Citation
Service and regulatory announcements

Material Information

Title:
Service and regulatory announcements
Added title page title:
Service and regulatory announcements with list of plant pests intercepted with imported plants and plant products
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C.
Publisher:
U.S. G.P.O.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Quarterly
Language:
English
Physical Description:
60 v. : 23 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Plant quarantine -- Periodicals -- United States ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )
federal government publication ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
S.R.A.--B.E.P.Q. no. 120 (July/Sept. 1934)-S.R.A.--B.E.P.Q. no. 179 (Oct./Dec. 1950).
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Also cummulated with an annual t.p.
Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not subject to copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105.
Resource Identifier:
030288977 ( ALEPH )
14207732 ( OCLC )
sn 86033973 ( LCCN )
Classification:
632.9 U54 ( ddc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Service and regulatory
Preceded by:
Service and regulatory announcements
Succeeded by:
Service and regulatory announcements

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S. Rk. A., B. E. P.:Q. Issued September 1937

United States Department of Agriculture

Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine



SERVICE AND
REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS
1936



These announcements are issued quarterly and constitute a per-
_ manent record of the work of the Bureau in the enforcement
of the Plant Quarantine Act of 1912 and certain related acts, includ-
ing the text of quarantines and regulations thereunder, and the
more important circulars and decisions explanatory of, or
bearing on, such quarantines and regulations

WITH LIST OF PLANT PESTS INTERCEPTED WITH IMPORTED
PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS







© Se¥
sae"










FOUNDATION OF MANUIRCTURE

UNITED STATES
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
WASHINGTON: 1937



hehe

BLA. DEPT. AG.

DIV. OF PLA NY
ENDUSTRY
HIBRARY

ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT
QUARANTINE

Ler A. SrronG, Chief.

S. A. RoHweEr, Assistant Chief.

Avery 8. Hoyt, Assistant Chief.

F. H. SpeENcER, Business Manager.

Rouua P. Currigr, Editor.

MABEL Coucorp, Librarian.

J. A. Hysuop, in Charge, Division of Insect Pest Survey and Information.

J. I. HAMBLETON, in Charge, Division of Bee Culture Investigations.

D. L. Van Dinu, in Charge, Division of Fruit Insect Investigations.

F. C. CRAIGHEAD, in Charge, Division of Forest Insect Investigations.

W. H. Waits, in Charge, Division of Truck Crop and Garden Insect Investigations.

N. ANNAND, in Charge, Division of Cereal and Forage Insect Investigations.

. W. HaRNneED, in Charge, Division of Cotton Insect Investigations.

C. Bisuopp, in Charge, Division of Insects Affecting Man and Animals.

A. HawkIns, in Charge, Division of Control Investigations.

C. Roark, tn Charge, Division of Insecticides and Fungicides.

F. W. MurEsEBECK, in Charge, Division of Insect Identification.

P. CLAUSEN, in Charge, Division of Foreign Parasite Introduction.

B. FracKER, in Charge, Division of Plant Disease Control.

M. Ganppis, 7n Charge, Division of Domestic Plant Quarantines.

E. R. Sasscer, in Charge, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines.

A. F. Burcsss, in Field Charge, Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail Moth Control
(headquarters, Greenfield, Mass.).

L. H. Wortutey, in Field Charge, Japanese Beetle and Gypsy Moth and Brown-
Tail Moth Quarantines, European Corn Borer Certification, and Dutch Elm
Disease Eradication (headquarters, Bloomfield, N. J.).

R. E. McDonatp, in Field Charge, Pink Bollworm and Thurberia Weevil Quar-
antines (headquarters, San Antonio, Tew.).

P. A. Homan, in Field Charge, Mexican Fruit Fly Quarantine (headquarters,
Harlingen, Tez.).

, BaksEr, in Field Charge, Fruit Fly Investigations (headquarters, Mexico
City, Mexico).

W. E. Sa: in Field Chaorae, Screw Worm Control (headquarters, San Antonio,

Tez.

a

WROD AAT



TABLE OF CONTENTS

CONTENTS OF NO. 126 (JANUARY-MARCH 1936)

Page
Quarantine and other official announcements- - ----------- See Kee bots be ee 1
Announcements relating to gypsy moth and brown-tail moth quarantine iO 445) ee eee ee 1
Instructions to postmasters-_-----------------------------------------------+----+---------- : 1
List of articles exempt from certification requirements under the gypsy moth and brown-tail
moth quarantine (B. E. P. Q.-386 (revised)) __-----------------------------~--------------- = 2
List of articles exempt from certification requirements under the gypsy moth and brown-tail
moth quarantine (B. E. P. Q.-386 (second revision)) ----_---------------------------------- Z
Announcements relating to pink bollworm quarantine (no. 52)_--------------------------------- 3
Instructions to postmasters--_--------------------------------------------------------------- 3
Administrative instructions—approval of alternative treatments for baled lint cotton from
heavily infested areas (B. E. P. Q.-388)__----------.-------------------------------------- 3
Announcements relating to Dutch elm disease quarantine (no. 71)-------------------------------- 4
Bien celmiGdiseaceiConbuno lesen se Sheers eis eed Sa ee ee _ See os Se 4
Modification of Dutch elm disease quarantine regulations_--_-_------------------------------ a
Notice to general public through newspapers-_------------------------------------------- 5
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (no. 48) -._------------------------------ 6
Japanese beetle zone widens here and there- ------------------------------------------------ 6
Mevisionvof quarantine and regulations-.2-+- 2-22. 2-.-.-------.L222.22+24---2-.------4.---- 6
Notice to general public through newspapers-_------.------------------------------------- 17
Announcement relating to nursery stock, plant, and seed quarantine (no. 37) ..----------------- 17
Reprint, with corrected footnotes and appendices_------------------------------------------ 17
Announcements relating to Mexican fruit-fiy quarantine (no. 64)__---__------------------------- 26
Shipping season for Texas citrus fruit extended to March 31___-------------.---------------- 26
eae instructions—shipping season for Texas citrus fruit extended (B. E. P. Q.- a
jj) Mend Det Pere singe ABs ri bl bet er nd Srey a eee se Pee Deb
MVSEol HEIs CCITIS eee Series SONS errr ct ararinlinwrr alt ee re Va Sue ok 27
MISiRUCHIONS LO) RUSLIOURICANSPOSUMIASTOLSS sae h Se eee ae pc re ee meee eam 27
imporiationsiot§plantiproducts yaa) sDS48ISl): sods 2 sees OS gl PEEL Eee ese eees 28
importations by mail—regulationsi(£MDr432350) 2 2 28 2 ba eeebreel Jo 2b lt lbs 29
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Dominion of New Zealand (P. Q. C. A.-306, supple-
ATVETLET OMS) eee ee ee eee em ae OP ede st ees 2) sie ieuats eee... 30
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Chile (B. P. Q.-348, supplement no. 3)--- 32
eee manune import restrictions, Republic of Argentina (B. P. Q.-357, suppiement no. a
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Czechoslovakia (B. E. P. Q.-366, supple-
THOMENITO So) eee lems rh Corriente) ners (Pelosi mye Sues eames ania bee 33
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, British Mandate of Palestine (B. E. P. Q.-370, revised) - 33
. Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Grand Ducny of Luxembourg (B. E. P. Q.-389)____--- 36
Fs ee awcd ts import restrictions, British Colony and Protectorate of Sierra Leone (B. E. a
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, British Gold Coast Colony (B. E. P. Q.-391)*__-_------- 38
- Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act_-_---------------------------------- 39
; Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine__-___---.------------------------- 40
CONTENTS OF NO. 127 (APRIL-JUNE 1936)
Onstanunoune obher oficial announcements. 220) 2) oon ere AE re 8 ee 41
Announcements relating to date-palm scale quarantine (no. 6)__.-------_------------------------ 41
Ware-palimcenle quarantinemevoked = 2. 1) eats seri ieee See on he esis 41
Bhovice Of liuLinewer date-palny seale quarantine ——~<-_----<+---_-=2+_-- S22 let lec tess. 42
ERS EPUB ELONMS TO" POSTINANtens oe eee eo a een ee) Eee 42
Announcements relating to nursery stock, plant, and seed quarantine (no. 37)------------------- 42
EAaniportations by mall (Bene: @ so92) hee we 2 ee Usa ee ees ae ee 42
Imstrietions vo collectors of customs (Glen 482pi)e. = os oe eee 43
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (no. 48) _-.-.---------------------------- 43
ist of rue bulbs, corms, and tibers (BiH P2Qrae4) a 43
List of articles exempt from certification reauirements under the Japanese beetle quarantine
EPA Oy B05 aes eee BeU Gee Os Ri tae ieee) Br Te eee 44
Announcement relating to pink bollworm quarantine (no. 52)___-_-_---------------------------- 45
Administrative instructions—Treatment requirements removed as a condition for interstate
shipment of baled lint and linters, and products thereof produced or manufactured from
sterilized cottonseed, from the pink bollworm regulated area in Florida (B. E. P. Q. 393) _-_-- 45
Announcement relating to Dutch elm disease quarantine (no. 71)_____-_--________--------------- 45
IGS PETICEIONSICONPOSUIIASLOIS # ote ae ere a enen Ree LE AES peeehe OE ee er ee one 45
NWiiSCollan CONS LORS ase as = mani eae aa ae St ne er eee eee VE Pee 46
‘Fermingal mspection opplants and plant products. = 2! = 22 222s base ie eee i 46
Piants and plant products addressed to places in Idaho_-__---.._-._.--...-_------------- 46
Achienalpiant-lnspection piace lm Orergn=- =~ = +22 22 Leen eee. ee 46
Inspection of plants and plant products from abroad_--_--.--..-..-.--.---------------------- 46
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Argentina (B. P. Q. 257, supplement no. 3) - 48
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Isiand of Cyprus (B. P. Q. 360, supplement no. 1) ----_- 48

Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Poland (B. E. P. Q. 368, supplement no. 1) 49
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Presidency of Antigua, British West Indies (B. E. P. Q.
OV ANSUED DIGINIONG 1G: “yeasts s Seaaes Sat er Se PPAR EAS oA Bt ee te ee ee ee ee 53

1102—37 III





IV TABLE OF CONTENTS

CONTENTS OF NO. i127 (APRIL-JUNE 1936)—Continued

Quarantine and other official announcements—C ontinued.

Miscellaneous items—C ontinued. Page
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Dominican Republic (B. E. P. Q-306) =... - SS ee 53
5 ee import restrictions, Colony of Grenada, British West Indies (B. E. P. Q.

OWE ) wenn nn os = PERE ess es — wea eee Sen a oe ee 56

Plant-quarantine import restrictions, French Colony of New Caledonia and De endencies
(B. BaP. GW. ee ee le ee ae :

mse eet aha sean no eee ee re ea reer i a 59
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Portugal (B. E. P. Q. 400)... rae 61
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Spain (B. E. P. Q. 400) 0 ee 64
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Austria (B. E. P. Q. 4). eee 68
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of France (B. E. P. Q.408)¢ = as2i: 5 be ee 73
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, British India (B. E. P. (404). - 7s oe es 79
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Germany (B. E. P. i), AUD) 5 5-52 Boe ee 83

Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act_________ a ere 91
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Piant Quarantine.._.....__......_..._........._... 93
CONTENTS OF NO. 128 (JULY-SEPTEMBER 1936)
Quarantine and other official announcements...-....._-- ee 96
Announcements relating to Hawaiian and Puerto Rican quarantine covering sand, soil, or earth,
with plants (no. 60) eS ee ee 96
Revised Hawaiian and Puerto Rican quarantine covering sand, soil, or earth, with plants____ 96
Hevision of quarantine... -- 3 96
Notice to general public through newspapers.__.--_---_-...--_.__-______.._._______-___- 97
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (no. 48)__._____.___________.___._______. 97
Instructions to postmasters_.. =! 21 40) sic oo be etal oa as 97
List of articles exempt from certification requirements under the Japanese beetle quarantine
(B. E..P. Q. 305, revised). cos RB ippesiigen ines iy 98
Instructions to postmasters...... = 5 Sins ot ae 2) Se eee it aol 98
Japanese beetle quarantine restrictions removed for season on fruit and vegetable shipments__ 99
Notice of removal of Japanese beetle quarantine restrictions on fruits and vegetables_______- 99
Instructions to posfmasterse) 220-222: 2see SO cpl eo Se 100
Announcements relating to satin moth quarantine (no. 53)____________________________ 100
Satin moth invades Oregon; quarantine hearing September 14_______________________________ 100
Notice of public hearing to consider the advisability of either revoking the domestic satin moth
quarantine or revising the regulations to designate the State of Oregon as infested with
that insect. <=> 2 55.25 ao es ee ee ee pees 2iu Pte Ok i oot ep ee 100
Announcements relating to nursery stock, plant, and seed quarantine (no. 37)__-.____--__________ 101
Treatment of foreign narcissus bulbs as a condition of entry_________________________________ 101
Information for prospective importers regarding the entry of foreign narcissus bulbs on and
after December 15, 1936.(B. Ii..P. Q: 412).2 2 ose sn a eee 101
Notice of permit requirement for the entry ofseeds of Lathyrus and Vicia__.__________________ 102
Instructions to colleetors of customs'(‘T: 1D! 48512). 2 3.8 sy ost es) or ee 102
Announcements relating to white pine blister rust quarantine (foreign) (mo. 7)_---...--.----------- 103
Lift special quarantines on foreign pine trees_________...____________________________.______- 103
White pines, currants, and gooseberries from Europe, Asia, Canada, and Newfoundland
brought under quarantine 37 by revocation of quarantine 7________________________________ 103
Instructions, to collectors of customs @D: D548501) 2223 ibis Sines es oi ee 104
Announcement relating to European pine shoot moth quarantine (no. 20)_______________________ 104
Pines, other than five-leaf pines, from Europe brought under quarantine 37 by revocation of
quarantine: 20.2 i. 223 sea a 8 ol i a i ees tl a) eee 104
Announcements relating to pink bollworm quarantine (no. 52)__________________________________ 105
Pink bollworm quarantine reculations'revised_ -. 2-2 222-7 2) te st eee ee 105
Modification of pink boliworm quarantine regulations (amendment no. 1)-_-----_------------- 105
Notice to general publie through newspapers. + 4232522 220 22422 ae 107
Instractions to postimasters: =2.: "= = ae ee ee ee ee eee 107
Administrative instructions—treatment requirements removed as a condition for interstate
shipment of baled lint and linters, and products thereof, from the counties or portions of
counties of the pink bollworm regulated areas in New Mexico and Texas described below
CB Te. PoQ. 414) ee oS RS adap te 5 ee 107
Miscellaneous items... 2-2-2 2 Pe ee 108
Regulations governing sanitary export certification_._....___......_____-_----.--2---s----+- 2 A 208
Public hearing called to consider the advisability of quarantining the States of California,
Colorado, New Mexico, Texas, and Utah on account of the peach mosaic disease____----_- ee
Notice of public hearing to consider the advisability of quarantining the States of California,
Colorado, New Mexico, Texas, and Utah on account of the peach mosaic disease_______-_-_--- 111
Change in date and place of public hearing relative to peach mosaic disease_____.____-._-- ae
Notice of change in place and date of public hearing to consider advisability of quarantining
the States of California, Colorado, New Mexico, Texas, and Utah on account of the peach
mosaic disease; also the inclusion of Arizona in the States to be considered__________--__-_--- 112
Pee import restrictions, Republic of Chile (B. P. Q. 348, supplements nos. 4 2
NG DB) 5 55 ho SS eae a een ee ee eS pee eee oe “
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Argentina (B. P. Q. 357, supplement no.4).. 114
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, British Mandate of Palestine (B. E. P. Q. 370, revised,
Supplement ro. 1). — == ee ee ee ee ee 114
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Brazil (B. E. P. Q.379, supplement no.1)--- 115
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, British Colony of Malta (B. E. P. Q. 406)_--._-__---- 115
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Kingdom of Denmark (B. E. P. Q. 407)__--.----_----- 117
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Irish Free State (Saorstat Eireann) (B. E. P. Q. 408). 120
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Free City of Danzig (B. E. P. Q. 409)______----------- 124
Federal domestic plant quarantines (B. E. P. Q. 410, superseding P. Q. C. A. 295)_--_-_- [; ian
PP ee te import restrictions, Republic of Mexico (B. E. P. Q. 411, superseding ra
o Wd. Ce Ae eee Fee pe ee ee PL ae pe SE
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Switzerland (B. E. P. Q. 413)_---_-------- 137
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act__-_-____-___-_-______- es =e 141
List of current quarantines and other restrictive orders and miscellaneous regulations. -_--------- 144

Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine____......._....._-.--------------- 150





TABLE OF CONTENTS V

CONTENTS OF NO. 129 (OCTOBER-DECEMBER 1936)

Page

Quarantine and other official announcements. ----.-------.--------------- ee eanter een ne e 152
Announcements relating to Mexican fruit fly quarantine (no. 5) (foreign) ---.------------------- 152
Changes in Federal fruit and vegetable quarantines-_--.------.----------------------------- 152

Notice of lifting of Mexican fruit fly quarantine (foreign)_...--....-------------------------- 152
Instructions to collectors of customs (T. D: 48728)_-..-.--.---------__-_-.---.-.-.-----.. 153
Announcements relating to nursery stock, plant, and seed quarantine (no. 37) ------------------ 153
Binr ieee a Ol OULD POSt--. 52 ee oe nn ew ees eee 153

Notice of conference to consider the desirability of requiring the treatment of all known hosts
of the bulb nematode enterable under quarantine no. 37_--_.----.-------------------------

Announcements relating to satin moth quarantine (no. 53)_.....-...---------------------------- 154
SarimMoObiOmarantine rOVOKCG. == sees teen ease a na owe er ae renee nena === 154
Notice Online Of salin moth quaraniinel=—------+-------- 22-5 a ee ee 154

DrTe ICIS UO OSDITIGSLODS 5 ost ne oe as ewe ewe emgaesnnnee 155

Announcements relating to pink bollworm quarantine (no. 52)__-.------.----------------------- 155
Florida released from pink bollworm quarantine--_-_--.-........--.----.--------..----------- 155
Rewision Of duarantineand recmlationss= -===-)-=-—~-- === sans osm eae anaes een ane =o ~~ 155

Notice to,ceneral public through newspapers-------.-_----<2_-.-2.-=-__-..--. == 163
PREeT Tati BOOS MASLOIS 2 — ee a = Sa ce an ano eases nena eee aa ss Pinkspollwormiquarantine regulations tevised--=----2-- === ee ee 163
Modification of pink bollworm quarantine regulations (amendment no. 1)------------------ 163
INolice to\general public through newspapers------------------—----- --- Sa -= == n = 165
TMS hil CLIOTIS TONDOS LINAS GOlS= aa ee ee aae oe ee on ce nena ese aaa ea == 165

Announcements relating to fruit and vegetable quarantine (no. 56)...--------------------------- 166
Sterilization of imported vinifera grapes by refrigeration (B. E. P. Q. 417)-.-.-.-------------- 166
Fruit and vegetable quarantine no. 56, with revised regulations---.....-.---.--------------- 166

Announcements relating to Thurberia weevil quarantine (no. 61)-_----------------------------- 171
Areas in Pinai County, Ariz., released under the Thurberia weevil quarantine--.-.----------- 171
Modification of Thurberia weevil quarantine regulations__..-.-------.---------------------- 171

Notice towenerall publ et brought NOWSPSDeNS=-— = =- == = - — nn a won ese ce eo eoe nae 172

Announcements relating to Mexican fruit worm quarantine (no. 64) ._...-..-----.-------------- 173
Mexas ciirusmaryestiextenged tomviarch(30; 1937o22-_.--—--- 5229255225222 5. 2-2-5 kee se 173
Administrative instructions—authorizing extension of harvesting season for Texas citrus fruit

SES EES Ch end '9) penn tee em ee eR cya WE Ce eb see ede sso 173
Mexican fruit worm quarantine regulations modified___..........-......-------------------- 173
Modification of Mexican fruit worm quarantine regulations___.._.......-_------------------- 174

Notice tojzeneral public through newspapers. = .--=- =. ==. ==-.5- -s-2 4-25-2522 eee 175

Announcements relating to Dutch elm disease quarantine (no. 71) (domestic)_---.-------------- 175
Wuatehelm disease quarantineineludes:new areas___._-- 2. =. 2.2... 2 2-2-2 -os-ces- see ae 175
Modification of Dutch elm disease quarantine regulations___.........-.....----------------- 176

iNoticeito seneral public through newspapers=2. ._- 2. s<-sas5~~- = 55-2 = ass ccSsoeecene =. Wi
NSE CLLONSLOMIOSUMIAS TOS eee ne ge eS a ee a oe Ce ee Lay,

Announcements relating to regulations governing the entry of potatoes into the United States__ 177
Amends potato regulations to protect Hawaiian growers. -._.--..---------------------------- 177
Amendment of regulations governing the entry of potatoes into the United States (amend-

TRE IA EET) Ones) eee ee ne ee re eee ee eee ee See Looe whe eke eieacese 178
: Instructions Focollectorsiol Customs) (Ie. ID? 48603) 2 oo ee ee ee see ce 179

sepminalanspechion of plantsvand plant products.------=----=-2-22-2-=-2..- 2225 255k ease eet 179

Amendment of law pertaining to terminal inspection of plants and plant products_______---- 179
: BENE GuONNibO OSUINASLORS= LE TSCEH BTR SOTOS TPSTO TS a EES 25 el cp ae nS gt AU ee pe rene 181

Notice of public hearing to consider the advisability of establishing a domestic plant quaran-

tine for the purpose of requiring the treatment of narcissus bulbs and other known hosts of

the bulb nematode as a prerequisite to interstate shipment_____._..-..__.-----.+---------- 181
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Germany (B. E. P. Q. 405, supplement

a iret a a ee ye ree me Ae a ee ea a 193

oe oa restrictions, Presidency of the Virgin Islands, British West Indies
BP. O. ene eee. Water ieee a ee a 196
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Finland (B. E. P. Q. 420) __-..----------- 198
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Kingdom of Bulgaria (B. E. P. Q. 421)_..------------- 202
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act-_-_.------------------------------ 205
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.._............-------------------- 207

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S. R. A—B. E. P. Q. No. 126 Issued June 1, 1936

United States Department of Agriculture

BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE



SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS

JANUARY-MARCH 1936



CONTENTS

Gunrantine and other official announcements-_--__-2. =... 2 2--- 252-2 nnn see ccee
Announcements relating to gypsy moth and brown-tail moth quarantine (no. 45).-__-.---..-..
REET TTSTES. 02) 908 GETAID GOS er en ar ae = oe ores — art i= Bie eee Sie eaeeseaneee
List of articles exempt from certification requirements under the gypsy moth and brown-tail
monmguarantine (5; lh. Py O-as6revised)) ties. fetes. oes) 4. see Secon steep A.

List of articles exempt from certification requirements under the gypsy moth and brown-tail
moth quarantine (B. E. P. Q.-386,(second revision)) =._===.-.=2-----------.-.--2--L-u-.--
Announcements relating to pink bollworm quarantine (no. 52)____-.---.-_--------------------
PeERITIND TA DOSLMMASLOTS- . 2 = ee hn eee kn eS Fn et
Administrative instructions—approval of alternative treatments for baled lint cotton from
Mea gt y MINCSIOe AtOHS (Ps. HS EO. SRe) ses S54" 2 oo es ol oe ett cee ee oe aa
Announcements relating to Dutch elm disease quarantine (no. 71)---__-_.------_-----------___-
ere aA APIICITAG ON 3 WP a ee 5 eee ee 2 eS ites estan td-<
Modification of Dutch elm disease quarantine regulations___._......__._---_-.-_-------___-
Notice to general public through newspapers_.-_.....--.....-...._..-.---------_----.--
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (no. 48)__-...._-_.._--_-____ oe
Japanese beciie. zone widens here and there... 2245-25- 2a22s5252 05 so-so t slate ene
Pest On Anata ANG TOrtaAtiONSs: = 2-2 ee ae oe ke eset
Piaiies toe renerabpublie Through HOWSDAapers-.- 25— = ==.- 8 + 8 oe Sk ec cen
Announcement relating to nursery stock, plant, and seed quarantine (no. 37)_-_____-___-____-__-
Hepes, will corrected fooLnotes and appendices... 2. -.--- > 2 ete
Announcements relating to Mexican fruit-fly quarantine (no. 64)_-----.--.-_____-_-_------ ee
Shipping season for Texas citrus fruit extended to March 31_____________________--________-
Saag instructions—shipping season for Texas citrus fruit extended (B. E. P. Q.-

TO a SL ale SE eas, 2 Rie ce ee eS ee ee ee ee a

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aA poranors.O1 plant products by mail CE.-D-48181) = = ewes
Mepresnous .)9-iatl—_rerd larions (1. 1): 48237) = 2) sat ote este
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Dominion of New Zealand (P. Q. C. A.-306, supple-
anaPNR rare raay Pere 8 apse En ee RA UO I I ae od 30
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Chile (B. P. Q.-348, supplement no. 3)-.. _ 32
ieee een import restrictions, Republic of Argentina (B. P. Q.-357, supplement no.

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Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Czechoslovakia (B. E. P. Q.-366, supple-

CORE SCE GV oie So Sie ee got acetal i RN, Ai pe ha I a 33
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, British Mandate of Palestine (B. E. P. Q.-370, revised)- 33
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Grand Duchy of Luxembourg (B. E. P. Q.-389)_____ 36
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, British Colony and Protectorate of Sierra Leone

ae Ae eee cet a) SS ILTT CE es es el eee 36
Plant-quarantineimport restrictions, British Gold Coast Colony (B. E. P. Q.-391)_________- 38

4 Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act____-_..._.-..__.---.--___._______- 39
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine_____._.-_-__-__------_-_-----.___ee 40

QUARANTINE AND OTHER OFFICIAL
ANNOUNCEMENTS

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO GYPSY MOTH AND BROWN-TAIL
MOTH QUARANTINE (NO. 45)

INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS

Post OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, February 6, 1936.
POSTMASTER :
My Dear Sire: Your attention is invited to the enclosed copy of the latest
revision of Quarantine Order No. 45 of the United States Department of Agri-
culture, on account of the gypsy moth and the brown-tail moth. The changes

67640—36——1 1



2 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.—March

are indicated in the “Introductory Note” and “Summary” on page 1 of the
enclosed copy, and you will please be governed accordingly. See paragraph 1,
section 595, Postal Laws and Regulations.
Very truly yours,
C. B. EILENBERGER,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.

B. E. P. Q.— 886 (revised). FEBRUARY 11, 1936.

LIST OF ARTICLES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS UNDER THE
GYPSY MOTH AND BROWN-TAIL MOTH QUARANTINE

In accordance with the proviso in Notice of Quarantine No. 45, as revised
effective November 4, 1935, the following articles, the interstate movement of
which is not considered to constitute a risk of moth dissemination, are exempted
from the restrictions of the regulations of this quarantine:

Acacia cuttings (for ornamental use) (Acacia spp.).

Banana stalks, when crushed, dried, and shredded.

Cable reels, when newly manufactured and empty.

Clubmoss (sometimes called ‘ground pine’) (Lycopodium spp.).
Evergreen smilax (Smilax lanceolata).

Fuchsia (Fuchsia spp.).

Galax (Galax aphylla).

Geranium (Pelargonium sgpp.).

Heather cuttings (for ornamental use) (Erica spp.) (Calluna spp.).
Heliotrope (Heliotropium spp.).

Jerusalem-cherry (Solanum capsicastrum, 8S. pseudocapsicum, 8. hendersoni).
Mistletoe (Phoradendron flavescens, Viscum album, etc.).

Oregon huckleberry (Vaccinium ovatum).

Partridgeberry (Mitchella repens).

Strawberry plants (Fragaria spp.).

Trailing arbutus (Hpigaea@ repens).

Verbena (Verbena spp.).

Wintergreen (Gaultheria spp., Pyrola spp.).

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

B. E. P. Q.-886 (second revision). Marcu 12, 1936.

LIST OF ARTICLES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS UNDER THE
GYPSY MOTH AND BROWN-TAIL MOTH QUARANTINE

In accordance with the proviso in Notice of Quarantine No. 45, as revised
effective November 4, 1985, the following articles, the interstate movement of
which is not considered to constitute a risk of moth dissemination, are exempted
from the restrictions of the regulations of this quarantine:

Acacia cuttings (for ornamental use) (Acacia spp.).

Banana stalks, when crushed, dried, and shredded.

Cable reels, when newly manufactured and empty.

Clubmoss (sometimes called “ground pine’) (Lycopodium spp.).

Evergreen smilax (Smilax lanceolata).

Fuchsia (Fuchsia spp.).

Galax (Galax aphylla).

Geranium (Pelargonium spp.).

Heather cuttings (for ornamental use) (Erica spp.) (Calluna spp.).

Heliotrope (Heliotropium spp.).

Herbarium specimens, when dried, pressed, and treated, and when so labeled on the
outside of each container of such materials.

Jerusalem-cherry (Solanum capsicastrum, S. pseudocapsicum, 8. henderson).

Mistletoe (Phoradendron flavescens, Viscum album, etc.).

Oregon huckleberry (Vaccinium ovatum).

Partridgeberry (Mitchella repens).

Strawberry plants (Fragaria spp.).

Trailing arbutus (Hpigaea repens).

Verbena (Verbena spp.).

Wintergreen (Gaultheria spp.) (Pyrola spp.)

LrEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.



1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 3

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO PINK BOLLWORM QUARANTINE
(NO. 52)

INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS

Post OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, February 21, 1936.
POSTMASTER :

My Dear Sir: Your attention is invited to the inclosed copy of the latest re-
vision of the pink bollworm quarantine and regulations (Quarantine Order No.
52 of the United States Department of Agriculture), by which you will please be
governed. See paragraph 1, section 595, Postal Laws and Regulations.

Very truly yours,

C. B. EMENBERGER,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.

B. E. P. Q.-388. MarcH 1, 1936.

ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS—APROVAL OF ALTERNATIVE TREATMENTS FOR
BALED LINT COTTON FROM HEAVILY INFESTED AREAS

Pursuant to authority vested in the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quaran-
tine, under regulation 8 of the Revised Rules and Regulaiions Supplemental to
Notice of Quarantine No. 52 (revised), approved December 4, 1935, effective
December 5, 1935, which provides that baled lint, produced in a heavily in-
fested area must be given both vacuum fumigation and either compression or
roller treatment, unless and until the said Bureau shall approve some other
treatment or treatments for the purpose; the Bureau, after having determined
that either of the two following additional treatments affords adequate protec-
tion, hereby approves either of them as further alternative treatments for
baled cotton originating in heavily infested areas and permits may be issued
for the interstate movement of baled cotton so treated.*

1. When, under the supervision of an inspector the flat bale shall be
enclosed in a steamtight chamber and subjected to a steam pressure of
not less than 15 pounds to the square inch for not less than 3 minutes at
a temperature of not less than 150° F. at a depth of 38 inches from the
surface of the bale at all points and when this treatment is followed by
standard or high-density compression.

2. When the lint of such bales has been passed between revolving
rollers which, in the judgment of the inspector, are of adequate weight
and are set sufficiently close to crush all cottonseed and kill any pink
bollworms present, the bagging for such bales is kept uncontaminated,
the platform and premises near to the bale press are clean and uncon-
taminated, and when the bales are moved directly from the press to a
location which, in the judgment of the inspector, is adequately safe-
guarded against contamination.

Persons or firms wishing to avail themselves of these additional treatments
should address the local inspector of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant
Quarantine, or the Regional Headquarters, P. O. Box 798, San Antonio, Tex.

Leg A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

1 This circular should not be construed to set aside or change any of the requirements
regarding seed sterilization or prevention of contamination or other prerequisites for the
eee of permits on cotton products originating in regulated areas, except as specifically
stated herein.



4 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.—March

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO DUTCH ELM DISEASE QUARANTINE
(NO. 71)

EXTEND ELM DISEASE CONTROL

(Press notice)
MarcH 31, 1936.

Extension of the Dutch elm disease quarantine to include 26 new townships
in New Jersey and 13 new towns in New York was announced today (Mar. 31)
by Secretary of Agriculture Henry A. Wallace.

This extension, effective April 1, was made necessary by the finding in the
new areas of a small number of trees which had become diseased. Any recent
spread of Dutch elm disease which may have occurred cannot be definitely
known until scouting starts again as the trees come into leaf, according to Lee
A. Strong, Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, who is in
charge of the Depariment’s campaign to save the American elm from destruction
by this disease.

The following territory is added to the area previously regulated:

New Jersey.—Townships of Bethlehem, Clinton, Franklin, Lebanon, Read-
ingston, Tewksbury, and Union, in Hunterdon County; township of Madison, in
Middlesex County; townships of Holmdel, Matawan, and Raritan, in Monmouth
County; townships of Mount Olive and Washington, in Morris County; town-
ships of Hardystown, Lafayette, Sparta, Vernon, and Wantage, in Sussex
County; townships of Allamuchy, Franklin, Hope, Independence, Mansfield,
Oxford, Washington, and White, in Warren County.

New York.—Towns of Blooming Grove, Chester, Highland, Monroe, Tuxedo,
Warwick, and Woodbury, in Orange County; towns of Carmel, Phillipstown,
Putnam Valley, and South East, in Putnam County; towns of Lewisboro and
North Salem, in Westchester County.

The area previously regulated included the following cities, towns, boroughs,
or other political subdivisions:

Connecticut—Towns of Darien, Fairfield, Greenwich, New Canaan, Norwalk,
Stamford, and Westport, in Fairfield County.

New Jersey.—Counties of Bergen, Essex, Hudson, Passaic, Somerset, and
Union ; townships of Princeton and West Windsor, and the city of Princeton, in
Mercer County ; townships of East Brunswick, Lincoln, Milltown, North Bruns-
wick, Piscataway, Raritan, Roosevelt, Sayreville, South Brunswick, South River,
and Woodbridge, boroughs of Dunellen, Highland Park, and Metuchen, and cities
of New Brunswick, Perth Amboy, and South Amboy, in Middlesex County ; town-
ships of Boonton, Chatham, Chester, Danville, Hanover, Jefferson, Mendham,
Montville, Morris, Passaic, Pequannock, Randolph, Rockaway, and Roxbury,
boroughs of Dover, Florham Park, and Mendham, and cities of Madison and
Morristown, in Morris County.

New York.—Counties of Bronx, Kings, Nassau, New York, Queens, Richmond,
and Rockland; towns of Bedford, Cortlandt, East Chester, Greenburg, Harrison,
Mamaroneck, Mount Pleasant, Mount Vernon, New Castie, New Rochelle, North
Castle, Ossining, Pelham, Poundridge, Rye, Scarsdale, Somers, White Plains,
Yonkers, and Yorktown, in Westchester County.







MODIFICATION OF DUTCH ELM DISEASE QUARANTINE REGULATIONS

INTRODUCTORY NOTE

The following modification of the Dutch elm disease quarantine regulations
adds to the area designated as regulated, 7 townships in Hunterdon County;
1 township in Middlesex County ; 3 townships in Monmouth County; 2 townships
in Morris County; 5 townships in Sussex County, and 8 townships in Warren
County, in the State of New Jersey. It also adds 7 towns in Orange County; 4
towns in Putnam County, and 2 towns in Westchester County, N. YÂ¥. This
action was taken on the basis of intensive inspections made throughout the year
which disclosed infections in areas contiguous to the previously regulated area.

Avery §. Hoyt,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.



1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 5

AMENDMENT NO. 1 TO RULES AND REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE OF
QUARANTINE NO. 71

(Approved Mar. 27, 1936; effective Apr. 1, 1936)

Under authority conferred by the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912
(37 Stat. 315), as amended by the act of Congress approved March 4, 1917 (39
Stat. 1134, 1165), it is ordered that regulation 3 of the rules and regulations
supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 71, on account of the Dutch elm dis-
ease, which were promulgated on February 20, 1935, be and the same is hereby
amended to read as follows:

REGULATION 3. REGULATED AREAS

In accordance with the provisos to Notice of Quarantine No. 71, the Secretary
of Agriculture designates as regulated areas for the purpose of these regulations
the counties, townships, towns, and cities listed below, including all cities, towns,
boroughs, or other political subdivisions within their limits:

Connecticut—Towns of Darien, Fairfield, Greenwich, New Canaan, Norwalk,
Stamford, and Westport, in Fairfield County.

New Jersey—Counties of Bergen, Essex, Hudson, Morris, Passaic, Somerset,
and Union; townships of Bethlehem, Clinton, Franklin, Lebanon, Readingston,
Tewksbury, and Union, in Hunterdon County; townships of Princeton and West
Windsor, and the city of Princeton, in Mercer County; townships of East Bruns-
wick, Lincoln, Madison, Milltown, North Brunswick, Piscataway, Raritan, Roose-
velt, Sayreville, South Brunswick, South River, and Woodbridge, boroughs of
Dunellen, Highland Park, and Metuchen, and cities of New Brunswick, Perth
Amboy, and South Amboy, in Middlesex County; townships of Holmdel, Mata-
wan, and Raritan, in Monmouth County; townships of Hardystown, Lafayette,
Sparta, Vernon, and Wantage, in Sussex County; townships of Allamuchy,
Franklin, Hope, Independence, Mansfield, Oxford, Washington, and White, in
Warren County.

New York—Counties of Bronx, Kings, Nassau, New York, Queens, Richmond,
Rockland, and Westchester: towns of Blooming Grove, Chester, Highland, Mon-
roe, Tuxedo, Warwick, and Woodbury, in Orange Cownty; towns of Carmel,
Phillipstown, Putnam Valley, and South East, in Putnam County.

This amendment shall be effective on and after April 1, 1936.

Done at the city of Washington this 27th day of March 1936.

Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.

[SEAL ] W. R. GREGG,
Acting Secretary of Agriculture.

[Copies of the foregoing amendment were sent to all common carriers doing business in
or through the regulated areas. ]

NoTIcE TO GENERAL PUBLIC THROUGH NEWSPAPERS

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,
BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE,
Washington, D. C., March 27, 1936.
Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority con-
ferred on him by the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315),
as amended, has promulgated amendment no. 1 to the Rules and Regulations
Supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 71, on account of the Dutch elm
disease, effective on and after April 1, 19386. Under this modification, 26 town-
ships in the State of New Jersey and 13 towns in the State of New York are
added to the regulated area.
Copies of the amendment may be obtained from the Bureau of Entomology and
Plant Quarantine, Washington, D. C.
W. R. GREGG,
Acting Secretary of Agriculture.

[Published in the following newspapers: The Times, New York, N. Y., Apr. 8, 1936;
the News, Newark, N. J., Apr. 8, 1936.] ie ;



6 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.—March

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE
(NO. 48)

JAPANESE BEETLE ZONE WIDENS HERE AND THERE

(Press notice)

A revision of the Japanese beetle quarantine and regulations, which goes
into effect March 16, is announced by Acting Secretary of Agriculture R. G.
Tugwell. The revised regulations extend the regulated area to include addi-
tional territory in the States of Maine, Maryland, New York, and Virginia. —
This action was taken as a result of inspections during the past few years,
which disclosed established infestations. Some outlying areas where Japanese
beetle infestations have been found are not included in the regulated area
because of assurance from the States concerned that adequate measures will
be taken to prevent the spread of the pest therefrom.

The revised regulations also extend the restrictions on the interstate move-
ment by refrigerator car or motor truck of all fruits and vegetables between
June 15 and October 15 inclusive, to include such movement from the entire
State of Delaware rather than from a part of the State as heretofore. Similar
restrictions are also in effect with respect to the District of Columbia and
certain areas in the States of: Maryland, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and
Virginia.

Under the revision of the quarantine the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology
and Plant Quarantine is authorized to exempt from restrictions the articles
and products covered thereby when he is convinced the movement involves
no risk of spreading the Japanese beetle. The additions to the regulated ter-
ritory are as follows:

Maine.—Towns of Auburn and Lewiston, in Androscoggin County; towns of
Gorham, Gray, New Gloucester, Raymond, Standish, and Windham, in Cwmber-
land County.

Maryland.—All of Caroline County, except election districts of American Cor-
ners (no. 8), Hillsboro (no. 6), and Preston (no. 4); election district of
Freedom (no. 5) in Carroll County; election districts of LaPlata and White
Plains in Charles County; election district of West Friendship (no, 3) in
Howard County; all of Prince Georges County, except the election districts
of Aquasco and Nottingham.

New York.—Towns of Caroline, Danby, Dryden, and Ithaca, and the city of
Ithaca, in Tompkins County.

Virginia.—The magisterial district of Manchester, in Chesterfield County;
Culpeper County; Magisterial districts of Centreville and Dranesville in Fair-
fax County; Fauquier County; magisterial districts of Fairfield, Tuckahce, and
Varina in Henrico County; Loudown County; and magisterial districts of
Brentsville, Gainesville, and Manassas in Prince William County. The regu-
lated area now includes all of Culpeper, Fairfax, Fauquier, Henrico, Loudoun,
and Prince William Counties as well as the counties previously under
regulation.

REVISION OF QUARANTINE AND REGULATIONS
INTRODUCTORY NOTE

An important change in the following revision of the Japanese beetle quaran-
tine provides for exemption of certain products by administrative instructions
issued by the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, when in
his judgment the nature of the growth or production, or the manufacture or
processing of such products, is such that their interstate movement is not
considered to constitute danger of spread of infestation.

The regulations have also been revised to include in the regulated area addi-
tional territory in the States of Maine, Maryland, New York, and Virginia.
Some outlying areas where Japanese beetle infestations have been found are
not included in the regulated area because of assurance from the States con-
cerned that adequate measures will be taken to prevent the spread of the pest
therefrom. The restrictions on the interstate movement by refrigerator car
or motor truck of all fruits and vegetables from the District of Columbia and
portions of the States of Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and
Virginia, between June 15 and October 15, inclusive, have been extended to
apply to the entire State of Delaware.



1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS i

SUMMARY

Unless a certificate or permit has been issued, these regulations as now revised
prohibit the interstate shipment of green corn on the cob, beans in the pod,
bananas in entire bunches or in clusters of 25 or more, apples, peaches, black-
berries, blueberries, huckleberries, or raspberries from any part of the regulated
areas, and also prohibit (unless a certificate or permit has been issued) the
interstate movement of all fruits and vegetables by refrigerator car or motor
truck from the District of Columbia, the State of Delaware, and parts of the
States of Maryland, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Virginia. Refrigerator cars
used for loading fruits and vegetables, other than onions and potatoes, in such
area must, prior to loading, be cleaned by the common carrier and kept tightly
closed and sealed during the interval between cleaning and loading. Onions
and potatoes must be fumigated in the car when such action is deemed neces-
sary by the inspector, and doors and hatches of the cars must be closed or
screened. For other details and exceptions see regulation 5.

The regulations also prohibit the interstate shipment of plants, sand, soil,
earth, peat, compost, and manure from any part of the regulated areas to or
through any outside point throughout the year unless a Federal permit or cer-
tificate has been secured. Portions of plants and cut flowers are restricted
interstate movement only between June 15 and October 15, inclusive. Tor
details and exceptions see regulations 6 and 7.

The regulated areas include the District of Columbia, the entire States of
Connecticut, Delaware, Massachusetts, New Jersey, and Rhode Island, and
parts of the States of Maine, Maryland, New Hampshire, New York, Pennsyl-
vania, Vermont, Virginia, and West Virginia. The boundaries are shown in
regulation 3.

These regulations also place certain restrictions to protect restricted articles
from infestation while in transit, require thorough cleaning of vehicles and
containers which have been used in transporting restricted products, and
provide other safeguards and conditions as provided in regulations 8 to 13,
inclusive.

To secure permits and certificates, address the Bureau of Entomology and
Plant Quarantine, Glenwood Avenue and Henry Street, Bloomfield, N. J. or the
nearest branch office listed in the appendix.

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 48 (ELEVENTH REVISION)
(Approved Mar. 7, 1936; effective Mar. 16, 1936)

I, R. G. Tugwell, Acting Secretary of Agriculture, have determined that it
is necessary to quarantine the States of Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Mary-
land, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania,
Rhode Island, Vermont, Virginia, and West Virginia, and the District of
Columbia, to prevent the spread of the Japanese beetle (Popillia japonica
Newm.), a dangerous insect new to and not heretofore widely prevalent or
distributed within and throughout the United States.

Now, therefore, under authority conferred by section 8 of the Plant Quaran-
tine Act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended- by the act of Congress
approved March 4, 1917 (89 Stat. 11384, 1165), and having duly given the
public hearing required thereby, I do quarantine the said States of Con-
necticut, Delaware, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New
Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, Virginia, and West
Virginia, and the District of Columbia, effective on and after March 16, 1936,
Hereafter, under the authority of said act of August 20, 1912, amended as
aforesaid (1) fruits and vegetables; (2) nursery, ornamental, and greenhouse
stock, and other plants; and (3) sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure
shall not be shipped, offered for shipment to a common earrier, received for
transportation or transported by a common carrier, or carried, transported,
moved, or allowed to be moved from any of said quarantined States or District
into or through any other State or Territory or District of the United States
in manner or method or under conditions other than those prescribed in the
rules and regulations hereinafter made and amendments thereto: Provided,



8 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan—March

That the restrictions of this quarantine and of the rules and regulations sup-
plemental thereto may be limited to the areas in a quarantined State now,
or which may hereafter be, designated by the Secretary of Agriculture as
regulated areas when, in the judgment of the Secretary of Agriculture, the
enforcement of the aforesaid rules and regulations as to such regulated areas
shall be adequate to prevent the spread of the Japanese beetle: Provided fur-
ther, That such limitations shall be conditioned upon the said State providing
for and enforcing such control measures with respect to such regulated areas
as, in the judgment of the Secretary of Agriculture, shall be deemed adequate
to prevent the spread of the Japanese beetle therefrom to other parts of the
State: And provided further, That certain articles classed as restricted herein
may, because of the nature of their growth or production or their manufactured
or processed condition, be exempted by administrative instructions issued by
the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine when, in his
judgment, such articles are considered innocuous as ecarriers of infestation.

Done at the city of Washington this 7th day of March 1936.

Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of
Agriculture.

[SEAL] R. G. TUGWELL,
Acting Secretary of Agriculture.

RULES AND REGULATIONS (FOURTEENTH REVISION) SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE
OF QUARANTINE NO. 48

(Approved Mar. 7, 1936; effective Mar. 16, 1936)
REGULATION 1. DEFINITIONS

For the purpose of these regulations the following words, names, and terms
shall be construed, respectively, to mean:

(a) Japanese beetle—The insect known as the Japanese beetle (Popillia
japonica Newm.), in any stage of development.

(b) The terms “infested”, “infestation”, and the like, relate to infestation
with the Japanese beetle.

(c) Quarantined area.—Any State or District quarantined by the Secretary
of Agriculture to prevent the spread of the Japanese beetle.

(d) Regulated area—Any area in a quarantined State or District which is
now, or which may hereafter be, designated as such by the Secretary of Agri-
culture in accordance with the provisos to Notice of Quarantine No. 48, as
revised.

(e) Fruits and vegetables—For the list of restricted fruits and vegetables
see regulation 5.

(f) Nursery and ornamental stock.—Nursery, ornamental, and greenhouse
stock, and all other plants, plant roots, cut flowers, or other portions of plants.

(g) Sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure—Sand, soil, earth, peat,
compost, or Manure of any kind and as to either bulk movement or in connection
with farm products or nursery and ornamental stock.

(h) Certified sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure—Sand, soil, earth,
peat, compost, or manure determined by the inspector as uninfested and so
certified.

(i) Certified greenhouse.—A greenhouse or similar establishment which has
complied to the satisfaction of the inspector with the conditions imposed in
regulation 6. This term may apply also to potting beds, heeling-in areas, hot-
beds, coldframes, or similar plots or to storage houses, packing sheds, or stores
treated or otherwise safeguarded in manner and method satisfactory to the
inspector.

(j) Inspector.—An inspector of the United States Department of Agriculture.

(k) Moved or allowed to be moved interstate—Shipped, offered for ship-
ment to a common carrier, received for transportation or transported by a
common carrier, or carried, transported, moved, or allowed to be moved from
one State or Territory or District of the United States into or through any
other State or Territory or District.



1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 9

REGULATION 2. LIMITATION OF RESTRICTIONS TO REGULATED AREAS

Conditioned upon the compliance on the part of the State concerned with
the provisos to Notice of Quarantine No. 48 (eleventh revision), the restrictions
provided in these regulations on the interstate movement of plants and plant
products and other articles enumerated in said notice of quarantine will be
limited to such movement from the areas in such State now or hereafter desig-
nated by the Secretary of Agriculture as regulated areas.

REGULATION 3. REGULATED AREAS

In accordance with the provisos to Notice of Quarantine No. 48 (eleventh
revision), the Secretary of Agriculture designates as regulated areas for the
purpose of these regulations the States, District, counties, townships, towns,
cities, election districts, and magisterial districts listed below, including all
cities, towns, boroughs, or other political subdivisions within their limits:

Connecticut.—The entire State.

Delaware.—The entire State.

District of Columbia.—The entire District.

Maine.—County of York; towns of Auburn and Lewiston, in Androscoggin
County; towns of Cape Elizabeth, Gorham, Gray, New Gloucester, Raymond,
Scarboro, Standish, and the cities of Portland, South Portland, Westbrook,
and Windham, in Cumberland County; and the city of Waterville, in Kennebec
County.

Maryland.—Counties of Cecil, Kent, Queen Annes, Somerset, and Worcester ;
the city of Baltimore; the city of Cumberland, the town of Frostburg, and elec-
tion districts nos. 4, 5, 6, 7, 11, 12, 14, 22, 23, 24, 26, 29, 31, and 32, in Allegany
County; the city of Annapolis and election district no. 5, in Anne Arundel
County; election districts nos. 1, 2, 3, 9, 11, 12, 18, 14, and 15, in Baltimore
County; all of Caroline County except election districts of Hillsboro (no. 6),
American Corners (no. 8), and Preston (no. 4); the city of Westminster, and
election district of. Freedom (no. 5), in Carroll County; election districts of
White Plains and LaPlata, in Charles County; election district of Cambridge
(no. 7), in Dorchester County; election districts of Petersville (no. 12), and
Brunswick (no. 25), in Frederick County; County of Harford, except election
district of Marshall (no. 4); election districts of Elkridge (no. 1), Ellicot
City (no. 2), and election district of West Friendship (no. 3), in Howard
County, and the right of way of United States Highway No. 1 through the elec-
tion district of Guilford (no. 6) in said county ;-all of Prince Georges County
except the election districts of Nottingham and Aquasco; that part of Mont-
gomery County located within the established boundaries of the so-called
“Washington Suburban Sanitary District’: towns of Easton and Oxford, in
Talbot County; election districts of Sharpsburg (no. 1), Williamsport (no. 2),
Hagerstown (nos. 3, 17, 21, 22, 24, and 25), Leitersburg (no. 9), Sandy Hook
(no. 11), and Halfway (no. 26), in Washington County; election districts of
Pittsburg (no. 4), Parsons (no. 5), Dennis (no. 6), Trappe (no. 7), Nutters
(no. 8), Salisbury (no. 9), Delmar (no. 11), Camden (no. 13), Willards (no.
14), and Fruitland (no. 16), in Wicomico County.

Massachusetts.—The entire State.

New Hampshire.—Counties of Belknap, Cheshire, Hillsboro, Merrimack, Rock-
ingham, Strafford, and Sullivan; towns of Brookfield, Eaton, Effingham, Free-
dom, Madison, Moultonboro, Ossipee, Sandwich, Tamworth, Tuftonboro, Wake-_
field, and Wolfeboro, in Carroll County; towns of Alexandria, Ashland, Bridge-
water, Bristol, Canaan, Dorchester, Enfield, Grafton, Groton, Hanover, Hebron,
Holderness, Lebanon, Lyme, Orange, and Plymouth, in Grafton County.

New Jersey.—The entire State.

New York.—Counties of Albany, Bronx, Broome, Chemung, Chenango, Colum-
fia, Cortland, Delaware, Dutchess, Fulton, Greene, Kings, Madison, Mont-
gomery, Nassau, New York, Oneida, Onondaga, Orange, Otsego, Putnam,
Queens, Rensselaer, Richmond, Rockland, Saratoga, Schenectady, Schoharie,
Suffolk, Sullivan, Tioga, Ulster, Washington, and Westchester ; towns of Red
House and Salamanca, and the city of Salamanca, in Cattaraugus County;
towns of Columbia, Danube, Fairfield, Frankfort, German Flats, Herkimer,
Litchfield, Little Falls, Manheim, Newport, Salisbury, Schuyler, Stark, Warren,
and Winfield, and the city of Little Falls, in Herkimer County; towns of Caton,
Corning, and Hornby, and the city of Corning, in Stewben County; towns of

67640—36——2



10 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.—March

Caroline, Danby, Dryden, and Ithaca, and the city of Ithaca, in Tompkins
County; towns of Luzerne and Queensbury and the city of Glens Falls, in
Warren County.

Pennsylvania.—The entire State, except Crawford, Erie, Forest, Mercer, Ve-
nango, and Warren Counties, Mercer Township in Butler County, and Ashland,
Beaver, Elk, Richland (including boroughs of Foxburg and St. Petersburg),
Salem, and Washington Townships, in Clarion County.

Rhode Island.—The entire State.

Vermont.—Counties of Bennington, Rutland, Windham, and Windsor.

Virginia.—Counties of Accomac, Arlington, Culpeper, Elizabeth City, Fairfax,
Fauquier, Henrico, Loudoun, Norfolk, Northampton, Prince William, and Staf-
ford; magisterial district of Manchester, in Chesterfield County; magisterial
district of Sleepy Hole, in Nansemond County; Camp Stuart, in Warwick
County; and the cities of Alexandria, Fredericksburg, Hampton, Newport News,
Norfolk, Portsmouth, Richmond, South Norfolk, and Suffolk.

West Virginia.—Town of Keyser and district of Frankfort, in Mineral County.

REGULATION 4. EXTENSION OR REDUCTION OF REGULATED AREAS

The regulated areas designated in regulation 3 may be extended or reduced
as may be found advisable by the Secretary of Agriculture. Due notice of any
extension or reduction and the areas affected thereby will be given in writing to
the transportation companies doing business in or through the States in which
such areas are located and by publication in one or more newspapers selected
by the Secretary of Agriculture within the States in which the areas affected are
located.

REGULATION 5. RESTRICTIONS ON THE MOVEMENT OF FRUITS AND VEGETABLES
SECTION A. CONTROL OF MOVEMENT

(1) Unless a certificate or permit shall have been issued therefor, by an
inspector, except as provided in paragraphs (a) to (€), inclusive, of this
section :

(i) No green corn on the cob, beans in the pod, bananas in entire bunches or
in clusters of 25 or more, apples, peaches, blackberries, blueberries, huckleberries,
or raspberries shall be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from any regu-
Jated area to or through any point outside thereof; and (i) no fruits and vege-
tables of any kind shall be moved or allowed to be moved interstate via refriger-
ator car or motor truck from the District, counties, or city listed below to or
through any point outside of the regulated areas:

Delaware.—The entire State.

District of Columbia.—The entire District.

Maryland.—County of Cecil and the city of Baltimore.

New Jersey.—Counties of Atlantic, Burlington, Camden, Cape May, Cumber-
land, Gloucester, Hunterdon, Mercer, Middlesex, Monmouth, Ocean, Salem, Som-
erset, and Union.

Pennsylvania.—Counties of Bucks, Chester, Delaware, Montgomery, and
Philadelphia.

Virginia.—County of Arlington.

(a) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of fruits and
-vegetables between October 16 and June 14, inclusive.

(b) No certificate will be required for the interstate movement of fruits and
vegetables on a through bill of lading either from an area not under regulation
through a regulated area to another nonregulated area, or from a regulated
area through a nonregulated area to another regulated area, except that a cer-
tificate is required for interstate movement to Richmond, Va., or to the other
regulated parts of Henrico County, Va., or to Waterville, Maine. No restrictions
are placed on the interstate movement of fruits and vegetables from the city
of Richmond, Va., or from other parts of Henrico County, Va., or from Water-
ville, Maine, to points outside the regulated areas.

(c) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of fruits or vege-
tables when they shall have been manufactured or processed in such a manner
that in the judgment of the inspector no infestation could be transmitted.

(d) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of any shipments
of apples or peaches of less than 15 pounds to the shipment, or of bananas other
than in entire bunches or in clusters of 25 or more,



1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS ll

(e) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of commercially
packed apples in any quantity, except those moving via refrigerator cars or
motor vehicles from the District, counties, or city listed in this section.

(2) No restrictions are placed on the interstate shipment from the regulated
areas of fruits and vegetables other than those mentioned above, except that
any such interstate shipments of fruits and vegetables may be inspected by
inspectors at any time or place inside or outside the regulated areas and when
actually found to involve danger of dissemination of Japanese beetle to unin-
fested localities, measures to eliminate infestation may be required as a condi-
tion of further transportation or delivery.

SECTION B. CONDITIONS. OF CERTIFICATION

Certificates may be issued for the interstate movement of fruits and vegetables
to points outside the regulated areas between June 15 and October 15, inclusive,
under one of the following conditions:

(1) When the fruits and vegetables, moving from a point in the regulated
area other than the District, counties, or city listed in paragraph 1 (i), of
this regulation, or moving from such designated District, counties, or city other
than by refrigerator car, have actually been inspected by the United States
Department of Agriculture and found free from infestation. The number of
inspection points for such certification will be limited and their location deter-
mined by shipping needs and further conditioned on the establishment at such
points of provisions satisfactory to the inspector for the handling and safe-
guarding of such shipments during inspection. Such inspection may be dis-
continued and certification withheld by the inspector during periods of general
or unusual flight of the beetles.

(2) When the fruits and vegetables have been handled or treated under the
supervision of an inspector in manner and by method to free them from any
infestation.

(3) When the fruits and vegetables have originated outside of the regulated
areas and are to be reshipped directly from freight yards, transfer points, or
unloading docks within such areas, under provisions satisfactory to the inspec-
tor for the safeguarding of such shipments pending certification and reship-
ment. Certificates on this basis will be issued without inspection only in cases
where, in the judgment of the inspector, the shipments concerned have not been
exposed to infestation while within such freight yards, transfer points, or
unloading docks.

(4) When the fruits and vegetables were grown in districts where the fact
has been established to the satisfaction of the inspector that no infestation
exists and are to be shipped directly from the farms where growr to points
outside the regulated areas, or are shipped from infested districts where the
fact has been established to the satisfaction of the inspector that the Japanese
beetle has not begun or has ceased its flight.

(5) When the fruits and vegetables, other than onions and potatoes, moving
via refrigerator car from the District, counties, or city listed in paragraph 1
(ii), of this regulation, have been inspected and loaded in a manner to prevent
infestation, in a refrigerator car with closed or adequately screened doors and
hatches, which car prior to loading has been determined by an inspector as
thoroughly swept and cleaned by the common carrier in a manner to rid it of
infestation. During the interval between cleaning and loading, such refrigerator
car must be tightly closed and sealed.

(6) When the onions or potatoes moving via refrigerator car from the Dis-
trict, counties, or city listed in this regulation have been fumigated in the car,
when deemed necessary in-the judgment of the inspector, and when the doors
and hatches of the car have been tightly closed or adequately screened, under
the supervision of an inspector.

REGULATION 6. RESTRICTIONS ON THE MovEMENT OF NURSERY AND
ORNAMENTAL STOCK

SECTION A. CONTROL OF MOVEMENT

Nursery and ornamental stock shall not be moved or allowed to be moved
interstate from the regulated areas to or through any point outside thereof,
unless a certificate or permit shall have been issued therefor by the inspector,
except as follows:



12 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.—March

(1) True bulbs, corms, and tubers, when dormant, except for storage growth,
and when free from soil, are exempt from the requirement of certification,
except that this exemption does not apply to dahlia tubers.

(2) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of nursery and
ornamental stock imported from foreign countries when reshipped from the
port of entry in the unopened original container and labeled as to each con-
tainer with a copy certificate of the country from which it was exported, a
statement of the general nature and quantity of the contents, the name and
address of the consignee, and the country and locality where grown.

(3) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement between October
16 and June 14, inclusive, of cut flowers, and of portions of plants without
roots and free from soil (such as branches and twigs of trees and shrubs,
scions, Christmas trees, holly, laurel, sphagnum moss, and parts of submerged
aquatic plants without roots).

(4) No certificate or permit will be required for the interstate movement
of nursery and ornamental stock when transported by a common carrier on a
through bill of lading either from an area not under regulation through a
regulated area, or from a regulated area through a nonregulated area to another
regulated area.

SECTION B. CONDITIONS GOVERNING THE ISSUANCE OF CERTIFICATES AND PERMITS

For the purpose of certification of nursery and ornamental stock, nurseries,
greenhouses, and other premises concerned in the movement of such stock will
be classified as follows:

(1) Class I—Nurseries, greenhouses, and other premises concerned in the
movement of nursery and ornamental stock on or within approximately 500
feet of which no infestation has been found may be classified as class I. Upon
compliance with the requirements of subsection (6) of this section, nursery
and ornamental stock may be certified by the inspector for shipment from such
premises without further inspection, and without meeting the safeguards pre-
seribed as a condition of interstate shipment of plants originating in nurseries
or greenhouses of class III.

(2) Class IIJ—(a) Nurseries, greenhouses, and other premises concerned
in the movement of nursery and ornamental stock on which either grubs in
the soil or one or more beetles have been found, will be classified as class III.
Such classification also may be given to nurseries, etc., in localities known to
be generally infested where one or more beetles or grubs are found in the
immediate proximity (within approximately 500 feet) of such nurseries, etc.,
on adjacent property or properties. In the case of nursery properties, under
single ownership and management, but represented by parcels of land widely
separated, such parcels may be independently classified either as class I or
class III upon compliance with such conditions and safeguards as shall be
required by the inspector. Similarly, unit nursery properties, which would
otherwise fall in class III, may be open to subdivision, for the purpose of rating
such subdivisions in classes I or III, when in the judgment of the inspector
such action is warranted by recent and scanty infestation limited to a portion
of the nursery concerned: Provided, That the subdivision containing the infes-
tation shall be clearly marked by boundaries of a permanent nature which .
shall be approximately 500 feet beyond the point where the infestation occurs.

(b) Upon compliance with subsections (3) and (6) of this section, nursery
and ornamental stock may be certified by the inspector for shipment from such
premises under any one of the following conditions: (i) That the roots shall
be treated by means approved by the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quaran-
tine in manner and by method satisfactory to the inspector; or (ii) in the case
of plants in which the root system is such that a thorough inspection may be
made, that the soil shall be entirely removed from the stock by shaking or wash-
ing, or (iii) that it shall be shown by evidence satisfactory to the inspector that
the plants concerned were produced in a certified greenhouse.

(3) Greenhouses of class III may be certified upon compliance with all the
following conditions with respect to the greenhouses themselves and to all potting
beds, heeling-in areas, hotbeds, coldframes, and similar plots:

(a) Ventilators, doors, and all other openings in greenhouses or coldframes
on premises in class III shall be kept screened in manner satisfactory to the
inspector during the period of flight of the beetle, namely, south of the northern
boundaries of Maryland and Delaware between June 1 and October 1, inclusive,
or north thereof between June 15 and October 15, inclusive.



1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 13

(b) Prior to introduction into nurseries or greenhouses, sand, soil, earth, peat,
compost, or manure taken from infested locations or which may have been ex-
posed to infestation, must be sterilized or fumigated under the direction and
supervision of, and in manner and by method satisfactory to the inspector. If
such treated sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, or manure is not to be immediately
used in such greenhouses, it must be protected from possible infestation in man-
ner and by method satisfactory to the inspector.

(c) All potted plants placed in certified greenhouses of class III and all potted
plants to be certified for interstate movement therefrom (i) shail be potted in
certified soil; (ii) shall, if grown outdoors south of the northern boundaries of
Maryland and Delaware at any time between June 1 and October 1, inclusive, or
north thereof at any time between June 15 and October 15, inclusive, be kept
in screened frames while outdoors; (iii) shall, if grown outdoors during any
part of the year, be placed in beds in which the soil or other material shall have
been treated in manner and by method approved by the Bureau of Entomology
and Plant Quarantine to eliminate infestation; and (iv) shall comply with
such other safeguards as may be required by the inspector.

(4) Cut flowers and other parts of plants without roots or soil may be
certified for movement either (a) when they have been inspected by an inspector
and found free from infestation, or (0) when they have been grown in a green-
house of class I or in a certified greenhouse of class III and are transported
under such safeguards as will in the judgment of the inspector prevent infesta-
tion. (See also sec. A (8) of this regulation. )

(5) Nursery and ornamental stock originating on or moved from unclassified
premises may be certified by the inspector under either one of the following
conditions: (a) That the soil shall be entirely removed from the stock, or (b)
that the roots shall be treated by means approved by the Bureau of Entomology
and Plant Quarantine in manner and by method satisfactory to the inspector,
or (c) that it shall be shown by evidence satisfactory to the inspector that the
accompanying soil was obtained at such points and under such conditions that
in his judgment no infestation could exist therein.

(6) Nurserymen, florists, dealers, and others, in order to maintain their
classified status, (a@) shall restrict their purchases or receipts of nursery and
ornamental stock, sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure within the
regulated area to articles which have been certified under these regulations as
to each such article and the said certificate shall accompany the articles when
moved; (0) shall obtain approval of the inspector before such articles are
received on their premises or moved from the open on their own premises into
certified greenhouses; and (c) shall also report immediately in writing all
purchases or receipts of such articles secured from within the regulated area.
Nurserymen, florists, dealers, and others whose premises are classified as class
III shall, in addition, report immediately on forms provided for that purpose
all their sales or shipments of such articles both to points outside the regulated
areas and to other classified nurseries or greenhouses within the regulated
areas. Certification may be denied to any person who has omitted to make the
report or reports required by this regulation, and such denial of certification
shall continue until the information so omitted has been supplied.

(7) Nursery and ornamental stock imported from foreign countries and not
reshipped from the port of entry in the unopened original container may be
certified for movement under these regulations when such stock has been
inspected by an inspector and found free from infestation.

(8) Nursery and ornamental stock originating outside the regulated areas
and certified stock originating in classified nurseries or greenhouses may be
certified for reshipment from premises other than those on which they origi-
nated, under provisions satisfactory to the inspector for the safeguarding of
such stock from infestation at the point of reshipment and en route, and, when
found advisable by the inspector, after reinspection and determination of
freedom from infestation.

REGULATION 7. RESTRICTIONS ON THE MOVEMENT oF SAND, SoIL, EARTH, PEAT,
COMPOST, AND MANURE
SECTION A. CONTROL OF MOVEMENT

7

Sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure shall not be moved or allowed
to be moved interstate from any point in the regulated areas to or through any
point outside thereof unless a certificate or permit shall have been issued
therefor by the inspector, except as follows:



14 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.—March

(1) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of sand for con-
struction purposes, nor of “bird gravel”, “bird sand”, or ground, dried imported
peat in packages of 5 pounds or less to the package.

(2) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of sand, soil, earth,
peat, compost, and manure imported from foreign countries when reshipped
from the port of entry in the unopened original container and labeled as to each
container with the country of origin, and when the shipment is further pro-
tected in manner or method satisfactory to the inspector.

(3) No certificate will be required for the interstate movement of sand,
soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure when transported by a common carrier on
a through bill of lading either from an area not under regulation through a
regulated area, or from a regulated area through a nonregulated area to
another regulated area.

SECTION B. CONDITIONS OF CERTIFICATION

Certificates for the movement of sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure
may be issued under any one of the following conditions:

(1) When the articles to be moved have originated in districts included
in the regulated area, but in which neither beetles nor grubs in soil have been
found.

(2) When the material consists of fresh manure or of mined, dredged, or
other Similar materials, and it has been determined by an inspector that no
infestation could exist therein.

(3) When the material has been removed, under the supervision of an
inspector, from a depth of more than 12 inches below the surface of the ground
and either (a) is to be moved between October 16 and June 14, inclusive, or
(b) is loaded and shipped at points where it has been determined by an
inspector that no general infestation of adult beetles exists, or (c) when the
ears and loading operations are protected by screening under the direction
of and in manner and by method satisfactory to the inspector.

(4) When the material has been fumigated with carbon disulphide or other-
wise treated under the supervision of and in manner and by method satisfac-
tory to the inspector. Such fumigation or treatment will be required as a
condition of certification of all sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure,
except such as is loaded and shipped in compliance with paragraphs (1), (2),
or (3) hereof.

REGULATION 8. CONDITIONS GOVERNING THE PROTECTION OF RESTRICTED ARTICLES
FRoM INFESTATION WHILE IN TRANSIT

Fruits and vegetables, nursery and ornamental stock, and sand, soil, earth,
peat, compost, and manure, moving interstate from or through the regulated
areas to points outside thereof between June 15 and October 15, inclusive, shall
at all times while they are in the regulated areas be screened, covered, or
otherwise protected in manner or method satisfactory to the inspector for
safeguarding the articles from infestation.

Trucks or other road vehicles transporting restricted articles may be sealed
by the inspector at the point of inspection and ali such seals shall remain intact
as long as the vehicle is en route within the regulated area.

REGULATION 9. MARKING AND CERTIFICATION A CONDITION OF INTERSTATE
TRANSPORTATION

(a) Every car, vehicle, box, basket, or other container of the articles listed,
the interstate movement of which is restricted in regulations 5, 6, and 7, shall
be plainly marked with the name and address of the consignor and the name
and address of the consignee and shall have securely attached to the outside
thereof a valid certificate or permit issued in compliance with these regulations.
In the case of lot shipments by freight, one certificate attached to one of the
cohtainers and another certificate attached to the waybill will be sufficient.

(b) In the case of bulk carload shipments by rail, the certificate shall accom-
pany the waybill, conductor’s manifest, memorandum, or bill of lading pertain-
ing to such shipment and in addition each car shall have securely attached to the
outside thereof a placard showing the number of the certificate or certificates
accompanying the waybill.

(c) In the case of shipment by road vehicle, the certificates shall accompany
the vehicle.





1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 15

(d) Certificates shall be surrendered to the consignee upon delivery of the
shipment.

REGULATION 10. GENERAL CONDITIONS GOVERNING INSPECTION AND ISSUANCE OF
CERTIFICATES AND PERMITS

(a) Persons intending to move or allow to be moved interstate any of the
articles the movement of which is restricted in regulations 5, 6, and 7, shall
make application for inspection and certification as far as possible in advance of
the probable date of shipment, specifying in the application the article and
quantity to be shipped, method of shipment, name and address of the consignor,
and name and address of the consignee.

(b) Applicants for inspection will be required to assemble the articles at
such points as the inspector shall designate and so to place them that inspec-
tion may readily be made; if not so placed, inspection may be refused. All
charges for storage, cartage, and labor incident to inspection, other than the
services of the inspector, shall be paid by the shipper.

(c) Certificates and permits shall be used in connection with the transporta-
tion of only those articles intended to be covered thereby.

(d@) Where the apparent absolute freedom from infestation of any of the
articles enumerated cannot be determined by the inspector, certification will be
refused.

(e) Permits may be issued for the interstate movement of restricted articles
by truck or other road vehicle from a regulated area through a nonregulated
area to another regulated area.

REGULATION 11. CANCELATION OF CERTIFICATES

Certificates issued under these regulations may be withdrawn or canceled by
the inspector and further certification refused, either for any failure of com-
pliance with the conditions of these regulations or violation of them, or when-
ever in the judgment of the inspector the further use of such certificates might
result in the dissemination of infestation.

REGULATION 12. INSPECTION IN TRANSIT

Any car, vehicie, basket, box, or other container moved interstate or offered
to a common carrier for shipment interstate, which contains or which the inspec-
tor has probable cause to believe contains either infested articles or articles the
movement of which is prohibited or restricted by these regulations, shall be
subject to inspection by an inspector at any time or place.

REGULATION 13. THOROUGH CLEANING REQUIRED oF TRUCKS, Wacons, CARs,
Boats, AND OTHER VEHICLES AND CONTAINERS BEFoRE MOovING INTERSTATE

Trucks, wagons, cars, boats, and other vehicles and containers which have
been used in transporting any article covered by these regulations within
the regulated areas shall not thereafter be moved or allowed to be moved
interstate until they have been thoroughly swept and cleaned by the carrier
at the point of unloading or destination.

REGULATION 14. SHIPMENTS BY THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

Articles subject to restriction in these regulations may be moved interstate
by the United States Department of Agriculture for experimental or scientific
purposes, on such conditions and under such safeguards as may be prescribed
by the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine. The container of articles
so moved shall bear, securely attached to the outside thereof, an identifying
tag from the Bureau of Entmology and Plant Quarantine showing compliance
with such conditions.

These revised rules and regulations shall be effective on and after March
16, ee and shall supersede the rules and regulations promulgated May 29,
1935,

Done at the city of Washington this 7th day of March 1936.

Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of
Agriculture.

[SEAL] R. G. TuGwELt,
Acting Secretary of Agriculture.



16 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.—March

APPENDIX
PENALTIES

The Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912 (87 Stat. 315), as amended,
provides that no person shall ship or offer for shipment to any common car-
rier, nor shall any common carrier receive for transportation or transport,
nor shall any person carry or transport from any quarantined State or Ter-
ritory or District of the United States, or from any quarantined portion
thereof, into or through any other State or Territory or District, any class
of nursery stock or any other class of plants, fruits, vegetables, roots, bulbs,
Seeds * * * or any other article * * * _ specified in the notice of quar-
antine * * * in manner or method or under conditions other than those
prescribed by the Secretary of Agriculture. It also provides that any person
who shall violate any of the provisions of this act, or who shall forge, counter-
feit, alter, deface, or destroy any certificate provided for in this act or in
the regulations of the Secretary of Agriculture shall be deemed guilty of a
misdemeanor, and shall upon conviction thereof be punished by a fine not
exceeding $500, or by imprisonment not exceeding 1 year, or both such fine
and imprisonment, in the discretion of the court.

* STATE AND FEDERAL INSPECTION

Certain of the quarantined States have promulgated or are about to promul-
gate quarantine regulations restricting intrastate movement supplemental to the
Federal quarantine. These State regulations are enforced in-cooperation with
the Federal authorities. Copies of either the Federal or State quarantine orders
may be obtained by addressing the United States Department of Agriculture,
Glenwood Avenue and Henry Street, Bloomfield, N. J.

Subsidiary offices are maintained at the following locations:

Fourth Floor, Customhouse, Boston, Mass.

1337 Dixwell Avenue, Hamden, Conn.

Room 840, 641 Washington Street, New York, N. Y.

Room 332, Post Office Building, Syracuse, N. Y.

Lawrence Building, 13-15 Orient Way, or Box C, Rutherford, N. J.

P. O. Box 1, Trenton, N. J., or Yardville Road, White Horse, N. J.

Kotler Building, Main and High Streets, Glassboro, N. J.

Frankford Arsenal, Frankford, Philadelphia, Pa.

Warehouse No. 4, General Depot, United States Army, New Cumberland,
Pa.

Rooms 488 K and L, New Post Office Building, Pittsburgh, Pa.

Room 210, New Post Office Building, Dover, Del.

Room 306, Post Office Building, Calvert and Fayette Streets, Baltimore,
Md.

Room 2138, Broad-Grace Arcade Building, Richmond, Va.

Room 217, New Federal Building, Granby Street and Brambleton Avenue,
Norfolk, Va.

Arrangements may be made for inspection and certification of shipments from
the District of Columbia by calling District 6850, Branch 2589, the inspection
house of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, Twelfth Street and
Constitution Avenue NW., Washington, D. C.

GENERAL OFFICES OF STATES COOPERATING

A Department of Entomology, Agricultural Experiment Station, New Haven,
onn.

Board of Agriculture, Dover, Del. .

State horticulturist, Augusta, Maine.

Department of Entomology, University of Maryland, College Park, Md.

Division of Plant Pest Control, Department of Agriculture, State House,
Boston, Mass.

Deputy Commissioner, Department of Agriculture, Durham, N. H.

Bureau of Plant Industry, Department of Agriculture, Trenton, N. J.



1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 17

Bureau of Plant Industry, Department of Agriculture and Markets, Albany,
IN: XY.

Bureau of Plant Industry, Department of Agriculture, Harrisburg, Pa.

Bureau of Entomology, Department of Agriculture, State House, Providence,
a.

Entomologist, Department of Agriculture, Montpelier, Vt.

Division of Plant Industry, Department of Agriculture and Immigration,
Richmond, Va.

State entomologist, Department of Agriculture, Charleston, W. Va.

[Copies of foregoing revision were sent to all common carriers doing business in or
through the regulated areas. |

NoTicE Tro GENERAL PuBLIC THROUGH NEWSPAPERS

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,
BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE,
Washington, D. C., March 7, 1936.

Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority
conferred on him by the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315),
as amended, has promulgated a revision of Notice of Quarantine No. 48 (elev-
enth revision), on account of the Japanese beetle, and of the rules and regula-
tions (fourteenth revision) suplemental thereto, effective on and after March
16, 1936. Under this revision additional territory has been included in the
regulated area in the States of Maine, Maryland, New York, and Virginia, and
the restrictions on the interstate movement by refrigerator car or motor truck
of all fruits and vegetables from the District of Columbia and portions of the
States of Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Virginia, be-
tween June 15 and October 15, inclusive, have been extended to apply to the
entire State of Delaware. Copies of the revised quarantine and regulations
may be obtained from the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine,
Washington, D. C.

R. G.’ TUGWELL,
Acting Secretary of Agriculture.

[Published in the following newspapers: The Hartford Times, Hartford, Conn., Mar.
19, 1936; the Journal, Wilmington, Del., Mar. 19, 1936; the Press-Herald, Portland,
Maine, Mar. 20, 1936; the Sun, Baltimore, Md., Mar. 20, 1936; the Post, Boston, Mass.,
Mar. 20, 1936; the Manchester Union, Manchester, N. H., Mar. 23, 1936; the News,
Newark, N. J., Mar. 21, 1936; the World-Telegram, New York, N. Y., Mar. 20, 1936;
the Bulletin, Providence, R. I., Mar. 19, 1936; the News-Leader, Richmond, Va.,
March 19, 19386; the Gazette, Charleston, W. Va., Mar. 20, 1936; the Star, Washing-

ton, D. C., Mar. 20, 1936; the Free Press, Burlington, Vt., Mar. 21, 1936; and the
Bulletin, Philadelphia, Pa., Mar. 19, 1936.]

ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO NURSERY STOCK, PLANT, AND SEED
QUARANTINE (NO. 37)

REPRINT, WITH CORRECTED FOOTNOTES AND APPENDICES
INTRODUCTORY NOTE

The supply of the last revised edition of Notice of Quarantine N vo. 37 (effective
Dec. 22, 1930) is exhausted and advantage has been taken of the opportunity
thus offered to incorporate, into this reprint, the revised regulations 3 and 7,
which became effective January 14, 1935. The name of the Bureau administer-
ing this quarantine is correctly given in regulation 7. The administrative
organization referred to in the other regulations as the Plant Quarantine and
Control Administration is now known as the Bureau of Entomology and Plant
Quarantine. Footnotes have been corrected and the appendices brought up to
date. In all other respects this is a mere reprint of the edition issued in
December 1930.

4 LEE A. STRONG.
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

67640—36——3



18 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.—March

NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 37
NURSERY STOCK, PLANT, AND SEED QUARANTINE

The fact has been determined by the Secretary of Agriculture, and notice is
hereby given, that there exist in Europe, Asia, Africa, Mexico, Central and
South America, and other foreign countries and localities certain injurious
insects and fungous diseases new to and not heretofore widely distributed
within and throughout the United States, which affect and are carried by
nursery stock and other plants and seeds, the words “nursery stock and other
plants and seeds’, including, wherever used in this notice and the rules and
regulations supplemental hereto, field-grown florists’ stock, trees, shrubs, vines,
cuttings, grafts, scions, buds, fruit pits and other seeds of fruit and orna-
mental trees or shrubs, also field, vegetable, and flower seeds, bedding plants,
and other herbaceous plants, bulbs, and roots, and other plants and plant
products for, or capable of, propagation.

Now, therefore, I, D. F. Houston, Secretary of Agriculture, under the au-
thority conferred by the act of Congress approved August 20, 1912 (37 Stat.
315), do hereby declare that it is necessary, in order to prevent the further
introduction into the United States of injurious insect pests and fungous dis-
eases, to forbid, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental
hereto, the importation into the United States of nursery stock and other plants
and seeds from the foreign countries and localities named and from any other
foreign locality or country.

On and after June 1, 1919, and until further notice, by virtue of said act
of Congress approved August 20, 1912, the importation of nursery stock and
other plants and seeds from the above named and all other foreign countries
and localities, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental
hereto, is prohibited.

This quarantine shall not apply to nursery stock and other plants and seeds
covered by special quarantines and other restrictive orders now in force, a
list of which is given in appendix A of the rules and regulations supplemental
hereto, nor to the importation by the United States Department of Agriculture
of nursery stock and other plants and seeds for experimental or scientific
purposes.

Done in the District of Columbia this 18th day of November 1918.

Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of
Agriculture.

[SEAL] D. F. Houston,
Secretary of Agriculture.

REVISED RULES AND REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE OF QUARANTINE
NO. 37, GOVERNING THE IMPORTATION OF NURSERY STOCK AND OTHER PLANTS
AND SEEDS INTO THE UNITED STATES

[Effective on and after December 22, 1930, and superseding the regulations heretofore
issued governing the importation of nursery stock]

REGULATION 1. DEFINITIONS

For the purposes of these regulations the following words, names, and terms
Shall be construed, respectively, to mean:

(a) Nursery stock and other plants and seeds: Field-grown florists’ stock,
trees, shrubs, vines, cuttings, grafts, scions, buds, fruit pits and other seeds of
fruit and ornamental trees or shrubs; also field, vegetable, and flower seeds,
bedding plants, and other herbaceous plants, bulbs, and roots, and other plants
and plant products for, or capable of, propagation.

(b) Field seeds: Seeds of cereal, forage, and other field crops.

(c) Vegetable seeds: Seeds of garden vegetables and other truck crops.

(d) Flower seeds: Seeds of annual, biennial, or even perennial flowering
plants which are essentially herbaceous, namely, plants which perish annually
down to, and sometimes including, the root (i. e., soft, succulent plants).

(e) Seeds of hardy perennial plants: Seeds of woody or other plants which
are not herbaceous and are either of a hardy and woody growth or are not
killed to the ground in temperate zones.



1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 19

(f) Bulbs and corms: Bulb—an enlarged subterranean bud with fleshy scales
or coats (for example, tulips, Spanish iris) : Corm—an enlarged fleshy base
of a stem, bulb-like but solid (for example, gladiolus, cyclamen, crocus).

(g) Plant roots, rhizomes, tubers: Plant roots—the more or less fibrous roots
of any plant (for example, fruit seedlings, ornamentals, lily of the valley pips) ;
rhizomes—a root stock or subterranean stem, usually fleshy and rooted at the
nodes (for example, German iris, Aspidistra) ; tuber—a thickened, fleshy sub-
terranean branch having numerous buds or eyes (for example, potatoes).

(h) New varieties: A new variety is understood to mean a novelty, i. e., a
new plant, variety, strain, type, or form, either recognized by the trade as such
or so listed or described in catalogs, trade journals, or other publications, or
duly and properly certified as such by the originator or introducer.

(i) Necessary propagating stock: Stock of old or standard varieties not
available in this country and imported for the multiplication of the plants in
question as a nursery or florist enterprise as distinguished from importations for
the immediate or ultimate sale of the stocks actually imported.

(j) Limited quantities: As used in regulation 14 “limited quantities” is
understood to mean such quantities as will supply any reasonable need for the
establishment of commercial reproduction plantings or as may be necessary for
the experimental, educational, or scientific purpose intended.

REGULATION 2. PLANT PropuUCcTs AND SEEDS FOR WHICH PERMIT Is NoT REQUIRED

Plant products capable of propagation, imported for medicinal, food, or manu-
facturing purposes, and field, vegetable, and flower seeds, except such products
and seeds as are governed by special quarantines and other restrictive orders
now in force and such as may hereafter be made the subject of special quaran-
tines or restrictive orders,? may be imported without permit or other compliance
with these regulations, when free from sand, soil, or earth: Provided, That any
such articles may be made subject to entry only under permit and on compli-
ance with the safeguards to be prescribed therein when it shall be determined
by the Secretary of Agriculture that their entry for the purpose indicated may
involve a risk of the introduction into the United States of injurious insect
pests or fungous diseases. Such determination with respect to any such articles
shall become effective after due notice.

REGULATION 3. NurseRY STocK, OTHER PLANTS AND PARTS OF PLANTS,
INCLUDING SEEDS, FOR WHICH A PERMIT IS REQUIRED

(As revised Jan. 14, 1935; effective Jan. 14, 1935)

The following nursery stock, other plants and parts of plants, including seeds,
not including, however, such other plants and parts of plants as are named in
appendix A, which are governed by special quarantines and other restrictive
orders now in force, nor such as may hereafter be made the subject of special
quarantines, may be imported, without limitation as to quantity or use, from
countries which maintain inspection (appendix B), under permit upon com-
pliance with these regulations:

(1) Bulbs, corms, or root stocks (pips) of the following genera: Lilium
(lily), Convallaria (lily-of-the-valley), Hyacinthus (hyacinth), Tulipa (tulip),
and Crocus; and, until further notice, Chionodoxa (glory-of-the-snow), Galan-
thus (snowdrop), Scilla (squill), Fritillaria, Muscari (grape-hyacinth), Jia,
and Hranthis (winter aconite) ; and, on and after December 15, 1936, Narcissus
(daffodil and jonquil).

(2) Cuttings, scions, and buds of fruits or nuts: Provided, That cuttings,
scions, and buds of fruits or nuts may be imported from Asia, Japan, Philip-
pine Islands, and Oceania (including Australia and New Zealand) under the
provisions of regulation 14 only. (Stocks of fruits or nuts may not be
imported, under permit or otherwise.)

(3) Rose stocks, including Manetti, Rosa multiflora (brier rose), and R.
rugosa.

2See appendix A to the Revised Rules and Regulations Supplemental to Notice of
Quarantine No. 37 for list of such quarantines and restrictive orders. In addition to the
quarantines and restrictive orders listed, a notice issued May 8, 1930, specifies that all
species of Aglaonema may be imported on and after June 1, 1930, only under the provi-
sions of regulation 14.



20 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan—March

(4) Nuts, including palm seeds for growing purposes: Provided, That such
nuts or seeds shall be free from pulp.

(5) Seeds of fruit, forest, ornamental, and shade trees, seeds of deciduous
and evergreen ornamental shrubs, and seeds of hardy perennial plants: Pro-
vided, That such seeds shall be free from pulp: Provided further, That citrus
seeds may be imported only through specified ports subject to disinfection as
provided in regulation 9: Provided further, That mango seeds may not be
imported under permit or otherwise, except from the countries of North
America, Central America, and South America, and the West Indies.

Importations from countries not maintaining inspection of nursery stock,
other plants and parts of plants, including seeds, the entry of which is per-
missible under this regulation, may be made under permit upon compliance
with these regulations in limited quantities for public-service purposes only,
but this limitation shall not apply to tree seeds.

(6) Materials permitted entry under Quarantine No. 56 for consumption
purposes are authorized entry under this regulation for propagation.

REGULATION 4. APPLICATION FOR PERMITS FOR IMPORTATION OF NURSERY STOCK
AND OTHER PLANTS AND SEEDS?

Persons contemplating the importation of nursery stock and other plants
and seeds, the entry of which is permitted under regulation 3, shall first make
application to the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration for a permit,
stating in the application the exact designation of the nursery stock and other
plants and seeds to be imported, the name and address of the exporter, the
country and locality where grown, the port of entry, and the name and address
of the importer in the United States to whom the permit should be sent.*

Applications for permits should be made in advance of the proposed ship-
ments, but if, through no fault of the importer, a shipment should arrive before
a permit is received the importation will be held in customs custody at the
risk and expense of the importer for a period not exceeding 20 days pending
the receipt of the permit.

Plant material refused entry shall, at the expense of the owner or his agent,
either be removed from United States territory immediately or, at the direction
of the owner or his agent, abandoned to the collector of customs for destruction.

Applications may be made by telegraph, in which case the information required
above must be given.

With the exception of the products enumerated under regulation 2, permits
are required for nursery stock and other plants and seeds entering the United
States for immediate transportation in bond to foreign countries.

Applications for permit to import nursery stock and other plants and Seeds
from countries which do not maintain inspection must contain a definite state-
ment of the quantity to be imported. Permits for importations from such
countries, other than for tree seeds (see regulation 3), will be issued only to
cover limited quantities and the permit will be valid only for a single importa-
tion. (See appendix B for list of countries which maintain inspection. )

REGULATION 5. DELIVERY IN BOND PENDING RECEIPT OF PERMIT WILL BE ALLOWED
FOR SHIPMENT F'roM COUNTRIES MAINTAINING INSPECTION

If the required permit be not at hand upon arrival of a shipment from a
country which maintains inspection, and such shipment meets the requirements
of regulations 7 and 8, it may be delivered to the importer, consignee, or agent
for the proper care thereof upon the filing of a bond with approved sureties
in double the invoice value (but in no case Jess than $100), the condition of
which shall be that the importation shall not be removed from the port of entry,
but shall be redelivered to the collector of customs within 20 days from the date

3A post-office order dated May 27, 1913, as amended Dec. 16, 1913, prohibits the im-
portation by mail of all growing or living plants, seeds, and other plant products for
propagation, except field, vegetable, and flower seeds. All importations of nursery stock
and other plants and seeds, other than field, vegetable, and flower seeds, must be made b
Selgin or express. This order was modified by a post-office order under date of July 28,
1924, to provide, on request, for importation by mail of material imported under the
provisions of regulations 8, 14, and 15, but only under special shipping tags secured
from the Department of Agriculture and bearing the address, Bureau of Entomology
and Plant Quarantine, United States Department of Agriculture,

*Application form no. EQ—687, will be sent on request.





1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS of

of arrival at the port, unless in the meantime the collector is presented with a
proper permit; or, if the importer, consignee, or agent shall so elect, the goods
may, so far as the Department of Agriculture 1s concerned, be retained in cus-
toms custody for a period not exceeding 20 days, pending the issuance of the
permit, wholly at the risk and expense of the importer,

REGULATION 6. ISSUANCE OF PERMITS

On approval by the Secretary of Agricuiture of an application for the im-
portation of nursery stock and other plants and seeds a permit will be issued
in quadruplicate. One copy will be furnished to the applicant for presenta-
tion to the customs officer at the port of entry, one copy will be mailed to the
collector of customs, and one to the inspector of the Department of Agriculture
at the port of entry, and the fourth will be filed with the application.

Permits shall be valid until revoked, unless otherwise specified therein, and
will be issued for such ports aS may from time to time be approved by the
Plant Quarantine and Control Administration. The permit will be addressed
to the collector of customs at the port for which it is issued.

REGULATION 7. CERTIFICATION, MARKING, FrEEDOM From SAND, Sort, or HARTH,
AND APPROVED PACKING MATERIAL

(As revised Jan. 14, 1935; effective Jan. 14, 19385)

The importation of nursery stock and other plants and seeds from countries
which maintain inspection will not be allowed unless the invoice is accom-
panied by an original certificate, and unless each container bears a copy cer-
tificate issued by a duly authorized official of the country from which it is
exported stating that the nursery stock and other plants and seeds covered
by the certificate have been thoroughly inspected by him or under his direction
at the time of packing, and found, or believed to be, free from injurious plant
diseases and insect pests.

Hach certificate and copy certificate shall give the date of inspection, name
of the grower or exporter, the district or locality and the country where
grown, and a statement that the nursery stock and other plants and seeds
have been inspected by a duly authorized official and found, or believed to be,
free from insect pests and plant diseases. The original certificate shall be
signed and sealed by, and the copy certificate shall bear the seal and the actual
or reproduced signature of, a responsible inspection official of the country of
origin.

Lists of officials in foreign countries authorized to inspect nursery stock and
other plants and seeds, giving their names and official designations, will be
furnished to collectors of customs through the Secretary of the Treasury.

Each case, box, or other container or covering of nursery stock and other
plants and seeds offered for entry shall be plainly and correctly marked to
show the number of the permit, the general nature and quantity of the contents,
the district or locality and country where grown, the name and address of the
exporter, and the name and address of the consignee: Provided, That all im-
portations of plants authorized under regulation 14 shall be addressed to the
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Entomology and Plant
Quarantine, at the port designated in the permit. In addition to the address,
as indicated, such shipments shall be marked with the permit number and
name of the importer.

All nursery stock and other plants and seeds offered for import must be free
from sand, soil, or earth; and all plant roots, rhizomes, tubers, ete., must
be freed by washing or other means from such sand, soil, or earth: Provided,
That this requirement shall not apply to plants imported from Canada under
regulation 15: Provided further, That sand, soil, or earth may be employed for
the packing of bulbs, corms, seeds, and nuts when such sand, soil, or earth has
been sterilized or otherwise safeguarded in accordance with the methods pre-
scribed by the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine and is so certified
by the duly authorized inspector of the country of origin. The use of such
sand, soil, or earth as packing for plants other than bulbs, corms, seeds, and
nuts is not authorized.

All packing materials employed in connection with importations of nursery
stock and other plants and seeds are subject to approval as to such use by
the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine. Such packing material must



22 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.—March

not previously have been used as packing or otherwise in connection with living
plants, and except as provided in the preceding paragraph for bulbs, corms,
seeds, and nuts, must be free from sand, soil, or earth, and must be certified
as meeting these conditions by the duly authorized inspector of the country of
origin.

If a package of nursery stock and other plants and seeds offered for entry
includes any prohibited article, or if any of the plants have not been freed
from earth, the entire package may be refused entry.

REGULATION 8. INSPECTION

In addition to the inspection at destination by the- proper official of a State,
Territory, or District of the United States, provided for in section 2 of the
Plant Quarantine Act of 1912, nursery stock and other plants and seeds im-
ported under regulations 3 and 15 shall be subject as a condition of entry to
such preliminary inspection ag shall be required by the Plant Quarantine and
Control Administration: Provided, That nursery stock and other plants and
seeds imported under regulations 83 and 15 from countries which do not maintain
inspection shall not be delivered to the importer or consignee until they have
been examined by an inspector of the Department of Agriculture and found to
be free from plant diseases and insect pests, or if infested, capable, in the
judgment of the inspector, of being adequately safeguarded by disinfection.

REGULATION 9. DISINFECTION A CONDITION OF ENTRY

Nursery stock and other plants and seeds imported under regulations 3 and
15 shall be subject, as a condition of entry, to such disinfection as shall be
required by the inspector of the Department of Agriculture. When disinfec-
tion is required, the nursery stock and other plants and seeds involved will
be delivered to the permittee for disinfection upon the filing with the collector
of customs of a bond in the amount of $5,000, or in an amount equal to the
invoice value if such value be less than $5,000, but in no case to be less than
$100, with approved sureties, the condition of which shall be that the nursery
stock and other plants and seeds shall be disinfected under the supervision
of an inspector of the Department of Agriculture; that no case or other con-
tainer thereof shall be broken, opened, or removed from the port of entry unless
and until a written notice is given to such collector by an inspector of the
Department of Agriculture that the nursery stock and other plants and seeds
have been properly disinfected; and that the importation shall be redelivered
to the collector of customs within 40 days from arrival at the port of entry.
All charges incident to inspection and disinfection, other than the services of
the inspector, shall be paid by the importer.

REGULATION 10. NoTIcE oF ARRIVAL BY PERMITTEE

Immediately upon arrival of the nursery stock and other plants and seeds
at the port of entry, the permittee shall submit in duplicate notice to the Secre-
tary of Agriculture, through the collector of customs, on forms provided for
that purpose, stating the number of the permit, date of entry, name of ship or
vessel, the country and locality where grown, name of the foreign shipper,
number of cases and marks and numbers on cases, the general nature and quan-
tity of the nursery stock and other plants and seeds, the port of entry, and the
name of the importer or broker at the port of entry.

REGULATION 11. Norice oF SHIPMENT BY PERMITTEE

After entry of the nursery stock and other plants and seeds and before
removal from the port of entry for each separate shipment or consignment
thereof the permittee shall notify the Secretary of Agriculture in duplicate, on
forms provided for that purpose, stating the number of the permit, the date
of entry, the port of entry, the customs entry number, name and address of the
consignee to whom it is proposed to forward the shipment, the general nature
and quantity of the nursery stock and other plants and seeds, the number of
cases or other containers included in the shipment, and the case or container



5 For detailed instructions relative to packing materials, including sterilized soil for
bulbs, corms, seeds, and nuts, see B. HB. P. Q.—369.





1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 23

numbers and marks, together with the probable date of delivery for and route
of transportation. A separate report is required for each ultimate consignee.

At the same time a copy of the notice to the Secretary of Agriculture shall
be sent by the permittee to the duly authorized inspector or other officer of
the State, Territory, or District to which the nursery stock and other plants and
seeds are to be shipped. A list of such inspectors and officers is appended.

Should a consignee named in such a notice ship or deliver for shipment to any
other State, Territory, or District such nursery stock and other plants or seeds
before they have been inspected by a duly authorized State, Territory, or Dis-
trict inspector or officer, he shall, prior to such shipment, give like notices to
the Secretary of Agriculture and to the duly authorized inspector or other
officer of the State, Territory, or District to which the nursery stock and other
plants and seeds are to be reshipped.

Nursery stock and other plants and seeds which have been once inspected and
passed by a duly authorized State, Territorial, or District inspector or other
officer, will be allowed to move interstate without restrictions other than those
imposed on the interstate movement of domestic nursery stock.

REGULATION 12. MARKING A CONDITION OF INTERSTATE SHIPMENT OF NURSERY
STocK AND OTHER PLANTS AND SHEDS Not INSPECTED

No person shall ship or deliver for shipment from one State, Territory, or
District of the United States into any other State, Territory, or District any
imported nursery stock and other plants and seeds, the case, box, package,
crate, bale, or bundle whereof is not plainly marked so as to show the general
nature and quantity of the contents, the name and address of the consignee, and
the country and locality where grown, unless and until such imported nursery
stock and other plants and seeds have been inspected and passed by the proper
official of a State, Territory, or District of the United States.

REGULATION 13. CANCELATION OF PERMITS FOR VIOLATION OF REGULATIONS

Permits may be canceled and further permits refused for the importation of
the products of any grower or exporter who has violated the Plant Quarantine
Act or any rules and regulations promulgated thereunder, or for the importa-
tion of the products of any country whose inspection is found by the Plant
Quarantine and Control Administration as the result of its examinations of
importations therefrom to be merely perfunctory, or for importations by any
permittee who fails to give any notice required by these rules and regulations,
or for the giving of a false or incomplete notice, or the mislabeling of any
shipment with intent to evade any provision of the Plant Quarantine Act or
any rules and regulations thereunder.

REGULATION 14. SpecrAL PERMITS FOR IMPORTATION IN LIMITED QUANTITIES OF
RESTRICTED PLANTS

Application may be made to the Secretary of Agriculture for special per-
mits for the importation, in limited quantities and under conditions and safe-
guards to be prescribed in such permits, of nursery stock and other plants and
seeds not covered by the preceding regulations, for the purpose of keeping the
country supplied with new varieiies and necessary propagating stock, or for
any necessary experimental, educational, or scientific purpose: Provided, That
this shall not apply to nursery stock and other plants and seeds covered by
special quarantines and other restrictive orders now in force, nor to such as°
may hereafter be made the subject of special quarantines. A list of nursery
stock and other plants and seeds covered by special quarantines and other
restrictive orders now in force is given in Appendix A of these regulations.

The requirements of regulations 7, 8, 9, and 10, with respect to certification,
marking, freedom from sand, soil, or earth, packing materials, inspection,
disinfection, and notice of arrival shall apply also to importations authorized
under special permits.°

®A special form of application (no. 207) must be filléd out. This form will be sent on
request. For mail entry of special permit material under regulation 14, see footnote 2
under regulation 4. Permits should be secured in advance. Material arriving without a
permit is likely to be returned at once or destroyed. In certain instances, however, it
may be handled as indicated in the second paragraph of regulation 4.



