Citation
Service and regulatory announcements

Material Information

Title:
Service and regulatory announcements
Added title page title:
Service and regulatory announcements with list of plant pests intercepted with imported plants and plant products
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C.
Publisher:
U.S. G.P.O.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Quarterly
Language:
English
Physical Description:
60 v. : 23 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Plant quarantine -- Periodicals -- United States ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )
federal government publication ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
S.R.A.--B.E.P.Q. no. 120 (July/Sept. 1934)-S.R.A.--B.E.P.Q. no. 179 (Oct./Dec. 1950).
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Also cummulated with an annual t.p.
Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not subject to copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105.
Resource Identifier:
030288977 ( ALEPH )
14207732 ( OCLC )
sn 86033973 ( LCCN )
Classification:
632.9 U54 ( ddc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Service and regulatory
Preceded by:
Service and regulatory announcements
Succeeded by:
Service and regulatory announcements

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State of Florida
STAT

Department of Agriculture

DIVISION OF PLANT
INDUSTRY

LIBRARY











LIBRARY
STATE PLANT BOARD



Digitized by the Internet Archive
in 2013

http://archive.org/details/servicereg38unit —



S.R. A., B. E. P. Q. Issued September 1939

United States Department of Agriculture

Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine

SERVICE AND
REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS
1938

These announcements are issued quarterly and constitute a per-
manent record of the work of the Bureau in the enforcement
of the Plant Quarantine Act of 1912 and certain related acts, in-
cluding the text of quarantines and regulations thereunder, and
the more important circulars and decisions explanatory of,
or bearing on, such quarantines and regulations

WITH LIST OF PLANT PESTS INTERCEPTED WITH IMPORTED
PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS



UNITED STATES

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
WASHINGTON : 1939



FLA. Bi: 2d,
DV, OF PLANT
GNDOUSTRY
WBRAR

ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY
AND PLANT QUARANTINE

Lrs A. Strona, Chief.

S. A. Ronwer, Assistant Chief.

Avery 8. Hoyt, Assistant Chief.

P. N. ANNAND, Special Research Assistant.

F. H. Spencer, Business Manager.

Rouua P. Currin, Editor.

Maset Coucorp, Librarian. ;

J. A. Hysuop, in Charge, Division of Insect Pest Survey and Information.

J. I. HAMBLETON, in Charge, Division of Bee Culture Investigations.

D. L. Van Dinu, in Charge, Division of Fruit Insect Investigations.

F. C. CRAIGHEAD, in Charge, Division of Forest Insect Investigations.

W. H. Waits, 7n Charge, Division of Truck Crop and Garden Insect Investigations.

C. M. Pacxarp, in Charge, Division of Cereal and Forage Insect Investigations.

R. W. Harnep, in Charge, Division of Cotton Insect Investigations.

F. C. BisHopp, in Charge, Division of Insects Affecting Man and Animals.

. A. Hawkins, in Charge, Division of Control Investigations.

. C. Roark, 7n Charge, Division of Insecticides and Fungicides.

. F. W. MuESEBECK, 2n Charge, Division of Insect Identification.

. P. CLuavusEN, in Charge, Division of Foreign Parasite Introduction.

. B. Fracktr, in Charge, Division of Plant Disease Control.

B. M. Ganppis, in Charge, Division of Domestic Plant Quarantines.

E. R. Sasscur, in Charge, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines.

A. F. Burcsss, in Field Charge, Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail Moth Control (head-
quarters, Greenfield, Mass.).

BREWER, in Field Charge, Japanese Beetle and Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail

Moth Quarantines, European Corn Borer Certification, and Dutch Elm Disease
Eradication (headquarters, Bloomfield, N. J.).

R. E. McDonatp, in Field Charge, Pink Bollworm and Thurteria Weevil Quar-

_antines (headquarters, San Antonio, Tex.).

P. A. Horpaun, in Field Charge, Mexican Fruitfly Quarantine (headquarters,
Harlingen, Tex.).

A. a BakgEr, in Field Charge, Fruitfly Investigations (headquarters, Mexico City,

€X1C0).

Il

RQOQWH



TABLE OF CONTENTS
CONTENTS OF NO. 134 (JANUARY-MARCH 1938)

Page

remenane ad orien oimcial announcements. - - —_-- -__ ~~. - - -seeen-apatt—-psee tei dee ete sa5ek
Announcement relating to rules and regulations governing the importation of cotton and cotton
BOI PRE MEU AGAUNILCO SUALCS 9 == 22 oo oe a nn ee Se eae eee
TAsEreplOns Loco lectors,o1 customs (1. D..49398).-: — 2. fo se ee os ecw ete cee
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (No. 48) -___--.--------.---.---------- acy
List of articles exempt from certification requirements under the Japanese beetle quarantine
(He aos revised: superseding B."B. P. Q. 383)"=_=----_...-2_.---._- ee eee Deets
Instructions to postmasters- --__-_--------- Se a a ae ge een Ee =
Announcement relating to pink bollworm quarantine (No. 52)_______--_--_------------___--- i
etre ean PREIS TES CCL OP late oe Mee ke ee i Sk Fe Be
Terminal inspection of plants and plant products aches 9 Pa ae va lee ee tS Soh tO Die Reger
Hoevocahlouoncertain Orevon plant quarantines.. 206-202) ees ee ee
Parra SR SAE Cx PASS In? See Em ie one Wee bl SoS ee ee An SOE oe a8 Te SS
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Kingdom of Egypt (B. E. P. Q. 375, revised, supple-

SUUEAT TPs eae ee Ss cee LE wn IER RS Ye ee ee ee ee Se
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Presidency of Saint Christopher (St. Kitts) and Nevis,
Peaemmestenaies (ts. 10. 0b: QQ. 38l, revised): *"'2.2 "8 ee ee

Plant-quarantine import restrictions, British Gold Coast Colony (B. E. P. Q. 391, revised) -
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of France (B. E. P. 2 403, supplement No. 2).
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Kingdom of Bulgaria (B. E. P. Q. 421, supplement
Piro EEN ane On DY TABS, EY ee Nee ete Tt ee eee eee ee ee
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Argentina (B. E. P. Q. 426, supplement
PP ees eee nmgene nee aP LLNS ©) NP Sea) 0 EAE NE NE eS Se ee a Pe eee
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, British Colony of Ceylon (B. E. P. Q. 428, supplement
ISTE TY a a RE re Ms SE Fag bs Sit le Sen ar lS
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Kingdom of Sweden (B. E. P. Q. 439, supplement
SSIs als) rman wei nares ea ls 8 Sm Eee ee os ee ee eS ee
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, French Zone of Morocco (B. E. P. Q. 444, supplements
PNRGaS mee bee a CAE) eas wt ne SS So Dt SRN BR SOR OE ee ee ae
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Central America (Salvador) (B. E. P. Q. 445, supple-
pera csta cM RO Ey et es ak Lk cas A Nel oe ae foe ee ee ERE See
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Central America (British Honduras) (B. E. P. Q.
PORE PICTHOM LING. 2) os Si Le es So ee somes (En eee oe eee
teeth eee import restrictions, Kingdom of Yugoslavia (B. E. P. Q. 447, supplement
Seay aaa rare s Ee! pnt bs aE oe ed SPT tere) dS pesca oye
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Persia (B. E. P. Q. 449, supplement No. 1)___-___.__-
eee oe import restrictions, French Colonies (Oceania) (B. E. P. Q. 465, supple-
SeaEArau STR EN) Pn ees i ahh A Or eo ss ees 2s se eh I ee
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Australian Territory of Papua (B. E. P. Q. 467)_____-
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Kingdom of Iraq (B. E. P. Q. 468)________-___--_-----
neta import restrictions, Kingdom of Italy (B. E. P. Q. 469, superseding P. Q.
Samah ye erecta tes Stal) kent & VOLES NT Si 2B eA 2) SATE BR
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Japan (B. E. P. Q. 470, superseding the Memorandum

to Inspectors i in Charge, dated August DOLL OSA IE A ss ctl UEDA IE LILO, i RO
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Union of South Africa (B. wp) Q. 471, superseding
eR ARE) ee Be gee LL eh) eee} OD SPA OT 20 Ub. ed OT LE
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act___.__________ 4S SRS Stee wee
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine__________________________________-

CONTENTS OF NO. 135 (APRIL-JUNE 1938)

uatanume era owner omicial announcements. -_-...=---.----.---_--.--cuawuwsicsn svue@seleusicul..
Announcement relating to European corn borer quarantine (No. 41)___________________________-
Method used for the disinfection of imported broomcorn and broomcorn brooms (B. E. P. Q.
a7, supersedes iH. 5. 161 and supplements P. Q. C. A. 309) so. 2ss22 222 2c st
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (No. 48)-_..._--.------_----__-----_-_-__-
Pa ONYTING FRTISDATE AIF OTA os See es 2 bd eek evo deel oe EL tee Ft el ly ete eas ah
Notice teeeneralipublic through newspapersc22 ==) -2.=2) se sense. laze soluslstecene al.
eee ESET EMEP UCTS! 320.00 28 oh pee eh he Jil. ce Liars pede Aoi per ee |
Administrative instructions—fumigation of potatoes by methyl] bromide as a condition of
certification of potatoes moving by refrigerator car from the area listed in regulation 5
DMGUATATHAOe NO 4S! (Ete Bo bs - QU 478) oe oh ooes 22) bes ou 2e3! civ Lelenees sede hele =
Announcement relating to Mexican fruitfly quarantine (No. 64).._______.._____-.._______.
Administrative instructions—sterilization of grapefruit and oranges by heat under the Mexi-
can fruitfly quarantine (B. E. P. Q. 472: superseding P. Q. C. A. 329)____..__________._- Jd
Announcements relating to white-pine blister rust quarantine (No. 63)___-..__________- op Ree
White-pine blister rust quarantine regulations modified_____-.__..--.-___- 1A Corti an fiphe do.
CeO CTRIAISTI St 2 Sunk fo cea, ks Ed it alibi d bo oe el ogee Biel Bie ey
Notice to general public through newspapers-_-_-_-_-___- Lereetinee Liye deg yes cto ret feel ee
MPIC INI TD WON PENSPGPS. p45 2 828 8 Fey eg ys Hera eke Peg ke eye ec BL =<
Announcements relating to District of Columbia plant regulations_.___.____.__.-__-_____- Bc
District of Columbia plant regulations modified___.__-_____...-..--.--.-------.-----------
Revised rules and regulations governing the movement of plants and plant products into and
BU PEOMSLTICE OM GOI DIS: et Sock a Bo toe 2p ee Ee REE hailed
Notice to general public through newspapers_______________-_______- eee dis ete PE :
SRMOUNTEESL DONGIIBSLOLS. 2 8082 a ae ae, ren ibd eden Ce eick
Announcement relating to rules and regulations governing the importation of cotton and cotton
PRPS NO TTLOG Dates. ete al Bes Cy os sera eee cree dees ut gstaeliseal la.
Modification of cotton regulations (revision of regulation 13)_____.____________-_____________-
Terminal inspection of.plants.and plant; products. _-.... 2-52. Jec--.-4-cecieeos cece -n---- ale
Arkansas State plant quarantine (shipment of sweetpotato plants restricted) steht:
Additional plant inspection places in California..__.....................-.-.-----..-..------
Miscellaneous items.
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, ‘Republic of Brazil (B. E. P. Q.3 79, ‘supplement No. 2) _-
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of France (B. E. P. Q. 403, supplement No. 3)
aah import restrictions, Republic of Germany (B: E. P. Q. 405, Guppiemant
vo.

171401—39 Ill

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IV TABLE OF CONTENTS

Quarantine and other official announcements—Continued.
Miscellaneous items—Continued.
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Central America (British Honduras) (B. E. P. Q. 445,
supplement -NOs:3) hs a ee eee
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Persia (Iran) (B. E. P. Q. 449, supplement No. 2)____
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act=-- 2-2) 5) eee
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine

CONTENTS OF NO. 136 (JULY-SEPTEMBER 1938)

Quarantine and other official announcements. .-_ -_ = 522¢)-2 =. 22 = be
Announcements relating to gypsy moth and brown-tail moth Gases (No. 45)
GaySVeT1O GUAR ATA ETT VSO he yee eae en -
Revision of quarantine and resulations: <2 22 205.2 se oc he ae ae as
Notice to general public through NEWSPADETS 2. = a ie
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (No. 48)____-______-_____________-_--_--) © 8
Administrative instructions—Fumigation of onions by methyl bromide as a condition of
certification of onions moving by refrigerator car from the area listed in regulation 5 of
quarantine, No-°48, (Bs Bie Pe -@) 475) ne Se gs at eg
Administrative instructions—Fumigation of tomatoes by methy! bromide as a condition of
certification of tomatoes moving by refrigerator car from the area listed in regulation 5 of
quarantine No. 48 (B. E. P. Q. 480)_____

Japanese beetle control ends for season on fruit and vegetable shipments fo 2 3
Termination date on fruit and vegetable restrictions “under J apanese beetle quarantine ad-
VAT CCU MOUS C1) LOT CLs A(t O LeU ILC yea SC ae ae a
Announcement relating to rules and regulations governing the importation of cotton and cotton
wrappingsinto the United: States. 29 = 292 eee
Instructions to collectors of customs (T. D. 49666)
Terminal inspection of plants and plant products
Revocation of Oregon plant quarantine
Miscellaneous items _= S225. 222s ese ie
Public hearing to consider United States quarantine on account of white- fae beetle______
Notice of public hearing to consider the advisability of quarantining the States of Alabama,
Florida, Louisiana, and Mississippi on account of the white-fringed beetle _-_-» =§-- ___
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, New Zealand (P. Q. C. A. 304, supplement No. 5)
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, French zone of Morocco (B. E. P. Q. 444, revised) ______
ant: Trentee import restrictions, Republic of Turkey (B. E. P. Q. 451, supplement
ORD) eis: 2 gs Ss ee se a Rt Se ee ee
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Kingdom of Italy (B. E. P. Q. a8 supplement No. t):
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Commonwealth of Australia (B. E. P. Q. 476) ____
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic ef Colombia (B. E. P. Q. 477, superseding
Memorandum to Chief Inspectors September 1, 1931) ;

Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Malaya (B. E. P. Q. 478, superseding B. E. P. Q. 458)_

Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Colony and Protectorate of Kenya (B. E. P. Q. 479) __
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act___________________________________-
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine

CONTENTS OF NO. 137. (OCTOBER-DECEMBER 1938)

Quarantine/and other officia Warn Ourmcene rises yee ee ee a a ae
Announcement relating tu gypsy moth and brown-tail moth quarantine (No. 45)______________-
Instructions to. postmasters. 22. 2-3. ee ee
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (No. 48)___-_______-___________._______--
List of articles exempt from certification requirements under the Japanese beetle quarantine
(B. E. P. Q. 395, 3d revision)
Instructions:to postmastersss. 26 2 SL eh EE es a ee
Announcements relating to Mediterranean fruitfly and melonfly quarantine (No. 13)
Hawaiian fruits and vegetables to be admitted to mainland after sterilization_______-______-
Administrative instructions—The shipment of fruits and vegetables from Hawaii to the
mainland subject to sterilization under supervision is authorized (B. E. P. Q. 481)
Announcements relating to nursery stock, plant, and seed quarantine (No. 37)_-______-_--------
Rescind order requiring treatment for narcissus bulbs from the Netherlands________________-
Treatment requirement of noninfested Netherlands narcissus bulbs as a condition of entry
revoked) (BYUBOP. Q: 482): De 8 Oe EA ee 2 Ee ee
Wallace permits importation of increased numbers of begonia and gloxinia tubers___.-_-_-___
Entry requirements of foreign begonia and gloxinia ¢ubers modified! | 2 asain
Modification of nursery stock, plant, and seed quarantine regulations (amendment No. 3)__
Announcements relating to pink bollworm quarantine’ (No:-52)/-_--.-.. So eee
Pink bollworm:quarantinereculationsamremcled i ee ee ee
Modification of pink bollworm quarantine regulations (amendment No. 5)________-_--=------
Notice:to. ceneral publicthroug@himewspapers es eee ee ee ee
Imstructions to: postmasters-.--— =... 3. See a ee
Announcements relating to white-fringed beetle quarantine (No. 72)_-_____________-__-----------
Quarantine issued to prevent spread of white-fringed beetle in four of Southern States___-__-
Wihite-fringed beetle-quarantine: ...... <5 20a PU eee eee
Wotice to:ceneral public through’ mewspaperse.—- 25. 28a ee eee ee
Terminalinspection of plants ‘and! plant productss 882) | Se eee
Florida State plant quarantine (citrus canker disease)... 52. Eee
Miscellaneous:items=-.4 2-2 -- 2.22. $54 a ee ee
The Plant Quarantine Act and Quarantine No. 37 (address by Lee A. Strong) __------_-----
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Switzerland (B. E. P. Q. 413, revised) ___-
Pant guarantine import restrictions, Republic of Argentina (B. E. P. Q. 426, supplement
Oe 4) se i hee SS a ll me = vs
Plant- aerate import restrictions, Commonwealth of Australia (B. E. P. Q. 476, supple-
mént NGA Ge et yt ea EE TS ON I ae a NA SUE L192
Plant-quarantine imnort restrictions, French Regency of Tunisia (B. E. P. Q. 483)____-----
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act________---- Ju er
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine_____-__-____----------------++------

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S. R. A—B. E. P. Q. No. 134 Issued June 1938

United States Department of Agriculture

BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS

JANUARY-MARCH 1938

CONTENTS

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amreane ettanemmenmuicia! almouncements: _-_- 2 -2----__ 2-4-2 ee en See tok
Announcement relating to rules and regulations governing the importationp of cotton and cotton
iM Oomer nan OMMMIbeG SLALCSs—-2-. 2-252 Sl loves 5 bis occas see tesbe nse sale
mnsimacuwous toreolectors of customs. (‘T. ID..49398)_-_ 2-2-6 -- oe ee eee sek 5 5 n-.e
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (No. 48)__.._-_--__---_---_-__-----__-_-__-
List of articles exempt from certification Parents under the Japanese beetle quarantine

(B. iPmOesgosTe vised. superseding 5. He P,Q. 383) 2... 252-.2222. 22222222 ee
Instructions to EAs REVS Ts Pate ae a fa te
Announcement relating to pink bollworm quarantine (No. 52)____.--....----..-----..----------
SESP ATC OMS ie) [OOS MS ee eS ee ee ee eee
Menniniaiminspecnonolplants and plant products: ._--22...--.2.....~22--.--2<-220 22-2 soe ae
Hevocwuononcertain Oregon, plant quarantines-=2_--..2 2. -+_..--2--.-.---L 22222 e 2
SEN ANC OICMNeT eee = = 8 Re Te ee rece 2 ee Se te 2k
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Kingdom of Egypt (B. E. P. Q. 375, revised, supple-
FTCA DN Ep cy, ae ee ee IS
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Pre siden cy of Saint Christopher (St. Kitts) and Nevis,
British West Indies, (B. E. P. Q. 381, REVISE Gl) oe eee Se A SE A
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, British Gold Coast Colony (B. E. P. Q. 391, revised) -
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of France (B. E. P. Q. 403, supplement No. 2)_
Sacre ee import restrictions, Kingdom of Bulgaria (B. E. P. Q. 421, supplement

Seay ly peennenee eae mn mitt oy) 4S) fT tite bt eek ete ie be oS ks SE tee)

Pane. -quarantine import restrictions, British Colony of Ceylon (B. E. P. Q. 428, supplement
iurael) | Paneer Seon Se ee we OS La elo ee
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Kingdom of Sweden (B. E. P. Q. 439, supplement
PSII an Se gt ee ge ee ee a ee ee ne
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, French Zone of Morocco (B. E. P. Q. 444, supplements
Rprapanasipens) meee ee 2/182) 2 LLL) iso. Ee ee te ahs 2 ee
eee import restrictions, Central America (Salvador) (B. E. P. Q. 445, supple-
Sri acs TAF at ap) a a a
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Central America (British Honduras) (B. E. P. Q.
ELATED) eee te ke, aE ka) ya te Pa eT oe eas Se
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Kingdom of Yugoslavia (B. E. P. Q. 447, supplement
SE ICUs) neue ann eee se a a a eRe ae oe eee
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Persia (B. E. P. Q. 449, sa eee IND Oh) Peers
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, French Colonies (Oceania) (B. E. P. Q. 465, supple-
mem me 80 OA te a SP see) ee Rip Ee eis oe spoepeial ave wate
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Australian Territory of Papua (B. E. P. Q. 467)____-- 15
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Kingdom of Iraq (B. E. P. Q. 468)__________-______--- 19
be aA eeppmmn import restrictions, Kingdom of Italy (B. E. P. Q. 469, superseding P. Q.
Saad ei ed peel Deke er Be pre es As ee es eee ge Bee ee eee Lees 22
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Japan (B. E. P. Q. 470, superseding the Memorandum
tgumepercors 10 Charge, dated Atupust 22, 1094). __ 2. --- 52-8 eee 2
ae oa restrictions, Union of South Africa (B. E. P. Q. 471, superseding
PORRIO Wy ) WO ee 92 Py Pal of Pee Merete cern Fa ee el ee Pe eg he Se oes 3
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act__.._--..-....---.-.-.--_---------. 36
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine_____._._._....._.--.--.----------- 37

71071—38

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2 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan—March

QUARANTINE AND OTHER OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS

ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO RULES AND REGULATIONS GOVERN-
ING THE IMPORTATION OF COTTON AND COTTON WRAPPINGS INTO
THE UNITED STATES

INSTRUCTIONS TO COLLECTORS OF CUSTOMS
COTTON AND COTTON WRAPPINGS—-APPLICATION FOR PERMITS

AMENDED REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE IMPORTATION OF COTTON AND COTTON WRAP-
PINGS INTO THE UNITED STATES (T. D. 89645 AND T. D. 40573) (T. D. 49398)

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,
OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONER OF CUSTOMS,
Washington, February 7, 1938.

To Collectors of Customs and Others Concerned:

The appended copy of an amendment to the regulations promulgated by the
Department of Agriculture governing the importation into the United States
of cotton and cotton wrappings is published for the information and guidance
of customs officers and others concerned.

The number of this Treasury decision should be noted as a marginal reference
for articles 579, 580, 581 (e), and 583 of the Customs Regulations of 1937.

JAMES H. Moytsz,
Commissioner of Customs.

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTIN&
(NO. 48)

B. E. P. Q. 395, Revised ; superseding B. E. P. Q. 383.
Marcu 18, 1938.

LIST OF ARTICLES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS UNDER THE
JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE

In accordance with the third proviso in Notice of Quarantine No. 48, as revised,
the following articles, being considered innocuous as earriers of infestation,
are exempted from the restrictions of this quarantine and of the rules and
regulations Supplemental thereto:

1. Balsam pillows, when composed of balsam needles only.

2. Banana stalks, when crushed, dried, and shredded.

3. Dyed moss and dyed sand, when heat treated, and when so labeled on the
outside of each container of such materials.

4. Floral designs or “set pieces,” including wreaths, sprays, casket covers, and
all formal florists’ designs. Bouquets and cut flowers not so prepared are not
exempted.

5. Greensand or greensand marl, when treated and so labeled on the outside
of each container of such materials.

6. Herbarium specimens, when dried, pressed, and treated, and when so labeled
on the outside of each container of such materials.

7. Manure, peat, compost, or humus (1) when dehydrated and either shredded,
ground, pulverized, or compressed, or (2) when treated with crude petroleum
or any other product having high potency as an insecticide, and when so labeled
on the outside of each commercial container of Such materials, or (3) peat when
imported and shipped in the unopened original container and labeled as to each
container with the country of origin. (See also item 15.)

8. Moss, sheet (Calliergon schriberi) and (Thuridium recognitum).

9. Mushroom spawn, in brick, flake, or pure culture form.

10. Orchids, cut.

11. Orchid plants, when growing exclusively in Osmunda fiber.

12. Osmunda fiber, Osmundine, or orchid peat (Osmunda cinnamomea, and
O. claytoniana).

13. Resurrection plant or birdsnest moss (Selaginella lepidophylla).

14. Silica sand or similar material, when processed by crushing, grinding, and
dehydrating silica or other rock, and when so labeled on the outside of each



1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 3

container of such material, or when so designated on the waybill accompanying
bulk carload shipments of the material.

15. Sphagnum moss, bog moss, or peat moss (Sphagnaceae) when dried and
baled. (See also item 7.)

16. Submerged aquatic plants, including Cryptocoryne spp.; Eelgrass or tape
grass (Vallisneria spiralis) ; false loosestrife (Ludwigia mulerttii) ; fish grass,
Washington plant, or fanwort (Cabomba caroliniana) ; hornwort or coontail
(Ceratophyllum demersum) ; water milfoil (Myriophylium spp.) ; water weed,
ditch moss, water thyme, or anacharis (Hlodea canadensis).

Avery S. Hoyt,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS

MODIFICATION OF RESTRICTIONS OF JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE NO. 48, U. 8.
DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, March 30, 1938.
Referring to Quarantine Order No. 48 on account of the Japanese beetle,
notice is given to postmasters in the regulated area in the States of Connecti-
cut, Delaware, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey,
New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, Virginia, West Virginia,
and the District of Columbia, that effective March 18, 1988, the following arti-
cles, the interstate movement of which is not considered to constitute a risk of
Japanese beetle dissemination, are exempted from the restrictions of the
regulations of this quarantine:
(Then follows the enumeration of the articles listed above.)
RAMSEY S. BLAck,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.

ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO PINK BOLLWORM QUARANTINE
(NO. 52)

INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS

Post OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, January 10, 1938.
Postmaster.

My Dear Sir: Your attention is invited to the inclosed copy of Plant Quaran-
tine No. 52 of the United States Department of Agriculture, on account of the
pink bollworm of cotton, and also a copy of revised regulation 3 in connection
therewith, effective January 3, 1938, by which you will please be governed. See
paragraph 1, section 595, Postal Laws and Regulations.

The revision extends the regulated area. adding the county of Santa Cruz
and portions of the counties of Pima and Pinal in Arizona to the area desig-
nated as lightly infested by the pink bollworm.

Very truly yours,
Roy M. NorruH,
Acting Third Assistant Postmaster General.

TERMINAL INSPECTION OF PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS
_ REVOCATION OF CERTAIN OREGON PLANT QUARANTINES

THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, March 2, 1938.
Oregon Plant Quarantine (Order No. 10-A Series), pertaining to gladiolus
thrips in other States and Oregon Plant Quarantine (No. 16—A Series), per-
taining to holly scale in Oregon, have been reyoked, effective at once.



4 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.—March

This amends the list of Oregon State Plant Quarantines dated June 23, 1937,
published in the Postal Bulletin of July 27, 1987, and on page 44 of the August
19387 Supplement to the Postal Guide, and removes the Oregon restrictions on
the acceptance of parcels containing holly and gladiolus corms or cormels.

Postmasters will please, therefore, make the proper correction and be
governed accordingly.

, RAMSEY S. BLAck,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.

MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS
B. E. P. Q. 375, revised, Supplement No. 2.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, KINGDOM OF EGYPT

MARrcH 8, 1988.
IMPORTATION OF DRIED FRUITS RESTRICTED

According to Booklet No. 20 of July 1937, crop protection section, Ministry
of Agriculture of Egypt, the import restrictions indicated in B. E. P. Q. 375
are applicable to the following dried fruits as well as to the fresh fruits,
therefore the words “(fresh or dried)” should be added to the following items:

Fruits, stone, including apricot, cherry, peach, plum (p. 8).

Grapes (Vitis spp.) (p. 9).

Leguminous fruits and seeds (p. 9).

“Nuts, green, including almonds” should read “Nuts, including almonds (fresh
or dried).”

Correction: Item (b) of paragraph 1 of article 2 of law No. 1 of 1916 (p. 2
of Supplement No. 1, B. E. P. Q. 80), should read “kaki fruits or ons
mons (Diospyros kaki)” instead of “cactus fruits.”

Ler A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

B. E. P. Q. 381, revised.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, PRESIDENCY OF SAINT CHRISTOPHER
(ST. KITTS) AND NEVIS, BRITISH WEST INDIES

JANUARY 14, 1988.

This digest of the plant-quarantine import restrictions of the Presidency of
Saint Christopher and Nevis has been prepared for the information of nursery-
men, plant-quarantine officials, and others interested in the exportation of
plants and plant products to that Presidency.

It was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant-quarantine inspector, in charge of
foreign service information of the Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines, from
the original texts of ordinance No. 2 of May 11, 1923, and proclamation No. 12
of July 2, 1937, and reviewed by the agricultural superintendent of the said
Presidency.

The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct and com-
plete up to the time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used inde-
pendently of, nor as a substitute for, the original texts, and it is not to be
interpreted as legally authoritative.

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, PRESIDENCY OF SAINT CHRISTOPHER
(ST. KITTS) AND NEVIS, BRITISH WEST INDIES (INCLUDING THE ISLAND OF
ANGUILLA)

BASIC LEGISLATION
[Plant Protection Ordinance No. 2, May 11, 1923]

SEc. 5. (1) The Governor may from time to time, by proclamation, prohibit
the importation into the Presidency of any plants, parts of plants, seeds, fruits,



1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 5

soil, or any class of goods, packages, coverings, or other articles or things named
and specified in such proclamation.

(2) The Governor may from time to time, by proclamation, order that the
articles mentioned in the preceding paragraph shall not be imported into the
. Presidency except upon such conditions as may be specified in such procia-
mation.

(3) Every plant, articie, or thing named in any proclamation in force under
this ordinance coming into the Presidency or any part thereof by sea may
be deemed to have come from a place the introduction thereof from which
is prohibited by this ordinance and may be treated accordingly, unless the
importer satisfies the treasurer, or the principal treasury or revenue officer
at the port of arrival, of the contrary.

SUMMARY
IMPORTATION PROHIBITED
[Proclamation No. 12, July 2, 1937

(a) Banana fruit (J/usa spp.): Importation prohibited from all countries
and places except the United States of America and the other islands of the
Colony of the Leeward Islands, to prevent the introduction of insect pests of
the banana.

(®) Citrus fruits and plants or parts thereof: Importation prohibited from
Cuba, Haiti, Jamaica, Santo Domingo, and the United States, to prevent the
introduction of citrus canker (Bacterium citri (Hasse) Doidge) and insect
pests-

(c) All other fruits except plantains, nuts, dried, canned, candied, or other
preserved fruit: Importation prohibited from Bahamas, Bermuda, British
Guiana, Venezuela, and- other countries and places except the British Isies,
Canada, British West Indies, and the United States, to prevent the introduction
of the Mediterranean fruitfiy (Ceratitis capitata Wied.).

(d) Vegetables except onions, potatoes, canned or preserved vegetables from:
Bahamas, Bermuda, British Guiana, and all other countries and places except
the British Isles, Canada, British West Indies, and the United States, to prevent
the introduction of the Mediterranean fruitfly (Ceratitis capitata Wied.).

The importation is also prohibited of the products named in items (e) to
(i) from Cuba, Haiti, and Santo Domingo:

(e) Agricultural produce in bags.

(f) Cottonseed, cottonseed hulls, cottonseed cake, cottonseed meal, and other.
products of cottonseed, seed cotton, cotton lint, cotton plants and: any part
thereof, and other malyaceous plants and any part thereof.

(g) Fertilizers and stock feed containing cottonseed meal.

(h) Second-hand bags and baling material.

(i) Packages and containers which contain or are reasonably suspected
of having contained any of the articles specified in item (f/f).

(j) Pillows and bedding material containing seed cotton, cotton lint, or
any part of the cotton plant. f

(%) Personal baggage and effects of any description which contain or are
Pow suspected of having contained any of the articles specified in
item (f).

(lt) Articles that have formed part ef the cargo of a ship another part of
the cargo of which is infested or is reasonably suspected of being infested by
the cotton boll weevil (Anthonomus grandis Boh.) : Importation prohibited from
all countries and places.

(m) Personal baggage and effects of any description that have been in con-
tact with or close proximity to any other baggage, cargo, or articles of any
description infested or reasonably suspected of being infested by the cotton
boll weevil: Importation prohibited from all countries and places, to prevent
the introduction of the cotton boll weevil (Anthonomus grandis Boh.).

(x) Soil: Importation prohibited from Bahamas, British (fuiana, Trinidad,
and all other countries and places except the British Isles, Canada, the United
States of America, and other islands of the British West Indies not specified
in this item, to prevent the introduction of insect pests and plant diseases.

A IMPORTATION CONDITIONAL

(a) Sugareane, sugarcane seedlings and plants, and all parts of the sugar-
cane: May be imported from any country and place only under a license



6 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.—March

granted by the Governor. Precaution against the introduction of insect pests
and plant diseases that do not already exist on the island.

(ob) Banana plants and parts thereof: May be imported from any country
and place only under a license granted by the Governor, to prevent the intro-
duction of Panama wilt disease (Fusarium cubense E. F. Sm.) and insect pests.

(c) Cottonseed, cotton lint, and seed cotton, and all packages, coverings, bags,
and other articles and things that have been used as packages, coverings, or
bags for cottonseed, cotton lint, and seed cotton: May be imported from any
country and place except Cuba, Haiti, and Santo Domingo under license granted
by the Governor. Precaution against the introduction of insect pests not
already established on the island.

(ad) Sprouted coconuts: May be imported from Grenada, St. Lucia, St. Vin-
cent, and Trinidad under license granted by the Governor. Precaution against
the eee of the red ring disease (Aphelenchoides cocophilus (Cobb)
Goodey).

(e) Soil and plants growing in soil: May be imported from any country or
place only after fumigation and under license granted by the Governor, to
prevent the introduction of insect pests and plant diseases.

(7) Fruit except plantains, nuts, dried, canned, candied, or other preserved
fruits from the British Isles, Canada, British West Indies, and United States
of America: Must be accompanied by a certificate from a responsible authority
in the country of export that the fruit does not originate in a prohibited coun-
try. Precautions against the introduction of the Mediterranean fruitily (Cera-
titis capitata Wied.).

(g) Vegetables except onions, potatoes, and canned or preserved vegetables
from the British Isles, Canada, British West Indies, and the United States:
-Must be accompanied by a certificate from a responsible authority in the
country of export that the vegetables do not originate in a prohibited country.

B. E. P. Q. 391, revised.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, BRITISH GOLD COAST COLONY

FEBRUARY 19, 1938.

This digest of the plant-quarantine import restrictions of the Gold Coast
Colony has been prepared for the information of nurserymen, plant-quarantine
officials, and others interested in the exportation of plants and plant products to
that country.

The present revision of the original summary of March 19, 1936, became neces-
sary to embody the provisions of new legislation, namely, the Importation of
Plants Regulation Ordinance, No. 18 of March 28, 1986, and the Importation of
Plants Regulations, No. 25 of May 6, 1986. This digest has been reviewed by the
director of agriculture of the Gold Coast Colony.

The information herein contained is believed to be correct and complete up to
the time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used independently of, nor
as a substitute for, the original texts and it is not to be interpreted as legally
authoritative.

Lee A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, BRITISH GOLD COAST COLONY
(Applicable also to British Togoland)
BASIc LEGISLATION
[Importation of Plant Regulation Ordinance, No. 18 of March 28, 1936]

Section 1. This ordinance may be cited as the Importation of Plants Regula-
tion Ordinance, 1936, and shall apply to the Gold Coast.

Sec. 2. Definitions.

“Plant” includes everything in the nature of a plant, and the fruit, leaves,
cuttings, bark, or any part thereof whatsoever, living or dead, severed or at-
tached, but does not include seed, unless specifically mentioned, nor manufac-



1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 7

tured products of plants, nor anything.mentioned in this definition that has been
cooked.

“Pest” means any insect or other invertebrate animal that may be injurious to
agricultural or horticultural crops.

“Plant disease” means any disease caused by fungus, bacterium, virus, or other
organism that may be injurious to agricultural or horticultural crops.

Sec. 4. Empowers the governor in council to make regulations for:

(a) Prohibiting, restricting, or regulating the importation into the Gold Coast
of plants, seeds, soil, manure, containers, straw, and other packing material or
any other similar goods or things.

REGULATIONS
(No. 25 of May 6, 1936)

ARTICLE 1. These regulations may be cited as the Importation of Plants
Regulations, 1936.
PLANT INTERCHANGE SCHEDULE

ArT. 2. (1) In these regulations “The Plant Interchange Schedule” means a
list of West African countries in respect of which agreements have been made
with the Government of the Gold Coast concerning the making and enforcement
in such countries and the Gold Coast of regulations governing the interchange of
plants and seeds of plants.

AUTHORIZED PORTS OF ENTRY

Art. 8. No person shall import or cause to be imported into the Gold Coast any
plant or seed except by mail or through the following ports of entry: Accra,
Winneba, Cape Coast, Saltpond, Takoradi.

IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

Art. 4. The following plants, produce, and seeds shall not be imported into the
Gold Coast:

(a) All plants in soil 0: in any material of which sotl forms a part.

(b) All plants from Central America, South America, and Trinidad, and other
‘countries in which witches’-broom disease of cocoa (Mardasmius perniciosus) is
known to occur, which are specified by the Governor by a notice in the Gazette,
except plants required and imported by the Department of Agriculture for
scientific purposes.

(c) All coconuts in husk from Central America, South America, Trinidad and
Tobago, Grenada, and St. Vincent (West Indies).

(d) All coffee in cherry unless accompanied by a certificate of freedom from
mealy pod disease issued by the Government agricultural authority of the
country of export.

(e) All cottonseed except such as may be required and imported by the
Department of Agriculture for scientific purposes.

PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS SUBJECT TO EXAMINATION

ArT. 5. (1) Any plant or seed, except seeds, bulbs, tubers, or corms of vege-
tables or ornamental plants from temperate countries, or dry hulled rice, coffee,
or pulses (legumes) for consumption, and any accompanying container brought
to the Gold Coast by steamer, mail, or any other channel may, before being
delivered to the consignee or addressee, be examined by a customs officer to
determine whether the plant or seed appears to be one whose importation is
forbidden or subject to precautions in accordance with these regulations.

DISPOSAL OF INFECTED PLANTS

ArT. 5 (3) Any plant or seed found actually infected by any pest or plant
disease shall, together with all other articles in the same receptacle, and all
packing material, be destroyed by the inspector without delay, but if the in-
spector considers that such plants, seeds, etc., can be so treated as entirely to
eradicate the pest or plant disease he may cause such treatment to be applied
at the consignee’s expense.



8S BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan—March

PROVISIONS GOVERNING THE IMPORTATION OF PLANTS AND SEEDS

ArT. 6. Subject to the provisions of the regulations, the importation of plants
and seeds of plants shall be governed by the following provisions:

(a) Importations of plants and seeds of schedule JI, group A, namely, cocoa,
cotton, cassava, oil palms, and all species of Musa and of Citrus shall be per-
mitted from. countries included in the plant interchange schedule only under
permit signed by the director of agriculture first obtained, and in accordance
with any special conditions which may be stated in such permit.

IMPORT PERMIT REQUIRED

(6) Importations of plants and seeds of schedule I, group A, namely, cocoa,
cotton, cassava, oil palms, all species of Musa and Citrus and of schedule I,
group B, namely, coconut, cola, coffee (except hulled and dried berries for con-
sumption), ground nuts (peanuts), yams, rice (except hulled rice for consump-
tion), pulses (except dry shelled seeds for consumption), guinea corn (broom-
corn), millets, maize, and rubber, from countries other than those of the plant
interchange schedule, shall be permitted only under permit signed by the director
of agriculture first obtained and in accordance with any special conditions
stated in the permit.

Such permit shall be granted for plants of cocoa, cotton, cassava, oil palms,
and all species of J/usa and Citrus only when needed for special scientific pur-
poses and when the director of agriculture is satisfied that the plants will be
grown under the observation of a person with special knowledge of the pests
and diseases of plants and under such conditions as should preclude any“ possi-
bility of the introduction of any dangerous pest or plant disease.

(c) Importations of plants and seeds of plants of group B, schedule I shall
be permitted from countries included in the plant interchange schedule.

ArT. 7. Applications for permits shall be made in writing to the director of
agriculture in advance of the shipment in order that the conditions of entry may
be ascertained and, where necessary, transmitted to the shipper.

Arr. 8. Pertains to the form in which permits are issued.

PHYTOSANITARY CERTIFICATES MAY BE PRESCRIBED

ArT. 9. Health certificates required from Government agricultural authori-
ties to accompany imports by any permit issued under these regulations shall
so far as practicable be in the form set out hereafter, or in a form accepted
by the director of agriculture as being substantially to the like effect.

Model certificate

This is to certify that the living plants or plant products ~-______-=_ = ==
a representative sample of the living plants or plant products ineluded in the
consignment, of which particulars are given below were/was thoroughly exam-
Ined On, (wears eee Pes (date) by 22 9st = ar ae (namepes ts |.
Beis Met a , a duly authorized official of 2222+ = eee eee ante
found to be healthy, no evidence of the presence of any injurious insect, pest, or
disease (destructive to vegetation) (destructive to agricultural crops) having
been found in/on them and that the consignment (including the packing) covered
by this certificate has/has not been treated in.the following manner (fumigated
with (agent) or disinfected with (agent) prior/immediately subsequent to
inspection).
(Inspected in the field by a duly authorized inspector) ~~------=—-~_1--=_=_
(noteinspected) 2. 2: 2 Spee ea 8 Se to oe
On MGlabeyy Hs sear aie aie ee

Signature: 22. 2. See eee
Official title-.22. 3 =e

escription of Shipment

Number and description of :packageS.._- = = =.
Distinguishing marks.._-'-.
Description of living plants or plant products or parts thereof________________
Stated to be grown at_-__-- eee re ee ee ee
Exported by. 2- ee 2 ee ee ee
Name and address of consigne@:.2--+—. = 4) ee EEE =



1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 9

Pe eteenar aaTiiciiars Of routes...
em eee 20. 1p PA) YY yee ed eet ee a a ed
IER ee A a
nnn imetne (6 jeattached (2.2 3 22!) teeta

(Give here details of any special certificate or certificates issued in respect
of imports specifically scheduled by the importing country.)

Note.—Strike out the alternative words that are not applicable.

B. E. P. Q. 403, Supplement No. 2.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF FRANCE

Marcu 8, 1938.

IMPORTATION OF SEEDS OF CONIFERS NOT PROHIBITED

According to the order of the direction-general of customs, No. 2505 2/2, of
April 23, 1936, the Minister of Agriculture, in response to an inquiry concerning
the applicability of the provisions of the decree of November 26, 1930 (p. 12,
B. E. P. Q. 403) to seeds of conifers, decided that aithough the expression
“parts of plants” of itself includes seeds, the seeds of the conifers in question
remain exempt from phytosanitary inspection on importation, if the shipment
is clean and the seeds have been sifted in such a manner that no foreign matter,
particularly needles of conifers, are contained therein.

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine,

B. E. P. Q. 421, Supplement No. 1.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, KINGDOM OF BULGARIA
Marcu 8, 1938.
IMPORTATION OF CITRUS FRUITS PLACED UNDER CONTROL

Article 4 of the decree of September 29, 1932 (B. E. P. Q. 421, p. 4) has been
supplemented by decree No. 40 (Derzhaven Vestnik No. 232, October 20, 1937) by
the addition of the following paragraph:

“All shipments containing oranges (Citrus aurantium=C. sinensis), mandarins
(C. nobilis=C. nobilis var. deliciosa), lemons (C. medica var. limonum=C.
limonia), grapefruit (C. decumana=—C. paradisi), bananas (Musa spp.), dates
(Phoenix dactylifera), carobs or St. John’s-bread (Ceratonia siliqua), pome-
granates (Punica granatum) and other southern fruits, are permitted entry
when the importer presents a certificate of health and of origin and when
all the requirements of the reguiation have been complied with.”

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

B. E. P. Q. 426, Supplement No. 3.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF ARGENTINA

JANUARY 18, 1938.
PASO DE Los LizResS AN ADDITIONAL PorT OF ENTRY

Decree No. 116897 of October 20, 1937, designates Paso de los Libres as an
additional port of entry for the introduction of plants in general, subject to the
provisions of decree No. 83732 of June 3, 1936, with the exception of sugarcane
(art. 35, p. 10, B. E. P. Q. 426), cottonseed (art. 41, p. 13), potatoes (art, 59,
p. 22), and grapevines (art. 60, p. 23).

Fresh fruits may enter that port only in transit to the Federal capital, Buenos
Aires, where they will be entered at the Federico Lacroze station subject to the
regulations governing the importation of those products (see art. 37, p. 12).

71071—38 2





10 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.—March

PoTATOES MADE SUBJECT 10 MERCHANDISE MARKING AcT

Decree No. 116277 of October 9, 1987, effective January 1, 1938, places imported
and domestic seed and consumption potatoes under the provisions of the Argen-
tine Merchandise Marking Act (law No. 11275) and promulgates the following
regulations governing the marking of potato containers.

POTATO CONTAINERS MUST MEET REQUIREMENTS OF LAW NO. 11275

ARTICLE 1. From January 1, 19388, all containers of potatoes must meet the
requirements established by law No. 11275, the Merchandise Marking Act, its
regulatory decrees of November 18, 1932, and November 26, 1935, respectively,
and the provisions established by the present decree.

MARKING OF CONTAINERS

ArT. 2. Potato containers must show whether potatoes for consumption or seed
potatoes are concerned, the net weight of their contents, and bear the legend
“Industria Argentina’ (Argentine Industry) when they are domestic products,
or the name of the country of origin if imported.

ArT. 3. The containers of domestic potatoes, whether for consumption or as
certified seed potatoes, must indicate the locality where grown, and the latter
must also bear the name of the variety of the potatoes; with respect to imported
seed potatoes, the indication of the place where grown will be substituted by
the name of the variety to which the potatoes belong. ;

NET WEIGHT REQUIRED

ArT. 4. The net weight of both domestic and imported potatoes must be
marked on the containers in kilograms, a tolerance up to 2 percent being allowed
between the weight marked on the containers and that due to the natural
shrinkage of the product en route.

METHOD OF MARKING

Art. 5. All the legends and marks referred to in the preceding articles must
be stamped, printed, or impressed clearly and legibly on the principal side of the
container, namely, that bearing the name or mark of the grower or seller.

SIZE OF MARKS

Art. 6. The following scale of minimal heights is established to which the
letters in the following expressions must conform: “Papa para consumo”
(potatoes for consumption), ‘‘Semilla certificada de papa” (certified seed pota-
toes), and ‘“‘Peso neto”’ (net weight) ; 4 em for boxes and 6 em for bags; “Zona
de produccion” (place where grown), and “Variedad” (variety) ; 3 em for boxes.
and 5 em for bags: “Industria Argentina’ (Argentine Industry), and “Pais de
origen” (country of origin) ; 2 cm for boxes and 4 cm for bags. The numerals
indicating the quantity placed after ‘Peso neto” shall in no case be smaller than
the letters of the words “Peso neto.”

SIZE OF CONTAINERS FOR DOMESTIC POTATOES

Art. 7. Domestic potatoes, whether for consumption or planting, shall be packed.
in bags of 60 kilos net or in boxes of 50 kilos net; the latter shall have a partition
in the middle.

Art. 8. Imported certified seed potatoes will circulate in Argentina in the
containers in which they were imported.

PROHIBITED MARKS

Art. 9. The use is prohibited on containers of potatoes for consumption of any
label, ticket, or inscription employing the words “semilla” (seed), “certificada”’
(certified), “seleccionada”’ (selected), “hija de certificada” (products of certified
material), “hija de importada”’ (products of imported material), or any other
indication, whether or not derived from the above, that might lead to confusion
as to the true condition or nature of the product.



1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 11

CORRECTION

The word “or” should be inserted between the words “net weight (metric),”
and “number of units” in line 6 of the second paragraph under the caption
“Packing of Fruit” on page 11 of B. E. P. Q. 426. Line 6 will then read:
“contents, class, variety, net weight (metric) or number of units, name and.”

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

B. E. P. Q. 428, Supplement No. 1.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, BRITISH COLONY OF CEYLON

JANUARY 14, 1938.
A regulation of February 27, 1937 (Ceylon Government Gazette, March 12,
1937), withdraws the item “ginger” from article 4, paragraph (a) of the general
regulations (see p. 3 of B. E. P. Q. 428). Consequently, the word “ginger” should
be stricken from the said paragraph and also from the item “Living plants,
trees, roots, bulbs or portions thereof” under the caption ‘Importation Restricted”
in the summary on page 1 of B. E. P. Q. 428.
| LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

B. E. P. Q. 439, Supplement No. 1.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, KINGDOM OF SWEDEN

AveustT 18, 1937.

Through the courtesy of the Central Institute for Agricultural Research -of
Sweden it is possible to make the following modifications in the text of circular
B. E. P. Q. 489, necessitated chiefly by the lack of the original texts involved.

1. The words “Great Britain, Greece, and Portugal” in the first item of the
summary, page 4 of B. E. P. Q. 439, are to be stricken out, because the provision
in question no longer applies to those countries.

2. The following note applying to the “Restrictions on the Importation of
Seeds,” page 13 of B. E. P. Q. 439, should be added as a footnote:

“As a generally applicable rule it may be stated that a license from the
Kungl. Lantbrukstyrelsen (Royal Department of Agriculture) is required for
the importation of all seeds, except seeds of ornamental plants.”

3. The item 90 F and 90 H of article 1, proclamation of March 18, 1921,
under the caption “Import Permits Required,’ on page 14 of B. E. P. Q. 439,
should be corrected to read:

“90 F Rye grasses (Lolium perenne and L. multiflorum) ;
90 H Turnips, carrots, swedes, and beets.”

Item 90 I has been revoked and should be stricken out.
Lee A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

B. E. P. Q. 444, Supplement No. 2.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, FRENCH ZONE OF MOROCCO

JANUARY 31, 1938.

RESTRICTIONS ON THE IMPORTATION OF SEED PoTATOES

[Vizirial decree of September 25, 1935, promulgated October 1, 1935, as amended by that
of May 27, 1936]

PACKAGES TO BE SECURELY FASTENED AND SEALED

ARTICLE 1. The importation into the French Zone of Morocco of seed potatoes
for sale or transfer is prohibited unless the tubers are contained in a package



Ly BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.—March

that is completely closed by a sealed locking device and provided with a tag
indicating in full:

1. The name and address of the seller.

2. The name of the variety of potatoes contained in the package.

3. A statement of the purity of the variety based on 100 tubers; the grading
may not be less than 98 percent. The indication “selected” may be placed after
the varietal name if the potatoes are accompanied by a certificate issued by a
control station that supervised the growing crop.

4, The minimum weight of the tubers, which may not fall below 35 g.

5. The words “calibrated seed” or “seeds not calibrated” as the case may be.
For so-called calibrated seed petatoes the variation in the weight of the tubers
may not exceed 15 percent, and none of them may weigh less than 35 g

6. The country of origin, with the name of the municipality and department
where France is concerned and the name of the locality when other countries
are concerned.

The above data must be repeated on all papers that concern the sale.

ArT. 2. Forbids erroneous statements concerning the condition, origin, variety,
and degree of purity of potatoes.

CATALOG NAME OF POTATO VARIETY TO BE USED

ArT. 3. The variety of seed potatoes is to be designated by the name under
which they are borne in the catalog issued by the French Department of Agri-
culture or the central station of agronomic research. Each newly produced
variety must be entered in one or both those catalogs before it can enter into
traffic.

GHNERAL IMPORT REGULATIONS REMAIN APPLICABLE

ArT. 4. The foregoing regulations are without prejudice to those of the Dahir
of September 20, 1927.
Lee A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

B. BH. P. Q. 444, Supplement No. 3.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, FRENCH ZONE OF MOROCCO

Marcu 8, 1938.
IMPORTATION AND TRANSIT UNRESTRICTED

The list of plant products named in the decree of the director general of
February 19, 1931 (see p. 14, B. HE. P. Q. 444), has been supplemented by the
decree of May 5, 1937.

The following items are added to the paragraphs correspondingly numbered
on pages 15 and 16 of B. HE. P. Q. 444:

1. Sorghum (Sorghum vulgare Pers.). Broomeorn millet (Panicum miliaceum

2. Chickpea or garbanzo (Cicer arietinum L.).

3. Cacao bean (Theobroma cacao L.)

5. Refuse (droppings) of roses (the flowers).

The following new paragraphs are added:

11. Sesame seeds (Sesamum indicum L.), and black cummin (Nigella sativa
L.). Pistachio seeds (Pistachio vera L.), seeds of stone pine (Pinus pinea L.),
shelled chestnuts (Castanea sativa Mill.), and shelled peanuts (Arachis
hypogaca I..).

12. Plants and parts of plants, dried, so-called sterilized by heat or chemicals.

Paragraph 9 is amended to read as follows:

9. Industrially dried fruits and vegetables; flours, food pastes, brans, oil
cakes, straw, and hay; excepting, however, rice straw, and such dried fruits
as dried plums, figs, grapes, apricots, apples, pears, and peaches.

Ler A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.



1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 13

B. E. P. Q. 445, Supplement No. 1.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, CENTRAL AMERICA (SALVADOR)

JANUARY 29, 1938.

PERMIT REQUIRED TO IMPORT RAW OR GINNED COTTON

Legislative decree No. 208, published in the Diario Oficial of December 1, 1937,
prohibits the importation of raw or ginned cotton into Salvador except under
permit from the Ministry of Finance.

Permits for the importation of cotton will be issued only in the event that
supplies of Salvadorean cotton are not available.

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine,



B. E. P. Q. 445; Supplement No. 2.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, CENTRAL AMERICA
(BRITISH HONDURAS)
Marcu 9, 1938.

IMPORTATION OF CITRUS PLANTS AND FRUITS PROHIBITED

Proclamation No. 5, January 14, 1938, prohibits the importation into the colony,
directly or indirectly, of any citrus fruit, seed, cutting, or plant, to prevent
introduction of citrus canker (Bacterium citri (Hasse) Doidge).

The proclamation of March 11, 19536, which restricted the importation of citrus
plants (see pp. 2 and 3 of B. E. P. Q. 445) was revoked by proclamation No. 5.

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Piant Quarantine.

B. E. P. Q. 447, Supplement No. 3.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, KINGDOM OF YUGOSLAVIA

Marcu 8, 1938.

LIST OF COUNTRIES INFECTED OR INFESTED BY THE POTATO WART, COLORADO POTATO
BEETLE, POTATO TUBER WORM, AND SAN JOSE SCALE

Under date of February 21, 1938, the Royal Yugoslav legation in Washington
transmitted a list, applicable for the year 1958, recently promulgated by the Yugo-
slay Ministry of Agriculture, of countries regarded as being infected or infested
by potato wart (Synchytrium endobioticum), Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa
decemlineata), potato tuber worm (Gnorimoschema operculella), and San Jose
scale (Aspidiotus perniciosus).

The list for 1938 adds the following names of countries to the list for 1937.
(See B. E. P. Q. 447, p. 4):

Under “Colorado potato beetle’ Netherlands and Switzerland are added.

Under ‘Potato tuber worm” Sicily is added.

Correction in Supplement No. 2 to B..E. P. Q. 447:

Line 1 of paragraph 1, prohibiting the importation of seedlings of Douglas fir,
should read:

“The Order of the Minister of Agriculture of Yugoslavia.”

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

B. E. P. Q. 449, Supplement No. 1.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, PERSIA

JANUARY 29, 1938.
IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

According to the Nachrichtenblatt fiir den Deutschen Pflanzenschutzdienst
18: 1, January 1938, the following plant products are named in a list of products



14 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.—March

whose importation into Persia is prohibited during the administrative year
1316-1317 (June 22, 1937, to June 22, 19388) :

Castor beans as seeds (ficinus sp.), grass seeds, sarcocolla seeds (Penaeca
fucata L.), quinee seeds (Cydonia sp.), fodder, hay, alfalfa (fresh or dried),
straw, potted flowers;

Seeds of all kinds;

Plant food material, fruits, vegetables, and dried fruits.

LreE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

B. E. P. Q. 465, Supplement No. 1.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, FRENCH COLONIES (OCEANIA)

FEBRUARY 19, 1938.

The order of the Governor, dated August 31, 1984, effective December 1,
1934, prohibits the importation into French Oceania of fresh cabbage and
cauliflower, in order to prevent the introduction of the common green cabbage
worm (Ascia rapae L.) into that Colony. Any shipment of those products
arriving in French Oceania will be destroyed.

[Superseding the Memorandum of November 26, 1934, to Inspectors in Charge]

IMPORTATION PROHIBITED INTO THE FRENCH SETTLEMENTS OF OCEANIA OF PLANTS,
PARTS OF PLANTS, SEEDLINGS, SEEDS, FRUITS, AND PLANT PRODUCTS GENERALLY,
FROM CERTAIN COUNTRIES

ARTICLE 1 of a recent order, No. 1233, prchibits the importation of plants,
parts of plants, seedlings, seeds, fruits, and plant products in general, as well
as their containers, proceeding from Samoa (eastern and western), the Tonga
Archipelago, the Bismarck Archipelago, New Guinea, the Philippine Islands,
Taiwan, Cuba, Haiti, San Domingo, and Puerto Rico, as a precaution against
the introduction of coleopterous parasites of the coconut palm especially
Oryctes monoceros Ol. (rhinoceros beetle).

IMPORTATION OF CRUDE FIBERS PROHIBITED

ArT, 2. This prohibition applies also to copra and crude (raw) fibers, but
not to parts of plants that have been subjected to any manufacturing process
unless they are moist or rotten.

IMPORTATION OF SAND, SOIL, AND FERTILIZERS PROHIBITED

ArT. 8. The importation of sand, soil, and fertilizers from the same sources,
whether alone or accompanying other products, is also prohibited.

RESTRICTIONS ON THE LANDING OF OTHER PRODUCTS

ArT. 5. Preseribes that general cargo, other than soils and plant products,
laden at ports of the above-named countries, may not be unladen until an
official certificate of the country of origin, affirming that the articles, packages,
and materials constituting the cargo to be unladen were fumigated with hydro-
cyanic acid gas for 1 hour immediately before the departure of the vessel, the
dosage being a minimum of 50 grams of potassium cyanide per cubic meter
of space, is presented to an inspector. Such articles shall not be landed until
they have been inspected by an inspector, who may forbid the landing of such
articles, or if permission be granted, only on condition of fumigation after
unlading. No customs official shall permit the landing of such articles except
on the instructions of an inspector.

Personal effects, baggage, ete., also shall be inspected and, if deemed neces-
sary, fumigated.

The following data should be inserted in B. EH. P. Q. 465 as page 4 a:

GUADELOUPE AND DEPENDENCIES

Banana plants (Musa spp.) : See order of December 7, 1926, as amended by
that of February 9, 1935, p. 25.



1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 15

Cocoa plants (Theobroma cacao lL.): See order of December 3, 1925, as
amended by that of February 13, 1932, p. 26.

Cotton (Gossypium spp.), plants or parts thereof in the dry or green state,
ginned or unginned cotton, cottonseed, soil or compost, packing or containers,
and seeds, plants, ete., capable of harboring the pink bollworm, especially
Hibiscus cannabinus, H. esculentus, and Bauhinia: See order of February 22,
1926, p. 32.

Coffee plants (Coffea spp.), berries or seeds: See order of May 19, 1924, to
prevent the introduction of coffee rust (Hemileia vastatrir B. and Br.), p. 20.

Coffee plants (Coffea spp.), and parts thereof, dry or fresh beans, beans in
parchment, hulled beans (fresh or unroasted), soil and composts, containers, and
plants capable of harboring the coffee-berry borer (Stephanoderes hampei Hag.),
especially Hibiscus and Rubus: See order of February 27, 1922, p. 28.

Sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum L.): See order of December 3, 1929, p. 34.

Correction: Page 5, under the item “Cotton,” the date of the order should be
February 22, 1926.

Insert in “Contents” page after ‘Equatorial Africa” the item
eawureremenareteee eee es Av ae AS sh heal sae hots 4 9.”

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

B. E. P. Q. 467.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, AUSTRALIAN TERRITORY OF PAPUA

JANUARY 14, 1938.

This summary of the plant-quarantine import restrictions of the Australian
Territory of Papua has been prepared for the information of nurserymen, plant-
quarantine officials, and others interested in the exportation of plants and plant
products to that Territory. j

It was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant quarantine inspector in charge of
foreign information service, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines, from the
Plants’ Diseases Ordinance 1911, as amended, the Cotton Ordinance 1925, and
proclamations and regulations promulgated thereunder, and reviewed by the
director of agriculture of Papua.

The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct and com-
plete up to the time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used inde-
pendently of, nor as a substitute for, the original texts, and it is not to be
interpreted as legally authoritative.

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, AUSTRALIAN TERRITORY OF PAPUA
Basic LEGISLATION

[Plants’ Diseases Ordinance, No. 28, November 20, 1911. Plants’ Diseases Ordinance, No.
17, November 25, 1913. Cotton Ordinance, No. 11, September 8, 1925]

SUMMARY
IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

Coffee seed (Coffea spp.) : Importation prohibited, except when obtained by
or through the director of Agriculture. (Statutory Rules, No. 10, May 8, 1929,
Dp. T4

Tobacco seed (Nicotiana tabacum L.): Importation prohibited, except when
obtained by or through the director of agriculture. (Statutory Rule No. 4 of
April 9, 1934.)

Bananas, banana plants (Musa spp.) or parts thereof: Importation prohibited.
(Proclamation of May 23, 1927, p. 8.)

Living palms, ornamentals, and fruit trees and any living part thereof except
the seeds: Importation from. the Malay Archipelago prohibited. (Proclamation
of February 8, 1932.)



16 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan—March

IMPORTATION RESTRICTED

Plants, including trees or plants, cuttings, slips, and all live parts of trees or
plants the entry of which is not prohibited: Importer shall notify customs of
intent to import; on arrival of the plants they shall be placed at disposal of
customs for fumigation. (Statutory Rules, No. 4, February 28, 1923, p. 6.)

Cottonseed (Gossypiwm spp.) : Importer shall notify customs of intent to
import; he shall also furnish to customs a certificate from responsible officer
of the Department of Agriculture of Queensland that the cottonseed has been
examined and fumigated by said Department, or that it has been examined and
is found free from disease. (Statutory Rules, No. 4, February 28, 1923, p. 6.)

Sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum L.): Importer shall notify customs of
intent to import and shall produce to the director of agriculture the following
certificates: (1) Fumigation certificate from Queensland Department of Agri-
culture; (2) certificate from properly qualified pathologist that the sugarcane
proceeds from a disease-free area and is itself free from disease; (8) certificate
from properly qualified entomologist that the sugarcane is free from injurious
insects. (Statutory Rules, No. 11, July 21, 1930, p. 7.)

LEGISLATIVE AUTHORITY

Plants’ Diseases Ordinance of 1911, as amended by ordinance No. 17, of
November 26, 1918, authorizes the Lieutenant Governor of the Territory by
proclamation, inter alia, to prohibit or restrict the importation of plants; to
seize and dispose of every insect, fungus, tree, plant, or vegetable imported into
the Territory contrary to the provisions of this ordinance or proclamations or
regulations issued thereunder; to inspect imported trees, plants, or vegetables;
to make regulations to control the importation of trees, plants, or vegetables.

The Cotton Ordinance, No. 11, September 8, 1925, authorizes the Lieutenant
Governor to regulate, prohibit, or restrict the importation into the Territory of
the cotton plant or any variety thereof.

DEFINITIONS

The following definitions are included in ordinance No. 28, of November 20,
1911:

“Disease’: Any disease affecting trees, plants, or vegetables caused by or
consisting of the presence of any insect or fungus, as well as any other disease
affecting trees, plants, or vegetables which the Lieutenant Governor may from
time to time, by proclamation in the Gazette, declare to be a disease within the
meaning of this ordinance and whether or not so caused by or consisting of the
presence of any disease or fungus.

“Insects” and “fungi” are those so declared by proclamation of the Lieutenant
Governor in the Gazette within the meaning of this ordinance in whatever stage
of existence they may be.

DECLARED DISEASES, INSECTS, AND FUNGI

Through the proclamation of January 26, 1912, the Lieutenant Governor de-
clared the following to be diseases, insects, and fungi within the meaning of
ordinance No. 28, of November 20, 1911, namely:

DISEASES

Coconuts (Cocos nucifera L.):
Leaf disease (Pestalozezia palmarum Cke.).
Root disease (Fomes sp.).
(Stem) bleeding disease (Thielaviopsis paradoxa (De Seyn.) v. Hoch.).
Bud rot (Phytophthora spp.) or (Pestalozzia palmarum Cke.).
Rubber (Hevea spp.) :
White root rot (Fomes lignosus Klotzsch).

- Sugareane (Saccharum officinarum Iu.) :

Leaf disease.
Red rust (Puccinia kuehnii (Kr.) Butl.).



1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 17

INSECTS

Coconuts:
Solomon Island stag beetle (Hurytrachelus pilosipes Waterh.).
Solomon Island elephant beetle (Xylotrupes ninurod Voet.=X. gideon L.).
Solomon Island rhinoceres beetle (Trichogomphus semmelinki Rits.).
Ceylon rhinoceros beetle (Oryctes rhinoceros L.).
Red beetle or Asiatic palm weevil (Rhynchophorus ferrugineus Oliv.).
Cane beetle (Sphenophorus obscurus=Rhabdocnemis obscura Boisd.).
Small palm weevil ((Calandra) Diocalandra taitensis Guerin).
Cabbage-palm beetie or leaf hispa (Brontispa froggatti Sharp).
Copra bug (Necrobia rufipes Degeer).
Longicorns (a) Xicuthrus costatus Montrouz.
Longicorns (b) Olethrius tyrannus Thoms.
Phasma or leaf insect (Graeffea crouanii (Le Guillou) syn. Lopaphus

coccophagus Westwood).
Coccids (Coccidae).
Stinkbugs (Pentatomidae).
Rubber:

White ants (Termes spp.).

Sugarcane:
Cane beetle ({Sphenophorus) Rhabdocnemis obscura Boisd.).
Leafhoppers (Perkinsiella bicoloris Muir., P. lalokensis Muir., P. papuensis

Muir., P. rattlei Muir., P. variegata Muir., and P. vastatriz Breddin).

FUNGI

Coconut :
Pestalozzia palmarum Cke., leaf disease and bud rot of coconut.
Pythium palmivorum Butler, Godavari disease of coconut.
Rubber:
Fomes (semitosa) lignosus Klotzsch, root rot.

GENERAL REGULATIONS
[Statutory Rules, Nc. 4 of 1923, February 28, 1923]

CITATION

ARTICLE 1. These regulations may be cited as the Plants’ (Importation)
Regulations, 1923.
DEFINITIONS

ArT. 2. In these regulations, unless the context otherwise indicates:

“Importer” includes the person who introduces any plant or the consignee
of any plant.

“Plants” means trees or plants and includes cuttings and slips of trees and
plants and all live parts of plants and trees.

ArT. 3. Revokes previous regulations.

DUTIES OF IMPORTER

Arr. 4. (1) The importer or intending importer of any plants shall, before
the plants are introduced or landed in the Territory, notify the principal
officer of customs at a port of entry of the fact that such plants are intended
to be introduced into the Territory by him.

(2) The importer shall thereafter cause the plants and the boxes, bags, and
wrappings in which they are contained to be placed in the tent provided for
the purpose of fumigation, or to such other structure as the principal officer
of customs may direct and in such manner as such officer shall approve.

FUMIGATION OF PLANTS REQUIRED

ArT. 5. Such plants, together with boxes, bags, and wrappings in which they
are contained, shall then be fumigated by the method provided by the director

71071—38 3





18 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan—March

of agriculture, under the supervision of the principal officer of customs or such
officer as he may appoint, before the same are removed.

PLANTS MAY NOT BE REMOVED BEFORE FUMIGATION

ArT. 6. No person shall remove the plants, boxes, bags, or wrappings in which ©
they are contained from the tent or structure in which they have been so placed
for the purpose of fumigation, until after they have been fumigated, as provided
by these regulations.

RESTRICTIONS ON THE IMPORTATION OF COTTONSEED

ArT. 7. No cottonseed shall be imported or introduced into the Territory
unless:

(1) The importer or intending importer shall, before the cottonseed is intro-
duced or landed in the Territory, notify the principal officer of customs at a
port of entry of the fact that such cottonseed is intended to be introduced into
the Territory by him.

(2) The importer or intending importer furnishes such principal officer of
customs with a certificate from some responsible officer of the Department of
Agriculture of the State of Queensland:

(a) That the cottonseed has been examined and fumigated by expert officers
of the department of agriculture concerned, or

(bo) That the cottonseed has been examined by expert officers of the depart-
ment of agriculture concerned and that it is free from disease.

Provided, that in cases where cottonseed is imported by and consigned to the
Government, the director of agriculture, on being satisfied in such manner as
seems to him sufficient that the cottonseed has been properly fumigated in
Queensland before shipment, or that it is free from disease, may, in writing,
authorize the principal officer of customs to permit the landing and delivery of
the cottonseed without requiring the production of any such certificate.

RESTRICTIONS ON IMPORTATION OF COFFEE SEED

ArT. Ta. No coffee seed shall be imported or introduced into the Territory
except when obtained by or through the director of agriculture. Any coffee seed
imported or introduced in breach of this regulation may be seized and destroyed
by any officer of customs. (Amendment through Statutory Rules No. 10, May
8, 1929.)

RESTRICTIONS ON IMPORTATION OF SUGARCANE

ArT. 7b. No sugareane shall be imported or introduced into the Territory
unless:

(1) The importer or intending importer shall, before the sugarcane is intro-
duced or landed in the Territory, notify the principal officer of customs at a port
of entry of the fact that such sugarcane is intended to be introduced into the
Territory by him; and

(2) The importer or intending importer furnishes the director of agriculture
with the following certificates:

(a) A certificate from a responsible officer of the Department of Agriculture
of the State of Queensland that the sugarcane has been properly fumigated under
the personal supervision of a person properly qualified to carry out such fum'ga-
tion ; and

(6) A certificate from a properly qualified plant pathologist that the sugarcane
is, to the best of his knowledge and belief, from a disease-free area and free
from diseases; and

(c) A certificate from a properly qualified entomologist that the sugarcane is
free from injurious insects.

(3) The director of agriculture is satisfied with the certificates so furnished,
whereupon the said director of agriculture may authorize the said principal
officer of customs by wireless or in writing to permit the introduction into the
Territory of the said sugarcane without observing the other conditions of these
regulations. (Amendment through Statutory Rules No. 11, July 21, 1930.)

RESTRICTIONS ON IMPORTATION OF TOBACCO SEED

Art. Tc. No tobacco seed shall be imported or introduced into the Territory,
except when obtained by or through the director of agriculture. Tobacco seed



1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 19

imported in breach of this regulation may be seized and destroyed by any officer
of customs. (Amendment through Statutory Rule No. 4 of 1934.)

IMPORTATION OF BANANAS PROHIBITED
[Proclamation of May 23, 1927]

In this proclamation, the lieutenant governor, by and with the advice of the
executive council, prohibits the importation or introduction of any banana,
banana plant (Musa spp.) or part thereof into the Territory.

B. E. P. Q. 468.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, KINGDOM OF IRAQ

JANUARY 20, 1938.

This digest of the plant-quarantine import restrictions of the Kingdom of
Iraq has been prepared for the information of nurserymen, plant-quarantine
officials, and others interested in the exportation of plants and plant products
to that country.

It was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant quarantine inspector in charge of
foreign information service, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines, from his
translations of the Importation of Plants Law of January 7, 1925, and customs
law No. 56, May 7, 1931, and reviewed by the director of agriculture, Depart-
ment of Agricultural Affairs, Baghdad, Iraq.

The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct and com-
plete up to the time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used inde-
pendently of, nor as a substitute for, the original texts, and it is not to be
interpreted as legally authoritative.

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, KINGDOM OF IRAQ

BAsiIc LEGISLATION
[Importation of plants law, January 7, 1925. Customs code law, No. 56, of May 7, 1931]

Through the customs code law No. 56, of May 7, 1931, the King of Iraq
decrees (ch. III, art. 18) that provisions may at any time be promulgated
whereby, for the public safety or for sanitary or moral reasons, or as preventive
measures against animal and plant diseases, the importation, exportation, or
transit of certain kinds of merchandise into or from Iraq, or to a particular
country or place outside the boundaries of Iraq, are restricted or prohibited.

SUMMARY
IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

Hemp seeds and plants (Cannabis sativa L.). (Customs tariff law No. 11,
ADI ZY, 1935, art. 11, p.' 5.)

Injurious insect pests and diseases. (Appendix to importation of plants
law of January 7, 1925, p. 3.)

IMPORTATION RESTRICTED

Citrus fruits and stocks, grapes, and grapevines: Must be accompanied by a
phytosanitary certificate of the competent authority of the country of origin.
(Customs tariff law No. 11, April 29, 1933, art. 5, p. 5.)

Plants with woody stems, parts thereof, also bulbs, corms, rhizomes, and
tubers, except potatoes; cottonseed and seed cotton: Subject to inspection on
arrival, but inspection may be waived if they are accompanied by a phyto-
sanitary certificate issued. by competent authority of the exporting country.
(Arts. 3, 4, and 5, importation of plants law of January 7, 1925, p. 2.



20 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan—March

Plants for scientific purposes: Unrestricted except that an import permit
must be obtained from the director of agricuiture. (Art. 12, importation of
plants law of January 7, 1925, p. 3.)

EXPORTATION PROHIBITED

Palm tree shoots: Exportation from Iraq prohibited. (Law No. 1, February’
tf. 1935," pr 762) ; ;

GENERAL REGULATIONS
(Importation of Plants Law of January 7, 1925)
ARTICLE 1. This law may be cited as “The Importation of Plants Law, 1924.”
DEFINITION

Art. 2. “Plant” means all plants with woody stems and all parts thereof,
such as stocks, nursery plants, scions, layers, and cuttings thereof; cottonseed
and seed cotton; bulbs, corms, rhizomes, and tubers, except potatoes.

INSPECTION ON ARRIVAL

Arr, 3. All plants imported into Iraq by mail or otherwise will be held for
inspection by a Government inspector, as prescribed in article 5.

INFECTED PLANTS DISINFECTED OR DESTROYED

Art. 4. Should it be found that plants are attacked by any of the diseases
named in the appendix hereto, or should a portion of the plants concerned be
so attacked, the Government inspector may order their disinfection or de-
struction.

INSPECTION MAY BE WAIVED IF PLANTS ACCOMPANIED BY CERTIFICATES

Art. 5. The Government inspector may, in his discretion, pass without inspec-
tion any plants or consignments of plants which are accompanied by a certifi-
‘eate of a competent branch of the agricultural institute of the exporting coun-
try, affirming that they are free from the diseases named in the appendix.

Art. 6. All expenses involved in inspection, detention, disinfection, or de-
struction of plants shall be borne ky the importer.

ART. 7. Provides for the inspection of plants for export.

ArT. 8. Relates to fees for inspection, ete.

ArT. 9. Provides for the promulgation or modification of administrative
decrees.

Art. 10. The Minister of the Interior may order the destruction by burning
of all plants in which epidemic diseases are found.

ArT. 11. Relates to violations and penalties.

IMPORTATION OF PLANTS FOR SCIENTIFIC PURPOSES NOT RESTRICTED

ArT. 12. No provision of this law is applicabie to plants imported for scien-
tific research on the basis of a separate (special) permit of the director of
agriculture. In this permit it will be expressly stated the plants shall not be
inspected.

APPENDIX

Inspect pests:
Anthonomus grandis Boh., boll weevil.
(Aspidiotus) Chrysomphalus curantii Mask., California red scale.
Aspidiotus perniciosus Comst., San Jose scale.
Ceratitis capitata Wied., Mediterranean fruitfly.
Chionaspis furfura Fitch, seurfy scale.
Conotrachelus nenuphar Hbst., plum curculio.



1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 21

(Cosmophila) Anomis erosa Hbn., okra, mallow, or cotton leaf cater-
pillar or cotton semilooper.
Craponius inaequalis Say, grape curculio.
Drosophila melanogaster Mg.
Farias fabia Stoll., cotton bollworm.
(Euproctis chrysorrhoea) =Nygmia phaeorrhoea Don., brown-tail moth.
(Gelechia) Pectinophora gossypiella Saund., pink bollworm.
Heliothis obsoleta Fab., bollworm, corn ear worm.
Icerya purchasi Mask., cottony-cushion scale.
Lepidosaphes ulmi L., oystershell scale.
(Leucania) Cirphis unipuncta Haw., armyworm.
Malacosoma americana Fab., eastern tent caterpillar.
(Mayetiola) Phytophaga destructor Say, hessian fly.
Phyllozera (vastatrir) vitifoliae Fitch, grape phylloxera.
Polychrosis viteana Clem.. grape berry moth.
Porthetria dispar L., gypsy moth.
Psyllia mali Schmid., apple sucker.
(Schizoneura) Eriosoma lanigerum Hausm., woolly apple aphid.
Sylepta derogata Fab.
Aphids, scale insects, and mites in general.
Fungous diseases:

Those caused by any species of the following genera:
Erysiphe, powdery mildew.
Hroascus, leaf curls.
Gloeosporium, anthracnoses.
Guignardia, black rots.
Nectria (ditissima) galligena Bres., European canker of apple.
Peronospora, downy miidews.
Plasmopora, downy mildews.
Plowrightia, black knot.
Puccinia, rusts.
Tilletia, smuts.
Ustilago, smuts.
Venturia, including apple and pear scab.

ADDITIONAL IMPORT RESTRICTIONS AND PROHIBITIONS

(Customs tariff law No. 11 of April 29, 1933, abstracted)

IMPORTATION OF CITRUS FRUITS AND STOCKS RESTRICTED

ArT. 5. The importation is prohibited of citrus fruits and stocks, such as
lemons, pomelos, grapefruit, and other citrus fruits, as well as grapes, grapevine
leaves, and stocks, unless those products are accompanied by a certificate of the
competent authorities of the country of origin, affirming that the said products
had been inspected and found free from disease. This prohibition does not
apply to such fruits if preserved, candied, or dried, or to their juice.

IMPORTATION OF HEMP PROHIBITED

ArT. 11. The importation of hemp seeds and plants (Cannabis sativa L.)
is prohibited.

INSPECTION ON ARRIVAL

ArT. 19. The importation of “plants,” namely, plants with woody stems,
and parts thereof, such as stems, stocks, scions, layers, and cuttings; also
seed cotton and cottonseed, flower bulbs, corms, rhizomes, and tubers other
than potatoes, is subject to inspection by agricultural ‘authorities on entry.
If a contagious disease is found, the infected product will be disinfected or
destroyed. They can be cleared through the customs only on presentation of
a “no objection” certificate issued by the agricultural authority.

Plants may be imported for scientific purposes under a permit from the Divi-
sion of Agriculture, regardless of the ‘above restrictions; cottonseed may be
imported only in accordance with the provisions of the cotton law, No. 26 of
1927.



22 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.—March

EXPORTATION OF PALM TREE SHOOTS PROHIBITED
(Law No. 1, February 11, 1935)

ARTICLE 1. The exportation of palm tree shoots from Iraq shall be prohibited.
ArT. 2. Penalty for violation.

B. E. P. Q. 469, Superseding P. Q. C. A. 289.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, KINGDOM OF ITALY

FEBRUARY 5, 1938.

This revised digest of the plant-quarantine import restrictions of the Kingdom
of Italy was rendered necessary by the abrogation of older legislation and its
supersession by more recent enactments. It was prepared for the information
of nurserymen, plant-quarantine officiais, and others interested in the exporta-
tion of plants and plant products to that country, by Harry B. Shaw, plant quar-
antine inspector in charge foreign information service, Division of Foreign Plant
Quarantines, from the original texts of the various Italian laws and decrees
concerned, and reviewed by the Italian Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry.

The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct up to the
time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used independently of, nor as a
substitute for, the original texts, and it is not to be interpreted as legally au-
thoritative. The said laws and decrees should be consulted for the exact texts.

LrEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, KINGDOM OF ITALY
Basic LEGISLATION

[Law No. 987 of June 18, 1931, as amended by decree law No. 913, June 23, 1932, and
decree law No. 1580 of June 12, 1936. International Phylloxera Convention of Berne,
November 3, 1881, and provisions adopted by the Italian Government]

[ Powers under law No. 987 of June 18, 19381]

Arr. 8. The Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry (Ministero dell’Agricoltura
e delle foreste), with the advice of the Ministry of Corporations (Ministero delle
corporazioni), can by decree:

(a) Suspend the importation into, and transit through, the Kingdom of plants,
parts of plants, and seeds found to be infected.

(0) Establish frontier stations and ports through which the importation and
transit of plants, parts of plants, and plant products may take place.

(c) Promulgate rules and regulations to be observed for the importation of
the products referred to in the preceding paragraph.

ArT. 9. Delegates of the Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry assigned for
supervisory service at frontier stations and ports, according to the rules pro-
mulgated by the said Ministry, have the following functions:

(a) To impose the disinfection or destruction of plants, parts of plants, and
seeds regarded as infected, as well as of materials, packing, containers, and such
other articles as may Serve as vehicles of infection.

(6) To prohibit the introduction into the Kingdom, and transit through it, of
plants and seeds found infested or bearing pathogenic organisms or parasites.

The provisions of law No. 987 of June 18, 1931. as amended, are administered
under regulations promulgated under decree law No. 913 of June 23, 1932, and
law No. 19383 of December 22, 1932.

SUMMARY
IMPORTATION AND TRANSIT PROHIBITED FROM ALL COUNTRIES

Almonds in the shell (Amygdalus communis L.). (Decree of March 3, 1927,
AUT pean (U) saOee be)

Banana plants and fruits (Musa spp.). (Decree of March 3, 1927, art. 8 (gq),
D0)



1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 23

Cactus plants and fruits (Cactaceae). (Ministerial order of December 20,
1982, p. 11.)

Citrus fruits and parts thereof, including fresh peel. (Decree of March 3,
1927, art. 8 (d), p. 6.) (See items 3 and 4 of derogations from the decree of
March 3, 1927, for exceptions; p. 8.)

Coniferous plants and parts of plants, including the genera Abies, Picea, Pinus,
Pseudotsuga, and Tsuga. (Ministerial order of December 20, 1932, p. 11.)

Elm plants and parts thereof (Ulmus spp.), except the seeds. (Ministerial
decree of March 29, 19383, p. 12.)

Fermente® grape marc, olive husks (Olea europaea L.) for the extraction of
oil, mulberry leaves (Morus spp.). (International Phylloxera Convention of
Berne, November 3, 1881.)

Palm and laurel leaves, fresh. (Decree of March 3, 1927, art. 8 (j), p. 7.)

Pineapple plants and fruits (Ananus sativus Schuit.). (Decree of March 8,
1927 art; 8 (kh), p. 7.)

Potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.), including tubers and green parts; tomatoes
(Lycopersicum esculentum Mill.) and other Solanaceae, including fruits and green
parts. (Decree of March 3, 1927, art. 8 (e), p. 6.) (For exceptions see deroga-
tions from the decree of March 8, 1927, p. 8.)

Vegetable manures and composts. (International Phylloxera Convention of
Berne and provisions adopted by the Italian Government.)

IMPORTATION AND TRANSIT PROHIBITED FROM CANADA, FRANCE, SPAIN, AND THE UNITED
STATES

Grapevines (Vitis spp.), European and American, including scions and cut-
tings. (Decree of March 8, 1927, art. 8 (a), p. 6.) Used props and supports for

9

grapevines. (International Phylloxera Convention of Berne, November 3, 1881.)
IMPORTATION AND TRANSIT PROHIBITED FROM AFRICA

Corn (Zea mays L.), stalks and ears. (Decree of March 3, 1927, art. 8 (f),
Dz; l.)

IMPORTATION AND TRANSIT PROHIBITED FROM ARGENTINA, AUSTRALIA, BRAZIL, CANADA,
CHILE, CHINA, HAWAII, INDIA, JAPAN, MEXICO, SOUTH AFRICA, AND THE UNITED

STATES

Fruit-bearing plants, parts thereof, and fresh fruits of any kind. (Decree of
Maren S, 1927, art. 8 (c), p. 6.)

IMPORTATION AND TRANSPORTATION PROHIBITED FROM NORTH AND SOUTH AMERICA,
CHINA, AND THE ORIENT IN GENERAL

Chestnut (Castanea spp.), including trees, fruits, seeds, bark, branches, and
trunks with bark. (Decree cf March 3, 1927, art. 8 (bd), p. 6.) : Importation and
transit prohibited also from countries that have not taken precautionary measures
against chestnut-bark disease.

IMPORTATION RESTRICTED

Live plants, parts of plants, seeds, and other products intended for ecultiva-
tion or propagation, not specifically mentioned in the prohibitions, and proceed-
ing from permitted countries of origin: Importation subject to compliance with
the effective provisions of the law of June 18, 1931, articles 8 and 9, and the
decree of March 3, 1927, articles 1, 2, 3, 4, 9, 10, 11, and 12.

_Seeds of forage-crop plants (legumes and grasses): Importation subject to
inspection for dodder (Cuscuta spp.). (Decree of March 3, 1927, article 7, p. 5.)
The port of Ancona also is authorized for the importation of such seeds. The
port of Messina also is opened for the entry of vegetable seeds. (Circular No.
44609, December 21, 1932.)

IMPORTATION UNRESTRICTED
Plant products intended for food and industrial purposes, not included among

those indicated in article 8 of the decree of March 3, 1927, may be admitted
through any customs port of entry.



24 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.—March

RESTRICTIONS ON THE IMPCRTATION GF PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS

[Ministerial decree of March 3, 1927 (Gazetta Ufficiale No. 73, March 29, 1927), as
amended by that of July 18, 1928 (Gaz. Uff. No. 191, August 17, 1928) ]

AUTHORIZED PORTS OF ENTRY

ARTICLE 1. The importation of living plants, parts of plants, seeds, and other
plant products, from foreign countries, intended for breeding and propagation,
may be effected through the following customs ports of entry: Bring@isi, Cagliari,
Catania, Fiume, Genoa, Liverne, Milan, Naples, Palermo, Rome, Syracuse,
Taranto, Trieste, Turin, Udine, Venice, Ventimiglia, and Verona.

The entry of forage-crop and grass seeds is authorized also through the port.
of Ancona and the entry of vegetable seeds also through the port of Messina.

ArT. 2. Packages containing the said plants must be refused entry when pre-
sented at other customs offices. However, such packages may be reshipped to
the nearest customs office among those above named, when the interested person
requests the customs authorities to do so and offers to pay the cost of
reshipment.

If the railroad station of destinatien is situated between the frontier station
and the place where one of the offices named in article 1 is located, or if it is
situated on a railroad diverging from the normal itinerary which the shipment
should follow to reach the customs office authorized for importation, the frontier
customs office at which the shipment was presented is authorized, at the request
of the interested person, to hold the shipment, fully informing the competent _
regional pathological laboratory. The latter will carry out the prescribed
Inspection in the manner and place deemed most convenient, at the expense of
the interested person.

INSPECTION REQUIRED

ArT. 8. Shipments of the plant material referred to in article 1 are admitted
for importation after inspection by a phytepathologist designated by the Minis-
try of National Economy at the authorized customs office, in accordance with
the provisions of articles 8 and 9 of law No. 987 of June 18, 1981.

Arr. 4. When a shipment is admitted for importation, the precautionary
measures prescribed by article 9 of law No. 987 of June 18, 1931, and article 23
of the regulations under that law are to be applied by the designated phyto-
pathologist at the expense of the interested person.

Arts. 5 and 6. Revoked by the decree of July 18, 1928.

FORAGE-PLANT SEEDS MUST BE FREE FROM DODDER

ArT. 7. Seeds of forage-crep plants are admitted for importation when the
absence of any species of Cuscuta has been ascertained. That is accomplished
by the phytopathological inspector, or by an authorized seed control laboratory
from samples withdrawn by that inspector.

IMPORTATION AND TRANSIT PROHIBITED

Art. 8. The importation and transit of the following plants and parts thereof
are suspended :

(a) European and American grapevine (Vitis spp.) stocks and cuttings from
Canada, France, Spain, and the United States, on account of the black rot,
Guignardia bidwellii (Hll.) Viala and Ravaz, the regulations against phylloxera
remaining effective. (International Phylloxera Convention of Berne.)

(b) Chestnut trees (Castanea spp.), including the fruits, seeds, bark, branches
and trunks with bark, from North America, South America, China, and the
Orient in general, as well as from any country which has not taken precautionary
measures against the chestnut bark disease, Endothia parasitica (Murr.) Ander.
and Ander.

(c) Fruit-bearing plants, parts thereof, and fresh fruits of all kinds from
Argentina. Australia, Brazil, Canada, Chile, China, Hawaii, India, Japan, Mexico,
Union of South Africa, and the United States, on account of the San Jose
seale, Aspidiotus perniciosus Comst.; the oriental fruit moth (Laspeyresia),
Grapholitha molesta Busck; foreign fruitflies; and the fungus Diaporthe
perniciosa Marchal.



1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 25

(d) Citrus piants, parts thereof, fresh citrus fruits and peel (cortex) of
such fruits, from all foreign countries, on account of Glover's scale, Lepidosaphes
gloveri Pack.; the citrus whitefly (Aleyrodes) Dialeurodes citri Ashm.; citrus
canker, Bacterium citri Hasse; the pink disease, Corticium salmonicolor B. &
Br.; Sphaeropsis tumifaciens Hedges; and lime withertip, Gloecosporium limetti-
colum R. F. Clausen.

(e) Potato tubers, fruit, and green parts of every species of the Solanaceae
(tomatoes (Lycopersicum spp.), eggplants (Solanum melongena L.), peppexys
(Capsicum spp.)) from all foreign countries, on account of the potato wart
disease (Synchytrium endobioticum (Schiib.) Pere.); potato tuber worm
(Phthorimaea) Gnorimoschema operculella Zell.) ; the Colorado potato beetle
(Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say) ; and the potato fiea beetle (Hpitrig cucumeris
Harr.).

(f) Stems and ears of corn (Zea mays) from every country in Africa, on
account of the maize stalk borer (Sesamia calamistis Hmps.).

(g) Banana plants and fruits (J/usa spp.), on account of Comstock’s mealybug
(Pseudococcus comstocki Kuwana); the Argentine ant (Jridomyrmez humilis
Mayr); black rot of sugarcane (Thielaviopsis paradoxa (De Sey.) V. Hoch.) ;
and the Panama wilt disease (Fusarium cubense BE. F. Sm.).

(h) Pineapple plants and fruits (Ananas sativus Schult), on account of the
danger of introducing with them injurious foreign scale insects, as well as black
rot of sugarcane (Thielaviopsis paradoxa (De Sey) V. Hoch.); and the
Panama wilt disease (Fusarium cubense E. F. Sm.).

(i) Almonds (Amygdalus communis L.) in the shell, on account of Hurytoma
amygdali End. of the almond, and shot hole and fruit spot of Prunus, Ascochyta
chlorospora Speg.

(j) Fresh palm and laurel leaves, on account of the danger of introducing
injurious foreign scale insects not at present existing in Italy.

REGULATIONS APPLICABLE TO PLANT MATERIAL INTRODUCED BY TRAVELERS

ArT. 9. The provisions of the preceding articles apply also to plants, parts
of plants, and seeds intended for breeding, and to other plant products brought
in by travelers from foreign countries.

ArT. 10. The unlading on free points, from vessels arriving in ports of the
Kingdom, of plants, parts of plants, and plant products the importation and
transit of which is suspended, is prohibited.

Art. 11. The preceding provisions are not applicable to importations made by
the Ministry of National Economy.

IMPORTATION UNRESTRICTED OF PLANT PRODUCTS INTENDED FOR FOOD AND INDUSTRIAL
PURPOSES

ArT. 12. Plant products intended for food and for industrial purposes, not
included among those indicated in article 8, are admitted for importation through
any customs port of entry, the provisions of article 9 of law 9S7 of June 18, 1931,
remaining effective. (See p. 5.)

ArT. 13. This decree becomes effective May 1, 1927, and revokes those of
February 21, 1921, and August 4, 1921.

DEROGATIONS FRoM THD DECREE OF MARrcH 38, 1927
POTATOES

1. Order No. 45012, October 18, 1927, provides for the transit solely through
the port of Trieste and further shipment by sea of potatees proceeding by land
from Czechoslovakia, Poland, and Yugoslavia.

2. Order No. 7910, February 27, 1925, provides for the transit of potatoes from
Malta through the territory of Italy.

CITRUS FRUITS
3. Orders No. 5046, January 26, 1928, and No. 44903, October 18, 1927, provide

that the transit of citrus fruits proceeding by sea from Palestine or the Aegean
Islands may be effected only through the ports of Trieste and Fiume,



26 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.—March

4. Order No. 35166, July 18, 1928, provides for the transit of citrus fruits
originating in other sources than Palestine and the Aegean Islands, solely through
the ports of Genoa and Trieste.

PHYLLOXERA RESTRICTIONS

Packages containing plants and plant products whose importation is authorized,
are admitted to entry into the Kingdom on condition that they are free from
animal or plant parasites and that they contain neither fragments nor leaves of
the grapevine.

SHIPPER’S DECLARATION AND PHYLLOXERA CERTIFICATE REQUIRED

If such packages proceed from foreign countries that have not adhered to the
International Phylloxera Convention of Berne, they must be accompanied by a
shipper’s declaration and an attestation by competent authority. The first
shall (a) declare that the contents of the shipment proceed exclusively from his
establishment; (0) indicate the place of destination and the address of the
consignee; (c) affirm that no grapevine stocks are included in the shipment;
(ad) indicate whether the shipment contains plants with particles of soil; (e)
bear the signature of the shipper.

The attestation of the authority of the country of origin shall be issued on
the declaration of an official expert designated for research and supervision of
phylloxera and shall bear the following data: (@) That the plants proceed
from ground at least 20 meters distant from any grapevine stock or other -
obstacle, deemed by the said authority to be sufficient, to the propagation
(spread) of the roots; (0) that the said ground contains no grapevine stocks;
(c) that no such plants are stored there; (d) that if phylloxerated grapevines
had been found there, their radical extirpation had been effected, by an insecti-
cide, or other means, during a period of 3 years, with appropriate research to
insure the complete destruction of insects and roots. The above attestation. (for
countries that adhere to the Phylloxera Convention) is not necessary with
respect to shipments of plants proceeding from an establishment registered in the
list of establishments officially declared in accordance with the provisions of the
International Convention of Berne.

The expenses involved in the inspecticn and storage are charged against the
interested persons.

PotTATo RESTRICTIONS:

The ministerial decree of March 3, 1927, article 8 (e), prohibiting the impor-
tation of potatoes from any source, remains effective, but by derogation from
that decree, the importation of seed potatoes is permitted under prescribed
conditions promulgated annually by ministerial decree.

That decree will prescribe the period of the year concerned during which seed
potatoes may be imported, the variety and quantity, and the conditions under
which they may be imported.

IMPORT PERMIT REQUIRED

An import permit must first be obtained from the Ministry of Agriculture and
Forestry.
FREEDOM OF ORIGIN FROM POTATO PARASITES

The seed potatoes to be imported must originate in localities free from the
following parasites: Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say (Colorado potato beetle),
Synchytrium endobioticum (Schilb.) Pere. (potato wart), Gnorimoschema oper-
culella Zell. (potato tuber worm), Heterodera rostochiensis (potato nematode
(eelworm) ), and Epitrix cucumeris Harr. (potato flea beetle).

The potatoes must be taken from fields under the technical supervision of a
Government institution of the exporting country, especially with reference to
so-called virus diseases.

PHYTOSANITARY CERTIFICATE REQUIRED

The sacks in which the potatoes are shipped must be sealed by the plant-
protection authorities of the country of origin and be accompanied by a phyto-



1938] SERVICH AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS aT

sanitary certificate indicating origin and affirming that the fields in which the
potatoes were grown are free from the above-named parasites; that within a
radius of 200 km of the place where the potatoes were grown the Colorado potato
beetle has not been found, and that the presence of the other parasites has not
been determined within a radius of 2 km; that the potatoes are shipped in new
containers; that each container was personally sealed by the inspector with the
official seal of the plant-inspection service; and that the potatoes are free from
earth. It must also be certified that the plants from which the potatoes were
harvested showed no visible symptoms of virus diseases.

AUTHORIZED PORTS OF ENTRY

The authorized ports of entry for seed potatoes during the prescribed period
are Bari, Brindisi, Cagliari, Catania, Chiasso, Domodossola, Fortezza (K:ausen),
Genoa, Modane, Naples, Trieste, and Udine.

IMPORTATION AND TRANSIT OF CACTUS PLANTS AND FRUITS PROHIBITED
[Ministerial order of December 20, 1932; Gazzetta Ufficiale No. 37, February 14, 1933]

The importation into, and transit through, Italy are prohibited of cactus
plants and fruits proceeding from any country, on account of the danger of
introducing insects, fungi, or bacteria that are injurious to the pricklypear
(Opuntia ficus-indica).

IMPORTATION OF PLANTS oF ABIES, PICEA, PINUS, PSEUDOTSUGA, AND TSUGA
PROHIBITED

[Ministerial order of December 20, 1932; Gazzetta Ufficiale No. 37, February 14, 1933]

The importation into Italy of plants, and parts thereof, of conifers of the
genera Abies, Picea, Pinus, Pseudotsuga, and Tsuga is prohibited.

The importation of plants, and parts thereof, belonging to other species of
conifers is permitted on condition that they are accompanied by a certificate,
issued by the plant-protection service of the country of origin, in Italian or
French, affirming that the plants or parts of plants included in the shipment
are free from injurious pests and diseases and especially from Rhabdocline
pseudotsugae.

The same certificate must also indicate the origin of the products and the
species of the products included in the shipment, as well as data necessary for
the identification of the shipment.

IMPORTATION AND TRANSIT OF ELMS PROHIBITED
[Ministerial decree of March 29, 1933; Gazzetta Ufficiale No. 104, May 4, 1933]

The importation into, and transit through, Italy from all foreign countries
of plants and parts of plants of the genus Ulmus, except the seed, are prohibited
on account of the danger of introducing foreign scale insects (Coccidae) which
are very injurious to Italian fruit culture.

B. es Q. 470, Superseding the Memorandum to Inspectors in Charge, dated August 22,
1934.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS OF JAPAN

FEBRUARY 5, 1938.

This digest of the plant-quarantine import restrictions of Japan has been
prepared for the information of nurserymen, plant quarantine officials, and
others interested in the exportation of plants and plant products to that
country.

It was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant quarantine inspector in charge,
foreign information service, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines, from the
Japanese regulations promulgated by ordnance No. 27 of October 13, 1914, as
amended, under the authority of law No. 11 of March 25, 1914, and reviewed
by the director of the Imperial Plant Quarantine Service, Yokohama.

The information included in this circular is believed to be correct and com-
plete up to the time of preparation, but is not intended to be used inde-



28 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.—March

pendently of, nor as a substitute for, the original texts, and it is not to be inter-
preted as legally authoritative. The original ordnance should be consulted
for the exact texts.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS OF JAPAN
Basic LEGISLATION
[Plant Quarantine Law No. 11, of March 25, 1914]

This law prescribes the inspection of plants and packing materials thereof
offered for export from or importation into Japan, but provides for the omission
of inspection in certain cases. Plant diseases and injurious insects may be im-
ported only with the permission of the respective Minister of State.

The iaw also provides for the disposal of plants infested by injurious insects
or infected by plant diseases, and for the restriction or prohibition of entry of
certain plants or any other article.

DEFINITION

Article 10 of the law defines ‘plant diseases and injurious insects” as fungi
and insects, respectively, that are injurious to plants. However, plants or
animals which are not fungi or insects may be considered as plant diseases
or injurious insects insofar as the application of this law is concerned, if the
Minister of State in charge of such affairs has reason to believe that they
are actually injurious to plants or are suspected of being so.

GENERAL REGULATIONS UNDER THE PLANT QUARANTINE LAW

[Department ordinance No. 27 of October 13, 1914, as amended by ordinance No. 24 of
June 1919; No. 21 of October 1933: No. 23 of August 1934; No. 28 of October 1936,
and No. 14 of May 1937]

PLANTS THAT ARE TO BE INSPECTED IN JAPAN

ARTICLE 1. Plants whose inspection is required in accordance with the pro-
Vision of article 1 of the plant quarantine law shall be of the following classes:

1. Plants to be imported from a foreign country or to be transported from
other parts of the Japanese Empire into Japan proper, under the following
categories.

(a) Plants or any of their parts, seeds, and bulbs for planting or cultivation 3

(6) Fresh fruits except those of pineapple (Ananas sativus L.), apples origi-
nating in Chosen (Korea), and the fruits of plants belonging to the families:
Musaceae, Solanaceae, Leguminosae, Fagaceae, and Cucurbitaceae (except
watermelons, Citrullus vulgaris, melons and muskmelons, Cucumis melo) ;

(c) Living potato tubers (Solanum tuberosum L.) ;

(d@) Plant or plant material that is permitted by the Minister of Agriculture
to be imported, which otherwise is prohibited ;

(e) Any plant or plant material besides those mentioned in (a) to (d),
that is suspected by plant inspection officials of being infested by plant diseases
or injurious insects.

2. Plants to be exported, the importation of which the government of the
importing country requires inspection certificates issued by the exporting
country.

Art. 2. (a) Any person importing plants mentioned in paragraph 1 (@) to (c)
of article 1 from a foreign country, or transporting the same from other parts
of the Japanese Empire into Japan proper. shall, without delay, upon the
arrival of the vessel carrying same on board, make application in writing to
the customhouse on the prescribed form No. 1.

If the plants are being carried by a passenger, the person concerned may
make a verbal application to the plant inspection officials or to the customs
officials in the absence of the former.

IMPORTATION PROHIBITED OF CERTAIN PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS

Art. 2. (b) The importation or transportation of the following plants and
plant materials are prohibited into Japan proper. However, exeeptions are



1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 29

made when the Minister of Agriculture permits importation for experimental
or research purposes:

(1) Fresh fruits originating in or landed in Africa, Argentina, Australia,
New Zealand, Bermuda, Brazil, Cyprus, France, Greece, Hawaii, Italy, Malta,
Palestine, Portugal, Spain, Syria, Turkey, and the West Indies to prevent the
introduction of the Mediterranean fruitfly (Ceratitis capitata Wied.).

(2) Fresh cucumbers, watermelons, pumpkins, and other cucurbitaceous
plants, tomatoes, beans, catjan peas (Vigna catjan Walp.), and cowpeas (Vigna
sinensis Endl.) originating in, or landed in Borneo, Celebes, Ceylon, China,
Taiwan, Hawaii, Hongkong, India (British), Indochina (French), Java, Malay
Peninsula, New Guinea, Philippines, Siam, Sumatra, and other Malayan islands
(except Formosan watermelons accompanied by a certificate of inspection
issued by the Government of Taiwan, which are accepted after inspection on
arrival), to prevent the introduction of the melon fly (Chaetodacus cucur-
bitae Coq.).

