Citation
Service and regulatory announcements

Material Information

Title:
Service and regulatory announcements
Added title page title:
Service and regulatory announcements with list of plant pests intercepted with imported plants and plant products
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C.
Publisher:
U.S. G.P.O.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Quarterly
Language:
English
Physical Description:
60 v. : 23 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Plant quarantine -- Periodicals -- United States ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )
federal government publication ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
S.R.A.--B.E.P.Q. no. 120 (July/Sept. 1934)-S.R.A.--B.E.P.Q. no. 179 (Oct./Dec. 1950).
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Also cummulated with an annual t.p.
Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not subject to copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105.
Resource Identifier:
030288977 ( ALEPH )
14207732 ( OCLC )
sn 86033973 ( LCCN )
Classification:
632.9 U54 ( ddc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Service and regulatory
Preceded by:
Service and regulatory announcements
Succeeded by:
Service and regulatory announcements

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LIBRARY
STATE PLANT BOARD

State of Florida

Department of Agriculture

DIVISION OF PLANT
INDUSTRY

LIBRARY









Digitized by the Internet Archive
in 2013

http://archive.org/details/regulato40unit



San, A., ob. E. P. Q. Issued November 1941

United States Department of Agriculture

Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine

SERVICE AND
REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS
1940

These announcements are issued quarterly and constitute a per-
manent record of the work of the Bureau in the enforcement
of the Plant Quarantine Act of 1912 and certain related acts, in-
cluding the text of quarantines and regulations thereunder, and
the more important circulars and decisions explanatory of,
or bearing on, such quarantines and regulations

WITH LIST OF PLANT PESTS INTERCEPTED WITH IMPORTED
PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS



UNITED STATES
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
WASHINGTON : 1941



~~

FLA. DEPT. AG.
DIV. OF PLANT
INDUSTRY.
LIBRARY

ete sve pth Dd

ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY
AND PLANT QUARANTINE

Les A. Strona, Chief.

S. A. RoHwEr, Assistant Chief.

Avery 8. Hoyt, Assistant Chief.

P. N. ANNAND, Assistant Chief.

F. H. Spencer, Business Manager.

Rouua P. Currin, Hditor.

Maseu Coucorp, Librarian.

J. A. Hysuop, in Charge, Division of Insect Pest Survey and Information.

J. I. HaAmMBLETON, in Charge, Division of Bee Culture Investigations.

D. L. Van Drnpu, in Charge, Division of Fruit Insect Investigations.

F. C. CratGHEean, in Charge, Division of Forest Insect Investigations.

W. H. Waits, in Charge, Division of Truck Crop and Garden Insect Investigations.

. M. Packarp, in Charge, Division of Cereal and Forage Insect Investigations.

. W. Harnen, in Charge, Division of Cotton Insect Investigations.

C. BisHopp, in Charge, Division of Insects Affecting Man and Animais.
A. Hawkins, zn Charge, Division of Control Investigations.

. C. Roark, in Charge, Division of Insecticides and Fungicides.

. F. W. MurEseBeEck, in Charge, Division of Insect Identification.

. P. CLuavusEn, in Charge, Division of Foreign Parasite Introduction.

B. FracKmR, in Charge, Division of Plant Disease Control.

B. M. Gappts, 7n Charge, Division of Domestic Plant Quarantines.

EK. R. Sasscer, in Charge, Division of Forecgn Piant Quarantines.

A. F. Burasss, in Field Charge, Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail Moth Control (head-
quarters, Greenfield, Mass.)

E. G. Brewer, in Field Charge, Japanese Beetle and Gypsy Moth and Brown-Taal
Moth Quarantines, European Corn Borer Certification, and Dutch Elm Disease
Eradication (headquarters, Bloomfield, N. J.).

R. E. McDonatp, in Field Charge, Pink Bollworm and Thurbertia Weevil Quar-
antines (headquarters, San Antonio, Tex.).

P. A. Horas, in Field Charge, Mexican Fruitfly Quarantine (headquarters,
Harlingen, Tez.).

ae Baker, in Field Charge, Fruitfly Investigations (headquarters, Mexico City,

€X1C0).

Il

RQOQNADMAADO

408653—41



CONTENTS
CONTENTS OF NO. 142 (JANUARY-MARCH 1940)

Quarantine and other official announcements-__-_------_---------_--- AS ree POE Cty etl) ofeer
Announcements relating to coffee quarantine (No. ey so we oy fy ad pee eS en Sp ee A
Hearing on- coffee quarantine scheduled for Puerto Rico___--________-___--__--_-----________--
Notice of public hearing to consider the advisability of prohibiting or restricting the entry
into Puerto Rico from all parts of the world of unroasted coffee beans, and coffee fruits,
aie rd eee ee ee et ee et! ee OE oe Sd So es Ss 5 ti ec ye PT
Quarantine to protect Puerto Rican coffee Decomesjietiectiy evAspril dee = 25! Pe re ew |
Gane qusaraniine—_Notice of quarantine No. 73_-_)_--..--_.-...-_-----..-_-.._. ibs. 2 2 --
Announcements relating to fruit and vegetable quarantine (No. 56) __-_________________________-
RASC MSO COLIECLOLS Of CUStOMmS: (L. 2: 50067)! 2.54 2 eee a ec
Quarantine rules on Newtoundland fruits and vegetables modified__________________________
Modification of fruit and vegetable quarantine regulations (amendment No. 1, effective Feb-
eae ie ett) ee ere, eee ee oe tee gee. Jee a ee pone eee en Vo be spe ss eseesee se
ini SaatcinenS eo CoOllectors.Of CuStOmMS (I. DD: 50017). 2
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (No. 48) ___._-_-_________________________-
Japanese beetle conference to discuss future measures________________________________._____.
Notice of conference to discuss the status of the Japanese beetle infestation in the United
eg ae a ee ee
Administrative instructions to inspectors on the treatment of nursery products, ey vege-
tables, and soil for the Japanese beetle (B. E. P. Q. 499, supplement No. 1, revised) ______
Announcements relating to Puerto Rican fruit and vegetable quarantine (No. 58) _--_ _________-
Administrative instructions—The shipment of oranges and grapefruit from Pere. me to the
mainland subject to treatment under supervision is authorized (B. E. P. Q. 505)__________
gsc on treating citrus fruits by methods prescribed in Circular B. E. P. oO 505 (B. E.
a ene en ee ee ee ee ee ee Oe eee
Announcements relating to white-fringed beetle quarantine (No. 72)___________________________-
Administrative instructions— Removal ot white-fringed beetle certification requirements for
a limited period tor potatoes and sweetpotatoes consigned from areas regulated under
Nanton Or. (i. i. FQ: 485. fourth revision)... 2°
SUR TOMS MASE STTITAST OES toe eee es ee ee lin ey ee ee re ee eg
Administrative instructions—M odifying the restrictions of the white-fringed beetle quaran-
tine by Bean | treatment by methyl bromide solutions of balled nursery stock of speci-
Pines (tt. P. Q. 503. revised)... |... 2
Terminal] inspection of plants Andean plOGUCL See esa = tees Wee eee ee ee age
Change of plant inspection place in Arizona______-__-____--__ __--- oa oe Eee
Saranac SUA COTE Tid PASSO gESTAS Sper eee ie Oe ee i ee
Administrative instructions—Citrus fruit from Mexico in transit to foriegn aie via the’
United States (B. P. E. Q. 507; supersedes P. Q. C. A. ae TOVASCO) pe oe ee es
i status of circulars of this ‘(B. E. P. Q.) series (B. E, P. Q. 508; supersedes Bote.
Fens ino ra St ee a eee
a import restrictions, British India (B. E. P. Q. 404, revised, supplem ent
oe ar re ee ee ie oe ef ee ee
eae import restrictions, United Kingdom of Great Britain (B. Rr FS - 416,
ean sot mene ee ee eee,

aa ae ee es oe ee a eee oe nee poet ae bee ones
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Qusarnmhine Ach... =e ae ee
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine______________________.

CONTENTS OF NO. 143 (APRIL-JUNE 1940)

aaranine aad Guer Oficial announcements.._..._.._____..___________-___--_____________-______.-
AntnoONucoMoenirTelatine to cofiee Quarantine (No. 73)2.22..--_--_---_-..-_~__--=.--+.--=-..----.-
ingiracmons 10 collectors of customs (T. D) 50129)___-.._.__________-_____________- meee Ate
Announcement relating to fruit and vegetable quarantine (No. 56)____________ Ae eee
imsirmenons to. collectors of customs (T. D: 50161)___.-__-__---_____-__-_-_--.--__-__-=__.._-
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (No. 48)_______________________________--

Japanese beetle quarantine continued—Extensions of area announced as of April 5,,/1940_ —...

PApaHesepeeiie muarantine cOntinued___°) -._-1-.2__.2 6 ee

ee of Japanese beetle quarantine regulations (amendment No. 2, effective April 5,

Notice to general public through. new spapers ae oe St eee

List of true bulbs, corms, and tubers exempted from Japanese beetle certi ification (B. E.
P. Q. 394, revised) See ee ee ee Lei ee ee ee ee

Quarantine restrictions on Japanese beetle modified.___________________________--___--

tae of Japanese beetle quarantine regulations (amendment No. 3, ‘effective May

Notice to general public through newspapers.___-______________________-__-___----

Administrative instructions to inspectors on the treatment of nursery products, ‘fruits,
vegetables, and soil for the Japanese beetle (B. E. P. Q. 499, supplement No. 2)

Order amending Section 301.48-5, Chapter III, Title 7, Code of Federal Regulations,
and modifying the Japanese beetle quarantine regulations as to ae of fruits
and vegetables from certain areas in Virginia (B. E. P. Q. 509)___________- k ae

Announcement relating to pink bollworm quarantine (No. 52)_._.___________-

Administrative instructions relating to pink bollworm quarantine— restoring the treatment
requirements as to cotton linters, cottonseed hulls, cake, and meal and extending the area
in which baled cotton lint may be moved from certain lightly infested areas in New Mexico
and Texas without treatment (B. E. P. Q. 493, revised)______________-- Bed *

III

OTH #& CO DD DO

“IJ ~7 cn

39
39
39
40
40
40
40



IV CONTENTS

Quarantine and other official announcements—Continued.
Announcements relating to white-fringed beetle quarantine (No. 72)______-__-___________________
Administrative instructions—Removal of white-fringed beetle certification requirements
until February 1, 1941, for specified articles consigned from designated portions of the
regulated areas (B. Ee P. Q. 485, fifth revision)
LIAS EGU CELOMS COD POS EUNAS COTS a ae a a a
Terminal inspection of plants and plant products
Change of plant inspection place in Arizona

Miscellaneous items._= __2 -2-- 2-4 eet ee
FE import restrictions, Republic of Cuba (P. Q. C. A. 283, revised, supplement
INO. 7) = 2-4-2682 chee eee pe Bie SE LR) eo ee
Plant- euarantine import restrictions, Kingdom of Egypt (B. E. P. Q. 375, revised, supple-
ment INO..3)¢ 22260) 22 SS See ee a IE ee
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Mexico (B. E. P. 2 ae supplement No. 2)
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Paraguay (B. E. P. Q. 502, supplement
No. 1

Penalties anes for violationsiof the Plant @imarantirre Ac Gee ae
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine

CONTENTS OF NO. 144 (JULY-SEPTEMBER 1940)

Quarantineiand! other oii cial armour Cer ers
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (No. 48)
Instructions to postmasters Yee n ees Soe Oo pa Sie eke a crc rrr
Japanese beetle control on fruit and vegetable shipments ends for season____-_______________
Order advancing date of termination of restrictions on fruit and vegetable shipments under the
Japanese beetle quarantine to September 19 for the year 1940
Instructions:topostmasters. 22 2 a Se

Order modifying administrative instructions to inspectors on the treatment of nursery prod-
ucts, fruits, vegetables, and soil for the Japanese beetle (B. E. P. Q. 499, supplement No. 3) __
Order modifying administrative instructions to inspectors on the treatment of nursery prod-
ucts, fruits, vegetables, and soil for the Japanese beetle (B. E. P. Q. 499, supplement No. if

2d revision) Se a Se I I SE ee ae
Announcements relating to Mediterranean fruitfly and melon fly quarantine (No. 13)_-
Use of a new fumigant approved for certain Hawaiian fruits and vegetables_________________
Use of methyl bromide authorized for treating fruits and vegetables for movement from
Hawaii to:the mainland. 2 2 2 ea ee eee
Administrative instructions amending authorization of the shipment of fruits and vegetables
from Hawaii to the mainland subject to fumigation with methyl] bromide under supervision

@BY By PHQyblQ)s 2 =k 2s A ee eee ee a ee
Announcement relating to pink bollworm quarantine (No. 52)__-_______-______________..--__---
Statement regarding cooperative pink bollworm control program for the crop season 1940____
Announcements relating to white-fringed beetle quarantine (No. 72)___..________.-___-..--__=--
Administrative instructions—removal of white-fringed beetle certification requirements until
February 1, 1941, for specified articles (B. E. P. Q. 485, 6th revision) _____________________-
Instructions to postimasters 2 ee ke er a
Terminal inspectionvof plambtSkam Ge pol arat [oT @ CU ES eee eae
Oregon State plant quarantines (revision of notice dated June 23, 1937)
Miscellaneous MEO TAS 25 SE he a ee er eer ee PU oh ee
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Kingdom of Iraq (B. E. P. Q. 468, revised)__________-
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Uruguay (B. E. P. Q. 382, revised) — phe Fe
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act..-.22-2 22).
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine

CONTENTS OF NO. 145 (OCTOBER-DECEMBER 1940)

Ouarantinetand! other oficial samim Ow COSTES eee ee a
Announcements relating to Mexican fruitfly quarantine (No. 64) __..___--------------------_-_--
Fruitfly quarantine modified to extend Valencia orange harvest in Texas area (press notice) __
Administrative instructions—modifying the restrictions of the Mexican fruitfly quarantine by
GRTIiee the harvesting season on Valencia oranges from April 30 to May 31, 1941 (B. E. P.

DTD ie. hs SSeS ee ae ee ee Be
Miscellaneous items2e.25 220200 oe ee te ee

ET aes se import restrictions, Republic of Chile (B. E. P. Q. 511; supersedes B. P. Q.

B48) ah eS eT ee Te NS a or a ee es tat

VO 2) oe oe ee le a eee

List of current quarantine and other restrictive orders and miscellaneous regulations ___-----
Penaltiestimposed for.violations onthe Plant QuarantinevAct= = ea
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine_______--_-----__------------------

O



S.R. A.B. E. P. Q. No. 142 Issued June 1940

United States Department of Agriculture

BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE



SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS

JANUARY-MARCH 1940

CONTENTS

Genramine and over oficial announcements... 22 22222. 52+ 2c. Gee bb 2 tno + 2b as-e ee 1
Announcements relating to.cofiee: quarantine (No. :73)=------ ------------=_-.-_- == --- === -+e 1
Hearing on coffee quarantine scheduled for Pucrip icons) MEE es 1

Notice of public hearing to consider the advisability of prohibiting or restricting the entry

into Puerto Rico from all parts of the world of unroasted coffee beans, and coffee fruits,

res 2
Quarantine to protect Puerto Rican coffee becomes effective April 1___--__--_---_._-_-_____- 2
Conca duarsntine—Notice of-quarantine No. 732_222-_ 4 222i ost 2 sek Lie 3

Announcements relating to fruit and vegetable quarantine (No. 56)__-_-_-_-_____-_--_--__-____-_- 4
nsiaieniousiolcolechors Of customs, (D. D. 50067). -22 ee ee oe ee 4
Quarantine rules on Newfoundland fruits and vegetables modified _-_______-_---_---_--..--- 5
Modification of fruit and vegetable quarantine regulations (amendment No. 1, effective Feb-

RPT TT IAs RMN 40) RS eee et BSP SR pn 8 he Poh SS nS 2 ee 5

Instructions to collectors of customs GILAD SOON) eae tee ans oct i eS ee ee if

Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (No. 48)__-________-_____________-__-_ Lee 7
Japanese beetle conference to discuss future measures. ----_..-.._-.-.----------------------- i
Notice of conference to discuss the status of the Japanese beetle infestation in the United

SEL ee eens aS Ee) «Ss es ae oe eee Ss De Se eee eee 8
Administrative instructions to ‘inspectors on the treatment of nursery products, fruits, vege-

tables, and soil for the Japanese beetle (B. E. P. Q. 499, supplement No. 1, revised) _--_-_--- 8

Announcements relating to Puerto Rican fruit and vegetable quarantine (No. 58) _ aie re onion, 5 Meee 9
Administrative instructions—The shipment of oranges and grapefruit from Puerto Rico to the -

mainland subject to treatment under supervision is authorized (B. E. P. Q. 505)----__-__- 9
Suggestions on treating citrus fruits by methods prescribed in Circular B. E. P. Q. 505

Is PeE Maen) eee carseat ee Sh a el Se Se ch se ee Seas 10

Announcements relating to white- -fringed beetle quarantine (No. UD) ee eS a Oe ee Be 1l
Administrative instructions—Removal of white-fringed beetle certification requirements for

a limited period for potatoes and sweetpotatoes consigned from areas regulated under

quarantine No. 72 (B. E. P. Q. 485, fourth revision) ___-_-_------- bh ts # OE. ee 11

Instructions to postmasters eee ee | ae ee er es ee ee a ee 11
Administrative instructions—Modifying the restrictions of the white- fringed beetle quaran-

tine by authorizing pment by methyl bromide solutions of balled nursery stock of speci-

fied thickness (B. E. P. Q. 503, revised) _._._-_------___- Fete de = 29 fiat ine Re, Bnd See Pere ae ee 12

Terminal inspection of plants and plant products Pia DIE A eee eer oe ee ee ee 13
Hane ompiant mspection place in Arizona.-_--.-=.- == en 13

ieee eM Ea TOIT Saar maeaeet yes oateeenen. GR STF EN EOS 5 PSR ee Ee ee 13
Administrative instructions—Citrus fruit from Mexico in transit to foreign countries v ia the

United States (B. P. E. Q. 507; supersedes P. Q. C. A. al TOVISOC) See eee ee eee 13
ayaa status of circulars of this (B. E. P. Q.) series (B. E P. Q. 508; supersedes B. E. P. Q. ‘“
Plant- ‘Ae mechani import restrictions, British India (B. E. P. Q. 404, rev ised, supplement

een FUNNIES ee eA: es ee ee ES eae ee 23
Pint: oa import restrictions, United Kingdom of Great Britain (B. E. P. Q. 416, ste

ORT peer T penmm er Aiea TE eT Lie te eR tee eG ct tee ten et
Plant- a import restrictions, Union of South Africa (B. Bey On40l, supplement aa

Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act__.------__------------------------ 36

Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine__._._...._-------------------___-- 38

QUARANTINE AND OTHER OFFICIAL
ANNOUNCEMENTS

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO COFFEE QUARANTINE (NO. 73)
HEARING ON COFFEE QUARANTINE SCHEDULED FOR PUERTO RICO

[Press notice]

JANUARY 17, 1940.

Secretary of Agriculture Henry A. Wallace has called a public hearing to
consider the desirability of establishing a quarantine to prohibit or restrict
entry into Puerto Rico of coffee which might carry pests into the Island. This
hearing will be held by the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine at
10 a. m., February 14, 1940, in the Templo del Maestro, San Juan, P. R.

229841—40——-1 1



a BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.—March

“The long-established coffee industry of Puerto Rico fortunately has re-
mained free from certain destructive insect pests, which have interfered ser-.
lously with the success of coffee growing in many other parts of the world,”
Lee A. Strong, Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, who
will preside at the hearing, said today. ‘To ensure the continuation of this
freedom from insect attack, the United States Department of Agriculture pro-
poses to consider the desirability of establishing a quarantine prohibiting or
restricting entry into Puerto Rico of unroasted coffee beans, as well as fruits,
plants, and leaves of coffee that might bring in these pests.”

A quarantine, if decided upon, probably would exclude commercial importa-
tions of unroasted coffee beans, as well as coffee fruits, plants, and leaves. It
would, however, provide for entry, under safe regulatory procedure, of the
usual coffee samples weighing a pound or less, and also for the safe handling
of shipments entering at San Juan for immediate transshipment to foreign
destinations or to the United States mainland.

The quarantine under consideration would affect only coffee imported into
Puerto Rico from foreign countries. It would not restrict in any way coffee
shipments from the United States mainland to Puerto Rico. These now are
and would continue to be subject to the coffee quarantines long maintained
by the Puerto Rico Department of Agriculture and Commerce.

Only in exceptional instances are public hearings like this held outside
Washington, D. C., Dr. Strong said. In this case the Department recognizes
that nearly all the interests concerned are centered in Puerto Rico and could
be represented in Washington only at a considerable expenditure of time and
money. It Seems more consistent with the public interest to hold this hearing
at San Juan.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING TO CONSIDER THE ADVISABILITY OF PROHIBITING
OR RESTRICTING THE ENTRY INTO PUERTO RICO FROM ALL PARTS OF THE
WORLD OF UNROASTED COFFEE BEANS, AND COFFEE FRUITS, PLANTS, AND
LEAVES

JANUARY 15, 1940.

The Secretary of Agriculture has information that there exist in various
countries of the world where coffee is grown ar injurious insect, the coffee
berry borer, Stephanoderes hampei Ferr., of which S. coffeae Hgdn. is a synonym,
and an injurious rust, Hemeleia vastatric B. and Br., as well as other injurious
insects and plant diseases, and that these pests, new to and hitherto not widely
distributed within or throughout the United States, may be introduced into
coffee-growing areas of Puerto Rico with importations of unroasted coffee
beans, or coffee fruits, plants, and leaves from other countries and localities.
It appears necessary, therefore, to consider the advisability of prohibiting or
restricting the entry of unroasted coffee beans aS well as fruits, plants, and
leaves of the coffee plant, Coffea spp., from all foreign countries and localities
into Puerto Rico.

Notice is hereby given, therefore, that in accordance with the Plant Quaran-
tine Act of August 20, 1912, as amended, a public hearing will be held before
the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine of the United States Depart-
ment of Agriculture in the Temple del Maestro, in the city of San Juan, Puerto
Rico, at 10 a. m., February 14, 1940, in order that any person interested in the
establishment of such prohibition or restriction may appear and be heard either
in person or by attorney.

[SEAL] GrRovER B. HI,

Acting Secretary of Agriculture.

QUARANTINE TO PROTECT PUERTO RICAN COFFEE BECOMES EFFECTIVE APRIL 1

[Press notice]

MarcH 22, 1940.

The Department of Agriculture today announced that Secretary Henry A.
Wallace has signed a plant quarantine order prohibiting the shipment into
Puerto Rico of unroasted coffeq beans, coffee berries, or coffee leaves from
foreign countries. The quarantine, which becomes effective April 1, is designed



1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 3

to protect the Puerto Rican coffee crop from insect pests, such as the coffee
berry borer, and from plant disease, such as coffee rust, that are a serious
handicap to the coffee industry in many countries. The quarantine applies
only to commercial shipments. Small coffee samples may come in under certain
regulations, and foreign coffee can be transshipped, also under regulation, at
the port of San Juan.

This new quarantine, the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine ex-
plains, is largely precautionary. Little unroasted coffee has entered the Island
for many years. Both Insular and Federal authorities are interested in the
restoration of Puerto Rico’s struggling coffee industry. Once a flourishing
industry, it has fallen off because of international trade barriers and intense
competition in world markets, and, in the last decade, because of hurricanes.
The introduction of plant pests would be a disastrous setback, the Bureau says.

B. E. P. Q.-Q. 73. Effective April 1, 1940.
COFFEE QUARANTINE

NOTICE OF QUARANTINE No. 73

INTRODUCTORY NOTE

The coffee industry in Puerto Rico established early in the history of the
Island has fortunately remained free from at least two of the world’s most
destructive coffee pests, the coffee berry borer and the coffee rust. The object
of the present quarantine is to ensure the continued freedom of Puerto Rican
coffee cultures from these and other coffee insects and diseases by prohibiting
or restricting entry into the Island of those coffee materials which might
be the means of introducing such pests. It is believed that the measures put
into effect by this quarantine will attain this end and at the same time provide
for as much freedom of movement as would be consistent with safety.

AvERY S. Hoyt,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

SEC. 319.733—NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 73 ON ACCOUNT OF COFFEE PESTS
(Approved March 20, 1940; effective April 1, 1940)

Having found that an injurious coffee insect (Stephanoderes [coffeae Hgdn.]}
hampei Ferr.) known as the coffee berry borer, and an injurious‘rust disease
due to the fungus Hemileia vastatriz B. & Br., not heretofore widely prev-
alent or distributed within and throughout the United States, exist in various
countries and localities throughout the world, I, Henry A. Wallace, Secretary of
Agriculture, pursuant to the provisions of the Plant Quarantine Act of August
20, 1912 (387 Stat. 315; 7 U. S. C. 151-167), as amended, have determined that,
in order to prevent the introduction of the said pests into the Island of Puerto
Rico, it is necessary to prohibit or restrict the importation into that Island
from all foreign countries and localities of unroasted seeds or beans of coffee
(Coffea spp.), coffee fruits or berries, and coffee plants and leaves.

Now, therefore, by virtue of the said Plant Quarantine Act, the public hear-
ing required thereby having been duly held, notice is hereby given, first, that
on and after April 1, 1940, the importation into the Island of Puerto Rico from
all foreign countries and localities of (1) the seeds or beans of coffee which,
previous to importation, have not been roasted to a degree which, in the
judgment of an inspector of the Department of Agriculture, will have destroyed
coffee borers in all stages, (2) coffee berries or fruits, and (38) coffee plants
and leaves, is prohibited except by the Department of Agriculture for experi-
mental and scientific purposes, and except for samples of unroasted coffee
seeds or beans, and for shipments of unroasted coffee seeds or beans
in transit to destinations other than Puerto Rico; and, second, that the
importation of samples of unroasted coffee seeds or beans, and importa-
tions of unroasted coffee seeds or beans in transit to destinations other
than Puerto Rico, shall be made only under the restrictions provided in the



4. BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE = [Jan.—March

rules and regulations supplemental hereto: Provided, That individual ship-
ments of materials prohibited or restricted by this quarantine may be exempted
from its provisions in whole or in part when it shall have been determined
by the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine that entry of
the shipment in question may be made without risk of pest introduction.’
Done at the city of Washington this 20th day of March 1940.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[SEAL] H. A. WALLACE,

Secretary of Agriculture.

RULES AND REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 73
(Approved March 20, 1940; effective April 1, 1940)
REGULATION 1

Sec. 319.73-1. Permit—All importations shall be made under permit and
only at the port of San Juan.’
REGULATION 2

Src. 319.738-2. Inspection and safeguard provisions.—Coffee samples shall not
exceed 1 pound in weight and may be imported by mail, freight, express, or
baggage. They shall be subject on arrival to inspection and fumigation or such
other treatment as the plant quarantine inspector may require.*

REGULATION 3

Sec. 319.73.-3. Restrictions on in-transit shipments.—In-transit shipments to
foreign countries shall be subject to the Plant Safeguard Regulations issued
October 4, 1932 (Secs. 352.2 to 352.8), or as hereafter revised. The same
restrictions shall apply to shipments in transit to destinations elsewhere in the
United States.’

These rules and regulations shall be effective on and after April 1, 1940.

Done at the city of Washington this 20th day of March 1940.

Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.

[SEAL ] H. A. WALLACE,

Secretary of Agriculture.

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO FRUIT AND VEGETABLE
QUARANTINE (NO. 56)

INSTRUCTIONS TO COLLECTORS OF CUSTOMS

PLANT QUARANTINE ACT—FRUIT AND VEGETABLE QUARANTINE—CONDITIONS
GOVERNING THE ENTRY OF CIPOLLINI From Morocco (T. D. 50067)

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,
OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONER OF CUSTOMS,
Washington, D. C., January 11, 1940.

To Collectors of Customs and Others Concerned:

The appended copy of B. E. P. Q. Circular No. 504 entitled “Administrative
Instructions; Conditions Governing the Entry of Cipollini from Morocco” issued
by the Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, United States
Department of Agriculture, effective December 7, 1939, under authority con-
tained in Regulation 2 of Notice of Quarantine No. 56 (fruit and vegetable
quarantine) (T. D. 48728) is published for the information and guidance of
customs officers and others concerned.

Beare 819.78 to 319.73-3 issued under authority contained in 37 Stat. 315; 7 U. S. C,



STATE PLANT F BOA

1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS

The number of this Treasury decision should be inserted as a marginal ref-
erence opposite articles 578 (b) (1) and 579 (a), Customs Regulations of 1937.
By direction of the Commissioner :
G. H. GRIFFITH,
Acting Deputy Commissioner of Customs.

(Then follows the text of B. E. P. Q. Circular No. 504.)

QUARANTINE RULES ON NEWFOUNDLAND FRUITS AND VEGETABLES MODIFIED

[Press notice]
FEBRUARY 27, 1940.

The Department of Agriculture announced today that fruits and vegetables
produced in Newfoundland, exclusive of potatoes, have been plaeed on the
dame basis of importation into this country as those from Canada. The
change became effective today.

For many years the comparatively few vegetable food products shipped here
from Newfoundland, mainly berries, have entered this country under the
restrictions of the general fruit and vegetable quarantine No. 56. Similar
products from Canada have for some years enjoyed greater freedom from
these restrictions. Avery S. Hoyt, Acting Chief of the Bureau of Entomology
and Plant Quarantine, said that inspection of fruits and vegetables from New-
foundland indicates that these importations may safely be put on the same
basis as those from Canada. He pointed out that although Newfoundland,
with its adjacent strip of Labrador, is politically distinct from Canada within
the British Empire, the two may be considered as almost identical from the
point of view of plant pests which might affect our imports from them.

Potatoes from Newfoundland continue to be excluded because of potato wart.

MODIFICATION OF FRUIT AND VEGETABLE QUARANTINE REGULATIONS
INTRODUCTORY NOTE

Inspection of fruits and vegetables offered for entry from Newfoundland
during the period since the promulgation of Quarantine No. 56, the Fruit and
Vegetable Quarantine, effective November 1, 1923, indicates that importations
of fruits and vegetables from Newfoundland can be safely permitted on a
basis comparable to those from Canada. The present revision of the regula-
tions supplemental to Quarantine No. 56 is made therefore to place the entry
of fruits and vegetables from Newfoundland and its mainland territory of
Labrador on the same status as those from Canada, with the exception of
potatoes, which have long been and still are excluded from Newfoundland on
account of potato wart.

AVERY S. Hoyt,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

AMENDMENT NO. 1 TO THE RULES AND REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE
OF QUARANTINE NO. 56, AS REVISED EFFECTIVE DECEMBER 1, 1936, GOVERN-
ING THE IMPORTATION OF FRUITS AND VEGETABLES INTO THE UNITED STATES

(Approved February 24, 1940; effective February 27, 1940)

Under authority conferred by the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912
(37 Stat. 315), as amended, it is ordered that regulation 2 (Sec. 319.56—-2) of
the Rules and Regulations supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 56 (Sec.
819.56), governing the importation of fruits and vegetables into the United
States, as revised effective December 1, 1936, be, and the same is hereby,
amended to read as follows:

REGULATION 2

Sec. 319.56-2. Restrictions on entry of fruits and vegetables.—All importa-
tions of fruits and vegetables must be free from plants or portions of plants,
as defined in regulation 1 (b) (Sec. 319.56-1 (b)).



; *
‘. # z"
La

6 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE — [Jan.—March

Dried, cured, or processed fruits and vegetables (except frozen fruits and
vegetables), including cured figs, and dates, raisins, nuts, and dry beans and
peas, may be imported without permit or other compliance with these regula-
tions: Provided, That any such articles may be made subject to entry only
under permit and on compliance with the safeguards to be prescribed therein,
when it shall be determined by the Secretary of Agriculture that the condition
of drying, curing, or processing to which they have been subjected may not
entirely eliminate risk. Such determination with respect to any such articles
shall become effective after due notice.

Except as restricted, as to certain countries and districts,? by special quaran-
tine and other orders now in force and by such restrictive orders as may here-
after be promulgated, the following fruits may be imported from all countries
under permit and on compliance with these regulations: Bananas, pineapples,
lemons, and sour limes. Grapes of the European or vinifera type and any
vegetable, except aS restricted by special quarantine as indicated above, may be
imported from any country under permit and on compliance with these regula-
tions, at such ports as Shall be authorized in the permits, on presentation of
evidence satisfactory to the United States Department of Agriculture that such
grapes and vegetables are not attacked in the country of origin by injurious
insects, including fruit and melonflies (Trypetidae), or that their importation
from definite areas or districts under approved safeguards prescribed in the
permits can be authorized without risk.

The following additions and exceptions are authorized for the countries
concerned to the fruits and vegetables listed in the preceding paragraph:
Provided, That as to such additions and exceptions, the issuance of permits
may be conditioned on presentation of evidence satisfactory to the United
States Department of Agriculture that such fruits and vegetables are not
attacked in the country of origin by injurious insects, including fruitflies and
melonflies; or that their importation from definite areas or districts under
approved safeguards prescribed in the permits can be authorized without risk.

Frozen or treated fruits and vegetables from ali countries.—Upon compliance
with these regulations and with such conditions aS may be prescribed by the
Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, fruits and vegetables
which have been treated, or are to be treated, under the supervision of a plant
quarantine inspector of the Department, will be permitted entry under permit
at such ports as may be Specified in the permit, when, in the judgment of the
Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, such importation
may be permitted without pest risk.

Commonwealth of Australia—States of Victoria, South Australia, and Tas-
mania.—Upon compliance with these regulations, fruits other than those listed
in the second and third paragraphs of this regulation may be imported from
the States of Victoria, South Australia, and Tasmania under such conditions
and at such ports as may be designated in the permits.

New Zealand—Upon compliance with these regulations, fruits other than
those listed in the second and third paragraphs of this regulation may be
imported from New Zealand under such conditions and at such ports as may
be designated in the permits.

Japan.—Upon compliance with the regulations under Quarantine No. 28
(Sec. 319.28), oranges of the mandarin class, including satsuma and tangerine
varieties, may be imported from. Japan at the port of Seattle and such other
northern ports as may be designated in the permits.

Mezico.—Potatoes may be imported from Mexico upon compliance with the
regulations issued under the order of December 2, 1913 (Secs. 321.1 to 321.8).

Argentina.—Upon compliance with these regulations, fruits other than those
listed in the second and third paragraphs of this regulation may be imported
from Argentina under such conditions and at such ports as may be designated
in the permits.

Chile-—Upon compliance with these regulations, fruits other than those
listed in the second and third paragraphs of this regulation may be imported
from Chile under such conditions and at such ports as may be designated in
the permits.

West Indies.—Upon compliance with these regulations all citrus fruits from
the West Indies may be permitted entry at such ports as may be designated
in the permits.

2See list of current quarantines and other restrictive orders and miscellaneous regula-
tions, obtainable on request from the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.



1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS e

Jamaica.—Entry of pineapples from Jamaica is restricted to the port of
New York or such other northern ports as may be designated in the permits.

Canada, and Newfoundland, including its mainland territory of Labrador.—
Fruits and vegetables grown in the Dominion of Canada and in Newfound-
land,® including its mainland territory of Labrador, may be imported into the
United States from these countries free from any restrictions whatsoever
under these regulations.

General.—In addition to the fruits, the entry of which is provided for in the
preceding paragraphs of this regulation, such specialties as hothouse-grown
fruits and other special fruits, which can be accepted by the United States
Department of Agriculture as free from risk of carrying injurious insects,
including fruitflies (Trypetidae), may be imported under such conditions and
at such ports as may be designated in the permits.

This amendment shall be effective on and after February 27, 1940.

Done at the city of Washington this 24th day of February 1940.

Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of
Agriculture.

[SEAL] H. A. WALLACE,

Secretary of Agriculture.

INSTRUCTIONS TO CoLLECTORS OF CUSTOMS

PLANT QUARANTINE ACT—FRUIT AND VEGETABLE QUARANTINE—MODIFICATION OF
QUARANTINE REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE ENTRY OF FRUITS AND VEGETABLES,
EXCLUSIVE OF PoTATOES, FRoM NEWFOUNDLAND (T. D. 50017)

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,
OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONER OF CUSTOMS,
Washington, March 22, 1940.

To Collectors of Customs and Others Concerned:

The appended copy of Amendment No. 1 to the rules and regulations supple-
mental to Notice of Quarantine No. 56, as revised, effective December 1, 1986
(T. D. 48728), governing the importation of fruits and vegetables into the
United States, is published for the information and guidance of customs officers
and others concerned. This amendment, which became effective February 27,
1940, modifies Regulation 2 by placing the entry of fruits and vegetables from
Newfoundland and its mainland territory of Labrador, with the exception of
potatoes, on the same status as those from Canada, namely, free from any
restrictions whatsoever under Quarantine No. 56.

The number of this Treasury decision should be inserted as a marginal ref-
erence opposite 578 (b) (1) and 579 (a), Customs Regulations of 1937.

By direction of the Commissioner :

W. R. JoHNSON,
Deputy Commissioner of Customs.

{Then follows the text of the amendment. ]

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE
(NO. 48)

JAPANESE BEETLE CONFERENCE TO DISCUSS FUTURE MEASURES

[Press notice]
JANUARY 8, 1940.

A public conference to consider the advisability of withdrawing Federal
quarantine gainst the Japanese beetle and ending Federal cooperation with
the States for the suppression of the beetle, will be held at 10 a. m., February
27, in the auditorium of the United States National Museum, Tenth Street and
Constitution Avenue, Washington, D. C.

*The importation of potatoes into the United States is governed by the regulations
issued under the order of December 22, 1913 (Secs. 321.1 to 321.8).



8 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE = [Jan.—March

The Federal-State suppressive program, begun in 1919, has retarded the
spread of the Japanese beetle, particularly long-distance jumps, through being
earried from one place to another. It cannot, however, stop entirely the
beetle’s spread. The 1989 survey showed an additional spread of the beetle,
especially in New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, West Virginia, Indiana, North
Carolina, and Georgia. Lee A. Strong, Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and
Plant Quarantine, United States Department of Agriculture, has ealled the
February meeting to allow those interested to express their opinions as to
whether the benefits derived from the Federal quarantine and cooperation
are worth the costs.

If the Federal quarantine is withdrawn and Federal cooperation ended, Dr.
Strong points out, States where the Japanese beetle is not yet established may
take any measure they choose to prevent the entry of the beetle.

NOTICE OF CONFERENCE TO DISCUSS THE STATUS OF THE JAPANESE BEETLE
INFESTATION IN THE UNITED STATES

JANUARY 6, 1940.

For the last several years it has been increasingly apparent that the Japanese
beetle is gradually Spreading into hitherto uninfested areas. While the jumps
taken by the insect to points where new centers of infestation would result in
the last several years have not been unduly alarming aS compared with the
progress it had made in previous years, nevertheless every one who has watched
the Japanese beetle situation knows there is a continual expansion of the area
under regulation on account of this insect. The results of the scouting program
for 1939 indicate some additional expansions in a number of the States in
which the Japanese beetle infestation occurs. If the suppressive measures are
to keep pace with the constantly growing area, increased expenditures appear
to be the only answer. The thought of increased expenditures leads to the
question whether the benefits derived from the efforts to prevent the spread of
the Japanese beetle are now worth the price and particularly whether they
justify the greatly increased cost which will be necessary to adequately deal
with the situation in the larger area now involved. It seems advisable to obtain
an expression of public opinion with respect to this situation and before
amending the quarantine to take care of the points found infested during the
past season, a public conference in the city of Washington is being called to
consider the wisdom of the maintenance of the Suppressive program directed
against the Japanese beetle, the benefits derived under that program, the
possible alternative measures that may be taken by the uninfested States for
their own protection if the Federal quarantine were revoked, and the additional
areas that would need to be brought under the Japanese beetle quarantine before
the adult beetle season of 1940 arrives. For this reason a public confer-
ence will be held in Washington, D. C., in the Auditorium of the U. S. National
Museum at 10th Street and Constitution Avenue, NW., beginning at 10 a. m. on
February 27, 1940.

. LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Piant Quarantine.

B. E. P. Q. 499 (Supplement No. 1—Revised).

ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS TO INSPECTORS ON THE TREATMENT OF NURSERY
PRODUCTS, FRUITS, VEGETABLES, AND SOIL, FOR THE JAPANESE BEETLE

Marcu 22, 1940.

Further experiments in the use of methyl bromide fumigation for Japanese
beetle larvae indicate that the temperature in the dosage schedule provided in
circular B. E. P. Q. 499 for fumigation of plants with or without soil may be
lower than the minimum of 63° F. heretofore required, provided there is a
longer period of exposure. The treatment schedules are therefore widened in
this revision of Supplement No. 1, to provide for alternative treatments as
specified below.



1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 9

Circular B. E. P. Q. 499, issued June 9, 1939, is hereby modified by changing
subsection (5) on page 13 of the mimeographed circular to read as follows:

(5) METHYL BROMIDE FUMIGATION

Equipment.—A fumigation chamber, of approved design, equipped with vapor-
izing, air-circulating, and ventilating systems must be provided.

Application.—After the chamber is loaded, the methyl bromide must be
vaporized within it. The air within the chamber must be kept in circulation
during the period of fumigation. At the completion of the treatment, the
chamber must be well ventilated before it is entered and the plants removed.
The ventilating system should also be in continuous operation during the entire
period of removal of the fumigated articles.

(1) FUMIGATION OF PLANTS, WITH OR WITHOUT SOIL

Temperatures and periods of treatment.—The temperature of the soil (with
bare root stock, the root Spaces) and air must be at least:

1. 63° F. for an exposure period of 2% hours, or
2. 54° F. for an exposure period of 4 hours, or
3. 50° F. for an exposure period of 4% hours.

Dosage.—Two and one-half pounds of methyl bromide per 1,000 cubic feet,
including the space occupied by the load.

Preparation of plants—The treatment is to be applied only to plants with
bare roots or in 12-inch pots, or smaller, or in soil balls not larger than 12 inches
in diameter nor thicker than 12 inches when not spherical. The soil should
not be puddled or saturated. With wet material, drying for a period of 12
hours is advisable before treatment. The plants should be stacked on racks or
separated so that the gas can have access to both top and bottom surfaces of
pots or soil balls. While not essential that the balls be completely separated
from each other, they should not be jammed tightly together.

Varieties of plants.—The list of plants, including greenhouse, perennial, and
nursery Stock types treated experimentally is subject to continual expansion
and, moreover, is too great to include in these instructions. Such a list, inelud-
ing also those which have been injured by the treatment, will be supplied on
request.

The schedule for the fumigation of strawberry plants as specified on page
14 of circular B. E. P. Q. 499 remains the same as heretofore.

This supplement supersedes Supplement No. 1, dated November 4, 1939.

(See. 301.48a, issued under See. 301.48)

AVERY S. Hoyt,

Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Piant Quarantine.

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO PUERTO RICAN FRUIT AND
VEGETABLE QUARANTINE (NO. 58)

B. E. P. Q. 505.

ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS—THE SHIPMENT OF ORANGES AND GRAPEFRUIT
FROM PUERTO RICO TO THE MAINLAND SUBJECT TO TREATMENT UNDER
SUPERVISION IS AUTHORIZED

JANUARY 4, 1940.

Investigations in treating fruit for the fruitfly Anastrepha suspensa Loew
have demonstrated that the holding of the fruits at certain prescribed tem-
peratures for certain periods will kill all stages of this insect.

The interstate shipment, subject to one of the following prescribed treat-
ments, is therefore authorized for Puerto Rican oranges and grapefruit other-
wise ineligible for the usual certification given under the provisions of Quar-
antine No. 58 (Sec. 301.58).

229841—40——_2



10 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-March

1. HEAT TREATMENT

Heating the fruit with air at 100 percent relative humidity for a period of
not less than 16 hours during which time the temperature at the approximate
centers of the fruits shall be raised to 110° F. or above and maintained at
110° F. or above for the last 8 hours of such treatment.

2. COLD TREATMENT

Cooling until the approximate centers of the fruits reach a temperature of
34° F. or below and holding the fruits so that the inside temperature does
not exceed 34° F. for a period of 15 days.

Hither the heat treatment or the cold treatment may be employed at the
shipper’s option and at his expense provided that adequate facilities are avail-
able and arrangements for supervision can be made. Information on the
application of the prescribed treatments may be had on application to the
Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

While injury to the fruits is not expected to result from either treatment,
no liability shall be attached to the United States Department of Agriculture
on account of any claim of damage to such fruits attributed to either treatment.

On and after January 15, 1940, certification for shipment to mainland desti-
nations under Quarantine No. 58 (Sec. 301.58) will be given to Puerto Rican
oranges and grapefruit which have been subjected to either of the above-pre-
scribed treatments carried out under supervision of a plant quarantine in-
spector of the United States Department of Agriculture at a treating plant
approved for the purpose. (Sec. 301.58-3a, issued under Sec. 301.58-3).

. Lee A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

B. E. P. Q. 506.

SUGGESTIONS ON TREATING CITRUS FRUITS BY METHODS PRESCRIBED IN
CIRCULAR B. E. P. Q. 505

JANUARY 4, 1940.
Circular B. HE. P. Q. 505, which provides for the shipment of oranges and
grapefruit from Puerto Rico to the mainland on the basis of heat or cold
treatments, makes no specifications as to methods or equipment required.

1. HEAT TREATMENT

Available information with respect to the high-temperature treatment clearly
indicates that by the application of dry heat the required temperatures cannot
be reached without injury to the fruit. Experience has also shown that tem-
peratures much above 110° EF. may have injurious effect on the fruit. It is
important therefore that the temperature be held very close to 110° EF. and
that it at no time exceeds 112° F.

In successful treatments live steam as the source of heat was applied in
such a manner as to secure a uniform distribution of steam-heated air intro-
duced into the treating chamber so that it did not discharge directly on the
fruit. Uniform and gradual heating of the fruit to the required temperatures
was found necessary for the best results. A good method is to increase the
air temperature with the fruit temperature, gradually raising it to 110° F. as
the fruit temperature rises. In treating rooms properly equipped and operated
commercial quantities of fruit can be heated to the prescribed temperature of
110° F. in not more than 8 hours, and this fruit temperature maintained for
the required period by using air at a temperature not exceeding 110° F. and
at a relative humidity of 100 percent.

After treatment the fruit should be well cooled before being packed. If fruit
is to be colored by the use of gas, this should be done prior to treatment. Wax
or paraffin should not be used on fruit either before or after treatment.

2. COLD TREATMENT

In successful treatments employing low temperature, experience has shown
that satisfactory cooling can be accomplished in cold-storage chambers only



1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS ti

when the chambers are provided with adequate refrigeration and positive, uni-
form circulation of the refrigerated air. In cold-storage rooms properly
equipped and operated it is possible to cool the fruit to the required temper-
ature and maintain this temperature with variations of 2° F. or less.

Attention is called to the fact that Puerto Rican fruits certified for ship-
ment to the mainland under the provisions of circular B. E. P. Q. 505 are
treated under supervision of a plant quarantine inspector of the Department
of Agiculture in plants approved for the purpose by the Bureau of Entomology
and Plant Quarantine.

LeEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE
QUARANTINE (NO. 72)

B. E. P. Q. 485, Fourth Revision.*

ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS—REMOVAL OF WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE CER-
TIFICATION REQUIREMENTS FOR A LIMITED PERIOD, FOR POTATOES AND
SWEETPOTATOES CONSIGNED FROM AREAS REGULATED UNDER QUARANTINE
NO. 72

[Approved February 2, 1940; effective February 6, 1940]

Circular B. E. P. Q. 485, as revised July 28, 1939, waived certification require-
ments until February 1, 1940, for specified articles consigned from certain parts
of the areas regulated under quarantine No. 72. The present revision exempts
from certification soil-free potatoes until May 1, 1940, and soil-free sweetpotatoes
until June 1, 1940, consigned from any part of the regulated areas,

The restrictions on soil, earth, sand, clay, peat, compost, and manure remain
in effect throughout the year when shipped interstate from any part of the
regulated areas.

Under authorization provided in Notice of Quarantine No. 72 (Sec. 301.72),
all certification requirements are hereby waived until May 1, 1940, on potatoes,
and until June 1, 1940, on sweetpotatoes when such products are free from
Soil, and are consigned interstate from any part of the regulated areas, it
having been determined that sanitary measures and natural conditions have
so reduced the risk of contamination with any stage of the white-fringed beetle
a vane certification of the above products unnecesSary during the periods
stated.

No modifications are made by this revision in the certification requirements
on the interstate movement, throughout the year, of other articles designated in
paragraph (a) of Regulation 3 (Sec. 301.72-3), namely: Soil, earth, sand,
clay, peat, compost, and manure, whether moved independent of, or in connec-
tion with or attached to nursery stock, plants, products, articles, or things.

(Sec. 301.72a, issued under Sec. 301.72.)

AVERY S. Hoyt,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS

Post OrricE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, February 12, 1940.
Postmaster:

My Dear Sir: Attention is invited to the inclosed administrative instructions
(B. E. P. Q. 485, Fourth Revision), issued by the Bureau of Entomology and
Plant Quarantine, United States Department of Agriculture, in connection with
Federal Quarantine Order No. 72, on account of the white-fringed beetle.

Postmasters in the quarantined areas will please be governed accordingly.
See paragraph 1, section 595, Postal Laws and Regulations.

Very truly yours,
RAMSEY S. Brack,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.



« Supersedes revision of July 28, 1939.



12 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.—March

B. E. P. Q. 503 Revised. ;

ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS—MODIFYING THE RESTRICTIONS OF THE WHITE-
FRINGED BEETLE QUARANTINE BY AUTHORIZING TREATMENT BY METHYL
BROMIDE SOLUTION OF BALLED NURSERY STOCK OF SPECIFIED THICKNESS

Marcu 15, 1940.
INTRODUCTORY NOTE

The instructions in circular B. E. P. Q. 503 issued on November 21, 1939,
provided for treatment of nursery stock by a solution of methyl bromide for
larvae of the white-fringed beetle and limited the treatment to balled and bur-
lapped nursery stock with soil balls not larger than 6 inches in diameter, and
provided for an exposure of 24 hours at temperatures of 70° or above. As a
result of more recent investigations, the instructions are now revised to pro-
vide that soil balls 7 inches in diameter may be so exposed for 8 hours at a-
minimum temperature of 65°. The modification is restricted, however, to
treatment for larvae of the more common species of the beetle, Pantomorus
leucoloma Boh., and does not apply to such treatment for the new species,
P. peregrinus Buch., known to exist at present at Gulfport and certain other
points in Mississippi. The former specifications remain in effect for treat-
ment of larvae of that species and are brought forward in the instructions
which follow. :

TREATMENT AUTHORIZED

Under the provisions of Regulation 5 (a) (See. 301.72-5) supplemental to
Notice of Quarantine No. 72 (Sec. 301.72), the Chief of the Bureau of Ento-
mology and Plant Quarantine hereby authorizes as a prerequisite to certifica-
tion, the following method of treatment for balled plants, when carried out
under the supervision of an authorized inspector of the United States Depart-
ment of Agriculture.

TYPE OF MATERIAL AUTHORIZED

For the more common species, P. leucoloma.—The treatment shall be applied
only to plants in soil balls not greater than 7 inches in diameter nor greater
than 7 inches in thickness when not spherical.

For the new species, P. peregrinus.—The treatment shall be applied only to
plants in soil balls not greater than 6 inches in diameter nor greater than 6
inches in thickness when not spherical.

TREATMENT MeEtrHop
FOR BOTH SPECIES OF WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE

(a) The soil balls around the roots of plants must be buried in sand and
plunged in boxes or trays approximately one foot deep, which are watertight.

(b) A 2-inch space filled with sand shall be provided between the soil balls,
also above and beneath them.

(c) Such soil balls shall be treated with a solution of methyl bromide and
alcohol at a concentration of 0.3 percent methyl bromide and 0.6 percent de-
natured ethyl alcohol by volume in water. The solution is to be prepared by
first mixing the methyl bromide and alcohol together and then adding this
mixture to the water and mixing thoroughly.

(d) The aqueous solution of methyl bromide and alcohol shall then be ap-
plied evenly over the surface of the sand around the plants at the rate of 40
gallons per 100 square feet of surface area by means of a sprinkling can or
sprayer.

EXPOSURE AND TEMPERATURE FOR THH MORE COMMON SPECIES (P. LEUCOLOMA)

(e) After the required dosage has been applied, the soil balls shall remain
embedded in the sand for a period of 8 hours.

(f) The temperature of the soil balls during the treatment shall not be
lower than 65° F.

- EXPOSURE AND TEMPERATURE FOR THE NEW SPECIES (P. PEREGRINUS)

(g) After the required dosage has been applied, the soil balls shall remain
embedded in the sand for a period of 24 hours.

(hn) The temperature of the soil balls during the treatment shall not be
lower than 70° F. .



1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 13

DISCLAIMER

There has been no opportunity to test this treatment on many varieties of
plants, and it is understood that no liability shall attach either to the United
States Department of Agriculture or its employees in the event of injury to
either plants or operators.

CAUTION

Methyl bromide is a gas at ordinary temperatures. It is colorless and prac-
tically odorless, and in preparing the solution the operator should wear an
approved gas mask. (Sec. 301.72-5c, issued under Sec. 301.72-5. )

This revision supersedes circular B. E. P. Q. 5C3 dated November 21, 1939.

AVERY S. Hoyt,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

TERMINAL INSPECTION OF PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS

CHANGE OF PLANT INSPECTION PLACE IN ARIZONA

THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, March 28, 1940.
Postmasters are informed that facilities for the inspection of plants and
plant products at San Simon, Ariz., have been discontinued and a new inspec-
tion place established in lieu thereof at Bowie, Ariz., where inspection will be
made upon call. See section 596, Postal Laws and Regulations, and article 62
(b), page 20 of the July 1939 Postal Guide, Part I.
RAMSEY S. BLACK,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.

MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS

B. E. P. Q. 507. (Supersedes P. Q. C. A. 305, Revised)

SEC. 352.9. ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS; CITRUS FRUIT FROM MEXICO IN
TRANSIT TO FOREIGN COUNTRIES VIA THE UNITED STATES

JANUARY 24, 1940.

Citrus fruit as referred to herein is defined as all citrus fruit other than
lemons and sour limes.

To prevent the entry into the United States of an injurious insect known as
the Mexican fruit fly (Anastrepha ludens Loew) the importation from Mexico
of citrus fruit, except lemons and sour limes, for consumption in the United
States is not authorized under Quarantine No. 56 (Sec. 319.56), its governing
quarantine, unless so treated as to eliminate pest risk.

However, in accordance with the Plant Safeguard Regulations (Secs. 352.2
to 352.8), which provide for the entry of prohibited commodities for immediate
transportation and exportation in bond or for immediate export when such
movement can be made without risk to the plant cultures of the United States,
Mexican citrus fruit is authorized to enter for either of these purposes as fol-
lows:

A. Entry via ports on the Mexican Border.—1. Permits.—Permits shall be
procured in advance of shipment from the Bureau of Entomology and Plant
Quarantine, Washington, D. C., by the forwarding agent or other representative
of the consignee or consignor in the United States. Application for permits
shall indicate the proposed routing of the shipment. Separate permits shall be
procured for each port of entry and for each country of destination but permits
as issued will be continuing for shipments over the approved routes designated
therein.

2. Origin of citrus fruit—Entry is limited to citrus fruit produced in and
shipped from the State of Sonora, Mexico.

3. Authorized ports of entry.—Nogales and Naco, Ariz.

4, Period of entry.—Entry is authorized throughout the entire year.



14 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE — [Jan.—March

5. Notice of arrival.—Prior to entry, a notice of arrival shall be submitted
to the Collector of Customs at the port of entry in duplicate on a form pro-
vided for that purpose giving the initials and number of the railroad car, and
the authorized routing.

6. Inspection—Each shipment shall be subject to inspection at the port of
entry to determine the nature of the contents and freedom from pests.

7. Disinfection—Each car shall be subject to such disinfection at the port
of entry as the plant quarantine inspector shall require.

8. Authorized bonded rail movement.—All shipments shall move in refriger-
ator cars from Sonora through Nogales or Naco, Ariz., by direct authorized
rail routing in bond under customs seal without diversion from the port of
entry to the port of exit as follows:

To Canada: Movement is limited to direct eastward rail routing to El Paso
thence to Canada by any direct rail route which does not pass west of the
direct rail routes through Salt Lake City, Utah, and Portland, Oreg., or south-
east of the direct rail routes through San Antonio, Tex., and St. Louis, Mo.
(See accompanying map.)

To Mexico: Movement for return to Mexico is limited to direct eastward
rail routing for export through border ports between and including Nogales
and El Paso.

9. Cleaning of cars prior to return to the United States—Carg conveying
Mexican citrus fruit through the United States to Canada or Mexico shall
be carefully swept and freed of all fruit, aS well as boxes and other rubbish,
by the railroad company involved prior to reentry into the United States.

B. Entry via North Atlantic Ports—Conditions as in A-1l (Permits), 5
(Notice of arrival), 6 (Inspection), 9 (Cleaning of cars prior to return to the
United States), and in addition as follows:

1. Origin of citrus fruit.—Citrus fruit produced in any part of Mexico.

2. Authorized ports of entry.—New York and Boston and such other northern
ports as may later be approved.

3. Period of entry.—Entry is authorized only during the period October 15 to
March 15.

4. Authorized routing.—All shipments shall move by water direct to New
York or Boston or to such northern ports as may later be approved for im-
mediate direct export or for immediate transportation and exportation in
bond by direct approved rail route to Canada.

(Sec. 852.9, issued under Secs. 352.2-352.8)

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.



Ficurn 1.—Direct rail routing from Sonora, Mexico, via Nogales or Naco to El Paso,
thence to Canada, by any railroad within the unshaded area.



1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 15

B. E. P. Q. 508 (Supersedes B. E. P. Q. 461).
PRESENT STATUS OF CIRCULARS OF THIS (B. E. P. Q.) SERIES

MArcH 18, 1940.

Circulars containing information as to Federal plant quarantines have been
issued from time to time since January 18, 1915, in-a numbered Series desig-
re rewnrenzes » HH. Bb.” “P. Q..C.. A.,” “B. P. @:,” and “B. B..P: Qy.
These designations referred to the Federal Horticultural Board, Plant Quaran-
tine and Control Administration, Bureau of Plant Quarantine, and Bureau of
Entomology and Plant Quarantine, respectively.

Many of the circulars contained information or instructions of transitory
importance only; others were superseded by later circulars; in many instances
changes in, or revocation of, quarantines have rendered the circulars of interest
only as a record of Bureau activities; while in still other instances, changes
in procedure, techinque, or other conditions have made them obsolete insofar
as present practice is concerned.

Circular B. E. P. Q. 461, of August 31, 1937, gave a list of the circulars which
had been issued up to that date, with information as to which were valid and
which were obsolete. Circular B. E. P. Q. 508 brings that material forward,
with such changes as are necessitated by subsequent quarantine action, or in-
struction, and gives a list of the circulars issued to date with information as to
the present validity of each.

A circular may be herein indicated as obsolete insofar as its present status
is concerned, although it may contain informative material that is still useful.
For that reason, inspectors and others will wish to place the obsolete circulars in
an inactive.-file, available for reference if occasion arises.

Avery S. Hoyt,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

LEGEND
Column 1:
D—Indicates that the circular was issued in connection with domestic
plant quarantine work.
F—Indicates that the circular was issued in connection with foreign plant
quarantine work.
Column 2:
R—Following the number of a circular, this symbol indicates the circular
has been revised; the latest revised edition only should be consulted.
Column 3:
Act—Plant Quarantine Act of 1912.
Adm.—Administrative.
C. R.—Cotton regulations.
D. P. R.—Domestic potato regulations,
EH. C.—Export certification.
M. B. R.—Mexican border regulations.
N. 8. R.—Nursery stock regulations.
P. L. & R.—Postal laws and regulations.
P. R.—Potato regulations.
P. S. R.—Plant safeguard regulations.
Q. 5, Q. 14, ete.—Notice of Plant Quarantine No. 5, No. 14, ete.

F or ao. Issued in connec- Status



tion with— Remarks
Pea er eles. 5. oon CUE ee een ae Obsolete.-_| Of transitory importance. (See current
ee Regulations and quarantine No.

fs

F Bp eee ee eee ah N.S. R._----------|---do___.-._| Of importance only as a record of Bureau
activity; quarantine No. 37 superseded

regulations referred to.
F GRAS foe Se a Py OR. 2. ie eee A025 Of transitory importance. (See current

Potato Regulations.)

F PRA es IN Ss kb a Sal. 1. ree Of importance only as a record of Bureau

activity; quarantines Nos. 20 and 37 pro-
mulgated subsequently.

F EME Hee. ao Pipe mene ak. = eee = Cis age Of transitory importance. (See current
Potato Regulations.)



16

BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

[Jan.—Marech



Ont i So Soy y | o

PP ff af fa hf Pf af af af Pal a CY jf fy

ber rx Fy Fy}

hy

Â¥
Â¥



olde fete} fh det ttf ff
Diniwtd bitty bitty mtd biibbbty by bbb bibibd bd

H.

HH i
wD

PoE
WR RBG Wome vy

pbb
BOO

oo

B.

2B:

H
SB:

ROS See eee

Issued in connec-

tion with— Remarks



Status |



No. |
| Obsolete __ Pomesac potato regulations lifted Sept. 1

Of importance only as a record of Bureau
activity.

“I
t
'
'
'
{
'
'
'
'
'
'
___—
1
'
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RU eee Atet eee Fee do====— Of transitory importance. (See current
ae Regulations and quarantine No.
le
On ieee QrtES PRs | ado sae Domestic potato quarantines and regula-
tions lifted Sept. 1, 1915
10S(f 22s GigRSe tee sags Se | ae do. Of transitory importance.!
ISP mare ee On Re eee eo ee doe Superseded by H. B. 42.
19= 2p Nees Cs a eee eet alee dos: Of RISO importance.!
2A erties ek | tA Ta ee ee ee dost =e Do.
cee ceee el CepEU se eased) Eee s| eee do.22Fee Sannin by H. B. 26.
Oboe eee CAR epi it Rte | eed Ou eens Supplemented H. B. 25; superseded by
. B. 159.
(300 xe Ras Soke ee Ee does ee Of transitory importance.!
ice are SEES ie ane ew |---do ne ee See current Potato Regulations.
Siler es eee ACE is ee ee oe ee Pee Coe Present practice is a modification.
32 -AO ee Eee! OPER Eee. SAMAR aR ee do “eae. Of transitory importance.!
Aisa ere ae ACERS ee cao eee Of transitory importance; domestic Blister
Rust Quarantine promulgated effective
June 1, 1917.
ADA Sil Sake ERE CRRA ERE SNES oe je edna Superseded H. B. 18; superseded by H. B.
| 164.
43 ease -8 AG ee ee Ey. dove .=4 Of transitory importance.
BA eee ee anes CFR eae ee Sa doi ae Do.!
A Rei See 2S COARSER da hee |e do. 251 See current Cotton Regulations and Plant
| Safeguard Regulations.
AGAR ES ee ES C2 Ree eee S |= 2d0. es Of transitory importance.!
1Oe Se am BCR are Y TS is Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 375 R.
BOERS 2E2. seks Goa en Gk Te do: see Of transitory importance.!
ioe eae Sere | SQ 22 an ee Rtas ae see do: Sa Of value only asa record of Bureau activity.
547 ee ee |), GE eee ee ae [nado ee Of transitory importance.1
rip esa Sana cece gene |___do_______| Supplemented by H. B. 73. (See current
Potato Regulations.)
Ff EE atl Uh Bod tae Sel as |___do_______| Supplemented H. B. 72. (See current
Potato Regulations.)
fA Gee eee ey ER cie Saerem cole oe ee ___do_______| Of transitory importance.!
Yen rere eee Acree ee rename doen Do.
(8-80 Lt a oe eR ete ee eo (Rd Ora | Do.!
SiS ae ees ACES Ser ae Cas Sd Qn Do.
S901 Sel Ce Rae ae ee Ik Oe Do.!
ODM re A VAIN ee ..-do_......| Superseded by instructions not in this
series.
O38 ea tee Se eee |__do_______| Of transitory importance.!
AEN ES Ons OYE SG ae etn eee ___do__.____| Of transitory importance; quarantine No.
38 promulgated effective May 1, 1919.
95-101 ee OCR eee ___do_______| Of transitory importance.!
5) 2 Ba oes | IN eee ee ___do..._____| Of transitory importance. (See quaran-
| tine No. 37).
NOSE are eet OC ah at eee cee eae |___do_..____| Oftransitory importance. 1
104 Se eee [EIN SS Res Bese: >| 4280 Oe Do.
105 SS ee See RQ SS ieee ee ee td ons ia Superseded by P.Q.C. A. 249.
DOG 2 eae Oi aa ___d0_______| Superseded by H. B.132R.
107108 2 Oona ee eee |.--do_......| Superseded by instructions not in this
series.
1OQE Sis eee, OS The See ee __-do_______| Seeregulation 7, quarantine No. 37.
AIOE Se eee Mis Be Ru. =_2*)]/"2 ido =| Superseded by HaBonss
Ae es SETS GRY (etemieel Ae aaa oe 23d0==) Of transitory importance.!
11D Bee Leas | eu Ti= aE SECs uleaieen aera idors bees Superseded H. B. 110; supplemented by
H. B. 118; superseded by instructions not
in this series.
SL pe ee Sh ees Ee SG 0e2 ae Of transitory importance.!
HAS en eee ORS (het as eee Sd one eat See Plant Safeguard Regulations.
AN fie ee ss Se |} QS i aeee os ec eee ee Ge Ae See current revision of quarantine No. 37.
TA Fice SOEs He Osi eae RE eae Of importance only as a record of formation
of Bureau policy; superseded by instruc-
foes eh in this series (See quarantine
; No. 37.
TS Sees i ae Mi Bayh sae ae Validi se Supplemented. H. B. 112; as far as fee is
concerned, H. B. 118 is valid.
119) A RUSE ae ne a Obsolete__| Of transitory importance.!
(00! ee (Lie een ane, Se Superseded by P. Q. C. A. 309.

1 Certain of the earlier H. B.’s issued in connection with the Cotton Regulations were modified or super
seded by the several amendments to the Cotton Regulations which went into effect July 1, 1915, and by
the revisions of the Cotton Regulations effective Feb. 1, 1916, and Aug. 1, 1917, and the amendments thereto;

also by the current Cotton Regulations effective Feb. 24, 1923, as amended.

A number of H. B.’s were

superseded or supplemented by other circulars which were later amended or invalidated. Therefore,

insofar as they remain in effect, Cotton H.

B.’s included in H. B.’s 10 to 163, inclusive, unless otherwise

stated, are absorbed and superseded by the current Cotton Regulations, and are shown herein as “‘of tran-
sitory importance.”’



1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 17

F or :
D No.
F Pre oiiit 2 s.
F ee. 1a TA: f
F Hees Toa} ee i! t
F EI shel one. Foaie? (00512.
F eee? 125-126-222
F Pees S107 te eee 8
F Epi OR ee teh |
F mp 120S 1. 43. 2)
F Pepa Lois
F HS Badoge st tt 7
F epee 3. e) 3!
F eb sas ane} t4 §
F eB eishe Fb. vi!
F He Be tap Gee +e 2.
F EPVB aS 7-138 ei
F eB Ase EY
D IE Bela. ee hd
F PAB
F ea 4g ee, tit
F eat Asy Lae Su
F PSR Agee et
F Hess ape ts Fe
F Pe 146s
F bre 147-93. 35-42 |
D eee plage eek
F H. B 149-150________
F Ebest tae se tt |
F eB 152-154. __ 2) |
F eee pe.
F BH. Bi id6-157_.-t__)_ =
F Les ee ee ee
F He 4s ABO RS) 2 es.
F FET ES ply ehcp ss
F bey S16 Te (AR) pes once ces

Wa I 2 0 2 7
F ey elo) tay 8.
F TEP EAL G4 oe Sieg sd
F GB 365-1664 2.2 - =.
D Hee Bs 1G(2 2-8.
F Tees ES eh Ri ae PS os
F its top.
F Heb. res. 21. <4!
F ie eel ile oe oF Oe
F 160 4 534072 Sel
F isfy hele
D Riese A mete
D per alge 2s. 2s
F inate slgoe ee. b.. 8

a ap tEy taco ee!
D em el eee ks
D eo. 22 et
D pes e080 ss.0 305 e
Ge eteettet s)he
D lef i) ee ae
F PT IRA es

1 See footnote p. 16.
229841—40—~— 4









Issued in connec-
fon witht Status Remarks
OR elds Valid 22 | Supplemented by H. B. 191 (subject to
| revision).

GiwRigetl 5. Obsolete__| Of transitory importance.!

pater mtercy 1 f- - -| OR ap. = Of transitory importance; see current
quarantine No. 37.

Ore NO EE. | 8 dQ; eae Superseded by H. B. 127.

Sepals Gi. nos | DE do. 22 | Of transitory importance.!

ake y UF | 3 do. == eae aed H. B. 124; superseded by H. B.
176.

(PRS ek SN P=. | OS do... === Of transitory importance. (See current
revision quarantine No. 37.)

COPS R gt ie. - G0. .2=83= Of transitory importance.!

ORs eee Ye ed 8 ao.! Saas Do.

GPa PET 80) Te do__-3 Superseded H.'B. 106; superseded by B. E.
Pe Q.7369:

(Pee INS 2s nots do: == See regulation 7, quarantine No. 37.

CS EEE 2 Sido ies Notice of shipment is filed with notice of
arrival.

Aer eere we Ao. se Of transitory importance.!

Qs ioGke =! Valid ___-__ (Subject to revision.)

Og wey ts. s Obsolete __| Of transitory importance.

Ore see te edo eee Of transitory importance; see H. B. 155.

(RABE ie. es do -ek~ Of transitory importance.

MMos Ve be... - Sudo. 2=2- See current U.S. Official Postal Guide.

igi Abel ado =e Of transitory importance.!

Owayes 1 IMIG O_ teat, Do.

5S oa oe Sdo0-i-2-=-. See current revision quarantines Nos. 37
and 56.

Oasis kL =O: eee Of transitory importance.

GeRSIg tire 2... ido. 22: >t

OG Id 0. Bea Superseded by P. Q. C. A. 305.

Op aee SEs tae 23400 Bees Of importance only as a record of Bureau
activity.

Qed iaamee tt Pe OO: s Of transitory importance.

MAGS itis 2. ..-do_..--..| Superseded by H. B. 160, P. Q. C. A.’s 301
302, 303, 315. :

eateries | GO Mey Of transitory importance.

Ne eeet ote SAO ee of transitory importance; superseded H.B.

CVA Teen 3 OE Ona Supe.seded by current practices;

eres 3 | OE gee Of transitory importance.

C. R., P. L, & R_.|---do___.--.| Superseded H. B. 26. (See current U. S.

Official Postal Guide.)
Dg Cs es ec doses Superseded H. B. 151 in part; supplemented

by P. Q. C. A. 296; superseded by P. Q.
Cs An327-

Cy Atimeert 3032: Nl (0 (oe eae Superseded by P. Q. C. A. 309; B. E. P. Q.
474.

Sao Remriesee a fa COs. Of transitory importance.

MO Ai Reais) Fah) + Lee ge| tive GO tere Do.

(Cipepin eT Valid=.... Superseded H. B. 42; formally superseded

by P. Q. C. A. 309, but pending revision
of the latter H. B. 164 is valid.

On Siyereneyty Obsolete__| See current revision Form EQ-207.

ange dos... =. . Superseded by H. B. 178.

Orttrss aeD seb do tes See current quarantine No. 41.

17) 0 te ee We = got. Superseded by P. Q. C. A. 327.

GghGstawerte i Walid. - See current quarantine No. 56.

MOrrbGY er =f. Obsolete-- Do.

aie ae | dots See current quarantine No. 41.

Q. 37__------------|-,-do_-..---| Superseded by instructions not contained
in this series.

Csi iyi geet lee do.....--| Supplemented by H. B.’s 179, 182; super-
seded by P. Q. C. A. 334.

UC ipaieme es | ahs dozza Superseded by P. Q. C. A. 292.

Cr sere. dE oh Moze252 -| Superseded H. B. 127; supplemented by

H. B.’s 184, 186; revised under same
number, 1925, 1926, 1927, 1928, and 1929;
superseded by B. E. P. Q. 460.

GUA. Bevee $e dona Of value only asa record of Bureau activity.

OnAtpere rs bate doles. = Superseded H. B. 167; supplemented by
H. B. 180; superseded by P. Q. C. A 220.

DAG acest ye - -do.......| Supplemented H. B. 174; supplemented by
H. B. 182; superseded by P. Q. C. A. 334.

Ras Ae eg ost ee lia dol... Supplemented H. B. 178; superseded by
P,Q. GA; 220.

Qvale: 11... aie aga 2. See current quarantine No. 41.

Oi, Ab. 8-558. See dae. Supplemented H. B.’s 174, 179; superseded

’ ; by. P,Q. C: A. 334.
GQaBie—. geet ke Walid... Subject to revision.



18



ky
Pe BY DOU YB 8 DO Oe ot ett mt Otel bl tafbattattatbattas tality ey aftr | 33





















BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.—Mareh
No. Issued. Re Status Remarks

FRB see ee Cie ee Obsolete__| Supplemented H. B. 176; superseded by
1925 revision of H. B. 176.

ESB Sal Sb waa eke ONS Teas eased el. doses: Supplemented by H. B. 187.

BLS Gee. eee Creo eel a ECE d= Supplemented H. B.’s 176, 184; superseded
by 1925 revision of H. B. 176.

He B. 18% sees Osiae or ayer ot 8 Walidiaees Been H. B. 185 (subject to re-
vision).

EPR el Seas eee: eee ORS (ae ee ee Obsolete_-} See current revision quarantine No. 37.

Eg 189. ee nea BC eee eo ae Openers Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 366.

eSB pL G0 tees eene ORS Teese tes diets: Of value only as record of Bureau activity.

sD aoLOlees eee CTA aa ake ee oS Validze== Pep euenes H. B. 121; (subject to re
vision).

He Bl O2 se ieee AF © eas ee ee Obsolete__| Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 428.

ERB E93 Seis ora OS | see ae Oe ea dole Superseded by B. E. P. Q.’s 412, 482.

Te Bal 4 oe ease eet ORS (aa ae ois aS do__--_-_| Superseded by P. Q. C. A. 308.

TB 195 ae a (VRS Ge = ates gee emerge | ee do Fx Sa Superseded by B. E. P. Q.’s 412, 482.

Tee Bee Gee ares eneeacee @QS5G aie eee do__.---| Of transitory importance.

ERB 197s es ees QS sees Fs a do Bees: Supplemented by H. B. 207; superseded by
Bey SPOS 4125482)

ERM OS ee eee OS Y (ee a Leanne: | BE do_..._-| Of transitory importance; superseded by
BY EPA Os l2s Ago

EB 109 one eee Bon Cale eS ae ee Co Superseded by P. Q. C. A. 304.

ee B20 Ome aaeene eee QO Zee ee Oa See do ===" Superseded by H. B. 203; quarantine Nc
62 lifted effective Apr. 1, 1935.

EB 20 eens ai ere (CE Sy fae tee tent oe Orme gee Gowers an Superseded by P. Q. C. A. 285.

eeB 202.520 ea eee Ons (epee ee er ees dos Superseded by B. E. P. Q.’s 412, 482.

EB 203s eee Qi G25 Bike Bee do wees Superseded H. B. 200; quarantine No. 62
lifted effective Apr. 1, 1935.

eg 204 eee Oxo 62h es | ee OBE Superseded by H. B. 206.

Ee B20 bee ee Qo ORE eae ERG Ome Pup cuented by H. B. 208; superseded by

eB, 206Re ete QaS TOL Ee = esas [eee dows Lee of pramsitory. importance; superseded H. B.

HS Bete ee ees Qe ware kar Oe 8 | ee domeer=: Supplemented H. B. 197; superseded by
B. E. P. Q. 412.

He Bs 2085 ee ee Qa G ee ere ae | ae doses: Supple ened H. B. 205; superseded by

TB 201 aaa ee QS cas ete a aca doe Of transitory importance.

Hs Ba2lO esse eeu QRS ee cede) eae domes Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 412.

Ele IB 2 1 Se eee rene EC eine te RS ENE dosese. Superseded by P. Q. C. A. 284.

Be 21.2 ee See REC eae ae doses Superseded by B. P. Q. 351.

eae 21S emer eleernees OP Bie se eae ee donee Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 412.

PaaS 2A eee PS a a Viner does See departmental regulations par. 1547.

Hi Bao bee aaa es QR Ge ee as Te do==—— Superseded H. B.’s 205, 208; superseded by
BAO wAg2aIr

He BO Ghee eae @igbO eeee see se ae Seas dose Of transitory importance; see current quar-
antine No. 56.

POO x: Ace2 Uta OGD eats See oe do____-.| Superseded by B. P. Q. 337.

BQ © As 2189 GR) Bi @ aS (mennnees ee |eee do__.-_.| Superseded by P. Q. C. A. 278.

PONG HAR2IO= Qe Gs sarees Car ee doles See current revision quarantine No. 63.

PaO aC. AG220 ae QAR rss Ss hee se do__.--.| Superseded H. B.’s 178, 180. (See current
revision quarantine No. 48.)

POs C. cAq22 1b ee OuG6sta wae"? anaes doses es Quer anue No. 66 lifted effective Mar. 1,

IP QMIC seAN e222 eens ORs ee ee a dost x. See current revision Form EQ -208.

IPO OC pAy 223 eaane OU fe ps aie eeteiele apie domesses Superseded by B. E. P. Q.’s 412, 482.

PS QC AC 224 @M4SaGGane. fae see dows sas: Supplemented by P. Q. C. A.’s 239, 265,
293, 307, 322, 333; B. P. Q. 339; superseded
by BeeRe@r359

SOC aA te2 25ers 52 OMG Sees ee es | aes d0s2 452 Of value as record only, quarantine No. 68
lifted effective Nov. 15, 1930.

Bi QC VAT 226-208) 8 @jgGSeret se | a dose Ouarenting No. 68 lifted effective Nov. 15,
1930.

POG BACT 229 swt oat QO Suna Se Ss || eee dose 228 Supplemented by P. Q. C. A. 240; quaran-

tine No. 68 lifted effective Nov. 15, 1930.

RaQ) CvArg230=23 2 On OSs be ee alee 0s aee Quatantine No. 68 lifted effective Nov. 15,
1930.

124 (Oe Os AY AR ss Qe68ev ses 2 Sees Ue donee. Supplemented by P. Q. C. A. 238; quaran-

: tine No. 68 lifted effective Nov. 15, 1930.

Pein GA -1234—23/7-21 OG Smet si ee dos Quarancie No. 68 lifted effective Nov. 15,
1930.

IPO CapAy 238i QAaGSeiea nen 2. 2.2.) me doses Supplemented P. Q. C. A. 233; quarantine
No. 68 lifted effective Noy. 15, 1930.

IPA Qin© wAC 289208 2h @ SAS NGGtese = oe. | ae do_...__-| Supplemented P. Q. C. A. 224; supple-
mented by B. P. Q. 339; superseded by*
Bee Qk ooo:

4 QC PAY, (240) 2 Oe GS aera | do Supplemented P. Q. C. A. 229: quarantine
No. 68 lifted effective Nov. 15, 1930.

IPAQ WO pA ose eae OSGi ee do 22. Rave H. B. 215; superseded by B. P.

PaO ChwAn 242 seams O68 ees | ae dozer Quarantine No. 68 lifted effective Nov. 15,

1930.









1940} SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 19
! I d -
re No. femagE e Status Remarks
eee, Os A SAS O70 ie ee Obsolete _.| Superseded by P. Q. C. A. 269; quarantine
| No. 68 lifted effective Nov. 15, 1930.
i ee. ew aes Ab @ .68-__-_.__----}--- dO... = as No. 68 lifted effective Nov. 15,
DP. Ose. £. AAG... ROGE sIAist .-..|.8 aig... 2a2= Supplemented by P. Q. C. A. 271; quaran-
tine No. 68 lifted effective Nov. 15, 1930.
D PEOW Os An DAG. ON GRE tires ee se do: Explanatory of P. Q. C. A. 246, quarantine
No. 68 lifted effective Nov. 15, 1930.
F E@. ©. As 248) PGi sire tot. le BOS GO) =e Of transitory importance.
MeO 2A, 240) = fe mye Ue = 8. (253 do... Se Gab H. B. 105; superseded by
Pe eee Ate 2o0ss 2511 68.22. - 2 -=--|==2 GO: <. === cae No. 68 lifted effective Nov. 15,
D Peace A eel... EGR oe eee 8 2 do___..__| Supplemented by P. Q. C. A. 256; quaran-
tine No. 68 lifted effective Nov. 15, 1930.
D a Me ao) Cymraeg tS 122 |. Gp: 2 gan Cueraee No. 68 lifted effective Nov. 15,
1930.
Pek 3) ©. AL rob ke 2 CYR GS etre) oe |e GO: S325 Superseded by P. @. C. A. 263; quarantine
No. 68 lifted effective Noy. 15, 1930.
Pr ePO CSA Dba Ch eS ee ee do: Supplemented by P. Q. C. A.’s 261, 262;
superseded by P. Q. C. A. 272; quaran-
tine No. 68 lifted effective Nov. 15, 1930.
De lees OC Anbp:..f GO) Gabe mie 3. =|. ee do. .2==—= Cease No. 68 lifted effective Nov. 15,
: 1930.
D Pa GutG. Ae 2h6t = 22 OM GSS Nt 2 bes. 222 G0. 32 Supplemented P. Q. C. A. 251; quarantine
No. 68 lifted effective Nov. 15, 1930.
Peer. CA. 2h7.. Grete sees tle do_.3 = ere No. 68 lifted effective Nov. 15,
1930.
OMe @ COA 258. Ls IGS eae. 3. GO! ta2-= Supplemented by P. Q. C. A. 266; quaran-
tine No. 68 lifted effective Nov. 15, 1930.
DMPO On As 2595. . ORG ete. 3.2. | 2 we do::#2_- one eaee No. 66 lifted effective Mar. 1,
1930...
De) PAOE Ce VAL 260. 2 COPPA se | doch =: Of transitory importance.
D PaO nee Awol ooo | Qs 68.2... en. doa Supplemented P. Q. C. A. 254; superseded
by P.O. ‘Az 272.
D BIO eC. At 263. 3 2 ONG see afer 8 eee Gorsten:- Superseded P. Q. C. A. 253; superseded by
P,Q. ©. A, 280:
D PAORC PAs lO Gere ee ss dos = Superseded by P. Q. C. A.’s 269, 272.
D PP) MG ARB hoo. 22k ORAS 66S oes shee GO=21=5=- Supplemented P. Q. C. A. 294: supple-
mented by P. Q. C. A. 333; superseded bv
BP: @.359:
D PONG TA SIGGs 22 CMG Ries OF es oles. =. Supplemented P. Q. C. A. 258.
D ew eater 2o8-_) (@s.682.-8 2 | e-e Goss ee Quarantine No. 68 lifted effective iNovem-
ver 15, 1930.
D PPOV CLA, 26985. 5. |S aah ES ee ee 0 (0 ee ee Superseded P. Q. C. A.’s 243, 264; supple-
mented by P. Q. C. A. 272; quarantine
No. 68 lifted effective Nov. 15, 1930.
D Bao Crane 2s02 OMGSee et ee Fe G0 ae Quarantine No. 68 lifted effective Nov. 15,
1930.
D PAO A@e AL glo 22: TCR Games ede EEE 8 gah do__._.--| Supplemented P. Q. C. A. 246; quarantine
No. 68 lifted effective Nov. 15, 1930.
Dyn ee) OnmAeto 7s) @) 68025) = |. (3 (oa Superseded P. Q. C. A.’s 254, 261, 262, 264;
supplemented P. Q. C. A. 269; supple-
mented by P. Q. C. A.’s 273, 279, 280, 282,
286, 288; quarantine No. 68 lifted effective
Nov. 15, 1930.
Pee OG. AS27752 OQ FGSweere Ek HF | GO24s55- Supplemented P. Q. C. A. 272; quarantine
No. 68 lifted effective Nov. 15, 1930.
D Pay Ge Aso 74s. - 2. OAR ep sae dose. Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 394.
D Pe a enew270-276_ || _Q. 68..2.--..-...-_|-=- dose.) Quarantine No. 68 lifted effective Nov. 15,
1930.
F PQ CAR oT Pimper a) tae does: Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 376.
F eNO PAG 78 (Fv) =_|| Q. 372... Walidis!- Superseded P. Q. C. A. 218.
eee At 270. || Qi 682l2 22. Obsolete_.| Supplemented P. Q. C. A. 272; quarantine
No. 68 liffed effective Nov. 15, 1930.
eer Oeker, (ALL I80 ONGS Seets 3 4 fd0Se Superseded P. Q. C. A. 263; supplemented
P. Q. C. A. 272; quarantine No. 68 lifted
effective Nov. 15, 1930.
DYN eer CMALL ORI 252: Qe aioe) ty /Bido 24s... Supplemented by P. Q. C. A.’s 298, 300.
Er ere. AS ORF \ CR GSB sre. _..do_.--...| Supplemented P. Q. C. A. 272; superseded
by P. Q. C. A. 288; quarantine No. 68
lifted effective Nov. 15, 1930.
F PCIe PRS CR) 4) BiG eevee Malidee. ,
F Peery e eee Osi Obsolete_.| Superseded H. B. 211; superseded by B. E.
: | P.O; 410,
F eG. A. 285.2 Ora na ee eee 2) Gepenscner H. B. 201; superseded by P. Q.
», A. 308.
ea. ©, A. 286). 62... Gees) Shae No. 68 lifted effective Nov. 15, 1930.
MP mee GrcAs 287 -_-_ 2 = Gy.Gs 1h? See dos - Quarantine No. 68 lifted effective Nov. 15,

| 1930.



20

BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.—March



For |

D

ae

oO

bY bob Ub Hh uo g Ky Oe ef ey OO oy OW

y boo ob sey

Bo

yoy Oo Oo



ae

wid

Bi:
B.

BED TO aot gu eee ee a Cee Og J) Uma HO Ue TU aS CRON OC OSC. Clee tae

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© LL22 © GOLD

wo

fc

POL OLD © OLG LOO © © OH © OO O OLELO LOD O22 OO ©

eae ve
©



Issued in connec-
No. sore Status Remarks
CeAs 288ee a QryGSies no to Obsolete_.| Supplemented P. Q. C. A. 272; superseded
P. Q. C. A. 282; quarantine No. 68 lifted
E effective Nov. 15, 1930.
OMAR 289 ee eo WO ea teeweycte ce Be does Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 4
CevAN.290—29 fess ON GS meee es ae dott Cueree No. 68 lifted deci Nov. 15,
OAS 292 ese AChE ERE Re aes Validaas== Superseded H. B. 175.
CAG 293 eeeee Qe 4Sewes te Obsolete_-| Supplemented P. Q. C. A.’s 224, 239;
superseded by P. Q. C. A. 322.
COHAN 2040seke 1 Ryser | dose Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 379.
CAS 295i Oa. ACE anaiden tet || ees do. ess Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 410.
CAM OG ween BC 2 tone es ae does eee H. B. 160; superseded by
Dilie
OWA. 297 - ets Ow sie ot ee dos Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 471.
CAV 2908% 35. Ob D ise eee se do2 aaa Supplemented P. Q. C. A. 281.
@ earls 2095 GR) S| bed eae dome Superseded by B. E. E Q. 476.
CeeAe 300 ae ORD D ies beer ts alias Gorse s8 Supplemented P. Q. C. A. 281.
(OL WS BU 1 SG Oya ok Sie | E doz. tobee Superseded H. B. 151, in part; superseded
by B. E.P. Q. 403:
CapAe 302m nee i Opec laa e. Sle do. eas Superseded H. B. 151, in part; superseded
by B. EB. PB. @. 405:
@ApAeys03Emees iy CN eeeees es oh ee Malidiiss Sanomeded H. B., 151, in part.
(Og AAS SU BACs Fees hee Obsolete__| Superseded i ‘B: 199; superseded by
Bs EY Be@e 407.
PASO Sig GE) RO ep eae teetere sea mes dosaaanes Superseded H. B. 147; superseded by
iB. Be By Qe 507.
CRAG (Gener Hye Oe aaah ah Malideaa
CARS 0 (aaaae Qn ASi aaah ce Obsolete _- See Noes Q. C. A. 224; superseded
C@arAn30Seuaee Quis Teme Sree ee Ne d0s eee Superseded H. B.’s 194, 285; superseded
by Be Re @ 734
(Oe Je CMs se Various quaran- |_.-do______- Supplemented by Babee @e47a2
tines.
CAR 310Reees EY SOs Fe eee stare Validaa
CA Siileeeses OPS ls oO oe = Obsolete__}| Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 462.
CAA 312e ee QRiG 2s eer ene d= Of transitory importance; quarantine No.
62 lifted Apr. 1, 1935.
Cele oIge es Oia tapes me |e owas Superseded by B. E.P. Q. 386.
CWAS Si4ie sa aoc @ ube tenga te ce rea hs Jee donee Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 445.
Cre ol bie GHA Oe rate detec | a Goes Superseded H. B. 151, in part; superseded
bDyBe BaP Or 4372
CRASS 16 (Orr 4 Rustin years sare oleae done: Superseded by Department Circular 373.
See B. E. P. Q. 499.
OA Bi (eee | MO) eA Sane lea CR do__..._-| Superseded by B. P. Q. 359.
Or An 3iStees = OS RE ee es ee Oko) Superseded by B. P. Q. 342.
©. Ae s1Qe ees QING 2b tee Ol) ae dot-47 << Superseded by B. P. Q. 337; quarantine
No. 62 lifted Apr. 1, 1935.
©. FAS 320 bebe NOS Sa eauaneids ae canes | eee G0 Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 385.
Ge ALSO ea «26 eB Chee itieree eee oe don: 2-2-2 Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 439.
ChAR 3200 we @adges ote el. | downs. Supplemented P. Q. C. A. 224; superseded
Pe C. A. 293; superseded by ibe.
GrrA+ 30308 7s QigS ieee eae domeeaa Of transitory importance .
OivAL Soden Qs eon mes 0S seid omen Do.
@s AS 32523965 nO) 642 eee Ee dome Do.
Gi Ae 30720 TAO engl pel Se cell Gowen Superseded H. B.’s 160, 169, 296; superseded
by B. E. P. Q.’s 408, 416.
Cr AG 32Re ee Q@ipA See cee cathe Ee GO scuaenee Quarantine No. 48 lifted effective July 15,
OpeAe 300 eee QuiG 4a sean Golan Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 472.
OVA 350=33 1s ON G4 eee ae Go. kes Of transitory importance.
© JAS 339.9 es O60 te ie dove sans Do.
Oe Ay 8302250 8S QN486682253 oe 2. |e does Supplemented P. Q. C. A.’s 224, 265; super-
; seded by B. P. Q. 359.
OayAe 394te eas Oss weev eee a dows! Superseded H. B.’s 174, 179, 182; superseded
by current regulations of quarantine
No. 45.
OETA Ooh maeens JAC hating ds enya cy Valid_____| Legal data re quarantine litigation. d
@P3369-356b. | E On Gouna ne Obsolete__| See summary published with quarantine
No. 63 as revised effective July 1, 1938.
QuS3762 5. es QAGQRe ewe | ae does Superseded P. Q. C. A.’s 217, 319; supple-
. mented by B. P. Q. 353; quarantine No.
62 lifted effective Apr. 1, 1985. |
O33 3 eae Q: G2E eae eae |e Go. eae Supplemented by B. P. Q. 353; quarantine
No. 62 lifted effective Apr. 1, 1935.
O83 9a Q). As CGE ee See Go: 2 8 Supplemented P. Q. C. A.’s 224, 239; super-
seded by B. P. Q. 359.
Ors 4 eases ws Qe ieee oe oa do= == Superseded P. Q. C. A. 249; superseded by

B. E. P. Q. 384.

Brey le ask ener Qi 7 aa Se a es (60) eee ee Superseded P. Q. C. A. 308; see current

revision Form EQ -208.





1940]
F or Issued in connec-

D No. tion with— Status
ap Pe. BAS): G52) ws epsclee :
tee Pte oda. QMGiat "| edo Be
Heeb. es Os oss oe Cat a eee | + LN
Deri: bee Oe dAbaec- -.2- Papa aoe WS 2. ae do 3a=—
D Bese. p40" 2 is A Chet c=eere ke 3. ae do
emis ie. @, o4i 2 —-- Ree Sete se dose=>
Beni @. 345... 2: = _ es. ee eae oe Valid-=e—
Deeb. us @. 3405-. --. - - DE Goa ae eee Se Obsolete _-
Piss Qsp0 2 =... eee eee ee Validea
Meebo... pele oc Re ee dO ee
TD) El A te OeAse seo o Ses Obsolete __
Wri. P.O aps... --.-2- (8) (7S Se fe os
ManieB: ba Qe sp4se 2.2) (Ve sieeoeatet lees JO28ees2
Eel Tels TE (0) 8455) (G29) ee I OO Validmeees
F Bee Gp s00 see st OAT Oi ee oe Obsolete_
Mises Oa coi... RE eee sce Silene Ose
Debts QO. ab8--— =. ONO 2e ee eee sees dose
Pe Oy a0g:. OFAN BRE er ee Soe dosenae:.
ese Oe Seek Hee eee ae Validea.
Pees ei pole Bi yop Ye a ee ae Obsolete__
ee eaiGehe es ee Oe pi Rowen ee dogs. 2
eet | Sis. bs Oa abo ss! =. 22 PAG felees | Valid_.--.
Mine 1) hts br BA pee ete | dome:
ee eben es. @) sop=. 5. 2 Oa iews see se 2.) ye GOS: 2-5:
eb ee 306, + Owe eee re eee dors. _--
D 100 Oe OnG4. 2 ee e Obsolete _-
Ro. Brae. -@. 368--.-.- Bae Se ae Nee a Le: alidis. - 2
ee BPs 369... asi ee ee |e dpi 2b 22
eet esos STOlCR) >|) Bs Obes.) |b = donee
Deere O)aS71—3/2.-| Q. 64.22... -- Obsolete__
Dee Os Pe2373. Ges ee oat doz ts.
Mae iecta eG 374... __ eens 2 ees Pee Wialidl =.= =
Me ei ods) |) Br) Oe anenc=- ee. Goeee: 2"
Rie a nO Re Oe se Qa8 a= Obsolete_-
eae. He eon. _—— | eRe ek ye ae dome 2
F Boe. Q878-25_ Paes i Valid. .-.-
Â¥F | B.E.P.Q. 379... Wage ca eae | 2 does:
F Pape Onsen). H. Ox.-.....--_=.|_.. dos.
eer sess th) - =| WH. Co... Lf dozer s =
a seen lees 382... pie Oe eee ee |e dom = ==
D ree Qe. 228 Q 4825.22 2 Obsolete_ -
F Bee temeiGl Seta? Qa ie 22 Valides ===
oe esrb era os (hy) =e | Q8s a=. 2.2. _]__. doe.
Wes abet Oo oBbdT) | O45 0252... Joe Gomes. =
D Bo. Be@esay. 52° GAS Fe ayer ts Obsolete__

aD Babee esee. C3 ED De ame ee ee Que 2. -
nets yee soo Big ee sere Be Vali
a es He tea oO0i() 3) BW. iChsense-=-_-.-]-22 doz=5.. ==
F etree sO) =| i. ©... --_ |. Ge Bae Si:
F Best eee@:. 302).-_ AC ee ees ree ee Ouro
en ree eeaMoesps. 6.1 OQ. 59.-. 2-2 OteeS

~iDyes)"2 Sa OAD Rai) 1 AB ee Validea -
D Peete GC) Boo (rt). |) Q4a8e ==. Obsolete _ -
F eat ten 306... BAO eee acl Er Valide: =...
F Bot fea nsor 3. EL UG a eer DO 2 | date. _.-
Be ey 3982-2... OY tees ote Obsolete - -
i alee Fe ee QQ; 399... Ge ary es 20 AV alice tees!
ese tre) 2400. = _ LD O) eee eee ee | ae domes.
ese ta) 401_ +s _ 2 IBY, Cy ie emercae tS cok, dos ==
Sal ese ee Gy A02-(.40) |). Os... .___]__- dg ses...
Herb epee. Q:403_ 2-2. BG See eee does <1.
eSB ts 1) 404 CR) -|) Wo Ge sce, ee doa yt.
Taisen, @. 40b:__ Hy CS 2a ee dae.
Peete eee Ge 406 CR)e| Ey C_-....- 0: See Gags: =:
Seen es Gh, 407. °.. || Fe, O.-- 5 eek dae... __
Peete OQ). 408_. ++ i OY ORs Pies Se Edge =
Rieter be 400... . _- By, Oc 52), See Ofe too
D Beet. e. Q.410.._._. Ache. _ tee ae Gry. oo s-"
ese ices, ©. 411_...-. Es pees See dg

SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS



21

Remarks

Superseded P. Q. C. A. 318.

Of transitory importance.

Superseded P. Q. C. A. 241; superseded by
B. Eb. 2s @) 50

Florida removed from under restrictions of
quarantine No. 52, effective Oct. 14, 1936.

Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 438.
Quarantine No. 62 lifted effective Apr. 1,
1935.

Superseded H. B. 212; euisea ts revision).
Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 498.
Supplemented B. P. Q. ’s 337, 338; quaran-

tine No. 62 lifted effective Apr] , 1935.
Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 4

See quarantine No. 74, revised.

Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 426.

Quarantine No. 62 lifted effective Apr. 1,
1935.

Superseded PaiQ> ©, cAs sQ945 239), 265,307,
317, 322, 333, B. P. Q. 339; superseded by
B. E. P. Q. 499.

Of transitory importance.
Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 417.

Superseded H. B. 189.
Of transitory importance.

Superseded H. B. 132R.

Of transitory importance.
Quarantine No. 62 lifted effective Apr. 1,
1935. iz

As revised, superseded H. B. 49.

Superseded P. Q. C. A. 277; superseded by
B. E. P. Q. 412.

Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 425.

Superseded P.Q.C. A. 294.

Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 395R.

Superseded B. P. Q. 340.

Superseded P. Q. C. A. 320.

Superseded P. Q. C. A. 313.

Of transitory importance.

See current revision of regulations under
quarantine No. 52.

Florida removed from under restrictions of
quarantine No. 52, effective Oct. 14, 1936.

Superseded P. Q. C. A. 274.

Superseded B. E. P. Q. 383; incorporated i in
current regulations of quarantine No. 48.

Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 465.

Superseded P, Q. C. A. 301.
Superseded P. Q. C. A. 302.

Superseded P. Q. C. A. 304.
Superseded P. Q. C. A. 327, in part.

Superseded P. Q. C. A. 295; (subject to
revision).
Superseded P. Q. C. A. 284,





D No.
F Behe Oro ween
F B. Ey, RB. Q. 413 GR)e
D Been ple ee Re
D BAH Pen @e il jemereee
F Bee OGG) =
F Beh eae 4'lh(eeeee
F Bee H lea @he4l Canaan
F Beaute O40 eve
F Beer Pek Oras 0 eae
F IS ate bes 2) er?) ee
F BMH OQ ADD eee
F HS eae len @) 42 aes
F Bein PaOn424 (Rye
F Be Bae tO hea 2 ba ae
F SoH eae O42 6 meas
F nee re O42 pone
F B. E. P. Q. 428 (R)
F Behe @ 4429 nes
F 1B Bis 125 @), CRW)
F AS Hella ap 43 eerie
F IBS ADS de, Os caylee
F Bee @ 433 n ue
F B. E. P. Q. 484 (R)_
F BEE @43 hues
D Beh Os 43652)
F Bee O43 ieee
F Sse G4 3 Seen
F 1338 Taio dees Oye Rw)
F 18), 1B), 12, @), Ze ae
FBP Qn aden
F 1835 diy 124s (Os AY
F Byba Ra On443ieaee.
F B. E. P. Q. 444 (R)
F Be Heeb Oh44 pase
F 1336 doe Oy CE
F Se amie Oy 4A: enone
F Beh Sele) 4 4 Gumemane
F Bee Bieter Os 4.0 meme
D Sao H et @ 4 ()eeeae
FE |B ee ase Oe! Tinea
F BPR plese O) ey Dene
F 1B}, 18s 12, Qs CBee
F Be hee On 5 4eau es
F aan 455s) ee
F Iso Wagon Qe tier
F iS ee Eaton Gerd jeune
F Beh hie @yyA 5 Sauna
D Bee ea @h4'5 OaanEs
F 1a35 IDiy Je @)., 0
ID Beek Oe bleu
DBS SBE ee On 460 mae
F Beet ee AG 3 eee
F Bee hanes O46 4 aan
F BP aE ie Ob4 6 eemeee
F iBeehaces Oe 466m
F Bee eel 4 6s
Be eBay @ 4 68eenne
Ee WB shee @)y 4 69 eee
I |) eke Tig IR Os Cis
Ee | eS ee ee) 4 alee
D [Beene eas Or Ari 2 eee
D BEE ae Ora joes
Ten ee Serato Oy ee
D Rhea @) ey beeen
ES Bee Biel @) sii Omen
Ee eee ayy eee
His es ee eelae en. e eens
BeBe Bean O70 penne
D 135 135 12 Qo 40
D2) SBN ey Ome lee
H | BeMBMPh Owego) iis
Ee esol @)4 83 maa
pn | eS see eee @) a 4 eee
D Bet ee @nAsh GR) es
2 Enforced by Di





Issued in connec-

tion with—

i356! ca







BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

Status

Valid: 8222

Valid. fp
Obsolete _-

ivision of hee pe Plant Quarantines.







[Jan.—March

Remarks



Superseded H. B.’s 193, 195, 197, 198, 202,
207, ae ra POk Cau a B. P. Q.
354; B. P. Q. 376; see B. E. P. Q. 482.

Superseded by B. E. P. Q.’s 492, 493.

Of transitory Torta

Superseded P. @ C. A. 327, in part.

Superseded B. P. Q. 362; superseded by
1835 1Dj5 125 ©, Ce

Superseded B. E. P. Q. 377.
Superseded B. P. Q. 357.

Superseded H. B. 192.

Superseded P. Q. C. A. 315
Superseded B. P. Q. 347.
Superseded P. Q. C. A. 3

Superseded P. Q. C. A. 314.

Superseded by current revision of regula-
tions of quarantine No. 52.

Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 478.

Superseded by eee revision of regu[a-
tions of quarantine No. 52.

Superseded H. B. 176.

Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 508.

Superseded P. Q@. C. A. 311.

Superseded B. E. P. Q. 417.

Superseded B. E. P. Q. 398.

Superseded P. Q. C. A. 289. :

Superseded memorandum to inspectors,
Aug. 22, 1934.

Superseded P. Q. C. A. 297.

Superseded P. Q. C. A. 329.

Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 499.

Superseded H. B. 161; supplemented P. Q.
C. A. 309, in part.

Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 499.

Superseded P: Q. C. A. 299R.

Superseded memorandum to chief inspec-
tors, Sept. 1, 1931.

Superseded B. E. P. Q. 458.

Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 499.
See By Ei Pi: Q, 402bs ee ee ee eee oe



1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 23







F or No. es eee Status Remarks
Meee hee. Oe 486. --.-|-Q: 72.__._-- etd Validi<.2--
D BeBe) Qy487-_-.-- ON 64 ee 8 Obsolete__| Expired June 15, 1939.
ees Bre .O.488. = OVD a RE Walia
Diep Hs b. QQ? 489"... Qs (2. URE LON does
F Be. es Q490.-! =. BPG eee FE ee jae ae
F HPO 4G. «at. BSC? ee bo ai dot ace
D gee AO aie, ECG 2 Stes. = she Obsolete__|. Expired Apr. 30, 1939.
DPD 6403. O52. seen mV alidesa ==
D BMH yIPt Qeaose eos 2 5222 eet h Ss: Be! ores
D BSB Py OMAG nee. = O64 er See Cay ae 3. dor eeaay | As tosterlization requirements only.
D Bei ROndgh. = =. Oy) ee _- donee
F Banyo be QsA97 2. Be a eee ee (0
D Bette PS Ge498) * Oe 4se ae ae Sito. dq Superseded B. P. Q. 352.
eS ieee eG L LL. 82 | (> 48.0 ees ee : diguaee Superseded P. Q. C. A. 316; B. P. Q. 359;
B. E. P. Q.’s 473, 475, 480.
F Be Hee] @. 500) | BAC recta. pee omen
F BRE. O50 2 22: =: CONS OUe tees eee ah dons see Superseded B. P. Q. 344.
F BARE P SO 8502. IBA es =, SE Sas Ae. Os Y dee
D Bees. —- OR ime renee. id d=
F BeBe Be @eo0d. =. __ (ONS Ol nea = Niels Ge a
ON eis Pe 750552. 2 1h OCD SRET ANE) RS be Oe Supplemented by B. E. P. Q. 506.
IDDM jad De ees) OS. oe 2 a tava Be Gr cece Supplemented B. E. P. Q. 505.
F Babs O oO == PAGS Ris24 te oe ee donee: Superseded P. Q. C. A. 305R





2 Enforced by division of Foreign Plant Quarantines.

B. E. P. Q. 404, Revised, Supplement 1.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, BRITISH INDIA

FEBRUARY 16, 1940.

[Amendment of the Order No. F. 320/35—A of July 20, 1936, by Notification of Depart-
ment of Education, Health and Lands, No. F. 50—83/39—A dated December 7, 1939, and
effective February 15, 1940]

CERTIFICATION OF UNMANUFACTURED TOBACCO

8B. Unmanufactured tobacco, either raw or cured, shall not be imported into
British India, unless, in addition to the general certificate required under Rule
5 it is accompanied by an Official certificate, that it is free from HEphestia
elutella or that the pest does not exist in the country of origin.
AVERY S. Hoyt,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

B. E. P. Q. 416, Revised. ;
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, UNITED KINGDOM OF GREAT BRITAIN

FEBRUARY 6, 1940.

This revision of the digest of plant-quarantine import restrictions of the
United Kingdom of Great Britain was rendered necessary by the promulgation
of the Importation of Plants Order of 1939, dated May 16, 1939, and effective
June 1, 1939. This order consolidates and amends the hitherto existing regula-
tions and revokes those which it superseded. The regulations of the Channel
Islands remain unchanged.

This circular was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant quarantine inspector, in
charge of foreign service information, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines,
from the text of the importation of plants order of 1939, of England and the
corresponding orders of Scotland, Northern Ireland, and the Channel Islands.

The information herein contained is believed to be correct and complete up
to the time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used independently of,
nor as a substitute for, the original texts, and is not to be interpreted as legally
authoritative.

AVERY SS. Hoyt,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.



24 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.—March

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPCRT RESTRICTIONS, ENGLAND AND WALES

BAsic LEGISLATION
[The Destructive Insects and Pests Acts, 1877 to 1927]

SUMMARY
IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

Coniferous trees:° Importation prchibited from all foreign sources of living
plants of the following genera of the order Pinaceae: Abies, Lariz, Picea,
Pinus, Pseudotsuga, Sequoia, Thuja, and Tsuga, to prevent the introduction
of diseases and pesis likely to prove injurious to forestry undertakings in the
United Kingdom. (Importation of elm trees and conifers [prohibition] order
of 19383, p. 10.)

Elm trees (Ulmus spp.) :° Importation prohibited from all foreign sources
to prevent the introduction of the Dutch elm disease Graphium ulmi (Cerato-
stomella ulmi (Schwarz) Buisman). Licenses may be issued for importation
for scientific purposes only. (Importation of elm trees and conifers [prohibi-
tion] order of 1933, p. 11.)

Potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.):° Importation prohibited of potatoes
grown in Canada, the United States of America, and European France, to pre-
vent the introduction of the Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata
Say). Transshipment is also prohibited except under license. (Importation
of plants order of 1989, art. 3, p. 4.)

IMPORTATION RESTRICTED

Apples grown in the United States:° Shipments landed between July 7 and
November 15 must be accompanied by a certificate of a duly authorized
inspector of the United States Department of Agriculture in the form set out
in the fifth schedule. (Importation of plants order of 1939, art. 7 (4), p. 8.)

Chrysanthemum plants:° The landing in England and Wales of any chrys-
anthemum plant is prohibited except under and in accordance with the condi-
tions of a license issued by the Minister cf Agriculture and Fisheries or by an
inspector. (Importation of plants order of 1989, art. 4 (2), p. 5.)

Plants, living, or parts thereof (except seeds) for planting,’ except those
whose importation is prohibited: Phytosanitary certificate in duplicate in
form prescribed in Second Schedule (p. 9), issued by competent authority of
the country oi origin. For shipments from the United States the certificate
must be issued by an official duly authorized by the United States Department
of Agriculture. The certiiicate must also include a statement that the consign-
ment does not include any plant of sugar beet or mangold, of Ulmus, or of
conifers of the prohibited genera of the order Pinaceae, or any chrysanthemum
plant. (Importation of plants order of 1989, art. 5, pars. 1 and 2, pp. 5 and 6.)

Sugar beets and mangolds (Beta vulgaris L.) living plants:° Importation
from all foreign sources prohibited, except under license issued by the Minis-
ter of Agriculture and Fisheries, to prevent the introduction of virus diseases.
(Importation of plants order of 1939, art. 4 (1), p. 5.)

Vegetables° (not including cucumbers or mushrooms for which no certificate
is required) grown in any other country than Belgium, European France,
Germany, Luxemburg, the Netherlands or Switzerland: A certificate of origin
visaed by a competent authority of the country of origin, during the period
April 21 to September 30. (Impcrtation of plants order of 1939, art. 6 (8),
p72)

Specific restrictions are applied to the importation of cider apples, cherries,
living plants and parts thereof, potatoes, and other vegetables grown in France,
Germany, Belgium, the Netherlands, Switzerland, and various other European
countries.