24 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.—March

REGULATION 15. PERMITS FOR THE IMPORTATION oF NuRSERY STOCK AND OTHER
PLANTS AND SHEDS FRoM CoUNTRIES CONTIGUOUS TO THE UNITED STATES

When it is deemed by the Secretary of Agriculture that the importation
from countries contiguous to the United States of any class or classes of
nursery stock and other plants and seeds the entry of which is not provided
for under regulations 2 and 3 will not be attended by serious risk to the
agriculture, horticulture, or floriculture of the United States, permits may be
issued, on application, authorizing the entry of such nursery stock and other
plants and seeds under such safeguards as may be prescribed in the permits:
Provided, That importations under this regulation shall be limited to specific
classes of nursery stock and other plants and seeds which can be considered as
peculiar to or standard productions of such contiguous countries, as opposed
to stock imported from foreign countries and held or grown on for later sale:
Provided further, That this shall not apply to nursery stock and other plants
and seeds governed by special quarantines and other restrictive orders, other
than quarantine 37, now in force, nor to such as may hereafter be made the
subject of special quarantines: Provided further, That in addition to the cer-
tificate required by regulation 7, the invoice covering nursery stock and other
plants and seeds offered for entry under this regulation must be accompanied
by a certificate of a duly authorized official of the country of origin, stating that
the nursery stock and other plants and seeds proposed to be exported to the
United States have been produced or grown in the country from which they are
proposed to be exported:* Provided further, That cut flowers from the Domin-
ion of Canada may be imported into the United States without permit or other
restriction.

The above rules and regulations are hereby adopted and shall be effective on
and after December 22, 1930, and shall supersede the rules and regulations
governing the importation of nursery stock into the United States which were
promulgated October 24, 1928, as amended July 29, 1929.

Done at the city of Washington this 17th day of December 1930.

Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.

[ SEAL] ARTHUR M. Hype,
Secretary of Agriculture.

APPENDIX A

The entry of the following plant material for propagation is prohibited or
restricted by specific quarantines and other restrictive orders now in force:

(a) Irish potatoes from all countries except the Dominion of Canada and
Bermuda.

(b) All five-leafed pines and all species and varieties of the genera Ribes and
Grossularia from each and every country of Europe and Asia and from the
Dominion of Canada and Newfoundland.

(c) Cottonseed (including seed cotton) of all species and varieties from any
foreign locality and country.

(d) Seeds of the avocado or alligator pear from Mexico and the countries of
Central America.

(e) Canes of sugarcane or parts thereof from all foreign countries.

(f) All citrus nursery stock (tribe Citrinae), including buds and scions from
all foreign localities and countries.

_ (g) All pines not included in paragraph (b) from all European countries and
localities.

(h) Seed and all other portions in the raw or unmanufactured state of In-
dian corn or maize (Zea mays L.), and the closely related plants, including all
species of Teosinte (Huchlaena), Job’s tears (Coix), Polytoca, Chinoachne, and
Sclerachne, from southeastern Asia (including India, Siam, Indo-China, and
China), Malayan Archipelago, Australia, New Zealand, Oceania, Philippine
Islands, Formosa, Japan, and adjacent islands.

(i) All varieties of sweetpotatoes and yams (Ipomoea batatas and Dios-
corea spp.) from all foreign countries and localities.

7 Application form no. E. Q.—687 for permit under this regulation will be sent on
request.





1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 25

(j) All species or varieties of banana plants (Musa spp.) from all foreign
countries and localities.

(k%) All varieties of bamboo seed, plants, or cuttings thereof, capable of
propagation, including all genera and species of the tribe Bambuseae, from all
foreign countries.

(1) Seed or paddy rice from all foreign countries and localities.

(m) Wheat from Australia, India, Japan, Italy, China, Union of South
Africa, and Spain.

(n) Seed and all other portions in the raw or unmanufactured state of
Indian corn or maize, broomcorn, sweet sorghums, grain sorghums, Sudan grass,
Johnson grass, sugarcane, pearl millet, napier grass, teosinte, and Job’s tears
from all foreign countries and localities.

(o) All plants, cuttings, scions, and seeds of elm and related plants from
the Continent of Europe.

APPENDIX B
LIST OF THE FOREIGN COUNTRIES WHICH HAVE PROVIDED FOR INSPECTION AND
CERTIFICATION IN CONFORMITY WITH THE REQUIREMENTS OF THE PLANT QUAR-
ANTINE ACT OF AUGUST 20, 1912

Australia. Hong Kong. Mexico.

Austria. Hungary. Morocco (French).
Azores. Treland. New Zealand.
Barbados. Italy. Philippine Islands.
Belgium. Jamaica. Scotland.
Bermuda. Japan. Union of South Africa.
Brazil. Java. Spain.
British Guiana. Leeward Islands: Straits Settlements.
Canada. Antigua. Switzerland.
Cuba. St. Christopher- Trinidad.
Czechoslovakia. Nevis. Wales.
Denmark. Dominica. Windward Islands:
England. Montserrat. Granada,
France. Virgin Islands. St. Lucia.
Germany. Grand Duchy of Luxem- St. Vincent.
Guatemala. burg.
Holland.

APPENDIX C

STATE INSPECTION OFFICIALS

Alabama: Chief, division of plant industry, Montgomery, Ala.

Arizona: State entomologist, Phoenix, Ariz.

Arkansas: Chief inspector, State plant board, Little’ Rock, Ark.

California: Chief, bureau of plant quarantine, State department of agricul-
ture, Sacramento, Calif.

Colorado: Bureau of plant and insect control, Capitol Building, Denver.

Connecticut: State entomologist, New Haven, Conn.

Delaware. Plant pathologist, State board of agriculture, Dover, Del.

District of Columbia: United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of
Entomology and Plant Quarantine, Washington, D. C.

Florida: Quarantine inspector, State plant board, Gainesville, Fla.

Georgia: State entomologist, Atlanta, Ga.

Hawaii: Chief plant inspector, board of commissioners of agriculture and
forestry, Honolulu, T. H.

Idaho: Director, bureau of plant industry, Boise, Idaho.

Illinois: Chief plant inspector, State Entomologist Building, Urbana, Ill.

Indiana: State entomologist, Indianapolis, Ind.

Iowa: State entomologist, Ames, Iowa.

Kansas, north: State entomologist, Kansas State Agricultural College, Man-
hattan, Kans.

Kansas, south: State entomologist, University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kans.

Kentucky: State entomologist, Lexington, Ky.

Louisiana: State entomologist, Baton Rouge, La.

Maine: State horticulturist, Augusta, Maine.

Maryland: State entomologist, College Park, Md.



96 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.—March

Massachusetts: Director, division of plant pest control, State House, Boston,
Mass.

Michigan: State inspector of orchards and nurseries, State department of
agriculture, Lansing, Mich.

Minnesota: State entomologist, University Farm, St. Paul, Minn.

Mississippi: Entomologist, State plant board, State College, Miss.

Missouri: Plant officer, department of agriculture, Jefferson City, Mo.

Montana: Chief, division of horticulture, Missoula, Mont.

Nebraska: Nursery inspector, State department of agriculture, Lincoln, Nebr.

Nevada: Director, division of plant industry, Reno, Nev.

New Hampshire: Deputy commissioner of agriculture, Durham, N. H.

New Jersey: Chief, bureau of plant industry, State department of agricul-
ture, Trenton, N. J.

New Mexico: Biologist, agricultural experiment station, State College, N. Mex.

New York: Director, bureau of plant industry, department of agriculture and
markets, Albany, N. Y.

North Carolina: State entomologist, State department of agriculture, Raleigh,
N. C.

North Dakota: State entomologist, Fargo, N. Dak.

Ohio: Chief, division of plant industry, State department of agriculture,
Columbus, Ohio.

Oklahoma: State plant board, Oklahoma City, Okla.

For seeds: Attention, seed analyst.
For other nursery stock: Attention, nursery inspector.

Oregon: Chief, division of plant industry, Agriculture Building, Salem, Oreg.

Pennsylvania: Director, bureau of plant industry, State department of agri-
culture, Harrisburg, Pa.

Puerto Rico: Chief plant quarantine inspector, care Commissioner of Agricul-
ture and Labor, San Juan, P. R.

Rhode Island: Chief, bureau of entomology, State House, Providence, R. I.

South Carolina: Chief, division of entomology, Clemson College, S. C.

South Dakota: State nursery inspector, Pierre, S. Dak.

Tennessee: State entomologist, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tenn.

Texas: Chief inspector of nurseries, Austin, Tex. .

Utah: State agriculture inspector, Salt Lake City, Utah.

Vermont: State nursery inspector, Burlington, Vt.

Virginia: State entomologist, 1112 State Office Building, Richmond, Va.

Washington: Supervisor of horticulture, Olympia, Wash.

West Virginia: State department of agriculture, Charleston, W. Va.

Wisconsin: State entomologist, Capitol Annex, Madison, Wis.

Wyoming: State entomologist, State department of agriculture, Powell, Wyo.

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO MEXICAN FRUIT FLY
‘QUARANTINE (NO. 64)

SHIPPING SEASON FOR TEXAS CITRUS FRUIT EXTENDED TO MARCH 31

(Press notice)
JANUARY 13, 1936.

The season for shipping citrus fruit from Texas under the Mexican fruit fly
quarantine regulations, which apply to Brooks, Willacy, Cameron, and Hidalgo
Counties, has been extended provisionally to include March 31, 1936, Lee A.
Strong, Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, announced
today. If conditions of reinfestation occur or if growers fail to observe sanitary
requirements and fail to comply with clean-up restrictions, it may be necessary
to set an earlier date. The shipping season normally closes—under the quar-
antine—in March.

The extension was announced after consultation with the Texas State Depart-
ment of Agriculture and is concurred in by J. E. McDonald, commissioner of
agriculture. Quarantine officials of the State Department of Agriculture of
Texas and of the United States Department of Agriculture anticipate the same
cooperation heretofore extended in this work by growers and packers of the
lower Rio Grande Valley.

Mr. Strong pointed out that the United States Department of Agriculture de-
sires to assist in every possible manner in the movement of the Texas citrus
crop. At the same time there must be full appreciation of the Department’s







1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 27

responsibility to prevent the building up of infestation and the spread of the
fruit fly. Mr. Strong hopes and believes that the growers will at all times
realize the importance of full compliance with the clean-up regulations. Dis-
covery of any infestation of the Mexican fruit fly, he said, will necessarily require
immediate eradication and precautionary clean-up measures in any area which
may be involved.

B. E. P. Q.-387 JANUARY 13, 1936.

ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS—SHIPPING SEASON FOR TEXAS CITRUS FRUIT
. EXTENDED

(Issued under regulation 7, sec. A, Federal Quarantine No. 64)

(Approved Jan. 13, 1936; issued Jan. 13, 1936)

The shipping season for citrus fruit under the Federal Mexican fruit fly
quarantine (Notice of Quarantine No. 64) from the Counties of Brooks, Willacy,
Cameron, and Hidalgo, in Texas, is hereby extended to the close of March
31, 1936, provided conditions of infestation or lack of observance of sanitary
requirements and failure to comply with clean-up restrictions do not necessitate
an earlier closing date.

The discovery of any infestation of this insect within the regulated area will
of necessity require immediate eradication and precautionary clean-up measures
in any area which may be involved.

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

—

MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS

INSTRUCTIONS TO PUERTO RICAN POSTMASTERS

Post OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, D. C., March 10, 1936.
POSTMASTER :

In a recent 1-day test made at the post office of New York, N. Y., there were
received many parcels from a number of post offices in Puerto Rico containing
green ginger, banana leaves, oranges, yams, and other plant materials which
were accepted for mailing to the mainland of the United States in violation of
Quarantine Orders Nos. 16, 30, 32, 47, 58, and 60, in that they were either pro-
hibited from entry into the United States or were not accompanied with the
required certificate of inspection.

A copy of each of the quarantine orders mentioned is inclosed, and you are
requested to take such steps as will prevent the acceptance of any parcels mailed
at your office in future addressed to the mainland of the United States which
contain any of the plants or plant products quarantined by the various orders
mentioned or which contain plant products which are not accompanied with the
prescribed certificate.

When any unpermissible plants or plant products are discovered in such parcels
or where parcels of the other plants and plant products referred to are not
accompanied with the prescribed certificate of inspection, the parcels should
be returned to the senders and their attention invited to the provisions of the
quarantine orders mentioned, particularly the penalty for violation thereof,
and they should be cautioned not to attempt to mail such matter to the main-
land in future, except as provided therein.

Quarantine Order No. 30 was amended (effective Oct. 10, 1935), lifting the
prohibition from yams and allowing the movement of these tubers to the main-
land under the restrictions of Quarantine Order No. 58, but sweetpotatoes are
still prohibited movement to the mainland.

Your cooperation in carefully watching for parcels of plant material which

may be mailed at your office addressed to the mainland of the United States
will be appreciated.

Very truly yours,

C. B. EILENBERGER,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.



28 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan—March

IMPORTATION OF PLANT PRODUCTS BY MAIL (T. D. 48181)

REVISED REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE JOINT TREATMENT OF SUCH IMPORTATIONS
UNDER THE PLANT QUARANTINE ACT BY PLANT QUARANTINE INSPECTORS, CUS-
TOMS OFFICERS, AND PosTMAsTERS—T. D. 40363, T. D. 40753, anp T. D. 41562
SUPERSEDED. ;

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,
OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONER OF CUSTOMS,
Washington, D. C.
To Collectors of Customs and Others Concerned:

1. Under various orders, quarantines, and regulations promulgated by the
Secretary of Agriculture under authority of the Plant Quarantine Act of August
20, 1912 (387 Stat. 315), as amended, the entry into the United States of cer-
tain plants and plant products is prohibited or restricted. (See United States
Official Postal Guide, July 1935, section 49, pages 233-234 and also articles 389
and 559 to 565 inclusive of the Customs Regulations of 1931.) As an aid in
enforcing these or subsequent orders, quarantines, and regulations, provisions
have been made by the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine of the
United States Department of Agriculture, concurrently with the Postal and
Customs Services, to insure closer inspection of such importations.

2. Inspectors of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine and cus-
toms officers are stationed at the following post offices:

Atlanta, Ga. Hidalgo, Tex. Philadelphia, Pa.
Baltimore, Md. Honolulu, T. H. Port Arthur, Tex.
Bellingham, Wash. Houston, Tex. Portland, Oreg.
Blaine, Wash. Jacksonville, Fla. Presidio, Tex.
Boston, Mass. Key West, Fla. Rio Grande City, Tex.
Brownsville, Tex. Laredo, Tex. Roma, Tex.

Buffalo, N. Y. Los Angeles, Calif. St. Paul, Minn.
Calexico, Calif. (including San Pedro) San Diego, Calif.
Charleston, S. C. Miami, Fla. San Francisco, Calif.
Chicago, Il. Mobile, Ala. San Juan, P. R.

Del Rio, Tex. Naco, Ariz. San Ysidro, Calif.
Detroit, Mich. New Orleans, La. Savannah, Ga.
Douglas, Ariz. New York, N. Y. Seattle, Wash.

Eagle Pass, Tex. Nogales, Ariz. Tampa, Fla.

El Paso, Tex. Norfo!k, Va. Washington, D. C.
Galveston, Tex. Pensacola, Fla.

3. All parcel post or other mail packages from foreign countries which, either
from examination or external evidence, are found to contain plants or plant
products shall be dispatched for submission, or actually submitted, to the plant
quarantine inspector (article 564 (e), Customs Regulations of 1931) at the most
accessible of the foregoing places, who shall pass upon the contents, under the
Plant Quarantine Act, and with the cooperation of the customs and postal
officers, either (1) release the package from further plant-quarantine examina-
tion and indorse his decision thereon; or (2) divert it to Washington, D. C., San
Francisco, Calif., or Seattle, Wash., for disposition. If so diverted, the plant-
quarantine inspector shall attach to the package the yellow-and-green special
mailing tag addressed to the proper quarantine station. The package should
also be accompanied by customs card form 3511 and transmitted in accordance
with the appropriate provisions of article 367 (a) (JR 12a) of the Customs
Regulations of 1931.

4. The customs officers at San Francisco, Calif., Seattle, Wash., and Washing-
ton, D. C., shall keep a record of such packages as may be delivered to represent-
atives of the Department of Agriculture, and upon the return thereof shall
prepare mail entry to accompany the dutiable package and deliver. it to the
postmaster for delivery or onward dispatch; or in appropriate cases subject tie
shipment to formal customs-entry procedure.

5. The plant-quarantine inspector may require the entire shipment to be re-
‘urned to the country of origin as a prohibited importation, in which event he
shall indorse his action thereon and deliver the shipment over to the collector
of customs, who shall in turn deliver it to the postmaster for dispatch to the
country of origin. If the plant material, upon examination, is deemed dangerous
to plant life, the collector of customs shall permit the plant-quarantine inspector
to destroy immediately both the container and contents. In either case the plant-
quarantine inspector shall notify the addressee of the action taken and the
reason therefor. If the objectionable plant material forms only a portion of the
contents of the mail package and in the judgment of the inspector the package
can safely be delivered to the addressee, after removing and destroying the





1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 29

objectionable material, such procedure is authorized. In the latter case the
inspector shall place in the package a memorandum (B. HE. P. Q. form 387)
informing the addressee of the action taken by the inspector and describing the
matter which has been seized and destroyed and the reasons therefor. (See
T. D. 42952.) Mail packages received at San Juan, P. R., and Honolulu, T. H.,
shall be accorded treatment as herein prescribed at these two ports and not
diverted to Washington, D. C., San Francisco, Calif., or Seattle, Wash.

6. Packages containing plants or plant products received in closed mail
dispatches made up direct to post offices (located at a customs port at which no
plant-quarantine inspector is stationed) not included in the foregoing list of
post offices. or such packages which are forwarded to these post offices from the
post office of original receipt without having received plant-quarantine examina-
tion, shall be forwarded by the collector of customs through the postmaster (ac-
companied by customs card form 3511 in the manner heretofore described) to
the most accessible of the post offices listed above for treatment in accordance
with the foregoing instructions. Packages discovered at post offices where no
customs officer is located shall be forwarded by the postmaster under his official
penalty envelope addressed to the collector of customs at the most accessible of
the post offices listed for appropriate treatment as prescribed herein.

7. The provisions of T. D. 40868, T. D. 40753, and T. D. 41562 are hereby
revoked and superseded.

8. The foregoing regulations have been approved by the Postmaster General
and the Secretary of Agriculture.

JAMES H. Moy ze,
Commissioner of Customs.
Approved February 25, 1936:
WAYNE C. TAYLOR,
Acting Secretary of the Treasury.

IMPORTATIONS BY MAIL—REGULATIONS (T. D. 48237)

REGULATIONS PERMITTING (1) Maiu IMporTATIONS OF PLANT MATERIAL, AND (2)
MAIL PARCELS IN TRANSIT INTENDED FOR OUTWARD DISPATCH BY PRIVATE AIR
TRANSPORTATION AGENCIES, To Br IMMEDIATELY EXPorTED, FREE oF DUTY,
UNDER CUSTOMS SUPERVISION

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,
OFFICH OF THE COMMISSIONER OF CUSTOMS,
Washington, D. C.
To Collectors of Customs and Others Concerned:

(A)Shipments of plant material may be imported by mail for immediate
exportation by mail, free of duty, subject to the following regulations, which
have been approved by the Department of Agriculture and the Post Office
Department:

1. Each shipment shall be dispatched in the mails from abroad, accompanied
by a yellow and green special mail tag bearing the serial number of the
permit for entry for immediate exportation or immediate transportation and
exportation, issued by the United States Department of Agriculture, and also
the postal form of customs declaration.

2. Upon arrival, the shipment shall be detained by, or redispatched to, the
postmaster at Washington, D. C., San Francisco, Calif., Seattle, Wash, Honolulu,
T. H., or San Juan, P. R., as may be appropriate, according to the address
on the yellow and green tag, and there submitted to the customs officer and
the Federal quarantine inspector (T. D. 40363). The merchandise shall
under no circumstances be permitted to enter the commerce of the United States.

3. After inspection by the customs and quarantine officers, and with their
approval, the adressee, or his authorized agent, shall repack and readdress
the mail parcel under customs supervision; affix to the parcel the necessary
postage, and comply with other mailing requirements, after which the parcel
shall be delivered to the postmaster for exportation by mail pursuant to article
382 of the Customs Regulations of 1931. The contents of the original parcel
may be subdivided and exported in separate parcels in like manner.

4. Each parcel imported shall be subject to the payment of the regular 10-
cent customs clearance fee and the 5-cent delivery fee exacted by the postal
service,



30 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan—March

5. It will not be necessary to issue customs mail entry (Form 3419) nor
to require formal entry of the shipments. Copies of customs Form 7518 shall
be furnished the Comptroller and the Section of Customs Statistics at New
York, respectively.

The mail shipments referred to shall be accorded special handling only at
the five points specified in paragraph 2. ;

The foregoing procedure shall not affect the movement of plant material
in the international mails in transit through the United States.

(B) In order to facilitate the transmission by air transportation of articles
imported through the international mail service intended for immediate exporta-
tion through private air transportation agencies, the following regulations are
promulgated with the concurrence of the Post Office Department:

1. Mail articles of foreign origin, addressed to, or in care of an air transporta-
tion agency in the United States (located at a customs port), containing mer-
chandise intended for immediate exportation by such agency, may be exported
free of duty, under customs supervision, subject to the following conditions:
The postmaster shall, upon written authority of the addressee, and in the pres-
ence of a customs officer, rewrap and readdress the mail article, which should
be retained in postal custody until a reasonable time before the departure of the
exporting aircraft. Thereafter the postmaster shall have the article dispatched
in postal equipment to the point of departure of the aircraft and delivered to
the customs officer, who shall, in turn, deliver it on board the departing air-
craft after the latter has cleared for a foreign destination.

2. If the mail article reaches the post office of address in the United States with
mail entry attached, the latter should be forwarded to the Bureau of Customs,
with report of the particulars of the exportation of the merchandise. It will
not be necessary to prepare mail entry in cases where the article reaches the
port of exportation unaccompanied thereby. Formal entry may be dispensed
with at the port of exportation and Form 3509, if issued, should be forwarded
to the Bureau of Customs with appropriate report.

JAMES H. MOYLE,
Commissioner of Customs.
Approved March 20, 1936:
WAYNE C. TAYLOR,
Acting Secretary of the Treasury.

P. Q. C. A.—3806, Supplement No. 38. Marcu 9, 1936.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, DOMINION OF NEW ZEALAND

The New Zealand Orchard and Diseases Act of September 13, 1928, defines
“disease” as any of the diseases named in the first schedule to the act. In the
prescribed forms of certificate set forth in P. Q. C. A.-806, certification of free-
dom from disease as above defined is required. The first schedule naming the
declared diseases was not included in Circular P. Q. C. A306. It is now
deemed desirable, for the guidance of plant quarantine inspectors, to present
that list, as supplemented since its publication.

Regulation 13 of the regulations approved August 23, 1915, prescribes that if
any fruits or plants are introduced or attempted to be introduced into New
Zealand which, though accompanied by the certificates prescribed as necessary
for such fruits or plants, are yet found on examination by an inspector to be
infected with disease, such fruit or plants shall, together with any packages,
wrappings, ete., containing the same, be dealt with as hereinafter provided:

Fruit, plants, or things infected with the diseases named in the twelfth sched-
ule shall be held and fumigated.

Fruit, plants, or things infected with the diseases named in the thirteenth
schedule shall be seized and destroyed.

Fruit, plants, or things infected with the diseases named in the fourteenth
schedule shall be held and dipped.

Fruits, plants, and things infected with the diseases named in the fifteenth
schedule shall either be reshipped at once by the importer to a place beyond
schedule shall be seized and destroyed.

Since the pests named in the twelfth schedule represent chiefly coccids and
mites which are believed susceptible to destruction on arrival in New Zealand





1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 31

by approved methods of fumigation, and those comprising the fourteenth sched-
ule represent parasitic fungi, which are regarded as susceptible to treatment
with fungicides, their names, exceeding 100, have been omitted from the list.

For convenience of reference, the names of the pests and fungi included in
the thirteenth and fifteenth schedules have been rearranged and revised by
listing them alphabetically under their scientific names, corrected in accordance
with the most recent determinations, and supplemented by the common names,
if any, recognized in the United States, followed by those used in New Zealand,
if they differ. These names are prefixed by the letter “a” to represent those
included in the thirteenth schedule and by the letter “b” as representing those
in the fifteenth schedule.

Shipments of plants and plant products infected or infested by any of the
diseases and pests named in the following list should not be certified for expor-
tation to New Zealand:

DECLARED PESTS AND DISEASES

. Aegeria opalescens Hy. Edw.—Samenoidea opalescens, western peach tree
borer.
. Aegeria tipuliformis Cl., currant or gooseberry borer; currant clearwing.
. Alternaria solani (Hl. and Mart.) L. R. Jones and A. J. Grout, early blight
of potato.

. Anarsia lineatella Zell., peach twig borer; peach moth.

. Anguillulina dipsaci (Kuhn) Gery. and Von Ben.—Tylenchus devastatriz,
eelworm or nematode of stem or bulb.

Bacillus spp., potato wet rot.

. Bacillus amylovorus (Burr.) Trev., fire blight of apple and pear.

Bacillus phytophthorus O. Appel, potato blackleg.

Bacterium citri (Hasse) Jehle, citrus canker.

Bacterium hyacinthi Wak., yellow disease; bulb bacteriosis.

Bacterium solanacearum EK. F. Smith, potato bacterial wilt; bacteriosis.

Bitter pit of apples, undetermined.

Blastodaena herellera Dup.=—Laverna herellera, pith moth; apple pith moth.

Cacoecia postvittana W1k., light brown apple moth.

Ceratitis capitata Wied.—Halterophora capitata, Mediterranean or West
Australian fruit fly.

Conioihecium chromatosporum Cda., blister and fruit-cracking disease.

Corticium vagum var. solam (B. and C.) Burt.=—Rhizoctonia solani, potato
stem rot; little potato; collar fungus; etc.

Cylas formicarius Fab., sweetpotato weevil.

Dacus cucumis Frogg., cucumber or melon fruit fly.

Dacus facialis Coq., a fruit fly.

. Dacus ferrugineus Fab.—Tephrytes tryoni, mango or Queensland fruit fly.

Dacus kirki, Frogg., a fruit fly.

Dacus melanotus Coq.—D. rarotongiensis.

Dacus kirki Frogg., a fruit fly.

Dacus psidii Frogg.

Dacus (tongiae) tongiensis Frogg., a fruit fly.

Dacus virgatus Coq., a fruit fly.

Humerus strigatus Fallen, a bulb fly.

Fusarium lycopersici Sace., sleepy disease of potato.

Fusarium oxysporum Schl., potato dry rot.

Gloeosporium venetum Speg., raspberry anthracnose or spot.

Glomerella cingulata (Ston.) Spauld. and Sch., bitter rot.

Gnorimoschema operculella Zell.=(Lita) Phthorimaea operculella, potato
tuber worm; potato moth.

Heliothis obsoleta Fab., corn ear worm; tomato caterpillar.

Heterosporium echinulatum (Berk.) Cke., carnation leaf spot; fairy-ring.

Hypholoma fasciculare Fr., raspberry root roi.

Lemon bacteriosis.

Lonchaea splendida Loew, tomato fruit fly.

Melanose (7?)

Merodon equestris Fab., narcissus bulb fly.

Mycosphaerella brassicicola (Fr.) Lindau, ring spot; cabbage leaf spot.

. Mycosphaerella tabifica (P. and D.) Johns., dry heart rot; leaf spot of beets.

. Nectria cinnabarina (Tode) Fr. and N., canker of woody plants, coral spot.

Soe) en

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Por aes BPP RS PP ee

COOP SR OOO



32 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.—March

. Nectria galligena Bres., European canker; apple canker.

. Phoma citricarpa McAlIp., citrus anthracnose.

Phomopsis citri Fawe., melanose or stem end rot.

. Phyllorera vitifoliae Fitch=P. vastatrix, grape phylloxera; vine louse.

. Phytophthora infestans (Mont.) D. By., late blight of potatoes.

Plowrightia morbosa (Schw.) Sace., black knot.

Polyporus cinnabarinus (Jacq.) Fr.=Polystictus cinnabarinus, bark rot.

Pseudomonas campestris (Pam.) E. F. Smith, black or soft rot of cabbage.

Pythiacystis citrophthora Smith and Smith, lemon brown rot.

Rhagoletis pomonella Walsh=Trypeta pomonella, apple maggot.

. Rhyzoglyphus hyacinthi Byd.—R. echinopus, bulb mite.

Riora musae Frogg.=Trypeta musae, Island or New Hebrides fruit fly.

Sclerotinia bulborum (Wak.) Rehm., onion and hyacinth sclerotinia.

Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) Mass., watery soft-rot of carrot.

. Synchytrium endobioticum (Schilb.) Pere., potato wart disease.

; oe zanthodes Broun=Dacus xanthodes, Broun’s fruit fly; pineapple
ruit fly.

. Tortrix excessama Wlk.—Cacoecia excessana, leaf roll caterpillar.

. Venturia pyrina Aderh., pear scab.

oS PO COPPESSOOSO SOS

Les A. Strona,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

B. P. Q-3848, Supplement No. 3. MarcH 2, 1986.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF CHILE

Decree No. 781, May 29, 1985, modifies paragraph (e) of article 5 of Supreme
Decree No. 105, of February 11, 1935, regulating Decree Law No. 177 of Decem-
ber 31, 1924, in the following manner:

“(e) Peach trees originating in the United States of America, that are
earriers of the diseases known as peach yellows, peach rosette, and little
peach. Plants not attacked by these diseases may be introduced in conformity
with the provisions contained in the present decree.” (Diario Oficial de la
Republica de Chile. LXIII, No. 17, 207, July 3, 1935, p. 2112.)

Paragraph (e) on page 4 of B. P. Q.348 should be replaced by the revised
paragraph (e) above quoted.

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

.

B. P. Q.—357, Supplement No. 3. FEBRUARY 28, 1936.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF ARGENTINA

SUPPLEMENTAL RESTRICTIONS ON SEED POTATOES

Following is the text, in translation, of decree No. 64961 of August 8, 1935,
supplementing the decree of July 12, 1923, on the importation of seed potatoes
into Argentina (see pp. 18 and 14, B. P. Q.-357) :

CERTIFIED SEED POTATOES

Article 1. Every shipment of seed potatoes introduced into Argentina shall be
“certified seed potatoes’, meaning thereby that they have been grown in cultures
registered in the special service for the certification of seed potatoes, subject to
preestablished regulations, and periodically inspected by the above-mentioned
service, under Federal or State Departments of Agriculture or official experiment
stations of the country of orig/n.

EACH CONTAINER MUST BEAR A COPY CERTIFICATH

Art. 2. Each container of certified seed potatoes shall have affixed thereto the
certification ticket (tag) granted by the official service that certified the tubers.





1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 33

NAMB OF VARIETY TO BE INDICATED

Art. 3. If the name of the variety of the potatoes is not inscribed on the
certification tag, it must be stamped on the container.
Arts. 4 and 5. Transitory.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

B. E. P. Q.-366, Supplement No. 38. MArcH 2, 1936.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF CZECHOSLOVAKIA
IMPORTATION OF POTATOES FROM UNITED STATES NOT PERMITTED

As a precaution against the introduction of wart disease (Synchytriwm endo-
bioticum (Schilb.) Perc.) the importation of potatoes into Czechoslovakia during
1935 is prohibited from countries other than Italy, Hungary, Spain, and
Yugoslavia.

Import permits may be granted, in exceptional cases, for consignments pro-
ceeding from the Netherlands, Canada, Germany, Poland, and Austria. (Minis-
terial Notification of Apr. 1, 1935.)

SAN JOSH SCALH PROHIBITION EXTENDED

On the basis of precautionary measures against the introduction of San Jose
scale (Aspidiotus perniciosus Comst.), the order of July 27, 1935, extends the
prohibition against the importation of living plants, stocks, cuttings, and scions,
as well as other cut plant parts with which the said goods have come in direct
contact, and finally of barrels, cases, sacks, and other containers that have
served to pack or hold such goods, to those proceeding from India, Portugal,
Spain, and Yugoslavia, inasmuch as San Jose scale has invaded those countries.

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

B. BE. P. Q.-3870, Revised. MarcH 9, 1936.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, BRITISH MANDATE OF PALESTINE

Plant Protection Order No. 2, February 26, 1934, has been revised by
Order No. 129 of September 5, 1935, as follows:

IMPORTATION SUBJECT TO INSPECTION ON ARRIVAL

All plants not included in schedules I, II, and IIi to this order may be im-
ported into Palestine, provided that they are first inspected by a plant in-
spector at the place of entry into Palestine and found free from diseases and
pests. :

PLANTS FOR SCIENTIFIC PURPOSES

All plants included in schedules I and III that are required for experimental
or scientific purposes may be imported into Palestine, provided that the writ-
ten permission of the director of agriculture and forests to import such plants
is obtained at least 7 days before the date of importation.

7

IMPORTATION OF SEED POTATOES RESTRICTED

No seed potatoes shall be imported into Palestine after October 1, 1935, save
under and in accordance with the special conditions indicated in this order.



34 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.—March

ScHEDULE I
IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

The importation of the following plants is prohibited, provided that any or
all of them may be imported for experimental or scientific purposes and pro-
vided that the prohibition does not apply to preserved, pressed, or dried fruits:

Annona spp., custard apple.

Carica papaya L., papaya, pawpaw.

Citrus spp., other than citrus fruits from Egypt.

Ficus spp., fig.

Gossypium spp., cotton, other than ginned cotton.

Hibiscus spp. ;

Lycopersicum esculentum Mill., tomato, other than tomato fruit, the bona fide
produce of Egypt.

Mangifera spp., mango, other than mango fruit, the bona fide produce of Egypt.

Morus spp., mulberry, plants only.

Musa spp., bananas.

Palms, all species other than the fruit of the date palm.

Persea spp., avocado.

Psidium guajava L., guava, plants only.

Punica granatum L., pomegranate, plants only.

Solanum melongena L., eggplant.

SCHEDULE II
INSPECTION CERTIFICATE REQUIRED

The importation of the following plants is permitted, provided that each
consignment is accompanied by a certificate that the plants are free (a) from
all diseases and pests, and (0) in particular, from the diseases and pests indi-
cated opposite the name of each plant respectively in the list below. The cer-
tificate must be signed by an officer of the phytopathological service (or any
equivalent authority) in the country of origin.

Plants and plant products Plant pests

Phyliozera vitifoliae Fitch; disease known
as court noue or arricciamento.

Bacillus mangiferae Doidge; the coccids:

Phenacoccus hirsutus Green, hibiscus mealy-

Grapevines, Vitis vinifera.
Mango fruit, the bona fide produce of Egypt.

bug ;

Chrysomphalus (ficus) aonidum UL., the
Florida red scale or fig scale; all species
of Trypetidae.

Consignments must be accompanied by
a certificate stating that the grove
from which the fruit was gathered on
inspection proved free from Phena-
coceus hirsutus Green, and Chrysom-
phalus personatus Comst., a masked
scale. Only boxed fruit will be ac-
cepted and only through the ports
of Jaffa and Haifa or Jerusalem
railway station.

Chrysomphalus (ficus) aonidum L.,
the Florida red scale or fig scale;
(Aonidiella) Chrysomphalus awran-
tii Mask., the California red scale.

Chrysomphalus aonidum L., and Phen-
acoccus hirsutus Green.

Citrus fruits from Egypt, Syria, or
Cyprus.

All other fruits, vegetables, and plants
from Egypt not ineluded in
schedule I.

Plums, quinces, apples, and pears, | Aspidiotus perniciosus Comst., San

whether nursery stock or fruit, from
Argentina, Australia, Austria, Bra-
zil, Canada, Chile, China, Hawaii,
Hungary, India, Japan, Mesopo-
tamia, Mexico, New Zealand, Por-
tugal, Rumania, South. Africa,
Spain, United States of America,
and Yugoslavia, also apple, quince,
and pear nursery stocks from coun-
tries other than those above men-
tioned.

Jose scale. The following grades of
fruit will be accepted without certif-
icate: Fancy No. 1, Extra Fancy,
and Fancy grades from United
States of America, Scuth Africa,
New Zealand, and Australia.





1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 35

Plants and plant products Plant pests

Maize (Zea mays L.) seed for sowing | Sclerospora graminicola (Sacc.)

only. Schroet., downy mildew.

Seed beans, Colletotrichum lindemuthianum (Sace.
and Magn.) Briosa and Cav., bean
anthracnose. :

Potatoes for consumption. (Phthorimaea) Gnorimoschema oper-

culella Zell., potato tuber worm, and
Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say, the
Colorado potato beetle.

Cabbage and cauliflower seeds. Bacterium campestre (Pam.) E. F.
Smith = Pseudomonas campestris,
black rot of cabbage.

Fresh cherries. Rhagoletis cerasi L., cherry fruit fly.

Fresh peaches. Clasterosporium carpophilum (Lev.)

Aderh., peach dieback.

ScHEDULE III
PLANTS FOR SCIENTIFIC PURPOSES ADMITTED UNDER CERTIFICATION

The following plants, if required for scientific purposes, shall, in addition
to the said written permission of the Director of Agriculture and Forests, be
accompanied by a certificate that the plants are free: (a) From all diseases
and pests, (0) in particular, from the diseases or pests indicated opposite the
name of each plant, respectively, named below. The certificate must be signed
by an officer of the phytopathological service (or any equivalent authority)
in the country of origin.

Plants and plant products Plant pests

Citrus nursery stock and budwood. (Cryptorhynchus) Sternochetus mangi-
(Hasse) Doidge, citrus canker;
Sphaceloma (fawcetti) citri, citrus
seab.

Mango stock or budwood. Bacillus mangiferae Doidge, bacterial
blight of mango; Chrysomphalus
personatus Comst., masked scale;
Aonidiella aurantii Mask.; and
Phenacoccus hirsutus Green.

Mango fruit, not the bona-fide produce | (Cryptorhynchus) Sternochetus mangi-

of Egypt. ferae Fab., mango weevil; (Cryp-
torhynchus) Sternochetus gravis
; Fab.; all species of Trypetidae.

Fig. (Ficus spp.) Chrysomphalus (ficus) aonidum L.; C.

personatus Comst., masked scale.

Schedules IV and V concern the importer.

SCHEDULE VI
DISEASES FROM WHICH SEED POTATOES MUST BE FREE

Potato tuber worm, (Phthorimaea) Gnorimoschema operculella Zell.

Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say.

Wart disease, Synchytriwm endobioticum (Schilb.) Pere.

Powdery scab, Spongospora subterranea (Walls.) Lang.

Common scab, Oospora (Actinomyces) scabies Thaxt.

Blackleg, Bacillus phytophthorus O. Appel.

Any consignment of potatoes that on inspection is found to be infected with
powdery scab or common scab to the extent of more than 10 percent of the
total number of tubers will be considered as not free from disease and be
liable to reexportation or destruction.

Len A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.



36 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.—March

B. E. P. Q.-389 MAkrc#H 11, 1986.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, GRAND DUCHY OF LUXEMBOURG

The Nachrichtenblatt fur den Deutschen Pflanzenschutzdienst XV: 1, Jan-
uary 1935, summarizes the decision of the Grand Duke of December 4, 1934.
The summary, in translation, reads as follows:

SPECIAL IMPORT AUTHORIZATION REQUIRED

A special authorization is required for the importation of the following
articles: Potatoes, cereals of all kinds, fruits and vegetables of all kinds,
greenhouse and open-air plants and shrubs.

AUTHORIZED PORTS OF BPNTRY

Importation may be made only by rail and on the following highways:
Diedenhofen-Friesingen, Diedenhofen-Mondoft, Deutsch-Oth-Esch-Alz, Trier-
Wasserbillig, Rennig-Rennich, Arlon-Steinfort, Arlon-Oberpallen, Athus-Rodin-
gen, Bastnach-Donkols, St. Bith-Wemperhardt, Stavelot-Wemperhardt, and
Perl-Schengen.

PHYTOSANITARY CERTIFICATH REQUIRED

However, the phylloxera regulations promulgated by the Order of August 20,
1886, prescribe that trees and plants from abroad must be accompanied by a
certificate of competent authority affirming that they proceed from nurseries
that are free from injurious insects and plant diseases. Otherwisé, they are
subject to inspection, and infested shipments may be reladen for return to the
country of origin, disinfected, or burned.

CERTIFICATE REQUIRED FOR POTATOES, TOMATOES, AND EGGPLANTS

The Order of September 24, 1928, prescribes that potatoes, and the fruits and
plants of tomatoes and eggplants will be admitted to entry and transit only
when accompanied by a certificate issued by the phytopathological service of
the country of origin, affirming that those products proceed from a district free
from the Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say) and from the
potato wart (Synchytriwm endobioticum (Schilb.) Pere.). Products grown in,
and shipped from, a locality at least 20 kilometers from any infestation of
Leptinotarsa are considered to be from an exempt district.

Lee A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quaran.ine.

B. E. P. Q.-390 MArcH 19, 1936.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, BRITISH COLONY AND
PROTECTORATE OF SIERRA LEONE

This summary of the plant-quarantine import restrictions of the British
Colony and Protectorate of Sierra Leone has been prepared for the information
of nurserymen, plant quarantine officials, and others interested in the exporta-
tion of plants and plant products to that Colony.

It was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant quarantine inspector, in Charge
of Foreign Service Information, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines, from
the original text of the Destructive Pests Ordinance, 1924, revision of 1925,
and orders promulgated thereunder, and reviewed by the Director of Agriculture
of Sierra Leone.

The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct and
complete up to the time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used inde-
pendently of, nor as a substitute for, the original texts, and it is not to be
interpreted as legally authoritative.

Avery S. Hoyt,
Acting Ohief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.





1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 37

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, BRITISH COLONY AND
PROTECTORATE OF SIERRA LEONE

BAsic LEGISLATION

The Destructive Pests Ordinance of February 19, 1912, revision of 1925.

This ordinance empowers the Governor in council from time to time to
make such orders as may appear expedient for preventing the introduction
into the Colony of any insect, fungus, or other pest destructive to agricultural
or horticultural crops or to trees or plants, and for preventing the spreading
in the Colony of any such insect, fungus, or other pest.

IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

Trees, plants, soil, leaves, branches, stems, roots, seeds, or any other part of
a tree or plant, or any packages or packing materials which have contained
or been in contact with any such trees, plants, or parts thereof: Importation into
the Colony prohibited from Central America, South America, and the West
Indies, to prevent the introduction of the witches’-broom disease, Marasmius
perniciosus Stahel (Order in Council No. 12, Sept. 29, 1930).

IMPORTATION RESTRICTED:

Cocoa trees or plants (Theobroma cacao L.), or the leaves, branches, stems,
roots, seeds, or fruit of any such trees or plants: May be imported only through
the port of Freetown and such other ports as may be approved by the Governor,
and only subject to inspection by the Director of Agriculture. If such plants
or parts thereof are deemed likely to introduce any insect, fungus, or pest,
the director may order their immediate destruction, or their disinfection under
his supervision at the expense of the importer. (Order constituting the schedule
to the Destructive Pests Ordinance of 1924.)

Citrus plants, including the leaves, branches, stems, roots, seeds, or fruits:
May be imported only under the conditions prescribed for Theobroma cacao, in
order to prevent the introduction of—

Diseases:
Bacillus citrimaculans Doidge, bacterial spot (South Africa).
Bacterium citri (Hasse) Doidge, citrus canker.
Bacterium syringae (Van Hall) HE. F. Smith=B. citrarefaciens H. A. Lee,
blast.
Colletotrichum gloeosporioides Penz. and withertip.
Gloeosporium limetticolum (R. F. Clausen).
Oidium spp., mildew.
Pests:
Aleurocanthus wogiumi Ashby, citrus blackfly.
Aleurothrixzus floccosus Mask.
(Aonidiella) Chrysomphalus aurantii Mask., California red scale.
Ceratitis capitata Wied., Mediterranean fruit fly.
Chrysomphalus (ficus) aonidum L., Florida red scale.
Coccus pseudomagnoliarum Kuw., coccid.
Dialeurodes citri Riley and Howard, citrus whitefly.
Dialeurodes citrifolii Morg., cloudy-winged whitefly.
Icerya purchasi Mask.; cottony-cushion scale.
Icerya seychellarum Westw., coccid.
Parlatoria ziziphus Lucas, coccid.
Phyllocoptes oleivorus Ashm., citrus rust mite.
Pseudococcus adonidum L., long-tailed mealybug.
Tylenchus semi-penetrans Cobb, eelworm or nematode.

(Order in Council No. 5, Feb. 9, 1929.)

Banana plants, including the leaves, branches, stems, roots, seeds, or fruits:
May be imported only under the conditions prescribed for Theobroma cacao, in
order to prevent the introduction of “bunchy top”; Panama disease, Fusarium
cubense K EF. Smith, strains other than those present in Sierra Leone.



38 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan—March

(Order in Council No. 5, Feb. 9, 1929.)

Except as indicated under the captions ‘Importation Prohibited” and “Impor-
tation Restricted”, there are no phytosanitary restrictions upon the importation
of plants and plant products into the Colony or Protectorate of Sierra Leone.

B. E. P. Q.-391. ~ Marcu 19, 1936.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, BRITISH GOLD COAST COLONY

This summary of the plant-quarantine import restrictions of the Gold Coast
Colony has been prepared for the information of nurserymen, plant quarantine
officials, and others interested in the exportation of plants and plant products to
that country.

It was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant quarantine inspector, in charge of
Foreign Service Information, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines, from the
Plants (Injurious Pests) Ordinance, No. 37, of December 28, 1923, and orders
promulgated thereunder, and reviewed by the Director of Agriculture of the
Colony.

The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct and com-
plete up to the time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used independently
of, nor as a substitute for, the original texts, and it is not to be interpreted as
legally authoritative.

Avery S. Hoyt,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology end Plant Quarantine.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT Sener OF THE BRITISH GOLD COAST

BASIc LEGISLATION
The Plants (Injurious Pests) Ordinance, December 28, 19253.
CoNCISE SUMMARY

IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

Nothing.
IMPORTATION CONDITIONAL

Any plant from Central America, South America, and the West Indies:
Importation subject to a license from the Director of Agriculture (Order No. 20
of 1930), to prevent the introduction of Fusarium cubense E. F. Smith, Panama
disease, and Marasmius perniciosus Stahel, witches’-broom.

Cocoa (Theobroma cacao L.), cotton (Gossypium spp.), and rubber (Hevea
spp.) : Importation from any source subject to a license from the Director
(Ordinance No. 37 of 1923) to prevent the introduction of Marasmius perniciosus
Stahel, witches’-broom ; Heliothis obsoleta Fab., corn ear worm; diseases likely
to affect cocoa.

Cola (Cola spp.), and bananas (Musa spp.): Importation from any source
subject to a license from the Director (Order No. 44 of 1926) to prevent the
introduction of Fusarium vasinfectum Atk.; Fusarium cubense HE. F. Smith,
and diseases likely to affect cocoa.

IMPORTATION UNRESTRICTED

All nursery stock, other plants, seeds, bulbs, fruits and vegetables, other than
those above specifically mentioned, may be imported into this Colony from any
country without plant quarantine restriction.

ORDINANCE FOR THE PREVENTION AND TREATMENT OF PESTS INJURIOUS TO PLANTS
(The Plants (Injurious Pests) Ordinance, Dec. 28, 1923)

SHORT TITLE

SEecTIon 1. This ordinance may be cited as “The Plants (Injurious Pests)
Ordinance, 1923” and shall become effective January 1, 1924.





1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 39

DEFINITIONS

Seo. 2. “Plant” includes tree, shrub, and any other vegetable growth, as also
any part thereof.

‘Declared plant” includes cocoa (Theobroma cacao L.), cotton (Gossypium
spp.), and rubber (Hevea spp.) plants, as also any other plant which may be
declared under section 3 to be a declared plant ;

“Injurious pest” includes any disease, pest, fungus, parasite, insect, or animal,
declared under section 3 to be an injurious pest ;

“Prescribed port of entry” includes the ports of Accra and Seccondee, as also
any other port declared under section 3 to be a prescribed port of entry.

POWER OF GOVERNOR TO DECLARE PLANTS

Src. 8. It shall be lawful for the Governor by order under his hand:

(1) To declare any plant to be a “declared plant” ;

(2) To declare any disease, pest, fungus, parasite, insect, or animal, to be an
injurious pest;

(3) To declare any port of the Colony to be a “prescribed port of entry” ;

(4) To prescribe any treatment of an injurious pest and any treatment or
destruction of a declared plant to be a “prescribed treatment”, for the purposes
of this ordinance. o

ENTRY TO BE MADE AT A PRESCRIBED PORT

Sec. 4. No person shall import into the Colony any declared plant except at a
prescribed port of entry, namely, Accra and Seccondee.

RESTRICTED MATERIALS:

Src. 5. (1) No person shall import into the Colony any of the following articles
or materials except under license of the Director of Agriculture:

(a) Declared plants;

(6) Wrappings, cases, packages, or other coverings which contain or have
contained declared plants;

(c) Soil or earth;

(d) Wrappings, cases, packages, or other covering which contain or have
contained soil or earth;

(e) Any article or material of whatever kind packed with such soil or plant.

Paragraphs 2 and 38 relate to the character of licenses and authorize the
seizure of shipments imported contrary to the regulations.

Sxos. 6 to 14. Insular administration of the ordinance, penalties, etc.

GOVERNOR EMPOWERED TO MAKE REGULATIONS

Seo. 15. It shall be lawful for the Governor in council to make regulations for
the further, better, or more convenient effectuation of any of the provisions or
purposes of this ordinance.

PENALTIES IMPOSED FOR VIOLATIONS OF THE PLANT
QUARANTINE ACT

According to reports received by the Bureau during the period January 1 to
March 31, 1936, penalties have recently been imposed by the proper Federal
authorities for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act, as follows:

, QUARANTINES AFFECTING MEXICAN PRODUCTS

In the case of the United States versus the persons listed below, for attempting
to smuggle in contraband plant material, the penalties indicated were imposed by
the United States customs officials at the following ports:



40 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.—March



Name Port Contraband Penalty
Mo Garipe yy... acme soo eee Brownsville, Tex....| 12:avocados........_._.J2usaemeee ee $1. 00
Albert: Hernandercus {2222.22 alee Cibes ot ot Aen 1 DAPBY Sans os 5t 2S eee eee 1.00
EFING ER OT) HU OB ls in Seid eens ae Se ee 2 SDDIOS_ . ...--naee sees esaee eee 1.00
Damacio Dominguoer.- 22-2. = 2-22 -Se Oe sath ae ee lmamey.. 22-02 2b ec e eee 1.00
OA. Weridvegyees 523 fe oe eee dots. $1954 Siapplessi cl. 2. coche see 2. 90
Jesus/Valeneia .jc2vend 2 tense E] Paso, Tex.._.-... I OPEN GO ne isin b tears 4 Uae ee 1.00
Simon (Caldara. 0. 226 ee ee oe CLO oo eet ee 14 Pus VOS...- oo 1.00
J; Pineda 23) ete: See Taredo, Tex 22s. }orangé:2.. ) 3. AL eee eee 1.00
Mrs. Jesus Maria Muno-----_---.--|_---- doki ital. Ses Bi potatoess2. 102. 2a. 3162 fae 1.90
Ricardo Medina. 2) t 2 24d See leo) CO. 28.2 eae LOvange scent ie atl eee 1.00
Valentine Santa Cruz} 20-2] 8 002-325-250 -5eeee 2 8V0CadOS. _ = ee 1.00
TAGY. (name THknOWII). 22-2 e122 C0282) ee 7 avocados: -. 2.22.22 eee 1.00
Mrs. Petra Martinez Sosa__.......-}_.--- do. 4 = _ 2 ees 9 avocados... ..2.. 22 eee 1.00
BGarOseebaaee |e TE Se do. *! eee 2 Oranges. O ._ -.. ee 1.00
Mrs. Antonio Maria de Valencio-_-_-_}|_---- AQ. => eee ] PUSVa~- 34. ~--4-2-s- eee 1.00
RAP er Wer oe seer ee ke os C0: 404. ees 4 sweeb limes... !.-._..2 3 =e ee 1.00
earengimo ValdGz—7 ot oe ool ones Gos 2 ee eee 9 guavas and 3 avocados.---.-.------ 1.00
Mrs. Adelia de Eseobelo Martinez_|_-_-- Gos! 277 EOS Spee S:plantsi21i8.2: 22 as ei 1.00
Moseo Mallonada § +22. 225. 2 -eSs5t|o2 Q0+sc..2226:™ 6. sweet dimes. 22235 s-5- speedo eee 1. 00
Mrs. Manuel Gonzales__.__.._.-_-_]___-- 00: Sees ee 40 plants! + __ 2-2 2 eee 1.00
PCr RTI SDR et ee do 25.32/25) 10 plants:.......-...._... 3 eee 1.00
Dirs: Jesus rerreral 22 10) Se ea aes | dot Sib: Bk view 6 guavas and 2 sweet limes__-__------ 1.00
FimiliorVda'de:Avalos 2. %<2- . Seu) 265 d0sn boa Ne 2 DISH 3 oot - cece nae 1.00
AUCIANIAEOR 55 thee: Fe eel eae One ae oe eo 4 sapotes..__-.-- 2. = 1.00
WiTs. Ly. B.-de ozane. + 222s ae Gi) Sey 2 ek CE 3 avoeados.. £.. 22/2) 2a 1.00
pesosa Garcia. jahee = vobe! s+ Sa eee 03 38 eee 5 avocados..__-.._.._. See 1.00
irs: ‘Pedro Roche... _- =". see Goss ee 2.orangves.. 2 =. ee 1.00
Mrs. Jesus Valenzuela._____..__-_ _-]-...=- Gove t e 12 avocados, 4 mangoes, and 3 oranges. 1.00



ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND
PLANT QUARANTINE ,

LEE A. Strona, Chief.

S. A. RoHweEr, Assistant Chief.

Avery S. Hoyt, Assistant Chief.

F. H. Spencer, Business Manager.

R. P. Currin, Editor.

Masex CoLcorp, Librarian.

J. A. Hystop, in Charge, Division of Insect Pest Survey and Information.

J. 1. HAMBLETON, in Charge, Division of Bee Culture Investigations.

D. L. VAN Drye, in Charge, Division of Fruit Insect Investigations.

F. C. CRAIGHEAD, in Charge, Division of Forest Insect Investigations.

W. H. Wuirs, in Charge, Division of Truck Crop and Garden Insect Investiga-
tions.

P. N. ANNAND, in Charge, Division of Cereal and Forage Insect Investigations.

R. W. HarNep, in Charge, Division of Cotton Insect Investigations.

F. C. BisHopp, in Charge, Division of Insects Affecting Man and Animals.

L. A. HAWKINS, in Charge, Division of Control Investigations.

R. C. RoarK, in Charge, Division of Insecticides and Fungicides.

C. F. W. Murseseck, in Charge, Division of Insect Identification.

C. P. CLAUSEN, in Charge, Division of Foreign Parasite Introduction.

S. B. Fracker, in Charge, Division of Plant Disease Control.

B. M. Gappis, in Charge, Division of Domestic Plant Quarantines.

BE. R. SAsscer, in Charge, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines.

A. F. Bureess, in Field Charge, Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail Moth Control
(headquarters, Greenfield, Mass.).

L. H. WorTH Ley, in Field Charge, Japanese Beetle and Gypsy Moth and Brown-
Tail Moth Quarantines, European Corn Borer Certification, and Dutch Elm
Disease Eradication (headquarters, White Plains, N. Y.).

R, BE. McDonatp, in Field Charge, Pink Bollworm and Thurberia Weevil Quar-
antines (headquarters, San Antonio, Tea.).

oe este in Field Charge, Date Scale Quarantine (headquarters, Indio,

alif.). :

P, A. Homatr, in Field Charge, Mexican Fruit Fly Quarantine (headquarters,
Harlingen, Tez.).

A. C. Baker, in Field Charge, Fruit Fly Investigations (headquarters, Meaico
City, Mexico).

W. E. Dove, in Field Charge, Screw Worm Control (headquarters, Atlanta, Ga.).

U. $. COVERNBENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1936





8. R. A.—B. E. P. Q. No. 127 Issued September 1936

United States Department of Agriculture

BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS

APRIL-JUNE 1936

CONTENTS

Page
eereniine and other official announcements____.. - = ---_--__---4_--.-_-2+-+-+----22------------.--- 41
Announcements relating to date-palm scale quarantine (no. 6)__--__--_-_-_---_-___-___-_-____--. 41
Wa PE ENIOMIUATAULINOG TOVOKEG2: 2. P72 shu srt ete ee 41
Nomen mailing oF date-palm seale quarantine. 2-22. 5. 22+ S222 2c 222s ise cel eee kee 42
SRSA EIS RTOSIOOS EITITS DOT See ee eens yen ed wee eo 42
Announcements relating to nursery stock, plant, and seed quarantine (no. 37)_-_-___--_____-___ 42
POM PHEUALIONS DYNAM (Bt be b02)~ ne! ok ee a ee 42
Psiiaieniensite collectors Of-customs (iD) 48257) 2. i > bt hohe ee eo 43
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (no. 48)______-___________-_--___-________. 43
Seeder eis, Conus, Atid tlbers (bi: b. ©. 304) 2. se te 43

List of articles exempt from certification requirements under the Japanese beetle quarantine
eee Aurea reer ete eh eT Pera rethiley eis 8 Re i oo ie Oe ee el ee 44
Announcement relating to pink bollworm quarantine (no. 52)_____=____________-______________- 45

Administrative instructions—Treatment requirements removed as a condition for interstate

shipment of baled lint and linters, and products thereof produced or manufactured from
sterilized cottonseed, from the pink bollworm regulated area in Florida (B. E. P. Q. 393)__ 45
Announcement relating to Dutch elm disease quarantine (no. 71)__-_-___-___-______-___________- 45
ee SAA SUAS CE RSEISOOS REST See eee ee SO ee an ee 45
en Mnnnn ERE soo toe 8 de SEE TSE) ip ee 587 Wate ye ev iia siesta Co Bees 46
Lermims) Inspection oe plants aud plant products: 23. 222 = bs 2 ee 58s Secs 46
Plants and plant products addressed to places in Idaho____-________-_--________________. 46
POM ALA His peCtiorl plnce Il OTesOn = 2-22) 18 oa) A Te ee 46
inepocwion a platta nnd plant products from abroad. _.-...-...-._._--..-.-..=._..-_t »s) 46

ma ee import restrictions, Republic of Argentina (B. P. Q. 357, supplement
a a ne pee rasa en Nek ee ee ee a eee 48
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Island of Cyprus (B. P. Q. 360, supplement no. 1)______ 48

Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Poland (B. E. P. Q. 368, supplement no. 1)_ 49
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Presidency of Antigua, British West Indies(B. E. P. Q.

aa PS REMUS UAE ES EN PERC V SL) ee ee he ee ee ee eee eeeok 53
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Dominican Republic (B. E. P. Q. 396)______________- 53
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Colony of Grenada, British West Indies (B. E. P. Q.

ee eee eee eee toe a a a Pe A ee LF ee ete 56
ieee import restrictions, French Colony of New Caledonia and Dependencies

PSE PR eS DTU) ee tte ee eee ee ie re
a ae import restrictions, Presidency of Dominica, British West Indies (B. E.

ah tag) eee eg in Ses me ea 2 eg ee ee eo NF te cl 59
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Portugal (B. E. P. Q. 400)_______________ 61
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Spain (B. E. P. Q. 401)__-________________ 64
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Austria (B. E. P. Q. 402)________________ 68
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of France (B. E. P. Q. 403)__--______________ 73
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, British India (B. E. P. Q. 404)_______________________ 79
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Germany (B. E. P. Q. 405)______________ 83

Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act_____.____-.__---_______--_________- 91
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine_______--__________________________ 93

QUARANTINE AND OTHER OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO DATE-PALM SCALE QUARANTINE
(NO. 6)

DATE-PALM SCALE QUARANTINE REVOKED

(Press notice)
JUNE 19, 1936.

The apparent eradication of the date-palm seale has led Secretary of Agricul-
ture Wallace to revoke the Federal date-palm scale quarantine (no. 6), effective
July 1, 1936. Under the quarantine, which was promulgated in March 1913, the
interstate movement of date palms and date-palm offshoots was regulated from
certain areas in California, Arizona, and Texas on account of the Parlatoria
seale, an injurious date-palm scale insect.

88937—36——1 41



42 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE _ [April-June

Eradication of this pest, which has been the subject of a vigorous eradication
campaign conducted cooperatively by the affected States and the United States
Department of Agriculture for a number of years, has apparently now been
effected, as intensive inspection of the previously infested areas has revealed no
infestation since 1934, the infestation at that time being extremely light. It is

therefore believed that domestic quarantine restrictions may be removed with

respect to the Parlatoria scale with safety to the date-growing areas.
NOTICE CF LIFTING OF DATE-PALM SCALE QUARANTINE
(Effective on and after July 1, 1936)

The fact has been determined by the Secretary of Agriculture, as a result of
intensive field inspection work, that there is, at the present time, no known
infestation in the States of Arizona, California, and Texas or elsewhere in the
continental United States by the Parlatoria scale (Parlatoria blanchardi), and it
is the belief of the Department that Notice of Quarantine No. 6, on account of
the Parlatoria scale (Parlatoria blanchardi) and the Phoenicococcus scale (Phoe-
nicococcus marlatti), with regulations, which was promulgated Mareh 1, 1913,
and which became effective on March 24, 1913, as well as amendment no. 1
thereto, promulgated November 18, 1932, which eliminated all reference in the
quarantine and regulations to the Phoenicococcus scale, may now be removed
with safety to the country as a whole.

Now, therefore, I, H. A. Wallace, Secretary of Agriculture, under authority
conferred by the Plant Quarantine Act, approved August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315),
as amended by the act of Congress approved March 4, 1917 (39 Stat. 1184, 1165),
do hereby remove and revoke the quarantine placed by said Notice of Quarantine
No. 6 and the amendment thereto upon the States of Arizona, California, and
Texas, and do also hereby remove and revoke the rules and regulations supple-
mental thereto, such removal and revocation to take effect on July 1, 1936.

Done at the city of Washington this 11th day of June 1936.

Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.

[SEAL ] H. A. WALLACE,

Secretary of Agriculture.

INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS

Post OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, June 30, 1936.
Postmaster.

My Dear Stir: Your attention is invited to the enclosed notice of the United
States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quaran-
tine, lifting the date-palm scale quarantine.

This quarantine (no. 6) was promulgated in March 1913 to regulate the
interstate movement of date palms and date-palm offshoots from certain areas
in California, Arizona, and Texas, on account of the Parlatoria seale, an
injurious date-palm scale insect. By order of the Secretary of Agriculture,
under date of June 11, 1936, quarantine no. 6 was revoked, effective July 1,
1936, and thereafter becomes noneffective. :

You will please be governed accordingly.

Very truly yours,
C. B. EILENBERGER,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO NURSERY STOCK, PLANT, AND
SEED QUARANTINE (NO. 37)

B: Ey P.'Q: 392
PLANT IMPORTATIONS BY MAIL
AprIL 13, 1986.

Experience has shown that many packages containing plant material re-
stricted as to entry by foreign plant quarantines are daily being received in
the mails without permit authorization for such entry, or in violation of a
prohibition against the importation. Obviously, a large proportion of these
packages are sent without any knowledge of the quarantine restrictions. At



1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 43

the same time an increasing tendency is noted toward the use of the mails
for authorized importations.

A convenient means was established several years ago for the orderly entry
under permit of restricted plant material by mail when provision exists for
entry by this means. Special mailing tags are provided for the material under
permit, and these tags are to be transmitted to the sender. Instructions in
four languages for sending the packages accompany the tags. Packages ad-
dressed by these tags are routed direct to the inspection station indicated on
them and, after the material has passed inspection, are released to go forward
to destination without the payment of additional postage.

Packages containing restricted plant material not sent forward in this man-
ner are liable to be returned to the country of origin. However, to accord
a more sympathetic treatment toward the addressee who has a package con-
taining material of this character addressed to him but who has no permit
for the entry or whose sender did not follow the instructions and use a special
mailing tag, an opportunity will be given the addressee to apply for a permit
to import such of the material as may be enterable by mail. Should the
addressee fail to take advantage of this opportunity, disposition will be made
of the package in accordance with existing postal, customs, and plant quaran-
tine regulations covering the procedure.

Persons importing seeds of woody perennial plants are cautioned to apply
for and receive a permit and mail tags and, in turn, supply the sender with
these tags, if they are planning to import such seeds by mail. Field, vegetable,
and flower seeds, when free from soil, unless prohibited or restricted entry
by special quarantines, do not require a permit for importation. Flower seeds
are defined as seeds of annual, biennial, or even perennial flowering plants,
which are essentially herbaceous, namely, plants which perish annually down
to, and sometimes including, the roots.

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

INSTRUCTIONS TO COLLECTORS OF CUSTOMS

NOTICE OF QUARANTINE 37, NURSERY STOCK, PLANT, AND SEED QUARANTINE, WITH
REVISED RULES AND REGULATIONS (T. D. 44600, As AMENDED By T. D. 47515,
SUPERSEDED) (T. D. 48257)

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,
OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONER OF CUSTOMS,
Washington, D. C., April sy 1936.
To Collectors of Customs and Others Concerned:

Notice of Quarantine 37, with revised rules and regulations applicable to
nursery stock, plants, and seeds from certain foreign countries, has been re-
printed by the United States Department of Agriculture as of January 1936, so
as to include amendment 2 (T. D. 47515). It also includes footnote corrections
and brings the appendices up to date.

Copies of the reprinted Notice of Quarantine will be sent to all collectors of
customs for their information and guidance.

The number of this Treasury decision should be noted as a marginal reference
for article 559 (a) of the Customs Regulations of 1931.

JAMES H. Moyte,
Commissioner of Customs.

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE
(NO. 48)
B. E. P. Q. 394 (Supersedes P. Q. C. A. 274)
LIST OF TRUE BULBS, CORMS, AND TUBERS
(Exempted under regulation 6, sec. A (1), Quarantine No. 48)

JUNE 1, 1936.
The accompanying list of bulbs, corms, and tubers is issued for the information
of inspectors of the Bureau who are assigned to the enforcement of the regula-
tions of the Japanese beetle quarantine. It is believed that the information will



44 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

also be useful to shippers within the regulated areas. Regulation 6, section
A (1), under Quarantine No. 48, reads as follows:

“True bulbs, corms, and tubers, when dormant, except for storage growth, and
when free from soil, are exempt from the requirement of certification, except
that this exemption does not apply to dahlia tubers.”

The key letter in parentheses before each name indicates whether the variety
in question is a true bulb, corm, or tuber, (B) standing for true bulb, (C) for
corm, and (T) for tuber. Plant roots of a bulbous nature not given on this list
are, in most cases, fleshy rhizomes and are therefore not exempt from certifi-
eation. (C) Acidanthera, (T) Alstroemeria, (B) Amaryllis, (C) Amorpho-
phallus (devilstongue), (B) Anemone (bulbous), (C) Antholyza, (C) Babiana,
(T) Begonia (tuberous-rooted), (T) Boussingaultia (Madeira vine), (C) Bro-
diaea, (B) Bulbocodiwm, (C) Calochortus (Mariposa lily or globe-tulip), (B)
Camassia (wild hyacinth), (B) Chionodoxa (Glory-of-the-Snow), (B) Colchi-
cum (autumn crocus), (T) Colocasia (Caladium esculentum and fancy-leaved
varieties), (B) Cooperia (evening-star and rainlily), (B) Crinum, (C) Crocus,
(C) Cyclamen, (C) Dierama, (T) Cinnamon vine (Dioscorea batatas), (T)
Eranthis (winter aconite), (B) Hrythroniuwm (troutlily or dog’s-tooth violet),
(B) Eucharis (amazonlily), (C) Freesia, (B) Fritillaria (fritillary), (B)
Galanthus (snowdrop), (B) Galtonia (Hyacinthus candicans) (summer hya-
cinth), (C) Gladiolus, (T) Gloxinia (see Sinningia), (B) Hippeastrum
(house-amaryllis), (B) Hyacinthus (hyacinth, Dutch and Roman), (B)
Hymenocallis (spiderlily), (B) Iris, bulbous (Dutch, Spanish, and English),
(B) Ismene (see Hymenocallis), (B) Ixia, (B) Iwiolirion, (B) Lachenalia
(cape-cowslip), (B) Lapeyrousia (Anomatheca), (B) Leucojum (snowflake),
(B) Lilium (lily bulbs, imported and domestic), (B) JLycoris (cluster-
amaryllis), (B) Milla (Mexican star), (B) Muscari (grape and feathered
hyacinths), (B) Narcissus (daffodil, jonquil), (B) Nerine, (B) Ornithogalum
(Star-of-Bethlehem), (B) Ovalis, (B) Pancratium, (B) Polianthes (tuberose),
(B) Puschkinia, (T) Ranunculus, (B) Scilla (squill, star hyacinth), (T)
Sinningia speciosa (gloxinia), (C) Sparaxris (wandflower), (B) Sprekelia
(St. James lily), (B) Sternbergia, (B) Tigridia (tiger flower or shellfiower),
(C) Tritonia (Montbretia), (B) Tulipa (tulip), (B) Vallota (scarboro-lily),
(B) Watsonia (buglelily), (T) Zantedeschia (Richardia) (calla, white, yellow,
spotted; arum-lily), and (B) Zephyranthes (zephyriily). .

Lee A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

B. E. P. Q. .395

LIST OF -ARTICLES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS UNDER THE
JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE

JUNE 1, 1936.

In accordance with the proviso in Notice of Quarantine No. 48, as revised,
effective March 16, 1936, the following articles, the interstate movement of
which is not considered to constitute a risk of Japanese beetle dissemination,
are exempted from the restrictions of the regulations of this quarantine:

Balsam pillows, when composed of balsam needles only.

Cut orchids.

Dyed moss and dyed sand, when heat treated, and when so labeled on the
outside of each container of such materials.

Floral designs or “set pieces”, including wreaths, sprays, casket covers, and
all formal florists’ designs other than bouquets and cut flowers. ;

Greensand or greensand marl, when treated and so labeled on the outside
of each container of such materials.

Herbarium specimens, when dried, pressed, and treated, and when so labeled
on the outside of each container of such materials.

Imported peat, when shipped in the unopened original container and labeled
as to each container with the counfry of origin.

Manure, peat, compost, or humus, when dehydrated and either shredded,
ground, pulverized, or compressed, and when so labeled on the outside of
each commercial container of such materials.

Orchid plants, when growing exclusively in Osmunda fiber.

Mushroom spawn, in brick, flake, or pure culture form.





1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 45

Osmunda fiber, osmundine, or orchid peat (Osmunda cinnamomea and
O. claytoniana).
Resurrection plant or bird’s-nest moss (Selaginella lepidophylla).
Sheet moss (Calliergon schriberi and Thuridium recognitum).
Sphagnum moss, bog moss, or peat moss, when dried and baled (Sphag-
naceae ).
Submerged aquatic plants, including—
Crytocoryne spp.
Eelgrass or tape grass (Vallisneria spiralis).
False loosestrife (Ludwigia mulerttii).
Fish grass, Washington plant, or fanwort (Cabomba caroliniana).
Hornwort or coontail (Ceratophylium demersum).
Water milfoil (Myriophylluwm spp.).
Water weed, ditch moss, water thyme, or anacharis (Hlodea canadensis).
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO PINK BOLLWORM QUARANTINE
(NO. 52)

BBs Pi-Q: 393

ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS—TREATMENT REQUIREMENTS REMOVED AS A
CONDITION FOR INTERSTATE SHIPMENT OF BALED LINT AND LINTERS, AND
PRODUCTS THEREOF PRODUCED OR MANUFACTURED FROM STERILIZED COT-
TONSEED, FROM THE PINK BOLLWORM REGULATED AREA IN FLORIDA

(Issued under regulations 8, 9, 10, and 11 of Quarantine No. 52—domestic)

APRIL 13, 1936.

In accordance with the authorizations contained in regulations 8, 9, 10, and 11
of Quarantine No. 52 (domestic), on account of the pink bollworm, notice is
hereby given that baled cotton lint, baled cotton linters, and products thereof

produced or manufactured from sterilized cottonseed may be moved interstate

from the regulated area in Florida without restriction, other than that a permit
issued by the United States Department of Agriculture must be secured and
attached to the articles or shipping papers in accordance with the methods
prescribed in regulation 15 of said quarantine.

The removal of treatment requirements for the above-mentioned products is
considered safe due to the fact that no pink bollworm infestation has been found
in the regulated area of Florida during the 1935 season.

Len A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO DUTCH ELM DISEASE QUARANTINE
(NO. 71)

INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS

Post OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, D. C., April 27, 1936.
Postmaster:

My Dear SiR: Your attention is invited to the enclosed copy of the latest revi-
sion of Quarantine Order No. 71 of the United States Department of Agriculture,
extending the Dutch elm disease quarantine, by which you will be governed. See
paragraph 1, section 595, Postal Laws and Regulations.

Very truly yours,
C. B. EILENBERGER,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.



46 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS

TERMINAL INSPECTION OF PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS
PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS ADDRESSED TO PLACES IN IDAHO

Post OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, June 1, 1936.

The State of Idaho has reestablished places for terminal inspection under
the provisions of the act of March 4, 1915, embodied in section 596, Postal Laws
and Regulations, of the following plants and plant products:

“All florists’ stock, trees, shrubs, vines, cuttings, grafts, scions, buds, fruit
pits and other seeds of fruit and ornamental trees or shrubs, and other plants
and plant products in the raw or unmanufactured state, except vegetable and
flower seeds: Provided, That this list of plants and plant products shall not
apply to plants and plant products shipped either under the certificate of the
Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine of the United States Department
of Agriculture or of the Idaho State Department of Agriculture.”

All postmasters are, therefore, informed that packages containing any plants
or plant products addressed to places in the State of Idaho may be accepted for
mailing only when plainly marked so that the contents may be readily ascer-
tained by an inspection of the outside thereof. The law makes the failure so
to mark such parcels an offense punishable by a fine of not more than $100.

Postmasters within the State of Idaho shall be governed strictly by the provi-
sions of paragraphs 3, 4, 5, and 6, section 596, Postal Laws and Regulations, in
the treatment of all packages addressed for delivery at their offices containing
any of the plants or plant products above described as subject to terminal
inspection.

Inspection service is maintained at the places in Idaho named below, and all
postmasters in that State shall, after receiving the required postage therefor,
under the provisions of section 596, Postal Laws and Regulations, send to the
nearest inspection point each package containing plants or plant products sub-
ject to terminal inspection:

Blackfoot. Jerome. Pocatello.
Boise. Lewiston. Rathdrum.
Bonners Ferry. Moscow. Rupert.
Burley. Nampa. St. Anthony.
Caldwell. New Plymouth Sandpoint.
Emmett. Parma. Twin Falls.
Idaho Falls. Payette. Weiser.

Owing to the perishable character of plants and plant products, the packages
containing such matter must be given prompt attention.

Any failure of compliance with the foregoing instructions or with the provi-
sions of section 596, Postal Laws and Regulations, coming to the attention of
any postmaster should be reported to the Third Assistant Postmaster General,
Division of Classification.

C. B. EILENBERGER,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.

ADDITIONAL PLANT-INSPECTION PLACE IN OREGON

Post OFFICE DEPARTMENT, °
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, June 9, 1936.
Postmasters in the State of Oregon are informed that provision has been made
for the terminal inspection of plants and plant products at Warren, Columbia
County, and this place should, therefore, be added to the list of places within
the State of Oregon to which plants and plant products subject to terminal
inspection may be sent by postmasters for inspection under the provisions of
section 596, Postal Laws and Regulations.
C. B. EILENBERGER,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.





1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 47

INSPECTION OF PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS FROM ABROAD

Post OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
SECOND ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, April 9, 1936.

Under various orders, quarantines, and regulations promulgated by the
Secretary of Agriculture under authority of the Plant Quarantine Act of
August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended, the entry into the United
States of certain plants and plant products is prohibited or restricted.
(See United States Official Postal Guide, July 1935, sec. 49, pp. 233-23
and also arts. 389 and 559 to 565 inclusive of the Customs Regulations of
1931.) As an aid in enforcing these or subsequent orders, quarantines, and
regulations, provisions have been made by the Bureau of Entomology and
Plant Quarantine of the United States Department of Agriculture, con-
currently with the Postal and Customs Services, to insure closer inspection
of such importations.

Inspectors of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine and customs
officers are stationed at the following post offices:

Atlanta, Ga. Hidalgo, Tex. Philadelphia, Pa.
Baltimore, Md. Honolulu, Hawaii Port Arthur, Tex.
Bellingham, Wash. Houston, Tex. Portland, Oreg.
Blaine, Wash. Jacksonville, Fla. Presidio, Tex.
Boston, Mass. Key West, Fla. Rio Grande City, Tex.
Brownsville, Tex. Laredo, Tex. Roma, Tex.

Buffalo, N. Y. Los Angeles, Calif. (in- St. Paul, Minn.
Calexico, Calif. cluding San Pedro). San Diego, Calif.
Charleston, S. C. Miami, Fla. San Francisco, Calif.
Chieago, II. Mobile, Ala. San Juan, P. R.

Del Rio, Tex. Naco, Ariz. San Ysidro, Calif.
Detroit, Mich. New Orleans, La. Savannah, Ga.
Douglas, Ariz. New York, N. Y. Seattle, Wash.

Eagle Pass, Tex. Nogales, Ariz. Tampa, Fla.

El Paso Tex. Norfolk, Va. Washington, D. C.
Galveston, Tex. Pensacola. Fla.

The procedure agreed to is as follows:

All parcel post or other mail packages from foreign countries which, either
from examination or external evidence, are found to contain plants or plant
products shall be dispatched for submission, or actually submitted to the plant
quarantine inspector (art. 564 (e), Customs Regulations of 1931) at the
most accessible of the foregoing places, who shall pass upon the contents,
under the plant quarantine act, and with the cooperation of the customs and
postal officers, either (1) release the package from further plant quarantine
and examination and endorse his decision thereon; or (2) divert it to Wash-
ington, D. C., San Francisco, Calif., or Seattle, Wash., for disposition. If
so diverted, the plant quarantine inspector shall attach to the package the
yellow-and-green special mailing tag addressed to the proper quarantine station.
The package shall also be accompanied by customs card form 3511 and trans-
mitted in accordance with the appropriate provisions of article 367 (a)
(JR 12a) of the Customs Regulations of 1931.

The customs officers at San Francisco, Calif., Seattle, Wash., aud Wash-
ington, D. C., shall keep a record of such packages as may be delivered to
representatives of the Department of Agriculture, and upon the return thereof
shall prepare mail entry to accompany the dutiable package and deliver it
to the postmaster for delivery or onward dispatch; or in appropriate cases
subject the shipment to formal customs entry procedure.

The plant quarantine inspector may require the entire shipment to be
returned to the country of origin as a prohibited importation, in which
event he shall endorse his action thereon and deliver the shipment over to
the collector of customs, who shall in turn deliver it to the postmaster
for dispatch to the country of origin. If the plant material, upon examina-
tion, is deemed dangerous to plant life, the collector of customs shall permit
the plant quarantine inspector to destroy immediately both the container and
contents. In either case the plant quarantine inspector shall notify the ad-
dressee of the action taken and the reason therefor. If the objectionable
plant material forms only a portion of the contents of the mail package and
in the judgment of the inspector the package can safely be delivered to the
addressee, after removing and destroying the objectionable material, such
procedure is authorized. In the latter case the inspector shall place in the



48 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE _ [April-June

package a memorandum (B. BE. P. Q. Form 3887) informing the addressee of
the action taken by the inspector and describing the matter which has been
seized and destroyed and the reasons therefor. Mail packages received at
San Juan, P. R., and Honolulu, Hawaii, shall be accorded treatment as herein
prescribed at these two ports and not diverted to Washington, D. C., San
Francisco, Calif., or Seattle, Wash.

Packages containing plants or plant products received in closed mail dis- |
patches made up direct to post offices (located at a customs port at which no
plant quarantine inspector is stationed) not included in the foregoing list of
post offices or such packages which are forwarded to these post offices from the
post office of original receipt without having received plant quarantine examina-
tion, shall be forwarded by the collector of customs through the postmaster
(accompanied jby customs card form 3511 in the manner heretofore described)
to the most accessible of the post offices listed above for treatment in accord-
ance with the foregoing instructions. Packages discovered at post offices where
no customs officer is located shall be forwarded by the postmaster under his
official penalty envelope addressed to the collector of customs at the most
accessible of the post offices listed for appropriate treatment as prescribed
herein.

HARLLEE BRANCH,
Second Assistant Postmaster General.

B. P. Q. 357, Supplement No. 3
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF ARGENTINA

SUPPLEMENTAL RESTRICTIONS ON SEED POTATOES

FEBRUARY 28, 1936.

Following is the text, in translation, of decree no. 64961, of August 8, 1935,
supplementing the decree of July 12, 1923, on the importation of seed potatees
into Argentina (pp. 13 and 14, B. P. Q. 357) :

CERTIFIED SEED POTATOES

ARTICLE 1. Every shipment of seed potatoes introduced into Argentina shall be
“certified seed potatoes’, meaning thereby that they have been grown in cul-
tures registered in the special service for the certification of seed potatoes,
subject to preestablished regulations, and periodically inspected by the above-
mentioned service, under Federal or State Departments of Agriculture or official
experiment stations of the country of origin.

EACH CONTAINER MUST BEAR A COPY CERTIFICATE

Art. 2. Each container of certified seed potatoes shall have affixed thereto the
certification ticket (tag) granted by the official service that certified the tubers.

NAME OF VARIETY TO BE INDICATED

ArT. 3. If the name of the variety of the potatoes is not inscribed on the
certification tag, it must be stamped on the container.
Arts. 4 and 5. Transitory.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

B. P. Q. 360, Supp'ement No. 1
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, ISLAND OF CYPRUS

May 28, 1936.
The order in council, no. 1643, June 21, 1935, of the Governor of Cyprus, amends
order in council no. 1421, April 23, 1931, by substituting the following form of
phytosanitary certificate for the one originally prescribed (see p. 8 of Circular
Bb. P. Q. 360) :
This is to certify that’ the living plants or plant products/a sample of the
living plants or plant products/included in the consignment, of which particulars

1 Strike out what is not applicable,







1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 49

are given below’ were/was thoroughly examined on the —_--__~_- Brana ;
ate
NES et eg nt ee , a duly authorized oflicial of the ___-_---_-
(name of inspector) (name of the
eee , and found to be healthy, no evidence of the presence of any injurious
inspection service)
insect, pest, or: disease: having been found* '-_~_-_--___-________ in/on them,
and that the consignment (including the packing) covered by this certificate *
bas/have not been treated in the following manner (e. g., fumigated with
aerate pare ti Ni dieimfeerea ) with) ta un 2. ere +)? > prior/imme-
diately subsequent to inspection.
Inspected/not inspected in the field by a duly authorized inspector on

(date)
gn ae ents oe eee
eae (officialstatus)
ee
Pretest CeSseriiiion Of patkases. soo
Piameais Ine Marks] =. 28 ae see

Description of living plants or plant products or parts thereof___-_____-___--

Peete SPoOwln, Ab. eS

aN TAN nItem,

PPE TOOT ESS Ol \CONSLONCOS a5 eos te et ek

Bee eee see Or Warliciilars- OF FOUtC =. 22> oe

Pine te SAMO nN Go. 2

PomeGr pidCe OF CN GEy 2. oe oe ee

Additional certificates attached (details gf any special certificate in respect of
imports specifically scheduled by the importing country).

; LEE A. STRONG,

Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

B. E. P. Q. 368, Supplement No. 1
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF POLAND

PHYTOSANITARY CERTIFICATES
APRIL 11, 1936.

According to article 11 of the decree of the Polish Minister of Finance on
Customs Procedure, October 4, 1933 (see p. 9 of B. EH. P. Q. 368), the certificates
mentioned in articles 1, 2, 3, and 5 of that decree must be issued either in the
Polish language or in that of the exporting country. The customs office has the
right to require a translation into Polish of a certificate in a foreign language.

When Circular B. E. P. Q. 368 was prepared, the Polish texts of those certifi-
cates were not available; they have now been received from the Polish Ministry
of Agriculture and Agrarian Reform, which states that the English translation
has no official status and that the official text is that in the Polish language.

For the convenience of inspectors the texts of those certificates are here
presented in both English and Polish.

PRESCRIBED POTATO CERTIFICATE

Ly 1 eagle
Certificate of health and origin for potatoes
(Valid 30 days from date of issue)
OTT Tr Iie cations Se ea ee gs Ra (full name and official title)

certifies that the shipment of potatoes described below was inspected and:

(1) Is free-from the following-named diseases and pests, as well as from the
eggs and larvae of such pests;

Wart disease, Synchytrium endobioticum; powdery scab, Spongospora subter-
ranea; Colorado potato beetle (Doryphora), Leptinotarsa decemlineata; potato

1 Strike out what is not applicable.
88937—36——_2



50 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

tuber worm, (Phthorimaea) Gnorimoschema operculella; and the potato
nematode, Heterodera schachtii rostochiensis ;

(2) Was grown in a locality free from the said diseases and pests and at least
20 km from the nearest place where the wart disease has been determined, and
50 km from the nearest place where the Colorado beetle-is known to occur ;

(8) Was shipped in new, unused containers, without packing ;

(4) Was shipped in containers provided with seals in a railroad car bearing
the inscription: (insert inscription) ;

(5) All articles employed in packing (containing) the potatoes included in the
shipment are free from the diseases and pests Cnekneoie eges and larvae) named
in paragraph (1).

Description of shipment

Weight of shipment __----.
Number and kind of containers
Marks on: eorntamerd 1 see ee oe ee
Railroad car numbers —-_-_-.

Varietal names of potatoes —.-..-. =.-. eee
AQMMISGCATIVE -GIstrtely oe

Name and address of shipper
Name and address of consignee
Wate wo. 2 oe eee
[SEAL ]

‘ (Signature)
Wz06r Swiadectwa zdrowia i pochodzenia ziemniakéw.
oo pochodzenia_ = = eee
T
oO

SWIADECTWO ZDROWIA I POCHQDZENIA ZIEMNIAKOW
(Wazne w ciagu 30 dni od daty wystawienia)

Mises POUpISsBy es 2 A Sie. eee) ae (full name and official title)
zaSwiadeza, ze ziemniaki, zawarte w nizej oznaczonej przesyice, zostaly zbadane
i ze:

(1) Sa wolne od nastepujacych choréb i szkodnikéw oraz jajek i larw tych
szkodinkow: rak ziemniaczany (synchytrium endobioticum) parch proés zysty
(Spongospora subterranea), chrzaszcz Colorado (Leptinotarsa decemlineata),
m6l ziemniaczany (Phthorimaea operculella) i matwik ziemniaczany (Heterodera
schachtii rostochiensis) :

(2) Zostaly wyprodukowane w miejscowoSsci wolnej od powyzszych chorob i
szkodnikow i odleglej co najmniej 20 km od najblizszego mieisca, w ktorem
stwierdzono raka ziemniaczanego (Synchytrium endobioticum) i 50 km od

najblizszego miejsca, w ktorem stwierdzono chrzaszcza Colorado (Leptinotarsa
decemlineata) ;

(3) Sa w nowem nieuzywanem opakowaniu ®

bez opakowania
(4) Sa w opakowaniu opatrzonem * plomba z napisem ~_-_---------------.----
Ww wagonie opatrzonym
(5) Wszelkie przedmioty, uzyte do opakowania zawartych Ww pozesyice
ziemniakow, sa wolne od wymienionych pod p. (1) chordb i szkodnikow oraz
jajek i larw tych szkodnikow.

Opis przesylki

Waga przesytki toa ey ee See ee eee
Liczba i rodzaj opakowania = .———=2=--~-=22 2-22 =
Znaki (Signum) na opakowaniu
Nr. wagonie
Odmiana ziemniakOw : 3.2222. =e ee
Okree .adninistitacy jy” __ 2. eee eee ee
Nazwisko i adres wysylajacego ~--_-----~-----------------------.
NazmwaISKO. 1.90°eCS OdDIONGY, «=~... 2k ee ee
PTA Be ee dee ca hme Dane ion GU ee te ed 19. ars

2Nazwisko, imie i charakter urzedowy funkcjonarjusza sluzby ochrony roSlin.
2 Nieodpowiadjace przesylee ~------~------------- skresli¢.





1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS Bik

PRESCRIBED CERTIFICATE FOR PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS

Certificate of health and origin for plants
(Valid 30 days from date of issue)

MMPETIRTC SITIO) 22 RN (full name and official title)
certifies that the (description of plants and plant products) included in this
shipment, and all the articles serving as packing therefor, have been inspected
and are:

(1) Free from the diseases and pests (including eggs and larvae of the latter)
named in Appendix V (Appendix A to this summary) to the decree of October 4,
1933, on Customs Procedure (Dziennik Ustaw R. P. No. 77/552), and were
produced in an establishment free from those diseases and pests;

(2) *The nursery products included in the shipment were produced in a local-
ity free from wart disease, Synchytrium endobioticum; and

(3) *The earth contained in the shipment originated in ground not infected
with wart disease.

Description of shipment

Weight of shipment _____-.

ee eer ATG) SOL CON LAINGI S25 ke,

OTN COUbA MOUS) (oe

Railroad car numbers ____--.

Mims veatlve GIStTiCt.

TOILE SS (OT ONT Del = — = Se
Rena aOUTess, OF. CONSIONCE. a ek ae oe Be a
meee See ne

air are eR ea ee A ee Dee a sig :

(Signature)
Wzor Swiadectwa zdrowia i pochodzenia roSslin.
rap OCUOUZeMI a 22 38 22 ak ee

INO see
SWIADECTWO ZDROWIA I POCHODZENIA ROSLIN
(Wazne w ciagu 30 dni od daty wystawienia)
EMPIRE ce ee (full name and _ official

title), zaswiadceza, ze zawarte w przesytce® (description of plants and plant
products) oraz wazelkie przedmioty sluzace do ich opakowania zostaly zbadane
i ze:

(1) Sa wolne od choréb i szkodnikéw oraz jajek i larw szkodnik6w wymie-
nionych w zataczniku III do rozporzadzenia Ministra Scarbu z dnia 9 paz-
dziernika 1934 r. o przepisach wykonawezych do rozporzadzenia Prezydenta
Rzeczypospolitej z dnia 27 pazdziernika 1933 r. o prawie celnem i zostaly
wyprodukowane w zaktadzie (na plantacji) wolnym (nej) od powyzszych
chorob i szkodnikéw;

(2) Zawarte w przesytce wytwory produkcji roslinej zostaty wyprodukowane
Ww miejscowosci wolnej od raka ziemniaczanego (Synchytrium endobioticum) .*

(3) Zawarta w przesytce ziemia nie pochodzi z terenu zarazonego rakiem
ziemniaczanym (Synchytrium endobioticum).

Opis przesytki

Waga przestki —_..-_.
ican aA TodZa) Gpalzowania = -8 ase eee
Znak (Signum) no opakowaniu
Nr. wagonu
Peter am msctrn cy, pi gfe. {Sek os Ce tee er Th
Raw t-AUreSs OW ysylayacemo List ate EO ihe Pt ht ae
eer ke) lt aes “OODIOrCY (26h. ti~ eer SEU Pe) 8
[PIECZEC | Lee er Wen ey eee. EEG See IE rs ee ee aoe ore

- Strike out the clause that does not apply to the shipment.

5 Nazwisko, imie i charakter urzedowy funkcjonarjusza stuzby ochrony roéglin.
® Wyszezegélnié zawarte w przesytce wytwory produkeji roslinnej.

* Nieodpowiadajace przesyice ..- ~~~. 2 skreslié¢,



52 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

CERTIFICATE OF PURITY FOR CLOVER AND RELATED SEEDS

This certificate is amended to read as follows:

The seed testing station at (locality of station) certifies that in the samples
taken from (number of sacks) sacks provided with lead seals and labels
(tags) of that establishment, containing seeds of clover (Trifolium spp.),
alfalfa (Medicago spp.), sand clover (Anthyllis vulneraria), sweet clover
(Melilotus spp.), and timothy (Phleum pratense), numbered as follows: analy-
sis has not revealed a single dodder (Cuscuta spp.) seed.

At the same time, this establishment declares that the inspection for Cus-
cuta was effected in the following manner: The sample was taken from at least
three places in each sack, namely, near the top, middle, and bottom, when
inspecting the seeds of red clover (Trifolium pratense), crimson clover (T. in-
carnatum), alfalfa (Medicago spp.), sand clover (Anthyllis vulneraria), sweet-
clover (Melilotus spp.) and birdsfoot trefoil (Lotus corniculatus), respectively,
100 grams of seed being taken from the mixed sample of each sack separately ;
in the same manner, 50 grams of seed were taken from the mixed sample of
each sack when inspecting white clover (Trifolium repens), alsike clover (T. hy-
bridum), Lotus uliginosus, and timothy (Phleum pratense),° respectively,
and that the seeds mentioned in the present certificate represent, after the
elimination of sacks in which dodder was determined, more than half the total
weight of the seeds inspected.

Description of shipment

Marks of the seeds ~-----.

Gross weight of shipment —-----.

Number of sacks ~_----.

Ful name and address of shipper. __-=.-.~- 2222-2 _ eee
Full name and address of consignee —..-~— ~~ 2225-2 = eee

FOBAT] << = —- = ya i a a
(Signature of Director of Seed Testing Station.)
Date.

Wzor Swiadectwa dla przywozonych z zagranicy nasion koniczyny.
lucerny, przelotu, nostrzyku, komonicy i tymotki.

SWIADECTWO BADANIA NA KANIANKE

Stacja: Oceny Nasien (wis =e ee ee (locality of station) stwierdza,
ze W probach, pobranych z zaplombowanych i opatrzonych etykieta tej stacji
LN een ee workéw nasion koniczyny, lucerny, przelotu,
nostrzyku, komonicy, tymotki,® oznaczonych nastepujacemi numerami ~____---~
ee a ETE Be , przeprowadzona analiza nie wykryla ani jednego ziarna
kanianki.

JednoezeSnie Stacja stwierdza, ze badanie na kanianke zostato pee a
zone z zachowaniem nastepujacych przepisOw ; przynajmniej z trzech miejse, u
gory, ze Srodka i dolu kazdego worka pobrano probke, z ktorej po wymieszaniu

wzieto do oznaczenia w kazdym worku oddzielnie —____________________-__-__=
przy koniczynie czerwonoj, inkarnatce, lucernach, przelocie, nostrzyku i ko-
monicy pospohtey SS fae ee eee 100 gramow nasion, przy
koniczynach: bialej i szwedzkiej, komonicy blotnej oraz tymotce ~-------------

Beery se) ees 50 gramow nasion oraz Ze nasiona, na ktore niniejsze Swia-
dectwe jest wydane, stanowia, po wyeliminowaniu work6w, w ktorych stwierdzono
obecnosé kanianki, wiecej niz potowe ogélnej wagi badanej partji nasion.

Oznaczenie przesytki

Nazwa nasion —= =...

Waga przesytki brutto ______.

Znaki zbadanej przestki ____-_-.

Imie, nazwisko i adres nadawcy —-----.

Imie, nazwisko i adres odbiorcy ~-----.

[PIECZEC] Podpis Kierownika Stacji:

Lert A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

® Strike out what is not applicable.
® Niepotrzebne skreslié¢.



ees UL Lee



1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 53

B. E. P. Q. 374, Supplement No. 1

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, PRESIDENCY OF ANTIGUA,
BRITISH WEST INDIES

May 12, 1936.

The proclamation of March 4, 1936, supersedes that of March 8, 1935.
The new proclamation remains effective for 1 year from March 4, 1936.
The provisions of the new proclamation are identical with those of the procla-
mation of March 8, 1935.
Lee A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

B..HoP,. Q.. 396
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, DOMINICAN REPUBLIC

JUNE 1, 1936.

This summary of the plant-quarantine import restrictions of the Dominican
Republic has been prepared for the information of nurserymen, plant-quarantine
officials, and others interested in the exportation of plants and plant products to
that country.

It was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant quarantine inspector, in charge
of Foreign Information Service, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines, from his
translations of the original texts, and reviewed by the Secretaria de Estado de
Agricultura, Industria y Comercio of the Dominican Republic.

The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct up to the
time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used independently of, nor as a
substitute for, the original texts, and it is not to be interpreted as legally
authoritative. The texts themselves should be consulted.

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, DOMINICAN REPUBLIC
BASIC LEGISLATION

Third sentence of article 49 of the Constitution of the Republic, and law no.
938 of May 23, 1928, as amended.

DEFINITIONS

For the purpose of these quarantine orders, decrees, and laws, the term ‘The
Department” means the Department of Agriculture and Commerce of the
Dominican Republic, and the term “The Secretary” means the Secretary of
State for the Department of Agriculture and Commerce of that Republic.

LAW GOVERNING THE IMPORTATION OF PLANT MATERIAL

Import permit required.—Law no. 938, May 23, 1928, section 1, prohibits the
introduction into the Republic from any exterior source, through any maritime
or frontier port, of any plant material, such as plants and seeds of any kind
intended for propagation, unless the introducer possesses a special permit,
signed by the Secretary, indicating the quantity, kind, origin, and other identify-
ing data deemed necessary. The regulations promulgated by decree no. 1287,
May 24, 1935, under law no. 988, prescribe that the importer shall apply to the
Department of Agriculture of the Dominican Republic for a permit to import
plant material and that such material shall be inspected on arrival.

Authorized ports of entry.—Section 2 of law no. 938, as amended by law no.
906, May 23, 1935, designates Santo Domingo, San Pedro de Macoris, Barahana,
and Puerto Plata as the exclusive ports for the introduction of such plant
material,



54 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

SPECIAL ORDERS, DECREES, AND LAWS GOVERNING THE IMPORTATION OF PLANT
MATERIAL

The Government of the Dominican Republic controls the importation of plants
and plant products by the following special orders, decrees, and law, under the
authority of law no. 938. These are arranged as nearly as practicable in
chronological sequence.

Propucts WHOSE IMPORTATION IS RESTRICTED OR PROHIBITED
IMPORTATION OF COTTONSEED PROHIBITED EXCEPT FROM THE UNITED STATES

Executive Order No. 80, of September 17, 1917, prescribes that: The importa-
tion of cottonseed into the Dominican Republic is at present prohibited, except
from the United States. Cottonseed from that country must be certified by the
Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine of the United States Department
of Agriculture as being free from contagious organisms and insect pests. No
cottonseed that is not so certified will be permitted to enter the Dominican
Republic. This action is taken to prevent the introduction of contagious plant
diseases and of insect pests from foreign countries.

Executive Order No. 508, of June 2, 1920, amends order no. 80 by prescribing
that cottonseed may not be imported from the United States unless it is also
accompanied by a certificate issued by the United States Bureau of Entomology
and Plant Quarantine affirming that the seed proceeds from a district not
infested by the boll weevil (Anthonomus grandis Bobh.).

IMPORTATION PROHIBITED OF COCONUTS FROM PUERTO RICO

Executive Order No. 4, of June 10, 1919, prescribes that:

ARTICLE 1. Owing to the existence in Puerto Rico of the bud-rot disease
(Phytophthora palmivora Butler) of the coconut palm, the importation of
coconuts from that island into the Dominican Republic is for the present
prohibited.

Art. 2. To protect the domestic coconut palm cultures, no species of coconut
may be imported from any other place or country without previous authorization
by the Department.