(3) Fresh apples, pears, quinces, peaches, plums, apricots, and cherries, as
well as walnuts (except without shells), originating in or landed in Africa,
Argentina, Australia, New Zealand, Brazil, Canada, China, Cyprus, Europe,
Honk Kong, India (British), Mesopotamia (Iraq), Persia (Iran), United States,
Uruguay, and Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (Asiatic portion), to prevent
the introduction of the codling moth ((Grapholitha) Carpocapsa pomonella L.).

(4) Fresh citrus fruits, mangoes, loquats, plums, peaches, persimmons
{Diospyros kaki) ; rose apple or malabar plum (Hugenia jambos) ; large fruited
rose apple or Malay apple (Hugenia malaccensis) ; guavas, peppers (Capsicum
spp.) ; Solanum verbascifolium Link., Nephelium longana Camb., N. litchi Camb.=
Litchi chinensis Sonn.; and Carambtola (Averrhoa carambola L.), originating in
or landed in Borneo, Celebes, Ceylon, China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, India (British),
Java, Malay (Federated States), Philippines, South Sea Islands, Straits Settle-
ments, as well as Sumatra and the other Malayan islands (except Formosan
citrus fruits). to prevent the introduction of Chaetodacus dorsalis Hendel.

(5) Live sweetpotato tubers originating in or landed in Africa, Borneo, Celebes, -
Ceylon, China, Taiwan (south of the Yang-Tse-Kiang), Guiana, Hong Kong, India
(British), Indo-China (French), Java, Malay Peninsula, Oceania, Philippines,
Siam, South Sea Islands, Sumatra end other Malayan islands, the United States,
and the West Indies to prevent the introduction of the sweetpotato weevil (Cylas
formicarius Fab.) and the sweetpotato vine borer (Omphisa anastomosalis
Guen. ).

(6) Sugarcane and parts thereof, including seeds, to prevent the introduction
of the downy mildew of sugarcane (Sclerospora sacchari T. Mayake), the
Hawaiian sugarcane borer (Rhabdocnemis obscurus Boisd.), and the sugareane
borer (Diatraea saccharalis Fab.).

(7) Potatoes, eggplants, tomatoes, peppers (Capsicum annuum L.), and other
solanaceous plants, as well as parts, fresh fruits, and tubers thereof, originating
in or landed in Africa, America (North and South), Australia, New Zealand,
Cyprus, Europe, Guam, Hawaii, India (British), and Java, to prevent the intro-
duction of the potato wart disease (Synchytrium endobioticum Percival), the
powdery scab (Spongospora subterranea Lang), the potato tuber worm ( (Phthori-
maea) Gnorimoschema operculelia Zell.), and the Colorado potato beetle (Lepti-
notarsa decemlineata Say).

(8) Plants with soil adhering, to prevent, infection by ecryptogams and infesta-
tion by insects injurious to plants.

(9) Straw from wheat, barley, oats, and rye, with the exception of artificial
products other than straw for packing, bedding, and other articles of the same
class originating in or landed in Asia Minor, Canada, Europe, New Zealand,
Persia, the United States, and Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (Asiatie por-
tion) to prevent the introduction of the hession fly. (Piylophaga destructor
Say).

(10) Fresh fruits of apple and other species of Malus and Crataegus originat-
ing in China, the leased Territory of Kwantung and Manchuria, or landed in
that country or Territories (except fresh fruits of apple originating in the
leased Territory of Kwantung and Manchuria, accompanied by a certificate of
disinfection issued by the Government of the leased Territory of Kwantung,
which are accepted on inspection of the plants on arrival), to prevent infestation
by Grapholitha inopinata Heinrich.

: (11) Containers and materials used for packing the articles listed under Nos.

to 10.



30 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan—March:

CONDITIONS UNDER WHICH PLANT DISEASES AND INJURIOUS INSECTS MAY BB
IMPORTED

ART. 7. Any person importing plant diseases or injurious insects from a foreign
country, or transporting same from other parts of the Japanese Empire into
Japan proper, shall be required to make an application for inspection, in writing,
to the customhouse, in accordance with the prescribed form No. 4, without delay,
after the arrival of the vessel carrying such articles on board.

ArT. 8. The plant-inspection officials may proceed to make the inspection previ-
ous to the application required in article 2 or in the preceding article.

Art. 10. Importation from a foreign country, and transportation from other
parts of the Japanese Empire into Japan proper of plants, or any other article
whose inspection is required, by mail, except by parcel post or small packet, is
prohibited.

Art. 10 (06). Any person receiving mail matter contrary to the provision of
the preceding paragraph, is required to deliver such mail matter without delay
to the customhouse together with the required written application form.

INSPECTION OF CERTIFIED PLANTS MAY BE WAIVED

Art. 14.7 Any person importing plants from a foreign country or transporting
same from other parts of the Japanese Empire into Japan proper, which are
certified by the authorities at their source of exportation or transportation, to
the effect that such plants are not infected by plant diseases or infested by
injurious insects, shall report the fact to the customhouse. In this case the
provisions of article 2 shall apply.

Plants certified as mentioned in the preceding paragraph may be exempted
from the inspection required with their importation from a foreign country, or
transportation from other parts of the Japanese Empire into Japan proper.

B. H. P. Q. 471, superseding P. Q. C. A. 297.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, UNION OF SOUTH AFRICA

FEBRUARY 5, 1988.

This digest of the rules and regulations promulgated under the Agricultural
Pests Act of 1911, and subsequent amendments thereof, has been prepared for
the information of nurserymen, plant-quarantine officials, and others interested
in the exportation of plants and plant products to South Africa.

The digest was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant-quarantine inspector in
charge of foreign information service, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines,
from the original texts and reviewed by the chief inspector, plant regulatory
service, Department of Agriculture and Forestry of the Union of South Africa.

The information presented in this circular is believed to be correct and com-
plete up to the time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used independ-
ently of, nor as a substitute for, the original texts, and it. is not to be inter-
preted as legally authoritative. The proclamations and Government notices.
themselves should be consulted for the exact texts.

Lee A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, UNION OF SOUTH AFRICA
BAsic LEGISLATION
[Agricultural Pests Act (Act No. 11 of 1911 as amended]
DEFINITIONS

Src. 2. In this act and the regulations made thereunder, unless inconsistent:
with the context:

“Insect pest” shall mean any insect or other invertebrate animal that is.
injurious to plants.

“1Jn other words, the fact that a shipment is accompanied by an inspection eertificate
does not exempt it from the requirement of art. 2, namely, that the importer apply to the
customhouse for inspection. Then, according to par. 2 of art. 14, inspection may be
waived,



1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 31

“Plant” shall mean any tree, shrub, or vegetation, and the fruit, leaves,
cuttings, or bark thereof, and shall include any live portion of a plant, whether
severed or attached, and any dead portion or any product of a plant which by
proclamation under this act or any amendment thereof has been included in
this definition, but shall not include any seed unless the seed has been specially
mentioned in this act or has been included in the definition of plant by
proclamation under this act.

“Plant disease” shall mean any bacterial or fungous or other disease that is
injurious to plants.

“Hxotic animal’ shall mean any animal (other than man) and any bird,
reptile, insect, or other member of the animal kingdom, including the eggs
thereof, that is not indigenous or native to South Africa. Species of the
following classes are included in this definition: Amphibia, Arachnida, Aves,
Crustacea, Insecta, Mammalia, Mollusca, Myriapoda, Nematoda, and Reptilia.

AUTHORIZED PORTS OF ENTRY

Section 8 of the act, as supplemented by proclamation No. 283 of 1936, pre-
seribes that no person shall introduce or cause to be introduced from oversea into
the Union any plant otherwise than by mail or through the authorized customs
ports of entry: Cape Town, Durban, East London, Johannesburg, Nelspruit, Port
Elizabeth, and Pretoria. Fruits, potatoes, and onions may enter also through
Mossel Bay, Port Nolloth, and Simonstown.

RESTRICTIONS ON IMPORTATION OF PLANTS

Section 9 prohibits the introduction of certain plants, subjects other plants to
restrictions, and requires an import permit from the Department of Agriculture
and Forestry for all plants except fruits, most seeds, bulbs, tubers, and vegetables.

PROVISION FOR INSPECTION OF IMPORTED PLANTS

Section 10 provides for the inspection of all plants offered for entry into the
Union and their subsequent disposal.

TREATMENT OF INFECTED PLANTS

Sections 11 and 12 provide for the disinfection, cleansing, or destruction of
infected plants when deemed necessary, and the issuance, upon request, of
certificates for shipments that have complied with the provisions of the act and
the regulations.

POWER OF GOVERNOR GENERAL TO EXTEND APPLICATION OF CERTAIN PROVISIONS OF ACT

Section 14 empowers the Governor General, by proclamation in the Gazette:

(a) To include in the definition of plant, the seed of any plant or any dead
portion or product of a plant.

(b) To vary, by addition or withdrawal, the list of plants the introduction
whereof into the Union is under section 9 prohibited, supervised, or restricted.

(c) To prohibit or restrict the introduction into the Union from anywhere,
or from any specified country or place, of any plant, insect, or germ of any plant
disease.

Section 21 prohibits the importation from oversea of live bees, honey, and
apiary appliances, and empowers the Governor General to apply the provisions to
other African territories. Live bees may be imported by the Government.

Section 22 enables the Governor General, by proclamation, to prohibit or
restrict the importation from anywhere or from any specified country or place
of any particular class of exotic animals.

Section 28 empowers the Governor General to make regulations not incon-
sistent with the act prescribing:

(a) The manner and place in which any registration, inspection, disinfecting,
cleansing, or destruction authorized under this act shall be carried out.

(b) The conditions and restrictions governing the importation and keeping of
plants, bees, articles, exotic animals, and anything whatsoever dealt with under
this act.



32 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.—March

SUMMARY

Applicable to countries oversea, and to Portuguese Hast Africa, mandated
territory of South-West Africa, or any State or Territory in Africa north of the
Zambesi, except Northern Rhodesia, Nyasaland, or in the case of plants other
‘than maize and barley, the Belgian Congo.

IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

Acacia spp., wattle trees but not the seeds (Act No. 11 of 1911).

Alfalfa or lucerne (Medicago sativa L.) hay, fresh or dried, to prevent the
introduction of clover canker, crown gall, or crown wart (Urophlyctis alfalfue
(v. Lagerh.) Magn. (Proclamation No. 151 of 1937.)

Arctium spp., burdock, seeds, and flowering seed heads. (Proclamation No.
ASIVO 193K.)

Broomcorn (Sorghum vulgare var. technicum (Koern.) Jav.), or articles made
thereof containing unshredded broomcorn stalk, to prevent the introduction of the
Huropean corn borer (Pyrausia nubilalis Hbn.). (Proclamation No. 286 of
1936.)

Chestnut (Castanea spp.) plants and seeds of any species from North America
or any other country where the chestnut blight disease (Hndothia parasitica
(Murr.) Ander. and Ander.) exists. Proclamation No. 286 of 1936.)

Citrus trees, except by the Department of Agriculture and Forestry, to prevent
the introduction of citrus canker. (Proclamation No. 286 of 1936.)

Coniferous plants but not the seeds. (Act No. 11 of 1911.)

Elm (Ulmus spp.) plants and seeds of any species from the continent of
Europe and any other country where the Dutch elm disease (Graphium ulmi
Schwarz) exists. (Proclamation No. 286 of 1936.)

Hucalyptus spp., gum trees, but not the seeds. (Act No. 11 of 1911.)

Fruits: Apples, pears, quinces, and loquats (Malus, Pyrus, Cydonia, Hriobdo-
trya), from China, Chosen, East Siberia, Japan, and Manchuria, to prevent the
introduction of such fruit pests as the oriental fruit moth ((Cydia) Grapho-
‘litha molesta Buseck), (Carposina sasakii Mats.), a fruit moth, ete. (Proclama-
tion No. 286 of 1936.)

Citrus fruits (Citrus spp.) and the peel thereof, whether fresh or dried,
but not candied peel, to prevent the introduction of citrus canker (Bac-
terium citri (Hasse) Doidge). (Proclamation No. 151 of 1987.)

Citrus fruits from southwest Africa are admitted without restriction and
from a portion of the territory administered by the Companhia de Mo-
cambique under certain conditions. (Proclamation 201 of 1987 and 202
of 1987. )

Stone fruits, fresh: Apricot (Prunus armeniaca L.), cherry (Prunus spp.),
nectarine (Amygdalus persica var. nucipersica), peach (Amygdalus per-
sica), plum (Prunus spp.). (Proclamation No. 285 of 1936.)

Honey, jam, sirup, or malt, mixed with honey, medicines containing honey, fly
‘tapes or fly papers containing honey, live bees, second-hand hives, and any con-
tainer used for honey, bees, or beeswax. Medicines containing not more than
25 percent of honey may be passed. Precaution against the introduction of
American foulbrood and other bee diseases. (Act No. 11 of 1911, Government
notices Nos. 1837 of 1825 and 2032 of 1980.)

Opuntia spp. (Proclamation No. 151 of 1937.)

Peach stones (Amygadalus persica L.). (Act No. 11 of 1911.)

Plants packed in soil other than special rooting compost, to prevent the intro-
duction of injurious insect pests and plant diseases that occur in soil. (Proc-
lamation No. 286 of 1936.)

Sugarcane plants, rooted (Saccharum officinarum .), to prevent the intro-
duction of injurious pests and diseases of the sugarcane. (Government notice
1798 of 1986.)

Trees and plants ordinarily raised from seed, if the seed be easily procurable
in the Union or can be readily introduced in a viable condition to prevent the
introduction of injurious insect pests and plant diseases. (Government notice
No. 1793 of 1936, as amended by Government notice No. 677 of 1937. )

‘Trees and fruit-bearing plants listed by nurserymen within the Union and
procurable from them at or below the ordinary price for recent novelties of
their class, unless the Department is satisfied that the strain of the variety
procurable in the Union is an inferior one or untrue to type. (Government
notice No. 1793 of 1936, as amended by Government notice No. 677 of 1937.)



1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 33

IMPORTATION RESTRICTED

Backhousia citriodora F. Muell.: No limitation on number admissible, but
must be grown in quarantine. (Government notice No. 1793 of 1936, as amended
by Government notice No. 677 of 1937.)

Bags, second-hand: No import permit required; subject to inspection on ar-
rival to ascertain whether any had contained cottonseed, and, if any cottonseed
present, may be refused entry or treated by heat at the expense of the owner.

Beeswax and foundation comb: Import permit and inspection on arrival;
consignor’s sworn declaration that the beeswax has been heated to 212° F.
for 30 minutes. No declaration is required for white beeswax. In the absence
of the declaration for unmanufactured yellow beeswax, the wax may be heated
at the expense of the owner under official supervision, or the Department may
agree to the keeping and manufacture of the beeswax under conditions deemed
to make special heating unnecessary. Precaution against the introduction of
American foulbrood and other bee diseases. (Government notice No. 1793 of
1936. )

Broomcorn (Sorghum vulgare var. technicum (Koern.) Jav.) and brooms,
brushes, and other articles made from broomcorn (except as prohibited) (see
item under Importation Prohibited) : Import permit and inspection on arrival,
to prevent the introduction of the European corn borer (Pyrausta nubilalis Hbn.)
and other stalk borers. (Proclamation No. 282 of 1936.)

Cork, unmanufactured, derived from the cork oak tree (Quercus suber L.):
Import permit and inspection on arrival, to prevent the introduction of the gypsy
moth (Porthetria dispar L.). (Proclamation No. 282 of 1936.)

Cotton (Gossypium spp.) unmanufactured, including linters and unspun cot-
ton waste (but not including purified cotton wool (absorbent cotton) and cotton
batting) is admissible only under special import permit. This restriction does
not apply to kapok. The use of cotton waste as packing material for merchan-
dise is not permitted. (Act No. 11 of 1911, and proclamation No. 282 of 1936.)

Cottonseed: Permits will be issued only for seed intended for sowing, and only
when its introduction is deemed desirable by the principal field husbandry of-
ficer. Cottonseed that is allowed to enter will be fumigated with carbon di-
sulphid. Importations are restricted to official cotton breeders. Precautions
against the introduction of pink bollworm (Pectinophora gossypiella Saund.).
(Act No. 11 of 1911, and proclamation No. 282 of 1936.)

Exotic animals of the classes: Amphibia, Arachnida, Aves, Crustacea, Insecta,
Mammalia, Mollusca, Myriapoda, Nematoda, and Reptilia: Importation subject
fo permit and such conditions as may be prescribed therein. (Proclamation 115
of 1937.)

Grapes:” May not be introduced into the district of Graaff Reinet, nor into
the area in the Cape Province defined in paragraph 3 (1) of the schedule to
proclamation No. 287 of 1936, but grapes may be landed at Cape Town, Simons-
town, and Mossel Bay and be consigned to destinations beyond. (Proclamation
287 of 1936.)

Plants, living’? (see definition of plants, p. 1) of all admissible kinds, except
those specifically mentioned, and except fruits, most seeds, bulbs, and tubers:
Importation subject to a permit issued by the Union Department of Agri-
culture and Forestry and inspection on arrival. (See rules governing the issu-
ance of permits p. 7 et seq.) .

Pome-fruit trees* and all plants of the genera Malus, Pyrus, and Cydonia:
Import permit and inspection on arrival; must be accompanied by an official
certificate from the Department of Agriculture or other recognized official in-
stitution of the country of origin affirming that fire blight (Bacillus amylovorus
(Burr.) Trey.) is not known to occur on the premises where the plants were
grown. Entry is conditional also on the plants being cut back severely and sub-
jected, without expense to the Government, at Cape Town, Durban, or Pretoria,
or other approved place for special inspection and disinfection. (Proclamation
No. 286 of 1936.)

Potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.): No import permit required; subject to in-
spection on arrival; must be accompanied by a shipper’s sworn declaration of
the country of origin and of the locality where grown, together with sufticient
data clearly to establish the identity of the consignment; also an official cer-
tificate dated not more than 30 days before the dispatch of the consignment
affirming that potato wart (Synchytrium endobioticum (Schilb.) Perc.) has



2See note, p. 36.



34 jj BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.—March

not been known to exist within 5 miles of the place or places where the potatoes
are declared to have been grown, or an official certificate, dated not more than
9 months prior to the date of arrival of the potatoes, affirming that the said
disease has not been known to exist within the shire, county, or other such
territorial division comprising the deciared place or places of origin.

The certificate is not required with potatoes from British East Africa and
Western Australia.

A certificate will be accepted from the United Kingdom declaring that no eases
of potato wart are known to have occurred at the place or places where the
potatoes are declared to have been grown, that the only outbreaks of the disease
within 5 miles of such places are trivial and without menace to land where
potatoes are grown for sale, and that, on official inspection, the potatoes con-
cerned were found to be apparently free from serious diseases and insect pests.
(Proclamation No. 286 of 19386.)

Roses (Rosa spp.) from Australia and North America and any other country
in which a virus disease of roses is known to occur: An official certificate af-
firming that no virus diseases are present in the premises where they were
grown. (Proclamation No. 286, 1936.)

Seeds: Import permits and inspection on arrival. This applies only to seeds
of the plants named below, which have been included in the definition of “plant.”
{Act No. 11 of 1911, proclamation No, 282 of 1936, and Government notice No.
1793 of 19386.)

Alfalfa or lucerne (JJedicago sativa L.): Permits issued only to the De-
partment of Agriculture and Forestry. (Proclamation No. 282, 1936, and
proclamation 286 of 1936.) Grown in quarantine and produce released
if no disease discovered.

Chestnut (Castanea spp.) (except from North America and any other
Sua in which the chestnut blight occurs). (Proclamation No. 282
of 1936.)

Cotton: See also item “Cottonseed.” (Proclamation No. 282 of 1936.)

Elm (Ulmus spp.) : (Proclamation No. 282 of 1936.)

Maize (Zea mays lL.) and barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) (except from ter-
ritory administered by the Companhia de Mocambique) : Importation lim-
ited to 10 pounds of any variety. However, in times of shortage the De-
partment may authorize the importation of maize in bulk under prescribed
conditions. (Government notice No. 1793, of 1936, as amended by Goy-
ernment notice No. 677 of 1937.) Maize imported for planting is dis-
infected in a solution of mercuric bichloride.

Oak (Quercus spp.) : (Proclamation No. 282 of 1936.)

Tea (except from countries in which Ea2obasidium verans Mass. occurs).
(Proclamation 282 of 1936.) See also item, Tea plants and tea seeds.

Tomato (for importation from countries in which Aplanobacter michiganense
E. F. Sm. oceurs). (Froclamation No. 282, of 1986.) Importation from
such countries is not exempt from permit. See item, Tomato seed from
Germany, etc.

Sugarcane cuttings: Import permit; fumigation with hydrocyanic acid gas on
‘arrival and disinfection with solution of copper sulphate. Permits issued only
to South African Sugar Association; canes grown in quarantine greenhouse and
then in open ground. .

Tea plants and tea seeds (Camellia thea=Thea sinensis L.) from India, Japan,
Chosen, and other countries where blister blight (Hzobasidium verans Mass.)
occurs: Import permit and inspection on arrival; must be accompanied by an
official certificate from the Department of Agriculture, the Indian Tea Associa-
tion, or other recognized institution of the country of origin, affirming that the
disease is not known to occur within 10 miles of the place where the plants or
seeds were produced. (Proclamation No. 286 of 1936.)

Tomato seeds (Lycopersicum esculentum Mill.) from Germany, Italy, North
America, or any country where bacterial canker of tomato (Aplanobacter
michiganense E. F. Sm.) occurs: Import permit required ; must be accompanied by
‘an official certificate stating that the seed was produced by plants officially
inspected in the field and found free from that disease. (Proclamation 286
of 1936.) ;

-Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.), unmanufactured or leaf tobacco: Import
permit and inspection on arrival. Must be accompanied by an official certificate
affirming that the tobacco has been inspected and found free from Hphestia
elutella Hbn. At the discretion of the Union Department of Agriculture and



1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 35

Forestry the certification requirement may be waived. (Proclamation No. 286
of 1936.)
IMPORTATION UNRESTRICTED

Fruits, seeds (except those specially restricted or prohibited), bulbs, tubers,
and vegetables. However, admissible fruits are inspected and may be rejected
if any serious pest is found on them. Consignments of apples are refused entry
if more than 5 percent are infested by codling moth or infected by one Fusicladium
spot over one-eighth inch in diameter to 10 fruits. Affected fruits may be picked
out and clean ones passed. Fruit will be fumigated if more than one San Jose
scale or oystershell scale found per fruit.

RULES GOVERNING THE ISSUANCE OF IMPORT PERMITS

[Government notice No. 1793 of 1936, an eh by Government notice No. 677, April
i.

’

NUMBER OF PLANTS LIMITED

1. No permit shall be issued to any one person to introduce into the Union
during any one calendar year from oversea or from Portuguese East Africa, the
mandated territory of South West Africa or any State or Territory in Africa
north of the Zambesi, except Northern Rhodesia, Nyasaland, or, in the case of
plants other than maize and barley, the Belgian Congo:

(a) More than 10 plants of any 1 variety of:

(1) Rooted forest trees, ornamental trees, nut trees, rose trees, fruit trees,
and fruit-bearing plants (not including strawberries).

(2) Ornamental shrubs,*® including azaleas, rhododendrons, camelias, hydran-
geas, spireas, lilacs, and oleanders.

(3) Climbing plants, including clematis, begonias, passifloras, wistarias, honey-
suckles, jasminums, and solanums, or

(6) More than 100 plants of any 1 variety of:

(1) Strawberry plants.

(2) Scions or unrooted cuttings of any tree, woody shrub, or sugarcane, or

(c) More than 10 pounds of any 1 variety cf maize or barley.

2. Nothing contained in the above regulation shall prevent the Department
from:

(a) Introducing stocks, which it may consider of exceptional or special value,
into the Union in excess of the number above stipulated for budding or grafting,
or issuing a permit to any person for special reasons and subject to such condi-
tions as it may determine, to introduce into the Union any stocks in excess of the
number provided in this regulation ;

(6b) Issuing permits to any person to introduce into the Union Backhousia
citriodora plants in excess of the maximum provided in this regulation, on
condition that such plants be kept in quarantine, at a place approved by the
Department, for a period of 2 years or such lesser period as the Department may
direct: Provided, That the Department, if it deems expedient, may destroy with-
out compensation to the owner all the plants so introduced, together with the
progeny thereof.

(c) Issuing permits for the introduction of maize in bulk in times of shortage,
and subject to such conditions as the Department may determine.

3. No permit shall be issued to any person to introduce into the Union:

(a) Any kind of tree or plant ordinarily raised from seed, if the seed be
easily procurable in the Union or can be readily introduced in a viable
condition.

(b) Any variety of tree or fruit-bearing plant or rose plant listed by nursery-
men within the Union, and procurable from them at or below the ordinary
price for recent novelties of its class, unless the Department is satisfied that
the strain of the variety procurable in the Union is an inferior one or untrue
to type.

(c) Any rooted sugarcane plants.

However, the Department may issue a permit for the introduction of any
tree or plant specified in either subparagraphs (a) or (0) of paragraph (3) in
any case where the Department is satisfied that for special reasons such intro-
duction should be exempted from the prohibition of that paragraph.

3 Permits are not issued for species of Berberis that are intermediate hosts of Puccinia
graminis Pers., black stem rust of wheat.



36 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.—March

PLANTS NOT LIMITED IN NUMBER

4. Ornamental palms and florists’ plants, such as violets, carnations, chrysan-
themums, geraniums, pelargoniums, fuchsias, orchids, and ferns, shall not be
subject to any limitation in regard to the number of such plants that may be
introduced into the Union.

Nore.—All trees and other hardwocd plants and fruit-bearing plants are fumigated
with hydroecyanie acid gas before importation is permitted. Herbaceous plants and
ornamental palms are fumigated oniy when insect pests are present for which such
treatment is deemed necessary. Grapevines are also disinfected in a solution of copper
sulphate. All species of Ribes, Castanea, and Jugians are cut back and disinfected in a
2-percent solution of copper sulphate. Treatments are to be affected without expense
to the Government at Cape Town, Durban, Pretoria, or other approved center.

PENALTIES IMPOSED FOR VIOLATIONS OF THE PLANT
QUARANTINE ACT

According to reports received by the Bureau during the period January 1 to
March 31, 1938, penalties have recently been imposed by the proper Federal
authorities for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act, as follows

GYPSY MOTH AND BROWN-TAIL MOTH QUARANTINE

In the case of the United States v. James Kookoolis, New Haven, Conn., in
the interstate transportation of several bundles of laurel from a point in the
quarantined area to a point outside thereof, without inspection and certification,
the defendant entered a plea of nolo contendere and was fined $25.

JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE

Yn the case of the United States v. Hugo Kind, of the Shady Lawn Nursery,
Hammonton, N. J., in the interstate shipment of six lots of nursery and green-
house stock from the regulated area to points outside thereof, the defendant
pleaded guilty and was fined $100.

In the case of the United States v. Harry Lavere, Woodside, Del., in the
interstate transportation of a truckload of cantaloups from Woodside, Del., to
Rochester, N. Y., without inspection and certification, the defendant pleaded
guilty and was fined $25.

QUARANTINES AFFECTING MEXICAN PRODUCTS

In the case of the United States versus the persons listed below, for attempting
to smuggle in contraband plant material, the penalties indicated were imposed.
by the United States customs officials at the following ports:



Name Port Contraband Penalty
Vics aelViaT Tan iall Ge zea eee Brownsville, Tex_.._.-_- 2 GUAVAS . = 2a ee ee $l
PANICISCONS ALAS = ee ees | ee COG eee Aes rene ZOLANEES. o0 082 7 Se ee ee Hl
IViarhian Oy Ganz ase aera Hacile se asslexsssssss l avocad0s-2-222-2 = ee eee 1
Mrs. Josefa Cervantes de Garza___|_---_ CO ae eee cei leg G02 2.222. Se he ee 1
ATID ATO Gan Zaee eerie oe eunre | ae een GO ne eee aetna ls 0. 332s. eee 1
JOSCSRUbIOu sas See es 1M IBASO, “Ne oe 4 pieces sugarcane___.--___------__ L
LTA TAS Ta CCU Oe ee ee ee |e GORY hehe SEE eae TS guavase . 24) eee ee i
IDV ONURZVONO) Ialopltavsy Je hiolaikeyo), “Were i chéerimoya.23- =o 1
aul Ogers Ae een eae Laredo, ier oMen ane 4 plants... 52% 2 eee eee i
IMineoveIbieo) IMIpNA OS GOR eta h eae He Be 2 Oranges 2)... eae eee Re L.
NV Tors © instal Ts tl © ts ize | ec CLO tee Sepa she sel eu ors § stalks sugarcane__-....-------.-- 1
HVE aa VV FACTS GO Leste ster ngs es | CO te ee ee ea 2.apples and 2 tangerines_____-__-- L
Mrs! Matilda Hernandez!) 22 222223 |2 2222 CO ee aes 5 plants Jl. 2 5 ox See eee 1
Mins iNemaiciaviviora less seen | eee (Glo) ees ae SS se 1O'piants. . hs Bee eee eee l
Mrs. Dometilla de Arazon__-__----|__--- GO 3 Ben ahirys. ase Leuava. 2) ea See ee 1
Juan alerillose as eee eee GOs ee eee ee ee 2 apples and 4 gmavas_----=___2._- i
Same @ avez ar ee tee ee nud el eee ere Oe et sae e es ea bsweet limes. 82/2 22e) 32a ee ik
VFB ai GUleSsie eka 6 hear ea Se ene eee GOps eee eh Zmaypcps, 2 sapotes, 1 tangerine, 1

1 plant.

SOLS TT STATS HNL cee eee ee | are Goss = ie ean ee! 15 sweet limes, 4 oranges, 6 guavas_ 2
Nishi Ser yee oO Tyee | mere Oe ae a eee 5 oranges, 1 tangerine Ups EN 1
BAT) oh ad ye al hh IANA HH SY cae RE I GO See eS 2 oranges. Gy. 3 se eee 2 1
ATTONS OPA ON SO Ieee eae ne ae | eects Oe EE oe eee Sigraperruits 45. eee ee eee 1
IMTRSS MESS WAV Ortho ee oso ste COs eee RO a ae 24 OTANSES.... 2. ee ee ee I
Roquella.Cucausstkse se lene ae es eee ae CO ee ae rere T plants. 2 2 Ree See eee I
Bp Gi siWialer eee eek ie ae Ls Sears O22 ee See 30 oranges and 18 tangerines__-____ 2



aoe IZATION OF THE BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY
AND PLANT QUARANTINE

Lee A. Srrone, Chief.

S. A. Rouwer, Assistant Chief.

Avery S. Hoyt, Assistant Chief.

P. N. ANNAND, Special Research Assistant.

F. H. Spencer, Business Manager.

Rotia P. Currie, Hditor.

MABEL CoLcorD, Librarian.

J. A. Hystop, in Charge, Division of Insect Pest Survey and Information.

J. 1. HAmBLeron, in Charge, Division of Bee Culture Investigations.

D. L. Van Ding, in Charge, Division of Fruit Insect Investigations.

F. C. CRAIGHEAD, in Charge, Division of Forest Insect Investigations.

W. H. Wuite, in Charge, Division of Truck Crop and Garden Insect Investigations.

. M. Packarp, in Charge, Division of Cereal and Forage Insect Investigations.

W. HaArRnep, in Charge, Division of Cotton Insect Investigations.

C. BisHopp, in Charge, Division of Insects Affecting Man and Animals.
A. HAWKINS, in Charge, Division of Control Investigations.

C. Roark, in Charge, Division of Insecticides and Fungicides.

F. W. MUESEBECK, in Charge, Division of Insect Identification.

P. CLAUSEN, in Charge, Division of Foreign Parasite Introduction.

B. FRACKER, in Charge, Division of Piant Disease Control.

M. GAppis, in Charge, Division of Domestic Plant Quarantines.

R. Sasscur, in Charge, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines.

F. Burcess, in Field Charge, Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail Moth Control (head-

quarters, Greenfield, Mass.).

E. G. BREWER, in Field Charge, Japanese Beetle and Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail
Moth Quarantines, European Corn Borer Certification, and Dutch Eim Disease
HBradication (headquarters, Bloomfield, N. J.)

R. E. McDonAa.p, in Field Charge, Pink Bollworm and Thurberia Weevil Quar-
antines (headquarters, San Antonio, Tez.).

P. A. Homate, in Field Charge, Mexican Fruitfly Quarantine (headquarters,
Harlingen, Tez.).

A. C. Baxksr, in Field Charge, Fruitfly Investigations (headquarters, Mezico
City, Mezico).

PEPHOORRE RG:

o7

U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1938





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S. R. A.—B. E. P. Q. No. 135 5 Issued September 1938

United States Department of Agriculture

BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS

APRIL-JUNE 1938

CONTENTS

Page
“unranine and osner placa! announcements. __.-____ --______-=_____.-- 5. -- 2 nes 39
Announcement relating to European corn borer quarantine (No. 41)____-_____-__________________ 39

Method used for the disinfection of imported broomcorn and broomcorn brooms (B. E. P. Q.
AT) Supersedes fl. 6.161 and supplements P..Q. C. A. 309) ___.-22.-_- 2-22-22. ot 39
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (No. 48).._.---_.----_--__-_-____________. 40
SPURTE! PHL PRET UOT SE ae ate el ea ee es ai ae Rak Dd A 8 ee eee ee 40
MNomeetoceneral public through newspapers=___-_ 2. -=22s..2-2)82 20) 2 51
ApISHUICiIUTISHLODOSUIMASLCIS= =) =e es ee ee 2 rs 52

Administrative instructions—fumigation of potatoes by methyl bromide as a condition of
certification of potatoes moving by refrigerator car from the area listed in regulation 5

OMOMALATPIMOENO. 48, C5. tb. OQ. to) -- noe ee ewe Fe 52
Announcement relating to Mexican fruitfly quarantine (No. 64)._.--_-__________________________ 53
Administrative instructions—sterilization of grapefruit and oranges by heat under the
Mexican fruitfly quarantine (B. E. P. Q. 472; superseding P. Q. C. A. 329)___-____________. 53
Announcements relating to white-pine blister rust quarantine (No. 63)__----_--______-______--__ 54
White-pine blister rust quarantine. regulations modified__....-.-._.._._...--_-__----.-_-_-_- 54
PERU STOMEOIMEO Ea TONS 5-015 = ty Se eee SP Uhemuni et ade ee eo Oe ee es 55
iNopcetormeneral paplic through mewspapers.......- .==2 2222-22 = soso cco an sons 60
eerie tOSMISEINETIN MOST UAL DLS See = oa oe ee ee Di Ee es eee 61
Announcements relating to District of Columbia plant regulations _-_...-.--_-_-_-_-_____---__-- 62
Districtiot Conmmaia plant rezulations:modified=_ 4. 2 2. 22 es be ae eee cb ook 62
Revised rules and regulations governing the movement of plants and plant products into and
GED NGNGEOIsnnic ol COM bla. a et ee bl A 62
INgrice lo ceneral public through newspapers-_. 2-5 test ese _ iaitiset ee en 65
GAS ERE CUI OSORNO SIN ASUDES Ets Seren aay Petes 2 Feet Ede ae te ee Le 65
Announcement relating to rules and regulations governing the importation of cotton and cotton
Mie eSwL OMG ORU WILOG us LALCS = an on ee ee ee ee Secon eee 66
Modificaticn of cotton regulations (revision of regulation 13)_-_..__.___----___-__-_-._-------- 66
Terninalanspeevion of plants andiplant proG@ucts:c22 2-2: -2-s=22.2----< i a.bees- ssc --5-5--2- 67
Arkansas State plant quarantine (shipment of sweetpotato plants restricted) _._._-___.------ 67
MAGinoOMAlEDaatAnspection places in California.-= 22.222 2 eae a See 67
68

eee Sere nn mn 3 See ee eee Boi Sys 8 Eis Syl Se eo hie eee oe ESS
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Brazil (B. E. P. Q. 379, supplement No. 2)- 68

Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of France (B. E. P. Q. 403, supplement No. 3)- 68
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Germany (B. E. P. Q. 405, supplement No.
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Central America (British Honduras) (B. E. P. Q. 445,
Saraswat ep Se Seg ne et a nn eee ma eae aS
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Persia (Iran) (B. E. P. Q. 449, supplement No. 2) 70
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act__..-----.---------..------.------ es 70
‘Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine_-_-....-.-.----.------------------ 73



QUARANTINE AND OTHER OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS

ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO EUROPEAN CORN BORER
QUARANTINE (NO. 41)
May 7, 1938.

B. E. P. Q. 474 (supersedes H. B. 161 and supplements P. Q. C. A. 309).

METHOD USED FOR THE DISINFECTION OF IMPORTED BROOMCORN AND
BROOMCORN BROOMS

Broomcorn and articles made of broomecorn which are required to be treated,
under the provisions of regulation 5 of Quarantine No. 41, will be treated by one
of the following methods:

1. Vacuum fumigation:
(1) The temperature of the stalks and of the fumigation chamber during the

fumigation shall be not less than 60° F,
39
86995—38——-1



40 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

(2) The dosage for the fumigation shall be 38 pounds of liquid hydrocyanic
acid or its equivalent per 1,000 cubic feet of space.

(3) The air pressure in the fumigation chamber shall be reduced to the
equivalent of 2 inches of mercury (a 28-inch vacuum at sea level), after which
the hydrocyanie acid shall be introduced and the low pressure held for the
duration of the fumigation.

(4) The exposure shall be not less than 3 hours.

2. Steam sterilization :

(1) The air pressure in the treating chamber shall be reduced to the equivalent
of 5 inches of mercury (a 25-inch vacuum at sea level).

(2) Steam shall then be introduced until a positive pressure of 10 pounds is
obtained.

(3) The exposure to the 10-pound positive pressure’ of steam shall continue
for a period sufficient to assure a constant temperature in all parts of the treat-
ing.chamber, after which the steam may be shut off and the treating chamber
exhausted of the uncondensed steam.

Avery S. Hoyt,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE
(NO. 48)

REVISION OF REGULATIONS
INTRODUCTORY NOTE

An important change in the following revision of the regulations of the Japa-
nese beetle quarantine is the inclusion in the regulated areas for the first time
of part of Schuyler County, N. Y., parts of the Ohio counties of Coshocton,
Portage, and Summit, and parts of the West Virginia counties of Berkeley and
Jefferson. This action is considered necessary because of the establishment of
the Japanese beetle therein. Areas were also added to counties, parts of which
were formerly under regulation, in the States of New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio,
Maryland, and Virginia. Lancaster County, Pa., has been added to the special
area (regulation 5, sec. A (1) (ii)) from which the movement of fruits and
vegetables by motortruck or refrigerator car is regulated. Wheeling, W. Va.,
and Coshocton, Ohio, are brought under regulation and placed in the same cate-
gory as Buffalo, Cleveland, and other outlying cities in that a certificate or
permit is required in the movement of fruits and vegetables to these cities but
no restrictions are placed on the interstate movement therefrom.

Of interest to nurserymen is the elimination of restrictions on the movement
of aquatics except during the period from June 15 to October 15, inclusive.

The restrictions on the movement of sand are modified to exempt from certifi-
eation silica sand, greensand, marl, ‘‘bird sand,” “bird gravel,” and pottery clay,
when free from vegetable matter, and when labeled as to contents on the outside
of each container.

Some outlying areas where Japanese beetle infestations have been found the
past field season are not included in the regulated area because of assurance
from the States concerned that adequate measures will be taken to prevent the
spread of the pest therefrom.

SUMMARY

Unless a certificate or permit has been issued, these regulations as now
revised prohibit the interstate shipment of green corn on the cob, beans in the
pod, bananas in entire bunches or in clusters of 25 or more, apples, peaches,
blackberries, blueberries, huckleberries, or raspberries from the regulated areas,
to or through points outside; and also prohibit (unless a certificate or permit
has been issued) the interstate movement of all fruits and vegetables by re-
frigerator car or motortruck from the District of Columbia, the State of
Delaware, and parts of the States of Maryland, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and
Virginia, to or through points outside the regulated areas as defined in regula-
tion 3. Refrigerator cars used for loading fruits and vegetables, other than
onions and potatoes, in such area must, prior to loading, be cleaned by the
common carrier and kept tightly closed and sealed during the interval between



1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 4]

cleaning and loading. Onions and potatoes must be fumigated in the car when
such action is deemed necessary by the inspector, and doors and hatches of the
ears must be closed or screened. For other details and exceptions see
regulation 5.

The regulations also prohibit the interstate shipment of plants, sand, soil,
earth, peat, compost, and manure from any part of the regulated areas to
or through any outside point throughout the year unless a Federal permit
or certificate has been secured. Portions of plants and cut flowers are re-
stricted interstate movement only between June 15 and October 15, inclusive.
For details and exceptions see regulations 6 and 7.

The regulated areas include the District of Columbia, the entire States of
Connecticut, Delaware, Massachusetts, New Jersey, and Rhode Island, and
parts of the States of Maine, Maryland, New Hampshire, New York, Ohio,
Pennsylvania, Vermont, Virginia, and West Virginia. The boundaries are
shown in regulation 3.

These regulations also place certain restrictions to protect restricted articles
from infestation while in transit, require thorough cleaning of vehicles and
containers which have been used in transporting restricted products, and
provide other safeguards and conditions as specified in regulations 8 to 18,
inclusive.

To secure permits and certificates, address the Bureau of Entomology and
Plant Quarantine, 266 Glenwood Avenue, Bloomfield, N. J., or the nearest
branch office listed in the appendix.

Avery S. Hoyt,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 48 (TWELFTH REVISION) 7
[Approved March 1, 1937; effective March 1, 1937]

I, H. A. Wallace, Secretary of Agriculture, have determined that it is neces-
sary to quarantine the States of Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Maryland,
Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania,
Rhode Island, Vermont, Virginia, and West Virginia, and the District of
Columbia, to prevent the spread of the Japanese beetle (Popillia japonica
Newm.), a dangerous insect new to and not heretofore widely prevalent or
distributed within and throughout the United States.

Now, therefore, under authority conferred by section 8 of the Plant Quaran-
tine Act of August 20, 1912 (387 Stat. 315), as amended by the act of Congress
approved March 4, 1917 (39 Stat. 1134, 1165), and having duly given the public
hearing required thereby, I do quarantine the said States of Connecticut, Dela-
ware, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New
York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, Virginia, and West Virginia,
and the District of Columbia, effective on and after March 1, 1937. Hereafter,
under the authority of said act of August 20, 1912, amended as aforesaid (1)
fruits and vegetables; (2) nursery, ornamental, and greenhouse stock, and
other plants; and (3) sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure shall not be
shipped, offered for shipment to a common carrier, received for transportation
or transported by a common carrier, or carried, transported, moved or allowed
to be moved from any of said quarantined States or District into or through
any other State or Territory or District of the United States in manner or
method or under conditions other than those prescribed in the rules and regu-
lations hereinafter made and amendments thereto: Provided, That the re
strictions of this quarantine and of the rules and regulations supplemental
thereto may be limited to the areas in a quarantined State now, or which
may hereafter be, designated by the Secretary of Agriculture as regulated
areas when, in the judgment of the Secretary of Agriculture, the enforcement
of the aforesaid rules and regulations as to such regulated areas shall be
adequate to prevent the spread of the Japanese beetle: Provided further,
That such limitations shall be conditioned upon the said State providing for
and enforcing such control measures with respect to such regulated areas as, in
the judgment of the Secretary of Agriculture, shall be deemed adequate to
prevent the spread of the Japanese beetle therefrom to other parts of the State:
And provided further, That certain articles classed as restricted herein may,
because of the nature of their growth or production or their manufactured
or processed condition, be exempted by administrative instructions issued by



42 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine when, in his
judgment, such articles are considered innocuous as earriers of infestation.
Done at the city of Washington this 1st day of March 1937.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture,
[SEAL] H. A. WALLACE,
Secretary of Agriculture.

RULES AND REGULATIONS (SIXTEENTH REVISION) SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE
OF QUARANTINE NO. 48

[Approved April 6, 1988; effective April 11, 1938]
REGULATION 1. DEFINITIONS

For the purpose of these regulations the following words, names, and terms
shall be construed, respectively, to mean:

(a) Japanese beetle—The insect known as the Japanese beetle (Popillia ja-
ponica Newm.), in any stage of development.

(b) The terms “infested,” “infestation,” and the like, relate to infestation with
the Japanese beetle.

(c) Quarantined area.—Any State or District quarantined by the Secretary of
Agriculture to prevent the spread of the Japanese beetle.

(d) Regulated area—Any area in a quarantined State or District which is
now, or which may hereafter be, designated as such by the Secretary of Agri-
culture in accordance with the provisos to Notice of Quarantine No. 48, as
revised.

(e) Fruits and vegetables.—F¥or the list of restricted fruits and vegetables
see regulation 5.

(f) Nursery and ornamental stock.—Nursery, ornamental, and greenhouse
stock, and all other plants, plant roots, cut flowers, or other portions of plants.

(g) Sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure——Sand, soil, earth, peat,
eompost, or manure of any kind and as to either bulk movement or in connection
with farm products or nursery and ornamental stock.

(h) Certified sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure.—Sand, soil, earth,
peat, compost, or manure determined by the inspector as uninfested and so
eertified.

(i) Certified greenhouse—A greenhouse or similar establishment which has
complied to the satisfaction of the inspector with the conditions imposed in
regulation 6. This term may apply also to potting beds, heeling-in areas, hot-
beds, coldframes, or similar plots or to storage houses, packing sheds, or stores
treated or otherwise safeguarded in manner and method satisfactory to the
inspector.

(7) Inspector.—An inspector of the United States Department of Agriculture.

(k) Moved or allowed to be moved interstate.—Shipped, offered for shipment
to a common earrier, received for transportation or transported by a common
carrier, or carried, transported, moved, or allowed to be moved from one State
or Territory or District of the United States into or through any other State or
Territory or District.

REGULATION 2. LIMITATION OF RESTRICTIONS TO REGULATED AREAS

Conditioned upon the compliance on the part of the State concerned with the
provisos to Notice of Quarantine No. 48 (twelfth revision), the restrictions pro-
vided in these regulations on the interstate movement of plants and plant
products and other articles enumerated in said notice of quarantine will be
limited to such movement from the areas in such State now or hereafter desig-
nated by the Secretary of Agriculture as regulated areas.

REGULATION 38. REGULATED AREAS

In accordance with the provisos to Notice of Quarantine No. 48 (twelfth revi-
sion), the Secretary of Agriculture designates as regulated areas for the purpose
of these regulations the States, District, counties, townships, towns, cities, elec-
tion districts, and magisterial districts listed below, including all cities, towns,
boroughs, or other political subdivisions within their limits:

Connecticut.—The entire State.



1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 43

Delaware.—The entire State.

District of Columbia.—The entire District.

Maine.—County of York; towns of Auburn and Lewiston, in Androscoggin
County; towns of Cape Elizabeth, Gorham, Gray, New Gloucester, Raymond,
Secarboro, Standish, and the cities of Portland, South Portland, Westbrook, and
Windham, in Cumberland County; the city of Waterville, in Kennebec County;
and the city of Brewer, in Penobscot County.

Maryland.—Counties of Cecil, Kent, Queen Annes, Somerset, and Worcester ;
the city of Baltimore; the city of Cumberland, the town of Frostburg, and elec-
tion districts Nos. 4, 5, 6, 7, 11, 12, 14, 22, 28, 24, 26, 29, 31, and 52, in Allegany
County; the city of Annapolis and election districts Nos. 3, 4, and 5, in Ame
Arundel County; election districts Nos. 1, 2, 3, 9, 11, 12, 18, 14, and 15, and that
portion of election district No. 8 lying south of Shawan, Beaver Dam, and Sher-
wood Roads, in Baltimore County; all of Caroline County except election dis-
tricts of Hillsboro (No. 6), American Corners (No. 8), and Preston (No. 4); the
city of Westminster, and election district of Freedom (No. 5), in Carroll County;
election districts of White Plains and La Plata, in Charles County; election dis-
trict of Cambridge (No. 7), in Dorchester County; election districts of Buckeys-

‘town (No. 1), Frederick (No. 2), New Market (No. 9), Petersville (No. 12), and
Brunswick (No. 25), in Frederick County; County of Harford, except election
district of Marshall (No. 4) ; election districts of Elkridge (No. 1), Ellicott City
(No. 2), and West Friendship (No. 3), in Howard County, and the right-of-way
of United States Highway No. 1 through the election district of Guilford (No. 6),
in said county; all of Prince Georges County except the election districts of Not-
tingham and Aquasco; that part of Montgomery County located within the
established boundaries of the so-called “Washington Suburban Sanitary Dis-
trict”; towns of Easton and Oxford, in Talbot County; election districts of
Sharpsburg (No. 1), Williamsport (No. 2), Hagerstown (Nos.. 3, 17, 21, 22, 24,
and 25), Leitersburg (No. 9), Sandy Hook (No. 11), and Halfway (No. 26), in
Washington County; election districts of Pittsburg (No. 4), Parsons (No. 5),
Dennis (No. 6), Trappe (No. 7), Nutters (No. 8), Salisbury (No. 9), Delmar~â„¢
(No. 11), Camden (No. 18), Willards (No. 14), and Fruitland (No, 16), in
Wicom:.co County.

Massachusetts.—The entire State.

New Hampshire—Counties of Belknap, Cheshire, Hillsboro, Merrimack,
Rockingham, Strafford, and Sullivan; towns of Brookfield, Eaton, Effingham,
Freedom, Madison, Moultonboro, Ossipee, Sandwich, Tamworth, Tuftonboro,
Wakefield, and Wolfeboro, in Carroll County; towns of Alexandria, Ashland,
Bridgewater, Bristol, Canaan, Dorchester, Enfield, Grafton, Groton, Hanover,
Hebron, Holderness, Lebanon, Lyme, Orange, and Plymouth, in Grafton County.

New Jersey.—The entire State.

New York.—Counties of Albany, Bronx, Broome, Chemung, Chenango, Colum-
bia, Cortland, Delaware, Dutchess, Fulton, Greene, Kings, Madison, Mont-
gomery, Nassau, New York, Oneida, Onondaga, Orange, Otsego, Putnam, Queens,
Rensselaer, Richmond, Saratoga, Schenectady, Schoharie, Suffolk, Sullivan,
Tioga, Ulster, Rockland, Washington, and Westchester; towns of Red House
and Salamanca, and the city of Salamanca, in Cattaraugus County; towns
of Tonawanda, Amherst, and Cheektowaga, and the cities of Buffalo and
Lackawanna, in Hrie County; towns of Columbia, Danube, Fairfield, Frankfort,
German Flats, Herkimer, Litchfield, Little Falls, Manheim, Newport, Salisbury,
Schuyler, Stark, Warren, and Winfield, and the city of Little Falls, in Herkimer
County; towns of Catherine, Cayuta, Dix, Hector, Montour, and Reading, and
the Borough of Watkins Glen, in Schuyler County; towns of Caton, Corning,
and Hornby, and the city of Corning, in Stewben County; towns of Caroline,
Danby, Dryden, Enfield, Ithaca, Newfield, and the city of Ithaca, in Tompkins
County; towns of Luzerne and Queensbury and the city of Glens Falls, in
Warren County.

Ohio.—Counties of Columbiana and Mahoning; townships of Augusta, Brown,
and East, in Carroll County; the city of Coshocton, in Coshocton County ; the city
of Cleveland in Cuyahoga County; the city of Columbus in Franklin County;
townships of Cross Creek, Island Creek, Knox, Saline, Steubenville, and Wells,
and the city of Steubenville, in Jefferson County; the city of Toledo, in Lucas
County; townships of Atwater, Brimfield, Charlestown, Deerfield, Edinburg,
Franklin, Palmyra, Paris, Randolph, Ravenna, Rootstown, and Suffield, in
Portage County; all of Stark County, except the townships of Lawrence, Sugar
Creek, and Tuscarawas; and the townships of Bath, Copley, Coventry, Franklin,



44 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

Green, Northampton, Norton, Portage, Springfield, Stow, and Tallmadge, and
the cities of Akron, Barberton, and Cuyahoga Falls, in Summit County.

Pennsylvania.—The entire State, except Crawford, Erie, Forest, Mercer, and
Venango Counties; Mercer Township in Butler County; Ashland, Beaver, Elk,
Richland (including the boroughs of Foxburg and St. Petersburg), Salem, and
Washington Townships, in Clarion County, and townships of Brokenstraw,
Cherry Grove, Columbus, Conewango, Deerfield, Eldred, Farmington, Freehold,
Limestone, Pine Grove, Pittsfield, Pleasant, Southwest, Spring Creek, Sugar
Grove, Triumph, Watson (including the boroughs of Bear Lake, Grand Valley,
Sugar Grove, Tidioute, and Youngsville), in Warren County.

Rhode Island—The entire State.

Vermont.—Counties of Bennington, Rutland, Windham, and Windsor; and the
town of Burlington, in Chittenden County.

Virginia—Counties of Accomac, Arlington, Culpepper, Elizabeth City, Fair-
fax, Fauquier, Henrico, Loudoun, Norfolk, Northampton, Prince William,
Princess Anne, and Stafford; magisterial districts of Dale and Manchester, in
Chesterfield County; magisterial district of Sleepy Hole, in Nansemond County;
Camp Stuart, in Warwick County; and the cities of Alexandria, Fredericks-
burg, Hampton, Newport News, Norfolk, Portsmouth, Richmond, South Norfolk, -
and Suffolk.

West Virginia.—Counties of Hancock, Harrison, Marion, Monongalia, and
Taylor; districts of Hedgesville, Falling Waters, and Opequon, in Berkeley
County; the towns of Bolivar and Harpers Ferry, in Jefferson County; town of
Keyser and district of Frankfort, in Mineral County; the city of MBbeStiNE,
in Ohio County; and the city of Parkersburg, in Wood County.

REGULATION 4. EXTENSION OR REDUCTION OF REGULATED AREAS

The regulated areas designated in regulation 3 may be extended or reduced as
may be found advisable by the Secretary of Agriculture. Due notice of any
extension or reduction and the areas affected thereby will be given in writing
to the transportation companies doing business in or through the States in
which such areas are located and by publication in one or more newspapers
selected by the Secretary of Agriculture within the States in which the areas
affected are located.

REGULATION 5. RESTRICTIONS ON THE MOVEMENT OF FRUITS AND VEGETABLES
SECTION A. CONTROL OF MOVEMENT

(1) Unless a certificate or permit shall have been issued therefor, by an in-
spector, except as provided in paragraphs (a) to (e), inclusive, of this section:
(4) No green corn on the cob, beans in the pod, bananas in entire bunches or in
clusters of 25 or more, apples, peaches, blackberries, blueberries, huckleberries,
or raspberries shall be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from any
regulated area to or through any point outside thereof; and (ii) no fruits
and vegetables of any kind shall be moved or allowed to be moved interstate
via refrigerator car or motortruck from the State, District, counties, election
districts, or city listed below to or through any point outside of the regulated
areas:

Delaware.—The entire State.

District of Columbia.—The entire District.

Maryland.—Counties of Cecil, Kent, Queen Annes, Somerset, and Worcester ;
the city of Baltimore; all of Caroline County except election districts of Hills-
boro (No. 6), American Corners (No. 8), and Preston (No. 4); election district
of Cambridge (No. 7), in Dorchester County; and election districts of Pitts-
burg (No. 4), Parsons (No. 5), Dennis (No. 6), Trappe (No. 7), Nutters .
(No. 8), Salisbury (No. 9), Delmar (No. 11), Camden (No. 13), Willards
(No. 14), and Fruitland (No. 16), in Wiconvico County.

New Jersey—Counties of Atlantic, Burlington, Camden, Cape May, Cumber-
land, Gloucester, Hunterdon, Mercer, Middlesex, Monmouth, Ocean, Salem,
Somerset, and Union.

Pennsylvania—Counties of Bucks, Chester, Delaware, Lancaster, Mont-
gomery, and Philadelphia.

Virginia.—Counties of Accomac, Arlington, and Northampton.

Provided, That the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine
may by administrative instructions extend or reduce the areas specified in this
regulation when in his judgment such action is considered advisable.



1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 45

(a) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of fruits and
vegetables between October 16 and June 14, inclusive.

(b) No certificate will be required for the interstate movement of fruits and
vegetables on a through bill of lading either from an area not under regulation
through a regulated area to another nonregulated area, or from a regulated
area through a nonregulated area to another regulated area, except that a
cetificate is required for interstate movement to Brewer and Waterville, Maine;
Buffalo, N. Y., or to the other regulated parts of Erie County, N. Y.; Cleveland,
Columbus, Coshocton, and Toledo, Ohio; Burlington, Vt.; and Parkersburg and
Wheeling, W. Va. No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of
fruits and vegetables from Brewer and Waterville, Maine; Buffalo, N. Y.,
or from other parts of Erie County, N. Y.; Cleveland, Columbus, Coshocton, and
Toledo, Ohio; Burlington, Vt.; and Parkersburg and Wheeling, W. Va.

(c) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of fruits and
vegetables when they shall have been manufactured or processed in such a
manner that in the judgment of the inspector no infestation could be
transmitted.

(d) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of any shipments
of apples or peaches of less than 15 pounds to the shipment or of bananas
other than in entire bunches or in clusters of 25 or more.

(e) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of commercially
packed apples in any quantity, except those moving via refrigerator cars or
motor vehicles from the State, District, counties, election districts, or city
listed in paragraph (1) (ii) of this section.

(2) No restrictions are placed on the interstate shipment from the regu-
lated areas of fruits and vegetables other than those mentioned above, except
that any such interstate shipments of fruits and vegetables may be inspected
at any time or place inside or outside the regulated areas and when actually
found to involve danger of dissemination of Japanese beetle to uninfested
localities, measures to eliminate infestation may be required as a condition
of further transportation or delivery.

SECTION B. CONDITIONS OF CERTIFICATION

Certificates may be issued for the interstate movement of fruits and vege-
tables to points outside the regulated areas between June 15 and October 15,
inclusive, under one of the following conditions:

(1) When the fruits and vegetables, moving from a point in the regulated
area other than the State, District, counties, election districts, or city listed
in paragraph 1 (ii) of this regulation, or moving from such Cesignated State,
District, counties, election districts, or city other than by refrigerator car,
have actually been inspected by the United States Department of Agriculture
and found free from infestation. The number of inspection points for such
certification will be limited and their location determined by shipping needs
and further conditioned on the establishment at such points of provisions
satisfactory to the inspector for the handling and safeguarding of such ship-
ments during inspection. Such inspection may be discontinued and certifica-
tion withheld by the inspector during periods of general or unusual flight of
the beetles.

(2) When the fruits and vegetables have been handled or treated under the
supervision of an inspector in Manner and by method to free them from
any infestation.

(3) When the fruits and vegetables have originated outside of the regu-
jated areas and are to be reshipped directly from freight yards, transfer
points, or unloading docks within such areas, under provisions satisfactory to
the inspector for the safeguarding of such shipments pending certification
and reshipment. Certificates on this basis will be issued without inspection
only in cases where, in the judgment of the inspector, the shipments concerned
have not been exposed to infestation while within such freight yards, transfer
points, or unloading docks.

(4) When the fruits and vegetables were grown in districts where the fact
has been established to the satisfaction of the inspector that no infestation
exists and are to be shipped directly from the farms where grown to points
outside the regulated areas, or are shipped from infested districts where the
fact has been established to the satisfaction of the inspector that the Japanese
beetle has not begun or has ceased its flight.



46 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

(5) When the fruits and vegetables other than onions and potatoes, moving
via refrigerator car from the State, District, counties, election districts, or
city listed in paragraph 1 (ii) of this regulation, have been inspected and
loaded in a manner to prevent infestation, in a refrigerator car with closed.
or adequately screened doors and hatches, which car prior to loading has been
determined by an inspector as thoroughly swept and cleaned by the common
earrier in’a manner to rid it of infestation. During the interval between
cleaning.and loading such refrigerator car must be tightly closed and sealed.

(6) When the onions or potatoes moving via refrigerator car from the
State, District, counties, election districts, or city listed in this regulation
have been fumigated in the car, when deemed necessary in the judgment of
the inspector and when the doors and hatches of the car have been tightly
closed or adequately screened under the supervision of an inspector.

REGULATION 6. RESTRICTIONS ON THE MOVEMENT OF NURSERY AND ORNAMENTAL
Stock

SECTION A. CONTROL OF MOVEMENT

Nursery and ornamental stock as defined in regulation 1 shall not be
moved or allowed to be moved interstate from the regulated areas to or through
any point outside thereof, unless a certificate or permit Shall have been issued
therefor by the inspector except as follows:

(1) True bulbs, corms, and tubers, when dormant, except for storage growth,
and when free from soil, are exempt from the requirement of certification,
except that this exemption does not apply to dahlia tubers.

(2) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of nursery and
ornamental stock imported from foreign countries when reshipped from the
port of entry in the unopened original container and labeled as to each con-
tainer with a copy certificate of the country from which it was exported,
a statement of the general nature and quantity of the contents, the name and
address of the consignee, and the country and locality where grown.

(3) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement between October
16 and June 14, inclusive, of cut flowers, aquatic plants, and of portions of
plants without roots and free from soil (Such as branches and twigs of trees
and shrubs, scions, Christmas trees, holly, laurel, and sphagnum moss).

(4) No certificate or permit will be required for the interstate movement of
nursery and ornamental stock when transported by a common earrier on a
through bill of lading either from an area not under regulation through
a regulated area, or from a regulated area through a nonregulated area to
another regulated area.

SECTION B. CONDITIONS GOVERNING THE ISSUANCH OF CERTIFICATES AND PERMITS

For the purpose of certification of nursery and ornamental stock, nurseries,
greenhouses, and other premises concerned in the movement of such stock will
be classified as follows:

(1) Class I.—Nurseries, greenhouses, and other premises concerned in the
movement of nursery and ornamental stock on or within approximately 500 feet
of which no infestation has been found may be classified as class I. Upon
compliance with the requirements of subsection (6) of this section, nursery and
ornamental stock may be certified by the inspector for shipment from such
premises without further inspection, and without meeting the safeguards pre-
seribed as a condition of interstate shipment of plants originating in nurseries
or greenhouses of class III.

(2) Class ITI.—(a) Nurseries, greenhouses, and other premises concerned in
the movement of nursery and ornamental stock on which either grubs in the
soil or one or more beetles have been found, will be classified as class III. Such
classification also may be given to nurseries, ete., in localities known to be
generally infested where one or more beetles or grubs are found in the imme-
diate proximity (within approximately 500 feet) of such nurseries, ete, on
adjacent property or properties. In the ease of nursery properties, under
single ownership and management, but represented by parcels of land widely
separated, such parcels may be independently classified either as class I or
class III upon compliance with such conditions and safeguards as shall be re-
quired by the inspector. Similarly, unit nursery properties, which would other-
wise fall in class III, may be open to subdivision, for the purpose of rating such



1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 47

subdivisions in classes I or III, when in the judgment of the inspector such
action is warranted by recent and scanty infestation limited to a portion of the
nursery concerned: Provided, That the subdivision containing the infestation
shall be clearly marked by boundaries of a permanent nature which shall be
approximately 500 feet beyond the point where the infestation occurs.

(6) Upon compliance with subsections (3) and (6) of this section, nursery
and ornamental stock may be certified by the inspector for shipment from such
premises under any one of the following conditions: (i) That the roots shall
be treated by means approved by the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quaran-
tine in manner and by method satisfactory to the inspector; or (ii) in the case
of plants in which the root system is such that a thorough inspection may be
made, that the soil shall be entirely removed from the stock by shaking or
washing; or (iii) that it shall be shown by evidence satisfactory to the inspector
that the plants concerned were produced in a certified greenhouse.

(3) Greenhouses of class III may be certified upon compliance with all the
following conditions with respect to the greenhouses themselves and to all pot-
ting beds, heeling-in areas, hotbeds, coldframes, and similar plots:

(a) Ventilators, doors, and all other openings in greenhouses or coldframes
on premises in class III shall be kept screened in manner satisfactory to the
inspector during the period of flight of the beetle, namely, south of the northern
boundaries of Maryland and Delaware between June 1 and October 1, inclusive,
or north thereof between June 15 and October 15, inclusive.

(6) Prior to introduction into nurseries or greenhouses, sand, if contaminated
with vegetable matter, soil, earth, peat, compost, or manure taken from infested
locations or which may have been exposed to infestation, must be sterilized or
fumigated under the direction and supervision of, and in manner and by method
satisfactory to the inspector. If such sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, or manure
is not to be immediately used in such greenhouses, it must be protected from
possible infestation in manner and by method satisfactory to the inspector.

(c) All potted plants placed in certified greenhouses of class III and all
potted plants to be certified for interstate movement therefrom (i) shall be
potted in certified soil; (ii) shall, if grown outdoors south of the northern
boundaries of Maryland and Delaware at any time between June 1 and October
1, inclusive, or north thereof at any time between June 15 and October 15, in-
clusive, be kept in screened frames while outdoors; (iii) shall, if grown out-
doors during any part of the year, be placed in beds in which the soil or other
material shall have been treated in manner and by method approved by the
Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine to eliminate infestation; and (iv)
shall comply with such other safeguards as may be required by the inspector.

(4) Cut flowers and other parts of plants without roots or soil may be certi-
fied for movement either (@) when they have been inspected by an inspector
and found free from infestation, or (6) when they have been grown in a green-
house of class I or in a certified greenhouse of class III and are transported
under such safeguards as will in the judgment of the inspector prevent infesta-
tion. (See also sec. A (8) of this regulation. )

(5) Nursery and ornamental stock originating on or moved from unclassified
premises may be certified by the inspector under either one of the following
conditions: (a) That the soil shall be entirely removed from the stock, or (b)
that the roots shall be treated by means approved by the Bureau of Entomology
and Plant Quarantine in manner and by method satisfactory to the inspector, or
(c) that it shall be shown by evidence satisfactory to the inspector that the
accompanying soil was obtained at such points and under such conditions that
in his judgment no infestation could exist therein.

(6) Nurserymen, florists, dealers, and others, in order to maintain their
classified status, (a) shall restrict their purchases or receipts of nursery and
ornamental stock, sand, if contaminated with vegetable matter, soil, earth,
peat, compost, and manure within the regulated area to articles which have been
certified under these regulations as to each such article and the said certificate
shall accompany the articles when moved; (0) shall obtain approval of the
inspector before such articles are received on their premises or moved from
the open on their own premises into certified greenhouses; and (¢) shall also
report immediately in writing all purchases or receipts of such articles secured
from within the regulated area. Nurserymen, florists, dealers, and others
whose premises are classified as class III shall, in addition, report immediately
on forms provided for that purpose all their sales or shipments of such articles
both to points outside the regulated areas and to other classified nurseries
or greenhouses within the regulated areas. Certification may be denied to any

86995—38

2





AS BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

person who has omitted to make the report or reports required by this regula-
tion, and such denial of certification shall continue until the information so:
omitted has been supplied.

(7) Nursery and ornamental stock imported from foreign countries and not
reshipped from the port of entry in the unopened original container may be
certified for movement under these regulations when such stock has been
inspected by an inspector and found free from infestation.

(8) Nursery and ornamental stock originating outside the regulated areas
and certified stock originating in classified nurseries or greenhouses may be
certified for reshipment from premises other than those on which they orig-
inated, under provisions satisfactory to the inspector for the safeguarding of
such stock from infestation at the point of reshipment and en route, and when.
found advisable by the inspector, after reinspection and determination of
freedom from, infestation.

REGULATION 7%. RESTRICTIONS ON THE MOVEMENT oF SAND, Som, HARTH, PEAT,
COMPOST, AND MANURE

SECTION A. CONTROL OF MOVEMENT

Sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure shall not be moved or allowed
to be moved interstate from any point in the regulated areas to or through
any point outside thereof unless a certificate or permit shall have been issued
therefor by the inspector, except as follows:

(1) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of (a) sand for
construction purposes, silica sand, greensand, marl, “bird sand,” “bird gravel,’”
and pottery clay, when free from vegetable matter; (0) such other sands ag
have been treated or processed and Subsequently handled in such manner that
in the judgment of the inspector no Japanese beetle could exist therein, provided.
that each container of such article shall be labeled on the outside thereof as
to nature of contents, except that in case of bulk shipments such label shall
accompany the waybill or other shipping papers; and (c) ground, dried,
imported peat in packages of 5 pounds or less to the package.

(2) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of sand, Soil, earth,
peat, compost, and manure imported from foreign countries when reshipped:
from the port of entry in the unopened original container and labeled as to
each container with the country of origin, and when the shipment is further
protected in manner or method satisfactory to the inspector.

(3) No certificate will be required for the interstate movement of sand,
soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure when transported by a common carrier
on a through bill of lading either from an area not under regulation through
a regulated area, or from a regulated area through a nonregulated area to
another regulated area.

SECTION B. CONDITIONS OF CERTIFICATION

Certificates for the movement of restricted sand, soil, earth, peat, compost,
and manure may be isSued under any one of the following conditions:

(1) When the articles to be moved have originated in districts included in
the regulated area, but in which neither beetles nor grubs in soil have been
found.

(2) When the material consists of fresh manure or of mined, dredged, or
other similar materials, and it has been determined by an inspector that no
infestation could exist therein.

(3) When the material has been removed, under the supervision of an
inspector, from a depth of more than 12 inches below the surface of the ground
and either (a) is to be moved between October 16 and June 14, inclusive, or
(b) is loaded and shipped at points where it has been determined by an
inspector that no general infestation of adult beetles exists, or (c) when the
ears and loading operations are protected by screening under the direction of
and in manner and by method Satisfactory to the inspector.

(4) When the material has been fumigated with carbon disulphide or
otherwise treated under the supervision of and in manner and by method
satisfactory to the inspector. Such fumigation or treatment will be required
as a condition of certification of all restricted sand, soil, earth, peat, compost
and manure, except such as is loaded and shipped in compliance with parar
graphs (1), (2), or (3) hereof.



1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 49

REGULATION 8, CONDITIONS GOVERNING THE PROTECTION OF RESTRICTED ARTICLES
FRoM INFESTATION WHILE IN TRANSIT

Fruits and vegetables, nursery and ornamental stock, and sand, soil, earth,
peat, compost, and manure, moving interstate from or through the regulated
areas to points outside thereof between June 15 and October 15, inclusive,
shall at all times while they are in the regulated areas be screened, covered,
or otherwise protected in manner or method satisfactory to the inspector for
safeguarding the articles from infestation.

Trucks or other road vehicles transporting restricted articles may be sealed
by the inspector at the point of inspection, and all such seals shall remain
intact as long as the vehicle is en route within the regulated area.

REGULATION 9. MARKING AND CERTIFICATION A CONDITION OF INTERSTATE
TRANSPORTATION

(a) Every ear, vehicle, box, basket, or other container of the articles listed,
the interstate movement of which is restricted in regulations 5, 6, and 7, shall
be plainly marked with the name and address of the consignor and the name
and address of the consignee, and shall have securely attached to the outside
thereof a valid certificate or permit issued in compliance with these regula-
tions. In the case of lot shipments by freight, one certificate attached to
one of the containers and another certificate attached to the waybill will be
sufficient.

(6) In the case of bulk carload shipments by rail, the certificate shall accom-
pany the waybill, conductor’s manifest, memorandum, or bill of lading per-
taining to such shipment, and in addition each car shall have securely attached
to the outside thereof a placard showing the number of the certificate or
certificates accompanying the waybill.

(c) In the case of shipment by road vehicle, the certificates shall accompany
the vehicle. .

(d) Certificates shcll be surrendered to the consignee upon delivery of the
shipment.

REGULATION 10. GENERAL CONDITIONS GOVERNING INSPECTION AND ISSUANCE OF
CERTIFICATES AND PERMITS

(a) Persons intending to move or allow to be moved interstate any of the
articles the movement of which is restricted in regulations 5, 6, and 7, shall
make application for inspection and certification as far as possible in advance
of the probable date of shipment, specifying in the application the article
and quantity to be shipped, method of shipment, name and address of the
consignor, and name and address of the consignee.

(b) Applicants for inspection will be required to assemble the articles at
such points as the inspector shall designate and so to place them that inspec-
tion may readily be made; if not so placed, inspection may be refused. All
charges for storage, cartage, and labor incident to inspection, other than the
services of the inspector, shall be paid by the shipper.

(c) Certificates and permits shall be used in counection with the transpor-
tation of only those articles intended to be covered thereby.

(d@) Where the apparent absolute freedom from infestation of any of the
articles enumerated cannot be determined by the inspector, certification will
be refused.

(e) Permits may be issued for the interstate movement of restricted articles
by truck or other road vehicle from a regulated area through a nonregulated
area to another regulated area except that permits issued for the movement
of fruits and vegetables from the State, District, counties, election districts,
or city listed in regulation 5, section A, (1) (ii), shall be limited to green
corn on the cob, beans in the pod, bananas in entire bunches or in clusters
of 25 or more, apples, peaches, blackberries, blueberries, huckleberries, or rasp-
berries. Fruits and vegetables other than the above-named commodities may
be moved from the State, District, counties, election districts, or city listed
in regulation 5, section A, (1) (ii), only under certification,



50 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

REGULATION 11. CANCELATION OF CERTIFICATES

Certificates issued under these regulations may be withdrawn or canceled
by the inspeetor and further certification refused, either for any failure of
compliance with the conditions of these regulations or violation of them, or
whenever in the judgment of the inspector the further use of such certificates
might result in the dissemination of infestation.

REGULATION 12. INSPECTION IN TRANSIT

Any car, vehicle, basket, box, or other container moved interstate or offered
to a common carrier for shipment interstate, which contains or which the
inspector has probable cause to believe contains either infested articles or
articles the movement of which is prohibited or restricted by these regulations,
shall be subject to inspection by an inspector at any time or place.

REGULATION 13. THOROUGH CLEANING REQUIRED OF TRUCKS, WAGONS, CIARS,
Boats, AND OTHER VEHICLES AND CONTAINERS BEFORE MOyING INTERSTATE

Trucks, wagons, cars, boats, and other vehicles and containers which have
been used in transporting any article covered by these regulations within the
regulated areas shall not thereafter be moved or allowed to be moved inter-
state until they have been thoroughly swept and cleaned by the carrier at the
point of unloading or destination.

REGULATION 14. SHIPMENTS BY THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

Articles subject to restriction in these regulations may be moved interstate
by the United States Department of Agriculture for experimental or scientific
purposes, on such conditions and under such safeguards as may be prescribed
by the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine. The container of articles
so moved shall bear, securely attached to the outside thereof, an identifying
tag from the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine showing compliance
with such conditions.

These revised rules and regulations shall be effective on and after April 11,
1938, and shall supersede the rules and regulations promulgated March 1,
1937, as amended effective May 10, 1937.

Done at the city of Washington this 6th day of April 1988.

Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agri-
culture.

[sHAL] H. A. WALLACE,
Secretary of Agriculture.

APPENDIX
PENALTIES

The Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912 (87 Stat. 315), as amended,
provides that no person shall ship or offer for shipment to any common carrier,
nor shall any common carrier receive for transportation or transport, nor shall
any person carry or transport, from any quarantined State or Territory or
District of the United States, or from any quarantined portion thereof, into or
through any other State or Territory or District, any class of nursery stock or
any other class of plants, fruits, vegetables, roots, bulbs, seeds * * * or any
other article * * * gpecified in the notice of quarantine * * * jn manner
or method or under conditions other than those prescribed by the Secretary of
Agriculture. It also provides that any person who shall violate any of the
provisions of this act, or who shall forge, counterfeit, alter, deface, or destroy
any certificate provided for in this act or in the regulations of the Secretary of
Agriculture shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor and shall, upon conviction
thereof, be punished by a fine not exceeding $500, or by imprisonment not
exceeding 1 year, or both such fine and imprisonment, in the discretion of the
court.



1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 51

STATE AND FEDERAL INSPECTION

Certain of the quarantined States have promulgated or are about to promul-
gate quarantine regulations restricting intrastate movement supplemental to the
Federal quarantine. These State regulations are enforced in cooperation with
the Federal authorities. Copies of either the Federal or State quarantine orders
may be obtained by addressing the United States Department of Agriculture,
266 Glenwood Avenue, Bloomfield, N. J.

Subsidiary offices are maintained at the following locations:

Thirteenth Floor, Custom House, Boston, Mass.

Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station, 123 Huntington Street, New
Haven, Conn, -

Room 838, 641 Washington Street, New York, N. Y.

Room 200, 2507 James Street, Syracuse, N. Y.

P. O. Box 1, Trenton, N. J., or Yardville Road, White Horse, N. J.

Kotler Building, Main and High Streets, Glassboro, N. J.

Frankfort Arsenal, Bridge and Tacony Streets, Frankford, Philadelphia, Pa.

Warehouse No. 4, General Depot, United States Army, New Cumberland, Pa.

Room 438-K, New Post Office Building, Pittsburgh, Pa.

Room 210, New Post Office Building, Dover, Del. °

Room 306, Post Office Building, Calvert and Fayette Streets, Baltimore, Md.

Room 202, New Post Office Building, Main Street, Salisbury, Md.

Washington County Annex Building, Hagerstown, Md.

307 Mellett Building, Canton, Ohio.

1005 Grace-American Building, Richmond, Va.

Room 217, New Federal Building, Granby Street and Brambleton Avenue,
Norfolk, Va.

Arrangements may be made for inspection and certification of shipments
from the District of Columbia by calling District 6350, branch 2589, the inspec-
tion house of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, Twelfth Street .
and Constitution Avenue NW., Washington, D. C.

GENERAL OFFICES OF STATES COOPERATING

is Department of Entomology, Agricultural Experiment Station, New Haven,
onn.
Board of Agriculture, Dover, Del.
State horticulturist, Augusta, Maine.
Department of Entomology, University of Maryland, College Park, Md.
eS of Plant Pest Control, Department of Agriculture, Statehouse, Boston,
ass.
Deputy commissioner, Department of Agriculture, Durham, N. H.
Bureau of Plant Industry, Department of Agriculture, Trenton, N. J.
eee of Plant Industry, Department of Agriculture and Markets, Albany,
ake
Division of Plant Industry, Department of Agriculture, Columbus, Ohio.
Bureau of Plant Industry, Department of Agriculture, Harrisburg, Pa.
Bureau of Entomology, Department of Agriculture, Statehouse, Providence,
I

Entomologist, Department of Agriculture; Montpelier, Vt.

Division of Plant Industry, Department of Agriculture and Immigration,
Richmond, Va.

State entomologist, Department of Agriculture, Charleston, W. Va.

[Copies of the foregoing revised regulations were sent to all common carriers doing
business in or through the quarantined area. ]

Notice To GENERAL Pusitic THROUGH NEWSPAPERS

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURD,
BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE,
Washington, D. C., April 6, 1398.
Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority
conferred on him by the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat.



52 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

315), as amended, has promulgated a revision of the rules and regulations
(sixteenth revision) supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 48, on account
of the Japanese beetle, effective on and after April 11, 1938. The purpose of
the revision is to include in the regulated area part of Schuyler County, N. ay
parts of the Ohio counties of Coshocton, Portage, and Summit, and parts of
West Virginia counties of Berkeley and Jefferson. There were also added areas
in the following counties, parts of which were formerly under regulation:
Frederick County, Md., Tompkins County, N. Y., Stark County, Ohio, Warren
County, Pa., and Princess Anne County, Va. Wheeling, W. Va., and Coshocton,
Ohio, are brought under regulation. Lancaster County, Pa., has been added to
the special area from which the movement of fruits and vegetables by motor-
truck or refrigerator car is regulated. The restrictions on the movement of sand
are modified. Of interest to nurserymen is the elimination of restrictions on
the movement of aquatic plants except during the period from June 15 to
October 15, inclusive.

Copies of the revised regulations may be obtained from the Bureau of
Entomology and Plant Quarantine, United States Department of Agriculture,
Washington, D. C.

H. A. WALLACE,
Secretary of Agriculture.

[Published in the following newspapers: The Hartford Times, Hartford, Conn.,
April 16, 1938; the Evening Journal, Wilmington, Del., April 15, 1938; the Press-Herald,
Portland, Maine, April 16, 1938; the Sun, Baltimore, Md., April 16, 19388; the Post,
Boston, Mass., April 16, 1938; the Union, Manchester, N. H., April 16, 1938; the News,
Newark, N. J., April 16, 19388; the Times, New York, N. Y., April 16, 1938; the Press,
Cleveland, Ohio, April 15, 1938; the Bulletin, Philadelphia, Pa., April 15, 1938; the
Bulletin, Providence, R. I., April 15, 1938; the Free Press, Burlington, Vt., April 16,
19388; the News Leader, Richmond, Va., April 15, 1938; the Gazette, Charleston, W. Va.,
April 16, 1938; and the Evening Star, Washington, D. C., April 16, 1938.]

INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS

Post OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, June 13, 1938.
Postmaster:

My Dear Sir: Your attention is invited to the inclosed copy of the latest
revision of Quarantine No. 48 of the United States Department of Agriculture
(effective April 11, 1938), extending the area and modifying the regulations
in connection with the Japanese beetle quarantine, by which you will please be
governed. See paragraph 1, section 595, Postal Laws and Regulations.

Very truly yours,
Ramsey S. BLAckE,

Third Assistant Postmaster General.

B. E. P..Q. 473.

ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS—F'UMIGATION OF POTATOES BY METHYL BROMIDE
AS A CONDITION OF CERTIFICATION OF POTATOES MOVING BY REFRIGERATOR CAB
FRoM THE AREA LISTED IN REGULATION 5 OF QUARANTINE No. 48

[Approved April 30, 1938; effective May 2, 1938]

Regulation 5, section B, paragraph (6) of the Japanese beetle quarantine (No.
48) authorizes the issuance of certificates for the interstate movement of pota-
toes via refrigerator car from the area listed in that regulation to points out-
side the regulated areas between June 15 and October 15 when the potatoes have
been fumigated in the car, when deemed necessary in the judgment of the
inspector and when the doors and hatches of the car have been tightly closed
or adequately screened under the supervision of an inspector.

TREATMENT AUTHORIZED

' The treatment described herein has been found to be effective against the
Japanese beetle and such treatment is authorized as a basis for certification of



1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 53

potatoes moving to points outside the regulated areas between June 15 and
October 15 via refrigerator car when such treatment is carried out under the
supervision of an inspector and in a manner satisfactory to him.

TREATMENT METHOD

Fumigation of potatoes in dry refrigerator cars with methyl bromide at a
dosage of 2 pounds per 1,000 cubic feet of space, including the space occupied
by the potatoes and bunkers of the cars, for a period of 2 hours during which
time the car shall remain tightly closed with the plugs in place in the ventilator
hatehes. The temperature within the car when fumigated shall be not less
than 70° F. Provision shall be made for circulating the mixture of air and
fumigant in the car for as long a time as is deemed necessary by the inspector.
At the end of the fumigation period the hatches shall be opened, the plugs
removed, screens placed in the hatch openings, and the car shipped under
standard ventilation.

In authorizing the movement of potatoes fumigated according to the require-
ments stated above, it is to be understood that no liability shall attach either
to the United States Department of Agriculture or to any of its employees in
the event of injury.

CAUTION: Methyl bromide is a gas at ordinary temperatures. It is colorless
and practically odorless in concentration used for the fumigation of potatoes.
It is a poison, and the operator should use an approved gas mask when exposed
to the gas at concentrations used in fumigation, and when opening the hatches
for ventilating the cars. The car should not be entered until it is well aerated.

AvERY S. Hoyt,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO MEXICAN FRUITFLY QUARANTINE
(NO. 64)

Aprit 8, 19388.
B. E. P. Q. 472 (Superseding P. Q. C. A. 329).

ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS—STERILIZATION OF GRAPEFRUIT AND ORANGES
BY HEAT UNDER THE MEXICAN FRUITFLY QUARANTINE

[Approved April 5, 1938; effective April 8, 1938]
INTRODUCTORY NOTE

Investigations in sterilizing fruit for the Mexican fruitfly have shown that
the holding period at 110° F. can be reduced from 8 to 6 hours provided the
time for heating the fruit to this temperature is at least 8 hours, making a min-
imum treating period of 14 hours. In order that shippers may take advantage of
this reduction, the administrative instructions issued as circular P. Q. C. A. 329
on March 3, 1932, are modified and superseded by the following instructions.

Under the authority contained in paragraph (e) of regulation 6 of the Mexi-
can fruitfly quarantine regulations, as revised effective October 15, 1937, and
having determined that shipments of unsterilized oranges and grapefruit from
infested areas might involve risk of spread of the Mexican fruitfly, notice is
hereby given that sterilization is required as a condition of issuance of permits
for the interstate movement of oranges and grapefruit produced in areas desig-
nated by the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine as in-
fested. Such sterilization shall be in accordance with one of the following
prescribed treatments:

(1) Heating the fruit to a temperature of 110° F. or above (not to exceed
112°) in the approximate center of the fruit and holding the temperature of
110° or above (not to exceed 112°) for a period of 8 hours;

(2) Heating the fruit for a period of not less than 14 hours during which
time the fruit shall be raised to a temperature of 110° F. at the approximate



54 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

center of the fruit and shall be maintained at or above that temperature for the
last 6 hours of such treatment.

No specifications as to the exact methods and equipment for obtaining these
conditions are prescribed. Available information clearly indicates that by the
application of dry heat the required temperatures cannot be reached without
injury to the fruit. To prevent such injury it is necessary to maintain a very
high humidity throughout the period of treatment. In the tests where suc-
cessful performance was obtained, live steam as the source of heat was applied
in such a way as to secure as nearly as possible a uniform distribution of
steam-heated air so directed as not to discharge directly on the fruit. The
air temperature ranged from 110° to 112° F., and the air was very moist.
The fruit was held in field boxes stacked four boxes high and without special
means of separating the boxes in each stack. The experiments indicate that
the fruit should be sterilized after coloring, if this is necessary, and before
packing for shipment, and then cooled down to a temperature around 45° as
soon as possible after sterilizing. Wax or paraffine, either dry or in solution,
should not be applied to this fruit either before or after sterilization.

Such treatment is authorized in sterilization plants in the regulated area
which are approved by the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine. The
Bureau will approve only those plants which are adequately equipped to
handle and sterilize the fruit. Such sterilization will be done under the super-
vision of inspectors of the Bureau. These inspectors should at all times be
given access to fruit while in process of sterilization. They will supervise
the movement of the fruit from the car to and from the sterilizing rooms. :

While the results of the experiments so far conducted have been successful,
it should be emphasized that inexactness and carelessness in operation may
result in injury to fruit. In authorizing the movement of fruit sterilized in
accordance with the above requirements, it is understood that the Department
does not accept responsibility for fruit injury.

Avery S. Hoyt,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO WHITE-PINE BLISTER RUST

QUARANTINE (NO. 63)
JUNE 8, 1988.

WHITE-PINE BLISTER RUST QUARANTINE REGULATIONS MODIFIED

(Press notice)

All restrictions on the interstate movement of five-leaved pines—except to
points in two pine-growing regions in which the blister rust has not been found,
one in the West and the other in the Southeast—will be lifted, it was an-
nounced by the Secretary of Agriculture today, in a modification of the white-
pine blister rust quarantine regulations, which becomes effective July 1.

An embargo is placed on the interstate movement of five-leaved pines into
the Western States of Arizona, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah, Wyo-
ming, and part of California, and into the Southeastern States of Georgia,
Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee, from States other
than these 11 entire States and from 10 northern California counties.

When the earlier blister rust quarantines were enacted and for several years
thereafter there were several additional regions with extensive areas of com-
mercially valuable stands of five-leaved pines in which the rust had not
appeared. The restrictions in effect were designed to prevent the artificial
spread of the disease into such regions, and the quarantines, first enacted over
20 years ago, have been effective in delaying the spread of the rust while
control measures were being developed and applied.

The rust has now become established, however, in most of the commercially
valuable pine-producing areas of the country. It has been found in 25 States.
Owing to this condition and the fact that the disease can, under favorable
conditions, spread naturally from pines to Ribes for a distance of 150 miles
or more, it is believed there is no biolegically sound basis for continuing the
former restrictions.



1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 55

The currant and gooseberry shipping regulations also are revised. The
extensive Federal-State control work throughout the infected States is con-
tinued, and in order to protect accomplishments and to maintain sanitation
zones around the valuable pine stands, the control-area permit requirement
is extended to apply to shipments to 23 States. The requirements as_ to
dormancy, defoliation, or dipping of currant and gooseberry plants. are con-
tinued in the case of shipments to the 12 pine-growing States to which pine
shipments are prohibited. The embargo as to shipments of European black
currants throughout the United States except into the 12 central States of
Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Kansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Ne-
braska, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Dakota, and Texas is continued
unchanged.

Copies of the regulations of the quarantine. as revised, may be obtained from
the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, United States Department
of Agriculture, Washington, D. C.

WHITE-PINE BLISTER RUST QUARANTINE
REVISION OF REGULATIONS
INTRODUCTORY NOTE

Several important changes are made in the restrictions on the interstate
movement of five-leaved pines and currant and gooseberry plants in the follow-
“ing revision of the white-pine blister rust quarantine regulations. An embargo
is placed on the interstate movement of five-leaved pines into two pine-growing
regions, one in the West comprising the States of Arizona, Colorado, Nevada,
New Mexico, Utah, Wyoming, and part of California, and the other in the
Southeast comprising the States of Georgia, Kentucky, North Carolina, South
Carolina, and Tennessee. The interstate movement of such pines from States
other than these 11 entire States and from 10 northern California counties into
the regions described is prohibited. The new regulations are designed to
protect these pine-growing areas in which the blister rust is not known to exist.

No other restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of five-leaved
pines unless they are visibly infected with the rust.

The dipping and dormancy requirements for currant and gooseberry plants
which formerly applied only to shipments originating in the infected States, now
apply to all shipments consigned to the States and counties listed above, from
any State or District other than the 11 entire States and from the 10 northern
California counties.

The control-area permit requirement now applies to currant and gooseberry
plants consigned to 23 States as listed in regulation 3 (0). The aim of this
requirement is to strengthen the Federal-State control activities carried on in
areas surrounding valuable stands of five-leaved pine in these States.

No modification is made in the embargo as to all interstate movement of
European black currant plants and of the wild native western currant plants
(Ribes bracteosum and R. petiolare) except as to unrestricted movement into
and between 12 central States as heretofore.

SUMMARY
Five-leaved pine shipments (regulation 2)

Five-leaved pines are prohibited movement into the following regions, except
that no restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of such pines from
or between any of these 11 entire States nor from the part of California
described: Arizona, California (that part lying south of the south line of the
counties of Humboldt, Trinity, Tehama, Butte, Plumas, and Lassen), Colorado,
Georgia, Kentucky, Nevada, New Mexico, North Carolina, South Carolina, Ten-
nessee, Utah, and Wyoming.

No pines or their parts visibly infected with blister rust may be shipped into
any State or District unless shipped in a preservative or under special authori-
zation of regulation 7.

For permit requirements in shipping five-leaved pines for planting on Federal
lands in the above regions see regulation 7.

86995—38&—_—3



56

BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE >

[| April-June

Currant and Gooseberry Shipments (regulation 3)

Requirements as to shipments from any State or District into each of the

States, as follows:



Destination
(State)

Arkansas
California (that part south
of the southern line of
the counties of Hum- |
boldt, Trinity, Tehama, |
Butte, Plumas and
Lassen).
That part north of
the above line.
Coloridors sess

Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Milissounise: 22-2 = _ ae

New Hampshire
New Jersey



Oregon ;
Pennsylvania

Ribes

nigrum (Euro-

pean black currant);

Rp.
Rf.

and
(wild,

bracteosum
petiolare

western currants). Re-

stric



Rhode island
South Carolina
South Dakota

West Virginia._.__________
Wisconsin
Wiyomings= ste-ess See



tions



Other currant and gooseberry plants

Control-area permit re-
quired from State of
destination



Plants must be either
dipped! or: dormant
and defoliated

No.
ae with exceptions.?

Yes, with exceptions.?

No.



Yes, with exceptions.?

Yes, with exceptions.?
No.

No.
Yes, with exceptions.’
No.
Yes, with exceptions.”



as with exceptions.’
No.
Yes, with exceptions.2
No.

Yes, with excepticns. ?

Yes, with exceptions.”

1 Plants must be dipped immediately before shipment in a lime-sulphur solution of 4.5° B. Prepare this
olution by diluting 1 part of commercial concentrated lime-sulphur solution of 32° B. with 8 parts of water.

2 Plants originating in Arizona, Colorado, Georgia, Kentucky, Nevada, New Mexico, North Carolina,
South Carolina, Tennessee, Utah, or Wyoming, or in that part of California lying south of the south line of
the counties of Humboldt, Trinity, Tehama, Butte, Plumas, and Lassen, are not required to be dipped or

dormant.

Applications for control-area permits

-Shippers should apply for control-area permits (Form 415) to the officer
of the State to which shipments are to be made (addresses of officers are listed



1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 57

below) stating the kind of plants to be shipped and the names and addresses
of the consignor and consignee.
Federal inspector designated to act in the State into which shipment is

State to be made

Calhfornia=s== ==: Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine, Sacramento, Calif.

Connecticut__--~- State entomologist, Agricultural Experiment Station, New Haven, Conn.

Georgviat =. 3%. State entomologist, Atlanta, Ga. ;

cdanos< 2 Director, Bureau of Plant Industry, Boise, Idaho.

Maine Ss s State horticulturist, Augusta, Maine.

Maryland___-_-_~_- State plant pathologist, College Park, Md.

Massachusetts__- Director, Division of Plant Pest Control, State House. Boston, Mass.

Michigan_---~__ Inspector in charge, orchard and nursery inspection, Department of Agri-
culture, Lansing, Mich.

Minnesota—-___- Commissioner of conservation, State Office Building, St. Paul, Minn.

Montana——— == _. Chief, Division of Horticulture, Missoula, Mont.

New Hampshire_. State nursery inspector, Durham, N. H.

New Jersey——-—-_-_. Chief, Bureau of Plant Industry, Trenton, N. J.

INewevoerke =. =. Director, Bureau of Plant Industry, Albany, N. Y. |

North Carolina__ State entomologist, Department of Agriculture, Raleigh, N. C.

Ohi = ere: eu Chief, Division of Plant Industry, Columbus, Ohio.

Pennsylvania___. Chief, Division of Forest Protection, Harrisburg, Pa.

Rhode Island____ State entomologist, 310 State House, Providence, R. I. 7

Tennessee___-_-__. State entomologist and plant pathologist, 406 Morrill Hall, University
of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tenn.

Merniont=_=>2- = Forest commissioner, Montpelier, Vt. ei! i

Paroinig— == 3 State entomologist, 1112 State Office Building, Richmona, Va. <

Washington__-_-_ Supervisor of horticulture, Department of Agriculture, Olympia, Wash.

West Virginia___ Commissioner, Department of Agriculture, Charleston, W. Va.

iWaseonsin= _- = State entomologist, Madison, Wis.

AvERY S. Hoyt,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 63

[Approved August 27, 1926; effective October 1, 1926; supersedes Quarantine No. 26, as
amended, and Quarantine No. 54, as extended] :

I, C. F. Marvin, Acting Secretary of Agriculture, have determined that it is
necessary to quarantine every State of the continental United States and the
District of Columbia, in order to prevent the spread of the white-pine blister
rust (Cronartium ribicola Fischer), a dangerous plant disease not heretofore
widely prevalent or distributed within and throughout the United States.

Now, therefore, under authority conferred by the Plant Quarantine Act
of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended by the act of Congress approved
March 4, 1917 (389 Stat. 1134, 1165), and having duly given the public hearing
required thereby, I do quarantine every State in the continental United States
and the District of Columbia, effective on and after October 1, 1926. Here-
after, under the authority of said act of August 20, 1912, amended as afore-
said, no five-leaved pines (Pinus) or currant and gooseberry plants (Ribes
and Grossularia, including cultivated or wild or ornamental sorts) shall be
moved or allowed to be moved from any such State or from the District of
Columbia into or through any other State in the continental United States
or the District of Columbia, except in manner or method or under conditions
prescribed in the rules and regulations supplemental hereto and in amendments
thereof: Provided, That the restrictions of this quarantine and the rules and
regulations supplemental hereto may be limited to the areas in a quarantined
State now or hereafter designated by the Secretary of Agriculture as infected
when said State shall have provided for and enforced such control measures
with respect to such designated areas as, in the judgment of the Secretary of
Agriculture, shall be deemed adequate to effect the control and prevent the
spread of the white-pine blister rust: Provided further, That, for the enforce-
ment of the restrictions under this quarantine on the interstate movement of
five-leaved pines and currant and gooseberry plants, all interstate shipments
of nursery stock or other plants shall be subject to inspection at place of
shipment or destination or at any point en route, by duly authorized inspectors
of the United States Department of Agriculture.

Done at the city of Washington this 27th day of August 1926.

Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agri-
culture.

[SEAL] C. F. Marvin,

Acting Secretary of Agriculture.



58 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE ~ [April-June

REVISED RULES AND REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE OF QUARANTINE
NO. 63

[Approved June 1, 1938; effective July 1, 1938]
¢
REGULATION 1. DEFINITIONS

For the purpose of these regulations the following words, names, and terms
shall be construed, respectively, to mean:

(a) White-pine blister rust,.or blister rust. ine fungus a Tueiee caused by
Cronartium ribicola Fischer.

(6) Five-leaved pines.—Entire plants with roots, of the following species
belonging to the genus Pinus:



American species:

Ayacahuite pine (P. ayacahuite Ehrenb.).
Bristlecone pine (P. aristata Engelm.).

Foxtail pine (P. balfowriana Murr.).

Limber pine (P. flexilis James).

Mexican white pine (P. strobiformis Engelm.).
Sugar pine (P. lambertiana Dougl.).

Western white or silver pine (P. monticola Dougl.).
Whitebark pine (P. albicaulis Engelm.).

White pine (northern) (P. strobus L.).

Foreign species:

Balkan pine (P. peuce Griseb.).

Chinese white pine (P. armandi Franch.).
Himalayan or Bhotan pine (P. excelsa Wall.).
Japanese white pine (P. parviflora Sieb. and Zuce.).
Korean pine (P. koraiensis Sieb. and Zuce.).

Swiss stone pine (P. cembra L.).

(ce) Currant and gooseberry plants.—Plants, cuttings, or scicns, belonging to
the genera Ribes L., and Grossularia (Tourn.) Mill., including cultivated or
wild or ornamental sorts.

(d) European black currant plants——Plauts, cuttings, stocks, scions, buds,
seeds, or parts of plants of Ribes nigrum L.

(e) Inspector.—An inspector of the United States Department of Agriculture.

(f) Dormant.—In a nonvegetative state, with inactive buds.

(g) Moved interstate—Shipped, offered for shipment to a common earrier,
received for transportation or transported by a common carrier, or carried
transported, moved or allowed to be moved from one State or District of the
United States into or through any other State or District.

REGULATION 2. CONTROL OF MOVEMENT OF FIVE-LEAVED PINES

(a) Five-leaved pines shall not be moved interstate into any of the States of
Arizona, Colorado, Georgia, Kentucky, Nevada, New Mexico, North Carolina,
South Carolina, Tennessee, Utah, or Wyoming, nor into that part of California
lying south of the south line of the counties of Humboldt, Trinity, Tehama,
Butte, Plumas, and Lassen: Provided, That no restrictions are placed on the
interstate movement of such pines from or between any of the 11 above-
named entire States nor from the part of California described.

(b) Five-leaved pines or parts thereof, when visibly infected with the white-
pine blister rust shall not be moved interstate into any State or District
unless such pines are shipped in a preservative or are authorized and labeled
in accordance with the provisions of regulation 7.

REGULATION 3. CONTROL OF MOVEMENT OF CURRANT AND GOOSEBERRY PLANTS

(a) Embargo on European black currant plants.—No European black currant
plants (Ribes nigrum) and no currant plants of the wild native western species
known as &. bracteosum and R. petiolare shall be moved interstate in the
continental United States except into or within the area comprised in the
States of Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Kansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri,
Nebraska, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Dakota, and Texas.



1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 59

(b) Control-area permits required.—No currant or gooseberry plants of any
species or variety shall be moved interstate into any of the States of California,’
Connecticut, Georgia,” Idaho, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Min-
nesota, Montana, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina,
Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Tennessee,” Vermont, Virginia, Washington,
West Virginia, or Wisconsin, unless a Federal control-area permit has been
issued therefor by an inspector designated to act for the Bureau of Entomology
and Plant Quarantine in such State (see addresses in Summary). Such
permit will not be issued if the plants are to be shipped into or planted in
areas in which five-leaved pines have been protected from white-pine blister
rust or in which such protection is contemplated. The continuance of this
requirement as to any State is conditioned on the State providing such legal
or other control on the planting and movement therein of currant and goose-
berry plants as in the judgment of the Secretary of Agriculture may be deemed
adequate to control white-pine blister rust in the protected areas.

(c) Dipping or dormancy required—No currant or gooseberry plants of any
species or variety shall be moved interstate into any of the States of Arizona,
Colorado, Georgia,” Kentucky, Nevada, New Mexico, North Carolina,? South
Carolina, Tennessee,? Utah, or Wyoming, nor into that part of California? lying
south of the south line of the counties ef Humboldt, Trinity, Tehama, Butte,
Plumas, and Lassen, unless such plants have either been dipped (except the
roots) immediately prior to shipment in lime-sulphur solution of a strength
of 4.5° B.*, or are shipped in a dormant and defoliated condition. Such lime-
sulphur dip shall be plainly visible on said plants and be easily detectable
by odor, the judgment of the inspector to be final as to adequacy of the dip
and as to the condition of the plants as to dormancy or defoliation: Provided,
That no such dipping or dormancy restrictions are placed on the interstate
movement of currant and gooseberry plants from or between any of the 11
above-named entire States, nor from the part of California described.

REGULATION 4. MARKING REQUIREMENTS

(a) Every box, bale, or other container of plants for which permits are
required by regulations 3 and-7 shall be plainly marked with the name and
address of the consignor and of the consignee, and shall bear the permit securely
attached to the outside thereof.

(6) The permit in the case of carload shipments by rail shall accompany the
waybill, conductor’s manifest, memorandum, or bill of lading pertaining to such
shipment. In the case of shipment by road vehicle, the permit shall accompany
the vehicle.

REGULATION 5. INSPECTION IN TRANSIT

Every car, vehicle, box, bale, or other container moved interstate or offered to
a common carrier for shipment interstate, which contains or which the inspector
has probable cause to believe contains either infected articles or articles the
movement of which is prohibited or restricted by these regulations, shall be
subject to inspection by an inspector at any time or place.

