant
parasites,

Dutch elm disease.—Quarantine No. 70, revised, effective January 1, 1935:
Forbids the importation from Europe, on account of a disease due to the fungus
Graphium ulmi, of seeds, leaves, plants, cuttings, and scions of elm or related
plants, defined to include all species and genera of the family Ulmaceae; logs of
elm and related plants; lumber, timber, or veneer of such plants if bark is present
on them; and crates, boxes, barrels, packing cases, and other containers, and other
articles manufactured in whole or in part from the wood of elm or related
plants if not free from bark.

Coffee.—Quarantine No. 73, effective April 1, 1940: Prohibits the importa-

tion into Puerto Rico from all foreign countries and localities of (1) the seeds

or beans of coffee which, previous to importation, have not been roasted to a
degree which, in the judgment of an inspector of the Department of Agri-
culture, will have destroyed coffee borers in all stages, (2) coffee berries or

fruits, and (3) coffee plants and leaves, on account of an injurious coffee insect

known as the coffee berry borer (Stephanoderes [coffeae Hgdn.] hampei Ferr.)
and an injurious rust disease due to the fungus Hemileia vastatrig B. and Br.
Provision is made for importations of samples of unroasted coffee seeds or beans
and for shipments of unroasted coffee seeds or beans in transit to destinations
other than Puerto Rico.

OTHER RESTRICTIVE ORDERS

The regulation of the entry of nursery stock from foreign countries into the
United States was specifically provided for in the Plant Quarantine Act. The
act further provides for the similar regulation of any other class of plants or
plant products when the need therefor shall be determined. The entry of the
plants and plant products listed below has been brought under such regulation.

Nursery stock.—The conditions governing the entry of nursery stock and other
plants and seeds from all foreign countries and localities are indicated above
under “Foreign plant quarantines.” (See Quarantine No. 37.)

Potatoes.—The order of December 22, 1913, and the regulations issued there-
under, revised, effective March 1, 1922, and amended, effective December 1,
1936, restrict the importation of potatoes from all foreign countries and locali-
ties except the Dominion of Canada and Bermuda, on account of injurious
‘92 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct.—Dee.

potato diseases and insect pests. The importation of potatoes is now authorized
from Bermuda, Canada, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Estonia, Latvia, Spain
(including the Canary Islands), and the States of Chihuahua and Sonora, and
the northern territory of Baja California, Mexico.

Cotton and cotton wrappings.—The order of April 27, 1915, and the rules and
regulations isSued thereunder, revised, effective February 24, 1923, amended
effective May 1, 1924, December 15, 1924, December 11, 1937, and July 1, 1938, re-
strict the importation of cotton and cotton wrappings from all foreign countries
and localities, on account of injurious insects, including the pink bollworm.

Cottonseed products.—The two orders of June 23, 1917, and the rules and regu-
lations issued thereunder, effective July 16, 1917, amended, effective August 7,
1925, restrict the importation of cottonseed cake and meal and all other cotton-
seed products except oil from all foreign countries and localities, and the impor-
tation of cottonseed oil from Mexico, on account of injurious insects, including
the pink bollworm: Provided, That these commodities which originate in and
are shipped directly from the Imperial Valley, Baja California, Mexico, may
enter without restriction.

Plant safeguard regulations.—These rules and regulations, revised, effective
December 1, 1932, provide safeguards for the landing or unloading for trans-
‘shipment and exportation and for transportation and exportation in bond of
restricted or prohibited plants and plant products when it is determined that .
Such entry can be made without involving risk to the plant cultures of the
United States and also provide for the safeguarding of such plant material at a
port or within the territorial limits of the United States where entry or landing
is not intended or where entry has been refused.

Rules and regulations governing the movement of plants and plant products
into and out of the District of Columbia—These rules and regulations, revised
effective April 30, 1938, are promulgated under the amendment to the Plant
‘Quarantine Act of May 31, 1920. They provide for the regulation of the move-
ment of plants and plant products, including nursery stock, from or into the
District of Columbia and for the control of injurious plant diseases and insect
pests within the said District.

MISCELLANEOUS REGULATIONS

Mezican border regulations.—These regulations, effective September 28, 1942,
were promulgated under the act approved January 31, 1942, entitled, “To provide
for regulating, inspecting, cleaning, and, when necessary, disinfecting railway
cars, other vehicles, and other materials entering the United States from Mexico”
(Public Law 426, 77th Congress), and supersede the rules and regulations pro-
hibiting the movement of cotton and cottonseed from Mexico into the United
States and governing the entry into the United States of railway cars and
other vehicles, freight, express, baggage, or other materials from Mexico at
border points, promulgated June 23, 1917, and amended effective January 29,
1920. They are designed to prevent the entry of the pink bollworm of cotton,
which is known to exist widely in Mexico. They provide for the examination
of passengers’ baggage, for the disinfection of railways cars and other vehicles,
freight, express, and other shipments, and for the cleaning of domestic cars
handling Mexican freight. All fees collected for disinfecting railways cars and
other vehicles are deposited in the United States Treasury as miscellaneous
receipts.

The inspectors concerned in the enforcement of these regulations at border
points are charged also with enforcement of restrictions on the entry of plants
and plant products under various foreign plant quarantines.

Regulations governing sanitary export certification—These regulations, revised
‘effective September 21, 1936, were promulgated pursuant to authority granted in
the Agricultural Appropriation Act of May 17, 1935 (49 Stat. 268), and repeated
in subsequent appropriation acts. They provide for the inspection and certifica-
tion of domestic plants and plant products intended for export to countries
requiring such certification. All fees collected for this service are deposited in
the United States Treasury as miscellaneous receipts. :


1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 93:

TERMINAL INSPECTION OF PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS
PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS ADDRESSED TO PLACES IN CALIFORNIA 1

CHANGES IN TERMINAL INSPECTION PLACES Mopiryine List PUBLISHED ON PAGES 21
AND 22 OF THE CURRENT PosTAL GUIDE, PaRT I

DISCONTINUED: Facilities for the terminal inspection of plants and plant prod-
ucts have been discontinued at the following places in California:

Alhambra Giendale Palms
Alvarado Glendora Pasadena
Arcadia Harbor City Puente

Artesia Hermosa Beach Redondo Beach
Azusa Huntington Beach ‘ Rivera

Bell Huntington Park San Dimas
Bellflower Hynes San Gabriel
Beverly Hills Inglewood San Juan Capistrano
Brea Irwindale San Lorenzo
Burbank La Habra San Pedro
Centerville Lancaster Santa Fe Springs
Charter Oak LaVerne Santa Monica
Chatsworth Lomita Saugus
Claremont Long Beach Sierra Madre
Clearwater Monrovia South Pasadena
Compton Montebello Spadra
Cottonwood Mount Eden Topanga
Covina Newark Torrance
Culver City | Newhall Van Nuys
Downey North Pomona Venice

Duarte Norwalk Walnut

El Monte Ocean Park Whittier

El Segundo Pacoima Willowbrook
Gardena Palmdale

ESTABLISHED: Facilities for the terminal inspection of plants and plant products:
have been established at the following places in California:

Adin Clovis Novato
Cedarville Dorris

Postmasters will please correct their California list of terminal plant inspection
places on pages 21 and 22 of the July, 1941, Postal Guide (Part I) and be governed
accordingly.

Attention is also invited to the instructions appearing in article 62 (b), page 20
of the 1941 Postal Guide, Part I, particularly method No. 3, provided for the
handling of parcels containing plants and plant products subject to terminal in-
spection. This arrangement contemplates the mailer will have the parcels di-
rected to the addressees in care of a plant inspector at a conveniently located in-
spection point, where, after being examined and passed by the State plant in-
spector, the parcels (if bearing the sender’s pledge guaranteeing forwarding

. postage) will, after the address is changed, reenter the mails for onward dis-

patch to the addressees, rated with the necessary postage due for forwarding.
The correct manner of labeling such parcels, including the proper form of ad-
dress and return card, is illustrated in the article of the Guide referred to. It
is suggested that shippers be encouraged to adopt and follow this method
whenever practicable in order to expedite and facilitate terminal inspection
and to avoid reshipments after reaching the office of address.

1The Postal Bulletin, December 16, 1942.
‘94 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct.—Dee.

INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS

Post OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
OFFICE OF THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, December 18, 1942.

CALIFORNIA STATE PLANT QUARANTINE MODIFIED
(Change in Notice Published in May 1937 Supplement to the Postal Guide)

The California State quarantine pertaining to the Oriental fruit moth \estab-.
lished pursuant to the act of June 4, 1936, has been amended so as to add hawthorn
to the approved list of plants and plant products regarded as hosts or carriers of
the Oriental fruit moth. This will amend the list appearing in the second column
of the Department’s notice of April 6, 1937, entitled “California State Plant Quar-
antines” published in the May 1937 Supplement to the Postal Guide so as to read
when corrected :

All varieties and species including the flowering forms of almond, apple,
apricot, cherry, chokecherry, hawthorn, nectarine, peach, pear, plum, and
quince trees or plants or parts thereof, including the fresh fruits.

The acceptance for mailing of these plants and plant products from the quar-
antined areas into California is entirely prohibited, except that scions and bud-
wood will be admitted under California permit during the period from Novem-_ .
ber 1 to March 1.

The area quarantined on account of the Oriental fruit moth has also been
amended to include (in addition to the several States named in the first column
of the notice of April 6, 1937) certain areas within California described as follows:

Entire Counties of Imperial, Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, San Ber-
nardino, San Diego, and Ventura and all that portion of Santa Barbara County
lying south of the first standard parallel line north, San Bernardino base line.

Postmasters will please make the necessary changes on their records and be
governed accordingly in the future. See section 596, Postal Laws and Regulations.

RAMSEY S. BLAck,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.

PENALTIES IMPOSED FOR VIOLATIONS OF THE PLANT
QUARANTINE ACT

According to reports received by the Bureau during the period October 1 to
December 31, 1942, penalties have recently been imposed by the proper authorities
for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act, as follows:

QUARANTINES AFFECTING MEXICAN PRODUCTS
In the case of the United States versus the persons listed below, for attempting

to smuggle in contraband plant material, the penalties indicated were imposed by
the United States customs officials at the following ports:



Pen-
Name Port Contraband alty
Josefinias Nunez = 520) oi 2 ad te ee San Ysidro, Calif______ 85 nodes sugarcane. -_._----L.22-2- $2
Josefina Villareal de Elizon-_-_-.-------- Brownsville, Tex___-_-- 2. apples._2- >_-==25 ee ee eee 1
Maria Julia: Martinez.2-2 == 22s se2 ee eS 063 ee eee 12 oranges and 1 guava-_-_---------- 1
asia) SOjAG. 2 coe ec Del, Rio, Dex .s-2se. Lorange icc: See 1
ROIGIIPNOY LU OITGS 2 si ee ae en 2 0:2. 32 seas oO orangegs: tf ees 1
Donala"MicKay 2:2. 2 te I ee eee eee CQ. ee ae eee 15 nodessugarcane_ —- . = = - 22254 1
Encarnacion Torres___-..-------------|----- One SA ee eee eoranges. . 2. 2-2 eee 1
Maria: 0; Martinez: .... 2222255 > Eagle Pass, Tex_._---- 7. fUaVaS>.. 9262 35 5.-5 2 2 eee 1
ANGE IT OVATLO-.. Uo eee eee ee One. <7 ' Stee ae H:apples 25-8. 23: 225.2 1
Wisireeling Grarza =) Fe GOs 2 {eS 4 potatoes: = = 2 see 1
Maria Ibarra de Villanueva____------_]----- Ome eas te Pee 2.sweet limes: ...=2.-22225) See 1
Ascencion Ramirez de Rodriguez_-_-_-_|_---- °C Ite mes LAE Y Gla lpyaveal 2.22 ee eee 1
Jose; Andres asiietvera_. sss ae M620 Bae THerange.-- 22-2 27 eee 1
Aleandro Hernandez. « — 2 as 2. ee eee rs i a A ea Says A OTANGOS: 352 50252" oe 1
Relipe Ogio ne ee 66) 2 es es et LD gene ees Leranve. oo. Sou Leen 1
Rieti reali gato ens ok ee eee C02 es eee Lplant..- <9. 5. Soe eee 1
Francisca Lopez de Ruiz__.-_--.------ oar Gok eae 2 DIants 22h se eee 1
1942] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 95











Name Port Contraband Ae
covariate SOSA. 2 ee see raat f eee Eagle Pass, Tex__-_-_-- ZiOTAN LES ant ae sae aes oe $1
Mian Cuellar de Garza... -2.25--5_|222-- OOue ae ee er AND IANES eee pee ee Wome 5 =p. 1
ITO ee wag ye mA E] Paso, ‘Tex._..-..-.- By SUR VERS Se Sco es 1
Donaciano Salinas-__-------.---------- Hidaleoy Mexsie4 _ 23 _v 4 QUINCE: eB BTS 1
DEACON | eee 2 el eas (Sa) 2 Sa eS ae Oi AVOCAGOS 22 ope eae ame sor oe 1
@onche bina. 2 Se. eo gh ee Be) doe fi. ee ge ie G AVOCADOS Mace cee eee ee 1
Melamades Gonzalez__._..-.-..------|----- CO eee eee uk plenty ss ase ee es eee eee ne 1
INovertiade Singletary. ..--.22--.--<-|-4--- CO ere eter QaVvOCAGOSs 245s ee suc es ees ee 1
Tecvacey cao, ee ae eee (ee done see eens 3/2 3-plants...-} Sse) iw ge Fe 1
MnimaAza ANZalGUAy 225-2. o2--22cssnel} ons 32 OVE a! aan Z2iplants: 23.5 te5 ogee Cex 1
Tosepa Lena Gonzales. .22..-5222-2--|e 42 Oe eek ea 1 orange and 2 avocados__________- 1
inmede laut. ceo ltst ht aN any does SL Sees WW. sweet-limés! 20) 2.2. is i AO 1
Teodosia Gil de Hernandez__---------|----- COLL Pet. Sees . 7 appless_ 2b wy tee 2 2 eee eee, 1
WanimeunonzAle7.- 322482 23 i alas ee GOES he are as ah PHN ON 0) Cp aa een ea ener Mae IEA Gy PY 1
Diem abner. ~~ 8 2 ye EP MOS a one hte POD Dien se 3.2L ae nee eee 1
Pita Gnivonas se ses See EL ee Go see ee | Oranges 2 hehe Se es ee 1
Mince uOZANO. . 22. Or. eS OMS a wee t4splantse ys . Sores: AU gb ey mt
RUPE (lattes fee ee a Qasr Soran Ges. sey ele ea ee 1
free pando.) .2-..-+--2=- 225-22 -2].2 2.2 Co ONE ee a igllt PURh PACE) ENOL 5 St a i ay 1
RS MISE TG a oo aie oe | Gone se weer Davocado seeds =. 22 te a 1
Robert Masti... Ie 2 Mote Go aa nh day PavocadOs ives tii. 2 wah eke 9 1
Mranciseo Wongorios. a... to.) =bp dusk [uae GO? dist eds ib GRAN SCs Fs i te 5 1
Pea Se ee Ue ee cee Oe ee eee a GNU LCS Meee eee es ce omens nore Na eae 1
OIE ATEOG ONGO Meee ee NES GO TEs 2a eyes Pea vases hss shone ARERR eas 2h 1
ANeeliiG Garcia. UELeLUs, e AL ST ea se dota s tu ye Fel ee Zyepplesmewes 3 ks ALM R ss Y 1
Anjonioaramos:Chapass. -ee.n! 308. ]c 2 Oa a LS ad ne 16 plants and 1 pound tree seed____ 2
WMoloresiGe lOSSantOS-a 22.52. S nse CLOSES Seg Neg oer TR ORATLG Ch perimeter 1 bes See ee 1
Meligitas beuO sso ee Gosia eee 6 tubers and 4% pound tree seed___ 1
CUE Cal Dla eek ye tera Sy ee Gokspaiek) te eas orangelsiia 3 yen. greek Sy TS 1
Jessie coy GUAM. ok oon sk lye Ob 5p tates oS 6 oranges and 105 nodes sugarcane_ 2
IRIS TIO ee ae ee BATCH O- OX. 2 ee SB AaVOCRGOS Maen ae ka eee 1
inst ATLONIOTE TONtOe oe 2. See Ae Corea. SIS hie 5 guavas and 10 oranges___________ 1
Mrs. Morala V. de Espinosa__--------]_---- GO ta ha Bae 8 ANOPAN GB Soe sy SS ee 2 tn ae ga) 1
ube AAles ae ot 9 ke his Aaa oo COER EA goa SOLAN SCS co) ee see Foo tL a 1
VM DeROMoal adams =e 2 on ee A fe GQe Sree oe se 1 DADAY Ace ues a Eee eee 1
Gorgnimo Muinane = 2 s)he te See et yh 2 WOES Ae PLUS eee. ZiOTANZESS. 52 5 te Jee ae ey 1
Min, Andrea Reyess css o te) Loe ve He CORES RAOY. BAe 2 apples and 4 sugarcane nodes____ 1
@arlos Mormolejo22.. 325200. Behe ik eo OSL eS 2 ain tee ee AGA G se a 5 ee Se 1
Nariel Oinairess 22 a= See GQe see pee t DiOLATI ECS ae een cn ane ee Ce 1
mrancisea, Castilleja. sre ho sei pete Gone Hoa UAL Th. Oranges. 2252 2235 5) TO ee 1
ivenal Gonzalez. eas ebers bye LY] Mus ey) LOW Lets et SiR ahh il as GO Se = Se oat Wea | ae IF 1
Hipnstovie @resnosce ot. Be ot es or |e GOs ree BiOTANCOGER ie B2 = Fate Se | 1
REM PIOIMOLUCOR Ee. 22 2e ss on Seema te TS COaste toa Se AS OVI ASE cere tel s. ton oe Sed eR ne 1
MEAniCiscnMVEACIOS 22202) oe 2a lhe: GOb teen te te aes 5 OFANGES sees BILE ED ee). 1
WACTORMeOnZAIES Seeks = Ate EE es A Ie COA a Saye rok S'ORaMeese eel ct A elk rere oF 1
Demmi ZUnica — ke a a OES sa. 9 Pe Bt 10 sugarcane nodes..._--.-.______. 1
Macloria Mirano Perez: 220222252250. 25 te COsee see. PE ZAOLAE CS ire te eee ee te 1
PRITIS AMAT AN ee ee en Set eee |e COE ee ee ee COA RE OE 2 Neae. er OSE 1
BladiopAlvarado=2 8" 2 ee Slee i ee Cotas fh kee Ay, 20jorangves te Pik pee Pa eee 1


ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY
AND PLANT QUARANTINE

P. N. ANNAND, Chief.

Avery 8S. Hoyt, Associate Chief.

S. A. RoHWER, Assistant Chief in Charge of Regulatory Work.

F. C. BisHopp, Assistant Chief in Charge of Research Work.

W. L. PopHAM, Assistant Chief in Charge of Control Operations.

I’. H. SPENCER, AssiStant Chief in Charge of Administration.

B. Connor, in Charge, Division of Finance and Business Services.

Wm. F. LEFFLER, in Charge, Division of Personnel.

ROLLA P. CurRIE, in Charge of Editorial Work.

J. A. Hystop, in Charge, Division of Insect Pest Survey and Information.

J. I. HAMBELTON, in Charge, Division of Bee Culture Investigations.

D. L. VAN DINE, in Charge, Division of Fruit Insect Investigations.

F. C. CRAIGHEAD, in Charge, Division of Forest Insect Investigations.

W. H. WHITE, in Charge, Division of Truck Crop and Garden Insect Investiga-
tions.

C. M. PACKARD, in Charge, Division of Cereal and Forage Insect Investigations.

R. W. HARNED, in Charge, Division of Cotton Insect Investigations. :

W. E. Dove, in Charge, Division of Insects Affecting Man and Animals.

C. P. CLAUSEN, in Charge, Division of Control Investigations.

R. C. Roark, in Charge, Division of Insecticide Investigations.

C. F. W. MUESEBECK, in Charge, Division of Insect Identification. :

C. P. CLAUSEN, in Charge, Division of Foreign Parasite Introduction.

J. F. MARTIN, in Charge, Division of Plant Disease Control.

B. M. GAvpis, in Charge, Division of Domestic Plant Quarantines.

BE. R. SASsScER, in Charge, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines.

R. A. SHEALS, in Field Charge, Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail Moth Control (head-
quarters, Greenfield, Mass.).

E. G. BREWER, in Field Charge, Japanese Beetle and Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail
Moth Quarantines, and Dutch Elm Disease Eradication (headquarters, Hast
Orange, N. J.)

R. E. McDona.p, in Field Charge, Pink Bollworm and Thurberia Weevil Quaran-
tines (headquarters, San Antonio, Tez.).

P. A. HoIDALe, in Field Charge, Mexican Fruitfly Quarantine (headquarters,
Harlingen, Tez.). :

CLAUDE WAKELAND, in Field Charge, Grasshopper Control (headquarters, Denver,
Colo.).

A. C. BAKER, in Field Charge, Fruitfly Investigations (headquarters, Mexico City,
Mevzico).

96

U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1943
Ber. Ent. & P. Q. Issued May 1943

United States Department of Agriculture

BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS

LIST OF INTERCEPTED PLANT PESTS, 1942

(List of Pests Recorded During the Period July 1, 1941, to June 30, 1942, Inclu-
sive, as Intercepted in, on, or with Plants and Plant Products Entering United

States Territory.)
INTRODUCTION

This report covers the twenty-ninth year for which lists of pest interceptions
have been issued. The records summarized include pests intercepted in, on, or
with plants and plant products (1) imported, (2) offered for but refused entry,
(3) held as ships’ stores, etc., and hence not imported through customs, (4) offered
for entry for immediate export or for immediate transportation and exportation
in bond, and (5) in domestic shipments between Hawaii and Puerto Rico and the
mainland.

Determinations of collections made near the close of the preceding year are
included with data for the current year. In addition to routine reports and deter-
minations by the personnel of this Bureau, considerable information is supplied
by State and customs officials. Staffs of specialists maintained by the States of
California and Florida and the Territory of Hawaii determine most of the inter-
ceptions made there, and specialists of the Bureau of Plant Industry determine a
large part of the more difficult plant-disease material.

The scientific names of insects are checked by specialists in this Bureau and
those of hosts and fungi by specialists in the Bureau of Plant Industry to make
sure they conform to the appropriate international rules of nomenclature.

The alleged origin of plant materials cannot be verified in all cases. Obviously
doubtful items are either omitted or the origin is listed as unknown.

NOTES ON INSECTS INTERCEPTED

FRUITFLIES

Anastrepha fraterculus was intercepted at Baltimore, Boston, and New Orleans
in grapefruit and orange in quarters and stores from Argentina and Brazil. The
Mexican fruitfly (A. ludens) was intercepted 3 times in oranges in baggage and
quarters at Brownsville, Mobile, and New Orleans and 185 times in 12 different
hosts in baggage, quarters, and stores from Mexico. The West Indian fruitfly
(A. mombinpraeopians) was taken 17 times in 3 hosts in baggage, mail, quarters,
and stores from 7 different countries. A. serpentina was intercepted 8 times in 5
hosts in baggage, quarters, and stores from Brazil, Colombia, and Mexico. A.
striata (one adult) was taken at Hoboken with wild Cattleya sp. in cargo from
Venezuela. A. suspensa was intercepted at New York in guava in baggage and
mail from Puerto Rico. The Mediterranean fruitfly (Ceratitis capitata) was taken
11 times in 6 different hosts in baggage and quarters from Hawaii and Portugal.
The melon fly (Dacus cucurbitae) was intercepted at San Francisco and San Pedro
in 3 hosts in stores from Hawaii. The currant fruitfly (Hpochra canadensis) was
taken twice at El Paso in wild currant in baggage from Mexico. The apple
maggot (Rhagoletis pomonella) was taken 4 times in apples in baggage at Laredo
from Mexico. The papaya fruitfly (Toroirypana curvicauda) was intercepted at
New Orleans in papaya in stores from Honduras.

INSECTS OTHER THAN FRUITFLIES

In addition to the usuai insects of major importance, such as the citrus blackfly
(Aleurocanthus woglumz), the turnip gall weevil (Ceutorhynchus pleurostigma), the
Asiatic rice borer (Chilo simplex), the rhododendron whitefly (Dialeurodes chitien-
dent), the West Indian sweetpotato weevil (Huscepes postfasciatus), the East

515307—43——-1
2 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

Indian bean pod borer (Maruca testulalis), and the pink bollworm (Pectinophora
gossypvella), listed in the detailed table are many insects which were intercepted
for the first time, or for the first time on the host indicated, or for the first time
from the country indicated, or are of special interest for some other reason.
References to “‘first record” in these notes refer to our interception records only.
The insects fall in different groups, cover a wide host range, and come from many
parts of the world, e. g., Aonidiella pinicola (Coccidae) first record and not
previously in the National Museum Collection, A. eremocitri (Coccidae) first
record, Bruchus dentipes (Bruchidae) first record in broadbean, Capaneus odiosus
(Coreidae) first record from Venezuela, Chirothrips aculeatus (Thripidae) first
record, Dialeurodes kirkaldyi (Aleyrodidae) first record on Tabernaemontana sp.,
Elaphrothrips dampfi (Phlaeothripidae) first record, Fulvius brevicornis (Miridae)
first record, Heilipus trifasciatus (Curculionidae) (formerly listed as H. perseae)
first record from Costa Rica, Lamprosema schistisemalis (Pyraustidae) first
record, Metamasius callizona (Curculionidae) first record on pineapple, Micro-
cerotermes exiguus (Termitidae) first record in wood and also first record from
Nicaragua, the carrot rust fly (Pszla rosae) first record from Iceland, Urbanus
proteus (Hesperiidae) first record in string bean and also first record from Mexico,
and Urodus parvula (Hyponomeutidae) first record.

NOTES ON PLANT DISEASES INTERCEPTED

Among the more important plant-disease interceptions were 6 of citrus canker
(Bacterium citri), 5 of a somewhat similar bacterial canker of citrus in South
America which is called Cancrosis-B, 2 of Dutch elm disease (Ceratostomella
(Graphium) ulmt2), 159 of banana leaf spot (Cercospora musae), 12 of the bulb and
stem eelworm (Ditylenchus dipsaci), 16 of sweet orange scab (Elsinoe australis),
363 of lima bean scab (Elsinoe phaseolt), 9 of citrus black spot (Phoma citricarpa),
and 3 of a broomcorn smut (Sphacelotheca sorghicola).

COMMON PESTS INTERCEPTED

Many of the pests intercepted are of species already well established here.
Some of these may include potentially destructive strains not yet introduced, but
it is not practicable to determine that point. Pests not yet established here but
intercepted in large numbers on one or two hosts are in some eases listed here
instead of in the detailed table. While many thousands of interceptions of
common pests are not recorded, the data that follow are sufficient to show their
general nature. The numbers following the scientific names of the pests indicate
the number of countries of origin from which the pest was intercepted and the
number of interceptions recorded.