IMPORTATION OF EMPTY SACKS RESTRICTED OR PROHIBITED

Decree No. 203, of July 16, 1925, as amended by no. 1224 of November 19, 1929,
and no. 310 of January 5, 1932, to prevent the introduction of diseases and insect
pests injurious to agriculture, prescribes that:

ARTICLE 1. The introduction into the territory of the Republic is prohibited of
any kind of empty sacks which have contained fruits and plant products, as
well as of material derived from such used sacks.

ArT, 2. Any such sacks, or material derived therefrom, imported in contra-
vention of this decree will be held by the customs for reexportation or burning
within 7 days of the date of arrival, at the expense of the importer.

Provided, that new sacks, which were used for the first time for the exporta-
tion of maize (decree no. 1224 of Nov. 19, 1929), or starch (decree no. 310 of
Jan. 5, 1932), in quantity equal to those exported, and under a mark registered
by the Department, which permits their identification, may be imported if
accompanied by a fumigation certificate issued by competent authority.

PERMIT REQUIRED TO IMPORT SUGARCANE

Decree no. 494 of July 26, 1926, prescribes that a permit be obtained from the
Secretary of Agriculture of the Dominican Republic to import sugarcane.

POTATO REGULATIONS

Importation from certain countries prohibited—Decree no. 971 of June 8,
1928, as amended by decree no. 1079 of December 31, 1928, and no. 822 of
September 12, 1933, to prevent the introduction of potato wart (Synchytrium
endobioticum (Schilb.) Pere.), and Colorado beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata
Say), prescribes that:

ds





1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 5D

ARTICLE 1. The importation is prohibited of potatoes proceeding directly or
indirectly from any Huropean country except Spain (decrees nos. 1079 and 822),
and from Miquelon, St. Pierre, Newfoundland, and South Africa, in which the
existence of potato wart has been announced.

ArT, 2. Importation permitted under certification.—The introduction of pota-
toes is permitted from countries not mentioned in the preceding article when
each shipment is accompanied by a certificate of the official plant protection
service of the country of origin, certifying that the product was examined and
that in the district where it was grown neither potato wart nor Colorado beetle
exists.

IMPORTATION OF BANANA PLANTS AND FRUITS PROHIBITED FROM FIJI ISLANDS AND
PUERTO RICO

Decree no. 1122 of May 6, 1929, in virtue of the existence in the Fiji Islands
and Puerto Rico of the banana root borer (Cosmospolites sordidus Germ.),
whose entry into this country is to be prevented, the importation is prohibited
of plants, parts cf plants, and fruits of any variety of banana or plantain from
those sources.

INTRODUCTION OF INJURIOUS INSECTS AND ANIMALS RESTRICTED

Decree no. 1162 of June 6, 1929, to prevent the introduction of insects and
animals harmful to agriculture, prescribes that:

ARTICLE 1. The importation is prohibited of any species of insects or animals
that may be prejudicial to the national agriculture, unless a permit has been
issued in advance by the Secretary to the interested person. Such permit
shall indicate the class, order, family, tribe, genus, subgenus, if any, and the
species to which the insect or animal belongs, that he wishes to import, as
well as the country of origin.

IMPORTATION OF CONIFERS PROHIBITED

Decree no. 1185 of September 20, 1929, to prevent the introduction into the
Republic of diseases of the pine known as rusts, caused by Uredinales, which
exist in America and Europe, the importation is prohibited of living plants of
any class of conifer.

IMPORTATION OF PADDY RICE PROHIBITED

Decree no. 119 of April 25, 1931, to prevent the introduction of certain insect
pests and plant diseases of rice from various countries, prescribes that:

ARTICLE 1. The introduction of paddy rice from any exterior source, and
by any means, is prohibited.

Art. 2. Excepted from this prohibition are small quantities of seed rice
consigned to the Department exclusively for experimental culture.

The inspector of plants and seeds will disinfect such seed rice before deliver-
ing it to the departmental consignee.

RICE DISEASES AND PESTS EXISTING IN FOREIGN COUNTRIES

This decree lists the following insect pests and diseases as attacking rice
crops in foreign countries:

Insects

Chilo plejadellus Zinek (rice stalk borer).

Chilo simplex Butl. (Asiatic rice borer).

Diabrotica duodecimpunctata Fab. (spotted cucumber beetle).
Diabrotica soror Lee. (western spotted cucumber beetle).
Diatraea saccharalis Fab. (sugarcane borer).

Diatraea venosata Wik. (spotted borer).

Euetheola rugiceps Lee. (sugarcane beetle).

Haplothrips japonicus Matsumura (thrips).

Haplothrips oryzae Matsumura (thrips).

Laphygma frugiperda S. and A. (fall armyworm).



56 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

Lissorhoptrus simplex Say (rice water weevil).
Orya velox Fab. (Acrididae).

Oxya vicina Fab. (Acrididae).

(Parnara) Chapra mathias Fab. (rice skipper).
Solubea pugnar Fab. (Pentatomidae).

Systena frontalis Fab. (Chrysomelidae).

Diseases

Piricularia (oryzae) grisea (Cke.) Sace. (rice blast).
Tilletia horrida Tak. (rice smut).
Ustilaginoides virens (Cke.) Tak. (rice green smut).

Importation of rice straw and other wastes prohibited—Decree no. 792 of
August 7, 1933, for the protection of rice cultures in particular and of agricul-
ture in general, prescribes that:

ARTICLE 1. The entry through the ports of the Republic is prohibited of straw
and other wastes of rice used as packing material for any kind of imported
merchandise.

IMPORTATION OF CITRUS, ACACIA, CASUARINA, AND ROSA PROHIBITED FROM CERTAIN
COUNTRIES

Decree no. 810 of August 30, 1933, to prevent the introduction of the cottony
cushion scale (Jcerya purchasi Mask.), which is distributed in various countries,
including Australia, Cuba, Mexico, Puerto Rico, and the United States, pre-
scribes that:

ARTICLE 1. The introduction is prohibited of living plants, or parts thereof,

of Citrus spp., Acacia spp., Casuarina spp., and rose plants in general, from any

source, unless accompanied by an official certificate of the plant-protection
service of the country of origin, affirming that the plants or parts of plants
listed in the shipping documents have been inspected and found free from tbe
pest Icerya purchasi Mask. in any stage of development.

Art. 2. The inspectors of sanidad vegetal (plant health) will subject all
plants or parts of plants of the above-mentioned genera or other species which
are hosts of Icerya purchasi Mask., to inspection, and, in case this parasite is
found upon them in any stage they will proceed to destroy all infested plant
material.

B. EH. oP. Q..397

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, COLONY OF GRENADA, BRITISH
WEST INDIES

7 JUNE 1, 1936.

This summary of the plant-quarantine import restrictions of the colony of
Grenada, British West Indies, has been prepared for the information of nursery-
men, plant-quarantine officials, and others interested in the exportation of plants
and plant products to that country.

It was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant-quarantine inspector, in charge of
foreign information service, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines, from the
plant-protection ordinance of June 1, 1906, and the proclamations and regula-
tions promulgated thereunder, and reviewed by the agricultural authority of
the colony.

The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct and com-
plete up to the time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used inde-
pendently of, nor as a substitute for, the original texts.

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

oka

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,
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1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 57

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, COLONY OF GRENADA, BRITISH
WEST INDIES

Basic LEGISLATION

The plant quarantine ordinance of June 1, 1906 (no. 7 of 1906).
The noxious weeds ordinance of March 238, 1912 (no. 2 of 1912).

SUMMARY ”
IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

Coconut plants (Cocos nucifera L.) :* Importation into the colony prohibited
from any place out of the colony, to prevent the introduction of the red-ring
disease (Aphelenchus cocophilus Cobb) (proclamation of Apr. 4, 1919, p. 4).

Sugarcanes and sugarcane plants (Saccharum ofjicinarum L.): Importation
from Barbados, directly or indirectly, prohibited (except with the special sanc-
tion of the Governor in Council), to prevent the introduction of the mosaic or
yellow mottling disease (proclamation of Jan. 5, 1921).

Sugarcanes and sugarcane plants (Saccharum officinarum L.) from Trinidad,
British West Indies: Importation prohibited of all varieties, except the Uba
sugarcane plant when imported by the Agricultural Department of Grenada, to
prevent the introduction of the mosaic or yellow mottling disease (proclamation
of May 30, 1924).

Banana plants (suckers), Musa spp., from all places except the Leeward
Islands (Anguilla, Antigua, Barbuda, Dominica, Montserrat, Nevis, Redonda,
St. Kitts, and the Virgin Isles, British West Indies), St. Vincent, and Bar-
bados:* Importation prohibited to prevent the introduction of the Panama wilt
disease (Fusarium cubense E. F. Sm.) (proclamation of Dee. 14, 1922, p. 4).

Cacao plants (Theobroma cacco L.), parts thereof, and cacao beans from
Trinidad, British. West Indies: Importation, directly or indirectly, prohibited
to prevent the introduction of the Surinam witches-broom disease (Mardsmius
perniciosus Stahel) (proclamation of Oct. 24, 1928).

All succulent fruits (including apple, apricot, cherry, citrus, grape, guava,
mango, nectarine, peach, pear, and plum) :* Importation prohibited from Africa,
America (Central and South), Australia, Azores, Bahamas, Bermuda, Cape
Verde, France, Greece, Hawaii, Italy, Madeira, Malta, Palestine, Spain, and
Turkey, to prevent the introduction of the Mediterranean fruit fly (Ceratitis
capitata Wied.).

The importation of such fruits from countries other than those above named
is prohibited unless each shipment is accompanied by a certificate of origin
affirming that the fruit was not grown in any area infested by the Mediter-:
ranean fruit fly and that it did not pass through any area so infested (procla-
mation of Sept. 10, 1950, as amended by the proclamation of Feb. 8, 1932).

IMPORTATION RESTRICTED

Coconuts in the husk (Cocos nucifera L.) imported into Grenada are subject
to immediate treatment with efficient fungicides and to planting under quaran-
tine conditions; then to be kept under observation by the superintendent of
agriculture. Any resulting plants suspected of disease may be destroyed ”
(proclamation of Apr. 14, 1919, p. 4).

Cottonseed and seed cotton: Importation from St. Vincent, British West
indies, prohibited, except under license given by the Governor or the superin-
tendent of agriculture and subject to the provisions and conditions of such
license (proclamation of Feb. 4, 1924).

Lime plants (Citrus aurantifolia Swingle), and parts thereof, including the
fruits: Importation prohibited from all countries and places, except with the
special sanction of the Governor in Council, to prevent the introduction of
withertip disease (Gloeosporium limetticolum Clausen) (proclamation of July
A, 1925; p.-4).

a

10 Concerns the United States. Except as thus indicated, there are no restrictions upon
the entry into Grenada of plants and plant products of the United States and no phyto-
sanitary inspection certificate is prescribed.

88937—36 3





58 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

PLANT PROTECTION ORDINANCE
(June 1, 1906)

As defined by this ordinance, “plants” includes growing plants, cuttings, buds,
and grafts, bulbs, roots, seeds, and berries, also fruits and vegetables; “port of
entry’ means the port of St. Georges and any other port or place in the colony
designated by the Governor for the importation of plants.

The ordinance empowers the Governor in Council, by proclamation, to pro-
hibit or to restrict the importation of plants as above defined, either generally
or with respect to any country or place. He is also authorized to seize pro-
hibited “plants” offered for entry into the colony;.to apply such treatment to
imported “plants” as may be deemed necessary at the expense of the importer ;
and to make rules and regulations for carrying out the provisions and intentions
of the ordinance.

NOXIOUS WEEDS ORDINANCE

(Mar. 23, 1912)

This ordinance empowers the Governor, with the consent of the legislative
council, to make, modify, or revoke regulations to prevent the introduction into
the colony, or the sale of any plant, seed, or grain that is likely to propagate or
spread the growth of noxious weeds.

B. E. P. Q. 398

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, FRENCH COLONY OF NEW
CALEDONIA AND DEPENDENCIES
JUNE 1, 1936. ©

This summary of the plant quarantine import restrictions of the French
colony of New Caledonia and its dependencies has been prepared for the in-
formation of nurserymen, plant quarantine officials, and others interested in
the exportation of plants and plant products to that colony.

It was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant quarantine inspector, in charge of
foreign information service of the Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines, from
his translation of decree no. 103 C, January 27, 1934.

The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct and com-
plete up to the time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used independ-
ently of, nor as a substitute for, the original text, and it is not to be inter-

preted as legally authoritative.
Lee A. STRONG,

Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, FRENCH COLONY OF NEW
CALEDONIA

(Including the Futuna, Alofi, Huan, Loyalty, and Wallis Islands, and the Isle of
Pines)

GOVERNOR'S DEcREE No. 103 C, JANUARY 27, 1934
IMPORTATION RESTRICTED

ARTICLE 1. The importation into New Caledonia and its dependencies of roots,
seeds, flower bulbs, earth, and vegetable manures, and other similar goods, as
well as packing materials that have served for their transportation, 1s subject

to the following restrictions:

PHYTOSANITARY CERTIFICATE REQUIRED

Arr. 2. The products named in the preceding article must be accompanied by
a shipper’s declaration and a certificate issued by the competent authority of
the place of origin, and in certain cases visaed by the consular authority, wherein
it is stated that in the country of origin no injurious diseases or parasites are
present in the kinds of products imported.

te oe



1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 59

DISINFECTION MAY BE REQUIRED

Art. 38. The imported products, in order to be admitted into the colony, with-
out reference to their origin, may be subjected to disinfection, for which the
administration of the colony will establish regulations.

All imported plants, grains, or products which on arrival are found to be
infected or attacked by parasites must be destroyed at the expense of the
importers.

ENTRY UNRESTRICTED

Art. 4. Agricultural and horticultural products, kitchen vegetables, grains, and
fruits intended for consumption are free from the preceding provisions.
ArT. 5. Seeds intended for food purposes are not subject to any special
regulation.
IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

Art. 6. The importation of coconuts, seed hulls of coconut palms, and basket-
making goods of coconut palm leaves that originate outside the archipelago of
New Caledonia and the Loyalty Islands into New Caledonia and its dependencies
is absolutely prohibited. Every product of this kind that is seized on arrival in
Noumea shall be destroyed by burning.

POTATOES MUST BE CERTIFIED

ArT. 7. Potatoes will be admitted to entry only when accompanied by a
phytosanitary certificate issued by an authorized official of the exporting coun-
try and affirming that they were inspected on shipment and were free from any
kind of pest.

Tubers found on entry to be infected are to be returned or destroyed.

B. E. P. Q.-399

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, PRESIDENCY OF DOMINICA,
BRITISH WEST INDIES

JUNE 1, 1936.

This summary of the plant-quarantine import restrictions of the Presidency of
Dominica, British West Indies, has been prepared for the information of nursery-
men, plant-quarantine officials, and others interested in the exportation of plants
and plant products to that country.

It was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant-quarantine inspector, in charge of
foreign information service, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines, from the
plants-protection ordinance, 1927, and proclamations promulgated thereunder,
and reviewed by the agricultural superintendent of the Botanic and Agricul-
tural Department of Dominica.

The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct and com-
piete up to the time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used independ-
ently of nor as a substitute for the original texts, and it is not to be interpreted
as legally authoritative. The ordinance and proclamations should be consulted
for the exact texts.

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, PRESIDENCY OF DOMINICA, BRITISH
WEST INDIES

BASic LEGISLATION

Plants-protection ordinance, 1927, approved April 23, 1927.
SecTION 1. This ordinance may be cited as the plants-protection ordinance,
1927.

7 DEFINITIONS

Sec. 2. In this ordinance, unless the context otherwise requires:

“Disease” means any disease affecting trees, shrubs, or herbs caused by or
consisting in the presence of any pathogenic animal or vegetable organism which
the Governor may declare to be a disease within the meaning of this ordinance.



60 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

“Pest” includes any parasitic, epiphytic, or other animal or vegetable organ-
ism, and also any insect or other invertebrate animal (in any stage) affecting or
injurious to trees, shrubs, or herbs, which the Governor may declare to be a pest
within the meaning of this ordinance.

“Tree”, “shrub”, “herb”, respectively, include the fruit or any product of any
tree, shrub, or herb, and the roots, trunks, stems, branches, fruits, leaves, or
other parts thereof severed from any tree, shrub, or herb, including emptied pods
or husks.

Section 3 empowers the Governor to appoint a chief inspector and as many
inspectors as may be necessary.

Section 4 authorizes the Governor to rent or lease land for the purposes of
the ordinance.

Sections 5 and 6 authorize the Governor to prohibit, or to permit under
conditions specified by him, the importation of plants, parts of plants, plant
products, soil, packing material, things, and substances, and to seize, destroy,
or otherwise deal with material entered in violation of a proclamation.

IMPORTATION PROHIBITED
(Proclamation no. 12, Aug. 5, 1932)

Importation into the presidency is absolutely prohibited of the articles named
in the first schedule to this proclamation from the countries named therein,
with all earth and soil packed therewith and all packages, coverings, wrappings,
and containers.

The importation of the articles named in the second schedule is prohibited
from all countries, together with all earth and soil packed therewith. and all
packages, coverings, wrappings, and containers, unless and until the prescribed
conditions shall have been complied with: Provided, That all fruit and vege-
tables that may be imported into the presidency from the British Isles, Canada,
and the British West Indies shall be accompanied by a certificate from a respon-
sible authority in the country of export, stating that the product does not
originate in a prohibited country.

FIRST SCHEDULE—ARTICLES ABSOLUTELY PROHIBITED

Banana (Musa spp.), fruit of: Importation prohibited from all countries
except Barbados and the islands of the Leeward Island Colony (Anguilla,
Antigua, Barbuda, Dominica, Montserrat, Nevis, Redonda, St. Kitts, and the
Virgin Islands), to prevent the introduction of injurious diseases.

Lime (Citrus aurantifolia Swingle), fruit of: Importation prohibited from
3ahamas, Bermuda, British Guiana, St. Lucia, Trinidad, and all other countries,
except the other islands of the British West Indies not mentioned in this para-
graph, to prevent the introduction of injurious diseases.

All other fruits except plantains, nuts, dried, canned, candied, or other proc-
essed fruits: Importation prohibited from Bahamas, Bermuda, British Guiana,
and all other countries, except the British Isles, Canada, British West Indies,
and the United States of America, to prevent the introduction of the Mediter-
ranean fruit fly (Ceratitis capitata Wied.).

All vegetables except onions, potatoes, canned or processed vegetables: Impor-
tation prohibited from the same sources as fruits to prevent the introduction
of the Mediterranean fruit fly (Ceratitis capitata Wied.).

Johnson grass (Holcus halepensis L.): Importation prohibited from all coun-
tries to prevent the introduction of this noxious weed.

Soil: Importation prohibited from all countries to prevent the introduction
of injurious pests and diseases.

SECOND SCHEDULE—IMPORTATION CONDITIONALLY PROHIBITED FROM ALL COUNTRIES

Sugarcane, sugarcane seedlings and plants, and all parts of the cane: Impor-
tation prohibited unless under license granted by the Governor to prevent the
introduction of mosaic diseases (virus).

Banana plants and parts thereof: Importation prohibited unless under license
granted by the Governor to prevent the introduction of injurious pests and
diseases.

Citratae, rooted plants and parts thereof: Importation prohibited unless
under license from the Governor and unless accompanied by a certificate signed

“



i a A i nk





1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 61

by a responsible inspecting officer stating that the district from which such
plants originate has not been affected by, or has been free for the preceding
2 years from, citrus canker (Bacterium citri Hasse).

Lime (Citrus aurantifolia Swingle), fruit of: Importation prohibited unless
under license granted by the Governor to prevent the introduction of injurious
diseases. (This applies to the islands of the West Indies other than those
named above under the same caption. )

Cottonseed, cotton lint, and seed cotton, and all packages, coverings, bags, or
other articles that have been used to contain those products: Importation pro-
hibited unless under license granted by the Governor to prevent the introduction
of pink bollworm (Pectinophora gossypiella Saund.).

Sprouted coconuts and coconuts in the husk (Cocos nucifera L.) : Importation
prohibited unless under license granted by the Governor to prevent the intro-
duction of injurious diseases.

Cocoa plants (Theobroma cacao LL.) and parts thereof: Importation pro-
hibited, unless under license granted by the Governor, to prevent the introduc-
tion of witches’ broom (Marasmius perniciosus Stahel).

(Proclamation no. 3, Feb. 20, 1934)

Except as indicated above, plants and plant products originating in the United
States may be exported to Dominica, British West Indies, without an inspection
certificate or other restriction, but such products may be inspected on arrival
and, if deemed necessary, subjected to treatment or destroyed.

B. E. P. Q. 400
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF PORTUGAL

JUNE 1, 1936.

This summary of the plant-quarantine import restrictions of the Republic
of Portugal has been prepared for the information of nurserymen, plant-
quarantine officials, and others interested in the exportation of plants and plant
products to that country.

It was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant-quarantine inspector, in charge of
foreign information service, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines, from his
translations of the original texts of decree no. 22389, March 29, 1933, and decree
no. 20535, November 20, 1931, of the Portuguese Ministry of Agriculture, and
reviewed by the Direccaéo Geral dos Servicos Agricolas of that ministry.

The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct and com-
plete up to the time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used independ-
ently of, nor as a substitute for, the original texts, and it is not to be interpreted
as legally authoritative.

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF PORTUGAL

Basic LEGISLATION

Decree No. 12740, November 26, 1926, article 2, paragraph 2.
Decree No. 15331, April 9, 1928, article 1.

SUMMARY
IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

Eims (Ulmus spp.) from any source: Importation prohibited to prevent the
introduction of the Dutch elm disease (Graphiwm ulmi Schwarz) (decree no.
22389, Mar’ 29, 1933, art. 5, p. 3.)

Potatoes (Solanwm tuberosum L.) from America: Importation prohibited to
prevent the introduction of the Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decem-
lineata Say) (decree no. 20535, Nov. 20, 1931, art. 2, p. 5).



62 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

Potatoes from the island of Madeira: Importation into the Azores prohibited
to prevent the introduction of Bacterium solanacearum, EB. F. Sm., bacterial
wilt (decree no. 22389, Mar. 29, 1933, art. 6, p. 5).

IMPORTATION RESTRICTED

Living plants or parts thereof for propagation from extra-European coun-
tries: Importation subject to a previous authorization from the Direceao Geral
dos Servicos Agricolas. Phytosanitary certificate of competent authority re-
quired with each shipment (decree no. 22389, Mar. 29, 1933, arts. 2 and 3, p. 2).
See paragraphs (a) to (g) of article 38 for special certification for certain
groups of plant material. ,

Seeds of horticultural, field, or forest plants, from any country, or living
plants or parts thereof for propagation from any European country: May be
imported without a previous authorization, if accompanied by a phytosanitary
certificate of competent authority of the country of origin (decree no. 22389,
Mar. 29, 1933, arts. 1 and 3, pp. 2 and 8).

Fruits from any source: Importation into continental or insular Portugal
subject to inspection on arrival especially for scale insects, San Jose seale in
particular (decree no. 22389, Mar. 29, 1933, art. 9, p. 4).

Potatoes from sources other than America: Phytosanitary certificate of com-
petent authority of country of origin affirming freedom of the source from
potato wart (Synchytrium endobioticum (Schilb.) Pere.), and Colorado potato
beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say) (decree no. 20535, Nov. 20, 1931, art. 3,
p. 5).

GENERAL REGULATIONS

(Decree no. 22389, Mar. 29, 1933; Diario do Governo, I: 75, Apr. 1, 1933, pp. 447-449)
PLANT MATERIAL NOT SUBJECT TO AN IMPORT AUTHORIZATION

ARTICLE 1. The importation is permitted from European or extra-European
countries, without previous authorization, of seeds of horticultural, field, and
forest plants, and of living plants and- parts thereof for propagation (stocks,
wild plants, scions, rhizomes, bulbs, tubers) from European countries, except
those mentioned in articles 5 and 6.

PLANT MATERIAL SUBJECT TO SPECIAL IMPORT AUTHORIZATION

Art. 2. The importation into the mainland or the adjacent islands of living
plants or parts thereof for propagation (stocks, cuttings, scions, rhizomes,
tubers, and bulbs) from extra-European countries, whether or not those coun-
tries belong to Portugal, except the adjacent islands, is subject to a special
authorization of the Direccaéo Geral dos Servicos Agricolas.

PHYTOSANITARY CERTIFICATE REQUIRED

Art. 3. Shipments of living plants, or parts of living plants, intended for
propagation, must be accompanied by phytosanitary certificates indicating
origin, issued by authorities of the official phytosanitary inspection service of
the country of origin. These must indicate the names of shippers and con-
signees, the exact description of the goods, marks, quantity, weight, and phyto-
sanitary condition and, in particular, with respect to:

(a) Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), a declaration that they are free from
dodder seeds (Cuscuta trifolii, C. gronowii, C. suaveolens, ete.). .

(b) Beans (Vicia faba L.) and peas (Pisum sativum L. and Lathyrus
odoratus L.), a declaration of freedom from broomrape seed (Orobanche
crenata, O. minor, etc).

(c) Rooted plants, cuttings, bulbs, tubers, rootstocks, and other parts of
plants that. have been in contact with soil; a declaration that they were
grown in ground free from potato wart (Synchytriwm endobioticum (Schilb.)
Pere.) and located at least 5 km from any focus of that disease. ;

(d) Rooted pear trees, cuttings, scions, or buds, the same declaration as in
(c) ; also that in the locality of growth fire blight (Bacillus amylovorus (Burr.)
Trev.) does not occur.

(e) Rooted chestnut trees (Castanea spp.) scions, or buds, in addition to
the declaration of paragraph (c), another to the effect that chestnut canker





1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 63

(Endothia parasitica (Murr.) And. and And.) does not occur in the locality
in which the trees were grown, and that no planting or grove of chestnut trees
attacked by the ink disease (Phytophthora cambivora (Petri) Buis) exists
within at least 5 km of the place of growth.

(f) Grapevines, cuttings, or scions, in addition to declaration (c) one to
the effect that the material proceeded from vines free from the virus disease
known in France as “court-nous.”

(g) Potatoes, tomatoes, and eggplants (Solanwm tuberosum, Lycopersicum
esculentum, and S. melongena), all the data prescribed by decree no. 20535 of
November 20, 1981, and the regulations approved by decree no. 21172 of April
27, 1932.

PLANTS MUST BE FREE FROM SOIL

ArT. 4. Rooted plants, bulbs, rhizomes, and tubers, must be free from earth,
and, according to the case, be packed in sphagnum moss, or peat.

ArT. 5. The importation of elms (Ulmus spp.) is prohibited.

ArT. 6. The importation into the Azores of potatoes from Madeira is
prohibited. .

ALL IMPORTED PLANT MATERIAL SUBJECT TO INSPECTION

Art. 7. All plants or parts of plants imported into continental or insular
Portugal for propagation are subject to inspection.

AUTHORIZED PORTS OF ENTRY

(1) Inspection is effected in the customs offices of Lisbon, Oporto, Ponta
Delgada, Horta, Angra do Heroismo, and Funchal.

(2) Seeds of plants, except alfalfa, pea and bean seeds, are free from
inspection.

(3) Exceptionally, the entry of plants may be effected at eustoms offices other
than those above named on permission of the Direction-General of Customs at
the request of the Direction-General of Agriculture, which will send one or
more inspectors to make the necessary inspection.

(4) The merchandise will be delivered to the consignee only after he has
presented to the customs the duplicate of the phytosanitary certificate issued
by the Chief of the Division of Phytopathological Inspection, or by one of the
officials referred to in this article. J

FUMIGATION MAY BE REQUIRED ON ARRIVAL

ArT. 8. All plants, and especially apple, orange, olive, and other fruit trees,
must be fumigated by the phytopathological inspection service before delivery
to the consignee, provided that the inspectors deem it necessary.

FRUITS INSPECTED FOR SCALE

ArT. 9. Fruits imported into the mainland or the adjacent islands will be
inspected in customs offices and released only when found entirely free from
exotic coccids, and especially from San Jose scale (Aspidiotus perniciosus
Comst.).

POTATO IMPORT RESTRICTIONS

(Decree no. 20535, Nov. 20, 1931; Diario do Governo 1¢ Serie, no. 268, Nov. 20, 1931)

ARTICLE 1. The importation of potatoes into continental Portugal and the
adjacent islands (Azores and Madeira) is permitted only when the potatoes
originate in and proceed from a country possessing properly organized phyto-
pathological services.

IMPORTATION OF AMERICAN POTATOES PROHIBITED

Art. 2. The importation of American potatoes is expressly prohibited through
any port of continental Portugal or the adjacent islands.

ArT. 3. Shipments of potatoes from other countries must be accompanied by
an inspection certificate affirming freedom of place of growth from potato wart
and Colorado potato beetle,

Since potatoes may not be imported from the United States into Portugal, the
remaining regulations under this decree are omitted.



64 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

B. E. P. Q. 401

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF SPAIN

JUNE 12, 1936.

This summary of the plant-quarantine restrictions of the Republic of Spain
has been prepared for the information of nurserymen, plant-quarantine officials,
and others interested in the exportation of plants and plant products to that
country.

It was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant-quarantine inspector in charge of
foreign information service, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines, from his
translations of the original texts of the Spanish decrees and orders and reviewed
by the Spanish National Phytopathological Service, Ministry of Agriculture,
Industry, and Commerce (Servicio Nacional de Fitopathologia, Ministerio de
Agricultura, Industria y Comercio).

The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct and com-
plete up to the time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used independ-
ently of, nor as a substitute for, the original texts of the decrees and orders, and
it is not be interpreted as legally authoritative. The original decrees and
orders should be consulted for the exact texts.

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF SPAIN
Basic LAw
(Law on the extermination of crop pests and protection against the same, May 21, 1908)
CoNcIsH SUMMARY

Since the orders of April 19, 1929 (p. 4) and April 20, 1932 (p. 5), practically
constitute an absolute embargo against the importation of plants and fresh plant
products from the United States into Spain, reference to those orders alone is
necessary, except with respect to the unrestricted material covered by the law
of May 21, 1908, articles 22 and 32. (See item under “Importation unrestricted.” )

IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

Phyllozxera vitifoliae Fitch: Introduction of viable eggs, larvae, and pupae
into nonphylloxerated provinces of Spain prohibited unless enclosed in glass vials
or tubes hermetically sealed (law of May 21, 1908, art. 27).

Grapevines and dry stems: Importation into Spain and adjacent islands
prohibited (law of May 21, 1908, art. 29).

Trees, shrubs, and plants from countries that do not adhere to the Interna-
tional Phylloxera Convention and are infested with phylloxera may not be
imported into nonphylloxerated provinces (law of May 21, 1908, art. 51).

Chestnut (Castanea spp.) and its products, from China and Japan to prevent
the introduction of chestnut canker, Endothia parasitica (Murr.) And. and And.
(order of Dec. 21, 1922).

Live plants and parts thereof, including seeds, attacked by injurious parasites.

Live insects injurious to plants, including eggs, larvae, pupae, and nymphs of
such insects.

Cultures of bacteria and fungi injurious to plants. ;

Soils or other materials containing parasites injurious to plants, when the
soils, etc., accompany living plants.

Containers that have served for the transportation of the above-mentioned
products: Importation prohibited (decree of June 20, 1924, art. 1).

Fresh fruits, living plants, and parts thereof, including cuttings, scions, etc., of
fruits: Importation prohibited from Argentina, Brazil, Canada, Japan, Mexico,
New Zealand, Portugal, United States, and Union of South Africa, to prevent
the introduction of the injurious plant pests and diseases named in the order of
April 19, 1929, as extended by the decree of August 14, 1934. (See pp. 4 and 5.)

Cottonseed and seed cotton from Brazil, China, Egypt, India, Japan, Mexico,
and the United States, to prevent the introduction of the boll weevil, Anthonomus

‘

Te! ee so



1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 65

grandis Boh., and the pink bollworm, Pectinophora gossypiella Saund. (orders
of Apr. 19, 1929, and Nov. 5, 1923; see pp. 4 and 5).

Coconut fiber (decree of Oct. 31, 1931, see p. 7).

Potatoes, their leaves, stems, and peelings, to prevent the introduction of the
Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say, from France, Germany,
Poland, and other European countries infested by the Colorado potato beetle
(order of Nov. 3, 1931).

Plant parasites against which certification is required (order of Apr. 20, 1932;
see pp. 5 et seq.).

Banana plants or parts thereof: Importation into the Territory of the Canary
Islands of plants or parts thereof, of J/usa spp. from any source prohibited.

Living plants, straw, and other by-products, and other articles of plant origin,
such as trunks, roots, leaves, used supports—even though exported from Madeira
as fuel—as a precaution against the introduction of the banana root borer
(Cosmopolites sordidus Germ.) (order of May 28, 1954).



IMPORTATION RESTRICTED:

Phylloxera vitifoliae Fitch, viable eggs, larvae, and pupae: Importation and
transportation in viable condition permitted into nonphylloxerated Provinces
only in glass vials or tubes hermetically sealed with sealing wax (law of May
ee tO08. art. 27).

Grapevines and cuttings thereof, of American species, may be imported into
nonphylloxerated Provinces only under a special authorization of the respective
provincial agricultural council (law of May 21, 1908, and order of Dee. 31, 1909,
as amended by that of Dee. 14, 1914).

Trees, shrubs, and plants of all kinds except grapevines, from countries which
do not adhere to the Berne Convention, may be imported into or through non-
phylloxerated Provinces only when accompanied by a shipper’s declaration of
origin and a phylloxera certificate (law of May 21, 1908, art. 30, par. 3; this
applies only to plant material proceeding from countries in which phyloxera
does not occur: art. 31).

Cottonseed: Importation and distribution must be passed upon by the State
Cotton Commissary. Prohibited from Brazil, China, Egypt, India, Japan, Mex-
ico, and the United States (orders of Nov. 5, 1923, and Apr. 19, 1929).

Ornamentals with a minimum quantity of soil adhering to the roots, admitted
from Belgium, France, and the Netherlands under certification (orders of Novy.
8, 1929, June 28, 1930, and Nov. 9, 1931).

Potatoes: Each shipment to be accompanied by a certificate affirming that the
tubers were grown in a locality free from potato wart, Synchytrium endobio-
ticum (Schilb.) Pere., and that the place is situated not less than 20 km from
any crop attacked by that disease (order of June 4, 1928). Also a prohibition
against importation of potatoes from France, Germany, and other countries
infested with the Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say (order
of Nov. 3, 1931).

Mushroom spawn: Phytosanitary certificate required affirming that the
manure used for growing the spawn was sterilized before being sown, that the
sowing was made from a pure culture of mushrooms, and that the product con-
tains no pathogenic organisms injurious to crops (order of Nov. 18, 1931, see
p. 8).

Living plants and parts thereof, including seeds, fresh or dried fruits, fresh
vegetables, cereals, dried legumes, ete., must be accompanied by a phytosanitary
certificate affirming freedom from the parasites named in the order of April 20,
1932, pages 5 et seq. ‘The order of March 6, 1929, contains a list of products
subject to certification.

Dried fruits imported through Hamburg, when forwarded to Spain, must be
accompanied by a copy of the original phytosanitary certificate and by a new
one issued by the phytopathological officials of the port of Hamburg (order of
May 16, 1983, see p. 7).

IMPORTATION UNRESTRICTED

Seeds, dried plants properly prepared for herbariums, cut flowers, and prod-
ucts other than grapevines (art. 22, law of May 21, 1908) may enter Spain
without other restrictions than those resulting from measures to prevent the
spread of diseases other than phylloxera, except as provided in article 30 (law
of May 21, 1908, art. 32).

88937—36—-4



66 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

PRECAUTIONS AGAINST THE INTRODUCTION OF SPECIFIED PARASITES
(Royal order no. 976, of Apr. 19, 1929; Gaceta de Madrid, no. 114, Apr. 24, 1929)
IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

ARTICLE 1. From April 25, 1929, in order to prevent the introduction into Spain
of the plant parasites later specified, the importation of products originating
in the following-named countries is prohibited:

Japan, United States of America, Canada, and New Zealand.—All kinds of
fresh fruits, and the plants, shoots, scions, ete., of all fruits, and mulberry trees,
as a protection against the insect pests:

Aspidiotus perniciosus Comst., the San Jose scale.

Aulacaspis pentagona Targ., white peach scale.

Dialeurodes citri Riley and Howard, citrus whitefly.

Popillia japonica Newm., Japanese beetle.

And against the cryptogams:

Bacillus amylovorus (Burr.) Trev., fire blight or pear blight.

Phyllosticta solitaria EK. and E., apple blotch.

Bacterium citri Hasse, citrus canker.

Brazil, China, Egypt, India, Japan, Mexico, and the United States of Amer-
ica: Seed cotton and cottonseed, the cultures of which are attacked by the
cotton boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis Boh., and the pink bollworm, Pec-
tinophora gossypiella Saund. (see also order of Nov. 5, 1923, restricting the
entry of cottonseed).

EXTENSION OF THE PROHIBITION
(Decree of Aug. 14, 19384; Gaceta de Madrid,-no. 228, Aug. 16, 1934)

ARTICLE 1. AS a preventive measure against the introduction into, transit
through, and distribution of San Jose scale, Aspidiotus perniciosus Comst., in
Spain, the importation is prohibited of all kinds of fresh fruits, as well as
living plants and parts thereof (scions, buds, greenhouse plants, etc.), which
originate in, or proceed from Argentina, Brazil, Mexico, Portugal, and South
Africa.

NoTr.—Since the San Jose scale is widely distributed in the United States this decree
is undoubtedly applicable.

PARASITES AGAINST WHICH CERTIFICATION IS REQUIRED
(Order of Apr. 20, 1932; Gaceta de Madrid, no. 115, Apr. 24, 1932)

In connection with the order of the Ministry of Agriculture, Industry, and
Commerce, no. 624, of March 1, 1932, concerning a list of diseases and enemies
of plant cultures, against which Spain especially desires to be protected, and
to which certificates issued by the French phytopathological service are to be
adjusted with respect to shipments of living plants directed to Spain: This
ministry has resolved to transmit the list ef insects, fungi, and bacteria whose
presence in consignments of plant products from any source, which are shipped
to Spain, or whose existence in the countries of origin will determine the
prohibition of the importation of the plants, their fruits, seeds, or parts which
those parasites attack, and of articles that may serve as vehicles of infection.

Certificates of official phytopathological services of the various countries
that export plant products and living plants to Spain must affirm the non-
existence in the respective country of the diseases or pests caused by the
agencies named in the said list.

List of insects, fungi, and bacteria whose presence in consignments of plants
and plant products exported to Spain or whose existence in the countries of
origin will determine the prohibition of the plants, their fruits, seeds, or parts
which those parasites attack, and materials that may serve as vehicles of
infection.

INSECT PESTS

(Aleyrodes) Dialeurodes citri Ashm., citrus whitefly, and other species of
the same genus.
Anthonomus grandis Boh., boll weevil.

——— i



1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 67

(Aonidiella) Aspidiotus perniciosus Comst., San Jose scale, on fresh fruits
of any kind.

Coccus viridis Green, green scale, on coffee fruits and citrus plants.

Epitriz cucumeris Harr., potato flea beetle.

Icerya purchasi Mask., cottony-cushion scale.

(Laspeyresia) Grapholitha molesta, oriental fruit moth, in fresh fruits.

Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say, Colorado potato beetle on potatoes and other
solanaceous plants.

Pectinophora gossypiella Saund., pink bollworm.

Popillia japonica Newm., Japanese beetle.

(Saskiaspis) Aulacaspis pentagona Targ., white peach scale on apple (Malus
sylvestris L.), apricot (Prunus armeniaca), cherry (Prunus spp.), cherry-
laurel (Laurocerasus spp.), grape (Vitis spp.), jessamine (Jasminus spp.),
locust (Robinia spp.), mulberry (Morus spp.), peach (Amygdalus persica L.),
pear (Pyrus communis L.), poplar, Canadian (Populus deltoides Marsh), so-
phora (Sophora japonica L.), spindle tree or burningbush (Huwonymus), white
beam (Sorbus aria Cranz.), willow (Salix spp.), cacao pods (Theobroma
cacao I..).

Sesania calamistis Hmps., stalk borer of maize and millet.

Exotic fruit flies.

FUNGI AND PACTERIA

Ascochyta chlorospora Speg., shot hole and fruit spot of Prunus.

Bacillus amylovorus (Burr.) Trey., fire blight, on plants and fruits of apple,
pear, quince, and other cultivated or wild Pomaceae.

Bacterium citri Hasse, citrus canker, on citrus plants and fruits.

Ceratostomella (Graphium) ulmi (Schwarz) Buisman, Dutch elm disease.

Corticium koleroga (Cke.) v. Hoeh., koleroga.

Corticium salmonicolor B. and Br., pink disease, on citrus plants, parts thereof.
fruits, and peelings.

Diaporthe perniciosa Marchal, fruit tree canker.

Endothia parasitica (Murr.) And. and And., chestnut canker.

Fusarium cubense E. F. Sm., Panama disease, banana wilt, on plants and fruits
of Musa and Ananas.

Guignardia bidwelli (Ellis) V. and R., black rot of grape, on rooted and
unrooted cuttings of American and European grapes.

Gymnosporangium juniperi-virginianae Schw., apple rust, on plants and fruits
of apple and Juniperus virginiana.

Neofabraea malicorticis (Cordley) Jackson, black-spot canker of apple, on
plants and fruits of apple, pear, and quince.

Phyllosticta solitaria BE. and E., apple blotch, on plants and fruits of Walus.

Synchytrium endobioticum (Schilb.) Pere., potato wart, on potato tubers:
fruits and green parts of all Solanaceae, including tomatoes, eggplants, and
peppers.

Thielaviopsis paradoxra (De Seyn.) v. Hoeh., black rot of Sugarcane on plants
and fruits of Musa and Ananas.

A Copy oF ORIGINAL CERTIFICATE REQUIRED FOR DRIED FRUITS IMPORTED AT
HAMBURG

(Order of May 16, 19383; Gaceta de Madrid, no. 143, May 23, 1933)

Under reservation of the suspension of this order if the condition of shipments
makes it advisable, shipments of dry or desiccated fruits proceeding from the
port of Hamburg will be admitted into Spain only when accompanied by a copy
of the phytosanitary certificate issued by authorized technical officials of the
country of origin for each lot forming the shipment; these certificates must be
verified by the German technical officials of the port of Hamburg.

In addition, each such shipment must be accompanied by a phytopathological
inspection certificate issued by the Hamburg technical officials. Finally, these
shipments must be found in a satisfactory condition upon inspection by the
Spanish National Phytopathological Service.

/ IMPORTATION OF COCONUT FIBER PROHIBITED
(Decree of Oct. 31, 1981; Gaceta de Madrid, no. 305, Nov. 1, 1931)

Prohibits the importation of coconut fiber into Spain, in order to assist the
esparto grass industry.



68 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [ April-June

CERTIFICATION OF MUSHROOM SPAWN REQUIRED
(Order of Noy. 18, 1931; Gaceta de Madrid, no. 325, Nov. 21, 1931)

Each shipment of mushroom spawn offered for importation into Spain must
be accompanied by a phytosanitary certificate issued by an official of the phyto-
pathological authority of the country of origin, affirming that the manure used
for growing the spawn was sterilized before sowing (the method of disinfection
being stated) ; further, that the sowing was made from a pure culture of mush-
rooms (Agaricus campestris L.), and that the product contains no pathogenic
organisms injurious to crops.

B. E. P. Q. 402

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF AUSTRIA

JUNE 138, 1936.

This summary of the plant-quarantine import restrictions of the Republic of
Austria has been prepared for the information of nurserymen, plant-quarantine
officials, and others interested in the exportation of plant products to that
country.

It was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant quarantine inspector, in charge of
foreign information service, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines, from his
translations of the original texts of regulations promulgated to prevent the in-
troduction into Austria of phylloxera, San Jose scale, the apple maggot or fruit
fly, Colorado potato beetle, potato wart, and other injurious insects and diseases.

The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct, but it is
not intended to be interpreted as legally authoritative.

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

SUMMARY OF THE PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF
AUSTRIA

OBJECTS OF AUSTRIAN PLANT-QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS

The plant-quarantine restrictions of the Republic of Austria are designed to
prevent the introduction into and distribution in Austria of phylloxera
(Phylloxrera (vastatriz) vitifoliae Fitch), San Jose scale (Aspidiotus perniciosus
Comst.), apple maggot or fruit fly (Rhagoletis pomonella Walsh), Colorado
potato beetle (Leptinotarsa (Doryphora) decemlineata Say), potato wart
(Chrysophlyctis endobiotica, Syn. Synchytrium endobioticum (Schilb.) Perc.),
and of other injurious insects and diseases.

Basic LAws

International Phylloxera Convention of November 3, 1881 (R. G: Bl. no. 105
of 1882).

Customs law of June 10, 1920, article 2 (St. G. Bl. no. 250, 1920).

Federal law of July 12, 1929, part II, articles 12 and 13 (B. G. BI. no. 252,
1929).

CoNCISE SUMMARY
IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

Grapevine stocks and all parts of the grapevine, as well as composts, used
props, and supports, phylloxera eggs, and live insects: Importation prohibited
from any country to prevent introduction of phylloxera (International
Phylloxera Convention of Nov. 3, 1881; ministerial decrees of July 15, 1882, May
1, 1883, Jan. 24, 1890, and Nov. 8, 1896). See page 4.

Plants and plant products attacked by injurious plant pests and diseases:
Importation and transit prohibited (decree of July 18, 1932, art. 1; B. G. BL.
222, 1932). See pages 5 and 6.







1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 69

Potatoes, rooted plants with soil, bulbs, tubers, rhizomes, and corms, tomatoes,
eggplants, and strawberries, previously used packing material, earth, and
manure from the United States, Belgium, and continental European France:
Importation prohibited throughout the year (decree of July 18, 19382, as
amended by that of Dec. 19, 1985; B. G. Bl. 222, 1932; see arts. 11 and 14, p. 8).

Fresh potatoes: Importation and transit prohibited from countries in which
wart disease occurs, to prevent the introduction and spread of that disease
(decree of Jan. 9, 1930, art. 1; B. G. Bl. no. 25, 1930).

IMPORTATION RESTRICTED

Plants, shrubs, and other cultures, including scions, cuttings, etc.: Importa-
tion permitted if shipment is accompanied by a shipper’s declaration and a
certificate affirming freedom from phylloxera in the prescribed form (Interna-
tional Phylloxera Convention of Nov. 3, 1881, and ministerial decrees of July 15,
1882, May 1, 1883, Jan. 24, 1890, and Nov. 8, 1896). See page 4.

Fruit trees and berry-bearing shrubs (deciduous), and other deciduous trees
and shrubs, including stocks, scions, and cuttings: Importation permitted if
shipment accompanied by a phytosanitary certificate and a disinfection certifi-
cate to prevent the introduction of San Jose scale and other injurious pests and
diseases (decree of July 18, 1932, art. 5; B. G. Bl. 222, 1932). See page 6.

Plants other than those indicated in ‘the preceding item: Shipments must be
accompanied by an inspection certificate affirming freedom from San Jose scale
and other injurious pests and diseases (decree of July 18, 1932, art. 6; B. G. Bl.
222, 1982). See page 7.

Plants with balls of earth: Importation and transit permitted of shipments
from the United States, Canada, and France (not including Corsica and French
overseas colonies) if accompanied by certificates affirming not only freedom
from San Jose scale, but also from the Colorado beetle and other injurious
insects (decree of July 18, 19382, art. 6 (2); B. G. Bl. 222, 1982). See page 7.

Vegetables and truck crops other than potatoes, tomatoes, eggplants, and
strawberries may be imported from the United States, Belgium, and continental
European France from November 15 to March 14 only (decree of July 18, 19382,
as amended by that of Dec. 19, 1985; see arts. 12 and 16, pp. 8 and 9).

Fresh apples and pears: Importation permitted from any country only when
certified as free from San Jose scale and apple fruit fly (decree of July 18, 1932,
art. 8; B. G. Bl. 222, 19382). See page 7.

Fresh potatoes grown in south Huropean and north African countries and
islands may be transported through France for importation into Austria if
accompanied by a phytosanitary certificate and certificate of origin (decree of
July 18, 1982, art. 11 (3); B) G. Bl. 222; 1932).

Potatoes, eggplants, and tomatoes from France: Importation and transit
permitted under certification of freedom from Colorado potato beetle (decree of
June 15, 1929; B. G. Bl. 206, 1929).

Fresh potatoes from countries in which wart does not occur: Importation
and transit permitted under prescribed conditions if certified as to origin and
freedom from wart and other injurious diseases (decree of Jan. 9, 1930, art. 2;
B. G. Bl. 25, 1980).

Seed potatoes: Importation by rail permitted from any country not infested
with Colorado potato beetle under certificate of origin and health and guaranty
that they are select seed potatoes (decree of Jan. 9, atte art, 2 5) 3. -G,. Bl. 25.
1930).

IMPORTATION UNRESTRICTED

Cut flowers, seeds, bulbs, fruits (except grapes, apples, and pears), and vege-
tables: Importation and transit unrestricted (International Phylloxera Con-
vention of Noy. 3, 1881, and ministerial decrees of July 15, 1882, May 1, 1883,
Jan. 24, 1890, and Noy. 8, 1896; see also decree of July 18, 1932, art. 8). See
page 5.

Cut flowers, fresh fruits (except grapes, apples, and pears), and other fruits,
preserved or dried fruits, vegetables, root crops, tubers (potatoes), bulbs,
rhizomes, and other subterranean plants, as well as seeds, are not affected by
articles 5 to 9 of the decree of July 18, 1982 (see art. 10 of that decree). See
page 7.

Dried or processed plant products: Importation and transit not affected by
articles 11 to 13 of decree of July 18, 1982 (art. 10 of that decree and art. 3 of
the decree of June 15, 1929). See pages 7 and 8.



70 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE | April-June

RESTRICTIONS ON ACCOUNT OF PHYLLOXERA

Based upon the International Phylloxera Convention of Berne, November 3,
1881, the following restrictions were promulgated by the ministerial decrees of
July 15, 1882, May 1, 1888, January 24, 1890, and November 8, 1896.

IMPORTATION AND TRANSIT OF GRAPEVINES PROHIBITED

The importation into and transit through Federal territory is prohibited
from any country of:

Grapevines, including stocks and cuttings, with or without roots.

Grapevine stems, dry or fresh, whole or parts, leaves.

Any shipment containing leaves or stems of grapevines.

Composts, used props or supports, phylloxera eggs, or live insects.

IMPORTATION AND TRANSIT OF TABLE GRAPES PERMITTED

The importation and transit are permitted of table grapes in well-packed
boxes, cases, or baskets, as well as in barrels of any size, which are easy to
open for inspection, if free from grapevine stems and leaves.

IMPORTATION OF PLANTS AND PARTS THEREOF PERMITTED UNDER RESTRICTION
Shipper’s declaration and phylloxera certificate required

Plants, shrubs, and other cultures, including scions, cuttings, etc., from nur-
series, gardens, greenhouses, hotbeds, orangeries, etc., except the grapevine, may
be imported under the following conditions:

1. Those products must be securely packed in such a manner that the neces-
sary inspections can be made.

2. Each consignment must be accompanied by a shipper’s declaration fur-
nishing the following data:

(a) Affirming that the entire contents of the consignment are from his estab-
lishment.

(b) Indicating the destination and the address of the consignee.

(c) Affirming that the consignment contains no grapevines.

(d@) Indicating whether or not the consignment includes plants with earth
on the roots.

(e) Bearing the signature of the shipper.

8. Each consignment must be accompanied also by an inspection certificate
issued by a competent authority of the country of origin certifying—

(a) That the plants are from ground separated from any grapevine stocks
by at least 20 meters, or by some obstacle to the roots deemed sufficient by
competent authority.

(b) That the ground itself contains no grapevines.

(c) That the place has not been used as a depot for grapevines.

(d) That if stocks infested with phylloxera have been grown there, their
complete extirpation has been effected by repeated toxic applications and in-
vestigations for a period of 3 years, insuring the total destruction of thes,
insects and of roots.

CUT FLOWERS, SEEDS, BULBS, FRUITS (EXCEPT GRAPES), AND VEGETABLES, IMPORTA-
TION AND TRANSIT UNRESTRICTED

The importation and transit of cut flowers, seeds, and bulbs free from earth,
grape seeds, wine, fruits of any kind (except grapes), and vegetables is unre-
stricted by the phylloxera regulations, and entry may be made through any
customs port of entry (see also art. 8, decree of July 18, 1932, on apples and
pears, D. 7).

GENERAL RESTRICTIONS ON THE IMPORTATION OF PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS

The following restrictions upon the importation into, and transit through, the
Federal territory of Austria were imposed by decree no. 222 of the Federal Min-
ister of Agriculture and Forestry in cooperation with the Minister of Finance,
of July 18, 1932, B. G. Bl. no. 222, of 1932), as amended by decree no. 483,
effective January 1, 1936 (B. G. BL, no. 131, Dec. 19, 1935), on the basis of





1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS “a

article 2 of the customs law of June 10, 1920 (St. G. Bl. no. 250, of 1920), and
of article 12 of the plant protection law of July 12, 1929 (B. G. BL, no. 252, of
1929).

SHIPMENTS ATTACKED BY PLANT PESTS OR DISEASES, IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

ARTICLE 1. The importation into, or transit through, Austrian Federal terri-
tory is prohibited of shipments of any kind, from foreign countries, which are
attacked by an injurious plant pest or disease, and which may cause the intro-
duction of such a pest or disease.

Articles 2 and 38 prescribe that all plant-quarantine requirements shall be
met at the frontier port of entry and provide for the inspection of shipments
from foreign countries.

SPECIAL REGULATIONS CONCERNING PARTICULAR PLANT PESTS AND DISEASES
POTATO WART AND PHYLLOXERA

Article 4 prescribes that the special provisions for protection against potato
wart and phylloxera shall not be affected by this decree.

SAN JOSE SCALE AND APPLE FRUIT FLY, INSPECTION CERTIFICATE AND DISINFECTION
REQUIRED

ArT. 5. (1) The importation from any country into Federal territory of
deciduous fruit trees and berry-bearing shrubs, as well as of other deciduous
trees and shrubs, including stocks, slips, cuttings, and scions thereof, is permis-
sible only when each shipment—

(1) Is accompanied by a certificate issued by the official plant-protection
service of the exporting country declaring that: (@) Upon inspection
it has been found free from injurious plant pests and diseases; and
(6) in the exporting country an effective disinfection with hydro-
cyanic-acid gas was carried out, in connection with which each plant
or package (bale, basket, packet, etc.) was provided with a seal of
the official plant-protection service (the impression of which is to be
borne by the certificate) in such a manner that a substitution of the
plants for others is precluded ; and

(2) The shipment corresponds to those conditions.

CERTIFICATES REQUIRED WITH PLANTS OTHER THAN THOSE MENTIONED IN
ARTICLE 5 (1)

ArT. 6. (1) Without prejudice to the exception in article 10, each shipment
of living plants and parts of plants, other than those indicated in article 5 (1),
must be accompanied by a certificate issued by the plant-protection service of
the exporting country affirming that upon inspection they were found free from
San Jose scale and other injurious pests and diseases.

(2) However, shipments of rooted plants and parts of plants with balls of
earth fall also under the provisions of article 12.

IMPORTATION BY RAIL, WATER, AND MAIL PERMITTED

Art. 7. The importation of shipments of all the kinds referred to in articles 5
and 6 is permitted by rail, water, and mail only.

INSPECTION CERTIFICATE REQUIRED FOR APPLES AND PEARS

Art. 8. The importation of apples, pears, and refuse or waste from those
fruits, from any country into Federal territory, is permissible only when each
shipment is accompanied by a certificate issued by the plant-inspection service
of the country of origin affirming that, upon inspection, they were found free
from San Jose scale (Aspidiotus perniciosus) and apple fruit fly or maggot
(Rhagoletis pomonella).

TRANSIT RESTRICTIONS

Art. 9. (1) The provisions of articles 5 (1), 6, 7, and 8 apply also to transit
traffic through Federal territory.



72 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

(2) The transit of shipments of the kinds indicated in articlés 5, 6, and 8,
which, when effected by rail, ship, or mail, is exempt from the special import
restrictions when such shipments are transported in closed, undamaged contain-
ers or wrappers, or in sealed cars on a through bill of lading from one foreign
country to another.

UNRESTRICTED PRODUCTS

Art. 10. The traffic restrictions of articles 5 to 9 do not apply to cut flowers,
fresh fruits (other than apples and pears), and other fruits, preserved fruits,
dried fruits, vegetables, root crops, tubers (potatoes), bulbs, rhizomes, and other
subterranean parts of plants, as well as seeds.

RESTRICTIONS ON ACCOUNT OF THE COLORADO POTATO BEETLE

IMPORTATION PROHIBITED OF SUBTERRANEAN PLANT PARTS, INCLUDING POTATOES,
ALSO OF TOMATOES, EGGPLANTS, AND STRAWBERRIES, FROM UNITED STATES, CANADA,
BELGIUM, AND CONTINENTAL EUROPEAN FRANCE

ArT. 11. The importation and transit of fresh potatoes, rooted plants (parts
of plants) with balls of earth, bulbs, tubers, rhizomes, and corms, as well as
tomatoes, eggplants, and strawberries from certain countries, to be named
(see art. 16), that are already invaded by the Colorado beetle or menaced by
it, into or through the Federal territory is prohibited throughout the year.

Art. 12. The importation and transit of other vegetables and truck crops from
the above-named countries into or through the Federal territory is for the
present permitted only from November 15 to March 14.

Art. 13. The importation and transit of shipments of the kinds indicated
in articles 11 and 12, which are only transported in transit through the coun-
tries referred to in article 11, but which do not originate there, are permitted
into or through the Federal territory without regard to the provisions of the
potato wart law and the decree promulgated thereunder, for the present only
from November 15 to March 14 and on condition that their origin is apparent
from the freight documents or from a phytosanitary certificate of origin issued
by the plant protection service of the country of origin or a special declaration
of a customs authority of a railroad or port.

PREVIOUSLY USED PACKING MATERIALS, EARTH, AND MANURE ENTRY AND TRANSIT
PROHIBITED

Art. 14. Wrappers and materials of any kind which have served for packing
or storing the products, or refuse thereof, referred to in articles 11 and 12,
leaves and other refuse (peelings), as well as earth, manure, and compost, from
the countries named in Article 16, are excluded from entry into, and transit
through, the Federal territory.

DRIED OR PROCESSED PLANT PRODUCTS IMPORTATION AND TRANSIT NOT RESTRICTED

ArT. 15. The traffic restrictions of articles 11 to 13 do not apply to ship-
ments of dried products and processed foods, such as dried potatoes, potato
flour, canned tomatoes, and vegetables, ete.

COUNTRIES IN WHICH COLORADO BEETLE OCCURS

Art. 16. As countries (localities) which are now infested by the Colorado
potato beetle (art. 11), the United States of America, Canada, Belgium, and
continental European France are so declared.

When necessary, the foregoing regulations may be extended to other countries
that may become infested or menaced by that pest.

CLEARANCE OF TRANSIT SHIPMENTS

Art. 17. Any shipment affected by this decree, which is intended by the
shipper for transit, may be cleared through the customs in the Federal terri-
tory only when it is treated, in accordance with the corresponding kind of
shipment among those mentioned in articles 5, 6, 8, 12, and 13, and the above-
described certificate, or an import permit may be produced in particular cases
for such a shipment.



0 7 3

‘rT

Fo

7 le

1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 73

CERTIFICATE REQUIRED IN GERMAN AND IN THE LANGUAGE OF COUNTRY OF ORIGIN

Art. 18. (1) The official certificate prescribed in this decree must be furnished
both in the language of the country of origin and in German, or be provided
with a certified translation in German. ‘The date of the certificate shall not be
more than 3 weeks prior to the date of shipment.

DIVERSION OF SHIPMENTS TO PREVENT INTRODUCTION OF SAN JOSE SCALE AND APPLE
FRUIT FLY

Art. 19. The Federal Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry may divert the
entry and transit of shipments governed by the preceding regulations, if
through them an introduction of San Jose scale or apple fruit fly is to be
apprehended.

ART, 20. Penalties.

ArT. 21. Revocation of earlier decrees.

B. E. P. Q. 403 (supersedes P. Q. C. A. 301)

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF FRANCE

JUNE 13, 1936.

This summary of the plant-quarantine import restrictions of the Republic of
France has been prepared for the information of nuvserymen, plant-quarantine
officials, and others interested in the exportation of plants and plant products
to that country.

It was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant-quarantine inspector in charge,
foreign information service, Division of Foreign Piant Quarantines, from his
translations of the texts of the appropriate French legislation.

The information included in this circular is believed to be correct and com-
plete up to the time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used inde-
pendentiy of, nor as a substitute for, the original texts of the original laws,
decrees, orders, and circulars, and it is not to be interpreted as legally authorita-
tive. The original texts should be consulted.

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF FRANCE
Basic LEGISLATION

Law of December 17, 1814, article 34. San Jose scale.

Law of July 15, 1878, and of August 2, 1879, prohibiting the importation
of potatoes.

Law of June 21, 1898, prohibiting the importation of certain products.

Law of July 15, 1921, prohibiting the importation of grape seedlings.

Law of July 13, 1922, prohibiting the importation and transit of potatoes.

Law of July 20, 1927, requiring the coloring of foreign clover seeds.

Law of January 11, 1932, prescribing the standards.of purity and germinabil-
ity for grass seeds.

SUMMARY

The importation of living plants and parts of plants except seeds from the
United States into France is prohibited by the decree of March 8, 1952, as
amended; the importation of potatoes from the same source is prohibited by
the decree of July 138, 1922, article 1.

The entry of fresh fruits from the United States also is governed by the
decree of March 8, 19382, as amended.

The importation of forage-crop seeds is restricted by the law of July 20,
1927, the decree of November 18, 1927, and the order of July 5, 1933; and the
importation of chestnut seeds is prohibited by the decree of November 26, 1930.
The importation of other seeds is unrestricted.



74 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE _ [April-June

The above are the only French plant-quarantine import restrictions with
which United States exporters and shippers need be concerned. ‘These restric-
tions and prohibitions are indicated in the summary by footnotes.

IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

Grapevines, cuttings, leaves, used supports, composts, and molds (decree of
May 15, 1882); dry grapevines and cuttings (Circular No. 1619 and decree of
July 8, 1882) : Importation prohibited from any source to prevent the introduc-
tion of phylloxera.

Woody plants from Italy (except conifers, palms, cacti, and citrus plants,
which may enter throughout the year; fresh cut fldwers for perfumery, herba-
ceous and semiligneous plants, which may enter from November 1 to May 1,
inclusive; the cut flowers and plants enumerated may enter throughout the
year if accompanied by a phytosanitary certificate) : Importation prohibited to
prevent the introduction of the scale Diaspis pentagona Targ. However, woody
plants, except apricot, almond, bignonia, catalpa, cherry, Huonymus europacus,
Prunus laurocerasus, lilac, peach, plum, and sophora, whose importation and
transit are absolutely prohibited, may enter from November 15 to April 15 if
found free from that scale (Circular No. 4454, Oct. 25, 1913).

Chestnut—Living plants, fruits, and seeds from the Far East and from coun-
tries that have not taken measures against the chestnut-bark disease or canker
(Endothia parasitica (Murr.) And. and And.) :* Importation prohibited to pre-
vent the introduction of that disease. (Letter of the Minister of Agriculture,
Mar. 26, 1921.) The above does not apply to Italy (Journ. Off. Oct. 4, 1921).
See page 12.

Plants of the genera Abies, Picea, Pinus, Pseudotsuga, and Tsuga from any
source: * Importation prohibited to prevent the introduction of a needle cast
(Rhabdocline pseudotsugae Syd.) (decree of Noy. 26, 1930). See page 12.

Living plants and parts thereof from Argentina, Australia, Austria, Canada,
Chile, China, Hawaii, Hungary, Japan, Mexico, New Zealand, Portugal, Ru-
mania, Union of South Africa, and the United States: * Importation prohibited
to prevent the introduction of San Jose scale (Aspidiotus perniciosus Comst.)
(decree of Mar. 8, 1932, as amended by the ministerial orders of Apr. 8, June
23, Aug. 2, Nov. 2, 1982, and Sept. 22, 19384). See page 6.

Forest products from Czechoslovakia which may serve as carriers of the nun
moth (Lymantria monacha L.) (decree of Dec. 1, 1921, and letter of Minister
of Agriculture, Nov. 30, 1921).

Potatoes from any country: Importation prohibited if found on arrival in
France to be infected with the wart disease (Synchytrium endobioticum
(Schilb.) Pere.) (decree of Dec. 19, 1910, and Circular No. 4129, May 4, 1911).

Potatoes from the United States: Importation prohibited to prevent the
introduction of the Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say)
(decree of July 13, 1922, art. 1). See page 9.

Potatoes, tomatoes, eggplants, living plants, tubers, rhizomes, bulbs, bulbils,
root crops, and fresh vegetables from Germany and Great Britain.

Potatoes, tomatoes, eggplants, and fresh vegetables from the Netherlands; ”
potatoes from Spain: Importation prohibited to prevent the introduction of the
Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say) (decree and order of
Apr. 18, 1932; decree of May 21 and May 23, 1932, and decree of Jan. 17,
1933 ) .*

11Jtems bearing this footnote number affect products of the United States.

12 The portion of the decree of Apr. 18, 1932, concerning living plants, flower bulbs, and
root crops from the Netherlands was revoked by the decree of May 21, 1982, leaving
effective the prohibition against fresh vegetables and potatoes from that country. How-
ever, the order of Oct. 14, 1935, authorizes the importation and transit of fresb vegetables
from that source during the period Oct. 15 and Mar. 15.

13 Flowever, exceptionally, the importation of seed potatoes may be permitted from
the above-named countries under conditions established by the Minister of Agriculture
(decree and order of Apr. 18, 1932).

144The decree of June 30, 1934, revokes that of Mar. 1, 1934, and provides for the
importation of selected and unselected seed potatoes from Great Britain under the
conditions established by the decree of Jan. 17, 1933, on the basis of certification by
the plant protection authorities of that country, namely, a special authorization in
advance. The certificate must affirm that the potatoes were grown more than 75 km
from the nearest infestation of Colorado potato beetle and that the shipment was
inspected and found free from plant-feeding insects and other pests liable to propagate
in agricultural districts and orchards.



1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 75

Cuscuta (dodder) seeds and forage crop seeds containing Cuscuta:* Importa-
tion from any source prohibited (decree of Feb. 21, 1908). See page 10.
Mixed grass seeds for forage crops, and grass seeds that are unfit for sow-
ing:* Importation from any source prohibited (law of Jan. 11, 1982). See
pages 10 to 12.
IMPORTATION RESTRICTED

Seedlings of shrubs, other than those of the grapevine: To be accompanied
by a shipper’s declaration of origin and a phyloxera certificate issued by a
competent authority of the country of origin (Phylloxera Convention of Berne,
Noy. 3, 1881, art. 38; decree of Aug. 28, 1882). Since the importation of any
living plants is prohibited from Argentina, Australia, Austria, Canada, Chile,
China, Hawaii, Hungary, Japan, Mexico, New Zealand, Portugal, Rumania,
Union of South Africa, and the United States, the above is not applicable to
those countries.

Woody plants from Italy: See the same item under “Importation pro-
hibited” for exceptions to the prohibition.

Living plants, fruits, and seeds of chestnut (Castanea spp.) from Italy:
May be imported into France only when accompanied by a certificate of
origin; a precaution against the introduction of chestnut canker (Hndothia
parasitica (Murr.) And. and And.) (decree of Mar. 8, 1921, and notice in Journ.
OfF. Oct. 4; 1921).

Fresh fruits and vegetables from the United States must be free from in-
festation by the Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineatu Say)”
(decree of July 18, 1922, art. 2). See page 9.

Fresh fruits from countries in which San Jose scale (Aspidiotus perniciosus
Comst.) is known to occur, namely, Argentina, Australia, Austria, Canada,
Chile, China, Hawaii, Hungary, Japan, Mexico, New Zealand, Portugal, Ru-
mania, Union of South Africa, and the United States:* Will be admitted into
France only when accompanied by an inspection certificate issued by the
government of the country of origin (the Federal Government of the United
States) affirming freedom from diseases and pests, and especially from San
Jose scale.

The finding of that pest in a shipment of fresh fruit may result in its rejec-
tion or fumigation at the importer’s expense. A certificate of origin must
accompany every shipment of fresh fruits from other countries (decrees of
Mar. 8 and 15, 1982; orders of Apr. 8, May 9, June 23, Aug. 2, and Nov. 2,
1932, and July 22, 1983; decree of Apr. 5, 1933). See page 7.

Seed potatoes: May be imported from Germany, Great Britain, Netherlands,
and Spain, only under special import permits granted upon application to the
French Ministry of Agriculture (decree of July 13, 1922, art. 2).

Coniferous plants of genera other than Abies, Picea, Pinus, Pseudotsuga,
and Tsuga:** May be imported only when accompanied by a certificate issued
by the competent official plant-protection service of the country of origin attest-
ing that the shipment does not include plants of the above-named genera, and
that the plants and cultures from which they came had been inspected and
found free from needle cast (Rhabdocline pseudotsugae Syd.) (decree of
Nov. 26, 1980). See page 12.

Forage-crop seeds, such as alfalfa, red clover, white clover, alsike clover,
yellow-sand clover, birdsfoot trefoil, and hairy lotus, may be imported into
France only when free from dodder seeds (Cuscuta spp.)** (decree of Feb. 21,
1908), but provision is made for the entry of seeds after the removal of the
dodder seeds (circulars nos. 4020 and 4066). See page 10.

Seeds of clover (Trifolium pr atense) and alfalfa (Medicago sativa) may be
imported only when at least 5 percent of the seed has been artificially colored
to show its foreign origin * (law of July 20, 1927, and decree of Nov. 18, 1927).
See page 10. Procedure for coloring clover seeds (order of July 5, 1933).

Grass seeds that meet the prescribed standards of purity and germinability
may be imported into France” (law of Jan. 11, 1932). See pages 10 to 12.
yeaa of sampling grass seeds prescribed (decree of June 13, 1933). See
page

Seeds other than forage crop, coniferous, and chestnut seeds may be im-
ported into France without restriction, as provided in article 2 of the Phyl-
loxera Convention of Berne, November 3, 1881, to which France subscribed.*®

15 See footnote no. 11.
16 See footnote no. 11.



76 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

The same applies also to wine, grape seeds, vintage grapes in tightly closed
barrels, grape mare in closed casks or barrels, table grapes in securely closed
but easily opened boxes or baskets, and cut and potted flowers, except as
restricted when coming from Italy.

Cut flowers imported by airplane may enter only through Le Bourget, Paris
(notice to importers, published July 1, 1932).

SAN JOSE SCALE RESTRICTIONS

IMPORTATION OF ALL LIVING PLANTS FROM THE UNITED STATES AND CERTAIN OTHER
COUNTRIES PROHIBITED ON ACCOUNT OF SAN JOSE SCALE

(Decree of Mar. 8, 1932, as amended by ministerial orders of Apr. 8, June 23, Aug. 2,
Nov. 2, 1932, and July 23, 1933, and the decree of Apr. 5, 1933)

The entry into and transit through France are prohibited of living plants, and
living parts of plants (trees, shrubs, nursery products, cuttings, and other parts
of plants), including fresh fruits, as well as the containers and packing materials
serving, or having served, to transport such products, originating in or proceed-
ing from the United States of America: Provided, That the above-named prod-
ucts, when intended for study and research, may be imported under permits
granted by the Minister of Agriculture, who will prescribe the conditions of
importation.

The same prohibition is applicable to other countries in which the presence of
San Jose scale (Aspidiotus perniciosus Comst.) has been determined, namely:
Argentina, Australia, Austria, Canada, Chile, China, Hawaii, Hungary, Japan,
Mexico, New Zealand, Portugal, Rumania, Spain, and the Union of South Africa.

RESTRICTIONS ON THE ENTRY OF FRESH FRUITS
Certification of freedom from San Jose scale required

By derogation of the prohibition to enter fresh fruits into France from the
above-named countries and the United States, in which San Jose scale is known
to occur, the importation is authorized of certain categories of fruits maintained
in the countries of origin in such a manner as to give every assurance that they
are not carriers of Aspidiotus perniciosus, under the conditions and through the
customs offices authorized by the Minister of Agriculture.

Plants and fresh fruits from countries not infested by San Jose scale

Each shipment must be accompanied by a certificate of origin issued by a com-
petent administrative authority of the country of origin. If there is occasion to
do so, orders of the Ministry of Agriculture will indicate the plants and parts of
plants for which such a certificate is not required (decree of Apr. 5, 1933).

CONDITIONS OF ENTRY

The decree of March 15, 1932, regulating that of March 8, 1932, as modified by
the ministerial orders of April 8, May 9, June 23, August 2, and November 2, 1932,
prescribes :

ARTICLE 1. The entry into France of fresh fruits originating in and proceeding
from Argentina, Australia, Austria, Canada, Chile, ‘China, Hawaii, Hungary,
Japan, Mexico, Portugal, New Zealand, Rumania, Union of South Africa, and
the United States of America, is authorized on condition—

(a) That the products are accompanied by a phytosanitary inspection certifi-
cate, issued by competent authority of the country of origin, absolutely guaran-
teeing that the fruits are not carriers of San Jose scale.

(A notice to importers, published in the Journal Officiel of May 4, 1932, requires
the shipper to obtain the certificate in duplicate, one copy to accompany the cor-
responding shipment, and the other to be addressed to the Minister of Agricul-
ture, 78 Rue de Varenne, Paris, under the stamp of the plant protection service.
In this connection the French Minister of Agriculture will accept only certificates
issued by the United States Department of Agriculture for shipments of fresh
fruits produced in and proceeding from the United States.)

(b) That a phytosanitary inspection be effected on the arrival of the fruits in
France by an inspector of the service of plant protection, who will grant full





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1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 77

clearance if the fruits are found healthy or will order their destruction or
relading in the contrary case.

ArT. 2 Citrus frwits—Until further notice citrus fruits are admitted into
France on simple presentation of the certificate prescribed by article 1.

Art. 3. Transit of plants and fresh fruits.—This article has been modified and
amplified by the order of July 24, 1933, as follows:

The transit through French territory of living plants and living parts of
plants (including trees, shrubs, nursery products, cuttings, and other plant
parts, as well as fresh fruits originating in or proceeding from countries con-
taminated by San Jose scale (Aspidiotus perniciosus Comst.) is authorized
under the following conditions :

That transportation shall be effected in sealed cars; the products must be
packed in substantial containers which do not permit leakage, shipment in bulk
being prohibited; entry shall be made through. the customs at Marseille, Bor-
deaux, Dunkerque, Le Havre, Kehl-Strasbourg, St. Louis, Cerbere, and Hendaye;
no transshipment is permitted at the point of entry on a land frontier, and
direct transshipment must be made from ship to car at maritime ports without
storage on the dock.

Authorized ports of entry for fruits—The entry into and transit through
France of these fruits may take place only through the ports of Le Havre,
Bordeaux, Marseille, and Dunkerque. (As amended by the decree of May 9,
1932. )

PHYLLOXERA RESTRICTIONS

Since the decree of March 8, 1932, prohibits the importation into France of
living plants or parts thereof from countries infested by San Jose scale, the
phylloxera restrictions do not concern those countries insofar as living plants
or parts thereof are concerned. The phylloxera regulations do not restrict the
importation of seeds, but special restrictions are imposed on the importation of
clover and grass seeds.

IMPORTATION OF POTATOES PROHIBITED

(Decree of July 13, 1922, art. 1)

The entry into and transit through France is prohibited of potatoes and leaves
and refuse of that plant coming directly or indirectly from the United States of
America, a country in which the existence of the Colorado potato beetle (Lepti-
notarsa decemlineata Say) has been determined. The prohibition extends to
cases, barrels, sacks, and other containers serving or having served to transport
the above mentioned products.

IMPORTATION OF INFESTED PLANTS AND FRUITS PROHIBITED

The same prohibition is applicable to shipments of fruits and of plants other
than potatoes, leaves, and refuse of that plant, as well as to material that has
served to transport or contain them, when the presence of Leptinotarsa decem-
lineata is determined in the said shipments. To that end they are subjected
on their entry into France to a special examination.

(Since the importation of potatoes from the United States is prohibited on
account of the Colorado potato beetle, the restrictions on account of potato wart
(Synchytrium endobioticum (Schilb.) Pere.) are omitted.)

RESTRICTIONS ON THE IMPORTATION OF SEEDS

Although article 2 of the Phylloxera Convention of Berne, November 3, 1881,
provides for the importation of seeds without restriction from the standpoint of
phylloxera, certain classes of seeds are placed under restriction to prevent the
introduction of dodder (Cuscuta spp.).

IMPORTATION OF DODDER SEEDS PROHIBITED
7 (Decree of Feb. 21, 1908)

The importation into France of seeds of the plant parasite, dodder (Cuscuta
spp.), is prohibited.

That prohibition applies also to forage-crop seeds that upon inspection are
found to contain dodder seeds; especially alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), red



78 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

clover (Trifolium pratense L.), white clover (7. repens L.), alsike clover
(T. hybridum IL.) kidney vetch (Anthyllis vulneraria L.), birdsfoot trefoil
(Lotus corniculatus L.), and timothy (Phleum pratense L.).

Any mixture of seeds containing any of the above-mentioned species is pass-
able under special inspection; but if that operation reveals the presence of
Cuscuta, the entry of the mixture into France is prohibited.

The method of sampling alfalfa and clover seeds is prescribed in the order
of March 10, 1908; the same order provides also for resampling and a second
analysis. Circular no. 4020, August 13, 1910, provides for the removal of doddex
seeds.

COLORING OF IMPORTED CLOVER AND ALFALFA SEED REQUIRED
(Law of July 20, 1927)

The entry is prohibited, excluding warehouse and transit, of red clover (Tri-
folium pratense) and alfalfa (Medicago sativa) seed that has not been arti-
ficially colored in the proportion of at least 5 percent, to disclose its foreign
origin.

Seeds that have not been colored before exportation to France may be colored
under the supervision of the Customs Service at the expense of the interested
persons (decree of Nov. 18, 1927).

RESTRICTIONS ON THE IMPORTATION OF GRASS SEEDS

ARTICLE 1. Prohibited grass seeds—The importation into France is pro-
hibited of:

(1) Mixed grass seeds for forage purposes.

(2) Grass seeds intended for forage, but which are unfit for sowing.

Art. 2. Unfit grass seeds —The following are deemed unfit for sowing:

(1) Grass seeds containing more than 5 percent of tender bromegrass
(Bromus mollis L.) or of annual fescue grasses (Festuca section vulpia).

(2) Grass seeds that do not attain the following minimal percentages of
purity and germinability :



Species Purity eee

Percent Percent

Ayrostis Spp.,;DOMvesrass 2S i a a No SO ee a pe ee eee 50 50
‘Alopecurus profensisal,,, meadow foxtall= =... ==t 2" ee eee 50 45
Anthoranthum-odoratum L., sweet vernal grass_____________________-__---_-_---__e 70 50
Avena elitior= Arrhenatherwm elatius (L.) Mert. and Koch, tall oatgrass_________ 70 50
Avena flavescens= Trisetum flavescens (L.) Beauv., golden oatgrass_-.____________ 50 45
Bromus pratensis= B. commutatus Schrad., meadow bromegrass_.__-_._______._- 70 50
Conosurus cristatus-1.., erested dogtall grass-222 2 5 = oo 38 a ee eee 80 60
Dactylia glomeratat:;, orchard: eras. 22 os! ee) sis i ete ee ee 70 50
Festuca oni. 1, Sheep Silescue: 2 5 oes 8 ats ee eee ee 70 50
Festuca pratensis= F’. elatior L., meadow fescue__._-____._.___..-_---_--2__-__--- 80 60
Festuca rubra var. heterophylla Mutel., various-leafed fescue____._.___.__-__--____ 65 50
Holeus lanatus 1.;:velvetigrass. 2.2 ee ees es es ne eee 40 60
Lolium italicum=L. multiflorum Lam., Italian ryegrass____--__-_-_ rer ess 80 60
TOM DETENNE. Lt, KDEUSITVOBTASS oo - fon ees ee ne ee ee Son 60
Lolium perenne var. pacyi Sturtev., Pacey ryegrass__..__._.___.._-_-_-..--------_- 80 60
‘Philewm pretense L., timothy: ole 8 ee 1 i ee ee 80 70
Poa nemoralis \.,. wood meadow S6aSS. 2) 222 ss st eee 70 50
‘Pon pratensis s., Kentueky bluegrass: 2-2-2.) 2-2 ee eee 7 50



Toleration for difference of analysis, 6 percent of the cultural value.

Art. 3. Invoice and certificate of analysis—Shipments of the above-named
grass seeds will enter France without other examination than the official
sampling by the service for the repression of frauds when accompanied by—

(a) A duplicate of the seller’s invoice indicating the exact botanical species
and the percentages of purity and germinability;

(b) An international certificate of analysis, when it shall be instituted.
Meantime, reports of analysis issued by a State station will be admitted.

Art. 4. In case of bad faith of shippers or importers, the privilege of delivery
without inspection may be withdrawn. Moreover, the importer will be justicia-
ble under the law of August 1, 1905, on frauds. Expenses of all kinds for the









1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 19

control and inspection of grass seeds imported into France will be collected
from the declarants by the customs in accordance with a tariff established by
the Minister of Agriculture. Declarants will be required to permit the free
drawing of samples of grass seeds necessary for control and analysis (law of
Jan. 11, 1982; Journ. Off. Jan. 15, 1932).

SAMPLING OF GRAMINEOUS SEEDS

The decree of June 13, 1933, prescribes that in the application of the law of
January 11, 1932, gramineous forage-crop seeds declared for importation and
unaccompanied by the documents mentioned in article 3 of that law, will be
subject, prior to removal, and at the importer’s expense, to inspection and
analysis intended to verify their identity, purity, and germinability.

RESTRICTIONS ON ACCOUNT OF CHESTNUT BLIGHT

The importation into and transit in France are prohibited of living plants,
fruits, and seeds of chestnuts coming directly or indirectly from the Far Hast,
as well as from countries which have not taken protective measures against
the disease caused by the fungus Endothia parasitica.

Derogations from this prohibition may be authorized by the Minister of
Agriculture (decree of Mar. 8, 1921).

Notr.—Up to the present, since no country has taken sufficient protective measures

(Italy excepted), this prohibition is applicable, until further orders, to all sources except
Italy (letter of the Minister of Agriculture, Mar. 26, 1921).

ABIES, PIckA, PINUS, PSEUDOTSUGA, AND TSUGA IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

The entry into France is prohibited of plants and parts of plants belonging
to the genera Abies, Picea, Pinus, Pseudotsuga, and Tsuga as being capable
of introducing the needle cast disease (Rhabdocline pseudotsugae) (decree of
Novy. 26, 1930).

B. E. P. Q. 404
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, BRITISH INDIA

JUNE 13, 1936.

This summary of the plant-quarantine import restrictions of British India has
been prepared for the information of nurserymen, plant-quarantine officials, and
others interested in the exportation of plants and plant products to that
country.

It was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant-quarantine inspector, in charge,
foreign-information service, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines, from the
text of the Destructive Insects and Pests Act, approved February 3, 1914, as
amended, and that of notification no. 580-240, of June 22, 1922, as amended, and
was reviewed by the Imperial Council of Agricultural Research, Simla, India.

The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct and
complete up to the time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used inde-
pendently of, nor as a substitute for, the original texts.

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, BRITISH INDIA

BAsiIc LEGISLATION

(Act No. II of 1914, The Destructive Insects and Pests Act, approved Feb. 3, 1914, as
amended up to May 14, 1931)

The act empowers the Governor General in Council, by notification in the
Gazette of India, to prohibit or regulate the importation into British India of
any article or class of articles likely to cause the infection of any crop.

The act also empowers the local government, subject to the control of the
Governor General in Council, to make rules for the detention, inspection, dis-
infection, or destruction of such article or class of articles, and to impose
penalties for infractions of the said rules.



80 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

SUMMARY
IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

Plants may not be imported into British India by letter or sample mail or by
air, except as provided in article 2 of the notification of June 22, 1922, page 3.

Sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum L.): Importation prohibited from the Fiji
Islands, New Guinea, Australia, and the Philippines, to prevent the introduction
= injurious pests and diseases of sugarcane (notification of June 22, 1922, art.

(1), p. 4).

Hevea rubber plants and seeds: Importation from America or West Indies
prohibited except by the Director of Agriculture, Madras Presidency, to prevent
the introduction of Fomes semitostus Berk., Sphaerastilbe repens B. and Br.,
Fusicladium macrosporum Kuyper, and Oidium heveae Steinmann (notification
of June 22, 1922, art. 7, p. 5).

Seeds of flax (Linum usitatissimum L.), berseem (Trifolium alexandrinum
L.), and cotton (Gossypium spp.) : May not be imported by letter or sample mail
otherwise than by sea, to prevent the introduction of dodder (Cuscuta spp.)
(notification of June 22, 1922, art. 8, p. 5).

Coffee plants, seeds, and beans (Co/ffea spp.) : May not be imported except
by the Director of Agriculture, Madras Presidency, for experimental planting,
to prevent the introduction of insect pests, especially Stephanoderes hampei
Hagedorn. (See exceptions in art. 9, notification of June 22, 1922, p. 5.)

Unginned cotton, other than cotton from a Kathiawar port, that has been
produced in India, shall not be imported by sea or air, to prevent the intro-
duction of various pests of cotton (notification of June 22, 1922, art. 11 (1),
p. 5).

Mexican jumping beans (Sebastiana palmeri Rose; Euphorbiaceae) : Importa-
tion absolutely prohibited to prevent the introduction of Grapholitha saltitans
Westwood.

IMPORTATION RESTRICTED

Sugarcane intended to be grown under the supervision of the Government
sugarcane expert, Coimbatore, may be imported by him by mail (notification of
June 22, 1922, art. 2, p. 3).

Sugarcane from countries other than the Fiji Islands, New Guinea, Australia,
or the Philippines must be accompanied by an official inspection certificate
(notification of June 22, 1922, art. 6 (2), p. 4).

Plants, other than fruits and vegetables for consumption, potatoes, and sugar-
cane, May be imported by sea only at an authorized port, and after fumigation
with hydrocyanic acid gas, except as provided in article 3, notification of June

22, 1922, page 4, to prevent the introduction of injurious pests and diseases. .

Potatoes: Must be accompanied by a shipper’s declaration and a certificate
of competent authority affirming freedom from wart (notification of June 22,
1922, art. 4, p. 4).

Potatoes from Italy: Must be accompanied by a certificate of freedom from
disease (notification of June 22, 1922, art. 4).

Rubber plants imported by sea: Must be accompanied by an official certificate
that the estate on which the plants originated; or the individual plants, are
free from specified plant pests (notification of June 22, 1922, art. 5).

Flax seeds (Linum usitatissimum L.) and berseem (Trifolium alerandrinum
L.) may be imported only under a license from the Department of Agriculture
of India (notification of June 22, 1922, art. 10, p. 5).

Cottonseed: May be imported by sea at the port of Bombay when accom-
panied by a certificate, as prescribed in article 11 (2) of the notification of
June 22, 1922, page 5.

Cotton, including ginned cotton, droppings, strippings, fly, and other cotton-
mill wastes, other than yarn wastes: See conditions under article 11 (2),
paragraph 2, notification of June 22, 1922, and Notification No. 1581 of October
1, 1931, pages 5 and 6.

RULES ON THE IMPORTATION OF PLANTS INTO BRITISH INDIA

(Notification no. 580-240, of June 22, 1922, as amended up to Feb. 4, 1935)

ine Ae

ee es) ee





1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 81

DEFINITIONS

ARTICLE 1. (a) “Official certificate’ means a certificate granted by the proper
officer or authority in the country of origin (United States Department of
Agriculture).

(bo) “Plant” means a living plant or part thereof, but does not include seeds.

(c) “Prescribed port” means any of the following ports, namely, Bombay,
Caleutta, Cochin, Dhanushkodi, Karachi, Madras, Negapatam, Rangoon, and
Tuticorin.

(d) All provisions applying to plants or seeds shall apply also to all packing
material used in packing or wrapping such plants or seeds.

IMPORTATION OF PLANTS BY LETTER OR SAMPLE POST PROHIBITED

Art. 2. No plant shall be imported into British India by letter or sample
post; provided that sugarcane for planting, intended to be grown under the
personal supervision of the Government sugarcane expert, Coimbatore, may be
imported by him by such post.

IMPORTATION OF PLANT BY AIR PROHIBITED

ArT. 2 A. No plant shall be imported into British India by air; provided that
plants infested by living insects and intended for the introduction of such
insects may be so imported if they are accompanied by a special certificate
from the Imperial entomologist to the Government of India that such plants.
are imported for the purpose of introducing such insects.

IMPORTED PLANTS MUST BE FUMIGATED ON ARRIVAL

ArT. 3. No plants, other than fruits and vegetables intended for consumption,.
potatoes, and sugarcane shall be imported into British India by sea except after
fumigation with hydrocyanic-acid gas and at a prescribed port:

Provided that plants infested by living parasitized insects intended for the
introduction of such parasites may be imported without such fumigation if they
are accompanied by a special certificate from the imperial entomologist to the
Government of India that such plants are imported for the purpose of introduc-.
ing such parasites.

Provided also that in the case of plants imported direct by H. C. Javarayya,
so long as he holds the post of director of horticulture, Mysore, such fumigation:
shall be dispensed with. He is personally responsible for the fumigation of such
plants in the Bangalore fumigatorium.

POTATOES. MUST BE CERTIFIED AGAINST WART

ArT. 4. Potatoes shall not be imported into British India by sea unless:
accompanied by—

(a) A declaration from the shipper stating fully in what country and district
the potatoes were grown and guaranteeing that potato wart was not known to
exist on the farms where the potatoes were grown; and

(6) An official certificate that no case of wart disease of potatoes has been
known during the 12 months preceding the date of the certificate within 5 miles
of the place where the potatoes were grown.

Art. 5. Not applicable to the United States.

SUGARCANE RESTRICTIONS

Art. 6. (1) The importation of sugarcane into British India by sea from the
Fiji Islands, New Guinea, Australia, or the Philippine Islands is prohibited
absolutely.

(2) The importation of sugarcane into British India by sea from any other
country is prohibited, unless it is accompanied by an official certificate that it
has been examined and found free from cane borers, scale insects, aleyrodes,
root diseasé (any form), pineapple disease (Thielaviopsis (ethaceticus) para-
dora (De Seyn.) v. Hoeh.), sereh, and cane gummosis; that it was obtained
from a crop that was free from mosaic disease; and that the Fiji disease of
sugarcane does not occur in the country of export.



S82 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

Provided that in the case of canes for planting imported direct by the Govern-
ment sugarcane expert, Coimbatore, by the secretary, Sugar Bureau, Pusa, or by
G. Clarke, so long as he holds the appointment of agricultural chemist, United

Provinces, and intended to be grown under the personal supervision of the
importing officer in each case, such certificate shall be required only in respect
of the freedom of the country of export from the Fiji disease of sugarcane.

IMPORTATION PROHIBITED OF HEVEA FROM CERTAIN COUNTRIES

ArT. 7. Hevea rubber plants and seeds shall not be imported into British
India from America or from the West Indies except by the Director of Agricul-
ture, Madras Presidency. ‘

Art. 8. Seeds of flax, berseem, and cotton shall not be imported by letter or
sample post, otherwise than by sea.

RESTRICTIONS ON IMPORTATION OF COFFEE

ArT. 9. Coffee plants, coffee seeds, and coffee beans shall not be imported into
British India except for experimental planting by the Director of Agriculture,
Madras Presidency, who shall take all measures necessary to insure that such
coffee plants, beans, or seeds as are imported by him are free from plant diseases
and injurious insects. Provided that the prohibition hereinbefore contained
shall not apply (a) to roasted and ground coffee, or (0b) to a consignment of
unroasted or unground coffee beans or seeds produced in India and covered by
a certificate of origin in the prescribed form.

ArT. 10. Flax seeds and berseem (Trifolium alexandrinum UL.) shall not be
imported into British India by sea unless the consignee produces before the
collector of customs a license from the Department of Agriculture in India in
that behalf.

COTTON RESTRICTIONS

Art. 11. (1) Unginned cotton, other than cotton from a Kathiawar port,
which has been produced in India, shall not be imported by sea or by air.

(2) Cottonseed shall not be imported by sea save tor experimental purposes
by designated officers in India, and shall not be so imported by such officer save
at the port of Bombay and in quantities not exceeding one hundredweight (112
pounds) in any one consignment and on condition that it will be fumigated
with carbon disulphide on importation:

Provided, That if the cottonseed is accompanied by a certificate from a Goy-
ernment entomologist of the country of origin to the effect that the seed and
its container have been treated in such a way as to destroy all insect life, the
seed shall be examined on importation by such officer as the Governor-General-
in-Council may appoint and shall not be required to be refumigated unless such
examination shows that to be necessary. (See also the notification of Oct. 1,
1931, Cotton from America. See below.)

ArT. 12. Nothing in these rules shall be deemed to apply to—

(1) The import of any article into Aden; or

(2) The bringing by sea or by air from one port or place in British India,
not being in Aden, to another such port or place.

RESTRICTIONS ON COTTON FROM AMERICA
(Notification no. 1581—Agriculture, of Oct. 1, 1931)
Definition

ARTICLE 1. “Cotton” includes ginned cotton, and droppings, strippings, fly,
and other waste products of a cotton mill, other than yarn waste, but does not
include unginned cotton.

“American cotton” means all cotton produced in any part of America.

Entry of cotton by mail or baggage prohibited

Art. 2. American cotton shall not be imported into British India by letter or
sample mail or as passengers’ accompanied baggage, and shall not be imported
by any other means save through the port of Bombay and subject to disinfec-
tion as prescribed by the Government of Bombay at the expense of the
importer.



.



1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 83

B. E. P. Q. 405 (Superseding B. P. Q. 302, Revised)
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, GERMANY

JUNE 26, 1936.

A revision of Circular B. P. Q. 302, revised, became necessary because the
original San Jose scale decrees of the German Empire have been superseded
by the decree of November 3, 1931, and its regulatory order of November 26,
1931, and subsequent amendatory orders, restricting or prohibiting the impor-
tation of plants from the United States, among other countries, to prevent the
introduction of San Jose scale and the apple maggot, and providing for the
entry of fresh fruits from the United States if found free from San Jose scale
(Aspidiotus perniciosus Comst.) and the apple maggot or fruit fly (Riagoletis
pomonella Walsh).

This revised summary was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant-quarantine in-
spector, in charge of Foreign Information Service, Division of Foreign Plant
Quarantines, from his translations of the original texts, and reviewed by the
German Ministry of Nourishment and Agriculture for the information of nur-
serymen, plant quarantine officials, and others interested in the exportation of
plants and plant products from the United States to Germany.

The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct and com-
plete up to the time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used independ-
ently of, nor as a substitute for, the original texts; and it is not to be inter-
preted as legally authoritative. The German texts should be consulted.

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, GERMANY
OBJECTS OF THE GERMAN PLANT-QUARANTINE DECREES

The plant-quarantine import restrictions of Germany are designed to
prevent the introduction into and distribution in Germany of phylloxera
(Phylloxera (wastatrix) vitifoliae Fitch), San Jose scale (Aspidiotus per-
niciosus Comst.), apple maggot or fruit fly (Rhagoletis pomonella Walsh),
Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decenilineata Say), potato wart
(Synchytrium endobioticum (Schilb.) Pere.), European cherry fruit fly (Rhago-
letis cerasi L.), carnation leaf roller (Tortrir pronubana Hbn.), injurious
diseases and pests of flower bulbs and tubers, of conifers, of plants and parts
of plants of the genus Ulmus, of the southern cottonwood (Populus (canadensis )
deltoides Marshall), and of Azalea indica L.

INTRODUCTORY REMARKS

Whereas the following summary includes references to the entire body
of the effective plant-quarantine import restrictions of Germany, only the
texts of the legislation affecting plants and plant products of the United States,
either alone or among those of other countries, are included in this publication.
References affecting products of the United States are indicated in the sum-
mary by footnote.

SUMMARY
IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

Grapevine stocks and all parts of the grapevine: Importation prohibited
from any country to prevent the introduction of phylloxera (decree of Oct. 31,
1879, and subsequent orders; R. G. BIL, p. 3038, etce.). See page 5.

Living dicotyledonous trees and shrubs of all species, except cacti: ** Impor-
tation prohibited from the United States and certain other countries to prevent
the introduction of San Jose scale (Aspidiotus perniciosus Comst.) (decree of
Nov. 3, 1931, and Cireular of Nov. 26, 1931, as subsequently amended; R. G. BL.,
p. 303, etc.). See pages 6 and 9.

17 Affects products of the United States.



84 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

Potatoes from the United States:** Importation prohibited to prevent the
introduction of the Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say)
(decree of Feb. 26, 1875, and subsequent orders; R. G. BL, 135, ete.). See
page 11.

Potatoes, tomatoes, eggplants, strawberries, rooted vegetables, bulbs, tubers,
rhizomes, and other subterranean parts of plants; peelings and refuse of such
products; sacks and other materials that have been used for packing or presery-
ing such products: Importation and transit of the products from France
prohibited (decree of Feb. 23, 1982; R. G. BL. I: 18, 1932, p. 91).

Seeds of Scotch pine (Pinus sylvestris L.), and Norway spruce (Picea excelsa
Link.) :** Importation prohibited from any country, to prevent the introduction
of diseases of those trees (decree of Feb. 28, 1929; R. G. Bl., I: 11, 1929, p. 76).
See page 138.

Plants of the following genera from any country:* Fir (Abies), spruce
(Picea), pine (Pinus), Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga), and hemlock (Tsuga)
(decree of June 3, 19380; R. G. BI., I: 20, 1930, p. 188). See page 11.

Rooted carnations, cuttings and cut flowers from any country:* Importation
prohibited to prevent the introduction of the carnation leaf roller (Tortrir
pronubana Hbn.) (decree of Mar. 28, 1929; R. G. Bl., I: 15, 1929, p. 83). Entry
of carnation cut flowers prohibited from March 15 to November 30 of each year
(decree of Sept. 30, 1932; R. G. Bl., I: 68, 1932, p. 492). See page 13.

Rooted plants of the genus Ulmus, and of the southern cottonwood (Populus
(canadensis) deltoides Marshall), and parts thereof from any country:* Impor-
tation prohibited to prevent the introduction of pests and diseases of those
plants (decree of Feb. 2, 1982; R. G. Bl., I: 10, 1932, p. 63). See pages 12
and 13.

Living plants and fresh parts thereof from Portugal, Rumania, and Yugo-
Slavia (decree of July 11, 1933, as amended; R. G. BL, I, p. 468; R. Z. BL, p.
353, ete.).

Wild plants: Importation prohibited of those named in articles 4 and 5 of the
decree of March 18, 1986. See page 14.

IMPORTATION RESTRICTED

Deciduous plants and parts thereof not specifically prohibited :** Each ship-
ment must be accompanied by a certificate affirming that the noninclusion of
plants of Ulmus and Populus deltoides or parts thereof (decree of Feb. 2, 1932;
R. G. Bl. I: 10, 1932, p. 63). See pages 12 and 13.

Coniferous plants and parts thereof not specifically prohibited: Each ship-
ment must be accompanied by a certificate affirming the noninclusion of plants
of Abies, Picea, Pinus, Pseudotsuga, Tsuga, or parts thereof (decree of June 5,
1930; R. G. Bl. I: 20, 1930, p. 188). See pages 11 and 12.

Rooted plants, the importation of which is not prohibited by special decrees,
as indicated above: Shipments of restricted plants, only through authorized
customs offices, from countries—

1. Adhering to the International Phylloxera Convention are to be accom-
panied by a shipper’s declaration of origin and a certificate affirming freedom
of the shipment from phylloxera (decree of July 4, 1883).