REGULATION 6. CANCELATION OF PERMITS

Permits issued under these regulations may be withdrawn or canceled and
further permits refused, whenever in the judgment of the Bureau of Entomol-
ogy and Plant Quarantine, the further use of such permits might result in the
dissemination of the white-pine blister rust. After any such permit is with-
drawn or has expired, the further use of any permit tags issued thereunder is
prohibited.

REGULATION 7. SHIPMENTS FOR REFORESTATION, EXPERIMENTAL, EDUCATIONAL, OR
SCIENTIFIC PURPOSES

Plants subject to restriction in these regulations may be moved interstate
for reforestation purposes on Federal lands, or for experimental, educational,

* Dormancy and defoliation or lime-sulphur dip is also required for shipments to these
States. (See par. (c)).

2Control-area permits are also required for shipments to these States. (See par. (b).)

8 Prepare this solution by diluting 1 part of commercial concentrated lime-sulphur
solution of 32° B. with 8 parts of water.



60 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

or scientific purposes on such conditions and under such safeguards as may be
prescribed by the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine. The container
of plants so moved, except when shipped to or in care of the Inspection House,
Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, Washington, D. C., shall bear,
securely attached to the outside thereof, an identifying tag from the Bureau of
Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

Identifying tags to authorize the interstate movement of five-leaved pines for
planting on Federal lands in any of the 11 entire States named and part of
California described in regulation 2, will be issued only on condition that such
pines have been raised under such sanitation conditions as in the judgment of
the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine are adequate to protect them
from infection by white-pine blister rust: Provided, That no permit is required
for shipping such pines from or between any of the 11 entire States named nor
from the part of California described.

These revised rules and regulations shall be effective on and after July 1, 1938,
and shall on that date supersede the rules and regulations promulgated Feb-
ruary 16, 1937.

Done at the city of Washington this 1st day of June 19388.

Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.

[SEAL] H. A. WALLACE,
Secretary of Agriculture.

[Copies of the foregoing revised regulations were sent to all common carriers doing
‘business in or through the quarantined area.]

NotTIcE TO GENERAL PuBLIic THROUGH NEWSPAPERS

UNITED STATES DEPARMENT OF AGRICULTURE,
BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE,
Washington, D. C., June 1, 1938.

Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority
-conferred on him by the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315),
as amended, has promulgated a revision, effective July 1, 1938, of the rules and
regulations supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 63, on account of the
white-pine blister rust. This revision makes extensive changes in the require-
‘ments relating to the interstate movement of five-leafed pines and currant and
gooseberry plants.

Copies of the revised regulations may be obtained from the Bureau of
Entomology and Plant Quarantine, United States Department of Agriculture,

‘Washington, D. C.
H. A. WALLACE,

Secretary of Agriculture.

[Published in the following newspapers: The News, Birmingham, Ala., June 10, 1938; the
“Republican, Phoenix, Ariz., June 13, 1988; the Arkansas Gazette, Little Rock, Ark., June
10; 29385 the Herald and Express, "Los Angeles, Calif., June 13. 1938; the Post, Denver,
Colo., June 10, 1938 ; the Times, Hartford, Conn., June 6, 1938; the Journal- -Every Evening,
Wilmington, Del., June 9, 1938; the Star, Washington, 10), C., June 9, 1938; the Florida
Times-Union, Jacksonville, Fla., June 10, 1938; the Constitution, Atlanta, Ga., June 10,
1938; the Idaho Statesman, Boise, Idaho, June 11, 1938; the Tribune, Chicago, Ill., June
11, 1938; the News, Indianapolis, Ind., June OF 1938; the Register, Des Moines, Iowa, June
11, 1938 the Beacon, Wichita, Kans., June 10, 1938; the Courier- Journal, Louisville, Ky.,
June 10, 1938; the Times-Picayune. ‘New Orleans, La., June 10, 1938; the Press- Herald,
Portland, Maine, June 10, 1938; the Sun, Baltimore, Md., June 9, 1938; the Post, Boston,
Mass., June 9, 1938; the News, Detroit, Mich., June 9, "1938: the News. Jackson, Miss.,
June 10, 1938; the Journal, Minneapolis. Minn., ‘June 10, 1938; "the Star, Kansas City, Mo.,
June 9, 1938; the Montana ‘Standard, Butte, Mont., June Alte 1938 ; the World- Herald, Omaha,
Nebr., June 10, 1938; the Gazette, Reno, Nev., June 11, 19388; the Union, Manchester, INS Ee:
June 10, 1938; the News, Newark, N. Je June 9, 1938; the ‘Journal, Albuquerque, N. Mex.,
June 11, 1938; the Times, New York, N. SVE June 9, 1938; the Observer, Charlotte, N. CF
June 9, 1938; the Forum, Fargo, N. Dak., June 10, 1938; the Press, Cleveland, Ohio, June
9, 1938; the Oklahoman, Oklahoma City, Okla., June 13, 1938; the Oregon Journal, Port-
land, Oreg., June 138, 1938; the Bulletin, Philadelphia, ’Pa., June 8, 1938; the Bulletin,
Providence, R. June 9, 1938; the News, Greenville, S. C. June 9, 1938; the Argus-
Leader, Sioux Pails S. Dak., June 10, 1938; the Commercial Appeal, Memphis, "Tenn., June
10, 1938; the Chronicle, Houston, Tex., June 10, 1938; the Tribune, Salt Lake City, "Utah,
June lets 1938: the Free Press, Burlington, Waters June 9, 1938; the News Leader, Richmond,
Va., June 8, 1938; the Times, Seattle, Wash., June “AIGY 1938; the Gazette, Charleston,
W. Va., June 9, 1938 ; the Journal, Milwaukee, Wis., June 10, 1938 ; the Wyoming State
Tribune- Leader, Cheyenne, Wyo., June 15, 1938.]



1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 61

INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS

Post OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, July 8, 1938.

Quarantine Order No. 63 of the United States Department of Agriculture on
aecount of the white-pine blister rust has been revised effective July 1, 1938, so
as to modify the restrictions on the interstate movement of five-leaved pines, and
to extend the control-area permit requirement relating to the shipment of currant
and gooseberry plants.

Under the revision an embargo is placed on interstate movement of five-leaved
pines into Arizona, Colorado, Georgia, Kentucky, Nevada, New Mexico, North
Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Utah, Wyoming, and into that part of
California lying south of the south line of the counties of Humboldt, Trinity,
Tehama, Butte, Plumas, and Lassen, from ail other parts of the continental
United States. No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of such
pines from or between any of these 11 entire States, nor the part of California
described, except that no pines or their parts which are visibly infected with
blister rust may be shipped into any State or District unless in a preservative
or under a special authorization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quaran-
tine, United States Department of Agriculture.

With regard to currant and gooseberry plants, the requirements as to dor-
mancy, defoliation, or dipping in the prescribed lime-suiphur solution* now
apply in the case of shipments to the 12 protected pine-growing States as de-
seribed above. An embargo is placed on shipments of European black-currant
plants and currant plants of the wild native western species from any part of
the continental United States except into or within the area comprised in the
States of Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Kansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri,
Nebraska, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Dakota, and Texas.

No parcel containing currant or gooseberry plants of any species or variety
shall be accepted for mailing interstate into any of the States of California,
Connecticut, Georgia, Idaho, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minne-
sota, Montana, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Ohio,
Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Tennessee, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, West
Virginia, or Wisconsin unless accompanied with a Federal control-area permit
issued therefor by an inspector designated to act for the Bureau of Entomology
and Plant Quarantine, United States Department of Agriculture, in the State
to which the parcel is sent.

Mailers desiring to secure control-area permits (Form 415) should apply to
the officer of the State into which shipments are to be made stating the kind of
plants to be shipped and the names and addresses of the sender and addressee.
The addresses of such officers are shown below:

Federal inspector designated to act in the State into which shipment is to

State be made
@Calitornin..- = Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine, Sacramento, Calif.
Connecticut___--~_. State Entomologist, Agricultural Experiment Station, New Haven, Conn.
Georgia________-- State Entomologist, Atlanta, Ga.
TAN ee Director, Bureau of Plant Industry, Boise, Idaho.
Maines = — 2 State Horticulturist, Augusta, Maine.
Margiand—-——._-—, State Plant Pathologist, College Park, Md.
Massachusetts_-_-_-. Director, Division of Plant Pest Control, Statehouse, Boston, Mass.
Michigaits == =s~ ... Inspector in Charge, Orchard and Nursery Inspection, Department of
Agriculture, Lansing, Mich.
Minnesota______-. Commissioner of Conservation, State Office Building, St. Paul, Minn.
Monin ao Chief, Division of Horticulture, Missoula, Mont.
New Hampshire___ State Nursery Inspector, Durham, N. H.
New Jersey—--__-- Chief, Bureau of Plant Industry, Trenton, N. J.
Newey onk- .. 3 3.. Director, Bureau of Plant Industry, Albany, N. Y.
North Carolina_-_- State Entomologist, Department of Agriculture, Raleigh, N. C.
Cie ute re 2k. Chief, Division of Plant Industry, Columbus, Ohio.
Pennsylvania__--- Chief, Division of Forest Protection, Harrisburg, Pa.
Rhode Island__-~--. State Entomologist, 8310 Statehouse, Providence, R. I.
TeNnessee..______. State Entomologist and Plant Pathologist, 406 Morrill Hall, University
of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tenn.
Vermont.§.2ic2«.—- Forest Commissioner, Montpelier, Vt.
Virviniass 22... State Entomologist, 1112 State Office Building, Richmond, Va.
Washington_-__-~-. Supervisor of Horticulture, Department of Agriculture, Olympia, Wash.
West Virginia__~_.- Commissioner, Department of Agriculture, Charleston, W. Va.
Wisconsin_—_____- State Entomologist, Madison, Wis.



‘Prepare this solution by diluting 1 part of commercial concentrated lime-sulphur solu-
tion of 32° B. with 8 parts of water. :



62 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

Parcels containing any variety of five-leaved pines, or currant or gooseberry
plants, or parts thereof, which may be offered for mailing shall be plainly marked
with the name and address of the Sender and a statement showing the contents
and shall bear the control-area permit, when required, securely attached to the
outside.

This notice modifies instructions appearing on pages 24, 25, and 26 of the
April 1937 Supplement to the Postal Guide.

RAMSEY S. BLACK,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA PLANT

REGULATIONS
APRIL 29, 1938.

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA PLANT REGULATIONS MODIFIED

(Press notice)

The Secretary of Agriculture has announced a revision of the rules and
regulations governing the movement of plants and plant products into and out
of the District of Columbia, effective April 30, 1938.

Shippers will find few changes in the shipping requirements. The definition
of nursery stock is clarified to show that it includes woody plants and parts
capable of propagation (except domestic-grown seeds and fruit pits), foreign- |
grown seeds of woody plants, of palms, of Vicia (vetch, ete.), and of Lathyrus
(sweet peas, etc.). As heretofore, an inspection certificate is required in ship-
ping nursery stock, herbaceous perennials, bulbs, and roots from the District of
Columbia to points outside.

In shipping into the District of Columbia this certificate is required for
nursery stock, and labeling as to contents is required for nursery stock, her-
baceous perennial plants, bulbs, and roots.

REVISED RULES AND REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE MOVEMENT OF PLANTS AND
PLANT PRODUCTS INTO AND OUT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

INTRODUCTORY NOTE

The supply of the last revised edition of the plant regulations relating to
the District of Columbia having become exhausted, advantage is taken of
the necessity for a reprint of simplifying the form and wording of the regula-
tions without material change in shipping requirements. The definition of
nursery stock as stated in paragraph (a) of regulation 1 is clarified. The list
of domestic plant quarantines formerly published in the appendix is eliminated,
ence up-to-date copies of such quarantines are always available from this

ureau.

SUMMARY
SHIPMENTS INTO THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

Woody plants and foreign seeds—A valid nursery-inspection certificate of
the State, Territory, or country of origin must be attached to the outside of
each container of woody plants or parts thereof capable of propagation (except
domestic-grown seeds and fruit pits), shipped into the District of Columbia,
and the container must be marked to show the nature of the contents. Such
certification and marking are also required for foreign-grown seeds of woody
plants, of palms, of Vicia (vetch, ete.), and of Lathyrus (sweet peas, ete.).

Herbaceous plants—The container of each shipment of herbaceous peren-
nials (including strawberry plants), bulbs, and roots, consigned to the District
of Columbia must be marked to show the nature of the contents. (Herbaceous
plants from foreign countries must meet the certification and marking require-
ments of Federal plant quarantine No. 37.)



1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 63

SHIPMENTS OUT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

A certificate or permit issued by the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quar-
antine must be attached to the outside of each shipment of woody or herba-
ceous plants, bulbs, roots, foreign-grown seeds of woody plants, of palms, of
Vicia (vetch, ete.), and of Lathyrus (sweet peas, etc.) consigned from the Dis-
trict of Columbia to points outside. Each shipment is also subject to the re-
strictions of any Federal plant quarantine or order applicable thereto. To
arrange for inspection, apply at the Plant Inspection House of this Bureau,
Twelfth Street and Constitution Avenue NW. (District 6350, branch 4495),
Washington, D. C.

Avery S. Hoyt,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

REVISED RULES AND REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE MOVEMENT OF PLANTS AND
PLANT PRODUCTS INTO AND OUT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

[Approved April 27, 1938; effective April 30, 1938]

I, H. A. Wallace, Secretary of Agriculture, as required by the Plant Quaran-
tine Act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended, do order that no plants
or plant products shall be moved into or out of the District of Columbia except
in compliance with the rules and regulations supplemental hereto which are
hereby promulgated: Provided, That certain plants or plant products may be
exempted from these rules and regulations by administrative instructions issued
by the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine when, in his
judgment, such articles are considered innocuous as carriers of dangerous plant
pests.

REGULATION 1. DEFINITIONS

For the purpose of these regulations, the following words, names, and terms
shall be construed, respectively, to mean:

(a) Nursery stock.—Al1l trees, shrubs, and plants having a persistent woody
stem, and parts thereof capable of propagation, except fruit pits and seeds,
provided that foreign-grown seeds of woody plants, of palms, of Vicia (vetch,
etc.), and of Lathyrus (sweet peas, etc.), are defined as nursery stock.

(b) Herbaceous perennial plants, bulbs, and roots.—Plants whose roots per-
sist 2 or more years but which lack persistent woody stems above the ground.
This term includes fibrous-rooted perennials, such as strawberry plants and
phlox; bulbs, such as narcissus and crocus; corms, such as gladiolus; tubers,
such as dahlia; fleshy roots, such as peony; rhizomes, such as iris; and such
greenhouse-grown plants as ferns, geraniums, orchids, ete.

(c) Annual plants.—Plants grown from seed for bloom or food the same sea-
son and living only 1 year. This term includes such plants as cabbage, tomato,
and aster.

(d) Inspector.—Plant quarantine inspector of the United States Department
of Agriculture.

(e) Moved.—Offered for movement to or received for transportation by a
common carrier or moved by any means whatever into or out of the District of
Columbia.

(f) Certificate—A certificate showing that the nursery or premises from
which the plants or plant products were taken were inspected within 1 year
prior to the date of shipment and were found to be free from injurious insect
pests and plant diseases, or that the plants or plant products were inspected
prior to shipment and found to be free from injurious insect pests and plant
diseases.



REGULATION 2. UNRESTRICTED ARTICLES

No requirements as to certification or labeling are placed by these regula-
tions® on the entry into or movement out of the District of Columbia of (1)

5 Compliance with any special plant quarantine or restrictive order which may be appli-
cable thereto is required. Information relative to such restrictions may be obtained from
the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.



64 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

annual plants, cut flowers, or decorative plant material (such as branches and
Christmas trees); (2) seeds, except certain foreign-grown seeds as defined in
paragraph (a) of regulation 1; nor of (8) other plants and plant products not
included in the definitions in paragraphs (a) and (0) of regulation 1. The
requirements as to delivery of plant materials are stated in paragraphs (c)
and (d) of regulation 3.

SHIPMENTS INTO THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

REGULATION 8. REQUIREMENTS RELATING TO NURSERY STOCK AND OTHER PLANTS:
AND PLANT PRODUCTS

(a) Certification and marking of nursery stock.—No nursery stock as defined
in regulation 1 shall be moved into the District of Columbia unless a valid cer-
tificate signed by the State nursery or horticultural inspector of the State or
Territory or country from which the stock is shipped is attached to the outside
of each package or other container. Each package or other container shall in
addition be plainly marked with the names and addresses of the consignor and
consignee and with a statement showing the nature of the contents.

(0) Marking of herbaceous perennials, bulbs, or roots.—No herbaceous peren-
nial plants, bulbs, or roots, as defined in regulation 1, shall be moved into the
District of Columbia unless the container thereof is plainly marked with the
names and addresses of the consignor and consignee and with a statement show-
ing the nature of the contents.°®

(c) Delivery of plants and plant products—No nursery stock, herbaceous.
plants, bulbs, or roots, originating outside of the District of Columbia shall be
delivered to the consignee in the District of Columbia by a common earrier or
other person until such delivery is authorized by an inspector of the Bureau of
Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

(d) All nursery stock and herbaceous perennial plants, bulbs, and roots,
annual plants, decorative plant material, and other plants and plant products,,.
whether restricted or unrestricted, addressed to the United States Department
of Agriculture, Washington, D. C., shall be delivered only at the Plant Inspec-
tion House of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine (Twelfth Street.
and Constitution Avenue NW.).

REGULATION 4. SHIPMENTS WHIcH Fart To CoMpLty WITH REGULATIONS

Plants and plant products shipped into the District of Columbia, which are
found to be infected or infested with any plant pest or disease, or which have
not been moved in full compliance with these regulations, may be disposed of
as authorized in the Plant Quarantine Act.

SHIPMENTS OUT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

REGULATION 5, CERTIFICATION OF NursSERY STOCK AND HERBACEOUS PERENNIAL.
PLANTS, BULBS, AND ROOTS

(a) No nursery stock, or herbaceous perennial plants, bulbs, or roots, as
defined in regulation 1, shall be moved out of the District of Columbia unless a
certificate or permit has been issued therefor by the Bureau of Entomology and
Plant Quarantine. Each package or other container of such plants, bulbs, or
roots shall have such a certificate or permit attached to the outside thereof.

(bv) A certificate or permit may be issued for the movement out of the Dis-
trict of Columbia of the nursery stock covered by this regulation, when it has
been examined by an inspector and found apparently free from dangerous plant
diseases and insects and when such shipment is found to comply in full with
all Federal quarantine regulations.

(c) Nursery stock, herbaceous perennial plants, bulbs, or roots, to be
shipped out of the District of Columbia must be presented at the Plant Inspec-
tion House of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine (Twelfth Street
and Constitution Avenue NW.) for inspection at the time of shipment unless
otherwise authorized by an inspector.

¢ Herbaceous plants of foreign origin must be marked in accordance with the provisions
of Federal Quarantine No. 37 (Nursery Stock, Plants, and Seeds).



1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 65

When large shipments are contemplated, arrangements may be made for
inspection at other places by telephoning District 6350, branch 4495, or writing
the Bureau. ; ;

Application for inspection of articles the movement of which is restricted
by quarantine regulations or other restrictive orders shall be made at a season
of the year sufficiently in advance of the contemplated date of shipment to
provide for compliance with regulations.

(d) No common carrier or other person shall accept for shipment or remove
from the District of Columbia any nursery stock, herbaceous perennial plants,
bulbs, or roots, unless the required certificate or permit has been issued and is
securely attached to the outside of each container.

These revised rules and regulations shall be effective on and after April
30, 1938, and shall supersede the rules and regulations governing the movement
of plants and plant products into and out of the District of Columbia, promul-
gated April 29, 1931.

Done at the city of Washington this 27th day of April 1938.

Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agri-
culture.

[SEAL] H. A. WALLACE,

Secretary of Agriculture.

[Copies of the foregoing revised regulations were sent to all common carriers doing

business in or through the District of Columbia.]

NoTIce TO GENERAL Puptic THROUGH NEWSPAPERS

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,
BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE,
Washington, D. C., April 30, 1938.
Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority

conferred on him by the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat.
815), as amended, has promulgated a revision of the rules and regulations goy-
erning the movement of plants and plant products into and out of the District
of Columbia, effective April 30, 1938. This revision clarifies the definition of
nursery stock and simplifies the wording of the regulations. Copies of the
notice of the revision may be obtained from the Bureau of Entomology and
Plant Quarantine, Department of Agriculture, Washington, D. C.

H. A. WALLACE,
Secretary of Agriculture.

[The above notice was published in The Evening Star, Washington, D. C., May 6, 1938.}

INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS

Post OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, May 6, 1938.
POSTMASTER,
Washington, D. C.

My Dear Sir: Attention is invited to the inclosed copies of Revised Rules and
Regulations Governing the Movement of Plants and Plant Products into and out
of the District of Columbia as promulgated by the Bureau of Entomology and
Plant Quarantine, United States Department of Agriculture.

It is requested that these copies be distributed to the various stations and
branches of your office for the information and guidance of employees handling
parcels containing plants and plant material as contemplated in sections 595 and
596, Postal Laws and Regulations.

Very truly yours,
RAMSEY S. BLACK,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.



66 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO RULES AND REGULATIONS GOVERN-
ING THE IMPORTATION OF COTTON AND COTTON WRAPPINGS
INTO THE UNITED STATES

MODIFICATION OF COTTON REGULATIONS

AMENDMENT No. 4 OF RULES AND REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE IMPORTATION OF
COTTON AND COTTON WRAPPINGS INTO THE UNITED STATES

[Effective on and after July 1, 1938]
INTRODUCTORY NOTE

The Cotton Regulations revised effective February 24, 1923, provided for the
entry of cotton lint and cotton linters from Mexico via border ports only when
they originated in the Imperial Valley of Baja California, Mexico. Effective
December 15, 1924, the regulations were modified to provide for entry from other
specified areas in Mexico through ports on the border. Since that date the
Bureau has acquired a wider knowledge of pink bollworm control measures, and
has been able, in connection with its administration of Quarantine No. 52, the
domestic pink bollworm quarantine, to acquaint itself more thoroughly, through
the cooperation of the Mexican Government, with the pink bollworm conditions
in areas in Mexico adjacent to the border and with control measures carried on
in such areas by the Ministry of Agriculture and Development of that country.

In the light of this wider knowledge a more liberal policy is adopted to allow
the entry of baled cotton lint and linters from Mexico, subject to conditions of
entry paralleling the conditions under which cotton lint and linters, produced in
the pink bollworm infested areas of the United States, may move interstate under
the provisions of Quarantine No. 52.

Regulation 13 of the Cotton Regulations, as hereby amended, is predicated
upon a continuance of the enforcement, in cotton-producing areas of Mexico, of
measures of suppression and of measures to prevent the spread of the pink boll-
worm which are deemed by the United States Department of Agriculture to be
equal in effectiveness to measures enforced in cotton-producing areas of the
United States having a similar status with respect to the pink bollworm. The
importation of baled cotton lint and linters from Mexico, as provided in regula-
tion 13, as amended, is further contingent upon the determination, from time to
time, by manner and method deemed satisfactory to the Department, of the
status of Mexican cotton-producing areas with respect to the pink bollworm
and upon the determination, by manner and method deemed satisfactory to the
Department, of suppression and control measures enforced in Mexican cotton-
producing areas.

Avery §S. Hoyt,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

Under authority conferred by the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912
(37 Stat. 315) as amended, it is ordered that regulation 138, of the Rules and
Regulations Governing the Importation of Cotton and Cotton Wrappings into
the United States, be, and the same is hereby, amended to read as follows:

REGULATION 13. PROVISION FOR THE ENTRY VIA BorDER Ports oF CoTTOoN LINT
AND LINTERS FRoM MEXICO

Baled cotton lint and linters produced in Mexico may be imported into pink
bollworm infested areas of the United States through border ports approved by
the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine for that purpose,
subject to such treatment on arrival as is required under the regulations of the
domestic Pink Bollworm Quarantine No. 52, for the interstate movement of
cotton lint and linters produced in those areas: Provided, however, That no
cotton lint and linters produced in areas of Mexico determined by the Chief of
the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine as heavily infested with the
pink bollworm may enter the United States under the provisions of this
regulation unless such areas are adjacent to heavily infested areas of the
United States.



1988] © SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 67

Baled cotton lint and linters produced in areas of Mexico determined by the
Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine to be uninfested with
the pink bollworm may be imported through border ports approved by the
Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine for that purpose
subject to compression at compresses designated in the permit.

This regulation leaves in full force and effect the provisions of regulation 10
affecting the entry of cotton grown in the Imperial Valley in the State of
Baja California, Mexico.

Regulation 13, as amended herein, shall be effective on and after July 1, 19388.

Done at the city of Washington this 30th day of June 1938.

Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agri-
culture.

[SEAL] Harry L. Brown,

Acting Secretary of Agriculture.

[Copies of the foregoing amendment were sent to American diplomatic and consular

officers through the State Department. ]

TERMINAL INSPECTION OF PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS

ARKANSAS STATE PLANT QUARANTINE (SHIPMENT OF SWEETPOTATO PLANTS
RESTRICTED)

Post OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, May 6, 1938.

The State of Arkansas has established at Little Rock, Ark., a place for
terminal plant inspection under the provisions of the law embodied in section
596, Postal Laws and Regulations, of the following plants and plant products:
Sweetpotatoes, sweetpotato plants, vines, draws, and slips.

All postmasters are therefore informed that packages containing any plants
or plant products addressed to places in the State of Arkansas may be accepted
for mailing only when plainly marked so that the contents may be readily
ascertained by an inspection of the outside thereof. The law makes failure
so to mark such parcels an offense punishable by a fine of not more than $100.

The State of Arkansas has also issued a State plant quarantine on account
of the sweetpotato weevil, pursuant to the act of June 4, 1936, embodied in
amended section 596, Postal Laws and Regulations, which prohibits the ship-
ment into that State from any other part of the continental United States of
sweetpotatoes, sweetpotato plants, vines, draws, and slips, known to be hosts of
this pest, unless accompanied with an inspection certificate issued by the
State of origin, showing the plants and plant products to be free of infestation.

Postmasters are therefore requested to observe the restrictions of the
Arkansas quarantine when the host plants and plant products named above
are offered for mailing and will also invite the attention of mailers to these
provisions.

Postmasters within the State of Arkansas receiving parcels containing the
plants named, which are not accompanied with the required certificate, should
be guided by paragraphs 8 and 6, section 595, Postal Laws and Regulations,
obtaining the necessary forwarding postage, and forward the parcels to the
postmaster at Little Rock, Ark., endorsed in the prescribed manner. Parcels
containing these plants which are accompanied with a proper certificate may
be delivered to the addressees without being submitted for terminal inspection.

RAMSEY S. BLAcK,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.

| ADDITIONAL PLANT INSPECTION PLACES IN CALIFORNIA

Post OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, May 16, 1938.
Postmasters in the State of California are informed that provision has been
made for the terminal inspection of plants and plant products at the places
named below, and they should, therefore, be added to the list of places within



68 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

the State of California to which plants and plant products subject to terminal
inspection may be sent by postmasters for inspection under the provisions of
section 596, Postal Laws and Regulations: Alameda, Alvarado, Berkeley, Center-
ville, Hayward, Irvington, Livermore, Mission San Jose, Mount Eden, Newark,
Pleasanton, San Leandro, San Lorenzo, Sunol.
RAMSEY S. BLACK,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.

MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS
B. E. P. Q. 379, Supplement No. 2.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF BRAZIL
APRIL 5, 1988.

CERTIFICATE NOT REQUIRED FOR PROCESSED PLANT PRODUCTS

[Order of February 10, 1938; Diario Oficial, February 17, 1938]

- ARTICLE 1. The certificate of origin and plant health for imported plants or
parts of plants that have been processed, dried, manufactured, or which have
undergone any treatment that devitalizes them, may, in the terms of the said
regulations, be dispensed with.

SUBJECT TO INSPECTION ON ARRIVAL

ArT. 2. The products included in the preceding article are subject to inspection
on arrival in ports where phytosanitary inspection is provided for, and will be
released by the customs only by authorization of the.technical expert of the
phytosanitary service.

The required inspection of products recognized as being incapable of harboring
parasites may, at the discretion of the director, phytosanitary service, be dis-
pensed with.

The order of February 10, 1938, amplifies paragraph (c) of article 5 of decree
No. 24114 of April 12, 1934 (see p. 5 of B. E. P. Q. 379).

Avery §S. Hoyt,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

B. B. P. Q. 403, Supplement No. 3.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF FRANCE

JUNE 8, 1938.
BULBS, CORMS, TUBERS, AND RHIZOMES REGARDED AS PLANTS

The French decree of March 8, 1932, prohibits the entry into and transit through
France of living plants, and living parts of plants (trees, shrubs, nursery prod-
ucts, cuttings, and other parts of plants) * * * originating in or proceeding
from the United States of America, as a precaution against the introduction of
San Jose scale (see p. 6, B. H. P. Q. 403).

Uncertainty existed as to whether this prohibition was applicable to bulbs,
corms, tubers, and rhizomes, therefore the question was submitted to the French
Ministry of Agriculture. The said Ministry states that the prohibition does
apply to bulbs, corms, tubers, and rhizomes. .

Ler A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.



1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 69

B. EB. P. Q. 405, Supplement No. 4.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF GERMANY

JUNE 9, 1938.
‘ CUT CARNATION FLOWERS NOW ADMITTED

The decree of March 28, 1929, as amended by that of September 30, 1932, pro-
hibits the importation into Germany of rooted plants, cuttings, and cut flowers of
the carnation, to prevent the introduction of the carnation leaf folder (Tortriz
pronubana Hbn.).

According to the Nachrichtenblatt fiir den deutschen Pflanzenschutzdienst
17:12, December 1937, the Minister of Food and Agriculture so far relaxed the
provisions of those decrees as to permit the importation of carnation cut flowers,
effective November 15, 1937 (R. F. M. Nov. 10, 1937—Z1505f—1 IT).

Consequently the words “and cut flowers” should be stricken from the first line
of the item “Rooted Carnations” on page 2 of B. E. P. Q. 405. However, since
carnations are dicotyledonous plants and their cut flowers are parts of such
plants, the importation into Germany of carnation cut flowers grown in the
United States still is prohibited under the provisions of the decree of November
3, 1931, with the exceptions indicated in Note 1 (@) and (bd), page 8, of B. E. P. Q.
405.

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

B. E. P. Q. 445, Supplement No. 3.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, CENTRAL AMERICA (BRITISH
HONDURAS)

Aprit 6, 1938.

All the proclamations set forth on pages 2, 3, and 4, and in Supplement No. 2,
of Circular B. E. P. Q. 445 are revoked and superseded by proclamation No. 10
of February 12, 1938, as follows:

The importation into the colony, directly or indirectly, of the fruit, seeds,
cuttings, plants, ete., enumerated in schedules A and B, save with the exceptions
stated, is prohibited.

SCHEDULE A
IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

Citrus spp. All parts, including fruit, seeds, cuttings, plants, buds, and
grafts: Importation prohibited from all countries except in cases of importa-
tions made by the agricultural officer for scientific propagation.

Coconut palms (Cocos nucifera), coconuts in husk, any part of the palm,
including plants, leaves, and leaflets: Importation prohibited from all countries
except in cases of importations made by the Department of Agriculture for
experimental purposes.

SCHEDULE B
IMPORTATION CONDITIONAL

All fruits except green bananas, nuts, dried, canned, candied, or other proce-
essed fruits: Importation prohibited except from the United States, United
Kingdom and Ireland, Canada, and Jamaica. Provided that in the case of
Jamaica a certificate of introduction is granted by the agricultural officer after
inspection.

All vegetables except potato, onion, dried beans, peas, and grains, canned or
processed vegetables, and seeds: Importation prohibited from all countries
except Canada, United Kingdom, and Ireland, Jamaica, and United States.
Provided that in the case of Jamaica a certificate of introduction is granted by
the agricultural officer after inspection.



70 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [ April-June

Tobacco seed from all countries: May be imported only under license issued
by the agricultural officer and which shall prescribe such treatment of the seed
as he may consider necessary.

Cotton (Gossypium spp.), including seeds, cuttings, plants, seed cotton, lint,
or any articles packed therewith, or any covering or thing in which they may
be packed,.from all countries: May be imported under license issued by the
agricultural officer on the occasion of each importation.

Sugarcane (Sacharum officinarwm): Seedlings and plants, and all parts of
the sugarcane, or any articles packed therewith, from all countries: May be
imported under license issued by the agricultural officer.

Banana plants and plants of any other species of Musa, including suckers and
every part of the plant except green fruit from Canary Islands, Costa Riea,,.
Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Panama, South America, West Africa, West
Indies, together with any article or soil packed therewith, or any package
covering or container thereof: May be imported under license issued by the
agricultural officer or by the agricultural officer for experimental purposes.

All earth or soil of any description and any living plants not otherwise speci-
fied in schedules A and B, including plants growing in earth or soil or shipped.
bareroot, and including articles, covering, or packages in which they may be
packed, from all countries: May be imported provided a certificate of intro-
duction is granted by the agricultural officer after inspection and, if necessary,
fumigation.

Avery S. Hoyt,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

B. E. P. Q. 449, Supplement No. 2.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, PERSIA (IRAN)
JUNE 6, 1938.
AUTHORIZED PORTS OF ENTRY

Article 3 of the decision of the Council of Ministers, No. 7876, January 1-2,
1936, stated that the frontier offices at which plant material will be inspected
and through which it may be imported will be designated by the Department of
Agriculture (see p. 1, B. E. P. Q. 449).

According to a despatch from the American chargé d’affaires a. i., dated
April 1, 1988, the Department of Agriculture of Persia has designated Bandar
Pahlevi, Khorramshahr, Bushire, and Khosrovi as frontier ports of entry and
inspection for plant material under the provisions of the said article 3.

Lee A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

PENALTIES IMPOSED FOR VIOLATIONS OF THE PLANT QUARANTINE
ACT

According to reports received by the Bureau during the period April 1 to
June 30, 1988, penalties have recently been imposed by the proper Federal
authorities for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act, as follows:

JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE

In the case of the United States v. John Rambone, Newfield, N. J., in the
transportation of a truck load of farm products from southern New Jersey to
Rochester, N. Y., a point outside of the regulated area, without inspection and
certification, the defendant pleaded guilty and was fined $25.

In the case of the United States v. Charles Bogutz, Bridgeton, N. J., in the trans-
portation of a truck load of farm products from southern New Jersey to Roches-
ter, N. Y., a point outside of the regulated area, without inspection and
certification, the defendant pleaded guilty and was fined $25.



1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS ai
QUARANTINES AFFECTING MEXICAN PRODUCTS
In the case of the United States versus the persons listed below, for attempt-

ing to smuggle in contraband plant material, the penalties indicated were int
posed by the United States customs officials at the following ports:





Name : Port Contraband Penalty
Miguel Saldana.__._..-.-.-------- Brownsville, -b ex > =- )obmManeo- 623 = sc sess2e2ce5c023-.88 3 $1. 00
Mrs. Antonia Balli___........----|----- ee SNe == 222555525 5-3 eo 1.00
Wading Martinez = 222->>---=-----}----- dol*® & 22=222=- 2WMPUSOCR.ot225 22222202 iUL22_ 2h amet 1.00
Matalin te astiho:ss<2 22 o5-=s>-2=|->--- GOBLS 3. tense a2 2 LiMANSO. sss sassscsscccrcese.2e HSE 1.00
ara Orn pigus = aoe se © ese soo _ ===} 2.8 oe tS 32 sssheas}25 222 GO? ooo hisnehassseecsecc222LCNSsS 1.00
Manuela Sanchez__-_-------------|----- d9S 5254 2223-22 b pesehes 2-2 2sse2c22s2225225 SSL 1.00
En eh em ete = = =} 5 i L MGHS0- 2.22222 2522222525250 20220324 1.00
Pmpeninnsant ae > = = == es fe gor es 2. 2-22+=54 LM ANGCAA Oi At a Ss225e-22hessesceell57 1.00
Maria de J. Villalpondo----------|----- Ck PE ee Oe Ee ee eee eee 1.00
em dere ie = eee te AOE SB socccsss2 2 PARNBOCS 252 scscccsscsscsesss525F22 us 1.00
iutonion¥ parta =< <2 === -===---}----- AOPe 6 ja scase= L OFAHBC 52.22 caccsssersssz=sss55 silk. 1.00
Mrs. F. H. de Carlaga______-_--_- Eagle Pass, Tex__--- 2 DIANGS 2 no aso eee ares Se Ih 1.00
Wiaria Ponee---- ->-"-2-_-..-...--|----- age 8 Beasts: pg gUP oe ese sess 25k bcs oseed, 1.00
Concepcion Velasquez de Rodri- | El Paso ,Tex-_-_---- i flower bills 2 ssc25seiek-= eel o22) 1.00
quez.
UONPHUaLOYROSA = 2-22 5>555.5-.-_|----- (oo Pee eee 2 MANZ0CS-_ 2-8 Jesus Maldonado_=)-----=2:2...--)----- Gre Se wa es J 2A. BPTNCOUS 2S oe aa oe 1.00
Wrnesiinn Mls Caravee.-222-_--_-.|-.---do-- ~.-....=.... A MANE OCS 5122225 55255 23 1.00
Rofecio Rosalez====:=2=:--=:------ Hidalgo, Tex_.__-_-- BOL REPOS aaa eee ae 1.00
iPancho IMereno-—--==5=2=- 5===:>:-|-=--- Mees 13 25 < = = 4s SMAaNP 00S. 53 22sa5552sssssesos=> 1. 00
ED ACGey Cle ee Se dg te A-ANOCAGOS! 52 = 22k ee eee 1. 00
Brave bereyeen tba te Ieee Gomi at $2.67 553 SAMOCAG OS 227s AIS ORS Ferri 1.00
PI Gnnechpyans sae wees = -.--_|_2 22 OTe 5 LZoBGROOS 95 asses = Mh 8) 3. 00
PEE EAG ace Nar ei tere ee we SL GQ s 725555. LS AMOCIOO, MINA Ono 55 5 5 1.00
iw Gon eee ar ee Goma sitet sts ss 1D. A2VOCACOSEY 35 22a SO 2 is 2. 50
ES A ee gee S. SS es te3 LON Re ee aS 1.00
Wlorentina Garzae Pe = |e. CL OURS 2 Bose wae ZA AD SOCSS 2h = Fe ss hee Oe 28 eS 1.00
Bonita © Beves. 4: .).f---.- pes de 2s Dass as Ae ee Se 1.00
Isabella Hernandez----.------_---|----- Gees 2S SID AMP OCS Pl SSS Se 5 Se PO 2.00
Telesfero: Mendoza-==--- 022. 2.—-.=_|=---- pet Ee Pe she 4 mameys, 4 mamey seed_-__......-._- 3.00
Lb ree Ct) tye ee ee a LO PAGES Oe ey LMA? Oo: 234-580 Se be eae A 1. 00
Welipa Navarro=-- 22-22-52 -.2-.- Laredo, 'Tex....--.=- 1 pound orchid seeds___..._-_-2---_--- 1.00
iManicliNavarro=s) sss eos 1) | Gysest oF re 16,orenidsplantss2- <2" - >... Same 1.00
RE opts ee ee ek fe gue VAT a 21 tangerines, 15 oranges, 11 grape- 5.00
fruit, 1 sweet lime, 4 plants.
Candalaria Martinez_.-.........__|----- CONS het 3 53s LIMO Ye a F885 os ts ee 1.00
eee, Bal Oise bates eal re | oe Gon: O32. 5 SOLANLCS Ap ples= 2 i220 2 eee 1.00
WTA ri eee imi te) GQESRe. av ye? CAC Ss 34". et oT oe A ie 1.00
ROEINni Glebe lee e ese tft gel) Dh oi = oe IR OFanees 29-555 sce asssa5s ee 1.00
Series WMorenG—-2 5. ~~~. |e ip as ae ZCHEMIMNOYAS - 5-222 ee eae 1. 00
ROe PAD OAT BER poses = 2 6 fh Ae ISS he PORANSES + 8%, 5. 55S Deen eS: 1.00
Uj egith ee + eee Gomes. oes Woratee = 2b. 525 55 ee 1.00
Weta Gee ees es ss 2 tlc a ee mango: ah" 75 yeas ART 1.00
aE me ee eames ee es MOSM ti eas Dal RIES $755 593-5 Sos a, 1.00
WETS PATIO Na+ PORTER. soos 222-3 ~ lec se J “toes el eee 11 sweet limes, 1 mamey, 3 mamey 1.00
seed, 3 oranges.
PNAS EERE ee a on CGE 2 2 tos f-amocados:. $55.2 ee i) eh Bhs 1.00
Baye PIaIROn 2 | mee = GEE 2 354 2 se. Guam nes: 2 is. eel Rel 1.00
SVRER TU TINA OU Ges hese = oe 072 Ge eae WawOCAOS).0) DANG 5 2.00
BeaTO NV POrales eos wee. ey mos 2h) G:maneoes,..7ioranges......-. =. a 1.00
PAP Ibo VIGE ages See ft Gem 2 3.5 ss WManeos = 2 As 3 2. UN ee Mae ee 1.00
Mrs. Francisca Rodriguez-_--_-_-.-|----- Moen 5. 12 plants, 1 sweet lime, 1 mango, 1 1.00
mamey seed.
maprone- Gaspere. oo So 2 ek Ceres te PT RPE ets rier 1.00
SRomiastin Awuies PIS | es ges fl ss Gyplanite=--# Fynee e alee 1.00
Isabella Mendiola de Longoria___-|----- Greer rset at WAV OCROONSDROss |. soon 2 ee ee 1.00
Wie Pin a pre Lege TES OGRE Ss De Sen 1.00
Mrs. Refuigio Montes_-_-_.___.___|----- CO Oe Ee TOMA VOCATOS 527 © 3553: Sea ee 1.00
Mrs. Francisca Sanchez_-....__--_|----- dose LAavocado, lmanpy- 3 2.. e es eet 1.00
Wir ont ae rramsolo.. .-._.-..--|=.--- GOsen 2 en 3 oranges, 2 avocados, 8 sweet limes_-_- 3. 00
Wrariiplenwtigmeet. oof ee Coe aoe ASIISIN EY RCO = a See ee pe 1.00
TORTINDEGPHI Dee ee gees a a 30 plants, 1 pound tree seed, 3 avo- 5.00
cados, 6 avocado seed, 17 mameys,
24 mangoes.
Mipmamtarhine7 =.) =|-2--- (Oc ae WIMAMIAVISCCH See eS eS 1.00
Monmneo.Carte7-—. -- .-.-a2=~_}--ce Qt ee SAA. oa DIDTAU PES a ee eee er ete A EE ae 1.00
DiniguaeienniAno: =~... ..--2.....|---- CO. 2 aes. = LOAN RPGR 3 Fe es 8 1.00
sosenna Gon7Hled.--2.......-...._|--=.. G65: 5 eee oe REG OL ne ee ee a te Ted 1.00
UGS (ip Gh os a ar rae 0: = POuIAN tees ee ee 1.00
aCe BeneviGesee | .. 25... -|--2-e do). a a AN GG aS 1.00
Mira ivaria Arampula._..........|~.=.- do: 2 Se een COOS- 28 ee ee 1.00
aR PAIOt samen et | es G0: ..: 3. eur AIY CC ee min 1.00
Margarita Solalinde Garcia. --...-.|----- Oso es 1. 00
i Oe Ol | i re G0! 223 ee eee Coe ee 1. 00



7 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June







Name Port Contraband Penalty
Matilda de Garcia. =22"252- eared; Tex. see 2 Dlants= 3-252 222 ee ee ee $1. 00:
Juanita:Coronad ok: sie Sees ie COL Fs. SS aE 3) Mangoes. 4... ae ee 1. 00:
Hernand OF MEanE Me 7 eae eet C] (hai ee ee 2. GVOCAC OS! 55 aes ee meee eee 1. 00
Tenaciophernende7z se. sees | ee QR ener 1 Mango... ee eee 1. 00:
Hiloisa Millenucvases2 22 eee doe ee ee eee GOs: 2:8. 2. 2 eee 1.00
By Jee Barrons 2 sae ee Ose eee 2, Mangoes, avocad On === aan 1. 00
Gabricllores vets sees a sae eee een | Re] ky eee acer TP Mangor 22225 2 ee 1. 00
RAMON RCLEZ es ee ee el On Qa eal se ee 4° mianeoész.:>. 2 2 aN eee 1. 00:
TAN CISCOMMLOTET Oe eee es eee | ee] Qe ene 2 MAN PORS .2. 2.25252 e = ee 1.00
Mrs. BiblonaidevHsquiviol. 2 .--— |. ed Ome ee 4. aVOC8O0S. ...- 222 eal 1. 00
Pedro) Oma yao see ee | a ee ee Tl mamey__. 2.1.20 o.oo 1. 00:
RODECLLOVA UI Ga aeee eo Le | eae] Qe nee eee Qavocad0s 3.4. eee eee 1. 00
Wisse NO aim C7 ae = koe Bel eet na Qa eee Lmango: oso... ee eee 1. 00
Hcnestin ay Guerarass sass esa CL One eee ee 3 AVOCRCOS. fo: ae ae 1. 00:
PiCOS8 DUM ASS ee ee See en Qe em I Mango. —- 422 ee 1. 00
JuliowNVUNOZe ae ee ee BORA Owe eee ee 1AVOCAGO SCC Gs eae 1. 00:
AindrestBlores: 82 bao she - 2220 (oss eed Ober Rhee ee 3 Mangoes!) 2a v0CAd OSaa= = aes 1.00
Ramona Mano 7e Nata ee eaten 1 .ManO.. 52%. 2 ee en 1.00
PabloidewWesustGarzae 2 sae |e CO meee ae eens 2 avOCad OS: 22222 las as eee 1.00
POR ivicras 268s oss oo ec taco dO eae ee ee 1-OTANg6. 22 222 hs eee eee 1.00
BarcozasRatened res ass w= aaa | Se] Oakes Zieactiplants.—.<. = ee ee 1.00
GoaonimopVartinez=2 sea aes |e Ome ee 4 O©Fan? 0S. 2s Jos. 3 2 oo eee ee 1.00
Antonio Compose eas sos Se ee a ee) name tne ren | ae Os. 2652 ok 52 ee 1. 00
Sa Wallace -sscic25. 2555 ae BG Omen ie es 12 Oranges. 2320/52 aoe eee 1.00
HP AStewalts ees. 2258 ee aoe Ole ue Ser ee ae (-plants:...\. 423 eee 1.00
Mrs. Jessie) hy. MicDonalds222-= =. | ado ee eee Iscactus) plant = 2 sss see 1.00
AVG. Barrera. 2a26 52. saan. fa la ea] Que tae 1 plant. - 2.02325 ee eee 1.00
Regine Cadenas!:) 26 =. ee ee ome a ae ee 4 mameys_..l-. 22.2. -2he sos eee 1. 00-
Mrs. Felipe Lozano de Botello____|___..do___________-___ 4 avocadGSs....-=224 22s 1.00
Petra cade Cardinas sesso | eee (Sere ete cee 3 AVOCA OS. 4. 252.22 1. 00:
Ab Coppeliss. 22-3 22 = sea Sr a omen eee 5. cacti plants. 2... 22 eee 1.00
MirspelazeliCa Dunnin cee | | Ome ee 14 grapefruit. 2222 2e ee 1.00
SenontOrnelass 22: 2 Sas ees | ee TO ee 4 avocados, 20 lemon grass plants, 25 9.75

rose cuttings, 125 tuberose bulbs, 6
guavas, 5 oranges.

MES » Corhbettscase2s seen aoe |e er QM ne eee 1 coconhut.2.- 23-2. eee 1.00
Alpedo! Munoz: 23% See eaten |b ee Qe Be 3: BVOCAGOS. -.... 2 ee ee 1.00
Mrs. Aurora Martinez Garcia:—..|2_- 2 dow ts 1. M@MOY=.. 2-52... 222 1.00
F NIVEA Ieee VAN ace ie ee ee Ovando eee 1.00
BenaldevRamone sows ee een one | Q eat ee aoe 1 plant..2 2252 22222. ee eee 1.00
Juan. Charlesz=« 222 22h ews. Aer gh aateet 1 Sarre D'aVOCAMOS . 22 ee ee eee 1.00
© Ke Sibley: 2.2. ose eaten: ee a ee gue eee Uplints*2: 2:2 22.2 1.00
gta Garcia. es eee eee | eG Queen eo 3: aVOCAGOS. |=... == eee ee 1.00
vanehidiwards.- en aera ee eG Qian en ee 2 papayas, 3 Mangoes ae 1.00
DES AMiorin2. 26 eee ee a Ate eee] eee eee! 2: aV0CRd0S 5.222 Se ee 1.00
Josefa) Miartinezws asses ef RN | Qs eee t ue 1/4 man?oes:.-.2 2232 eee 1.00
MariayErelena Wongcorias ns | een Oe es 5aMangoes_. 22... 2 ee eee 1.00
irs Amita PAG a [a Se eae eae | eek 0 eee ee l avocado... ---=-- 5-25 eee et 1.00
SIVEGT Sede Teas G1 10 7, oe ee em | CE (7 sree 2: Mangoes: 4..-2. 25 eee 1.00
Mrs: Hermendez;Rameriz2.2-- =| ido aS LO plants... 2.2 1. 00
RafaelathRendonese. 2 ee ee | ee] Que ee 4 plants—.. 22.02. oe a 1. 00
WhesteriNpromit he sas sese ee ee ee | eee Qe ee eee 5 avocados... 2.222 eee 1.00
VirseeRWe Wawsoness-2 2-2 See eee Ome ee eee Dmangos. 23052 ee ee 1. 00
Mrs sOlivires!Gdewlauresso ss a | Seen Oia ee ee 0’... 255 ee 1.00
VETS HSER sa Wy SOM ee | eae Cl tase eae | me G0... = 5 32-5 Se ee eee 1.00
Hred:Soliriow 25 eee eae ee POE Que See 2;Mangoes:. 22.2... ee eee 1.00
Alfredo) Maciass-a. eee hid gms la eee 14 pomegranates_-.--- 2 eee 1.00
Mary Louisa Ramivez___.-._.--__|_-_-_- CORRS Ee ees lmango.... 2 eee 1.00
Worenza Aguilar==2_2- -2225- S252 Mercedes, Tex.__--- lL plant:..... 2... —. => === 1.00
Hstravelyham ez asses ee en ee Go sate See ee as 5 COMMS...) t=.5 eee 1.00
Joseph! Sauriquez soe ee San Ysidro, Tex_-_.- 4 sugarcane stalks, 8 pears______....--- 1.00
MED. Broyles. cece neat eer Gohan 3s Hee 5 tangerines, 5 apples_.____....-_...---- 1.00





ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY
AND PLANT QUARANTINE

Lee A. Strong, Chief.

S. A. RoHwWER, Assistant Chief.

Avery S. Hoyt, Assistant Chief.

P. N. ANNAND, Special Research Assistant.

F. H. Spencer, Business Manager.

Roiyia P. Currie, Lditor.

MaABet CoLcorp, Librarian.

J. A. Hystop, in Charge, Division of Insect Pest Survey and Information.

J. I. HAMBLETON, in Charge, Division of Bee Culture Investigations.

D. L. VAN DINE, in Charge, Division of Fruit Insect Investigations.

F. C. CRAIGHEAD, in Charge, Division of Forest Insect Investigations.

W. H. WHITE, in Charge, Division of Truck Crop and Garden Insect Investiga-
tions.

C. M. Packarp, in Charge, Division of Cereal and Forage Insect Investigations.

R. W. HArnep, in Charge, Division of Cotton Insect Investigations.

F, C. BisHoprp, in Charge, Division of Insects Affecting Man and Animals.

L. A. Hawkins, in Charge, Division of Control Investigutions.

a: 0. Se in Charge, Division of Insecticides and Fungicides.

C. F. W. MUESEBECK, in Charge, Division of Insect Identification.

oe. CLAUSEN, in Charge, Divison of Foreign Parasite Introduction.

S. B. Fracker, in Charge, Division of Plant Disease Control.

B. M. Gappis, in Charge, Division of Domestic Plant Quarantines.

E. R. SAsscer, in Charge, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines.

A. F. Burcess, in Field Charge, Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail Moth Control (head-
quarters, Greenfield, Mass.).

E. G. BREweER, in Field Charge, Japanese Beetle and Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail
Moth Quarantines, European Corn Borer Certification, and Dutch Elm Disease
Eradication (headquarters, Bloomfield, N. J.).

R. E. McDonatLp, in Field Charge, Pink Bollworm and Thurberia Weevil Quar-
antines (headquarters, San Antonio, Tez.).

P. A. Horas, in Field Charge, Mexican Fruitfly Quarantine (headquarters,
Harlingen, Tez.).

A. C. Baker, in Field Charge, Fruitfly Investigations (headquarters, Mezrico
City, Mexico).

73

U. S$. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1938



oe





S$. R. A—B. E. P. Q. No. 136 | Issued December 1938

United States Department of Agriculture

BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS

JULY-SEPTEMBER 1938



CONTENTS
Page
araiine aed oulenomer) announcements ____-__.-. 2-22 <_------ nnn nen nn ese eennne eee 75
Announcements relating to gypsy moth and brown-tail moth quarantine (No. 45)____-_-_________ 75
Damas wemareueener aren me TeVvISOG. —_ 22 ee ee eee tn 75
Revision of quarantine and regulations____---- a Ae Ail et A Rs rae OE a He 76
INGLICeLOpeneral pubic through newspapers. -__--2- 2-222 _2 22 84
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (No. 48)___--________-------_-_-________. 84

Administrative instructions—Fumigation of onions by methyl bromide as a condition of
certification of onions moving by refrigerator car from the area listed in regulation 5 of quaran-
UTTER N CMSA ee nm eer) cA.) mete re ae oe ce ee oe eee ee ee ee eens Tear? 84
Administrative instructions—Fumigation of tomatoes by methyl] bromide as a condition of
certification of tomatoes moving by refrigerator car from the area listed in regulation 5 of

PICT AME CN Oma aE Gb wirphn QO) 480) 2 = fe a ee es ee ee ek 85
Japanese beetle control ends for season on fruit and vegetable shipments______-____._______- 86
Termination date on fruit and vegetable restrictions under Japanese beetle quarantine ad-

VAnceGulofeplembper 20 fornithe year 1938: 22... 82223 - S 2 o eee 86

Announcement relating to rules and regulations governing the importation of cotton and cotton
PETA o SH UOM MO MUM UCO LS LALCS. = — 6-2 = ne a ee ee ee seen Bakes 87
instructions orcouleectors of. customs (TL. D. 49666)_.-.2 1. -- <2. 2 so eben et 87
MormnAlmspechionomplants and plant products:-<222=22-.=<2- ===. 28st senshi cn et 87
RewocaiomomOnreconplanbtiquaranbine.—=.-.-=..2-2-.<--s..<.-)-cs-c-sc2-.- lke nen ne es 87
NOTE Set EOP an 10 Sn ee Sn me Se ee Se can eau esese nce neee enone 87 ~
Public hearing to consider United States quarantine on account of white-fringed beetle____-_- 87
Notice of public hearing to consider the advisability of quarantining the States of Alabama,

Florida, Louisiana, and Mississippi on account of the white-fringed beetle_______.._-____- 88
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, New Zealand (P. Q. C. A. 306, supplement No. 5) ___-- 88
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, French zone of Morocco (B. E. P. Q. 444, revised)___- 88
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Turkey (B. E. P. Q. 451, supplement No. 1)- 99
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Kingdom of Italy (B. E. P. Q. 469, supplement No. 1)_- 99
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Commonwealth of Australia (B. E. P. Q. 476)________- 100
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Colombia (B. E. P. Q. 477, superseding

Memorandum to Chief Inspectors September 11981) 2-2 -.2--- 222 222s eee 110
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Malaya (B. E. P. Q. 478, superseding B. E. P. Q.458)__ 112
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Colony and Protectorate of Kenya (B. E. P. Q.479)_-. 116

Penalties imposed tor violations of the Plant Quarantine Act_._............--.--.-----2. 2-22. 119
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine-_--.--..--------------------------- 121

QUARANTINE AND OTHER OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO GYPSY MOTH AND BROWN-TAIL
MOTH QUARANTINE (NO. 45)

GYPSY MOTH QUARANTINE REVISED

(Press notice)
SEPTEMBER 30. 1938.

The quarantine and regulations relating to gypsy moth and brown-tail moth
infestations in New England have been revised, effective September 29, the
Acting Secretary of Agriculture, Harry L. Brown, announced today.

The principal changes are the release of certain areas from regulation and
the change in designation of certain other areas from that of lightly infested to
generally infested.

As a result of scouting of the past three seasons, conditions along the northern
border of the regulated area were found to be such that certain towns in
Coos County, N. H., and parts of the counties of Caledonia, Essex, Lamoille,
and Rutland, in Vermont, including a granite and marble district and an area
from which quantities of Christmas trees are shipped, could be released from
regulation.

104498—38——1 75



YHANSLI
gH s7ell BUREAU OF ewfoMOLoGy AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July—Sept.

The increased numbers of gypsy moth egg clusters found in parts of Maine
have been sufficient, however, to justify classifying as generally infested, parts
of the six counties of Franklin, Kennebec, Oxford, Penobscot, Somerset, and
Waldo, in that State, as well as parts of the counties of Orange, Windham, and
Windsor, in Vermont, and a district in Coos County, N. H., formerly found to
be lightly infested.

GYPSY MOTH AND BROWN-TAIL MOTH QUARANTINE (QUARANTINE
NO. 45)

REVISION OF QUARANTINE AND REGULATIONS

INTRODUCTORY NOTE .

The principal changes in this revision of the quarantine and the rezulations
are (1) the release from regulation of certain towns in Coos County, N. H.,
and parts of the counties of Caledonia, Essex, Lamoille, and Rutland, Vt.; and
(2) the transfer from lightly infested to generally infested area of part of
Coos County, N. H., parts of the Maine counties of Franklin, Kennebec, Oxford,
Penobscot, Somerset, and Waldo, and parts of the Vermont counties of Orange,
Windham, and Windsor. The quarantine as revised provides for modifications
of its restrictions in accordance with facts as to pest risk found by the Chief
of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine and set forth in adminis-
trative instructions..

Former regulations 2 and 4 have been discontinued and the present regula-
tions have been renumbered.

SUMMARY

The regulated area includes the entire State of Rhode Island and parts of
Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Vermont. The re-
stricted articles, unless exempted by administrative instructions, are as fol-
lows: (1) Coniferous trees, such as spruce, fir, hemlock, pine, juniper (cedar),
and arborvitae (white cedar), without roots, known as Christmas trees, and
parts thereof, and evergreen decorative plants, such as boxwood, holly. and
laurel, and their parts; (2) forest-plant products, including logs, tanbark, posts,
poles, car stakes, railroad ties, cordwood, empty cable reels, and lumber; (3)
trees, shrubs, vines, and all plants having persistent woody stems, and parts of
such plants excepting seeds and fruit; and (4) stone and quarry products
(regulation 1).

Under these regulations no restricted articles shall be moved interstate from
the regulated areas to or through any point outside thereof, nor from the
generally infested area to the lightly infested area, except under a certificate
or permit (regulation 38).

Christmas trees and evergreen boughs originating in the generally infested
area are not allowed to be moved interstate to any point outside of that area,
and no certificate er permit will be issued authorizing such movement unless
such trees have been grown as nursery stock in a cultivated nursery and are
certified under the provisions of regulation 4.

Deciduous trees and such parts thereof as bear leaves are not allowed to be
moved from the brown-tail moth infested area to outside points without a cer-
tificate or permit, except that a State nursery inspection certificate may be
substituted in the case of certain classes of movement within the gypsy moth
regulated areas (regulation 3).

Woody plants grown in the greenhouse throughout the year and cut flowers
thereof may be shipped interstate without inspection and certification on con-
dition that each box or package is plainly labeled to show that the contents
were greenhouse grown.

For the conditions governing inspection and certification, marking require-
ments, and similar details, see regulations 4 to 10, inclusive.

To arrange for inspection and certificates, address Bureau of Entomology and
Plant Quarantine, 266 Glenwood Avenue, Bloomfield, N. J.

S. A. ROHWER,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

8



1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS it

NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 45 (REVISED)
(Approved September 28, 1938; effective September 29, 1938)

I, Harry L. Brown, Acting Secretary of Agriculture, have determined that it
is necessary to quarantine the States of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont,
Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut, to prevent the spread of two
injurious insects—the gypsy moth (Porthetria dispar lL.) and the brown-tail
moth (Nygmia phaeorrhoea Don.)—not herefore widely distributed within and
throughout the United States.

Now, therefore, I, Harry L. Brown, Acting Secretary of Agriculture, under
the authority conferred by section 8 of the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20,
1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended, do hereby quarantine the States of Maine, New
Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut, and by
this Notice of Quarantine No. 45 do order that (1) coniferous trees, such as
spruce, fir, hemlock, pine, juniper (cedar), and arborvitae (white cedar), with-
out roots, known and described as “Christmas trees,” and parts thereof, and
evergreen decorative plants, such as boxwood, holly, and laurel, and parts
thereof, known and described as “Christmas greens and greenery”; (2) forest-
plant products, including logs, tanbark, posts, poles, car stakes, railroad ties,
cordwood, empty cable reels, and lumber; (5) trees, shrubs, vines, and all plants
having persistent woody stems, and parts of such plants excepting seeds and
fruit; and (4) stone and quarry products, shall not be shipped, offered for ship-
ment to a common carrier, received for transportation or transported by a
common carrier, or carried, transported, moved, or allowed to be moved from
any of said quarantined States into or through any other State or Territory
or District of the United States in manner or method or under conditions other
than those prescribed in the rules and regulations hereinafter made and amend-
ments thereto: Provided, That the restrictions of this quarantine and of the
rules and regulations supplemental thereto may be limited to the areas, in a -
quarantined State, now or hereafter designated by the Secretary of Agricul-
ture as regulated areas, when said State shall have provided for and enforced
such control and regulatory measures with respect to such designated areas as,
in the judgment of the Secretary of Agriculture, shall be deemed adequate to
prevent the spread of the gypsy moth and brown-tail moth: And provided fur-
ther, That, whenever, in any year, the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and
Plant Quarantine shall find that facts exist as to the pest risk involved in the
movement of one or more of the articles enumerated in the regulations supple-
mental hereto, making it safe to modify, by making less stringent, the restric-
tions contained in any such regulation, he shall set forth and publish such
finding in administrative instructions, specifying the manner in which the appli-
cable regulation should be made less stringent, whereupon such modification
shall become effective, for such period and for such regulated area or portion
thereof as shall be specified in said administrative instructions, and a copy
thereof shall be mailed to the common carriers doing business in the quaran-
tined area affected and every reasonable effort shall be made to give publicity
to the said modification of the regulation in the area affected.

Done at the city of Washington this 28th day of September 1938.

Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.

[SEAL] Harry L. Brown,

Acting Secretary of Agriculture.

RULES AND REGULATIONS (EIGHTH REVISION) SUPPLEMENTAL TO
NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 45

(Approved September 28, 1938; effective September 29, 1938)
REGULATION 1. DEFINITIONS

For the purpose of these regulations the following words, names, and terms
shall be construed, respectively, to mean:

(a) Gypsy moth.—The insect known as the gypsy moth (Porthetria dispar L.).

(6b) Brown-tail moth.—The insect known as the brown-tail moth (Nygmia
phaeorrhoea Don., formerly referred to as Huproctis chrysorrhoea).
_(c) Quarantined area.—Any State quarantined by the Secretary of Agricul-
ture upon determination by him that either the gypsy moth or the brown-tail
moth, or both, exist therein.



78 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July—Sept.

(d) Regulated area.—The entire area comprised of portions of the quaran-
tined States now or hereafter designated by the Secretary of Agriculture as
regulated to prevent the spread of the gypsy moth or brown-tail moth, or both,
therefrom.

(e) Generally infested area.—The entire area comprised of portions of the
quarantined States now or hereafter designated by the Secretary of Agriculture
as generally infested with the gypsy moth.

(f) Lightly infested area.—The entire area comprised of portions of the
quarantined States now or hereafter designated by the Secretary of Agriculture
as lightly infested with the gypsy moth.

(9g) Brown-tail moth infested area.—The entire area comprised of portions
of the quarantined States now or hereafter designated by the Secretary of
Agriculture as infested with the brown-tail moth.

(h) Restricted articles—(1) Coniferous trees, such as spruce, fir, hemlock,
pine, juniper (cedar), and arborvitae (white cedar), without roots, known and
described as “Christmas trees,” and parts thereof, and evergreen decorative
plants, such as boxwood, holly, and laurel, and parts thereof; (2) forest-plant
products, including logs, tanbark, posts, poles, car stakes, railroad ties, cord-
wood, empty cable reels, and lumber; (3) trees, shrubs, vines, and all plants
having persistent woody stems, and parts of such plants, excepting seeds and
fruit; and (4) stone and quarry products.

(i) Moved interstate; interstate movement.—Shipped, offered for shipment to
a common carrier, received for transportation or transported by a common car-
rier, or carried, transported, moved, or allowed to be moved from one State of
the United States into or through any other State or Territory or District.

(j) Inspector.—An inspector of the United States Department of Agriculture.

REGULATION 2. LIMITATION OF RESTRICTIONS TO REGULATED AREAS. DESIGNATION
OF REGULATED AREAS; GENERALLY INFESTED AREA; LIGHTLY INFESTED AREA;
Brown-Talt MotH INFESTED AREA

Conditioned upon maintenance on the part of the State concerned of action
deemed adequate by the Secretary of Agriculture to prevent the spread of the
gypsy moth and brown-tail moth, or both such moths, from the regulated area
or areas to other parts of the State, the restrictions of these regulations are
limited to the following areas:

(1) REGULATED AREAS

Connecticut.—Counties of Hartford, Middlesex, New London, Tolland, and
Windham; towns of Barkhamsted, Colebrook, Harwinton, New Hartford, Ply-
mouth, Thomaston, Torrington, and Winchester, in Litchfield County; towns of
Branford, Guilford, Madison, Meriden, North Branford, North Haven, Waterbury,
and Wolcott, in New Haven County.

Maine.—Counties of Androscoggin, Cumberland, Kennebec, Knox, Lincoln,
Sagadahoc, Waldo, and York; towns of Avon, Berlin, Carthage, Chesterville,
Crockertown, Dallas Plantation, Farmington, Freeman, Greenvale, Industry,
Jay, Jerusalem, Kingfield, Madrid, Mount Abraham, New Sharon, New Vineyard,
Perkins, Phillips, Rangeley Plantation, Redington, Salem, Sandy River Planta-
tion, Strong, Temple, Washington, Weld, and Wilton, and townships D and HE,
in Franklin County; all of Hancock County except plantations 38, 4, 35, and 41;
all that part of Oxford County south and southeast of and including the towns
of Magalloway and Richardsontown; towns of Alton, Argyle, Bradford, Brad-
ley, Carmel, Charleston, Clifton, Corinna, Corinth, Dexter, Dixmont, Eddington,
Etna, Exeter, Garland, Glenburn, Grand Falls Plantation, Greenbush, Greenfield,
Hampden, Hermon, Holden, Hudson, Kenduskeag, Levant, Milford, Newburgh,
Newport, Orono, Orrington, Plymouth, Stetson, Summit, and Veazie, and cities
of Bangor, Brewer, and Old Town, in Penobscot County; towns of Abboit,
Atkinson, Dover, Foxcroft, Guilford, Kingsbury Plantation, Parkman, Sanger-
ville, and Wellington, in Piscataquis County; all that part of Somerset County
south and southeast of and including Highland and Pleasant Ridge Plantations,
town of Moscow, and Mayfield Plantation; towns of Beddington, Cherryfield,
Columbia, Deblois, Harrington, Millbridge, and Steuben, and Plantations 18 and
24, in Washington County.

Massachusetts——Counties of Barnstable, Bristol, Dukes, Essex, Hampden,
Hampshire, Middlesex, Nantucket, Norfolk, Plymouth, Suffolk, and Worcester ;
-all of Franklin County except the town of Monroe.



1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 79

New Hampshire.—Counties of Belknap, Carroll, Cheshire, Grafton, Hillsboro,
Merrimack, Rockingham, Strafford, and Sullivan; all that part of Coos County
lying south of and including the towns of Stratford, Odell, Dummer, and
Cambridge.

Rhode Island—rThe entire State.

Vermont.—Counties of Orange, Windham, and Windsor; towns of Land-
grove, Peru, Readsboro, Searsburg, and Winhall, in Bennington County; towns
of Barnet, Danville, Groton, Kirby, Peacham, Ryegate, St. Johnsbury, and
Waterford, in Caledonia County; towns of Concord, Granby, Guildhall, Lunen-
burg, Maidstone, and Victory, in Essex County; town of Elmore, in Lameoille
County; towns of Mount Holly, Mount Tabor, Pittsfield, Sherburne, Shrewsbury,
and Wallingford, in Rutland County; towns of Barre, Berlin, Cabot, Calais,
East Montpelier, Marshfield, Middlesex, Montpelier, Moretown, Northfield, Plain-
field, Roxbury, Waitsfield, Woodbury, and Worcester, in Washington County.

(2) DIVISION OF REGULATED AREA

For the purpose of regulating inspection and transportation, the territory
designated above is divided into two classes of areas to be known as the
generally infested and lightly infested areas, respectively, and part of such
regulated area is also designated as brown-tail moth infested.

(3) Lightly Infested Area

The following States, counties, townships, towns, plantations, cities, and
other political subdivisions, including any cities, towns, boroughs, or other
political subdivisions included within their limits, are designated as the lightly
infested area:

Connecticut.—County of Middlesex; towns of Avon, Berlin, Bristol, Burling-
ton, Farmington, Marlboro, New Britain, Newington, Plainville, Rocky Hill, _
Southington, and West Hartford, in Hartford County; towns of Colebrook, Har-
winton, New Hartford, Plymouth, Thomaston, Torrington, and Winchester, in
Litchfield County; towns of Branford, Guilford, Madison, Meriden, North Bran-
ford, North Haven, Waterbury, and Wolcott, in New Haven County; towns of
EKast Lyme, Lyme, and Old Lyme, in New London County.

Maine.—Towns of Avon, Berlin, Carthage, Crockertown, Dallas Plantation,
Freeman, Greenvale, Jerusalem, Kingfield, Madrid, Mount Abraham, New Vine-
yard, Perkins, Phillips, Rangeley Plantation, Redington, Salem, Sandy River
Plantation, Strong, Temple, Washington, and Weld, and townships D and BE, in
Franklin County; towns of Amherst, Aurora, Bucksport, Dedham, Eastbrook,
Franklin, Gouldsboro, Hancock, Lamoine, Mariaville, Orland, Osborn Planta-
tion, Otis, Penobscot, Sorrento, Sullivan, Trenton, Verona, Waltham, city of
Ellsworth, and townships or plantations numbered 7, 8, 9, 10, 16, 22, 28, 32, 33,
34, 39, and 40, in Hancock County; towns of Andover, Andover North surplus,
Byron, C., C. surplus, Grafton, Hanover, Magalloway, Newry, Richardsontown,
Riley Grant, Roxbury, and Upton, in Oxford County; towns of Alton, Argyle,
Bradford, Bradley, Carmel, Charleston, Clifton, Corinna, Corinth, Dexter, Dix-
mont, Eddington, Etna, Exeter, Garland, Glenburn, Grand Falls Plantation,
Greenbush, Greenfield, Hampden, Hermon, Holden, Hudson, Kenduskeag, Levant,
Milford, Newburgh, Newport, Orono, Orrington, Stetson, Summit, and Veazie,
and cities of Bangor, Brewer, and Old Town, in Penobscot County; towns of
Abbott, Atkinson, Dover, Foxcroft, Guilford, Kingsbury Plantation, Parkman,
Sangerville, and Wellington, in Piscataquis County; towns of Anson, Athens,
Bingham, Brighton Plantation, Cambridge, Concord, Cornville, Embden, Har-
mony, Hartland, Highland, Lexington, Madison, Mayfield, Moscow, New Port-
land, Palmyra, Pleasant Ridge Plantation, Ripley, St. Albans, and Solon, in
Somerset County; towns of Brooks, Frankfort, Jackson, Knox, Monroe, Prospect,
Searsport, Stockton Springs, Swanville, Thorndike, Waldo, Winterport, and the
city of Belfast, in Waldo County; towns of Beddington, Cherryfield, Columbia,
Deblois, Harrington, Millbridge, and Steuben, and plantations 18 and 24, in
Washington County.

Massachusetts—Towns of Charlemont, Hawley, Heath, and Rowe, in Frank-
lin County; towns of Chester and Tolland, in Hampden County; towns of Cum-
mington, Huntington, Middlefield, Plainfield, and Worthington, in Hampshire
County.

New Hampshire.—Town of Harts Location, in Carroll County; towns of Beans
Grant, Cambridge, Carroll, Chandler Purchase, Crawford Grant, Crawford Pur-
chase, Cutts Grant, Dalton, Dummer, Hadleys Purchase, Jefferson, Kilkenny,



80 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July—Sept.

Lancaster, Low & Burbank Grant, Milan, Nash & Sawyer Location, Northumber-
land, Odell, Randolph, Sargent Purchase, Stark, Stratford, Success, Thompson
& Meserve Purchase, and Whitefield, in Coos County; towns of Bath, Bethlehem,
Franconia, Landaff, Lisbon, Littleton, Lyman, and Monroe, in Grafton County.
Rhode Island.—Town of New Shoreham (Block Island). in Newport County.
Vermont.—Towns of Landgrove, Peru, Readsboro, Searsburg, and Winhall,
in Bennington County; towns of Barnet, Danville, Groton, Kirby, Peacham,
Ryegate, St. Johnsbury, and Waterford, in Caledonia County; towns of Con-
cord, Grarby, Guildhall, Lunenburg, Maidstone, and Victory, in Hssex County;
town of Elmore, in Lamoille County; towns of Braintree, Brookfield, Chelsea,
Corinth, Orange, Randolph, Topsham, Strafford, Tunbridge, VersShire, Wash-
ington, West Fairlee, and Williamstown, in Orange County; towns of Mount
Holly, Mount Tabor, Pittsfield, Sherburne, Shrewsbury, and Wallingford, in
Rutland County; towns of Barre, Berlin, Cabot, Calais, East Montpelier,
Marshfield, Middlesex, Montpelier, Moretown, Northfield, Plainfield, Roxbury,
Waitsfield, Woodbury, and Worcester, in. Washington County; towns of Brook-
line, Dover, Halifax, Jamaica, Londonderry, Marlboro, Newfane, Somerset,
Stratton, Townshend, Wardsboro, Whitingham, Wilmington, and Windham, in
Windham County; towns of Andover, Baltimore, Barnard, Bethel, Bridgewater,
Cavendish, Ludlow, Plymouth, Pomfret, Reading, Rochester, Royalton, Sharon,
Stockbridge, Weston, West Windsor, and Woodstock, in Windsor County.

(4) Generally Infested Area

All parts of the regulated area not designated as lightly infested in section
(8) hereof, shall comprise the generally infested area.

(5) Brown-tail Moth Infested Area

The following counties, towns, and other political subdivisions, including
any cities, boroughs, or other political subdivisions included within their
limits, are also infested with the brown-tail moth and are hereby designated
as the brown-tail moth infested area:

Maine——Counties of Androscoggin, Cumberland, Kennebec, Knox, Lincoln,
Sagadahoc, Waldo, and York; towns of Chesterville, Farmington, Industry,
Jay, New Sharon, and Wilton, in Franklin County; towns of Bar Harbor,
Bucksport, Orland, Surry, and Trenton, and the city of EUsworth, in Hancock
County, and all territory west and south of said towns in said county; towns
of Albany, Bethel, Brownfield, Buckfield, Canton, Denmark, Dixfield, Fryeburg,
Greenwooc, Hartford, Hebron, Hiram, Lovell, Mason, Milton Plantation, Nor-
way, Oxford, Paris, Peru, Porter, Rumford, Stoneham, Stow, Sumner, Sweden,
Waterford, and Woodstock, in Oxford County; cities of Bangor and Brewer,
and towns of Carmel, Dixmont, Etna, Hampden, Hermon, Newburgh, Orring-
ton, and Plymouth, in Penobscot County; and towns of Canaan, Fairfield,
Mercer, Norridgewock, Pittsfield, Skowhegan, Smithfield, and Starks, in Somer-
set County.

Massachusetts——Counties of Barnstable, Bristol, Dukes, Essex, Middlesex,
Nantucket, Norfolk, Plymouth, and Suffolk; towns of Ashburnham, Berlin,
Blackstone, Bolton, Boyleston, Clinton, Douglas, Fitchburg, Gardner, Grafton,
Harvard, Holden, Hopedale, Lancaster, Leominster, Lunenburg, Menden, Mil-
ferd, Millbury, Millville, Northborough, Northbridge, Paxton, Princeton, Royal-
ston, Shrewsbury, Southboro, Sterling, Sutton, Templeton, Upton, Uxbridge,
Webster, West Boylston, Westboro, Westminster, and Winchendon, and the city
of Worcester, in Worcester County.

New Hampshire—Counties of Belknap, Cheshire, Hillsboro, Merrimack,
Rockingham, Strafford, and Sullivan; all of Carroll County except the town
of Jackson; all of Grafton County except the towns of Bethlehem and Littleton.

Vermont.—Towns of Barnet and Ryegate, in Caledonia County; towns of
Bradford, Fairlee, Newbury, Thetford, and West Fairlee, in Orange County;
towns of Brattleboro, Dummerston, Putney, Rockingham, Vernon, and West-
minster, in Windham County; towns of Hartford, Hartland, Norwich, Spring-
field, Weatherford, West Windsor, and Windsor, in Windsor County.

REGULATION 8. CONTROL OF MOVEMENT OF RESTRICTED ARTICLES

Certification required—Except as otherwise provided in this regulation:
(1) No restricted articles as defined in regulation 1 shall be moved inter-
state from the regulated areas to or through any point outside thereof, nor



1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS Sl

from the generally infested area to the lighly infested area, unless and until
a certificate or permit shall have been issued therefor by an inspector.

(2) Christmas trees and evergreen boughs.—Coniferous trees, such as spruce,
fir, hemlock, pine, juniper (cedar), and arborvitae (white cedar), without
roots, known and described as “Christmas trees,’ and parts thereof over 1 foot
in length, originating in the generally infested area (unless grown as nursery
stock in a cultivated nursery and certified under the provisions of regulation 4
hereof), shall not be moved interstate to any point outside of such area and
no certificate or permit will be issued authorizing such movement. Such
articles which have originated in the lightly infested area may be moved inter-
state from the generally iniested area under the inspection and certification
prescribed in paragraph (1) hereof.

(3) Shipments from brown-tail moth infested area.—Except as provided in
paragraph (5) hereof no deciduous trees or shrubs, or such branches or other
parts thereof as bear leaves, shall be moved interstate from the area
designated as infested by the brown-tail moth to any point outside thereof
unless and until a certificate or permit shall have been issued therefor by an
inspector, except that as to such movement wholly within the generally
infested gypsy-moth area or wholly within the lightly infested gypsy-moth
area, or from the lightly infested to the generally infested gypsy-moth area,
a valid State nursery inspection certificate of the State from which the ship-
ment is made may be substituted for such Federal certificate or permit.

(4) Shipments within regulated areas Unrestricted—Other than as pre-
scribed in paragraph (38) hereof, and in regulation 7, no restrictions are placed
by these regulations on the interstate movement of restricted articles wholly
within the generally infested area or wholly within the lightly infested area
or from the lightly infested area to the generally infested area.

(5) Cut flowers and greenhouse-grown plants.—In the case of woody plants
which are grown in the greenhouse throughout the year, the plants themselves.
and the cut flowers thereof may be moved interstate without inspection or
certification * under these regulations on condition that each box or package
thereof is plainly labeled to show that the contents were greenhouse grown.

(6) Herbaceous plants unrestricted.—No restrictions* are placed by these
regulations on the interstate movement of strawberry plants, or of other
herbaceous annual or perennial plants or parts thereof.



REGULATION 4. CONDITIONS GOVERNING THE ISSUANCE OF CERTIFICATES
or INSPECTION

(a) Application; assembly of articles for inspection.—Persons intending to
move restricted articles interstate shall make application therefor as far as
possible in advance of the probable date of shipment. Applications must show
the nature and quantity of the plants or plant products or stone and quarry
products it is proposed to move, together with their exact location, and, if
practicable, the contemplated date of shipment. Applicants for inspection will
be required to assemble or indicate the articles to be moved interstate so that
they can be readily examined by the inspector. If not so placed, inspection
will be refused. Articles to be inspected must be free from ice and snow and
in condition to make inspection easily practicable.

(b) Nursery-grown stock.—With respect to nursery-grown stock, Federal
inspection and the issuance of Federal certificates authorizing the interstate
movement of nursery products will be conditioned on the presentation of a
valid State certificate stating that the nursery or lot of nursery stock in
‘question has been inspected by a State nursery inspector and certifying that it
is apparently free from infestation with gypsy and brown-tail moths. Such
State certification shall be renewed each year, shall be based on an inspection
made as promptly as practicable after the egg-laying period of the gypsy
moth, and shall be valid for the purpose of Federal certification, until the
following egg-hatching period, except that, pending reinspection, shipments
may be inspected and certified for interstate movement on the basis of the
State certification of the preceding year. Whenever any nursery or inde-
pendent unit thereof in the regulated area, or any shipment therefrom, is

1 Shipments of such plants and flowers from the area regulated under the Japanese
‘beetle quarantine are subject to the certification requirements of that quarantine.



82 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July—-Sept.

reported by a State inspector to be appreciably infested with either the gypsy
moth or the brown-tail moth, or whenever such infestation is determined by
a Federal inspector, further certification for interstate movement from such
nursery, or independent unit thereof, will be refused until such nursery has
been freed from infestation and has been again inspected and certified by the
State to -be apparently clean except that during such periods of refusal,
Federal inspection and certification of individual shipments of nursery stock
from nurseries being freed from infestation may be given, provided a special
certificate showing freedom from infestation has been issued therefor by a
State inspector after examination of the material in each such shipment.
During the larval period of the gypsy moth all nursery stock shall be assembled
for the examination of the Federal inspector, and if passed by him as free from
any infestation, either by egg masses or larvae, it may then be lined up and
thoroughly sprayed under the direction of and in manner and method satis-
factory to the said inspector, who will certify each shipment as having been
thus inspected and treated.

(c) Native trees and shrubs.—With respect to living trees and plants not
grown in nurseries, inspection and certification for interstate movement will
be conditioned upon the presentation of a statement by the applicant specifying
the exact source of such trees and plants, and in addition to such statement,
if dug on land other than the property of the applicant, a permit from the
owner of the said land authorizing such digging, provided such permit is.
required under the law of the State wherein the land is situated. If the
inspection of the trees or plants intended for shipment discloses infestation
with either the gypsy moth or brown-tail moth, certification may be refused
as to the intended shipment and as to other Similar shipments of trees or
plants originating on the same property or in the same locality.

(ad) Forest products and stone and quarry products—Certificates of inspec-
tion authorizing the interstate movement of forest products and stone and
quarry products may be isSued under either of the following conditions: (1)
When the articles to be moved interstate have actually been inspected and
found free from infestation; or (2) when the articles have been disinfected
under the supervision of an inspector in such a manner as to eliminate all
risk of infestation. With respect to quarries, and with respect to yards or
other places where forest productS are assembled for shipment, as a condi-
tion of inspection and certification, the premises or surroundings of such places.
shall be cleaned up and kept free from gypsy moth infestation.

(e) Charges for storage, etc—AIll charges for storage, cartage, and labor
incident to inspection or disinfection other than the Services of the inspectors
shall be paid by the shipper.

(f) Use of certificates.—Certificates of inspection will be issued only for
plants and plant products and stone and quarry products which are free from
infestation by the gypsy moth and the brown-tail moth and have been so
determined by an inspector. The use of such certificates in connection with
plants and plant products and stone and quarry products which are not in
compliance with these regulations is unlawful.

(9g) Report of certificates—Persons to whom certificates are issued shall
report at time of shipment on forms provided for that purpose all their sales
or shipments of such articles to points outside the regulated area.

REGULATION 5. CONDITIONS. GOVERNING THE JSSUANCE OF PERMITS WITHOUT
INSPECTION, AND THE REPORTING OF SHIPMENTS

Permits authorizing the interstate movement of restricted articles may be
issued (1) when such products have been grown, or manufactured, processed,
and stored in such a manner that, in the judgment of the inspector, no infesta-
tion could be transmitted, and (2) when such products originate outside of
the infested areas and, while within the infested area, have been stored and
safeguarded in such manner that, in the judgment of the inspector, no infes-
tation could be transmitted. Permits will be issued only for plants and plant
products and stone and quarry products which are not infested with the
gypsy moth or brown-tail moth.

’ Persons to whom permits are issued shall report at time of shipment on forms
provided for that purpose all their sales or shipments of such articles to
points outside the regulated area.



1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 83

REGULATION 6. MARKING AND CERTIFICATION A CONDITION OF INTERSTATE
TRANSPORTATION

(a) Every box, basket, bale, or other container of the articles restricted for
which a certificate or permit is required by these regulations shall be plainly
marked with the name and address of the consignor and the name and address
of the consignee, and the shipper shall securely attach to the outside thereof a
valid certificate or permit issued in compliance with these regulations. In the
case of lot shipments by freight, one certificate attached to one of the contain-
ers and another certificate attached to the waybill will be sufficient.

(b) In the case of bulk carload shipments by rail, the certificate shall ae-
company the waybill, conductor’s manifest, memorandum, or bill of lading
pertaining to such shipment, and in addition each car shall have securely at-
tached to the outside thereof a placard showing the number of the certificate
or certificates accompanying the waybill.

(c) In the case of shipment by road vehicle, the certificates shall accom-
pany the vehicle.

(d) Certificates shall be surrendered to the consignee upon delivery of the
shipment.

REGULATION 7. THOROUGH CLEANING REQUIRED OF CARS, BOATS, AND OTHER
VEHICLES BEFORE MOVING INTERSTATE

Cars, boats, and other vehicles which have been used in transporting re-
stricted articles within the regulated areas shall not be moved interstate until
the same shall have been thoroughly swept out and cleaned by the carrier at
the point of unloading or destination of all litter and rubbish from such regu-
lated articles. No litter, rubbish, or refuse from any such restricted articles
shall be moved interstate.

REGULATION 8. INSPECTION IN TRANSIT

Every car, vehicle, basket, box, bale, or other container moved interstate
which contains or which the inspector has probable cause to believe contains
either infested articles or articles the movement of which is prohibited or
restricted by these regulations, shall be subject to inspection by an inspector
at any time or place.

REGULATION 9. CANCELATION OF CERTIFICATES AND PERMITS

Certificates and permits issued under these regulations may be withdrawn
or canceled by the inspector and further certification refused, whenever in the
judgment of the inspector the further use of such certificates might result in
the dissemination of infestation.

REGULATION 10. SHIPMENTS FOR EXPERIMENTAL, SCIENTIFIC, OR EDUCATIONAL
PURPOSES

Articles subject to restriction in these regulations may be moved interstate
for experimental, scientific, or educational purposes, on such conditions and
under such safeguards as may be prescribed by the Bureau of Entomology and
Plant Quarantine. The container of articles so moved shall bear, securely
attached to the outside thereof, an identifying tag from the Bureau of En-
tomology and Plant Quarantine.

These revised rules and regulations shall be effective on and after September
29, 1938, and shall supersede the rules and regulations promulgated Novem-
ber 4, 1935.

Done at the city of Washington this 28th day of September 1938.

Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.

[SEAL] Harry L. Brown,

Acting Secretary of Agriculture.

APPENDIX

PENALTIES

The Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended,
provides that no person shall ship or offer for shipment to any common carrier,
104498—38——2



84 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE ([July-Sept.

nor shall any common carrier receive for transportation or transport, nor shall any
person carry or transport, from any quarantined State or Territory or District
of the United States, or from any quarantined portion thereof, into or through
any other State or Territory or District, any class of nursery stock or any
other class of plants, fruits, vegetables, roots, bulbs, seeds * * * or any
other article * * * specified in the notice of quarantine * * * in man-
ner or method or under conditions other than those prescribed by the Secretary
of Agriculture. It also provides that any person who shall violate any of the
provisions of this act, or who shall forge, counterfeit, alter, deface, or destroy
any certificate provided for in this act or in the regulations of the Secretary
of Agriculture shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor and shall, upon e¢on-
viction thereof, be punished by a fine not exceeding $500, or by imprisonment
not exceeding 1 year, or both such fine and imprisonment, in the discretion of
the court.

[The foregoing revision was sent to all common carriers doing business in or through the
quarantined area.]

NOTICE TO GENERAL PUBLIC THROUGH NEWSPAPERS

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,
BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE,
Washington, D. C., September 28, 1938.

Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority
conferred on him by the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912, as amended,
has promulgated a revision of Notice of Quarantine No. 45 on aceount of the
gypsy moth and brown-tail moth, and of regulations Supplemental thereto,
effective September 28, 1938. The principal changes effected by this revision are
(1) the release from regulated area of certain towns in Coos County, N. H.,
and parts of the counties of Caledonia, Essex, Lamoille, and Rutland, Vt.; and
(2) the transfer from lightly infested to generally infested area of part of
Coos County, N. H., and parts of the Maine counties of Franklin, Kennebec,
Oxford, Penobscot, Somerset, and Waldo, and parts of the Vermont counties
of Orange, Windham, and Windsor.

Copies of the revised quarantine and regulations may be obtained from the
Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, United States Department of
Agriculture, Washington, D. C.

Harry L. Brown,
Acting Secretary of Agriculture.

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE
(NO. 48)
BP Oris:

ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS—FUMIGATION OF ONIONS BY METHYL BROMIDE
AS A CONDITION OF CERTIFICATION OF ONIONS MOVING BY REFRIGERATOR
CAR FROM THE AREA LISTED IN REGULATION 5 OF QUARANTINE NO. 48

(Approved July 14, 1938; effective July 19, 1938)

Regulation 5, section B, paragraph (6) of the Japanese beetle quarantine
(No. 48) authorizes the issuance of certificates for the interstate movement
of onions via refrigerator car from the area listed in that regulation to points.
outside the regulated areas between June 15 and October 15 when the onions
have been fumigated in the car, when deemed necessary in the judgment of
the inspector and when the doors and hatches of the car have been tightly
closed or adequately screened under the supervision of an inspector.

TREATMENT AUTHORIZED

The treatment described herein has been found to be effective against the
Japanese beetle and such treatment is authorized as a basis for certification
of onions moving to points outside the regulated areas between June 15 and
October 15 via refrigerator car when such treatment is carried out under the
supervision of an inspector and in a manner satisfactory to him.



1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 85

TREATMENT METHOD

Fumigation of onions in dry refrigerator cars with methyl bromide at a
dosage of 2 pounds per 1,000 cubic feet of space, including the space occupied
by the onions and bunkers of the cars, for a period of 2 hours, during which
time the car shall remain tightly closed with the plugs in place in the ventilator
hatches. The temperature within the car when fumigated shall be not less
than 70° F. Provision shall be made for circulating the mixture of air and
fumigant in the car for as long a time as is deemed necessary by the inspector.
At the end of the fumigation period the hatches shall be opened, the plugs
removed, screens placed in the hatch openings, and the car shipped under
standard ventilation.

In authorizing the movement of onions fumigated according to the require-
ments stated above, it is to be understood that no liability shall attach either
to the United States Department of Agriculture or to any of its employees in
the event of injury.

Caution.—Methyl bromide is a gas at ordinary temperatures. It is color-
less and practically odorless in concentration used for the fumigation of onions.
It is a poison, and the operator should use an approved gas mask when ex-
posed to the gas at concentrations used in fumigation, and when opening the
hatches for ventilating the cars. The car should not be entered until it is

well aerated.
Lre A. STRONG,

Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

B. BE. P. Q. 480.

ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS—FUMIGATION OF TOMATOES BY METHYL BROMIDE
AS A CONDITION OF CERTIFICATION OF TOMATOES MOVING BY REFRIGERATOR
CAR FROM THE AREA LISTED IN REGULATION 5 OF QUARANTINE NO. 48 ;

(Approved August 18, 1938; effective August 22, 1938)

Regulation 5, section B, paragraph (2) of the Japanese beetle quarantine
(No. 48) authorizes the issuance of certificates for the interstate movement of
fruits and vegetables via refrigerator car from the area listed in that regulation
to points outside the regulated areas between June 15 and October 15 when
they have been handled or treated under the supervision of an inspector in
manner and by method to free them from any infestation.

TREATMENT AUTHORIZED

The treatment described herein has been found to be effective against the
Japanese beetle and such treatment is authorized as a basis for certification
of tomatoes moving to points outside the regulated areas between June 15 and
October 15 via refrigerator car when such treatment is carried out under the
supervision of an inspector and in a manner satisfactory to him.

TREATMENT METHOD

Fumigation of tomatoes in dry refrigerator cars with methyl bromide at a
dosage of 2 pounds per 1,000 cubic feet of space, including the space occupied
by the tomatoes and bunkers of the cars, for a period of 2 hours, during which
time the car shall remain tightly closed with the plugs in place in the ventilator
hatches. The temperature within the car when fumigated shall be not less
than 70° F. Provision shall be made for circulating the mixture of air
and fumigant in the car for as long a time as is deemed necessary by the
inspector. At the end of the fumigation period the hatches shall be opened,
the plugs removed, screens placed in the hatch openings, and the car shipped
under standard ventilation.

In authorizing the movement of tomatoes fumigated according to the require-
ments stated above, it is to be understood that no liability shall attach either
to the United States Department of Agriculture or to any of its employees in
the event of injury.



$6 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July—Sept.

Caution.—Methyl bromide is a gas at ordinary temperatures. It is colorless
and practically odorless in concentration used for the fumigation of tomatoes.
It is a poison, and the operator should use an approved gas mask when exposed
to the gas at concentrations used in fumigation, and when opening the hatches
for ventilating the cars. The car should not be entered until it is well aerated.

AVERY S. Hoyt,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

JAPANESE BEETLE CONTROL ENDS FOR SEASON ON FRUIT AND VEGETABLE
SHIPMENTS

(Press notice)

SEPTEMBER 20, 1938.

Restrictions on the movement of fruits and vegetables under the Japanese
beetle quarantine regulations were removed for the season at midnight, Mon-
day, September 19, the Secretary of Agriculture announced today. Restrictions
on cut flowers, however, remain in force through October 15.

Under quarantine regulations, certificates showing freedom from Japanese
beetle are required until October 16 on interstate shipments of certain kinds
of fruits and vegetables from the entire regulated area and on interstate ship-
ments of fruits and vegetables of any kind via refrigerator car or motortruck from
eertain sections of the regulated area. The order, issued today, releases the
fruits and vegetables from that requirement nearly 4 weeks earlier than is
provided in the regulations.

Inspection of fruits and vegetables is necessary only during the period when
adult beetles are in active flight. There is no risk that such products will
carry the Japanese beetle after this active period, which is now apparently
over throughout the regulated area. During the last few days the Department’s
inspectors have found no beetles in fruits and vegetables.

There is still danger, however, that the adult beetles may be transported
in cut flowers. Therefore, the restrictions on the interstate movement of cut
flowers and other parts of plants will remain in full force and effect through
October 15.

Restrictions on the movement of nursery, ornamental, and greenhouse stock
and all other plants (except cut flowers, aquatic plants, and portions of plants
without roots and free from soil) are in force throughout the year and are
not affected by this amendment. .

TERMINATION DATE ON FRUIT AND VEGETABLE RESTRICTIONS UNDER JAPANESE
BEETLE QUARANTINE (QUARANTINE NO. 48) ADVANCED TO SEPTEMBER 20 FOR
THE YEAR 1938

It has been determined that the active period of the Japanese beetle in its
relation to fruits and vegetables has already ceased for the present season and
that it is, therefore, safe to permit the unrestricted movement of the fruits
and vegetables listed in regulation 5 of the rules and regulations (sixteenth
revision) supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 48 from the entire regu-
lated area as defined in regulation 3 of said rules and regulations; therefore,
it is ordered that all restrictions on the interstate movement of the articles
referred to above are hereby removed on and after September 20, 1938. This
order advances the termination of the restrictions as to fruits and vegetables
provided for in regulation 5 from October 16 to September 20, 1938, and
applies to this season only.

Done at the city of Washington this 19th day of September 1938.

Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agri-
culture.

[SEAL] H. A. WALLACE,

Secretary of Agriculture.

. [The foregoing notice was sent to all common carriers doing business in or through the
quarantined area.]



1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 87

ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO RULES AND REGULATIONS GOVERN-
ING THE IMPORTATION OF COTTON AND COTTON WRAPPINGS INTO
THE UNITED STATES

INSTRUCTIONS TO COLLECTORS OF CUSTOMS
COTTON AND COTTON WRAPPINGS—APPLICATION FOR PERMITS (T. D. 49666)

AMENDED REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE IMPORTATION OF COTTON AND COTTON
WRAPPINGS INTO THE UNITED States (T. D. 39645, T. D. 40573, and T. D.
49398 )

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,
OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONER OF CUSTOMS,
Washington, D. C., July 29, 1938.

To Collectors of Customs and Others Concerned:

The appended copy of an amendment to the regulations promulgated by
the Department of Agriculture governing the importation into the United
States of cotton and cotton wrappings is published for the information and
guidance of customs officers and others concerned.

The number of this Treasury decision should be noted as a marginal refer-
ence for articles 579, 580, 581 (c), and 588 of the Customs Regulations of 1937.

FRANK Dow,
Acting Commissioner of Customs.

[Then follows the text of the amendment.]

TERMINAL INSPECTION OF PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS
REVOCATION OF OREGON PLANT QUARANTINE

Post OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, August 1, 1938.

Oregon Plant Quarantine (Order No. 15—-A series) pertaining to the white
pine blister rust in Oregon has been revoked, effective May 24, 19388.

This amends the list of Oregon State Plant Quarantines dated June 23, 1937,
published in the Postal Bulletin of July 27, 1937, and on page 44 of the August
1937 Supplement to the Postal Guide, and removes the restrictions previously
imposed on the acceptance for mailing of parcels containing five-leafed pines
and currant and gooseberry plants intended for shipment within the State of
Oregon.

Postmasters will please, therefore, make the proper correction and be goy-
erned accordingly. ‘he removal of the Oregon quarantine, however, does not
in any way affect the provisions of Federal Quarantine No. 63 on account of
the white-pine blister rust.

RAMSEY S. BLACK,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.

MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS

PUBLIC HEARING TO CONSIDER UNITED STATES QUARANTINE ON ACCOUNT OF
WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE

(Press notice)
Aveust 19, 19388.

A public hearing to consider a Federal quarantine because of white-
fringed beetle infestations in Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, and Mississippi
was announced today by Secretary Wallace. The hearing will be in Court
Room 206 of the Post Office Building, New Orleans, La., at 10 a. m.,,
September 15, 19388.

The white-fringed beetle, known to occur in South America, has become es-
tablished in several areas in the four Southern States, where an extensive
survey in the current season has resulted in new findings.



88 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July—Sept.

This insect may be carried from place to place through commerce, especially
that involving agricultural products and used implements. The eggs are
deposited in soil and on various articles that may be moved in commerce, and
may remain viable more than 5 months, hatching when conditions are favor-
able. The larvae can be transported with products which carry small quan-
tities of soil. Adults may be carried attached to almost any object within
their reach.

Both larvae and adults feed on a wide range of plants. The larvae have
caused serious damage to numerous field and garden crops, and are exceed-
ingly destructive to several important crops. It is reasonable to assume that
the larvae and adults will attack many plants that are widely grown in
other sections of the country and, if allowed to spread, may become a serious
pest in other agricultural regions of the United States, the Secretary said.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING TO CONSIDER THE ADVISABILITY OF QUARANTINING
THE STATES OF ALABAMA, FLORIDA, LOUISIANA, AND MISSISSIPPI ON ACCOUNT
OF THE WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE

Aveust 18, 19388.

The Secretary of Agriculture has information that the white-fringed beetle
(Naupactus leucoloma Boh.), an insect pest dangerous to agriculture, and not
heretofore widely prevalent or distributed within and throughout the United
States, exists in the States of Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, and Mississippi,
and that a closely related species of Nauwpactus exists in the State of
Mississippi.

It appears necessary, therefore, to consider the advisability of quarantining
the States of Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, and Mississippi, and of restricting
or prohibiting the movement from these States, or regulated portions thereof,
of the following articles:

(1) Soil as such or in connection with nursery stock, plants, or other
products, articles, or things; and (2) farm products and such other articles as
may be deemed necessary to prevent the dissemination of these insects in any
stage of development.

Notice is, therefore, hereby given that, in accordance with ‘the Plant Quar-
antine Act of August 20, 1912 (87 Stat. 315), as amended by the act of Con-
gress approved March 4, 1917 (389 Stat. 1184, 1165), a public hearing will be
held- before the Bureau of Entomology and Piant Quarantine in Court Room
No. 206 of the Post Office, New Orleans, La., at 10 a. m. September 15, 1938,
in order that any persons interested in the proposed quarantine may appear
and be heard, either in person or by attorney.

[SEAL] H. A. WALLACE,

Secretary of Agriculture.

P. Q. C. A. 306, Supplement No. 5.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, NEW ZEALAND

SEPTEMBER 10, 1938.
IMPORTATION OF CITRUS FRUITS AND BANANAS PROHIBITED

New Zealand Customs Import Prohibition Order No. 3 of May 11, 1938,
gazetted May 12, 1938, prohibits, save with the consent of the Minister of
Customs, the importation of fresh fruit of any of the following kinds, namely,
oranges, mandarin oranges, grapefruit, lemons, and bananas.

Len A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

B. HE. P. Q. 444, Revised.
' PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, FRENCH ZONE OF MOROCCO

JULY 1, 1938.

The revision of the digest of the plant-quarantine import restrictions of the
French zone of Morocco has been prepared for the information of nurserymen,



1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 89

plant-quarantine officials, and others interested in the exportation of plants
and plant products to that country.

It was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant quarantine inspector in charge,
Foreign Information Service, Division of Foreign Plant Qwarantines, from his
translations of the French texts of the dahirs and decrees promulgated by the
Director General of Agriculture, Commerce, and Colonization, and more recently
from those of the Director of Economic Affairs of the French zone of the
Sherifian Empire (Morocco), and reviewed by the Direction of Economie
Affairs.

The information included in this circular is believed to be correct and
complete up to the time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used
independently of, nor as a substitute for, the original texts, and is not to be
interpreted as legally authoritative. The original dahirs and decrees should
be consulted for the exact texts.