IMPORTATION UNRESTRICTED

Seeds: The first schedule excepts seeds from the provisions of article 5 (1)
of the importation of plants order of 1939. (See p. 5.)

5 Indicates products of the United States.



1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 25

SUGGESTIONS TO CERTIFYING INSPECTORS

Under date of August 1935 a joint memorandum in the following sense was
issued by the Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries, England; the Department
of Agriculture, Scotland; and the Ministry of Agriculture, Northern Ireland:

CHARACTER OF INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION DESIRED

The required phytosanitary certificate must be based on an examination made
not more than 14 days prior to the date of shipment and it must state that the
plants (or in certain cases, a representative Sample of the plants) have been
thoroughly examined and “found to be healthy, no evidence of the presence of
any insect, fungus, or pest destructive to horticultural crops having been dis-
covered in them.” This form of words implies that the examining officer has
done everything that is reasonably possible to assure himself that the material
examined is free from pests and diseases; it does not involve him in any
personal guaranty that the plants are absolutely and completely free from all
plant diseases and pests—a guaranty which could seldom conscientiously be
given.

REINSPECTION ON ARRIVAL

All shipments of plant material are subject to reinspection on arrival at a
port of Great Britain and the action taken will depend on the findings. The
action taken on imported plants found to be infected by some disease or pest
is based upon a recognition of the difference in degree of importance to be
attributed to diseases and pests that have already become established in Great
Britain and those that have not. The action taken in the case of a pest or
disease new to Great Britain will be drastic, regardless of the extent of infesta-
tion. For example, the action taken with respect to infections of Common scab,
Actinomyces scabies, on potatoes, or of the oystershell scale, Lepidosaphes ulmi
(L.), on apples or other fruit stocks, would depend on the degree of infection
or infestation. On the other hand, the finding of plant material infested with
San Jose scale (ASspidiotus perniciosus Comst.), which does not occur in the
United Kingdom, or the discovery of even a single potato infected with wart
disease, Synchytrium endobioticum, a disease from which wide areas of Great
Britain are still free, would result in the exportation or destruction of the
Shipment concerned. Plant quarantine inspectors, therefore, are requested not
to certify for export to Great Britain plant products infested or infected by
injurious pests or diseases not known to occur there, and, in instances where
inspection cannot be depended on to determine freedom from plant pests, plant
products which, on account of their origin, are likely to be infested or infected
therewith.

FREEDOM FROM SOIL

Although no regulation specifically prohibits the importation of soil, the cer-
tification that plants have been “thoroughly examined” implies that the roots,
as well as other parts of plants, have been inspected, consequently, that adher-
ing soil (if any) has been reduced to a minimum. In other words, plants
should be practically free from soil and should be packed in such a manner as
to facilitate inspection and to prevent spoilage or injury in transit.

REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE IMPORTATION OF PLANTS AND PLANT Propucts INTO
ENGLAND AND WALES

[The importation of plants order of May 16, 1939]
DEFINITIONS

ARTICLE 1. In this order, unless the context otherwise requires :—

“Plant” includes tree and shrub, and the fruit, seeds, tubers, bulbs, corms,
rhizomes, roots, layers, cuttings, and other parts of a plant.

“Raw vegetables” includes raw onions, raw tomatoes, raw eggplants, and
raw salads, but does not include mushrooms or cucumbers.

“Unhealthy” means affected with any insect, fungus, bacteria, or other vege-
table or animal organisms or any agent causative of a transmissible crop disease.

ArT. 2. Refers to products grown in the United Kingdom.



26 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE — [Jan.—March

PROHIBITION AGAINST LANDING AND RESTRICTION ON THE TRANSSHIPMENT
OF POTATOES FROM CERTAIN COUNTRIES

Art. 8. (1) The landing in England or Wales of any potatoes grown in the
United States of America, the Dominion of Canada, and European France, is
prohibited.

(2) The transshipment in England or Wales of any of the potatoes specified
in subsection (1) of this article is prohibited except under and in accordance
with the conditions of a license issued by the Minister of Agriculture and
Fisheries or by an inspector.

(3) In this article “potatoes” includes potato haulms, leaves, and stalks.

IMPORTATION PROHIBITED OF PLANTS OF SUGAR BEET, MANGOLD, AND CHRYSANTHEMUM

Art. 4. (1) For the prevention of the introduction of virus diseases of sugar
beet and mangold, the landing in England or Wales of any plant of sugar beet
or mangold of the species Beta vulgaris L. (except the seeds thereof) is hereby
prohibited except under and in accordance with the conditions of a license.
issued by the Minister or by an inspector.

(2) For the prevention of the introduction of the chrysanthemum midge
(Diarthronomyia hypogaea F. Loew.), the landing in England or Wales of any
chrysanthemum plant (except the seeds thereof) is hereby prohibited except
under and in accordance with the conditions of a license issued by the Minister
or by an inspector.

RESTRICTIONS ON THE LANDING OF CERTAIN PLANTS AND POTATOES
PHYTOSANITARY CERTIFICATH REQUIRED

ArT. 5 (1) The landing in England and Wales of any of the plants mentioned
in the first schedule to this order, and of potatoes, is hereby prohibited, unless
each consignment is accompanied by two copies of a certificate of a duly
authorized official of the phytopathological service of the country in which the
plants or potatoes were grown, in the form prescribed in the second schedule
to this order. ‘The inspection referred to in the certificate shall be carried out
not more than 14 days prior to the date of shipment. The original of the cer-
tificate shall be forwarded by mail by the exporter to the horticulture branch
of the Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries, 10 Whitehall Place, London, S. W.
1, before the plants or potatoes are shipped. Except in the case of consignments
imported by mail, a copy of the prescribed certificate shall be delivered to an
officer of customs and excise at the same time as, and together with, the entry
relating to the consignment. In the case of consignments imported by mail, a
copy of the prescribed certificate shall be affixed to each package. (See also
art. 3 of the importation of elm trees and conifers [Prohibition] order of 1933,
p. 7.)

FEDERAL CERTIFICATE REQUIRED °

ArT. 5. (2) In the case of any of the plants mentioned in the first schedule
to this order and grown in the United States of America the certificate required
by paragraph (1) of this article Shall be the certificate of an Official duly
authorized by the United States Department of Agriculture.

SPECIAL NOTATION REQUIRED ON CERTIFICATE

Art. 5. (8) The certificate prescribed in this article shall, except in the
case of a consignment consisting wholly of potatoes, include a statement to
the effect that the consignment does not contain any plants of sugar beet or
mangold or any chrysanthemum plant, or any plant of the genus Ulmus or of
the following genera of the order Pinaceae: Abies, Larix, Picea, Pinus, Pseu-
dotsuga, Sequoia, Thuja, and Tsuga, except the seeds thereof.

ArT. 5. (4) Pertains to certification of plants from European France.

ArT. 5. (5) Relates to certification of plants and potatoes from Belgium,
Germany, Luxemburg, the Netherlands, and Switzerland.

¢ Hitherto both State and Federal certificates have been acceptable, but article 5 (2),
now in effect, prescribes a Federal certificate for plant material from the United States,



1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS DE

CERTIFICATION OF ABSENCE OF ELMS

Art. 5. (6) The reference in article 3 of the importation of elm trees and
conifers (prohibition) order of 1933 to the certificates prescribed in article 4
of the importation of plants order of 1933, shall be read and have effect as a
reference to the certificate prescribed in paragraph (1) of this article.

ArT. 5. (7) Paragraphs (4) and (5) of this article shall not apply to flower
bulbs, corms, tubers, or rhizomes.

Art. 5. (8) Nothing contained in this article shall be deemed to permit—

(a) The landing or transshipment in England or Wales of any potatoes of
which the landing or transshipment is prohibited or restricted under article 3
hereof ;

(b) "The landing in England or Wales of any plant of sugar beet or mangold
of the species Beta vulgaris L. or of any chrysanthemum plant of which the
landing is prohibited or restricted under article 4 hereof.

ArT. 6. (1) Refers to raw vegetables grown in European France or
Switzerland.

Art. 6. (2) Refers to raw vegetables grown in Belgium, Germany, Luxemburg,
or the Netherlands.

CERTIFICATE OF ORIGIN REQUIRED FOR RAW VEGETABLES

ArT. 6. (3) The landing in England or Wales between April 21 and September
30 in any year of any raw vegetables grown in any country other than Belgium,
European France, Germany, Luxemburg, the Netherlands, or Switzerland is
hereby prohibited unless each consignment is accompanied by a certificate of
origin visaed by a competent authority in the country of origin stating the
country and place where the raw vegetables were grown.

ART. 6. (4) The certificate prescribed in this article shall be delivered to the
proper officer of customs and excise at the same time as, and together with,
the entry relating to the consignment.

ART. 6. (5) Nothing contained in this article shall be deemed to permit the
landing or transshipment in England or Wales of any potatoes of which the land-
ing or transshipment is prohibited or restricted under article 3 hereof.

RESTRICTIONS ON THE LANDING IN ENGLAND OR WALES OF CERTAIN RAW APPLES

ArT. 7. (1) Relates to cider apples from European France or Switzerland.

ART. 7. (2) Relates to cider apples from Belgium, Germany, Luxemburg,
or the Netherlands.

ArT. 7. (3) Relates to cider apples from European countries other than
Belgium, France, Germany, Luxemburg, the Netherlands, and Switzerland.

APPLES FROM UNITED STATES MUST BE ACCOMPANIED BY A GRADE CERTIFICATE

ArT. 7. (4) The landing in England or Wales between July 7 and Novem-
ber 15 of any year of any raw apples grown in the United States of America
is hereby prohibited unless each consignment is accompanied by a certificate of
a duly authorized inspector of the United States Department of Agriculture
in the form set out in the fifth schedule to this order.

Art. 7. (5) The certificates prescribed in this article shall be delivered to the
proper officer of customs and excise at the same time as, and together with,
the entry relating to the consignment.

Arts. 8, 9, and 10 relate to the disposal of plants and plant products landed
or and Wales in contravention of this order, and other administrative

etails.

SPECIAL IMPORT LICENSES

ArT. 11. Notwithstanding any provisions of this order, any plants, potatoes,
Taw apples, or raw vegetables may be landed in England and Wales under and
in accordance with the conditions of a license issued by the minister or by an
inspector.

ArT. 12. Service of notices.

ART. 13. Information to be given as to plants, potatoes, raw apples, or raw
vegetables landed in England or Wales.

ArT. 14. Penalties.

AkT. 15. Revocation of previous orders.



28 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE — [Jan.—March

EFFECTIVE DATE OF ORDER

ART. 16. This order shall come into operation June 1, 1939.

SHORT TITLE OF ORDER

ArT. 17. This order may be cited as the importation of plants order of 1939.

First SCHEDULE

All living plants and parts thereof (except seeds) for planting.

SECOND SCHEDULE
PRESCRIBED CERTIFICATE FORMS

This is to certify that the living plants/a representative sample of the living
plants* included in the consignment, of which particulars are given below,
were/was thoroughly examined on the (date), by (name of inspector), a duly
authorized official of the (name of organization), and found to be healthy,
no evidence of the presence of any insect, fungus, or pest destructive to agri-
eultural or horticultural crops having been found in them.

ADDITIONAL STATEMENT FOR ALL SHIPMENTS EXCEPT POTATOES

It is further certified that the consignment does not contain any plant of
the genus Ulmus, or of the following genera of the order Pinaceae: Abies,
Lariz, Picea, Pinus, Pseudotsuga, Sequoia, Thuja, and Tsuga, nor any plant
of sugar beet or mangold (Beta vulgaris L.), nor any chrysanthemum plant.

ADDITIONAL CERTIFICATE FOR POTATOES

It is further certified that no case of the disease known as walt disease
(Synchytrium endobioticum) has occurred at any time on the farm or holding
where the potatoes included in the consignment were grown nor within 2
kilometers thereof.

Signature... eee
Official title. = eee
‘ Date 222232 EE

Number and description of packages.
Distinguishing marks.

Description of living plants or parts thereof.
Stated to be grown at.

Exported by.

Name and address of consignee.

Name of vessel.

Date of shipment.

Port of landing in England or Wales.

THIRD SCHEDULE
FORM A

This form applies only to shipments from Belgium, France, Germany, Luxem-
burg, the Netherlands, and Switzerland.

FORM B
Certificate Required under License

In accordance with the authorization contained in the general license number
of the Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries of England and Wales, this is to
certify that the plants included in the package or consignment described
below have been examined and have been found to be of the following species

7 Strike out words not applicable.



1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 29

epemmmneer reremeeeeetes 205) a , and that the conditions prescribed in
the above general license have been complied with.
Syren Fegreree oie Sere pate es See ere
COR Cin itaiee set ery se ft as See T
Date: Ses) eters 6 tea 8 eee

Followed by description of shipment.

FouRTH SCHEDULE

This form applies to certain shipments of vegetables from France.

FIFTH SCHEDULE
CERTIFICATE REQUIRED FOR APPLES FROM UNITED STATES
*s

This is to certify that the raw apples included in the package or consign-
ment described below are of one of the following grades as recognized by the
Department of Agriculture of the United States of America.

“Ws. Lancy” “Extra Fancy”

SU recive: £° “Rancy”
NEP te eee ee Ie eee, Ee ee ee.
Giniciayaties- 7 | As Jd ek ee BS
Diet ote) PE = ANS 2a) 2 OUT ASS)

DESCRIPTION OF CONSIGNMENT

Number and nature of packages.
Distinguishing marks.

Variety of apples.

Name and address of consignee.
Name of vessel.

Date of shipment.

Port of shipment.

IMPORTATION OF ELM TREES AND CONIFERS PROHIBITED
[The Importation of Elm Trees and Conifers (Prohibition) Order, Oct. 24, 1933]

ARTICLE 1. This order shall come into operation December 1, 1933.

Arr. 2. (1) For the prevention of the introduction of diseases and pests
injurious to elm trees and forest trees, the landing in England and Wales from
any other country than Scotland, Northern Ireland, Ireland (Eire), the Isle of
Man, or the Channel Islands of any living plant of any of the genera men-
tioned in the schedule to this order is hereby prohibited.

(2) In this article “plant” includes tree and shrub, and the roots, layers,
cuttings, and other parts of a plant.

ArT. 3. The certificates prescribed in article 5 (1) of the importation of
plants order of 1939 shall, except in the ease of a consignment consisting
wholly of potatoes, include a statement to the effect that the consignment does
not contain any plant of any of the genera mentioned below.

All species of the genus Ulmus.

The following genera of the order Pinaceae: Abies, Larir, Picea, Pinus,
Pseudotsuga, Sequoia, Thuja, and Tsuga.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, SCOTLAND

Since the regulations under the importation of plants (Scotland) order of May
24, 1939, etc., are essentially identical with those under the importation of plants
order of May 16, 1939, and other orders of England, it is unnecessary even to
recapitulate them.

In the case of shipments of plant material intended for export to Scotland, the
original certificate should be mailed to the Department of Agriculture, York
Buildings, Queen Street, Edinburgh, 2, Scotland.

NorTe.—See suggestions to certifying inspectors, pages 3 and 4.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, NORTHERN IRELAND

Since the regulations under the importation of plants (Northern Ireland) order
of 1939, etc., are essentially identical with those under the importation of plants



30 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.—March

order of May 16, 1939, and with orders of England, it is not necessary even to
make a recapitulation of them.

In the case of shipments of plant material intended for export to Northern
Ireland, the original certificates should be mailed to the Ministry of Agriculture,
Stormont, Belfast, Northern Ireland.

Notry.—See suggestions to certifying inspectors, pages 3 and 4.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, THE STATES OF JERSEY
(CHANNEL ISLANDS)

Basic LEGISLATION
[Destructive Insects and Pests Acts, 1877 to 1927, of Great Britain]

SUMMARY
IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

Potatoes, Solanum tuberosum L.: Importation of varieties susceptible to attack
by the wart disease, Synchytrium endobioticum (Schilb.) Pere., from any source
is prohibited. (Act No. 34 of April 28, 1930, p. 17.)

Potatoes: Importation prohibited from Great Britain and Ireland of tubers
grown in any district in which wart disease is known to exist. (Act No. 31 of
April 28, 19380, p. 16.)

All products of the soil: Importation from the mainland of France prohibited
to prevent the introduction of the Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemli-
neata Say. (Act No. 38 of August 7, 1931.)

Peat of any kind, moss litter, and leaf mold from all sources, except the product
called “‘bacterized peat” from England and Scotland under certification as to its
character. (Act of April 6, 1935, p. 17.)

IMPORTATION RESTRICTED

The plant material listed in the first schedule of the act of April 5, 1933, may
be imported only when accompanied by a phytosanitary certificate in the form
prescribed in the third schedule. (See p. 16.)

Raw apples from the United States may be imported between July 7 and Novem-
ber 15 of each year only when accompanied by a grade certificate in the same
form as prescribed by England and Wales. (See p. 17.)

IMPORTATION UNRESTRICTED

Seeds and herbaceous or succulent-stemmed plants: Importation not restricted
by the act of April 5, 1933, except that the entry of seeds and plants from France
is prohibited by the act of August 7, 1931.

[General regulations under the Act of the Committee of Agriculture of April 28, 1930, as
amended by that of April 5, 1933]

IMPORT REQUIREMENTS

ARTICLE 1. The landing in the island of Jersey of any of the plants men-
tioned in the first schedule to this act from any country other than Great
Britain, Ireland, the Isle of Man, and the other Channel Islands, is pro-
hibited except in accordance with the following provisions:

AUTHORIZED PORT OF ENTRY

(a} The plants may be landed in the port of St. Helier only.

PHYTOSANITARY CERTIFICATE REQUIRED

(ob) Hach consignment must be accompanied by two copies of a certificate
issued by a duly authorized official in the country whence the plants are ex-
ported, in the form prescribed in the third schedule of the act. One copy
must be produced to the harbor master and the other copy must be forwarded
by the importer to the consignee. In the case of mail shipments a copy of
the certificate need not be produced to the harbor master, but a copy must be
affixed to each package. The original of the certificate must be mailed to the
Committee of Agriculture by the exporter before the plants are shipped.



1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS on

INSPECTION MAY BE REQUIRED

(c) The Committee reserves the right to cause any package or parcel con-
taining plants imported or believed to have been imported into the island to
be opened and examined whether or not the provisions of this act have been
complied with.

INSPECTION REQUIRED IN THE ABSENCE OF CERTIFICATES

(d) In the case of importations of plants from a country in which there
is no official duly authorized to issue the certificate mentioned above, and of
consignments which are not accompanied by the copy certificate required by
this act, and in the case of plants sent by mail to which such copies are not
attached, the plants shall be retained by the harbor master until such time
as the Committee of Agriculture shall have caused them to be examined.

PLANTS FOR SCIENTIFIC PURPOSES EXEMPT

ArT. 2. The provisions of this act do not apply to plants the landing of
which is authorized by a general or special license issued by the Committee
or to consignments of plants to the Committee for experimental or scientific
purposes.

SCHEDULE I

RESTRICTED PLANT MATERIAL

(a) All living plants with a persistent woody stem above ground, and parts
of the same except seeds, when for use in propagation, such as fruit trees,
stocks and stools, forest trees, and ornamental shrubs, and grafts, layers, and
cuttings thereof.

(b) All potatoes; and all tubers, bulbs, rhizomes, corms, and hop stocks
for planting.

(c) Seeds of onions and leeks for sowing.

(d) All unrooted cuttings and rooted plants of chrysanthemums.

SCHEDULE II

PLANT PARASITES

Fungi:
Black-knot of plum and cherry, Plowrightia morbosa (Schw.) Sace.
Fire blight of apple and pear, Bacillus amylovorus (Burr.) Trev.
Chestnut blight or canker, Hndothia parasitica (Murr.) And. and And.
Wart disease of potatoes, Synchytrium endobioticum (Schilb.) Pere.
Smut of onion and leek, Urocystis cepulae C. C. Frost.
Downy mildew of hops, Peronoplasmopara humuli, Miy. and Taka.

Insects:
Grape phylloxera, Phyllorera (vastatriz) vitifoliae (Planch.) Fitch.
An American apple capsid, Heterocordylus malinus Reut.
Apple redbug, Lygidea mendagz Reut.
Pear tingid, Stephanitis pyri Fab.
Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say.
Plum curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar (Hbst.).
Potato tuber worm, (Phthorimaea) Gnorimoschema operculella (Zell.).
Eastern tent caterpillar, Malacosoma americana (F.).
Forest tent caterpillar, Malacosoma disstria Hbn.
Oriental fruit moth, (Cydia) Grapholitha molesta (Busck).
San Jose scale, Aspidiotus perniciosus Comst.
White peach scale, (Diaspis) Aulacaspis pentagona (Targ.).
Apple fruitfly, Rhagoletis pomonella (Walsh).
European cherry fruitfly, Rhagoletis cerasi L.
Cherry fruitfly, Rhagoletis cingulata (Loew).
Black cherry fruitfly, Rhagoletis fausta O. S.
Currant fruitfly, Hpochra canadensis Loew.
Chrysanthemum gall midge, Diarthronomyia hypogaea Loew.

ScHEDULE III
PRESCRIBED INSPECTION CERTIFICATE

This is to certify that the plants included in the package or consignment de-
scribed below were thoroughly inspected by-------------------- , a duly author-



32 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.—March

izéd «ofticial of. 22. 2230 2 Sevag Neer: 4 Sea eee EY one( date) aes , and
were found or believed by him to be healthy and free from _ any
of the plant diseases or pests named in the second schedule to the act of
the Committee of Agriculture of the States of Jersey of April 28, 1930.

It is understood that all cuttings and rooted plants of chrysanthemums
imported from abroad must be accompanied by the certificate prescribed in
this Schedule.

ADDITIONAL CERTIFICATE FOR POTATOES

Further, it is hereby certified that no case of the disease known as wart
disease or black scab of potatoes (Synchytrium endobioticum) has occurred
on the farm or holding where the potatoes included in this consignment were
grown, nor within 500 yards (about % kilometer) thereof.

Signatures: 222 a eee

Description of Shipment

Number and kind of packages.

Marks.

Description of plants.

Grown at.

Name and address of exporter.
Name and address of consignee.
Name of vessel.

Date of shipment.

Port of shipment.

Port of landing.

Approximate date of landing.

SPECIAL QUARANTINES
RESTRICTIONS ON THE IMPORTATION OF POTATOES

Potatoes from all sources except Great Britain and Ireland: The act of
the Committee of Agriculture, No. 34, of April 28, 1980, prohibits the importa-
tion of potatoes susceptible to the wart disease, Synchytrium endobioticum,
from whatever source. This is based upon the official list of varieties of po-
tatoes, with their synonyms, immune from and susceptible to wart disease,
published under the authority of the National Institute of Agricultural Botany,
in England.

GRADING REQUIRED OF APPLES FROM THE UNITED STATES

As applying to the Channel Islands, the act of the Committee of Agricul-
ture, No. 35, of July 24, 1930, places the same restrictions upon the importa-
tion of apples from the United States as are imposed by the “Importation of
raw apples order of June 21, 1930, of England and Wales” (see pp. 8 and 10).

IMPORTATION OF PEAT PROHIBITED

The act of the Committee of Agriculture of April 6, 1935, prohibits the im-
portation of peat of any kind, moss litter, and leaf mold from all sources,
except the product called ‘“‘bacterized peat” from England and Scotland, under
certification as to its character.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, STATES OF THE ISLAND OF
GUERNSEY

BAstc LEGISLATION
[Destructive Insects and Pests Acts, 1877 to 1927, of Great Britain]
SUMMARY
IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

Potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.) : Importation from United States, Canada,
European France, and Huropean Belgium prohibited to prevent the introduction
of the Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say). (Ordinanee
No. IX, February 15, 1936, art. 3, p. 20.)



1940} SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 33

Agricultural and horticultural products of the soil (including seeds and plants,
fruits, and vegetables) : Importation directly or indirectly from Belgium and
France prohibited, to prevent the introduction of the Colorado potato beetle
(Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say). (Ordinance No. XXIV, August 31, 1931, as
supplemented by Ordinance No. III, January 20, 1936.)

Plants of sugar beet and mangold (Seta vulgaris L.) : Importation prohibited
from any country except Great Britain and Northern Ireland, Irish Free State,
Isle of Man, Island of Jersey, Island of Alderney, or any other of the Islands,
to prevent the introduction of virus diseases of those plants. (Ordinance No.
IX, February 15, 1936, art. 4, p. 21.)

Cider apples grown in European France or European Belgium: Importation
into Guernsey prohibited. (Ordinance IX, art. 7 (2).)

Grapevines (Vitis spp.) : Importation prohibited of grapevines and stocks,
cuttings, and scions thereof: Provided, that any person desiring to introduce a
new variety of grape into Guernsey may apply to the Royal Court for a permit.
The court may authorize importation under prescribed conditions. Precaution
against the phylloxera of grapevines. (Ordinance of September 30, 1935, p. 21.)

Gooseberry (Ribes spp.) : Importation of gooseberry bushes and cuttings pro-
hibited in any manner or by any route, to prevent the introduction of gooseberry
mildew (Sphaerotheca mors-uvae (Schw.) Berk & Curt.). (Ordinance No. XIV,
October 5, 1931.)

IMPORTATION RESTRICTED

All living plants and parts thereof (except seeds) for planting, except those
which are prohibited, as indicated above: Phytosanitary certificate required in
prescribed form issued by competent authority of country of origin. (See the
First and Second Schedules.) (Ordinance No. IX, 1936, art. 5, p. 21.)

Vegetables not grown in EHuropean France or European Belgium: Landing pro-
hibited unless each shipment is accompanied by a certificate of origin visaed
by a competent authority of the country of origin, indicating country and
place where the produce was grown. (Ordinance IX, February 15, 1936, art.
6 (2).

Gooseberry (Ribes spp.) : Lawful for the Administrative Council of the States
of Guernsey to permit the importation of gooseberry bushes and cuttings from
the United Kingdom if accompanied by a certificate of origin declaring that
gooseberry mildew (Sphaerotheca mors-uvae (Schw.) Berk & Curt.) does not
exist in the place where they were grown. (Ordinance No. XIV, October
5, 1931.)

Apples from the United States: When accompanied by prescribed grade
certificate. (See p. 22.)

IMPORTATION UNRESTRICTED

Seeds from all sources, except from France and Belgium: (Ordinance IX,
art. 5 (1), and the First Schedule. See pp. 21 and 22.)

GENERAL REGULATIONS
[Ordinance IX, February 15, 1936, of the Royal Court of Guernsey]
DEFINITIONS

ARTICLE 1. In these regulations, unless the context otherwise requires:

“Board” means the Board of Administration of the States of Island of
Guernsey.

“Tslands” means the islands of Guernsey, Sark, Herm, and Jethou.

“Plant” in the case of sugar beet and mangold includes living plants and
parts thereof except seeds, and in all other cases includes tree and shrub, and
the fruit, seeds, tubers, bulbs, corms, rhizomes, roots, layers, cuttings, and other
parts of a plant.

“Raw vegetables” includes raw onions, raw tomatoes, raw eggplants, and
raw salads.

“Unhealthy” means affected with any insect, fungus, or other pest destructive
to agricultural or horticultural crops.

APPLICATION OF THE REGULATIONS

ArT. 2. Nothing in these regulations shall be deemed to prohibit or restrict
the landing or transshipment in the islands or any of them of any plant or



34 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.—March

produce (other than potatoes) grown in the United Kingdom of Great Britain
and Northern Ireland, the Irish Free State, the Isle of Man, the island of Jersey,
or the island of Alderney, or in any other of the islands.

POTATO RESTRICTIONS

ArT. 38. (1) The landing in the islands of any potatoes grown in the under-
mentioned countries is prohibited:

The United States of America, the Dominion of Canada, European France, and
European Belgium.

(2) The transshipment in the islands or any of them of the potatoes specified
in subsection (1) of this article is prohibited except under and in accordance
with the conditions of a license issued by the Board.

(3) In this article “potatoes” includes haulms, leaves, and stalks.

IMPORTATION OF SUGAR BEET AND MANGOLD PROHIBITED

Art. 4. For the prevention of the introduction of virus diseases of sugar
beet and mangolds, the landing in the islands or any of them from any country
other than the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, the
Irish Free State, the Isle of Man, the island of Jersey, the island of Alderney.
or any other of the islands, of any living plant of sugar beet or mangold
(Beta vulgaris L.) is hereby prohibited except under and in accordance with
the conditions of a license issued by the Board.

PHYTOSANITARY CERTIFICATE REQUIRED FOR PLANTS

ArT. 5. (1) The landing in the islands or any of them of any of the plants
mentioned in the first schedule to these regulations, and of potatoes (other
than potatoes grown in any other of the islands) is hereby prohibited, unless
such consignment is accompanied by two copies of a certificate of a duly
authorized official of the Phytopathological Service of the country in which
the plants or potatoes were grown, in the form prescribed in the second
schedule to these regulations. The inspection referred to in the certificate
shall be carried out not more than 14 days prior to the date of shipment. The
original of the certificate shall be mailed by the exporter to the States Super-
visor, States Office, Guernsey, before the plants or potatoes are despatched.
Except in the case of shipments imported by mail, a copy of the certificate
shall be delivered to a Guernsey customs officer at the same time as and to-
gether with the entry relating to the shipment. In the case of shipments
imported by mail, a copy of the certificate shall be affixed to each package.

RESTRICTIONS ON THE IMPORTATION OF RAW VEGETABLES

ArT. 6. (1) The landing in the islands of any raw vegetables grown in
HKuropean France or European Belgium is prohibited,

(2) The landing in the islands of any raw vegetables not grown in European
France or Huropean Belgium is hereby prohibited unless each consignment
is accompanied by a certificate of origin visaed by a competent authority in
the country of origin, indicating the country and place where the produce
was grown. The certificates prescribed in this article shall be delivered to
a Guernsey customs officer at the same time and together with the entry
relating to the consignments.

(3) Nothing contained in this article shall be deemed to permit the landing
or transshipment in the islands of any potatoes of which the landing or trans-
shipment is prohibited or restricted under article 38.

RESTRICTIONS ON THE IMPORTATION OF RAW APPLES

ArT. 7. (1) The landing in the islands or any of them of any cider apples
grown in any European country other than France or Belgium is hereby pro-
hibited unless accompanied by a certificate of origin visaed by a competent
authority of the country of origin, indicating the country and the place where
the apples were grown.

(2) The landing in the islands or any of them of any cider apples grown
in European France or European Belgium is hereby prohibited.



1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 30

(3) The landing in the islands or any of them between July 7 and Novem-
ber 15 in any year of any raw apples grown in the United States of America is
hereby prohibited unless each consignment is accompanied by a certificate
signed by a duly authorized inspector of the Federal Department of Agriculture
in the prescribed form. (See pp. 8 and 10 of this circular.)

(4) The certificates prescribed in this article shall be delivered to a Guernsey
customs officer at the same time and together with the entry relating to the
consignment.

ArT. 8. Prescribes the procedure in the event that plants and plant products
are landed in the islands in contravention of these regulations.

ArT. 9. Defines the powers of an inspector, and the remaining regulations do
not concern the exporter.

First SCHEDULE
All plants and parts thereof (except seeds) for planting.

SECOND SCHEDULE

This is to.certify that the living plants/a representative sample of the living
plants*® included in the consignment of which particulars are given below
were/was* thoroughly examined on (date) by (name of inspector), a duly
authorized official of the (name of the plant protection organization), and found
to be healthy, no evidence of the presence of any insect, fungus, or pest destruc-
tive to horticultural crops having been found in them.

The following additional certificate must be furnished for all potatoes:

It is further certified that no case of the disease known as “wart disease”
or “black scab” of potatoes (Synchytrium endobioticum) has occurred at any
time on the farm or holding where the potatoes included in the consignment
were grown nor within 2 kilometers thereof.

The following additional certificate must be furnished in the case of every
consignment not consisting wholly of potatoes:

It is further certified that the consignment does not contain any plant of
sugar beet or mangold.

Wietia tes 2 = ee nn ee
Offietal ditions. 20 en ee

Number and description of packages.
Distinguishing marks.

Description of living plants or parts thereof.
Stated to be grown at.

Name and address of exporter.

Name and address of consignee.

IMPORTATION OF GRAPEVINES PROHIBITED
[Ordinance of September 30, 1895, relating to the grapevine phylloxera]

ARTICLE 1. The importation of grapevines, stocks, cuttings, or Scions thereof
into Guernsey is prohibited under penalty of their confiscation and immediate
destruction and a fine imposed upon importer, consignee, or possessor of such
plants.

PROVISIONS FOR INTRODUCTION OF NEW VARIETIES

ART. 2. However, any person desiring to introduce a new variety of grape
into Guernsey may apply to the Royal Court for a permit. That Court may
authorize the importation of scions of the new variety, in the quantity de-
termined by the Court, in hermetically’ closed boxes consigned to a person
designated by the Court for inspection and cleaning at the expense of the im-
porter, before delivery to the latter. Diseased scions will be destroyed.



® Omit what is not applicable.



36 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.—March

B. E. P. Q. 471, Supplement No. 2.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, UNION OF SOUTH AFRICA

FEBRUARY 23, 1940.
- RESTRICTIONS ON THE IMPORTATION OF POTATOES

By proclamation No. 155 the Governor-General of the Union of South Africa
has amended the Schedule of Proclamation No. 286 of 19386 by the insertion of
the following paragraph:

“(c) A certificate from the Department of Agriculture of the declared coun-
try of origin, or a certificate from some official institution in that country
which the Minister has agreed to recognize, stating that the crop from which
the potatoes were derived was officially inspected in the field and that the
degree of freedom from virus diseases was sufficiently high to ensure the suit-
ability of the progeny for seed purposes, and stating further that the said
crop was not grown in the vicinity of any unhealthy potato crops or other
plants infected with potato virus diseases.”

Effective February 1, 1940.

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

PENALTIES IMPOSED FOR VIOLATIONS OF THE
PLANT QUARANTINE ACT

QUARANTINES AFFECTING MEXICAN PRODUCTS

In the case of the United States versus the persons listed below, for attempting
to smuggle in contraband plant material, the penalties indicated were imposed
by the United States customs officials at the following ports:





Name Port Contraband Penalty
CoiMartinez ee s225 2 ee ee San Ysidro, Calif______ 2 avocad0S2.= 2. 2 ee eee $1. 00
IMTS Vee Vie SCO tt eee eee | oe Gots. Sean ees SLCACEUSED LAME See 1. 00
MirsSeARn@ nists: ee eee Brownsville, Tex_____- 300 chrysanthemus and 2 floral wreaths. 5. 00
IDA vad eG One 7 ed ene Ws snes wei | he ek One ee Ea eee 29 SUAVAS2 22 25522 Oe ee ee 1. 00
INMiariavINig | anes secs Sera cen eee eon | ry aes GOERS ea ae Ss OLanses and le pear a eee 1.00
SEVIS LE G27. Ci ae eee ee | Ra GOSS eta aes | L OFange--_ 22.2 + a ee 1. 00
SDETLT SAV AT 2 rr merece | Go: at a ae S" kimamey: sols thecs ss ee ee 1.00
ein Rey GOES eae ee Ds plant. 2c. 222 hs ee 1. 00
Via eis IN aj eee eee | ae GO See eet singe 4 MANGOES 2s = -2<-8 ee ee 1. 00
EVO SIN UIC OS tree Mima eats a geemes etaee Ot eee 3 Mangoes. sh 2 ca, AS) See eee 1.00
Carolina 17 ee Eagle Pass, Tex_______ 4 guavas and 4 cherimoyas_-_-_________- 1.00
IBATCOLO MES PIMOS cepa | Mace GO aaa eee ee 2O0fangesc: -=-- 2. eee 1. 00
ID PMS (CronmnelyA COS 8 eee eX I Oran S623. 2 2 eee 1. 00
JuangPerez= fs 42 2k es ae a ee ee Se GOS AE SUL RR S| EES GO=:SR A= at eieeds hae 1.00
GilbertopBenavidess= ssaa samen poe GOL eee rake eee 2OLTANSCS =< os ke eee 1. 00
JOsel Ou ase oe ee ee en ees GOSS ae kes Soe @ OLANGES ok. wl Sa ee 1. 00
C@Jaravenermaid ez maaan |e Gonsts. fa Selita 22 plantss:= 2 3 ee 1. 00
Temacio we vicsteees = emilee ese | aa (0 Ko) tee ee 1 plante=2.5..4 2236 2 1.00:
Maria Luisa Gonzales_________- IBIAP aso, Ube 4 bull bs_262!2 292021 wae. eee 1. 00
RamongheeNaviane zeae see | pee GOs ss Soh ae 5 AVOCA OSE a2) a= oe Se eee 1. 00
TRAE Min eres Sa On tine orl | cee GOS Sie See Iplant: 202 ee ee 1.00
WGeSRVOY SINT ST ae ee ea ee | doe eee IWaviocadosi: 4.2: eee ee 1. 00°
IMEaTCIAliS aCe 7 mene anne nennel eer CO a eres 4 plantsiand:2|sapotes== = . 70
‘Rhomas Martinez sen eeee Hidal20; ING eee se 2:aN ples. . 220 ee 1.00
Marianosvianez? 22) ns Seen Seah dor ake ee |e Of Se aie Ue er 1. 00
HAUICTAN OR G.AT:Z een on | as Ee Se ce 3-avocad 0S: 2. 22 ee 1. 00
Simona, Sandijoesass) ee ee GOs sek eee ree ORS: LAVOCRE O22. soe. re 1. 00
Hlorentinoyared Osea aan an | ns COS SO QuMNaANgoese 2. Le SLs. Lee 1. 00
Julio*ReynalS 6 = aa See ee eee dose A ee Pmango- S34 a. eee eee 1. 00
HShebanehvaminez seesee eee s(n downr Al) 2mMangoes:.. ees ee ee ee 1. 00
AcE aTtine7 ah 5. Niele aye aoe, | ays GO: Sey 2 2 ee G0v) ceki he eeeee 1. 00
RALAe eR OLLGS eee ee WaredOwlexs= ae 4 jobo plums, 2 haw apples, 3 guavas, 5. 00

3 sweet limes, 1 orange, 2 tangerines,
14 lb. green orange leaves.

1D) OLORES WRC ys11 a ee eee | eee GOS ea Sa Wplant. 26-6222 2 eee 1.00
Mrs. Ricarda Llanas_._____-___- fat Ole ee ee 2 plants 3 eee a 1. 00
Dolores Montenegro_____-_-----|_---- doe ae ae 5cactus plantsi22220 3 2 See 1.00
© Kenne seo as et, Rs | ee doe = ae AnlantS 2 oe eee eee 1. 00
IVT Se AMG OMLOMVIO] [Omer | eee G0i45. 82 ee 2:cherimoyas.i=:..2 228. eee 1.00
UO a IMA yAL I doe ee eee BrStallkciSU@ancan ene ese nee 1. 00
Ee GOn7 a) Oza: a Ee ee dome ee ae 4 joints sugarcane and 5 plants__------ 1.00
RenevEre vino = cess. oo eee ee Goma a Sistalksisucancaness-2 eee eee 1.00



1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS of



Name Port Contraband Penalty
Laredo, Tex
Mirssaames Risso..--_=---....-|_..-- Oe Sees ee Lest ayme 2e e Oe tee)) ee ee Se 11.
eemeee aT es i ae U5) a ee eee ee L
DonaldiGapberb--=-----.----=-_|=.--- GON. ooo 58 HIST APOIO bere oe oe ae eke, eee ee fe
A Sem eR EROS ee ee | ok GO 3 ee. _ Lepaant oer ee oe a ee le
Mrs. Taylor E. Newman-------.|----- dos. See. SF DAL ATIS CHINGS arte oe ee oes eA if
Miss Clotilde Newman_______--]____- Gow a See eae La es Ss a gl, ie
BEGG SON GL Chee ee dpe ee _ [plates 2 eee eee eee eee ee 1
Vrs; Remana .Wlores=-_.......-_|_--.. 010). ek eee PAOLATI SES Seen es eee eee ad ee if
ranciseo Guiterrez__------....|_-_-- Cores Ven abe = LOLA OSs Soe ee Se Ae eee ee Lyne 1;
ARON) rie COs i ODATA CSc tgs a Sk a eg Ae
Johnne7mekermane® = - 5 = = |a- 8 Gols: 29 25 es 22 jgorance ts 5 3: Wj A Fe § £ eee A
po aoneViNngtele 2. - 8k ooo Monee ae. ae AV OCAUOS = eats ae a ee ee Meee ie
Salvador Capetillo___-..--.2222.|__-.- dom 25 Fy i385. 3 4 oranges, 10 plants, 3 avocados____--_-_- fe
ins wd welwassatete. oo | GO Eiea tae. AAV OCAGO Smite oe ees wees ein dees sO oS 12
WIONPIVIanANeZ sess eee (6 (0) ee = a DIOTAN GES ee et ke ee ee ee ee | fe
1D). lO COs Oie = ee OQ =aete = See: oe 1 orange and 2 apples__________________ 1.
Mirsbipaes INChOlas=—.-—- ._.-.|2._.- do ee. 7 plants, 1% lb. tree seed, and % lb. 1
seed cotton.
Cunaaope nioss-—-2---..----..|-...- Gos A. ye Lisplantss2t: 2 Meena ees i?
ie); Ch onl) =. es 0-2. eee. ee Liplant. Sasst > Seeec tebe BS pies ele i;
Ne COO Der ee et GQEe =. eee ee 3 apples and 5 oranges__....._.__.___.- Le
Waicrina Gallegos--_-.--.-=--=.=|_-_.- MOS ware ee WAN OCAD OEE et mee was eer ete | nee IF
Mrs. Maria Esguivel___..---.-_|____- Gor 2. ee ae 18 plants. 22! eee SEIS PN 1.
Mins EeAVidINOZ 255-2 -22.2--|---=- Gon! as ee ae 1 mango seed and 1 orange____________ 1.
iVMariesRodemaker.—-_.:.....-.|-.--< os ee. ee POF AN LCS £2 a ee ee a
IMG By yl Lob Se ee Qt & See Ve ATNANE OCS sas e2 ke Lee. eee ee eee di
DV EATAS AV ALC 7a ea 8 a tls Aa GOLY. 2. 3 Gplants Bisel) ee». Pee 3
Ve Vda de:;Zutuches..--..% _|-.=.- (MO! 55 2_- k ee Zi OTAM ECS»: ap A 8 RP oe a 1,
TS OSA Ollero..-_-...--- | .__— Gore ee ae iorance and 2 plantse-=- se ee ¥.

SSSSSSSSSSS SSSSSSSSSSSSSESSES



ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY
AND PLANT QUARANTINE

_ Lee A. Strone, Chief.

S. A. ROHWER, Assistant Chief.

Avery 8S. Hoyt, Assistant Chief.

P. N. ANNAND, Assistant Chief.

K.. H. SPENCER, Business Manager.

Roya P. CURRIE, Lditor.

MABEL COoLcorD, Librarian.

J. A. HysLop, in Charge, Division of Insect Pest Survey and Information.

J. I. HAMBLETON, in Charge, Division of Bee Culture Investigations.

D. L. VAN DINE, in Charge, Division of Fruit Insect Investigations.

F. C. CRAIGHEAD, in Charge, Division of Forest Insect Investigations.

W. H. WHITE, in Charge, Division of Truck Crop and Garden Insect Investiga-

tions.

M. PACKARD, in Charge, Division of Cereal and Forage Insect Investigations.

W. HARNED, in Charge, Division of Cotton Insect Investigations.

. C. BisHopp, in Charge, Division of Insects Affecting Man and Animals.

A. HAWKINS, in Charge, Division of Control Investigations.

C. Roark, in Charge, Division of Insecticides and Fungicides.

F. W. MUESEBECK, in Charge, Division of Insect Identification.

P. CLAUSEN, in Charge, Division of Foreign Parasite Introduction.

B. FRACKER, in Charge, Division of Plant Disease Control.

B. M. GADDIS, in Charge, Division of Domestic Plant Quarantines.

BE. R. Sasscer, in Charge, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines.

A. F. Burcess, in Field Charge, Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail Moth Control
(headquarters, Greenfield, Mass.).

BE. G. Brewer, in Field Charge, Japanese Beetle and Gypsy Moth and Brown-
Tail Moth Quarantines, European Corn Borer Certification, and Dutch Elm
Disease Eradication (headquarters, Bloomfield, N. J.).

R. BE. McDONALD, in Field Charge, Pink Bollworm and Thurberia Weevil Quar-
antines (headquarters, San Antonio, Tez.).

P. A. Homwate, in Field Charge, Mexican Fruitfiy Quarantine (headquarters
Harlingen, Tea.).

A. C. Baxer, in Field Charge, Fruitfly Investigations (headquarters, Mexico
City, Mewico.).

38

NOOO

U.S. GOVERNMEINT PRINTING OFFICE: 1940



S. R. A.B. E. P. Q. No. 143 Issued September 1940

United States Department of Agriculture

BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS

APRIL-JUNE 1940

CONTENTS
Page
Memmmnte and oper 6facial aTinouncements/_- _+2--- -__=--_-22-_-_- --J-2- 39
AMMBMnceImennrelaiim= tO cofiee quarantine (No, 73)2~-__--.-:----=____--=-_--/.-.-..2-2--_..2 39
iMaieitGeuLoOreallectorsiol Customs (1. ID: (50129) ee Se et 39
Announcement relating to fruit and vegetable quarantine (No. 56)_-----_-__-___-_-_____-_-_____- 40
factucnous Locouectors ot customs: (TD: 5016). a -- —2-2 one a ze seu see 2 - === =--=--=-21 40
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (No. 48)__-___-_-_________________________ 40
Japanese beetle quarantine continued—Extensions of area announced as of April 5, 1940____- 40
Seneca (uaratrine eontinued. =)! _ Se 2e1 22) AA so sk Sea Th ae 41
Modifications of Japanese beetle quarantine regulations (amendment No. 2, effective April 5,
ee 42
Notice to general public through HeWSbapelstr see. 224s ia ee ee ea 51
List of true bulbs, corms, and tubers exempted from Japanese beetle certification (B. E.
RM) ee Be ee ee ee ee 51
Quarantine restrictions on Japanese beetle modified _:--~___-___.__--.___-___--__-__-.-__.-- 52
Modifications of Japanese beetle quarantine regulations (amendment No. 3, effective May
ict ee nnn een 8 ob ee eS ee a SS 2 ee ee 555 Ba Sa aw 52
Noticenoxeneralipublice through. neyspapers._-- -=.-:.---- =. .-2.-+-2-—-=_-saen---- == 55
Administrative instructions to inspectors on the treatment of nursery products, fruits,
vegetables, and soil for the Japanese beetle (B. E. P. Q. 499, supplement No. 2)________ 56
Order amending Section 301.48-5, Chapter III, Title 7, Code of Federal Regulations,
and modifying the Japanese beetle qua” antine regulations as to shipments of fruits
and vegetables from certain areas in Virginia (B. = PQ) 500) 2h: See Bees! avis 57
Announcement relating fermi: bollyormiquarantine (N0O.52).. 28. --< 325-5. 21 Pe a . 57
Administrative instructions relating to pink bellworm Were ate eee the treatment
requirements as to cotton linters, cottonseed hulls, cake, and meal and extending the area

in which baled cotton lint may be moved from certain lightly infested areas in New Mexico

nigulexaswwaAnhout treatment (B.E. P,Q. 493, .revised)2.. 2-2. 2222 cs ae ee 57

Announcements relating to white-fringed beetle quarantine COINIO 02) pe ae eee a 58
Administrative instructions—Removal of white-fringed beetle certification requirements
until February 1, 1941, for specified articles consigned from designated portions of the

LPL NeaeTanstes or) ne). 48), lith TeVISION) 4-22 See 58

BERPNMAINATRUOSTOSUIMASHOLS = — 2+ = ee 8 of Se ae oe 2 ee eS 59

Poaaminalanseesionotpiants and plant products.....-..-2.2-24-2ib2 22 ea 59

Chanre or pian anspection place in Arizona_:__._........_.---_-----.---_+ +... LSA Me es 59

ISS TET eieiS Tn a2 0 es ee ee ee oe ee eS 60
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Cuba (P. Q. C. A. 283, rev ised, supplement

Inner ns napa nn ee ne ars a a a ee 60
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Kingdom of Egypt (B. E.P, Q. 375, revised, supple-

Tica nian emer en eree. hes SY ts) v2 Pee Be eel ee FEAR se eee ee Fat 60
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Mexico (B. E. P. 2 a supplement No. 2)_ 61
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Paraguay (B. . Q. 502, supplement

JI... teh est fe 3 RE ee en se ee ee ee ee ae ee ee ae 61

Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act__________________________________- 62
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine____________________________-______ 64

QUARANTINE AND OTHER OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS

ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO COFFEE QUARANTINE (NO. 73)
INSTRUCTIONS TO COLLECTORS OF CUSTOMS

PLANT QUARANTINE ACT—COFFEE QUARANTINE—NOTICE OF QUARANTINE No. 73,
PROHIBITING IMPORTATION INTO PUERTO RICO OF COMMERCIAL SHIPMENTS OF
UNROASTED SEEDS OR BEANS OF COFFEE, COFFEE FRUITS OR BERRIES, AND COFFEE
PLANTS AND LEAVES (T. D. 50129)

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONER OF CUSTOMS,
Washington, D. C., April 10, 1940.

T'o Collectors of Customs and Others Concerned:

The appended copy of B. E. P. Q. 73, Notice of Quarantine No. 73 (Coffee
Quarantine), effective April 1, 1940, prohibits the importation into the Island of

251222—40——-1 oo



AQ BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

Puerto Rico from ali foreign countries and localities of commercial shipments
of unroasted seeds or beans of coffee, coffee fruits or berries, and coffee plants
and leaves, to guard against the entry of the coffee berry borer and the coffee
rust.

The number of this Treasury decision should be inserted as a marginal refer-
ence opposite articles 578 (6) (1) and 579 (a), Customs Regulations of 1937.

By direction of the Commissioner:

W. R. JOHNSON,
Deputy Commissioner of Customs.

(Then follows the text of the quarantine.)

ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO FRUIT AND VEGETABLE QUARAN-

TINE (NO. 56)
INSTRUCTIONS TO COLLECTORS OF CUSTOMS

PLANT QUARANTINE AOCT—FRUIT AND VEGETABLE QUARANTINE—CITRUS FRUIT
FRoM MEXIcOo IN TRANSIT TO FOREIGN COUNTRIES VIA THD UNITED STATES (T. D.
50161)

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,
OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONER OF CUSTOMS,
Washington, D. C., May 31, 19:40.

To Collectors of Customs and Others Concerned: ,

The appended copy of B. H. P. Q. Circular No. 507, entitled “Administrative
Instructions; Citrus Fruit from Mexico in Transit to Foreign Countries via
the United States” issued by the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant
Quarantine, United States Department of Agriculture, effective January 24, 1940,
is published for the information and guidance of customs officers and others
concerned. This circular supersedes P. Q. C. A. 305, Revised, which was not
published as a Treasury decision.

The humber of this Treasury decision should be inserted as a marginal refer-
ence opposite articles 578 (a) and (b) (1), and 579 (a), Customs Regulations
of 1937.

By direction of the Commissioner:

W. R. JOHNSON,
Deputy Commissioner of Customs.

(Then follows the text of the circular.)

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE
(NO. 48)

JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE CONTINUED—EXTENSIONS OF AREA ANNOUNCED
AS OF APRIL 5, 1940
APRIL 5, 1940.

After careful consideration of information developed at the public conference
held in Washington on February 27, 1940, with respect to the Federal Japanese
beetle quarantine, the Secretary of Agriculture has signed a revision of the
quarantine, effective April 5. Some additional territory is being brought under
the quarantine. The additions are as follows:

Maryland—All of Caroline, Harford, and Talbot Counties not heretofore
under regulation; election districts Nos. 4, 7, and 10 in Baltimore County; the
city of Westminster, and the election districts of Mount Airy (No. 138), Taney-
town (No. 1), and Uniontown (No. 2), in Carroll County, election district of
Woodville (No. 18), in Frederick County; election district of Funkstown (No.
10) in Washington County; election district of Sharptown (No. 10) in Wicomico
County.

New York—Erwin Township in Steuben County.

Ohio—Entire Counties of Belmont, Guernsey, Medina, Wayne, and the town-
ships of Kirtland, Mentor, and Willoughby, and the villages of Kirtland Hills,



1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 41

Lakeline, Mentor, Mentor-on-the-Lake, Waite Hill, Wickliffe, Willoughby, and
Willowick, in Lake County.

Pennsylvania—All of Clarion County not heretofore under regulation; the
townships of Millcreek, Erie, Wayne, and the borough of Corry in Erie County,
placing Erie and Corry under regulation as isolated points; all of Venango
County except the townships of Allegheny, Canal, Cherrytree, Clinton, Irwin,
Jackson, Mineral, Oakland, Oilcreek, Plum, Scrubgrass, and Victory, and the
boroughs of Clintonville, Cooperstown, and Pleasantville.

West Virginia.—All of Brooke County and all of Jefferson County not here-
tofore under regulation; districts of Lubeck and Tygart in Wood County and the
city of Charleston, the latter as an isolated point. Wheeling is brought
within the main regulated area.

The special area from which the movement of fruits and vegetables by motor-
truck or refrigerator car is inspected has been extended to New York City
and surrounding area and additional territory as specified in the quarantine
regulations. Since the effective date of this change does not take place until
later the particulars are not being included in this advance notice.

Shippers of fruits and vegetables from a designated area in southern Virginia
will find that the season during which certification is required for such pro-
duce has been advanced to begin with June 1. In all other regulated areas
the season remains the same as heretofore—from June 15 to October 15,
inclusive.

Christmas trees and other parts of plants without roots and soil-free are
exempted from the certification requirements except that the certificate is still
required in shipping cut flowers from June 15 to October 15, inclusive.

It is anticipated that within a few days revised copies of Quarantine No. 48
will be available in order that you may become familiar with all provisions
contained therein. This is intended to serve in the meantime for those who
need this information more promptly than the full text of the quarantine as
revised can be made available.



LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE CONTINUED

WASHINGTON, D. C., April 5.

Secretary of Agriculture Henry A. Wallace today signed an order calling
for the continuance of the Federal Japanese beetle quarantine under the super-
vision of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine. The same order
enlarges the regulated area which goes under quarantine today (April 5).

At a public conference in Washington, February 27, 1940, representatives
of nurserymen and plant-quarantine officials from 18 States and Canada discussed
the advisability of revoking the Federal quarantine. With one exception, all
favored its continuance.

- Officials of the Bureau said the regulated area will be extended to include
all of Caroline, Harford, and Talbot Counties, and some additional townships,
Carroll, Frederick, Washington, and Wicomico Counties, and Baltimore, all
in Maryland; all of Belmont, Guernsey, Medina, Wayne, and a part of Lake
Counties in Ohio; all of Clarion, and parts of Venango and Hrie Counties in
Pennsylvania; all of Brooke and Jefferson and part of Wood Counties in West
Virginia ; Erwin Township in Steuben County, New York. The newly added area
also includes the outlying cities of Corry and Erie, Pa., and Charleston, W. Va.

The special area from which the movement of fruits and vegetables by
motortruck or refrigerator car is inspected has been extended to New York City
and surrounding area including the town of Greenwich, in Fairfield County,
Conn., and more area in Maryland, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania.

Shippers of fruits and vegetables from a designated area in southern Virginia
will find that the season during which certification is required for such
produce has been advanced to begin with June 1. In all other regulated
areas the season remains the same as heretofore—from June 15 to October
15, inclusive.

Christmas trees and other parts of plants without roots and soil-free are
exempted from the certification requirements except that the certificate is
still required in shipping cut flowers from June 15 to October 15, inclusive.



4? BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

MODIFICATIONS OF JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE REGULATIONS

INTRODUCTORY NOTE

Extensions of the regulated areas in Maryland, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania,
and West Virginia are made in the following revision of regulation 3. In Mary-
land, the entire counties of Caroline, Harford, and Talbot are brought under regu-
lation, and minor extensions have been made in the counties of Baltimore, Carroll,
Frederick, Washington, and Wicomico. In New York, but one community is
added, Erwin Township in Steuben County. The newly added Ohio area in-
cludes the entire counties of Belmont, Guernsey, Medina, Wayne, and part of
Lake County. The area in Pennsylvania has been extended to all of Clarion
County and parts of Venango and Erie Counties, placing Corry and Erie under
regulation as isolated points. West Virginia extensions include Brooke County,
the whole of Jefferson County, area in Wood County, and the city of Charleston,
the latter as an isolated point. Wheeling is brought within the main regulated
area,

Under regulation 5, the special area from which the movement of fruits and
vegetables by motortruck or refrigerator car is regulated has been extended to
New York City and surrounding area, including one town in Connecticut, as well
as additional area in Maryland, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania.

The season during which fruits and vegetables are required to be certified when.
shipped from the regulated area remains the same as heretofore, from June 15 to
October 15, except that in the case of a small area in Virginia, designated in sub-
section (A) of regulation 5, certification is required beginning June 1. ;

Certification requirements are lifted as to portions of plants without roots and
free from soil, such as branches, twigs, and Christmas trees, and also as to soil-
free, dried roots incapable of propagation and appropriately labeled. The cer-
tification requirements remain in effect as to cut flowers shipped from June 15
to October 15, inclusive. Plants of trailing arbutus, heretofore exempted part of
the year when shipped without primary roots and soil-free, are now exempt from.
certification from October 16 to June 14, provided they are soil-free.

AVERY S. Hoyt,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Piant Quarantine.

AMENDMENT NO 2 TO THE RULES AND REGULATIONS (SEVENTEENTH REVISION):
SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 48

[Approved April 4, 1940; effective April 5, 1940]

Under authority conferred by the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912 (387
Stat. 315), as amended by the act of Congress approved March 4, 1917 (39) Stat.
1124, 1165), it is ordered that regulations 3, 5, and 6 (secs. 301.483, 5, and 6) of
the rules and regulations (seventeenth revision) supplemental to Notice of Quar-
antine No. 48 (sec. 301.48) on account of the Japanese beetle, which were promul-
gated February 16, 1939, as amended, are hereby further amended to read as
follows:

REGULATION 3

Sec, 301.48-38. Regulated areas.—In accordance with the provisos to Notice of
Quarantine No. 48 (twelfth revision) (sec. 301.48), the Secretary of Agriculture
designates as regulated areas for the purpose of these regulations the States, Dis-
trict, counties, townships, towns, cities, election districts, and magisterial districts
listed below, including all cities, towns, boroughs, or other political subdivisions
within their limits:

Connecticut.—The entire State.

Delaware.—tThe entire State.

District of Columbia.—The entire District.

Maine.—County of York; towns of Auburn and Lewiston, in Androscoggin
County; towns of Cape Hlizabeth, Gorham, Gray, New Gloucester, Raymond,
Scarboro, Standish, and the cities of Portland, South Portland, Westbrook, and
Windham, in Cumberland County; the city of Waterville, in Kennebec County;
and the city of Brewer, in Penobscot County.

Marytand.—Counties of Caroline, Cecil, Harford, Kent, Queen Annes, Somer-
set, Talbot, and Worcester; the city of Baltimore; the city of Cumberland, the.





1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 43

town of Frostburg, and election districts Nos. 4, 5, 6, 7, 11, 12, 14, 22. 23, 24, 26,
29, 31, and 82 in Allegany County; the city of Annapolis and election districts
Nos. 2, 3, 4, and 5, in Anne Arundel County; all of Baitimore County except elec-
tion districts Nos. 5 and 6; the city of Westminster, and the election districts
of Freedom (No. 5), Hampstead (No. 8), Mount Airy (No. 13), New Windsor
(No. 11), Taneytown (No. 1), Uniontown (No. 2), and Westminster (No. 7), in
Carroli County; election districts of La Plata and White Plains, in Charles
County; election districts of Cambridge (No. 7), East New Market (No. 2),
Hurlock (No. 15), and Wiliiamsburg (No. 12), in Dorchester County; election
districts of Brunswick (No. 25), Buckeystown (No. 1), Frederick (No. 2), Jef-
ferson (No. 14), New Market (No. 9), Petersville (No. 12), and Woodville
(No. 18), in Frederick County; election districts of Elkridge (No. 1), Ellicott
City (No. 2), Guilford (No. 6), and West Friendship (No. 3), in Howard
County; election districts of Colesville (No. 5), and Rockville (No. 4), in Mont-
gomery County, and those portions of the election districts of Bethesda (No. 7),
and Wheaton (No. 18), in said county located within the established boundaries
ot the so-called Washington Suburban Sanitary District; all of Prince Georges
County except the election districts of Aquasco (No. 8), and Noitingham (No. 4):
election districts of Funkstown (No. 10), Hagerstown (Nos. 3, 17, 21, 22, 24,
and 25), Halfway (No. 26), Leitersburg (No. 9). Sandy Hook (No. 11), Sharps-
burg (No. 1), and Williamsport (No. 2), in Washington County; election dis-
tricts of Camden (No. 13), Delmar (No. 11), Dennis (No. 6), Fruitland (No. 16),
Nutters (No. 8), Parsons (No. 5), Pittsburg (No. 4), Salisbury (No. 9), and
the town of Salisbury, Sharptown (No. 10), Trappe (No. 7), and Willards
(No. 14), in Wicomico County.

Massachusetts —The entire State.

New Hampshire.—Counties of Belknap, Cheshire, Hillsboro, Merrimack, Rock-
ingham, Strafford, and Sullivan; towns of Brookfield, Eaton, Effingham, Freedom,
Madison, Moultonboro, Ossipee, Sandwich, Tamworth, Tuftonboro, Wakefield, arid
Wolfeboro, in Carroll County; towns of Alexandria, Ashland, Bridgewater, Bris-
tol, Canaan, Dorchester, Enfield, Grafton, Groton, Hanover, Hebron, Holderness,
Lebanon, Lyme, Orange, and Plymouth, in Grafton County.

New Jersey.—The entire State.

New York.—Counties of Albany, Bronx, Broome, Chemung, Chenango, Columbia,
Cortland, Delaware, Dutchess, Fulton, Greene. Kings, Madison, Montgomery, Nas-
sau, New York, Oneida, Onondaga. Orange, Otsego, Putham, Queens, Rensselaer,
Richmond, Roskland, Saratoga, Schenectady, Schoharie, Suffolk, Sullivan, Tioga,
Ulster, Washington, and Westchester; towns of Red House and Salamane¢a, and
the city of Salamanca, in Cattaraugus County: towns of Amherst, Cheektowaga,
and Tonawanda, and the cities of Buffalo and Lackawanna, in Erie County ; towns
of Columbia, Danube, Fairfield, Frankfort, German Flats, Herkimer, Litchfield,
Little Falls, Manheim, Newport, Salisbury, Schuyler, Stark, Warren, and Win-
field, and the city of Little Falls, in Herkimer County; town of Watertown and
city of Watertown, in Jefferson County; town of Mount Morris and village of
Mount Morris, in Livingston County; city of Rochester and town of Brighton,
in Monroe County; towns of Catherine, Cayuta, Dix, Hector, Montour, and
Reading, and the borough of Watkins Glen, in Schuyler County; towns of Caton,
Corning, Erwin, Hornby, and Hornellsville, and the cities of Corning and Hornell,
in Steuben County; towns of Caroline, Danby, Dryden, Enfield, Ithaca, Newfield,
and the city of Ithaca. in Tompkins County; towns of Luzerne and Queensbury
and the city of Glens Falls, in Warren County.

Ohio.—Counties of Belmont, Carroll, Columbiana, Cuyahoga, Guernsey, Har-
rison, Jefferson, Mahoning, Medina, Portage, Stark, Summit, Tuscarawas, and
Wayne; the city of Coshocton, in Coshocton County; the city of Columbus, and
villages of Bexley, Grandview, Grandview Heights, Hanford, Marble Cliff, and
Upper Arlington, in Franklin County; townships of Kirtland, Mentor, and Wil-
loughby, and the villages of Kirtland Hills, Lakeline, Mentor, Mentor-on-the-
Lake, Waite Hill, Wickliffe, Willoughby, and Willowick, in Lake County; the town-
ship of Newark and city of Newark, in Licking Cownty; the city of Toledo, in
Lucas County; the township of Madison and the city of Mansfield, in Richland
County; townships of Bazetta, Braceville, Brookfield, Champion, Fowler, Hart-
ford, Howland, Hubbard, Liberty, Lordstown, Newton, Southington, Warren,
Weathersfield, and Vienna, the cities of Niles and Warren, and the villages of
Cortland, Girard, Hubbard, McDonald, Newton Falls, and Orangeville, in
Trumbull County.



44 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

Pennsylvania.—The entire State, except Crawford and Forest Counties; Mer-
cer Township in Butler County; townships of Amity, Concord, Conneaut, Elk
Creek, Fairview, Franklin, Girard, Greene, Greenfield, Harborcreek, Le Boeuf,
McKean, North East, Springfield, Summit, Union, Venango, Washington, and
Waterford, and the boroughs of Albion, Cranesville, East Springfield, Edinboro,
Elgin, Fairview, Girard, Lawrence Park, Middleboro, Mill Village, North East,
North Girard, Platea, Union City, Waterford, Wattsburg, and Wesleyville, in
Hrie County; townships of Coolspring, Deer Creek, Delaware, East Lackawan-
nock, Fairview, Findley, French Creek, Greene, Hempfield, Jackson, Jefferson,
Lackawannock, Lake, Liberty, Mill Creek, New Vernon, Otter Creek, Perry,
Pine, Pymatuning, Salem, Sandy Creek, Sandy Lake, South Pymatuning, Spring-
field, Sugar Grove, West Salem, Wilmington, Wolf Creek, and Worth, and the
boroughs of Clarksville, Fredonia, Greenville, Grove City, Jackson Center, James-
town, Mercer, New Lebanon, Sandy Lake, Sheakleyville, and Stoneboro, in
Mercer County; townships of Allegheny, Canal, Cherrytree, Clinton, Irwin,
Jackson, Mineral, Oakland, Gilcreek, Plum, Scrubgrass, and Victory, and the
boroughs of Clintonville, Cooperstown, and Pleasantville, in Venango County;
and the townships of Brokenstraw, Cherry Grove, Columbus, Conewango, Deer-
field, Eldred, Farmington, Freehold, Limestone, Pine Grove, Pittsfield, Pleasant,
Southwest, Spring Creek, Sugar Grove, Triumph, Watson (including the bor-
oughs of Bear Lake, Grand Valley, Sugar Grove, Tidioute, and Youngsville),
in Warren County.

Rhode Island.—The entire State. :

Vermont.—Counties of Bennington, Rutland, Windham, and Windsor; and the
town of Burlington, in Chittenden County.

Virginia.—Counties of Accomac, Arlington, Culpeper, Elizabeth City, Fairfax,
Fauquier, Henrico, Loudoun, Norfolk, Northampton, Prince William, Princess
Anne, and Stafford; magisterial districts of Dale and Manchester, in Chester-
field County; magisterial district of Sleepy Hole, in Nansemona County; magis-
terial district of Courtland, in Spotsylvania County; C Camp Stuart, in Warwick
County; magisterial district of Washington, in Westmoreland County: and the
cities of Alexandria, Fredericksburg, Hampton, Newport News, Norfolk, Ports-
mouth, Richmond, South Norfolk, and Suffolk.

West Virginia—Counties of Brooke, Hancock, Harrison, Jefferson, Marion,
Monongalia, and Taylor; districts of Arden, Falling Waters, Hedgesville, and
Opequon, and the city of Martinsburg, in Berkeley County; the city of Charleston
in Kanawha County ; town of Keyser and district of Frankfort, in Mineral County ;
the city of Wheeling, in Ohio County; and the city of Parkersburg, and districts
of Lubeck and Tygart, in Wood County.

REGULATION 5

Sec. 301.48-5. Restrictions on the movement of fruits and vegetables—A.
Control of movement.—(1) Unless a certificate or permit shall have been issued
therefor, by an inspector, except as provided in paragraphs (a) to (e), inclusive,
of this regulation: (4) No green corn on the cob, beans in the pod, bananas, apples,
peaches, blackberries. blueberries, huckleberries, or raspberries shall be moved or
allowed to be moved interstate from any regulated area to or through any point
outside thereof; and (ii) no fruits or vegetables of any kind shall be moved or
allowed to be moved interstate via refrigerator car or motortruck from the State,
District, counties, election districts, townships, towns, or cities listed below to or
through any point outside the regulated areas.

Connecticut.—Town of Greenwich in Fairfield County.

Delaware.—The entire State.

District of Columbia.—The entire District.

Maryland.—Counties of Cecil, Harford, Kent, Queen Annes, Somerset, and
Worcester ; election district No. 5 in Anne Arundel County: the city of Baltimore ;
all of Baltimore County except election districts Nos. 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 10; all of
Caroline County except election districts of American Corners (No. 8), and Hills-
boro (No. 6) ; election districts of Cambridge (No. 7), East New Market (No. 2),
Hurlock (No. 15), and Williamsburg (No. 12), in Dorchester County; election
districts of Camden (No. 18), Delmar (No. 11), Dennis (No. 6), Fruitland (No.
16), Nutters (No. 8), Parsons (No. 5), Pittsburg (No. 4), Salisbury (No. 9), and
the town of Salisbury, Trappe (No. 7), and Willard (No. 14), in Wicomico County.

1Seces. 301.48-3, 5, 6, 7, and 9 issued under authority of sec. 8, 37 Stat. 318; 39 Stat.
1165; 44 Stat. 250; 7 U.S. C. 161.



1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 45

New Jersey.—Counties of Atlantic, Burlington, Camden, Cape May, Cumber-
land, Essex, Gloucester, Hudson, Hunterdon, Mercer, Middlesex, Monmouth, Ocean,
Salem, Somerset, and Union; townships of Lodi, Lyndhurst, Overpeck, Rochelle
Park, Saddle River, and Teaneck, the cities of Englewood, Garfield and Hacken-
sack, and the boroughs of Bogota, Carlstadt, Cliffside Park, East Paterson, East
Rutherford, Edgewater, Englewood Cliffs, Fair Lawn, Fairview, Fort Lee, Glen
Rock, Hasbrouck Heights, Leonia, Little Ferry, Lodi, Maywood, Moonachie, North
Arlington, Palisades Park, Ridgefield, Rutherford, Teterboro, Wallington, and
Wood Ridge, in Bergen County; townships of Chatham, Chester, Denville, East
Hanover, Hanover, Harding, Mendham, Morris, Morristown, Parsipany-Troy Hills,
Passaic, Randolph, and Washington, and the boroughs of Chatham, Florham
Park, Madison, Mendham, and Morris Plains, in Morris County; township of
Little Falls, the cities of Clifton, Passaic, Paterson, and the boroughs of Haledon,
Hawthorne, North Haledon, Prospect Park, Totowa, and West Paterson, in
Passaic County; townships of Franklin, Greenwich, Lopatcong, Mansfield, Phil-
lipsburg, Pohatcong, and Washington, and the boroughs of Alpha and Washington,
in Warren County.

New York.—Counties of Bronx, Kings, New York, Queens, and Richmond ;
town of North Hempstead, in Nassau County; towns of Eastchester, Harrison,
Mamaroneck, Pelham, Rye, and Scarsdale, and the cities of Mount Vernon, New
Rochelle, White Plains, and Yonkers, in Westchester County.

Pennsylwania.—Counties of Bucks, Chester, Delaware, Lancaster, Montgomery,
and Philadelphia; townships of Alsace, Amity, Bern, Brecknock, Caernarvon,
Colebrookdale, Cumru, District, Douglass, Earl, Exeter, Hereford, Lower Alsace,
Maidencreek, Muhlenberg, Oley, Ontelaunee, Pike, Robeson, Rockland, Ruscomb-
manor, South Heidelberg, Spring, Union, and Washington, the city of Reading,
and the boroughs of Bally, Bechtelsville, Birdsboro, Boyertown, Mohnton, Mount
Penn, Saint Lawrence, Shillington, Sinking Spring, Temple, West Lawn, West
Reading, Wyomissing, and Wyomissing Hills, in Berks County; townships -of
Londonderry, Lower Paxton, Lower Swatara, Susquehanna, and Swatara, the
city of Harrisburg, and the boroughs of Highspire, Middletown, Paxtang, Pen-
brook, Royalton, and Steelton, in Dauphin County ; townships of Lower Macungie,
Lower Milford, Upper Milford, and Upper Saucon, and the boroughs of Coopers-
burg, and Emaus, in Lehigh Couniy; townships of Lower Saucon and Williams,
in Northampton County; townships of Lower Chanceford and Peach Bottom,
in York County.

Virginia.—Counties of Accomac, Arlington, and Northampton.

Provided, That the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine
may by administrative instructions extend or reduce the areas specified in this
regulation when in his judgment such action is considered advisable.

(a) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of fruits and vege-
tables between October 16 and June 14, inclusive, except that in the case of move-
ment interstate from the following areas, the exemption applies only during the
period from October 16 to May 31, inclusive:

Virginia.—The counties of Accomac, Elizabeth City, Norfolk, Northampton,
and Princess Anne ; the magisterial district of Sleepy Hole, in Nansemond County,
Camp Stuart in Warwick County, and the cities of Hampton, Newport News,
Norfolk, Portsmouth, South Norfolk, and Suffolk.

(b) No certificate or permit will be required for the interstate movement
of fruits and vegetables when transported by a common carrier on a through
bill of lading either from an area not under regulation through a regulated
area to another nonregulated area, or from a regulated area through a non-
regulated area to another regulated area, except that a certificate is required
for interstate movement from the main regulated area to the following-named
isolated points: Brewer and Waterville, Maine; Brighton, Buffalo, Hornell,
Mount Morris, Rochester, and Watertown, and the town of Hornellsyille,
Steuben County, N. Y., or to other regulated parts of Erie, Jefferson, and
Livingston Counties, N. Y.; Columbus, Coshocton, Mansfield. Newark, and
Toledo, Ohio, or to other regulated parts of Licking and Richland Counties,
Ohio; Corry and Erie, Pa.; Burlington, Vt.; and Charleston and Parkersburg,
W. Va. No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of fruits and
vegetables from the above-named isolated points.

(c) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of fruits ana
vegetables when they shall have been manufactured or processed in such a
manner that in the judgment of the inspector no infestation could be
transmitted.



AG BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

(d) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of any shipments
of (1) apples or peaches of less than 15 pounds to the shipment; (2) bananas
in single bunches packed in commercial containers; or (3) bananas singly, or
in individual hands.

(e) No restrictions are placed on the interestate movement of commercially
packed apples or commercially packed peaches in any quantity, except those
moving via refrigerator cars or motortrucks from the area listed in paragraph
(1) of this regulation.

(2) No restrictions are placed on the interstate shipment from the regulated
areas of fruits and vegetables other than those mentioned above except that
any such interstate shipments of fruits and vegetables may be inspected at any
time or place inside or outside the regulated areas and when actually found to
involve danger of dissemination of Japanese beetle to uninfested localities,
measures to eliminate infestation may be required as a condition of further
transportation or delivery.

B. Conditions of certification. — Certificates may be issued for the interstate
movement of fruits and vegetables between June 15 and October 15, inclusive
(or between June 1 and October 15, inclusive, when consigned from that part of
Virginia described in paragraph (a) of this regulation) under one of the follow-
ing conditions:

(3) When the fruits and vegetables, moving from a point in the regulated
area other than that specified in paragraph (1) of this regulation, or moving
from such designated area other than by refrigerator car, have actually been
inspected by the United States Department of Agriculture and found free from
infestation. The number of inspection points for such certification will be
limited and their location determined by shipping needs and further conditioned
on the establishment at such points of provisions satisfactory to the inspector
for the handling and safeguarding of such shipments during inspection. Such
inspection may be discontinued and certification withheld by the inspector during
periods of general or unusual flight of the beetles.

(4) When the fruits and vegetables have been handled or treated under the
observation of an inSpector in manner and by method to free them from any
infestation.

(5) When the fruits and vegetables have originated outside of the regu-
lated areas and are to be reshipped directly from freight yards, transfer points,
or unloading docks within such areas, under provisions satisfactory to the in-
spector for safeguarding of such shipments pending certification and reshipment.
Certificates on this basis will be issued without inspection only in cases where,
in the judgment of the inspector, the shipments concerned have not been
exposed to infestation while within such freight yards, transfer points, or
unloading docks.

(6) When the fruits and vegetables were grown in districts where the
fact has been established to the satisfaction of the inspector that no infesta-
tion exists and are to be shipped directly from the farms where grown to points
outside the regulated areas, or are shipped from infested districts where the
fact has been established to the satisfaction of the inspector that the Japanese
beetle has not begun or has ceased its flight.

(7) When the fruits and vegetables moving via refrigerator car from the
area listed in paragraph (1) of this regulation have been inspected and loaded
in a manner to prevent infestation, in a refrigerator car with closed or ade-
quately screened doors and hatches, which car prior to loading has been deter-
mined by an inspector as fumigated or thoroughly swept and cleaned by the com-
mon carrier in a manner to rid it of infestation. During the interval between
fumigation or cleaning and loading such refrigerator car must be tightly closed
and sealed.

(8) When the fruits and vegetables moving via refrigerator car from the
area listed in this regulation have been fumigated in the car, when deemed
necessary in the judgment of the inspector and when the doors and hatches of
the car have been tightly closed or adequately screened under the supervision
of an inspector.’

REGULATION 6

Sec. 301.48-6. Restrictions on the movement of nursery and ornamental
stock—A. Control of movement.—Nursery and ornamental stock as defined in

2See footnote 1, p. 44.



1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 47

regulation 1 (sec. 301.48-1) shall not be moved or allowed to be moved inter-
state from the regulated areas to or through any point outside thereof, unless
a certificate or permit shail have been issued therefor by the inspector except as
follows:

(1) The following articles, because of their growth or production, or their
manufactured or processed condition, are considered innocuous as carriers of
infestation and are therefore exempt from the requirements of certification:

(a) (7) True bulbs, corms, and tubers, when dormant, except for storage
growth, and when free from soil, and (ii) single dahlia tubers or small dahlia
root divisions when free from stems, cavities, and soil. Dahlia tubers, other
than single tubers or small root divisions meeting these conditions, require
certification.

(b) (7) Cut orchids, (77) orchid plants, when growing exclusively in Osmunda
fiber, (ivi) Osmunda fiber, Osmundine, or orchid peat (Osmunda cinnanomea,
and O. claytoniana.)

(c) (4) Floral designs or “set pieces,” including wreaths, sprays, casket
covers, and all formal florists’ designs; bouquets and cut flowers not so pre-
pared are not exempted; (ii) trailing arbutus, or Mayflower (Hpigaea repens),
when free from soil, and when shipped during the period between October 16
and June 14, inclusive.

(d@) (i) Herbarium specimens, when dried, pressed, and treated, and when
so labeled on the outside of each container of such materials, (47) mushroom
spawn, in brick, flake, or pure culture form.

(e) (4) Sheet moss (Cdlliergon schriberi and Thuridium recognitum), (ii)
resurrection plant or birds’-nest moss (Selaginella lepidophylla), (iii) sphagnum
moss, bog moss, or peat moss (Sphagnacea), (iv) dyed moss, when heat
treated and appropriately labeled.

(f) Soil-free, dried roots incapable of propagation, when appropriately
labeled.

(2) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of nursefy
and ornamental stock imported from foreign countries when reshipped from the
port of entry in the unopened original container and labeled as to each con-
tainer with a copy certificate of the country from which it was exported, a
statement of the general nature and quantity of the contents, the name and ad-
dress of the consignee, and the country and locality where ‘grown.

(3) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of soii-free
aquatic plants, and of portions of plants without roots and free from soil,
except that a certificate is required for the movement of cut flowers during
the period June 15 to October 15, inclusive.

(4) No certificate or permit will be required for the interstate movement
of nursery and ornamenta! stock when transported by a common earrier ona
through bill of lading either from an area not under regulation through a
regulated area, or from a regulated area through a nonregulated area to
another regulated area, except that a certificate is required between June 15
and October 15 for interstate movement of cut flowers from the main regulated
areas to the following-named isolated points: Brewer and Waterville, Maine;
Brighton, Buffalo, Hornell, Mount Morris, Rochester, and Watertown, and the
town of Hornellsville, Steuben County, N. Y., or to other regulated parts of
Erie, Jefferson, and Livingston Counties, N. ¥.; Columbus, Coshocton, Mans-
field, Newark, and Toledo, Ohio, or te other regulated parts of Licking
and Richland Counties, Ohio; Corry and Erie, Pa.; Burlington, Vt.; and
Charleston and Parkersburg, W. Va. No restrictions are placed on the inter-
state movement of cut flowers from the above-named isolated points.

B. Conditions governing the issuance of certificates and permits.—For the
purpose of certification of nursery and ornamental stock, nurseries, greenhouses,
and other premises concerned in the movement of such stock will be classified
as follows:

(5) Class I.—Nurseries, greenhouses, and other premises concerned in the
movement of nursery and ornamental stock on or within approximately 500
feet of which no infestation has been found may be classified as class I.
Upon compliance with the requirements of paragraph (11) of this regulation,
nursery and ornamental stock may be certified by the inspector for shipment
from such premises without further inspection, and without meeting the safe-
guards prescribed as a condition of interstate shipment of plants originating
in nurseries or greenhouses of class IIT.

251222—40——_2



AS BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

(6) Class III—(a) Nurseries, greenhouses, and other premises concerned
in the movement of nursery and ornamental stock on which either grubs in
the soil or one or more beetles have been found, will be classified as class
Ill, provided, (i) there are maintained on the premises subdivided elass I
areas, certified houses, frames, or plots or other certified areas, or (ii) there
is a legitimate need for interstate or intradealer certification of such stock.
Such classification will not be granted to nurseries, greenhouses, and other
premises that do not maintain certified or subdivided areas and require only
infrequent certification. Such classification also may be given to nurseries,
ete., where one or more beetles or grubs are found in the immediate proximity
(within approximately 500 feet) of such nurseries, ete., on adjacent property
or properties. in the case of nursery properties under single ownership and
management but represented by pareels of iand widely separated, such parceis
may be independently classified either as class I or class III] upon compliance
with such conditions and safeguards as shall be required by the inspector.
Similarly, unit nursery properties, which would otherwise fall in class III,
may be open to subdivision, for the purpose of rating such subdivisions in ciass
I or III, when in the judgment of the inspector such action is warranted by
recent and scanty infestation limited to a portion of the nursery concerned:
Provided, That the subdivision containing the infestation shall be clearly
marked by boundaries of a permanent nature which shail be approximately
500 feet beyond the point where the infestation occurs.

(b) Upon compliance with paragraphs (7), (10), and (11) of this regula-
tion, nursery and ornamental stock may be certified by the inspector for ship- ~
ment from such premises under any one of the following conditions: (i) That
the roots shall be treated by means approved by the Bureau of Entomology
and Plant Quarantine in manner and by method satisfactory to the inspector ;
or (ii) in the case of plants in which the root system is such that a thorough
inspection may be made, that the soil shall be entirely removed from the stock
by shaking or washing; or (wi) that it shall be shown by evidence Satisfac-
tory te the inspector that the plants concerned were produced in a certified
greenhouse.

(7) Greenhouses of Class III may be certified upon compliance with all the
following conditions with respect to the greenhouses themselves and to all
potting beds, heeling-in areas, hotbeds, coldframes, and similar plots:

(a) Ventilators, doors, and all other openings in greenhouses or coldframes
on premises in class III shall be kept screened in manner satisfactory to the
inspector during the period of flight of the beetle, namely, south of the north-
ern boundaries of Maryland and Delaware between June 1 and October 1,
inclusive, or north thereof between June 15 and October 15, inclusive.

(6) Prior to introduction into nurseries or greenhouses, sand, if contam-
inated with vegetable matter, soil, earth, peat, compost, or manure taken from
infested locations or which may have been exposed to infestation, must be
sterilized or fumigated under the direction and supervision of, and in manner
and by method satisfactory to the inspector. If such sand, soil, earth, peat,
compost, or manure is not to be immediately used in such greenhouses, it must
be protected from possible infestation in manner and by method satisfactory
to the inspector.

(c) All potted plants placed in certified greenhouses of class III and all
potted plants to be certified for interstate movement therefrom (i) shall be
potted in certified soil; (#) shall, if grown outdoors south of the northern
boundaries of Maryland and Delaware at any time between June 1 and Oc-
tober 1, inclusive, or north thereof at any time between June 15 and October
15, inclusive, be kept in screened frames while outdoors; (ii) shall, if grown
outdoors during any part of the year, be placed in beds in which the soil or
other material shall have been treated in manner and by method approved by
the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine to eliminate infestation;
and (iv) shall comply with such other safeguards as may be required by the
inspector.

(8S) Cut flowers may be certified for movement either (@) when they have
been inspected by an inspector and found free from infestation, or (6) when
they have been grown in a greenhouse of class I or in a certified greenhouse
of class III and are transported under such safeguards as will in the judg-
ment of the inspector prevent infestation. (See also paragraph (8) of this
regulation. )

(9) Nursery and ornamental stock originating on or moved from unclassi-
fied premises may be certified by the inspector under either one of the follow-



1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 49

ing conditions: (@) That the soil shall be entirely removed from the stock,
or (0) that the roots shall be treated by means aproved by the Bureau of
Entomoloy and Plant Quarantine in manner and by method satisfactory to
the inspector, or (c) that it shall be shown by evidence satisfactory to the
inspector that the accompanying soil was obtained at such points and under
sueh conditions that in his judgment no infestation could exist therein.

(10) Nurserymen, florists, dealers, and others, in order to maintain a class
III status shall report immediately on forms provided for that purpose all their
sales or shipments of nursery and ornamental stock, sand, if contaminated with
vegetable matter, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure both to points outside
the regulated areas and to other ciassiiied nurseries or greenhouses within the
regulated area. Certification may be denied to any person who has omitted
to make the report required by this regulation, and such denial of certification
shall continue until the information so omitted has been supplied.

(11) Nurserymei, fiorists, dealers, and others, in order to maintain a class
I status, or to maintain, in a class III establishment, a class I subdivision,
a certified plot, or a certified greenhouse, (@) Shall restrict their purchases or
receipts of nursery and ornamental stock, sand, if contaminated with vegetable
matter, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure, secured within the regulated
area and intended for use on class I or certified premises, to articles which
have been certified under these regulations as to each such article and the
said certificate shali accompany the article when moved; (0%) shall obtain
approval of the inspector before such articles are received on class I or Ccer-
tified premises or are taken into certified greenhouses; (c¢) shall report imme-
diately in writing all purchases or receipts of such articies secured from within
the regulated area for use on such premises; and (d) shall also report imme-
diately on forms provided for that purpose all their sales or shipments of
such articles both to points outside the regulated areas and to other classified
nurseries or greenhouses within the regulated areas. Certification may be
denied to any person who has omitted to make the report or reports required
by this regulation, and such denial of certification shall continue until the
information so omitted has been supplied.

(12) Nursery and ornamental stock imported from foreign countries and not
reshipped from the port of entry in the unopened original container may be
certified for movement under these regulations when such stock has been
inspected by an inspector and found free from infestation.

(18) Nursery and ornamental stock originating outside the regulated areas
and certified stock originating in classified nurseries or greenhouses may be
certified for reshipment from premises other than those on which they origi-
nated, under provisions satisfactory to the inspector for the safeguarding of
such stock from infestation at the point of reshipment and en route and when
found advisable by the inspector, after reinspection and determination of
freedom from infestation.*

REGULATION 7

Sec. 301.48-7. Restrictions on the movement of sand, soil, earth, peat, com-
post, and manure.—A. Control of movement.—Sand, soil, earth, peat, compost,
and manure shal! not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from any
point in the regulated areas to or through any point outside thereof unless a
certificate or permit shall have been issued therefor by the inspector, except
as follows:

(1) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of (a@) sand and
clay when free from vegetable matter; (b) greensand marl; and (¢) such
other sands and clays as have been treated or processed and subsequently
handled in such manner that in the judgment of the inspector no Japanese
beetle could exist therein, provided that each container of such article shall
be labeled on the outside thereof as to nature of contents, except that in the
case of bulk shipments such label shall accompany the waybill or other shipping
papers.

(2) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of manure, peat,
compost, or humus (a) when dehydrated and either shredded, ground, pulver-
ized, or compressed, or (b) when treated with crude petrolewm or any other

®See footnote 1, p. 44.



50 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

product having high potency as an insecticide, and when so labeled on the
outside of each commercial container of such materials.

(8) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of sand, soil,
earth, peat, compost, and manure imported from foreign countries when re-
shipped from the port of entry in the unopened original container and labeled
as to each container with the country of origin, and when the shipment is
further protected in manner or method satisfactory to the inspector.

(4) No certificate will be required for the interstate movement of sand, soil,
earth, peat, compost, and manure when transported by a common earrier on a
through bill of lading either from an area not under regulation through a
regulated area, or from a regulated area through a nonregulated area to
another regulated area.

B. Conditions of certification.—Certificates for the movement of restricted
sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure may be issued under any one of
the following conditions:

(5) When the articles to be moved have originated in districts included in
the reguiated area, but in which neither beetleS nor grubs in soil have been
found.

(6) When the material consists of fresh manure or of mined, dredged, or
other similar materials, and it has been determined by an inspector that no
infestation could exist therein.

(7) When the material has been removed, under the supervision of an in-
spector, from a depth of more than 12 inches below the surface of the ground
and either (a) is to be moved between October 16 and June 14, inclusive, or
(6) is loaded and Shipped at points where it has been determined by an in-
spector that no general infestation of adult beetles exists, or (c) when the
ears and loading operations are protected by screening under the direction of
and in manner and by method Satisfactory to the inspector.

(8) When the material has been fumigated with carbon disuiphide or other-
wise treated under the supervision of and in manner and by method Satis-
factory to the inspector. Such fumigation or treatment wiil be required as a
condition of certification of all restricted sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and
manure, except such as is loaded and shipped in compliance with paragraphs
(5), (6), or (7) hereof.*

REGULATION 9

Sec. 301.48-9. Marking and certification a condition of interstate transporta-
tion.—(a) Every box, basket, or other container of restricted articles listed in
regulations 5, 6, and 7 (sees. 301.48—5, 6, and 7) shail be plainly marked with
the name and address of the consignor and the name and address of the con-
signee, and Shall have securely attached to the outside thereof a valid certificate
or permit issued in compliance with these regulations. In the case of lot ship-
ments by freight, one certificate attached to one of the containers and another
certificate attached to the waybill will be sufficient.

(6) In the case of bulk carload shipments by rail, the certificate shall ac-
company the waybill, conductor’s manifest, memorandum, or bill of lading per-
taining to such shipment, and in addition each car shall have securely attached
to the outside thereof a placard showing the number of the certificate or
certificates accompanying the waybill.

(c) In the case of shipment by road vehicle, the certificates shall accompany
the vehicle.

(ad) Certificates shall be surrendered to the consignee upon delivery of the
shipment.*

This amendment supersedes amendment No. 1, promulgated June 22, 1939, and
shall be effective on and after April 5, 1940.

Done at the city of Washington this 4th day of April 1940.

Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.

[ SEAT | HENRY A. WALLACE,
Secretary of Agriculture.

[Copies of foregoing amendment were sent to all common carriers doing business in
or through the quarantined area. }

4 See footnote 1, p. 44.



1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS HL

NOTICE TO GENERAL PUBLIC THROUGH NEWSPAPERS

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,
Washington, D. C., April 4, 1940.

Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority
conferred on him by the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912 (87 Stat. 315),
as amended, has promulgated Amendment No. 2 to the revised regulations
supplemental to the Japanese beetle quarantine (Notice of Quarantine No. 48),
effective on and after April 5, 1940. The purpose of the amendment is prin-
cipally to bring under regulation considerable additional area in Maryland
and Ohio, nominal extensions in Pennsylvania and West Virginia, and one
more township (Erwin) in Steuben County, N. YÂ¥. The area from which the
movement of fruits and vegetables by motortruck or refrigerator car is regu-
lated has been extended to New York City and surrounding area including
the town of Greenwich, in Fairfield County, Conn., and also area in Mary-
land, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania. Fruits and vegetables shipped during
the period from June 15 to October 15, inclusive, are required to be certified,
as heretofore, and, when shipped from a designated area in southern Vir-
ginia, certification is advanced to cover the period from June 1 to October
15, inclusive. Minor modifications have been made in the certification re-
quirements for plants shipped from the regulated areas.

H. A. WALLACE,
Secretary of Agriculture.

[Published in the following newspapers: The Times, Hartford, Conn., April 18, 1940;
the Journal-Every Evening, Wilmington, Del., April 18, 1940; the Press-Herald, Portland,
Maine, April 19, 1940; the Sun, Baltimore, Md., April 19, 1940; the Post, Boston, Mass.,
April 19, 1940; the Union-Leader, Manchester, N. H., April 19, 1940; the News, Newark,
N. J., April 19, 1940; the Times, New York, N. Y., April 19, 1940; the Press, Cleveland,
Ohio, April 19, 1940; the Bulletin, Philadelphia, Pa., April 18, 1940; the Bulletin, Provi-
dence, R. I., April 18, 1940: the Free Press, Burlington, Vt., April 19, 1940; the News
Leader, Richmond, Va., April 18, 1940; the Gazett2, Charleston, W. Va., April 19, 1940-
and the Evening Star, Washington, D. C., April 19, 1940.]

B. E. P. Q. 394, revised.

List oF TRUE BULBS, CORMS, AND TUBERS EXEMPTED FROM JAPANESE BEETLE
CERTIFICATION

May 5, 1940.

Under regulation 6, A (1), of quarantine No. 48 (See. 301.48-6), true bulbs,
corms, and tubers are exempted from Japanese beetle certification when
dormant, except for storage growth, and when free from soil. The exemption
includes single dahlia tubers or small dahlia root divisions when free from
stems, cavities, and soil. Dahlia tubers, other than single tubers meeting these
conditions, require certification.

The following list of bulbs, corms, and tubers, issued for the information
of inspectors of the Bureau and for the use of shippers within the regulated
areas, is revised to include Gloriosa rothschildiana and two species of Corydalis,
and to list the species of bulbous Anemone.

The key letter in parentheses before each name indicates whether the variety
in question is a true bulb, corm, or tuber, (B) standing for true bulb, (C)
for corm, and (T) for tuber. Plant roots of a bulbous nature not given on
this list are, in most cases, fleshy rhizomes, and are therefore not exempt
from certification. (C) Acidanthera, (T) Alstroemeria, (B) Amaryllis, (C)
Amorphophallus (devilstongue), (B) Anemone nemorosa, A. ranunculoides, A.
trifolia, (C) Antholyza, (C) Babiana, (T) Begonia (tuberous-rooted), (T)
Boussingaultia (Madeira vine), (C) Brodiaea, (B) Bulbocodium, (C) Calo-
chortus (Mariposa lily or glove-tulip), (B) Camassia (wild hyacinth), (B)
Chionodoxa (glory-of-the-snow), (B) Colchicum (autumn-crocus), (T) Colo-
casia (Caladiwn esculentum and fancy-leaved varieties), (B) Cooperia (eve-
ning-star and rainlily), (B) Corydalis bulbosa, C. tuberosa, (B) Crinum, (C)
Crocus, (C) Cyclamen, (T)Dahlia (see statement in introductory paragraph),
(C) Dierama, (T) Dioscorea batatas (cinnamon-vine), (T) Hranthis (winter-
aconite), (B) Hrythronium (troutlily or dog-tooth violet), (B) Hucharis (Ama-
zonlily), (C) Freesia, (B) Fritillaria (fritillary), (B) Galanthus (snowdrop),
(B) Galtonia (Hyacinthus candicans) (summer hyacinth), (C) Gladiolus, (T)



o2 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

Gloriosa rothschildiana, (T) Glowvinia (see Sinningia), (B) Hippeastrum
(house-amaryllis), (B) Hyacinthus (hyacinth, Dutch and Roman), (B) Hyme-
nocallis (spiderlily), (B) Jris, bulbous (Dutch, Spanish, and English), (B)
Ismene (See Hymenocallis), (B) Ixia, (B) Iviolirion, (B) Lachenalia (Cape-
cowslip), (B) Lapeyrousia (Anomatheca), (B) Leucojum (snowflake), (B)
Lilium (lily bulbs, imported and domestic), (B) ZLycoris (cluster-amaryllis),
(B) Milla (Mexican-star), (B) dduscari (grape and feathered hyacinths), (B)
Narcissus (daffodil, jonguil), (B)Nerine, (B) Orinthogalum (Star-of-Bethie-
hem), (B) Ozxalis, (B) Pancratium, (B) Polianthes (tuberose), (B) Pusch-
kinia, (T) Ranunculus, (B) Scilla (squill, star-hyacinth), (T) Sinningia spe-
ciosa (Glovinia), (C) Sparavis (wandflower), (B) Sprekelia (St. Jameslily),
(B) Sternbergia, (B) Tigridia (tigerfiower or shellflower), (C) Tritonia
(Montbretia), (B) Tulipa (tulip), (B) Valiota (Scarboro-lily), (B) Watsonia
(buglelily), (1) Zantedeschia (Richardia) (calla, white, yellow, spotted; arum-
lily), and (B) Zephyranthes (zephyrlily).
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.



QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS ON JAPANESE BEETLE MODIFIED

May 25, 1940.

The Department of Agriculture today announced the removal, May 27, 1940,-
of all restrictions under the Japanese beetle quarantine regulations, on the inter-
state movement of fruits and vegetables, except by refrigerator car and motor-
truck from the areas of heavy beetle flight. The Department will discontinue,
temporarily at least, much of its inspection at highway stations of passenger
vehicles that may be carrying fruits and vegetables in small lots. It will continue
to require certificates of freedom from beetles for all refrigerator car and motor-
truck shipments of fruits and vegetables moving out from the areas of heavy
beetle flight.

It has been possible to remove these restrictions under the Japanese beetle
quarantine regulations because the chances of spreading an infestation from
small, noncommercial shipments of fruits and vegetables seem remote at this
time, according to Lee A. Strong, Chief of the Bureau of Hntomolcgy and Plant
Quarantine. The Department still has authority to inspect, at any point, any
shipment or vehicle that might spread the beetle from infested to noninfested
territory.

The areas of heavy Japanese beetle flight are:

Connecticut—Town of Greenwich in Fairfield County.

Delaware—the entire State.

District of Columbia—The entire District.

Maryland.—Cecil, Harford, Kent, Queen Annes, Somerset, and Worcester
Counties, the city of Baltimore, most of Baltimore and Caroline Counties, and
parts of Anne Arundel, Dorchester, and Wicomico Counties.

New Jersey—Atlantic, Burlington, Camden, Cape May, Cumberland, Essex,
Gloucester, Hudson, Hunterdon, Mercer, Middlesex, Monmouth, Ocean, Salem,
Somerset, and Union Counties, large parts of Bergen, Morris, and Passaic Coun-
ties, and part of Warren County.

New York—Bronx, Kings, New York, Queens, and Richmond Counties, and a
few towns and cities in Nassau and Westchester Counties.

Pennsylwania—Bucks, Chester, Delaware, Lancaster, Montgomery, and Phila-
delphia Counties, many towns and cities in Berks and Dauphin Counties and
several in Lehigh, Northampton, and York Counties.

Virginia—Accomae, Arlington, and Northampton Counties.

MODIFICATIONS OF JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE REGULATIONS
INTRODUCTORY NOTE
The following revision of regulation 5 removes all restrictions on the inter-

state movement of fruits and vegetables from the regulated areas, except that
restrictions still remain in force on the interstate movement of fruits and vege-



1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 53

tables by refrigerator ca: or motortruck from designated area in which heavy
flights of beetles occur tu points outside the regulated areas. However, fruits
and vegetables shipped by motortruck or refrigerator car from the area desig-
nated in paragraph (1) of regulation 5 to the city of Buffalo and other regulated
parts of Erie County, N. Y., and to Brighton and Rochester, N. Y., formerly
designated as isolated points in the regulated area, are not subject to certification
requirements.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

AMENDMENT NO. 3 TO THE RULES AND REGULATIONS (SEVENTEENTH REVISION)
SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 48

[Approved May 22, 1940; effective May 27, 1940]

Under authority conferred by the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912
(37 Stat. 315), as amended by the act of Congress approved March 4, 1917
(39 Stat. 1134, 1165), it is ordered that regulation 5 (sec. 301.48-5) of the rules
and regulations (seventeenth revision) supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No.
48 (sec. 301.48) on account of the Japanese beetle, which were promulgated
February 16, 1939, as amended, is hereby further amended to read as follows:

REGULATION 5



Sec. 301.48—5. Restrictions on the movement of fruits and vegetables.—A. Con-
trol of movement.—(1) Unless a certificate or permit shall have been issued
therefor, by an inspector, except as provided in paragraphs (a) to (e), in-
clusive, of this regulation, no fruits or vegetables of any kind shall be moved
or allowed to be moved interstate via refrigerator car or motortruck from the
State, District, counties, election districts, tewnships, towns, or cities listed
below to or through any point outside the reguiated areas:

Connecticut—Town of Greenwich in Fairfield County.

Delaware.—The entire State.

District of Colwmbia—The entire District.

Maryland.—Counties of Cecil, Harford, Kent, Queen Annes, Somerset, and
Worcester; election district No. 5 in Anne Arundel County; the city of Balti-
more; all of Baltimore County except election districts Nos. 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and
10; all of Caroline Couniy except election districts of American Corners (No. 8),
and Hillsboro (No. 6); election districts of Cambridge (No. 7), East New
Market (No. 2), Hurlock (No. 15), and Williamsburg ‘No. 12), in Dorchester
County; election districts of Camden (No. 18), Delmar (No. 11), Dennis (No. 6),
Fruitland (No. 16), Nutters (No. 8), Parsons (No. 5), Pittsburg (No. 4),
Salisbury (No. 9), and the town of Salisbury, Trappe (No. 7), and Willard
(No. 14), in Wicomico County.

New Jersey.—Counties of Atlantic, Burlington, Camden, Cape May, Cumber-
land, Essex, Gloucester, Hudson, Hunterdon, Mercer, Middlesex, Monmouth,
Ocean, Salem, Somerset, and Union; townships of Lodi, Lyndhurst, Overpeck,
Rochelle Park, Saddle River, and Teaneck, the cities of Englewood, Garfield,
and Hackensack, and the boroughs of Bogota, Carlstadt, Cliffside Park, East
Paterson, East Rutherford, Edgewater, Englewood Cliffs, Fair Lawn, Fairview,
Fort Lee, Glen Rock, Hasbrouck Heights, Leonia, Little Ferry, Lodi, Maywood,
Moonachie, North Arlington, Palisades Park, Ridgefield, Rutherford, Teterboro,
Wallington, and Wood Ridge, in Bergen County; townships of Chatham, Chester,
Denville, East Hanover, Hanover, Harding, Mendham, Morris, Morristown, Parsip-
pany-Troy Hills, Passaic, Randolph, and Washington, and the boroughs of
Chatham, Florham Park, Madison, Mendham, and Morris Plains, in Morris
County; township of Little Falls, the cities of Clifton, Passaic, Paterson, and
the boroughs of Haledon, Hawthorne, North Haledon, Prospect Park, Totowa,
and West Paterson, in Passaic County; townships of Franklin, Greenwich,
Lopatcong, Mansfield, Phillipsburg, Pohatcong, and Washington, and the
boroughs of Alpha and Washington, in Warren County.

New York.—Counties of Bronx, Kings, New York, Queens, and Richmond;
town of North Hempstead, in Nassau County; towns of Eastchester, Harrison,
Mamaroneck, Pelham, Rye, and Scarsdale, and the cities of Mount Vernon, New
Rochelle, White Plains, and Yonkers, in Westchester County.



54 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

Pennsylvania.—Counties of Bucks, Chester, Delawar2, Lancaster, Montgomery,
and Philadelphia; townships of Alsace, Amity, Bern, Brecknock, Caernarvon,
Colebrookdale, Cumru, District, Douglas, Earl, Hxeter, Hereford, Lower Alsace,
Maidencreek, Muhlenberg, Oley, Ontelaunee, Pike, Robeson, Rockland, Ruscomb-
manor, South Heidelberg, Spring, Union, and Washington, the city cf Reading,
and the boroughs of Bally, Bechteisville, Birdsboro, Boyertown, Mohnton, Mount
Penn, Saint Lawrence, Shillington, Sinking Spring, Temple, West Lawn, West
Reading, Wyomissing, and Wyomissing Hills, in Berks County; townships of
Londonderry, Lower Paxton, Lower Swatara, Susquehanna, and Swatara, the
city of Harrisburg, and the boroughs of Highspire, Middletown, Paxtang, Pen-
brook, Royalton, and Steelton, in auphin County; townships of Lower
Macungie, Lower Milford, Upper Milford, and Upper Saucon, and the boroughs
of Coopersburg, and Hmaus, in Lehigh County; townships of Lower Saucon and
Williams, in Nerthampton County; townships of Lower Chanceford and Peach
Bottom, in York County.

Virginia.—Counties of Accomac, Arlington, and Northampton: Provided,
That shipments of fruits and vegetables moving interstate from the area
specified in paragraph (1) of this regulation to other points in the regulated
area and subsequently diverted to points outside the regulated area, shall be
regarded as direct shipments from the point cf origin. As such they require
certification: Provided further, That the Chief of the Bureau of Hntomology
and Plant Quarantine may by administrative instructions extend or reduce the
areas specified in this regulation when in his judgment such action is consid-
ered advisable.

(a) No restrictions are piaced on the interstate mevement of fruits and
vegetables between October 16 and June 14, inclusive, except that in the case
of movement interstate from the following areas, the exemption applies only
during the period from October 16 to May 31, inclusive:

Virginia.—The counties of Accomac, Elizabeth City, Norfolk, Northampton,
and Princess Anne; the magisterial district of Sleepy Hole, in Nansemond
County; Camp Stuart in Warwick County; and the cities of Hampton, Newport
News, Norfolk, Portsmouth, South Norfolk, and Suffolk.

(6) No certificate or permit will be required for the interstate movement of
fruits and vegetables when transported by a common carrier on a through bill
of lading either from a point outside the area designated in this regulation through
that area to another outside point, or from the area designated in this regulation
through a nonregulated area to another regulated area, except that a certificate
is required for interstate movement from the area specified in paragraph (1) of
this regulation to the following-named isolated points: Brewer and Waterville,
Maine; Hornell, Mount Morris, and Watertown, and the town of Hornellsville,
Steuben County, N. Y., or to other regulated parts of Jefferson and Livingston
Counties, N. Y.; Columbus, Coshocton, Mansfield, Newark, and Toledo, Ohio, or
to other regulated parts of Licking and Richland Counties, Ohio; Corry and
Hrie, Pa.: Burlington, Vt.; and Charleston and Parkersburg, W. Va.

(c) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of fruits and
vegetables when they shall have been manufactured or processed in such a man-
ner that in the judgment of the inspector no infestation could be transmitted.

(ad) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of any shipments of
(1) bananas in single bunches packed in commercial containers; or (2) bananas
singly, or in individual hands.

(e) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of fruits and vege-
tables from the area listed in paragraph (1) of this regulation to the remainder
of the regulated area, other than as Specified in paragraph (0) of this regulation.

(2) No restrictions are placed on the interstate shipment from the regulated
areas of fruits and vegetables other than those mentioned above except that any
such interstate shipments of fruits and vegetables may be inspected at any time
or place inside or outside the regulated areas and when actually found to involve
danger of dissemination of Japanese beetle to uninfested localities, measures to
eliminate infestation may be required as a condition of further transportation
or delivery.

B. Conditions of certification.—Certificates may be issued for the interstate
movement of fruits and vegetables between June 15 and October 15, inclusive
(or between June 1 and October 15, inclusive, when consigned from that part of
Virginia described in paragraph (a) of this regulation), under one of the fol-
lowing conditions:



1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 55

(3) When the fruits and vegetables moving by motortruck have actually been
inspected by the United States Department of Agriculture and found free from
infestation. The number of inspection points for such certification will be limited
and their location determined by shipping needs and further conditioned on the
establishment at such points of provisions satisfactory to the inspector for the
handling and safeguarding of such shipments during inspection. Such inspection
may be discontinued and certification withheld by the inspector during periods
of general or unusual flight of the beetles.

(4) When the fruits and vegetables have been handled or treated under
the observation of an inspector in manner and by method to free them from
any infestation.

(5) When the fruits and vegetables have originated outside the areas des-
ignated in this regulation, and are to be reshipped directly from freight yards,
transfer points, or unlouding docks within such areas, uider provisions satis-
factory to the inspector for safeguarding of such shipments pending certification
and reshipment. Certificates on this basis will be issued without inspection only
in cases where, in the judgment of the inspector, the shipments concerned have
not been exposed to infestation while within such freight yards, transfer
points, or unloading docks.

(6) When the fruits and vegetables were grown in districts where the fact has
been established to the satisfaction of the inspector that no infestation exists
and are to be shipped directly from the farms where grown to points outside
the areas designated in paragraph (1) of this regulation, or are shipped from
infested districts where the fact has been established to the satisfaction of the
inspector that the Japanese beetle has not begun or has ceased its flight.

(7) When the fruits and vegetables moving via refrigerator car from the
area designated in this regulation have been inspected and loaded in a manner
to prevent infestation, in a refrigerator car with closed or adequately screened
doors and hatches, which car prior to loading has been determined by an in-
spector as fumigated or thoroughly swept and cleaned by the common earrier in
a manner to rid it of infestation. During the interval between fumigation or
cleaning and loading, such refrigerator car must be tightly closed and sealed.