2. Not adhering to the International Phylloxera Convention are to be accom-
panied by a shipper’s declaration— ”

(a) Obligating himself to pay the cost of inspection for phylloxera; and

(b) Commissioning the consignee or other person authorized by the shipper,
and living in Germany, to pay that cost *® (notice of Aug. 23, 1887; R. G. BL, p.
431). Shipments are subject to thorough inspection for freedom from grape-
vine roots or other parts of the grapevine and from phylloxera on arrival (de
cree of Apr. 7, 1887; R. G. Bl, p. 155). The fee for the inspection of rooted
plants is at the rate of 0.01 reichsmark per 1 kg net weight, the minimum fee
for any shipment being 1 reichsmark (decree of July 5, 1930; R. G. BL, p. 203).

Cacti, trees, shrubs, plants, and parts thereof not included among dicoty-
ledonous trees and shrubs (except when prohibited by other regulations) :”
Shipments subject to thorough inspection for San Jose scale on arrival (decree
of Noy. 3. 1931, and circular of Noy. 26, 1931, as amended; R. G. Bl. I: 74, 1931,

18 See footnote 17.

19 See footnote 17.

2 See the decree of June 3, 1930, pp. 11-12: decree of Mar. 28, 1929, p. 13; decree of
Feb. 2, 1932, p. 183; and decree of Mar. 18, 1936, p. 14.

i i



1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 85

p. 670, ete., and Rundschreiben des R. M. f. E. u. L. an Landerregierungen vom
26 Nov. 1931, Il: 41258). See page 9, class B.

zalea indica, plants of, from any source: Each shipment must be accom-
panied by a certificate issued by competent authority afiirming freedom from
specified pests and diseases (decree of Nov. 9, 1982; R. G. Bl. 1: 75, 1932, p. 528).

Fresh fruits from certain countries must be imported in the original pack
only and are subject to inspection for San Jose scale (Aspidiotus perniciosus
Comst.) and apple maggot (Rhagoletis pomonella Walsh) on arrival at the
port of entry” (decree of Nov. 3, 1931; circular of Nov. 26, 1931; decree of
July 8, 19382; ete.). See page 7.

Fresh cherries from any source:â„¢ To prevent the introduction of the Euro-
pean cherry fruit fly (Rhagoletis cerasi L.), each shipment must be accom-
panied by a certificate issued by competent authority affirming freedom from
that pest (decree of Apr. 27, 1929; R. G. Bl. I, 1929, p. 92). See page 14.

Potatoes from countries other than the United States and France: To prevent
the introduction of potato wart (Synchytrium endobioticum (Schilb.) Pere.),
each shipment must be accompanied by a certificate affirming freedom from
that disease (decree of Mar. 7, 1930; R. G. Bl. I: 6, 1930).

Fresh vegetables of all kinds, aerial parts of plants, except fruits, from
France, whose entry and transit are not prohibited by article 1 of the decree
of February 23, 1932 (see list under “Importation prohibited”), may be im-
ported from March 15 to November 15 of each year under certificate of origin
in uninfested land and phytosanitary certificate (decree of Feb. 235, 1952;
fil. 3.15, 1082, p. OL).

Subterranean parts of plants, seeds (except those of Pinus sylvestris and
Picea excelsa), tropical fruits, cereals, and vegetables for food and other
purposes (including fresh mushrooms)” (decree of Nov. 17, 1934; Z 1101-681,
II; see p. 10), drugs and raw materials for technical and medicinal purposes
from the United States, except as prohibited by other regulations, are not re-
stricted by the decree of November 3, 1931, and the circular of November 26,
1931, as amended. (See p. 9, class C.) However, subterranean parts of plants,
with the same exceptions, are subject to the phylloxera restrictions; and bulbs,
corms, and tubers also are subject to the certification requirements of the decree
of July 7, 1930; R. G. Bl. I: 24, 1930, page 204. See page 9, class C.

PHYLLOXERA RESTRICTIONS
IMPORTATION OF GRAPEVINES PROHIBITED

In accordance with the provisions of the International Phylloxera Convention
of Berne, November 3, 1881, the importation into Germany is prohibited of
grapevine stocks and all parts of the grapevine, especially of branches and
foliage.

IMPORTATION OF GRAPES PERMITTED

Table grapes may be imported when packed without grapevine leaves in boxes,
cases, baskets, or well-headed barrels, easy to inspect.

Wine grapes and grape mare may be imported only when packed in tightly
closed barrels (decree of Oct. 31, 1879; R. G. BL, p. 803; and decree of July 4,
1883; R. G. B1., p. 153, ete.).

SHIPPERS DECLARATION AND PHYLLOXERA CERTIFICATE REQUIRED

Shipments of rooted plants and parts thereof, other than grapes, the entry of
which is not prohibited by the San Jose scale and apple maggot and other
special quarantines, must be accompanied by a shipper’s declaration of origin
and by a phylloxera certificate issued by a competent authority of the country
of origin, as follows:

The shipper’s declaration shall:

1. Affirm that the entire contents of the shipment proceed from his estab-
lishment.

2. Indicate the receiving point and address of the consignee.

3. Affirm that no grapevines are included in the shipment.

4. State whether the shipment contains plants with earth on the roots.

5. Bear the signature of the shipper.

21 See footnote 17.



S6 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

The phylloxera certificate shall affirm:

1. That the plants were taken from ground separated from grapevine stocks
by at least 20 meters, or by some obstacle to the roots deemed suflicient by
competent authority.

2. That the ground itself contains no grapevines.

3. That the place has not been used as a depot for that plant.

4. That if stocks infested with phylloxera have been grown there, their com-
plete extirpation had been effected by repeated toxic applications and by inves-
tigations for a period of 3 years, thus insuring the complete destruction of
phylloxera and roots (decree of July 4, 1883, and subsequent orders; R. G. BL,
p. 153, ete.).

RESTRICTIONS TO PREVENT THE INTRODUCTION OF SAN JOSE SCALE
AND APPLE MAGGOT

The original San Jose scale decree of February 5, 1898, prohibited the
importation into Germany of all living plants or parts thereof from the United
States, but the edict of May 8, 1907, now superseded by the decree of November 3,
1931, as amended, and the circular of November 26, 1931 (Reichsgesetzbl. I: 74,
1931, p. 670, and Rundschreiben des R. M. f. E. u. L. and die Landerregierungen
vom 26 Noy. 1931, Il: 41258), group plants into class A, entry absolutely pro-
hibited; B, importation conditional; and C, importation unrestricted; and they
prescribe that fresh fruits may be imported only when found free from San Jose
scale and apple maggot.

Decree of November 3, 1931, to prevent the introduction of San Jose scale
(Aspidiotus perniciosus Comst.), and apple maggot (Rhagoletis pomonella
Walsh) (R. G. BI., I, p. 670; R. Z. Bl., p. 362), as amended by those of July 8,
1932 (R. G. BL, I, p. 351; -R. Z. Bl., p. 270), and April 20, 1983 (R. G. BL, p: 230;
RR. ZBL, p: 200)%

IMPORTATION OF LIVING PLANTS PROHIBITED FROM CERTAIN COUNTRIES

ARTICLE 1. (1) To prevent the introduction of San Jose scale (Aspidiotus
perniciosus Comst.), the importation is prohibited, until further notice, of living
plants and fresh parts thereof from America, Australia (including New Zealand
and Tasmania), Austria, China, Hawaii, Hungary, India, Iraq (Mesopotamia),
and the Union of South Africa.

(2) The same prohibition applies to the containers and articles of any kind
that have served for packing or storing such plants or parts of plants.

PROVISION FOR ENTRY SUBJECT TO INSPECTION

(3) The Federal Minister of Nourishment and Agriculture, in cooperation
with the Federal Minister of Finance, may prescribe that the importation of
living plants and fresh parts thereof from the countries named in paragraph
1, against which the suspicion of San Jose scale exists, be permitted through
certain customs offices and on condition that an inspection of the shipment
at the port of entry, at the expense of the interested person, reveals no infesta-
tion or suspicion of infestation by that pest.

FRESH FRUITS MAY BE IMPORTED ONLY THROUGH AUTHORIZED PORTS AND IN
ORIGINAL PACKAGES ’

Art. 2. (1) Fresh fruits (deciduous) and fresh refuse of fruits,” that orig-
inate in the countries named in paragraph 1 of article 1, until further notice,
may be imported only through customs offices designated by the Federal Gov-
ernment, in the original packages alone,” and only on condition that as a re-

“The regulations on the importation of fresh fruits and refuse thereof apply also to
the importation of nuts, oranges, mandarins, lemons, and other citrus fruits. Both
mature and immature (ripe and unripe) nuts are’ to be inspected if green husks still
adhere to them (R. F. M. of Mar. 15, 1934, Z 1101-216 II: R. Z. Bl. p. 168—R. F. M. of
Mar. 27 and Apr. 9, 1934, Z 1101-246 II, 275 II; R. Z. Bl., p. 212, 244—R. F. M. of
July 4, 1934, Z 1101-483 IT).

2 The importation of fresh fruits and fresh refuse thereof from Austria and Hungary
is permitted in bulk also, on condition that the shipments are accompanied by certificates
of origin and health issued by the official plant protection service of the country of
origin and the other conditions of the decree of Nov. 8, 1931, are complied with. The

OS ss Fr







-=
1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS S 4

sult of an inspection of the shipment for San Jose scale at the port of entry,
at the expense of the interested person, and in the case of those originating
in the United States and Canada, also for the apple maggot (Rhagoletis
pomonelia Walsh), no infestation or suspicion of infestation is found.

(See also regulations under pt. II, decree of Noy. 8, 1931, on the entry of
dried fruits, and the so-called southern fruits and on the inspection of imported
fruits, p. 10.)

EXCEPTIONS PROVIDED FOR

Arr. 8. (1) The Federal Minister of Nourishment and Agriculture can per-
mit exceptions to the provisions of articles 1 and 2 under necessary safe-
guards.

REGULATIONS UNDER THE DECREE OF NOVEMBER 3, 1931

(Circular of Nov. 26, 1931, II 41258)

1. IMPORTATION OF LIVING PLANTS AND FRESH PARTS OF PLANTS
Classification of plants for importation

Living plants and fresh parts thereof are divided into three groups accord-
ing to their species:

Nore 1. No restrictions apply under these regulations, apart from the cases
covered by article 4 and those covered by the circular of January 31, 1934—
II /Z—242, to:

(a) The importation of bouquets and cut flowers (not potted plants) brought
in by travelers, not for commercial purposés (R. F. M., Apr. 19, 1934, Z 1101-161
tix. 2. Bl, p: 267).

(b) The importation of funeral wreaths, bouquets, and cut flowers (not
potted plants) which are brought in personally for the decoration of graves
and coffins, family reunions, religicus festivals, and the like (R. F. M. of
Apr. 19, 1934, Z 1101-161 II; R. Z. B1., p. 267).

(c) The importation of blackberries, bilberries, raspberries, red whortle-
berries, and wild strawberries in restricted frontier traffic from Austria,
Poland, and Czechoslovakia (R. F. M. of Aug. 29, 1982, Z 1101-911 IT; of Oct. 2,
1933, Z 1101-308 II; and of Feb. 5, 1934, Z 1101-53 IT).

1. Plants and parts of plants that are unconditionally excluded from importa-
tion (A).

2. Plants and parts of plants whose importation is conditionally permitted
(B).

3. Plants and parts of plants that may be imported without restriction (C).

Dried plants are classed as living plants

Plants and parts of plants in the dry state also are to be regarded as fresh
and are to be treated as living plants.

The three classes of plants

A. Those unconditionally excluded from importation are living dicotyledonous
trees and shrubs of all kinds (except cacti) ; also seedlings and plants, as well
as parts thereof, such as twigs, scions, layers, cuttings, ete. In this group are
included all deciduous fruit trees and shrubs, as well as nut and ornamental
trees and shrubs of all kinds.

B. The importation is to be permitted, insofar as other regulations do not
prohibit (for example, the prohibition of importation of conifers, rooted carna-
tions, and carnation cuttings), of cacti, as well as plants not included among
dicotyledonous trees and shrubs and parts thereof, on condition that they are

said certificate must affirm that the shipment was inspected and found free from San
Jose scale, and that in the locality in which the shipment originated San Jose scale
had not hitherto appeared (R. F. M. of Aug. 8, 1932, Z 1101-833 II). On the importa-
tion of such consignments from Hungary, the railroad cars containing the goods must
bear on each side door an unbroken seal with the impression ‘‘M. Kir. Novenyvedelmi
Szolgalat Budapest.”

As for consignments of fruit declared to be of origin in a European country, the
country of origin must always be established, according to the provision of pt. II, no. 5,
of the Anleitung fiir die Zollabfertigung.



8S BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

not packed with plants of class A, and that inspection by a technical official at
the port of entry does not establish any infestation or suspicion of infesta-
tion with San Jose scale.

C. Importation unrestricted: Until further notice, except as prohibited by
other regulations (for example, importation of potatoes and diseased flower
bulbs and tubers is prohibited) all subterranean parts of plants, all kinds of
seeds (except those prohibited by special quarantines), tropical fruits (except
citrus fruits), cereals, and vegetables for food and as luxuries, drugs and
technical raw material for medicinal purposes, and raw material for technical
manufacture.

Shipments that include plants of the different groups are subject, in their
entirety, to the conditions of the most restricted group.

For plants of group A the right is reserved, in individual cases, for special
reasons, to permit exceptions to the import prohibition, when guaranties are
given against the introduction of San Jose scale.

The provisions of these regulations apply to living plants and fresh parts
thereof, but not to fruit, brought in as baggage by passengers (travelers).

Fresh mushrooms placed in class C

The order of November 17, 1934; Z 1101—681 II, prescribes that fresh mush-
rooms are to be regarded as vegetables for food purposes in the sense of group C
of the circular of November 26, 1931. Consequently that product is exempt
from the import prohibitions of the decree of November 3, 1931, as amended.

Importation permitted only through authorized ports

The importation of living plants and fresh parts thereof, insofar as it is
permitted, may be effected only through customs offices that have been author-
ized for the entry of fruit.”

2. IMPORTATION OF FRESH DECIDUOUS FRUITS AND FRESH REFUSE OF SUCH FRUITS
Inspection of imported fruits

The inspection of imported fruits for the presence of San Jose scale (Aspidi-
otus perniciosus Comst.) and apple maggot (Rhagoletis pomonella Walsh) is to
be carried out in accordance with “Instructions for the inspection of plants,
fruits, and potatoes on entry’, as presented in the circular of July 1, 1931—II
40305. The inspection may be entrusted only to technical specialists who
have had thorough instruction in the microscopic characteristics of San Jose
seale.

Dried fruits unrestricted

Dried fruits of any kind, and dried refuse of fruits, regardless of the degree
of desiccation, are not subject to the provisions of this decree, nor do they apply
to fruit brought in by passengers as baggage for their own needs during the
journey (as amended by the circular of January 31, 1934—II : 2242).

The so-called southern fruits, including raisins, pineapples, bananas, etce.,
are not to be regarded as fruit in the sense of this decree. Citrus fruits
are now placed under the same restrictions as deciduous fruits.

COLORADO POTATO BEETLE QUARANTINE
(Decree of Feb. 26, 1875)

Importation from the United States into Germany is prehibited of potatoes,
potato peelings, and other potato refuse, as well as of sacks and other con-
tainers that have been used for packing potatoes. This prohibition does not
apply to potatoes carried on vessels as ships’ stores.

The importation of dried potatoes also is prohibited (order of Mar. 8, 1900).

The importation of sweetpotatoes is not restricted (order of Aug. 19, 1906).

The importation and transit of living Colorado potato beetles, at any stage
of their life history, are prohibited. The Minister of Nourishment and Agricul-
ture can permit exceptions from this prohibition (decree of Oct. 7, 1932;
R. G. Bl., I: 69, 1932, p. 496).

*% The list of authorized ports is too long for inclusion in this circular.







1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 89

Importation must be made through authorized ports (decree of May 20, 1935;
R. M. Bl. p. 518). Article 3 of the decree of July 5, 1930; R. G. Bl., page 203,
referring to fees for the inspection of rooted plants, potatoes, and fruits on
importation is applicable as follows: The fee for the inspection of cherries is
at the rate of 0.003 reichsmark per 1 kilo net weight, the minimum fee for any
shipment being 1 reichsmark.

IMPORTATION OF CONIFEROGUS PLANTS RESTRICTED

The entry of coniferous plants of the following genera is prohibited until
further notice: Abies (fir), Picea (spruce), Pinus (pine), Pseudotsuga, and
Tsuga, or parts thereof.

The entry of other coniferous plants will not be allowed unless they are
packed separately or mixed only with each other, and unless the invoice is
accompanied by a certificate issued by a competent official of the plant pro-
tection service of the country of origin, affirming, in the German language, that
the shipment covered by the certificate has been thoroughly inspected by him
and found free from plants of the above-mentioned genera or of parts thereof.
The Minister of Nourishment and Agriculture can permit exceptions to this
prohibition. Transit shipment under customs supervision is permitted (decree
of June 3, 19380, R. G. Bi. I, No. 20, 1930, p. 188).

(The phrase “The entry of other coniferous plants will not be allowed unless
they are packed separately or mixed with each other” is understood to mean
that coniferous plants, other than those named above, will not be permitted
entry unless those of a single genus are packed by themselves, or unless those
of several genera, other than those named above, are packed together. In
other words, coniferous plants of the genera above named, and nonconiferous
plants, may not be included in any shipment of coniferous plants offered for
importation under the provisions of this decree.)

IMPORTATION OF FLOWER BULBS AND CORMS RESTRICTED

The entry of flower bulbs and corms is not allowed, unless each shipment is
accompanied by a certificate issued by a competent official of the plant pro-
tection service of the country of origin, affirming, in the German language,
that the shipment has been thoroughly inspected by him and found free from
the following plant diseases or insect pests: Yellow disease (Bacterium (Pseudo-
monas) hyacinthi Wakk.), Sclerotinia rot (Sclerotinia bulborum (Wakk.)
Rehm.), black rot of bulbs) (Selerotiun) Rhizoctonia tuliparum (Kleb.)
Whetzel and Arthur), fire disease (Botrytis (parasitica) tulipae (Lib.) E. F.
Hopkins), Penicillium rot (Penicillium sp.), eelworm disease of bulbs (Anguil-
lulina (Tylenchus) dipsaci (Kuhn) Cerv. and v. Ben.), greater and lesser nar-
cissus flies (Jlerodon spp. and Humerus spp.), and the bulb mite (Rhizoglyphus
(echinopus) hyacinthi Byd.).

Transit through Germany under customs supervision is permitted (decree of
July 7, 1980; B. G. Bl. I; 24, 1980, p. 204).

IMPORTATION OF ELM AND SOUTHERN POPLAR PROHIBITED

The importation of rooted plants of the genus Ulmus and of the Canadian
poplar (Populus (canadensis) deltoides Marshall), as well as of cuttings, scions,
grafts, and other fresh parts of such plants, is prohibited until further notice.

The importation of other deciduous plants than those named in article 1, or
cuttings, scions, grafts, and other fresh parts thereof, is permitted only when
the consignment is accompanied by a certificate in the German language and
that of the country of origin, affirming that the shipment was inspected and
that it does not contain plants or parts thereof above mentioned.

The Imperiai Minister of Agriculture can make exceptions to these pro-
visions.

The direct transit of the above-mentioned plants and their parts is permitted
under customs supervision (decree of Feb. 2, 1932; R. G. Bl. I: 10, 1932, p. 63).

IMPORTATION OF PINE AND SPRUCE SEEDS PROHIBITED

The importation into Germany of pine and spruce seeds and of pine and
spruce cones containing seeds (tariff no. 95) is prohibited as of March 15, 1929
(decree of Feb. 28, 1929; R. G. B1., I: 11, 1929, p. 76).



90 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

Amended by the decree of September 13, 1929 (R. G. BI., 1: 35, 1929, p. 147),
to prohibit the importation into Germany of seeds, and of cones containing
seeds of the Scotch pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and of the Norway spruce (Picea
excelsa Link) only: Provided, That these seeds may be imported into Germany,
in exceptional cases, if the importer has obtained an import permit from the
German Minister of Agriculture. Until further notice, no permit is required to
import the seeds of other species of pine or spruce (Pinus or Picea).

IMPORTATION OF CARNATIONS PROHIBITED

To prevent the introduction of the carnation leaf roller (Tortrix pronuwbana
Hbn.), the entry of rooted carnations and carnaticn cuttings is prohibited until
further notice. The entry of cut flowers of carnations also is prohibited from
March 15 to November 30 of each year.

The Federal Minister of Nourishment and Agriculture can permit exceptions
to this prohibition.

The unrestricted transit through Germany of the above-named plants under
customs supervision is permitted (decrees of Mar. 28, 1929; R. G. BL, I: 15,
1929, p. 88; decree of Sept. 30, 1982; R. G. Bl., I: 68, 1932, p. 492).

IMPORTATION OF FRESH CHERRIES RESTRICTED

The importation of fresh cherries attacked or suspected of being attacked by
the maggot of the European cherry fruit fly (Rhagoletis cerasi L.) is prohib-
ited until further notice. Shipments of this fruit must be accompanied by a
certificate of origin issued by the communal authorities of the place of origin
and by a sanitary certificate issued by a competent official of the plant protec-
tion service of the country of origin, vouching for the freedom of the fruit from
the maggot of the cherry fruit fly. Shipments will be inspected at the port of
entry. Transit shipment through Germany under customs supervision is per-
mitted (decree of Apr. 27, 1929, R. G. Bl., I, 1929, p. 92).

IMPORTATION OF WILD PLANTS PROHIBITED ©

(Decree of Mar. 18, 1986; R. G. Bl.. No. 25, Mar. 28, 1936)

The object of this decree is to protect wild plants and animals from wanton
destruction or injury. Article 6 prescribes as follows:

Art. 6. It is forbidden to carry, to send, to hold for sale, to import or export,
to turn over to others, to acquire, to take in custody, or to deal in plants and
parts of plants of the protected species named in article 4 or of the fresh or
dried protected plant parts named in article 5.

Fwily protected plants named in article 4
1. Pteretis struthiopteris=Struthiopteris germanica, ostrich fern.

2. Phyllitis scolopendrium Newman=Scolopendrium vulgare Smith, harts-
tongue.

3. Osmunda regalis L., royal fern.

4. Stipa pennaia L., feathergrass.

5. Lilium martagon L., turban or turkscap lily.

6. Fritillaria meleagris L., snakeshead.

7. Narcissus pseudonarcissus L., common daffodil.

8. Orchids, adder’s grass, Orchidaceae of the following genera and species:

Cypripedium calceoius l., Cephalanthera,, Nigritella, Platanthera, Ophruys,
Limodorum abortivum (l.) Swartz, Orchis.

9. Dianthus caesius Smith, Cheddar pink.

10. Anemone narcissifiora L., narcissus-flowered anemone.

11. Anemone alpina L., alpine anemone, including the yellow subspecies
A. sulphurea I.

12. Anemone silvestris I.., wood anemone.

13. Aquilegia spp., all native species.

14. Pulsatilla spp., all native species.

15. Adonis vernalis L., spring adonis.

16. Nymphea alba L., white waterlily.

17. Dietamnus albus L., white dittany.

18. Daphne spp., all native species.



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S. Rk. A., B. E. P.:Q. Issued September 1937

United States Department of Agriculture

Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine



SERVICE AND
REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS
1936



These announcements are issued quarterly and constitute a per-
_ manent record of the work of the Bureau in the enforcement
of the Plant Quarantine Act of 1912 and certain related acts, includ-
ing the text of quarantines and regulations thereunder, and the
more important circulars and decisions explanatory of, or
bearing on, such quarantines and regulations

WITH LIST OF PLANT PESTS INTERCEPTED WITH IMPORTED
PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS







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FOUNDATION OF MANUIRCTURE

UNITED STATES
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
WASHINGTON: 1937
hehe

BLA. DEPT. AG.

DIV. OF PLA NY
ENDUSTRY
HIBRARY

ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT
QUARANTINE

Ler A. SrronG, Chief.

S. A. RoHweEr, Assistant Chief.

Avery 8. Hoyt, Assistant Chief.

F. H. SpeENcER, Business Manager.

Rouua P. Currigr, Editor.

MABEL Coucorp, Librarian.

J. A. Hysuop, in Charge, Division of Insect Pest Survey and Information.

J. I. HAMBLETON, in Charge, Division of Bee Culture Investigations.

D. L. Van Dinu, in Charge, Division of Fruit Insect Investigations.

F. C. CRAIGHEAD, in Charge, Division of Forest Insect Investigations.

W. H. Waits, in Charge, Division of Truck Crop and Garden Insect Investigations.

N. ANNAND, in Charge, Division of Cereal and Forage Insect Investigations.

. W. HaRNneED, in Charge, Division of Cotton Insect Investigations.

C. Bisuopp, in Charge, Division of Insects Affecting Man and Animals.

A. HawkIns, in Charge, Division of Control Investigations.

C. Roark, tn Charge, Division of Insecticides and Fungicides.

F. W. MurEsEBECK, in Charge, Division of Insect Identification.

P. CLAUSEN, in Charge, Division of Foreign Parasite Introduction.

B. FracKER, in Charge, Division of Plant Disease Control.

M. Ganppis, 7n Charge, Division of Domestic Plant Quarantines.

E. R. Sasscer, in Charge, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines.

A. F. Burcsss, in Field Charge, Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail Moth Control
(headquarters, Greenfield, Mass.).

L. H. Wortutey, in Field Charge, Japanese Beetle and Gypsy Moth and Brown-
Tail Moth Quarantines, European Corn Borer Certification, and Dutch Elm
Disease Eradication (headquarters, Bloomfield, N. J.).

R. E. McDonatp, in Field Charge, Pink Bollworm and Thurberia Weevil Quar-
antines (headquarters, San Antonio, Tew.).

P. A. Homan, in Field Charge, Mexican Fruit Fly Quarantine (headquarters,
Harlingen, Tez.).

, BaksEr, in Field Charge, Fruit Fly Investigations (headquarters, Mexico
City, Mexico).

W. E. Sa: in Field Chaorae, Screw Worm Control (headquarters, San Antonio,

Tez.

a

WROD AAT
TABLE OF CONTENTS

CONTENTS OF NO. 126 (JANUARY-MARCH 1936)

Page
Quarantine and other official announcements- - ----------- See Kee bots be ee 1
Announcements relating to gypsy moth and brown-tail moth quarantine iO 445) ee eee ee 1
Instructions to postmasters-_-----------------------------------------------+----+---------- : 1
List of articles exempt from certification requirements under the gypsy moth and brown-tail
moth quarantine (B. E. P. Q.-386 (revised)) __-----------------------------~--------------- = 2
List of articles exempt from certification requirements under the gypsy moth and brown-tail
moth quarantine (B. E. P. Q.-386 (second revision)) ----_---------------------------------- Z
Announcements relating to pink bollworm quarantine (no. 52)_--------------------------------- 3
Instructions to postmasters--_--------------------------------------------------------------- 3
Administrative instructions—approval of alternative treatments for baled lint cotton from
heavily infested areas (B. E. P. Q.-388)__----------.-------------------------------------- 3
Announcements relating to Dutch elm disease quarantine (no. 71)-------------------------------- 4
Bien celmiGdiseaceiConbuno lesen se Sheers eis eed Sa ee ee _ See os Se 4
Modification of Dutch elm disease quarantine regulations_--_-_------------------------------ a
Notice to general public through newspapers-_------------------------------------------- 5
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (no. 48) -._------------------------------ 6
Japanese beetle zone widens here and there- ------------------------------------------------ 6
Mevisionvof quarantine and regulations-.2-+- 2-22. 2-.-.-------.L222.22+24---2-.------4.---- 6
Notice to general public through newspapers-_------.------------------------------------- 17
Announcement relating to nursery stock, plant, and seed quarantine (no. 37) ..----------------- 17
Reprint, with corrected footnotes and appendices_------------------------------------------ 17
Announcements relating to Mexican fruit-fiy quarantine (no. 64)__---__------------------------- 26
Shipping season for Texas citrus fruit extended to March 31___-------------.---------------- 26
eae instructions—shipping season for Texas citrus fruit extended (B. E. P. Q.- a
jj) Mend Det Pere singe ABs ri bl bet er nd Srey a eee se Pee Deb
MVSEol HEIs CCITIS eee Series SONS errr ct ararinlinwrr alt ee re Va Sue ok 27
MISiRUCHIONS LO) RUSLIOURICANSPOSUMIASTOLSS sae h Se eee ae pc re ee meee eam 27
imporiationsiot§plantiproducts yaa) sDS48ISl): sods 2 sees OS gl PEEL Eee ese eees 28
importations by mail—regulationsi(£MDr432350) 2 2 28 2 ba eeebreel Jo 2b lt lbs 29
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Dominion of New Zealand (P. Q. C. A.-306, supple-
ATVETLET OMS) eee ee ee eee em ae OP ede st ees 2) sie ieuats eee... 30
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Chile (B. P. Q.-348, supplement no. 3)--- 32
eee manune import restrictions, Republic of Argentina (B. P. Q.-357, suppiement no. a
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Czechoslovakia (B. E. P. Q.-366, supple-
THOMENITO So) eee lems rh Corriente) ners (Pelosi mye Sues eames ania bee 33
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, British Mandate of Palestine (B. E. P. Q.-370, revised) - 33
. Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Grand Ducny of Luxembourg (B. E. P. Q.-389)____--- 36
Fs ee awcd ts import restrictions, British Colony and Protectorate of Sierra Leone (B. E. a
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, British Gold Coast Colony (B. E. P. Q.-391)*__-_------- 38
- Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act_-_---------------------------------- 39
; Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine__-___---.------------------------- 40
CONTENTS OF NO. 127 (APRIL-JUNE 1936)
Onstanunoune obher oficial announcements. 220) 2) oon ere AE re 8 ee 41
Announcements relating to date-palm scale quarantine (no. 6)__.-------_------------------------ 41
Ware-palimcenle quarantinemevoked = 2. 1) eats seri ieee See on he esis 41
Bhovice Of liuLinewer date-palny seale quarantine ——~<-_----<+---_-=2+_-- S22 let lec tess. 42
ERS EPUB ELONMS TO" POSTINANtens oe eee eo a een ee) Eee 42
Announcements relating to nursery stock, plant, and seed quarantine (no. 37)------------------- 42
EAaniportations by mall (Bene: @ so92) hee we 2 ee Usa ee ees ae ee 42
Imstrietions vo collectors of customs (Glen 482pi)e. = os oe eee 43
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (no. 48) _-.-.---------------------------- 43
ist of rue bulbs, corms, and tibers (BiH P2Qrae4) a 43
List of articles exempt from certification reauirements under the Japanese beetle quarantine
EPA Oy B05 aes eee BeU Gee Os Ri tae ieee) Br Te eee 44
Announcement relating to pink bollworm quarantine (no. 52)___-_-_---------------------------- 45
Administrative instructions—Treatment requirements removed as a condition for interstate
shipment of baled lint and linters, and products thereof produced or manufactured from
sterilized cottonseed, from the pink bollworm regulated area in Florida (B. E. P. Q. 393) _-_-- 45
Announcement relating to Dutch elm disease quarantine (no. 71)_____-_--________--------------- 45
IGS PETICEIONSICONPOSUIIASLOIS # ote ae ere a enen Ree LE AES peeehe OE ee er ee one 45
NWiiSCollan CONS LORS ase as = mani eae aa ae St ne er eee eee VE Pee 46
‘Fermingal mspection opplants and plant products. = 2! = 22 222s base ie eee i 46
Piants and plant products addressed to places in Idaho_-__---.._-._.--...-_------------- 46
Achienalpiant-lnspection piace lm Orergn=- =~ = +22 22 Leen eee. ee 46
Inspection of plants and plant products from abroad_--_--.--..-..-.--.---------------------- 46
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Argentina (B. P. Q. 257, supplement no. 3) - 48
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Isiand of Cyprus (B. P. Q. 360, supplement no. 1) ----_- 48

Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Poland (B. E. P. Q. 368, supplement no. 1) 49
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Presidency of Antigua, British West Indies (B. E. P. Q.
OV ANSUED DIGINIONG 1G: “yeasts s Seaaes Sat er Se PPAR EAS oA Bt ee te ee ee ee ee 53

1102—37 III


IV TABLE OF CONTENTS

CONTENTS OF NO. i127 (APRIL-JUNE 1936)—Continued

Quarantine and other official announcements—C ontinued.

Miscellaneous items—C ontinued. Page
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Dominican Republic (B. E. P. Q-306) =... - SS ee 53
5 ee import restrictions, Colony of Grenada, British West Indies (B. E. P. Q.

OWE ) wenn nn os = PERE ess es — wea eee Sen a oe ee 56

Plant-quarantine import restrictions, French Colony of New Caledonia and De endencies
(B. BaP. GW. ee ee le ee ae :

mse eet aha sean no eee ee re ea reer i a 59
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Portugal (B. E. P. Q. 400)... rae 61
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Spain (B. E. P. Q. 400) 0 ee 64
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Austria (B. E. P. Q. 4). eee 68
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of France (B. E. P. Q.408)¢ = as2i: 5 be ee 73
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, British India (B. E. P. (404). - 7s oe es 79
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Germany (B. E. P. i), AUD) 5 5-52 Boe ee 83

Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act_________ a ere 91
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Piant Quarantine.._.....__......_..._........._... 93
CONTENTS OF NO. 128 (JULY-SEPTEMBER 1936)
Quarantine and other official announcements...-....._-- ee 96
Announcements relating to Hawaiian and Puerto Rican quarantine covering sand, soil, or earth,
with plants (no. 60) eS ee ee 96
Revised Hawaiian and Puerto Rican quarantine covering sand, soil, or earth, with plants____ 96
Hevision of quarantine... -- 3 96
Notice to general public through newspapers.__.--_---_-...--_.__-______.._._______-___- 97
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (no. 48)__._____.___________.___._______. 97
Instructions to postmasters_.. =! 21 40) sic oo be etal oa as 97
List of articles exempt from certification requirements under the Japanese beetle quarantine
(B. E..P. Q. 305, revised). cos RB ippesiigen ines iy 98
Instructions to postmasters...... = 5 Sins ot ae 2) Se eee it aol 98
Japanese beetle quarantine restrictions removed for season on fruit and vegetable shipments__ 99
Notice of removal of Japanese beetle quarantine restrictions on fruits and vegetables_______- 99
Instructions to posfmasterse) 220-222: 2see SO cpl eo Se 100
Announcements relating to satin moth quarantine (no. 53)____________________________ 100
Satin moth invades Oregon; quarantine hearing September 14_______________________________ 100
Notice of public hearing to consider the advisability of either revoking the domestic satin moth
quarantine or revising the regulations to designate the State of Oregon as infested with
that insect. <=> 2 55.25 ao es ee ee ee pees 2iu Pte Ok i oot ep ee 100
Announcements relating to nursery stock, plant, and seed quarantine (no. 37)__-.____--__________ 101
Treatment of foreign narcissus bulbs as a condition of entry_________________________________ 101
Information for prospective importers regarding the entry of foreign narcissus bulbs on and
after December 15, 1936.(B. Ii..P. Q: 412).2 2 ose sn a eee 101
Notice of permit requirement for the entry ofseeds of Lathyrus and Vicia__.__________________ 102
Instructions to colleetors of customs'(‘T: 1D! 48512). 2 3.8 sy ost es) or ee 102
Announcements relating to white pine blister rust quarantine (foreign) (mo. 7)_---...--.----------- 103
Lift special quarantines on foreign pine trees_________...____________________________.______- 103
White pines, currants, and gooseberries from Europe, Asia, Canada, and Newfoundland
brought under quarantine 37 by revocation of quarantine 7________________________________ 103
Instructions, to collectors of customs @D: D548501) 2223 ibis Sines es oi ee 104
Announcement relating to European pine shoot moth quarantine (no. 20)_______________________ 104
Pines, other than five-leaf pines, from Europe brought under quarantine 37 by revocation of
quarantine: 20.2 i. 223 sea a 8 ol i a i ees tl a) eee 104
Announcements relating to pink bollworm quarantine (no. 52)__________________________________ 105
Pink bollworm quarantine reculations'revised_ -. 2-2 222-7 2) te st eee ee 105
Modification of pink boliworm quarantine regulations (amendment no. 1)-_-----_------------- 105
Notice to general publie through newspapers. + 4232522 220 22422 ae 107
Instractions to postimasters: =2.: "= = ae ee ee ee ee eee 107
Administrative instructions—treatment requirements removed as a condition for interstate
shipment of baled lint and linters, and products thereof, from the counties or portions of
counties of the pink bollworm regulated areas in New Mexico and Texas described below
CB Te. PoQ. 414) ee oS RS adap te 5 ee 107
Miscellaneous items... 2-2-2 2 Pe ee 108
Regulations governing sanitary export certification_._....___......_____-_----.--2---s----+- 2 A 208
Public hearing called to consider the advisability of quarantining the States of California,
Colorado, New Mexico, Texas, and Utah on account of the peach mosaic disease____----_- ee
Notice of public hearing to consider the advisability of quarantining the States of California,
Colorado, New Mexico, Texas, and Utah on account of the peach mosaic disease_______-_-_--- 111
Change in date and place of public hearing relative to peach mosaic disease_____.____-._-- ae
Notice of change in place and date of public hearing to consider advisability of quarantining
the States of California, Colorado, New Mexico, Texas, and Utah on account of the peach
mosaic disease; also the inclusion of Arizona in the States to be considered__________--__-_--- 112
Pee import restrictions, Republic of Chile (B. P. Q. 348, supplements nos. 4 2
NG DB) 5 55 ho SS eae a een ee ee eS pee eee oe “
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Argentina (B. P. Q. 357, supplement no.4).. 114
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, British Mandate of Palestine (B. E. P. Q. 370, revised,
Supplement ro. 1). — == ee ee ee ee ee 114
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Brazil (B. E. P. Q.379, supplement no.1)--- 115
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, British Colony of Malta (B. E. P. Q. 406)_--._-__---- 115
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Kingdom of Denmark (B. E. P. Q. 407)__--.----_----- 117
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Irish Free State (Saorstat Eireann) (B. E. P. Q. 408). 120
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Free City of Danzig (B. E. P. Q. 409)______----------- 124
Federal domestic plant quarantines (B. E. P. Q. 410, superseding P. Q. C. A. 295)_--_-_- [; ian
PP ee te import restrictions, Republic of Mexico (B. E. P. Q. 411, superseding ra
o Wd. Ce Ae eee Fee pe ee ee PL ae pe SE
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Switzerland (B. E. P. Q. 413)_---_-------- 137
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act__-_-____-___-_-______- es =e 141
List of current quarantines and other restrictive orders and miscellaneous regulations. -_--------- 144

Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine____......._....._-.--------------- 150


TABLE OF CONTENTS V

CONTENTS OF NO. 129 (OCTOBER-DECEMBER 1936)

Page

Quarantine and other official announcements. ----.-------.--------------- ee eanter een ne e 152
Announcements relating to Mexican fruit fly quarantine (no. 5) (foreign) ---.------------------- 152
Changes in Federal fruit and vegetable quarantines-_--.------.----------------------------- 152

Notice of lifting of Mexican fruit fly quarantine (foreign)_...--....-------------------------- 152
Instructions to collectors of customs (T. D: 48728)_-..-.--.---------__-_-.---.-.-.-----.. 153
Announcements relating to nursery stock, plant, and seed quarantine (no. 37) ------------------ 153
Binr ieee a Ol OULD POSt--. 52 ee oe nn ew ees eee 153

Notice of conference to consider the desirability of requiring the treatment of all known hosts
of the bulb nematode enterable under quarantine no. 37_--_.----.-------------------------

Announcements relating to satin moth quarantine (no. 53)_.....-...---------------------------- 154
SarimMoObiOmarantine rOVOKCG. == sees teen ease a na owe er ae renee nena === 154
Notice Online Of salin moth quaraniinel=—------+-------- 22-5 a ee ee 154

DrTe ICIS UO OSDITIGSLODS 5 ost ne oe as ewe ewe emgaesnnnee 155

Announcements relating to pink bollworm quarantine (no. 52)__-.------.----------------------- 155
Florida released from pink bollworm quarantine--_-_--.-........--.----.--------..----------- 155
Rewision Of duarantineand recmlationss= -===-)-=-—~-- === sans osm eae anaes een ane =o ~~ 155

Notice to,ceneral public through newspapers-------.-_----<2_-.-2.-=-__-..--. == 163
PREeT Tati BOOS MASLOIS 2 — ee a = Sa ce an ano eases nena eee aa ss Pinkspollwormiquarantine regulations tevised--=----2-- === ee ee 163
Modification of pink bollworm quarantine regulations (amendment no. 1)------------------ 163
INolice to\general public through newspapers------------------—----- --- Sa -= == n = 165
TMS hil CLIOTIS TONDOS LINAS GOlS= aa ee ee aae oe ee on ce nena ese aaa ea == 165

Announcements relating to fruit and vegetable quarantine (no. 56)...--------------------------- 166
Sterilization of imported vinifera grapes by refrigeration (B. E. P. Q. 417)-.-.-.-------------- 166
Fruit and vegetable quarantine no. 56, with revised regulations---.....-.---.--------------- 166

Announcements relating to Thurberia weevil quarantine (no. 61)-_----------------------------- 171
Areas in Pinai County, Ariz., released under the Thurberia weevil quarantine--.-.----------- 171
Modification of Thurberia weevil quarantine regulations__..-.-------.---------------------- 171

Notice towenerall publ et brought NOWSPSDeNS=-— = =- == = - — nn a won ese ce eo eoe nae 172

Announcements relating to Mexican fruit worm quarantine (no. 64) ._...-..-----.-------------- 173
Mexas ciirusmaryestiextenged tomviarch(30; 1937o22-_.--—--- 5229255225222 5. 2-2-5 kee se 173
Administrative instructions—authorizing extension of harvesting season for Texas citrus fruit

SES EES Ch end '9) penn tee em ee eR cya WE Ce eb see ede sso 173
Mexican fruit worm quarantine regulations modified___..........-......-------------------- 173
Modification of Mexican fruit worm quarantine regulations___.._.......-_------------------- 174

Notice tojzeneral public through newspapers. = .--=- =. ==. ==-.5- -s-2 4-25-2522 eee 175

Announcements relating to Dutch elm disease quarantine (no. 71) (domestic)_---.-------------- 175
Wuatehelm disease quarantineineludes:new areas___._-- 2. =. 2.2... 2 2-2-2 -os-ces- see ae 175
Modification of Dutch elm disease quarantine regulations___.........-.....----------------- 176

iNoticeito seneral public through newspapers=2. ._- 2. s<-sas5~~- = 55-2 = ass ccSsoeecene =. Wi
NSE CLLONSLOMIOSUMIAS TOS eee ne ge eS a ee a oe Ce ee Lay,

Announcements relating to regulations governing the entry of potatoes into the United States__ 177
Amends potato regulations to protect Hawaiian growers. -._.--..---------------------------- 177
Amendment of regulations governing the entry of potatoes into the United States (amend-

TRE IA EET) Ones) eee ee ne ee re eee ee eee ee See Looe whe eke eieacese 178
: Instructions Focollectorsiol Customs) (Ie. ID? 48603) 2 oo ee ee ee see ce 179

sepminalanspechion of plantsvand plant products.------=----=-2-22-2-=-2..- 2225 255k ease eet 179

Amendment of law pertaining to terminal inspection of plants and plant products_______---- 179
: BENE GuONNibO OSUINASLORS= LE TSCEH BTR SOTOS TPSTO TS a EES 25 el cp ae nS gt AU ee pe rene 181

Notice of public hearing to consider the advisability of establishing a domestic plant quaran-

tine for the purpose of requiring the treatment of narcissus bulbs and other known hosts of

the bulb nematode as a prerequisite to interstate shipment_____._..-..__.-----.+---------- 181
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Germany (B. E. P. Q. 405, supplement

a iret a a ee ye ree me Ae a ee ea a 193

oe oa restrictions, Presidency of the Virgin Islands, British West Indies
BP. O. ene eee. Water ieee a ee a 196
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Finland (B. E. P. Q. 420) __-..----------- 198
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Kingdom of Bulgaria (B. E. P. Q. 421)_..------------- 202
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act-_-_.------------------------------ 205
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.._............-------------------- 207

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S. R. A—B. E. P. Q. No. 126 Issued June 1, 1936

United States Department of Agriculture

BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE



SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS

JANUARY-MARCH 1936



CONTENTS

Gunrantine and other official announcements-_--__-2. =... 2 2--- 252-2 nnn see ccee
Announcements relating to gypsy moth and brown-tail moth quarantine (no. 45).-__-.---..-..
REET TTSTES. 02) 908 GETAID GOS er en ar ae = oe ores — art i= Bie eee Sie eaeeseaneee
List of articles exempt from certification requirements under the gypsy moth and brown-tail
monmguarantine (5; lh. Py O-as6revised)) ties. fetes. oes) 4. see Secon steep A.

List of articles exempt from certification requirements under the gypsy moth and brown-tail
moth quarantine (B. E. P. Q.-386,(second revision)) =._===.-.=2-----------.-.--2--L-u-.--
Announcements relating to pink bollworm quarantine (no. 52)____-.---.-_--------------------
PeERITIND TA DOSLMMASLOTS- . 2 = ee hn eee kn eS Fn et
Administrative instructions—approval of alternative treatments for baled lint cotton from
Mea gt y MINCSIOe AtOHS (Ps. HS EO. SRe) ses S54" 2 oo es ol oe ett cee ee oe aa
Announcements relating to Dutch elm disease quarantine (no. 71)---__-_.------_-----------___-
ere aA APIICITAG ON 3 WP a ee 5 eee ee 2 eS ites estan td-<
Modification of Dutch elm disease quarantine regulations___._......__._---_-.-_-------___-
Notice to general public through newspapers_.-_.....--.....-...._..-.---------_----.--
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (no. 48)__-...._-_.._--_-____ oe
Japanese beciie. zone widens here and there... 2245-25- 2a22s5252 05 so-so t slate ene
Pest On Anata ANG TOrtaAtiONSs: = 2-2 ee ae oe ke eset
Piaiies toe renerabpublie Through HOWSDAapers-.- 25— = ==.- 8 + 8 oe Sk ec cen
Announcement relating to nursery stock, plant, and seed quarantine (no. 37)_-_____-___-____-__-
Hepes, will corrected fooLnotes and appendices... 2. -.--- > 2 ete
Announcements relating to Mexican fruit-fly quarantine (no. 64)_-----.--.-_____-_-_------ ee
Shipping season for Texas citrus fruit extended to March 31_____________________--________-
Saag instructions—shipping season for Texas citrus fruit extended (B. E. P. Q.-

TO a SL ale SE eas, 2 Rie ce ee eS ee ee ee ee a

bo tg i i
o> SINT NTO DD QD Or PCO WwWwh bn eee

ei aeE ESE IOTUGY RICHI) DOSLINASLOIS | 22 at ts ee eet eee enue
aA poranors.O1 plant products by mail CE.-D-48181) = = ewes
Mepresnous .)9-iatl—_rerd larions (1. 1): 48237) = 2) sat ote este
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Dominion of New Zealand (P. Q. C. A.-306, supple-
anaPNR rare raay Pere 8 apse En ee RA UO I I ae od 30
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Chile (B. P. Q.-348, supplement no. 3)-.. _ 32
ieee een import restrictions, Republic of Argentina (B. P. Q.-357, supplement no.

SBNSN

2 EE EE ee CE a ee eee ee ee ee 32
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Czechoslovakia (B. E. P. Q.-366, supple-

CORE SCE GV oie So Sie ee got acetal i RN, Ai pe ha I a 33
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, British Mandate of Palestine (B. E. P. Q.-370, revised)- 33
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Grand Duchy of Luxembourg (B. E. P. Q.-389)_____ 36
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, British Colony and Protectorate of Sierra Leone

ae Ae eee cet a) SS ILTT CE es es el eee 36
Plant-quarantineimport restrictions, British Gold Coast Colony (B. E. P. Q.-391)_________- 38

4 Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act____-_..._.-..__.---.--___._______- 39
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine_____._.-_-__-__------_-_-----.___ee 40

QUARANTINE AND OTHER OFFICIAL
ANNOUNCEMENTS

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO GYPSY MOTH AND BROWN-TAIL
MOTH QUARANTINE (NO. 45)

INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS

Post OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, February 6, 1936.
POSTMASTER :
My Dear Sire: Your attention is invited to the enclosed copy of the latest
revision of Quarantine Order No. 45 of the United States Department of Agri-
culture, on account of the gypsy moth and the brown-tail moth. The changes

67640—36——1 1
2 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.—March

are indicated in the “Introductory Note” and “Summary” on page 1 of the
enclosed copy, and you will please be governed accordingly. See paragraph 1,
section 595, Postal Laws and Regulations.
Very truly yours,
C. B. EILENBERGER,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.

B. E. P. Q.— 886 (revised). FEBRUARY 11, 1936.

LIST OF ARTICLES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS UNDER THE
GYPSY MOTH AND BROWN-TAIL MOTH QUARANTINE

In accordance with the proviso in Notice of Quarantine No. 45, as revised
effective November 4, 1935, the following articles, the interstate movement of
which is not considered to constitute a risk of moth dissemination, are exempted
from the restrictions of the regulations of this quarantine:

Acacia cuttings (for ornamental use) (Acacia spp.).

Banana stalks, when crushed, dried, and shredded.

Cable reels, when newly manufactured and empty.

Clubmoss (sometimes called ‘ground pine’) (Lycopodium spp.).
Evergreen smilax (Smilax lanceolata).

Fuchsia (Fuchsia spp.).

Galax (Galax aphylla).

Geranium (Pelargonium sgpp.).

Heather cuttings (for ornamental use) (Erica spp.) (Calluna spp.).
Heliotrope (Heliotropium spp.).

Jerusalem-cherry (Solanum capsicastrum, 8S. pseudocapsicum, 8. hendersoni).
Mistletoe (Phoradendron flavescens, Viscum album, etc.).

Oregon huckleberry (Vaccinium ovatum).

Partridgeberry (Mitchella repens).

Strawberry plants (Fragaria spp.).

Trailing arbutus (Hpigaea@ repens).

Verbena (Verbena spp.).

Wintergreen (Gaultheria spp., Pyrola spp.).

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

B. E. P. Q.-886 (second revision). Marcu 12, 1936.

LIST OF ARTICLES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS UNDER THE
GYPSY MOTH AND BROWN-TAIL MOTH QUARANTINE

In accordance with the proviso in Notice of Quarantine No. 45, as revised
effective November 4, 1985, the following articles, the interstate movement of
which is not considered to constitute a risk of moth dissemination, are exempted
from the restrictions of the regulations of this quarantine:

Acacia cuttings (for ornamental use) (Acacia spp.).

Banana stalks, when crushed, dried, and shredded.

Cable reels, when newly manufactured and empty.

Clubmoss (sometimes called “ground pine’) (Lycopodium spp.).

Evergreen smilax (Smilax lanceolata).

Fuchsia (Fuchsia spp.).

Galax (Galax aphylla).

Geranium (Pelargonium spp.).

Heather cuttings (for ornamental use) (Erica spp.) (Calluna spp.).

Heliotrope (Heliotropium spp.).

Herbarium specimens, when dried, pressed, and treated, and when so labeled on the
outside of each container of such materials.

Jerusalem-cherry (Solanum capsicastrum, S. pseudocapsicum, 8. henderson).

Mistletoe (Phoradendron flavescens, Viscum album, etc.).

Oregon huckleberry (Vaccinium ovatum).

Partridgeberry (Mitchella repens).

Strawberry plants (Fragaria spp.).

Trailing arbutus (Hpigaea repens).

Verbena (Verbena spp.).

Wintergreen (Gaultheria spp.) (Pyrola spp.)

LrEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.
1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 3

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO PINK BOLLWORM QUARANTINE
(NO. 52)

INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS

Post OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, February 21, 1936.
POSTMASTER :

My Dear Sir: Your attention is invited to the inclosed copy of the latest re-
vision of the pink bollworm quarantine and regulations (Quarantine Order No.
52 of the United States Department of Agriculture), by which you will please be
governed. See paragraph 1, section 595, Postal Laws and Regulations.

Very truly yours,

C. B. EMENBERGER,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.

B. E. P. Q.-388. MarcH 1, 1936.

ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS—APROVAL OF ALTERNATIVE TREATMENTS FOR
BALED LINT COTTON FROM HEAVILY INFESTED AREAS

Pursuant to authority vested in the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quaran-
tine, under regulation 8 of the Revised Rules and Regulaiions Supplemental to
Notice of Quarantine No. 52 (revised), approved December 4, 1935, effective
December 5, 1935, which provides that baled lint, produced in a heavily in-
fested area must be given both vacuum fumigation and either compression or
roller treatment, unless and until the said Bureau shall approve some other
treatment or treatments for the purpose; the Bureau, after having determined
that either of the two following additional treatments affords adequate protec-
tion, hereby approves either of them as further alternative treatments for
baled cotton originating in heavily infested areas and permits may be issued
for the interstate movement of baled cotton so treated.*

1. When, under the supervision of an inspector the flat bale shall be
enclosed in a steamtight chamber and subjected to a steam pressure of
not less than 15 pounds to the square inch for not less than 3 minutes at
a temperature of not less than 150° F. at a depth of 38 inches from the
surface of the bale at all points and when this treatment is followed by
standard or high-density compression.

2. When the lint of such bales has been passed between revolving
rollers which, in the judgment of the inspector, are of adequate weight
and are set sufficiently close to crush all cottonseed and kill any pink
bollworms present, the bagging for such bales is kept uncontaminated,
the platform and premises near to the bale press are clean and uncon-
taminated, and when the bales are moved directly from the press to a
location which, in the judgment of the inspector, is adequately safe-
guarded against contamination.

Persons or firms wishing to avail themselves of these additional treatments
should address the local inspector of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant
Quarantine, or the Regional Headquarters, P. O. Box 798, San Antonio, Tex.

Leg A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

1 This circular should not be construed to set aside or change any of the requirements
regarding seed sterilization or prevention of contamination or other prerequisites for the
eee of permits on cotton products originating in regulated areas, except as specifically
stated herein.
4 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.—March

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO DUTCH ELM DISEASE QUARANTINE
(NO. 71)

EXTEND ELM DISEASE CONTROL

(Press notice)
MarcH 31, 1936.

Extension of the Dutch elm disease quarantine to include 26 new townships
in New Jersey and 13 new towns in New York was announced today (Mar. 31)
by Secretary of Agriculture Henry A. Wallace.

This extension, effective April 1, was made necessary by the finding in the
new areas of a small number of trees which had become diseased. Any recent
spread of Dutch elm disease which may have occurred cannot be definitely
known until scouting starts again as the trees come into leaf, according to Lee
A. Strong, Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, who is in
charge of the Depariment’s campaign to save the American elm from destruction
by this disease.

The following territory is added to the area previously regulated:

New Jersey.—Townships of Bethlehem, Clinton, Franklin, Lebanon, Read-
ingston, Tewksbury, and Union, in Hunterdon County; township of Madison, in
Middlesex County; townships of Holmdel, Matawan, and Raritan, in Monmouth
County; townships of Mount Olive and Washington, in Morris County; town-
ships of Hardystown, Lafayette, Sparta, Vernon, and Wantage, in Sussex
County; townships of Allamuchy, Franklin, Hope, Independence, Mansfield,
Oxford, Washington, and White, in Warren County.

New York.—Towns of Blooming Grove, Chester, Highland, Monroe, Tuxedo,
Warwick, and Woodbury, in Orange County; towns of Carmel, Phillipstown,
Putnam Valley, and South East, in Putnam County; towns of Lewisboro and
North Salem, in Westchester County.

The area previously regulated included the following cities, towns, boroughs,
or other political subdivisions:

Connecticut—Towns of Darien, Fairfield, Greenwich, New Canaan, Norwalk,
Stamford, and Westport, in Fairfield County.

New Jersey.—Counties of Bergen, Essex, Hudson, Passaic, Somerset, and
Union ; townships of Princeton and West Windsor, and the city of Princeton, in
Mercer County ; townships of East Brunswick, Lincoln, Milltown, North Bruns-
wick, Piscataway, Raritan, Roosevelt, Sayreville, South Brunswick, South River,
and Woodbridge, boroughs of Dunellen, Highland Park, and Metuchen, and cities
of New Brunswick, Perth Amboy, and South Amboy, in Middlesex County ; town-
ships of Boonton, Chatham, Chester, Danville, Hanover, Jefferson, Mendham,
Montville, Morris, Passaic, Pequannock, Randolph, Rockaway, and Roxbury,
boroughs of Dover, Florham Park, and Mendham, and cities of Madison and
Morristown, in Morris County.

New York.—Counties of Bronx, Kings, Nassau, New York, Queens, Richmond,
and Rockland; towns of Bedford, Cortlandt, East Chester, Greenburg, Harrison,
Mamaroneck, Mount Pleasant, Mount Vernon, New Castie, New Rochelle, North
Castle, Ossining, Pelham, Poundridge, Rye, Scarsdale, Somers, White Plains,
Yonkers, and Yorktown, in Westchester County.







MODIFICATION OF DUTCH ELM DISEASE QUARANTINE REGULATIONS

INTRODUCTORY NOTE

The following modification of the Dutch elm disease quarantine regulations
adds to the area designated as regulated, 7 townships in Hunterdon County;
1 township in Middlesex County ; 3 townships in Monmouth County; 2 townships
in Morris County; 5 townships in Sussex County, and 8 townships in Warren
County, in the State of New Jersey. It also adds 7 towns in Orange County; 4
towns in Putnam County, and 2 towns in Westchester County, N. YÂ¥. This
action was taken on the basis of intensive inspections made throughout the year
which disclosed infections in areas contiguous to the previously regulated area.

Avery §. Hoyt,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.
1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 5

AMENDMENT NO. 1 TO RULES AND REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE OF
QUARANTINE NO. 71

(Approved Mar. 27, 1936; effective Apr. 1, 1936)

Under authority conferred by the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912
(37 Stat. 315), as amended by the act of Congress approved March 4, 1917 (39
Stat. 1134, 1165), it is ordered that regulation 3 of the rules and regulations
supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 71, on account of the Dutch elm dis-
ease, which were promulgated on February 20, 1935, be and the same is hereby
amended to read as follows:

REGULATION 3. REGULATED AREAS

In accordance with the provisos to Notice of Quarantine No. 71, the Secretary
of Agriculture designates as regulated areas for the purpose of these regulations
the counties, townships, towns, and cities listed below, including all cities, towns,
boroughs, or other political subdivisions within their limits:

Connecticut—Towns of Darien, Fairfield, Greenwich, New Canaan, Norwalk,
Stamford, and Westport, in Fairfield County.

New Jersey—Counties of Bergen, Essex, Hudson, Morris, Passaic, Somerset,
and Union; townships of Bethlehem, Clinton, Franklin, Lebanon, Readingston,
Tewksbury, and Union, in Hunterdon County; townships of Princeton and West
Windsor, and the city of Princeton, in Mercer County; townships of East Bruns-
wick, Lincoln, Madison, Milltown, North Brunswick, Piscataway, Raritan, Roose-
velt, Sayreville, South Brunswick, South River, and Woodbridge, boroughs of
Dunellen, Highland Park, and Metuchen, and cities of New Brunswick, Perth
Amboy, and South Amboy, in Middlesex County; townships of Holmdel, Mata-
wan, and Raritan, in Monmouth County; townships of Hardystown, Lafayette,
Sparta, Vernon, and Wantage, in Sussex County; townships of Allamuchy,
Franklin, Hope, Independence, Mansfield, Oxford, Washington, and White, in
Warren County.

New York—Counties of Bronx, Kings, Nassau, New York, Queens, Richmond,
Rockland, and Westchester: towns of Blooming Grove, Chester, Highland, Mon-
roe, Tuxedo, Warwick, and Woodbury, in Orange Cownty; towns of Carmel,
Phillipstown, Putnam Valley, and South East, in Putnam County.

This amendment shall be effective on and after April 1, 1936.

Done at the city of Washington this 27th day of March 1936.

Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.

[SEAL ] W. R. GREGG,
Acting Secretary of Agriculture.

[Copies of the foregoing amendment were sent to all common carriers doing business in
or through the regulated areas. ]

NoTIcE TO GENERAL PUBLIC THROUGH NEWSPAPERS

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,
BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE,
Washington, D. C., March 27, 1936.
Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority con-
ferred on him by the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315),
as amended, has promulgated amendment no. 1 to the Rules and Regulations
Supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 71, on account of the Dutch elm
disease, effective on and after April 1, 19386. Under this modification, 26 town-
ships in the State of New Jersey and 13 towns in the State of New York are
added to the regulated area.
Copies of the amendment may be obtained from the Bureau of Entomology and
Plant Quarantine, Washington, D. C.
W. R. GREGG,
Acting Secretary of Agriculture.

[Published in the following newspapers: The Times, New York, N. Y., Apr. 8, 1936;
the News, Newark, N. J., Apr. 8, 1936.] ie ;
6 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.—March

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE
(NO. 48)

JAPANESE BEETLE ZONE WIDENS HERE AND THERE

(Press notice)

A revision of the Japanese beetle quarantine and regulations, which goes
into effect March 16, is announced by Acting Secretary of Agriculture R. G.
Tugwell. The revised regulations extend the regulated area to include addi-
tional territory in the States of Maine, Maryland, New York, and Virginia. —
This action was taken as a result of inspections during the past few years,
which disclosed established infestations. Some outlying areas where Japanese
beetle infestations have been found are not included in the regulated area
because of assurance from the States concerned that adequate measures will
be taken to prevent the spread of the pest therefrom.

The revised regulations also extend the restrictions on the interstate move-
ment by refrigerator car or motor truck of all fruits and vegetables between
June 15 and October 15 inclusive, to include such movement from the entire
State of Delaware rather than from a part of the State as heretofore. Similar
restrictions are also in effect with respect to the District of Columbia and
certain areas in the States of: Maryland, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and
Virginia.

Under the revision of the quarantine the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology
and Plant Quarantine is authorized to exempt from restrictions the articles
and products covered thereby when he is convinced the movement involves
no risk of spreading the Japanese beetle. The additions to the regulated ter-
ritory are as follows:

Maine.—Towns of Auburn and Lewiston, in Androscoggin County; towns of
Gorham, Gray, New Gloucester, Raymond, Standish, and Windham, in Cwmber-
land County.

Maryland.—All of Caroline County, except election districts of American Cor-
ners (no. 8), Hillsboro (no. 6), and Preston (no. 4); election district of
Freedom (no. 5) in Carroll County; election districts of LaPlata and White
Plains in Charles County; election district of West Friendship (no, 3) in
Howard County; all of Prince Georges County, except the election districts
of Aquasco and Nottingham.

New York.—Towns of Caroline, Danby, Dryden, and Ithaca, and the city of
Ithaca, in Tompkins County.

Virginia.—The magisterial district of Manchester, in Chesterfield County;
Culpeper County; Magisterial districts of Centreville and Dranesville in Fair-
fax County; Fauquier County; magisterial districts of Fairfield, Tuckahce, and
Varina in Henrico County; Loudown County; and magisterial districts of
Brentsville, Gainesville, and Manassas in Prince William County. The regu-
lated area now includes all of Culpeper, Fairfax, Fauquier, Henrico, Loudoun,
and Prince William Counties as well as the counties previously under
regulation.

REVISION OF QUARANTINE AND REGULATIONS
INTRODUCTORY NOTE

An important change in the following revision of the Japanese beetle quaran-
tine provides for exemption of certain products by administrative instructions
issued by the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, when in
his judgment the nature of the growth or production, or the manufacture or
processing of such products, is such that their interstate movement is not
considered to constitute danger of spread of infestation.

The regulations have also been revised to include in the regulated area addi-
tional territory in the States of Maine, Maryland, New York, and Virginia.
Some outlying areas where Japanese beetle infestations have been found are
not included in the regulated area because of assurance from the States con-
cerned that adequate measures will be taken to prevent the spread of the pest
therefrom. The restrictions on the interstate movement by refrigerator car
or motor truck of all fruits and vegetables from the District of Columbia and
portions of the States of Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and
Virginia, between June 15 and October 15, inclusive, have been extended to
apply to the entire State of Delaware.
1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS i

SUMMARY

Unless a certificate or permit has been issued, these regulations as now revised
prohibit the interstate shipment of green corn on the cob, beans in the pod,
bananas in entire bunches or in clusters of 25 or more, apples, peaches, black-
berries, blueberries, huckleberries, or raspberries from any part of the regulated
areas, and also prohibit (unless a certificate or permit has been issued) the
interstate movement of all fruits and vegetables by refrigerator car or motor
truck from the District of Columbia, the State of Delaware, and parts of the
States of Maryland, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Virginia. Refrigerator cars
used for loading fruits and vegetables, other than onions and potatoes, in such
area must, prior to loading, be cleaned by the common carrier and kept tightly
closed and sealed during the interval between cleaning and loading. Onions
and potatoes must be fumigated in the car when such action is deemed neces-
sary by the inspector, and doors and hatches of the cars must be closed or
screened. For other details and exceptions see regulation 5.

The regulations also prohibit the interstate shipment of plants, sand, soil,
earth, peat, compost, and manure from any part of the regulated areas to or
through any outside point throughout the year unless a Federal permit or cer-
tificate has been secured. Portions of plants and cut flowers are restricted
interstate movement only between June 15 and October 15, inclusive. Tor
details and exceptions see regulations 6 and 7.

The regulated areas include the District of Columbia, the entire States of
Connecticut, Delaware, Massachusetts, New Jersey, and Rhode Island, and
parts of the States of Maine, Maryland, New Hampshire, New York, Pennsyl-
vania, Vermont, Virginia, and West Virginia. The boundaries are shown in
regulation 3.

These regulations also place certain restrictions to protect restricted articles
from infestation while in transit, require thorough cleaning of vehicles and
containers which have been used in transporting restricted products, and
provide other safeguards and conditions as provided in regulations 8 to 13,
inclusive.

To secure permits and certificates, address the Bureau of Entomology and
Plant Quarantine, Glenwood Avenue and Henry Street, Bloomfield, N. J. or the
nearest branch office listed in the appendix.

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 48 (ELEVENTH REVISION)
(Approved Mar. 7, 1936; effective Mar. 16, 1936)

I, R. G. Tugwell, Acting Secretary of Agriculture, have determined that it
is necessary to quarantine the States of Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Mary-
land, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania,
Rhode Island, Vermont, Virginia, and West Virginia, and the District of
Columbia, to prevent the spread of the Japanese beetle (Popillia japonica
Newm.), a dangerous insect new to and not heretofore widely prevalent or
distributed within and throughout the United States.

Now, therefore, under authority conferred by section 8 of the Plant Quaran-
tine Act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended- by the act of Congress
approved March 4, 1917 (89 Stat. 11384, 1165), and having duly given the
public hearing required thereby, I do quarantine the said States of Con-
necticut, Delaware, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New
Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, Virginia, and West
Virginia, and the District of Columbia, effective on and after March 16, 1936,
Hereafter, under the authority of said act of August 20, 1912, amended as
aforesaid (1) fruits and vegetables; (2) nursery, ornamental, and greenhouse
stock, and other plants; and (3) sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure
shall not be shipped, offered for shipment to a common earrier, received for
transportation or transported by a common carrier, or carried, transported,
moved, or allowed to be moved from any of said quarantined States or District
into or through any other State or Territory or District of the United States
in manner or method or under conditions other than those prescribed in the
rules and regulations hereinafter made and amendments thereto: Provided,
8 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan—March

That the restrictions of this quarantine and of the rules and regulations sup-
plemental thereto may be limited to the areas in a quarantined State now,
or which may hereafter be, designated by the Secretary of Agriculture as
regulated areas when, in the judgment of the Secretary of Agriculture, the
enforcement of the aforesaid rules and regulations as to such regulated areas
shall be adequate to prevent the spread of the Japanese beetle: Provided fur-
ther, That such limitations shall be conditioned upon the said State providing
for and enforcing such control measures with respect to such regulated areas
as, in the judgment of the Secretary of Agriculture, shall be deemed adequate
to prevent the spread of the Japanese beetle therefrom to other parts of the
State: And provided further, That certain articles classed as restricted herein
may, because of the nature of their growth or production or their manufactured
or processed condition, be exempted by administrative instructions issued by
the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine when, in his
judgment, such articles are considered innocuous as ecarriers of infestation.

Done at the city of Washington this 7th day of March 1936.

Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of
Agriculture.

[SEAL] R. G. TUGWELL,
Acting Secretary of Agriculture.

RULES AND REGULATIONS (FOURTEENTH REVISION) SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE
OF QUARANTINE NO. 48

(Approved Mar. 7, 1936; effective Mar. 16, 1936)
REGULATION 1. DEFINITIONS

For the purpose of these regulations the following words, names, and terms
shall be construed, respectively, to mean:

(a) Japanese beetle—The insect known as the Japanese beetle (Popillia
japonica Newm.), in any stage of development.

(b) The terms “infested”, “infestation”, and the like, relate to infestation
with the Japanese beetle.

(c) Quarantined area.—Any State or District quarantined by the Secretary
of Agriculture to prevent the spread of the Japanese beetle.

(d) Regulated area—Any area in a quarantined State or District which is
now, or which may hereafter be, designated as such by the Secretary of Agri-
culture in accordance with the provisos to Notice of Quarantine No. 48, as
revised.

(e) Fruits and vegetables—For the list of restricted fruits and vegetables
see regulation 5.

(f) Nursery and ornamental stock.—Nursery, ornamental, and greenhouse
stock, and all other plants, plant roots, cut flowers, or other portions of plants.

(g) Sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure—Sand, soil, earth, peat,
compost, or Manure of any kind and as to either bulk movement or in connection
with farm products or nursery and ornamental stock.

(h) Certified sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure—Sand, soil, earth,
peat, compost, or manure determined by the inspector as uninfested and so
certified.

(i) Certified greenhouse.—A greenhouse or similar establishment which has
complied to the satisfaction of the inspector with the conditions imposed in
regulation 6. This term may apply also to potting beds, heeling-in areas, hot-
beds, coldframes, or similar plots or to storage houses, packing sheds, or stores
treated or otherwise safeguarded in manner and method satisfactory to the
inspector.

(j) Inspector.—An inspector of the United States Department of Agriculture.

(k) Moved or allowed to be moved interstate—Shipped, offered for ship-
ment to a common carrier, received for transportation or transported by a
common carrier, or carried, transported, moved, or allowed to be moved from
one State or Territory or District of the United States into or through any
other State or Territory or District.
1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 9

REGULATION 2. LIMITATION OF RESTRICTIONS TO REGULATED AREAS

Conditioned upon the compliance on the part of the State concerned with
the provisos to Notice of Quarantine No. 48 (eleventh revision), the restrictions
provided in these regulations on the interstate movement of plants and plant
products and other articles enumerated in said notice of quarantine will be
limited to such movement from the areas in such State now or hereafter desig-
nated by the Secretary of Agriculture as regulated areas.

REGULATION 3. REGULATED AREAS

In accordance with the provisos to Notice of Quarantine No. 48 (eleventh
revision), the Secretary of Agriculture designates as regulated areas for the
purpose of these regulations the States, District, counties, townships, towns,
cities, election districts, and magisterial districts listed below, including all
cities, towns, boroughs, or other political subdivisions within their limits:

Connecticut.—The entire State.

Delaware.—The entire State.

District of Columbia.—The entire District.

Maine.—County of York; towns of Auburn and Lewiston, in Androscoggin
County; towns of Cape Elizabeth, Gorham, Gray, New Gloucester, Raymond,
Scarboro, Standish, and the cities of Portland, South Portland, Westbrook,
and Windham, in Cumberland County; and the city of Waterville, in Kennebec
County.

Maryland.—Counties of Cecil, Kent, Queen Annes, Somerset, and Worcester ;
the city of Baltimore; the city of Cumberland, the town of Frostburg, and elec-
tion districts nos. 4, 5, 6, 7, 11, 12, 14, 22, 23, 24, 26, 29, 31, and 32, in Allegany
County; the city of Annapolis and election district no. 5, in Anne Arundel
County; election districts nos. 1, 2, 3, 9, 11, 12, 18, 14, and 15, in Baltimore
County; all of Caroline County except election districts of Hillsboro (no. 6),
American Corners (no. 8), and Preston (no. 4); the city of Westminster, and
election district of. Freedom (no. 5), in Carroll County; election districts of
White Plains and LaPlata, in Charles County; election district of Cambridge
(no. 7), in Dorchester County; election districts of Petersville (no. 12), and
Brunswick (no. 25), in Frederick County; County of Harford, except election
district of Marshall (no. 4); election districts of Elkridge (no. 1), Ellicot
City (no. 2), and election district of West Friendship (no. 3), in Howard
County, and the right of way of United States Highway No. 1 through the elec-
tion district of Guilford (no. 6) in said county ;-all of Prince Georges County
except the election districts of Nottingham and Aquasco; that part of Mont-
gomery County located within the established boundaries of the so-called
“Washington Suburban Sanitary District’: towns of Easton and Oxford, in
Talbot County; election districts of Sharpsburg (no. 1), Williamsport (no. 2),
Hagerstown (nos. 3, 17, 21, 22, 24, and 25), Leitersburg (no. 9), Sandy Hook
(no. 11), and Halfway (no. 26), in Washington County; election districts of
Pittsburg (no. 4), Parsons (no. 5), Dennis (no. 6), Trappe (no. 7), Nutters
(no. 8), Salisbury (no. 9), Delmar (no. 11), Camden (no. 13), Willards (no.
14), and Fruitland (no. 16), in Wicomico County.

Massachusetts.—The entire State.

New Hampshire.—Counties of Belknap, Cheshire, Hillsboro, Merrimack, Rock-
ingham, Strafford, and Sullivan; towns of Brookfield, Eaton, Effingham, Free-
dom, Madison, Moultonboro, Ossipee, Sandwich, Tamworth, Tuftonboro, Wake-_
field, and Wolfeboro, in Carroll County; towns of Alexandria, Ashland, Bridge-
water, Bristol, Canaan, Dorchester, Enfield, Grafton, Groton, Hanover, Hebron,
Holderness, Lebanon, Lyme, Orange, and Plymouth, in Grafton County.

New Jersey.—The entire State.

New York.—Counties of Albany, Bronx, Broome, Chemung, Chenango, Colum-
fia, Cortland, Delaware, Dutchess, Fulton, Greene, Kings, Madison, Mont-
gomery, Nassau, New York, Oneida, Onondaga, Orange, Otsego, Putnam,
Queens, Rensselaer, Richmond, Rockland, Saratoga, Schenectady, Schoharie,
Suffolk, Sullivan, Tioga, Ulster, Washington, and Westchester ; towns of Red
House and Salamanca, and the city of Salamanca, in Cattaraugus County;
towns of Columbia, Danube, Fairfield, Frankfort, German Flats, Herkimer,
Litchfield, Little Falls, Manheim, Newport, Salisbury, Schuyler, Stark, Warren,
and Winfield, and the city of Little Falls, in Herkimer County; towns of Caton,
Corning, and Hornby, and the city of Corning, in Stewben County; towns of

67640—36——2
10 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.—March

Caroline, Danby, Dryden, and Ithaca, and the city of Ithaca, in Tompkins
County; towns of Luzerne and Queensbury and the city of Glens Falls, in
Warren County.

Pennsylvania.—The entire State, except Crawford, Erie, Forest, Mercer, Ve-
nango, and Warren Counties, Mercer Township in Butler County, and Ashland,
Beaver, Elk, Richland (including boroughs of Foxburg and St. Petersburg),
Salem, and Washington Townships, in Clarion County.

Rhode Island.—The entire State.

Vermont.—Counties of Bennington, Rutland, Windham, and Windsor.

Virginia.—Counties of Accomac, Arlington, Culpeper, Elizabeth City, Fairfax,
Fauquier, Henrico, Loudoun, Norfolk, Northampton, Prince William, and Staf-
ford; magisterial district of Manchester, in Chesterfield County; magisterial
district of Sleepy Hole, in Nansemond County; Camp Stuart, in Warwick
County; and the cities of Alexandria, Fredericksburg, Hampton, Newport News,
Norfolk, Portsmouth, Richmond, South Norfolk, and Suffolk.

West Virginia.—Town of Keyser and district of Frankfort, in Mineral County.

REGULATION 4. EXTENSION OR REDUCTION OF REGULATED AREAS

The regulated areas designated in regulation 3 may be extended or reduced
as may be found advisable by the Secretary of Agriculture. Due notice of any
extension or reduction and the areas affected thereby will be given in writing to
the transportation companies doing business in or through the States in which
such areas are located and by publication in one or more newspapers selected
by the Secretary of Agriculture within the States in which the areas affected are
located.

REGULATION 5. RESTRICTIONS ON THE MOVEMENT OF FRUITS AND VEGETABLES
SECTION A. CONTROL OF MOVEMENT

(1) Unless a certificate or permit shall have been issued therefor, by an
inspector, except as provided in paragraphs (a) to (€), inclusive, of this
section :

(i) No green corn on the cob, beans in the pod, bananas in entire bunches or
in clusters of 25 or more, apples, peaches, blackberries, blueberries, huckleberries,
or raspberries shall be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from any regu-
Jated area to or through any point outside thereof; and (i) no fruits and vege-
tables of any kind shall be moved or allowed to be moved interstate via refriger-
ator car or motor truck from the District, counties, or city listed below to or
through any point outside of the regulated areas:

Delaware.—The entire State.

District of Columbia.—The entire District.

Maryland.—County of Cecil and the city of Baltimore.

New Jersey.—Counties of Atlantic, Burlington, Camden, Cape May, Cumber-
land, Gloucester, Hunterdon, Mercer, Middlesex, Monmouth, Ocean, Salem, Som-
erset, and Union.

Pennsylvania.—Counties of Bucks, Chester, Delaware, Montgomery, and
Philadelphia.

Virginia.—County of Arlington.

(a) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of fruits and
-vegetables between October 16 and June 14, inclusive.

(b) No certificate will be required for the interstate movement of fruits and
vegetables on a through bill of lading either from an area not under regulation
through a regulated area to another nonregulated area, or from a regulated
area through a nonregulated area to another regulated area, except that a cer-
tificate is required for interstate movement to Richmond, Va., or to the other
regulated parts of Henrico County, Va., or to Waterville, Maine. No restrictions
are placed on the interstate movement of fruits and vegetables from the city
of Richmond, Va., or from other parts of Henrico County, Va., or from Water-
ville, Maine, to points outside the regulated areas.

(c) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of fruits or vege-
tables when they shall have been manufactured or processed in such a manner
that in the judgment of the inspector no infestation could be transmitted.

(d) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of any shipments
of apples or peaches of less than 15 pounds to the shipment, or of bananas other
than in entire bunches or in clusters of 25 or more,
1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS ll

(e) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of commercially
packed apples in any quantity, except those moving via refrigerator cars or
motor vehicles from the District, counties, or city listed in this section.

(2) No restrictions are placed on the interstate shipment from the regulated
areas of fruits and vegetables other than those mentioned above, except that
any such interstate shipments of fruits and vegetables may be inspected by
inspectors at any time or place inside or outside the regulated areas and when
actually found to involve danger of dissemination of Japanese beetle to unin-
fested localities, measures to eliminate infestation may be required as a condi-
tion of further transportation or delivery.

SECTION B. CONDITIONS. OF CERTIFICATION

Certificates may be issued for the interstate movement of fruits and vegetables
to points outside the regulated areas between June 15 and October 15, inclusive,
under one of the following conditions:

(1) When the fruits and vegetables, moving from a point in the regulated
area other than the District, counties, or city listed in paragraph 1 (i), of
this regulation, or moving from such designated District, counties, or city other
than by refrigerator car, have actually been inspected by the United States
Department of Agriculture and found free from infestation. The number of
inspection points for such certification will be limited and their location deter-
mined by shipping needs and further conditioned on the establishment at such
points of provisions satisfactory to the inspector for the handling and safe-
guarding of such shipments during inspection. Such inspection may be dis-
continued and certification withheld by the inspector during periods of general
or unusual flight of the beetles.

(2) When the fruits and vegetables have been handled or treated under the
supervision of an inspector in manner and by method to free them from any
infestation.

(3) When the fruits and vegetables have originated outside of the regulated
areas and are to be reshipped directly from freight yards, transfer points, or
unloading docks within such areas, under provisions satisfactory to the inspec-
tor for the safeguarding of such shipments pending certification and reship-
ment. Certificates on this basis will be issued without inspection only in cases
where, in the judgment of the inspector, the shipments concerned have not been
exposed to infestation while within such freight yards, transfer points, or
unloading docks.

(4) When the fruits and vegetables were grown in districts where the fact
has been established to the satisfaction of the inspector that no infestation
exists and are to be shipped directly from the farms where growr to points
outside the regulated areas, or are shipped from infested districts where the
fact has been established to the satisfaction of the inspector that the Japanese
beetle has not begun or has ceased its flight.

(5) When the fruits and vegetables, other than onions and potatoes, moving
via refrigerator car from the District, counties, or city listed in paragraph 1
(ii), of this regulation, have been inspected and loaded in a manner to prevent
infestation, in a refrigerator car with closed or adequately screened doors and
hatches, which car prior to loading has been determined by an inspector as
thoroughly swept and cleaned by the common carrier in a manner to rid it of
infestation. During the interval between cleaning and loading, such refrigerator
car must be tightly closed and sealed.

(6) When the onions or potatoes moving via refrigerator car from the Dis-
trict, counties, or city listed in this regulation have been fumigated in the car,
when deemed necessary in-the judgment of the inspector, and when the doors
and hatches of the car have been tightly closed or adequately screened, under
the supervision of an inspector.

REGULATION 6. RESTRICTIONS ON THE MovEMENT OF NURSERY AND
ORNAMENTAL STOCK

SECTION A. CONTROL OF MOVEMENT

Nursery and ornamental stock shall not be moved or allowed to be moved
interstate from the regulated areas to or through any point outside thereof,
unless a certificate or permit shall have been issued therefor by the inspector,
except as follows:
12 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.—March

(1) True bulbs, corms, and tubers, when dormant, except for storage growth,
and when free from soil, are exempt from the requirement of certification,
except that this exemption does not apply to dahlia tubers.

(2) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of nursery and
ornamental stock imported from foreign countries when reshipped from the
port of entry in the unopened original container and labeled as to each con-
tainer with a copy certificate of the country from which it was exported, a
statement of the general nature and quantity of the contents, the name and
address of the consignee, and the country and locality where grown.

(3) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement between October
16 and June 14, inclusive, of cut flowers, and of portions of plants without
roots and free from soil (such as branches and twigs of trees and shrubs,
scions, Christmas trees, holly, laurel, sphagnum moss, and parts of submerged
aquatic plants without roots).

(4) No certificate or permit will be required for the interstate movement
of nursery and ornamental stock when transported by a common carrier on a
through bill of lading either from an area not under regulation through a
regulated area, or from a regulated area through a nonregulated area to another
regulated area.

SECTION B. CONDITIONS GOVERNING THE ISSUANCE OF CERTIFICATES AND PERMITS

For the purpose of certification of nursery and ornamental stock, nurseries,
greenhouses, and other premises concerned in the movement of such stock will
be classified as follows:

(1) Class I—Nurseries, greenhouses, and other premises concerned in the
movement of nursery and ornamental stock on or within approximately 500
feet of which no infestation has been found may be classified as class I. Upon
compliance with the requirements of subsection (6) of this section, nursery
and ornamental stock may be certified by the inspector for shipment from such
premises without further inspection, and without meeting the safeguards pre-
seribed as a condition of interstate shipment of plants originating in nurseries
or greenhouses of class III.

(2) Class IIJ—(a) Nurseries, greenhouses, and other premises concerned
in the movement of nursery and ornamental stock on which either grubs in
the soil or one or more beetles have been found, will be classified as class III.
Such classification also may be given to nurseries, etc., in localities known to
be generally infested where one or more beetles or grubs are found in the
immediate proximity (within approximately 500 feet) of such nurseries, etc.,
on adjacent property or properties. In the case of nursery properties, under
single ownership and management, but represented by parcels of land widely
separated, such parcels may be independently classified either as class I or
class III upon compliance with such conditions and safeguards as shall be
required by the inspector. Similarly, unit nursery properties, which would
otherwise fall in class III, may be open to subdivision, for the purpose of rating
such subdivisions in classes I or III, when in the judgment of the inspector
such action is warranted by recent and scanty infestation limited to a portion
of the nursery concerned: Provided, That the subdivision containing the infes-
tation shall be clearly marked by boundaries of a permanent nature which .
shall be approximately 500 feet beyond the point where the infestation occurs.

(b) Upon compliance with subsections (3) and (6) of this section, nursery
and ornamental stock may be certified by the inspector for shipment from such
premises under any one of the following conditions: (i) That the roots shall
be treated by means approved by the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quaran-
tine in manner and by method satisfactory to the inspector; or (ii) in the case
of plants in which the root system is such that a thorough inspection may be
made, that the soil shall be entirely removed from the stock by shaking or wash-
ing, or (iii) that it shall be shown by evidence satisfactory to the inspector that
the plants concerned were produced in a certified greenhouse.

(3) Greenhouses of class III may be certified upon compliance with all the
following conditions with respect to the greenhouses themselves and to all potting
beds, heeling-in areas, hotbeds, coldframes, and similar plots:

(a) Ventilators, doors, and all other openings in greenhouses or coldframes
on premises in class III shall be kept screened in manner satisfactory to the
inspector during the period of flight of the beetle, namely, south of the northern
boundaries of Maryland and Delaware between June 1 and October 1, inclusive,
or north thereof between June 15 and October 15, inclusive.
1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 13

(b) Prior to introduction into nurseries or greenhouses, sand, soil, earth, peat,
compost, or manure taken from infested locations or which may have been ex-
posed to infestation, must be sterilized or fumigated under the direction and
supervision of, and in manner and by method satisfactory to the inspector. If
such treated sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, or manure is not to be immediately
used in such greenhouses, it must be protected from possible infestation in man-
ner and by method satisfactory to the inspector.

(c) All potted plants placed in certified greenhouses of class III and all potted
plants to be certified for interstate movement therefrom (i) shail be potted in
certified soil; (ii) shall, if grown outdoors south of the northern boundaries of
Maryland and Delaware at any time between June 1 and October 1, inclusive, or
north thereof at any time between June 15 and October 15, inclusive, be kept
in screened frames while outdoors; (iii) shall, if grown outdoors during any
part of the year, be placed in beds in which the soil or other material shall have
been treated in manner and by method approved by the Bureau of Entomology
and Plant Quarantine to eliminate infestation; and (iv) shall comply with
such other safeguards as may be required by the inspector.

(4) Cut flowers and other parts of plants without roots or soil may be
certified for movement either (a) when they have been inspected by an inspector
and found free from infestation, or (0) when they have been grown in a green-
house of class I or in a certified greenhouse of class III and are transported
under such safeguards as will in the judgment of the inspector prevent infesta-
tion. (See also sec. A (8) of this regulation. )

(5) Nursery and ornamental stock originating on or moved from unclassified
premises may be certified by the inspector under either one of the following
conditions: (a) That the soil shall be entirely removed from the stock, or (b)
that the roots shall be treated by means approved by the Bureau of Entomology
and Plant Quarantine in manner and by method satisfactory to the inspector,
or (c) that it shall be shown by evidence satisfactory to the inspector that the
accompanying soil was obtained at such points and under such conditions that
in his judgment no infestation could exist therein.

(6) Nurserymen, florists, dealers, and others, in order to maintain their
classified status, (a@) shall restrict their purchases or receipts of nursery and
ornamental stock, sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure within the
regulated area to articles which have been certified under these regulations as
to each such article and the said certificate shall accompany the articles when
moved; (0) shall obtain approval of the inspector before such articles are
received on their premises or moved from the open on their own premises into
certified greenhouses; and (c) shall also report immediately in writing all
purchases or receipts of such articles secured from within the regulated area.
Nurserymen, florists, dealers, and others whose premises are classified as class
III shall, in addition, report immediately on forms provided for that purpose
all their sales or shipments of such articles both to points outside the regulated
areas and to other classified nurseries or greenhouses within the regulated
areas. Certification may be denied to any person who has omitted to make the
report or reports required by this regulation, and such denial of certification
shall continue until the information so omitted has been supplied.

(7) Nursery and ornamental stock imported from foreign countries and not
reshipped from the port of entry in the unopened original container may be
certified for movement under these regulations when such stock has been
inspected by an inspector and found free from infestation.

(8) Nursery and ornamental stock originating outside the regulated areas
and certified stock originating in classified nurseries or greenhouses may be
certified for reshipment from premises other than those on which they origi-
nated, under provisions satisfactory to the inspector for the safeguarding of
such stock from infestation at the point of reshipment and en route, and, when
found advisable by the inspector, after reinspection and determination of
freedom from infestation.

REGULATION 7. RESTRICTIONS ON THE MOVEMENT oF SAND, SoIL, EARTH, PEAT,
COMPOST, AND MANURE
SECTION A. CONTROL OF MOVEMENT

7

Sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure shall not be moved or allowed
to be moved interstate from any point in the regulated areas to or through any
point outside thereof unless a certificate or permit shall have been issued
therefor by the inspector, except as follows:
14 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.—March

(1) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of sand for con-
struction purposes, nor of “bird gravel”, “bird sand”, or ground, dried imported
peat in packages of 5 pounds or less to the package.

(2) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of sand, soil, earth,
peat, compost, and manure imported from foreign countries when reshipped
from the port of entry in the unopened original container and labeled as to each
container with the country of origin, and when the shipment is further pro-
tected in manner or method satisfactory to the inspector.

(3) No certificate will be required for the interstate movement of sand,
soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure when transported by a common carrier on
a through bill of lading either from an area not under regulation through a
regulated area, or from a regulated area through a nonregulated area to
another regulated area.

SECTION B. CONDITIONS OF CERTIFICATION

Certificates for the movement of sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure
may be issued under any one of the following conditions:

(1) When the articles to be moved have originated in districts included
in the regulated area, but in which neither beetles nor grubs in soil have been
found.

(2) When the material consists of fresh manure or of mined, dredged, or
other Similar materials, and it has been determined by an inspector that no
infestation could exist therein.

(3) When the material has been removed, under the supervision of an
inspector, from a depth of more than 12 inches below the surface of the ground
and either (a) is to be moved between October 16 and June 14, inclusive, or
(b) is loaded and shipped at points where it has been determined by an
inspector that no general infestation of adult beetles exists, or (c) when the
ears and loading operations are protected by screening under the direction
of and in manner and by method satisfactory to the inspector.

(4) When the material has been fumigated with carbon disulphide or other-
wise treated under the supervision of and in manner and by method satisfac-
tory to the inspector. Such fumigation or treatment will be required as a
condition of certification of all sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure,
except such as is loaded and shipped in compliance with paragraphs (1), (2),
or (3) hereof.

REGULATION 8. CONDITIONS GOVERNING THE PROTECTION OF RESTRICTED ARTICLES
FRoM INFESTATION WHILE IN TRANSIT

Fruits and vegetables, nursery and ornamental stock, and sand, soil, earth,
peat, compost, and manure, moving interstate from or through the regulated
areas to points outside thereof between June 15 and October 15, inclusive, shall
at all times while they are in the regulated areas be screened, covered, or
otherwise protected in manner or method satisfactory to the inspector for
safeguarding the articles from infestation.

Trucks or other road vehicles transporting restricted articles may be sealed
by the inspector at the point of inspection and ali such seals shall remain intact
as long as the vehicle is en route within the regulated area.

REGULATION 9. MARKING AND CERTIFICATION A CONDITION OF INTERSTATE
TRANSPORTATION

(a) Every car, vehicle, box, basket, or other container of the articles listed,
the interstate movement of which is restricted in regulations 5, 6, and 7, shall
be plainly marked with the name and address of the consignor and the name
and address of the consignee and shall have securely attached to the outside
thereof a valid certificate or permit issued in compliance with these regulations.
In the case of lot shipments by freight, one certificate attached to one of the
cohtainers and another certificate attached to the waybill will be sufficient.

(b) In the case of bulk carload shipments by rail, the certificate shall accom-
pany the waybill, conductor’s manifest, memorandum, or bill of lading pertain-
ing to such shipment and in addition each car shall have securely attached to the
outside thereof a placard showing the number of the certificate or certificates
accompanying the waybill.

(c) In the case of shipment by road vehicle, the certificates shall accompany
the vehicle.


1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 15

(d) Certificates shall be surrendered to the consignee upon delivery of the
shipment.

REGULATION 10. GENERAL CONDITIONS GOVERNING INSPECTION AND ISSUANCE OF
CERTIFICATES AND PERMITS

(a) Persons intending to move or allow to be moved interstate any of the
articles the movement of which is restricted in regulations 5, 6, and 7, shall
make application for inspection and certification as far as possible in advance of
the probable date of shipment, specifying in the application the article and
quantity to be shipped, method of shipment, name and address of the consignor,
and name and address of the consignee.

(b) Applicants for inspection will be required to assemble the articles at
such points as the inspector shall designate and so to place them that inspec-
tion may readily be made; if not so placed, inspection may be refused. All
charges for storage, cartage, and labor incident to inspection, other than the
services of the inspector, shall be paid by the shipper.

(c) Certificates and permits shall be used in connection with the transporta-
tion of only those articles intended to be covered thereby.

(d@) Where the apparent absolute freedom from infestation of any of the
articles enumerated cannot be determined by the inspector, certification will be
refused.

(e) Permits may be issued for the interstate movement of restricted articles
by truck or other road vehicle from a regulated area through a nonregulated
area to another regulated area.

REGULATION 11. CANCELATION OF CERTIFICATES

Certificates issued under these regulations may be withdrawn or canceled by
the inspector and further certification refused, either for any failure of com-
pliance with the conditions of these regulations or violation of them, or when-
ever in the judgment of the inspector the further use of such certificates might
result in the dissemination of infestation.

REGULATION 12. INSPECTION IN TRANSIT

Any car, vehicie, basket, box, or other container moved interstate or offered
to a common carrier for shipment interstate, which contains or which the inspec-
tor has probable cause to believe contains either infested articles or articles the
movement of which is prohibited or restricted by these regulations, shall be
subject to inspection by an inspector at any time or place.

REGULATION 13. THOROUGH CLEANING REQUIRED oF TRUCKS, Wacons, CARs,
Boats, AND OTHER VEHICLES AND CONTAINERS BEFoRE MOovING INTERSTATE

Trucks, wagons, cars, boats, and other vehicles and containers which have
been used in transporting any article covered by these regulations within
the regulated areas shall not thereafter be moved or allowed to be moved
interstate until they have been thoroughly swept and cleaned by the carrier
at the point of unloading or destination.

REGULATION 14. SHIPMENTS BY THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

Articles subject to restriction in these regulations may be moved interstate
by the United States Department of Agriculture for experimental or scientific
purposes, on such conditions and under such safeguards as may be prescribed
by the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine. The container of articles
so moved shall bear, securely attached to the outside thereof, an identifying
tag from the Bureau of Entmology and Plant Quarantine showing compliance
with such conditions.

These revised rules and regulations shall be effective on and after March
16, ee and shall supersede the rules and regulations promulgated May 29,
1935,

Done at the city of Washington this 7th day of March 1936.

Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of
Agriculture.

[SEAL] R. G. TuGwELt,
Acting Secretary of Agriculture.
16 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.—March

APPENDIX
PENALTIES

The Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912 (87 Stat. 315), as amended,
provides that no person shall ship or offer for shipment to any common car-
rier, nor shall any common carrier receive for transportation or transport,
nor shall any person carry or transport from any quarantined State or Ter-
ritory or District of the United States, or from any quarantined portion
thereof, into or through any other State or Territory or District, any class
of nursery stock or any other class of plants, fruits, vegetables, roots, bulbs,
Seeds * * * or any other article * * * _ specified in the notice of quar-
antine * * * in manner or method or under conditions other than those
prescribed by the Secretary of Agriculture. It also provides that any person
who shall violate any of the provisions of this act, or who shall forge, counter-
feit, alter, deface, or destroy any certificate provided for in this act or in
the regulations of the Secretary of Agriculture shall be deemed guilty of a
misdemeanor, and shall upon conviction thereof be punished by a fine not
exceeding $500, or by imprisonment not exceeding 1 year, or both such fine
and imprisonment, in the discretion of the court.

* STATE AND FEDERAL INSPECTION

Certain of the quarantined States have promulgated or are about to promul-
gate quarantine regulations restricting intrastate movement supplemental to the
Federal quarantine. These State regulations are enforced in-cooperation with
the Federal authorities. Copies of either the Federal or State quarantine orders
may be obtained by addressing the United States Department of Agriculture,
Glenwood Avenue and Henry Street, Bloomfield, N. J.

Subsidiary offices are maintained at the following locations:

Fourth Floor, Customhouse, Boston, Mass.

1337 Dixwell Avenue, Hamden, Conn.

Room 840, 641 Washington Street, New York, N. Y.

Room 332, Post Office Building, Syracuse, N. Y.

Lawrence Building, 13-15 Orient Way, or Box C, Rutherford, N. J.

P. O. Box 1, Trenton, N. J., or Yardville Road, White Horse, N. J.

Kotler Building, Main and High Streets, Glassboro, N. J.

Frankford Arsenal, Frankford, Philadelphia, Pa.

Warehouse No. 4, General Depot, United States Army, New Cumberland,
Pa.

Rooms 488 K and L, New Post Office Building, Pittsburgh, Pa.

Room 210, New Post Office Building, Dover, Del.

Room 306, Post Office Building, Calvert and Fayette Streets, Baltimore,
Md.

Room 2138, Broad-Grace Arcade Building, Richmond, Va.

Room 217, New Federal Building, Granby Street and Brambleton Avenue,
Norfolk, Va.

Arrangements may be made for inspection and certification of shipments from
the District of Columbia by calling District 6850, Branch 2589, the inspection
house of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, Twelfth Street and
Constitution Avenue NW., Washington, D. C.

GENERAL OFFICES OF STATES COOPERATING

A Department of Entomology, Agricultural Experiment Station, New Haven,
onn.

Board of Agriculture, Dover, Del. .

State horticulturist, Augusta, Maine.

Department of Entomology, University of Maryland, College Park, Md.

Division of Plant Pest Control, Department of Agriculture, State House,
Boston, Mass.

Deputy Commissioner, Department of Agriculture, Durham, N. H.

Bureau of Plant Industry, Department of Agriculture, Trenton, N. J.
1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 17

Bureau of Plant Industry, Department of Agriculture and Markets, Albany,
IN: XY.

Bureau of Plant Industry, Department of Agriculture, Harrisburg, Pa.

Bureau of Entomology, Department of Agriculture, State House, Providence,
a.

Entomologist, Department of Agriculture, Montpelier, Vt.

Division of Plant Industry, Department of Agriculture and Immigration,
Richmond, Va.

State entomologist, Department of Agriculture, Charleston, W. Va.

[Copies of foregoing revision were sent to all common carriers doing business in or
through the regulated areas. |

NoTicE Tro GENERAL PuBLIC THROUGH NEWSPAPERS

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,
BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE,
Washington, D. C., March 7, 1936.

Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority
conferred on him by the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315),
as amended, has promulgated a revision of Notice of Quarantine No. 48 (elev-
enth revision), on account of the Japanese beetle, and of the rules and regula-
tions (fourteenth revision) suplemental thereto, effective on and after March
16, 1936. Under this revision additional territory has been included in the
regulated area in the States of Maine, Maryland, New York, and Virginia, and
the restrictions on the interstate movement by refrigerator car or motor truck
of all fruits and vegetables from the District of Columbia and portions of the
States of Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Virginia, be-
tween June 15 and October 15, inclusive, have been extended to apply to the
entire State of Delaware. Copies of the revised quarantine and regulations
may be obtained from the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine,
Washington, D. C.