Lee A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, FRENCH ZONE OF MOROCCO

Basic LEGISLATION

[Dahir of September 20, 1927: Bulletin Officiel No. 803, March 18, 1928. Dahir of April
20, 1933 ; Bulletin Officiel No. 1076, June 9, 1933]

SUMMARY
IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

Live insects and, unless preserved in liquids, their eggs, larvae, nymphs, or
pupae, cultures of myxomycetes, fungi, or bacteria; dodder seeds (Cuscuta
spp.), may not be imported except for scientific or official technical purposes.
(Dahir of September 20, 1927, articles 1 and 2.)

Plants or parts thereof used as packing material, prohibited unless indus-
trially processed, except those named in the vizirial decree of September 13,
1933

Living plants, culms, straw, leaves, roots, husks, rachises, and inflorescences
of Zea mays L., Sorghum vuigare Pers., including all cultivated species of
Sorghum or Andropogon, Panicum miliaceum L., (Chaetochloa italica) Setaria
italica (L.) Beauy., and other species of Panicum; any part or residue of
Cannabis sativa L. except seeds, fiber, and inflorescences; whole plants, living
or dead, of Arundo donar L., xcept peeled or sawn stems used in making
packings. (Vizirial decree of August 31, 1932, as amended by vizirial decree
of September 3, 1984, and July 12, 1935.)

IMPORTATION RESTRICTED

Insects of economic importance: Certain honey-producing and silk-producing
insects may be imported into the French zone subject to inspection on arrival
if properly marked. (Decree of the Director General, March 1, 1928, as amended
by decree of May 12, 1937.)

Fungi, myxomycetes, and bacteria of economic or sanitary interest may be
imported into the French zone subject to examination on arrival. (Decree of
the Director General of March 1, 1928.)

Forage-crop seeds of the genera Medicago, Trifolium, Lotus, and Anthyllis,
subject to examination for dodder seeds (Cuscuta spp.). (Vizirial decree of
May 8, 1933.)

All plants or parts of plants, including seedlings, layers, cuttings, scions,
bulbs, cut flowers, fruits, pits of fruits, vegetables, tubers, rhizomes, roots,
grain, seeds, and in general, all plant wastes; manures, fertilizers, containers,
and packing materials; lumber and bark, industrially processed plant products,”
bran,” straw,” hay” (see below for restrictions on hay), oil cakes; are subject to
the provisions of the dahir of September 20, 1927.

Potatoes, tomatoes, and eggplants: Phytosanitary certificate which must
attest their freedom from potato wart; in addition, a certificate of supervision
is required for such products originating in countries invaded by the Colorado
potato beetle, and the products must be packed in new containers which are

2 Unrestricted entry authorized by the decree of February 19, 1931, as amended.



90 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

then officially sealed. (Vizirial decree of August 1, 1936, amended by Vizirial
decree of January 23, 1937.)

Hay: Importation subject to the phytosanitary regulations and those relat.
ing to the control of parasites and importation permitted only in the form of
mechanically compressed bales bound with iron wire. (Vizirial decree of Sep-
temper 138, 1933, article 4.)

Authorized ports of entry for plant products: Casablanca, Port-Lyautey
(Kenitra), and Oujda. (Article 6 of dahir of September 20, 1927, and decree
of September 10, 1936.)

IMPORTATION UNRESTRICTED

Cereals: Wheat, barley, oats, rye, maize, rice, soybean, and millet; beans,
peas, lentils, vetches, garbanzos, coffee, spices, and dried herbs; gums and resins;
dried medicinal plants in packages; lumber and bark; industrially dried vege-
tables, flours, food pastes, brans, oil cakes, straw, and hay. (Decree of the
Director General, February 19, 1951, amended by decrees of November 23, 1934,
and May 5, 1937.)

Dried herbarium specimens: Importation not restricted. (Dahir of September
201920. art. 225)

PHYTOSANITARY REGULATIONS OF THE FRENCH ZONE, SHERIFIAN EMPIRE
(MOROCCO)

{Promulgated by the dahir of Bee oo Tee ; Bulletin Officiel No. 803, March 13,

GENERAL REGULATIONS
DEFINITION OF PLANT PARASITE

ARTICLE 1. The term “plant parasite” designates any animal or plant organ-
ism, at any stage of development, that can effect lesions or other injury to wild
plants of economic importance, to cultivated plants, to plant products belonging
to those categories, or is of such a character as to cause their death or
modification.

IMPORTATION AND TRANSIT OF INSECTS, FUNGI, BACTERIA, AND DODDER PROHIBITED

The entry into or-transit through the French zone is prohibited of live insects,
the eggs, larvae, nymphs, or pupae of such insects, when not preserved in
liquids; cultures of myxomycetes, fungi, or bacteria; and dodder seeds (Cuscuta
spp.).

ENTRY PERMITTED FOR SCIENTIFIC PURPOSES

ArT. 2. When the articles named in article 1 are intended for scientific pur-
poses or for official technical purposes, they may be admitted to entry if so
packed as to prevent their dispersal.

Art. 3. A decree of the Director General of Agriculture, Commerce, and
Colonization (now Director of Economic Affairs) will determine what species of
insects, myxomycetes, fungi, or bacteria may be admitted to entry or transit
for economic or sanitary interests and the conditions under which they will be
admitted.

Art. 4. The Director General and the Director of Public Health and Hygiene
may likewise grant temporary derogations from the provisions of article 1.

ENTRY AND TRANSIT CONTROLLED

Art. 5. The entry into, transit through, and movement within the French
zone, and the exportation beyond that zone, of the following-named products or
articles, are regulated by the provisions of the present dahir:

1. All plants, or parts of plants such as seedlings, layers, cuttings, scions,
grafts, cut flowers, fruits, pits of fruits, vegetables, tubers, bulbs, rhizomes, roots,
grain, and seeds, and in general all plant waste.

2. Manures, vegetable fertilizers, composts, soil, even when the latter forms a
portion of a package of live plants.

8. Cases, baskets, sacks, wrappers, packing, used props and supports, and any
other article or material that has been used for the transportation or handling



1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS Of

of the products or articles above mentioned, the utilization of which might
involve pest risk to crops.

4, Logs, cork, bark, tan, posts, poles, railroad ties, and cordwood.

5. All products of plant origin, such as fruits and vegetables industrially
dried, flours, food pastes, bran, oil cakes, straw, and hay.

6. Plants in pots or balls of earth; potatoes, tomatoes, and eggplants. (De-
cree of the Director General, March 27, 1931; Bulletin Officiel No. 962, Aprit
3, 1931.)

AUTHORIZED PORTS OF ENTRY

ArT. 6. The ports of entry for the importation or transit of the products
named in article 5 are designated in orders of the Director General.

The decree of September 10, 1936, designates the ports of Casablanca and
Port-Lyautey and the frontier post of Oujda.

The decree of the Director General of September 10, 1936, authorizes also the
entry of potatoes through the ports of Rabat, Mazagan, Safi, and Magador, when.
shipments weighing not less than 20 metric quintals of 100 kilograms are con-
cerned, and through the port of Agadir when shipments weighing not less than:
100 metric quintals are concerned. This decree authorizes also the entry of:
used bags through the ports of Rabat, Mazagan, Safi, Magador, when shipments:
weighing less than 20 metric quintals are concerned, and the frontier post of
Martimprey du Kiss whatever the weight.

INSPECTION ON ARRIVAL

ArT. 7. The products named in article 5 will be inspected by officials of the
Director General of Agriculture on their entry into the French zone and dealt
with in accordance with the findings: Reiease for entry, treatment, relading, or
destruction. Inspectors are authorized to withdraw samples from shipments
for detailed examination. :

This inspection may be extended to other products if the inspector has reason
to suspect that they carry plant parasites. Products intended for propagation
may be placed under observation for variable periods. The Director General
may determine, if occasion requires, the products that, by derogation, shall not
be subject to the provisions of this article.

PHYTOSANITARY CERTIFICATE MAY BE REQUIRED

ArT. 8. The list of products named in article 5, shipments of which shall be
accompanied by a phytosanitary certificate and documents attesting their ori-
gin, as well as the conditions according to which these documents must be estab-
lished, are declared by decree of the Director General. These are potatoes, toma-
toes, and eggplants.

Compliance with the provisions of this article does not exclude the phytosani-
tary inspection prescribed by article 7, with all the consequences involved:
Refusal of entry, destruction, disinfection, or fumigation, etc.

PACKING AND MARKING

ArT. 9. The packing of the products named in article 5 shall be done in such
a manner as to permit their inspection and, if necessary, their disinfection or
fumigation.*

It should be possible to identify the packages with certainty, failing which,
they will be reloaded or destroyed at the option of the consignee.

The opening of containers will be at the expense and risk of the consignee.

SAMPLING SEEDS

ArT. 10. The conditions for sampling seeds on their entry into the French
zone to disclose the presence of dodder (Cuscuta spp.) will be determined by
a decree of the Grand Vizir. In-transit shipments are excepted. Sampling is

®The decree of February 19, 1931, amended by those of November 23, 1934, and May
5, 1937, enumerates the products which shall not fall under the provisions of articles 6, 7,
and 9 of the present dahir.

For approved packing materials see the decree of September 13, 1933, and vizirial
decree of August 31, 1932.

104498—38——3



Q2 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July—Sept.

done at the expense of importers in accordance with rates established by the
same order. The withdrawal of samples gives no right of indemnity.°

PRODUCTS AFFECTED BY THE LAW

ART. 11. The preceding provisions apply to the products mentioned in article
5 whatever be the means of transportation, even if brought in by members of
ships’ crews, or by the personnel of railroad or steamship companies, or any
other transportation services.

ArT. 12. The importation and transit of certain products mentioned in arti-
cle 5, or of certain others among them from specified countries or localities,
may be prohibited by a decree of the Grand Vizir.

BOTANICAL SPECIMENS UNRESTRICTED

The preceding provisions do not apply to dried plants intended for botanicas
collections.

The Grand Vizir, by decree, may make provisions to facilitate in frontier
localities of the French zone, the exchange of plants with frontier localities.

Arts. 13 to 35. Domestic procedure.

PHYTOSANITARY CONTROL OF IMPORTED PLANT MATERIAL

The decree of September 10, 1936, as amended by decree of October 16, 1936,
Bulletin Officiel No. 1242, September 18, 1936, revokes those of March 1, 1928,
February 19, 1981, March 27, 1981, March 31, 1933, and March 19, 1936, of the
Director General, and promulgates the following regulations for the enforce-
ment of the provisions of the dahir of September 20, 1927:

AUTHORIZED PORTS OF ENTRY

ARTICLE 1. The importation and transit of the products named in article 5
of the dahir of September 20, 1927, may be effected only through the ports of
Casablanea and Port-Lyautey and the frontier post of Oujda.

ART. 2. Relates to inspection on arrival, ete.

DOCUMENTS REQUIRED WITH EACH SHIPMENT

ArT. 2A. Shipments of seedlings (stocks), layers, cuttings, scions, bulbs,
tubers, rhizomes, roots, cut flowers, must be accompanied by:

1. A copy, certified as correct, of the invoice of the shipment, indicating:
(a) the botanical species and varieties included in the shipment; (0) the
name and address of the shipper and of the establishment from which the
plant material proceeds; (c¢c) the name and address of the consignee; and
(d) the weight of the packages, as well as their marks and numbers, and their
contents.

IMPORTATION PERMITTED OF INSECTS OF ECONOMIC IMPORTANCE

[Decree of the Director General of March 1, 1928; Bulletin Officiel No. 803. March 13,
1928, as amended by the decree of the Director General of May 12, 1937; Bulletin Offi-
ciel No. 1282, May 21, 1937]

ARTICLE 1. The insects hereafter hamed are admitted to entry into and transit
through the French zone:

Honey-producing insects: Apis ligustica Spin.; A. mellifica (mellifera) L.,
honeybee.

Silk-producing insects: Antheraea mylitta Drury, Tasar silkworm; A. pernyi
var. yama-mai Guer.; Attacus atlas L.; (Sericaria) Bombyx mori L., silkworm ;
Philosamia cynthia Drury; (Attacus ricini Hutton) =Philosamia lunula Walk. ;
Attacus (Rothschildi) orizaba Westw.; (Platysamia) Samia cecropia L.; Telea
polyphemus Cramer.

Cocoons or pupae of Formica rufa l., commonly known as ants’ eggs.

The entry of the honey-producing insects is permitted only in (oeufs de
fourmis) the adult stage and only in egg and pupal stages of the silk-producing
insects.

ArT. 2. The entry of these insects may be effected only through the: ports
of Casablanea and Port-Lyautey and the frontier post of Oujda.

5 See vizirial decree of May 8, 1933, on the importation of forage crop seeds.



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Department of Agriculture

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LIBRARY
STATE PLANT BOARD
Digitized by the Internet Archive
in 2013

http://archive.org/details/servicereg38unit —
S.R. A., B. E. P. Q. Issued September 1939

United States Department of Agriculture

Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine

SERVICE AND
REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS
1938

These announcements are issued quarterly and constitute a per-
manent record of the work of the Bureau in the enforcement
of the Plant Quarantine Act of 1912 and certain related acts, in-
cluding the text of quarantines and regulations thereunder, and
the more important circulars and decisions explanatory of,
or bearing on, such quarantines and regulations

WITH LIST OF PLANT PESTS INTERCEPTED WITH IMPORTED
PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS



UNITED STATES

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
WASHINGTON : 1939
FLA. Bi: 2d,
DV, OF PLANT
GNDOUSTRY
WBRAR

ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY
AND PLANT QUARANTINE

Lrs A. Strona, Chief.

S. A. Ronwer, Assistant Chief.

Avery 8. Hoyt, Assistant Chief.

P. N. ANNAND, Special Research Assistant.

F. H. Spencer, Business Manager.

Rouua P. Currin, Editor.

Maset Coucorp, Librarian. ;

J. A. Hysuop, in Charge, Division of Insect Pest Survey and Information.

J. I. HAMBLETON, in Charge, Division of Bee Culture Investigations.

D. L. Van Dinu, in Charge, Division of Fruit Insect Investigations.

F. C. CRAIGHEAD, in Charge, Division of Forest Insect Investigations.

W. H. Waits, 7n Charge, Division of Truck Crop and Garden Insect Investigations.

C. M. Pacxarp, in Charge, Division of Cereal and Forage Insect Investigations.

R. W. Harnep, in Charge, Division of Cotton Insect Investigations.

F. C. BisHopp, in Charge, Division of Insects Affecting Man and Animals.

. A. Hawkins, in Charge, Division of Control Investigations.

. C. Roark, 7n Charge, Division of Insecticides and Fungicides.

. F. W. MuESEBECK, 2n Charge, Division of Insect Identification.

. P. CLuavusEN, in Charge, Division of Foreign Parasite Introduction.

. B. Fracktr, in Charge, Division of Plant Disease Control.

B. M. Ganppis, in Charge, Division of Domestic Plant Quarantines.

E. R. Sasscur, in Charge, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines.

A. F. Burcsss, in Field Charge, Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail Moth Control (head-
quarters, Greenfield, Mass.).

BREWER, in Field Charge, Japanese Beetle and Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail

Moth Quarantines, European Corn Borer Certification, and Dutch Elm Disease
Eradication (headquarters, Bloomfield, N. J.).

R. E. McDonatp, in Field Charge, Pink Bollworm and Thurteria Weevil Quar-

_antines (headquarters, San Antonio, Tex.).

P. A. Horpaun, in Field Charge, Mexican Fruitfly Quarantine (headquarters,
Harlingen, Tex.).

A. a BakgEr, in Field Charge, Fruitfly Investigations (headquarters, Mexico City,

€X1C0).

Il

RQOQWH
TABLE OF CONTENTS
CONTENTS OF NO. 134 (JANUARY-MARCH 1938)

Page

remenane ad orien oimcial announcements. - - —_-- -__ ~~. - - -seeen-apatt—-psee tei dee ete sa5ek
Announcement relating to rules and regulations governing the importation of cotton and cotton
BOI PRE MEU AGAUNILCO SUALCS 9 == 22 oo oe a nn ee Se eae eee
TAsEreplOns Loco lectors,o1 customs (1. D..49398).-: — 2. fo se ee os ecw ete cee
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (No. 48) -___--.--------.---.---------- acy
List of articles exempt from certification requirements under the Japanese beetle quarantine
(He aos revised: superseding B."B. P. Q. 383)"=_=----_...-2_.---._- ee eee Deets
Instructions to postmasters- --__-_--------- Se a a ae ge een Ee =
Announcement relating to pink bollworm quarantine (No. 52)_______--_--_------------___--- i
etre ean PREIS TES CCL OP late oe Mee ke ee i Sk Fe Be
Terminal inspection of plants and plant products aches 9 Pa ae va lee ee tS Soh tO Die Reger
Hoevocahlouoncertain Orevon plant quarantines.. 206-202) ees ee ee
Parra SR SAE Cx PASS In? See Em ie one Wee bl SoS ee ee An SOE oe a8 Te SS
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Kingdom of Egypt (B. E. P. Q. 375, revised, supple-

SUUEAT TPs eae ee Ss cee LE wn IER RS Ye ee ee ee ee Se
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Presidency of Saint Christopher (St. Kitts) and Nevis,
Peaemmestenaies (ts. 10. 0b: QQ. 38l, revised): *"'2.2 "8 ee ee

Plant-quarantine import restrictions, British Gold Coast Colony (B. E. P. Q. 391, revised) -
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of France (B. E. P. 2 403, supplement No. 2).
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Kingdom of Bulgaria (B. E. P. Q. 421, supplement
Piro EEN ane On DY TABS, EY ee Nee ete Tt ee eee eee ee ee
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Argentina (B. E. P. Q. 426, supplement
PP ees eee nmgene nee aP LLNS ©) NP Sea) 0 EAE NE NE eS Se ee a Pe eee
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, British Colony of Ceylon (B. E. P. Q. 428, supplement
ISTE TY a a RE re Ms SE Fag bs Sit le Sen ar lS
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Kingdom of Sweden (B. E. P. Q. 439, supplement
SSIs als) rman wei nares ea ls 8 Sm Eee ee os ee ee eS ee
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, French Zone of Morocco (B. E. P. Q. 444, supplements
PNRGaS mee bee a CAE) eas wt ne SS So Dt SRN BR SOR OE ee ee ae
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Central America (Salvador) (B. E. P. Q. 445, supple-
pera csta cM RO Ey et es ak Lk cas A Nel oe ae foe ee ee ERE See
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Central America (British Honduras) (B. E. P. Q.
PORE PICTHOM LING. 2) os Si Le es So ee somes (En eee oe eee
teeth eee import restrictions, Kingdom of Yugoslavia (B. E. P. Q. 447, supplement
Seay aaa rare s Ee! pnt bs aE oe ed SPT tere) dS pesca oye
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Persia (B. E. P. Q. 449, supplement No. 1)___-___.__-
eee oe import restrictions, French Colonies (Oceania) (B. E. P. Q. 465, supple-
SeaEArau STR EN) Pn ees i ahh A Or eo ss ees 2s se eh I ee
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Australian Territory of Papua (B. E. P. Q. 467)_____-
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Kingdom of Iraq (B. E. P. Q. 468)________-___--_-----
neta import restrictions, Kingdom of Italy (B. E. P. Q. 469, superseding P. Q.
Samah ye erecta tes Stal) kent & VOLES NT Si 2B eA 2) SATE BR
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Japan (B. E. P. Q. 470, superseding the Memorandum

to Inspectors i in Charge, dated August DOLL OSA IE A ss ctl UEDA IE LILO, i RO
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Union of South Africa (B. wp) Q. 471, superseding
eR ARE) ee Be gee LL eh) eee} OD SPA OT 20 Ub. ed OT LE
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act___.__________ 4S SRS Stee wee
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine__________________________________-

CONTENTS OF NO. 135 (APRIL-JUNE 1938)

uatanume era owner omicial announcements. -_-...=---.----.---_--.--cuawuwsicsn svue@seleusicul..
Announcement relating to European corn borer quarantine (No. 41)___________________________-
Method used for the disinfection of imported broomcorn and broomcorn brooms (B. E. P. Q.
a7, supersedes iH. 5. 161 and supplements P. Q. C. A. 309) so. 2ss22 222 2c st
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (No. 48)-_..._--.------_----__-----_-_-__-
Pa ONYTING FRTISDATE AIF OTA os See es 2 bd eek evo deel oe EL tee Ft el ly ete eas ah
Notice teeeneralipublic through newspapersc22 ==) -2.=2) se sense. laze soluslstecene al.
eee ESET EMEP UCTS! 320.00 28 oh pee eh he Jil. ce Liars pede Aoi per ee |
Administrative instructions—fumigation of potatoes by methyl] bromide as a condition of
certification of potatoes moving by refrigerator car from the area listed in regulation 5
DMGUATATHAOe NO 4S! (Ete Bo bs - QU 478) oe oh ooes 22) bes ou 2e3! civ Lelenees sede hele =
Announcement relating to Mexican fruitfly quarantine (No. 64).._______.._____-.._______.
Administrative instructions—sterilization of grapefruit and oranges by heat under the Mexi-
can fruitfly quarantine (B. E. P. Q. 472: superseding P. Q. C. A. 329)____..__________._- Jd
Announcements relating to white-pine blister rust quarantine (No. 63)___-..__________- op Ree
White-pine blister rust quarantine regulations modified_____-.__..--.-___- 1A Corti an fiphe do.
CeO CTRIAISTI St 2 Sunk fo cea, ks Ed it alibi d bo oe el ogee Biel Bie ey
Notice to general public through newspapers-_-_-_-_-___- Lereetinee Liye deg yes cto ret feel ee
MPIC INI TD WON PENSPGPS. p45 2 828 8 Fey eg ys Hera eke Peg ke eye ec BL =<
Announcements relating to District of Columbia plant regulations_.___.____.__.-__-_____- Bc
District of Columbia plant regulations modified___.__-_____...-..--.--.-------.-----------
Revised rules and regulations governing the movement of plants and plant products into and
BU PEOMSLTICE OM GOI DIS: et Sock a Bo toe 2p ee Ee REE hailed
Notice to general public through newspapers_______________-_______- eee dis ete PE :
SRMOUNTEESL DONGIIBSLOLS. 2 8082 a ae ae, ren ibd eden Ce eick
Announcement relating to rules and regulations governing the importation of cotton and cotton
PRPS NO TTLOG Dates. ete al Bes Cy os sera eee cree dees ut gstaeliseal la.
Modification of cotton regulations (revision of regulation 13)_____.____________-_____________-
Terminal inspection of.plants.and plant; products. _-.... 2-52. Jec--.-4-cecieeos cece -n---- ale
Arkansas State plant quarantine (shipment of sweetpotato plants restricted) steht:
Additional plant inspection places in California..__.....................-.-.-----..-..------
Miscellaneous items.
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, ‘Republic of Brazil (B. E. P. Q.3 79, ‘supplement No. 2) _-
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of France (B. E. P. Q. 403, supplement No. 3)
aah import restrictions, Republic of Germany (B: E. P. Q. 405, Guppiemant
vo.

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69
IV TABLE OF CONTENTS

Quarantine and other official announcements—Continued.
Miscellaneous items—Continued.
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Central America (British Honduras) (B. E. P. Q. 445,
supplement -NOs:3) hs a ee eee
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Persia (Iran) (B. E. P. Q. 449, supplement No. 2)____
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act=-- 2-2) 5) eee
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine

CONTENTS OF NO. 136 (JULY-SEPTEMBER 1938)

Quarantine and other official announcements. .-_ -_ = 522¢)-2 =. 22 = be
Announcements relating to gypsy moth and brown-tail moth Gases (No. 45)
GaySVeT1O GUAR ATA ETT VSO he yee eae en -
Revision of quarantine and resulations: <2 22 205.2 se oc he ae ae as
Notice to general public through NEWSPADETS 2. = a ie
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (No. 48)____-______-_____________-_--_--) © 8
Administrative instructions—Fumigation of onions by methyl bromide as a condition of
certification of onions moving by refrigerator car from the area listed in regulation 5 of
quarantine, No-°48, (Bs Bie Pe -@) 475) ne Se gs at eg
Administrative instructions—Fumigation of tomatoes by methy! bromide as a condition of
certification of tomatoes moving by refrigerator car from the area listed in regulation 5 of
quarantine No. 48 (B. E. P. Q. 480)_____

Japanese beetle control ends for season on fruit and vegetable shipments fo 2 3
Termination date on fruit and vegetable restrictions “under J apanese beetle quarantine ad-
VAT CCU MOUS C1) LOT CLs A(t O LeU ILC yea SC ae ae a
Announcement relating to rules and regulations governing the importation of cotton and cotton
wrappingsinto the United: States. 29 = 292 eee
Instructions to collectors of customs (T. D. 49666)
Terminal inspection of plants and plant products
Revocation of Oregon plant quarantine
Miscellaneous items _= S225. 222s ese ie
Public hearing to consider United States quarantine on account of white- fae beetle______
Notice of public hearing to consider the advisability of quarantining the States of Alabama,
Florida, Louisiana, and Mississippi on account of the white-fringed beetle _-_-» =§-- ___
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, New Zealand (P. Q. C. A. 304, supplement No. 5)
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, French zone of Morocco (B. E. P. Q. 444, revised) ______
ant: Trentee import restrictions, Republic of Turkey (B. E. P. Q. 451, supplement
ORD) eis: 2 gs Ss ee se a Rt Se ee ee
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Kingdom of Italy (B. E. P. Q. a8 supplement No. t):
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Commonwealth of Australia (B. E. P. Q. 476) ____
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic ef Colombia (B. E. P. Q. 477, superseding
Memorandum to Chief Inspectors September 1, 1931) ;

Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Malaya (B. E. P. Q. 478, superseding B. E. P. Q. 458)_

Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Colony and Protectorate of Kenya (B. E. P. Q. 479) __
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act___________________________________-
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine

CONTENTS OF NO. 137. (OCTOBER-DECEMBER 1938)

Quarantine/and other officia Warn Ourmcene rises yee ee ee a a ae
Announcement relating tu gypsy moth and brown-tail moth quarantine (No. 45)______________-
Instructions to. postmasters. 22. 2-3. ee ee
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (No. 48)___-_______-___________._______--
List of articles exempt from certification requirements under the Japanese beetle quarantine
(B. E. P. Q. 395, 3d revision)
Instructions:to postmastersss. 26 2 SL eh EE es a ee
Announcements relating to Mediterranean fruitfly and melonfly quarantine (No. 13)
Hawaiian fruits and vegetables to be admitted to mainland after sterilization_______-______-
Administrative instructions—The shipment of fruits and vegetables from Hawaii to the
mainland subject to sterilization under supervision is authorized (B. E. P. Q. 481)
Announcements relating to nursery stock, plant, and seed quarantine (No. 37)_-______-_--------
Rescind order requiring treatment for narcissus bulbs from the Netherlands________________-
Treatment requirement of noninfested Netherlands narcissus bulbs as a condition of entry
revoked) (BYUBOP. Q: 482): De 8 Oe EA ee 2 Ee ee
Wallace permits importation of increased numbers of begonia and gloxinia tubers___.-_-_-___
Entry requirements of foreign begonia and gloxinia ¢ubers modified! | 2 asain
Modification of nursery stock, plant, and seed quarantine regulations (amendment No. 3)__
Announcements relating to pink bollworm quarantine’ (No:-52)/-_--.-.. So eee
Pink bollworm:quarantinereculationsamremcled i ee ee ee
Modification of pink bollworm quarantine regulations (amendment No. 5)________-_--=------
Notice:to. ceneral publicthroug@himewspapers es eee ee ee ee
Imstructions to: postmasters-.--— =... 3. See a ee
Announcements relating to white-fringed beetle quarantine (No. 72)_-_____________-__-----------
Quarantine issued to prevent spread of white-fringed beetle in four of Southern States___-__-
Wihite-fringed beetle-quarantine: ...... <5 20a PU eee eee
Wotice to:ceneral public through’ mewspaperse.—- 25. 28a ee eee ee
Terminalinspection of plants ‘and! plant productss 882) | Se eee
Florida State plant quarantine (citrus canker disease)... 52. Eee
Miscellaneous:items=-.4 2-2 -- 2.22. $54 a ee ee
The Plant Quarantine Act and Quarantine No. 37 (address by Lee A. Strong) __------_-----
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Switzerland (B. E. P. Q. 413, revised) ___-
Pant guarantine import restrictions, Republic of Argentina (B. E. P. Q. 426, supplement
Oe 4) se i hee SS a ll me = vs
Plant- aerate import restrictions, Commonwealth of Australia (B. E. P. Q. 476, supple-
mént NGA Ge et yt ea EE TS ON I ae a NA SUE L192
Plant-quarantine imnort restrictions, French Regency of Tunisia (B. E. P. Q. 483)____-----
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act________---- Ju er
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine_____-__-____----------------++------

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- 156
S. R. A—B. E. P. Q. No. 134 Issued June 1938

United States Department of Agriculture

BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS

JANUARY-MARCH 1938

CONTENTS

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C0 COP FP RPWHWWwWH NHN Ww

amreane ettanemmenmuicia! almouncements: _-_- 2 -2----__ 2-4-2 ee en See tok
Announcement relating to rules and regulations governing the importationp of cotton and cotton
iM Oomer nan OMMMIbeG SLALCSs—-2-. 2-252 Sl loves 5 bis occas see tesbe nse sale
mnsimacuwous toreolectors of customs. (‘T. ID..49398)_-_ 2-2-6 -- oe ee eee sek 5 5 n-.e
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (No. 48)__.._-_--__---_---_-__-----__-_-__-
List of articles exempt from certification Parents under the Japanese beetle quarantine

(B. iPmOesgosTe vised. superseding 5. He P,Q. 383) 2... 252-.2222. 22222222 ee
Instructions to EAs REVS Ts Pate ae a fa te
Announcement relating to pink bollworm quarantine (No. 52)____.--....----..-----..----------
SESP ATC OMS ie) [OOS MS ee eS ee ee ee eee
Menniniaiminspecnonolplants and plant products: ._--22...--.2.....~22--.--2<-220 22-2 soe ae
Hevocwuononcertain Oregon, plant quarantines-=2_--..2 2. -+_..--2--.-.---L 22222 e 2
SEN ANC OICMNeT eee = = 8 Re Te ee rece 2 ee Se te 2k
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Kingdom of Egypt (B. E. P. Q. 375, revised, supple-
FTCA DN Ep cy, ae ee ee IS
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Pre siden cy of Saint Christopher (St. Kitts) and Nevis,
British West Indies, (B. E. P. Q. 381, REVISE Gl) oe eee Se A SE A
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, British Gold Coast Colony (B. E. P. Q. 391, revised) -
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of France (B. E. P. Q. 403, supplement No. 2)_
Sacre ee import restrictions, Kingdom of Bulgaria (B. E. P. Q. 421, supplement

Seay ly peennenee eae mn mitt oy) 4S) fT tite bt eek ete ie be oS ks SE tee)

Pane. -quarantine import restrictions, British Colony of Ceylon (B. E. P. Q. 428, supplement
iurael) | Paneer Seon Se ee we OS La elo ee
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Kingdom of Sweden (B. E. P. Q. 439, supplement
PSII an Se gt ee ge ee ee a ee ee ne
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, French Zone of Morocco (B. E. P. Q. 444, supplements
Rprapanasipens) meee ee 2/182) 2 LLL) iso. Ee ee te ahs 2 ee
eee import restrictions, Central America (Salvador) (B. E. P. Q. 445, supple-
Sri acs TAF at ap) a a a
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Central America (British Honduras) (B. E. P. Q.
ELATED) eee te ke, aE ka) ya te Pa eT oe eas Se
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Kingdom of Yugoslavia (B. E. P. Q. 447, supplement
SE ICUs) neue ann eee se a a a eRe ae oe eee
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Persia (B. E. P. Q. 449, sa eee IND Oh) Peers
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, French Colonies (Oceania) (B. E. P. Q. 465, supple-
mem me 80 OA te a SP see) ee Rip Ee eis oe spoepeial ave wate
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Australian Territory of Papua (B. E. P. Q. 467)____-- 15
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Kingdom of Iraq (B. E. P. Q. 468)__________-______--- 19
be aA eeppmmn import restrictions, Kingdom of Italy (B. E. P. Q. 469, superseding P. Q.
Saad ei ed peel Deke er Be pre es As ee es eee ge Bee ee eee Lees 22
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Japan (B. E. P. Q. 470, superseding the Memorandum
tgumepercors 10 Charge, dated Atupust 22, 1094). __ 2. --- 52-8 eee 2
ae oa restrictions, Union of South Africa (B. E. P. Q. 471, superseding
PORRIO Wy ) WO ee 92 Py Pal of Pee Merete cern Fa ee el ee Pe eg he Se oes 3
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act__.._--..-....---.-.-.--_---------. 36
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine_____._._._....._.--.--.----------- 37

71071—38

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2 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan—March

QUARANTINE AND OTHER OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS

ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO RULES AND REGULATIONS GOVERN-
ING THE IMPORTATION OF COTTON AND COTTON WRAPPINGS INTO
THE UNITED STATES

INSTRUCTIONS TO COLLECTORS OF CUSTOMS
COTTON AND COTTON WRAPPINGS—-APPLICATION FOR PERMITS

AMENDED REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE IMPORTATION OF COTTON AND COTTON WRAP-
PINGS INTO THE UNITED STATES (T. D. 89645 AND T. D. 40573) (T. D. 49398)

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,
OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONER OF CUSTOMS,
Washington, February 7, 1938.

To Collectors of Customs and Others Concerned:

The appended copy of an amendment to the regulations promulgated by the
Department of Agriculture governing the importation into the United States
of cotton and cotton wrappings is published for the information and guidance
of customs officers and others concerned.

The number of this Treasury decision should be noted as a marginal reference
for articles 579, 580, 581 (e), and 583 of the Customs Regulations of 1937.

JAMES H. Moytsz,
Commissioner of Customs.

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTIN&
(NO. 48)

B. E. P. Q. 395, Revised ; superseding B. E. P. Q. 383.
Marcu 18, 1938.

LIST OF ARTICLES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS UNDER THE
JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE

In accordance with the third proviso in Notice of Quarantine No. 48, as revised,
the following articles, being considered innocuous as earriers of infestation,
are exempted from the restrictions of this quarantine and of the rules and
regulations Supplemental thereto:

1. Balsam pillows, when composed of balsam needles only.

2. Banana stalks, when crushed, dried, and shredded.

3. Dyed moss and dyed sand, when heat treated, and when so labeled on the
outside of each container of such materials.

4. Floral designs or “set pieces,” including wreaths, sprays, casket covers, and
all formal florists’ designs. Bouquets and cut flowers not so prepared are not
exempted.

5. Greensand or greensand marl, when treated and so labeled on the outside
of each container of such materials.

6. Herbarium specimens, when dried, pressed, and treated, and when so labeled
on the outside of each container of such materials.

7. Manure, peat, compost, or humus (1) when dehydrated and either shredded,
ground, pulverized, or compressed, or (2) when treated with crude petroleum
or any other product having high potency as an insecticide, and when so labeled
on the outside of each commercial container of Such materials, or (3) peat when
imported and shipped in the unopened original container and labeled as to each
container with the country of origin. (See also item 15.)

8. Moss, sheet (Calliergon schriberi) and (Thuridium recognitum).

9. Mushroom spawn, in brick, flake, or pure culture form.

10. Orchids, cut.

11. Orchid plants, when growing exclusively in Osmunda fiber.

12. Osmunda fiber, Osmundine, or orchid peat (Osmunda cinnamomea, and
O. claytoniana).

13. Resurrection plant or birdsnest moss (Selaginella lepidophylla).

14. Silica sand or similar material, when processed by crushing, grinding, and
dehydrating silica or other rock, and when so labeled on the outside of each
1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 3

container of such material, or when so designated on the waybill accompanying
bulk carload shipments of the material.

15. Sphagnum moss, bog moss, or peat moss (Sphagnaceae) when dried and
baled. (See also item 7.)

16. Submerged aquatic plants, including Cryptocoryne spp.; Eelgrass or tape
grass (Vallisneria spiralis) ; false loosestrife (Ludwigia mulerttii) ; fish grass,
Washington plant, or fanwort (Cabomba caroliniana) ; hornwort or coontail
(Ceratophyllum demersum) ; water milfoil (Myriophylium spp.) ; water weed,
ditch moss, water thyme, or anacharis (Hlodea canadensis).

Avery S. Hoyt,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS

MODIFICATION OF RESTRICTIONS OF JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE NO. 48, U. 8.
DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, March 30, 1938.
Referring to Quarantine Order No. 48 on account of the Japanese beetle,
notice is given to postmasters in the regulated area in the States of Connecti-
cut, Delaware, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey,
New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, Virginia, West Virginia,
and the District of Columbia, that effective March 18, 1988, the following arti-
cles, the interstate movement of which is not considered to constitute a risk of
Japanese beetle dissemination, are exempted from the restrictions of the
regulations of this quarantine:
(Then follows the enumeration of the articles listed above.)
RAMSEY S. BLAck,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.

ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO PINK BOLLWORM QUARANTINE
(NO. 52)

INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS

Post OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, January 10, 1938.
Postmaster.

My Dear Sir: Your attention is invited to the inclosed copy of Plant Quaran-
tine No. 52 of the United States Department of Agriculture, on account of the
pink bollworm of cotton, and also a copy of revised regulation 3 in connection
therewith, effective January 3, 1938, by which you will please be governed. See
paragraph 1, section 595, Postal Laws and Regulations.

The revision extends the regulated area. adding the county of Santa Cruz
and portions of the counties of Pima and Pinal in Arizona to the area desig-
nated as lightly infested by the pink bollworm.

Very truly yours,
Roy M. NorruH,
Acting Third Assistant Postmaster General.

TERMINAL INSPECTION OF PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS
_ REVOCATION OF CERTAIN OREGON PLANT QUARANTINES

THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, March 2, 1938.
Oregon Plant Quarantine (Order No. 10-A Series), pertaining to gladiolus
thrips in other States and Oregon Plant Quarantine (No. 16—A Series), per-
taining to holly scale in Oregon, have been reyoked, effective at once.
4 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.—March

This amends the list of Oregon State Plant Quarantines dated June 23, 1937,
published in the Postal Bulletin of July 27, 1987, and on page 44 of the August
19387 Supplement to the Postal Guide, and removes the Oregon restrictions on
the acceptance of parcels containing holly and gladiolus corms or cormels.

Postmasters will please, therefore, make the proper correction and be
governed accordingly.

, RAMSEY S. BLAck,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.

MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS
B. E. P. Q. 375, revised, Supplement No. 2.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, KINGDOM OF EGYPT

MARrcH 8, 1988.
IMPORTATION OF DRIED FRUITS RESTRICTED

According to Booklet No. 20 of July 1937, crop protection section, Ministry
of Agriculture of Egypt, the import restrictions indicated in B. E. P. Q. 375
are applicable to the following dried fruits as well as to the fresh fruits,
therefore the words “(fresh or dried)” should be added to the following items:

Fruits, stone, including apricot, cherry, peach, plum (p. 8).

Grapes (Vitis spp.) (p. 9).

Leguminous fruits and seeds (p. 9).

“Nuts, green, including almonds” should read “Nuts, including almonds (fresh
or dried).”

Correction: Item (b) of paragraph 1 of article 2 of law No. 1 of 1916 (p. 2
of Supplement No. 1, B. E. P. Q. 80), should read “kaki fruits or ons
mons (Diospyros kaki)” instead of “cactus fruits.”

Ler A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

B. E. P. Q. 381, revised.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, PRESIDENCY OF SAINT CHRISTOPHER
(ST. KITTS) AND NEVIS, BRITISH WEST INDIES

JANUARY 14, 1988.

This digest of the plant-quarantine import restrictions of the Presidency of
Saint Christopher and Nevis has been prepared for the information of nursery-
men, plant-quarantine officials, and others interested in the exportation of
plants and plant products to that Presidency.

It was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant-quarantine inspector, in charge of
foreign service information of the Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines, from
the original texts of ordinance No. 2 of May 11, 1923, and proclamation No. 12
of July 2, 1937, and reviewed by the agricultural superintendent of the said
Presidency.

The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct and com-
plete up to the time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used inde-
pendently of, nor as a substitute for, the original texts, and it is not to be
interpreted as legally authoritative.

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, PRESIDENCY OF SAINT CHRISTOPHER
(ST. KITTS) AND NEVIS, BRITISH WEST INDIES (INCLUDING THE ISLAND OF
ANGUILLA)

BASIC LEGISLATION
[Plant Protection Ordinance No. 2, May 11, 1923]

SEc. 5. (1) The Governor may from time to time, by proclamation, prohibit
the importation into the Presidency of any plants, parts of plants, seeds, fruits,
1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 5

soil, or any class of goods, packages, coverings, or other articles or things named
and specified in such proclamation.

(2) The Governor may from time to time, by proclamation, order that the
articles mentioned in the preceding paragraph shall not be imported into the
. Presidency except upon such conditions as may be specified in such procia-
mation.

(3) Every plant, articie, or thing named in any proclamation in force under
this ordinance coming into the Presidency or any part thereof by sea may
be deemed to have come from a place the introduction thereof from which
is prohibited by this ordinance and may be treated accordingly, unless the
importer satisfies the treasurer, or the principal treasury or revenue officer
at the port of arrival, of the contrary.

SUMMARY
IMPORTATION PROHIBITED
[Proclamation No. 12, July 2, 1937

(a) Banana fruit (J/usa spp.): Importation prohibited from all countries
and places except the United States of America and the other islands of the
Colony of the Leeward Islands, to prevent the introduction of insect pests of
the banana.

(®) Citrus fruits and plants or parts thereof: Importation prohibited from
Cuba, Haiti, Jamaica, Santo Domingo, and the United States, to prevent the
introduction of citrus canker (Bacterium citri (Hasse) Doidge) and insect
pests-

(c) All other fruits except plantains, nuts, dried, canned, candied, or other
preserved fruit: Importation prohibited from Bahamas, Bermuda, British
Guiana, Venezuela, and- other countries and places except the British Isies,
Canada, British West Indies, and the United States, to prevent the introduction
of the Mediterranean fruitfiy (Ceratitis capitata Wied.).

(d) Vegetables except onions, potatoes, canned or preserved vegetables from:
Bahamas, Bermuda, British Guiana, and all other countries and places except
the British Isles, Canada, British West Indies, and the United States, to prevent
the introduction of the Mediterranean fruitfly (Ceratitis capitata Wied.).

The importation is also prohibited of the products named in items (e) to
(i) from Cuba, Haiti, and Santo Domingo:

(e) Agricultural produce in bags.

(f) Cottonseed, cottonseed hulls, cottonseed cake, cottonseed meal, and other.
products of cottonseed, seed cotton, cotton lint, cotton plants and: any part
thereof, and other malyaceous plants and any part thereof.

(g) Fertilizers and stock feed containing cottonseed meal.

(h) Second-hand bags and baling material.

(i) Packages and containers which contain or are reasonably suspected
of having contained any of the articles specified in item (f/f).

(j) Pillows and bedding material containing seed cotton, cotton lint, or
any part of the cotton plant. f

(%) Personal baggage and effects of any description which contain or are
Pow suspected of having contained any of the articles specified in
item (f).

(lt) Articles that have formed part ef the cargo of a ship another part of
the cargo of which is infested or is reasonably suspected of being infested by
the cotton boll weevil (Anthonomus grandis Boh.) : Importation prohibited from
all countries and places.

(m) Personal baggage and effects of any description that have been in con-
tact with or close proximity to any other baggage, cargo, or articles of any
description infested or reasonably suspected of being infested by the cotton
boll weevil: Importation prohibited from all countries and places, to prevent
the introduction of the cotton boll weevil (Anthonomus grandis Boh.).

(x) Soil: Importation prohibited from Bahamas, British (fuiana, Trinidad,
and all other countries and places except the British Isles, Canada, the United
States of America, and other islands of the British West Indies not specified
in this item, to prevent the introduction of insect pests and plant diseases.

A IMPORTATION CONDITIONAL

(a) Sugareane, sugarcane seedlings and plants, and all parts of the sugar-
cane: May be imported from any country and place only under a license
6 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.—March

granted by the Governor. Precaution against the introduction of insect pests
and plant diseases that do not already exist on the island.

(ob) Banana plants and parts thereof: May be imported from any country
and place only under a license granted by the Governor, to prevent the intro-
duction of Panama wilt disease (Fusarium cubense E. F. Sm.) and insect pests.

(c) Cottonseed, cotton lint, and seed cotton, and all packages, coverings, bags,
and other articles and things that have been used as packages, coverings, or
bags for cottonseed, cotton lint, and seed cotton: May be imported from any
country and place except Cuba, Haiti, and Santo Domingo under license granted
by the Governor. Precaution against the introduction of insect pests not
already established on the island.

(ad) Sprouted coconuts: May be imported from Grenada, St. Lucia, St. Vin-
cent, and Trinidad under license granted by the Governor. Precaution against
the eee of the red ring disease (Aphelenchoides cocophilus (Cobb)
Goodey).

(e) Soil and plants growing in soil: May be imported from any country or
place only after fumigation and under license granted by the Governor, to
prevent the introduction of insect pests and plant diseases.

(7) Fruit except plantains, nuts, dried, canned, candied, or other preserved
fruits from the British Isles, Canada, British West Indies, and United States
of America: Must be accompanied by a certificate from a responsible authority
in the country of export that the fruit does not originate in a prohibited coun-
try. Precautions against the introduction of the Mediterranean fruitily (Cera-
titis capitata Wied.).

(g) Vegetables except onions, potatoes, and canned or preserved vegetables
from the British Isles, Canada, British West Indies, and the United States:
-Must be accompanied by a certificate from a responsible authority in the
country of export that the vegetables do not originate in a prohibited country.

B. E. P. Q. 391, revised.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, BRITISH GOLD COAST COLONY

FEBRUARY 19, 1938.

This digest of the plant-quarantine import restrictions of the Gold Coast
Colony has been prepared for the information of nurserymen, plant-quarantine
officials, and others interested in the exportation of plants and plant products to
that country.

The present revision of the original summary of March 19, 1936, became neces-
sary to embody the provisions of new legislation, namely, the Importation of
Plants Regulation Ordinance, No. 18 of March 28, 1986, and the Importation of
Plants Regulations, No. 25 of May 6, 1986. This digest has been reviewed by the
director of agriculture of the Gold Coast Colony.

The information herein contained is believed to be correct and complete up to
the time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used independently of, nor
as a substitute for, the original texts and it is not to be interpreted as legally
authoritative.

Lee A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, BRITISH GOLD COAST COLONY
(Applicable also to British Togoland)
BASIc LEGISLATION
[Importation of Plant Regulation Ordinance, No. 18 of March 28, 1936]

Section 1. This ordinance may be cited as the Importation of Plants Regula-
tion Ordinance, 1936, and shall apply to the Gold Coast.

Sec. 2. Definitions.

“Plant” includes everything in the nature of a plant, and the fruit, leaves,
cuttings, bark, or any part thereof whatsoever, living or dead, severed or at-
tached, but does not include seed, unless specifically mentioned, nor manufac-
1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 7

tured products of plants, nor anything.mentioned in this definition that has been
cooked.

“Pest” means any insect or other invertebrate animal that may be injurious to
agricultural or horticultural crops.

“Plant disease” means any disease caused by fungus, bacterium, virus, or other
organism that may be injurious to agricultural or horticultural crops.

Sec. 4. Empowers the governor in council to make regulations for:

(a) Prohibiting, restricting, or regulating the importation into the Gold Coast
of plants, seeds, soil, manure, containers, straw, and other packing material or
any other similar goods or things.

REGULATIONS
(No. 25 of May 6, 1936)

ARTICLE 1. These regulations may be cited as the Importation of Plants
Regulations, 1936.
PLANT INTERCHANGE SCHEDULE

ArT. 2. (1) In these regulations “The Plant Interchange Schedule” means a
list of West African countries in respect of which agreements have been made
with the Government of the Gold Coast concerning the making and enforcement
in such countries and the Gold Coast of regulations governing the interchange of
plants and seeds of plants.

AUTHORIZED PORTS OF ENTRY

Art. 8. No person shall import or cause to be imported into the Gold Coast any
plant or seed except by mail or through the following ports of entry: Accra,
Winneba, Cape Coast, Saltpond, Takoradi.

IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

Art. 4. The following plants, produce, and seeds shall not be imported into the
Gold Coast:

(a) All plants in soil 0: in any material of which sotl forms a part.

(b) All plants from Central America, South America, and Trinidad, and other
‘countries in which witches’-broom disease of cocoa (Mardasmius perniciosus) is
known to occur, which are specified by the Governor by a notice in the Gazette,
except plants required and imported by the Department of Agriculture for
scientific purposes.

(c) All coconuts in husk from Central America, South America, Trinidad and
Tobago, Grenada, and St. Vincent (West Indies).

(d) All coffee in cherry unless accompanied by a certificate of freedom from
mealy pod disease issued by the Government agricultural authority of the
country of export.

(e) All cottonseed except such as may be required and imported by the
Department of Agriculture for scientific purposes.

PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS SUBJECT TO EXAMINATION

ArT. 5. (1) Any plant or seed, except seeds, bulbs, tubers, or corms of vege-
tables or ornamental plants from temperate countries, or dry hulled rice, coffee,
or pulses (legumes) for consumption, and any accompanying container brought
to the Gold Coast by steamer, mail, or any other channel may, before being
delivered to the consignee or addressee, be examined by a customs officer to
determine whether the plant or seed appears to be one whose importation is
forbidden or subject to precautions in accordance with these regulations.

DISPOSAL OF INFECTED PLANTS

ArT. 5 (3) Any plant or seed found actually infected by any pest or plant
disease shall, together with all other articles in the same receptacle, and all
packing material, be destroyed by the inspector without delay, but if the in-
spector considers that such plants, seeds, etc., can be so treated as entirely to
eradicate the pest or plant disease he may cause such treatment to be applied
at the consignee’s expense.
8S BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan—March

PROVISIONS GOVERNING THE IMPORTATION OF PLANTS AND SEEDS

ArT. 6. Subject to the provisions of the regulations, the importation of plants
and seeds of plants shall be governed by the following provisions:

(a) Importations of plants and seeds of schedule JI, group A, namely, cocoa,
cotton, cassava, oil palms, and all species of Musa and of Citrus shall be per-
mitted from. countries included in the plant interchange schedule only under
permit signed by the director of agriculture first obtained, and in accordance
with any special conditions which may be stated in such permit.

IMPORT PERMIT REQUIRED

(6) Importations of plants and seeds of schedule I, group A, namely, cocoa,
cotton, cassava, oil palms, all species of Musa and Citrus and of schedule I,
group B, namely, coconut, cola, coffee (except hulled and dried berries for con-
sumption), ground nuts (peanuts), yams, rice (except hulled rice for consump-
tion), pulses (except dry shelled seeds for consumption), guinea corn (broom-
corn), millets, maize, and rubber, from countries other than those of the plant
interchange schedule, shall be permitted only under permit signed by the director
of agriculture first obtained and in accordance with any special conditions
stated in the permit.

Such permit shall be granted for plants of cocoa, cotton, cassava, oil palms,
and all species of J/usa and Citrus only when needed for special scientific pur-
poses and when the director of agriculture is satisfied that the plants will be
grown under the observation of a person with special knowledge of the pests
and diseases of plants and under such conditions as should preclude any“ possi-
bility of the introduction of any dangerous pest or plant disease.

(c) Importations of plants and seeds of plants of group B, schedule I shall
be permitted from countries included in the plant interchange schedule.

ArT. 7. Applications for permits shall be made in writing to the director of
agriculture in advance of the shipment in order that the conditions of entry may
be ascertained and, where necessary, transmitted to the shipper.

Arr. 8. Pertains to the form in which permits are issued.

PHYTOSANITARY CERTIFICATES MAY BE PRESCRIBED

ArT. 9. Health certificates required from Government agricultural authori-
ties to accompany imports by any permit issued under these regulations shall
so far as practicable be in the form set out hereafter, or in a form accepted
by the director of agriculture as being substantially to the like effect.

Model certificate

This is to certify that the living plants or plant products ~-______-=_ = ==
a representative sample of the living plants or plant products ineluded in the
consignment, of which particulars are given below were/was thoroughly exam-
Ined On, (wears eee Pes (date) by 22 9st = ar ae (namepes ts |.
Beis Met a , a duly authorized official of 2222+ = eee eee ante
found to be healthy, no evidence of the presence of any injurious insect, pest, or
disease (destructive to vegetation) (destructive to agricultural crops) having
been found in/on them and that the consignment (including the packing) covered
by this certificate has/has not been treated in.the following manner (fumigated
with (agent) or disinfected with (agent) prior/immediately subsequent to
inspection).
(Inspected in the field by a duly authorized inspector) ~~------=—-~_1--=_=_
(noteinspected) 2. 2: 2 Spee ea 8 Se to oe
On MGlabeyy Hs sear aie aie ee

Signature: 22. 2. See eee
Official title-.22. 3 =e

escription of Shipment

Number and description of :packageS.._- = = =.
Distinguishing marks.._-'-.
Description of living plants or plant products or parts thereof________________
Stated to be grown at_-__-- eee re ee ee ee
Exported by. 2- ee 2 ee ee ee
Name and address of consigne@:.2--+—. = 4) ee EEE =
1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 9

Pe eteenar aaTiiciiars Of routes...
em eee 20. 1p PA) YY yee ed eet ee a a ed
IER ee A a
nnn imetne (6 jeattached (2.2 3 22!) teeta

(Give here details of any special certificate or certificates issued in respect
of imports specifically scheduled by the importing country.)

Note.—Strike out the alternative words that are not applicable.

B. E. P. Q. 403, Supplement No. 2.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF FRANCE

Marcu 8, 1938.

IMPORTATION OF SEEDS OF CONIFERS NOT PROHIBITED

According to the order of the direction-general of customs, No. 2505 2/2, of
April 23, 1936, the Minister of Agriculture, in response to an inquiry concerning
the applicability of the provisions of the decree of November 26, 1930 (p. 12,
B. E. P. Q. 403) to seeds of conifers, decided that aithough the expression
“parts of plants” of itself includes seeds, the seeds of the conifers in question
remain exempt from phytosanitary inspection on importation, if the shipment
is clean and the seeds have been sifted in such a manner that no foreign matter,
particularly needles of conifers, are contained therein.

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine,

B. E. P. Q. 421, Supplement No. 1.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, KINGDOM OF BULGARIA
Marcu 8, 1938.
IMPORTATION OF CITRUS FRUITS PLACED UNDER CONTROL

Article 4 of the decree of September 29, 1932 (B. E. P. Q. 421, p. 4) has been
supplemented by decree No. 40 (Derzhaven Vestnik No. 232, October 20, 1937) by
the addition of the following paragraph:

“All shipments containing oranges (Citrus aurantium=C. sinensis), mandarins
(C. nobilis=C. nobilis var. deliciosa), lemons (C. medica var. limonum=C.
limonia), grapefruit (C. decumana=—C. paradisi), bananas (Musa spp.), dates
(Phoenix dactylifera), carobs or St. John’s-bread (Ceratonia siliqua), pome-
granates (Punica granatum) and other southern fruits, are permitted entry
when the importer presents a certificate of health and of origin and when
all the requirements of the reguiation have been complied with.”

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

B. E. P. Q. 426, Supplement No. 3.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF ARGENTINA

JANUARY 18, 1938.
PASO DE Los LizResS AN ADDITIONAL PorT OF ENTRY

Decree No. 116897 of October 20, 1937, designates Paso de los Libres as an
additional port of entry for the introduction of plants in general, subject to the
provisions of decree No. 83732 of June 3, 1936, with the exception of sugarcane
(art. 35, p. 10, B. E. P. Q. 426), cottonseed (art. 41, p. 13), potatoes (art, 59,
p. 22), and grapevines (art. 60, p. 23).

Fresh fruits may enter that port only in transit to the Federal capital, Buenos
Aires, where they will be entered at the Federico Lacroze station subject to the
regulations governing the importation of those products (see art. 37, p. 12).

71071—38 2


10 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.—March

PoTATOES MADE SUBJECT 10 MERCHANDISE MARKING AcT

Decree No. 116277 of October 9, 1987, effective January 1, 1938, places imported
and domestic seed and consumption potatoes under the provisions of the Argen-
tine Merchandise Marking Act (law No. 11275) and promulgates the following
regulations governing the marking of potato containers.

POTATO CONTAINERS MUST MEET REQUIREMENTS OF LAW NO. 11275

ARTICLE 1. From January 1, 19388, all containers of potatoes must meet the
requirements established by law No. 11275, the Merchandise Marking Act, its
regulatory decrees of November 18, 1932, and November 26, 1935, respectively,
and the provisions established by the present decree.

MARKING OF CONTAINERS

ArT. 2. Potato containers must show whether potatoes for consumption or seed
potatoes are concerned, the net weight of their contents, and bear the legend
“Industria Argentina’ (Argentine Industry) when they are domestic products,
or the name of the country of origin if imported.

ArT. 3. The containers of domestic potatoes, whether for consumption or as
certified seed potatoes, must indicate the locality where grown, and the latter
must also bear the name of the variety of the potatoes; with respect to imported
seed potatoes, the indication of the place where grown will be substituted by
the name of the variety to which the potatoes belong. ;

NET WEIGHT REQUIRED

ArT. 4. The net weight of both domestic and imported potatoes must be
marked on the containers in kilograms, a tolerance up to 2 percent being allowed
between the weight marked on the containers and that due to the natural
shrinkage of the product en route.

METHOD OF MARKING

Art. 5. All the legends and marks referred to in the preceding articles must
be stamped, printed, or impressed clearly and legibly on the principal side of the
container, namely, that bearing the name or mark of the grower or seller.

SIZE OF MARKS

Art. 6. The following scale of minimal heights is established to which the
letters in the following expressions must conform: “Papa para consumo”
(potatoes for consumption), ‘‘Semilla certificada de papa” (certified seed pota-
toes), and ‘“‘Peso neto”’ (net weight) ; 4 em for boxes and 6 em for bags; “Zona
de produccion” (place where grown), and “Variedad” (variety) ; 3 em for boxes.
and 5 em for bags: “Industria Argentina’ (Argentine Industry), and “Pais de
origen” (country of origin) ; 2 cm for boxes and 4 cm for bags. The numerals
indicating the quantity placed after ‘Peso neto” shall in no case be smaller than
the letters of the words “Peso neto.”

SIZE OF CONTAINERS FOR DOMESTIC POTATOES

Art. 7. Domestic potatoes, whether for consumption or planting, shall be packed.
in bags of 60 kilos net or in boxes of 50 kilos net; the latter shall have a partition
in the middle.

Art. 8. Imported certified seed potatoes will circulate in Argentina in the
containers in which they were imported.

PROHIBITED MARKS

Art. 9. The use is prohibited on containers of potatoes for consumption of any
label, ticket, or inscription employing the words “semilla” (seed), “certificada”’
(certified), “seleccionada”’ (selected), “hija de certificada” (products of certified
material), “hija de importada”’ (products of imported material), or any other
indication, whether or not derived from the above, that might lead to confusion
as to the true condition or nature of the product.
1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 11

CORRECTION

The word “or” should be inserted between the words “net weight (metric),”
and “number of units” in line 6 of the second paragraph under the caption
“Packing of Fruit” on page 11 of B. E. P. Q. 426. Line 6 will then read:
“contents, class, variety, net weight (metric) or number of units, name and.”

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

B. E. P. Q. 428, Supplement No. 1.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, BRITISH COLONY OF CEYLON

JANUARY 14, 1938.
A regulation of February 27, 1937 (Ceylon Government Gazette, March 12,
1937), withdraws the item “ginger” from article 4, paragraph (a) of the general
regulations (see p. 3 of B. E. P. Q. 428). Consequently, the word “ginger” should
be stricken from the said paragraph and also from the item “Living plants,
trees, roots, bulbs or portions thereof” under the caption ‘Importation Restricted”
in the summary on page 1 of B. E. P. Q. 428.
| LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

B. E. P. Q. 439, Supplement No. 1.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, KINGDOM OF SWEDEN

AveustT 18, 1937.

Through the courtesy of the Central Institute for Agricultural Research -of
Sweden it is possible to make the following modifications in the text of circular
B. E. P. Q. 489, necessitated chiefly by the lack of the original texts involved.

1. The words “Great Britain, Greece, and Portugal” in the first item of the
summary, page 4 of B. E. P. Q. 439, are to be stricken out, because the provision
in question no longer applies to those countries.

2. The following note applying to the “Restrictions on the Importation of
Seeds,” page 13 of B. E. P. Q. 439, should be added as a footnote:

“As a generally applicable rule it may be stated that a license from the
Kungl. Lantbrukstyrelsen (Royal Department of Agriculture) is required for
the importation of all seeds, except seeds of ornamental plants.”

3. The item 90 F and 90 H of article 1, proclamation of March 18, 1921,
under the caption “Import Permits Required,’ on page 14 of B. E. P. Q. 439,
should be corrected to read:

“90 F Rye grasses (Lolium perenne and L. multiflorum) ;
90 H Turnips, carrots, swedes, and beets.”

Item 90 I has been revoked and should be stricken out.
Lee A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

B. E. P. Q. 444, Supplement No. 2.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, FRENCH ZONE OF MOROCCO

JANUARY 31, 1938.

RESTRICTIONS ON THE IMPORTATION OF SEED PoTATOES

[Vizirial decree of September 25, 1935, promulgated October 1, 1935, as amended by that
of May 27, 1936]

PACKAGES TO BE SECURELY FASTENED AND SEALED

ARTICLE 1. The importation into the French Zone of Morocco of seed potatoes
for sale or transfer is prohibited unless the tubers are contained in a package
Ly BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.—March

that is completely closed by a sealed locking device and provided with a tag
indicating in full:

1. The name and address of the seller.

2. The name of the variety of potatoes contained in the package.

3. A statement of the purity of the variety based on 100 tubers; the grading
may not be less than 98 percent. The indication “selected” may be placed after
the varietal name if the potatoes are accompanied by a certificate issued by a
control station that supervised the growing crop.

4, The minimum weight of the tubers, which may not fall below 35 g.

5. The words “calibrated seed” or “seeds not calibrated” as the case may be.
For so-called calibrated seed petatoes the variation in the weight of the tubers
may not exceed 15 percent, and none of them may weigh less than 35 g

6. The country of origin, with the name of the municipality and department
where France is concerned and the name of the locality when other countries
are concerned.

The above data must be repeated on all papers that concern the sale.

ArT. 2. Forbids erroneous statements concerning the condition, origin, variety,
and degree of purity of potatoes.

CATALOG NAME OF POTATO VARIETY TO BE USED

ArT. 3. The variety of seed potatoes is to be designated by the name under
which they are borne in the catalog issued by the French Department of Agri-
culture or the central station of agronomic research. Each newly produced
variety must be entered in one or both those catalogs before it can enter into
traffic.

GHNERAL IMPORT REGULATIONS REMAIN APPLICABLE

ArT. 4. The foregoing regulations are without prejudice to those of the Dahir
of September 20, 1927.
Lee A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

B. BH. P. Q. 444, Supplement No. 3.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, FRENCH ZONE OF MOROCCO

Marcu 8, 1938.
IMPORTATION AND TRANSIT UNRESTRICTED

The list of plant products named in the decree of the director general of
February 19, 1931 (see p. 14, B. HE. P. Q. 444), has been supplemented by the
decree of May 5, 1937.

The following items are added to the paragraphs correspondingly numbered
on pages 15 and 16 of B. HE. P. Q. 444:

1. Sorghum (Sorghum vulgare Pers.). Broomeorn millet (Panicum miliaceum

2. Chickpea or garbanzo (Cicer arietinum L.).

3. Cacao bean (Theobroma cacao L.)

5. Refuse (droppings) of roses (the flowers).

The following new paragraphs are added:

11. Sesame seeds (Sesamum indicum L.), and black cummin (Nigella sativa
L.). Pistachio seeds (Pistachio vera L.), seeds of stone pine (Pinus pinea L.),
shelled chestnuts (Castanea sativa Mill.), and shelled peanuts (Arachis
hypogaca I..).

12. Plants and parts of plants, dried, so-called sterilized by heat or chemicals.

Paragraph 9 is amended to read as follows:

9. Industrially dried fruits and vegetables; flours, food pastes, brans, oil
cakes, straw, and hay; excepting, however, rice straw, and such dried fruits
as dried plums, figs, grapes, apricots, apples, pears, and peaches.

Ler A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.
1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 13

B. E. P. Q. 445, Supplement No. 1.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, CENTRAL AMERICA (SALVADOR)

JANUARY 29, 1938.

PERMIT REQUIRED TO IMPORT RAW OR GINNED COTTON

Legislative decree No. 208, published in the Diario Oficial of December 1, 1937,
prohibits the importation of raw or ginned cotton into Salvador except under
permit from the Ministry of Finance.

Permits for the importation of cotton will be issued only in the event that
supplies of Salvadorean cotton are not available.

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine,



B. E. P. Q. 445; Supplement No. 2.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, CENTRAL AMERICA
(BRITISH HONDURAS)
Marcu 9, 1938.

IMPORTATION OF CITRUS PLANTS AND FRUITS PROHIBITED

Proclamation No. 5, January 14, 1938, prohibits the importation into the colony,
directly or indirectly, of any citrus fruit, seed, cutting, or plant, to prevent
introduction of citrus canker (Bacterium citri (Hasse) Doidge).

The proclamation of March 11, 19536, which restricted the importation of citrus
plants (see pp. 2 and 3 of B. E. P. Q. 445) was revoked by proclamation No. 5.

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Piant Quarantine.

B. E. P. Q. 447, Supplement No. 3.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, KINGDOM OF YUGOSLAVIA

Marcu 8, 1938.

LIST OF COUNTRIES INFECTED OR INFESTED BY THE POTATO WART, COLORADO POTATO
BEETLE, POTATO TUBER WORM, AND SAN JOSE SCALE

Under date of February 21, 1938, the Royal Yugoslav legation in Washington
transmitted a list, applicable for the year 1958, recently promulgated by the Yugo-
slay Ministry of Agriculture, of countries regarded as being infected or infested
by potato wart (Synchytrium endobioticum), Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa
decemlineata), potato tuber worm (Gnorimoschema operculella), and San Jose
scale (Aspidiotus perniciosus).

The list for 1938 adds the following names of countries to the list for 1937.
(See B. E. P. Q. 447, p. 4):

Under “Colorado potato beetle’ Netherlands and Switzerland are added.

Under ‘Potato tuber worm” Sicily is added.

Correction in Supplement No. 2 to B..E. P. Q. 447:

Line 1 of paragraph 1, prohibiting the importation of seedlings of Douglas fir,
should read:

“The Order of the Minister of Agriculture of Yugoslavia.”

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

B. E. P. Q. 449, Supplement No. 1.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, PERSIA

JANUARY 29, 1938.
IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

According to the Nachrichtenblatt fiir den Deutschen Pflanzenschutzdienst
18: 1, January 1938, the following plant products are named in a list of products
14 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.—March

whose importation into Persia is prohibited during the administrative year
1316-1317 (June 22, 1937, to June 22, 19388) :

Castor beans as seeds (ficinus sp.), grass seeds, sarcocolla seeds (Penaeca
fucata L.), quinee seeds (Cydonia sp.), fodder, hay, alfalfa (fresh or dried),
straw, potted flowers;

Seeds of all kinds;

Plant food material, fruits, vegetables, and dried fruits.

LreE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

B. E. P. Q. 465, Supplement No. 1.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, FRENCH COLONIES (OCEANIA)

FEBRUARY 19, 1938.

The order of the Governor, dated August 31, 1984, effective December 1,
1934, prohibits the importation into French Oceania of fresh cabbage and
cauliflower, in order to prevent the introduction of the common green cabbage
worm (Ascia rapae L.) into that Colony. Any shipment of those products
arriving in French Oceania will be destroyed.

[Superseding the Memorandum of November 26, 1934, to Inspectors in Charge]

IMPORTATION PROHIBITED INTO THE FRENCH SETTLEMENTS OF OCEANIA OF PLANTS,
PARTS OF PLANTS, SEEDLINGS, SEEDS, FRUITS, AND PLANT PRODUCTS GENERALLY,
FROM CERTAIN COUNTRIES

ARTICLE 1 of a recent order, No. 1233, prchibits the importation of plants,
parts of plants, seedlings, seeds, fruits, and plant products in general, as well
as their containers, proceeding from Samoa (eastern and western), the Tonga
Archipelago, the Bismarck Archipelago, New Guinea, the Philippine Islands,
Taiwan, Cuba, Haiti, San Domingo, and Puerto Rico, as a precaution against
the introduction of coleopterous parasites of the coconut palm especially
Oryctes monoceros Ol. (rhinoceros beetle).

IMPORTATION OF CRUDE FIBERS PROHIBITED

ArT, 2. This prohibition applies also to copra and crude (raw) fibers, but
not to parts of plants that have been subjected to any manufacturing process
unless they are moist or rotten.

IMPORTATION OF SAND, SOIL, AND FERTILIZERS PROHIBITED

ArT. 8. The importation of sand, soil, and fertilizers from the same sources,
whether alone or accompanying other products, is also prohibited.

RESTRICTIONS ON THE LANDING OF OTHER PRODUCTS

ArT. 5. Preseribes that general cargo, other than soils and plant products,
laden at ports of the above-named countries, may not be unladen until an
official certificate of the country of origin, affirming that the articles, packages,
and materials constituting the cargo to be unladen were fumigated with hydro-
cyanic acid gas for 1 hour immediately before the departure of the vessel, the
dosage being a minimum of 50 grams of potassium cyanide per cubic meter
of space, is presented to an inspector. Such articles shall not be landed until
they have been inspected by an inspector, who may forbid the landing of such
articles, or if permission be granted, only on condition of fumigation after
unlading. No customs official shall permit the landing of such articles except
on the instructions of an inspector.

Personal effects, baggage, ete., also shall be inspected and, if deemed neces-
sary, fumigated.

The following data should be inserted in B. EH. P. Q. 465 as page 4 a:

GUADELOUPE AND DEPENDENCIES

Banana plants (Musa spp.) : See order of December 7, 1926, as amended by
that of February 9, 1935, p. 25.
1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 15

Cocoa plants (Theobroma cacao lL.): See order of December 3, 1925, as
amended by that of February 13, 1932, p. 26.

Cotton (Gossypium spp.), plants or parts thereof in the dry or green state,
ginned or unginned cotton, cottonseed, soil or compost, packing or containers,
and seeds, plants, ete., capable of harboring the pink bollworm, especially
Hibiscus cannabinus, H. esculentus, and Bauhinia: See order of February 22,
1926, p. 32.

Coffee plants (Coffea spp.), berries or seeds: See order of May 19, 1924, to
prevent the introduction of coffee rust (Hemileia vastatrir B. and Br.), p. 20.

Coffee plants (Coffea spp.), and parts thereof, dry or fresh beans, beans in
parchment, hulled beans (fresh or unroasted), soil and composts, containers, and
plants capable of harboring the coffee-berry borer (Stephanoderes hampei Hag.),
especially Hibiscus and Rubus: See order of February 27, 1922, p. 28.

Sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum L.): See order of December 3, 1929, p. 34.

Correction: Page 5, under the item “Cotton,” the date of the order should be
February 22, 1926.

Insert in “Contents” page after ‘Equatorial Africa” the item
eawureremenareteee eee es Av ae AS sh heal sae hots 4 9.”

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

B. E. P. Q. 467.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, AUSTRALIAN TERRITORY OF PAPUA

JANUARY 14, 1938.

This summary of the plant-quarantine import restrictions of the Australian
Territory of Papua has been prepared for the information of nurserymen, plant-
quarantine officials, and others interested in the exportation of plants and plant
products to that Territory. j

It was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant quarantine inspector in charge of
foreign information service, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines, from the
Plants’ Diseases Ordinance 1911, as amended, the Cotton Ordinance 1925, and
proclamations and regulations promulgated thereunder, and reviewed by the
director of agriculture of Papua.

The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct and com-
plete up to the time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used inde-
pendently of, nor as a substitute for, the original texts, and it is not to be
interpreted as legally authoritative.

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, AUSTRALIAN TERRITORY OF PAPUA
Basic LEGISLATION

[Plants’ Diseases Ordinance, No. 28, November 20, 1911. Plants’ Diseases Ordinance, No.
17, November 25, 1913. Cotton Ordinance, No. 11, September 8, 1925]

SUMMARY
IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

Coffee seed (Coffea spp.) : Importation prohibited, except when obtained by
or through the director of Agriculture. (Statutory Rules, No. 10, May 8, 1929,
Dp. T4

Tobacco seed (Nicotiana tabacum L.): Importation prohibited, except when
obtained by or through the director of agriculture. (Statutory Rule No. 4 of
April 9, 1934.)

Bananas, banana plants (Musa spp.) or parts thereof: Importation prohibited.
(Proclamation of May 23, 1927, p. 8.)

Living palms, ornamentals, and fruit trees and any living part thereof except
the seeds: Importation from. the Malay Archipelago prohibited. (Proclamation
of February 8, 1932.)
16 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan—March

IMPORTATION RESTRICTED

Plants, including trees or plants, cuttings, slips, and all live parts of trees or
plants the entry of which is not prohibited: Importer shall notify customs of
intent to import; on arrival of the plants they shall be placed at disposal of
customs for fumigation. (Statutory Rules, No. 4, February 28, 1923, p. 6.)

Cottonseed (Gossypiwm spp.) : Importer shall notify customs of intent to
import; he shall also furnish to customs a certificate from responsible officer
of the Department of Agriculture of Queensland that the cottonseed has been
examined and fumigated by said Department, or that it has been examined and
is found free from disease. (Statutory Rules, No. 4, February 28, 1923, p. 6.)

Sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum L.): Importer shall notify customs of
intent to import and shall produce to the director of agriculture the following
certificates: (1) Fumigation certificate from Queensland Department of Agri-
culture; (2) certificate from properly qualified pathologist that the sugarcane
proceeds from a disease-free area and is itself free from disease; (8) certificate
from properly qualified entomologist that the sugarcane is free from injurious
insects. (Statutory Rules, No. 11, July 21, 1930, p. 7.)

LEGISLATIVE AUTHORITY

Plants’ Diseases Ordinance of 1911, as amended by ordinance No. 17, of
November 26, 1918, authorizes the Lieutenant Governor of the Territory by
proclamation, inter alia, to prohibit or restrict the importation of plants; to
seize and dispose of every insect, fungus, tree, plant, or vegetable imported into
the Territory contrary to the provisions of this ordinance or proclamations or
regulations issued thereunder; to inspect imported trees, plants, or vegetables;
to make regulations to control the importation of trees, plants, or vegetables.

The Cotton Ordinance, No. 11, September 8, 1925, authorizes the Lieutenant
Governor to regulate, prohibit, or restrict the importation into the Territory of
the cotton plant or any variety thereof.

DEFINITIONS

The following definitions are included in ordinance No. 28, of November 20,
1911:

“Disease’: Any disease affecting trees, plants, or vegetables caused by or
consisting of the presence of any insect or fungus, as well as any other disease
affecting trees, plants, or vegetables which the Lieutenant Governor may from
time to time, by proclamation in the Gazette, declare to be a disease within the
meaning of this ordinance and whether or not so caused by or consisting of the
presence of any disease or fungus.

“Insects” and “fungi” are those so declared by proclamation of the Lieutenant
Governor in the Gazette within the meaning of this ordinance in whatever stage
of existence they may be.

DECLARED DISEASES, INSECTS, AND FUNGI

Through the proclamation of January 26, 1912, the Lieutenant Governor de-
clared the following to be diseases, insects, and fungi within the meaning of
ordinance No. 28, of November 20, 1911, namely:

DISEASES

Coconuts (Cocos nucifera L.):
Leaf disease (Pestalozezia palmarum Cke.).
Root disease (Fomes sp.).
(Stem) bleeding disease (Thielaviopsis paradoxa (De Seyn.) v. Hoch.).
Bud rot (Phytophthora spp.) or (Pestalozzia palmarum Cke.).
Rubber (Hevea spp.) :
White root rot (Fomes lignosus Klotzsch).

- Sugareane (Saccharum officinarum Iu.) :

Leaf disease.
Red rust (Puccinia kuehnii (Kr.) Butl.).
1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 17

INSECTS

Coconuts:
Solomon Island stag beetle (Hurytrachelus pilosipes Waterh.).
Solomon Island elephant beetle (Xylotrupes ninurod Voet.=X. gideon L.).
Solomon Island rhinoceres beetle (Trichogomphus semmelinki Rits.).
Ceylon rhinoceros beetle (Oryctes rhinoceros L.).
Red beetle or Asiatic palm weevil (Rhynchophorus ferrugineus Oliv.).
Cane beetle (Sphenophorus obscurus=Rhabdocnemis obscura Boisd.).
Small palm weevil ((Calandra) Diocalandra taitensis Guerin).
Cabbage-palm beetie or leaf hispa (Brontispa froggatti Sharp).
Copra bug (Necrobia rufipes Degeer).
Longicorns (a) Xicuthrus costatus Montrouz.
Longicorns (b) Olethrius tyrannus Thoms.
Phasma or leaf insect (Graeffea crouanii (Le Guillou) syn. Lopaphus

coccophagus Westwood).
Coccids (Coccidae).
Stinkbugs (Pentatomidae).
Rubber:

White ants (Termes spp.).

Sugarcane:
Cane beetle ({Sphenophorus) Rhabdocnemis obscura Boisd.).
Leafhoppers (Perkinsiella bicoloris Muir., P. lalokensis Muir., P. papuensis

Muir., P. rattlei Muir., P. variegata Muir., and P. vastatriz Breddin).

FUNGI

Coconut :
Pestalozzia palmarum Cke., leaf disease and bud rot of coconut.
Pythium palmivorum Butler, Godavari disease of coconut.
Rubber:
Fomes (semitosa) lignosus Klotzsch, root rot.

GENERAL REGULATIONS
[Statutory Rules, Nc. 4 of 1923, February 28, 1923]

CITATION

ARTICLE 1. These regulations may be cited as the Plants’ (Importation)
Regulations, 1923.
DEFINITIONS

ArT. 2. In these regulations, unless the context otherwise indicates:

“Importer” includes the person who introduces any plant or the consignee
of any plant.

“Plants” means trees or plants and includes cuttings and slips of trees and
plants and all live parts of plants and trees.

ArT. 3. Revokes previous regulations.

DUTIES OF IMPORTER

Arr. 4. (1) The importer or intending importer of any plants shall, before
the plants are introduced or landed in the Territory, notify the principal
officer of customs at a port of entry of the fact that such plants are intended
to be introduced into the Territory by him.

(2) The importer shall thereafter cause the plants and the boxes, bags, and
wrappings in which they are contained to be placed in the tent provided for
the purpose of fumigation, or to such other structure as the principal officer
of customs may direct and in such manner as such officer shall approve.

FUMIGATION OF PLANTS REQUIRED

ArT. 5. Such plants, together with boxes, bags, and wrappings in which they
are contained, shall then be fumigated by the method provided by the director

71071—38 3


18 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan—March

of agriculture, under the supervision of the principal officer of customs or such
officer as he may appoint, before the same are removed.

PLANTS MAY NOT BE REMOVED BEFORE FUMIGATION

ArT. 6. No person shall remove the plants, boxes, bags, or wrappings in which ©
they are contained from the tent or structure in which they have been so placed
for the purpose of fumigation, until after they have been fumigated, as provided
by these regulations.

RESTRICTIONS ON THE IMPORTATION OF COTTONSEED

ArT. 7. No cottonseed shall be imported or introduced into the Territory
unless:

(1) The importer or intending importer shall, before the cottonseed is intro-
duced or landed in the Territory, notify the principal officer of customs at a
port of entry of the fact that such cottonseed is intended to be introduced into
the Territory by him.

(2) The importer or intending importer furnishes such principal officer of
customs with a certificate from some responsible officer of the Department of
Agriculture of the State of Queensland:

(a) That the cottonseed has been examined and fumigated by expert officers
of the department of agriculture concerned, or

(bo) That the cottonseed has been examined by expert officers of the depart-
ment of agriculture concerned and that it is free from disease.

Provided, that in cases where cottonseed is imported by and consigned to the
Government, the director of agriculture, on being satisfied in such manner as
seems to him sufficient that the cottonseed has been properly fumigated in
Queensland before shipment, or that it is free from disease, may, in writing,
authorize the principal officer of customs to permit the landing and delivery of
the cottonseed without requiring the production of any such certificate.

RESTRICTIONS ON IMPORTATION OF COFFEE SEED

ArT. Ta. No coffee seed shall be imported or introduced into the Territory
except when obtained by or through the director of agriculture. Any coffee seed
imported or introduced in breach of this regulation may be seized and destroyed
by any officer of customs. (Amendment through Statutory Rules No. 10, May
8, 1929.)

RESTRICTIONS ON IMPORTATION OF SUGARCANE

ArT. 7b. No sugareane shall be imported or introduced into the Territory
unless:

(1) The importer or intending importer shall, before the sugarcane is intro-
duced or landed in the Territory, notify the principal officer of customs at a port
of entry of the fact that such sugarcane is intended to be introduced into the
Territory by him; and

(2) The importer or intending importer furnishes the director of agriculture
with the following certificates:

(a) A certificate from a responsible officer of the Department of Agriculture
of the State of Queensland that the sugarcane has been properly fumigated under
the personal supervision of a person properly qualified to carry out such fum'ga-
tion ; and

(6) A certificate from a properly qualified plant pathologist that the sugarcane
is, to the best of his knowledge and belief, from a disease-free area and free
from diseases; and

(c) A certificate from a properly qualified entomologist that the sugarcane is
free from injurious insects.

(3) The director of agriculture is satisfied with the certificates so furnished,
whereupon the said director of agriculture may authorize the said principal
officer of customs by wireless or in writing to permit the introduction into the
Territory of the said sugarcane without observing the other conditions of these
regulations. (Amendment through Statutory Rules No. 11, July 21, 1930.)

RESTRICTIONS ON IMPORTATION OF TOBACCO SEED

Art. Tc. No tobacco seed shall be imported or introduced into the Territory,
except when obtained by or through the director of agriculture. Tobacco seed
1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 19

imported in breach of this regulation may be seized and destroyed by any officer
of customs. (Amendment through Statutory Rule No. 4 of 1934.)

IMPORTATION OF BANANAS PROHIBITED
[Proclamation of May 23, 1927]

In this proclamation, the lieutenant governor, by and with the advice of the
executive council, prohibits the importation or introduction of any banana,
banana plant (Musa spp.) or part thereof into the Territory.

B. E. P. Q. 468.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, KINGDOM OF IRAQ

JANUARY 20, 1938.

This digest of the plant-quarantine import restrictions of the Kingdom of
Iraq has been prepared for the information of nurserymen, plant-quarantine
officials, and others interested in the exportation of plants and plant products
to that country.

It was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant quarantine inspector in charge of
foreign information service, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines, from his
translations of the Importation of Plants Law of January 7, 1925, and customs
law No. 56, May 7, 1931, and reviewed by the director of agriculture, Depart-
ment of Agricultural Affairs, Baghdad, Iraq.

The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct and com-
plete up to the time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used inde-
pendently of, nor as a substitute for, the original texts, and it is not to be
interpreted as legally authoritative.

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, KINGDOM OF IRAQ

BAsiIc LEGISLATION
[Importation of plants law, January 7, 1925. Customs code law, No. 56, of May 7, 1931]

Through the customs code law No. 56, of May 7, 1931, the King of Iraq
decrees (ch. III, art. 18) that provisions may at any time be promulgated
whereby, for the public safety or for sanitary or moral reasons, or as preventive
measures against animal and plant diseases, the importation, exportation, or
transit of certain kinds of merchandise into or from Iraq, or to a particular
country or place outside the boundaries of Iraq, are restricted or prohibited.

SUMMARY
IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

Hemp seeds and plants (Cannabis sativa L.). (Customs tariff law No. 11,
ADI ZY, 1935, art. 11, p.' 5.)

Injurious insect pests and diseases. (Appendix to importation of plants
law of January 7, 1925, p. 3.)

IMPORTATION RESTRICTED

Citrus fruits and stocks, grapes, and grapevines: Must be accompanied by a
phytosanitary certificate of the competent authority of the country of origin.
(Customs tariff law No. 11, April 29, 1933, art. 5, p. 5.)

Plants with woody stems, parts thereof, also bulbs, corms, rhizomes, and
tubers, except potatoes; cottonseed and seed cotton: Subject to inspection on
arrival, but inspection may be waived if they are accompanied by a phyto-
sanitary certificate issued. by competent authority of the exporting country.
(Arts. 3, 4, and 5, importation of plants law of January 7, 1925, p. 2.
20 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan—March

Plants for scientific purposes: Unrestricted except that an import permit
must be obtained from the director of agricuiture. (Art. 12, importation of
plants law of January 7, 1925, p. 3.)

EXPORTATION PROHIBITED

Palm tree shoots: Exportation from Iraq prohibited. (Law No. 1, February’
tf. 1935," pr 762) ; ;

GENERAL REGULATIONS
(Importation of Plants Law of January 7, 1925)
ARTICLE 1. This law may be cited as “The Importation of Plants Law, 1924.”
DEFINITION

Art. 2. “Plant” means all plants with woody stems and all parts thereof,
such as stocks, nursery plants, scions, layers, and cuttings thereof; cottonseed
and seed cotton; bulbs, corms, rhizomes, and tubers, except potatoes.

INSPECTION ON ARRIVAL

Arr, 3. All plants imported into Iraq by mail or otherwise will be held for
inspection by a Government inspector, as prescribed in article 5.

INFECTED PLANTS DISINFECTED OR DESTROYED

Art. 4. Should it be found that plants are attacked by any of the diseases
named in the appendix hereto, or should a portion of the plants concerned be
so attacked, the Government inspector may order their disinfection or de-
struction.

INSPECTION MAY BE WAIVED IF PLANTS ACCOMPANIED BY CERTIFICATES

Art. 5. The Government inspector may, in his discretion, pass without inspec-
tion any plants or consignments of plants which are accompanied by a certifi-
‘eate of a competent branch of the agricultural institute of the exporting coun-
try, affirming that they are free from the diseases named in the appendix.

Art. 6. All expenses involved in inspection, detention, disinfection, or de-
struction of plants shall be borne ky the importer.

ART. 7. Provides for the inspection of plants for export.

ArT. 8. Relates to fees for inspection, ete.

ArT. 9. Provides for the promulgation or modification of administrative
decrees.

Art. 10. The Minister of the Interior may order the destruction by burning
of all plants in which epidemic diseases are found.

ArT. 11. Relates to violations and penalties.

IMPORTATION OF PLANTS FOR SCIENTIFIC PURPOSES NOT RESTRICTED

ArT. 12. No provision of this law is applicabie to plants imported for scien-
tific research on the basis of a separate (special) permit of the director of
agriculture. In this permit it will be expressly stated the plants shall not be
inspected.

APPENDIX

Inspect pests:
Anthonomus grandis Boh., boll weevil.
(Aspidiotus) Chrysomphalus curantii Mask., California red scale.
Aspidiotus perniciosus Comst., San Jose scale.
Ceratitis capitata Wied., Mediterranean fruitfly.
Chionaspis furfura Fitch, seurfy scale.
Conotrachelus nenuphar Hbst., plum curculio.
1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 21

(Cosmophila) Anomis erosa Hbn., okra, mallow, or cotton leaf cater-
pillar or cotton semilooper.
Craponius inaequalis Say, grape curculio.
Drosophila melanogaster Mg.
Farias fabia Stoll., cotton bollworm.
(Euproctis chrysorrhoea) =Nygmia phaeorrhoea Don., brown-tail moth.
(Gelechia) Pectinophora gossypiella Saund., pink bollworm.
Heliothis obsoleta Fab., bollworm, corn ear worm.
Icerya purchasi Mask., cottony-cushion scale.
Lepidosaphes ulmi L., oystershell scale.
(Leucania) Cirphis unipuncta Haw., armyworm.
Malacosoma americana Fab., eastern tent caterpillar.
(Mayetiola) Phytophaga destructor Say, hessian fly.
Phyllozera (vastatrir) vitifoliae Fitch, grape phylloxera.
Polychrosis viteana Clem.. grape berry moth.
Porthetria dispar L., gypsy moth.
Psyllia mali Schmid., apple sucker.
(Schizoneura) Eriosoma lanigerum Hausm., woolly apple aphid.
Sylepta derogata Fab.
Aphids, scale insects, and mites in general.
Fungous diseases:

Those caused by any species of the following genera:
Erysiphe, powdery mildew.
Hroascus, leaf curls.
Gloeosporium, anthracnoses.
Guignardia, black rots.
Nectria (ditissima) galligena Bres., European canker of apple.
Peronospora, downy miidews.
Plasmopora, downy mildews.
Plowrightia, black knot.
Puccinia, rusts.
Tilletia, smuts.
Ustilago, smuts.
Venturia, including apple and pear scab.

ADDITIONAL IMPORT RESTRICTIONS AND PROHIBITIONS

(Customs tariff law No. 11 of April 29, 1933, abstracted)

IMPORTATION OF CITRUS FRUITS AND STOCKS RESTRICTED

ArT. 5. The importation is prohibited of citrus fruits and stocks, such as
lemons, pomelos, grapefruit, and other citrus fruits, as well as grapes, grapevine
leaves, and stocks, unless those products are accompanied by a certificate of the
competent authorities of the country of origin, affirming that the said products
had been inspected and found free from disease. This prohibition does not
apply to such fruits if preserved, candied, or dried, or to their juice.

IMPORTATION OF HEMP PROHIBITED

ArT. 11. The importation of hemp seeds and plants (Cannabis sativa L.)
is prohibited.

INSPECTION ON ARRIVAL

ArT. 19. The importation of “plants,” namely, plants with woody stems,
and parts thereof, such as stems, stocks, scions, layers, and cuttings; also
seed cotton and cottonseed, flower bulbs, corms, rhizomes, and tubers other
than potatoes, is subject to inspection by agricultural ‘authorities on entry.
If a contagious disease is found, the infected product will be disinfected or
destroyed. They can be cleared through the customs only on presentation of
a “no objection” certificate issued by the agricultural authority.

Plants may be imported for scientific purposes under a permit from the Divi-
sion of Agriculture, regardless of the ‘above restrictions; cottonseed may be
imported only in accordance with the provisions of the cotton law, No. 26 of
1927.
22 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.—March

EXPORTATION OF PALM TREE SHOOTS PROHIBITED
(Law No. 1, February 11, 1935)

ARTICLE 1. The exportation of palm tree shoots from Iraq shall be prohibited.
ArT. 2. Penalty for violation.

B. E. P. Q. 469, Superseding P. Q. C. A. 289.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, KINGDOM OF ITALY

FEBRUARY 5, 1938.

This revised digest of the plant-quarantine import restrictions of the Kingdom
of Italy was rendered necessary by the abrogation of older legislation and its
supersession by more recent enactments. It was prepared for the information
of nurserymen, plant-quarantine officiais, and others interested in the exporta-
tion of plants and plant products to that country, by Harry B. Shaw, plant quar-
antine inspector in charge foreign information service, Division of Foreign Plant
Quarantines, from the original texts of the various Italian laws and decrees
concerned, and reviewed by the Italian Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry.

The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct up to the
time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used independently of, nor as a
substitute for, the original texts, and it is not to be interpreted as legally au-
thoritative. The said laws and decrees should be consulted for the exact texts.

LrEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, KINGDOM OF ITALY
Basic LEGISLATION

[Law No. 987 of June 18, 1931, as amended by decree law No. 913, June 23, 1932, and
decree law No. 1580 of June 12, 1936. International Phylloxera Convention of Berne,
November 3, 1881, and provisions adopted by the Italian Government]

[ Powers under law No. 987 of June 18, 19381]

Arr. 8. The Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry (Ministero dell’Agricoltura
e delle foreste), with the advice of the Ministry of Corporations (Ministero delle
corporazioni), can by decree:

(a) Suspend the importation into, and transit through, the Kingdom of plants,
parts of plants, and seeds found to be infected.

(0) Establish frontier stations and ports through which the importation and
transit of plants, parts of plants, and plant products may take place.

(c) Promulgate rules and regulations to be observed for the importation of
the products referred to in the preceding paragraph.

ArT. 9. Delegates of the Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry assigned for
supervisory service at frontier stations and ports, according to the rules pro-
mulgated by the said Ministry, have the following functions:

(a) To impose the disinfection or destruction of plants, parts of plants, and
seeds regarded as infected, as well as of materials, packing, containers, and such
other articles as may Serve as vehicles of infection.

(6) To prohibit the introduction into the Kingdom, and transit through it, of
plants and seeds found infested or bearing pathogenic organisms or parasites.

The provisions of law No. 987 of June 18, 1931. as amended, are administered
under regulations promulgated under decree law No. 913 of June 23, 1932, and
law No. 19383 of December 22, 1932.

SUMMARY
IMPORTATION AND TRANSIT PROHIBITED FROM ALL COUNTRIES

Almonds in the shell (Amygdalus communis L.). (Decree of March 3, 1927,
AUT pean (U) saOee be)

Banana plants and fruits (Musa spp.). (Decree of March 3, 1927, art. 8 (gq),
D0)
1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 23

Cactus plants and fruits (Cactaceae). (Ministerial order of December 20,
1982, p. 11.)

Citrus fruits and parts thereof, including fresh peel. (Decree of March 3,
1927, art. 8 (d), p. 6.) (See items 3 and 4 of derogations from the decree of
March 3, 1927, for exceptions; p. 8.)

Coniferous plants and parts of plants, including the genera Abies, Picea, Pinus,
Pseudotsuga, and Tsuga. (Ministerial order of December 20, 1932, p. 11.)

Elm plants and parts thereof (Ulmus spp.), except the seeds. (Ministerial
decree of March 29, 19383, p. 12.)

Fermente® grape marc, olive husks (Olea europaea L.) for the extraction of
oil, mulberry leaves (Morus spp.). (International Phylloxera Convention of
Berne, November 3, 1881.)

Palm and laurel leaves, fresh. (Decree of March 3, 1927, art. 8 (j), p. 7.)

Pineapple plants and fruits (Ananus sativus Schuit.). (Decree of March 8,
1927 art; 8 (kh), p. 7.)

Potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.), including tubers and green parts; tomatoes
(Lycopersicum esculentum Mill.) and other Solanaceae, including fruits and green
parts. (Decree of March 3, 1927, art. 8 (e), p. 6.) (For exceptions see deroga-
tions from the decree of March 8, 1927, p. 8.)

Vegetable manures and composts. (International Phylloxera Convention of
Berne and provisions adopted by the Italian Government.)

IMPORTATION AND TRANSIT PROHIBITED FROM CANADA, FRANCE, SPAIN, AND THE UNITED
STATES

Grapevines (Vitis spp.), European and American, including scions and cut-
tings. (Decree of March 8, 1927, art. 8 (a), p. 6.) Used props and supports for

9

grapevines. (International Phylloxera Convention of Berne, November 3, 1881.)
IMPORTATION AND TRANSIT PROHIBITED FROM AFRICA

Corn (Zea mays L.), stalks and ears. (Decree of March 3, 1927, art. 8 (f),
Dz; l.)

IMPORTATION AND TRANSIT PROHIBITED FROM ARGENTINA, AUSTRALIA, BRAZIL, CANADA,
CHILE, CHINA, HAWAII, INDIA, JAPAN, MEXICO, SOUTH AFRICA, AND THE UNITED

STATES

Fruit-bearing plants, parts thereof, and fresh fruits of any kind. (Decree of
Maren S, 1927, art. 8 (c), p. 6.)

IMPORTATION AND TRANSPORTATION PROHIBITED FROM NORTH AND SOUTH AMERICA,
CHINA, AND THE ORIENT IN GENERAL

Chestnut (Castanea spp.), including trees, fruits, seeds, bark, branches, and
trunks with bark. (Decree cf March 3, 1927, art. 8 (bd), p. 6.) : Importation and
transit prohibited also from countries that have not taken precautionary measures
against chestnut-bark disease.

IMPORTATION RESTRICTED

Live plants, parts of plants, seeds, and other products intended for ecultiva-
tion or propagation, not specifically mentioned in the prohibitions, and proceed-
ing from permitted countries of origin: Importation subject to compliance with
the effective provisions of the law of June 18, 1931, articles 8 and 9, and the
decree of March 3, 1927, articles 1, 2, 3, 4, 9, 10, 11, and 12.

_Seeds of forage-crop plants (legumes and grasses): Importation subject to
inspection for dodder (Cuscuta spp.). (Decree of March 3, 1927, article 7, p. 5.)
The port of Ancona also is authorized for the importation of such seeds. The
port of Messina also is opened for the entry of vegetable seeds. (Circular No.
44609, December 21, 1932.)

IMPORTATION UNRESTRICTED
Plant products intended for food and industrial purposes, not included among

those indicated in article 8 of the decree of March 3, 1927, may be admitted
through any customs port of entry.
24 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.—March

RESTRICTIONS ON THE IMPCRTATION GF PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS

[Ministerial decree of March 3, 1927 (Gazetta Ufficiale No. 73, March 29, 1927), as
amended by that of July 18, 1928 (Gaz. Uff. No. 191, August 17, 1928) ]

AUTHORIZED PORTS OF ENTRY

ARTICLE 1. The importation of living plants, parts of plants, seeds, and other
plant products, from foreign countries, intended for breeding and propagation,
may be effected through the following customs ports of entry: Bring@isi, Cagliari,
Catania, Fiume, Genoa, Liverne, Milan, Naples, Palermo, Rome, Syracuse,
Taranto, Trieste, Turin, Udine, Venice, Ventimiglia, and Verona.

The entry of forage-crop and grass seeds is authorized also through the port.
of Ancona and the entry of vegetable seeds also through the port of Messina.

ArT. 2. Packages containing the said plants must be refused entry when pre-
sented at other customs offices. However, such packages may be reshipped to
the nearest customs office among those above named, when the interested person
requests the customs authorities to do so and offers to pay the cost of
reshipment.

If the railroad station of destinatien is situated between the frontier station
and the place where one of the offices named in article 1 is located, or if it is
situated on a railroad diverging from the normal itinerary which the shipment
should follow to reach the customs office authorized for importation, the frontier
customs office at which the shipment was presented is authorized, at the request
of the interested person, to hold the shipment, fully informing the competent _
regional pathological laboratory. The latter will carry out the prescribed
Inspection in the manner and place deemed most convenient, at the expense of
the interested person.

INSPECTION REQUIRED

ArT. 8. Shipments of the plant material referred to in article 1 are admitted
for importation after inspection by a phytepathologist designated by the Minis-
try of National Economy at the authorized customs office, in accordance with
the provisions of articles 8 and 9 of law No. 987 of June 18, 1981.

Arr. 4. When a shipment is admitted for importation, the precautionary
measures prescribed by article 9 of law No. 987 of June 18, 1931, and article 23
of the regulations under that law are to be applied by the designated phyto-
pathologist at the expense of the interested person.

Arts. 5 and 6. Revoked by the decree of July 18, 1928.

FORAGE-PLANT SEEDS MUST BE FREE FROM DODDER

ArT. 7. Seeds of forage-crep plants are admitted for importation when the
absence of any species of Cuscuta has been ascertained. That is accomplished
by the phytopathological inspector, or by an authorized seed control laboratory
from samples withdrawn by that inspector.

IMPORTATION AND TRANSIT PROHIBITED

Art. 8. The importation and transit of the following plants and parts thereof
are suspended :

(a) European and American grapevine (Vitis spp.) stocks and cuttings from
Canada, France, Spain, and the United States, on account of the black rot,
Guignardia bidwellii (Hll.) Viala and Ravaz, the regulations against phylloxera
remaining effective. (International Phylloxera Convention of Berne.)

(b) Chestnut trees (Castanea spp.), including the fruits, seeds, bark, branches
and trunks with bark, from North America, South America, China, and the
Orient in general, as well as from any country which has not taken precautionary
measures against the chestnut bark disease, Endothia parasitica (Murr.) Ander.
and Ander.

(c) Fruit-bearing plants, parts thereof, and fresh fruits of all kinds from
Argentina. Australia, Brazil, Canada, Chile, China, Hawaii, India, Japan, Mexico,
Union of South Africa, and the United States, on account of the San Jose
seale, Aspidiotus perniciosus Comst.; the oriental fruit moth (Laspeyresia),
Grapholitha molesta Busck; foreign fruitflies; and the fungus Diaporthe
perniciosa Marchal.
1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 25

(d) Citrus piants, parts thereof, fresh citrus fruits and peel (cortex) of
such fruits, from all foreign countries, on account of Glover's scale, Lepidosaphes
gloveri Pack.; the citrus whitefly (Aleyrodes) Dialeurodes citri Ashm.; citrus
canker, Bacterium citri Hasse; the pink disease, Corticium salmonicolor B. &
Br.; Sphaeropsis tumifaciens Hedges; and lime withertip, Gloecosporium limetti-
colum R. F. Clausen.

(e) Potato tubers, fruit, and green parts of every species of the Solanaceae
(tomatoes (Lycopersicum spp.), eggplants (Solanum melongena L.), peppexys
(Capsicum spp.)) from all foreign countries, on account of the potato wart
disease (Synchytrium endobioticum (Schiib.) Pere.); potato tuber worm
(Phthorimaea) Gnorimoschema operculella Zell.) ; the Colorado potato beetle
(Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say) ; and the potato fiea beetle (Hpitrig cucumeris
Harr.).

(f) Stems and ears of corn (Zea mays) from every country in Africa, on
account of the maize stalk borer (Sesamia calamistis Hmps.).

(g) Banana plants and fruits (J/usa spp.), on account of Comstock’s mealybug
(Pseudococcus comstocki Kuwana); the Argentine ant (Jridomyrmez humilis
Mayr); black rot of sugarcane (Thielaviopsis paradoxa (De Sey.) V. Hoch.) ;
and the Panama wilt disease (Fusarium cubense BE. F. Sm.).

(h) Pineapple plants and fruits (Ananas sativus Schult), on account of the
danger of introducing with them injurious foreign scale insects, as well as black
rot of sugarcane (Thielaviopsis paradoxa (De Sey) V. Hoch.); and the
Panama wilt disease (Fusarium cubense E. F. Sm.).

(i) Almonds (Amygdalus communis L.) in the shell, on account of Hurytoma
amygdali End. of the almond, and shot hole and fruit spot of Prunus, Ascochyta
chlorospora Speg.

(j) Fresh palm and laurel leaves, on account of the danger of introducing
injurious foreign scale insects not at present existing in Italy.

REGULATIONS APPLICABLE TO PLANT MATERIAL INTRODUCED BY TRAVELERS

ArT. 9. The provisions of the preceding articles apply also to plants, parts
of plants, and seeds intended for breeding, and to other plant products brought
in by travelers from foreign countries.

ArT. 10. The unlading on free points, from vessels arriving in ports of the
Kingdom, of plants, parts of plants, and plant products the importation and
transit of which is suspended, is prohibited.