INSECTS

Common insects intercepted 10 or more times, and recorded, included Acantho-
scelides obtectus (11-82), Ahasverus advena (11-23), Anthonomus eugenti (2—4,930),
Aonidiella aurantii (15-49), Aphis gossypii (6-38), Araecerus fasciculatus (7-21),
Aspidiotus camelliae (4-14), A. cyanophylli (10-48), A. hederae (6-39), A. latantae
(17-187), A. perniciosus (3-17), Brevicoryne brassicae (12-24), Carpocapsa po-
monella (8-200), Cathartus quadricollis (2-14), Cerataphis lataniae (14-122),
Chionaspis citri (8-14), Chrysomphalus aonidum (18-69), C. dictyospermi (10-122),
Coccus hesperidum (13-100), Diaspis boisduvalii (20-582), D. bromeliae (4-22),
Ephestia cautella (6-19), Etiella zinckenella (2-20), Gnorimoschema operculella
(22-283), Heliothis armigera (8—7,987), H. virescens (8-222), Hippodamia con-
vergens (1-35), Howardia biclavis (5-16), Ischnaspis longirestris (6-13), Laphygma
frugiperda (4-333), Lasioderma serricorne (10-45), Lepidosaphes beckw (34-150),
L. gloverti (5-10), Myzus persicae (10-46), Necrobia rufipes (4-20), Oryzaephilus
surinamensis (2-11), Parlatoria pergandii (8-15), P. proteus (10-69), Pinnaspis
minor (7-99), Plodia interpunctella (4-31), Pseudococcus adonidum (11-23), P.
brevipes (8-15), P. citri (11-26), P. maritimus (8-16), Rhizoglyphus hyacinthi
(9-39), Saissetia hemisphaerica (16-175), S. nigra (4-25), S. oleae (11-16), Selen-
aspidus articulatus (16-49), Sitophilus oryza (7-26), Sitotroga cerealella (5-11),
Stegobium paniceum (8-15), Tenebroides mauritanicus (2-10), Thrips tabact
(10-38), Tribolium castaneum (9-16), Typhaea stercorea (10-53).

In addition to the listed species of common insects, there were 5,560 intercep-
tions belonging to 695 different species which were not deemed to be of sufficient
importance from the plant-quarantine viewpoint to warrant listing them by
species. Total of common insects intercepted, 21,966.


SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 3

DISEASES

Common plant diseases intercepted 10 or more times, and recorded, included
Actinomyces scabies (21-247), Albugo candida (3-36), Alternaria brassicae (8-12),
A. solani (3-103), A. tomato (1-1,157), Aphelenchoides parietinus (6-10), Aplano-
bacter michiganense (1-101), Aspergillus niger (22-345), Bacillus carotovorus (12-59),
Bacterium phaseoli. (1-56), B. vesicatorium (7—1,588), Botrytis cinerea (17-39), B.
tulipae (2-23), Capnodium citri (8-15), Cephalothecium roseum (8-45), Ceratosio-
mella adiposum (1-13), C. fimbriata (6-15), C. paradoxa (16-198), Cercospora
beticola (1-16), C. capsici (2-102), C. rosicola (38-89), Cladosporium fuluwm (2-154),
Colletotrichum circinans (4-359), C. lindemuthianum (8-67), C. nigrum (4-12),
C. orchidearum (11-80), C. phomoides (1-26), Corticium vagum (16-622), Cylindro-
sporium chrysanthemi (1-22), Diaporthe citri (19-124), D. phaseolorum (3-99),
Diplocarpon rosae (3-23), Diplodia natalensis (19-53), D. tubericola (12-24),
Elsinoe fawcetttt (16-141), EH. phaseoli (2-863), Erysiphe graminis (2-13), EH. poly-
goni (1-40), Gloeosporium limetticolum (25-273), G. musarum (7-18), Glomerella
cingulata (19-541), Helminthosporium alli (6—2,247), Heterodera marioni (13-22),
Melanconium sacchari (3-24,) Mycosphaerella brassicicola (7-12), M. citrullina
(5-20), Oospora citri-aurantii (2-14), O. lactis parasitica (9-205), O. pustulans
(2-11), Penicillium digitatum (9-87), P. expansum (2-20), P. italicum (11-15),
Phoma destructiva (4-566), Phomopsis verans (9-217), Phytophthora infestans
(7-382), P. phaseolt (1-10), Pucctnia alla (5-17), P. chrysanthemi (1-28), P.
graminis (15-45), P. rubigo-vera (8-23), Pucciniopsis caricae (1-35), Pythiwm
debaryanum (1-34), Rhizopus nigricans (20-663), Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (12-38),
Sclerotium oryzae (8-15), S. rolfsi (7-20), Septoria apii (9-14), Sphaceloma per seae
(6-267), Sphacelotheca sorghi (1-10), Sphaerotheca pannosa (3-10), Spondylo-
cladium atrovirens (10-19), Spongospora subterranea (4-11), Uromyces phaseola
typica (1-24), Ustilago zeae (2-26), Venturia inaequalis (16-61), Verticillium
cinnabarina (10-47).

In addition there were recorded 244 interceptions of 74 other species of common
pathogens, making a total of 12,428 recorded interceptions of common diseases.

INCOMPLETELY DETERMINED PESTS

Each year interceptions include some pests which appear to be new to science
and hence undescribed. Others are not determinable because available descrip-
tions are inadequate and authentic material is lacking. In many cases the
intercepted material is inadequate or not in a stage to permit determination.

INSECTS

Among the incompletely determined insects intercepted during the year were
the following fruitflies: Anastrepha sp., probably fraterculus, intercepted at
Baltimore, Brownsville, New Orleans, New York, and Philadelphia in peach,
grapefruit, and orange from Argentina, Brazil, Mexico, and Trinidad; Anastrepha
sp. at Jacksonville, Laredo, Miami, and New Orleans in cherimoya, guava, mango,
orange, plum, and quince from Brazil, Colombia, Honduras, Jamaica, and Mexico;
Ceratitis sp., likely capitata, at Seattle in coffee berry from Hawaii; Ceratitis sp. at
Boston in orange from the Union of South Africa; Dacus sp. at Baltimore in
orange from Mozambique; Epochra sp., probably canadensis, at El Paso in currant
from Mexico; Rhagoletis sp., probably pomonella, at Brownsville and Laredo in
apple, Crataegus sp., mango and plum from Mexico; and Rhagoletis sp., probably
suavis (Loew), at Nogales in black walnut from Mexico.

_In addition to the incompletely identified fruitflies the following miscellaneous
insects of special interest were intercepted: Acrolophus sp., near pallidus (Mosch.)
(Acrolophidae), at Hoboken with orchids from Colombia and Costa Rica; Agro-
myza sp., near setosa Loew (Agromyzidae), at Nogales in purslane from Mexico;
Amblycerus sp. (Bruchidae) at Chicago and New York in seeds of Dipteryx sp. and
Prosopis chilensis from Brazil and Dominican Republic; Amphicerus sp., probably
hamatus (F.) (Bostrichidae), at New York in elder from Mexico; Chirothrips sp.,
near sulcatus Johns. (Thripidae), at Baltimore and the Inspection House in
Washington, D. C., with grass seeds from the Union of South Africa: Asterole-
canium sp., close to puteanum Russell (Coccidae), at San Francisco on /lex sp. (?)
from Guatemala; Ceuthorhynchidius sp., near wickhami Champ. (Curculionidae),
at Laredo on an herb from Mexico; Cnemonyz sp. (Scolvtidae) at New York under
the bark of a mahogany hybrid log from Costa Rica; Conotrachelus sp., probably
nenuphar (Hbst.) (Curculionidae), at Brownsville, FE] Paso, and Laredo in apple
4 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

and peach from Mexico; Desiantha sp., near maculata Blackburn (Curculionidae),
at Seattle with dahlia tubers from Australia; Epitriz sp., near hirtipennis (Melsh.)
(Chrysomelidae), at Laredo and Nogales with lettuce and tomato from Mexico;
Heilipus sp., probably lauri Boh. (Curculionidae), at Brownsville in an avocado
seed from Guatemala; Laspeyresia sp., probably nigricana (Stph.) (Olethreu-
tidae), at New York in fresh peas from Portugal; Lygus sp., close to plagiatus Uhl.
(Miridae), at Eagle Pass with lettuce from Mexico; Magdalis sp., probably
armigera Geoff. (Curculionidae), at New York on elm crates from England;
Marmara sp. (Gracilariidae) at El Paso and Nogales in avocado and pepper from
Mexico; Melamasius sp., probably ritchiei (Marsh.) (Curculionidae), at Hidalgo
in pineapple from Mexico; Palmaricoccus sp., very close to attaleae Stickney
(Coccidae), at New York on Attalea sp. from Venezuela; Pityophthorus sp., near
confertus Sw. (Scolytidae), at New York in wooden canes used as packing from
Mexico; Platypus sp., near apertus Chapuis (Platypodidae), at New York in
lignumvitae log from Guatemaia.

In addition to the incompletely determined insects listed above there were
5,498 interceptions which could be identified to genus only. These were dis-
tributed among 691 different genera. A total of 208 could be determined to
family and subfamily only.

Total of incompletely determined insects intercepted, 5,833.

DISEASES

Among the incompletely determined diseases intercepted during the year were
5 of a serious disease similar to citrus canker and known as “‘Cancrosis-B”, all on
lemons from Argentina in stores. Nematodes intercepted included Acrobeloides
sp. and Aphelenchoides sp., both new species apparently, in narcissus bulbs from
Canada. Other undetermined pathogens included Colletotrichum spp. on Paspalum
dilatatum seed from India and flower seed from Mexico, Helminthosporium sp. on
tomato from Mexico, Phytophthora sp. on Cattleya sp. from Venezuela, undeter-
mined rusts on grasses from Canada, Dutch East Indies, and Mexico and on
Heteropogon contortus from Straits Settlements, Sclerotinia sp. on carrot from the
Union of South Africa and tomato and husk tomato from Mexico, Sphaeronema sp.
on Sechium edule from Brazil, and undetermined virus diseases on vegetables
from Cuba and Mexico. A total of 6,843 incompletely determined pathogens
~were recorded during the year.

ENTOMOGENOUS FUNGI

Entomogenous fungi noted during the course of inspection are sometimes
recorded. Records for this year include Aschersonia sp. on undetermined scale
insect on Syzgium malaccense leaf from Trinidad and on camellia leaf from Mexico;
Cephalosporium lecanti Zimm. on Coccus viridis on Cape-jasmine from Cuba and
Venezuela, on C. acuminatus on Cape-jasmine from Cuba, and on Pulvinaria
pyriformis on Cape-jasmine from Venezuela; Microcera sp. on cocecid on lime and
orange leaves from Mexico; Myriangium durtaei on Lepidosaphes beckti on orange
from Cuba; Nectria diploa Berk. & Curt. on Lepidosaphes beckit on oranges from
Bahamas, Brazil, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Jamaica, and Trinidad and on
grapefruit from Cuba and Puerto Rico; Periconta pycnospora Fres. on a lepidop-
terous larva on an orchid leaf from Mexico; Pestalozzia sp. on a lepidopterous
larva on an orchid leaf from Mexico; Podonectria coccicola (Ell. & Kv.) Petch on
Lepidosaphes beckii on oranges from Puerto Rico and Carribean region and on
unknown host on Cape-jasmine from Mexico; and Torrubiella sp. on an insect on
a gardenia leaf from Mexico.


SERVICE AND REGULATORY

Geographic summary of interceptions listed in main table and interception totals



Country



Africa:
LARA ee ee ee
Belgian Congo. _.....---
Gold: Coasts: - 2. s2-)
Morocco (French) _-------
mMnOGesia 2 wes =.
Mancanwilken oe 28S
‘MranSvadlets ote... Se
Union of South Africa ___-

Asia:

Ohingeee te ;

ABSIT ae ees ot ey OBE SLL
Malaya (British)_..___---
HEIST Oat tl. Meee
Straits Settlements__-___-_-
mneAT Ges. = 95.25
Australasia:
PAUISLT ANAS = 4252) eke en ek
(CxES Voy TV See pa, Cs

IBOTbNSAl tthe ee Ase ee ob

econlande4 ee ook

POS ae So fed

Union of Soviet Socialist

IR DUD MCS sete
North America:

British Columbia_- _-
Newfoundland_-_____-
INGVa scotian—2.--—.—
Central America:
British Honduras_--_-
Canal’7one_.-2ul =...
Costa Inica >. 3.2.5
Girahemala.. o5----.-
ION GUTAS= ss5
Niearaciua_..-2_._--2:
IPanamaa eat st a
SHIWAGOr= 2.5.8 oc.
7 leel anges Fo pl Poe se





North America—Continued
Miexicol 5220-2

LOCOrNDE Ww
IeFKNocoeoSo

—
—



ANNOUNCEMENTS

Country Insects | Diseases





Number

N
Nore ew

a
RFPWOCOONeFNOCOFH

Qo
be

w
em s1TO O10 00 O aw he DP

NII CONF NHK OY,

Ro oocoen & wore

toe bt
QO rh



Total (common pests,

Dp. 2
Total (incompletely de-

oe pests, p.
3

American Virgin
Islands... Wee Pet 2 1
ATITISHA.. Stee See 2 0
IBaAnsamMaAs yay 8 0
Barbados 7228-2 eee 2 0
British West Indies __ 1 0
Up aee ss a er epee 95 41
Dominica_____ cet oe 1 0
Dominican Republic. 14 4
Dutch West Indies__ 10 0
Guadeloupe---_-____- 1 0
EL Aimee sae it Sy. og 2 34
Jamaica =2. 22 7 4
Martinique_________-- 2 0
ING Vise a a 1 a
IPWERbO ICOM 2 =e 27 3
SU UNICIOae es freeones 5 0
Sip Vilncent= ss) aaeee 1 0
TPrinidads: Seo 22 sas 48 1
VWareiniislands..= 23- 2 0

South America:

Arcentina.< Brazile eto A eee alee 65 iI¢6
British) Gulanges so." 2 4 0
Chiles ceey ae yee 2 9
Colombiakws os see. es. 76 6
Dutch Gulanarensss. eee 5 0
GUA C.Obsee. ieee ee TS 2 1
Pert: Systhi.. Cea atts 31 5
OETA ee 2 a oe 0 1
enézuela = fevesea) Lice 88 4
PAT CA oo ee 21 21
PANG Tyan Oe Ng eS a Ps 77 10
IATIStralaSta £2 See eee a 145 21
LUTODCS =. sear = Seen. Se 128 61
North America__-._-_---- 9, 896 329
SouthvAmerica 22.222 291 55
Uinkrio ty set Sees Ss 2 i
Motalieesi darn a2 ca 10, 560 498

21, 966 12, 428

tf gi h Then) OV ee se tee 5, 833 6, 343
Entomogenous fungi-___|-.-----_--
MTotalansects3o 4.24ea 383369 oles eo
otal Gisedseses 2-285 ela sae 19, 296
Grand total =53) 4 Passe eet 57, 655

Nore.—In addition to the countries named above, interceptions including common pests (p. 2) and
incompletely determined pests (p. 3) were made from American Samoa, Angola, Aruba, Azores, Batavia,
Bolivia, Canary Islands, Canton Island, Curacao, East Africa, Fanning Island, Fiji Islands, France,
Gibraltar, Greece, Grenada, Guam, Kenya, Liberia, Madeira Islands, Midway, Montserrat, Mozambique,
Netherlands, New Brunswick, New Caledonia, Nigeria, Palmyra Island, Paraguay, Sierra Leone, Solo
mon Islands, Sweden, Switzerland, Tasmania, Turkey, Turks Island, Uganda, Wales. and West Africa.
6 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

List of pests collected and reported from July 1, 1941, to June 30, 1942, inclusive

[All findings marked with an asterisk indicate State inspection]

Number of inter-
ceptions in—

Insect and host Country of origin Collected in—







Acalypta mera Drake (Tingitidae):
Sazifraga camposi (campos saxifrage) __
Sempernivum Sp..." 5. aaa | do. 25.2550 Ae ee ee Wash.

Acanthoderes circumfiera Duv. (Ceramby-

cidae):
Tabebuia donnell-smithii (primavera) -
coe alticola (Sharp) (Bruchi-
ae):
Cassia occidentalis (coffee senna) ______|_____ do 2k eae sae N.Y.
Acanthoscelides ceratioborus (Philippi)
(Bruchidae):
Ceratonia stliqua (carob) ________-____-
Prosopis sp. (mesquite) ___.._2______.-
Acanthoscelides dominicanus (Jekel) (Bru-
chidae): x
Acacia farnesiana (sweet acacia) ______



Perl. aie le eee Fe
Dutch East Indies, Peru_

IVI COs) 18 2

Caesalpinia coriaria (divi-divi)________ Colombia, Dominican Fla.*, La., ‘N.
Republic, Dutch East doy: he Pe
Indies, Dutch West Tex
Indies, Jamaica, Mex-
ico, Salvador, Vene-
zuela.

Cacsalpinig Spee 4525. 321 dhe S51 Mexico Ao os. ets Nis

Acanthoscelides flexicaulis (Schffr.) (Bru-
chidae):
Pithecellobium flericaule (ebony) _-____|____- do ates). Fa gs Tex

tenes julianus (Horn) (Bruchi-
ae):
Pithere ots niac 8p 50s le Oe GU: Renee eee eee ee Tex.
crea Sa limbatus (Horn) (Bruchi-
ae):
Pithecellobium dulce (guamachil apes-
earring).
GS ca pruininus (Horn) (Bruchi-
ae):
ogaenmiien spt 2. | PU Se (6 (OER Ud : See ECS
Acanthoscelides sallaei (Sharp) (Bruchidae):
Acacia farnesiana (huisache) __________
Aceratagallia nana Oman (Cicadellidae):

Chrysanthemum sp..---=---._-.-..2\k___- oti Bd en oe Ariz.
Aceratagallia pallida Oman (Cicadellidae): d

Capsicum annuum (pepper) _________-_|__-_- dos PieF ey vos Ariz.
Aceratagallia robusta Oman (Cicadellidae):

Beta vnlgaris (pect), 22300) aed any ee G0: saa ee ee Tex
Acmaeodera gibbula delumbis Horn (Bu-

prestidae): ?

Prosopis sp. (mesquite)... 2.22 ey dots 8 -f pina Ariz.
Acroleucus vicinalis Dist. (Lygaeidae):

Ananas comosus (pineapple) __________|____-_ CO) ae Wa eee ar Tex.

Acrolophus fervidus Busck (Acrolophidae):
Cattleya sp. (orchid) __-___.......____-

Gace stitica (Dall.) (Pentatomi-
ae):

Colonibints:: aba sete lee). aluars ty N. J.

Gardenia jasminoides (Cape-jasmine) -_| Mexico__________._______ Tex.

Adraneothrips tibialis (Hood) (Phlaeothri-
pidae): 4

Musa paradisiaca sapientum (banana) _| Cuba__._-------__-____- Fla.
Aeolus pulchellus Cand. (Elateridae):

Stanhopea sp. (orchid) --_------------- Whexito:- 2 22 tl test ae eee ae Tex.
Aganactesis indecora Dyar (Galleriidac): ;

Cassia fistula (goldenshower senna) ---| St. Lucia.__---.----...-- N..Â¥

Â¥ OMCIANE S02. eee Trinidad]: ee res A eee La.
Agromyza virens (Loew) (Agromyzidae): ’

Daucus carota sativa (carrot) __----__-- WVEOXICO 2s: /e Bee oe Sad Tex

Agrotis vetusta (W1k.) (Phalaenidae):
Beans, (Corn) 2 4) Se ae gl Seee GOt a Ss eS ee
Aleurocanthus woglumi Ashby (Aleyrodi-
dae):
Pee AND ent oe eo
ae cococolus Q. & B. (Aleyrodi-
ae):
APCWIBER CONGUE: 225 oe ae
Ae myricae Q. & B. (Aleyrodi-
ae):
Epigaea repens (trailing arbutus)__-_-_-
SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 7

List of pests collected and reported from July 1, 1941, to June 30, 1942, inclusive—









Continued
Number of inter-
ceptions in—
Insect and. host Country of origin | Collected in—
Con- | Non. | PTOP-
sump we | Oar
tion entry tion
a: aad
Aleurotracheius camelliae(Kuwana)(Aley-
rodidae):
rere Littyae te Ne eee We alae ey wees oS el ek 1 | Wash
Aleurotrachelus trachoides (Back) (Aley-
rodidae):
Wimdenmned plants-s2-.2 32220 28 GH aAd Or ae re ee A La IN
ye incognita (McA. & M.) (Cydni-
ae
Dianthus sp. (carnation) -__----------- Mexico..__- pier awe oe kt Eee st et Tex.

Alpheias conspirata Hein. (Galleriidae):
Ananas comosus (pineapple) -_--------|----- G0tge aaa eet oS DOE 2-2 a Eee Tex.
Amblycerus piurae (Pierce) (Bruchidae):
Ceratonia siliqua (carob) _---_-_-------
Amphicerus cornutus (Pallas) (Bostri-
chidae):
Lycopersicon esculentum (tomato) ----| Mexico---.-------------- ein hase Ariz.
SLMERMEIS SPs (ClGGE)--=_- 22. = =. |L__ = Gen aie: Sere Ae see 3 | et ya.
ee a ee be eS Leet Qe ese ® SA eee een ING Ys, oa
Amphorophora rhododendri (Wils.) (Aphii-

Hhododenanon Sp 22. --2 = 222 2 - =.
Anacentrinus aac riitean Csy. (Curculi-
onidae):
Lactuca sativa (lettuce) ___.-.__-_-----
Ave orchidaceus Bagn. (Thripi-

Pere ae Oo hhh Tet Dee [eee La.

British Columbia} =. "|. 2_ 2-25 )E--+.- 1 | Wash.

IWViERTCOe = ee ee eee ee Tex.

Cattleya mendeli Gremd’ Mike We oI, oe IPertie 2 e ee e ee ae oee Teal.
Milionia pulchra (orchid) __-_--------- ECan sae Wee | See FS ease 1 | Calif.*
UNA ete nen ee The SS ea Geeta re i OP see ed ten nae 1 | Hawaii.*
Odontoglossum sp. (orchid) _--_-_-----|____- A eee ee eee he ee [eee Ie peal.
eerie oe Cece EP ee ae de ck Colombia = 4s HL | eae [oh SS Aa
tne orchidiit (Moult.) (Thripi-
Cypripedium curtisi (orchid) _________- ATIStLalin® eo Sac e e Ere | ers 1 | Hawaii.*
Anastrepha fraterculus (Wied.) (Tephri-
tidae):
Citrus paradisi (grapefruit) - -_-------- Argentina, Brazil: 22-22 j2--- 5 3 irate Md., Mass.
- Citrus sinensis (orange) ____-_.-------- STZ eee ate eh Se ee eh Aye es La., Md.
Anastrepha ludens (Loew) (Tephritidae):
Amygdalus persica (peach) --_--------- IM Gx1C0 ena Dison eee) ere ae Tex.
Citrus aurantifolia (lime) -----.~-.=2-2--|_£-- OS ieee aes SF id) bg EAS bse eae Tex.
Citrus aurantivm (sour orange) -___----|____- Cs ee ee SUP. eer Eee Tex.
Citrus paradisi (grapefruit) _____.-----]____- GO: ere ee ee Aer ne Pe Rex;
Citrus sinensis (orange) ___-_--_------- Guatemala, Mexico, 108 ote Le Ala., Ariz.,
unknown origin. Calif. eA."
La., Md.,
Y= Pa, Tex
‘ .Cydonia oblonga (quince) ____---_----- Wiexieg: ss... ee SF hen eas Tex.
UILIES SU WESITES (AD pPle) 22-2 soe | CAG aD is en A he rae tee se Tex.
Mangifera indica (mango) ---___-_-----|____- Oe se ote a 23 Ae eS Ariz., Tex.
Persea americana (avocado) --____-----|____- fo a eS Bae Tepe Rex.
Punica granatum (pomegranate) ______|____- Ose hy a Sialvee oe eee Tex.
IPyFus COMMUNTS (DEAT) ===! 22 = b= |h a Ose Sete aie Beers, De eras (Pree ae Tex.
Spotter eee tae me SE Shs ge von EL oasis salar eg 75 eats ee eee Tex:
Anasirepha mombinpraeoptans Sein (Te-
phritidae):
Citrus paradisi (grapefruit) _____-__--- Shei Genie. atone IE ee We Tee Mass.