R. G.’ TUGWELL,
Acting Secretary of Agriculture.

[Published in the following newspapers: The Hartford Times, Hartford, Conn., Mar.
19, 1936; the Journal, Wilmington, Del., Mar. 19, 1936; the Press-Herald, Portland,
Maine, Mar. 20, 1936; the Sun, Baltimore, Md., Mar. 20, 1936; the Post, Boston, Mass.,
Mar. 20, 1936; the Manchester Union, Manchester, N. H., Mar. 23, 1936; the News,
Newark, N. J., Mar. 21, 1936; the World-Telegram, New York, N. Y., Mar. 20, 1936;
the Bulletin, Providence, R. I., Mar. 19, 1936; the News-Leader, Richmond, Va.,
March 19, 19386; the Gazette, Charleston, W. Va., Mar. 20, 1936; the Star, Washing-

ton, D. C., Mar. 20, 1936; the Free Press, Burlington, Vt., Mar. 21, 1936; and the
Bulletin, Philadelphia, Pa., Mar. 19, 1936.]

ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO NURSERY STOCK, PLANT, AND SEED
QUARANTINE (NO. 37)

REPRINT, WITH CORRECTED FOOTNOTES AND APPENDICES
INTRODUCTORY NOTE

The supply of the last revised edition of Notice of Quarantine N vo. 37 (effective
Dec. 22, 1930) is exhausted and advantage has been taken of the opportunity
thus offered to incorporate, into this reprint, the revised regulations 3 and 7,
which became effective January 14, 1935. The name of the Bureau administer-
ing this quarantine is correctly given in regulation 7. The administrative
organization referred to in the other regulations as the Plant Quarantine and
Control Administration is now known as the Bureau of Entomology and Plant
Quarantine. Footnotes have been corrected and the appendices brought up to
date. In all other respects this is a mere reprint of the edition issued in
December 1930.

4 LEE A. STRONG.
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

67640—36——3
18 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.—March

NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 37
NURSERY STOCK, PLANT, AND SEED QUARANTINE

The fact has been determined by the Secretary of Agriculture, and notice is
hereby given, that there exist in Europe, Asia, Africa, Mexico, Central and
South America, and other foreign countries and localities certain injurious
insects and fungous diseases new to and not heretofore widely distributed
within and throughout the United States, which affect and are carried by
nursery stock and other plants and seeds, the words “nursery stock and other
plants and seeds’, including, wherever used in this notice and the rules and
regulations supplemental hereto, field-grown florists’ stock, trees, shrubs, vines,
cuttings, grafts, scions, buds, fruit pits and other seeds of fruit and orna-
mental trees or shrubs, also field, vegetable, and flower seeds, bedding plants,
and other herbaceous plants, bulbs, and roots, and other plants and plant
products for, or capable of, propagation.

Now, therefore, I, D. F. Houston, Secretary of Agriculture, under the au-
thority conferred by the act of Congress approved August 20, 1912 (37 Stat.
315), do hereby declare that it is necessary, in order to prevent the further
introduction into the United States of injurious insect pests and fungous dis-
eases, to forbid, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental
hereto, the importation into the United States of nursery stock and other plants
and seeds from the foreign countries and localities named and from any other
foreign locality or country.

On and after June 1, 1919, and until further notice, by virtue of said act
of Congress approved August 20, 1912, the importation of nursery stock and
other plants and seeds from the above named and all other foreign countries
and localities, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental
hereto, is prohibited.

This quarantine shall not apply to nursery stock and other plants and seeds
covered by special quarantines and other restrictive orders now in force, a
list of which is given in appendix A of the rules and regulations supplemental
hereto, nor to the importation by the United States Department of Agriculture
of nursery stock and other plants and seeds for experimental or scientific
purposes.

Done in the District of Columbia this 18th day of November 1918.

Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of
Agriculture.

[SEAL] D. F. Houston,
Secretary of Agriculture.

REVISED RULES AND REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE OF QUARANTINE
NO. 37, GOVERNING THE IMPORTATION OF NURSERY STOCK AND OTHER PLANTS
AND SEEDS INTO THE UNITED STATES

[Effective on and after December 22, 1930, and superseding the regulations heretofore
issued governing the importation of nursery stock]

REGULATION 1. DEFINITIONS

For the purposes of these regulations the following words, names, and terms
Shall be construed, respectively, to mean:

(a) Nursery stock and other plants and seeds: Field-grown florists’ stock,
trees, shrubs, vines, cuttings, grafts, scions, buds, fruit pits and other seeds of
fruit and ornamental trees or shrubs; also field, vegetable, and flower seeds,
bedding plants, and other herbaceous plants, bulbs, and roots, and other plants
and plant products for, or capable of, propagation.

(b) Field seeds: Seeds of cereal, forage, and other field crops.

(c) Vegetable seeds: Seeds of garden vegetables and other truck crops.

(d) Flower seeds: Seeds of annual, biennial, or even perennial flowering
plants which are essentially herbaceous, namely, plants which perish annually
down to, and sometimes including, the root (i. e., soft, succulent plants).

(e) Seeds of hardy perennial plants: Seeds of woody or other plants which
are not herbaceous and are either of a hardy and woody growth or are not
killed to the ground in temperate zones.
1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 19

(f) Bulbs and corms: Bulb—an enlarged subterranean bud with fleshy scales
or coats (for example, tulips, Spanish iris) : Corm—an enlarged fleshy base
of a stem, bulb-like but solid (for example, gladiolus, cyclamen, crocus).

(g) Plant roots, rhizomes, tubers: Plant roots—the more or less fibrous roots
of any plant (for example, fruit seedlings, ornamentals, lily of the valley pips) ;
rhizomes—a root stock or subterranean stem, usually fleshy and rooted at the
nodes (for example, German iris, Aspidistra) ; tuber—a thickened, fleshy sub-
terranean branch having numerous buds or eyes (for example, potatoes).

(h) New varieties: A new variety is understood to mean a novelty, i. e., a
new plant, variety, strain, type, or form, either recognized by the trade as such
or so listed or described in catalogs, trade journals, or other publications, or
duly and properly certified as such by the originator or introducer.

(i) Necessary propagating stock: Stock of old or standard varieties not
available in this country and imported for the multiplication of the plants in
question as a nursery or florist enterprise as distinguished from importations for
the immediate or ultimate sale of the stocks actually imported.

(j) Limited quantities: As used in regulation 14 “limited quantities” is
understood to mean such quantities as will supply any reasonable need for the
establishment of commercial reproduction plantings or as may be necessary for
the experimental, educational, or scientific purpose intended.

REGULATION 2. PLANT PropuUCcTs AND SEEDS FOR WHICH PERMIT Is NoT REQUIRED

Plant products capable of propagation, imported for medicinal, food, or manu-
facturing purposes, and field, vegetable, and flower seeds, except such products
and seeds as are governed by special quarantines and other restrictive orders
now in force and such as may hereafter be made the subject of special quaran-
tines or restrictive orders,? may be imported without permit or other compliance
with these regulations, when free from sand, soil, or earth: Provided, That any
such articles may be made subject to entry only under permit and on compli-
ance with the safeguards to be prescribed therein when it shall be determined
by the Secretary of Agriculture that their entry for the purpose indicated may
involve a risk of the introduction into the United States of injurious insect
pests or fungous diseases. Such determination with respect to any such articles
shall become effective after due notice.

REGULATION 3. NurseRY STocK, OTHER PLANTS AND PARTS OF PLANTS,
INCLUDING SEEDS, FOR WHICH A PERMIT IS REQUIRED

(As revised Jan. 14, 1935; effective Jan. 14, 1935)

The following nursery stock, other plants and parts of plants, including seeds,
not including, however, such other plants and parts of plants as are named in
appendix A, which are governed by special quarantines and other restrictive
orders now in force, nor such as may hereafter be made the subject of special
quarantines, may be imported, without limitation as to quantity or use, from
countries which maintain inspection (appendix B), under permit upon com-
pliance with these regulations:

(1) Bulbs, corms, or root stocks (pips) of the following genera: Lilium
(lily), Convallaria (lily-of-the-valley), Hyacinthus (hyacinth), Tulipa (tulip),
and Crocus; and, until further notice, Chionodoxa (glory-of-the-snow), Galan-
thus (snowdrop), Scilla (squill), Fritillaria, Muscari (grape-hyacinth), Jia,
and Hranthis (winter aconite) ; and, on and after December 15, 1936, Narcissus
(daffodil and jonquil).

(2) Cuttings, scions, and buds of fruits or nuts: Provided, That cuttings,
scions, and buds of fruits or nuts may be imported from Asia, Japan, Philip-
pine Islands, and Oceania (including Australia and New Zealand) under the
provisions of regulation 14 only. (Stocks of fruits or nuts may not be
imported, under permit or otherwise.)

(3) Rose stocks, including Manetti, Rosa multiflora (brier rose), and R.
rugosa.

2See appendix A to the Revised Rules and Regulations Supplemental to Notice of
Quarantine No. 37 for list of such quarantines and restrictive orders. In addition to the
quarantines and restrictive orders listed, a notice issued May 8, 1930, specifies that all
species of Aglaonema may be imported on and after June 1, 1930, only under the provi-
sions of regulation 14.
20 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan—March

(4) Nuts, including palm seeds for growing purposes: Provided, That such
nuts or seeds shall be free from pulp.

(5) Seeds of fruit, forest, ornamental, and shade trees, seeds of deciduous
and evergreen ornamental shrubs, and seeds of hardy perennial plants: Pro-
vided, That such seeds shall be free from pulp: Provided further, That citrus
seeds may be imported only through specified ports subject to disinfection as
provided in regulation 9: Provided further, That mango seeds may not be
imported under permit or otherwise, except from the countries of North
America, Central America, and South America, and the West Indies.

Importations from countries not maintaining inspection of nursery stock,
other plants and parts of plants, including seeds, the entry of which is per-
missible under this regulation, may be made under permit upon compliance
with these regulations in limited quantities for public-service purposes only,
but this limitation shall not apply to tree seeds.

(6) Materials permitted entry under Quarantine No. 56 for consumption
purposes are authorized entry under this regulation for propagation.

REGULATION 4. APPLICATION FOR PERMITS FOR IMPORTATION OF NURSERY STOCK
AND OTHER PLANTS AND SEEDS?

Persons contemplating the importation of nursery stock and other plants
and seeds, the entry of which is permitted under regulation 3, shall first make
application to the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration for a permit,
stating in the application the exact designation of the nursery stock and other
plants and seeds to be imported, the name and address of the exporter, the
country and locality where grown, the port of entry, and the name and address
of the importer in the United States to whom the permit should be sent.*

Applications for permits should be made in advance of the proposed ship-
ments, but if, through no fault of the importer, a shipment should arrive before
a permit is received the importation will be held in customs custody at the
risk and expense of the importer for a period not exceeding 20 days pending
the receipt of the permit.

Plant material refused entry shall, at the expense of the owner or his agent,
either be removed from United States territory immediately or, at the direction
of the owner or his agent, abandoned to the collector of customs for destruction.

Applications may be made by telegraph, in which case the information required
above must be given.

With the exception of the products enumerated under regulation 2, permits
are required for nursery stock and other plants and seeds entering the United
States for immediate transportation in bond to foreign countries.

Applications for permit to import nursery stock and other plants and Seeds
from countries which do not maintain inspection must contain a definite state-
ment of the quantity to be imported. Permits for importations from such
countries, other than for tree seeds (see regulation 3), will be issued only to
cover limited quantities and the permit will be valid only for a single importa-
tion. (See appendix B for list of countries which maintain inspection. )

REGULATION 5. DELIVERY IN BOND PENDING RECEIPT OF PERMIT WILL BE ALLOWED
FOR SHIPMENT F'roM COUNTRIES MAINTAINING INSPECTION

If the required permit be not at hand upon arrival of a shipment from a
country which maintains inspection, and such shipment meets the requirements
of regulations 7 and 8, it may be delivered to the importer, consignee, or agent
for the proper care thereof upon the filing of a bond with approved sureties
in double the invoice value (but in no case Jess than $100), the condition of
which shall be that the importation shall not be removed from the port of entry,
but shall be redelivered to the collector of customs within 20 days from the date

3A post-office order dated May 27, 1913, as amended Dec. 16, 1913, prohibits the im-
portation by mail of all growing or living plants, seeds, and other plant products for
propagation, except field, vegetable, and flower seeds. All importations of nursery stock
and other plants and seeds, other than field, vegetable, and flower seeds, must be made b
Selgin or express. This order was modified by a post-office order under date of July 28,
1924, to provide, on request, for importation by mail of material imported under the
provisions of regulations 8, 14, and 15, but only under special shipping tags secured
from the Department of Agriculture and bearing the address, Bureau of Entomology
and Plant Quarantine, United States Department of Agriculture,

*Application form no. EQ—687, will be sent on request.


1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS of

of arrival at the port, unless in the meantime the collector is presented with a
proper permit; or, if the importer, consignee, or agent shall so elect, the goods
may, so far as the Department of Agriculture 1s concerned, be retained in cus-
toms custody for a period not exceeding 20 days, pending the issuance of the
permit, wholly at the risk and expense of the importer,

REGULATION 6. ISSUANCE OF PERMITS

On approval by the Secretary of Agricuiture of an application for the im-
portation of nursery stock and other plants and seeds a permit will be issued
in quadruplicate. One copy will be furnished to the applicant for presenta-
tion to the customs officer at the port of entry, one copy will be mailed to the
collector of customs, and one to the inspector of the Department of Agriculture
at the port of entry, and the fourth will be filed with the application.

Permits shall be valid until revoked, unless otherwise specified therein, and
will be issued for such ports aS may from time to time be approved by the
Plant Quarantine and Control Administration. The permit will be addressed
to the collector of customs at the port for which it is issued.

REGULATION 7. CERTIFICATION, MARKING, FrEEDOM From SAND, Sort, or HARTH,
AND APPROVED PACKING MATERIAL

(As revised Jan. 14, 1935; effective Jan. 14, 19385)

The importation of nursery stock and other plants and seeds from countries
which maintain inspection will not be allowed unless the invoice is accom-
panied by an original certificate, and unless each container bears a copy cer-
tificate issued by a duly authorized official of the country from which it is
exported stating that the nursery stock and other plants and seeds covered
by the certificate have been thoroughly inspected by him or under his direction
at the time of packing, and found, or believed to be, free from injurious plant
diseases and insect pests.

Hach certificate and copy certificate shall give the date of inspection, name
of the grower or exporter, the district or locality and the country where
grown, and a statement that the nursery stock and other plants and seeds
have been inspected by a duly authorized official and found, or believed to be,
free from insect pests and plant diseases. The original certificate shall be
signed and sealed by, and the copy certificate shall bear the seal and the actual
or reproduced signature of, a responsible inspection official of the country of
origin.

Lists of officials in foreign countries authorized to inspect nursery stock and
other plants and seeds, giving their names and official designations, will be
furnished to collectors of customs through the Secretary of the Treasury.

Each case, box, or other container or covering of nursery stock and other
plants and seeds offered for entry shall be plainly and correctly marked to
show the number of the permit, the general nature and quantity of the contents,
the district or locality and country where grown, the name and address of the
exporter, and the name and address of the consignee: Provided, That all im-
portations of plants authorized under regulation 14 shall be addressed to the
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Entomology and Plant
Quarantine, at the port designated in the permit. In addition to the address,
as indicated, such shipments shall be marked with the permit number and
name of the importer.

All nursery stock and other plants and seeds offered for import must be free
from sand, soil, or earth; and all plant roots, rhizomes, tubers, ete., must
be freed by washing or other means from such sand, soil, or earth: Provided,
That this requirement shall not apply to plants imported from Canada under
regulation 15: Provided further, That sand, soil, or earth may be employed for
the packing of bulbs, corms, seeds, and nuts when such sand, soil, or earth has
been sterilized or otherwise safeguarded in accordance with the methods pre-
scribed by the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine and is so certified
by the duly authorized inspector of the country of origin. The use of such
sand, soil, or earth as packing for plants other than bulbs, corms, seeds, and
nuts is not authorized.

All packing materials employed in connection with importations of nursery
stock and other plants and seeds are subject to approval as to such use by
the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine. Such packing material must
22 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.—March

not previously have been used as packing or otherwise in connection with living
plants, and except as provided in the preceding paragraph for bulbs, corms,
seeds, and nuts, must be free from sand, soil, or earth, and must be certified
as meeting these conditions by the duly authorized inspector of the country of
origin.

If a package of nursery stock and other plants and seeds offered for entry
includes any prohibited article, or if any of the plants have not been freed
from earth, the entire package may be refused entry.

REGULATION 8. INSPECTION

In addition to the inspection at destination by the- proper official of a State,
Territory, or District of the United States, provided for in section 2 of the
Plant Quarantine Act of 1912, nursery stock and other plants and seeds im-
ported under regulations 3 and 15 shall be subject as a condition of entry to
such preliminary inspection ag shall be required by the Plant Quarantine and
Control Administration: Provided, That nursery stock and other plants and
seeds imported under regulations 83 and 15 from countries which do not maintain
inspection shall not be delivered to the importer or consignee until they have
been examined by an inspector of the Department of Agriculture and found to
be free from plant diseases and insect pests, or if infested, capable, in the
judgment of the inspector, of being adequately safeguarded by disinfection.

REGULATION 9. DISINFECTION A CONDITION OF ENTRY

Nursery stock and other plants and seeds imported under regulations 3 and
15 shall be subject, as a condition of entry, to such disinfection as shall be
required by the inspector of the Department of Agriculture. When disinfec-
tion is required, the nursery stock and other plants and seeds involved will
be delivered to the permittee for disinfection upon the filing with the collector
of customs of a bond in the amount of $5,000, or in an amount equal to the
invoice value if such value be less than $5,000, but in no case to be less than
$100, with approved sureties, the condition of which shall be that the nursery
stock and other plants and seeds shall be disinfected under the supervision
of an inspector of the Department of Agriculture; that no case or other con-
tainer thereof shall be broken, opened, or removed from the port of entry unless
and until a written notice is given to such collector by an inspector of the
Department of Agriculture that the nursery stock and other plants and seeds
have been properly disinfected; and that the importation shall be redelivered
to the collector of customs within 40 days from arrival at the port of entry.
All charges incident to inspection and disinfection, other than the services of
the inspector, shall be paid by the importer.

REGULATION 10. NoTIcE oF ARRIVAL BY PERMITTEE

Immediately upon arrival of the nursery stock and other plants and seeds
at the port of entry, the permittee shall submit in duplicate notice to the Secre-
tary of Agriculture, through the collector of customs, on forms provided for
that purpose, stating the number of the permit, date of entry, name of ship or
vessel, the country and locality where grown, name of the foreign shipper,
number of cases and marks and numbers on cases, the general nature and quan-
tity of the nursery stock and other plants and seeds, the port of entry, and the
name of the importer or broker at the port of entry.

REGULATION 11. Norice oF SHIPMENT BY PERMITTEE

After entry of the nursery stock and other plants and seeds and before
removal from the port of entry for each separate shipment or consignment
thereof the permittee shall notify the Secretary of Agriculture in duplicate, on
forms provided for that purpose, stating the number of the permit, the date
of entry, the port of entry, the customs entry number, name and address of the
consignee to whom it is proposed to forward the shipment, the general nature
and quantity of the nursery stock and other plants and seeds, the number of
cases or other containers included in the shipment, and the case or container



5 For detailed instructions relative to packing materials, including sterilized soil for
bulbs, corms, seeds, and nuts, see B. HB. P. Q.—369.


1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 23

numbers and marks, together with the probable date of delivery for and route
of transportation. A separate report is required for each ultimate consignee.

At the same time a copy of the notice to the Secretary of Agriculture shall
be sent by the permittee to the duly authorized inspector or other officer of
the State, Territory, or District to which the nursery stock and other plants and
seeds are to be shipped. A list of such inspectors and officers is appended.

Should a consignee named in such a notice ship or deliver for shipment to any
other State, Territory, or District such nursery stock and other plants or seeds
before they have been inspected by a duly authorized State, Territory, or Dis-
trict inspector or officer, he shall, prior to such shipment, give like notices to
the Secretary of Agriculture and to the duly authorized inspector or other
officer of the State, Territory, or District to which the nursery stock and other
plants and seeds are to be reshipped.

Nursery stock and other plants and seeds which have been once inspected and
passed by a duly authorized State, Territorial, or District inspector or other
officer, will be allowed to move interstate without restrictions other than those
imposed on the interstate movement of domestic nursery stock.

REGULATION 12. MARKING A CONDITION OF INTERSTATE SHIPMENT OF NURSERY
STocK AND OTHER PLANTS AND SHEDS Not INSPECTED

No person shall ship or deliver for shipment from one State, Territory, or
District of the United States into any other State, Territory, or District any
imported nursery stock and other plants and seeds, the case, box, package,
crate, bale, or bundle whereof is not plainly marked so as to show the general
nature and quantity of the contents, the name and address of the consignee, and
the country and locality where grown, unless and until such imported nursery
stock and other plants and seeds have been inspected and passed by the proper
official of a State, Territory, or District of the United States.

REGULATION 13. CANCELATION OF PERMITS FOR VIOLATION OF REGULATIONS

Permits may be canceled and further permits refused for the importation of
the products of any grower or exporter who has violated the Plant Quarantine
Act or any rules and regulations promulgated thereunder, or for the importa-
tion of the products of any country whose inspection is found by the Plant
Quarantine and Control Administration as the result of its examinations of
importations therefrom to be merely perfunctory, or for importations by any
permittee who fails to give any notice required by these rules and regulations,
or for the giving of a false or incomplete notice, or the mislabeling of any
shipment with intent to evade any provision of the Plant Quarantine Act or
any rules and regulations thereunder.

REGULATION 14. SpecrAL PERMITS FOR IMPORTATION IN LIMITED QUANTITIES OF
RESTRICTED PLANTS

Application may be made to the Secretary of Agriculture for special per-
mits for the importation, in limited quantities and under conditions and safe-
guards to be prescribed in such permits, of nursery stock and other plants and
seeds not covered by the preceding regulations, for the purpose of keeping the
country supplied with new varieiies and necessary propagating stock, or for
any necessary experimental, educational, or scientific purpose: Provided, That
this shall not apply to nursery stock and other plants and seeds covered by
special quarantines and other restrictive orders now in force, nor to such as°
may hereafter be made the subject of special quarantines. A list of nursery
stock and other plants and seeds covered by special quarantines and other
restrictive orders now in force is given in Appendix A of these regulations.

The requirements of regulations 7, 8, 9, and 10, with respect to certification,
marking, freedom from sand, soil, or earth, packing materials, inspection,
disinfection, and notice of arrival shall apply also to importations authorized
under special permits.°

®A special form of application (no. 207) must be filléd out. This form will be sent on
request. For mail entry of special permit material under regulation 14, see footnote 2
under regulation 4. Permits should be secured in advance. Material arriving without a
permit is likely to be returned at once or destroyed. In certain instances, however, it
may be handled as indicated in the second paragraph of regulation 4.
24 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.—March

REGULATION 15. PERMITS FOR THE IMPORTATION oF NuRSERY STOCK AND OTHER
PLANTS AND SHEDS FRoM CoUNTRIES CONTIGUOUS TO THE UNITED STATES

When it is deemed by the Secretary of Agriculture that the importation
from countries contiguous to the United States of any class or classes of
nursery stock and other plants and seeds the entry of which is not provided
for under regulations 2 and 3 will not be attended by serious risk to the
agriculture, horticulture, or floriculture of the United States, permits may be
issued, on application, authorizing the entry of such nursery stock and other
plants and seeds under such safeguards as may be prescribed in the permits:
Provided, That importations under this regulation shall be limited to specific
classes of nursery stock and other plants and seeds which can be considered as
peculiar to or standard productions of such contiguous countries, as opposed
to stock imported from foreign countries and held or grown on for later sale:
Provided further, That this shall not apply to nursery stock and other plants
and seeds governed by special quarantines and other restrictive orders, other
than quarantine 37, now in force, nor to such as may hereafter be made the
subject of special quarantines: Provided further, That in addition to the cer-
tificate required by regulation 7, the invoice covering nursery stock and other
plants and seeds offered for entry under this regulation must be accompanied
by a certificate of a duly authorized official of the country of origin, stating that
the nursery stock and other plants and seeds proposed to be exported to the
United States have been produced or grown in the country from which they are
proposed to be exported:* Provided further, That cut flowers from the Domin-
ion of Canada may be imported into the United States without permit or other
restriction.

The above rules and regulations are hereby adopted and shall be effective on
and after December 22, 1930, and shall supersede the rules and regulations
governing the importation of nursery stock into the United States which were
promulgated October 24, 1928, as amended July 29, 1929.

Done at the city of Washington this 17th day of December 1930.

Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.

[ SEAL] ARTHUR M. Hype,
Secretary of Agriculture.

APPENDIX A

The entry of the following plant material for propagation is prohibited or
restricted by specific quarantines and other restrictive orders now in force:

(a) Irish potatoes from all countries except the Dominion of Canada and
Bermuda.

(b) All five-leafed pines and all species and varieties of the genera Ribes and
Grossularia from each and every country of Europe and Asia and from the
Dominion of Canada and Newfoundland.

(c) Cottonseed (including seed cotton) of all species and varieties from any
foreign locality and country.

(d) Seeds of the avocado or alligator pear from Mexico and the countries of
Central America.

(e) Canes of sugarcane or parts thereof from all foreign countries.

(f) All citrus nursery stock (tribe Citrinae), including buds and scions from
all foreign localities and countries.

_ (g) All pines not included in paragraph (b) from all European countries and
localities.

(h) Seed and all other portions in the raw or unmanufactured state of In-
dian corn or maize (Zea mays L.), and the closely related plants, including all
species of Teosinte (Huchlaena), Job’s tears (Coix), Polytoca, Chinoachne, and
Sclerachne, from southeastern Asia (including India, Siam, Indo-China, and
China), Malayan Archipelago, Australia, New Zealand, Oceania, Philippine
Islands, Formosa, Japan, and adjacent islands.

(i) All varieties of sweetpotatoes and yams (Ipomoea batatas and Dios-
corea spp.) from all foreign countries and localities.

7 Application form no. E. Q.—687 for permit under this regulation will be sent on
request.


1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 25

(j) All species or varieties of banana plants (Musa spp.) from all foreign
countries and localities.

(k%) All varieties of bamboo seed, plants, or cuttings thereof, capable of
propagation, including all genera and species of the tribe Bambuseae, from all
foreign countries.

(1) Seed or paddy rice from all foreign countries and localities.

(m) Wheat from Australia, India, Japan, Italy, China, Union of South
Africa, and Spain.

(n) Seed and all other portions in the raw or unmanufactured state of
Indian corn or maize, broomcorn, sweet sorghums, grain sorghums, Sudan grass,
Johnson grass, sugarcane, pearl millet, napier grass, teosinte, and Job’s tears
from all foreign countries and localities.

(o) All plants, cuttings, scions, and seeds of elm and related plants from
the Continent of Europe.

APPENDIX B
LIST OF THE FOREIGN COUNTRIES WHICH HAVE PROVIDED FOR INSPECTION AND
CERTIFICATION IN CONFORMITY WITH THE REQUIREMENTS OF THE PLANT QUAR-
ANTINE ACT OF AUGUST 20, 1912

Australia. Hong Kong. Mexico.

Austria. Hungary. Morocco (French).
Azores. Treland. New Zealand.
Barbados. Italy. Philippine Islands.
Belgium. Jamaica. Scotland.
Bermuda. Japan. Union of South Africa.
Brazil. Java. Spain.
British Guiana. Leeward Islands: Straits Settlements.
Canada. Antigua. Switzerland.
Cuba. St. Christopher- Trinidad.
Czechoslovakia. Nevis. Wales.
Denmark. Dominica. Windward Islands:
England. Montserrat. Granada,
France. Virgin Islands. St. Lucia.
Germany. Grand Duchy of Luxem- St. Vincent.
Guatemala. burg.
Holland.

APPENDIX C

STATE INSPECTION OFFICIALS

Alabama: Chief, division of plant industry, Montgomery, Ala.

Arizona: State entomologist, Phoenix, Ariz.

Arkansas: Chief inspector, State plant board, Little’ Rock, Ark.

California: Chief, bureau of plant quarantine, State department of agricul-
ture, Sacramento, Calif.

Colorado: Bureau of plant and insect control, Capitol Building, Denver.

Connecticut: State entomologist, New Haven, Conn.

Delaware. Plant pathologist, State board of agriculture, Dover, Del.

District of Columbia: United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of
Entomology and Plant Quarantine, Washington, D. C.

Florida: Quarantine inspector, State plant board, Gainesville, Fla.

Georgia: State entomologist, Atlanta, Ga.

Hawaii: Chief plant inspector, board of commissioners of agriculture and
forestry, Honolulu, T. H.

Idaho: Director, bureau of plant industry, Boise, Idaho.

Illinois: Chief plant inspector, State Entomologist Building, Urbana, Ill.

Indiana: State entomologist, Indianapolis, Ind.

Iowa: State entomologist, Ames, Iowa.

Kansas, north: State entomologist, Kansas State Agricultural College, Man-
hattan, Kans.

Kansas, south: State entomologist, University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kans.

Kentucky: State entomologist, Lexington, Ky.

Louisiana: State entomologist, Baton Rouge, La.

Maine: State horticulturist, Augusta, Maine.

Maryland: State entomologist, College Park, Md.
96 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.—March

Massachusetts: Director, division of plant pest control, State House, Boston,
Mass.

Michigan: State inspector of orchards and nurseries, State department of
agriculture, Lansing, Mich.

Minnesota: State entomologist, University Farm, St. Paul, Minn.

Mississippi: Entomologist, State plant board, State College, Miss.

Missouri: Plant officer, department of agriculture, Jefferson City, Mo.

Montana: Chief, division of horticulture, Missoula, Mont.

Nebraska: Nursery inspector, State department of agriculture, Lincoln, Nebr.

Nevada: Director, division of plant industry, Reno, Nev.

New Hampshire: Deputy commissioner of agriculture, Durham, N. H.

New Jersey: Chief, bureau of plant industry, State department of agricul-
ture, Trenton, N. J.

New Mexico: Biologist, agricultural experiment station, State College, N. Mex.

New York: Director, bureau of plant industry, department of agriculture and
markets, Albany, N. Y.

North Carolina: State entomologist, State department of agriculture, Raleigh,
N. C.

North Dakota: State entomologist, Fargo, N. Dak.

Ohio: Chief, division of plant industry, State department of agriculture,
Columbus, Ohio.

Oklahoma: State plant board, Oklahoma City, Okla.

For seeds: Attention, seed analyst.
For other nursery stock: Attention, nursery inspector.

Oregon: Chief, division of plant industry, Agriculture Building, Salem, Oreg.

Pennsylvania: Director, bureau of plant industry, State department of agri-
culture, Harrisburg, Pa.

Puerto Rico: Chief plant quarantine inspector, care Commissioner of Agricul-
ture and Labor, San Juan, P. R.

Rhode Island: Chief, bureau of entomology, State House, Providence, R. I.

South Carolina: Chief, division of entomology, Clemson College, S. C.

South Dakota: State nursery inspector, Pierre, S. Dak.

Tennessee: State entomologist, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tenn.

Texas: Chief inspector of nurseries, Austin, Tex. .

Utah: State agriculture inspector, Salt Lake City, Utah.

Vermont: State nursery inspector, Burlington, Vt.

Virginia: State entomologist, 1112 State Office Building, Richmond, Va.

Washington: Supervisor of horticulture, Olympia, Wash.

West Virginia: State department of agriculture, Charleston, W. Va.

Wisconsin: State entomologist, Capitol Annex, Madison, Wis.

Wyoming: State entomologist, State department of agriculture, Powell, Wyo.

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO MEXICAN FRUIT FLY
‘QUARANTINE (NO. 64)

SHIPPING SEASON FOR TEXAS CITRUS FRUIT EXTENDED TO MARCH 31

(Press notice)
JANUARY 13, 1936.

The season for shipping citrus fruit from Texas under the Mexican fruit fly
quarantine regulations, which apply to Brooks, Willacy, Cameron, and Hidalgo
Counties, has been extended provisionally to include March 31, 1936, Lee A.
Strong, Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, announced
today. If conditions of reinfestation occur or if growers fail to observe sanitary
requirements and fail to comply with clean-up restrictions, it may be necessary
to set an earlier date. The shipping season normally closes—under the quar-
antine—in March.

The extension was announced after consultation with the Texas State Depart-
ment of Agriculture and is concurred in by J. E. McDonald, commissioner of
agriculture. Quarantine officials of the State Department of Agriculture of
Texas and of the United States Department of Agriculture anticipate the same
cooperation heretofore extended in this work by growers and packers of the
lower Rio Grande Valley.

Mr. Strong pointed out that the United States Department of Agriculture de-
sires to assist in every possible manner in the movement of the Texas citrus
crop. At the same time there must be full appreciation of the Department’s




1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 27

responsibility to prevent the building up of infestation and the spread of the
fruit fly. Mr. Strong hopes and believes that the growers will at all times
realize the importance of full compliance with the clean-up regulations. Dis-
covery of any infestation of the Mexican fruit fly, he said, will necessarily require
immediate eradication and precautionary clean-up measures in any area which
may be involved.

B. E. P. Q.-387 JANUARY 13, 1936.

ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS—SHIPPING SEASON FOR TEXAS CITRUS FRUIT
. EXTENDED

(Issued under regulation 7, sec. A, Federal Quarantine No. 64)

(Approved Jan. 13, 1936; issued Jan. 13, 1936)

The shipping season for citrus fruit under the Federal Mexican fruit fly
quarantine (Notice of Quarantine No. 64) from the Counties of Brooks, Willacy,
Cameron, and Hidalgo, in Texas, is hereby extended to the close of March
31, 1936, provided conditions of infestation or lack of observance of sanitary
requirements and failure to comply with clean-up restrictions do not necessitate
an earlier closing date.

The discovery of any infestation of this insect within the regulated area will
of necessity require immediate eradication and precautionary clean-up measures
in any area which may be involved.

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

—

MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS

INSTRUCTIONS TO PUERTO RICAN POSTMASTERS

Post OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, D. C., March 10, 1936.
POSTMASTER :

In a recent 1-day test made at the post office of New York, N. Y., there were
received many parcels from a number of post offices in Puerto Rico containing
green ginger, banana leaves, oranges, yams, and other plant materials which
were accepted for mailing to the mainland of the United States in violation of
Quarantine Orders Nos. 16, 30, 32, 47, 58, and 60, in that they were either pro-
hibited from entry into the United States or were not accompanied with the
required certificate of inspection.

A copy of each of the quarantine orders mentioned is inclosed, and you are
requested to take such steps as will prevent the acceptance of any parcels mailed
at your office in future addressed to the mainland of the United States which
contain any of the plants or plant products quarantined by the various orders
mentioned or which contain plant products which are not accompanied with the
prescribed certificate.

When any unpermissible plants or plant products are discovered in such parcels
or where parcels of the other plants and plant products referred to are not
accompanied with the prescribed certificate of inspection, the parcels should
be returned to the senders and their attention invited to the provisions of the
quarantine orders mentioned, particularly the penalty for violation thereof,
and they should be cautioned not to attempt to mail such matter to the main-
land in future, except as provided therein.

Quarantine Order No. 30 was amended (effective Oct. 10, 1935), lifting the
prohibition from yams and allowing the movement of these tubers to the main-
land under the restrictions of Quarantine Order No. 58, but sweetpotatoes are
still prohibited movement to the mainland.

Your cooperation in carefully watching for parcels of plant material which

may be mailed at your office addressed to the mainland of the United States
will be appreciated.

Very truly yours,

C. B. EILENBERGER,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.
28 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan—March

IMPORTATION OF PLANT PRODUCTS BY MAIL (T. D. 48181)

REVISED REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE JOINT TREATMENT OF SUCH IMPORTATIONS
UNDER THE PLANT QUARANTINE ACT BY PLANT QUARANTINE INSPECTORS, CUS-
TOMS OFFICERS, AND PosTMAsTERS—T. D. 40363, T. D. 40753, anp T. D. 41562
SUPERSEDED. ;

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,
OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONER OF CUSTOMS,
Washington, D. C.
To Collectors of Customs and Others Concerned:

1. Under various orders, quarantines, and regulations promulgated by the
Secretary of Agriculture under authority of the Plant Quarantine Act of August
20, 1912 (387 Stat. 315), as amended, the entry into the United States of cer-
tain plants and plant products is prohibited or restricted. (See United States
Official Postal Guide, July 1935, section 49, pages 233-234 and also articles 389
and 559 to 565 inclusive of the Customs Regulations of 1931.) As an aid in
enforcing these or subsequent orders, quarantines, and regulations, provisions
have been made by the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine of the
United States Department of Agriculture, concurrently with the Postal and
Customs Services, to insure closer inspection of such importations.

2. Inspectors of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine and cus-
toms officers are stationed at the following post offices:

Atlanta, Ga. Hidalgo, Tex. Philadelphia, Pa.
Baltimore, Md. Honolulu, T. H. Port Arthur, Tex.
Bellingham, Wash. Houston, Tex. Portland, Oreg.
Blaine, Wash. Jacksonville, Fla. Presidio, Tex.
Boston, Mass. Key West, Fla. Rio Grande City, Tex.
Brownsville, Tex. Laredo, Tex. Roma, Tex.

Buffalo, N. Y. Los Angeles, Calif. St. Paul, Minn.
Calexico, Calif. (including San Pedro) San Diego, Calif.
Charleston, S. C. Miami, Fla. San Francisco, Calif.
Chicago, Il. Mobile, Ala. San Juan, P. R.

Del Rio, Tex. Naco, Ariz. San Ysidro, Calif.
Detroit, Mich. New Orleans, La. Savannah, Ga.
Douglas, Ariz. New York, N. Y. Seattle, Wash.

Eagle Pass, Tex. Nogales, Ariz. Tampa, Fla.

El Paso, Tex. Norfo!k, Va. Washington, D. C.
Galveston, Tex. Pensacola, Fla.

3. All parcel post or other mail packages from foreign countries which, either
from examination or external evidence, are found to contain plants or plant
products shall be dispatched for submission, or actually submitted, to the plant
quarantine inspector (article 564 (e), Customs Regulations of 1931) at the most
accessible of the foregoing places, who shall pass upon the contents, under the
Plant Quarantine Act, and with the cooperation of the customs and postal
officers, either (1) release the package from further plant-quarantine examina-
tion and indorse his decision thereon; or (2) divert it to Washington, D. C., San
Francisco, Calif., or Seattle, Wash., for disposition. If so diverted, the plant-
quarantine inspector shall attach to the package the yellow-and-green special
mailing tag addressed to the proper quarantine station. The package should
also be accompanied by customs card form 3511 and transmitted in accordance
with the appropriate provisions of article 367 (a) (JR 12a) of the Customs
Regulations of 1931.

4. The customs officers at San Francisco, Calif., Seattle, Wash., and Washing-
ton, D. C., shall keep a record of such packages as may be delivered to represent-
atives of the Department of Agriculture, and upon the return thereof shall
prepare mail entry to accompany the dutiable package and deliver. it to the
postmaster for delivery or onward dispatch; or in appropriate cases subject tie
shipment to formal customs-entry procedure.

5. The plant-quarantine inspector may require the entire shipment to be re-
‘urned to the country of origin as a prohibited importation, in which event he
shall indorse his action thereon and deliver the shipment over to the collector
of customs, who shall in turn deliver it to the postmaster for dispatch to the
country of origin. If the plant material, upon examination, is deemed dangerous
to plant life, the collector of customs shall permit the plant-quarantine inspector
to destroy immediately both the container and contents. In either case the plant-
quarantine inspector shall notify the addressee of the action taken and the
reason therefor. If the objectionable plant material forms only a portion of the
contents of the mail package and in the judgment of the inspector the package
can safely be delivered to the addressee, after removing and destroying the


1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 29

objectionable material, such procedure is authorized. In the latter case the
inspector shall place in the package a memorandum (B. HE. P. Q. form 387)
informing the addressee of the action taken by the inspector and describing the
matter which has been seized and destroyed and the reasons therefor. (See
T. D. 42952.) Mail packages received at San Juan, P. R., and Honolulu, T. H.,
shall be accorded treatment as herein prescribed at these two ports and not
diverted to Washington, D. C., San Francisco, Calif., or Seattle, Wash.

6. Packages containing plants or plant products received in closed mail
dispatches made up direct to post offices (located at a customs port at which no
plant-quarantine inspector is stationed) not included in the foregoing list of
post offices. or such packages which are forwarded to these post offices from the
post office of original receipt without having received plant-quarantine examina-
tion, shall be forwarded by the collector of customs through the postmaster (ac-
companied by customs card form 3511 in the manner heretofore described) to
the most accessible of the post offices listed above for treatment in accordance
with the foregoing instructions. Packages discovered at post offices where no
customs officer is located shall be forwarded by the postmaster under his official
penalty envelope addressed to the collector of customs at the most accessible of
the post offices listed for appropriate treatment as prescribed herein.

7. The provisions of T. D. 40868, T. D. 40753, and T. D. 41562 are hereby
revoked and superseded.

8. The foregoing regulations have been approved by the Postmaster General
and the Secretary of Agriculture.

JAMES H. Moy ze,
Commissioner of Customs.
Approved February 25, 1936:
WAYNE C. TAYLOR,
Acting Secretary of the Treasury.

IMPORTATIONS BY MAIL—REGULATIONS (T. D. 48237)

REGULATIONS PERMITTING (1) Maiu IMporTATIONS OF PLANT MATERIAL, AND (2)
MAIL PARCELS IN TRANSIT INTENDED FOR OUTWARD DISPATCH BY PRIVATE AIR
TRANSPORTATION AGENCIES, To Br IMMEDIATELY EXPorTED, FREE oF DUTY,
UNDER CUSTOMS SUPERVISION

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,
OFFICH OF THE COMMISSIONER OF CUSTOMS,
Washington, D. C.
To Collectors of Customs and Others Concerned:

(A)Shipments of plant material may be imported by mail for immediate
exportation by mail, free of duty, subject to the following regulations, which
have been approved by the Department of Agriculture and the Post Office
Department:

1. Each shipment shall be dispatched in the mails from abroad, accompanied
by a yellow and green special mail tag bearing the serial number of the
permit for entry for immediate exportation or immediate transportation and
exportation, issued by the United States Department of Agriculture, and also
the postal form of customs declaration.

2. Upon arrival, the shipment shall be detained by, or redispatched to, the
postmaster at Washington, D. C., San Francisco, Calif., Seattle, Wash, Honolulu,
T. H., or San Juan, P. R., as may be appropriate, according to the address
on the yellow and green tag, and there submitted to the customs officer and
the Federal quarantine inspector (T. D. 40363). The merchandise shall
under no circumstances be permitted to enter the commerce of the United States.

3. After inspection by the customs and quarantine officers, and with their
approval, the adressee, or his authorized agent, shall repack and readdress
the mail parcel under customs supervision; affix to the parcel the necessary
postage, and comply with other mailing requirements, after which the parcel
shall be delivered to the postmaster for exportation by mail pursuant to article
382 of the Customs Regulations of 1931. The contents of the original parcel
may be subdivided and exported in separate parcels in like manner.

4. Each parcel imported shall be subject to the payment of the regular 10-
cent customs clearance fee and the 5-cent delivery fee exacted by the postal
service,
30 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan—March

5. It will not be necessary to issue customs mail entry (Form 3419) nor
to require formal entry of the shipments. Copies of customs Form 7518 shall
be furnished the Comptroller and the Section of Customs Statistics at New
York, respectively.

The mail shipments referred to shall be accorded special handling only at
the five points specified in paragraph 2. ;

The foregoing procedure shall not affect the movement of plant material
in the international mails in transit through the United States.

(B) In order to facilitate the transmission by air transportation of articles
imported through the international mail service intended for immediate exporta-
tion through private air transportation agencies, the following regulations are
promulgated with the concurrence of the Post Office Department:

1. Mail articles of foreign origin, addressed to, or in care of an air transporta-
tion agency in the United States (located at a customs port), containing mer-
chandise intended for immediate exportation by such agency, may be exported
free of duty, under customs supervision, subject to the following conditions:
The postmaster shall, upon written authority of the addressee, and in the pres-
ence of a customs officer, rewrap and readdress the mail article, which should
be retained in postal custody until a reasonable time before the departure of the
exporting aircraft. Thereafter the postmaster shall have the article dispatched
in postal equipment to the point of departure of the aircraft and delivered to
the customs officer, who shall, in turn, deliver it on board the departing air-
craft after the latter has cleared for a foreign destination.

2. If the mail article reaches the post office of address in the United States with
mail entry attached, the latter should be forwarded to the Bureau of Customs,
with report of the particulars of the exportation of the merchandise. It will
not be necessary to prepare mail entry in cases where the article reaches the
port of exportation unaccompanied thereby. Formal entry may be dispensed
with at the port of exportation and Form 3509, if issued, should be forwarded
to the Bureau of Customs with appropriate report.

JAMES H. MOYLE,
Commissioner of Customs.
Approved March 20, 1936:
WAYNE C. TAYLOR,
Acting Secretary of the Treasury.

P. Q. C. A.—3806, Supplement No. 38. Marcu 9, 1936.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, DOMINION OF NEW ZEALAND

The New Zealand Orchard and Diseases Act of September 13, 1928, defines
“disease” as any of the diseases named in the first schedule to the act. In the
prescribed forms of certificate set forth in P. Q. C. A.-806, certification of free-
dom from disease as above defined is required. The first schedule naming the
declared diseases was not included in Circular P. Q. C. A306. It is now
deemed desirable, for the guidance of plant quarantine inspectors, to present
that list, as supplemented since its publication.

Regulation 13 of the regulations approved August 23, 1915, prescribes that if
any fruits or plants are introduced or attempted to be introduced into New
Zealand which, though accompanied by the certificates prescribed as necessary
for such fruits or plants, are yet found on examination by an inspector to be
infected with disease, such fruit or plants shall, together with any packages,
wrappings, ete., containing the same, be dealt with as hereinafter provided:

Fruit, plants, or things infected with the diseases named in the twelfth sched-
ule shall be held and fumigated.

Fruit, plants, or things infected with the diseases named in the thirteenth
schedule shall be seized and destroyed.

Fruit, plants, or things infected with the diseases named in the fourteenth
schedule shall be held and dipped.

Fruits, plants, and things infected with the diseases named in the fifteenth
schedule shall either be reshipped at once by the importer to a place beyond
schedule shall be seized and destroyed.

Since the pests named in the twelfth schedule represent chiefly coccids and
mites which are believed susceptible to destruction on arrival in New Zealand


1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 31

by approved methods of fumigation, and those comprising the fourteenth sched-
ule represent parasitic fungi, which are regarded as susceptible to treatment
with fungicides, their names, exceeding 100, have been omitted from the list.

For convenience of reference, the names of the pests and fungi included in
the thirteenth and fifteenth schedules have been rearranged and revised by
listing them alphabetically under their scientific names, corrected in accordance
with the most recent determinations, and supplemented by the common names,
if any, recognized in the United States, followed by those used in New Zealand,
if they differ. These names are prefixed by the letter “a” to represent those
included in the thirteenth schedule and by the letter “b” as representing those
in the fifteenth schedule.

Shipments of plants and plant products infected or infested by any of the
diseases and pests named in the following list should not be certified for expor-
tation to New Zealand:

DECLARED PESTS AND DISEASES

. Aegeria opalescens Hy. Edw.—Samenoidea opalescens, western peach tree
borer.
. Aegeria tipuliformis Cl., currant or gooseberry borer; currant clearwing.
. Alternaria solani (Hl. and Mart.) L. R. Jones and A. J. Grout, early blight
of potato.

. Anarsia lineatella Zell., peach twig borer; peach moth.

. Anguillulina dipsaci (Kuhn) Gery. and Von Ben.—Tylenchus devastatriz,
eelworm or nematode of stem or bulb.

Bacillus spp., potato wet rot.

. Bacillus amylovorus (Burr.) Trev., fire blight of apple and pear.

Bacillus phytophthorus O. Appel, potato blackleg.

Bacterium citri (Hasse) Jehle, citrus canker.

Bacterium hyacinthi Wak., yellow disease; bulb bacteriosis.

Bacterium solanacearum EK. F. Smith, potato bacterial wilt; bacteriosis.

Bitter pit of apples, undetermined.

Blastodaena herellera Dup.=—Laverna herellera, pith moth; apple pith moth.

Cacoecia postvittana W1k., light brown apple moth.

Ceratitis capitata Wied.—Halterophora capitata, Mediterranean or West
Australian fruit fly.

Conioihecium chromatosporum Cda., blister and fruit-cracking disease.

Corticium vagum var. solam (B. and C.) Burt.=—Rhizoctonia solani, potato
stem rot; little potato; collar fungus; etc.

Cylas formicarius Fab., sweetpotato weevil.

Dacus cucumis Frogg., cucumber or melon fruit fly.

Dacus facialis Coq., a fruit fly.

. Dacus ferrugineus Fab.—Tephrytes tryoni, mango or Queensland fruit fly.

Dacus kirki, Frogg., a fruit fly.

Dacus melanotus Coq.—D. rarotongiensis.

Dacus kirki Frogg., a fruit fly.

Dacus psidii Frogg.

Dacus (tongiae) tongiensis Frogg., a fruit fly.

Dacus virgatus Coq., a fruit fly.

Humerus strigatus Fallen, a bulb fly.

Fusarium lycopersici Sace., sleepy disease of potato.

Fusarium oxysporum Schl., potato dry rot.

Gloeosporium venetum Speg., raspberry anthracnose or spot.

Glomerella cingulata (Ston.) Spauld. and Sch., bitter rot.

Gnorimoschema operculella Zell.=(Lita) Phthorimaea operculella, potato
tuber worm; potato moth.

Heliothis obsoleta Fab., corn ear worm; tomato caterpillar.

Heterosporium echinulatum (Berk.) Cke., carnation leaf spot; fairy-ring.

Hypholoma fasciculare Fr., raspberry root roi.

Lemon bacteriosis.

Lonchaea splendida Loew, tomato fruit fly.

Melanose (7?)

Merodon equestris Fab., narcissus bulb fly.

Mycosphaerella brassicicola (Fr.) Lindau, ring spot; cabbage leaf spot.

. Mycosphaerella tabifica (P. and D.) Johns., dry heart rot; leaf spot of beets.

. Nectria cinnabarina (Tode) Fr. and N., canker of woody plants, coral spot.

Soe) en

oS POP OO OP ONS of

Por aes BPP RS PP ee

COOP SR OOO
32 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.—March

. Nectria galligena Bres., European canker; apple canker.

. Phoma citricarpa McAlIp., citrus anthracnose.

Phomopsis citri Fawe., melanose or stem end rot.

. Phyllorera vitifoliae Fitch=P. vastatrix, grape phylloxera; vine louse.

. Phytophthora infestans (Mont.) D. By., late blight of potatoes.

Plowrightia morbosa (Schw.) Sace., black knot.

Polyporus cinnabarinus (Jacq.) Fr.=Polystictus cinnabarinus, bark rot.

Pseudomonas campestris (Pam.) E. F. Smith, black or soft rot of cabbage.

Pythiacystis citrophthora Smith and Smith, lemon brown rot.

Rhagoletis pomonella Walsh=Trypeta pomonella, apple maggot.

. Rhyzoglyphus hyacinthi Byd.—R. echinopus, bulb mite.

Riora musae Frogg.=Trypeta musae, Island or New Hebrides fruit fly.

Sclerotinia bulborum (Wak.) Rehm., onion and hyacinth sclerotinia.

Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) Mass., watery soft-rot of carrot.

. Synchytrium endobioticum (Schilb.) Pere., potato wart disease.

; oe zanthodes Broun=Dacus xanthodes, Broun’s fruit fly; pineapple
ruit fly.

. Tortrix excessama Wlk.—Cacoecia excessana, leaf roll caterpillar.

. Venturia pyrina Aderh., pear scab.

oS PO COPPESSOOSO SOS

Les A. Strona,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

B. P. Q-3848, Supplement No. 3. MarcH 2, 1986.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF CHILE

Decree No. 781, May 29, 1985, modifies paragraph (e) of article 5 of Supreme
Decree No. 105, of February 11, 1935, regulating Decree Law No. 177 of Decem-
ber 31, 1924, in the following manner:

“(e) Peach trees originating in the United States of America, that are
earriers of the diseases known as peach yellows, peach rosette, and little
peach. Plants not attacked by these diseases may be introduced in conformity
with the provisions contained in the present decree.” (Diario Oficial de la
Republica de Chile. LXIII, No. 17, 207, July 3, 1935, p. 2112.)

Paragraph (e) on page 4 of B. P. Q.348 should be replaced by the revised
paragraph (e) above quoted.

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

.

B. P. Q.—357, Supplement No. 3. FEBRUARY 28, 1936.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF ARGENTINA

SUPPLEMENTAL RESTRICTIONS ON SEED POTATOES

Following is the text, in translation, of decree No. 64961 of August 8, 1935,
supplementing the decree of July 12, 1923, on the importation of seed potatoes
into Argentina (see pp. 18 and 14, B. P. Q.-357) :

CERTIFIED SEED POTATOES

Article 1. Every shipment of seed potatoes introduced into Argentina shall be
“certified seed potatoes’, meaning thereby that they have been grown in cultures
registered in the special service for the certification of seed potatoes, subject to
preestablished regulations, and periodically inspected by the above-mentioned
service, under Federal or State Departments of Agriculture or official experiment
stations of the country of orig/n.

EACH CONTAINER MUST BEAR A COPY CERTIFICATH

Art. 2. Each container of certified seed potatoes shall have affixed thereto the
certification ticket (tag) granted by the official service that certified the tubers.


1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 33

NAMB OF VARIETY TO BE INDICATED

Art. 3. If the name of the variety of the potatoes is not inscribed on the
certification tag, it must be stamped on the container.
Arts. 4 and 5. Transitory.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

B. E. P. Q.-366, Supplement No. 38. MArcH 2, 1936.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF CZECHOSLOVAKIA
IMPORTATION OF POTATOES FROM UNITED STATES NOT PERMITTED

As a precaution against the introduction of wart disease (Synchytriwm endo-
bioticum (Schilb.) Perc.) the importation of potatoes into Czechoslovakia during
1935 is prohibited from countries other than Italy, Hungary, Spain, and
Yugoslavia.

Import permits may be granted, in exceptional cases, for consignments pro-
ceeding from the Netherlands, Canada, Germany, Poland, and Austria. (Minis-
terial Notification of Apr. 1, 1935.)

SAN JOSH SCALH PROHIBITION EXTENDED

On the basis of precautionary measures against the introduction of San Jose
scale (Aspidiotus perniciosus Comst.), the order of July 27, 1935, extends the
prohibition against the importation of living plants, stocks, cuttings, and scions,
as well as other cut plant parts with which the said goods have come in direct
contact, and finally of barrels, cases, sacks, and other containers that have
served to pack or hold such goods, to those proceeding from India, Portugal,
Spain, and Yugoslavia, inasmuch as San Jose scale has invaded those countries.

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

B. BE. P. Q.-3870, Revised. MarcH 9, 1936.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, BRITISH MANDATE OF PALESTINE

Plant Protection Order No. 2, February 26, 1934, has been revised by
Order No. 129 of September 5, 1935, as follows:

IMPORTATION SUBJECT TO INSPECTION ON ARRIVAL

All plants not included in schedules I, II, and IIi to this order may be im-
ported into Palestine, provided that they are first inspected by a plant in-
spector at the place of entry into Palestine and found free from diseases and
pests. :

PLANTS FOR SCIENTIFIC PURPOSES

All plants included in schedules I and III that are required for experimental
or scientific purposes may be imported into Palestine, provided that the writ-
ten permission of the director of agriculture and forests to import such plants
is obtained at least 7 days before the date of importation.

7

IMPORTATION OF SEED POTATOES RESTRICTED

No seed potatoes shall be imported into Palestine after October 1, 1935, save
under and in accordance with the special conditions indicated in this order.
34 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.—March

ScHEDULE I
IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

The importation of the following plants is prohibited, provided that any or
all of them may be imported for experimental or scientific purposes and pro-
vided that the prohibition does not apply to preserved, pressed, or dried fruits:

Annona spp., custard apple.

Carica papaya L., papaya, pawpaw.

Citrus spp., other than citrus fruits from Egypt.

Ficus spp., fig.

Gossypium spp., cotton, other than ginned cotton.

Hibiscus spp. ;

Lycopersicum esculentum Mill., tomato, other than tomato fruit, the bona fide
produce of Egypt.

Mangifera spp., mango, other than mango fruit, the bona fide produce of Egypt.

Morus spp., mulberry, plants only.

Musa spp., bananas.

Palms, all species other than the fruit of the date palm.

Persea spp., avocado.

Psidium guajava L., guava, plants only.

Punica granatum L., pomegranate, plants only.

Solanum melongena L., eggplant.

SCHEDULE II
INSPECTION CERTIFICATE REQUIRED

The importation of the following plants is permitted, provided that each
consignment is accompanied by a certificate that the plants are free (a) from
all diseases and pests, and (0) in particular, from the diseases and pests indi-
cated opposite the name of each plant respectively in the list below. The cer-
tificate must be signed by an officer of the phytopathological service (or any
equivalent authority) in the country of origin.

Plants and plant products Plant pests

Phyliozera vitifoliae Fitch; disease known
as court noue or arricciamento.

Bacillus mangiferae Doidge; the coccids:

Phenacoccus hirsutus Green, hibiscus mealy-

Grapevines, Vitis vinifera.
Mango fruit, the bona fide produce of Egypt.

bug ;

Chrysomphalus (ficus) aonidum UL., the
Florida red scale or fig scale; all species
of Trypetidae.

Consignments must be accompanied by
a certificate stating that the grove
from which the fruit was gathered on
inspection proved free from Phena-
coceus hirsutus Green, and Chrysom-
phalus personatus Comst., a masked
scale. Only boxed fruit will be ac-
cepted and only through the ports
of Jaffa and Haifa or Jerusalem
railway station.

Chrysomphalus (ficus) aonidum L.,
the Florida red scale or fig scale;
(Aonidiella) Chrysomphalus awran-
tii Mask., the California red scale.

Chrysomphalus aonidum L., and Phen-
acoccus hirsutus Green.

Citrus fruits from Egypt, Syria, or
Cyprus.

All other fruits, vegetables, and plants
from Egypt not ineluded in
schedule I.

Plums, quinces, apples, and pears, | Aspidiotus perniciosus Comst., San

whether nursery stock or fruit, from
Argentina, Australia, Austria, Bra-
zil, Canada, Chile, China, Hawaii,
Hungary, India, Japan, Mesopo-
tamia, Mexico, New Zealand, Por-
tugal, Rumania, South. Africa,
Spain, United States of America,
and Yugoslavia, also apple, quince,
and pear nursery stocks from coun-
tries other than those above men-
tioned.

Jose scale. The following grades of
fruit will be accepted without certif-
icate: Fancy No. 1, Extra Fancy,
and Fancy grades from United
States of America, Scuth Africa,
New Zealand, and Australia.


1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 35

Plants and plant products Plant pests

Maize (Zea mays L.) seed for sowing | Sclerospora graminicola (Sacc.)

only. Schroet., downy mildew.

Seed beans, Colletotrichum lindemuthianum (Sace.
and Magn.) Briosa and Cav., bean
anthracnose. :

Potatoes for consumption. (Phthorimaea) Gnorimoschema oper-

culella Zell., potato tuber worm, and
Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say, the
Colorado potato beetle.

Cabbage and cauliflower seeds. Bacterium campestre (Pam.) E. F.
Smith = Pseudomonas campestris,
black rot of cabbage.

Fresh cherries. Rhagoletis cerasi L., cherry fruit fly.

Fresh peaches. Clasterosporium carpophilum (Lev.)

Aderh., peach dieback.

ScHEDULE III
PLANTS FOR SCIENTIFIC PURPOSES ADMITTED UNDER CERTIFICATION

The following plants, if required for scientific purposes, shall, in addition
to the said written permission of the Director of Agriculture and Forests, be
accompanied by a certificate that the plants are free: (a) From all diseases
and pests, (0) in particular, from the diseases or pests indicated opposite the
name of each plant, respectively, named below. The certificate must be signed
by an officer of the phytopathological service (or any equivalent authority)
in the country of origin.

Plants and plant products Plant pests

Citrus nursery stock and budwood. (Cryptorhynchus) Sternochetus mangi-
(Hasse) Doidge, citrus canker;
Sphaceloma (fawcetti) citri, citrus
seab.

Mango stock or budwood. Bacillus mangiferae Doidge, bacterial
blight of mango; Chrysomphalus
personatus Comst., masked scale;
Aonidiella aurantii Mask.; and
Phenacoccus hirsutus Green.

Mango fruit, not the bona-fide produce | (Cryptorhynchus) Sternochetus mangi-

of Egypt. ferae Fab., mango weevil; (Cryp-
torhynchus) Sternochetus gravis
; Fab.; all species of Trypetidae.

Fig. (Ficus spp.) Chrysomphalus (ficus) aonidum L.; C.

personatus Comst., masked scale.

Schedules IV and V concern the importer.

SCHEDULE VI
DISEASES FROM WHICH SEED POTATOES MUST BE FREE

Potato tuber worm, (Phthorimaea) Gnorimoschema operculella Zell.

Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say.

Wart disease, Synchytriwm endobioticum (Schilb.) Pere.

Powdery scab, Spongospora subterranea (Walls.) Lang.

Common scab, Oospora (Actinomyces) scabies Thaxt.

Blackleg, Bacillus phytophthorus O. Appel.

Any consignment of potatoes that on inspection is found to be infected with
powdery scab or common scab to the extent of more than 10 percent of the
total number of tubers will be considered as not free from disease and be
liable to reexportation or destruction.

Len A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.
36 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.—March

B. E. P. Q.-389 MAkrc#H 11, 1986.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, GRAND DUCHY OF LUXEMBOURG

The Nachrichtenblatt fur den Deutschen Pflanzenschutzdienst XV: 1, Jan-
uary 1935, summarizes the decision of the Grand Duke of December 4, 1934.
The summary, in translation, reads as follows:

SPECIAL IMPORT AUTHORIZATION REQUIRED

A special authorization is required for the importation of the following
articles: Potatoes, cereals of all kinds, fruits and vegetables of all kinds,
greenhouse and open-air plants and shrubs.

AUTHORIZED PORTS OF BPNTRY

Importation may be made only by rail and on the following highways:
Diedenhofen-Friesingen, Diedenhofen-Mondoft, Deutsch-Oth-Esch-Alz, Trier-
Wasserbillig, Rennig-Rennich, Arlon-Steinfort, Arlon-Oberpallen, Athus-Rodin-
gen, Bastnach-Donkols, St. Bith-Wemperhardt, Stavelot-Wemperhardt, and
Perl-Schengen.

PHYTOSANITARY CERTIFICATH REQUIRED

However, the phylloxera regulations promulgated by the Order of August 20,
1886, prescribe that trees and plants from abroad must be accompanied by a
certificate of competent authority affirming that they proceed from nurseries
that are free from injurious insects and plant diseases. Otherwisé, they are
subject to inspection, and infested shipments may be reladen for return to the
country of origin, disinfected, or burned.

CERTIFICATE REQUIRED FOR POTATOES, TOMATOES, AND EGGPLANTS

The Order of September 24, 1928, prescribes that potatoes, and the fruits and
plants of tomatoes and eggplants will be admitted to entry and transit only
when accompanied by a certificate issued by the phytopathological service of
the country of origin, affirming that those products proceed from a district free
from the Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say) and from the
potato wart (Synchytriwm endobioticum (Schilb.) Pere.). Products grown in,
and shipped from, a locality at least 20 kilometers from any infestation of
Leptinotarsa are considered to be from an exempt district.

Lee A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quaran.ine.

B. E. P. Q.-390 MArcH 19, 1936.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, BRITISH COLONY AND
PROTECTORATE OF SIERRA LEONE

This summary of the plant-quarantine import restrictions of the British
Colony and Protectorate of Sierra Leone has been prepared for the information
of nurserymen, plant quarantine officials, and others interested in the exporta-
tion of plants and plant products to that Colony.

It was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant quarantine inspector, in Charge
of Foreign Service Information, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines, from
the original text of the Destructive Pests Ordinance, 1924, revision of 1925,
and orders promulgated thereunder, and reviewed by the Director of Agriculture
of Sierra Leone.

The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct and
complete up to the time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used inde-
pendently of, nor as a substitute for, the original texts, and it is not to be
interpreted as legally authoritative.

Avery S. Hoyt,
Acting Ohief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 37

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, BRITISH COLONY AND
PROTECTORATE OF SIERRA LEONE

BAsic LEGISLATION

The Destructive Pests Ordinance of February 19, 1912, revision of 1925.

This ordinance empowers the Governor in council from time to time to
make such orders as may appear expedient for preventing the introduction
into the Colony of any insect, fungus, or other pest destructive to agricultural
or horticultural crops or to trees or plants, and for preventing the spreading
in the Colony of any such insect, fungus, or other pest.

IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

Trees, plants, soil, leaves, branches, stems, roots, seeds, or any other part of
a tree or plant, or any packages or packing materials which have contained
or been in contact with any such trees, plants, or parts thereof: Importation into
the Colony prohibited from Central America, South America, and the West
Indies, to prevent the introduction of the witches’-broom disease, Marasmius
perniciosus Stahel (Order in Council No. 12, Sept. 29, 1930).

IMPORTATION RESTRICTED:

Cocoa trees or plants (Theobroma cacao L.), or the leaves, branches, stems,
roots, seeds, or fruit of any such trees or plants: May be imported only through
the port of Freetown and such other ports as may be approved by the Governor,
and only subject to inspection by the Director of Agriculture. If such plants
or parts thereof are deemed likely to introduce any insect, fungus, or pest,
the director may order their immediate destruction, or their disinfection under
his supervision at the expense of the importer. (Order constituting the schedule
to the Destructive Pests Ordinance of 1924.)

Citrus plants, including the leaves, branches, stems, roots, seeds, or fruits:
May be imported only under the conditions prescribed for Theobroma cacao, in
order to prevent the introduction of—

Diseases:
Bacillus citrimaculans Doidge, bacterial spot (South Africa).
Bacterium citri (Hasse) Doidge, citrus canker.
Bacterium syringae (Van Hall) HE. F. Smith=B. citrarefaciens H. A. Lee,
blast.
Colletotrichum gloeosporioides Penz. and withertip.
Gloeosporium limetticolum (R. F. Clausen).
Oidium spp., mildew.
Pests:
Aleurocanthus wogiumi Ashby, citrus blackfly.
Aleurothrixzus floccosus Mask.
(Aonidiella) Chrysomphalus aurantii Mask., California red scale.
Ceratitis capitata Wied., Mediterranean fruit fly.
Chrysomphalus (ficus) aonidum L., Florida red scale.
Coccus pseudomagnoliarum Kuw., coccid.
Dialeurodes citri Riley and Howard, citrus whitefly.
Dialeurodes citrifolii Morg., cloudy-winged whitefly.
Icerya purchasi Mask.; cottony-cushion scale.
Icerya seychellarum Westw., coccid.
Parlatoria ziziphus Lucas, coccid.
Phyllocoptes oleivorus Ashm., citrus rust mite.
Pseudococcus adonidum L., long-tailed mealybug.
Tylenchus semi-penetrans Cobb, eelworm or nematode.

(Order in Council No. 5, Feb. 9, 1929.)

Banana plants, including the leaves, branches, stems, roots, seeds, or fruits:
May be imported only under the conditions prescribed for Theobroma cacao, in
order to prevent the introduction of “bunchy top”; Panama disease, Fusarium
cubense K EF. Smith, strains other than those present in Sierra Leone.
38 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan—March

(Order in Council No. 5, Feb. 9, 1929.)

Except as indicated under the captions ‘Importation Prohibited” and “Impor-
tation Restricted”, there are no phytosanitary restrictions upon the importation
of plants and plant products into the Colony or Protectorate of Sierra Leone.

B. E. P. Q.-391. ~ Marcu 19, 1936.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, BRITISH GOLD COAST COLONY

This summary of the plant-quarantine import restrictions of the Gold Coast
Colony has been prepared for the information of nurserymen, plant quarantine
officials, and others interested in the exportation of plants and plant products to
that country.

It was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant quarantine inspector, in charge of
Foreign Service Information, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines, from the
Plants (Injurious Pests) Ordinance, No. 37, of December 28, 1923, and orders
promulgated thereunder, and reviewed by the Director of Agriculture of the
Colony.

The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct and com-
plete up to the time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used independently
of, nor as a substitute for, the original texts, and it is not to be interpreted as
legally authoritative.

Avery S. Hoyt,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology end Plant Quarantine.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT Sener OF THE BRITISH GOLD COAST

BASIc LEGISLATION
The Plants (Injurious Pests) Ordinance, December 28, 19253.
CoNCISE SUMMARY

IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

Nothing.
IMPORTATION CONDITIONAL

Any plant from Central America, South America, and the West Indies:
Importation subject to a license from the Director of Agriculture (Order No. 20
of 1930), to prevent the introduction of Fusarium cubense E. F. Smith, Panama
disease, and Marasmius perniciosus Stahel, witches’-broom.

Cocoa (Theobroma cacao L.), cotton (Gossypium spp.), and rubber (Hevea
spp.) : Importation from any source subject to a license from the Director
(Ordinance No. 37 of 1923) to prevent the introduction of Marasmius perniciosus
Stahel, witches’-broom ; Heliothis obsoleta Fab., corn ear worm; diseases likely
to affect cocoa.

Cola (Cola spp.), and bananas (Musa spp.): Importation from any source
subject to a license from the Director (Order No. 44 of 1926) to prevent the
introduction of Fusarium vasinfectum Atk.; Fusarium cubense HE. F. Smith,
and diseases likely to affect cocoa.

IMPORTATION UNRESTRICTED

All nursery stock, other plants, seeds, bulbs, fruits and vegetables, other than
those above specifically mentioned, may be imported into this Colony from any
country without plant quarantine restriction.

ORDINANCE FOR THE PREVENTION AND TREATMENT OF PESTS INJURIOUS TO PLANTS
(The Plants (Injurious Pests) Ordinance, Dec. 28, 1923)

SHORT TITLE

SEecTIon 1. This ordinance may be cited as “The Plants (Injurious Pests)
Ordinance, 1923” and shall become effective January 1, 1924.


1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 39

DEFINITIONS

Seo. 2. “Plant” includes tree, shrub, and any other vegetable growth, as also
any part thereof.

‘Declared plant” includes cocoa (Theobroma cacao L.), cotton (Gossypium
spp.), and rubber (Hevea spp.) plants, as also any other plant which may be
declared under section 3 to be a declared plant ;

“Injurious pest” includes any disease, pest, fungus, parasite, insect, or animal,
declared under section 3 to be an injurious pest ;

“Prescribed port of entry” includes the ports of Accra and Seccondee, as also
any other port declared under section 3 to be a prescribed port of entry.

POWER OF GOVERNOR TO DECLARE PLANTS

Src. 8. It shall be lawful for the Governor by order under his hand:

(1) To declare any plant to be a “declared plant” ;

(2) To declare any disease, pest, fungus, parasite, insect, or animal, to be an
injurious pest;

(3) To declare any port of the Colony to be a “prescribed port of entry” ;

(4) To prescribe any treatment of an injurious pest and any treatment or
destruction of a declared plant to be a “prescribed treatment”, for the purposes
of this ordinance. o

ENTRY TO BE MADE AT A PRESCRIBED PORT

Sec. 4. No person shall import into the Colony any declared plant except at a
prescribed port of entry, namely, Accra and Seccondee.

RESTRICTED MATERIALS:

Src. 5. (1) No person shall import into the Colony any of the following articles
or materials except under license of the Director of Agriculture:

(a) Declared plants;

(6) Wrappings, cases, packages, or other coverings which contain or have
contained declared plants;

(c) Soil or earth;

(d) Wrappings, cases, packages, or other covering which contain or have
contained soil or earth;

(e) Any article or material of whatever kind packed with such soil or plant.

Paragraphs 2 and 38 relate to the character of licenses and authorize the
seizure of shipments imported contrary to the regulations.

Sxos. 6 to 14. Insular administration of the ordinance, penalties, etc.

GOVERNOR EMPOWERED TO MAKE REGULATIONS

Seo. 15. It shall be lawful for the Governor in council to make regulations for
the further, better, or more convenient effectuation of any of the provisions or
purposes of this ordinance.

PENALTIES IMPOSED FOR VIOLATIONS OF THE PLANT
QUARANTINE ACT

According to reports received by the Bureau during the period January 1 to
March 31, 1936, penalties have recently been imposed by the proper Federal
authorities for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act, as follows:

, QUARANTINES AFFECTING MEXICAN PRODUCTS

In the case of the United States versus the persons listed below, for attempting
to smuggle in contraband plant material, the penalties indicated were imposed by
the United States customs officials at the following ports:
40 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.—March



Name Port Contraband Penalty
Mo Garipe yy... acme soo eee Brownsville, Tex....| 12:avocados........_._.J2usaemeee ee $1. 00
Albert: Hernandercus {2222.22 alee Cibes ot ot Aen 1 DAPBY Sans os 5t 2S eee eee 1.00
EFING ER OT) HU OB ls in Seid eens ae Se ee 2 SDDIOS_ . ...--naee sees esaee eee 1.00
Damacio Dominguoer.- 22-2. = 2-22 -Se Oe sath ae ee lmamey.. 22-02 2b ec e eee 1.00
OA. Weridvegyees 523 fe oe eee dots. $1954 Siapplessi cl. 2. coche see 2. 90
Jesus/Valeneia .jc2vend 2 tense E] Paso, Tex.._.-... I OPEN GO ne isin b tears 4 Uae ee 1.00
Simon (Caldara. 0. 226 ee ee oe CLO oo eet ee 14 Pus VOS...- oo 1.00
J; Pineda 23) ete: See Taredo, Tex 22s. }orangé:2.. ) 3. AL eee eee 1.00
Mrs. Jesus Maria Muno-----_---.--|_---- doki ital. Ses Bi potatoess2. 102. 2a. 3162 fae 1.90
Ricardo Medina. 2) t 2 24d See leo) CO. 28.2 eae LOvange scent ie atl eee 1.00
Valentine Santa Cruz} 20-2] 8 002-325-250 -5eeee 2 8V0CadOS. _ = ee 1.00
TAGY. (name THknOWII). 22-2 e122 C0282) ee 7 avocados: -. 2.22.22 eee 1.00
Mrs. Petra Martinez Sosa__.......-}_.--- do. 4 = _ 2 ees 9 avocados... ..2.. 22 eee 1.00
BGarOseebaaee |e TE Se do. *! eee 2 Oranges. O ._ -.. ee 1.00
Mrs. Antonio Maria de Valencio-_-_-_}|_---- AQ. => eee ] PUSVa~- 34. ~--4-2-s- eee 1.00
RAP er Wer oe seer ee ke os C0: 404. ees 4 sweeb limes... !.-._..2 3 =e ee 1.00
earengimo ValdGz—7 ot oe ool ones Gos 2 ee eee 9 guavas and 3 avocados.---.-.------ 1.00
Mrs. Adelia de Eseobelo Martinez_|_-_-- Gos! 277 EOS Spee S:plantsi21i8.2: 22 as ei 1.00
Moseo Mallonada § +22. 225. 2 -eSs5t|o2 Q0+sc..2226:™ 6. sweet dimes. 22235 s-5- speedo eee 1. 00
Mrs. Manuel Gonzales__.__.._.-_-_]___-- 00: Sees ee 40 plants! + __ 2-2 2 eee 1.00
PCr RTI SDR et ee do 25.32/25) 10 plants:.......-...._... 3 eee 1.00
Dirs: Jesus rerreral 22 10) Se ea aes | dot Sib: Bk view 6 guavas and 2 sweet limes__-__------ 1.00
FimiliorVda'de:Avalos 2. %<2- . Seu) 265 d0sn boa Ne 2 DISH 3 oot - cece nae 1.00
AUCIANIAEOR 55 thee: Fe eel eae One ae oe eo 4 sapotes..__-.-- 2. = 1.00
WiTs. Ly. B.-de ozane. + 222s ae Gi) Sey 2 ek CE 3 avoeados.. £.. 22/2) 2a 1.00
pesosa Garcia. jahee = vobe! s+ Sa eee 03 38 eee 5 avocados..__-.._.._. See 1.00
irs: ‘Pedro Roche... _- =". see Goss ee 2.orangves.. 2 =. ee 1.00
Mrs. Jesus Valenzuela._____..__-_ _-]-...=- Gove t e 12 avocados, 4 mangoes, and 3 oranges. 1.00



ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND
PLANT QUARANTINE ,

LEE A. Strona, Chief.

S. A. RoHweEr, Assistant Chief.

Avery S. Hoyt, Assistant Chief.

F. H. Spencer, Business Manager.

R. P. Currin, Editor.

Masex CoLcorp, Librarian.

J. A. Hystop, in Charge, Division of Insect Pest Survey and Information.

J. 1. HAMBLETON, in Charge, Division of Bee Culture Investigations.

D. L. VAN Drye, in Charge, Division of Fruit Insect Investigations.

F. C. CRAIGHEAD, in Charge, Division of Forest Insect Investigations.

W. H. Wuirs, in Charge, Division of Truck Crop and Garden Insect Investiga-
tions.

P. N. ANNAND, in Charge, Division of Cereal and Forage Insect Investigations.

R. W. HarNep, in Charge, Division of Cotton Insect Investigations.

F. C. BisHopp, in Charge, Division of Insects Affecting Man and Animals.

L. A. HAWKINS, in Charge, Division of Control Investigations.

R. C. RoarK, in Charge, Division of Insecticides and Fungicides.

C. F. W. Murseseck, in Charge, Division of Insect Identification.

C. P. CLAUSEN, in Charge, Division of Foreign Parasite Introduction.

S. B. Fracker, in Charge, Division of Plant Disease Control.

B. M. Gappis, in Charge, Division of Domestic Plant Quarantines.

BE. R. SAsscer, in Charge, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines.

A. F. Bureess, in Field Charge, Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail Moth Control
(headquarters, Greenfield, Mass.).

L. H. WorTH Ley, in Field Charge, Japanese Beetle and Gypsy Moth and Brown-
Tail Moth Quarantines, European Corn Borer Certification, and Dutch Elm
Disease Eradication (headquarters, White Plains, N. Y.).

R, BE. McDonatp, in Field Charge, Pink Bollworm and Thurberia Weevil Quar-
antines (headquarters, San Antonio, Tea.).

oe este in Field Charge, Date Scale Quarantine (headquarters, Indio,

alif.). :

P, A. Homatr, in Field Charge, Mexican Fruit Fly Quarantine (headquarters,
Harlingen, Tez.).

A. C. Baker, in Field Charge, Fruit Fly Investigations (headquarters, Meaico
City, Mexico).

W. E. Dove, in Field Charge, Screw Worm Control (headquarters, Atlanta, Ga.).

U. $. COVERNBENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1936


8. R. A.—B. E. P. Q. No. 127 Issued September 1936

United States Department of Agriculture

BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS

APRIL-JUNE 1936

CONTENTS

Page
eereniine and other official announcements____.. - = ---_--__---4_--.-_-2+-+-+----22------------.--- 41
Announcements relating to date-palm scale quarantine (no. 6)__--__--_-_-_---_-___-___-_-____--. 41
Wa PE ENIOMIUATAULINOG TOVOKEG2: 2. P72 shu srt ete ee 41
Nomen mailing oF date-palm seale quarantine. 2-22. 5. 22+ S222 2c 222s ise cel eee kee 42
SRSA EIS RTOSIOOS EITITS DOT See ee eens yen ed wee eo 42
Announcements relating to nursery stock, plant, and seed quarantine (no. 37)_-_-___--_____-___ 42
POM PHEUALIONS DYNAM (Bt be b02)~ ne! ok ee a ee 42
Psiiaieniensite collectors Of-customs (iD) 48257) 2. i > bt hohe ee eo 43
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (no. 48)______-___________-_--___-________. 43
Seeder eis, Conus, Atid tlbers (bi: b. ©. 304) 2. se te 43

List of articles exempt from certification requirements under the Japanese beetle quarantine
eee Aurea reer ete eh eT Pera rethiley eis 8 Re i oo ie Oe ee el ee 44
Announcement relating to pink bollworm quarantine (no. 52)_____=____________-______________- 45

Administrative instructions—Treatment requirements removed as a condition for interstate

shipment of baled lint and linters, and products thereof produced or manufactured from
sterilized cottonseed, from the pink bollworm regulated area in Florida (B. E. P. Q. 393)__ 45
Announcement relating to Dutch elm disease quarantine (no. 71)__-_-___-___-______-___________- 45
ee SAA SUAS CE RSEISOOS REST See eee ee SO ee an ee 45
en Mnnnn ERE soo toe 8 de SEE TSE) ip ee 587 Wate ye ev iia siesta Co Bees 46
Lermims) Inspection oe plants aud plant products: 23. 222 = bs 2 ee 58s Secs 46
Plants and plant products addressed to places in Idaho____-________-_--________________. 46
POM ALA His peCtiorl plnce Il OTesOn = 2-22) 18 oa) A Te ee 46
inepocwion a platta nnd plant products from abroad. _.-...-...-._._--..-.-..=._..-_t »s) 46

ma ee import restrictions, Republic of Argentina (B. P. Q. 357, supplement
a a ne pee rasa en Nek ee ee ee a eee 48
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Island of Cyprus (B. P. Q. 360, supplement no. 1)______ 48

Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Poland (B. E. P. Q. 368, supplement no. 1)_ 49
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Presidency of Antigua, British West Indies(B. E. P. Q.

aa PS REMUS UAE ES EN PERC V SL) ee ee he ee ee ee eee eeeok 53
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Dominican Republic (B. E. P. Q. 396)______________- 53
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Colony of Grenada, British West Indies (B. E. P. Q.

ee eee eee eee toe a a a Pe A ee LF ee ete 56
ieee import restrictions, French Colony of New Caledonia and Dependencies

PSE PR eS DTU) ee tte ee eee ee ie re
a ae import restrictions, Presidency of Dominica, British West Indies (B. E.

ah tag) eee eg in Ses me ea 2 eg ee ee eo NF te cl 59
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Portugal (B. E. P. Q. 400)_______________ 61
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Spain (B. E. P. Q. 401)__-________________ 64
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Austria (B. E. P. Q. 402)________________ 68
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of France (B. E. P. Q. 403)__--______________ 73
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, British India (B. E. P. Q. 404)_______________________ 79
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Germany (B. E. P. Q. 405)______________ 83

Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act_____.____-.__---_______--_________- 91
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine_______--__________________________ 93

QUARANTINE AND OTHER OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO DATE-PALM SCALE QUARANTINE
(NO. 6)

DATE-PALM SCALE QUARANTINE REVOKED

(Press notice)
JUNE 19, 1936.

The apparent eradication of the date-palm seale has led Secretary of Agricul-
ture Wallace to revoke the Federal date-palm scale quarantine (no. 6), effective
July 1, 1936. Under the quarantine, which was promulgated in March 1913, the
interstate movement of date palms and date-palm offshoots was regulated from
certain areas in California, Arizona, and Texas on account of the Parlatoria
seale, an injurious date-palm scale insect.

88937—36——1 41
42 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE _ [April-June

Eradication of this pest, which has been the subject of a vigorous eradication
campaign conducted cooperatively by the affected States and the United States
Department of Agriculture for a number of years, has apparently now been
effected, as intensive inspection of the previously infested areas has revealed no
infestation since 1934, the infestation at that time being extremely light. It is

therefore believed that domestic quarantine restrictions may be removed with

respect to the Parlatoria scale with safety to the date-growing areas.
NOTICE CF LIFTING OF DATE-PALM SCALE QUARANTINE
(Effective on and after July 1, 1936)

The fact has been determined by the Secretary of Agriculture, as a result of
intensive field inspection work, that there is, at the present time, no known
infestation in the States of Arizona, California, and Texas or elsewhere in the
continental United States by the Parlatoria scale (Parlatoria blanchardi), and it
is the belief of the Department that Notice of Quarantine No. 6, on account of
the Parlatoria scale (Parlatoria blanchardi) and the Phoenicococcus scale (Phoe-
nicococcus marlatti), with regulations, which was promulgated Mareh 1, 1913,
and which became effective on March 24, 1913, as well as amendment no. 1
thereto, promulgated November 18, 1932, which eliminated all reference in the
quarantine and regulations to the Phoenicococcus scale, may now be removed
with safety to the country as a whole.

Now, therefore, I, H. A. Wallace, Secretary of Agriculture, under authority
conferred by the Plant Quarantine Act, approved August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315),
as amended by the act of Congress approved March 4, 1917 (39 Stat. 1184, 1165),
do hereby remove and revoke the quarantine placed by said Notice of Quarantine
No. 6 and the amendment thereto upon the States of Arizona, California, and
Texas, and do also hereby remove and revoke the rules and regulations supple-
mental thereto, such removal and revocation to take effect on July 1, 1936.

Done at the city of Washington this 11th day of June 1936.

Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.

[SEAL ] H. A. WALLACE,

Secretary of Agriculture.

INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS

Post OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, June 30, 1936.
Postmaster.

My Dear Stir: Your attention is invited to the enclosed notice of the United
States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quaran-
tine, lifting the date-palm scale quarantine.

This quarantine (no. 6) was promulgated in March 1913 to regulate the
interstate movement of date palms and date-palm offshoots from certain areas
in California, Arizona, and Texas, on account of the Parlatoria seale, an
injurious date-palm scale insect. By order of the Secretary of Agriculture,
under date of June 11, 1936, quarantine no. 6 was revoked, effective July 1,
1936, and thereafter becomes noneffective. :

You will please be governed accordingly.

Very truly yours,
C. B. EILENBERGER,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO NURSERY STOCK, PLANT, AND
SEED QUARANTINE (NO. 37)

B: Ey P.'Q: 392
PLANT IMPORTATIONS BY MAIL
AprIL 13, 1986.

Experience has shown that many packages containing plant material re-
stricted as to entry by foreign plant quarantines are daily being received in
the mails without permit authorization for such entry, or in violation of a
prohibition against the importation. Obviously, a large proportion of these
packages are sent without any knowledge of the quarantine restrictions. At
1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 43

the same time an increasing tendency is noted toward the use of the mails
for authorized importations.

A convenient means was established several years ago for the orderly entry
under permit of restricted plant material by mail when provision exists for
entry by this means. Special mailing tags are provided for the material under
permit, and these tags are to be transmitted to the sender. Instructions in
four languages for sending the packages accompany the tags. Packages ad-
dressed by these tags are routed direct to the inspection station indicated on
them and, after the material has passed inspection, are released to go forward
to destination without the payment of additional postage.

Packages containing restricted plant material not sent forward in this man-
ner are liable to be returned to the country of origin. However, to accord
a more sympathetic treatment toward the addressee who has a package con-
taining material of this character addressed to him but who has no permit
for the entry or whose sender did not follow the instructions and use a special
mailing tag, an opportunity will be given the addressee to apply for a permit
to import such of the material as may be enterable by mail. Should the
addressee fail to take advantage of this opportunity, disposition will be made
of the package in accordance with existing postal, customs, and plant quaran-
tine regulations covering the procedure.

Persons importing seeds of woody perennial plants are cautioned to apply
for and receive a permit and mail tags and, in turn, supply the sender with
these tags, if they are planning to import such seeds by mail. Field, vegetable,
and flower seeds, when free from soil, unless prohibited or restricted entry
by special quarantines, do not require a permit for importation. Flower seeds
are defined as seeds of annual, biennial, or even perennial flowering plants,
which are essentially herbaceous, namely, plants which perish annually down
to, and sometimes including, the roots.

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

INSTRUCTIONS TO COLLECTORS OF CUSTOMS

NOTICE OF QUARANTINE 37, NURSERY STOCK, PLANT, AND SEED QUARANTINE, WITH
REVISED RULES AND REGULATIONS (T. D. 44600, As AMENDED By T. D. 47515,
SUPERSEDED) (T. D. 48257)

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,
OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONER OF CUSTOMS,
Washington, D. C., April sy 1936.
To Collectors of Customs and Others Concerned:

Notice of Quarantine 37, with revised rules and regulations applicable to
nursery stock, plants, and seeds from certain foreign countries, has been re-
printed by the United States Department of Agriculture as of January 1936, so
as to include amendment 2 (T. D. 47515). It also includes footnote corrections
and brings the appendices up to date.

Copies of the reprinted Notice of Quarantine will be sent to all collectors of
customs for their information and guidance.

The number of this Treasury decision should be noted as a marginal reference
for article 559 (a) of the Customs Regulations of 1931.

JAMES H. Moyte,
Commissioner of Customs.

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE
(NO. 48)
B. E. P. Q. 394 (Supersedes P. Q. C. A. 274)
LIST OF TRUE BULBS, CORMS, AND TUBERS
(Exempted under regulation 6, sec. A (1), Quarantine No. 48)

JUNE 1, 1936.
The accompanying list of bulbs, corms, and tubers is issued for the information
of inspectors of the Bureau who are assigned to the enforcement of the regula-
tions of the Japanese beetle quarantine. It is believed that the information will
44 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

also be useful to shippers within the regulated areas. Regulation 6, section
A (1), under Quarantine No. 48, reads as follows:

“True bulbs, corms, and tubers, when dormant, except for storage growth, and
when free from soil, are exempt from the requirement of certification, except
that this exemption does not apply to dahlia tubers.”

The key letter in parentheses before each name indicates whether the variety
in question is a true bulb, corm, or tuber, (B) standing for true bulb, (C) for
corm, and (T) for tuber. Plant roots of a bulbous nature not given on this list
are, in most cases, fleshy rhizomes and are therefore not exempt from certifi-
eation. (C) Acidanthera, (T) Alstroemeria, (B) Amaryllis, (C) Amorpho-
phallus (devilstongue), (B) Anemone (bulbous), (C) Antholyza, (C) Babiana,
(T) Begonia (tuberous-rooted), (T) Boussingaultia (Madeira vine), (C) Bro-
diaea, (B) Bulbocodiwm, (C) Calochortus (Mariposa lily or globe-tulip), (B)
Camassia (wild hyacinth), (B) Chionodoxa (Glory-of-the-Snow), (B) Colchi-
cum (autumn crocus), (T) Colocasia (Caladium esculentum and fancy-leaved
varieties), (B) Cooperia (evening-star and rainlily), (B) Crinum, (C) Crocus,
(C) Cyclamen, (C) Dierama, (T) Cinnamon vine (Dioscorea batatas), (T)
Eranthis (winter aconite), (B) Hrythroniuwm (troutlily or dog’s-tooth violet),
(B) Eucharis (amazonlily), (C) Freesia, (B) Fritillaria (fritillary), (B)
Galanthus (snowdrop), (B) Galtonia (Hyacinthus candicans) (summer hya-
cinth), (C) Gladiolus, (T) Gloxinia (see Sinningia), (B) Hippeastrum
(house-amaryllis), (B) Hyacinthus (hyacinth, Dutch and Roman), (B)
Hymenocallis (spiderlily), (B) Iris, bulbous (Dutch, Spanish, and English),
(B) Ismene (see Hymenocallis), (B) Ixia, (B) Iwiolirion, (B) Lachenalia
(cape-cowslip), (B) Lapeyrousia (Anomatheca), (B) Leucojum (snowflake),
(B) Lilium (lily bulbs, imported and domestic), (B) JLycoris (cluster-
amaryllis), (B) Milla (Mexican star), (B) Muscari (grape and feathered
hyacinths), (B) Narcissus (daffodil, jonquil), (B) Nerine, (B) Ornithogalum
(Star-of-Bethlehem), (B) Ovalis, (B) Pancratium, (B) Polianthes (tuberose),
(B) Puschkinia, (T) Ranunculus, (B) Scilla (squill, star hyacinth), (T)
Sinningia speciosa (gloxinia), (C) Sparaxris (wandflower), (B) Sprekelia
(St. James lily), (B) Sternbergia, (B) Tigridia (tiger flower or shellfiower),
(C) Tritonia (Montbretia), (B) Tulipa (tulip), (B) Vallota (scarboro-lily),
(B) Watsonia (buglelily), (T) Zantedeschia (Richardia) (calla, white, yellow,
spotted; arum-lily), and (B) Zephyranthes (zephyriily). .

Lee A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

B. E. P. Q. .395

LIST OF -ARTICLES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS UNDER THE
JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE

JUNE 1, 1936.

In accordance with the proviso in Notice of Quarantine No. 48, as revised,
effective March 16, 1936, the following articles, the interstate movement of
which is not considered to constitute a risk of Japanese beetle dissemination,
are exempted from the restrictions of the regulations of this quarantine:

Balsam pillows, when composed of balsam needles only.

Cut orchids.

Dyed moss and dyed sand, when heat treated, and when so labeled on the
outside of each container of such materials.

Floral designs or “set pieces”, including wreaths, sprays, casket covers, and
all formal florists’ designs other than bouquets and cut flowers. ;

Greensand or greensand marl, when treated and so labeled on the outside
of each container of such materials.

Herbarium specimens, when dried, pressed, and treated, and when so labeled
on the outside of each container of such materials.

Imported peat, when shipped in the unopened original container and labeled
as to each container with the counfry of origin.

Manure, peat, compost, or humus, when dehydrated and either shredded,
ground, pulverized, or compressed, and when so labeled on the outside of
each commercial container of such materials.

Orchid plants, when growing exclusively in Osmunda fiber.

Mushroom spawn, in brick, flake, or pure culture form.


1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 45

Osmunda fiber, osmundine, or orchid peat (Osmunda cinnamomea and
O. claytoniana).
Resurrection plant or bird’s-nest moss (Selaginella lepidophylla).
Sheet moss (Calliergon schriberi and Thuridium recognitum).
Sphagnum moss, bog moss, or peat moss, when dried and baled (Sphag-
naceae ).
Submerged aquatic plants, including—
Crytocoryne spp.
Eelgrass or tape grass (Vallisneria spiralis).
False loosestrife (Ludwigia mulerttii).
Fish grass, Washington plant, or fanwort (Cabomba caroliniana).
Hornwort or coontail (Ceratophylium demersum).
Water milfoil (Myriophylluwm spp.).
Water weed, ditch moss, water thyme, or anacharis (Hlodea canadensis).
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO PINK BOLLWORM QUARANTINE
(NO. 52)

BBs Pi-Q: 393

ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS—TREATMENT REQUIREMENTS REMOVED AS A
CONDITION FOR INTERSTATE SHIPMENT OF BALED LINT AND LINTERS, AND
PRODUCTS THEREOF PRODUCED OR MANUFACTURED FROM STERILIZED COT-
TONSEED, FROM THE PINK BOLLWORM REGULATED AREA IN FLORIDA

(Issued under regulations 8, 9, 10, and 11 of Quarantine No. 52—domestic)

APRIL 13, 1936.

In accordance with the authorizations contained in regulations 8, 9, 10, and 11
of Quarantine No. 52 (domestic), on account of the pink bollworm, notice is
hereby given that baled cotton lint, baled cotton linters, and products thereof

produced or manufactured from sterilized cottonseed may be moved interstate

from the regulated area in Florida without restriction, other than that a permit
issued by the United States Department of Agriculture must be secured and
attached to the articles or shipping papers in accordance with the methods
prescribed in regulation 15 of said quarantine.

The removal of treatment requirements for the above-mentioned products is
considered safe due to the fact that no pink bollworm infestation has been found
in the regulated area of Florida during the 1935 season.

Len A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO DUTCH ELM DISEASE QUARANTINE
(NO. 71)

INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS

Post OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, D. C., April 27, 1936.
Postmaster:

My Dear SiR: Your attention is invited to the enclosed copy of the latest revi-
sion of Quarantine Order No. 71 of the United States Department of Agriculture,
extending the Dutch elm disease quarantine, by which you will be governed. See
paragraph 1, section 595, Postal Laws and Regulations.

Very truly yours,
C. B. EILENBERGER,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.
46 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS

TERMINAL INSPECTION OF PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS
PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS ADDRESSED TO PLACES IN IDAHO

Post OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, June 1, 1936.

The State of Idaho has reestablished places for terminal inspection under
the provisions of the act of March 4, 1915, embodied in section 596, Postal Laws
and Regulations, of the following plants and plant products:

“All florists’ stock, trees, shrubs, vines, cuttings, grafts, scions, buds, fruit
pits and other seeds of fruit and ornamental trees or shrubs, and other plants
and plant products in the raw or unmanufactured state, except vegetable and
flower seeds: Provided, That this list of plants and plant products shall not
apply to plants and plant products shipped either under the certificate of the
Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine of the United States Department
of Agriculture or of the Idaho State Department of Agriculture.”

All postmasters are, therefore, informed that packages containing any plants
or plant products addressed to places in the State of Idaho may be accepted for
mailing only when plainly marked so that the contents may be readily ascer-
tained by an inspection of the outside thereof. The law makes the failure so
to mark such parcels an offense punishable by a fine of not more than $100.

Postmasters within the State of Idaho shall be governed strictly by the provi-
sions of paragraphs 3, 4, 5, and 6, section 596, Postal Laws and Regulations, in
the treatment of all packages addressed for delivery at their offices containing
any of the plants or plant products above described as subject to terminal
inspection.

Inspection service is maintained at the places in Idaho named below, and all
postmasters in that State shall, after receiving the required postage therefor,
under the provisions of section 596, Postal Laws and Regulations, send to the
nearest inspection point each package containing plants or plant products sub-
ject to terminal inspection:

Blackfoot. Jerome. Pocatello.
Boise. Lewiston. Rathdrum.
Bonners Ferry. Moscow. Rupert.
Burley. Nampa. St. Anthony.
Caldwell. New Plymouth Sandpoint.
Emmett. Parma. Twin Falls.
Idaho Falls. Payette. Weiser.

Owing to the perishable character of plants and plant products, the packages
containing such matter must be given prompt attention.

Any failure of compliance with the foregoing instructions or with the provi-
sions of section 596, Postal Laws and Regulations, coming to the attention of
any postmaster should be reported to the Third Assistant Postmaster General,
Division of Classification.

C. B. EILENBERGER,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.

ADDITIONAL PLANT-INSPECTION PLACE IN OREGON

Post OFFICE DEPARTMENT, °
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, June 9, 1936.
Postmasters in the State of Oregon are informed that provision has been made
for the terminal inspection of plants and plant products at Warren, Columbia
County, and this place should, therefore, be added to the list of places within
the State of Oregon to which plants and plant products subject to terminal
inspection may be sent by postmasters for inspection under the provisions of
section 596, Postal Laws and Regulations.
C. B. EILENBERGER,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.


1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 47

INSPECTION OF PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS FROM ABROAD

Post OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
SECOND ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, April 9, 1936.

Under various orders, quarantines, and regulations promulgated by the
Secretary of Agriculture under authority of the Plant Quarantine Act of
August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended, the entry into the United
States of certain plants and plant products is prohibited or restricted.
(See United States Official Postal Guide, July 1935, sec. 49, pp. 233-23
and also arts. 389 and 559 to 565 inclusive of the Customs Regulations of
1931.) As an aid in enforcing these or subsequent orders, quarantines, and
regulations, provisions have been made by the Bureau of Entomology and
Plant Quarantine of the United States Department of Agriculture, con-
currently with the Postal and Customs Services, to insure closer inspection
of such importations.

Inspectors of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine and customs
officers are stationed at the following post offices:

Atlanta, Ga. Hidalgo, Tex. Philadelphia, Pa.
Baltimore, Md. Honolulu, Hawaii Port Arthur, Tex.
Bellingham, Wash. Houston, Tex. Portland, Oreg.
Blaine, Wash. Jacksonville, Fla. Presidio, Tex.
Boston, Mass. Key West, Fla. Rio Grande City, Tex.
Brownsville, Tex. Laredo, Tex. Roma, Tex.

Buffalo, N. Y. Los Angeles, Calif. (in- St. Paul, Minn.
Calexico, Calif. cluding San Pedro). San Diego, Calif.
Charleston, S. C. Miami, Fla. San Francisco, Calif.
Chieago, II. Mobile, Ala. San Juan, P. R.

Del Rio, Tex. Naco, Ariz. San Ysidro, Calif.
Detroit, Mich. New Orleans, La. Savannah, Ga.
Douglas, Ariz. New York, N. Y. Seattle, Wash.