(8) When the fruits and vegetables moving via refrigerator car from the
area designated in this regulation have been fumigated in the car, when deemed
necessary in the judgment of the inspector and when the doors and hatches of
the car have been tightly closed or adequately screened under the supervision
of an inspector.°

This amendment supersedes regulation 5 of amendment 2 promulgated April
4, 1940, and shall be effective on and after May 27, 1940.

Done at the city of Washington this 22d day of May 1940.

Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.

[ SEAL | H. A. WALLACE,
Secretary of Agriculture.

[Copies of foregoing amendment were sent to all common carriers doing business in
or through the quarantined area. |

NorTicE TO GENERAL PuBLIC THROUGH NEWSPAPERS
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,
Washington, D. C., May 22, 1940.

Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority con-
ferred on him by the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912 (87 Stat. 315),
as amended, has promulgated Amendment No. 3 to the revised regulations sup-
plemental to the Japanese beetle quarantine (Notice of Quarantine No. 48),
effective on and after May 27, 1949. The purpose of the amendment is to remove
the restrictions on the interstate movement of fruits and vegetables from the
regulated areas, except that restrictions still remain in force on the interstate
movement of fruits and vegetables by refrigerator car or motortruck from des-
ignated area in which heavy flights of beetles occur to points outside the regu-
lated areas. Fruits and vegetables shipped by motortruck or refrigerator car
from that area to Buffalo, other regulated parts of Erie County, Rochester, and
Brighton, N. Y., formerly designated as isolated regulated points, are not sub-

5 Sec. 301.48-5 issued under authority of sec. 8, 37 Stat. 318

; 39 Stat. 1165; 44 Stat.
200 OU. S.C. 261,



56 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

ject to certification requirements. Copies of the amendment may be obtained
from the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, U. S. Department of
Agriculture, Washington, D. C.
H. A. WALLACE,
Secretary of Agriculture.

[Published in the following newspapers: The Times, Hartford, Conn., May 28, 1940;
the Journal-Every Evening, Wilmington, Del., May 27, 1940; the Press-Herald, Portland,
Maine, May 28, 1940; the Sun, Baltimore, Md., May 28, 1940; the Post, Boston, Mass.,
May 28, 1940; the Union-Leader, Manchester, N. H., May 28, 1940: the News, Newark,
N. J., May 28, 1940; the Times, New York, N. Y., May 27, 1940; the Press, Cleveland,
Ohio, May 28, 1940; the Bulletin, Philadelphia, Pa., May 27, 1940; the Bulletin, Provi-
dence, R. ste May 28, 1940; the Free Press, Burlington. Vt., May 28, 1940; the News
Leader, Richmond, Va., May 27, 1940; the Gazette, Charleston, W. Va., May 28, 1940;
and the Evening Star, Washington, D. C., June 3, 1940. ]

B. E. P. Q. 499, Supplement No. 2.

ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS TO INSPECTCRS ON THE TREATMENT OF NUR-
SERY PRODUCTS, FRUITS, VEGETABLES, AND SOIL, FOR THE JAPANESE BEETLE

METHYL BROMIDE TREATMENT SCHEDULE FOR FRUITS AND VEGETABLES MODIFIED
[Approved June 1, 1940; effective June 4, 1940]

Results of further experiments in methyl bromide fumigation of produce for
compliance with certification requirements of Quarantine No. 48 indicate that
the dosage may be reduced from 5 pounds to 4 per refrigerator car at a tem-
perature of 80° F. and retain effectiveness of the treatment against adult Japa-
nese beetles. The modified treatment will, it is believed, reduce the cost of
fumigation as well as the possibility of injury to certain fruits and vegetables.
Circular B. E. P. Q. 499, issued June 9, 1939, is accordingly hereby modified by
changing subsection (q) on page 19 of the mimeographed circular to provide
for alternative treatments as follows:

(q) MetHyt BroMIpE FUMIGATION
(1) REFRIGERATOR CARS

Equipment.—Refrigerator cars must have sound, well-fitting doors and
hatches, and be in condition satisfactory to the inspector. Standard cloth
screens for covering the haiches and a temporary cloth screen for covering one
door during ventilation are essential. An electric blower of not less than 750
CFM capacity against 14-inch water pressure, equipped with devices for lower-
ing into the bunker and securing, so that the blower outlet butts against the
punker screen unimpeded either by studs or burglar bar.

Tenvperature and dosage—The temperature in the car during the treatment
must be at least:

(i) 80° F. with a dosage of 1.6 pounds for each 1,000 cubic feet, or 4 pounds
per refrigerator car; or

(ii) 70° F. with a dosage of 2 pounds for each 1,000 cubic feet, or 5 pounds
per refrigerator car.

Period of treatment—Two hours from the end of the fumigant release period.

Application—The doors must be closed tightly and the ice drips properly
plugged. The methyl bromide may be either weighed or measured and released
through a copper or brass applicator tube of 44-inch bore. This tube must be
fitted with a disc-type spray nozzle and must be bent in a “U” shape at the end,
so that the spray nozzle is directed upward toward the center of the bunker
and not less than 1 foot below the ceiling during the release of the fumigant.
The blower must be in continuous operation during the release of the fumigant,
and for 5 minutes thereafter. At the end of this period the blower may be
removed and transferred to the next car. The fumigant must be released in a
split dosage. When a 5-pound dosage is applied, 3 pounds must be released
in the bunker through the hatch across from the blower, and 2 pounds in the
bunker at the opposite end of the car and in line with the blower. When a
4-pound dosage is applied, 2 pounds must be released in the blower end, and 2
pounds at the opposite end of the car as described above.

Modification of this method of application may be made upon authorization
of an inspector.

Ventilation.—At the end of the exposure period, all hatches must be imme-
diately propped open and screened, and the drip plugs removed. One door must
be opened and screened for a period of 20 minutes, following which it should
be closed and sealed. If the car is to be moved within half an hour, the open-
ing of the door may be omitted.



1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 57

Commodities treated—The treatment is approved for the following fruits and
vegetables: White potatoes, sweetpotatoes, onions, tomatoes, snap beans, lima
beans, sweet corn, cabbage, carrots, beets, apples, and peaches.

(2) FUMIGATION HOUSE, ROOM, AND BOX

The commodities listed above may be fumigated in approved fumigation
chambers. The same requirements as to dosage, circulation period, exposure,
temperature, and screening of doors listed under refrigerator car fumigation
apply. The chamber must be ventilated with the ventilating equipment in
continuous operation for half an hour. All ventilator intakes must be protected
with S-mesh wire screen. The ventilating fan must run during both the placing
and removal of the load. In addition, the requirements for screened loading
facilities and the subsequent certification of loads must be met.

AVERY S. Hoyt,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

B. E. P. Q. 509.

ORDER AMENDING SECTION 301.48-5, CHAPTER III, TITLE 7, CODE OF FEDERAL
REGULATIONS AND MODIFYING THE JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE REGULA-
TIONS AS TO SHIPMENTS OF FRUITS AND VEGETABLES FROM CERTAIN AREAS
IN VIRGINIA

Pursuant to the authority conferred upon the Chief of the Bureau of Ento-
mology and Plant Quarantine by the second proviso of paragraph (1) of sub-
section A of Section 301.48—5, Chapter III, Title 7, Code of Federal Regulations
[regulation 5 of the rules and regulations (17th revision) supplemental to
Notice of Quarantine No. 48 on account of the Japanese beetle, as amended], as
amended by the order of the Secretary of Agriculture dated May 22, 1940
(5 F. R. 1847 et seg.), subdivision (a) of said paragraph is hereby amended to
read as follows:

“(a) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of fruits and
vegetables between October 16 and June 14, inclusive, except that in the case of
movement interstate from the following areas, the exemption applies only during
the period from October 16 to May 31, inclusive:

“Virginia.—The counties of Accomac and Northampton.”

The infestation in the remainder of the area formerly designated in sub-
division (@) is of such a nature that it is considered to be of no hazard in
the spread of Japanese beetles through shipments of fruits and vegetables.
Therefore, it is considered advisable to reduce the area specified in the
subdivision.

Done at Washington, D. C., this 20th day of June 1940.

AveERY S. Hoyt,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO PINK BOLLWORM QUARANTINE
(NO. 52)

B. E. P. Q. 493, revised.

ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS RELATING TO PINK BOLLWORM QUARANTINE—
RESTORING THE TREATMENT REQUIREMENTS AS TO COTTON LINTERS, COTTON-
SEED HULLS, CAKE, AND MEAL, AND EXTENDING THE AREA IN WHICH BALED
COTTON LINT MAY BE MOVED FROM CERTAIN LIGHTLY INFESTED AREAS IN
NEW MEXICO AND TEXAS WITHOUT TREATMENT

May 1, 1940.
INTRODUCTORY NOTE

Administrative instructions issued March 30, 1989 (circular B. E. P. Q. 493)
modified the treatment requirements for the pink bollworm as to baled lint and
linters and products thereof, and also as to cottonseed hulls, cake, and meal
when moved interstate from certain counties in northwestern Texas and from



58 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [ April-June

Lea and Roosevelt Counties, N. Mex. At the time this action was taken, it was
hoped that climatic conditions unfavorabie to the development of the pink boll-
worm, plus control and reguiatory activities, would result in elimination of the
pink bollworm in northwest Texas and adjacent areas in New Mexico. However,
infestations have persisted in such areas and spread to additional counties to the
south and southeast. Therefore, it is considered necessary to restore the re-
strictions previously in effect so that linters, cottonseed hulls, cake, and meal
shall be produced, as a condition of interstate movement from such areas, from
sterilized seed, or in the case of linters, ctherwise treated as specified in quaran-
tine regulations. Baled cotton lint, however, may, under the current instructions,
continue to be shipped from the designated area, without the treatment formerly
required.

The purposes of the present revision of the administrative instructions are
therefore (1) to return to the treatment requirements of paragraphs (@) and
(c) of regulation 4, in shipping cotton linters, cottonseed hulis, cake, and meal,
and (2) to extend the area from which it is considered safe to remove treat-
ment requirements for baled cotton lint, by adding the Texas counties of Concho,
Irion, Mitchell, Sterling, Tom Green, and the regulated part of Coke County.

MODIFICATION OF RESTRICTIONS

Under authority contained in the second proviso of Notice of Quarantine
No. 52, revised (Sec. 301.52), and having determined that facts exist as to the
pest risk involved which make it safe to modify, by making less stringent, the
restrictions contained in paragraph («#) of regulation 4 (Sec. 301.524) of the
pink bollworm quarantine, notice is hereby given that baled cotton lint and
products thereof may be moved interstate without restriction from the following
area:

New Mezxico—lLea and Rooseveit Counties. Jexas—Counties of Andrews,
Ceehran, Conche, Dawson, Ector, Gaines, Glasscock, Hockley, Howard, Irion,
Martin, Midland, Mitchell, Stering. Terry, Tom Green, Yoakum, and the regulated
parts of Bailey, Coke, and Lamb Counties: Provided, (1) That the products have
been produced in an authorized gin and subsequently protected from contamina-
tion, and (2) that a certificate of the United States Department of Agriculture
has been obtained and attached to the containers or shipping papers in accordance
with the requirements prescribed in regulation 11 (Sec. 301.52-11) of said
quarantine.

These instructions supersede and cancel those in circular B. E. P. Q. 493
dated March 380, 1939.

AVERY S. Hoyt,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE QUARAN-
TINE (NO. 72)
B. E. P. Q. 485 (fifth revision).

ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS—REMOVAL OF WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE CERTI-
FICATION REQUIREMENTS UNTIL FEBRUARY 1, 1941, FOR SPECIFIED ARTICLES
CONSIGNED FROM DESIGNATED PORTIONS OF THE REGULATED AREAS

May 24, 1940.

It has been determined that the application of control measures, the continua-
tion of approved sanitation practices, and natural conditions have so decreased
the intensity of infestation of the white-fringed beetle in certain parts of the
regulated areas, aS to eliminate the risk of contamination with the egg or adult
stage, thereby justifying modification of certification requirements. Therefore,
under authorization provided in Notice of Quarantine No. 72 (See. 301.72) all
certification requirements are hereby waived until February 1, 1941, for the
following articles enumerated in Regulation 3 (a) and (0) (See. 301.72-38), when
free from soil and when movcd interstate from the regulated parts of the areas
listed below :

1.-When moved interstate from the regulated parts of the following counties:
In Alabama, Mobile County; in Florida, Escambia County: in Lowisiana, East
Baton Rouge Parish; in J/ississippi, counties of Jackson, Hinds, and Pearl River ;
certification requirements are waived for the following articles:



1940} SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 59

Potatoes and sweetpotatoes.

Sweetpotato vines, draws, and cuttings.

Cordwood, pulpwood, stumpwood, and logs.

Used or unused lumber, timbers, posts, poles, crossties, and other building
materials.

Hay, roughage of all kinds, straw, leaves, and leafmold.

Peas, beans, and peanuts in shells, or the shells of any of these products.

Seed cotton, cottonseed, baled cotton lint, and linters.

Used implements and machinery, scrap metal, junk, and utensils or containers
coming in contact with the ground.

Brick, tiling, stone, and concrete slabs and blocks.

Nursery stock and other plants, which are free from soil.

2. When moved interstate from the parishes of Saint Bernard and Orleans
(including the city of New Orleans) and from the regulated parts of the parishes
of Jefferson and Plaquemines in Lowisiana, certification requirements are waived
for the following articles:

Potatoes and sweetpotatoes.

Sweetpotato vines, draws, and cuttings.

Cordwood, pulpwood, stumpwood, and logs.

Unused lumber, timbers, posts, poles, and crossties.

Hay, roughage of all kinds, straw, leaves, and leafmold.

Peas, beans, and peanuts in the shells, or the shells of any of these products.

Seed cotton, cottonseed, baled cotton lint, and linters.

All articles designated in paragraphs (a) and (06) of Regulation 3 of Quaran-
tine No. 72 (Sec. 301.72-8) for which certification requirements are not herein-
above waived, shall remain under the restrictions of that regulation during the
periods covered therein.

(Issued under Sec. 301.72) [B. E. P. Q. 485, Fifth Revision, effective June 1,
1940. ]

This revision supersedes all previous issues of circular B. E. P. Q. 485.

Avery S. Hoyr,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

INSTRUCTORS TO POSTMASTERS

Post OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, June 10, 1940.

POSTMASTER :

My Dear Sir: Attention is invited to the inclosed administrative instructions
(B. E. P. Q. 485, Fifth Revision), issued by the Bureau of Entomology and Plant
Quarantine, United States Department of Agriculture, in connection with Federal
Quarantine Order No. 72, on account of the white-fringed beetle.

Postmasters in the quarantined areas will please be governed accordingly.
See paragraph 1, section 595, Postal Laws and Regulations.

Very truly yours,
; RAMSEY S. BLAck,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.

TERMINAL INSPECTION OF PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS
CHANGE OF PLANT INSPECTION PLACE IN ARIZONA

Post OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, April 2, 1940.

Postmasters are informed that facilities for the inspection of plants and plant
products at San Simon, Ariz., have been discontinued and a new inspection place
established in lieu thereof at Bowie, Ariz., where inspection will be made upon
call. See section 596, Postal Laws and Regulations, and article 62 (b), page 20
of the July 1939, Postal Guide, Part I.

RAMSEY S. BLACK,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.



60 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS
P. Q. C. A. 283, Revised, Supplement No. 7. ’
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF CUBA

APRIL 8, 1940.
WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE RESTRICTIONS
[Resolution No. 253, Mareh 27, 1939]
IMPORTATION OF CERTAIN PRODUCTS PROHIBITED FROM INFESTED AREAS

ARTICLE 1. The following products are deemed possible carriers of the insect
pest known as the white-fringed beetle (Pantomorus leucoloma (Boh.)) and
another closely related species of Pantomorus, namely, potatoes, sweetpotatoes,
and other tubers, peas, peanuts in the shell, unginned cotton, cottonseed, earth,
and turf (sod).

Art. 2. The importation into Cuba of any of the above-mentioned products is
strictly prohibited from the infested (regulated) areas *® of the States of Alabama,
Florida, Mississippi, and Louisiana, and similar regions in the United States
where the above-mentioned insects may become established in the future. Other
products which, in the opinion of the Cuban Ministry of Agriculture, may be- -
deemed possible carriers of the above-mentioned insects, may be prohibited
entry from such infested areas in the future.

PRODUCTS FROM UNINFESTED AREAS MUST BE CERTIFIED

ArT. 3. When these products which are the subject of quarantine action by
Cuba, originate in uninfested areas of the above-mentioned States, or from like
areas in States which may become infested in the future, it will be necessary,
in order to permit their entry into Cuba, that they be accompanied by a phyto-
sanitary certificate, visaed by a Cuban consul, issued by the U. 8S. Department of
Agriculture, affirming that the areas from which the products proceed are free
from the above-mentioned insects.

INSPECTION ON ARRIVAL

Art. 4. The products referred to in this resolution whose importation is not
prohibited, will be subjected on arrival in Cuba to inspection by the Bureau of

lant Quarantines of the Cuban Ministry of Agriculture, and if they are found
without the aforesaid certificate when such certificates are required, or if
inspection shows them to be infested, they will be disposed of by reexportation
or by burning, as the consignee may elect.

AveERY S. Hoyz,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

B. E. P. Q. 375, Revised Supplement No. 3.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, KINGDOM OF EGYPT

Aprit 8, 1940.

IMPORTATION OF CERTAIN FRUITS AND PLANTS PROHIBITED

[Order of May 29, 1939, of the Ministry of Agriculture Notice in “Journal Officiel,’”’
No. 71 of July 20, 1939]

INFESTATION BY CERTAIN SCALE INSECTS PROHIBITED ENTRY

ARTICLE 2. The entry into Egypt of all fruits, plants, and parts of plants
will. be prohibited if, after inspection by agents of the Ministry of Agricul-
ture, they are shown to be infested with Aspidiotus destructor Sign., Pseudo-
coccus nipae Mask., or Pseudococcus comstocki Kuw. It has been demon-
strated that these insects cannot be controlled effectively by fumigation.



6 See Notice of Quarantine No. 72, the White-Fringed Beetle Quarantine.



1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 61

LIST OF PLANTS REQUIRING AUTHORIZATION EXTENDED

Art. 3. The following list of plants, including also the fruits and parts of
plants, is added to those which may be imported into Egypt only by an
authorization granted by the Ministry of Agriculture and the importation
must conform to the conditions of the authorization:

Palmaceae. _ Amaryllidaceae.
Pandanaceae. Myrtaceae.
Bignoniaceae. Cleaceae.
Anonaceae. Lauraceae.
Musaceae. Caricaceae.
Anacardiaceae. Ebenaceae.
Rubiaceae.

The application for the authorization should be addressed to the Crop Pro-
tection Section, Ministry of Agriculture, Cairo.
AvERY S. Hoyt,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

B. E. P. Q. 411, Supplement No. 2
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF MEXICO

APRIL 8, 1940.

AMENDMENT TO EXTERIOR QUARANTINE No. 12 ABROGATED
[Resolution published October 11, 1939]

THE MINISTRY OF AGRICULTURE AND DEVELOPMENT
ALFALFA SEED FROM YUMA COUNTY, ARIZONA

* * * * % * *
Whereas, the insect found in Yuma County, Ariz., corresponds to the species

Hypera brunneipennis Boh. which is not found in the fields during the har-
vesting of alfalfa seed and, therefore, cannot contaminate it:
* * as * *

* 7

This Ministry has seen fit to issue the following Resolution.

1. There is abrogated hereby the Addition to Exterior Quarantine No. 12,
promulgated on June 16, 1939, because it is not applicable.

2. Alfalfa seed harvested in the County of Yuma, Ariz. U. S. A., may
be imported into the Republic of Mexico, provided that it is covered by a
certificate of soundness (sanitary certificate) issued by the competent au-
thorities of the neighbor country of the north, in which it is stated that it
(the seed) is free from the insects Hypera posticus and Bgera brunneipennis
and, in addition, it is packed in new and closed sacks.

This supplement cancels B. E. P. Q. 411, supplement No. 1.

AvERY S. Hoyt,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

B. E. P. Q. 502, Supplement No. 1.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF PARAGUAY
May 9, 1940.
CuRCULIO ADDED TO List Or DECLARED PESTS
[Decree No. 165, published in Gaceta Oficial of Paraguay, March 8, 1940]

The President of the Republic of Paraguay decrees: In accordance with
Article 11, division B of the law 672, the cureulio, Conotrachelus denieri Hust.,
is added to the list of agricultural insect pests.

Lee A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.



62

BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

[April—June

PENALTIES IMPOSED FOR ee OF THE PLANT QUARANTINE

<

According to reports received by the Bureau during the period April 1 to
June 30, 1940, penalties have recently been imposed by the proper authorities
for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act, as follows:

QUARANTINES AFFECTING MEXICAN PRODUCTS

In the case of the United States versus the persons listed below, for attempt-

ing to smuggle in contraband plant material,
imposed by the United States customs officials at the following ports:







Name Port
BeWas Qe ants eee ae San Ysidro, Calif________
SESUSUH BRO ms BA ee eee 2 ol ee GO sige ee ae
IVI SV AG [0 Jo iira eee ee a eal OSS eee. ee
ARVO WAG CASE ee eee eee ie eet ee Brownsville, Tex_______-
FA OLOMTO WV Nears tn C7 eee | eee OSS Oh aah ee de
IZ TFOXE Gi ORO Ts1 (0) Cee ee ee ee | nega CO Foe oe
VIS PEC TIVL SH © eS till © eee eee emcee | eens Ona te. at ie eee
ITAA VAS vil gas ae a EL ee ee GORIaES., Sala eee ee
‘BenibaeheyicSe ee eee eee Del 10, ROX we) Sie
ASE ditspVialde7dey Beri camec=t= |e ae Okes=s aaa = eee
RetusiOpB a ROdnISUeZ a= =e ‘ace IaSS ue xan eee
IMaRoanita ss am dae open seen ee ee Oss. A Bae ea
Vis ViariavAeide: Bel tram waaay | reer CLO ites Bue eect
EVO MAT a AU vate Gl meee ees see em | Dorel GOULSi: Sa wear ace oun
RIV 9 Cra ire ewan ee nee Sen ees | ede COE Tee eats eae
PB@Te Git hea VE area ClO ees eee | ee GOEL Ors wa
CrP ovina IN Tyee m2 Ee AC] ON GSEY ENE POET
hiburciosMedinillaa sana ER aso exc 52 Jes
Bera Teer til O e ee e ge | ee On, . eshte Fate ened
iMarcanitaseinonvde: Contrerdsaa=- ===. Omeyeae sen on ewe ele
Me] C VA. 67m eee Hidalgo, Mexd va pees
Salinas G OMICT ee ee eee | ee GOP eee ee ee
VIA CUS TS 210 Cle 7a ee ee ae | ne GOMER er rare
TNETeSAe aT ITC 7 see et SE OR a ee Goh etEth eee
SallvadorsB Seat @ mesa seers eee ees |e GLa ee ey ae ene
Maria Rosales de Gonzales_______|____- CONS ele are tater
IVICA) AC avazOSees tease ee ee eee aa COPE. JR Sake
BMelistaseAto will rks eee meee eee ey | eee Go. Saker ee tae
Florencia Reyas_ Lae BNR ce | a CO sys Stil eee ee
AP ULATUNG ES CSC Tete et ere teers a oe | nee COE Rae air SU ean
ET FUTON pe ee a rae Coe | ane Cl Oe a tee ee
PAamad ar G Barret see see esate sat |e GOW SE Per ae
MOA arden as eee eee ee en gee || ene ae Gop eae brow ees
1RxXoyses), IBYostnaelerga Sa GO Aare ses etic nee
SIV Tear LENE LIN Ze oe ewe rere et | eee CO LO aly aera Naat alae oe Ro
JuameAlmaraz. - = =2 eee eee eee Coutts Ri ares 7 erat
Be CA dam chaise Soe ia er as |i Goeth Feo Bee
Mani elave rine dam sare ae ees |e C1 Qe ae tyne Sea pega eT TEA
UP ee AUST ae Spee ee ae asp tg pl res CO eee crerce ee
(hibrada'C asas ia! Se Be Beet Sh GOs FAL SES aks
ViUAN AHO ALISUCSES ke ergee mele eae eee dO sit cee alic EA 2
GuadalipayRiamire7 esse ee eee GOs eat ee eee
SNAP a MTC Zee ae es ee ee ene ete aes WG Arecosdie kes s see eee
Rebecca hame7za= eee |e SOO Res Pe ey
Maria de Jesus Martinez ________|____- GOR aitonas SHS. = Scene
Ofiliay Mar G17 C7 eee a oe oe | ea Osta ee ae
HMTigwe Aldopes = seawes e ee CORO SH. he poe
Micwellernnand 72 aees see ene en Pee Goze ie: eee ee
Divencea Vda. Rodriquez____-___|.___- Ones ae Se ee
AVA Tai EVO CUNT CUT Zep ee re | Gos Ais 55.2 ee eee
AVITC IAT GiTarG ad Oe ee | ena Oe Ms ee i
irs Oliva Rodriquez esas. seen | eee GO Pea ie ees
Oscar Carabelloy seme Ss ae | eee GOBSARET tees fe
WValentine Hernandez... 2-225 -5-) e dO eee as anes
CesariorRamosia seit oie. Ne a ees CO Seria 2 Ses ee
SF LT UUs ple 1a epee eee | ee GO eae RS eS
Bilena Bacaneeras= ss ees eee. seen Deen Goes So 2 res. ee
JESUS Val OZ o = ese tees Sie Se tg tee CKO) eee ee eee Sere
Rilias ¥ Wopezsek. - sir ke oe 0 eee dos: tate ht) wii sss
aed ca Wear, trite ene ree ea | Ofna - Sa
Nazario: Galvanks.-242 = 2232 $2 allah CO tabs so Ue eae
TOCIOCNOS. 5.5 shee Lehtele | A ce an Oe a SANE eer ae
EIS CEN CIA: eisat Leman acne hae een | eee CORE BS cel nile EN
Blvirai Saenz. i.2) asBNke ot ae a ee GOR REE ee ES
ROSE Siedamaniewie 2 ae Sep ee GORE Ee TNE Lane See
BMT LORD: Fle rm a1 © zee a eee | GON 23 eta a ee
SOMME EB OSS le ee ee |S ee CO an se ee ee

Contraband

ispapaya: oe eerie eee
98 plants: .22.3) eee
20 plants’... ae eee

4 MANGOGs at 5 eee eee eee

3 Mangoes... ee eee

6 plant

§22li ese se 2 See eS Se eee

2 plums. eee eee
L6-plantss2 2) ee eee
2 avocados... {t= ee eee

6 plant

8 MangoeSi-<.- So eee eee
1 mangos. 2-2 Pee eee
2 AVOCACOS SS 2s 2 ee ee ee

Sis Je ae eee

5 plants.
il INaNneo Seed 2 ee eee
3 avecad0Ss:2.) 235) ea

1 plant

1 mango and 1 mango seed _-_-___---
I. mangosiz. _ Seeet eee eee
5 ae 2222.3 ee

2 plants. 22. eee
2iavocados=_=-. 204s ae eee
13 avocados and 5 mangoes_-_--_---

1 plant

1 plant and 4% pound tree seed_---
ZavoOcCadoss 2:22 Ae ae Se

19 plan

ti) fo ee

24 sweet limes, 10 plants, 1 avocado-

4: QRAN GCS: . 22452223 eS eee
2 mangoes and 4 sapote seed____-_-_-
Mame y=s o.oo eee



the penalties indicated were

Penalty

See et tend aPC Eegb P tome ene Fr Pt Ft Fs) Feat gh pt e=Ah a =AQ Gd fF ptf Fh A ef tu pk cya fos fons) pea fc cat espe pea) fn a eat pet pdt pe ay pe aS



1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 63



Name Port Contraband

Penalty



lOO ES Gi WATOGO wROx. ao 22252 5-8 Osea OCSe meee ee oe ee $1
INGE 1S). IMIG. oe GOES Eee Sst od See PEMA EO OSL st aa eS a a 1
Wsminany sw OOnIpie7 22. =| ____ COs tS eee + meres 4mameys, and 4sapote 1
seed.
dgater. eh ANOS Cee Ee Gos TASS TS Cl. et 1 mango seed and4 plants__________ 1
Enrique Barrera_------- ee (10 ies ee ees ae Eee | GO PIV OC ROSS eee eee ee eee 1
BME HeVeL-. .-. =... | 5° d@- 47.4. 1 4 +s | symone 2. | 1
Iwi, Wha ZT Dee, a re aT fl Qe aetees. Ao eee a ee GLA ERS en ee ee eee ee 1
Weanwel Vorres. ss |__ Cee ae ae Dp ee ie ps he 1
I eonmineGeee ss ee | (Ot se e ee ee 6 mameys and 1 mango____________ 1
Mamoaamornoms - 9-2. |____- Goat si? 5 ee 3 mangoes and | orange___________| 1
DIAMIOMGUIMONLOZ=9- =) 222. 222. 2.) 2-2 LO eee ea on ee TWO CAGO fe ee ee ee ee 1
Mrs. Maria Ramirez... ._-_____|____- RSC tees ce ty 4 avocados and 1 mango___________ 1
Bednopiaminezes-- =|. (0 (6) See ee ol 8 aay oe 2 MAR PDES Ase Skee fee se 3 | 1
Mrs) Carmen Ariuilar...__.._.-|__-.. dow tae ee LBTINAM OOP. ee iere ae oe 1
HestISPROGEIGUCTE = ee nee Ot ee ee SIRI ELCOLSE Se ree ee eee = 1
Miss Amelia Bacanega____________|____- domes Pree Fee Smanzoes:. WORE ay eA P| 1
eae orem | _ OG See 10 mangoes and 25avocados_______- 3
IMIS INE ee en rr Oi ae ee sa ZO USTN GS ee ye ne he 1
MinssuaseranUandeze eos 2 | Qe er ee ae SR (GO i oo tele Babs shel Tinh del Satara torts 1
Donieano Corba ss yes tk do=2. Ath. 30 ies Pimangos Vos 2 sth FhOT Weg | 1
VER Se Scales car Aes eS eye Be oye ne | A. Ol. 82 pt eo sag) 2iplan tssqee AU ee ese C0 ea 1
David Mizondo. +e -----. Miereodes, Texter = =. | A OPIOOS as 2 Ke i

\





ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY
AND PLANT QUARANTINE

Len A. STRONG, Chief.

S. A. RoHwER, ASsistant Chief.

Avery S. Hoyt, Assistant Chief.

P. N. ANNAND, Assistant Chief.

Ff. H. SPENCER, Business Manager.

Roiwia P. CurRIE, Editor.

MABEL COLCcORD, Librarian.

J. A. HystLop, in Charge, Division of Insect Pest Survey and Information.

J. I. HAMBLETON, in Charge, Division of Bee Culture Investigations.

D. L. VAN DINE, in Charge, Division of Fruit Insect Investigations.

F. C. CRAIGHEAD, in Charge, Division of Forest Insect Investigations.

W. H. WHITE, in Charge, Division of Truck Crop and Garden Insect Investiga-
tions.

C. M. PAcKARD, in Charge, Division of Cereal and Forage Insect Investigations. -

R. W. HARNED, in Charge, Division of Cotton Insect Investigations.

F. C. BrsHoprp, in Charge, Division of Insects Affecting Man and Animals.

L. A. HAWKINS, in Charge, Division of Control Investigations.

R. C. Roark, in charge, Division of Insecticides and Fungicides.

C. F. W. MUESEBECK, in Charge, Division of Insect Identification.

C. P. CLAUSEN, in Charge, Division of Foreign Parasite Introduction.

S. B. FrAcker, in Charge, Division of Plant Disease Control.

B. M. GApDIS, in Charge, Division of Domestic Plant Quarantines.

HE. R. SAsscer, in Charge, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines.

A. F. Burerss, in Field Charge, Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail Moth Control
(headquarters, Greenfield, Mass.).

H., G. Brewer, in Field Charge, Japanese Beetle and Gypsy Moth and Brown-
Tail Moth Quarantines, European Corn Borer Certification, and Dutch Elm
Disease Eradication (headquarters, Bloomfield, N. J.).

R. E. McDona.LD, in Field Charge, Pink Bollworm and Thurberia Weevil Quar-
antines (headquarters, San Antonio, Tea.).

P. A. Horan, in Field Charge, Mexican Fruitfly Quarantine (headquarters,
Harlingen, Tez.).

A. C. BAKER, in Field Charge, Fruitfly Investigations (headquarters, Mewico
City, Mexico).

64

U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1940



2 A,B. i: P..Q,.No.-144 Issued December 1940

United States Department of Agriculture

BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS
JULY-SEPTEMBER 1940

CONTENTS
: Page
Quarantine and other official announcements-_--_____-__-_--__----.----------------------------------- 65
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (No. 48)-_____-_-___-_-_---__--___________- 65
Instructions to poStmmasters ---_-_.--_--_-_---_- Ee ie ea oe eee 65
Japanese beetle control on fruit and vegetable shipments ends for Season--_____________________- 66

Order advancing date of termination of restrictions on fruit and vegetable shipments under the
Japanese beetlé quarantine to September 19 for the year 1940--___________________-________--

Instructions to poStmasters-________ eee re see ee eee 66
Order modifying administrative instructions to inspectors on the treatment of nursery products,
fruits, vegetables, and soil for the Japanese beetle (B. E. P. Q. 499, supplement No. 3)________ 67

Order modifying administrative instructions to inspectors on the treatment of nursery products,
fruits, vegetables, and soil for the Japanese beetle (B. E. P. Q. 499, supplement No. 1, 2d

cet apne remee tons 2 sense IT SNE Sh NSd ANI Sea BE PET en oF RRs SSPE SS 22 eA ee 67
Announcements relating to Mediterranean fruitfly and melonfly quarantine (No. 13)______________ 68
Use of a new fumigant approved for certain Hawaiian fruits and vegetables______._____________ 68
Use of methyl] bromide authorized for treating fruits and vegetables for movement from Hawaii
casunpeaeeaeeraabrerame ee oe meee fore 2 NR YL ATCT gt TE TIE) a ee) Pe ee 69

Administrative instructions amending authorization of the shipment of fruits and vegetanies -
from Hawaii to the mainland subject to fumigation with methyl bromide under supervision

noun RES UENO ere ots, RU ee ae ee ee eee oe Oe
Announcement relating to pink bo]lworm quarantine (No. 52)_________________-___._____________- 70
Statement regarding cooperative pink bollworm control program for the crop season 1940______ 70
Announcements relating to white-fringed beetle quarantine (No. 72)______________________________ 72
Administrative instructions—removal of white-fringed beetle certification requirements until
February 1, 1941, for specified articles (B. E. P. Q. 485, 6th revision)_________________-_______ 7
rie eae EEA SU TLINE LOLS 7 eset. yee. sah sy 2 Sheet esl da Tee ee 73
emminal Mispecwon of plants and plant producis._____ _- . - =_- - - tnt ee teen ee bt 73
Oregon State plant quarantines (revision of notice dated June 23, 1937)________________________ 73
ene ubICUMMteMIC in! site 20ee SUA aU Sere ee eer bbe a PEST aed Tie 76
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Kingdom of Iraq (B. E. P. Q. 468, revised)______________ 76
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Uruguay (B. E. P. Q. 382, revised)__________ 78
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act___._________-_______________________- 82
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine____________________________________. 84

QUARANTINE AND OTHER OFFICIAL
ANNOUNCEMENTS

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE
(NO. 48)

INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS

Post OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, August 8, 1940.
POSTMASTER :

My Dear Sir: Your attention is invited to the inclosed copy of the latest
revision of the regulations supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 48 of the
-U. 8. Department of Agriculture on account of the Japanese beetle, effective
April 5, 1940, extending the area under quarantine and modifying slightly the
restrictions previously imposed, by which you will please be governed. See
paragraph 1, section 595, Postal Laws and Regulations.

Very truly yours,
RAMSEY 8S. BLAcK,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.
273058—40



66 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July—Sept.

JAPANESE BEETLE CONTROL ON FRUIT AND VEGETABLE SHIPMENTS ENDS FOR
SEASON

(Press notice)
SEPTEMPER 21, 1940.

Restrictions on the movement of fruits and vegetables under the Japanese
beetle quarantine regulations have been removed for the season, the Department
of Agriculture announced today. Restrictions on cut flowers, however, remain
in force through October 15.

Under quarantine regulations, certificates showing freedom from Japanese
beetle are required until October 16 on interstate shipments of fruits and .vege-
tables of any kind moved via refrigerator car or motortruck from the areas of
heavy beetle flight. The new order, however, releases the fruits and vegetables
from that requirement nearly four weeks earlier than is provided in the
regulations.

The areas of heavy flight include Delaware, the District of Columbia, and
parts of Connecticut, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, and Vir-
ginia.

Inspection of fruits and vegetables is necessary only during the period when
the beetles are in active flight. Officials of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant
Quarantine said that there is no risk that such products will carry the Japanese
beetle after this active period, which is now apparently over throughout the
regulated areas. During the last few days the Department’s inspectors have
found no beetles in fruits and vegetables. .

There is still danger, however, that the beetles may be transported in cut
flowers. ‘Therefore, the restrictions on interstate movement of cut flowers and
other parts of plants will remain in full force through October 15.

Restrictions on the movement of nursery, ornamental, and greenhouse stock
and all other plants (except cut flowers, soil-free aquatic plants, and portions
of plants without roots and free from soil) are in force throughout the year and
are not affected by this order.

ORDER ADVANCING DATE OF TERMINATION OF RESTRICTIONS ON FRUIT AND VEGE-
TABLE SHIPMENTS UNDER JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE TO SEPTEMBER 19
FOR THE YEAR 1940

It has been determined that the active period of the Japanese beetle in its
relation to fruits and vegetables has already ceased for the present season and
that it is, therefore, safe to permit the unrestricted movement of fruits and veg-
etables from the regulated areas. Therefore it is ordered that the restrictions
on the interstate movement of fruits and vegetables: imposed by Sec. 301: 48-5
[regulation 5 of the rules and regulations (17th. revision) as amended, supple-
mental to Notice of Quarantine No. 48] are hereby removed effective on and
after September 19, 1940. This order advances the termination of the restric-
tions as to fruits and vegetables provided for in regulation 5 from October 16
to September 19, 1940, and applies to this season only.

Done at the city of Washington this 19th day of September 1940.

Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.

[ SEAL ] Paut H. APPLEBY,

Acting Secretary of Agriculture.

a on the Division of the Federal Register September 19, 1940, 11:01 a. m.; 5

INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS

THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, September 26, 1940.

The United States Department of Agriculture advises it has been determined
that the active period of the Japanese beetle in its relation to fruits and vege-
. fables. has already ceased for the present season and that it is, therefore, safe to
permit the unrestricted movement of fruits and vegetables listed in regulation
5 (see. 301.48—5), Rules and Regulations (17th revision), supplemental to
Notice of Quarantine No. 48, on account of the Japanese beetle from the entire
regulated area as defined in article 3 of such rules and regulations.



1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 67

Postmasters in the area regulated by the Japanese beetle quarantine may,
therefore, until June 15, 1941, accept fully prepaid parcels of fruits and vege-
tables when properly packed without being accompanied with the certificate of
inspection prescribed by that quarantine, except that in the case of the move-
ment interstate from certain areas in Virginia—section 301.48—-5 paragraph
(a)—the exemption will apply only until June 1, 1941.

There is still danger, however, that the beetles may be transported in cut
flowers. Therefore, the restrictions on interstate movement of cut flowers and
other parts of plants will remain in full force through October 15.

Restrictions on the movement of nursery, ornamental, and greenhouse stock
and all other plants (except cut flowers, soil-free aquatic plants, and portions
of plants without roots and free from soil) are in force throughout the year
and are not affected by this notice.

RAMSEY S. BLACK,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.

B. E. P. Q. 499, Supplement No. 3.

ORDER MODIFYING ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS TO INSPECTORS ON THE TREAT-
MENT OF NURSERY PRODUCTS, FRUITS, VEGETABLES, AND SOIL FOR THE
JAPANESE BEETLE

Pursuant to the authority conferred upon the Chief of the Bureau of Ento-
mology and Plant Quarantine by Sec. 301.48-6, Chapter III, Title 7, Code of
Federal Regulations [regulation 6 of the rules and regulations (17th revision)
supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 48 on account of the Japanese beetle,
as amended], the paragraph reading “Period of treatment.—The soil must not be
disturbed for 48 hours,’ under subsection (m) (1) of Sec. 301.48b [Circular
B. E. P. Q. 499, issued June 9, 1939], is hereby deleted. The paragraph quoted
above appears on page 15 of the mimeographed edition of said circular.

Results of further experience in treatment of plants in the field with earbon
disulphide emulsion for compliance with the certification requirements of Sec.
301.48 [Notice of Quarantine No. 48] indicate that the existing requirement
that soil must not be disturbed for 48 hours after treatment may be safely
eliminated.

Done at Washington, D. C., this 19th day of September 1940.

AVERY S. Hoyt,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

[Filed with the Division of the Federal Register September 24, 1940, 11:46 a. m.;
Sun dee 3191.)

B. E. P. Q. 499 (Supplement No. 1, Second Revision).

ORDER MODIFYING ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS TO INSPECTORS ON THE TREAT-
MENT OF NURSERY PRODUCTS, FRUITS, VEGETABLES, AND SOIL, FOR THE
JAPANESE BEETLE

Pursuant to the authority conferred upon the Chief of the Bureau of En-
tomology and Plant Quarantine by Sec. 301.48-6, Chapter III, Title 7, Code of
Federal Regulations [regulation 6 of the rules and regulations (17th revision)
supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 48 on aceount of the Japanese beetle,
as amended], subsection (1) (5) of Sec. 301.48b* on page 13 of the mimeo-
graphed edition of circular B. E. P. Q. 499, issued June 9, 1939, is hereby modi-
fied to read as follows:

(5) METHYL BROMIDE FUMIGATION

Equipment.—An approved fumigation chamber equipped with vaporizing, air-
cireulating, and ventilating systems must be provided.

Application —After the chamber is loaded, the methyl bromide must be vapor-
ized within it. The air within the chamber must be kept in circulation during
the period of fumigation. At the completion of the treatment, the chamber
must be well ventilated before it is entered and the plants removed. The ven-
tilating system should also be in continuous operation during the entire period
of removal of the fumigated articles.

1 This section was originally issued as Sec. 301.48a.



68 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July—Sept.

(i) Fumigation of plants, with or without soil

Temperatures, periods of treatment, and dosages.—The temperature of the soil
(with bare root stock, the root spaces) and of the air for each type of treatment
must remain throughout the entire period of treatment at the minimum specified
in the following table, or higher:

Dosage

Period of | , “methyl

bromide per

Temperature at least treatment | ¥ 9090 cubi
,000 cubic

feet)
aot Hours Pounds
RROD et GS eS Ie eS aS aoe ee a Ee eS 2
DOS ge egies le 8 Me 5 i Rs tes Ne a al tS ee 2% 2%
Osa Pe ee creat en rn EME EIN ise (leer are SA =a el NP ey ope 4 2%
AP DOPS HEA Sere be mba ce AT ache eR We es ree Sd Rec eR Ree AR 44 2%



The dosage shall be for each 1,000 cubic feet including the space occupied by
the load.

Preparation of plants.—The treatment is to be applied to plants with bare
roots or in 12-inch pots or smaller, or in soil balls not larger than 12 inches in
diameter nor thicker than 12 inches when not spherical. The soil should not be —
puddled or saturated and must be in a condition which in the judgment of the
inspector is suitable for fumigation. The plants should be stacked on racks or
separated so that the gas can have access to both top and bottom surfaces of
pots or soil balls. While not essential that the balls be completely separated
from each other they should not be jammed tightly together. 'Treatments J
and 2 may be employed in fumigating packaged plants prepared in a manner
satisfactory to the inspector.

Results of further experiments in treatment of plants with methyl bromide
for compliance with the certification requirements of Sec. 301.48 [Notice of Quar-
antine No. 48] indicate that the additional authorized method of fumigation is
effective in destroying the Japanese beetle. a

Varieties of plants.—The list of plants, including greenhouse, perennial, and
nursery-stock types treated experimentally, is subject to continual expansion
and, moreover, is too great to include in these instructions. Such a list, includ-
“ing also those which have been injured by the treatment, will be supplied on
request.

The schedule for the fumigation of strawberry plants as specified in sub-
section (1) (5) (ii) of Sec. 301.48b | page 14 of the mimeographed edition of
circular B. E. P. Q. 499] remains the same as heretofore. ;
- - This supplement supersedes Supplement No. 1, revised, dated March 22, 1940.

Done at. the city of Washington this 27th day of September 1940.

AVERY S. Hoyt,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.
sett with the Division of the Federal Register October 1, 1940, 11:56 a. m.;5 F.R.,
(ke eye

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO MEDITERRANEAN FRUITFLY
AND MELONFLY QUARANTINE (NO. 18)

USE OF A NEW FUMIGANT APPROVED FOR CERTAIN HAWAIIAN FRUITS AND
VEGETABLES

(Press notice)
JuLy 19, 1940.
Certain Hawaiian fruits and vegetables, entry of which to the continental
United States is restricted by Federal plant quarantine, may now come in,
provided they have received a treatment under supervision and safeguards that
makes it impossible for them to spread two destructive insect pests—the Mediter-
ranean fruitfly and the melonfly—which made the quarantine necessary. Lee A.
Strong, Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, United States



1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 69

Department of Agriculture, authorizes, effective August 1, 1940, a method of
treatment by methyl bromide and special handling of these certain fruits and
vegetables as a condition for certification for their movement from Hawaii
to the mainland.

The Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine developed this treatment
after extensive research, during which tests were made with thousands of insects.
The results of these tests show conclusively that fumigation with methyl bro-
mide, properly done under the supervision of trained inspectors, will kill the
Mediterranean fruitfly and the melonfly in all stages of their life cycles in these
certain fruits and vegetables—guavas, papayas, bell peppers, bitter melons, cucum-
bers, Summer squash, string beans, and tomatoes. This, together with safe-
guards to prevent infestation after treatment, will prevent the entry of these
pests and make it possible to ship the fruits and vegetables to he mainland.

Doctor Strong points out that the requirements as to the possible use of this
new method involve many details and that those interested may get full informa-
tion and detailed instructions from the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quaran-
tine in Washington, D. C.

USE OF METHYL BROMIDE AUTHORIZED FOR TREATING FRUITS AND VEGETABLES
FOR MOVEMENT FROM HAWAII TO THE MAINLAND 2

JuLY 19, 1940.

Lee A. Strong, Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, United
States Department of Agriculture, announced today that he has authorized, effec-
tive August 1, 1940, a method of treatment, under supervision, of certain fruits
and vegetables with methyl bromide as a condition for certification for their
movement from Hawaii to the mainland. In making this announcement, Strong
stated that extensive experiments by the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quar-
antine have demonstrated that the fumigation of guavas, papayas, bell peppers,
bitter melons, cucumbers, Summer squash, string beans, and tomatoes with methyl
bromide under prescribed temperature, dosage, and exposure conditions will kill
all stages of the Mediterranean fruitfly and the melonfly. As an added safe-
guard in connection with this treatment the instructions require that the fruits
and vegetables so treated shall be handled subsequent to treatment in a man-
ner which will preclude infestation until they are dispatched to the mainland.

In authorizing this method of treatment Strong says the information avail-
able suggests that the fumigation of papayas and tomatoes can be accomplished
without affecting their palatability. He states, however, that information is
not now available as to the possible effect the treatment will have on guavas,
bell peppers, bitter melon, Summer squash, and string beans under the conditions
that prevail in Hawaii. He adds that the data obtained in experimental work
elsewhere indicate that cucumbers fumigated with dosages of methyl bromide
even lower than that authorized for Hawaiian fruits and vegetables may result
in severe injury.

In making this announcement Strong emphasizes that inexactness or care-
lessness in the application of the fumigant may result in injury to the fruits
and vegetables which will cause their rejection. He also emphasized that evi-
dence based on trial shipments under conditions of transportation from Hawaii
is not available to demonstrate that the fruits and vegetables the movement of
which is now authorized will be marketable on the mainland after the application
of the treatment here authorized. He suggests that those interested in using
this treatment now approved should make small trial shipments.

B. E. P. Q. 510.

ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS AMENDING AUTHORIZATION OF THE SHIPMENT
OF FRUITS AND VEGETABLES FROM HAWAII TO THE MAINLAND SUBJECT TO
FUMIGATION WITH METHYL BROMIDE UNDER SUPERVISION

Pursuant to the authority contained in the first proviso of Section 301.13-2,
Chapter III, Title 7, Code of Federal Regulations [regulation 2 of the rules and
regulations supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 138, on account of the
Mediterranean fruitfly and melonfiy in Hawaii], provision is hereby made, effec-

2 Special statement prepared for Hawaiian newspapers.



70 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July—Sept.

tive August 1, 1940, for the certification of guavas, papayas, bell peppers. bitter
melon, cucumbers, summer squash, string beans, and tomatoes for movement from
the Territory of Hawaii into or through any State, Territory, or District of the
United States, when the prescribed fumigation with methyl bromide is applied
in Hawaii at plants designated for this purpose by the United States Depart-
ment of Agriculture and under the supervision of the inspectors of the Bureau
of Entomology and Plant Quarantine. Any fruits or vegetables treated and
shipped under the provisions of these instructions are so handled at the risk
of the shipper, and no liability shall attach to the United States Department of
Agriculture or to any officer or representative of that Department in the event
of injury resulting to the fruits and vegetables named.

Required fumigation equipment.—Fumigation must be performed in a gas-
tight fumigation chamber. This chamber shall be lined with sheet metal, with
locked and soldered seams, and fitted with a tight metal-clad door which closes
against gaskets so that it is gastight at ordinary atmospheric pressures. The
fumigation chamber shall be equipped with a blower-type fan having a capacity
of at least one-third the volume of the room per minute for stirring the gas mix-
ture in the chamber. A method for ventilating the fumigation chamber and
removing the fumigant from the commodity after fumigation shall also be pro-
vided. The fumigation equipment and method of application of the fumigant
shall be satisfactory to the inspector charged by the Department with the super-
vision of the treatment.

Method of fumigation.—The commodity to be treated shall be stacked in the
chamber in a manner satisfactory te the supervising inspector and fumigated for
a period of 3144 hours at a dosage of 2 pounds of methyl bromide per 1,000 cubic
feet, including the space occupied by the commodity. The temperature of the
commodity within the fumigation chamber shall not be lower than 80° F. through-
out the period of fumigation. Throughout the exposure the fan referred to
above shall be operated. After the fumigation has been completed the com-
modity shall be ventilated by drawing fresh air over and through the load for
a period of at least 20 minutes.

Caution.—Methyl bromide is a gas at ordinary temperatures. It is colorless
and practically odorless in concentrations used for fumigation purposes. It is
a poison and the operator should, as a measure of safety, use an approved gas
mask when exposed to the gas at concentrations used in fumigation and when
opening the door to ventilate the fumigation chamber. The fumigation cham-
ber should not be entered without a gas mask until it has been thoroughly
aerated.

Certification.—The certification of the fruits and vegetables enumerated will
be contingent upon the surrounding of the products so treated with safeguards
which, in the judgment of the inspector, will preclude infestation of the treated
fruits and vegetables from the time they leave the fumigation chamber until
loaded for dispatch to the mainland.

Done at Washington, D. C., this 15th day of July 1940.

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

Saunas with the Division of the Federal Register July 18, 1940, 10:13 a. m.; 5 F. R.,

ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO PINK BOLLWORM QUARANTINE
(NO. 52)

STATEMENT REGARDING COOPERATIVE PINK BOLLWORM CONTROL PROGRAM FOR
THE CROP SEASON 1940
JULY 5, 1940.

On December 15, 1939. a public conference was held in San Antonio, Tex., to
discuss the status of the pink bollworm infestation in the United States with
particular reference to the situation in the lower Rio Grande Valley. At that
conference it was developed that no immediate recommendation would be made
for the establishment of a noncotton zone in that section of the United States
and -that for at least the crop season 1940 it appeared desirable to continue a
cooperative suppressive program along the lines followed during the 1939
season. Following the conference and with the submission of a special report
to Congress it was pointed out that a supplemental estimate would be sub-



1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 71

mitted requesting additional funds to provide for part of the cost of continu-
ing the cooperative field clean-up in south Texas. Such supplemental estimate
was in order since in accordance with required practice and before the results
of clean-up were available the Department had submitted its regular estimates
of funds required for the fiscal year i941.

The President’s annual Budget estimates for the fiscal year 1941 requested
$526,800 for the regular work associated with control and prevention of spread
of the pink bollworm. This was $77,192 more than provided for these purposes
for the fiscal year 1940. This increase in the amount needed for regular ac-
tivities was approved because of the additional work involved in connection
with the enforcement of the Federal quarantine and related operations. Since
the regular Budget estimate did not provide special funds for field clean-up
in Texas for which $460,000 had been provided for the fiscal year 1940 the
amount of the estimate for pink bollworm control was $382,808 less than the
appropriation for that year.

When Congress considered the Agricultural bill which was based on the regu-
lar estimates an unsuccessful effort was made in both the House and the
Senate to increase the amount to be provided for pink bollworm control in
order to provide funds for clean-up and other suppressive measures in the
lower Rio Grande Valley.

On May 31, 1940, the President submitted a supplemental estimate request-
ing $380,000 additional for pink bollworm control to provide for suppressive
and clean-up work in south Texas. This amount together with $526,800 in-
cluded in the regular estimate would have provided for the fiscal year 1941
the same appropriation as that available for the fiscal year 1940. This addi-
tional supplemental estimate was considered by Congress in connection with
the Second Deficiency bill but was not approved.

Since final action has now been taken on the amount of funds that will be
available to the Department for the control «nd prevention of spread of the
pink bollworm for the fiscal year 1941, it is necessary that the program for
the season 1940 be determined on the basis of funds available, namely, $526,800.
It is proposed to use this money, first, for the continuance of enforcement of
the Federal domestic quarantine on account of the pink bollworm in all known
infested areas. This involves the sterilization of seed and of lint and other
cotton products originating in all heavily infested areas, and in certain of the
lightly infested areas. It involves work in Arizona, New Mexico, Texas, and
that part of south Florida where wild cotton infested with pink bollworm has
been found, and scouting to determine the distribution of the pink bollworm
in additional cotton-producing States.

After carefully reviewing the situation, it is believed the program in these
various States should not be appreciably modified but should even be strength-
ened. where possible in order to reduce, wherever possible, the danger of addi-
tional spread of pink bollworm. There would be no financial point to sacrific-
ing the efficiency of the work elsewhere to increase the scope of the Gperations
in the Rio Grande area, since the amount that could thus be raised would be
not only entirely inadequate to meet the requirements of the situation in the
lower Rio Grande Valley, but might conceivably result in spread from less
Leavily infested areas. The Department is therefore calling upon the farmers
of south Texas to cooperate even more vigorously than they have in the past
with the effort to supply suppressive measures during this crop season.

It is expected that with the cooperation of those concerned, it will be
possible to clean the fields effectively and thoroughly at the earliest possible
moment following the completion of the harvest. To this end, representatives
of the State Department of Agriculture, cooperating with those of the Bureau,
will contact the growers and give advice and assistance in every way prac-
ticable. It is believed the growers will furnish every possible assistance
to the end that prompt destruction of the crop residues may be accomplished
as soon as possible after cotton picking this fall. The recommendation of the
Department is that this work be done as thoroughly and as promptly as possible
in the lower Rio Grande Valley and the Coastal Bend counties of Texas. In
this program, we are assured of having the same cooperation from the Republic
of Mexico as we have had heretofore.

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.



2 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July—Sept.

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE
QUARANTINE (NO. 72)

B. E. P. Q. 485, Sixth Revision.

ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS—REMOVAL OF WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE CERTIFI-
CATION REQUIREMENTS UNTIL FEBRUARY 1, 1941, FOR SPECIFIED ARTICLES

(a) Pursuant to the authority conferred upon the Chief of the Bureau of
Entomology and Plant Quarantine by the second proviso of Section 301.72,
Chapter III, Title 7, Code of Federal Regulations [Notice of Quarantine No.
72, on account of the white-fringed beetle], all certification requirements are
hereby waived until February 1, 1941, for the following articles enumerated in
Section 301.72-3 [Regulation 3 (a@) and (0b)] when free from soil and when
sanitation practices are maintained to the Satisfaction of the inspector and
when moved interstate from the regulated areas, or parts of the areas listed
below:

(1) When moved interstate from any regulated area, certification require-
ments are waived for the following articles:

Baled cotton lint and linters.
Cottonseed when free from gin trash.

(2) When moved interstate from the regulated parts of the following coun-
ties: In Alabama, Mobile County; in Florida, Escambia County; in Louisiana,
Hast Baton Rouge Parish; in Mississippi, counties of Jackson, Hinds, and Pearl
River ; certification requirements are waived for the following articles: '

Potatoes and sweetpotatoes.

Sweetpotato vines, draws, and cuttings.

Cordwood, pulpwood, stumpwood, and logs.

Used or unused lumber, timbers, posts, poles, crossties, and other building
materials.

Hay, roughage of all kinds, Straw, leaves, and leafmold.

Peas, beans, and peanuts in Shells, or the shells of any of these products.

Seed cotton.

Used implements and machinery, scrap metal, junk, and ttensils or
containers coming in contact with the ground.

Brick, tiling, stone, and concrete slabs and blocks.

Nursery stock and other plants, which are free from soil.

(3) When moved interstate from the parishes of Saint Bernard and Orleans
(including the city of New Orleans) and from the regulated parts of the
parishes of Jefferson and Plaquemines in Lowisiana, certification requirements
are waived for the following articles:

Potatoes and sweetpotatoes.

Sweetpotato vines, draws, and euttings.

Cordwood, pulpwood, stumpwood, and logs.

Unused lumber, timbers, posts, poles, and crossties.

Hay, roughage of all kinds, straw, leaves, and leafmold.

Peas, beans, and peanuts in the Shells, or the shells of any of these
products.

Seed cotton.

It has been determined that the application of control measures, the main-
tenance of approved sanitation practices, and natural conditions have so
decreased the intensity of infestation of the white-fringed beetle as to eliminate
the risk of contamination with the egg or adult stage, thereby justifying
modification of certification requirements as set forth above.

(b) All articles designated in Section 301.72-8 [paragraphs (a) and (b) of
Regulation 38 of Quarantine No. 72] for which certification requirements are
not hereinabove waived, shall remain under the restrictions of that regulation
during the period covered therein.

This revision supersedes all previous issues of Circular B. E. P. Q. 485.

Done at Washington, D. C., this 9th day of August 1940.

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.
sane with the Division of the Federal Register August 18, 1940, 3:36 p. m.; 5 F. R.,
oVU.



1940]

SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS

73

INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS

POSTMASTER:

Post OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, August 23, 1940.

My Dear Sm: - Attention is invited to the enclosed administrative instructions
(B. E. P. Q. 485, Sixth Revision), issued by the Bureau of Entomology and
Plant Quarantine, United States Department of Agriculture, in connection with
Federal Quarantine Order No. 72, on account of the white-fringed beetie.

Postmasters in the quarantined areas will please be governed accordingly.
See paragraph 1, section 595, Postal Laws and Regulations.

Very truly yours,

Ramsey S. Brack,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.

TERMINAL INSPECTION OF PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS

OREGON STATE PLANT QUARANTINES

(Revision of notice dated June 25, 1957)

THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, September 11, 1940.

Under plant quarantines and regulations issued by the State of Oregon the
shipment into that State of certain plants and plant material known to be hosts
of injurious pests and plant diseases is subject to certain restrictions or entirel

prohibited.

The following table gives a summary of the Oregon quarantine laws and regu-
lations, showing the quarantined areas, the piants and plant products affected,

and the pests and diseases of which such plants are known hosts.

Under the

provisions of paragraph 2 (b), amended section 596, Postal Laws and Regula-
tions, postmasters should not accept such plants and plant products when
presented for mailing in violation of these quarantine laws and regulations,
and should invite the attention of the mailers thereto.

Plants and plant products prohibited or regulated entry into Oregon

Area quarantined

(Column I)

(1) Counties in Oregon: Baker,
Grant, Malheur, Morrow, Uma-
tilla, Union, and Wallowa.

All States except California and
Nevada.

(2) All States and al] counties in
Oregon.

273058—40——2



Plants and plant products affected



Plant pests
and diseases

Accepted for mailing
only when accom-
panied with approved
certificate or Oregon
permit

(Column IIT)

Acceptance for mailing
entirely § prohibited
from quarantined area

(Column IT) (Column IV)







Colorado po-
tato beetle.

Potatoes and potato tops
require State of origin
certificate showing
they were grown and
packed in noninfested
areas; or, screened and
packed as prescribed
by Oregon law.



Narcissus bulb
fly, eelworm,
or nematode.

Narcissus bulbs, includ-
ing daffodils, jonquils,
and Chinese sacred
lilies—require satisfac-
tory State of origin
certificate as to field
and storage inspection
and freedom from in-
festation.



74

BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

| July--Sept.

Plants and plant products prohibited or regulated entry into Oregon—Continued



Area quarantined

(Column I)

(3) Counties in Oregon: Benton,
Clackamas, Clatsop, Columbia,
Lane, Lincoln, Linn, Marion,
Multnomah, Polk, ‘Tillamook,
Union, Washington, and Yamhill.

All counties in Idaho ercept Benewah
and Latah.

Counties in Washington: Clallam,
Clark, Cowlitz, Grays Harbor,
Island, Jefferson, King, Kitsap,
Lewis, Mason, Pacific, Pierce,
San Juan, Skagit, Skamania, Sno-
homish, Spokane, ‘Thurston,
Wahkiakum, Whatcom, Whit-
man.

(4) State of California and Josephine
County, Oregon.

(5) Counties in Oregon: Benton,
Clackamas, Clatsop, Columbia,
Douglas, Hood River, Lane,
Linn, Marion, Multnomah, Polk,
Washington, and Yamhill.

States of Connecticut, Maine, Mas-
sachusetts, New Hampshire,
Rhode Island, Vermont, and
Washington.

CG) EAUTES Fates sae ets Nae ee ee



(7) Alabama, Arkansas, Connecti-
cut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia,
Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Ken-
tucky, Louisiana, Maryland,
Massachusetts, Michigan, Missi-
sippi, Missouri, New Jersey.
North Carolina, New York, Ohio,
Pennsy!vania, Rhode Isiand,
South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas,
Virginia, West Virginia, and Dis-
trict of Columbia.



(8) California, Florida, Louisiana,
North Carolina, South Carolina,
Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, and
Hawaii.

(9) All States east of and including
the States of Montana, Wyoming,
Colorado, and New Mexico.





Plants ana plant products affected

Acceptance for mailing
entirely § prohibited
from quarantined area

(Column IT)









Strawberry plants pro-
hibited from Cali-
fornia.

All varieties and species,
including the flower-
ing forms of the peach,
nectarine, almond,
apricot, plum, cherry,
chokecherry, quince,
pear, and apple trees
and plants and parts
thereof and the fresh
fruit.

All trees, plants, cut-
tings, and scions of the
cultivated and wild
filbert and hazel.





Accepted for mailing
only when accom-.
panied with approved
certificate or Oregon
permit

(Column III)



Fresh cherries and cher-
ry lug boxes—fresh
cherries accepted only
with State of origin
certificate they are
from a county free
from cherry fruit fly.

Lug boxes from quaran-
tined area must be
steam or hot-water
treated and so certi-
fied. Cherries can
be shipped from in-
fested into infested
territory.

Plants may be moved
from disease-free fields
in Josephine County
with certificate.

Poplar and willow trees
and parts capable of
propagation—must
carry State of origin
certification they were
grown in a county
free from satin moth
and have not been
stored where poplar or
willow trees from in-
fested areas are or have
been stored.

Grapevines and cuttings
accepted with State of
origin certificate that
shipment is from an
area or premises free
of phylloxera.



Scions or budwood ad-
mitted under Oregon
permit from Nov. 1 to
Mar.15. Bare-rooted
plants allowed entry
from Nov.1 to Mar. 15,
after fumigation as re-
quired, provided with
satisfactory State of
origin certificate.

Potatoes—accepted only
with certificate of
State of origin show-
ing area free of infesta-
tion; or that shipment
was fumigated accord-
ing to Oregon specifi-
tions.





Plant pests
and diseases

(Column IV)

Cherry fruit
fly.

Strawberry
yellows.



Satin moth.

Grape phyl-
loxera.
Oriental fruit
moth.
Potato tuber
moth.
Filbert blight.

Lee e ee eee ee eee eee ee



1940]

SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS

79

Plants and vlant products prohibited or regulated entry into Oregon—Continued

|
|
Area quarantined |

(Column I)



Plants and plant products affected

Acceptance for mailing

entirely § prohibited
from quarantined area

(Column If)

(10) All States and all counties in | Red raspberry, logan-

Oregon,

(11) Connecticut, Indiana, Maine,
Massachusetts, Michigan, New
Hampshire, New Jersey. New
York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode
Island, Vermont, and West Vir-
ginia.

(12) California, Delaware, Florida,
New Mexico, Mississippi, Penn-
sylvania, Virginia, and Hawaii.

(13) All States east of and including
Montana, Wyoming, Colorado,
and New Mexico.

(14) Territory of Hawaii__-__.--__--

(15) Counties in Arizona: Apache,
Cochise, Coconino, Graham,
Maricopa, Pima, Santa Cruz, and
Yavapai.

Counties in California: Imperial,
Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside,
San Bernardino, and San Diego.

Counties in Colorado; Delta, Gar-
field, Mesa, and Montezuma.

Counties in New Mezico: Bernalillo, |
Dona Ana, Lincoln, Otero, Rio
Arriba, Sandoval, Santa Fe, Sierra,
Socorro, Taos, and Valencia.

County in Oklahoma: Bryan.

Counties in Teras: Bowie, Brown,
Callahan, Cherokee, Comanche, |
Denton, Eastland. El Paso, Erath,|
Floyd, Grayson, Gregg, Hopkins,
Jones, Mills, Palo Pinto, Rusk,
San Saba, Smith, Tarrant, and
Wilbarger.

Counties in Utah: Grand and Wash-
ington.



berry, dewberry, or
blackberry plants and
their horticultural va-
rieties.

Chestnut and chinqua-
pin trees, nuts, cut-
tings, grafts, or scions.

| All trees, cuttings,

|
|
|



| Accepted for mailing

grafts, scions, or buds |

of the peach and nec-
tarine, including the
flowering forms.

Foreign-grown



only when accom-
panied with approved
certificate or Oregon
permit

(Column [il)

New and desirable varie-

ties for trial plots may
be shipped into Ore-
gon provided accom-
panied with Oregon
permit. Shipments
within Oregon require
certificate showing
area free of disease
after two field inspec-
tions.

Corn, broomcorn, sor-

ghums, Sudan grass,
except clean seed and
shelied grain, lima and
green beans in pod,
beets with tops, rhu-
barb, and cut flowers
or entire plants of
mums, asters, dahlias,
and gladiolus (except
corms and tubers
without stems)—ad-
mitted only with
special certificate of
United States Depart-
ment of Agriculture:

Tomatoes and tomato

plants require certifi-
cate of State of origin
showing fruit or plants
weregrown and shipped
from a free area, or
treated with Oregon
approved formula.

chest-
nuts and chinquapins
not restricted when
reshipped into Oregon
in the original

opened containers.

un- |



Plant pests
and diseases

(Column IV)

Virus diseases
of the genus
Rubus and
red raspberry
mosaic.

European corn
borer.

Tomato pin
worm.

Chestnut
blight.

East Indian
bean borer.



Peach mosaic.



76 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July—Sept.
Plants and plant products prohibited or regulated entry into Oregon—Continued

Plants and plant products affected

Area quarantined

(Column I)

(16) Alabama, Arkansas, Connecti-
cut, Delaware, District of Colum-

Acceptance for mailing

entirely prohibited
from quarantined area

(Column II)

Peach, nectarine, or

apricot trees; cuttings,

Accepted for mailing
only when accom-
panied with approved
certificate or Oregon
permit

(Column III)

Plant pests
and diseases
(Column IV

Peach yellows,
little peach,

bia, Florida, Georgia, Indiana, grafts, scions, buds, or and peach
Kentucky, Maryland, Massa- pits, including any rosette.
chusetts, Michigan, Mississippi, trees budded or grafted
New Jersey, New York, North on peach stock or
Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Penn- peach roots—from
sylvania, Rhode Island, South areas where any of
Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, these diseases are
and West Virginia known to exist.
GUA ATTEORO Tee Ores Moers te Ree ane Rc eg enc ee Gladiolus bulbs ac-|} Gladiolus
cepted only when ac- thrips.

companied by special
gladiolus permit.

Shippers desiring Oregon permits must make application therefor direct
to the Division of Plant Industry, State Department of Agriculture, Salem,
Oreg.

Postmasters at places in Oregon where State inspection of plants and
plant products is maintained under the Terminal Inspection Act should
take the action prescribed by amended paragraph 4 (b), section 596, Postal
Laws and Regulations, if parcels sent to such offices for terminal inspection
are found to be in violation of these plant quarantine laws or regulations.

RAMSEY S. BLACK,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.

MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS

B. E. P. Q. 468, Revised.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, KINGDOM OF IRAQ

Avcust 5, 1940.

This revision of the plant-quarantine import restrictions of the Kingdom
of Iraq has been prepared for the information of exporters of plants and plant
products to that country and plant-quarantine officials.

The English text of the Importation of Plants Law No. 31 for 1988 was pub-
lished in Iraq Government Gazette No. 7 of February 18, 1940, and became
effective on that date. This text was forwarded to the Department of Agri-
culture by the American Legation at Baghdad.

The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct and com-
plete up to the time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used independ-
ently of, nor as a substitute for, the original texts, and it is not to be inter-
preted as legally authoritative.

LrE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.



1940) SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS a

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, KINGDOM OF IRAQ
NOTIFICATIONS, Etc. BY THE COUNCIL OF MINISTERS
[103a—Importation of plants law No. 31 for 1938]

We, Kine oF IRAQ, with the approval of the Senate and the Chamber of
Deputies, do hereby order the enactment of the following Law:

ARTICLE 1. In this Law, the following expressions shall have the meanings
hereinafter set out.

(a) Plant: All living or dead plants or any part thereof, whether growing
above or underground as roots, bulbs, tubers, stems, leaves, flowers, fruits,
seeds, cottonseed, or cotton lint.

(b) Citrus: Cuttings, parts or fruits of any variety of plants of the family
Rutaceae such as oranges, sweet lemons, limes, tangerines, mandarins, ete.

(ec) Vines: Cuttings, parts, leaves, and fruits of the genus Vitis or other mem-
bers of the family Vitaceae.

(d) Pests: I. All species of the Insecta in any of their different stages;
II. Arachnida (spiders, etc.) ; III. Fungus diseases of the Thallophyta in
general.

(e) Government Inspector: The official who shall be appointed by the
Department of Agricultural Affairs for the fulfillment of the purposes of this
Law.

ArT. 2. All plants arriving in Iraq by sea, air, or land route, whether by post
or Otherwise, shall be examined by the Government Inspector in the places
defined in a notification published by the Minister of Economics and Communi-
cations.

ArT. 3. (a) The Government Inspector may order the destruction of the whole
or any part of a consignment if, on inspection, it be found infected with any pest to
a degree incurable by disinfection by fumigation or other method.

(b) If the Government Inspector considers that treatment in a_ suitable
manner of such infected plants eradicates the pest in question, he shall
detail and apply such methods.

ArT. 4. (a) The importation into Iraq of citrus plants, vines, and cottonseed,
shall be prohibited, unless accompanied by an official certificate from tne com-
petent authority of the country of origin, to the effect that they have been
examined and found free of pests.

(b) All plants imported into Iraq in accordance with paragraph (a) of
this article, shall, though they may be found free from pests, be either fumi-
gated or treated in suitable ways tc ensure this being the case, before being
allowed to enter or delivered to the consignee.

(c) If the inspector finds on examination that the imported plants do not
fulfill the required standard of cleanness, despite the contents of the certificate,
he shall order the consignment to be incinerated together with its covering,
unless the consignee wishes to reexport the same within 10 days of the order
being given by the inspector.

ArT. 5. If dispute shall arise between the inspector and the importer as to
the validity of the certificate, the importer may refer the matter to the Di-
rector of Agricultural Affairs, whose decision shall be considered final.

Art. 6. No compensation whatever shall be granted in lieu of plants de-
stroyed by order of the Government Inspector, or Director of Agricultural
Affairs.

ArT. 7. The restriction mentioned in article 3 of this Law, shall neither
apply to the juices of citrus fruits. nor to preserved, dried, or crystallized
fruits.

Arr. 8. Living or dead insects of any species shall not be imported into
Iraq for any purpose unless a license is obtained from the Director of Agricultural
Affairs, prior to importing, by a period of 50 days at least. The said license
shall enumerate the species and number of insects and the purpose for which
they are intended.

ArT. 9. The following shall be prescribed by regulation.

(a) Fees to be charged and collected from the importer for the examination,
detention, or disinfection of the plants.



78 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July—Sept.

(b) The practical methods for the proper execution of the provisions of this
Law.

ArT. 10. A penalty, not exceeding 75 dinars or an imprisonment for a period
not exceeding 6 months, or both, is imposed on:

(a) Persons who remove any plant from a place of detention without 2 written
permit from the Government Inspector.

(b) Persons evading or attempting to evade the examination of plants.

(c) Persons obstructing or attempting to obstruct the Government Inspector
in the execution of his duties as prescribed in this Law.

ArT. 11. The Importation of Plants Law of 1924 and the regulation issued
under article 13 of Customs and Excise Law No. 10 of 1982 shall be canceled...

ArT. 12. This Law shall come into force from the date of its publication in the
Official Gazette.

ArT. 18. The Ministers of Economics and Communications and Justice are
charged with the execution of this Law.

[Made at Baghdad this 28th day of Mhuarram 1357, and the 30th day of March 1938. ]

B. E. P. Q. 382, Revised.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF URUGUAY

SEPTEMBER 14, 1940.

This digest of the plant-quaratine import restrictions of the Republic of
Uruguay is offered for the information of nurserymen, plant-quarantine officials;
and others interested in the exportation of plants and plant products to that
country. .

It was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, formerly in charge of Foreign Service
Information, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines, from the original texts of
the Law of October 21, 1911, and decrees promulgated thereunder.

The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct and suf-
ficiently complete for its purpose up to the time of its preparation, but it is not
intended to be used independently of, nor as a substitute for, the original texts,
and it is not to be interpreted as legally authoritative.

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF URUGUAY

Basic LEGISLATION
[Law of October 21, 1911]

Article 4 of this law authorizes the Executive Power to prohibit the intro-
duction into Uruguay of seeds, plants, fertilizers, etc., that favor the develop-
ment of pests.

SUMMARY
IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

According to information supplied by the International Institute of Agri-
culture of Rome, Italy, the importation of the following plants into Uruguay is
prohibited: Acacia, Actinidia, Akebia, alder, almond, Ampelopsis, apple, apricot,
ash, beech, birch, blackberry, boxwood, catalpa, cherry, chestnut, citron, cornus,
cotoneaster, deutzia, Eleagnus, elder, elm, fig, forsythia, gooseberry, grapevine,
honeysuckle, horsechestnut, Jersey tea, Kalmia, Kerria, lignumvitae, lilac, linden,
locust, maple, marshmallow, medlar, mountain ash, mulberry, orange, Oxyacan-
thus, peach, pear, Photinia, plum, poplar, privet, quince, Rhodotypus, rose, sas-
safras, Spirea, Spruce, Sumac, Symphoricarpos, Thuya, Viburnum, walnut, and
willow.

Seeds of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) and forage crop seeds containing
more than 20 grains of Cuscuta seed per kilogram will be rejected, but may
be cleaned and offered again for entry. (Decree of March 9, 1912, article 11
(3), p. 3.)



1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 79

IMPORTATION RESTRICTED

Seeds: Consignee must apply for import permit and present documents attest-
ing their origin and purpose for which imported. Samples will be taken for
analysis. An excess of dodder (more than 20 grains per kilogram) will cause
rejection of shipment. (Decree of March 9, 1912, article 11 (1) and (8), p. 3.)

Plants from countries free from San Jose scale (Aspidiotus perniciosus
Comst.) : Consignee must apply for an import permit and must indicate the per-
mit number when making the customs entry. The plants will be inspected
on arrival, with disposal according to the findings. Decree of March 9, 1912,
article 11 (6) to (12), pp. 3 and 4.)

Fruits, vegetables, tubers, roots, etc., which may carry pests: Will be inspected
on arrival with disposal according to the findings. (Decree of March 9, 1912,
article 11 (14), p. 4.)

Plants, parts thereof, and fresh fruits from countries infested by San Jose
scale (Aspidiotus perniciosus Comst.) : Phytosanitary certificate issued by compe-
tent authority of the country of origin attesting freedom from injurious plant
diseases, must accompany each shipment; inspection on arrival at the expense
of the interested persons. (Decree of March 24, 1922, as amended, article 1 (a),
(b), and (c), p. 4.)

Seed potatoes: Phytosanitary certificate indicating origin must accompany each
shipment. This must be issued by competent authorities of the country of
origin and it must declare that the potatoes proceed from localities free from
potato wart, powdery scab, potato tuber worm, and Colorado potato beetle. A
toleranee of not more than 5 percent of tubers infected by common scab is
allowed. (Decree of January 10, 1934, article 1 (a), pp. 5 and 6.)

GENERAL REGULATIONS
[Decree of March 9, 1912, issued under the provisions of the law of October 21, 1911]
IMPORTATION OF SEEDS, PLANTS, FERTILIZERS, ETC.

ArT. 11. The importation of seeds, plants, fertilizers, and other vehicles for
the distribution of pests may be effected only through the port of Montevideo,
until the Executive Power authorizes others, and it will be subject to the following
regulations:

IMPORTATION OF SEEDS

(1) In order to be able to import seeds, the interested person must make an
application to the Plant Protection Service (Direccion de la Defensa Agricola)
indicating therein the name and address of the importer, the name of the seed,
its origin and the documents attesting the origin and the purpose for which the
seeds are intended—sale, sowing, or consumption.

SAMPLES WILL BE TAKEN FOR ANALYSIS

(2) A representative of Defensa Agricola will draw samples at random which
will be analyzed. According to the results of the analysis their entry will be
permitted, or refused, in the latter case requiring their immediate relading or
destruction without indemnity, at the choice of the interested person.

EXCESS OF DODDER WILL CAUSE REJECTION

(3) Seeds of alfalfa and other forage crop seeds that contain more than 20
grains of Cuscuta per kilogram will be rejected.

CLEANING OF SEEDS PERMITTED

(4) The cleaning of forage crop seeds which contain more than the allowable
amount of dodder seeds will be permitted. The seeds will be cleaned under the
supervision designated by Defensa Agricola. The refuse will be completely de-
stroyed by fire. The inspector will take care that the entire shipment is cleaned
and require the submittal of samples for a new analysis. In no case will entry
be permitted if the results of the analysis do not show that the required condition
has been attained.

(5) When the analysis is favorable a certificate will be issued to the interested
person; without it a customs permit will not be granted,



80 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

IMPORTATION OF PLANTS

(6) For the introduction of plants, an application must be made to the Plant
Protection Service, indicating the name and address of the importer, species,
quantity, and destination of the plants.

(7) The number of the respective permit must always be indicated. The
inspection having been made, Defensa Agricola will, in each ease, notify the
customs, indicating the permit number referred to in the entry papers.

INSPECTION ON ARRIVAL

(8) Inspection will be made at Montevideo if possible.

(9) If plants are infected in such a way as to constitute a risk for the national
agriculture and their efficacious disinfection is not possible in the opinion of the
inspector, a period of 48 hours in which to effect reembarkation or destruction
by fire, will be fixed without right of indemnity.

(10) When plants to be imported, on account of their packing and quantity,
cannot be inspected in that port without serious injury to the plants, the owner
will be permitted to carry them to his agricultural establishment under control
of Defensa Agricola, whose representative will be present and supervise the
opening of the packages.

DISPOSAL OF INFECTED SHIPMENTS

(11) Every shipment or part thereof that shows signs of infection shall be
destroyed at once, except in cases where, on account of the character of the
disease, disinfection can be carried out which will completely sterilize the
plants attacked. :

(12) Shipments will be regarded as cleared through the customs only when
the importer receives the corresponding inspection certificate from the Plant
Protection Service.

NOTICE OF ARRIVAL REQUIRED

(13) Importers or owners of plants will furnish a notice of arrival in ad-
vance, indicating the day and hour when unlading will be effected.

(14) Fruits, vegetables, tubers, roots, ete., that may be vehicles for the dis-
tribution of pests will be cleared only after inspection and isSuance of the
certificate establishing their freedom from pests.

(15) Refers to fertilizers.

AUTHORIZED PORTS OF ENTRY

The importation of plants, parts of plants, and fresh fruits, except as pro-
vided in Decree No. 2086 of September 23, 1921, may be effected through the
ports of Montevideo, Salto, Santa Rosa del Guareim, Rivera, and Paysandu.
The port of Carmelo is authorized for the entry of fresh fruits only.

REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE IMPORTATION OF PLANTS FROM
COUNTRIES NOT FREE FROM SAN JOSE SCALE

[Deeree of March 24, 1922, as amended by that of December 22, 1922]
PHYTOSANITARY CERTIFICATE REQUIRED

ARTICLE 1. The importation through the Port of Montevideo is authorized of
plants, parts thereof, and fresh fruits proceeding from countries that are not
free from San Jose scale under the following conditions:

(a) Every shipment of plants, parts thereof, and fresh fruits must be accom-
panied by a phytosanitary certificate from the exporting country, issued by
competent authority, which affirms that it has been inspected and found free
from injurious plant diseases.

(b) The interested persons shall present the phytosanitary certificate indi-
eating origin to Defensa Agricola with the application, indicating the name,
business, and address of the importer, kinds of plants, parts thereof, and fresh



1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 81

fruits that they desire to import and the quantity in detail of each, purpose
for which the products are intended, place of planting in case they are to
be cultivated, and port of embarkation and name of ship.

(c) Defensa Agricola will proceed to inspect the products to be imported and
if on inspection they are found to be infected or are suspected of being so, will
require their disinfection in a manner indicated by Defensa Agricola, at the
expense of the interested persons.

REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE IMPORTATION OF SEED POTATOES
[Decree of January 10, 1934]
PHYTOSANITARY CERTIFICATE REQUIRED

ARTICLE 1. Every shipment of potatoes imported into Uruguay for planting
shall be accompanied by a phytosanitary certificate indicating origin which
shall affirm:

(a) That the imported tubers proceed from localities free from the fol-
lowing diseases and parasites: Synchytrium endobioticum (Schilb.) Pere.,
Spongospora subterranea (Walls.) Lang., (Phthorimaea) Gnorimoschema
operculella Zell., and (Doryphora) Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say.

(b) That the tubers intended for exportation are free from other serious
parasitic diseases, a certain margin of toleration being allowed of relatively
innocuous infections.

With respect to scab, distinction should be made between:

(1) Powdery scab caused by Spongospora subterranea which, as mentioned
above, renders the shipment useless for seed purposes.

(2) Black scab caused by Rhizoctonia violacea, the presence of which ne-
cessitates the disinfection of tubers intended for seed purposes.

(3) Common scab caused by Actinomyces (Oospora) scabies, which may be
tolerated when found only in a small proportion, for example, when not more
than 5 percent of the tubers are affected, and of these not more than 10 percent
of the surface.

ART. 2. In addition to a phytosanitary certificate indicating origin, each con-
signment of potatoes must be accompanied by a certificate issued by the Govern-
ment of the exporting country to the effect that the tubers were especially se-
lected for seed and that the farms on which they were grown have been under
official supervision and inspection; also that in the course of the official inspec-
tions it was ascertained that there was no evidence of “degeneration” (virus
diseases) such as leaf roll, mosaic, etc., which lower the vitality of the tubers.

(Note.—The decree of July 4, 1935, temporarily suspends the provisions of
art. 2. In other words, until further notice, the certification that the potatoes
concerned were selected seed potatoes and that the cultures from which they
were obtained had been officially inspected and found free from the so-called
degenerative diseases, is not required. )

JNFIT SEED POTATOES MAY BE CONSUMED

ArT. 3. If the tubers, on arrival in Uruguay, are deemed by the experts of
the Agronomic Board (Direccion de Agronomia) to be unsuitable for seed,
they may be utilized for consumption unless for a special reason they are unfit
for this purpose also.

TOTALITY UNFIT POTATOES MUST BE DESTROYED

Art. 4. Tubers deemed by competent authorities to be unsuitable either for
planting or consumption shall be destroyed under the supervision of those
authorities, the importer having to pay the expenses involved thereby.

Tubers imported by commercial firms for planting in Uruguay will remain
subject, even after release from the customs, to supervision by technical officials
of the Division of Agricultural Encouragement and Protection (Seccion Fo-
mento y Defensa Agricola), the importers being responsible for the maintenance
of the tubers in good condition.



82 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July—Sept.

PENALTIES IMPOSED FOR VIOLATIONS OF THE PLANT QUARANTINE
ACT

According to reports received by the Bureau during the period July 1 to Sep-
tember 30, 1940, penalties have recently been imposed by the proper authorities
for violations of the Piant Quarantine Act, as follows:

QUARANTINES AFFECTING MEXICAN PRODUCTS

In the case of the United States versus the persons listed below, for attempt-
ing to smuggle in contraband plant material, the penalties indicated were
imposed by the United States customs officials at the following ports:









Name Port Contraband Penalty
ni

Francisco M. Esperanza. _________- Nogales) Ariz. {cans 195bulbs: is. 5 oe aya aera | $3. 90
RodoltoiG@uerteross oss eee see eee ree opeae CO eee ri id ee aos 2 pounds acorns___________________ 1. 00
Wonsueloy Roce sas eaies sere eae San Ysidro, Calif._____ 2mangoesad/s i. UN) Tae 1.00
WredlS alazarie cease foes ae eens Cys hae GOES 2g eats ss Sega Ee O22 ee ee 1.00
BJA PEO SETS eye eee tes ara eye ere GQ Eas 2o8 Sua soe MCACtus) plants 5. =e ee eee 1.00
Noe @harlesak see mG ol sak wand MENEES Brownsville, Tex______ {mangoes eae ae 1.00
Maria Alejandro____-_-------------|----- io sess eee ete Bae 2 peaches and 3 guavas____________ 1.00
Beatriz ahz aes: 2 ee ates eo Goss seu haan Maa 2 AN. O CAC OSE = 2 ya 1.00
Catarinac@puz ....-- <2 - Magle.Passs:Tex---__-_2 LSA O Ye 3s oo ey 1.00
Mrs. Santos Ramon de Moreno__-__|____- Goss tisthic. Fy Cee 14 apples and 7 avocados__________ 1.00
Maria Antonia de Pallos___________|____- COE aie se eae 1 mango: 5.2 eel eee eee 1. 00
Maria) Gaiard 025.2 ee eee |e COE ise we aint ae lavocag6)s: 5522 eae ee 1.00
Maria Guadalupe Rodriguez_______|____- GOES ae ae 2 CACEUS HOTA IGS eee 1. 00
Herlinda Trevino de Perez_________|_____ Got Le Es SON 2 avocado seedS___________________ 1. 00
IV imSepAR PARE SCOl aT en ae yee nenmne El] Paso, Tex_.___--___ 1 mango and 19 bulbs_____________ 1.00
HenomiGonzalezy 2555 ses Thee Eidalzon exseutee nes 8 avocado seed___._-_-__________- 1.00
AR RiN teh GRU ED] ene ee ee eee nee | eae CO KO reece Scr ie tee SIDVO CRC OS ia at a ee age ee 1.00
iMiarcel Cre zis 5S eas ee en ea or dos Sra aae ee 2 avocado plants___._____________- 1.00
Imo centasPereze sas). esses eae pees COM ays Bee 2 MaNngoes2 25. eae ee 1.00
Mars asia tee ns ae es ee re ee GOS is oe enc To plants~ 2. 2p eee 1.00
Francisco Paula Castillo____.______}____- GOs Sens Meme 3 MAN oes! 2 e . Je ae ee ee ae 1.00
MAlVAG ORANG VAS=e ae ee ee es ae TOMS LP 2MANgOeSs2 LE Pees a 1.00
Aoueday Gonzalez sees esse eee ee |e ones doz feiss say a ee 3 mangoes: 2.03.4 1. 00
Tosa Gant ees ae ees ewe ie a Oss rae Bees 4 MANOS 2 ee ee eee 1.00
iPaulanlopeze ee mesa eee ee oer ae tee ee dois Sane Pavocado 2022s ae ae ean 1.00
Lucinda Rodriguez ___-_.--_-------]----- GO s2225 WA ea 2 POMEeLTAN ates sas ees ae eee 1. 00
Mrs. Pabla A. Barrios_------------ Varedo. Lexan ses 1 plant and 14 pound tree seed__-_-. 1.00
VATION CS Asse eer ee eae eath eel en GOR ee eit tae Tsmmangoss. 2s. . ee es eee 1. 00
ena Villareal 22222 222.0 re Pee ee ae Os Ee eR et ee C6 (Ope chet teil EIR oP 1.00
RSAC VG Le eT pas a Oe | ea LOR es A EE @oile ik Ns ee eee 1.00
Mrs. Dorotea Ramirez______-_-----]--_-- GO oS As gs 2 eles [ilallahe GOs 6S eed oe ee ea 1.00
BNC NNN oe VS as | a Oss ee alla LO 2h cs Se ee ga 1.00
Mrs. Maria Q..de Garza.__--------|----- QoL separa = ANS OCS. ak Ee einen 1:00
Mrs: Arda Pod#e ‘Pilar: = fee COU NE S eres ST planbe Stare gee oe ~ 1500
Mrs. Julia Vargas_________-_-_____-]----- GOES Sats Pees Timan gor: . .cfy2- ee ee Ee 1.00
Mrs. Manuela Carnero de Villarreal. |..___- LO ae sy ek ies ye | omer GO ne foe oo Ee ee 1. 00
Mrs. Hortensia Longoria___________|--__- dOeSe esa) aes 4 mango seeds___________-________- 1.00
Joseferia Combrono___-------------|----.- dO. Fe Vee 3 plants... 222 eee ee eee 1.00
Esperonza Fernandez_-------------|----- COs ae el el €O2 2. 5 5 a ee eee 1.00
RobertouNovas. 220 eee a ee eee COE Sees. 4 Mangoes: See 1.00
MirsSeAdiulay Ganz ae ee eee | eee C6 (0) ae et cee 2:plants: (222) Lea eee 1.00
Ar turOsEOZaNnO. Dae eee 2 ee en aye es GOS... ae See 14 peaches...) 3.) | aoe ae eee 1. 00
Esperanza Rancel-. 222-22 272222 2” Comet Nae sae eiiet 3 sweet limes and 2 mamey seed __- 1.00
Severa Gonzalez.____..._.---------|----- GOLaN Laas ees 2: Mangoes): 22 Uses eee 1.00
Eudelia Guerra Reyes. -_---_------|----- CLO pee Se pea See DR eo GO 2 see el le ee 1.00
Mrs: Josefa Lopez .:.. == -2-2- 22) 22) 2223 GOs sake ale he ieee 2; PeacheSe = <2 Notas Ae yee eee 1.00
Mrs. Esperanza Ramos-_--.-------|----- Gott SEN? SEaaae 2 Mangoes: 22s 22 eae 1.00
Wirs) Salia Sanchez 2) so 2h s ied eer G02 Set Tees limango.!3!i2 fe ee eee 1.00
IMIS RET Oe rr ati Gl CZs Sos aaa ee ere | a ae dos aL eae 4 avocados... 415. a eee 1.00
Edwarda De La Rosa___-____._-----|----- Om 2 es ee 1 pound tree seed and 12 plants___- 1.00
JosevRamirez: 2252 22. ss See | ere dows. Se See 3 plants... 2u. 2-22: eee eee 1.00
MeresaeAtalavss 2228 See een eet Ee A ale Ossetia 8, plants. 225) 42 eee 1.00
SOCK GAZ Gigs ee So 2 eek Crone Vera eye ate Goves setae oe ee 4 plants... RomulowNMinost = eee ee ee ne nee Goma te ences ane 3:avocados-.. 222.522 a eee fe 1.00
Mrs. Josepha Alvarez _______------|----- COE gh Be ete Mees 2 plants) 2-225. 222825 oe eee 1.00
Mrs. Sara Gomez de Pedrosa______|____- GOs ss See engeee 2 MAaANGOeS 222 = eee 1.00
‘Hiije! Castillon! Vath _8 see we 2 Ce bee GOLEES Se ER Z.avocadose. |) jst See eae eae eee 1.00
Rudencio Munoz__._.._-----------]-___- LOMA wae) cle =| 2eMNaIM en, SCC Ce sae eee ees 1.00
PentiwrarGirterrey. - es LN A donee eee A SHY BT Os a 1.00
PAT DENA Zee co ives ee eee ree aL Mees Le Oe Oe ee 1 avocado and 8 plants__--_____-_- 1.00
Mrs WidiasBermall 2 aah es eae Gow. elated Q flO S EL Oe SE SE ev es 1.00
Mrs. Merced Montelongo.__-__-___]____- GOseans ehh Ga 14 pound tree seed________--___-__- 1. 00
Ghose rtine Zs ieee cee pe eh eee Gowieul eee ry) eh Giavocados:. -4=)5)2._ > eee 1.00
IVINS Soh) exe Behn an GeCZz asap nee | eee GO eu tetae ae Spe sae 45 mamey' seed_22 2222 5 Saaeee een 1.00
ip PETE rn and © zee ee ee | eee GO. chee ae Qimangoesi.: sa! a jt Te eae 1.00
PANT OMNIOs G:aiZ ae ae eee eee | Gots eee ee 4iquincess222 222. 2) 32 ae eee 1.00
Guadalupe A. de Blanca___________|---_- Gost ee: Sans aes 4:mangoes) 2) .22. eee 1.00
Mania VErevin0: 225 esse eee eae AOE S22 She ee i peachte2s22- 22.5 22 So eee 1.00



1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS §3











Name Port | Contraband | Penalty
| | }

Wie ASTOOUCTS se Waredo;) exe 2... 52= | 1 avocado and 2 avocado seeds_____ $1. 00
mdpreeo ee Age ey ace epee seas! se mr es | 1. 00
Mrs. Maria Don Miguel-_-----_----|----- GOls Rie ts oh ok OIAVOCAU OSES =) eee as oe eee 1. 00
Winsmenliznieigeee S| 0st ee DANIAN OCS ster ee ED ee Se aS | 1. 00
MMrsm@eliaviumsey =). =. _-_|_.-.- GOFSe2 es eles 2: IOV OCAUMOS ae ste Sse ec! 1. 06
Rees iarearita Jiminez: = | --}_____ ts fee oe dp bt oe) ST eS es ee ee ge 1. 00
ReronbreuinQwe= eos | oe Ge = ae ten ae oe DATA ORS See =e ae ee eee bee | 1. 00
Sirplicrmental Smee ee 1 Owes ne sane Se ANTON] LS eee a Se es Lee | 1.00
Mrs. Maria de la aie Mendoza____|_-__- OV) ee eee ee Ouplanticepe es. eee ee ee ae | 1. 00
‘Mits.2S-+Gonagless .-._-_-.-4_-----|--_-. one e ts ee SL ONDIN Pease nee eS 1. 00
Weowveramiys 54.20 pF ea) Goue Ser ety. Fe 5 avocados with seed__~_-___-_____- 1.00
Winco amenge 9 efi CO eae as Se ee ZiT COS see = eer enees ener eee 1.00
iemnsaGe la) Riz? 22) 2st id 22 oe det 2. _ is." he IS TD CACSE 28) ) Soe § 2 8 5h aoe 1. 00
mosaueshenavidess= =) = 2 = 27 spe Corse tS TSt plants es a ee ee Ae ee 1. 00
Sir Airap On eee ee ee | 1, ee ee IA OCAUOS See ee ee ee | 3. 00
Canminhiagrlen lO. 9" = 222. te eet Moses. = sero sevice ARON Ces sa Se SS Pe ee 1.00
ree ne mick pes 2 | __-_e gre oe aere een fiplantâ„¢ 22.2. aN) ar ere 4 1.00
Pepueradiin | does TAs 5 eae Renlantart ss 4 ei beh og Bw speed owes! | 1. 00



ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY
AND PLANT QUARANTINE

LEE A. Strone, Chief.

S. A. RoHwer, ASsistant Chief.

AVERY S. Hoyt, Assistant Chief.

P. N. ANNAND, ASsistant Chief.

J. C. Hotton, Agent, Cooperative Field Relations.

F. H. SPENCER, Business Manager.

RoLita P. CURRIE, Editor.

MABEL Cotcorpb, Librarian.

J. A. Hystop, in Charge, Division of Insect Pest Survey and Information.

J. I. HAMBLETON, in Charge, Division of Bee Culture Investigations.

D. L. VAN DINE, in Charge, Division of Fruit Insect Investigations.

I’. C. CRAIGHEAD, in Charge, Division of Forest Insect Investigations.

W. H. WHITE, in Charge, Division of Truck Crop and Garden Insect Investiga-

tions.

. M. Packarp, in Charge, Division of Cereal and Forage Insect Investigations.

W. HARNeED, in Charge, Division of Cotton Insect Investigations.

C. BisHopp, in Charge, Division of Insects Affecting Man and Animals.

A. HAWKINS, in Charge, Division of Control Investigations.

C. Roark, in Charge, Division of Insecticides and Fungicides.

FE. W. MUESEBECK, in Charge, Division of Insect Identification.

. P. CLAUSEN, in Charge, Division of Foreign Parasite Introduction.

S. B. FRACKER, in Charge, Division of Plant Disease Control.

B. M. Gappis, in Charge, Division of Domestic Plant Quarantines.

E. R. SAsscer, in Charge, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines.

A. F. BurcEss, in Field Charge, Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail Moth Control (head-
quarters, Greenfield, Mass.).

EK. G. Brewer, in Field Charge, Japanese Beetle and Gypsy Moth and Brown-
Tail Moth Quarantines, European Corn Borer Certification, and Dutch Elm
Disease Eradication (headquarters, Bloomfield, N. J.).

R. E. McDona.p, in Field Charge, Pink Bollworm and Thurberia Weevil Quar-
antines (headquarters, San Antonio, Tez.).

P. A. HOIWALE, in Field Charge, Mexican Fruitfly Quarantine (headquarters
Harlingen, Tez.).

A. C. Baker, in Field Charge, Fruitfly Investigations (headquarters, Mexico
City, Mexico).

84

ORE a RO

U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1940



S. R. A.—B. E. P. Q. No. 145.

United States Department of Agriculture

BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS
OCTOBER-DECEMBER 1940

CONTENTS
Page
Quarantine and other official announcements__---_-____- se ee et ee to ee eee 85
Announcements relating to Mexican fruitfly quarantine (No. 64)_______________________________ Le 85
Fruitfly quarantine modified to extend Valencia orange harvest in Texas area (press notice)___ 8&5

Administrative instructions—modifying the restrictions of the Mexican fruitfly quarantine by
extending the harvesting season on Valencia oranges from April 30 to May 31, 1941 (B. E. P.
I ia a a ge 86

NCES ME DYISMICTiiGe ee = 2. 2 oP Ee eee Fe a a ae eee aoe
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Chile (B. E. P. Q. 511; supersedes B. P. Q.

BOS lo. Se 2 ee ee eee eee eee
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, British India (B. E. P. Q. 404, revised, supplement No.2). 95

List of current quarantine and other restrictive orders and miscellaneous regulations__________ 95
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act___.______-_________--__---_---_-_-. 101
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine______..__.___--_--.______--_-.--___- 103

QUARANTINE AND OTHER OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO MEXICAN FRUITFLY QUARANTINE
(No. 64)

FRUITFLY QUARANTINE MODIFIED TO EXTEND VALENCIA ORANGE HARVEST IN
TEXAS AREA

(Press notice)
JANUARY 10, 1941.

To provide for more orderly marketing of this year’s large crop of Valencia
oranges in Brooks, Willacy, Cameron, and Hidalgo Counties, Tex., the United
States Department of Agrieulture today announced the extension of the har-
vest:season to May 31, from April 30, the date set in the Department’s Mexican
fruitfly quarantine regulations. These regulations require a fruit-free period
between harvests to prevent fruitfly infestations in the lower Rio Grande
Valley. April 30 bad been set as the date when all citrus fruit must be off
the trees. It remains the date for the closing of the grapefruit harvest season.

Lee A. Strong, Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine,
said that extension of the harvesting season for Valencia oranges will not in-
crease the hazard of fruitfly infestation in the United States. Valencia oranges
are not preferred hosts of the fruitfly and seldom are infested by it. Plant
quarantine inspectors will make an extensive inspection of the groves during
the extra month the oranges are allowed to remain on the trees. Should this
inspection reveal any fruitfly infestation, Dr. Strong said, steps necessary to
prevent its dissemination through interstate movement of the fruit will be
taken.

The extension was announced after consultation with the Texas State De-
partment of Agriculture, which concurred. Quarantine officials of the State
Department of Agriculture of Texas and of the United States Department of
Agriculture count on the cooperation of growers and packers that has been
extended in the past.

85
290314—41——_1



86 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct.—Dec,

B. H. P. Q. 512.
TITLE 7—AGRICULTURE

CHAPTER III—BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS—MODIFYING THE RESTRICTIONS OF THE MEXI-
CAN FRUITFLY QUARANTINE BY EXTENDING THE HARVESTING SEASON ON
VALENCIA ORANGES FROM APRIL 30 TO MAY 31, 1941

§301.64-5c. Administrative instructions; modifying the restrictions of the
Mexican fruitfly quarantine by extending the harvesting season on Valencia
oranges from April 30 to May 31, 1941—Pursuant to the authority conferred
upon the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Piant Quarantine by the
third proviso of Section 301.64, Chapter III, Title 7, Code of Federal Regula-
tions [Notice of Quarantine No. 64], it having been determined by me that
a modification may be safely made without increasing the risk of spread of
the Mexican fruitfly, Section 301.645 (a) [subsection (a) of regulation 5
supplemental to this quarantine] is hereby modified to extend the harvesting
season for Valencia oranges for the Texas Counties of Brooks, Willacy, Cam-
eron, and Hidalgo to the close of May 31 for the year 1941, provided conditions
of infestation do not necessitate an earlier closing date.

The host-free period for Valencia oranges, under this modification, will
begin June 1 and continue to August 31, 1941, inclusive.

This modification does not affect or alter the harvesting season for grape- -
fruit which closes, under the conditions of the above regulation, on April 30.

Done at Washington, D. C., this 30th day of December 1940.

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.
[Filed with the Division of the Hederal Hoonia January 6, 1941, 11:43 a. m3;

MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS

B. E. P. Q. 511 (Supersedes B. P. Q. 348).
NOVEMBER 28, 1940.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF CHILE

This revision of the digest of the plant-quarantine import restrictions of the
Republic of Chile has been prepared for the information of exporters of
plants and plant products to that country and plant quarantine officials.

This circular was prepared by Richard Faxon, District Supervisor, Certifi-
eation for Export, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines, from a translation
of “Leyes y Reglamentos en Vigencia sobre Sanidad Vegetal 1925 a 1938”
received from the Ministry of Agriculture, Santiago, Chile, dated 1939, and
later decrees, and was reviewed by the Chief of the Department of Plant
Sanitation, Santiago, Chile.

The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct and
sufficiently complete for its purpose up to the time of preparation, but it is
not intended to be used independently of, nor as a substitute for, the original
text, and it is not to be interpreted as legally authoritative.

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF CHILE
Basic Law

[Decree-Law No. 177, Plant-Quarantine Law (Ley de Policia Sanitaria Vegetal) of
December 31, 1924]

DECREE-LA W

ARTICLE 1. For the purposes of the present law it is hereby declared that
weeds, injurious animals and in general, diseases of cryptogamic or animal
origin, eSpecially dangerous insects, will be deemed plant pests and will be the
objects of Sanitary measures. oe



1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS S87

Art. 2. The importation of plants, cuttings, seeds, fruits, or any other plant
products will only be authorized through ports determined by special decrees
in accordance with the regulations prescribed to that effect.

The same regulations will prescribe the procedure to be followed in case
of mail importations.

ArT. 8. Such plants and plant products offered for importation shall be
inspected in the Customs by the Plant Quarantine Service (Servicio de Policia
Sanitaria Vegetal), and in case they are infected or are suspected of being
infected, any of the following measures may be ordered: Disinfection, quar-
antine, return to port of departure, confiscation, or destruction.

CONCISE SUMMARY
IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

Seeds, plants or parts thereof, if infested by any of the diseases or insects
named in Decree No. 105, article 5 (a) and (b). (See p. 5.)

Rooted grapevines from any source. (Decree No. 105, art. 5 (d), and Decree
No. 2921, May 27, 1929. See pp. 5 and 6.)

Peach trees from the United States. (Decree No. 105, art. 5 (e). See p. 6.)

Plants with soil. (Decree No. 105, art. 5 (f). See p. 6.)

Bulbs, tubers, or roots infested with injurious parasites. (Decree No. 105,
art. 5 (g). See p. 6.)

Fresh plant products capable of introducing fruitflies. (Decree No. 105, art.
5 (h), and Decree No. 12, September 4, 1930. See pp. 6 and 7.)

Fruits infested with Aspidiotus perniciosus or Diaspis pentagona. (Decree
No, 105) art. 5.(1).. See p. 7.)

Corn on the cob and broomcorn. (Decree No. 2526, August 28, 1928. See
p. 9.)

Potatoes. (Decree No. 130, April 28, 1931. See p. 13.)

IMPORTATION RESTRIOTED—INSPECTION CERTIFICATE REQUIRED

Seeds if not infested by any of the insects named in article 5 (a) of Decree
No. 105, February 11, 1925. (See p. 5.)

Soybeans for industrial purposes, subject to fumigation if slightly infested.
(Decree No. 298 of April 9, 1935.) (See pp. 15 and 16.)

Plants or parts thereof if not infested by any of the insects named in article
5 (b) of Decree No. 105, February 11, 1925. (See p. 5.)

Bulbs, tubers, or roots free from parasites deemed injurious. (Art. 5 (g)
of Decree No. 105, February 11, 1925. See p. 6.)

Fresh fruits from the United States if free from the scale insects Aspidiotus
perniciosus and Diaspis pentagona, and if accompanied by a certificate attesting
origin in a district free from Mediterranean fruitfly and visaed by Chilean
Consul. (Decree No. 105, art. 5 (i), February 11, 1925, and No. 12, September
4, 1930. See pp. 7, 10, 11, and 13, and following.)

Alfalfa, clover, and other forage seeds containing less than 10 seeds of
Cuscuta sp. per kilogram. (Decree No. 629 of September 27, 1989. See p. 7.)

Straw packing to be sterilized and certified accordingly. (Decree No. 2526,
August 28, 1928. See pp. 9 and 10.)

Grapevine stocks of varieties resistant to phylloxera. (Decree No. 2921 of
May 27, 1929. See pp. 5 and 6.)

Peach trees from the United States in conformity with the provisions of
Decree No. 781 of May 29, 1935. (See p. 6.)

Clean shelled corn and sorgo seed. (Decree No. 2526 of August 28, 1929.
See p. 9.)

Cottonseed for the production of oil, and unginned cotton, subject to fumi-
gation and other provisions. (Decree No. 226 of March 31, 1936. See pp. 16
and 17.)

Wheat for milling purposes must be free from Angoumois grain moth and
so certified. (Decree No. 4, January 4, 1934. See pp. 14 and 15.)

Seed wheat must be certified as coming from a district free from loose smut
of wheat. (Decree of January 31, 1989. See p. 15.)

IMPORTATION UNRESTRICTED

Coffee, tea, yerba mate, rice, chicory, saffron, mushrooms, cinnamon, cloves,
cumin, peanuts, cacao, and pepper: No inspection certificate required, If



88 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct.—Dee,

imported in tin cans may enter any port without inspection. If found infested
with pests, Subject to the general regulations of Decree No. 105. (Decree No.
450, August 6, 1986. See pp. 8 and 9.)

Wood, ground red pepper, cornmeal and corn starch, dried leaves, and bark
and roots for medicinal and industrial purposes through the port of Chacalluta-
(See p. 10.)>

SUMMARY OF THE GENERAL REGULATIONS
[Decree No. 105, sec. 1, February 11, 1925]

DECLARATION OF PLANT PESTS

ARTICLE 1. Plant diseases of cryptogamic or animal nature, as well as in-
jurious animals and weeds, which can be regarded as plant pests, will be so
declared by decree. The office of the Plant Quarantine Service will indicate
the procedure to be followed in each case.

AUTHORIZED PORTS OF ENTRY

ART. 2. (a) The importation of plants, seeds, cuttings, bulbs, fruits, and other
plant products capable of introducing any agricultural pests into the country
may be permitted through the ports of Valparaiso, Taleahuano, and Los Andes.

(b) The importation by mail of the products above mentioned may only be
made through those ports and Santiago.

(ec) The imported products are subject to the jurisdiction of the Plant Quaran-
tine Service who are entrusted with the task of preventing the introduction of
plant pests.

(d) Other ports of entry may be either limited or authorized in accordance
with the recommendations of the Board of Agriculture.

DECLARATION AND CERTIFICATE REQUIRED

ART. 8. The importer in Chile shall furnish to the Customs a written declara-
tion indicating:

(a) Name and address of importer ;

(b) Purpose for which material is intended;

(ec) Country of origin;

(d) Locality where the material will be planted or sown.