Mangifera indica (mango) ------------- Cuba, Dominican Re- 12 A |e eee





public, Haiti, Jamaica, ING YG,
Puerto Rico, un-
a ; known origin.
Psidium guajava (guava) _______--_-_- Dominican Republic.___|_--.---|_----- baal) en pkes
Anastrepha serpentina (Wied.) (Tephri-
tidae):
Calocarpum sapota (mamey sapote)_.-| Mexico__.............---]_------ eee s.C
Citrus paradisi (frapelrinit) 2 = ---=252-- Spee ae a ae deel! Oe oe ae La.
Gairus: sinensis (Orange) © 2 eo |e Ce ee ree Sat es ie Ala
Mammea americana (mamey)-_--_____- 1 WO te Ee a Oe eee eee Ariz., Tex
Serie Sone pe eee ees! 5 289s ols Walamipins pera tis: be ee La
Anastrepha striata Schin. (Tephritidae):
Curitleva sp: (Orchig)e = =p eh ee MONO aIIG Abie ope eee |e ome ee LENS
— suspensa (Loew) (Tephriti-
ae):
Psidiwm guajava (guava) -.-.___------- Puerto Bicoe.. ht. = re) a oe | No.
8 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

List of pests collected and reported from July 1, 1941, to June 80, 1942, inclusive—







Continued
Number of inter-
ceptions in—
Insect and host Country of origin 2 a Collected in—
on- _| Prop-
sump- vee aga-
tion Y| tion
ees championi Ashmead (Cynipi-
ae):
Quercrs Sp al0ak) 4 os sear ee Mexicosers.. ees pe oaee | I Be ele sae Rex
Andricus mezicanus Kinsey (Cynipidae):
Quercus macrophylla 2 tS Miexicos 403 2. sea es! 1 \\_ 6a eee Ariz.
Anuraphis apiifolia Theob. (Aphiidae):
Apium graveolens (celery)___-________- Union of South Africa___}_______ ee Md.
Aonidia lauri (Bouche) (Coecidae):
Laurus nobilis (Grecian laurel)____....| Cyprus, Spain_________-_ 1 2 eee Noe ne
Aonidia pinicola Leon. (Coccidge):
Fangessp. (plnie)=— nani eee iPortigalsee = ot ps 1 Ni ie
Aonidiella eremocitri McKenzie (Coccidae):
Coelogyne asperata (orchid) __________-_ Nn ailay Ghaseetae ey Be eee ee ke See 1 | Hawaii.*
Aonidiella inornata McKenzie (Coccidae):
Citrus peradisi (pomelo)______________ Pihnhippinest. = ee ae eee 1 | eee Hawaii.*
Gitrusmeticnloatac(taneenine) 4.9. 2.2) alee COA Se ee Sey eres | eee 1 | Hawaii.*
Cycas revoluta (Sago cycas)____________ a walt eee: 2 eee ed eee See 1 | Calif.*
Jasminum sambac (jasmine) __________]__--- CO Ae ae. |b ore ee eee 1 | Calif.*
Piper betle (betel pepper) _....-....-..]----- GOiwaS oe See ee [hs (4. 2a eee Calif.*
re conwayana (F.) (Tortrici-
ae):
Frazinus excelsior (European ash) ____- Binegland: = 2 o0 2.8 ee | eee Oe TIN es
Arvelius albopunctatus (Deg.) (Pentato-
midae):
Capsicum annuum (pepper) _-_______- IMiexd COs Ss 1h 2 ee Ge) ae ee 1 ee Ariz., Tex.
Aspidiotus destructor Sign. (Coccidae):
Annona squamosa (sugarapple)__..._.| Cuba___________-_______- {vent Fla.*
Cocos nucifera (coconut)_.-_-______=_- Dominican Republic____ {| ee eee :
Musa paradisiaca sapientum (banana)_| Cuba, Guatemala, Pan- 8.22 == |e Fla.*, Wash.
ama.
Palins - Lc eee ek Seen: Cubas Persea americana (avoocado)_________ |_---- dois ea erat See ] ING Ys
dipystones. regia (Cuban royal palm). -|22--.00+_5 2) ss ee ee ee 1 | Hie
Terminalia catappa (West Indian al- | ----do__-_---______-_.__- fe Fla.*
monqd)._-
Aspidiotus diffinis Newst. (Coccidae):
Oncidiuin pusillum (orchid)__________- Canal’ Zones se Se ee eee 1 | Hawaii.*
Aspidiotus herculeanus Doane & Haddon
(Coccidae) :
GUS ee ee ee ea ee Co een aca A Ra Mekal ae ete DAN atu 12) oe
Pelliciera rhizophoreae_________._____-- Panama ee ay eee | -| SS, | eres Fla.*
Spondias mombin (yellow mombin)___| Dominican Republic____ 1120 ae ee INS aes
Spondias purpurea (purple mombin)__| Venezuela______________- 1 i a bal 2M Na
Aspidiotus spinosus Comst. (Coccidae):
PaCS CHICi HO) pe eke eee. ae WIGXICO: Sen eet eee 1) ee Tex.
Mammea americana (mamey)___------ Cilia Sr Lee 1 ieee Fla.*
Persea americana (avocado) ___________|----- Ot 632. a eee 3. ase oe ee Noes
ene bambusae (Bdv.) (Cocci-
ae):
BAM DOO. eee ee Be, ee Costa Rica, Cuba__-_-____ eal J | Rigen ye
Bambusa vulgaris (bamboo) _________- Guateimalaly-- «pears > 3) 0. is ee 17 | Dees
free epidendri (Bouche) (Coc-
cidae):
Brassia gireoudiana (orchid) ___--____- Goesta Ricat!?2uslhw ins bh cose ih ne a8 4| Calif.*, N. J.
ROMIGGCeI. (tere eR og. Slee (1 ORIN oi ER ak a | 1 | Calif.*
Cattleya dowiana (orchid) _____________|----- on gs ee ey Dk. ee naan eae 1 | Calif.*
Cattleya lweddemanniana_____________- Venezuela) 16> Fa ai ae Ee 2 | Calis a. i.
CCU RD) /1 tes ee Lee SIE” Brazil, Colombia, Costa |_--__--|_----- 10 | Calif.*, N. J.
Rica, Venezuela.
Epidendrum ciliare (orchid) __-__-___-- Wostar forces. 2 4. Ol eo | eee eee 1) N. J.
Gongora armeniaca (orchid) ___________|----- OD WOUND 2a ge ees 1 | Calif.*
Laelia superbiens (orchid) ___________-- Gilatemalae 4 tle SE 1 | Calif.*
Odontoglossum grande (orchid) _______- Salvader...... 2 a Ee ee 1 | Calif.*
es ke miliaris (Bdv.) (Cocci-
ae):
BAM DOOe._) s+ Neihe a eter ey eee ee © Cubay=24.- Ute eee ae 1 1 Ne Fla.*
Asterolecanium miliaris longum (Green)
(Coccidae):
Bampout te ay Bo Pe vel Acinti gig HO IE fe ede flee S| 5 Ni ¥4
Asterolecanium miliaris robustum Green
(Coccidae):
IBambO0: . 63004-5252 ke te eee Barbados: 22-2. ee Lit Ans 2) See IN).

Aylaz salviae (Giraud) (Cynipidae):
Salvia officinalis (sage) _-__-...-------- Gy prises 2 Eee sche 3 |Seae S e8 ING
SERVICE

AND REGULATORY

ANNOUNCEMEN

cS

9

List of pests collected and reported from July 1, 1941, to June 30, 1942, inclusive—

Cont

inued

Sr nn eae dtttty titttttEES SSeS

515807—43——_2



Number of inter- |



ceptions in—













Insect and host Country of origin a | Collected in—
ae Non- eed
ae P-Jentry | 28°
ion tion
Biorhiza solita Kinsey (Cynipidae): :
Quercus macrophylla_________.-_------ VICK COM eee ee 1 ee | ee Ariz
Bouhelia maroccana Bal. (Coccidae):
Muscari comosum (eipollino)___.----.- Morocco (French) ___---- eae ees N. Y
Brentus anchorago L. (Brentidae):
WO Rem ed eee senen INNGXICOD=s a2 eee eee Op | Se ee ex
Tabebuia donnell-smithii (primavera) ..| Guatemala___----------- 2 | een || eee NOY;
Brentus mexicanus Boh, (Brentidae):
Tabebuia donnell-smithii. ___.-_-.-| Guatemala, Mexico----- Oe bese | aes ING exe
Bruchidius dorsalis (Boh.) (Bruchidae):
Gleditsia japonica (Japanese honey: | Japan_..----------------|-------|------ 2 | Wash,
locust).
Bruchidius versicolor (Boh.) (Bruchidae):
Podalyria sericea (satinleaf podalyria)_| Union of South Africa___|.------|------ 1 | Oreg.
Bruchus dentipes (Baudi) (Bruchidae):
Vicia faba (broad bean)._-_----_------- Set ee eee eee | ea ee |e Le Ce
Bruchus dentipes ochraceosignatus Heyden
(Bruchidae):
LEC [Los ep ee na LO eer ree pee |e Tj Das
Bruchus emarginatus Allard (Bruchidae):
Pisum sativum (pea) .....------------- Nidias diralie S222 eee AS ete ty |) DEC Ne Ye
Bruchus hamatus Miller (Bruchidae):
Vicia tenuifolia__.._._..-.------------ TAR ue deel oes Hee sale eee Li Doe,
Bucculatrir thurberiella Busck (Lyon-
etiidae):
Gossypium sp. (cotton) __.--------_---- IVT EST CO sees ee ee [eee ee | be ae Tex.
Callidium antennatum hesperum Csy.
(Cerambycidae):
Lycopersicon esculentum (tomato) _____|----- CQ aaah abe sae ce 1 Eee ee eee Ariz.
Callosobruchus chinensis (L.) (Bruchidae): .
Cajanus cajan (pigeon pea)_-_-----_--- Philippines, Puerto Rico- aL ees 1 | Hawaii*, N. Y.
Cicer arietinum (chickpea) _._..-.-----| India__------------------ | eee Ga-yiNe Ys
Phaseolus aureus (mung bean) ________- HUT PICS awe sete eee ll eee oes Ga.
Pee maculatus (F.) (Bruchi-
ae):
Cicer arietinum (chickpea) ____-------- Wiex1 CO meee ee eee Dae | ene riz.
Phaseolus aureus (mung bean) ____-_-_- hip DINGS see eee eee Nee = a.
Phaseolus mungo radiatus__._____--_-- COT oes oe Se 16 ee Pet Wash
Portulaca oleracea (purslane) ___------- IMICXI CORE S525) Jase 252 [as 2e22 le eee Ariz.
MON ODICUTOSD a2 s20 ae oe ee (A PCr se Set | Bones |e 1 wOSC
Vigna sinensis (cowpea) _..-----------|----- Oi ee Oe Oe eee EDS
ZEO MOY Su(COEN) 2 220 eee 5 NeXT COnte 2222 ose 25 1g pe ts Ariz.
ane subinnotatus Pie. (Bruchi-
ae):
Voandzeia subterranea (congo goober)__| Algeria._..---------------|-------|------ LiL aC.
Calydon submetallicum Blanch. (Ceram-
bycidae):
WO OAs Bz See eS Ft @hilowtse ese ee sees [| een Ie ae NY.
Capaneus odiosus Stal (Coreidae):
Cattleya sp. (orchid) ___________--_-_--- SVS TIC ZUG oy tees ee ae | re ence |e ee De eee.
Cee enbalt sagittifera (Uhl1.) (Cicadelli-
ae):
Ananas comosus (pineapple) _________- IMICXICO#2 222224 2 css ]ON Re eel ae Tex.
Caryedon fuscus (Goeze) (Bruchidae):
Cassia fistula (golden-shower) ____----- Dutch East Indies___---- Dial Oc 2 late Se Ga.
Cassia nodosa (jointwood senna) ______- LAV Or eee = ee Seis 2 ol Uae? 1 | Calif.*
Tamarindus indica (tamarind) _______- British Guiana, Nevis_- AO ee ee Mass., Pa.
eee buscki (Bridwell) (Bruchi-
ae):
SCHEELE ZOMENSIG =e es ae @analiZone. 22s Se 2. |S ae Se ole 2 | 1 | Calif.*
eee latinasus (Say) (Curculioni-
ae °
Persea americana (avocado) _____------ IMD OX1COm ers 2 te te eek y+ (eos seen te Tex.
Punica granatum (pomegranate) _____-|----- COs ss ee eet eke - PEs Tex.
Ceratitis capitata (Wied.) (Tephritidae): |
Coffea arabica (Arabian coffee) ______--- la Walls is oe 3 | Bee ae en eae Calif.*
WOPCRSD eames See eet daees SEERA on os Otis ee aks)... Say! iy eee ted Calif.*
Malus ieee (apple) Sse 202 Seis WOrtugele a8 524 3 Te ee el NEY
Mangifera indica (mango) ________----- ELWaldee eS ER oe 1 | BA ae pA eal Calif.*
Persea americana (avocado) -__-_------]----- CGF ee oe) Js 1 |------]------ | Calif.*
Psidium guajava (guava) _._.-__------. }]----- GO Sel ae ed Ly ee eae FON Calif.*
Ceratocapsus cubanus Bergr. (Miridae):
Brassicasp.<(MUStard) — 5-2 = 2st Le Gubsuass ooh s2e.--4e-82 2 aT ae | N.Y
10 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

List of pests collected and reported from July 1, 1941, to June 30, 1942, inclusive—
Continued |

Number of inter-
ceptions in—








Insect and host Country of crigin . Collected in—
Prop-
aga-
tion
Ceroplastes rubens Mask. (Coccidae):
Anthur im, SP <= se ee i ee a Wwellcco 2. ee 2 ee ee ee eee 1 | Calif.*
Litchi chinensis (lychee) __-...-.-_---_- (Chingaas 7 Ye ei ee - aol). ee eee Hawaii.*
Ceutorhynchus pleurostigma Marsh. (Cur-
culionidae):
Brassica campestris (rutabaga) -_-____- RinglandJ> BPs > sah Se Sek Md., Pa.,.
ex.
Brassica rapa (turnip) -.-._--_-.---___ England, Seotland. 3... _|.. "saa a NN, en ee
a., Tex.
Ceutorhynchus quadridens Panz. (Cur-

culionidae):

Brassica oleracea capitata (cabbage)__| England__.__-__________].-_--_-| 3 |______ Ala., Md..
eos bambusae (Mask.) (Cocci-

ae):

BaD OG. oe th ~ Se ee ne Se I AWall S22 me Ne ere eee: L | ‘Calif
ae mexicana Duges (Platypodi-

ae):

PROUISISD: Geet. Bee Ss WEexIGQ a © eo iy fe Ariz.
Chilo simplex (Butl.) (Crambidae):

Orica salting (rice). bv. a eS Jaane ioe tes ee LO een ae eaeoen | ee Calit.

Hawaii.*

Chionaspis diosmae Brain (Coccidae):

Barosima 0cinling. Uae ee et: Uxiton‘of South ‘Afries:°) sist eee N;. ¥:
OMe yanonensis (Kuw.) (Cocci-

ae):

Citrus reticulata (tangerine)___________ Japanieee cee eo eeea le \* * icn oe eerie ae Hawaii.*
Chirothrips aculeatus Bagn. (Thripidae):

ZC RUEOUS (COUN) sae an Ae etl MiexiGo 522 58 fa AS a ee Calif,
Chrysomphalus nulliporus McKenzie

(Coccidae): ;
Dendrobium lyonii. (orchid) .. __._._-__| Philippines_--.-_. 2 _|--.--_. [7 1 | Hawaii.”

Chrysomphalus personatus (Comst.) (Coc-

cidae):

Citrus aurantifolia (ime)___---________ Meme: = 2 Ser Ren ee ee Ariz.

Cocos nucifera (coconut) --_-__________ ‘Trim@ad\ 22 ise TO ee

Laurus nobilis (Grecian laurel)________ Bar badQet 24s: tee 1 tS F6 * phat Se eee Noy

Persea americana (avocado)__-________ IMEGXIGO sora ote pret: SOT el eee | ec Tex

Fosa Spin: <7. AL A Ney DY MMOS Neeson We 250 122 GO) Ogre tat) | ee re Tex
Chrysomphalus wmboniferus (Newst.)

(Coccidae): .
Epidendrum stamfordianum (orchid) __| Costa Rica______________ 1 | Calif.*
LG SDD. AOLCUIA Ys. te Venteznela "2 F 1 | Calif.*
Oucidium sphacelatum (orchid)_______| Guatemala___.__________ 1 | Calif.*

Cinara tujafilina (DelGuer.) (Aphiidae):
EADS ee oe Wet bere baie Va pan eee a te eee Wash,
Clerada apicicornis Sign. (Lygaeidae):
Cattleya sp: (orchid)... -._-__ Colombia, Venezuela_-_- 8 | N.J.
Clytus arietis L. (Cerambycidae):
Castanea sp. (chestnut) _______________ Helen” ee Fe 1 tage
Rimes SOURCUNi ch ee ee ee GO = soes ee eo | pe | ee ee N. Y., Wash.
Coccotrypes dactyliperda (F .) (Scolytidae):
ASITOLOTAUMISD 2 ge Poringek. Sot se ts) tate See INiY:
Coccus viridis (Green) (Coccidae):
Citrus aurantifolia (lime) --__--_-_____- Cait get terete tcce | ST Aphetyche eae Fla.*
Gardenia jasminoides (Cape-jasmine)__| Bahamas, Canal Zone, | 15| 7 |_____- Calif.*, Fla.,
Cuba, Hawaii, Pana- N.Y.
ma, Puerto Rico, Ven-
ezuela
Psidium guajava (guava) _.__________ sc. Calbe: Ae et ek tet Wyte | ed) || ee Fla.*
Pos Sp ee. a ee Dominican Republie__2.)),.ck a: scouls bones Fla.*
Colias eurytheme Bdv. (Pieridag):
Medicago sativa (alfalfa)__.____-_______ IMLGxICGS*. 2 eee 1) i ae Tex.
Colpocarena complanata (Burm.) (Penta-

tomidae): :

Bougainvillea sp__-...-..--_--- Pes OTA oo ee eS Ne eee 1 | Calif.*
Conchaspis angraeci (Ckll.) (Coccidae):

Caltleya: sp. (orchid). IBTazAle 9a Sey 2 .J.

Oncidium ampliatum (orchid) __-_____- arial ZOMG 5 ke tio i Pao ei gee 1 .| Calif.*

DUGINALAUBD Skee ee ee BAZ; awe ae eee a eee i ee
Conchylodes ovulalis (Gn.) (Pyraustidae):

Colocasia sp. (elephantsear)_________- WIGHC0.. 2.4. ea el ieee a Tex
Conoderus lividus (Deg.) (Elateridae):

Lactuca sativa (lettuce) .____.._-_____- Sad Gee Se ee 2 EL Cee eee Tex
Conoderus laurenti Guer. (Elateridae):

Brassica chinensis (white greens) ____-- Cuber. 8 eee | Die eee N.Y
SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 11

List of pests collected and reported from July 1, 1941, to June 30, 1942, inclusive—









Continued
| Number of inter-
ceptions in—
Insect and host Country of origin Collected in—
Con- Non- | FTP-
sump- aga-
tion entry | tion
Conotrachelus aguacatae Barber (Curcu-
lionidae):
Persea americana (avocado) __________- Me RIeEOTes sapere! oh 1 Aaa See si ee Sa Tex
ees integer Csy. (Curculioni-
ae):
Querems sp. (acorn) ___---__-_-_-_-.--|.--_- dos. tvaeat we S* * 2 Lie | aa Ariz
PRS AS. A By oes oe A le GoM Seek ak od Be 1} (S334) 28a Ariz
Conotrachelus naso Lec. (Curculionidae):
ete CIP IES Boo N ak Ne eee ok @olomibiae ere Fe eS ye tees ie 1 | Calif.*
pees perseae Barber (Curculioni-
ae):
Persea americana (avocado)___-______- MI@RICO} 24 2 a are Pipa.) Speake Tex
Conotrachelus seniculus Lee. (Curculion-
idae):
PEROT De ic ine ye ee pe ee VEER] COs oo Te rei Tex.
ACHE ANTS (DEC) = - 4 <= 4 (DSA. Shea Brill ows tall aee es Ariz., Tex.
Brassica oleracea capitata (cabbage) -__-}____-_ do. sae Ta ee Ariz
EE ASSICUSp + CrMUSHATO)- =~ 12-4 -}_2 MOL Dae eee st | te Ti iveos! by ets Tex
Persea americana (avocado)___------_-|_____ dou Beret 5 P| Scenzaiare) or Tex.
Rae IMITIARS AUNTY) St hy ee 8 |e OCS ee eet eee se PS eee BI Ariz.
ae cephalonica (Staint.) (Galleri-
idae):
Gossypium sp. (cottonseed) -___--_----- Brazil, Colombia__-_-_--__- Sale crt hies La., Wash.
Or720 ROLE (PCR) 2 eee ee tS Dutch Guana - 2s Lie a. Sap WM, Ya
Theobroma cacao (cacao) ___-------__-- Menador © 22 s= Bae oes flee. Shree Wash
Cosmogramma angustofasciata Jac. (Chry-
somelidae):
eRe 8 tet 8 Perr ees 3 eS bo eee 1 | Calif.*
Cosmotyce boeticus (L.) adic’
CIIORIMES L282 ee et Hawa... att 3 2 See |e Calif.*
oem canaliculatus F. (Curculioni-
ae):
Aneanas comosus (pineapple)__--_----- IWEEXT@O! <2 sere 2a Ses fae | ee Tex.
Tabebuia donnell-smithii (primavera)_| Guatemala, Mexico____- 3) >t trea) ea Ney 4
Aue impressus Boh.var. (Curculioni-
ae):
Ananas comosus (pineapple) -_--------- Mexico.
Crocidosema plebeiana (Zell.) (Olethreuti-
dae):
Crataegusisp..(bawthorn)_—_-—_~------|____- MOy st LOR. oh. Fee 2. seo Tex.
Hibiscus esculentus (okra)_____-------- Cuba=.2--_- 4. et ify) = ee Alle te NiwYs
Cryphula apicatus (Dist.) (Lygaeidae):
Caitlejasp: (orchid): _.-.-_=-—--- ---- Menezierilirete. 2.3 t | cn ey er) hice F
Cryphula fasciatus (Dist.) (Lygaeidae):
@atileyvasp. (orenid) =. ._-.2-2.-.2._2 Colombia222 2... — 3 Sea pipiens 1 PS ae
one desjardinsi (Guer.) (Cucu-
jidae
Schomburgkia sp. (orchid) ____--------- pPremnaGh athe = eee a Lot NE he
‘Curculio q-griseae Chitt. (Curculionidae):
ey iieatee ss eC BA ly. Ed oe) Be $5 MiexiCOu as s22 ee ee De eek le Ariz
Cylas formicarius (F.) (Curculionidae):
Ipomoea batatas (sweetpotato) _______- Cuba, Dominican Re- 26 ADTs ites Fla.*, La, N.
public, Mexico. Ys Pa; Pex.
Cylas formicarius elegantulus (Summers)
(Curculionidae) : :
Brassica chinensis (white greens) __---- ReMi. oe Peis a Be A ic 2 eas ees ING a:
Ipomoea batatas (sweetpotato) --__----- Argentina, China, Cuba, 4 Seyi Ga., Hawaii*,
Dominican Republic, La., Md., N.
Mexico, Puerto Rico. iY 9 Pex:
Physalis sp. (husk tomato)______---_-- Mexico« {208 4s 1) ess eae Tex.
Cylas formicarius F. var. (Curculionidae):
Ipomoea batatas (sweetpotato)_____ _-.-| Dominican Republic_-_-- 1 22 Siege WE wy. 6
Cylas puncticollis Boh. (Curculionidae):
DONOR MA DOLANIS ts 38 ae Union of South Africa___}______- fh aes Mass.
Cylas turcipennis Boh. (Curculionidae):
EID CW PATO S st 2 2 28 2 = 8 eee ee os 292 oS ee 1) (Lek La.
Cylindrocopturus biradiatus Champ. (Cur-
culionidae):
pialeisien e-gee oe Oe ete fs See Be Poh Mesicor tk! <= 25.2 TR ee Tex.
Cymus virescens (F.) (Lygaeidae):
iE NICITE SDE ee ah oe es es Dutch West Indies___-_-_- 1 [eee De ee NS Ys
Cyrtopeltis varians (Dist.) (Miridae):
Brassica chinensis (white greens) __---- (mba. s ses i oo. 5 ee Dy |e ae ez ING Ye
Miscellaneous flowers_____------------ WMexigoo$ » i. _« 27285. ee ee fe Tex
12 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

List of pests collected and reported fiom July 1, 1941, to June 30, 1942, inclusive—
ontinued

Number of inter-
ceptions in—
Collected in—

Insect and host Country of origin







Dacus cucurbitae (Coq.) (Tephritidae):




Lycopersicon esculentum (tomato) ____- Heawail.. - sts 25-4 acyl eee Calif.*
Phaseolus vulgaris (kidney bean) ____-_}___-- 0.2. 5.te eM) 2-8). 2 ere eee Calif.*
Phaseolus sp. (string bean) __-__.--..-|_-.-: G02: 2285 2522 Se ee | ee Calif.*
Dalopius marginatus (1..) (Elateridae):
Fchodaseniiren, sii oh be England... O08 2628 cede el ee 1 | Wash,
Deloyala guttata (Oliv.) (Chrysomelidae):
Orchid 422): whee Pee 1 Mexico.-...-.2.. [1 Saioting ee Lex
Spinacia oleracea (Spinach) ee. a] 2 ee GOL SOON I nes ef) Tl): =. Tex
Deloyala lecontei (Cr.) (Chrysomelidae):
BYASSiCa Tapa (LUT) ee pee ea Oz 2228.28 2cee-soot ey ) | i. < ee Tex
Dialeurodes chittendeni Laing (Aleyro-
didae):
PeGdedenaron'spie_ 2a" Bitola t oor 43 ae. ep ah eo ee es 2| N.J., Wash
Dialeurodes kirkaldyi (Kot.) (Aleyro-
didae):
Tabernaemontana sp_____------------- Tahiti... 8... 2. Se ah Rise 1 | Calif.*
Diaspis cocois Licht. (Coccidae):
Cocos nucifera (coconut) ____---------- Jamai¢a-.-Loltaeo- feck sa), . = Saab eee INN
Diaspis terensis (Ckll.) (Coccidae):
Sopot Gphee so. hee sa ee Merxico._22:-.2ccc 22a) Tee ee Tex,
Dicyphus minimus Uhl. (Miridae):
Lycopersicon esculentum (tomato) _-_-__-_ ad One? fie 3228). hese ee Tex.
Dinoderus bifoveolatus Woll. (Bostri-
chidae):
Derris scandens (derris)--.------------ Malaya (Britis Wid)) oo eiieesiseee Now
Straits Settlements.
Serjania mexicana (barbasco) __-_----- OF | oe ected oe oe Ni
Dinoderus pilifrons Lesne (Bostrichidae):
anibope 5.22 Sere eee fae es: India... hegeRs| Klis J eee La., N. Y.,
Oreg.
Diocalandra taitensis (Guer.) (Curculi-
onidae):
Cocos nucifera (coconut) ____--------_- HawAlietars i aeit) 1 ise5|pniniOy | Sateen Calif.*
Diphaulaca cordobae Barber (Chrysome-
lidae):
Ananas comosus (pineapple)________-_- Mexico. .setistt.o.2 .2|| -, Sbeiasent eee Tex.
Disonycha antennata Jac. (Chrysome-
lidae):
ANGNAMEOMOSUSE So -e Ne SB LO ee he LS doe 22 ie AN Eb Dd | eee eee Tex
Disonycha argentinensis Jac. (Chrysome-
lidae):
Capsicum annuum (pepper) ---------- Argentinghs pies Fs esses ee Mass.
Helianthus sp. (sunflower) _-.-..-.---.|----- GO ee sbeee bse 2S i ee pes ee Nit:
Disonycha arizonae Cas. (Chrysomelidae): :
Portulaca oleracea (purslane) __-______-_- Mexic0scs22cceesss ee (2B See Tex
Disonycha politula Horn (Chrysomelidae):
Lactuca sativa (lettuce) _.----.--------]-- = IO 2 eee Ee |) ee ee Tex
Dorytomus brevisetosus Csy. (Curculi-
onidae): :
Lycopersicon esculentum (tomato)__--_|----- GOks 2223 2s sae gen ie hl pel | oe Ariz,
Populus sp. (cottonwood) __-_--------|----- Gorestt odes AIL estat alias oon Ariz
ae minerva Ball (Cicadel-
idae):
Medicago sativa (alfalfa)_......--.-----]----- G02 see Se ee a es ee Tex.
Miscellaneous flowers____....-...._-|----> G6. a es Fe) i ap ta allieg yt oh get ce ceo Ariz.
Rorippa nasturtium aquaticum (water- |----- Or re eye 7 P| |: Pipl elaeeteee oe wee Tex.
cress).
Drasterius livens (Lec.) (Elateridae):
Beta viugaris: (beet) = = ee aS dO. s2 eres Sl eset eee Tex
Brossicaraon (curnip) 2 dow. eo ee Beeline: Hae ‘Tex,
Brassiea sp.) (mustard): 2 2—. 22. Se G6 esi 1 lg erie eae Tex.
Portulaca oleracea (purslane) _---------|----- 004. 22s bee | Sees Tex.
Dros petasum Kinsey (Cynipidae): ;
Quercus macrophylla (oak)__..------.-|---=- do. 222.222.220.225 ee | Ste = Ariz
Drymus sylvaticus (F.) (uygaeidae):
Packing around camellia plants_____- England. -...-2...3-s))4.c3gege are 1,;N.J
Dynatopechus aureopilosus Fairm. (Curcu- [
lionidae): ie
Adenanthera pavonina (sandal bead- | Japan_----.-------------|-------|------ 1 | Hawaii.
tree). x if *
Rein aps eee ie ee Hawaill: .-......<....-.<-|2ee Bes eset Calif.
Dysdercus mimulus Huss. (Pyrrhoco-
ridae): Tex

Lagerstroemia sp. iiapamverine!) 2) México. 2 5b So 2 AP eee ote
SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS

13

List of pests collected and reported from July 1, 1941, to June 30, 1942, inclusive—

Continued



Insect and host

Eburia brevispinis Bates (Cerambycidae) :
Ananes comosus (pineapple)
Elaphidion irroratum (L.) (Ceramby-
cidae):
TEWMINMHLONSD) setae as ee ees
Elaphrothrips dampfi Hood (Thripidae):
Ananas comosus (pineapple)
Empoasca abrupta Del. (Cicadellidae):
Brassica sp. (mustard)
Lactuca sativa (lettuce)
Empoasca batatae Poos (Cicadellidae):
Lactuca sativa (lettuce)
Empoasca phaseola Oman (Cicadellidae):
Lycaste aromatica (orchid)
Endrosis lacteella (Schiff.) (Gecophoridae):
IN OCISSUSIGD see eee es
Epicaerus cognatus Sharp (Curculi-
onidae):
Solanum tuberosum (potato)
Epilachna varivestis Muls. (Coccinellidae):
Brassica rapa (turnip)
Medicago sativa (alfalfa)
Phascolus sp. (string bean)
Epinotia opposita Hein. (Olethreutidae):
Capsicum annuum (pepper)
Lycopersicon esculentum (tomato)
Phaseolus lunatus macrocarpus
(lima bean).
Phaseolus sp. (string bean)

Epitriz subcrinita (Lec.) (Chrysomelidae) :
Rhododendron s
Epochra canadensis Loew (Tephritidae):
Ribes sp. (wild currant)
Ereunetis flavistriata (Walsm.) (Tineidae):
Cocos nucifera (coconut) -
Eriococcus araucariae Mask. (Coecidae):
Araucaria excelsa (N orfolk-Island-
pine).
Erynephala puncticollis (Say) (Chrysome-
lidae):
Beta vulgaris (beet)

Vegetables
Eucalandra s2etulosa Gyll.

(Curculioni-

Cattleya sp. (orchid)
Eumecosomyia nubila (Wied.) (Otitidae):
Musa paradisiaca (plantain)
Zea mays (corn)

ee maculicula (Dyar) (Phyciti-
ae): -
FLOOUS OUSUCCHICN ee = ser oe en:
Euphorie kerni Hald. (Scarabaeidae):
Sve ae eee ee Bees IE ee
Gardenia jasminoides (Cape-jasmine) _-
Eurycipitia vestitus Dist. (Miridae):
Cattleya lueddemanniana (orchid)
Cattleya mossiae (orchid)
Cattleya sp
Epidendrum sp. (orchid)

Oncidium cavendishianum (orchid) - 1

Oncidium splendidum (orchid)

Eurytoma orchidearum (Westw.) (Euryto-
midae):
niileya sp. (OTCDIG) P43 52 Sa eee
Orchid
Euscepes postfasciatus (Fairm.) (Curcu-
lionidae):
Ipomoea batatas (sweetpotato)

Country of origin



Honduras, Venezuela

Brazil, Colombia, Peru,
Venezuela.
Brazil, Mexico

| Brazil, Cuba, Dutch
| Guiana, Hawaii, Pe-
ru, Puerto Rico, Trin-
idad, Virgin Islands.



a

RV N71 C1 ee gu cee es | eee | A

Number of inter-
ceptions iIn—

Collected in—





Con- Prop-
Non
sump entry aga-
tion tion
Jteses2 ee Tex
et Se ee ee ae IN) Ye
75 bye ee | ed Tex.
TEES Re SNS Tex
Oo Rso 2 sear Tex
es oe a) Shee Tex
Ane Rex:
TENE Tie
Salk ee Sea Tex.
Zee eA Tex.
UU re a.
if Rae pe Ch ee Ariz.
pl eect ae ae Tex
At Pees Ariz..
i | Pere |p a Tex.
272 105 eae one , Ma...
ex
3 | Wash
Doyrotisn skeet Text
Tapeheey ae Calif.*
ene Te
1) See eee ce TRex:
[hs] S5 oe ewan Tex
1 ees a SP Mex:
1S | eas eee Tex
1 users hegre, INS Ye
TENE
i) |e La.
90 LAeaaex2 Atriize INGY o5
ex,
Di Pare aaah le Calif.
ih ee Mex:
a ete | es Tex
ae 2 \eCalit:®
LyipCaliiâ„¢
1} Califi*
Ie Calit=
1 | Calif.*
1 | Calif.*
17 As ePaRy (hexs:
Sie PrsaalEe. aes 44 | Calif.,* N. F.
Salt Nad.» Tex
5 Br] Sane Ala., La., Md.,
Mass., .N. Y.,
Biaeysi Dex ss
Va.
14 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

List of pests collected and reported from July 1, 1941, to June 30, 1942, inclusive—
Continued

——_— ee eee

Number of inter-



ceptions in—
Insect and host Country, of origin Collected in—
Con- | xon- | ProP-
sump- aga-
tion entry tion
Euschistus obscurus (P. B.) (Pentato- 4
midae): :
Celosia sp. (cockscomb)____. -________- Moexic0.. =. 22227 2k 1}. 2a05). sae Tex.
Euzesta sororcula (Wied.) (Otitidae):
EE: MAYS (OED) £5 2 15 e eee ee | GQ: 3 age ye ee 1) >. eee Tex.
Euzesta stigmatias Loew (Otitidae):
Persea americana (avocado)___________|____- do. 2) sedan FA Injicc 22 a Tex,
AOD ANY S (COG) 535 Se a) ES On. == Ps ee 25 li Piakees Ariz., Tex.
Exitianus obscurinervis (Stal) (Cicadelli-
dae):
Portulaca oleracea (purslane)_. ---__-_- 2 a: 2 35 24 a ee Pitta pee Ariz.
Exptochiomera tumens (Stal) (Lygaeidae):
Gattlega spi; (orchid)> ==. 4-2) _- Ee Veneruela._:.--:-----tabhiafeh i @ 2pPNF, ;
Falconia caduca Dist. (Miridae):
Ricinus communis (castor bean) -__-_-_-- Mexico: --.>- =: 32-506 dix Wat ky S| beta Tex
Forficula auricularia L. (Forficulidae):
Apium graveolens (celery)___---------- Portugal .-=-.-<--.- alee. i. 2a Pa.
irerciss'Sp. (Qak). OR Or ee et. ee FR eB: 40-3 in ee Piloe 2) ah oe Pa:
Semeeas ut foetidus, (skunkcab- | Canada. __.<- 2974... |... Gl ietieg) 1 | Pa.
age): :
uae cephalica (Crawf.) (Thripi-
dae
Chrysanthemum frutescens (Margue- | Mexico_____._______-___- 1: } ead eee Tex.
rite daisy).
Gertera sa 2s 32 de ee Canal Zone_osp-2.U- -___- 1 Foe) see IN 7
Frankliniella cubensis Hood (Thripidae):
LOR SP ese Ee ie ee eh Cuba, Mexiep*::.2-) << 2 1 Leia Fla.*
Frankliniella fortissima Pr. (Thripidae):
Giadiohe sp... Sh ee ieee MexIy 4c205 fewee") 1 3 ietwork ees Ariz
Lathyrus odoratus (sweet pea) anv bee eee MO. 2 oe eel. eee ef 23° |. Ariz
Portulaca oleracea (purslane)__--______|____- Go Ere, seen ee 2 Qiloosh S| eee Ariz.
Frankliniella insularis (Frankl.) (Thrip-
idae):
Passifiora sp. (passionflower) __-_-___ Bermuda... enh. 5. 2 |. <4 freee ae N?}Y,
Rosa. spies ts Vacs Sree Jn Bahamas: =. -*"_. Se Gahgie Dp Ap See Fla.*
Fulvius hisbistillatus (Stal) (Miridae):
Chrysanthemum sp?! 2... = b= Mi exICO-— 22-5 3r5 chi by 22 ete aaa Tex.
Fulvius brevicornis (Reut.) (Miridae):
PAGIOONOTIUE Set ee ee ee Clings 720-3 aN as ee ee 4|N.J.
Furcaspis biformis (CkIl.) (Coccidae):
Brassavola sp. (orchid)___---__---_---- Canal Zone. es 3 st es ee 2) Noe
Cattleya dowiana (orchid) _____________}____- do... seen a ee te 1 | Calif.*
Cattleymsipecha so oS 2. he British West, @ndies. 2.0}, AS 1 | Calif.*
Cuitley arin Gee see. 8 TR (anal Zone. -Abt 26 te Bh sag 1’ |S@aht
Oaitioga mp ts 20. 2). Pe te, Colombia, Dutch West |______-|____-- 11.| Navi Ree,
Indies, Panama, Trin-
idad, Venezuela.
Epidendrum atropurpureum (orchid)_-| Canal Zone, Panama____|_______|_____- 2 | Calif.*, N. J.
Th TOE Spee 2a. a eet Canal Zone, Venezuela__|_._____|___-_- 3 | Cailif., N J.
Odontoglossum:sp. (orchid).-__.._-)_--| Canal Zone: _ > 2) Seu el) ee 1 | Calif.*
Oncidiumilanceanum (orchid)-.........|,/Trinidad=-3* 2480-82 | _ iineae 1 | Calif.*
Oncidium panamense_-_-_----____--__-- Ganalhtondls.e ity 2 6 Yel Oe 1 | Calif.*
Oniciimanisp 2h eS ie Fe GS Se ee Base bal i tet Re 2 ||
MCS 2 rte) eee SEs Lt Pes Canal Zone, Colombia, 1 2 5) | Plas Ne ea
Panama, Trinidad, N.Y:, Pam
Venezuela.
ee punetifer McA. & M. (Cydni-
Orchid= et stats: 52 ee eo te: Honduras, Mexico. 5. cjeiaeetpiee) 2°) La.; Tex:
Geocoris sonoraensis Van D. ( Lygaeidae): :
Brassica rapa (turnip) _._22.. 2-1... Mexiea 2...4620istoit wk 1p) See Tex.
Tactwensntwa (ettée) 2s... 533922 st dos See LS Leis Stes eae Tex.
Gerstaeckeria mutillaria Gerst. (Curculi-
onidae): ;
Mammillaria lenta (cactus)_______----]----- G0. Sf or eS 2) > 3. | Tie ee 1} exe:
Gnathotrichus aciculatus Blackm. (Sco-
lytidae):
Lycopersicon esculentum (tomato) _____|____- G0). 2 k8Ce 252k ee ew DSS Tex.
Gnathotrichus denticulatus Blackm. (Sco-
lytidae):
Brassica oleracea capitata (cabbage) ____|____- Go Abt reeks Fat 9% DSS 2 Sh eo Tex.
Lycopersicon esculentum (tomato) __--_|_-_-- GOR sh MAE fe 1 Pee Ariz
Gnorimoschema gudmannella (Wlsm.)
(Gelechiidae): :
‘Capsicum annuum (pepper) -_--------}----- dowitc 2 _ 4. a2 GOrpeig Parse} Ariz., Calif.,
ex.
LIycopersicon esculentum (tomato) _---_|----- Ge GIVI 88) a Lal eel ee Tex.
SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 15

List of pests collected and reported fiom July 1, 1941, to June 30, 1942, inclusive—

















Continued
Number of inter-
ceptions in—
Insect and host Country of origin Collected in—
Gnorimoschema lavernella (Chamb.) (Gele-
chiidae):
Physalis sp. (husk tomato) - - --------- NiexiCoh see eee ete Tex.
-Gonatas typicus Dist. (Lygaeidae):
Ciitleym spn (orchig))- 22s. --4 22. 4-~-- @olom bigvee tues oes eae cee ae ING:
oi lage uzeli one ) (Phlaeothrip-
idae
Brassica o’eracea acephala (kale) ------ Gilbert ee ee = ING SY?
ene gowdeyi (Frankl.) (Thripi-
DUG UITNILLEd SPi = os2e 4 Daal ee See Calif.*
Brassica oleracea acephala (Kale) -_----| Cuba__-_---------------- INBOY.;
Daucus carota (Queen-Annes-lace) ----| Bahamas___------------- Ne
Dianthus sp. (carnation) -------------- Canal Zone, Hawaii__--- Calif.*, Fla.*
Gardenia jasminoides (Cape-jasmine)--| Mexico__---------------- Tex,
ar Venus Death pe eet ke ee @anall Zones < a2 222-2 NY
Hibiscus syriacus (rose of sharon) ------ Bernmudas sea ee Ne Ng
Nerium oleander (oleander) - S| ORS a ee Se N. yy :
rae nigricornis Bagn. (Thripi-
ae
Ornithogalum thyrsoides (chinkerichee)_| Union of South Africa__- INS
Feilipus trifasciatus (Â¥.) (Curculionidae):
Persea americana (avocado) -__--------- OSAMU ICH == 5-2 eo ale ee Tex.
Heliodines bella (Chamb.) (Heliodinidae):
EM UlGaTASs (Deeb). = a a-ak = ITER COR so 2 5! = Tex.
Lycopersicon esculentum (tomato) -----|----- << G)1 yp. eRe RAI wipdil the Tex.
Portulaca oleracea (purslane) __--------|_---- Come at a eter be es , Calif.;
ex.
Heliothis subfiera (Gn.) (Phalaenidae):
asa Spanbusketomayo)eee2s2 .- \kot dOw <2. .-bs-3-- 05 Tex.
Hellula phidilealis (W1k.) (Pyraustidae):
Brassica chinensis (white greens)__----| Cuba__----------------- Ny.
Brassica hirta (white mustard) __------| Mexico__-_-------------- Calif
Brassica oleracea capitata (cabbage) __- ae torhico, rinidad—s\-o=s--— INE Ye
Brassica rapa:(turpip) -- 224-24 2-4--22- TD ahs wer sees toe eae ING Ye
Brassica Sp. (oMuistard).2-. = 2--- 2 Cue: IM IGS Stee Sa Calit; IN. ey:
Hellula undalis (F.) (Pyraustidae):
Bea cicla (Swiss.chard).-_--_.-..----- WRONG Y Cosh eee Se kl) Ariz.
Brassica chinensis (white greens) ___-__]____- (6 Ko pee mel be ag Ariz.
Brassica hirta (white mustard)_____-__|____- (oes ea Calif.
Brassica oleracea botrytis (cauliflower) |____- Gone ee Tex,
Brassica oleracea capitata (cabbage) ._|____. gn eae BE) Ariz.
PRUSSICM TO PGs (LUBRID) S22. eeta—ec-| 2. Cees eae soe Bn ees Ariz., Tex.
Brassica.sp.Gmustard)_.0. 0022221222 4222 Worm et A Ariz., "Tex.
Raphanus sativus (radish) _.-.._-------|_---- GOMES Ae oe eae Tex.
Heraeus guttatus (Dall.) (Lygaeidae):
Ananas comosus (pineapple)___-------}_---- QRS as a Tex.
ne femoralis (Reut.) (Thripi-
ae
Cypripedium sp. (orchid) ___-___-___- Sipe nelpnide eee eat Tee |. oC Hawaii*, N. J.
Fleterobostrychus aequalis (Waterh.) (Bos-
trichidae):
Cocos nucifera (coconut) ..------------ MG Ae eee ees eee CA a Ni das
RO GGheapnnges oe See ge a F fench Indo-China, In- OCali*, N.Y.
x dia, Java
Heteroderes laurenti Guer. (Elateridae):
Brassica chinensis (white greens). .---| Cuba_____-_-.---------- NOY
Heteroderes rufangulus Gyll. (Elateridae):
Excelsior in box of grapes__--.------- ATPOnpiNa i262 sees 3. N. Y
Hofmannophila pseudospretella (Staint. )
(Oecophoridae):
PHISIEOGINENIOISD 20) 8 ot. See BeinTidee ee ee eee Celie be (22 oe N.J
menvenisjamesonits. oe ae eee Ge ee ome sae ee elas Ce a are yer.
OTA BS Ont ae EOS bP gee Se ee | ne ee ee See 2 eke ING cos
Flomalopalpia dalera Dyar (Phycitidae):
Carica papaya (papaya) - eet ea Coens e eet wee ING Ys
Tomona patulana Wik. (Tortricidae):
Gardenia jasminoides (Cape-jasmine)__| Mexico____-------------- Tex
a alate lustrans (Cr.) (Chrysomeli-
dae):
Hackuca sativa (etuuce) 3) 22.022 -|l Le DOr aap ee ee eee MMiteeeeeaieaes . Tex
Flypera meles F. (Curculionidae):
DS ee ye fee eee Oe I ee AO a) OF INewfoundland__-_-_------ PRI Spee eC PMc.
16

BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

List of pests collected and reported from July 1, 1941, to June 30, 1942, inclusive— -

Continued



Insect and host Country of origin



Number of inter-
ceptions in—

Collected in—
Con- | non. | Prop-







sump- aga-
tion entry tion
|
Hypselonotus fulvus (Deg.) (Coreidae):
Chrysanthemum: sp__-_-- =. 2-32. £32 -... Mexico: 222. 25. 3-2 is Cees leat Tex
a ee interruptus Hahn (Corei-
ae):
Saponaria 80. os- 9-5 bt ee ee YMRS Feo eset Enea MeN ue anal aces as»: Se
Hypsipyla grandella (Zell.) (Phycitidae):
Swietenia mahogani (mahogany) -_---- Guatemala’. 22402 4.227 Olea: peels gle L: NY
Hypsoprora nogolata Ball (Membracidae):
Gardenia jasminoides (Cape-jasmine)_-| Mexico__...-----.-__--_- 1 ee eae Ariz
nae lycopersicella (Busck) (Gelechii-
ae):
Lycopersicon esculentum (tomato) ----- Cuba, Mexico___.....-_- 7, 067 Tet aun oh Ariz., Calif.,
nny Yass L OXs,
, ; Vt
Lacon leseleuci Cand. (Elateridae):
Portulaca oleracea (purslane) _---_----- M6xi@0.-- + as eee ee ieee. 2, Sean Ariz
Laemophloeus suturalis Reitt. (Cucu-
jidae):
Tabebuia donnell-smithii (primavera) __| Guatemala____________-. (Pieroeey wee e Tex
Laemotmetus rhizophagoides (Walk.) (Cu-
cujidae):
BamDGOrs: 2 220 eee oe a ee te Dutch East Indies, Java_}_.____- Se oe La.
Lamprosema schistisemalis Hamps. (Py-
raustidae):
Cattleya’ sp. (orchid) ~~~: 2. 2 ==. =.22226 Vimomtv@in SE S602 32 Se ed in ‘Ni gs
Laspeyresia membrosa Hein. (Olethreu-
tidae):
Prosopis sp: (mesquite)__.--..-------- MEXICOL ne eee eee Jeo eae. eee Calif
mapa splendana (Hbn.) (Olethreu-
tidae):
Castanea sp. (chestnut)__------------- Japan, Portugal... 1.22 6; |e ae Hawaii, N. Y.
Leperisinus frazini (Panz.) (Scolytidae):
FATAL SD: (ASU) - oe Se eee Bneland--Se Aves pins s i | see eee et eres Ny es.
Lepidosaphes alba (Ckll.) (Coccidae):
Manihot esculenta (cassava) -_-------- British Honduras, Cuba_ ities 1° Re Co his?
A eoAL auriculata (Green) (Cocci-
ae):
Codiaewm sp. (croton) - __------------- a wails 2: See Oe. Test 84 ees + | Oates”
be te philococcus (Ckll.) (Cocci-
ae):
Wamehitgte. ut: LUSTER ae eel ae fe? MieeicOits: Woe occclUsoe seas eee SNe, 2 Oe
Cereus victoriensis (cactus) __.-.-------|----- digs 6 <3 92 kA See ee 1) | "Pex,
ER CUS Slee oe ee aos Sees Swe COE anni i) hae) coe 20 eae eee 1 ex:
Lemaireocercus dumortieri (cactus) ----|----- Gottins ON 52 7: Alans aa] o> gee eRe 2 | Dex
Wiematreocereus Spee oe 35 Ss |S Ose) as li Fs Se ee | ee 1 Tex:
Myrtillocactus geometrizans (cactus) -_-|----- dot. 2 xivens. Sew! SIRS a TMs ta Tex®
Pachycereus marginatus (organpipe- |----- Gos 9h a oe 1s OE st ees 4] Tex.
cactus).
Lepidosaphes tuberculata Malen. (Coc-
cidae):
Cymbidium sp. (orchid) --_------------ MnelsnG _ 22. es 22 Ae ee ee 27 Cait
Lepidosaphes uniloba (Kuw.) (Coccidae):
Alyzia olivaeformis (maile alyxia)--_-_- Paw alist ae wees ire] gap 1 | Calif.*
Leptopharsa distantis Drake (Tingitidae):
Picusiaamea(hig.) 2-0. = bee ieee Giuiatemalae 2 22--'). 88 ee Lee Tex. 2%
Leptophobia aripa (Bdv.) (Pieridae):
Brassica oleracea botrytis (cauliflower)_; Mexico_.-.-------------- Bg) See SE teres Tex.
Lactuca sativa (lettuce) -..------------|----+- Goce NARA y bask 3 Patetais! she Tex.
Leptostylus argentatus Duy. (Ceramby-
cidae): 5
VFI OUSLY eee ee Cuber. Fen i: hs ad ag Si INGAY
— cockerelli (deCharm.) (Cocci-
ae):
Dendrobium thyrsiflorum (orchid) _---- Costa Riea..>_.....3.- ees eee eS 1} Calit*
Epidendrum sp. (orchid)--..--------- Honduras: i223 toe 8s oh ee 1 | Calif.*
aa 9 oe elegantalis Guen. (Pyrausti-
we):
Lycopersicon esculentum (tomato) ___-- IMeGzICO. 2.524222. Sees On) f= eg. © ee Tex
Lichtensia lutea (CkI1.) (Coccidae):
Codiaeum sp. (croton) Gps ee Ve piers 8 ib | nn SRE Se Tex




SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 17

List of pests collected and reported from July 1, 1941, to June 30, 1942, inclusive—
Continued







Number of inter-
ceptions in—

Insect and host Collected in—



Ligyrocoris aurivilliana (Dist.) (Lygaei-
dae):



Ananas comosus (pineapple) -_--------- IWiexicoe nase o4- 3. - .. Tex.
Brassica chinensis (pakchoi) ----------|----- GOP. 1 tee Se pac Et 3% Ariz
By OSsicansp. GMUStard) 23. - + A222 = ce esas Cee eee re See Tex.
Centaurea cyanus (bachelorbutton) ---|_---- Ret ee he So al Tex.
Loetuen-sativa (lettuce)... 2-5-2222. 22]... =. AO: Teste eS a Tex.
Gincircieetese 22) 8 je ee ee G0 es 5 ee cass Tee - Tex.
Phaseolus sp. (string bean) -----------]----- OMe ae He eh eet Tex
Portulaca‘sp. (purslane) -. --22222-2-.2]2-.-- 0s -Usetecs4. 23 Soe Tex
Ligyrocoris nitidicollis (Stal) (Lygaeidae):
Cereus victoriensis (cactus) __...-------|_---- G02 eee Fe hee. Tex.
Citrus aurantifolia Gime):_-..-...2----]..--- GE: ao ese oth tied Tex
Lineodes integra (Zell.) (Pyraustidae): :
Lycopersicon esculentum (tomato) --- -- @ubs;: Mexigo-----_-- 2. Ae Pe acs
ex
eae triangulalis Moschler (Pyrausti-
ae):
Capsicum annuum (pepper) ----------| Mexico_.-...-..-.-.--.-- Ariz
Liriomyza flaveola Fall. (Agromyzidac):
Brassica chinensis (white greens) -_---- Chaban ntveta si? hse nee NEY:
Brassica oleracea acephala (kale) -------|----- GOs Gat ek ey.
Brassica’ sor Giustard) wea 2 els) oe Ole oe ae ey. bots N.Y
Coriandrum sativum (coriander) -------|----- Oe ees eee baat N.Y
Lophocateres pusillus (Klug) (Ostomidae):
CUTGIOR S'S): Pee ee ee Cana dacece tra Mer 1 fo N. J
JUGLENS. SD. (walmlit) = do ee ee INUISiTala=ta=. 222 5k oe ee Va.
aah) abornana chatka Busck (Phaloni-
idae):
Capsicum annuum (pepper) - --------- WEESICOE= J ecete- MEL asen* Ariz., Tex.
Lycopersicon esculentum (tomato) _----}----- GQ- 225 2b et = he Ariz.
Lyctoxylon japonum Reitt. (Lyctidae):
Bam DOO Ie ee ee ee ee ot a Dutch East Indies, Java- La., Tex.
Iygaeus guatemalanus Dist. (Lygaeidae):
Swietenia mahogani (mahogany) --.-__- (GuUatemalacs. 2a tL. oe NX
Lygaeus vittiscutis Stal (Lygaeidae):
Oren 24241) aes a EDRF pe had bee BS” Tex.
Lygus oblineatus (Say) var. (Miridae): 5, ‘
Spinacia oleracea (spinach) _._________- WEOXICO!. Spent eget 2 Ariz.
Lygus pratensis (L.) var. (Miridae):
Brassica hirta (white mustard) ____-__-|_---- C0 ppt eer bt Calif.
Brassicanepe. (turiip) = 2555 ee. 2-..|.b22- C0 se ae: tena b ane Tex.
Portulaca oleracea (purslane) -__..---_-}----- COn pe Tex.
Macrodactylus mexicanus Bts. (Scarabae-
idae):
Capsicum annuum (pepper) _._-------]----- Qua Serene. oe) Tex
Maruca testulalis (Geyer) (Pyraustidae):
CURDUGLIASD 22 at) epee ES 2 Fe await ae eb a Calif.*
Dioclea violacea (mauna loa lei) ___--_-}___-- OO pda e ae she 2 8 Calif.*
Phaseolus sp. (string bean) __._-__--_- Colombia, Dominica, Ala., Calif.*
Dutch Guiana, Ha- La., Mass.,
waii, Mexico, Puerto Y. oy 'Tex
; Rico, Trinidad.
Mecidea proliza Stal (Pentatomidae):
GrdesGned: ee reat Oy Oe) Union of South Africa__.|_______|_.____ Md.
Melanaspis aliena (Newst.) (Coccidae):
Cattleya bowringiana (orchid) - --_------ Guatemala ie ete setihrees ts \ Calif.*
Melusina annulata (Mg.) (Melusinidae):
Brassica oleracea botrytis (cauliflower)_| Scotland-___----.-------|__.___- N.Y
Melusina regelationis L. (Melusinidae):
BROT 285 Sel ee eee 2 Deg) ee ARES 2 t te oo 2) INCAS
Metamasius callizona (Chevy.) (Curculi-
onidae):
Ananas comosus (pineapple)-__-____-_- WAG 09-5, PE Tex.
ae sericeus (Latr.) (Curculioni-
ae):
Musa See sapientum.+ (ba- | Panama. _-.2-.-__b 2 Jo, Calif.*
nana).
Metriona profligata (Boh.) (Chrysome-
lidae):
eliwed floweprsccas 2 2820 NT extents Bape sis ee et Pc” Ariz.