Eagle Pass, Tex. Nogales, Ariz. Tampa, Fla.

El Paso Tex. Norfolk, Va. Washington, D. C.
Galveston, Tex. Pensacola. Fla.

The procedure agreed to is as follows:

All parcel post or other mail packages from foreign countries which, either
from examination or external evidence, are found to contain plants or plant
products shall be dispatched for submission, or actually submitted to the plant
quarantine inspector (art. 564 (e), Customs Regulations of 1931) at the
most accessible of the foregoing places, who shall pass upon the contents,
under the plant quarantine act, and with the cooperation of the customs and
postal officers, either (1) release the package from further plant quarantine
and examination and endorse his decision thereon; or (2) divert it to Wash-
ington, D. C., San Francisco, Calif., or Seattle, Wash., for disposition. If
so diverted, the plant quarantine inspector shall attach to the package the
yellow-and-green special mailing tag addressed to the proper quarantine station.
The package shall also be accompanied by customs card form 3511 and trans-
mitted in accordance with the appropriate provisions of article 367 (a)
(JR 12a) of the Customs Regulations of 1931.

The customs officers at San Francisco, Calif., Seattle, Wash., aud Wash-
ington, D. C., shall keep a record of such packages as may be delivered to
representatives of the Department of Agriculture, and upon the return thereof
shall prepare mail entry to accompany the dutiable package and deliver it
to the postmaster for delivery or onward dispatch; or in appropriate cases
subject the shipment to formal customs entry procedure.

The plant quarantine inspector may require the entire shipment to be
returned to the country of origin as a prohibited importation, in which
event he shall endorse his action thereon and deliver the shipment over to
the collector of customs, who shall in turn deliver it to the postmaster
for dispatch to the country of origin. If the plant material, upon examina-
tion, is deemed dangerous to plant life, the collector of customs shall permit
the plant quarantine inspector to destroy immediately both the container and
contents. In either case the plant quarantine inspector shall notify the ad-
dressee of the action taken and the reason therefor. If the objectionable
plant material forms only a portion of the contents of the mail package and
in the judgment of the inspector the package can safely be delivered to the
addressee, after removing and destroying the objectionable material, such
procedure is authorized. In the latter case the inspector shall place in the
48 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE _ [April-June

package a memorandum (B. BE. P. Q. Form 3887) informing the addressee of
the action taken by the inspector and describing the matter which has been
seized and destroyed and the reasons therefor. Mail packages received at
San Juan, P. R., and Honolulu, Hawaii, shall be accorded treatment as herein
prescribed at these two ports and not diverted to Washington, D. C., San
Francisco, Calif., or Seattle, Wash.

Packages containing plants or plant products received in closed mail dis- |
patches made up direct to post offices (located at a customs port at which no
plant quarantine inspector is stationed) not included in the foregoing list of
post offices or such packages which are forwarded to these post offices from the
post office of original receipt without having received plant quarantine examina-
tion, shall be forwarded by the collector of customs through the postmaster
(accompanied jby customs card form 3511 in the manner heretofore described)
to the most accessible of the post offices listed above for treatment in accord-
ance with the foregoing instructions. Packages discovered at post offices where
no customs officer is located shall be forwarded by the postmaster under his
official penalty envelope addressed to the collector of customs at the most
accessible of the post offices listed for appropriate treatment as prescribed
herein.

HARLLEE BRANCH,
Second Assistant Postmaster General.

B. P. Q. 357, Supplement No. 3
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF ARGENTINA

SUPPLEMENTAL RESTRICTIONS ON SEED POTATOES

FEBRUARY 28, 1936.

Following is the text, in translation, of decree no. 64961, of August 8, 1935,
supplementing the decree of July 12, 1923, on the importation of seed potatees
into Argentina (pp. 13 and 14, B. P. Q. 357) :

CERTIFIED SEED POTATOES

ARTICLE 1. Every shipment of seed potatoes introduced into Argentina shall be
“certified seed potatoes’, meaning thereby that they have been grown in cul-
tures registered in the special service for the certification of seed potatoes,
subject to preestablished regulations, and periodically inspected by the above-
mentioned service, under Federal or State Departments of Agriculture or official
experiment stations of the country of origin.

EACH CONTAINER MUST BEAR A COPY CERTIFICATE

Art. 2. Each container of certified seed potatoes shall have affixed thereto the
certification ticket (tag) granted by the official service that certified the tubers.

NAME OF VARIETY TO BE INDICATED

ArT. 3. If the name of the variety of the potatoes is not inscribed on the
certification tag, it must be stamped on the container.
Arts. 4 and 5. Transitory.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

B. P. Q. 360, Supp'ement No. 1
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, ISLAND OF CYPRUS

May 28, 1936.
The order in council, no. 1643, June 21, 1935, of the Governor of Cyprus, amends
order in council no. 1421, April 23, 1931, by substituting the following form of
phytosanitary certificate for the one originally prescribed (see p. 8 of Circular
Bb. P. Q. 360) :
This is to certify that’ the living plants or plant products/a sample of the
living plants or plant products/included in the consignment, of which particulars

1 Strike out what is not applicable,




1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 49

are given below’ were/was thoroughly examined on the —_--__~_- Brana ;
ate
NES et eg nt ee , a duly authorized oflicial of the ___-_---_-
(name of inspector) (name of the
eee , and found to be healthy, no evidence of the presence of any injurious
inspection service)
insect, pest, or: disease: having been found* '-_~_-_--___-________ in/on them,
and that the consignment (including the packing) covered by this certificate *
bas/have not been treated in the following manner (e. g., fumigated with
aerate pare ti Ni dieimfeerea ) with) ta un 2. ere +)? > prior/imme-
diately subsequent to inspection.
Inspected/not inspected in the field by a duly authorized inspector on

(date)
gn ae ents oe eee
eae (officialstatus)
ee
Pretest CeSseriiiion Of patkases. soo
Piameais Ine Marks] =. 28 ae see

Description of living plants or plant products or parts thereof___-_____-___--

Peete SPoOwln, Ab. eS

aN TAN nItem,

PPE TOOT ESS Ol \CONSLONCOS a5 eos te et ek

Bee eee see Or Warliciilars- OF FOUtC =. 22> oe

Pine te SAMO nN Go. 2

PomeGr pidCe OF CN GEy 2. oe oe ee

Additional certificates attached (details gf any special certificate in respect of
imports specifically scheduled by the importing country).

; LEE A. STRONG,

Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

B. E. P. Q. 368, Supplement No. 1
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF POLAND

PHYTOSANITARY CERTIFICATES
APRIL 11, 1936.

According to article 11 of the decree of the Polish Minister of Finance on
Customs Procedure, October 4, 1933 (see p. 9 of B. EH. P. Q. 368), the certificates
mentioned in articles 1, 2, 3, and 5 of that decree must be issued either in the
Polish language or in that of the exporting country. The customs office has the
right to require a translation into Polish of a certificate in a foreign language.

When Circular B. E. P. Q. 368 was prepared, the Polish texts of those certifi-
cates were not available; they have now been received from the Polish Ministry
of Agriculture and Agrarian Reform, which states that the English translation
has no official status and that the official text is that in the Polish language.

For the convenience of inspectors the texts of those certificates are here
presented in both English and Polish.

PRESCRIBED POTATO CERTIFICATE

Ly 1 eagle
Certificate of health and origin for potatoes
(Valid 30 days from date of issue)
OTT Tr Iie cations Se ea ee gs Ra (full name and official title)

certifies that the shipment of potatoes described below was inspected and:

(1) Is free-from the following-named diseases and pests, as well as from the
eggs and larvae of such pests;

Wart disease, Synchytrium endobioticum; powdery scab, Spongospora subter-
ranea; Colorado potato beetle (Doryphora), Leptinotarsa decemlineata; potato

1 Strike out what is not applicable.
88937—36——_2
50 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

tuber worm, (Phthorimaea) Gnorimoschema operculella; and the potato
nematode, Heterodera schachtii rostochiensis ;

(2) Was grown in a locality free from the said diseases and pests and at least
20 km from the nearest place where the wart disease has been determined, and
50 km from the nearest place where the Colorado beetle-is known to occur ;

(8) Was shipped in new, unused containers, without packing ;

(4) Was shipped in containers provided with seals in a railroad car bearing
the inscription: (insert inscription) ;

(5) All articles employed in packing (containing) the potatoes included in the
shipment are free from the diseases and pests Cnekneoie eges and larvae) named
in paragraph (1).

Description of shipment

Weight of shipment __----.
Number and kind of containers
Marks on: eorntamerd 1 see ee oe ee
Railroad car numbers —-_-_-.

Varietal names of potatoes —.-..-. =.-. eee
AQMMISGCATIVE -GIstrtely oe

Name and address of shipper
Name and address of consignee
Wate wo. 2 oe eee
[SEAL ]

‘ (Signature)
Wz06r Swiadectwa zdrowia i pochodzenia ziemniakéw.
oo pochodzenia_ = = eee
T
oO

SWIADECTWO ZDROWIA I POCHQDZENIA ZIEMNIAKOW
(Wazne w ciagu 30 dni od daty wystawienia)

Mises POUpISsBy es 2 A Sie. eee) ae (full name and official title)
zaSwiadeza, ze ziemniaki, zawarte w nizej oznaczonej przesyice, zostaly zbadane
i ze:

(1) Sa wolne od nastepujacych choréb i szkodnikéw oraz jajek i larw tych
szkodinkow: rak ziemniaczany (synchytrium endobioticum) parch proés zysty
(Spongospora subterranea), chrzaszcz Colorado (Leptinotarsa decemlineata),
m6l ziemniaczany (Phthorimaea operculella) i matwik ziemniaczany (Heterodera
schachtii rostochiensis) :

(2) Zostaly wyprodukowane w miejscowoSsci wolnej od powyzszych chorob i
szkodnikow i odleglej co najmniej 20 km od najblizszego mieisca, w ktorem
stwierdzono raka ziemniaczanego (Synchytrium endobioticum) i 50 km od

najblizszego miejsca, w ktorem stwierdzono chrzaszcza Colorado (Leptinotarsa
decemlineata) ;

(3) Sa w nowem nieuzywanem opakowaniu ®

bez opakowania
(4) Sa w opakowaniu opatrzonem * plomba z napisem ~_-_---------------.----
Ww wagonie opatrzonym
(5) Wszelkie przedmioty, uzyte do opakowania zawartych Ww pozesyice
ziemniakow, sa wolne od wymienionych pod p. (1) chordb i szkodnikow oraz
jajek i larw tych szkodnikow.

Opis przesylki

Waga przesytki toa ey ee See ee eee
Liczba i rodzaj opakowania = .———=2=--~-=22 2-22 =
Znaki (Signum) na opakowaniu
Nr. wagonie
Odmiana ziemniakOw : 3.2222. =e ee
Okree .adninistitacy jy” __ 2. eee eee ee
Nazwisko i adres wysylajacego ~--_-----~-----------------------.
NazmwaISKO. 1.90°eCS OdDIONGY, «=~... 2k ee ee
PTA Be ee dee ca hme Dane ion GU ee te ed 19. ars

2Nazwisko, imie i charakter urzedowy funkcjonarjusza sluzby ochrony roSlin.
2 Nieodpowiadjace przesylee ~------~------------- skresli¢.


1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS Bik

PRESCRIBED CERTIFICATE FOR PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS

Certificate of health and origin for plants
(Valid 30 days from date of issue)

MMPETIRTC SITIO) 22 RN (full name and official title)
certifies that the (description of plants and plant products) included in this
shipment, and all the articles serving as packing therefor, have been inspected
and are:

(1) Free from the diseases and pests (including eggs and larvae of the latter)
named in Appendix V (Appendix A to this summary) to the decree of October 4,
1933, on Customs Procedure (Dziennik Ustaw R. P. No. 77/552), and were
produced in an establishment free from those diseases and pests;

(2) *The nursery products included in the shipment were produced in a local-
ity free from wart disease, Synchytrium endobioticum; and

(3) *The earth contained in the shipment originated in ground not infected
with wart disease.

Description of shipment

Weight of shipment _____-.

ee eer ATG) SOL CON LAINGI S25 ke,

OTN COUbA MOUS) (oe

Railroad car numbers ____--.

Mims veatlve GIStTiCt.

TOILE SS (OT ONT Del = — = Se
Rena aOUTess, OF. CONSIONCE. a ek ae oe Be a
meee See ne

air are eR ea ee A ee Dee a sig :

(Signature)
Wzor Swiadectwa zdrowia i pochodzenia roSslin.
rap OCUOUZeMI a 22 38 22 ak ee

INO see
SWIADECTWO ZDROWIA I POCHODZENIA ROSLIN
(Wazne w ciagu 30 dni od daty wystawienia)
EMPIRE ce ee (full name and _ official

title), zaswiadceza, ze zawarte w przesytce® (description of plants and plant
products) oraz wazelkie przedmioty sluzace do ich opakowania zostaly zbadane
i ze:

(1) Sa wolne od choréb i szkodnikéw oraz jajek i larw szkodnik6w wymie-
nionych w zataczniku III do rozporzadzenia Ministra Scarbu z dnia 9 paz-
dziernika 1934 r. o przepisach wykonawezych do rozporzadzenia Prezydenta
Rzeczypospolitej z dnia 27 pazdziernika 1933 r. o prawie celnem i zostaly
wyprodukowane w zaktadzie (na plantacji) wolnym (nej) od powyzszych
chorob i szkodnikéw;

(2) Zawarte w przesytce wytwory produkcji roslinej zostaty wyprodukowane
Ww miejscowosci wolnej od raka ziemniaczanego (Synchytrium endobioticum) .*

(3) Zawarta w przesytce ziemia nie pochodzi z terenu zarazonego rakiem
ziemniaczanym (Synchytrium endobioticum).

Opis przesytki

Waga przestki —_..-_.
ican aA TodZa) Gpalzowania = -8 ase eee
Znak (Signum) no opakowaniu
Nr. wagonu
Peter am msctrn cy, pi gfe. {Sek os Ce tee er Th
Raw t-AUreSs OW ysylayacemo List ate EO ihe Pt ht ae
eer ke) lt aes “OODIOrCY (26h. ti~ eer SEU Pe) 8
[PIECZEC | Lee er Wen ey eee. EEG See IE rs ee ee aoe ore

- Strike out the clause that does not apply to the shipment.

5 Nazwisko, imie i charakter urzedowy funkcjonarjusza stuzby ochrony roéglin.
® Wyszezegélnié zawarte w przesytce wytwory produkeji roslinnej.

* Nieodpowiadajace przesyice ..- ~~~. 2 skreslié¢,
52 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

CERTIFICATE OF PURITY FOR CLOVER AND RELATED SEEDS

This certificate is amended to read as follows:

The seed testing station at (locality of station) certifies that in the samples
taken from (number of sacks) sacks provided with lead seals and labels
(tags) of that establishment, containing seeds of clover (Trifolium spp.),
alfalfa (Medicago spp.), sand clover (Anthyllis vulneraria), sweet clover
(Melilotus spp.), and timothy (Phleum pratense), numbered as follows: analy-
sis has not revealed a single dodder (Cuscuta spp.) seed.

At the same time, this establishment declares that the inspection for Cus-
cuta was effected in the following manner: The sample was taken from at least
three places in each sack, namely, near the top, middle, and bottom, when
inspecting the seeds of red clover (Trifolium pratense), crimson clover (T. in-
carnatum), alfalfa (Medicago spp.), sand clover (Anthyllis vulneraria), sweet-
clover (Melilotus spp.) and birdsfoot trefoil (Lotus corniculatus), respectively,
100 grams of seed being taken from the mixed sample of each sack separately ;
in the same manner, 50 grams of seed were taken from the mixed sample of
each sack when inspecting white clover (Trifolium repens), alsike clover (T. hy-
bridum), Lotus uliginosus, and timothy (Phleum pratense),° respectively,
and that the seeds mentioned in the present certificate represent, after the
elimination of sacks in which dodder was determined, more than half the total
weight of the seeds inspected.

Description of shipment

Marks of the seeds ~-----.

Gross weight of shipment —-----.

Number of sacks ~_----.

Ful name and address of shipper. __-=.-.~- 2222-2 _ eee
Full name and address of consignee —..-~— ~~ 2225-2 = eee

FOBAT] << = —- = ya i a a
(Signature of Director of Seed Testing Station.)
Date.

Wzor Swiadectwa dla przywozonych z zagranicy nasion koniczyny.
lucerny, przelotu, nostrzyku, komonicy i tymotki.

SWIADECTWO BADANIA NA KANIANKE

Stacja: Oceny Nasien (wis =e ee ee (locality of station) stwierdza,
ze W probach, pobranych z zaplombowanych i opatrzonych etykieta tej stacji
LN een ee workéw nasion koniczyny, lucerny, przelotu,
nostrzyku, komonicy, tymotki,® oznaczonych nastepujacemi numerami ~____---~
ee a ETE Be , przeprowadzona analiza nie wykryla ani jednego ziarna
kanianki.

JednoezeSnie Stacja stwierdza, ze badanie na kanianke zostato pee a
zone z zachowaniem nastepujacych przepisOw ; przynajmniej z trzech miejse, u
gory, ze Srodka i dolu kazdego worka pobrano probke, z ktorej po wymieszaniu

wzieto do oznaczenia w kazdym worku oddzielnie —____________________-__-__=
przy koniczynie czerwonoj, inkarnatce, lucernach, przelocie, nostrzyku i ko-
monicy pospohtey SS fae ee eee 100 gramow nasion, przy
koniczynach: bialej i szwedzkiej, komonicy blotnej oraz tymotce ~-------------

Beery se) ees 50 gramow nasion oraz Ze nasiona, na ktore niniejsze Swia-
dectwe jest wydane, stanowia, po wyeliminowaniu work6w, w ktorych stwierdzono
obecnosé kanianki, wiecej niz potowe ogélnej wagi badanej partji nasion.

Oznaczenie przesytki

Nazwa nasion —= =...

Waga przesytki brutto ______.

Znaki zbadanej przestki ____-_-.

Imie, nazwisko i adres nadawcy —-----.

Imie, nazwisko i adres odbiorcy ~-----.

[PIECZEC] Podpis Kierownika Stacji:

Lert A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

® Strike out what is not applicable.
® Niepotrzebne skreslié¢.
ees UL Lee



1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 53

B. E. P. Q. 374, Supplement No. 1

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, PRESIDENCY OF ANTIGUA,
BRITISH WEST INDIES

May 12, 1936.

The proclamation of March 4, 1936, supersedes that of March 8, 1935.
The new proclamation remains effective for 1 year from March 4, 1936.
The provisions of the new proclamation are identical with those of the procla-
mation of March 8, 1935.
Lee A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

B..HoP,. Q.. 396
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, DOMINICAN REPUBLIC

JUNE 1, 1936.

This summary of the plant-quarantine import restrictions of the Dominican
Republic has been prepared for the information of nurserymen, plant-quarantine
officials, and others interested in the exportation of plants and plant products to
that country.

It was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant quarantine inspector, in charge
of Foreign Information Service, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines, from his
translations of the original texts, and reviewed by the Secretaria de Estado de
Agricultura, Industria y Comercio of the Dominican Republic.

The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct up to the
time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used independently of, nor as a
substitute for, the original texts, and it is not to be interpreted as legally
authoritative. The texts themselves should be consulted.

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, DOMINICAN REPUBLIC
BASIC LEGISLATION

Third sentence of article 49 of the Constitution of the Republic, and law no.
938 of May 23, 1928, as amended.

DEFINITIONS

For the purpose of these quarantine orders, decrees, and laws, the term ‘The
Department” means the Department of Agriculture and Commerce of the
Dominican Republic, and the term “The Secretary” means the Secretary of
State for the Department of Agriculture and Commerce of that Republic.

LAW GOVERNING THE IMPORTATION OF PLANT MATERIAL

Import permit required.—Law no. 938, May 23, 1928, section 1, prohibits the
introduction into the Republic from any exterior source, through any maritime
or frontier port, of any plant material, such as plants and seeds of any kind
intended for propagation, unless the introducer possesses a special permit,
signed by the Secretary, indicating the quantity, kind, origin, and other identify-
ing data deemed necessary. The regulations promulgated by decree no. 1287,
May 24, 1935, under law no. 988, prescribe that the importer shall apply to the
Department of Agriculture of the Dominican Republic for a permit to import
plant material and that such material shall be inspected on arrival.

Authorized ports of entry.—Section 2 of law no. 938, as amended by law no.
906, May 23, 1935, designates Santo Domingo, San Pedro de Macoris, Barahana,
and Puerto Plata as the exclusive ports for the introduction of such plant
material,
54 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

SPECIAL ORDERS, DECREES, AND LAWS GOVERNING THE IMPORTATION OF PLANT
MATERIAL

The Government of the Dominican Republic controls the importation of plants
and plant products by the following special orders, decrees, and law, under the
authority of law no. 938. These are arranged as nearly as practicable in
chronological sequence.

Propucts WHOSE IMPORTATION IS RESTRICTED OR PROHIBITED
IMPORTATION OF COTTONSEED PROHIBITED EXCEPT FROM THE UNITED STATES

Executive Order No. 80, of September 17, 1917, prescribes that: The importa-
tion of cottonseed into the Dominican Republic is at present prohibited, except
from the United States. Cottonseed from that country must be certified by the
Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine of the United States Department
of Agriculture as being free from contagious organisms and insect pests. No
cottonseed that is not so certified will be permitted to enter the Dominican
Republic. This action is taken to prevent the introduction of contagious plant
diseases and of insect pests from foreign countries.

Executive Order No. 508, of June 2, 1920, amends order no. 80 by prescribing
that cottonseed may not be imported from the United States unless it is also
accompanied by a certificate issued by the United States Bureau of Entomology
and Plant Quarantine affirming that the seed proceeds from a district not
infested by the boll weevil (Anthonomus grandis Bobh.).

IMPORTATION PROHIBITED OF COCONUTS FROM PUERTO RICO

Executive Order No. 4, of June 10, 1919, prescribes that:

ARTICLE 1. Owing to the existence in Puerto Rico of the bud-rot disease
(Phytophthora palmivora Butler) of the coconut palm, the importation of
coconuts from that island into the Dominican Republic is for the present
prohibited.

Art. 2. To protect the domestic coconut palm cultures, no species of coconut
may be imported from any other place or country without previous authorization
by the Department.

IMPORTATION OF EMPTY SACKS RESTRICTED OR PROHIBITED

Decree No. 203, of July 16, 1925, as amended by no. 1224 of November 19, 1929,
and no. 310 of January 5, 1932, to prevent the introduction of diseases and insect
pests injurious to agriculture, prescribes that:

ARTICLE 1. The introduction into the territory of the Republic is prohibited of
any kind of empty sacks which have contained fruits and plant products, as
well as of material derived from such used sacks.

ArT, 2. Any such sacks, or material derived therefrom, imported in contra-
vention of this decree will be held by the customs for reexportation or burning
within 7 days of the date of arrival, at the expense of the importer.

Provided, that new sacks, which were used for the first time for the exporta-
tion of maize (decree no. 1224 of Nov. 19, 1929), or starch (decree no. 310 of
Jan. 5, 1932), in quantity equal to those exported, and under a mark registered
by the Department, which permits their identification, may be imported if
accompanied by a fumigation certificate issued by competent authority.

PERMIT REQUIRED TO IMPORT SUGARCANE

Decree no. 494 of July 26, 1926, prescribes that a permit be obtained from the
Secretary of Agriculture of the Dominican Republic to import sugarcane.

POTATO REGULATIONS

Importation from certain countries prohibited—Decree no. 971 of June 8,
1928, as amended by decree no. 1079 of December 31, 1928, and no. 822 of
September 12, 1933, to prevent the introduction of potato wart (Synchytrium
endobioticum (Schilb.) Pere.), and Colorado beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata
Say), prescribes that:

ds


1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 5D

ARTICLE 1. The importation is prohibited of potatoes proceeding directly or
indirectly from any Huropean country except Spain (decrees nos. 1079 and 822),
and from Miquelon, St. Pierre, Newfoundland, and South Africa, in which the
existence of potato wart has been announced.

ArT, 2. Importation permitted under certification.—The introduction of pota-
toes is permitted from countries not mentioned in the preceding article when
each shipment is accompanied by a certificate of the official plant protection
service of the country of origin, certifying that the product was examined and
that in the district where it was grown neither potato wart nor Colorado beetle
exists.

IMPORTATION OF BANANA PLANTS AND FRUITS PROHIBITED FROM FIJI ISLANDS AND
PUERTO RICO

Decree no. 1122 of May 6, 1929, in virtue of the existence in the Fiji Islands
and Puerto Rico of the banana root borer (Cosmospolites sordidus Germ.),
whose entry into this country is to be prevented, the importation is prohibited
of plants, parts cf plants, and fruits of any variety of banana or plantain from
those sources.

INTRODUCTION OF INJURIOUS INSECTS AND ANIMALS RESTRICTED

Decree no. 1162 of June 6, 1929, to prevent the introduction of insects and
animals harmful to agriculture, prescribes that:

ARTICLE 1. The importation is prohibited of any species of insects or animals
that may be prejudicial to the national agriculture, unless a permit has been
issued in advance by the Secretary to the interested person. Such permit
shall indicate the class, order, family, tribe, genus, subgenus, if any, and the
species to which the insect or animal belongs, that he wishes to import, as
well as the country of origin.

IMPORTATION OF CONIFERS PROHIBITED

Decree no. 1185 of September 20, 1929, to prevent the introduction into the
Republic of diseases of the pine known as rusts, caused by Uredinales, which
exist in America and Europe, the importation is prohibited of living plants of
any class of conifer.

IMPORTATION OF PADDY RICE PROHIBITED

Decree no. 119 of April 25, 1931, to prevent the introduction of certain insect
pests and plant diseases of rice from various countries, prescribes that:

ARTICLE 1. The introduction of paddy rice from any exterior source, and
by any means, is prohibited.

Art. 2. Excepted from this prohibition are small quantities of seed rice
consigned to the Department exclusively for experimental culture.

The inspector of plants and seeds will disinfect such seed rice before deliver-
ing it to the departmental consignee.

RICE DISEASES AND PESTS EXISTING IN FOREIGN COUNTRIES

This decree lists the following insect pests and diseases as attacking rice
crops in foreign countries:

Insects

Chilo plejadellus Zinek (rice stalk borer).

Chilo simplex Butl. (Asiatic rice borer).

Diabrotica duodecimpunctata Fab. (spotted cucumber beetle).
Diabrotica soror Lee. (western spotted cucumber beetle).
Diatraea saccharalis Fab. (sugarcane borer).

Diatraea venosata Wik. (spotted borer).

Euetheola rugiceps Lee. (sugarcane beetle).

Haplothrips japonicus Matsumura (thrips).

Haplothrips oryzae Matsumura (thrips).

Laphygma frugiperda S. and A. (fall armyworm).
56 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

Lissorhoptrus simplex Say (rice water weevil).
Orya velox Fab. (Acrididae).

Oxya vicina Fab. (Acrididae).

(Parnara) Chapra mathias Fab. (rice skipper).
Solubea pugnar Fab. (Pentatomidae).

Systena frontalis Fab. (Chrysomelidae).

Diseases

Piricularia (oryzae) grisea (Cke.) Sace. (rice blast).
Tilletia horrida Tak. (rice smut).
Ustilaginoides virens (Cke.) Tak. (rice green smut).

Importation of rice straw and other wastes prohibited—Decree no. 792 of
August 7, 1933, for the protection of rice cultures in particular and of agricul-
ture in general, prescribes that:

ARTICLE 1. The entry through the ports of the Republic is prohibited of straw
and other wastes of rice used as packing material for any kind of imported
merchandise.

IMPORTATION OF CITRUS, ACACIA, CASUARINA, AND ROSA PROHIBITED FROM CERTAIN
COUNTRIES

Decree no. 810 of August 30, 1933, to prevent the introduction of the cottony
cushion scale (Jcerya purchasi Mask.), which is distributed in various countries,
including Australia, Cuba, Mexico, Puerto Rico, and the United States, pre-
scribes that:

ARTICLE 1. The introduction is prohibited of living plants, or parts thereof,

of Citrus spp., Acacia spp., Casuarina spp., and rose plants in general, from any

source, unless accompanied by an official certificate of the plant-protection
service of the country of origin, affirming that the plants or parts of plants
listed in the shipping documents have been inspected and found free from tbe
pest Icerya purchasi Mask. in any stage of development.

Art. 2. The inspectors of sanidad vegetal (plant health) will subject all
plants or parts of plants of the above-mentioned genera or other species which
are hosts of Icerya purchasi Mask., to inspection, and, in case this parasite is
found upon them in any stage they will proceed to destroy all infested plant
material.

B. EH. oP. Q..397

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, COLONY OF GRENADA, BRITISH
WEST INDIES

7 JUNE 1, 1936.

This summary of the plant-quarantine import restrictions of the colony of
Grenada, British West Indies, has been prepared for the information of nursery-
men, plant-quarantine officials, and others interested in the exportation of plants
and plant products to that country.

It was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant-quarantine inspector, in charge of
foreign information service, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines, from the
plant-protection ordinance of June 1, 1906, and the proclamations and regula-
tions promulgated thereunder, and reviewed by the agricultural authority of
the colony.

The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct and com-
plete up to the time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used inde-
pendently of, nor as a substitute for, the original texts.

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

oka

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1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 57

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, COLONY OF GRENADA, BRITISH
WEST INDIES

Basic LEGISLATION

The plant quarantine ordinance of June 1, 1906 (no. 7 of 1906).
The noxious weeds ordinance of March 238, 1912 (no. 2 of 1912).

SUMMARY ”
IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

Coconut plants (Cocos nucifera L.) :* Importation into the colony prohibited
from any place out of the colony, to prevent the introduction of the red-ring
disease (Aphelenchus cocophilus Cobb) (proclamation of Apr. 4, 1919, p. 4).

Sugarcanes and sugarcane plants (Saccharum ofjicinarum L.): Importation
from Barbados, directly or indirectly, prohibited (except with the special sanc-
tion of the Governor in Council), to prevent the introduction of the mosaic or
yellow mottling disease (proclamation of Jan. 5, 1921).

Sugarcanes and sugarcane plants (Saccharum officinarum L.) from Trinidad,
British West Indies: Importation prohibited of all varieties, except the Uba
sugarcane plant when imported by the Agricultural Department of Grenada, to
prevent the introduction of the mosaic or yellow mottling disease (proclamation
of May 30, 1924).

Banana plants (suckers), Musa spp., from all places except the Leeward
Islands (Anguilla, Antigua, Barbuda, Dominica, Montserrat, Nevis, Redonda,
St. Kitts, and the Virgin Isles, British West Indies), St. Vincent, and Bar-
bados:* Importation prohibited to prevent the introduction of the Panama wilt
disease (Fusarium cubense E. F. Sm.) (proclamation of Dee. 14, 1922, p. 4).

Cacao plants (Theobroma cacco L.), parts thereof, and cacao beans from
Trinidad, British. West Indies: Importation, directly or indirectly, prohibited
to prevent the introduction of the Surinam witches-broom disease (Mardsmius
perniciosus Stahel) (proclamation of Oct. 24, 1928).

All succulent fruits (including apple, apricot, cherry, citrus, grape, guava,
mango, nectarine, peach, pear, and plum) :* Importation prohibited from Africa,
America (Central and South), Australia, Azores, Bahamas, Bermuda, Cape
Verde, France, Greece, Hawaii, Italy, Madeira, Malta, Palestine, Spain, and
Turkey, to prevent the introduction of the Mediterranean fruit fly (Ceratitis
capitata Wied.).

The importation of such fruits from countries other than those above named
is prohibited unless each shipment is accompanied by a certificate of origin
affirming that the fruit was not grown in any area infested by the Mediter-:
ranean fruit fly and that it did not pass through any area so infested (procla-
mation of Sept. 10, 1950, as amended by the proclamation of Feb. 8, 1932).

IMPORTATION RESTRICTED

Coconuts in the husk (Cocos nucifera L.) imported into Grenada are subject
to immediate treatment with efficient fungicides and to planting under quaran-
tine conditions; then to be kept under observation by the superintendent of
agriculture. Any resulting plants suspected of disease may be destroyed ”
(proclamation of Apr. 14, 1919, p. 4).

Cottonseed and seed cotton: Importation from St. Vincent, British West
indies, prohibited, except under license given by the Governor or the superin-
tendent of agriculture and subject to the provisions and conditions of such
license (proclamation of Feb. 4, 1924).

Lime plants (Citrus aurantifolia Swingle), and parts thereof, including the
fruits: Importation prohibited from all countries and places, except with the
special sanction of the Governor in Council, to prevent the introduction of
withertip disease (Gloeosporium limetticolum Clausen) (proclamation of July
A, 1925; p.-4).

a

10 Concerns the United States. Except as thus indicated, there are no restrictions upon
the entry into Grenada of plants and plant products of the United States and no phyto-
sanitary inspection certificate is prescribed.

88937—36 3


58 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

PLANT PROTECTION ORDINANCE
(June 1, 1906)

As defined by this ordinance, “plants” includes growing plants, cuttings, buds,
and grafts, bulbs, roots, seeds, and berries, also fruits and vegetables; “port of
entry’ means the port of St. Georges and any other port or place in the colony
designated by the Governor for the importation of plants.

The ordinance empowers the Governor in Council, by proclamation, to pro-
hibit or to restrict the importation of plants as above defined, either generally
or with respect to any country or place. He is also authorized to seize pro-
hibited “plants” offered for entry into the colony;.to apply such treatment to
imported “plants” as may be deemed necessary at the expense of the importer ;
and to make rules and regulations for carrying out the provisions and intentions
of the ordinance.

NOXIOUS WEEDS ORDINANCE

(Mar. 23, 1912)

This ordinance empowers the Governor, with the consent of the legislative
council, to make, modify, or revoke regulations to prevent the introduction into
the colony, or the sale of any plant, seed, or grain that is likely to propagate or
spread the growth of noxious weeds.

B. E. P. Q. 398

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, FRENCH COLONY OF NEW
CALEDONIA AND DEPENDENCIES
JUNE 1, 1936. ©

This summary of the plant quarantine import restrictions of the French
colony of New Caledonia and its dependencies has been prepared for the in-
formation of nurserymen, plant quarantine officials, and others interested in
the exportation of plants and plant products to that colony.

It was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant quarantine inspector, in charge of
foreign information service of the Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines, from
his translation of decree no. 103 C, January 27, 1934.

The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct and com-
plete up to the time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used independ-
ently of, nor as a substitute for, the original text, and it is not to be inter-

preted as legally authoritative.
Lee A. STRONG,

Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, FRENCH COLONY OF NEW
CALEDONIA

(Including the Futuna, Alofi, Huan, Loyalty, and Wallis Islands, and the Isle of
Pines)

GOVERNOR'S DEcREE No. 103 C, JANUARY 27, 1934
IMPORTATION RESTRICTED

ARTICLE 1. The importation into New Caledonia and its dependencies of roots,
seeds, flower bulbs, earth, and vegetable manures, and other similar goods, as
well as packing materials that have served for their transportation, 1s subject

to the following restrictions:

PHYTOSANITARY CERTIFICATE REQUIRED

Arr. 2. The products named in the preceding article must be accompanied by
a shipper’s declaration and a certificate issued by the competent authority of
the place of origin, and in certain cases visaed by the consular authority, wherein
it is stated that in the country of origin no injurious diseases or parasites are
present in the kinds of products imported.

te oe
1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 59

DISINFECTION MAY BE REQUIRED

Art. 38. The imported products, in order to be admitted into the colony, with-
out reference to their origin, may be subjected to disinfection, for which the
administration of the colony will establish regulations.

All imported plants, grains, or products which on arrival are found to be
infected or attacked by parasites must be destroyed at the expense of the
importers.

ENTRY UNRESTRICTED

Art. 4. Agricultural and horticultural products, kitchen vegetables, grains, and
fruits intended for consumption are free from the preceding provisions.
ArT. 5. Seeds intended for food purposes are not subject to any special
regulation.
IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

Art. 6. The importation of coconuts, seed hulls of coconut palms, and basket-
making goods of coconut palm leaves that originate outside the archipelago of
New Caledonia and the Loyalty Islands into New Caledonia and its dependencies
is absolutely prohibited. Every product of this kind that is seized on arrival in
Noumea shall be destroyed by burning.

POTATOES MUST BE CERTIFIED

ArT. 7. Potatoes will be admitted to entry only when accompanied by a
phytosanitary certificate issued by an authorized official of the exporting coun-
try and affirming that they were inspected on shipment and were free from any
kind of pest.

Tubers found on entry to be infected are to be returned or destroyed.

B. E. P. Q.-399

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, PRESIDENCY OF DOMINICA,
BRITISH WEST INDIES

JUNE 1, 1936.

This summary of the plant-quarantine import restrictions of the Presidency of
Dominica, British West Indies, has been prepared for the information of nursery-
men, plant-quarantine officials, and others interested in the exportation of plants
and plant products to that country.

It was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant-quarantine inspector, in charge of
foreign information service, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines, from the
plants-protection ordinance, 1927, and proclamations promulgated thereunder,
and reviewed by the agricultural superintendent of the Botanic and Agricul-
tural Department of Dominica.

The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct and com-
piete up to the time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used independ-
ently of nor as a substitute for the original texts, and it is not to be interpreted
as legally authoritative. The ordinance and proclamations should be consulted
for the exact texts.

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, PRESIDENCY OF DOMINICA, BRITISH
WEST INDIES

BASic LEGISLATION

Plants-protection ordinance, 1927, approved April 23, 1927.
SecTION 1. This ordinance may be cited as the plants-protection ordinance,
1927.

7 DEFINITIONS

Sec. 2. In this ordinance, unless the context otherwise requires:

“Disease” means any disease affecting trees, shrubs, or herbs caused by or
consisting in the presence of any pathogenic animal or vegetable organism which
the Governor may declare to be a disease within the meaning of this ordinance.
60 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

“Pest” includes any parasitic, epiphytic, or other animal or vegetable organ-
ism, and also any insect or other invertebrate animal (in any stage) affecting or
injurious to trees, shrubs, or herbs, which the Governor may declare to be a pest
within the meaning of this ordinance.

“Tree”, “shrub”, “herb”, respectively, include the fruit or any product of any
tree, shrub, or herb, and the roots, trunks, stems, branches, fruits, leaves, or
other parts thereof severed from any tree, shrub, or herb, including emptied pods
or husks.

Section 3 empowers the Governor to appoint a chief inspector and as many
inspectors as may be necessary.

Section 4 authorizes the Governor to rent or lease land for the purposes of
the ordinance.

Sections 5 and 6 authorize the Governor to prohibit, or to permit under
conditions specified by him, the importation of plants, parts of plants, plant
products, soil, packing material, things, and substances, and to seize, destroy,
or otherwise deal with material entered in violation of a proclamation.

IMPORTATION PROHIBITED
(Proclamation no. 12, Aug. 5, 1932)

Importation into the presidency is absolutely prohibited of the articles named
in the first schedule to this proclamation from the countries named therein,
with all earth and soil packed therewith and all packages, coverings, wrappings,
and containers.

The importation of the articles named in the second schedule is prohibited
from all countries, together with all earth and soil packed therewith. and all
packages, coverings, wrappings, and containers, unless and until the prescribed
conditions shall have been complied with: Provided, That all fruit and vege-
tables that may be imported into the presidency from the British Isles, Canada,
and the British West Indies shall be accompanied by a certificate from a respon-
sible authority in the country of export, stating that the product does not
originate in a prohibited country.

FIRST SCHEDULE—ARTICLES ABSOLUTELY PROHIBITED

Banana (Musa spp.), fruit of: Importation prohibited from all countries
except Barbados and the islands of the Leeward Island Colony (Anguilla,
Antigua, Barbuda, Dominica, Montserrat, Nevis, Redonda, St. Kitts, and the
Virgin Islands), to prevent the introduction of injurious diseases.

Lime (Citrus aurantifolia Swingle), fruit of: Importation prohibited from
3ahamas, Bermuda, British Guiana, St. Lucia, Trinidad, and all other countries,
except the other islands of the British West Indies not mentioned in this para-
graph, to prevent the introduction of injurious diseases.

All other fruits except plantains, nuts, dried, canned, candied, or other proc-
essed fruits: Importation prohibited from Bahamas, Bermuda, British Guiana,
and all other countries, except the British Isles, Canada, British West Indies,
and the United States of America, to prevent the introduction of the Mediter-
ranean fruit fly (Ceratitis capitata Wied.).

All vegetables except onions, potatoes, canned or processed vegetables: Impor-
tation prohibited from the same sources as fruits to prevent the introduction
of the Mediterranean fruit fly (Ceratitis capitata Wied.).

Johnson grass (Holcus halepensis L.): Importation prohibited from all coun-
tries to prevent the introduction of this noxious weed.

Soil: Importation prohibited from all countries to prevent the introduction
of injurious pests and diseases.

SECOND SCHEDULE—IMPORTATION CONDITIONALLY PROHIBITED FROM ALL COUNTRIES

Sugarcane, sugarcane seedlings and plants, and all parts of the cane: Impor-
tation prohibited unless under license granted by the Governor to prevent the
introduction of mosaic diseases (virus).

Banana plants and parts thereof: Importation prohibited unless under license
granted by the Governor to prevent the introduction of injurious pests and
diseases.

Citratae, rooted plants and parts thereof: Importation prohibited unless
under license from the Governor and unless accompanied by a certificate signed

“



i a A i nk


1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 61

by a responsible inspecting officer stating that the district from which such
plants originate has not been affected by, or has been free for the preceding
2 years from, citrus canker (Bacterium citri Hasse).

Lime (Citrus aurantifolia Swingle), fruit of: Importation prohibited unless
under license granted by the Governor to prevent the introduction of injurious
diseases. (This applies to the islands of the West Indies other than those
named above under the same caption. )

Cottonseed, cotton lint, and seed cotton, and all packages, coverings, bags, or
other articles that have been used to contain those products: Importation pro-
hibited unless under license granted by the Governor to prevent the introduction
of pink bollworm (Pectinophora gossypiella Saund.).

Sprouted coconuts and coconuts in the husk (Cocos nucifera L.) : Importation
prohibited unless under license granted by the Governor to prevent the intro-
duction of injurious diseases.

Cocoa plants (Theobroma cacao LL.) and parts thereof: Importation pro-
hibited, unless under license granted by the Governor, to prevent the introduc-
tion of witches’ broom (Marasmius perniciosus Stahel).

(Proclamation no. 3, Feb. 20, 1934)

Except as indicated above, plants and plant products originating in the United
States may be exported to Dominica, British West Indies, without an inspection
certificate or other restriction, but such products may be inspected on arrival
and, if deemed necessary, subjected to treatment or destroyed.

B. E. P. Q. 400
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF PORTUGAL

JUNE 1, 1936.

This summary of the plant-quarantine import restrictions of the Republic
of Portugal has been prepared for the information of nurserymen, plant-
quarantine officials, and others interested in the exportation of plants and plant
products to that country.

It was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant-quarantine inspector, in charge of
foreign information service, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines, from his
translations of the original texts of decree no. 22389, March 29, 1933, and decree
no. 20535, November 20, 1931, of the Portuguese Ministry of Agriculture, and
reviewed by the Direccaéo Geral dos Servicos Agricolas of that ministry.

The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct and com-
plete up to the time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used independ-
ently of, nor as a substitute for, the original texts, and it is not to be interpreted
as legally authoritative.

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF PORTUGAL

Basic LEGISLATION

Decree No. 12740, November 26, 1926, article 2, paragraph 2.
Decree No. 15331, April 9, 1928, article 1.

SUMMARY
IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

Eims (Ulmus spp.) from any source: Importation prohibited to prevent the
introduction of the Dutch elm disease (Graphiwm ulmi Schwarz) (decree no.
22389, Mar’ 29, 1933, art. 5, p. 3.)

Potatoes (Solanwm tuberosum L.) from America: Importation prohibited to
prevent the introduction of the Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decem-
lineata Say) (decree no. 20535, Nov. 20, 1931, art. 2, p. 5).
62 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

Potatoes from the island of Madeira: Importation into the Azores prohibited
to prevent the introduction of Bacterium solanacearum, EB. F. Sm., bacterial
wilt (decree no. 22389, Mar. 29, 1933, art. 6, p. 5).

IMPORTATION RESTRICTED

Living plants or parts thereof for propagation from extra-European coun-
tries: Importation subject to a previous authorization from the Direceao Geral
dos Servicos Agricolas. Phytosanitary certificate of competent authority re-
quired with each shipment (decree no. 22389, Mar. 29, 1933, arts. 2 and 3, p. 2).
See paragraphs (a) to (g) of article 38 for special certification for certain
groups of plant material. ,

Seeds of horticultural, field, or forest plants, from any country, or living
plants or parts thereof for propagation from any European country: May be
imported without a previous authorization, if accompanied by a phytosanitary
certificate of competent authority of the country of origin (decree no. 22389,
Mar. 29, 1933, arts. 1 and 3, pp. 2 and 8).

Fruits from any source: Importation into continental or insular Portugal
subject to inspection on arrival especially for scale insects, San Jose seale in
particular (decree no. 22389, Mar. 29, 1933, art. 9, p. 4).

Potatoes from sources other than America: Phytosanitary certificate of com-
petent authority of country of origin affirming freedom of the source from
potato wart (Synchytrium endobioticum (Schilb.) Pere.), and Colorado potato
beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say) (decree no. 20535, Nov. 20, 1931, art. 3,
p. 5).

GENERAL REGULATIONS

(Decree no. 22389, Mar. 29, 1933; Diario do Governo, I: 75, Apr. 1, 1933, pp. 447-449)
PLANT MATERIAL NOT SUBJECT TO AN IMPORT AUTHORIZATION

ARTICLE 1. The importation is permitted from European or extra-European
countries, without previous authorization, of seeds of horticultural, field, and
forest plants, and of living plants and- parts thereof for propagation (stocks,
wild plants, scions, rhizomes, bulbs, tubers) from European countries, except
those mentioned in articles 5 and 6.

PLANT MATERIAL SUBJECT TO SPECIAL IMPORT AUTHORIZATION

Art. 2. The importation into the mainland or the adjacent islands of living
plants or parts thereof for propagation (stocks, cuttings, scions, rhizomes,
tubers, and bulbs) from extra-European countries, whether or not those coun-
tries belong to Portugal, except the adjacent islands, is subject to a special
authorization of the Direccaéo Geral dos Servicos Agricolas.

PHYTOSANITARY CERTIFICATE REQUIRED

Art. 3. Shipments of living plants, or parts of living plants, intended for
propagation, must be accompanied by phytosanitary certificates indicating
origin, issued by authorities of the official phytosanitary inspection service of
the country of origin. These must indicate the names of shippers and con-
signees, the exact description of the goods, marks, quantity, weight, and phyto-
sanitary condition and, in particular, with respect to:

(a) Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), a declaration that they are free from
dodder seeds (Cuscuta trifolii, C. gronowii, C. suaveolens, ete.). .

(b) Beans (Vicia faba L.) and peas (Pisum sativum L. and Lathyrus
odoratus L.), a declaration of freedom from broomrape seed (Orobanche
crenata, O. minor, etc).

(c) Rooted plants, cuttings, bulbs, tubers, rootstocks, and other parts of
plants that. have been in contact with soil; a declaration that they were
grown in ground free from potato wart (Synchytriwm endobioticum (Schilb.)
Pere.) and located at least 5 km from any focus of that disease. ;

(d) Rooted pear trees, cuttings, scions, or buds, the same declaration as in
(c) ; also that in the locality of growth fire blight (Bacillus amylovorus (Burr.)
Trev.) does not occur.

(e) Rooted chestnut trees (Castanea spp.) scions, or buds, in addition to
the declaration of paragraph (c), another to the effect that chestnut canker


1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 63

(Endothia parasitica (Murr.) And. and And.) does not occur in the locality
in which the trees were grown, and that no planting or grove of chestnut trees
attacked by the ink disease (Phytophthora cambivora (Petri) Buis) exists
within at least 5 km of the place of growth.

(f) Grapevines, cuttings, or scions, in addition to declaration (c) one to
the effect that the material proceeded from vines free from the virus disease
known in France as “court-nous.”

(g) Potatoes, tomatoes, and eggplants (Solanwm tuberosum, Lycopersicum
esculentum, and S. melongena), all the data prescribed by decree no. 20535 of
November 20, 1981, and the regulations approved by decree no. 21172 of April
27, 1932.

PLANTS MUST BE FREE FROM SOIL

ArT. 4. Rooted plants, bulbs, rhizomes, and tubers, must be free from earth,
and, according to the case, be packed in sphagnum moss, or peat.

ArT. 5. The importation of elms (Ulmus spp.) is prohibited.

ArT. 6. The importation into the Azores of potatoes from Madeira is
prohibited. .

ALL IMPORTED PLANT MATERIAL SUBJECT TO INSPECTION

Art. 7. All plants or parts of plants imported into continental or insular
Portugal for propagation are subject to inspection.

AUTHORIZED PORTS OF ENTRY

(1) Inspection is effected in the customs offices of Lisbon, Oporto, Ponta
Delgada, Horta, Angra do Heroismo, and Funchal.

(2) Seeds of plants, except alfalfa, pea and bean seeds, are free from
inspection.

(3) Exceptionally, the entry of plants may be effected at eustoms offices other
than those above named on permission of the Direction-General of Customs at
the request of the Direction-General of Agriculture, which will send one or
more inspectors to make the necessary inspection.

(4) The merchandise will be delivered to the consignee only after he has
presented to the customs the duplicate of the phytosanitary certificate issued
by the Chief of the Division of Phytopathological Inspection, or by one of the
officials referred to in this article. J

FUMIGATION MAY BE REQUIRED ON ARRIVAL

ArT. 8. All plants, and especially apple, orange, olive, and other fruit trees,
must be fumigated by the phytopathological inspection service before delivery
to the consignee, provided that the inspectors deem it necessary.

FRUITS INSPECTED FOR SCALE

ArT. 9. Fruits imported into the mainland or the adjacent islands will be
inspected in customs offices and released only when found entirely free from
exotic coccids, and especially from San Jose scale (Aspidiotus perniciosus
Comst.).

POTATO IMPORT RESTRICTIONS

(Decree no. 20535, Nov. 20, 1931; Diario do Governo 1¢ Serie, no. 268, Nov. 20, 1931)

ARTICLE 1. The importation of potatoes into continental Portugal and the
adjacent islands (Azores and Madeira) is permitted only when the potatoes
originate in and proceed from a country possessing properly organized phyto-
pathological services.

IMPORTATION OF AMERICAN POTATOES PROHIBITED

Art. 2. The importation of American potatoes is expressly prohibited through
any port of continental Portugal or the adjacent islands.

ArT. 3. Shipments of potatoes from other countries must be accompanied by
an inspection certificate affirming freedom of place of growth from potato wart
and Colorado potato beetle,

Since potatoes may not be imported from the United States into Portugal, the
remaining regulations under this decree are omitted.
64 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

B. E. P. Q. 401

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF SPAIN

JUNE 12, 1936.

This summary of the plant-quarantine restrictions of the Republic of Spain
has been prepared for the information of nurserymen, plant-quarantine officials,
and others interested in the exportation of plants and plant products to that
country.

It was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant-quarantine inspector in charge of
foreign information service, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines, from his
translations of the original texts of the Spanish decrees and orders and reviewed
by the Spanish National Phytopathological Service, Ministry of Agriculture,
Industry, and Commerce (Servicio Nacional de Fitopathologia, Ministerio de
Agricultura, Industria y Comercio).

The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct and com-
plete up to the time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used independ-
ently of, nor as a substitute for, the original texts of the decrees and orders, and
it is not be interpreted as legally authoritative. The original decrees and
orders should be consulted for the exact texts.

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF SPAIN
Basic LAw
(Law on the extermination of crop pests and protection against the same, May 21, 1908)
CoNcIsH SUMMARY

Since the orders of April 19, 1929 (p. 4) and April 20, 1932 (p. 5), practically
constitute an absolute embargo against the importation of plants and fresh plant
products from the United States into Spain, reference to those orders alone is
necessary, except with respect to the unrestricted material covered by the law
of May 21, 1908, articles 22 and 32. (See item under “Importation unrestricted.” )

IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

Phyllozxera vitifoliae Fitch: Introduction of viable eggs, larvae, and pupae
into nonphylloxerated provinces of Spain prohibited unless enclosed in glass vials
or tubes hermetically sealed (law of May 21, 1908, art. 27).

Grapevines and dry stems: Importation into Spain and adjacent islands
prohibited (law of May 21, 1908, art. 29).

Trees, shrubs, and plants from countries that do not adhere to the Interna-
tional Phylloxera Convention and are infested with phylloxera may not be
imported into nonphylloxerated provinces (law of May 21, 1908, art. 51).

Chestnut (Castanea spp.) and its products, from China and Japan to prevent
the introduction of chestnut canker, Endothia parasitica (Murr.) And. and And.
(order of Dec. 21, 1922).

Live plants and parts thereof, including seeds, attacked by injurious parasites.

Live insects injurious to plants, including eggs, larvae, pupae, and nymphs of
such insects.

Cultures of bacteria and fungi injurious to plants. ;

Soils or other materials containing parasites injurious to plants, when the
soils, etc., accompany living plants.

Containers that have served for the transportation of the above-mentioned
products: Importation prohibited (decree of June 20, 1924, art. 1).

Fresh fruits, living plants, and parts thereof, including cuttings, scions, etc., of
fruits: Importation prohibited from Argentina, Brazil, Canada, Japan, Mexico,
New Zealand, Portugal, United States, and Union of South Africa, to prevent
the introduction of the injurious plant pests and diseases named in the order of
April 19, 1929, as extended by the decree of August 14, 1934. (See pp. 4 and 5.)

Cottonseed and seed cotton from Brazil, China, Egypt, India, Japan, Mexico,
and the United States, to prevent the introduction of the boll weevil, Anthonomus

‘

Te! ee so
1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 65

grandis Boh., and the pink bollworm, Pectinophora gossypiella Saund. (orders
of Apr. 19, 1929, and Nov. 5, 1923; see pp. 4 and 5).

Coconut fiber (decree of Oct. 31, 1931, see p. 7).

Potatoes, their leaves, stems, and peelings, to prevent the introduction of the
Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say, from France, Germany,
Poland, and other European countries infested by the Colorado potato beetle
(order of Nov. 3, 1931).

Plant parasites against which certification is required (order of Apr. 20, 1932;
see pp. 5 et seq.).

Banana plants or parts thereof: Importation into the Territory of the Canary
Islands of plants or parts thereof, of J/usa spp. from any source prohibited.

Living plants, straw, and other by-products, and other articles of plant origin,
such as trunks, roots, leaves, used supports—even though exported from Madeira
as fuel—as a precaution against the introduction of the banana root borer
(Cosmopolites sordidus Germ.) (order of May 28, 1954).



IMPORTATION RESTRICTED:

Phylloxera vitifoliae Fitch, viable eggs, larvae, and pupae: Importation and
transportation in viable condition permitted into nonphylloxerated Provinces
only in glass vials or tubes hermetically sealed with sealing wax (law of May
ee tO08. art. 27).

Grapevines and cuttings thereof, of American species, may be imported into
nonphylloxerated Provinces only under a special authorization of the respective
provincial agricultural council (law of May 21, 1908, and order of Dee. 31, 1909,
as amended by that of Dee. 14, 1914).

Trees, shrubs, and plants of all kinds except grapevines, from countries which
do not adhere to the Berne Convention, may be imported into or through non-
phylloxerated Provinces only when accompanied by a shipper’s declaration of
origin and a phylloxera certificate (law of May 21, 1908, art. 30, par. 3; this
applies only to plant material proceeding from countries in which phyloxera
does not occur: art. 31).

Cottonseed: Importation and distribution must be passed upon by the State
Cotton Commissary. Prohibited from Brazil, China, Egypt, India, Japan, Mex-
ico, and the United States (orders of Nov. 5, 1923, and Apr. 19, 1929).

Ornamentals with a minimum quantity of soil adhering to the roots, admitted
from Belgium, France, and the Netherlands under certification (orders of Novy.
8, 1929, June 28, 1930, and Nov. 9, 1931).

Potatoes: Each shipment to be accompanied by a certificate affirming that the
tubers were grown in a locality free from potato wart, Synchytrium endobio-
ticum (Schilb.) Pere., and that the place is situated not less than 20 km from
any crop attacked by that disease (order of June 4, 1928). Also a prohibition
against importation of potatoes from France, Germany, and other countries
infested with the Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say (order
of Nov. 3, 1931).

Mushroom spawn: Phytosanitary certificate required affirming that the
manure used for growing the spawn was sterilized before being sown, that the
sowing was made from a pure culture of mushrooms, and that the product con-
tains no pathogenic organisms injurious to crops (order of Nov. 18, 1931, see
p. 8).

Living plants and parts thereof, including seeds, fresh or dried fruits, fresh
vegetables, cereals, dried legumes, ete., must be accompanied by a phytosanitary
certificate affirming freedom from the parasites named in the order of April 20,
1932, pages 5 et seq. ‘The order of March 6, 1929, contains a list of products
subject to certification.

Dried fruits imported through Hamburg, when forwarded to Spain, must be
accompanied by a copy of the original phytosanitary certificate and by a new
one issued by the phytopathological officials of the port of Hamburg (order of
May 16, 1983, see p. 7).

IMPORTATION UNRESTRICTED

Seeds, dried plants properly prepared for herbariums, cut flowers, and prod-
ucts other than grapevines (art. 22, law of May 21, 1908) may enter Spain
without other restrictions than those resulting from measures to prevent the
spread of diseases other than phylloxera, except as provided in article 30 (law
of May 21, 1908, art. 32).

88937—36—-4
66 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

PRECAUTIONS AGAINST THE INTRODUCTION OF SPECIFIED PARASITES
(Royal order no. 976, of Apr. 19, 1929; Gaceta de Madrid, no. 114, Apr. 24, 1929)
IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

ARTICLE 1. From April 25, 1929, in order to prevent the introduction into Spain
of the plant parasites later specified, the importation of products originating
in the following-named countries is prohibited:

Japan, United States of America, Canada, and New Zealand.—All kinds of
fresh fruits, and the plants, shoots, scions, ete., of all fruits, and mulberry trees,
as a protection against the insect pests:

Aspidiotus perniciosus Comst., the San Jose scale.

Aulacaspis pentagona Targ., white peach scale.

Dialeurodes citri Riley and Howard, citrus whitefly.

Popillia japonica Newm., Japanese beetle.

And against the cryptogams:

Bacillus amylovorus (Burr.) Trev., fire blight or pear blight.

Phyllosticta solitaria EK. and E., apple blotch.

Bacterium citri Hasse, citrus canker.

Brazil, China, Egypt, India, Japan, Mexico, and the United States of Amer-
ica: Seed cotton and cottonseed, the cultures of which are attacked by the
cotton boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis Boh., and the pink bollworm, Pec-
tinophora gossypiella Saund. (see also order of Nov. 5, 1923, restricting the
entry of cottonseed).

EXTENSION OF THE PROHIBITION
(Decree of Aug. 14, 19384; Gaceta de Madrid,-no. 228, Aug. 16, 1934)

ARTICLE 1. AS a preventive measure against the introduction into, transit
through, and distribution of San Jose scale, Aspidiotus perniciosus Comst., in
Spain, the importation is prohibited of all kinds of fresh fruits, as well as
living plants and parts thereof (scions, buds, greenhouse plants, etc.), which
originate in, or proceed from Argentina, Brazil, Mexico, Portugal, and South
Africa.

NoTr.—Since the San Jose scale is widely distributed in the United States this decree
is undoubtedly applicable.

PARASITES AGAINST WHICH CERTIFICATION IS REQUIRED
(Order of Apr. 20, 1932; Gaceta de Madrid, no. 115, Apr. 24, 1932)

In connection with the order of the Ministry of Agriculture, Industry, and
Commerce, no. 624, of March 1, 1932, concerning a list of diseases and enemies
of plant cultures, against which Spain especially desires to be protected, and
to which certificates issued by the French phytopathological service are to be
adjusted with respect to shipments of living plants directed to Spain: This
ministry has resolved to transmit the list ef insects, fungi, and bacteria whose
presence in consignments of plant products from any source, which are shipped
to Spain, or whose existence in the countries of origin will determine the
prohibition of the importation of the plants, their fruits, seeds, or parts which
those parasites attack, and of articles that may serve as vehicles of infection.

Certificates of official phytopathological services of the various countries
that export plant products and living plants to Spain must affirm the non-
existence in the respective country of the diseases or pests caused by the
agencies named in the said list.

List of insects, fungi, and bacteria whose presence in consignments of plants
and plant products exported to Spain or whose existence in the countries of
origin will determine the prohibition of the plants, their fruits, seeds, or parts
which those parasites attack, and materials that may serve as vehicles of
infection.

INSECT PESTS

(Aleyrodes) Dialeurodes citri Ashm., citrus whitefly, and other species of
the same genus.
Anthonomus grandis Boh., boll weevil.

——— i
1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 67

(Aonidiella) Aspidiotus perniciosus Comst., San Jose scale, on fresh fruits
of any kind.

Coccus viridis Green, green scale, on coffee fruits and citrus plants.

Epitriz cucumeris Harr., potato flea beetle.

Icerya purchasi Mask., cottony-cushion scale.

(Laspeyresia) Grapholitha molesta, oriental fruit moth, in fresh fruits.

Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say, Colorado potato beetle on potatoes and other
solanaceous plants.

Pectinophora gossypiella Saund., pink bollworm.

Popillia japonica Newm., Japanese beetle.

(Saskiaspis) Aulacaspis pentagona Targ., white peach scale on apple (Malus
sylvestris L.), apricot (Prunus armeniaca), cherry (Prunus spp.), cherry-
laurel (Laurocerasus spp.), grape (Vitis spp.), jessamine (Jasminus spp.),
locust (Robinia spp.), mulberry (Morus spp.), peach (Amygdalus persica L.),
pear (Pyrus communis L.), poplar, Canadian (Populus deltoides Marsh), so-
phora (Sophora japonica L.), spindle tree or burningbush (Huwonymus), white
beam (Sorbus aria Cranz.), willow (Salix spp.), cacao pods (Theobroma
cacao I..).

Sesania calamistis Hmps., stalk borer of maize and millet.

Exotic fruit flies.

FUNGI AND PACTERIA

Ascochyta chlorospora Speg., shot hole and fruit spot of Prunus.

Bacillus amylovorus (Burr.) Trey., fire blight, on plants and fruits of apple,
pear, quince, and other cultivated or wild Pomaceae.

Bacterium citri Hasse, citrus canker, on citrus plants and fruits.

Ceratostomella (Graphium) ulmi (Schwarz) Buisman, Dutch elm disease.

Corticium koleroga (Cke.) v. Hoeh., koleroga.

Corticium salmonicolor B. and Br., pink disease, on citrus plants, parts thereof.
fruits, and peelings.

Diaporthe perniciosa Marchal, fruit tree canker.

Endothia parasitica (Murr.) And. and And., chestnut canker.

Fusarium cubense E. F. Sm., Panama disease, banana wilt, on plants and fruits
of Musa and Ananas.

Guignardia bidwelli (Ellis) V. and R., black rot of grape, on rooted and
unrooted cuttings of American and European grapes.

Gymnosporangium juniperi-virginianae Schw., apple rust, on plants and fruits
of apple and Juniperus virginiana.

Neofabraea malicorticis (Cordley) Jackson, black-spot canker of apple, on
plants and fruits of apple, pear, and quince.

Phyllosticta solitaria BE. and E., apple blotch, on plants and fruits of Walus.

Synchytrium endobioticum (Schilb.) Pere., potato wart, on potato tubers:
fruits and green parts of all Solanaceae, including tomatoes, eggplants, and
peppers.

Thielaviopsis paradoxra (De Seyn.) v. Hoeh., black rot of Sugarcane on plants
and fruits of Musa and Ananas.

A Copy oF ORIGINAL CERTIFICATE REQUIRED FOR DRIED FRUITS IMPORTED AT
HAMBURG

(Order of May 16, 19383; Gaceta de Madrid, no. 143, May 23, 1933)

Under reservation of the suspension of this order if the condition of shipments
makes it advisable, shipments of dry or desiccated fruits proceeding from the
port of Hamburg will be admitted into Spain only when accompanied by a copy
of the phytosanitary certificate issued by authorized technical officials of the
country of origin for each lot forming the shipment; these certificates must be
verified by the German technical officials of the port of Hamburg.

In addition, each such shipment must be accompanied by a phytopathological
inspection certificate issued by the Hamburg technical officials. Finally, these
shipments must be found in a satisfactory condition upon inspection by the
Spanish National Phytopathological Service.

/ IMPORTATION OF COCONUT FIBER PROHIBITED
(Decree of Oct. 31, 1981; Gaceta de Madrid, no. 305, Nov. 1, 1931)

Prohibits the importation of coconut fiber into Spain, in order to assist the
esparto grass industry.
68 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [ April-June

CERTIFICATION OF MUSHROOM SPAWN REQUIRED
(Order of Noy. 18, 1931; Gaceta de Madrid, no. 325, Nov. 21, 1931)

Each shipment of mushroom spawn offered for importation into Spain must
be accompanied by a phytosanitary certificate issued by an official of the phyto-
pathological authority of the country of origin, affirming that the manure used
for growing the spawn was sterilized before sowing (the method of disinfection
being stated) ; further, that the sowing was made from a pure culture of mush-
rooms (Agaricus campestris L.), and that the product contains no pathogenic
organisms injurious to crops.

B. E. P. Q. 402

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF AUSTRIA

JUNE 138, 1936.

This summary of the plant-quarantine import restrictions of the Republic of
Austria has been prepared for the information of nurserymen, plant-quarantine
officials, and others interested in the exportation of plant products to that
country.

It was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant quarantine inspector, in charge of
foreign information service, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines, from his
translations of the original texts of regulations promulgated to prevent the in-
troduction into Austria of phylloxera, San Jose scale, the apple maggot or fruit
fly, Colorado potato beetle, potato wart, and other injurious insects and diseases.

The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct, but it is
not intended to be interpreted as legally authoritative.

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

SUMMARY OF THE PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF
AUSTRIA

OBJECTS OF AUSTRIAN PLANT-QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS

The plant-quarantine restrictions of the Republic of Austria are designed to
prevent the introduction into and distribution in Austria of phylloxera
(Phylloxrera (vastatriz) vitifoliae Fitch), San Jose scale (Aspidiotus perniciosus
Comst.), apple maggot or fruit fly (Rhagoletis pomonella Walsh), Colorado
potato beetle (Leptinotarsa (Doryphora) decemlineata Say), potato wart
(Chrysophlyctis endobiotica, Syn. Synchytrium endobioticum (Schilb.) Perc.),
and of other injurious insects and diseases.

Basic LAws

International Phylloxera Convention of November 3, 1881 (R. G: Bl. no. 105
of 1882).

Customs law of June 10, 1920, article 2 (St. G. Bl. no. 250, 1920).

Federal law of July 12, 1929, part II, articles 12 and 13 (B. G. BI. no. 252,
1929).

CoNCISE SUMMARY
IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

Grapevine stocks and all parts of the grapevine, as well as composts, used
props, and supports, phylloxera eggs, and live insects: Importation prohibited
from any country to prevent introduction of phylloxera (International
Phylloxera Convention of Nov. 3, 1881; ministerial decrees of July 15, 1882, May
1, 1883, Jan. 24, 1890, and Nov. 8, 1896). See page 4.

Plants and plant products attacked by injurious plant pests and diseases:
Importation and transit prohibited (decree of July 18, 1932, art. 1; B. G. BL.
222, 1932). See pages 5 and 6.




1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 69

Potatoes, rooted plants with soil, bulbs, tubers, rhizomes, and corms, tomatoes,
eggplants, and strawberries, previously used packing material, earth, and
manure from the United States, Belgium, and continental European France:
Importation prohibited throughout the year (decree of July 18, 19382, as
amended by that of Dec. 19, 1985; B. G. Bl. 222, 1932; see arts. 11 and 14, p. 8).

Fresh potatoes: Importation and transit prohibited from countries in which
wart disease occurs, to prevent the introduction and spread of that disease
(decree of Jan. 9, 1930, art. 1; B. G. Bl. no. 25, 1930).

IMPORTATION RESTRICTED

Plants, shrubs, and other cultures, including scions, cuttings, etc.: Importa-
tion permitted if shipment is accompanied by a shipper’s declaration and a
certificate affirming freedom from phylloxera in the prescribed form (Interna-
tional Phylloxera Convention of Nov. 3, 1881, and ministerial decrees of July 15,
1882, May 1, 1883, Jan. 24, 1890, and Nov. 8, 1896). See page 4.

Fruit trees and berry-bearing shrubs (deciduous), and other deciduous trees
and shrubs, including stocks, scions, and cuttings: Importation permitted if
shipment accompanied by a phytosanitary certificate and a disinfection certifi-
cate to prevent the introduction of San Jose scale and other injurious pests and
diseases (decree of July 18, 1932, art. 5; B. G. Bl. 222, 1932). See page 6.

Plants other than those indicated in ‘the preceding item: Shipments must be
accompanied by an inspection certificate affirming freedom from San Jose scale
and other injurious pests and diseases (decree of July 18, 1932, art. 6; B. G. Bl.
222, 1982). See page 7.

Plants with balls of earth: Importation and transit permitted of shipments
from the United States, Canada, and France (not including Corsica and French
overseas colonies) if accompanied by certificates affirming not only freedom
from San Jose scale, but also from the Colorado beetle and other injurious
insects (decree of July 18, 19382, art. 6 (2); B. G. Bl. 222, 1982). See page 7.

Vegetables and truck crops other than potatoes, tomatoes, eggplants, and
strawberries may be imported from the United States, Belgium, and continental
European France from November 15 to March 14 only (decree of July 18, 19382,
as amended by that of Dec. 19, 1985; see arts. 12 and 16, pp. 8 and 9).

Fresh apples and pears: Importation permitted from any country only when
certified as free from San Jose scale and apple fruit fly (decree of July 18, 1932,
art. 8; B. G. Bl. 222, 19382). See page 7.

Fresh potatoes grown in south Huropean and north African countries and
islands may be transported through France for importation into Austria if
accompanied by a phytosanitary certificate and certificate of origin (decree of
July 18, 1982, art. 11 (3); B) G. Bl. 222; 1932).

Potatoes, eggplants, and tomatoes from France: Importation and transit
permitted under certification of freedom from Colorado potato beetle (decree of
June 15, 1929; B. G. Bl. 206, 1929).

Fresh potatoes from countries in which wart does not occur: Importation
and transit permitted under prescribed conditions if certified as to origin and
freedom from wart and other injurious diseases (decree of Jan. 9, 1930, art. 2;
B. G. Bl. 25, 1980).

Seed potatoes: Importation by rail permitted from any country not infested
with Colorado potato beetle under certificate of origin and health and guaranty
that they are select seed potatoes (decree of Jan. 9, atte art, 2 5) 3. -G,. Bl. 25.
1930).

IMPORTATION UNRESTRICTED

Cut flowers, seeds, bulbs, fruits (except grapes, apples, and pears), and vege-
tables: Importation and transit unrestricted (International Phylloxera Con-
vention of Noy. 3, 1881, and ministerial decrees of July 15, 1882, May 1, 1883,
Jan. 24, 1890, and Noy. 8, 1896; see also decree of July 18, 1932, art. 8). See
page 5.

Cut flowers, fresh fruits (except grapes, apples, and pears), and other fruits,
preserved or dried fruits, vegetables, root crops, tubers (potatoes), bulbs,
rhizomes, and other subterranean plants, as well as seeds, are not affected by
articles 5 to 9 of the decree of July 18, 1982 (see art. 10 of that decree). See
page 7.

Dried or processed plant products: Importation and transit not affected by
articles 11 to 13 of decree of July 18, 1982 (art. 10 of that decree and art. 3 of
the decree of June 15, 1929). See pages 7 and 8.
70 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE | April-June

RESTRICTIONS ON ACCOUNT OF PHYLLOXERA

Based upon the International Phylloxera Convention of Berne, November 3,
1881, the following restrictions were promulgated by the ministerial decrees of
July 15, 1882, May 1, 1888, January 24, 1890, and November 8, 1896.

IMPORTATION AND TRANSIT OF GRAPEVINES PROHIBITED

The importation into and transit through Federal territory is prohibited
from any country of:

Grapevines, including stocks and cuttings, with or without roots.

Grapevine stems, dry or fresh, whole or parts, leaves.

Any shipment containing leaves or stems of grapevines.

Composts, used props or supports, phylloxera eggs, or live insects.

IMPORTATION AND TRANSIT OF TABLE GRAPES PERMITTED

The importation and transit are permitted of table grapes in well-packed
boxes, cases, or baskets, as well as in barrels of any size, which are easy to
open for inspection, if free from grapevine stems and leaves.

IMPORTATION OF PLANTS AND PARTS THEREOF PERMITTED UNDER RESTRICTION
Shipper’s declaration and phylloxera certificate required

Plants, shrubs, and other cultures, including scions, cuttings, etc., from nur-
series, gardens, greenhouses, hotbeds, orangeries, etc., except the grapevine, may
be imported under the following conditions:

1. Those products must be securely packed in such a manner that the neces-
sary inspections can be made.

2. Each consignment must be accompanied by a shipper’s declaration fur-
nishing the following data:

(a) Affirming that the entire contents of the consignment are from his estab-
lishment.

(b) Indicating the destination and the address of the consignee.

(c) Affirming that the consignment contains no grapevines.

(d@) Indicating whether or not the consignment includes plants with earth
on the roots.

(e) Bearing the signature of the shipper.

8. Each consignment must be accompanied also by an inspection certificate
issued by a competent authority of the country of origin certifying—

(a) That the plants are from ground separated from any grapevine stocks
by at least 20 meters, or by some obstacle to the roots deemed sufficient by
competent authority.

(b) That the ground itself contains no grapevines.

(c) That the place has not been used as a depot for grapevines.

(d) That if stocks infested with phylloxera have been grown there, their
complete extirpation has been effected by repeated toxic applications and in-
vestigations for a period of 3 years, insuring the total destruction of thes,
insects and of roots.

CUT FLOWERS, SEEDS, BULBS, FRUITS (EXCEPT GRAPES), AND VEGETABLES, IMPORTA-
TION AND TRANSIT UNRESTRICTED

The importation and transit of cut flowers, seeds, and bulbs free from earth,
grape seeds, wine, fruits of any kind (except grapes), and vegetables is unre-
stricted by the phylloxera regulations, and entry may be made through any
customs port of entry (see also art. 8, decree of July 18, 1932, on apples and
pears, D. 7).

GENERAL RESTRICTIONS ON THE IMPORTATION OF PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS

The following restrictions upon the importation into, and transit through, the
Federal territory of Austria were imposed by decree no. 222 of the Federal Min-
ister of Agriculture and Forestry in cooperation with the Minister of Finance,
of July 18, 1932, B. G. Bl. no. 222, of 1932), as amended by decree no. 483,
effective January 1, 1936 (B. G. BL, no. 131, Dec. 19, 1935), on the basis of


1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS “a

article 2 of the customs law of June 10, 1920 (St. G. Bl. no. 250, of 1920), and
of article 12 of the plant protection law of July 12, 1929 (B. G. BL, no. 252, of
1929).

SHIPMENTS ATTACKED BY PLANT PESTS OR DISEASES, IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

ARTICLE 1. The importation into, or transit through, Austrian Federal terri-
tory is prohibited of shipments of any kind, from foreign countries, which are
attacked by an injurious plant pest or disease, and which may cause the intro-
duction of such a pest or disease.

Articles 2 and 38 prescribe that all plant-quarantine requirements shall be
met at the frontier port of entry and provide for the inspection of shipments
from foreign countries.

SPECIAL REGULATIONS CONCERNING PARTICULAR PLANT PESTS AND DISEASES
POTATO WART AND PHYLLOXERA

Article 4 prescribes that the special provisions for protection against potato
wart and phylloxera shall not be affected by this decree.

SAN JOSE SCALE AND APPLE FRUIT FLY, INSPECTION CERTIFICATE AND DISINFECTION
REQUIRED

ArT. 5. (1) The importation from any country into Federal territory of
deciduous fruit trees and berry-bearing shrubs, as well as of other deciduous
trees and shrubs, including stocks, slips, cuttings, and scions thereof, is permis-
sible only when each shipment—

(1) Is accompanied by a certificate issued by the official plant-protection
service of the exporting country declaring that: (@) Upon inspection
it has been found free from injurious plant pests and diseases; and
(6) in the exporting country an effective disinfection with hydro-
cyanic-acid gas was carried out, in connection with which each plant
or package (bale, basket, packet, etc.) was provided with a seal of
the official plant-protection service (the impression of which is to be
borne by the certificate) in such a manner that a substitution of the
plants for others is precluded ; and

(2) The shipment corresponds to those conditions.

CERTIFICATES REQUIRED WITH PLANTS OTHER THAN THOSE MENTIONED IN
ARTICLE 5 (1)

ArT. 6. (1) Without prejudice to the exception in article 10, each shipment
of living plants and parts of plants, other than those indicated in article 5 (1),
must be accompanied by a certificate issued by the plant-protection service of
the exporting country affirming that upon inspection they were found free from
San Jose scale and other injurious pests and diseases.

(2) However, shipments of rooted plants and parts of plants with balls of
earth fall also under the provisions of article 12.

IMPORTATION BY RAIL, WATER, AND MAIL PERMITTED

Art. 7. The importation of shipments of all the kinds referred to in articles 5
and 6 is permitted by rail, water, and mail only.

INSPECTION CERTIFICATE REQUIRED FOR APPLES AND PEARS

Art. 8. The importation of apples, pears, and refuse or waste from those
fruits, from any country into Federal territory, is permissible only when each
shipment is accompanied by a certificate issued by the plant-inspection service
of the country of origin affirming that, upon inspection, they were found free
from San Jose scale (Aspidiotus perniciosus) and apple fruit fly or maggot
(Rhagoletis pomonella).

TRANSIT RESTRICTIONS

Art. 9. (1) The provisions of articles 5 (1), 6, 7, and 8 apply also to transit
traffic through Federal territory.
72 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

(2) The transit of shipments of the kinds indicated in articlés 5, 6, and 8,
which, when effected by rail, ship, or mail, is exempt from the special import
restrictions when such shipments are transported in closed, undamaged contain-
ers or wrappers, or in sealed cars on a through bill of lading from one foreign
country to another.

UNRESTRICTED PRODUCTS

Art. 10. The traffic restrictions of articles 5 to 9 do not apply to cut flowers,
fresh fruits (other than apples and pears), and other fruits, preserved fruits,
dried fruits, vegetables, root crops, tubers (potatoes), bulbs, rhizomes, and other
subterranean parts of plants, as well as seeds.

RESTRICTIONS ON ACCOUNT OF THE COLORADO POTATO BEETLE

IMPORTATION PROHIBITED OF SUBTERRANEAN PLANT PARTS, INCLUDING POTATOES,
ALSO OF TOMATOES, EGGPLANTS, AND STRAWBERRIES, FROM UNITED STATES, CANADA,
BELGIUM, AND CONTINENTAL EUROPEAN FRANCE

ArT. 11. The importation and transit of fresh potatoes, rooted plants (parts
of plants) with balls of earth, bulbs, tubers, rhizomes, and corms, as well as
tomatoes, eggplants, and strawberries from certain countries, to be named
(see art. 16), that are already invaded by the Colorado beetle or menaced by
it, into or through the Federal territory is prohibited throughout the year.

Art. 12. The importation and transit of other vegetables and truck crops from
the above-named countries into or through the Federal territory is for the
present permitted only from November 15 to March 14.

Art. 13. The importation and transit of shipments of the kinds indicated
in articles 11 and 12, which are only transported in transit through the coun-
tries referred to in article 11, but which do not originate there, are permitted
into or through the Federal territory without regard to the provisions of the
potato wart law and the decree promulgated thereunder, for the present only
from November 15 to March 14 and on condition that their origin is apparent
from the freight documents or from a phytosanitary certificate of origin issued
by the plant protection service of the country of origin or a special declaration
of a customs authority of a railroad or port.

PREVIOUSLY USED PACKING MATERIALS, EARTH, AND MANURE ENTRY AND TRANSIT
PROHIBITED

Art. 14. Wrappers and materials of any kind which have served for packing
or storing the products, or refuse thereof, referred to in articles 11 and 12,
leaves and other refuse (peelings), as well as earth, manure, and compost, from
the countries named in Article 16, are excluded from entry into, and transit
through, the Federal territory.

DRIED OR PROCESSED PLANT PRODUCTS IMPORTATION AND TRANSIT NOT RESTRICTED

ArT. 15. The traffic restrictions of articles 11 to 13 do not apply to ship-
ments of dried products and processed foods, such as dried potatoes, potato
flour, canned tomatoes, and vegetables, ete.

COUNTRIES IN WHICH COLORADO BEETLE OCCURS

Art. 16. As countries (localities) which are now infested by the Colorado
potato beetle (art. 11), the United States of America, Canada, Belgium, and
continental European France are so declared.

When necessary, the foregoing regulations may be extended to other countries
that may become infested or menaced by that pest.

CLEARANCE OF TRANSIT SHIPMENTS

Art. 17. Any shipment affected by this decree, which is intended by the
shipper for transit, may be cleared through the customs in the Federal terri-
tory only when it is treated, in accordance with the corresponding kind of
shipment among those mentioned in articles 5, 6, 8, 12, and 13, and the above-
described certificate, or an import permit may be produced in particular cases
for such a shipment.
0 7 3

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Fo

7 le

1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 73

CERTIFICATE REQUIRED IN GERMAN AND IN THE LANGUAGE OF COUNTRY OF ORIGIN

Art. 18. (1) The official certificate prescribed in this decree must be furnished
both in the language of the country of origin and in German, or be provided
with a certified translation in German. ‘The date of the certificate shall not be
more than 3 weeks prior to the date of shipment.

DIVERSION OF SHIPMENTS TO PREVENT INTRODUCTION OF SAN JOSE SCALE AND APPLE
FRUIT FLY

Art. 19. The Federal Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry may divert the
entry and transit of shipments governed by the preceding regulations, if
through them an introduction of San Jose scale or apple fruit fly is to be
apprehended.

ART, 20. Penalties.

ArT. 21. Revocation of earlier decrees.

B. E. P. Q. 403 (supersedes P. Q. C. A. 301)

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF FRANCE

JUNE 13, 1936.

This summary of the plant-quarantine import restrictions of the Republic of
France has been prepared for the information of nuvserymen, plant-quarantine
officials, and others interested in the exportation of plants and plant products
to that country.

It was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant-quarantine inspector in charge,
foreign information service, Division of Foreign Piant Quarantines, from his
translations of the texts of the appropriate French legislation.

The information included in this circular is believed to be correct and com-
plete up to the time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used inde-
pendentiy of, nor as a substitute for, the original texts of the original laws,
decrees, orders, and circulars, and it is not to be interpreted as legally authorita-
tive. The original texts should be consulted.

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF FRANCE
Basic LEGISLATION

Law of December 17, 1814, article 34. San Jose scale.

Law of July 15, 1878, and of August 2, 1879, prohibiting the importation
of potatoes.

Law of June 21, 1898, prohibiting the importation of certain products.

Law of July 15, 1921, prohibiting the importation of grape seedlings.

Law of July 13, 1922, prohibiting the importation and transit of potatoes.

Law of July 20, 1927, requiring the coloring of foreign clover seeds.

Law of January 11, 1932, prescribing the standards.of purity and germinabil-
ity for grass seeds.

SUMMARY

The importation of living plants and parts of plants except seeds from the
United States into France is prohibited by the decree of March 8, 1952, as
amended; the importation of potatoes from the same source is prohibited by
the decree of July 138, 1922, article 1.

The entry of fresh fruits from the United States also is governed by the
decree of March 8, 19382, as amended.

The importation of forage-crop seeds is restricted by the law of July 20,
1927, the decree of November 18, 1927, and the order of July 5, 1933; and the
importation of chestnut seeds is prohibited by the decree of November 26, 1930.
The importation of other seeds is unrestricted.
74 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE _ [April-June

The above are the only French plant-quarantine import restrictions with
which United States exporters and shippers need be concerned. ‘These restric-
tions and prohibitions are indicated in the summary by footnotes.

IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

Grapevines, cuttings, leaves, used supports, composts, and molds (decree of
May 15, 1882); dry grapevines and cuttings (Circular No. 1619 and decree of
July 8, 1882) : Importation prohibited from any source to prevent the introduc-
tion of phylloxera.

Woody plants from Italy (except conifers, palms, cacti, and citrus plants,
which may enter throughout the year; fresh cut fldwers for perfumery, herba-
ceous and semiligneous plants, which may enter from November 1 to May 1,
inclusive; the cut flowers and plants enumerated may enter throughout the
year if accompanied by a phytosanitary certificate) : Importation prohibited to
prevent the introduction of the scale Diaspis pentagona Targ. However, woody
plants, except apricot, almond, bignonia, catalpa, cherry, Huonymus europacus,
Prunus laurocerasus, lilac, peach, plum, and sophora, whose importation and
transit are absolutely prohibited, may enter from November 15 to April 15 if
found free from that scale (Circular No. 4454, Oct. 25, 1913).

Chestnut—Living plants, fruits, and seeds from the Far East and from coun-
tries that have not taken measures against the chestnut-bark disease or canker
(Endothia parasitica (Murr.) And. and And.) :* Importation prohibited to pre-
vent the introduction of that disease. (Letter of the Minister of Agriculture,
Mar. 26, 1921.) The above does not apply to Italy (Journ. Off. Oct. 4, 1921).
See page 12.

Plants of the genera Abies, Picea, Pinus, Pseudotsuga, and Tsuga from any
source: * Importation prohibited to prevent the introduction of a needle cast
(Rhabdocline pseudotsugae Syd.) (decree of Noy. 26, 1930). See page 12.

Living plants and parts thereof from Argentina, Australia, Austria, Canada,
Chile, China, Hawaii, Hungary, Japan, Mexico, New Zealand, Portugal, Ru-
mania, Union of South Africa, and the United States: * Importation prohibited
to prevent the introduction of San Jose scale (Aspidiotus perniciosus Comst.)
(decree of Mar. 8, 1932, as amended by the ministerial orders of Apr. 8, June
23, Aug. 2, Nov. 2, 1982, and Sept. 22, 19384). See page 6.

Forest products from Czechoslovakia which may serve as carriers of the nun
moth (Lymantria monacha L.) (decree of Dec. 1, 1921, and letter of Minister
of Agriculture, Nov. 30, 1921).

Potatoes from any country: Importation prohibited if found on arrival in
France to be infected with the wart disease (Synchytrium endobioticum
(Schilb.) Pere.) (decree of Dec. 19, 1910, and Circular No. 4129, May 4, 1911).

Potatoes from the United States: Importation prohibited to prevent the
introduction of the Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say)
(decree of July 13, 1922, art. 1). See page 9.

Potatoes, tomatoes, eggplants, living plants, tubers, rhizomes, bulbs, bulbils,
root crops, and fresh vegetables from Germany and Great Britain.

Potatoes, tomatoes, eggplants, and fresh vegetables from the Netherlands; ”
potatoes from Spain: Importation prohibited to prevent the introduction of the
Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say) (decree and order of
Apr. 18, 1932; decree of May 21 and May 23, 1932, and decree of Jan. 17,
1933 ) .*

11Jtems bearing this footnote number affect products of the United States.

12 The portion of the decree of Apr. 18, 1932, concerning living plants, flower bulbs, and
root crops from the Netherlands was revoked by the decree of May 21, 1982, leaving
effective the prohibition against fresh vegetables and potatoes from that country. How-
ever, the order of Oct. 14, 1935, authorizes the importation and transit of fresb vegetables
from that source during the period Oct. 15 and Mar. 15.

13 Flowever, exceptionally, the importation of seed potatoes may be permitted from
the above-named countries under conditions established by the Minister of Agriculture
(decree and order of Apr. 18, 1932).

144The decree of June 30, 1934, revokes that of Mar. 1, 1934, and provides for the
importation of selected and unselected seed potatoes from Great Britain under the
conditions established by the decree of Jan. 17, 1933, on the basis of certification by
the plant protection authorities of that country, namely, a special authorization in
advance. The certificate must affirm that the potatoes were grown more than 75 km
from the nearest infestation of Colorado potato beetle and that the shipment was
inspected and found free from plant-feeding insects and other pests liable to propagate
in agricultural districts and orchards.
1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 75

Cuscuta (dodder) seeds and forage crop seeds containing Cuscuta:* Importa-
tion from any source prohibited (decree of Feb. 21, 1908). See page 10.
Mixed grass seeds for forage crops, and grass seeds that are unfit for sow-
ing:* Importation from any source prohibited (law of Jan. 11, 1982). See
pages 10 to 12.
IMPORTATION RESTRICTED

Seedlings of shrubs, other than those of the grapevine: To be accompanied
by a shipper’s declaration of origin and a phyloxera certificate issued by a
competent authority of the country of origin (Phylloxera Convention of Berne,
Noy. 3, 1881, art. 38; decree of Aug. 28, 1882). Since the importation of any
living plants is prohibited from Argentina, Australia, Austria, Canada, Chile,
China, Hawaii, Hungary, Japan, Mexico, New Zealand, Portugal, Rumania,
Union of South Africa, and the United States, the above is not applicable to
those countries.

Woody plants from Italy: See the same item under “Importation pro-
hibited” for exceptions to the prohibition.

Living plants, fruits, and seeds of chestnut (Castanea spp.) from Italy:
May be imported into France only when accompanied by a certificate of
origin; a precaution against the introduction of chestnut canker (Hndothia
parasitica (Murr.) And. and And.) (decree of Mar. 8, 1921, and notice in Journ.
OfF. Oct. 4; 1921).

Fresh fruits and vegetables from the United States must be free from in-
festation by the Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineatu Say)”
(decree of July 18, 1922, art. 2). See page 9.

Fresh fruits from countries in which San Jose scale (Aspidiotus perniciosus
Comst.) is known to occur, namely, Argentina, Australia, Austria, Canada,
Chile, China, Hawaii, Hungary, Japan, Mexico, New Zealand, Portugal, Ru-
mania, Union of South Africa, and the United States:* Will be admitted into
France only when accompanied by an inspection certificate issued by the
government of the country of origin (the Federal Government of the United
States) affirming freedom from diseases and pests, and especially from San
Jose scale.

The finding of that pest in a shipment of fresh fruit may result in its rejec-
tion or fumigation at the importer’s expense. A certificate of origin must
accompany every shipment of fresh fruits from other countries (decrees of
Mar. 8 and 15, 1982; orders of Apr. 8, May 9, June 23, Aug. 2, and Nov. 2,
1932, and July 22, 1983; decree of Apr. 5, 1933). See page 7.

Seed potatoes: May be imported from Germany, Great Britain, Netherlands,
and Spain, only under special import permits granted upon application to the
French Ministry of Agriculture (decree of July 13, 1922, art. 2).

Coniferous plants of genera other than Abies, Picea, Pinus, Pseudotsuga,
and Tsuga:** May be imported only when accompanied by a certificate issued
by the competent official plant-protection service of the country of origin attest-
ing that the shipment does not include plants of the above-named genera, and
that the plants and cultures from which they came had been inspected and
found free from needle cast (Rhabdocline pseudotsugae Syd.) (decree of
Nov. 26, 1980). See page 12.

Forage-crop seeds, such as alfalfa, red clover, white clover, alsike clover,
yellow-sand clover, birdsfoot trefoil, and hairy lotus, may be imported into
France only when free from dodder seeds (Cuscuta spp.)** (decree of Feb. 21,
1908), but provision is made for the entry of seeds after the removal of the
dodder seeds (circulars nos. 4020 and 4066). See page 10.

Seeds of clover (Trifolium pr atense) and alfalfa (Medicago sativa) may be
imported only when at least 5 percent of the seed has been artificially colored
to show its foreign origin * (law of July 20, 1927, and decree of Nov. 18, 1927).
See page 10. Procedure for coloring clover seeds (order of July 5, 1933).

Grass seeds that meet the prescribed standards of purity and germinability
may be imported into France” (law of Jan. 11, 1932). See pages 10 to 12.
yeaa of sampling grass seeds prescribed (decree of June 13, 1933). See
page

Seeds other than forage crop, coniferous, and chestnut seeds may be im-
ported into France without restriction, as provided in article 2 of the Phyl-
loxera Convention of Berne, November 3, 1881, to which France subscribed.*®

15 See footnote no. 11.
16 See footnote no. 11.
76 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

The same applies also to wine, grape seeds, vintage grapes in tightly closed
barrels, grape mare in closed casks or barrels, table grapes in securely closed
but easily opened boxes or baskets, and cut and potted flowers, except as
restricted when coming from Italy.

Cut flowers imported by airplane may enter only through Le Bourget, Paris
(notice to importers, published July 1, 1932).

SAN JOSE SCALE RESTRICTIONS

IMPORTATION OF ALL LIVING PLANTS FROM THE UNITED STATES AND CERTAIN OTHER
COUNTRIES PROHIBITED ON ACCOUNT OF SAN JOSE SCALE

(Decree of Mar. 8, 1932, as amended by ministerial orders of Apr. 8, June 23, Aug. 2,
Nov. 2, 1932, and July 23, 1933, and the decree of Apr. 5, 1933)

The entry into and transit through France are prohibited of living plants, and
living parts of plants (trees, shrubs, nursery products, cuttings, and other parts
of plants), including fresh fruits, as well as the containers and packing materials
serving, or having served, to transport such products, originating in or proceed-
ing from the United States of America: Provided, That the above-named prod-
ucts, when intended for study and research, may be imported under permits
granted by the Minister of Agriculture, who will prescribe the conditions of
importation.

The same prohibition is applicable to other countries in which the presence of
San Jose scale (Aspidiotus perniciosus Comst.) has been determined, namely:
Argentina, Australia, Austria, Canada, Chile, China, Hawaii, Hungary, Japan,
Mexico, New Zealand, Portugal, Rumania, Spain, and the Union of South Africa.

RESTRICTIONS ON THE ENTRY OF FRESH FRUITS
Certification of freedom from San Jose scale required

By derogation of the prohibition to enter fresh fruits into France from the
above-named countries and the United States, in which San Jose scale is known
to occur, the importation is authorized of certain categories of fruits maintained
in the countries of origin in such a manner as to give every assurance that they
are not carriers of Aspidiotus perniciosus, under the conditions and through the
customs offices authorized by the Minister of Agriculture.

Plants and fresh fruits from countries not infested by San Jose scale

Each shipment must be accompanied by a certificate of origin issued by a com-
petent administrative authority of the country of origin. If there is occasion to
do so, orders of the Ministry of Agriculture will indicate the plants and parts of
plants for which such a certificate is not required (decree of Apr. 5, 1933).

CONDITIONS OF ENTRY

The decree of March 15, 1932, regulating that of March 8, 1932, as modified by
the ministerial orders of April 8, May 9, June 23, August 2, and November 2, 1932,
prescribes :

ARTICLE 1. The entry into France of fresh fruits originating in and proceeding
from Argentina, Australia, Austria, Canada, Chile, ‘China, Hawaii, Hungary,
Japan, Mexico, Portugal, New Zealand, Rumania, Union of South Africa, and
the United States of America, is authorized on condition—

(a) That the products are accompanied by a phytosanitary inspection certifi-
cate, issued by competent authority of the country of origin, absolutely guaran-
teeing that the fruits are not carriers of San Jose scale.

(A notice to importers, published in the Journal Officiel of May 4, 1932, requires
the shipper to obtain the certificate in duplicate, one copy to accompany the cor-
responding shipment, and the other to be addressed to the Minister of Agricul-
ture, 78 Rue de Varenne, Paris, under the stamp of the plant protection service.
In this connection the French Minister of Agriculture will accept only certificates
issued by the United States Department of Agriculture for shipments of fresh
fruits produced in and proceeding from the United States.)

(b) That a phytosanitary inspection be effected on the arrival of the fruits in
France by an inspector of the service of plant protection, who will grant full


ae ae ee
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1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 77

clearance if the fruits are found healthy or will order their destruction or
relading in the contrary case.

ArT. 2 Citrus frwits—Until further notice citrus fruits are admitted into
France on simple presentation of the certificate prescribed by article 1.

Art. 3. Transit of plants and fresh fruits.—This article has been modified and
amplified by the order of July 24, 1933, as follows:

The transit through French territory of living plants and living parts of
plants (including trees, shrubs, nursery products, cuttings, and other plant
parts, as well as fresh fruits originating in or proceeding from countries con-
taminated by San Jose scale (Aspidiotus perniciosus Comst.) is authorized
under the following conditions :

That transportation shall be effected in sealed cars; the products must be
packed in substantial containers which do not permit leakage, shipment in bulk
being prohibited; entry shall be made through. the customs at Marseille, Bor-
deaux, Dunkerque, Le Havre, Kehl-Strasbourg, St. Louis, Cerbere, and Hendaye;
no transshipment is permitted at the point of entry on a land frontier, and
direct transshipment must be made from ship to car at maritime ports without
storage on the dock.

Authorized ports of entry for fruits—The entry into and transit through
France of these fruits may take place only through the ports of Le Havre,
Bordeaux, Marseille, and Dunkerque. (As amended by the decree of May 9,
1932. )

PHYLLOXERA RESTRICTIONS

Since the decree of March 8, 1932, prohibits the importation into France of
living plants or parts thereof from countries infested by San Jose scale, the
phylloxera restrictions do not concern those countries insofar as living plants
or parts thereof are concerned. The phylloxera regulations do not restrict the
importation of seeds, but special restrictions are imposed on the importation of
clover and grass seeds.

IMPORTATION OF POTATOES PROHIBITED

(Decree of July 13, 1922, art. 1)

The entry into and transit through France is prohibited of potatoes and leaves
and refuse of that plant coming directly or indirectly from the United States of
America, a country in which the existence of the Colorado potato beetle (Lepti-
notarsa decemlineata Say) has been determined. The prohibition extends to
cases, barrels, sacks, and other containers serving or having served to transport
the above mentioned products.

IMPORTATION OF INFESTED PLANTS AND FRUITS PROHIBITED

The same prohibition is applicable to shipments of fruits and of plants other
than potatoes, leaves, and refuse of that plant, as well as to material that has
served to transport or contain them, when the presence of Leptinotarsa decem-
lineata is determined in the said shipments. To that end they are subjected
on their entry into France to a special examination.

(Since the importation of potatoes from the United States is prohibited on
account of the Colorado potato beetle, the restrictions on account of potato wart
(Synchytrium endobioticum (Schilb.) Pere.) are omitted.)

RESTRICTIONS ON THE IMPORTATION OF SEEDS

Although article 2 of the Phylloxera Convention of Berne, November 3, 1881,
provides for the importation of seeds without restriction from the standpoint of
phylloxera, certain classes of seeds are placed under restriction to prevent the
introduction of dodder (Cuscuta spp.).

IMPORTATION OF DODDER SEEDS PROHIBITED
7 (Decree of Feb. 21, 1908)

The importation into France of seeds of the plant parasite, dodder (Cuscuta
spp.), is prohibited.

That prohibition applies also to forage-crop seeds that upon inspection are
found to contain dodder seeds; especially alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), red
78 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

clover (Trifolium pratense L.), white clover (7. repens L.), alsike clover
(T. hybridum IL.) kidney vetch (Anthyllis vulneraria L.), birdsfoot trefoil
(Lotus corniculatus L.), and timothy (Phleum pratense L.).

Any mixture of seeds containing any of the above-mentioned species is pass-
able under special inspection; but if that operation reveals the presence of
Cuscuta, the entry of the mixture into France is prohibited.

The method of sampling alfalfa and clover seeds is prescribed in the order
of March 10, 1908; the same order provides also for resampling and a second
analysis. Circular no. 4020, August 13, 1910, provides for the removal of doddex
seeds.

COLORING OF IMPORTED CLOVER AND ALFALFA SEED REQUIRED
(Law of July 20, 1927)

The entry is prohibited, excluding warehouse and transit, of red clover (Tri-
folium pratense) and alfalfa (Medicago sativa) seed that has not been arti-
ficially colored in the proportion of at least 5 percent, to disclose its foreign
origin.

Seeds that have not been colored before exportation to France may be colored
under the supervision of the Customs Service at the expense of the interested
persons (decree of Nov. 18, 1927).

RESTRICTIONS ON THE IMPORTATION OF GRASS SEEDS

ARTICLE 1. Prohibited grass seeds—The importation into France is pro-
hibited of:

(1) Mixed grass seeds for forage purposes.

(2) Grass seeds intended for forage, but which are unfit for sowing.

Art. 2. Unfit grass seeds —The following are deemed unfit for sowing:

(1) Grass seeds containing more than 5 percent of tender bromegrass
(Bromus mollis L.) or of annual fescue grasses (Festuca section vulpia).

(2) Grass seeds that do not attain the following minimal percentages of
purity and germinability :



Species Purity eee

Percent Percent

Ayrostis Spp.,;DOMvesrass 2S i a a No SO ee a pe ee eee 50 50
‘Alopecurus profensisal,,, meadow foxtall= =... ==t 2" ee eee 50 45
Anthoranthum-odoratum L., sweet vernal grass_____________________-__---_-_---__e 70 50
Avena elitior= Arrhenatherwm elatius (L.) Mert. and Koch, tall oatgrass_________ 70 50
Avena flavescens= Trisetum flavescens (L.) Beauv., golden oatgrass_-.____________ 50 45
Bromus pratensis= B. commutatus Schrad., meadow bromegrass_.__-_._______._- 70 50
Conosurus cristatus-1.., erested dogtall grass-222 2 5 = oo 38 a ee eee 80 60
Dactylia glomeratat:;, orchard: eras. 22 os! ee) sis i ete ee ee 70 50
Festuca oni. 1, Sheep Silescue: 2 5 oes 8 ats ee eee ee 70 50
Festuca pratensis= F’. elatior L., meadow fescue__._-____._.___..-_---_--2__-__--- 80 60
Festuca rubra var. heterophylla Mutel., various-leafed fescue____._.___.__-__--____ 65 50
Holeus lanatus 1.;:velvetigrass. 2.2 ee ees es es ne eee 40 60
Lolium italicum=L. multiflorum Lam., Italian ryegrass____--__-_-_ rer ess 80 60
TOM DETENNE. Lt, KDEUSITVOBTASS oo - fon ees ee ne ee ee Son 60
Lolium perenne var. pacyi Sturtev., Pacey ryegrass__..__._.___.._-_-_-..--------_- 80 60
‘Philewm pretense L., timothy: ole 8 ee 1 i ee ee 80 70
Poa nemoralis \.,. wood meadow S6aSS. 2) 222 ss st eee 70 50
‘Pon pratensis s., Kentueky bluegrass: 2-2-2.) 2-2 ee eee 7 50



Toleration for difference of analysis, 6 percent of the cultural value.

Art. 3. Invoice and certificate of analysis—Shipments of the above-named
grass seeds will enter France without other examination than the official
sampling by the service for the repression of frauds when accompanied by—

(a) A duplicate of the seller’s invoice indicating the exact botanical species
and the percentages of purity and germinability;

(b) An international certificate of analysis, when it shall be instituted.
Meantime, reports of analysis issued by a State station will be admitted.

Art. 4. In case of bad faith of shippers or importers, the privilege of delivery
without inspection may be withdrawn. Moreover, the importer will be justicia-
ble under the law of August 1, 1905, on frauds. Expenses of all kinds for the






1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 19

control and inspection of grass seeds imported into France will be collected
from the declarants by the customs in accordance with a tariff established by
the Minister of Agriculture. Declarants will be required to permit the free
drawing of samples of grass seeds necessary for control and analysis (law of
Jan. 11, 1982; Journ. Off. Jan. 15, 1932).

SAMPLING OF GRAMINEOUS SEEDS

The decree of June 13, 1933, prescribes that in the application of the law of
January 11, 1932, gramineous forage-crop seeds declared for importation and
unaccompanied by the documents mentioned in article 3 of that law, will be
subject, prior to removal, and at the importer’s expense, to inspection and
analysis intended to verify their identity, purity, and germinability.

RESTRICTIONS ON ACCOUNT OF CHESTNUT BLIGHT

The importation into and transit in France are prohibited of living plants,
fruits, and seeds of chestnuts coming directly or indirectly from the Far Hast,
as well as from countries which have not taken protective measures against
the disease caused by the fungus Endothia parasitica.

Derogations from this prohibition may be authorized by the Minister of
Agriculture (decree of Mar. 8, 1921).

Notr.—Up to the present, since no country has taken sufficient protective measures

(Italy excepted), this prohibition is applicable, until further orders, to all sources except
Italy (letter of the Minister of Agriculture, Mar. 26, 1921).

ABIES, PIckA, PINUS, PSEUDOTSUGA, AND TSUGA IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

The entry into France is prohibited of plants and parts of plants belonging
to the genera Abies, Picea, Pinus, Pseudotsuga, and Tsuga as being capable
of introducing the needle cast disease (Rhabdocline pseudotsugae) (decree of
Novy. 26, 1930).

B. E. P. Q. 404
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, BRITISH INDIA

JUNE 13, 1936.

This summary of the plant-quarantine import restrictions of British India has
been prepared for the information of nurserymen, plant-quarantine officials, and
others interested in the exportation of plants and plant products to that
country.

It was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant-quarantine inspector, in charge,
foreign-information service, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines, from the
text of the Destructive Insects and Pests Act, approved February 3, 1914, as
amended, and that of notification no. 580-240, of June 22, 1922, as amended, and
was reviewed by the Imperial Council of Agricultural Research, Simla, India.

The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct and
complete up to the time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used inde-
pendently of, nor as a substitute for, the original texts.

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, BRITISH INDIA

BAsiIc LEGISLATION

(Act No. II of 1914, The Destructive Insects and Pests Act, approved Feb. 3, 1914, as
amended up to May 14, 1931)

The act empowers the Governor General in Council, by notification in the
Gazette of India, to prohibit or regulate the importation into British India of
any article or class of articles likely to cause the infection of any crop.

The act also empowers the local government, subject to the control of the
Governor General in Council, to make rules for the detention, inspection, dis-
infection, or destruction of such article or class of articles, and to impose
penalties for infractions of the said rules.
80 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

SUMMARY
IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

Plants may not be imported into British India by letter or sample mail or by
air, except as provided in article 2 of the notification of June 22, 1922, page 3.

Sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum L.): Importation prohibited from the Fiji
Islands, New Guinea, Australia, and the Philippines, to prevent the introduction
= injurious pests and diseases of sugarcane (notification of June 22, 1922, art.

(1), p. 4).

Hevea rubber plants and seeds: Importation from America or West Indies
prohibited except by the Director of Agriculture, Madras Presidency, to prevent
the introduction of Fomes semitostus Berk., Sphaerastilbe repens B. and Br.,
Fusicladium macrosporum Kuyper, and Oidium heveae Steinmann (notification
of June 22, 1922, art. 7, p. 5).

Seeds of flax (Linum usitatissimum L.), berseem (Trifolium alexandrinum
L.), and cotton (Gossypium spp.) : May not be imported by letter or sample mail
otherwise than by sea, to prevent the introduction of dodder (Cuscuta spp.)
(notification of June 22, 1922, art. 8, p. 5).

Coffee plants, seeds, and beans (Co/ffea spp.) : May not be imported except
by the Director of Agriculture, Madras Presidency, for experimental planting,
to prevent the introduction of insect pests, especially Stephanoderes hampei
Hagedorn. (See exceptions in art. 9, notification of June 22, 1922, p. 5.)

Unginned cotton, other than cotton from a Kathiawar port, that has been
produced in India, shall not be imported by sea or air, to prevent the intro-
duction of various pests of cotton (notification of June 22, 1922, art. 11 (1),
p. 5).

Mexican jumping beans (Sebastiana palmeri Rose; Euphorbiaceae) : Importa-
tion absolutely prohibited to prevent the introduction of Grapholitha saltitans
Westwood.

IMPORTATION RESTRICTED

Sugarcane intended to be grown under the supervision of the Government
sugarcane expert, Coimbatore, may be imported by him by mail (notification of
June 22, 1922, art. 2, p. 3).

Sugarcane from countries other than the Fiji Islands, New Guinea, Australia,
or the Philippines must be accompanied by an official inspection certificate
(notification of June 22, 1922, art. 6 (2), p. 4).

Plants, other than fruits and vegetables for consumption, potatoes, and sugar-
cane, May be imported by sea only at an authorized port, and after fumigation
with hydrocyanic acid gas, except as provided in article 3, notification of June

22, 1922, page 4, to prevent the introduction of injurious pests and diseases. .

Potatoes: Must be accompanied by a shipper’s declaration and a certificate
of competent authority affirming freedom from wart (notification of June 22,
1922, art. 4, p. 4).

Potatoes from Italy: Must be accompanied by a certificate of freedom from
disease (notification of June 22, 1922, art. 4).

Rubber plants imported by sea: Must be accompanied by an official certificate
that the estate on which the plants originated; or the individual plants, are
free from specified plant pests (notification of June 22, 1922, art. 5).

Flax seeds (Linum usitatissimum L.) and berseem (Trifolium alerandrinum
L.) may be imported only under a license from the Department of Agriculture
of India (notification of June 22, 1922, art. 10, p. 5).

Cottonseed: May be imported by sea at the port of Bombay when accom-
panied by a certificate, as prescribed in article 11 (2) of the notification of
June 22, 1922, page 5.

Cotton, including ginned cotton, droppings, strippings, fly, and other cotton-
mill wastes, other than yarn wastes: See conditions under article 11 (2),
paragraph 2, notification of June 22, 1922, and Notification No. 1581 of October
1, 1931, pages 5 and 6.

RULES ON THE IMPORTATION OF PLANTS INTO BRITISH INDIA

(Notification no. 580-240, of June 22, 1922, as amended up to Feb. 4, 1935)

ine Ae

ee es) ee


1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 81

DEFINITIONS

ARTICLE 1. (a) “Official certificate’ means a certificate granted by the proper
officer or authority in the country of origin (United States Department of
Agriculture).

(bo) “Plant” means a living plant or part thereof, but does not include seeds.

(c) “Prescribed port” means any of the following ports, namely, Bombay,
Caleutta, Cochin, Dhanushkodi, Karachi, Madras, Negapatam, Rangoon, and
Tuticorin.

(d) All provisions applying to plants or seeds shall apply also to all packing
material used in packing or wrapping such plants or seeds.

IMPORTATION OF PLANTS BY LETTER OR SAMPLE POST PROHIBITED

Art. 2. No plant shall be imported into British India by letter or sample
post; provided that sugarcane for planting, intended to be grown under the
personal supervision of the Government sugarcane expert, Coimbatore, may be
imported by him by such post.

IMPORTATION OF PLANT BY AIR PROHIBITED

ArT. 2 A. No plant shall be imported into British India by air; provided that
plants infested by living insects and intended for the introduction of such
insects may be so imported if they are accompanied by a special certificate
from the Imperial entomologist to the Government of India that such plants.
are imported for the purpose of introducing such insects.

IMPORTED PLANTS MUST BE FUMIGATED ON ARRIVAL

ArT. 3. No plants, other than fruits and vegetables intended for consumption,.
potatoes, and sugarcane shall be imported into British India by sea except after
fumigation with hydrocyanic-acid gas and at a prescribed port:

Provided that plants infested by living parasitized insects intended for the
introduction of such parasites may be imported without such fumigation if they
are accompanied by a special certificate from the imperial entomologist to the
Government of India that such plants are imported for the purpose of introduc-.
ing such parasites.

Provided also that in the case of plants imported direct by H. C. Javarayya,
so long as he holds the post of director of horticulture, Mysore, such fumigation:
shall be dispensed with. He is personally responsible for the fumigation of such
plants in the Bangalore fumigatorium.

POTATOES. MUST BE CERTIFIED AGAINST WART

ArT. 4. Potatoes shall not be imported into British India by sea unless:
accompanied by—

(a) A declaration from the shipper stating fully in what country and district
the potatoes were grown and guaranteeing that potato wart was not known to
exist on the farms where the potatoes were grown; and

(6) An official certificate that no case of wart disease of potatoes has been
known during the 12 months preceding the date of the certificate within 5 miles
of the place where the potatoes were grown.

Art. 5. Not applicable to the United States.

SUGARCANE RESTRICTIONS

Art. 6. (1) The importation of sugarcane into British India by sea from the
Fiji Islands, New Guinea, Australia, or the Philippine Islands is prohibited
absolutely.

(2) The importation of sugarcane into British India by sea from any other
country is prohibited, unless it is accompanied by an official certificate that it
has been examined and found free from cane borers, scale insects, aleyrodes,
root diseasé (any form), pineapple disease (Thielaviopsis (ethaceticus) para-
dora (De Seyn.) v. Hoeh.), sereh, and cane gummosis; that it was obtained
from a crop that was free from mosaic disease; and that the Fiji disease of
sugarcane does not occur in the country of export.
S82 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

Provided that in the case of canes for planting imported direct by the Govern-
ment sugarcane expert, Coimbatore, by the secretary, Sugar Bureau, Pusa, or by
G. Clarke, so long as he holds the appointment of agricultural chemist, United

Provinces, and intended to be grown under the personal supervision of the
importing officer in each case, such certificate shall be required only in respect
of the freedom of the country of export from the Fiji disease of sugarcane.

IMPORTATION PROHIBITED OF HEVEA FROM CERTAIN COUNTRIES

ArT. 7. Hevea rubber plants and seeds shall not be imported into British
India from America or from the West Indies except by the Director of Agricul-
ture, Madras Presidency. ‘

Art. 8. Seeds of flax, berseem, and cotton shall not be imported by letter or
sample post, otherwise than by sea.

RESTRICTIONS ON IMPORTATION OF COFFEE

ArT. 9. Coffee plants, coffee seeds, and coffee beans shall not be imported into
British India except for experimental planting by the Director of Agriculture,
Madras Presidency, who shall take all measures necessary to insure that such
coffee plants, beans, or seeds as are imported by him are free from plant diseases
and injurious insects. Provided that the prohibition hereinbefore contained
shall not apply (a) to roasted and ground coffee, or (0b) to a consignment of
unroasted or unground coffee beans or seeds produced in India and covered by
a certificate of origin in the prescribed form.

ArT. 10. Flax seeds and berseem (Trifolium alexandrinum UL.) shall not be
imported into British India by sea unless the consignee produces before the
collector of customs a license from the Department of Agriculture in India in
that behalf.

COTTON RESTRICTIONS

Art. 11. (1) Unginned cotton, other than cotton from a Kathiawar port,
which has been produced in India, shall not be imported by sea or by air.

(2) Cottonseed shall not be imported by sea save tor experimental purposes
by designated officers in India, and shall not be so imported by such officer save
at the port of Bombay and in quantities not exceeding one hundredweight (112
pounds) in any one consignment and on condition that it will be fumigated
with carbon disulphide on importation:

Provided, That if the cottonseed is accompanied by a certificate from a Goy-
ernment entomologist of the country of origin to the effect that the seed and
its container have been treated in such a way as to destroy all insect life, the
seed shall be examined on importation by such officer as the Governor-General-
in-Council may appoint and shall not be required to be refumigated unless such
examination shows that to be necessary. (See also the notification of Oct. 1,
1931, Cotton from America. See below.)

ArT. 12. Nothing in these rules shall be deemed to apply to—

(1) The import of any article into Aden; or

(2) The bringing by sea or by air from one port or place in British India,
not being in Aden, to another such port or place.

RESTRICTIONS ON COTTON FROM AMERICA
(Notification no. 1581—Agriculture, of Oct. 1, 1931)
Definition

ARTICLE 1. “Cotton” includes ginned cotton, and droppings, strippings, fly,
and other waste products of a cotton mill, other than yarn waste, but does not
include unginned cotton.

“American cotton” means all cotton produced in any part of America.

Entry of cotton by mail or baggage prohibited

Art. 2. American cotton shall not be imported into British India by letter or
sample mail or as passengers’ accompanied baggage, and shall not be imported
by any other means save through the port of Bombay and subject to disinfec-
tion as prescribed by the Government of Bombay at the expense of the
importer.



.
1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 83

B. E. P. Q. 405 (Superseding B. P. Q. 302, Revised)
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, GERMANY

JUNE 26, 1936.

A revision of Circular B. P. Q. 302, revised, became necessary because the
original San Jose scale decrees of the German Empire have been superseded
by the decree of November 3, 1931, and its regulatory order of November 26,
1931, and subsequent amendatory orders, restricting or prohibiting the impor-
tation of plants from the United States, among other countries, to prevent the
introduction of San Jose scale and the apple maggot, and providing for the
entry of fresh fruits from the United States if found free from San Jose scale
(Aspidiotus perniciosus Comst.) and the apple maggot or fruit fly (Riagoletis
pomonella Walsh).

This revised summary was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant-quarantine in-
spector, in charge of Foreign Information Service, Division of Foreign Plant
Quarantines, from his translations of the original texts, and reviewed by the
German Ministry of Nourishment and Agriculture for the information of nur-
serymen, plant quarantine officials, and others interested in the exportation of
plants and plant products from the United States to Germany.

The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct and com-
plete up to the time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used independ-
ently of, nor as a substitute for, the original texts; and it is not to be inter-
preted as legally authoritative. The German texts should be consulted.

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, GERMANY
OBJECTS OF THE GERMAN PLANT-QUARANTINE DECREES

The plant-quarantine import restrictions of Germany are designed to
prevent the introduction into and distribution in Germany of phylloxera
(Phylloxera (wastatrix) vitifoliae Fitch), San Jose scale (Aspidiotus per-
niciosus Comst.), apple maggot or fruit fly (Rhagoletis pomonella Walsh),
Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decenilineata Say), potato wart
(Synchytrium endobioticum (Schilb.) Pere.), European cherry fruit fly (Rhago-
letis cerasi L.), carnation leaf roller (Tortrir pronubana Hbn.), injurious
diseases and pests of flower bulbs and tubers, of conifers, of plants and parts
of plants of the genus Ulmus, of the southern cottonwood (Populus (canadensis )
deltoides Marshall), and of Azalea indica L.

INTRODUCTORY REMARKS

Whereas the following summary includes references to the entire body
of the effective plant-quarantine import restrictions of Germany, only the
texts of the legislation affecting plants and plant products of the United States,
either alone or among those of other countries, are included in this publication.
References affecting products of the United States are indicated in the sum-
mary by footnote.

SUMMARY
IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

Grapevine stocks and all parts of the grapevine: Importation prohibited
from any country to prevent the introduction of phylloxera (decree of Oct. 31,
1879, and subsequent orders; R. G. BIL, p. 3038, etce.). See page 5.

Living dicotyledonous trees and shrubs of all species, except cacti: ** Impor-
tation prohibited from the United States and certain other countries to prevent
the introduction of San Jose scale (Aspidiotus perniciosus Comst.) (decree of
Nov. 3, 1931, and Cireular of Nov. 26, 1931, as subsequently amended; R. G. BL.,
p. 303, etc.). See pages 6 and 9.

17 Affects products of the United States.
84 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

Potatoes from the United States:** Importation prohibited to prevent the
introduction of the Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say)
(decree of Feb. 26, 1875, and subsequent orders; R. G. BL, 135, ete.). See
page 11.

Potatoes, tomatoes, eggplants, strawberries, rooted vegetables, bulbs, tubers,
rhizomes, and other subterranean parts of plants; peelings and refuse of such
products; sacks and other materials that have been used for packing or presery-
ing such products: Importation and transit of the products from France
prohibited (decree of Feb. 23, 1982; R. G. BL. I: 18, 1932, p. 91).

Seeds of Scotch pine (Pinus sylvestris L.), and Norway spruce (Picea excelsa
Link.) :** Importation prohibited from any country, to prevent the introduction
of diseases of those trees (decree of Feb. 28, 1929; R. G. Bl., I: 11, 1929, p. 76).
See page 138.

Plants of the following genera from any country:* Fir (Abies), spruce
(Picea), pine (Pinus), Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga), and hemlock (Tsuga)
(decree of June 3, 19380; R. G. BI., I: 20, 1930, p. 188). See page 11.

Rooted carnations, cuttings and cut flowers from any country:* Importation
prohibited to prevent the introduction of the carnation leaf roller (Tortrir
pronubana Hbn.) (decree of Mar. 28, 1929; R. G. Bl., I: 15, 1929, p. 83). Entry
of carnation cut flowers prohibited from March 15 to November 30 of each year
(decree of Sept. 30, 1932; R. G. Bl., I: 68, 1932, p. 492). See page 13.

Rooted plants of the genus Ulmus, and of the southern cottonwood (Populus
(canadensis) deltoides Marshall), and parts thereof from any country:* Impor-
tation prohibited to prevent the introduction of pests and diseases of those
plants (decree of Feb. 2, 1982; R. G. Bl., I: 10, 1932, p. 63). See pages 12
and 13.

Living plants and fresh parts thereof from Portugal, Rumania, and Yugo-
Slavia (decree of July 11, 1933, as amended; R. G. BL, I, p. 468; R. Z. BL, p.
353, ete.).

Wild plants: Importation prohibited of those named in articles 4 and 5 of the
decree of March 18, 1986. See page 14.

IMPORTATION RESTRICTED

Deciduous plants and parts thereof not specifically prohibited :** Each ship-
ment must be accompanied by a certificate affirming that the noninclusion of
plants of Ulmus and Populus deltoides or parts thereof (decree of Feb. 2, 1932;
R. G. Bl. I: 10, 1932, p. 63). See pages 12 and 13.

Coniferous plants and parts thereof not specifically prohibited: Each ship-
ment must be accompanied by a certificate affirming the noninclusion of plants
of Abies, Picea, Pinus, Pseudotsuga, Tsuga, or parts thereof (decree of June 5,
1930; R. G. Bl. I: 20, 1930, p. 188). See pages 11 and 12.

Rooted plants, the importation of which is not prohibited by special decrees,
as indicated above: Shipments of restricted plants, only through authorized
customs offices, from countries—

1. Adhering to the International Phylloxera Convention are to be accom-
panied by a shipper’s declaration of origin and a certificate affirming freedom
of the shipment from phylloxera (decree of July 4, 1883).

2. Not adhering to the International Phylloxera Convention are to be accom-
panied by a shipper’s declaration— ”

(a) Obligating himself to pay the cost of inspection for phylloxera; and

(b) Commissioning the consignee or other person authorized by the shipper,
and living in Germany, to pay that cost *® (notice of Aug. 23, 1887; R. G. BL, p.
431). Shipments are subject to thorough inspection for freedom from grape-
vine roots or other parts of the grapevine and from phylloxera on arrival (de
cree of Apr. 7, 1887; R. G. Bl, p. 155). The fee for the inspection of rooted
plants is at the rate of 0.01 reichsmark per 1 kg net weight, the minimum fee
for any shipment being 1 reichsmark (decree of July 5, 1930; R. G. BL, p. 203).

Cacti, trees, shrubs, plants, and parts thereof not included among dicoty-
ledonous trees and shrubs (except when prohibited by other regulations) :”
Shipments subject to thorough inspection for San Jose scale on arrival (decree
of Noy. 3. 1931, and circular of Noy. 26, 1931, as amended; R. G. Bl. I: 74, 1931,

18 See footnote 17.

19 See footnote 17.

2 See the decree of June 3, 1930, pp. 11-12: decree of Mar. 28, 1929, p. 13; decree of
Feb. 2, 1932, p. 183; and decree of Mar. 18, 1936, p. 14.

i i
1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 85

p. 670, ete., and Rundschreiben des R. M. f. E. u. L. an Landerregierungen vom
26 Nov. 1931, Il: 41258). See page 9, class B.

zalea indica, plants of, from any source: Each shipment must be accom-
panied by a certificate issued by competent authority afiirming freedom from
specified pests and diseases (decree of Nov. 9, 1982; R. G. Bl. 1: 75, 1932, p. 528).

Fresh fruits from certain countries must be imported in the original pack
only and are subject to inspection for San Jose scale (Aspidiotus perniciosus
Comst.) and apple maggot (Rhagoletis pomonella Walsh) on arrival at the
port of entry” (decree of Nov. 3, 1931; circular of Nov. 26, 1931; decree of
July 8, 19382; ete.). See page 7.

Fresh cherries from any source:â„¢ To prevent the introduction of the Euro-
pean cherry fruit fly (Rhagoletis cerasi L.), each shipment must be accom-
panied by a certificate issued by competent authority affirming freedom from
that pest (decree of Apr. 27, 1929; R. G. Bl. I, 1929, p. 92). See page 14.

Potatoes from countries other than the United States and France: To prevent
the introduction of potato wart (Synchytrium endobioticum (Schilb.) Pere.),
each shipment must be accompanied by a certificate affirming freedom from
that disease (decree of Mar. 7, 1930; R. G. Bl. I: 6, 1930).

Fresh vegetables of all kinds, aerial parts of plants, except fruits, from
France, whose entry and transit are not prohibited by article 1 of the decree
of February 23, 1932 (see list under “Importation prohibited”), may be im-
ported from March 15 to November 15 of each year under certificate of origin
in uninfested land and phytosanitary certificate (decree of Feb. 235, 1952;
fil. 3.15, 1082, p. OL).

Subterranean parts of plants, seeds (except those of Pinus sylvestris and
Picea excelsa), tropical fruits, cereals, and vegetables for food and other
purposes (including fresh mushrooms)” (decree of Nov. 17, 1934; Z 1101-681,
II; see p. 10), drugs and raw materials for technical and medicinal purposes
from the United States, except as prohibited by other regulations, are not re-
stricted by the decree of November 3, 1931, and the circular of November 26,
1931, as amended. (See p. 9, class C.) However, subterranean parts of plants,
with the same exceptions, are subject to the phylloxera restrictions; and bulbs,
corms, and tubers also are subject to the certification requirements of the decree
of July 7, 1930; R. G. Bl. I: 24, 1930, page 204. See page 9, class C.

PHYLLOXERA RESTRICTIONS
IMPORTATION OF GRAPEVINES PROHIBITED

In accordance with the provisions of the International Phylloxera Convention
of Berne, November 3, 1881, the importation into Germany is prohibited of
grapevine stocks and all parts of the grapevine, especially of branches and
foliage.

IMPORTATION OF GRAPES PERMITTED

Table grapes may be imported when packed without grapevine leaves in boxes,
cases, baskets, or well-headed barrels, easy to inspect.

Wine grapes and grape mare may be imported only when packed in tightly
closed barrels (decree of Oct. 31, 1879; R. G. BL, p. 803; and decree of July 4,
1883; R. G. B1., p. 153, ete.).

SHIPPERS DECLARATION AND PHYLLOXERA CERTIFICATE REQUIRED

Shipments of rooted plants and parts thereof, other than grapes, the entry of
which is not prohibited by the San Jose scale and apple maggot and other
special quarantines, must be accompanied by a shipper’s declaration of origin
and by a phylloxera certificate issued by a competent authority of the country
of origin, as follows:

The shipper’s declaration shall:

1. Affirm that the entire contents of the shipment proceed from his estab-
lishment.

2. Indicate the receiving point and address of the consignee.

3. Affirm that no grapevines are included in the shipment.

4. State whether the shipment contains plants with earth on the roots.

5. Bear the signature of the shipper.

21 See footnote 17.
S6 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

The phylloxera certificate shall affirm:

1. That the plants were taken from ground separated from grapevine stocks
by at least 20 meters, or by some obstacle to the roots deemed suflicient by
competent authority.

2. That the ground itself contains no grapevines.

3. That the place has not been used as a depot for that plant.

4. That if stocks infested with phylloxera have been grown there, their com-
plete extirpation had been effected by repeated toxic applications and by inves-
tigations for a period of 3 years, thus insuring the complete destruction of
phylloxera and roots (decree of July 4, 1883, and subsequent orders; R. G. BL,
p. 153, ete.).

RESTRICTIONS TO PREVENT THE INTRODUCTION OF SAN JOSE SCALE
AND APPLE MAGGOT

The original San Jose scale decree of February 5, 1898, prohibited the
importation into Germany of all living plants or parts thereof from the United
States, but the edict of May 8, 1907, now superseded by the decree of November 3,
1931, as amended, and the circular of November 26, 1931 (Reichsgesetzbl. I: 74,
1931, p. 670, and Rundschreiben des R. M. f. E. u. L. and die Landerregierungen
vom 26 Noy. 1931, Il: 41258), group plants into class A, entry absolutely pro-
hibited; B, importation conditional; and C, importation unrestricted; and they
prescribe that fresh fruits may be imported only when found free from San Jose
scale and apple maggot.

Decree of November 3, 1931, to prevent the introduction of San Jose scale
(Aspidiotus perniciosus Comst.), and apple maggot (Rhagoletis pomonella
Walsh) (R. G. BI., I, p. 670; R. Z. Bl., p. 362), as amended by those of July 8,
1932 (R. G. BL, I, p. 351; -R. Z. Bl., p. 270), and April 20, 1983 (R. G. BL, p: 230;
RR. ZBL, p: 200)%

IMPORTATION OF LIVING PLANTS PROHIBITED FROM CERTAIN COUNTRIES

ARTICLE 1. (1) To prevent the introduction of San Jose scale (Aspidiotus
perniciosus Comst.), the importation is prohibited, until further notice, of living
plants and fresh parts thereof from America, Australia (including New Zealand
and Tasmania), Austria, China, Hawaii, Hungary, India, Iraq (Mesopotamia),
and the Union of South Africa.

(2) The same prohibition applies to the containers and articles of any kind
that have served for packing or storing such plants or parts of plants.

PROVISION FOR ENTRY SUBJECT TO INSPECTION

(3) The Federal Minister of Nourishment and Agriculture, in cooperation
with the Federal Minister of Finance, may prescribe that the importation of
living plants and fresh parts thereof from the countries named in paragraph
1, against which the suspicion of San Jose scale exists, be permitted through
certain customs offices and on condition that an inspection of the shipment
at the port of entry, at the expense of the interested person, reveals no infesta-
tion or suspicion of infestation by that pest.

FRESH FRUITS MAY BE IMPORTED ONLY THROUGH AUTHORIZED PORTS AND IN
ORIGINAL PACKAGES ’

Art. 2. (1) Fresh fruits (deciduous) and fresh refuse of fruits,” that orig-
inate in the countries named in paragraph 1 of article 1, until further notice,
may be imported only through customs offices designated by the Federal Gov-
ernment, in the original packages alone,” and only on condition that as a re-

“The regulations on the importation of fresh fruits and refuse thereof apply also to
the importation of nuts, oranges, mandarins, lemons, and other citrus fruits. Both
mature and immature (ripe and unripe) nuts are’ to be inspected if green husks still
adhere to them (R. F. M. of Mar. 15, 1934, Z 1101-216 II: R. Z. Bl. p. 168—R. F. M. of
Mar. 27 and Apr. 9, 1934, Z 1101-246 II, 275 II; R. Z. Bl., p. 212, 244—R. F. M. of
July 4, 1934, Z 1101-483 IT).

2 The importation of fresh fruits and fresh refuse thereof from Austria and Hungary
is permitted in bulk also, on condition that the shipments are accompanied by certificates
of origin and health issued by the official plant protection service of the country of
origin and the other conditions of the decree of Nov. 8, 1931, are complied with. The

OS ss Fr




-=
1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS S 4

sult of an inspection of the shipment for San Jose scale at the port of entry,
at the expense of the interested person, and in the case of those originating
in the United States and Canada, also for the apple maggot (Rhagoletis
pomonelia Walsh), no infestation or suspicion of infestation is found.

(See also regulations under pt. II, decree of Noy. 8, 1931, on the entry of
dried fruits, and the so-called southern fruits and on the inspection of imported
fruits, p. 10.)

EXCEPTIONS PROVIDED FOR

Arr. 8. (1) The Federal Minister of Nourishment and Agriculture can per-
mit exceptions to the provisions of articles 1 and 2 under necessary safe-
guards.

REGULATIONS UNDER THE DECREE OF NOVEMBER 3, 1931

(Circular of Nov. 26, 1931, II 41258)

1. IMPORTATION OF LIVING PLANTS AND FRESH PARTS OF PLANTS
Classification of plants for importation

Living plants and fresh parts thereof are divided into three groups accord-
ing to their species:

Nore 1. No restrictions apply under these regulations, apart from the cases
covered by article 4 and those covered by the circular of January 31, 1934—
II /Z—242, to:

(a) The importation of bouquets and cut flowers (not potted plants) brought
in by travelers, not for commercial purposés (R. F. M., Apr. 19, 1934, Z 1101-161
tix. 2. Bl, p: 267).

(b) The importation of funeral wreaths, bouquets, and cut flowers (not
potted plants) which are brought in personally for the decoration of graves
and coffins, family reunions, religicus festivals, and the like (R. F. M. of
Apr. 19, 1934, Z 1101-161 II; R. Z. B1., p. 267).

(c) The importation of blackberries, bilberries, raspberries, red whortle-
berries, and wild strawberries in restricted frontier traffic from Austria,
Poland, and Czechoslovakia (R. F. M. of Aug. 29, 1982, Z 1101-911 IT; of Oct. 2,
1933, Z 1101-308 II; and of Feb. 5, 1934, Z 1101-53 IT).

1. Plants and parts of plants that are unconditionally excluded from importa-
tion (A).

2. Plants and parts of plants whose importation is conditionally permitted
(B).

3. Plants and parts of plants that may be imported without restriction (C).

Dried plants are classed as living plants

Plants and parts of plants in the dry state also are to be regarded as fresh
and are to be treated as living plants.

The three classes of plants

A. Those unconditionally excluded from importation are living dicotyledonous
trees and shrubs of all kinds (except cacti) ; also seedlings and plants, as well
as parts thereof, such as twigs, scions, layers, cuttings, ete. In this group are
included all deciduous fruit trees and shrubs, as well as nut and ornamental
trees and shrubs of all kinds.

B. The importation is to be permitted, insofar as other regulations do not
prohibit (for example, the prohibition of importation of conifers, rooted carna-
tions, and carnation cuttings), of cacti, as well as plants not included among
dicotyledonous trees and shrubs and parts thereof, on condition that they are

said certificate must affirm that the shipment was inspected and found free from San
Jose scale, and that in the locality in which the shipment originated San Jose scale
had not hitherto appeared (R. F. M. of Aug. 8, 1932, Z 1101-833 II). On the importa-
tion of such consignments from Hungary, the railroad cars containing the goods must
bear on each side door an unbroken seal with the impression ‘‘M. Kir. Novenyvedelmi
Szolgalat Budapest.”

As for consignments of fruit declared to be of origin in a European country, the
country of origin must always be established, according to the provision of pt. II, no. 5,
of the Anleitung fiir die Zollabfertigung.
8S BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

not packed with plants of class A, and that inspection by a technical official at
the port of entry does not establish any infestation or suspicion of infesta-
tion with San Jose scale.

C. Importation unrestricted: Until further notice, except as prohibited by
other regulations (for example, importation of potatoes and diseased flower
bulbs and tubers is prohibited) all subterranean parts of plants, all kinds of
seeds (except those prohibited by special quarantines), tropical fruits (except
citrus fruits), cereals, and vegetables for food and as luxuries, drugs and
technical raw material for medicinal purposes, and raw material for technical
manufacture.

Shipments that include plants of the different groups are subject, in their
entirety, to the conditions of the most restricted group.

For plants of group A the right is reserved, in individual cases, for special
reasons, to permit exceptions to the import prohibition, when guaranties are
given against the introduction of San Jose scale.

The provisions of these regulations apply to living plants and fresh parts
thereof, but not to fruit, brought in as baggage by passengers (travelers).

Fresh mushrooms placed in class C

The order of November 17, 1934; Z 1101—681 II, prescribes that fresh mush-
rooms are to be regarded as vegetables for food purposes in the sense of group C
of the circular of November 26, 1931. Consequently that product is exempt
from the import prohibitions of the decree of November 3, 1931, as amended.

Importation permitted only through authorized ports

The importation of living plants and fresh parts thereof, insofar as it is
permitted, may be effected only through customs offices that have been author-
ized for the entry of fruit.”

2. IMPORTATION OF FRESH DECIDUOUS FRUITS AND FRESH REFUSE OF SUCH FRUITS
Inspection of imported fruits

The inspection of imported fruits for the presence of San Jose scale (Aspidi-
otus perniciosus Comst.) and apple maggot (Rhagoletis pomonella Walsh) is to
be carried out in accordance with “Instructions for the inspection of plants,
fruits, and potatoes on entry’, as presented in the circular of July 1, 1931—II
40305. The inspection may be entrusted only to technical specialists who
have had thorough instruction in the microscopic characteristics of San Jose
seale.

Dried fruits unrestricted

Dried fruits of any kind, and dried refuse of fruits, regardless of the degree
of desiccation, are not subject to the provisions of this decree, nor do they apply
to fruit brought in by passengers as baggage for their own needs during the
journey (as amended by the circular of January 31, 1934—II : 2242).

The so-called southern fruits, including raisins, pineapples, bananas, etce.,
are not to be regarded as fruit in the sense of this decree. Citrus fruits
are now placed under the same restrictions as deciduous fruits.

COLORADO POTATO BEETLE QUARANTINE
(Decree of Feb. 26, 1875)

Importation from the United States into Germany is prehibited of potatoes,
potato peelings, and other potato refuse, as well as of sacks and other con-
tainers that have been used for packing potatoes. This prohibition does not
apply to potatoes carried on vessels as ships’ stores.

The importation of dried potatoes also is prohibited (order of Mar. 8, 1900).

The importation of sweetpotatoes is not restricted (order of Aug. 19, 1906).

The importation and transit of living Colorado potato beetles, at any stage
of their life history, are prohibited. The Minister of Nourishment and Agricul-
ture can permit exceptions from this prohibition (decree of Oct. 7, 1932;
R. G. Bl., I: 69, 1932, p. 496).

*% The list of authorized ports is too long for inclusion in this circular.




1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 89

Importation must be made through authorized ports (decree of May 20, 1935;
R. M. Bl. p. 518). Article 3 of the decree of July 5, 1930; R. G. Bl., page 203,
referring to fees for the inspection of rooted plants, potatoes, and fruits on
importation is applicable as follows: The fee for the inspection of cherries is
at the rate of 0.003 reichsmark per 1 kilo net weight, the minimum fee for any
shipment being 1 reichsmark.

IMPORTATION OF CONIFEROGUS PLANTS RESTRICTED

The entry of coniferous plants of the following genera is prohibited until
further notice: Abies (fir), Picea (spruce), Pinus (pine), Pseudotsuga, and
Tsuga, or parts thereof.

The entry of other coniferous plants will not be allowed unless they are
packed separately or mixed only with each other, and unless the invoice is
accompanied by a certificate issued by a competent official of the plant pro-
tection service of the country of origin, affirming, in the German language, that
the shipment covered by the certificate has been thoroughly inspected by him
and found free from plants of the above-mentioned genera or of parts thereof.
The Minister of Nourishment and Agriculture can permit exceptions to this
prohibition. Transit shipment under customs supervision is permitted (decree
of June 3, 19380, R. G. Bi. I, No. 20, 1930, p. 188).

(The phrase “The entry of other coniferous plants will not be allowed unless
they are packed separately or mixed with each other” is understood to mean
that coniferous plants, other than those named above, will not be permitted
entry unless those of a single genus are packed by themselves, or unless those
of several genera, other than those named above, are packed together. In
other words, coniferous plants of the genera above named, and nonconiferous
plants, may not be included in any shipment of coniferous plants offered for
importation under the provisions of this decree.)

IMPORTATION OF FLOWER BULBS AND CORMS RESTRICTED

The entry of flower bulbs and corms is not allowed, unless each shipment is
accompanied by a certificate issued by a competent official of the plant pro-
tection service of the country of origin, affirming, in the German language,
that the shipment has been thoroughly inspected by him and found free from
the following plant diseases or insect pests: Yellow disease (Bacterium (Pseudo-
monas) hyacinthi Wakk.), Sclerotinia rot (Sclerotinia bulborum (Wakk.)
Rehm.), black rot of bulbs) (Selerotiun) Rhizoctonia tuliparum (Kleb.)
Whetzel and Arthur), fire disease (Botrytis (parasitica) tulipae (Lib.) E. F.
Hopkins), Penicillium rot (Penicillium sp.), eelworm disease of bulbs (Anguil-
lulina (Tylenchus) dipsaci (Kuhn) Cerv. and v. Ben.), greater and lesser nar-
cissus flies (Jlerodon spp. and Humerus spp.), and the bulb mite (Rhizoglyphus
(echinopus) hyacinthi Byd.).

Transit through Germany under customs supervision is permitted (decree of
July 7, 1980; B. G. Bl. I; 24, 1980, p. 204).

IMPORTATION OF ELM AND SOUTHERN POPLAR PROHIBITED

The importation of rooted plants of the genus Ulmus and of the Canadian
poplar (Populus (canadensis) deltoides Marshall), as well as of cuttings, scions,
grafts, and other fresh parts of such plants, is prohibited until further notice.

The importation of other deciduous plants than those named in article 1, or
cuttings, scions, grafts, and other fresh parts thereof, is permitted only when
the consignment is accompanied by a certificate in the German language and
that of the country of origin, affirming that the shipment was inspected and
that it does not contain plants or parts thereof above mentioned.

The Imperiai Minister of Agriculture can make exceptions to these pro-
visions.

The direct transit of the above-mentioned plants and their parts is permitted
under customs supervision (decree of Feb. 2, 1932; R. G. Bl. I: 10, 1932, p. 63).

IMPORTATION OF PINE AND SPRUCE SEEDS PROHIBITED

The importation into Germany of pine and spruce seeds and of pine and
spruce cones containing seeds (tariff no. 95) is prohibited as of March 15, 1929
(decree of Feb. 28, 1929; R. G. B1., I: 11, 1929, p. 76).
90 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June

Amended by the decree of September 13, 1929 (R. G. BI., 1: 35, 1929, p. 147),
to prohibit the importation into Germany of seeds, and of cones containing
seeds of the Scotch pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and of the Norway spruce (Picea
excelsa Link) only: Provided, That these seeds may be imported into Germany,
in exceptional cases, if the importer has obtained an import permit from the
German Minister of Agriculture. Until further notice, no permit is required to
import the seeds of other species of pine or spruce (Pinus or Picea).

IMPORTATION OF CARNATIONS PROHIBITED

To prevent the introduction of the carnation leaf roller (Tortrix pronuwbana
Hbn.), the entry of rooted carnations and carnaticn cuttings is prohibited until
further notice. The entry of cut flowers of carnations also is prohibited from
March 15 to November 30 of each year.

The Federal Minister of Nourishment and Agriculture can permit exceptions
to this prohibition.

The unrestricted transit through Germany of the above-named plants under
customs supervision is permitted (decrees of Mar. 28, 1929; R. G. BL, I: 15,
1929, p. 88; decree of Sept. 30, 1982; R. G. Bl., I: 68, 1932, p. 492).

IMPORTATION OF FRESH CHERRIES RESTRICTED

The importation of fresh cherries attacked or suspected of being attacked by
the maggot of the European cherry fruit fly (Rhagoletis cerasi L.) is prohib-
ited until further notice. Shipments of this fruit must be accompanied by a
certificate of origin issued by the communal authorities of the place of origin
and by a sanitary certificate issued by a competent official of the plant protec-
tion service of the country of origin, vouching for the freedom of the fruit from
the maggot of the cherry fruit fly. Shipments will be inspected at the port of
entry. Transit shipment through Germany under customs supervision is per-
mitted (decree of Apr. 27, 1929, R. G. Bl., I, 1929, p. 92).

IMPORTATION OF WILD PLANTS PROHIBITED ©

(Decree of Mar. 18, 1986; R. G. Bl.. No. 25, Mar. 28, 1936)

The object of this decree is to protect wild plants and animals from wanton
destruction or injury. Article 6 prescribes as follows:

Art. 6. It is forbidden to carry, to send, to hold for sale, to import or export,
to turn over to others, to acquire, to take in custody, or to deal in plants and
parts of plants of the protected species named in article 4 or of the fresh or
dried protected plant parts named in article 5.

Fwily protected plants named in article 4
1. Pteretis struthiopteris=Struthiopteris germanica, ostrich fern.

2. Phyllitis scolopendrium Newman=Scolopendrium vulgare Smith, harts-
tongue.

3. Osmunda regalis L., royal fern.

4. Stipa pennaia L., feathergrass.

5. Lilium martagon L., turban or turkscap lily.

6. Fritillaria meleagris L., snakeshead.

7. Narcissus pseudonarcissus L., common daffodil.

8. Orchids, adder’s grass, Orchidaceae of the following genera and species:

Cypripedium calceoius l., Cephalanthera,, Nigritella, Platanthera, Ophruys,
Limodorum abortivum (l.) Swartz, Orchis.

9. Dianthus caesius Smith, Cheddar pink.

10. Anemone narcissifiora L., narcissus-flowered anemone.

11. Anemone alpina L., alpine anemone, including the yellow subspecies
A. sulphurea I.

12. Anemone silvestris I.., wood anemone.

13. Aquilegia spp., all native species.

14. Pulsatilla spp., all native species.

15. Adonis vernalis L., spring adonis.

16. Nymphea alba L., white waterlily.

17. Dietamnus albus L., white dittany.

18. Daphne spp., all native species.




1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS

19. Bryngiwn maritimnum L., seaholly.

20. Cyclamen europeum L., European cyclamen.

21. Primula auricula L.

22. Digitalis ambigua Murr. and D. lutea L., foxgloves.

91

23. Gentiana acaulis L., G. clusii P. and §S., G. kochiana P. and S., G. ciliata

L., G. pneumonanthe L., G. lutea IL.
24. Leontopodium alpinum L., edelweiss.

Partially protected plants named in article 5

The underground parts (rhizomes, bulbs) or the rosettes of wild plants of the

following species:

Convallaria majalis L., lily-of-the-valley.

Scilla spp., all Native species of squill.

Muscari spp., all native species of grape-hyacinth.
Galanthus nivalis L., snowdrop.

Leucojum vernum U., spring snowflake.

Gladiolus spp., all native species.

Helleborus niger l., Christmas-rose.

Saxifraga spp., all rosette-bearing species of saxifrage.
Primula spp., all native species of primrose.

f CON OUR OO No pA

PENALTIES IMPOSED FOR VIOLATIONS OF THE PLANT QUARANTINE

ACT

According to reports received by the Bureau during the period April 1 to
June 380, 1936, penalties have recently been imposed by the proper Federal

authorities for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act, as follows:

QUARANTINES AFFECTING MEXICAN PRODUCTS

In the case of the United States versus the persons listed below, for attempting
to smuggle in contraband plant material, the penalties indicated were imposed

by the United States customs officials at the following ports:







Name Port Contraband

“ATieli@ aStillOs ees ee tess Brownsville, Tex-___| 1 orange___________-_____________-
IMiaUnICIOMMUdON: a Coster eae 4 avocados with seed____-_____--
PADS lUO7AN Om. +. Jae ae eters COE eae ee 6 avocados with seed__________--
Rafaela R. de Martinez___-__.__-.--__--]-___- Osea o ee eee 2 MAanvoes._- 2 22 ea
Gem GME OL OZ te tees eae eee Se ed a Oss aa res 2 avocado seeds... ......=.-_--_--
POSOR@ MAR CS eee Pr feet ese eS CQet amen eee 6 avocados with seed________----
PAU BAG SD ACCKS ee ee. pe ee BL dO sane iS SmMancoess 2 ee
BG Pill ence 8 a so Se eal Ne Ma oe | as doles. sess AVOCA Oe == ee 2 eee eB ee
WIT SS Onli7moan chez se sce Se ee |e (Qe e ee Ee eae Sa ViOCAO OSE ea
RatacleB aromas <2 2 oe ee heed OSes ee TA VOCAC Os nes eat eee es
Margarita Delgado de Martinez______--|____- COs ee E Seke oe HEM SING Yee eee ee
eT ew RAI Spee ne eh eee te PO eee Oe S SINAN OCS. os ee es
ACUMEN TIT) eee Ne ye nia ee a TE oo dos2e.2 oe ee IRM AM OV = ae en a SP
HVEATIMOLPANON ZO; iis = soe ee ee ee Oke ASDIaNiS sans see es ed Be
iViarcelay Garza oso ee oh COS ee Ea ae 2 avocado S6edS-~--) = = ss
Huisinio Mermandez----.--.._-.---. eo s-|_-.-= Gone as ese 5 avocado seeds ___._------------
INE Ole zee eee ee ke pth owe. 2 CO 5a a ee Ail antGeemesa wae kaw s Ye eee:
IPOUEOR@ ChON det =e eo ce wemeale les (ca a ee Oplan ice ene ee fee
Mrs. Concepcion Zavaleta___._..-.----|----- dos ee. RTT C Gee ee ee ee
WA CTO OMG One ee er | | Fe G0sSe AS lATIEShae ase re ee
SlNOM Hernan GO7Zes es 2 |e doseage stk lavocados-_.--*- 0-8 ee
Reis ONG am pPoSwasaa==- 29-2. eee Ss. 7 (Obs s et ee SIM aN ORS ee eee
HZ CUICHG@ISNELOSs =a eee ee COME ae eT AS OOS Fa. See eae ee ee
nIAdelupenMiejla=see=s ae ee ok Ee aE QOS eae ee DIDADUS]* 2a ee enn ee ee
Vice Geen OlOSaa== eee an oe eee G0 we [ha VOCRUOSRa2-3 26-3 2 eh |e
Or CG ON a1 6Ss eee ee eee |e O= see e ee ASYM OCS ste
PATICTCS! GAO OVA. e ease oe ee | doe ee IAMSN POEs. o o-oo Ae
OSeai Cate ies Wasa as hc sede ee doxtetea-2s sh 5 stalks sorghum cane_--__-_-_--
George samtuels=. 92-228 ee el doMeas 2 ee BrawiOCad OSs eee a Bo
EMG ONZaleS sete ee Eagle Pass, Tex_____ 4 mangoes, 9 plums, 2 oranges,

16 haws, 19 apricots, 3 peaches,
and 1 mamey.

Penalty

RRR RR RR ee ee pe
92 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [April-June



Name Port Contraband Penalty
HMiorantine Sosa. eee Eagle Pass, Tex_____ 1 mango...) $L
Julie G: Ginig. 8 ook 2 Lol ee Re ees ese. Ae 2 manpoes.> \!* 2S eee I
Honry ‘GUslabas <3. oo on es Cs 3 ee J maned._2.i. vj te eee I
Rosa, Oorredor >... = ee ee Gh ets bo ne 1 mango and 2 mango seeds-__-_-- L
De. OPER. 2. ee eee Oye so eee 1 avocado.*_ 2 eee x
JOse Sombpranho: 2... =. eee ea es ee 4 avocados: : 2...) | ae =
Jose Najera: ....--<.. 2. 2 eee } Paso; \Tex.2. 2-23: 7 mangegsire as). eee x
NMirs< TJ. "Rhomas 2. = eee eee Minaleo; Tex co. 2s 135 pounds cottonseed cake_-__- L
Obristoval Valder... >) Mrs. 5) G. Despett. it ae ene Go SE eee S ‘plants... 227. 1
Joss Gardia®..- 5s: ee ee eee nos) Bart ace 3 avocados: }_..2.. 2 eee z
Manupl Quisitenslie. = “-2. ae es dO.%: = 8 4 Mameys . 366 fen4 ee 1
ers. Ls. Vi. Ramirer--2 5 2. 1 ee eee Ee ae Oe oe ee 7 MANES... +-.---_. 6 I
Wearring Valder? <=. = eee Sa seer Lee doses ie aa S‘aivoeados /*.. / > + Se aa 1
Mrs: ‘Prinidad Mesa-..-3s-_2--. Aisa Gy). 332 eid 2 avocados, 2 oranges, and 3 1
sapotes.
PER GT EROS 6 oes a ene G6 eee oe 3 mangoes... =~...) ae 1
Paseual Nealicara 2: ~ 9s Se dette, BONS <3 2 oranges and 2 sweet limes______ ul
eamiensPaliten 2b ee Le do.2.0: lL eises 1 avocado with seed_____-_-______ 1
Gonrepoion siraga.<.. -.- 2 ed Ge Bo he 4. 8VOC30 0S). oa. 3. alee zr
Geo Grardliae ee eee ee Gpter ee. a 0 avoeados....... ee 1
Rodulfo Mendiola_-..- Cc 42 ae AT goric @ Biase 6'avoecados >... > Se ee 1
Jesus Pens o6 a ee Ne ose = 7s tS 3 avocados: i230" 2s ieee x
HistobenldVioraless- eso ee ee ee GG ops ete 1 avocado... |... eee 1
EF. Bo dehiidT - es ns oes an Se GO: 2 aioe Bore 4 mangoes and 12 avocados_____- 1
62 MEranco.. (se ee ee Pee GOh eee ee 1 plant and 1 avocado._-.________ 1
Ntes: Holipe Gienero= > ee do: see aes 4 plants” 2c... 2". 2 | ee 1
MWixs. Maria dole tose. 6 o! sw Scalewene ome. be ee 2: mangoes: se See 1
Gatino Hermander... 222283 eh] ae do* 372 Lies 1 avocadd = 3/2 3° 8 See I
Tenino Merricanes 2 eee Gc ea, 18 avocados and 4 mangoes__-___- 1
ether Gornsalas-=2.)-".* | ot die: 7a ae 3 avocados... 2-0 3 eee 1
Manic! Oannles. 4-2), 6. i A ee dp. 3 oe 1 mango. ct eee 1
Jaw Cosmet: eset her. at | yy eis eee deis...24f. yt: S:avocados=U2L. <4. 4 eee I
Were. JUNG Narsa? oe. eT gc eben eee Lmango-)5\5.<..5- ee ee I
Srarone Trees kee ee G5... CFO See epee de: 2.2 eee 1
Mrs. EF. Garcine 4:2 te 520 in Se do tel, bes es a eee 1
WERrAsL AbUIHOr 2989 oe 622 ee 2maneoes. ~. >.> - See 1
Mrs. Carmen Costelliona tren 2ste ee ste ve dit 4 ie eas 3: Hodes! A A ye ee 1
MMrs.:Josephis dé Pena... -). F ses 2 26S fo<=) ESE S plarite 5 ee) ee <
Mrs ME A. de Guat... en es I Gass. Se 2 MANGOGG cea -) og 1
Josepha Ramos. +o. 2525) Je icd). Serie Go's 2 2iae Y 2 ounces cottonseed_____________ Q@) -
Baw .Garretts-2¢ {544-3147 2G) eye dip tee tet nee 6 avocados and 1 mango-_________ 1
Mrs. Carmen Gonzales_-.__.._.-_-.-_--]____- igi cta se a BV0e900..-. 22.45 7s te 1
Mrs: Mearia Torres! 8 SS ee ds. eee 2 avocados... <--... ee eee I
Rive. Porfiria Rarges< <5 5 eee 8 - i SM om a S-manpoes._. 2. 2 1
Bee en. 9 see ie ee gt ad oe a pat ss tk ae L avV0eadG...3-cectete see z
Mins, Mehide Torch. et Tt Seen ere 3-aanpoes.__. =. =) eee L
Siac Pon: Ramirerieci eer) Ss Pts bo Ag? Tel & 4 1 plant...- = eee 1
Mrs. Manuella Gonzales____--_____._-_|____- doi: «=r aks 2 oranges, 2 mangoes, and 16
apricots. 1
Mrs. Manuela Guajardo-_-__.__.-._-..=.|_---- dost: ay ae Tee ea se I
a. Witlorvpal A 6 ee eee O60... ssae ee 2 manroes:.__... ..-. ... =. eae 1
Olive Alefandro.~.) ¢_ 3 2) a eS NOs. 3 tea. oe 1 mranee 42 ese a 1
Alvero Gautier, eee e. re tcc eet ee en re aL 1
irs. P SHlermsndes.. .. sss eee en (lo. i 02 eee G0. 2 4 as 2 se 1
Mrs A. Villareal. > 424i eae ee a) ao aes, 8 avocados and 1 mango-_-_--___-- :
Patrino Mendoza: .. =) = oa are a Oo eel Gs ee ees Siavocados.-_ 2.25... =e eae 1
Bonny se Mera. ee eee ee d0.9 2 2 ae 2. mangoes._4 tt eee 1
Pita Olivares -. 2 a et es GOL ao ated 2 avocados... _-....0 - ee apae e 1
mon Basted: 2.22 0 as een ok GG 62 = ets 2? plants... 2... .-.2 Mntonio: OU. Suatin.2-! 22 ee ee WOS©. fs 2 eee 2) Mangoes 42h ke At eh ee 1
Rirs.- Panis Sitnerites.-. a ee ae CG 22274 ee Siplantss: 24 28) en eee 1
Mrs: Rosa Cantu... 22 eel oak. ae 2 SY OGR0 082 a5, 2... 2 ee 1
Mrs: Ricarda Contrera_--_-= =. eae eee Ors 2 hh Liavyocado=.. 2. -..-24_ - st ee I
Witte Paper. Se eee Oe OE kee ho 5imangoes..-... =... ese 1
Mrs. eopold Ruliz.2 24 ee ee COS at ee 1 plante 362.2) 2 eee t
‘ACen ainires Ge vuuns._-. -- =... - ee MO oh = i rene 1avocad0..=- sso ee 1
Nrs- Ramona §> Santos.-°_..--— sn = 2 Goes. 2 =F Ssplants’ 22 ce. 22. aes 1
Natalia Martinez___.._______ [25 2 ee alee do. 432 eo 2'Mangoes.-_ .- =e BB eee 1
Pe SEER OS So eg a fp Ste ee a4 ee 1 mango... > 522... 25 ee 1
Man ielvire Jarnes__-. =... | deals ee Fn ne See eee a do: 32. eee 1
RATS OGIosiine EBUIs. =. =...) | eee do 7. as TP mamey. 2... eee 1
Bers. eo Ae 95. lee Oo ee 1 TRANS... Wc ~ cata eee 1
BRSISILTMLIGLIO?< 22... = eee ee ee do. - 22. Scale Limamey.022_ 2-2 eee 1
TANS. PPMMCINCO COLTS. 8 oo sisal soc UO 2. eae at 2 DOSLS . _. ssa sees agen 1
PYaliasaiia te Se Se ee) do a Ian aiplants- 9. o2. 0 ee eee I
Bir ee iterate. 6- >> le oe G6.5.-.2 ee Smangoess oot ae eee 1
Mrs. Francisco Rodriguez__-........-_--|_____ 002. 2s ee 1RAN CO. 2 cones ek eE ee 1



1 No fine collected, as the woman had no money.


1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 93

ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY
AND PLANT QUARANTINE

Les A. Strrone, Chief.

S. A. RoHWER, Assistant Chief.

AVERY S. Hoyt, Assistant Chief.

F. H. Spencer, Business Manager.

R. P. Currin, Hditor.

MABEL Cotcorp, Librarian.

J. A. Hystop, in Charge, Division of Insect Pest Survey and Information.

J. I. HAMBLETON, in Charge, Division of Bee Culture Investigations.

D. L. VAN Dine, in Charge, Division of Fruit Insect Investigations.

I’. C. CRAIGHEAD, in Charge, Division of Forest Insect Investigations.

W. H. WHIrsE, in Charge, Division of Truck Crop and Garden Insect Investiga-
tions.

P. N. ANNAND, in Charge, Division of Cereal and Forage Insect Investigations.

R. W. HARNED, in Charge, Division of Cotton Insect Investigations.

F. C. BisHopp, in Charge, Division of Insects Affecting Man and Animals.

L. A. HAwKINs, in Charge, Division of Control Investigations.

R. C. Roark, in Charge, Division of Insecticides and Fungicides.

C. F. W. MUESEBECK, in Charge, Division of Insect Identification.

€. P. CLAUSEN, in Charge, Division of Foreign Parasite Introduction.

S. B. Fracker, in Charge, Division. of Plant Disease Control.

B. M. Gavpis, in Charge, Division of Domestic Plant Quarantines.

EK. R. SAsscoer, in Charge, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines.

A. F. Burcess, in Field Charge, Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail Moth Control
(headquarters, Greenfield, Mass.).

L. H. WortHtey, in Field Charge, Japanese Beetle and Gypsy Moth and Brown-
Tail Moth Quarantines, European Corn Borer Certification, and Dutch Elm
Disease Eradication (headquarters, Bloomfield, N. J.).

R. E. McDonatp, in Field Charge, Pink Bollworm and Thurberia Weevil Quar-
antines (headquarters, San Antonio, Tez.).

eT: ogee in Field Charge, Date Scale Quarantine (headquarters, Indio,
Calif.).

P. A. Homats, in Field Charge, Mexican Fruit Fly Quarantine (headquarters,
Harlingen, Tez.).

A. C, BAKER, in Field Charge, Fruit Fly Investigations (headquarters, Mexico
City, Mexico).

oe Dove, in Field Charge, Screw Worm Control (headquarters, San Antonio,

e@.).

U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1936
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S. R. A.B. EH. P. Q. 128 Issued December 1936

United States Department of Agriculture

BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS

JULY-SEPTEMBER 1936







CONTENTS
Page
Cuaraotine and other oficial announcements _ ...-----.---------<-2<-o oo ese canes eos eee 96
Announcements relating to Hawaiian and Puerto Rican quarantine covering sand, soil, or earth,
UML bss O00) eas kao secon eee ho te ee ee ee ee ee Pacer eee 96
Revised Hawaiian and Puerto Rican quarantine covering sand, soil, or earth, with plants __ 96
UO ASLONIGO HOU ATR VIG seine See et ne, Ne ee et ee 96
Notice to general public through newspapers.......-_------------_---------------------. 97
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (no. 48)____-___--___---_------_-______--_- 97
ITM SunGULOM SIO sDOSUUNASUCISE sae aaa = a eee eee ee ee eS 97
List of articles exempt from certification requirements under the Japanese beetle quarantine
(CE welems Cho Gos LOVASCC) Set ee a ee eee ewe eee ae tee 98
IASTTCHONS WOVDOSLMIGSLOIS2 seen ont Ee ae See ee ee Bema oe case 98
Japanese beetle quarantine restrictions removed for season on fruit and vegetable shipments_- 99
Notice of removal of Japanese beetle quarantine restrictions on fruits and vegetables__________ 99
ImsStouctions LO, POStmasters2-= 2 o> oe te 8 oe ee ee ee eS 100
Announcements relating to satin moth quarantine (no.53)_________._____---_-__-_______--_- Le 100
Satin moth invades Oregon; quarantine hearing September 14_________ Sif ee pac 100
Notice of public hearing to consider the advisability of either revoking the domestic satin moth
quarantine or revising the regulations to designate the State of Oregon as infested with
EIT ALBINISCC Lane ane nner ar A eee Se Pee Ae ie SS a 100
Announcements relating to nursery stock, plant, and seed quarantine (no. 37)_________________- 101
‘Treatment of foreign narcissus bulbs as a condition of entry___.-____----------_____________- 101
Information for prospective importers regarding the entry of foreign narcissus bulbs on and
albereb ecomther th 1936 UB. EP. @: 412) 22 oo oe on ce cee nbn s ecco oe eee ese 101
Notice of permit requirement for the entry of seeds of Lathyrus and Vicia___________________ 102
imstrietions to collecgorsiof customs (Ls 1D), 48512) 222 20 Se oe eee 102
Announcements relating to white pine blister rust quarantine (foreign) (mo. 7)__-_______________- 103
Lift special quarantines on foreign pine trees_____.___._---_-_---------------_--___-_---___-_- 103
White pines, currants, and gooseberries from Europe, Asia, Canada, and Newfoundland
brought under quarantine 37 by revocation of quarantine 7____._---_____________________. 103
Instructions to collectors of customs (T. D. 48501)_-____-_._._._-_-_--_-_-_-_2 ee 104
Announcement relating to European pine shoot moth quarantine (no. 20)-____- a ae eee: 104
Pines, other than five-leaf pines, from Europe brought under quarantine 37 by revocation of
C(UARATIG IT p20) keer at Sane re ena CON soe AoW aS Al ee en ee AE A AE in 104
Announcements relating to pink bollworm quarantine (no. 52)._----..--------------------__--_- 105
Pink bollworm quarantine regulations revised _________________------_-------__-_.-----_---- 105
Modification of pink bollworm quarantine regulations (amendment no. 1)__________________ 105
Notice to general public through newspapers. .____________-_-.___--_---------_-_________- 107
MSCRUCLIONS GO DOStMAasterss=.2 420 -) ee ae ee rMIF
Administrative instructions—treatment requirements removed as a condition for interstate
shipment of baled lint and linters, and products therecf, from the counties or portions of
counties of the pink bollworm regulated areas in New Mexico and Texas described below
Bales edi es wee tole eee eee eee ee Fh ee Aes a eae 107
IWISCOMANCOUSHLOIUS 2-2 S200 a ee 108
Regulations governing sanitary export certification___________---.__----_----------___-_____- 108
Public hearing called to consider the advisability of quarantining the States of California,
Colorado, New Mexico, Texas, and Utah on account of the peach mosaic disease__________ Ae
Notice of public hearing to consider the advisability of quarantining the States of California,
Colorado, New Mexico, Texas, and Utah on account of the peach mosaic disease_________- itt
Change in date and place of public hearing relative to peach mosaic disease___._____________ lll
Notice of change in place and date of public hearing to consider advisability of quarantining
the States of California, Colorado, New Mexico, Texas, and Utah on account of the peach
mosaic disease; also the inclusion of Arizona in the States to be considered_____.__________ 112
ee ee import restrictions, Republic of Chile (B. P. Q. 348, supplements nos. 4
ELT Ua) eee ee ae ae EEE BAS ig. oi cpa ee bar ee ee ee eS ee 112
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Argentina (B. P. Q. 357, supplement no.4)_ 114
| Plant-quarantine import restrictions, British Mandate of Palestine (B. E. P. Q. 370, revised,
STEP PISIMEM Up Os 1) seuss mere tee ts da 3 ec ia NS ee 114
| Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Brazil (B. E. P. Q.379,supplement no. 1)-_ 115
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, British Colony of Malta (B. E. P. Q. 406)___-_-_____- 115
| Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Kingdom of Denmark (B. E. P. Q. 407)___-_-__________ 117
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Irish Free State (Saorstat Eireann) (B. E. P. Q.408)__ 120
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Free City of Danzig (B. E. P. Q. 409)__---__-._-______ 124
Federal domestic plant quarantines (B. E. P. Q. 410, superseding P. Q. C. A. 295)__________ 125
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Mexico (B. E. P. Q. 411, superseding
renee tres) ee eee Cee ee) See ear OTS pa Ri Tt a 126
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Switzerland (B. E. P. Q. 413)___________- 137
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act_____-___-____-_____----_--_-_______- 141
List of current quarantines and other restrictive orders and miscellaneous regulations___________ 144
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine._____-_.___-______________________ 150
96 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

QUARANTINE AND OTHER OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO HAWAIIAN AND PUERTO RICAN
QUARANTINE COVERING SAND, SOIL, OR EARTH, WITH PLANTS
(NO. 60)

REVISED HAWAIIAN AND PUERTO RICAN QUARANTINE COVERING SAND, SOIL,
OR EARTH, WITH PLANTS

[Press notice]
Avcust 18, 1936.

Notice of Quarantine No. 60, the Hawaiian and Puerto Rican quarantine cov-
ering sand, soil, or earth with plants, has been revised, the Secretary of Agri-
culture announced today. The revision contains provision for the retention on
board vessels at mainland ports of plants in soil, originating in these Terri-
tories and carried for ornamental purposes, when adequate safeguards have
been employed to preclude pest risk, although still prohibiting landing of plants
in soil on the mainland.

REVISION OF QUARANTINE

INTRODUCTORY NOTE

Notice of Quarantine No. 60 originally prohibited the movement of plants in
soil from the Territories of Hawaii and Puerto Rico to the mainland. In-
formation accumulated since this quarantine was first promulgated indicates
that, under satisfactory safeguards, plants in soil originating in the Territories
of Hawaii and Puerto Rico may be carried by, and may remain on, vessels for
ornamental purposes while such vessels are in mainland waters, without risk
of spreading the pests named in the quarantine. The present revision of Notice
of Quarantine No. 60 makes provision for retention of potted plants on board
vessels from Hawaii and Puerto Rico when evidence is presented satisfactory
to the plant quarantine inspector that the soil about the plants has been so
sterilized or otherwise treated that pest risk is eliminated, that it is of such
nature that there is no pest risk, or that the safeguards erected around such
soil are adequate to preclude pest escape.

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 60 (REVISED)
(Approved Aug. 14, 1936; effective Sept. 1, 1936)

Whereas the Secretary of Agriculture, after holding the required public
hearing, did issue Notice of Quarantine No. 60, on February 19, 1926, in order
to prevent the spread of certain injurious insects named therein, and did
declare therein, under the authority of the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20,
1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended, that sand (other than clean ocean sand), soil,
or earth around the roots of plants should not be shipped, offered for ship-
ment to a common carrier, received for transportation, or transported by a
common carrier, or carried, transported, moved, or allowed to be moved from
the Territories of Puerto Rico and Hawaii into or through any other State
or Territory or District of the United States;

And whereas it is now believed that plants in sand, soil, or earth originating
in Hawaii or Puerto Rico, which are carried for ornamental purposes on vessels
entering the territorial waters of continental United States, may be allowed
to remain on board, under certain conditions and safeguards, without risk
of spreading the pests named in the said Notice of Quarantine No. 60, and
that it should be revised accordingly:

Now, therefore, I, M. L. Wilson, Acting Secretary of Agriculture, under
authority of said Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912, the required public
hearing having been duly given, and having determined that it is necessary
to quarantine the Territories of Hawaii and Puerto Rico to prevent the spread,
by means of sand, soil, or earth about the roots of plants, of immature stages
of certain injurious insects, including Phyllophaga spp. (white grubs), Phytalus
1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS O7

sp., Adoretus sp., and of several species of termites or white ants, new to and
not heretofore widely prevalent or distributed within and throughout the
United States, do quarantine the said Territories of Hawaii and Puerto Rico,
effective on and after September 1, 1936. Thereafter, pursuant to the provi-
sions of the said act of August 20, 1912, sand (other than clean ocean sand),
soil, or earth around the roots of plants, shall not be shipped, offered for ship-
ment to a common carrier, received for transportation, or transported by
a common earrier, carried, transported, moved, or allowed to be moved from
the Territories of Hawaii and Puerto Rico into or through any other State,
Territory, or District of the United States: Provided, That this prohibition
shall not apply to sand, soil, or earth around the roots of plants which are
carried, for ornamental purposes, on vessels into mainland ports of the United
States and which are not intended to be landed thereat, when evidence is
presented satisfactory to the inspector of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant
Quarantine of the Department of Agriculture (q@) that such sand, soil, or
earth has been so processed or is of such nature that no pest risk is involved,
or (0) that the plants with sand, soil, or earth around them are maintained
on board under such safeguards as will preclude pest escape.

The prohibition of this quarantine shall not apply to the movement of sand,
soil, or earth around the roots of plants moved from the Territories of Hawaii
and Puerto Rico for experimental or scientific purposes by the United States
Department of Agriculture.

Effective September 1. 1936, this notice of quarantine revises and superse les.
Notice of Quarantine No. 60, approved February 19, 1926, which became effec-
tive March 1, 1926.

Done at the city of Washington this 14th day of August 1936.

Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.

[SEAL] M. L. WILSON,

Acting Secretary of Agriculture.

[Copies of foregoing quarantine were sent to all steamship lines plying between Puerto

Rico and Hawaii and the mainland. ]

NoTIcE TO GENERAL PUBLIC THROUGH NEWSPAPERS

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,
BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE,
Washington, D. C., August 14, 1936.
Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority
conferred on him by the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912 (87 Stat. 315),
as amended, has revised Notice of Quarantine No. 60, Hawaiian and Puerto
Rican quarantine covering sand, soil, or earth, with plants, so as to make pro-
vision for the retention on board vessels, at mainland ports, of plants, with
soil about the roots, originating in Hawaii and Puerto Rico and carried for
ornamental purposes, when evidence is presented satisfactory to the inspector
of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine that such soil has been
adequately safeguarded against risk of pest escape. Copies of said quarantine,
as revised, effective September 1, 1986, may be obtained from the Bureau of
Entomology and Plant Quarantine, Department of Agriculture, Washington, D. C.
. M. L. WILSoN,
Acting Secretary of Agriculture.

[Published in the following newspapers: The Star Bulletin, Honolulu, H ii, §
1936; the El Mundo, San Juan, P. R., Sept. 5, 1936.] a eee eee

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE
(NO. 48)

INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS

Post OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, D. C., July 9, 1936.
Postmaster.
My Dear Sir: Your attention is invited to the enclosed copy of a revision of
the Japanese beetle quarantine and regulations (Quarantine Order No. 48, U. §.
98 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July—Sept.

Department of Agriculture), effective March 16, 1936, by which you will please
be governed. See paragraph 1, section 595, Postal Laws and Regulations.

The principal changes affecting the Postal Service consist of the extension of
the regulated area to include additional territory in the States of Maine, Mary-
land, New York, and Virginia, and the provision for exemptions when specially
authorized by the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine,
United States Department of Agriculture.

Very truly yours,
C. B. EILENBERGER,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.

B. E. P. Q. 395 (revised).

LIST OF ARTICLES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS UNDER THE
JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE

SEPTEMBER 15, 1936.

In accordance with the proviso in Notice of Quarantine No. 48, as revised,
effective March 16, 1936, the following articles, the interstate movement of
which is not considered to constitute a risk of Japanese beetle dissemination,
are exempted from the restrictions of the regulations of this quarantine:

Balsam pillows, when composed of balsam needles only.

Banana stalks, when crushed, dried, and shredded.

Cut orchids.

Dyed moss and dyed sand, when heat treated, ard when so labeled on the
outside of each container of such materials.

Floral designs or ‘‘set pieces”, including wreaths, sprays, casket covers, and
all formal florists’ designs other than bouquets and cut flowers.

Greensand or greensand marl, when treated and so labeled on the outside of
each container of such materials.

Herbarium specimens, when dried, pressed, and treated, and when so labeled
on the outside of each container of such materials.

Imported peat, when shipped in the unopened original container and labeled
as to each container with the country of origin.

Manure, peat, compost, or humus, when dehydrated and either shredded,
ground, pulverized, or compressed, and when so labeled on the outside of each
commercial container of such materials.

Orchid plants, when growing exclusively in Osmunda fiber.

Mushroom spawn, in brick, flake, or pure-culture form.

Osmunda fiber, Osmundine, or orchid peat (Osmunda cinnamomea, and O.
claytoniana).

Resurrection plant or birdsnest moss (Selaginella lepidophylla).

Sheet moss (Calliergon schriberi and Thuridium recognitum).

Silica sand or similar material, when processed by crushing, grinding, and
dehydrating silica or other rock, and when so labeled on the outside of each
container of such material, or when so designated on the waybill accompanying
bulk carload shipments of the material.

Sphagnum moss, bog moss, or peat moss, when dried and baled (Sphagnaceae).

Submerged aquatic plants, including—

Crytocoryne spp.

Eelgrass or tape grass (Vallisneria spiralis).

False loosestrife (Ludwigia mulerttii).

Fish grass, Washington plant, or Fanwort (Cabomba caroliniana).

Hornwort or coon tail (Ceratophyllum demersum).

Water milfoil (Myriophyllum spp.).

Water weed, ditch moss, water thyme, or anacharis (Elodea canadensis).
Lee A. STRONG,

Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS

Post OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
Tuirp ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Postmaster. Washington, D. C., September 21, 1936.

My Dear Sir: Referring to quarantine order no. 48, on account of the Japa-
nese beetle, notice is given to postmasters in the regulated area in the States


1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 99

of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rbode Island, Connecticut,
New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, West Vir-
ginia, and the District of Columbia, that effective September 15, 1936, the fol-
lowing articles, the interstate movement of which is not considered to consti-
tute a risk of Japanese beetle dissemination, are exempted from the restrictions
of the regulations of this quarantine:

[Then follows the list of articles appearing on p. 98 of this number of the S. R. A.]

C. E. EILENBERGER,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.

JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS REMOVED FOR SEASON ON
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE SHIPMENTS

[Press notice]
SEPTEMBER 25, 1936.

Restrictions on the movement of fruits and vegetables under the Japanese
beetle quarantine regulations have been removed for the season by order of the
Secretary of Agriculture. Restrictions on cut flowers, however, remain until
October 15. Under the quarantine regulations, certificates showing freedom
from Japanese beetle are required until October 15 on interstate shipments of
certain kinds of fruits and vegetables from the entire regulated area and on
interstate shipments of fruits and vegetables of any kind via refrigerator car
or motortruck from certain sections of the regulated area. The present order
releases the fruits and vegetables from that requirement Several weeks earlier
than is provided in the regulations themselves.

Inspection of fruits and vegetables is necessary only during the period when
adult beetles are in active flight. There is no risk that such products will carry
the Japanese beetle after this active period, which is now apparently over
throughout the regulated area. During the last few days the Department’s
inspectors have found no beetles in fruits and vegetables.

There is still danger, however, that the adult beetles may be transported in
cut flowers. In cool fall evenings the beetles have a tendency to crawl down
into the flowers for protection. Therefore, the restrictions on the interstate
movement of cut flowers and other parts of plants will remain in full force
and effect until October 15.

Restrictions on the movement of nursery, ornamental, and greenhouse stock
and all other plants (except cut flowers and portions of plants without roots
and free from soil) are in force throughout the year and are not affected by
this amendment.

NOTICE OF REMOVAL OF JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS ON
FRUITS AND VEGETABLES

It has been determined that the active period of the Japanese beetle in its
relation to fruits and vegetables has already ceased for the present season and
that it is, therefore, safe to permit the unrestricted movement of the fruits and
vegetables listed in regulation 5 of the rules and regulations (fourteenth revi-
Sion) supplemental to Notice of Quarantine ‘No. 48 from the regulated area as
defined in regulation 3 of said rules and regulations.- It is therefore ordered
that all restrictions on the interstate movement of the articles referred to above
are hereby removed on and after September 22, 1936. This order advances the
termination date of the restrictions as to fruits and vegetables provided for in
aes 5 from October 16 to September 22, 1936, and applies to this season
only.

Done at the city of Washington this 22d day of September 1936.

Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agri-
culture.

[SEAL] W. R. Grea,

r Acting Secretary of Agriculture.

[Copies of above order were sent to all common carriers doing business in or through
the regulated area.]
100 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS

Post OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, D. C., September 28, 1936.
Postmaster.

My Dear Sir: The United States Department of Agriculture advises it has
been determined that the active period of the Japanese beetle in its relation to
fruits and vegetables has already ceased for the present season and that it is,
therefore, safe to permit the unrestricted movement of fruits and vegetables
listed in regulation 5, rules and regulations, supplemental to Notice of Quaran-
tine No. 48, on account of the Japanese beetle from the regulated area as
defined in regulation 3 of such rules and regulations.

Postmasters in the area regulated by the Japanese beetle quarantine may,
therefore, accept until June 15, 1937, fully prepaid parcels of fruits and vege-
tables when properly packed without being accompanied with the certificate of
inspection prescribed by that quarantine.

C. B. EIENBERGER,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO SATIN MOTH QUARANTINE (NO. 53)
SATIN MOTH INVADES OREGON; QUARANTINE HEARING SEPTEMBER 14

[Press notice]
AvucustT 21, 1936.

A public hearing to consider the advisability of either (1) revoking the
domestic satin moth quarantine, or (2) revising the regulations to designate
the State of Oregon as infested with that insect, will be held before the Bureau
of Entomology and Plant Quarantine in room 2050, Bureau of Agricultural
Economics conference room, Extensible Building, Independence Avenue and
Fourteenth Street SW., Washington, D. C., at 10 a. m., September 14, 1936.

This insect, although not widely prevalent in the United States, has been
known to exist for some time in some areas in Connecticut, Maine, Massachu-
setts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Washington. Recently it
was discovered in Oregon. It appears necessary, therefore, either to revoke
the quarantine or to include Oregon in the quarantine, now covering the other
infested States. The quarantine prohibits the movement from infested areas
of poplar and willow trees or parts of these trees capable of propagation.

The hearing is called by the Secretary of Agriculture in accordance with the
Plant Quarantine Act so that any person interested in the proposed revocation
or extension of the quarantine may appear and be heard either in person or by
attorney.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING TO CONSIDER THE ADVISABILITY OF EITHER RE-
VOKING THE DOMESTIC SATIN MOTH QUARANTINE OR REVISING THE REGULA-
TIONS TO DESIGNATE THE STATE OF OREGON AS INFESTED WITH THAT INSECT

AvucustT 19, 1936.

The Secretary of Agriculture has information that the satin moth (Stilpnotia
salicis L.), a dangerous insect not heretofore widely prevalent or distributed
within and throughout the United States, which has been known for some time
to exist in portions of the States of Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New
Hampshire, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Washington, has recently been found
in the State of Oregon.

It appears necessary, therefore, to consider the advisability of either (1)
revoking the Federal domestic quarantine (no. 53) on account of this insect,
or (2) extending to the State of Oregon the restrictions which apply to the
movement from infested States of poplar and willow trees or parts thereof
capable of propagation.

Notice is, therefore, hereby given that in accordance with the Plant Quaran-
tine Act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended by the act of Congress
approved March 4, 1917 (39 Stat. 1134, 1165), a public hearing will be held
before the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine in room 2050, Bureau


1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 101

of Agricultural Economies conference room, Extensible Building, Independence
Avenue and Fourteenth Street SW., Washington, D. C., at 10 a. m., September
14, 1936, in order that any persons interested in the proposed revocation or
extension of the quarantine may appear and be heard either in person or by
attorney.
[SEAL] . H. A. WALLACE,
Secretary of Agriculture.

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO NURSERY STOCK, PLANT, AND SEED
QUARANTINE (NO. 37)

TREATMENT OF FOREIGN NARCISSUS BULBS AS A CONDITION OF ENTRY

[Press notice]
AvGustT 1, 1986.

The announcement on January 14, 1935, of the unlimited entry as to number
and variety of narcisSus bulbs from all countries, effective December 15, 1936,
provided that all infested bulbs offered for entry will be rejected. External
examination of narcissus bulbs cannot be relied upon to determine their free-
dom from infestation by the bulb eelworm, Anguillulina dipsaci. In order to
prevent the distribution within the United States of foreign narcissus bulbs
infested with eelworm and at the same time provide for unlimited entry as
to number and variety, Lee A. Strong, Chief of the Bureau of Entomology
and Plant Quarantine, United States Department of Agriculture, announces
that, under the provisions of regulation no. 9 of Nursery Stock, Plant, and
Seed Quarantine No. 37, plant quarantine inspectors will require that all im-
ported narcissus bulbs be given the latest approved treatment as a condition
of entry.



BH. P. Qs 412.

(On Dec. 15, 1936, this circular will supersede all previous circulars of this
series on the specific subject of the entry of foreign narcissus bulbs.)

INFORMATION FOR PROSPECTIVE IMPORTERS REGARDING THE ENTRY OF FOREIGN
NARCISSUS BULBS ON AND AFTER DECEMBER 15, 1936

SEPTEMBER 16, 1936.

Importations of narcissus bulbs on and after December 15, 1936, may be
made upon compliance with the requirements of Nursery Stock, Plant, and
Seed Quarantine No. 37, under permit issued in accordance with the provisions
of regulation 38 of that quarantine.

In an announcement by the Department dated August 1, 1936, it was stated
that external examination of narcissus bulbs cannot be relied upon to deter-
mine their freedom from infestation by the bulb eelworm, Anguillulina dipsaci.
In order to prevent the distribution within the United States of foreign
narcissus bulbs infested with the bulb eelworm and at the same time to
provide for unlimited entry as to number and variety, it was further an-
nounced that under the provisions of regulation 9 of Nursery Stock, Plant,
and Seed Quarantine No. 37, plant quarantine inspectors will require all im-
ported narcissus bulbs to be given the latest approved treatment as a condition
of entry.

Those in interest are informed that the plant quarantine inspector will con-
strue the term “latest approved treatment” to consist of soaking the bulbs
in water at a temperature of 70° to 80° F., preferably 75°, for a period of 2
hours, after which the bulbs are to be held in hot water until all the bulbs
have reached a temperature of 110° to 111° F. throughout. The bulbs are
then to be held in hot water at a temperature of not less than 110° F. for
a period of 4 hours. As a precautionary measure to check the subsequent
dissemination of diseases such as basal rot, a pint of formalin may be added
for each 35-gallons of water, but the addition of the disinfectant is optional
with the importer.

Treatment may be given at the port of first arrival or at any point designated
in the permit, but the permittee will be required to have available at such place
of treatment the services of a treating plant capable of treating the importa-
102 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

tion according to the method to be prescribed by the inspector, which is in-
dicated above. The plant concerned may be owned, or contracted for, by the
permittee. Applicants for permits to import narcissus bulbs are asked to state,
when submitting the application for permit, the point and premises at which
they propose to have the bulbs treated, naming the owner of the plant.

Furthermore, before an inspector will authorize the release of imported bulbs
to such plant for treatment, the owner or operator of the treating plant will be
asked to certify to the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine at Wash-
ington, D. C., that the plant is in good working order and will be available for
use in treating the importation.

Shipments not to be treated at or in the vicinity of the port of first arrival
may be released for movement in bond to the customs port nearest the premises
at which the treatment is to be given. Shipments released from a port for de-
livery to a treating plant are to be held intact until the permittee has been
instructed by a representative of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quaran-
tine to proceed with the treatment.

All charges incident to such hot-water treatment are to be met by the importer
or owner, but there will be no charges for the services of a plant quarantine
inspector to supervise the treatment.

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

NOTICE OF PERMIT REQUIREMENT FOR THE ENTRY OF SEEDS OF LATHYRUS
AND VICIA

It has been determined by the Secretary of Agriculture that sweet pea
(Lathyrus sp.) and vetch (Vicia spp.) seeds imported into this country are
frequently infested with one or more species of seed weevils, Bruchus spp., in-
cluding B. brachialis Fahr., B. rufipes Hbst., and B. tristiculus Fahr. 8B. bra-
chialis is reported as established in only a limited area of this country, and
B. rufipes and B. tristiculus are not recorded as occurring in the United States.
Lathyrus and Vicia seeds at present are admitted without inspection in accord-
ance with the provisions of regulation 2 of the Rules and Regulations Supple-
mental to Nursery Stock, Plant, and Seed Quarantine No. 37. Since no inspec-
tion is made of these seeds to determine the presence of injurious insects and
consequently no treatment is given to eliminate such infestations when they
exist, importations of these seeds constitute a pest risk. Their further entry,
therefore, shall meet the requirements governing the entry of tree and shrub
seeds.

Notice is, therefore, hereby given, in accordance with the provisions of regula-
tion 2 of the Rules and Regulations Supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No.
37, that the seeds of all species and varieties of Lathyrus and Vicia. may be im-
ported from any foreign country and locality on and after August 1, 1936, only
under permit and upon the compliance with the provisions for the entry of tree
and shrub seeds, the importation of which is restricted by regulation 3 of the
regulations referred to above.

Done in the city of Washington this 20th day of July, 1936.

Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.

[SEAL] W. R. GREce@,

‘Acting Secretary of Agriculture.

INSTRUCTIONS TO COLLECTORS OF CUSTOMS
CUSTOMS REGULATIONS—PLANT QUARANTINE (T. D. 48512)

NOTICE OF PERMIT REQUIREMENT FOR THE ENTRY OF SEEDS OF SWEET PEA AND
VETCH SUBJECT TO THE PROVISIONS OF NURSERY STOCK, PLANT, AND SEED QUAR-
ANTINE 37 (T. D. 48257)

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,
OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONER OF CUSTOMS,
Washington, D. C., September 5, 1936.

To Collectors of Customs and Others Concerned:

The appended copy of notice of permit requirement for the entry of seeds of

Sweet pea (Lathyrus sp.) and vetch (Vicia spp.), announced by the Secretary

— — »

s.r

ee
1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 103

of Agriculture, effective on and after August 1, 1936. is published for the infor-
mation and guidance of the customs officers and others concerned.

This notice refers only to the restrictions under the Plant Quarantine Act of
August 20, 1912, and does not relate in any way to the restrictions on the entry
of vetch seeds under the Federal Seed Act (T. D. 44419).

The number of this Treasury decision should be noted as a marginal reference
for article 559 of the Customs Regulations of 1931.

FRANK Dow,
Acting Commissioner of Customs.

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO WHITE PINE BLISTER RUST
QUARANTINE (FOREIGN) (NO. 7)

LIFT SPECIAL QUARANTINES ON FOREIGN PINE TREES

[Press notice]
JULES Zo, 1956:

Foreign Plant Quarantine No. 7, as amended, which prohibits the entry into
the United States of white pines, currants, and gooseberries from Europe, Asia,
Canada, and Newfoundland, and Foreign Plant Quarantine No. 20, which pro-
hibits the entry of certain pines from Europe, have been lifted by the United
States Department of Agriculture. The order, signed July 20 by Acting Secre-
tary of Agriculture W. R. Gregg, becomes effective September 1, 1936. Control
will be continued under Foreign Plant Quarantine 37, which provides that plants
can be imported only under permit and such safeguards as are necessary to pro-
tect against the entry of various pests.

Foreign Plant Quarantine No. 7 was promulgated in 1913 to prevent the intro-
duction into this country of the white pine blister rust, which passes part of
its life cycle on eurrants and gooseberries. The host plants of this serious
plant disease can now come in under certain conditions without any risk of
spreading it to new localities. Foreign plant quarantine no. 20 was promul-
gated in 1915 to prevent the entry of the European pine shoot moth. This
insect pest is now established in some parts of the eastern United States.

WHITE PINES, CURRANTS, AND GOOSEBERRIES FROM EUROPE, ASIA, CANADA, AND
NEWFOUNDLAND BROUGHT UNDER QUARANTINE 37 BY REVOCATION OF QUAR-
ANTINE 7

INTRODUCTORY NOTE

As promulgated on May 21, 1913, February 29, 1916, and April 21, 1917,
respectively, Notice of:Quarantine No. 7 and its amendments nos. 1 and 2 pro-
hibited entirely (except for experimental purposes by the Department of Agri-
culture) the entry into the United States from Europe, Asia, Canada, and
Newfoundland of five-leafed pines, currants, and gooseberries. The object of
this quarantine was to prevent the introduction into this country of the white
pine blister rust, an injurious plant disease. Our present knowledge of the
distribution of this disease in this country, and of factors necessary for its
establishment, indicates that, under certain conditions, host plants may be per-
mitted entry without the risk of spread of the disease to new localities. For
that reason a completely prohibitory quarantine is deemed no longer necessary.

The revocation of quarantine no. 7 automatically places the entry of white
pines, currants, and gooseberries under the provisions of Notice of Quarantine
No. 37, the Nursery Stock, Plant, and Seed Quarantine; and under that quaran-
tine their entry will be regulated in harmony with the restrictions of the
Domestic White Pine Blister Rust Quarantine No. 63.

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

7

NOTICE OF LIFTING OF QUARANTINE NO. 7 (FOREIGN) WHITE PINE BLISTER
RUST

Under the authority of the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat.
315), as amended, I, W. R. Gregg, Acting Secretary of Agriculture, do hereby

105566—36——-2
104 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

revoke Notice of Quarantine No. 7, White Pine Blister Rust, and its amendments
nos. 1 and 2, promulgated May 21, 1913, February 29, 1916, and April 21, 1917,
respectively, such revocation to become effective September 1, 1936.

Done at the city of Washington this 20th day of July 1936.

Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.

[SEAL] W. R. Greea,
Acting Secretary of Agriculture.

INSTRUCTIONS TO COLLECTORS OF -CUSTOMS
CusTOMS REGULATIONS—PLANT QUARANTINE (T. D. 48501)

Notices OF LIFTING OF QUARANTINES PLACED ON ACCOUNT OF WHITE PINE BLISTER
Rust (T. D. 33469 anp T. D. 36246) AND EuRopEAN Pinpe SHoor MortsH (T. D.
30287), BRINGING CERTAIN PLANTS UNDER THE PROVISIONS OF QUARANTINE 37,
THE NURSERY Stock, PLANT, AND SEED QUARANTINE (T. D. 48257)

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,
OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONER OF CUSTOMS,
Washington, D. C., August 29, 1936.

To collectors of customs and others concerned:

The appended copies of notice of lifting of quarantine 7 (foreign), white pine
blister rust, as amended, and notice of lifting of quarantine 20, on account of the
European pine shoot moth, announced by the Secretary of Agriculture, effective
September 1, 1936, are published for the information and guidance of customs
officers and others concerned.

The number of this Treasury decision should be noted as a marginal refer-
ence for articles 559 (a), 560 (a), and 564 (a), Customs Regulations of 1931.

FRANK Dow,
Acting Commissioner of Customs.

[Then follows the text of the notices of lifting quarantines nos. 7 and 20.]
: a

ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO EUROPEAN PINE-SHOOT MOTH
QUARANTINE (NO. 20)

PINES, OTHER THAN FIVE-LEAF PINES, FROM EUROPE BROUGHT UNDER
QUARANTINE 37 BY REVOCATION OF QUARANTINE 20

INTRODUCTORY NOTE ;

As promulgated March 1, 1915, effective July 1, 1915, Notice of Quarantine
No. 20 prohibited the entry of all pines from Europe not already excluded
by quarantine. The purpose of the quarantine was to prevent the further intro-
duction of the European pine shoot moth. This insect is now established in
certain areas of the eastern portion of the United States and, in view of the
concurrent lifting of Notice of Quarantine No. 7 on account of the white-pine
blister rust, it now seems desirable to revoke Quarantine No. 20. The entry of
all pines from Europe thus automatically falls under the restrictions of Notice
of Quarantine No. 37, the Nursery Stock, Plant, and Seed Quarantine.

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

NOTICE OF LIFTING OF QUARANTINE NO. 20 ON ACCOUNT OF THE EUROPEAN
PINE SHOOT MOTH

Under the authority of the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat.
315), as amended, I, W. R. Gregg, Acting Secretary of Agriculture, do hereby i
revoke Notice of Quarantine No. 20, on account of the European pine shoot |

© ie Se,
1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 105

moth, promulgated March 1, 1915, and effective July 1, 1915, such revocation
to become effective September 1, 1936.
Done at the city of Washington this 20th day of July 1936.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of
Agriculture.
[SEAL ] W. R. GREGG,
Acting Secretary of Agriculture.

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO PINK BOLLWORM QUARANTINE
(NO. 52)

PINK BOLLWORM QUARANTINE REGULATIONS REVISED
{Press notice]

AvueGusT 18, 1936.

The Secretary of Agriculture announced today a revision of the pink boll-
worm quarantine regulations. The revision adds the Texas counties of Cam-
eron, Hidalgo, Starr, and Willacy to the lightly infested area, due to the recent
finding of the pink bollworm in gin trash at Brownsville and San Benito in
Cameron County. Hidalgo, Starr, and Willacy Counties are included, since seed
cotton is moved throughout these counties for ginning without regard to county
lines. No other changes are made at this time.

MODIFICATION OF PINK BOLLWORM QUARANTINE REGULATIONS

INTRODUCTORY NOTE

The following amendment modifies the area regulated under the pink boll-
worm quarantine regulations by bringing under restriction the counties of
Cameron, Hidalgo, Starr, and Willacy, in the State of Texas. These counties
are designated as lightly infested, due to the finding of pink bollworm infesta-
tion in gin trash at Brownsville and San Benito in Cameron County. Hidalgo,
Starr, and Willacy Counties are included, since seed cotton is moved through-
out these four counties for ginning without regard to county lines.

AvERyY S. Hoyt,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

AMENDMENT NO. 1 TO REVISED RULES AND REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL TO
NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 52

[Approved Aug. 17, 1936; effective Aug. 17, 1936]

Under authority conferred by the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912
(387 Stat. 315), as amended by the act of Congress approved March 4, 1917
(39 Stat. 1184, 1165), it is ordered that regulation 8 of the revised rules and
regulations supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 52, on account of the
pink bollworm of cotton, which were promulgated on December 4, 1935, be, and
the same is hereby, amended to read as follows:

REGULATION 3. REGULATED AREAS; HEAVILY AND LIGHTLY INFESTED AREAS
REGULATED AREAS

In accordance with the provisos to Notice of Quarantine No. 52 (revised),
the Secretary of Agriculture designates as regulated areas, for the purpose of
these regulations, the following counties in Arizona, Florida, New Mexico, and
Texas, including all cities, districts, towns, townships, and other political sub-
divisions within their limits:

Arizona area.—Counties of Cochise, Graham. and Greenlee.

Florida area.—Counties of Alachua, Baker, Bradford, Columbia, Dixie, Gil-
christ, Hamilton, Jackson, Lafayette, Levy, Madison, Suwannee, Taylor, and
Union.
106 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

New Mexico area.—Counties of Chaves, Dona Ana, Eddy, Grant, Hidalgo,
Lea, Luna, Otero, and Roosevelt.

Texas area.—Counties of Andrews, Brewster, Cameron, Cochran, Culberson,
Ector, El Paso, Gaines, Hidalgo, Hockley, Hudspeth, Jeff Davis, Pecos, Presidio,
Reeves, Starr, Terrell, Terry, Ward, Willacy, and Yoakum; that part of
Bailey County lying south of the following-described boundary line: beginning
on the east line of said county where the county line intersects the northern
boundary line of league 207; thence west following the northern boundary line
of leagues. 207, 203, 191, 188, 175, and 171 to the northeast corner of league 171;
thence south on the western line of league 171 to the northeast corner of the
W. H. L. survey; thence west along the northern boundary of the W. H. L.
Survey and the northern boundary of secs. 68, 67, 66, 65, 64, 63, 62, 61, and 60
of block A of the M. B. & B. survey to the western boundary of said county;
that part of Dawson County lying north and west of the following-described
boundary line: beginning on the western boundary line of said county at the
northwest corner of sec. 113 of block M; thence in a northeasterly direction
on the northern boundary line of secs. 113, 90, 83, 72, 65, 54, 47, and 36 of
block M to the northeast corner of sec. 36; thence in a northwesterly direction
along the western boundary line of sec. 21 to the northwest corner of sec. 21;
thence northeasterly along the northern boundary line of sec. 21 to the north-
east corner of sec. 21; thence northwesterly along the western boundary lines
of secs. 27 and 30 in said block M to the northwest corner of sec. 30; thence
southwesterly along the northern boundary line of sec. 29 of block M to the
southwest corner of sec. 17, block C—41; thence north along the western bound-
ary line of secs. 17 and 16 of block C—41 to the Dawson County line; that
part of Lamb County lying south of the following-described boundary line:
beginning on the east line of said county where the county line intersects the
northern boundary line of sec. 9 of the R. M. Thomson survey; thence west
following the northern boundary line of secs. 9 and 10 of the R. M. Thomson
survey and the northern boundary line of secs. 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, and 1 of the T. A.
Thompson survey and the northern boundary line of leagues 637, 636, and 635
to the southeast corner of league 239; thence north on the eastern boundary
line of league 239 to the northeast corner of said league; thence west on the
northern boundary line of leagues 239, 238, 233, 222, 218, and 207 to the west-
ern boundary line of said county; that part of Midland County lying south and
west of the following-described boundary line, to wit: beginning at a point on
the Midland-Martin County line, where the lines between sees. 26 and 27,
block 37, T. 1 S. intersect said line; thence in a southerly direction along the
east line of secs. 27, 34, 39, and 46 in said block: continuing in a southerly
direction on the west line of surveys nos. 2, 11, 14, 37, 58, 60, 1, and 2, of
block 37, T. 2 S., a distance of 8 miles to the northwest corner of survey no. 2,

T. and P., block 37, T. 3 S.: continuing in the same direction along the west.

line of surveys nos. 2, 11, 14, 23, 26, 35, 38, and 47 of block 37, T. 3 S., to
the southwest corner of said survey no. 47; thence in an easterly direction on
the south block line and section line of surveys nos. 47 and 48 of said block
to the intersection of the Midland and Glasscock County line.