The declaration shall be accompanied by a certificate of inspection issued
by the competent authority of the exporting country and visaed by the respective
consul of Chile.

INSPECTION OF PASSENGERS’ BAGGAGE

Art. 4. Passengers who carry in their baggage any plants, seeds, fruits, or
any other product subject to inspection, are required to declare them to the
Captain of the vessel, who in turn shall notify the customs authorities.

Custom inspectors shall confiscate all plant products whose clandestine im-
portation is attempted. ;

IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

Art. 5. The importation is prohibited of:

(a) Every kind of seed which reaches the country infested by any of the
following-named insects: Sitotroga cerealella, Bruchus obtectus, B. quadrimacu-
latus, B. rufimanus, B. chinensis, B. signaticornis, B. lentis, Spermophagus pec-
toralis.

(b) Plants or parts thereof upon which the following-named insects are
shown to exist: Aspidiotus perniciosus, Diaspis pentagona, EHuproctis chryso-
rrhoea, Porthetria dispar.

(ec) Potatoes (Solanum tuberosum). (See Decree No. 1380, April 28, 1931.)

(d) Rooted grapevines whatever their origin may be (as modified by Decree
No. 2921 of May 27, 1929), except as follows:

1. The importation of grapevine stocks will be authorized when the varieties.
are known to be resistant to phylloxera and when application is made in
conformity with the requirements determined by the Plant Quarantine Service
and the Services of Viticulture and Oenology.

2. The Customs will exercise special supervision to prevent the importation
of plants from countries infested with phylloxera and will extend such super-
vision to baggage and cargo.



1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 89

(e) Peach trees originating in the United States of America which are
infected with the diseases known as peach yellows, peach rosette, and little
peach. (As modified by Decree No. 781 of May 29, 1935.) Those not showing
signs of these diseases may be imported in conformity with the following
provisions:

1. Compliance with the general requirements of the Laws and Regulations of
the Plant Quarantine Service.

2. In case the importation consists of several varieties, only 10 plants of
each variety are allowed, and 20 plants in case only one variety is involved.
The plants shall be subjected to quarantine or isolation during a growing
season in the Experimental Field of the Plant Quarantine Service of the
Ministry of Agriculture.

3. At the expiration of this period the plants will be returned to the im-
porter provided they have not shown any signs of the diseases indicated in
the preamble, or of any other dangerous diseases not yet established in Chile
or which cannot be controlled by the known methods of treatment.

(f) Plants in pots or other containers with soil, from whatever source. To
permit the entry of these plants they will have to be deprived of all their
soil for inspection, after which their admission or rejection will be determined.

(g) Bulbs, tubers, or roots in which parasites deemed injurious are shown
to exist, and whose existence has not been demonstrated in the country.

(h) Fruits which are believed capable of introducing insects commonly known
as “fruitflies:’ Rhagoletis pomonella, R. cingulata, Contarinia pyrivora, Epochra
canadensis, Ortalis (Tephritis) cerasi, Ceratitis capitata, Dacus oleae, Trypeta
ludens, T. acidusa, Tephritis tryoni, and others.

A decree shall determine the cases and the classes of fruit deemed to be
comprehended in the prohibitions referred to in the preceding section. (See
Decree No. 12, September 4, 1930.)

(i) Fruits in which the presence is determined of: Aspidiotus perniciosus and
Diaspis pentagona. (See Decree No. 12, September 4, 1930.)

(j) Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), Clover (Trifolium sp.) or other seeds
which contain more than 10 seeds of Cuscuta sp. per kilogram. (As modified by
Decree No. 629 of September 27, 1939.)

The certificate of inspection issued by the official authorities of the exporting
country shall have a statement to the effect that this provision has been com-
plied with.

On its arrival in Chile, alfalfa, clover, or any other seeds subject to the
contamination of Cuscuta sp. seeds, shall be inspected by the Plant Quaran-
tine Service and shall be refused entry if found to contain more than 10 seeds
of Cuscuta sp. per kilogram.

The enumeration of the diseases in the various sections of this article is
not limited and, consequently, others may be added in subsequent orders.

DISPOSAL OF PROHIBITED MATERIAL

ArT. 6. If, upon inspection by the Plant Quarantine Service, any of the con-
ditions set forth in article 5 or in any of the special prohibitions promulgated
in accordance with paragraph (h) or in any other necessary prohibitions, are
found to be violated, the Chief of the Plant Quarantine Service is authorized
to order the return or the destruction of the plants, seeds, cuttings, bulbs, or
fruits offered for importation. Where the value of the consignment exceeds
5,000 pesos, authority for the application of those measures may be obtained
from the Ministry of Agriculture.

Such destruction does not entail any indemnity and if relading of the
refused products is resorted to, it shall take place immediately, or else shall
be subject, pending reshipment, to such conditions of isolation as the Plant
Quarantine Service may determine.

ArT. 7. Not applicable.

TREATMENT REQUIRED IF DEEMED NECESSARY

Art. 8. Plants, seeds, cuttings, bulbs, or fruits, the importation of which is
not prohibited by article 5, may be released after having passed inspection
and other requirements having been fulfilled, in accordance with the following
provisions:

(a) Quarantine of suspected or infected consignments pending final decision.

(b) Disinfection in the manner prescribed by the Plant Quarantine Service.



90 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct.—Dec.

The expenses incurred, including the cost of ingredients for disinfection,
will be borne by the importer.

SPECIAL QUARANTINES

Coffee, tea, yerba mate, rice, chicory, saffron, mushrooms, cinnamon, cloves,
cumin, peanuts, cacao, and peppers:

Since these products are exclusively for food purposes no inspection certif-
icate is required. They may be imported in tin cans through any port of
Chile without inspection.

Rice, cumin, peanuts, and cacao may be imported without restriction through
the ports of Arica, Iquique, Tecopilla, Antofagasta, and Taltal, but shipment
thence to southern ports is prohibited. These products may be imported through
the ports of Coquimbo, Valparaiso, Talcahuano, Los Andes, and Corral subject
to inspection. If any of these products are found to be infested with pests,
whether or not those pests occur in Chile, they shall be subject to the general
provisions of the respective law and, regulations. (Decree No. 450, August 6,
1926. )

Rice may enter Puerto Montt subject to inspection. (Decree No. 148,
March 16, 1927.)

The southern limit of the zone fixed by Decree No. 450 for the unrestricted
entry of rice, cumin, peanuts, cacao, ete., is the Department of Chanaral and
the unrestricted reshipment of these products is permitted between the ports
included in this zone. (Decree No. 1080, April 25, 1928.)

STRAW, PACKING, CORN ON THE COB, AND BROOMCORN
_ [Decree No. 2526 of August 28, 1928]

ARTICLE 1. The importation of corn on the cob or parts thereof is prohibited.

ArT, 2. The importation of broomecorn for manufacturing purposes is equally
prohibited.

Arr, 3. The importation of clean shelled corn and sorgo seed, if thoroughly
clean and free from fragments of cobs and stalks, may be allowed.

ArT, 4. Except for the dispositions of articles 5 and 6 of this decree, no goods
of whatever origin may be imported if packed in straw, grasses, or stems of
any class of plants.

ArT. 5. The importation of spirits, wines, or other bottled liquids shall not
be allowed, when packed in straw jackets, unless the consignments are accom-
panied by a certificate issued by authorized officials of the exporting country
attesting that the jackets have been sterilized with steam for at least 15 minutes
at 115° C., or disinfected in a closed chamber at a temperature of not less
than 20° C., with a solution of formaldehyde. The solution shall contain at
least 37 percent by weight of formaldehyde and shal! be used at the rate of
500 ce. per 20 cubic meters of space, in a hermetically closed chamber. The
straw to be disinfected shall remain there for at least 8 hours.

ART. 6. The importation of glass, glassware, chinaware, etc., if packed
with straw, shall be allowed provided the shipment is accompanied by a certif-
icate issued by the exporting country and visaed by the corresponding Chilean
consul attesting that the straw used for packing has been disinfected by one
of the processes outlined in article 5.

ART. 7. Goods arriving without the above-mentioned certificate of disinfection
shall be treated as prescribed under article 5.

Art. 8. All expenses incurred in order to comply with the provisions of
the present decree shall be charged against the person directly concerned.

CHACALLUTA AN AUTHORIZED PorT OF ENTRY
[Decree No. 1555 of May 28, 1930]

ARTICLE 1. Authorizes the importation of wood, ground red pepper, cornmeal
and corn starch, dried leaves, and bark and roots for medicinal and industrial
purposes, through the Customs at the port of Chacalluta, without an inspection
certificate.

ART. 2, Cereals, including clean shelled corn, are allowed provided they are
accompanied by a certificate of inspection to the effect that they are not
infested with the Angoumois grain moth (Sitotroga cerealella) or with any
other insects or plant diseases.



1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS QO]

ArT. 3. Through the ports of Ollague and San Pedro de Atacama only the
following products are allowed entry without a certificate: Wood, ground red
pepper, cornmeal and corn starch, and dried leaves, bark, and roots for
medicinal or industrial purposes.

IMPORTATION PROHIBITED OF FRESH PLANT PRODUCTS CAPABLE OF CARRYING
FRUITFLIES

[Decree No. 12, September 4, 19350]

ARTICLE 1. The importation into Chile is prohibited of all fresh plant products,
whatever their origin, which are capable of carrying fruitflies. Especially
included in this prohibition are all kinds of fresh fruits, and the following
vegetables: Tomatoes, eggplants, squash, string beans, and peppers.

ENTRY PERMITTED WHEN CERTIFIED AS ORIGINATING IN A DISTRICT FREE FROM
FRUITFLIES

ArT, 2. Fresh fruits from the State of California are excepted from the above
prohibition.

Arv. 3. The declaration that the fruits or other products are from a zone free
from fruitfly shall be made in the certificate issued by the plant quarantine
authorities of the country of origin, which certificate shall accompany the ship-
ping papers or bill of lading, and which will indicate in each case the kind,
quality, and origin of the products whose entry is permitted by this decree. This
certificate shall be issued in duplicate and shall be visaed by the Chilean consul
in the country of origin of the fruit. A copy of the said certificate shall accom-
pany the shipping papers, and another shall be retained with the fruit while
it remains on board.

ArT. 4. The importation of the products excepted from the prohibition, indi-
cated in article 2, is subject to the following conditions:

INSPECTION CERTIFICATE REQUIRED

(a) Through the ports of the zone included between Arica and the Chanaral
entry is permitted, provided that the products are accompanied by the sanitary
certificate which must come with each shipment and in which it is also stated
that the consignment has been inspected at the port of embarkation by com-
petent sanitary authority. The said certificate shall be visaed by the respective
Chilean consul, in accordance with the provisions of article 3, and it will also
be required that the certificate bear the approval of the inspector of the Plant
Quarantine Service of Arica, after inspection made on board by the official.

AUTHORIZED PORTS OF ENTRY

The inspection made at Arica will serve to permit entry through ports where
there are no inspectors of the Plant Quarantine Service; but in ports where
there are officials of that service, entry will be permitted only after inspection
has been made at the place where the products were unladen.

(b) The fruits and other products named in article 2 of the present decree
may be entered through the port of Chanaral, provided that they are intended
exclusively for consumption in the mining establishments of the region included
between Pueblo Hundido and the northern boundary.

(c) The products named in article 2, with the exception of avocados, water-
melons, and cucumbers, may be entered south of Chanaral only through the ports
of Coquimbo, Valparaiso, Los Andes, San Antonio, Taleahuano, and Valdivia,
after the inspection established by the Law of the Plant Quarantine Service and
upon presentation of the certificate referred to in article 3.

Art 5. The importation is authorized of fresh fruits and vegetables of what-
ever origin through the port of Magellanes without other requirement than the
certificate prescribed by article 3, provided that those products are intended for
consumption in the Departments of Magellanes, Natales, and Tierra del Fuego,
their relading being definitely prohibited for the north of these Departments.

Arts. 6 to 10. Not applicable.

ArT. 11. Steamship companies are prohibited from transporting to any port
of the country fresh fruits and the other products named in article 1 of the
present decree, and the crew and passengers shall not be allowed to have or to
embark those products; but the transportation of the products excepted from
the prohibition in article 2 may be effected.



02? BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct.—Dec.

Arts. 12 and 13. Not applicable.

Art. 14. Vessels that embark fresh fruits, vegetables, and other products whose
importation is prohibited by article 1 shall not keep these products on board
if they have to call at any port south of Taltal; but if those products should be
intended exclusively as food for their passengers and crews they may be
retained on board provided that they be kept in locked inclosures while the
vessels remain in port. In no case may tomatoes, mangoes, cherimoyas, guavas,
or other tropical fruits be kept on board, unless expressly excepted from the
prohibition to enter, as ordered in the present decree.

An inspector of the Piant Quarantine Service will confirm compliance with
this provision and the vessel shail not be received if this requirement is not
complied with.

Arts. 15 and 16. Not applicable.

FRESH FRUITS FROM THE UNITED STATES

Fresh fruits may be imported into Chile from any State of the United States,
provided that each shipment is accompanied by a certificate issued by the com-
petent American authorities, affirming that the fruit originated in a district free
from the Mediterranean fruitfly (Ceratitis capitata), the certificate to be visaed
by a Chilean Consul. (Minister of Agriculture of Chile through the American
Consul, Santiago, Chile, October 28, 1930.)

IMPORTATION OF POTATOES PROHIBITED

From the date of this decree the importation is prohibited of potatoes from
foreign sources, to prevent the introduction of the wart disease (Chrysophiyctis
endobiotica). (Decree No. 130, April 28, 1931.)

ADDITIONAL AUTHORIZED PORTS
[Decree No. 336 of July 24, 1933]

Authorizes the importation of the following products through the port of
San Antonio: Fruits, seeds, cuttings, bulbs, and any other plant products.

[Decree No. 270 of March 28, 1934]

Authorizes the importation of the following products through the port of
Antofogasta: Plants, seeds, cuttings, bulbs, fruits, and any other plant products.

[Decree No. 553 of August 18, 1934]

Authorizes the importation of the following products through the port of
Arica: Plants, cuttings, fruits, and any other agricultural products.

[Decree No. 708 of November 30, 19384]
IMPORTATION OF FRUIT THROUGH THE PORT OF ARICA FOR LOCAL CONSUMPTION

ARTICLE 1. The importation of fruit for local consumption is hereby allowed
through the port of Arica, provided it originates in national or foreign territories
free of the fruitfly. The fruit must be accompanied by a certificate of inspec-
tion stating that it is free of the fruitfly. If the fruit is of foreign origin,
the certificate must be visaed by the corresponding Chilean Consul.

Fruit imported into Arica for local consumption is not allowed to proceed
to the valleys of Azapa and Codpa.

USE OF WHEAT IMPORTED FOR MILLING
[Decree No. 386 of September 30, 1932]

ARTICLE 1. The use for planting purposes of wheat imported for milling is
hereby prohibited. All wheat so imported must be milled in its entirety.

WHEAT INTENDED FOR MILLING

Chilean Decree No. 4 of January 4, 1984, extends the prohibitions of article
5 of Decree No. 105 of February 11, 1925, to wheat intended for milling. The
text of Decree No. 4 follows:



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LIBRARY
STATE PLANT BOARD

State of Florida

Department of Agriculture

DIVISION OF PLANT
INDUSTRY

LIBRARY



Digitized by the Internet Archive
in 2013

http://archive.org/details/regulato40unit
San, A., ob. E. P. Q. Issued November 1941

United States Department of Agriculture

Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine

SERVICE AND
REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS
1940

These announcements are issued quarterly and constitute a per-
manent record of the work of the Bureau in the enforcement
of the Plant Quarantine Act of 1912 and certain related acts, in-
cluding the text of quarantines and regulations thereunder, and
the more important circulars and decisions explanatory of,
or bearing on, such quarantines and regulations

WITH LIST OF PLANT PESTS INTERCEPTED WITH IMPORTED
PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS



UNITED STATES
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
WASHINGTON : 1941
~~

FLA. DEPT. AG.
DIV. OF PLANT
INDUSTRY.
LIBRARY

ete sve pth Dd

ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY
AND PLANT QUARANTINE

Les A. Strona, Chief.

S. A. RoHwEr, Assistant Chief.

Avery 8. Hoyt, Assistant Chief.

P. N. ANNAND, Assistant Chief.

F. H. Spencer, Business Manager.

Rouua P. Currin, Hditor.

Maseu Coucorp, Librarian.

J. A. Hysuop, in Charge, Division of Insect Pest Survey and Information.

J. I. HaAmMBLETON, in Charge, Division of Bee Culture Investigations.

D. L. Van Drnpu, in Charge, Division of Fruit Insect Investigations.

F. C. CratGHEean, in Charge, Division of Forest Insect Investigations.

W. H. Waits, in Charge, Division of Truck Crop and Garden Insect Investigations.

. M. Packarp, in Charge, Division of Cereal and Forage Insect Investigations.

. W. Harnen, in Charge, Division of Cotton Insect Investigations.

C. BisHopp, in Charge, Division of Insects Affecting Man and Animais.
A. Hawkins, zn Charge, Division of Control Investigations.

. C. Roark, in Charge, Division of Insecticides and Fungicides.

. F. W. MurEseBeEck, in Charge, Division of Insect Identification.

. P. CLuavusEn, in Charge, Division of Foreign Parasite Introduction.

B. FracKmR, in Charge, Division of Plant Disease Control.

B. M. Gappts, 7n Charge, Division of Domestic Plant Quarantines.

EK. R. Sasscer, in Charge, Division of Forecgn Piant Quarantines.

A. F. Burasss, in Field Charge, Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail Moth Control (head-
quarters, Greenfield, Mass.)

E. G. Brewer, in Field Charge, Japanese Beetle and Gypsy Moth and Brown-Taal
Moth Quarantines, European Corn Borer Certification, and Dutch Elm Disease
Eradication (headquarters, Bloomfield, N. J.).

R. E. McDonatp, in Field Charge, Pink Bollworm and Thurbertia Weevil Quar-
antines (headquarters, San Antonio, Tex.).

P. A. Horas, in Field Charge, Mexican Fruitfly Quarantine (headquarters,
Harlingen, Tez.).

ae Baker, in Field Charge, Fruitfly Investigations (headquarters, Mexico City,

€X1C0).

Il

RQOQNADMAADO

408653—41
CONTENTS
CONTENTS OF NO. 142 (JANUARY-MARCH 1940)

Quarantine and other official announcements-__-_------_---------_--- AS ree POE Cty etl) ofeer
Announcements relating to coffee quarantine (No. ey so we oy fy ad pee eS en Sp ee A
Hearing on- coffee quarantine scheduled for Puerto Rico___--________-___--__--_-----________--
Notice of public hearing to consider the advisability of prohibiting or restricting the entry
into Puerto Rico from all parts of the world of unroasted coffee beans, and coffee fruits,
aie rd eee ee ee et ee et! ee OE oe Sd So es Ss 5 ti ec ye PT
Quarantine to protect Puerto Rican coffee Decomesjietiectiy evAspril dee = 25! Pe re ew |
Gane qusaraniine—_Notice of quarantine No. 73_-_)_--..--_.-...-_-----..-_-.._. ibs. 2 2 --
Announcements relating to fruit and vegetable quarantine (No. 56) __-_________________________-
RASC MSO COLIECLOLS Of CUStOMmS: (L. 2: 50067)! 2.54 2 eee a ec
Quarantine rules on Newtoundland fruits and vegetables modified__________________________
Modification of fruit and vegetable quarantine regulations (amendment No. 1, effective Feb-
eae ie ett) ee ere, eee ee oe tee gee. Jee a ee pone eee en Vo be spe ss eseesee se
ini SaatcinenS eo CoOllectors.Of CuStOmMS (I. DD: 50017). 2
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (No. 48) ___._-_-_________________________-
Japanese beetle conference to discuss future measures________________________________._____.
Notice of conference to discuss the status of the Japanese beetle infestation in the United
eg ae a ee ee
Administrative instructions to inspectors on the treatment of nursery products, ey vege-
tables, and soil for the Japanese beetle (B. E. P. Q. 499, supplement No. 1, revised) ______
Announcements relating to Puerto Rican fruit and vegetable quarantine (No. 58) _--_ _________-
Administrative instructions—The shipment of oranges and grapefruit from Pere. me to the
mainland subject to treatment under supervision is authorized (B. E. P. Q. 505)__________
gsc on treating citrus fruits by methods prescribed in Circular B. E. P. oO 505 (B. E.
a ene en ee ee ee ee ee ee Oe eee
Announcements relating to white-fringed beetle quarantine (No. 72)___________________________-
Administrative instructions— Removal ot white-fringed beetle certification requirements for
a limited period tor potatoes and sweetpotatoes consigned from areas regulated under
Nanton Or. (i. i. FQ: 485. fourth revision)... 2°
SUR TOMS MASE STTITAST OES toe eee es ee ee lin ey ee ee re ee eg
Administrative instructions—M odifying the restrictions of the white-fringed beetle quaran-
tine by Bean | treatment by methyl bromide solutions of balled nursery stock of speci-
Pines (tt. P. Q. 503. revised)... |... 2
Terminal] inspection of plants Andean plOGUCL See esa = tees Wee eee ee ee age
Change of plant inspection place in Arizona______-__-____--__ __--- oa oe Eee
Saranac SUA COTE Tid PASSO gESTAS Sper eee ie Oe ee i ee
Administrative instructions—Citrus fruit from Mexico in transit to foriegn aie via the’
United States (B. P. E. Q. 507; supersedes P. Q. C. A. ae TOVASCO) pe oe ee es
i status of circulars of this ‘(B. E. P. Q.) series (B. E, P. Q. 508; supersedes Bote.
Fens ino ra St ee a eee
a import restrictions, British India (B. E. P. Q. 404, revised, supplem ent
oe ar re ee ee ie oe ef ee ee
eae import restrictions, United Kingdom of Great Britain (B. Rr FS - 416,
ean sot mene ee ee eee,

aa ae ee es oe ee a eee oe nee poet ae bee ones
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Qusarnmhine Ach... =e ae ee
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine______________________.

CONTENTS OF NO. 143 (APRIL-JUNE 1940)

aaranine aad Guer Oficial announcements.._..._.._____..___________-___--_____________-______.-
AntnoONucoMoenirTelatine to cofiee Quarantine (No. 73)2.22..--_--_---_-..-_~__--=.--+.--=-..----.-
ingiracmons 10 collectors of customs (T. D) 50129)___-.._.__________-_____________- meee Ate
Announcement relating to fruit and vegetable quarantine (No. 56)____________ Ae eee
imsirmenons to. collectors of customs (T. D: 50161)___.-__-__---_____-__-_-_--.--__-__-=__.._-
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (No. 48)_______________________________--

Japanese beetle quarantine continued—Extensions of area announced as of April 5,,/1940_ —...

PApaHesepeeiie muarantine cOntinued___°) -._-1-.2__.2 6 ee

ee of Japanese beetle quarantine regulations (amendment No. 2, effective April 5,

Notice to general public through. new spapers ae oe St eee

List of true bulbs, corms, and tubers exempted from Japanese beetle certi ification (B. E.
P. Q. 394, revised) See ee ee ee Lei ee ee ee ee

Quarantine restrictions on Japanese beetle modified.___________________________--___--

tae of Japanese beetle quarantine regulations (amendment No. 3, ‘effective May

Notice to general public through newspapers.___-______________________-__-___----

Administrative instructions to inspectors on the treatment of nursery products, ‘fruits,
vegetables, and soil for the Japanese beetle (B. E. P. Q. 499, supplement No. 2)

Order amending Section 301.48-5, Chapter III, Title 7, Code of Federal Regulations,
and modifying the Japanese beetle quarantine regulations as to ae of fruits
and vegetables from certain areas in Virginia (B. E. P. Q. 509)___________- k ae

Announcement relating to pink bollworm quarantine (No. 52)_._.___________-

Administrative instructions relating to pink bollworm quarantine— restoring the treatment
requirements as to cotton linters, cottonseed hulls, cake, and meal and extending the area
in which baled cotton lint may be moved from certain lightly infested areas in New Mexico
and Texas without treatment (B. E. P. Q. 493, revised)______________-- Bed *

III

OTH #& CO DD DO

“IJ ~7 cn

39
39
39
40
40
40
40
IV CONTENTS

Quarantine and other official announcements—Continued.
Announcements relating to white-fringed beetle quarantine (No. 72)______-__-___________________
Administrative instructions—Removal of white-fringed beetle certification requirements
until February 1, 1941, for specified articles consigned from designated portions of the
regulated areas (B. Ee P. Q. 485, fifth revision)
LIAS EGU CELOMS COD POS EUNAS COTS a ae a a a
Terminal inspection of plants and plant products
Change of plant inspection place in Arizona

Miscellaneous items._= __2 -2-- 2-4 eet ee
FE import restrictions, Republic of Cuba (P. Q. C. A. 283, revised, supplement
INO. 7) = 2-4-2682 chee eee pe Bie SE LR) eo ee
Plant- euarantine import restrictions, Kingdom of Egypt (B. E. P. Q. 375, revised, supple-
ment INO..3)¢ 22260) 22 SS See ee a IE ee
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Mexico (B. E. P. 2 ae supplement No. 2)
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Paraguay (B. E. P. Q. 502, supplement
No. 1

Penalties anes for violationsiof the Plant @imarantirre Ac Gee ae
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine

CONTENTS OF NO. 144 (JULY-SEPTEMBER 1940)

Quarantineiand! other oii cial armour Cer ers
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (No. 48)
Instructions to postmasters Yee n ees Soe Oo pa Sie eke a crc rrr
Japanese beetle control on fruit and vegetable shipments ends for season____-_______________
Order advancing date of termination of restrictions on fruit and vegetable shipments under the
Japanese beetle quarantine to September 19 for the year 1940
Instructions:topostmasters. 22 2 a Se

Order modifying administrative instructions to inspectors on the treatment of nursery prod-
ucts, fruits, vegetables, and soil for the Japanese beetle (B. E. P. Q. 499, supplement No. 3) __
Order modifying administrative instructions to inspectors on the treatment of nursery prod-
ucts, fruits, vegetables, and soil for the Japanese beetle (B. E. P. Q. 499, supplement No. if

2d revision) Se a Se I I SE ee ae
Announcements relating to Mediterranean fruitfly and melon fly quarantine (No. 13)_-
Use of a new fumigant approved for certain Hawaiian fruits and vegetables_________________
Use of methyl bromide authorized for treating fruits and vegetables for movement from
Hawaii to:the mainland. 2 2 2 ea ee eee
Administrative instructions amending authorization of the shipment of fruits and vegetables
from Hawaii to the mainland subject to fumigation with methyl] bromide under supervision

@BY By PHQyblQ)s 2 =k 2s A ee eee ee a ee
Announcement relating to pink bollworm quarantine (No. 52)__-_______-______________..--__---
Statement regarding cooperative pink bollworm control program for the crop season 1940____
Announcements relating to white-fringed beetle quarantine (No. 72)___..________.-___-..--__=--
Administrative instructions—removal of white-fringed beetle certification requirements until
February 1, 1941, for specified articles (B. E. P. Q. 485, 6th revision) _____________________-
Instructions to postimasters 2 ee ke er a
Terminal inspectionvof plambtSkam Ge pol arat [oT @ CU ES eee eae
Oregon State plant quarantines (revision of notice dated June 23, 1937)
Miscellaneous MEO TAS 25 SE he a ee er eer ee PU oh ee
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Kingdom of Iraq (B. E. P. Q. 468, revised)__________-
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Uruguay (B. E. P. Q. 382, revised) — phe Fe
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act..-.22-2 22).
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine

CONTENTS OF NO. 145 (OCTOBER-DECEMBER 1940)

Ouarantinetand! other oficial samim Ow COSTES eee ee a
Announcements relating to Mexican fruitfly quarantine (No. 64) __..___--------------------_-_--
Fruitfly quarantine modified to extend Valencia orange harvest in Texas area (press notice) __
Administrative instructions—modifying the restrictions of the Mexican fruitfly quarantine by
GRTIiee the harvesting season on Valencia oranges from April 30 to May 31, 1941 (B. E. P.

DTD ie. hs SSeS ee ae ee ee Be
Miscellaneous items2e.25 220200 oe ee te ee

ET aes se import restrictions, Republic of Chile (B. E. P. Q. 511; supersedes B. P. Q.

B48) ah eS eT ee Te NS a or a ee es tat

VO 2) oe oe ee le a eee

List of current quarantine and other restrictive orders and miscellaneous regulations ___-----
Penaltiestimposed for.violations onthe Plant QuarantinevAct= = ea
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine_______--_-----__------------------

O
S.R. A.B. E. P. Q. No. 142 Issued June 1940

United States Department of Agriculture

BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE



SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS

JANUARY-MARCH 1940

CONTENTS

Genramine and over oficial announcements... 22 22222. 52+ 2c. Gee bb 2 tno + 2b as-e ee 1
Announcements relating to.cofiee: quarantine (No. :73)=------ ------------=_-.-_- == --- === -+e 1
Hearing on coffee quarantine scheduled for Pucrip icons) MEE es 1

Notice of public hearing to consider the advisability of prohibiting or restricting the entry

into Puerto Rico from all parts of the world of unroasted coffee beans, and coffee fruits,

res 2
Quarantine to protect Puerto Rican coffee becomes effective April 1___--__--_---_._-_-_____- 2
Conca duarsntine—Notice of-quarantine No. 732_222-_ 4 222i ost 2 sek Lie 3

Announcements relating to fruit and vegetable quarantine (No. 56)__-_-_-_-_____-_--_--__-____-_- 4
nsiaieniousiolcolechors Of customs, (D. D. 50067). -22 ee ee oe ee 4
Quarantine rules on Newfoundland fruits and vegetables modified _-_______-_---_---_--..--- 5
Modification of fruit and vegetable quarantine regulations (amendment No. 1, effective Feb-

RPT TT IAs RMN 40) RS eee et BSP SR pn 8 he Poh SS nS 2 ee 5

Instructions to collectors of customs GILAD SOON) eae tee ans oct i eS ee ee if

Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (No. 48)__-________-_____________-__-_ Lee 7
Japanese beetle conference to discuss future measures. ----_..-.._-.-.----------------------- i
Notice of conference to discuss the status of the Japanese beetle infestation in the United

SEL ee eens aS Ee) «Ss es ae oe eee Ss De Se eee eee 8
Administrative instructions to ‘inspectors on the treatment of nursery products, fruits, vege-

tables, and soil for the Japanese beetle (B. E. P. Q. 499, supplement No. 1, revised) _--_-_--- 8

Announcements relating to Puerto Rican fruit and vegetable quarantine (No. 58) _ aie re onion, 5 Meee 9
Administrative instructions—The shipment of oranges and grapefruit from Puerto Rico to the -

mainland subject to treatment under supervision is authorized (B. E. P. Q. 505)----__-__- 9
Suggestions on treating citrus fruits by methods prescribed in Circular B. E. P. Q. 505

Is PeE Maen) eee carseat ee Sh a el Se Se ch se ee Seas 10

Announcements relating to white- -fringed beetle quarantine (No. UD) ee eS a Oe ee Be 1l
Administrative instructions—Removal of white-fringed beetle certification requirements for

a limited period for potatoes and sweetpotatoes consigned from areas regulated under

quarantine No. 72 (B. E. P. Q. 485, fourth revision) ___-_-_------- bh ts # OE. ee 11

Instructions to postmasters eee ee | ae ee er es ee ee a ee 11
Administrative instructions—Modifying the restrictions of the white- fringed beetle quaran-

tine by authorizing pment by methyl bromide solutions of balled nursery stock of speci-

fied thickness (B. E. P. Q. 503, revised) _._._-_------___- Fete de = 29 fiat ine Re, Bnd See Pere ae ee 12

Terminal inspection of plants and plant products Pia DIE A eee eer oe ee ee ee 13
Hane ompiant mspection place in Arizona.-_--.-=.- == en 13

ieee eM Ea TOIT Saar maeaeet yes oateeenen. GR STF EN EOS 5 PSR ee Ee ee 13
Administrative instructions—Citrus fruit from Mexico in transit to foreign countries v ia the

United States (B. P. E. Q. 507; supersedes P. Q. C. A. al TOVISOC) See eee ee eee 13
ayaa status of circulars of this (B. E. P. Q.) series (B. E P. Q. 508; supersedes B. E. P. Q. ‘“
Plant- ‘Ae mechani import restrictions, British India (B. E. P. Q. 404, rev ised, supplement

een FUNNIES ee eA: es ee ee ES eae ee 23
Pint: oa import restrictions, United Kingdom of Great Britain (B. E. P. Q. 416, ste

ORT peer T penmm er Aiea TE eT Lie te eR tee eG ct tee ten et
Plant- a import restrictions, Union of South Africa (B. Bey On40l, supplement aa

Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act__.------__------------------------ 36

Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine__._._...._-------------------___-- 38

QUARANTINE AND OTHER OFFICIAL
ANNOUNCEMENTS

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO COFFEE QUARANTINE (NO. 73)
HEARING ON COFFEE QUARANTINE SCHEDULED FOR PUERTO RICO

[Press notice]

JANUARY 17, 1940.

Secretary of Agriculture Henry A. Wallace has called a public hearing to
consider the desirability of establishing a quarantine to prohibit or restrict
entry into Puerto Rico of coffee which might carry pests into the Island. This
hearing will be held by the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine at
10 a. m., February 14, 1940, in the Templo del Maestro, San Juan, P. R.

229841—40——-1 1
a BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.—March

“The long-established coffee industry of Puerto Rico fortunately has re-
mained free from certain destructive insect pests, which have interfered ser-.
lously with the success of coffee growing in many other parts of the world,”
Lee A. Strong, Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, who
will preside at the hearing, said today. ‘To ensure the continuation of this
freedom from insect attack, the United States Department of Agriculture pro-
poses to consider the desirability of establishing a quarantine prohibiting or
restricting entry into Puerto Rico of unroasted coffee beans, as well as fruits,
plants, and leaves of coffee that might bring in these pests.”

A quarantine, if decided upon, probably would exclude commercial importa-
tions of unroasted coffee beans, as well as coffee fruits, plants, and leaves. It
would, however, provide for entry, under safe regulatory procedure, of the
usual coffee samples weighing a pound or less, and also for the safe handling
of shipments entering at San Juan for immediate transshipment to foreign
destinations or to the United States mainland.

The quarantine under consideration would affect only coffee imported into
Puerto Rico from foreign countries. It would not restrict in any way coffee
shipments from the United States mainland to Puerto Rico. These now are
and would continue to be subject to the coffee quarantines long maintained
by the Puerto Rico Department of Agriculture and Commerce.

Only in exceptional instances are public hearings like this held outside
Washington, D. C., Dr. Strong said. In this case the Department recognizes
that nearly all the interests concerned are centered in Puerto Rico and could
be represented in Washington only at a considerable expenditure of time and
money. It Seems more consistent with the public interest to hold this hearing
at San Juan.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING TO CONSIDER THE ADVISABILITY OF PROHIBITING
OR RESTRICTING THE ENTRY INTO PUERTO RICO FROM ALL PARTS OF THE
WORLD OF UNROASTED COFFEE BEANS, AND COFFEE FRUITS, PLANTS, AND
LEAVES

JANUARY 15, 1940.

The Secretary of Agriculture has information that there exist in various
countries of the world where coffee is grown ar injurious insect, the coffee
berry borer, Stephanoderes hampei Ferr., of which S. coffeae Hgdn. is a synonym,
and an injurious rust, Hemeleia vastatric B. and Br., as well as other injurious
insects and plant diseases, and that these pests, new to and hitherto not widely
distributed within or throughout the United States, may be introduced into
coffee-growing areas of Puerto Rico with importations of unroasted coffee
beans, or coffee fruits, plants, and leaves from other countries and localities.
It appears necessary, therefore, to consider the advisability of prohibiting or
restricting the entry of unroasted coffee beans aS well as fruits, plants, and
leaves of the coffee plant, Coffea spp., from all foreign countries and localities
into Puerto Rico.

Notice is hereby given, therefore, that in accordance with the Plant Quaran-
tine Act of August 20, 1912, as amended, a public hearing will be held before
the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine of the United States Depart-
ment of Agriculture in the Temple del Maestro, in the city of San Juan, Puerto
Rico, at 10 a. m., February 14, 1940, in order that any person interested in the
establishment of such prohibition or restriction may appear and be heard either
in person or by attorney.

[SEAL] GrRovER B. HI,

Acting Secretary of Agriculture.

QUARANTINE TO PROTECT PUERTO RICAN COFFEE BECOMES EFFECTIVE APRIL 1

[Press notice]

MarcH 22, 1940.

The Department of Agriculture today announced that Secretary Henry A.
Wallace has signed a plant quarantine order prohibiting the shipment into
Puerto Rico of unroasted coffeq beans, coffee berries, or coffee leaves from
foreign countries. The quarantine, which becomes effective April 1, is designed
1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 3

to protect the Puerto Rican coffee crop from insect pests, such as the coffee
berry borer, and from plant disease, such as coffee rust, that are a serious
handicap to the coffee industry in many countries. The quarantine applies
only to commercial shipments. Small coffee samples may come in under certain
regulations, and foreign coffee can be transshipped, also under regulation, at
the port of San Juan.

This new quarantine, the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine ex-
plains, is largely precautionary. Little unroasted coffee has entered the Island
for many years. Both Insular and Federal authorities are interested in the
restoration of Puerto Rico’s struggling coffee industry. Once a flourishing
industry, it has fallen off because of international trade barriers and intense
competition in world markets, and, in the last decade, because of hurricanes.
The introduction of plant pests would be a disastrous setback, the Bureau says.

B. E. P. Q.-Q. 73. Effective April 1, 1940.
COFFEE QUARANTINE

NOTICE OF QUARANTINE No. 73

INTRODUCTORY NOTE

The coffee industry in Puerto Rico established early in the history of the
Island has fortunately remained free from at least two of the world’s most
destructive coffee pests, the coffee berry borer and the coffee rust. The object
of the present quarantine is to ensure the continued freedom of Puerto Rican
coffee cultures from these and other coffee insects and diseases by prohibiting
or restricting entry into the Island of those coffee materials which might
be the means of introducing such pests. It is believed that the measures put
into effect by this quarantine will attain this end and at the same time provide
for as much freedom of movement as would be consistent with safety.

AvERY S. Hoyt,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

SEC. 319.733—NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 73 ON ACCOUNT OF COFFEE PESTS
(Approved March 20, 1940; effective April 1, 1940)

Having found that an injurious coffee insect (Stephanoderes [coffeae Hgdn.]}
hampei Ferr.) known as the coffee berry borer, and an injurious‘rust disease
due to the fungus Hemileia vastatriz B. & Br., not heretofore widely prev-
alent or distributed within and throughout the United States, exist in various
countries and localities throughout the world, I, Henry A. Wallace, Secretary of
Agriculture, pursuant to the provisions of the Plant Quarantine Act of August
20, 1912 (387 Stat. 315; 7 U. S. C. 151-167), as amended, have determined that,
in order to prevent the introduction of the said pests into the Island of Puerto
Rico, it is necessary to prohibit or restrict the importation into that Island
from all foreign countries and localities of unroasted seeds or beans of coffee
(Coffea spp.), coffee fruits or berries, and coffee plants and leaves.

Now, therefore, by virtue of the said Plant Quarantine Act, the public hear-
ing required thereby having been duly held, notice is hereby given, first, that
on and after April 1, 1940, the importation into the Island of Puerto Rico from
all foreign countries and localities of (1) the seeds or beans of coffee which,
previous to importation, have not been roasted to a degree which, in the
judgment of an inspector of the Department of Agriculture, will have destroyed
coffee borers in all stages, (2) coffee berries or fruits, and (38) coffee plants
and leaves, is prohibited except by the Department of Agriculture for experi-
mental and scientific purposes, and except for samples of unroasted coffee
seeds or beans, and for shipments of unroasted coffee seeds or beans
in transit to destinations other than Puerto Rico; and, second, that the
importation of samples of unroasted coffee seeds or beans, and importa-
tions of unroasted coffee seeds or beans in transit to destinations other
than Puerto Rico, shall be made only under the restrictions provided in the
4. BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE = [Jan.—March

rules and regulations supplemental hereto: Provided, That individual ship-
ments of materials prohibited or restricted by this quarantine may be exempted
from its provisions in whole or in part when it shall have been determined
by the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine that entry of
the shipment in question may be made without risk of pest introduction.’
Done at the city of Washington this 20th day of March 1940.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[SEAL] H. A. WALLACE,

Secretary of Agriculture.

RULES AND REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 73
(Approved March 20, 1940; effective April 1, 1940)
REGULATION 1

Sec. 319.73-1. Permit—All importations shall be made under permit and
only at the port of San Juan.’
REGULATION 2

Src. 319.738-2. Inspection and safeguard provisions.—Coffee samples shall not
exceed 1 pound in weight and may be imported by mail, freight, express, or
baggage. They shall be subject on arrival to inspection and fumigation or such
other treatment as the plant quarantine inspector may require.*

REGULATION 3

Sec. 319.73.-3. Restrictions on in-transit shipments.—In-transit shipments to
foreign countries shall be subject to the Plant Safeguard Regulations issued
October 4, 1932 (Secs. 352.2 to 352.8), or as hereafter revised. The same
restrictions shall apply to shipments in transit to destinations elsewhere in the
United States.’

These rules and regulations shall be effective on and after April 1, 1940.

Done at the city of Washington this 20th day of March 1940.

Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.

[SEAL ] H. A. WALLACE,

Secretary of Agriculture.

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO FRUIT AND VEGETABLE
QUARANTINE (NO. 56)

INSTRUCTIONS TO COLLECTORS OF CUSTOMS

PLANT QUARANTINE ACT—FRUIT AND VEGETABLE QUARANTINE—CONDITIONS
GOVERNING THE ENTRY OF CIPOLLINI From Morocco (T. D. 50067)

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,
OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONER OF CUSTOMS,
Washington, D. C., January 11, 1940.

To Collectors of Customs and Others Concerned:

The appended copy of B. E. P. Q. Circular No. 504 entitled “Administrative
Instructions; Conditions Governing the Entry of Cipollini from Morocco” issued
by the Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, United States
Department of Agriculture, effective December 7, 1939, under authority con-
tained in Regulation 2 of Notice of Quarantine No. 56 (fruit and vegetable
quarantine) (T. D. 48728) is published for the information and guidance of
customs officers and others concerned.

Beare 819.78 to 319.73-3 issued under authority contained in 37 Stat. 315; 7 U. S. C,
STATE PLANT F BOA

1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS

The number of this Treasury decision should be inserted as a marginal ref-
erence opposite articles 578 (b) (1) and 579 (a), Customs Regulations of 1937.
By direction of the Commissioner :
G. H. GRIFFITH,
Acting Deputy Commissioner of Customs.

(Then follows the text of B. E. P. Q. Circular No. 504.)

QUARANTINE RULES ON NEWFOUNDLAND FRUITS AND VEGETABLES MODIFIED

[Press notice]
FEBRUARY 27, 1940.

The Department of Agriculture announced today that fruits and vegetables
produced in Newfoundland, exclusive of potatoes, have been plaeed on the
dame basis of importation into this country as those from Canada. The
change became effective today.

For many years the comparatively few vegetable food products shipped here
from Newfoundland, mainly berries, have entered this country under the
restrictions of the general fruit and vegetable quarantine No. 56. Similar
products from Canada have for some years enjoyed greater freedom from
these restrictions. Avery S. Hoyt, Acting Chief of the Bureau of Entomology
and Plant Quarantine, said that inspection of fruits and vegetables from New-
foundland indicates that these importations may safely be put on the same
basis as those from Canada. He pointed out that although Newfoundland,
with its adjacent strip of Labrador, is politically distinct from Canada within
the British Empire, the two may be considered as almost identical from the
point of view of plant pests which might affect our imports from them.

Potatoes from Newfoundland continue to be excluded because of potato wart.

MODIFICATION OF FRUIT AND VEGETABLE QUARANTINE REGULATIONS
INTRODUCTORY NOTE

Inspection of fruits and vegetables offered for entry from Newfoundland
during the period since the promulgation of Quarantine No. 56, the Fruit and
Vegetable Quarantine, effective November 1, 1923, indicates that importations
of fruits and vegetables from Newfoundland can be safely permitted on a
basis comparable to those from Canada. The present revision of the regula-
tions supplemental to Quarantine No. 56 is made therefore to place the entry
of fruits and vegetables from Newfoundland and its mainland territory of
Labrador on the same status as those from Canada, with the exception of
potatoes, which have long been and still are excluded from Newfoundland on
account of potato wart.

AVERY S. Hoyt,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

AMENDMENT NO. 1 TO THE RULES AND REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE
OF QUARANTINE NO. 56, AS REVISED EFFECTIVE DECEMBER 1, 1936, GOVERN-
ING THE IMPORTATION OF FRUITS AND VEGETABLES INTO THE UNITED STATES

(Approved February 24, 1940; effective February 27, 1940)

Under authority conferred by the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912
(37 Stat. 315), as amended, it is ordered that regulation 2 (Sec. 319.56—-2) of
the Rules and Regulations supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 56 (Sec.
819.56), governing the importation of fruits and vegetables into the United
States, as revised effective December 1, 1936, be, and the same is hereby,
amended to read as follows:

REGULATION 2

Sec. 319.56-2. Restrictions on entry of fruits and vegetables.—All importa-
tions of fruits and vegetables must be free from plants or portions of plants,
as defined in regulation 1 (b) (Sec. 319.56-1 (b)).
; *
‘. # z"
La

6 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE — [Jan.—March

Dried, cured, or processed fruits and vegetables (except frozen fruits and
vegetables), including cured figs, and dates, raisins, nuts, and dry beans and
peas, may be imported without permit or other compliance with these regula-
tions: Provided, That any such articles may be made subject to entry only
under permit and on compliance with the safeguards to be prescribed therein,
when it shall be determined by the Secretary of Agriculture that the condition
of drying, curing, or processing to which they have been subjected may not
entirely eliminate risk. Such determination with respect to any such articles
shall become effective after due notice.

Except as restricted, as to certain countries and districts,? by special quaran-
tine and other orders now in force and by such restrictive orders as may here-
after be promulgated, the following fruits may be imported from all countries
under permit and on compliance with these regulations: Bananas, pineapples,
lemons, and sour limes. Grapes of the European or vinifera type and any
vegetable, except aS restricted by special quarantine as indicated above, may be
imported from any country under permit and on compliance with these regula-
tions, at such ports as Shall be authorized in the permits, on presentation of
evidence satisfactory to the United States Department of Agriculture that such
grapes and vegetables are not attacked in the country of origin by injurious
insects, including fruit and melonflies (Trypetidae), or that their importation
from definite areas or districts under approved safeguards prescribed in the
permits can be authorized without risk.

The following additions and exceptions are authorized for the countries
concerned to the fruits and vegetables listed in the preceding paragraph:
Provided, That as to such additions and exceptions, the issuance of permits
may be conditioned on presentation of evidence satisfactory to the United
States Department of Agriculture that such fruits and vegetables are not
attacked in the country of origin by injurious insects, including fruitflies and
melonflies; or that their importation from definite areas or districts under
approved safeguards prescribed in the permits can be authorized without risk.

Frozen or treated fruits and vegetables from ali countries.—Upon compliance
with these regulations and with such conditions aS may be prescribed by the
Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, fruits and vegetables
which have been treated, or are to be treated, under the supervision of a plant
quarantine inspector of the Department, will be permitted entry under permit
at such ports as may be Specified in the permit, when, in the judgment of the
Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, such importation
may be permitted without pest risk.

Commonwealth of Australia—States of Victoria, South Australia, and Tas-
mania.—Upon compliance with these regulations, fruits other than those listed
in the second and third paragraphs of this regulation may be imported from
the States of Victoria, South Australia, and Tasmania under such conditions
and at such ports as may be designated in the permits.

New Zealand—Upon compliance with these regulations, fruits other than
those listed in the second and third paragraphs of this regulation may be
imported from New Zealand under such conditions and at such ports as may
be designated in the permits.

Japan.—Upon compliance with the regulations under Quarantine No. 28
(Sec. 319.28), oranges of the mandarin class, including satsuma and tangerine
varieties, may be imported from. Japan at the port of Seattle and such other
northern ports as may be designated in the permits.

Mezico.—Potatoes may be imported from Mexico upon compliance with the
regulations issued under the order of December 2, 1913 (Secs. 321.1 to 321.8).

Argentina.—Upon compliance with these regulations, fruits other than those
listed in the second and third paragraphs of this regulation may be imported
from Argentina under such conditions and at such ports as may be designated
in the permits.

Chile-—Upon compliance with these regulations, fruits other than those
listed in the second and third paragraphs of this regulation may be imported
from Chile under such conditions and at such ports as may be designated in
the permits.

West Indies.—Upon compliance with these regulations all citrus fruits from
the West Indies may be permitted entry at such ports as may be designated
in the permits.

2See list of current quarantines and other restrictive orders and miscellaneous regula-
tions, obtainable on request from the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.
1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS e

Jamaica.—Entry of pineapples from Jamaica is restricted to the port of
New York or such other northern ports as may be designated in the permits.

Canada, and Newfoundland, including its mainland territory of Labrador.—
Fruits and vegetables grown in the Dominion of Canada and in Newfound-
land,® including its mainland territory of Labrador, may be imported into the
United States from these countries free from any restrictions whatsoever
under these regulations.

General.—In addition to the fruits, the entry of which is provided for in the
preceding paragraphs of this regulation, such specialties as hothouse-grown
fruits and other special fruits, which can be accepted by the United States
Department of Agriculture as free from risk of carrying injurious insects,
including fruitflies (Trypetidae), may be imported under such conditions and
at such ports as may be designated in the permits.

This amendment shall be effective on and after February 27, 1940.

Done at the city of Washington this 24th day of February 1940.

Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of
Agriculture.

[SEAL] H. A. WALLACE,

Secretary of Agriculture.

INSTRUCTIONS TO CoLLECTORS OF CUSTOMS

PLANT QUARANTINE ACT—FRUIT AND VEGETABLE QUARANTINE—MODIFICATION OF
QUARANTINE REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE ENTRY OF FRUITS AND VEGETABLES,
EXCLUSIVE OF PoTATOES, FRoM NEWFOUNDLAND (T. D. 50017)

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,
OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONER OF CUSTOMS,
Washington, March 22, 1940.

To Collectors of Customs and Others Concerned:

The appended copy of Amendment No. 1 to the rules and regulations supple-
mental to Notice of Quarantine No. 56, as revised, effective December 1, 1986
(T. D. 48728), governing the importation of fruits and vegetables into the
United States, is published for the information and guidance of customs officers
and others concerned. This amendment, which became effective February 27,
1940, modifies Regulation 2 by placing the entry of fruits and vegetables from
Newfoundland and its mainland territory of Labrador, with the exception of
potatoes, on the same status as those from Canada, namely, free from any
restrictions whatsoever under Quarantine No. 56.

The number of this Treasury decision should be inserted as a marginal ref-
erence opposite 578 (b) (1) and 579 (a), Customs Regulations of 1937.

By direction of the Commissioner :

W. R. JoHNSON,
Deputy Commissioner of Customs.

{Then follows the text of the amendment. ]

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE
(NO. 48)

JAPANESE BEETLE CONFERENCE TO DISCUSS FUTURE MEASURES

[Press notice]
JANUARY 8, 1940.

A public conference to consider the advisability of withdrawing Federal
quarantine gainst the Japanese beetle and ending Federal cooperation with
the States for the suppression of the beetle, will be held at 10 a. m., February
27, in the auditorium of the United States National Museum, Tenth Street and
Constitution Avenue, Washington, D. C.

*The importation of potatoes into the United States is governed by the regulations
issued under the order of December 22, 1913 (Secs. 321.1 to 321.8).
8 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE = [Jan.—March

The Federal-State suppressive program, begun in 1919, has retarded the
spread of the Japanese beetle, particularly long-distance jumps, through being
earried from one place to another. It cannot, however, stop entirely the
beetle’s spread. The 1989 survey showed an additional spread of the beetle,
especially in New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, West Virginia, Indiana, North
Carolina, and Georgia. Lee A. Strong, Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and
Plant Quarantine, United States Department of Agriculture, has ealled the
February meeting to allow those interested to express their opinions as to
whether the benefits derived from the Federal quarantine and cooperation
are worth the costs.

If the Federal quarantine is withdrawn and Federal cooperation ended, Dr.
Strong points out, States where the Japanese beetle is not yet established may
take any measure they choose to prevent the entry of the beetle.

NOTICE OF CONFERENCE TO DISCUSS THE STATUS OF THE JAPANESE BEETLE
INFESTATION IN THE UNITED STATES

JANUARY 6, 1940.

For the last several years it has been increasingly apparent that the Japanese
beetle is gradually Spreading into hitherto uninfested areas. While the jumps
taken by the insect to points where new centers of infestation would result in
the last several years have not been unduly alarming aS compared with the
progress it had made in previous years, nevertheless every one who has watched
the Japanese beetle situation knows there is a continual expansion of the area
under regulation on account of this insect. The results of the scouting program
for 1939 indicate some additional expansions in a number of the States in
which the Japanese beetle infestation occurs. If the suppressive measures are
to keep pace with the constantly growing area, increased expenditures appear
to be the only answer. The thought of increased expenditures leads to the
question whether the benefits derived from the efforts to prevent the spread of
the Japanese beetle are now worth the price and particularly whether they
justify the greatly increased cost which will be necessary to adequately deal
with the situation in the larger area now involved. It seems advisable to obtain
an expression of public opinion with respect to this situation and before
amending the quarantine to take care of the points found infested during the
past season, a public conference in the city of Washington is being called to
consider the wisdom of the maintenance of the Suppressive program directed
against the Japanese beetle, the benefits derived under that program, the
possible alternative measures that may be taken by the uninfested States for
their own protection if the Federal quarantine were revoked, and the additional
areas that would need to be brought under the Japanese beetle quarantine before
the adult beetle season of 1940 arrives. For this reason a public confer-
ence will be held in Washington, D. C., in the Auditorium of the U. S. National
Museum at 10th Street and Constitution Avenue, NW., beginning at 10 a. m. on
February 27, 1940.

. LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Piant Quarantine.

B. E. P. Q. 499 (Supplement No. 1—Revised).

ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS TO INSPECTORS ON THE TREATMENT OF NURSERY
PRODUCTS, FRUITS, VEGETABLES, AND SOIL, FOR THE JAPANESE BEETLE

Marcu 22, 1940.

Further experiments in the use of methyl bromide fumigation for Japanese
beetle larvae indicate that the temperature in the dosage schedule provided in
circular B. E. P. Q. 499 for fumigation of plants with or without soil may be
lower than the minimum of 63° F. heretofore required, provided there is a
longer period of exposure. The treatment schedules are therefore widened in
this revision of Supplement No. 1, to provide for alternative treatments as
specified below.
1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 9

Circular B. E. P. Q. 499, issued June 9, 1939, is hereby modified by changing
subsection (5) on page 13 of the mimeographed circular to read as follows:

(5) METHYL BROMIDE FUMIGATION

Equipment.—A fumigation chamber, of approved design, equipped with vapor-
izing, air-circulating, and ventilating systems must be provided.

Application.—After the chamber is loaded, the methyl bromide must be
vaporized within it. The air within the chamber must be kept in circulation
during the period of fumigation. At the completion of the treatment, the
chamber must be well ventilated before it is entered and the plants removed.
The ventilating system should also be in continuous operation during the entire
period of removal of the fumigated articles.

(1) FUMIGATION OF PLANTS, WITH OR WITHOUT SOIL

Temperatures and periods of treatment.—The temperature of the soil (with
bare root stock, the root Spaces) and air must be at least:

1. 63° F. for an exposure period of 2% hours, or
2. 54° F. for an exposure period of 4 hours, or
3. 50° F. for an exposure period of 4% hours.

Dosage.—Two and one-half pounds of methyl bromide per 1,000 cubic feet,
including the space occupied by the load.

Preparation of plants—The treatment is to be applied only to plants with
bare roots or in 12-inch pots, or smaller, or in soil balls not larger than 12 inches
in diameter nor thicker than 12 inches when not spherical. The soil should
not be puddled or saturated. With wet material, drying for a period of 12
hours is advisable before treatment. The plants should be stacked on racks or
separated so that the gas can have access to both top and bottom surfaces of
pots or soil balls. While not essential that the balls be completely separated
from each other, they should not be jammed tightly together.

Varieties of plants.—The list of plants, including greenhouse, perennial, and
nursery Stock types treated experimentally is subject to continual expansion
and, moreover, is too great to include in these instructions. Such a list, inelud-
ing also those which have been injured by the treatment, will be supplied on
request.

The schedule for the fumigation of strawberry plants as specified on page
14 of circular B. E. P. Q. 499 remains the same as heretofore.

This supplement supersedes Supplement No. 1, dated November 4, 1939.

(See. 301.48a, issued under See. 301.48)

AVERY S. Hoyt,

Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Piant Quarantine.

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO PUERTO RICAN FRUIT AND
VEGETABLE QUARANTINE (NO. 58)

B. E. P. Q. 505.

ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS—THE SHIPMENT OF ORANGES AND GRAPEFRUIT
FROM PUERTO RICO TO THE MAINLAND SUBJECT TO TREATMENT UNDER
SUPERVISION IS AUTHORIZED

JANUARY 4, 1940.

Investigations in treating fruit for the fruitfly Anastrepha suspensa Loew
have demonstrated that the holding of the fruits at certain prescribed tem-
peratures for certain periods will kill all stages of this insect.

The interstate shipment, subject to one of the following prescribed treat-
ments, is therefore authorized for Puerto Rican oranges and grapefruit other-
wise ineligible for the usual certification given under the provisions of Quar-
antine No. 58 (Sec. 301.58).

229841—40——_2
10 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-March

1. HEAT TREATMENT

Heating the fruit with air at 100 percent relative humidity for a period of
not less than 16 hours during which time the temperature at the approximate
centers of the fruits shall be raised to 110° F. or above and maintained at
110° F. or above for the last 8 hours of such treatment.

2. COLD TREATMENT

Cooling until the approximate centers of the fruits reach a temperature of
34° F. or below and holding the fruits so that the inside temperature does
not exceed 34° F. for a period of 15 days.

Hither the heat treatment or the cold treatment may be employed at the
shipper’s option and at his expense provided that adequate facilities are avail-
able and arrangements for supervision can be made. Information on the
application of the prescribed treatments may be had on application to the
Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

While injury to the fruits is not expected to result from either treatment,
no liability shall be attached to the United States Department of Agriculture
on account of any claim of damage to such fruits attributed to either treatment.

On and after January 15, 1940, certification for shipment to mainland desti-
nations under Quarantine No. 58 (Sec. 301.58) will be given to Puerto Rican
oranges and grapefruit which have been subjected to either of the above-pre-
scribed treatments carried out under supervision of a plant quarantine in-
spector of the United States Department of Agriculture at a treating plant
approved for the purpose. (Sec. 301.58-3a, issued under Sec. 301.58-3).

. Lee A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

B. E. P. Q. 506.

SUGGESTIONS ON TREATING CITRUS FRUITS BY METHODS PRESCRIBED IN
CIRCULAR B. E. P. Q. 505

JANUARY 4, 1940.
Circular B. HE. P. Q. 505, which provides for the shipment of oranges and
grapefruit from Puerto Rico to the mainland on the basis of heat or cold
treatments, makes no specifications as to methods or equipment required.

1. HEAT TREATMENT

Available information with respect to the high-temperature treatment clearly
indicates that by the application of dry heat the required temperatures cannot
be reached without injury to the fruit. Experience has also shown that tem-
peratures much above 110° EF. may have injurious effect on the fruit. It is
important therefore that the temperature be held very close to 110° EF. and
that it at no time exceeds 112° F.

In successful treatments live steam as the source of heat was applied in
such a manner as to secure a uniform distribution of steam-heated air intro-
duced into the treating chamber so that it did not discharge directly on the
fruit. Uniform and gradual heating of the fruit to the required temperatures
was found necessary for the best results. A good method is to increase the
air temperature with the fruit temperature, gradually raising it to 110° F. as
the fruit temperature rises. In treating rooms properly equipped and operated
commercial quantities of fruit can be heated to the prescribed temperature of
110° F. in not more than 8 hours, and this fruit temperature maintained for
the required period by using air at a temperature not exceeding 110° F. and
at a relative humidity of 100 percent.

After treatment the fruit should be well cooled before being packed. If fruit
is to be colored by the use of gas, this should be done prior to treatment. Wax
or paraffin should not be used on fruit either before or after treatment.

2. COLD TREATMENT

In successful treatments employing low temperature, experience has shown
that satisfactory cooling can be accomplished in cold-storage chambers only
1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS ti

when the chambers are provided with adequate refrigeration and positive, uni-
form circulation of the refrigerated air. In cold-storage rooms properly
equipped and operated it is possible to cool the fruit to the required temper-
ature and maintain this temperature with variations of 2° F. or less.

Attention is called to the fact that Puerto Rican fruits certified for ship-
ment to the mainland under the provisions of circular B. E. P. Q. 505 are
treated under supervision of a plant quarantine inspector of the Department
of Agiculture in plants approved for the purpose by the Bureau of Entomology
and Plant Quarantine.

LeEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE
QUARANTINE (NO. 72)

B. E. P. Q. 485, Fourth Revision.*

ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS—REMOVAL OF WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE CER-
TIFICATION REQUIREMENTS FOR A LIMITED PERIOD, FOR POTATOES AND
SWEETPOTATOES CONSIGNED FROM AREAS REGULATED UNDER QUARANTINE
NO. 72

[Approved February 2, 1940; effective February 6, 1940]

Circular B. E. P. Q. 485, as revised July 28, 1939, waived certification require-
ments until February 1, 1940, for specified articles consigned from certain parts
of the areas regulated under quarantine No. 72. The present revision exempts
from certification soil-free potatoes until May 1, 1940, and soil-free sweetpotatoes
until June 1, 1940, consigned from any part of the regulated areas,

The restrictions on soil, earth, sand, clay, peat, compost, and manure remain
in effect throughout the year when shipped interstate from any part of the
regulated areas.

Under authorization provided in Notice of Quarantine No. 72 (Sec. 301.72),
all certification requirements are hereby waived until May 1, 1940, on potatoes,
and until June 1, 1940, on sweetpotatoes when such products are free from
Soil, and are consigned interstate from any part of the regulated areas, it
having been determined that sanitary measures and natural conditions have
so reduced the risk of contamination with any stage of the white-fringed beetle
a vane certification of the above products unnecesSary during the periods
stated.

No modifications are made by this revision in the certification requirements
on the interstate movement, throughout the year, of other articles designated in
paragraph (a) of Regulation 3 (Sec. 301.72-3), namely: Soil, earth, sand,
clay, peat, compost, and manure, whether moved independent of, or in connec-
tion with or attached to nursery stock, plants, products, articles, or things.

(Sec. 301.72a, issued under Sec. 301.72.)

AVERY S. Hoyt,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS

Post OrricE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, February 12, 1940.
Postmaster:

My Dear Sir: Attention is invited to the inclosed administrative instructions
(B. E. P. Q. 485, Fourth Revision), issued by the Bureau of Entomology and
Plant Quarantine, United States Department of Agriculture, in connection with
Federal Quarantine Order No. 72, on account of the white-fringed beetle.

Postmasters in the quarantined areas will please be governed accordingly.
See paragraph 1, section 595, Postal Laws and Regulations.

Very truly yours,
RAMSEY S. Brack,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.



« Supersedes revision of July 28, 1939.
12 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.—March

B. E. P. Q. 503 Revised. ;

ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS—MODIFYING THE RESTRICTIONS OF THE WHITE-
FRINGED BEETLE QUARANTINE BY AUTHORIZING TREATMENT BY METHYL
BROMIDE SOLUTION OF BALLED NURSERY STOCK OF SPECIFIED THICKNESS

Marcu 15, 1940.
INTRODUCTORY NOTE

The instructions in circular B. E. P. Q. 503 issued on November 21, 1939,
provided for treatment of nursery stock by a solution of methyl bromide for
larvae of the white-fringed beetle and limited the treatment to balled and bur-
lapped nursery stock with soil balls not larger than 6 inches in diameter, and
provided for an exposure of 24 hours at temperatures of 70° or above. As a
result of more recent investigations, the instructions are now revised to pro-
vide that soil balls 7 inches in diameter may be so exposed for 8 hours at a-
minimum temperature of 65°. The modification is restricted, however, to
treatment for larvae of the more common species of the beetle, Pantomorus
leucoloma Boh., and does not apply to such treatment for the new species,
P. peregrinus Buch., known to exist at present at Gulfport and certain other
points in Mississippi. The former specifications remain in effect for treat-
ment of larvae of that species and are brought forward in the instructions
which follow. :

TREATMENT AUTHORIZED

Under the provisions of Regulation 5 (a) (See. 301.72-5) supplemental to
Notice of Quarantine No. 72 (Sec. 301.72), the Chief of the Bureau of Ento-
mology and Plant Quarantine hereby authorizes as a prerequisite to certifica-
tion, the following method of treatment for balled plants, when carried out
under the supervision of an authorized inspector of the United States Depart-
ment of Agriculture.

TYPE OF MATERIAL AUTHORIZED

For the more common species, P. leucoloma.—The treatment shall be applied
only to plants in soil balls not greater than 7 inches in diameter nor greater
than 7 inches in thickness when not spherical.

For the new species, P. peregrinus.—The treatment shall be applied only to
plants in soil balls not greater than 6 inches in diameter nor greater than 6
inches in thickness when not spherical.

TREATMENT MeEtrHop
FOR BOTH SPECIES OF WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE

(a) The soil balls around the roots of plants must be buried in sand and
plunged in boxes or trays approximately one foot deep, which are watertight.

(b) A 2-inch space filled with sand shall be provided between the soil balls,
also above and beneath them.

(c) Such soil balls shall be treated with a solution of methyl bromide and
alcohol at a concentration of 0.3 percent methyl bromide and 0.6 percent de-
natured ethyl alcohol by volume in water. The solution is to be prepared by
first mixing the methyl bromide and alcohol together and then adding this
mixture to the water and mixing thoroughly.

(d) The aqueous solution of methyl bromide and alcohol shall then be ap-
plied evenly over the surface of the sand around the plants at the rate of 40
gallons per 100 square feet of surface area by means of a sprinkling can or
sprayer.

EXPOSURE AND TEMPERATURE FOR THH MORE COMMON SPECIES (P. LEUCOLOMA)

(e) After the required dosage has been applied, the soil balls shall remain
embedded in the sand for a period of 8 hours.

(f) The temperature of the soil balls during the treatment shall not be
lower than 65° F.

- EXPOSURE AND TEMPERATURE FOR THE NEW SPECIES (P. PEREGRINUS)

(g) After the required dosage has been applied, the soil balls shall remain
embedded in the sand for a period of 24 hours.

(hn) The temperature of the soil balls during the treatment shall not be
lower than 70° F. .
1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 13

DISCLAIMER

There has been no opportunity to test this treatment on many varieties of
plants, and it is understood that no liability shall attach either to the United
States Department of Agriculture or its employees in the event of injury to
either plants or operators.

CAUTION

Methyl bromide is a gas at ordinary temperatures. It is colorless and prac-
tically odorless, and in preparing the solution the operator should wear an
approved gas mask. (Sec. 301.72-5c, issued under Sec. 301.72-5. )

This revision supersedes circular B. E. P. Q. 5C3 dated November 21, 1939.

AVERY S. Hoyt,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

TERMINAL INSPECTION OF PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS

CHANGE OF PLANT INSPECTION PLACE IN ARIZONA

THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, March 28, 1940.
Postmasters are informed that facilities for the inspection of plants and
plant products at San Simon, Ariz., have been discontinued and a new inspec-
tion place established in lieu thereof at Bowie, Ariz., where inspection will be
made upon call. See section 596, Postal Laws and Regulations, and article 62
(b), page 20 of the July 1939 Postal Guide, Part I.
RAMSEY S. BLACK,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.

MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS

B. E. P. Q. 507. (Supersedes P. Q. C. A. 305, Revised)

SEC. 352.9. ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS; CITRUS FRUIT FROM MEXICO IN
TRANSIT TO FOREIGN COUNTRIES VIA THE UNITED STATES

JANUARY 24, 1940.

Citrus fruit as referred to herein is defined as all citrus fruit other than
lemons and sour limes.

To prevent the entry into the United States of an injurious insect known as
the Mexican fruit fly (Anastrepha ludens Loew) the importation from Mexico
of citrus fruit, except lemons and sour limes, for consumption in the United
States is not authorized under Quarantine No. 56 (Sec. 319.56), its governing
quarantine, unless so treated as to eliminate pest risk.

However, in accordance with the Plant Safeguard Regulations (Secs. 352.2
to 352.8), which provide for the entry of prohibited commodities for immediate
transportation and exportation in bond or for immediate export when such
movement can be made without risk to the plant cultures of the United States,
Mexican citrus fruit is authorized to enter for either of these purposes as fol-
lows:

A. Entry via ports on the Mexican Border.—1. Permits.—Permits shall be
procured in advance of shipment from the Bureau of Entomology and Plant
Quarantine, Washington, D. C., by the forwarding agent or other representative
of the consignee or consignor in the United States. Application for permits
shall indicate the proposed routing of the shipment. Separate permits shall be
procured for each port of entry and for each country of destination but permits
as issued will be continuing for shipments over the approved routes designated
therein.

2. Origin of citrus fruit—Entry is limited to citrus fruit produced in and
shipped from the State of Sonora, Mexico.

3. Authorized ports of entry.—Nogales and Naco, Ariz.

4, Period of entry.—Entry is authorized throughout the entire year.
14 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE — [Jan.—March

5. Notice of arrival.—Prior to entry, a notice of arrival shall be submitted
to the Collector of Customs at the port of entry in duplicate on a form pro-
vided for that purpose giving the initials and number of the railroad car, and
the authorized routing.

6. Inspection—Each shipment shall be subject to inspection at the port of
entry to determine the nature of the contents and freedom from pests.

7. Disinfection—Each car shall be subject to such disinfection at the port
of entry as the plant quarantine inspector shall require.

8. Authorized bonded rail movement.—All shipments shall move in refriger-
ator cars from Sonora through Nogales or Naco, Ariz., by direct authorized
rail routing in bond under customs seal without diversion from the port of
entry to the port of exit as follows:

To Canada: Movement is limited to direct eastward rail routing to El Paso
thence to Canada by any direct rail route which does not pass west of the
direct rail routes through Salt Lake City, Utah, and Portland, Oreg., or south-
east of the direct rail routes through San Antonio, Tex., and St. Louis, Mo.
(See accompanying map.)

To Mexico: Movement for return to Mexico is limited to direct eastward
rail routing for export through border ports between and including Nogales
and El Paso.

9. Cleaning of cars prior to return to the United States—Carg conveying
Mexican citrus fruit through the United States to Canada or Mexico shall
be carefully swept and freed of all fruit, aS well as boxes and other rubbish,
by the railroad company involved prior to reentry into the United States.

B. Entry via North Atlantic Ports—Conditions as in A-1l (Permits), 5
(Notice of arrival), 6 (Inspection), 9 (Cleaning of cars prior to return to the
United States), and in addition as follows:

1. Origin of citrus fruit.—Citrus fruit produced in any part of Mexico.

2. Authorized ports of entry.—New York and Boston and such other northern
ports as may later be approved.

3. Period of entry.—Entry is authorized only during the period October 15 to
March 15.

4. Authorized routing.—All shipments shall move by water direct to New
York or Boston or to such northern ports as may later be approved for im-
mediate direct export or for immediate transportation and exportation in
bond by direct approved rail route to Canada.

(Sec. 852.9, issued under Secs. 352.2-352.8)

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.



Ficurn 1.—Direct rail routing from Sonora, Mexico, via Nogales or Naco to El Paso,
thence to Canada, by any railroad within the unshaded area.
1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 15

B. E. P. Q. 508 (Supersedes B. E. P. Q. 461).
PRESENT STATUS OF CIRCULARS OF THIS (B. E. P. Q.) SERIES

MArcH 18, 1940.

Circulars containing information as to Federal plant quarantines have been
issued from time to time since January 18, 1915, in-a numbered Series desig-
re rewnrenzes » HH. Bb.” “P. Q..C.. A.,” “B. P. @:,” and “B. B..P: Qy.
These designations referred to the Federal Horticultural Board, Plant Quaran-
tine and Control Administration, Bureau of Plant Quarantine, and Bureau of
Entomology and Plant Quarantine, respectively.

Many of the circulars contained information or instructions of transitory
importance only; others were superseded by later circulars; in many instances
changes in, or revocation of, quarantines have rendered the circulars of interest
only as a record of Bureau activities; while in still other instances, changes
in procedure, techinque, or other conditions have made them obsolete insofar
as present practice is concerned.

Circular B. E. P. Q. 461, of August 31, 1937, gave a list of the circulars which
had been issued up to that date, with information as to which were valid and
which were obsolete. Circular B. E. P. Q. 508 brings that material forward,
with such changes as are necessitated by subsequent quarantine action, or in-
struction, and gives a list of the circulars issued to date with information as to
the present validity of each.

A circular may be herein indicated as obsolete insofar as its present status
is concerned, although it may contain informative material that is still useful.
For that reason, inspectors and others will wish to place the obsolete circulars in
an inactive.-file, available for reference if occasion arises.

Avery S. Hoyt,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

LEGEND
Column 1:
D—Indicates that the circular was issued in connection with domestic
plant quarantine work.
F—Indicates that the circular was issued in connection with foreign plant
quarantine work.
Column 2:
R—Following the number of a circular, this symbol indicates the circular
has been revised; the latest revised edition only should be consulted.
Column 3:
Act—Plant Quarantine Act of 1912.
Adm.—Administrative.
C. R.—Cotton regulations.
D. P. R.—Domestic potato regulations,
EH. C.—Export certification.
M. B. R.—Mexican border regulations.
N. 8. R.—Nursery stock regulations.
P. L. & R.—Postal laws and regulations.
P. R.—Potato regulations.
P. S. R.—Plant safeguard regulations.
Q. 5, Q. 14, ete.—Notice of Plant Quarantine No. 5, No. 14, ete.

F or ao. Issued in connec- Status



tion with— Remarks
Pea er eles. 5. oon CUE ee een ae Obsolete.-_| Of transitory importance. (See current
ee Regulations and quarantine No.

fs

F Bp eee ee eee ah N.S. R._----------|---do___.-._| Of importance only as a record of Bureau
activity; quarantine No. 37 superseded

regulations referred to.
F GRAS foe Se a Py OR. 2. ie eee A025 Of transitory importance. (See current

Potato Regulations.)

F PRA es IN Ss kb a Sal. 1. ree Of importance only as a record of Bureau

activity; quarantines Nos. 20 and 37 pro-
mulgated subsequently.

F EME Hee. ao Pipe mene ak. = eee = Cis age Of transitory importance. (See current
Potato Regulations.)
16

BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

[Jan.—Marech



Ont i So Soy y | o

PP ff af fa hf Pf af af af Pal a CY jf fy

ber rx Fy Fy}

hy

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Issued in connec-

tion with— Remarks



Status |



No. |
| Obsolete __ Pomesac potato regulations lifted Sept. 1

Of importance only as a record of Bureau
activity.

“I
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RU eee Atet eee Fee do====— Of transitory importance. (See current
ae Regulations and quarantine No.
le
On ieee QrtES PRs | ado sae Domestic potato quarantines and regula-
tions lifted Sept. 1, 1915
10S(f 22s GigRSe tee sags Se | ae do. Of transitory importance.!
ISP mare ee On Re eee eo ee doe Superseded by H. B. 42.
19= 2p Nees Cs a eee eet alee dos: Of RISO importance.!
2A erties ek | tA Ta ee ee ee dost =e Do.
cee ceee el CepEU se eased) Eee s| eee do.22Fee Sannin by H. B. 26.
Oboe eee CAR epi it Rte | eed Ou eens Supplemented H. B. 25; superseded by
. B. 159.
(300 xe Ras Soke ee Ee does ee Of transitory importance.!
ice are SEES ie ane ew |---do ne ee See current Potato Regulations.
Siler es eee ACE is ee ee oe ee Pee Coe Present practice is a modification.
32 -AO ee Eee! OPER Eee. SAMAR aR ee do “eae. Of transitory importance.!
Aisa ere ae ACERS ee cao eee Of transitory importance; domestic Blister
Rust Quarantine promulgated effective
June 1, 1917.
ADA Sil Sake ERE CRRA ERE SNES oe je edna Superseded H. B. 18; superseded by H. B.
| 164.
43 ease -8 AG ee ee Ey. dove .=4 Of transitory importance.
BA eee ee anes CFR eae ee Sa doi ae Do.!
A Rei See 2S COARSER da hee |e do. 251 See current Cotton Regulations and Plant
| Safeguard Regulations.
AGAR ES ee ES C2 Ree eee S |= 2d0. es Of transitory importance.!
1Oe Se am BCR are Y TS is Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 375 R.
BOERS 2E2. seks Goa en Gk Te do: see Of transitory importance.!
ioe eae Sere | SQ 22 an ee Rtas ae see do: Sa Of value only asa record of Bureau activity.
547 ee ee |), GE eee ee ae [nado ee Of transitory importance.1
rip esa Sana cece gene |___do_______| Supplemented by H. B. 73. (See current
Potato Regulations.)
Ff EE atl Uh Bod tae Sel as |___do_______| Supplemented H. B. 72. (See current
Potato Regulations.)
fA Gee eee ey ER cie Saerem cole oe ee ___do_______| Of transitory importance.!
Yen rere eee Acree ee rename doen Do.
(8-80 Lt a oe eR ete ee eo (Rd Ora | Do.!
SiS ae ees ACES Ser ae Cas Sd Qn Do.
S901 Sel Ce Rae ae ee Ik Oe Do.!
ODM re A VAIN ee ..-do_......| Superseded by instructions not in this
series.
O38 ea tee Se eee |__do_______| Of transitory importance.!
AEN ES Ons OYE SG ae etn eee ___do__.____| Of transitory importance; quarantine No.
38 promulgated effective May 1, 1919.
95-101 ee OCR eee ___do_______| Of transitory importance.!
5) 2 Ba oes | IN eee ee ___do..._____| Of transitory importance. (See quaran-
| tine No. 37).
NOSE are eet OC ah at eee cee eae |___do_..____| Oftransitory importance. 1
104 Se eee [EIN SS Res Bese: >| 4280 Oe Do.
105 SS ee See RQ SS ieee ee ee td ons ia Superseded by P.Q.C. A. 249.
DOG 2 eae Oi aa ___d0_______| Superseded by H. B.132R.
107108 2 Oona ee eee |.--do_......| Superseded by instructions not in this
series.
1OQE Sis eee, OS The See ee __-do_______| Seeregulation 7, quarantine No. 37.
AIOE Se eee Mis Be Ru. =_2*)]/"2 ido =| Superseded by HaBonss
Ae es SETS GRY (etemieel Ae aaa oe 23d0==) Of transitory importance.!
11D Bee Leas | eu Ti= aE SECs uleaieen aera idors bees Superseded H. B. 110; supplemented by
H. B. 118; superseded by instructions not
in this series.
SL pe ee Sh ees Ee SG 0e2 ae Of transitory importance.!
HAS en eee ORS (het as eee Sd one eat See Plant Safeguard Regulations.
AN fie ee ss Se |} QS i aeee os ec eee ee Ge Ae See current revision of quarantine No. 37.
TA Fice SOEs He Osi eae RE eae Of importance only as a record of formation
of Bureau policy; superseded by instruc-
foes eh in this series (See quarantine
; No. 37.
TS Sees i ae Mi Bayh sae ae Validi se Supplemented. H. B. 112; as far as fee is
concerned, H. B. 118 is valid.
119) A RUSE ae ne a Obsolete__| Of transitory importance.!
(00! ee (Lie een ane, Se Superseded by P. Q. C. A. 309.

1 Certain of the earlier H. B.’s issued in connection with the Cotton Regulations were modified or super
seded by the several amendments to the Cotton Regulations which went into effect July 1, 1915, and by
the revisions of the Cotton Regulations effective Feb. 1, 1916, and Aug. 1, 1917, and the amendments thereto;

also by the current Cotton Regulations effective Feb. 24, 1923, as amended.

A number of H. B.’s were

superseded or supplemented by other circulars which were later amended or invalidated. Therefore,

insofar as they remain in effect, Cotton H.

B.’s included in H. B.’s 10 to 163, inclusive, unless otherwise

stated, are absorbed and superseded by the current Cotton Regulations, and are shown herein as “‘of tran-
sitory importance.”’
1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 17

F or :
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F Pre oiiit 2 s.
F ee. 1a TA: f
F Hees Toa} ee i! t
F EI shel one. Foaie? (00512.
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F Pees S107 te eee 8
F Epi OR ee teh |
F mp 120S 1. 43. 2)
F Pepa Lois
F HS Badoge st tt 7
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F eb sas ane} t4 §
F eB eishe Fb. vi!
F He Be tap Gee +e 2.
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F eat Asy Lae Su
F PSR Agee et
F Hess ape ts Fe
F Pe 146s
F bre 147-93. 35-42 |
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F H. B 149-150________
F Ebest tae se tt |
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F He 4s ABO RS) 2 es.
F FET ES ply ehcp ss
F bey S16 Te (AR) pes once ces

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F ey elo) tay 8.
F TEP EAL G4 oe Sieg sd
F GB 365-1664 2.2 - =.
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F isfy hele
D Riese A mete
D per alge 2s. 2s
F inate slgoe ee. b.. 8

a ap tEy taco ee!
D em el eee ks
D eo. 22 et
D pes e080 ss.0 305 e
Ge eteettet s)he
D lef i) ee ae
F PT IRA es

1 See footnote p. 16.
229841—40—~— 4









Issued in connec-
fon witht Status Remarks
OR elds Valid 22 | Supplemented by H. B. 191 (subject to
| revision).

GiwRigetl 5. Obsolete__| Of transitory importance.!

pater mtercy 1 f- - -| OR ap. = Of transitory importance; see current
quarantine No. 37.

Ore NO EE. | 8 dQ; eae Superseded by H. B. 127.

Sepals Gi. nos | DE do. 22 | Of transitory importance.!

ake y UF | 3 do. == eae aed H. B. 124; superseded by H. B.
176.

(PRS ek SN P=. | OS do... === Of transitory importance. (See current
revision quarantine No. 37.)

COPS R gt ie. - G0. .2=83= Of transitory importance.!

ORs eee Ye ed 8 ao.! Saas Do.

GPa PET 80) Te do__-3 Superseded H.'B. 106; superseded by B. E.
Pe Q.7369:

(Pee INS 2s nots do: == See regulation 7, quarantine No. 37.

CS EEE 2 Sido ies Notice of shipment is filed with notice of
arrival.

Aer eere we Ao. se Of transitory importance.!

Qs ioGke =! Valid ___-__ (Subject to revision.)

Og wey ts. s Obsolete __| Of transitory importance.

Ore see te edo eee Of transitory importance; see H. B. 155.

(RABE ie. es do -ek~ Of transitory importance.

MMos Ve be... - Sudo. 2=2- See current U.S. Official Postal Guide.

igi Abel ado =e Of transitory importance.!

Owayes 1 IMIG O_ teat, Do.

5S oa oe Sdo0-i-2-=-. See current revision quarantines Nos. 37
and 56.

Oasis kL =O: eee Of transitory importance.

GeRSIg tire 2... ido. 22: >t

OG Id 0. Bea Superseded by P. Q. C. A. 305.

Op aee SEs tae 23400 Bees Of importance only as a record of Bureau
activity.

Qed iaamee tt Pe OO: s Of transitory importance.

MAGS itis 2. ..-do_..--..| Superseded by H. B. 160, P. Q. C. A.’s 301
302, 303, 315. :

eateries | GO Mey Of transitory importance.

Ne eeet ote SAO ee of transitory importance; superseded H.B.

CVA Teen 3 OE Ona Supe.seded by current practices;

eres 3 | OE gee Of transitory importance.

C. R., P. L, & R_.|---do___.--.| Superseded H. B. 26. (See current U. S.

Official Postal Guide.)
Dg Cs es ec doses Superseded H. B. 151 in part; supplemented

by P. Q. C. A. 296; superseded by P. Q.
Cs An327-

Cy Atimeert 3032: Nl (0 (oe eae Superseded by P. Q. C. A. 309; B. E. P. Q.
474.

Sao Remriesee a fa COs. Of transitory importance.

MO Ai Reais) Fah) + Lee ge| tive GO tere Do.

(Cipepin eT Valid=.... Superseded H. B. 42; formally superseded

by P. Q. C. A. 309, but pending revision
of the latter H. B. 164 is valid.

On Siyereneyty Obsolete__| See current revision Form EQ-207.

ange dos... =. . Superseded by H. B. 178.

Orttrss aeD seb do tes See current quarantine No. 41.

17) 0 te ee We = got. Superseded by P. Q. C. A. 327.

GghGstawerte i Walid. - See current quarantine No. 56.

MOrrbGY er =f. Obsolete-- Do.

aie ae | dots See current quarantine No. 41.

Q. 37__------------|-,-do_-..---| Superseded by instructions not contained
in this series.

Csi iyi geet lee do.....--| Supplemented by H. B.’s 179, 182; super-
seded by P. Q. C. A. 334.

UC ipaieme es | ahs dozza Superseded by P. Q. C. A. 292.

Cr sere. dE oh Moze252 -| Superseded H. B. 127; supplemented by

H. B.’s 184, 186; revised under same
number, 1925, 1926, 1927, 1928, and 1929;
superseded by B. E. P. Q. 460.

GUA. Bevee $e dona Of value only asa record of Bureau activity.

OnAtpere rs bate doles. = Superseded H. B. 167; supplemented by
H. B. 180; superseded by P. Q. C. A 220.

DAG acest ye - -do.......| Supplemented H. B. 174; supplemented by
H. B. 182; superseded by P. Q. C. A. 334.

Ras Ae eg ost ee lia dol... Supplemented H. B. 178; superseded by
P,Q. GA; 220.

Qvale: 11... aie aga 2. See current quarantine No. 41.

Oi, Ab. 8-558. See dae. Supplemented H. B.’s 174, 179; superseded

’ ; by. P,Q. C: A. 334.
GQaBie—. geet ke Walid... Subject to revision.
18



ky
Pe BY DOU YB 8 DO Oe ot ett mt Otel bl tafbattattatbattas tality ey aftr | 33





















BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.—Mareh
No. Issued. Re Status Remarks

FRB see ee Cie ee Obsolete__| Supplemented H. B. 176; superseded by
1925 revision of H. B. 176.

ESB Sal Sb waa eke ONS Teas eased el. doses: Supplemented by H. B. 187.

BLS Gee. eee Creo eel a ECE d= Supplemented H. B.’s 176, 184; superseded
by 1925 revision of H. B. 176.

He B. 18% sees Osiae or ayer ot 8 Walidiaees Been H. B. 185 (subject to re-
vision).

EPR el Seas eee: eee ORS (ae ee ee Obsolete_-} See current revision quarantine No. 37.

Eg 189. ee nea BC eee eo ae Openers Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 366.

eSB pL G0 tees eene ORS Teese tes diets: Of value only as record of Bureau activity.

sD aoLOlees eee CTA aa ake ee oS Validze== Pep euenes H. B. 121; (subject to re
vision).

He Bl O2 se ieee AF © eas ee ee Obsolete__| Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 428.

ERB E93 Seis ora OS | see ae Oe ea dole Superseded by B. E. P. Q.’s 412, 482.

Te Bal 4 oe ease eet ORS (aa ae ois aS do__--_-_| Superseded by P. Q. C. A. 308.

TB 195 ae a (VRS Ge = ates gee emerge | ee do Fx Sa Superseded by B. E. P. Q.’s 412, 482.

Tee Bee Gee ares eneeacee @QS5G aie eee do__.---| Of transitory importance.

ERB 197s es ees QS sees Fs a do Bees: Supplemented by H. B. 207; superseded by
Bey SPOS 4125482)

ERM OS ee eee OS Y (ee a Leanne: | BE do_..._-| Of transitory importance; superseded by
BY EPA Os l2s Ago

EB 109 one eee Bon Cale eS ae ee Co Superseded by P. Q. C. A. 304.

ee B20 Ome aaeene eee QO Zee ee Oa See do ===" Superseded by H. B. 203; quarantine Nc
62 lifted effective Apr. 1, 1935.

EB 20 eens ai ere (CE Sy fae tee tent oe Orme gee Gowers an Superseded by P. Q. C. A. 285.

eeB 202.520 ea eee Ons (epee ee er ees dos Superseded by B. E. P. Q.’s 412, 482.

EB 203s eee Qi G25 Bike Bee do wees Superseded H. B. 200; quarantine No. 62
lifted effective Apr. 1, 1935.

eg 204 eee Oxo 62h es | ee OBE Superseded by H. B. 206.

Ee B20 bee ee Qo ORE eae ERG Ome Pup cuented by H. B. 208; superseded by

eB, 206Re ete QaS TOL Ee = esas [eee dows Lee of pramsitory. importance; superseded H. B.

HS Bete ee ees Qe ware kar Oe 8 | ee domeer=: Supplemented H. B. 197; superseded by
B. E. P. Q. 412.

He Bs 2085 ee ee Qa G ee ere ae | ae doses: Supple ened H. B. 205; superseded by

TB 201 aaa ee QS cas ete a aca doe Of transitory importance.

Hs Ba2lO esse eeu QRS ee cede) eae domes Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 412.

Ele IB 2 1 Se eee rene EC eine te RS ENE dosese. Superseded by P. Q. C. A. 284.

Be 21.2 ee See REC eae ae doses Superseded by B. P. Q. 351.

eae 21S emer eleernees OP Bie se eae ee donee Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 412.

PaaS 2A eee PS a a Viner does See departmental regulations par. 1547.

Hi Bao bee aaa es QR Ge ee as Te do==—— Superseded H. B.’s 205, 208; superseded by
BAO wAg2aIr

He BO Ghee eae @igbO eeee see se ae Seas dose Of transitory importance; see current quar-
antine No. 56.

POO x: Ace2 Uta OGD eats See oe do____-.| Superseded by B. P. Q. 337.

BQ © As 2189 GR) Bi @ aS (mennnees ee |eee do__.-_.| Superseded by P. Q. C. A. 278.

PONG HAR2IO= Qe Gs sarees Car ee doles See current revision quarantine No. 63.

PaO aC. AG220 ae QAR rss Ss hee se do__.--.| Superseded H. B.’s 178, 180. (See current
revision quarantine No. 48.)

POs C. cAq22 1b ee OuG6sta wae"? anaes doses es Quer anue No. 66 lifted effective Mar. 1,

IP QMIC seAN e222 eens ORs ee ee a dost x. See current revision Form EQ -208.

IPO OC pAy 223 eaane OU fe ps aie eeteiele apie domesses Superseded by B. E. P. Q.’s 412, 482.

PS QC AC 224 @M4SaGGane. fae see dows sas: Supplemented by P. Q. C. A.’s 239, 265,
293, 307, 322, 333; B. P. Q. 339; superseded
by BeeRe@r359

SOC aA te2 25ers 52 OMG Sees ee es | aes d0s2 452 Of value as record only, quarantine No. 68
lifted effective Nov. 15, 1930.

Bi QC VAT 226-208) 8 @jgGSeret se | a dose Ouarenting No. 68 lifted effective Nov. 15,
1930.

POG BACT 229 swt oat QO Suna Se Ss || eee dose 228 Supplemented by P. Q. C. A. 240; quaran-

tine No. 68 lifted effective Nov. 15, 1930.

RaQ) CvArg230=23 2 On OSs be ee alee 0s aee Quatantine No. 68 lifted effective Nov. 15,
1930.

124 (Oe Os AY AR ss Qe68ev ses 2 Sees Ue donee. Supplemented by P. Q. C. A. 238; quaran-

: tine No. 68 lifted effective Nov. 15, 1930.

Pein GA -1234—23/7-21 OG Smet si ee dos Quarancie No. 68 lifted effective Nov. 15,
1930.

IPO CapAy 238i QAaGSeiea nen 2. 2.2.) me doses Supplemented P. Q. C. A. 233; quarantine
No. 68 lifted effective Noy. 15, 1930.

IPA Qin© wAC 289208 2h @ SAS NGGtese = oe. | ae do_...__-| Supplemented P. Q. C. A. 224; supple-
mented by B. P. Q. 339; superseded by*
Bee Qk ooo:

4 QC PAY, (240) 2 Oe GS aera | do Supplemented P. Q. C. A. 229: quarantine
No. 68 lifted effective Nov. 15, 1930.

IPAQ WO pA ose eae OSGi ee do 22. Rave H. B. 215; superseded by B. P.

PaO ChwAn 242 seams O68 ees | ae dozer Quarantine No. 68 lifted effective Nov. 15,

1930.






1940} SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 19
! I d -
re No. femagE e Status Remarks
eee, Os A SAS O70 ie ee Obsolete _.| Superseded by P. Q. C. A. 269; quarantine
| No. 68 lifted effective Nov. 15, 1930.
i ee. ew aes Ab @ .68-__-_.__----}--- dO... = as No. 68 lifted effective Nov. 15,
DP. Ose. £. AAG... ROGE sIAist .-..|.8 aig... 2a2= Supplemented by P. Q. C. A. 271; quaran-
tine No. 68 lifted effective Nov. 15, 1930.
D PEOW Os An DAG. ON GRE tires ee se do: Explanatory of P. Q. C. A. 246, quarantine
No. 68 lifted effective Nov. 15, 1930.
F E@. ©. As 248) PGi sire tot. le BOS GO) =e Of transitory importance.
MeO 2A, 240) = fe mye Ue = 8. (253 do... Se Gab H. B. 105; superseded by
Pe eee Ate 2o0ss 2511 68.22. - 2 -=--|==2 GO: <. === cae No. 68 lifted effective Nov. 15,
D Peace A eel... EGR oe eee 8 2 do___..__| Supplemented by P. Q. C. A. 256; quaran-
tine No. 68 lifted effective Nov. 15, 1930.
D a Me ao) Cymraeg tS 122 |. Gp: 2 gan Cueraee No. 68 lifted effective Nov. 15,
1930.
Pek 3) ©. AL rob ke 2 CYR GS etre) oe |e GO: S325 Superseded by P. @. C. A. 263; quarantine
No. 68 lifted effective Noy. 15, 1930.
Pr ePO CSA Dba Ch eS ee ee do: Supplemented by P. Q. C. A.’s 261, 262;
superseded by P. Q. C. A. 272; quaran-
tine No. 68 lifted effective Nov. 15, 1930.
De lees OC Anbp:..f GO) Gabe mie 3. =|. ee do. .2==—= Cease No. 68 lifted effective Nov. 15,
: 1930.
D Pa GutG. Ae 2h6t = 22 OM GSS Nt 2 bes. 222 G0. 32 Supplemented P. Q. C. A. 251; quarantine
No. 68 lifted effective Nov. 15, 1930.
Peer. CA. 2h7.. Grete sees tle do_.3 = ere No. 68 lifted effective Nov. 15,
1930.
OMe @ COA 258. Ls IGS eae. 3. GO! ta2-= Supplemented by P. Q. C. A. 266; quaran-
tine No. 68 lifted effective Nov. 15, 1930.
DMPO On As 2595. . ORG ete. 3.2. | 2 we do::#2_- one eaee No. 66 lifted effective Mar. 1,
1930...
De) PAOE Ce VAL 260. 2 COPPA se | doch =: Of transitory importance.
D PaO nee Awol ooo | Qs 68.2... en. doa Supplemented P. Q. C. A. 254; superseded
by P.O. ‘Az 272.
D BIO eC. At 263. 3 2 ONG see afer 8 eee Gorsten:- Superseded P. Q. C. A. 253; superseded by
P,Q. ©. A, 280:
D PAORC PAs lO Gere ee ss dos = Superseded by P. Q. C. A.’s 269, 272.
D PP) MG ARB hoo. 22k ORAS 66S oes shee GO=21=5=- Supplemented P. Q. C. A. 294: supple-
mented by P. Q. C. A. 333; superseded bv
BP: @.359:
D PONG TA SIGGs 22 CMG Ries OF es oles. =. Supplemented P. Q. C. A. 258.
D ew eater 2o8-_) (@s.682.-8 2 | e-e Goss ee Quarantine No. 68 lifted effective iNovem-
ver 15, 1930.
D PPOV CLA, 26985. 5. |S aah ES ee ee 0 (0 ee ee Superseded P. Q. C. A.’s 243, 264; supple-
mented by P. Q. C. A. 272; quarantine
No. 68 lifted effective Nov. 15, 1930.
D Bao Crane 2s02 OMGSee et ee Fe G0 ae Quarantine No. 68 lifted effective Nov. 15,
1930.
D PAO A@e AL glo 22: TCR Games ede EEE 8 gah do__._.--| Supplemented P. Q. C. A. 246; quarantine
No. 68 lifted effective Nov. 15, 1930.
Dyn ee) OnmAeto 7s) @) 68025) = |. (3 (oa Superseded P. Q. C. A.’s 254, 261, 262, 264;
supplemented P. Q. C. A. 269; supple-
mented by P. Q. C. A.’s 273, 279, 280, 282,
286, 288; quarantine No. 68 lifted effective
Nov. 15, 1930.
Pee OG. AS27752 OQ FGSweere Ek HF | GO24s55- Supplemented P. Q. C. A. 272; quarantine
No. 68 lifted effective Nov. 15, 1930.
D Pay Ge Aso 74s. - 2. OAR ep sae dose. Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 394.
D Pe a enew270-276_ || _Q. 68..2.--..-...-_|-=- dose.) Quarantine No. 68 lifted effective Nov. 15,
1930.
F PQ CAR oT Pimper a) tae does: Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 376.
F eNO PAG 78 (Fv) =_|| Q. 372... Walidis!- Superseded P. Q. C. A. 218.
eee At 270. || Qi 682l2 22. Obsolete_.| Supplemented P. Q. C. A. 272; quarantine
No. 68 liffed effective Nov. 15, 1930.
eer Oeker, (ALL I80 ONGS Seets 3 4 fd0Se Superseded P. Q. C. A. 263; supplemented
P. Q. C. A. 272; quarantine No. 68 lifted
effective Nov. 15, 1930.
DYN eer CMALL ORI 252: Qe aioe) ty /Bido 24s... Supplemented by P. Q. C. A.’s 298, 300.
Er ere. AS ORF \ CR GSB sre. _..do_.--...| Supplemented P. Q. C. A. 272; superseded
by P. Q. C. A. 288; quarantine No. 68
lifted effective Nov. 15, 1930.
F PCIe PRS CR) 4) BiG eevee Malidee. ,
F Peery e eee Osi Obsolete_.| Superseded H. B. 211; superseded by B. E.
: | P.O; 410,
F eG. A. 285.2 Ora na ee eee 2) Gepenscner H. B. 201; superseded by P. Q.
», A. 308.
ea. ©, A. 286). 62... Gees) Shae No. 68 lifted effective Nov. 15, 1930.
MP mee GrcAs 287 -_-_ 2 = Gy.Gs 1h? See dos - Quarantine No. 68 lifted effective Nov. 15,

| 1930.
20

BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.—March



For |

D

ae

oO

bY bob Ub Hh uo g Ky Oe ef ey OO oy OW

y boo ob sey

Bo

yoy Oo Oo



ae

wid

Bi:
B.

BED TO aot gu eee ee a Cee Og J) Uma HO Ue TU aS CRON OC OSC. Clee tae

re ruritds td thidh
© LL22 © GOLD

wo

fc

POL OLD © OLG LOO © © OH © OO O OLELO LOD O22 OO ©

eae ve
©



Issued in connec-
No. sore Status Remarks
CeAs 288ee a QryGSies no to Obsolete_.| Supplemented P. Q. C. A. 272; superseded
P. Q. C. A. 282; quarantine No. 68 lifted
E effective Nov. 15, 1930.
OMAR 289 ee eo WO ea teeweycte ce Be does Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 4
CevAN.290—29 fess ON GS meee es ae dott Cueree No. 68 lifted deci Nov. 15,
OAS 292 ese AChE ERE Re aes Validaas== Superseded H. B. 175.
CAG 293 eeeee Qe 4Sewes te Obsolete_-| Supplemented P. Q. C. A.’s 224, 239;
superseded by P. Q. C. A. 322.
COHAN 2040seke 1 Ryser | dose Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 379.
CAS 295i Oa. ACE anaiden tet || ees do. ess Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 410.
CAM OG ween BC 2 tone es ae does eee H. B. 160; superseded by
Dilie
OWA. 297 - ets Ow sie ot ee dos Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 471.
CAV 2908% 35. Ob D ise eee se do2 aaa Supplemented P. Q. C. A. 281.
@ earls 2095 GR) S| bed eae dome Superseded by B. E. E Q. 476.
CeeAe 300 ae ORD D ies beer ts alias Gorse s8 Supplemented P. Q. C. A. 281.
(OL WS BU 1 SG Oya ok Sie | E doz. tobee Superseded H. B. 151, in part; superseded
by B. E.P. Q. 403:
CapAe 302m nee i Opec laa e. Sle do. eas Superseded H. B. 151, in part; superseded
by B. EB. PB. @. 405:
@ApAeys03Emees iy CN eeeees es oh ee Malidiiss Sanomeded H. B., 151, in part.
(Og AAS SU BACs Fees hee Obsolete__| Superseded i ‘B: 199; superseded by
Bs EY Be@e 407.
PASO Sig GE) RO ep eae teetere sea mes dosaaanes Superseded H. B. 147; superseded by
iB. Be By Qe 507.
CRAG (Gener Hye Oe aaah ah Malideaa
CARS 0 (aaaae Qn ASi aaah ce Obsolete _- See Noes Q. C. A. 224; superseded
C@arAn30Seuaee Quis Teme Sree ee Ne d0s eee Superseded H. B.’s 194, 285; superseded
by Be Re @ 734
(Oe Je CMs se Various quaran- |_.-do______- Supplemented by Babee @e47a2
tines.
CAR 310Reees EY SOs Fe eee stare Validaa
CA Siileeeses OPS ls oO oe = Obsolete__}| Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 462.
CAA 312e ee QRiG 2s eer ene d= Of transitory importance; quarantine No.
62 lifted Apr. 1, 1935.
Cele oIge es Oia tapes me |e owas Superseded by B. E.P. Q. 386.
CWAS Si4ie sa aoc @ ube tenga te ce rea hs Jee donee Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 445.
Cre ol bie GHA Oe rate detec | a Goes Superseded H. B. 151, in part; superseded
bDyBe BaP Or 4372
CRASS 16 (Orr 4 Rustin years sare oleae done: Superseded by Department Circular 373.
See B. E. P. Q. 499.
OA Bi (eee | MO) eA Sane lea CR do__..._-| Superseded by B. P. Q. 359.
Or An 3iStees = OS RE ee es ee Oko) Superseded by B. P. Q. 342.
©. Ae s1Qe ees QING 2b tee Ol) ae dot-47 << Superseded by B. P. Q. 337; quarantine
No. 62 lifted Apr. 1, 1935.
©. FAS 320 bebe NOS Sa eauaneids ae canes | eee G0 Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 385.
Ge ALSO ea «26 eB Chee itieree eee oe don: 2-2-2 Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 439.
ChAR 3200 we @adges ote el. | downs. Supplemented P. Q. C. A. 224; superseded
Pe C. A. 293; superseded by ibe.
GrrA+ 30308 7s QigS ieee eae domeeaa Of transitory importance .
OivAL Soden Qs eon mes 0S seid omen Do.
@s AS 32523965 nO) 642 eee Ee dome Do.
Gi Ae 30720 TAO engl pel Se cell Gowen Superseded H. B.’s 160, 169, 296; superseded
by B. E. P. Q.’s 408, 416.
Cr AG 32Re ee Q@ipA See cee cathe Ee GO scuaenee Quarantine No. 48 lifted effective July 15,
OpeAe 300 eee QuiG 4a sean Golan Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 472.
OVA 350=33 1s ON G4 eee ae Go. kes Of transitory importance.
© JAS 339.9 es O60 te ie dove sans Do.
Oe Ay 8302250 8S QN486682253 oe 2. |e does Supplemented P. Q. C. A.’s 224, 265; super-
; seded by B. P. Q. 359.
OayAe 394te eas Oss weev eee a dows! Superseded H. B.’s 174, 179, 182; superseded
by current regulations of quarantine
No. 45.
OETA Ooh maeens JAC hating ds enya cy Valid_____| Legal data re quarantine litigation. d
@P3369-356b. | E On Gouna ne Obsolete__| See summary published with quarantine
No. 63 as revised effective July 1, 1938.
QuS3762 5. es QAGQRe ewe | ae does Superseded P. Q. C. A.’s 217, 319; supple-
. mented by B. P. Q. 353; quarantine No.
62 lifted effective Apr. 1, 1985. |
O33 3 eae Q: G2E eae eae |e Go. eae Supplemented by B. P. Q. 353; quarantine
No. 62 lifted effective Apr. 1, 1935.
O83 9a Q). As CGE ee See Go: 2 8 Supplemented P. Q. C. A.’s 224, 239; super-
seded by B. P. Q. 359.
Ors 4 eases ws Qe ieee oe oa do= == Superseded P. Q. C. A. 249; superseded by

B. E. P. Q. 384.

Brey le ask ener Qi 7 aa Se a es (60) eee ee Superseded P. Q. C. A. 308; see current

revision Form EQ -208.


1940]
F or Issued in connec-

D No. tion with— Status
ap Pe. BAS): G52) ws epsclee :
tee Pte oda. QMGiat "| edo Be
Heeb. es Os oss oe Cat a eee | + LN
Deri: bee Oe dAbaec- -.2- Papa aoe WS 2. ae do 3a=—
D Bese. p40" 2 is A Chet c=eere ke 3. ae do
emis ie. @, o4i 2 —-- Ree Sete se dose=>
Beni @. 345... 2: = _ es. ee eae oe Valid-=e—
Deeb. us @. 3405-. --. - - DE Goa ae eee Se Obsolete _-
Piss Qsp0 2 =... eee eee ee Validea
Meebo... pele oc Re ee dO ee
TD) El A te OeAse seo o Ses Obsolete __
Wri. P.O aps... --.-2- (8) (7S Se fe os
ManieB: ba Qe sp4se 2.2) (Ve sieeoeatet lees JO28ees2
Eel Tels TE (0) 8455) (G29) ee I OO Validmeees
F Bee Gp s00 see st OAT Oi ee oe Obsolete_
Mises Oa coi... RE eee sce Silene Ose
Debts QO. ab8--— =. ONO 2e ee eee sees dose
Pe Oy a0g:. OFAN BRE er ee Soe dosenae:.
ese Oe Seek Hee eee ae Validea.
Pees ei pole Bi yop Ye a ee ae Obsolete__
ee eaiGehe es ee Oe pi Rowen ee dogs. 2
eet | Sis. bs Oa abo ss! =. 22 PAG felees | Valid_.--.
Mine 1) hts br BA pee ete | dome:
ee eben es. @) sop=. 5. 2 Oa iews see se 2.) ye GOS: 2-5:
eb ee 306, + Owe eee re eee dors. _--
D 100 Oe OnG4. 2 ee e Obsolete _-
Ro. Brae. -@. 368--.-.- Bae Se ae Nee a Le: alidis. - 2
ee BPs 369... asi ee ee |e dpi 2b 22
eet esos STOlCR) >|) Bs Obes.) |b = donee
Deere O)aS71—3/2.-| Q. 64.22... -- Obsolete__
Dee Os Pe2373. Ges ee oat doz ts.
Mae iecta eG 374... __ eens 2 ees Pee Wialidl =.= =
Me ei ods) |) Br) Oe anenc=- ee. Goeee: 2"
Rie a nO Re Oe se Qa8 a= Obsolete_-
eae. He eon. _—— | eRe ek ye ae dome 2
F Boe. Q878-25_ Paes i Valid. .-.-
Â¥F | B.E.P.Q. 379... Wage ca eae | 2 does:
F Pape Onsen). H. Ox.-.....--_=.|_.. dos.
eer sess th) - =| WH. Co... Lf dozer s =
a seen lees 382... pie Oe eee ee |e dom = ==
D ree Qe. 228 Q 4825.22 2 Obsolete_ -
F Bee temeiGl Seta? Qa ie 22 Valides ===
oe esrb era os (hy) =e | Q8s a=. 2.2. _]__. doe.
Wes abet Oo oBbdT) | O45 0252... Joe Gomes. =
D Bo. Be@esay. 52° GAS Fe ayer ts Obsolete__

aD Babee esee. C3 ED De ame ee ee Que 2. -
nets yee soo Big ee sere Be Vali
a es He tea oO0i() 3) BW. iChsense-=-_-.-]-22 doz=5.. ==
F etree sO) =| i. ©... --_ |. Ge Bae Si:
F Best eee@:. 302).-_ AC ee ees ree ee Ouro
en ree eeaMoesps. 6.1 OQ. 59.-. 2-2 OteeS

~iDyes)"2 Sa OAD Rai) 1 AB ee Validea -
D Peete GC) Boo (rt). |) Q4a8e ==. Obsolete _ -
F eat ten 306... BAO eee acl Er Valide: =...
F Bot fea nsor 3. EL UG a eer DO 2 | date. _.-
Be ey 3982-2... OY tees ote Obsolete - -
i alee Fe ee QQ; 399... Ge ary es 20 AV alice tees!
ese tre) 2400. = _ LD O) eee eee ee | ae domes.
ese ta) 401_ +s _ 2 IBY, Cy ie emercae tS cok, dos ==
Sal ese ee Gy A02-(.40) |). Os... .___]__- dg ses...
Herb epee. Q:403_ 2-2. BG See eee does <1.
eSB ts 1) 404 CR) -|) Wo Ge sce, ee doa yt.
Taisen, @. 40b:__ Hy CS 2a ee dae.
Peete eee Ge 406 CR)e| Ey C_-....- 0: See Gags: =:
Seen es Gh, 407. °.. || Fe, O.-- 5 eek dae... __
Peete OQ). 408_. ++ i OY ORs Pies Se Edge =
Rieter be 400... . _- By, Oc 52), See Ofe too
D Beet. e. Q.410.._._. Ache. _ tee ae Gry. oo s-"
ese ices, ©. 411_...-. Es pees See dg

SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS



21

Remarks

Superseded P. Q. C. A. 318.