515307—43-—-—3


18 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE
List of pests collected and reported from July 1, 1941, to June 30, 1942, inclusive—
Continued ;
Number of inter-
ceptions in—
Insect and host Country of origin Collected in—
Con- | xon-| Prop-
sump- aga-
tion entry tion
Micrapaie scapularis (Gorh.) (Bostri-
chidae):
Sambucus sp. (elder)_-.--.-.---------- Morite : .0ofeiid: f.... Uli tit | tite N.Y.
bss Ray ee ee eee ee aoe GQ. a2 oS sepa ee G PARTE tir: ae Ill.,
Micrelus ericae Gyll. (Curculionidae): “
Calluna vulgaris (heather) - -__---_.--- Seotiatd.. 90-3 ess i. ee Mass.
at exiguus Hagn. (Termiti-
dae):
W O0G.23 8 in 8 ee en eens WNigeragua.0 5). - 22) 22-4 a ES 1 Paes:
Monanthia monotropidia Stal (Tingitidae):
Tillandsia sp. (orchid) ---_-__.--------- Merxieo.' 2! 6052.<3 0}. ee 1 | Tex.
Moneilema opuntiae Fisher (Ceramby-
cidae):
Mammillaria celsiana (cactus)___--__--|_____ do tis. we? 7 gen ae 1] Tex:
Mammillaria sempervivi (cactus)_--___-|_____ do: = eee ee ee 1 | Tex.
Moodna bisinuella Hamp. (Phycitidae):
Fem, TAGS NGO See ee eee Ne GG % AP ea es 47 of... ga
Mordellistena caitleyana Champ. (Mor-
dellidae):
Cattizga- sp. (orchid)... 2 S22... 4G Brazil, Canal Zone, Co- |_______|---_-- 15°) WS:
lombia, Venezuela.
Orcni@ i} 2} 8 EE ee wee Bravili. }-..<'P > ~~ 82.) . oo ee 1} NSS.
Morganeila longispina (Morsg.) (Goccidas):
Dendrobium spectabile (orchid) .__-.---| Australia-_>...___| - >See ee 1 | Calif.*
Grammatophyllum speciosum (orchid)-| Philippines_____-_._____.|__-_____|____- 1 | Calif.*
Myelois ceratoniae Zell. (Phycitidae):
Ceratonia siliqua (St. Johnsbread) -_--| Costa Rica______________]_______}_--__- 1 | Calif.*
Myelois venipars Dyar (Phycitidae):
Pithecellobium flexicaute (ebony) - ----- Mexico =2- 049 BO 5 anno SAT Sey i ees Tex.
Muodocha intermedia Dist. (Lygaeidae):
Cattleya skinnerii (orchid) -_____---_---|_____ do. 8. tyeo). tA ae | thes
Myodocha unispinosa Stal (Lygaeidae): |
Orebid. «= 2) teh Yee Lo ae GAGS. hs ee fr Ears 1) Pex.
Myzus ornatus Laing (Aphiidae):
MENUGTS 72.8). taba wba ys TE Wanada! threat. > cbs | CMa Mee eee 1 | Wash.
Patrinta palate. 2.2: 2 hens ee British Coltmbia : is. 224). - 3 1 SE
Primvada sp; (primrose) —3..-- --~-+=__== Canada... | A eee 1 | Wash.
Tulipa Sp: (thulipjpe See. 3: fe 82 beet Wngland 080 ee fn te 3 es Py Reye
Nabis alternatus Parsh. (Nabidae):
Brassica papa. (turnip)_..2_ d=. Fxee Meorices<--2 2) 2 =-l i se PST 4 e Se Tex.
Brassica sp. (mustard)_____-_--- Senos hill Got =-.NE. - at ee 1h A ae Tex.
Cicer arietinum (garbanzo) -__---...----]____- ese SRE sn be EE Ot PL SET Ariz.
Daphne laureola (spurge laurel) ____-_-_- Candida»... . J (ere 1 | Wash.
Portulaca oleracea (purslane)_______-_- Miexten - 9 15 a tu -_a S| Fex.
Spinacia oleracea(spinach) -_______---]____- Gigs 5-2 SR arco gare ee eee Ariz.
Nabis annulatus Reut. (Nabidae):
Portulaca oleracea (purslane) -_--------|___-- e+: 5 ARRAYS _ aes Pieced Tex.
Nabis dentipes Harris (Nabidae):
Lactuca sativa (lettuce) ___--.-_-------]__--_ 6. PEE OIOI DS. dona > tT - (ee Bye Tex.
Nahis punctipennis Blanch. (Nabidae): .
Pagksnpt efron! fp 8S Bs oy Cheer te: tN te TIE = eee N. Y.
ae cornigera Motsch. (Termi-
tidae):
Cattleya sp. (orchid) -__-_-..-------_--- Colombia, Costa Rica___}_._----|------ 2 | Calif.*, N. J.
Cedrus sp. (pedar)) 32-24. 8a. Coste Hira. 220-1 2058 teh fee w= ee N. Y.
Guaiacum officinale (lignumvitae)____- WNiceratwa®.2. 3222262... PS 2 ee Calif.*
Nemapogon granelia (L.) (Tineidae): 7
Agaricus campestris (mushroom)_----- Canada. /2iciese.. en (0) A eee Wash.
prep np a guatemalensis Senna (Bren-
tidae
Tabebuia donnell-smithii (primavera)__| Guatemala, Panama_- -__- Dp nt Woe Pex.
Neoclytus cacicus Chevr. (Cerambycidae):
Guaiacum officinale (lignumvitae)____- Honduras, Panama_-__-_- Pa) ae &
ee rufus Oliv. (Cerambycidae): s
Wood... .< .) oe ieee Trinidied (©) .2 notes hae ap. 5. N.¥
Neusoctnaliia litigiosus (Stal) (Aradidae): :
Oronid. vw 9 Ot 2 eee Guateninle =... 28 ee eee 8 1 | Tex.
Niveaspis fenestrata Ferris (Coccidae): ~e
Marsdenia cundurango (condorvine) -_| Peru_-__._-_------------- Piss fl oozes Wey.
Nysius scutellatus Dall. (Lygaeidae):
Myristica fragrans (nutmeg) - --------- Guausdtioupe 2.85 ee. | nee 17 Pre,

Odonaspis greeni (Ckll.) (Cocet ine: }
Bambegee2 22 = 3. ea ee Hawai... .= 2.5. Se ee 1 Calif?

——
SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS

19

List of pests collected and reported from July 1, 1941, to June 30, 1942, inclusive—
Continued

Insect and host

Odonaspis saccharicaulis (Zehnt.) (Cocci-
dae):

Country of origin

|
|

|



Number of. inter-

Saccharum officinarum (sugarcane)__-| Guatemala_____________-
Ogdoecosta biannularis (Boh.) (Chrysome-
lidae):
Oncaea eee) os ote foes Beez NVEGRICO eee sa AE ee
re gemelius (Oliv.) (Tenebrioni-
“Cattleya ap -(orenid) 2 ee ee a. = - Venezuela
Opsius stactogalus Fieb. (Cicadellidae):
Chevsarithemaum Sp. - 25222 oo ee Wiexleg ey. ar es SS
Gardenia jasminoides (Cape-jasmine)__|_-___- En a he es
Ora sezlineata Chev. (Cyphonidae):
Brassica chinensis (white greens) -_____- Ombge sos si oefed 3d 2-22:
Orchidophilus aierrimus Waterh. (Curcu-
lionidae):
Opehidy 2222 Seek tee 2s os oe 2s TR TIARA 3 Pee a: 7s Pa
Orchidophilus peregrinator Buch. (Cur-
culionidae):
Phalaenopsis amabilis (orchid) __--_--- Emlippiicses: * 3." _|L _. Seeley «
Vanda cacrates (orchid) 22> Fe | GOr sr SS. SOE ns +
Pachnaeus litus Germ. (Curculionidae):
Brassica chinensis (white greens)__-__- Cpba ere Fae
Pachycoris torridus (Scop.) var. (Penta- :
tomidae):
OV GHid® = 2 ns bl ime aw wk Ewe Miexicoe 0.22 22th
ee periusalis (Wlk.) (Pyrausti-
ae
Solanum melongena (eggplant)_______- @ubae 2-2-2052. Scho
Pagiocerus rimosus Eichh. (Scolytidae):
Mimulus moschatus___...-_-.-------- Colombia~ eta ery T Go.
eG Mays (Got) 2 eee Crus hs) fue
ae costicollis Marsh. (Curculioni-
ae):
Dioseorea sp. yam) 28 eo Hondarases =. 8 ae
Ipomoea batatas (sweetpotato) _______- Trinidad
Pantomorus zanthographus Germar (Cur-
culionidae) :
Vatigisp. (erape) ots <2 Se he ee Arfenting .2iet S25.
Parlatoria blanchardi Targ. (Coccidae):
Phoenix dactylifera (date)_-____---___- Tren s Seles JagT Pt oy’
Parlatoria cinerea Hadden (Coccidae):
Citrus medica (citron)...-..-.-._=-.--- Palestines: 2anst
Citrus paradisi (grapefruit)__________- TDrundag:-astiee ts
Citrus sinensis (orange)___________-_-_- Argentina, Bahamas,
Brazil.
Parlatoria crotonis Doug. (Coccidae):
Codiaewm sp. (croton) ___..______-_--_- PQ Ts. See oT ete This og nw it eae
Parlatoria oleae (Colvee) (Coccidae):
Prunus domestica (plum) -____________- ATSENtin gee GE Sc |
Porus communis (pear) 23-5 OSS a yes foes Ses!
ae pseudaspidiotus Ldgr. (Cocci-
Trichoglottis philippinensis (orchid) ___| Philippines_____________|_______]__-__-

Vanda hookeriana (orchid)

Vand terest et nok

Philippines, Sumatra

India, Philippines,

Sumatra.

matra.

Pectinophora gossypiella (Saund.) (Gel-
echiidae):

Gossypium sp. (cottonseed) _________-

India, Philippines, Su-

American Virgin Is-

lands, Brazil, Hawaii,
Mexico, Puerto Rico.

Gossypium sp. (seed cotton)_________-

Antigua, Mexico_-_____--

_ Gossypium sp. (cotton) (boll) -_______- Hawai =

ea sp. _(cotton).; (oil.mill.| Mexico... ios 252.2222
motes

Hibiscus esculentus (Okey et ee =. Puerto Bice. 2--. 6) 52





ceptions in—
Con- Prop-
Non-
sump- aga-
tion |°2"TY| tion
Den) S362 | Sees
1
2
Bis ee
By pnden See oe
18 ness ees, oe
Bipters ftir 33 1
2
pe _ Stel ye: 1
eee 2. eee
Leste yeiee 1
AD: _ Sa e eh he
Le eee le =e
2. 225 1
1) eth ewe 9
J. CE EO et
er hn ti Po ey 1
A. [ics bab staleye) pe
bY si shrew Drier
1 Be pssde.
3
7 Se
ib ey see AP") 488
1
sa tall eee ns 2
br eee Paes 7
ac SP: 1
WP hetco teh) 2.505
Pinfteneys hy 8
9 1 1
6 Lees ss
We at eee
h tresea pete?
Loe

Collected in—

Hawaii.*

Calif.*,
Hawaii.*
Calif.*

N: ¥%
Tex,

ba., NiarXe
N. Y.
Ned; Nok.

Nis? ¥i

Ala., Mass.,
Pa.

La.

N. Ye

Calif.*

Fla.*

Fla.*, Mass.

Calif.*
20 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE |

List of pests collected and reported from July 1, 1941, to June 30, 1942, inclusive—













Continued
Number of inter-
ceptions in—
Insect and host Country of origin Collected in—
Con- _| Prop-
sump- aga-
tion |®2"TY| tion
a purpurea (Linell) (Chrysomeli-
ae
Brassica chinensis (white chard) ______ Moexiqos Sao 35a Tela! SS tor ew Ariz
Phelomerus aberrans (Sharp) (Bruchidae):
Cassia javanica (appleblossom senna) -_| Trinidad________________]-------]___.__ 2 he
Cassia. moscaatt-28. 2 Leas ee Canal-ZoneMiai. ja alee ahha
Phenacaspis eugeniae sandwichensis Full.
(Coccidae) :
Cycas revoluta (sago eycas) __ yo ee ER Hawaii 2bigsaey 4 ele eee 1 | Calif.*
Phenacoccus gossypii Towns. & Ckll.
(Coccidae):
Capsicum annuum (pepper) Seg Ouba. 2.0... ee a ae, ea NY:
Chrysanthemum Sp: 2-=~ 2252s 3seU-k Wiex1C0 2 Spee Lo ae Ariz.
FIGSCUS SDs 2~. ose ee ee ee Dominican Republic____ GAY 52 Re anes NOY:
Mentha sos (mint) 22" or 4 eee 2 Pie Merino... 222. 2 ee Lust fears Tex.
Pelargonium sp. (geranium) -_-_________|-_-_- Cob - 7 4 ts. Fee er ee ee 1 | Ariz., Tex.
Phyllotreta pusilla Horn (Chrysomelidae):
Brassica oleracea capitata (cabbage) _-__|_..._do____..___________. qt 2ST Tex
Brassica rape (turnip) -..-..----------]----- dp: 2 a ee ee a Soe ee ee Tex.
Daucus carota sativa (carrot). ___._.___]_-__- do 2zwigiie St 2 a Ati Sato: Bo Tex.
Lactuca'sativa (lettuce) - 2.2 = 22 2 GOOFS: cc.) ne i Ya eee Tex.
Raphanus sativus (radish) __._-.-___--_]--_-- Tn se et set on ies 2. | Lae De Tex.
Phyllotreta vittata discedens Weise (Chrys-
omelidae):
Brassica chinensis (white greens) _.._.._| Cuba__________________- Ay Cena eee ee Fs
Brassica oleracea acephala (Kale)_______|_-..-do___-______________- eae le ee Ny Ye
Phymata pennsylvanica coloradensis Mel.
(Phymatidae):
Portulaca oleracea (purslane)______-__.] Mexico________________-- 1s] 2 Soe ys ete Tex.
es bs ate picticollis Boh. (Chrysomel-
idae):
IBLOMEIINCORG |. 2 fet ee ee Guatemalaiziuie J sic eee 1 | Calif.*
gra brachypterus Popp. (Miri-
ae):
Lycopersicon esculentum (tomato) ____- VEGXIGO. eo eae ie ae eee Ariz.
Pinnaspis minor strachani Cooley (Coc-,
cidae):
Musa paradisiaca sapientum (banana)_| Trinidad________________ 1}t3 Sette eee Fla.*
Pinnaspis townsendi (Ckl1.) (Coccidae):
Aerides falcatum (orchid) __.-________- "Thanandsa ale A) ee ee 1 | Hawaii.*
Aerides tamwrencide 4: =. eo Philippines. _"--.-.... SPREE RE ee 1 | Hawaii.*
Aeridés odorataim) ok Thatland 23 eee 1 | Hawaii.*
Aerides quinquevulnera___..._______--- Philippines: --_-__:)_.-1 |e eee 1 | Hawaii.*
Cymbidium sp. (orchid)__-....____---- Japan 2 ei teeiet Fale See eee 1 | Hawaii.*
Dendrobium moschatum (orchid) --_--- Philippineseie:t.-° 3.28] _a ee 1 | Hawaii.*
Dendrobium phalaenopsis________----- Saimatracstinatie loa lc aes 1 | Calif.*
Renanthera storiei (orchid) __________-- Philippimeseers- 7s dae 1 | Hawaii.*
Trichoglottis brachiata (orchid) ________|____- d0.2= so... b= 2 eS 1 | Hawaii.*
Vanda luzonica (orchid)___..-.-......]._-_- G0. < See ee ee 1 | Hawaii.*
Vanda Merit te. ee ee ee do:..: = 4_ = ) eee 1 | Hawaii.*
Vanda roxburght..2 2 os + see Thailand singe £2. 2). eee 1 | Hawaii.*
Pionea forficalis (L.) (Pyr ak
Brassica oleracea capitata canes (2) Hapland: 22" > see Sey eee NETYA
Pityophthorus schwarzi Blackm. (Scoly-
tidae): ,
Pinus te. Apime)- ee Moemieperoiireit 32. 2k 1 ote eae Ariz.
Placosternus difficilis (Chevr.) (Ceramby-
cidae):
Ananas comosus (pineapple)______.___|___-- do avenue .-'$) So Bebe cole =e Tex.
Persea americana (avocado) __-____--_--|----- UG. 2 eee eee 1 ee Tex.
Platyonta rostrana (Walk.) (Tortricidae):
Ananas comosus (pineapple) ___-______|___-- da... sR 3 ot 1-j.>. ote Tex.
Capsicum annuum (nc a a IC sch ACO, fata ck Bt eel La., N. Y.
Citrus paradisi (grapefruit) ___--._.----|----- Gn. Mais. le Re tes eee
Musa paradisiaca (plantain) ___.____._|-__-- a6... se ee aren) Sees N. Y.
Platynota stultana (W1sm.) (Tortricidae):
Brassica sp. (mustard) ----..---------- MVESxICO fore Pe. Lee eee oy Bae
Capsicum annuum (pepper) ---_-------|----- Maris. Ae 2s apie o |S. Sat Ariz., Tex.
Lycopersicon esculentum (tomato) --__-|_---- Gi. ake Oe rte Ariz., Tex.
Toe lividigaster Muls. (Coccinel-
idae
Zingiber officinale (ginger)_____-__-_-- Hawnil....0 cite s2G Re 1 bebe) _ oe Calif.*

ree alternans Chapuis (Platypodi-
Cearda sp. (oeder) 1. 32 Coico MOR... aceeteee Re eek anell NAY.


Insect and host

Platypus ezaratus*Bldf. (Platypodidae):

Tabebuia donnell-smithii (primavera) __|{

aes rugulosus Chapuis (Platypodi-

Ananas comosus (pineapple) -_--_-_-_-
Caschiparacaey. —. 2... % ess
canes officinale (lignumvitae) -___-

Oe ae 2 ee SS ones
Swietenia mahogani (mahogany) - - ----
Tabebuia donnell-smithii (primavera) --

AGN t Atese Sc os, ee eS DACRO =< 2 2 = Tees 8 Lo: 1h) Fd et
Polymerus basalis (Reut.) (Miridae):
Cirymaniiiemam sp eo 31. Loe eont Biers to ESE RTs) see 2
> endocarpa (Meyr.) (Hyponomeuti-
Citrus aurantifolia (lime) -__-_.--------- Philinpinds $i? 2 2 as 2. Eee eee
Citrus limon (Germinm) 2. 3. Dutch East Indies______|__-___- fj ees
ee nce pyriformis (Ckil.) (Coc-
ae):
Anacardium occidentale (cashew) --___- Dominican Republic____|_-__-_-]_---.- i
Gardenia jasminoides (Cape-jasmine)-_| Mexico, Venezuela_-____-_ shee aor PN os
Lonicera sp. (honeysuckle) -___-__-_--_- Bermuda a eee ee eo 1
Pseudaonidia clavigera (Ckll.) (Coccidae): =
Genipa sp. (genip)~ J =--_----~------ GanaliFione ot) 24 tee 1
Fbseud SPs Fl Se es awe os_ aatr Se EL 4
TAGES PS oo oe oe ee AIS) a BA Gansimiene. 2-2 2h Pe 8) eS. oe 1
VEGI EUT ED Sys els FPO ee et (lo. 2 eee Bed 1
Pseudaonidia tesserata (deCharm.) (Coc-
. cidae):
FIibiSCus SpE as res a EAR Te ys 2 et Sole 6
Pseudaonidia trilobitiformis (Green) (Coc-
cidae):
Citrus patadist (Srapeiru) ees aby aaryeecte te ret Fe tape te
Citrus sinensis (orange) ________.--_-_- Brag 2 aainlegt i ane
Mangifera indica (mango) -_--_____--__-|---_- GAO: i eS ee Bee it est
Terminalia catappa (Indian-almond)_- Martinique..__________- Wap ee ee
ee alienus (Newst.) (Cocci-
Brassavola glauca (orchid)___________- ip reg e 2 ES oh ets ee 1
Cattleya skinneri (orchid)___.________- Costa Rica; Salvador-_-_}-_--2_]_-22_- 5
Cattleya spits c eset A ere Fa OSE Reet © Sep tee ie Ee ee Ne 9 3
Odontoglossum Sp: (Grebe): 254s ~~ Moexieos. 22.2 8 eae leh ae 1
Chrchrighte eft 2 ee et og Plostarienk hacks t= ob be 1
Pseudococcus boninsis (Kuw.)(Coccidae):
Cymbopogon sp. (lemon grass) ______- Ghent ae 7 et Fy ee 8
Saccharum officinarum (sugarcane)____| Bahamas, Cuba, Mexico- a 1 1
Pseudococcus gahani (Green) (Coccidae):
Citrus limon Memon) 2.224 22s ee Union of South Africa___}__.___- eee
Psila rosae (F.) (Psilidae):
Daucus carota sativa (carrot)____2____- England, Iceland. __-.__}_.-_-_- 6b rin
Pastinaca sativa (parsnip)---_________- Bene art ol We, see be mee ote Oe eg
Pteleobius vittatus F. (Scolytidae):
LOPS i eC) tiny iba ees a) ea ee G0. oes BS ee Gg Fe re
Pulvinaria fioccifera (Westw.) (Coccidae):
Cymbidium sp. (orchid) -.--___________]----- ib So se A ete oT 1
Pulvinaria urbicola Ckll. (Coccidae):
Capsicum annuum (pepper) _____-_---- rune rete ae 12 ct eer)
Puto mezicanus (Ckll.) (Coccidae):
GREE Sap Ris: CRA ue BS ES sl ee ge a A 1
Renocis mericanus Blackm. (Scolytidae):
RUS LIG Sp 5a A Ae Ae en es Go shatc tee tty Ane eA Read
cae. sp (elder) 2204 |. 34 Comer re Pe eee ee es ee
pee ea ree Sees 2S: Oo ae ee 9 Pesel e ) 3 3
Rhagoetis pomonella (Walsh) (Tephriti-
Malus sylvestris (apple)______- iGo ea ete es 4 [ee oh ee
Rhigopsidius tucumanus Heller (?) (Cur--
culionidae):
Solanunutubherasum (potato)-<*>.2.-_) Pern 222-2222... 1 2b eee
Rhizophagus dominica (Bostrichidae):
Cucurbga GH... 5 ents 5 Belgian Congo-_-..----.. Pie bets bP lnics
Rhobonda gaurisana Wikr. (Glyphiptery-
gidae):
Pee Sp ae eS a Cstemala? . toe) 3. eos sores

SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS

Continued

Number of inter-
ceptions in—

Country of origin
Con-
sump-
tion

Non-

entry | 283

tion



'Guatemalawe22-—. 2. _- eee pss
WVEGRI COS si :t as 2 + sid « PD as
Venezuela.:_..--_-___._- Ee} Lig sess 2
Gratemalay 3-72)... Sap? 3). ele

@xico.: nies J... - Bak Hee
Costa Rica, Mexico-_--- 2S a
Canal Zone, Guatemala, as bee

Mexico, Panama.



Prop-

21

List of pests collected and reported from July 1, 1941, to June 80, 1942, inclusive—

Collected in—



N.

Mass.
Ne Y), Tex:
Pa.

.
Fu >

Ariz. N. Y.
22 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

List of pests collected and reported from J uly 1, 1941, to June 30, 1942, inclusive—
Continued





Number of inter-
ceptions in—
Insect and host

Country of origin Collected in—

—_—_—$—$<—$—$———=_ —— — ————————————————————————— | | |) SS -

Rhopalothrips bicolor Hood (Thripidae):
RORGUS Pee ee ee
Ribua innozia Hein. (Phycitidae):
Ananas comosus (pineapple) ____-.-__- Cubs........-- ‘ La., N. Xe
Ripersia palmarum (Ebrh.) (Coccidae):
Cocos nucifera (coconut) --_...-.------
Salpingus planirostris F. (Pythidae):
Ulmilé spi (81m). eee
Saulaspis graphica (Germ.) (Chryso-
melidae):
Viissp. (etape) te. ho A FS
Scirtothrips longipennis (Bagn.) (Thri-
pidae):
Cypripedium sp. (orchid) ___________-_-
Scolyius multistriatus Marsh. (Scoly-
tidae):



Gimusisp.. (eb) ee ee doesent ys 2 se Ny Yt
Sinorylon anale Lesne (Bostrichidae):
PCC SID. 5k taste 8 See Malaya (British) _______- N. Y.
Derris scandens (Malay jewelvine)-__-_|_____ GG. eee oe eer 1 ee a
TRCCTES Se hd it hs Malaya (British), Phil- Me Te
ippines.
WiO0Gs $859.0 etc eee ee India _A6o eres ts Mich., N. Y.
Sinorylon conigerum Gerst.(Bostrichidae):
Wend. 3.2 bt NA eo ee ee do 428 lene ee NEY
Sinorylon sezdentatum (Oliv.) (Bostri-
chidae): ;
Silat on. cork: btmdle______..._..-_ -. +2_- Portugal 2208 ed ese Ny E
Sisamnes contractus Dist. (Lygaeidae):
Ananas comosus (pineapple)_-____.__- INMexi00=_. = tee Tex.
Sitona lineata L. (Curculionidae):
Frhododendromsp— toe ee ee British: Columbia... sie"|> tae ee 1 | Wash
Spathulina hessi (Wy ied.) (Tephritidae):
Helchy) san Sp 6 ee eee Union of South Africa___ N. Y
See erythrinae Bridweill (Bruchi- | ~
ae):
yUny ne Catia: fs A be do sinless 2. the wie
Erythrina constantiana_.....--.------|____- dit. £ o)* o>. Se Ne ¥.
Stephanoderes brunneus Hopk. (Scoly-
tidae):
Poinciana pulcherrima (flowerfence | Mexico____-_-_---___----- Ariz
poinciana).
Stephanoderes hampei Ferr. (Scolytidae):
Cement 0 a ce kee eg ea Canadatics Gian? ta: Minn
Stephanoderes trinitatis Hopk. (Scoly-
tidae):
Ormosia coutinhoi_........-._.--..-..- British Guiana___._.. __- Mass

Sternochetus mangiferae (F.) (Curculio-
nidae):
Mangifera indica (mango)__-___-_-___- Hawai co ee ee Calif.*
Stilodes fuscolineata (Stal) (Chrysome-
lidae):
Banana (@DhS =. 33s. ee ee
Stolas illustris (Chevr.) (Chrysomelidae):
Musa paradisiaca sapientum (banana).
Systena basalis (Duv.) (Chrysomelidae):

Brassica chinensis (white greens) _-____- Oubse 4 eee Nie

Brassita sp. (mustard)... =. do. SR Ny ¥

Chrysanthemum coronarium (crown- |____- do: 2 5 aS eee ; N. Y.
daisy)

Tadius erirhinoides Pascoe (Curculionidae):
Cypripedium haynaldianum (orchid) __| Philippines--_..__..__.-|.._.---]------ 1 | Calif.*
Tzxniothrips ericae (Hal.) (Thripidae):
Cailluna vulgaris (heather) ___________- Sootiassd 26 gene Nz 2
Tee hawaiiensis (Morg.) (Thripi-
ae):

Bougainvillea sp__-_..---.-.---.-----. Wawaiis...- #4". 6 Calif.*
a+ a simpler (Morison) (Thrip-
idae):
Gladiolussp! ....} U2) bre eee Mexico ..-...208e sk FS Tex
Talponia batesi Hein. (Olethreutidae):
Annona cherimola (cherimoya)-______--|_-.-- inte) Sree se Tex.

eo sexmaculatus Boh. (Bren-
tidae):
Swietenia mahogani (mahogany)--.---- Coste, tien 2). 255 N.Y.

——
SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 23

List of pests collected and reported from July 1, 1941, to June 30, 1942, inclusive—

Insect and host

Continued

Country of origin

Number of inter-
ceptions in—

Collected in—

sump _| aga-
tion |\°2"Y| tion
Targionia bromeliae (‘‘Newst.’’ Leon)
(Coccidae):
Ananas comosus (pineapple)____-__-_- Colas = 2s ete 1) |seXediew Fla.*
Targionia hartii (Ckll.) (Coccidae):
Diotcongamn. Gyarn)-_-.-.2 2. Cuba, Trinidad, Union 2 Shoes. MlatscN Y.;
of South Africa, West Pa.
Indies.
Targionia sacchari (Ckll.) (Coccidae):
Saccharum officinarum (sugarcane)--...| Bahamas, Cuba, Jamai- 1 2 L | Flat aN
ca, Puerto Rico.
Teleonemia scrupulosa Stal (Tingitidae):
Chrgsanthemum: Sp. 222 2 Mexico} =.= - 4 -tAe Uyak od by “eect Tex
Tenthecoris bicolor Scott (Miridae):
Cattleya mossiae (orchid)__-_-------_-- Menieznelet 35 or) 2 oats is) 2 | Calif.*, P. R.
Catileya'sp: (orchid) 228 3 2.2 =. Brazil, -Canali7one, Co- }-2_.2.|--.._- 30 | Calif.*, N. J.
lombia, Costa Rica,
Venezuela,
Epidendrum sp. (orchid)__---__-___--- TAZ a ase ee Cars i heh ch ae F, peoIN di
Timelta, Stic (OLGUIG ee ee ae G05 ees ee. gh ere tee oe Dh Ned.
Oncidium sp. (orchid) ..._..----..-__-- rinidad. 2 seeks t co ln eade es) sme Beis Nek
Orchids toe Ne se en ee ee oe Colombia, Mexico, Ven- |__.___-]_---_- Gk Ned TEX.
ezuela.
Tesserocerus dejeani Chapuis (Platypo- Ny
didae):
Guaiacum officinale (lignumvitae) Guatemala». =2 5: = BP iidebete toh Neve
Swietenia mahogani (mahogany) __---- Costa Rica, Honduras _- Zaher 2 oe Sate N.Y
Tabebuia donnell-smithii (primavera)_| Guatemala__ ________._- Sidiel ebceh Peden Noth.
Tetraleurodes acaciae (Q.) (Aleyrodidae):
SODROLG‘SD = =e ee ee Mexico... ete Taipies 2 fe oa.) | Tex
Tetraleurodes Tia Q. & B. (Aleyrodidae):
RICHS COLtCG CE) eee ee Gtratemalacos >). Dee ea Tex
aa a ursorum (Ckll.) (Aleyrodi-
ae):
Epigaea repens (trailing arbutus) Nova Scotia_.:-------.-- 4} tae Des Mass
Tetraopes femoratus texanus Horn (Ceram-
bycidae):
Aliun cepa: (oniom) as. eS Mexico: sre St AEF Tex
Tetrapriocera longicornis (Oliv.) (Bostzi-
chidae):
Swietenia mahogani (mahogany) -___-__|_____ G0. 22) pee akin DP Poteet fo N. &
SW OOCL Ft ea ee ree ef Co.) + 3eRyn tes Tees Di Tae viet Tex.
Toxotrypana curvicauda Gerst. (Tephri-
tidae):
Carica papaya (papaya)-_---_--__._.--- Pendants ct on ee A Pica5 se La
Trionymus peregrinus (Green) (Coccidae):
ATROTUHASISTS 5 See ae Fe MOIANG en ee LieNed
Trionymus sacchari (Ckll.) (Coccidae):
Saccharum officinarum (sugareane)_-_.| Australia__.__.___________|______- Pie Mass
Trogorylon prostomoides Gorh. (Lyctidae):
Sambucus sp- (elder) = 2-2 52.05. = WEeNIGO= 2. ea ee Tee NaY
LOCC) <= 2. Samemen grea eee 2 fo 3 ene a Ren Vetere fee We
Urbanus proteus (L.) (Hesperiidae):
Phaseolus sp.. (strins. pean) _2 2. =.-=|_.2.2 dd... pa ee ene oe Ariz.
rh asa (Hy. Edw.) (Hyponomeu-
tidae):
Persea americana (avocado)____-__-_---_|__--- Gi 25 fey ee Dele ee pe Tex.
Vinsonia stellifera (Westw.) Rap):
Brassavola sp. (orchid)____-_.________- C@AnAWZONG see a eee Pe 4 | Calif.*
(BrQssig: Sp. COLeMig yt 25 G5 28 te ey ape FT Oshe*
Cainledan Sp. (Grchnig)= 5 25s ee GOS a5 o6 ee ee ee | EA, Caht*
eee campechianum (log- | Martinique__________-_- De a ee re NES
wood).
Oncidium altissimus (orchid) ________- American Virgin Islands|_-__.__|_-_--- 1 | Fla.*
Stanhopea bucephalus (orchid) _______- Canal’Zone. =e ee ee 1 | Calif.*
aes omoger (Cr.) (Chrysomeli-
ae):
Bromelincege- 2-2: _- = 2 ee Gluatemala® . 425 cote eee 1 | Calif.*
Xyleborus affinis Eichh. (Scolytidae):
GEMS SD. (COORD) 2. en ees = Costa: Rica: Dy) eee foe ee nS
Swietenia mahogani (mahogany). ----_- EIOnGHFAS: Uo os ek Peps > eee Ne Y.
Tabebuia donnell-smithii (primavera)_.| Mexico____-_._-_-__-___-- Pe eee | N.


24 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE
List of pests collected and reported from J ibis 1, 1941, to June 30, 1942, inclusive—
Continued
Number of inter-
ceptions in—
Insect and host Country of origin Collected in--
Con- —— Prop-
sump aga-
tion |°2"Y| tion
Xyleborus confusus Eichh. (Scolytidae):
Cearas sp..leedar) 222)" 2. thee iste Rick..2 2b Pehle so NEY,
Citrus paradisi (grapefruit) -__-.-.---- Qupbae oo. risen ee a7) eee st aoe NS Se
Guaiacum officinale (lignumvitae) _-_--- Guatemalan. 2. Jee Pete 3 CEs) EN
Lycopersicon esculentum (tomato) ----- Wi exiGos ls so te SO er 3 Lass cee eS Ariz.
Swietenia mahogani (mahogany) ----_-- — Rica, Honduras, Bah acckeel es 9 N.Y.
exico.
Tabebuia donnell-smithii (primavera)__| Guatemala, Mexico--__- Braet, eee IN SYs, Dox
Xyleborus fuscatus Eichh. (Scolytidae):
Cedrus sp: (cedar) 2.5 :4 220-4. bk Gosta Ricazy..<2--...2- She se See N.Y.
Jacaranda acutijolia (jacaranda) ___---- BYAgHSS ie ood eee TY} ees N.Y.
Xyleborus propinquus Eichh. (Scolytidae):
Citrus aurantijolia (lime) _------------ WEexIe0: = $e tc use one BASTS ieee Ariz.
Guaiacum officinale (lignumvitae) -__-_- Guatemaliasociss 1 [See ee W.-Y
ye ese ce A os Se eee Movxieots). Lisette 14... Se Tex.
Lycopersicon esculentum (tomato)--_--}----- G2: Sheetal. ee 4 S4\5- Ariz.
Swietenia mahogani (mahogany) _-_-_-_- Honduras-_-_-_-- Le ee Boi oes oes IN. WY.
Tabebuia donnell-smithii (primavera)_.| Guatemala___._--_--____ 21). nadaiok sie IN EYs
Xyleborus sacchari Hopk. (Scolytidae):
Saccharum officinarum (sugarcane) ._..| Haiti_......_....--=..---|.-..--- Hasek: S Md.
Tadcbuia donnell-smithii (primavera) _.| Guatemala_____.______-_- Cee ae SM
Xyleborus torquatus Eichh. (Scolytidae):
Guaiacum officinale (lignumvitae)___-_- MexicOci 2. ee Al Alsen ee tee Nias
Swietenia mahogani (mahogany). -_-_-_-_- Costa Rica, Mexico- ---- 341. oe oe NW .Y,
Xyulion adustus (F.) (Bostrichidae):
Entandrophragma sp_-_---------------- Gold Coanstt S2s9-2 7k Lt eGe ae NEY
Swietenia mahogani (mahogany) --_-_--]|----- do Sa caeLsee Uh steels NOX
Xylobiops texanus (Horn) (Bostrichidae):
In bag containing avocados. é Mexico. oat Lt altos Tex.
Xylopsocus capucinus(F.) (Bostrichidae): —
Derris Sp © SA ae ee lee Oe Malaya (British)___.---- 04 ee N. Y.
Zabrotes Aitisdiias (Boh.) (Bruchidae):
Alltim cena (onion). e552 Se Mexico: = ee eee Ta ot eee Tex.
Allium sativum (garlic), si-0- 22 2-22-2-4e.2+ Goel iaannee 3. NS gis se Tex.
Arachis hypogaea (peanut) __-.-.------]----- GOk.. aS Se Pech Bios sae Tex.
Beate oF or tel ae, Peo | ee ee a aeniia Mexico, bate 2/|D. C., Mich
Peru. ex.
Panicum marimum (guineagrass) _--_-- Costa: Rica... ot bee Ole bi Ne ¥:
ra Saad lunatus macrocarpus (lima | Union of South Africa___|___---- 2 feo ce We
ean).
Phaseolus vulgaris (kidney bean) _----- Mexico. <. -) NOSE. = 2 al See 1A
Pisum sativum (pea)_.....------------ Pero 2 ee ee 1 sia: esses N.o¥s
Pisum sp. (yellow pea) ___-_-..--_---- Mesto: 6 22 eee fh AEA fe
Portulaca oleracea (purslane) -_--------]----- GOs= Aku DALE 1 hs Gee S Ariz.
Saccharum officinarum (sugarcane) --.-|.----d0------------------ Ts S221) 2 Sate Tex.
Triticum aestivum Gwihteat jo. cote eloe do. > teins 4 BB rel care eae Tex.
Vigna sinensis (cowpea) --------------|----- G0. (Uiieea... +. ebieeet f ie pe


SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 25

Hosts and insects

ACACIA:

Acanthoscelides dominicanus (Coleoptera)

Acanthoscelides sallaei (Coleoptera)
ADENANTHERA:

Dynatopechus aureopilosus (Coleoptera)
AECHMEA

Aleuroplatus cococolus (Homoptera)
AERIDIES—See Orchidaceae
AGLAONEMA

Fulvius brevicornis (Hemiptera)
AGARICUS:

Nemapogon cee (Lepidoptera)
ALLIUM CEPA

Tetraopes femoratus texunus (Coleoptera)

Zabrotes subfasciatus (Coleoptera)
ALLIUM SATIVUM:

Zabrotes subfasciatus (Coleoptera)
ALSTROEMERIA

oman pseudos pretella (Lepidoptera)

sepecraines uniloba (Homoptera)
AMARYLLIS
Trionymus peregrinus (Homoptera)
AMYGDALUS PERSICA:
Anastrepha ludens (Diptera)
ANACARDIUM:
Protopulvinaria pyriformis (Homoptera)
ANANAS:
Acroleucus vicinalis (Hemiptera)
Alpheias conspirata (Lepidoptera)
Carneocephala sagittifera (Homoptera)
Cossonus canaliculatus (Coleoptera)
Cossonus impressus var. (Coleoptera)
Diphaulaca cordobae (Coleoptera)
Disonycha antennata (Coleoptera)
Eburia brevispinis (Coleoptera)
Elaphrothrips dampfi (Thysanoptera)
Heraeus guttatus (Hemiptera)
Ligyrocoris aurivilliana (Hemiptera)
Metamasius callizona (Coleoptera)
Placosternus difficilis (Coleoptera)
Piatynota rostrana (Lepidoptera)
Platypus rugulosus (Coleoptera)
Ribua innoria (Lepidoptera)
Sisamnes contractus (Hemiptera)
Targionia bromeliae (Homoptera)
ANNONA:
Aspidiotus destructor (Homoptera)
Talponia batesi (Lepidoptera)
ANTHURIUM
coe abind (Homoptera)

Anuraphis apiifolia ({iomoptera)

ana (Orthoptera)
AR

Zabrotes plese: (Coleoptera)
ARAUCAR

Eriococcus fentate (tiomoptera)
ARECA:

Sin zylon anala {Dolegptens)
AST ROCARY

Coccotrypes Jonaunede (Coleoptera)

AMBOO:

Asterolecanium bambusae (Homoptera)
Asterolecanium miliaris (Homoptera)
Asterolecanium miliaris longum (Homoptera)
Asterolecanium miliaris robustum (Homoptera)
Chaetococcus bambusae (Homoptera)
Dinoderus pilifrons (Coleoptera)
Eucalandra setulosa (Coleoptera)
Laemotmetus rhizophagoides (Coleoptera)
Lyctorylon japonum (Coleoptera)
Odonaspis greeni (Homoptera)
BAMBUSA:
Asterolecanium bambusae (Homoptera)
BANANA DEBRIS:
Stilodes ae (Coleoptera)
BAROSM
Chionaspie ‘diosmae (Homoptera)
EAN:

Conotrachelus seniculus (Coleoptera)

Zabrotes subfasciatus (Coleoptera)
BERBERIS:

Hofmannophila pseudospretella (Lepidoptera)
BETA CICLA:

Hellula undalis (Lepidoptera)

BETA VULGARIS:

Aceratagallia robusta (Homoptera)

Conotrachelus seniculus (Coleoptera)

Drasterius livens (Coleoptera)

Erynephala puncticollis (Coleoptera)

Heliodines bella (Lepidoptera)
BOUGAINVILLEA:

Acanthoscelides pruininus (Coleoptera)

Colpocarena complanata (Hemiptera)

Haplothrips gowdeyi (Thysanoptera)

Taeniothrips hawaiiensis (Thysanoptera)
BRASSAVOLA—See Orchidaceae
BRASSIA—See Orchidaceae
BRASSICA CAMPESTRIS:

Ceutorhynchus pleurostigma (Coleoptera)
BRASSICA CHINENSIS:

Conoderus laurenti (Coleoptera)

Cylas formicarius elegantulus (Coleoptera)

Crytopeltis varians (Hemiptera)

Hellula phidilealis (Lepidoptera)

Hellula undalis (Lepidoptera)

Heteroderes laurenti (Coleoptera)

Ligyrocoris aurivilliana (Hemiptera)

Liriomyza flaveola (Diptera)

Ora sezlineata (Coleoptera)

Pachnaeus litus (Coleoptera)

Phaedon purpurea (Coleoptera)

Phyllotreta vittata discedens (Coleoptera)

Systena basalis (Coleoptera)
BRASSICA HIRTA:

Hellula phidiiealis (Lepidoptera)

Hellula undalis (Lepidoptera)

Lygus pratensis var. (Hemiptera)
BRASSICA OLERACEA ACEPHALA:

Gynaikothrips wzeli (Thysanoptera)

Haplothrips gowdeyi (Thysanoptera)

Liriomyza flaveola (Diptera)

Phyllotreta vittata discedens (Coleoptera)
BRASSICA OLERACEA BOTRYTIS:

Hellula undalis (Lepidoptera)

Leptophobia aripa (Lepidoptera)

Melusina annulata (Hemiptera)
BRASSICA OLERACEA CAPITATA:

Ceutorhynchus quadridens (Coleoptera)

Conotrachelus seniculus (Coleoptera)

Gnathotrichus denticulatus (Coleoptera)

Hellula phidilealis (Lepidoptera)

Hellula undalis (Lepidoptera)

Phyllotreta pusilla (Coleoptera)

Pionea forficalis jeg egies
BRASSICA RAP

Ceutorhynchus Disteailiiin (Coleoptera)

Deloyala lecontei (Coleoptera)

Drasterius livens (Coleoptera)

Epilachna varivestis (Coleoptera)

Geocoris sonoraensis (Hemiptera)

Hellula phidilealis (Lepidoptera)

Hellula undalis (Lepidoptera)

Lyqgus pratensis var. (Hemiptera)

Nabis alternatus (Hemiptera)

Phyllotreta pusilla (Coleoptera)
BRASSICA SP. (mustard):

Ceratocapsus cubanus (Hemiptera)

Conotrachelus seniculus (Coleoptera)

Drasterius livens (Coleoptera)

Empoasca abrupta (Homoptera)

Hellula phidileatis (Lepidoptera)

Hellula undalis (Lepidoptera)

Ligyrocoris aurivilliana (Hemiptera)

Liriomyza flaveola (Diptera)

Nabis alternatus (Hemiptera)

Platynota stultana¢Lepidoptera)

Systena basalis (Coleoptera)
BROMELIACEAE:

Asterolecanium epidendri (Homoptera)

Physonota picticollis (Coleoptera)

Xenochalepus omoger (Coleoptera)
CAESALPINIA:

Acanthoseclides dominicanus (Coleoptera)
CAJANUS:

Callosobruchus chinensis (Coleoptera)
CACTACEAE:

Cosmogramma angustofasciata (Coleoptera)

Cylindrocopturus biradiatus (Coleoptera)

Gerstaeckeria mutillaria (Coleoptera)

Lepidosaphes philococcus (Homoptera)
26 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE —

Hosts and insects—Continued

CACTACEAE—Continued.
Ligurocoris nitidicollis (Hemiptera)
Moneilema opuntiae (Coleoptera)
Puto mezicanus (Homoptera)
Rhopalothrips bicolor (Thysanoptera)

CALLUNA:

Micrelus ericae (Coleoptera)
Taeniothrips ericae (Thysanoptera)

CALOCARPUM:

Anastrepha serpentina (Diptera)

CAMELLIA:

Aleurotrachelus camelliae (Homoptera)

CANAVALIA:

Cosmolyce boeticus (Lepidoptera)
Maruca tesiulalis (Lepidoptera)

CAPSICUM:

Aceratagallia pallida (Homoptera)
Arvelius albopunctatus (Hemiptera)
Disonycha argentinensis (Coleoptera)
Epinotia opposita (Lepidoptera)
Gnorimoschema gudmannelia (Lepidoptera)
Lineodes triangulalis (Lepidoptera)
Lorita abornana chatka (Lepidoptera)
Macrodactylus merxicanus (Coleoptera)
Phenacoccus gossypii (Homoptera)
Platynota rostrana (Lepidoptera)
Platynota stultana (Lepidoptera)
Pulvinaria urbicola (Homoptera)

CARICA:

Homalopalpia dalera (Lepidoptera)
Toxotrypana curvicauda (Diptera)

CASEARIA:

Platupus rugulosus (Coleoptera)

CASSIA:

Acanthoscelides alticola (Coleoptera)
Aganactesis indecora (Lepidoptera)
Caryedon fuscus (Coleoptera)
Phelomerus aberrans (Coleoptera)

CASTANEA:

Clytus arietis (Coleoptera) |
Laspeyresia splendana (Lepidoptera)

CATTLEYA—See Orchidaceae

CEDRUS:

Nasutitermes cornigera (Isoptera)
Platypus alternans (Coleoptera)
Xyleborus affinis (Coleoptera)
Xyleborus confusus (Coleoptera)
Xyleborus fuscatus (Coleoptera)

CELOSIA:

Euschistus obscurus (Hemiptera)

CENTAUREA:

Ligyrocoris aurivilliana (Hemiptera)

CERATONIA:

Acanthoscelides ceratioborus (Coleoptera)
Amblycerus piurae (Coleoptera)
Myelois ceratoniae (Lepidoptera)

CEREUS—See Cactaceae

CHRYSANTHEMUM:
Aceratagallia nana (Homoptera)
Frankliniella cephalica (Thysanoptera)
Fulvius bisdistillatus (Hemiptera)
Hypselonotus fulvus (Hemiptera)
Opsius stactogalus (Homoptera)
Phenacoccus gossypii (Homoptera)
Polymerus basalis (Hemiptera)
Systena basalis (Coleoptera)
Teleonemia scrupulosa (Hemiptera)

CICER:

Callosobruchus chinensis (Coleoptera)
Callosobruchus maculatus (Coleoptera)
Nabis alternatus (Hemiptera)

CITRUS AURANTIFOLIA:
Anastrepha ludens (Diptera)
Chrysomphalus personatus (Homoptera)
Coccus viridis (Homoptera) |
Ligyrocoris nitidicollis (Hemiptera)
Prays endocarpa (Lepidoptera)
Xyleborus propinguus (Coloeptera)

CITRUS AURANTIUM:

Anastrepha ludens (Diptera)

CITRUS LIMON:

Prays endocarpa (Lepidoptera)
Pseudococcus gahani (Homoptera)

CITRUS MEDICA:

Parlatoria cinerea (Homoptera)

CITRUS PARADISI:

Anastrepha fraterculus (Diptera)

Anastrepha ludens (Diptera)

Anastrepha mombinpraeoptans (Diptera)

Anastrepha serpentina (Diptera)

Aonidiella inornata (Homoptera)

Parlatoria cinerea (Homoptera)

Platynota rostrana (Lepidoptera)

Pseudaonidia trilobitiformis (Homoptera)

Xyleborus confusus (Coleoptera)
CITRUS RETICULATA:

Aonidiella inornata (Homoptera)

Chionaspis yanonensis (Homoptera)
CITRUS SINENSIS:

Anastrepha fraterculus (Diptera)

Anastrepha ludens (Diptera)

Anastrepha serpentina (Diptera)

Parlatoria cinerea (Homoptera)

Pseudaonidia trilobitiformis (Homoptera)
GITRUS SP

Aleurocanthus woglumi (Homoptera)
COCOS:

Aspidiotus destructor (Homoptera)

Chrysomphalus personatus (Homptera)

Diaspis cocois (Homptera)

Diocalandra taitensis (Coleoptera)

Ereunetis flavistriata (Lepidoptera)

Heterobostrychus aequalis (Coleoptera)

Ripersia palmarum (Homoptera)
CODIAEUM:

Lepidosaphes auriculata (Homoptera)

Lichtensia lutea (Homoptera)

Parlatoria crotonis (Homoptera)
COELOGYNE—See Orchidaceae
COFFEA:

Ceratitis capitgta (Diptera)

Stephanoderes hampei (Coleoptera)
COLOCASIA:

Conchylodes ovulalis (Lepidoptera)
CORIANDRUM:

Liriomyza flaveola (Diptera)
CRATAEGUS:

Crocidosema plebciana (Lepidoptera)
CUCURBITA:

Rhizophagus dominica (Coleoptera)
CYCAS:

Aonidiella inornata (Homoptera)

Phenacaspis eugeniae sandwichensis (Homoptera)
CYDONIA:

Anastrepha ludens (Diptera)
CYMBIDIUM—See Orchidaceae
CYMBOPOGON:

Pseudococcus boninsis (Homoptera)
CYPRIPEDIUM—See Orchidaceae
DAHLIA:

Hofmannophila pseudospretella (Lepidoptera)
DAISY:

Euphoria kerni (Coleoptera)
DAPHNE:

Nabis alternatus (Hemiptera)
DAUCUS:

Agromyza virens (Diptera)

Haplothrips gowdeyi (Thysanoptera)

Phyliotreta pusilla (Coleoptera)

Psila rosae (Diptera)

DERRIS:

Dinoderus bifoveolatus (Coleoptera)

Sinorylon anale (Coleoptera)

Xylopsocus capucinus (Coleoptera)
DIOCLEA:

Maruca testulalis (Lepidoptera)
DIOSCOREA:

Palaeopus costicollis (Coleoptera)

Targionia hartii (Homoptera)

DEN DROBIUM—See Orchidaceae
DIANTHUS: ;

Allocoris incognita (Hemiptera)

Haplothrips gowdeyi (Thysanoptera)
ENTANDROPHRAGMA:

Xzylion adustus (Coleoptera)
EPIDENDRUM—See Orchidaceae
EPIGAEA:

Aleuroplatus myricae (Homoptera)

Tetraleurodes ursorum (Homoptera)
SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS Zt

Hosts and insects—Continued

ERICA:

Myzus ornatus (Homoptera)
ERYTHRINA:

Aspidiotus herculeanus (Homoptera)

Specularius erythrinae (Coleoptera)
EYSONHARDTIA:

Renocis mexicanus (Coleoptera)
FICUS:

Aspidiotus spinosus (Homoptera)

Leptopharsa distantis (Hemiptera)

Rhobonda gaurisana (Lepidoptera)

Tetraleurodes fici (Homoptera)
FRAXINUS:

Argyrotora conwayana (Lepidoptera)

Leperisinus frazini (Coleoptera)
GARDENIA:

Acrosternum stitica (Hemiptera)

Coccus viridis (Homoptera)

Euphoria kerni (Coleoptera)

Haplothrips gowdeyi (Thysanoptera)

flomona patulana (Lepidoptera)

Hypsoprora nogolata (Homoptera)

Opsius siactogalus (Homoptera)

Protopulvinaria pyriformis (Homoptera)
GENIPA:

Pseudaonidia clavigera (Homoptera)
GERBERA:

Frankliniella cephalica (Thysanoptera)

Haplothrips gowdeyi (Thysanoptera)
GLADIOLUS:

Frankliniella fortissima (Thysanoptera)

Lophocateres pusillus (Coleoptera)

Taeniothrips simplex) (Thysanoptera)
GLEDITSIA:

Bruchidius dorsalis (Coleoptera)
GONGORA—See Orchidaceae
GOSSYPIUM:

Bucculatriz thurberiella (Lepidoptera)

Corcyra cephalonica (Lepidoptera)

Pectinophora gossypiella (Lepidoptera)
GRAMMATOPHYLLUM—See Orchidaceae
GUAIACUM:

Nasutitermes cornigera (Isoptera)

Neoclytus cacicus (Coleoptera)

Platypus rugulosus (Coleoptera)

Tesserocerus dejeani (Coleoptera)

Xyleborus confusus (Coleoptera)

Xyleborus propinguus (Coleoptera)

Xyleborus torquatus (Coleoptera)
HAEMATOXYLON:

Vinsonia stellifera (Homoptera)
HELIANTHUS:

Disonycha argentinensis (Coleoptera)
HELICHRYSUM:

Spathulina hessi (Diptera)
HIBISCUS:

Crocidosema plebeiana (Lepidoptera)

Haplothrips gowdeyi (Thysanoptera)

Pectinophora gossypiella (Lepidoptera)

Phenacoccus gossypii (Homoptera)

Pseudaonidia clavigera (Homoptera)

ee tesserata (Homoptera)

Pseudaonidia clavigera (Homoptera)
IPOMOEA:

Cylas formicarius (Coleoptera)

Cylas formicarius var. (Coleoptera)

Cylas formicarius elegantulus (Coleoptera)

Cylas puncticollis (Coleoptera)

Cylas turcipennis (Coleoptera)

Euscepes postfasciatus (Coleoptera)

Palaeopus costicollis (Coleoptera)
JACARANDA:

Xyleborus fuscatus (Coleoptera)
JASMINUM:

Aonidiella inornata (Homoptera)
JUGLANS:

Lophocateres pusillus (Coleoptera)
LACTUCA:

Anacentrinus deplanatus (Coleoptera)

Conoderus lividus (Coleoptera)

Disonycha politula (Coleoptera)

Empoasca abrupta (Homoptera)

Empoasca batatae (Homoptera)

Geocoris sonoraensis (Hemiptera)

Homophoeta lustrans (Coleoptera)

LACTUCA—Continued.
Leptophobia aripa (Lepidoptera)
Ligyrocoris aurivilliana (Hemiptera)
Nabis dentipes (Hemiptera)
Phyllotreta pusilla (Coleoptera)

LAELIA—See Orchidaceae

LAGERSTROEMIA: -

Dysdercus mimulus (Hemiptera)

LATHYRUS:

Frankliniella fortissima (Thysanoptera)
URUS:

Aonidia lauri (Homoptera)

Chrysomphalus personatus (Homoptera)
LEMAIREOCEREUS—See Cactaceae
LITCHI:

Ceroplastes rubens (Homoptera)
LONICERA:

Protopulvinaria pyriformis (Homoptera)
LYCAST E—See Orchidaceae
LYCOPERSICON:

Amphicerus cornutus (Coleoptera)

Callidium antennatum hesperum (Coleoptera)

Dacus cucurbitae (Diptera)

Dicyphus minimus (Hemiptera)

Dorytomus brevisetosus (Coleptera)

Epinotia opposita (Lepidoptera)

Gnathotrichus aciculatus (Coleoptera)

Gnathotrichus denticulatus (Coleoptera)

Gnorimoschema gudmannella (Lepidoptera)

Heliodines bella (Lepidoptera)

Keiferia lycopersicella (Lepidoptera)

Leucinodes elegantalis (Lepidoptera)

Lineodes integra (Lepidoptera)

Lorita abornana chatka (Lepidoptera)

Pilophoropsis brechypterus (Hemiptera)

Platynota stultana (Lepidoptera)

Xyleborus confusus (Coleoptera)

Xyleborus propinguus (Coleoptera)
MALUS:

Anastrepha ludens (Diptera)

Ceratitis capitata (Diptera)

Rhagoletis pomonelia (Diptera)
MAMMEA:

Anasirepha serpentina (Diptera)

Aspidiotus spinosus (Homoptera)
MAMMILLARIA—See Cactaceae
MANGIFERA:

Anasirepha ludens (Diptera)

Anastrepha mombinpraeoptans (Diptera)

Ceratitis capitata (Diptera)

Pseudaonidia trilobitiformis (Homoptera)

Sternochetus mangiferae (Coleoptera)
MANTHOT:

Lepidosaphes alba (Homoptera)
MARSDENTA:

Niveaspis fenestrata (Homoptera)
MEDICAGO:

Colias eurytheme (Lepidoptera)

Draeculacephala minerva (Homoptera)

Epilachna varivestis (Coleoptera)
MENTHA:

Phenacoccus gossypii (Homoptera)
MILTONIA—See Orchidaceae
MIMULUS:

Pagiocerus rimosus (Coleoptera)
MUCUNA:

Dynatopechus aureopilosus (Coleoptera)
MUSA PARADISIACA:

Eumecosomyia nubila (Diptera)

Platynota rostrana (Lepidoptera)
MUSA PARADISIACA SAPIENTUM:

Adraneothrips tibialis (Thysanoptera)

Aspidiotus destructor (Homoptera)

Meiamasius sericeus (Coleoptera)

Pinnaspis minor strachani (Homoptera)

Stolas iilustris (Coleoptera)
MUSCARI:

Bouhelia maroccana (Homoptera)
MYRISTICA:

Nysius scutellatus (Hemiptera)
MYRICARIA:

Pseudaonidia clavigera (Homoptera)
MYRTILLOCACTUS—See Cactaceae
NARCISSUS:

Endrosis lacteelia (Lepidoptera)
28 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

Hosts and insects—Continued

NERIUM:

Haplothrips gowdeyi (Thysanoptera)
ODONTOGLOSSU M-—See Orchidaceae
ONCIDIU M—See Orchidaceae
ORMOSIA:

Stephanoderes trinitatis (Coleoptera)
ORNITHOGALUM:

ee nigricornis (Thysanoptera)
ORYZA

Chilo si implex (Lepidoptera)

Corcyra cephalonica (Lepidoptera)
ORCHIDACEAE:

Acrolophus fervidus (Lepidoptera)

Aeolus pulchellus (Coleoptera)

Anaphothrips orchidaceus (Thysanoptera)

Anaphothrips orchidii (Thysanoptera)

Anastrepha striata (Diptera)

Aonidiella eremocitri (Homoptera)

Aspidiotus diffinis (Homoptera)

Asterolecanium epidendri (Homoptera)

Capaneus odiosus (Hemiptera)

Chrysomphalus nulliporus (Homoptera)

Chrysomphalus umboniferus (Homoptera)

Clerada apicicornis (Hemiptera)

Conchaspis angraeci (Homoptera)

Conotrachelus naso (Coleoptera)

Cryphula apicatus (Hemiptera)

Cryphula fasciatus (Hemiptera)

Cryptamorpha desjardinsi (Coleoptera)

Deloyala guttata (Coleoptera)

Empoasca phaseola (Homoptera)

Fucalandra setulosa (Coleoptera)

Eurycipitia vestitus (Hemiptera)

Eurytoma orchidearum (Hymenoptera)

Exptochiomera tumens (Hemiptera)

Furcaspis biformis (Homoptera)

Galgupha punctifera (Hemiptera)

Gonatas typicus (Hemiptera)

Hercinothrips femoralis (Thysanoptera)

Lamprosema schistisemalis (Lepidoptera)

Lepidosaphes tuberculata (Homoptera)

Leucaspis cockerelli (Homoptera)

Ligyrocoris aurivillianus (Hemiptera)

Lygaeus vittiscutis (Hemiptera)

Melanaspis aliena (Homoptera)

Mordellistena catileyana (Coleoptera)

Morganella longispina (Homoptera)

Myodocha intermedia (Hemiptera)

Myodocha unispinosa (Hemiptera)

Nasutitermes cornigera (Isoptera)

Neuroctenus litigiosus (Hemiptera)

Ogdoecosta biannularis (Coleoptera)

Opatrinus gemellus (Coleoptera)

Orchidophilus aterrimus (Coleoptera)

Orchidophilus peregrinator (Coleoptera)

Pachycoris torridus var. (Hemiptera)

Parlatoria pseudaspidiotus (Homoptera)

Pinnaspis townsendi (Homoptera)

Pseudischnaspis alienus (Homoptera)

Pulvinaria floccifera (Homoptera)

Scirtothrips longipennis (Thysanoptera)

Tadius erirhinoides (Coleoptera)

Tenthecoris bicolor (Hemiptera)

Vinsonia stellifera (Homoptera)
PACHYCEREUS—See Cactaceae
PANICUM:

Cymus virescens (Hemiptera)

Zabrotes subfasciatus (Coleoptera)
PASSIFLORA

Frankliniella insularis (Thysanoptera)
PASTINACA:

Psila rosae (Diptera)

PATRINIA:

Myzus ornatus (Homoptera)
PELARGONIUM:

Phenacoccus gossypii (Homoptera)
PELLICIERA:

Aspidiotus herculeanus (Homoptera)
PERSEA:

Anastrepha ludens (Diptera)

Aspidiotus destructor (Homoptera)

Aspidiotus spinosus (Homoptera)

Caulophilus latinasus (Coleoptera)

Ceratitis capitaia (Diptera)

Chrysomphalus personatus (Homoptera)

Conotrachelus aguacatae (Coleoptera)

PERSEA—Continued.
Conotrachelus perseae (Coleoptera)
Conotrachelus seniculus (Coleoptera)
Euzxesta stigmatias (Diptera)
Feilipus trifasciatus (Coleoptera)
Placosternus difficilis (Coleoptera)
Urodus parvula (Lepidoptera)
PHALAENOPSIS—See Orchidaceae
PHASEOLUS AUREUS:
Callosobruchus chinensis (Coleoptera)
Callosobruchus maculatus (Coleoptera)
PHASEOLUS LUNATUS MACROCARPUS:
Epinotia opposita (Lepidoptera)
Zabrotes subfasciatus (Coleoptera)
PHASEOLUS MUNGO RADIATUS:
Callosobruchus maculatus ee
PHASEOLUS VULGARIS
Dacus cucurbitae (inten |
Zabrotes subfasciatus (Coleoptera)
PHASEOLUS SP. (string bean):
Dacus cucurbitae (Diptera)
Epilachna varivestis (Coleoptera)
Epinotia opposita (Lepidoptera)
Ligyrocoris aurivilliana (Hemiptera)
Maruca testulalis (Lepidoptera)
Urbanus proteus (Lepidoptera)
PHOENIX:
Parlatoria blanchardi (Homoptera)
PHYSALIS:
Cylas formicarius elegantulus (Coleoptera)
Gnorimoschema lavernella (Lepidoptera)
Heliothis subfleca (Lepidoptera)
PINUS:

Aonidia pinicola (Homoptera)

Chapuisia mexicana (Coleoptera)

Pityophthorus schwarzi (Coleoptera)
PIPER:

Aonidiella inornata (Homoptera)

ISUM:

Bruchus emarginatus (Coleoptera)

Zabrotes subfasciatus ce
PITHECELLOBIUM

Acanthoscelides flexicaulis (Coleoptera)

Acanthoscelides julianus (Coleoptera)

Acanthoscelides limbatus (Coleoptera)

Myelois venipars (Lepidoptera)
PODALYRIA:

Bruchidius versicolor (Coleoptera)
POINCIANA:

Aganactesis indecora (Lepidoptera)

Stephanoderes brunneus (Coleoptera)
POPULUS:

Dorytomus brevisetosus (Coleoptera)
PORTULACA: é

Callosobruchus maculatus (Coleoptera)

Disonycha arizonae (Coleoptera)

Drasterius livens (Coleoptera)

Exitianus obscurinervis (Homoptera)

Frankliniella fortissima (Thysanoptera)

Heliodines bella (Lepidoptera)

Lacon leseleuci (Coleoptera)

Ligyrocoris aurivilliana (Hemiptera)

Lygus pratensis var. (Hemiptera)

Nabis alternatus (Hemiptera)

Nabis annulatus (FH emiptera)

Phymata pennsylvanica coloradensis (Hemiptera)

Zabrores subfasciatus (Coleoptera)
PRIMULA

Myzus ornatus (Homoptera)
PROSOPIS:

Acanthoscelides ceratioborus (Coleoptera)

Acmaeodera gibbula delumbis (Coleoptera)

Laspeyresia membrosa (Lepidoptera)
PRUNUS:

Parlatoria oleae (Homoptera)
PSIDIUM:

Anastrepha mombinpraeoptans (Diptera)

Anastrepha suspensa (Diptera)

Ceratitis capitata (Diptera)

Coccus viridis (Homoptera)
PUNICA:

Anastrepha ludens (Diptera)

Caulophilus latinasus (Coleoptera)

YRUS:

Anastrepha ludens (Diptera)
Parlatoria oleae (Homoptera)


SERVICH AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 29

Hosts and insects—Continued

QUERCUS:
Andricus championi (Hymenoptera)
Andricus mexicanus (Hymenoptera)
Biorhiza solita (Hymenoptera)
Conotrachelus integer (Coleoptera)
Dros petasum (Hymenoptera)
Forficula auricularia (Orthoptera)

RADICULA:

Draeculacephala minerva (Homoptera)
RAPHAN US:

Hellula undalis (Lepidoptera)

Phyllotreta pusilla (Coleoptera)
RENAN THERA—See Orchidaceae
RHODODENDRON:

Amphorophora rhododendri (Homoptera)

Dalopius marginatus (Coleoptera)

Dialeurodes chittendeni (Homoptera)

Epitriz subcrinita (Coleoptera)

Sitona lineata (Coleoptera)
RIBES:

Epochra canadensis (Diptera)
RICINUS:

Falconia caduca (Hemiptera)

SA:

Chrysomphalus personatus (Homoptera)

Coccus viridis (Homoptera)

Frankliniella cubensis (Thysanoptera)

Frankliniella insularis (Thysanoptera)
ROYSTONEA:

Aspidiotus destructor (Homoptera)
SACCHARUM:

Odonaspis saccharicaulis (Homoptera)

Pseudococcus boninsis (Homoptera)

Targionia sacchari (Homoptera)

Trionymus sacchari (Homoptera)

Xyleborus sacchari (Coleoptera)

Zabrotes subfasciatus (Coleoptera)
SALVIA:

Aylaz salviae (Hymenoptera)
SAMBUCUS:

Amphicerus cornutus (Coleoptera)

Micrapate scapularis ( Coleoptera)

Renocis mexicanus (Coleoptera)

Trogoxylon prostomoides (Coleoptera)
SAPONARIA:

Hypselonotus interruptus (Hemiptera)
SAPOTE:

Anastrepha ludens (Diptera)

Anastrepha serpentina (Diptera)
SAXIFRAGA:

Acalypta mera (Hemiptera)
SCHEELEA:

Caryobruchus buscki (Coleoptera)
SCHOMBURGKIA—See Orchidaceae
SEMPERVIVUM:

Acalypta mera (Hemiptera)
SERJANIA:

Dinoderus bifoveolatus (Coleoptera)
SOIL:

Conotrachelus integer (Coleoptera)

Curculio q-griseae (Coleoptera)
SOLANUM MELONGENA:

Pachyzancla periusalis (Lepidoptera)
SOLANUM TUBEROSUM:

Epicaerus cognatus (Coleoptera)

Phigopsidius tucumanus (?) (Coleoptera)
SOPHORA:

Diaspis texrensis (Homoptera)

Tetraleurodes acaciae (Homoptera)
SPINACIA:

Deloyala guttata (Coleoptera)

Lyqus oblineatus var. (Hemiptera)

Nabis alternatus (Hemiptera)
SPONDIAS:

Aspidiotus herculeanus (Homoptera)
STANHOPEA—See Orchidaceae

SWIETENTA:
Hypsipyla grandella (Lepidoptera)
Lygaeus guatemalanus (Hemiptera)
Platypus rugulosus (Coleoptera)
Taphroderes sexmaculatus (Coleoptera)
Tesserocerus dejeani (Coleoptera)
Tetrapriocera longicornis (Coleoptera)
Xyleborus affinis (Coleoptera)
Xyleborus confusus (Coleoptera)
Xyleborus propinquus (Coleoptera)
Xyleborus torquatus (Coleoptera)
Xylion adustus (Coleoptera)
SYMPLOCARPUS:
Forficula auricularia (Orthoptera)
TABEBUIA:
Acanthoderes circumflera (Coleoptera)
Rrentus anchorago (Coleoptera)
Prentus mexicanus (Coleoptera)
Cossonus canaliculatus (Coleoptera)
Laemophloeus suturalis (Coleoptera)
Nemocephalus guatemalensis (Coleoptera)
_Platypus exaratus (Coleoptera)
Platypus rugulosus (Coleoptera)
Tesserocerus dejeani (Coleoptera)
Xyleborus affinis (Coleoptera)
Xyleborus confusus (Coleoptera)
Xyleborus propinguus (Coleoptera)
Xyleborus subaffinis (Coleoptera)
TABERNAEMONTANA:
Dialeurodes kirkaldyi (Homoptera)
TAMARINDUS:
Caryedon fuscus (Coleoptera)
TERMINALIA:
Aspidiotus destructor (Homoptera)
Elaphidion irroratum (Coleoptera)
Leptostylus argentatus (Coleoptera)
Pseudaonidia trilobitiformis (Homoptera)
TETRAPLEURA:
Callosobruchus maculatus (Coleoptera)
THEOBROMA:
Corcyra cephalonica (Lepidoptera)
NEROPAY .

Cinara tujafilina (Homoptera)
TILLANDSIA:

Monanthia monotropidia (Hemiptera)
TRITICUM:

Zabrotes subfasciatus (Coleoptera)
TULIPA:

Myzus ornatus (Homoptera)
ULMUS:

Clytus arietis (Coleoptera)

Pteleobius vittatus (Coleoptera)

Salpingus planirostris (Coleoptera)

Scolytus multistriatus (Coleoptera)
VANDA—See Orchidaceae
VICIA:

Bruchus dentipes (Coleoptera)

Bruchus dentipes ochraceosignatus (Coleoptera)

Bruchus hamatus (Coleoptera)
VIGNA:

Callosobruchus maculatus (Coleoptera)

Zabrotes subfasciatus (Coleoptera)
VITIS:

Pantomorus zanthographus (Coleoptera)

Saulaspis graphica (Coleoptera)
VOANDZELA: -

Caipobruclas subinnotatus (Coleoptera)

Agrotis vetusta (Lepidoptera)

Callosobruchus maculatus (Coleoptera)

Chirothrips aculeatus (Thysanoptera)

Conotrachelus seniculus (Coleoptera)

Eumecosomyia nubila (Diptera)

Euzesta sororcula (Diptera)

Euzesta stigmatias (Diptera)

Moodna bisinuella (Lepidoptera)

Paciocerus rimosus (Coleoptera)
ZINGIBER:

Platyomus lividigaster (Coleoptera)
30 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

BAG CONTAINING AVOCADOS:
Xylobiops teranus (Coleoptera)

EXCELSIOR IN BOX OF GRAPES:

Heteroderes rufangulus (Coleoptera)
FLOWERS:

Cyrtopeltis varians (Hemiptera)

Draeculacephala minerva (Homoptera)

Erynephala puncticollis (Coleoptera)
Metriona profligata (Coleoptera)
GRASS SEED:
Mecidea prolizra (Hemiptera)
HAY:

Hypera meles (Coleoptera)
Hypera nigrirostris (Coleoptera)
ERB:
Erynephala puncticollis (Coleoptera)
Melusina regelationis (Hemiptera)
LOG:
Prentus anchorago (Coleoptera)
Calydon submetallicum (Coleoptera)
Platypus rugulosus (Coleoptera)
Xyleborus propinguus (Coleoptera)
PACKING:
Drymus sylvaticus (Hemiptera)

Hosts unknown

PACKIN G-—-Continued.

Nabis punctipennis (Hemiptera)
PALM:

Aspidiotus destructor (Homoptera)
PLANT:

Aleurotrachelus trachoides (Homoptera)
SUCCULENT:

Eumysia maculicula (Lepidoptera)
VEGETABLES:

Erynephala puncticollis (Coleoptera)
WOOD:

Amphicerus cornutus (Coleoptera)

Feterobostrychus aequalis (Coleoptera)

Micrapate scapularis (Coleoptera)

Microcerotermes exiguus (Isoptera)

Neoc!ytus rufus (Coleoptera)

Platypus rugulosus (Coleoptera)

Penocis mezicanus (Coleoptera)

Sinozylon anale (Coleoptera)

Sinoxylon conigerum (Coleoptera)

Sinoxylon sexdentatum (Coleoptera)

Tetrapriocera longicornis (Coleoptera)

Trogorylon prostomoides (Coleoptera)

Country of origin and insects

ALGERIA:
Callosobruchus maculatus
Callosobruchus subinnotatus
AMERICAN VIRGIN ISLANDS:
Pectinophora gossy piella
Vinsonia stellifera
ANTIGUA:
Asterolecanium miliaris longum
Pectinophora gossypiella
ARGENTINA:
Anastrepha fraterculus
Cylas formicarius elegantulus
Disonycha argentinensis
Epilachna varivestis
Fletéroderes rusjangulus
Pantomorus ranthographus
Parlatoria cinerea
Parlatoria oleae
Saulaspis graphica
AUSTRALIA:
Anaphothrips orchidii
Lophocateres pusillus
Morganella longispina
Trionymus sacchari
BAHAMAS:
Coccus viridis
Frankliniella insularis
Furcaspis biformis
Haplothrips gowdeyi
Parlatoria cinerea
Pseudococcus boninsis
Targionia sacchari
BARBA DOS:
Asterolecanium miliaris robustum
Chrysomphalus personatus
BELGIAN CONGO:
Phizophagus dominica
BERMUDA:
Frankliniella insularis
Haplothrips gowdeyi
Protopulvinaria pyriformis
BRAZIL:
Anastrepha fraterculus
Anastrepha serpentina
Asterolecanium epidendri
Colpocarena complanata
Conchaspis angraeci
Corcyra cephalonica
Eurytoma orchidearum
Euscepes postfasciatus
FHypseclonotus interruptus
Mordellistena cattleyana
Parlatoria cinerea
Pectinophora gossy piella
Pseudaonidia trilobitiformis
Tenthecoris bicolor
Xyleborus fuscatus

BRITISH COLUMBIA:
Amphorophora rhododendri
Myzus ornatus
Sitona lineata

BRITISH GUIANA:
Caryedon fuscus
Stephanoderes trinitatis

BRITISH HONDURAS:
Lepidosaphes alba
Stolas illustris

BRITISH WEST INDIES:
Furcaspis biformis

CANADA:

Acalypta mera
Epitrix subcrinita
Forficula auricularia
Lophocateres pusillus
Myzus ornatus

Nabis alternatus
Nemapogon granella
Stephanoderes hampei

CANAL ZONE:
Acanthoderes circumflera
Acanthoscelides alticola
Aspidiotus diffinis
Aspidiotus herculeanus
Caryobruchus buscki
Coccus viridis
Conchaspis angraeci
Epinotia opposita
Frankliniella cephalica
Furcaspis biformis
Haplothrips gowdeyi
Mordellistena cattleyana
Phelomerus aberrans
Platypus rugulosus
Pseudaonidia clavigera
Tenthecoris bicolor
Vinsonia stellifera

CHILE:

Calydon submetallicum
Nabis punctipennis
CHINA:
Callcosobruchus maculatus
Ceroplasies rubens
Cylas formicarius elegantulws
Fulvius brevicornis
COLOMBIA:
Acanthoscelides dominicanus
Acrolophus fervidus
Anaphothrips orchidaceus
Anastrepha serpentina
Asterolecanium epidendri
Clerada apicicornis
Conotrachelus naso
Corcyra cephalonica
Cryphula fasciatus
SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS ol

Country of origin and insects—Continued

COLOMBIA—C ontinued.
Eucalandra setulosa
Eurytoma orchidearum
Furcaspis biformis
Gonatas typicus
Maruca testulalis
Mordellistena cattleyana
Nasutitermes cornigera
Pagiocerus rimosus
Tenthecoris bicolor

COSTA RICA:
Asterolecanium bambusae
Asterolecanium epidendri
Chrysomphalus umboniferus
Fleilipus trifasciatus
Leucaspis cockerelli
Myelois ceratoniae
Nasutitermes cornigera
Platypus alternans
Platypus rugulosus
Pseudischnaspis alienus
Stilodes fuscolineata
Taphroderes sexmaculatus
Tenthecoris bicolor
Tesserocerus dejeani
Xyleborus affinis
Xyleborus confusus
Xyleborus fuscatus
Xyleborus torquatus
Ea subfasciatus

CUB
Cea nbcinvens tibialis
Aleurocanthus woglumi
Anasthrepha mombinpraeoptans
Aspidiotus destructor
Aspidiotus spinosus
Asterolecanium bambusae
Asterolecanium miliaris
Ceratocapsus cubanus
Coccus viridis
Conoderus laurenti

-Crocidosema plebeiana
Cylas formicarius:
Cylas jormicarius elegantulus
Cyrtopeltis varians
Elaphidion irroratum
Eumecosomyia nubila
Euscepes postfasciatus
Frankliniella cubensis
Gynaikothrips uzeli
Haplothrips gowdeyi
Flellula phidilealis
fleteroderes laurenti
FTomalopalpia dalera
Keiferia lycopersicella
Lepidosaphes alba
Leptostylus argentatus
Lineéodes integra
Liriomy7a flaveola

Ora serlineata
Pachnaeus litus ‘
Pachyzancila periusalis
Phenacoccus gossynii
Phylloireta vittata discedens
Platynota rostrana
Pscudococcus boninsis
Pulvinaria urbicota
Ribua innovria

Systena basalis
Targionia bromeliae
Targonia hartii
Targionia sacchari
eee confusus

OME

Peau lauri
Aylex salviae

DOMINICA:

Maruca testulalis

DOMINICAN REPUBLIC:

Acanthoscelides dominicanus
Anastrepha mombinpraeoptans
Aspidiotus destructor
Aspidiotus herculeanus

Coccus viridis

Cylas formicarius

Cylas formicarius var.