Art. 11. The preceding provisions are not applicable to importations made by
the Ministry of National Economy.

IMPORTATION UNRESTRICTED OF PLANT PRODUCTS INTENDED FOR FOOD AND INDUSTRIAL
PURPOSES

ArT. 12. Plant products intended for food and for industrial purposes, not
included among those indicated in article 8, are admitted for importation through
any customs port of entry, the provisions of article 9 of law 9S7 of June 18, 1931,
remaining effective. (See p. 5.)

ArT. 13. This decree becomes effective May 1, 1927, and revokes those of
February 21, 1921, and August 4, 1921.

DEROGATIONS FRoM THD DECREE OF MARrcH 38, 1927
POTATOES

1. Order No. 45012, October 18, 1927, provides for the transit solely through
the port of Trieste and further shipment by sea of potatees proceeding by land
from Czechoslovakia, Poland, and Yugoslavia.

2. Order No. 7910, February 27, 1925, provides for the transit of potatoes from
Malta through the territory of Italy.

CITRUS FRUITS
3. Orders No. 5046, January 26, 1928, and No. 44903, October 18, 1927, provide

that the transit of citrus fruits proceeding by sea from Palestine or the Aegean
Islands may be effected only through the ports of Trieste and Fiume,
26 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.—March

4. Order No. 35166, July 18, 1928, provides for the transit of citrus fruits
originating in other sources than Palestine and the Aegean Islands, solely through
the ports of Genoa and Trieste.

PHYLLOXERA RESTRICTIONS

Packages containing plants and plant products whose importation is authorized,
are admitted to entry into the Kingdom on condition that they are free from
animal or plant parasites and that they contain neither fragments nor leaves of
the grapevine.

SHIPPER’S DECLARATION AND PHYLLOXERA CERTIFICATE REQUIRED

If such packages proceed from foreign countries that have not adhered to the
International Phylloxera Convention of Berne, they must be accompanied by a
shipper’s declaration and an attestation by competent authority. The first
shall (a) declare that the contents of the shipment proceed exclusively from his
establishment; (0) indicate the place of destination and the address of the
consignee; (c) affirm that no grapevine stocks are included in the shipment;
(ad) indicate whether the shipment contains plants with particles of soil; (e)
bear the signature of the shipper.

The attestation of the authority of the country of origin shall be issued on
the declaration of an official expert designated for research and supervision of
phylloxera and shall bear the following data: (@) That the plants proceed
from ground at least 20 meters distant from any grapevine stock or other -
obstacle, deemed by the said authority to be sufficient, to the propagation
(spread) of the roots; (0) that the said ground contains no grapevine stocks;
(c) that no such plants are stored there; (d) that if phylloxerated grapevines
had been found there, their radical extirpation had been effected, by an insecti-
cide, or other means, during a period of 3 years, with appropriate research to
insure the complete destruction of insects and roots. The above attestation. (for
countries that adhere to the Phylloxera Convention) is not necessary with
respect to shipments of plants proceeding from an establishment registered in the
list of establishments officially declared in accordance with the provisions of the
International Convention of Berne.

The expenses involved in the inspecticn and storage are charged against the
interested persons.

PotTATo RESTRICTIONS:

The ministerial decree of March 3, 1927, article 8 (e), prohibiting the impor-
tation of potatoes from any source, remains effective, but by derogation from
that decree, the importation of seed potatoes is permitted under prescribed
conditions promulgated annually by ministerial decree.

That decree will prescribe the period of the year concerned during which seed
potatoes may be imported, the variety and quantity, and the conditions under
which they may be imported.

IMPORT PERMIT REQUIRED

An import permit must first be obtained from the Ministry of Agriculture and
Forestry.
FREEDOM OF ORIGIN FROM POTATO PARASITES

The seed potatoes to be imported must originate in localities free from the
following parasites: Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say (Colorado potato beetle),
Synchytrium endobioticum (Schilb.) Pere. (potato wart), Gnorimoschema oper-
culella Zell. (potato tuber worm), Heterodera rostochiensis (potato nematode
(eelworm) ), and Epitrix cucumeris Harr. (potato flea beetle).

The potatoes must be taken from fields under the technical supervision of a
Government institution of the exporting country, especially with reference to
so-called virus diseases.

PHYTOSANITARY CERTIFICATE REQUIRED

The sacks in which the potatoes are shipped must be sealed by the plant-
protection authorities of the country of origin and be accompanied by a phyto-
1938] SERVICH AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS aT

sanitary certificate indicating origin and affirming that the fields in which the
potatoes were grown are free from the above-named parasites; that within a
radius of 200 km of the place where the potatoes were grown the Colorado potato
beetle has not been found, and that the presence of the other parasites has not
been determined within a radius of 2 km; that the potatoes are shipped in new
containers; that each container was personally sealed by the inspector with the
official seal of the plant-inspection service; and that the potatoes are free from
earth. It must also be certified that the plants from which the potatoes were
harvested showed no visible symptoms of virus diseases.

AUTHORIZED PORTS OF ENTRY

The authorized ports of entry for seed potatoes during the prescribed period
are Bari, Brindisi, Cagliari, Catania, Chiasso, Domodossola, Fortezza (K:ausen),
Genoa, Modane, Naples, Trieste, and Udine.

IMPORTATION AND TRANSIT OF CACTUS PLANTS AND FRUITS PROHIBITED
[Ministerial order of December 20, 1932; Gazzetta Ufficiale No. 37, February 14, 1933]

The importation into, and transit through, Italy are prohibited of cactus
plants and fruits proceeding from any country, on account of the danger of
introducing insects, fungi, or bacteria that are injurious to the pricklypear
(Opuntia ficus-indica).

IMPORTATION OF PLANTS oF ABIES, PICEA, PINUS, PSEUDOTSUGA, AND TSUGA
PROHIBITED

[Ministerial order of December 20, 1932; Gazzetta Ufficiale No. 37, February 14, 1933]

The importation into Italy of plants, and parts thereof, of conifers of the
genera Abies, Picea, Pinus, Pseudotsuga, and Tsuga is prohibited.

The importation of plants, and parts thereof, belonging to other species of
conifers is permitted on condition that they are accompanied by a certificate,
issued by the plant-protection service of the country of origin, in Italian or
French, affirming that the plants or parts of plants included in the shipment
are free from injurious pests and diseases and especially from Rhabdocline
pseudotsugae.

The same certificate must also indicate the origin of the products and the
species of the products included in the shipment, as well as data necessary for
the identification of the shipment.

IMPORTATION AND TRANSIT OF ELMS PROHIBITED
[Ministerial decree of March 29, 1933; Gazzetta Ufficiale No. 104, May 4, 1933]

The importation into, and transit through, Italy from all foreign countries
of plants and parts of plants of the genus Ulmus, except the seed, are prohibited
on account of the danger of introducing foreign scale insects (Coccidae) which
are very injurious to Italian fruit culture.

B. es Q. 470, Superseding the Memorandum to Inspectors in Charge, dated August 22,
1934.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS OF JAPAN

FEBRUARY 5, 1938.

This digest of the plant-quarantine import restrictions of Japan has been
prepared for the information of nurserymen, plant quarantine officials, and
others interested in the exportation of plants and plant products to that
country.

It was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant quarantine inspector in charge,
foreign information service, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines, from the
Japanese regulations promulgated by ordnance No. 27 of October 13, 1914, as
amended, under the authority of law No. 11 of March 25, 1914, and reviewed
by the director of the Imperial Plant Quarantine Service, Yokohama.

The information included in this circular is believed to be correct and com-
plete up to the time of preparation, but is not intended to be used inde-
28 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.—March

pendently of, nor as a substitute for, the original texts, and it is not to be inter-
preted as legally authoritative. The original ordnance should be consulted
for the exact texts.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS OF JAPAN
Basic LEGISLATION
[Plant Quarantine Law No. 11, of March 25, 1914]

This law prescribes the inspection of plants and packing materials thereof
offered for export from or importation into Japan, but provides for the omission
of inspection in certain cases. Plant diseases and injurious insects may be im-
ported only with the permission of the respective Minister of State.

The iaw also provides for the disposal of plants infested by injurious insects
or infected by plant diseases, and for the restriction or prohibition of entry of
certain plants or any other article.

DEFINITION

Article 10 of the law defines ‘plant diseases and injurious insects” as fungi
and insects, respectively, that are injurious to plants. However, plants or
animals which are not fungi or insects may be considered as plant diseases
or injurious insects insofar as the application of this law is concerned, if the
Minister of State in charge of such affairs has reason to believe that they
are actually injurious to plants or are suspected of being so.

GENERAL REGULATIONS UNDER THE PLANT QUARANTINE LAW

[Department ordinance No. 27 of October 13, 1914, as amended by ordinance No. 24 of
June 1919; No. 21 of October 1933: No. 23 of August 1934; No. 28 of October 1936,
and No. 14 of May 1937]

PLANTS THAT ARE TO BE INSPECTED IN JAPAN

ARTICLE 1. Plants whose inspection is required in accordance with the pro-
Vision of article 1 of the plant quarantine law shall be of the following classes:

1. Plants to be imported from a foreign country or to be transported from
other parts of the Japanese Empire into Japan proper, under the following
categories.

(a) Plants or any of their parts, seeds, and bulbs for planting or cultivation 3

(6) Fresh fruits except those of pineapple (Ananas sativus L.), apples origi-
nating in Chosen (Korea), and the fruits of plants belonging to the families:
Musaceae, Solanaceae, Leguminosae, Fagaceae, and Cucurbitaceae (except
watermelons, Citrullus vulgaris, melons and muskmelons, Cucumis melo) ;

(c) Living potato tubers (Solanum tuberosum L.) ;

(d@) Plant or plant material that is permitted by the Minister of Agriculture
to be imported, which otherwise is prohibited ;

(e) Any plant or plant material besides those mentioned in (a) to (d),
that is suspected by plant inspection officials of being infested by plant diseases
or injurious insects.

2. Plants to be exported, the importation of which the government of the
importing country requires inspection certificates issued by the exporting
country.

Art. 2. (a) Any person importing plants mentioned in paragraph 1 (@) to (c)
of article 1 from a foreign country, or transporting the same from other parts
of the Japanese Empire into Japan proper. shall, without delay, upon the
arrival of the vessel carrying same on board, make application in writing to
the customhouse on the prescribed form No. 1.

If the plants are being carried by a passenger, the person concerned may
make a verbal application to the plant inspection officials or to the customs
officials in the absence of the former.

IMPORTATION PROHIBITED OF CERTAIN PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS

Art. 2. (b) The importation or transportation of the following plants and
plant materials are prohibited into Japan proper. However, exeeptions are
1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 29

made when the Minister of Agriculture permits importation for experimental
or research purposes:

(1) Fresh fruits originating in or landed in Africa, Argentina, Australia,
New Zealand, Bermuda, Brazil, Cyprus, France, Greece, Hawaii, Italy, Malta,
Palestine, Portugal, Spain, Syria, Turkey, and the West Indies to prevent the
introduction of the Mediterranean fruitfly (Ceratitis capitata Wied.).

(2) Fresh cucumbers, watermelons, pumpkins, and other cucurbitaceous
plants, tomatoes, beans, catjan peas (Vigna catjan Walp.), and cowpeas (Vigna
sinensis Endl.) originating in, or landed in Borneo, Celebes, Ceylon, China,
Taiwan, Hawaii, Hongkong, India (British), Indochina (French), Java, Malay
Peninsula, New Guinea, Philippines, Siam, Sumatra, and other Malayan islands
(except Formosan watermelons accompanied by a certificate of inspection
issued by the Government of Taiwan, which are accepted after inspection on
arrival), to prevent the introduction of the melon fly (Chaetodacus cucur-
bitae Coq.).

(3) Fresh apples, pears, quinces, peaches, plums, apricots, and cherries, as
well as walnuts (except without shells), originating in or landed in Africa,
Argentina, Australia, New Zealand, Brazil, Canada, China, Cyprus, Europe,
Honk Kong, India (British), Mesopotamia (Iraq), Persia (Iran), United States,
Uruguay, and Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (Asiatic portion), to prevent
the introduction of the codling moth ((Grapholitha) Carpocapsa pomonella L.).

(4) Fresh citrus fruits, mangoes, loquats, plums, peaches, persimmons
{Diospyros kaki) ; rose apple or malabar plum (Hugenia jambos) ; large fruited
rose apple or Malay apple (Hugenia malaccensis) ; guavas, peppers (Capsicum
spp.) ; Solanum verbascifolium Link., Nephelium longana Camb., N. litchi Camb.=
Litchi chinensis Sonn.; and Carambtola (Averrhoa carambola L.), originating in
or landed in Borneo, Celebes, Ceylon, China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, India (British),
Java, Malay (Federated States), Philippines, South Sea Islands, Straits Settle-
ments, as well as Sumatra and the other Malayan islands (except Formosan
citrus fruits). to prevent the introduction of Chaetodacus dorsalis Hendel.

(5) Live sweetpotato tubers originating in or landed in Africa, Borneo, Celebes, -
Ceylon, China, Taiwan (south of the Yang-Tse-Kiang), Guiana, Hong Kong, India
(British), Indo-China (French), Java, Malay Peninsula, Oceania, Philippines,
Siam, South Sea Islands, Sumatra end other Malayan islands, the United States,
and the West Indies to prevent the introduction of the sweetpotato weevil (Cylas
formicarius Fab.) and the sweetpotato vine borer (Omphisa anastomosalis
Guen. ).

(6) Sugarcane and parts thereof, including seeds, to prevent the introduction
of the downy mildew of sugarcane (Sclerospora sacchari T. Mayake), the
Hawaiian sugarcane borer (Rhabdocnemis obscurus Boisd.), and the sugareane
borer (Diatraea saccharalis Fab.).

(7) Potatoes, eggplants, tomatoes, peppers (Capsicum annuum L.), and other
solanaceous plants, as well as parts, fresh fruits, and tubers thereof, originating
in or landed in Africa, America (North and South), Australia, New Zealand,
Cyprus, Europe, Guam, Hawaii, India (British), and Java, to prevent the intro-
duction of the potato wart disease (Synchytrium endobioticum Percival), the
powdery scab (Spongospora subterranea Lang), the potato tuber worm ( (Phthori-
maea) Gnorimoschema operculelia Zell.), and the Colorado potato beetle (Lepti-
notarsa decemlineata Say).

(8) Plants with soil adhering, to prevent, infection by ecryptogams and infesta-
tion by insects injurious to plants.

(9) Straw from wheat, barley, oats, and rye, with the exception of artificial
products other than straw for packing, bedding, and other articles of the same
class originating in or landed in Asia Minor, Canada, Europe, New Zealand,
Persia, the United States, and Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (Asiatie por-
tion) to prevent the introduction of the hession fly. (Piylophaga destructor
Say).

(10) Fresh fruits of apple and other species of Malus and Crataegus originat-
ing in China, the leased Territory of Kwantung and Manchuria, or landed in
that country or Territories (except fresh fruits of apple originating in the
leased Territory of Kwantung and Manchuria, accompanied by a certificate of
disinfection issued by the Government of the leased Territory of Kwantung,
which are accepted on inspection of the plants on arrival), to prevent infestation
by Grapholitha inopinata Heinrich.

: (11) Containers and materials used for packing the articles listed under Nos.

to 10.
30 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan—March:

CONDITIONS UNDER WHICH PLANT DISEASES AND INJURIOUS INSECTS MAY BB
IMPORTED

ART. 7. Any person importing plant diseases or injurious insects from a foreign
country, or transporting same from other parts of the Japanese Empire into
Japan proper, shall be required to make an application for inspection, in writing,
to the customhouse, in accordance with the prescribed form No. 4, without delay,
after the arrival of the vessel carrying such articles on board.

ArT. 8. The plant-inspection officials may proceed to make the inspection previ-
ous to the application required in article 2 or in the preceding article.

Art. 10. Importation from a foreign country, and transportation from other
parts of the Japanese Empire into Japan proper of plants, or any other article
whose inspection is required, by mail, except by parcel post or small packet, is
prohibited.

Art. 10 (06). Any person receiving mail matter contrary to the provision of
the preceding paragraph, is required to deliver such mail matter without delay
to the customhouse together with the required written application form.

INSPECTION OF CERTIFIED PLANTS MAY BE WAIVED

Art. 14.7 Any person importing plants from a foreign country or transporting
same from other parts of the Japanese Empire into Japan proper, which are
certified by the authorities at their source of exportation or transportation, to
the effect that such plants are not infected by plant diseases or infested by
injurious insects, shall report the fact to the customhouse. In this case the
provisions of article 2 shall apply.

Plants certified as mentioned in the preceding paragraph may be exempted
from the inspection required with their importation from a foreign country, or
transportation from other parts of the Japanese Empire into Japan proper.

B. H. P. Q. 471, superseding P. Q. C. A. 297.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, UNION OF SOUTH AFRICA

FEBRUARY 5, 1988.

This digest of the rules and regulations promulgated under the Agricultural
Pests Act of 1911, and subsequent amendments thereof, has been prepared for
the information of nurserymen, plant-quarantine officials, and others interested
in the exportation of plants and plant products to South Africa.

The digest was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant-quarantine inspector in
charge of foreign information service, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines,
from the original texts and reviewed by the chief inspector, plant regulatory
service, Department of Agriculture and Forestry of the Union of South Africa.

The information presented in this circular is believed to be correct and com-
plete up to the time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used independ-
ently of, nor as a substitute for, the original texts, and it. is not to be inter-
preted as legally authoritative. The proclamations and Government notices.
themselves should be consulted for the exact texts.

Lee A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, UNION OF SOUTH AFRICA
BAsic LEGISLATION
[Agricultural Pests Act (Act No. 11 of 1911 as amended]
DEFINITIONS

Src. 2. In this act and the regulations made thereunder, unless inconsistent:
with the context:

“Insect pest” shall mean any insect or other invertebrate animal that is.
injurious to plants.

“1Jn other words, the fact that a shipment is accompanied by an inspection eertificate
does not exempt it from the requirement of art. 2, namely, that the importer apply to the
customhouse for inspection. Then, according to par. 2 of art. 14, inspection may be
waived,
1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 31

“Plant” shall mean any tree, shrub, or vegetation, and the fruit, leaves,
cuttings, or bark thereof, and shall include any live portion of a plant, whether
severed or attached, and any dead portion or any product of a plant which by
proclamation under this act or any amendment thereof has been included in
this definition, but shall not include any seed unless the seed has been specially
mentioned in this act or has been included in the definition of plant by
proclamation under this act.

“Plant disease” shall mean any bacterial or fungous or other disease that is
injurious to plants.

“Hxotic animal’ shall mean any animal (other than man) and any bird,
reptile, insect, or other member of the animal kingdom, including the eggs
thereof, that is not indigenous or native to South Africa. Species of the
following classes are included in this definition: Amphibia, Arachnida, Aves,
Crustacea, Insecta, Mammalia, Mollusca, Myriapoda, Nematoda, and Reptilia.

AUTHORIZED PORTS OF ENTRY

Section 8 of the act, as supplemented by proclamation No. 283 of 1936, pre-
seribes that no person shall introduce or cause to be introduced from oversea into
the Union any plant otherwise than by mail or through the authorized customs
ports of entry: Cape Town, Durban, East London, Johannesburg, Nelspruit, Port
Elizabeth, and Pretoria. Fruits, potatoes, and onions may enter also through
Mossel Bay, Port Nolloth, and Simonstown.

RESTRICTIONS ON IMPORTATION OF PLANTS

Section 9 prohibits the introduction of certain plants, subjects other plants to
restrictions, and requires an import permit from the Department of Agriculture
and Forestry for all plants except fruits, most seeds, bulbs, tubers, and vegetables.

PROVISION FOR INSPECTION OF IMPORTED PLANTS

Section 10 provides for the inspection of all plants offered for entry into the
Union and their subsequent disposal.

TREATMENT OF INFECTED PLANTS

Sections 11 and 12 provide for the disinfection, cleansing, or destruction of
infected plants when deemed necessary, and the issuance, upon request, of
certificates for shipments that have complied with the provisions of the act and
the regulations.

POWER OF GOVERNOR GENERAL TO EXTEND APPLICATION OF CERTAIN PROVISIONS OF ACT

Section 14 empowers the Governor General, by proclamation in the Gazette:

(a) To include in the definition of plant, the seed of any plant or any dead
portion or product of a plant.

(b) To vary, by addition or withdrawal, the list of plants the introduction
whereof into the Union is under section 9 prohibited, supervised, or restricted.

(c) To prohibit or restrict the introduction into the Union from anywhere,
or from any specified country or place, of any plant, insect, or germ of any plant
disease.

Section 21 prohibits the importation from oversea of live bees, honey, and
apiary appliances, and empowers the Governor General to apply the provisions to
other African territories. Live bees may be imported by the Government.

Section 22 enables the Governor General, by proclamation, to prohibit or
restrict the importation from anywhere or from any specified country or place
of any particular class of exotic animals.

Section 28 empowers the Governor General to make regulations not incon-
sistent with the act prescribing:

(a) The manner and place in which any registration, inspection, disinfecting,
cleansing, or destruction authorized under this act shall be carried out.

(b) The conditions and restrictions governing the importation and keeping of
plants, bees, articles, exotic animals, and anything whatsoever dealt with under
this act.
32 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.—March

SUMMARY

Applicable to countries oversea, and to Portuguese Hast Africa, mandated
territory of South-West Africa, or any State or Territory in Africa north of the
Zambesi, except Northern Rhodesia, Nyasaland, or in the case of plants other
‘than maize and barley, the Belgian Congo.

IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

Acacia spp., wattle trees but not the seeds (Act No. 11 of 1911).

Alfalfa or lucerne (Medicago sativa L.) hay, fresh or dried, to prevent the
introduction of clover canker, crown gall, or crown wart (Urophlyctis alfalfue
(v. Lagerh.) Magn. (Proclamation No. 151 of 1937.)

Arctium spp., burdock, seeds, and flowering seed heads. (Proclamation No.
ASIVO 193K.)

Broomcorn (Sorghum vulgare var. technicum (Koern.) Jav.), or articles made
thereof containing unshredded broomcorn stalk, to prevent the introduction of the
Huropean corn borer (Pyrausia nubilalis Hbn.). (Proclamation No. 286 of
1936.)

Chestnut (Castanea spp.) plants and seeds of any species from North America
or any other country where the chestnut blight disease (Hndothia parasitica
(Murr.) Ander. and Ander.) exists. Proclamation No. 286 of 1936.)

Citrus trees, except by the Department of Agriculture and Forestry, to prevent
the introduction of citrus canker. (Proclamation No. 286 of 1936.)

Coniferous plants but not the seeds. (Act No. 11 of 1911.)

Elm (Ulmus spp.) plants and seeds of any species from the continent of
Europe and any other country where the Dutch elm disease (Graphium ulmi
Schwarz) exists. (Proclamation No. 286 of 1936.)

Hucalyptus spp., gum trees, but not the seeds. (Act No. 11 of 1911.)

Fruits: Apples, pears, quinces, and loquats (Malus, Pyrus, Cydonia, Hriobdo-
trya), from China, Chosen, East Siberia, Japan, and Manchuria, to prevent the
introduction of such fruit pests as the oriental fruit moth ((Cydia) Grapho-
‘litha molesta Buseck), (Carposina sasakii Mats.), a fruit moth, ete. (Proclama-
tion No. 286 of 1936.)

Citrus fruits (Citrus spp.) and the peel thereof, whether fresh or dried,
but not candied peel, to prevent the introduction of citrus canker (Bac-
terium citri (Hasse) Doidge). (Proclamation No. 151 of 1987.)

Citrus fruits from southwest Africa are admitted without restriction and
from a portion of the territory administered by the Companhia de Mo-
cambique under certain conditions. (Proclamation 201 of 1987 and 202
of 1987. )

Stone fruits, fresh: Apricot (Prunus armeniaca L.), cherry (Prunus spp.),
nectarine (Amygdalus persica var. nucipersica), peach (Amygdalus per-
sica), plum (Prunus spp.). (Proclamation No. 285 of 1936.)

Honey, jam, sirup, or malt, mixed with honey, medicines containing honey, fly
‘tapes or fly papers containing honey, live bees, second-hand hives, and any con-
tainer used for honey, bees, or beeswax. Medicines containing not more than
25 percent of honey may be passed. Precaution against the introduction of
American foulbrood and other bee diseases. (Act No. 11 of 1911, Government
notices Nos. 1837 of 1825 and 2032 of 1980.)

Opuntia spp. (Proclamation No. 151 of 1937.)

Peach stones (Amygadalus persica L.). (Act No. 11 of 1911.)

Plants packed in soil other than special rooting compost, to prevent the intro-
duction of injurious insect pests and plant diseases that occur in soil. (Proc-
lamation No. 286 of 1936.)

Sugarcane plants, rooted (Saccharum officinarum .), to prevent the intro-
duction of injurious pests and diseases of the sugarcane. (Government notice
1798 of 1986.)

Trees and plants ordinarily raised from seed, if the seed be easily procurable
in the Union or can be readily introduced in a viable condition to prevent the
introduction of injurious insect pests and plant diseases. (Government notice
No. 1793 of 1936, as amended by Government notice No. 677 of 1937. )

‘Trees and fruit-bearing plants listed by nurserymen within the Union and
procurable from them at or below the ordinary price for recent novelties of
their class, unless the Department is satisfied that the strain of the variety
procurable in the Union is an inferior one or untrue to type. (Government
notice No. 1793 of 1936, as amended by Government notice No. 677 of 1937.)
1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 33

IMPORTATION RESTRICTED

Backhousia citriodora F. Muell.: No limitation on number admissible, but
must be grown in quarantine. (Government notice No. 1793 of 1936, as amended
by Government notice No. 677 of 1937.)

Bags, second-hand: No import permit required; subject to inspection on ar-
rival to ascertain whether any had contained cottonseed, and, if any cottonseed
present, may be refused entry or treated by heat at the expense of the owner.

Beeswax and foundation comb: Import permit and inspection on arrival;
consignor’s sworn declaration that the beeswax has been heated to 212° F.
for 30 minutes. No declaration is required for white beeswax. In the absence
of the declaration for unmanufactured yellow beeswax, the wax may be heated
at the expense of the owner under official supervision, or the Department may
agree to the keeping and manufacture of the beeswax under conditions deemed
to make special heating unnecessary. Precaution against the introduction of
American foulbrood and other bee diseases. (Government notice No. 1793 of
1936. )

Broomcorn (Sorghum vulgare var. technicum (Koern.) Jav.) and brooms,
brushes, and other articles made from broomcorn (except as prohibited) (see
item under Importation Prohibited) : Import permit and inspection on arrival,
to prevent the introduction of the European corn borer (Pyrausta nubilalis Hbn.)
and other stalk borers. (Proclamation No. 282 of 1936.)

Cork, unmanufactured, derived from the cork oak tree (Quercus suber L.):
Import permit and inspection on arrival, to prevent the introduction of the gypsy
moth (Porthetria dispar L.). (Proclamation No. 282 of 1936.)

Cotton (Gossypium spp.) unmanufactured, including linters and unspun cot-
ton waste (but not including purified cotton wool (absorbent cotton) and cotton
batting) is admissible only under special import permit. This restriction does
not apply to kapok. The use of cotton waste as packing material for merchan-
dise is not permitted. (Act No. 11 of 1911, and proclamation No. 282 of 1936.)

Cottonseed: Permits will be issued only for seed intended for sowing, and only
when its introduction is deemed desirable by the principal field husbandry of-
ficer. Cottonseed that is allowed to enter will be fumigated with carbon di-
sulphid. Importations are restricted to official cotton breeders. Precautions
against the introduction of pink bollworm (Pectinophora gossypiella Saund.).
(Act No. 11 of 1911, and proclamation No. 282 of 1936.)

Exotic animals of the classes: Amphibia, Arachnida, Aves, Crustacea, Insecta,
Mammalia, Mollusca, Myriapoda, Nematoda, and Reptilia: Importation subject
fo permit and such conditions as may be prescribed therein. (Proclamation 115
of 1937.)

Grapes:” May not be introduced into the district of Graaff Reinet, nor into
the area in the Cape Province defined in paragraph 3 (1) of the schedule to
proclamation No. 287 of 1936, but grapes may be landed at Cape Town, Simons-
town, and Mossel Bay and be consigned to destinations beyond. (Proclamation
287 of 1936.)

Plants, living’? (see definition of plants, p. 1) of all admissible kinds, except
those specifically mentioned, and except fruits, most seeds, bulbs, and tubers:
Importation subject to a permit issued by the Union Department of Agri-
culture and Forestry and inspection on arrival. (See rules governing the issu-
ance of permits p. 7 et seq.) .

Pome-fruit trees* and all plants of the genera Malus, Pyrus, and Cydonia:
Import permit and inspection on arrival; must be accompanied by an official
certificate from the Department of Agriculture or other recognized official in-
stitution of the country of origin affirming that fire blight (Bacillus amylovorus
(Burr.) Trey.) is not known to occur on the premises where the plants were
grown. Entry is conditional also on the plants being cut back severely and sub-
jected, without expense to the Government, at Cape Town, Durban, or Pretoria,
or other approved place for special inspection and disinfection. (Proclamation
No. 286 of 1936.)

Potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.): No import permit required; subject to in-
spection on arrival; must be accompanied by a shipper’s sworn declaration of
the country of origin and of the locality where grown, together with sufticient
data clearly to establish the identity of the consignment; also an official cer-
tificate dated not more than 30 days before the dispatch of the consignment
affirming that potato wart (Synchytrium endobioticum (Schilb.) Perc.) has



2See note, p. 36.
34 jj BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.—March

not been known to exist within 5 miles of the place or places where the potatoes
are declared to have been grown, or an official certificate, dated not more than
9 months prior to the date of arrival of the potatoes, affirming that the said
disease has not been known to exist within the shire, county, or other such
territorial division comprising the deciared place or places of origin.

The certificate is not required with potatoes from British East Africa and
Western Australia.

A certificate will be accepted from the United Kingdom declaring that no eases
of potato wart are known to have occurred at the place or places where the
potatoes are declared to have been grown, that the only outbreaks of the disease
within 5 miles of such places are trivial and without menace to land where
potatoes are grown for sale, and that, on official inspection, the potatoes con-
cerned were found to be apparently free from serious diseases and insect pests.
(Proclamation No. 286 of 19386.)

Roses (Rosa spp.) from Australia and North America and any other country
in which a virus disease of roses is known to occur: An official certificate af-
firming that no virus diseases are present in the premises where they were
grown. (Proclamation No. 286, 1936.)

Seeds: Import permits and inspection on arrival. This applies only to seeds
of the plants named below, which have been included in the definition of “plant.”
{Act No. 11 of 1911, proclamation No, 282 of 1936, and Government notice No.
1793 of 19386.)

Alfalfa or lucerne (JJedicago sativa L.): Permits issued only to the De-
partment of Agriculture and Forestry. (Proclamation No. 282, 1936, and
proclamation 286 of 1936.) Grown in quarantine and produce released
if no disease discovered.

Chestnut (Castanea spp.) (except from North America and any other
Sua in which the chestnut blight occurs). (Proclamation No. 282
of 1936.)

Cotton: See also item “Cottonseed.” (Proclamation No. 282 of 1936.)

Elm (Ulmus spp.) : (Proclamation No. 282 of 1936.)

Maize (Zea mays lL.) and barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) (except from ter-
ritory administered by the Companhia de Mocambique) : Importation lim-
ited to 10 pounds of any variety. However, in times of shortage the De-
partment may authorize the importation of maize in bulk under prescribed
conditions. (Government notice No. 1793, of 1936, as amended by Goy-
ernment notice No. 677 of 1937.) Maize imported for planting is dis-
infected in a solution of mercuric bichloride.

Oak (Quercus spp.) : (Proclamation No. 282 of 1936.)

Tea (except from countries in which Ea2obasidium verans Mass. occurs).
(Proclamation 282 of 1936.) See also item, Tea plants and tea seeds.

Tomato (for importation from countries in which Aplanobacter michiganense
E. F. Sm. oceurs). (Froclamation No. 282, of 1986.) Importation from
such countries is not exempt from permit. See item, Tomato seed from
Germany, etc.

Sugarcane cuttings: Import permit; fumigation with hydrocyanic acid gas on
‘arrival and disinfection with solution of copper sulphate. Permits issued only
to South African Sugar Association; canes grown in quarantine greenhouse and
then in open ground. .

Tea plants and tea seeds (Camellia thea=Thea sinensis L.) from India, Japan,
Chosen, and other countries where blister blight (Hzobasidium verans Mass.)
occurs: Import permit and inspection on arrival; must be accompanied by an
official certificate from the Department of Agriculture, the Indian Tea Associa-
tion, or other recognized institution of the country of origin, affirming that the
disease is not known to occur within 10 miles of the place where the plants or
seeds were produced. (Proclamation No. 286 of 1936.)

Tomato seeds (Lycopersicum esculentum Mill.) from Germany, Italy, North
America, or any country where bacterial canker of tomato (Aplanobacter
michiganense E. F. Sm.) occurs: Import permit required ; must be accompanied by
‘an official certificate stating that the seed was produced by plants officially
inspected in the field and found free from that disease. (Proclamation 286
of 1936.) ;

-Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.), unmanufactured or leaf tobacco: Import
permit and inspection on arrival. Must be accompanied by an official certificate
affirming that the tobacco has been inspected and found free from Hphestia
elutella Hbn. At the discretion of the Union Department of Agriculture and
1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 35

Forestry the certification requirement may be waived. (Proclamation No. 286
of 1936.)
IMPORTATION UNRESTRICTED

Fruits, seeds (except those specially restricted or prohibited), bulbs, tubers,
and vegetables. However, admissible fruits are inspected and may be rejected
if any serious pest is found on them. Consignments of apples are refused entry
if more than 5 percent are infested by codling moth or infected by one Fusicladium
spot over one-eighth inch in diameter to 10 fruits. Affected fruits may be picked
out and clean ones passed. Fruit will be fumigated if more than one San Jose
scale or oystershell scale found per fruit.

RULES GOVERNING THE ISSUANCE OF IMPORT PERMITS

[Government notice No. 1793 of 1936, an eh by Government notice No. 677, April
i.

’

NUMBER OF PLANTS LIMITED

1. No permit shall be issued to any one person to introduce into the Union
during any one calendar year from oversea or from Portuguese East Africa, the
mandated territory of South West Africa or any State or Territory in Africa
north of the Zambesi, except Northern Rhodesia, Nyasaland, or, in the case of
plants other than maize and barley, the Belgian Congo:

(a) More than 10 plants of any 1 variety of:

(1) Rooted forest trees, ornamental trees, nut trees, rose trees, fruit trees,
and fruit-bearing plants (not including strawberries).

(2) Ornamental shrubs,*® including azaleas, rhododendrons, camelias, hydran-
geas, spireas, lilacs, and oleanders.

(3) Climbing plants, including clematis, begonias, passifloras, wistarias, honey-
suckles, jasminums, and solanums, or

(6) More than 100 plants of any 1 variety of:

(1) Strawberry plants.

(2) Scions or unrooted cuttings of any tree, woody shrub, or sugarcane, or

(c) More than 10 pounds of any 1 variety cf maize or barley.

2. Nothing contained in the above regulation shall prevent the Department
from:

(a) Introducing stocks, which it may consider of exceptional or special value,
into the Union in excess of the number above stipulated for budding or grafting,
or issuing a permit to any person for special reasons and subject to such condi-
tions as it may determine, to introduce into the Union any stocks in excess of the
number provided in this regulation ;

(6b) Issuing permits to any person to introduce into the Union Backhousia
citriodora plants in excess of the maximum provided in this regulation, on
condition that such plants be kept in quarantine, at a place approved by the
Department, for a period of 2 years or such lesser period as the Department may
direct: Provided, That the Department, if it deems expedient, may destroy with-
out compensation to the owner all the plants so introduced, together with the
progeny thereof.

(c) Issuing permits for the introduction of maize in bulk in times of shortage,
and subject to such conditions as the Department may determine.

3. No permit shall be issued to any person to introduce into the Union:

(a) Any kind of tree or plant ordinarily raised from seed, if the seed be
easily procurable in the Union or can be readily introduced in a viable
condition.

(b) Any variety of tree or fruit-bearing plant or rose plant listed by nursery-
men within the Union, and procurable from them at or below the ordinary
price for recent novelties of its class, unless the Department is satisfied that
the strain of the variety procurable in the Union is an inferior one or untrue
to type.

(c) Any rooted sugarcane plants.

However, the Department may issue a permit for the introduction of any
tree or plant specified in either subparagraphs (a) or (0) of paragraph (3) in
any case where the Department is satisfied that for special reasons such intro-
duction should be exempted from the prohibition of that paragraph.

3 Permits are not issued for species of Berberis that are intermediate hosts of Puccinia
graminis Pers., black stem rust of wheat.
36 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.—March

PLANTS NOT LIMITED IN NUMBER

4. Ornamental palms and florists’ plants, such as violets, carnations, chrysan-
themums, geraniums, pelargoniums, fuchsias, orchids, and ferns, shall not be
subject to any limitation in regard to the number of such plants that may be
introduced into the Union.

Nore.—All trees and other hardwocd plants and fruit-bearing plants are fumigated
with hydroecyanie acid gas before importation is permitted. Herbaceous plants and
ornamental palms are fumigated oniy when insect pests are present for which such
treatment is deemed necessary. Grapevines are also disinfected in a solution of copper
sulphate. All species of Ribes, Castanea, and Jugians are cut back and disinfected in a
2-percent solution of copper sulphate. Treatments are to be affected without expense
to the Government at Cape Town, Durban, Pretoria, or other approved center.

PENALTIES IMPOSED FOR VIOLATIONS OF THE PLANT
QUARANTINE ACT

According to reports received by the Bureau during the period January 1 to
March 31, 1938, penalties have recently been imposed by the proper Federal
authorities for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act, as follows

GYPSY MOTH AND BROWN-TAIL MOTH QUARANTINE

In the case of the United States v. James Kookoolis, New Haven, Conn., in
the interstate transportation of several bundles of laurel from a point in the
quarantined area to a point outside thereof, without inspection and certification,
the defendant entered a plea of nolo contendere and was fined $25.

JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE

Yn the case of the United States v. Hugo Kind, of the Shady Lawn Nursery,
Hammonton, N. J., in the interstate shipment of six lots of nursery and green-
house stock from the regulated area to points outside thereof, the defendant
pleaded guilty and was fined $100.

In the case of the United States v. Harry Lavere, Woodside, Del., in the
interstate transportation of a truckload of cantaloups from Woodside, Del., to
Rochester, N. Y., without inspection and certification, the defendant pleaded
guilty and was fined $25.

QUARANTINES AFFECTING MEXICAN PRODUCTS

In the case of the United States versus the persons listed below, for attempting
to smuggle in contraband plant material, the penalties indicated were imposed.
by the United States customs officials at the following ports:



Name Port Contraband Penalty
Vics aelViaT Tan iall Ge zea eee Brownsville, Tex_.._.-_- 2 GUAVAS . = 2a ee ee $l
PANICISCONS ALAS = ee ees | ee COG eee Aes rene ZOLANEES. o0 082 7 Se ee ee Hl
IViarhian Oy Ganz ase aera Hacile se asslexsssssss l avocad0s-2-222-2 = ee eee 1
Mrs. Josefa Cervantes de Garza___|_---_ CO ae eee cei leg G02 2.222. Se he ee 1
ATID ATO Gan Zaee eerie oe eunre | ae een GO ne eee aetna ls 0. 332s. eee 1
JOSCSRUbIOu sas See es 1M IBASO, “Ne oe 4 pieces sugarcane___.--___------__ L
LTA TAS Ta CCU Oe ee ee ee |e GORY hehe SEE eae TS guavase . 24) eee ee i
IDV ONURZVONO) Ialopltavsy Je hiolaikeyo), “Were i chéerimoya.23- =o 1
aul Ogers Ae een eae Laredo, ier oMen ane 4 plants... 52% 2 eee eee i
IMineoveIbieo) IMIpNA OS GOR eta h eae He Be 2 Oranges 2)... eae eee Re L.
NV Tors © instal Ts tl © ts ize | ec CLO tee Sepa she sel eu ors § stalks sugarcane__-....-------.-- 1
HVE aa VV FACTS GO Leste ster ngs es | CO te ee ee ea 2.apples and 2 tangerines_____-__-- L
Mrs! Matilda Hernandez!) 22 222223 |2 2222 CO ee aes 5 plants Jl. 2 5 ox See eee 1
Mins iNemaiciaviviora less seen | eee (Glo) ees ae SS se 1O'piants. . hs Bee eee eee l
Mrs. Dometilla de Arazon__-__----|__--- GO 3 Ben ahirys. ase Leuava. 2) ea See ee 1
Juan alerillose as eee eee GOs ee eee ee ee 2 apples and 4 gmavas_----=___2._- i
Same @ avez ar ee tee ee nud el eee ere Oe et sae e es ea bsweet limes. 82/2 22e) 32a ee ik
VFB ai GUleSsie eka 6 hear ea Se ene eee GOps eee eh Zmaypcps, 2 sapotes, 1 tangerine, 1

1 plant.

SOLS TT STATS HNL cee eee ee | are Goss = ie ean ee! 15 sweet limes, 4 oranges, 6 guavas_ 2
Nishi Ser yee oO Tyee | mere Oe ae a eee 5 oranges, 1 tangerine Ups EN 1
BAT) oh ad ye al hh IANA HH SY cae RE I GO See eS 2 oranges. Gy. 3 se eee 2 1
ATTONS OPA ON SO Ieee eae ne ae | eects Oe EE oe eee Sigraperruits 45. eee ee eee 1
IMTRSS MESS WAV Ortho ee oso ste COs eee RO a ae 24 OTANSES.... 2. ee ee ee I
Roquella.Cucausstkse se lene ae es eee ae CO ee ae rere T plants. 2 2 Ree See eee I
Bp Gi siWialer eee eek ie ae Ls Sears O22 ee See 30 oranges and 18 tangerines__-____ 2
aoe IZATION OF THE BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY
AND PLANT QUARANTINE

Lee A. Srrone, Chief.

S. A. Rouwer, Assistant Chief.

Avery S. Hoyt, Assistant Chief.

P. N. ANNAND, Special Research Assistant.

F. H. Spencer, Business Manager.

Rotia P. Currie, Hditor.

MABEL CoLcorD, Librarian.

J. A. Hystop, in Charge, Division of Insect Pest Survey and Information.

J. 1. HAmBLeron, in Charge, Division of Bee Culture Investigations.

D. L. Van Ding, in Charge, Division of Fruit Insect Investigations.

F. C. CRAIGHEAD, in Charge, Division of Forest Insect Investigations.

W. H. Wuite, in Charge, Division of Truck Crop and Garden Insect Investigations.

. M. Packarp, in Charge, Division of Cereal and Forage Insect Investigations.

W. HaArRnep, in Charge, Division of Cotton Insect Investigations.

C. BisHopp, in Charge, Division of Insects Affecting Man and Animals.
A. HAWKINS, in Charge, Division of Control Investigations.

C. Roark, in Charge, Division of Insecticides and Fungicides.

F. W. MUESEBECK, in Charge, Division of Insect Identification.

P. CLAUSEN, in Charge, Division of Foreign Parasite Introduction.

B. FRACKER, in Charge, Division of Piant Disease Control.

M. GAppis, in Charge, Division of Domestic Plant Quarantines.

R. Sasscur, in Charge, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines.

F. Burcess, in Field Charge, Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail Moth Control (head-

quarters, Greenfield, Mass.).

E. G. BREWER, in Field Charge, Japanese Beetle and Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail
Moth Quarantines, European Corn Borer Certification, and Dutch Eim Disease
HBradication (headquarters, Bloomfield, N. J.)

R. E. McDonAa.p, in Field Charge, Pink Bollworm and Thurberia Weevil Quar-
antines (headquarters, San Antonio, Tez.).

P. A. Homate, in Field Charge, Mexican Fruitfly Quarantine (headquarters,
Harlingen, Tez.).

A. C. Baxksr, in Field Charge, Fruitfly Investigations (headquarters, Mezico
City, Mezico).

PEPHOORRE RG:

o7

U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1938


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S. R. A.—B. E. P. Q. No. 135 5 Issued September 1938

United States Department of Agriculture

BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS

APRIL-JUNE 1938

CONTENTS

Page
“unranine and osner placa! announcements. __.-____ --______-=_____.-- 5. -- 2 nes 39
Announcement relating to European corn borer quarantine (No. 41)____-_____-__________________ 39

Method used for the disinfection of imported broomcorn and broomcorn brooms (B. E. P. Q.
AT) Supersedes fl. 6.161 and supplements P..Q. C. A. 309) ___.-22.-_- 2-22-22. ot 39
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (No. 48).._.---_.----_--__-_-____________. 40
SPURTE! PHL PRET UOT SE ae ate el ea ee es ai ae Rak Dd A 8 ee eee ee 40
MNomeetoceneral public through newspapers=___-_ 2. -=22s..2-2)82 20) 2 51
ApISHUICiIUTISHLODOSUIMASLCIS= =) =e es ee ee 2 rs 52

Administrative instructions—fumigation of potatoes by methyl bromide as a condition of
certification of potatoes moving by refrigerator car from the area listed in regulation 5

OMOMALATPIMOENO. 48, C5. tb. OQ. to) -- noe ee ewe Fe 52
Announcement relating to Mexican fruitfly quarantine (No. 64)._.--_-__________________________ 53
Administrative instructions—sterilization of grapefruit and oranges by heat under the
Mexican fruitfly quarantine (B. E. P. Q. 472; superseding P. Q. C. A. 329)___-____________. 53
Announcements relating to white-pine blister rust quarantine (No. 63)__----_--______-______--__ 54
White-pine blister rust quarantine. regulations modified__....-.-._.._._...--_-__----.-_-_-_- 54
PERU STOMEOIMEO Ea TONS 5-015 = ty Se eee SP Uhemuni et ade ee eo Oe ee es 55
iNopcetormeneral paplic through mewspapers.......- .==2 2222-22 = soso cco an sons 60
eerie tOSMISEINETIN MOST UAL DLS See = oa oe ee ee Di Ee es eee 61
Announcements relating to District of Columbia plant regulations _-_...-.--_-_-_-_-_____---__-- 62
Districtiot Conmmaia plant rezulations:modified=_ 4. 2 2. 22 es be ae eee cb ook 62
Revised rules and regulations governing the movement of plants and plant products into and
GED NGNGEOIsnnic ol COM bla. a et ee bl A 62
INgrice lo ceneral public through newspapers-_. 2-5 test ese _ iaitiset ee en 65
GAS ERE CUI OSORNO SIN ASUDES Ets Seren aay Petes 2 Feet Ede ae te ee Le 65
Announcement relating to rules and regulations governing the importation of cotton and cotton
Mie eSwL OMG ORU WILOG us LALCS = an on ee ee ee ee Secon eee 66
Modificaticn of cotton regulations (revision of regulation 13)_-_..__.___----___-__-_-._-------- 66
Terninalanspeevion of plants andiplant proG@ucts:c22 2-2: -2-s=22.2----< i a.bees- ssc --5-5--2- 67
Arkansas State plant quarantine (shipment of sweetpotato plants restricted) _._._-___.------ 67
MAGinoOMAlEDaatAnspection places in California.-= 22.222 2 eae a See 67
68

eee Sere nn mn 3 See ee eee Boi Sys 8 Eis Syl Se eo hie eee oe ESS
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Brazil (B. E. P. Q. 379, supplement No. 2)- 68

Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of France (B. E. P. Q. 403, supplement No. 3)- 68
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Germany (B. E. P. Q. 405, supplement No.
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Central America (British Honduras) (B. E. P. Q. 445,
Saraswat ep Se Seg ne et a nn eee ma eae aS
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Persia (Iran) (B. E. P. Q. 449, supplement No. 2) 70
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act__..-----.---------..------.------ es 70
‘Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine_-_-....-.-.----.------------------ 73



QUARANTINE AND OTHER OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS

ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO EUROPEAN CORN BORER
QUARANTINE (NO. 41)
May 7, 1938.

B. E. P. Q. 474 (supersedes H. B. 161 and supplements P. Q. C. A. 309).

METHOD USED FOR THE DISINFECTION OF IMPORTED BROOMCORN AND
BROOMCORN BROOMS

Broomcorn and articles made of broomecorn which are required to be treated,
under the provisions of regulation 5 of Quarantine No. 41, will be treated by one
of the following methods:

1. Vacuum fumigation:
(1) The temperature of the stalks and of the fumigation chamber during the

fumigation shall be not less than 60° F,
39
86995—38——-1
40 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

(2) The dosage for the fumigation shall be 38 pounds of liquid hydrocyanic
acid or its equivalent per 1,000 cubic feet of space.

(3) The air pressure in the fumigation chamber shall be reduced to the
equivalent of 2 inches of mercury (a 28-inch vacuum at sea level), after which
the hydrocyanie acid shall be introduced and the low pressure held for the
duration of the fumigation.

(4) The exposure shall be not less than 3 hours.

2. Steam sterilization :

(1) The air pressure in the treating chamber shall be reduced to the equivalent
of 5 inches of mercury (a 25-inch vacuum at sea level).

(2) Steam shall then be introduced until a positive pressure of 10 pounds is
obtained.

(3) The exposure to the 10-pound positive pressure’ of steam shall continue
for a period sufficient to assure a constant temperature in all parts of the treat-
ing.chamber, after which the steam may be shut off and the treating chamber
exhausted of the uncondensed steam.

Avery S. Hoyt,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE
(NO. 48)

REVISION OF REGULATIONS
INTRODUCTORY NOTE

An important change in the following revision of the regulations of the Japa-
nese beetle quarantine is the inclusion in the regulated areas for the first time
of part of Schuyler County, N. Y., parts of the Ohio counties of Coshocton,
Portage, and Summit, and parts of the West Virginia counties of Berkeley and
Jefferson. This action is considered necessary because of the establishment of
the Japanese beetle therein. Areas were also added to counties, parts of which
were formerly under regulation, in the States of New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio,
Maryland, and Virginia. Lancaster County, Pa., has been added to the special
area (regulation 5, sec. A (1) (ii)) from which the movement of fruits and
vegetables by motortruck or refrigerator car is regulated. Wheeling, W. Va.,
and Coshocton, Ohio, are brought under regulation and placed in the same cate-
gory as Buffalo, Cleveland, and other outlying cities in that a certificate or
permit is required in the movement of fruits and vegetables to these cities but
no restrictions are placed on the interstate movement therefrom.

Of interest to nurserymen is the elimination of restrictions on the movement
of aquatics except during the period from June 15 to October 15, inclusive.

The restrictions on the movement of sand are modified to exempt from certifi-
eation silica sand, greensand, marl, ‘‘bird sand,” “bird gravel,” and pottery clay,
when free from vegetable matter, and when labeled as to contents on the outside
of each container.

Some outlying areas where Japanese beetle infestations have been found the
past field season are not included in the regulated area because of assurance
from the States concerned that adequate measures will be taken to prevent the
spread of the pest therefrom.

SUMMARY

Unless a certificate or permit has been issued, these regulations as now
revised prohibit the interstate shipment of green corn on the cob, beans in the
pod, bananas in entire bunches or in clusters of 25 or more, apples, peaches,
blackberries, blueberries, huckleberries, or raspberries from the regulated areas,
to or through points outside; and also prohibit (unless a certificate or permit
has been issued) the interstate movement of all fruits and vegetables by re-
frigerator car or motortruck from the District of Columbia, the State of
Delaware, and parts of the States of Maryland, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and
Virginia, to or through points outside the regulated areas as defined in regula-
tion 3. Refrigerator cars used for loading fruits and vegetables, other than
onions and potatoes, in such area must, prior to loading, be cleaned by the
common carrier and kept tightly closed and sealed during the interval between
1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 4]

cleaning and loading. Onions and potatoes must be fumigated in the car when
such action is deemed necessary by the inspector, and doors and hatches of the
ears must be closed or screened. For other details and exceptions see
regulation 5.

The regulations also prohibit the interstate shipment of plants, sand, soil,
earth, peat, compost, and manure from any part of the regulated areas to
or through any outside point throughout the year unless a Federal permit
or certificate has been secured. Portions of plants and cut flowers are re-
stricted interstate movement only between June 15 and October 15, inclusive.
For details and exceptions see regulations 6 and 7.

The regulated areas include the District of Columbia, the entire States of
Connecticut, Delaware, Massachusetts, New Jersey, and Rhode Island, and
parts of the States of Maine, Maryland, New Hampshire, New York, Ohio,
Pennsylvania, Vermont, Virginia, and West Virginia. The boundaries are
shown in regulation 3.

These regulations also place certain restrictions to protect restricted articles
from infestation while in transit, require thorough cleaning of vehicles and
containers which have been used in transporting restricted products, and
provide other safeguards and conditions as specified in regulations 8 to 18,
inclusive.

To secure permits and certificates, address the Bureau of Entomology and
Plant Quarantine, 266 Glenwood Avenue, Bloomfield, N. J., or the nearest
branch office listed in the appendix.

Avery S. Hoyt,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 48 (TWELFTH REVISION) 7
[Approved March 1, 1937; effective March 1, 1937]

I, H. A. Wallace, Secretary of Agriculture, have determined that it is neces-
sary to quarantine the States of Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Maryland,
Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania,
Rhode Island, Vermont, Virginia, and West Virginia, and the District of
Columbia, to prevent the spread of the Japanese beetle (Popillia japonica
Newm.), a dangerous insect new to and not heretofore widely prevalent or
distributed within and throughout the United States.

Now, therefore, under authority conferred by section 8 of the Plant Quaran-
tine Act of August 20, 1912 (387 Stat. 315), as amended by the act of Congress
approved March 4, 1917 (39 Stat. 1134, 1165), and having duly given the public
hearing required thereby, I do quarantine the said States of Connecticut, Dela-
ware, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New
York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, Virginia, and West Virginia,
and the District of Columbia, effective on and after March 1, 1937. Hereafter,
under the authority of said act of August 20, 1912, amended as aforesaid (1)
fruits and vegetables; (2) nursery, ornamental, and greenhouse stock, and
other plants; and (3) sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure shall not be
shipped, offered for shipment to a common carrier, received for transportation
or transported by a common carrier, or carried, transported, moved or allowed
to be moved from any of said quarantined States or District into or through
any other State or Territory or District of the United States in manner or
method or under conditions other than those prescribed in the rules and regu-
lations hereinafter made and amendments thereto: Provided, That the re
strictions of this quarantine and of the rules and regulations supplemental
thereto may be limited to the areas in a quarantined State now, or which
may hereafter be, designated by the Secretary of Agriculture as regulated
areas when, in the judgment of the Secretary of Agriculture, the enforcement
of the aforesaid rules and regulations as to such regulated areas shall be
adequate to prevent the spread of the Japanese beetle: Provided further,
That such limitations shall be conditioned upon the said State providing for
and enforcing such control measures with respect to such regulated areas as, in
the judgment of the Secretary of Agriculture, shall be deemed adequate to
prevent the spread of the Japanese beetle therefrom to other parts of the State:
And provided further, That certain articles classed as restricted herein may,
because of the nature of their growth or production or their manufactured
or processed condition, be exempted by administrative instructions issued by
42 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine when, in his
judgment, such articles are considered innocuous as earriers of infestation.
Done at the city of Washington this 1st day of March 1937.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture,
[SEAL] H. A. WALLACE,
Secretary of Agriculture.

RULES AND REGULATIONS (SIXTEENTH REVISION) SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE
OF QUARANTINE NO. 48

[Approved April 6, 1988; effective April 11, 1938]
REGULATION 1. DEFINITIONS

For the purpose of these regulations the following words, names, and terms
shall be construed, respectively, to mean:

(a) Japanese beetle—The insect known as the Japanese beetle (Popillia ja-
ponica Newm.), in any stage of development.

(b) The terms “infested,” “infestation,” and the like, relate to infestation with
the Japanese beetle.

(c) Quarantined area.—Any State or District quarantined by the Secretary of
Agriculture to prevent the spread of the Japanese beetle.

(d) Regulated area—Any area in a quarantined State or District which is
now, or which may hereafter be, designated as such by the Secretary of Agri-
culture in accordance with the provisos to Notice of Quarantine No. 48, as
revised.

(e) Fruits and vegetables.—F¥or the list of restricted fruits and vegetables
see regulation 5.

(f) Nursery and ornamental stock.—Nursery, ornamental, and greenhouse
stock, and all other plants, plant roots, cut flowers, or other portions of plants.

(g) Sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure——Sand, soil, earth, peat,
eompost, or manure of any kind and as to either bulk movement or in connection
with farm products or nursery and ornamental stock.

(h) Certified sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure.—Sand, soil, earth,
peat, compost, or manure determined by the inspector as uninfested and so
eertified.

(i) Certified greenhouse—A greenhouse or similar establishment which has
complied to the satisfaction of the inspector with the conditions imposed in
regulation 6. This term may apply also to potting beds, heeling-in areas, hot-
beds, coldframes, or similar plots or to storage houses, packing sheds, or stores
treated or otherwise safeguarded in manner and method satisfactory to the
inspector.

(7) Inspector.—An inspector of the United States Department of Agriculture.

(k) Moved or allowed to be moved interstate.—Shipped, offered for shipment
to a common earrier, received for transportation or transported by a common
carrier, or carried, transported, moved, or allowed to be moved from one State
or Territory or District of the United States into or through any other State or
Territory or District.

REGULATION 2. LIMITATION OF RESTRICTIONS TO REGULATED AREAS

Conditioned upon the compliance on the part of the State concerned with the
provisos to Notice of Quarantine No. 48 (twelfth revision), the restrictions pro-
vided in these regulations on the interstate movement of plants and plant
products and other articles enumerated in said notice of quarantine will be
limited to such movement from the areas in such State now or hereafter desig-
nated by the Secretary of Agriculture as regulated areas.

REGULATION 38. REGULATED AREAS

In accordance with the provisos to Notice of Quarantine No. 48 (twelfth revi-
sion), the Secretary of Agriculture designates as regulated areas for the purpose
of these regulations the States, District, counties, townships, towns, cities, elec-
tion districts, and magisterial districts listed below, including all cities, towns,
boroughs, or other political subdivisions within their limits:

Connecticut.—The entire State.
1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 43

Delaware.—The entire State.

District of Columbia.—The entire District.

Maine.—County of York; towns of Auburn and Lewiston, in Androscoggin
County; towns of Cape Elizabeth, Gorham, Gray, New Gloucester, Raymond,
Secarboro, Standish, and the cities of Portland, South Portland, Westbrook, and
Windham, in Cumberland County; the city of Waterville, in Kennebec County;
and the city of Brewer, in Penobscot County.

Maryland.—Counties of Cecil, Kent, Queen Annes, Somerset, and Worcester ;
the city of Baltimore; the city of Cumberland, the town of Frostburg, and elec-
tion districts Nos. 4, 5, 6, 7, 11, 12, 14, 22, 28, 24, 26, 29, 31, and 52, in Allegany
County; the city of Annapolis and election districts Nos. 3, 4, and 5, in Ame
Arundel County; election districts Nos. 1, 2, 3, 9, 11, 12, 18, 14, and 15, and that
portion of election district No. 8 lying south of Shawan, Beaver Dam, and Sher-
wood Roads, in Baltimore County; all of Caroline County except election dis-
tricts of Hillsboro (No. 6), American Corners (No. 8), and Preston (No. 4); the
city of Westminster, and election district of Freedom (No. 5), in Carroll County;
election districts of White Plains and La Plata, in Charles County; election dis-
trict of Cambridge (No. 7), in Dorchester County; election districts of Buckeys-

‘town (No. 1), Frederick (No. 2), New Market (No. 9), Petersville (No. 12), and
Brunswick (No. 25), in Frederick County; County of Harford, except election
district of Marshall (No. 4) ; election districts of Elkridge (No. 1), Ellicott City
(No. 2), and West Friendship (No. 3), in Howard County, and the right-of-way
of United States Highway No. 1 through the election district of Guilford (No. 6),
in said county; all of Prince Georges County except the election districts of Not-
tingham and Aquasco; that part of Montgomery County located within the
established boundaries of the so-called “Washington Suburban Sanitary Dis-
trict”; towns of Easton and Oxford, in Talbot County; election districts of
Sharpsburg (No. 1), Williamsport (No. 2), Hagerstown (Nos.. 3, 17, 21, 22, 24,
and 25), Leitersburg (No. 9), Sandy Hook (No. 11), and Halfway (No. 26), in
Washington County; election districts of Pittsburg (No. 4), Parsons (No. 5),
Dennis (No. 6), Trappe (No. 7), Nutters (No. 8), Salisbury (No. 9), Delmar~â„¢
(No. 11), Camden (No. 18), Willards (No. 14), and Fruitland (No, 16), in
Wicom:.co County.

Massachusetts.—The entire State.

New Hampshire—Counties of Belknap, Cheshire, Hillsboro, Merrimack,
Rockingham, Strafford, and Sullivan; towns of Brookfield, Eaton, Effingham,
Freedom, Madison, Moultonboro, Ossipee, Sandwich, Tamworth, Tuftonboro,
Wakefield, and Wolfeboro, in Carroll County; towns of Alexandria, Ashland,
Bridgewater, Bristol, Canaan, Dorchester, Enfield, Grafton, Groton, Hanover,
Hebron, Holderness, Lebanon, Lyme, Orange, and Plymouth, in Grafton County.

New Jersey.—The entire State.

New York.—Counties of Albany, Bronx, Broome, Chemung, Chenango, Colum-
bia, Cortland, Delaware, Dutchess, Fulton, Greene, Kings, Madison, Mont-
gomery, Nassau, New York, Oneida, Onondaga, Orange, Otsego, Putnam, Queens,
Rensselaer, Richmond, Saratoga, Schenectady, Schoharie, Suffolk, Sullivan,
Tioga, Ulster, Rockland, Washington, and Westchester; towns of Red House
and Salamanca, and the city of Salamanca, in Cattaraugus County; towns
of Tonawanda, Amherst, and Cheektowaga, and the cities of Buffalo and
Lackawanna, in Hrie County; towns of Columbia, Danube, Fairfield, Frankfort,
German Flats, Herkimer, Litchfield, Little Falls, Manheim, Newport, Salisbury,
Schuyler, Stark, Warren, and Winfield, and the city of Little Falls, in Herkimer
County; towns of Catherine, Cayuta, Dix, Hector, Montour, and Reading, and
the Borough of Watkins Glen, in Schuyler County; towns of Caton, Corning,
and Hornby, and the city of Corning, in Stewben County; towns of Caroline,
Danby, Dryden, Enfield, Ithaca, Newfield, and the city of Ithaca, in Tompkins
County; towns of Luzerne and Queensbury and the city of Glens Falls, in
Warren County.

Ohio.—Counties of Columbiana and Mahoning; townships of Augusta, Brown,
and East, in Carroll County; the city of Coshocton, in Coshocton County ; the city
of Cleveland in Cuyahoga County; the city of Columbus in Franklin County;
townships of Cross Creek, Island Creek, Knox, Saline, Steubenville, and Wells,
and the city of Steubenville, in Jefferson County; the city of Toledo, in Lucas
County; townships of Atwater, Brimfield, Charlestown, Deerfield, Edinburg,
Franklin, Palmyra, Paris, Randolph, Ravenna, Rootstown, and Suffield, in
Portage County; all of Stark County, except the townships of Lawrence, Sugar
Creek, and Tuscarawas; and the townships of Bath, Copley, Coventry, Franklin,
44 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

Green, Northampton, Norton, Portage, Springfield, Stow, and Tallmadge, and
the cities of Akron, Barberton, and Cuyahoga Falls, in Summit County.

Pennsylvania.—The entire State, except Crawford, Erie, Forest, Mercer, and
Venango Counties; Mercer Township in Butler County; Ashland, Beaver, Elk,
Richland (including the boroughs of Foxburg and St. Petersburg), Salem, and
Washington Townships, in Clarion County, and townships of Brokenstraw,
Cherry Grove, Columbus, Conewango, Deerfield, Eldred, Farmington, Freehold,
Limestone, Pine Grove, Pittsfield, Pleasant, Southwest, Spring Creek, Sugar
Grove, Triumph, Watson (including the boroughs of Bear Lake, Grand Valley,
Sugar Grove, Tidioute, and Youngsville), in Warren County.

Rhode Island—The entire State.

Vermont.—Counties of Bennington, Rutland, Windham, and Windsor; and the
town of Burlington, in Chittenden County.

Virginia—Counties of Accomac, Arlington, Culpepper, Elizabeth City, Fair-
fax, Fauquier, Henrico, Loudoun, Norfolk, Northampton, Prince William,
Princess Anne, and Stafford; magisterial districts of Dale and Manchester, in
Chesterfield County; magisterial district of Sleepy Hole, in Nansemond County;
Camp Stuart, in Warwick County; and the cities of Alexandria, Fredericks-
burg, Hampton, Newport News, Norfolk, Portsmouth, Richmond, South Norfolk, -
and Suffolk.

West Virginia.—Counties of Hancock, Harrison, Marion, Monongalia, and
Taylor; districts of Hedgesville, Falling Waters, and Opequon, in Berkeley
County; the towns of Bolivar and Harpers Ferry, in Jefferson County; town of
Keyser and district of Frankfort, in Mineral County; the city of MBbeStiNE,
in Ohio County; and the city of Parkersburg, in Wood County.

REGULATION 4. EXTENSION OR REDUCTION OF REGULATED AREAS

The regulated areas designated in regulation 3 may be extended or reduced as
may be found advisable by the Secretary of Agriculture. Due notice of any
extension or reduction and the areas affected thereby will be given in writing
to the transportation companies doing business in or through the States in
which such areas are located and by publication in one or more newspapers
selected by the Secretary of Agriculture within the States in which the areas
affected are located.

REGULATION 5. RESTRICTIONS ON THE MOVEMENT OF FRUITS AND VEGETABLES
SECTION A. CONTROL OF MOVEMENT

(1) Unless a certificate or permit shall have been issued therefor, by an in-
spector, except as provided in paragraphs (a) to (e), inclusive, of this section:
(4) No green corn on the cob, beans in the pod, bananas in entire bunches or in
clusters of 25 or more, apples, peaches, blackberries, blueberries, huckleberries,
or raspberries shall be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from any
regulated area to or through any point outside thereof; and (ii) no fruits
and vegetables of any kind shall be moved or allowed to be moved interstate
via refrigerator car or motortruck from the State, District, counties, election
districts, or city listed below to or through any point outside of the regulated
areas:

Delaware.—The entire State.

District of Columbia.—The entire District.

Maryland.—Counties of Cecil, Kent, Queen Annes, Somerset, and Worcester ;
the city of Baltimore; all of Caroline County except election districts of Hills-
boro (No. 6), American Corners (No. 8), and Preston (No. 4); election district
of Cambridge (No. 7), in Dorchester County; and election districts of Pitts-
burg (No. 4), Parsons (No. 5), Dennis (No. 6), Trappe (No. 7), Nutters .
(No. 8), Salisbury (No. 9), Delmar (No. 11), Camden (No. 13), Willards
(No. 14), and Fruitland (No. 16), in Wiconvico County.

New Jersey—Counties of Atlantic, Burlington, Camden, Cape May, Cumber-
land, Gloucester, Hunterdon, Mercer, Middlesex, Monmouth, Ocean, Salem,
Somerset, and Union.

Pennsylvania—Counties of Bucks, Chester, Delaware, Lancaster, Mont-
gomery, and Philadelphia.

Virginia.—Counties of Accomac, Arlington, and Northampton.

Provided, That the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine
may by administrative instructions extend or reduce the areas specified in this
regulation when in his judgment such action is considered advisable.
1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 45

(a) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of fruits and
vegetables between October 16 and June 14, inclusive.

(b) No certificate will be required for the interstate movement of fruits and
vegetables on a through bill of lading either from an area not under regulation
through a regulated area to another nonregulated area, or from a regulated
area through a nonregulated area to another regulated area, except that a
cetificate is required for interstate movement to Brewer and Waterville, Maine;
Buffalo, N. Y., or to the other regulated parts of Erie County, N. Y.; Cleveland,
Columbus, Coshocton, and Toledo, Ohio; Burlington, Vt.; and Parkersburg and
Wheeling, W. Va. No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of
fruits and vegetables from Brewer and Waterville, Maine; Buffalo, N. Y.,
or from other parts of Erie County, N. Y.; Cleveland, Columbus, Coshocton, and
Toledo, Ohio; Burlington, Vt.; and Parkersburg and Wheeling, W. Va.

(c) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of fruits and
vegetables when they shall have been manufactured or processed in such a
manner that in the judgment of the inspector no infestation could be
transmitted.

(d) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of any shipments
of apples or peaches of less than 15 pounds to the shipment or of bananas
other than in entire bunches or in clusters of 25 or more.

(e) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of commercially
packed apples in any quantity, except those moving via refrigerator cars or
motor vehicles from the State, District, counties, election districts, or city
listed in paragraph (1) (ii) of this section.

(2) No restrictions are placed on the interstate shipment from the regu-
lated areas of fruits and vegetables other than those mentioned above, except
that any such interstate shipments of fruits and vegetables may be inspected
at any time or place inside or outside the regulated areas and when actually
found to involve danger of dissemination of Japanese beetle to uninfested
localities, measures to eliminate infestation may be required as a condition
of further transportation or delivery.

SECTION B. CONDITIONS OF CERTIFICATION

Certificates may be issued for the interstate movement of fruits and vege-
tables to points outside the regulated areas between June 15 and October 15,
inclusive, under one of the following conditions:

(1) When the fruits and vegetables, moving from a point in the regulated
area other than the State, District, counties, election districts, or city listed
in paragraph 1 (ii) of this regulation, or moving from such Cesignated State,
District, counties, election districts, or city other than by refrigerator car,
have actually been inspected by the United States Department of Agriculture
and found free from infestation. The number of inspection points for such
certification will be limited and their location determined by shipping needs
and further conditioned on the establishment at such points of provisions
satisfactory to the inspector for the handling and safeguarding of such ship-
ments during inspection. Such inspection may be discontinued and certifica-
tion withheld by the inspector during periods of general or unusual flight of
the beetles.

(2) When the fruits and vegetables have been handled or treated under the
supervision of an inspector in Manner and by method to free them from
any infestation.

(3) When the fruits and vegetables have originated outside of the regu-
jated areas and are to be reshipped directly from freight yards, transfer
points, or unloading docks within such areas, under provisions satisfactory to
the inspector for the safeguarding of such shipments pending certification
and reshipment. Certificates on this basis will be issued without inspection
only in cases where, in the judgment of the inspector, the shipments concerned
have not been exposed to infestation while within such freight yards, transfer
points, or unloading docks.

(4) When the fruits and vegetables were grown in districts where the fact
has been established to the satisfaction of the inspector that no infestation
exists and are to be shipped directly from the farms where grown to points
outside the regulated areas, or are shipped from infested districts where the
fact has been established to the satisfaction of the inspector that the Japanese
beetle has not begun or has ceased its flight.
46 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

(5) When the fruits and vegetables other than onions and potatoes, moving
via refrigerator car from the State, District, counties, election districts, or
city listed in paragraph 1 (ii) of this regulation, have been inspected and
loaded in a manner to prevent infestation, in a refrigerator car with closed.
or adequately screened doors and hatches, which car prior to loading has been
determined by an inspector as thoroughly swept and cleaned by the common
earrier in’a manner to rid it of infestation. During the interval between
cleaning.and loading such refrigerator car must be tightly closed and sealed.

(6) When the onions or potatoes moving via refrigerator car from the
State, District, counties, election districts, or city listed in this regulation
have been fumigated in the car, when deemed necessary in the judgment of
the inspector and when the doors and hatches of the car have been tightly
closed or adequately screened under the supervision of an inspector.

REGULATION 6. RESTRICTIONS ON THE MOVEMENT OF NURSERY AND ORNAMENTAL
Stock

SECTION A. CONTROL OF MOVEMENT

Nursery and ornamental stock as defined in regulation 1 shall not be
moved or allowed to be moved interstate from the regulated areas to or through
any point outside thereof, unless a certificate or permit Shall have been issued
therefor by the inspector except as follows:

(1) True bulbs, corms, and tubers, when dormant, except for storage growth,
and when free from soil, are exempt from the requirement of certification,
except that this exemption does not apply to dahlia tubers.

(2) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of nursery and
ornamental stock imported from foreign countries when reshipped from the
port of entry in the unopened original container and labeled as to each con-
tainer with a copy certificate of the country from which it was exported,
a statement of the general nature and quantity of the contents, the name and
address of the consignee, and the country and locality where grown.

(3) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement between October
16 and June 14, inclusive, of cut flowers, aquatic plants, and of portions of
plants without roots and free from soil (Such as branches and twigs of trees
and shrubs, scions, Christmas trees, holly, laurel, and sphagnum moss).

(4) No certificate or permit will be required for the interstate movement of
nursery and ornamental stock when transported by a common earrier on a
through bill of lading either from an area not under regulation through
a regulated area, or from a regulated area through a nonregulated area to
another regulated area.

SECTION B. CONDITIONS GOVERNING THE ISSUANCH OF CERTIFICATES AND PERMITS

For the purpose of certification of nursery and ornamental stock, nurseries,
greenhouses, and other premises concerned in the movement of such stock will
be classified as follows:

(1) Class I.—Nurseries, greenhouses, and other premises concerned in the
movement of nursery and ornamental stock on or within approximately 500 feet
of which no infestation has been found may be classified as class I. Upon
compliance with the requirements of subsection (6) of this section, nursery and
ornamental stock may be certified by the inspector for shipment from such
premises without further inspection, and without meeting the safeguards pre-
seribed as a condition of interstate shipment of plants originating in nurseries
or greenhouses of class III.

(2) Class ITI.—(a) Nurseries, greenhouses, and other premises concerned in
the movement of nursery and ornamental stock on which either grubs in the
soil or one or more beetles have been found, will be classified as class III. Such
classification also may be given to nurseries, ete., in localities known to be
generally infested where one or more beetles or grubs are found in the imme-
diate proximity (within approximately 500 feet) of such nurseries, ete, on
adjacent property or properties. In the ease of nursery properties, under
single ownership and management, but represented by parcels of land widely
separated, such parcels may be independently classified either as class I or
class III upon compliance with such conditions and safeguards as shall be re-
quired by the inspector. Similarly, unit nursery properties, which would other-
wise fall in class III, may be open to subdivision, for the purpose of rating such
1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 47

subdivisions in classes I or III, when in the judgment of the inspector such
action is warranted by recent and scanty infestation limited to a portion of the
nursery concerned: Provided, That the subdivision containing the infestation
shall be clearly marked by boundaries of a permanent nature which shall be
approximately 500 feet beyond the point where the infestation occurs.

(6) Upon compliance with subsections (3) and (6) of this section, nursery
and ornamental stock may be certified by the inspector for shipment from such
premises under any one of the following conditions: (i) That the roots shall
be treated by means approved by the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quaran-
tine in manner and by method satisfactory to the inspector; or (ii) in the case
of plants in which the root system is such that a thorough inspection may be
made, that the soil shall be entirely removed from the stock by shaking or
washing; or (iii) that it shall be shown by evidence satisfactory to the inspector
that the plants concerned were produced in a certified greenhouse.

(3) Greenhouses of class III may be certified upon compliance with all the
following conditions with respect to the greenhouses themselves and to all pot-
ting beds, heeling-in areas, hotbeds, coldframes, and similar plots:

(a) Ventilators, doors, and all other openings in greenhouses or coldframes
on premises in class III shall be kept screened in manner satisfactory to the
inspector during the period of flight of the beetle, namely, south of the northern
boundaries of Maryland and Delaware between June 1 and October 1, inclusive,
or north thereof between June 15 and October 15, inclusive.

(6) Prior to introduction into nurseries or greenhouses, sand, if contaminated
with vegetable matter, soil, earth, peat, compost, or manure taken from infested
locations or which may have been exposed to infestation, must be sterilized or
fumigated under the direction and supervision of, and in manner and by method
satisfactory to the inspector. If such sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, or manure
is not to be immediately used in such greenhouses, it must be protected from
possible infestation in manner and by method satisfactory to the inspector.

(c) All potted plants placed in certified greenhouses of class III and all
potted plants to be certified for interstate movement therefrom (i) shall be
potted in certified soil; (ii) shall, if grown outdoors south of the northern
boundaries of Maryland and Delaware at any time between June 1 and October
1, inclusive, or north thereof at any time between June 15 and October 15, in-
clusive, be kept in screened frames while outdoors; (iii) shall, if grown out-
doors during any part of the year, be placed in beds in which the soil or other
material shall have been treated in manner and by method approved by the
Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine to eliminate infestation; and (iv)
shall comply with such other safeguards as may be required by the inspector.

(4) Cut flowers and other parts of plants without roots or soil may be certi-
fied for movement either (@) when they have been inspected by an inspector
and found free from infestation, or (6) when they have been grown in a green-
house of class I or in a certified greenhouse of class III and are transported
under such safeguards as will in the judgment of the inspector prevent infesta-
tion. (See also sec. A (8) of this regulation. )

(5) Nursery and ornamental stock originating on or moved from unclassified
premises may be certified by the inspector under either one of the following
conditions: (a) That the soil shall be entirely removed from the stock, or (b)
that the roots shall be treated by means approved by the Bureau of Entomology
and Plant Quarantine in manner and by method satisfactory to the inspector, or
(c) that it shall be shown by evidence satisfactory to the inspector that the
accompanying soil was obtained at such points and under such conditions that
in his judgment no infestation could exist therein.

(6) Nurserymen, florists, dealers, and others, in order to maintain their
classified status, (a) shall restrict their purchases or receipts of nursery and
ornamental stock, sand, if contaminated with vegetable matter, soil, earth,
peat, compost, and manure within the regulated area to articles which have been
certified under these regulations as to each such article and the said certificate
shall accompany the articles when moved; (0) shall obtain approval of the
inspector before such articles are received on their premises or moved from
the open on their own premises into certified greenhouses; and (¢) shall also
report immediately in writing all purchases or receipts of such articles secured
from within the regulated area. Nurserymen, florists, dealers, and others
whose premises are classified as class III shall, in addition, report immediately
on forms provided for that purpose all their sales or shipments of such articles
both to points outside the regulated areas and to other classified nurseries
or greenhouses within the regulated areas. Certification may be denied to any

86995—38

2


AS BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

person who has omitted to make the report or reports required by this regula-
tion, and such denial of certification shall continue until the information so:
omitted has been supplied.

(7) Nursery and ornamental stock imported from foreign countries and not
reshipped from the port of entry in the unopened original container may be
certified for movement under these regulations when such stock has been
inspected by an inspector and found free from infestation.

(8) Nursery and ornamental stock originating outside the regulated areas
and certified stock originating in classified nurseries or greenhouses may be
certified for reshipment from premises other than those on which they orig-
inated, under provisions satisfactory to the inspector for the safeguarding of
such stock from infestation at the point of reshipment and en route, and when.
found advisable by the inspector, after reinspection and determination of
freedom from, infestation.

REGULATION 7%. RESTRICTIONS ON THE MOVEMENT oF SAND, Som, HARTH, PEAT,
COMPOST, AND MANURE

SECTION A. CONTROL OF MOVEMENT

Sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure shall not be moved or allowed
to be moved interstate from any point in the regulated areas to or through
any point outside thereof unless a certificate or permit shall have been issued
therefor by the inspector, except as follows:

(1) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of (a) sand for
construction purposes, silica sand, greensand, marl, “bird sand,” “bird gravel,’”
and pottery clay, when free from vegetable matter; (0) such other sands ag
have been treated or processed and Subsequently handled in such manner that
in the judgment of the inspector no Japanese beetle could exist therein, provided.
that each container of such article shall be labeled on the outside thereof as
to nature of contents, except that in case of bulk shipments such label shall
accompany the waybill or other shipping papers; and (c) ground, dried,
imported peat in packages of 5 pounds or less to the package.

(2) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of sand, Soil, earth,
peat, compost, and manure imported from foreign countries when reshipped:
from the port of entry in the unopened original container and labeled as to
each container with the country of origin, and when the shipment is further
protected in manner or method satisfactory to the inspector.

(3) No certificate will be required for the interstate movement of sand,
soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure when transported by a common carrier
on a through bill of lading either from an area not under regulation through
a regulated area, or from a regulated area through a nonregulated area to
another regulated area.

SECTION B. CONDITIONS OF CERTIFICATION

Certificates for the movement of restricted sand, soil, earth, peat, compost,
and manure may be isSued under any one of the following conditions:

(1) When the articles to be moved have originated in districts included in
the regulated area, but in which neither beetles nor grubs in soil have been
found.

(2) When the material consists of fresh manure or of mined, dredged, or
other similar materials, and it has been determined by an inspector that no
infestation could exist therein.

(3) When the material has been removed, under the supervision of an
inspector, from a depth of more than 12 inches below the surface of the ground
and either (a) is to be moved between October 16 and June 14, inclusive, or
(b) is loaded and shipped at points where it has been determined by an
inspector that no general infestation of adult beetles exists, or (c) when the
ears and loading operations are protected by screening under the direction of
and in manner and by method Satisfactory to the inspector.

(4) When the material has been fumigated with carbon disulphide or
otherwise treated under the supervision of and in manner and by method
satisfactory to the inspector. Such fumigation or treatment will be required
as a condition of certification of all restricted sand, soil, earth, peat, compost
and manure, except such as is loaded and shipped in compliance with parar
graphs (1), (2), or (3) hereof.
1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 49

REGULATION 8, CONDITIONS GOVERNING THE PROTECTION OF RESTRICTED ARTICLES
FRoM INFESTATION WHILE IN TRANSIT

Fruits and vegetables, nursery and ornamental stock, and sand, soil, earth,
peat, compost, and manure, moving interstate from or through the regulated
areas to points outside thereof between June 15 and October 15, inclusive,
shall at all times while they are in the regulated areas be screened, covered,
or otherwise protected in manner or method satisfactory to the inspector for
safeguarding the articles from infestation.

Trucks or other road vehicles transporting restricted articles may be sealed
by the inspector at the point of inspection, and all such seals shall remain
intact as long as the vehicle is en route within the regulated area.

REGULATION 9. MARKING AND CERTIFICATION A CONDITION OF INTERSTATE
TRANSPORTATION

(a) Every ear, vehicle, box, basket, or other container of the articles listed,
the interstate movement of which is restricted in regulations 5, 6, and 7, shall
be plainly marked with the name and address of the consignor and the name
and address of the consignee, and shall have securely attached to the outside
thereof a valid certificate or permit issued in compliance with these regula-
tions. In the case of lot shipments by freight, one certificate attached to
one of the containers and another certificate attached to the waybill will be
sufficient.

(6) In the case of bulk carload shipments by rail, the certificate shall accom-
pany the waybill, conductor’s manifest, memorandum, or bill of lading per-
taining to such shipment, and in addition each car shall have securely attached
to the outside thereof a placard showing the number of the certificate or
certificates accompanying the waybill.

(c) In the case of shipment by road vehicle, the certificates shall accompany
the vehicle. .

(d) Certificates shcll be surrendered to the consignee upon delivery of the
shipment.

REGULATION 10. GENERAL CONDITIONS GOVERNING INSPECTION AND ISSUANCE OF
CERTIFICATES AND PERMITS

(a) Persons intending to move or allow to be moved interstate any of the
articles the movement of which is restricted in regulations 5, 6, and 7, shall
make application for inspection and certification as far as possible in advance
of the probable date of shipment, specifying in the application the article
and quantity to be shipped, method of shipment, name and address of the
consignor, and name and address of the consignee.

(b) Applicants for inspection will be required to assemble the articles at
such points as the inspector shall designate and so to place them that inspec-
tion may readily be made; if not so placed, inspection may be refused. All
charges for storage, cartage, and labor incident to inspection, other than the
services of the inspector, shall be paid by the shipper.

(c) Certificates and permits shall be used in counection with the transpor-
tation of only those articles intended to be covered thereby.

(d@) Where the apparent absolute freedom from infestation of any of the
articles enumerated cannot be determined by the inspector, certification will
be refused.

(e) Permits may be issued for the interstate movement of restricted articles
by truck or other road vehicle from a regulated area through a nonregulated
area to another regulated area except that permits issued for the movement
of fruits and vegetables from the State, District, counties, election districts,
or city listed in regulation 5, section A, (1) (ii), shall be limited to green
corn on the cob, beans in the pod, bananas in entire bunches or in clusters
of 25 or more, apples, peaches, blackberries, blueberries, huckleberries, or rasp-
berries. Fruits and vegetables other than the above-named commodities may
be moved from the State, District, counties, election districts, or city listed
in regulation 5, section A, (1) (ii), only under certification,
50 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

REGULATION 11. CANCELATION OF CERTIFICATES

Certificates issued under these regulations may be withdrawn or canceled
by the inspeetor and further certification refused, either for any failure of
compliance with the conditions of these regulations or violation of them, or
whenever in the judgment of the inspector the further use of such certificates
might result in the dissemination of infestation.

REGULATION 12. INSPECTION IN TRANSIT

Any car, vehicle, basket, box, or other container moved interstate or offered
to a common carrier for shipment interstate, which contains or which the
inspector has probable cause to believe contains either infested articles or
articles the movement of which is prohibited or restricted by these regulations,
shall be subject to inspection by an inspector at any time or place.

REGULATION 13. THOROUGH CLEANING REQUIRED OF TRUCKS, WAGONS, CIARS,
Boats, AND OTHER VEHICLES AND CONTAINERS BEFORE MOyING INTERSTATE

Trucks, wagons, cars, boats, and other vehicles and containers which have
been used in transporting any article covered by these regulations within the
regulated areas shall not thereafter be moved or allowed to be moved inter-
state until they have been thoroughly swept and cleaned by the carrier at the
point of unloading or destination.

REGULATION 14. SHIPMENTS BY THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

Articles subject to restriction in these regulations may be moved interstate
by the United States Department of Agriculture for experimental or scientific
purposes, on such conditions and under such safeguards as may be prescribed
by the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine. The container of articles
so moved shall bear, securely attached to the outside thereof, an identifying
tag from the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine showing compliance
with such conditions.

These revised rules and regulations shall be effective on and after April 11,
1938, and shall supersede the rules and regulations promulgated March 1,
1937, as amended effective May 10, 1937.

Done at the city of Washington this 6th day of April 1988.

Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agri-
culture.

[sHAL] H. A. WALLACE,
Secretary of Agriculture.

APPENDIX
PENALTIES

The Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912 (87 Stat. 315), as amended,
provides that no person shall ship or offer for shipment to any common carrier,
nor shall any common carrier receive for transportation or transport, nor shall
any person carry or transport, from any quarantined State or Territory or
District of the United States, or from any quarantined portion thereof, into or
through any other State or Territory or District, any class of nursery stock or
any other class of plants, fruits, vegetables, roots, bulbs, seeds * * * or any
other article * * * gpecified in the notice of quarantine * * * jn manner
or method or under conditions other than those prescribed by the Secretary of
Agriculture. It also provides that any person who shall violate any of the
provisions of this act, or who shall forge, counterfeit, alter, deface, or destroy
any certificate provided for in this act or in the regulations of the Secretary of
Agriculture shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor and shall, upon conviction
thereof, be punished by a fine not exceeding $500, or by imprisonment not
exceeding 1 year, or both such fine and imprisonment, in the discretion of the
court.
1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 51

STATE AND FEDERAL INSPECTION

Certain of the quarantined States have promulgated or are about to promul-
gate quarantine regulations restricting intrastate movement supplemental to the
Federal quarantine. These State regulations are enforced in cooperation with
the Federal authorities. Copies of either the Federal or State quarantine orders
may be obtained by addressing the United States Department of Agriculture,
266 Glenwood Avenue, Bloomfield, N. J.

Subsidiary offices are maintained at the following locations:

Thirteenth Floor, Custom House, Boston, Mass.

Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station, 123 Huntington Street, New
Haven, Conn, -

Room 838, 641 Washington Street, New York, N. Y.

Room 200, 2507 James Street, Syracuse, N. Y.

P. O. Box 1, Trenton, N. J., or Yardville Road, White Horse, N. J.

Kotler Building, Main and High Streets, Glassboro, N. J.

Frankfort Arsenal, Bridge and Tacony Streets, Frankford, Philadelphia, Pa.

Warehouse No. 4, General Depot, United States Army, New Cumberland, Pa.

Room 438-K, New Post Office Building, Pittsburgh, Pa.

Room 210, New Post Office Building, Dover, Del. °

Room 306, Post Office Building, Calvert and Fayette Streets, Baltimore, Md.

Room 202, New Post Office Building, Main Street, Salisbury, Md.

Washington County Annex Building, Hagerstown, Md.

307 Mellett Building, Canton, Ohio.

1005 Grace-American Building, Richmond, Va.

Room 217, New Federal Building, Granby Street and Brambleton Avenue,
Norfolk, Va.

Arrangements may be made for inspection and certification of shipments
from the District of Columbia by calling District 6350, branch 2589, the inspec-
tion house of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, Twelfth Street .
and Constitution Avenue NW., Washington, D. C.

GENERAL OFFICES OF STATES COOPERATING

is Department of Entomology, Agricultural Experiment Station, New Haven,
onn.
Board of Agriculture, Dover, Del.
State horticulturist, Augusta, Maine.
Department of Entomology, University of Maryland, College Park, Md.
eS of Plant Pest Control, Department of Agriculture, Statehouse, Boston,
ass.
Deputy commissioner, Department of Agriculture, Durham, N. H.
Bureau of Plant Industry, Department of Agriculture, Trenton, N. J.
eee of Plant Industry, Department of Agriculture and Markets, Albany,
ake
Division of Plant Industry, Department of Agriculture, Columbus, Ohio.
Bureau of Plant Industry, Department of Agriculture, Harrisburg, Pa.
Bureau of Entomology, Department of Agriculture, Statehouse, Providence,
I

Entomologist, Department of Agriculture; Montpelier, Vt.

Division of Plant Industry, Department of Agriculture and Immigration,
Richmond, Va.

State entomologist, Department of Agriculture, Charleston, W. Va.

[Copies of the foregoing revised regulations were sent to all common carriers doing
business in or through the quarantined area. ]

Notice To GENERAL Pusitic THROUGH NEWSPAPERS

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURD,
BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE,
Washington, D. C., April 6, 1398.
Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority
conferred on him by the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat.
52 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

315), as amended, has promulgated a revision of the rules and regulations
(sixteenth revision) supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 48, on account
of the Japanese beetle, effective on and after April 11, 1938. The purpose of
the revision is to include in the regulated area part of Schuyler County, N. ay
parts of the Ohio counties of Coshocton, Portage, and Summit, and parts of
West Virginia counties of Berkeley and Jefferson. There were also added areas
in the following counties, parts of which were formerly under regulation:
Frederick County, Md., Tompkins County, N. Y., Stark County, Ohio, Warren
County, Pa., and Princess Anne County, Va. Wheeling, W. Va., and Coshocton,
Ohio, are brought under regulation. Lancaster County, Pa., has been added to
the special area from which the movement of fruits and vegetables by motor-
truck or refrigerator car is regulated. The restrictions on the movement of sand
are modified. Of interest to nurserymen is the elimination of restrictions on
the movement of aquatic plants except during the period from June 15 to
October 15, inclusive.

Copies of the revised regulations may be obtained from the Bureau of
Entomology and Plant Quarantine, United States Department of Agriculture,
Washington, D. C.

H. A. WALLACE,
Secretary of Agriculture.

[Published in the following newspapers: The Hartford Times, Hartford, Conn.,
April 16, 1938; the Evening Journal, Wilmington, Del., April 15, 1938; the Press-Herald,
Portland, Maine, April 16, 1938; the Sun, Baltimore, Md., April 16, 19388; the Post,
Boston, Mass., April 16, 1938; the Union, Manchester, N. H., April 16, 1938; the News,
Newark, N. J., April 16, 19388; the Times, New York, N. Y., April 16, 1938; the Press,
Cleveland, Ohio, April 15, 1938; the Bulletin, Philadelphia, Pa., April 15, 1938; the
Bulletin, Providence, R. I., April 15, 1938; the Free Press, Burlington, Vt., April 16,
19388; the News Leader, Richmond, Va., April 15, 1938; the Gazette, Charleston, W. Va.,
April 16, 1938; and the Evening Star, Washington, D. C., April 16, 1938.]

INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS

Post OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, June 13, 1938.
Postmaster:

My Dear Sir: Your attention is invited to the inclosed copy of the latest
revision of Quarantine No. 48 of the United States Department of Agriculture
(effective April 11, 1938), extending the area and modifying the regulations
in connection with the Japanese beetle quarantine, by which you will please be
governed. See paragraph 1, section 595, Postal Laws and Regulations.

Very truly yours,
Ramsey S. BLAckE,

Third Assistant Postmaster General.

B. E. P..Q. 473.

ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS—F'UMIGATION OF POTATOES BY METHYL BROMIDE
AS A CONDITION OF CERTIFICATION OF POTATOES MOVING BY REFRIGERATOR CAB
FRoM THE AREA LISTED IN REGULATION 5 OF QUARANTINE No. 48

[Approved April 30, 1938; effective May 2, 1938]

Regulation 5, section B, paragraph (6) of the Japanese beetle quarantine (No.
48) authorizes the issuance of certificates for the interstate movement of pota-
toes via refrigerator car from the area listed in that regulation to points out-
side the regulated areas between June 15 and October 15 when the potatoes have
been fumigated in the car, when deemed necessary in the judgment of the
inspector and when the doors and hatches of the car have been tightly closed
or adequately screened under the supervision of an inspector.

TREATMENT AUTHORIZED

' The treatment described herein has been found to be effective against the
Japanese beetle and such treatment is authorized as a basis for certification of
1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 53

potatoes moving to points outside the regulated areas between June 15 and
October 15 via refrigerator car when such treatment is carried out under the
supervision of an inspector and in a manner satisfactory to him.

TREATMENT METHOD

Fumigation of potatoes in dry refrigerator cars with methyl bromide at a
dosage of 2 pounds per 1,000 cubic feet of space, including the space occupied
by the potatoes and bunkers of the cars, for a period of 2 hours during which
time the car shall remain tightly closed with the plugs in place in the ventilator
hatehes. The temperature within the car when fumigated shall be not less
than 70° F. Provision shall be made for circulating the mixture of air and
fumigant in the car for as long a time as is deemed necessary by the inspector.
At the end of the fumigation period the hatches shall be opened, the plugs
removed, screens placed in the hatch openings, and the car shipped under
standard ventilation.

In authorizing the movement of potatoes fumigated according to the require-
ments stated above, it is to be understood that no liability shall attach either
to the United States Department of Agriculture or to any of its employees in
the event of injury.

CAUTION: Methyl bromide is a gas at ordinary temperatures. It is colorless
and practically odorless in concentration used for the fumigation of potatoes.
It is a poison, and the operator should use an approved gas mask when exposed
to the gas at concentrations used in fumigation, and when opening the hatches
for ventilating the cars. The car should not be entered until it is well aerated.

AvERY S. Hoyt,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO MEXICAN FRUITFLY QUARANTINE
(NO. 64)

Aprit 8, 19388.
B. E. P. Q. 472 (Superseding P. Q. C. A. 329).

ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS—STERILIZATION OF GRAPEFRUIT AND ORANGES
BY HEAT UNDER THE MEXICAN FRUITFLY QUARANTINE

[Approved April 5, 1938; effective April 8, 1938]
INTRODUCTORY NOTE

Investigations in sterilizing fruit for the Mexican fruitfly have shown that
the holding period at 110° F. can be reduced from 8 to 6 hours provided the
time for heating the fruit to this temperature is at least 8 hours, making a min-
imum treating period of 14 hours. In order that shippers may take advantage of
this reduction, the administrative instructions issued as circular P. Q. C. A. 329
on March 3, 1932, are modified and superseded by the following instructions.

Under the authority contained in paragraph (e) of regulation 6 of the Mexi-
can fruitfly quarantine regulations, as revised effective October 15, 1937, and
having determined that shipments of unsterilized oranges and grapefruit from
infested areas might involve risk of spread of the Mexican fruitfly, notice is
hereby given that sterilization is required as a condition of issuance of permits
for the interstate movement of oranges and grapefruit produced in areas desig-
nated by the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine as in-
fested. Such sterilization shall be in accordance with one of the following
prescribed treatments:

(1) Heating the fruit to a temperature of 110° F. or above (not to exceed
112°) in the approximate center of the fruit and holding the temperature of
110° or above (not to exceed 112°) for a period of 8 hours;

(2) Heating the fruit for a period of not less than 14 hours during which
time the fruit shall be raised to a temperature of 110° F. at the approximate
54 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

center of the fruit and shall be maintained at or above that temperature for the
last 6 hours of such treatment.

No specifications as to the exact methods and equipment for obtaining these
conditions are prescribed. Available information clearly indicates that by the
application of dry heat the required temperatures cannot be reached without
injury to the fruit. To prevent such injury it is necessary to maintain a very
high humidity throughout the period of treatment. In the tests where suc-
cessful performance was obtained, live steam as the source of heat was applied
in such a way as to secure as nearly as possible a uniform distribution of
steam-heated air so directed as not to discharge directly on the fruit. The
air temperature ranged from 110° to 112° F., and the air was very moist.
The fruit was held in field boxes stacked four boxes high and without special
means of separating the boxes in each stack. The experiments indicate that
the fruit should be sterilized after coloring, if this is necessary, and before
packing for shipment, and then cooled down to a temperature around 45° as
soon as possible after sterilizing. Wax or paraffine, either dry or in solution,
should not be applied to this fruit either before or after sterilization.

Such treatment is authorized in sterilization plants in the regulated area
which are approved by the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine. The
Bureau will approve only those plants which are adequately equipped to
handle and sterilize the fruit. Such sterilization will be done under the super-
vision of inspectors of the Bureau. These inspectors should at all times be
given access to fruit while in process of sterilization. They will supervise
the movement of the fruit from the car to and from the sterilizing rooms. :

While the results of the experiments so far conducted have been successful,
it should be emphasized that inexactness and carelessness in operation may
result in injury to fruit. In authorizing the movement of fruit sterilized in
accordance with the above requirements, it is understood that the Department
does not accept responsibility for fruit injury.

Avery S. Hoyt,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO WHITE-PINE BLISTER RUST

QUARANTINE (NO. 63)
JUNE 8, 1988.

WHITE-PINE BLISTER RUST QUARANTINE REGULATIONS MODIFIED

(Press notice)

All restrictions on the interstate movement of five-leaved pines—except to
points in two pine-growing regions in which the blister rust has not been found,
one in the West and the other in the Southeast—will be lifted, it was an-
nounced by the Secretary of Agriculture today, in a modification of the white-
pine blister rust quarantine regulations, which becomes effective July 1.

An embargo is placed on the interstate movement of five-leaved pines into
the Western States of Arizona, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah, Wyo-
ming, and part of California, and into the Southeastern States of Georgia,
Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee, from States other
than these 11 entire States and from 10 northern California counties.

When the earlier blister rust quarantines were enacted and for several years
thereafter there were several additional regions with extensive areas of com-
mercially valuable stands of five-leaved pines in which the rust had not
appeared. The restrictions in effect were designed to prevent the artificial
spread of the disease into such regions, and the quarantines, first enacted over
20 years ago, have been effective in delaying the spread of the rust while
control measures were being developed and applied.

The rust has now become established, however, in most of the commercially
valuable pine-producing areas of the country. It has been found in 25 States.
Owing to this condition and the fact that the disease can, under favorable
conditions, spread naturally from pines to Ribes for a distance of 150 miles
or more, it is believed there is no biolegically sound basis for continuing the
former restrictions.
1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 55

The currant and gooseberry shipping regulations also are revised. The
extensive Federal-State control work throughout the infected States is con-
tinued, and in order to protect accomplishments and to maintain sanitation
zones around the valuable pine stands, the control-area permit requirement
is extended to apply to shipments to 23 States. The requirements as_ to
dormancy, defoliation, or dipping of currant and gooseberry plants. are con-
tinued in the case of shipments to the 12 pine-growing States to which pine
shipments are prohibited. The embargo as to shipments of European black
currants throughout the United States except into the 12 central States of
Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Kansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Ne-
braska, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Dakota, and Texas is continued
unchanged.

Copies of the regulations of the quarantine. as revised, may be obtained from
the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, United States Department
of Agriculture, Washington, D. C.

WHITE-PINE BLISTER RUST QUARANTINE
REVISION OF REGULATIONS
INTRODUCTORY NOTE

Several important changes are made in the restrictions on the interstate
movement of five-leaved pines and currant and gooseberry plants in the follow-
“ing revision of the white-pine blister rust quarantine regulations. An embargo
is placed on the interstate movement of five-leaved pines into two pine-growing
regions, one in the West comprising the States of Arizona, Colorado, Nevada,
New Mexico, Utah, Wyoming, and part of California, and the other in the
Southeast comprising the States of Georgia, Kentucky, North Carolina, South
Carolina, and Tennessee. The interstate movement of such pines from States
other than these 11 entire States and from 10 northern California counties into
the regions described is prohibited. The new regulations are designed to
protect these pine-growing areas in which the blister rust is not known to exist.

No other restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of five-leaved
pines unless they are visibly infected with the rust.

The dipping and dormancy requirements for currant and gooseberry plants
which formerly applied only to shipments originating in the infected States, now
apply to all shipments consigned to the States and counties listed above, from
any State or District other than the 11 entire States and from the 10 northern
California counties.

The control-area permit requirement now applies to currant and gooseberry
plants consigned to 23 States as listed in regulation 3 (0). The aim of this
requirement is to strengthen the Federal-State control activities carried on in
areas surrounding valuable stands of five-leaved pine in these States.

No modification is made in the embargo as to all interstate movement of
European black currant plants and of the wild native western currant plants
(Ribes bracteosum and R. petiolare) except as to unrestricted movement into
and between 12 central States as heretofore.

SUMMARY
Five-leaved pine shipments (regulation 2)

Five-leaved pines are prohibited movement into the following regions, except
that no restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of such pines from
or between any of these 11 entire States nor from the part of California
described: Arizona, California (that part lying south of the south line of the
counties of Humboldt, Trinity, Tehama, Butte, Plumas, and Lassen), Colorado,
Georgia, Kentucky, Nevada, New Mexico, North Carolina, South Carolina, Ten-
nessee, Utah, and Wyoming.

No pines or their parts visibly infected with blister rust may be shipped into
any State or District unless shipped in a preservative or under special authori-
zation of regulation 7.

For permit requirements in shipping five-leaved pines for planting on Federal
lands in the above regions see regulation 7.

86995—38&—_—3
56

BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE >

[| April-June

Currant and Gooseberry Shipments (regulation 3)

Requirements as to shipments from any State or District into each of the

States, as follows:



Destination
(State)

Arkansas
California (that part south
of the southern line of
the counties of Hum- |
boldt, Trinity, Tehama, |
Butte, Plumas and
Lassen).
That part north of
the above line.
Coloridors sess

Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Milissounise: 22-2 = _ ae

New Hampshire
New Jersey



Oregon ;
Pennsylvania

Ribes

nigrum (Euro-

pean black currant);

Rp.
Rf.

and
(wild,

bracteosum
petiolare

western currants). Re-

stric



Rhode island
South Carolina
South Dakota

West Virginia._.__________
Wisconsin
Wiyomings= ste-ess See



tions



Other currant and gooseberry plants

Control-area permit re-
quired from State of
destination



Plants must be either
dipped! or: dormant
and defoliated

No.
ae with exceptions.?

Yes, with exceptions.?

No.



Yes, with exceptions.?

Yes, with exceptions.?
No.

No.
Yes, with exceptions.’
No.
Yes, with exceptions.”



as with exceptions.’
No.
Yes, with exceptions.2
No.

Yes, with excepticns. ?

Yes, with exceptions.”

1 Plants must be dipped immediately before shipment in a lime-sulphur solution of 4.5° B. Prepare this
olution by diluting 1 part of commercial concentrated lime-sulphur solution of 32° B. with 8 parts of water.

2 Plants originating in Arizona, Colorado, Georgia, Kentucky, Nevada, New Mexico, North Carolina,
South Carolina, Tennessee, Utah, or Wyoming, or in that part of California lying south of the south line of
the counties of Humboldt, Trinity, Tehama, Butte, Plumas, and Lassen, are not required to be dipped or

dormant.

Applications for control-area permits

-Shippers should apply for control-area permits (Form 415) to the officer
of the State to which shipments are to be made (addresses of officers are listed
1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 57

below) stating the kind of plants to be shipped and the names and addresses
of the consignor and consignee.
Federal inspector designated to act in the State into which shipment is

State to be made

Calhfornia=s== ==: Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine, Sacramento, Calif.

Connecticut__--~- State entomologist, Agricultural Experiment Station, New Haven, Conn.

Georgviat =. 3%. State entomologist, Atlanta, Ga. ;

cdanos< 2 Director, Bureau of Plant Industry, Boise, Idaho.

Maine Ss s State horticulturist, Augusta, Maine.

Maryland___-_-_~_- State plant pathologist, College Park, Md.

Massachusetts__- Director, Division of Plant Pest Control, State House. Boston, Mass.

Michigan_---~__ Inspector in charge, orchard and nursery inspection, Department of Agri-
culture, Lansing, Mich.

Minnesota—-___- Commissioner of conservation, State Office Building, St. Paul, Minn.

Montana——— == _. Chief, Division of Horticulture, Missoula, Mont.

New Hampshire_. State nursery inspector, Durham, N. H.

New Jersey——-—-_-_. Chief, Bureau of Plant Industry, Trenton, N. J.

INewevoerke =. =. Director, Bureau of Plant Industry, Albany, N. Y. |

North Carolina__ State entomologist, Department of Agriculture, Raleigh, N. C.

Ohi = ere: eu Chief, Division of Plant Industry, Columbus, Ohio.

Pennsylvania___. Chief, Division of Forest Protection, Harrisburg, Pa.

Rhode Island____ State entomologist, 310 State House, Providence, R. I. 7

Tennessee___-_-__. State entomologist and plant pathologist, 406 Morrill Hall, University
of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tenn.

Merniont=_=>2- = Forest commissioner, Montpelier, Vt. ei! i

Paroinig— == 3 State entomologist, 1112 State Office Building, Richmona, Va. <

Washington__-_-_ Supervisor of horticulture, Department of Agriculture, Olympia, Wash.

West Virginia___ Commissioner, Department of Agriculture, Charleston, W. Va.

iWaseonsin= _- = State entomologist, Madison, Wis.

AvERY S. Hoyt,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 63

[Approved August 27, 1926; effective October 1, 1926; supersedes Quarantine No. 26, as
amended, and Quarantine No. 54, as extended] :

I, C. F. Marvin, Acting Secretary of Agriculture, have determined that it is
necessary to quarantine every State of the continental United States and the
District of Columbia, in order to prevent the spread of the white-pine blister
rust (Cronartium ribicola Fischer), a dangerous plant disease not heretofore
widely prevalent or distributed within and throughout the United States.

Now, therefore, under authority conferred by the Plant Quarantine Act
of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended by the act of Congress approved
March 4, 1917 (389 Stat. 1134, 1165), and having duly given the public hearing
required thereby, I do quarantine every State in the continental United States
and the District of Columbia, effective on and after October 1, 1926. Here-
after, under the authority of said act of August 20, 1912, amended as afore-
said, no five-leaved pines (Pinus) or currant and gooseberry plants (Ribes
and Grossularia, including cultivated or wild or ornamental sorts) shall be
moved or allowed to be moved from any such State or from the District of
Columbia into or through any other State in the continental United States
or the District of Columbia, except in manner or method or under conditions
prescribed in the rules and regulations supplemental hereto and in amendments
thereof: Provided, That the restrictions of this quarantine and the rules and
regulations supplemental hereto may be limited to the areas in a quarantined
State now or hereafter designated by the Secretary of Agriculture as infected
when said State shall have provided for and enforced such control measures
with respect to such designated areas as, in the judgment of the Secretary of
Agriculture, shall be deemed adequate to effect the control and prevent the
spread of the white-pine blister rust: Provided further, That, for the enforce-
ment of the restrictions under this quarantine on the interstate movement of
five-leaved pines and currant and gooseberry plants, all interstate shipments
of nursery stock or other plants shall be subject to inspection at place of
shipment or destination or at any point en route, by duly authorized inspectors
of the United States Department of Agriculture.

Done at the city of Washington this 27th day of August 1926.

Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agri-
culture.

[SEAL] C. F. Marvin,

Acting Secretary of Agriculture.
58 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE ~ [April-June

REVISED RULES AND REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE OF QUARANTINE
NO. 63

[Approved June 1, 1938; effective July 1, 1938]
¢
REGULATION 1. DEFINITIONS

For the purpose of these regulations the following words, names, and terms
shall be construed, respectively, to mean:

(a) White-pine blister rust,.or blister rust. ine fungus a Tueiee caused by
Cronartium ribicola Fischer.

(6) Five-leaved pines.—Entire plants with roots, of the following species
belonging to the genus Pinus:



American species:

Ayacahuite pine (P. ayacahuite Ehrenb.).
Bristlecone pine (P. aristata Engelm.).

Foxtail pine (P. balfowriana Murr.).

Limber pine (P. flexilis James).

Mexican white pine (P. strobiformis Engelm.).
Sugar pine (P. lambertiana Dougl.).

Western white or silver pine (P. monticola Dougl.).
Whitebark pine (P. albicaulis Engelm.).

White pine (northern) (P. strobus L.).

Foreign species:

Balkan pine (P. peuce Griseb.).

Chinese white pine (P. armandi Franch.).
Himalayan or Bhotan pine (P. excelsa Wall.).
Japanese white pine (P. parviflora Sieb. and Zuce.).
Korean pine (P. koraiensis Sieb. and Zuce.).

Swiss stone pine (P. cembra L.).

(ce) Currant and gooseberry plants.—Plants, cuttings, or scicns, belonging to
the genera Ribes L., and Grossularia (Tourn.) Mill., including cultivated or
wild or ornamental sorts.

(d) European black currant plants——Plauts, cuttings, stocks, scions, buds,
seeds, or parts of plants of Ribes nigrum L.

(e) Inspector.—An inspector of the United States Department of Agriculture.

(f) Dormant.—In a nonvegetative state, with inactive buds.

(g) Moved interstate—Shipped, offered for shipment to a common earrier,
received for transportation or transported by a common carrier, or carried
transported, moved or allowed to be moved from one State or District of the
United States into or through any other State or District.

REGULATION 2. CONTROL OF MOVEMENT OF FIVE-LEAVED PINES

(a) Five-leaved pines shall not be moved interstate into any of the States of
Arizona, Colorado, Georgia, Kentucky, Nevada, New Mexico, North Carolina,
South Carolina, Tennessee, Utah, or Wyoming, nor into that part of California
lying south of the south line of the counties of Humboldt, Trinity, Tehama,
Butte, Plumas, and Lassen: Provided, That no restrictions are placed on the
interstate movement of such pines from or between any of the 11 above-
named entire States nor from the part of California described.

(b) Five-leaved pines or parts thereof, when visibly infected with the white-
pine blister rust shall not be moved interstate into any State or District
unless such pines are shipped in a preservative or are authorized and labeled
in accordance with the provisions of regulation 7.

REGULATION 3. CONTROL OF MOVEMENT OF CURRANT AND GOOSEBERRY PLANTS

(a) Embargo on European black currant plants.—No European black currant
plants (Ribes nigrum) and no currant plants of the wild native western species
known as &. bracteosum and R. petiolare shall be moved interstate in the
continental United States except into or within the area comprised in the
States of Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Kansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri,
Nebraska, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Dakota, and Texas.
1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 59

(b) Control-area permits required.—No currant or gooseberry plants of any
species or variety shall be moved interstate into any of the States of California,’
Connecticut, Georgia,” Idaho, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Min-
nesota, Montana, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina,
Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Tennessee,” Vermont, Virginia, Washington,
West Virginia, or Wisconsin, unless a Federal control-area permit has been
issued therefor by an inspector designated to act for the Bureau of Entomology
and Plant Quarantine in such State (see addresses in Summary). Such
permit will not be issued if the plants are to be shipped into or planted in
areas in which five-leaved pines have been protected from white-pine blister
rust or in which such protection is contemplated. The continuance of this
requirement as to any State is conditioned on the State providing such legal
or other control on the planting and movement therein of currant and goose-
berry plants as in the judgment of the Secretary of Agriculture may be deemed
adequate to control white-pine blister rust in the protected areas.

(c) Dipping or dormancy required—No currant or gooseberry plants of any
species or variety shall be moved interstate into any of the States of Arizona,
Colorado, Georgia,” Kentucky, Nevada, New Mexico, North Carolina,? South
Carolina, Tennessee,? Utah, or Wyoming, nor into that part of California? lying
south of the south line of the counties ef Humboldt, Trinity, Tehama, Butte,
Plumas, and Lassen, unless such plants have either been dipped (except the
roots) immediately prior to shipment in lime-sulphur solution of a strength
of 4.5° B.*, or are shipped in a dormant and defoliated condition. Such lime-
sulphur dip shall be plainly visible on said plants and be easily detectable
by odor, the judgment of the inspector to be final as to adequacy of the dip
and as to the condition of the plants as to dormancy or defoliation: Provided,
That no such dipping or dormancy restrictions are placed on the interstate
movement of currant and gooseberry plants from or between any of the 11
above-named entire States, nor from the part of California described.

REGULATION 4. MARKING REQUIREMENTS

(a) Every box, bale, or other container of plants for which permits are
required by regulations 3 and-7 shall be plainly marked with the name and
address of the consignor and of the consignee, and shall bear the permit securely
attached to the outside thereof.

(6) The permit in the case of carload shipments by rail shall accompany the
waybill, conductor’s manifest, memorandum, or bill of lading pertaining to such
shipment. In the case of shipment by road vehicle, the permit shall accompany
the vehicle.

REGULATION 5. INSPECTION IN TRANSIT

Every car, vehicle, box, bale, or other container moved interstate or offered to
a common carrier for shipment interstate, which contains or which the inspector
has probable cause to believe contains either infected articles or articles the
movement of which is prohibited or restricted by these regulations, shall be
subject to inspection by an inspector at any time or place.

REGULATION 6. CANCELATION OF PERMITS

Permits issued under these regulations may be withdrawn or canceled and
further permits refused, whenever in the judgment of the Bureau of Entomol-
ogy and Plant Quarantine, the further use of such permits might result in the
dissemination of the white-pine blister rust. After any such permit is with-
drawn or has expired, the further use of any permit tags issued thereunder is
prohibited.

REGULATION 7. SHIPMENTS FOR REFORESTATION, EXPERIMENTAL, EDUCATIONAL, OR
SCIENTIFIC PURPOSES

Plants subject to restriction in these regulations may be moved interstate
for reforestation purposes on Federal lands, or for experimental, educational,

* Dormancy and defoliation or lime-sulphur dip is also required for shipments to these
States. (See par. (c)).

2Control-area permits are also required for shipments to these States. (See par. (b).)

8 Prepare this solution by diluting 1 part of commercial concentrated lime-sulphur
solution of 32° B. with 8 parts of water.
60 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

or scientific purposes on such conditions and under such safeguards as may be
prescribed by the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine. The container
of plants so moved, except when shipped to or in care of the Inspection House,
Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, Washington, D. C., shall bear,
securely attached to the outside thereof, an identifying tag from the Bureau of
Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

Identifying tags to authorize the interstate movement of five-leaved pines for
planting on Federal lands in any of the 11 entire States named and part of
California described in regulation 2, will be issued only on condition that such
pines have been raised under such sanitation conditions as in the judgment of
the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine are adequate to protect them
from infection by white-pine blister rust: Provided, That no permit is required
for shipping such pines from or between any of the 11 entire States named nor
from the part of California described.

These revised rules and regulations shall be effective on and after July 1, 1938,
and shall on that date supersede the rules and regulations promulgated Feb-
ruary 16, 1937.

Done at the city of Washington this 1st day of June 19388.

Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.

[SEAL] H. A. WALLACE,
Secretary of Agriculture.

[Copies of the foregoing revised regulations were sent to all common carriers doing
‘business in or through the quarantined area.]

NotTIcE TO GENERAL PuBLIic THROUGH NEWSPAPERS

UNITED STATES DEPARMENT OF AGRICULTURE,
BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE,
Washington, D. C., June 1, 1938.

Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority
-conferred on him by the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315),
as amended, has promulgated a revision, effective July 1, 1938, of the rules and
regulations supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 63, on account of the
white-pine blister rust. This revision makes extensive changes in the require-
‘ments relating to the interstate movement of five-leafed pines and currant and
gooseberry plants.

Copies of the revised regulations may be obtained from the Bureau of
Entomology and Plant Quarantine, United States Department of Agriculture,

‘Washington, D. C.
H. A. WALLACE,

Secretary of Agriculture.

[Published in the following newspapers: The News, Birmingham, Ala., June 10, 1938; the
“Republican, Phoenix, Ariz., June 13, 1988; the Arkansas Gazette, Little Rock, Ark., June
10; 29385 the Herald and Express, "Los Angeles, Calif., June 13. 1938; the Post, Denver,
Colo., June 10, 1938 ; the Times, Hartford, Conn., June 6, 1938; the Journal- -Every Evening,
Wilmington, Del., June 9, 1938; the Star, Washington, 10), C., June 9, 1938; the Florida
Times-Union, Jacksonville, Fla., June 10, 1938; the Constitution, Atlanta, Ga., June 10,
1938; the Idaho Statesman, Boise, Idaho, June 11, 1938; the Tribune, Chicago, Ill., June
11, 1938; the News, Indianapolis, Ind., June OF 1938; the Register, Des Moines, Iowa, June
11, 1938 the Beacon, Wichita, Kans., June 10, 1938; the Courier- Journal, Louisville, Ky.,
June 10, 1938; the Times-Picayune. ‘New Orleans, La., June 10, 1938; the Press- Herald,
Portland, Maine, June 10, 1938; the Sun, Baltimore, Md., June 9, 1938; the Post, Boston,
Mass., June 9, 1938; the News, Detroit, Mich., June 9, "1938: the News. Jackson, Miss.,
June 10, 1938; the Journal, Minneapolis. Minn., ‘June 10, 1938; "the Star, Kansas City, Mo.,
June 9, 1938; the Montana ‘Standard, Butte, Mont., June Alte 1938 ; the World- Herald, Omaha,
Nebr., June 10, 1938; the Gazette, Reno, Nev., June 11, 19388; the Union, Manchester, INS Ee:
June 10, 1938; the News, Newark, N. Je June 9, 1938; the ‘Journal, Albuquerque, N. Mex.,
June 11, 1938; the Times, New York, N. SVE June 9, 1938; the Observer, Charlotte, N. CF
June 9, 1938; the Forum, Fargo, N. Dak., June 10, 1938; the Press, Cleveland, Ohio, June
9, 1938; the Oklahoman, Oklahoma City, Okla., June 13, 1938; the Oregon Journal, Port-
land, Oreg., June 138, 1938; the Bulletin, Philadelphia, ’Pa., June 8, 1938; the Bulletin,
Providence, R. June 9, 1938; the News, Greenville, S. C. June 9, 1938; the Argus-
Leader, Sioux Pails S. Dak., June 10, 1938; the Commercial Appeal, Memphis, "Tenn., June
10, 1938; the Chronicle, Houston, Tex., June 10, 1938; the Tribune, Salt Lake City, "Utah,
June lets 1938: the Free Press, Burlington, Waters June 9, 1938; the News Leader, Richmond,
Va., June 8, 1938; the Times, Seattle, Wash., June “AIGY 1938; the Gazette, Charleston,
W. Va., June 9, 1938 ; the Journal, Milwaukee, Wis., June 10, 1938 ; the Wyoming State
Tribune- Leader, Cheyenne, Wyo., June 15, 1938.]
1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 61

INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS

Post OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, July 8, 1938.

Quarantine Order No. 63 of the United States Department of Agriculture on
aecount of the white-pine blister rust has been revised effective July 1, 1938, so
as to modify the restrictions on the interstate movement of five-leaved pines, and
to extend the control-area permit requirement relating to the shipment of currant
and gooseberry plants.

Under the revision an embargo is placed on interstate movement of five-leaved
pines into Arizona, Colorado, Georgia, Kentucky, Nevada, New Mexico, North
Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Utah, Wyoming, and into that part of
California lying south of the south line of the counties of Humboldt, Trinity,
Tehama, Butte, Plumas, and Lassen, from ail other parts of the continental
United States. No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of such
pines from or between any of these 11 entire States, nor the part of California
described, except that no pines or their parts which are visibly infected with
blister rust may be shipped into any State or District unless in a preservative
or under a special authorization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quaran-
tine, United States Department of Agriculture.

With regard to currant and gooseberry plants, the requirements as to dor-
mancy, defoliation, or dipping in the prescribed lime-suiphur solution* now
apply in the case of shipments to the 12 protected pine-growing States as de-
seribed above. An embargo is placed on shipments of European black-currant
plants and currant plants of the wild native western species from any part of
the continental United States except into or within the area comprised in the
States of Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Kansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri,
Nebraska, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Dakota, and Texas.

No parcel containing currant or gooseberry plants of any species or variety
shall be accepted for mailing interstate into any of the States of California,
Connecticut, Georgia, Idaho, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minne-
sota, Montana, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Ohio,
Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Tennessee, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, West
Virginia, or Wisconsin unless accompanied with a Federal control-area permit
issued therefor by an inspector designated to act for the Bureau of Entomology
and Plant Quarantine, United States Department of Agriculture, in the State
to which the parcel is sent.

Mailers desiring to secure control-area permits (Form 415) should apply to
the officer of the State into which shipments are to be made stating the kind of
plants to be shipped and the names and addresses of the sender and addressee.
The addresses of such officers are shown below:

Federal inspector designated to act in the State into which shipment is to

State be made
@Calitornin..- = Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine, Sacramento, Calif.
Connecticut___--~_. State Entomologist, Agricultural Experiment Station, New Haven, Conn.
Georgia________-- State Entomologist, Atlanta, Ga.
TAN ee Director, Bureau of Plant Industry, Boise, Idaho.
Maines = — 2 State Horticulturist, Augusta, Maine.
Margiand—-——._-—, State Plant Pathologist, College Park, Md.
Massachusetts_-_-_-. Director, Division of Plant Pest Control, Statehouse, Boston, Mass.
Michigaits == =s~ ... Inspector in Charge, Orchard and Nursery Inspection, Department of
Agriculture, Lansing, Mich.
Minnesota______-. Commissioner of Conservation, State Office Building, St. Paul, Minn.
Monin ao Chief, Division of Horticulture, Missoula, Mont.
New Hampshire___ State Nursery Inspector, Durham, N. H.
New Jersey—--__-- Chief, Bureau of Plant Industry, Trenton, N. J.
Newey onk- .. 3 3.. Director, Bureau of Plant Industry, Albany, N. Y.
North Carolina_-_- State Entomologist, Department of Agriculture, Raleigh, N. C.
Cie ute re 2k. Chief, Division of Plant Industry, Columbus, Ohio.
Pennsylvania__--- Chief, Division of Forest Protection, Harrisburg, Pa.
Rhode Island__-~--. State Entomologist, 8310 Statehouse, Providence, R. I.
TeNnessee..______. State Entomologist and Plant Pathologist, 406 Morrill Hall, University
of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tenn.
Vermont.§.2ic2«.—- Forest Commissioner, Montpelier, Vt.
Virviniass 22... State Entomologist, 1112 State Office Building, Richmond, Va.
Washington_-__-~-. Supervisor of Horticulture, Department of Agriculture, Olympia, Wash.
West Virginia__~_.- Commissioner, Department of Agriculture, Charleston, W. Va.
Wisconsin_—_____- State Entomologist, Madison, Wis.



‘Prepare this solution by diluting 1 part of commercial concentrated lime-sulphur solu-
tion of 32° B. with 8 parts of water. :
62 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

Parcels containing any variety of five-leaved pines, or currant or gooseberry
plants, or parts thereof, which may be offered for mailing shall be plainly marked
with the name and address of the Sender and a statement showing the contents
and shall bear the control-area permit, when required, securely attached to the
outside.

This notice modifies instructions appearing on pages 24, 25, and 26 of the
April 1937 Supplement to the Postal Guide.

RAMSEY S. BLACK,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA PLANT

REGULATIONS
APRIL 29, 1938.

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA PLANT REGULATIONS MODIFIED

(Press notice)

The Secretary of Agriculture has announced a revision of the rules and
regulations governing the movement of plants and plant products into and out
of the District of Columbia, effective April 30, 1938.

Shippers will find few changes in the shipping requirements. The definition
of nursery stock is clarified to show that it includes woody plants and parts
capable of propagation (except domestic-grown seeds and fruit pits), foreign- |
grown seeds of woody plants, of palms, of Vicia (vetch, ete.), and of Lathyrus
(sweet peas, etc.). As heretofore, an inspection certificate is required in ship-
ping nursery stock, herbaceous perennials, bulbs, and roots from the District of
Columbia to points outside.

In shipping into the District of Columbia this certificate is required for
nursery stock, and labeling as to contents is required for nursery stock, her-
baceous perennial plants, bulbs, and roots.

REVISED RULES AND REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE MOVEMENT OF PLANTS AND
PLANT PRODUCTS INTO AND OUT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

INTRODUCTORY NOTE

The supply of the last revised edition of the plant regulations relating to
the District of Columbia having become exhausted, advantage is taken of
the necessity for a reprint of simplifying the form and wording of the regula-
tions without material change in shipping requirements. The definition of
nursery stock as stated in paragraph (a) of regulation 1 is clarified. The list
of domestic plant quarantines formerly published in the appendix is eliminated,
ence up-to-date copies of such quarantines are always available from this

ureau.

SUMMARY
SHIPMENTS INTO THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

Woody plants and foreign seeds—A valid nursery-inspection certificate of
the State, Territory, or country of origin must be attached to the outside of
each container of woody plants or parts thereof capable of propagation (except
domestic-grown seeds and fruit pits), shipped into the District of Columbia,
and the container must be marked to show the nature of the contents. Such
certification and marking are also required for foreign-grown seeds of woody
plants, of palms, of Vicia (vetch, ete.), and of Lathyrus (sweet peas, ete.).

Herbaceous plants—The container of each shipment of herbaceous peren-
nials (including strawberry plants), bulbs, and roots, consigned to the District
of Columbia must be marked to show the nature of the contents. (Herbaceous
plants from foreign countries must meet the certification and marking require-
ments of Federal plant quarantine No. 37.)
1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 63

SHIPMENTS OUT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

A certificate or permit issued by the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quar-
antine must be attached to the outside of each shipment of woody or herba-
ceous plants, bulbs, roots, foreign-grown seeds of woody plants, of palms, of
Vicia (vetch, ete.), and of Lathyrus (sweet peas, etc.) consigned from the Dis-
trict of Columbia to points outside. Each shipment is also subject to the re-
strictions of any Federal plant quarantine or order applicable thereto. To
arrange for inspection, apply at the Plant Inspection House of this Bureau,
Twelfth Street and Constitution Avenue NW. (District 6350, branch 4495),
Washington, D. C.

Avery S. Hoyt,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

REVISED RULES AND REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE MOVEMENT OF PLANTS AND
PLANT PRODUCTS INTO AND OUT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

[Approved April 27, 1938; effective April 30, 1938]

I, H. A. Wallace, Secretary of Agriculture, as required by the Plant Quaran-
tine Act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended, do order that no plants
or plant products shall be moved into or out of the District of Columbia except
in compliance with the rules and regulations supplemental hereto which are
hereby promulgated: Provided, That certain plants or plant products may be
exempted from these rules and regulations by administrative instructions issued
by the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine when, in his
judgment, such articles are considered innocuous as carriers of dangerous plant
pests.

REGULATION 1. DEFINITIONS

For the purpose of these regulations, the following words, names, and terms
shall be construed, respectively, to mean:

(a) Nursery stock.—Al1l trees, shrubs, and plants having a persistent woody
stem, and parts thereof capable of propagation, except fruit pits and seeds,
provided that foreign-grown seeds of woody plants, of palms, of Vicia (vetch,
etc.), and of Lathyrus (sweet peas, etc.), are defined as nursery stock.

(b) Herbaceous perennial plants, bulbs, and roots.—Plants whose roots per-
sist 2 or more years but which lack persistent woody stems above the ground.
This term includes fibrous-rooted perennials, such as strawberry plants and
phlox; bulbs, such as narcissus and crocus; corms, such as gladiolus; tubers,
such as dahlia; fleshy roots, such as peony; rhizomes, such as iris; and such
greenhouse-grown plants as ferns, geraniums, orchids, ete.

(c) Annual plants.—Plants grown from seed for bloom or food the same sea-
son and living only 1 year. This term includes such plants as cabbage, tomato,
and aster.

(d) Inspector.—Plant quarantine inspector of the United States Department
of Agriculture.

(e) Moved.—Offered for movement to or received for transportation by a
common carrier or moved by any means whatever into or out of the District of
Columbia.

(f) Certificate—A certificate showing that the nursery or premises from
which the plants or plant products were taken were inspected within 1 year
prior to the date of shipment and were found to be free from injurious insect
pests and plant diseases, or that the plants or plant products were inspected
prior to shipment and found to be free from injurious insect pests and plant
diseases.



REGULATION 2. UNRESTRICTED ARTICLES

No requirements as to certification or labeling are placed by these regula-
tions® on the entry into or movement out of the District of Columbia of (1)

5 Compliance with any special plant quarantine or restrictive order which may be appli-
cable thereto is required. Information relative to such restrictions may be obtained from
the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.
64 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

annual plants, cut flowers, or decorative plant material (such as branches and
Christmas trees); (2) seeds, except certain foreign-grown seeds as defined in
paragraph (a) of regulation 1; nor of (8) other plants and plant products not
included in the definitions in paragraphs (a) and (0) of regulation 1. The
requirements as to delivery of plant materials are stated in paragraphs (c)
and (d) of regulation 3.

SHIPMENTS INTO THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

REGULATION 8. REQUIREMENTS RELATING TO NURSERY STOCK AND OTHER PLANTS:
AND PLANT PRODUCTS

(a) Certification and marking of nursery stock.—No nursery stock as defined
in regulation 1 shall be moved into the District of Columbia unless a valid cer-
tificate signed by the State nursery or horticultural inspector of the State or
Territory or country from which the stock is shipped is attached to the outside
of each package or other container. Each package or other container shall in
addition be plainly marked with the names and addresses of the consignor and
consignee and with a statement showing the nature of the contents.

(0) Marking of herbaceous perennials, bulbs, or roots.—No herbaceous peren-
nial plants, bulbs, or roots, as defined in regulation 1, shall be moved into the
District of Columbia unless the container thereof is plainly marked with the
names and addresses of the consignor and consignee and with a statement show-
ing the nature of the contents.°®

(c) Delivery of plants and plant products—No nursery stock, herbaceous.
plants, bulbs, or roots, originating outside of the District of Columbia shall be
delivered to the consignee in the District of Columbia by a common earrier or
other person until such delivery is authorized by an inspector of the Bureau of
Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

(d) All nursery stock and herbaceous perennial plants, bulbs, and roots,
annual plants, decorative plant material, and other plants and plant products,,.
whether restricted or unrestricted, addressed to the United States Department
of Agriculture, Washington, D. C., shall be delivered only at the Plant Inspec-
tion House of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine (Twelfth Street.
and Constitution Avenue NW.).

REGULATION 4. SHIPMENTS WHIcH Fart To CoMpLty WITH REGULATIONS

Plants and plant products shipped into the District of Columbia, which are
found to be infected or infested with any plant pest or disease, or which have
not been moved in full compliance with these regulations, may be disposed of
as authorized in the Plant Quarantine Act.

SHIPMENTS OUT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

REGULATION 5, CERTIFICATION OF NursSERY STOCK AND HERBACEOUS PERENNIAL.
PLANTS, BULBS, AND ROOTS

(a) No nursery stock, or herbaceous perennial plants, bulbs, or roots, as
defined in regulation 1, shall be moved out of the District of Columbia unless a
certificate or permit has been issued therefor by the Bureau of Entomology and
Plant Quarantine. Each package or other container of such plants, bulbs, or
roots shall have such a certificate or permit attached to the outside thereof.

(bv) A certificate or permit may be issued for the movement out of the Dis-
trict of Columbia of the nursery stock covered by this regulation, when it has
been examined by an inspector and found apparently free from dangerous plant
diseases and insects and when such shipment is found to comply in full with
all Federal quarantine regulations.

(c) Nursery stock, herbaceous perennial plants, bulbs, or roots, to be
shipped out of the District of Columbia must be presented at the Plant Inspec-
tion House of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine (Twelfth Street
and Constitution Avenue NW.) for inspection at the time of shipment unless
otherwise authorized by an inspector.

¢ Herbaceous plants of foreign origin must be marked in accordance with the provisions
of Federal Quarantine No. 37 (Nursery Stock, Plants, and Seeds).
1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 65

When large shipments are contemplated, arrangements may be made for
inspection at other places by telephoning District 6350, branch 4495, or writing
the Bureau. ; ;

Application for inspection of articles the movement of which is restricted
by quarantine regulations or other restrictive orders shall be made at a season
of the year sufficiently in advance of the contemplated date of shipment to
provide for compliance with regulations.

(d) No common carrier or other person shall accept for shipment or remove
from the District of Columbia any nursery stock, herbaceous perennial plants,
bulbs, or roots, unless the required certificate or permit has been issued and is
securely attached to the outside of each container.

These revised rules and regulations shall be effective on and after April
30, 1938, and shall supersede the rules and regulations governing the movement
of plants and plant products into and out of the District of Columbia, promul-
gated April 29, 1931.

Done at the city of Washington this 27th day of April 1938.

Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agri-
culture.

[SEAL] H. A. WALLACE,

Secretary of Agriculture.

[Copies of the foregoing revised regulations were sent to all common carriers doing

business in or through the District of Columbia.]

NoTIce TO GENERAL Puptic THROUGH NEWSPAPERS

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,
BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE,
Washington, D. C., April 30, 1938.
Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority

conferred on him by the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat.
815), as amended, has promulgated a revision of the rules and regulations goy-
erning the movement of plants and plant products into and out of the District
of Columbia, effective April 30, 1938. This revision clarifies the definition of
nursery stock and simplifies the wording of the regulations. Copies of the
notice of the revision may be obtained from the Bureau of Entomology and
Plant Quarantine, Department of Agriculture, Washington, D. C.

H. A. WALLACE,
Secretary of Agriculture.

[The above notice was published in The Evening Star, Washington, D. C., May 6, 1938.}

INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS

Post OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, May 6, 1938.
POSTMASTER,
Washington, D. C.

My Dear Sir: Attention is invited to the inclosed copies of Revised Rules and
Regulations Governing the Movement of Plants and Plant Products into and out
of the District of Columbia as promulgated by the Bureau of Entomology and
Plant Quarantine, United States Department of Agriculture.

It is requested that these copies be distributed to the various stations and
branches of your office for the information and guidance of employees handling
parcels containing plants and plant material as contemplated in sections 595 and
596, Postal Laws and Regulations.

Very truly yours,
RAMSEY S. BLACK,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.
66 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO RULES AND REGULATIONS GOVERN-
ING THE IMPORTATION OF COTTON AND COTTON WRAPPINGS
INTO THE UNITED STATES

MODIFICATION OF COTTON REGULATIONS

AMENDMENT No. 4 OF RULES AND REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE IMPORTATION OF
COTTON AND COTTON WRAPPINGS INTO THE UNITED STATES

[Effective on and after July 1, 1938]
INTRODUCTORY NOTE

The Cotton Regulations revised effective February 24, 1923, provided for the
entry of cotton lint and cotton linters from Mexico via border ports only when
they originated in the Imperial Valley of Baja California, Mexico. Effective
December 15, 1924, the regulations were modified to provide for entry from other
specified areas in Mexico through ports on the border. Since that date the
Bureau has acquired a wider knowledge of pink bollworm control measures, and
has been able, in connection with its administration of Quarantine No. 52, the
domestic pink bollworm quarantine, to acquaint itself more thoroughly, through
the cooperation of the Mexican Government, with the pink bollworm conditions
in areas in Mexico adjacent to the border and with control measures carried on
in such areas by the Ministry of Agriculture and Development of that country.

In the light of this wider knowledge a more liberal policy is adopted to allow
the entry of baled cotton lint and linters from Mexico, subject to conditions of
entry paralleling the conditions under which cotton lint and linters, produced in
the pink bollworm infested areas of the United States, may move interstate under
the provisions of Quarantine No. 52.

Regulation 13 of the Cotton Regulations, as hereby amended, is predicated
upon a continuance of the enforcement, in cotton-producing areas of Mexico, of
measures of suppression and of measures to prevent the spread of the pink boll-
worm which are deemed by the United States Department of Agriculture to be
equal in effectiveness to measures enforced in cotton-producing areas of the
United States having a similar status with respect to the pink bollworm. The
importation of baled cotton lint and linters from Mexico, as provided in regula-
tion 13, as amended, is further contingent upon the determination, from time to
time, by manner and method deemed satisfactory to the Department, of the
status of Mexican cotton-producing areas with respect to the pink bollworm
and upon the determination, by manner and method deemed satisfactory to the
Department, of suppression and control measures enforced in Mexican cotton-
producing areas.

Avery §S. Hoyt,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

Under authority conferred by the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912
(37 Stat. 315) as amended, it is ordered that regulation 138, of the Rules and
Regulations Governing the Importation of Cotton and Cotton Wrappings into
the United States, be, and the same is hereby, amended to read as follows:

REGULATION 13. PROVISION FOR THE ENTRY VIA BorDER Ports oF CoTTOoN LINT
AND LINTERS FRoM MEXICO

Baled cotton lint and linters produced in Mexico may be imported into pink
bollworm infested areas of the United States through border ports approved by
the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine for that purpose,
subject to such treatment on arrival as is required under the regulations of the
domestic Pink Bollworm Quarantine No. 52, for the interstate movement of
cotton lint and linters produced in those areas: Provided, however, That no
cotton lint and linters produced in areas of Mexico determined by the Chief of
the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine as heavily infested with the
pink bollworm may enter the United States under the provisions of this
regulation unless such areas are adjacent to heavily infested areas of the
United States.
1988] © SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 67

Baled cotton lint and linters produced in areas of Mexico determined by the
Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine to be uninfested with
the pink bollworm may be imported through border ports approved by the
Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine for that purpose
subject to compression at compresses designated in the permit.

This regulation leaves in full force and effect the provisions of regulation 10
affecting the entry of cotton grown in the Imperial Valley in the State of
Baja California, Mexico.

Regulation 13, as amended herein, shall be effective on and after July 1, 19388.

Done at the city of Washington this 30th day of June 1938.

Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agri-
culture.

[SEAL] Harry L. Brown,

Acting Secretary of Agriculture.

[Copies of the foregoing amendment were sent to American diplomatic and consular

officers through the State Department. ]

TERMINAL INSPECTION OF PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS

ARKANSAS STATE PLANT QUARANTINE (SHIPMENT OF SWEETPOTATO PLANTS
RESTRICTED)

Post OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, May 6, 1938.

The State of Arkansas has established at Little Rock, Ark., a place for
terminal plant inspection under the provisions of the law embodied in section
596, Postal Laws and Regulations, of the following plants and plant products:
Sweetpotatoes, sweetpotato plants, vines, draws, and slips.

All postmasters are therefore informed that packages containing any plants
or plant products addressed to places in the State of Arkansas may be accepted
for mailing only when plainly marked so that the contents may be readily
ascertained by an inspection of the outside thereof. The law makes failure
so to mark such parcels an offense punishable by a fine of not more than $100.

The State of Arkansas has also issued a State plant quarantine on account
of the sweetpotato weevil, pursuant to the act of June 4, 1936, embodied in
amended section 596, Postal Laws and Regulations, which prohibits the ship-
ment into that State from any other part of the continental United States of
sweetpotatoes, sweetpotato plants, vines, draws, and slips, known to be hosts of
this pest, unless accompanied with an inspection certificate issued by the
State of origin, showing the plants and plant products to be free of infestation.

Postmasters are therefore requested to observe the restrictions of the
Arkansas quarantine when the host plants and plant products named above
are offered for mailing and will also invite the attention of mailers to these
provisions.

Postmasters within the State of Arkansas receiving parcels containing the
plants named, which are not accompanied with the required certificate, should
be guided by paragraphs 8 and 6, section 595, Postal Laws and Regulations,
obtaining the necessary forwarding postage, and forward the parcels to the
postmaster at Little Rock, Ark., endorsed in the prescribed manner. Parcels
containing these plants which are accompanied with a proper certificate may
be delivered to the addressees without being submitted for terminal inspection.

RAMSEY S. BLAcK,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.

| ADDITIONAL PLANT INSPECTION PLACES IN CALIFORNIA

Post OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, May 16, 1938.
Postmasters in the State of California are informed that provision has been
made for the terminal inspection of plants and plant products at the places
named below, and they should, therefore, be added to the list of places within
68 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

the State of California to which plants and plant products subject to terminal
inspection may be sent by postmasters for inspection under the provisions of
section 596, Postal Laws and Regulations: Alameda, Alvarado, Berkeley, Center-
ville, Hayward, Irvington, Livermore, Mission San Jose, Mount Eden, Newark,
Pleasanton, San Leandro, San Lorenzo, Sunol.
RAMSEY S. BLACK,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.

MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS
B. E. P. Q. 379, Supplement No. 2.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF BRAZIL
APRIL 5, 1988.

CERTIFICATE NOT REQUIRED FOR PROCESSED PLANT PRODUCTS

[Order of February 10, 1938; Diario Oficial, February 17, 1938]

- ARTICLE 1. The certificate of origin and plant health for imported plants or
parts of plants that have been processed, dried, manufactured, or which have
undergone any treatment that devitalizes them, may, in the terms of the said
regulations, be dispensed with.

SUBJECT TO INSPECTION ON ARRIVAL

ArT. 2. The products included in the preceding article are subject to inspection
on arrival in ports where phytosanitary inspection is provided for, and will be
released by the customs only by authorization of the.technical expert of the
phytosanitary service.

The required inspection of products recognized as being incapable of harboring
parasites may, at the discretion of the director, phytosanitary service, be dis-
pensed with.

The order of February 10, 1938, amplifies paragraph (c) of article 5 of decree
No. 24114 of April 12, 1934 (see p. 5 of B. E. P. Q. 379).

Avery §S. Hoyt,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

B. B. P. Q. 403, Supplement No. 3.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF FRANCE

JUNE 8, 1938.
BULBS, CORMS, TUBERS, AND RHIZOMES REGARDED AS PLANTS

The French decree of March 8, 1932, prohibits the entry into and transit through
France of living plants, and living parts of plants (trees, shrubs, nursery prod-
ucts, cuttings, and other parts of plants) * * * originating in or proceeding
from the United States of America, as a precaution against the introduction of
San Jose scale (see p. 6, B. H. P. Q. 403).

Uncertainty existed as to whether this prohibition was applicable to bulbs,
corms, tubers, and rhizomes, therefore the question was submitted to the French
Ministry of Agriculture. The said Ministry states that the prohibition does
apply to bulbs, corms, tubers, and rhizomes. .

Ler A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.
1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 69

B. EB. P. Q. 405, Supplement No. 4.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF GERMANY

JUNE 9, 1938.
‘ CUT CARNATION FLOWERS NOW ADMITTED

The decree of March 28, 1929, as amended by that of September 30, 1932, pro-
hibits the importation into Germany of rooted plants, cuttings, and cut flowers of
the carnation, to prevent the introduction of the carnation leaf folder (Tortriz
pronubana Hbn.).

According to the Nachrichtenblatt fiir den deutschen Pflanzenschutzdienst
17:12, December 1937, the Minister of Food and Agriculture so far relaxed the
provisions of those decrees as to permit the importation of carnation cut flowers,
effective November 15, 1937 (R. F. M. Nov. 10, 1937—Z1505f—1 IT).

Consequently the words “and cut flowers” should be stricken from the first line
of the item “Rooted Carnations” on page 2 of B. E. P. Q. 405. However, since
carnations are dicotyledonous plants and their cut flowers are parts of such
plants, the importation into Germany of carnation cut flowers grown in the
United States still is prohibited under the provisions of the decree of November
3, 1931, with the exceptions indicated in Note 1 (@) and (bd), page 8, of B. E. P. Q.
405.

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

B. E. P. Q. 445, Supplement No. 3.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, CENTRAL AMERICA (BRITISH
HONDURAS)

Aprit 6, 1938.

All the proclamations set forth on pages 2, 3, and 4, and in Supplement No. 2,
of Circular B. E. P. Q. 445 are revoked and superseded by proclamation No. 10
of February 12, 1938, as follows:

The importation into the colony, directly or indirectly, of the fruit, seeds,
cuttings, plants, ete., enumerated in schedules A and B, save with the exceptions
stated, is prohibited.

SCHEDULE A
IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

Citrus spp. All parts, including fruit, seeds, cuttings, plants, buds, and
grafts: Importation prohibited from all countries except in cases of importa-
tions made by the agricultural officer for scientific propagation.

Coconut palms (Cocos nucifera), coconuts in husk, any part of the palm,
including plants, leaves, and leaflets: Importation prohibited from all countries
except in cases of importations made by the Department of Agriculture for
experimental purposes.

SCHEDULE B
IMPORTATION CONDITIONAL

All fruits except green bananas, nuts, dried, canned, candied, or other proce-
essed fruits: Importation prohibited except from the United States, United
Kingdom and Ireland, Canada, and Jamaica. Provided that in the case of
Jamaica a certificate of introduction is granted by the agricultural officer after
inspection.

All vegetables except potato, onion, dried beans, peas, and grains, canned or
processed vegetables, and seeds: Importation prohibited from all countries
except Canada, United Kingdom, and Ireland, Jamaica, and United States.
Provided that in the case of Jamaica a certificate of introduction is granted by
the agricultural officer after inspection.
70 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [ April-June

Tobacco seed from all countries: May be imported only under license issued
by the agricultural officer and which shall prescribe such treatment of the seed
as he may consider necessary.

Cotton (Gossypium spp.), including seeds, cuttings, plants, seed cotton, lint,
or any articles packed therewith, or any covering or thing in which they may
be packed,.from all countries: May be imported under license issued by the
agricultural officer on the occasion of each importation.

Sugarcane (Sacharum officinarwm): Seedlings and plants, and all parts of
the sugarcane, or any articles packed therewith, from all countries: May be
imported under license issued by the agricultural officer.

Banana plants and plants of any other species of Musa, including suckers and
every part of the plant except green fruit from Canary Islands, Costa Riea,,.
Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Panama, South America, West Africa, West
Indies, together with any article or soil packed therewith, or any package
covering or container thereof: May be imported under license issued by the
agricultural officer or by the agricultural officer for experimental purposes.

All earth or soil of any description and any living plants not otherwise speci-
fied in schedules A and B, including plants growing in earth or soil or shipped.
bareroot, and including articles, covering, or packages in which they may be
packed, from all countries: May be imported provided a certificate of intro-
duction is granted by the agricultural officer after inspection and, if necessary,
fumigation.

Avery S. Hoyt,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

B. E. P. Q. 449, Supplement No. 2.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, PERSIA (IRAN)
JUNE 6, 1938.
AUTHORIZED PORTS OF ENTRY

Article 3 of the decision of the Council of Ministers, No. 7876, January 1-2,
1936, stated that the frontier offices at which plant material will be inspected
and through which it may be imported will be designated by the Department of
Agriculture (see p. 1, B. E. P. Q. 449).

According to a despatch from the American chargé d’affaires a. i., dated
April 1, 1988, the Department of Agriculture of Persia has designated Bandar
Pahlevi, Khorramshahr, Bushire, and Khosrovi as frontier ports of entry and
inspection for plant material under the provisions of the said article 3.

Lee A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

PENALTIES IMPOSED FOR VIOLATIONS OF THE PLANT QUARANTINE
ACT

According to reports received by the Bureau during the period April 1 to
June 30, 1988, penalties have recently been imposed by the proper Federal
authorities for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act, as follows:

JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE

In the case of the United States v. John Rambone, Newfield, N. J., in the
transportation of a truck load of farm products from southern New Jersey to
Rochester, N. Y., a point outside of the regulated area, without inspection and
certification, the defendant pleaded guilty and was fined $25.

In the case of the United States v. Charles Bogutz, Bridgeton, N. J., in the trans-
portation of a truck load of farm products from southern New Jersey to Roches-
ter, N. Y., a point outside of the regulated area, without inspection and
certification, the defendant pleaded guilty and was fined $25.
1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS ai
QUARANTINES AFFECTING MEXICAN PRODUCTS
In the case of the United States versus the persons listed below, for attempt-

ing to smuggle in contraband plant material, the penalties indicated were int
posed by the United States customs officials at the following ports:





Name : Port Contraband Penalty
Miguel Saldana.__._..-.-.-------- Brownsville, -b ex > =- )obmManeo- 623 = sc sess2e2ce5c023-.88 3 $1. 00
Mrs. Antonia Balli___........----|----- ee SNe == 222555525 5-3 eo 1.00
Wading Martinez = 222->>---=-----}----- dol*® & 22=222=- 2WMPUSOCR.ot225 22222202 iUL22_ 2h amet 1.00
Matalin te astiho:ss<2 22 o5-=s>-2=|->--- GOBLS 3. tense a2 2 LiMANSO. sss sassscsscccrcese.2e HSE 1.00
ara Orn pigus = aoe se © ese soo _ ===} 2.8 oe tS 32 sssheas}25 222 GO? ooo hisnehassseecsecc222LCNSsS 1.00
Manuela Sanchez__-_-------------|----- d9S 5254 2223-22 b pesehes 2-2 2sse2c22s2225225 SSL 1.00
En eh em ete = = =} 5 i L MGHS0- 2.22222 2522222525250 20220324 1.00
Pmpeninnsant ae > = = == es fe gor es 2. 2-22+=54 LM ANGCAA Oi At a Ss225e-22hessesceell57 1.00
Maria de J. Villalpondo----------|----- Ck PE ee Oe Ee ee eee eee 1.00
em dere ie = eee te AOE SB socccsss2 2 PARNBOCS 252 scscccsscsscsesss525F22 us 1.00
iutonion¥ parta =< <2 === -===---}----- AOPe 6 ja scase= L OFAHBC 52.22 caccsssersssz=sss55 silk. 1.00
Mrs. F. H. de Carlaga______-_--_- Eagle Pass, Tex__--- 2 DIANGS 2 no aso eee ares Se Ih 1.00
Wiaria Ponee---- ->-"-2-_-..-...--|----- age 8 Beasts: pg gUP oe ese sess 25k bcs oseed, 1.00
Concepcion Velasquez de Rodri- | El Paso ,Tex-_-_---- i flower bills 2 ssc25seiek-= eel o22) 1.00
quez.
UONPHUaLOYROSA = 2-22 5>555.5-.-_|----- (oo Pee eee 2 MANZ0CS-_ 2-8 Jesus Maldonado_=)-----=2:2...--)----- Gre Se wa es J 2A. BPTNCOUS 2S oe aa oe 1.00
Wrnesiinn Mls Caravee.-222-_--_-.|-.---do-- ~.-....=.... A MANE OCS 5122225 55255 23 1.00
Rofecio Rosalez====:=2=:--=:------ Hidalgo, Tex_.__-_-- BOL REPOS aaa eee ae 1.00
iPancho IMereno-—--==5=2=- 5===:>:-|-=--- Mees 13 25 < = = 4s SMAaNP 00S. 53 22sa5552sssssesos=> 1. 00
ED ACGey Cle ee Se dg te A-ANOCAGOS! 52 = 22k ee eee 1. 00
Brave bereyeen tba te Ieee Gomi at $2.67 553 SAMOCAG OS 227s AIS ORS Ferri 1.00
PI Gnnechpyans sae wees = -.--_|_2 22 OTe 5 LZoBGROOS 95 asses = Mh 8) 3. 00
PEE EAG ace Nar ei tere ee we SL GQ s 725555. LS AMOCIOO, MINA Ono 55 5 5 1.00
iw Gon eee ar ee Goma sitet sts ss 1D. A2VOCACOSEY 35 22a SO 2 is 2. 50
ES A ee gee S. SS es te3 LON Re ee aS 1.00
Wlorentina Garzae Pe = |e. CL OURS 2 Bose wae ZA AD SOCSS 2h = Fe ss hee Oe 28 eS 1.00
Bonita © Beves. 4: .).f---.- pes de 2s Dass as Ae ee Se 1.00
Isabella Hernandez----.------_---|----- Gees 2S SID AMP OCS Pl SSS Se 5 Se PO 2.00
Telesfero: Mendoza-==--- 022. 2.—-.=_|=---- pet Ee Pe she 4 mameys, 4 mamey seed_-__......-._- 3.00
Lb ree Ct) tye ee ee a LO PAGES Oe ey LMA? Oo: 234-580 Se be eae A 1. 00
Welipa Navarro=-- 22-22-52 -.2-.- Laredo, 'Tex....--.=- 1 pound orchid seeds___..._-_-2---_--- 1.00
iManicliNavarro=s) sss eos 1) | Gysest oF re 16,orenidsplantss2- <2" - >... Same 1.00
RE opts ee ee ek fe gue VAT a 21 tangerines, 15 oranges, 11 grape- 5.00
fruit, 1 sweet lime, 4 plants.
Candalaria Martinez_.-.........__|----- CONS het 3 53s LIMO Ye a F885 os ts ee 1.00
eee, Bal Oise bates eal re | oe Gon: O32. 5 SOLANLCS Ap ples= 2 i220 2 eee 1.00
WTA ri eee imi te) GQESRe. av ye? CAC Ss 34". et oT oe A ie 1.00
ROEINni Glebe lee e ese tft gel) Dh oi = oe IR OFanees 29-555 sce asssa5s ee 1.00
Series WMorenG—-2 5. ~~~. |e ip as ae ZCHEMIMNOYAS - 5-222 ee eae 1. 00
ROe PAD OAT BER poses = 2 6 fh Ae ISS he PORANSES + 8%, 5. 55S Deen eS: 1.00
Uj egith ee + eee Gomes. oes Woratee = 2b. 525 55 ee 1.00
Weta Gee ees es ss 2 tlc a ee mango: ah" 75 yeas ART 1.00
aE me ee eames ee es MOSM ti eas Dal RIES $755 593-5 Sos a, 1.00
WETS PATIO Na+ PORTER. soos 222-3 ~ lec se J “toes el eee 11 sweet limes, 1 mamey, 3 mamey 1.00
seed, 3 oranges.
PNAS EERE ee a on CGE 2 2 tos f-amocados:. $55.2 ee i) eh Bhs 1.00
Baye PIaIROn 2 | mee = GEE 2 354 2 se. Guam nes: 2 is. eel Rel 1.00
SVRER TU TINA OU Ges hese = oe 072 Ge eae WawOCAOS).0) DANG 5 2.00
BeaTO NV POrales eos wee. ey mos 2h) G:maneoes,..7ioranges......-. =. a 1.00
PAP Ibo VIGE ages See ft Gem 2 3.5 ss WManeos = 2 As 3 2. UN ee Mae ee 1.00
Mrs. Francisca Rodriguez-_--_-_-.-|----- Moen 5. 12 plants, 1 sweet lime, 1 mango, 1 1.00
mamey seed.
maprone- Gaspere. oo So 2 ek Ceres te PT RPE ets rier 1.00
SRomiastin Awuies PIS | es ges fl ss Gyplanite=--# Fynee e alee 1.00
Isabella Mendiola de Longoria___-|----- Greer rset at WAV OCROONSDROss |. soon 2 ee ee 1.00
Wie Pin a pre Lege TES OGRE Ss De Sen 1.00
Mrs. Refuigio Montes_-_-_.___.___|----- CO Oe Ee TOMA VOCATOS 527 © 3553: Sea ee 1.00
Mrs. Francisca Sanchez_-....__--_|----- dose LAavocado, lmanpy- 3 2.. e es eet 1.00
Wir ont ae rramsolo.. .-._.-..--|=.--- GOsen 2 en 3 oranges, 2 avocados, 8 sweet limes_-_- 3. 00
Wrariiplenwtigmeet. oof ee Coe aoe ASIISIN EY RCO = a See ee pe 1.00
TORTINDEGPHI Dee ee gees a a 30 plants, 1 pound tree seed, 3 avo- 5.00
cados, 6 avocado seed, 17 mameys,
24 mangoes.
Mipmamtarhine7 =.) =|-2--- (Oc ae WIMAMIAVISCCH See eS eS 1.00
Monmneo.Carte7-—. -- .-.-a2=~_}--ce Qt ee SAA. oa DIDTAU PES a ee eee er ete A EE ae 1.00
DiniguaeienniAno: =~... ..--2.....|---- CO. 2 aes. = LOAN RPGR 3 Fe es 8 1.00
sosenna Gon7Hled.--2.......-...._|--=.. G65: 5 eee oe REG OL ne ee ee a te Ted 1.00
UGS (ip Gh os a ar rae 0: = POuIAN tees ee ee 1.00
aCe BeneviGesee | .. 25... -|--2-e do). a a AN GG aS 1.00
Mira ivaria Arampula._..........|~.=.- do: 2 Se een COOS- 28 ee ee 1.00
aR PAIOt samen et | es G0: ..: 3. eur AIY CC ee min 1.00
Margarita Solalinde Garcia. --...-.|----- Oso es 1. 00
i Oe Ol | i re G0! 223 ee eee Coe ee 1. 00
7 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June







Name Port Contraband Penalty
Matilda de Garcia. =22"252- eared; Tex. see 2 Dlants= 3-252 222 ee ee ee $1. 00:
Juanita:Coronad ok: sie Sees ie COL Fs. SS aE 3) Mangoes. 4... ae ee 1. 00:
Hernand OF MEanE Me 7 eae eet C] (hai ee ee 2. GVOCAC OS! 55 aes ee meee eee 1. 00
Tenaciophernende7z se. sees | ee QR ener 1 Mango... ee eee 1. 00:
Hiloisa Millenucvases2 22 eee doe ee ee eee GOs: 2:8. 2. 2 eee 1.00
By Jee Barrons 2 sae ee Ose eee 2, Mangoes, avocad On === aan 1. 00
Gabricllores vets sees a sae eee een | Re] ky eee acer TP Mangor 22225 2 ee 1. 00
RAMON RCLEZ es ee ee el On Qa eal se ee 4° mianeoész.:>. 2 2 aN eee 1. 00:
TAN CISCOMMLOTET Oe eee es eee | ee] Qe ene 2 MAN PORS .2. 2.25252 e = ee 1.00
Mrs. BiblonaidevHsquiviol. 2 .--— |. ed Ome ee 4. aVOC8O0S. ...- 222 eal 1. 00
Pedro) Oma yao see ee | a ee ee Tl mamey__. 2.1.20 o.oo 1. 00:
RODECLLOVA UI Ga aeee eo Le | eae] Qe nee eee Qavocad0s 3.4. eee eee 1. 00
Wisse NO aim C7 ae = koe Bel eet na Qa eee Lmango: oso... ee eee 1. 00
Hcnestin ay Guerarass sass esa CL One eee ee 3 AVOCRCOS. fo: ae ae 1. 00:
PiCOS8 DUM ASS ee ee See en Qe em I Mango. —- 422 ee 1. 00
JuliowNVUNOZe ae ee ee BORA Owe eee ee 1AVOCAGO SCC Gs eae 1. 00:
AindrestBlores: 82 bao she - 2220 (oss eed Ober Rhee ee 3 Mangoes!) 2a v0CAd OSaa= = aes 1.00
Ramona Mano 7e Nata ee eaten 1 .ManO.. 52%. 2 ee en 1.00
PabloidewWesustGarzae 2 sae |e CO meee ae eens 2 avOCad OS: 22222 las as eee 1.00
POR ivicras 268s oss oo ec taco dO eae ee ee 1-OTANg6. 22 222 hs eee eee 1.00
BarcozasRatened res ass w= aaa | Se] Oakes Zieactiplants.—.<. = ee ee 1.00
GoaonimopVartinez=2 sea aes |e Ome ee 4 O©Fan? 0S. 2s Jos. 3 2 oo eee ee 1.00
Antonio Compose eas sos Se ee a ee) name tne ren | ae Os. 2652 ok 52 ee 1. 00
Sa Wallace -sscic25. 2555 ae BG Omen ie es 12 Oranges. 2320/52 aoe eee 1.00
HP AStewalts ees. 2258 ee aoe Ole ue Ser ee ae (-plants:...\. 423 eee 1.00
Mrs. Jessie) hy. MicDonalds222-= =. | ado ee eee Iscactus) plant = 2 sss see 1.00
AVG. Barrera. 2a26 52. saan. fa la ea] Que tae 1 plant. - 2.02325 ee eee 1.00
Regine Cadenas!:) 26 =. ee ee ome a ae ee 4 mameys_..l-. 22.2. -2he sos eee 1. 00-
Mrs. Felipe Lozano de Botello____|___..do___________-___ 4 avocadGSs....-=224 22s 1.00
Petra cade Cardinas sesso | eee (Sere ete cee 3 AVOCA OS. 4. 252.22 1. 00:
Ab Coppeliss. 22-3 22 = sea Sr a omen eee 5. cacti plants. 2... 22 eee 1.00
MirspelazeliCa Dunnin cee | | Ome ee 14 grapefruit. 2222 2e ee 1.00
SenontOrnelass 22: 2 Sas ees | ee TO ee 4 avocados, 20 lemon grass plants, 25 9.75

rose cuttings, 125 tuberose bulbs, 6
guavas, 5 oranges.

MES » Corhbettscase2s seen aoe |e er QM ne eee 1 coconhut.2.- 23-2. eee 1.00
Alpedo! Munoz: 23% See eaten |b ee Qe Be 3: BVOCAGOS. -.... 2 ee ee 1.00
Mrs. Aurora Martinez Garcia:—..|2_- 2 dow ts 1. M@MOY=.. 2-52... 222 1.00
F NIVEA Ieee VAN ace ie ee ee Ovando eee 1.00
BenaldevRamone sows ee een one | Q eat ee aoe 1 plant..2 2252 22222. ee eee 1.00
Juan. Charlesz=« 222 22h ews. Aer gh aateet 1 Sarre D'aVOCAMOS . 22 ee ee eee 1.00
© Ke Sibley: 2.2. ose eaten: ee a ee gue eee Uplints*2: 2:2 22.2 1.00
gta Garcia. es eee eee | eG Queen eo 3: aVOCAGOS. |=... == eee ee 1.00
vanehidiwards.- en aera ee eG Qian en ee 2 papayas, 3 Mangoes ae 1.00
DES AMiorin2. 26 eee ee a Ate eee] eee eee! 2: aV0CRd0S 5.222 Se ee 1.00
Josefa) Miartinezws asses ef RN | Qs eee t ue 1/4 man?oes:.-.2 2232 eee 1.00
MariayErelena Wongcorias ns | een Oe es 5aMangoes_. 22... 2 ee eee 1.00
irs Amita PAG a [a Se eae eae | eek 0 eee ee l avocado... ---=-- 5-25 eee et 1.00
SIVEGT Sede Teas G1 10 7, oe ee em | CE (7 sree 2: Mangoes: 4..-2. 25 eee 1.00
Mrs: Hermendez;Rameriz2.2-- =| ido aS LO plants... 2.2 1. 00
RafaelathRendonese. 2 ee ee | ee] Que ee 4 plants—.. 22.02. oe a 1. 00
WhesteriNpromit he sas sese ee ee ee | eee Qe ee eee 5 avocados... 2.222 eee 1.00
VirseeRWe Wawsoness-2 2-2 See eee Ome ee eee Dmangos. 23052 ee ee 1. 00
Mrs sOlivires!Gdewlauresso ss a | Seen Oia ee ee 0’... 255 ee 1.00
VETS HSER sa Wy SOM ee | eae Cl tase eae | me G0... = 5 32-5 Se ee eee 1.00
Hred:Soliriow 25 eee eae ee POE Que See 2;Mangoes:. 22.2... ee eee 1.00
Alfredo) Maciass-a. eee hid gms la eee 14 pomegranates_-.--- 2 eee 1.00
Mary Louisa Ramivez___.-._.--__|_-_-_- CORRS Ee ees lmango.... 2 eee 1.00
Worenza Aguilar==2_2- -2225- S252 Mercedes, Tex.__--- lL plant:..... 2... —. => === 1.00
Hstravelyham ez asses ee en ee Go sate See ee as 5 COMMS...) t=.5 eee 1.00
Joseph! Sauriquez soe ee San Ysidro, Tex_-_.- 4 sugarcane stalks, 8 pears______....--- 1.00
MED. Broyles. cece neat eer Gohan 3s Hee 5 tangerines, 5 apples_.____....-_...---- 1.00


ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY
AND PLANT QUARANTINE

Lee A. Strong, Chief.

S. A. RoHwWER, Assistant Chief.

Avery S. Hoyt, Assistant Chief.

P. N. ANNAND, Special Research Assistant.

F. H. Spencer, Business Manager.

Roiyia P. Currie, Lditor.

MaABet CoLcorp, Librarian.

J. A. Hystop, in Charge, Division of Insect Pest Survey and Information.

J. I. HAMBLETON, in Charge, Division of Bee Culture Investigations.

D. L. VAN DINE, in Charge, Division of Fruit Insect Investigations.

F. C. CRAIGHEAD, in Charge, Division of Forest Insect Investigations.

W. H. WHITE, in Charge, Division of Truck Crop and Garden Insect Investiga-
tions.

C. M. Packarp, in Charge, Division of Cereal and Forage Insect Investigations.

R. W. HArnep, in Charge, Division of Cotton Insect Investigations.

F, C. BisHoprp, in Charge, Division of Insects Affecting Man and Animals.

L. A. Hawkins, in Charge, Division of Control Investigutions.

a: 0. Se in Charge, Division of Insecticides and Fungicides.

C. F. W. MUESEBECK, in Charge, Division of Insect Identification.

oe. CLAUSEN, in Charge, Divison of Foreign Parasite Introduction.

S. B. Fracker, in Charge, Division of Plant Disease Control.

B. M. Gappis, in Charge, Division of Domestic Plant Quarantines.

E. R. SAsscer, in Charge, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines.

A. F. Burcess, in Field Charge, Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail Moth Control (head-
quarters, Greenfield, Mass.).

E. G. BREweER, in Field Charge, Japanese Beetle and Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail
Moth Quarantines, European Corn Borer Certification, and Dutch Elm Disease
Eradication (headquarters, Bloomfield, N. J.).

R. E. McDonatLp, in Field Charge, Pink Bollworm and Thurberia Weevil Quar-
antines (headquarters, San Antonio, Tez.).

P. A. Horas, in Field Charge, Mexican Fruitfly Quarantine (headquarters,
Harlingen, Tez.).

A. C. Baker, in Field Charge, Fruitfly Investigations (headquarters, Mezrico
City, Mexico).

73

U. S$. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1938
oe


S$. R. A—B. E. P. Q. No. 136 | Issued December 1938

United States Department of Agriculture

BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS

JULY-SEPTEMBER 1938



CONTENTS
Page
araiine aed oulenomer) announcements ____-__.-. 2-22 <_------ nnn nen nn ese eennne eee 75
Announcements relating to gypsy moth and brown-tail moth quarantine (No. 45)____-_-_________ 75
Damas wemareueener aren me TeVvISOG. —_ 22 ee ee eee tn 75
Revision of quarantine and regulations____---- a Ae Ail et A Rs rae OE a He 76
INGLICeLOpeneral pubic through newspapers. -__--2- 2-222 _2 22 84
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (No. 48)___--________-------_-_-________. 84

Administrative instructions—Fumigation of onions by methyl bromide as a condition of
certification of onions moving by refrigerator car from the area listed in regulation 5 of quaran-
UTTER N CMSA ee nm eer) cA.) mete re ae oe ce ee oe eee ee ee ee eens Tear? 84
Administrative instructions—Fumigation of tomatoes by methyl] bromide as a condition of
certification of tomatoes moving by refrigerator car from the area listed in regulation 5 of

PICT AME CN Oma aE Gb wirphn QO) 480) 2 = fe a ee es ee ee ek 85
Japanese beetle control ends for season on fruit and vegetable shipments______-____._______- 86
Termination date on fruit and vegetable restrictions under Japanese beetle quarantine ad-

VAnceGulofeplembper 20 fornithe year 1938: 22... 82223 - S 2 o eee 86

Announcement relating to rules and regulations governing the importation of cotton and cotton
PETA o SH UOM MO MUM UCO LS LALCS. = — 6-2 = ne a ee ee ee seen Bakes 87
instructions orcouleectors of. customs (TL. D. 49666)_.-.2 1. -- <2. 2 so eben et 87
MormnAlmspechionomplants and plant products:-<222=22-.=<2- ===. 28st senshi cn et 87
RewocaiomomOnreconplanbtiquaranbine.—=.-.-=..2-2-.<--s..<.-)-cs-c-sc2-.- lke nen ne es 87
NOTE Set EOP an 10 Sn ee Sn me Se ee Se can eau esese nce neee enone 87 ~
Public hearing to consider United States quarantine on account of white-fringed beetle____-_- 87
Notice of public hearing to consider the advisability of quarantining the States of Alabama,

Florida, Louisiana, and Mississippi on account of the white-fringed beetle_______.._-____- 88
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, New Zealand (P. Q. C. A. 306, supplement No. 5) ___-- 88
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, French zone of Morocco (B. E. P. Q. 444, revised)___- 88
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Turkey (B. E. P. Q. 451, supplement No. 1)- 99
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Kingdom of Italy (B. E. P. Q. 469, supplement No. 1)_- 99
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Commonwealth of Australia (B. E. P. Q. 476)________- 100
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Colombia (B. E. P. Q. 477, superseding

Memorandum to Chief Inspectors September 11981) 2-2 -.2--- 222 222s eee 110
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Malaya (B. E. P. Q. 478, superseding B. E. P. Q.458)__ 112
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Colony and Protectorate of Kenya (B. E. P. Q.479)_-. 116

Penalties imposed tor violations of the Plant Quarantine Act_._............--.--.-----2. 2-22. 119
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine-_--.--..--------------------------- 121

QUARANTINE AND OTHER OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO GYPSY MOTH AND BROWN-TAIL
MOTH QUARANTINE (NO. 45)

GYPSY MOTH QUARANTINE REVISED

(Press notice)
SEPTEMBER 30. 1938.

The quarantine and regulations relating to gypsy moth and brown-tail moth
infestations in New England have been revised, effective September 29, the
Acting Secretary of Agriculture, Harry L. Brown, announced today.

The principal changes are the release of certain areas from regulation and
the change in designation of certain other areas from that of lightly infested to
generally infested.

As a result of scouting of the past three seasons, conditions along the northern
border of the regulated area were found to be such that certain towns in
Coos County, N. H., and parts of the counties of Caledonia, Essex, Lamoille,
and Rutland, in Vermont, including a granite and marble district and an area
from which quantities of Christmas trees are shipped, could be released from
regulation.

104498—38——1 75
YHANSLI
gH s7ell BUREAU OF ewfoMOLoGy AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July—Sept.

The increased numbers of gypsy moth egg clusters found in parts of Maine
have been sufficient, however, to justify classifying as generally infested, parts
of the six counties of Franklin, Kennebec, Oxford, Penobscot, Somerset, and
Waldo, in that State, as well as parts of the counties of Orange, Windham, and
Windsor, in Vermont, and a district in Coos County, N. H., formerly found to
be lightly infested.

GYPSY MOTH AND BROWN-TAIL MOTH QUARANTINE (QUARANTINE
NO. 45)

REVISION OF QUARANTINE AND REGULATIONS

INTRODUCTORY NOTE .

The principal changes in this revision of the quarantine and the rezulations
are (1) the release from regulation of certain towns in Coos County, N. H.,
and parts of the counties of Caledonia, Essex, Lamoille, and Rutland, Vt.; and
(2) the transfer from lightly infested to generally infested area of part of
Coos County, N. H., parts of the Maine counties of Franklin, Kennebec, Oxford,
Penobscot, Somerset, and Waldo, and parts of the Vermont counties of Orange,
Windham, and Windsor. The quarantine as revised provides for modifications
of its restrictions in accordance with facts as to pest risk found by the Chief
of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine and set forth in adminis-
trative instructions..

Former regulations 2 and 4 have been discontinued and the present regula-
tions have been renumbered.

SUMMARY

The regulated area includes the entire State of Rhode Island and parts of
Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Vermont. The re-
stricted articles, unless exempted by administrative instructions, are as fol-
lows: (1) Coniferous trees, such as spruce, fir, hemlock, pine, juniper (cedar),
and arborvitae (white cedar), without roots, known as Christmas trees, and
parts thereof, and evergreen decorative plants, such as boxwood, holly. and
laurel, and their parts; (2) forest-plant products, including logs, tanbark, posts,
poles, car stakes, railroad ties, cordwood, empty cable reels, and lumber; (3)
trees, shrubs, vines, and all plants having persistent woody stems, and parts of
such plants excepting seeds and fruit; and (4) stone and quarry products
(regulation 1).

Under these regulations no restricted articles shall be moved interstate from
the regulated areas to or through any point outside thereof, nor from the
generally infested area to the lightly infested area, except under a certificate
or permit (regulation 38).

Christmas trees and evergreen boughs originating in the generally infested
area are not allowed to be moved interstate to any point outside of that area,
and no certificate er permit will be issued authorizing such movement unless
such trees have been grown as nursery stock in a cultivated nursery and are
certified under the provisions of regulation 4.

Deciduous trees and such parts thereof as bear leaves are not allowed to be
moved from the brown-tail moth infested area to outside points without a cer-
tificate or permit, except that a State nursery inspection certificate may be
substituted in the case of certain classes of movement within the gypsy moth
regulated areas (regulation 3).

Woody plants grown in the greenhouse throughout the year and cut flowers
thereof may be shipped interstate without inspection and certification on con-
dition that each box or package is plainly labeled to show that the contents
were greenhouse grown.

For the conditions governing inspection and certification, marking require-
ments, and similar details, see regulations 4 to 10, inclusive.

To arrange for inspection and certificates, address Bureau of Entomology and
Plant Quarantine, 266 Glenwood Avenue, Bloomfield, N. J.

S. A. ROHWER,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

8
1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS it

NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 45 (REVISED)
(Approved September 28, 1938; effective September 29, 1938)

I, Harry L. Brown, Acting Secretary of Agriculture, have determined that it
is necessary to quarantine the States of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont,
Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut, to prevent the spread of two
injurious insects—the gypsy moth (Porthetria dispar lL.) and the brown-tail
moth (Nygmia phaeorrhoea Don.)—not herefore widely distributed within and
throughout the United States.

Now, therefore, I, Harry L. Brown, Acting Secretary of Agriculture, under
the authority conferred by section 8 of the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20,
1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended, do hereby quarantine the States of Maine, New
Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut, and by
this Notice of Quarantine No. 45 do order that (1) coniferous trees, such as
spruce, fir, hemlock, pine, juniper (cedar), and arborvitae (white cedar), with-
out roots, known and described as “Christmas trees,” and parts thereof, and
evergreen decorative plants, such as boxwood, holly, and laurel, and parts
thereof, known and described as “Christmas greens and greenery”; (2) forest-
plant products, including logs, tanbark, posts, poles, car stakes, railroad ties,
cordwood, empty cable reels, and lumber; (5) trees, shrubs, vines, and all plants
having persistent woody stems, and parts of such plants excepting seeds and
fruit; and (4) stone and quarry products, shall not be shipped, offered for ship-
ment to a common carrier, received for transportation or transported by a
common carrier, or carried, transported, moved, or allowed to be moved from
any of said quarantined States into or through any other State or Territory
or District of the United States in manner or method or under conditions other
than those prescribed in the rules and regulations hereinafter made and amend-
ments thereto: Provided, That the restrictions of this quarantine and of the
rules and regulations supplemental thereto may be limited to the areas, in a -
quarantined State, now or hereafter designated by the Secretary of Agricul-
ture as regulated areas, when said State shall have provided for and enforced
such control and regulatory measures with respect to such designated areas as,
in the judgment of the Secretary of Agriculture, shall be deemed adequate to
prevent the spread of the gypsy moth and brown-tail moth: And provided fur-
ther, That, whenever, in any year, the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and
Plant Quarantine shall find that facts exist as to the pest risk involved in the
movement of one or more of the articles enumerated in the regulations supple-
mental hereto, making it safe to modify, by making less stringent, the restric-
tions contained in any such regulation, he shall set forth and publish such
finding in administrative instructions, specifying the manner in which the appli-
cable regulation should be made less stringent, whereupon such modification
shall become effective, for such period and for such regulated area or portion
thereof as shall be specified in said administrative instructions, and a copy
thereof shall be mailed to the common carriers doing business in the quaran-
tined area affected and every reasonable effort shall be made to give publicity
to the said modification of the regulation in the area affected.

Done at the city of Washington this 28th day of September 1938.

Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.

[SEAL] Harry L. Brown,

Acting Secretary of Agriculture.

RULES AND REGULATIONS (EIGHTH REVISION) SUPPLEMENTAL TO
NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 45

(Approved September 28, 1938; effective September 29, 1938)
REGULATION 1. DEFINITIONS

For the purpose of these regulations the following words, names, and terms
shall be construed, respectively, to mean:

(a) Gypsy moth.—The insect known as the gypsy moth (Porthetria dispar L.).

(6b) Brown-tail moth.—The insect known as the brown-tail moth (Nygmia
phaeorrhoea Don., formerly referred to as Huproctis chrysorrhoea).
_(c) Quarantined area.—Any State quarantined by the Secretary of Agricul-
ture upon determination by him that either the gypsy moth or the brown-tail
moth, or both, exist therein.
78 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July—Sept.

(d) Regulated area.—The entire area comprised of portions of the quaran-
tined States now or hereafter designated by the Secretary of Agriculture as
regulated to prevent the spread of the gypsy moth or brown-tail moth, or both,
therefrom.

(e) Generally infested area.—The entire area comprised of portions of the
quarantined States now or hereafter designated by the Secretary of Agriculture
as generally infested with the gypsy moth.

(f) Lightly infested area.—The entire area comprised of portions of the
quarantined States now or hereafter designated by the Secretary of Agriculture
as lightly infested with the gypsy moth.

(9g) Brown-tail moth infested area.—The entire area comprised of portions
of the quarantined States now or hereafter designated by the Secretary of
Agriculture as infested with the brown-tail moth.

(h) Restricted articles—(1) Coniferous trees, such as spruce, fir, hemlock,
pine, juniper (cedar), and arborvitae (white cedar), without roots, known and
described as “Christmas trees,” and parts thereof, and evergreen decorative
plants, such as boxwood, holly, and laurel, and parts thereof; (2) forest-plant
products, including logs, tanbark, posts, poles, car stakes, railroad ties, cord-
wood, empty cable reels, and lumber; (3) trees, shrubs, vines, and all plants
having persistent woody stems, and parts of such plants, excepting seeds and
fruit; and (4) stone and quarry products.

(i) Moved interstate; interstate movement.—Shipped, offered for shipment to
a common carrier, received for transportation or transported by a common car-
rier, or carried, transported, moved, or allowed to be moved from one State of
the United States into or through any other State or Territory or District.

(j) Inspector.—An inspector of the United States Department of Agriculture.

REGULATION 2. LIMITATION OF RESTRICTIONS TO REGULATED AREAS. DESIGNATION
OF REGULATED AREAS; GENERALLY INFESTED AREA; LIGHTLY INFESTED AREA;
Brown-Talt MotH INFESTED AREA

Conditioned upon maintenance on the part of the State concerned of action
deemed adequate by the Secretary of Agriculture to prevent the spread of the
gypsy moth and brown-tail moth, or both such moths, from the regulated area
or areas to other parts of the State, the restrictions of these regulations are
limited to the following areas:

(1) REGULATED AREAS

Connecticut.—Counties of Hartford, Middlesex, New London, Tolland, and
Windham; towns of Barkhamsted, Colebrook, Harwinton, New Hartford, Ply-
mouth, Thomaston, Torrington, and Winchester, in Litchfield County; towns of
Branford, Guilford, Madison, Meriden, North Branford, North Haven, Waterbury,
and Wolcott, in New Haven County.

Maine.—Counties of Androscoggin, Cumberland, Kennebec, Knox, Lincoln,
Sagadahoc, Waldo, and York; towns of Avon, Berlin, Carthage, Chesterville,
Crockertown, Dallas Plantation, Farmington, Freeman, Greenvale, Industry,
Jay, Jerusalem, Kingfield, Madrid, Mount Abraham, New Sharon, New Vineyard,
Perkins, Phillips, Rangeley Plantation, Redington, Salem, Sandy River Planta-
tion, Strong, Temple, Washington, Weld, and Wilton, and townships D and HE,
in Franklin County; all of Hancock County except plantations 38, 4, 35, and 41;
all that part of Oxford County south and southeast of and including the towns
of Magalloway and Richardsontown; towns of Alton, Argyle, Bradford, Brad-
ley, Carmel, Charleston, Clifton, Corinna, Corinth, Dexter, Dixmont, Eddington,
Etna, Exeter, Garland, Glenburn, Grand Falls Plantation, Greenbush, Greenfield,
Hampden, Hermon, Holden, Hudson, Kenduskeag, Levant, Milford, Newburgh,
Newport, Orono, Orrington, Plymouth, Stetson, Summit, and Veazie, and cities
of Bangor, Brewer, and Old Town, in Penobscot County; towns of Abboit,
Atkinson, Dover, Foxcroft, Guilford, Kingsbury Plantation, Parkman, Sanger-
ville, and Wellington, in Piscataquis County; all that part of Somerset County
south and southeast of and including Highland and Pleasant Ridge Plantations,
town of Moscow, and Mayfield Plantation; towns of Beddington, Cherryfield,
Columbia, Deblois, Harrington, Millbridge, and Steuben, and Plantations 18 and
24, in Washington County.

Massachusetts——Counties of Barnstable, Bristol, Dukes, Essex, Hampden,
Hampshire, Middlesex, Nantucket, Norfolk, Plymouth, Suffolk, and Worcester ;
-all of Franklin County except the town of Monroe.
1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 79

New Hampshire.—Counties of Belknap, Carroll, Cheshire, Grafton, Hillsboro,
Merrimack, Rockingham, Strafford, and Sullivan; all that part of Coos County
lying south of and including the towns of Stratford, Odell, Dummer, and
Cambridge.

Rhode Island—rThe entire State.

Vermont.—Counties of Orange, Windham, and Windsor; towns of Land-
grove, Peru, Readsboro, Searsburg, and Winhall, in Bennington County; towns
of Barnet, Danville, Groton, Kirby, Peacham, Ryegate, St. Johnsbury, and
Waterford, in Caledonia County; towns of Concord, Granby, Guildhall, Lunen-
burg, Maidstone, and Victory, in Essex County; town of Elmore, in Lameoille
County; towns of Mount Holly, Mount Tabor, Pittsfield, Sherburne, Shrewsbury,
and Wallingford, in Rutland County; towns of Barre, Berlin, Cabot, Calais,
East Montpelier, Marshfield, Middlesex, Montpelier, Moretown, Northfield, Plain-
field, Roxbury, Waitsfield, Woodbury, and Worcester, in Washington County.

(2) DIVISION OF REGULATED AREA

For the purpose of regulating inspection and transportation, the territory
designated above is divided into two classes of areas to be known as the
generally infested and lightly infested areas, respectively, and part of such
regulated area is also designated as brown-tail moth infested.

(3) Lightly Infested Area

The following States, counties, townships, towns, plantations, cities, and
other political subdivisions, including any cities, towns, boroughs, or other
political subdivisions included within their limits, are designated as the lightly
infested area:

Connecticut.—County of Middlesex; towns of Avon, Berlin, Bristol, Burling-
ton, Farmington, Marlboro, New Britain, Newington, Plainville, Rocky Hill, _
Southington, and West Hartford, in Hartford County; towns of Colebrook, Har-
winton, New Hartford, Plymouth, Thomaston, Torrington, and Winchester, in
Litchfield County; towns of Branford, Guilford, Madison, Meriden, North Bran-
ford, North Haven, Waterbury, and Wolcott, in New Haven County; towns of
EKast Lyme, Lyme, and Old Lyme, in New London County.

Maine.—Towns of Avon, Berlin, Carthage, Crockertown, Dallas Plantation,
Freeman, Greenvale, Jerusalem, Kingfield, Madrid, Mount Abraham, New Vine-
yard, Perkins, Phillips, Rangeley Plantation, Redington, Salem, Sandy River
Plantation, Strong, Temple, Washington, and Weld, and townships D and BE, in
Franklin County; towns of Amherst, Aurora, Bucksport, Dedham, Eastbrook,
Franklin, Gouldsboro, Hancock, Lamoine, Mariaville, Orland, Osborn Planta-
tion, Otis, Penobscot, Sorrento, Sullivan, Trenton, Verona, Waltham, city of
Ellsworth, and townships or plantations numbered 7, 8, 9, 10, 16, 22, 28, 32, 33,
34, 39, and 40, in Hancock County; towns of Andover, Andover North surplus,
Byron, C., C. surplus, Grafton, Hanover, Magalloway, Newry, Richardsontown,
Riley Grant, Roxbury, and Upton, in Oxford County; towns of Alton, Argyle,
Bradford, Bradley, Carmel, Charleston, Clifton, Corinna, Corinth, Dexter, Dix-
mont, Eddington, Etna, Exeter, Garland, Glenburn, Grand Falls Plantation,
Greenbush, Greenfield, Hampden, Hermon, Holden, Hudson, Kenduskeag, Levant,
Milford, Newburgh, Newport, Orono, Orrington, Stetson, Summit, and Veazie,
and cities of Bangor, Brewer, and Old Town, in Penobscot County; towns of
Abbott, Atkinson, Dover, Foxcroft, Guilford, Kingsbury Plantation, Parkman,
Sangerville, and Wellington, in Piscataquis County; towns of Anson, Athens,
Bingham, Brighton Plantation, Cambridge, Concord, Cornville, Embden, Har-
mony, Hartland, Highland, Lexington, Madison, Mayfield, Moscow, New Port-
land, Palmyra, Pleasant Ridge Plantation, Ripley, St. Albans, and Solon, in
Somerset County; towns of Brooks, Frankfort, Jackson, Knox, Monroe, Prospect,
Searsport, Stockton Springs, Swanville, Thorndike, Waldo, Winterport, and the
city of Belfast, in Waldo County; towns of Beddington, Cherryfield, Columbia,
Deblois, Harrington, Millbridge, and Steuben, and plantations 18 and 24, in
Washington County.

Massachusetts—Towns of Charlemont, Hawley, Heath, and Rowe, in Frank-
lin County; towns of Chester and Tolland, in Hampden County; towns of Cum-
mington, Huntington, Middlefield, Plainfield, and Worthington, in Hampshire
County.

New Hampshire.—Town of Harts Location, in Carroll County; towns of Beans
Grant, Cambridge, Carroll, Chandler Purchase, Crawford Grant, Crawford Pur-
chase, Cutts Grant, Dalton, Dummer, Hadleys Purchase, Jefferson, Kilkenny,
80 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July—Sept.

Lancaster, Low & Burbank Grant, Milan, Nash & Sawyer Location, Northumber-
land, Odell, Randolph, Sargent Purchase, Stark, Stratford, Success, Thompson
& Meserve Purchase, and Whitefield, in Coos County; towns of Bath, Bethlehem,
Franconia, Landaff, Lisbon, Littleton, Lyman, and Monroe, in Grafton County.
Rhode Island.—Town of New Shoreham (Block Island). in Newport County.
Vermont.—Towns of Landgrove, Peru, Readsboro, Searsburg, and Winhall,
in Bennington County; towns of Barnet, Danville, Groton, Kirby, Peacham,
Ryegate, St. Johnsbury, and Waterford, in Caledonia County; towns of Con-
cord, Grarby, Guildhall, Lunenburg, Maidstone, and Victory, in Hssex County;
town of Elmore, in Lamoille County; towns of Braintree, Brookfield, Chelsea,
Corinth, Orange, Randolph, Topsham, Strafford, Tunbridge, VersShire, Wash-
ington, West Fairlee, and Williamstown, in Orange County; towns of Mount
Holly, Mount Tabor, Pittsfield, Sherburne, Shrewsbury, and Wallingford, in
Rutland County; towns of Barre, Berlin, Cabot, Calais, East Montpelier,
Marshfield, Middlesex, Montpelier, Moretown, Northfield, Plainfield, Roxbury,
Waitsfield, Woodbury, and Worcester, in. Washington County; towns of Brook-
line, Dover, Halifax, Jamaica, Londonderry, Marlboro, Newfane, Somerset,
Stratton, Townshend, Wardsboro, Whitingham, Wilmington, and Windham, in
Windham County; towns of Andover, Baltimore, Barnard, Bethel, Bridgewater,
Cavendish, Ludlow, Plymouth, Pomfret, Reading, Rochester, Royalton, Sharon,
Stockbridge, Weston, West Windsor, and Woodstock, in Windsor County.

(4) Generally Infested Area

All parts of the regulated area not designated as lightly infested in section
(8) hereof, shall comprise the generally infested area.

(5) Brown-tail Moth Infested Area

The following counties, towns, and other political subdivisions, including
any cities, boroughs, or other political subdivisions included within their
limits, are also infested with the brown-tail moth and are hereby designated
as the brown-tail moth infested area:

Maine——Counties of Androscoggin, Cumberland, Kennebec, Knox, Lincoln,
Sagadahoc, Waldo, and York; towns of Chesterville, Farmington, Industry,
Jay, New Sharon, and Wilton, in Franklin County; towns of Bar Harbor,
Bucksport, Orland, Surry, and Trenton, and the city of EUsworth, in Hancock
County, and all territory west and south of said towns in said county; towns
of Albany, Bethel, Brownfield, Buckfield, Canton, Denmark, Dixfield, Fryeburg,
Greenwooc, Hartford, Hebron, Hiram, Lovell, Mason, Milton Plantation, Nor-
way, Oxford, Paris, Peru, Porter, Rumford, Stoneham, Stow, Sumner, Sweden,
Waterford, and Woodstock, in Oxford County; cities of Bangor and Brewer,
and towns of Carmel, Dixmont, Etna, Hampden, Hermon, Newburgh, Orring-
ton, and Plymouth, in Penobscot County; and towns of Canaan, Fairfield,
Mercer, Norridgewock, Pittsfield, Skowhegan, Smithfield, and Starks, in Somer-
set County.

Massachusetts——Counties of Barnstable, Bristol, Dukes, Essex, Middlesex,
Nantucket, Norfolk, Plymouth, and Suffolk; towns of Ashburnham, Berlin,
Blackstone, Bolton, Boyleston, Clinton, Douglas, Fitchburg, Gardner, Grafton,
Harvard, Holden, Hopedale, Lancaster, Leominster, Lunenburg, Menden, Mil-
ferd, Millbury, Millville, Northborough, Northbridge, Paxton, Princeton, Royal-
ston, Shrewsbury, Southboro, Sterling, Sutton, Templeton, Upton, Uxbridge,
Webster, West Boylston, Westboro, Westminster, and Winchendon, and the city
of Worcester, in Worcester County.

New Hampshire—Counties of Belknap, Cheshire, Hillsboro, Merrimack,
Rockingham, Strafford, and Sullivan; all of Carroll County except the town
of Jackson; all of Grafton County except the towns of Bethlehem and Littleton.

Vermont.—Towns of Barnet and Ryegate, in Caledonia County; towns of
Bradford, Fairlee, Newbury, Thetford, and West Fairlee, in Orange County;
towns of Brattleboro, Dummerston, Putney, Rockingham, Vernon, and West-
minster, in Windham County; towns of Hartford, Hartland, Norwich, Spring-
field, Weatherford, West Windsor, and Windsor, in Windsor County.

REGULATION 8. CONTROL OF MOVEMENT OF RESTRICTED ARTICLES

Certification required—Except as otherwise provided in this regulation:
(1) No restricted articles as defined in regulation 1 shall be moved inter-
state from the regulated areas to or through any point outside thereof, nor
1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS Sl

from the generally infested area to the lighly infested area, unless and until
a certificate or permit shall have been issued therefor by an inspector.

(2) Christmas trees and evergreen boughs.—Coniferous trees, such as spruce,
fir, hemlock, pine, juniper (cedar), and arborvitae (white cedar), without
roots, known and described as “Christmas trees,’ and parts thereof over 1 foot
in length, originating in the generally infested area (unless grown as nursery
stock in a cultivated nursery and certified under the provisions of regulation 4
hereof), shall not be moved interstate to any point outside of such area and
no certificate or permit will be issued authorizing such movement. Such
articles which have originated in the lightly infested area may be moved inter-
state from the generally iniested area under the inspection and certification
prescribed in paragraph (1) hereof.

(3) Shipments from brown-tail moth infested area.—Except as provided in
paragraph (5) hereof no deciduous trees or shrubs, or such branches or other
parts thereof as bear leaves, shall be moved interstate from the area
designated as infested by the brown-tail moth to any point outside thereof
unless and until a certificate or permit shall have been issued therefor by an
inspector, except that as to such movement wholly within the generally
infested gypsy-moth area or wholly within the lightly infested gypsy-moth
area, or from the lightly infested to the generally infested gypsy-moth area,
a valid State nursery inspection certificate of the State from which the ship-
ment is made may be substituted for such Federal certificate or permit.

(4) Shipments within regulated areas Unrestricted—Other than as pre-
scribed in paragraph (38) hereof, and in regulation 7, no restrictions are placed
by these regulations on the interstate movement of restricted articles wholly
within the generally infested area or wholly within the lightly infested area
or from the lightly infested area to the generally infested area.

(5) Cut flowers and greenhouse-grown plants.—In the case of woody plants
which are grown in the greenhouse throughout the year, the plants themselves.
and the cut flowers thereof may be moved interstate without inspection or
certification * under these regulations on condition that each box or package
thereof is plainly labeled to show that the contents were greenhouse grown.

(6) Herbaceous plants unrestricted.—No restrictions* are placed by these
regulations on the interstate movement of strawberry plants, or of other
herbaceous annual or perennial plants or parts thereof.



REGULATION 4. CONDITIONS GOVERNING THE ISSUANCE OF CERTIFICATES
or INSPECTION

(a) Application; assembly of articles for inspection.—Persons intending to
move restricted articles interstate shall make application therefor as far as
possible in advance of the probable date of shipment. Applications must show
the nature and quantity of the plants or plant products or stone and quarry
products it is proposed to move, together with their exact location, and, if
practicable, the contemplated date of shipment. Applicants for inspection will
be required to assemble or indicate the articles to be moved interstate so that
they can be readily examined by the inspector. If not so placed, inspection
will be refused. Articles to be inspected must be free from ice and snow and
in condition to make inspection easily practicable.

(b) Nursery-grown stock.—With respect to nursery-grown stock, Federal
inspection and the issuance of Federal certificates authorizing the interstate
movement of nursery products will be conditioned on the presentation of a
valid State certificate stating that the nursery or lot of nursery stock in
‘question has been inspected by a State nursery inspector and certifying that it
is apparently free from infestation with gypsy and brown-tail moths. Such
State certification shall be renewed each year, shall be based on an inspection
made as promptly as practicable after the egg-laying period of the gypsy
moth, and shall be valid for the purpose of Federal certification, until the
following egg-hatching period, except that, pending reinspection, shipments
may be inspected and certified for interstate movement on the basis of the
State certification of the preceding year. Whenever any nursery or inde-
pendent unit thereof in the regulated area, or any shipment therefrom, is

1 Shipments of such plants and flowers from the area regulated under the Japanese
‘beetle quarantine are subject to the certification requirements of that quarantine.
82 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July—-Sept.

reported by a State inspector to be appreciably infested with either the gypsy
moth or the brown-tail moth, or whenever such infestation is determined by
a Federal inspector, further certification for interstate movement from such
nursery, or independent unit thereof, will be refused until such nursery has
been freed from infestation and has been again inspected and certified by the
State to -be apparently clean except that during such periods of refusal,
Federal inspection and certification of individual shipments of nursery stock
from nurseries being freed from infestation may be given, provided a special
certificate showing freedom from infestation has been issued therefor by a
State inspector after examination of the material in each such shipment.
During the larval period of the gypsy moth all nursery stock shall be assembled
for the examination of the Federal inspector, and if passed by him as free from
any infestation, either by egg masses or larvae, it may then be lined up and
thoroughly sprayed under the direction of and in manner and method satis-
factory to the said inspector, who will certify each shipment as having been
thus inspected and treated.

(c) Native trees and shrubs.—With respect to living trees and plants not
grown in nurseries, inspection and certification for interstate movement will
be conditioned upon the presentation of a statement by the applicant specifying
the exact source of such trees and plants, and in addition to such statement,
if dug on land other than the property of the applicant, a permit from the
owner of the said land authorizing such digging, provided such permit is.
required under the law of the State wherein the land is situated. If the
inspection of the trees or plants intended for shipment discloses infestation
with either the gypsy moth or brown-tail moth, certification may be refused
as to the intended shipment and as to other Similar shipments of trees or
plants originating on the same property or in the same locality.

(ad) Forest products and stone and quarry products—Certificates of inspec-
tion authorizing the interstate movement of forest products and stone and
quarry products may be isSued under either of the following conditions: (1)
When the articles to be moved interstate have actually been inspected and
found free from infestation; or (2) when the articles have been disinfected
under the supervision of an inspector in such a manner as to eliminate all
risk of infestation. With respect to quarries, and with respect to yards or
other places where forest productS are assembled for shipment, as a condi-
tion of inspection and certification, the premises or surroundings of such places.
shall be cleaned up and kept free from gypsy moth infestation.

(e) Charges for storage, etc—AIll charges for storage, cartage, and labor
incident to inspection or disinfection other than the Services of the inspectors
shall be paid by the shipper.

(f) Use of certificates.—Certificates of inspection will be issued only for
plants and plant products and stone and quarry products which are free from
infestation by the gypsy moth and the brown-tail moth and have been so
determined by an inspector. The use of such certificates in connection with
plants and plant products and stone and quarry products which are not in
compliance with these regulations is unlawful.

(9g) Report of certificates—Persons to whom certificates are issued shall
report at time of shipment on forms provided for that purpose all their sales
or shipments of such articles to points outside the regulated area.

REGULATION 5. CONDITIONS. GOVERNING THE JSSUANCE OF PERMITS WITHOUT
INSPECTION, AND THE REPORTING OF SHIPMENTS

Permits authorizing the interstate movement of restricted articles may be
issued (1) when such products have been grown, or manufactured, processed,
and stored in such a manner that, in the judgment of the inspector, no infesta-
tion could be transmitted, and (2) when such products originate outside of
the infested areas and, while within the infested area, have been stored and
safeguarded in such manner that, in the judgment of the inspector, no infes-
tation could be transmitted. Permits will be issued only for plants and plant
products and stone and quarry products which are not infested with the
gypsy moth or brown-tail moth.

’ Persons to whom permits are issued shall report at time of shipment on forms
provided for that purpose all their sales or shipments of such articles to
points outside the regulated area.
1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 83

REGULATION 6. MARKING AND CERTIFICATION A CONDITION OF INTERSTATE
TRANSPORTATION

(a) Every box, basket, bale, or other container of the articles restricted for
which a certificate or permit is required by these regulations shall be plainly
marked with the name and address of the consignor and the name and address
of the consignee, and the shipper shall securely attach to the outside thereof a
valid certificate or permit issued in compliance with these regulations. In the
case of lot shipments by freight, one certificate attached to one of the contain-
ers and another certificate attached to the waybill will be sufficient.

(b) In the case of bulk carload shipments by rail, the certificate shall ae-
company the waybill, conductor’s manifest, memorandum, or bill of lading
pertaining to such shipment, and in addition each car shall have securely at-
tached to the outside thereof a placard showing the number of the certificate
or certificates accompanying the waybill.

(c) In the case of shipment by road vehicle, the certificates shall accom-
pany the vehicle.

(d) Certificates shall be surrendered to the consignee upon delivery of the
shipment.

REGULATION 7. THOROUGH CLEANING REQUIRED OF CARS, BOATS, AND OTHER
VEHICLES BEFORE MOVING INTERSTATE

Cars, boats, and other vehicles which have been used in transporting re-
stricted articles within the regulated areas shall not be moved interstate until
the same shall have been thoroughly swept out and cleaned by the carrier at
the point of unloading or destination of all litter and rubbish from such regu-
lated articles. No litter, rubbish, or refuse from any such restricted articles
shall be moved interstate.

REGULATION 8. INSPECTION IN TRANSIT

Every car, vehicle, basket, box, bale, or other container moved interstate
which contains or which the inspector has probable cause to believe contains
either infested articles or articles the movement of which is prohibited or
restricted by these regulations, shall be subject to inspection by an inspector
at any time or place.

REGULATION 9. CANCELATION OF CERTIFICATES AND PERMITS

Certificates and permits issued under these regulations may be withdrawn
or canceled by the inspector and further certification refused, whenever in the
judgment of the inspector the further use of such certificates might result in
the dissemination of infestation.

REGULATION 10. SHIPMENTS FOR EXPERIMENTAL, SCIENTIFIC, OR EDUCATIONAL
PURPOSES

Articles subject to restriction in these regulations may be moved interstate
for experimental, scientific, or educational purposes, on such conditions and
under such safeguards as may be prescribed by the Bureau of Entomology and
Plant Quarantine. The container of articles so moved shall bear, securely
attached to the outside thereof, an identifying tag from the Bureau of En-
tomology and Plant Quarantine.

These revised rules and regulations shall be effective on and after September
29, 1938, and shall supersede the rules and regulations promulgated Novem-
ber 4, 1935.

Done at the city of Washington this 28th day of September 1938.

Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.

[SEAL] Harry L. Brown,

Acting Secretary of Agriculture.

APPENDIX

PENALTIES

The Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended,
provides that no person shall ship or offer for shipment to any common carrier,
104498—38——2
84 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE ([July-Sept.

nor shall any common carrier receive for transportation or transport, nor shall any
person carry or transport, from any quarantined State or Territory or District
of the United States, or from any quarantined portion thereof, into or through
any other State or Territory or District, any class of nursery stock or any
other class of plants, fruits, vegetables, roots, bulbs, seeds * * * or any
other article * * * specified in the notice of quarantine * * * in man-
ner or method or under conditions other than those prescribed by the Secretary
of Agriculture. It also provides that any person who shall violate any of the
provisions of this act, or who shall forge, counterfeit, alter, deface, or destroy
any certificate provided for in this act or in the regulations of the Secretary
of Agriculture shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor and shall, upon e¢on-
viction thereof, be punished by a fine not exceeding $500, or by imprisonment
not exceeding 1 year, or both such fine and imprisonment, in the discretion of
the court.

[The foregoing revision was sent to all common carriers doing business in or through the
quarantined area.]

NOTICE TO GENERAL PUBLIC THROUGH NEWSPAPERS

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,
BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE,
Washington, D. C., September 28, 1938.

Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority
conferred on him by the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912, as amended,
has promulgated a revision of Notice of Quarantine No. 45 on aceount of the
gypsy moth and brown-tail moth, and of regulations Supplemental thereto,
effective September 28, 1938. The principal changes effected by this revision are
(1) the release from regulated area of certain towns in Coos County, N. H.,
and parts of the counties of Caledonia, Essex, Lamoille, and Rutland, Vt.; and
(2) the transfer from lightly infested to generally infested area of part of
Coos County, N. H., and parts of the Maine counties of Franklin, Kennebec,
Oxford, Penobscot, Somerset, and Waldo, and parts of the Vermont counties
of Orange, Windham, and Windsor.

Copies of the revised quarantine and regulations may be obtained from the
Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, United States Department of
Agriculture, Washington, D. C.

Harry L. Brown,
Acting Secretary of Agriculture.

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE
(NO. 48)
BP Oris:

ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS—FUMIGATION OF ONIONS BY METHYL BROMIDE
AS A CONDITION OF CERTIFICATION OF ONIONS MOVING BY REFRIGERATOR
CAR FROM THE AREA LISTED IN REGULATION 5 OF QUARANTINE NO. 48

(Approved July 14, 1938; effective July 19, 1938)

Regulation 5, section B, paragraph (6) of the Japanese beetle quarantine
(No. 48) authorizes the issuance of certificates for the interstate movement
of onions via refrigerator car from the area listed in that regulation to points.
outside the regulated areas between June 15 and October 15 when the onions
have been fumigated in the car, when deemed necessary in the judgment of
the inspector and when the doors and hatches of the car have been tightly
closed or adequately screened under the supervision of an inspector.

TREATMENT AUTHORIZED

The treatment described herein has been found to be effective against the
Japanese beetle and such treatment is authorized as a basis for certification
of onions moving to points outside the regulated areas between June 15 and
October 15 via refrigerator car when such treatment is carried out under the
supervision of an inspector and in a manner satisfactory to him.
1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 85

TREATMENT METHOD

Fumigation of onions in dry refrigerator cars with methyl bromide at a
dosage of 2 pounds per 1,000 cubic feet of space, including the space occupied
by the onions and bunkers of the cars, for a period of 2 hours, during which
time the car shall remain tightly closed with the plugs in place in the ventilator
hatches. The temperature within the car when fumigated shall be not less
than 70° F. Provision shall be made for circulating the mixture of air and
fumigant in the car for as long a time as is deemed necessary by the inspector.
At the end of the fumigation period the hatches shall be opened, the plugs
removed, screens placed in the hatch openings, and the car shipped under
standard ventilation.

In authorizing the movement of onions fumigated according to the require-
ments stated above, it is to be understood that no liability shall attach either
to the United States Department of Agriculture or to any of its employees in
the event of injury.

Caution.—Methyl bromide is a gas at ordinary temperatures. It is color-
less and practically odorless in concentration used for the fumigation of onions.
It is a poison, and the operator should use an approved gas mask when ex-
posed to the gas at concentrations used in fumigation, and when opening the
hatches for ventilating the cars. The car should not be entered until it is

well aerated.
Lre A. STRONG,

Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

B. BE. P. Q. 480.

ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS—FUMIGATION OF TOMATOES BY METHYL BROMIDE
AS A CONDITION OF CERTIFICATION OF TOMATOES MOVING BY REFRIGERATOR
CAR FROM THE AREA LISTED IN REGULATION 5 OF QUARANTINE NO. 48 ;

(Approved August 18, 1938; effective August 22, 1938)

Regulation 5, section B, paragraph (2) of the Japanese beetle quarantine
(No. 48) authorizes the issuance of certificates for the interstate movement of
fruits and vegetables via refrigerator car from the area listed in that regulation
to points outside the regulated areas between June 15 and October 15 when
they have been handled or treated under the supervision of an inspector in
manner and by method to free them from any infestation.

TREATMENT AUTHORIZED

The treatment described herein has been found to be effective against the
Japanese beetle and such treatment is authorized as a basis for certification
of tomatoes moving to points outside the regulated areas between June 15 and
October 15 via refrigerator car when such treatment is carried out under the
supervision of an inspector and in a manner satisfactory to him.

TREATMENT METHOD

Fumigation of tomatoes in dry refrigerator cars with methyl bromide at a
dosage of 2 pounds per 1,000 cubic feet of space, including the space occupied
by the tomatoes and bunkers of the cars, for a period of 2 hours, during which
time the car shall remain tightly closed with the plugs in place in the ventilator
hatches. The temperature within the car when fumigated shall be not less
than 70° F. Provision shall be made for circulating the mixture of air
and fumigant in the car for as long a time as is deemed necessary by the
inspector. At the end of the fumigation period the hatches shall be opened,
the plugs removed, screens placed in the hatch openings, and the car shipped
under standard ventilation.

In authorizing the movement of tomatoes fumigated according to the require-
ments stated above, it is to be understood that no liability shall attach either
to the United States Department of Agriculture or to any of its employees in
the event of injury.
$6 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July—Sept.

Caution.—Methyl bromide is a gas at ordinary temperatures. It is colorless
and practically odorless in concentration used for the fumigation of tomatoes.
It is a poison, and the operator should use an approved gas mask when exposed
to the gas at concentrations used in fumigation, and when opening the hatches
for ventilating the cars. The car should not be entered until it is well aerated.

AVERY S. Hoyt,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

JAPANESE BEETLE CONTROL ENDS FOR SEASON ON FRUIT AND VEGETABLE
SHIPMENTS

(Press notice)

SEPTEMBER 20, 1938.

Restrictions on the movement of fruits and vegetables under the Japanese
beetle quarantine regulations were removed for the season at midnight, Mon-
day, September 19, the Secretary of Agriculture announced today. Restrictions
on cut flowers, however, remain in force through October 15.

Under quarantine regulations, certificates showing freedom from Japanese
beetle are required until October 16 on interstate shipments of certain kinds
of fruits and vegetables from the entire regulated area and on interstate ship-
ments of fruits and vegetables of any kind via refrigerator car or motortruck from
eertain sections of the regulated area. The order, issued today, releases the
fruits and vegetables from that requirement nearly 4 weeks earlier than is
provided in the regulations.

Inspection of fruits and vegetables is necessary only during the period when
adult beetles are in active flight. There is no risk that such products will
carry the Japanese beetle after this active period, which is now apparently
over throughout the regulated area. During the last few days the Department’s
inspectors have found no beetles in fruits and vegetables.

There is still danger, however, that the adult beetles may be transported
in cut flowers. Therefore, the restrictions on the interstate movement of cut
flowers and other parts of plants will remain in full force and effect through
October 15.

Restrictions on the movement of nursery, ornamental, and greenhouse stock
and all other plants (except cut flowers, aquatic plants, and portions of plants
without roots and free from soil) are in force throughout the year and are
not affected by this amendment. .

TERMINATION DATE ON FRUIT AND VEGETABLE RESTRICTIONS UNDER JAPANESE
BEETLE QUARANTINE (QUARANTINE NO. 48) ADVANCED TO SEPTEMBER 20 FOR
THE YEAR 1938

It has been determined that the active period of the Japanese beetle in its
relation to fruits and vegetables has already ceased for the present season and
that it is, therefore, safe to permit the unrestricted movement of the fruits
and vegetables listed in regulation 5 of the rules and regulations (sixteenth
revision) supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 48 from the entire regu-
lated area as defined in regulation 3 of said rules and regulations; therefore,
it is ordered that all restrictions on the interstate movement of the articles
referred to above are hereby removed on and after September 20, 1938. This
order advances the termination of the restrictions as to fruits and vegetables
provided for in regulation 5 from October 16 to September 20, 1938, and
applies to this season only.

Done at the city of Washington this 19th day of September 1938.

Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agri-
culture.

[SEAL] H. A. WALLACE,

Secretary of Agriculture.

. [The foregoing notice was sent to all common carriers doing business in or through the
quarantined area.]
1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 87

ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO RULES AND REGULATIONS GOVERN-
ING THE IMPORTATION OF COTTON AND COTTON WRAPPINGS INTO
THE UNITED STATES

INSTRUCTIONS TO COLLECTORS OF CUSTOMS
COTTON AND COTTON WRAPPINGS—APPLICATION FOR PERMITS (T. D. 49666)

AMENDED REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE IMPORTATION OF COTTON AND COTTON
WRAPPINGS INTO THE UNITED States (T. D. 39645, T. D. 40573, and T. D.
49398 )

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,
OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONER OF CUSTOMS,
Washington, D. C., July 29, 1938.

To Collectors of Customs and Others Concerned:

The appended copy of an amendment to the regulations promulgated by
the Department of Agriculture governing the importation into the United
States of cotton and cotton wrappings is published for the information and
guidance of customs officers and others concerned.

The number of this Treasury decision should be noted as a marginal refer-
ence for articles 579, 580, 581 (c), and 588 of the Customs Regulations of 1937.

FRANK Dow,
Acting Commissioner of Customs.

[Then follows the text of the amendment.]

TERMINAL INSPECTION OF PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS
REVOCATION OF OREGON PLANT QUARANTINE

Post OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, August 1, 1938.

Oregon Plant Quarantine (Order No. 15—-A series) pertaining to the white
pine blister rust in Oregon has been revoked, effective May 24, 19388.

This amends the list of Oregon State Plant Quarantines dated June 23, 1937,
published in the Postal Bulletin of July 27, 1937, and on page 44 of the August
1937 Supplement to the Postal Guide, and removes the restrictions previously
imposed on the acceptance for mailing of parcels containing five-leafed pines
and currant and gooseberry plants intended for shipment within the State of
Oregon.

Postmasters will please, therefore, make the proper correction and be goy-
erned accordingly. ‘he removal of the Oregon quarantine, however, does not
in any way affect the provisions of Federal Quarantine No. 63 on account of
the white-pine blister rust.

RAMSEY S. BLACK,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.

MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS

PUBLIC HEARING TO CONSIDER UNITED STATES QUARANTINE ON ACCOUNT OF
WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE

(Press notice)
Aveust 19, 19388.

A public hearing to consider a Federal quarantine because of white-
fringed beetle infestations in Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, and Mississippi
was announced today by Secretary Wallace. The hearing will be in Court
Room 206 of the Post Office Building, New Orleans, La., at 10 a. m.,,
September 15, 19388.

The white-fringed beetle, known to occur in South America, has become es-
tablished in several areas in the four Southern States, where an extensive
survey in the current season has resulted in new findings.
88 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July—Sept.

This insect may be carried from place to place through commerce, especially
that involving agricultural products and used implements. The eggs are
deposited in soil and on various articles that may be moved in commerce, and
may remain viable more than 5 months, hatching when conditions are favor-
able. The larvae can be transported with products which carry small quan-
tities of soil. Adults may be carried attached to almost any object within
their reach.

Both larvae and adults feed on a wide range of plants. The larvae have
caused serious damage to numerous field and garden crops, and are exceed-
ingly destructive to several important crops. It is reasonable to assume that
the larvae and adults will attack many plants that are widely grown in
other sections of the country and, if allowed to spread, may become a serious
pest in other agricultural regions of the United States, the Secretary said.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING TO CONSIDER THE ADVISABILITY OF QUARANTINING
THE STATES OF ALABAMA, FLORIDA, LOUISIANA, AND MISSISSIPPI ON ACCOUNT
OF THE WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE

Aveust 18, 19388.

The Secretary of Agriculture has information that the white-fringed beetle
(Naupactus leucoloma Boh.), an insect pest dangerous to agriculture, and not
heretofore widely prevalent or distributed within and throughout the United
States, exists in the States of Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, and Mississippi,
and that a closely related species of Nauwpactus exists in the State of
Mississippi.

It appears necessary, therefore, to consider the advisability of quarantining
the States of Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, and Mississippi, and of restricting
or prohibiting the movement from these States, or regulated portions thereof,
of the following articles:

(1) Soil as such or in connection with nursery stock, plants, or other
products, articles, or things; and (2) farm products and such other articles as
may be deemed necessary to prevent the dissemination of these insects in any
stage of development.

Notice is, therefore, hereby given that, in accordance with ‘the Plant Quar-
antine Act of August 20, 1912 (87 Stat. 315), as amended by the act of Con-
gress approved March 4, 1917 (389 Stat. 1184, 1165), a public hearing will be
held- before the Bureau of Entomology and Piant Quarantine in Court Room
No. 206 of the Post Office, New Orleans, La., at 10 a. m. September 15, 1938,
in order that any persons interested in the proposed quarantine may appear
and be heard, either in person or by attorney.

[SEAL] H. A. WALLACE,

Secretary of Agriculture.

P. Q. C. A. 306, Supplement No. 5.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, NEW ZEALAND

SEPTEMBER 10, 1938.
IMPORTATION OF CITRUS FRUITS AND BANANAS PROHIBITED

New Zealand Customs Import Prohibition Order No. 3 of May 11, 1938,
gazetted May 12, 1938, prohibits, save with the consent of the Minister of
Customs, the importation of fresh fruit of any of the following kinds, namely,
oranges, mandarin oranges, grapefruit, lemons, and bananas.

Len A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

B. HE. P. Q. 444, Revised.
' PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, FRENCH ZONE OF MOROCCO

JULY 1, 1938.

The revision of the digest of the plant-quarantine import restrictions of the
French zone of Morocco has been prepared for the information of nurserymen,
1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 89

plant-quarantine officials, and others interested in the exportation of plants
and plant products to that country.

It was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant quarantine inspector in charge,
Foreign Information Service, Division of Foreign Plant Qwarantines, from his
translations of the French texts of the dahirs and decrees promulgated by the
Director General of Agriculture, Commerce, and Colonization, and more recently
from those of the Director of Economic Affairs of the French zone of the
Sherifian Empire (Morocco), and reviewed by the Direction of Economie
Affairs.

The information included in this circular is believed to be correct and
complete up to the time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used
independently of, nor as a substitute for, the original texts, and is not to be
interpreted as legally authoritative. The original dahirs and decrees should
be consulted for the exact texts.

Lee A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, FRENCH ZONE OF MOROCCO

Basic LEGISLATION

[Dahir of September 20, 1927: Bulletin Officiel No. 803, March 18, 1928. Dahir of April
20, 1933 ; Bulletin Officiel No. 1076, June 9, 1933]

SUMMARY
IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

Live insects and, unless preserved in liquids, their eggs, larvae, nymphs, or
pupae, cultures of myxomycetes, fungi, or bacteria; dodder seeds (Cuscuta
spp.), may not be imported except for scientific or official technical purposes.
(Dahir of September 20, 1927, articles 1 and 2.)

Plants or parts thereof used as packing material, prohibited unless indus-
trially processed, except those named in the vizirial decree of September 13,
1933

Living plants, culms, straw, leaves, roots, husks, rachises, and inflorescences
of Zea mays L., Sorghum vuigare Pers., including all cultivated species of
Sorghum or Andropogon, Panicum miliaceum L., (Chaetochloa italica) Setaria
italica (L.) Beauy., and other species of Panicum; any part or residue of
Cannabis sativa L. except seeds, fiber, and inflorescences; whole plants, living
or dead, of Arundo donar L., xcept peeled or sawn stems used in making
packings. (Vizirial decree of August 31, 1932, as amended by vizirial decree
of September 3, 1984, and July 12, 1935.)

IMPORTATION RESTRICTED

Insects of economic importance: Certain honey-producing and silk-producing
insects may be imported into the French zone subject to inspection on arrival
if properly marked. (Decree of the Director General, March 1, 1928, as amended
by decree of May 12, 1937.)

Fungi, myxomycetes, and bacteria of economic or sanitary interest may be
imported into the French zone subject to examination on arrival. (Decree of
the Director General of March 1, 1928.)

Forage-crop seeds of the genera Medicago, Trifolium, Lotus, and Anthyllis,
subject to examination for dodder seeds (Cuscuta spp.). (Vizirial decree of
May 8, 1933.)

All plants or parts of plants, including seedlings, layers, cuttings, scions,
bulbs, cut flowers, fruits, pits of fruits, vegetables, tubers, rhizomes, roots,
grain, seeds, and in general, all plant wastes; manures, fertilizers, containers,
and packing materials; lumber and bark, industrially processed plant products,”
bran,” straw,” hay” (see below for restrictions on hay), oil cakes; are subject to
the provisions of the dahir of September 20, 1927.

Potatoes, tomatoes, and eggplants: Phytosanitary certificate which must
attest their freedom from potato wart; in addition, a certificate of supervision
is required for such products originating in countries invaded by the Colorado
potato beetle, and the products must be packed in new containers which are

2 Unrestricted entry authorized by the decree of February 19, 1931, as amended.
90 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

then officially sealed. (Vizirial decree of August 1, 1936, amended by Vizirial
decree of January 23, 1937.)

Hay: Importation subject to the phytosanitary regulations and those relat.
ing to the control of parasites and importation permitted only in the form of
mechanically compressed bales bound with iron wire. (Vizirial decree of Sep-
temper 138, 1933, article 4.)

Authorized ports of entry for plant products: Casablanca, Port-Lyautey
(Kenitra), and Oujda. (Article 6 of dahir of September 20, 1927, and decree
of September 10, 1936.)

IMPORTATION UNRESTRICTED

Cereals: Wheat, barley, oats, rye, maize, rice, soybean, and millet; beans,
peas, lentils, vetches, garbanzos, coffee, spices, and dried herbs; gums and resins;
dried medicinal plants in packages; lumber and bark; industrially dried vege-
tables, flours, food pastes, brans, oil cakes, straw, and hay. (Decree of the
Director General, February 19, 1951, amended by decrees of November 23, 1934,
and May 5, 1937.)

Dried herbarium specimens: Importation not restricted. (Dahir of September
201920. art. 225)

PHYTOSANITARY REGULATIONS OF THE FRENCH ZONE, SHERIFIAN EMPIRE
(MOROCCO)

{Promulgated by the dahir of Bee oo Tee ; Bulletin Officiel No. 803, March 13,

GENERAL REGULATIONS
DEFINITION OF PLANT PARASITE

ARTICLE 1. The term “plant parasite” designates any animal or plant organ-
ism, at any stage of development, that can effect lesions or other injury to wild
plants of economic importance, to cultivated plants, to plant products belonging
to those categories, or is of such a character as to cause their death or
modification.

IMPORTATION AND TRANSIT OF INSECTS, FUNGI, BACTERIA, AND DODDER PROHIBITED

The entry into or-transit through the French zone is prohibited of live insects,
the eggs, larvae, nymphs, or pupae of such insects, when not preserved in
liquids; cultures of myxomycetes, fungi, or bacteria; and dodder seeds (Cuscuta
spp.).

ENTRY PERMITTED FOR SCIENTIFIC PURPOSES

ArT. 2. When the articles named in article 1 are intended for scientific pur-
poses or for official technical purposes, they may be admitted to entry if so
packed as to prevent their dispersal.

Art. 3. A decree of the Director General of Agriculture, Commerce, and
Colonization (now Director of Economic Affairs) will determine what species of
insects, myxomycetes, fungi, or bacteria may be admitted to entry or transit
for economic or sanitary interests and the conditions under which they will be
admitted.

Art. 4. The Director General and the Director of Public Health and Hygiene
may likewise grant temporary derogations from the provisions of article 1.

ENTRY AND TRANSIT CONTROLLED

Art. 5. The entry into, transit through, and movement within the French
zone, and the exportation beyond that zone, of the following-named products or
articles, are regulated by the provisions of the present dahir:

1. All plants, or parts of plants such as seedlings, layers, cuttings, scions,
grafts, cut flowers, fruits, pits of fruits, vegetables, tubers, bulbs, rhizomes, roots,
grain, and seeds, and in general all plant waste.

2. Manures, vegetable fertilizers, composts, soil, even when the latter forms a
portion of a package of live plants.

8. Cases, baskets, sacks, wrappers, packing, used props and supports, and any
other article or material that has been used for the transportation or handling
1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS Of

of the products or articles above mentioned, the utilization of which might
involve pest risk to crops.

4, Logs, cork, bark, tan, posts, poles, railroad ties, and cordwood.

5. All products of plant origin, such as fruits and vegetables industrially
dried, flours, food pastes, bran, oil cakes, straw, and hay.

6. Plants in pots or balls of earth; potatoes, tomatoes, and eggplants. (De-
cree of the Director General, March 27, 1931; Bulletin Officiel No. 962, Aprit
3, 1931.)

AUTHORIZED PORTS OF ENTRY

ArT. 6. The ports of entry for the importation or transit of the products
named in article 5 are designated in orders of the Director General.

The decree of September 10, 1936, designates the ports of Casablanca and
Port-Lyautey and the frontier post of Oujda.

The decree of the Director General of September 10, 1936, authorizes also the
entry of potatoes through the ports of Rabat, Mazagan, Safi, and Magador, when.
shipments weighing not less than 20 metric quintals of 100 kilograms are con-
cerned, and through the port of Agadir when shipments weighing not less than:
100 metric quintals are concerned. This decree authorizes also the entry of:
used bags through the ports of Rabat, Mazagan, Safi, Magador, when shipments:
weighing less than 20 metric quintals are concerned, and the frontier post of
Martimprey du Kiss whatever the weight.

INSPECTION ON ARRIVAL

ArT. 7. The products named in article 5 will be inspected by officials of the
Director General of Agriculture on their entry into the French zone and dealt
with in accordance with the findings: Reiease for entry, treatment, relading, or
destruction. Inspectors are authorized to withdraw samples from shipments
for detailed examination. :

This inspection may be extended to other products if the inspector has reason
to suspect that they carry plant parasites. Products intended for propagation
may be placed under observation for variable periods. The Director General
may determine, if occasion requires, the products that, by derogation, shall not
be subject to the provisions of this article.

PHYTOSANITARY CERTIFICATE MAY BE REQUIRED

ArT. 8. The list of products named in article 5, shipments of which shall be
accompanied by a phytosanitary certificate and documents attesting their ori-
gin, as well as the conditions according to which these documents must be estab-
lished, are declared by decree of the Director General. These are potatoes, toma-
toes, and eggplants.

Compliance with the provisions of this article does not exclude the phytosani-
tary inspection prescribed by article 7, with all the consequences involved:
Refusal of entry, destruction, disinfection, or fumigation, etc.

PACKING AND MARKING

ArT. 9. The packing of the products named in article 5 shall be done in such
a manner as to permit their inspection and, if necessary, their disinfection or
fumigation.*

It should be possible to identify the packages with certainty, failing which,
they will be reloaded or destroyed at the option of the consignee.

The opening of containers will be at the expense and risk of the consignee.

SAMPLING SEEDS

ArT. 10. The conditions for sampling seeds on their entry into the French
zone to disclose the presence of dodder (Cuscuta spp.) will be determined by
a decree of the Grand Vizir. In-transit shipments are excepted. Sampling is

®The decree of February 19, 1931, amended by those of November 23, 1934, and May
5, 1937, enumerates the products which shall not fall under the provisions of articles 6, 7,
and 9 of the present dahir.

For approved packing materials see the decree of September 13, 1933, and vizirial
decree of August 31, 1932.

104498—38——3
Q2 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July—Sept.

done at the expense of importers in accordance with rates established by the
same order. The withdrawal of samples gives no right of indemnity.°

PRODUCTS AFFECTED BY THE LAW

ART. 11. The preceding provisions apply to the products mentioned in article
5 whatever be the means of transportation, even if brought in by members of
ships’ crews, or by the personnel of railroad or steamship companies, or any
other transportation services.

ArT. 12. The importation and transit of certain products mentioned in arti-
cle 5, or of certain others among them from specified countries or localities,
may be prohibited by a decree of the Grand Vizir.

BOTANICAL SPECIMENS UNRESTRICTED

The preceding provisions do not apply to dried plants intended for botanicas
collections.

The Grand Vizir, by decree, may make provisions to facilitate in frontier
localities of the French zone, the exchange of plants with frontier localities.

Arts. 13 to 35. Domestic procedure.

PHYTOSANITARY CONTROL OF IMPORTED PLANT MATERIAL

The decree of September 10, 1936, as amended by decree of October 16, 1936,
Bulletin Officiel No. 1242, September 18, 1936, revokes those of March 1, 1928,
February 19, 1981, March 27, 1981, March 31, 1933, and March 19, 1936, of the
Director General, and promulgates the following regulations for the enforce-
ment of the provisions of the dahir of September 20, 1927:

AUTHORIZED PORTS OF ENTRY

ARTICLE 1. The importation and transit of the products named in article 5
of the dahir of September 20, 1927, may be effected only through the ports of
Casablanea and Port-Lyautey and the frontier post of Oujda.

ART. 2. Relates to inspection on arrival, ete.

DOCUMENTS REQUIRED WITH EACH SHIPMENT

ArT. 2A. Shipments of seedlings (stocks), layers, cuttings, scions, bulbs,
tubers, rhizomes, roots, cut flowers, must be accompanied by:

1. A copy, certified as correct, of the invoice of the shipment, indicating:
(a) the botanical species and varieties included in the shipment; (0) the
name and address of the shipper and of the establishment from which the
plant material proceeds; (c¢c) the name and address of the consignee; and
(d) the weight of the packages, as well as their marks and numbers, and their
contents.

IMPORTATION PERMITTED OF INSECTS OF ECONOMIC IMPORTANCE

[Decree of the Director General of March 1, 1928; Bulletin Officiel No. 803. March 13,
1928, as amended by the decree of the Director General of May 12, 1937; Bulletin Offi-
ciel No. 1282, May 21, 1937]

ARTICLE 1. The insects hereafter hamed are admitted to entry into and transit
through the French zone:

Honey-producing insects: Apis ligustica Spin.; A. mellifica (mellifera) L.,
honeybee.

Silk-producing insects: Antheraea mylitta Drury, Tasar silkworm; A. pernyi
var. yama-mai Guer.; Attacus atlas L.; (Sericaria) Bombyx mori L., silkworm ;
Philosamia cynthia Drury; (Attacus ricini Hutton) =Philosamia lunula Walk. ;
Attacus (Rothschildi) orizaba Westw.; (Platysamia) Samia cecropia L.; Telea
polyphemus Cramer.

Cocoons or pupae of Formica rufa l., commonly known as ants’ eggs.

The entry of the honey-producing insects is permitted only in (oeufs de
fourmis) the adult stage and only in egg and pupal stages of the silk-producing
insects.

ArT. 2. The entry of these insects may be effected only through the: ports
of Casablanea and Port-Lyautey and the frontier post of Oujda.

5 See vizirial decree of May 8, 1933, on the importation of forage crop seeds.
1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 93

Shipments of these insects shall bear the name, address, and occupation of
the shipper, as well as the names of the species comprising the shipment.

For the purpose of identification these shipments, on arrival, will be in-
spected by an official of the Direction-General charged with the phytosanitary
inspection, in accordance with the provisions of article 7 of the dahir of
September 20, 1927.

Inseets recognized by the said official as not belonging to the above-named

species will be refused entry or destroyed at the choice and expense of the
consignee.

IMPORTATION PERMITTED OF CRYPTOGAMS OF ECONOMIC OR SANITARY INTEREST

[Decree of the Director General of March 1, 1928; Bulletin Officiel No. 803, March 18,
1928]

ARTICLE 1. The following classes of fungi, myxomycetes, and bacteria may be
admitted for entry into or transit through the French zone:

(a) Yeasts used in the manufacture of wines, ciders, in brewing, bread
making, and in the production of alcohol; (0) mucors used in the manufacture
of alcohol; (c) yeasts and bacteria for use in vegetable conserves such as
sauerkraut, string beans; (d) bacteria for the production of vinegar; (e)
bacteria employed in the retting of textile plants; (f) bacteria known as nitric
and nitrous ferments; (yg) bacteria assimilating nitrogen from the air; (h)
fungi (molds) used in cheese making; (7) bacteria known as lactic ferments
in yaourt or yoghourt; (j) yeasts for silage; (xk) ferments of kephir and
koumiss; (1) cryptogams intended for veterinary, therapeutic, or experimental
purposes; (m) cryptogams intended for use in therapeutic and medical ex-
perimentation.

ArT. 2. The cryptogams designated in paragraphs (a) to (i) may be im-
ported as pure cultures only.

ART. 3. The cryptogams designated in article 1 of the present order may be
imported only through the ports of Casablanca and Port-Lyautey and the
frontier post of Oujda.

ART. 4, Containers of the cryptogams mentioned in article 1 must bear the
name, address, and business or status of the shipper, and the name of the
species of cryptogam, if it is included in paragraphs (a) to (i) of article 1.

Shipments included in paragraphs (@) to (g) of article 1 must be examined,
on arrival, for purposes of igentity, as required by article 7 of the dahir of
September 20, 1927.

Shipments included in the other paragraphs will be subject to the same
conditions and, according to the circumstances, shipments under paragraph
(m) will go to an official designated by the director of public health and
hygiene; or to the chief of the research laboratory of animal industry in the
case of shipments under paragraphs (i) to (J).

Cryptogams (fungi, myxomycetes, or bacteria) recognized by these officials
as not belonging to one of the categories listed in the present order shall be
reembarked or destroyed at the choice and expense of the consignee.

APPROVED PACKING MATERIALS

ARTICLES 1 and 2. The vizirial decree of September 13, 1933 (Bulletin Officiel
No. 1094, October 15, 1933), prohibits the utilization of plants, that is, any
plant or part of a plant, wild or cultivated, which has received no industrial
treatment of a mechanical or chemical character, for purposes of containing,
packing, wrapping, decorating, conditioning, or making up the weight of
products or objects of any kind intended for importation into or transit
through the French Zone.

ArT. 3. The following exceptions are allowed: Straw of wheat (Triticum
spp.), barley (Hordeum spp.), oats (Avena spp.), and rye (Secale cereale L.) ;
rice straw (Oryza spp.) from French West Africa; wrappings made with leaves
of the date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.); esparto grass (Stipa tenacissima
L.) ; stems of the giant reed, Arundo donag L., if barked, defoliated, and split;
coconut fiber (Cocos nucifera L.); roots of ferns of the genera Polypodium,
Pteris, and Osmunda; osiers (Salix spp.) used in basket making; plants of
the various species of Hypnaceae and Bryaceae (mosses) and of Sphagnaceae
(sphagnum); leaves of species of Clinogyne (Scitamineae) and Mitragyne
(Rubiaceae) when used as packing for kola nuts.
O94 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July—Sept.

ArT. 4. Subject to the application of the phytosanitary regulations and those
relating to the control of plant parasites, the entry of hays into the French
zone is authorized only in the form of mechanically compressed bales bound
with iron wire.

Art. 5. Products or articles not packed in accordance with the present decree
will be returned or destroyed at the option and expense of the consignee or his
representative, in conformity with the provisions of article 7 of the dahir of
September 20, 1927.

The agents of the plant protection and phytosanitary inspection services, how-
ever, may authorize, in exceptional cases, the entry of products or articles of
metal or inorganie substances the packing of which is not in accordance with
the above requirements. In such a case the consignee is required to carry out
the measures demanded by the agents with a view to preventing the introduction
of parasites. These measures in every case will include the destruction of the
materials which have been used to pack, wrap, decorate, or contain the said
products or articles.

IMPORTATION AND TRANSIT UNRESTRICTED

A decree of the Director General of February 19, 1931, as amended by the
decrees of November 23, 19384, and May 5, 1987, authorizes the importation and
transit of the following-named products without restriction concerning the
place of entry, sanitary inspection, disinfection, fumigation, return, or
destruction :

(1) Grain of the following cereals: Wheat (cultivated species of the genus
Triticum L.) ; barley (cultivated species of the genus Hordeum L.) ; oats (eulti-
vated species of the genus Avena L.) ; rye (Secale cereale L.) ; maize (Zea mays
L.); rice (Oryza sativa L.); sorghum (Sorghum vulgare Pers.) ; millet (Pani-
cum mitiaceum).

(2) Seed of: French beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.); Peas (Pisum sativum
L.); lentils (Hrvum lens L.); breadbeans (Faba vulgaris Moench.) ; vetches
(Vicia sativa L.) ; chickpeas or garbanzos (Cicer arietinum L.).

(3) Coffee beans (Coffea arabica L., C. liberica Hiern, and C. stenophylla
Don.), and green leaves of tea (Thea chinensis Sims.).

(4) Black pepper (Piper nigrum L.); cloves (Hugenia aromatica L.) ; cinna-
mon bark (Cinnamomum zeylanicum L.) ; galangal (Alpinia officinarum Hance)
and, in general, all spices other than pimento; ginger, rhizomes of Zingiber
officinale Rose.

(5) Dried lavender (Lavandula vera D. C., L. latifolia Vall., L. stoechas L.) ;
dried garden thyme (Thymus vulgaris L.), dried sarsaparilla (Smilax sar-
saparilla I.., senna (Cassia sp.), seeds of anise (Illicium anisatum L.) ; cones
of hops (female inflorescence of Humulus lupulus L. and H. japonicus Sieb. and
Zuce.) ; henna (dried leaves and stems of Lawsonia alba Lam.) ; refuse of rose
flowers.

(6) Gums, resins, gum resins, incense, benzoin, resin of aloes, various nutgalls
(Chinese galls, takaout, oak galls, etc.).

(7) Dried medicinal plants in packets.

(8) Blocks of wood, cork, bark, tan, poles, rods, railroad ties, rough lumber,
and cordwood.

(9) Industrially dried vegetables, flours, food pastes, brans, oil cakes, straw,
and hay; dried fruits and rice straw are excepted.

(10) Peat.

(11) Seeds of: Sesamum (Sesamum indicum L.), black cumin (Nigella sativa
L.), pistachio (Pistachia vera L.), stone pine (Pinus pinea L.), shelled chest-
nuts (Casianea sativa Mill.), shelled peanuts (Arachis hypogaea L.), unhusked
coconuts (Cocos nucifera L.).

(12) Dried plants and parts of plants known as “sterilized,” which have been
treated by heat or chemicals.

RESTRICTIONS ON THE IMPORTATION OF F'ORAGE-CROP SEEDS
[Vizirial decree of May 8, 1933]
AUTHORIZED PORTS OF ENTRY

ArTIcLE 1. The importation of forage-crop seeds into the French zone may be
effected only through the ports of Casablanca and Port-Lyautey and the frontier
1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 95

post of Oujda in accordance with the provisions of article 6 of the dahir of
September 20, 1927.

SEEDS CONCERNED

ArT. 2. Forage-crop seeds of the following genera are subject to examination
to determine whether or not they contain dodder seeds (Cuscuta spp.) : Medicago
(alfalfa and yellow trefoil), Trifolium (clovers), Lotus, and Anthyllis.

ART. 3. Importers or their agents are required to furnish the botanical names
of the seeds and the weight of the shipment.

Arts. 4 to 6. Examination of the seeds and charges therefor.

Art. 7. These regulations do not preclude the application of the provisions
of the dahir of September 20, 1927, and the decree pertaining thereto.

RESTRICTIONS ON THE IMPORTATION OF SEED POTATOES

{Vizirial decree of September 25, 1935, promulgated October 1, 1935, as amended by that of
May 27, 1936]

PACKAGES TO BE SECURELY FASTENED AND SEALED

ARTICLE 1. The importation into the French zone of Morocco of seed potatoes
for sale or transfer is prohibited unless the tubers are contained in a package
that is completely closed by a sealed locking device and provided with a tag
indicating in full: (1) The name and address of the seller; (2) the name of
the variety of potatoes contained in the package; (3) a statement of the purity
of the variety based on 100 tubers; the grading may not be less than 98 percent.
The indication “selected” may be placed after the varietal name if the
potatoes are accompanied by a certificate issued by a control station that
supervised the growing crop; (4) the minimum weight of the tubers, which
may not fall below 385 gm; (5) the words “calibrated seed” or “seeds not cali-
brated” as the case may be. For so-called calibrated seed potatoes the varia-
tion in the weight of the tubers may not exceed 15 percent, and none of them
may weigh less than 35 gm; (6) the country of origin, with the name of the
municipality and department where France is concerned and the name of the
locality when other countries are concerned.

The above data must be repeated on all papers that concern the sale.

ArT. 2. Forbids erroneous statements concerning the condition, origin,
variety, and degree of purity of potatoes.

CATALOG NAME OF POTATO VARIETY TO BE USED

ArT. 3. The variety of seed potatoes is to be designated by the name under
which they are borne in the catalog issued by the French Department of
Agriculture or the central station of agronomic research. Each newly pro-
duced variety must be entered in one or both those catalogs before it can
enter into traffic.

GENERAL IMPORT REGULATIONS REMAIN APPLICABLE

ArT. 4. The foregoing regulations are ‘without prejudice to those of the dahir
of September 20, 1927.

RESTRICTIONS ON THE IMPORTATION OF POTATOES, EGGPLANTS, AND TOMATOES
{Vizirial decree of August 1, 1936, as amended by that of January 23, 1937]
PHYTOSANITARY CERTIFICATE REQUIRED

ARTICLE 1. Shipments of tomatoes, eggplants, and potatoes intended for the
French zone of the Sherifian Empire, or for transit through it, may be made
only: (a) When supported by a phytosanitary inspection certificate; (0b) when
packed in new containers; (c) in certain cases, after being subjected to suitable
treatments to prevent the introduction of the Colorado potato beetle (Leptino-
tarsa decemlineata Say) and Leptinotarsa multitaeniata Stal. in their different
stages of development.
06 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July—Sept.

Art. 2. The certificate referred to in article 1 must be prepared in accord-
ance with the following model:

PHYTOSANITARY INSPECTION CERTIFICATE FOR POTATOES, TOMATOES, AND 'EGGPLANTS °

The undersigned (full name and title of official belonging to the plant pro-
tection service of the country of origin), certifies, in accordance with the
result:

Of a phytosanitary supervision of the crops, that the products included in the
shipment described below proceed from crops situated more than 20 km from
fields infected by potato wart (Synchytrium endobioticum (Schilb.) Perc.) ;*

Of the phytosanitary supervision of crops and of a phytosanitary inspection,
that the products included in the shipment described below proceed from
crops situated more than 5 km from fields infected by potato wart (Synchy-
trium endobioticum (Schilb.) Pere.) and that they were not found to be
infected by that parasite.®

Description of Shipment

Number, weight, and kind) .Of packages ee ;
Place where’ grown. 2-222 2220 (22 9 Se eee ee
Kind of products, variety, and marks on containers__________-______________-_.
Name and address of shipper .2)- 222520) Uhl is 0 ee ee ees
Name and. address: of Consigneé.22 2225200) 2 eee eee BL

[SEAL]

(Place and date) . (Signature)
NEW CONTAINERS REQUIRED

ArT. 3. Shipments of the products referred to in the present decree, in each
case, whatever their origin, should include only packages whose packing
material, wrappers, receptacles, cases, barrels, baskets, etec., and in general
all materials others than the tubers or vegetabies concerned, that are strictly
new.

No packing, container, ete., is deemed new at the time of shipment if it
bears: (a) Names of firms other than those of the last shipper or consignee;
(6) names of localities other than those of the last shipper; (c) names of lo-
ealities that are not situated within the French zone or when they concern
shipments in transit into those of contiguous countries; (d) letters other than
those shown in the invoice and in the phytosanitary certificate accompanying
the shipment; (e) cancelled marks, letters, words, or designs; (f) devices or
designs other than those serving to identify the packages when not reproduced
in the invoice under the same conditions as the name or style of the shipper;
(g) marks or inscriptions that have no connection with the commerce in the
product represented by the shipment and indicating, in particular, that the
packing has been used or could have been used for containing other products;
(h) traces of products other than those comprising the shipment or which
serve as packing.

And especially with Teac to sacks and fabrics, those are not regarded as.
new at the time of shipment which show: (a) Darns, repairs, or patches; (b)
traces of having been closed by tying, cutting, or by any other means prior
to those existing at the time of sanitary inspection on entry into the French
zone.

The provisions of the present article are not limiting; any other indication
permitting the assumption that packages or containers have been used, shall
determine the refusal of entry or the destruction of shipments.

PRECAUTIONS AGAINST COLORADO POTATO BEETLE

Art. 4. The shipment of potatoes (applicable also to tomatoes and eggplants
except with respect to cleaning): (@) Proceeding from crops located in the
territory of countries invaded by Colorado potato beetle; (0) or having been

6 This certificate should be used only when potato wart is concerned.
7Strike out the formula that is not applicable.
8 Strike out the formula that is not applicable.
1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS O07

shipped in transit through those countries by any route except sea; (c) or pro-
ceeding from crops located in the territory of countries when the Colorado po-
tato beetle has been reported less than 50 km from their frontiers, shall have
been made in accordance with the provisions of the present article. The list
of countries referred to in paragraphs (a) and (c) is established by order of
the Director of Economie Affairs. These are: Belgium, Brazil, Canada, France,
Germany, Mexico, Netherlands, Switzerland, and the United States.

CLEANING AND PACKING OF POTATOES

The potatoes shall have been cleaned and packed in the port where lading is
done, to the exclusion of any other place. This work shall have been carried
out under the effective supervision of an official of the plant inspection service
of the country of origin or transit.

The tubers may be cleaned by washing or in the dry state and under condi-
tions permitting the elimination of soil as well as any other matter adhering
to or mixed with them.

When the phytosanitary inspection made on entry into the French zone of
the Sherifian Empire makes it apparent that the cleaning has not been
effected or is insufficient, the shipment will be reladen.

The packing and handling of cleaned tubers shall have been done in sacks,
wrappers, sacking, cases, barrels, baskets, etc., that have not previously been
used and in places apart from those in which cleaning was effected.

Packages prepared in accordance with the above-prescribed conditions should
at once be sealed in the presence of the officials who supervised the above-
mentioned operations.

Shipments of potatoes, tomatoes, and eggplants formed in one of the cases
covered by cases (a), (b), and (c) of the first section of this article will be
admitted for importation only when the Government of the country in question
has sent to the Sherifian Government the names and signatures of the officials
designated for the prescribed supervision in the ports, as well as a specimen of
the seal.

ArT. 5. Transshipment in one of the ports of a country infested by the
Colorado potato beetle is not to be regarded as transit when the shipments are
forwarded to that port by sea, and when it is affirmed by the consular authority
of the country of origin at the port of transshipment that the merchandise was
transshipped directly from ship to ship.

The document established under these conditions shall bear data enabling
identification of the shipment, such as are prescribed in paragraph 4 of article 2.

IMPORTATION AND TRANSIT OF POTATOES IN BULK PROHIBITED

Art. 6. Importation into and transit through the French zone of potatoes,
tomatoes, and eggplants in bulk are prohibited; by derogation from the pro-
visions of article 1, quantities not exceeding 10 kg may be admitted to entry
without packing.

IRREGULAR SHIPMENTS REJECTED

ArT. 7. Shipments of potatoes, tomatoes, and eggplants, including packages
that do not conform to the provisions of the present decree, are refused entry
in their entirety.

The application of provisions of the present order is made without prejudice
to those of the above-mentioned dahir of September 20, 1927, embodying
phytosanitary regulations and orders made in the application of that text.

CERTIFICATE OF SUPERVISION OF CLEANING AND PACKING POTATOES
EGGPLANTS

TOMATOES, AND

’

The undersigned (full name and title), certifies that the potatoes, tomatoes,
and eggplants (erase the words that are not applicable) included in the ship-
ment described below were: (1) Cleaned by washing; cleaned in a dry condi-
tion; (2) packed in (kind of package—sacks, cases, ete.) that have not been
used previously; (8) sealed.

I affirm that these operations were effected in the port of (name of port) in
my presence and under my effective supervision.
98 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July—Sept.

DESCRIPTION OF SHIPMENT

Number,: weight,,and.,kind of, package 228. 2) f.. ect See ee ee
Kind of product, variety, and,marks of, containers- 2282-3. 2 = See ead,
same .and; address, of shipper_——- ——-) . eee ee
Name) and:.address,.of consignee -.=<-.-— 22) 2 0 2 2 Be ee
Place. and \dates.22222¢ 222. joe fi | ee

[SHAR] 0 I ee

(Signature)

RESTRICTIONS TO PREVENT INTRODUCTION OF THE EUROPEAN CORN BORER

{Vizirial decree of August 31, 1932; Bulletin Officiel No. 1039, September 23, 1932,
amended by that of September 3, 1934; Bulletin Officiel No. 1143, September 21, 1934:
and by that of July 12, 1935, Bulletin Officiel No. 1184, July 26, 1935]

IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

ARTICLE 1. The importation into and transit through the French zone of the
following are prohibited:

(1) Living plants, or culms, straw, leaves, roots, husks, rachises, and in-
florescences of maize, Zea mays L.; sorghums, Holcus sorghum (Sorghum
wulgare Pers.), all cultivated species of Sorghum or Andropogon; millet, Pani-
cum miliaceum L., Chaetochloa (Panicum) italica, and other cultivated species
of Panicum, and in general, of any part or residue of these plants, except the
seeds, of whatever origin.

(2) Any part or residue of plants of hemp (Cannabis sativa L.), except seeds,
fiber, and inflorescenses without any portion of the stems.

(3) Whole plants, living or dead, of the giant reed (Arundo donag L.), or
parts thereof, except peeled or sawn stems used in making packings.

(4) Produce of any kind the packings of which are composed of the above-
named plants or parts thereof.

(5) Articles made of the above-named plants, or with parts thereof, especially
brooms.

Art. 2. Any shipment containing the products named in the preceding article
will be returned or destroyed, at the option of the consignee or his representa-
tive, in accordance with the provisions of article 7 of the dahir of September
20, 1927.

No. 1

CERTIFICAT D’INSPECTION SANITAIRE DE POMMES DE TERRE, DE TOMATES 0U
D’ AUBERGINES
Indication du pays:
Designation du service officiel de protection des cultures:
Je soussigné (full name and official title of inspector), certifie, conformé-
ment aux résultats—

de la surveillance sanitaire des cultures, que les produits compris dans
Venvoi décrit ci-dessous proviennent de cultures situées a plus de vingt
kilométres de champs infestés par la gale verruqueuse (Synchytrium
endobioticum (Schilb.) Pere.),°

* de la surveillance sanitaire des cultures et de l’inspection sanitaire,
que les produits compris dans l’envoi décrit ci-dessous proviennent de
cultures situées 4 plus de cing kilométres de champs infestés par la
gale verruqueuse (Synchyirium endobioticum (Schilb.) Perc.),°

et quils ont été reconnus comme ne portant pas ce parasite.

Description de VEnvoi

Nombre; poids, et; nature des: colise__cu 2 tain ele ee eee
daien. de: cultupesées. se os es et cee ee ee ae eee ae
Nature des produits, variété 4 laquelle ils; apparticnnentekiet eee aa
Marques: des)eolist: .209 se.500 te eer ee ee eee eet
Lieu.et. date... = + ee i eee

[SCHAD ]i,.charys ) donde Gel) (fh le ie Dee ee ot
(Signature)

® Strike out the formula that is not applicable.
1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 99

Nos 2

‘CERTIFICAT DU CONTROLE DU NETTOYAGE ET DE L’EMBALLAGE DE POMMES DE TERRE,
DE TOMATES ET D’AUBERGINES

Indication du pays:
Designation du service officiel de protection des cultures:

Je soussigné (full name and official title of inspector), certifie que les pommes
de terre, les tomates et les aubergines compris dans l’envoi décrit ci-dessous ont
été,

1. Nettoyées par lavage; nettoyées en état sec;

2. Emballées en (kind of container) n’ayant pas servi antérieurement ;

3. Plombées.

J’atteste que ces operations ont été effectuées dans le port de: en ma présence
et sous mon controle effectif.

Description de ?Envoi

i re Mature Ces eOls = it
Nature des produits, variété 4 laquelle ils appartienment____-___--__-__________
a Rees a ee ee
a rere RCTINEE TIE a
BES ES TG 1 en
I ee

Od wean wn ree Te wr a
(Signature)

B. E. P. Q. 451, Supplement No. 1.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF TURKEY

JULY 6, 1938.
CERTIFICATION OF FRESH FRUITS REQUIRED

In view of the fact that no specific mention is made of fresh fruits in Turkish
law No. 2906 of January 29, 1936, an interpretation of the application of article
1 of that law to fresh fruits was requested of the appropriate Turkish
authorities.

Those authorities, under date of May 30, 1938, now state that: “American
fresh fruits, in order to be admitted into Turkey, must likewise satisfy the
conditions required by the above law and be accompanied by the necessary
certificates mentioned therein.”

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

B. E. P. Q. 469, Supplement No. 1.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, KINGDOM OF ITALY

AvGustT 22, 1938.

IMPORTED PLANTS SUBJECT TO PHYLLOXERA RESTRICTIONS

Since live plants, parts of plants, seeds, etc., not specifically prohibited entry
into Italy remain subject to the phylloxera restrictions (p. 9, B. E. P. Q. 469),
the following paragraph should be added to the first item under the caption
“Importation Restricted,” on page 4 of B. E. P. Q. 469: ‘““However, such plants
and plant products are subject to the phylloxera restrictions set forth on page
9, namely, each shipment must be accompanied by a shipper’s declaration and
a phylloxera certificate; the latter can be issued by a State inspection service
only.’

AVERY S. Hoyt,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.
100 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

Ba ..@. 46;
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA

JULY 20, 1938.

This digest of the plant-quarantine import restrictions of the Commonwealth.
of Australia has been prepared for the information of nurserymen, plant-
quarantine officials, and others interested in the exportation of plants and plant
products to the Commonwealth.

It was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant quarantine inspector in charge
of foreign information service, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines, from.
the proclamations promulgated under the Quarantine Act 1908-24 (plants divi-
sion), gazetted September 19, 1985, and from subsequent amendments and
proclamations, and reviewed by the Director-General of Health, Common-
wealth Department of Health, Canberra.

The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct and com-
plete up to the time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used inde-
pendently of, nor as a substitute for, the original texts, and it is not to be
interpreted as legally authoritative.

Lee A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA
BASIc LEGISLATION
[The Quarantine Act 1908-1924 (Plants Division) ]

ALL PLANTS SURJECT TO QUARANTINE
[Proclamation 1—P, gazetted September 19, 1935]

This proclamation revokes that published in the Gazette of July 10, 1909,
insofar as it related to plants and declares that all plants imported into
Australia from any place beyond Australia shall be subject to quarantine.

PREVIOUS PROCLAMATIONS REVOKED

Proclamation 2 P, gazetted September 19, 1935, revokes prior quarantine
proclamations concerning the importation of plants into Australia.

IMPORTATION INTO THE COMMONWEALTH PROHIBITED
[Proclamation 9—P, gazetted September 19, 1935]

Banana plants, exclusive of the fruit, grown in any country in which boring
beetles of the genera Sphenophorus, Cosmopolites, or Rhabdocnemis exist.

Broom millet (Sorghum vulgare var. technicum (Koern.) Jay.) broomecorn.

Cactaceae: Any plant, including root, pad, cutting, or seed, except seed of
free-flowering or ornamental species and varieties other than of the genera
Opuntia and Nopalia.

Chestnut plants (Castanea spp.) or parts thereof, including the fruit or nuts,.
from any part of the world.

Citrus plants, including the fruits, but exempting the seeds, from any country
in which citrus canker (Bacterium (Pseudomonas) citri (Hasse) Doidge)
exists.

Gooseberry plants (Ribes spp.) or parts thereof in which Sphaerotheca
mors-uvae (American gooseberry mildew) exists.

Hop plants (Humulus spp.), except the dried flower cones known in commerce
as hops, grown in any country in which either downy mildew (Plasmopara
(Pseudoperonospora) humuli) or mosaic exists.

Peanut plants (Arachis spp.), exclusive of the fruit (peanuts).

Plants or parts thereof, including fruits or seeds (other than manufactured
products thereof) liable to infestation with any species of Hemileia from any
country in which Hemileia exists.

Rosaceae: Plants or parts thereof of the suborder or tribe Pomeae of
the order Rosaceae (including the fruit but exempting the seeds) from any
1938] SERVICH AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 101

country in which fireblight of apple and pear (Bacillus amylovorus (Burr.)
Trev.) exists.

Stone-fruit trees, or parts thereof, including the fruit, grown in any couniry
in which any of the diseases known as peach yellow, peach rosette, little peach,
or phony peach exists.

Sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum L.) grown in any country in which bor-
ing beetles of the genera Sphenophorus, Cosmopolites, or Rhabdocnemis exist.

Tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum lL.), or parts thereof, exclusive of the
seed, and

Ulmaceae: Plants, including seeds and cuttings, from Europe.

IMPORTATION INTO THE STATE OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA PROHIBITED
[Proclamation 11—P, gazetted September 19, 1935]

Walnuts -(Juglans spp.) from the State of California wherever such walnuts
may have been grown.

Walnuts grown in the State of California wherever such walnuts may have
been shipped.

IMPORTATION RESTRICTED
[Proclamation 8—P, gazetted September 19, 1935]

The importation of the following-named plants and plant products is pro-
hibited except in accordance with the provisions of the quarantine (plants)
regulations:

Citrus fruits from any country in which citrus canker (Bacterium citri
(Hasse) Doidge) does not exist, and seeds of citrus plants from any country.

Cottonseed and cotton lint (raw cotton). (Gossypium spp.) ;

Hops that are the commercial product of plants grown in countries other
than those known to be free from downy mildew or mosaic diseases.

Nursery stock and cuttings and scions of same.

Peanuts (Arachis hypogaea l..). Refers to the nuts only.

Potatoes (Solanum tuberosum I..).

Rice plants (Oryza sativa L.), rice seed or any rough or unmilled rice
(paddy rice) capable of germinating. (Proc. 15 P, March 25, 1936.)

Tobacco seed (Nicotiana tabacum L.).

Vitis spp.: Plants or parts thereof, including the fruit.

IMPORTATION FOR SCIENTIFIC PURPOSES
[Proclamation 12—P, gazetted September 19, 1935]

Notwithstanding any prohibition under the Quarantine Act 1908-24, the Min-
ister of Health may permit the importation into Australia or the removal from
any part of the Commonwealth of any plants or goods, or parts of plants,
for scientific purposes, or in special circumstances, subject in all cases to any
conditions that he may think fit to impose.

AUTHORIZED PORTS OF ENTRY FOR PLANTS
[Proclamation 8—P, gazetted September 19, 1935]

Sydney and New Castle, New South Wales.

Melbourne and Geelong, Victoria.

Burnie, Hobart, Launceston, and Devonport, Tasmania.

Port Adelaide, South Australia.

Fremantle, Albany, Broome, Carnarvon, and Geraldton, Western Australia.

Brisbane, Cairus, Townsville, and Rockhampton, Queensland.

Port Darwin; Port Kennedy (Thursday Island) for fruits and vegetables only,
Northern Territory.

REGULATIONS UNDER THE QUARANTINE Acr 1908-1924
[Quarantine (plants) regulations (effective September 19, 1935) ]

Only the regulations of direct interest to the exporter or shipper of plants
and plant products to Australia are set forth below.
102 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July—Sept.

DEFINITIONS

REGULATION 38. In these regulations, unless the contrary intention appears—

“Diseases” means affected with disease and includes showing the presence or
evidence of any deteriorated or abnormal condition, whether dependent on the
presence of or due to the operation, development, growth, or effect of any disease.

‘‘Pest” includes weed pest as well as insect pest.

“Plant” means plants of any kind or size, and includes cuttings, slips, and
buds, the fruit and seeds, and all live parts of plants.

NOTICE OF ARRIVAL REQUIRED

REGULATION 4. Any person desirous of landing any imported plants shall give
to the quarantine officer at the port of landing a notice and a declaration in
prescribed form. (Form Q-—P-1—Importers’ Notice.)

REGULATION 5. No person Shall import any timber (either logs or Sawn timber)
unless he has given to the quarantine officer at the port of entry a notice and
declaration in prescribed form. (Form Q-P-—2—Timber Importers’ Notice.)

TREATMENT AND RECONDITIONING OF IMPORTED FRUIT, VEGETABLES, NUTS, CEREALS,
SEEDS

REGULATION 16. Any imported fruit, vegetables (including tubers, bulbs,
corms, and rhizomes), nuts, cereals, pulse, or other seed, of which any propor-
tion is, on inspection by a quarantine officer, found to be, or suspected of being
affected with a disease, or any cereals, pulse, or other seed found on inspection
to be mixed with a seed of a proclaimed weed pest, shall be ordered into quar-
antine and, under the supervision of a quarantine oflicer may be treated as
prescribed, or as the chief quarantine officer may direct, or be sorted at a quar-
antine station or other approved place, subject to prescribed conditions.

IMPORTED PLANTS MAY BE PLACED IN QUARANTINE

REGULATION 17. Any plant not otherwise provided for in the regulations shall
be retained in quarantine for such period as the chief quarantine inspector
deems necessary, having regard to the nature and condition of the plant and
the place from which it comes.

DOCUMENTS TO BE FURNISHED ON ARRIVAL

REGULATION 21. Any person desirous of landing any imported plant shall, at
the time of giving notice, as required by regulation 4, furnish also the following
declarations, certificates, notices, and permits, and comply with the following
conditions:

SPECIAL R*&QUIREMENTS

BANANA FRUIT RESTRICTIONS

A. Banana fruits from Fiji: A certificate dated and signed by a responsible
officer of the Fiji Department of Agriculture affirming the freedom of the ba-
nanas from disease.

CITRUS FRUIT RESTRICTIONS *

B. (1) Citrus fruits from any country in which citrus canker (Bacterium
(Pseudomonas) citri (Hasse) Doidge) does not exist: A certificate dated and
signed by a responsible officer of the Department of Agriculture of the country
of origin certifying that: (a) The fruit was grown in the country specified;
(6) the consignment is free from canker; (c) the fruit, after picking and prior
to packing was effectively fumigated with hydrogen cyanide gas or by such
other gas or method as is prescribed or approved by the director of quarantine.

(2) Pips, imported as pips: The certificate shall certify the country of origin,
the occurrence of, or freedom from citrus canker in the said country, the nature
of the preparation and treatment of the pips, and that the pips are clean and
free from pulp. (As amended by the amendment of quarantine (plants) regu-
lations of March 17, 19387; gazetted March 18, 1937.)

10 Citrus fruit from California would be admitted under these conditions. (Letter of
Director General of Health, March 21, 1938.)
1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 103

POTATO RESTRICTIONS

C. (1) Potatoes from any country: A certificate dated and signed by a respon-
sible officer of the Department of Agriculture of the country of origin, identifying
the potatoes, stating the quantity and certifying: (a) That they were grown
in the country named; (0) that they were packed in the country of origin in
clean new packages; (c) that at the date of issue of the certificate they were
free from Phytophthora infestans, Synchytrium endobioticum, Spongospora sub-
terranea, and all other serious diseases.

(2) All potatoes, other than those imported for food purposes, after being
landed in quarantine, shall be planted in a quarantine station and grown through
one or more successive generations, until on inspection it is found that the
progeny is free from disease. Only potatoes found to be free from disease
shall be released from quarantine.

(3) All bags, crates, or other packages containing potatoes shall be marked
on the outside with the name of the country of origin and with other marks
that will serve to identify the consignment.

D. Apples from New Zealand: Certificate of Department of Agriculture that
fire blight does not exist in the district where the apples were grown, that they
were grown and packed in the said district, and that the apples are free from
adherent spurs and leaves. (Stat. Rules No. 86, March 25, 1936.)

COTTON AND COTTONSEED RESTRICTIONS

REGULATION 22. (1) Any person desirous of importing cottonseed for -the
extraction of oil or for manufacturing purposes shall comply with the following
conditions:

(2) Prior to shipment an application for permission to import shall be made
to the Minister, stating the quantity desired to be imported, the origin of the
seed, port of shipment, the treatment (if any) given in the country of origin, the _
vessel, and the anticipated date of arrival in Australia.

(3) A permit to import shall be obtained from the Minister, subject to any
conditions he may think fit to impose.

REGULATION 22A. Where any imported raw cotton (lint and linters), other
than cotton grown in the United States of America, is ordered into quarantine
and conveyed to a quarantine station, it shall, while detained there, be fumigated
in the manner prescribed by subregulation N of these regulations. (Stat. Rule
No. 116, December 15, 1937. )

RESTRICTIONS ON HOPS

REGULATION 24. (1) Any person desirous of importing hops for manufactur-
ing purposes, from countries other than those known to be free from downy
mildew and mosaic diseases, shall comply with the following conditions:

(2) An application for permission to import for special purposes shall be
made to the Minister stating the nature and quantity desired to be imported,
the reasons for the importation, the precautions to be taken to procure hops
free from disease and to insure delivery without escape.

(3) A permit to import shall be obtained from the Minister subject to any
condition he may think fit to impose, in addition to the requirement that such
hops when imported shall be contained in sealed metal-lined cases, and shall
be landed in quarantine and opened under the supervision of a quarantine
officer, at the factory or brewery for immediate use in manufacture.

SOIL TO BE REMOVED FROM IMPORTED NURSERY STOCK

REGULATION 25. Any imported plant, nursery stock, cuttings, or other plant
parts growing in soil, sand, or earth shall be ordered into quarantine and
thoroughly freed from such material by being washed in water, or otherwise
treated as directed by the director of quarantine.

RESTRICTIONS ON PEANUTS
REGULATION 26. Deals with the handling and disposal of peanuts after entry.
RESTRICTIONS ON FODDER, HAY, OR CHAFF

“oe 27. Shipments to be reported to the chief quarantine officer (ani-
mals).
104 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July—Sept.

RESTRICTIONS ON THE IMPORTATION OF INSECTS

REGULATION 28. (1) Insects and parasites of insects shall not be imported
unless: (@) The importer, prior to shipment, has certified the present state of
knowledge concerning the life history, hosts, hyperparasites (if any), and the
economic value of the insects or parasites, together with a description of the
experiments which it is proposed to conduct and the precautions to be taken
during the course of the experiments to prevent escape of any insect or parasite;
(6) the importer, prior to shipment, has made an application for permission
and has obtained the consent of the director of quarantine to that importation.

(2) The insects shall remain in quarantine for such time as the director of
quarantine requires.

DECLARED DISEASES

[Proclamation 4—P, gazetted September 19, 1935]

The fungi, bacteria, viruses, and disease agents specified below shall be dis-
eases affecting plants, and their introduction into Australia prohibited:

Ne binoOmiyiGeS! 22 see se ee eae

IMIG enmanmige tie ani eel ea

AD LATO WS CLOT ase e «eeu neue ean Bacterial diseases.

Armillaria: = 202252 le eee ee eRe A. melea (Vahl) Zuel., root rot.

AISCHERSONIQ = Shae = fee Us ee

ASCOCHIY Gass ee eS ee sta Leaf spots.

Ba cillwss en VEE So

1B ACen eee eee eee ane cee e. g. B. citri (Hasse) Doidge, citrus canker.

Bacterium: 2-2 ee eS anes e. g. B. rubrilineans (Lee, Purdy, Barnum, Martin) Elliott, red-
stripe disease of sugarcane.

iS OG GISE= 2268 en Se re eae ee oe e.g. B. cinerea Pers., gray mold, many hosts.

IBOLEYOSPHAChI ass see ee ee e.g. B. ribis Gross and Dug., currant cane blight.

Bremiay Sk 25 sehr ee a CLES RD OEE e.g. B. lactucae E. Regel, downy mildew.

Cenatostomellas2ee 220: eee e.g. C. ulmi (Schwarz), Buisman, Dutch elm disease.

CencoSponas= ae i eee ee ee e. g. C. circumcissa Sacc., shot hole of Prunus.

GETCOSD OLE! gees eee eee eee ee e.g. C. theae Petch, leaf disease of tea.

C@ladosporiumes sae een eee ee e. g. C. carpophilum Thum., peach and apricot scab, freckle.

Clasterosporium____-.------------- e. g. C. carpophilum, see Corynium beijerinckii Oud.

@laviGeDSs 222s a aie nas ey a C. purpurea (Fr.) Tul., ergot.

Colletotrichumeeet swe h a wee e.g. C. circinans (Berk. ) Vogel, onion smudge, rot.

e. g. C. gossypii, see Glomerella gossypit.

Coniothyritims ee ee eee eae e. g. C. fuckelii Sace., raspberry cane blight, rose stem canker.

Corticiim sas. sss eee See e. g. C. vagum (B. and C. ) var. solani Burt. ., scurf and stem rot,
rhizoctonia scab of potato.

Conymiumesee2 2 ee eee een ee e. g. C. beijerinckit Oud., peach blight.

OOM aul eee ee ee eee eee ea a nen e.g. C. ribicola Fisch., white- -pine blister rust.

Cryptosporel lass eeee eee e. g. C. viticola (Reddick) Shear, dead arm of grapes.

Cylindrosponums ==. e. a Ge ea Karst., shot hole disease of plum and cherry, cherry leaf

ig

Cytospora ses. Wee a ae eee e.g. C. ambiens Sace. on twigs of many trees. Perfect stage= Valsa.

IDASyScy phase ae Sees eee e.g. D.calycina (Fr.) Fekl.=D. willkommii (Schum.) Fekl., larch
canker

Dematoph ora. se ee eee ee e.g. D. necatrix Hartig, root rot of the vine, white root rot.

Digponthes nse ese a eee eee e.g. D. parasitica Murr., see Endothia parasitica.

Dibotwyonk. Sse. Stee ole e.g. D. morbosum, black knot.

Diitchyameliase jucce cele Neen ye e.g. D. citri Noack, see Botrysphaeria ribis.

Diplodia ses onan lee ele eee e.g. D. zeae (Schw.) Lev., dry rot of corn.

Dothiorellaes setae we eee nee e.g. D. mali Ell. and Ev., apple canker.

MN othignec = eee eee ae e. g. H. parasitica (Murr.) And. and And., chestnut blight, chestnut
bark disease.

RAS pace ae eee ee Powdery mildews.

EXOASCUSH2 Aen Caen ene eee ee e.g. H. deformans (Berk.) Fckl., peach leaf curl.

Hxobasiditm: S922) eee e.g. H.vexans Mass., tea-leaf blister blight.

Habracaea'ss tie. a ee Speen eee e.g. F. maculata (Lev. ) Atk., leaf blight, leaf spot of pear.

THQ CS see sai Ie oe Ok eee lee ene e.g. F. semitostus Berk., root rot.

HUSATICW aS 2.2 os See ORO eee eee ee teeter e.g. F. atrovirens Berk., onion black mold.

USAT ITO sates Se ae ee e.g. F. tricothesioides Woll., powdery dry rot of potatoes.

USAT uM 22 8 2 ee eee e.g. F. vasinfectum Atk., wilt of cotton and other hosts.

Gibberellazes 222 See eee e.g. G. saubinettii (Mont.) Sace., wheat scab.

GI OCOSD OFT eee ee e. g. G. fructigena, see Glomerella cingulata.

Gilomerellat et ease. ance tae e. g. G. cingulata (Ston.) Spauld. and Schrenk, bitter rot.

Gilomercllacteeee se eee eee e. g. G. gossypti (Southworth) Edg., anthracnose or wilt of cotton.

Qmomoniaw se ey po ys e.g. G. erythrostoma (Pers.) Auersw., cherry leaf scorch.

Gira WO la wees = ee ee sae aed see e.g. G. phoenicis (Moug.) Poit., false smut, leaf spot of palms.

(Green po Ne rare a e.g. G. ulmi see Ceratostomella ulmi.

Giulgmandiasa= =e eee e.g. G. bidwellii (Ell.) Viala and Ravaz, black rot of grape.

Gymmnosporangium= == Rusts, e. g., white cedar.

Helminthosporium_______________-.- ©. Oaelde (brominewm ?) bromi Diedicke, barley leaf stripe.

bermin] 615 sate cs oe e. g. H. vastatrix B. and Br., coffee rust, coffee leaf disease.

EVEtCrOS Pp OnU e eee e.g. H. echinulatum (Berk. ) Cke., carnation leaf spot, leaf mold.

eptosphaenriae= sae. === asa e.g. L. herpotrichoides De N., stem blight of rye and wheat.

Macrosporium
1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 105

VMERISSON AM eK e.g. M. populi (Lib.) Magn., leaf spot.

NVUGU TRI ke e.g. M. glumarum Miy., glume blotch of rice.

IWIOSAICIGIS@ASOS == =

WVEvcosphacrelia-.-.. 2 8 te e.g. M. fragariae (Tul.) Lind., leaf spot.

IMigxGMmNCOleSs- == =o sae 2-2-2. Slime molds.

Wide barsstl es Sa ibis Testi ie e. g. N. decretus Mass., coffee twig disease.

MOChT allstar hee rib bee bs) e.g. N. connabarina Fr., coral spot.

ING CL Oe ee e.g. N. ditissima Tul., European apple canker.

INieacosmospora:--2=.2->~----------- e.g. N. vasinfecta (Atk.) E. F. Sm., see Fusarium vasinfectum.

Chon Ces ae ’

RONCS TOOT Ce ee a ee

Oyo ave} oye) tosh e.g. O. cariceti (B. and Br.) Sace.,=O. graminis Sacc., take-all of
several hosts, foot rot.

OAC NTU oe as peers A ek e.g. O. omnivorum, see Phymatotrichum omnivorum (Shear) Dug.

Peach rosette, yellows, little peach,
phony peach, or other virus

diseases = ~~ **_--------=--.-----..-

ean LOSeltems 222 esse eseseclsS. virus.

OTIGenMiMiMe = a ea ae ees 2 S282 e. g. P. strobi, see Cronartium ribicola.

POrOnosPOlAcede= 2222 222li22222-=2 Downy mildews.

TEA Cv TL ee ek e.g. P. oleraceae Sacc.=P. lingam (Tode) Desm., blackleg, cabbage
black spot.

ASS ia) O77 ee ee ee hhh e.g. P. guepini Desm., probably=P. theae Saw.,=gray blight of tea.

AN Gin OVSISEE tenn ese eee aah e.g. P. citri Fawc., melanose, stem-end rot.

Phiracimidiime=2s 92525252225 2252252- e.g. P. subcorticinum (Schrank) Wint., rose rust.

EMVCOMNY COS ess sea 225522222525 52-5 ;

PV OSuLCh Aree ee eae - eet 228 y e.g. P. prunicola (Opiz) Sacc., leaf spot, scurf, shot hole.

Bhymatormichwme 222) 2) 5222s... e.g. P. omnivorum (Shear) Dug., root rot of cotton.

hivsalosporae 22-2222 2222222222222 e.g. P. cydoniae Am. auct., see P. malorum (Pk.) Shear.

phiysalospoliem eens see ne = hoses e.g. P. malorum (Pk.) Shear, black rot of apple.

lejon(steG iar. ee e. g. P. zeae-maydis Shaw, brown spot.

IBhintomonas:s. 2222452. See el e.g. P. rwhrilineans, see Bacterium rubrilineans.

Phiytopnihorae=ss2s4u ==22555222--5- e. g. P. citrophthora (Sm. and Sm.) Leonian, brown rot, gummosis of
citrus.

12a 50/0) 0) 019) 016) de ae e.g. P. injestans (Mont.) D. By., late blight of potato.

LUG ee ens ee e.g. P. oryzae Br. and Cav., =P. grisea (Cke.) Sace., rice blast.

PIASMOdIOpNOLas = se eee see = Se 2 2 e.g. P. brassicae Wor., club root of cabbage.

PIASTNO POL Aas sess es he's 2 e.g. P. viticola (Berk. and Curt. ) Berland De Toni, downy mildew of
grape. 5

PlasmoG potas ee aaa ss - 2 2 e.g. P. humuli Miy. and Tak., downy mildew of hops.

IR owripi il ase we ee Pe e. g. P. morbosa, see Dibotryon morbosum.

IPOG OSD Ger ates te ran aso csess- e. g. P. oryacanthae (DC.) D. By., mildew of apple and cherry,
powdery mildew.

[EO LyDORUSE eee se ea ae e.g. P. ponderosus Schrenk, red rot of pine.

oly shichtisse = e. g. P. versicolor (L.) Fr., soft heart rot, heart rot, yellowish wood rot
of Catalpa.

RSS dOMONAS— 24 ass-S 225555 25 Y2 e. g. P. citri, see Bacterium citri.

Pseudoperonospora.-__.------------ e.g. P. humuli, see Plasmopara humuli.

IPO OQa finesse en a e. g. P. citrophthora, see Phytophthora citrophthora.

PEAVY aTeee eee ca e.g. P. palmivorum Butler, bud rot of palms.

VAIN ANIA ess Se masons = 2 e. g. R. necator Mass., cacao seed mold.

RIM ZOCUOMIA I ee anon So. e.g. R. solani, see Corticiwm vagum.

Rosellinias os. Pe Pe 25 ae e.g. R. necatrir (R. Hart.) Berlese, white root rot.

SClONOS DOTA Meee ee eee e. g. S. macrospora Sace.. downy mildew of maize and wheat.

SGISLO UL seeeee nee ON BUS ok eee a e. g. S. cinerea (Bon.) Schroet., blossom blight of sweet cherry.

SCIGFO DMEM aee 2 es ...-. e. g. S. rol/sii Sace., many hosts, probably several specific confused,
stem rot, southern blight.

SOV LOnIAeece ees eee LE eA e.g. 8S. petroselini Desm., var. apii Br. and Cav., late blight of celery.

BNMACe OMIA Mea ho isen so ed e. g. S. populi (Sace.) Jenkins, poplar leaf scab.

RII GTO MA es ee eee e.g. S. jragariae, strawberry leaf spot.

SpuAcronema 2 wa ee ee

SUNACIODSISaen te ee et oe e. g. S. malorum, see Physalospora malorum.

Spouky cio e.g. S. flavida Mass., coffee spot.

Spbserovnecseus=s 22). 2 ae e.g. S. pannosa (Wallr.) Lev., mildew of peach, rose mildew, powdery
mildew of rose. °

DPONLOSWOLA Se een sos a ee eee e.g. S. subterranea (Wallr.) T. Johnson, powdery scab of potato.

STIOROUN COUN sae enn e.g. S. anthophilum Pk., bud rot of carnation.

Spotted wilt of tomato, virus Sa ie

PLOLO UNIS eee ees Se Ne g. S. purpureum Pers., silver leaf.

Synchytrium endobioticum (Schilb.)- Poie., potato wart.

San NAM oe a ote e. g. 7’. bullata (Berk.) Tul., pear-leaf blister.

SIS ani Ame ee ee e. g. T. basicola (B. and Br.) Zopf., end rot, fiber rot, black rot of
tobacco, ete.

sDilloiacsne see se jars ell aL Smuts.

WIN AIALOS SS eee fen cee we we e.g. T. pin (Brot.) Fr., honeycomb rot, dry rot of pine.

Abiotic ant) (rr e.g. T. koningi Oud., a soil fungus.

(iniperemileriaes 2.22.2. e.g. T. vulgaris, see Nectria cinnabarina.

Wincinilameee fe Ete The! e. g. U. spiralis= U. necator (Schw.) Burr., powdery mildew of grape.

Uireainehemserats 25... ..-.-...-.-.- Rusts.

Mingeyanisueetes to. I OF e.g. U. cepulae C. C. Frost, onion smut.

MNO TOLVGbISs22 ven sane ccn nook e.g. U. aljaljae (Lagh.) Magn., crown wart, crown gall of alfalfa
(lucerne).

MWSHISCINACRHOses 5255222. -2.-.-. Smuts.

Vier Teepe ee e.g. V. lewcostoma (Pers.) Fr., dieback.

WiGTRULI Arete sso kk e.g. V. inaequalis (Cke.) Aderh., apple scab.

MO TITIGWIAII Gee ee et cect e.g. V. circinans, see Colletotrichum circinans.

EASON tae a e.g. X. thw aitesii Cke., rot of Hevea.
106 BURFAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

DECLARED PESTS
[Proclamation 5—P, gazetted September 19, 1935]

The pests (insects) specified below shall be diseases affecting plants and their
introduction: into Australia prohibited. (Those marked with an asterisk are.
not known to occur in the United States.)

AGAIN acs - 2 SSeS See hee se eee eee see ee Mites and ticks.
Aggeriidae: - i seein t ee eee eee eee Peach, plum, and currant borers.
APT OMY 7Z10A6 se 4— Sooo Se oe ee ee ee Leaf and stem miners.
Aleyrodidac iret ee ee ee en tS Oe White flies.
Anarsia lineatella Zell_.....---..__---- Be See Se ean Peach twig borer.
Anobiidae--- See eee en eee Timber and stored products beetles.
Anomala orientalis Waterh___..._._---------------.- Asiatic beetle, Hawaiian sugar-cane white"grub.
ARhONOMUS OTANUIS Oe ne eee Cotton boll weevil. .
AMT HOY] Cae tee ee ee eee Root maggot flies.
Acunonydias godmani Crotch=Pantomorus godmani Fuller’s rose beetle.

rotch.
BOstrichidacsaee = sie G48 2 SOE en iaetes see eae Tree borers.
Bruchidae 922222. —~ s5o5 scot. Jon eshte ee Seed weevils, bruchids.
IBUPTeSti GAO seee ok ese eee eee Sa ee Tree and timber borers.
~Busseolanetsca Wullete sae ee ee Maize stalk borer.
Cecidomysii diet ese he ae Seen oe ee Gall midges.
Cephidke: = 2 2t- #4328 aoe BS ee Stem-boring sawflies.
Ceram by. ChO ae 2s Se ee eee Tree borers.
* CeratitesicapitatagwiCGe= sass ee oe ee ee Mediterranean fruitfly.
*Chilosimples Buble. ae Ae eee ee Asiatic rice borer.
Citrysomelidnes*--2 ee ee es Leaf-eating beetles.
@occidaews:. 22s se ee ee eee Scale insects and mealybugs.
Gollembola i224 52222 Foe ee eee Springtails.
Cossid aot ee oe re See re ee ae ee eee Wood-boring moths.
*Ctenopseustis obliquana WI1K- —_2.2--.2.--—.-.-<-- New Zealand peach moth.
Curenilionidaes= =" == anes e 8 eee ee eee Weevils.
(Delphacidae) Araeopidae___----....--.-.-----.-.-. Near leafhoppers, really fulgoroid.
Denrmestidacs-<54- i -222 a2) ba te ee Se ean ee Carpet and skin beetles.
Digiraea, siccharalisoWa ese eee eee Sugarcane borer.
* arias 2. 25 Ne ee ee ee ee ee Cotton boll moths.
Piphestia. =. 2s ses ao eee ee ee Tobacco and stored-food moths.
POUT CTUS Se lee eee ee EE ee Bulb flies.
POUT LOMAU GE ee ne Grass and grain jointworms and seed chaleids.
Formicidae... . 225 ee eee eee Ants.
Gelechiidaes: a2) 38 See gc ee te ee See Twig, leaf, and seed moths.
Gnorimoschemd SDBe vei sesso aan ee eae Tobacco, potato, and tomato moths.
Hepislidae.. 2 - = ee ee eee W ood-boring moths.
Tridomyrmen humilis Mayr. eee Argentine ant.
Tsopterae 25-223. see eee Termites or white ants.
(Jassidae) Cicadellidae:2 ee a a eee Leafhoppers.
Lasiocampidae s2-- So. Se Sos ee eee eee Tent caterpillars.
Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say-.-.-------.----------- Colorado potato beetle.
oy ctidae. . 5-2-2 se eee ae ee ee es Powderpost beetles.
@Giymantriidae)—Eiparidae.-- = ee Tussock moths.
(Mayetiola) Phytophaga destructor Say..._..---.-.--. Hessian fly.
WMerodons 23 Bare is a Ee ee Bulb flies.
Nitidulidaes ==. 3-02 ee a ee Dried-fruit beetles.
Noctitidaeseht att ee th eee ee ee ee Armyworm and cutworm moths,
(Pantomorus fulleri) =P. godmani Crotch... --....-- Fuller’s rose beetle.
Pentatomidaes 2 oS a eee SS ee ees Stinkbugs.
(Phthorimaea) Gnorimoschema___...-.....-..-------- Tobacco and potato moths,
Phyllozera (vastatrix) vitifoliae Fitch.._.......-..---- Grape phytloxera.
Phytophag@ destructon Saye sno ee eee Hessian fly.
Pierigsankt wal tien Rane Re ein Leah eee anes Cabbage butterflies.
(Platyedra) Gelechia gossypiella Saund___...._.---..- Pink bollworm.
Popilliagaponica,Newimesees seeee eee Japanese beetle.
Porthetria dispar Va). =. = eee ee eee Gypsy moth.
= PriOnODUUs TeLiCUlants) WWLLUG yarn eee ee ee eee Huhu Huhu beetle.
Pyralidae = Se ee ee ee eee Leaf rollers, stem borers,flour moths.
PUT AUSTOALDULALTS EL ee ee European corn borer.
Scarabaeidae. 2 8 2 2 aa ee eee White grub beetles.
Schoenobivs? _ 422 sea aes Seeks Se ee ee Rice borers.
Scolyiidaees sf ee ee ee eee Bark beetles.
SII CUM AG ee Ce A Ee ee ea eee ere ee Wood wasps or horntails.
Steirastoma: 2 Sa tk as ewlh = 1 ere ee eee Cacao beetles.
Thysanopteras 6255." 2 ae ee ee ee Thrips.
Tineidae®- 22-6 2.6 eee eee Clothes moths.
‘Tortricidae ist seth | ee ey eee Leaf rollers and fruit moths.
TPrypetidae: 2 nee eae ae ee ee ee eee Fruitflies.

Xanthorhoe= 2. 4. a eee eee New Zealand flax root borer.
1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 107

DECLARED WEED PESTS
[Proclamation 6—-P, gazetted September 19, 1935]

The weed pests specified below shall be diseases of plants and their introduc-
tion into Australia is prohibited.

SPAT LTT Fool’s parsley.

VALINE CILINELOGILN PRIS CH= es os Camelthorn.

STAD POLE TCA a Angled onion.
Alternanthera achyrantha R. Br. var. echinata_____--- Khaki weed.
JRE ie eee Ragweeds.

VANE ROM ZOAGELINIODICN ATs ss African corn flag.
PAPAS UG Ss Ea eee Burdock.

Asperula orientalis Boiss & Hohen__-_.-------------- Oriental woodruff.
VARTIIGHPIAISIRISLLORUS ee 8 om = ~-=- = Onion weed, asphodel.
PALLET Eee ts Deadly nightshade.
PES E SUT ae Ope eee ees eS ee ok Pink bartsia.

TET AUT) Ue Sticky weed, tarweed.
ES EEE AERIS De ee ra AG ed he oe Beggarticks, bur-marigold.
IBANSsiCh SIUOIsiTI, BOSS 2
BEES CMM ME Otis GOUAN-. —~._.-.--..------=----- Wild turnip.

OT IOATILSST) ne a ee Es ek Thistles? Safflower.
OCT ILT LISTS eee ee = kee Lol Thistles?

Cnicus spp. (including C. arvensis) Hofim. Syn. Car- Thistles (including California thistle).
duus arvensis, Cirsium arvense.

Candia IIRC ee a obs see Skeletonweed.
Chrysanthemum leucanthemum L__.---------------- Oxeye daisy.

CORN at: 1 So a Cowbane.

COLETTE TIRC TIN Te PE 2 Waterhemlock or spotted hemlock.
CORPSE R Tage ee Ee 2 Cowbane.

ETT SID er ek St Hemlocks.
Gpnnalpilisiimpensisla= es =. ese Bindweed.

CTEA CTE ee ee a 2 I es Dodders.

CO UELOT AI OUES ee ee Cardoon.

CURTAIL ye ee ee eee eS tlk Thorn apples.

EP SIETES SUNS ies WM oo acne eee tke Teazle.

JES AIS VO PIT A) ee - Stickweeds.

ED IL OTHIDMA POC TIa aE ee Carnation weed.

IBURME ORL CRIUIU ee eee Sanne Carnation weed.

Gilia (Navarreitia) sguarrosa Hook and Aen_--_------ California stinkweed.
GUAZEIGNDYSSIICONG ASS ek Niger.

PEATOTEES ANRC OI GIP TL ee he be Ls One-leaved Cape tulip.
LEAT NGMISYLITLA Sh eo) 2 a ee ees ae Two-leaved Cape tulip.
SETATIES CAICUTIETERMOLI ET a er St 2 Henbane.

TAY PCTICUIMOANOTOSREMUM Ws. ---------.-.-----=-= Tutsan, sweet amber.

TAUPE ICIME PENI ONG Maa eet se St. Johnswort.

LET TOGA OS ET OR ee Poverty weed.

CEG a eee es a eee Barbados nut or physic nut.
PICAIIAN IEA EEE = ks Hoary cress.

Iago Soo. eri hp). Corn cockles.

IN CULTCHAT CALM Nes Se A matrimony-vine.
Tycvnnenocissiimiuim, WMAIerS. _..... --==-=22.-.-=222-- Box thorns.

GEIR OTLL Ma = Scan eek

DEEDS TAO SME SS ey Hexham scent, a sweetclover.
VIG COULD ETC ate 2 8 eee Muskweed.

OTN LOU TASS) ee eee Scotch thistles. ,
Cm ainsi ee Ss Pricklypears.

Oryza sativa var. rubribarbis Desv__-_--------------- Red rice.

ERURAISINILCCOMILM INC ee ek Prairie groundcherry.
Raphanis raphanisirivm Avs... -..=-....-------222-- Mild radish, white charlock.
AL SLMIUIT MALODSIUE AN ee a ook eae Giant mustard.

TROLL RCOUIMIID ILS iy te pc a Skee Castor-bean,

IAP ONOS eee ee SS ee Sweetbriar.

SEGALL Ne eer ee ee eee Onion weeds.

GAL SILAM STAD DBILRO La as see oe Blackberry.

SR ALPILS EL CLTTEALB NVI a ee ‘Italian blackberry, cut-leaved blackberry.
CADIS ieee en aS ses cee sol eee Roly-poly or tumbleweed.
RSL TI DLTP NERD IROCONR (ING Pewee kas cae Cow soapwort, cowherb.
LOUUMIIOMITICCUMEMUS Ne 3 oon asaeccenceneesec se Spotted thistle.

NILORE CUCLDALILE WADGL~ 25052-1000 0cc00-------= Bladder campion.
pivbimunananum Gaertn... ..22.+..--<-.-2...------ Variegated thistle, St. Mary’s‘thistle, holy thistle.
SOMUMMTIMOSITORLN: DUN. =~ - =. 32250000--2c~2cecewne Buffalo-bur.

I CNIME TERN OLLORTILEDENID Re a Apple of Sodom.

PTE O DEMO ETERAB i a nn Ot a ee Perennial sowthistle.
PALAU OIORE eee ee ee Wild garlic, penny cress.
LITT TEL, | 0 rr i a Rs ee Caltrops.

LEA TaD OTT ee a er. Coltsfoot.

AUT, S00), rr i 8 Burs.
108 EUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

DECLARED WEED PESTS
[Proclamation 7P, gazetted September 19, 1936]
TOLERANCE OF WEED SEEDS

The weed pests specified below are declared to be diseases affecting plants:

The introduction of their seeds into Australia is prohibited if the proportion-
ate amount of seed of any pest in any sample when mixed with other seeds
shall exceed the proportion specified below, calculated on the following basis:
(a) In the case of oats, barley, wheat, buckwheat, vetches, and other seeds of
similar or larger size, the number of weed seeds allowed in 1 pound weight
(avoirdupois) of such seed crop shall be as prescribed in the list; (6) In the
ease of seeds other than those mentioned in (a), the number of seeds allowed
in 1 ounce (avoirdupois) of such seed, shall be as prescribed in the list.

BAC CUNTTILCLEC BER as ES Te ee ee ae IPricklyacacia. Kan SarOOut MOMs eee 20
VAC ENANOUIN GeAt, OT ee ee oe Sheep bur New: Zealand) burs =e ee 20
PALL TTOOV LT GUL T1e Ma ene a GarliCs.. = 2524 2->. os See. 5 10
Amaranthus (albus L.) graecizans L__------------- Commonittumbleweed ese 50
Amaranthus ManiculatUs Woes 2 eee eee ae eee iPanicled amaranth. 2: == 2252s ee a 50
Ania Spay Ehlineiniuan capillacewm 7 GVEIChx.) BB 1STO 11S Wie Cee eee ee 10
ollick.
VAMMSINCKIG SPDs eta a on ok eon Ss Yellow bur -weeds..<.2.2..5-25 =e 10
AAG AUASTOTDETSIS Uses oe ae ee Pimpermel.2.c c=... -2. 3 ee ee 200
Anthemis cotula L__------ SIAC cE pA te ere Stinking mayweed or fetid camomile, dogfennel____ 10-
VAN ER CTLs 1 OD1LES Mi a ee ee ee Ne aon ee Comm onicamomile sess ee 10
LARGETMONERIILELICE IUD) Va ese re ee oe Mexican poppy,, pricklepop Dp yeesss =e 50
WAIST ESTE ULC IES oN Tee ar Bush: starwortss2 322 o See Le eee 10
Astragalusmollissimus (hOtte 22 3-3-2 =) ee Woolly locoweéeds 22222222224 2 eee eee 10
DAVE Tt LCT IO CEE UL CU Vig es te ee Spreader sale lows hee ee 50
PAVE ALOU DRED MS T.O Gee ee ee ee ene Slender oabses2s4 4 255s So eee 50
ADEN CEG Wise 2 =e a te eS al ee ee Wild.or blackoatss20222 2022 ee eee 50
Bartschia (Bartsia) all other species__--_------------ Sticky, weedSis.e..2. 222.2112 er rrr 50
BOSSIC: QUANG ULECUS DIS ae eee Roly-polys--24s1 es... 2.2.52.i62 ee 100
Brassica (all other weed Species) ..-20 22 ee Pe a ee 20
Bulbine semibar batalla. ==.-=-—-——- eee dueek Wye - cee segoecke esse ee 10
Bupleurum protractum Hofim. and Link__-------- Hare’s ear. es. ie ao ee ee eee 20
Bupleurum semicompositum L__..---------------- Dwarf hare’s ear... 2-2 eee 20
Calandrinia caulescens H. B. K..-.------==-_-_-_-- Purple Calandrinia 2 ee 20
Galendila: aruenis7s Mie ne aes ee nn One ne Wild:maricold. o...5 225422 eee 20
Gul COLOTIVE) SPiNOSQ Muka see = Spiny broom. 4.20.4... 2 ee 20
Gamelinassativas Cran see enn ene nee Falseflax 022322002 iio 2 2 eee 10
Garduus pycnocephalius Miss 22s =o = ee Slender thistlecs..- ==. 2 = ee ees 10
CaF er SPD oss. soe Ae Jo ee Sedgesi e225: ee rr 300
CUSSUNTON OT CUED ERs ee eae ee Chinese shrub. ck. \). 2-5 beet 20
COUCHES NGCOSAISCO Dee ee ee Knottedthedseiparsle yeaa ee ae 50
Cenchrus SDP =<22-- === 2 524--5 32550 5 eL e e 5
Chenopodium albwmalu== 2-2 sean Wat hen. .u22.2cc 2.5 _. 12.226 ee rrr 200
Ghenopodiwan miele eles sa eee ae oo nee INettleleavedcooselo0t 2 ae ee 200
CRenOMOdiU MOU VO ia ee eee ee eee ee ee Stinking; coosefoots 2 ===. = eee ep aaa. ee 50
Gichorauama ney Ouse ee ee eee Chicory 228. ho Ye ee een 50
Cirsium lanceolatum L. (syn. Carduus lanceolatus). Common thistle, spear thistle, black thistle________ 10
Convolvulus spp. (except C. arvensis) ___----_---___ Bind weedse2 i) se oe ee 10
GrepPiS VUES ise ie Sele es ee oe eae eee SHAaVOLO) EOL Ove MY Aas) OYeaH OM 10
Grotalariaesagitalicnli se sees eee nee eee Rattleboxs 2.0 cuit ee eee nena 10
Cucumis myTi0carpuUsiNai dese eee eee Paddy melon: -s-.22..22.25 22 eee 5
GUperus TOCUNCUS is ae ee eee eR Loe et INniterass 8. 232s a 5
GYytisuS CANGTICNStS SLCUG ee ee ee a Cape broome- 5-22.) 50
GQ ESAS. SCO DET LUS MU I Kee ae ne ne eae eR Mnelish broom! 02. 22 oe 2 ee 50
Digitaria sanguinale Scop_22..-- == 2-2 8 @raberass\ Summer grasses = 2s eee 100
DO dtAsbeneSuNVia lb sae oe ee ee ae Rough buttonweed or poverty weed_____.---___--_- 10
DiplotaciSaMUnal iS) © eee ee ee Sand rockets.-20 =. <2. 2.02 100
IDEAS UA Ui NIT INC BS a ee Wall rocket. ...¢) 2.40. | 22 eee eee 100
EChiwmiSDPacec<:. 222 22. eee ae eh, Sees Bugloss 542-2 . Wichormia speciosa Kunth) 222s sees eee Woater-hyacinth.-... .... J eee 10
IREL VUSELALIS SbOlNN ee nee a ee Spiny @mex. .. =. 2s es 5
Eragrostis cilianensis (All.) Link_-.-.----.....---- Stinkerass. e222 200
‘brechtites oalerianecfolia DC 2 ae eee Brazilian firewee@-....-..... ee ee 20
FirigenOnmicanadens (Silane ee eee Canada fleabane....... 5-2 eee 100
ERIGen On Linviyourws: Wall eee ee ee ee Plax-leaved ‘fleabane.. 22). 5 ae ee ee 100
Hrodium cicutariwm LL? Aerit. 22 ase Crowfoot, alfilariay win! Clover eee 100
Erodium moschatum L’ Herit.....------.---------- Musky crowfoot, filaree, musk clover____-_----__- 100
ropriavulganis: DCos. 85 Se ee Common rocket... - 3... 2-222 ee 50
IFIP ALC GS OULD LNA ere pe ce ees IROCKeti tose co se tne 2 ee a 20
Tinysumumachemanthoides Wet sees sae eee ‘Mreacle-mustard.-.2. 22-22. 22o ce ee ee es 10
Erysimum repandum Woo. 2222 ee Mistard): 2.2 Sosa a oe eee 10
PUL DROTO LU LELZOSCOD Cp ee mee eae a SUMSPUGO elo k ae = ee 20
RUD OTT C7) ULES = ee a ee ee aa ‘Petty SPuree ss. 233262 so ere 50
ROENIGWIALTOULG OTe ee ee Henne) 222 hoe a 10
FEAL TIVO ACO TLCT TEU TS ree ere en Bum it onyen en ones ee See ee ers 50
HAUT DATONG Walesa eee eee Simall-owered stm tony see se eee 50
Galinsogatparpijlond Cavece eee ee Rotatonweedaaeesas sean vail = oes ere 50

Galiumuaporine ti aS ee ee Oléavers: 22.25.22. - 50
1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 109

Galium murale All___------------ pe ee Sripll hadsirawes so2 2s F asec ssr elo Ae eee 50
Galinm tricorne Stokes=--__--=-_--=--=-=---------- Rough-fruited corn, bedstraw--_--_..---.----.---- 50
Geraminm mole f-=-2 52" 2222--2-=5222222=--------- Oe Aa SU eee a eee eee 100
Gladiolus cuspidatus Jacq--.---------------------- Wiha pladioltie 22-22-52 252552355 -<5 2 eee 5
Gomphocarpus SpP-------------------------------------,---------------------------------------------- 20
Grindelia squarrosa Dunal_-_---.------------------ Brodd-leaved gumplant «<2 22252522202552225-2 5828 2 10
Piengnneiscrerica Wilds = +22 225-2-2---------.-- Drumsticks:or eretan weed-- ==.-=222/2.22 25 ee 50
Helenium-auiumnate Is-----=---===-=-=-=-=-------- DBHCOLOW ROE Asa =e siossosceweccccessccenze ee eee 20
TACs TION l= 2s asa22o2ses221 22-2 ssst.- Bladderiketmia=s2ssso4.2s=.---.. 21. es 20
ee emersatanionantyse====>-=-=-=>----- =~ Smeoth Cats-0af-ss225252-s2225225<-42-2) SEL EAS 100
Fipnochoeris vadieata Us. - = -=--==----------------- a ae eee 100
Weiraveniena TOs = =2>=>->=-=2—->2.---._.---=-- Stink werts- soe 2252s ssses ee SU eee 50
Tuueeasina Midis 2 ote. = 2....------ Marsh-elder or false sunflower_--__-......-.------- 5
Juncus capitatus Weigel. -._....------.----------- eMC RAMS ee a ee 100
are NI Ta ee ss senna Wl PG thee a= tet rea se ee ns eee 10
amin wmmericatle be. -----------=-=-=- MEAT I ee se oe 50
Lantana spp-------------.--------------------------- ------------------------------------------------- 5
manera eee Nipplewort. 2-2-2 ae eS 20
nner oS sole Topped lavender: 217 tis 2s feck 2 2st see 50
Levidiwm inciswm Banks and Soland-_--------.---- Apetalous peppergrags- --------------------------- 100
Tanneries Winliee a=... -.-----~-----.- AROY Veli hry cae se ee ee ee 100
Sr ee | a CaneerwOrts ose. eek oss feo a ae te 100
ENNIS Eee ee Sn a Ue ene ee Rae ok ee te ee es A 10
Lithospermum arcense L__------.---.--.----------- Corn cromwell, take-all weed--.-_.-.--_-_..._._.-. 5
PPO SEA Vee 2322 es 8 ane Great lopelia? 2 > ose oh et 20
Dan reniuemm. = -.=—=-.--====--=---=---= Drake, darnel___---------------------------------- os
ene ee = SOLO WMO en en aes 10
Qed lige es eto 2 Darweed, puch weeds 54-222) = hess er tL 20
area CUI G IR PAN eet EE es Sot MMnllowsat Nicky 2255525 eas os 100
NIIP TR EE a oo rn nanan sa -s— se Small flowerca mallow. 2252-25 oe ee ee 100
ame atait ls, fee eee PWaAT! SIQUOW. 2-5 220522 She oe ee lS 1¢0
SC Ts Ee Se ee Commonymaallo we igi eriaet iret EE Se ee 8 Pijianled sallow. +. 6 ts 5 ee et 100
IRIE DUNO ONE inn a a i == HMorevOUnGs ce a nee a eee eee ae 5
Dh) ee i ee Wild camioumletssstltt te ce tee ee 10
Melanthium virginicum L.--.-.------------------- CUD Wels Sy sae see eo ee eee 10
Moaiola multifida Muench. -.-.-.----------------- Red-flowered creeping mallow-__-____--.-_-___-___. 200
pated ee OPIS... .--=----- BAM IS and Seen oe eee cone ee ee eee ne 100
apc ponent. GYAn2o =~. -2.22~=----- Wild tobacco, tree tobacco--._-.........-.---.--.-- 5
OFF DINAN TTT ee oS a eae ee eee European evening-primrose_-_-__.__..-.-..-.......- 50
OranMIcnecernnianueoee ===. 25. 525 --2=~--- LOD UITA IG en eee eee ee 2 ae ee ee 50
GLI CERII MONI eo bok ee . South African wood sorrel, Bermuda buttercup__. 50
Grirrastepumiere? EMish 22-828 Stomless locoweede 8. = se ne ae ee ne ee 400
Pe eee Leg tate |e 8 Cie) eee ee ee 400
Paaverhuordin ts 2o- =. 2+ 2-2-2 ok. Oriental poppy, rough-heade@ poppy----_-_------- 400
NN ee Gorn poppy, Held poppy. 225-8 50
PUP LOCLOME CITI NN ge pote sta PIP COR DEL 46 oA Sk me Le 50
RENNER CADETIIA TM tite eee PASO OC (A eee are are ee ee 50
ea eee eee ee eee Se Oxtoreiie hawiweedt i222) 2 lt eh be 20
PP Untnugiinennrie Wee 828s £236 2 ee RIDETASS TD wOnle set Ee eas oe ET ey eee 200
Erp as ee Sk ee Brosd-leaveqcwmlantaln=- = eo = ea a es 100
Plano DLagonitd Jacda+------..2----.------.- IBTACLeO) plan UAlnee cea = een er eee Se eee ae 100
(2 apa iah i) Hieawort plantain. "=o vite Poesia? es A 100
Piiningo migent Ween. - -— ~— 2225 so. SL 3. Rugel’s broad-leaved plantain__-_._._._______.___- 100
IIE TL RIN a sen ene eee Se Wireweed, jointweed, knotweed__-___--___-.-_____- 30
Dre OL erUCe As. © eee ee Se ee PAT ES ATG oer 2 Fee 2 oat be Ry Ys SED Pe 100
SPTGP PT ETO 0) ee Ce ee a. eS ee Crowilooioniouiiercup << 2... .2-2-.- 255252324 = 5 20
Dee PEALE EN plete nnn e nn VWINIUALINeMOneLtObes. Ae ea ee ee = 20
Rhavadsalus hedypnois All. +. -..-.2.2--.2-.---=~- Eiger kite sto eS ey a mee. 20
MERI CHACRLON Dab ee ee IP OISOMAIWIYS saan een es eee See Pee) OE 5
ALU TRAUCELDREIL Vs e see aoe 2 DS ls DIOS S-SOLLCl as Fe Ae et ed a 200
Rumer spp. (except R. acetosella)--.-......-------- Docks ters Sl ares Fah cies Nes res as bee gars 20
Salpichroa rhomboidea Miers........-.------------- Pampas iily-ofthe-valley-=22=. = ses 5 hs ee 5
SOD E RANE PR DER = seeker os Ne UAICRSR oe ess he oie See to © oe ee ee Se ee 50
Perrmnmerieninen tbe etn ote ioe ee lee Vid sees) ot) fo LS Ie) A 50
CHO NUMOROHICMIIIS tase ete 2. ser Soespwors, DoUNGng-peb_. 2-4 ae es Sah ee 50
Scabiosa (Maritima) atropurpurea L__-.----------- Bincushion, sweet'scablous:- «+ .-2.-25 3 4en. ke 50
MOuiiD pecren-venene Ws... | eee Shepherd’s needle or Venus comb--_-_--_------.--- 50
COSA VSS) eae ns RUS 3 ot UE th) A 50
Rene Ren OOr DMD De COI. <0 coo ose nce saeco n nn SILOS ONESSa eee ee ie eee ee Ee ee 100
EnCUIETIN IE a 1) O~ 5 oneoee ase ID OSSOINGMIMOISICLOSS ..f. eo oon een ok weet a 100
EnCtIN De ees ke ee CTOUTdSRle Sc. eee nae eR WREST RE 100
Setaria (glauca) lutescens (Weigel) F. T. Hubb__.. Yellow bristle grass, pigeon grass____..__-.--.----- 400
Serarsruernciiata (.) Beativ.....-- 2 est Bur bristle grass or whorled pigeon grass__.-_-_--- 400
Sem annie (as,)PmeaUy oo 222) 2ou. 2. se Green bristle grass or green foxtail__......-.-.-.--- 400
a rh TIO R RRP NE gt oe SUNOLO MERC G0 ae i ae Re A A 10
UA aCEMEA ETE ee eee > eS Ne FS oe ee Sea BP SE) OCCT OTN UU Se te os Sg 100
EMO ONOLOM Grn uin. ee oe mwo-prancned cavehfiys<2. 52-22. 22s) Leih ee 100
RrePeTOnnAtnoteee eee fe ist Gr EE) eee eran UO flys tes 2s ep ey oe 5 es Dre ed ee 100
US OTAGO COTO = Se oop tess he remain Bn mee POOLING COLONY. ook oe os menace un 100
IIREMISUT EIT eres oe ee eee EER kd Cre re nee ls nwceeaune 20
Sy Va yee 4 LE ye Se oO ee 20
Prem e MME. eet tt eee fo) 8s. dvs ie be IPI Giry SOU UM Inu Geer ees aed 2k et ee 100
MCE LL ATOCAULRE To. ee oe ae ee ee RS URIIN Uae eee Lg te ee 100
BOLUM ROLEDeTIRe © Ol. =.= 2-5 --- canna wane oe DOTS OL UR a Bele ek eek een dcopounsaum 5
MINEROUONS TD Pereeas sce ce oe oS. a lL oe Sper ynce acme. ee ee blo eos 50

Rrmanoe armenstarie: si been eves. ec lies eeudy Stagger weed, wound wort 2
110 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July—Sept.

Stellaniatmediai@ yr eee ee Chickweed..:2.. 2-23 eee * .. 200
Tag ebes: SPD ee ose ok a ce ae en a rere Ne NN Marigoldssoe ceo) oo 22222 Eee eee eens, 5
Triumipetta rhomboidea Va cQessee es se ee ene Chinese burs 2202 enna 10
Cee Cun opae us a. ee ae a ee nae eee ee ee URE Hurze orcorsezs 28s 3 eee ee eee 5
Grospermum: picnoid es) Wye Wess CL TINT Ga aa a ae a ae ae 50
Unlicd SPDs icc oats c oe eco ne a Wiettles: 2 Soros 2 2 Ee ee 10
Weratrimiyinid CyAd Geese ee ee mo ee American hellebores -- so. ee eee 10
Weer Das Curis Sa ae ea ge ee Mulleins» 22. 3. 22 100
Ver DenaibOnaTienst syle ae ee ee ee Rurnpleitopy Venvall= 2.2 eee ee 50
WGC SOW OGG Wp 8 ee a ee ees Praline vervain cs 2 hes ke ee ee 100
Watsoniavnenianay Till ee Rees near nae Mierian’s) bugilelily so. 2222 see eee 5
Zygadenus venenosus S. Wats_..-_.--------------- Death camomile2....2- 2.225 eee 5

B. E. P. Q. 477, Superseding Memorandum to Chief Inspectors, September 1, 1931.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF COLOMBIA

Aveust 15, 19388.

This summary of the plant-quarantine import restrictions of the Republic
of Colombia has been prepared for the information of nurserymen, plant-quar-
antine inspectors, and others interested in the exportation of plants and plant
products to that country.

It was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant quarantine inspector in charge of
foreign information service, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines, from the
original texts of the respective Colombian decrees, and reviewed by the phyto- ©
pathological section of the Ministry of Agriculture and Commerce of Colombia.

The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct and com-
plete up to the time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used inde-
pendently of, nor as a substitute for, the original texts, and it is not to be
interpreted as legally authoritative.

Ler A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF COLOMBIA

BASIC LEGISLATION

Article 37 of law No. 74, of November 30, 1936, determines that the Govern-
ment shall regulate matters relating to the phytosanitary protection of agri-
culture and livestock through provisions which shall have the character of
public control and hygiene which are obligatory, subject to penalties estab-
lished by the Government.

SUMMARY
IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

Coffee (Coffea spp.) plants, roots, and seeds, as well as those of other Rubi-
aceae and related plants of whatever origin: Importation prohibited to prevent
the introduction of coffee rust (Hemileia vastatric B. and Br.). (Decree No.
1172, July 10, 1934.)

Sacks, used: Importation prohibited to prevent the introduction of coffee rust
(Hemileia vastatrix B. and Br.). (Instructions of Ministry of Industries to
customs officials. Commerce Reports September 14, 1931, No. 37, p. 690; decree
No. 2850, November 17, 1936.)

IMPORTATION RESTRICTED

Trees, plants, bulbs, fruits, seeds, banana slips, unmanufactured plant prod-
ucts, or parts thereof: Must be accompanied by a certificate issued by an au-
thorized official of the country of origin, duly visaed by the consul of Colombia
or of a friendly nation, affirming the freedom of those products from pests and
diseases harmful to agriculture. (Decree No. 1128 of July 1, 1931, p. 2.)

Sugareane seed (Succharum officinarum L.): May be imported by the Min-
istry of Agriculture or by the experimental farms of the Department under
authorization of the said Ministry, but only from the Bureau of Plant Indus-
try, United States Department of Agriculture, Washington, the Insular Ex-
periment Station of Puerto Rico, or the Agronomic Station, Santiago de las
Vegas, Cuba, and if accompanied by a phytosanitary certificate issued by the
SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS TH

respective organization. (Decree No. 1128, July 1, 1931.) Otherwise, the im-
portation of sugarcane seed is strictly prohibited. (Decree No. 3067, Decem-
ber 16, 1936.)

GENERAL REGULATIONS

[Abstracts from Decree No. 1128, July 1, 1981; Diario Oficial, July 17, 1931]
_ PHYTOSANITARY CERTIFICATE REQUIRED

ARTICLE 1. All trees, fruits, plants, bulbs, seeds, banana slips, and unmanu-
factured plant products introduced into Colombia must be accompanied by a
certificate issued by a phytopathologist or entomologist of the government of
the country of origin, or by the person who has the required authority, in
which it is affirmed that such products are free from diseases or pests harmful
to agriculture. These certificates shall be visaed by the respective consular
agents of Colombia or of a friendly nation, if there is no Colombian agent in
the place of origin.

According to an undated circular published in Boletin Agricola, Medellin,
Colombia, No. 227, p. 980, 1937, by the Seccidn de Sanidad Vegetal, any person
who desires to introduce into Colombia plant material for propagation (seeds,
slips, cuttings, branches, fruits, roots, tubers, bulbs, rhizomes, stocks, ete.) is
required to make a preliminary application on stamped paper to the Depart-
ment of Agriculture and Commerce, for the necessary import permit.

The importer must present with the certificate the original import permit in
order to verify the importation. The imported product will be subjected to
strict inspection by Sanidad Vegetal at the port of entry, whether importation
is made by sea, rail, air, or mail.

UNCERTIFIED PLANTS NOT ADMITTED

Permission is not granted for the introduction of plants remaining in custom-
houses of Colombia if not accompanied by a phytosanitary certificate of the
country of origin, or of those which in the opinion of the agricultural inspector
of the plant protection service constitute a danger of propagating diseases in
the interior of the country.

SUGARCANE FOR SCIENTIFIC PURPOSES

ARTICLE 1, par. 2. Relates to sugarcane seed. See that item under “Impor-
tation Restricted” in the summary.

REGISTER OF CERTIFIED EXPORT FIRMS

ArT. 2. The Department of Agriculture of the Ministry of Industries will
open a register in which will be listed alphabetically and in such detail as may
be necessary, persons, firms, or commercial entities that send garden seeds,
plants, and flowers, duly certified by the appropriate authorities of the country
of origin.

ArT. 3. There may enter into Colombia without meeting the requirements
of article 1, vegetable, plant, and flower seeds in labeled packages with health
certificates from a commercial house registered in the Department of Agri-
culture, in accordance with regulations that the Department may promulgate.

AUTHORIZED PORTS OF ENTRY

Art. 4. Material for plant propagation may be imported into Colombia
through the ports and frontiers of Puerto Colombia, Buenaventura, Cartagena,
Cucuta, and Ipiales.

IMPORTATION OF PLANTS FOR SCIENTIFIC PURPOSES

ArT. 5. Federal experiment stations and experiment farms of the Depart-
ment may import through the Department of Agriculture and with its approval,
without the certificate prescribed by article 1, any tree, plant, or part thereof,
needed for experiments in those establishments. However, if on inspection at
the customs some pest or disease should be found, the said materials must be
destroyed.
112 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July—Sept.

IMPORT PERMIT REQUIRED

Art. 6. Preseribes that an import permit shall be obtained in advance from
the Department of Agriculture for the importation of the plant material re-
ferred to in article 1.

IMPORT PERMIT MAY BE REFUSED

The Ministry of Agriculture and Commerce may refuse permission to import
planting material under the provisions of article 6 of decree No. 1128 of June
80, 1931, when, in the opinion of the Chief of Sanidad Vegetal, importation into
or transit through certain regions is deemed inadvisable owing to the condi-
tion of the material and the possibility of danger to existing crops. (Decree
No. 893, April 29, 1937.)

B. E. P. Q. 478, Superseding B. E. P. Q. 458.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, MALAYA

Avaust 16, 1938.

This digest of the plant-quarantine import restrictions of Malaya has been .
prepared for the information of nurserymen, plant-quarantine officials, and
others interested in the exportation of plants and plant products from the
United States to the various States comprising Malaya.

The digest was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant quarantine inspector in
charge, foreign information service, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines,
from the Plant Importation Rules of Malaya, and. reviewed by the adviser on
agriculture, Department of Agriculture, Kuala Lumpur, Federated Malay
States.

The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct and suffi-
ciently complete for its purpose up to the time of preparation, but it is not
intended to be used independently of, nor as a substitute for, the original texts,
and it is not to be interpreted as legally authoritative. The plant importation
rules of Malay themselves should be consulted for the exact texts.

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, MALAYA (BRITISH)

Malaya includes the Federated Malay States of Negri Sembilan, Pahang,
Perak, and Selangor; the Straits Settlements of Labuan, Malacca, Penang,
Province Wellesley, Singapore, and the Christmas and Cocos Islands; and the
Unfederated Malay States of Johore, Kedah, Kelantan, Perlis, and Trengganu.

PLANT IMPORTATION BY AIR PROHIBITED

The importation into Malaya of plants by air from outside the Malay
Peninsula is prohibited, except that cut flowers of plants that are not specifi-
cally restricted may be imported by air from the Netherlands Indies, but even
restricted plants may be imported by air, under special authorization, for
scientific purposes.

IMPORTATION OF SPECIFIED PILANTS CONDITIONALLY PROHIBITED

The importation into Malaya of the following plants is prohibited except
under written permit in advance of shipment and under prescribed certification :
Banana, coconut (for seed), coffee, cotton, oil-palm seeds, palms, pineapple,
rubber (Hevea spp.) sugarcane, and tea, provided that they may be imported
for scientific purposes without compliance with the regulations, under proper
authorization.

Since the general regulations governing the importation of plants into the
Federated Malay States include the corresponding provisions that apply to «all
the States comprising Malaya, it is believed necessary to present only those
regulations. However, separate mention is made of the Straits Settlements
and the Unfederated Malay States in order to indicate the basic legislation
and the authorized ports of entry of each.
1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 113

FEDERATED MALAy STATES
[Negri Sembilan, Pahang, Perak, and Selangor]

BASIC LEGISLATION
[Customs Enactment of 1936; Gazette Notification No. 1823, May 11, 1936]

This enactment is for the purpose of controlling plant imports and by State
* enactments for the control of plant pests in each State.

DEFINITION OF PLANT

“Plant” includes growing plants, roots, tubers, bulbs, stocks, cuttings, slips,
suckers, and Seeds, and any parts thereof from which further plants might
be propagated.

[Customs Enactment, 1936; Gazette Notification No. 1823, May 1, 1936]
PLANT IMPORTATION BY AIR PROHIBITED

Any plant: Importation by air prohibited, otherwise than from the Colony
or from any Unfederated Malay State, provided that the adviser on agriculture
may issue a permit, at his discretion, for the importation from the Netherlands
Indies by air of cut flowers that are not portions of any plants specified in
the following paragraph.

IMPORTATION CONDITIONALLY PROHIBITED

The importation is prohibited, otherwise than from the Colony or from any
Unfederated Malay State, of the following plants, except in accordance with
prescribed conditions: (1) Banana suckers for planting (from all subspecies
and varieties of Musa sapientum, M. cavendishii or chinensis, M. paradisiaca,
M. teztilis); (2) coffee (Coffea spp.), except dried beans for consumption or
transshipment; (3) coconuts, the seed nuts (Cocos nucifera); (4) cotton
(Gossypiunr spp.) ; (5) Oil palm seeds (Hlacis spp.) ; (6) palms of any species
living and growing; (7) pineapple (all varieties of Ananas sativus), including
suckers, tops, or other living parts intended for propagation, but excluding
pineapple fruits from the Netherlands Indies for consumption or canning;
(8) Rubber (Hevea spp.); (9) sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum) ; (10) tea
(Thea sinensis [Camellia thea]), living plants, including seeds.

IMPORTATION UNRESTRICTED °

No plant-quarantine import restrictions are imposed on the importation of
plants other than those above indicated.

CONDITIONS oF ENTRY FoR THE LISTED PLANTS

AUTHORIZED PORT OF ENTRY

The above-named plants may be imported by sea alone, and only at Port
Swettenham, whether such plants have been transshipped in the waters of the
Colony or brought direct from a place outside the Colony, the Federated and
the Unfederated Malay States, or by parcel post addressed to the consignee
care of the adviser on agriculture, Federated Malay States, or the chief field
officer, Department of Agriculture, Federated Malay States.

WRITTEN IMPORT AUTHORITY REQUIRED IN ADVANCE OF SHIPMENT

Importation shall be allowed only under and in accordance with the written
authority of the adviser on agriculture, Federated Malay States, or the chief
field officer, Federated Malay States, which shall be obtained prior to the
despatch of such plants from the country of origin.

CERTIFICATE REQUIRED IN PRESCRIBED FORM

Every such plant or consignment of plants shall be accompanied by a cer-
tificate in the form below, signed by an officer of the Department of Agriculture
114 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

of the country of origin or by some other competent person in the country of
origin previously approved by the adviser on agriculture, Federated Malay
States, or the chief field officer, Federated Malay States, not more than 14
days prior to date of shipment.

Prescribed Certificate

This is to certify that the living plants or plant products,” a representative
sample of the living plants or plant products included in the consignment, of —
which particulars are given below were/was thoroughly examined on (date)
by (name), a duly authorized official of the (name of plant protection or-
ganization), and found to be healthy, no evidence of the presence of any in-
jurious insect, pest, or disease having been found in/on them and that the
consignment (including the packing) covered by this certificate have/hasâ„¢ not
been treated in the following manner (e. g. fumigated with ~__-____________---
or, disintected: wwiths 282 22 ea eee ee , prior/immediately subsequent “ to
inspection.

( Inspected/not inspectedâ„¢ in the field by a duly authorized inspector on

Gate) eee ee Vs he a eee ee

INumber and description of packages2-{ 2.2) 4) ee See
Distinguishing: “marks 22222 Ost ey Ss a eee
Description of living plants or plant products or parts thereof___________
Stated .toxbe grown: atlse 4. oa 2 See ee eee
Hxported: by 22222222. 2a) ee oe a ee ee
Name. and. address. of consignee... -__- =... a eee
Name of vessel or: particulars. of routes2222_ 22) eee
Date. of shipments 2203 eae Ba a A
Port: or, placé;of entry 222202 2 ee
Additional certificates (if any) attached22_= "= eee

One copy of such certificate shall be sent direct to the importer in the Fed-
erated Malay States and handed by him or his agent to the superintendent of
customs and excise at Port Swettenham, and one copy shall be sent to the chief
field officer, Federated Malay States.

INSPECTION ON ARRIVAL

Every such plant or consignment of plants on arrival at Port Swettenham or
in the case of plants imported by parcel post after receipt by the adviser on
agriculture, Federated Malay States, or by the chief field officer, Federated
Malay States, shall be examined by the latter or by the State agricultural
officer, Selangor, or his deputy authorized in writing, who shall have power
at his discretion to deliver it to the importer or to order that it be quarantined
or Subjected to such treatment as he may deem necessary for the destruction
of any pest or to order the destruction of such plant or plants and of their
containers.

Such plants shall be subject to any further conditions the adviser on agri-
culture, federated Malay States, may deem fit to impose.

WRITTEN AUTHORITY AND CERTIFICATE MUST BE PRESENTED ON ARRIVAL OF SHIPMENT

If the above mentioned written authority and certificate are not produced
together to the superintendent of customs and excise at Port Swettenham, he
shall prohibit the landing of any such plant or consignment of plants.

PLANTS ADMITTED FOR SCIENTIFIC PURPOSES

The foregoing provisions shall not prevent the importation, with the written
permission of the adviser on agriculture, of plants intended for scientific pur-
poses.

1 Strike out the words that are not applicable.
1938] SERVICH AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 115

Srraits SETTLEMENTS

(Labuan, Malacca, Penang, Province ee Singapore, and the Christmas and Cocos
slands

BASIC LEGISLATION
[No. 1485.—Section 18 of Ordinance No. 166 (Agricultural Pests) ]
AUTHORIZED PORTS OF ENTRY

Plants may be imported by sea through the ports of Singapore and Penang
only. The import officer for Singapore is the registrar of imports and exports,
and for Penang, the officer-in-charge of imports and exports.

Plants sent by parcel post shall be addressed to the consignee care of the
agricultural officer, Singapore or Penang. One copy of the certificate from the
country of origin shall be enclosed in the parcel.

UNFEDERATED MALAY STATES
[Johore, Kedah, Kelantan, Trengganu, Perlis]
STATE OF JOHORE
Basic Legislation

Section 19 of the Agricultural Pests Enactment.

Authorized Ports of Entry

Plants may be imported by sea alone and only through the ports of Johore
Bahru, Muar, and Kota Tinggi. The import officer for Johore Bahru is the
deputy commissioner of customs; for Muar, the deputy commissioner of cus-
toms; and for Kota Tinggi, the superintendent of customs.

Importation by Mail

The specified plants may be imported by parcel post only with the written
permission of the principal agricultural officer and subject to the terms and
conditions thereby imposed, from any country other than the Colony or a
Malay State. Any parcel or parcels of such plant or plants shall be addressed
to the consignee care of the principal agricultural officer, Johore Bahru. One
copy of the certificate from the country of origin shall be enclosed in the parcel.

STATE OF KEDAH
Basic Legislation
[Section 8 of the Agricultural Pests Enactment, 1344 (1926?) ]
Authorized Ports of Entry

No person shall land or cause to be landed by sea in the State of Kedah
from any place outside of Malaya any plant whatsoever except at Alor Star, or
by land except at Kodiang or Bukit Kayu Itam.

Mail Shipments

Any of the listed plants imported by mail from any country outside Malaya
shall be addressed to the consignee care of the principal agricultural officer,
Kedah, Alor Star. One copy of the required certificate shall be enclosed in the
parcel.

STATE OF KELANTAN
Basic Legislation
Section 19 (1) of the Agricultural Pests Enactment, 1931.
Authorized Port of Entry

No person shall land or cause to be landed in Kelantan from any place
outside the Malay Peninsula any plant whatsover except at Tumpat whether
116 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July—Sept.

such plant shall have been transshipped in the waters of the Colony or brought
direct from a place outside the Malay Peninsula.

Mail Shipments

Any of the listed plants imported by parcel post from any country outside
the Malay Peninsula shall be addressed to the consignee, care of the principal
agricultural officer, Kota Bahru. One copy of the certificate from the country
of origin shall be enclosed in the parcel.

STATE OF TRENGGANU
[Order of the State Secretary, January 5, 19387]

STATE OF PERLIS
Basic Legislation
[The Customs Duties Enactment, 1336; March 21, 1932]

B. E. P. Q. 479.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT Ree COLONY AND PROTECTORATE OF
KENYA

Aveust 18, 1938.

This digest of the plant-quarantine import restrictions of the Colony and
Protectorate of Kenya, which. is also applicable to Uganda, has been prepared
for the information of nurserymen, plant-quarantine officials, and others in-
terested in the exportation of plants and plant products to those colonies.

It was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant quarantine inspector in charge,
foreign service information, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines, from Ordi-
nance No. XXIV, August 28, 1987, and Government Notices 687 and 688 of
September 2, 1937.

The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct and
complete up to the time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used in-
dependently of, nor as a substitute for, the original texts, and it is not to be
interpreted as legally authoritative.

Lee A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, BRITISH COLONY AND PROTECTORATE
OF KENYA

BAsiIc LEGISLATION
[The Plant Protection Ordinance, No. XXIV, August 28, 19387]
DEFINITIONS

Section 2 of the ordinance makes the following definitions:

“Animal organism” means any animal organism in any stage of its existence.

“Disease” means any abnormal condition of plants communicable or believed
to be communicable by the transfer of a causative agent or by the propagation
of the affected plant which the Governor may, by order, declare to be a disease
for the purposes of this ordinance. (See the order of September 2, 1937, p. 4.)

“Pest” means any of the following, which the Governor, by order, may declare
to be a pest for the purposes of this ordinance:

(a) Any animal or vegetable organism inimical to the growth or existence
of living plants or injurious to plant products.

(b) Any other agent capable of producing a communicable disease of plants.

“Plant” means any member of the vegetable kingdom and includes any part
of a plant, whether severed therefrom or not.

“Vegetable organism” means any vegetable organism at any stage of its
existence.

Section 8 of the ordinance empowers the Governor, by order, to prohibit, re-
strict, or regulate the importation into and the exportation from the colony
of any plants, and the soil, packages, coverings or wrappings thereof, and of
any article or class of articles, whether of a nature similar to plants or not,
and of any animals or insects likely to infest any plant with any pest or disease.
1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS Lig

GENERAL REGULATIONS
[The Plant Protection Ordinance, September 2, 1937]
IMPORT PERMIT REQUIRED FOR PLANTS

ArTIcLE 1. No plant or part of a plant shall be imported into the Colony
except under the authority of a permit obtained from, and signed by, the
Director of Agriculture, and subject to the conditions stated in such permit.
This restriction shall not apply to seeds except those of the following plants:
Cacao (Theobroma cacao), cloves (Eugenia aromatica), coconut (Cocos
nucifera), coffee (Coffea spp.) except roasted coffee beans, cotton (Gossypium
spp.), groundnut or peanut (Arachis hypogaea), lucerne or aifalfa (Medicago
sativa) and clover (Trifolium spp.), maize or corn (Zea mays), peach
(Amygdalus persica), rubber (Hevea spp.), tea (Thea sinensis), tobacco (Nico-
tiana tabacum), and wheat (Triticum spp.).

APPLICATIONS FOR IMPORT PERMITS

Art. 2. All applications for permits shall furnish:

(a) Full name and address of applicant;

(b) Name and address of person or firm from whom the plants or seeds are
to be obtained ;

(c) Names and quantities of plants or seeds to be obtained ;

(d) Name of the farm or estate on which the plants or seeds are to be planted
and the district in which it is situated.

AUTHORIZED PORTS OF ENTRY

Art. 3. No plant shall be imported into the Colony except through one of the
following ports or places of entry: Mombasa, Kisumu, Nairobi.

INSPECTION ON ARRIVAL

Art. 4. All plants, seed, and fruit, other than dried, canned, or bottled fruits
imported into the Colony shall be examined by an inspector.

DISPOSAL OF IMPORTED PLANTS

Art. 5. The inspector may require the disinfection or treatment of any plant
and any article believed by him to be infected with a pest or disease, or likely
to infect any plant with a pest or disease, or require the immediate destruction
of any such imported plant or article if, in his opinion, disinfection or treat-
ment is impracticable or will not be a complete safeguard or if the delay caused
by disinfection or treatment would involve risk of the introduction or spread
of any pest or disease, or require the disinfection of any vessel, vehicle, or
aircraft which, in the opinion of the inspector, is harboring any pest or disease,
or an article likely to infect any plant with a pest or disease.

ArT. 6. Any package or parcel containing any plant or seed imported other-
wise than by mail shall be delivered to:an inspector by the commissioner of
customs. Any package or parcel containing any plant or seed imported by
mail shall be delivered to an inspector by the Postmaster General. After
inspection the package shall be disposed of as indicated in article 5 or turned
over for delivery to the addressee.

NO COMPENSATION FOR DESTRUCTION OF PLANTS

ArT. 7. No compensation shall be payable in respect of any package, parcel,
article, plant, or seed destroyed or damaged in any required treatment.

IMPORTED PLANTS MAY BE QUARANTINED

ArT. 8. The Director of Agriculture may require imported plants to be de-
tained in quarantine or in special nurseries or places approved by him for such
period as he may think fit.

IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

ArT. 9. The importation of all species of fruit trees and fruit grown in or
consigned from Japan, China, Chosen (Korea), or Manchuria is prohibited.
118 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July—Sept.

ArT. 10. No plant or part of any plant of the order Gramineae, except seeds,
intended for use as fodder shall be imported into the Colony.

ArT. 11. No living insects or invertebrate animals in any stage may be im-
ported except by virtue of a permit previously obtained from and signed by
the Director of Agriculture and under the conditions stated in such permit.

DECLARED DISEASES AND PESTS
[Government Notice No. 687, Order of September 2, 19387]
DISEASES
BACkET ULM MOLVA CEOTAL Te Hie sHsen Se ee ea Angular leafspot or black arm disease of
Bacterium rubrilineans (Lee, Purdy, Barnum, Martin) Elliott__- Receuaioe of sugarcane.

Bacterium translucens var. undulosum EK. F.S., L. R. Jones, C. Black chaff of wheat.
S. Reddy.

Bacterium tumefaciens E. F.S.and Townsend____-_--------------- Crown gall.
Colletotnichamicopiea ri Nia C Kee ee a = nee apnea Coffee berry disease.
CorticiumisalmonicolorsB anduB Tan 22 se ee ee eee ee Pink disease.
HemileiavasiatrizeB aang Breese se ee ee Coffee leaf disease or rust.

Miosaicidiseasevofiily nek es Dee aes Meee Ee ai ens ree i
Mosaic crinkle or streak disease of potato_........--------------
Mosaicidisease of'sugarcane.)-.. 232 ee ee eee

I SOTTO) NOU CORT VEER se Coffee bean disease.
INTC TIVGEOSDOT COAG OS SU) 1000 eee te eee ee IE Internal boll disease of cotton.
Rosette diseasevof peanultss tas Se ee ee a ee
Sorosporium reilianum (Kuhn) McAIp.--__---.-----_------------ Head smut of sorghum and maize
Spongospora subterranea (Walls) Lang__.--.--._----------------- Powdery scab of potato.
Streaks diseases o fests avec Cesena eee eee eee nese ee
INSECTS
Orthoptera:
Locusta migratoria migratorioides (Roh. and Frm.)__-___---- Hairy-chested locust.
Nomadacris septemfasciata (Serv.)._.--..----.--------------- Red locust.
Sehistocencavgneg ania CHOLS ke) ee ee Desert locust.
Thysanoptera:
Diarthrothripsicopede: Williamse 22 sesame os een ae eee The coffee thrips.
Hemiptera:
Anéestialineaticollisn(Stall) iiss mien oe ee eee A coffee bug.
PALTUEE Stik Ef CCL ON (GC TaTTae) temo een eg A coffee bug.
(Chrysomphalus) Aonidiella aurantii (Mask.)..-.--.--------- Red scale.
Alstenolecaniwmicosreaes Ne@wStemss sere oe oe eee a ee The fringed scale.
DY SCOR CUS SDE Sate nea EAS RE Re ee ak cen amen nen Cotton stainers.
Briosoma lanigenum (Hausm) 20a ee ee Woolly apple aphid.
Lygus coffeae and other species of Capsidae__-__.....-------- Coffee capsid bug.
OntheziaiWsignis a Ol eee ee ee ee ee eee
Rseudococcus kenyaewbekelleys see eee ee ee Common coffee mealybug.
Pseudococcus virgatus (Ckll.) and other mealybugs_-_-___-----
Lepidoptera:
SUSSCOlASQUSCOMLATIN SO Temenos Se ne eg ee Maize stalk borer.
Epicampoptena andensoni Gcaras) meee eee eet ee a Coffee leaf-eating caterpillar.
SISO GAT eG cet (dela ra) eee were ye sg Armyworm.
ED GAOkeL ETI INE Cin ON ee)) epee eet oo ge Armyworm.
TOONS HARE CONGANO, WNW Oe Coffee leaf miner.
ORS D104 Ls OVW AK) ere a ea a pg Stinging caterpillar.
PN YEOTIVCLT COTE CIE ELC Ce CHes) epee ereeee ae ee eae eee Flax caterpillar.
(Platyedra) Pectinophora gossypiella (Saund.)_....---_-_----- Pink bollworm.
SES CNCOLAIIASELS MILANI TOS OTe eee see eee ep ee a Maize stalk borer.
ECGCoe cia OCCide Neal SAILS races ee een es ell ate aren Tip stem borer.
Coleoptera:
AMtNOTES LEUCONOEUS MEAS Cee a eRe White borer.
BALD ALE TU OME CHES Hie eae seer tN LS a eae LR aed CPE ae Black borer.
ESOT UA USS UCIT COLON GV ALDI tO) reenter en ee es on epee wpe DEE West African borer.
(Dirphya) Nitocris princeps Jord--..---.-----------_--------- Yellow-headed borer.
EZhLoebausipeesteelatesy Greve Gest eee aa ee
SODIVTON1 COCO TUET OUTS ONC ape eae ner
StephanodenessNamines GHerE) eee eee eee ne pean Coffee berry borer beetle.
ON CEESETTOMOCETOS CO lily) eee ery ee ae Oe Coconut beetle.
Diptera:
(RTA AIS CU OU HITIOS NINE oe Si sere Sono bocbetandeoeesbe Mediterranean fruitfly.
DDO CUS EST Psi ees a Se ie Sot a tg PP Fruitflies.
Hymenoptera:
Pheidole megacephala subsp. punctulata Mayr--------------- Ant attending mealybug.

Acantholepsis capensis Mayr and other species of ants attend-
ing mealybugs.

PLANT PESTS

aStrigahermonthica Js: hase io 2) Set SR AS eee ene Striga weed. ;
Pagetes nninwta-2 22 353 SiS aa aS Se eee eee Stinkweed, Mexican marigold.
OnuntianmenmisiandlONsini cla sass ee eee eee Pricklypear.

Allectra vogelit-25- i on soos coo eon ce eeeie es ee seen eeneee Leguminous corps.
1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 119

PENALTIES IMPOSED FOR VIOLATIONS OF THE PLANT QUARANTINE
ACT

According to reports received by the Bureau during the period July 1 to
September 30, 1938, penalties have recently been imposed by the proper Fed-
eral authorities for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act, as follows:

GYPSY MOTH AND BROWN-TAIL MOTH QUARANTINE

In the case of the United States v. Louis Lucien Bascetti, Winsted, Conn., in
attempting to transport spruce and hemlock cuttings from Winsted, Conn., to
New York, N. Y., a point outside of the regulated area, without inspection and
certification, the defendant pleaded guilty and was fined $10 on each of the

two counts.
JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE

In the case of the United States v. Associated Merchandising Corporation,
New York, N. Y., in the shipment to Los Angeles, Calif., of a forsythia plant
with soil, without inspection and certification, and which was found to be in-
fested with larvae of the Japanese beetle when intercepted at destination, the
defendant pleaded guilty and was fined $5.

QUARANTINES AFFECTING MEXICAN PRODUCTS

In the case of the United States versus the persons listed below, for attempt-
ing to smuggle in contraband plant material, the penalties indicated were im-
posed by the United States customs officials at the following ports:







Name Port Contraband Penaity

Benjamin Valli-Romero--.------ San Ysidro, Calif_..._--- DA TAAMPOCS =A 2 Jo 2 $e ee $3
RGIEOR AER OLRSet eo oe Brownsville, Tex_._----- MANGO Sr ene ees ee ae 1
alent eanos = = pee eee tee Se Eek See eee 1
Mrs. Fausto Yturria__-.--------|----- oer Sh it 52 2s S5digsiand. 7 plamise! = 2 1
Mrs. Corinth Fenimore__-------|-..-- OS = oe ee B AV OCATI OS asters Oe eS 1
Ja) Gopaniaver.<£>2--_ ==..=-|--.=- eee eee Gm anepeg a= ee 1
Mes Gussiesnncker. == _- =. |=. 25 Monies 323 = 2 peaches and 2 avocados__--_-__-- 1
Wiens Qamminn dias ae 5 OG 232 a eee ee 3 pomepranntes es 2 1
arora Garelnss see eee SS | Meee tse ee ee SIOPIAU AS = Seek res ee ee ee 1
Howard Gautreaux. ..-+-.~==--|-.=-- domes: £2. 7.2 - 2-8 3 avocados and 3 pomegranates___- 1
J. i inate Sire 7 ee (a SEAN EOGS 88) Se eee ae 1
dwicolosi satan. -—--- =| AORMA TS 222 S222 lppachiets 2 i. 13 oF. 8 eee 1
Bere ce OnLeebas-=--—- 45-2] ome Bet esos DEUS AS) See ee eyes Vays 1
irs] Nie ontreras: ees 22 | 2 =. LS ee St Goria yi caeeeet see ee eg ee Se 1
NVIREOArILS CU ASSO= sso ==_- =| GOs ~~ 5a o- sce sss LO PUR VAS onsen ee ee ee eee 1
SSE EEE sree ee ee ee! done) 22s DERE NeS Hea 2k Fo ee Oe I 1
Mnures Hodmeuez: 22-22... -]____- UE RSS 3 ae eee AEDS oe a ee 1
Mrs: Elaria B. Martinez__------|_--_- Goes eS 2 ee st Manco sengeees ee ee ee 1
Wrarsa iconv Winrenls == Eagle Pass, Tex_-----_-_- OM anGsee ke aee we a nia Oe 1
Hidelfonsia Sanchez___--_.------|----- Gol ee 3 avocados with seed____-_______-_- 1
WarmentVasgiess. 8 s-=— s2--=--]= 25.2 GO. 2 AEP etee eat Se 1epear ang: 5.quineess- === =- =.=. | 1
Senna 7apapam sess. |... OSet= ss. soos 5e5s oS 4 pomegranates and 5 pears_____-_- 1
Dressage a eS giles tees wae se Se ATIP OGG ee oe ese et Se 1
Teresa Fuente de Garza_......._|_-.-- 1G: Fe ta 1 apple and 2 quinces______--_____- 1
Pe BRT egeee eee 2 =] do......--.----------| 2 avocados, 1 apple, and 3 avocado

SCBUS saree ce ee 2 Be ae 1
Mire A delnigs Garza ---_..=..=|--..- gees oe ere plane sees el eae 1
Mrs. Carmen G. de Gonzalez_--|_---- Gh aa Ee as. 7 Dlantsiand 4: bulbs: — 2s 1
Anvelita Espionosa=.---.--.---].=--- C0 ee a a ZIG OCAC OSs ose = ee ee 1
Margaret Rowley_-------------- APE ASO; LOk- 5 - Soman eoes: = 3. ee 1
dp An Batnerncoutie—-—=—-....--==|=----~ pee Fe eee 12 peaches and 2 oranges__-___-__-- 1
BANOO waaunNaG-—-2 <=. --5=~ Hidaleo;fex 2-2-2 PINANE GES 4 ey ee a 1
Maximow ilanweva-..._-.......]_...- iG ees ee SB DOMOPTANRLeS. 222 Ae st A 1
Weird repens pee af doe ee SORE ae Hee Ae ee 1
LDSIGO Ci! Qe Le shee ALD BACHOS Ms ees soo) eae SE 1
Opt auertr eae eS et GO eee es IPStUNCAOO l= eee i oe 1
Mee iOLGS sees a — | a a 0 (1 ee ee BIRVOCAN OS 2 ene ee 1
Wie RGD i ()eeee peal s 2 see I DRIMCSTANALOs 30 e et 1
Mrs. Senaida Rodriguez_-_--__--|..-__- do. 2...) DIDT EN Coe cce wees en ee 1
rite GV RSs ke Laredo; Tex-- ee PMTYTELTA Oech emer 8 1
MVE TOA LAGE ete ae a anne do... Penlants: = eee ee ee 1
Mrs. Antonia M. de Reyes-_-_---_-|-.---- doi: ae 13 mangoes, 5 plants, 8 mameys,

and 10 pomegranates_______-___- 1
eee SIE RNG less |e G0... 22 eee BDI eee seen 1
WEIS HOlieinv Ee Orez-...---.-._|_--.- O62) soe ok eee Ceres 0, Se ee 1
Wish Die ob (i eos Ses eee SRMPO ENE a a oe 1
Nes Dolores Wilanss._..........]---=- 6 {¢ Sea Se re SI ER ONSET aes = Sa ae 1
eee re vines = a5 a2 3a lance °C {¢ ee ele et aia pe Ur TRB OR oe es en oe wns 1
120 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE | [July—Sept.

»



Name Port Contraband Penalty
Hive ROrres 262 5s os as ene GOs acc ee a 6 plants. 23.222.) 2 eee $1
Mirst Mm eresay Uae Za nana eee et eee ee CLO Da ns ae ener 1 mango and 5 avocados____----._- 1
ANtODIOM RTOS Se KGa aie eee Pal Seen | eee GOs Se reso eee HSIAVOCACOS Wa aetna 204 AS I
Marae GeAVCOS tees era | Mena COBO AUE Re eweaee eee SOM eCeraAN ates a eee ane 1
JOS Merlo es Bele eS Reale ee | pm GO Mie ah ee ents 2.peaches.. 22wes 82. eee ee 1
George) Wlores!e= oe ee eee Gon Sole ee eee L mangos 5c eee ee come I
Joseiay ly, Calzadoue ake es | ee GCOS pepe note ey ES 10 avocados and 20 figs._..-_-_____- 1
Walters Hallivill eee eas eee | ata (6b) ae ii 4 POMEeSTANATCS eee etree 1
Mrs. Hortensa Arnela___..-..--|_-__- COLE Sh: Si Daaea 2 3 mangoes and 8 plums____---.--_- 1
Mrs. Rafaela N. Morales____--.|----- Opn es eee ert SOiAVO CAG OSs ae enna ae 3
MlawaorCamales age e ewes eer | ek GON Sea Ivcactus plants’ sa asa eee 1
IATA ORECZ see ee ae ee ee GOS See See ee TP papaya. o2 eee eee eee 1
Aurora Hlernamd 67eeea ease ta | eee C2 Xe ane ites NN ee l-avocadonc.. 32 oss eee 1
Peters amie eee ee ale een | ae GOR Se Leora tien tae D/DOMCSTAM AGC see ee ee 1
PetravArizala lew saws seat GOs Bae 3 plantgec loc. 55. See eae il
CWelsaivAniz a lavetee Siecle ie Laie Hilal | tis RO, GO Kea yo wipe Ee mse (@plantSssasou. tA ee eee 1
CED WTC See eee re GOR eS iene VOCE GLO eae Lara ag 1
Mrs. Crencesia N. Flores___-----|_---- GO n ee ee ae aes AAV OCAG OS aha neat nee one ee 1
Estaban A. Marchado.--.-.-.--|_.-.- dois eee es 3 avocados, 1 avocado seed, 2 1
mango seed, and 2 sweet limes.
Mrs. Olivares de Kazen____._--.|___-- GO eS A ee dee at 2 avocados with seed____----__----- 1
Antonio Roderiquez. 22225552228 | sans GOs se ee LQ TA COL se SE Re eee eae I
GuadalupelGarciase se eee CLO ae ge 8 pomegranates and 4 oranges__--- 1
CiriliozHernandez san ae eae ee Goma tee sake bates T-mango:: Yee eee it
FACE G ONZAIOZ A eeemne ee, a eee a CLO pees Ee et hee 2 peachesi22 22 aaa ee 1
MianuelbAllivareze eee Sanh eae re Pe en Coie res sar 8 ie ohn aalie lO avocados tic.) Sa eee eee 1-
Mrs) ConsueloyDiaze2. esa alee GLO SIR SaaS eo 2 aVOCAM OSL. 255 See ee ee 1
Hil MTOre} © are salty eee | CLO RS UN ERRIN Sime eed |e nea OS SSRN ee ee ea 1
CRVAR EtG) Wit ee BEE A GOW Re is ee Siplants2 20020. eS ee eee 1
4 Mopaakeisy\Gleyen mee eee GO aaa 3 peaches and 4 pears__._-_-_-_---__ 1
ChristobelDiazeoes es ees GO zersers ure mpriwenl dna 3 OFAN SOS v 2a oe 1
EONS A OZ aT ei as oe cee ae ve a | QDS ae a neil SpDLAMUS 2 Sj Pay Naas see ee eee 1
Pomposa Wozanos eee eee QO ee eS LT mangoejee 0 eee 1
Mrs. Amada Ruiz de Bozan_.-__|___-- GOs2 nese ee amare Tipo eg rnb essen ee es a 1
Mrs. Desiderla Prince__.__.-___}__._- Gots ee a aE D Mangoes. Se ee eee 1
Mrs. Maggie Estrada_.........-]_---- dope eae L5"plants tic. 15.2 3 2 ee 1
Irancisco) Necreteaao oe ee Gomme Ur eee 2avocadoss se eee eee 1
Miss Teresa Marquez_____._..._|___-- dow eae ie 2 Mang oesic 3.c5 eee 1
ZACiSEOLGant Use Gomes a G.avViocad oss. 26.2 222 eee 1
Mrs. Barbara V. de Villareal____|_._- GORGE We ee 1. mangoes. [oe ee 1
OT valet Cae ree seer | OR eae en 5. AVOCAGOS..j). 2 oie eae ae 1
Mrs. Numpua Escomilla___-___]__--- GO Raae SO ee 1 aVoCad On... oa ee 1
Pimothy. Ralomeraase sees soe eee GLO UERREN Ae le ea 3. AVOCAG OS) 1k ee Se eee 1
Mrs) Esther Nissim oie in | eee Goes es ee i, oranges. S244 2 Lee ean 1
PORE 0 TaTVe a ns | I Geeta seal TV MAMN SO es. 2 eae 1
TROTESIS AIC ING Zee ee ee nee | onset 20) ce aw 2:AVOCACOS su 0 a ee 1
Mirsiinipersienma ae ne ee eee Gone hs ae en 7 plants) .225). oho. eee 1
Mrs. Romona Gomez.__-...-...|_---- GOWen ae Ee eon cae 3 avocados) {82 ks 2 eee i


ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY
AND PLANT QUARANTINE

Lep A. Strone, Chief.

S. A. RoHweEr, Assistant Chief.

Avery S. Hoyt, Assistant Chief.

P. N. ANNAND, Special Research Assistant.

F. H. Spencer, Business Manager.

Rotta P. CuRRIE, Hditor.

Mase CotcorD, Librarian.

J. A. Hystop, in Charge, Division of Insect Pest Survey and Information.

J. I. HAMBLETON, in Charge, Division of Bee Culture Investigations.

D. L. VAN DINE, in Charge, Division of Fruit Insect Investigations.

F. C. CRAIGHEAD, in Charge, Division of Forest Insect Investigations.

W. H. WHuirts, in Charge, Division of Truck Crop and Garden Insect Investiga-

tions.

M. PACKARD, in Charge, Division of Cereal and Forage Insect Investigations. ~

. W. HARneD, in Charge, Division of Cotton Insect Investigations.

C. BisHopp, in Charge, Division of Insects Affecting Man and Animals.

A. Hawkins, in Charge, Division of Control Investigations.

. ©. Roark, in Charge, Division of Insecticides and Fungicides.

F. W. MUESEBECK, in Charge, Division of Insect Identification.

P. CLAUSEN, in Charge, Division of Foreign Parasite Introduction.

B. FrackeEr, in Charge, Division of Plant Disease Control.

. M. Ganpis, in Charge, Division of Domestic Plant Quarantines.

. R. Sasscer, in Charge, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines.

. F. Burcess, in Field Charge, Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail Moth Control (head-

quarters, Greenfield, Mass.).

E. G. Brewer, in Field Charge, Japanese Beetle and Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail
Moth Quarantines, European Corn Borer Certification, and Dutch Elm Disease
Eradication (headquarters, Bloomfield, N. J.).

R. BH. McDona.p, in Field Charge, Pink Bollworm and Thurberia Weevil Quar-
antines (headquarters, San Antonio, Tez.).

P. A. Hormate, in Field Charge, Mexican Fruitfly Quarantine (headquarters,
Harlingen, Tea.).

A. C. BAKER, in Field Charge, Fruitfly Investigations (headquarters, Mevzico,
City, Mewico). .

AOA

EW RAQ

>

121

U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1938

§. R. A.-B. E. P. Q. No. 137 Issued March 1939

United States Department of Agriculture

BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS

OCTOBER-DECEMBER 1938

CONTENTS
Page
Quarantine and other official announcements- _-_-____--_____-___-__----__----.-----.---------------- 123
Announcement relating to gypsy moth and brown-tail moth quarantine (No. 45)._____-_--_-__-- 123
RE UAIreIAra Se EOSIN Aner S= - 52223). s AE. fez2 22 ses § Shed bies 2a teers es gen n8s2i.2 123
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (No. 48)__._---_-_-_-_____-__-_------__-. 124
List of articles exempt from certification requirements under the Japanese beetle quarantine
(see OE SU DOVIbiGn) 2144 £2) Se site Pd eS eee oo) RI 124
MHI CH OM SOMOS LIMASLELS = =~ 52505 22 2 tt ee See ee Be ee Se eh eee he 124
Announcements relating to Mediterranean fruitfly and melonfiy quarantine (No. 13)____._-__-- 125
Hawaiian fruits and vegetabies to be admitted to mainland after sterilization______._._____- 125
Administrative instructions—The shipment of fruits and vegetables from Hawaii to the
mainland subject to sterilization under supervision is authorized (B. E. P. Q. 481)___--- 125
Announcements relating to nursery stock, plant, and seed quarantine (No. 37)_____-_______-_--- 126
Rescind order requiring treatment for narcissus bulbs from the Netherlands________-______-- 126
Treatment requirement of noninfested Netherlands narcissus bulbs as a condition of entry
TORCHES Ape Cl Pika) tare et ae) Plone 29. toe be Barts eee. cosh 1 nod) nt Bae 127
Wallace permits importation of increased numbers of begonia and gloxinia tubers___-_-___--_- 128
Entry requirements of foreign begonia and gloxinia tubers modified_.___.........._-___-_--- 128
Modification of nursery stock, plant, and seed quarantine regulations (amendment No. 3)__ 128
Announcements relating to pink bo]lworm quarantine (No. 52)_-_...._-_._-__-----_-_-----_-------- 13
Pinks lworne, Giaraniane repilations amended... _ = - .-. -===+=52-- =-22¢ 22 5-2 asec 130
Modification of pink bollworm quarantine regulations (amendment No. 5)___-___--__-_-_--- 130
iMGnce toreneral pil blic througn Newspapers... _.------_-2_ =. --e3_ 2 - eo eee 131
UES FPO 0D WO p0e 5) 72 a a ee ne eee ee a a se a ee 132
Announcements relating to white-fringed beetle quarantine (No. 72)__.________--_._____-___---_- 132
Quarantine issued to prevent spread of white-fringed beetle in four of Southern States____-_- 132
Dito eM srrme luaraniiiar o___= 9 "~ Serruys = re. pera see y -__ eee _ erent pe od 133
Maticnto epneralspablic through newspapers... ~-=- <2. --6-2 Mlertinalinsiechnonio: plants and plant products... __-.._-..--.-.-_-__.__-2.--..--=-_--ns Florida State plant quarantine (citrus canker disease)__........._-_-___---_-----___-.------- 138
end ae PRE ea gaa ane te Se | SP ty) Sek ee ees oN poe ise eg 138
The Plant Quarantine Act and Quarantine No. 37 (address by Lee A. Strong)_______-_-_-_- 138
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Switzerland (B. E. P. Q. 413, revised)____ 142
oD import restrictions, Republic of Argentina (B. E. P. Q. 426, supplement
elssee a ene SreRer rae “ees: tery bere r se. - ey EVES orareey gt) yee) cers. tree eye eh pes PE 147
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Commonwealth of Australia (B. E. P. Q. 476, supple-
IR ai Ta ee eg ee ee 148
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, French Regency of Tunisia (B. E. P. Q. 483)_________- 148
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act___.________ Ep) _ Sanity Rgusreyyscet > 153
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine____._....._____-_-_-..-----.------ 156

QUARANTINE AND OTHER OFFICIAL
ANNOUNCEMENTS

GYPSY MOTH AND BROWN-TAIL MOTH QUARANTINE (NO. 45)
| INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS

Post OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,

Washington, December 7, 1938.
Postmaster:

My Dear Sir: Your attention is invited to the inclosed copy of the latest
revision of Federal Quarantine Order No. 45 on account of the gypsy moth and

127134—39—_—1 123
124 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct.—Dec.

brown-tail moth, by which you will please be governed. See paragraph 1,
section 595, Postal Laws and Regulations.

The principal change is in the release of certain infested areas from regula-
tion and the change in designation of certain other areas from that of lightly
infested to generally infested.

Very truly yours, :
RAMSEY SS. BLACK,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE
(NO. 48)

B. BE. P. Q. 395 (8d revision).

LIST OF ARTICLES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS UNDER THE
JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE

[Approved October 26, 1938; effective November 1, 1938]

The principal change in this revision is the addition of trailing arbutus
to the list of exempted plants (see item 14). There have been eliminated from
this list items such as aquatic plants, silica sand, and similar materials, since -
the conditions of exemption with reference to these items are covered in the
current regulations of the quarantine.

In accordance with the third proviso in Notice of Quarantine No. 48, as re-
vised, the following articles, being considered innocuous as carriers of infesta-
tion, are exempted from the restrictions of this quarantine and of the regula-
tions supplemental thereto:

1. Balsam pillows, when composed of balsam needles only.

2. Banana stalks, when crushed, dried, and shredded.

3. Dyed moss and dyed sand, when heat treated, and when so labeled on
the outside of e2ch container of such materials.

4. Floral designs or “set pieces,” including wreaths, sprays, casket covers, and
all formal florists’ designs. Bouquets and cut flowers not so prepared are not
exempted.

5. Herbarium specimens, when dried, pressed, and treated, and when so
labeled on the outside of each container of such materials.

6. Manure, peat, compost, or humus (a) when dehydrated and either
shredded, ground, pulverized, or compressed, or (0) when treated with crude
petroleum or any other product having high potency as an insecticide, and when
so labeled on the outside of each commercial container of such materials. (See
also item 13.)

7. Moss, sheet (Calliergon schriberi and Thuridium recognitum).

8. Mushroom spawn, in brick, flake, or pure culture form.

9. Orchids, cut.

10. Orchid plants, when growing exclusively in Osmunda fiber.

11. Osmunda fiber, Osmundine, or orchid peat (Osmunda cinnamomea, and
O. claytoniana).

12. Resurrection plant or birds’-nest moss (Selaginella lepidophylia).

13. Sphagnum moss, bog moss, or peat moss (Sphagnaceae) when dried and
baled. (See also item 6.)

14. Trailing arbutus, or mayflower (Hpigaea repens), when free from soil or
primary roots, and when shipped during the period between October 16 and
June 14, inclusive.

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS

Post OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, November 2, 1938.

Referring to quarantine order No. 48 on account of the Japanese beetle, notice
is given to postmasters in the regulated area in the States of Connecticut, Dela-
1939] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 125

ware, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New J ersey, New York,
Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, Virginia, West Virginia, and the
District of Columbia that effective November 1, 1938, the following articles,
the interstate movement of which is not considered to constitute a risk of
Japanese beetle dissemination, are exempted from the restrictions of the regula-

tions of this quarantine: é 4 "oe
(Here follow the 14 numbered items in B. BE. P. Q. 395 (3d revision), as

above. ) Ramsey S. BLack,

Third Assistant Postmaster General.

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO MEDITERRANEAN FRUITFLY AND
MELONFLY QUARANTINE (NO. 13)

HAWAIIAN FRUITS AND VEGETABLES TO BE ADMITTED TO MAINLAND AFTER
STERILIZATION

[Press notice ]

OcTOBER 20, 19388.

Modification of the fruitfly regulations affecting the movement of products
from Hawaii to the mainland, effective November 1, was announced by Lee
A. Strong, Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, today.

Experimental work carried on at field stations of the Bureau, Dr. Strong
said, has developed the fact that exposure to heat or to cold under controlled
conditions for a specified time will destroy immature stages of the Mediterranean
fruitfly or the melonfly that may be present.

On the basis of this evidence provision will be made, effective November 1,
1938, for the shipment to the mainland of Hawaiian fruits and vegetables
treated in that territory under the supervision of an inspector of the Depart-
ment of Agriculture by either of two treatments.

The cold or low-temperature treatment involves chilling fruits or vegetables
until they reach a temperature of 35° F. at the center and maintaining this
for 15 days. The hot or high-temperature treatment consists of heating the
product to 110° at the center and holding it for 8 hours.

B. BE. P. Q. 481.

ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS—THE SHIPMENT OF FRUITS AND VEGETABLES
FROM HAWAII TO THE MAINLAND SUBJECT TO STERILIZATION UNDER SUPER-
VISION IS AUTHORIZED

[Approved October 19, 1938; effective November 1, 1938]

Extensive experiments have demonstrated that holding of fruits and vege-
tables at certain prescribed temperatures for certain periods will kill all stages
of the Mediterranean fruitfly and the melonfly. Available data suggest that
certain fruits and vegetables may be subjected to such treatment without
affecting their palatability and marketability. Treatment in Hawaii of fruits
and vegetables at prescribed temperatures under supervision of inspectors of
the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine and the handling of the
treated products under supervision so as to prevent reinfestation will preclude
the possible introduction of these pests into the mainland and the following
two treatments are prescribed:

1. Cooling until the approximate center of the fruit or vegetable reaches a
temperature of 35° F. and holding the fruit or vegetable so the inside tem-
perature does not exceed 35° for a period of 15 days.

2. Heating the fruit or vegetable until the approximate center reaches 110° F.
and holding this temperature for a period of 8 hours.

On the basis of evidence obtained and under the authority contained in the
first proviso of regulation 2 of the rules and regulations supplemental to
/Quarantine 13, provision is hereby made for the certification of fruits and
vegetables for movement from the Territory of Hawaii into or through any
126 BURHAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct.—Dee,

State, Territory, or District of the United States when treatments are applied
in Hawaii at plants designated for this purpose by the United States Depart-
ment of Agriculture and under the supervision of the inspectors of the Bureau
of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, provided that in the issuance of permits
fruits and:-vegetables so treated shall be moved and handled by the treating
plant and loaded on ships in a manner which, in the judgment of the inspectors,
wil! preclude fruitfly infestation subsequent to treatment.

In authorizing the entry of fruits and vegetables into the mainland of the
United States under the provisions of this circular, it should be emphasized that
inexactness and carelessness in applying the treatment may result in injury
to fruits or vegetables or to their rejection.

The treatment required under the provisions of this circular represents the
requirements necessary for the elimination of pest risk and no liability shall be
attached to the United States Department of Agriculture or to any officer or
representative of that Department in event of injury resulting to fruit or vege-
able offered for entry under the provisions of this circular. It should also be
emphasized that evidence based on trial shipments under conditions of trans-
portation from Hawaii is not available to demonstrate that fruits and vege-
tables will be marketable after the application of the treatments here author-
ized, and that any fruits or vegetables treated and shipped under the provisions
of this circular are at the risk of the shipper.

Lee A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine. -

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO NURSERY STOCK, PLANT, AND
SEED QUARANTINE (NO. 37)

RESCIND ORDER REQUIRING TREATMENT FOR NARCISSUS BULBS FROM THE
NETHERLANDS

[ Press notice]

NOVEMBER 10, 1938.

The requirement, in effect since August 1, 1986, that all narcissus bulbs from
the Netherlands be given the hot-water treatment upon entry to the United
States, was revoked today (November 10), effective August 15, 1989. The
announcement was made in an order signed by Lee A. Strong, Chief of the
Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

On and after August 15, 1939, all such importations shall be accompanied by a
certificate certifying that the bulbs have been thoroughly inspected at the time
of packing and found or believed to be free of injurious plant diseases and
insect pests.

Upon arrival at the American ports of entry, all shipments will be examined
by inspectors of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine. This exami-
nation will include the cutting of suspicious-looking bulbs when necessary to
determine their freedom from infestation by the bulb nematode. Any shipments
found infested will be given the latest approved treatment or rejected.

At the request of the Netherlands Government, a committee of technical ex-
perts representing the Governments of the Netherlands and of this country was
appointed for the purpose of considering on the ground, in the Netherlands, the
necessity of requiring the hot-water treatment of Netherlands narcissus bulbs
as a condition of entry into the United States. This committee held a series of
meetings in the Netherlands, during April 1938, most of which took place in the
narcissus bulb fields where every opportunity was afforded to inspect the bulbs
as to foliage or by lifting them, and to observe the cultural practices and sani-
tary measures employed in an effort to reduce the bulb nematode infestation to
the minimum. The field examinations revealed an almost complete absence of
bulb nematode infestations in the narcissus plantings.

In view of this condition and the sanitary measures practiced, which involve
repeated field examinations during the growing season, supplemented by inspec-
tion and certification of the bulbs at the time of shipment, it was evident, so
long as the above conditions exist, that the bulb nematode risk incident to the
importation of Netherlands narcissus bulbs does not justify the continuation
of the requirement that all importations of these bulbs be given the hot-water
treatment as a condition of entry.


19389} SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 127

B. EB. P. Q. 482.

TREATMENT REQUIREMENT OF NONINFESTED NETHERLANDS NARCISSUS BULBS
AS A CONDITION OF ENTRY REVOKED

NOVEMBER 10, 1938.

On January 14, 1935, as authorized in regulation 38, as revised on said date,
of the rules and regulations supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 37, the
announcement was made that on and after December 15, 1936, narcissus bulbs
would be authorized entry under permit in unlimited numbers for any pur-
pose, subject to inspection and certification in the country of origin and Te-
inspection at the port of entry in the United States with the understanding
that any shipments found to be infested would be rejected. At the same time,
revocation of the domestic Narcissus Bulb Quarantine No. 62 was announced,
effective April 1, 1935.

On August 1, 1926, in accordance with the authority contained in regula-
tion 9 of said Notice of Quarantine No. 37, it was further announced that, as
a condition of entry, the treatment of narcissus buibs would be required since
external examination of these bulbs could not be relied upon to determine their
freedom from infestation by the bulb nematode, Ditylenchus dipsaci. Those in
interest were informed in a circular issued September 16, 1936, of the “latest
approved treatment” to be employed with respect to all entries of narcissus
bulbs.

Since it was a matter of record that imported and domestic bulbs other than
narcissus were known hosts of the bulb nematode, a conference was held in
Washington on December 15, 1936, to consider the desirability of treating all
known hosts of the bulb nematode enterable under the Nursery Stock, Plant,
and Seed Quarantine No. 37. The following day, December 16, 1936, a hearing
was held to consider the advisability of establishing a domestic plant quaran- ~
tine for the purpose of requiring the treatment of narcissus bulbs and other
known hosts of the bulb nematode as a prerequisite to interstate shipment. On
February 15, 1937, it was announced that the evidence presented at the con-
ference in question indicated that the bulb nematode risk which accompanies
the importation of most ornamental bulbs which have been inspected in the
country of origin, supplemented by inspection at the port of entry in the United
States, does not justify the requirement that all known hosts of this nematode
be treated as a condition of entry. No change in the requirements as to im-
portation of narcissus bulbs was announced at that time. While no public
announcement has been made with reference to the conclusion reached as the
result of the hearing on December 16, 1936, no Federal domestic quarantine
has been promulgated requiring the treatment of narcissus bulbs and other
known hosts of the bulb nematode as a condition of interstate shipment.

At the request of the Netherlands Government, a committee of technical
experts representing the Governments of the Netherlands and of this country
was appointed for the purpose of considering on the ground, in the Nether-
lands, the necessity of requiring the hot-water treatment of Netherlands nar-
cissus bulbs as a condition of entry into the United States. This committee
held a series of meetings in the Netherlands, during the month of April 1938,
most of which took place in the narcissus bulb fields where every opportunity
was afforded to inspect the bulbs as to foliage or by lifting them, and to ob-
serve the cultural practices and sanitary measures employed in an effort to
reduce the bulb nematode infestation to the minimum. The field examinations
revealed an almost complete absence of bulb nematode infestations in the nar-
cissus plantings. In view of this condition and the sanitary measures prac-
ticed, which involve repeated field examinations during the growing season,
supplemented by inspection and certification of the bulbs at the time of ship-
ment, it is evident, so long as the above conditions exist, that the bulb nema-
tode risk incident to the importation of Netherlands narcissus bulbs does not
justify the continuation of the requirement that all importations of these bulbs
be given the hot-water treatment as a condition of entry. This requirement,
therefore, will not be in effect on and after August 15, 1939. On and after
that date, all such importations, in accordance with the provisions of regula-
tion 7 of the Nursery Stock, Plant, and Seed Quarantine No. 37, shall be ac-
companied by a certificate certifying that the bulbs have been thoroughly in-
spected at the time of packing and found or believed to be free of injurious
plant diseases and insect pests. Finally, upon arrival at the American ports
128 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct.—Dee,

of entry, all shipments will be examined by inspectors of the Bureau of Ento-
mology and Plant Quarantine and this examination will include the cutting of
suspicious-looking bulbs when necessary to determine their freedom from in-
festation by the bulb nematode. Any shipments found to be infested will be
given the latest approved treatment or rejected.
Lee A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

WALLACE PERMITS IMPORTATION OF INCREASED NUMBERS OF BEGONIA AND
GLOXINIA TUBERS

[Press notice]

DECEMBER 1, 1938.

Federal regulations governing the entry into the United States of begonia and
gloxinia tubers from foreign countries, which now permit entry only in limited
numbers, will be changed to permit entry in unlimited numbers, effective De-
cember 1, 1959, Secretary of Agriculture Henry A. Wallace announced today.
Since the effective date of Nursery Stock, Plant, and Seed Quarantine No. 37,
June 1, 1919, this material has been allowed entry in limited quantities and for
certain purposes only.

Inspection of importations of this material discloses no known justifiable
biological reason for the continuation of these restrictions. Accordingly, entry of
these tubers has been placed under the restrictions of regulation 3 of Quar-
antine No. 37, which imposes to limitations on quantities that may be im-
ported or on their utilization after entry although still requiring entry under
permit and inspection.

The 1-year interval between the date of signing the order changing the present
restrictions and the date it becomes operative is allowed for those adjustments
which may become necessary because of this action.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS OF FOREIGN BEGONIA AND GLOXINIA TUBERS MODIFIED

DECEMBER 1, 1938.

A study of the results of the inspection of begonia and gloxinia tubers im-
ported in limited quantities since June 1, 1919, the effective date of the Nursery
Stock, Plant, and Seed Quarantine No. 37, indicates that the known pest risk
incident to their importation does not justify the continuance of the limitations
as to quantity and utilization now governing their entry.

Since careful inspection has not evidenced a biological basis for the present
restrictions, begonia and gloxinia tubers may be imported, on and after De-
cember 1, 1939, under the provisions of regulation 3 of Quarantine No. 37, as
amended, effective December 1, 1938, without limitation as to quantity and
utilization. This postponement, for approximately 1 year, of the operation of
this amendment, as it affects these tubers, is made for the purpose of allowing
the adjustments which may become necesSary as a result of the evel or
such limitations.

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

MODIFICATION OF NURSERY STOCK, PLANT, AND SEED QUARANTINE REGULATIONS

INTRODUCTORY NOTE

The only change involved in this revision of regulation 3 of the regulations

supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 37 is to make provision for the entry
of begonia and gloxinia tubers on and after December 1, 1939, without limita-
tion as to quantity or use.
Lee A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine. —


1939] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 129

AMENDMENT NO. 3 TO REVISED RULES AND REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL TO
NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 37

{Approved November 30, 1938 ; effective December 1, 1938]

Under authority conferred by the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912
(37 Stat. 315), it is ordered that regulation 3 of the revised rules and regula-
.tions supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 387, on account of certain injurious
insects and fungous diseases, which were promulgated December 17, 1930, and
amended effective July 1, 1932, and January 14, 1935, be, and the same is hereby,
further amended to read as follows:

REGULATION 3. NURSERY STOCK, OTHER PLANTS AND PARTS OF PLANTS, [INCLUDING
SEEDS, FOR WHICH A PERMIT IS REQUIRED

The following nursery stock, other plants and parts of plants, including seeds,
not including, however, such other plants and parts of plants as are named in
appendix A, which are governed by special quarantines ard other restrictive
orders now in force, nor such as may hereafter be made the subject of special
quarantines, may be imported, without limitation as to quantity or use, from
countries which maintain inspection (apperdix B), under permit upon com-
pliance with these regulations:

(1) Bulbs, coims, or root stocks (pips) of the following genera: Lilium (lily),
Convallaria (lily-of-the-valliey), Hyacinthus (hyacinth), Tulipa (tulip), Crocus,
and Narcissus (daffodil and jonquil) ; until further totice, Chionodoxra (glory-
of-the-snow), Galanthus (snowdrop), Scilla (squill), Fritillaria, Muscari (grape-
hyacinth), Jvia, and Hranthis (winter aconite) ; and, on and after December 1,
1939, begonia and gloxinia tubers.

(2) Cuttings, scions, and buds of fruits or nuts: Provided, That cuttings,
Scions, and buds of fruits or nuts may be imported from Asia, Japan, Philippine
Islands, and Oceania (including Australia and New Zealand) under the pro-
visions of regulation 14 only. (Stocks of fruits or nuts may not be imported,
under permit or otherwise. ) .

(3) Rose stocks, including Manetti, Rosa multiflora (brier rose), and R.
rugosa.

(4) Nuts, including palm seeds for growing purposes: Provided, That such
nuts or seeds shall be free from puilp.

(5) Seeds of fruit, forest, ornamental, and shade trees, seeds of deciduous and
evergreen orlLamental shrubs, and seeds of hardy perennial plants: Provided,
That such seeds shall be free from pulp: Provided further, That citrus seeds
may be imported only through specified ports subject to disinfection as provided
in regulation 9: Provided further, That mango seeds may not be imported under
permit or otherwise, except from the countries of North America, Central
America, and South America, and the West Indies.

Importations from countries not maintaining inspection of nursery stock,
other plants and parts of plants, including seeds, the entry of which is permis-
sible under this regulation, may be made under permit upon compliance with
these regulations in limited quantities for public-service purposes only, but this
limitation shall not apply to tree seeds.

(6) Materials permitted entry under Quarantine No. 56 for consumption pur-
poses are authorized entry under this regulation for propagation.

‘This amendment shall be effective on and after December 1, 1938, and shall
ae as date supersede amendment No. 2, which became effective January 14,
19385.

Done in the city of Washington this 30th day of November 1938.

Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.

[SEAL] HENRY A. WALIACE,

Secretary of Agriculture.
130 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct.—Dec.

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO PINK BOLLWORM QUARANTINE
(NO. 52)

PINK BOLLWORM QUARANTINE REGULATIONS AMENDED

[Press notice]
NOVEMBER 17, 1938.

The Secretary of Agriculture today announced an amendment to the regula-
tions of the quarantine relating to the pink bollworm of cotton, effective No-
vember 17, 1938. This revision adds to the lightly infested areas that part of
Pinal County in Arizona not heretofore within the regulated area, all of Mari-
copa County in Arizona, and the Texas counties of Brooks, Nueces, Kenedy,
Kleberg, and Jim Wells.

The regulated area now includes 6 entire counties and part of another in
Arizona, 12 in New Mexico, and 85 counties and parts of 2 others in Texas.

MODIFICATION OF PINK BOLLWORM QUARANTINE REGULATIONS
INTRODUCTORY NOTE

The following revision adds to the lightly infested area that part of Pinal
County in Arizona not heretofore within the regulated area, all of Maricopa
County in Arizona, and the Texas counties of Brooks, Jim Wells, Kenedy,
Kleberg, and Nueces. This action is taken with respect to all counties, except
Kenedy, owing to the recent finding of light infestations of the pink bollworm
of cotton. Kenedy County is included in the regulated area because there are
no facilities in that county for ginning the small acreage of cotton grown
therein which is normally ginned in the regulated area.

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plani Quarantine.

AMENDMENT NO. 5 TO REVISED RULES AND REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL TO
NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 52

[Approved November 15, 1938; effective November 17, 1938]

Under authority conferred by section 8 of the Plant Quarantine Act of
August 20, 1912 (87 Stat. 315), as amended by the act of Congress approved
March 4, 1917 (39 Stat. 1134, 1165), it is ordered that regulation 3 of the revised
rules and regulations supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 52, on account
of the pink bollworm of cotton, which were promulgated on October 13, 1936,
as amended, effective December 1, 1936, April 6, 1937, October 28, 1937, and
January 3, 1938, be and the same is hereby still further amended to read as
follows:

REGULATION 3. REGULATED AREAS; HEAVILY AND LIGHTLY INFESTED AREAS
REGULATED AREAS

In accordance with the provisos to Notice of Quarantine No. 52 (revised),
the Secretary of Agriculture designates as regulated areas, for the purpose of
these regulations, the following counties and parts of counties in Arizona, New
Mexico. and Texas:

Arizona area.—Counties of Cochise, Graham, Greenlee, Maricopa, Pinal, and
Santa Cruz, and all of Pima County except that part lying west of the western
boundary line of range 8 east.

New Mezico area.—Counties of Chaves, Dona Ana, Eddy, Grant, Hidalgo, Lea,
Luna, Otero, Roosevelt, Sierra, Socorro, and Valencia.

Texas area.—Counties of Andrews, Brewster, Brooks, Cameron, Cochran,
Crane, Culberson, Dawson, Ector, El Paso, Gaines, Glasscock, Hidalgo, Hockley,
Howard, Hudspeth, Jeff Davis, Jim Wells, Kenedy, Kleberg, Loving, Martin,
Midland, Nueces, Pecos, Presidio, Reeves, Starr, Terrell, Terry, Upton, Ward,
Willacy, Winkler, and Yoakum; that part of Bailey County lying south of the
1939] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 131

following-described boundary line: beginning on the east line of said county
where the county line intersects the northern boundary line of league 207; theuce
west following the northern boundary line of leagues 207, 203, 191, 188, 175, and
171 to the northeast corner of league 171; thence south on the western line of
league 171 to the northeast corner of the W. H. L. survey; thence west along the
northern boundary of the W. H. L. survey and the northern boundary of sections
68, 67, 66, 65, 64, 63, 62, 61, and 60 of block A of the M. B. and B. survey to the
western boundary of said county; that part of Lamb County lying south of the
following-described boundary line: beginning on the east line of said county where
the county line intersects the northern boundary line of section 9 of the R. M.
Thomson survey; thence west following the northern boundary line of sections
9 and 10 of the R. M. Thomson survey and the northern boundary line of sections
6, 5, 4, 3, 2, and 1 of the T. A. Thompson survey and the northern boundary line
of leagues 637, 636, and 635 to the southeast corner of league 239; thence north
on the eastern boundary line of league 239 to the northeast corner of said league;
thence west on the northern boundary line of leagues 239, 238, 233, 222, 218, and
207 to the western boundary line of said county.

Heavily infested areas

Of the regulated areas, the following counties and parts of counties are hereby
designated as heavily infested within the meaning of these regulations:

Counties of Brewster, Culberson, Jeff Davis, Presidio, and Terrell, in the State
of Texas, and all of Hudspeth County in the same State except that part of the
northwest corner of said county lying north and west of a ridge of desert land
extending from the banks of the Rio Grande northeasterly through the desert
immediately west of the town of McNary, such ridge being an extension of the
northwest boundary line of section 11, block 65%.

Lightly infested areas

The following areas are designated as lightly infested:

The counties of Cochise, Graham, Greenlee, Maricopa, Pinal, and Santa Cruz,
and the regulated part of Pima County in Arizona ;* the counties of Chaves, Dona
Ana, Eddy, Grant, Hidalgo, Lea, Luna, Otero, Roosevelt, Sierra, Socorro, and
Valencia in New Mexico; the entire counties of Andrews, Brooks, Cameron,
Cochran, Crane, Dawson, Ector, El Paso, Gaines, Glasscock, Hidalgo, Hockley,
Howard, Jim Wells, Kenedy, Kleberg, Loving, Martin, Midland, Nueces, Pecos,
Reeves, Starr, Terry, Upton, Ward, Willacy, Winkler, and Yoakum, the regulated
parts of Bailey and Lamb Counties in Texas, and that part of the northwest cor-
ner of Hudspeth County, Tex., lying north and west of a ridge of desert land
extending from the banks of the Rio Grande northeasterly through the desert
immediately west of the town of McNary, such ridge being an extension of the
northwest boundary line of section 11, block 65%.

This amendment shall be effective on and after November 17, 1938, and shall
on that date supersede amendment No. 4 which became effective January 3, 1938.

Done at the city of Washington this 15th day of November 19388.

Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.

[SEAL] H. A. WALLACE,

Secretary of Agriculture.

[The foregoing amendment was sent to all common carriers doing business in or through

the areas regulated on account of the pink bollworm.]

Norice To GENERAL PusBLIc THROUGH NEWSPAPERS

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,
BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE,
Washington, D. C., November 15, 1938.
Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority
conferred on him by the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat.



1 Part of the lightly infested area in Arizona is regulated on account of the Thurberia
weevil under quarantine No. 61, and shipments therefrom must comply with the require-
ments of that quarantine.

127134—39——2
132 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct.—Dec.

815), as amended, has promulgated amendment No. 5 to the revised rules and
regulations supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 52 on account of the
pink bollworm of cotton, effective on and after November 17, 1938. The pur-
pose of the amendment is to add to the lightly infested area that part of Pinal
County in Arizona not heretofore within the regulated area, all of Maricopa
County in Arizona, and the Texas counties of Brooks, Nueces, Kenedy, Kleberg,
and Jim Wells. Copies of the amendment may be obtained from the Bureau
of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, United States Department of Agricul-
ture, Washington, D. C. :
H. A. WALLACE,
Secretary of Agriculture.
[The above notice was published in the following newspapers: The Republican,

Phoenix, Ariz., November 23, 1938; the Journal, Albuquerque, N. Mex., November 23,
1938; the Chronicle, Houston, Tex., November 22, 1938.]

INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS

Post OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, November 28, 1938.
Postmaster:

My Dear Sire: Your attention is invited to the inclosed revision of Federal ~

Quarantine Order No. 52 on account of the pink bollworm of cotton, by which
vou will please be governed. See paragraph 1, section 595, Postal Laws and
Regulations. :

The revision extends the regulated area, adding to the area designated as
lightly infested by the pink bollworm the following: That part of Pinal County
in Arizona not heretofore within the regulated area, all of Maricopa Oounty
in Arizona, and the Texas counties of Brooks, Nueces, Kenedy, Kleberg, and
Jim Wells.

Very truly yours,
RAMSEY S. BLACK,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE
QUARANTINE (NO. 72)

QUARANTINE ISSUED TO PREVENT SPREAD OF WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE IN FOUR
OF SOUTHERN STATES

[Press notice]
DECEMBER 15, 1938.

A quarantine on account of white-fringed beetle infestations in areas in
Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, and Mississippi—where this pest has become estab-
lished as determined by extensive surveys during the past field season—was
announced today by the Secretary of Agriculture. Under the provisions of this
quarantine which becomes effective January 15, 1939, the interstate movement
from the regulated areas of specified commodities is subject to inspection and
certification requirements.

Movement of such materials as soil, compost, manure, and balled nursery
stock, as well as potatoes and sweetpotatoes, is regulated throughout the year.
Bare-rooted nursery stock and other plants, beans, peas, peanuts in shells, cot-
ton, hay and other roughage, lumber and other unmanufactured wood, building
materials, used machinery, junk, and similar articles are regulated part of the
year.

The regulated areas are comprised of parts of the Alabama counties of
Conecuh, Covington, Geneva, Mobile, Monroe, and Wilcox; parts of the counties
of Escambia, Okaloosa, and Walton in west Florida; two entire Louisiana
parishes and parts of two others all in the vicinity of and including the city
of New Orleans, as well as East Baton Rouge Parish; and parts of the Missis-
sippi counties of Harrison, Hinds, Jackson, Jones, Pearl River, and Stone.

The white-fringed beetle, known to occur in South America, has become
established in several areas in the four Southern States. The eggs are deposited
1939) SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 122

in soil and on various articles that may be moved in commerce, and may remain
viable more than 5 months, hatching when conditions are favorable. The larvae
can be transported with products which carry small quantities of soil. Adults
may be carried attached to almost any object within their reach.

Both larvae and adults feed on a wide range of plants. The larvae have
caused serious damage to numerous field and garden crops, and are exceedingly
destructive to several important crops.

WHITE-FRINGED BEETLE QUARANTINE
QUARANTINE No. 72
INTRODUCTORY NOTE

The white-fringed beetle was first discovered in the United States in Okaloosa
County, Fla., in the autumn of 1936. This pest is known to occur in South
America and has recently been reported in New South Wales but the time and
method of introduction into the United States are unknown.

The larvae of the beetle feed on a wide variety of plant roots and tubers,
while the adults feed on leaves and tender shoots above ground.

Adults may be carried to other points by any moving thing, eggs may be trans-
ported from place to place in the movement of almost any article coming in
contact with the ground, and larvae may be moved with various kinds of soil,
peat, compost, and manure.

It is evident, therefore, that cosmopolitan food habits of the pest, its diverse
means of spread in any stage of development, together with its parthenogenetic
mode of reproduction, characterize the white-fringed beetle as a potentially
serious threat to American agricultural and horticultural interests.

SUMMARY

The restricted articles are prohibited movement interstate from any regulated
area to or through any point outside thereof unless there is attached to the
outside of the container a valid inspection certificate issued by an inspector
duly authorized by the United States Department of Agriculture. This require-
ment applies in the case of all restricted articles and for the period of the year
designated in regulation 3 unless the Chief of the Bureau has given formal
notice to the public that modification has been made as to the articles, or areas,
or periods of the year specified in the regulations.

The list of restricted articles and the period of the year when the certifica-
tion requirement applies, are stated in regulation 38.

The regulated areas are designated in regulation 2.

Arrangements for inspection may be made by addressing the Bureau of
Entomology and Plant Quarantine, Box 989, Gulfport, Miss.

Lee A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 72
[Approved December 14, 1938; effective January 15, 1939]

I, H. A. Wallace, Secretary of Agriculture, have determined that a quarantine
of the States of Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, and Mississippi is necessary to
prevent the spread of dangerous infestations of the white-fringed beetle (Nau-
pactus leucoloma Boh.), and a closely related species of Naupactus, two insect
pests not widely prevalent within and throughout the United States.

Now, therefore, under authority conferred by section 8 of the Plant Quaran-
tine Act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended, and having given the
public hearing required thereby, I do quarantine the States of Alabama, Florida,
Louisiana, and Mississippi, and do order that (1) nursery stock or any other
plants or plant products; (2) soil, independent of, or used in connection with
nursery stock, plants, or plant products; or (3) other articles (as specifically
named in the regulations supplemental hereto, in modifications thereof, or in
administrative instructions as provided in the regulations supplemental hereto)
which are capable of carrying the aforesaid insect infestations, shall not be
134. BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct.—Dec,

shipped or offered for shipment to a common carrier by any person, or received
for transportation or transported by a common carrier, or carried or transported
by any person from any such State into or through any other State or Terri-
tory or District of the United States, under conditions other than those pre-
seribed in the regulations supplemental hereto: Provided, That the restrictions
of this quarantine and of the regulations supplemental hereto may be limited
to such areas, designated by the Secretary of Agriculture as regulated areas,
in the quarantined States, as, in his judgment, shall be adequate to prevent
the spread of the said pest or pests. Any such limitation shall be conditioned,
however, upon the affected State or States providing for and enforcing the
control of the intrastate movement of the restricted articles under the condi-
tions which apply to their interstate movement under existing provisions of the
Federal quarantine regulations, and upon their enforcing such control and
sanitation measures with respect to such areas or portions thereof as, in the
judgment of the Secretary of Agriculture, shall be deemed adequate to prevent
the intrastate spread therefrom of said insect infestation; and Provided fur-
ther, That whenever, in any year, the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and
Plant Quarantine shall find that facts exist as to the pest risk involved in the
movement of one or more oi the articles to which the regulations supplemental
hereto apply, making it safe to modify, by making less stringent, the restric-
tions contained in any such regulations, he shall set forth and publish such
finding in administrative instructions, specifying the manner in which the

applicable regulation should be made less stringent, whereupon such modifica-.

tion shall become effective, for such period and for such regulated area or
portion thereof as shall be specified in said administrative instructions, and
every reasonable effort shall be made to give publicity to such administrative
instructions throughout the affected areas.

Done at the city of Washington this 14th day of December 1988.

Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.

[SEAL] H. A. WALLACE,
Secretary of Agriculture.

REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 72

REGULATION 1. DEFINITIONS

(a) The pests—The white-fringed beetle, Naupactus leucoloma Boh., and a
closely related species of Naupactus, in any stage of development.

(bd) Adults and larvae——Adults and larvae of Naupactus leucoloma and a
closely related species of Naupactus.

(c) Regulated area.—Any area in a quarantined State which is now, or which
may hereafter be, designated as regulated by the Secretary of Agriculture in
accordance with the provisos to Notice of Quarantine No. 72.

(d) Restricted articles—Products or articles of any character whatsoever,
‘the interstate movement of which is restricted by the provisions of the white-
fringed beetle quarantine, and the regulations supplemental thereto.

(e) Inspector.—Duly authorized Federal plant-quarantine inspector.

(f) Certificate—An approved document, issued by an inspector, evidencing
the apparent freedom of restricted articles from the pests.

(9g) Limited permit.—An approved document, issued by an inspector, to allow
movement of noncertified, restricted articles to or from designated and author-
ized manufacturing plants, mills, gins, or processing plants.

(hk) Dealer-carrier permit.—An approved document issued to persons or firms
approved for, and engaged in purchasing, assembling, exchanging, processing, or
transporting restricted articles.

(i) Administrative instructions —Administrative instructions issued by the
Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

(j) Infested or infestation.—Infested by the white-fringed beetle, the closely
related species, or both such pests, in any stage of development.

REGULATION 2. REGULATED AREAS

The following counties, parishes, cities and towns or parts thereof, as de-
scribed, are designated by the Secretary of Agriculture as regulated areas:

Alabama.—In Conecuh, Monroe, and Wilcox Countics: The W% Tps. 5 and
6 N. and all of Tps. 7, 8, 9, 10, and S% T. 11 N., R.9 HB. All of Tps. 5, 6, 7%, 8,

|
|
:


1939] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 135

9, and S%4 T. 10 N., R. 8 E. secs. 25, 26, 35, and 36, T. 7 N., R 7 E., and secs. 1
and 2, T. 6 N., R. 7 E.; in Covington County: T.1N., Rs. 17 and 18 BE. and SE%
T.1N., R. 16 E. and all south of both areas to the Alabama-Fiorida State line;
in Geneva County: Secs. 31, 32, and 33, T. 1 N., R. 19 E. and south thereof to
the Alabama-Florida State line; in Mobile County: That area bound on the
east by Mobile River, on the south by Congress Street and a line extended
therefrom to Mobile River in the city of Mobile, on the west by Joachim Street
in the same city, to its intersection with One Mile Creek; thence northeast
along One Mile Creek to Conception Street Road; thence northwest on said
road to Three Mile Creek; thence east along Three Mile Creek to Mobile River.

Florida.—In Escambia County: All of the city of Pensacoia; in Okaloosa
County: T. 5 N., R. 22 W. and secs. 1, 2, and 3 of T.5 N., R. 23 W. and all lands
north of both areas to the Florida-Alabama State line; in Walton County: T.
5 N., Rs. 20 and 21 W. and secs. 31, 32, and 33, T. 6 N., R. 19 W., and all lands
north of both areas to the Florida-Alabama State line; also secs. 1-24, inclusive,
oT. 4 N., RK. 19 W.

Louisiana.—All of Orleans Parish including the city of New Orleans, and all
of St. Bernard Parish; in East Baton Rouge Parish: T. 78, Rs. 1 and 2 E.
and 1 W., including all of the city of Baton Rouge; in Jefferson and Plaque-
mines Parishes: Those parts lying north of the township line between Tps.
14 and 15 S.

Mississippitin Harrison and Stone Counties: That area bound by the east
line of sec. 31, T. 7 S., R. 10 W. extending from a point where it intersects or
would intersect with the Mississippi Sound if extended without change in
direction to said sound; thence north to Bayou Bernard; thence following a
general northwesterly direction along Bayou Bernard to east line of sec. 22,
T. 7 8., R. 11 W., thence north to intersection with Biloxi River, thence north-
west along Biloxi River to intersection with the east line of sec. 5, T.6S., R. .
11 W., thence north to southeast corner sec. 32, T. 3 S., R. 11 W., thence west
along township line to southeast corner sec. 34, T. 3 S., R. 12 W., thence south
to a point where the east line of sec. 15, T. 7 S., R. 12 W. intersects Landon
Road, thence west along Landon Road to intersection of east line of sec. 9,
T. 7 S., R. 12 W., thence south to Mississippi Sound, thence along the sound
to starting point and including all property extending onto or over the waters
of Mississippi Sound; in Hinds County: E% T.6N., R. 3 W., and W%% T. 6 N..,
R. 2 W.; in Jackson County: That area included within a boundary beginning
at southeast corner sec. 31, T. 7 S., R. 5 W., and extending north to Escatawpa
River; thence west along said river to the Pascagoula River, thence south along
Pascagoula River to township line between Tps. 7 and 8 §S., thence east along
the said township line to the starting point; in Jones County: That area in-
cluded within a boundary beginning at southwest corner sec. 14, T. 8 N., R. 12
W., thence east to southeast corner sec. 16, T. 8 N., R. 11 W., thence north to
northeast corner sec. 9, T. 8 N., R. 11 W., thence east to northeast corner
sec. 11. T. 8 N., R. 11 W., thence north to northeast corner sec. 26, T. 9 N.,
R. 11 W., thence west to southeast corner sec. 21, T. 9 N., R. 11 W., thence north
to northeast corner sec. 16, T. 9 N., R. 11 W., thence west to northwest corner
sec. 14, T. 9 N., R. 12 W., thence south to Tallahoma Creek, thence southerly
along said creek to its intersection with the west line of sec. 11, T. 8 N.. R.
12 W., thence south to starting point; in Pearl River County: All of T. 5 S.,
R. 16 W., and E% T.5S., R. 17 W.

REGULATION 3. RESTRICTED ARTICLES

(a) Carriers of larvae.—The interstate movement of the following articles
from the regulated areas is regulated throughout the year:

(1) Soil, earth, sand, clay, peat, compost, and manure whether moved inde-
pendent of, or in connection with or attached to nursery stock, plants, products,
articles, or things.

(2) Potatoes and sweetpotatoes.

(b) Carriers of eggs and adults—Except as provided in regulation 4 hereof,
the interstate movement from any regulated area of the following products is
regulated for the periods indicated:

From June 1 to November 30, inclusive, of each year

(1) Sweetpotato vines, draws, and cuttings.
(2) Cordwood, pulpwood, stump wood. and logs.
(3) Unused lumber, timbers, posts, poles, and cross ties.
136 PUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct.—Dee,

From June 1 to January 31, inclusive, of any 12-month period

(1) Hay, roughage of all kinds, straw, leaves, and leafmold.

(2) Peas, beans, and peanuts in shells, or the shells of any of these products.

(3) Seed cotton, cottonseed, baled cotton lint, and linters.

(4) Used impiements and machinery, scrap metal, junk, and utensils or
containers coming in contact with the ground.

(5) Brick, tiling, stone, and concrete siabs and blocks.

(6) Used lumber, timbers, posts, poles, cross ties, and other building materials,

(7) Nursery stock and other plants, which are free from soil.

(c) Designation of other restricted articles—Any other articles which, by
reason of exposure or surroundings, may be found by the Chief of the Bureau
of Entomology and Plant Quarantine to serve as carriers of the pest in any
stage of development and which are so designated by him in administrative
instructions, Shall thereafter be subject to the restrictions of this quarantine and
the regulations supplemental thereto. :

REGULATION 4. CONDITIONS GOVERNING INTERSTATE MOVEMENT OF RESTRICTED
ARTICLES

(a) Restricted articles shall not be moved interstate from a regulated area
to or through any point outside thereof unless accompanied by a valid inspection
certificate issued by an inspector: Provided, That certification requirements as
they relate to part or all of any regulated area and as they pertain to carriers
of adults and eggs, may be waived, during part or all of the year, by the Chief
of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, on his finding and giving
notice thereof, in administrative instructions, that the State eoneerned has
promulgated and enforced adequate sanitary measures on and about the premises
on which restricted articles originate or are retained, or that adequate volun-
teer sanitary measures have been applied, or that other control or natural
econditions exist which have eliminated the risk of egg or adult contamination.

(b) No certificates are required for interstate movement of regulated articles
when such movement is wholly within contiguous regulated areas.

REGULATION 5. CONDITIONS GOVERNING THE ISSUANCE OF CERTIFICATES AND PERMITS

(a) Certificates authorizing the interstate movement of soil, earth, sand, clay,
peat, compost, or manure, originating in an infested area, may be issued only
when such articles have been treated, fumigated, sterilized, or processed under
methods approved by the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant
Quarantine.

(b) Certificates authorizing the interstate movement of soil, earth, sand, clay,
peat, compost, or manure, originating in noninfested parts of a regulated area,
and of all other restricted articles from any part of a regulated area, may be
issued upon determination by the inspector that the articles are (1) apparently
free from infestation; or (2) have been treated, fumigated, sterilized, or proc-
essed under approved methods; or (8) were grown, produced, manufactured,
stored, or handled in such a manner that, in the judgment of the inspector, no
infestation would be transmitted thereby.

(c) Limited permits for manufacturing and processing purposes.—Limited
permits may be issued for the movement of noncertified restricted articles to
such manufacturing or processing plants, mills, or gins in nhonregulated areas
as may be authorized and designated by the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology
and Plant Quarantine, for manufacture, processing, or treatment. AS a con-
dition of such authorization and designation, manufacturing or processing
plants, mills, or gins in nonregulated areas shall agree in writing to maintain
such sanitary safeguards against the establishment and spread of infestation
and to comply with such restrictions as to the handling and subsequent movement
of restricted products as may be required by the inspector.

(ad) Dealer-carrier permit.—As a condition of issuance of certificates or per-
mits for the interstate movement of restricted articles, all persons or firms
engaged in purchasing, assembling, exchanging, processing, or carrying such
restricted articles originating or stored in regulated areas, Shall make applica-
tion for a dealer-carrier permit to the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quar-

antine, stipulating that the permittee will maintain an accurate record of re- —

ceipts and sales, shipments, or services, when so required, which records shall
be available at all times for examination by an inspector; and that he will carry

Sa ihe iat gee age a
1939] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 137

out, under a signed agreement, any and all conditions, treatments, precautions,
and sanitary measures which may be specified therein.

REGULATION 6. CERTIFICATION A CONDITION OF INTERSTATE MOVEMENT

Unless exempted by administrative instructions issued by the Chief of the
Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, every container of restricted
articles moved interstate from any regulated area shall have securely attached
to the outside thereof a certificate or permit issued in compliance with these
regulations, except that the certificate or permit issued (1) for lot shipments
by freight shall be attached to one of the containers and a duplicate thereof
shall be attached to the waybill, (2) for shipments by road vehicle shall accom-
pany the vehicle, (3) for buJk carload shipments by freight shall accompany the
waybill or conductor’s manifest.

REGULATION 7. ASSEMBLY OF RESTRICTED ARTICLES FOR INSPECTION

Persons intending to move restricted articles interstate shall make application
for certification as far as possible in advance of the probable date of shipment.
Applications must show the nature and quantity of articles to be moved, together
with their exact location, and if practicable, the contemplated date of shipment.
Applicants for inspection may be required to assemble or indicate the articles
to be shipped so that they may readily be examined by the inspector.

The United States Department of Agriculture will not be responsible for any
cost incident to inspection or treatment other than the services of the inspector.

REGULATION 8. CANCELATION OF PERMITS

Certificates or permits issued under these regulations may be withdrawn or
eanceled and further certification refused whenever, in the judgment of the
Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, the further use of such certificates
or permits might result in the dissemination of infestation.

REGULATION 9. SHIPMENTS FOR EXPERIMENTAL AND SCIENTIFIC PURPOSES

Articles subject to restrictions may be moved interstate for experimental or
scientific purposes, on such conditions as may be prescribed by the Chief of the
Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine. The container of articles so
moved shall bear an identifying tag from the Bureau of Entomology and Plant
Quarantine.

These regulations shall be effective on and after January 15, 1939.

Done at the city of Washington this 14th day of December 1988S.

Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.

[SEAL] H. A. WALLACE, ,,
Secretary of Agriculture.

{The foregoing quarantine was sent to all common carriers doing business in or through
the auarantined area. }

NoTIcE TO THE GENERAL PUBLIC THROUGH NEWSPAPERS

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,
BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE,
Washington, D. C., December 14, 1938.

Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority
conferred on him by the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315),
as amended, has, by Notice of Quarantine No. 72, effective on and after January
15, 1939, quarantined the States of Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, and Mississippi,
to prevent the spread of the white-fringed beetle. Under the provisions of this
quarantine the interstate movement from the regulated areas in the States
named, of the following products and articles is prohibited, except as provided
in the regulations:

Throughout the year: (1) Soil, earth, sand, clay, peat, compost, and manure
either with or without plants or other products; (2) potatoes and sweet-
potatoes.

Part of the year: (1) Sweetpotato vines, draws, and cuttings; (2) nursery
stock and other plants; (3) peas, beans, and peanuts in shells, or the shells
of these products; (4) seed cotton, cottonseed, baled lint and linters; (5) hay,
138 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct,—Dee.

roughage of all kinds, straw, leaves, leafmolds; (6) cordwood, pulpwood, stump
wood, and logs; (7) lumber, timbers, posts, poles, cross ties, and other build-
ing materials; (8) brick, tiling, stone, and concrete slabs and blocks: (9)
used implements and machinery, scrap metal, junk, and utensils or containers
in contact with the ground.

Copies of the quarantine notice (Quarantine No. 72) may be obtained from
the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, Washington, D. C., or the
Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, Box 989, Gulfport, Miss.

H. A. WALLACE,
Secretary of Agriculture.
[The above notice was published in the following newspapers: The Birmingham News,
Birmingham, Ala., December 24, 1938; the Florida Times-Union, Jacksonville, Fla., Decem-

ber 26, 1938; the Times-Picayune, New Orleans, La., December 26, 1938 ; the News, Jackson,
Miss., December 24, 1938.]

TERMINAL INSPECTION OF PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS
FLORIDA STATE PLANT QUARANTINE

(CITRUS CANKER DISEASE)

Post OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, November 7, 1938.

Pursuant to the act of June 4, 1936, embodied in amended section 596, Postal
Laws and Regulations, the State of Florida has promulgated a plant quarantine,
on account of a plant disease Known as citrus canker, which prohibits the ship-
ment into that State from all other States and the District of Columbia of any
aud all kinds of citrus trees and parts thereof, including budwood and scions,
known to be hosts of this disease, except, however, that citrus nursery stock
shipped from Washington, D. C., by the Bureau of Plant Industry, United States
Department of Agriculture, may be admitted when accompanied with an inspec-
tion certificate. New or rare varieties of citrus plants of demonstrated com-
mercial value will also be admitted provided the shipper has first secured a
special permit therefor from the State Plant Board, at Gainesville, Fla. The
prohibition does not relate to fruits of citrus plants or trees.

Postmasters are therefore requested to observe the Florida State quarantine
and regulations, refusing to accept for mailing any parcels containing citrus
plants or parts thereof offered for shipment in violation of such quarantine,
and invite the attention of mailers thereto. See amended section 596, Postal
Laws and Regulations. Inspection service is maintained at Gainesville, Fla.

RAMSEY S. BLACK,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.



MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS
THE PLANT QUARANTINE ACT AND QUARANTINE NO. 37

By LEE A. STRONG, Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, United
States Department of Agriculture

{Address given before Section of Plant Quarantine and Inspection, American Association
of Economic Entomologists, meeting at Richmond, Va., December 29, 1938]

Over a period of some 20 years there has been so much prominence given
to Quarantine 37 that the fact is almost always completely disregarded that
the plant quarantines placed by the United States Department of Agriculture
must be placed under authority of the Plant Quarantine Act passed by Congress
more than 26 years ago. When any change is made or suggested in nursery
stock import requirements there invariably comes a flood of telegrams and peti-
tions, all saving the same thing in just about the same words: “Maintain
Quarantine No. 57 as is.” In general, these demands come from certain groups
interested in some one class of nursery stock. They could not come from people
familiar with Quarantine 37 because such people would not want Quarantine 37
maintained as is. If they were really interested in keeping the country free of
1939] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 139

pests they would want Quarantine 37 changed. Not only that, they would want
the Plant Quarantine Act so changed as to insure as nearly as such things can
be that plant pests be kept out.

Section 1 of the Plant Quarantine Act provides “that it shall be unlawful
for any person to offer for entry into the United States any nursery stock
unless and until a permit shall have been issued therefor by the Secretary of
Agriculture under- such conditions and regulations as the said Secretary of
Agriculture may prescribe.” Please note that this applies only to nursery
stock.

Section 6 provides “that for the purpose of this act the term ‘nursery stock’
shall inelude all field-grown florists’ stock, trees, shrubs, vines, cuttings, grafts,
scions, buds, fruit pits, and other seeds of fruit and ornamental trees or shrubs,
and other plants and plant products for propagation, except field, vegetable and
flower seeds, bedding plants, and other herbaceous plants, bulbs, and roots.”
However, there is another section which authorizes the Secretary by promulga-
tion to bring other plants and plant products for propagation under the term
‘nursery stock.”

Section 7 provides ‘that whenever, in order to prevent the introduction into
the United States of any tree, plant, or fruit disease or of any injurious insect,
new to or not theretofore widely prevalent or distributed within and throughout
the United States, the Secretary of Agriculture shall determine that it is neces-
sary to forbid the importation into the United States of any class of nursery
stock or of any other class of plants, fruits, vegetables, roots, bulbs, seeds, or
other plant products from a country or locality where such disease or insect
infestation exists, he shall promulgate such determination, specifying the
country and locality and the class of nursery stock or other class of plants,
fruits, vegetables, roots, bulbs, seeds, or other plant products which, in his
opinion, should be excluded. Following the promulgation of such determination
by the Secretary of Agriculture, and until the withdrawal of the said promulga-
tion by him, the importation of the class of nursery stock or of other class of
plants, fruits, vegetables, roots, bulbs, seeds, or other plant products specified
in the said promulgation from the country and locality therein named, regardless
of the use for which the same is intended, is hereby prohibited.”

There are two features of this section to be especially noted: First, it does
not cover all injurious pests but only those new to or not theretofore widely
prevalent or distributed within and throughout the United States. Second, it is
not the Secretary’s determination that excludes the articles specified: he is
authorized merely to determine that their exclusion is necessary and to promul-
gate that determination and then the act of Congress excludes them. None
of the products so specified is eligible for importation, even under restriction.

It will be noted in all these Plant Quarantine Act sections that jurisdiction of
the Secretary extends only to nursery stock as defined except where other plants
and plant products not defined as nursery stock may be considered dangerous,
such plants and plant products may by promulgation of the Secretary be brought
under his jurisdiction as nursery stock as contemplated in the Plant Quarantine
Act. However, in no case does the jurisdiction extend beyond nursery stock.

We are informed by legal authorities that section 1 means that from countries
where official inspection exists a permit.must be issued by the Secretary for
nursery stock when requested. The Secretary can prescribe conditions and
regulations providing that the nursery stock must be free of insect pests and
plant diseases and subject to departmental inspection to determine whether or
not they are so free, but the permit must be issued.

Section 7 means that when the Secretary has promulgated his determination
thereunder to the effect that the nursery stock or other plant products are
likely to introduce into the United States any tree, plant, or fruit disease or
any injurious insect new to or not theretofore widely prevalent and distributed
within and throughout the United States that thereafter all such nursery stock
and other plant products are definitely excluded entirely and can not be im-
ported for any purpose under any conditions except by the Department for ex-
perimental or scientific purposes. In this case we are advised that it is not the
Secretary’s determinations that exclude the article specified, that he is author-
ized merely to determine that their exclusion is necessarv and to promulgate
that determination and then the act of Congress, the Plant Quarantine Act
excludes them. Whatever authority there is in the Plant Quarantine Act, I
am advised, touching regulations governing the importation of nursery stock, is

127134—39



=
”
140 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE _ [Oct.—Dee,

found in section 1.
authorizes the Secretary only to prescribe conditions and regulations governing
the issuance of permits for the importation, and inasmuch as it provides that
the Secretary shall issue the permits for any particular importation of nursery
stock when.the importer shall have complied with such conditions and regula-
tions, it would seem to follow that the “conditions and regulations” must oper-
ate on and be connected with matters and things bearing on such importation
before the nursery stock is actually admitted. Apparently, the law does not
seek to control or enforce any restrictions on nursery stock after its entry
other than the provisions of sections 2 and 4 which relate only to their subse-
quent interstate movement. ‘Therefore, any conditions attached to the issuance
of the permit to which the importer would assent requiring him to do certain
things in connection with the propagation of nursery stock subsequent to its
entry, would make the transaction one of contract, a breach of which would
not constitute a violation of the statute. Therefore, the opinion is given that
regulations made by the Secretary purporting to control nursery stock subsequent
to its entry are legally unenforceable. ;

On November 18, 1918, the Secretary of Agriculture promulgated the follow-
ing determination under Notice of Quarantine No. 37:

“The fact has been determined by the Secretary of Agriculture, and notice
is hereby given, that there exist in Europe, Asia, Africa, Mexico, Central
America, and South America, and other foreign countries and localities certain
injurious insects and fungous diseases new to and not heretofore widely dis--
tributed within and throughout the United States, which affect and are carried
by nursery stock and other plants and seeds, the words ‘nursery stock and
other plants and seeds,’ including, wherever used in this notice and the rules
and regulations supplemental hereto, field-grown florists’ stock, trees, shrubs,
vines, cuttings, grafts, scions, buds, fruit pits and other seeds of fruit and or-
namental trees or shrubs, also field, vegetable, and flower seeds, bedding plants,
and other herbaceous plants, bulbs, and roots, and other plants and plant
products, for, or capable, of propagation.

“Now, therefore, I, D. F. Houston, Secretary of Agriculture, under the author-
ity conferred by the act of Congress approved August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315),
do hereby declare that it is necessary in order to prevent the further intro-
duction into the United States of injurious insect pests and fungous diseases,
to forbid, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental hereto,
the importation into the United States of nursery stock and other plants and
seeds from the foreign countries and localities named and from any other
foreign locality or country.

“On and after June 1, 1919, and until further notice, by virtue of said act
of Congress approved August 20, 1912, the importation of nursery stock and
other plants and seeds from the above named and all other foreign countries
and localities, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental
hereto, is prohibited.”

Under this promulgation, in accordance with the legal interpretation we
have received of the Plant Quarantine Act, all nursery stock from the countries
of Hurope, Asia, Africa, Mexico, Central America, and South America and other
foreign countries and localities would have been definitely, completely, and
finally excluded for any purpose by the Plant Quarantine Act itself. However,
regulations were set up under the quarantine which provided that certain
classes of nursery stock and other plants and plant products would be ex-
empted from the quarantine promulgation. Among these were certain classes
of bulbs, fruit stock, rose stocks, nuts, and certain classes of seeds. Provision
was made for entry in limited quantities, on the other hand, from all these
countries for numerous genera and species of plants. Provision was made
in practice, at least, for holding the imported plants in detention for a period
of two years for propagation purposes only although the authority for such
practice does not appear clearly in the quarantine and does not appear at all in
the Plant Quarantine Act.

Quarantine 37 attempts to do those things which should be done by legis-
lative enactment and really places the Department in the position of legislat-
ing on things that are considered desirable or necessary in nursery Stock and
plant importations. When this is done in many cases first consideration is
likely to be economic consideration and this nmaay bring the Department into
the trade protection field and in many instances entirely out of the quarantine
field.
1939] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 141

Acting on the theory that to reduce the volume of importations of foreign
plants the danger of importation of pests is thereby correspondingly reduced,
numerous classes of plants have been completely excluded when they became
commercially available in this country. Other plants are permitted entry in
unlimited numbers because they are not commercially available in this coun-
try. Certainly it can not be denied that there is scientific merit for the con-
clusion that a logical reduction of the volume of imports does reduce the risk
of pest introduction. Particularly is this true in considering the status of
obscure and undetectable and unknown insect pests and plant diseases. How-
ever, Quarantine No. 37 does not do this.

It is suggested that in order to place the importation of plants from foreign
countries and the quarantine governing the importation of such plants on a
sound, scientific, fully defensible basis, the Congress of the United States should
declare a policy. It should say it is the policy of the United States that in order
to safeguard agriculture in the United States by preventing introduction into
or the spread within the United States of plant pests which exist in other coun-
tries which may be known or unknown, detectable or undetectable by inspection,
and which may be carried by plants and plant products of such other countries
when offered for importation into the United States, that plants and plant prod-
ucts capable of propagation offered for importation from any foreign country
shall not be imported except for propagation under surveillance of the Secretary
of Agriculture for such time and under such conditions as the said Secretary may
prescribe in order that he may be able to determine by inspection or otherwise
whether such plants and plant products are apparently free from plant pests.
The term “plant pests’ should include any stage of development of insect,
uematode, or other invertebrate animal, or any virus, or any bacteria, fungi,
or other parasitical p