Of transitory importance.

Superseded P. Q. C. A. 241; superseded by
B. Eb. 2s @) 50

Florida removed from under restrictions of
quarantine No. 52, effective Oct. 14, 1936.

Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 438.
Quarantine No. 62 lifted effective Apr. 1,
1935.

Superseded H. B. 212; euisea ts revision).
Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 498.
Supplemented B. P. Q. ’s 337, 338; quaran-

tine No. 62 lifted effective Apr] , 1935.
Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 4

See quarantine No. 74, revised.

Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 426.

Quarantine No. 62 lifted effective Apr. 1,
1935.

Superseded PaiQ> ©, cAs sQ945 239), 265,307,
317, 322, 333, B. P. Q. 339; superseded by
B. E. P. Q. 499.

Of transitory importance.
Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 417.

Superseded H. B. 189.
Of transitory importance.

Superseded H. B. 132R.

Of transitory importance.
Quarantine No. 62 lifted effective Apr. 1,
1935. iz

As revised, superseded H. B. 49.

Superseded P. Q. C. A. 277; superseded by
B. E. P. Q. 412.

Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 425.

Superseded P.Q.C. A. 294.

Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 395R.

Superseded B. P. Q. 340.

Superseded P. Q. C. A. 320.

Superseded P. Q. C. A. 313.

Of transitory importance.

See current revision of regulations under
quarantine No. 52.

Florida removed from under restrictions of
quarantine No. 52, effective Oct. 14, 1936.

Superseded P. Q. C. A. 274.

Superseded B. E. P. Q. 383; incorporated i in
current regulations of quarantine No. 48.

Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 465.

Superseded P, Q. C. A. 301.
Superseded P. Q. C. A. 302.

Superseded P. Q. C. A. 304.
Superseded P. Q. C. A. 327, in part.

Superseded P. Q. C. A. 295; (subject to
revision).
Superseded P. Q. C. A. 284,


D No.
F Behe Oro ween
F B. Ey, RB. Q. 413 GR)e
D Been ple ee Re
D BAH Pen @e il jemereee
F Bee OGG) =
F Beh eae 4'lh(eeeee
F Bee H lea @he4l Canaan
F Beaute O40 eve
F Beer Pek Oras 0 eae
F IS ate bes 2) er?) ee
F BMH OQ ADD eee
F HS eae len @) 42 aes
F Bein PaOn424 (Rye
F Be Bae tO hea 2 ba ae
F SoH eae O42 6 meas
F nee re O42 pone
F B. E. P. Q. 428 (R)
F Behe @ 4429 nes
F 1B Bis 125 @), CRW)
F AS Hella ap 43 eerie
F IBS ADS de, Os caylee
F Bee @ 433 n ue
F B. E. P. Q. 484 (R)_
F BEE @43 hues
D Beh Os 43652)
F Bee O43 ieee
F Sse G4 3 Seen
F 1338 Taio dees Oye Rw)
F 18), 1B), 12, @), Ze ae
FBP Qn aden
F 1835 diy 124s (Os AY
F Byba Ra On443ieaee.
F B. E. P. Q. 444 (R)
F Be Heeb Oh44 pase
F 1336 doe Oy CE
F Se amie Oy 4A: enone
F Beh Sele) 4 4 Gumemane
F Bee Bieter Os 4.0 meme
D Sao H et @ 4 ()eeeae
FE |B ee ase Oe! Tinea
F BPR plese O) ey Dene
F 1B}, 18s 12, Qs CBee
F Be hee On 5 4eau es
F aan 455s) ee
F Iso Wagon Qe tier
F iS ee Eaton Gerd jeune
F Beh hie @yyA 5 Sauna
D Bee ea @h4'5 OaanEs
F 1a35 IDiy Je @)., 0
ID Beek Oe bleu
DBS SBE ee On 460 mae
F Beet ee AG 3 eee
F Bee hanes O46 4 aan
F BP aE ie Ob4 6 eemeee
F iBeehaces Oe 466m
F Bee eel 4 6s
Be eBay @ 4 68eenne
Ee WB shee @)y 4 69 eee
I |) eke Tig IR Os Cis
Ee | eS ee ee) 4 alee
D [Beene eas Or Ari 2 eee
D BEE ae Ora joes
Ten ee Serato Oy ee
D Rhea @) ey beeen
ES Bee Biel @) sii Omen
Ee eee ayy eee
His es ee eelae en. e eens
BeBe Bean O70 penne
D 135 135 12 Qo 40
D2) SBN ey Ome lee
H | BeMBMPh Owego) iis
Ee esol @)4 83 maa
pn | eS see eee @) a 4 eee
D Bet ee @nAsh GR) es
2 Enforced by Di





Issued in connec-

tion with—

i356! ca







BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

Status

Valid: 8222

Valid. fp
Obsolete _-

ivision of hee pe Plant Quarantines.







[Jan.—March

Remarks



Superseded H. B.’s 193, 195, 197, 198, 202,
207, ae ra POk Cau a B. P. Q.
354; B. P. Q. 376; see B. E. P. Q. 482.

Superseded by B. E. P. Q.’s 492, 493.

Of transitory Torta

Superseded P. @ C. A. 327, in part.

Superseded B. P. Q. 362; superseded by
1835 1Dj5 125 ©, Ce

Superseded B. E. P. Q. 377.
Superseded B. P. Q. 357.

Superseded H. B. 192.

Superseded P. Q. C. A. 315
Superseded B. P. Q. 347.
Superseded P. Q. C. A. 3

Superseded P. Q. C. A. 314.

Superseded by current revision of regula-
tions of quarantine No. 52.

Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 478.

Superseded by eee revision of regu[a-
tions of quarantine No. 52.

Superseded H. B. 176.

Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 508.

Superseded P. Q@. C. A. 311.

Superseded B. E. P. Q. 417.

Superseded B. E. P. Q. 398.

Superseded P. Q. C. A. 289. :

Superseded memorandum to inspectors,
Aug. 22, 1934.

Superseded P. Q. C. A. 297.

Superseded P. Q. C. A. 329.

Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 499.

Superseded H. B. 161; supplemented P. Q.
C. A. 309, in part.

Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 499.

Superseded P: Q. C. A. 299R.

Superseded memorandum to chief inspec-
tors, Sept. 1, 1931.

Superseded B. E. P. Q. 458.

Superseded by B. E. P. Q. 499.
See By Ei Pi: Q, 402bs ee ee ee eee oe
1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 23







F or No. es eee Status Remarks
Meee hee. Oe 486. --.-|-Q: 72.__._-- etd Validi<.2--
D BeBe) Qy487-_-.-- ON 64 ee 8 Obsolete__| Expired June 15, 1939.
ees Bre .O.488. = OVD a RE Walia
Diep Hs b. QQ? 489"... Qs (2. URE LON does
F Be. es Q490.-! =. BPG eee FE ee jae ae
F HPO 4G. «at. BSC? ee bo ai dot ace
D gee AO aie, ECG 2 Stes. = she Obsolete__|. Expired Apr. 30, 1939.
DPD 6403. O52. seen mV alidesa ==
D BMH yIPt Qeaose eos 2 5222 eet h Ss: Be! ores
D BSB Py OMAG nee. = O64 er See Cay ae 3. dor eeaay | As tosterlization requirements only.
D Bei ROndgh. = =. Oy) ee _- donee
F Banyo be QsA97 2. Be a eee ee (0
D Bette PS Ge498) * Oe 4se ae ae Sito. dq Superseded B. P. Q. 352.
eS ieee eG L LL. 82 | (> 48.0 ees ee : diguaee Superseded P. Q. C. A. 316; B. P. Q. 359;
B. E. P. Q.’s 473, 475, 480.
F Be Hee] @. 500) | BAC recta. pee omen
F BRE. O50 2 22: =: CONS OUe tees eee ah dons see Superseded B. P. Q. 344.
F BARE P SO 8502. IBA es =, SE Sas Ae. Os Y dee
D Bees. —- OR ime renee. id d=
F BeBe Be @eo0d. =. __ (ONS Ol nea = Niels Ge a
ON eis Pe 750552. 2 1h OCD SRET ANE) RS be Oe Supplemented by B. E. P. Q. 506.
IDDM jad De ees) OS. oe 2 a tava Be Gr cece Supplemented B. E. P. Q. 505.
F Babs O oO == PAGS Ris24 te oe ee donee: Superseded P. Q. C. A. 305R





2 Enforced by division of Foreign Plant Quarantines.

B. E. P. Q. 404, Revised, Supplement 1.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, BRITISH INDIA

FEBRUARY 16, 1940.

[Amendment of the Order No. F. 320/35—A of July 20, 1936, by Notification of Depart-
ment of Education, Health and Lands, No. F. 50—83/39—A dated December 7, 1939, and
effective February 15, 1940]

CERTIFICATION OF UNMANUFACTURED TOBACCO

8B. Unmanufactured tobacco, either raw or cured, shall not be imported into
British India, unless, in addition to the general certificate required under Rule
5 it is accompanied by an Official certificate, that it is free from HEphestia
elutella or that the pest does not exist in the country of origin.
AVERY S. Hoyt,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

B. E. P. Q. 416, Revised. ;
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, UNITED KINGDOM OF GREAT BRITAIN

FEBRUARY 6, 1940.

This revision of the digest of plant-quarantine import restrictions of the
United Kingdom of Great Britain was rendered necessary by the promulgation
of the Importation of Plants Order of 1939, dated May 16, 1939, and effective
June 1, 1939. This order consolidates and amends the hitherto existing regula-
tions and revokes those which it superseded. The regulations of the Channel
Islands remain unchanged.

This circular was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant quarantine inspector, in
charge of foreign service information, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines,
from the text of the importation of plants order of 1939, of England and the
corresponding orders of Scotland, Northern Ireland, and the Channel Islands.

The information herein contained is believed to be correct and complete up
to the time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used independently of,
nor as a substitute for, the original texts, and is not to be interpreted as legally
authoritative.

AVERY SS. Hoyt,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.
24 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.—March

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPCRT RESTRICTIONS, ENGLAND AND WALES

BAsic LEGISLATION
[The Destructive Insects and Pests Acts, 1877 to 1927]

SUMMARY
IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

Coniferous trees:° Importation prchibited from all foreign sources of living
plants of the following genera of the order Pinaceae: Abies, Lariz, Picea,
Pinus, Pseudotsuga, Sequoia, Thuja, and Tsuga, to prevent the introduction
of diseases and pesis likely to prove injurious to forestry undertakings in the
United Kingdom. (Importation of elm trees and conifers [prohibition] order
of 19383, p. 10.)

Elm trees (Ulmus spp.) :° Importation prohibited from all foreign sources
to prevent the introduction of the Dutch elm disease Graphium ulmi (Cerato-
stomella ulmi (Schwarz) Buisman). Licenses may be issued for importation
for scientific purposes only. (Importation of elm trees and conifers [prohibi-
tion] order of 1933, p. 11.)

Potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.):° Importation prohibited of potatoes
grown in Canada, the United States of America, and European France, to pre-
vent the introduction of the Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata
Say). Transshipment is also prohibited except under license. (Importation
of plants order of 1989, art. 3, p. 4.)

IMPORTATION RESTRICTED

Apples grown in the United States:° Shipments landed between July 7 and
November 15 must be accompanied by a certificate of a duly authorized
inspector of the United States Department of Agriculture in the form set out
in the fifth schedule. (Importation of plants order of 1939, art. 7 (4), p. 8.)

Chrysanthemum plants:° The landing in England and Wales of any chrys-
anthemum plant is prohibited except under and in accordance with the condi-
tions of a license issued by the Minister cf Agriculture and Fisheries or by an
inspector. (Importation of plants order of 1989, art. 4 (2), p. 5.)

Plants, living, or parts thereof (except seeds) for planting,’ except those
whose importation is prohibited: Phytosanitary certificate in duplicate in
form prescribed in Second Schedule (p. 9), issued by competent authority of
the country oi origin. For shipments from the United States the certificate
must be issued by an official duly authorized by the United States Department
of Agriculture. The certiiicate must also include a statement that the consign-
ment does not include any plant of sugar beet or mangold, of Ulmus, or of
conifers of the prohibited genera of the order Pinaceae, or any chrysanthemum
plant. (Importation of plants order of 1989, art. 5, pars. 1 and 2, pp. 5 and 6.)

Sugar beets and mangolds (Beta vulgaris L.) living plants:° Importation
from all foreign sources prohibited, except under license issued by the Minis-
ter of Agriculture and Fisheries, to prevent the introduction of virus diseases.
(Importation of plants order of 1939, art. 4 (1), p. 5.)

Vegetables° (not including cucumbers or mushrooms for which no certificate
is required) grown in any other country than Belgium, European France,
Germany, Luxemburg, the Netherlands or Switzerland: A certificate of origin
visaed by a competent authority of the country of origin, during the period
April 21 to September 30. (Impcrtation of plants order of 1939, art. 6 (8),
p72)

Specific restrictions are applied to the importation of cider apples, cherries,
living plants and parts thereof, potatoes, and other vegetables grown in France,
Germany, Belgium, the Netherlands, Switzerland, and various other European
countries.

IMPORTATION UNRESTRICTED

Seeds: The first schedule excepts seeds from the provisions of article 5 (1)
of the importation of plants order of 1939. (See p. 5.)

5 Indicates products of the United States.
1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 25

SUGGESTIONS TO CERTIFYING INSPECTORS

Under date of August 1935 a joint memorandum in the following sense was
issued by the Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries, England; the Department
of Agriculture, Scotland; and the Ministry of Agriculture, Northern Ireland:

CHARACTER OF INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION DESIRED

The required phytosanitary certificate must be based on an examination made
not more than 14 days prior to the date of shipment and it must state that the
plants (or in certain cases, a representative Sample of the plants) have been
thoroughly examined and “found to be healthy, no evidence of the presence of
any insect, fungus, or pest destructive to horticultural crops having been dis-
covered in them.” This form of words implies that the examining officer has
done everything that is reasonably possible to assure himself that the material
examined is free from pests and diseases; it does not involve him in any
personal guaranty that the plants are absolutely and completely free from all
plant diseases and pests—a guaranty which could seldom conscientiously be
given.

REINSPECTION ON ARRIVAL

All shipments of plant material are subject to reinspection on arrival at a
port of Great Britain and the action taken will depend on the findings. The
action taken on imported plants found to be infected by some disease or pest
is based upon a recognition of the difference in degree of importance to be
attributed to diseases and pests that have already become established in Great
Britain and those that have not. The action taken in the case of a pest or
disease new to Great Britain will be drastic, regardless of the extent of infesta-
tion. For example, the action taken with respect to infections of Common scab,
Actinomyces scabies, on potatoes, or of the oystershell scale, Lepidosaphes ulmi
(L.), on apples or other fruit stocks, would depend on the degree of infection
or infestation. On the other hand, the finding of plant material infested with
San Jose scale (ASspidiotus perniciosus Comst.), which does not occur in the
United Kingdom, or the discovery of even a single potato infected with wart
disease, Synchytrium endobioticum, a disease from which wide areas of Great
Britain are still free, would result in the exportation or destruction of the
Shipment concerned. Plant quarantine inspectors, therefore, are requested not
to certify for export to Great Britain plant products infested or infected by
injurious pests or diseases not known to occur there, and, in instances where
inspection cannot be depended on to determine freedom from plant pests, plant
products which, on account of their origin, are likely to be infested or infected
therewith.

FREEDOM FROM SOIL

Although no regulation specifically prohibits the importation of soil, the cer-
tification that plants have been “thoroughly examined” implies that the roots,
as well as other parts of plants, have been inspected, consequently, that adher-
ing soil (if any) has been reduced to a minimum. In other words, plants
should be practically free from soil and should be packed in such a manner as
to facilitate inspection and to prevent spoilage or injury in transit.

REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE IMPORTATION OF PLANTS AND PLANT Propucts INTO
ENGLAND AND WALES

[The importation of plants order of May 16, 1939]
DEFINITIONS

ARTICLE 1. In this order, unless the context otherwise requires :—

“Plant” includes tree and shrub, and the fruit, seeds, tubers, bulbs, corms,
rhizomes, roots, layers, cuttings, and other parts of a plant.

“Raw vegetables” includes raw onions, raw tomatoes, raw eggplants, and
raw salads, but does not include mushrooms or cucumbers.

“Unhealthy” means affected with any insect, fungus, bacteria, or other vege-
table or animal organisms or any agent causative of a transmissible crop disease.

ArT. 2. Refers to products grown in the United Kingdom.
26 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE — [Jan.—March

PROHIBITION AGAINST LANDING AND RESTRICTION ON THE TRANSSHIPMENT
OF POTATOES FROM CERTAIN COUNTRIES

Art. 8. (1) The landing in England or Wales of any potatoes grown in the
United States of America, the Dominion of Canada, and European France, is
prohibited.

(2) The transshipment in England or Wales of any of the potatoes specified
in subsection (1) of this article is prohibited except under and in accordance
with the conditions of a license issued by the Minister of Agriculture and
Fisheries or by an inspector.

(3) In this article “potatoes” includes potato haulms, leaves, and stalks.

IMPORTATION PROHIBITED OF PLANTS OF SUGAR BEET, MANGOLD, AND CHRYSANTHEMUM

Art. 4. (1) For the prevention of the introduction of virus diseases of sugar
beet and mangold, the landing in England or Wales of any plant of sugar beet
or mangold of the species Beta vulgaris L. (except the seeds thereof) is hereby
prohibited except under and in accordance with the conditions of a license.
issued by the Minister or by an inspector.

(2) For the prevention of the introduction of the chrysanthemum midge
(Diarthronomyia hypogaea F. Loew.), the landing in England or Wales of any
chrysanthemum plant (except the seeds thereof) is hereby prohibited except
under and in accordance with the conditions of a license issued by the Minister
or by an inspector.

RESTRICTIONS ON THE LANDING OF CERTAIN PLANTS AND POTATOES
PHYTOSANITARY CERTIFICATH REQUIRED

ArT. 5 (1) The landing in England and Wales of any of the plants mentioned
in the first schedule to this order, and of potatoes, is hereby prohibited, unless
each consignment is accompanied by two copies of a certificate of a duly
authorized official of the phytopathological service of the country in which the
plants or potatoes were grown, in the form prescribed in the second schedule
to this order. ‘The inspection referred to in the certificate shall be carried out
not more than 14 days prior to the date of shipment. The original of the cer-
tificate shall be forwarded by mail by the exporter to the horticulture branch
of the Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries, 10 Whitehall Place, London, S. W.
1, before the plants or potatoes are shipped. Except in the case of consignments
imported by mail, a copy of the prescribed certificate shall be delivered to an
officer of customs and excise at the same time as, and together with, the entry
relating to the consignment. In the case of consignments imported by mail, a
copy of the prescribed certificate shall be affixed to each package. (See also
art. 3 of the importation of elm trees and conifers [Prohibition] order of 1933,
p. 7.)

FEDERAL CERTIFICATE REQUIRED °

ArT. 5. (2) In the case of any of the plants mentioned in the first schedule
to this order and grown in the United States of America the certificate required
by paragraph (1) of this article Shall be the certificate of an Official duly
authorized by the United States Department of Agriculture.

SPECIAL NOTATION REQUIRED ON CERTIFICATE

Art. 5. (8) The certificate prescribed in this article shall, except in the
case of a consignment consisting wholly of potatoes, include a statement to
the effect that the consignment does not contain any plants of sugar beet or
mangold or any chrysanthemum plant, or any plant of the genus Ulmus or of
the following genera of the order Pinaceae: Abies, Larix, Picea, Pinus, Pseu-
dotsuga, Sequoia, Thuja, and Tsuga, except the seeds thereof.

ArT. 5. (4) Pertains to certification of plants from European France.

ArT. 5. (5) Relates to certification of plants and potatoes from Belgium,
Germany, Luxemburg, the Netherlands, and Switzerland.

¢ Hitherto both State and Federal certificates have been acceptable, but article 5 (2),
now in effect, prescribes a Federal certificate for plant material from the United States,
1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS DE

CERTIFICATION OF ABSENCE OF ELMS

Art. 5. (6) The reference in article 3 of the importation of elm trees and
conifers (prohibition) order of 1933 to the certificates prescribed in article 4
of the importation of plants order of 1933, shall be read and have effect as a
reference to the certificate prescribed in paragraph (1) of this article.

ArT. 5. (7) Paragraphs (4) and (5) of this article shall not apply to flower
bulbs, corms, tubers, or rhizomes.

Art. 5. (8) Nothing contained in this article shall be deemed to permit—

(a) The landing or transshipment in England or Wales of any potatoes of
which the landing or transshipment is prohibited or restricted under article 3
hereof ;

(b) "The landing in England or Wales of any plant of sugar beet or mangold
of the species Beta vulgaris L. or of any chrysanthemum plant of which the
landing is prohibited or restricted under article 4 hereof.

ArT. 6. (1) Refers to raw vegetables grown in European France or
Switzerland.

Art. 6. (2) Refers to raw vegetables grown in Belgium, Germany, Luxemburg,
or the Netherlands.

CERTIFICATE OF ORIGIN REQUIRED FOR RAW VEGETABLES

ArT. 6. (3) The landing in England or Wales between April 21 and September
30 in any year of any raw vegetables grown in any country other than Belgium,
European France, Germany, Luxemburg, the Netherlands, or Switzerland is
hereby prohibited unless each consignment is accompanied by a certificate of
origin visaed by a competent authority in the country of origin stating the
country and place where the raw vegetables were grown.

ART. 6. (4) The certificate prescribed in this article shall be delivered to the
proper officer of customs and excise at the same time as, and together with,
the entry relating to the consignment.

ART. 6. (5) Nothing contained in this article shall be deemed to permit the
landing or transshipment in England or Wales of any potatoes of which the land-
ing or transshipment is prohibited or restricted under article 3 hereof.

RESTRICTIONS ON THE LANDING IN ENGLAND OR WALES OF CERTAIN RAW APPLES

ArT. 7. (1) Relates to cider apples from European France or Switzerland.

ART. 7. (2) Relates to cider apples from Belgium, Germany, Luxemburg,
or the Netherlands.

ArT. 7. (3) Relates to cider apples from European countries other than
Belgium, France, Germany, Luxemburg, the Netherlands, and Switzerland.

APPLES FROM UNITED STATES MUST BE ACCOMPANIED BY A GRADE CERTIFICATE

ArT. 7. (4) The landing in England or Wales between July 7 and Novem-
ber 15 of any year of any raw apples grown in the United States of America
is hereby prohibited unless each consignment is accompanied by a certificate of
a duly authorized inspector of the United States Department of Agriculture
in the form set out in the fifth schedule to this order.

Art. 7. (5) The certificates prescribed in this article shall be delivered to the
proper officer of customs and excise at the same time as, and together with,
the entry relating to the consignment.

Arts. 8, 9, and 10 relate to the disposal of plants and plant products landed
or and Wales in contravention of this order, and other administrative

etails.

SPECIAL IMPORT LICENSES

ArT. 11. Notwithstanding any provisions of this order, any plants, potatoes,
Taw apples, or raw vegetables may be landed in England and Wales under and
in accordance with the conditions of a license issued by the minister or by an
inspector.

ArT. 12. Service of notices.

ART. 13. Information to be given as to plants, potatoes, raw apples, or raw
vegetables landed in England or Wales.

ArT. 14. Penalties.

AkT. 15. Revocation of previous orders.
28 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE — [Jan.—March

EFFECTIVE DATE OF ORDER

ART. 16. This order shall come into operation June 1, 1939.

SHORT TITLE OF ORDER

ArT. 17. This order may be cited as the importation of plants order of 1939.

First SCHEDULE

All living plants and parts thereof (except seeds) for planting.

SECOND SCHEDULE
PRESCRIBED CERTIFICATE FORMS

This is to certify that the living plants/a representative sample of the living
plants* included in the consignment, of which particulars are given below,
were/was thoroughly examined on the (date), by (name of inspector), a duly
authorized official of the (name of organization), and found to be healthy,
no evidence of the presence of any insect, fungus, or pest destructive to agri-
eultural or horticultural crops having been found in them.

ADDITIONAL STATEMENT FOR ALL SHIPMENTS EXCEPT POTATOES

It is further certified that the consignment does not contain any plant of
the genus Ulmus, or of the following genera of the order Pinaceae: Abies,
Lariz, Picea, Pinus, Pseudotsuga, Sequoia, Thuja, and Tsuga, nor any plant
of sugar beet or mangold (Beta vulgaris L.), nor any chrysanthemum plant.

ADDITIONAL CERTIFICATE FOR POTATOES

It is further certified that no case of the disease known as walt disease
(Synchytrium endobioticum) has occurred at any time on the farm or holding
where the potatoes included in the consignment were grown nor within 2
kilometers thereof.

Signature... eee
Official title. = eee
‘ Date 222232 EE

Number and description of packages.
Distinguishing marks.

Description of living plants or parts thereof.
Stated to be grown at.

Exported by.

Name and address of consignee.

Name of vessel.

Date of shipment.

Port of landing in England or Wales.

THIRD SCHEDULE
FORM A

This form applies only to shipments from Belgium, France, Germany, Luxem-
burg, the Netherlands, and Switzerland.

FORM B
Certificate Required under License

In accordance with the authorization contained in the general license number
of the Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries of England and Wales, this is to
certify that the plants included in the package or consignment described
below have been examined and have been found to be of the following species

7 Strike out words not applicable.
1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 29

epemmmneer reremeeeeetes 205) a , and that the conditions prescribed in
the above general license have been complied with.
Syren Fegreree oie Sere pate es See ere
COR Cin itaiee set ery se ft as See T
Date: Ses) eters 6 tea 8 eee

Followed by description of shipment.

FouRTH SCHEDULE

This form applies to certain shipments of vegetables from France.

FIFTH SCHEDULE
CERTIFICATE REQUIRED FOR APPLES FROM UNITED STATES
*s

This is to certify that the raw apples included in the package or consign-
ment described below are of one of the following grades as recognized by the
Department of Agriculture of the United States of America.

“Ws. Lancy” “Extra Fancy”

SU recive: £° “Rancy”
NEP te eee ee Ie eee, Ee ee ee.
Giniciayaties- 7 | As Jd ek ee BS
Diet ote) PE = ANS 2a) 2 OUT ASS)

DESCRIPTION OF CONSIGNMENT

Number and nature of packages.
Distinguishing marks.

Variety of apples.

Name and address of consignee.
Name of vessel.

Date of shipment.

Port of shipment.

IMPORTATION OF ELM TREES AND CONIFERS PROHIBITED
[The Importation of Elm Trees and Conifers (Prohibition) Order, Oct. 24, 1933]

ARTICLE 1. This order shall come into operation December 1, 1933.

Arr. 2. (1) For the prevention of the introduction of diseases and pests
injurious to elm trees and forest trees, the landing in England and Wales from
any other country than Scotland, Northern Ireland, Ireland (Eire), the Isle of
Man, or the Channel Islands of any living plant of any of the genera men-
tioned in the schedule to this order is hereby prohibited.

(2) In this article “plant” includes tree and shrub, and the roots, layers,
cuttings, and other parts of a plant.

ArT. 3. The certificates prescribed in article 5 (1) of the importation of
plants order of 1939 shall, except in the ease of a consignment consisting
wholly of potatoes, include a statement to the effect that the consignment does
not contain any plant of any of the genera mentioned below.

All species of the genus Ulmus.

The following genera of the order Pinaceae: Abies, Larir, Picea, Pinus,
Pseudotsuga, Sequoia, Thuja, and Tsuga.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, SCOTLAND

Since the regulations under the importation of plants (Scotland) order of May
24, 1939, etc., are essentially identical with those under the importation of plants
order of May 16, 1939, and other orders of England, it is unnecessary even to
recapitulate them.

In the case of shipments of plant material intended for export to Scotland, the
original certificate should be mailed to the Department of Agriculture, York
Buildings, Queen Street, Edinburgh, 2, Scotland.

NorTe.—See suggestions to certifying inspectors, pages 3 and 4.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, NORTHERN IRELAND

Since the regulations under the importation of plants (Northern Ireland) order
of 1939, etc., are essentially identical with those under the importation of plants
30 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.—March

order of May 16, 1939, and with orders of England, it is not necessary even to
make a recapitulation of them.

In the case of shipments of plant material intended for export to Northern
Ireland, the original certificates should be mailed to the Ministry of Agriculture,
Stormont, Belfast, Northern Ireland.

Notry.—See suggestions to certifying inspectors, pages 3 and 4.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, THE STATES OF JERSEY
(CHANNEL ISLANDS)

Basic LEGISLATION
[Destructive Insects and Pests Acts, 1877 to 1927, of Great Britain]

SUMMARY
IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

Potatoes, Solanum tuberosum L.: Importation of varieties susceptible to attack
by the wart disease, Synchytrium endobioticum (Schilb.) Pere., from any source
is prohibited. (Act No. 34 of April 28, 1930, p. 17.)

Potatoes: Importation prohibited from Great Britain and Ireland of tubers
grown in any district in which wart disease is known to exist. (Act No. 31 of
April 28, 19380, p. 16.)

All products of the soil: Importation from the mainland of France prohibited
to prevent the introduction of the Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemli-
neata Say. (Act No. 38 of August 7, 1931.)

Peat of any kind, moss litter, and leaf mold from all sources, except the product
called “‘bacterized peat” from England and Scotland under certification as to its
character. (Act of April 6, 1935, p. 17.)

IMPORTATION RESTRICTED

The plant material listed in the first schedule of the act of April 5, 1933, may
be imported only when accompanied by a phytosanitary certificate in the form
prescribed in the third schedule. (See p. 16.)

Raw apples from the United States may be imported between July 7 and Novem-
ber 15 of each year only when accompanied by a grade certificate in the same
form as prescribed by England and Wales. (See p. 17.)

IMPORTATION UNRESTRICTED

Seeds and herbaceous or succulent-stemmed plants: Importation not restricted
by the act of April 5, 1933, except that the entry of seeds and plants from France
is prohibited by the act of August 7, 1931.

[General regulations under the Act of the Committee of Agriculture of April 28, 1930, as
amended by that of April 5, 1933]

IMPORT REQUIREMENTS

ARTICLE 1. The landing in the island of Jersey of any of the plants men-
tioned in the first schedule to this act from any country other than Great
Britain, Ireland, the Isle of Man, and the other Channel Islands, is pro-
hibited except in accordance with the following provisions:

AUTHORIZED PORT OF ENTRY

(a} The plants may be landed in the port of St. Helier only.

PHYTOSANITARY CERTIFICATE REQUIRED

(ob) Hach consignment must be accompanied by two copies of a certificate
issued by a duly authorized official in the country whence the plants are ex-
ported, in the form prescribed in the third schedule of the act. One copy
must be produced to the harbor master and the other copy must be forwarded
by the importer to the consignee. In the case of mail shipments a copy of
the certificate need not be produced to the harbor master, but a copy must be
affixed to each package. The original of the certificate must be mailed to the
Committee of Agriculture by the exporter before the plants are shipped.
1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS on

INSPECTION MAY BE REQUIRED

(c) The Committee reserves the right to cause any package or parcel con-
taining plants imported or believed to have been imported into the island to
be opened and examined whether or not the provisions of this act have been
complied with.

INSPECTION REQUIRED IN THE ABSENCE OF CERTIFICATES

(d) In the case of importations of plants from a country in which there
is no official duly authorized to issue the certificate mentioned above, and of
consignments which are not accompanied by the copy certificate required by
this act, and in the case of plants sent by mail to which such copies are not
attached, the plants shall be retained by the harbor master until such time
as the Committee of Agriculture shall have caused them to be examined.

PLANTS FOR SCIENTIFIC PURPOSES EXEMPT

ArT. 2. The provisions of this act do not apply to plants the landing of
which is authorized by a general or special license issued by the Committee
or to consignments of plants to the Committee for experimental or scientific
purposes.

SCHEDULE I

RESTRICTED PLANT MATERIAL

(a) All living plants with a persistent woody stem above ground, and parts
of the same except seeds, when for use in propagation, such as fruit trees,
stocks and stools, forest trees, and ornamental shrubs, and grafts, layers, and
cuttings thereof.

(b) All potatoes; and all tubers, bulbs, rhizomes, corms, and hop stocks
for planting.

(c) Seeds of onions and leeks for sowing.

(d) All unrooted cuttings and rooted plants of chrysanthemums.

SCHEDULE II

PLANT PARASITES

Fungi:
Black-knot of plum and cherry, Plowrightia morbosa (Schw.) Sace.
Fire blight of apple and pear, Bacillus amylovorus (Burr.) Trev.
Chestnut blight or canker, Hndothia parasitica (Murr.) And. and And.
Wart disease of potatoes, Synchytrium endobioticum (Schilb.) Pere.
Smut of onion and leek, Urocystis cepulae C. C. Frost.
Downy mildew of hops, Peronoplasmopara humuli, Miy. and Taka.

Insects:
Grape phylloxera, Phyllorera (vastatriz) vitifoliae (Planch.) Fitch.
An American apple capsid, Heterocordylus malinus Reut.
Apple redbug, Lygidea mendagz Reut.
Pear tingid, Stephanitis pyri Fab.
Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say.
Plum curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar (Hbst.).
Potato tuber worm, (Phthorimaea) Gnorimoschema operculella (Zell.).
Eastern tent caterpillar, Malacosoma americana (F.).
Forest tent caterpillar, Malacosoma disstria Hbn.
Oriental fruit moth, (Cydia) Grapholitha molesta (Busck).
San Jose scale, Aspidiotus perniciosus Comst.
White peach scale, (Diaspis) Aulacaspis pentagona (Targ.).
Apple fruitfly, Rhagoletis pomonella (Walsh).
European cherry fruitfly, Rhagoletis cerasi L.
Cherry fruitfly, Rhagoletis cingulata (Loew).
Black cherry fruitfly, Rhagoletis fausta O. S.
Currant fruitfly, Hpochra canadensis Loew.
Chrysanthemum gall midge, Diarthronomyia hypogaea Loew.

ScHEDULE III
PRESCRIBED INSPECTION CERTIFICATE

This is to certify that the plants included in the package or consignment de-
scribed below were thoroughly inspected by-------------------- , a duly author-
32 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.—March

izéd «ofticial of. 22. 2230 2 Sevag Neer: 4 Sea eee EY one( date) aes , and
were found or believed by him to be healthy and free from _ any
of the plant diseases or pests named in the second schedule to the act of
the Committee of Agriculture of the States of Jersey of April 28, 1930.

It is understood that all cuttings and rooted plants of chrysanthemums
imported from abroad must be accompanied by the certificate prescribed in
this Schedule.

ADDITIONAL CERTIFICATE FOR POTATOES

Further, it is hereby certified that no case of the disease known as wart
disease or black scab of potatoes (Synchytrium endobioticum) has occurred
on the farm or holding where the potatoes included in this consignment were
grown, nor within 500 yards (about % kilometer) thereof.

Signatures: 222 a eee

Description of Shipment

Number and kind of packages.

Marks.

Description of plants.

Grown at.

Name and address of exporter.
Name and address of consignee.
Name of vessel.

Date of shipment.

Port of shipment.

Port of landing.

Approximate date of landing.

SPECIAL QUARANTINES
RESTRICTIONS ON THE IMPORTATION OF POTATOES

Potatoes from all sources except Great Britain and Ireland: The act of
the Committee of Agriculture, No. 34, of April 28, 1980, prohibits the importa-
tion of potatoes susceptible to the wart disease, Synchytrium endobioticum,
from whatever source. This is based upon the official list of varieties of po-
tatoes, with their synonyms, immune from and susceptible to wart disease,
published under the authority of the National Institute of Agricultural Botany,
in England.

GRADING REQUIRED OF APPLES FROM THE UNITED STATES

As applying to the Channel Islands, the act of the Committee of Agricul-
ture, No. 35, of July 24, 1930, places the same restrictions upon the importa-
tion of apples from the United States as are imposed by the “Importation of
raw apples order of June 21, 1930, of England and Wales” (see pp. 8 and 10).

IMPORTATION OF PEAT PROHIBITED

The act of the Committee of Agriculture of April 6, 1935, prohibits the im-
portation of peat of any kind, moss litter, and leaf mold from all sources,
except the product called ‘“‘bacterized peat” from England and Scotland, under
certification as to its character.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, STATES OF THE ISLAND OF
GUERNSEY

BAstc LEGISLATION
[Destructive Insects and Pests Acts, 1877 to 1927, of Great Britain]
SUMMARY
IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

Potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.) : Importation from United States, Canada,
European France, and Huropean Belgium prohibited to prevent the introduction
of the Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say). (Ordinanee
No. IX, February 15, 1936, art. 3, p. 20.)
1940} SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 33

Agricultural and horticultural products of the soil (including seeds and plants,
fruits, and vegetables) : Importation directly or indirectly from Belgium and
France prohibited, to prevent the introduction of the Colorado potato beetle
(Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say). (Ordinance No. XXIV, August 31, 1931, as
supplemented by Ordinance No. III, January 20, 1936.)

Plants of sugar beet and mangold (Seta vulgaris L.) : Importation prohibited
from any country except Great Britain and Northern Ireland, Irish Free State,
Isle of Man, Island of Jersey, Island of Alderney, or any other of the Islands,
to prevent the introduction of virus diseases of those plants. (Ordinance No.
IX, February 15, 1936, art. 4, p. 21.)

Cider apples grown in European France or European Belgium: Importation
into Guernsey prohibited. (Ordinance IX, art. 7 (2).)

Grapevines (Vitis spp.) : Importation prohibited of grapevines and stocks,
cuttings, and scions thereof: Provided, that any person desiring to introduce a
new variety of grape into Guernsey may apply to the Royal Court for a permit.
The court may authorize importation under prescribed conditions. Precaution
against the phylloxera of grapevines. (Ordinance of September 30, 1935, p. 21.)

Gooseberry (Ribes spp.) : Importation of gooseberry bushes and cuttings pro-
hibited in any manner or by any route, to prevent the introduction of gooseberry
mildew (Sphaerotheca mors-uvae (Schw.) Berk & Curt.). (Ordinance No. XIV,
October 5, 1931.)

IMPORTATION RESTRICTED

All living plants and parts thereof (except seeds) for planting, except those
which are prohibited, as indicated above: Phytosanitary certificate required in
prescribed form issued by competent authority of country of origin. (See the
First and Second Schedules.) (Ordinance No. IX, 1936, art. 5, p. 21.)

Vegetables not grown in EHuropean France or European Belgium: Landing pro-
hibited unless each shipment is accompanied by a certificate of origin visaed
by a competent authority of the country of origin, indicating country and
place where the produce was grown. (Ordinance IX, February 15, 1936, art.
6 (2).

Gooseberry (Ribes spp.) : Lawful for the Administrative Council of the States
of Guernsey to permit the importation of gooseberry bushes and cuttings from
the United Kingdom if accompanied by a certificate of origin declaring that
gooseberry mildew (Sphaerotheca mors-uvae (Schw.) Berk & Curt.) does not
exist in the place where they were grown. (Ordinance No. XIV, October
5, 1931.)

Apples from the United States: When accompanied by prescribed grade
certificate. (See p. 22.)

IMPORTATION UNRESTRICTED

Seeds from all sources, except from France and Belgium: (Ordinance IX,
art. 5 (1), and the First Schedule. See pp. 21 and 22.)

GENERAL REGULATIONS
[Ordinance IX, February 15, 1936, of the Royal Court of Guernsey]
DEFINITIONS

ARTICLE 1. In these regulations, unless the context otherwise requires:

“Board” means the Board of Administration of the States of Island of
Guernsey.

“Tslands” means the islands of Guernsey, Sark, Herm, and Jethou.

“Plant” in the case of sugar beet and mangold includes living plants and
parts thereof except seeds, and in all other cases includes tree and shrub, and
the fruit, seeds, tubers, bulbs, corms, rhizomes, roots, layers, cuttings, and other
parts of a plant.

“Raw vegetables” includes raw onions, raw tomatoes, raw eggplants, and
raw salads.

“Unhealthy” means affected with any insect, fungus, or other pest destructive
to agricultural or horticultural crops.

APPLICATION OF THE REGULATIONS

ArT. 2. Nothing in these regulations shall be deemed to prohibit or restrict
the landing or transshipment in the islands or any of them of any plant or
34 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.—March

produce (other than potatoes) grown in the United Kingdom of Great Britain
and Northern Ireland, the Irish Free State, the Isle of Man, the island of Jersey,
or the island of Alderney, or in any other of the islands.

POTATO RESTRICTIONS

ArT. 38. (1) The landing in the islands of any potatoes grown in the under-
mentioned countries is prohibited:

The United States of America, the Dominion of Canada, European France, and
European Belgium.

(2) The transshipment in the islands or any of them of the potatoes specified
in subsection (1) of this article is prohibited except under and in accordance
with the conditions of a license issued by the Board.

(3) In this article “potatoes” includes haulms, leaves, and stalks.

IMPORTATION OF SUGAR BEET AND MANGOLD PROHIBITED

Art. 4. For the prevention of the introduction of virus diseases of sugar
beet and mangolds, the landing in the islands or any of them from any country
other than the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, the
Irish Free State, the Isle of Man, the island of Jersey, the island of Alderney.
or any other of the islands, of any living plant of sugar beet or mangold
(Beta vulgaris L.) is hereby prohibited except under and in accordance with
the conditions of a license issued by the Board.

PHYTOSANITARY CERTIFICATE REQUIRED FOR PLANTS

ArT. 5. (1) The landing in the islands or any of them of any of the plants
mentioned in the first schedule to these regulations, and of potatoes (other
than potatoes grown in any other of the islands) is hereby prohibited, unless
such consignment is accompanied by two copies of a certificate of a duly
authorized official of the Phytopathological Service of the country in which
the plants or potatoes were grown, in the form prescribed in the second
schedule to these regulations. The inspection referred to in the certificate
shall be carried out not more than 14 days prior to the date of shipment. The
original of the certificate shall be mailed by the exporter to the States Super-
visor, States Office, Guernsey, before the plants or potatoes are despatched.
Except in the case of shipments imported by mail, a copy of the certificate
shall be delivered to a Guernsey customs officer at the same time as and to-
gether with the entry relating to the shipment. In the case of shipments
imported by mail, a copy of the certificate shall be affixed to each package.

RESTRICTIONS ON THE IMPORTATION OF RAW VEGETABLES

ArT. 6. (1) The landing in the islands of any raw vegetables grown in
HKuropean France or European Belgium is prohibited,

(2) The landing in the islands of any raw vegetables not grown in European
France or Huropean Belgium is hereby prohibited unless each consignment
is accompanied by a certificate of origin visaed by a competent authority in
the country of origin, indicating the country and place where the produce
was grown. The certificates prescribed in this article shall be delivered to
a Guernsey customs officer at the same time and together with the entry
relating to the consignments.

(3) Nothing contained in this article shall be deemed to permit the landing
or transshipment in the islands of any potatoes of which the landing or trans-
shipment is prohibited or restricted under article 38.

RESTRICTIONS ON THE IMPORTATION OF RAW APPLES

ArT. 7. (1) The landing in the islands or any of them of any cider apples
grown in any European country other than France or Belgium is hereby pro-
hibited unless accompanied by a certificate of origin visaed by a competent
authority of the country of origin, indicating the country and the place where
the apples were grown.

(2) The landing in the islands or any of them of any cider apples grown
in European France or European Belgium is hereby prohibited.
1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 30

(3) The landing in the islands or any of them between July 7 and Novem-
ber 15 in any year of any raw apples grown in the United States of America is
hereby prohibited unless each consignment is accompanied by a certificate
signed by a duly authorized inspector of the Federal Department of Agriculture
in the prescribed form. (See pp. 8 and 10 of this circular.)

(4) The certificates prescribed in this article shall be delivered to a Guernsey
customs officer at the same time and together with the entry relating to the
consignment.

ArT. 8. Prescribes the procedure in the event that plants and plant products
are landed in the islands in contravention of these regulations.

ArT. 9. Defines the powers of an inspector, and the remaining regulations do
not concern the exporter.

First SCHEDULE
All plants and parts thereof (except seeds) for planting.

SECOND SCHEDULE

This is to.certify that the living plants/a representative sample of the living
plants*® included in the consignment of which particulars are given below
were/was* thoroughly examined on (date) by (name of inspector), a duly
authorized official of the (name of the plant protection organization), and found
to be healthy, no evidence of the presence of any insect, fungus, or pest destruc-
tive to horticultural crops having been found in them.

The following additional certificate must be furnished for all potatoes:

It is further certified that no case of the disease known as “wart disease”
or “black scab” of potatoes (Synchytrium endobioticum) has occurred at any
time on the farm or holding where the potatoes included in the consignment
were grown nor within 2 kilometers thereof.

The following additional certificate must be furnished in the case of every
consignment not consisting wholly of potatoes:

It is further certified that the consignment does not contain any plant of
sugar beet or mangold.

Wietia tes 2 = ee nn ee
Offietal ditions. 20 en ee

Number and description of packages.
Distinguishing marks.

Description of living plants or parts thereof.
Stated to be grown at.

Name and address of exporter.

Name and address of consignee.

IMPORTATION OF GRAPEVINES PROHIBITED
[Ordinance of September 30, 1895, relating to the grapevine phylloxera]

ARTICLE 1. The importation of grapevines, stocks, cuttings, or Scions thereof
into Guernsey is prohibited under penalty of their confiscation and immediate
destruction and a fine imposed upon importer, consignee, or possessor of such
plants.

PROVISIONS FOR INTRODUCTION OF NEW VARIETIES

ART. 2. However, any person desiring to introduce a new variety of grape
into Guernsey may apply to the Royal Court for a permit. That Court may
authorize the importation of scions of the new variety, in the quantity de-
termined by the Court, in hermetically’ closed boxes consigned to a person
designated by the Court for inspection and cleaning at the expense of the im-
porter, before delivery to the latter. Diseased scions will be destroyed.



® Omit what is not applicable.
36 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.—March

B. E. P. Q. 471, Supplement No. 2.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, UNION OF SOUTH AFRICA

FEBRUARY 23, 1940.
- RESTRICTIONS ON THE IMPORTATION OF POTATOES

By proclamation No. 155 the Governor-General of the Union of South Africa
has amended the Schedule of Proclamation No. 286 of 19386 by the insertion of
the following paragraph:

“(c) A certificate from the Department of Agriculture of the declared coun-
try of origin, or a certificate from some official institution in that country
which the Minister has agreed to recognize, stating that the crop from which
the potatoes were derived was officially inspected in the field and that the
degree of freedom from virus diseases was sufficiently high to ensure the suit-
ability of the progeny for seed purposes, and stating further that the said
crop was not grown in the vicinity of any unhealthy potato crops or other
plants infected with potato virus diseases.”

Effective February 1, 1940.

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

PENALTIES IMPOSED FOR VIOLATIONS OF THE
PLANT QUARANTINE ACT

QUARANTINES AFFECTING MEXICAN PRODUCTS

In the case of the United States versus the persons listed below, for attempting
to smuggle in contraband plant material, the penalties indicated were imposed
by the United States customs officials at the following ports:





Name Port Contraband Penalty
CoiMartinez ee s225 2 ee ee San Ysidro, Calif______ 2 avocad0S2.= 2. 2 ee eee $1. 00
IMTS Vee Vie SCO tt eee eee | oe Gots. Sean ees SLCACEUSED LAME See 1. 00
MirsSeARn@ nists: ee eee Brownsville, Tex_____- 300 chrysanthemus and 2 floral wreaths. 5. 00
IDA vad eG One 7 ed ene Ws snes wei | he ek One ee Ea eee 29 SUAVAS2 22 25522 Oe ee ee 1. 00
INMiariavINig | anes secs Sera cen eee eon | ry aes GOERS ea ae Ss OLanses and le pear a eee 1.00
SEVIS LE G27. Ci ae eee ee | Ra GOSS eta aes | L OFange--_ 22.2 + a ee 1. 00
SDETLT SAV AT 2 rr merece | Go: at a ae S" kimamey: sols thecs ss ee ee 1.00
ein Rey GOES eae ee Ds plant. 2c. 222 hs ee 1. 00
Via eis IN aj eee eee | ae GO See eet singe 4 MANGOES 2s = -2<-8 ee ee 1. 00
EVO SIN UIC OS tree Mima eats a geemes etaee Ot eee 3 Mangoes. sh 2 ca, AS) See eee 1.00
Carolina 17 ee Eagle Pass, Tex_______ 4 guavas and 4 cherimoyas_-_-_________- 1.00
IBATCOLO MES PIMOS cepa | Mace GO aaa eee ee 2O0fangesc: -=-- 2. eee 1. 00
ID PMS (CronmnelyA COS 8 eee eX I Oran S623. 2 2 eee 1. 00
JuangPerez= fs 42 2k es ae a ee ee Se GOS AE SUL RR S| EES GO=:SR A= at eieeds hae 1.00
GilbertopBenavidess= ssaa samen poe GOL eee rake eee 2OLTANSCS =< os ke eee 1. 00
JOsel Ou ase oe ee ee en ees GOSS ae kes Soe @ OLANGES ok. wl Sa ee 1. 00
C@Jaravenermaid ez maaan |e Gonsts. fa Selita 22 plantss:= 2 3 ee 1. 00
Temacio we vicsteees = emilee ese | aa (0 Ko) tee ee 1 plante=2.5..4 2236 2 1.00:
Maria Luisa Gonzales_________- IBIAP aso, Ube 4 bull bs_262!2 292021 wae. eee 1. 00
RamongheeNaviane zeae see | pee GOs ss Soh ae 5 AVOCA OSE a2) a= oe Se eee 1. 00
TRAE Min eres Sa On tine orl | cee GOS Sie See Iplant: 202 ee ee 1.00
WGeSRVOY SINT ST ae ee ea ee | doe eee IWaviocadosi: 4.2: eee ee 1. 00°
IMEaTCIAliS aCe 7 mene anne nennel eer CO a eres 4 plantsiand:2|sapotes== = . 70
‘Rhomas Martinez sen eeee Hidal20; ING eee se 2:aN ples. . 220 ee 1.00
Marianosvianez? 22) ns Seen Seah dor ake ee |e Of Se aie Ue er 1. 00
HAUICTAN OR G.AT:Z een on | as Ee Se ce 3-avocad 0S: 2. 22 ee 1. 00
Simona, Sandijoesass) ee ee GOs sek eee ree ORS: LAVOCRE O22. soe. re 1. 00
Hlorentinoyared Osea aan an | ns COS SO QuMNaANgoese 2. Le SLs. Lee 1. 00
Julio*ReynalS 6 = aa See ee eee dose A ee Pmango- S34 a. eee eee 1. 00
HShebanehvaminez seesee eee s(n downr Al) 2mMangoes:.. ees ee ee ee 1. 00
AcE aTtine7 ah 5. Niele aye aoe, | ays GO: Sey 2 2 ee G0v) ceki he eeeee 1. 00
RALAe eR OLLGS eee ee WaredOwlexs= ae 4 jobo plums, 2 haw apples, 3 guavas, 5. 00

3 sweet limes, 1 orange, 2 tangerines,
14 lb. green orange leaves.

1D) OLORES WRC ys11 a ee eee | eee GOS ea Sa Wplant. 26-6222 2 eee 1.00
Mrs. Ricarda Llanas_._____-___- fat Ole ee ee 2 plants 3 eee a 1. 00
Dolores Montenegro_____-_-----|_---- doe ae ae 5cactus plantsi22220 3 2 See 1.00
© Kenne seo as et, Rs | ee doe = ae AnlantS 2 oe eee eee 1. 00
IVT Se AMG OMLOMVIO] [Omer | eee G0i45. 82 ee 2:cherimoyas.i=:..2 228. eee 1.00
UO a IMA yAL I doe ee eee BrStallkciSU@ancan ene ese nee 1. 00
Ee GOn7 a) Oza: a Ee ee dome ee ae 4 joints sugarcane and 5 plants__------ 1.00
RenevEre vino = cess. oo eee ee Goma a Sistalksisucancaness-2 eee eee 1.00
1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS of



Name Port Contraband Penalty
Laredo, Tex
Mirssaames Risso..--_=---....-|_..-- Oe Sees ee Lest ayme 2e e Oe tee)) ee ee Se 11.
eemeee aT es i ae U5) a ee eee ee L
DonaldiGapberb--=-----.----=-_|=.--- GON. ooo 58 HIST APOIO bere oe oe ae eke, eee ee fe
A Sem eR EROS ee ee | ok GO 3 ee. _ Lepaant oer ee oe a ee le
Mrs. Taylor E. Newman-------.|----- dos. See. SF DAL ATIS CHINGS arte oe ee oes eA if
Miss Clotilde Newman_______--]____- Gow a See eae La es Ss a gl, ie
BEGG SON GL Chee ee dpe ee _ [plates 2 eee eee eee eee ee 1
Vrs; Remana .Wlores=-_.......-_|_--.. 010). ek eee PAOLATI SES Seen es eee eee ad ee if
ranciseo Guiterrez__------....|_-_-- Cores Ven abe = LOLA OSs Soe ee Se Ae eee ee Lyne 1;
ARON) rie COs i ODATA CSc tgs a Sk a eg Ae
Johnne7mekermane® = - 5 = = |a- 8 Gols: 29 25 es 22 jgorance ts 5 3: Wj A Fe § £ eee A
po aoneViNngtele 2. - 8k ooo Monee ae. ae AV OCAUOS = eats ae a ee ee Meee ie
Salvador Capetillo___-..--.2222.|__-.- dom 25 Fy i385. 3 4 oranges, 10 plants, 3 avocados____--_-_- fe
ins wd welwassatete. oo | GO Eiea tae. AAV OCAGO Smite oe ees wees ein dees sO oS 12
WIONPIVIanANeZ sess eee (6 (0) ee = a DIOTAN GES ee et ke ee ee ee ee | fe
1D). lO COs Oie = ee OQ =aete = See: oe 1 orange and 2 apples__________________ 1.
Mirsbipaes INChOlas=—.-—- ._.-.|2._.- do ee. 7 plants, 1% lb. tree seed, and % lb. 1
seed cotton.
Cunaaope nioss-—-2---..----..|-...- Gos A. ye Lisplantss2t: 2 Meena ees i?
ie); Ch onl) =. es 0-2. eee. ee Liplant. Sasst > Seeec tebe BS pies ele i;
Ne COO Der ee et GQEe =. eee ee 3 apples and 5 oranges__....._.__.___.- Le
Waicrina Gallegos--_-.--.-=--=.=|_-_.- MOS ware ee WAN OCAD OEE et mee was eer ete | nee IF
Mrs. Maria Esguivel___..---.-_|____- Gor 2. ee ae 18 plants. 22! eee SEIS PN 1.
Mins EeAVidINOZ 255-2 -22.2--|---=- Gon! as ee ae 1 mango seed and 1 orange____________ 1.
iVMariesRodemaker.—-_.:.....-.|-.--< os ee. ee POF AN LCS £2 a ee ee a
IMG By yl Lob Se ee Qt & See Ve ATNANE OCS sas e2 ke Lee. eee ee eee di
DV EATAS AV ALC 7a ea 8 a tls Aa GOLY. 2. 3 Gplants Bisel) ee». Pee 3
Ve Vda de:;Zutuches..--..% _|-.=.- (MO! 55 2_- k ee Zi OTAM ECS»: ap A 8 RP oe a 1,
TS OSA Ollero..-_-...--- | .__— Gore ee ae iorance and 2 plantse-=- se ee ¥.

SSSSSSSSSSS SSSSSSSSSSSSSESSES
ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY
AND PLANT QUARANTINE

_ Lee A. Strone, Chief.

S. A. ROHWER, Assistant Chief.

Avery 8S. Hoyt, Assistant Chief.

P. N. ANNAND, Assistant Chief.

K.. H. SPENCER, Business Manager.

Roya P. CURRIE, Lditor.

MABEL COoLcorD, Librarian.

J. A. HysLop, in Charge, Division of Insect Pest Survey and Information.

J. I. HAMBLETON, in Charge, Division of Bee Culture Investigations.

D. L. VAN DINE, in Charge, Division of Fruit Insect Investigations.

F. C. CRAIGHEAD, in Charge, Division of Forest Insect Investigations.

W. H. WHITE, in Charge, Division of Truck Crop and Garden Insect Investiga-

tions.

M. PACKARD, in Charge, Division of Cereal and Forage Insect Investigations.

W. HARNED, in Charge, Division of Cotton Insect Investigations.

. C. BisHopp, in Charge, Division of Insects Affecting Man and Animals.

A. HAWKINS, in Charge, Division of Control Investigations.

C. Roark, in Charge, Division of Insecticides and Fungicides.

F. W. MUESEBECK, in Charge, Division of Insect Identification.

P. CLAUSEN, in Charge, Division of Foreign Parasite Introduction.

B. FRACKER, in Charge, Division of Plant Disease Control.

B. M. GADDIS, in Charge, Division of Domestic Plant Quarantines.

BE. R. Sasscer, in Charge, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines.

A. F. Burcess, in Field Charge, Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail Moth Control
(headquarters, Greenfield, Mass.).

BE. G. Brewer, in Field Charge, Japanese Beetle and Gypsy Moth and Brown-
Tail Moth Quarantines, European Corn Borer Certification, and Dutch Elm
Disease Eradication (headquarters, Bloomfield, N. J.).

R. BE. McDONALD, in Field Charge, Pink Bollworm and Thurberia Weevil Quar-
antines (headquarters, San Antonio, Tez.).

P. A. Homwate, in Field Charge, Mexican Fruitfiy Quarantine (headquarters
Harlingen, Tea.).

A. C. Baxer, in Field Charge, Fruitfly Investigations (headquarters, Mexico
City, Mewico.).

38

NOOO

U.S. GOVERNMEINT PRINTING OFFICE: 1940
S. R. A.B. E. P. Q. No. 143 Issued September 1940

United States Department of Agriculture

BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS

APRIL-JUNE 1940

CONTENTS
Page
Memmmnte and oper 6facial aTinouncements/_- _+2--- -__=--_-22-_-_- --J-2- 39
AMMBMnceImennrelaiim= tO cofiee quarantine (No, 73)2~-__--.-:----=____--=-_--/.-.-..2-2--_..2 39
iMaieitGeuLoOreallectorsiol Customs (1. ID: (50129) ee Se et 39
Announcement relating to fruit and vegetable quarantine (No. 56)_-----_-__-___-_-_____-_-_____- 40
factucnous Locouectors ot customs: (TD: 5016). a -- —2-2 one a ze seu see 2 - === =--=--=-21 40
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (No. 48)__-___-_-_________________________ 40
Japanese beetle quarantine continued—Extensions of area announced as of April 5, 1940____- 40
Seneca (uaratrine eontinued. =)! _ Se 2e1 22) AA so sk Sea Th ae 41
Modifications of Japanese beetle quarantine regulations (amendment No. 2, effective April 5,
ee 42
Notice to general public through HeWSbapelstr see. 224s ia ee ee ea 51
List of true bulbs, corms, and tubers exempted from Japanese beetle certification (B. E.
RM) ee Be ee ee ee ee 51
Quarantine restrictions on Japanese beetle modified _:--~___-___.__--.___-___--__-__-.-__.-- 52
Modifications of Japanese beetle quarantine regulations (amendment No. 3, effective May
ict ee nnn een 8 ob ee eS ee a SS 2 ee ee 555 Ba Sa aw 52
Noticenoxeneralipublice through. neyspapers._-- -=.-:.---- =. .-2.-+-2-—-=_-saen---- == 55
Administrative instructions to inspectors on the treatment of nursery products, fruits,
vegetables, and soil for the Japanese beetle (B. E. P. Q. 499, supplement No. 2)________ 56
Order amending Section 301.48-5, Chapter III, Title 7, Code of Federal Regulations,
and modifying the Japanese beetle qua” antine regulations as to shipments of fruits
and vegetables from certain areas in Virginia (B. = PQ) 500) 2h: See Bees! avis 57
Announcement relating fermi: bollyormiquarantine (N0O.52).. 28. --< 325-5. 21 Pe a . 57
Administrative instructions relating to pink bellworm Were ate eee the treatment
requirements as to cotton linters, cottonseed hulls, cake, and meal and extending the area

in which baled cotton lint may be moved from certain lightly infested areas in New Mexico

nigulexaswwaAnhout treatment (B.E. P,Q. 493, .revised)2.. 2-2. 2222 cs ae ee 57

Announcements relating to white-fringed beetle quarantine COINIO 02) pe ae eee a 58
Administrative instructions—Removal of white-fringed beetle certification requirements
until February 1, 1941, for specified articles consigned from designated portions of the

LPL NeaeTanstes or) ne). 48), lith TeVISION) 4-22 See 58

BERPNMAINATRUOSTOSUIMASHOLS = — 2+ = ee 8 of Se ae oe 2 ee eS 59

Poaaminalanseesionotpiants and plant products.....-..-2.2-24-2ib2 22 ea 59

Chanre or pian anspection place in Arizona_:__._........_.---_-----.---_+ +... LSA Me es 59

ISS TET eieiS Tn a2 0 es ee ee ee oe ee eS 60
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Cuba (P. Q. C. A. 283, rev ised, supplement

Inner ns napa nn ee ne ars a a a ee 60
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Kingdom of Egypt (B. E.P, Q. 375, revised, supple-

Tica nian emer en eree. hes SY ts) v2 Pee Be eel ee FEAR se eee ee Fat 60
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Mexico (B. E. P. 2 a supplement No. 2)_ 61
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Paraguay (B. . Q. 502, supplement

JI... teh est fe 3 RE ee en se ee ee ee ee ae ee ee ae 61

Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act__________________________________- 62
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine____________________________-______ 64

QUARANTINE AND OTHER OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS

ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO COFFEE QUARANTINE (NO. 73)
INSTRUCTIONS TO COLLECTORS OF CUSTOMS

PLANT QUARANTINE ACT—COFFEE QUARANTINE—NOTICE OF QUARANTINE No. 73,
PROHIBITING IMPORTATION INTO PUERTO RICO OF COMMERCIAL SHIPMENTS OF
UNROASTED SEEDS OR BEANS OF COFFEE, COFFEE FRUITS OR BERRIES, AND COFFEE
PLANTS AND LEAVES (T. D. 50129)

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONER OF CUSTOMS,
Washington, D. C., April 10, 1940.

T'o Collectors of Customs and Others Concerned:

The appended copy of B. E. P. Q. 73, Notice of Quarantine No. 73 (Coffee
Quarantine), effective April 1, 1940, prohibits the importation into the Island of

251222—40——-1 oo
AQ BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

Puerto Rico from ali foreign countries and localities of commercial shipments
of unroasted seeds or beans of coffee, coffee fruits or berries, and coffee plants
and leaves, to guard against the entry of the coffee berry borer and the coffee
rust.

The number of this Treasury decision should be inserted as a marginal refer-
ence opposite articles 578 (6) (1) and 579 (a), Customs Regulations of 1937.

By direction of the Commissioner:

W. R. JOHNSON,
Deputy Commissioner of Customs.

(Then follows the text of the quarantine.)

ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO FRUIT AND VEGETABLE QUARAN-

TINE (NO. 56)
INSTRUCTIONS TO COLLECTORS OF CUSTOMS

PLANT QUARANTINE AOCT—FRUIT AND VEGETABLE QUARANTINE—CITRUS FRUIT
FRoM MEXIcOo IN TRANSIT TO FOREIGN COUNTRIES VIA THD UNITED STATES (T. D.
50161)

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,
OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONER OF CUSTOMS,
Washington, D. C., May 31, 19:40.

To Collectors of Customs and Others Concerned: ,

The appended copy of B. H. P. Q. Circular No. 507, entitled “Administrative
Instructions; Citrus Fruit from Mexico in Transit to Foreign Countries via
the United States” issued by the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant
Quarantine, United States Department of Agriculture, effective January 24, 1940,
is published for the information and guidance of customs officers and others
concerned. This circular supersedes P. Q. C. A. 305, Revised, which was not
published as a Treasury decision.

The humber of this Treasury decision should be inserted as a marginal refer-
ence opposite articles 578 (a) and (b) (1), and 579 (a), Customs Regulations
of 1937.

By direction of the Commissioner:

W. R. JOHNSON,
Deputy Commissioner of Customs.

(Then follows the text of the circular.)

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE
(NO. 48)

JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE CONTINUED—EXTENSIONS OF AREA ANNOUNCED
AS OF APRIL 5, 1940
APRIL 5, 1940.

After careful consideration of information developed at the public conference
held in Washington on February 27, 1940, with respect to the Federal Japanese
beetle quarantine, the Secretary of Agriculture has signed a revision of the
quarantine, effective April 5. Some additional territory is being brought under
the quarantine. The additions are as follows:

Maryland—All of Caroline, Harford, and Talbot Counties not heretofore
under regulation; election districts Nos. 4, 7, and 10 in Baltimore County; the
city of Westminster, and the election districts of Mount Airy (No. 138), Taney-
town (No. 1), and Uniontown (No. 2), in Carroll County, election district of
Woodville (No. 18), in Frederick County; election district of Funkstown (No.
10) in Washington County; election district of Sharptown (No. 10) in Wicomico
County.

New York—Erwin Township in Steuben County.

Ohio—Entire Counties of Belmont, Guernsey, Medina, Wayne, and the town-
ships of Kirtland, Mentor, and Willoughby, and the villages of Kirtland Hills,
1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 41

Lakeline, Mentor, Mentor-on-the-Lake, Waite Hill, Wickliffe, Willoughby, and
Willowick, in Lake County.

Pennsylvania—All of Clarion County not heretofore under regulation; the
townships of Millcreek, Erie, Wayne, and the borough of Corry in Erie County,
placing Erie and Corry under regulation as isolated points; all of Venango
County except the townships of Allegheny, Canal, Cherrytree, Clinton, Irwin,
Jackson, Mineral, Oakland, Oilcreek, Plum, Scrubgrass, and Victory, and the
boroughs of Clintonville, Cooperstown, and Pleasantville.

West Virginia.—All of Brooke County and all of Jefferson County not here-
tofore under regulation; districts of Lubeck and Tygart in Wood County and the
city of Charleston, the latter as an isolated point. Wheeling is brought
within the main regulated area.

The special area from which the movement of fruits and vegetables by motor-
truck or refrigerator car is inspected has been extended to New York City
and surrounding area and additional territory as specified in the quarantine
regulations. Since the effective date of this change does not take place until
later the particulars are not being included in this advance notice.

Shippers of fruits and vegetables from a designated area in southern Virginia
will find that the season during which certification is required for such pro-
duce has been advanced to begin with June 1. In all other regulated areas
the season remains the same as heretofore—from June 15 to October 15,
inclusive.

Christmas trees and other parts of plants without roots and soil-free are
exempted from the certification requirements except that the certificate is still
required in shipping cut flowers from June 15 to October 15, inclusive.

It is anticipated that within a few days revised copies of Quarantine No. 48
will be available in order that you may become familiar with all provisions
contained therein. This is intended to serve in the meantime for those who
need this information more promptly than the full text of the quarantine as
revised can be made available.



LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE CONTINUED

WASHINGTON, D. C., April 5.

Secretary of Agriculture Henry A. Wallace today signed an order calling
for the continuance of the Federal Japanese beetle quarantine under the super-
vision of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine. The same order
enlarges the regulated area which goes under quarantine today (April 5).

At a public conference in Washington, February 27, 1940, representatives
of nurserymen and plant-quarantine officials from 18 States and Canada discussed
the advisability of revoking the Federal quarantine. With one exception, all
favored its continuance.

- Officials of the Bureau said the regulated area will be extended to include
all of Caroline, Harford, and Talbot Counties, and some additional townships,
Carroll, Frederick, Washington, and Wicomico Counties, and Baltimore, all
in Maryland; all of Belmont, Guernsey, Medina, Wayne, and a part of Lake
Counties in Ohio; all of Clarion, and parts of Venango and Hrie Counties in
Pennsylvania; all of Brooke and Jefferson and part of Wood Counties in West
Virginia ; Erwin Township in Steuben County, New York. The newly added area
also includes the outlying cities of Corry and Erie, Pa., and Charleston, W. Va.

The special area from which the movement of fruits and vegetables by
motortruck or refrigerator car is inspected has been extended to New York City
and surrounding area including the town of Greenwich, in Fairfield County,
Conn., and more area in Maryland, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania.

Shippers of fruits and vegetables from a designated area in southern Virginia
will find that the season during which certification is required for such
produce has been advanced to begin with June 1. In all other regulated
areas the season remains the same as heretofore—from June 15 to October
15, inclusive.

Christmas trees and other parts of plants without roots and soil-free are
exempted from the certification requirements except that the certificate is
still required in shipping cut flowers from June 15 to October 15, inclusive.
4? BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

MODIFICATIONS OF JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE REGULATIONS

INTRODUCTORY NOTE

Extensions of the regulated areas in Maryland, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania,
and West Virginia are made in the following revision of regulation 3. In Mary-
land, the entire counties of Caroline, Harford, and Talbot are brought under regu-
lation, and minor extensions have been made in the counties of Baltimore, Carroll,
Frederick, Washington, and Wicomico. In New York, but one community is
added, Erwin Township in Steuben County. The newly added Ohio area in-
cludes the entire counties of Belmont, Guernsey, Medina, Wayne, and part of
Lake County. The area in Pennsylvania has been extended to all of Clarion
County and parts of Venango and Erie Counties, placing Corry and Erie under
regulation as isolated points. West Virginia extensions include Brooke County,
the whole of Jefferson County, area in Wood County, and the city of Charleston,
the latter as an isolated point. Wheeling is brought within the main regulated
area,

Under regulation 5, the special area from which the movement of fruits and
vegetables by motortruck or refrigerator car is regulated has been extended to
New York City and surrounding area, including one town in Connecticut, as well
as additional area in Maryland, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania.

The season during which fruits and vegetables are required to be certified when.
shipped from the regulated area remains the same as heretofore, from June 15 to
October 15, except that in the case of a small area in Virginia, designated in sub-
section (A) of regulation 5, certification is required beginning June 1. ;

Certification requirements are lifted as to portions of plants without roots and
free from soil, such as branches, twigs, and Christmas trees, and also as to soil-
free, dried roots incapable of propagation and appropriately labeled. The cer-
tification requirements remain in effect as to cut flowers shipped from June 15
to October 15, inclusive. Plants of trailing arbutus, heretofore exempted part of
the year when shipped without primary roots and soil-free, are now exempt from.
certification from October 16 to June 14, provided they are soil-free.

AVERY S. Hoyt,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Piant Quarantine.

AMENDMENT NO 2 TO THE RULES AND REGULATIONS (SEVENTEENTH REVISION):
SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 48

[Approved April 4, 1940; effective April 5, 1940]

Under authority conferred by the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912 (387
Stat. 315), as amended by the act of Congress approved March 4, 1917 (39) Stat.
1124, 1165), it is ordered that regulations 3, 5, and 6 (secs. 301.483, 5, and 6) of
the rules and regulations (seventeenth revision) supplemental to Notice of Quar-
antine No. 48 (sec. 301.48) on account of the Japanese beetle, which were promul-
gated February 16, 1939, as amended, are hereby further amended to read as
follows:

REGULATION 3

Sec, 301.48-38. Regulated areas.—In accordance with the provisos to Notice of
Quarantine No. 48 (twelfth revision) (sec. 301.48), the Secretary of Agriculture
designates as regulated areas for the purpose of these regulations the States, Dis-
trict, counties, townships, towns, cities, election districts, and magisterial districts
listed below, including all cities, towns, boroughs, or other political subdivisions
within their limits:

Connecticut.—The entire State.

Delaware.—tThe entire State.

District of Columbia.—The entire District.

Maine.—County of York; towns of Auburn and Lewiston, in Androscoggin
County; towns of Cape Hlizabeth, Gorham, Gray, New Gloucester, Raymond,
Scarboro, Standish, and the cities of Portland, South Portland, Westbrook, and
Windham, in Cumberland County; the city of Waterville, in Kennebec County;
and the city of Brewer, in Penobscot County.

Marytand.—Counties of Caroline, Cecil, Harford, Kent, Queen Annes, Somer-
set, Talbot, and Worcester; the city of Baltimore; the city of Cumberland, the.


1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 43

town of Frostburg, and election districts Nos. 4, 5, 6, 7, 11, 12, 14, 22. 23, 24, 26,
29, 31, and 82 in Allegany County; the city of Annapolis and election districts
Nos. 2, 3, 4, and 5, in Anne Arundel County; all of Baitimore County except elec-
tion districts Nos. 5 and 6; the city of Westminster, and the election districts
of Freedom (No. 5), Hampstead (No. 8), Mount Airy (No. 13), New Windsor
(No. 11), Taneytown (No. 1), Uniontown (No. 2), and Westminster (No. 7), in
Carroli County; election districts of La Plata and White Plains, in Charles
County; election districts of Cambridge (No. 7), East New Market (No. 2),
Hurlock (No. 15), and Wiliiamsburg (No. 12), in Dorchester County; election
districts of Brunswick (No. 25), Buckeystown (No. 1), Frederick (No. 2), Jef-
ferson (No. 14), New Market (No. 9), Petersville (No. 12), and Woodville
(No. 18), in Frederick County; election districts of Elkridge (No. 1), Ellicott
City (No. 2), Guilford (No. 6), and West Friendship (No. 3), in Howard
County; election districts of Colesville (No. 5), and Rockville (No. 4), in Mont-
gomery County, and those portions of the election districts of Bethesda (No. 7),
and Wheaton (No. 18), in said county located within the established boundaries
ot the so-called Washington Suburban Sanitary District; all of Prince Georges
County except the election districts of Aquasco (No. 8), and Noitingham (No. 4):
election districts of Funkstown (No. 10), Hagerstown (Nos. 3, 17, 21, 22, 24,
and 25), Halfway (No. 26), Leitersburg (No. 9). Sandy Hook (No. 11), Sharps-
burg (No. 1), and Williamsport (No. 2), in Washington County; election dis-
tricts of Camden (No. 13), Delmar (No. 11), Dennis (No. 6), Fruitland (No. 16),
Nutters (No. 8), Parsons (No. 5), Pittsburg (No. 4), Salisbury (No. 9), and
the town of Salisbury, Sharptown (No. 10), Trappe (No. 7), and Willards
(No. 14), in Wicomico County.

Massachusetts —The entire State.

New Hampshire.—Counties of Belknap, Cheshire, Hillsboro, Merrimack, Rock-
ingham, Strafford, and Sullivan; towns of Brookfield, Eaton, Effingham, Freedom,
Madison, Moultonboro, Ossipee, Sandwich, Tamworth, Tuftonboro, Wakefield, arid
Wolfeboro, in Carroll County; towns of Alexandria, Ashland, Bridgewater, Bris-
tol, Canaan, Dorchester, Enfield, Grafton, Groton, Hanover, Hebron, Holderness,
Lebanon, Lyme, Orange, and Plymouth, in Grafton County.

New Jersey.—The entire State.

New York.—Counties of Albany, Bronx, Broome, Chemung, Chenango, Columbia,
Cortland, Delaware, Dutchess, Fulton, Greene. Kings, Madison, Montgomery, Nas-
sau, New York, Oneida, Onondaga. Orange, Otsego, Putham, Queens, Rensselaer,
Richmond, Roskland, Saratoga, Schenectady, Schoharie, Suffolk, Sullivan, Tioga,
Ulster, Washington, and Westchester; towns of Red House and Salamane¢a, and
the city of Salamanca, in Cattaraugus County: towns of Amherst, Cheektowaga,
and Tonawanda, and the cities of Buffalo and Lackawanna, in Erie County ; towns
of Columbia, Danube, Fairfield, Frankfort, German Flats, Herkimer, Litchfield,
Little Falls, Manheim, Newport, Salisbury, Schuyler, Stark, Warren, and Win-
field, and the city of Little Falls, in Herkimer County; town of Watertown and
city of Watertown, in Jefferson County; town of Mount Morris and village of
Mount Morris, in Livingston County; city of Rochester and town of Brighton,
in Monroe County; towns of Catherine, Cayuta, Dix, Hector, Montour, and
Reading, and the borough of Watkins Glen, in Schuyler County; towns of Caton,
Corning, Erwin, Hornby, and Hornellsville, and the cities of Corning and Hornell,
in Steuben County; towns of Caroline, Danby, Dryden, Enfield, Ithaca, Newfield,
and the city of Ithaca. in Tompkins County; towns of Luzerne and Queensbury
and the city of Glens Falls, in Warren County.

Ohio.—Counties of Belmont, Carroll, Columbiana, Cuyahoga, Guernsey, Har-
rison, Jefferson, Mahoning, Medina, Portage, Stark, Summit, Tuscarawas, and
Wayne; the city of Coshocton, in Coshocton County; the city of Columbus, and
villages of Bexley, Grandview, Grandview Heights, Hanford, Marble Cliff, and
Upper Arlington, in Franklin County; townships of Kirtland, Mentor, and Wil-
loughby, and the villages of Kirtland Hills, Lakeline, Mentor, Mentor-on-the-
Lake, Waite Hill, Wickliffe, Willoughby, and Willowick, in Lake County; the town-
ship of Newark and city of Newark, in Licking Cownty; the city of Toledo, in
Lucas County; the township of Madison and the city of Mansfield, in Richland
County; townships of Bazetta, Braceville, Brookfield, Champion, Fowler, Hart-
ford, Howland, Hubbard, Liberty, Lordstown, Newton, Southington, Warren,
Weathersfield, and Vienna, the cities of Niles and Warren, and the villages of
Cortland, Girard, Hubbard, McDonald, Newton Falls, and Orangeville, in
Trumbull County.
44 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

Pennsylvania.—The entire State, except Crawford and Forest Counties; Mer-
cer Township in Butler County; townships of Amity, Concord, Conneaut, Elk
Creek, Fairview, Franklin, Girard, Greene, Greenfield, Harborcreek, Le Boeuf,
McKean, North East, Springfield, Summit, Union, Venango, Washington, and
Waterford, and the boroughs of Albion, Cranesville, East Springfield, Edinboro,
Elgin, Fairview, Girard, Lawrence Park, Middleboro, Mill Village, North East,
North Girard, Platea, Union City, Waterford, Wattsburg, and Wesleyville, in
Hrie County; townships of Coolspring, Deer Creek, Delaware, East Lackawan-
nock, Fairview, Findley, French Creek, Greene, Hempfield, Jackson, Jefferson,
Lackawannock, Lake, Liberty, Mill Creek, New Vernon, Otter Creek, Perry,
Pine, Pymatuning, Salem, Sandy Creek, Sandy Lake, South Pymatuning, Spring-
field, Sugar Grove, West Salem, Wilmington, Wolf Creek, and Worth, and the
boroughs of Clarksville, Fredonia, Greenville, Grove City, Jackson Center, James-
town, Mercer, New Lebanon, Sandy Lake, Sheakleyville, and Stoneboro, in
Mercer County; townships of Allegheny, Canal, Cherrytree, Clinton, Irwin,
Jackson, Mineral, Oakland, Gilcreek, Plum, Scrubgrass, and Victory, and the
boroughs of Clintonville, Cooperstown, and Pleasantville, in Venango County;
and the townships of Brokenstraw, Cherry Grove, Columbus, Conewango, Deer-
field, Eldred, Farmington, Freehold, Limestone, Pine Grove, Pittsfield, Pleasant,
Southwest, Spring Creek, Sugar Grove, Triumph, Watson (including the bor-
oughs of Bear Lake, Grand Valley, Sugar Grove, Tidioute, and Youngsville),
in Warren County.

Rhode Island.—The entire State. :

Vermont.—Counties of Bennington, Rutland, Windham, and Windsor; and the
town of Burlington, in Chittenden County.

Virginia.—Counties of Accomac, Arlington, Culpeper, Elizabeth City, Fairfax,
Fauquier, Henrico, Loudoun, Norfolk, Northampton, Prince William, Princess
Anne, and Stafford; magisterial districts of Dale and Manchester, in Chester-
field County; magisterial district of Sleepy Hole, in Nansemona County; magis-
terial district of Courtland, in Spotsylvania County; C Camp Stuart, in Warwick
County; magisterial district of Washington, in Westmoreland County: and the
cities of Alexandria, Fredericksburg, Hampton, Newport News, Norfolk, Ports-
mouth, Richmond, South Norfolk, and Suffolk.

West Virginia—Counties of Brooke, Hancock, Harrison, Jefferson, Marion,
Monongalia, and Taylor; districts of Arden, Falling Waters, Hedgesville, and
Opequon, and the city of Martinsburg, in Berkeley County; the city of Charleston
in Kanawha County ; town of Keyser and district of Frankfort, in Mineral County ;
the city of Wheeling, in Ohio County; and the city of Parkersburg, and districts
of Lubeck and Tygart, in Wood County.

REGULATION 5

Sec. 301.48-5. Restrictions on the movement of fruits and vegetables—A.
Control of movement.—(1) Unless a certificate or permit shall have been issued
therefor, by an inspector, except as provided in paragraphs (a) to (e), inclusive,
of this regulation: (4) No green corn on the cob, beans in the pod, bananas, apples,
peaches, blackberries. blueberries, huckleberries, or raspberries shall be moved or
allowed to be moved interstate from any regulated area to or through any point
outside thereof; and (ii) no fruits or vegetables of any kind shall be moved or
allowed to be moved interstate via refrigerator car or motortruck from the State,
District, counties, election districts, townships, towns, or cities listed below to or
through any point outside the regulated areas.

Connecticut.—Town of Greenwich in Fairfield County.

Delaware.—The entire State.

District of Columbia.—The entire District.

Maryland.—Counties of Cecil, Harford, Kent, Queen Annes, Somerset, and
Worcester ; election district No. 5 in Anne Arundel County: the city of Baltimore ;
all of Baltimore County except election districts Nos. 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 10; all of
Caroline County except election districts of American Corners (No. 8), and Hills-
boro (No. 6) ; election districts of Cambridge (No. 7), East New Market (No. 2),
Hurlock (No. 15), and Williamsburg (No. 12), in Dorchester County; election
districts of Camden (No. 18), Delmar (No. 11), Dennis (No. 6), Fruitland (No.
16), Nutters (No. 8), Parsons (No. 5), Pittsburg (No. 4), Salisbury (No. 9), and
the town of Salisbury, Trappe (No. 7), and Willard (No. 14), in Wicomico County.

1Seces. 301.48-3, 5, 6, 7, and 9 issued under authority of sec. 8, 37 Stat. 318; 39 Stat.
1165; 44 Stat. 250; 7 U.S. C. 161.
1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 45

New Jersey.—Counties of Atlantic, Burlington, Camden, Cape May, Cumber-
land, Essex, Gloucester, Hudson, Hunterdon, Mercer, Middlesex, Monmouth, Ocean,
Salem, Somerset, and Union; townships of Lodi, Lyndhurst, Overpeck, Rochelle
Park, Saddle River, and Teaneck, the cities of Englewood, Garfield and Hacken-
sack, and the boroughs of Bogota, Carlstadt, Cliffside Park, East Paterson, East
Rutherford, Edgewater, Englewood Cliffs, Fair Lawn, Fairview, Fort Lee, Glen
Rock, Hasbrouck Heights, Leonia, Little Ferry, Lodi, Maywood, Moonachie, North
Arlington, Palisades Park, Ridgefield, Rutherford, Teterboro, Wallington, and
Wood Ridge, in Bergen County; townships of Chatham, Chester, Denville, East
Hanover, Hanover, Harding, Mendham, Morris, Morristown, Parsipany-Troy Hills,
Passaic, Randolph, and Washington, and the boroughs of Chatham, Florham
Park, Madison, Mendham, and Morris Plains, in Morris County; township of
Little Falls, the cities of Clifton, Passaic, Paterson, and the boroughs of Haledon,
Hawthorne, North Haledon, Prospect Park, Totowa, and West Paterson, in
Passaic County; townships of Franklin, Greenwich, Lopatcong, Mansfield, Phil-
lipsburg, Pohatcong, and Washington, and the boroughs of Alpha and Washington,
in Warren County.

New York.—Counties of Bronx, Kings, New York, Queens, and Richmond ;
town of North Hempstead, in Nassau County; towns of Eastchester, Harrison,
Mamaroneck, Pelham, Rye, and Scarsdale, and the cities of Mount Vernon, New
Rochelle, White Plains, and Yonkers, in Westchester County.

Pennsylwania.—Counties of Bucks, Chester, Delaware, Lancaster, Montgomery,
and Philadelphia; townships of Alsace, Amity, Bern, Brecknock, Caernarvon,
Colebrookdale, Cumru, District, Douglass, Earl, Exeter, Hereford, Lower Alsace,
Maidencreek, Muhlenberg, Oley, Ontelaunee, Pike, Robeson, Rockland, Ruscomb-
manor, South Heidelberg, Spring, Union, and Washington, the city of Reading,
and the boroughs of Bally, Bechtelsville, Birdsboro, Boyertown, Mohnton, Mount
Penn, Saint Lawrence, Shillington, Sinking Spring, Temple, West Lawn, West
Reading, Wyomissing, and Wyomissing Hills, in Berks County; townships -of
Londonderry, Lower Paxton, Lower Swatara, Susquehanna, and Swatara, the
city of Harrisburg, and the boroughs of Highspire, Middletown, Paxtang, Pen-
brook, Royalton, and Steelton, in Dauphin County ; townships of Lower Macungie,
Lower Milford, Upper Milford, and Upper Saucon, and the boroughs of Coopers-
burg, and Emaus, in Lehigh Couniy; townships of Lower Saucon and Williams,
in Northampton County; townships of Lower Chanceford and Peach Bottom,
in York County.

Virginia.—Counties of Accomac, Arlington, and Northampton.

Provided, That the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine
may by administrative instructions extend or reduce the areas specified in this
regulation when in his judgment such action is considered advisable.

(a) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of fruits and vege-
tables between October 16 and June 14, inclusive, except that in the case of move-
ment interstate from the following areas, the exemption applies only during the
period from October 16 to May 31, inclusive:

Virginia.—The counties of Accomac, Elizabeth City, Norfolk, Northampton,
and Princess Anne ; the magisterial district of Sleepy Hole, in Nansemond County,
Camp Stuart in Warwick County, and the cities of Hampton, Newport News,
Norfolk, Portsmouth, South Norfolk, and Suffolk.

(b) No certificate or permit will be required for the interstate movement
of fruits and vegetables when transported by a common carrier on a through
bill of lading either from an area not under regulation through a regulated
area to another nonregulated area, or from a regulated area through a non-
regulated area to another regulated area, except that a certificate is required
for interstate movement from the main regulated area to the following-named
isolated points: Brewer and Waterville, Maine; Brighton, Buffalo, Hornell,
Mount Morris, Rochester, and Watertown, and the town of Hornellsyille,
Steuben County, N. Y., or to other regulated parts of Erie, Jefferson, and
Livingston Counties, N. Y.; Columbus, Coshocton, Mansfield. Newark, and
Toledo, Ohio, or to other regulated parts of Licking and Richland Counties,
Ohio; Corry and Erie, Pa.; Burlington, Vt.; and Charleston and Parkersburg,
W. Va. No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of fruits and
vegetables from the above-named isolated points.

(c) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of fruits ana
vegetables when they shall have been manufactured or processed in such a
manner that in the judgment of the inspector no infestation could be
transmitted.
AG BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

(d) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of any shipments
of (1) apples or peaches of less than 15 pounds to the shipment; (2) bananas
in single bunches packed in commercial containers; or (3) bananas singly, or
in individual hands.

(e) No restrictions are placed on the interestate movement of commercially
packed apples or commercially packed peaches in any quantity, except those
moving via refrigerator cars or motortrucks from the area listed in paragraph
(1) of this regulation.

(2) No restrictions are placed on the interstate shipment from the regulated
areas of fruits and vegetables other than those mentioned above except that
any such interstate shipments of fruits and vegetables may be inspected at any
time or place inside or outside the regulated areas and when actually found to
involve danger of dissemination of Japanese beetle to uninfested localities,
measures to eliminate infestation may be required as a condition of further
transportation or delivery.

B. Conditions of certification. — Certificates may be issued for the interstate
movement of fruits and vegetables between June 15 and October 15, inclusive
(or between June 1 and October 15, inclusive, when consigned from that part of
Virginia described in paragraph (a) of this regulation) under one of the follow-
ing conditions:

(3) When the fruits and vegetables, moving from a point in the regulated
area other than that specified in paragraph (1) of this regulation, or moving
from such designated area other than by refrigerator car, have actually been
inspected by the United States Department of Agriculture and found free from
infestation. The number of inspection points for such certification will be
limited and their location determined by shipping needs and further conditioned
on the establishment at such points of provisions satisfactory to the inspector
for the handling and safeguarding of such shipments during inspection. Such
inspection may be discontinued and certification withheld by the inspector during
periods of general or unusual flight of the beetles.

(4) When the fruits and vegetables have been handled or treated under the
observation of an inSpector in manner and by method to free them from any
infestation.

(5) When the fruits and vegetables have originated outside of the regu-
lated areas and are to be reshipped directly from freight yards, transfer points,
or unloading docks within such areas, under provisions satisfactory to the in-
spector for safeguarding of such shipments pending certification and reshipment.
Certificates on this basis will be issued without inspection only in cases where,
in the judgment of the inspector, the shipments concerned have not been
exposed to infestation while within such freight yards, transfer points, or
unloading docks.

(6) When the fruits and vegetables were grown in districts where the
fact has been established to the satisfaction of the inspector that no infesta-
tion exists and are to be shipped directly from the farms where grown to points
outside the regulated areas, or are shipped from infested districts where the
fact has been established to the satisfaction of the inspector that the Japanese
beetle has not begun or has ceased its flight.

(7) When the fruits and vegetables moving via refrigerator car from the
area listed in paragraph (1) of this regulation have been inspected and loaded
in a manner to prevent infestation, in a refrigerator car with closed or ade-
quately screened doors and hatches, which car prior to loading has been deter-
mined by an inspector as fumigated or thoroughly swept and cleaned by the com-
mon carrier in a manner to rid it of infestation. During the interval between
fumigation or cleaning and loading such refrigerator car must be tightly closed
and sealed.

(8) When the fruits and vegetables moving via refrigerator car from the
area listed in this regulation have been fumigated in the car, when deemed
necessary in the judgment of the inspector and when the doors and hatches of
the car have been tightly closed or adequately screened under the supervision
of an inspector.’

REGULATION 6

Sec. 301.48-6. Restrictions on the movement of nursery and ornamental
stock—A. Control of movement.—Nursery and ornamental stock as defined in

2See footnote 1, p. 44.
1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 47

regulation 1 (sec. 301.48-1) shall not be moved or allowed to be moved inter-
state from the regulated areas to or through any point outside thereof, unless
a certificate or permit shail have been issued therefor by the inspector except as
follows:

(1) The following articles, because of their growth or production, or their
manufactured or processed condition, are considered innocuous as carriers of
infestation and are therefore exempt from the requirements of certification:

(a) (7) True bulbs, corms, and tubers, when dormant, except for storage
growth, and when free from soil, and (ii) single dahlia tubers or small dahlia
root divisions when free from stems, cavities, and soil. Dahlia tubers, other
than single tubers or small root divisions meeting these conditions, require
certification.

(b) (7) Cut orchids, (77) orchid plants, when growing exclusively in Osmunda
fiber, (ivi) Osmunda fiber, Osmundine, or orchid peat (Osmunda cinnanomea,
and O. claytoniana.)

(c) (4) Floral designs or “set pieces,” including wreaths, sprays, casket
covers, and all formal florists’ designs; bouquets and cut flowers not so pre-
pared are not exempted; (ii) trailing arbutus, or Mayflower (Hpigaea repens),
when free from soil, and when shipped during the period between October 16
and June 14, inclusive.

(d@) (i) Herbarium specimens, when dried, pressed, and treated, and when
so labeled on the outside of each container of such materials, (47) mushroom
spawn, in brick, flake, or pure culture form.

(e) (4) Sheet moss (Cdlliergon schriberi and Thuridium recognitum), (ii)
resurrection plant or birds’-nest moss (Selaginella lepidophylla), (iii) sphagnum
moss, bog moss, or peat moss (Sphagnacea), (iv) dyed moss, when heat
treated and appropriately labeled.

(f) Soil-free, dried roots incapable of propagation, when appropriately
labeled.

(2) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of nursefy
and ornamental stock imported from foreign countries when reshipped from the
port of entry in the unopened original container and labeled as to each con-
tainer with a copy certificate of the country from which it was exported, a
statement of the general nature and quantity of the contents, the name and ad-
dress of the consignee, and the country and locality where ‘grown.

(3) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of soii-free
aquatic plants, and of portions of plants without roots and free from soil,
except that a certificate is required for the movement of cut flowers during
the period June 15 to October 15, inclusive.

(4) No certificate or permit will be required for the interstate movement
of nursery and ornamenta! stock when transported by a common earrier ona
through bill of lading either from an area not under regulation through a
regulated area, or from a regulated area through a nonregulated area to
another regulated area, except that a certificate is required between June 15
and October 15 for interstate movement of cut flowers from the main regulated
areas to the following-named isolated points: Brewer and Waterville, Maine;
Brighton, Buffalo, Hornell, Mount Morris, Rochester, and Watertown, and the
town of Hornellsville, Steuben County, N. Y., or to other regulated parts of
Erie, Jefferson, and Livingston Counties, N. ¥.; Columbus, Coshocton, Mans-
field, Newark, and Toledo, Ohio, or te other regulated parts of Licking
and Richland Counties, Ohio; Corry and Erie, Pa.; Burlington, Vt.; and
Charleston and Parkersburg, W. Va. No restrictions are placed on the inter-
state movement of cut flowers from the above-named isolated points.

B. Conditions governing the issuance of certificates and permits.—For the
purpose of certification of nursery and ornamental stock, nurseries, greenhouses,
and other premises concerned in the movement of such stock will be classified
as follows:

(5) Class I.—Nurseries, greenhouses, and other premises concerned in the
movement of nursery and ornamental stock on or within approximately 500
feet of which no infestation has been found may be classified as class I.
Upon compliance with the requirements of paragraph (11) of this regulation,
nursery and ornamental stock may be certified by the inspector for shipment
from such premises without further inspection, and without meeting the safe-
guards prescribed as a condition of interstate shipment of plants originating
in nurseries or greenhouses of class IIT.

251222—40——_2
AS BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

(6) Class III—(a) Nurseries, greenhouses, and other premises concerned
in the movement of nursery and ornamental stock on which either grubs in
the soil or one or more beetles have been found, will be classified as class
Ill, provided, (i) there are maintained on the premises subdivided elass I
areas, certified houses, frames, or plots or other certified areas, or (ii) there
is a legitimate need for interstate or intradealer certification of such stock.
Such classification will not be granted to nurseries, greenhouses, and other
premises that do not maintain certified or subdivided areas and require only
infrequent certification. Such classification also may be given to nurseries,
ete., where one or more beetles or grubs are found in the immediate proximity
(within approximately 500 feet) of such nurseries, ete., on adjacent property
or properties. in the case of nursery properties under single ownership and
management but represented by pareels of iand widely separated, such parceis
may be independently classified either as class I or class III] upon compliance
with such conditions and safeguards as shall be required by the inspector.
Similarly, unit nursery properties, which would otherwise fall in class III,
may be open to subdivision, for the purpose of rating such subdivisions in ciass
I or III, when in the judgment of the inspector such action is warranted by
recent and scanty infestation limited to a portion of the nursery concerned:
Provided, That the subdivision containing the infestation shall be clearly
marked by boundaries of a permanent nature which shail be approximately
500 feet beyond the point where the infestation occurs.

(b) Upon compliance with paragraphs (7), (10), and (11) of this regula-
tion, nursery and ornamental stock may be certified by the inspector for ship- ~
ment from such premises under any one of the following conditions: (i) That
the roots shall be treated by means approved by the Bureau of Entomology
and Plant Quarantine in manner and by method satisfactory to the inspector ;
or (ii) in the case of plants in which the root system is such that a thorough
inspection may be made, that the soil shall be entirely removed from the stock
by shaking or washing; or (wi) that it shall be shown by evidence Satisfac-
tory te the inspector that the plants concerned were produced in a certified
greenhouse.

(7) Greenhouses of Class III may be certified upon compliance with all the
following conditions with respect to the greenhouses themselves and to all
potting beds, heeling-in areas, hotbeds, coldframes, and similar plots:

(a) Ventilators, doors, and all other openings in greenhouses or coldframes
on premises in class III shall be kept screened in manner satisfactory to the
inspector during the period of flight of the beetle, namely, south of the north-
ern boundaries of Maryland and Delaware between June 1 and October 1,
inclusive, or north thereof between June 15 and October 15, inclusive.

(6) Prior to introduction into nurseries or greenhouses, sand, if contam-
inated with vegetable matter, soil, earth, peat, compost, or manure taken from
infested locations or which may have been exposed to infestation, must be
sterilized or fumigated under the direction and supervision of, and in manner
and by method satisfactory to the inspector. If such sand, soil, earth, peat,
compost, or manure is not to be immediately used in such greenhouses, it must
be protected from possible infestation in manner and by method satisfactory
to the inspector.

(c) All potted plants placed in certified greenhouses of class III and all
potted plants to be certified for interstate movement therefrom (i) shall be
potted in certified soil; (#) shall, if grown outdoors south of the northern
boundaries of Maryland and Delaware at any time between June 1 and Oc-
tober 1, inclusive, or north thereof at any time between June 15 and October
15, inclusive, be kept in screened frames while outdoors; (ii) shall, if grown
outdoors during any part of the year, be placed in beds in which the soil or
other material shall have been treated in manner and by method approved by
the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine to eliminate infestation;
and (iv) shall comply with such other safeguards as may be required by the
inspector.

(8S) Cut flowers may be certified for movement either (@) when they have
been inspected by an inspector and found free from infestation, or (6) when
they have been grown in a greenhouse of class I or in a certified greenhouse
of class III and are transported under such safeguards as will in the judg-
ment of the inspector prevent infestation. (See also paragraph (8) of this
regulation. )

(9) Nursery and ornamental stock originating on or moved from unclassi-
fied premises may be certified by the inspector under either one of the follow-
1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 49

ing conditions: (@) That the soil shall be entirely removed from the stock,
or (0) that the roots shall be treated by means aproved by the Bureau of
Entomoloy and Plant Quarantine in manner and by method satisfactory to
the inspector, or (c) that it shall be shown by evidence satisfactory to the
inspector that the accompanying soil was obtained at such points and under
sueh conditions that in his judgment no infestation could exist therein.

(10) Nurserymen, florists, dealers, and others, in order to maintain a class
III status shall report immediately on forms provided for that purpose all their
sales or shipments of nursery and ornamental stock, sand, if contaminated with
vegetable matter, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure both to points outside
the regulated areas and to other ciassiiied nurseries or greenhouses within the
regulated area. Certification may be denied to any person who has omitted
to make the report required by this regulation, and such denial of certification
shall continue until the information so omitted has been supplied.

(11) Nurserymei, fiorists, dealers, and others, in order to maintain a class
I status, or to maintain, in a class III establishment, a class I subdivision,
a certified plot, or a certified greenhouse, (@) Shall restrict their purchases or
receipts of nursery and ornamental stock, sand, if contaminated with vegetable
matter, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure, secured within the regulated
area and intended for use on class I or certified premises, to articles which
have been certified under these regulations as to each such article and the
said certificate shali accompany the article when moved; (0%) shall obtain
approval of the inspector before such articles are received on class I or Ccer-
tified premises or are taken into certified greenhouses; (c¢) shall report imme-
diately in writing all purchases or receipts of such articies secured from within
the regulated area for use on such premises; and (d) shall also report imme-
diately on forms provided for that purpose all their sales or shipments of
such articles both to points outside the regulated areas and to other classified
nurseries or greenhouses within the regulated areas. Certification may be
denied to any person who has omitted to make the report or reports required
by this regulation, and such denial of certification shall continue until the
information so omitted has been supplied.

(12) Nursery and ornamental stock imported from foreign countries and not
reshipped from the port of entry in the unopened original container may be
certified for movement under these regulations when such stock has been
inspected by an inspector and found free from infestation.

(18) Nursery and ornamental stock originating outside the regulated areas
and certified stock originating in classified nurseries or greenhouses may be
certified for reshipment from premises other than those on which they origi-
nated, under provisions satisfactory to the inspector for the safeguarding of
such stock from infestation at the point of reshipment and en route and when
found advisable by the inspector, after reinspection and determination of
freedom from infestation.*

REGULATION 7

Sec. 301.48-7. Restrictions on the movement of sand, soil, earth, peat, com-
post, and manure.—A. Control of movement.—Sand, soil, earth, peat, compost,
and manure shal! not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from any
point in the regulated areas to or through any point outside thereof unless a
certificate or permit shall have been issued therefor by the inspector, except
as follows:

(1) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of (a@) sand and
clay when free from vegetable matter; (b) greensand marl; and (¢) such
other sands and clays as have been treated or processed and subsequently
handled in such manner that in the judgment of the inspector no Japanese
beetle could exist therein, provided that each container of such article shall
be labeled on the outside thereof as to nature of contents, except that in the
case of bulk shipments such label shall accompany the waybill or other shipping
papers.

(2) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of manure, peat,
compost, or humus (a) when dehydrated and either shredded, ground, pulver-
ized, or compressed, or (b) when treated with crude petrolewm or any other

®See footnote 1, p. 44.
50 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

product having high potency as an insecticide, and when so labeled on the
outside of each commercial container of such materials.

(8) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of sand, soil,
earth, peat, compost, and manure imported from foreign countries when re-
shipped from the port of entry in the unopened original container and labeled
as to each container with the country of origin, and when the shipment is
further protected in manner or method satisfactory to the inspector.

(4) No certificate will be required for the interstate movement of sand, soil,
earth, peat, compost, and manure when transported by a common earrier on a
through bill of lading either from an area not under regulation through a
regulated area, or from a regulated area through a nonregulated area to
another regulated area.

B. Conditions of certification.—Certificates for the movement of restricted
sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure may be issued under any one of
the following conditions:

(5) When the articles to be moved have originated in districts included in
the reguiated area, but in which neither beetleS nor grubs in soil have been
found.

(6) When the material consists of fresh manure or of mined, dredged, or
other similar materials, and it has been determined by an inspector that no
infestation could exist therein.

(7) When the material has been removed, under the supervision of an in-
spector, from a depth of more than 12 inches below the surface of the ground
and either (a) is to be moved between October 16 and June 14, inclusive, or
(6) is loaded and Shipped at points where it has been determined by an in-
spector that no general infestation of adult beetles exists, or (c) when the
ears and loading operations are protected by screening under the direction of
and in manner and by method Satisfactory to the inspector.

(8) When the material has been fumigated with carbon disuiphide or other-
wise treated under the supervision of and in manner and by method Satis-
factory to the inspector. Such fumigation or treatment wiil be required as a
condition of certification of all restricted sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and
manure, except such as is loaded and shipped in compliance with paragraphs
(5), (6), or (7) hereof.*

REGULATION 9

Sec. 301.48-9. Marking and certification a condition of interstate transporta-
tion.—(a) Every box, basket, or other container of restricted articles listed in
regulations 5, 6, and 7 (sees. 301.48—5, 6, and 7) shail be plainly marked with
the name and address of the consignor and the name and address of the con-
signee, and Shall have securely attached to the outside thereof a valid certificate
or permit issued in compliance with these regulations. In the case of lot ship-
ments by freight, one certificate attached to one of the containers and another
certificate attached to the waybill will be sufficient.

(6) In the case of bulk carload shipments by rail, the certificate shall ac-
company the waybill, conductor’s manifest, memorandum, or bill of lading per-
taining to such shipment, and in addition each car shall have securely attached
to the outside thereof a placard showing the number of the certificate or
certificates accompanying the waybill.

(c) In the case of shipment by road vehicle, the certificates shall accompany
the vehicle.

(ad) Certificates shall be surrendered to the consignee upon delivery of the
shipment.*

This amendment supersedes amendment No. 1, promulgated June 22, 1939, and
shall be effective on and after April 5, 1940.

Done at the city of Washington this 4th day of April 1940.

Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.

[ SEAT | HENRY A. WALLACE,
Secretary of Agriculture.

[Copies of foregoing amendment were sent to all common carriers doing business in
or through the quarantined area. }

4 See footnote 1, p. 44.
1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS HL

NOTICE TO GENERAL PUBLIC THROUGH NEWSPAPERS

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,
Washington, D. C., April 4, 1940.

Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority
conferred on him by the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912 (87 Stat. 315),
as amended, has promulgated Amendment No. 2 to the revised regulations
supplemental to the Japanese beetle quarantine (Notice of Quarantine No. 48),
effective on and after April 5, 1940. The purpose of the amendment is prin-
cipally to bring under regulation considerable additional area in Maryland
and Ohio, nominal extensions in Pennsylvania and West Virginia, and one
more township (Erwin) in Steuben County, N. YÂ¥. The area from which the
movement of fruits and vegetables by motortruck or refrigerator car is regu-
lated has been extended to New York City and surrounding area including
the town of Greenwich, in Fairfield County, Conn., and also area in Mary-
land, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania. Fruits and vegetables shipped during
the period from June 15 to October 15, inclusive, are required to be certified,
as heretofore, and, when shipped from a designated area in southern Vir-
ginia, certification is advanced to cover the period from June 1 to October
15, inclusive. Minor modifications have been made in the certification re-
quirements for plants shipped from the regulated areas.

H. A. WALLACE,
Secretary of Agriculture.

[Published in the following newspapers: The Times, Hartford, Conn., April 18, 1940;
the Journal-Every Evening, Wilmington, Del., April 18, 1940; the Press-Herald, Portland,
Maine, April 19, 1940; the Sun, Baltimore, Md., April 19, 1940; the Post, Boston, Mass.,
April 19, 1940; the Union-Leader, Manchester, N. H., April 19, 1940; the News, Newark,
N. J., April 19, 1940; the Times, New York, N. Y., April 19, 1940; the Press, Cleveland,
Ohio, April 19, 1940; the Bulletin, Philadelphia, Pa., April 18, 1940; the Bulletin, Provi-
dence, R. I., April 18, 1940: the Free Press, Burlington, Vt., April 19, 1940; the News
Leader, Richmond, Va., April 18, 1940; the Gazett2, Charleston, W. Va., April 19, 1940-
and the Evening Star, Washington, D. C., April 19, 1940.]

B. E. P. Q. 394, revised.

List oF TRUE BULBS, CORMS, AND TUBERS EXEMPTED FROM JAPANESE BEETLE
CERTIFICATION

May 5, 1940.

Under regulation 6, A (1), of quarantine No. 48 (See. 301.48-6), true bulbs,
corms, and tubers are exempted from Japanese beetle certification when
dormant, except for storage growth, and when free from soil. The exemption
includes single dahlia tubers or small dahlia root divisions when free from
stems, cavities, and soil. Dahlia tubers, other than single tubers meeting these
conditions, require certification.

The following list of bulbs, corms, and tubers, issued for the information
of inspectors of the Bureau and for the use of shippers within the regulated
areas, is revised to include Gloriosa rothschildiana and two species of Corydalis,
and to list the species of bulbous Anemone.

The key letter in parentheses before each name indicates whether the variety
in question is a true bulb, corm, or tuber, (B) standing for true bulb, (C)
for corm, and (T) for tuber. Plant roots of a bulbous nature not given on
this list are, in most cases, fleshy rhizomes, and are therefore not exempt
from certification. (C) Acidanthera, (T) Alstroemeria, (B) Amaryllis, (C)
Amorphophallus (devilstongue), (B) Anemone nemorosa, A. ranunculoides, A.
trifolia, (C) Antholyza, (C) Babiana, (T) Begonia (tuberous-rooted), (T)
Boussingaultia (Madeira vine), (C) Brodiaea, (B) Bulbocodium, (C) Calo-
chortus (Mariposa lily or glove-tulip), (B) Camassia (wild hyacinth), (B)
Chionodoxa (glory-of-the-snow), (B) Colchicum (autumn-crocus), (T) Colo-
casia (Caladiwn esculentum and fancy-leaved varieties), (B) Cooperia (eve-
ning-star and rainlily), (B) Corydalis bulbosa, C. tuberosa, (B) Crinum, (C)
Crocus, (C) Cyclamen, (T)Dahlia (see statement in introductory paragraph),
(C) Dierama, (T) Dioscorea batatas (cinnamon-vine), (T) Hranthis (winter-
aconite), (B) Hrythronium (troutlily or dog-tooth violet), (B) Hucharis (Ama-
zonlily), (C) Freesia, (B) Fritillaria (fritillary), (B) Galanthus (snowdrop),
(B) Galtonia (Hyacinthus candicans) (summer hyacinth), (C) Gladiolus, (T)
o2 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

Gloriosa rothschildiana, (T) Glowvinia (see Sinningia), (B) Hippeastrum
(house-amaryllis), (B) Hyacinthus (hyacinth, Dutch and Roman), (B) Hyme-
nocallis (spiderlily), (B) Jris, bulbous (Dutch, Spanish, and English), (B)
Ismene (See Hymenocallis), (B) Ixia, (B) Iviolirion, (B) Lachenalia (Cape-
cowslip), (B) Lapeyrousia (Anomatheca), (B) Leucojum (snowflake), (B)
Lilium (lily bulbs, imported and domestic), (B) ZLycoris (cluster-amaryllis),
(B) Milla (Mexican-star), (B) dduscari (grape and feathered hyacinths), (B)
Narcissus (daffodil, jonguil), (B)Nerine, (B) Orinthogalum (Star-of-Bethie-
hem), (B) Ozxalis, (B) Pancratium, (B) Polianthes (tuberose), (B) Pusch-
kinia, (T) Ranunculus, (B) Scilla (squill, star-hyacinth), (T) Sinningia spe-
ciosa (Glovinia), (C) Sparavis (wandflower), (B) Sprekelia (St. Jameslily),
(B) Sternbergia, (B) Tigridia (tigerfiower or shellflower), (C) Tritonia
(Montbretia), (B) Tulipa (tulip), (B) Valiota (Scarboro-lily), (B) Watsonia
(buglelily), (1) Zantedeschia (Richardia) (calla, white, yellow, spotted; arum-
lily), and (B) Zephyranthes (zephyrlily).
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.



QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS ON JAPANESE BEETLE MODIFIED

May 25, 1940.

The Department of Agriculture today announced the removal, May 27, 1940,-
of all restrictions under the Japanese beetle quarantine regulations, on the inter-
state movement of fruits and vegetables, except by refrigerator car and motor-
truck from the areas of heavy beetle flight. The Department will discontinue,
temporarily at least, much of its inspection at highway stations of passenger
vehicles that may be carrying fruits and vegetables in small lots. It will continue
to require certificates of freedom from beetles for all refrigerator car and motor-
truck shipments of fruits and vegetables moving out from the areas of heavy
beetle flight.

It has been possible to remove these restrictions under the Japanese beetle
quarantine regulations because the chances of spreading an infestation from
small, noncommercial shipments of fruits and vegetables seem remote at this
time, according to Lee A. Strong, Chief of the Bureau of Hntomolcgy and Plant
Quarantine. The Department still has authority to inspect, at any point, any
shipment or vehicle that might spread the beetle from infested to noninfested
territory.

The areas of heavy Japanese beetle flight are:

Connecticut—Town of Greenwich in Fairfield County.

Delaware—the entire State.

District of Columbia—The entire District.

Maryland.—Cecil, Harford, Kent, Queen Annes, Somerset, and Worcester
Counties, the city of Baltimore, most of Baltimore and Caroline Counties, and
parts of Anne Arundel, Dorchester, and Wicomico Counties.

New Jersey—Atlantic, Burlington, Camden, Cape May, Cumberland, Essex,
Gloucester, Hudson, Hunterdon, Mercer, Middlesex, Monmouth, Ocean, Salem,
Somerset, and Union Counties, large parts of Bergen, Morris, and Passaic Coun-
ties, and part of Warren County.

New York—Bronx, Kings, New York, Queens, and Richmond Counties, and a
few towns and cities in Nassau and Westchester Counties.

Pennsylwania—Bucks, Chester, Delaware, Lancaster, Montgomery, and Phila-
delphia Counties, many towns and cities in Berks and Dauphin Counties and
several in Lehigh, Northampton, and York Counties.

Virginia—Accomae, Arlington, and Northampton Counties.

MODIFICATIONS OF JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE REGULATIONS
INTRODUCTORY NOTE
The following revision of regulation 5 removes all restrictions on the inter-

state movement of fruits and vegetables from the regulated areas, except that
restrictions still remain in force on the interstate movement of fruits and vege-
1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 53

tables by refrigerator ca: or motortruck from designated area in which heavy
flights of beetles occur tu points outside the regulated areas. However, fruits
and vegetables shipped by motortruck or refrigerator car from the area desig-
nated in paragraph (1) of regulation 5 to the city of Buffalo and other regulated
parts of Erie County, N. Y., and to Brighton and Rochester, N. Y., formerly
designated as isolated points in the regulated area, are not subject to certification
requirements.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

AMENDMENT NO. 3 TO THE RULES AND REGULATIONS (SEVENTEENTH REVISION)
SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 48

[Approved May 22, 1940; effective May 27, 1940]

Under authority conferred by the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912
(37 Stat. 315), as amended by the act of Congress approved March 4, 1917
(39 Stat. 1134, 1165), it is ordered that regulation 5 (sec. 301.48-5) of the rules
and regulations (seventeenth revision) supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No.
48 (sec. 301.48) on account of the Japanese beetle, which were promulgated
February 16, 1939, as amended, is hereby further amended to read as follows:

REGULATION 5



Sec. 301.48—5. Restrictions on the movement of fruits and vegetables.—A. Con-
trol of movement.—(1) Unless a certificate or permit shall have been issued
therefor, by an inspector, except as provided in paragraphs (a) to (e), in-
clusive, of this regulation, no fruits or vegetables of any kind shall be moved
or allowed to be moved interstate via refrigerator car or motortruck from the
State, District, counties, election districts, tewnships, towns, or cities listed
below to or through any point outside the reguiated areas:

Connecticut—Town of Greenwich in Fairfield County.

Delaware.—The entire State.

District of Colwmbia—The entire District.

Maryland.—Counties of Cecil, Harford, Kent, Queen Annes, Somerset, and
Worcester; election district No. 5 in Anne Arundel County; the city of Balti-
more; all of Baltimore County except election districts Nos. 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and
10; all of Caroline Couniy except election districts of American Corners (No. 8),
and Hillsboro (No. 6); election districts of Cambridge (No. 7), East New
Market (No. 2), Hurlock (No. 15), and Williamsburg ‘No. 12), in Dorchester
County; election districts of Camden (No. 18), Delmar (No. 11), Dennis (No. 6),
Fruitland (No. 16), Nutters (No. 8), Parsons (No. 5), Pittsburg (No. 4),
Salisbury (No. 9), and the town of Salisbury, Trappe (No. 7), and Willard
(No. 14), in Wicomico County.

New Jersey.—Counties of Atlantic, Burlington, Camden, Cape May, Cumber-
land, Essex, Gloucester, Hudson, Hunterdon, Mercer, Middlesex, Monmouth,
Ocean, Salem, Somerset, and Union; townships of Lodi, Lyndhurst, Overpeck,
Rochelle Park, Saddle River, and Teaneck, the cities of Englewood, Garfield,
and Hackensack, and the boroughs of Bogota, Carlstadt, Cliffside Park, East
Paterson, East Rutherford, Edgewater, Englewood Cliffs, Fair Lawn, Fairview,
Fort Lee, Glen Rock, Hasbrouck Heights, Leonia, Little Ferry, Lodi, Maywood,
Moonachie, North Arlington, Palisades Park, Ridgefield, Rutherford, Teterboro,
Wallington, and Wood Ridge, in Bergen County; townships of Chatham, Chester,
Denville, East Hanover, Hanover, Harding, Mendham, Morris, Morristown, Parsip-
pany-Troy Hills, Passaic, Randolph, and Washington, and the boroughs of
Chatham, Florham Park, Madison, Mendham, and Morris Plains, in Morris
County; township of Little Falls, the cities of Clifton, Passaic, Paterson, and
the boroughs of Haledon, Hawthorne, North Haledon, Prospect Park, Totowa,
and West Paterson, in Passaic County; townships of Franklin, Greenwich,
Lopatcong, Mansfield, Phillipsburg, Pohatcong, and Washington, and the
boroughs of Alpha and Washington, in Warren County.

New York.—Counties of Bronx, Kings, New York, Queens, and Richmond;
town of North Hempstead, in Nassau County; towns of Eastchester, Harrison,
Mamaroneck, Pelham, Rye, and Scarsdale, and the cities of Mount Vernon, New
Rochelle, White Plains, and Yonkers, in Westchester County.
54 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

Pennsylvania.—Counties of Bucks, Chester, Delawar2, Lancaster, Montgomery,
and Philadelphia; townships of Alsace, Amity, Bern, Brecknock, Caernarvon,
Colebrookdale, Cumru, District, Douglas, Earl, Hxeter, Hereford, Lower Alsace,
Maidencreek, Muhlenberg, Oley, Ontelaunee, Pike, Robeson, Rockland, Ruscomb-
manor, South Heidelberg, Spring, Union, and Washington, the city cf Reading,
and the boroughs of Bally, Bechteisville, Birdsboro, Boyertown, Mohnton, Mount
Penn, Saint Lawrence, Shillington, Sinking Spring, Temple, West Lawn, West
Reading, Wyomissing, and Wyomissing Hills, in Berks County; townships of
Londonderry, Lower Paxton, Lower Swatara, Susquehanna, and Swatara, the
city of Harrisburg, and the boroughs of Highspire, Middletown, Paxtang, Pen-
brook, Royalton, and Steelton, in auphin County; townships of Lower
Macungie, Lower Milford, Upper Milford, and Upper Saucon, and the boroughs
of Coopersburg, and Hmaus, in Lehigh County; townships of Lower Saucon and
Williams, in Nerthampton County; townships of Lower Chanceford and Peach
Bottom, in York County.

Virginia.—Counties of Accomac, Arlington, and Northampton: Provided,
That shipments of fruits and vegetables moving interstate from the area
specified in paragraph (1) of this regulation to other points in the regulated
area and subsequently diverted to points outside the regulated area, shall be
regarded as direct shipments from the point cf origin. As such they require
certification: Provided further, That the Chief of the Bureau of Hntomology
and Plant Quarantine may by administrative instructions extend or reduce the
areas specified in this regulation when in his judgment such action is consid-
ered advisable.

(a) No restrictions are piaced on the interstate mevement of fruits and
vegetables between October 16 and June 14, inclusive, except that in the case
of movement interstate from the following areas, the exemption applies only
during the period from October 16 to May 31, inclusive:

Virginia.—The counties of Accomac, Elizabeth City, Norfolk, Northampton,
and Princess Anne; the magisterial district of Sleepy Hole, in Nansemond
County; Camp Stuart in Warwick County; and the cities of Hampton, Newport
News, Norfolk, Portsmouth, South Norfolk, and Suffolk.

(6) No certificate or permit will be required for the interstate movement of
fruits and vegetables when transported by a common carrier on a through bill
of lading either from a point outside the area designated in this regulation through
that area to another outside point, or from the area designated in this regulation
through a nonregulated area to another regulated area, except that a certificate
is required for interstate movement from the area specified in paragraph (1) of
this regulation to the following-named isolated points: Brewer and Waterville,
Maine; Hornell, Mount Morris, and Watertown, and the town of Hornellsville,
Steuben County, N. Y., or to other regulated parts of Jefferson and Livingston
Counties, N. Y.; Columbus, Coshocton, Mansfield, Newark, and Toledo, Ohio, or
to other regulated parts of Licking and Richland Counties, Ohio; Corry and
Hrie, Pa.: Burlington, Vt.; and Charleston and Parkersburg, W. Va.

(c) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of fruits and
vegetables when they shall have been manufactured or processed in such a man-
ner that in the judgment of the inspector no infestation could be transmitted.

(ad) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of any shipments of
(1) bananas in single bunches packed in commercial containers; or (2) bananas
singly, or in individual hands.

(e) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of fruits and vege-
tables from the area listed in paragraph (1) of this regulation to the remainder
of the regulated area, other than as Specified in paragraph (0) of this regulation.

(2) No restrictions are placed on the interstate shipment from the regulated
areas of fruits and vegetables other than those mentioned above except that any
such interstate shipments of fruits and vegetables may be inspected at any time
or place inside or outside the regulated areas and when actually found to involve
danger of dissemination of Japanese beetle to uninfested localities, measures to
eliminate infestation may be required as a condition of further transportation
or delivery.

B. Conditions of certification.—Certificates may be issued for the interstate
movement of fruits and vegetables between June 15 and October 15, inclusive
(or between June 1 and October 15, inclusive, when consigned from that part of
Virginia described in paragraph (a) of this regulation), under one of the fol-
lowing conditions:
1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 55

(3) When the fruits and vegetables moving by motortruck have actually been
inspected by the United States Department of Agriculture and found free from
infestation. The number of inspection points for such certification will be limited
and their location determined by shipping needs and further conditioned on the
establishment at such points of provisions satisfactory to the inspector for the
handling and safeguarding of such shipments during inspection. Such inspection
may be discontinued and certification withheld by the inspector during periods
of general or unusual flight of the beetles.

(4) When the fruits and vegetables have been handled or treated under
the observation of an inspector in manner and by method to free them from
any infestation.

(5) When the fruits and vegetables have originated outside the areas des-
ignated in this regulation, and are to be reshipped directly from freight yards,
transfer points, or unlouding docks within such areas, uider provisions satis-
factory to the inspector for safeguarding of such shipments pending certification
and reshipment. Certificates on this basis will be issued without inspection only
in cases where, in the judgment of the inspector, the shipments concerned have
not been exposed to infestation while within such freight yards, transfer
points, or unloading docks.

(6) When the fruits and vegetables were grown in districts where the fact has
been established to the satisfaction of the inspector that no infestation exists
and are to be shipped directly from the farms where grown to points outside
the areas designated in paragraph (1) of this regulation, or are shipped from
infested districts where the fact has been established to the satisfaction of the
inspector that the Japanese beetle has not begun or has ceased its flight.

(7) When the fruits and vegetables moving via refrigerator car from the
area designated in this regulation have been inspected and loaded in a manner
to prevent infestation, in a refrigerator car with closed or adequately screened
doors and hatches, which car prior to loading has been determined by an in-
spector as fumigated or thoroughly swept and cleaned by the common earrier in
a manner to rid it of infestation. During the interval between fumigation or
cleaning and loading, such refrigerator car must be tightly closed and sealed.

(8) When the fruits and vegetables moving via refrigerator car from the
area designated in this regulation have been fumigated in the car, when deemed
necessary in the judgment of the inspector and when the doors and hatches of
the car have been tightly closed or adequately screened under the supervision
of an inspector.°

This amendment supersedes regulation 5 of amendment 2 promulgated April
4, 1940, and shall be effective on and after May 27, 1940.

Done at the city of Washington this 22d day of May 1940.

Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.

[ SEAL | H. A. WALLACE,
Secretary of Agriculture.

[Copies of foregoing amendment were sent to all common carriers doing business in
or through the quarantined area. |

NorTicE TO GENERAL PuBLIC THROUGH NEWSPAPERS
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,
Washington, D. C., May 22, 1940.

Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority con-
ferred on him by the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912 (87 Stat. 315),
as amended, has promulgated Amendment No. 3 to the revised regulations sup-
plemental to the Japanese beetle quarantine (Notice of Quarantine No. 48),
effective on and after May 27, 1949. The purpose of the amendment is to remove
the restrictions on the interstate movement of fruits and vegetables from the
regulated areas, except that restrictions still remain in force on the interstate
movement of fruits and vegetables by refrigerator car or motortruck from des-
ignated area in which heavy flights of beetles occur to points outside the regu-
lated areas. Fruits and vegetables shipped by motortruck or refrigerator car
from that area to Buffalo, other regulated parts of Erie County, Rochester, and
Brighton, N. Y., formerly designated as isolated regulated points, are not sub-

5 Sec. 301.48-5 issued under authority of sec. 8, 37 Stat. 318

; 39 Stat. 1165; 44 Stat.
200 OU. S.C. 261,
56 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

ject to certification requirements. Copies of the amendment may be obtained
from the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, U. S. Department of
Agriculture, Washington, D. C.
H. A. WALLACE,
Secretary of Agriculture.

[Published in the following newspapers: The Times, Hartford, Conn., May 28, 1940;
the Journal-Every Evening, Wilmington, Del., May 27, 1940; the Press-Herald, Portland,
Maine, May 28, 1940; the Sun, Baltimore, Md., May 28, 1940; the Post, Boston, Mass.,
May 28, 1940; the Union-Leader, Manchester, N. H., May 28, 1940: the News, Newark,
N. J., May 28, 1940; the Times, New York, N. Y., May 27, 1940; the Press, Cleveland,
Ohio, May 28, 1940; the Bulletin, Philadelphia, Pa., May 27, 1940; the Bulletin, Provi-
dence, R. ste May 28, 1940; the Free Press, Burlington. Vt., May 28, 1940; the News
Leader, Richmond, Va., May 27, 1940; the Gazette, Charleston, W. Va., May 28, 1940;
and the Evening Star, Washington, D. C., June 3, 1940. ]

B. E. P. Q. 499, Supplement No. 2.

ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS TO INSPECTCRS ON THE TREATMENT OF NUR-
SERY PRODUCTS, FRUITS, VEGETABLES, AND SOIL, FOR THE JAPANESE BEETLE

METHYL BROMIDE TREATMENT SCHEDULE FOR FRUITS AND VEGETABLES MODIFIED
[Approved June 1, 1940; effective June 4, 1940]

Results of further experiments in methyl bromide fumigation of produce for
compliance with certification requirements of Quarantine No. 48 indicate that
the dosage may be reduced from 5 pounds to 4 per refrigerator car at a tem-
perature of 80° F. and retain effectiveness of the treatment against adult Japa-
nese beetles. The modified treatment will, it is believed, reduce the cost of
fumigation as well as the possibility of injury to certain fruits and vegetables.
Circular B. E. P. Q. 499, issued June 9, 1939, is accordingly hereby modified by
changing subsection (q) on page 19 of the mimeographed circular to provide
for alternative treatments as follows:

(q) MetHyt BroMIpE FUMIGATION
(1) REFRIGERATOR CARS

Equipment.—Refrigerator cars must have sound, well-fitting doors and
hatches, and be in condition satisfactory to the inspector. Standard cloth
screens for covering the haiches and a temporary cloth screen for covering one
door during ventilation are essential. An electric blower of not less than 750
CFM capacity against 14-inch water pressure, equipped with devices for lower-
ing into the bunker and securing, so that the blower outlet butts against the
punker screen unimpeded either by studs or burglar bar.

Tenvperature and dosage—The temperature in the car during the treatment
must be at least:

(i) 80° F. with a dosage of 1.6 pounds for each 1,000 cubic feet, or 4 pounds
per refrigerator car; or

(ii) 70° F. with a dosage of 2 pounds for each 1,000 cubic feet, or 5 pounds
per refrigerator car.

Period of treatment—Two hours from the end of the fumigant release period.

Application—The doors must be closed tightly and the ice drips properly
plugged. The methyl bromide may be either weighed or measured and released
through a copper or brass applicator tube of 44-inch bore. This tube must be
fitted with a disc-type spray nozzle and must be bent in a “U” shape at the end,
so that the spray nozzle is directed upward toward the center of the bunker
and not less than 1 foot below the ceiling during the release of the fumigant.
The blower must be in continuous operation during the release of the fumigant,
and for 5 minutes thereafter. At the end of this period the blower may be
removed and transferred to the next car. The fumigant must be released in a
split dosage. When a 5-pound dosage is applied, 3 pounds must be released
in the bunker through the hatch across from the blower, and 2 pounds in the
bunker at the opposite end of the car and in line with the blower. When a
4-pound dosage is applied, 2 pounds must be released in the blower end, and 2
pounds at the opposite end of the car as described above.

Modification of this method of application may be made upon authorization
of an inspector.

Ventilation.—At the end of the exposure period, all hatches must be imme-
diately propped open and screened, and the drip plugs removed. One door must
be opened and screened for a period of 20 minutes, following which it should
be closed and sealed. If the car is to be moved within half an hour, the open-
ing of the door may be omitted.
1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 57

Commodities treated—The treatment is approved for the following fruits and
vegetables: White potatoes, sweetpotatoes, onions, tomatoes, snap beans, lima
beans, sweet corn, cabbage, carrots, beets, apples, and peaches.

(2) FUMIGATION HOUSE, ROOM, AND BOX

The commodities listed above may be fumigated in approved fumigation
chambers. The same requirements as to dosage, circulation period, exposure,
temperature, and screening of doors listed under refrigerator car fumigation
apply. The chamber must be ventilated with the ventilating equipment in
continuous operation for half an hour. All ventilator intakes must be protected
with S-mesh wire screen. The ventilating fan must run during both the placing
and removal of the load. In addition, the requirements for screened loading
facilities and the subsequent certification of loads must be met.

AVERY S. Hoyt,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

B. E. P. Q. 509.

ORDER AMENDING SECTION 301.48-5, CHAPTER III, TITLE 7, CODE OF FEDERAL
REGULATIONS AND MODIFYING THE JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE REGULA-
TIONS AS TO SHIPMENTS OF FRUITS AND VEGETABLES FROM CERTAIN AREAS
IN VIRGINIA

Pursuant to the authority conferred upon the Chief of the Bureau of Ento-
mology and Plant Quarantine by the second proviso of paragraph (1) of sub-
section A of Section 301.48—5, Chapter III, Title 7, Code of Federal Regulations
[regulation 5 of the rules and regulations (17th revision) supplemental to
Notice of Quarantine No. 48 on account of the Japanese beetle, as amended], as
amended by the order of the Secretary of Agriculture dated May 22, 1940
(5 F. R. 1847 et seg.), subdivision (a) of said paragraph is hereby amended to
read as follows:

“(a) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of fruits and
vegetables between October 16 and June 14, inclusive, except that in the case of
movement interstate from the following areas, the exemption applies only during
the period from October 16 to May 31, inclusive:

“Virginia.—The counties of Accomac and Northampton.”

The infestation in the remainder of the area formerly designated in sub-
division (@) is of such a nature that it is considered to be of no hazard in
the spread of Japanese beetles through shipments of fruits and vegetables.
Therefore, it is considered advisable to reduce the area specified in the
subdivision.

Done at Washington, D. C., this 20th day of June 1940.

AveERY S. Hoyt,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO PINK BOLLWORM QUARANTINE
(NO. 52)

B. E. P. Q. 493, revised.

ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS RELATING TO PINK BOLLWORM QUARANTINE—
RESTORING THE TREATMENT REQUIREMENTS AS TO COTTON LINTERS, COTTON-
SEED HULLS, CAKE, AND MEAL, AND EXTENDING THE AREA IN WHICH BALED
COTTON LINT MAY BE MOVED FROM CERTAIN LIGHTLY INFESTED AREAS IN
NEW MEXICO AND TEXAS WITHOUT TREATMENT

May 1, 1940.
INTRODUCTORY NOTE

Administrative instructions issued March 30, 1989 (circular B. E. P. Q. 493)
modified the treatment requirements for the pink bollworm as to baled lint and
linters and products thereof, and also as to cottonseed hulls, cake, and meal
when moved interstate from certain counties in northwestern Texas and from
58 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [ April-June

Lea and Roosevelt Counties, N. Mex. At the time this action was taken, it was
hoped that climatic conditions unfavorabie to the development of the pink boll-
worm, plus control and reguiatory activities, would result in elimination of the
pink bollworm in northwest Texas and adjacent areas in New Mexico. However,
infestations have persisted in such areas and spread to additional counties to the
south and southeast. Therefore, it is considered necessary to restore the re-
strictions previously in effect so that linters, cottonseed hulls, cake, and meal
shall be produced, as a condition of interstate movement from such areas, from
sterilized seed, or in the case of linters, ctherwise treated as specified in quaran-
tine regulations. Baled cotton lint, however, may, under the current instructions,
continue to be shipped from the designated area, without the treatment formerly
required.

The purposes of the present revision of the administrative instructions are
therefore (1) to return to the treatment requirements of paragraphs (@) and
(c) of regulation 4, in shipping cotton linters, cottonseed hulis, cake, and meal,
and (2) to extend the area from which it is considered safe to remove treat-
ment requirements for baled cotton lint, by adding the Texas counties of Concho,
Irion, Mitchell, Sterling, Tom Green, and the regulated part of Coke County.

MODIFICATION OF RESTRICTIONS

Under authority contained in the second proviso of Notice of Quarantine
No. 52, revised (Sec. 301.52), and having determined that facts exist as to the
pest risk involved which make it safe to modify, by making less stringent, the
restrictions contained in paragraph («#) of regulation 4 (Sec. 301.524) of the
pink bollworm quarantine, notice is hereby given that baled cotton lint and
products thereof may be moved interstate without restriction from the following
area:

New Mezxico—lLea and Rooseveit Counties. Jexas—Counties of Andrews,
Ceehran, Conche, Dawson, Ector, Gaines, Glasscock, Hockley, Howard, Irion,
Martin, Midland, Mitchell, Stering. Terry, Tom Green, Yoakum, and the regulated
parts of Bailey, Coke, and Lamb Counties: Provided, (1) That the products have
been produced in an authorized gin and subsequently protected from contamina-
tion, and (2) that a certificate of the United States Department of Agriculture
has been obtained and attached to the containers or shipping papers in accordance
with the requirements prescribed in regulation 11 (Sec. 301.52-11) of said
quarantine.

These instructions supersede and cancel those in circular B. E. P. Q. 493
dated March 380, 1939.

AVERY S. Hoyt,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE QUARAN-
TINE (NO. 72)
B. E. P. Q. 485 (fifth revision).

ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS—REMOVAL OF WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE CERTI-
FICATION REQUIREMENTS UNTIL FEBRUARY 1, 1941, FOR SPECIFIED ARTICLES
CONSIGNED FROM DESIGNATED PORTIONS OF THE REGULATED AREAS

May 24, 1940.

It has been determined that the application of control measures, the continua-
tion of approved sanitation practices, and natural conditions have so decreased
the intensity of infestation of the white-fringed beetle in certain parts of the
regulated areas, aS to eliminate the risk of contamination with the egg or adult
stage, thereby justifying modification of certification requirements. Therefore,
under authorization provided in Notice of Quarantine No. 72 (See. 301.72) all
certification requirements are hereby waived until February 1, 1941, for the
following articles enumerated in Regulation 3 (a) and (0) (See. 301.72-38), when
free from soil and when movcd interstate from the regulated parts of the areas
listed below :

1.-When moved interstate from the regulated parts of the following counties:
In Alabama, Mobile County; in Florida, Escambia County: in Lowisiana, East
Baton Rouge Parish; in J/ississippi, counties of Jackson, Hinds, and Pearl River ;
certification requirements are waived for the following articles:
1940} SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 59

Potatoes and sweetpotatoes.

Sweetpotato vines, draws, and cuttings.

Cordwood, pulpwood, stumpwood, and logs.

Used or unused lumber, timbers, posts, poles, crossties, and other building
materials.

Hay, roughage of all kinds, straw, leaves, and leafmold.

Peas, beans, and peanuts in shells, or the shells of any of these products.

Seed cotton, cottonseed, baled cotton lint, and linters.

Used implements and machinery, scrap metal, junk, and utensils or containers
coming in contact with the ground.

Brick, tiling, stone, and concrete slabs and blocks.

Nursery stock and other plants, which are free from soil.

2. When moved interstate from the parishes of Saint Bernard and Orleans
(including the city of New Orleans) and from the regulated parts of the parishes
of Jefferson and Plaquemines in Lowisiana, certification requirements are waived
for the following articles:

Potatoes and sweetpotatoes.

Sweetpotato vines, draws, and cuttings.

Cordwood, pulpwood, stumpwood, and logs.

Unused lumber, timbers, posts, poles, and crossties.

Hay, roughage of all kinds, straw, leaves, and leafmold.

Peas, beans, and peanuts in the shells, or the shells of any of these products.

Seed cotton, cottonseed, baled cotton lint, and linters.

All articles designated in paragraphs (a) and (06) of Regulation 3 of Quaran-
tine No. 72 (Sec. 301.72-8) for which certification requirements are not herein-
above waived, shall remain under the restrictions of that regulation during the
periods covered therein.

(Issued under Sec. 301.72) [B. E. P. Q. 485, Fifth Revision, effective June 1,
1940. ]

This revision supersedes all previous issues of circular B. E. P. Q. 485.

Avery S. Hoyr,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

INSTRUCTORS TO POSTMASTERS

Post OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, June 10, 1940.

POSTMASTER :

My Dear Sir: Attention is invited to the inclosed administrative instructions
(B. E. P. Q. 485, Fifth Revision), issued by the Bureau of Entomology and Plant
Quarantine, United States Department of Agriculture, in connection with Federal
Quarantine Order No. 72, on account of the white-fringed beetle.

Postmasters in the quarantined areas will please be governed accordingly.
See paragraph 1, section 595, Postal Laws and Regulations.

Very truly yours,
; RAMSEY S. BLAck,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.

TERMINAL INSPECTION OF PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS
CHANGE OF PLANT INSPECTION PLACE IN ARIZONA

Post OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, April 2, 1940.

Postmasters are informed that facilities for the inspection of plants and plant
products at San Simon, Ariz., have been discontinued and a new inspection place
established in lieu thereof at Bowie, Ariz., where inspection will be made upon
call. See section 596, Postal Laws and Regulations, and article 62 (b), page 20
of the July 1939, Postal Guide, Part I.

RAMSEY S. BLACK,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.
60 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS
P. Q. C. A. 283, Revised, Supplement No. 7. ’
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF CUBA

APRIL 8, 1940.
WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE RESTRICTIONS
[Resolution No. 253, Mareh 27, 1939]
IMPORTATION OF CERTAIN PRODUCTS PROHIBITED FROM INFESTED AREAS

ARTICLE 1. The following products are deemed possible carriers of the insect
pest known as the white-fringed beetle (Pantomorus leucoloma (Boh.)) and
another closely related species of Pantomorus, namely, potatoes, sweetpotatoes,
and other tubers, peas, peanuts in the shell, unginned cotton, cottonseed, earth,
and turf (sod).

Art. 2. The importation into Cuba of any of the above-mentioned products is
strictly prohibited from the infested (regulated) areas *® of the States of Alabama,
Florida, Mississippi, and Louisiana, and similar regions in the United States
where the above-mentioned insects may become established in the future. Other
products which, in the opinion of the Cuban Ministry of Agriculture, may be- -
deemed possible carriers of the above-mentioned insects, may be prohibited
entry from such infested areas in the future.

PRODUCTS FROM UNINFESTED AREAS MUST BE CERTIFIED

ArT. 3. When these products which are the subject of quarantine action by
Cuba, originate in uninfested areas of the above-mentioned States, or from like
areas in States which may become infested in the future, it will be necessary,
in order to permit their entry into Cuba, that they be accompanied by a phyto-
sanitary certificate, visaed by a Cuban consul, issued by the U. 8S. Department of
Agriculture, affirming that the areas from which the products proceed are free
from the above-mentioned insects.

INSPECTION ON ARRIVAL

Art. 4. The products referred to in this resolution whose importation is not
prohibited, will be subjected on arrival in Cuba to inspection by the Bureau of

lant Quarantines of the Cuban Ministry of Agriculture, and if they are found
without the aforesaid certificate when such certificates are required, or if
inspection shows them to be infested, they will be disposed of by reexportation
or by burning, as the consignee may elect.

AveERY S. Hoyz,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

B. E. P. Q. 375, Revised Supplement No. 3.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, KINGDOM OF EGYPT

Aprit 8, 1940.

IMPORTATION OF CERTAIN FRUITS AND PLANTS PROHIBITED

[Order of May 29, 1939, of the Ministry of Agriculture Notice in “Journal Officiel,’”’
No. 71 of July 20, 1939]

INFESTATION BY CERTAIN SCALE INSECTS PROHIBITED ENTRY

ARTICLE 2. The entry into Egypt of all fruits, plants, and parts of plants
will. be prohibited if, after inspection by agents of the Ministry of Agricul-
ture, they are shown to be infested with Aspidiotus destructor Sign., Pseudo-
coccus nipae Mask., or Pseudococcus comstocki Kuw. It has been demon-
strated that these insects cannot be controlled effectively by fumigation.



6 See Notice of Quarantine No. 72, the White-Fringed Beetle Quarantine.
1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 61

LIST OF PLANTS REQUIRING AUTHORIZATION EXTENDED

Art. 3. The following list of plants, including also the fruits and parts of
plants, is added to those which may be imported into Egypt only by an
authorization granted by the Ministry of Agriculture and the importation
must conform to the conditions of the authorization:

Palmaceae. _ Amaryllidaceae.
Pandanaceae. Myrtaceae.
Bignoniaceae. Cleaceae.
Anonaceae. Lauraceae.
Musaceae. Caricaceae.
Anacardiaceae. Ebenaceae.
Rubiaceae.

The application for the authorization should be addressed to the Crop Pro-
tection Section, Ministry of Agriculture, Cairo.
AvERY S. Hoyt,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

B. E. P. Q. 411, Supplement No. 2
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF MEXICO

APRIL 8, 1940.

AMENDMENT TO EXTERIOR QUARANTINE No. 12 ABROGATED
[Resolution published October 11, 1939]

THE MINISTRY OF AGRICULTURE AND DEVELOPMENT
ALFALFA SEED FROM YUMA COUNTY, ARIZONA

* * * * % * *
Whereas, the insect found in Yuma County, Ariz., corresponds to the species

Hypera brunneipennis Boh. which is not found in the fields during the har-
vesting of alfalfa seed and, therefore, cannot contaminate it:
* * as * *

* 7

This Ministry has seen fit to issue the following Resolution.

1. There is abrogated hereby the Addition to Exterior Quarantine No. 12,
promulgated on June 16, 1939, because it is not applicable.

2. Alfalfa seed harvested in the County of Yuma, Ariz. U. S. A., may
be imported into the Republic of Mexico, provided that it is covered by a
certificate of soundness (sanitary certificate) issued by the competent au-
thorities of the neighbor country of the north, in which it is stated that it
(the seed) is free from the insects Hypera posticus and Bgera brunneipennis
and, in addition, it is packed in new and closed sacks.

This supplement cancels B. E. P. Q. 411, supplement No. 1.

AvERY S. Hoyt,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

B. E. P. Q. 502, Supplement No. 1.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF PARAGUAY
May 9, 1940.
CuRCULIO ADDED TO List Or DECLARED PESTS
[Decree No. 165, published in Gaceta Oficial of Paraguay, March 8, 1940]

The President of the Republic of Paraguay decrees: In accordance with
Article 11, division B of the law 672, the cureulio, Conotrachelus denieri Hust.,
is added to the list of agricultural insect pests.

Lee A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.
62

BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

[April—June

PENALTIES IMPOSED FOR ee OF THE PLANT QUARANTINE

<

According to reports received by the Bureau during the period April 1 to
June 30, 1940, penalties have recently been imposed by the proper authorities
for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act, as follows:

QUARANTINES AFFECTING MEXICAN PRODUCTS

In the case of the United States versus the persons listed below, for attempt-

ing to smuggle in contraband plant material,
imposed by the United States customs officials at the following ports:







Name Port
BeWas Qe ants eee ae San Ysidro, Calif________
SESUSUH BRO ms BA ee eee 2 ol ee GO sige ee ae
IVI SV AG [0 Jo iira eee ee a eal OSS eee. ee
ARVO WAG CASE ee eee eee ie eet ee Brownsville, Tex_______-
FA OLOMTO WV Nears tn C7 eee | eee OSS Oh aah ee de
IZ TFOXE Gi ORO Ts1 (0) Cee ee ee ee | nega CO Foe oe
VIS PEC TIVL SH © eS till © eee eee emcee | eens Ona te. at ie eee
ITAA VAS vil gas ae a EL ee ee GORIaES., Sala eee ee
‘BenibaeheyicSe ee eee eee Del 10, ROX we) Sie
ASE ditspVialde7dey Beri camec=t= |e ae Okes=s aaa = eee
RetusiOpB a ROdnISUeZ a= =e ‘ace IaSS ue xan eee
IMaRoanita ss am dae open seen ee ee Oss. A Bae ea
Vis ViariavAeide: Bel tram waaay | reer CLO ites Bue eect
EVO MAT a AU vate Gl meee ees see em | Dorel GOULSi: Sa wear ace oun
RIV 9 Cra ire ewan ee nee Sen ees | ede COE Tee eats eae
PB@Te Git hea VE area ClO ees eee | ee GOEL Ors wa
CrP ovina IN Tyee m2 Ee AC] ON GSEY ENE POET
hiburciosMedinillaa sana ER aso exc 52 Jes
Bera Teer til O e ee e ge | ee On, . eshte Fate ened
iMarcanitaseinonvde: Contrerdsaa=- ===. Omeyeae sen on ewe ele
Me] C VA. 67m eee Hidalgo, Mexd va pees
Salinas G OMICT ee ee eee | ee GOP eee ee ee
VIA CUS TS 210 Cle 7a ee ee ae | ne GOMER er rare
TNETeSAe aT ITC 7 see et SE OR a ee Goh etEth eee
SallvadorsB Seat @ mesa seers eee ees |e GLa ee ey ae ene
Maria Rosales de Gonzales_______|____- CONS ele are tater
IVICA) AC avazOSees tease ee ee eee aa COPE. JR Sake
BMelistaseAto will rks eee meee eee ey | eee Go. Saker ee tae
Florencia Reyas_ Lae BNR ce | a CO sys Stil eee ee
AP ULATUNG ES CSC Tete et ere teers a oe | nee COE Rae air SU ean
ET FUTON pe ee a rae Coe | ane Cl Oe a tee ee
PAamad ar G Barret see see esate sat |e GOW SE Per ae
MOA arden as eee eee ee en gee || ene ae Gop eae brow ees
1RxXoyses), IBYostnaelerga Sa GO Aare ses etic nee
SIV Tear LENE LIN Ze oe ewe rere et | eee CO LO aly aera Naat alae oe Ro
JuameAlmaraz. - = =2 eee eee eee Coutts Ri ares 7 erat
Be CA dam chaise Soe ia er as |i Goeth Feo Bee
Mani elave rine dam sare ae ees |e C1 Qe ae tyne Sea pega eT TEA
UP ee AUST ae Spee ee ae asp tg pl res CO eee crerce ee
(hibrada'C asas ia! Se Be Beet Sh GOs FAL SES aks
ViUAN AHO ALISUCSES ke ergee mele eae eee dO sit cee alic EA 2
GuadalipayRiamire7 esse ee eee GOs eat ee eee
SNAP a MTC Zee ae es ee ee ene ete aes WG Arecosdie kes s see eee
Rebecca hame7za= eee |e SOO Res Pe ey
Maria de Jesus Martinez ________|____- GOR aitonas SHS. = Scene
Ofiliay Mar G17 C7 eee a oe oe | ea Osta ee ae
HMTigwe Aldopes = seawes e ee CORO SH. he poe
Micwellernnand 72 aees see ene en Pee Goze ie: eee ee
Divencea Vda. Rodriquez____-___|.___- Ones ae Se ee
AVA Tai EVO CUNT CUT Zep ee re | Gos Ais 55.2 ee eee
AVITC IAT GiTarG ad Oe ee | ena Oe Ms ee i
irs Oliva Rodriquez esas. seen | eee GO Pea ie ees
Oscar Carabelloy seme Ss ae | eee GOBSARET tees fe
WValentine Hernandez... 2-225 -5-) e dO eee as anes
CesariorRamosia seit oie. Ne a ees CO Seria 2 Ses ee
SF LT UUs ple 1a epee eee | ee GO eae RS eS
Bilena Bacaneeras= ss ees eee. seen Deen Goes So 2 res. ee
JESUS Val OZ o = ese tees Sie Se tg tee CKO) eee ee eee Sere
Rilias ¥ Wopezsek. - sir ke oe 0 eee dos: tate ht) wii sss
aed ca Wear, trite ene ree ea | Ofna - Sa
Nazario: Galvanks.-242 = 2232 $2 allah CO tabs so Ue eae
TOCIOCNOS. 5.5 shee Lehtele | A ce an Oe a SANE eer ae
EIS CEN CIA: eisat Leman acne hae een | eee CORE BS cel nile EN
Blvirai Saenz. i.2) asBNke ot ae a ee GOR REE ee ES
ROSE Siedamaniewie 2 ae Sep ee GORE Ee TNE Lane See
BMT LORD: Fle rm a1 © zee a eee | GON 23 eta a ee
SOMME EB OSS le ee ee |S ee CO an se ee ee

Contraband

ispapaya: oe eerie eee
98 plants: .22.3) eee
20 plants’... ae eee

4 MANGOGs at 5 eee eee eee

3 Mangoes... ee eee

6 plant

§22li ese se 2 See eS Se eee

2 plums. eee eee
L6-plantss2 2) ee eee
2 avocados... {t= ee eee

6 plant

8 MangoeSi-<.- So eee eee
1 mangos. 2-2 Pee eee
2 AVOCACOS SS 2s 2 ee ee ee

Sis Je ae eee

5 plants.
il INaNneo Seed 2 ee eee
3 avecad0Ss:2.) 235) ea

1 plant

1 mango and 1 mango seed _-_-___---
I. mangosiz. _ Seeet eee eee
5 ae 2222.3 ee

2 plants. 22. eee
2iavocados=_=-. 204s ae eee
13 avocados and 5 mangoes_-_--_---

1 plant

1 plant and 4% pound tree seed_---
ZavoOcCadoss 2:22 Ae ae Se

19 plan

ti) fo ee

24 sweet limes, 10 plants, 1 avocado-

4: QRAN GCS: . 22452223 eS eee
2 mangoes and 4 sapote seed____-_-_-
Mame y=s o.oo eee



the penalties indicated were

Penalty

See et tend aPC Eegb P tome ene Fr Pt Ft Fs) Feat gh pt e=Ah a =AQ Gd fF ptf Fh A ef tu pk cya fos fons) pea fc cat espe pea) fn a eat pet pdt pe ay pe aS
1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 63



Name Port Contraband

Penalty



lOO ES Gi WATOGO wROx. ao 22252 5-8 Osea OCSe meee ee oe ee $1
INGE 1S). IMIG. oe GOES Eee Sst od See PEMA EO OSL st aa eS a a 1
Wsminany sw OOnIpie7 22. =| ____ COs tS eee + meres 4mameys, and 4sapote 1
seed.
dgater. eh ANOS Cee Ee Gos TASS TS Cl. et 1 mango seed and4 plants__________ 1
Enrique Barrera_------- ee (10 ies ee ees ae Eee | GO PIV OC ROSS eee eee ee eee 1
BME HeVeL-. .-. =... | 5° d@- 47.4. 1 4 +s | symone 2. | 1
Iwi, Wha ZT Dee, a re aT fl Qe aetees. Ao eee a ee GLA ERS en ee ee eee ee 1
Weanwel Vorres. ss |__ Cee ae ae Dp ee ie ps he 1
I eonmineGeee ss ee | (Ot se e ee ee 6 mameys and 1 mango____________ 1
Mamoaamornoms - 9-2. |____- Goat si? 5 ee 3 mangoes and | orange___________| 1
DIAMIOMGUIMONLOZ=9- =) 222. 222. 2.) 2-2 LO eee ea on ee TWO CAGO fe ee ee ee ee 1
Mrs. Maria Ramirez... ._-_____|____- RSC tees ce ty 4 avocados and 1 mango___________ 1
Bednopiaminezes-- =|. (0 (6) See ee ol 8 aay oe 2 MAR PDES Ase Skee fee se 3 | 1
Mrs) Carmen Ariuilar...__.._.-|__-.. dow tae ee LBTINAM OOP. ee iere ae oe 1
HestISPROGEIGUCTE = ee nee Ot ee ee SIRI ELCOLSE Se ree ee eee = 1
Miss Amelia Bacanega____________|____- domes Pree Fee Smanzoes:. WORE ay eA P| 1
eae orem | _ OG See 10 mangoes and 25avocados_______- 3
IMIS INE ee en rr Oi ae ee sa ZO USTN GS ee ye ne he 1
MinssuaseranUandeze eos 2 | Qe er ee ae SR (GO i oo tele Babs shel Tinh del Satara torts 1
Donieano Corba ss yes tk do=2. Ath. 30 ies Pimangos Vos 2 sth FhOT Weg | 1
VER Se Scales car Aes eS eye Be oye ne | A. Ol. 82 pt eo sag) 2iplan tssqee AU ee ese C0 ea 1
David Mizondo. +e -----. Miereodes, Texter = =. | A OPIOOS as 2 Ke i

\


ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY
AND PLANT QUARANTINE

Len A. STRONG, Chief.

S. A. RoHwER, ASsistant Chief.

Avery S. Hoyt, Assistant Chief.

P. N. ANNAND, Assistant Chief.

Ff. H. SPENCER, Business Manager.

Roiwia P. CurRIE, Editor.

MABEL COLCcORD, Librarian.

J. A. HystLop, in Charge, Division of Insect Pest Survey and Information.

J. I. HAMBLETON, in Charge, Division of Bee Culture Investigations.

D. L. VAN DINE, in Charge, Division of Fruit Insect Investigations.

F. C. CRAIGHEAD, in Charge, Division of Forest Insect Investigations.

W. H. WHITE, in Charge, Division of Truck Crop and Garden Insect Investiga-
tions.

C. M. PAcKARD, in Charge, Division of Cereal and Forage Insect Investigations. -

R. W. HARNED, in Charge, Division of Cotton Insect Investigations.

F. C. BrsHoprp, in Charge, Division of Insects Affecting Man and Animals.

L. A. HAWKINS, in Charge, Division of Control Investigations.

R. C. Roark, in charge, Division of Insecticides and Fungicides.

C. F. W. MUESEBECK, in Charge, Division of Insect Identification.

C. P. CLAUSEN, in Charge, Division of Foreign Parasite Introduction.

S. B. FrAcker, in Charge, Division of Plant Disease Control.

B. M. GApDIS, in Charge, Division of Domestic Plant Quarantines.

HE. R. SAsscer, in Charge, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines.

A. F. Burerss, in Field Charge, Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail Moth Control
(headquarters, Greenfield, Mass.).

H., G. Brewer, in Field Charge, Japanese Beetle and Gypsy Moth and Brown-
Tail Moth Quarantines, European Corn Borer Certification, and Dutch Elm
Disease Eradication (headquarters, Bloomfield, N. J.).

R. E. McDona.LD, in Field Charge, Pink Bollworm and Thurberia Weevil Quar-
antines (headquarters, San Antonio, Tea.).

P. A. Horan, in Field Charge, Mexican Fruitfly Quarantine (headquarters,
Harlingen, Tez.).

A. C. BAKER, in Field Charge, Fruitfly Investigations (headquarters, Mewico
City, Mexico).

64

U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1940
2 A,B. i: P..Q,.No.-144 Issued December 1940

United States Department of Agriculture

BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS
JULY-SEPTEMBER 1940

CONTENTS
: Page
Quarantine and other official announcements-_--_____-__-_--__----.----------------------------------- 65
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (No. 48)-_____-_-___-_-_---__--___________- 65
Instructions to poStmmasters ---_-_.--_--_-_---_- Ee ie ea oe eee 65
Japanese beetle control on fruit and vegetable shipments ends for Season--_____________________- 66

Order advancing date of termination of restrictions on fruit and vegetable shipments under the
Japanese beetlé quarantine to September 19 for the year 1940--___________________-________--

Instructions to poStmasters-________ eee re see ee eee 66
Order modifying administrative instructions to inspectors on the treatment of nursery products,
fruits, vegetables, and soil for the Japanese beetle (B. E. P. Q. 499, supplement No. 3)________ 67

Order modifying administrative instructions to inspectors on the treatment of nursery products,
fruits, vegetables, and soil for the Japanese beetle (B. E. P. Q. 499, supplement No. 1, 2d

cet apne remee tons 2 sense IT SNE Sh NSd ANI Sea BE PET en oF RRs SSPE SS 22 eA ee 67
Announcements relating to Mediterranean fruitfly and melonfly quarantine (No. 13)______________ 68
Use of a new fumigant approved for certain Hawaiian fruits and vegetables______._____________ 68
Use of methyl] bromide authorized for treating fruits and vegetables for movement from Hawaii
casunpeaeeaeeraabrerame ee oe meee fore 2 NR YL ATCT gt TE TIE) a ee) Pe ee 69

Administrative instructions amending authorization of the shipment of fruits and vegetanies -
from Hawaii to the mainland subject to fumigation with methyl bromide under supervision

noun RES UENO ere ots, RU ee ae ee ee eee oe Oe
Announcement relating to pink bo]lworm quarantine (No. 52)_________________-___._____________- 70
Statement regarding cooperative pink bollworm control program for the crop season 1940______ 70
Announcements relating to white-fringed beetle quarantine (No. 72)______________________________ 72
Administrative instructions—removal of white-fringed beetle certification requirements until
February 1, 1941, for specified articles (B. E. P. Q. 485, 6th revision)_________________-_______ 7
rie eae EEA SU TLINE LOLS 7 eset. yee. sah sy 2 Sheet esl da Tee ee 73
emminal Mispecwon of plants and plant producis._____ _- . - =_- - - tnt ee teen ee bt 73
Oregon State plant quarantines (revision of notice dated June 23, 1937)________________________ 73
ene ubICUMMteMIC in! site 20ee SUA aU Sere ee eer bbe a PEST aed Tie 76
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Kingdom of Iraq (B. E. P. Q. 468, revised)______________ 76
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Uruguay (B. E. P. Q. 382, revised)__________ 78
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act___._________-_______________________- 82
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine____________________________________. 84

QUARANTINE AND OTHER OFFICIAL
ANNOUNCEMENTS

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE
(NO. 48)

INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS

Post OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, August 8, 1940.
POSTMASTER :

My Dear Sir: Your attention is invited to the inclosed copy of the latest
revision of the regulations supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 48 of the
-U. 8. Department of Agriculture on account of the Japanese beetle, effective
April 5, 1940, extending the area under quarantine and modifying slightly the
restrictions previously imposed, by which you will please be governed. See
paragraph 1, section 595, Postal Laws and Regulations.

Very truly yours,
RAMSEY 8S. BLAcK,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.
273058—40
66 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July—Sept.

JAPANESE BEETLE CONTROL ON FRUIT AND VEGETABLE SHIPMENTS ENDS FOR
SEASON

(Press notice)
SEPTEMPER 21, 1940.

Restrictions on the movement of fruits and vegetables under the Japanese
beetle quarantine regulations have been removed for the season, the Department
of Agriculture announced today. Restrictions on cut flowers, however, remain
in force through October 15.

Under quarantine regulations, certificates showing freedom from Japanese
beetle are required until October 16 on interstate shipments of fruits and .vege-
tables of any kind moved via refrigerator car or motortruck from the areas of
heavy beetle flight. The new order, however, releases the fruits and vegetables
from that requirement nearly four weeks earlier than is provided in the
regulations.

The areas of heavy flight include Delaware, the District of Columbia, and
parts of Connecticut, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, and Vir-
ginia.

Inspection of fruits and vegetables is necessary only during the period when
the beetles are in active flight. Officials of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant
Quarantine said that there is no risk that such products will carry the Japanese
beetle after this active period, which is now apparently over throughout the
regulated areas. During the last few days the Department’s inspectors have
found no beetles in fruits and vegetables. .

There is still danger, however, that the beetles may be transported in cut
flowers. ‘Therefore, the restrictions on interstate movement of cut flowers and
other parts of plants will remain in full force through October 15.

Restrictions on the movement of nursery, ornamental, and greenhouse stock
and all other plants (except cut flowers, soil-free aquatic plants, and portions
of plants without roots and free from soil) are in force throughout the year and
are not affected by this order.

ORDER ADVANCING DATE OF TERMINATION OF RESTRICTIONS ON FRUIT AND VEGE-
TABLE SHIPMENTS UNDER JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE TO SEPTEMBER 19
FOR THE YEAR 1940

It has been determined that the active period of the Japanese beetle in its
relation to fruits and vegetables has already ceased for the present season and
that it is, therefore, safe to permit the unrestricted movement of fruits and veg-
etables from the regulated areas. Therefore it is ordered that the restrictions
on the interstate movement of fruits and vegetables: imposed by Sec. 301: 48-5
[regulation 5 of the rules and regulations (17th. revision) as amended, supple-
mental to Notice of Quarantine No. 48] are hereby removed effective on and
after September 19, 1940. This order advances the termination of the restric-
tions as to fruits and vegetables provided for in regulation 5 from October 16
to September 19, 1940, and applies to this season only.

Done at the city of Washington this 19th day of September 1940.

Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.

[ SEAL ] Paut H. APPLEBY,

Acting Secretary of Agriculture.

a on the Division of the Federal Register September 19, 1940, 11:01 a. m.; 5

INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS

THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, September 26, 1940.

The United States Department of Agriculture advises it has been determined
that the active period of the Japanese beetle in its relation to fruits and vege-
. fables. has already ceased for the present season and that it is, therefore, safe to
permit the unrestricted movement of fruits and vegetables listed in regulation
5 (see. 301.48—5), Rules and Regulations (17th revision), supplemental to
Notice of Quarantine No. 48, on account of the Japanese beetle from the entire
regulated area as defined in article 3 of such rules and regulations.
1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 67

Postmasters in the area regulated by the Japanese beetle quarantine may,
therefore, until June 15, 1941, accept fully prepaid parcels of fruits and vege-
tables when properly packed without being accompanied with the certificate of
inspection prescribed by that quarantine, except that in the case of the move-
ment interstate from certain areas in Virginia—section 301.48—-5 paragraph
(a)—the exemption will apply only until June 1, 1941.

There is still danger, however, that the beetles may be transported in cut
flowers. Therefore, the restrictions on interstate movement of cut flowers and
other parts of plants will remain in full force through October 15.

Restrictions on the movement of nursery, ornamental, and greenhouse stock
and all other plants (except cut flowers, soil-free aquatic plants, and portions
of plants without roots and free from soil) are in force throughout the year
and are not affected by this notice.

RAMSEY S. BLACK,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.

B. E. P. Q. 499, Supplement No. 3.

ORDER MODIFYING ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS TO INSPECTORS ON THE TREAT-
MENT OF NURSERY PRODUCTS, FRUITS, VEGETABLES, AND SOIL FOR THE
JAPANESE BEETLE

Pursuant to the authority conferred upon the Chief of the Bureau of Ento-
mology and Plant Quarantine by Sec. 301.48-6, Chapter III, Title 7, Code of
Federal Regulations [regulation 6 of the rules and regulations (17th revision)
supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 48 on account of the Japanese beetle,
as amended], the paragraph reading “Period of treatment.—The soil must not be
disturbed for 48 hours,’ under subsection (m) (1) of Sec. 301.48b [Circular
B. E. P. Q. 499, issued June 9, 1939], is hereby deleted. The paragraph quoted
above appears on page 15 of the mimeographed edition of said circular.

Results of further experience in treatment of plants in the field with earbon
disulphide emulsion for compliance with the certification requirements of Sec.
301.48 [Notice of Quarantine No. 48] indicate that the existing requirement
that soil must not be disturbed for 48 hours after treatment may be safely
eliminated.

Done at Washington, D. C., this 19th day of September 1940.

AVERY S. Hoyt,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

[Filed with the Division of the Federal Register September 24, 1940, 11:46 a. m.;
Sun dee 3191.)

B. E. P. Q. 499 (Supplement No. 1, Second Revision).

ORDER MODIFYING ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS TO INSPECTORS ON THE TREAT-
MENT OF NURSERY PRODUCTS, FRUITS, VEGETABLES, AND SOIL, FOR THE
JAPANESE BEETLE

Pursuant to the authority conferred upon the Chief of the Bureau of En-
tomology and Plant Quarantine by Sec. 301.48-6, Chapter III, Title 7, Code of
Federal Regulations [regulation 6 of the rules and regulations (17th revision)
supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 48 on aceount of the Japanese beetle,
as amended], subsection (1) (5) of Sec. 301.48b* on page 13 of the mimeo-
graphed edition of circular B. E. P. Q. 499, issued June 9, 1939, is hereby modi-
fied to read as follows:

(5) METHYL BROMIDE FUMIGATION

Equipment.—An approved fumigation chamber equipped with vaporizing, air-
cireulating, and ventilating systems must be provided.

Application —After the chamber is loaded, the methyl bromide must be vapor-
ized within it. The air within the chamber must be kept in circulation during
the period of fumigation. At the completion of the treatment, the chamber
must be well ventilated before it is entered and the plants removed. The ven-
tilating system should also be in continuous operation during the entire period
of removal of the fumigated articles.

1 This section was originally issued as Sec. 301.48a.
68 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July—Sept.

(i) Fumigation of plants, with or without soil

Temperatures, periods of treatment, and dosages.—The temperature of the soil
(with bare root stock, the root spaces) and of the air for each type of treatment
must remain throughout the entire period of treatment at the minimum specified
in the following table, or higher:

Dosage

Period of | , “methyl

bromide per

Temperature at least treatment | ¥ 9090 cubi
,000 cubic

feet)
aot Hours Pounds
RROD et GS eS Ie eS aS aoe ee a Ee eS 2
DOS ge egies le 8 Me 5 i Rs tes Ne a al tS ee 2% 2%
Osa Pe ee creat en rn EME EIN ise (leer are SA =a el NP ey ope 4 2%
AP DOPS HEA Sere be mba ce AT ache eR We es ree Sd Rec eR Ree AR 44 2%



The dosage shall be for each 1,000 cubic feet including the space occupied by
the load.

Preparation of plants.—The treatment is to be applied to plants with bare
roots or in 12-inch pots or smaller, or in soil balls not larger than 12 inches in
diameter nor thicker than 12 inches when not spherical. The soil should not be —
puddled or saturated and must be in a condition which in the judgment of the
inspector is suitable for fumigation. The plants should be stacked on racks or
separated so that the gas can have access to both top and bottom surfaces of
pots or soil balls. While not essential that the balls be completely separated
from each other they should not be jammed tightly together. 'Treatments J
and 2 may be employed in fumigating packaged plants prepared in a manner
satisfactory to the inspector.

Results of further experiments in treatment of plants with methyl bromide
for compliance with the certification requirements of Sec. 301.48 [Notice of Quar-
antine No. 48] indicate that the additional authorized method of fumigation is
effective in destroying the Japanese beetle. a

Varieties of plants.—The list of plants, including greenhouse, perennial, and
nursery-stock types treated experimentally, is subject to continual expansion
and, moreover, is too great to include in these instructions. Such a list, includ-
“ing also those which have been injured by the treatment, will be supplied on
request.

The schedule for the fumigation of strawberry plants as specified in sub-
section (1) (5) (ii) of Sec. 301.48b | page 14 of the mimeographed edition of
circular B. E. P. Q. 499] remains the same as heretofore. ;
- - This supplement supersedes Supplement No. 1, revised, dated March 22, 1940.

Done at. the city of Washington this 27th day of September 1940.

AVERY S. Hoyt,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.
sett with the Division of the Federal Register October 1, 1940, 11:56 a. m.;5 F.R.,
(ke eye

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO MEDITERRANEAN FRUITFLY
AND MELONFLY QUARANTINE (NO. 18)

USE OF A NEW FUMIGANT APPROVED FOR CERTAIN HAWAIIAN FRUITS AND
VEGETABLES

(Press notice)
JuLy 19, 1940.
Certain Hawaiian fruits and vegetables, entry of which to the continental
United States is restricted by Federal plant quarantine, may now come in,
provided they have received a treatment under supervision and safeguards that
makes it impossible for them to spread two destructive insect pests—the Mediter-
ranean fruitfly and the melonfly—which made the quarantine necessary. Lee A.
Strong, Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, United States
1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 69

Department of Agriculture, authorizes, effective August 1, 1940, a method of
treatment by methyl bromide and special handling of these certain fruits and
vegetables as a condition for certification for their movement from Hawaii
to the mainland.

The Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine developed this treatment
after extensive research, during which tests were made with thousands of insects.
The results of these tests show conclusively that fumigation with methyl bro-
mide, properly done under the supervision of trained inspectors, will kill the
Mediterranean fruitfly and the melonfly in all stages of their life cycles in these
certain fruits and vegetables—guavas, papayas, bell peppers, bitter melons, cucum-
bers, Summer squash, string beans, and tomatoes. This, together with safe-
guards to prevent infestation after treatment, will prevent the entry of these
pests and make it possible to ship the fruits and vegetables to he mainland.

Doctor Strong points out that the requirements as to the possible use of this
new method involve many details and that those interested may get full informa-
tion and detailed instructions from the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quaran-
tine in Washington, D. C.

USE OF METHYL BROMIDE AUTHORIZED FOR TREATING FRUITS AND VEGETABLES
FOR MOVEMENT FROM HAWAII TO THE MAINLAND 2

JuLY 19, 1940.

Lee A. Strong, Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, United
States Department of Agriculture, announced today that he has authorized, effec-
tive August 1, 1940, a method of treatment, under supervision, of certain fruits
and vegetables with methyl bromide as a condition for certification for their
movement from Hawaii to the mainland. In making this announcement, Strong
stated that extensive experiments by the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quar-
antine have demonstrated that the fumigation of guavas, papayas, bell peppers,
bitter melons, cucumbers, Summer squash, string beans, and tomatoes with methyl
bromide under prescribed temperature, dosage, and exposure conditions will kill
all stages of the Mediterranean fruitfly and the melonfly. As an added safe-
guard in connection with this treatment the instructions require that the fruits
and vegetables so treated shall be handled subsequent to treatment in a man-
ner which will preclude infestation until they are dispatched to the mainland.

In authorizing this method of treatment Strong says the information avail-
able suggests that the fumigation of papayas and tomatoes can be accomplished
without affecting their palatability. He states, however, that information is
not now available as to the possible effect the treatment will have on guavas,
bell peppers, bitter melon, Summer squash, and string beans under the conditions
that prevail in Hawaii. He adds that the data obtained in experimental work
elsewhere indicate that cucumbers fumigated with dosages of methyl bromide
even lower than that authorized for Hawaiian fruits and vegetables may result
in severe injury.

In making this announcement Strong emphasizes that inexactness or care-
lessness in the application of the fumigant may result in injury to the fruits
and vegetables which will cause their rejection. He also emphasized that evi-
dence based on trial shipments under conditions of transportation from Hawaii
is not available to demonstrate that the fruits and vegetables the movement of
which is now authorized will be marketable on the mainland after the application
of the treatment here authorized. He suggests that those interested in using
this treatment now approved should make small trial shipments.

B. E. P. Q. 510.

ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS AMENDING AUTHORIZATION OF THE SHIPMENT
OF FRUITS AND VEGETABLES FROM HAWAII TO THE MAINLAND SUBJECT TO
FUMIGATION WITH METHYL BROMIDE UNDER SUPERVISION

Pursuant to the authority contained in the first proviso of Section 301.13-2,
Chapter III, Title 7, Code of Federal Regulations [regulation 2 of the rules and
regulations supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 138, on account of the
Mediterranean fruitfly and melonfiy in Hawaii], provision is hereby made, effec-

2 Special statement prepared for Hawaiian newspapers.
70 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July—Sept.

tive August 1, 1940, for the certification of guavas, papayas, bell peppers. bitter
melon, cucumbers, summer squash, string beans, and tomatoes for movement from
the Territory of Hawaii into or through any State, Territory, or District of the
United States, when the prescribed fumigation with methyl bromide is applied
in Hawaii at plants designated for this purpose by the United States Depart-
ment of Agriculture and under the supervision of the inspectors of the Bureau
of Entomology and Plant Quarantine. Any fruits or vegetables treated and
shipped under the provisions of these instructions are so handled at the risk
of the shipper, and no liability shall attach to the United States Department of
Agriculture or to any officer or representative of that Department in the event
of injury resulting to the fruits and vegetables named.

Required fumigation equipment.—Fumigation must be performed in a gas-
tight fumigation chamber. This chamber shall be lined with sheet metal, with
locked and soldered seams, and fitted with a tight metal-clad door which closes
against gaskets so that it is gastight at ordinary atmospheric pressures. The
fumigation chamber shall be equipped with a blower-type fan having a capacity
of at least one-third the volume of the room per minute for stirring the gas mix-
ture in the chamber. A method for ventilating the fumigation chamber and
removing the fumigant from the commodity after fumigation shall also be pro-
vided. The fumigation equipment and method of application of the fumigant
shall be satisfactory to the inspector charged by the Department with the super-
vision of the treatment.

Method of fumigation.—The commodity to be treated shall be stacked in the
chamber in a manner satisfactory te the supervising inspector and fumigated for
a period of 3144 hours at a dosage of 2 pounds of methyl bromide per 1,000 cubic
feet, including the space occupied by the commodity. The temperature of the
commodity within the fumigation chamber shall not be lower than 80° F. through-
out the period of fumigation. Throughout the exposure the fan referred to
above shall be operated. After the fumigation has been completed the com-
modity shall be ventilated by drawing fresh air over and through the load for
a period of at least 20 minutes.

Caution.—Methyl bromide is a gas at ordinary temperatures. It is colorless
and practically odorless in concentrations used for fumigation purposes. It is
a poison and the operator should, as a measure of safety, use an approved gas
mask when exposed to the gas at concentrations used in fumigation and when
opening the door to ventilate the fumigation chamber. The fumigation cham-
ber should not be entered without a gas mask until it has been thoroughly
aerated.

Certification.—The certification of the fruits and vegetables enumerated will
be contingent upon the surrounding of the products so treated with safeguards
which, in the judgment of the inspector, will preclude infestation of the treated
fruits and vegetables from the time they leave the fumigation chamber until
loaded for dispatch to the mainland.

Done at Washington, D. C., this 15th day of July 1940.

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

Saunas with the Division of the Federal Register July 18, 1940, 10:13 a. m.; 5 F. R.,

ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO PINK BOLLWORM QUARANTINE
(NO. 52)

STATEMENT REGARDING COOPERATIVE PINK BOLLWORM CONTROL PROGRAM FOR
THE CROP SEASON 1940
JULY 5, 1940.

On December 15, 1939. a public conference was held in San Antonio, Tex., to
discuss the status of the pink bollworm infestation in the United States with
particular reference to the situation in the lower Rio Grande Valley. At that
conference it was developed that no immediate recommendation would be made
for the establishment of a noncotton zone in that section of the United States
and -that for at least the crop season 1940 it appeared desirable to continue a
cooperative suppressive program along the lines followed during the 1939
season. Following the conference and with the submission of a special report
to Congress it was pointed out that a supplemental estimate would be sub-
1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 71

mitted requesting additional funds to provide for part of the cost of continu-
ing the cooperative field clean-up in south Texas. Such supplemental estimate
was in order since in accordance with required practice and before the results
of clean-up were available the Department had submitted its regular estimates
of funds required for the fiscal year i941.

The President’s annual Budget estimates for the fiscal year 1941 requested
$526,800 for the regular work associated with control and prevention of spread
of the pink bollworm. This was $77,192 more than provided for these purposes
for the fiscal year 1940. This increase in the amount needed for regular ac-
tivities was approved because of the additional work involved in connection
with the enforcement of the Federal quarantine and related operations. Since
the regular Budget estimate did not provide special funds for field clean-up
in Texas for which $460,000 had been provided for the fiscal year 1940 the
amount of the estimate for pink bollworm control was $382,808 less than the
appropriation for that year.

When Congress considered the Agricultural bill which was based on the regu-
lar estimates an unsuccessful effort was made in both the House and the
Senate to increase the amount to be provided for pink bollworm control in
order to provide funds for clean-up and other suppressive measures in the
lower Rio Grande Valley.

On May 31, 1940, the President submitted a supplemental estimate request-
ing $380,000 additional for pink bollworm control to provide for suppressive
and clean-up work in south Texas. This amount together with $526,800 in-
cluded in the regular estimate would have provided for the fiscal year 1941
the same appropriation as that available for the fiscal year 1940. This addi-
tional supplemental estimate was considered by Congress in connection with
the Second Deficiency bill but was not approved.

Since final action has now been taken on the amount of funds that will be
available to the Department for the control «nd prevention of spread of the
pink bollworm for the fiscal year 1941, it is necessary that the program for
the season 1940 be determined on the basis of funds available, namely, $526,800.
It is proposed to use this money, first, for the continuance of enforcement of
the Federal domestic quarantine on account of the pink bollworm in all known
infested areas. This involves the sterilization of seed and of lint and other
cotton products originating in all heavily infested areas, and in certain of the
lightly infested areas. It involves work in Arizona, New Mexico, Texas, and
that part of south Florida where wild cotton infested with pink bollworm has
been found, and scouting to determine the distribution of the pink bollworm
in additional cotton-producing States.

After carefully reviewing the situation, it is believed the program in these
various States should not be appreciably modified but should even be strength-
ened. where possible in order to reduce, wherever possible, the danger of addi-
tional spread of pink bollworm. There would be no financial point to sacrific-
ing the efficiency of the work elsewhere to increase the scope of the Gperations
in the Rio Grande area, since the amount that could thus be raised would be
not only entirely inadequate to meet the requirements of the situation in the
lower Rio Grande Valley, but might conceivably result in spread from less
Leavily infested areas. The Department is therefore calling upon the farmers
of south Texas to cooperate even more vigorously than they have in the past
with the effort to supply suppressive measures during this crop season.

It is expected that with the cooperation of those concerned, it will be
possible to clean the fields effectively and thoroughly at the earliest possible
moment following the completion of the harvest. To this end, representatives
of the State Department of Agriculture, cooperating with those of the Bureau,
will contact the growers and give advice and assistance in every way prac-
ticable. It is believed the growers will furnish every possible assistance
to the end that prompt destruction of the crop residues may be accomplished
as soon as possible after cotton picking this fall. The recommendation of the
Department is that this work be done as thoroughly and as promptly as possible
in the lower Rio Grande Valley and the Coastal Bend counties of Texas. In
this program, we are assured of having the same cooperation from the Republic
of Mexico as we have had heretofore.

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.
2 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July—Sept.

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE
QUARANTINE (NO. 72)

B. E. P. Q. 485, Sixth Revision.

ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS—REMOVAL OF WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE CERTIFI-
CATION REQUIREMENTS UNTIL FEBRUARY 1, 1941, FOR SPECIFIED ARTICLES

(a) Pursuant to the authority conferred upon the Chief of the Bureau of
Entomology and Plant Quarantine by the second proviso of Section 301.72,
Chapter III, Title 7, Code of Federal Regulations [Notice of Quarantine No.
72, on account of the white-fringed beetle], all certification requirements are
hereby waived until February 1, 1941, for the following articles enumerated in
Section 301.72-3 [Regulation 3 (a@) and (0b)] when free from soil and when
sanitation practices are maintained to the Satisfaction of the inspector and
when moved interstate from the regulated areas, or parts of the areas listed
below:

(1) When moved interstate from any regulated area, certification require-
ments are waived for the following articles:

Baled cotton lint and linters.
Cottonseed when free from gin trash.

(2) When moved interstate from the regulated parts of the following coun-
ties: In Alabama, Mobile County; in Florida, Escambia County; in Louisiana,
Hast Baton Rouge Parish; in Mississippi, counties of Jackson, Hinds, and Pearl
River ; certification requirements are waived for the following articles: '

Potatoes and sweetpotatoes.

Sweetpotato vines, draws, and cuttings.

Cordwood, pulpwood, stumpwood, and logs.

Used or unused lumber, timbers, posts, poles, crossties, and other building
materials.

Hay, roughage of all kinds, Straw, leaves, and leafmold.

Peas, beans, and peanuts in Shells, or the shells of any of these products.

Seed cotton.

Used implements and machinery, scrap metal, junk, and ttensils or
containers coming in contact with the ground.

Brick, tiling, stone, and concrete slabs and blocks.

Nursery stock and other plants, which are free from soil.

(3) When moved interstate from the parishes of Saint Bernard and Orleans
(including the city of New Orleans) and from the regulated parts of the
parishes of Jefferson and Plaquemines in Lowisiana, certification requirements
are waived for the following articles:

Potatoes and sweetpotatoes.

Sweetpotato vines, draws, and euttings.

Cordwood, pulpwood, stumpwood, and logs.

Unused lumber, timbers, posts, poles, and crossties.

Hay, roughage of all kinds, straw, leaves, and leafmold.

Peas, beans, and peanuts in the Shells, or the shells of any of these
products.

Seed cotton.

It has been determined that the application of control measures, the main-
tenance of approved sanitation practices, and natural conditions have so
decreased the intensity of infestation of the white-fringed beetle as to eliminate
the risk of contamination with the egg or adult stage, thereby justifying
modification of certification requirements as set forth above.

(b) All articles designated in Section 301.72-8 [paragraphs (a) and (b) of
Regulation 38 of Quarantine No. 72] for which certification requirements are
not hereinabove waived, shall remain under the restrictions of that regulation
during the period covered therein.

This revision supersedes all previous issues of Circular B. E. P. Q. 485.

Done at Washington, D. C., this 9th day of August 1940.

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.
sane with the Division of the Federal Register August 18, 1940, 3:36 p. m.; 5 F. R.,
oVU.
1940]

SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS

73

INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS

POSTMASTER:

Post OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, August 23, 1940.

My Dear Sm: - Attention is invited to the enclosed administrative instructions
(B. E. P. Q. 485, Sixth Revision), issued by the Bureau of Entomology and
Plant Quarantine, United States Department of Agriculture, in connection with
Federal Quarantine Order No. 72, on account of the white-fringed beetie.

Postmasters in the quarantined areas will please be governed accordingly.
See paragraph 1, section 595, Postal Laws and Regulations.

Very truly yours,

Ramsey S. Brack,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.

TERMINAL INSPECTION OF PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS

OREGON STATE PLANT QUARANTINES

(Revision of notice dated June 25, 1957)

THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, September 11, 1940.

Under plant quarantines and regulations issued by the State of Oregon the
shipment into that State of certain plants and plant material known to be hosts
of injurious pests and plant diseases is subject to certain restrictions or entirel

prohibited.

The following table gives a summary of the Oregon quarantine laws and regu-
lations, showing the quarantined areas, the piants and plant products affected,

and the pests and diseases of which such plants are known hosts.

Under the

provisions of paragraph 2 (b), amended section 596, Postal Laws and Regula-
tions, postmasters should not accept such plants and plant products when
presented for mailing in violation of these quarantine laws and regulations,
and should invite the attention of the mailers thereto.

Plants and plant products prohibited or regulated entry into Oregon

Area quarantined

(Column I)

(1) Counties in Oregon: Baker,
Grant, Malheur, Morrow, Uma-
tilla, Union, and Wallowa.

All States except California and
Nevada.

(2) All States and al] counties in
Oregon.

273058—40——2



Plants and plant products affected



Plant pests
and diseases

Accepted for mailing
only when accom-
panied with approved
certificate or Oregon
permit

(Column IIT)

Acceptance for mailing
entirely § prohibited
from quarantined area

(Column IT) (Column IV)







Colorado po-
tato beetle.

Potatoes and potato tops
require State of origin
certificate showing
they were grown and
packed in noninfested
areas; or, screened and
packed as prescribed
by Oregon law.



Narcissus bulb
fly, eelworm,
or nematode.

Narcissus bulbs, includ-
ing daffodils, jonquils,
and Chinese sacred
lilies—require satisfac-
tory State of origin
certificate as to field
and storage inspection
and freedom from in-
festation.
74

BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

| July--Sept.

Plants and plant products prohibited or regulated entry into Oregon—Continued



Area quarantined

(Column I)

(3) Counties in Oregon: Benton,
Clackamas, Clatsop, Columbia,
Lane, Lincoln, Linn, Marion,
Multnomah, Polk, ‘Tillamook,
Union, Washington, and Yamhill.

All counties in Idaho ercept Benewah
and Latah.

Counties in Washington: Clallam,
Clark, Cowlitz, Grays Harbor,
Island, Jefferson, King, Kitsap,
Lewis, Mason, Pacific, Pierce,
San Juan, Skagit, Skamania, Sno-
homish, Spokane, ‘Thurston,
Wahkiakum, Whatcom, Whit-
man.

(4) State of California and Josephine
County, Oregon.

(5) Counties in Oregon: Benton,
Clackamas, Clatsop, Columbia,
Douglas, Hood River, Lane,
Linn, Marion, Multnomah, Polk,
Washington, and Yamhill.

States of Connecticut, Maine, Mas-
sachusetts, New Hampshire,
Rhode Island, Vermont, and
Washington.

CG) EAUTES Fates sae ets Nae ee ee



(7) Alabama, Arkansas, Connecti-
cut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia,
Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Ken-
tucky, Louisiana, Maryland,
Massachusetts, Michigan, Missi-
sippi, Missouri, New Jersey.
North Carolina, New York, Ohio,
Pennsy!vania, Rhode Isiand,
South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas,
Virginia, West Virginia, and Dis-
trict of Columbia.



(8) California, Florida, Louisiana,
North Carolina, South Carolina,
Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, and
Hawaii.

(9) All States east of and including
the States of Montana, Wyoming,
Colorado, and New Mexico.





Plants ana plant products affected

Acceptance for mailing
entirely § prohibited
from quarantined area

(Column IT)









Strawberry plants pro-
hibited from Cali-
fornia.

All varieties and species,
including the flower-
ing forms of the peach,
nectarine, almond,
apricot, plum, cherry,
chokecherry, quince,
pear, and apple trees
and plants and parts
thereof and the fresh
fruit.

All trees, plants, cut-
tings, and scions of the
cultivated and wild
filbert and hazel.





Accepted for mailing
only when accom-.
panied with approved
certificate or Oregon
permit

(Column III)



Fresh cherries and cher-
ry lug boxes—fresh
cherries accepted only
with State of origin
certificate they are
from a county free
from cherry fruit fly.

Lug boxes from quaran-
tined area must be
steam or hot-water
treated and so certi-
fied. Cherries can
be shipped from in-
fested into infested
territory.

Plants may be moved
from disease-free fields
in Josephine County
with certificate.

Poplar and willow trees
and parts capable of
propagation—must
carry State of origin
certification they were
grown in a county
free from satin moth
and have not been
stored where poplar or
willow trees from in-
fested areas are or have
been stored.

Grapevines and cuttings
accepted with State of
origin certificate that
shipment is from an
area or premises free
of phylloxera.



Scions or budwood ad-
mitted under Oregon
permit from Nov. 1 to
Mar.15. Bare-rooted
plants allowed entry
from Nov.1 to Mar. 15,
after fumigation as re-
quired, provided with
satisfactory State of
origin certificate.

Potatoes—accepted only
with certificate of
State of origin show-
ing area free of infesta-
tion; or that shipment
was fumigated accord-
ing to Oregon specifi-
tions.





Plant pests
and diseases

(Column IV)

Cherry fruit
fly.

Strawberry
yellows.



Satin moth.

Grape phyl-
loxera.
Oriental fruit
moth.
Potato tuber
moth.
Filbert blight.

Lee e ee eee ee eee eee ee
1940]

SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS

79

Plants and vlant products prohibited or regulated entry into Oregon—Continued

|
|
Area quarantined |

(Column I)



Plants and plant products affected

Acceptance for mailing

entirely § prohibited
from quarantined area

(Column If)

(10) All States and all counties in | Red raspberry, logan-

Oregon,

(11) Connecticut, Indiana, Maine,
Massachusetts, Michigan, New
Hampshire, New Jersey. New
York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode
Island, Vermont, and West Vir-
ginia.

(12) California, Delaware, Florida,
New Mexico, Mississippi, Penn-
sylvania, Virginia, and Hawaii.

(13) All States east of and including
Montana, Wyoming, Colorado,
and New Mexico.

(14) Territory of Hawaii__-__.--__--

(15) Counties in Arizona: Apache,
Cochise, Coconino, Graham,
Maricopa, Pima, Santa Cruz, and
Yavapai.

Counties in California: Imperial,
Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside,
San Bernardino, and San Diego.

Counties in Colorado; Delta, Gar-
field, Mesa, and Montezuma.

Counties in New Mezico: Bernalillo, |
Dona Ana, Lincoln, Otero, Rio
Arriba, Sandoval, Santa Fe, Sierra,
Socorro, Taos, and Valencia.

County in Oklahoma: Bryan.

Counties in Teras: Bowie, Brown,
Callahan, Cherokee, Comanche, |
Denton, Eastland. El Paso, Erath,|
Floyd, Grayson, Gregg, Hopkins,
Jones, Mills, Palo Pinto, Rusk,
San Saba, Smith, Tarrant, and
Wilbarger.

Counties in Utah: Grand and Wash-
ington.



berry, dewberry, or
blackberry plants and
their horticultural va-
rieties.

Chestnut and chinqua-
pin trees, nuts, cut-
tings, grafts, or scions.

| All trees, cuttings,

|
|
|



| Accepted for mailing

grafts, scions, or buds |

of the peach and nec-
tarine, including the
flowering forms.

Foreign-grown



only when accom-
panied with approved
certificate or Oregon
permit

(Column [il)

New and desirable varie-

ties for trial plots may
be shipped into Ore-
gon provided accom-
panied with Oregon
permit. Shipments
within Oregon require
certificate showing
area free of disease
after two field inspec-
tions.

Corn, broomcorn, sor-

ghums, Sudan grass,
except clean seed and
shelied grain, lima and
green beans in pod,
beets with tops, rhu-
barb, and cut flowers
or entire plants of
mums, asters, dahlias,
and gladiolus (except
corms and tubers
without stems)—ad-
mitted only with
special certificate of
United States Depart-
ment of Agriculture:

Tomatoes and tomato

plants require certifi-
cate of State of origin
showing fruit or plants
weregrown and shipped
from a free area, or
treated with Oregon
approved formula.

chest-
nuts and chinquapins
not restricted when
reshipped into Oregon
in the original

opened containers.

un- |



Plant pests
and diseases

(Column IV)

Virus diseases
of the genus
Rubus and
red raspberry
mosaic.

European corn
borer.

Tomato pin
worm.

Chestnut
blight.

East Indian
bean borer.



Peach mosaic.
76 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July—Sept.
Plants and plant products prohibited or regulated entry into Oregon—Continued

Plants and plant products affected

Area quarantined

(Column I)

(16) Alabama, Arkansas, Connecti-
cut, Delaware, District of Colum-

Acceptance for mailing

entirely prohibited
from quarantined area

(Column II)

Peach, nectarine, or

apricot trees; cuttings,

Accepted for mailing
only when accom-
panied with approved
certificate or Oregon
permit

(Column III)

Plant pests
and diseases
(Column IV

Peach yellows,
little peach,

bia, Florida, Georgia, Indiana, grafts, scions, buds, or and peach
Kentucky, Maryland, Massa- pits, including any rosette.
chusetts, Michigan, Mississippi, trees budded or grafted
New Jersey, New York, North on peach stock or
Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Penn- peach roots—from
sylvania, Rhode Island, South areas where any of
Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, these diseases are
and West Virginia known to exist.
GUA ATTEORO Tee Ores Moers te Ree ane Rc eg enc ee Gladiolus bulbs ac-|} Gladiolus
cepted only when ac- thrips.

companied by special
gladiolus permit.

Shippers desiring Oregon permits must make application therefor direct
to the Division of Plant Industry, State Department of Agriculture, Salem,
Oreg.

Postmasters at places in Oregon where State inspection of plants and
plant products is maintained under the Terminal Inspection Act should
take the action prescribed by amended paragraph 4 (b), section 596, Postal
Laws and Regulations, if parcels sent to such offices for terminal inspection
are found to be in violation of these plant quarantine laws or regulations.

RAMSEY S. BLACK,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.

MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS

B. E. P. Q. 468, Revised.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, KINGDOM OF IRAQ

Avcust 5, 1940.

This revision of the plant-quarantine import restrictions of the Kingdom
of Iraq has been prepared for the information of exporters of plants and plant
products to that country and plant-quarantine officials.

The English text of the Importation of Plants Law No. 31 for 1988 was pub-
lished in Iraq Government Gazette No. 7 of February 18, 1940, and became
effective on that date. This text was forwarded to the Department of Agri-
culture by the American Legation at Baghdad.

The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct and com-
plete up to the time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used independ-
ently of, nor as a substitute for, the original texts, and it is not to be inter-
preted as legally authoritative.

LrE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.
1940) SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS a

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, KINGDOM OF IRAQ
NOTIFICATIONS, Etc. BY THE COUNCIL OF MINISTERS
[103a—Importation of plants law No. 31 for 1938]

We, Kine oF IRAQ, with the approval of the Senate and the Chamber of
Deputies, do hereby order the enactment of the following Law:

ARTICLE 1. In this Law, the following expressions shall have the meanings
hereinafter set out.

(a) Plant: All living or dead plants or any part thereof, whether growing
above or underground as roots, bulbs, tubers, stems, leaves, flowers, fruits,
seeds, cottonseed, or cotton lint.

(b) Citrus: Cuttings, parts or fruits of any variety of plants of the family
Rutaceae such as oranges, sweet lemons, limes, tangerines, mandarins, ete.

(ec) Vines: Cuttings, parts, leaves, and fruits of the genus Vitis or other mem-
bers of the family Vitaceae.

(d) Pests: I. All species of the Insecta in any of their different stages;
II. Arachnida (spiders, etc.) ; III. Fungus diseases of the Thallophyta in
general.

(e) Government Inspector: The official who shall be appointed by the
Department of Agricultural Affairs for the fulfillment of the purposes of this
Law.

ArT. 2. All plants arriving in Iraq by sea, air, or land route, whether by post
or Otherwise, shall be examined by the Government Inspector in the places
defined in a notification published by the Minister of Economics and Communi-
cations.

ArT. 3. (a) The Government Inspector may order the destruction of the whole
or any part of a consignment if, on inspection, it be found infected with any pest to
a degree incurable by disinfection by fumigation or other method.

(b) If the Government Inspector considers that treatment in a_ suitable
manner of such infected plants eradicates the pest in question, he shall
detail and apply such methods.

ArT. 4. (a) The importation into Iraq of citrus plants, vines, and cottonseed,
shall be prohibited, unless accompanied by an official certificate from tne com-
petent authority of the country of origin, to the effect that they have been
examined and found free of pests.

(b) All plants imported into Iraq in accordance with paragraph (a) of
this article, shall, though they may be found free from pests, be either fumi-
gated or treated in suitable ways tc ensure this being the case, before being
allowed to enter or delivered to the consignee.

(c) If the inspector finds on examination that the imported plants do not
fulfill the required standard of cleanness, despite the contents of the certificate,
he shall order the consignment to be incinerated together with its covering,
unless the consignee wishes to reexport the same within 10 days of the order
being given by the inspector.

ArT. 5. If dispute shall arise between the inspector and the importer as to
the validity of the certificate, the importer may refer the matter to the Di-
rector of Agricultural Affairs, whose decision shall be considered final.

Art. 6. No compensation whatever shall be granted in lieu of plants de-
stroyed by order of the Government Inspector, or Director of Agricultural
Affairs.

ArT. 7. The restriction mentioned in article 3 of this Law, shall neither
apply to the juices of citrus fruits. nor to preserved, dried, or crystallized
fruits.

Arr. 8. Living or dead insects of any species shall not be imported into
Iraq for any purpose unless a license is obtained from the Director of Agricultural
Affairs, prior to importing, by a period of 50 days at least. The said license
shall enumerate the species and number of insects and the purpose for which
they are intended.

ArT. 9. The following shall be prescribed by regulation.

(a) Fees to be charged and collected from the importer for the examination,
detention, or disinfection of the plants.
78 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July—Sept.

(b) The practical methods for the proper execution of the provisions of this
Law.

ArT. 10. A penalty, not exceeding 75 dinars or an imprisonment for a period
not exceeding 6 months, or both, is imposed on:

(a) Persons who remove any plant from a place of detention without 2 written
permit from the Government Inspector.

(b) Persons evading or attempting to evade the examination of plants.

(c) Persons obstructing or attempting to obstruct the Government Inspector
in the execution of his duties as prescribed in this Law.

ArT. 11. The Importation of Plants Law of 1924 and the regulation issued
under article 13 of Customs and Excise Law No. 10 of 1982 shall be canceled...

ArT. 12. This Law shall come into force from the date of its publication in the
Official Gazette.

ArT. 18. The Ministers of Economics and Communications and Justice are
charged with the execution of this Law.

[Made at Baghdad this 28th day of Mhuarram 1357, and the 30th day of March 1938. ]

B. E. P. Q. 382, Revised.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF URUGUAY

SEPTEMBER 14, 1940.

This digest of the plant-quaratine import restrictions of the Republic of
Uruguay is offered for the information of nurserymen, plant-quarantine officials;
and others interested in the exportation of plants and plant products to that
country. .

It was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, formerly in charge of Foreign Service
Information, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines, from the original texts of
the Law of October 21, 1911, and decrees promulgated thereunder.

The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct and suf-
ficiently complete for its purpose up to the time of its preparation, but it is not
intended to be used independently of, nor as a substitute for, the original texts,
and it is not to be interpreted as legally authoritative.

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF URUGUAY

Basic LEGISLATION
[Law of October 21, 1911]

Article 4 of this law authorizes the Executive Power to prohibit the intro-
duction into Uruguay of seeds, plants, fertilizers, etc., that favor the develop-
ment of pests.

SUMMARY
IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

According to information supplied by the International Institute of Agri-
culture of Rome, Italy, the importation of the following plants into Uruguay is
prohibited: Acacia, Actinidia, Akebia, alder, almond, Ampelopsis, apple, apricot,
ash, beech, birch, blackberry, boxwood, catalpa, cherry, chestnut, citron, cornus,
cotoneaster, deutzia, Eleagnus, elder, elm, fig, forsythia, gooseberry, grapevine,
honeysuckle, horsechestnut, Jersey tea, Kalmia, Kerria, lignumvitae, lilac, linden,
locust, maple, marshmallow, medlar, mountain ash, mulberry, orange, Oxyacan-
thus, peach, pear, Photinia, plum, poplar, privet, quince, Rhodotypus, rose, sas-
safras, Spirea, Spruce, Sumac, Symphoricarpos, Thuya, Viburnum, walnut, and
willow.

Seeds of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) and forage crop seeds containing
more than 20 grains of Cuscuta seed per kilogram will be rejected, but may
be cleaned and offered again for entry. (Decree of March 9, 1912, article 11
(3), p. 3.)
1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 79

IMPORTATION RESTRICTED

Seeds: Consignee must apply for import permit and present documents attest-
ing their origin and purpose for which imported. Samples will be taken for
analysis. An excess of dodder (more than 20 grains per kilogram) will cause
rejection of shipment. (Decree of March 9, 1912, article 11 (1) and (8), p. 3.)

Plants from countries free from San Jose scale (Aspidiotus perniciosus
Comst.) : Consignee must apply for an import permit and must indicate the per-
mit number when making the customs entry. The plants will be inspected
on arrival, with disposal according to the findings. Decree of March 9, 1912,
article 11 (6) to (12), pp. 3 and 4.)

Fruits, vegetables, tubers, roots, etc., which may carry pests: Will be inspected
on arrival with disposal according to the findings. (Decree of March 9, 1912,
article 11 (14), p. 4.)

Plants, parts thereof, and fresh fruits from countries infested by San Jose
scale (Aspidiotus perniciosus Comst.) : Phytosanitary certificate issued by compe-
tent authority of the country of origin attesting freedom from injurious plant
diseases, must accompany each shipment; inspection on arrival at the expense
of the interested persons. (Decree of March 24, 1922, as amended, article 1 (a),
(b), and (c), p. 4.)

Seed potatoes: Phytosanitary certificate indicating origin must accompany each
shipment. This must be issued by competent authorities of the country of
origin and it must declare that the potatoes proceed from localities free from
potato wart, powdery scab, potato tuber worm, and Colorado potato beetle. A
toleranee of not more than 5 percent of tubers infected by common scab is
allowed. (Decree of January 10, 1934, article 1 (a), pp. 5 and 6.)

GENERAL REGULATIONS
[Decree of March 9, 1912, issued under the provisions of the law of October 21, 1911]
IMPORTATION OF SEEDS, PLANTS, FERTILIZERS, ETC.

ArT. 11. The importation of seeds, plants, fertilizers, and other vehicles for
the distribution of pests may be effected only through the port of Montevideo,
until the Executive Power authorizes others, and it will be subject to the following
regulations:

IMPORTATION OF SEEDS

(1) In order to be able to import seeds, the interested person must make an
application to the Plant Protection Service (Direccion de la Defensa Agricola)
indicating therein the name and address of the importer, the name of the seed,
its origin and the documents attesting the origin and the purpose for which the
seeds are intended—sale, sowing, or consumption.

SAMPLES WILL BE TAKEN FOR ANALYSIS

(2) A representative of Defensa Agricola will draw samples at random which
will be analyzed. According to the results of the analysis their entry will be
permitted, or refused, in the latter case requiring their immediate relading or
destruction without indemnity, at the choice of the interested person.

EXCESS OF DODDER WILL CAUSE REJECTION

(3) Seeds of alfalfa and other forage crop seeds that contain more than 20
grains of Cuscuta per kilogram will be rejected.

CLEANING OF SEEDS PERMITTED

(4) The cleaning of forage crop seeds which contain more than the allowable
amount of dodder seeds will be permitted. The seeds will be cleaned under the
supervision designated by Defensa Agricola. The refuse will be completely de-
stroyed by fire. The inspector will take care that the entire shipment is cleaned
and require the submittal of samples for a new analysis. In no case will entry
be permitted if the results of the analysis do not show that the required condition
has been attained.

(5) When the analysis is favorable a certificate will be issued to the interested
person; without it a customs permit will not be granted,
80 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

IMPORTATION OF PLANTS

(6) For the introduction of plants, an application must be made to the Plant
Protection Service, indicating the name and address of the importer, species,
quantity, and destination of the plants.

(7) The number of the respective permit must always be indicated. The
inspection having been made, Defensa Agricola will, in each ease, notify the
customs, indicating the permit number referred to in the entry papers.

INSPECTION ON ARRIVAL

(8) Inspection will be made at Montevideo if possible.

(9) If plants are infected in such a way as to constitute a risk for the national
agriculture and their efficacious disinfection is not possible in the opinion of the
inspector, a period of 48 hours in which to effect reembarkation or destruction
by fire, will be fixed without right of indemnity.

(10) When plants to be imported, on account of their packing and quantity,
cannot be inspected in that port without serious injury to the plants, the owner
will be permitted to carry them to his agricultural establishment under control
of Defensa Agricola, whose representative will be present and supervise the
opening of the packages.

DISPOSAL OF INFECTED SHIPMENTS

(11) Every shipment or part thereof that shows signs of infection shall be
destroyed at once, except in cases where, on account of the character of the
disease, disinfection can be carried out which will completely sterilize the
plants attacked. :

(12) Shipments will be regarded as cleared through the customs only when
the importer receives the corresponding inspection certificate from the Plant
Protection Service.

NOTICE OF ARRIVAL REQUIRED

(13) Importers or owners of plants will furnish a notice of arrival in ad-
vance, indicating the day and hour when unlading will be effected.

(14) Fruits, vegetables, tubers, roots, ete., that may be vehicles for the dis-
tribution of pests will be cleared only after inspection and isSuance of the
certificate establishing their freedom from pests.

(15) Refers to fertilizers.

AUTHORIZED PORTS OF ENTRY

The importation of plants, parts of plants, and fresh fruits, except as pro-
vided in Decree No. 2086 of September 23, 1921, may be effected through the
ports of Montevideo, Salto, Santa Rosa del Guareim, Rivera, and Paysandu.
The port of Carmelo is authorized for the entry of fresh fruits only.

REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE IMPORTATION OF PLANTS FROM
COUNTRIES NOT FREE FROM SAN JOSE SCALE

[Deeree of March 24, 1922, as amended by that of December 22, 1922]
PHYTOSANITARY CERTIFICATE REQUIRED

ARTICLE 1. The importation through the Port of Montevideo is authorized of
plants, parts thereof, and fresh fruits proceeding from countries that are not
free from San Jose scale under the following conditions:

(a) Every shipment of plants, parts thereof, and fresh fruits must be accom-
panied by a phytosanitary certificate from the exporting country, issued by
competent authority, which affirms that it has been inspected and found free
from injurious plant diseases.

(b) The interested persons shall present the phytosanitary certificate indi-
eating origin to Defensa Agricola with the application, indicating the name,
business, and address of the importer, kinds of plants, parts thereof, and fresh
1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 81

fruits that they desire to import and the quantity in detail of each, purpose
for which the products are intended, place of planting in case they are to
be cultivated, and port of embarkation and name of ship.

(c) Defensa Agricola will proceed to inspect the products to be imported and
if on inspection they are found to be infected or are suspected of being so, will
require their disinfection in a manner indicated by Defensa Agricola, at the
expense of the interested persons.

REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE IMPORTATION OF SEED POTATOES
[Decree of January 10, 1934]
PHYTOSANITARY CERTIFICATE REQUIRED

ARTICLE 1. Every shipment of potatoes imported into Uruguay for planting
shall be accompanied by a phytosanitary certificate indicating origin which
shall affirm:

(a) That the imported tubers proceed from localities free from the fol-
lowing diseases and parasites: Synchytrium endobioticum (Schilb.) Pere.,
Spongospora subterranea (Walls.) Lang., (Phthorimaea) Gnorimoschema
operculella Zell., and (Doryphora) Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say.

(b) That the tubers intended for exportation are free from other serious
parasitic diseases, a certain margin of toleration being allowed of relatively
innocuous infections.

With respect to scab, distinction should be made between:

(1) Powdery scab caused by Spongospora subterranea which, as mentioned
above, renders the shipment useless for seed purposes.

(2) Black scab caused by Rhizoctonia violacea, the presence of which ne-
cessitates the disinfection of tubers intended for seed purposes.

(3) Common scab caused by Actinomyces (Oospora) scabies, which may be
tolerated when found only in a small proportion, for example, when not more
than 5 percent of the tubers are affected, and of these not more than 10 percent
of the surface.

ART. 2. In addition to a phytosanitary certificate indicating origin, each con-
signment of potatoes must be accompanied by a certificate issued by the Govern-
ment of the exporting country to the effect that the tubers were especially se-
lected for seed and that the farms on which they were grown have been under
official supervision and inspection; also that in the course of the official inspec-
tions it was ascertained that there was no evidence of “degeneration” (virus
diseases) such as leaf roll, mosaic, etc., which lower the vitality of the tubers.

(Note.—The decree of July 4, 1935, temporarily suspends the provisions of
art. 2. In other words, until further notice, the certification that the potatoes
concerned were selected seed potatoes and that the cultures from which they
were obtained had been officially inspected and found free from the so-called
degenerative diseases, is not required. )

JNFIT SEED POTATOES MAY BE CONSUMED

ArT. 3. If the tubers, on arrival in Uruguay, are deemed by the experts of
the Agronomic Board (Direccion de Agronomia) to be unsuitable for seed,
they may be utilized for consumption unless for a special reason they are unfit
for this purpose also.

TOTALITY UNFIT POTATOES MUST BE DESTROYED

Art. 4. Tubers deemed by competent authorities to be unsuitable either for
planting or consumption shall be destroyed under the supervision of those
authorities, the importer having to pay the expenses involved thereby.

Tubers imported by commercial firms for planting in Uruguay will remain
subject, even after release from the customs, to supervision by technical officials
of the Division of Agricultural Encouragement and Protection (Seccion Fo-
mento y Defensa Agricola), the importers being responsible for the maintenance
of the tubers in good condition.
82 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July—Sept.

PENALTIES IMPOSED FOR VIOLATIONS OF THE PLANT QUARANTINE
ACT

According to reports received by the Bureau during the period July 1 to Sep-
tember 30, 1940, penalties have recently been imposed by the proper authorities
for violations of the Piant Quarantine Act, as follows:

QUARANTINES AFFECTING MEXICAN PRODUCTS

In the case of the United States versus the persons listed below, for attempt-
ing to smuggle in contraband plant material, the penalties indicated were
imposed by the United States customs officials at the following ports:









Name Port Contraband Penalty
ni

Francisco M. Esperanza. _________- Nogales) Ariz. {cans 195bulbs: is. 5 oe aya aera | $3. 90
RodoltoiG@uerteross oss eee see eee ree opeae CO eee ri id ee aos 2 pounds acorns___________________ 1. 00
Wonsueloy Roce sas eaies sere eae San Ysidro, Calif._____ 2mangoesad/s i. UN) Tae 1.00
WredlS alazarie cease foes ae eens Cys hae GOES 2g eats ss Sega Ee O22 ee ee 1.00
BJA PEO SETS eye eee tes ara eye ere GQ Eas 2o8 Sua soe MCACtus) plants 5. =e ee eee 1.00
Noe @harlesak see mG ol sak wand MENEES Brownsville, Tex______ {mangoes eae ae 1.00
Maria Alejandro____-_-------------|----- io sess eee ete Bae 2 peaches and 3 guavas____________ 1.00
Beatriz ahz aes: 2 ee ates eo Goss seu haan Maa 2 AN. O CAC OSE = 2 ya 1.00
Catarinac@puz ....-- <2 - Magle.Passs:Tex---__-_2 LSA O Ye 3s oo ey 1.00
Mrs. Santos Ramon de Moreno__-__|____- Goss tisthic. Fy Cee 14 apples and 7 avocados__________ 1.00
Maria Antonia de Pallos___________|____- COE aie se eae 1 mango: 5.2 eel eee eee 1. 00
Maria) Gaiard 025.2 ee eee |e COE ise we aint ae lavocag6)s: 5522 eae ee 1.00
Maria Guadalupe Rodriguez_______|____- GOES ae ae 2 CACEUS HOTA IGS eee 1. 00
Herlinda Trevino de Perez_________|_____ Got Le Es SON 2 avocado seedS___________________ 1. 00
IV imSepAR PARE SCOl aT en ae yee nenmne El] Paso, Tex_.___--___ 1 mango and 19 bulbs_____________ 1.00
HenomiGonzalezy 2555 ses Thee Eidalzon exseutee nes 8 avocado seed___._-_-__________- 1.00
AR RiN teh GRU ED] ene ee ee eee nee | eae CO KO reece Scr ie tee SIDVO CRC OS ia at a ee age ee 1.00
iMiarcel Cre zis 5S eas ee en ea or dos Sra aae ee 2 avocado plants___._____________- 1.00
Imo centasPereze sas). esses eae pees COM ays Bee 2 MaNngoes2 25. eae ee 1.00
Mars asia tee ns ae es ee re ee GOS is oe enc To plants~ 2. 2p eee 1.00
Francisco Paula Castillo____.______}____- GOs Sens Meme 3 MAN oes! 2 e . Je ae ee ee ae 1.00
MAlVAG ORANG VAS=e ae ee ee es ae TOMS LP 2MANgOeSs2 LE Pees a 1.00
Aoueday Gonzalez sees esse eee ee |e ones doz feiss say a ee 3 mangoes: 2.03.4 1. 00
Tosa Gant ees ae ees ewe ie a Oss rae Bees 4 MANOS 2 ee ee eee 1.00
iPaulanlopeze ee mesa eee ee oer ae tee ee dois Sane Pavocado 2022s ae ae ean 1.00
Lucinda Rodriguez ___-_.--_-------]----- GO s2225 WA ea 2 POMEeLTAN ates sas ees ae eee 1. 00
Mrs. Pabla A. Barrios_------------ Varedo. Lexan ses 1 plant and 14 pound tree seed__-_-. 1.00
VATION CS Asse eer ee eae eath eel en GOR ee eit tae Tsmmangoss. 2s. . ee es eee 1. 00
ena Villareal 22222 222.0 re Pee ee ae Os Ee eR et ee C6 (Ope chet teil EIR oP 1.00
RSAC VG Le eT pas a Oe | ea LOR es A EE @oile ik Ns ee eee 1.00
Mrs. Dorotea Ramirez______-_-----]--_-- GO oS As gs 2 eles [ilallahe GOs 6S eed oe ee ea 1.00
BNC NNN oe VS as | a Oss ee alla LO 2h cs Se ee ga 1.00
Mrs. Maria Q..de Garza.__--------|----- QoL separa = ANS OCS. ak Ee einen 1:00
Mrs: Arda Pod#e ‘Pilar: = fee COU NE S eres ST planbe Stare gee oe ~ 1500
Mrs. Julia Vargas_________-_-_____-]----- GOES Sats Pees Timan gor: . .cfy2- ee ee Ee 1.00
Mrs. Manuela Carnero de Villarreal. |..___- LO ae sy ek ies ye | omer GO ne foe oo Ee ee 1. 00
Mrs. Hortensia Longoria___________|--__- dOeSe esa) aes 4 mango seeds___________-________- 1.00
Joseferia Combrono___-------------|----.- dO. Fe Vee 3 plants... 222 eee ee eee 1.00
Esperonza Fernandez_-------------|----- COs ae el el €O2 2. 5 5 a ee eee 1.00
RobertouNovas. 220 eee a ee eee COE Sees. 4 Mangoes: See 1.00
MirsSeAdiulay Ganz ae ee eee | eee C6 (0) ae et cee 2:plants: (222) Lea eee 1.00
Ar turOsEOZaNnO. Dae eee 2 ee en aye es GOS... ae See 14 peaches...) 3.) | aoe ae eee 1. 00
Esperanza Rancel-. 222-22 272222 2” Comet Nae sae eiiet 3 sweet limes and 2 mamey seed __- 1.00
Severa Gonzalez.____..._.---------|----- GOLaN Laas ees 2: Mangoes): 22 Uses eee 1.00
Eudelia Guerra Reyes. -_---_------|----- CLO pee Se pea See DR eo GO 2 see el le ee 1.00
Mrs: Josefa Lopez .:.. == -2-2- 22) 22) 2223 GOs sake ale he ieee 2; PeacheSe = <2 Notas Ae yee eee 1.00
Mrs. Esperanza Ramos-_--.-------|----- Gott SEN? SEaaae 2 Mangoes: 22s 22 eae 1.00
Wirs) Salia Sanchez 2) so 2h s ied eer G02 Set Tees limango.!3!i2 fe ee eee 1.00
IMIS RET Oe rr ati Gl CZs Sos aaa ee ere | a ae dos aL eae 4 avocados... 415. a eee 1.00
Edwarda De La Rosa___-____._-----|----- Om 2 es ee 1 pound tree seed and 12 plants___- 1.00
JosevRamirez: 2252 22. ss See | ere dows. Se See 3 plants... 2u. 2-22: eee eee 1.00
MeresaeAtalavss 2228 See een eet Ee A ale Ossetia 8, plants. 225) 42 eee 1.00
SOCK GAZ Gigs ee So 2 eek Crone Vera eye ate Goves setae oe ee 4 plants... RomulowNMinost = eee ee ee ne nee Goma te ences ane 3:avocados-.. 222.522 a eee fe 1.00
Mrs. Josepha Alvarez _______------|----- COE gh Be ete Mees 2 plants) 2-225. 222825 oe eee 1.00
Mrs. Sara Gomez de Pedrosa______|____- GOs ss See engeee 2 MAaANGOeS 222 = eee 1.00
‘Hiije! Castillon! Vath _8 see we 2 Ce bee GOLEES Se ER Z.avocadose. |) jst See eae eae eee 1.00
Rudencio Munoz__._.._-----------]-___- LOMA wae) cle =| 2eMNaIM en, SCC Ce sae eee ees 1.00
PentiwrarGirterrey. - es LN A donee eee A SHY BT Os a 1.00
PAT DENA Zee co ives ee eee ree aL Mees Le Oe Oe ee 1 avocado and 8 plants__--_____-_- 1.00
Mrs WidiasBermall 2 aah es eae Gow. elated Q flO S EL Oe SE SE ev es 1.00
Mrs. Merced Montelongo.__-__-___]____- GOseans ehh Ga 14 pound tree seed________--___-__- 1. 00
Ghose rtine Zs ieee cee pe eh eee Gowieul eee ry) eh Giavocados:. -4=)5)2._ > eee 1.00
IVINS Soh) exe Behn an GeCZz asap nee | eee GO eu tetae ae Spe sae 45 mamey' seed_22 2222 5 Saaeee een 1.00
ip PETE rn and © zee ee ee | eee GO. chee ae Qimangoesi.: sa! a jt Te eae 1.00
PANT OMNIOs G:aiZ ae ae eee eee | Gots eee ee 4iquincess222 222. 2) 32 ae eee 1.00
Guadalupe A. de Blanca___________|---_- Gost ee: Sans aes 4:mangoes) 2) .22. eee 1.00
Mania VErevin0: 225 esse eee eae AOE S22 She ee i peachte2s22- 22.5 22 So eee 1.00
1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS §3











Name Port | Contraband | Penalty
| | }

Wie ASTOOUCTS se Waredo;) exe 2... 52= | 1 avocado and 2 avocado seeds_____ $1. 00
mdpreeo ee Age ey ace epee seas! se mr es | 1. 00
Mrs. Maria Don Miguel-_-----_----|----- GOls Rie ts oh ok OIAVOCAU OSES =) eee as oe eee 1. 00
Winsmenliznieigeee S| 0st ee DANIAN OCS ster ee ED ee Se aS | 1. 00
MMrsm@eliaviumsey =). =. _-_|_.-.- GOFSe2 es eles 2: IOV OCAUMOS ae ste Sse ec! 1. 06
Rees iarearita Jiminez: = | --}_____ ts fee oe dp bt oe) ST eS es ee ee ge 1. 00
ReronbreuinQwe= eos | oe Ge = ae ten ae oe DATA ORS See =e ae ee eee bee | 1. 00
Sirplicrmental Smee ee 1 Owes ne sane Se ANTON] LS eee a Se es Lee | 1.00
Mrs. Maria de la aie Mendoza____|_-__- OV) ee eee ee Ouplanticepe es. eee ee ee ae | 1. 00
‘Mits.2S-+Gonagless .-._-_-.-4_-----|--_-. one e ts ee SL ONDIN Pease nee eS 1. 00
Weowveramiys 54.20 pF ea) Goue Ser ety. Fe 5 avocados with seed__~_-___-_____- 1.00
Winco amenge 9 efi CO eae as Se ee ZiT COS see = eer enees ener eee 1.00
iemnsaGe la) Riz? 22) 2st id 22 oe det 2. _ is." he IS TD CACSE 28) ) Soe § 2 8 5h aoe 1. 00
mosaueshenavidess= =) = 2 = 27 spe Corse tS TSt plants es a ee ee Ae ee 1. 00
Sir Airap On eee ee ee | 1, ee ee IA OCAUOS See ee ee ee | 3. 00
Canminhiagrlen lO. 9" = 222. te eet Moses. = sero sevice ARON Ces sa Se SS Pe ee 1.00
ree ne mick pes 2 | __-_e gre oe aere een fiplantâ„¢ 22.2. aN) ar ere 4 1.00
Pepueradiin | does TAs 5 eae Renlantart ss 4 ei beh og Bw speed owes! | 1. 00
ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY
AND PLANT QUARANTINE

LEE A. Strone, Chief.