Cylas formicarius elegantulus

HAI

DOMINICAN REPUBLIC—Continued.
Phenacoccus gossypii
Protopulvinaria puriformis

DUTCH EAST INDIES:
Acanthoscelides ceratioborus
Acanthoscelides dominicanus
Caryedon fuscus
Laemotmetus rhizophagoides
Lyctoxylon japonum
Prays endocarpa

DUTCH GUIANA:

Corcyra cephalonica
Euscepes postfasciatus
Maruca testulalis

DUTCH WEST INDIES:
Acanthoscelides dominicanus
Cymus virescens
F Oe biformis

ECUADOR:

Aleurotrachelus trachoides
Corcyra cephalonica

ENGLAND:

Anaphothrips orchidaceus
Argyrotora conwayana
Ceutorhynchus pleurostigma
Ceutorhynchus quadridens
Clytus arietis

Dalopius marginatus
Dialeurodes chittendeni
Drymus sylvaticus
FHercinothrips femorailis
Hofmannophila pseudospretella
Leperisinus fraxini
Lepidosaphes tuberculata
Melusina regelationis
Myzus ornatus

Pionea forjicalis

Psila rosae

Pteleobius vitiatus
Pulvinaria floccifera
Salpingus planirostris
Scirtothrips longipennis
Scolutus multistriatus
Trionymus peregrinus

FRENCH INDO-CHINA:
Heterobostrychus aequalis

GOLD COAST:

Xylion adusius

GUADELOUPE:

Nysius scutellatus

GUATEMALA:
Aleuroplatus cococolus
Anastrepha ludens
Aspidiotus destructor
Asterolecanium bambusae
Asterolecanium epidendri
Brentus anchorago
Brentus mexicanus
Chrysomphalus umboniferus
Cossonus canaliculatus
Eriococcus araucariae
Eurycipitia vestitus
Flypsipyla grandella
Laemophloeus suturalis
Leptopharsa distantis
Lygaeus guatemelanus
Lygaeus vittiscutis
Melanaspis aliena
Nemocephalus guatemalensis
Neuroctenus litigiosus
Odonaspis saccharicaulis
Physonoia picticol/is
Platypus exaratus
Platypus rugulosus J
PRhobonda gaurisana
Tesserocerus dejeani
Tetraleurodes fici
Xenochalepus omoger
Xyleborus confusus
Xyleborus propinguus
Xyleborus subaffinis

eee subfasciatus

Anastrepha mombinpraeoptans
A yleborus sacchari

HAWA

Acanthoscelides limbatus
32 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

Country of origin and insects—Continued

HAW AlII—Continued.
Acanthoscelides pruininus
Aonidiella inornata
Caryedon fuscus
Cer atitis capitata
Ceroplastes rubens
Chaetococcus bambusae
Coccus viridis
Cosmolyce boeticus
Dacus cucurbditae
Diocaland ra taitensis
Dynatopechus aureopilosus
Ereunetis flavistriata
Euscepes postfasciatus
Haplothrips gowdeyi
Lepidosaphes auriculata
Lepidosaphes uniloba
Maruca testulalis
Odonaspis greeni
Parlatoria crotonis
Pectinophora gossypiella
Phenacaspis eugeniaé sandwichensis
Platyomus lividigaster
Pseudaonidia clavigera
Pseudaonidia tesserata
Ripersia palmarum
Sternochetus mangiferae
Taeniothrips hawatiensis

HONDURAS:

Eurycipitia vestitus
Gaigupha punctifer
Leucaspis cockerelli
Neoclytus cacicus
Palaeopus costicollis
Tesserocerus dejeani
Toxotrypana curvicauda
Xyleborus affinis
Xyleborus confusus
Xyleborus propinquus
ICELAND:
Psila rosae

INDIA:

Bruchus emarginatus

Callosobruchus chinensis

Dinoderus pilifrons

Heterobostrychus aequalis

Parlatoria pseudaspidiotus

Sinorylon anale

Sinoxylon conigerum
IRAN:
<
Citation
Service and regulatory announcements

Material Information

Title:
Service and regulatory announcements
Added title page title:
Service and regulatory announcements with list of plant pests intercepted with imported plants and plant products
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C.
Publisher:
U.S. G.P.O.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Quarterly
Language:
English
Physical Description:
60 v. : 23 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Plant quarantine -- Periodicals -- United States ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )
federal government publication ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
S.R.A.--B.E.P.Q. no. 120 (July/Sept. 1934)-S.R.A.--B.E.P.Q. no. 179 (Oct./Dec. 1950).
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Also cummulated with an annual t.p.
Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not subject to copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105.
Resource Identifier:
030288977 ( ALEPH )
14207732 ( OCLC )
sn 86033973 ( LCCN )
Classification:
632.9 U54 ( ddc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Service and regulatory
Preceded by:
Service and regulatory announcements
Succeeded by:
Service and regulatory announcements

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Full Text
=] 5
43
neue.



LIBRARY
STATE PLANT BOARD

State of Florida

Department of Agriculture

DIVISION OF PLANT
INDUSTRY

LIBRARY







LIBRARY
STATE PLANT BOARD

EPLIOLT *OyTASSurEery

PSI

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otate riomdca
7 i BP, Cc ae as a ; . #1 “4 . rs
John Ir. We agie Se
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Sra. oo BP: .Q. Issued September 1943

United States Department of Agriculture

Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine

SERVICE AND
REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS
1942

These announcements are issued quarterly and constitute a per-
manent record of the work of the Bureau in the enforcement
of the Plant Quarantine Act of 1912 and certain related acts, in-
cluding the text of quarantines and regulations thereunder, and
the more important circulars and decisions explanatory of,
or bearing on, such quarantines and regulations

WITH LIST OF PLANT PESTS INTERCEPTED WITH IMPORTED
PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS



UNITED STATES
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
WASHINGTON : 1943





ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY |
AND PLANT QUARANTINE

P. N. ANNAND, Chief.

Avery 8. Hoyt, Associate Chief.

S. A. Ronwer, Assistant Chief in Charge of Regulatory Work.

F. C. Bisnopp, Assistant Chief in Charge of Research Work.

W. L. Pornam, Assistant Chief in Charge of Control Operations.

F. H. Spencer, Assistant Chief in Charge of Administration.

B. Connor, in ‘Charge, Division of Finance and Business Services.

Wo. F. LEFFEER, in Charge, Division of Personnel.

Rouua P. Currie, in Charge of Editorial Work.

J. A. Hysuop, in Charge, Division of Insect Pest Survey and fafornaon:

J. I. HAMBELTON, in Charge, Division of Bee Culture Investigations.

D. L. Van DINE, ain Charge, Division of Fruit Insect Investigations.

F. C. CraiGHEAD, in Charge, Division of Forest Insect Investigations.

W. H. Wuirs, in Charge, Division of Truck Crop and Garden Insect Investigations.

C. M. PacKxarp, in Charge, Division of Cereal and Forage Insect Investigations.

R, W. Harnep, in Charge, Division of Cotton Insect Investigations.

W. E. Dove, in Charge, Division, of Insects Affecting Man and Animals.

Gor CLAUSEN, in Charge, Division of Control I nvestigations.

R. C. Roark, in Charge, Division of Insecticide Investigations. 4

3; ous. WY. MUESEBECK, in Charge, Division of Insect Identification.

C. P. CLAUSEN, in Charge, Division of Foreign Parasite Introduction.

J. F. Martin, in Charge, Division of Plant Disease Control.

B. M. GADDIS, in Charge, Division of Domestic Plant Quaraniines.

KE. R. SASSCER, in Charge, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines.

R. A. SHeaus, in Field Charge, Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail Moth Control (head-
quarters, Greenfield, Mass.).

E. G. Brewer, in Field Charge, Japanese Beetle and Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail
Moth Quarantines, and Duich Elm Disease Eradication (headquarters, Hast
Orange, N. J.). t

R. E. McDonaxp, in Field Charge, Pink Bollworm and Thurberia Weevil Quaran-
tines (headquarters, San Antonio, Tex.).

P. A. Homa.eE, in Field Charge, ’ Mexican Fruatfly Quarantine (headquarters,
Harlingen, Tex.).

CLAUDE WAKELAND, in Field Charge, Grasshopper Control (headquarters, Denver,
Colo.). ;

A. C. Baker, in Field Charge, Fruitfly Investigations (headquarters, Mexico City,
Mexico). !

BI

Cs (DED te CET MOT DRIB SAW ‘“



TABLE OF CONTENTS
CONTENTS OF NO. 150 (JANUARY-MARCH 1942)

Quarantine and other official announcements_--____------------------- ta tas ee AES 2 ee oe
Announcemenis relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (No. 48) ______. ISP NE rae
Revise auarantine on Japanese beetle (press notice)
Revision of regulations effective March 24, 1942

INGtice torgeneral publicithrough mewspapersisi.2 eo) ee Ne ae eee :

Announcements relating to Mexican (ruitfly quarantine (No. 64)_._.___________-____________.:_-
Texas citrus fruit harvest extended (press notice) ____________- $525 9 AOS SOR Pee eae
Mexican fruitfly regulations modified—harvesting season extended (B. E. P. Q. 521)________

Announcement relating to white-fringed beetle quarantine (No. 72)__________-__________________
White-fringed beetle administrative instructions modified—treatments authorized (B. E.

P. Q. 503, fourth revision) - -__- Ue oy ee On RLM RLS BS i hala | Se a

MIS OES TOO 01S 20 6 0 Ss nS are ee ee ee eee eee een et ee eee n eae eee ee sale

| Wakeland to head Division of Grasshopper Control (press notice) __________________-____-_-
Plant-quarantine import restriction, Republic of Cuba (B. E. P. Q. 519, supplement No. 1)_
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Burma (B. BE. P. Q. 520)__-_-_-_______________________-
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Ecuador (B. E. P. Q. 522)______.__-______-

Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quaratine Act________2_____2.___2 2 ee
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine__________________2______________-

CONTENTS OF NO. 151 (APRIL-JUNE 1942)

< Wunarantine and other oficial announcentents: 2222) stellt soled ee ee
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (No. 48)_......-__._..._--__---_-.__.___-
Japanese beetle administrative instructions modified (B. E. P. Q. 499, supplement No. 1,
PiLMerGVvISlOn) == =° 4 jou ns bere) ret maralst mb leone gif ott ait Lae ie ees oan
Japanese beetle administrative instructions modified (B. E. P. Q. 499, supplement No. 4,
TNS TEVASIOM) ae oe Ee Rt a Tee eee a i AE | etcetera ee BATE,
Japanese beetle administrative instructions modified (B. E. P. Q. 499, supplement No. 5)__-
Announcement relating to nursery stock, plant, and seed quarantine (No. 37)_______._-_--- Tie!
Additional quantity limits for plants imported for propagation purposes (B. E. P. Q. 523,
amending P. Q. C. A. 278, revised) _________ PRR ee Nene. eee ial. kos See ee
Announcements relating to white-fringed beetle quarantine (No. 72) _._---_.________-_-_------___-
White-fringed beetle quarantine regulations revised (press notice) ____.-.__.-______-------___-
W hite-fringed beetle quarantine (revision of quarantine and regulations effectivé May 9, 1942)
Notice to general public through newspapers_____-.-.-_____.-_----- ie eee eh
TISUET CLLOHSELOSDOSTIMGASTCLS.- satteetn ee Meer: 45 oe tee Ieee he en
White-fringed beetle administrative instructions modified; treatment authorized (B. E. P. Q.
AUS POULT oVISION SUpOlOMment NO. Dees 2 2 ee Se et ee a Soe
White-fringed beetle administrative instructions modified (B. E. P. Q. 485, ninth revision) _-

Miscellaneous items :
MepACe La wicinsireuires:(DheSs NObIGO)= 25,2 ee eS ee ee
Walter E. Dove named USDA division chief (press notice)
| S. B. Fracker named coordinator of insect and disease research; is succeeded by J. F. Martin
(CERES SS SPIO GLO) pees Bey at ey Phe ini ea Sy en fa eb gigs 3 Bao ay! be eg | 9b et
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Peru (P. Q. C. A. 310, supplement No. 5)_-
eS import restrictions, Republic of Colombia, (B. E. P. Q. 477, supplement
Cnn) ee a eae gee) Beem ese, |: WME TEE ER ete Oe er AS ee
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act___--._-__-_-_-.-------------------
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine

CONTENTS OF NO. 152 (JULY-SEPTEMBER 1942)

Quarantine and other official announcements___..____________________=2__._.- ese ee eee
Anncuncement relating to gypsy moth and brown-tail moth quarantine (No. 45)______________-
Sheals to head Division of Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail Moth Control in the United States
Department of Agriculture (press notice)__________ Rear fe ene toe mm pe ee 2. Mey ee
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (No. 48)
Instructions to postmasters____________ Sate SE EOE Eee py ee hy esha et a ie
Japanese beetle administrative instructions modified (B. E. P. Q. 394, second revision)
Beetle restrictions on vegetable and fruit shipments ended for season (press notice)___ _____-
Administrative instructions modifying the restrictions of the Japanese beetle quarantine by
advancing the date of termination of restrictions on fruit and vegetable shinments under

§ 301.48 of the Japanese beetle quarantive to september 9 for the year 1942 (B. E. P. Q. 524) _-
Japanese beetle administrative instructions modified (B. E. P. Q. 499, supplement No. 6)____
Japanese beetle administrative instructions modified (B. E. P. Q. 499, supplement No. 1,
sixth revision) _._...2._.- eet J syet = ae CPt ery.) DARL) Se gf TL
Japanese beetie adm.nistrative instructions modified (B. E. P. Q. 499, supplement No. 7) ___-
Announcement reiating to pink bollworm quarantine (No. 52)_.___.._-..--_--_---.--------------
Pink bollworm quarantine regulations mced'‘fied (B. E. P. Q. 493, second revision) ___-
Announcements relating to white-fringed beetle quarantine (No. 72)... ______._--.--------------
White-fringed heetle regulations modified (B. E. P. Q. 485, tenth revision)
Hearing will consider beetle quarantine for North Carolina (press notice) .___...-____.-----
Netice of public hearing to consider the advisability of revising the white-fringed beetle quar-
antine to include North Carolina____...._..___- :

541987—43 Ill





RE eee ee aN oc a ae ne

oe cm PA aaa
j \ + : ‘ ' o
2 : ; |
igs: AV CONTENTS. oS a ek
ie . ae
Quarantine and other official announcements—Continued. a
Â¥ : Announcements relating to Mexican border regulaticns._________---------- one ii eto hee
vo Moxiean Border Act... .... 5.0 0+ 2-5 1. a Mexican border regulations (press notice)_..__...-__.._-..-.-.2--- 2-5 2L----21-- snes Moe
ier’ Mexican border regulations effective September 8, 1942_._.______.___._.___--_- 22 ------e
a Maisctiiancous items -~ _-.-— 4 - > -- -4— + -+ 3 es ie So es
( ; Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Jamaica, British West Indies (B. P. Q. 355, scien
. supplement No. 4).......--<--.--..-- Pee. OS. ee se
e Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Peru (P. Q. C. A. 310, supplement — @).%
fr ‘Terminal inspection of plants and plant progdurts-..-—- 9.5 =. -} --..---2.5-.5__ =. 6 eee
Arizonha plant quarantine... S426 22t A FoS Fe A ee EE a eee
i Oregon State plant quarantines_.___...-... 250-22 Sle 42s)
“ Penalties imposed for viclations of the Plant Quarantine Act____._______.__.-.___.-_-------.eee
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine_-__________s__-_--_-_----------- ws
CONTENTS OF NO. 153 (OCTOBER-DECEMBER 1942)
- Quarantine and other official announcements-______.___-_-_.---------------------- st eee
oxy Announcement relating to black stem rust quarantine (No. 38)__._____.-.--.-----.-------------
i : Administrative instructions; classification of barberry and mahonia plants (B. E. P. Q. 385,
, third revision) _<--<_.-—---. 22.25. - =
Full Text
=] 5
43
neue.
LIBRARY
STATE PLANT BOARD

State of Florida

Department of Agriculture

DIVISION OF PLANT
INDUSTRY

LIBRARY




LIBRARY
STATE PLANT BOARD

EPLIOLT *OyTASSurEery

PSI

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otate riomdca
7 i BP, Cc ae as a ; . #1 “4 . rs
John Ir. We agie Se
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Sra. oo BP: .Q. Issued September 1943

United States Department of Agriculture

Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine

SERVICE AND
REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS
1942

These announcements are issued quarterly and constitute a per-
manent record of the work of the Bureau in the enforcement
of the Plant Quarantine Act of 1912 and certain related acts, in-
cluding the text of quarantines and regulations thereunder, and
the more important circulars and decisions explanatory of,
or bearing on, such quarantines and regulations

WITH LIST OF PLANT PESTS INTERCEPTED WITH IMPORTED
PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS



UNITED STATES
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
WASHINGTON : 1943


ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY |
AND PLANT QUARANTINE

P. N. ANNAND, Chief.

Avery 8. Hoyt, Associate Chief.

S. A. Ronwer, Assistant Chief in Charge of Regulatory Work.

F. C. Bisnopp, Assistant Chief in Charge of Research Work.

W. L. Pornam, Assistant Chief in Charge of Control Operations.

F. H. Spencer, Assistant Chief in Charge of Administration.

B. Connor, in ‘Charge, Division of Finance and Business Services.

Wo. F. LEFFEER, in Charge, Division of Personnel.

Rouua P. Currie, in Charge of Editorial Work.

J. A. Hysuop, in Charge, Division of Insect Pest Survey and fafornaon:

J. I. HAMBELTON, in Charge, Division of Bee Culture Investigations.

D. L. Van DINE, ain Charge, Division of Fruit Insect Investigations.

F. C. CraiGHEAD, in Charge, Division of Forest Insect Investigations.

W. H. Wuirs, in Charge, Division of Truck Crop and Garden Insect Investigations.

C. M. PacKxarp, in Charge, Division of Cereal and Forage Insect Investigations.

R, W. Harnep, in Charge, Division of Cotton Insect Investigations.

W. E. Dove, in Charge, Division, of Insects Affecting Man and Animals.

Gor CLAUSEN, in Charge, Division of Control I nvestigations.

R. C. Roark, in Charge, Division of Insecticide Investigations. 4

3; ous. WY. MUESEBECK, in Charge, Division of Insect Identification.

C. P. CLAUSEN, in Charge, Division of Foreign Parasite Introduction.

J. F. Martin, in Charge, Division of Plant Disease Control.

B. M. GADDIS, in Charge, Division of Domestic Plant Quaraniines.

KE. R. SASSCER, in Charge, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines.

R. A. SHeaus, in Field Charge, Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail Moth Control (head-
quarters, Greenfield, Mass.).

E. G. Brewer, in Field Charge, Japanese Beetle and Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail
Moth Quarantines, and Duich Elm Disease Eradication (headquarters, Hast
Orange, N. J.). t

R. E. McDonaxp, in Field Charge, Pink Bollworm and Thurberia Weevil Quaran-
tines (headquarters, San Antonio, Tex.).

P. A. Homa.eE, in Field Charge, ’ Mexican Fruatfly Quarantine (headquarters,
Harlingen, Tex.).

CLAUDE WAKELAND, in Field Charge, Grasshopper Control (headquarters, Denver,
Colo.). ;

A. C. Baker, in Field Charge, Fruitfly Investigations (headquarters, Mexico City,
Mexico). !

BI

Cs (DED te CET MOT DRIB SAW ‘“
TABLE OF CONTENTS
CONTENTS OF NO. 150 (JANUARY-MARCH 1942)

Quarantine and other official announcements_--____------------------- ta tas ee AES 2 ee oe
Announcemenis relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (No. 48) ______. ISP NE rae
Revise auarantine on Japanese beetle (press notice)
Revision of regulations effective March 24, 1942

INGtice torgeneral publicithrough mewspapersisi.2 eo) ee Ne ae eee :

Announcements relating to Mexican (ruitfly quarantine (No. 64)_._.___________-____________.:_-
Texas citrus fruit harvest extended (press notice) ____________- $525 9 AOS SOR Pee eae
Mexican fruitfly regulations modified—harvesting season extended (B. E. P. Q. 521)________

Announcement relating to white-fringed beetle quarantine (No. 72)__________-__________________
White-fringed beetle administrative instructions modified—treatments authorized (B. E.

P. Q. 503, fourth revision) - -__- Ue oy ee On RLM RLS BS i hala | Se a

MIS OES TOO 01S 20 6 0 Ss nS are ee ee ee eee eee een et ee eee n eae eee ee sale

| Wakeland to head Division of Grasshopper Control (press notice) __________________-____-_-
Plant-quarantine import restriction, Republic of Cuba (B. E. P. Q. 519, supplement No. 1)_
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Burma (B. BE. P. Q. 520)__-_-_-_______________________-
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Ecuador (B. E. P. Q. 522)______.__-______-

Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quaratine Act________2_____2.___2 2 ee
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine__________________2______________-

CONTENTS OF NO. 151 (APRIL-JUNE 1942)

< Wunarantine and other oficial announcentents: 2222) stellt soled ee ee
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (No. 48)_......-__._..._--__---_-.__.___-
Japanese beetle administrative instructions modified (B. E. P. Q. 499, supplement No. 1,
PiLMerGVvISlOn) == =° 4 jou ns bere) ret maralst mb leone gif ott ait Lae ie ees oan
Japanese beetle administrative instructions modified (B. E. P. Q. 499, supplement No. 4,
TNS TEVASIOM) ae oe Ee Rt a Tee eee a i AE | etcetera ee BATE,
Japanese beetle administrative instructions modified (B. E. P. Q. 499, supplement No. 5)__-
Announcement relating to nursery stock, plant, and seed quarantine (No. 37)_______._-_--- Tie!
Additional quantity limits for plants imported for propagation purposes (B. E. P. Q. 523,
amending P. Q. C. A. 278, revised) _________ PRR ee Nene. eee ial. kos See ee
Announcements relating to white-fringed beetle quarantine (No. 72) _._---_.________-_-_------___-
White-fringed beetle quarantine regulations revised (press notice) ____.-.__.-______-------___-
W hite-fringed beetle quarantine (revision of quarantine and regulations effectivé May 9, 1942)
Notice to general public through newspapers_____-.-.-_____.-_----- ie eee eh
TISUET CLLOHSELOSDOSTIMGASTCLS.- satteetn ee Meer: 45 oe tee Ieee he en
White-fringed beetle administrative instructions modified; treatment authorized (B. E. P. Q.
AUS POULT oVISION SUpOlOMment NO. Dees 2 2 ee Se et ee a Soe
White-fringed beetle administrative instructions modified (B. E. P. Q. 485, ninth revision) _-

Miscellaneous items :
MepACe La wicinsireuires:(DheSs NObIGO)= 25,2 ee eS ee ee
Walter E. Dove named USDA division chief (press notice)
| S. B. Fracker named coordinator of insect and disease research; is succeeded by J. F. Martin
(CERES SS SPIO GLO) pees Bey at ey Phe ini ea Sy en fa eb gigs 3 Bao ay! be eg | 9b et
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Peru (P. Q. C. A. 310, supplement No. 5)_-
eS import restrictions, Republic of Colombia, (B. E. P. Q. 477, supplement
Cnn) ee a eae gee) Beem ese, |: WME TEE ER ete Oe er AS ee
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act___--._-__-_-_-.-------------------
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine

CONTENTS OF NO. 152 (JULY-SEPTEMBER 1942)

Quarantine and other official announcements___..____________________=2__._.- ese ee eee
Anncuncement relating to gypsy moth and brown-tail moth quarantine (No. 45)______________-
Sheals to head Division of Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail Moth Control in the United States
Department of Agriculture (press notice)__________ Rear fe ene toe mm pe ee 2. Mey ee
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (No. 48)
Instructions to postmasters____________ Sate SE EOE Eee py ee hy esha et a ie
Japanese beetle administrative instructions modified (B. E. P. Q. 394, second revision)
Beetle restrictions on vegetable and fruit shipments ended for season (press notice)___ _____-
Administrative instructions modifying the restrictions of the Japanese beetle quarantine by
advancing the date of termination of restrictions on fruit and vegetable shinments under

§ 301.48 of the Japanese beetle quarantive to september 9 for the year 1942 (B. E. P. Q. 524) _-
Japanese beetle administrative instructions modified (B. E. P. Q. 499, supplement No. 6)____
Japanese beetle administrative instructions modified (B. E. P. Q. 499, supplement No. 1,
sixth revision) _._...2._.- eet J syet = ae CPt ery.) DARL) Se gf TL
Japanese beetie adm.nistrative instructions modified (B. E. P. Q. 499, supplement No. 7) ___-
Announcement reiating to pink bollworm quarantine (No. 52)_.___.._-..--_--_---.--------------
Pink bollworm quarantine regulations mced'‘fied (B. E. P. Q. 493, second revision) ___-
Announcements relating to white-fringed beetle quarantine (No. 72)... ______._--.--------------
White-fringed heetle regulations modified (B. E. P. Q. 485, tenth revision)
Hearing will consider beetle quarantine for North Carolina (press notice) .___...-____.-----
Netice of public hearing to consider the advisability of revising the white-fringed beetle quar-
antine to include North Carolina____...._..___- :

541987—43 Ill


RE eee ee aN oc a ae ne

oe cm PA aaa
j \ + : ‘ ' o
2 : ; |
igs: AV CONTENTS. oS a ek
ie . ae
Quarantine and other official announcements—Continued. a
Â¥ : Announcements relating to Mexican border regulaticns._________---------- one ii eto hee
vo Moxiean Border Act... .... 5.0 0+ 2-5 1. a Mexican border regulations (press notice)_..__...-__.._-..-.-.2--- 2-5 2L----21-- snes Moe
ier’ Mexican border regulations effective September 8, 1942_._.______.___._.___--_- 22 ------e
a Maisctiiancous items -~ _-.-— 4 - > -- -4— + -+ 3 es ie So es
( ; Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Jamaica, British West Indies (B. P. Q. 355, scien
. supplement No. 4).......--<--.--..-- Pee. OS. ee se
e Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Peru (P. Q. C. A. 310, supplement — @).%
fr ‘Terminal inspection of plants and plant progdurts-..-—- 9.5 =. -} --..---2.5-.5__ =. 6 eee
Arizonha plant quarantine... S426 22t A FoS Fe A ee EE a eee
i Oregon State plant quarantines_.___...-... 250-22 Sle 42s)
“ Penalties imposed for viclations of the Plant Quarantine Act____._______.__.-.___.-_-------.eee
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine_-__________s__-_--_-_----------- ws
CONTENTS OF NO. 153 (OCTOBER-DECEMBER 1942)
- Quarantine and other official announcements-______.___-_-_.---------------------- st eee
oxy Announcement relating to black stem rust quarantine (No. 38)__._____.-.--.-----.-------------
i : Administrative instructions; classification of barberry and mahonia plants (B. E. P. Q. 385,
, third revision) _<--<_.-—---. 22.25. - =