HEAVILY INFESTED AREAS

Of the regulated areas, the following counties and parts of counties are
hereby designated as heavily infested within the meaning of these regulations:

Counties of Brewster, Culberson, Jeff Davis, Presidio, and Terrell, in the
State of Texas, and all of Hudspeth County in the same State except that
part of the northwest corner of said county lying north and west of a ridge
of desert land extending from the banks of the Rio Grande northeastecly
through the desert immediately west of the town of McNary, such ridge being
an extension of the northwest boundary line of sec. 11, block 6514.

LIGHTLY INFESTED AREAS

The following areas are designated as lightly infested:

The counties of Cochise, Graham, and Greenlee, in Arizona;* the counties
of Alachua, Baker, Bradford, Columbia, Dixie, Gilchrist, Hamilton, Jackson,
Lafayette, Levy, Madison, Suwannee, Taylor, and Union in Florida; the coun-
ties of Chaves, Dona Ana, Eddy, Grant, Hidalgo, Lea, Luna, Otero, and

1Part of the lightly infested area in Arizona is regulated on account of the Thurberia
weevil under Quarantine No. 61, and shipments therefrom must comply with the require-
ments of that quarantine.

i al en i i

i et


1936 J SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 107

Roosevelt in New Mexico: the entire counties of Andrews, Cameron, Cochran,
Ector, El Paso, Gaines, Hidalgo, Hockley, Pecos, Reeves, Starr, Terry, Ward,
Willacy, and Yoakum, the regulated parts of Bailey, Dawson, Lamb, and
Midland Counties in Texas, and that part of the northwest corner of Hudspeth
County, Tex., lying north and west of a ridge of desert land extending from
the banks of the Rio Grande northeasterly through the desert immediately
west of the town of McNary, such ridge being an extension of the northwest
boundary line of sec. 11, block 6514.

This amendment shall be effective on and after August 17, 1956.

Done at the city of Washington this 17th day of August 1936.

Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agri-
cuiture.

[SEAL ] H. A. WALLACE,

Secretary of Agriculture.

[Foregoing amendment was sent to all common carriers doing business in or through

the reguiated area. ]



NoTICcCE TO GENERAL PUBLIC THROUGH NEWSPAPERS

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,
BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE,
Washington, D. C., August 17, 1936.
Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority
conferred on him by the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912 (87 Stat.
315), as amended, has promulgated amendment no. 1 to the revised rules
and regulations supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 52, on account of
the pink bollworm, effective on and after August 17, 1936. The amendment
modifies the area regulated under those regulations by bringing under restric-
tion the counties of Cameron, Hidalgo, Starr, and Willacy, in the State of .
Texas. These counties are now being designated as lightly infested. Copies
of the amendment may be obtained from the Bureau of Entomology and Piant
Quarantine, United States Department of Agriculture, Washington, D. C.

H. A. WALLACE,
Secretary of Ag¢iculture.

[Published in The Herald, Brownsville, Tex., Aug. 31, 1936. ]

INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS

Post OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,
Washington, September 1, 1936.
Postmaster.

My Dear Sir: Your attention is invited to the enclosed copy of Plant Quar-
antine No. 52 of the United States Department of Agriculture on account of the
pink bollworm of cotton (Pectinophora gossypiella Saunders), and also a copy
of revised regulations in connection therewith dated August 18, 1986, by which
you will please be governed. See paragraph 1, section 595, Postal Laws and
Regulations.

The principal changes affecting the Postal Service consist of the extension of
the regulated area to add the counties of Cameron, Hidalgo, Starr, and Willacy,
Tex., to the area designated as lightly infested by the pink bollworm.

Very truly yours,
C. B. EILENBERGER,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.

B. E. P. Q. 414.

ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS—TREATMENT REQUIREMENTS REMOVED AS A
CONDITION FOR INTERSTATE SHIPMENT OF BALED LINT AND LINTERS, AND
PRODUCTS THEREOF FROM THE COUNTIES OR PORTIONS OF COUNTIES OF THE
fa BOLLWORM REGULATED AREAS IN NEW MEXICO AND TEXAS DESCRIBED

ELOW

{Issued under regulations 8, 9, 10, and 11 of Quarantine No. 52—Domestic]
SEPTEMBER 28, 1936.

In accordance with the authorizations contained in regulations 8, 9, 10, and
11 of Quarantine No. 52 (domestic), on account of the pink bollworm, notice is
108 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

hereby given that baled cotton lint, baled cotton linters, and products thereof
from all of Lea and Roosevelt Counties of the pink bollworm regulated area in
New Mexico and from that part of the pink bollworm regulated area in Texas
comprising the counties of Andrews, Cochran, Ector, Gaines, Hockley, Terry,
and Yoakum, and those parts of the counties of Bailey, Dawson, Lamb, and
Midland particularly described in regulation 3 of Quarantine No. 52 (revised),
may be moved interstate without restriction, other than that a permit issued
by the United States Department of Agriculture must be secured and attached
to the articles or shipping papers in accordance with the methods prescribed in
Regulation 15 of said quarantine.

The removal of treatment requirements for the above-mentioned products is
considered safe due to the fact that no pink bollworm infestation has been
found in the above-described areas during the 1935 season.

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

; [The above circular was sent to all common carriers in the States of Texas and New
Mexico. ]

MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS
REGULATIONS GOVERNING SANITARY EXPORT CERTIFICATION
INTRODUCTORY NOTE

The service providing for the certification of plants and plant products to
meet the sanitary requirements of foreign countries is conducted under
authority granted in appropriation acts for the Department of Agriculture. In
appropriation acts for the fiscal years prior to and including the fiscal year
_ 1934, authority was granted to certify “domestic fresh fruits, vegetables, and
seeds, and nursery stock and other plants for propagation.” In subsequent
appropriation acts authority was granted to certify all domestic plants and
pliant products. The changes in this revision of the Inspection and Certification
Regulations to meet foreign sanitary requirements takes cognizance of the
extension of the authority to inspect products not heretofore certified for
export. Provisions have also been made to certify plant products on the basis
of the inspections made by cooperating State and Federal agencies. For the
sake of brevity the title of the inspection and certification regulations to meet
ioreign sanitary requirements has been changed to Regulations Governing
Sanitary Export Certification.

Lrg A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

Pursuant to the Agricultural Appropriation Act of May 17, 1935 (49 Stat.
268), and repeated in subsequent appropriation acts “For the inspection, under
such rules and regulations as the Secretary of Agriculture may prescribe, of
domestic plants and plant products when offered for export and to certify to
shippers and interested parties as to the freedom of such products from
injurious plant diseases and insect pests according to the sanitary requirements
of the foreign countries affected and to make such reasonable charges and to
use such means aS may be necessary to accomplish this object, * * *
Provided, That moneys received on account of such inspection and certification
shall be covered into the Treasury as miscellaneous receipts’—

I, Henry A. Wallace, Secretary of Agriculture, in order to carry out the pur-
pose of the aforesaid acts, do prescribe the following revised rules and regula-
tions, which shall become and be effective on and after September 21, 1936.

Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agricul-
ture this 19th day of September 1936.

[SEAL ] H. A. WALLACE,

Secretary of Agriculture.

Ee
1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 109

REGULATION 1. DEFINITIONS

SecTion 1. Words used in these regulations in the singular form shall be
deemed to import the plural, and vice versa, as the case may demand.

Sec. 2. For the purpose of these regulations, unless the context otherwise
requires, the following terms shall be construed, respectively, to mean—

Paragraph 1. The act.—The following provision of an act of Congress entitled
“An act making appropriations for the Department of Agriculture and for the
Farm Credit Administration for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1936, and for
other purposes’, approved May 17, 1935 (Public, No. 62, 74th Cong.), or any
future act of Congress conferring like authority: “For the inspection, under
such rules and regulations as the Secretary of Agriculture may prescribe, of
domestic plants and plant products, when offered for export, and to certify to
shippers and interested parties as to the freedom of such products from injuri-
ous plant diseases and insect pests according to the sanitary requirements of
foreign countries affected and to make such reasonable charges and to use such
means as may be necessary to accomplish this object, * * * Provided, That
moneys received on account of such inspection and certification shall be covered
into the Treasury as miscellaneous receipts.”

Par. 2. Secretary.——The Secretary or Acting Secretary of Agriculture of the
United States.

Par. 3. Bureau.—The Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine of the
United States Department of Agriculture.

Par. 4. Products—Domestic plants and plant products.

Par. 5. Inspector—An inspector of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant
Quarantine, United States Department of Agriculture, or other person author-
ized by the Secretary of Agriculture to inspect and certify to shippers and
other interested parties, as to the sanitary condition of the products inspected
under the act.

Par. 6. Office of inspection.—The office of an inspector of products covered by
these regulations.

Par. 7. Certificate—A certificate of the sanitary condition of the products
concerned, based on inspection of representative samples, issued by an inspector
under the act.

Par. 8. Regulations.—Rules and regulations of the Secretary under the act.

Par. 9. Consignment.—Any shipment of products assembled and inspected at
one place at one time and covered by one application, or any mail shipment
consigned to one consignee.

REGULATION 2. ADMINISTRATION

Section 1. The Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine is
charged with the supervision of the performance of all duties arising in the
administration of the act.

REGULATION 3. WHERE SERVICE IS OFFERED

Section 1. Certification may be made at the following ports of export, where
inspectors of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine are located:

Baltimore, Md. Port Arthur, Tex.
Bellingham, Wash. Portland, Oreg.
Boston, Mass. Presidio, Tex.
Brownsville, Tex. Rio Grande City, Tex.
Buffalo, N. Y. Roma, Tex.

Calexico, Calif. San Diego, Calif.
Charleston, S. C. San Francisco, Calif.

Honolulu, Hawaii.
Houston, Tex.
Jacksonville, Fla.
Key West, Fla.
‘Laredo, Tex.

Los Angeles, Calif.
Mercedes, Tex.

Chicago, Ill. Miami, Fla. San Juan, P. R.
Del Rio, Tex. Mobile, Ala. San Pedro, Calif.
Detroit, Mich. Naco, Ariz. San Ysidro, Calif.

Douglas, Ariz.

Eagle Pass, Tex.

El Paso, Tex.
Galveston, Tex.
Hidalgo, Tex.

New Orleans, La.

New York, N. Y.
Nogales, Ariz.
Norfolk, Va.
Philadelphia, Pa

Savannah, Ga.
Seattle, Wash.

Tampa, Fla.
Ysleta, Tex.
110 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

REGULATION 4. Propucts COVERED
SecTion 1. Domestic plants and plant products when offered for export.
REGULATION 5. APPLICATION FOR CERTIFICATION

SecTION 1. A written application shall be made on forms provided for the
purpose setting forth such information as is called for, as far in advance as
possible, and shall be filed in the office of inspection at the port of certification.

Sec. 2. Each application shall be deemed filed when delivered to the proper
office of certification. When such application is filed, a record showing the
date and time of filing shall be made in such office.

REGULATION 6. INSPECTION

Section 1. The applicant shall cause the product for which inspection is re-
quested to be made accessible for inspection and identification and to be so
placed as to permit efficient inspection for insects and plant diseases of repre-
sentative samples of all grades or kinds of products.

Sec. 2. All labor involved in the inspection, including the moving, opening, and
closing of containers shall be furnished by the applicant.

Sec. 3. Certificates may be refused for failure to carry out fully any of the
foregoing provisions.

SEc. 4. No inspector shall inspect any products in which he or a memner of
his family is directly or indirectly financially interested.

REGULATION 7. CERTIFICATES

Section 1. For each consignment of products for which certification is re-
quested, the inspector shall sign and issue a separate certificate based on the
findings of the inspection.

Sec. 2. The original certificate shall immediately upon its issuance be deliy-
ered or mailed to the applicant or a person designated by him.

Sec. 3. One copy of each certificate shall be filed in the office of certification,
and one forwarded to the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quaran-
tine.

Sec. 4. The Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine may
authorize inspectors to issue certificates on the basis of inspections made by
cooperating Federal and State agencies under requirements and conditions
approved by him.

Sec. 5. Inspectors may issue new certificates on a basis of inspections for
previous certifications when the previously issued certificates can be canceled
before they have been accepted by the phytopathological authorities of the
country of destination involved.

REGULATION 8& FEES

Section 1. For each certificate issued the fee shall be $1.

Sec. 2. A fee of $1 shall be charged for extra copies of certificates requested
after the original certificate and its accompanying copies have been issued.

Sec. 3. All fees shall be paid by check, money order, or draft made payable
to disbursing clerk, United States Department of Agriculture. Such collections
shall be promptly forwarded to the Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and
Plant Quarantine at the close of each week to be covered into the Treasury as
miscellaneous receipts.

REGULATION 9. PUBLICATIONS

SecTIoNn 1. Publications under the act and these regulations shall be made in
Service and Regulatory Announcements of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant
Quarantine and such other media as the chief of that Bureau may from time
to time designate for the purpose. |

These revised rules and regulations shall be effective on and after September
21, 1936, and shall supersede the inspection and certification regulations to meet
for eign sanitary requirements promulgated July 23, 1931.

Done at the city of Washington this 19th day of September 1936.

Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agri-
culture.

[SEAL ] H. A. WALLACE,

Secretary of Agriculture.
1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS Lit

PUBLIC HEARING CALLED TO CONSIDER THE ADVISABILITY OF QUARANTINING
THE STATES OF CALIFORNIA, COLORADO, NEW MEXICO, TEXAS, AND UTAH ON
ACCOUNT OF THE PEACH MOSAIC DISEASE

{Press notice]
August 21, 1936.

A public hearing to consider the advisability of quarantining the States of
California, Colorado, New Mexico, Texas, and Utah on account of the peach
mosaic disease will be held before the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quar-
antine in room 2050, Extensible Building, Independence Avenue and Fourteenth
Street SW., Washington, D. C., at 2 p. m., September 14, 19386.

The peach mosaic disease was first observed in Texas in 19381 by Federal
inspectors and was identified by the Bureau of Plant Industry as a previously
unknown virus disease. The presence of this disease has since been determined
in California, Colorado, New Mexico, and Utah.

Special investigations begun in 1931 by the United States Department of
Agriculture to determine the cause of the disease and the methods of control
have resulted in finding that the disease is communicable and is spreading in
the manner of a contagious disease, but the exact cause or nature of the con-
tagion is unknown. From this information it appears advisable to prohibit or
restrict the shipment of peach and nectarine trees and parts thereof from the
infected States in an effort to prevent its spread to other peach districts.

With the onset of the disease, a peach mosaic infected tree develops shortened
internodes, the blade and leaf axils start intergrowth in profusion, and the leaf
blades develop striking mosaic patterns and in many instances are small, nar-
row, irregular in outline, and crinkly. After the disease appears there is a
notable decrease in the average size of the fruit, which is apt to be irregular
in shape and the texture of the pulp is inclined to be pithy.

The hearing is called by the Secretary of Agriculture in accordance with the
Plant Quarantine Act in order that any person interested in the proposed
quarantine may appear and be heard, either in person or by attorney.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING TO CONSIDER THE ADVISABILITY OF QUARANTINING
THE STATES OF CALIFORNIA, COLORADO, NEW MEXICO, TEXAS, AND UTAH ON
ACCOUNT OF THE PEACH MOSAIC DISEASE

AvucustT 19, 1936.

The Secretary of Agriculture has information that peach mosaic, a dangerous
plant disease not heretofore widely prevalent or distributed within and through-
out the United States, exists in portions of the States of California, Colorado,
New Mexico, Texas, and Utah.

It appears necessary, therefore, to consider the advisability of quarantining
the States of California, Colorado, New Mexico, Texas, and Utah, and of
restricting or prohibiting the movement of peach and nectarine trees and parts
thereof from these States or from any districts therein designated as infected.

Notice is, therefore, hereby given that in accordance with the Plant Quarantine
Act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended by the act of Congress
approved March 4, 1917 (89 Stat. 1134, 1165), a public hearing will be held
before the Bureau of Hntomology and Plant Quarantine in room 2050, Bureau
of Agricultural Economics conference room, Extensible Building, Independence
Avenue and Fourteenth Street SW., Washington, D. C., at 2 p. m., September 14,
1936, in order that any .persons interested in the propoSed quarantine may
appear and be heard, either in person or by attorney.

[SEAL] H. A. WALLACE,
Secretary of Agriculture.

CHANGE IN DATE AND PLACE OF PUBLIC HEARING RELATIVE TO PEACH MOSAIC
DISEASE

[Press notice]
SEPTEMBER 9, 1936.

Under date of August 19, 1936, the Secretary of Agriculture issued a notice
announcing that a public hearing would be held to consider the advisability of
quarantining the States of California, Colorado, New Mexico, Texas, and Utah,

105566—36——-3
112 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July—Sept.

on account of the peach mosaie disease, and of restricting or prohibiting the
movement of peach and nectarine trees and parts thereof from these States or
from any districts therein designated as infected. The notice stated that the
hearing would be held before the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine
in room 2050, Bureau of Agricultural Economics conference room, Extensible
Building, Independence Avenue and Fourteenth Street SW., Washington, D. C.,
at 2 p. m., September 14, 1936.

Since the release of the notice it has been found desirable to extend the
scope of the hearing to include the State of Arizona, where the disease has
recently been found, and to change the date and place of the hearing to 10
a. m., September 21, 1936, in the Chamber of Commerce Auditorium, 319 North
Fourth Street, Albuquerque, N. Mex. The change in date and place is made
for the convenience of those in the affected States who may desire to attend
the hearing. .

NOTICE OF CHANGE IN PLACE AND DATE OF PUBLIC HEARING TO CONSIDER
THE ADVISABILITY OF QUARANTINING THE STATES OF CALIFORNIA, COLORADO,
NEW MEXICO, TEXAS, AND UTAH, ON ACCOUNT OF THE PEACH MOSAIC DIS-
EASE; ALSO THE INCLUSION OF ARIZONA IN THE STATES TO BE CONSIDERED

SEPTEMBER 8, 1936.

The purpose of this announcement is to change the place and date of public
hearing to be held to consider the advisability of quarantining the States of
California, Colorado, New Mexico, Texas, and Utah, on account of the peach
mosaic disease, and of restricting or prohibiting the movement of peach and
nectarine trees and parts thereof from those States or from any districts
therein designated as infected; also to extend the scope of the hearing to
include the State of Arizona where the disease has recently been found.

The original notice, dated August 19, 1936, stated that the hearing would be
held before the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine in room 2050,
Bureau of Agricultural Economics conference room, Extensible Building, Inde-
pendence Avenue and Fourteenth Street SW., Washington, D. C., at 2 p. m.,
September 14, 1936. Since the release of the notice it has been found desirable
to change the place and date of the hearing from Washington, D. C., to a more
convenient location and time for those in the affected States who may desire
to attend. ‘

The Secretary of Agriculture has information that peach mosaic, a dangerous
plant disease not heretofore widely prevalent+or distributed within and
throughout the United States, exists in portions of the States of Arizona,
California, Colorado, New Mexico, Texas, and Utah.

It appears necessary, therefore, to consider the advisability of quarantining
the States of Arizona, California, Colorado, New Mexico, Texas, and Utah, and
of vestricting or prohibiting the movement of peach and nectarine trees and
parts thereof from these States or from any districts therein designated as
infected.

Notice is therefore hereby given that in accordance with the Plant Quaran-
tine Act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended by the act of Congress
approved March 4, 1917 (389 Stat. 1134, 1165), a public hearing will be held
before the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine in the Chamber of
Commerce Auditorium, 319 North Fourth Street, Albuquerque, N. Mex., at 10
a. m., September 21, 1936, in order that any persons interested in the proposed
quarantine may appear and be heard, either in person or by attorney.

[SEAL] H. A. WALLACE,” —“_

Secretary of Agriculture.

B. P. Q. 348, Supplement No. 4.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF CHILE

SEPTEMBER 1, 1936.
REGULATIONS TO PREVENT THE INTRODUCTION OF COTTONSEED PESTS

Decree no. 671, October 30, 1933 (see supplement no. 2 to B. P. Q. 348),
was superseded by decree no. 1031, September 30, 1935, which in turn, has
been superseded by decree no. 226, March 81, 1936, a translation of which
follows:


1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS Ets

FUMIGATION REQUIRED TO PREVENT INTRODUCTION OF PINK BOLLWORM

ARTICLE 1. Cottonseed imported into Chile for the production of oil, un-
ginned cotton, and the containers thereof, proceeding from regions where the
pink bollworm (Pectinophora gossypiella Saund.) exists shall be fumigated
or treated by heat before embarkation, in such a manner as to destroy all
insects contained in the shipment.

The phytosanitary authority of the exporting country shall certify to the
fumigation in the phytosanitary certificate that must accompany the shipment,
in accordance with article 3 of the General Regulations of the Law of Phyto-
sanitary Police. (See Basic Law, p. 1, B. P. Q. 348.)

Art. 2. If on arrival in Chile a consignment of cottonseed is found to carry
live insects, despite compliance with the requirements of the preceding article,
it shall be fumigated, the operation to begin within 24 hours after unlading.
If fumigation cannot be effected within the designated period, the Servicio de
Sanidad Vegetal shall prevent the unlading of the shipment or proceed with
its destruction after the lapse of 24 hours from unlading.

Art. 8. If the certificate referred to in article 1 cannot be obtained, the
shipment shall be fumigated on board, before unlading is begun in the Chilean
port, for a minimum period of 12 hours. If this treatment does not prove
efficacious, a second fumigation shall be applied on board or on lighters or
barges, and its landing shall not be permitted while live insects are found in
the shipment.

Fumigation on board may be waived if the operation can be effected on
lighters or barges on condition that both the unlading of such a shipment and
the fumigation are carried out not less than 500 meters from shore. The
shipment shall not be landed while specimens of live pink bollworms or other
insects are found therein.

Art. 4. Shipments of cottonseed arriving by land, if not supported by the
fumigation certificate referred to in article 1, shall be returned to the country
of origin within a minimum period that will be determined by the Servicio de
Sanidad Vegetal, or destroyed if the return is not effected within the stipu-
lated period.

Art. 5. In all cases, this seed shall be ground immediately after it is re
ceived, preference being given over any other, and not allowing the work to
stop until the entire shipment has been manufactured.

Art. 6. The foregoing measures will not be required for seed proceeding
from regions where pink bollworm does not exist, if such seed is subjected
to the general provisions relating to the importation of seeds. In such case
the certificate shall explicitly declare that pink bollworm does not exist in
the region where the seed was produced.

THE COTTON STAINER, DYSDERCUS SP.

Art. 7. The phytosanitary certificate accompanying cottonseed intended for
the production of oil proceeding from regions in which the cotton Stainer,
Dysdercus sp., exists shall clearly affirm that the shipment does not contain
that insect. If the said insect does not occur in the region, that fact shall
be stamped on the certificate.

Art. 8. The seed shall be inspected on board in the port of destination by
the Servicio de Sanidad Vegetal.

Arr. 9. If live eotton stainers are found, it will be treated in accordance
with the provisions of the second article of this decree.

Art. 10. Unginned cotton or cottonseed imported from regions where the
pink bollworm or the cotton stainer exist shall meet the requirements of
articles 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5.

Art. 11. Importation of cotton will be permitted only in sacks; these shall
be so strong that they will not tear or burst during transportation or in lading
or unlading. The unlading of torn sacks will not be permitted.

COTTONSEED INTENDED FOR SOWING

Art. 12. The importation of seeds for sowing from regions in which pink
bollworm occurs is prohibited, and all the other measures indicated in the
present decree will be applied to the said seed.
114 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

SAMPLES IMPORTED BY MAIL

ArT. 18. Samples without value arriving by mail will comply with the re-
quirements of article 3 of the General Regulations of the Law of Phytosanitary
Police only. (See p. 1, B. P. Q. 348.)

ArT. 14. Decree No. 1031 of September 30, 1935, is revoked.

Avery §8. Hoyt,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

B. P. Q. 348, Supplement No. 5.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF CHILE

SEPTEMBER 10, 1936.

IMPORTATION OF BENEFICIAL INSECTS
[Decree No. 458, Apr. 27, 1935]

ARTICLE 1. The importation of insects beneficial to agriculture, or of those
which are natural enemies of others that constitute pests, may be effected only
by the Phytosanitary Service of the Ministry of Agriculture of Chile.

Art. 2. The importation of other insects of direct economic value to private
persons, such as bees, silkworms, etc., may be effected, provided that all the
requirements established by the Law of Phytosanitary Police for the importa-
tion of plants, or parts thereof, are complied with.

Arr. 8. Relates to the importation of birds, rodents, and other small animals,
and article 4 deals with penalties for violations.
Lee A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

B. P. Q. 357, Supplement No. 4.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF ARGENTINA

JuLy 20, 1936.
AUTHORIZED PORTS OF ENTRY

Decree No. 69595, October 25, 1935, authorizes the importation of plants and
plant products in general through the port of Mendoza, in addition to the ports
of Buenos Aires and Bahia Blanca already designated. (See p. 3, B. P. Q. 357.)

Lee A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

B. E. P. Q. 370, revised, Supplement No. 1.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, BRITISH MANDATE OF PALESTINE

SEPTEMBER 1, 1936.
GRADING OF FRUITS

On page 3 of B. E. P. Q. 370 it is indicated that plums, quinces, apples, and
pears may be imported into Palestine from the United States and certain
other countries without a phytosanitary certificate if of the following grades:
Fancy No. 1, Extra Fancy, and Fancy.

These grades do not correspond exactly to the United States standard grades
for apples and pears, there being no United States grade Fancy No. 1, but
apparently were based on the United States standards, therefore, the question
was taken up with the authorities of Palestine.

Under date Jerusalem, August 8, 1936, the American Consul General dis-
patched the following reply:

‘Department of Agriculture and Fisheries states Palestine grade fruit Fancy
No. 1 means U. S. No. 1 and that Palestine Government will accept without






1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 115

certificate (phytosanitary certificate) the following United States grades: U. S.

Fancy, U. S. No. 1, Extra Fancy, and Fancy.”
AvERY §. Hoyt,

Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

B. E. P. Q. 379, Supplement No. 1.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF BRAZIL

SEPTEMBER 1, 1936.
DISINFECTION OF CHESTNUTS REQUIRED

[Resolution of Jan. 25, 1936; Diario Official, Jan. 29, 1936]

ARTICLE 1. The obligatory certification of the disinfection of chestnuts (Cas-
tanea vulgaris) imported from any source, is hereby established.

The presence of the lepidopteron Laspeyresia sp., and of the coleopteron
Balaninus sp., in any stage of development, being verified by inspection in the
port of destination, the Servico de Defesa Sanitaria Vegetal, at the request and
expense of the consignees, will subject the shipment to a new disinfection, pro-
viding that the infestation does not exceed 2 percent, the interested persons
being subjected to other precautionary measures deemed necessary.

Avery 8. Hoyt,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

B. H.-P: Q. 406.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, BRITISH COLONY OF MALTA

JuLy 18, 1936.

This summary of the plant-quarantine import restrictions of the British Col-
ony of Malta has been prepared for the information of nurserymen, plant-
quarantine officials, and others interested in the exportation of plants and plant
products to that Colony.

It was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant-quarantine inspector, in charge of
Yoreign Information Service, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines, from the
original ordinance and Government notices, and reviewed by the director of
agriculture of Malta.

The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct and com-
plete up to the time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used inde-
pendently of, nor as a substitute for, the original texts, and it is not to be
interpreted as legally authoritative.

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, BRITISH COLONY OF MALTA
Basic LEGISLATION

Ordinance no. III of 1876 (June 20, 1876).

It shall be lawful for the Head of the Government, whenever, in his opinion,
there is reason to believe that any agricultural produce in any country out of
the island of Malta and its dependencies, is affected with a disease which, by
the introduction of such produce into those islands, might be introduced into
and spread within those islands, to prohibit, by a notice in the Government
Gazette, the importation of the said produce from the country and from any
other country into which the importation of the same produce from the former
country be not prohibited.

SUMMARY
IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

Cottonseed from places infected with anthrax (Government Notice No. 21
of Jan. 30, 1914, p. 3).
116 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

Potatoes from France: Importation prohibited to prevent the introduction of
the Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say (Government notice
of Sept. 11, 1922).

Plants, parts of plants, tomatoes, and raw vegetables: Importation prohibited
from European France, North America, Belgium, and Luxembourg, to prevent
the introduction of the Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say,
and San Jose scale, Aspidiotus perniciosws Comst. (Government Notice No. 175
of July 28, 1923, as amended by no. 272, of Aug. 1, 1932, p. 8).

Potatoes from northern Africa: Importation prohibited to prevent the intro-
duction of pests dangerous to the domestic potato crop (Government Notice No.
236 of Aug. 27, 1924).

IMPORTATION RESTRICTED

Cottonseed from places not declared infected with anthrax: Must be accom-
panied by a certificate from the British consular authority or the local govern-
ment authority affirming that anthrax is not prevalent in the district in which
the cottonseed was grown (Government Notice No. 21, art. 1 (c), of Jan. 30,
1914, p. 3).

Potatoes: Must be accompanied by shipper’s declaration of freedom of land
where grown from potato wart, Synchytrium endobioticum, and a certificate of
competent authority to the same effect (Government Notice No. 21, art. 1 (d)
of Jan. 30, 1914, p. 3).

Plants, roots, or garden soil from any Mediterranean port: Must be accom-
panied by an antiphylloxera certificate (Government Notice No. 21, art. 3, Jan.
30, 1914).

Citrus fruits: Importation subject to inspection on arrival, with action ac-
cording to findings (Government Notice No. 21, art. 4, Jan. 30, 1914, p. 4).

Sulla seed, Hedysarum coronarium L.: If imported after March is liable to
seizure and detention in Government bonded store until January 1 of the follow-
ing year, unless certified by competent authority of country of origin that the
seed is over 12 months old (Government notice of June 11, 1920, p. 4).

Live plants from Great Britain: Subject to inspection on arrival; if found
infested by Colorado potato beetle, will be disposed of as the superintendent of

agriculture may direct (Government Notice No. 387, of Sept. 20, 1933).

IMPORTATION UNRESTRICTED

All imports made by the Department of Agriculture (Government Notice No.
352, Sept. 3, 1927, p. 5).

From the foregoing it would appear that the only plant material admissible
from the United States comprises fresh fruits, including citrus fruits; dried,
desiccated, canned, candied, or preserved fruits and vegetables; nuts, dried
beans, peas, etc., seeds, and cereals, for which neither import permits nor
inspection certificates are required.

IMPORT REGULATIONS
[Government Notice No. 21 of Jan. 30, 1914]
IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

ARTICLE 1. The importation of the following articles is prohibited:

(a) Revoked by Government Notice No. 448, October 24, 1933.

(6b) Revoked by Government Notice No. 448, October 24, 1933.

(c) Cottonseed, arriving or originating from infected places, or in any other
case, unless accompanied by a certificate from the British consular authority,
or, where there is no such authority, from the local government authority, to
the effect that anthrax is not prevalent in the district in which such cottonseed
was grown.

(d) Potatoes, unless accompanied by the following documents:

(1) Statutory declaration by the shipper, naming the place of origin and
stating that such potatoes were not grown on land infected with potato wart
or black scab (Synchytrium endobioticum (Schilb.) Pere.).

(2) A certificate from the inspector of agriculture or other equivalent au-
thority of the place from which the potatoes are imported, stating that the
locality in which the potatoes were grown is free from that disease.
1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS EET

Consignments of potatoes not accompanied by the documents above mentioned
shall, on importation, be liable to be inspected, at the expense of the cousignee,
by the inspector of agriculture, who may give such directions and take such
steps as he may consider necessary, including the prohibition of the disposal
of consignments locally for seed purposes. (As amended by Government Notice
No. 342 of Oct. 20, 1926.)

Art. 2. Concerning the importation of cuttings or shoots of grapevines (Vitis
spp.) was revoked by Government Notice No. 448 of October 24, 1933.

Art. 3. The importation of plants, roots, or garden soil from any port in
the Mediterranean is prohibited, unless the goods be accompanied by an an-
tiphylloxera certificate (as approved by the International Phylloxera Confer-
ence, Berne, Noy. 3, 1881) signed by the proper authority.

Art. 4. Citrus fruits shall, on importation, be liable to be inspected at the
expense of the consignee, by the inspection officer for plant diseases, who may
give such directions and take such steps as he may consider necessary. (As
amended by Government Notice of Dec. 18, 1923.)

IMPORTATION OF SULLA SEED RESTRICTED
[Government notice of June 11, 1920]

Consignments of Sulla seeds (Hedysarum coronarium L., French honeysuckle
or sulla clover) imported after March are liable to be seized and kept, at the
expense and risk of the importer, in a Government bonded store until January
1 of the following year, unless the consignment be accompanied by a certificate
from the superintendent of agriculture, or from another equivalent authority
in the country of origin, that the seed is over 12 months old and is of good
germinating quality.

IMPORTATION PROHIBITED OF PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS FROM FRANCE AND
NORTH AMERICA

[Government Notice No. 175 of July 28, 1923, as amended by No. 272 of Aug. 1, 19382]

To prevent the introduction of the Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa
decemlineata Say, and San Jose seale, Aspidiotus perniciosus Comst., the im-
portation into the islands is prohibited of all trees, shrubs, cuttings, tubers,
bulbs, and flowering roots, tomatoes, and raw vegetables from European France
and North America.

DEPARTMENTAL IMPORTATIONS UNRESTRICTED
[Government Notice No. 352 of Sept. 3, 1927]

All imports to be made by the Department of Agriculture are exempted from
the prohibitions contained in all Government notices issued in virtue of Ordi-
nance No. III of 1876.

B. E. P. Q. 407 (superseding P. Q. C. A. 304).

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, KINGDOM OF DENMARK
JULY 18, 1936.

This summary of the plant-quarantine import restrictions of the Kingdom of
Denmark has been prepared for the information of nurserymen, plant-quaran-
tine officials, and others interested in the exportation of plants and plant prod-
ucts to that country.

It was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant quarantine inspector in charge of
Foreign Information Service, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines, from his
tranSlations of the texts of law no. 140 of July 1, 1927, the order of February
22, 1935, and other orders; and was reviewed by the Danish Ministry of
Agriculture.

The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct and com-
plete up to the time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used independ-
ently of, nor as a substitute for, the original texts, and it is not to be interpreted
as legally authoritative. The original texts should be consulted.

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.
118 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, KINGDOM OF DENMARK
BAsiIc LEGISLATION
Law no. 140, of July 1, 1927.
CoNcISE SUMMARY
IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

Potatoes: Importation prohibited from any country in which potato wart
(Synchytrium endobioticum (Schilb.) Pere.), potato nematodes or eelworms
(Heterodera rostochiensis), or Colorado potato beetle ((Doryphora) Leptino-
tarsa decemlineata Say) have been determined during the last 10 years (order
of Feb. 22, 1935, p. 5).

Elm trees (Ulmus spp.) : Importation of all species prohibited (order of Jan.
29, 1929, p. 5).

Douglas firs (Pseudotsuga (douglasi) taxifolia Brit.) : Importation of plants
and seeds prohibited (order of July 17, 1929, p. 5).

Vegetable mold, composts, and animal manures: Importation prohibited
(order of Feb. 22, 1935, art. 1, p. 5).

IMPORTATION RESTRICTED

Plants and parts of plants with adhering soil, including fruit and other trees,
shrubs, bushes, roots, rooted vegetables, bulbs, tubers, bedding plants, potted
plants, ete.: Importation permitted if shipped direct from the place of produc-
tion to the importer and if accompanied by a phytosanitary certificate issued
by an official plant inspection service of the country of origin in prescribed form
(order of Feb. 22, 1935, p. 2).

Potatoes from countries in which potato wart, potato nematode, and Colo-
rado potato beetle are not known to have occurred during the last 10 years, if
shipped in new containers and accompanied by a phytosanitary certificate issued -
by an official plant inspection service of the country of origin in prescribed
form (order of Feb. 22, 1985, p. 5).

IMPORTATION UNRESTRICTED

Cut asparagus, mushrooms, aquatic plants, mosses for wreaths, and sphagnum
moss (order of Feb. 22, 1935, pp. 2 and 3).

Fresh fruits and vegetables, other than rooted vegetables and root crops in
general (order of Feb. 22, 1985).

PROVISIONS OF THE BASIC LEGISLATION

Law no. 140, July 1, 1927, authorizes the Danish Minister of Agriculture to
take the necessary measures to prevent the introduction into the Kingdom of
Denmark of plant diseases and pests that are regarded as dangerous to agri-
cultural, horticultural, and sylvicultural plants, and which have not hitherto
become established in Denmark, or which are of limited distribution ; to combat
such diseases and pests by prohibiting the sowing or planting or transportation
of cultivated plants; by the disinfection or destruction of such plants and their
packing which might serve to spread the parasites; by isolating certain areas;
by disinfecting warehouses, implements, ete.; or by any other means suitable
for combating such parasites. . ;

RESTRICTIONS ON THE IMPORTATION OF PLANTS
[Order of Feb. 22, 1935, as amended by that of Aug. 26, 1935]
GENERAL REGULATIONS
Direct shipment and phytosanitary certificate required
ARTICLE 1. The importation of plants and parts of plants with adhering soil,
such as fruit and other trees, shrubs, bushes, roots, rooted vegetables, bulbs,

tubers, bedding plants, potted plants, etc., is permitted on condition that the
shipment is made direct from the place of production to the importer, that it is


1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 119

accompanied by a certificate issued by an official plant-inspection service of
the country of origin, and that this certificate be presented to the customs
authorities at the port of entry. Plants, the roots of which have been washed,
also are affected by these regulations, but they do not apply to cut asparagus,
mushrooms, aquatic plants, mosses for wreaths, and sphagnum moss.

The importation of vegetable mold, composts, and animal manures is pro-
hibited.

Character of certificate

Art. 2. The certificate, which must be attached to the bill of lading, shall be
issued by the plant-inspection service within a period of 1 mouth prior to
exportation from the country of origin. It shall affirm that the place where
the plants were grown is free from potato wart (Synchytrium endobioticum
(Schilb.) Pere.), potato nematodes or eelworms (Heterodera rostochiensis),
and Colorado potato beetle ((Doryphora) Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say), and
that it is situated at least 5 km from any place where the potato wart and
potato nematode have been observed during the past 10 years, and not less than
50 km from any infestation of Colorado potato beetle within the same period.

The certificate shall also indicate the country of origin, the place where the
products were grown, the name and address of the grower, the date, and it shall
be provided with the official seal or stamp of the inspection service.

At the foot of the certificate the grower must indicate the number and kind
of packages included in the shipment, and declare that the plants were shipped
direct from the place of production to the importer.

ArT. 3. The provisions concerning the importation of elms, Douglas firs, and
potatoes of January 29, 1929, July 17, 1929, and February 22, 1935, are not
affected by the present order.

The form of certificate required by the Danish Government appears below:
ae ats ere Gs a 2

(Name of the country of origin)
Certificate of origin

This is to certify that the plants included in the shipment described below

BOM TAMMY a ec SUNG ees
(Name of grower) (Postal address of place where grow n)-

a locality free from infection by potato wart (Synchytrium endobioticum
(Schilb.) Pere.), potato nematodes or eelworms (Heterodera rostochiensis),
and Colorado potato beetle ((Doryphora) Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say), and
situated at least 5 km from any place where potato wart and potato nematodes
have oceurred during the last 10 years, and not less than 50 km from any place
where the Colorado potato beetle has been observed during the same period.

Seal of the official Plant Inspection Service.

Chief, Plant Inspection Service.

The undersigned grower hereby declares that the shipment comprises

pee Nock ae Ps. COMeaI INS. 2) St WI
(Number) (Number and kind of plants)

are being shipped direct from the place of production to __--__--___--________
eae and address of consignee)

(Postal address)
RESTRICTIONS ON THE IMPORTATION OF POTATOES
[Order of Feb. 22, 1935]
IMPORTATION PROHIBITED FROM CERTAIN COUNTRIES

ARTICLE 1. (1) No potatoes may be imported into Denmark from any country
in which potato wart (Synchyirium endobioticum (Schilb.) Pere.), potato
nematodes (Heterodera rostochiensis), or Colorado potato beetle ((Doryphora)
Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say) have been determined during the past 10
years. (This, of course, has the effect of a prohibition against the importa-
tion of potatoes from the United States.) Provision is made in this article

105566—36——_4
120 BUREAU OF FNTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-—Sept.

for the importation, under certification, of potatoes from countries free from
wart disease.
Arts. 2 and 3 relate to inspection on arrival and entry procedure.

TRANSIT NOT REGARDED AS IMPORTATION

Art. 4. The transit of potatoes will not be regarded as importation if the
shipment is made on a through bill of lading and the potatoes are securely
packed, or the lading in the Danish port is made from vessel to vessel (or
railroad car) without being unladen upon the dock.

IMPORTATION OF ELMS PROHIBITED
[Order of Jan. 29, 1929]

The importation into Denmark of all species and varieties of elm (Ulmus)
is prohibited until further orders.

IMPORTATION OF DouGcLAS Firs PROHIBITED
{Order of July 17, 1929]

The importation into Denmark of plants and parts of plants, including
the seeds, of Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga (douglasi) tazvifolia Brit.) is prohibited
until further orders.

B. E. P. Q. 408.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, IRISH FREE STATE (SAORSTAT
EIREANN)
JULY 18, 1936.

This summary of the plant-quarantine import restrictions of the Irish Free
State has been prepared for the information of nurserymen, plant-quarantine
officials, and others interested in the exportation of plants and plant products
to that country. This information was previously included in Cireular
P. Q. C. A. 327; however, since the plant-quarantine restrictions of Great
Britain have been recently revised, whereas those of the Irish Free State have
not, and, Since the Irish Free State is not a part of the United Kingdom, it
was deemed desirable to publish this summary separately.

It was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant quarantine inspector in charge of
Foreign Information Service, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines, from the
text of the Destructive Insects and Pests (Ireland) Order, 1922, and subsequent
plant-quarantine orders and was reviewed by the Department of Agriculture
of the Irish Free State.

The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct and
complete up to the time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used
independently of, nor as a substitute for, the original texts, and it is not to
be interpreted as legally authoritative. The quarantines themselves should be
consulted for the exact texts.

Lee A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

-PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, IRISH FREE STATE
(SAORSTAT EIREANN)

Basic LEGISLATION
Destructive Insects and Pests Acts, 1877 to 1929.
SUMMARY
IMPORTATION PROHIBITED
Elm trees (Ulmus spp.) from any country outside of Ireland, to prevent the

introduction of the Dutch elm disease, Graphium ulani (Ceratostomella ulmi
(Schwartz) Buisman) and Micrococcus ulmi (order of Feb. 1, 1929, p. 8).




1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 121

IMPORTATION RESTRICTED
Certification required

(a) All living plants with a persistent woody stem above ground, and parts
thereof, except seeds, for propagation ;

(b) Potatoes; and all tubers, bulbs, rhizomes, corms, and hop stocks for
planting ;

(c) Seeds of onions and of leeks for sowing;

(d@) Gooseberries ;

(e) Chrysanthemums; rooted and unrooted cuttings ;

(f) Raw apples from the United States;

(g) Vegetables and tomatoes, and living plants other than those indicated
in items (a) and (0b), except potatoes.

For details on the certification of items (a) to (e) see the third schedule
(pp. 4 and 5). The original certificates should be mailed to the Secretary,
Department of Agriculture, Dublin, C. 17 (Runai, An Roinn Talmhaiochta,
Baile Atha Cliath, M. 17, Saorstat Eireann). A model of the certificate re-
quired for item (f) is furnished on page 5; this certificate should accompany
the consignment concerned and be delivered to an officer of customs and excise
on arrival.

The Colorado beetle order of November 30, 1931, prescribes that the products
included in item (g), originating in any country other than European France,
shall be accompanied by two copy certificates in the form indicated in the
third schedule, issued by a duly authorized official, or by a certificate of origin
visaed by a local authority.

IMPORTATION UNRESTRICTED
Seeds and fresh fruits, other than those above mentioned.
REGULATIONS UNDER THE DESTRUCTIVE Tenors AND PESTS (IRELAND) ORDER, 1922
ARTICLE 1. This order shall come into operation December 4, 1922.

DEFINITIONS

ArT, 2. “Department” means the Department of Agriculture and Technical
Instruction for Ireland.

“Plant”, where the context permits, includes tree and shrub, and the fruit,
seeds, tubers, bulbs, layers, cuttings, or any other parts of a plant.

“Landing” includes importation by mail.

RESTRICTION ON IMPORTATION OF PLANTS

ArT. 3. (1) The landing in the Irish Free State from any country other than
Great Britain and the Channel Islands of any of the plants mentioned in the
first schedule to this order is prohibited except in accordance with the regula-
tions set out in the third schedule.

(2) The importer of any plant the landing of which is regulated by this
article shall comply with the regulations set out in the third schedule.

(3) This article shall not apply to any plant the landing of which is au-
thorized by a general license issued by the Department, or by a special license
issued by an inspector or other authorized person, or to a consignment of a
plant to the Department for experimental or scientific purposes.

Articles 4 to 12 of the order relate to internal and administrative matters.

FIRST SCHEDULE

(a) All living plants with a persistent woody stem above ground, and parts
of the same, except seeds, when for use in propagation, such as fruit trees,
stocks and stools, forest trees, and ornamental shrubs and grafts, layers, and
cuttings thereof.

(b) All potatoes, and all tubers, bulbs, rhizomes, corms, and hop stocks for
planting.

(c) Seeds of onions and of leeks for sowing.

(d) Gooseberries, bushes and fruit.

(e) Unrooted cuttings and rooted plants of chrysanthemums (amendment of
Nov. 27,°1927).
122 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

SECOND SCHEDULE
Fungi

Black knot of plum and cherry, Plowrightia morbosa (Schw.) Sace.

Fire or pear blight, Bacillus amylovorus Trev.

Chestnut canker, Endothia parasitica (Murr.) And. and And.

Potato wart disease, Synchytrium endobioticum (Schilb.) Pere.

Onion and leek smut, Urocystis cepulae Frost.

Downy mildew of hops, Pseudoperonospora (Peronoplasmopora) humuli Miy.
and Tak.

Insects

Grape phylloxera, Phylloxera (vastatrix) vitifoliae Fitch.

Apple red bug, Lygidea mendax Reut.

Dark apple red bug, Heterocordylus malinus Reut.

Pear tingid, Stephanitis pyri Fab.

Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say.

Plum curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar Hbst.

Potato tuber worm (Phthorimaea) Gnorimoschema operculella Zell.

Eastern tent caterpillar, Walacosoma americana Fab.

Forest tent caterpillar, Malacosoma disstria Hbn.

Oriental fruit moth (Cydia) Grapholitha molesta Buseck.

San Jose scale, Aspidiotus perniciosus Comst.

White peach scale (Diaspis) Aulacaspis pentagona Targ.

Apple maggot, Rhagoletis pomonella Walsh.

Cherry fruit fly, Rhagoletis cerasi L.

European cherry fruit fly, Rhagoletis cingulata Loew.

Black cherry fruit fly, Rhagoletis fausta O. S.

Currant fruit fly, Hpochra canadensis Loew.

Chrysanthemum gall midge, Diarthronomyia hypogaea Loew (amendment
of Nov. 24, 1927).

THIRD SCHEDULE

Regulations governing the importation of plants into the Irish Free State

1. The restrictions on landing imposed by the order and these regulations do
not apply to plants the landing of which is authorized by a general license
issued by the Department or by a special license issued by an inspector or other
authorized person, or to consignments of plants to the Department for experi-
mental or scientific purposes.

Inspection and certification required

2. (a) In the case of an importation of plants otherwise than by mail from
a country whose plant-inspection service is recognized for the time being, each
consignment must be accompanied by two copies of a certificate issued after
inspection, and not more than 14 days prior to the date of shipment, by a duly
authorized official of the country whence the plants are exported, in the form
prescribed below. One copy of the certificate must be produced to the customs
officer at the port of entry, and the other copy must be forwarded by the im-
porter to the consignee. In the case of consignments imported by mail a copy
of the prescribed certificate need not be produced to the customs officer, but a
copy must be affixed to each package.

The original of the certificate must be mailed by the exporter, before the
plants are shipped, to the Secretary, Department of Agriculture and Technical
Instruction for Ireland, Dublin, ron 17, Irish Free State (Runai, An Roinn
Talmhaischta, Baile Atha Cliath, M. 17, Saorstat Hireann).

Certificate of examination of plants

No, 22
This is to certify that the plants included in the package or consignment
described below were thoroughly inspected by —---------______—__ ua .
(Name)
a guly authorized official of, 28) 2S. {eee ee op OND ieee eee ,
(Name of inspection service) é (Date)

and were found or believed by him to be healthy and free from any of the
plant diseases or pests named in the second schedule.
1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 123

Additional certificate for potatoes

Further, it is hereby certified that no case of the disease known as potato
wart, Synchytrium endobioticum (Schilb.) Pere. has occurred on the farm or
holding where the potatoes included in this consignment were grown, nor
within 500 yards (approximately 0.5 km) thereof.

SOMO es emo ies oo eh ee! eee
CIA Piller te Ste et

Description of shipment

(To be supplied by the shipper)

mene reanarcdescripelon Of PacCkalese = ee ee
Snares a ee Ee ak ee
eRaniMO ly Ol emis ena tk a So a i et
a TPP Sh pen at Se GE cere ee
Ree uOVAGOUTeSS OL\eOxpOnler. os 6 2.52) 4 eee DU Se A oe
MCE Tie Oreos Or CONSISONCCs. 2p. es ke ee ee ee
SRAM IES oO ee ee ee ee Sg ee eee
CMMI R IAB SUES DING EA ete eae eae Poy Saye ghee fe) te ey a ey
Loyd COL ORLOV YO) 1129 0 upc ae 5 els team er ig et 2d Be ee ee a Se ee a er a
LonPorranginte 1 the TrighamreeyobaiGrd +A keto 2 es 2
Pproxiiitabe dare: OF landimel elle Sibir Sete eee bbe eee esse

(Shipper’s signature)

(bd) Any imported plants which on inspection are found to be unhealthy or
attacked by any insect or pest mentioned in the second schedule, and which, in
the judgment of the inspector or other authorized person, cannot be cleaned
by disinfection or other treatment shall, with packing and package, either be
destroyed or returned to the country of exportation by the importer.

SPECIAL QUARANTINES

IMPORTATION PROHIBITED OF POTATOES AND GOOSEBERRY AND CURRANT BUSHES, EXCEPT
UNDER LICENSE AND INSPECTION CERTIFICATE

Prior to the promulgation of the order of 1922, the landing in Ireland of
potatoes or of gooseberry or currant bushes was prohibited, save in cases in
which the consignee in Ireland obtained a license from the Department au-
thorizing the landing of the consignment. This restriction applied to the im-
portation of such plants from Great Britain, as well as from other countries,
and has been continued in force under the order of 1922, so far as relates to any
part of Ireland within the jurisdiction of the Irish Free State Government.
The Department has issued a general license permitting the importation of
“new” potatoes; that is, potatoes landed before May 16 of the year in which
they were lifted. Consequently, the consignee is not required at present to
obtain a license for the importation of such potatoes, but if imported from
places outside of Great Britain and the Channel Islands these potatoes must be
accompanied by the certificate required under the order. As regards all other
potatoes, as well as gooseberry and currant bushes, not only must the con-
signments be accompanied by the prescribed certificate, but the consignee must
obtain beforehand a license from the Department in respect of each consign-
ment, authorizing its importation. Exporters, therefore, are advised not to
forward potatoes, with the exception above referred to, or gooseberry or cur-
rant bushes, to any part of Ireland within the jurisdiction of the Irish Free
State Government, without first assuring themselves that the requisite license
has been obtained by the consignee.

GRADE CERTIFICATE MUST ACCOMPANY RAW APPLES GROWN IN THE UNITED STATES
OF AMERICA

[Importation of Raw Apples Order of Aug. 23, 1930]

To prevent the introduction of the apple maggot, Rhagoletis pomonella Walsh,
the importation into the Irish Free State between July 7 and November 15
of each year, of any raw apples grown in the United States of America is hereby
prohibited unless each consignment is accompanied by a certificate signed by a
124 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

duly authorized inspector of the Federal Department of Agriculture in the form
set out in the schedule hereto.

The certificate shall be delivered to an officer of customs and excise at the
Same time as and together with the entry relating to the consignment.

In the absence of the certificate such potatoes shall be forthwith destroyed by
and at the expense of the importer unless they are reexported or are disposed
of in accordance with the terms of a license issued by an inspector.

SCHEDULE

[Certificate to accompany raw apples grown in the United States and imported into the
Irish Free State between July 7 and Nov. 15]

This is to certify that the raw apples included in the package or consignment
described below are of one of the following grades as recognized by the United
States of North America:

For barrel apples: For boxed apples:
U. S. Fancy. Extra Fancy.
U;. S.~ No; 4: Fancy.
Sienatite oo ee
Official status a eee
Datel- la 2 2 eee

Description of consignment

Number and nature of packages
Distinguishing marks
Variety Of @pples so ne ie oc fe ek eee ee
Name and address of consignee_..¢ +2. tee oe ee ee
Namie. ‘of -yvesselo2e — 50022 bebidas ee se tn ees bo ee i
Date of shipment
Port of shipment

—— a a a a a ee

a a a a a a a

IMPORTATION OF ELM TREES PROHIBITED |
[Order of Feb. 1, 1929]

To prevent the introduction of pests of elm trees, including the Dutch elm
disease, Graphium ulmi (Ceratostomella ulmi (Schwartz) Buisman) and
Micrococcus ulmi, the importation into the Irish Free State from all other
countries is prohibited.

B. E. P. Q. 409.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, FREE CITY OF DANZIG
JULY 20, 1936.

PoLIsH RESTRICTIONS APPLIED TO FRED CITY OF DANZIG

On the basis of an agreement dated August 6,.1934, between Poland and the
Free City of Danzig, the plant-quarantine restrictions of Poland, as promulgated
in the decree of the Polish Minister of Finance on customs procedure, of
October 4, 1933 (Dziennik Ustaw R. P. No. 77/552, Oct. 9, 1983), have been taken
over by and applied to Danzig. However, the special authorization to import
potatoes prescribed by article 1 of that decree is not required for the importa-
tion of potatoes into Danzig, but the other restrictions on the entry of potatoes
remain applicable. (See B. E. P. Q. 368.)

TRANSIT REQUIREMENTS

A decree of the Free City of Danzig, dated July 15, 1935, relating to the
transit of potatoes, plants, seeds, and fruits named in articles 1 and 2 of the
Polish decree of October 4, 1933 (see pp. 2 and 4 of B. E. P. Q. 368), through
the Free City of Danzig, prescribes that for such transit the certificates pro-
vided for in those articles are necessary. However, that requirement does not
apply if those products are forwarded in securely closed and sealed railroad
cars without unloading, or in securely closed and undamaged containers, and
when the products mentioned in article 2 must be unladen in the port of Danzig
into closed railroad cars.
1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 125

COLORING OF SEEDS NOT REQUIRED FOR COMMERCIAL SAMPLES

The same decree exempts commercial samples of seeds not exceeding 10
grams gross weight from the requirements of coloring and certification of
purity prescribed by articles 5 and 7 of the Polish decree of October 4, 1933.
(See pp. 7 and 8 of B. HE. P. Q. 368.) The same exemption is extended to
shipments and seeds that are imported through scientific institutes and re-
search stations for scientific investigations. These samples and shipments may
be imported without restriction. The model certificates are set forth in Sup-
plement No. 1 to B. E. P. Q. 368.

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

B. E. P. Q. 410 (superseding P. Q. C. A. 295).
FEDERAL DOMESTIC PLANT QUARANTINES

JULY 29, 1936.

The cooperation of the public is requested in assisting the United States
Department of Agriculture in its efforts to prevent the spread of certain
especially injurious insect pests and plant diseases which have been made the
subject of Federal domestic plant quarantines. These quarantines are promul-
gated to prevent dissemination within the United States of dangerous plant
pests new to or not widely distributed within this country. To accomplish
these purposes it is necessary to regulate the movement of plants and certain
other articles likely to carry the pests.

Many persons unaware of quarantine regulations unwittingly offer oppor-
tunity for establishing new centers of infestation by shipping prohibited or
uninspected materials. Shippers unfamiliar with Federal quarantines should
write for information to the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine,
United States Department of Agriculture, Washington, D. C., stating the
kinds of plants and associated articles to be transported, and the points of
origin and destination.

QUARANTINES AGAINST DOMESTIC PESTS

There are now in force 10 domestic quarantines controlling the interstate
movement within the continental United States of plants and plant products,
and of certain other materials likely to carry insects or plant diseases.

These quarantines are intended to protect our agricultural crops and forests
from pests of major importance. Some of them aid in the effort to eradicate
the insects and plant diseases, while others are designed to prevent the artifi-
cial spread of pests which now occur only in limited areas.

In order to minimize interference with normal commerce, however, the regu-
lations of most of the quarantines provide that in lieu of complete prohibition
of the restricted articles, movement may be permitted under inspection or
sterilization or such other treatment as may be required to insure freedom
from infestation.

Insects and plant diseases which are the subject of existing Federal domestic
plant quarantines are the black stem rust, the white pine blister rust, the
woodgate rust, the gypsy moth and brown-tail moth, the satin moth, the Japa-
nese beetle, the Thurberia weevil, the Mexican fruit fly, the pink bollworm,
and the Dutch elm disease.

Eradication or control measures against these pests are undertaken by the
Federal Government in cooperation with and under the direct authority of the
States concerned. Such efforts have been successful in the eradication of the
pink bollworm of cotton in an extensive area involving a number of counties
in the Trinity Bay region of Texas, in several parishes in southwestern Louisi-
ana, aS well as a number of isolated local outbreaks in other parts of the same
States, and in a limited area in south central Georgia; in stamping out gypsy
moth infestations in Cleveland, Ohio, in western New York, and in northern
New Jersey; and in the eradication of the Mediterranean fruit fly from Florida;
and the date palm scale from Arizona, California, and Texas.
126 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

STATE NURSERY INSPECTION REQUIREMENTS

The regulations of practically all States require that trees, shrubs, and other
woody plants must be inspected and certified as free from injurious pests before
being shipped or otherwise transported. Several States require such a certifi-
cate for herbaceous plants and bulbs as well. A postal regulation requires that
a State nursery inspection certificate shall accompany woody plants offered for
mailing. Prospective shippers should, therefore, also make inquiry of the in-
spection service of their own State as to any requirements which may be in
effect before making shipments.

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

B. E. P. Q. 411 (superseding P. Q. C. A. 284).
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF MEXICO

AvucustT 24, 1936.

This summary of the plant-quarantine import restrictions of the Republic of
Mexico has been prepared for the information of nurserymen, plant-quarantine
officials, and others interested in the exportation of plants and plant products
to that country.

It was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant-quarantine inspector in charge of
Foreign Information Service, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines, from his
translations of the Federal pest law of November 29, 1924, the Phytosanitary
Regulations of June 80, 1927 (Reglamento de Policia Sanitaria Agricola), and
the various decrees and resolutions promulgated under the Federal pest law.

The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct and com-
plete up to the time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used independ-
ently of, nor as a substitute for, the original texts, and it is not to be inter-
preted as legally authoritative.

Avery 8. Hoyt,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF MEXICO
Basic LEGISLATION

The Constitution, section I of article 69, and paragraph III of article 27.
The Federal pest law of November 29, 1924 (Diario Oficial XXVIII, Dec. 10,
1924).
SUMMARY

IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

Potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.): Importation prohibited from Maryland,
West Virginia, and Pennsylvania on account of the existence of potato wart
(Synchytrium endobioticum (Schilb.) Pere.) in those States (Exterior Quaran-
tine No. 4, decree of June 26, 1927, see p. 15).

Fresh fruits and vegetables, except root crops such as onions, carrots, turnips,
beets, etc., when free from soil: Importation prohibited from Africa (the entire
continent and the islands thereof), Argentina, Australia, Azores, Bermuda,
Brazil, Canary Islands, Cyprus, France, Greece, Hawaii, Hungary, Italy, Malta,
New Zealand, Palestine, Portugal, Spain, Syria, and Tasmania, to prevent the
introduction of the Mediterranean fruit fly (Ceratitis capitata Wied.) (Hxte-
rior Quarantine No. 5, decree of July 17, 1927, as revised Jan. 27, 1936, effective
Aug. 18, 1936).

Rice (Oryza sativa L.): Importation of seed or paddy rice prohibited from
all countries except the United States to prevent the introduction of leaf smut
(Entyloma oryzae Syd.), blight (Oospora oryzetorum Sacc.), take-all or foot-
rot (Ophiobolus cariceti (B. and Br.) Sace.) (O. graminis Sace.), glume blight
(Phoma glumarum Ell. and Tr.), downy mildew (Sclerospora macrocarpa Sace.),
and flag smut of wheat (Urocystis tritici Koern.) (Exterior Quarantine No.
6, decree of May 12, 1927, p. 16).
1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 127

Sugarcane (Saccharum officinalis L.) : Importation prohibited from all sources
to prevent the introduction of cane smut (Ustilago sacchari Rabh.), downy
mildew (Sclerospora sacchari Miy.), eye-spot disease (Helminthosporium sac-
chart Butler), ete., except for scientific purposes and under special permit
(Exterior Quarantine No. 9, decree of Sept. 18, 1928, p. 18).

Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), plants and parts thereof (including seeds) in
the fresh condition or as hay, proceeding from the States of Colorado, Idaho,
Nevada, Oregon, Utah, and Wyoming, to prevent the introduction of the alfalfa
weevil ((Phytonomus) Hypera postica Gyll.) (Exterior Quarantine No. 12,
resolution of July 2, 1934, p. 20).

EXPORTATION PROHIBITED

Cactus plants, fruits, and seeds: Exportation from Mexico prohibited (regu-
lations of June 28, 1930, and decision of Dec. 20, 1933, p. 22).

IMPORTATION RESTRICTED

Seeds, plants, and parts thereof, for propagation: Each shipment must be
accompanied by a phytosanitary certificate of competent authority of the coun-
try of origin, affirming freedom from injurious pests and diseases, especially
from virus diseases, and will be inspected on arrival in Mexico. Consular visa
not necessary (resolution of Oct. 17, 1934, p. 6). This does not apply to plants
or plant products governed by special quarantines.

Citrus plants and parts thereof: Importation permitted under the provisicas
of regulation 47 of the regulations of July 5, 1927 (p. 9), as a precaution against
the introduction of citrus canker (Bacterium citri Hasse), citrus root worms
(Tylenchus semipenectrans Cobb.), the citrus black fly (Aleurocanthus woglum
Ashby), etc. (Exterior Quarantine No. 1 of Dec. 2, 1922, p. 12).

Coffee plants (Coffea spp.), and their various parts (roots, stems, flowers,
fruits, and even the commercial coffee beans in the natural state) : Importation
permitted only under the provisions of regulation 47 of the regulations of July
5, 1927, as a precaution against the introduction of the coffee berry borer
(Stephanoderes coffeae Hag.) (Exterior Quarantine No. 2, decree of Nov. 26,
1926, p. 18).

Cotton, seed cotton, cottonseed, cottonseed hulls: Importation subject to com-
pliance with the provisions of regulation 47 of the regulations of July 5, 1927,
and to the special conditions set forth in Exterior Quarantine No. 3, decree of
February 4, 1926, as amended (see pp. 13 et seq.), to prevent the introduction of
the pink bollworm (Pectinophora gossypiella Saund.) and other injurious pests.

Potatoes (Solanum tubcroswm L.): Importation subject to compliance with
the provisions of regulation 47 of the regulations of July 5, 1927. See also spe-
cial provisions applying to the importation of potatoes grown in and exported
from the United States (pp. 9 and 15). Precaution against the introduction of
potato wart (Synchytrium endobioticum (Schilb.) Pere.), and the potato tuber
worm (Gnorimoschema operculella Zell.) (Exterior Quarantine No. 4, decree of
June 26, 1927).

Seed or paddy rice from the United States: Importation subject to compliance
with the provisions of regulation 47 of the regulations of July 5, 1927, to prevent
the introduction of leaf smut (Hntyloma oryzae Syd.), blight (Oospora oryze-
torum Sace.), take-all or foot-rot disease (Ophiobolus cariceti (B. and Br.)
Sace.) (O. graminis Sace.), glume blight (Phoma glumarum Ell. and Tr.) , downy
mildew (Sclerospora macrocarpa Sace.), and flag smut of wheat (Urocystis
tritici Koern.) (Exterior Quarantine No. 6, decree of May 12, 1927, p. 16).

Wheat for seed purposes: Importation subject to an import permit and toa
certificate issued by competent authority of the country of origin, visaed by the
Mexican Consul, affirming that in the locality where grown the wheat was not
infected by flag smut (Urocystis tritici Koern.), or take-all (Ophiobolus cariceti
(B. and Br.) Sace.) (Exterior Quarantine No. 8, decree of July 23, 1931, and
resolution of July 30, 1931, pp. 17 and 18).

Peach, nectarine, almond, and apricot plants and parts thereof, from the
United States: Importation subject to the provisions of regulation 47 of the
regulations of July 5, 1927. A precaution against the introduction of so-called
virus diseases: Phony peach, peach yellows, peach rosette, and little peach
(Exterior Quarantine No. 10, decree effective Aug, 14, 1929, p. 19).

Corn, broomcorn, sorghum, sudan grass, straw, etc.: Application to be made
In advance for an import permit, which, if issued, will indicate the conditions
~

128 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

under which importation will be permitted. Precaution against the introduction
of the European corn borer (Pyrausta nubilialis Hbn.) (Exterior Quarantine No.
11 as modified by decree of June 27, 1931, p. 19).

Alfalfa (J/edicago sativa L.), plants and parts thereof (including seeds) in
the fresh condition or as hay, proceeding from the State of California: Importer
must obtain a special permit in advance and the shipment must be accompanied
by a certificate affirming that the alfalfa weevil ((Phytonomus) Hypera postica
Gyll.) does not exist there (Exterior Quarantine No. 12, resolution of July 2,
1934, p. 20).

Seeds, plants, and parts of plants, including bulbs, rhizomes, stolons, layers,
cuttings, etc., for propagation, not otherwise restricted or prohibited: Each ship-
ment must be accompanied by a certificate issued by competent authority of the
country of origin affirming freedom from injurious pests and diseases, and
especially from virus diseases (resolution of Oct. 17, 1934, pp. 6-8).

IMPORTATION UNRESTRICTED

Fresh fruits and vegetables from the United States of America: Except as
restricted or prohibited by special quarantines, their importation into Mexico is
unrestricted.

Dried or processed fruits and vegetables, cereals for food or manufacturing
purposes, nuts: Importation unrestricted.

THE FEDERAL PEsT LAW
[Noy. 29, 1924; Diario Oficial XXVIII, Dec. 10, 1924]
GENERAL PROVISIONS

Chapter II, article 3. It is declared of public utility to prevent, combat, and
exterminate pests and diseases that affect or may affect agriculture, as well as
to prevent the introduction of the said pests into the country. Consequently,
the Executive of the Republic, through the Secretaria de Agricultura y Fomento,
will apply the provisions of this law and its regulations in the whole of the
national territory.

REGULATIONS OF THE AGRICULTURAL PHYTOSANITARY SERVICE
[July 5, 1927 ; Diario Oficial XLIII: 14, July 16, 1927]

Chapter I, articles 1 to 16. Organization of the Plant Protection Service
(Servicio de Defensa Agricola).

Chapter II, articles 17 to 30. Interior quarantines and zones of control.

Chapter III, articles 31 to 37. On internal commerce in agricultural plants
and plant products.

Chapter IV, articles 88 to 42. On the importation of agricultural plants and
plant products.

GENERAL REGULATIONS ON THE IMPORTATION OF PLANTS NOT SUBJECT TO SPECIAL
QUARANTINES

ArT. 38. Plants, parts, or products thereof not subject to special quarantines
may be imported only through the ports and frontier cities autltorized by the
Department of Agriculture.

ART. 39. Inspectors of the Office of Agricultural Protection will be advised of
the arrival of any plants, parts, or products thereof (seeds, bulbs, tubers, rcots,
cuttings, stems, etc.), from a foreign country, in order that they may be
inspected.

ArT. 40. If inspection establishes that the merchandise constitutes a danger
of introducing a plant disease or pest into Mexico, the shipment shall be reladen
and exported within 30 days, or it will be destroyed without indemnity.

In case of doubt, the matter shall be referred to the Federal office for decision.

Art. 41. If the results of inspection are favorable, the inspector will authorize
entry and will issue a phytosanitary certificate after the charges fixed by the
respective tariff have been paid.

Art. 42. The obligations imposed by the preceding articles shall fall upon the
consignee.
1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 129

CERTIFICATION REQUIRED OF AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS INTENDED FOR PROPAGATION

The resolution of October 17, 1934, supplements the provisions of articles 38
to 42, inclusive, with respect to seeds, plants, and parts thereof, intended for
propagation, the importation of which is not restricted or prohibited by special
quarantines, as follows:

PHYTOSANITARY CERTIFICATE REQUIRED

ARTICLE 1. The importation into the Republic of Mexico is permitted of all
kinds of agricultural seeds and products intended for sowing and propagation,
only when accompanied by a phytosanitary certificate indicating origin, issued
by the competent authority of the official service of the country of origin, except
in cases where partial or absolute quarantines are in effect against the imported
product.

ArT. 2. The certificate shall affirm that the seeds, bulbs, rhizomes, stolons,
layers, cuttings, etc., from field, garden, nursery, ete., which is under the super-
vision of the phytosanitary, service of the country of origin, do not bear injuri-
ous diseases or pests, especially virus diseases, and that the shipment was
subjected to a phytopathological and entomological inspection by an inspector
of the phytosanitary service of the exporting country.

ART. 3. In accordance with the regulations on matters of agricultural health,
issued by the President of the Republic, March 22, 1928, Mexican consuls in
foreign countries will inform the Department of Agriculture, through the De-
partment of Foreign Relations, which agricultural areas of the respective
countries are under the supervision of the phytosanitary service of the same.

AUTHORIZED PORTS OF ENTRY

Art. 4. The unlading and introduction of the products referred to in this
resolution will be permitted only through the following ports and custom-
houses:

Northern frontier—Tiajuana and Mexicali, Baja California; Nogales,
Sonora; Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua; Piedras Negras, Coahuila; Nuevo Laredo
and Matamoros, Tamaulipas.

Gulf ports—Tampico, Tamaulipas; Veracruz, Veracruz; Progreso, Yucatan;
Payo Obispo, Campeche.

Pacific ports—Ensenada, La Paz and Santa Rosalia, Baja California;
Guaymas, Sonora; Mazatlan, Sinaloa; Manzanillo, Colima; Acapulco, Guerrero ;
Salina Cruz, Oaxaca.

Southern frontier—Suchiate, Chiapas.

INSPECTION ON ARRIVAL

ArT. 5. The phytosanitary inspector will inspect every shipment of seeds,
bulbs, ete., in the port or customhouse of entry and will issue a correspond-
ing certificate in accordance with articles 38 to 42 of the Reglamento de Policia
Agricola, provided that the phytosanitary certificate accompanies the shipment,
that it is valid, and that the result of the inspection is satisfactory.

CONSULAR VISA NOT REQUIRED

ArT. 6. Since the present resolution does not correspond to a partial or
absolute quarantine, in. the concept of the Reglamento de Policia Sanitaria,
chapter V, the legalization of phytosanitary certificates by the Mexican consul
in the country of origin is not necessary.

FUMIGATION IF DEEMED NECESSARY

ArT. 7. When shipments are not accompanied by the corresponding phyto-
sanitary certificates, the Direccion de Fomento Agricola will decide, after the
merchandise has been examined by an inspector, whether it shall be subjected
to fumigation at atmospheric pressure in the port or customhouse of entry,
using 100 grams carbon disulphide per cubic meter for 24 hours, or 8 grams
hydrocyanie acid gas per cubic meter with a vacuum of 400 mm at sea level
with an exposure of 1 hour, or disinfection with hot water, with compounds
aie Te or with formalin, or whether the entry of the product should be
refused.
130 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

Art. 8. The cost of fumigation or disinfection, and of labor incidental to
inspection made at the port or customhouse of entry, with the exception of
the inspector’s services, will be borne by the consignee of the merchandise.

This resolution becomes effective 2 months after date of publication in the
Diario Oficial (published Nov. 10, 1934).

Norge.—Since the expression, “all kinds of agricultural seeds and products
intended for propagation”, appeared rather indefinite, an interpretation was
requested. The Director de Fomento Agricola of the Mexican Secretaria de
Agricultura y Fomento offers the following explanation: “The regulation covers
every kind of plant product intended for propagation and applies also to living
plants, including trees and shrubs, or so-called nursery stock.”

The required certification emphasizes freedom from virus diseases. Since
infection with virus diseases can be detected by field inspections only, the
required certificate can be issued only by authorized State inspection services
and not by this Bureau. The Director adds that shipments of plant material
intended for propagation, from nurseries that are State-inspected and which
are officially recognized by the respective States, are acceptable without in-
dividual certificates. In other words, a seasonal State nursery inspection cer-
tificate is acceptable. In the absence of such certificates, the shipper must
obtain a certificate based on an inspection of the plants intended for exporta-
tion to Mexico and on inspections of those plants in the nursery during the
growing season for virus diseases.

Chapter V, articles 43 to 55. On exterior quarantines.

GENERAL REGULATIONS ON EXTERIOR QUARANTINES

ArT. 43. Exterior quarantines will be imposed against plants, parts, or prod-
ucts thereof, of foreign origin, which may be attacked by injurious plant
diseases and pests.

These quarantines will be absolute or partial, according as they wholly pro-
hibit importation, or, should disinfection be deemed sufficient, entry may be
authorized under certain restrictions.

Arts. 44 and 45. Quarantines will be established by executive declaration and
the country concerned will be notified.

ABSOLUTE EXTERIOR QUARANTINES

Art. 46. An absolute quarantine having been declared, specimens may be im-
ported only for study and scientific work, under a special permit.

PARTIAL EXTERIOR QUARANTINES

Art. 47. A partial quarantine subjects importations to the following require-
ments:

(1) The intending Mexican importer must procure a permit in advance of
shipment from the Office of Agricultural Protection (Oficina para la Defensa
Agricola).

(2) The shipment shall be accompanied by a duly legalized certificate, issued
by phytosanitary authorities of the country of origin, indicating the importer’s
permit number; date of inspection; name and address of exporter, locality, dis-
trict, and country of origin; name and address of consignee; declaration that
the article is from a district not infested with the disease or pest which occa-
sioned the quarantine, or any other pest or disease, and certification that the
product was shipped in containers that had not previously been used for the
same product; bulk shipments are excepted from the last provision.

(3) The shipment must also be accompanied by a consular certificate sei ans
ing that quarantines are in force in the country of origin against the entry of
products from countries infected by any pest or disease which affects said
products.

(4) Notice of the arrival of the shipment shall be given to the Department of
ner iculture on the forms provided for that purpose.

(5) Entry will be allowed only at the places indicated in the importer’s per-
mit, and provided that the captain of the vessel, when it is a maritime importa-
tion, shall certify that the consignment has not been transshipped or in case
transshipment has been necessary at any place or port under quarantine, that
it has been effected without landing the goods.

(6) Except with bulk shipments, the merchandise shall be packed only in
containers that have not previously been used for other agricultural products.

ee
1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 131

(7) The consignment shall be inspected at the port of entry by an inspector
of the Office of Agricultural Protection. If found free from pests or diseases, it
may be introduced into the country; if, on the contrary, it is found to be
infested, its entry will not be authorized, unless disinfection be deemed a sufii-
cient safeguard, in which case the shipment will be subjected to such treatment:

Art. 48. Applications for import permits may be made by telegraph and shall
indicate the name and address of the exporter; the country and locality of
origin of the shipment; the port of embarkation or port where the consular
invoice was issued and the port through which it is intended to import the
shipment; its quantity and the name and address of the consignee.

Art. 49. An application for permit being duly approved, the permit will be
issued in quadruplicate, one copy being delivered to the applicant for presenta-
tion on requesting entry at the respective customhouse; another will be sent to
the latter, the third will be for the inspector, and the fourth will be transmitted
to the shipper.

The period of validity will be indicated in each permit.

Art. 50. Permits granted will be canceled when any of the following circum-
stances are determined:

(a) When the certificate does not correctly indicate the locality in which the
merchandise was produced.

(b) When the freedom of the shipment with respect to the diseases or pests
referred to is not as certified.

Furthermore, in this case, new permits will not be issued for the importation
of the same product from the country concerned.

(c) When the containers or wrappers have previously been used for agri-
cultural products.

(d@) When the permittee does not comply with the objections imposed by these
regulations or furnishes false data.

ArT. 51. All expenses for storage, transportation, fumigation, or disinfection
and labor incidental to inspection at the port of destination, except the services
of the inspector, will be borne by the consignee.

ARTS. 52, 53, 54. Administrative details.

ArT. 55. Mexican consuls abroad, commercial and agricultural attachés, and
fiscal agents are required to inform the Secretaria de Agricultura of agricul-
tural pests or diseases which may appear in countries in which they are
stationed.

Chapter VI, articles 56 to 59. On the exportation of agricultural plants and
plant products.

Chapter VII, articles 60 to 73. General provisions. ;

ArT. 60. The provisions of the laws and of the present regulations will be
upplicable—

(a) To all plants, parts thereof or their products, which are attacked by
diseases, insects, or other parasites known to be injurious to agriculture in what-
ever biological stage.

(ob) To live insects, harmful to plants, in whatever biological stage.

(c) To cultures of bacteria, fungi, and other agents injurious to plants.

(d) To all articles and things that may serve as vehicles of pests or diseases
dangerous to agriculture.

ArT. 61. The designation of pests or diseases, aS well as the determination of
the various articles indicated in the previous regulation, may be effected by
special Executive decree, also determining at the same time the procedure to be
adopted for prevention and control, in which case the respective declaration
will be subject to conditions prescribed in each instance by these regulations.

ArT. 62. Plants and plant products intended for food, industrial, or medicinal
purposes or for ornamentation are subject to the restrictions established by the
Secretaria de Agricultura only when it is established or believed that they are
vehicles of pests or diseases harmful to agriculture.

ARTS. 63 to 73. Miscellaneous provisions.

Chapter VIII, articles 74 to 85. Penalties.

AUTHORIZED MEXICAN PORTS OF ENTRY

On the northern frontier: Mexicali, Baja California; Nogales, Sonora;
Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua; Piedras Negras, Coahuila; Nuevo Laredo and Mata-
moros, Tamaulipas. On the Gulf coast: Tampico, Tamaulipas; Veracruz and
Puerto Mexico, Veracruz; Frontera, Tabasco; Progreso, Yucatan. On the Pacific
coast: Guaymas and Yavaros, Sonora; Topolobampo and Mazailan, Sinaloa ;
132 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July—Sept.

Manzanillo, Colima; Acapulco, Guerrero; Salina Cruz, Oaxaca; Tapachula,
Chiapas. Other ports of entry may be authorized on special request and on
payment of the cost of employing an inspector.

SPECIAL QUARANTINES

EXTERIOR QUARANTINE NO. 1—CITRUS TREES
[Decree of Dec. 2, 1922]

This is a partial quarantine on account of citrus canker (Bacterium citri
Hasse) ; citrus root worms (T7ylenchus semipenetrans Cobb): the citrus black-
fly (Aleurocanthus woglumi Ashby); and other pests and diseases new to or
not widely distributed in Mexico.

In order to import into Mexico citrus trees or parts thereof (shoots, sprouts,
roots, buds, ete.), the general provisions applying to partial quarantines must
be complied with.

This quarantine does not affect citrus fruits.

EXTERIOR QUARANTINE NO. 2—COFFEE
[Decree of Nov. 26, 1926]

A partial quarantine on account of the coffee berry borer, Stephanoderes
coffeae Hag. (S. hampei Fen.).

In order to import into Mexico coffee plants and their various parts (roots,
stems, flowers, fruits, and even the commercial coffee beans in their natural
state) the general provisions applying to partial quarantines must be complied
with.

EXTERIOR QUARANTINE NO. 3—COTTON
[Decree of Feb. 4, 1926, as amended Apr. 23 and Aug. 28, 1928, and Nov. 12, 1929]

A partial quarantine on account of the pink bollworm of cotton (Pectinophora
gossypiella Saund.) and other dangerous pests.

In order to import into Mexico cottonseed, seed cotton, and cottonseed hulls,
the general provisions applying to partial quarantines must be complied with,
as well as the following special provisions:

Shipments of these products must be subjected to vacuum fumigation on
arrival at the Mexican port of entry if suitable fumigation plants are located
there.

When the products referred to in this quarantine are from the counties of
Cochise, Graham, Greenlee, Maricopa, Pima, Pinal, and Santa Cruz, State of
Arizona; Chaves, Dona Ana, Eddy, Grant, Hidalgo, Luna, and Otero, State of
New Mexico; Andrews, Borden, Brewster, Crane, Culberson, Dawson, Ector,
El Paso, Glasscock, Howard, Hudspeth, Jeff Davis, Loring, Martin, Midland,
Pecos, Presidio, Reeves, Terrell, Upton, Ward, and Winkler, State of Texas,
their importation into Mexico will be permitted only after a special permit has
been granted by the Office of Agricultural Defense, subject to vacuum fumiga-
tion with hydrocyanie acid gas at a dosage of 60 grams per cubic meter, pro-
vided that the said products are intended solely for manufacturing purposes
in factories located in districts where the existence of the pink bollworm
(Pectinophora gossypiella) has been demonstrated.

The same general provisions apply to shipments of carded cotton, cotton
waste, and raw cotton with and without seeds, except that Puerto Mexizo,
Veracruz, is added as a port of entry. Fumigation of these products is
permitted at the point of shipment, with corresponding certification by
competent authority. A certificate declaring that these products do not proceed
from districts infested with the pink-bollworm of cotton must also accompany
the shipment.

Bales and packages of cotton shall bear numbered tags on arrival at the
port of entry. All immigrants from the States of Arizona, New Mexico, and
Texas, who enter Mexico through the northern border of that country, are
prohibited from bringing with them cotton or cotton products which may
serve to carry the pink bollworm (Pectinophora gossypiella).

All railroad ears from the United States which it is attempted to enter into
Mexico shall be inspected before entering Mexican territory by inspectors
1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 13a

appointed by the Office of Plant Protection, who, after inspection, shal admit
ears found free from evidence of having been used for the transportation of
cotton, or its raw, unmanufactured products, and they shall require the
cleaning or fumigation of contaminated cars.

Nore.—The following letter, dated Mexico City, October 21, 1926, has been
received from the Office of the Director General of Agriculture and Livestock:

“In answer to your letter of the 15th instant, you are informed that you
have correctly interpreted the decision of this office relative to the requisites
that should be complied with, at the present time, to allow the importation
into this country of seeds from abroad, which requisites consist in subjecting
to fumigation the seeds of cotton and coffee; seeds of other kinds being sub-
jected only to inspection; it being understood that the introduction of seeds
infected with disease is prohibited.

“The importation of cottonseed or coffee should be supported by a certificate
issued by a competent and authorized person, without it being absolutely neces-
sary that the fumigation take place precisely at the port or customhouse of
entry, since it will be sufficient that in the document mentioned it appear that
the fumigation took place immediately before or after the last loading.”

EXTERIOR QUARANTINE NO. 4—POTATOES
[Decree of June 26, 1927]

A partial quarantine against potatoes on account of the potato wart disease
(Synchytrium endobioticum (Schilb.) Pere.) and other injurious pests or dis-
eases not known to occur in Mexico.

The importation of potatoes is subject to the general provisions applying to
partial quarantines and to the following:

Special provisions applying to the importation of potatoes from the United
States

The importation of potatoes from Maryland, West Virginia, and Pennsylvania
is absolutely prohibited, because of the occurrence of potato wart in those
States.

Potatoes from California, Colorado, Tennessee, Virginia, North Carolina,
South Carolina, Texas, and Florida may be imported into Mexico if previously
fumigated or disinfected. This requirement is imposed on account of the
potato tuber worm ((Phthorimaea) Gnorimoschema operculella Zell.), which
occurs in those States.

This quarantine does not affect potatoes from any other State.

EXTERIOR QUARANTINE NO. 5—FRUITS AND VEGETABLES
[Decree of July 17, 1927, as revised by that of Jan. 27, 1936, effective Aug. 18, 1936]

ARTICLE 1. In accordance with the provisions of article 48 of the Regulations
of the Agricultural Sanitary Police (Phytosanitary Service) an absolute quar-
antine is established against all kinds of fruits with a soft pericarp, and fresh
produce (truck crops) proceeding from Africa (the whole continent and islands
thereof), Argentina, Australia, Azores, Bermuda, Brazil, Canary Islands, Cyprus,
France, Greece, Hawaii, Hungary, Italy, Malta, New Zealand, Palestine, Portu-
gal, Spain, Syria, and Tasmania.

Subterranean products excepted

Art. 2. The following are not affected by the provisions of article 1 if they
arrive free from soil: Fresh produce of subterranean growth, such as onions,
carrots, turnips, beets, ete.

Products admitted for scientific purposes

ArtT.3. The entry into Mexico of the fruits and vegetables indicated in
article 1 may be authorized only under a special permit, for study or scientific
work, and on observing the precautions required by the respective office.

The foregoing applies also to mail shipments of the products concerned.
134 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

EXTERIOR QUARANTINE NO 6—RICE
[Decree of May 12, 1927]

This is an absolute quarantine in its application to all countries except the
United States.

As applied to the United States, it is a partial quarantine, restricting the
importation of seed or paddy rice from that country into Mexico, to prevent the
introduction of leaf smut (Hntyloma oryzae Syd.), blight (Oospora oryzetorum
Sace.), take-all or foot-rot disease (Ophiobolus cariceti (B. and Br.) Sace. (0.
graminis Sace.), glume blight (Phoma glumarum Ell. and Tr.), downy mildew
(Sclerospora macrocarp@ Sace.), and flag smut of wheat (Urocystis tritici
Koern.).

The general provisions governing partial quarantines are applicable to ship-
ments from the United States.

This quarantine does not affect husked or polished rice imported for food or
industrial purposes.

EXTERIOR QUARANTINE NO. 7—BANANA PLANTS
[Decrees of Nov. 17, 1927, and May 30, 1928]

An absolute quarantine on account of the banana root borer (Cosmopolites
sordidus Germ.) and the Panama or wilt disease (Fusariwm cubense HE. F. Sm.),
prohibiting the importation into Mexico of banana plants and parts thereof
from foreign countries.

Banana fruits may be imported through the ports of Mexicali, Naco, and
Agua Prieta when intended for food in the northern district of Baja California
and the towns through which the railroads pass between Naco and Canea, and
between Agua Prieta and Nacozari in the State of Sonora.

REVOCATION OF EXTERIOR QUARANTINE NO. 8—LIST OF COUNTRIES AFFECTED BY FLAG-
SMUT AND TAKE-ALL DISEASES OF WHEAT.

The Presidential decree of July 23, 1951, published and effective July 29,
1931, revokes that of March 4, 1931, which established Absolute Exterior Quar-
antine No. 8. The text follows:

ARTICLE 1. The Absolute Quarantine of March 4, 1931, which was promulgated
against the agricultural diseases caused by the fungi “Urocystis tritici Koern.”
and “Ophiobolus cariceti (B. and Br.) Sace. (O. graminis Sacc.)”, which attack
species and varieties of foreign wheat, is revoked.

ArT. 2. The Department of Agriculture and Public Works (Secretaria de
Agricultura y Fomento) is authorized to dictate special provisions which may
protect the national agriculture against invasion by the said agricultural
diseases, indicating for that purpose, in lists that will be published in the
Official Journal of the Federation, the countries or localities which, as being
affected, should be subjected to special provisions.

In the absence of any statement of the special provisions above referred to,
inquiry through the Office of Agricultural Protection of the above-named Depart-
ment elicits the information that—

“To permit the introduction into our country (Mexico) of the seed (wheat)
proceeding from the places named in the resolution cited (July 30, 1931) a per-
mit from this Department is required, and also a certificate signed by the
sanitary authorities of the country of origin, visaed by our consul, which shall
accompany the merchandise. The certificate shall affirm that in the locality
where it was grown the wheat was not infected by the diseases referred to.”

Arr. 3. After the publication of the lists referred to in the preceding article,
the Department of Agriculture and Public Works will issue regulations pre-
scribing the requirements which every importation from quarantined localities
shall) meet, for which purpose interested persons shall apply to the above-
mentioned Department in advance for a permit for the importation and move-
ment of these products.

The resolution of July 30, 1931, published and effective August 3, 1931, sup-
plements the above cited decree of July 23, 1931. The text follows:

“Complying with the provisions of article 2 of the Presidential decree of July
23, 1931, published in the ‘Diario Oficial’ of the Federation, of July 29, of the
same year, this Department declares, supported by reports in its possession, that
1936] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 135

in the countries indicated below there exists the diseases known as ‘flag-smut
and take-all’, caused, respectively, by the fungi Urocystis tritici Koern. and
Ophiobolus cariceti (B. and Br.) Sace. (O. graminis Sacc.) and that therefore,
and in compliance with the provisions of article 3 of the same decree, interested
persons, in moving wheat originating in the said countries, shall previously
apply for and obtain a permit from the Department.

“The countries in which Urocystis tritici exists are China, India, Italy,
Japan, Spain, the Union of South Africa, and the United States of America
(States of Illinois, Missouri, and Kansas).

“The countries in which Ophiobolus (graminis) cariceti exists are Argentina,
Australia, Austria, Canada, Czechoslovakia, Denmark, England, France, Ger-
many, Hungary, India, Italy, Japan, Poland, Portugal, Sweden, Union of Sotth
Africa, and the United States of America (States of Arkansas, California,
Indiana, Kansas, New York, North Carolina, Oregon, Tennessee, and Wash-
ington).”

EXTERIOR QUARANTINE NO. 9—SUGARCANE
[Decree of Sept. 13, 1928]

An absolute quarantine on account of cane smut (Ustilago sacchari Rabh.),
downy mildew (Sclerospora sacchari Miy.), eye-spot disease (Helminthosporium
sacchari Butler), etc., prohibiting the importation into Mexico of shoots
(suckers, tillers) of sugarcane, except for scientific purposes and under
special permit.

EXTERIOR QUARANTINE NO. 10—PEACH, NECTARINE, ALMOND, AND APRICOT
[Effective Aug. 14, 1929]

A partial quarantine against plants, and parts thereof, of peach, nectarine,
almond, and apricot from the United States, on account of Phony Peach, Peach
Yellows, Peach Rosette, and Little Peach diseases.

In order to import into Mexico the plant material above mentioned the
general provisions applying to partial quarantines must be complied with.

Landing and entry will be permitted only through the following ports: Ciudad
Juarez, Chihuahua; Nuevo Laredo, Tamaulipas; and Veracruz.

REVOCATION OF EXTERIOR QUARANTINE NO. 11

The Mexican decree of June 27, 1931, as published in the Diario Oficial of
July 3, 1931, revokes Absolute Exterior Quarantine No. 11, which prohibited the
importation into Mexico of corn, broomcorn, sorghum, sudan grass, straw, etc.
The text of that decree, in translation, is as follows:

ARTICLE 1. Absolute Quarantine No. 11 of March 25, of the current year,
promulgated against invasion by the European borer of corn and the other
agricultural products indicated in the said quarantine, is revoked.

LIST OF PRODUCTS NAMED IN EXTERIOR QUARANTINE NO. 11

(a) Grain corn, corn in the ear, green corn in the ear, and all parts of the
plant (stems, leaves, etc.).

(6) Broomcorn, including all parts of the plant.

(c) All varieties of sorghum, including all parts of the plant.

(d) Sudan grass, including all parts of the plant.

(e) Celery and rhubarb, dry or fresh, and beets with leaves.

(f) Cut flowers or entire plants of chrysanthemum, aster, cosmos, zinnia,
mallow, hortensia, and cut flowers or entire plants, except the bulbs without
stems, of gladiolus and dahlia.

(9g) Straw of all kinds of cereals and grains, as such, or when used as
packing.

Art. 2. The Department of Agriculture and Public Works Departamento de
Agricultura y Fomento is authorized to dictate special provisions to protect
the national agriculture against invasion by the pest in question, indicating for
that purpose, in lists that will be published in the official journal of the federa-
tion, the countries, or localities which, as being affected, will be subject to
special provisions.
136 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July—Sept.

Art. 3. After publication of the lists referred to in the preceding articles,
the Department of Agriculture and Public Works will formulate regulations on
the requirements to be met with every importation from quarantined localities,
for which purpose interested persons shall apply in advance to the said De-
partment for a permit for the movement of those products.

LIST OF QUARATINED COUNTRIES AND LOCALITIES

The resolution of the same date declares the following-named countries and
localities to be infested with the European corn borer (Pyrausta nubilalis Hbn.) :

North America.—Canada (Provinces of Ontario and Quebec) ; and the United
States (Connecticut, Indiana, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, New Hamp-
shire, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, and
West Virginia).

Hurope.—tThe entire continent.

Asia.—Siberia from the Ural to the Amur; Asia Minor and India.

Africa.—The northwest (Algeria, Morocco, Tunisia).

EXTERIOR QUARANTINE NO. 12—ALFALFA
[Resolution of July 2, 1934]

ARTICLE 1. In accordance with article 43 of the Regulations of Agricultural
Sanitary Police (Policia Sanitaria Agricola), an absolute quarantine is estab-
lished against plants of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) and their various parts
(roots, stems, leaves, flowers, and seeds), in the fresh condition or as hay,
which proceed from the following States of the American Union: Colorado,
Idaho, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, and Wyoming, and a partial quarantine for the
counties of California infested by the alfalfa weevil ((Phytonomus) Hypera
postica Gyll.).

Art. 2. The following conditions are established for the importation into
Mexico of the articles mentioned from the State of California, United States
of America:

(a) Importers must apply for and obtain, before shipment, a special permit
from the Direccion de Fomento Agricola.

(b) Application for permit may be made by telegraph and shall indicate the
name and address of the exporter; locality where the alfalfa was grown; port
of shipment and port of entry into Mexican territory; destination and name of
importer; quantity of the product; date of application and signature of
applicant.

(c) Each permit issued will be numbered, and the period of its validity will
be indicated therein.

(d) The product shall be accompanied by a phytosanitary certificate, duly
legalized, issued by the respective authorities of the State of California, United
States of America, and visaed by one of our consuls with jurisdiction in the
place of origin of the product, declaring that the pest in question does not exist
there.

(e) Unloading or introduction will be permitted only at the following frontier
ports or customs offices:

On the northern frontier.—Mexicali and Tiajuana, Baja California; Nogales,
Sonora; Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua; Piedras Negras, Coahuila; Nuevo Laredo
and Matamoros, Tamaulipas.

On the Pacific coast—Santa Rosalia, Ensenada, and La Paz, Baja California ;
Guaymas and Yvaros, Sonora; Topolobampo and Mazatlan, Sinaloa; Manza-
nillo, Colima; Acapulco, Guerrero; Salina Cruz, Oaxaca.

Art. 3. Contravention of the provisions of the present quarantine will be
deemed illegal transit, in accordance with article 74 of the Regulations of
Policia Sanitaria Agricola already cited, and in accordance with article 75 of
the same regulations, the illegal transit will be punished by a fine of $10 to
$1,000, both with respect to the consignee and the carrier of the merchandise,
and by proceeding with the destruction of the latter without right of indemnity.

THE COLLECTION AND EXPORTATION OF CACTUS PLANTS, FRUITS, AND SEEDS REGULATED

Under date of June 28, 1930, the Executive Power of Mexico promulgated

regulations prescribing that—
1. Cacti intended for exportation from Mexico may be collected only from

January 1 to July 31 of each year.
2. The collection of any kind of cactus fruits and seeds for exportation to

foreign countries is prohibited.
1936]

SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS

137

3. All exporters of cactus plants from Mexico must transmit to the Botanic
Garden of Chapultepec, D. F., five specimens of the less common plants from

each consignment to a foreign country.

EXPORTATION OF CERTAIN CACTI PROHIBITED

The decision of the Mexican Secretaria de Agricultura y Fomento of Decem-
ber 20, 1933, supplements the regulations of June 28, 1930, by prohibiting the
collection of the following-named cacti for exportation from Mexico:

Ariocarpus fissuratus Schum,
Ariocarpus kotschoubeyanus Schum,
Ariocarpus retusus Scheidw.
Ariocarpus trigonus Schum.
Astrophytum capricorne Dietr.
Astrophytum myriostigma Lem,
Cephalocereus senilis Pfeiff.
Coryphantha (Neomammillaria) posel-
geriana Dietr.
Coryphantha (Neomammillaria) valida
Dietr.
Echinocactus grusoni Hildm.
Echinocactus horizonthalonius Lem.
Echinocereus conglomeratus Forst.
Echinocereus delaeti Gurke.
Echinocereus pectinatus Engelm.
Echinocereus rigidissimus Engelm.
Grusonia bradtiana (Coulter) Brit.
and Rose.
(Opuntia cereiformis Webber).
Leuchtenbergia principis Hook.
Fisch.
Lophophora williamsi Coult.
Neomammillaria candida Scheidw.

and

BH. @. 415.

Neomammillaria chinocephala Purpus.

Neomammiliaria elegans Brit. and
Rose.

Neomammillaria grahami Engelm.

Neomammillaria lenta K. Brandeg.

Neomammillaria (leona) potsi (Scheer )
Brit. and Rose.

Neomammillaria micromeris Engelm.

Neomammillaria parkinsoni Ehrenb.

Neomammillaria rhodantha Link and
Otto.

Neolloydia (Echinocactus)
Brit. and Rose.

Obregonia denegri Fric.

Opuntia microdasys Lehm.

beguini

Pachycereus chrysomallus Brit. and
Rose.

Pelecyphora aselliformis Ehrb.

Solisia pectinata Stein.

Thelocactus (EHchinocactus) bicolor-
tricolor Galeotti.

Thelocactus (Echinocactus) bicolor-

bolansis Galeotti.
Thelocactus heterochromus Webber.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF SWITZERLAND

SEPTEMBER 28, 1936.

This summary of the plant-quarantine import restrictions of the Republic

of Switzerland has been prepared for the information of nurserymen, plant-
quarantine officials, and others interested in the exportation of plants and plant
products to that country.

It was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant-quarantine inspector, in charge
of Foreign Information Service, of the Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines,
from the French and German texts of the corresponding Swiss laws and regu-
lations, and reviewed by the Division of Agriculture, Federal Department of
Public Economy of the Republic of Switzerland.

The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct and
complete up to the time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used inde-
pendently of, nor as a substitute for, the original texts, and it is not to be
interpreted as legally authoritative.

. LEE A. STRONG,
‘Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF SWITZERLAND

Basic LEGISLATION

[Federal law of Dec. 22, 1893, as amended by those of Oct. 5, 1929, and Apr. 7, 1930,
concerning the improvement of agriculture by the Federation, art. 12]

“The Federal Council is authorized to order an efficacious supervision of vine-
yards and to take necessary preservative measures against the spread of phyl-
loxera and other parasites, to prohibit the importation, traffic in, and exporta-
tion of plants, materials, and products that could serve as carriers of phylloxera
or any other parasite menacing agriculture, and to enact penal provisions
against violators, prescribing fines up to 1,000 francs.”
138 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

SUMMARY

IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

Grapevine stocks, shoots, stems, leaves, refuse, unpressed vintage grapes, used
props and supports, composts, and vegetable molds:*- Importation from any
source prohibited, as a precaution against the introduction of Phylloxera viti-
foliae Fitch (art. 57, regulations of July 10, 1894. See p. 3).

IMPORTATION RESTRICTED

Table and vintage grapes, grape mare, fruit trees, stocks, and shrubs proceed-
ing from countries that do not adhere to the International Phylloxera Conyvyen-
tion of Berne:* May be imported only with the permission of the Division of
Agriculture of the Swiss Feder