S. A. RoHwer, ASsistant Chief.

AVERY S. Hoyt, Assistant Chief.

P. N. ANNAND, ASsistant Chief.

J. C. Hotton, Agent, Cooperative Field Relations.

F. H. SPENCER, Business Manager.

RoLita P. CURRIE, Editor.

MABEL Cotcorpb, Librarian.

J. A. Hystop, in Charge, Division of Insect Pest Survey and Information.

J. I. HAMBLETON, in Charge, Division of Bee Culture Investigations.

D. L. VAN DINE, in Charge, Division of Fruit Insect Investigations.

I’. C. CRAIGHEAD, in Charge, Division of Forest Insect Investigations.

W. H. WHITE, in Charge, Division of Truck Crop and Garden Insect Investiga-

tions.

. M. Packarp, in Charge, Division of Cereal and Forage Insect Investigations.

W. HARNeED, in Charge, Division of Cotton Insect Investigations.

C. BisHopp, in Charge, Division of Insects Affecting Man and Animals.

A. HAWKINS, in Charge, Division of Control Investigations.

C. Roark, in Charge, Division of Insecticides and Fungicides.

FE. W. MUESEBECK, in Charge, Division of Insect Identification.

. P. CLAUSEN, in Charge, Division of Foreign Parasite Introduction.

S. B. FRACKER, in Charge, Division of Plant Disease Control.

B. M. Gappis, in Charge, Division of Domestic Plant Quarantines.

E. R. SAsscer, in Charge, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines.

A. F. BurcEss, in Field Charge, Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail Moth Control (head-
quarters, Greenfield, Mass.).

EK. G. Brewer, in Field Charge, Japanese Beetle and Gypsy Moth and Brown-
Tail Moth Quarantines, European Corn Borer Certification, and Dutch Elm
Disease Eradication (headquarters, Bloomfield, N. J.).

R. E. McDona.p, in Field Charge, Pink Bollworm and Thurberia Weevil Quar-
antines (headquarters, San Antonio, Tez.).

P. A. HOIWALE, in Field Charge, Mexican Fruitfly Quarantine (headquarters
Harlingen, Tez.).

A. C. Baker, in Field Charge, Fruitfly Investigations (headquarters, Mexico
City, Mexico).

84

ORE a RO

U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1940
S. R. A.—B. E. P. Q. No. 145.

United States Department of Agriculture

BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS
OCTOBER-DECEMBER 1940

CONTENTS
Page
Quarantine and other official announcements__---_-____- se ee et ee to ee eee 85
Announcements relating to Mexican fruitfly quarantine (No. 64)_______________________________ Le 85
Fruitfly quarantine modified to extend Valencia orange harvest in Texas area (press notice)___ 8&5

Administrative instructions—modifying the restrictions of the Mexican fruitfly quarantine by
extending the harvesting season on Valencia oranges from April 30 to May 31, 1941 (B. E. P.
I ia a a ge 86

NCES ME DYISMICTiiGe ee = 2. 2 oP Ee eee Fe a a ae eee aoe
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Chile (B. E. P. Q. 511; supersedes B. P. Q.

BOS lo. Se 2 ee ee eee eee eee
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, British India (B. E. P. Q. 404, revised, supplement No.2). 95

List of current quarantine and other restrictive orders and miscellaneous regulations__________ 95
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act___.______-_________--__---_---_-_-. 101
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine______..__.___--_--.______--_-.--___- 103

QUARANTINE AND OTHER OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO MEXICAN FRUITFLY QUARANTINE
(No. 64)

FRUITFLY QUARANTINE MODIFIED TO EXTEND VALENCIA ORANGE HARVEST IN
TEXAS AREA

(Press notice)
JANUARY 10, 1941.

To provide for more orderly marketing of this year’s large crop of Valencia
oranges in Brooks, Willacy, Cameron, and Hidalgo Counties, Tex., the United
States Department of Agrieulture today announced the extension of the har-
vest:season to May 31, from April 30, the date set in the Department’s Mexican
fruitfly quarantine regulations. These regulations require a fruit-free period
between harvests to prevent fruitfly infestations in the lower Rio Grande
Valley. April 30 bad been set as the date when all citrus fruit must be off
the trees. It remains the date for the closing of the grapefruit harvest season.

Lee A. Strong, Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine,
said that extension of the harvesting season for Valencia oranges will not in-
crease the hazard of fruitfly infestation in the United States. Valencia oranges
are not preferred hosts of the fruitfly and seldom are infested by it. Plant
quarantine inspectors will make an extensive inspection of the groves during
the extra month the oranges are allowed to remain on the trees. Should this
inspection reveal any fruitfly infestation, Dr. Strong said, steps necessary to
prevent its dissemination through interstate movement of the fruit will be
taken.

The extension was announced after consultation with the Texas State De-
partment of Agriculture, which concurred. Quarantine officials of the State
Department of Agriculture of Texas and of the United States Department of
Agriculture count on the cooperation of growers and packers that has been
extended in the past.

85
290314—41——_1
86 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct.—Dec,

B. H. P. Q. 512.
TITLE 7—AGRICULTURE

CHAPTER III—BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS—MODIFYING THE RESTRICTIONS OF THE MEXI-
CAN FRUITFLY QUARANTINE BY EXTENDING THE HARVESTING SEASON ON
VALENCIA ORANGES FROM APRIL 30 TO MAY 31, 1941

§301.64-5c. Administrative instructions; modifying the restrictions of the
Mexican fruitfly quarantine by extending the harvesting season on Valencia
oranges from April 30 to May 31, 1941—Pursuant to the authority conferred
upon the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Piant Quarantine by the
third proviso of Section 301.64, Chapter III, Title 7, Code of Federal Regula-
tions [Notice of Quarantine No. 64], it having been determined by me that
a modification may be safely made without increasing the risk of spread of
the Mexican fruitfly, Section 301.645 (a) [subsection (a) of regulation 5
supplemental to this quarantine] is hereby modified to extend the harvesting
season for Valencia oranges for the Texas Counties of Brooks, Willacy, Cam-
eron, and Hidalgo to the close of May 31 for the year 1941, provided conditions
of infestation do not necessitate an earlier closing date.

The host-free period for Valencia oranges, under this modification, will
begin June 1 and continue to August 31, 1941, inclusive.

This modification does not affect or alter the harvesting season for grape- -
fruit which closes, under the conditions of the above regulation, on April 30.

Done at Washington, D. C., this 30th day of December 1940.

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.
[Filed with the Division of the Hederal Hoonia January 6, 1941, 11:43 a. m3;

MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS

B. E. P. Q. 511 (Supersedes B. P. Q. 348).
NOVEMBER 28, 1940.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF CHILE

This revision of the digest of the plant-quarantine import restrictions of the
Republic of Chile has been prepared for the information of exporters of
plants and plant products to that country and plant quarantine officials.

This circular was prepared by Richard Faxon, District Supervisor, Certifi-
eation for Export, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines, from a translation
of “Leyes y Reglamentos en Vigencia sobre Sanidad Vegetal 1925 a 1938”
received from the Ministry of Agriculture, Santiago, Chile, dated 1939, and
later decrees, and was reviewed by the Chief of the Department of Plant
Sanitation, Santiago, Chile.

The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct and
sufficiently complete for its purpose up to the time of preparation, but it is
not intended to be used independently of, nor as a substitute for, the original
text, and it is not to be interpreted as legally authoritative.

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF CHILE
Basic Law

[Decree-Law No. 177, Plant-Quarantine Law (Ley de Policia Sanitaria Vegetal) of
December 31, 1924]

DECREE-LA W

ARTICLE 1. For the purposes of the present law it is hereby declared that
weeds, injurious animals and in general, diseases of cryptogamic or animal
origin, eSpecially dangerous insects, will be deemed plant pests and will be the
objects of Sanitary measures. oe
1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS S87

Art. 2. The importation of plants, cuttings, seeds, fruits, or any other plant
products will only be authorized through ports determined by special decrees
in accordance with the regulations prescribed to that effect.

The same regulations will prescribe the procedure to be followed in case
of mail importations.

ArT. 8. Such plants and plant products offered for importation shall be
inspected in the Customs by the Plant Quarantine Service (Servicio de Policia
Sanitaria Vegetal), and in case they are infected or are suspected of being
infected, any of the following measures may be ordered: Disinfection, quar-
antine, return to port of departure, confiscation, or destruction.

CONCISE SUMMARY
IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

Seeds, plants or parts thereof, if infested by any of the diseases or insects
named in Decree No. 105, article 5 (a) and (b). (See p. 5.)

Rooted grapevines from any source. (Decree No. 105, art. 5 (d), and Decree
No. 2921, May 27, 1929. See pp. 5 and 6.)

Peach trees from the United States. (Decree No. 105, art. 5 (e). See p. 6.)

Plants with soil. (Decree No. 105, art. 5 (f). See p. 6.)

Bulbs, tubers, or roots infested with injurious parasites. (Decree No. 105,
art. 5 (g). See p. 6.)

Fresh plant products capable of introducing fruitflies. (Decree No. 105, art.
5 (h), and Decree No. 12, September 4, 1930. See pp. 6 and 7.)

Fruits infested with Aspidiotus perniciosus or Diaspis pentagona. (Decree
No, 105) art. 5.(1).. See p. 7.)

Corn on the cob and broomcorn. (Decree No. 2526, August 28, 1928. See
p. 9.)

Potatoes. (Decree No. 130, April 28, 1931. See p. 13.)

IMPORTATION RESTRIOTED—INSPECTION CERTIFICATE REQUIRED

Seeds if not infested by any of the insects named in article 5 (a) of Decree
No. 105, February 11, 1925. (See p. 5.)

Soybeans for industrial purposes, subject to fumigation if slightly infested.
(Decree No. 298 of April 9, 1935.) (See pp. 15 and 16.)

Plants or parts thereof if not infested by any of the insects named in article
5 (b) of Decree No. 105, February 11, 1925. (See p. 5.)

Bulbs, tubers, or roots free from parasites deemed injurious. (Art. 5 (g)
of Decree No. 105, February 11, 1925. See p. 6.)

Fresh fruits from the United States if free from the scale insects Aspidiotus
perniciosus and Diaspis pentagona, and if accompanied by a certificate attesting
origin in a district free from Mediterranean fruitfly and visaed by Chilean
Consul. (Decree No. 105, art. 5 (i), February 11, 1925, and No. 12, September
4, 1930. See pp. 7, 10, 11, and 13, and following.)

Alfalfa, clover, and other forage seeds containing less than 10 seeds of
Cuscuta sp. per kilogram. (Decree No. 629 of September 27, 1989. See p. 7.)

Straw packing to be sterilized and certified accordingly. (Decree No. 2526,
August 28, 1928. See pp. 9 and 10.)

Grapevine stocks of varieties resistant to phylloxera. (Decree No. 2921 of
May 27, 1929. See pp. 5 and 6.)

Peach trees from the United States in conformity with the provisions of
Decree No. 781 of May 29, 1935. (See p. 6.)

Clean shelled corn and sorgo seed. (Decree No. 2526 of August 28, 1929.
See p. 9.)

Cottonseed for the production of oil, and unginned cotton, subject to fumi-
gation and other provisions. (Decree No. 226 of March 31, 1936. See pp. 16
and 17.)

Wheat for milling purposes must be free from Angoumois grain moth and
so certified. (Decree No. 4, January 4, 1934. See pp. 14 and 15.)

Seed wheat must be certified as coming from a district free from loose smut
of wheat. (Decree of January 31, 1989. See p. 15.)

IMPORTATION UNRESTRICTED

Coffee, tea, yerba mate, rice, chicory, saffron, mushrooms, cinnamon, cloves,
cumin, peanuts, cacao, and pepper: No inspection certificate required, If
88 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct.—Dee,

imported in tin cans may enter any port without inspection. If found infested
with pests, Subject to the general regulations of Decree No. 105. (Decree No.
450, August 6, 1986. See pp. 8 and 9.)

Wood, ground red pepper, cornmeal and corn starch, dried leaves, and bark
and roots for medicinal and industrial purposes through the port of Chacalluta-
(See p. 10.)>

SUMMARY OF THE GENERAL REGULATIONS
[Decree No. 105, sec. 1, February 11, 1925]

DECLARATION OF PLANT PESTS

ARTICLE 1. Plant diseases of cryptogamic or animal nature, as well as in-
jurious animals and weeds, which can be regarded as plant pests, will be so
declared by decree. The office of the Plant Quarantine Service will indicate
the procedure to be followed in each case.

AUTHORIZED PORTS OF ENTRY

ART. 2. (a) The importation of plants, seeds, cuttings, bulbs, fruits, and other
plant products capable of introducing any agricultural pests into the country
may be permitted through the ports of Valparaiso, Taleahuano, and Los Andes.

(b) The importation by mail of the products above mentioned may only be
made through those ports and Santiago.

(ec) The imported products are subject to the jurisdiction of the Plant Quaran-
tine Service who are entrusted with the task of preventing the introduction of
plant pests.

(d) Other ports of entry may be either limited or authorized in accordance
with the recommendations of the Board of Agriculture.

DECLARATION AND CERTIFICATE REQUIRED

ART. 8. The importer in Chile shall furnish to the Customs a written declara-
tion indicating:

(a) Name and address of importer ;

(b) Purpose for which material is intended;

(ec) Country of origin;

(d) Locality where the material will be planted or sown.

The declaration shall be accompanied by a certificate of inspection issued
by the competent authority of the exporting country and visaed by the respective
consul of Chile.

INSPECTION OF PASSENGERS’ BAGGAGE

Art. 4. Passengers who carry in their baggage any plants, seeds, fruits, or
any other product subject to inspection, are required to declare them to the
Captain of the vessel, who in turn shall notify the customs authorities.

Custom inspectors shall confiscate all plant products whose clandestine im-
portation is attempted. ;

IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

Art. 5. The importation is prohibited of:

(a) Every kind of seed which reaches the country infested by any of the
following-named insects: Sitotroga cerealella, Bruchus obtectus, B. quadrimacu-
latus, B. rufimanus, B. chinensis, B. signaticornis, B. lentis, Spermophagus pec-
toralis.

(b) Plants or parts thereof upon which the following-named insects are
shown to exist: Aspidiotus perniciosus, Diaspis pentagona, EHuproctis chryso-
rrhoea, Porthetria dispar.

(ec) Potatoes (Solanum tuberosum). (See Decree No. 1380, April 28, 1931.)

(d) Rooted grapevines whatever their origin may be (as modified by Decree
No. 2921 of May 27, 1929), except as follows:

1. The importation of grapevine stocks will be authorized when the varieties.
are known to be resistant to phylloxera and when application is made in
conformity with the requirements determined by the Plant Quarantine Service
and the Services of Viticulture and Oenology.

2. The Customs will exercise special supervision to prevent the importation
of plants from countries infested with phylloxera and will extend such super-
vision to baggage and cargo.
1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 89

(e) Peach trees originating in the United States of America which are
infected with the diseases known as peach yellows, peach rosette, and little
peach. (As modified by Decree No. 781 of May 29, 1935.) Those not showing
signs of these diseases may be imported in conformity with the following
provisions:

1. Compliance with the general requirements of the Laws and Regulations of
the Plant Quarantine Service.

2. In case the importation consists of several varieties, only 10 plants of
each variety are allowed, and 20 plants in case only one variety is involved.
The plants shall be subjected to quarantine or isolation during a growing
season in the Experimental Field of the Plant Quarantine Service of the
Ministry of Agriculture.

3. At the expiration of this period the plants will be returned to the im-
porter provided they have not shown any signs of the diseases indicated in
the preamble, or of any other dangerous diseases not yet established in Chile
or which cannot be controlled by the known methods of treatment.

(f) Plants in pots or other containers with soil, from whatever source. To
permit the entry of these plants they will have to be deprived of all their
soil for inspection, after which their admission or rejection will be determined.

(g) Bulbs, tubers, or roots in which parasites deemed injurious are shown
to exist, and whose existence has not been demonstrated in the country.

(h) Fruits which are believed capable of introducing insects commonly known
as “fruitflies:’ Rhagoletis pomonella, R. cingulata, Contarinia pyrivora, Epochra
canadensis, Ortalis (Tephritis) cerasi, Ceratitis capitata, Dacus oleae, Trypeta
ludens, T. acidusa, Tephritis tryoni, and others.

A decree shall determine the cases and the classes of fruit deemed to be
comprehended in the prohibitions referred to in the preceding section. (See
Decree No. 12, September 4, 1930.)

(i) Fruits in which the presence is determined of: Aspidiotus perniciosus and
Diaspis pentagona. (See Decree No. 12, September 4, 1930.)

(j) Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), Clover (Trifolium sp.) or other seeds
which contain more than 10 seeds of Cuscuta sp. per kilogram. (As modified by
Decree No. 629 of September 27, 1939.)

The certificate of inspection issued by the official authorities of the exporting
country shall have a statement to the effect that this provision has been com-
plied with.

On its arrival in Chile, alfalfa, clover, or any other seeds subject to the
contamination of Cuscuta sp. seeds, shall be inspected by the Plant Quaran-
tine Service and shall be refused entry if found to contain more than 10 seeds
of Cuscuta sp. per kilogram.

The enumeration of the diseases in the various sections of this article is
not limited and, consequently, others may be added in subsequent orders.

DISPOSAL OF PROHIBITED MATERIAL

ArT. 6. If, upon inspection by the Plant Quarantine Service, any of the con-
ditions set forth in article 5 or in any of the special prohibitions promulgated
in accordance with paragraph (h) or in any other necessary prohibitions, are
found to be violated, the Chief of the Plant Quarantine Service is authorized
to order the return or the destruction of the plants, seeds, cuttings, bulbs, or
fruits offered for importation. Where the value of the consignment exceeds
5,000 pesos, authority for the application of those measures may be obtained
from the Ministry of Agriculture.

Such destruction does not entail any indemnity and if relading of the
refused products is resorted to, it shall take place immediately, or else shall
be subject, pending reshipment, to such conditions of isolation as the Plant
Quarantine Service may determine.

ArT. 7. Not applicable.

TREATMENT REQUIRED IF DEEMED NECESSARY

Art. 8. Plants, seeds, cuttings, bulbs, or fruits, the importation of which is
not prohibited by article 5, may be released after having passed inspection
and other requirements having been fulfilled, in accordance with the following
provisions:

(a) Quarantine of suspected or infected consignments pending final decision.

(b) Disinfection in the manner prescribed by the Plant Quarantine Service.
90 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct.—Dec.

The expenses incurred, including the cost of ingredients for disinfection,
will be borne by the importer.

SPECIAL QUARANTINES

Coffee, tea, yerba mate, rice, chicory, saffron, mushrooms, cinnamon, cloves,
cumin, peanuts, cacao, and peppers:

Since these products are exclusively for food purposes no inspection certif-
icate is required. They may be imported in tin cans through any port of
Chile without inspection.

Rice, cumin, peanuts, and cacao may be imported without restriction through
the ports of Arica, Iquique, Tecopilla, Antofagasta, and Taltal, but shipment
thence to southern ports is prohibited. These products may be imported through
the ports of Coquimbo, Valparaiso, Talcahuano, Los Andes, and Corral subject
to inspection. If any of these products are found to be infested with pests,
whether or not those pests occur in Chile, they shall be subject to the general
provisions of the respective law and, regulations. (Decree No. 450, August 6,
1926. )

Rice may enter Puerto Montt subject to inspection. (Decree No. 148,
March 16, 1927.)

The southern limit of the zone fixed by Decree No. 450 for the unrestricted
entry of rice, cumin, peanuts, cacao, ete., is the Department of Chanaral and
the unrestricted reshipment of these products is permitted between the ports
included in this zone. (Decree No. 1080, April 25, 1928.)

STRAW, PACKING, CORN ON THE COB, AND BROOMCORN
_ [Decree No. 2526 of August 28, 1928]

ARTICLE 1. The importation of corn on the cob or parts thereof is prohibited.

ArT, 2. The importation of broomecorn for manufacturing purposes is equally
prohibited.

Arr, 3. The importation of clean shelled corn and sorgo seed, if thoroughly
clean and free from fragments of cobs and stalks, may be allowed.

ArT, 4. Except for the dispositions of articles 5 and 6 of this decree, no goods
of whatever origin may be imported if packed in straw, grasses, or stems of
any class of plants.

ArT. 5. The importation of spirits, wines, or other bottled liquids shall not
be allowed, when packed in straw jackets, unless the consignments are accom-
panied by a certificate issued by authorized officials of the exporting country
attesting that the jackets have been sterilized with steam for at least 15 minutes
at 115° C., or disinfected in a closed chamber at a temperature of not less
than 20° C., with a solution of formaldehyde. The solution shall contain at
least 37 percent by weight of formaldehyde and shal! be used at the rate of
500 ce. per 20 cubic meters of space, in a hermetically closed chamber. The
straw to be disinfected shall remain there for at least 8 hours.

ART. 6. The importation of glass, glassware, chinaware, etc., if packed
with straw, shall be allowed provided the shipment is accompanied by a certif-
icate issued by the exporting country and visaed by the corresponding Chilean
consul attesting that the straw used for packing has been disinfected by one
of the processes outlined in article 5.

ART. 7. Goods arriving without the above-mentioned certificate of disinfection
shall be treated as prescribed under article 5.

Art. 8. All expenses incurred in order to comply with the provisions of
the present decree shall be charged against the person directly concerned.

CHACALLUTA AN AUTHORIZED PorT OF ENTRY
[Decree No. 1555 of May 28, 1930]

ARTICLE 1. Authorizes the importation of wood, ground red pepper, cornmeal
and corn starch, dried leaves, and bark and roots for medicinal and industrial
purposes, through the Customs at the port of Chacalluta, without an inspection
certificate.

ART. 2, Cereals, including clean shelled corn, are allowed provided they are
accompanied by a certificate of inspection to the effect that they are not
infested with the Angoumois grain moth (Sitotroga cerealella) or with any
other insects or plant diseases.
1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS QO]

ArT. 3. Through the ports of Ollague and San Pedro de Atacama only the
following products are allowed entry without a certificate: Wood, ground red
pepper, cornmeal and corn starch, and dried leaves, bark, and roots for
medicinal or industrial purposes.

IMPORTATION PROHIBITED OF FRESH PLANT PRODUCTS CAPABLE OF CARRYING
FRUITFLIES

[Decree No. 12, September 4, 19350]

ARTICLE 1. The importation into Chile is prohibited of all fresh plant products,
whatever their origin, which are capable of carrying fruitflies. Especially
included in this prohibition are all kinds of fresh fruits, and the following
vegetables: Tomatoes, eggplants, squash, string beans, and peppers.

ENTRY PERMITTED WHEN CERTIFIED AS ORIGINATING IN A DISTRICT FREE FROM
FRUITFLIES

ArT, 2. Fresh fruits from the State of California are excepted from the above
prohibition.

Arv. 3. The declaration that the fruits or other products are from a zone free
from fruitfly shall be made in the certificate issued by the plant quarantine
authorities of the country of origin, which certificate shall accompany the ship-
ping papers or bill of lading, and which will indicate in each case the kind,
quality, and origin of the products whose entry is permitted by this decree. This
certificate shall be issued in duplicate and shall be visaed by the Chilean consul
in the country of origin of the fruit. A copy of the said certificate shall accom-
pany the shipping papers, and another shall be retained with the fruit while
it remains on board.

ArT. 4. The importation of the products excepted from the prohibition, indi-
cated in article 2, is subject to the following conditions:

INSPECTION CERTIFICATE REQUIRED

(a) Through the ports of the zone included between Arica and the Chanaral
entry is permitted, provided that the products are accompanied by the sanitary
certificate which must come with each shipment and in which it is also stated
that the consignment has been inspected at the port of embarkation by com-
petent sanitary authority. The said certificate shall be visaed by the respective
Chilean consul, in accordance with the provisions of article 3, and it will also
be required that the certificate bear the approval of the inspector of the Plant
Quarantine Service of Arica, after inspection made on board by the official.

AUTHORIZED PORTS OF ENTRY

The inspection made at Arica will serve to permit entry through ports where
there are no inspectors of the Plant Quarantine Service; but in ports where
there are officials of that service, entry will be permitted only after inspection
has been made at the place where the products were unladen.

(b) The fruits and other products named in article 2 of the present decree
may be entered through the port of Chanaral, provided that they are intended
exclusively for consumption in the mining establishments of the region included
between Pueblo Hundido and the northern boundary.

(c) The products named in article 2, with the exception of avocados, water-
melons, and cucumbers, may be entered south of Chanaral only through the ports
of Coquimbo, Valparaiso, Los Andes, San Antonio, Taleahuano, and Valdivia,
after the inspection established by the Law of the Plant Quarantine Service and
upon presentation of the certificate referred to in article 3.

Art 5. The importation is authorized of fresh fruits and vegetables of what-
ever origin through the port of Magellanes without other requirement than the
certificate prescribed by article 3, provided that those products are intended for
consumption in the Departments of Magellanes, Natales, and Tierra del Fuego,
their relading being definitely prohibited for the north of these Departments.

Arts. 6 to 10. Not applicable.

ArT. 11. Steamship companies are prohibited from transporting to any port
of the country fresh fruits and the other products named in article 1 of the
present decree, and the crew and passengers shall not be allowed to have or to
embark those products; but the transportation of the products excepted from
the prohibition in article 2 may be effected.
02? BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct.—Dec.

Arts. 12 and 13. Not applicable.

Art. 14. Vessels that embark fresh fruits, vegetables, and other products whose
importation is prohibited by article 1 shall not keep these products on board
if they have to call at any port south of Taltal; but if those products should be
intended exclusively as food for their passengers and crews they may be
retained on board provided that they be kept in locked inclosures while the
vessels remain in port. In no case may tomatoes, mangoes, cherimoyas, guavas,
or other tropical fruits be kept on board, unless expressly excepted from the
prohibition to enter, as ordered in the present decree.

An inspector of the Piant Quarantine Service will confirm compliance with
this provision and the vessel shail not be received if this requirement is not
complied with.

Arts. 15 and 16. Not applicable.

FRESH FRUITS FROM THE UNITED STATES

Fresh fruits may be imported into Chile from any State of the United States,
provided that each shipment is accompanied by a certificate issued by the com-
petent American authorities, affirming that the fruit originated in a district free
from the Mediterranean fruitfly (Ceratitis capitata), the certificate to be visaed
by a Chilean Consul. (Minister of Agriculture of Chile through the American
Consul, Santiago, Chile, October 28, 1930.)

IMPORTATION OF POTATOES PROHIBITED

From the date of this decree the importation is prohibited of potatoes from
foreign sources, to prevent the introduction of the wart disease (Chrysophiyctis
endobiotica). (Decree No. 130, April 28, 1931.)

ADDITIONAL AUTHORIZED PORTS
[Decree No. 336 of July 24, 1933]

Authorizes the importation of the following products through the port of
San Antonio: Fruits, seeds, cuttings, bulbs, and any other plant products.

[Decree No. 270 of March 28, 1934]

Authorizes the importation of the following products through the port of
Antofogasta: Plants, seeds, cuttings, bulbs, fruits, and any other plant products.

[Decree No. 553 of August 18, 1934]

Authorizes the importation of the following products through the port of
Arica: Plants, cuttings, fruits, and any other agricultural products.

[Decree No. 708 of November 30, 19384]
IMPORTATION OF FRUIT THROUGH THE PORT OF ARICA FOR LOCAL CONSUMPTION

ARTICLE 1. The importation of fruit for local consumption is hereby allowed
through the port of Arica, provided it originates in national or foreign territories
free of the fruitfly. The fruit must be accompanied by a certificate of inspec-
tion stating that it is free of the fruitfly. If the fruit is of foreign origin,
the certificate must be visaed by the corresponding Chilean Consul.

Fruit imported into Arica for local consumption is not allowed to proceed
to the valleys of Azapa and Codpa.

USE OF WHEAT IMPORTED FOR MILLING
[Decree No. 386 of September 30, 1932]

ARTICLE 1. The use for planting purposes of wheat imported for milling is
hereby prohibited. All wheat so imported must be milled in its entirety.

WHEAT INTENDED FOR MILLING

Chilean Decree No. 4 of January 4, 1984, extends the prohibitions of article
5 of Decree No. 105 of February 11, 1925, to wheat intended for milling. The
text of Decree No. 4 follows:
1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 93

ARTICLE 1. Wheat intended for milling may be admitted into Chilean territory
only when absolutely free from the Angoumois grain moth (Sitotroga cerealella).

Art. 2. Each shipment must be accompanied by a certificate issued by com-
petent authorities of the exporting country, visaed by the respective Chilean
Consul, affirming that the region in which the wheat is grown is free from the
insect mentioned in article 1.

Art. 3. Shipments of wheat and their containers proceeding from regions where
this insect exists shall be fumigated or treated with heat before shipment in
such a manner as to insure the total destruction of insects which may infest
the wheat.

Art. 4. A single proof of the presence of live insects in the shipment offered for
importation will be sufficient cause for the Servicio de Sanidad Vegetal to
prevent its unlading.

Art. 5. Sacks containing wheat shall be strong enough to withstand the
ordinary operations of lading and unlading without being torn.

ArT, 6. Wheat imported for seed purposes shall be subject to the general
provisions of the regulations governing the importation of seeds.

Art. 7. Violations of the foregoing provisions will be subject to the sanctions
of Decree No. 177 of December 31, 1924.

SEED WHEAT
[Chilean Decree, Santiago, January 31, 1939]

ARTICLE 1. The use of wheat infected with loose smut (UsSstilago tritici) for
seeding purposes is prohibited.

Arts. 2 to 6. Refer to domestic matters.

Akt. 7. Wheat imported for seed purposes must be accompanied by a certifi-
cate issued by competent authorities of the exporting country, stating that the
wheat was grown in localities free from loose smut (Ustilago tritici).

IMPORTATION OF SOYBEANS FoR OIL EXTRACTION
[Decree No. 298 of April 9, 1935]

Whereas it is convenient to import soybeans in sufficient quantities to meet
the demand of the oil industry until we are capable of producing enough
ourselves; whereas it is highly improbable that soybeans may be infested
with Bruchus obtectus, and that -if so infested any danger of contamination
could be avoided by refusing its entry, therefore the following decree is issued:

ARTICLE 1. The provisions of article 5 of Decree No. 105 are hereby waived
in the case of the importation of soybeans.

Art. 2. If the presence in small numbers of Bruchus obtectus, Laspeyresia
glycinivorella, or any other dangerous insect not established in Chile is detected
upon inspection by the Plant Quarantine Service, fumigation shall be required
before its release. :

ArT. 3. In case of a heavy infestation the seed must be reembarked within
a period designated by the Plant Quarantine Service. At the expiration of
that period the seed shall be destroyed by burning if this order is not complied
with.

COTTONSEED PESTS
[Decree No. 226, March 31, 1936]
FUMIGATION REQUIRED TO PREVENT INTRODUCTION OF PINK BOLLWORM

ARTICLE 1. Cottonseed imported into Chile for the production of oil, unginned
cotton, and the containers thereof, proceeding from regions where the pink
bollworm (Pectinophora gossypiella Saund.) exists shall be fumigated or treated
by heat before embarkation, in such a manner as to destroy all insects contained
in the shipment.

The phytosanitary authority of the exporting country shall certify to the
fumigation in the phytosanitary certificate that must accompany the shipment,
in accordance with article 3 of the General Regulations of the Law of Phyto-
sanitary Police.

Art. 2. If on arrival in Chile a consignment of cottonseed is found to carry
live insects, despite compliance with the requirements of the preceding article,
it shall be fumigated, the operation to begin within 24 hours after unlading.
If fumigation cannot be effected within the designated period, the Servicio de

290314—-41—_2
Q4 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct.—Dec.

Sanidad Vegetal shall prevent the unlading of the shipment or proceed with
its destruction after the lapse of 24 hours from unlading.

ArT. 3. If the certificate referred to in article 1 cannot be obtained, the ship-
ment shall be fumigated on board, before unlading is begun in the Chilean port,
for a minimum period of 12 hours. If this treatment does not prove efficacious,
a second fumigation shall be applied on board or on lighters or barges, and
its landing shall not be permitted while live insects are found in the shipment.

Fumigation on board may be waived if the operation can be effected on lighters
or barges on condition that both the unlading of such a shipment and the fumi-
gation are carried out not less than 500 meters from shore. The shipment shall
not be landed while specimens of live pink bollworms or other insects are
found therein.

ArT. 4. Shipments of cottonseed arriving by land, if not supported by the
fumigation certificate referred to in article 1, shall be returned to the country
of origin with a minimum period that will be determined by the Servicio de
Sanidad Vegetal, or destroyed if the return is not effected within the stipulated
period.

ART. 5. In all cases, this seed shall be ground immediately after it is received,
preference being given over any other, and not allowing the work to stop until
the entire shipment has been manufactured.

ArT. 6. The foregoing measures will not be required for seed proceeding from
regions where pink bollworm does not exist, if such seed is subjected to the
general provisions relating to the importation of seeds. In such ease, the
certificate shall explicitly declare that pink bollworm does not exist in the -
region where the seed was produced.

THE COTTON STAINER (Dysdercus sp.)

ArT. 7. The phytosanitary certificate accompanying cottonseed intended for
the producticn of oil proceeding from regions in which the cotton stainer
(Dysdercus sp.) exists shall clearly affirm that the shipment does not contain
that insect. If the said insect does not occur in the region, that fact shall be
stamped on the certificate.

ArT. 8. The seed shall be inspected on board in the port of destination by the
Servicio de Sanidad Vegetal.

ArT. 9. If live cotton stainers are found, the seed will be treated in accordance
with the provisions of the second article of this decree.

ArT. 10. Unginned cotton or cottonseed imported from regions where the pink
boilworm or the cotton stainer exist shall meet the requirements of articles 1,
2. 3, 4, and o.

ArT. 11. Importation of cotton will be permitted only in sacks; these shall be
so strong that they will not tear or burst during transportation or in lading
or unlading. The unlading of torn sacks will not be permitted.

COTTONSEED INTENDED FOR SOWING

Art. 12. The importation of seed for sowing from regions in which pink
bollworm occurs is prohibited, and all the other measures indicated in the present
decree will be applied to the said seed.

SAMPLES IMPORTED BY MAIL

Art. 13. Samples without value arriving by mail will comply with the require-
ments of article 3 of the General Regulations of the Law of Phytosanitary
Police only.

ArT. 14. Decree No. 1031 of September 30, 1935, is revoked.

IMPORTATION OF BENEFICIAL INSECTS
[Decree No. 458, April 27, 1935]

ARTICLE 1. The importation of insects beneficial to agriculture, namely, those
which are natural enemies of other that constitute pests, may be effected only
by the Phytosanitary Service of the Ministry of Agriculture of Chile.

Art, 2. The importation of other insects of direct economic value to private
persons, such as bees, silkworms, etc., may be effected, provided that all the
requirements established by the Law of Phytosanitary Police for the impor-
tation of plants, or parts thereof, are complied with.
1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 95

Art. 3. Relates to the importation of birds, rodents, and other small animals,
and article 4 deals with penalties for violations.

DECEMBER 2, 1940.
B. E. P. Q. 404, Revised, Supplement No. 2

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, BRITISH INDIA

Notification of the Department of Education, Health and Lands, No. F. 30-8/37,
dated under Agriculture, at Simla, June 7, 1940.

PRESCRIBED FORM OF CERTIFICATES

“T. (i) (2) The certificate shall be in the form precsribed in the Third
Schedule or in a form as near thereto as may be and supplying all the infor-
mation called for in that form.”

This paragraph modifies article 5 on page 6 of B. E. P. Q. 404, revised, and
apparently permits the use of the Export Certificate, Form EQ-375, when the
information required in the prescribed certificate as shown on page 9 is incorpo-
rated in Form EQ-3875.

Several revisions in terminology have been adopted in paragraphs (ii), (iii),
and (iv) of the above Notification. In accordance with these changes, in article
7, on page 6 of B. E. P. Q. 404, revised, Dothidiella uiei should be inserted
before Melanopsammosis ulei, in article 9 (2) on page 7, “aleurodes”’ should
be changed to read “white flies,’ and Ceratostomella paradora, as a synonym
for Thielaviopsis paradoxza, should be inserted after “pineapple disease.”

On page 7, article 8, insert the words “except from Burma” afier the words
“British India” in line three. (Notification No. F. 43-15/40-A, August 14,
1940.)

LEE A. STRONG, :
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

LIST OF CURRENT QUARANTINE AND OTHER RESTRICTIVE ORDERS
AND MISCELLANEOUS REGULATIONS

[The domestic and foreign quarantine and other restrictive orders summarized herein
are issued under the authority of the Plant Quarantine Act of Aug. 20, 1912, as amended.
The Mexican border regulations and the export-certification regulations are issued under
specific acts of Congress. }

QUARANTINE ORDERS

The numbers assigned to these quarantines indicate merely the chronological
order of issuance of both domestic and foreign quarantines in one numerical
series. The quarantine numbers missing in this list are quarantines which have
either been superseded or revoked. For convenience of reference these quaran-
tines are here classified as domestic and foreign, the domestic quarantines being
divided into (1) those applying primarily to the continental United States and
(2) those applying primarily to shipments from and to the Territories of Hawaii
and Puerto Rico.

DoMESTIC PLANT QUARANTINES
QUARANTINES APPLYING TO THE CONTINENTAL UNITED STATES

Black stem rust.—Quarantine No. 88, revised, effective September 1, 1937:
Prohibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto,
revised, effective September 1, 1937, the movement into any of the protected States,
namely, Colorado, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Mon-
tana, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Virginia, West
Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming, as well as the movement from any one of
said protected States into any other protected State of the common barberry
(Berberis vulgaris), or other species of Berberis or Mahonia or parts thereof
capable of propagation, on account of the black stem rust of grains. The regula-
tions place no restrictions on the interstate movement of Japanese barberry
(B. thunbergii) or any of its rust-resistant varieties, or of cuttings (without roots)
of Mahonia shipped for decorative purposes and not for propagation.

Gypsy moth and brown-tail moth.—Quarantine No. 45, revised, effective Sep-
tember 29, 1938: Prohibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations supple-
96 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct.Dee.

mental thereto, revised, effective September 29, 1988, the movement interstate to
any point outside of the infested area, or from points in the generally infested
area to points in the lightly infested area, of stone and quarry products, and of
the plants and the plant products listed therein. The regulated area covers Rhode
Island and parts of the States of Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New
Hampshire, and Vermont.

Japanese beetle-—Quarantine No. 48, revised, effective February 12, 1941: Pro-
hibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto,
revised, effective February 12, 1941, the interstate movement of (1) fruits and
vegetables; (2) nursery, ornamental, and greenhouse stock, and other plants; and
(3) sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure, from the regulated area to or
through any point outside thereof. ‘The regulated area includes the entire States
of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, and Delaware, and
the District of Columbia, and portions of the States of Maine, New Hampshire,
Vermont, New York, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia, West Virginia, and Ohio.

Pink bollworm.—Quarantine No. 52, revised, effective March 15, 1939:: Prohibits,
except aS provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto, revised,
effective March 15, 1989, as amended effective November 20, 1939, the interstate
movement from the regulated areas of Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona, of (1)
cotton, wild cotton, including ail parts of either cotton or wild cotton plants, seed
cotton, cotton lint, linters, and all other forms of unmanufactured cotton fiber,
gin waste, cottonseed, cottonseed hulls, cottonseed cake, and meal; (2) bagging
and other containers and wrappers of cotton and cotton products; (38) railway
ears, boats, and other vehicles which have been used in conveying cotton or cotton
products or which are fouled with such products; (4) farm products, farm
household goods, farm equipment, and, if contaminated with cotton, any other
articles.

Thurberia weevil.—Quarantine No. 61, revised, effective August 1, 1927: Pro-
hibits the interstate movement of Thurberia, including all parts of the plant, from
any point in Arizona and prohibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations
supplemental thereto, revised, effective October 2, 1933, as amended effective
October 22, 1936, the interstate movement from the regulated area of Arizona
of (1) cotton, including all parts of the plant, seed cotton, cotton lint, linters, and
all other forms of unmanufactured cotton lint, gin waste, cottonseed, cottonseed
hulls, and cottonseed cake and meal; (2) bagging and other containers and wrap-
pers of cotton and cotton products: (8) railway cars, boats, and other vehicles
which have been used in conveying cotton and cotton products, or which are fouled
with such products; (4) hay and other farm products; and (5) farm household
goods, farm equipment, and, if contaminated with cotton, any other articles.

White-pine blister rust— Quarantine No. 63, effective October 1, 1926: Prohibits,
exeept aS provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto, revised,
effective July 1, 1988, the interstate movement from every State in the continental
United States and the District of Columbia of five-leafed pines (Pinus) or currant
and gooseberry plants (Ribes and Grossularia), including cultivated or wild or
ornamental sorts.

Mexican fruitfly—Quarantine No. 64, revised, effective October 15, 1987: Pro-
hibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations Supplemental thereto, re-
vised, effective October 16, 1989, the interstate movement from the regulated area
of Texas of fruits of all varieties.

Dutch elm disease.—Quarantine No. 71, effective February 25, 1935: Prohibits,
except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto, effective
February 25, 1935, as amended, effective September 11, 1989, the interstate move-
ment from the regulated areas in the States of New Jersey, New York, and Con-
necticut to or through any point outside thereof, of elm plants or parts thereof of
all species of the genus Ulmus, irrespective of whether nursery, forest, or privately
grown, including (1) trees, plants, leaves, twigs, branches, bark, roots, trunks,
cuttings, and scions of such plants; (2) logs or cordwood of such plants; and (38)
lumber, crates, boxes, barrels, packing cases, and other containers manufactured
in whole or in part from such plants, unless the wood is entirely free from bark.

White-fringed beetle—Quarantine No. 72, effective January 15, 1939: Prohibits,
except as provided in the regulations supplemental thereto, effective January 15,
1939, the interstate movement from the regulated areas in the States of Alabama,
Florida, Louisiana, and Mississippi, to or through any point outside thereof, of
(1) nursery stock or any other plants or plant products; (2) soil, independent of,
or used in connection with nursery stock, plants, or plant products; and (8) other
articles (as specifically named in said regulations, in modifications thereof, or in
administrative instructions as provided in said regulations).
1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 97

QUARANTINES APPLYING TO THE TERRITORIES OF HAWAII AND PUERTO RICO

Hawaiian fruits and vegetables—Quarantine No. 13, revised, effective June 1,
1917: Prohibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental
thereto, revised, effective June 1, 19380, the movement from the Territory of
Hawaii into or through any other Territory, State, or District of the United
States, of all fruits and vegetables in the natural or raw state, on account of the
Mediterranean fruitfly (Ceratitis capitata) and the melonfly (Dacus cucurbitae).

Sugarcane.—Quarantine No. 16, revised, effective January 1, 1935: Prohibits
the movement from the Territories of Hawaii and Puerto Rico into or through
any other Territory, State, or District of the United States of canes of sugar-
cane, or cuttings or parts thereof, sugarcane leaves, and bagasse, on account of
certain injyrious insects and diseases, except that movement will be allowed
under permit of specific materials on condition that they have been or are to be
so treated, processed, or manufactured that, in the judgment of the Department,
their movement will involve no pest risk.

Siweetpotato—Quarantine No. 30, revised, effective October 10, 1934: Pro-
hibits the movement from the Territories of Hawaii and Puerto Rico into
or through any other Territory, State, or District of the United States of any
variety of sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas Poir.), regardless of the use for which
the same is intended, on acount of the sweetpotato stem borer (Omphisa
anastomosalis Guen.) and the sweetpotato scarabee (Huscepes batatae Waterh.).

Banana plants.—Quarantine No. 32, effective April 1, 1918: Prohibits the
movement from the Territories of Hawaii and Puerto Rico into or through any
other Territory, State, or District of the United States of any species or variety
of banana plants (Musa spp.), regardless of the use for which the same is in-
tended, on account of two injurious weevils (Rhabdocnemis obscurus Boisd. and
Metamasius hemipterus Linn.).

Hawaiian and Puerto Rican cotton, cottonseed, and cottonseed products.—
Quarantine No. 47, effective August 15, 1920: Prohibits, except as provided in
the rules and regulations supplemental thereto, effective August 15, 1920, the
movement of cotton, cottonseed, and cottonseed products, except oil, from the
Territories of Hawaii and Puerto Rico into or through any other Territory, State,
or District of the United States on account of the pink bollworm (Pectinophora
gossypiella Saund.) and the cotton-blister mite (Hriophyes gossypii Banks).

United States quarantined to protect Hawaii.—Quarantine No. 51, effective
October 1, 1921: Prohibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations
supplemental thereto, effective October 1, 1921, the movement from the United
States to the Territory of Hawaii, as ships’ stores or as baggage or effect= of
passengers or crews, of sugarcane, corn (other than shelled corn), cotton, alfalfa,
and the fruits of the avocado and papaya in the natural or raw state, on account
of injurious insects, especially the sugarcane borer (Diatraea saccharalis Fab.),
the alfalfa weevil (Hypera postica Gyll.), the cotton boll weevil (Anthonomus
grandis Boh.), the papaya fruitfly (Toxrotrypana curvicauda Gerst.), and certain
insect enemies of the fruit of the avocado.

Puerto Rican fruits and vegetables.—Quarantine No. 58, revised, effective
January 22, 1941: Prohibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations
supplemental thereto, effective January 22, 1941, the movement from the Ter-
ritory of Puerto Rico into or through: any other Territory, State, or District
of| the United States of all fruits and vegetables in the raw or unprocessed
state, on account of certain injurious insects, including the fruitflies Anastrepha
suspensa (Loew) and A. mombinpraeoptans Sein, and the bean-pod borer
Maruca testulalis (Geyer).

Sand, soil, or earth, with plants from Hawaii and Puerto Rico—Quarantine
No. 60, revised, effective September 1, 1936: Prohibits the movement from the
Territories of Hawaii and Puerto Rico into or through any other Territory,
State, or District of the United States of sand (other than clean ocean sand),
soil, or earth around the roots of plants, to prevent the spread of white grubs,
the Japanese rose beetle, and termites or white ants. Provision is made for the
retention of potted plants on board vessels from Hawaii and Puerto Rico when
evidence is presented satisfactory to the plant quarantine inspector that the
soil has been so treated or is so safeguarded as to eliminate pest risk.

Coffee.-—Quarantine No. 73, effective April 1, 1940: Prohibits the importa-
tion into Puerto Rico from all foreign countries and localities of (1) the seeds
or beans of coffee which, previous to importation, have not been roasted to a
degree which, in the judgment of an inspector of the Department of Agri-
culture, will have destroyed coffee borers in all stages, (2) coffee berries or
O8 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct.—Dee.

fruits, and (38) coffee plants and leaves, on account of an injurious coffee insect
known as the coffee berry borer (Stephanoderes [coffeaec Hgdn.] hampei Ferr.)
and an injurious rust disease due to the fungus Hemileia vastatrig B. and Br.
Provision is made for importations of Samples of unroasted coffee seeds or beans
and for shipments of unroasted coffee seeds or beans in transit to destinations
other than Puerto Rico.

FoREIGN PLANT QUARANTINES

Pink bollworm.—Quarantine No. 8, effective July 1, 19138, with revised regula-
tions effective July 1, 1917: Forbids the importation from any foreign locality
and country, excepting only the locality of the Imperial Valley in the State of
Baja California, Mexico, of cottonseed (including seed cotton) of all species
and varieties and cottonseed hulls. Seed cotton, cottonseed, and cottonseed
hulls from the Imperial Valley may be entered under permit and regulation.

Seeds of avocado or alligator pear.—Quarantine No. 12, effective February
27, 1914: Forbids the importation from Mexico and the countries of Central
America of the seed of the avocado or alligator pear on account of the avocado
weevil (Heilipus lauri).

Sugarcane.—Quarantine No. 15, revised, effective October 1, 1934: Prohibits
the importation from all foreign countries and localities of canes of sugarcane,
or cuttings or parts thereof, sugarcane leaves, and bagasse, on account of
certain injurious insects and diseases, except that importation will be allowed
under permit of specific materials on condition that they have been or are to be -
so treated, processed, or manufactured that, in the judgment of the Department,
their entry will involve no pest risk.

Citrus nursery stock.—Quarantine No. 19, revised, effective September 1, 1934:
Forbids the importation from all foreign localities and countries of all citrus
nursery stock, including buds and scions, on account of the citrus canker and
other dangerous citrus diseases. The term “citrus,” as used in this quarantine,
includes only plants belonging to the tribe Citrinae, subfamily Citratae, of the
family Rutaceae.

Indian corn or maize and related plants.—Quarantine No. 24, effective July 1,
1916, as amended, effective April 1, 1917, and April 28, 1917: Forbids the im-
portation from southeastern Asia (including India, Siam, Indo-China, and
China), Malayan Archipelago, Australia, New Zealand, Oceania, Philippine
Islands, Taiwan (Formosa), Japan, and adjacent islands, in the raw or unman-
ufactured state, of seed and all other portions of Indian corn or maize (Zea
mais LL.) and the closely related plants, including all species of Teosinte
(Euchlaena), jobs-tears (Coix), Polytoea, Chionachne, and Sclerachne, on
account of the downy mildews and Physoderma diseases of Indian corn, except
that Indian corn or maize may be imported under permit and upon compliance
with the conditions prescribed in the regulations of the Secretary of Agriculture.

Citrus fruits—Quarantine No. 28, effective August 1, 1917: Forbids the im-
portation from eastern and southeastern Asia (including India, Siam, Indo-
China, and China), the Malayan Archipelago, the Philippine Islands, Oceania
(except Australia, Tasmania, and New Zealand), Japan (including Taiwan
(Formosa) and other islands adjacent to Japan), and the Union of South
Africa, of all species and varieties of citrus fruits, on account of the citrus
canker, except that oranges of the mandarin class (including satsuma and
tangerine varieties) may be imported under permit and upon compliance with
the conditions prescribed in the regulations of the Secretary of Agriculture.

Sweetpotato and yam.—Quarantine No. 29, effective January 1, 1918: Forbids
the importation for any purpose of any variety of sweetpotatoes and yams
(Ipomoea batatas and Dioscorea spp.), from all foreign countries and localities,
on account of the sweetpotato weevils (Cylas spp.) and the sweetpotato scarabee
(Huscepes batatae).

Banana plants.—Quarantine No. 31, effective April 1, 1918: Forbids the impor-
tation for any purpose of any species or variety of banana plants (Musa spp.),
or portions thereof, from all foreign countries and localities, on account of the
banana-root borer (Cosmopolites sordidus). This quarantine places no restric-
tions on the importation of the fruit of the banana. (For restrictions on the
entry of the fruit of the banana see quarantine 56.)

Bamboo.—Quarantine No. 34, effective October 1, 1918: Forbids the importa-
tion for any purpose of any variety of bamboo seed, plants, or cuttings thereof
capable of propagation, including all genera and species of the tribe Bambuseae,
from all foreign countries and localities, on account of dangerous plant diseases,
1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 99

including the bamboo smut (Ustilago shiraiana). This quarantine order does
not apply to bamboo timber consisting of the mature dried culms or canes which
are imported for fishing rods, furniture making, or other purposes, or to any
kind of articles manufactured from bamboo, or to bamboo shoots cooked or
otherwise preserved.

Nursery stock, plants, and seeds.—Quarantine No. 387, effective June 1, 1919:
Forbids, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto,
revised, effective December 22, 1930, and amended effective December 1, 1938, the
importation of seeds, nursery stock, and other plants and plant products capable
of propagation from all foreign countries and localities on account of certain
injurious insects and fungous diseases. Under this quarantine the following
plant products may be imported without restriction when free from sand, soil,
or earth, unless covered by special quarantine or other restrictive orders: Plant
products imported for medicinal, food, or manufacturing purposes, and field,
vegetable, and flower seeds, except seeds of Lathyrus and Vicia. Cut flowers
from the Dominion of Canada are also allowed entry without permit. The
entry of the following nursery stock and other plants and seeds is permitted
under permit:

Under regulation 8:

(1) Bulbs, corms, or root stocks (pips) of the following genera: Liliwm (lily),
Convallaria (lily-of-the-valley), Hyacinthus (hyacinth), Tulipa (tulip), Crocus,
and Narcissus (daffodil and jonquil) ; and, until further notice, Chionodoza (glory
of-the-snow), Galanthus (snowdrop), Scilla (squill), Fritillaria, Muscari (grape-
hyacinth), Jvia, and Hranthis (winter aconite) ; and on and after December 1,
1939, Begonia and Glowinia tubers.

(2) Cuttings, scions, and buds of fruits or nuts; Provided, That cuttings,
scions, and buds of fruits or nuts may be imported from Asia, Japan, Philippine
Islands, and Oceania (including Australia and New Zealand) under the provi-
sions of regulation 14 only. (Stocks of fruits or nuts may not be imported,
under permit or otherwise.) f

(3) Rose stocks, including Manetti, Rosa multiflora (brier rose), and R.
rugosa.

(4) Nuts, including palm seeds for growing purposes: Provided, That such
nuts or seeds Shall be free from pulp.

(5) Seeds of fruit, forest, ornamental, and shade trees, seeds of deciduous
and evergreen ornamental shrubs, and seeds of hardy perennial plants: Pro-
vided, That such seeds shall be free from pulp: Provided further, That citrus
seeds may be imported only through specified ports subject to disinfection as
provided in regulation 9: Provided further, That mango seeds may not be im-
ported under permit or otherwise, except from the countries of North America,
Central America, and South America, and the West Indies.

Importations from countries not maintaining inspection of nursery stock,
other plants and parts of plants, including seeds, the entry of which is permissi-
ble under this regulation, may be made under permit upon compliance with
these regulations in limited quantities for public-service purposes only, but this
limitation shall not apply to tree seeds.

(6) Materials permitted entry under Quarantine No. 56 for consumption pur-
poses are authorized entry under this regulation for propagation.

Under regulation 14: Provision exists in this regulation for the entry of
most kinds of plants that are not covered by other regulations of this quarantine
or by other quarantines.

Under regulation 15: Provision exists for the entry in unlimited quantities of
most kinds of plants which can be considered as peculiar to or standard produc-
tions of the Dominion of Canada, as opposed to stock imported into the
Dominion from foreign countries and held or grown on there for later sale.

Huropean corn borer.—Quarantine No. 41, revised, effective June 1, 1926:
Forbids, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto,
revised effective March 1, 1933, the importation from all foreign countries and
localities of the stalk and all other parts, whether used for packing or other pur-
poses, in the raw or unmanufactured state, of Indian corn or maize, broomcorn,
sweet sorghums, grain sorghums, Sudan grass, Johnson grass, sugarcane, pearl
millet, napier grass, teosinte, and jobs-tears, on account of the European corn
borer (Pyrausta nubilalis) and other dangerous insects and plant diseases.

Rice.—Quarantine No. 55, revised, effective November 23, 1933: Forbids the
importation of seed or paddy rice from all foreign countries and localities ex-
cept the Republic of Mexico, and forbids the importation of rice straw and rice
100 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [ Oct._Dec.

hulls from all foreign countries and localities, and seed or paddy rice from the
Republic of Mexico, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemen-
tal thereto, effective July 1, 1933, as amended effective August 1, 1934, on
account of injurious fungous diseases of rice, including downy mildew (Sclero-
spora macrocarpa), leaf smut (EHntyloma oryzae), blight (Oospora oryztorum),
and glume blotch (Melanomma glumarum), as well as dangerous insect pests.

Fruits and vegetables.——Quarantine No. 56, effective November 1, 1923: For-
bids, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto,
revised, effective December 1, 1956, as amended effective February 27, 1940, the
importation of fruits and vegetables, except as restricted, as to certain countries
and districts, by special quarantines and other orders, and of plants or portions
of plants used as packing material in connection with shipments of such fruits
and vegetables from all foreign countries and localities other than the Dominion
of Canada, on account of injurious insects, including fruitflies and melonflies
(Trypetidae). Includes and supersedes Quarantine No. 49 on account of the
citrus blackfly.

Flag smut.—Quarantine No. 59, effective February 1, 1926: Forbids the
importation of all species and varieties of wheat (Triticum spp.) and wheat
products, unless so milled or so processed as to have destroyed all flag-smut
spores, from India, Japan, China, Australia, Union of South Africa, Italy, and
Spain.

Packing materials._-Quarantine No. 69, effective July 1, 1933, as amended,
effective July 1, 1933: Forbids the entry from all foreign countries and locali-
ties of the following materials when used as packing for other commodities, —
except in special cases where preparation, processing, or manufacture are
judged by an inspector of the United States Department of Agriculture to have
eliminated risk of carrying injurious insects and plant diseases: Rice straw,
hulls, and chaff; cotton and cotton products; sugarcane, including bagasse;
bamboo leaves and small shoots; leaves of plants; forest litter; and soil with
an appreciable admixture of vegetable matter not therein provided for by regu-
jJation. All parts of corn and allied plants are likewise prohibited except from
Mexico and the countries of Central America, the West Indies, and South
America. This quarantine also brings under restriction, involving inspection
at will by the Department but requiring no permit or certificate, the following
when used as packing: Cereal straw, chaff, and hulls (other than rice); corn
and allied plants from Mexico, Central America, the West Indies, and South
America; willow twigs from Europe; grasses, hay, and similar plant mixtures
from all countries; and authorized soil-packing materials from all countries,
This quarantine does not cover such widely used packing materials as excelsior,
paper, sawdust, ground cork, charcoal, and various other materials.

Dutch elm disease-——Quarantine No. 70, revised, effective January 1, 1935:
Forbids the importation from Europe, on account of a disease due to the fungus
Graphium ulmi, of seeds, leaves, plants, cuttings, and scions of elm or related
plants, defined to include all genera of the family Ulmaceae; logs of elm and
related plants; lumber, timber, or veneer of such plants if bark is present on
them; and crates, boxes, barrels, packing cases, and other containers, and other
articles manufactured in whole or in part from the wood of elm or related
plants if not free from bark.

OTHER RESTRICTIVE ORDERS

The regulation of the entry of nursery stock from foreign countries into the
United States was specifically provided for in the Plant Quarantine Act. The
act further provides for the similar regulation of any other class of plants or
plant products when the need therefor shall be determined. The entry of the
plants and plant products listed below has been brought under such regulation.

Nursery stock.—The conditions governing the entry of nursery stock and other
plants and seeds from all foreign countries and localities are indicated above
under “Foreign plant quarantines.”’ (See Quarantine No. 37.)

Potatoes.—The order of December 22, 1913, and the regulations issued there-
under, revised, effective March 1, 1922, and amended, effective December 1,
1936, restrict the importation of potatoes from all foreign countries and locali-
ties except the Dominion of Canada and Bermuda, on account of injurious
potato diseases and insect pests. The importation of potatoes is now authorized
from Bermuda, Canada, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Estonia, Latvia, Spain
(including the Canary Islands), and the States of Chihuahua and Sonora, and
the northern territory of Baja California, Mexico.
1940] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 101

Cotton and cotton wrappings.—The order of April 27, 1915, and the rules and
regulations issued thereunder, revised, effective February 24, 1923, amended
effective May 1, 1924, December 15, 1924, December 11, 1937, and July 1, 1938, re-
strict the importation of cotton and cotton wrappings from all foreign countries
and localities, on account of injurious insects, including the pink bollworm.

Cottonseed products.—The two orders of June 23, 1917, and the rules and regu-
lations issued thereunder, effective July 16, 1917, amended, effective August 7,
1925, restrict the importation of cottonseed cake and meal and all other cotton-
seed products except oil from all foreign countries and localities, and the impor-
tation of cottonseed oil from Mexico, on account of injurious insects, including
the pink bollworm: Provided, That these commodities which originate in and
are shipped directly from the Imperial Valley, Baja California, Mexico, may
enter without restriction.

Plant safeguard regulations—These rules and regulations, revised, effective
December 1, 1932, provide safeguards for the landing or unloading for trans-
shipment and exportation and for transportation and exportation in bond of
restricted or prohibited plants and plant products when it is determined that
such entry can be made without involving risk to the plant cultures of the
United States and also provide for the safeguarding of such plant material at a
port or within the territorial limits of the United States where entry or landing
is not intended or where entry has been refused.

Rules and regulations governing the movement of plants and plant products
into and out of the District of Columbia.—These rules and regulations, revised
effective April 30, 1938, are promulgated under the amendment to the Plant
Quarantine Act of May 31, 1920. They provide for the regulation of the move-
ment of plants and plant products, including nursery stock, from or into the
District of Columbia and for the control of injurious plant diseases and insect
pests within the said District.

MISCELLANEOUS REGULATIONS

Rules and regulations prohibiting the movement of cotton and cottonseed
from Mezico into the United States and governing the entry into the United
States of railway cars and other vehicles, freight, express, baggage, or other
materials from Mexico at border points—These rules and regulations, promul-
gated June 23, 1917, pursuant to authority given in the appropriation act for
the United States Department of Agriculture for the fiscal year 1918, and since
repeated annually, and amended effective January 29, 1920, are designed to pre-
vent the entry of the pink bollworm of cotton which is known to exist widely
in Mexico. They provide for the examination of passengers’ baggage, for the
disinfection of railway cars, freight, express, and other shipments, and for the
cleaning of domestic cars handling Mexican freight. All fees collected for dis-
infecting railway cars are deposited in the United States Treasury as miscel-
laneous receipts.

The inspectors concerned in the enforcement of these regulations at border
points are charged also with enforcement of restrictions on the entry of plants
and plant products under various foreign plant quarantines.

Regulations governing sanitary export certification.—These regulations, re-
vised effective September 21, 1936, were promulgated pursuant to authority
granted in the Agricultural Appropriation Act of May 17, 1985 (49 Stat. 268),
and repeated in subsequent appropriation acts. They provide for the inspection
and certification of domestic plants and plant products intended for export
to countries requiring such certification. All fees collected for this service are
deposited in the United States Treasury as miscellaneous receipts.

PENALTIES IMPOSED FOR VIOLATIONS OF THE PLANT QUARANTINE
ACT
According to reports received by the Bureau during the period October 1 to

December 31, 1940, penalties have recently been imposed by the proper authori-
ties for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act, as follows:

QUARANTINES AFFECTING MEXICAN PRODUCTS

In the case of the United States versus the persons listed below, for attempt-
ing to smuggle in contraband plant material, the penalties indicated were
imposed by the United States customs officials at the following ports:
102 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct.—Dee.



ot emt peed ed femh Peel fret fh rd och eh fk Pel fod fh fod fel fons fh fom feck fem fol ped fod fem fond fal fomeh fe freed fo fod fl food foeh fom fot ford fo

Name Port Contraband Penalty
Curtis\Hollands2s ee ae San Ysidro, Calif____-- 4'stalks'sugarcanes: =) =e aaeaenee $
Clementina Rodriguez___--..-----|----- GOS: 2a Beare eta 62 nodes sugarcane__________-_____
Oneetareladding aes seas eal eden Oe or ol ne 8 nodes sugarcane________________-_
INTOMENXOO) LEO Osten were ie Browmnsvilles exes 2241 2/avioCad Ost ase tenement nnn
Mrs. Sandoval de Reyes---------- HleRasoy dex! s5 pba BAO MHS TAL CO
CP BS Kory Geis eh oi ea alee hae Conte Sass eee avocados. kg) Mees eT Tees
Primativea | Chapas 22225522 2 Ehidalgoj Mexia 14 peaches and 7 apples___________-
JosesRecelio Cela ate sees an ees COLSON Teton me 5 nodes sugarcane________-__--_____
EC avaz OSE eae eae SEA aredow he xan oie nn at 4 apples and 7 peaches____________-
Conception Acusto_.-.-.-+---.----}----- GO beenpe Kis. upped ie 2: (UI NCES A hse Ss ee ae
Mrs. Angelina Canales_____-__.-.-]----- AG 2522 ha ae Lae 2 plants and 1 avocado seed__-____-_
Guadalupe Arredonodo-_-___-------|----- GLO DPeNS ast ene iene 2 DOMECSLAM ALCS Hees eens mee ee
VETS EIEN Eva Gea ciieie Oe eh as GO ra PE Sis, en 3) plants in} popes ee eee
IY Weoley MRO a Rec, ee A ees Oa, hace who alle S plants.) 4 olusieaes Mowe
JosephiG a@have7zea a s= eee se eee OO eo ae ay ae Gisweeb, Lim esis: 5 yee mean ome
MaxiiKappnen: suet swat ants ae 2 an COLES SEES 3 TMAMe YS _ et a eee ae ee
Miaria buen tess 22 eee eee S OA Pore Cee 7 plants and 3 guavas_____________
TBS ORR aS UT. ee a ae RN a se GO Pk oe Sibies wy (inde 3 apples and 1 quince______ £ adel
OscariGonzalez ese see eee | eee GO ee es We tae 5 oranges and 1 avocado___________
Mrs. Maria G. Gaitoin-_-___-- i RN CLOWN Ree aa ae Gisweet limeses sy ce see eeee
MeoneVAckmair seen one see eee | an GOWNS eyes BE aes Al plantsis ee ie Le es ee
Christina Escamilla__._......_.---]--_-_ GOLA ee DP ok ye thy A plants ! jer ess is ve ea ee bo
Guadalupe Reyna_______---------]----- (6 Voy Sele Saag 1 Dla) oo oe a ee
Severo Rodriguez. 252222 a ee aes GOs Manna aaa Ra 1 CUAVae Poet Pe eee eee
Doravibarra svete acl s wena Bee Reha te WG OMAWEEMC EES tee RAND Popa G a's Wa VS Oe ee
UTATAA TS SI CLA CZ ee ee een a ep | ee Le ea 2a Rigi | a WO. chain Ge EE cc Reps ee
JSTMACIAIRIGY CS ols eae eetee ener tele GO2 tat eam anes eae 121 red Haws: tis ee eae
Mirstiee Mitchel leases seit ees |e COLLEEN te aes 3 oranges and 2 sweet limes_______-
JuleaugV illerresl sess ene ee ea eee GO. ES Pa oe Ags 9 OLANGES pee SEAL ea eee
JET TaSHSiemras tet. esis eg an tee eae ea CCG ae pats RT aI WOU A Vide eke ele eee
Modesta Montaga____________-_--}----_- CO ese ne Miaee T'OTAN EE) A oo Ne eee eee eee
Thomas B. Lippincott_.____:.__--]_-.-- Oe ah EAA AS 3B SUBV AS. SLA MU MRR eee een
lw ara Garzae ean ene Oe es aie CLO eis Gi ie alates 2-orangesiuvh elke Ciba ee
ema cA Oni Tey ae ale ea |p (6 OA UA 2plants: ge 4 a ee
Faustina de Ramirez__._.___-_----|----- COE ears os tos eye ate 3'SUAV AS bs Oe A ee ee
IAMTONIOMGRU LAS ee ees eee ee eae eae GOR Lee EE eee 2 /AaVOCAGOS: = 2250 ee eee
Fur eV Ear Gi 7S eg ea a rae ae | ye COME yay Sie aU Di OVO sia) ess kl
IMirss Re Garciaatyss ies aaa ea ey al eae Gowihe hee. She Ue i plant invSol Ress wey ee ee
Morris Greenblum__.___________--]----- COSCER GE Anis Aan Syplantsele: 2k ee Bae ho aks
Leonora G. de Ayala______.___.___|-___- Oe sae ote BURRS S}OPANLES lo 2h) ae ee pe a
ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY
AND PLANT QUARANTINE

Lee A. Strone, Chief.

S. A. RoHWER, Assistant Chief.

AVERY S. Hoyt, Assistant Chief.

P. N. ANNAND, Assistant Chief.

J. C. Hotton, Agent, Cooperative Field Relations.

F. H. SPENCER, Business Manager.

Roiua P. CurRiz, Hditor.

Maset Cowcorp, Librarian.

J. A. Hystop, in Charge, Division of Insect Pest Survey and Information.

J. I. HAMBLETON, in Charge, Division of Bee Cuiture Investigations.

D. L. VAN DINE, in Charge, Division of Fruit Insect Investigations.

F. C. CRAIGHEAD, in Charge, Division of Forest Insect Investigations.

W. H. WHits, in Charge, Division of Truck Crop and Garden Insect Investiga-

tions.

M. PACKARD, in Charge, Division of Cereal and Forage Insect Investigations.

W. HARNED, in Charge, Division of Cotton Insect Investigations.

C. BisHopp, in Charge, Division of Insects Affecting Man and Animals.

A. HAwKIns, in Charge, Division of Control Investigations.

C. Roark, in Charge, Division of Insecticides and Fungicides.

F. W. MUESEBECK, in Charge, Division of Insect Identification.

P. CLAUSEN, in Charge, Division of Forcign Parasite Introduction.

B. FRACKER, in Charge, Division of Plant Disease Control.

B. M. GAppis, in Charge, Division of Domestic Plant Quarantines.

E. R. SAsscer, in Charge, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines.

A. F. Buresss, in Field Charge, Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail Moth Control
(headquarters, Greenfield, Mass.).

E. G. Brewer, in Field Charge, Japanese Beetle and Gypsy Moth and Brown-
Tail Moth Quarantines, European Corn Borer Certification, and Dutch Elm
Disease Eradication (headquarters, Bloomfield, N. J.).

R. E. McDonAatp, in Field Charge, Pink Bollworm and Thurberia Weevil Quar-
antines (headquarters, San Antonio, Tez.).

P. A. Homatr, in Field Charge, Mexican Fruitfly Quarantine (headquarters,
Harlingen, Tez.).

A. C. BaKkeEr, in Field Charge, Fruitfly Investigations (headquarters, Mexico
City, Mezico).

DOE sO

103

U, S$. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1941


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Bur, Ent. & P. Q. Issued December 1941

United States Department of Agriculture
BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS

LIST OF INTERCEPTED PLANT PESTS, 1940

(List of Pests Recorded During the Period July 1, 1939, to June 30, 1940, In-
clusive, as Intercepted in, on, or with Plants and Plant Products Entering
United States Territory.)

INTRODUCTION

This report, covering the twenty-seventh year for which lists of interceptions
have been issued, shows a decided change in arrangement of the detailed tabular
information regarding those species believed to be of sufficient interest to warrant
such presentation. Under the new arrangement the detailed data are given
under the names of the pests and indexed under the names of the hosts and
under the countries of origin instead of being given under the countries of origin
without any indexing.

This change is being made so that the list will be more serviceable under
present-day conditions. When the first list of interceptions was issued on
February 2, 1914, covering the period July 1 to December 31, 1913, 84 percent
of the interceptions listed were made by State quarantine officers. Federal
quarantine inspectors were located in Washington only, and interception data
were assembled and used on a country-of-origin basis. Data were so few that
all could be reviewed quickly regardless of the arrangement used.. Today most
of the interceptions are made by Federal inspectors who are stationed at numerous
maritime and border ports; interceptions are indexed in the Washington office
under pest, host, and country of origin, but these files are not available to the
major part of the personnel except by correspondence; and the pest-and-host
relationship is more important than the country of origin, since rapid transporta-
tion of pests with host materials has made distribution data less stable than they
were formerly.

In an effort to meet the needs of the organization as a whole, and of cooperating
agencies and specialists as well, an index to previous interceptions has been pre-
pared and is being checked prior to expected publication. This index has alpha-
betical lists of intercepted insects and pathogens, with alphabetical lists of the
hosts in, on, or with which they were intercepted and alphabetical lists ot the coun-
tries of origin. Hosts are listed alphabetically also and the pests found associated
with them are indicated. The new arrangement of the annual list is not only
more serviceable of itself but will make it usable as an annual supplement to the
cumulated index when it becomes available.

With so much of the data cross-indexed it is felt that relatively little text is
needed to enable readers to find information of special interest to them.

Following the introduction there are brief references to a few of the more
interesting findings, as well as summaries of the interceptions of some of the species
too common to be included in the detailed tables, and ot incompletely determined
pests. '

As usual, the records summarized in this report cover determinations of pests
intercepted in, on, or with plants and plant products (1) imported, (2) offered for
but refused entry, (3) held as ships’ stores, etc., and hence not imported through
customs, (4) offered for entry tor immediate export or for immediate transporta-
tion and exportation in bond, and (5) in domestic shipments reaching the mainland
from Hawaii and Puerto Rico.

Collections made late in the year are often included in the report for the follow-
ing year, especially if not determined immediately. The data on which this paper
is based are on file in Washington, D.C. In addition to routine reports and deter-
minations by the personnel of this Bureau, State and customs officials furnish
considerable information. Staffs of specialists maintained by the States of Cali-

400127—41—_—-_1 x
2 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

fornia and Florida and the Territory of Hawaii determine most of the intercep-
tions made there, and specialists in the Bureau of Plant Industry determine a large
part of the more difficult plant-disease material.

The alleged origin of plant materials cannot be verified in all cases. Obviously
doubtful items are either omitted or the origin is listed as unknown.

NOTES ON INSECTS INTERCEPTED
FRUITFLIES

The following fruitflies were intercepted: Anastrepha distincta Greene in Inga sp.
from Mexico; A. fraterculus (Wied.) in peach from Mexico; Mexican fruitfly (A.
ludens (Loew)) in avocado, grapefruit, mango, orange, peach, pear, pomegranate,
ponderosa lemon, quince, sour orange, sweet lime, tangerine, and white sapote
from Mexico; A. mombinpraeoptans Sein in Spondias sp. from the American Virgin
Islands, mango from Cuba, Dominican Republic, Haiti, Jamaica, and Mexico,
and guava and mango from Puerto Rico; A. serpentina (Wied.) in sapote from
Honduras, mamey and sapote from Mexico, and orange and sapodilla from Trini-
dad; A. suspensa (Loew) in guava from Cuba and Puerto Rico; Anastrepha sp.
in grapefruit from Argentina, sapodilla fromm Colombia, mango from Costa Rica,
Cuba, Haiti, Jamaica, and Panama, star-apple from Guatemala, mango and star-
apple from Honduras, apple, apricot, avocado, guava, mango, orange, peach, pear,
quince, and sapote from Mexico, and mango and sapodilla from Trinidad; Mediter-
ranean fruitfly (Ceratitis capitata Wied.) in tangerine from Brazil, in box contain- -
ing apples and pears from Germany, avocado, coffee berry, and pepper from Hawaii,
bitter orange, pear, pricklypear, and where oranges had been stored on deck of
ship from Italy, and orange from Portugal and Spain; Ceratztis sp. in grapefruit
from Palestine and Union of South Africa; melonfly (Dacus cucurbitae (Coq.)) in
box of cucumbers from Hawaii; olive fruitfly (D. oleae Gmel.) in olive from Italy
and Portugal; Dacus sp. in pumpkin from Union of South Africa; Epochra sp.
in currant from Mexico; apple maggot (Rhagoletis pomonella (Walsh)) in apple from
Canada and Mexico and Crataegus sp. from Mexico; Rhagoletis sp. in black walnut
and Crataegus sp. from Mexico; Spilographa sp. in Rosa spinosissima var. from
Canada; papaya fruitfly (Toxotrypana curvicauda (Gerst.) in bag containing
papaya fruit from Puerto Rico; trypetid in Wisteria sp. from Japan, cut flowers,
seed pod, and Zinnia sp. from Mexico, Lonicera sp. seed from Sweden, rhizome
from Switzerland, and peach and plum from Union of South Africa.

INSECTS OTHER THAN FRUITFLIES

Acrolepia assectella (Zell.) (Hyponomeutidae) was intercepted in leeks from
Italy and Sweden. The citrus blackfly (Aleurocanthus woglumi Ashby) was
feund on leaves of lemon, orange, and sweet lime from Cuba, fruit of sour lime
from Dominica, and leaf of sour lime from Jamaica. Pineapples from Mexico
were infested with Alpheias conspirata Hein. (Galleriidae). Anthonomus funereus
Champ. (Curcuculionidae) arrived with orchids from Mexico. Aonidiella com-
peret McK. (Coccidae) was found on sour limes from Dominica and Guatemala.
Aspidiotus coryphae Ckll. (Ceecidae) infested coconuts from Philippines. Astero-
lecanium stentae Brain (Coccidae) was intercepted on Euphorbia sp. from Union
of South Africa. Baris lepidii Germ. (Curculionidae) was taken in horseradish
from Poland. Bruchus pallidicornis (Boh.) (Bruchidae) infested lentil seed from
Italy. Cerotoma atrofasciata Jac. (Chrysomelidae) arrived with Oncidium caven-
dishianum from Guatemala. The turnip gall weevil (Ceutorhynchus pleurostigma
Marsh.) was intercepted in turnip from England, France, Netherlands, Scotland,
and Sweden. The Asiatic rice borer (Chilo simplex (Butler)) was intercepted
with rice straw from Japan. Chrysomphalus wmboniferus Newst. (Coccidae)
was taken on an orchid leaf from Venezuela. Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki
(termite) arrived with Cycas sp. from Japan. Crocidosema plebeiana Zell. (Oleth-
reutidae) infested Hibiscus sp. from Bermuda and okra from Cuba and Mexico.
Diaspis visci (Schr.) (Coccidae) was found on Juniperus sp. berry from Italy.
C>ernuts from Hawaii and Philippines were infested with the Tahitian coconut
weevil (Diocalandra taitensis Guer.). Epicaerus cognatus Sharp (Curculionidae)
was taken in potato from Mexico. Epinotia opposita Hein. (Olethreutidsge)
arrived with lima and string beans from Mexico and string beans from Venezuela.
Eumecosomyia nubila Wied. (Otitidae) was taken in corn from Brazil and Mexico,
lettuce from Mexico, and orange from Panama. Eupteryx melissae Curt. (Cica-
dellidae) was found on sage from England. The West Indian sweetpotato weevil
SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 3

(Eusepes postfasciatus Fairm.) was intercepted in sweetpotatoes from Brazil,
Dominican Republic, Haiti, Hawaii, Jamaica, and Trinidad. Ezxosoma lustitanica
L. (Chrysomelidae) was found in cipollini from Morocco. Exptochiomera oblonga
(Stal) (Lygaeidae) was taken on eggplant, pepper, and tomato from Mexico.
Faustinus cubae (Boh.) (Curculionidae) infested peppers from Cuba. Frank-
liniella schultzei Tryb. (thrips) was found on chinkerichee from the Union of South
Africa. Fulvius bisbistillatus (Stal) (Miridae) arrived with Cattleya spp. from
Colombia. Gelechia ericetella (Hbn.) (Gelechiidae) was taken on heather from
Scotland. Gnorimoschema gudmanella (Wlsm.) (Gelechiidae) infested peppers
from Cuba and Mexico and tomatoes from Mexico. Hellula phidilealis (Walk.)
(Pyraustidae) was found on mustard, radish, and white greens from Cuba.
Heraeus cincticornis Stal (Lygaeidae) arrived with Cattleya sp. from Venezuela.
Hoplandrothrips xanthopoides Bagn. (thrips) was intercepted on Bryophyllum sp.
from Barbados. Kalotermes snyderi Light (termite) was taken in mesquite from
Mexico. Laspeyresia splendana Hbn. (Olethreutidae) was intercepted in chest-
nuts from the Azores, Italy, Japan, and Portugal. Lecaniodiaspis dendrobit
(Dougl.) (Coccidae) was taken on Cattleya sp. from Colombia. The East Indian
bean pod borer (Maruca testulalis Geyer) infested string beans from American
Virgin Islands, Brazil, Dominican Republic, Haiti, Hawaii, Japan, and Puerto
Rico, and Canavalia sp. and Dioclea violacea from Hawaii. Megalometis chiliensis
Boh. (Curculionidae) arrived with nectarine from Chile. Pistache nut from Italy
was infested with Megastigmus pistaciae Walk. (Callimomidae). Micrelus ericae
Gyll. (Curculionidae) was found on heather from Scotland. Moodna bisinuella
Hamp. (Phycitidae) arrived with corn from Mexico. Mordellistena cattleyana
Champ. (Mordellidae) infested orchids from Colombia and Venezuela and M.
chapini Ray arrived with orchids from Colombia and Mexico. Myzus hemero-
callis Taka. (aphid) was intercepted on Hemerocallis sp. from China. Napomyza
lateralis Fallen (Agromyzidae) was found in witloof leaves from Belgium. Ophi-
omyia pinguis (Agromyzidae) arrived with witloof from Belgium. The pink
bollworm (Pectinophora gossypiella (Saund.)) was intercepted in cottonseed from
. Brazil, Egypt, Italy, Mexico, and Puerto Rico, seed cotton from Brazil, Man-
churia, and Mexico, cotton from Hawaii, and okra from Mexico. The vine moth
(Polychrosis botrana (Schiff.)) arrived with grapes from Italy. Psylliodes chryso-
cephala L. (Chrysomelidae) infested broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, and turnip
from Italy and turnip from France and Morocco. The European corn borer
(Pyrausta nubilalis (Hbn.)) arrived with string beans from Japan. Ribua innozia
Hein. (Phycitidae) was intercepted in pineapples from Cuba. The mango weevil
(Sternochetus mangifera F.) was taken in mangoes from Hawaii. Taeniothrips
ericae (Hal.) (thrips) was taken on heather from Germany and Scotland.

NOTES ON PLANT DISEASES INTERCEPTED

Interceptions of citrus canker (Bacterium citri) during the year numbered 17,
on 4 host species, with 4 countries of origin. Thirteen of these interceptions were
made during the 6-month period March to August, inclusive. The banana leaf
spot (Cercospora musae) was reported 15 times, although bananas receive relatively
little inspection. Elsinoe australis, the sweet orange scab of South America, was
found twice on oranges in stores. Lima bean scab (EH. phaseoli) was intercepted
304 times during the year. Mycosphaerella schoenoprasi continues to be inter-
cepted, especially from Japan, but not with such frequency as formerly. Pana-
grolaimus hygrophilus, a new species of nematode, was found November 27, 1939,
in a wet rot of waterlily root from Cuba and later described. Papulospora
coprophila was apparently rotting an onion bulb from Mexico on which it was
intercepted in May 1940. Citrus black spot (Phoma citricarpa) was intercepted
but twice during the year. During the course of an inspection of Sagittaria sp.
corms from Wisconsin for export a new species of nematode was found and later
described as Rhabditis chitwoodi. During the year Tritirachium, a new form
genus in the Moniliaceae, was described, based in part on 7. dependens, the type
species found on Yucca treculeana from Cuba, but being secondary it is not listed
as an interception. Uredo wakensis, described during the year, was intercepted
at Honolulu February 22, 1938, on Tournefortia sp. from Wake Island and
mentioned in the 1939 list of interceptions on page 4. The oriental lespedeza
rust which goes under the name Uromyces lespedezae-procumbentis, although
markedly different in host reactions and potentially a menace to plants of oriental
species of lespedeza, was intercepted with lespedeza seed from Japan.

It may be noted that some fairly common diseases are listed in the detailed
table. The general policy has been to list these common diseases until a reason-
4 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

ably representative set of data are recorded showing the hosts and countries of
origin involved—a contribution to the study of the types of diseases actually
transported in commerce. 7

COMMON PESTS INTERCEPTED

In order to give a complete picture of the interception work it is necessary to
call attention, however briefly, to the thousands of interceptions of common
pests. Some of these pests are cosmopolitan, others are not so widely distributed
but are well established in this country. ‘Two of the diseases, Elsinoe phaseoli
and Helminthosporium allii, have not been reported as occurring in the United
States mainland but are intercepted in such numbers that detailed records of
them are no longer made. Some of the interceptions of diseases known to occur
in this country doubtless represent forms or strains not found here. Great
numbers of common pests are discarded without any record being made of them,
but enough are recorded to give a reasonably representative sample. In the
following summaries of these records the numbers following the names of organ-
isms indicate the number of countries of origin from which the pest was
intercepted and the total number of interceptions recorded.

INSECTS

Common insects intercepted 10 or more times, and recorded, included Acan-
thoscelides obtectus (10—185), Ahasverus advena (23—113) Anthonomus eugenit
(1—6,068), Aonzdiella aurantit (19—618), Aphis gossypii (8—177), A. rumicis
(4—13), Araecerus fasciculatus (14—26), Aspidiotus camelliae (9—32), A. cyan-
ophylli (12—66), A. hederae (20—141), A. lataniae (183—232), A. perniciosus
(10—34), Aulacaspis pentagona (7—15), Brevicoryne brassicae (18—19), Car-
pocapsa pomonella (18—89), Cathartus quadricollis (4A—165), Cerataphis lataniae
(11—28), Chionaspis citri (9—19), Chrysomphalus aonidum (82—5,368), C. dic-
tyospermt (22—752), Coccus hesperidum (21—77), Diaspis boisduvaliz (20—243),
D. bromeliae (6—821), D. echinocacta (9—28), Ephestia cautella (9—20), Gnori-
moschema operculella (29—203), Heliothis armigera (11—8,390), H. virescens
(6—106), Hippodamia convergens (1—192), Howardia biclavis (7—46), Ischnaspis
longirostris (8—15), Laphygma frugiperda (83—829) , Lastoderma serricorne (10—118)
Lepidosaphes beckii (50—8,938), L. gloverit (14—772), L. ulmi (146—47), Macro-
siphum solanifolii (8—209), Myzus persicae (18—309), Necrobia rufipes (15—56),
Oryzaephilus surinamensis (12—98), Parlatoria pergandi (19—4,012), P. proteus
(14—62), Pinnaspis aspidistrae (12—61), P. minor (11—129), Plodia interpunc-
tella (9—378), Pseudococcus adonidum (6—26), P. brevipes (15—435), P. citri
(20—73), P. maritimus (12—42), Rhizoglyphus hyacinthi (11—127), Rhizopertha
dominica (6—54), Rhopalostphum . pseudobrassicae (2—72), Saissetia hemi-
sphaerica (21—1386), S. nigra (7—46), S. oleae (11—40), Selenaspidus articulatus
(23—79), Sitophilus oryza (18—1,113), Sitotroga cerealella (5—21), Tenebroides
mauritanicus (12—56), Thrips tabaci (22—347), Tribolium castaneum (9—282),
T. confusum (9—97), and Typhaea stercorea (12—98).

In addition to the listed species of common insects, there were 5,249 intercep-
tions belonging to 693 different species which were not deemed to be of sufficient
importance from the plant-quarantine viewpoint to warrant listing them by species.
Total of insects included in this paragraph, 39,711.

DISEASES

Common plant diseases intercepted included Actinomyces scabies (37—469),
Albugo candida (4—78), Alternaria brassicae (11—87), A. herculea (17—33), A.
radicina (5—10), A. solani (1—108), Aspergillus niger (30—313), Bacillus caroto-
vorus (21—63), Bacterium maculicola (9—19), B. marginatum (7—300), B. rhizo-
genes (3—6), B. tumefaciens (6—23), B. vesicatorirum (4—2,472), Botrytis cinerea
(28—168), Capnodium citri (17—55), Cephalothecium roseum (16—71), Ceratosto-
mella adiposum (4—38), C. paradozxa (12—212), Cercospora beticola (4—39), C.
capsici (8—344), C. rosicola (4—88), Cladosporium fuluum (2—168), C. herbarum
(3—31), Colletotrichum circinans (5—120), C. lindemuthianum (11—145), Conzio-
thyrium fuckeli (5—6), Corticium vagum (32—517), Diaporthe phaseolorum (8—108),
Diplocarpon rosae (6—29), Diplodia natalensis (20—39), Elsinoe fawcetti1 (20—55),
FE. phaseoli (2—804), Erysiphe graminis (2—23), Fusarium moniliforme (2—18),
Gloeosporium limetticolum (11-123), Glomerella cingulata (20—533), Graphiola
phoenicis (3—7), Helminthosporium allit (10—844), H. sativum (2—21), Heterodera
marioni (16—44), Macrosporium tomato (4—1,672), Melanconium sacchari (3—4),

a
SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 5

Mycosphaerella brassicicola (4—9), M. pinodes (9—21), Oospora lactis parasitica
(10-—78), Penicillium digitatum (18—98), P. expansum (14—36), P. gladioli
(83—1,597), P. italicum (18—58), Peronospora parasitica (4—5), Pestalozzi guepint
(7—29), Phoma destructiva (10—850), Phomopsis citri (31—156), P. verans (9—
295), Phytophthora infestans (13—62), Puccinia graminis (18—152), P. menthae
(5—11), P. rubigo-vera (10—33), Pythium debaryanum (1—17), Rhizopus nigricans
(34—652), Sclerotinia gladioli (8—403), S. sclerotiorum (17—382), Sclerotium
oryzae (6—13), S. rolfsii (7—23), Septoria apii (17—88), S. petroselini (7—38),
Spondylocladium atrovirens (28—182), Spongospora subterranea (9—20), Uromyces
phaseolt typica (4—251), Venturia inaequalis (832—189), V. pyrina (7—18),
Verticillium cinnabarina (19—58).
Total recorded interceptions of these common diseases, 15,131.

INCOMPLETELY DETERMINED PESTS

Some interceptions are not determined to species because they are new and un-
described, others because descriptions are faulty and authentic material is not
available for comparison, but a large part of the incompletely determined material
could not be determined because it was not in the right stage or was not in good
condition or was of sucha nature that determination would require more work
than the probable value of the determination seemed to warrant. A few notes
regarding some of these interceptions should be of interest.

INSECTS

Of the pests intercepted a total of 67 could be determined to family, subfamily,
or tribe only. A total of 5,613 other lots of insect pests, determined to genus
only, were distributed among 1,159 genera.

DISEASES

Many of the fungi infecting plant material offered for entry are in a nonfruiting
condition and could not be determined without culturing them. Since the Divi-
sion of Foreign Plant Quarantines of this Bureau is not prepared to do routine
culture work or to get it done, these must remain undetermined for the most part.
Fungi found on special-permit plants are sometimes fruiting in some stage, but
the material is often so scanty that it cannot be studied properly.
diseases are determinable on the basis of their symptoms. Others must remain
undetermined. There is no practicable means for inspecting most imported
plant material for the possible presence of virus diseases or for determining the
identity of viruses if detected.

Fungi not determinable by inspectors are sometimes referred to specialists for
examination. The following notes are based on reports covering a few such
specimens among those the specialists were unable to determine to species.

Ascochyta sp., either undescribed or not reported as occurring on orchids, was
intercepted at Seattle in March 1940 on Cymbidium crassifolium, C. parishit,
Cypripedium callosum, C. fairrieanum, C hirsutissimum, C. parishii, and C.
Spicerianum in mail shipments from India. Condothyriwm sp. with spores smaller
than those of either species reported on orchids was intercepted at San Francisco
in December 1939 on Epidendrum sp. in cargo from Mexico. Coryneum sp.,
which does not agree with C. rhododendr or C. triseptatum, was intercepted at
Seattle in January 1940 on Rhododendron sp. in cargo from Canada. An unde-
termined Diplodia (or Microdiplodia) with spcres measuring about 3 by 8 microns
was found on a lemon from Italy in July 1939 at New York, in stores. Gloeospor-
tum sp. (no species reported on host) was intercepted at San Francisco the latter
part of June 1939 on Caralluma sp. in mail from Mozambique. An undetermined
species of Gloeosporium was found on Typha sp. used as packing for fish coming
in from Mexico during October, November, and December, 1939, at El Paso.
The spotting has been noted frequently but the scanty sporulation on this material
is the only time the fungus had developed sufficiently to permit even a partial
determination. Macrosporium sp. with smaller spores than those of M. camelliae
was intercepted at Seattle in December 1939 on Camellia japonica in cargo from
Japan. Mycosphaerella sp., apparently not M. gardeniae, was intercepted at
Brownsville in December 1939 on Gardenia florida in baggage from Mexico.
Myzxosporium sp., apparently undescribed, was intercepted at Seattle in December
1939 and at San Francisco in February and March 1940 on Camellia japonica
in cargo from Japan. Myzosporium sp., no species reported on the host, was
found at New York in May 1939 on Euphorbia sp. among ship’s furnishings from
6 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

Straits Settlements. Papulospora sp., possibly P. coprophila which was found
apparently responsible for a rot of onion from Mexico, was intercepted at El Paso
in March 1940 on garlic from Mexico. Phoma sp., an undescribed species previ-
ously intercepted from Syria, was taken at El Paso on October 1939 on Sechiwm
edulis in baggage from Mexico. Phoma sp., unlike any of the species described
on the host, was intercepted at San Francisco in June 1939 on Euphorbia sp. in
mail from Mozambique. Phomopsis sp., no species reported on host, was inter-
cepted at San Francisco in January 1940 on Paeonia moutan in cargo from Japan.
Sclerotium sp., sclerotia forming all over the ferns but without evident injury,
was found at San Francisco in February 1940 on Nephrodium glabratum in mail
from New Zealand. Sphaerulina sp., no species reported on host, was intercepted
at Seattle in December 1939 on Paeonia moutan from Japan. Vermicularia sp.,
no species reported on host, was intercepted at San Francisco in June 1939 on
Caralluma sp. in mail from Mozambique.

Ten of these seventeen fungi were found on plant material offered for entry
under special permit, for propagation.

While thousands of incompletely determined interceptions of plant disease
and related organisms are never recorded, a total of 8,950 were recorded during
the year.

Geographic summary of interceptions listed 1n main table and interception totals

Country Insects | Diseases Country Insects | Diseases
Africa: Number | Number Europe—Continued. Number | Number
TATA) Gee gS tees Oe 4 0 Italy 3:22.20 S29 ee 128 75
British East Africa__-__- ae 1 0 Malta < ~S:ie te eer 0 1
Dayo Gs he EL a etn 8 2 INetherlands®=_s2ssnaeae 89 482
Italian Somaliland________ 1 0 INOEW ae) tee = eee 1 4
iberiaz: was fe ate es 1 0 Poland. 2s 2a eee 7 ie
INLOKOCCO Reena ees 14 8 Portugal: = =e ee 21 11
Si@iclena- eee 1 0 IRUMani aes == eee 6 7
Sierra@leonet. 22.) . nies 0 7 4 Scotland=]=) Sree 45 0
Southwest Africa________- 1 0 Spates. 2. en 6 27
TRANS Ayla eeeee 2 0 Sweden: sock. a eee uf 1
Union of South Africa___- 72 4 Switzerland____________-- 7 3
WreestiAifricaise avs: een ties 4 1 Turkeys is/+ orl abewenene 8 3
ZanZiD alae ee ee ee 1 0 Wialesaee a0s 2 ee ee 1 0
rere VUE OSIA VIAL eo eae it 0
Afehanistan.____________- 0 1 || North America:
ATADIabes hee (hb, males 0 3 IBermud asta eee 10 7
Baluchistan_____________- 1 0 Canada____________- seas 13 5
China : 12 10 British Columbia eens 2 0
Cyprus Sree er ee 1 0 Nova Scotia _______- 0 1
Jayden le a aA 13 9 Prince Edward Island 1 0
Trane k atceivesmd any oh 0 19 Central America:

Japan Pach ome eee Wie ae 213 ) British Honduras-_-_- 1 0
Manchurinlo. 22) ene 4 0 @anal Zone. .---. 222-2 13 0
Palestine 1 uskieeeel Sos 2 1 C@ostavRica= 10 1
Straits Settlements______- 3 2 Guatemala-____-.---- 52 12

VEACS eae eee opegee ne 1 1 Hiondurasae esas 24 6
TAWA Ee Lee het ie 1 0 INT Gara gu aes eee 6 0
Thailan cease luce wnat 2 1 Panama_-___-----.---- 15 2

; Salvadorssaesl seas 2 0
Australasia: Mexicos: =. eee 8, 074 539
American Samoa-__-___-__-_- 1 0 Newfoundland....... : 1
Australia aah ore a tastes ayes ot 8 4 West Indies: a uaa
Cookolslandsi 27 ssss-ss5 1 0 American Virgin
Hijiclslandseseteeeeea ee 1 0 Islands ae 4 0
Hawall eee eres e y Antica tise ee 5 1

BV Bo Be ee Eh Se SLNH Rie GUSALCl| ore pbs: bee iil) 1S ene ae 2
New South Wales.-___-- 0 1 Barteden: cea alae 0
New Zealand__________-_- 4 ] British West Indies_- 1 0
Ehilippines) ye <2 2s eee 30 4 Cuba en) eee 383 204
Tonga\lslandss 222-2353" 1 0 Dominicase ag. .seaee 5 0

Europe: Dominican Republic_ 11 1
SAIZOTCSU == ey heats on ae 5 0 Dutch West Indies___ 2 0
IBeloirie eee 302 30 Grenada eee 2 0
1) COTATI kee eee 24 5 Guadeloupe_-_____-__- 1 0
Bing landiiei ae es se 91 25 Eb aititee 2. Se eee 6 2
HE SEO TUT eee eee ee 1 0 VarMnaleae aes eee 51 9
ninlandsh tee Se 3 0 Martinique__________- 1 9
Hrancoeehii reel Sh eee, ae 97 39 Puerto Rico___------- 38 13
Germanya set See es 9 19 Steiitts: =. se See 1 0
Grecces see eee ee 8 1 StSVincent= =a 2 1
DEIN ary ee ae 25 6 Trini aden 33 1
Treland-}.2\iowiet Peer 4 11 Virgin Islands_______- 0 1
SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 7

Geographic summary of interceptions listed in main table and interception totals—





Continued
Country Insects | Diseases Country Insects | Diseases
South America: Number | Number Total—Continued. Number | Number
ATTONnEINA = 2 2 se Se= c= 10 3 AaStralasia 3) 3 = 97 17
Pirapilesates 2 8% tL . 75 13 RRO RECY 08 ee 896 .751
leno aoe 21 9 North America_______--_-- 8, 784 809
Welompia.-- 8-4 Ft. 66 24 South America__________- 222 70
Mich Guiang. =.2 2.2 _. 1 0 —$_|—________
MOA OR = 2 os ee + 1 POLLS oak oe tes SS. 10, 362 1, 758
PORE te ee 3 3 7 (common pests,
SOuLh America? = = = 2 Oeths p> MRP. A) ee eee ee 39, 711 15, 131
REPT Gee ee ne 0 11 Total (incompletely de-
WPHORIOl Ss = ea ed i 40 6 termined pests, p. 5)-- 5, 680 8, 950
Total: Motal:insectse 7 tees’ Daa ee ee
UNTIED 5 A 110 19 Ota GISeASeS” =e < A SE Pe 25, 839
RasISgs yee See ees ee et: 253 92 Grand toears <2 ee SENS) eae 81, 592

NotTe.—In addition to the countries named above, interceptions including those of common pests (Dp. 4)
and of incompletely determined pests (p. 5) were made from Algeria, Austria, British Guiana, Bulgaria,
Canary Islands, Czechoslovakia, Dutch East Indies, French Cameroons, Gibraltar, Gold Coast, Guam,
Montserrat, Mozambique, Nigeria, Rhodesia, St. Lucia, Sumatra, Surinam, Tahiti, Tasmania, Tortola
Island, Tunis, and Wake Island.

List of pests collected and reported from July 1, 1939, to June 30, 1940, inclusive
[All findings marked with an asterisk indicate State inspection]

Number of interceptions

in—
Pest and host Country of origin 2, Z Collected in—
S oS _ n
oO fa! m | o/s
INSECTS
Acalypta musci (‘Tingitidae):
Moss packing around plants__| Switzerland_____._______|_____- Bh ee Tl.
Acalypta parvula (Tingitidae):
LIER Spat eee A RGA n ee Pea ee PASTE 7 eee eee Calif.*
Acanalonia laticosta (Fulgoridae):
Prosopis sp. (mesquite) _.-...| Mexico_...-.......-.---- i) ee BUTE SES Tex.
Acanthoscelides armitagei (Bru-
chidae):
Cajanus indicus (pigeon pea) __| Trinidad______-_______--_|__-__- esos] ere en BIC:
Acanthoscelides dominicanus (Bru-
chidae):
Acacia farnesiana (huisache).-.| Mexico_____...-..--.---- Deeb] La.
pe aa coriaria (divi- | Mexico, Nicaragua_-_-___- rd ls ees a | Seen eee La., N. Y.
ivi
aetemeraee spinipes (Bruchi-
ae):
Acacia farnesiana (acacia). ...| Greece. __......___..----|_-----]__-- Al Raises NEY
sa tubulus (Bupresti-
ae):
Brassica oleracea capitata (cab- | Mexico_-.-_-__-.-_------|_-----|__-- Bop) s | Tex
age).
Acrolepia assectella (Hyponomeu-
tidae):
Allium porrum (leek)... ____- Rial yy OS WOGGHIG. CE ee fs bh 6 | Md., N. Y., Pa.
aa privatana (Tortrici-
LO a) NWA ce he OG, | 3 Oe 1 | Wash.
ae duvali (Aeolothripi-
ae
ao Sie cea See WWEGTION = 55 cee Bo fe SL ete ek Tex.
Ee fen RO Ssh 5 ae Recs] Sa ieee I lca |e
Avaliie’ a ae (Cicadellidae):
Lactuca sativa (lettuce) -.._.._|..--- ip se Pee eA el Sia as Sie Tex.
Matricaria chamomilla coro- |__--- CO. Ee Eee. ee fe RG epee, ue bo Tex.

mata (manzanilla).
Agriotes sp. (Elateridae):
Cyndéra eardunculus.(cardoon)|-. Italy...................-]--~L2=]_-.~]--.2-|i.<. Lh wed
Agromyza sp., very close to bur-
gessi (Agromyzidae):
Phaseolus sp. (string bean)_...| Mexico_......----_..---- A le cel sett shew kesse Ariz.
8 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

List of pests collected and reported from Juby 1, 1939, to June 30, 1940, inclu-
sive—Continued

[All findings marked with an asterisk indicate State inspection]

Number of interceptions

in—
Pest and host Country of origin 2, 2 Collected in—
oF |. | Sen een aes
s/S| 2#/s5/8
Ola| A lela
INSECTS—continued
Agromyzasp.(Agromyzidae)—Con.
Allium porrum (leek) _____-_- it aliy ees ee |S a ee Se | ZilINeYS
Alopecurus longearistatus___-_ Manehuria =... 3 Sees 44] -_ 38 Al se ee ee DAC
Apium graveolens (celery) -_..| Argentina, Cuba______-- 2g |e ee eee INE Ye
‘Brassice -achinensis= (whiter! Cuba. = 4Q:-|2 so Se] oh el Ne¥s
greens).
EBT SSI COOLET ACECMMOELYETS, (GRU as |h HEAT CO ree | |e To) GNEaYy
liflower).
STGSTED oleracea capitata (cab-| Italy, Netherlands_-_____|------]---_|-----_]---- 2} Ala.,"Ga.
age).
Brassica rapa (turnip) ________ Birances sos. 2) 22 ee ae ees TS | eee |e ile ved
IBraSSiCCISMe MUStATG) | MC HD 2 eee ee 15 i225 sae ae eee Nay «
Capsicum annuum (pepper)_.| Mexico____-.-___-______- Sajcess|_ ben |e eee Ariz., Tex.
ee SQLUULTIO (GCOLIATI == | © Uy eee Bosco 22 ee ee INESYe
er).
Dauces carota (earrot)_______- Brazile Miexi COs see | en ee 2) | 2-23) Te NEVA iiexs
EHehanthusispi@viexican sun= |) IMiGxico ss | ee eee Le Tex.
flower).
Miedicinaliinenb== a s- Jaane 28 2 ee a eae ni | ee pS Wash.
Urisikaem pert GapaneSeiris) =| sae CO b= eee ene eee feo ob. eee eee Calif.*
Lactuca sativa (lettuce) ______- DER ye ee aS eee el |S | Peace | ee EIN Ye
ae esculentum (to- |) Miexico:=-2.2--s Gu eee 4. |. 2 Ariz., Tex.
mato). |
Matricaria chamomilla coro- |_---- GOs: Skea ss es |e eee TL |} eee Tex.
nata (manzanilla).
Mentha sp (nint) seca ten |e Gosia 2-3e. | eee 1 | Tex.
Orchid sees wea te eee Wana Zones i | eee qo | DAC:
‘Phaseolisisps (Strineibean)=224|) IMiexiCOs 28) 22a anne eee eee 53] 22=2 | Ariz.
Pisum sativum (pea) . _______- Cubans bes seer eee [siete |b S|ee INGE Yas
Prunussmaholebiamahaleb) io) Rumania so eee | eee Lei. ae DEC:
Raphanus sativus (adish)=-—- |) Mexican 2s sae eee ee by (| > Fal eee. Tex.
Tagetes sp. (marigold)_______- Jamal cas Wiexd cos see | eens ee 2 | ie eaes N. Yigthex:
Tithonia sp. (Mexican. sun- | Mexico____-..._...______]----=-|---- 2 ee Tex.
flower).
Tropaeolum sp. (nasturtium) _|__--_- Gob ss ure | see Tes aR pes Tex.
SANTOS se ee ee |e dole} ee Be ee a eg |= oeealentee Tex.
Aleurocanthus woglumi (Aleyro-
didae):
Citrus aurantifolia (lime) ____- Dominica, Jamaica____-_- Wed) oT | bcetts) ase Til., Mass.
GitrusihimeiolGweetilime)= 4h Ciba ae ree | ee een eee 1 | eee Fla.*
Citrus limonia (lemon) _____--|----- dos. 2022 ore ees Ji | ode [eae IN Xe
Citrus sinensis (orange) _______|_---- G02 221. 2pm ane! | A eee },|_.25)2223|pRlas
Aleurodicus manni (Aleyrodidae):
Gardenia florida (Cape-jas- | Mexico__...-..-_-------- | edafh abt s alee Tex:
mine).
Aleuroplatus mammaeferus (Aley-
rodidae):
Codiaeum sp. (croton) _______- Japane .2) 2252528 2. a eet eee | Soa
ee cinctus (Tenthredini-
ae):
Rosa eens manetti (ma- | Ireland, Netherlands___- 4s |e] Saeco ee IN}. Ma
netti).
ROSS eee te eee British Columbia, Eng- Ijei3 (Soe D.C., Wash.
land, Ireland.
Allocoris incognita (Cydnidae): F
Antirrhinum majus (snapdra- | Mexico__-.-.------------|------|---- 2h) 2a bese Ariz., Tex.
gon). f‘
Paes carota (Queen Anne’s |__--_- GOe 225s. 22 Bee ee | Se eee 0) 2 e Ariz.
ace).
TO WOES smite d eee a eee | pees Oe. i ee ee ee Cay Pee Pie Ariz., Tex.
Lactuca sativa (lettuce) ____-__]__--- GOE ees a Be |e ee ee AL, || eee eee Tex.
Allocoris interupta (Cydnidae):
aAntirrhinum majus (snap-
dragon). Bac ROOR SLL oo), eet one 2 creme | pees 1: a2 eee Tex.
Alpheias conspirata “(Galleriidae):
Ananas sativus (pineapple) __|_---- COE ee PAV] faeces) ee peers peneee| (eee La., Tex.
Alpheias sp. (Galleriidae):
VAM ONASSAIDUS= a | eee GOs hos a 20220 Ezese= | 55 ee La., Tex.
Amoblycerus nigromarginatus (Bru-
chidae):

Cassia occidentalis_____.------ IPanama eee eee 1 eee eee DAC:
SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS

9

List of pests collected and reported from July 1, 1939, to June 30, 1940, inclu-
sive—Continued

[All findings marked with an asterisk indicate State inspection]



Pest and host.

Country of origin

INSECTS—continued
Amorbia emigratella (Tortrici-
dae):
NDRISWAIe eee Fee ee IMiexIbO-=.. 445. yinethice
Gardenia florida (Cape-jas-
TANT) ) sept Leos SO Se ee G02. =+) hye... ais
Lilium longiflorum (Easter
1h )) ee eee eee ko! iE ee oe
Lycopersicum esculentum
(ROTO? 50) ee ee a GOR FS ae ee
Amphicerus cornutus (Bostrichi-
dae):
TCT eee eee es | OSES Oe ees
Lactuca sativa (lettuce)___-___|___-- COs ees ta os ted

Amphorophora azaleae (Aphiidae):

Azalea indica
ene globulus (Hydrophili-

Forest litter and sphagnum
mace ee ee ee
Anacentrinus blanditus (Curcu-
lionidae):
Lactuca sativa (lettuce)
ee orchidaceus (Thripi-
ae):

Cammellia japonica (camel-
lia)

Wikediiowerse. te 1 I ied

Odontoglossum sp. (orchid) --
Orchid

Anaphothrips orchidii (Thripidae):

Anthurium scherzerianum___-

Bneland sc 289) seers s
Colombia, England,
Guatemala Mexico.

IVIGRECOS 4 2 se ele eee RL i Paele cere

Renanthera sp. (orchid) _____- Piiiippines spe ee A aR
Anaphothrips secticornis (Thripi-
dae):
chererim@epr-aoe 2.2 2222. . Moewador 2-2.
Anasa uhleri (Coreidae):
Empty railway car___.._.-__-
Anastrepha distincta (Trypeti-
dae):
TOUS Dee see ke See 2b ool eee Se ee
Anasirepha fraterculus (Trypeti-
Amygdalus persica (peach) ___|_____ FOE eee oe
Anastrepha ludens (Trypetidae):
Amygdalus percica (peach) -_-__|____- 1 OS Re See og Pao
-Casimiroa edulis (white sa- |____- Crate fF ae
pote).
Citrus aurantium (Sorin) 22s C04 Shes St
orange).
Citrus grandis (grapefruit) ___|____- GO e Ne eee st
Citrus limetta (sweet lime) ____|____- Coe har h sate}:
Citrus limonia ponderosa |____- CLO ee ere Se eee ee
(ponderosa lemon).
Citrus nobilis deliciosa (tan- |____- On. Be we es
gerine).
Citrus sinensis (orange) _--.--|_-_-- Ores Oe eS
Cydonia oblonga (quince) _____|____- eS Fer ee
Mangifera indica (mango)-____|____. Co Foote FE et ee ee
Mangifera indica (in railway |____-

car).

Persea americana (avocado).--|...-.do___...._----.-____.

Punica granatum (pome- |____- GO" ~ 3: ae
granate).
Pyrus communis (pear) _._.-..|_-__- 0:23 fee ee
400127—41 2







Number of interceptions







iIn—
© a Collected in—
co o
= o E| 3
Pie & beers
Seah a [ot la
Sede Ljesacla2 thi Rex:
Ne pee ee Pe? AE || ee Tex
epmese? |i. |Lere elie) Tex
Vs cece 2 ees Ee Tex
cae 4 2. | teehee! fiex
oo eS An jece leo Dex
A}... |Paaeeath - ag Div.
ee ee aa ee NEY
_ SA bilso4 nat Box
Toe] opel _ Sl fee Tex.
Loca S22 eee help ey Tex.
1 Calif.*
AS 2? ce (a ee Tex.
1 eS ee ee eat | Were Hawaii.*
wewede Bee ele ee s\C%
= ayes lt) 8 tA eee: shld.
Tex
ee a 1 foetal Ane
sucess. Zio 1E sl eee
= a 1 Weezetes) alex
6 ahs l | eeclewcla Rex
es eS SwWleseiiee tN Meg,
eet eae Db Biecoly |, deb baxe
= = Seer BE 8s |.--4|2-—=| PARIS of Dex.
eee a sees M thee Sale Ory
ee Tie secre at seks
Bee 3 148 2 4 | Ala.,Md., N.Y.,
Tex.
dene 2 band VORA.
a es 33 Tex.
xa DOE:
eee Dee oA eee ex
bs octet. 2 | eestentn| Dex
So A Pee cee Oo Sale ee Ox
10 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

List of pests collected and reported from July 1, 1939, to June 30, 1940, inelu-
sitve—Continued

[All findings marked with an asterisk indicate State inspection]

Number of interceptions

in—
Pest and host Country of origin ©, a Collected in—
Sl |) lene
2 |2| 2/5/58
O 1a |) A Velie
INSECTS—continued
Anastrepha mombinpraeoptans
(Trypetidae):

Mangiferaindica (mango) -_-_--- Cuba, Dominican Re- Vj2222)| _ 18h) 2s Sale aibasViassseNe-y...
public, Haiti, Jamai- Tex., Va.
ca, Mexico, Puerto
Rico.

Psidium guajava (guava) -_._-- BRAUER EO 1CO ea eee em ee 25 a2e| amen INS

SPONdI CSIs pee ee American Virgin Islands_|_-----|__-- fic] nee PR

Ane serpentina (Trypeti- |

Achras sapota (sapodilla) - _--- Brinidad=-- = oo sos Ses) Se eee 1o| Sed ee ING Ys

Citrus sinensis (orange)-__.-__|____- GO | | ee 1 | Mass.

Mammea americana (mamey)-| Mexico___-______---_---_]------|_-_- 2 5), Pa ieee Boiexe

Sapotesse sees ae eee kates ie Honduras) Mexd Comes = sp eee di \e 252384 wa seexs

ANTS suspensa (Trypeti-
ae):
Peidium guajava (guava) __-__- Cuba: Pucrtoy ico 4 a eee 27) an eessiailas = Neve
Anastrepha sp., probably frater-
culus (Trypetidae):

Amygdalus persica (peach)__..| Mexico_____.__...._.__--]----=<|__-_ 1 ees Tex.

Citrus grandis (grapefruit) _.__.| Argentina__-___-__- rr ed S| AIRE oe | Hf] IN aay

Prunus armeniace (apricot) __| Mexico.......__.-=__...-_]------]=_=_ 1 |e eee Tex.

Anastrepha sp., probably ludens
(Trypetidae):
Pyrus communis (pear)____-__|_---- GO ele SO Sar eg Oe eee |e Pips = SS Tex.
Anastrepha sp.. probably mom-
binpraeoptans (Trypetidae):
Manaifera indica (mango)--.-| Cuba, Honduras, Ja- |------|---- 22/2225 SE eNGe
maica. x
Anastrepha sp., probably serpen-
tina (Trypetidae):
Achras sapoa (sapodilla) ____- Colombia, Trinidad_.-_- alin eee ess Sees INB NG
Chrysophyllum cainito (star- | Honduras__-__---_--____|_-----]_--- Biss ease | ee La.
apple).
Anastrepha sp. (Trypetidae):

Amygdalus persica (peach)____| Mexico__.-_-_..--------_|_-----_}_-_- Sues ee Tex.

Chrysophyllum cainito. _____- @uatemialass_siee es eee S| rere | pee 1 2S eee Tex.

Cus grandis (crapeinuit) =. 1) Avoe mb iria a a ee ee Saas mee 1 | Md.

Citrus sinensis (orange) ______ MiGxicons 2a ee. aes ae ee ee 6) (223 ee Tex.

Cydonia oblonga (quince) _____]-_-- Gost Sa Eee NOES se rs 4) ees] eee Tex.

Malus sylvestris (apple) ____-__}___- GO a a | ee 2). |PS2aeee Tex.

Mandgifera indica (mango) __--- Costa Rica, Haiti, Mex- |______|____ 21> 1) | Shr Cali eahas
ico, Panama, Trini- Mass., N. Y.,
dad. Tex

Persea americana (avocado) —-|; Mexico 22 a2 ase 1S ee Tex.

Psidium guajava (guava) -__-___}__-- Goi ea ee 2 |e Fs | ee Tex.

Pyrus communis (pear) __-----]----- Goss a ee eee | eae 10¢ ce eas Tex.

Sapotewmeness ihe ee ee oa GOs Si Da aa | es | ee 1 | eco | ee Tex

Andricus glandium (Cynipidae):
Quercus:sp. 8! 2a Ere AMIE KG ys ate eee a Dil |e | INEYS
Andricus ruginosus (Cynipidae):
Unknownroot. a aa IMIG 1 COS es Be area ie eee | 14/2 S| eee Tex.
Anoplodera crassipes (Ceramby
cidae):
ROSAS i Rees encase 2 ee Canada fiat Se nes On ae at} |e es Wash.
Anthonomus funereus (Curculi-
onidae): :
Orchids &: oF ate str ce ee Mexico 2d ee ee | eo ea DC:
Anthonomus mericanus (Curcu-
lionidae):
Mixedicuthowers= ss. | eee UO ec Re oe ese le ee £!|22_0/e7es Tex.
Anthonomus rectirostris (Curcu-
lionidae):
Prunus avium sylvestris ______- Denmavks ss. sae Pe 2] ade INIURY.
Antliarhinus zamiae (Curculi-
onidae):
Encephalartos kosiensis_._-_-_- Unioniof South Africas. 12-0ee) Tae ee eee D.C.
Encephalartos sp_---.- A England ).0i-2 20127 Soe eee 1] eee eee ING Ys
Anuraphis cynariella (A phiidae):
Cynara scolymus (globe arti- |; Greece!-- <2 2. -<2-- ee fee ee 1 PINE

choke).
SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 11

List of pests collected and reported from July 1, 1939, to June 30, 1940, inclu-
sive—Continued

[All findings marked with an asterisk indicate State inspection]

Number of interceptions



in—
Pest and host Country of origin 2 2 Collected in—
a1 SiS
fe le| 2/818
O.Lsa 2 1C La
INSECTS—continued
Aonidiella comperei (Coccidae): 4
Citrus aurantifolia (lime) _____- Dominica, Guatemala_-_- Bh os ees al a 1 | Mass., Pa.
Aphis rumicis (Aphiidae):
Euonymus europaeus____-_--- yr lgti Ge er ee Oo Bh ee. m2;
Apion flavipes (Curculionidae):
Forest litter and sphagnum | Denmark~.-----.--.-__-- OBES 8) S| ae N. YÂ¥.
moss.
Apion pomonae (Curculionidae): ae
WACKESDACVELCH) 222 2-2. England, France, Neth- Tee |e eaters [aes il, 7 ha. Ma.,
erlands. IN: CY.
Archimerus scutellaris (Coreidae):
reigiete 2 WMexic¢g.. Je 2 =e eee Tee eS he Calif.*
Arvelius elbopunctatus (Pentato-
midae):
Capsicum annuum (pepper)-_-|----- GO fees seer ee Ae ee ers ee Ae Tex.
Ascia monuste (Pieridae):
Brassica chinensis (white | Cuba_-__---.--..--_-_._- Die Seach eo etl NixXs
greens).
ERASER UIRHStAEO pee == | do... 2. ==. = 2-2 22- Dh ee Ee Ns Xe
Aspidiotus coryphae (Coccidae):
Cocos nucifera (coconut). ___.| Philippines_...________- DS Se a |E 2 sae ee les Hawaii,* N. Y.
Aspidiotus destructor (Coccidae):
Camellia japonica (camellia) __| Japan__..._.--..--__--_- Be ES PANE a rateg! Yipee | RY Wash,
Carica papaya (papaya) -.-_-_- nba 22 aces See DS plats fh repel ate ieee Fla.*
Cocos nucifera (coconut) - ---_- Bahamas, Brazil, Cook fees 4 {2___|) I |) ¥la4,esHawaii*
Islands, Cuba. IN vt
Musa sp. (banana)-__.______-- Guatemala, Panama--_-_- al eee ye Ea ey PS Calif.*, Fla.*
Badia ere Haiti, Straits Settle- |__.___|__-- 1] 1 |_...| Md., Mass.
ments.
Roystonea regia (royal palm) __| Cuba__._.-___-.-..__..__|_._.-_]___- | es Fla.*
Terminalia catappa (tropical | Bahamas, Cuba____-____|____--|___- Sees Fla.*
almond).
Aspidiotus fabernii (Coccidae):
Unksowmpark.. 2-2... Cobaaes 2 en es Bibiana s_ De 12 Fla.*
ee herculeanus (Cocci-
Annona muricata (sour-sop)_-| Bahamas__-_.-__-__--____|______}____ Le aie Fla.*
Aspidiotus spinosus (Coccidae):
Mammea americana (mamey)_| Cuba, Trinidad_________|______|___- Gi |e ole Fla.*
Persea americana (avocado) __-| Cuba______----._-______ BOE bate | ee Fla.*
Asterolecanium aureum (Cocci-
ae):
Cattleya sp. (orchid) _________ Brazil, Costa Rica_-_-__- 4 Ge L. Wesasee | eyctulieten, DAG:
Epidendrum sp. (orchid) _____- AERIS Gh ee ee on ee Ae Eek ee DIG:
Oncidium varicosum rogersi | Brazil_..___--.--________ Vege s 1 eet thee Alege f D::C;
(orchid).
Oncidium sp. (orchid)--.----- Mexico, Venezuela _-___- Wes Sere Calif.*, D. C.
erates ee Dominican Republic, |_.---_|___- Snkolay Las DP: Cy Pe R.
Trinidad.
Asierolecanium stentae (Coccidae):
Euphorbia sp________________.| Union of South Africa___|______ Te see Hp. GC.
Asterolecanium urichi (Coccidae):
Guilielma gasipaes (pejibaye)-| Brazil__..-...-..________ PERS. ee D.C:
ry (drt terminalis (Scarabaei-
ae):
Capsicum annuum (pepper) .| Cuba____.--.----------- Perla s iat aiae Ne ¥.
Aufeius impressicollis (Coreidae):
Mixed flowers ________ Bees le INeRi opment 2 ft Wa Relais} Ariz.
Aulacaspis mangiferae (Coccidae):
Mangifera indica (mango).___| Grenada, Trinidad, |______|____ Bie) idee PISO, eels
Venezuela.
Autographa sp. (Phalaenidae):
ere. mayus (Gnap- | Cuba___....-22..... hfe | YN
dragon).
Apium graveolens (celery) ___|.._...do__...._--......___- DP eee 2 Ure atat NE
Beta vulgaris cicla (Swiss | Mexico_______--.________ to eet Tex
chard).
Brassica chinensis (white | Cuba___............_._- Sis se ones, Boy,

greens).
12

List of pests collected and

BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

reported frum July 1, 1939, to June 30, 1940, inclu-
sive—Continued

[All findings marked with an asterisk indicate State inspection]

Pest and host

INSECTS—continued

Autographat sp (Phalaenidae)—
Continued Brassica. oleracea
botrytis (cauliflower).
Brassica oleracea capitata
(cabbage).
Brassica rapa (turnip)
Brassica sp. (mustard)
Capsicum annuum (pepper)

Coriandrum sativum (corian-
der).

Gardenia florida (Cape-
jasmine).

Lactuca sativa (lettuce)
Lycopersicum esculentum (to-
mato).
Petroselinum hortense (pars-
ley).
Radicula nasturtium aquati-
cum (watercress).
Raphanus sativus (radish)
Baldulus elimatus (Cicadellidae):
Lactuca sativa (lettuce)
Barathra brassicae (Phalaenidae):

Brassica oleracea botrytis (cau-
liflower).

Brassica oleracea capitata
(cabbage).

Baris lepidii (Curculionidae):
Radicula armoracia (horse-
radish).
Berginus nigricolor (Lyctidae):
Bitoma parallela (Colydiidae):
lard wooda os===e52 ane ea=
Bolbonota pictipennis (Mem-
bracidae):
Unidentified flowers__________
Brachylacon murinus (Flateridae):
Paeonia sp. (peony)
Brachyrhinus porcatus (Curcu-
lionidae):
Azalea indica (azalea)
Brachyrhinus rugosostriatus (Cur-
culionidae):
Packing around rose cuttings_
Brachyrhinus sp. (Curculionidae):
PAIStiberS Dit Ase ee Ae te
Sinningia speciosa (gloxinia) __
Soil around plants _____ ra sa
Soil on roots of Berberidopsis

sp.
Brachystylus tamaulipanus (Cur-
culionidae):
Miscellaneous leaves________-
Brentus mexicanus (Brentidae):
Tabebuia donnell-smithii
(primavera).
Brochymena aculeata (Pentatomi-
dae):
Tamarix juniperina (juniper
tamarix).
Brochymena sulcata (Pentatomi-
dae):
Delphinium sp. (larkspur)
Brontes australis (Cucujidae):
Grevillea robusta (silk-oak)__-_-
Bruchidius gilrus (Bruchidae):
' Hedysarum coronarium
(French-honeysuckle).

ELEC SCT ALITUNS ) eee | eae
Onobrichisisp eee eee do

Number of interceptions

in—
Country of origin 2 a Colleeted in—
So lai Siem
ai&|2j|s is
© lh A aeeaiica
Branees Mexicans ce | temees al iemee 8.1201) GV ASI ZING Tex,
Miexd cos 2 |) 7 | 2 eee Ariz., Tex
Goss et ae Psi 62 | acres ee eae Tex.
CO wel Ae Sen td ee [53| 2. S| ee ne ies ee Ariz., Tex
Cal | en iee GOn a ene Serene Ti |. Nes el eerie
Cubak. > F-0ier i none! Tutt | | ee N=: Y
INGCKI COR 2% ase ee Te) 2 a See ee Tex
By Ree) eek GOssks eee LE 66 a0) 2a Ariz Rex
Eiee GOR. ah eee abe | ae eee Pi) ei oa exe
ie 4 SA AGS RALET BAe es ae 1 |i oe 22] oe ee iex
peo Osi Seo eS ee |e Poe al eee
GOEL hae eee Lc. 2/2. 2) eae eee Tex
Coie Soy ae ee cee |e hilleea teas Tex
Beleitam= = ve Ec fk a ee 1 | Ga.
Belgium, Netherlands___|_--._-|____|__--_-|_--2 391) Ga laseNeay
Poland 2) 20 her a a ee ee W | Nie YS
Guatemala os See a | ee |S ae | Tex
IPhilippiness assesses digi Pre h 2l ee a Wash.
omduiras: = 22 2. so) eee ee eae Aa gre gey ee La.
SY TIS OS1 A Vil ea {x)2.0 pee NewS
Bel sium eee 1G sell | D.C
WPante se) 2 ee eee jee see. Des
INetherlands:--22 sen 5 Ai | ee eee Db: G,
Bela se eens by | th ok ee INE RY
@amads 22h a | Th Ae ae Wash
aT rn Gh el |e eee Ye [A Ae Ee net | ae Dac
IMexd COs bs 8 ae ae eel eas Dina seen ho Tex
EON GUTASH eee Withee eo See | os eae N. Y
IMIERICO s)he fy ert Fs a eee Vy feseqael ea Tex
GO Bee ee ee Ices ee Tex.
ATIStEOl aa ee PoletZ.| choot. oafabes Niei¥.
Tiga liye 2 aoe i ees ea es ff te sed ea ee N. Ye
GQ: A oe ee ee 1 a ea 2 a DANCE
I ah’ SE Ee eran Tee ele ees
SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 13

List of pests collected and reported from July 1, 1939, to June 30, 1940, inclu-
sive—Continued

[All findings marked with an asterisk indicate State inspection]



Number of interceptions





in—
Pest and host Country of origin 2 |e Collected in—
oi te eee cents
Ais) #/ SIs
oS ei @21'S 1a
INSECTS—continued
Bruchidius lividimanus retamae
(Bruchidae):
Cytisus sessilifolius_-__--.---- BERGE eer eee ee ge ee Ae ee ae, N. Y
Bruchidius villosus (Bruchidae):
Cytisus laburnum._...-------- Kraices 2 tee DG ern eee eee
Cytisus purpureus._-...------- OrLOrGY NIN 2 2 sr gS od a be D. C.
Cytisus sessilifolius-_---------- GS hg ee ree od Bt icy S| ned ISA eee Nu.
a Ee a Be Mans? See Mich.
Genista anrantica_.......---- Switzerland__._____-_-__]_----- Lasse < aeree DD. C.
eee gs 2 st eet ey ee Lae =e Tee:
Laburnum alpinum. ._..---..| France__-._--.---------- ee ee eee Wr Xp
Spartium junceum (Spanish England, Germany-.---.-|------ 2a eae ape een Pye Ee
broom).
Bruchus affinis (Bruchidae):
te latifolius (perennial | Netherlands__...--------|------ Bas Pe ee cle =! Nl.
erepriis odoratus (sweet pea) | Germany, Netherlands_.|-_----- Papen A eee Mich., N. Y.
I England, France, Neth- |------ Se Se _--| D. C., Mich.
erlands.
Vicia sp.-(vetch) -. ._--------- Remanig-2-: 2. 2522-222 hy | Retr) emer | Fad oes N.Y
Bruchus brachialis (Bruchidae):
Vicia villosa (hairy vetch)-.. | Germany, Hungary----- Ah el eee tes or ee Am. TC. Pa.
Va.
Vicia'sp- Cveteh) .----5--.2-- Hungary, Italy_...------ Oe Onl ase tees pee 0 a oS
Pa, Va.
Bruchus ervi (Bruchidae):
Lens esculenta (lentil) ------- SME ene ee es Tete ss foo esate NY
Bruchus lentis (Bruchidae):
Lens esculenta (lentil) ------ AOS RTIS OS ese a Vey 5 ces he Ne Ys
Bruchus loti (Bruchidae):
Rye straw jacket with vetch | France___--------------- Re i Ala
Bruchus luteicornis (Bruchidae):
Vicia angustifolia___--------- BO Fe E28 ei Tit eee eee le ie ee La.
Wiewep. (vou) —----5---_-- England, France, Greece,| 50 |--__|___-__|---_|___- Ala., D. C., Ti,
Jamaica, Netherlands, aioe. WA Gy
Portugal, Rumania, Mass., N. id
Scotland, Spain. Pa., Wash.
eat | pallidicornis (Bruchi-
pe esculenta (lentil) - ----- OB eh ee ee es Oe coe eC
Bruchus rufipes (Bruchidae):
Vicia sp. (vetch) . ----------- France, Hungary, Ru- te eel oa DiC, Th Tet
mania. ING Y.
Bruchus tristiculus (Bruchidae):
Sead eee eee ea. go Pearce ale.* ee ent ee Toe ee hs ee Pa.
Bucculatriz sp., probably fthur-
beriella (Bucculatrigidae):
Gossuniwm sn: (cotton) (boll) | Mexico........---:-.----|.--.--|---- aR ola Ariz.. Tex.
Bythoscopus misellus (Cicadel-
lidae):
Chrysanthemum parthenium OO ed oe oes Le. Spent ey epee ae ee Tex
(feverfew).
ee glandulosa (Cynipi-
Quercus sp. (acorn) --__---_- PDE MO ore en oe Ae Bee 2 Spee N, y.
Sern ademptus (Bruchi-
Pueraria thunbergiana (kud- | France, Japan, Nether- Pn ee Sree eee Ala., D. C., Md.,
zu). lands. MICH. IN. Nes
Wash.
Callosobruchus analis (Bruchi-
dae):
Cicer 1rietinum (chickpea) __.| India___._.-_..-_-------- in sae ea Ga.
Vigna sinensis (cowpea) - _-___- Baluchistan <2 _-. 14a: ee ek DO
se bs rechus chinensis (Bruchi-
ae):
Serie repens 8 SLs is China, Italy, Japan- ---- z 1 Pe a NN. UY.
Wash.
Cajanus indicus (pigeon pea). | Hawaii__.........-------]_----- a el ae Hawaii.*
Phaseolus mungo radiatus.___.| Japan............--.-...]-..-<- Ue eo | || REELS
Ph seorus sp. (String bean) ...] China, Japan: .:.-.._..<}i2- 2k }Usan 1 -| 1 | Hawaii,* Wash.
Ta -arindus indica (tama- | Egypt._.................]-..... PA 3s oo D.

rin :).
14 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

List of pests collected and reported Mibm July 1, 1939, to June 30, 1940, inclu-
sive—Continued

[All findings marked with an asterisk indicate State inspection]



Number of interceptions



_in—
Pest and host Country of origin 2 g Collected in—
5 3 ~~ n
—“ on o
Bees ceaseless
©) ye ea eee
INSECTS—continued
Carsidara dugesii (Psyllidae):
Mixed flowers__.___________-- IME@XE CO ei Nee Sal | DUNS ae ae Ds 5 eae Tex.
Caryedon fuscus (Bruchidae):
fee aie indica: a (tam a=m | ain al Case eee ee | eee AD ifs 2 | eS ae Mich.
rin
Caryedon sp. (Bruchidae):
Bolusanthus speciosus. ..----- Union of South Africa___|_----- i) Spee | eee | eee D.C.
Corndeauriazedilisha sense oe Italian Somaliland. _____|------ Dy 2 Scar ee D.C.
Peliophorum Spee eae Union of South Africa___|------ ab 3) che isa DOr
Castnia sp. (Castniidae):
IB TOME] a dee susseetoeaee eee BT Zee a a ee cee, | ceo I | ees eee D. C.
Oncidium varicosum (orchid) _|___-- COE Steere ema AV | ele | Calif.*
Cephaloleia pretiosa (Chrysomel-
idae):
Heliconia latispatha__._._--_-- Panamnaiensonsa eens Deke 2 eee | eee | eee Tex.
Cerapachys augustae (Formici-
dae):
Blantsencolliaaetn ian aes IVEGXI CO cele ee lie ie rn eed Tea ESee Tex.
Ceratitis capitata (Brvpetiduey:
Capsicum annuum (pepper) 2) Hawaile eo eres eee |eeee 2 | Calif.*
Gitruse .aunantianmin (bitterd|yltalliyan seme aes oem 2 | ees eres | eae | ING Ye
orange).
Citrus nobilis: Celiciosay (CCAIR ES TAZ eee ae ana |e | 1 | Mass.
gerine).
Citrus sinensis (orange) ______- POrbue aly pansy [eee | eee | 1 | 2] Mass.,N. Y.,Tex
Coffea sp. (coffee) ___________- TEES Weather ss a Rc ese Dae ee Calif.*
ee compressa, (pricklyz=w Pit ally. | es ee iP ake eee INERYS
pear).
Persea americana (avocado) ..-| Hawaii__._____._____._-- Lille 75 sa Calif.*
Pyrus communis (pear) __-___- ET GEMM ype Sie ae Sea as ea Ti) a eee MiasseNeaye.
In box containing pears and |} Germany_______________]------|---- aL eaicy eens INENYS
apples.
On cases of bitter oranges and | Italy____-_______________ Dey) a SS ee N.Y.
in hold of ship.
On wall in hold of ship_______|_-__- LO eae seed Yay ae | ate er | ey I oe) exe
On deck on which oranges |__-_-- OE EE Se Ge ON | eo ee La.
had been stored (4 inter-
ceptions).
Ceratitis sp. (Trypetidae):
Citrus grandis (grapefruit)._.._| Palestine, Union of |------|----|------|---- AS evidSSesNet Vics
South Africa. Pa.
a punctulatus (Miri-
ae):
Chysanthemum sp__---------- IMDGXICO: Se ey Lo res ee | Lee oes ee exe
Lactuca sativa (lettuce) __._._-}_-_-- GO Se ae ie | ees | eee eee Tex.
Cercyon melanocephalus (Hydro-
philidae):
Forest litter and sphagnum | Denmark_---______-_-_-- Pe oh Dae ee eae Ness
moss.
ee quisquilius (Hydrophili-
ae):
Tabebuia donnell-smithii (pri- | Honduras________--____- feo Soe oe | ee N.Y.
mavera).
Ceroplastes rubens (Coccidae):
AN NUTIUTy SO ee eee NET Wye Deu wh A alte oma | aula ae (i a) cee eae Calif.*
Camellia japonica (camellia) __| Japan______-_-__________- Es Yay Pet 4 se | a Calif.*, Wash.
Parnes a Pe ie Ra ETS WRT oe ai i lah ee a oa a fo | see 1) eC alite
Ceroplastes rusci (Coccidae):
Hicws cariea (fig) 222-2822 ees TRG Sh ys eat Bet ae ee ae ie 1S eee | ee Zi: See ee INERYS
Cerotoma atrofasciata (Chrysomel-
idae):
Cue cavendishianum (or- | Guatemala_____.__-______ HD yy la as sci a Calif.*
chid).
Ceutorhynchus atomus (Curculion-
idae):
Forest litter and sphagnum | Denmark_-_-____________- DA er ae | eee | Nia
moss.
Ceutorhynchus contractus (Curcu-
lionidae):
Forest litter and sphagnum | _____ Coste noe ee DD lesion | eee ING YW

MOSss. |
SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 15

List of pests collected and reported from July 1, 1939, tv June 30, 1940, inclu-
sive—Continued

[All findings marked with an asterisk indicate State inspection]



Number of interceptions



in—
Pest and host Country of origin 2 m Collected in—
e (ae fei 3
31/8/22 /5/8
Os | po wm
INSECTS—continued
Ceutorhynchus pleurostigma (Cur-
culionidae):

Brassica rapa (turnip) .------- England, France, Neth-.|_-»-=-|-.--|.-----|---- 2a da8.5. Ni) Tex,
erlands, Scotland, Swe-
den.

Ceutorhynchus quadridens (Cur-
culionidae):
EP eMmUriernucemporiiis (CAall=||\ Ltéaly— =... --..-..--. 22.22]. -22..|6.--]_..---|._-- 2 -NeE Ys
liflower).
Ceutorhynchus sp., possibly rapae
(Curculionidae):
Brassica oleracea capitata (cab- |_---- GG. os ee 2 eee 1} Ala.
bage). ,
ene sp. (Curculioni-

ae):

Brassica campestris (rutabaga)| England, France, Neth- |__-.--|_---|__----|__-- 12-| Md.,INoY.; Pa.,
erlands. Tex.

Brassica oleracea botrytis___-_- Waly Seotland 22. oe SE seers Sis/EINS Yas

Teeairies oleracea capitata (cab- | France, Italy, Portugal_|__..-_|__--|____-_]__-- 4] La., N. Y.

age).

Brassica rapa (turnip)_------- Belgium, England, Es- D222 eee) 64 | Ala., Ga., La.,
tonia, France, Ger- Md., Mass.,
many, Italy, Morocco, INGE SG Pas,
Netherlands, Scot- S. C., Tex., Va.
land, Spain, Sweden,

' Wales.
Lactuca sativa (lettuce) __-__-- BEG Aen ae ee es eee ee Ve ie 2 irNG Ye
Chaetopsis fulvifrons (Otitidae):
ao aethiopica (calla | Mexico__--___________--- AEs 2 |Seee SCr.. 3 tea & Tex.
ily).

Chalcodermus sp. (Curculionidae):

Phaseolus sp. (string bean)_..}| Cuba, Mexico__.________|____--}___- | esl a eee
Chilo simplex (Crambidae):

Oryza sativa (rice) _-_.-------- Japan: bb i. saben), Pepe4 1), pS eae Hawaii*, a.

: Mass., Pas,
Wash.

Chilo sp. (Crambidae):

Andropogon citratus_________- IWMEOXICO.-> to. 2 2a tee et Taleo 5... Calif.

Saccharum officinarum (sugar- |____- OO eee ES ere Sule cise Ariz.

cane).

VA ANT TRAC CO) i) OS i oe a LO a eae Daye) BS Ariz.

Chionaspis humilis (Coccidae):
FAVWOMIAG SD! 3 2 Southwest Africa__....__|_____- Dpto olla US DiGs
Chionaspis yanonensis (Coccidae):

Pmmnoves EID Orange). |S apan. n-ne cece OE |e] 2 | Calif.*

Citrus nobilis deliciosa (Man- |____- Oe. eee ne eee ieee 1) Toft Wash.

darin orange).

Citrus nobilis deliciosa (tan- |___-_- CL en ee ee A ft eee

gerine).

Citrus sinensis (orange) _______|____- Ow. <) eee ee I Ee Ce 2 es LOIN TY

Chirothrips falsus (Thripidae):

Gardenia florida (Cape-jas- | Mexico__...-.._-.....-._|--.__-]__-- 1 lec i ee Tex.

mine).

INGTSGGHOWOrS==-9e = fk eee ee Re oe Ls aol. | Tex.

RO rh igen ees td De chal eee ete ee P5525) ee DS Tex.

Chrysobothris guatimalensis (Bu-
prestidae):
PMINPIMNBEEe fobs os. [tak OAs aioe neers eRe = |i ans | UO 1} Dex
Chrysolina brunsvicensis (Chryso-
melidae): .
Forest litter and sphagnum | Denmark_-_-___________-- Te Fe oes bil oe ee NEY,
moss.
Chrysoltna varians centaura (Chry-
somelidae):
MIRADA AE ae os | BOIZIUM | seein SUS ni choaene| tabenl D.C.
Chrysomphalus bowreyi (Coccidae):
Oroiiieeeeeee ee. | Wh Bonduras..._._ ee a ee a. Die eee La.
Chrysomphalus dictyospermi var.
(Coccidae):
Camellia japonica (camellia)_.| Mexico__...._---___-__-- NS se = REO Tex.
Mangifera indica (mango) ___-- Granada. ele ele Bc scl aa ES NY.

Persea. americana (avocado) -..-' Mexico_......--...----__!-_.-_!-__. tee kat Tex:
16

BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

Lis: of pests collected and reported from July 1, 1939, to June 30, 1940, inclu-

sive —Continued

[All findings marked with an asterisk indicate State inspection]

Pest and host

Number of intereeptions

Country of origin

INSECTS—continued
Chrysomphalus nigropunctatus
(Coecidae):
Orechid2 | 22. _.5| Miexico: 1 =#ia0S sAcaes. Toes
Chrysomphalus odontoglossi “(Coc-
cidae):
OFchide yw Aes sere hols FIM) 8] Cale ere ee a | ee 1
Chrysomphalus personatus (Coc-
cidae):
Citrusorandis (Grapefruit) ses |) Vie xd CO ne ee eee | pen |
Citrus limonia (lemon) _____--- TAZA Zee eB ee 8 Eee OM | ese) (ET
Citrus sinensis (orange) ______- LOSS aes ate dae lat ag eS il
Perseaamentcana(avocado)=s4| .Vlexi Coes: = ass yee |e ee ee
Unidentified leaf_______ __._-| American Virgin Islands |_____-_ 1
Chrysomphalus umboniferus (Coe:
cidase):
Orchid Pree Gr pets iemeee 4 Venezuela 1220 Anes | Pie ian pein
Clerada apicicornis (Lygaeidae):
Solanum melongena (eggplant)| Cuba____-___---_______- ees
Cligenes delineata (Lygaeidae): :
Unknownlleateeees = snkese IMEC x1 CO #25 a oe ss ee Sl letra |e
Coccotrypes bassiaeverus (Seolyti-
dae):
GCocgs spia(palin) ep =e Brazilic ce aees he jele S| oneek 1
NS dactyliperda (Scolyti-
ae):
eR OCICS DE ee nan ces 225 22 le sa | eee 1
Coccotrypes pygmaeus (Scolyti-
dae):
Livistona chinensis (Chinese | Tanganyika____-.-__---_]______ 1
fan palm).
Coccus viridis (Coccidae): .
Bryophyltlam sp. -_-__2_2_-__! OTE TNT A Ge ne | 1
Citrus sinensis (orange) .-___-- Dominican Republic____|______]____
Coffea spy (eoffee)=. - = 252-2 =: Brazil, Colombia, Ha- ie} ¥. 23
waii, Jamaica, Puerto
Rico.
Gardenia florida (Cape-jas- | Cuba, Hawaii, Jamaica, |______|____
mine). Venezuela.
[LOT AS Dwi ke af. BREE. oy ee Tonia ly Ges ee | |
Bagerstroemiassp a. . ee SLAIN UY Cea St alee Seow ei as
Psitdium quajava (guava) ____- Gb ae a a Ser Re | een eee
Conchaspis angraeci (Coccidae):
Cattleya sp. (orchid). ______. Menezuela. 2 te as Ttpi|eute!
Laelia rubescens (orchid) ____- CostayRicar=..00 sss a8 | Renee 1
Orchid Sey acts Tears @anall Zone ee wee ee ee 2
Vanilla sp. (orchid) -________-_ CUS GOT 5 ee ee 1g rs
Conotrachelus flavangulus (Cur- | -
culionidae) : ;
Cydonia oblonga (quince) __-__- IMIG X1 CO SES ie sae S| a en ee
Conotrachelus leucophaeatus (Cur-
culionidae):
Dahliaispee toss e ie eae eae CG (Se eee ere a 1 ee
Conotrachelus sp., possibly nenu-
phar (Curculionidae):
AVY GAOIAUSYP En StCG, ((OCACT) aes |e aa Oe ee eau | ep | ee
Conotrachelus sp., apparently
seniculus (Curculionidae):
Spinaciavoleracega(Spimachy rsa CLO mee eee ere eel | eae |e
Conotrachelus sp. (Curculioni-
dae):
Achras sapota (sapodilla) ____- Colqmbias == =a aan 2A
Anacardium occidentale (ca- | Canal Zone_-_-_----__-_|_---_- 1
shew).
Brassica rapa (turnip) -_-____- IMiex1 CO ses ps owee nee P| eet
EU CIULCAS TO matte ee eee @anal- Zones. = | sees 1
INGO’ Spee 2 es ee oe Guatemala. 2-42 e222 | een eee
Miaynicarigisp 222-23 s= see Brazile te a ae 1
Rerseavamenicana’ (avocado) ms VlexXiCO bss ne eee | eee | ere
EA TUTUUSESCLES 1) ee (Gur a tre rn a ey ere | ee |
Psidium guajava (guava) -._-- Miexicos228 si Sh Sees See | aie ee eer
Quercusaunculatga ee |e Ons es 2 a ee | ea | ea
Quencusispl Ae aoe eee eee COE Set Ne a 2 1





in—
2, g Collectedjin—
a _ n
a0 m o
ao aS &
oS 3 &
faa} Clam
522560) fee Tex.
2253 oe) eis D.C
Pols ie nl aes
Se tequdl __f_) 1 | Mass.
ca 2 OM als |S Blass
} afisetivs [hee Tex.
ti ee IN|, YE
Lys inde s)| eae N. Y
2 siete INS Yai
TIN js 2 Tex.
ooo Ne D.C.
Oo DO!
aft. |e ee Hawaii.*
— at Sealer onl eee Ne
DNase INE Xe
4 | 1) | fsb) Calif ee Ds C:,
PBia: NYY.
28 | 10 |_._.| Calif.*, Fla.*
Jo.) seal eye Fla:*
TL 31 ei | DuCz
iL) | es Fla.*
2 eal D.C.
Eta ar | D.C.
Li |psee A eae DAC. IPR.
i332 | Se IPE
i ee Tex.
oak a eo ee Tex.
1} 33a el eee Tex
Len eee Ariz
Peeve ey ee | N. Y
i || 1D), ©
ok ee eee Tex
1a | eo Ds
1s Ee eee La.
Ae. 2 38 | ee aoe ID), ©
TOL} eee lao Tex
Le eee et ae La.
Diatterad |) ake Tex.
Ih |eees sae Ariz.
Oli eee ah Ariz., Tex.
SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 17

List of pests collected and reported from July 1, 1939, to June 30, 1940, inclu-
sive —Continued

[All findings marked with an asterisk indicate State inspection]



Number of interceptions

in—
Pest and host Country of origin 2 |Z Collected in—
° a _— n
Big) 2/5\5
Oo le] A | ela
INSECTS—continued
Coptotermes formosanus (Rhino-
termitidae): ‘
CUCTSIRD IE Se) ns 8 aaa es steer ee eee Te eeeeiesee Calif.*
Gacegrn cephalonica (Galleriidae) :
oe covering for forest | Liberia__-.___.__________ ee a ee ee Nays.
itter.
Cocos nucifera (coconut) _____- Phlinpines. =. ---—ee hfe ad oe ere oe La a Hawaii.*
Gossypium sp. (cottonseed) -.-| India, Puerto Rico-__-__--|------ 1 Pee Dw. iN Ys
Oryza sativa (rice) ___-_-__-_-___ Eng See eee ee eee eee Ee ee 4 | Ga.
mee parumpunctatus (Corei-
‘Forest litter and sphagnum | Denmark_______________ OL 9 lee een, | heme» lie | INE Ye
moss
Corizus sidae (Coreidae):
aah Mose (ONap= 4) Wiexico-_2-.2-—- _<-__ )|-se beet. Pee sco Tex.
dra,
Tabs sativa (lettuce) ____-__] .___- GO 8. ek Pee rt eee: Ly) see Tex.
Mixed fowers) a9)! eee ee pe ee Ee eee Tex.
Cosmolyce boeticus (Lycaenidae): :
Criavaha sp!) st em Sea. ee Ee op os ele eC aAles had.
Soja maz (soybean) -________-_- Cetra eure peepee ae oe ie rea, Ae ee || a 1 | Md.
‘Creontiades pallidus (Miridae):
irnononieinraesearole) .-|| Thaly_ =: - -- sot ft] Se o- 5] =the [ks ArdNG ave
Crocidosema plebeiana (Olethreu-
tidae):
Hibiscus esculentus (okra) .---| Mexico__________________ Gel ee sa ee Tex.
ETTRDISCUS See eee Bermuda, Cuba___-____- Aye Uae oe a oe as Niecy
Cryphula apicatus (Lygaeidae): i
See cavendishianum (or- | Guatemala______-________ Dy | ea oe ee ee Calif.*
chid).
Cryptopleurum atomarium (Hy-
drophilidae):
Forest litter and sphagnum | Denmark_-_-_____________ gr. | | ee Nowe
moss.
Curculio sp. (Curculionidae):
Castanea sp. (chestnut) ___--_- Azores, Italy, Japan, 5} 3 3 |---| 4 | Hawaii,* Mass.,
Portugal. N.. ¥., Wash.
PIA eek Philippines s- Hicoria 7 (hickony)) 3-2. -- = Mexico 422-25 26--- 2 eee E = ig eee as Tex.
Ouercusviumilis. 22 —- -- - - - - orice ees 2 es. os OM ee a ae eet a
Quercus suber (cork oak)___-_|____- iggeen. 25 os) Sealine eee Bi os2 244s DwG.
Quercus undulata (acorn) -_-_--- Wihexicie: fos 2. = oS) Ba aaa Ves en ee Ariz.
Quercus sp. (acorn) -_..-------- Manchuria, Mexico-----_|------ 1 AG es Soe Ariz., Calif.,*
ex,
Cydamus borealis (Coreidae):
Mizeamowers.+-02. ......-- - Guatemala. 5922 See he 2 Toe eo aks Tex.
Cylas femoralis (Curculionidae):
coe batatas (sweetpo- | Angola, West Africa____- bo WS al sete Je ay: iG Say eon ee
to).
. formicarius (Curculioni-
ae):
Ipomoea batatas (sweetpo- | China, Cuba, Domini- 0 ee 39) |_-.-|' 17 |-Ariz., Havwaii,*
tato). can Republic, Haiti, La., Md.,
India, Jamaica, Mexi- Mass., N. Y.,
co, Puerto Rico. Patnetex., Va.
. puncticollis (Curculioni-
Ipomea batatas (sweetpotato)_| Angola, Mexico, West Bee al tee see SHIRIVEASS, i. IN cca te
Africa. Pa.
Cylindrocopturus armatus (Cur-
culionidae):
Mramian weeds. - 4. Mexiqg’=¢ ae eel Joe cele es Ariz.
Cymoninus notabilis (Lygaeidae):
ierossicn chimensis. (white | Cubasscc. Joe e~csscnnne Dh oo ener Sk oP Nz ¥.
chard).
Cyrtopeltis tenuis (Miridae):
ao majus (snap- | Cuba, Jamaica, Mexico-_|------|---- By he Sleek. ASP eco «
ragon
Brassica chinensis (white | Cuba__.__-------------- BR Pt eat Ne ates a
greens).
Brassica sp. (mustard) __.-.--|_---- GO-3.3 2 ee el eee eee | ce Na Berks



400127—41
18

BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

List of pests collected and reported from July 1, 1939, to June 30, 1940, inclu-

sive —Continued

[All findings marked with an asterisk indicate State inspection}



Number of interceptions

1n—
Pest and host Country of origin 2 K Collected in—
6 3 + wn
e|e| #|8| 8
© Ve | a. keaites
INSECTS—continued
Cyrtopeltis tenuis (Miridac)—Con.
mae chinensis (Chinese | Jamaica_.............-..|------]_--- Ip Ths ses ea N.Y
pink).
Mixed flowers__._------------ Guatemalass uae es es Eee (ees Vc RE 8 Tex.
IPetunignS panes eee Jamaica: a5. s 2545422 See Yi ea eae IN:
Raphanus sativus (radish)_-._| Cuba_...--__--_____-___- Offic a se ata INI We
Crytopeltis varians (Miridae):
Heliotropium parviflorun || Miexicoss.222 2225 ee Aeon ee eee Tole ee Tex
(borraja).
Mixed! flowmersoess sess oe ee Oe a er ee |e ees 2 yee Ariz.
Dactylosternum centrale (Hydro-
philidae):
Heliconia latispatha_._.-_------ ATV TTT eee Tees eee Tex
Dacus cucurbitae (Trypetidae):
In debris in box of cucumbers_| Hawaii__-_._._._________|------|----]------|---- 1 | Calif.*
Dacus oleae (Trypetidae):
Olea europaea (olive)__------- Italy, Portugale. 225525 5|be2222 14 2 EME eae MSS INES Yip
a.
Punica qranatum (pomegran- | Italy_........-.._..-.-__|------ Ti See eee eee Pa.
ate) (packed in box with
fresh olives).
Dacus sp. (Trypetidae):
Cucurbita pepo (pumpkin) _-_-| Union of South Africa__ |.---.-|----|------]_--- PINES Ya
Deane campestris (Araeopi-
ae):
Chenopodium album (lambs- | Mexico_._...--....------_|------]|---- 1 Ae ee Ariz
quarters).
Dea micronyx (Curculioni-
ae):
Brownea qrandiflora__.__--_-- FS reir lk Chi pees a | ee Dh rere ee Calif.*
Dialeurodes chittendeni (Aleyrodi-
ae):
Rhododendron sp_._---------- STO Lairy ye eee ek ee wh Ra il) AEE | eae ! Calit.*
Diaphania sp. (Pyraustidae): 1
Benincasa hispida (hairy Culbats tat reeesatadin Dhe oN ee N.Y
squash).
IBraSsicassp.,QMUStand)) iy asso Ossett en eee OE Ee Sone ss ee ae.
Cucumis sativus (cucumber) ..| Cuba, Mexico, Panama, Op eA Saas eee 2) Pinas ealassiNi. Wi. 5-
Venezuela. Tex.
Cucurbita maxima (squash)_-| Cuba, Mexico_........-_|------ 1 Nae coe| eee N. Y., Tex
Diaspis visci (Coccidae):
SUNUDETUS See ee ee iG eal ye ee i a lite nn oot) SO Calif.*
Diaspis zamiae (Coccidae):
Encephalartos latifrons____---- Union of South Africa--_- DN ea aloo Sis | eee D.C.
Diatraea crambidoides (Crambi-
dae):
Zeaimays (Corn) ee ee Bahamase yn. 2a eal (eee pia eee ee Fla.*
Dae cockerelli (Cicadelli-
ae):
Brassica Sp. (mustard) 4555524 Uvlexicos22.225. 22 aes Ve Se Tex
sag bifoveolatus (Bostrichi-
ae):
Dennis spree oe usa aian kon Indias ie Ss ose RP eee gp Oa |e INGYa
Gnaphalium vira-vira (huira- | Peru___-_--.-.-----___-- Ae Se ee INLOYS
huira).
Serjania mexicana (barbasco) _|_-_-- CG KOM Pasa aig Le Ages Ds | PRR es ee N. ¥
Unidentified loess Dutch West Indies_____- Tin] 23. aes et Se eee N.Y
Pee taitensis (Curculioni-
ae):
Cocos nucifera (coconut). ____- Hawaii, Philippines_-___ Ls See 2A) 2a Calif.*, Hawaii.*
Disongds antennata (Chrysomeli-
ae):
Laelia sp. (orchid) _----_____- VIC x1 COs aan eae Toe. a) Ee ee Tex
Draeculacephala minerva (Cica-
dellidae): :
Lactuca sativa (lettuce) .__-___|_---- Onto eee coc ne ee en |e a 31) Sees Ariz., Tex
Draeculacephala portola (Cica-
dellidae): -
Ananas sativus (pineapple) -__|_---- Gost ae Bene MDs | A Se a La.
Drasterius cribratus (Elateridae):
Beta vulgaris (beet) ...___---_-]_---- Os: 225s e5 Sos ee ee STP eral | Cele lO Tex
Prosopis sp. (mesquite) _---__|__--- GOe fee eee 1 Ye pene 2 | a | Tex.
SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 19

List of pests cullected and reported from July 1, 1939, to June 30, 1940, inclu-
sive —Continued

[All findings marked with an asterisk indicate State inspection]
NNN

Number of interceptions





in—
Pest and host Country of origin 2 x Collected in—
el Ss |ehe
21/3| 2/1s/8
Gia! @ | ola
INSECTS—continued
Drymus sylvaticus (Lygaeidae):
Forest litter and sphagnum | Denmark-_--__---..----- fe eee Ik eee eee eee NEY 4.
moss.
Dysdercus mimulus (Pyrrho-
coridae):
Mixed flowers.o...-.-..---... Mexico... 4+. AU ILONE 1 eA Lo em exe
Eleodes tricostata (Tenebrionidae):
Soil around plant :___..._.__|__._- Le ea 9d te se zn en Ss PP, sal Tex.
Empoasca abrupta (Cicadellidae) :
Lactuca sativa (lettuce) -_.---_]____- GL snk OT AAO EE Serer Nees Tex.
Wimedeowers)-o =) 2 ----|_-..5 do: 0) ERE SR if | tee Arix.
Empoasca solana (Cidaellidae):
Beta vulgaris (beet).......--.-|----- MOMs ee I ee [eee itine © Tex.
Beta vulgaris cicla (Swiss |____- LGN ae ah eA le |e 8 Ph TEx;
chard).
Gardenia florida (Cape-jas- |____- Ose ee eee a ve ft | sn he een ee ee Tex.
mine).
Lactuca sativa (lettuce) -__----|____- (TO... hops nn pine Tex.
Endrosis lacteella (Oecophoridae):
Agsmnema@sp...-t__.2.5.--- Ching ete Lass i Li) a |Salad yell 5 I | a Wash.
Tulipa sp. (tulip) --..__------ Netherlands: —...-.-.-... De Seta ihe 2 Seb. le Wash.
Epicaerus cognatus (Curculioni-
ae):
Solanum tuberosum (potato) --| Mexico__-.____._-------- Behe lb -29t 1 ee iia Pex,
Epidiaspis piricola (Coccidae):
Malus sylvestris (apple) - -- --- Ntaliye’ so. beerytaten Be I eS Dilen- sean) IN: Ye
Pyrus communis (pear) ---___- Vaal ee mene See a [ere ia): eee Wash,
eae varivestis (Coccinelli-
ae):
Brassica chinensis (Chinese | Mexico_.............----|_-----|_--- qe ee & Tex,
cabbage).
erase Cas pm IMUStaLd) 425-22). 52510! ..-2.-22s ewes A etes (2 ORO ay Tex.
Epinotia opposita (Olethreutidae):
Phaseolus lunatus macrocarpus}_---- G0: OF ee LS Sig ee ee eee Tex,
(lima bean).
Phaseotus sp. (string bean)__.| Mexico, Venezuela ---_-_-- 6) 22221) M1OSN Sl 2) | PArIiZe “Pas Tex.
Epochra sp. (Trypetidae):
Aves spa(eurrant)=—-_ 2 -..- - IMiexT C02 2 sess) 2-22 1) eee Tex.
Eriosoma crataegi (Aphiidae):
Matus sylvestris (apple) -_------ New Zealand. -2- 252-2 2|S2--. 2] 22 2a eee ee 1% | Pat
natn. Wememenes 1. Puplang st 2. 2s sk DS ee Ale Soe et De G,
Ernobius abietis (Anobiidae):
ice spa (Spilice)m---.4.-.--- (Cenmanyvee os. Hs- = 23225 e a alle ee P02 faye No:
Eucalandra setulosa (Curculioni-
e):
Grass used as packing_______- IMigxi Cot 8 222 ok as Dleecah te. ape cn base Tex.
Eucnocerus anthrenoides (Dermes-
tidae):
Zeca maya (corn). =--=--.=|.5-=. G02 eS 55s | Se Pen) ® Tex.
Eurecosoryia nubila (Otitidae):
Citrus sinensis (orange)______- ANGINA hos. 332 55 555255 eee |e es Ih} Pat
Iactuca sativa (lettuce) -__-__- VI ERICO ees eee eee Pee Tex,
Zea mays (corn)_.------.---- Brazil, Mexico_........- 7 714s oe ee 1 | Ariz.,Mass.,Tex.
Eumerus sp. (Syrphidae):
Allium cepa (onion) __--_----- Denmarks 15 = 2 |e ee i i isPae§
INONCISGUSISD=2)-.- 5 .-----.--- Netherlands so52.-5-- J) | |S ome pas eee Mass., Va.
Eupteryr melissue (Cicadeliidae):
ON GO CO) ng landie 222 5 eee ee os Te) eteeter SS ee Pa.
Eurycipitia vestitus (Miridae):
Lycaste sp. (orchid). ________- Guatemala ses... a fi eee D. C.
gh cavendishianum (or- |----- GO ie Bi et a hi | ee ee Calif.*
chid).
Oncidium sp. (orchid) ___---_- Ee 00.2 1 eee iy ee le ee eh Calif.*
OVchid Sees te Guatemala, Honduras__ A) Fe le Calif.*, D. O.
aes oleraceum (Pentatomi-
ae):
Forest litter and sphagnum | Denmark--------------- SS | ee eee IND Xs
moss.
Euryophthalmus cinctus (Pyrrho-
coridae):
Gardenia florida (Cape-jas- | Mexico.....-.-...-------]------]---- Be ae be a Tex.

mine).
20 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

List oe pests collected and reported from July 1, 1939, to June 30, 1940, inclu-
sive —Continued

[All findings marked with an asterisk indicate State inspection]



Number of interceptions
in—



Pest and host

Country of origin © a Collected in—
° is 3 8 2
e|2| 2 |8| 5
O° ee) |) TQ oe lies
INSECTS—continued
Eurytoma orchidearum (Eurytom-
idae):
Cattleya gigas (orchid) _______- Colombiana ee |e | ear | Calif.*
Cattleya mossiae (orchid) ____- South Ammericay 2.022222 ]h > Ses A ae Calif.*
Cattleya trianae (orchid) _____- Colombia ee Se Sh | ee eer ee ae | Calif.*
Cattleya sp. (orchid) ___-__-____- Colombia, Venezuela_-__- SBE S| B8| o e | Calif.*, D. C.

cents posifasciatus (Curculioni-
ae)
Ipomoea batatas (sweetpotato)

Brazil, Dominican Re- Laks Md., Mass.,
Y.





public, Haiti, Hawaii, Rueba.,
Jamaica, Trinidad. ae Te Di sy
Wash.
Euschistus obscurus (Pentatomi-
dae):
Mixed flowers_______-_---___- INT ORI CO eee Se eee 2 | yee eek} oe as eee | ae exe
Hees spurculus (Pentatomi-
ae):
ae cavendishianum(or- || Guatemala. 2-222 |) a es ee Calif.*
chid).
St cardui (Bruchi-
dae):
Undetermined seed_______--- Tea yet ieee Uae verte ek 2 co, care) | P| ee ate | tec D.C
Eustictus minimus (Miridae):
Miscellaneous leaves_____---- Mexico: 2. Soe ee ee a Tex
Euzesta stigmatias (Otitidae):
Zed ay Sh (CORT) ae nee ee eee Ose Soh RH Di esp |S | Ariz.
Exitianus obscurinervis (Cicadel-
lidae):
OWT SU se eee Be emer tea ee Oso eee aE OP ed | ee | Ariz
Exosoma lusitanica (Chrysomel-
idae):
Muscari comosum (cipollino)_| Morocco_______--------- 12) ee ae INES
Exptochiomera oblonga (Lygaei-
dae):
Capsicum annuum (pepper)__| Mexico______--__-------- a Saeco eS | | a Ae
Lycopersicum esculentum |____- G02: 2 a ween | pial A a ere | Ariz.
(tomato).
Solanum melongena (egg- |_---- Ge te Nae hee lt Ae | Ariz.
plant).
SE tumens (Lygaei-
dae):
Cattleya sp. (orchid)________-_ Menézulelac2 2222 22 SE a ee | | D.C
Faustinus cubae (Curculionidae):
Capsicum annuum (pepper) =| Cubase 2 | ee eee ee INAS
Forficula auricularia (Â¥orficuli-
dae):
Brassica joleraceay | capitaia|eSpainte oe se ee eee ee | | eee eee Is wRae
(cabbage).
Calluna vulgaris (heather)__-.| Scotland________-.-_----|_----- 2) ie S| ee ee INES.
Malus sylvestris (apple) ___--_- Portugal? 02k ho) oka] ae ee ee eee
Packing around” Galenia, sp... Canadas. 2 a ee ee ee ee meer
roots.
Packing around sbudsticks:_-4|’Netherlands. =| Wess | ee ees | ee ee ee Dy Ge
Tulupasp. (Gulip) se 2422222 ees Goce tes Ske te os ateeee Rael ot wre i ae | ee Mich.
Vallota purpurea_—__..--_-_=- hye) cari 2 | apa ag ae ee Calif.*
Forsebia perlaeta (Phalaenidae):
Pisum sativum (pea) ___---_-- IMEexiGO lent bawdliwe |) f ae e Ariz
Frankliniella cephalica (Thripi-
dae):
Galendwlarspi ee he Ree CO A ie et ll Le Se Tex
Cochlospermum vitifolium.__-- Panama. ee. A Coe ete Se Tex
Chrysanthemum sp___-------- IMiexiGon 2b 5 oe |e eG 2 | Tex
i) aiSiys@ Meeotae Bet a a eS | a | | Tex
IMiixediflowenrsianner es eee Oe 2h. Me Ear te Fee ok) LORE | | ae Ariz
ESOSQS Doe ea deg ye | ea GO MEPAN CS eR || RRL Ree | eee Tex
Frankliniella cubensis (Thripi-
dae):
Lathyrusodorayus (Sweet pea) sl) Cub ates eases a ee | ee ee | ee Bee || Ib
ROSAS SURE ee rae GOS a ea eee oe 6 Saas
SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 21

List of pests collected and reported from July 1, 1939, to June 30, 1940, inclu-
sive —Continued

[All findings marked with an asterisk indicate State inspection]

Number of interceptions

In—
Pest and host Country of origin 2, z Collected in—
° i] —_ n
oael cL ~ oS
si|3) 2/8/38
Oo lal a (ela
INSECTS—continued
ae fortissima (Thripi-
ae):
Antirrhinum majus (snap- | Mexico__._-_-___-------- feo Tease ee Tex.
dragon).
Chrysanthemum marimum |__--- GO: ba Steree ee Pee ee oe eee eee Tex.
(Shasta daisy).
Chrysanthemum sp-.-..-.-_=\-.-_- Oran eee © Ween on |e Dee ee Tex
RRS ee ae Ce a" teense Ps $28 Leese ieteee ee ss Tex
aT aera kame g bree et = | gy Pee eA ever eie De | eee ee Tex.
Dianthus sp. (carnation)______|_____ dose een eee Zale ae ee vee Tex.
ine SCY) ee Gor 2 Rte FE fees ES Ee IE Tex.
Wiser flowers se CCI ant I oni Soe | a ||) eae T2Hee Sie ae Ariz., Tex.
PETER R STs ges ee tf Osa: Seren. Pees OE iat ae AYTiz,.,.T ex.
Scabiosa sp. (pincushion |_____ Qwee ee 23 8 I ee OS ee Tex.
fiower).
Are inheba insularis (Thripi-
Antirrhinum majus (snap- | Cuba, Jamaica___.______]__----|_-_- Te le tae ee
dragon).
Chrysanthemum sp__-_-_------ iB ern Gases eo ae PS Sa oe 1 i (eta | area IN: Ye
RAST 252 eee ie Copa ee eee ae eee ee te LS een: INS Ye
Gioia sa=s2enese | BRIAN 822 oe eee INE ven
rola dieters 2d Atl or it SGT e ene ene eee eee 0 LB | saa ene INT ae
ER STEN Ty i ak orcs Dn ee ipaAnamas Oompa. < ee ee IE feo) eee
Frankliniella melanommatus :
(Thripidae):
ee emeuenmia ce ninese. | Jamaica_._--222--2-2222 [elo ese eee N.Y
pin
Suemrmemrya. Osea kee eee ce ete ae des ees Wee
Pipe Setetorst Moruya I eS fe hers es N.Y.
es schultzei (Thripi-
ae):
Ornithogalum thyrsoides | Union of South Africa__|_____- 51 Celene ING
(chinkerichee).
Frankliniella tenuicornis (Thrip-
idae):
Azalea indica (azalea)_______- Belvinm +=. - 7. see Pe ee eee Ie DC;
Mentha sp. (mint)__________- Nehnerlangs= 2-8 ose eee 2 IE SU eerie TTS 8Â¥s
si ra williamsi (Thripi-
ae):
Allium cepa (onion) __________ INGrICR ae oo oe le DS. ee Ariz.
Centaurea cyanus (corn- |____- Gotestee-F ha nsenses + ]b FI aan ee eee Tex
flower).
Chrysanthemum sp____.---_-_|__--- ite ae eee ae pee ss Tex.
eerippereestos ise fl) Ot rt e-s een cae «AS NEES hopes pete Tex.
Lactuda sativa (lettuce) ___~___}____- OSs =! 2 ote serene we A OTIS aes es Tex.
WMenthasns (ning) 2-2 - | Ginn l= <2 pees we eens fe = ON Hh = 0] Pale ser Tex
IMoxediiowers-==-'---- |i. - AO es levee coun sen PS fi Ree Be Tex
RP hortense (pars- |__-_- gue! 5 eee epee eed ieee Tex
ey).
ROSIN eee fe owes. ee NE et ees aes Tex.
mem enmae (enemy |e Qe nr ens A Suit A (RR Ree Ariz., Tex.
Franklinothrips vespifor mis (Aeol-
othripidae):
Brassica chinensis (white | Cuba_______-.._--_____- Nae AR ee Nk,
greens).
Brassica sp. (mustard) _______|____- CO ee gece a oes 12 Jes 2) Pee eet i SE IN
Capsicum annuum (pepper)__| Mexico___----___--______ TOE Sal oe [Ee x» NUE Ariz.
Oren Omens. is Si.) 1G So ee eed Pele: eee Tex.
Pisum sativum (pea) ________- Orig. bso is 5 3 1 epee te N.
Fulvius bisbistillatus (Miridae):
Cattleya spp..-----.-.-----.-- Colombia: 2-2-4252. ] eee ee Calif.*
Fulvius quadristellatus (Miridae) :
FHeliconia latispatha__________- Panama’ 2.2 foes tee de ee Tex
Fulvius sp. (Miridae):
amet 8 = ttt Veresuela.—- <2. aoe ree alan oct D.C
22

,BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

List of pests collected and reported from July 1, 1939, to June 30, 1940, inclu-

sive —Continued

[All findings marked with an asterisk indicate State inspection]

Pest and host

INSECTS—continued

Furcaspis biformis (Coccidae):
Brassavola nodosa (orchid) --_--
Cattleya gigas (orchid)
Cattleya percivaliana (orchid) -
Cattleya trianae (orchid)
Cattleya sp. (orchid)
Epidendrum atropurpurewm
E/pidendrum sp. (orchid) - - -_-
Oncidium panamense (orchid) -
Oncidium sp. (orchid)

Orchige ssa Aa eae ke eee ae

Galgupha punctifer (Cydnidae):
Soil around orchid plant
Gastrothrips sp.(Phlaeothripidae):

Calluna vulgaris (heather) _-_-_-
Geocoris sonoraensis (Lygaeidae):

Cucurbita maxima (squash) ---
Geoomus parvulus (Cydnidae):

Lycopersicum esculentum (to-

mato).
Gerstaeckeria mutillaria (Cur-
culionidae):
Mammillaria pseudoschideana
(cactus).

Gnorimoschema gudmannella (Ge-
lechiidae):
Capsicum annuum (pepper) -

Lycopersicum esculentum (to-
mato).
Gracilia minuta (Cerambycidae):
Saliz sp. (willow) __---.._----
Grapholitha saltitans (Olethreu-
tidae):
Sebastiania sp
Grapholitha sp., probably molesta
(Olethreutidae):
Amygdalus persica (peach) _ -_-
Prunus domestica (plum)
Grapholitha sp (Olethreutidae):
Amygdalus persica (peach) - --
Cydonia oblonga (quince)
Malus sylvestris (apple) -_------
Pyrus communis (pear)
Gymnaspis aechmeae (Coccidae):
ACO CLUGES Deepen emer eee
(Phlaeo-

Gynaikothrips wuzeli
thripidae):
Ficus indica (fig)
Hadrobregmus destructor (Anibii-
dae):
Taxus brevifolia (yew)
Halimococcus lampas (Coccidae):
Bismarckia nobilis
Haplothrips aculeatus (Phlaeo-
thripidae):
Forest litter and sphagnum

moss.
Haplothrips gowdeyi (Phiaeothrip-
idae):
Antirrhinum majus (snap-
dragon).
AISLETI Syne once nes Se emer
Celosigis pee ee ee

Number of interceptions

in—
Country of origin o n Collected in—
o0 o
S12) 6 ieee
apse | sls
© ei) auleemiees
Canal Zone... 2225224 AD 9] ed] Se | ee Hawaii.”
Colombia= = aaa BD? ae AN, Sal Calif.*
WEMCZUCl AY ame con ee al || ees hae | oe I a ee | eae N. Y.
Colombia, Hawaii_____-- Di ae 1 eee Calif.*
Colombia, Venezuela___- 1025] ee ere | Calif.*, D. C.
Canal Zone, Philippines_ Do Dye Se ee Calif.*, Hawaii.®
Canal Zones 22225 ae Ui (ie Va A lc Calif.*
BAN oF 2 cof Wee a | [4] Sa es | ae | ee Hawaii.*
Brazil, Canal Zone, 2 reo 2) i ea eae Calif.*, D. OC.,
Trinidad. Teegive
Cuba, Hawaii, Vene- Zien Deacon Calif.*, Fla.*,
zuela. P.R.
Wiexiconst ss SSI Se wees AD pt aa ES 2 foe Tex
ee ge eS MP a LG aa ale dha (ee 1) 82) 2 2 mex
Scotland aedaei= ream ema 192 TO ea Viaseeeas
IMICXI CORE a es aaa ee TD hee ae Calif.*
Eee Tet GOseRs eae a Re ee alee eee NO
el isrant GO ee ee a Gee a ee | en
Cuba, Mexico_-.._------ 124) ee 19) ese lee Nise Yes
ex.
Miexicou! 2220 ee ee Ih | ones La Ariz., Tex.
Belgium, England, 8 2c as ee | ee N. Y
Netherlands.
INTOX1 CO eee ee See Lye eee Hawaii.*
FE) ala a ey a pe VD | | ees Nk 1 | Wash.
Lee ee I se aes aa | rerum zeta [ort a 1 | Wash.
TGA yAPIVCXICO ma oes ee ee eee [eee 1 |___-| 1 | Mass., Tex.
INTE XH CQ eee ee are Cen eee |e a 3. eas eee Tex.
pe ear LOE Oe ae gcc te ita alee met | eg en a ga Dey ee ex.
ADAMS See es ce eee nue Inceas Pca Wash
TAZ Se eee pare ere (Chae reer eran ee cia | ene D.C
CU eee UN ete Neca eee 1 [essa Nave
Canada eine ae Tea ee 2 Wash.
Branco see e on scee ran eeeea AD ae a nena D.C
Denmark sso oe eee ns ease a at HE Pe INS 90
Colombia, Cuba, Ja- |_-----]---- 3} NEY
maica.
JT AT Gale kr er eal es eee Pele DN | eae IN ae
British’ Wiest-Indiess 2a | eee eee Nees) INTs Ge
Bermuda. se ee ae ee ee Oe ele ee ING Yo

Chrysanthemum sp-_----------
SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 23

List of pests collected and reported from July 1, 1939, to June 30, 1940, inclu-
sive—Continued

[All findings marked with an asterisk indicate State inspection]



Number of interceptions

in—
Pest and host Country of origin 2, z Collected in~
o Ss — n
60 = co pa o
4/8) i] s/s
Ool/e/ a lela
INSECTs—continued
Haplothrips gowdeyi (Phiaeo-
thripidae)—Con.
aoe chinensis, (ce pinese | Jamaien.-.......----..-.|-=--=-|__=- Eileen IN pYe.
pink).
Gardenia florida (Cape-jas- | Mexico_.._....-...---.-- Ae Mee eek eae oe Tex.
mine).
Qnieit (0S Bermuda, Canal Zone, |------|---- Bf elas el) ING
Jamaica.
PUTS NALTIS a= to == = = Jamaicans ss |e eS We epee IN|. Ys.
Ten urlsiouoLalisiSweet pea).| Culba_.---_-...-.--------|---=2=|-+--]--=.-- Tir ecsehlas®
PATE SD a a ee a = IMICXICO! S82 ee eae eee De A ae ales Tex.
Moxed flowers= =.) =. Bermuda, Mexico_..----]------|_--- Spee ee INA OX.
Raphanus sativus: (radish)).{.--.| Culba.__.-_.-_....---.--- De see SS oa N=
Da Ge ee eee Bahamase Jamaica. ae De) a ea oN oie
Tagetes sp. (marigold)__--_---- Bahamas® 22-2) ee ese ee NE Ye
DIRE eee mee ak Pra Eee Se oe SL rar ee Ee ee Lol NEAN
Haplothrips nigricornis (Phlaeo-
thripidae):
Ornithogalum thyrsoides | Union of South Africa___|_.---- Osan ees oy rae INGO
(chinkerichee).
Haplothrips subtilissimus (Phlaeo-
thripidae):
Azalea indica (azalea)__------- Beles se 6 ase eee eee D.C
Heilipus sp. (Curculionidae):
Persea americana (avocado)-.--| Mexico_.-.--..---.-.---_|------|__-- Ques Tex.
Heliodines bella (Heliodinidae):
Portulaca sp. (purslane) ------]____- GOs se ewe yee he Tex.
Hellula phidilealis (P yraustidae):
Brassica chinensis (white || Cuba.....---...--.-..-- Ogee eas soi ae Nisei
greens).
ATCO aS iA) eae |. G0._.222----s-----2-- Peet eee fe [ee N. Y.
Raphanus sativus (radish) _.--|____- GOmet ere ae See eee | ek NGax
Hellula undalis (Pyraustidae):
Brassica rapa (turnip) __------ JADA esc aceee acer oe ERR eee ae 3 | Wash.
Heraeus cincticornis se peeerdne)-
Cattleya sp. (orchid) __-_------ Venezuela......-.......- feces eee ss ae DACs
Hercothrips errans (Thripidae):
MPenaroowim pormosum | Japan.........-.-..---.-]--...- A ces eet ries Hawaii.*
(orchid).
Hercothrips phaseoli (Thripidae):
Brassicuscnimensis white.) Cuba. ..---=--=--.----- Be er Neots
greens).
Herculia psammioxantha (Pyra-
lididae):
Cattleya qigas (orchid) ------ aa! Colompbig..-.-2---s—- ae To i haere Calif.*
Heterobostrychus aequalis (Bostri-
chidae):
Wino lenupoxeens=s. 2-25 = __ Pn@igh=--*-s-- ee ane De ee ee Naot.
Hofmannophila pseudospretella
(Oecophoridae):
LEGGE OE a ee eee MInplANG cannes eee ecene Wile ocd|scace eee | oe D.C,
1718 SUS ss k= = Netherlands: -2.—--5-- 2 Da a gale Ds Ce
SiLAWMSCHhE—--5.-.-.--...- Neoplangs-«—- cae eae De ee ee Ala.
Homoeosoma electellum (Phycit-
idae):
Chrysanthemum sp----------- WIGS. « Ce et ee a: last heed nese a= Dax.
Minced tNowoerds 2. | Osteen ee an rer een oan i Gp (ae ee Tex.
Hoplandrothrips ranthopoides
(Phlaeothripidae):
Bryopnvilavin sp__...-=-- =---- Barbados see ea Pesce es News
Hortensia similis (Cicadellidae):
mrnesicn chinensis (white | Cubs... 3<.cecss-<- greens).
Hylesinus frazini (Scolytidae):
Frazinus sp. (ash)-.-=..-..--- England 3.23"... ese De eed et eS aces N.Y.
Hypera arator (Curculionidae):
Forest litter and sphagnum | Denmark-_-------------- eg sic oot wl Se Ni ¥.
moss.
ee nigrirostris (Curculioni-
ae):
Forest litter and sphagnum |._-_-_- Greco co ee Pleeseeee ee eee lo one No es

moss.
24 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

List of pests collected and reported from July 1, 1989, to June 30, 1940, inclu-
sive—Continued

[All findings marked with an asterisk indicate State inspection]



Number of interceptions

in—
Pest and host Country of origin 2 a Collected in—
ole) & eres
Be ie eae
© le) ea. Vewiites
INSECTS—continued
Hypera postica (Curculionidae):
Packing around rose cuttings_| France______.___.--___-_|_----- Pees. 23] ae eee DACs
Hypoborus ficus (Scolytidae):
PHCUSICATICAE (TIS) ube a yee Titaliysstange: eee We SS ae | ee Calif.*
Hypocassida subferruginea
(Chrysomelidae):
Moss around grapes_______-__|_---- OO Ab EOE ARNG ates |) ETRE Je jscee esis seals Calif.*
Hypsipyla grandellu (Phycitidae):
Cedrus sp. (cedar) __________-_- Mexico eas sete shes GS es La.
Tug peo oe ae TN Bek ow nc [lace CO 2 eh Ses sas 3 hoes PRLS eet ne | Tex.
Swietenia mahogani (mahog- | Honduras_-___---___-__-_- LPP SYE ae ia ae La.
any’.
Fe nogalata (Membraci-
dae
MIO WOES S200 h a aan ied MNO CO its oe et i ee 1/2). aes Ariz
Ips suturalis (Scolytidae):
JER TS SO; Goria) 2h ee ee inland esis saa Looe 2] ee ee IN| YG
Iridomyrmex humilis (Formici-
dae):
Dahtiais pa te es eke Portugal ye See lee |e 1 sae INE Ye
Tritonia sp. (montbretia)____- EAU OT CSW Sei a ia ae Eat eR PR [ih 2a Naa INES
Iridomyrmex iniquus (Formici-
dae):
Cattleya sw. (orchid) ________- Colombia, Venezuela_-__- y Wes Wey Perma DACs
In soil around Cypripedium | Belgium__________--____- A] She tie 1 oe a DCP
sp.
Iridomyrmex iniquus nigella (For-
micidae):
Cattleya sp. (orchid) _________- Colombiawesss25s225= P22 es AN 2a DD. Ct
Iridomyrmex melleus (Formici-
dae):
Vanda caerulea (orchid) ___-_-_- IBTANCE! bbe ae = tare mandiiie em pF a ete aN eRe | Hawaii.*
Ischnorhynchus erirae (Lygaeidae):
Brassica oleracea capitate” Ww Ltaly pee ee ss ae a | 9 || | ese | 1.| Ala.
(cabbage).
Tsochaetothrips sp. (Thripidae):
Gardenia florida (Cape-jas- | Mexico_.-__-____.-_---_- Uae Qi ee rae Tex.
mine).
Polianthes tuberosa (tuberose) _|___-- GOP eae BN Oe Ne eel one 1h, 2G eee Tex.
Kalotermes snyderi (Termitidae):
IPrOSOpisisp. GNeSquite) Mass == |-s22- C0. tsa e sane e ae PE Se SRT te ee Tex.
Keiferia lycopersicella (Gelechi-
idae): ,
Capsicum annuum (pepper) --|-_---- GOS Beat are ae Dei oe ANY ee a Ariz.
Lycopersicum esculentum (to- | Cuba, Mexico_________-- PTS Are: 1) 2)'940\ | eel aes Ariz., Calif., La.,
mato). N. Y., Tex.
Phaseolvusisp. (strines bean) 224) Mexicos2 22 s= an es |e ees || a eee Ariz.
Kurtomathrips sp., close to mor-
rilli (Thripidae):
Antirrhinum majus (snap---._| Jamaica_2__.-.----_-__.2-|-__.-2-|-. 2 Dt ec coal oe N.Y.
dragon).
Laemophloeus iteratus (Cucuji-
dae):
Guaiacug officinale (lignum- | Nicaragua____._---..--_- Ty V5 Ng ee a N. Y
vitae).
Tabebuia donnell-smithii (pri- | Guatemala___.___._-_____ oJ TTS eer so N. Y
mavera).
Laspeyresia membrosa (Olethreu-
tidae):
Prosopis sp. (mesquite) _____- MiGxICO de saan e een ak 5 aa PUA Beg i] | ees | ee Tex.
Laspeyresia splendana (Olethreu-
tidae): 4
Castanea sp. (chestnut)_.__._- Azores, Italy, Japan, eee 4 3 eee Calif.*, N. Y.
Portugal.
Laspeyresia strobilella (Olethreu-
tidae):
IPicea:Sps(SPrTUCe) oes Germany Ass os22 2 hs ee i]t) RENE INE Ys

Lecaniodiaspis dendrobii (Cocci-

ae
Cattleya sp. (orchid)____-___-- Colombia=== Toa oe eS ue cet Calif.*
SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS

25

List of pests collected and reported from July 1, 1939, to June 30, 1940, inclu-
sive —Continued

[All findings marked with an asterisk indicate State inspection]



Number of interceptions

in—
Pest and host Country of origin 2, Zz Collected in—
° a Pe) n
— co I a
e |e] #1 8/8
O fe lrm bole
INSECTS—continued
Lecanium coryli (Coccidae):
Malus sylvestris (apple) -__----- Switzerland = === 35222222 PES Se | FAO) a aye DLC}
POR SDs be AA gk Pneland Leperisinus frazini (Scolytidae):
PRANUSSD Aas) =) | GOss2 2 enseesscacescs Gejecee (lie af Oo NOY.
Unidentified wood ((proba- |____- Hoses ihe eee Dy ze = SIO La.
bly ash).
Lepidosaphes alba (Coccidae):
Manioresculenta (eassava)..| Bahamas_:_...........__]----.-]_-__].----- Tee) ls!
| auriculata (Cocci-
ae
Codiaeum sp. (croton) _____-_-_- yale ee Wk ck [de SRS Calif.*
Lepidosaphes camelliae(Coccidae):
Camellia japonica (camellia) __| Japan___-...__---_------- 3 AG eee ele ae. Wash
Lepidosaphes carinata (Coccidae): ‘
EARNS Bee Mexieo:224.0. =U. | TRS 2 he ee Calif.*
Lepidosaphes chinensis(Coccidae):
Laninniiesi. (sctowpine)--—_|Ching...----<2ss2s-2s rte conchiformis (Cocci-
ae):
PERN UTOssEs (persimmon) -- || Japan. _...--==-=-==-=2<-|===00149222)_-~-24 202) 1 | Wash
Pyrus pyrifolia (sand pear) ___|____- Osseo eons (be 2d. 1 | Wash
Lepidosaphes ficus (Coccidae):
Weus carica (hig) 22.2.1... SEE ys oe ee ee 2 Tj Ae HaOe rey OD 2 'Os,
Lepidosaphes lasianthi (Coccidae):
Codiaeum sp. (croton) ____-_-_- Bahamas, Japans Lepidosaphes philococcus (Cocci-
dae):
Wachus).28 5 o222 2h... IM@xiC@@ 25-3 ---s2e225s22=eo2s0==-+ oO ES A Tex
Myrtillocactus geometrizans |__-_-_- Gs sete eae ok Toe Qe cs | ke Tex
(cactus).
Myrtillocactus sp. (cactus) __-_|____- GE Rie nx et tee SS ee, 1 |e Cc;
oo marginatus (cac- |____- G@s22ciceetssescseszs 1 Dy fen af ES, Calif.*, Tex
tus).
Pachycereus sp. (cactus) ------|____- (0 -2selasescserzesss2 edt -- =< Je fn hs Seo Ariz
Lepidosaphes pistaciae (Coccidae):
Pistacia mutica (terebinth) - (reece s<=2-=2% soe sas ~ Se 3 Ale- 2549 Nex
ppomphes tuberculata (Cocci-
Cymbidium insiqne (orchid) -_--| Australia__.._...--.----_]------]__-- do (tae Calif.*
Cymbidium sp. (orchid) ____--| Belgium, Japan__.___-_- Si 41) [2s. i RRioie 22 D.C., Wash.
Leptodictya plana (Tingitidae):
Bougaimvillea sp.-—---------- Whexd Coss sues 2k See. BRS yee 28 Tex
Leptostylus testaceus (Ceramby-
cidae):
Dioscorea sp. (yam) ___------- Armia 4 3-- S82 Sse |_ =~ 42/234 PBB as) Mass
Leucaspis cockerelli (Coccidae):
Citrus limonia (lemon) _--_---- Panamian-l2s=sssasescsrd eee eeee [so a Pr eanir.*
Op ch oS Be ISTP ANOL? tens Sasso e | so See ee ad 1 hy ee Hawaii.*
Spathoglotlis sp. (orchid) _ _-_ -- aT eee Foe a ap 12s Zftsec a Aa Ae Hawaii.*
Leucaspis loewi (Coccidae):
Pirie sp? (pine) 8-2 =-2=2-- Portugal 2 s2<2222es2s2-3 ee OS 4)? < =) Ee | oe NY
ae albofasciata (Miri-
ae
CUT SS) oe Gubseeensesesssersaess2 beset Ne eze [hewn ecee 1 a a oi
Lactuca sativa (lettuce) __---_- Mexico:..--s2sct2secserestes2eO ej c< ae Ps al ae
aimea nowers | 20.22) 8. fe iQ meee ee SP he papeetl ess 4 Tex.
Solanum melongena (egg- |____- WOsttSsi sens sense sss* Fe) ee ee ee a Bf on Ariz
plant)...
Leucoptera coffeetla (Lyonetiidae):
rremtteee © ee Golombia Leuronota maculata (Psyllidae):
Prosopis sp. (mesquite) _____- WIGxICO 2 3s Re AA ae ek 8 Rl sestlecce Tex
ee beat abdominalis (Lygaei-
erciiGeeeeeoeee 42 Guatemala. <--20. 92. ee Oe a D.C
ee ern nitidicollis (Lygaei-
Tagetes sp. (marigold)___.___- WGxI00..- 45 on ope eee eee Dee ees Tex

400127414
26

BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

List of pests collected and reported from July 1, 1939, to June 30, 1940, inclu-

sive—Continued

[All findings marked with an asterisk indicate State inspection]



Number of interceptions

in—
Pest and host Country of origin 2, ”
lenis || 8
a ee
Oo la|/ a lela
INSECTS—continued
Ligyrocoris nitidulus (l.ygaeidae):
Lycopersicum esculentum (to- | Mexico_.....-_------_---]------|___- 1 Lee eee
mato).
Ligyrocoris setosus (Lygaeidae):
Lactuca sativa (lettuce) _______]----- CLO ee as ct re | pee |e 1 |
Lilioceris liiii (Chrysomelidae):
mee candidum (Madonna | France_____-_---_-------- 2 Lc Soles: ose ee
i
Lineodes integra (Pyraustidae):
Lycopersicum esculentum (to- | Cuba, Mexico_-.__--.--- @ |cowc| Poche | bs ee
mato).
Liothriz s vaneeckei (Thripidae):
ten candidum (Madonna | France__._.__----------- 1 ele. |2ecsehibed pee
Eile misp (lily) pssse eee England, France, Japan, Ga|)- 2c] eee eee 4
St. Helena.
Liriomyza flaveola (Agromyzidae):
Brassica chinensis (white | Cuba._...-.-......--__- 1, teen| 22-4 |e ae
greens).
Lophocateres pusillus (Ostomidae):
Allium sativum. (garlic) ._.--- VEGRI CORE Sea eae ee Jehecct LL ope eee ee
Lorita abornana (Phaloniidae):
CaDSiCum OTL IN (DET WEL) ee eel Oe ee | eee Lio elgce
Lorita abnornana chatka (Phalo-
niidae):
Capsicum annuum___._-..----|----- CORR NS es ee Sliizee 5p ea Sees
Lyconersicum esculentum (to- }_---- GO oe Sule Ro.
mato).
Lygazus lateralis (Lygaeidae):
Cucurbita maxima (squash) ___]_---- G0 ses ies eee sess eee 1. ees eee
Lygaeus pulchellus (Lygaeidae):
Capsicum annuum (pepper).-_|.----do_--_.----.--------- Pees a ee
Lygaeus vittiscutis (Lygaeidae):
Lactuca sativa (lettuce) ._...--]_---- GOs 2k Se eso eee 1. lee
Lygus elisus (Miridae):
IBTUSSiCAESP | (MUStATG) pee |e en Oe ee Se bre 2. |e. <. 22s eee
Petunia hybrida (petunia) ____|_---- CO ee es eee ear rae (peas dL s)he | ee
Lygus sallei (Miridae):
Lactuca sativa (lettuce) ___-___|_----- CLO es Bs i Peres Te ae
Macrosieles divisus (Cicadellidae):
Lactuca: sativa (lettuce) se oan een 0 Onna see e es eee en eee 2) eal ee
Mamurius mopsus (Coreidae):
Orchid! 223) = AS eae oe sero CO eae eee Lo eou.| else |e eee
Marmara sp., near opuntiella
(Gracilariidae):
Capsicum annuum (pepper).-.|----- COs ee oe eases Lf oeoeosse: |e
Mormarasp., probably opuntiella
(Gracilariidae):
Onuntie compressa (prickly- |.---- GOn ee ee ee ee eee Teale
pear
Marmara sp. (Gracilariidae):
BCA Cees eb atiaeee Silane ee aMule CO Ee Saino | eee Bie 12 al ell ene
Capsicum annuum (pepper)--|----- Gos ee ee P5 iPass: 3 eee ee
Citrus aurantifolia (lime) --_--|----- GOb et on San 1, |e eo |e ese ee alee
Citrus sinensis (crange)___----]_---- GO ese a eee ee Bente alee Loe. 3 |\eea8
ODUNTIOISp a ee ee ee GO mee a aE ee ieee Le) ee
Persea americana (avocado) -_-_-|_---- Orn aS er earn toe |) 2004- |b 2a eee
Maruca testulalis (Pyraustidae):
Ganavaliaispesee eee Ha wale t2 2 eee neo oe ee oe
Dene violacea (mauna loa |__--__ GOee eee ee Cee eee eee 2; |bGes|Reee
ei).
Phaseolus sp. (string bean)-..| American Virgin Islands, |-.----|---- 2 leeeo ele:
Brazil, Dominican
Republic, Haiti, Ha-
waii, Japan, Puerto
Rico.
Matigramma rubrosuffusa (Pha-
laenidae):
Solanum melongena (egg- | Mexico_-..__-.-.-------- aD UR ea | RS |e

plant).

Collected in—

Tex.

Tex.
NY.

Ariz.,N. Y., Texe

Ariz,

Eoa

Ala., Ga., La.,
Mass., N. Y.,
Tex., Wash.
SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 2m,

List of pests collected and reported from July 1, 1939, to June 30, 1940, inclu-
sive—Continued

[All findings marked with an astcrisk indicate State inspection]



Number of interceptions







in—
Pest and host Country of origin 2, n Collected in—
et ||) ae teal
: S| aly ae | alse
Oleal a | ela
INSECTS—continued
Tee circulatus (Curculioni-
ae
JAA o) 2 et Se ee eee Italy 2222 te ee TUT Is | SS = te ee Calif.*
Megacerus Mbiniabias (Bruchidae): ?
TPOTOCUIS Pen et a Walle. 2) eee ee = eee Dye 20 Calif.*
Megalometis chiliensis (Curculi-
onidae):
Amygdalus persica nectarina. | Chile.__...._-__--_-_--- UR EOFS See INS
(nectarine).
Megastigmus pistaciae (Callimo-
midae):
Pistacia vera (pistache) . »____- Ga yee pes eew oe: cL EA En <2 S| | INDY.
Merodon sp. (Syrphidae):
Gilanthus'spy. 22 22h 2. PINTO oe a Stee es (aes see eee Nee
HAyacinthus orientalis albulus |_--_- doe.) See) eine UT MERE | Bo ol etl ee DC:
(Roman hyacinth).
amie spe se |. Netherlands: .-._-..-_ =. 1 2 pee eee iD? C:
INTER GVOS ee ee ee ee ee 28), | Rares | ee | ae ee Clan t,* > Wide.
Mass., ’Pa., Va.,
Wash.
Mertila malayensis (Miridae):
Vanda sp. (orchid) ._..._----- DYN CL 6a es et hee ee ne SEA a | a as D.C.
Metamasius hemipterus (Curculi-
onidae):
Ananas sativus (pineapple).__| Puerto Rico_.._________- Dae eee ee | ee La.
Pao sericeus (Curculioni-
ae
Ananas sativus — —.-.-..=-.--- Crip ae see ee ee te ee ee fee Fla.*
Bananardebris#= 22-52: ->.- Honduras, Mexico_--__-- Sa HOS ho 32 [by a! La., Tex.
Musa sp. (banana)..__---.--- Elondnras= Bio 22 | ee o eee Ala., _Md., Tex.
Metamasius sericeus carbonarius
(Curculionidae):
VIATSOAS ee eee Guatemalae Dae | ee ve || Noe ae.
ae scapularis (Bostrichi-
ae
AVVi0 0d Mate tee Be SL Miexd Cos 228 2 2 cee Dyk =. Bae. 5 ee ee NoY
Micrelus ericae (Curculionidae):
Calluna vulgaris (heather)._--.| Scotland_-__.__.._______]_--_-- 10/2222. 4/2 = a ea:
Eas
es opuntiae (Cerambyci-
ae):
Ca Chtisnee se ee == VIO Rd C0 Sees seen cee tae | ee UP | deh Bes | Dee Calif.*
Be ie centralis (Monotomi-
ae):
Gieinbiamoanma(squash) = |2--.-00-...s Moodna bisinuella (Phycitidae):
7ea mays (corn)-_.-...-_..---|---- GOs = ores PLES |) Mordellistena cattleyana (Mordel-
lidae):
Cattleya gigas (orchid) _______- Colombla==—3se—2 eee Jp ieee satel see EE Calif.*
Cattleya sp. (orchid) _--_-______ Menezuela- sss Qe ee) neal et DG.
Oriole Se Colombia_ =.=. AP ENE | ke is aha a ER Ae:
Mordellistena chapini (Mordel-
lidae):
Cattleya‘spy (orehid)_.....+.__|.===- CON 2s. goes eee eee Lee's] eee DO:
tans. skinneri virginalis (or- | Mexico__--__-_.--.------- LL. |S ee Tex
chi
Mordellistena sp., probably cat-
tleyana (Mordellidae):
Cattleya labiata (orchid)-__--__- Brag lee eae te RRSP Th” RUS SD. Calif.*
Cattleyasp. (orchid) -_........|_...- GOs eee eee pee DO:
Mordellistena sp., near chapini
(Mordellidae):
Cattleya sp. (orchid) __.______- Guatemala =e ee Ls ae ee a Le tes Di oO;
aOenUnne By (Orehid) == 2=-)| 256300... 2 aeeee eer bee Mal deecss| este. Calif.*
Mordellisiena sp., probably cha-
pini (Mordellidae):
Cattleya sp. (orchid) --__-__- Byer. 33 Oe es De so Pee D.O
28 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

List of pests collected and reported from July 1, 1939, to June 30, 1940, inclu-
stve—Continued

[All findings marked with an asterisk indicate State inspection]



Number of interceptions





Pest and host Country of origin Collected in—
So
ey ks
INSECTS—continued
Mordellistena sp. (Mordellidae):
Cattleya gigas (orchid) _______- Colombiana)... au 3 1 Calif.*
Cattleya skinneri (orchid) --__| Brazil, Costa Rica_____-_ 2 IDS ACP
Cattleya trianae (orchid) _____- Colonthigees een nen ae UO al els Feet aia Calif.*
Cattleya warneri (orchid) _-__-_- TAZ eer Par eae ek ees i oil vo eo FS| 8 Se ALD ae Calif.*
Cattleya sp. (orchid) _______- Brazil, Colombia, Gua- AGH 2 Calif.,* D.C
temala.
Epidendrum ciliare (orchid)__| Guatemala _____________ 1) iett | AS 7s]: ta ae Calif.*
Epidendrum sp. (orchid) -__--|_____ GO ne Ee tat re Oe ee 1 Calif.*
Laelia anceps (orchid) _______- TAI U0) aa ee Rs tg) (Cee 1 Calif.*
Laelia crispa (orchid) _______- IS Ty 7All eee ow Lae BD] sh | ene ID
Laelia sp. (orchid) __________- IVEOXG COM ene cs LO nn Eee 1 1D) (GO)
Lycaste skinneri virginalis |_____ GOs ne aun emcees Dido 5a ee Tex.
(orchid). ; .
Orchidsy rem 025 et oo oye Brazil, Colombia, Gua- Sila Calif.;*. Do C.,
f temala, Mexico. La., Tex.
Mormidea collaris (Pentatomi-
dae):
Cattleya sp. (orchid) ______-_- TVX Co ee ca Bree] (ee Tex.
Mormidea cubrosa (Pentatomi-
dae):
Orchidssen 2 eas oi Peco CL od GL Oe ee abs eS Dh | Steet Pe | | Calif.*
Mormidea pictiventris (Pentato-
midae):
Tillandsia usneoides (Span- |_____ CO eS Ee al ee as vee Tex.
ish-moss)
Mormidea v-lutewm (Pentatomi-
dae):
Catt’eya sp. (orchid) _______- IBTAzil bo. pen ee Lap oenit 2 oS eee DACs
Orchids stieechl unten ae ae CL Oe ee as ee 1p et Nea) hs as | ey DAC.
Myelois ceratoniae (Phycitidae):
AMYGAUUS =. COMMUNISM (al= |altalye 22 -2e eee el ee mee NaN:
mond).
fine granatum (pomegran-| Greece, Italy _..--------|------|---- NiegYs
ate). :
Myelois venipars (Phycitidae):
GitraisS/SiNeENSiSa(OLANEC) iy || BIN Tie xl COR eee eee eee | eae | ee Tex
Myelois sp. (Phycitidae):
GilruSiSiMenS1S eae eee | ee Oe ae ie ohne | eae |e Ss tex:
Cydonia oblonga (quince)_-____|_____ LO ee aaa NEE a | es aiex
Mixed! frig 2 eee ool TE Suliy se eee ee Tex
Tamannduseindica (tama) | a@ubas on eee eee IWeetel to |e a eee La
rind).
Myelophilus minor (Scolytidae):
PiNnwUs Sps(pine) ep.) 3822p Netherlands__-...--__-- Qi.) 4.2 = Se Ney
Myzus hemerocallis (Aphiidae):
Hemerocallis sp._____--_------ Giiimal oe ce ea ie en eee 1 D.C
Myzus ornatus (Aphiidae):
Chrysanthemum sp.____------ aR Mean sh ee as eek hha NEWS
Myrius sp. (myrtle) _._._.___|_____ Go. ie ee el ine |e N.Y.
rime spate teens dT a Scotland! 3-202 2 ete 1 DG.
Ramondia pyrenaica_________- Wnoland tee ees Ti s|32.05| 4 28 2] Soe eee Calif.*
Nabis alternata (Nabidae):
Brassica sp. (mustard)-_____-- IVICKICOM eee cee eee 2) | es eee ee eee Tex.
Lactuca sativa (lettuce)_______|_____ Oe ci a fal eae Tex
Nabis angustatus (Nabidae):
Lactuca sativa (lettuce) _.--_--|____- GOES 2h oe ee a ee | ee Tex
Napomyza lateralis (Agromyzi-
dae):
Cichorium intybus (witloof) .-| Belgium___--_---------- 194:j)-ef8| 4.2.2] ees N.Y.
Naucles pusio (Mordellidae):
Phaseolkisisp. (String bean) = == | V Ue xd Cosas cee | re eee Tex
ROSA Spe a ee CLEC Sige aeeipeah een OU ee ees Tex
Neella generosa (Miridae):
‘Agave sp sie bE aes eee GOL Ss ees. 2 See |e eet D.C.
Nemapogon granella (Tineidae):
Allium sativum (garlic) _._--_- Chiles: heen Mew eae 1p eee eee Pee N.Y
Neoclytus cacicus (Cerambycidae):
Guaiacum officinale (lignum- | Guatemala______-------- 10 | eee eee NEY,
vitae).
Tabebuia donnell-smithii (pri- |_---- GQeo ee eens 1 |----]------|----|---- N.Y

mavera).
SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 29

List of pests collected and reported from July 1, 1939, to June 30, 1940, inclu-
sive—Continued

[All findings marked with an asterisk indicate State inspection]

Nees eee _—_— eee

Number of interceptions






in—
Pest and host Country of origin 2, Z Collected in—
o Ss ~~ n
on a 5 2
a 3 =| 2
oO = Ce) a
INSECTS—continued
Nesosteles incisus (Cicadellidae):
man menee (Oa ias- | Mexico) ...-._-_..--.-] 1. }----|------]=---]---- Tex
mine).
Neurocolpus mericanus (Miridae):
eeempage weorm) ss ot || CGE Sa ee be ee eee ie Fs Le eee Tex
Neuroctenus simpler (Aradidae):
Prosopis sp. (mesquite) -__---|___-- Gg RTS As oh OR et ee ek 2 alee Tex
Nicobium castaneum (Anobiidae):
Wood strip on trunk_______-_- eps Sse Sees Sie ccasie sense ies | ede feleeleces Ane
Nicobium hirtum (Anobiidae):
Mixeditiowers= 92 ese /o¢0 MGR CORE = nn ee eee eee fT cen ec ee Tex
Nysius ericae (Lirygaeidae): :
Lactuca sativa (lettuce) -__---_|_____ GOT fee 6 oo otes | eee al Plyle tale Ariz
Nysius monticola (Lygaeidae):
Brassica oleracea capilata (cab- |____- Gow 2282 25 Jee cna eS Ee pes ak cet kt Ariz
bage). :
PT ILE (SAA ere ee he) pe a te Ne a el as es Tex.
AiG ime eeaeen nes eh GO sts tee ene eee ens ee be pe ee Ariz
aoe notatulus (Pentatomi-
ae):
ne a ai haemo Ole Colombia.=.2--2-+--2=2)) 4 etdaee- leas tee leete Calif.*
chid).
Odonaspis pencillata (Coccidae):
Deni penunisamerrinanus | Philippines. ------2--2-|" 1 |-o=-|_-----]_---|-=--]- Die
Oedancala dorsilinea (Lygaeidae):
Minar eaieeTmneApme)es | Clmba__.- 2272222222 l Sli]. 2 | eee eee La.
Ogdoecosta biannularis (Chryso-
melidae):
Mammillaria sp. (cactus) __-__ WICKICO Re eee neh Ceeeg | ere ete gee Tex.
Moss on orchid plant____.__-.|___-- oe eh Resa A ee hh ele oo ed er et Tex.
Olethreutid:
ACHE ALG ADANESE) || JAPAN 2.4. -a<-2--2s-|- pl y|eta|eeeece bee bales Wash
maple).
Acer palmatum atropurpur- |___-_- 0 re ae ee ee ee eee foes ee Wash.
eum.
FANMUnOamersicanpeacn))- | Chile. 223..----s-s2s.u-] 2) 2-4 ]ee-2--]-=-- eee N. Y
Amygdalus persica nectarina |____- NO.) See 2s. ee lige ee |e - eels Re Wis Y;
(nectarine).
Catumamionris (aeatner) =| Scotland ......-----2.|--....]' B |2222--]22 2] e ee Mass
Chrysanthemum sp__--------- INDORICO.2 2) 25 2-2 5 ee P|) tds Set Tex.
Citrus sinensis (orange)______- Mxionion South Atriea.--|-22. 2 | | ye een Pa.
Crataegus sp. (haw) ___------- Wirewicg:) 2 5. 2 | eee |) aliens see Tex.
SoTL INE SILRIN Te EMSTESS) oo | Japan 2a foo 8 2222-22, 2] ool [a5 ee 1 Wash
a REM OL | Whalan@=----—-- ea] oe lo fa] bee 5 83 Calif.*
chid).
MMamosmsne es i222 WMiexiCOf 5-8 5 ee ele eee |) dee le Tex.
Mrenigeer pera ieee QO ses eae ee ecc ees poh bao se [ee ee IESE Tex.
Phaseolus sp. (string bean) ___|____- G0. 4. ball ete ee ET [alee Ariz.
Podveanpiemmucnopniyud (yew | Japan. ..---=====--<-<=| 98 )|22--|s2-t selecas|s3-2 Wash
podocarpus).
Prosopis sp. (mesquite) _____- DVEGXICOPS.- =o cccccewe coe, 2S. atone weet Tex.
Prunus domestica (plum)- ---- OHO A oe en ee eek een ee Nin Y «
ROR Stapeeeree ET British @olumbia=—o2-23)45-23| 3 Dh lee Wash.
Tino moronauona (Wex- |, Mexico.s_ 2-22 2---22-2--|---s-n)22--]- | 1 |_-caleent Tex.
ican sunflower).
Vaccinium sp. (blueberry)...| Newfoundland___-------| 2 |..__]__--__]___-]___- Pa.
Wacwpsp: Cvetch) 2s. k HYANCG ss oe ee cc|. FL es eee: Til.
Oliarus concinnulus (Fulgoridae):
i eee te ee ee Miexico:s 2. ee 3 3- S eee ei Tele dk ay Tex.
Oligomerus brunneus (Anobii-
dae) :
Wood strip on trunk-________- tally 2225. eee ter. lee i ke rhe Niet
Paras pinguis (Agromyzi-
ae):
Cichorium intybus (witloof)__.| Belgium-_--_..-..__-___- ee eae N.Y.
Orchidophilus aterrimus (Curculi-
onidae):
Vand@annderiana (orchid) -_-.1’ Philippines... el dy Meee Jee Le ccdece Calif.*
30

BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

List of pests collected and reported from July 1, 19389, to June 30, 1940, inclu-
sive—Continued

{All findings marked with an asterisk indicate State inspection]





Number of interceptions

inm—



Collected in—

Calit* >
Calif.*, Hawaii.*

Calif.*, Wash.
Calif.*

Calif.*
Calif.*, Hawaii,*

IPAERE
Calif.,* Hawaii.*

4 | Calif.,* Mass.

1} Mass.

1 |) Calif.*

1 | Fla.,* Mass.
Fla.*
Calif.*

Pest and host Country of origin 2, mn
o
ne oe $ eS
B || 2 | 8
© |er |) pauses,
INSECTS—continued
Orchidophilus sp. (Curculioni-
dae):
oe callosum (or- | Thailand_--__...________ Dy pe eee
chid).
ee superbum (or- | Philippines._...._______]------ 1 bes ee
chid).
Hria obesa (orchid)______-_____}----- GO eas sen seer oe ee | see Yt es eee
Phalaenopsis aphrodite (or- |----- Oe Sea eee Oe Teena 1 L222 | ee
chid).
Phalaenopsis schilleriana (or- |_---- CLO a 2 ek eee | eo 1 23 eee ee
chid).
Orthaea bilobata (Lygaeidae):
Fragaria sp. (strawberry) -_-.-.| Mexico__-.______________ Sa ee | eee |
Orthaea servillei (Lygaeidae):
Ananas sativus (pineapple) _-_-_}----- Gor =t2s228 Re eee TL ise Se eee ee
Orthaea vincta (Lygaeidae):
Dry medicinal herb __-______|----- CO Co Me Es al adipose foes Aa Le 1
Orthezia praelonga (Coccidae):
Ti RUNDET GLAS Da eet ae Varn al Cotes ae so eee. | eee | ee iH
Orthotylus virens (Miridae):
Calluna culgaris (heather) _.._| Scotland________________]---- Le ee
Pachnaeus litus (Curculionidae): |
Brassica chinensis (white | Cuba_.-............____ 1 je | ee ee
greens).
Litchi chinensis (lychee) ______|----- OES eens sehen Too) See ee
Pachyzancla periusalis (Pyraus-
tidae):
Solanum melongena (egg- |----- GO, Sat rete at eee 1 |.2-. el ee
plant).
Se costicollis (Curculioni-
ae):
Capsicum annuum (pepper)-.| Cuba___.-_----.-------- Les eae | eee | eee
Ipomoea batatas(sweetpotato) | Antigua, Jamaica, St. |------|---- Die ee
Vincent.
Pantomorus ranthographus (Cur-
culionidae):
Packing around grapes-___-___ Aro entinas==24 = sss nen 22 hol ee eee |e
Parallelodiplosis cattleyae (Ceci-
domyiidae):
Brassavola deckeri (orchid)_...| Calan Zone__._.-_______ 9128 2) See ee eee
Parlatoria camelliae (Coccidae):
Camellia japonica (camellia)__| Japan_.._.-_-.-_-.--___- 42818) 222. se
CGamelhatsasanqua ee |e 0 2 as 5 ee EY ete 2 ee
Parlatoria cineria (Coccidae): :
Citrus limonia (lemon) -_-_--_-- ‘Trinidad —. os ee |e ee | eee
Citrus sinensis (orange) _______ Brazil Palestines sakes | Sess spans |e aoe | ee
Parlatoria crotonis (Coccidae):
Codiaewm sp. (croton) -______- British Honduras, Cuba |------|---- 2
Mee movilise(Grecianwlatiqn |) Cubase sass a= sae nes |e eee 1
rel).
Parlatoria oleae (Coccidac):
Malus sylvestris (apple)_..-_-_|' Greece, Italy_.---_.---__]------ 1 5
Prunus domestica (plum) __--- AT CON GING sae eee 2 ce cease ees eee
Prunus'sp. (cherry)--_...-_-- Taye .3t = ahaa eee ee el See Yt | 22 eee | ee
Pyrus communis (pear) __.---- Greece.) 226 ee |e eee ut
SOnDUS'S se ee eee a BS eee: Gallivess 1a aoe beeen ENE [Se eiet | eee
Parlatoria pseudaspidiotus (Coc-
cidae):
Vanda lamellata (orchid) -_____- Philippines ea ae 1
Vanda teres (orchid)__-_--_-_-_- Philippines, Straits Set- |_----_|---- 4
tlements, Trinidad.
Vanda sp. (orchid) _____-_---- Java, Philippines_______|------ 2 1
Parlatoria theae (Coccidae):
LAC ETISD octane ee eee ee Japan: 2.2252 22224 eee P )s-siee e
Parlatoria ziziphus (Coccidae):
Citrus grandis (grapefruit)__..| China, Java, Taiwan____|------]----]------|----
Citrus grandis (pomelo) __-_-- PAVE So ee a a | eS | | Se es
Gitrusitimoniai (demon) sas) Sita ya ee ee eee eee
Citrus nobilis deliciosa (tan- |----- Qecse bse 2 | 1
gerine).
Citrus sinensis (orange) __----- Italy, Spain. 22232222524) 2 as | ee ee se
Citrausispe 2 ee eee Hawaii, Philippines_---- 1) See 1
STATE PLANT BOARD

SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS

List of pests collected and reported from July 1, 1939, to June 30, 1940, inclu-
sive—Continued

[All findings marked with an asterisk indicate State inspection]



Number of interc2ptions





in—
Pest and host Country of origin 2, 2 Collected in—
eo Net ee eile
Hilo] @ js |S
Se) A hee
INSEcTs—continued
Pectinophora gossypiella (Gele-
chiidae): - ;
Gossypium sp. (cottonseed)---| Brazil, Egypt, Italy, 5.3 tie ene Oe, O,
Mexico, Puerto Rico La., Mass., N.
(one in tank car). i eek
Gossypium sp: (cotton boll) ---)| Hawaii_-...-.-....---=--]------|_--- |= epee Calif.*
Gossypium sp. (seed cotton)---| Brazil, Manchuria, Mex- ab est See leeee Fla.,* Tex.
ico.
Gossypium sp. (cotton) (un- | Manchuria_...-_---.----|------ 1p eee |S aloo D.C.
ginned).
Hibiscus esculentus (okra) ___-- IMGXICO! S022 Se Te ee Aa eee Tex.
Peregrinus maidis (Araeopidae):
EID CUsispLgniemnSOrentuim)) == |=. 2d0s-lassscceccessese2|22-2 2312 104 22S Tex.
Phaedon confinie (Chrysomelidae):
Ananas bracteatus__---------- IBTA7 ote oe ee DE Serer ae | eee Hawaii.*
PANTER OSS pews sees we lawns 2 Fo G0 rst cestassasasnss 2p |e |e eee Hawaii.*
Pseudananas macrodontes_____|____- Os betes eee ee Le | Soe | tee eee Hawaii.*
Phelomerus aberrans (Bruchidae):
Cassia fistula (golden shower) _| Trinidad_......-..--_--_]_----- 1 |G lesa [ al ct ita DIC:
CUssip javanica se | GOreR 2 eee Fate aes eee ee Dre;
Phelomerus germaini (Bruchidae):
Parkinsonia aculeata (Jerusa- | France_.-...-...--------]------ 1G | seen s eee DAC:
lem thorn).
Phenacaspis fujicola (Coccidae):
Marierinwn. - MinS 54552) _ 2 RAE oe Se Pee ee se Wash.
Phiepsius utahnus (Cicadellidae):
Masverses mee ee eee co. INECXICO Dee ae eee ate eer eee Ariz.
ele callosus (Curculioni-
ae):
Vas spy (ereape). ss. - _ -- Union of South Africa__- eset ee eee Ne,
Photinus nefarius (Lampyridae):
presses chinensis. (white | Cuba.....--------.----- oD |e Se | Rene om ne ee oa Nes
greens).
ee analis (Scarabaei-
ae):
Ananas sativus (pineapple) ___|_____ G02 basses lig | eae eee ee INL.
ea alhionica (Chrysomeli-
ae):
~ erage hoxense. (pars- |’ Mexico. 2=s=2=22222=2s==- | es ee ees ee Tex.
ey).
ee undulata (Chrysomel-
idae):
Brassica eoeraces gemmijera | Netherlands.....--<:----|_..--__]-_—_|----.-]--_- ee ke
(brussels sprouts).
Forest litter and sphagnum | Denmark-._---_------_--- Mi |e we a als ee ee Ne Ys
moss.
Phyllotretua ovittata discedens
(Chr ysomelidae):
Benincaspeiepiaga ‘(hairy | Cuba-....--.-.-...-.--- ee ee ee ee Ney.
squash).
Brassica chinensis (white |____- eee ee eee 21s Samal oe ea ee NE
greens).
‘Brassica sp. (mustard) -_....--|-...- tees 10) | 22.52 eee ee ING dia
Pisum sativum (pea) --_------|_---- GO. levwer ss ese eee 1p ese eae ee NS
moapniainis sans (radish) = ...|.....do_....-...-.----.-.- Bho eee eee ire
Physonota attenuata (Chrysomel-
idae):
Ananas sativus (pineapple) -_--| Mexico_...__--_-_-__---- Se en eee eee Sel ee Tex
Phytomyza sp. (Agromyzidae):
oe chinensis (white | Cuba, Netherlands_-__--- eee te eee eee 7 ed Wed Agi Gem ad We
greens).
gsi oleracea acephala | Cuba._i._22..-._.---.-- Fel aap ee Nay.
ale).
rae oreracea “botrytis: |; Netherlands... 2 seen ne) ee ee. eh iN Mie
(cauliflower).
irene oreracea. capitata’\ Italy ....222fsenesse rn ee enn ee oe NOY.
(cabbage).
Brassica rapa (turnip)__------ Mexicg:t 225. ae ee eee eee Pelee le ee Tex.
Brassica sp. (mustard) .-__--- @uba. i252 tee mre SI Saeed eed NG
PUA RITOAI Noe a BOT 2 eo a aaa re ee ees ae eed ee aa ING oy
& fa ef HRS

2" &,

es
§ 3
5

Ln PS THATS 3
9 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE