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Service and regulatory announcements

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Title:
Service and regulatory announcements
Added title page title:
Service and regulatory annoucements with list of plant pests intercepted with imported plants and plant products
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Plant Quarantine
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C.
Publisher:
U.S. G.P.O.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Quarterly
Language:
English
Physical Description:
8 v. : 23 cm.

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Subjects / Keywords:
Plant quarantine -- Periodicals -- United States ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )
federal government publication ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
S.R.A.--B.P.Q. no. 112 (July/Sept. 1932)-S.R.A.--B.P.Q. no. 119 (Apr./June 1934).
General Note:
Title from caption.
Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not subject to copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105.
Resource Identifier:
030288972 ( ALEPH )
12903553 ( OCLC )
sn 86033972 ( LCCN )

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Preceded by:
Service and regulatory announcements
Succeeded by:
Service and regulatory announcements

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State of Florida
Department of Agriculture DIVISION OF PLANT
INDUSTRY










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S.R.A., B.E.P.Q. Issued September 1935

United States Department of Agriculture

Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine






SERVICE AND


REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS


1934





These announcements are issued quarterly and constitute a per.
manent record of the work of the Bureau in the enforcement of the plant quarantine act of 1912 and certain related acts, including the text of quarantines and regulations thereunder, and the
more important circulars and decisions explanatory of, or bearing on, such quarantines and regulations





WITH LIST OF PLANT PESTS INTERCEPTED WITH IMPORTED PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS
































UNITED STATES
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE WASHINGTON: 1935
11324---35










E A. DEPT. Ai.
L. OF PLANt
fODUSTRY



ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

LEE A. STRONG, Chief.
S. A. RoiiwE, Assistant Chief.
Av RY S. HOYT, Assistant Chief. F. H. SPENCER, Business Manager. R. P. CURRIE, Editor.
MABEL COLCORD, Librarian.
J. A. HYSLor, in Charge, Division of Insect Pest Survey and Information. J. I. IIAMBLETON, in Charge, Division of Bee Culture Investigations. D. L. VAN DINE, in Charge, Division of Fruit Insect Investigations. F. C. CRAIGHEAD, in Charge, Division of Forest Insect Investigations. W. H. WnEIITE, in Charge, Division of Truck Crop and Garden Insect Investigations.
P. N. ANNAND, in Charge, Division of Cereal and Forage Insect Investigations. R. W. HARNED, in Charge, Division of Cotton Insect Inves:igations. F. C. BISIOPP, in Charge, Division of Insects Affecting Man and Animals. C. H. HADLEY, in Charge, Division of Japanese and Asiatic Beetle Investigations. L. A. HAWKINS, in Charge, Division of Control Investigations. R. C. RI-ARK, in Charge, Division of Insecticides and Fungicides. HAnoIaD .ioIniIsoN, in Charge, Division of Insect Identification. C. P. CIUATSEN, in Charge, Division of Foreign Parasite Introduction. S. B. FRACKER, in Charge, Division of Plant Disease Control. B. 'I. GADDIS, in Charge, Division of Domestic Plant Quarantines. E. It. SASSCEu, in Charge, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines. A. F. BURGESS, in Field Charge, Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail Moth Control
(headquarters, Greenfield, Mass.).
L. H. WORTILEY, in, Field Charge, Japanese Beetle and Gypsy Moth and BrownTail Moth Quarantines, European Corn Borer Certification, and Dutch Elm
Disease Eradication (headquarters, Wlhi'e Plains, N. Y.).
R. E. McI)oNALD, in Field Charge, Pink BoliEorm and Thurberia Weevil Quarantines (headquarters, San Antonio, Tex.).
B. L. BOYDE;N, in, Field Charge, Date Scale Quarantine (headquarters, Indio,
Calif.).
P. A. HOIDALE, in Field Charge, Mexican Fruit Fly Quarantine (headquarters,
Harlingen, Tex.).







TABLE OF CONTENTS

CONTENTS OF NO. 118 (JANUARY-MARCH 1934)
Page
Quarantine and other official announcements 1---------------------------------- 1
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (no. 48) ------------- 1
Instructions to postmasters___------------ 1
Instructions to inspectors on the treatment of nursery products, fruits,
vegetables, and soil for the Japanese beetle (B. P. Q.-359) 1
Announcements relating to Mexican fruit-fly quarantine (no. 64) ---------_ 12
Texas citrus shipping season ends April 5 ----------------------------- 12
Shipping season for Texas citrus fruit to end on April 5 (B. P. Q.-361) 12
Announcement relating to narcissus-bulb quarantine (no. 62) --------------- 12
Narcissus inspection records for 1933 (B. P. Q.-358) ----------------- 12
Terminal inspection of plants and plant products --------------------------- 15
Arkansas discontinues terminal inspection ---------------------------- 15
Miscellaneous items ---------------------------------------------------- 15
PlInt-quarantine import restrictions of the Republic of Cuba (P. Q. C. A.283, supplement no. 2) ------------------------------------------- 15
Plant-quarantine import restrictions of the Netherlands (P. Q. C. A.-303,
supplement no. 1) ------------ ------------ ---------- 15
Plant-qiuarantine export restrictions, Republic of Mexico (P. Q. C. A.-284,
supplement no. 8) ----------------------------------------------- 16
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Chile (B. P. Q.-348,
supplements nos. 1 and 2) --------------------------------------- 16
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Island of Cyprus (B. P. Q.-360) 17
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, British Honduras (P. Q. C. A.-314,
supplement no. 4) ------------------------------------ -----22
European corn borer-State regulations (B. P. Q.-346, re-ised March 15,
1934) ---------------------------------------------------------- 23
Penalties imposed for viol:itions of the Plant Quarantine Act --------------- 30
Organization of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine ------------------------------- 31

CONTENTS OF NO. 119 (APRIL-JUNE 1934)

Quarantine and other official announcements ---------------------------------- 33
Announcement relating to black stem-rust quarantine (no. 38) -------------- 33
Revised list of barberries and Mahonias classified under black stem-rust
quarantine regulations (P. Q. C. A.-320, second revision) -------------- 33
Announcement relating to fruit and vegetable quarantine (no. 56) ----------- 35
Sterilization of imported vinifera granes by refrigeration (B. P. Q.-362)__ 35
Announcement relating to Mexican fruit-fly quarantine (no. 64) ------------- 36
Citrus census of the lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas as of April 1,
1934_ ----------------------------------------------------------- 26
Miscellaneous items----- ----------------------------------------------- 38
Plant-pest and quarantine work in Agriculture Department merged------ 38
Plant-iouarantine import restrictions, Republic of Argentina (B. I'. Q.-57,
supplement no. 1) ----------------------------------------------- 39
Plant-quarantine import restrictions. Philippine Islands (B. P. Q.-363)___ 40
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, French mandate of Syria (B. P. Q.364) ----------------------------------------------------------- 46
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, British Honduras (P. Q. C. A.-314,
su plements now 5. (, and 7-.... 4!)
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Greece (B. P. Q.-347,
supplement no. 2) ----------------------------------------------- 50
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Jamaica, British West Indies (B. P.
Q.-355, revised) ----------------------------------------------- 50
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Kingdom of Norway (B. P. Q.-350,
supplement no. 1) ---------------------------------------------- 52
Plant-quarantine import restrictions. Republic of Peru (P. Q. C. A.-310,
supplement no. 1) 53
supplement no. 1)-------------------------------------------------53
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, New Zealand (P. Q. C. A.-306, supplement no. 2) -------------------------------------------------- 53
Plant-quarantine import restrictions. Commonwealth of Australia (P. Q.
C. A.-299, supplement no. 2) 55
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act --------------- 55
Organization of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine ------------------------------- 57

CONTENTS OF NO. 120 (JULY-SEPTEMBER 1934)

Quarantine and other official announcements ---------------------------------- 59
Announcements relating to citrus canker quarantine (no. 19) ----------59
Revision of quarantine --------------------------------------------- 59
Instructions to collectors of customs (T. D. 47254) -------------- 60
Announcements relating to fruit and vegetable quarantine (no. 56) -------- 61
Sterilization of imported vinifera grapes by refrigeration (B. P. Q.-362,
: supplements nos 1 and 2). ----- ------------------ 61
Announcements relating to gypsy moth and brown-tail moth quarantine (no.
45) --------------------------------------------------------------- 61
Revision of regulations -------------------------------------------- 61
Notice to general public through newspapers --------------------- 69
1







2 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE

Quarantine and other official announcements--Continued Page
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (no. 48) ------------ 69
Japanese beetle control ends for season on fruit and vegetable shipments 69
Removal of Japanese beetle quarantine restrictions on the interstate
movement of fruits and vegetables---....---------------- ------------Instructions to postmasters ------------------------------------- 70
Announcement relating to Mexican fruit-fly quarantine (no. 64) ----------- 71
Administrative instructions-shipping season for Texas citrus fruit to begin September 26 (B. E. P. Q.-367) ------------------------------- 71
Announcement relating to nursery stock, plant. and seed quarantine (no. 37)_ 71
Notice to permittees and others interested-willow withes as plant ties
prohibited on plants for entry from Europe and Canada (B. E. P. Q.365) ----------------------------------------------------------- 71
Announcements relating to pink bollworm quarantine (no. 52) -------------- 72
Modification of pink bollworm quarantine regulations (amendment no. 1). 72
Notice to general public through newspapers ---------------------- 74
Instructions to postmasters ------------------------------------ 74
Announcements relating to rice quarantine (no. 55) ----------------------- 74
Rice quarantine amended (amendment no. 1)-------- ---------------- 74
Instructions to collectors of customs (T. D. 47229) --------------- 76
Announcements relating to sugarcane quarantine (no. 15)----------------- 76
Sugarcane quarantine revised-------------------------- ------------- 76
Revision of quarantine ----------------- ----------------------------- 76
Miscellaneous items --------------------------------------------------- 77
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Greece (B. P. Q.-347,
supplement no. 3) ----------------------------------------------- 77
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Jamaica, British West Indies
(B. E. P. Q.-355, revised, supplement no. 1) ------------------------ 78
Peru prohibits the exportation of propagating material of rotenoneproducing plants (P. Q. C. A.-310, supplement no. 2) --------------- 78
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Cuba (P. Q. C. A.-283,
revised, supplement no. 3) ------------------------------------ 79
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Mexico (P. Q. C. A.284, supplement no. 9) ------------------------------------------ 79
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Germany (B. P. Q.-302, revised,
supplement no. 2) ---------------------------------------- --80
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Czechoslovakia (B. E.
P. Q.-366) ------------------------------------------------------ 80
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act --------------- 89
Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine -------------- 92
CONTENTS OF NO. 121 (OCTOBER-DECEMBER 1934)
Quarantine and other official announcements ----------------------------------- 93
Announcement relating to Dutch elm disease quarantine (no. 70) ----------- 93
Revision of quarantine------------------------------ ----- ---------- 94
Announcement relating to gypsy moth and brown-tail moth quarantine (no.
45) --------------------------------------------------------------- 94
Instructions to postmasters --------------94
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (no. 48)------------- 95
No extension of Japanese beetle regulated area this year------------ 95
Developments in the Japanese beetle situation during 1934 ------------ 95
Announcements relating to pink bollworm quarantine (no. 52) ------------- 98
Modification of pink bollworm quarantine regulations (amendment no. 2)_ 98
Notice to general public through newspapers --------------------- 100
Instructions to postmasters------------- -- ------------------ 100
Announcement relating to sugarcane quarantine (foreign) (no. 15) --------- 101
Instructions to collectors of customs (T. D. 47298) ------------------- 101
Announcements relating to sugarcane quarantine (domestic) (no. 16) ----- 101
Revision of quarantine_ -------------------------------------------- 101
Instructions to postmasters------------------------------------ 102
Announcement relating to sweetpotato quarantine (domestic) (no. 30) ------ 102
Revision of quarantine --------------------------------------------- 102
Miscellaneous items ---------------------------------------------------- 103
Calls conferences to consider control of three plant pests ---------------. 103
Fracker and Gaddis to head plant-pest-control division_ -----------------104
Peru prohibits the exportation of propagating material of rotenone-producing plants (P. Q. C. A.-310. supplement no. 3)-__---------- ------ 104
Plant-quarantine export re-trictions. Republic of Cuba (P. Q. C. A.-283,
revised. supplement no. 4) --------------------------- 105
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Poland (B. E. P. Q.36-) --- 105
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Germany (B. P. Q.-302, revised,
supplement no. 3) ----------------------------------------------- 112
Pla nt-quarantine import restrictions. Republic of Czechoslovakia (B. E.
P. Q.-366. supplement no. 1) ------------------------------------- 112
I'lant-quarantine import restrictions. British Mandate of Palestine
(B. E. P. Q.-370) ---------------------------- 113
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Mexico (P. Q. C. A.-284,
supplement no. 10 ----------------------------------------------115
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act ---------------- 116
Iist of current quarantines and other restrictive orders and miscellaneous
regulations ---------------------------------------------------------- 117
Organizationr of the tsureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine. --------------- 24








S.R.A.-B.P.Q. No. 118 Issued May 1934

United States Department of Agriculture

BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE



SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS

JANUARY-MARCH 1934



CONTENTS
Page
Quarantine and other official announcements-----......---------------------------------------- 1
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (no. 48) ----------------------------.... 1
Instructions to postmasters............................................................... 1
Instructions to inspectors on the treatment of nursery products, fruits, vegetables, and soil
for the Japanese beetle (B.P.Q.-359) ---------------- --------------------------............. 1
Announcements relating to Mexican fruit-fly quarantine (no. 64)............................... 12
Texas citrus shipping season ends April 5----------------------------------------.............. 12
Shipping season for Texas citrus fruit to end on April 5 (B.P.Q.-361)....................... --------------------12
Announcement relating to narcissus-bulb quarantine (no. 62)-----------------------------............................ 12
Narcissus inspection records for 1933 (B.P.Q.-358) ......................................... ----------------------------------12
Terminal inspection of plants and plant products ............------------------------------------.................................. 15
Arkansas discontinues terminal inspection ...------------------------------------.............. 15
Miscellaneous items --------------------------.------------------------------------------ 15
Plant-quarantine import restrictions of the Republic of Cuba (P.Q.C.A.-283, supplement
no. 2) --------------------------------------------------------------------------- 15
Plant-quarantine import restrictions of the Netherlands (P.Q.C.A.-303, supplement no. 1).. 15 Plant-quarantine export restrictions, Republic of Mexico (P.Q.C.A.-284, supplement no. 8). 16
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Chile (B.P.Q.-348, supplements nos.
1 and 2)..----------------------------------------------------------------................. 16
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Island of Cyprus (B.P.Q.-360).....-----------------.......... 17
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, British Honduras (P.Q.C.A.-314, supplement no. 4).. 22 European corn borer-State regulations (B.P.Q.-346, revised Mar. 15, 1934) ---------------................. 23
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act----........-------------------------............ 30
Organization of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine ------------ ----------------------------...... 31



QUARANTINE AND OTHER OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE (NO. 48)

INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS

POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL, Washington, February 20, 1934.
POSTMASTER:
MY DEAR SIR: Your attention is invited to the enclosed copy of the twelfth revision of the Japanese beetle quarantine and regulations (Quarantine Order No. 48, U.S. Department of Agriculture), by which you will please be governed. The important changes and features are indicated in the Introductory Note and Summary. See paragraph 1, section 595, Postal Laws and Regulations.
Very truly yours,
C. B. EILENBERGER,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.



B.P.Q.-359 MARCH 14, 1934.

INSTRUCTIONS TO INSPECTORS ON THE TREATMENT OF NURSERY PRODUCTS,
FRUITS, VEGETABLES, AND SOIL FOR THE JAPANESE BEETLE

Existing disinfection and fumigation methods authorized for elimination of the Japanese beetle from nursery stock and other plant materials, as well as from sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure, have been revised and consolidated
54156-34- 1





2 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-Mar.

in these instructions. Methods outlined herein are to be employed as a basis of quarantine certification under regulations 6 and 7 of Quarantine No. 48, Revised.
Issuance of these instructions cancels the methods of treatment prescribed in P.Q.C.A.-224, P.Q.C.A.-239, P.Q.C.A.-265, P.Q.C.A.-307, P.Q.C.A.-317,
P.Q.C.A.-322, P.Q.C.A.-333, and B.P.Q.-339.
A. S. HOYT,
Acting Chief of Bureau.
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page
i. Treatment of soil in the absence of plants---------................----------------------------------- 2
A Potting soil ................----------------------------------------------------------------........ 2
1. Carbon disulphide----------- ---------------------------------------------....................... 2
2. Naphthalene .............................................------------------------------------------------------------ 3
3. Steam .........................................................----------------------------------------------------------------- 3
4. Lead arsenate ...................................................----------------------------------------------------------- 3
B. Sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure shipments ..................................------------------------------ 4
1. Carload treatment requirements, June 15 to October 15, inclusive ---------------------.. 4
2. Carload treatment requirements, October 16 to June 14, inclusive---------------------........................ 4
C. Soil in and around plots, coldframes, hotbeds, ete -----------------------------------....... 4
1. Lead arsenate-----------------------------------------------------------..................... 4
2. Carbon disulphide ------------------------------------------------------.......... 5
3. Carbon disulphide emulsion---------------..--------------------------------------------- 5
4. Naphthalene-- ----------------------------------------------------------------......... 6
2. Treatment of soil about the roots of plants --------------------------------------------.......... 6
A. Removing infestation by shaking, or washing with water-------------...................--------- 6
B. Treatment with hot water-------------------------------------------------------........................................ 6
C. Carbon disulphide dip...............................................................------------------------------------------------------- 7
D. Carbon disulphide emulsion, field treatment---------------------------------------............................................... 7
E. Lead arsenate, field treatments---..................---------------------------------------------........................................... 10
3. Miscellaneous treatments--------------------------------------------------------.................................................. 10
A. Fumigation of bananas in refrigerator cars with liquid hydrocyanic acid.................... -----------------10
B. Fumigation of bananas in refrigerator cars with calcium cyanide............................ 11
C. Fumigation of berries with carbon disulphide--------------------------------------............................................. 11
D. Fumigation of berries with ethylene oxide-----------....................----------------------------.............................. 11

1. TREATMENT OF SOIL IN THE ABSENCE OF PLANTS
A. Potting soil
Potting soil may be treated by the use of carbon disulphide, naphthalene, heat treatment, or lead arsenate. All of these treatments are effective and do not impair soil fertility when applied as recommended.
A. 1. Fumigation of potting soil with carbon disulphide
Material.-A technical, C.P., or U.S.P. grade of carbon disulphide should be used to fumigate soil in which plants are to be grown. Caution: Carbon disulphide is a dangerous chemical. The vapor is inflammable and explosive when mixed with air at concentrations ranging from 1 to 50 parts of carbon disulphide to 99 to 50 parts of air. At these concentrations any spark is liable to cause an explosion. At a temperature of 2970 F. it may take fire spontaneously, and it may ignite spontaneously in the presence of certain metals, particularly copper, at considerably lower temperatures. It should be kept away from fire, and from hot objects such as electric light bulbs, heating coils, steam pipes, etc. Lighted cigars, cigarettes, or pipes should never be brought into the same room. These facts must be brought to the attention of a responsible person at the nursery before the fumigation is applied to the soil.
Equipment.-The fumigation must be done in a tight box or bin, which may be made of metal, wood, concrete, brick, stone, or other material, providing the top, sides, and bottom are gas proof. It should be of a size adapted to the quantity of soil to be treated.
Condition of soil.-Soil of any type may be fumigated with carbon disulphide, providing the soil is friable and is thrown loosely into the box. It should be dry or only moist. Wet soil must never be fumigated.
Temperature.-The effectiveness of fumigation with carbon disulphide depends, to a large extent, upon the temperature of the soil. The higher the temperature the more readily the vapor diffuses through the soil, and the more easily the immature stages of the beetle are killed by its action. The temperature must be at least 450 F. when the treatment is applied and it must not fall below 400 during the course of the treatment; otherwise, it will be necessary to fumigate the soil again to insure destruction of the immature stages of the beetle.
Dosage.-Carbon disulphide must be used at the rate of 350 cubic centimeters (1 pound) to 1 cubic yard of soil.






19341 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 3

Application to soil.-Any quantity of soil may be fumigated, providing the carbon disulphide is distributed uniformly throughout. One method is to fumigate the soil while the box is being filled. Place 18 inches of soil loosely in the box. Inject carbon disulphide at the rate of 176 cubic centimeters for each square yard of surface, distributing the material uniformly in holes 2 inches deep and 18 inches apart, 44 cubic centimeters to each hole. Fill the holes with soil immediately after the liquid is injected. When the first 18 inches of soil has been treated, put in 18 inches more, and fumigate it the same as the first. This can be repeated until the container is filled.
Another method is to fumigate the soil after the box has been filled. This is done by making holes from the surface to the different levels, so that the carbon disulphide can be applied in the same positions as by the other method. The liquid, in this case, must be poured into the deep holes through a tube, or injected to insure its reaching the proper level.
Period of fumigation.-The container must be sealed, and left undisturbed for at least 48 hours.
Storage of soil.-The soil must be stored under such conditions as will prevent reinfestation.
A. 2. Fumigation of potting soil with naphthalene
Material.-Flake naphthalene free from tar must be used for fumigation.
Caution.-Naphthalene will burn. It must be kept away from fire.
Equipment.-It is not necessary to have a special fumigation box in which to fumigate soil with naphthalene.
Condition of soil.-Dry or moist soil of any type may be fumigated with naphthalene. Wet soil cannot be fumigated satisfactorily.
Temperature.-The effectiveness of the treatment depends to a large extent upon the temperature of the soil. The higher the temperature the more effective is the fumigation. The temperature must never be allowed to fall below 500 F.
Dosage.-Five pounds of flake naphthalene must be used to a cubic yard of soil.
Mixing.-The success of the fumigation depends to a large extent upon the thoroughness with which the flakes are mixed with the soil. Spread the flakes on the soil and mix thoroughly by shoveling over at least three times.
Period of fumigation.-Soil must be left undisturbed for a week after fumigation.
Storage of soil.-The soil must be stored under such conditions as will prevent reinfestation.
A. 3. Treatment of potting soil with steam
Equipment.-It is necessary to have a boiler that will generate an ample supply of steam, and equipment for properly dispersing the steam throughout the soil.
Condition of soil.-Soil of any type may be treated with steam, providing it is friable.
Temperature.-The soil must be heated throughout to a temperature of 1300 F.
Period of treatment.-The soil temperature must be maintained at 1300 F. for 30 minutes after it has reached this temperature throughout the mass.
Storage of soil.-After treatment with steam, soil must be so stored and handled as to prevent reinfestation.

A. 4. Treatment of potting soil with lead arsenate
Material.-Powdered acid lead arsenate.
Condition of soil.-The soil to be treated must be in a friable condition. Wet soil cannot be treated satisfactorily. The treatment is recommended only for soils which are slightly acid or neutral in reaction.
Season.-Lead arsenate must be applied before August 1. When plants potted in soil treated as prescribed are carried over until the following year,. they may be again eligible for certification between October 1 and the following June 15 of the second year if, on August 1 of the second year, analyses show the soil to contain lead arsenate at the rate of 2 pounds per cubic yard. This treatment cannot be relied upon to eliminate the infestation in the soil if applied in the fall or in. the spring when the larvae are fully developed. It is important to have poison in the soil at the time the eggs are hatching.
Dosage.-Acid lead arsenate must be used at the rate of 2 pounds to each cubic yard of soil.
Application to soil.-The lead arsenate must be uniformly mixed with the soil This may be accomplished either by hand shoveling or by the use of a machine






4 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-Mar.

mixer, such as a concrete mixer. Plants must be free from soil when potted in soil treated in this manner.
Period of treatment.-Plants freed from soil and potted in soil treated in the above manner by August 1, may be certified for shipment between the following October 1 and the subsequent June 15.
Handling of treated soil.-When plants, potted in lead-arsenate-treated soil, are plunged in beds or set in frames exposed to possible infestation, the soil of these beds or frames must previously have been treated with lead arsenate at the rate of 1,300 pounds per acre.

B. Sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure shipments
Regulation 7, quarantine no. 48, authorizes certification of sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure, providing it has been treated under the supervision of and in manner and by method satisfactory to the inspector. If the carbon disulphide method is used, follow the detailed instructions given for the fumigation of potting soil with carbon disulphide (1, A. 1). The only other method which may be used is steam, in which case the instructions for steam treatment should be followed (1, A. 3).
Top soil or other materials from within 12 inches of the soil surface, to receive certification, must be treated throughout the year.
Pit sand, from infested areas, must be treated during the period June 15 and October 15, inclusive, since infestation is likely to occur between the time of removal from the pits and loading in the cars.
B. 1. Carload treatment requirements, June 15 to October 15, inclusive
Type of car.-Tight box cars must be used during this period. Open cars may be used providing they are protected from reinfestation while within the regulated area.
Doors.-The doorways of box cars must be boarded up and covered with heavy paper up to a point beyond the height of the sand or soil in the car.
Depth of soil or sand.-The sand or soil must not be loaded in the car to such a depth as would restrict the overhead working space and hamper the work of the men performing the fumigation.
Keeping doors closed.-Certified cars must have doors closed and fastened while en route within the regulated area.

B. 2. Carload treatment requirements, October 16 to June 14, inclusive
Type of car.-Open freight cars may be used during this period of the year, but they must be of steel gondola type. In cars with dump bottoms, planks must be laid across the bottoms and these covered with heavy paper to cover the openings. Where this is necessary, the inspector must give his approval before the sand or soil is loaded.
Depth of soil or sand.-The soil or sand must not be piled above the level of the sides of the car.
Covering with canvas.-When open cars are used canvases or heavy paper must be used for covering the surface as it is fumigated. These canvases or covers must be free from holes and a foot or more wider than the width of the car. Where several pieces of covers are used they must be large enough to allow for overlapping of at least a foot where they meet. The covers must be fastened down at the sides of the car and weighted on the surfaces, particularly where they overlap.
C. Soil in and around plots, coldframes, hotbeds, etc.
Soil in and surrounding plots, coldframes, hotbeds, etc., which is used for plunging pots or heeling-in plants, must be disinfected by treatment with lead arsenate as precribed in section C. 1. Under special conditions or specific authorization from the inspector, fumigation with carbon disulphide, carbon disulphide emulsion, or naphthalene may be substituted for the temporary elimination of infestation.
C. 1. Treatment with lead arsenate
Material.-Powdered acid lead arsenate.
Condition of soil.-The soil must be friable and in good tilth.
Season.-Treatment must be applied before August 1 if the land is to be used that autumn.






1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 5

Dosage.-Lead arsenate must be applied at the rate of 1,500 pounds to each acre, or 35 pounds to each 1,000 square feet. For subsequent re-treatments, lead arsenate must be applied in sufficient quantity to restore the original concentration of 1,500 pounds of the insecticide per acre. The quantity to be added in the re-treatment will be determined by analyses.
Application.-The lead arsenate may be applied with a suitable distributor or broadcast by hand. The lead arsenate must be thoroughly mixed and incorporated with the upper 3 inches of soil.
Period of treatment.-As lead arsenate is a stomach poison which has to be eaten by the larvae, it may take several weeks before all the infestation is eliminated. Do not plant, heel in, or plunge plants in soil thus treated until after October 1.
Safety zone.-In addition to the area desired to be certified, there shall be treated a 3-foot strip of land around the entire plot, coldframe, hotbed, etc. No plants may be certified from this strip. In the case of coldframes, hotbeds, etc., extending into the ground to a depth of 12 inches or more, thus preventing larval movement into the frame, no such safety zone is required.
Marking.-Nurserymen shall be required to furnish suitable stakes at least 4 inches square and at least 30 inches long to be placed on the boundaries of certified plots. Proper designations will be stenciled on the stakes by the Department. In the case of coldframes, hotbeds, etc., having fixed boundaries, proper designation will be made on such coldframes, hotbeds, etc., and no stakes will be required.
C. 2. Fumigation with carbon disulphide
Material.-A technical, U.S.P., or C.P. grade of carbon disulphide should be used. Carbon disulphide is explosive. Observe the precautions mentioned in 1, A. 1.
Equipment.-A tarpaulin or other gasproof cover must be provided to cover the soil after fumigation.
Condition of soil.-Soil of any type may be treated providing it is friable. Wet soil must not be treated.
Temperature.-The temperature of the soil 6 inches below the surface must be at least 45' F. when the fumigation is applied. If the temperature falls below 400 before the fumigation is complete, the treatment must be repeated.
Weather conditions.-The ideal conditions for fumigation are a warm, humid atmosphere without wind.
Season.-The fumigation must not be applied when adult beetles are present. An exception may be made in the case of plots that are protected from beetles.
Dosage.-Carbon disulphide must be used at the rate of 6 pounds, or 2,100 cubic centimeters, to 100 square feet of soil surface.
Application.-Carbon disulphide must be uniformly distributed over the surface of the soil. Apply it in holes 12 inches apart and 1 to 2 inches deep, putting 21 cubic centimeters in each hole. Fill each hole with soil immediately after the liquid is poured in. Complete the fumigation as quickly as possible, covering each section with tarpaulin as soon as it is fumigated.
Period of fumigation.-The soil must remain covered for at least 48 hours.
Safety zone.-Same as that prescribed in 1, C. 1.
Marking.-Same as that prescribed in 1, C. 1.
C. 3. Treatment with carbon disulphide emulsion
Material.-Carbon disulphide emulsion consists of a dilution of the stock solution known as "50 percent miscible carbon disulphide." The stock solution is composed of equal parts of carbon disulphide and castor-oil soap emulsifier. The castor-oil soap emulsifier must be prepared according to the directions published in the Journal of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry, volume 20, pages 849-850, August 1928.
The component materials, carbon disulphide and castor-oil soap emulsion, are supplied in separate containers-the carbon disulphide in one container and the emulsified castor-oil soap in another. Equal parts of each by volume must be used in preparing the stock solution or miscible carbon disulphide. The stock solution when diluted with water forms carbon disulphid.e emulsion.
The miscible carbon disulphide should be prepared in the field as it is used. It should not be prepared in quantity before use.
Caution.-Miscible carbon disulphide and carbon disulphide emulsion are inflammable. Observe the precautions mentioned in 1, A. 1.






6 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-Mar.

Equipmen-t-Twenty-four-gage galvanized-iron collars 10 inches wide and not more than 4 feet square are needed for applying the emulsion. Suitable tanks, barrels, or tubs for preparing the solution must be provided.
Condition of soil.-Any type of soil, providing it is friable, may be treated by this method. Wet soil cannot be treated satisfactorily. The surface must be level and not disturbed by recent cultivation. The drainage conditions of the soil are important. The solution must not disappear from the surface in less than 10 minutes, and must be absorbed by the soil within 5 hours.
Temperature.-The temperature of the soil 6 inches below the surface must be at least 450 F. when the treatment is applied. If the temperature falls below 400 before the treatment is finished, the soil must be treated again.
Season.-Treatment must not be applied when adult beetles are present. An exception may be made in the case of plots that are protected from beetles.
Dosage.-The dilution depends on the soil temperature; follow table 2 of section 2, D. Use 2/ gallons of the dilute emulsion to each square foot of soil, as in table 4 of section 2, D.
Application.-Level the surface of the ground, removing weeds and debris. Force a galvanized-iron collar 3 inches into the soil, and firm the soil against the metal. Place another collar next to the first, and so on. When enough collars are in place, pour the dilute carbon disulphide into the basins formed within the collars. As soon as the liquid has disappeared from the surface, the collar may be lifted and set in another position.
Period of treatment.-The soil must not be disturbed for 48 hours after treatment.
Safety zone.-Same as that prescribed in 1, C. 1.
Marking.-Same as that prescribed in 1, C. 1.
C. 4. Fumigation with naphthalene
Material.-Flake naphthalene free from tar. Caution: Fire should be kept away from naphthalene.
Condition of soil.-Any type of soil may be treated with naphthalene provided it is friable and in good tilth. Wet soil must not be treated.
Season.-The treatment must not be applied when adult beetles are present. An exception may be made in the case of plots that are protected from beetles.
Temperature.-To be effective the temperature of the soil at a depth of 6 inches must not be less than 500 F. for a week after fumigation.
Dosage.-Naphthalene must be used at the rate of 2,000 pounds per acre, or approximately 46 pounds per 1,000 square feet.
Application.-The naphthalene must be uniformly distributed over the surface, worked in, and thoroughly and uniformly mixed with the soil to a depth of 3 inches.
Period of fumigation.-The land must not be disturbed for 1 week after fumigation.
Safety .one.-Same as that prescribed in 1, C. 1.
Marking.-Same as that prescribed in 1, C. 1.
2. TREATMENT OF SOIL ABOUT THE ROOTS OF PLANTS
A. Removing infestation by shaking, or washing with water
The roots of some plants can be made entirely free from soil, either by shaking or washing.
Washing all soil from the roots of the plants with water is probably one of the most simple methods for removing the infestation from certain varieties of plants. The method has certain disadvantages in that it is dependent for its effectiveness almost entirely upon the vigilance and the determination of the inspector in making sure that all soil is washed from the roots and that no tangled mass of roots or cavity hides a larva.
Condition of plants.-The plants should be in a dormant or semidormant condition. Only such root masses as can be thoroughly examined and the absence of infestation verified should be certified under this procedure. Plants must be protected from possible reinfestation.
B. Treatment with hot water
Equipment.-It is necessary to have a water tank equipped with a suitable heating device, and a system for circulating the water in order to maintain a uniform temperature.
Condition of plants.-Plants are usually most resistant to hot water when they are dormant, and most susceptible when they are growing vigorously. It is






19341 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS I

therefore recommended that treatment be applied only when the plants are dormant or semidormant.
Temperature.-The water must be maintained at a temperature of 1120 F. for the entire period of treatment. If the temperature falls below 111.50 the infestation may not be destroyed; if it rises above 112.50 the plants may be injured.
Period of treatment.-The treatment must be continued for 70 minutes after the root masses are heated throughout to 1120 F.
Preparation for treatment.-Before being tendered for treatment, plants shall have all excess soil removed and the roots pruned. Large clumps should be divided as much as possible without injuring the roots.
Small plants and root stocks may be packed loosely in wire baskets or in other containers providing water can circulate through the masses. Large plants must be placed individually in the water.
Before the plants are immersed, thermometers must be inserted with the mercury bulbs in the center of at least three of the largest clumps, baskets, or root masses, and placed at each end of the tank and in the center. In addition, three thermometers, with the mercury bulbs in the water, must be placed in the same relative positions as the thermometers in the root masses.
Application.-The roots must be immersed completely. Temperature readings should be recorded on form no. 91. These temperatures should be taken at each end of the tank and in the center with individual thermometers.
Care of plants after treatment.-The treatment by hot water is complete when the plants are removed from the tank. The way plants are handled after treatment may seriously affect subsequent growth. Tubers should be dry when packed for shipment. Plants should be cooled slowly to room temperatures. Plants should not be removed from the hot water and heeled in cold soil. Pot the plants, or set them in the ground as soon as possible after cooling to room temperature. They should be protected against reinfestation.

C. Carbon disulphide dip
Material.-Use 50 percent miscible carbon disulphide. Fully described in 1, C. 3.
Caution.-Observe the precautions mentioned in 1, A. 1.
Equipment.-Metal or wooden tanks or tubs in which the plants can be treated at a temperature of 700 F. should be provided.
Condition of plants.-Dilute carbon disulphide emulsion is least injurious to roots when they are dormant or semidormant. Treatment should be applied during the dormant period of the variety to be treated.
Temperature.-The temperature of the dilute emulsion must be maintained at approximately 700 F. If the temperature falls below 650 the treatment may not be effective; if it rises above 700 the plants may be injured.
Dosage.-Miscible carbon disulphide (50 percent) must be mixed with water at the rate of 45 cubic centimeters to 10 gallons.
Period of treatment.-The roots must be immersed for 24 hours.
Preparation of treating bath.-Determine the capacity of the container and use 45 cubic centimeters of miscible carbon disulphide for each 10 gallons of water. There are 231 cubic inches in a gallon. Pour into tank and stir until mixed, which operation should be done just before using. Do not mix with a mechanical agitator or stir too violently.
Preparation of plants.-This treatment is not effective when the soil about the roots is too wet or when the diameter of the soil ball is more than 6 inches. The temperature of the plants should be at least 600 F. at the beginning of the treatment.
Application.-The roots must be immersed completely.
Care of plants after treatment.-The treatment is complete when the plants are removed from the solution. The suggestions regarding handling of plants after treatment with hot water should be followed. Plants should be protected from reinfestation.

D. Carbon disulphide emulsion, field treatment
The basis of certification of field nursery plants treated with miscible carbon disulphide shall be: (1) That the concentrated stock solution shall be freshly mixed carbon disulphide and castor-oil soap in the proper concentration. (2) That all five conditions, subsequently mentioned, governing the application of the treatment have been met.
Material.-Use 50 percent miscible carbon disulphide. (See 1, C. 3.)






8 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE Jan.-Mar.

Caution.-Observe the precautions mentioned in 1, A. 1.
Season.-This treatment must not be used when adult beetles are present.
Equipment.-Strips of 24-gage galvanized iron, 10 inches wide and of the proper length, are required. (See table 1.)

TABLE 1.-Size of collar

Diameter of ball to be dug Diameter Length of Diameter of ball to be dug Diameter Length of (inches) of collar collar (inches) of collar collar

Inches Feet Inche Feet
12 or less...................... 18 54 24............................ 36 104
14 ..............-------------------------- 21 60j 25-27 ------------------------......................... 39 11
18-............................ 27 8 28-30....................... ---------------------- 42 12
20......-------------------------- 30 9 33--------------------------............ 45 13
22 ----------------------33 9 36-.......-------------------------.................... 48 14


Condition of plants.-Dilute carbon disulphide is least injurious to roots when the plants are dormant or semidormant, and treatment should be applied at that time.
Dosage.-The dilution depends upon the probable temperature of the soil during the 48 hours following application, and must be determined by the Treating Division in accordance with table 2.

TABLE 2.-Dilution schedule

Miscible
carbon diMinimum soil temperature 6 inches below the surface (O F.) sulphide per 10 gallons
of water

Cc
Schedule no. 1-40-50...................................................................... 68
Schedule no. 2-50-60...................................................................... 57
Schedule no. 3-60-70 ..................................................................-------------------------------------------------------------... 45


The concentration of the emulsion must not be greater than is necessary, as this may injure the plants.
The dosages which must be applied under different conditions are given in table 3 or table 4.

TABLE 3.-Dosage for circular collars

Miscible carbon disul- Miscible carbon disulphide phide Diameter of col- Diametr of colD iameter of col-hes) Water Sched- Sched- Sched- a r of col- Water Sched- Sched- Schedlar (inches) ule ule ule lar (inches) ule ule ule no. 1- no. 2- no. 3- no. 1- no. 2- no. 340-500 50-600 60-700 40-500 50-60 60-700 F. F. F. F. F. F.

Gallons Cc Cc Cc Gallons Cc Cc c
12---------------................ 2.0 14 11 9 33................ 15. 0 102 85 68
15--------------.............-- 3.0 20 17 14 36...............-------------- 17.5 119 99 80
18...............---------------- 4. 5 31 26 20 39_.-------------- 21.0 143 119 95
21................ 6. 0 41 34 27 42....---------------24. 0 164 136 108
24---------------................-- 8. 0 55 45 .36 45----............---------.... 27. 5 187 156 125
27................ ---------------10. 0 68 57 45 48...............--------------. 31.5 215 179 143
30--------------- 12. 0 82 68 54






1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 9

TABLE 4.-Dosage for square collars

Miscible carbon disul- Miscible carbon disulphide phide
Length of side of Water Sched- Sched- Sched- Length of side of Water Sched- Sched- Schedcollar (inches) ule ule ule collar (inches) ule ule ule no. 1- no. 2- no. 3- no. 1- no. 2- no. 340-500 50-600 60-700 40-500 50-600 60-700 F. F. F. F. F. F.

Gallons Cc Cc Cc Gallons Cc Cc Cc
12-----..............-----.. 2. 5 17 14 11 33___--------------- 19.0 129 108 86
15...............------------. 4. 0 27 23 18 36-.....-------------22. 5 153 128 102
18....---------------5. 5 37 31 25 39-------------- ............... 26. 0 177 148 118
21 --------------- 7. 5 51 43 34 42--------------30. 5 208 173 139
24....-------------- 10. 0 68 57 45 45............... 35. 0 238 199 159
27................ -------------12. 5 85 71 57 48 ------------- 40. 0 272 227 182
30................ 15. 5 106 88 70

Temperature of soil.-Begin treating in the spring when the minimum soil temperature at a depth of 6 inches remains above 400 F., using schedule no. 1. When the minimum soil temperature at this depth remains above 500 decrease the concentration to meet schedule no. 2. When the minimum soil temperature remains above 600 decrease the concentration to meet schedule no. 3. In the autumn, as the minimum temperature of the soil decreases, it is necessary to increase the schedule in the opposite order. Treatment must be discontinued when the minimum soil temperature at the 6-inch depth is below 400.
For treatment to be successful, the temperature of the soil during the 48-hour period of the treatment should never fal! below the minimum temperature for the schedule used.
Preparation of plant for treatment.-Remove all weeds and debris from the soil about the plant. Tie low-hanging branches so they will not dip into the solution. Level the soil. After the size of the soil ball to be lifted has been determined, place a galvanized-iron collar about the plant and force it 3 inches into the soil. The size of the collar to be used is shown in table 1. Firm the soil carefully on each side of the metal.
Application.-Measure the diameter of the collar, find from table 3 or table 4 the number of gallons of water and the cubic centimeters of miscible carbon disulphide required; and mix well. Pour into the collar, avoiding splashing or unnecessary disturbance of the soil. If the solution is poured on a spade it will help considerably.
Period of treatment.-The soil must not be disturbed for 48 hours, but the plant must be dug between 2 and 5 days after treatment.
Handling after treatment.-The plant may be dug and handled according to the usual nursery practice, except that the ball must be of a diameter which corresponds to the diameter of the collar mentioned in table 1.
Conditions under which the carbon disulphide treatment may be applied
(1) The minimum soil temperature 6 inches below the surface in the nursery must be 400 F. or higher for the 48-hour period immediately following the application of the carbon disulphide emulsion.
(2) The surface of the soil around the base of the plant to be treated must be level and the treatment must not be applied where the ground has a slope of more than 1 inch in 10 inches.
(3) The collars must be carefully placed in strict accordance with the directions in order to assure that no seepage occurs. Especial care must be taken on plowed and stony land to prevent loss of the solution.
(4) A record must be made of the time of penetration of the solution on each plant treated. If the solution disappears from the surface in less than 10 minutes or requires more than 5 hours, the treatment will not be successful.
(5) An examination must be made during the treatment and after the solution has disappeared to determine the uniformity of penetration. Uniform penetration must be obtained.
54156-34---2






10 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-Mar.

E. Lead arsenate, field treatments
.Material.-Powdered acid lead arsenate.
Condition of soil.-The soil must be friable. The treatment is recommended only for soils that are slightly acid or neutral in reaction.
Season.-When the treatment is to be used as a basis for certification between September 20 (re-treatment) or October 1 (initial treatment) and the following June 15, the treatment must be completed by July 1. Because of differences of seasonal conditions it may, in other years, be necessary to modify these dates.
Dosage.-For initial treatments lead arsenate must be applied at the rate of 1,500 pounds per acre, which is equivalent to approximately 35 pounds per 1,000 square feet.
For subsequent re-treatments, lead arsenate must be applied in sufficient quantity to restore the original concentration of 1,500 pounds of the insecticide per acre. The quantity to be added in the re-treatment will be determined by analyses.
Application. (1) Plants growing in rows.-The ground must be in good tilth. Lead arsenate may be applied by either of the following methods: (a) The lead arsenate may be broadcast or applied with a suitable distributor. At least 2 inches of soil from the ridge between the plants in the row and from about the base of the plants must be removed into the space between the rows of plants.
(b) At least 2 inches of soil from the ridge between the plants in the row and from about the base of the plants must be removed into the space between the rows of plants. The lead arsenate may then be broadcast or applied with a suitable distributor. After either procedure has been completed, cultivate at least three times, adjusting the cultivator for the third operation so that the soil will be thrown toward the rows of plants to obtain at least 3 inches of poisoned soil about the base of all plants.
(2) Individual plants.-The treatment of individual plants is essentially a hand operation. The soil must be treated in a manner to obtain the same conditions as are required for trees planted in rows. The area to be treated must never be less than 10 feet in diameter and must be at least 6 feet greater in diameter than the diameter of the soil ball to be removed with the tree.
Safety zone.-In addition to the area desired to be certified there shall be treated a 3-foot strip of land around the entire plot, coldframe, hotbed, etc. No plants may be certified from this strip.
Marking.-Nurserymen shall be required to furnish suitable stakes at least 4 inches square and at least 30 inches long to be placed on the boundaries of certified plots. Proper designations will be stenciled on the stakes by the Department. In the case of coldframes, hotbeds, etc., having fixed boundaries, proper designation will be made on such coldframes, hotbeds, etc., and no stakes will be required.
3. MISCELLANEOUS TREATMENTS
A. Fumigation of bananas in refrigerator cars with liquid hydrocyanic acid
Material.-Liquid hydrocyanic acid.
Caution.-Hydrocyanic acid gas is very poisonous and because of the readiness with which it is liberated, care should be exercised during the entire process of fumigation not to breathe the fumes. Gas masks must be used when applying the liquid.
Equipment.-Two metal trays having an area of about 2 square feet, equipped to be suspended about 24 inches below the hatch openings. Two tin cups with a capacity of 3 ounces each. Four screens made of cotton netting on light wooden frames which will fit tightly in hatch openings.
Condition of car.-Only refrigerator cars in good condition should be used to insure against leaks.
Temperature.-The temperature inside the car during the period of fumigation must be at least 750 F.
Dosage.-Six ounces of hydrocyanic acid per car.
Application.-The doors should be closed tightly and the ice drip plugged. Remove one insulating plug from each ice bunker and suspend a tray therein. Place on tray a tin cup of 3-ounce capacity with string attached to handle and long enough to fasten at the top of the bunker. Fill each cup with 3 ounces of liquid hydrocyanic acid and pour into trays by tipping with string. Replace plug and close hatch covering tightly.
Period of fumigation.-The car must be kept sealed for a period of 2 hours after the liquid hydrocyanic acid has been applied.






19341 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 11

Handling after fumigation.-Remove pan and cup from ice bunkers. Replace plug with screen, leaving hatches open for aeration. Remove plugs from ice drips. Doors must be kept closed or satisfactorily screened to prevent reinfestation.
B. Fumigation of bananas in refrigerator cars with calcium cyanide
laterial.-Calcium cyanide (88 percent).
Caution.-Observe the same precautions as outlined for liquid hydrocyanic acid treatment (3, A).
Equipment.-Two trays of light wooden construction, 6 to 8 feet long, 2 feet wide, and about 2 inches deep. Sufficient building paper to cover the trays and hatch openings. Four screens made of cotton netting on light wooden frames which will fit tightly in hatch openings.
Condition of car.-Only refrigerator cars in good condition should be used to insure against leaks.
Temperature.-The temperature inside the car during the period of fumigation must be at least 750 F.
Dosage.-Three pounds of calcium cyanide per car.
Application.-Remove plugs from the ice bunkers and insert screens. Cove the hatch openings with paper and close the hatches tightly on the paper. Plug ice drip openings. Cover the trays with paper and apply 1% pounds of calcium cyanide as uniformly as possible in each of the trays and place them on the load in the doorway of the car. Close door tightly.
Period of fumigation.-The car must be kept sealed for a period of 1V2 hours after the calcium cyanide has been applied.
Handling after fumigation.-Remove trays and dispose of residue. Open screened hatches for aeration. Remove plugs from ice drips. Doors must be kept closed or satisfactorily screened to prevent reinfestation.
C. Fumigation of berries with carbon disulphide
Material.-A technical, C.P., or U.S.P. grade of carbon disulphide should be used to fumigate berries.
Caution.-Observe the precautions mentioned in 1, A. 1.
Equipment.-It is necessary to have a gastight room, equipped with a hotwater heating system to volatilize the carbon disulphide over copper coils, and fans to keep the air-and-gas mixture in circulation. A supply of heat should be available to keep the room at the required temperature on cool days.
Temperature.-The water in the coil used for vaporizing the gas must be at least 1480 F. and should not exceed 1800. The room must be at a temperature of 800, or above, during the period of fumigation.
Dosage.-Carbon disulphide must be applied at the rate of 1 pound per 100 cubic feet of space in the room, including the space occupied by the berries.
Period of fumigation.-The berries must be exposed to the gas for a period of
2 hours.
Application.-Crates may be stacked in layers, separated by slats allowing ample space between crates for circulation of the gas. The temperature of the room should be taken before and after fumigation. When the' water in the boiler has reached the proper temperature, close all doors. Start water circulating through coils of vaporizing pan and turn on the fans. Pour the required amount of carbon disulphide through the funnel outside, into the vaporizing pan, and make sure valve is closed. Keep the water circulating throughkthe coils of vaporizing pan for 60 minutes after carbon disulphide has been applied. Keep doors closed for 2 hours. Aerate the house before allowing anyone to enter.

D. Fumigation of berries with ethylene orzide
Material.-Ethylene oxide in cylinder.
Equipment.-It is necessary to have a gastight room.
Temperature.-The temperature of the fruit and the room during the fumigation shall be 750 F. or above.
Dosage.-Ethylene oxide must be applied at the rate of 2 pounds per 1,000 cubic feet of space, including the space occupied by the berries.
Period of fumigation.-The berries must be exposed to the gas for a period of
2 hours.
Application.-Crates may be stacked in layers, separated by slats allowing ample space between the crates for circulation of the gas. Means should be available for the introduction of the gas into the room in the required amounts.






12 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-Mar.

Caution.-This fumigation has been effective in destroying the Japanese beetle and no injury has been noted in raspberries, blackberries, and dewberries fumigated experimentally by this method. Some injury has been observed in blueberries fumigated with ethylene oxide in the concentrations required to destroy all the beetles.


ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO MEXICAN FRUIT FLY QUARANTINE (NO. 64)
TEXAS CITRUS SHIPPING SEASON ENDS APRIL 5
(Press Notice)
MARCH 26, 1934.
Shipment of citrus fruit from the lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas will cease for the season on April 5, 1934, Avery S. Hoyt, the Acting Chief of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, announced today. Under the Mexican fruit worm quarantine regulations, a period of from 6 to 7 months without any fruit on the trees is maintained in Cameron, Hidalgo, and Willacy Counties, in Texas, in order to prevent the establishment of the Mexican fruit fly, which occurs in Mexico and reaches the Texas citrus orchards from time to time.
Each year the State of Texas requires all fruits susceptible to attack by the Mexican fruit fly to be removed from the trees by the end of the shipping season. The closing date is fixed by the Federal and State Departments of Agriculture after consultation. J. M. DelCurto, entomologist of the Texas State Department of Agriculture, concurs in the present order closing the shipping season on April 5, says Mr. Hoyt.
SHIPPING SEASON FOR TEXAS CITRUS FRUIT TO END ON APRIL 5 (Approved Mar. 24, 1934; effective Apr. 5, 1934)
B.P.Q.-361 MARCH 24, 1934.
Announcement is made that the shipping season for citrus fruit under the Federal Mexican fruit worm quarantine (Notice of Quarantine No. 64) from the counties of Cameron, Hidalgo, and Willacy, in Texas, will close for the season on April 5, 1934. The host-free period required under the regulations to be enforced by the State of Texas will for the year 1934 begin on April 6.
Under the provisions of the quarantine it is required that prior to the beginning of the host-free period each year all citrus fruit except lemons and sour limes shall be removed from the trees for shipment, storage, or sale, and all other host fruits shall be destroyed either following removal from the trees or by destruction of the trees themselves. Permits will not be issued for the interstate shipment of citrus fruits after the close of April 5 except as to such fruits shipped from approved storage.
This order modifies an announcement made by the Department on July 31, 1933, when the current shipping season was extended to include April 30, 1934. The modification is necessary owing to the discovery of Mexican fruit flies within the regulated area during the past several weeks and the importance of instituting the host-free period without delay in order to avoid the establishment of infestations in the groves. The findings consist thus far entirely of the capture of adult flies in traps. No infested fruit has been discovered this season, but the presence of such flies either may indicate an undiscovered infestation or may threaten to result in the local establishment of the pest. The present action is taken to avoid that danger.
AVERY S. HOYT,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.


ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO NARCISSUS-BULB QUARANTINE (NO. 62)
NARCISSUS INSPECTION RECORDS FOR 1933 B.P.Q.-358. MARCH 15, 1934.
The following table (table 5) gives a record of the narcissus plantings inspected during the calendar year 1933 under the Federal quarantine for the prevention of spread of bulb pests. The figures given are summarized from the reports sent to this Bureau by the nursery inspectors of the various States who act as Federal collaborators in making such inspections.






1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 13

Similar tables have been issued in previous years, that for 1932 being given on pages 143 and 144 of no. 114 of the Service and Regulatory Announcements of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine.
The number of narcissus bulbs of all types reported as inspected in 1933 totals 305,875,898. This is an increase of about 1 percent over the number reported the previous year. About 59 percent of the bulbs reported for 1933 are Paper Whites and other polyanthus varieties commonly grown in the South, an increase over 1932; and about 41 percent are of the daffodil type produced in the Northern States, a decrease from 1932. In this series of tables the only varieties considered as of the polyanthus type are Paper White, Soliel d'Or, Chinese Sacred Lily, Grand Monarque, Aspacia, Elvira, and a few uncommon varieties grown in small numbers. The figures therefore differ to some extent from the census totals, since the Census Bureau accepted the reporting growers' division into "narcissus (polyanthus)" and "narcissus (all other)" and many growers customarily include within the polyanthus group numerous important hardy Poetaz varieties, such as Laurens Koster.
The figures given in the table showing "bulbs certified", whether on the basis of freedom from infestation or on account of treatment, indicate supplies available for shipment so far as adequate inspection and freedom from pests are concerned. The greater proportion of such bulbs are, however, replanted by the growers on their own premises for the purpose of securing increase in future years. Growers estimate that only from 20 to 30 percent of the total number of bulbs inspected is available for interstate movement during any one year.
Infestations with the bulb eelworm (Anguillulina dipsaci, formerly called Tylenchus dipsaci) were reported in 1933 as to one or more plantings in each of the following States: California, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Maryland, Michigan, Missouri, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oregon, Tennessee, Virginia, and Washington. In addition to the records for the year 1933, this species had previously been reported on properties in Alabama, Indiana, Kansas,, Kentucky, Mississippi, Rhode Island, Utah, and Wisconsin. Some of these properties have not since been reported as inspected, and infestation may possibly still be persisting in some of them.
Greater bulb flies were reported in California, Michigan, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, and Washington. They have also been found in previous years in Illinois, Rhode Island, Utah, and Virginia.
AVERY S. HoYT,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.










14 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-Mar.



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1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 15

TERMINAL INSPECTION OF PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS
ARKANSAS DISCONTINUES TERMINAL INSPECTION
INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS
POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL, Washington, March 30, 1934.
POSTMASTER:
MY DEAR SIR: The chief plant inspector of Arkansas has advised that the State of Arkansas desires to discontinue the terminal inspection of nursery stock and all other plants. Therefore, parcels of such matter arriving at the office of address may be delivered to the addressees without first being subjected to terminal inspection under section 596, Postal Laws and Regulations. Please be governed accordingly in future.
Very truly yours,
C. B. EILENBERGER,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.


MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS
P.Q.C.A.-283, Supplement No. 2 JANUARY 25, 1934.
PLANT QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS OF THE REPUBLIC OF CUBA
FRUITS AND OTHER PLANT PRODUCTS, CERTIFICATION OF TRANSSHIPPED OR RESHIPPED CONSIGNMENTS
The Cuban decree of May 28, 1933, prescribes:
1. That consignments of fruits and other plant products transshipped or reshipped to Cuba, whose entry into that country is permitted under a certificate of origin, shall bear the original certification of the country of origin, or in lieu thereof, a copy of the same certified by the chief of the plant inspection service of the port where reshipment is effected, and the copy shall be visaed by the Cuban consul at that port.
2. Fruits and other plant products, the containers, wraps, or labels of which indicate that they are from countries from which certificate of origin is required, must bear the said certification or a certified copy of the same, even when issued as of other origin.
AVERY S. HOYT,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.


P.Q.C.A.-303, Supplement No. 1 FEBRUARY 19, 1934.
PLANT QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS OF THE NETHERLANDS
IMPORT AND TRANSIT RESTRICTIONS ON POTATOES
The law of July 7, 1932, prohibits the importation and transit of potatoes and fresh vegetables from countries designated by the Minister of Agriculture of the Netherlands. It also prohibits the importation and transit of fresh vegetables from such countries during the period March 15 to October 14, inclusive, unless each shipment is accompanied by a written declaration of the phytopathological authorities of the country of origin, affirming that the fresh vegetables are not infested with the Colorado beetle, and that they were grown in and proceed from a locality where that beetle does not occur, and so far as known, does not occur within a distance of 200 kilometers.
The Minister of Agriculture may grant exemption from the foregoing provisions under certain conditions.
Order No. 11319 of the same date designates France as a country from which the importation and transit of potatoes are prohibited. -Consequently, the above provisions at present apply only to potatoes and fresh vegetables from France.
AVERY S. HOYT,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.





16 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-Mar.

P.Q.C.A.-284, Supplement No. 8 FEBRUARY 28, 1934.
PLANT QUARANTINE EXPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF MEXICO
EXPORTATION OF CERTAIN CACTI PROHIBITED
The decision of the Mexican Secretaria de Agricultura y Fomento of December 20, 1933, supplements the regulations of June 28, 1930 (see Supplement No. 6 to P.Q.C.A.-284) by prohibiting the collection of the following-named cacti for exportation from Mexico:
Ariocarpus fissuratus, A. kotschoubeyanus, A. retusus, A. trigonus, Astrophytum capricornis, A. mnyriostigma, Cephalocereus senilis, Coryphantha (Neomammillaria) poselgeriana, C. (Neomammillaria) valida, Echinocactus grusoni, E. horizonthalonius, Echinocereus conglomeratus, E. delaeti, E. pectinatus, E. rigidissimus, Leuchtenbergia principis, Lophophora williamsi, Neomammillaria candida, N. chinocephala, N. elegans, N. grahami, N. lenta, N. leona, N. micromeris, N. parkinsoni, N. rhodantha, Neolloydia (Echinocactus) beguini, Obregonia denegri, Opuntia cereiformis, O. microdasys, Pachycereus chrysomallus, Pelecyphora aselliformis, Solisia pectinata, Thelocactus (Echinocactus) bicolor-tricolor, T. (Echinocactus) bicolor-bolansis, and T. heterochromus.
AVERY S. HOYT,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.


B.P.Q.-348, Supplement No. 1 MARCH 14, 1934.
PLANT QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF CHILE
Chilean decree no. 4 of January 4, 1934, extends the prohibitions of article 5 of decree no. 105 of February 11, 1925 (see B.P.Q.-348, p. 3) to wheat intended or milling. The text of decree no. 4 follows:
ARTICLE 1. Only wheat intended for milling which is absolutely free from the Angoumois grain moth, Sitotroga cerealella, may be admitted into Chilean territory.
ART. 2. Each shipment must be accompanied by a certificate issued by competent authorities of the exporting country, visaed by the respective Chilean consul, affirming that the region in which the wheat was grown is free from the insect mentioned in article 1.
ART. 3. Shipments of wheat and their containers proceeding from regions where this insect exists shall be fumigated or treated with heat before shipment in such a manner as to insure the total destruction of insects which may infest the wheat.
ART. 4. A single proof of the presence of live insects in the shipment offered for importation will be sufficient cause for the Servicio de Sanidad Vegetal to prevent its unlading.
ART. 5. Sacks containing wheat shall be strong enough to withstand the ordinary operations of lading and unlading without being torn.
ART. 6. Wheat imported for seed purposes shall be subject to the general provisions of the regulations governing the importation of seeds.
ART. 7. Violations of the foregoing provisions will be subject to the sanctions of decree no. 177 of December 31, 1924.
AVERY S. HOYT,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.


B.P.Q.-348, Supplement No. 2 MARCH 15, 1934.
PLANT QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF CHILE
REGULATIONS TO PREVENT THE INTRODUCTION OF COTTONSEED PESTS
The following is the text, in translation, of decree no. 671, of October 30, 1933: ARTICLE 1. The importation is permitted only of cottonseed contained in sacks.
The sacks shall be of material sufficiently strong to prevent their being. stretched open or torn during the trip. Unlading of torn sacks will not be permitted.
ART. 2. Cottonseed from regions where the pink bollworm exists shall be fumigated or treated by heat before embarkation, which fact shall be accredited by a certificate issued by a competent official authority of the exporting country and visaed by the respective Chilean consul.





1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 17

ART. 3. If it be determined that the seeds on arriving in the country carry live insects, the shipment shall be treated in accordance with the provisions of article
3 of the law of plant sanitary police. (See B.P.Q.-348, Basic Law, p. 1.)
ART. 4. Fumigation or treatment will not be required prior to the embarkation of cottonseed from countries in which pink bollworm does not exist; these being subject to the general provisions of the regulations on the importation of seeds.
ART. 5. Cottonseed from countries in which Disdercus ruficollis exists must come in sacks and the importers shall be required to transport them, immediately after their discharge, to hermetically closed warehouses, all the windows of which shall be completely protected by fine wire screens.
ART. 6. If it be determined by the service of plant health that live insects infest the seeds, the fumigation of the shipment shall be required in the warehouse in which the seed was placed.
ART. 7. When it is desired to import cottonseed for planting, application must be made to the service of plant health for the respective authorization. That service will investigate the origin of the seed, which will remain at the disposal of the said service pending verification of its sanitary condition. This procedure having been completed, it will be delivered to the interested person.
AVERY S. HOYT,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.


B.P.Q.-360 MARCH 14, 1934.
PLANT QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, ISLAND OF CYPRUS
This summary of the plant quarantine import restrictions of Cyprus has been prepared for the information of nurserymen, plant quarantine officials, and others interested in the exportation of plants and plant products to that island.
The summary was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant quarantine inspector of this Bureau, from orders of the Governor in Council, No. 1054, of May 13, 1925; No. 1305, of May 20, 1929; and No. 1421, of April 23, 1931.
The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct and complete up to the time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used independently of, nor as a substitute for, the original texts of the decrees, and it is not to be interpreted as legally authoritative. The decrees themselves should be consulted for the exact text.
AVERY S. HOYT,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.
BASIc LAWS
Customs and Excise Regulation laws, 1879 to (no. 3) 1930; Diseases of Plant Prevention law, 1893; Customs Excise and Revenue law, 1899; Phylloxera Prevention law, 1890.
CONCISE SUMMARY
Importation prohibited
Potatoes for consumption. (Order-in-Council No. 1305, May 20, 1929.)
Hay or straw, save under permit from the Director of Agriculture.
Grasses, leaves, or other vegetable matter, used as packing, from any place not mentioned in article 1, Order-in-Council No. 1421, April 23, 1931, except as manufactured wrappers of dry straw, which may be admitted.
Grapevines, including fresh or dry parts thereof, but excluding raisins and currants, except under special permission of the Governor. (Order-in-Council No. 1421, Apr. 23, 1931.)
Importation restricted
Cottonseed, seed cotton, raw cotton, any living or dry parts of cotton plants, and packing material used in the transportation or storage thereof: Must be accompanied by a shipper's declaration of origin and shall be disinfected on arrival or placed in quarantine. (Order-in-Council No. 1054 of May 13, 1925.)
Potatoes for seed purposes: Shipper's declaration and inspection certificate of competent authority in the country of origin, affirming freedom from potato tuber worm, wart disease, and Colorado potato beetle. (Order-in-Council No. 1305 of May 20, 1929.)





18 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [an.-Mar.

Bananas and tomatoes from Palestine: Certificate of competent authority in prescribed form attesting fumigation.
Fresh fruits and vegetables in the raw state.
Trees and plants, and every living part thereof, including seeds.
Flowers, cut or otherwise.
Dried plants and flowers.
Staves which have been used as grapevine props or for similar purposes.
Binding that has been used for grapevines or other plants.
Earth and gravel, leaf and garden mold.
Animal and vegetable manures, except guano, bone meal and other fossil or chemically prepared manures: Must be imported directly from any place named in article 1 and must be accompanied by a certificate of competent authority in the form prescribed in article 2 (1) (a). (Order-in-Council No. 1421 of Apr. 23, 1931.)
Importation unrestricted
Cereals and all dry seeds, except cottonseed, free from husk, straw, and earth; acorns and valonia.
Almonds, walnuts, chestnuts, and other nuts, including ground nuts, free from outer husks, leaves, stalks, and branches.
Preserves, crystallized fruits, bottled and canned fruits, and vegetables hermetically sealed in proper receptacles.
Flour and meal of all kinds and preparations thereof.
Tamarind; saponaria wood.
Vegetables desiccated by artificial heat and inclosed in packages.
Dry and aromatic plants used for medicinal purposes and for dyeing, if free from earth.
Dried fruits and vegetables; carobs, if free from earth. (Order-in-Council No. 1421 of Apr. 23, 1931.)
RESTRICTIONS ON THE IMPORTATION OF COTTON
(Order-in-Council No. 1054 of May 13, 1925)
ARTICLE 1. This order is cited as the Importation of Cotton Order, 1925.
ART. 2. (a) Raw cotton, cottonseed, seed cotton, any living or dry part of the cotton plant, and packing material which has or is suspected of having been used in the transportation or storage thereof, may be imported into Cyprus directly or indirectly from the American Continent (including Canada, the United States, South America, and The West Indies), China, Cochin-China, Greece, India, Turkestan, Turkey, Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, and any country not possessing a government entomological service, under the following conditions:
(1) Through the port of Famagusta only;
(2) When accompanied by a shipper's declaration in the following form:
I, the undersigned, member of the firm of consigner of
cases of each containing and marked to be shipped by S.S. from (port of departure) to (port of arrival) do hereby declare that the herein referred to was all grown at (locality), in the district of in (country).
(Signature) .
Declared at this day of -- before me.
(Name and title of officer administering oath)

(3) Forthwith on importation they are disinfected in such a manner as the Director of Agriculture shall prescribe: Provided, That in lieu of disinfection the Director of Agriculture may order that such articles be placed in quarantine in such place and for such period as he shall deem fit;
(b) If such articles have been imported from a country other than those above mentioned:
(1) Importation takes place through the port of Famagusta;
(2) Each shipment must be accompanied by a shipper's declaration in the form set forth above.
ART. 3. Provides for an importer's notice of arrival for any article it is desired to import under the provisions of article 2 (a).
ART. 4. Any article offered for importation under the provisions of article 2
(a) shall be completely inclosed within stout packing material. The package shall be clearly labeled on the outside with identification marks, the name of the article contained, and the country of origin, and such packages shall be opened






1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 19

only in the presence of the official and in the place appointed by the Director of Agriculture.
ART. 5. All expenses incurred in connection with the foregoing matters, including cost of disinfection or quarantine and cost of transport to and from the place of disinfection or quarantine, shall be at the charge of the importer, and in no case shall compensation be payable to the importer in respect to any loss or damage consequent on any action taken by the Director of Agriculture in accordance with the provisions of this order.

RESTRICTIONS ON THE IMPORTATION OF POTATOES
(Order-in-Council No. 1305 of May 20, 1929)
Only seed potatoes may be imported into Cyprus
ARTICLE 1. Potatoes for seed purposes only may be imported into Cyprus. Their importation may be made through the ports of Famagusta, Larnaca, Limassol, or Paphos only, and in such quantities and from such countries only as shall be specially authorized beforehand in writing by the Director of Agriculture. The potatoes shall be imported direct from the country of origin: Provided, That they may be transshipped if they remain in customs charge while at the transshipping port.
ART. 2. All potatoes imported for seed purposes must be the produce of crops inspected while growing by inspectors of the Department of Agriculture or equivalent authority of the country in which they were grown, and must have been found by these inspectors to be not less than 97 percent pure.
ART. 3. No bag of potatoes imported for seed purposes shall contain more than one hundredweight (112 pounds).
Shipper's declaration and inspection certificates required
ART. 4. Every consignment of potatoes for seed purposes shall be accompanied by the following documents:
(a) A shipper's declaration in the following form: Address:
I, the undersigned, member of the firm of consignors of
cases/bags containing a total of net weight of potatoes for seed purposes and marked to be shipped per S.S. from (port of departure)
t9 (port of arrival) do hereby declare that:
(1) These potatoes were grown by ,of at
(2) They are of the variety (3) Their size and grade is
(4) The number of the certificate or inspection report issued by a duly authorized inspector of the Department of Agriculture or equivalent authority of the country in which they were grown, following the inspection of the crop during growth is
(5) These potatoes were not grown in land infested with potato tuber worm (Phthorimaea) Gnorimoschema operculella, Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata), or infected with wart disease (Synchytrium endobioticum).
(Signature)
Declared at this day of 19-, before me.
(Name and title of officer administering oath)
(b) A certificate from the department of Agriculture or other equivalent authority of the country from which the potatoes are imported, certifying at a date not more than 30 days before the time of dispatch of the consignment that the diseases referred to therein have not been known to exist, so far as it is aware, within 5 miles of the place or places in which the potatoes are declared to have been grown.
(c) A certificate from the source indicated in (b) certifying that the consignment has been inspected and found to be in good condition and free from diseases and insect pests.
Inspection on arrival required
ART. 5. Every consignment of potatoes for seed purposes shall be subject to inspection by the Director of Agriculture or by an inspecting officer acting in his behalf.






20 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-Mar..

Disposal of infected shipments
ART. 6. If on such inspection as in article 5 the potatoes are found to be not free from disease or should the inspector have reason to suspect them of being diseased they may at the discretion of the Director of Agriculture be ordered to beeither:
(1) Destroyed by the importer or his agent under the supervision of the inspector; or (2) subjected to such process of disinfection or treatment as the inspector may prescribe, the expenses of such process being paid by the importer; or (3) reexported.
Provided always that in no case shall compensation be payable to the importer in respect of any loss or damage consequent on any action taken by the Director of Agriculture or any inspecting officer in accordance with the provisions of this clause.
ART. 7. If a consignment of potatoes for seed purposes does not conform to the conditions of articles 2 and 3, or is unaccompanied by the documents required in article 4 hereof, or if such documents do not conform to the shipper's declaration prescribed by this order, the consignment shall be dealt with as if it had been inspected as provided for in article 5 and found to be not free from disease.
ART. 8. Concerns the sale of imported seed potatoes.
ART. 9. Revokes previous potato orders.
ART. 10. Makes the effective date of the order May 27, 1929.

RESTRICTIONS ON THE IMPORTATION OF PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS
(Order-in-Council No. 1421 of Apr. 23, 1931)
Products and countries of origin
ARTICLE 1. Fresh fruits and vegetables in the raw state; trees and plants, and living parts thereof (inlcuding seeds, save those specially excepted); all flowers, cut or otherwise; all dried plants and flowers; staves that have been used as grapevine props or for similar purposes; all binding that has been used for grape-vines or other plants; earth and gravel, leaf and garden mold; animal and vegetable manures, except guano, bone dust and other fossil or chemically prepared manures, may be imported from: Great Britain, Northern Ireland, Irish Free State, Belgium, Denmark, Holland, Norway, Sweden, and any other country possessing a government phytopathological service, subject to prior permissionfrom the Director of Agriculture.
ART. 2. (1) The plants and plant products mentioned in article 1 may be imported into Cyprus from the countries named in that article under the following. conditions:
Inspection certificate required
(a) Each consignment of such plants and plant products shall be accompanied: by a certificate in the form set forth below, a copy whereof shall be delivered to the Director of Agriculture 7 days before the arrival of the consignment to which the certificate refers. A certificate in the same form shall be attached to theoutside of any mail package of such plants and plant products.
Prescribed inspection certificate
This is to certify that the plants included in the consignment/package described below were thoroughly inspected by me, a duly authorized official of the Government of (name of country) on (date) and were found or believed by me to be healthy and free from plant diseases and insect pests, especially from the following:
Insects: (Aleurodes) Dialeurodes citri, citrus whitefly; Anthonomus grandis, boll weevil; Aspidiotus perniciosus, San Jose scale; Chionaspis furfura, scurfy scale; Chrysomphalus aonidum, Florida red scale; Conotrachelus nenuphar, plum curculio; (Cydia) Grapholitha molesta, oriental fruit moth; (Diaspis) Aulacaspis pentagona, white peach scale; Epochra canadensis, currant fruit fly; Eriosoma lanigerum, woolly apple aphid; Heliothis obsoleta, corn ear worm; Heterocordylus malinus; Icerya aegyptiaca; 1 Icerya purchasi, cottony-cushion scale; Ihidomyrmex humilis, Argentine ant; Lepidosaphes beckii, purple scale; L. gloverii, Glover's scale; L. ulmi, oyster-shell scale; Leptinotarsa decemlineata, Colorado potato beetle; Lygidea mendax, apple redbug; Malacosoma americana, eastern tent caterpillar; M. disstria, forest tent caterpillar; Phylloxera (vastatrix) vitifoliae, grapeSNot recorded as occurring in the United States.






19341 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 21

phylloxera; Prodenia litura; 1 Pseudococcus comstocki; Rhagoletis cerasi, 1 European cherry fruit fly; R. cingulata, cherry fruit fly; R. fausta, black cherry fruit fly; R. pomonella, apple maggot; and Saissetia oleae, black scale.
Fungi: Bacillus amylovorus, fire blight; Bacterium tumefaciens, crown gall; Endothia parasitica, chestnut blight; Plasmopara (Peronoplasmopara) humuli, hop downy mildew; Plowrightia morbosa, black knot; Synchytrium endobioticum, potato wart; Urocystis cepulae, onion smut.
Signature --------------------------Title ------------------------------Date -----------------------------------------------------Number and description of packages ----------------------------Distinguishing marks---------------------------------------Nature of contents -----------------------------------------Grown at -------------------------------------------------Name and address of exporter ---------------------------------Name and address of consignee -------------------------------Name of vessel ----------------------------------------------Date of shipment ------------------------------------------Port of shipment. ------------------------------------------Port of landing in Cyprus ----------------------------------Approximate date of landing ---------------------------------Inspection required
(b) They shall be subject to inspection by any official of the Agricultural Department duly authorized in that behalf by the Director of Agriculture.
(c) They shall be subject to any treatment which the inspector may require.
Notice of arrival required
(2) Importers of such goods, articles, or merchandise shall inform the Director of Agriculture in writing of the arrival or the expected arrival of any such materials.
Packing
(3) Such materials shall be completely inclosed within stout packing material, which shall be clearly labeled on the outside with the identification marks and the name of the goods, articles, or merchandise therein contained, and shall be
-opened only in the presence of an officer of the Agricultural Department duly .authorized in that behalf by the Director of Agriculture.

Expenses charged to importer
(4) All expenses incurred with the foregoing matters, including cost of transport to and from the place of disinfection, shall be at the charge of and payable by the importer of the goods.
No compensation for damage
(5) No action shall be and no compensation will be payable in respect of any loss or damage consequent upon any action taken by the Director of Agriculture or any authorized official, in accordance with the provisions of this order.
Tomatoes and bananas from Palestine
ART. 3. Tomato and banana fruit may be imported from Palestine into Cyprus under the following conditions only:
(a) They shall be imported directly from Palestine.
(b) Each consignment shall be accompanied by a certificate from the competent authority of the country of origin in prescribed form, certifying that the consignment has been fumigated and stating the kind and quantity of chemicals used, the duration of treatment, the space occupied during treatment, and whether the treatment was carried out under single or double fumigation sheets, in an airtight chamber or in a vacuum apparatus.
ART. 4. The importation of hay or straw other than hay or straw imported under the provisions of the Importation of Fodderpacking Order, 1926, is prohibited, save under permit from the Director of Agriculture.
1 Not recorded as occurring in the United States.






22 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-Mar.

ART. 5. Grasses, leaves, or other vegetable matter used as packing for goods imported from any place not mentioned in article 1 shall be destroyed at the customhouse at the port of arrival, except when such packing is in the form of manufactured wrappers of dry straw, which may be admitted.
Importation of grapevines prohibited
ART. 6. The importation of the grapevine, including the fresh or dry parts thereof, but excluding raisins and currants, is prohibited unless the special permission of the Governor is first obtained.
Unrestricted products
ART. 7. Nothing contained in this order shall be deemed to prohibit the importation of the following: Wheat, barley, and other cereals, and all dry seeds (except cottonseed) properly cleaned from the husk, straw, and earth; acorns, valonia; almonds, walnuts, chestnuts, and other nuts, including ground nuts, free from the outer husks, leaves, stalks, and branches; preserves, crystallized fruits; bottled and canned fruits and vegetables hermetically sealed in proper receptacles; flour and meal of all kinds, and every preparation thereof; tamarind, saponaria wood; vegetables desiccated by artificial heat and enclosed in packages; dry and aromatic plants used for medicinal purposes and for dyeing, if free from earth; dried fruits and vegetables, provided the proper officer of customs is satisfied that they are bona fide dried fruit and vegetables, and subject to inspection by any officer of the Agricultural Department and to any treatment at the expense and risk of the importer which may be required by such officer; carobs, if free from earth.
ART. 8. No articles, goods, or merchandise, the importation of which is in any way prohibited or restricted under the provisions of this order, shall be allowed to be imported from any place or country from which the importation of such articles, goods, or merchandise is not prohibited or restricted, unless the proper officer of customs is satisfied that such articles, goods, or merchandise do not originate in any place or country from which the importation of the same is prohibited or restricted, and that the other requirements of the order have been complied with in respect of such articles, goods, or merchandise.
ART. 9. Nothing contained in this order shall prevent the importation by the Director of Agriculture on behalf of the Government of any articles, goods, or merchandise dealt with under this order for the purposes of experimental cultivation or scientific investigation.

P.Q.C.A.-314, Supplement No. 4 MARCH 20, 1934.
PLANT QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, BRITISH HONDURAS
Proclamation no. 19, of July 21, 1932, superseding proclamation no. 3, of May 27, 1931 (see Supplement No. 1 to P.Q.C.A.-314), and effective July 23, 1932, declares:
The importation prohibited into British Honduras from all sources except Canada, the United Kingdom and Ireland, and the United States of America, of fruits (except green bananas, nuts, and dried or processed fruits); and vegetables (except potatoes, onions, canned or processed vegetables, grains, seeds, dried beans, and peas).
Each shipment of fruits and vegetables from Canada and from the United Kingdom and Ireland shall be accompanied by a certificate affirming that the products are of home origin.
Fruits (except bananas and plantains) grown in Jamaica may be imported only when each shipment is accompanied by a certificate of origin and inspection issued by the agricultural officer.
Plants packed or growing in soil (except citrus plants) may be imported only when a certificate of introduction is granted by the agricultural officer after inspection and, if necessary, fumigation.
All such plants and plant products, offered for entry into the Colony, which do not comply with the above regulations, shall be destroyed by the Government.
This proclamation shall not apply to materials required by the Agricultural Department.
AVERY S. HOYT,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.






1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 23

B.P.Q.-346 (Revised Mar. 15, 1934) MARCH 15, 1934.

EUROPEAN CORN BORER
STATE REGULATIONS
The following is a summary of the current quarantines relating to the European corn borer, of which notices have reached this Bureau from the various States.
Since the summary was revised in March 1933 new regulations on the part of Indiana, Michigan, and Ohio, and revisions of former regulations on the part of Illinois, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, and Wisconsin have been issued, which place no requirements on vegetables and floral plants shipped from Indiana, Michigan, and Ohio. The regulations of these eight States, with the exceptions of Kansas and Nebraska, also exempt from any requirements, during a part of the year, green corn and certain floral plants from any of the infested States. The part-year exemption also applies to beans, beets, and rhubarb in the regulations of Indiana, Michigan, and Ohio. A recent revision of the Utah quarantine places a complete embargo on the restricted articles from the infested States, and a quarantine by Idaho dated February 15, 1933, has reached this Bureau, which provides for acceptance of State certification of such articles.
This compilation is not intended to be used independently of or as a substitute for the quarantines and is not to be interpreted as legally authoritative. It should also be understood that the Bureau is not in a position to give explanatory information concerning State quarantines. Inquiries as to the interpretation of such restrictions, or requests for the full text of orders, should be addressed to the appropriate official of the State concerned. (See list of State officials on p. 29.)
To secure a Federal certificate required under regulations of certain States as shown in the summary, inspection may be arranged by addressing the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, 2101 North Sixth Street, Harrisburg, Pa. For the State certificate, address the plant quarantine officer or State nursery inspector of your own State.
Wherever the term "certificate" is used in the following summary, it refers to a special certificate showing that the articles have been inspected and found free from the European corn borer. A general State nursery inspection certificate does not fulfill the requirements with respect to these quarantines.

SUMMARY OF REGULATIONS
Method of use.-In using the following summary it is suggested that the shipper mark in the second column (with a colored pencil or otherwise) the State from which he ships, wherever it occurs in the column. Also in column 3 the group number of the articles he expects to ship wherever he finds they are entered.
Column 4 shows whether a State or Federal certificate may be used, and the nature of other restrictions or exemptions. For example, it will be seen that a Connecticut florist shipping cut flowers of gladiolus must attach a certificate of the United States Department of Agriculture for shipments to Arizona, California, Colorado, Georgia, Louisiana, Nevada, and Oregon; that a State certificate is acceptable for shipments to a number of other States; that a part-year exemption from any certification or other requirement is provided in shipments to Indiana, Michigan, and Ohio; and that these flowers are not admissible to Utah or Wyoming from the quarantined States under any condition.
The kinds of articles restricted vary somewhat and they are accordingly arranged in groups in a list given at the top of each page. The designation of the classes of beans covered, however, shows so much diversity among the different State orders that the exact phraseology is given in the third column after each State name.







24 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-Mar.


Restricted articles
Group 1.-Corn, broomcorn, sorghums, Sudan grass; (debris, cobs, and parts of plants in this group except
clean shelled corn and seeds).
Group 2.-Aster, chrysanthemum, gladiolus, dahlia (cut flowers or entire plants except bulbs or tubers
without stems); beans in the pod (see below); beets with tops, rhubarb. Group 3.-Celery.
Group 4.-Oat and rye straw; cosmos, zinnia, hollyhock (cut flowers or entire plants). Group 5.-Spinach. (Only South Dakota places requirements with respect to spinach. See p. 27.)

To (States which From (quarantined Restricted articles (see Nature of requirements
have enacted States)- above groups) Nature of requirement quarantines)Arizona ......- Connecticut, Michigan, Groups 1 and 2. Kinds of Federal certificate required.
Ohio, Indiana, New beans under regulation: Hampshire, Pennsyl- "Lima beans in the pod; vania, Maine, New green shell beans in the Jersey, Rhode Island, pod (of the variety Massachusetts, New known as Cranberry or York, Vermont, West Horticultural)." Virginia.
Arkansas--------......... Connecticut, Michigan, Group 1.................--------------- Entirely prohibited.
Ohio, Indiana, New
Hampshire, Pennsylvania.
Maine, New Jersey, Groups 2,3, and 4. Kinds State or Federal certificate Rhode Island, Massa- of beans under regula- required. chusetts, New York, tion:"Beans in the pod." Vermont, West Virginia.
California........ -------Connecticut, Michigan, Group 1 ---------------................... Federal certificate required,
Rhode Island, Indiana, which must show disinNew Hampshire, Vir- fection. ginia, Kentucky, New
Jersey, Vermont, Maryland, New York, West
Virginia.
Maine, Ohio, Wisconsin, Group 2. Kinds of beans Federal certificate required, Massachusetts, Penn- underregulation: "Lima showing disinfection or sylvania. beans in the pod, green inspection.
shell beans in the pod of
the variety known as
Cranberry or Horticultural."
Colorado--------......... Connecticut, New Hamp- Groups 1 and 2. Kinds of Federal certificate required.
shire, Rhode Island, beans under regulation: Indiana, New Jersey, Lima beans in the pod, Vermont, Maine, New green shell beans in the York, West Virginia, pod of the variety known Massachusetts. Ohio, as 'Cranberry or HortiMichigan, and Penn- cultural'." sylvania.
Florida---------........... Connecticut, Michigan, Groups 1 and 2. KiLdsof State or Federal certificate
Ohio, Indiana, New beans under regulation: required. Hampshire, Pennsylva- "Green and lima beans nia, Maine, New Jersey, in the pod." Rhode Island, Massachusetts, New York,
Vermont, West Virginia,
and others becoming infested.
Georgia...... --------- Connecticut, Michigan, Groups 1 and 2. Kinds of Federal certificate required.
Ohio, Indiana, New beans under regulation: Hampshire, Pennsylva- "Lima beans in the pod, nia, Maine, New Jersey, green shell beans in the Rhode Island, Massa- pod (of the variety chusetts, New York, known as' Cranberry or Vermont, West Virginia, Horticultural')." and others becoming infested.
Idaho----------............. Connecticut, New Hamp- Groups 1, 2, 3, and 4. State or Federal certificate
shire, Rhode Island, Kinds of beans under required. Ear corn in small Indiana, New Jersey, regulation: "Lima beans quantities for exhibition Virginia, Maine, New in the pod, green shell purposes is admitted if York, Vermont, Massa- beans in the pod." treated with heat and so chusetts, Ohio, West certified. Virginia, Michigan,
Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin.
Illinois---------........... Connecticut, Michigan, Group 1---------------................... Entirely prohibited except
Ohio, Indiana, New that green corn may be Hampshire, Pennsylva- shipped without a certifinia, Maine, New Jersey, cate or other requirements, Rhode Island, Massa- from Jan. 1 to June 14. chusetts, New York,
Vermont, and West Virginia.







1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 25

Restricted articles-Continued

To (States which From (quarantined Restricted articles (see Nature of requirements
have enacted States)- above groups) Nature of requirements quarantines)Illinois ........-------- Connecticut, New Hamp- Group 2. Kinds of beans State or Federal certificate
shire, Pennsylvania, under regulation: "Lima required except that cut Maine, New Jersey, beans in the pod, green flowers or plants (without Rhode Island, Massa- shell beans in the pod." old stems) of chrysanthechusetts, New York, mum, aster, and dahlia Vermont, and West Vir- may be shipped without a ginia. certificate or other requirements, from Jan. 1 to Apr. 30.
Group 1.................--------------- Entirely prohibited except
Indiana.......... ---------Connecticut, New Hamp- that green corn may be
shire, Pennsylvania, shipped without restriction Maine, New Jersey, from Jan. 1 to June 1. Rhode Island, Massa- Group 2. Kinds of beans State or Federal certificate chusetts, New York, under regulation: "Lima required except that young Virginia, and Vermont. beans in the pod, green chrysanthemum, a s t e r, shell beans in the pod."' dahlia, cut flowers of gladiolus without old stalk, and beans, beets, and rhubarb may be shipped without a certificate or other requirements, from Jan. 1 to June 1.
Iowa -----------............. Connecticut, Michigan,
Ohio, Indiana, New Group 1 ---------------............... Entirely prohibited.
Hampshire, Pennsylva- Groups 2, 3, and 4. Kinds State or Federal certificate nia, Maine, New Jersey, of beans under regula- required. Rhode Island, Massa- tion: "Beans in the chusetts, New York, pod." Vermont, and West Virginia.
Connecticut, Michigan, Group 1 ................--------------- Entirely prohibited.
Ohio, Indiana, New
Hampshire, Pennsylvania, Maine, New Jersey,
Rhode Island, Massachusetts, New York,
Vermont, and West VirKansas----------........... ginia.
Connecticut, New Hamp- Group 2. Kinds of beans State or Federal certificate shire, Pennsylvania, under regulation: "Lima required. Maine, New Jersey, beans in the pod, green Rhode Island, Massa- shell beans in the pod." chusetts, New York,
Vermont, and West Virginia.
Kentucky ------- Connecticut, Michigan, Ohio, Indiana, New
Hampshire, Pennsylva- Group 1 ---------------.................. Entirely prohibited.
nia, Maine, New Jersey, Groups 2 and 4. Kinds of State or Federal certificate Rhode Island, Massa- beans under regulation: required. chusetts, New York, "Beans in the pod." Vermont, and West Virginia. I
Louisiana......... --- Connecticut, Michigan, Groups 1 and 2. Kinds of Federal certificate required,
Ohio, Indiana, New beans under regulation: except that rhubarb is exHampshire, Pennsylva- "Lima beans in the pod; empt from certification or nia, Maine, New Jersey, green shell beans in the other requirement. Rhode Island, Massa- pod (varieties variously chusetts, New York, known as Cranberry or
Vermont, West Virginia, Horticultural shell and others becoming beans)." infested.
Group 1 ---------------.... Entirely prohibited except
that green corn may be shipped without a certificate or other restriction Michigan-------......... Connecticut, New Hamp- Group 2. Kinds of beans Stfroma1 to June 1.ertificate
sire, Pennsylvania, under regulation: "Lima required except that young Rhodaine, New Jersey, beans in the pod, green chrysanthemum, aster, chusetts, New Yaork, shell beans in the pod."2 dahlia, cut flowers of gladiVirginia, Vermont. olus without any old stalk, and beans, beets, and rhubarb may be shipped without a certificate or other requirement from Jan. 1 to June 1.
I This term includes varieties variously known as "Cranberry or Horticultural shell beans" but does not include dry beans, shelled lima or other beans, or string or wax beans.
2 This term includes varieties known as "Cranberry or Horticultural shell beans" but does not include dry beans, shelled lima or other beans, or string or wax beans.







26 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-Mar.

Restricted articles-Continued


To (States which From (quarantined Restricted articles (see
have enacted States)- above groups) Nature of requirements quarantines)Mississippi ....... Connecticut, Michigan, Groups 1, 2, and 3. Kinds State or Federal certificate Ohio, Indiana, New of beans under regula- required. Hampshire, Pennsylva- tion: "Green and lima nia, Maine, New Jersey, beans in the pod." Rhode Island, Massachusetts, New York,
Vermont,West Virginia,
and others becoming
infested.
Connecticut, Michigan, Group 1 ..---------------................ Entirely prohibited except
Ohio, Indiana, New that green corn maybe Hampshire, Pennsylva- shipped from Jan. 1 to June nia, Maine, New Jersey, 14 without a certificate or Rhode Island, Massa- other requirement. chusetts, New York,
Vermont, WestVirginia.
Missouri --------Connecticut, New Hamp- Group 2. Kinds of beans State or Federal certificate
u......... shire, Pennsylvania, under regulation: "Lima required except that cut Maine, New Jersey, beans in the pod, green flowers or plants (without Rhode Island, Massa- shell beans in the pod." old stems) of chrysanthechusetts, New York, mum, aster, and dahlia Vermont, West Virginia. may be shipped without a certificate or other requirement from Jan. 1 to Apr. 30.
Connecticut, Michigan, Group 1---------------................... Entirely prohibited.
Ohio, Indiana, New
Hampshire, Pennsylvania, Maine, New Jersey,
Rhode Island, Massachusetts, New York,
Nebraska--------..... Vermont, West Virginia.
Connecticut, New Hamp- Group 2. Kinds of beans State or Federal certificate shire, Pennsylvania, under regulation: "Lima required. Maine, New Jersey, beans in the pod, green Rhode Island, Massa- shell beans in the pod." chusetts, New York,
SVermont, West Virginia.
Nevada........... Connecticut, Michigan, Grp
ohi, I ia Group 1 ..--------------- Entirely prohibited.
Ohio, Indiana, New Group 2. Kinds of beans Federal certificate required. Hampshire, Pennsylva- under regulation: "Lima nia, Maine, New Jersey, beans in the pod, green Rhode Island, Massa- shell beans in the pod chusetts, New York, (of the variety known Vermont, West Virginia, as Cranberry or Hortiand others becoming cultural)." infested.
New Mexico...... -----Connecticut, Michigan,
Ohio, Indiana, New Group 1..---------------................ Entirely prohibited.
Hampshire, Pennsylva- Groups 2, 3, and 4. Kinds State or Federal certificate nia, Maine. New Jersey, of beans under regula- required. Rhode Island, Massa- I tion: "Beans in the chusetts, New York, pod." Vermont, West Virginia.
Group 1---------------................... Entirely prohibited except
that green corn may be shipped without a certificate or other restriction from Jan. 1 to June 1.
Ohio.............. -----------Connecticut, New Hamp- Group 2. Kinds of beans State or Federal certificate
shire, Pennsylvania, under regulation: "Lima required except that young Maine, New Jersey, basi h ogen rqie xetta on MaRhode, New Jersey, beans in the pod, green chrysanthemum, aster, chusetts, New York,Massa- shell beans in the pod."3 dahlia, cut flowers of gladichusetts, New York, olus without any old stalk, Virginia, Vermont. and beans, beets, and rhubarb may be shipped without a certificate or other requirement from Jan. 1 to June 1.
Oklahoma ------...... Connecticut, New Hampshire, Rhode Island,
Indiana, New Jersey, Group 1---------------................... Entirely prohibited.
Vermont, Maine, New Groups2, 3, and4. Kinds State or Federal certificate York, West Virginia, of beans under regula- required. Massachusetts, Ohio, tion: "Beans in the Wisconsin, Michigan, pod." Pennsylvania, and
others becoming infested.
SSee footnote 2.







1934J SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 27

Restricted articles-Continued

To (States which From (quarantined Restricted articles (see Nature of requirements
have enacted Nature of requirements quarantines)- States)- above groups) quarantines)Oregon --------- Connecticut, Michigan, Group 1 ................. ---------------Entirely prohibited.
Ohio, Indiana, New Group 2. Kinds of beans Federal certificate required. Hampshire, Pennsylva- under regulation: "Lima nia, Maine, New Jersey, shell beans in the pod, green Rhode shell beans in the pod Rhode Island, Massa-New York, (of the variety known as
cVuet, ew Vigk. Cranberry or HorticulVermont, West Virginia. tural)."
South Carolina... Connecticut, Michigan, Ohio, Indiana, New
Hampshire, Pennsylva- Group 1 ............---------------.. Entirely prohibited.
nia, Maine, New Jersey, Groups 2, 3, and 4. Kinds State or Federal certificate Rhode Island, Massa- of beans under regula- required. chusetts, New York, tion: "Beans in the Vermont, West Virginia, pod." and others becoming
infested.
South Dakota.... Connecticut, Michigan, Groups 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5. Do.4 Ohio, Indiana, New Kinds of beans under Hampshire, Pennsylva- regulation: "Green nia, Maine, New Jersey, beans in the pod." Rhode Island, Massachusetts, New York,
Vermont, West Virginia.
Tennessee........ -------Connecticut, Michigan, Groups 1, 2, 3, and 4. Do.
Pennsylvania, Indiana, Kinds of beans under New Hampshire, Rhode regulation: "Lima Island, Kentucky, New beans in the pod, green Jersey, Virginia, Maine, shell beans in the pod." New York, Vermont,
Massachusetts, Ohio,
West Virginia, Wisconsin.
Texas. ----------........... Connecticut, Michigan, Groups 1 and 2. Kinds of Do.
Ohio, Indiana, New beans under regulation: Hampshire, Pennsylva- "Lima beans in the pod, nia, Maine, New Jersey, green shell beans in the Rhode Island, Massa- pod (of the variety varichusetts, New York, ously known as CranVermont, West Virginia, berry or Horticultural)." and others becoming infested.
Utah------.......-..... ---Connecticut, Michigan, Groups 1 and 2. Kinds of Entirely prohibited.
Ohio, Indiana, New beans restricted: "Lima Hampshire, Pennsylva- beans in the pod, green nia, Maine, New Jersey, shell beans in the pod Rhode Island, Massa- (of the variety known as chusetts, New York, Cranberry or HorticulVermont, West Virginia. tural)."
Group 1 ---------------Entirely prohibited except
Virginia ..--........ ------Connecticut, Michigan, that small quantities of ear
Ohio, Indiana, New corn are admissible for exHampshire, Pennsylva- hibition purposes when Hampshire, Pennsylva- treated with heat and so nia, Mamne, New Jersey, Ohio, Indiana, New Group I ---------------Entirely prohibited.
Hampshire, Pennsylva- Groups 2, 3, and 4. Kinds State or Federal certificate nia, Maine, New Jersey, of beans under regula- required. Rhode Island, Massa- tion: "Beans in the chusetts, New York, pod." Vermont, West Virginia.
Connecticut, Michigan, Group 1 ---------------Entirely prohibited except
Ohio, Indiana, New that green corn may be Hampshire, Pennsylva- shipped from Jan. 1 to June nia, Maine, New Jersey, 14 without a certificate or Rhode Island, Massa- other requirement. chusetts, New York,
Vermont, West Virginia.
Wisconsin........ Connecticut, New Hamp- Group 2. Kinds of beans State or Federal certificate shire, Pennsylvania, under regulation: "Lima required except that cut Maine, New Jersey, beans in the pod, green flowers or plants (without Rhode Island, Massa- shell beans in the pod." old stems) of chrysanthechusetts, New York, mum, aster, and dahlia Vermont, West Virginia. may be shipped without a certificate or other requirement from Jan. 1 to Apr. 30.
4 Shelled corn and seeds of plants in group 1 require certification under South Dakota regulations.






28 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE (Jan.-Mar.

Restricted articles-Continued

To (States which From (quarantined Restricted articles (see have enacted States)- above groups) Nature of requirements uaatns-States)- above groups) quarantines)Wyoming........ -------Connecticut, Michigan, Groups 1, 2, 3, and 4. Entirely prohibited.
Ohio, Indiana, New Kinds of beans restrictHampshire, Pennsylva- ed: "Beans in the pod."
nia, Maine, New Jersey, Rhode Island, Massachusetts, New York, Vermont, West Virginia.

Processed articles exempt
Articles which are processed or manufactured in such manner as to eliminate all danger of carrying the corn borer are exempt from certification or other requirements, under the regulations of most of the States. The following States, however, make no exception to processed articles in the certification requirements or embargoes: Arizona, California, Georgia, Louisiana, Nevada, Oregon, South Carolina (articles in group 1 are exempt when processed or manufactured; those in groups 2, 3, and 4 are not so exempt), Utah, and Wyoming.
REGULATIONS WITH RESPECT TO CANADA

SHIPMENTS TO CANADA
(Canadian regulation 10 [foreign] sixth revision, effective July 21, 1931)
"The importation into the Dominion of Canada of the following plants or plant products from the areas hereinafter described is prohibited except under the conditions specified under Section II.
Section I(a) Corn and broom corn, including all parts of the plant, all sorghums and sudan grass from the following states of the United States of America: Connecticut, Indiana, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, and West Virginia;
(b) During the period June 1 to December 31, cut flowers and entire plants of chrysanthemum, aster, cosmos, zinnia, hollyhock and cut flowers or entire plants of gladiolus and dahlia except the corms and roots thereof without stems, oat and rye straw as such or when used for packing, celery, green beans in the pod, beets with tops, and rhubarb, from the states of Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Rhode Island.
"Provided, however, the products listed above may be imported into Canada through the above mentioned states, from any other state of the United States, when shipped on a through bill of lading or when accompanied by a certificate signed by an authorized official of the United States Department of Agriculture or a State Department of Agriculture giving the name of the state in which the products originated.
Section II(a) Broom corn for manufacturing, clean shelled corn either for seed or feed purposes, and clean seed of broom corn, may be imported from the States listed in subsection (a) of Section I provided such shipments are accompanied by a certificate of inspection, issued by an authorized officer of the United States Department of Agriculture, or by an authorized State official, which states that the shipment is free from infestation by the European corn borer.
(b) The products named above in Subsection (b) of Section I may be imported from the States mentioned within the dates specified, provided they are accompanied by a certificate of inspection issued by an authorized officer of the United States Department of Agriculture, which states that the shipment is free from infestation by the European corn borer. (No certificate is required for these products between January 1 and May 31.)
(c) This regulation shall not apply to the plants or plant products enumerated when they shall have been manufactured or processed in such a manner as to. eliminate all risk of carriage of the European corn borer."






1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 29

SHIPMENTS FROM CANADA
Federal Quarantine no. 41 (revised) prohibits the importation into the United States from all foreign countries and localities of the stalk and all other parts, whether used for packing or other purposes, in the raw or unmanufactured state, of Indian corn or maize, broomcorn, sweet sorghums, grain sorghums, Sudan grass, Johnson grass, and certain other articles, with the following exceptions: 1. Entry allowed without permit of (a) green corn on the cob, in small lots for local use only, from areas in Canada adjacent to the United States; and (b) manufactured articles made of the stalks, leaves, or cobs of corn. 2. Entry allowed under permit of (a) broomcorn for manufacturing purposes; (b) brooms or similar articles made of broomcorn; (c) clean shelled corn and clean seed of the other plants covered by Quarantine no. 41; and (d) corn on the cob from Provinces of Canada west of and including Manitoba.
A number of States include part or all of Canada in the area quarantined, but reference to such restrictions is not included herein as State restrictions on foreign commerce are considered unconstitutional.
For further information as to restrictions on shipments to Canada, apply to Department of Agriculture, Ottawa, Canada.
For further information as to shipments from Canada, apply to Bureau of Plant Quarantine, United States Department of Agriculture, Washington, D.C.
AVERY S. HOYT,
Acting Chief of Bureau.

REFERENCES
The addresses of officers or organizations of the various States which have placed corn borer quarantines, and the designations of the quarantine orders, are given below.
Arizona-State entomologist, Phoenix, Ariz., Quarantine Order No. 12 and
Amendment No. 1, effective January 17, 1933.
Arkansas-State Plant Board, Little Rock, Ark., Quarantine No. 11 and Rule
No. 65, amended effective February 3, 1934.
California-Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine, Sacramento, Calif., Quarantine
Order No. 15 (new series), effective March 10, 1933.
Colorado-State entomologist, Fort Collins, Colo., Quarantine Order No. 4
(second series) as amended effective February 17, 1933.
Florida-State plant board, Gainesville, Fla., Rule 32 (revised), effective August
16, 1932,
Georgia-State entomologist, Atlanta, Ga., Regulation 36 (revised), effective
January 12, 1933.
Idaho-Bureau of Plant Industry, Boise, Idaho, Order No. 2 and Amendment
No. 1, effective February 15, 1933.
Illinois-State department of agriculture, Springfield, Ill., A Proclamation by
the Governor, effective May 1, 1933.
Indiana-State entomologist, Indianapolis, Ind., Quarantine No. 1, effective
May 12, 1933.
Iowa-State entomologist, Ames, Iowa, Warning and Quarantine No. 3, effective
July 25, 1932.
Kansas-State entomological commission, Topeka, Kans., Quarantine No. 5
(revised), effective July 1, 1933.
Kentucky-Commissioner of Agriculture, Lexington, Ky., Quarantine No. 1,
effective October 10, 1932.
Louisiana-State entomologist, Baton Rouge, La., European Corn Borer Quarantine (revised), effective January 16, 1933.
Michigan-Bureau of agricultural industry, Lansing, Mich., Quarantine No. 534,
effective June 20, 1933.
Mississippi-State plant board, State College, Miss., Rule 49, amended September 13, 1932.
Missouri-Plant officer, department of agriculture, Jefferson City, Mo., Quarantine No. 3, effective July 10, 1933.
Nebraska-State department of agriculture and inspection, Lincoln, Nebr.,
Quarantine No. 2 (first revision), effective January 15, 1934.
Nevada-Division of Plant Industry, Reno, Nev., a proclamation by the Governor, effective September 1, 1932. (A modification is pending, we are informed,
to permit Federal certification of articles in group 2.)





30 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE Jan.-M.lar.

New Mexico-Head of biology, college of agriculture and mechanic arts, State College, N.Mex., Quarantine No. 9, effective September 22, 1932.
Ohio-Division of plant industry, Columbus, Ohio, Regulation on account of European corn borer, effective July 7, 1933.
Oklahoma-State Plant Board, Oklahoma City, Okla., Plant Board Quarantine No. 9, amended effective September 14, 1930.
Oregon-Director of agriculture, Agricultural Building, Salem, Oreg., Quarantine Order No. 26 (new series), effective October 11, 1932. (Arrangements have been made, administratively, we are informed, to accept Federal certification
of articles in group 2.)
South Carolina-State crop pest commission, Clemson College, S.C., Quarantine
regulation on account of the European Corn Borer, effective October 1, 1932. South Dakota-Secretary of agriculture, Pierre, S.Dak., Quarantine No. 2
(revised), effective March 7, 1933.
Tennessee-Commissioner of agriculture, Nashville, Tenn., Notice of Quarantine
No. 6 (first revision), effective November 1, 1932.
Texas-Commissioner of agriculture, Austin, Tex., Emergency Quarantine
Proclamation No. 71, effective July 25, 1932.
Utah-Commissioner of agriculture, Salt Lake City, Utah, Quarantine No. 6-A,
issued August 5, 1933.
Virginia-Commissioner of agriculture and immigration, Richmond, Va., Quarantine No. 2, effective January 26, 1933.
Washington-Director of agriculture, Olympia, Wash., Quarantine No. 18 (new
series), effective July 11, 1933.
Wisconsin-State entomologist, Madison, Wis., Quarantine No. 4 (fifth revision),
effective June 16, 1933.
Wyoming-Commissioner of Agriculture, Cheyenne, Wyo., Quarantine Order
No. 5, effective November 1, 1932.


PENALTIES IMPOSED FOR VIOLATIONS OF THE PLANT QUARANTINE ACT
According to reports received by the Bureau during the period January 1 to March 31, 1934, penalties have recently been imposed by the proper Federal authorities for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act, as follows:
QUARANTINES AFFECTING MEXICAN PRODUCTS
In the case of the United States versus the persons listed below, for attempting to smuggle in contraband plant material, the penalties indicated were imposed by the United States customs officials at the following ports:


Name Port Contraband Penalty

Charles L. Evans....------------------............... Nogales, Ariz........... ----6 cactus plants................ --------------$25
B. V. Jones............................. ----------------------Brownsville, Tex........ ------3 oranges ....................-------------------- 5
Martin Hernandez-------------------..................... ..... do ---------------................. 1 mango----------------....................... 5
Felicetos Gonzales--------------------...................... ..... do ---------------................. 2 oranges----------------...................... 5
Mrs. Guadalupe O. Von Hattem------.......---.....do ---------------1 orange....................... 5
Jose A. del Castillo-------------------..........................do....---------------..............- 2 apples-------------------..................... 5
Felix Tellez............................. ----------------------El Paso, Tex............ ----------2 oranges--------------------...................... 1
Maximiana Hernandez Vda Gaitan..... .....----- --do.... ---------------............ 1 avocado and 1 guava --........ 1
C. G. Palacios.......................... --------------------Laredo, Tex----------............. 2 mangoes.... ------------------- 1
Agarito Rocha-----------------------...............................do--------------................... 3 avocados.................... 1
Leabardo Quevera--------------------...................... ..... do---------------................... 7 avocados.................... 1
Juan Hernandez ---------------------.............................do---------------................... 22 guavas, 2 sapotes, and 2 1
mamey seeds.
F. G. Gissler------------------------................................do---------------................... 2 avocados.................... 1
Jose Ramos----------------------.......................--- ......... do....---------------.............. 5 plants....................... 1
Maria Garcia------------------------................................do---------------................... 2 orange trees................. 1























ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE
A. S. HOYT, Acting Chief. B. CONNOR, Business Manager. R. C. ALTHOUSE, Information officer.


E. R. SASSCER, in Charge Foreign Plant Quarantines. S. B. FRACKER, in Charge Domestic Plant Quarantines. LON A. HAWKINS, in Charge Technological Division. A. F. BURGESS, in Field Charge Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail Moth Control (Headquarters, Greenfield, Mass.).
L. H. WORTHLEY, in Field Charge Japanese Beetle and Gypsy iloth and BrownTail Moth Quarantines and European Corn Borer Project (Headquarters, Harrisburg, Pa.).
R. E. McDONALD, in Field Charge Pink Bollworm and Thurberia Weevil Quarantines (Headquarters, San Antonio, Tex.).
B. L. BOYDEN, in Field Charge Date Scale Quarantine (Headquarters, Indio,
Calif.).
P. A. HOIDALE, in Field Charge MIexican Fruit Fly Quarantine (Headquarters,
Harlingen, Tex.).
31






















U S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 1934

























Orr






S.R.A.-B.P.Q. No. 119 Issued September 1934



LIBRARY

'TATE PLANT MW


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE



SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS

APRIL-JUNE 1934


CONTENTS
Page
Quarantine and other official announcements -------------------------------------------.... 33
Announcement relating to black stem-rust quarantine (no. 38)------------------------------... 33
Revised list of barberries and Mahonias classified under black stem-rust quarantine regulations (P. Q. C.A.-320, second revision)................................ ----------------------------------------- 33
Announcement relating to fruit and vegetable quarantine (no. 56)-------------------------------- 35
Sterilization of imported vinifera grapes by refrigeration (B.P.Q.-362)------------------------ 35
Announcement relating to Mexican fruit-fly quarantine (no. 64) -----------------------------.... 36
Citrus census of the lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas as of April 1, 1934 ------------------....... 36
Miscellaneous items------------------------------------------------------------------------.... 38
Plant-pest and quarantine work in Agriculture Department merged --------------------.... 38
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Argentina (B.P.Q.-357, supplement no. 1). 39 Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Philippine Islands (B.P.Q.-363).-------------------- 40
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, French mandate of Syria (B.P.Q.-364) ---------------..... 46
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, British Honduras (P.Q.C.A.-314, supplements nos. 5,
6, and 7).....-------------------------------------------------------------------......... 49
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Greece (B.P.Q.-347, supplement no. 2)----- 50
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Jamaica, British West Indies (B.P.Q.-355, revised).... 50 Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Kingdom of Norway (B.P.Q.-350, supplement no. 1) 52 Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Peru (P.Q.C.A.-310, supplement no. 1).--. 53
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, New Zealand (P.Q.C.A.-306, supplement no. 2)------ 53
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Commonwealth of Australia (P.Q.C.A.-299, supplement no. 2).-------------------------------------------------------------------.......... 55
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act ------------------------------...... 55
Organization of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine----------------------------------------------------- 57



QUARANTINE AND OTHER OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS

ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO BLACK STEM-RUST QUARANTINE (NO. 38)

P.Q.C.A.-320 (Second Revision) MAY 15, 1934.

REVISED LIST OF BARBERRIES AND MAHONIAS CLASSIFIED UNDER BLACK STEM-RUST QUARANTINE REGULATIONS

In the following revision of the classification of Berberis and Mahonia under Quarantine No. 38, Berberis gilgiana and B. sanguinea, which were formerly in the doubtful list (group D), have been transferred to the list of resistant species (group B). This change is based on experimental work carried on by the Bureau of Plant Industry which has shown that these two species are highly resistant to black stem-rust infection. Another change consists in the addition of Berberi8 buxifolia pygmea to group D, evidence having developed that this variety of buxifolia may possibly prove to be susceptible to rust attack. This and other species and varieties listed in group D will be transferred to their proper places in groups B and C as soon as sufficient experimental data are available.
The rules and regulations supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 38, revised, provide that no plants, cuttings, stocks, scions, buds, fruits, seeds, or other plant parts capable of propagation, of the genera Berberis, Mahonia, or
80185---4- 1 33





34 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Apr.-June

Mahoberberia, "shall be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from any State Iinpntal United States or from the District of Columbia into any o r edStates, namely, Colorado, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan,
tm I, 1A North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, Wisconsin, S" yoming, nor from any one of said protected States into any other protected State, unless a permit shall have been issued therefor by the United States Department of Agriculture, except that no restrictions are placed by these regulations on the interstate movement of Japanese barberry (Berberis thunbergii) or any of its horticultural varieties." [Regulation 2 (a).]
The protected States referred to below under groups B, C, and D, are the 13 barberry-eradication States named in regulation 2 (a), quoted above.
AVERY S. HOYT,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.

A.-BERBERIS THUNBERGII AND ITS RUST-IMMUNE HORTICULTURAL VARIETIES

Permits are not required for any interstate movement of Berberis thunbergii or of the rust-immune varieties thereof under the regulations of the black stemrust quarantine, revised. The varieties so far as tested by the Department are as follows: Berberis thunbergii, B. thunbergii atropurpurea, B. thunbergii maximowiczii, B. thunbergii minor, B, thunbergii pluriflora, and B. thunbergii pluriflora erecta.

B.-BERBERIS AND MAHONIA SPECIES OR VARIETIES SUFFICIENTLY RESISTANT TO
BLACK STEM RUST FOR SHIPMENT INTO PROTECTED STATES

Permits are required under the regulations of the black stem-rust quarantine for interstate movement of the following species or varieties into the protected States and for such movement from any protected State into any other protected State:
Berberis aemulans, B. aquifolium (Mahonia), B. beaniana, B. buxifolia (except var. pygmea), B. candidula, B. chenaultii (hybrid), B. circumserrata, B. concinna, B. darwinii, B. dictyophylla var. albicaulia, B. diversifolia, B. edgeworthiana, B. gagnepainii, B. julianae, B. koreana, B. nervosa. (Mahonia), B. ottawensis (hybrid), B. potanini, B. repens (Mahonia), B. sargentiana, B. stenophylla (hybrid), B. triacanthophora, B. verruculosa, B. gilgiana, and B. sanguinea.

C.-BERBERIS, MAHONIA, AND MAHOBERBERIS; SPECIES OR VARIETIES WHICH ARE
SUSCEPTIBLE TO ATTACK OF BLACK STEM RUST

Interstate shipments of the following species or varieties must not be made into the protected States or from any protected State to any other protected State and permits will not be issued for such movement :
Berberis acuminata, B. aetensis, B. aggregata, B. aggregata prattii, B. alesuthiensis, B. altaica, B. amurensis, B. amurensis japonica, B. angulosa, B. aristata, B. arvensis, B. asiatica, B. atropurpurea, B. atrocarpa, B. bealei (japonica) (Mahonia), B. bergmanniana, B. brachybotrydis, B. brachybotrys, B. brachypoda, B. bretschneiderii, B. brevipaniculata, B. canadensis, B. oaroliniana, B. chinensis, B. coriuria, B. coryi, B. crataegina, B. cretica, B. declinata, B. declinata oxyphylla (hybrid), B. diaphana, B. dielsiana, B. dulois nana, B. durobrivensis (hybrid), B. emarginata (hybrid), B. emarginata britzensis (hybrid), B. fendleri, B. ftscheri, B. francisci-ferdinandi, B. fremontii (Mahonia), B. fwschioicdles, B. haeimatocarpa (Mahonia), B. hybrid serrate, B. ilicifolia, B. integerrima, B. japonica (bealei) (Mahonia), B. knightii (Xawthoxylon), B. koehneana, B. levis, B. laxiflora, B. leichklini, B. lucida, B. lycium (B. elegantissima), B. macrophylla, B. meehanii, B. morrisoneasis (Mahonia), B. nepalensis (Mahoia), B. neuberti (Mahobcrbcris), B. nevinii (Makonia), B. notabilis, B. oblonga, B. poiretii, B. poiretii latifolia, B. polyantha., B. pra-ttii, B. provin.cialis var. serrata, B. pruinosa, B. reyeliana, B. rugidicans, B. serotina, B. sibirica, B. sieboldii, B. sinensis, B. soulicana. B. stapfit"na, B. subcaulialata, B. sw,aseyi (Mahonia), B. thibetica, B. trifoliolata (Mahonia), B. umbellata, B. van fleetii, B. vernae, B. viridis, B. vulgaris, B. vulgaris alba, B. valgaris






1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 35

asperma, B. vulgaris atropurpurca, B. vulgaris emarginata, B. rulgaris fructoviolacea, B. vulgaris japonica, B. vulgaris lutea, B. vulgaris macrocarpa, B. vulgaris mitis, B. v'ulgaris nigra, B. vulgaris purpurea, B. vulgaris sanguinolenta, B. vulgar spathulata, B. vulgaris sheyalle, B. rulgaris sulcata, B. vulgaris violacea, B. wilsonae, and B. xanthoxylon (knightii).

D.-SPECIES OR VARIETIES OF BERBERIS OR MAHONIA FOR WHICH REACTION TO
BLAOK STEM-RUST ATTACK HAS NOT BEEN DETERMINED

Interstate shipments of the following species or varieties must not be made into the protected States or from any protected State to any other protected State. Permits will not be issued for such movement this season pending final determination of the reaction of such species or varieties to black stem-rust attack.
Berberis acicularis, B. buxifolia pygmea, B. californica, B. dictyophylla, B. dulcis (buaxifolia), B. henryana, B. heteropoda, B. hookeri, B. insignis, B. parvifolia, B. pinnata = fascicularis (Mahonia), B. thunbergit X juliana (hybrid), B. tischleri, B. virescens, B. wilsonae Autumn Cheer, B. wilsonae Fireflame, B. wilsonae Firefly, and B. wilsonae Sparkler.


ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO FRUIT AND VEGETABLE QUARANTINE (NO. 56)
B.P.Q.-362.
STERILIZATION OF IMPORTED VINIFERA GRAPES BY REFRIGERATION
(Approved Apr. 19, 1934; effective May 1, 1934)
Regulation 6 of the Fruit and Vegetable Quarantine (Quarantine No. 56), as amended effective August 1, 1933, reads in part, as follows:
"All importations of fruits and vegetables shall be subject as a condition of entry to such inspection or disinfection, or both, as shall be required by the inspector of the Department of Agriculture."
Recent experimental work by the Bureau of Entomology of the United States Department of Agriculture has proved that all stages of the Mediterranean fruit fly in fruit will be destroyed if the fruit is subjected to the following treatment:
Cooling until the approximate center of the fruit in the package reaches a temperature of 30'-31 F. and holding the fruit at that temperature for 15 days."
Storage tests with some varieties of vinifera grapes, grown in the United States, have shown that the treatment can be applied to this fruit without danger of injuring it provided the requirements of the treatment as to temperature are carefully followed.
On the basis of the evidence secured provision is made for the entry, under permit and sterilization, of grapes of the vinifera type from regions in which the Mediterranean fruit fly occurs, at the port of New York and such other northern ports as may be subsequently approved, under the following conditions:
(1) The grapes must be packed in tight barrels or kegs or other approved containers so constructed as to prevent the escape from the container pending sterilization of any stages of the Mediterranean fruit fly, should they be present. Any broken containers wherever found must be immediately repacked under the supervision of an inspector of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine or the contents shall be immediately destroyed in a manner satisfactory to the inspector.
(2) Within 24 hours from the time of unlading, the grapes shall be delivered for treatment to an approved sterilization plant.
To provide necessary safeguards for movement to and handling at approved sterilization plants, those concerns designated to sterilize fruit are required to file an application and complete a written agreement with the Bureau of Plant Quarantine. The Bureau will approve only those plants which are adequately equipped to handle and sterilize the fruit.






36 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Apr.-June

Sterilization will be done under the supervision of plant quarantine inspectors of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine. These inspectors shall at all times be given access to fruit while in process of sterilization. They will supervise the movement of the fruit from the docks to and from the sterilization rooins.
Shipments offered for entry may be allowed to leave customs custody under redelivery bond for sterilization. Final release of the shipment by the collector of customs and cancelation of the bond will be effected after the inspector of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine has notified the collector of customs that the required treatment has been given.
In authorizing the entry of fruit into the United States, sterilized in accordance with the above requirements, it should be emphasized that inexactness and carelessness in applying the treatment may result in injury to the fruit, but, in event of resulting injury, neither the Department of Agriculture nor its employees will be responsible.
E. R. SASSCEB,
Acting Ch ef, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.


ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO MEXICAN FRUIT-FLY QUARANTINE (NO. 64)

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE,
503 Rio GRANDE NATIONAL LIFE BUILDING, Harlingen, Tex., June 80, 1934.

CITRUS CENSUS OF THE LOWER RIO GRANDE VALLEY OF TEXAS AS OF APRIL 1, 1934

In administering the provisions of the Mexican fruit-fly quarantine it is necessary to know from year to year the number of citrus trees planted in the lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas. In response to requests from the citrus interests of this valley and of various other interested persons, this information is made available to the public.
A complete recheck of all groves was made necessary this year on account of the mortality among the trees as a result of the storm of September 1933. Included in these census figures are a total of 176,812 citrus trees which are considered noncommercial.
The census is presented in two arrangements, by counties and by districts. The 12 districts as shown in table 2 represent divisions of the territory which have been made for the convenience of administration. These divisions are designated by the names of the towns in which suboffices of the Mexican fruitfly project are located.
In explanation of the tables the following information is given:
Ages of trees: In the tables the ages of trees are classified as 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5. Trees given under classification 0 were planted during the period from April 1, 1933, to March 31. 1934. Trees given under classification 1 were planted from April 1, 1932, to March 31, 1933. Trees given under classification 2 were planted from July 1, 1931, to June 30, 1932. The ages of trees designated as 3 and 4, respectively, will be understood in the light of this explanation. Trees given under classification 5 were planted previous to June 30, 1929.
Other citrus: Under this classification are included kumquats, limes, mandarins, satsumas, sour oranges, tangelos, lemons, etc.






34 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 37


TABLE i.-Citrus census of the lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas as of Apr. 1, 1934, by oousties


Number of growing citrus trees of age-County and fruit
0 1 2 3 4 5 Total

Hidalgo:
Grapefruit............ ------------198,605 286,671 567,057 521,988 501, 534 2, 104, 595 4, 180,450
Orange................ ------- 63,449 73,798 105,365 72,452 117, 705 776, 003 1,208,772
Other citrus------------........... 8,617 6,053 5,073 2, 990 6,875 70,630 100, 238
T otal ............... ------------- 270,671 366,522 677,495 597, 430 626, 114 2,951,228 5,489,460
Cameron:
rapefruit-------------.62, 046 98, 275 334, 711 195,358 177, 745 985, 216 1,853, 351
Orange...........----------------.. 19,355 29,843 42, 560 30,674 44,859 417, 254 584, 545
Other citrus. ---------- 545 1,500 2,089 1,292 5,080 50,361 60,867Total............... 81, 946 129,618 379,360 227,324 227,684 1,452,831 2,498,763
Willacy:
(ra efruit. ------------15,751 16,947 47,659 16, 200 13,016 37,431 147, 004
range------------..... 7,105 6,747 16,235 4,369 3,764 18,419 56,639.
Other citrus............ ------------1,417 1,438 3,120 433 742 2, 195 9,345
Tota................ 24, 273 25, 132 67,014 21, 002 17,522 58,045 212, 988
Total, all counties:
(rapefru----------. 276,402 401,893 949,427 733,546 692, 295 3, 127, 242 6,180,805
Orange--------------............. 89,909 110.388 164, 160 107, 495 166, 328 1, 211, 676 1, 849,956
Other citrus..------------.......... 10,579 8,991 10,282 4,715 12, 697 123, 186 170,450
rand total ..-------....... 376,890 521, 272 1,123,869 845, 756 871,320 4,462, 104 8,201, 211


TABLE 2.- itrus census of the lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas as of Apr. 1, 1934, by districts


Number of growing citrus trees of age-District and fruit
0 1 2 3 4 5 Total

Mission:
rapefruit....---------- 41,375 40,058 155,352 153,046 150,271 564,758 1,104,860
range----------------- 8,312 9,627 44,551 31,431 41,309 205, 641 340,871
Other citrus------------ 2,299 1,181 1,975 844 2,017 22,613 30,929
Total.....-------....---------.......... 51,986 50,866 201,878 185,321 193, 597 793, 012 1,476,660
McAllen:
Graefruit-------------.......... 22,466 15,813 68,562 59,583 95,497 214,934 476,855
Orage...----..------------ 8, 285 5,248 11, 597 7,499 21,368 83,485 137,482
Other citrus ....------------ 1,418 245 792 452 2, 197 8, 275 13,379
Total..-------------- 32, 169 21,306 80,951 67,534 119,062 306, 694 627,716
Edinburg:
rapefruit......-------------....... 58,027 82, 193 189,549 177,661 111,683 474,734 1,093,847
COrange.-.------- ---. 28,905 13,769 16,625 7,309 21,460 138, 510 226,578
Other citrus------------ 1,457 150 529 340 186 4,363 7,025
Total.............----------------. 88,389 96, 112 206,703 185,310 133,329 617,607 1,327,450
harr-San Juan-Alamo:
Grapefrit.............. --------------18,910 62,992 45,494 37,832 46,985 285,309 497,522
Orange---.....-----....--------- 4,591 25,620 16,979 6,565 12,698 102,913 169,366
Other citrus....------------........ 179 825 1,077 410 818 10,274 13, 583
Total----------------................. 23,680 89,437 63,550 44,807 60,501 398,496 680,471
Donna:
Grapefruit...---..--....... 27,488 23,458 27,745 18,438 34, 670 178,400 310,199
Orange....--....------------ 4, 377 4,728 6,323 9, 163 10,842 113,362 148,795
Other citrus----------- 749 589 95 138 106 7,858 9,535
Total...-------------............ 32, 614 28,775 34, 163 27, 739 45, 618 299, 620 468,529






38 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Apr.-June

TABLE 2.-Citrus cea*u.s of the lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas as of Apr. 1, 193-, by districts-Continued


Number of growing citrus trees of ageDistrict and fruit
0 1 2 3 4 5 Total

Weslaco:
Grapefruit....-- ....------------ 16,012 28,302 44,314 42,443 44,062 243, 883 419, 016
Orange -----------------............ 5,171 8,512 4,312 3, 545 6,338 76,184 10 062
Other citrus. ------------ 2,385 2,882 481 514 377 7,009 13,648
Total----------------......... 23,568 39, 696 49, 107 46,502 50, 777 327,076 536,726
Mercedes:
Grapefruit ----------- 14, 327 33,855 36,041 32,985 18,366 142,577 278,151
Orange----------------- 3,808 6,294 4,978 6,940 3,690 55,908 81,618
Other citrus ------------ 130 181 124 292 1, 174 10,238 12,139
Total----------------................. 18, 265 40,330 41, 143 40,217 23,230 208,723 371,908
La Feria:
Grapefruit --------------28,571 33,473 99,846 24,973 27,859 287,704 502,426
Orange----------------.... 6,233 6,727 10,047 4,987 5,843 132,428 166,25
Other citrus............ ------------ 184 119 435 184 943 9,024 10 889
T otal...............----------------.. 34,988 40,319 110, 328 30,144 34,645 429,156 679, 58)
Raymondville:
Grapefruit --------------15,751 16,947 47,659 16,200 13,016 37,431 147,004
Orange -----------------7, 105 6,747 16,235 4, 369 3,764 18,419 5 ,639M
Other citrus. ------------ 1,417 1,438 3,120 433 742 2,195 9,345
Total ..............---------------- 24,273 25, 132 67,014 21,002 17,522 58,045 212,9 088
Harlingen:
Grapefruit.. --------------8,252 38,437 82,025 50,029 35,044 256,076 469,863
Orange -----------------2,501 10,773 10,277 9,228 11,456 117,519 161,754
Other citrus ------------ 137 1,157 918 410 995 10,836 14,453
Total ---------------- 10,890 50,367 93,220 59,667 47,495 384,431 646,070
San Benito:
Grapefruit........... --------------21,788 19, 998 134,327 96,925 88,702 289,892 651,632
Orange -----------------7,058 8,211 17,402 13,585 19,445 111,630 177,331
Other citrus ------------ 158 176 697 651 1,673 12,365 15,720
Total ---------------- 29,004 28,385 152,426 111,161 109,820 413,887 844,683
Brownsville:
Grapefruit. 3, 435 6,367 18,513 23,431 26, 140 151,544 229,430 Orange ----------------............ 3,563 4,132 4, 834 2,874 8,115 55,677 79,195
Other citrus.. ------------ 66 48 39 47 1,469 18,136 19,805
Total-----------------................. 7,064 10,547 23,386 26,352 35,724 225,357 328,430
Total, all districts:
Grapefruit ------------- 276,402 401,893 949,427 733, 546 692,295 3, 127,242 6,180,805
Orange----------------................. 89, 909 110,388 164, 160 107,495 166,328 1,211,676 1,849,956
Other citrus............ ------------10, 579 8,991 10, 282 4, 715 12,697 123,186 170,450
Grand total.......... ----------376,890 521,272 1, 123,869 845,756 871,320 4,462,104 8,201, 211


MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS

JUNE 26, 1934.

PLANT PEST AND QUARANTINE WORK IN AGRICULTURE DEPARTMENT MERGED

(Press notice)

Two major units of the United States Department of Agriculture, the Bureau of Entomology and the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, have been merged into one, to be known as the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, Secretary of Agriculture Henry A. Wallace announced today. The new organization takes over from the Bureau of Plant Industry the activities on the control and eradication of five important plant diseases.





1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 39

This consolidation, which goes into effect July 1, SecretaTry Wallace points out, will permit greater economy of administration in the Department's search for better methods of insect control and in the regulatory work necessary to prevent the spread of plant pests and diseases. It also insures better coordination and more effective direction of the various parallel lines of research and control activities.
Lee A. Strong, Chief of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine from December 1, 1929, to October 1, 1933, and since then Chief of the Bureau of Entomology, has been appointed Chief of the new bureau. S. A. Rohwer, now assistant chief of the Bureau of Entomology, and Avery S. Hoyt, now assistant chief of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, will be assistant chiefs of the new bureau. F. H. Spencer will be business manager. Karl F. Kellerman, formerly associate chief of the Bureau of Plant Industry, will have charge of the division devoted to the eradication and control of citrus canker, phony peach disease, Dutch elm disease, white pine blister rust, and the stem rust of grains.
Research in the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine will cover studies on the life history and habits of beneficial as well as injurious insects, with a view to developing practical methods for destroying injurious insects and promoting the increase and spread of those found beneficial.
The regulatory work, under the authority of the Federal Plant Quarantine Act, will include the enforcement of quarantines and restrictive measures to prevent the entry into, or the spread within, the United States of dangerous plant diseases and insect pests.
Under the new arrangement the different lines of work on related subjects, whether regulatory or research, are brought together in a single unit. The work of collection, introduction, and clearing through quarantine of foreign parasites for the control of injurious insect pests established in the United States has been placed in a single division under the direction of C. P. Clausen. The fundamental investigations to develop control methods by the use of insecticides, attractants, and repellents have been brought together in the Division of Control Investigations, under Lon A. Hawkins. The Division of Household and Stored Product Insects, in the Bureau of Entomology, as such, has been discontinued, and the work assigned to other divisions. Studies on insects attacking stored products have been transferred to the divisions concerned with the insects that infest the same crops in the field. For example, investigations on dried fruit insects will be conducted by the Division of Fruit Insects. As the insects found in stored products are often hangovers from field infestations, such an arrangement is designed to further simplify and expedite the new Bureau's work. The investigations on household insects formerly assigned to this division have been transferred to the Division of Insects Affecting Man and Animals, under the direction of F. C. Bishopp, who has long been in charge of that division. All informational work has been brought together with the Insect Pest Survey and placed in the Division of Insect Pest Survey and Information, under the leadership of J. A. Hyslop.
The other research divisions of the Bureau of Entomology, the regulatory divisions of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, and the field stations of both bureaus will remain about as they were.


B.P.Q.-357, Supplement No. 1 APRIL 25, 1934.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF ARGENTINA
The decree of February 20, 1934, revokes that of May 11, 1927, which prohibited the importation of corn (Zea mays) and broomcorn (Andropogon sorghum var. technicus) into that country. The text, in translation, follows:
ARTICLE 1. The decree of May 11, 1927 (see par. 1, p. 8, B.P.Q.-357), whereby the importation of corn and broomcorn was prohibited, is hereby revoked, and the portion (par. 2, p. 8, B.P.Q.-357) relating to the disinfection which was required for other seeds mentioned in that decree, becomes ineffective.
ART. 2. The importation is authorized of corn and sorghum only (Johnson grass, Andropogon halepensis, being excluded), if clean and free from any plant refuse, it being necessary when that condition is not fulfilled to disinfect the shipment with hydrocyanic acid gas, carbon disulphide, or other similar prod-





40 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Apr.-June

ucts applied in vacuo for the period and with the dosage established in this connection by the Health Office of Plant and Seed Importation and Exportation (Oficina Sanitaria de Importaci6n y Exportaci6n de Plantas y Semillas).
ART. 3. The importation is prohibited of plants, or parts of plants, of corn, especially the ear, tassel, stalk, green husk, etc., as well as of broomcorn straw intended for manufacturing purposes, or as raw material for packing agricultural implements and various other articles. The introduction is likewise prohibited of feed from plants belonging to other species of Andropogon, Saccharum, Pennisetum, and Coix, as well as fresh vegetables and flower stems of gladioli and dahlias from countries in which Pyrausta nubilalis exists and whose products may serve as vehicles for the distribution of the corn borer.
ART. 4. The introduction is permitted of shipments of the seeds referred to in article 1 of this decree through ports authorized for that purpose, but if those ports do not satisfy the provisions of the last part of article 2 entry is tems porarily restricted to the port of Buenos Aires, the authorization finally being extended to the ports of La Plata, Bahia Blanca, Rosario, Santa Fe, and the customs at Mendoza, as soon as equipments for vacuum disinfection are installed in those ports.
E. R. SASSCER,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.

B.P.Q.-363 MAY 1, 1934.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, PHILIPPINE ISLANDS
The following summary of the plant-quarantine-import restrictions of the Philippine Islands has been prepared for the information of nurserymen, plantquarantine officials, and others interested in the exportation of plants and plant products from the United States to those islands.
The summary was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant quarantine inspector of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, from the texts of the following administrative orders of the Philippine Bureau of Plant Industry: No. 10, approved April 25, 1932; no. 11, approved July 14, 1932, and no. 12, approved June 14, 1933, as well as administrative orders no. 56, approved August 21, 1928, and no. 57, approved October 10, 1928, of the old Bureau of Agriculture, and reviewed by the Director of Plant Industry, Manila, P.I.
The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct and complete up to the time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used independently of, nor as a substitute for, the original texts of those administrative orders, and it is not to be interpreted as legally authoritative. The orders themselves should be consulted for the exadt texts.
E. R. SAsscEE,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.
BASIC LAW
Act No. 3027 of March 8, 1922, entitled: An Act to protect the agricultural industries of the Philippine Islands from injurious plant pests and diseases existing in foreign countries and further to regulate the domestic movement of plant materials in order to minimize the injury from pests and diseases already introduced.
CONCISE SUMMARY
IMPORTATION PROHIBITED BY SPECIAL QUARANTINES
Plant materials of all plants of the genera and species: Agave castula, maguey; Musa spp., banana family; Agave sisalana, sisal; Nicotiana tabacum, tobacco; Ananas (comosUs) sativus, pineapple; Saccharum officinarum, sugarcane; Cocos nucifera, coconut; Oryza sativa, rice; Bambusa sp., bamboo; Citrus varieties, known commercially as the Chinese yellow and red kids; except under permit, in limited quantity, for experimental purposes in accordance with paragraphs 2 and 10 of Administrative Order No. 10 of March 19, 1932. (Administrative Order No. 11, approved July 14, 1932.)
Fresh fruits from countries infested with the Mediterranean fruit fly (Ceratitis capitata), namely: Algeria, Argentina, Azores, Bermuda, Brazil,






1984] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMiENTS 41

British East Africa, Canary Islands, Cape Colony, Cape Verde Islands, Congo, Dahomey, Delagoa Bay, Egypt, France, Greece, Hawaii, Italy, Madagascar, Madeira, Malta, Mauritius, Natal, New South Wales, New Zealand, Nigeria, Palestine, Queensland, Rhodesia, Sicily, Spain, Syria, Tasmania, Tripoli, Tunis, Turkey, Uganda, Victoria, and Western Australia, may be imported only in limited quantities for experimental purposes and under special permit. (Administrative Order No. 12, approved June 14, 1933.)
Fresh fruits from Texas, U.S.A., and from Mexico: Importation prohibited to prevent the introduction of the Mexican fruit fly or Morelos orange worm, Anastrepha ludens. Provision is made, however, for the importation of small quantities of those fruits to procure better varieties and new propagating stock, or specimens for experimental purposes in accordance with article 2 of Administrative Order No. 10, through the Bureau of Plant Industry, Manila. (Administrative Order No. 56, approved Aug. 21, 1928&.)
Mimosa invisa: Importation prohibited of plants in the natural state capable of propagation, except to procure new propagating stock for experimental purposes under the provisions of section 2 of Administrative Order No. 10 of March 19, 1932. (Administrative Order No. 57, approved Oct. 10, 1928.)
IMPORTATION RESTRICTED-IMPORT PERMIT AND INSPECTION CERTIFICATE REQUIRED
Fruits, vegetables, cereals, and other plant products intended for food purposes, or properly dried and poisoned botanical specimens, may be imported under the provisions of articles 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, and 13 of Administrative Order No. 10. (See art 14 of that order.)
Plant materials for propagation not governed by special quarantines are admitted after inspection upon arrival if found free from injurious insects and plant diseases, under the general provisions of article 9 of Administrative Order No. 10.
REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE IMPORTATION OF PLANT MATERIALS INTO THE PHILIPPINE ISLANDS
(Administrative Order No. 10, approved Apr. 25, 1932)
Deftnitions
ARTICLE 1. (a) "Person" is construed as singular or plural and applies to and includes corporations, societies, associations, firms, companies, and other legal entitles.
(b) "Plant materials" includes living plants, rhizomes, fruits, seeds, cuttings, bulbs, and corms, grafts, leaves, roots, scions, and fruit pits, and such other parts of plants as are capable of propagation or of harboring plant pests and diseases.
(c) "Country" shall refer to and include independent political units or sovereign nations, territories, colonies, and political or territorial subdivisions.

Plant materials for which a permit is required
ART. 2. Plant material governed by special quarantine orders may be imported from countries which maintain inspection in limited quantity under permit from the Director of Agriculture for the purpose, of keeping the country supplied with new varieties and necessary propagating stock, and from countries which do not maintain inspection in limited quantities for experimental purposes only, subject to such conditions as the Director of Plant Industry may impose, in compliance also with the particular administrative orders governing them respectively and with these regulations. Manila is the authorized port of entry for such importations.
Application for import permit
ART. 3. All persons who intend to import plant materials must apply to the Director of the Bureau of Plant Industry in advance of the shipment.
ART. 4. On approval by the Director of Plant Industry of an application to import plant materials under quarantine, a permit shall be issued, but before issuing a permit the Director may require the importer to file a bond in twice the invoice cost of the plants imported.
80185-34- 2






42 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Apr.-June

Notices of arrival and shipment required
ARTS. 5 and 6. Require the permittee to furnish in duplicate a notice of arrival and a notice of shipment on the prescribed forms.
Permits may be revoked for violations
ART. 7. Permits may be revoked and further permits may be refused for the importation of the products of any grower or exporter of any foreign country who has violated Act No. 3027, or any rules or rgeulations promulgated thereunder; or for the importation of the products of any country where inspection is considered by the Bureau of Plant Industry, as a result of its examinations of importations therefrom, to have been merely perfunctory, or because of the failure of the permittee to comply with the regulations, or if, in the judgment of the Director, the interests of the public and the service so require.

Conditions of entry
Foreign certificate of inspection required
ART. 8. Importations of fruits, vegetables, seeds, and other plant materials from foreign countries must be accompanied by certificates of inspection issued by the proper government authority of the country of origin, stating that the materials are free from injurious insects and plant diseases. Where the government maintains a plant-quarantine or plant-inspection service, the certiflcates of inspection required by this order shall be certificates of inspection of plant materials issued by the chief or director of the plant-quarantine or plantinspection service of the country or place of origin or his duly authorized representatives. In countries or places the governments of which do not maintain plant-quarantine or plant-inspection service, the certificates of inspection must have been accomplished by the exporter or shipper concerned, duly subscribed and sworn to by him before a person legally authorized to administer oaths in the country of origin; in this case the certificate must include a statement to the effect that the plant materials did not originate in a place where injurious insects or plant diseases were prevalent; that they have not been kept or stored in places infested by injurious insects or infected by plant diseases; and that whatever treatment is required by the Director of Plant Industry prior to shipment has been effected. The presentation of such certificates shall not preclude inspection on arrival if an inspection is deemed necessary.

Inspection upon arrival
AnT. 9. All persons who intend to import plant materials must submit to the Bureau of Plant Industry an application for inspection of incoming plants on or before the arrival of such shipment. All such plant materials shall be inspected upon arrival for injurious insects and plant diseases. All plants which are found to be free from injurious insects and plant diseases shall be certified and tagged or stamped. Such plants after having been so tagged or stamped shall then be allowed to enter. Plant materials which are found to be infested by injurious insects or infected with diseases shall be returned to the point of origin or destroyed, at the option of the importer and at his expense.
NOTE.-Plant materials not governed by special quarantine orders and which are imported for propagation purposes are allowed entry into the Philippines after the proper inspection and certification has been made by the plant quarantine inspectors of the Bureau of Plant Industry and they have been found free from any injurious insects and plant diseases, provided such plants or plant materials are not weeds or are not likely to become weeds. Such plant materials come under the general provisions of article 9 of this order. (Letter of the Director of Plant Industry of May 2, 1933.)
Disinfection or fumigation
ART. 10. Plant materials imported under article 2 shall, at the expense and responsibility of the importer, be subject, as a condition of entry, to such disinfection or fumigation as may be required, and may be quarantined in places designated by the Director of Plant Industry until evidence is available that no injurious insects or plant diseases are present on such plants.






19341 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 43

Plant materials must be free from sand, soil, or earth

ART. 11. All plant materials offered for entry must be free from sand, soil, or earth, and all plant roots, rhizomes, tubers, etc., must be washed to thoroughly free them from such sand, soil, or earth and must be so certified by the duly authorized inspector of the country of origin or by the shipper or exporter, as prescribed by article 8: Provided, That sand, soil, or earth may be employed for the packing of bulbs and corms when such material has been sterilized or otherwise safeguarded by methods prescribed by the Bureau of Plant Industry and so certified by the authorized inspector of the country of origin or by the exporter or shipper, in accordance with article 8. The use of such sand, soil, or earth for packing materials other than bulbs and corms is not authorized.

Approved packing materials

ART. 12. All packing materials used with importations of nursery stock and other plants and seeds shall be subject to approval by the Bureau of Plant Industry and must not previously have been used as packing or otherwise in connection with living plants, and, except for bulbs and corms, must be free from sand, soil, or earth, and must be certified as meeting these conditions by the authorized inspector or by the exporter or shipper, in accordance with article 8.
ART. 13. Any container of plant materials held for inspection, etc., shall have attached to it a quarantine sign.

Plant materials for which a permit is not required

ART. 14. Fruits, vegetables, cereals, and other plant products intended for food purposes, or properly dried and poisoned botanical specimens, when free from sand, soil, or earth, and when not governed by special quarantine orders, may be imported, but subject to the conditions prescribed by articles 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, and 13 of this order.

Authorized ports of entry

ART. 15. The inspection of incoming plant material shall be made at the ports of Manila, Cebu, Iloilo, Zamboanga, Legaspi, Davao, and Jolo. Plant materials shall not be admitted at any other port.

Importation by mail

ART. 16. Plant materials entering by mail shall be inspected by the plant quarantine officials upon notification of the presence of such materials at the post office. Such materials shall be subject to the same inspection as materials entering through the customhouse.
ART. 17. Deals with fees for fumigation or disinfection.

Certification for export

ART. 18. Application should be made to the Director of Plant Industry for the inspection of plant materials for export. ART. 19. Provides for the issuance of inspection certificates for plant materials intended for exportation.
ARTS. 20, 21, and 22. Penalties, repealing provision and effective date (May 1, 1932).
PROHIBITED PLANT MATERIALS
(Administrative Order No. 11, approved July 14, 1932)
ARTICLE 1. The importation is strictly prohibited of plant materials of all plants of the genus Musa; coconut, Cocos nucifera; sugarcane, Saccharum offiinarum; rice, Oryza sativa; pineapple, Ananas comosus; bamboo, Bambusa spp.; tobacco, Nicotiana tabacum; Citrus varieties commercially known as the Chinese yellow and red kids; maguey, Agave cantula; and sisal, Agave sisalana: Provided, That a limited quantity of plant materials of such plants may be imported, in accordance with articles 2 and 10 of Administrative Order No. 10, upon proper application to the Director of Plant Industry and under permit






44 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Apr.-Jne

from the said official, through the port of Manila. They shall also be subject to such other conditions, requirement, or treatment as the Director of Plant Industry may prescribe.
ART. 2. Definition of "plant materials" (see definitions).
ARTS. 3 and 4. Treatment of contraband, and penalties.
ART. 5. Revocations and effective date (Aug. 1, 1932).
IMPORTATION PROHIBITED OF FRUITS AND VEGETABLES FROM OUNTI8 INFSSTED WITH MEDITERRANEAN FRUIT FLY
(Administrative Order No. 12, approved June 14, 1933)
ARTICLE 1. The importation, bringing, or introduction of fruits and vegetables of the species listed hereunder from countries and places known to be actually infested with the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata, namely, Algeria, Argentina, Azores, Bermuda, Brazil, British East Africa, Canary Islands, Cape Colony, Cape Verde Islands, Congo, Dahomey, Delagoa Bay, Egypt, France, Greece, Hawaii, Italy, Madagascar, Madeira, Malta, Mauritius, Natal, New South Wales, New Zealand, Nigeria, Palestine, Queensland, Rhodesia, Sicily, Spain, Syria, Tasmania, Tripoli, Tunis, Turkey, Uganda, Victoria, and Western Australia, is strictly prohibited: Provided, That a limited quantity of such fruits and vegetables may, in accordance with articles 2 and 10 of Administrative Order No. 10, upon proper application made to the Director of Plant Industry, be imported through the port of Manila from countries or places herein enumerated which maintain plant-quarantine and inspection service, for the purpose of obtaining seeds or planting materials to ,keep the Philippine Islands supplied with new varieties and necessary propagating stock.
The same fruits and vegetables may also be imported in limited quantities under quarantine, from countries or places herein enumerated not maintaining plant-quarantine and inspection service, provided they are to be used for experimental purposes only, subject to such conditions as the Director may impose. The fruits and vegetables, or the seeds or planting materials obtained from them, imported for the purposes mentioned in this article, shall be held or planted, as the case may be, under quarantine in an isolation station by the Director for close observation and shall be released only when evidence is available showing that no injurious insects and plant diseases are present on, in, or amongst such fruits and vegetables, or seeds, seedlings, or plant materials derived therefrom. They shall also be subject to such other conditions, requirement, or treatment as the Director may prescribe.

PROHIBITED FRUITS AND VEGETABLES

Achras sapota, sapodilla.
Amygdalus (Prunus) persica, peach.
Amygdalus (Prunus) p ersica nectarina, nectarine.
Annona muricata, soursop.
Arenga saccharifera, sugar palm.
Artocarpus incisa, breadfruit.
Averrhoa carambola, carambola.
Calophyllum inophyllum, ball kamani.
Capsicum spp., peppers.
Carica papaya, papaya.
Carica quercifolia, dwarf papaya.
Carissa (arduina) bispinosa, carissa.
Casimiroa edulis, white sapote.
Cestrum sp., Chinese inkberry.
Chrysophyllum cainito, star-apple.
Chrysophyllum oliviforme, satin-leaf chrysophyllum.
Citrus japonica, Japanese orange.
(Citrus) Fortunella japonca, kumquat.
Citrus nobilis, var. deliciosa, tangerine and mandarin.
Citrus limonia, lemon.
Citrus (decumana) grandis, grapefruit, pomelo, shaddock.
Clausena wampi, wampi.
Coffea spp., coffee.
Cydonia oblonga, quince.
Diospyros (decondra) ebeiwm, persimmon.






1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 45

Eriobotrya japonica, loquat. Eugenia brasiliensiss) domnbeyi, Brazilian plum or Spanish cherry. Eugenia jambos, rose apple. Eugenia (micheli) uniflora, Surinam-cherry, French cherry. Ficus carioa, fig.
Garcinia mangostana., mangosteen. Garcinia xanthochymus, mangosteen. Gossypium spp., cultivated cotton. Jambosa malaccensis, mountain apple. Latania loddigesi, palm. Litchi chinensis, lychee or lichee nut. Lycopsersium esculentunm, tomato. Ma.lus spp., apple.
Mangifera. indica, mango. Mim usops elengi, elengi tree or Spanish cherry. Murraea or Murraya exotica, mockorange or orange-jasmine. Musa sp., banana.
Noronhia emarginata, noronhia. Ochrosia elliptica., ochrosia. Opuntia vrulgars, pricklypear. Passiflora caerulea, passion vine. Persea (gratissina) americana, avocado. Phoenix dactylifera, date palm. Prunus armeniaca, apricot. Prunus spp., plums.
Psidium cattleianum, strawberry guava. Psid4um guajava, sweet, red, and white lemon guavas. Psidiurn gitajava pomiferum, common guava. Psidium guajava pyriferum, waiawi. Punica granatunm, pomegranate. Pyrus communis, pear. SFantalum freycinetianum, sandalwood. Solanum melongena, eggplant.
Spondias (dulcis) cytherea.
Terminalia chebula, Natal plum.
Terminlia catappa, tropical almond or winged kamani.
Thevetia nereifolia, bestill, yellow oleander.
Vitis labrusca, fox grape.

Contraband plant products will be seized

Am. 2. All or any fruits and vegetables of the species listed herein imported from the countries and places named in article 1, in contravention of the provisions of this order, shall be seized by the plant quarantine inspectors of the Bureau of Plant Industry and shall be immediately returned to the country or place of origin or completely destroyed according to the decision of the Director of Plant Industry, at the expense of the importer.
ART. 3. Penalties.
ART. 4. Revokes orders, rules, and regulations which are inconsistent with the present order.
ART. 5. The effective date of this order is July 1, 1933.

FRESH FRUITS FROM TEXAS, U.S.A., AND MEXICO, IMPORTATION PROHIBITED TO
PREVENT THE INTRODUCTION OF ANASTREPHA LUDENS
(Administrative Order No. 56, approved Aug. 21, 1928)

An insect pest known as the Morelos orange worm or Mexican fruit fly, Anastrepha ludens, is known to exist in the State of Texas, U.S.A., and in Mexico, where it attacks fruits, especially oranges, limes, mangoes, peaches, guavas, chicos, and plums; this pest does not exist in the Philippine Islands;: consequently:
ARTICLE 1. The importation of fruits from the State of- Texas, U.S.A., and Mexico is hereby prohibited: Provided, That the importation through the port of Manila of small quantities of such fruits may be permitted in order toprocure better varieties, new propagating stock, or specimens for experimental purposes, in accordance with section 2 of Administrative Order No. 29 (now






46 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Apr.June

article 2 of Administrative Order No. 10). Such importation must be made through the Director of Agriculture (now Director of Plant Industry), subject to the provisions of Administrative Order No. 29 (now no. 10), and to the condition that the imported stock must be held in quarantine in an isolation station until it is evident that no plant diseases or injurious insects are present on such plant materials.
ART. 2. Any importation of fruits from these places made in contravention of the provisions of this order will be seized by the plant quarantine inspectors duly authorized by the Director of Plant Industry, and will be either immediately returned to the country or place of origin or completely destroyed, according to the decision of the Director of Plant Industry or his duly authorized agents. The cost of the returA or destruction of said plant materials shall be borne by the importer.
ART. 3. Penalties.
ART. 4. Effective date of this order, August 21, 1928.

IMPORTATION OF MIMOSA INVISA PROHIBITED
(Administrative Order No. 57, approved Oct. 10, 1928)

Under certain conditions Mimosa invisa Mart. is a noxious and very harmful weed to agriculture. Consequently:
ARTIcut 1. The importation of the seed of Mimosa invisa or of any part of the said plant in the raw or natural state capable of propagation is strictly prohibited: Provided, That the importation through the port of Manila of the seed or parts of the said plant may be permitted in order to procure new propagating stock, or specimens for experimental purposes, in accordance with article 2 of Administrative Order No. 10 of this Bureau. Such importation must be made through the Director of Plant Industry, subject to the provisions of the said Administrative Order No. 10, and to the conditions that the imported stock must be held in quarantine in an isolation station until it is evident that no plant diseases or injurious insects are present on such plant materials, and that the propagation of said imported stock must be made under such directions as may be prescribed by the Director.
ART. 2. Any importation of the seed of Mimosa invisa or any part of the said plant in the raw or natural state capable of propagation, made in contravention of the provisions of this order, will be seized by the plant quarantine inspectors duly authorized by the Director of Plant Industry, and will be either immediately returned to the country of origin or completely destroyed, according to the decision of the Director of Plant Industry or his duly authorized agents. The cost of the return or destruction of the said plant materials shall be borne by the importer.
ARTS. 3 and 4. Pertain to domestic restrictions. ART. 5. Prescribes penalties.


B.P.Q.-364 MAY 5, 1934.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, FRENCH MANDATE OF SYRIA

This summary of the plant-quaratine import restrictions of the French mandate of Syria has been prepared for the information of nurserymen, plant-quarantine officials, and others interested in the exportation of plants and plant products to that country.
The summary was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant-quarantine inspector of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, from his translation of the French text of the order of the French High Commission of Syria, No. 248, of April 19, 1934.
The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct and complete up to the time of its preparation, but it is not intended to be used independently of, nor as a substitute for, the original text of the order, and it is not to be interpreted as legally authoritative. The order should be consulted for the exact text.
Av=icT S. HOYT,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Pltant Quarantine.






1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 47

CONCISE SUMMARY

IMPORTATION RESTRICTED

Plants or parts of plants, including scions, cuttings, cut flowers, leaves, fruits, vegetables, bulbs, tubers, rhizomes, and seeds. Each shipment offered for entry must be accompanied by a phytosanitary certificate issued in the country of origin.
IMPORTATION UNRESTRICTED

Plants and parts of plants intended exclusively for food and for industrial :and medicinal purposes, but when their use is in doubt they shall be deemed restricted products.

ORDER OF THE FRENCH HIGH COMMISSION, No. 248, OF APRIL 19, 1926

GENERAL REGULATIONS

Movements of plant material restricted

ARTICLE 1. Subject to the provisions of the present order are:
(a) Importation into the States under French mandate;
(b) Commerce between these same States;
(o) Exportation from these States;
(d) Transit through the territories under French mandate.

Restricted plant material

(1) Plants or parts of plants, including scions, cuttings, bulbs, tubers, rhizomes, seeds, cut flowers, leaves, fruits, and vegetables;
(2) Material of any kind used for the packing and transport of the products mentioned in the preceding paragraph.

Unrestricted plant material

ART. 2. Plants and parts of plants intended exclusively for food, manufacturing, and medicinal purposes are not subject to the present regulations.
However, in case of doubt as to the real purpose of the plants and parts of plants, or if, although intended for food, or for manufacturing or medicinal purposes, their introduction into or distribution through the country constitutes a danger to agriculture, the present regulations will be applied to them by decision of the High Commissioner upon the request of the heads of the States concerned and upon the advice of the president of the Consultative Epiphyte Commission.
ART. 3. The High Commissioner may prohibit the importation and transit of these products by special orders issued upon the proposal of the Secretary General of the High Commissariat on the advice of the president of the Consultative Epiphyte Commission.
ART. 4. Commerce in the products mentioned in paragraphs 1 and 2 of article 1 shall be the object of provisions made by each State.

Customs ports of entry

ART. 5. Subject to the provisions mentioned in the following article, the right to import into the territories under mandate the products mentioned in paragraphs 1 and 2 of article 1 is limited to customs offices on maritime and land frontiers which will provide the technical personnel and material necessary to insure the control of importation and, when required, the disinfection of the imported products.
An agreement between the inspection-general of customs of Syria and Lebanon and the State concerned will regulate the conditions under which the products to be disinfected will be transported from the point of importation to the State disinfecting station and their delivery to the importers after disinfection.
ART. 6. Requests for the opening of customs offices for the entry of the products mentioned in paragraphs 1 and 2 of article 1 shall be addressed by the heads





48 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Apr.-Juneof the States concerned to the High Commissioner, who will promulgate a decree on the proposal of the Secretary-General of the High Commissariat upon the advice of the inspector-general of customs of Syria and Lebanon and of the president of the Consultative Epiphyte Commission.
According to the technical means and materials that the localities in which the customs offices whose opening for importation is requested will provide, import authorizations may be extended to all the products mentioned in paragraphs 1 and 2 of article 1, or be limited to certain of those products and to certain botanical species.
ART. 7. In each State, in order to facilitate for the agricultural service the control of the products mentioned in paragraphs 1 and 2 of article 1, the customs service shall notify the former service without delay of the address of the depository of the import declarations pertaining to those products.
Inspection certificate required

ART. 8. Products offered for importation must be accompanied by a phytopathological inspection certificate adopted in the country of origin affirming that the products are free from any parasite known to be injurious to crops.
This certificate, after being visaed by the customs service and registered by the director of agriculture of the State in which the port of entry is located, will accompany the imported products to their final destination.
Disposal of noncertified products

ART. 9. Products unaccompanied by a phytopathological inspection certificate will be inspected by the local Direction of Agriculture on their arrival at the port of entry.
They may be admitted if found free from parasites; disinfected if necessary; shipped to a port having facilities for disinfecting if the port of entry does not furnish those facilities; or returned to the country of origin or destroyed, at the choice of the importer, if disinfection cannot be carried out.
Destruction will be effected by the customs service within 6 days from the date the importer was notified by the customs service, if he had not made his decision known.
Packing

ART. 10. Imported products must be so packed as to facilitate inspection and disinfection.
Each package shall be provided with a tag attached conspicuously indicating: Full name and address of the exporter; locality of origin of the products; character, variety, and quantity of the products contained in the package; and name and address of the importer.
The opening of the packages, and disinfection, reshipment, or destruction of the products will be made at the expense and risk of the importer.
ART. 11. The examination of products imported without certificate will involve a report, in duplicate, which will be prepared by the agent charged with the inspection.
This report, which will contain the information necessary for the identification of the products examined, will state the outcome of the examination and the resultant operations.
ART. 12. If the entry of the inspected products is permitted, the duplicate of the report will accompany the products to their final destination.
No one may transport in territory under French mandate imported plants or parts of plants which are not accompanied by a phytopathological certificate or by the inspection report mentioned in the preceding article.
The Consultative Epiphyte Commission may satisfy itself, upon the arrival of the imported products at destination, that they are free from parasites.
ARTS. 13 to 19. Interstate traffic.

Transit

ART. 20. The transit of the plants and parts of plants mentioned in paragraphs 1 and 2 of article 1 through the territory of States under French mandate is subject to the regulations concerning the importation of those plants and parts thereof.






,,1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 49

ARTS. 21 to 23. Penalties.
ART. 24. The Secretary-General of the High Commissariat, the president of ,the State of Syria, the governors of the States of Great Lebanon and of Alaouites are charged each in that which concerns him, with the execution of the ,present decree.


-P.Q.C.A.-314, Supplement No. 5 MAY 7, 1934.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, BRITISH HONDURAS

Proclamation No. 6, of February 13, 1934, revokes Proclamation No. 1, of February 5, 1929, and supersedes it. Proclamation No. 6 prescribes:
An absolute prohibition of importation into the Colony, directly or indirectly,
-of citrus plants, including plants of grapefruit, orange, lemon, lime, and tangerine trees, save and except under the following conditions:
"(a) All orders shall be placed through the Department of Agriculture .and the selection of the nursery from which any plants are obtained shall
-be made by and be in the discretion of the agricultural officer.
"(b) Trees shall be fumigated on arrival if considered necessary by the
-agricultural officer.
"(c) Trees in each consignment shall be planted out in one block and shall be open to inspection at any time by officers of the Department of Agriculture.
"(d) Within 3 years after planting any tree as aforesaid, if in the opinion of the agricultural officer it is necessary to destroy any tree or to spray the same in any particular manner due to the presence of harmful disease believed to have been introduced on such tree, the owner thereof shall, on ;being required to do so in writing by the agricultural officer, carry out at his own expense any such instructions as aforesaid. The owner shall be
-precluded from claiming any damage or compensation arising through any destruction or treatment of any plant as aforesaid.
"(e) All materials used in the packing of any trees, as well as any container in which the same may have been conveyed, shall be destroyed by fire after the plants have been received on the farm on which they are to be set out."
AVERY S. HOYT,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.



B.P.Q.-314, Supplement No. 6 MAY 15, 1934.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, BRITISH HONDURAS

IMPORTATION OF COCONUT PALMS PROHIBITED

Proclamation No. 25, August 14, 1933, effective August 19, 1933, prohibits all importations into the Colony, directly or indirectly, of any part or portion ,of the coconut palm (Cocos nucifera), including plants, leaves, leaflets, and unhusked fruits (but not including the husked nut of commerce), except by the Department of Agriculture for the purpose of experimental work undertaken by that Department.
AVERY S. HOYT,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.



P.Q.C.A.-314, Supplement No. 7 JUNE 15, 1934.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, BRITISH HONDURAS
Proclamation No. 18, of May 4, 1934, revokes Proclamation No. 5 of Novemlber 27, 1920 (see P.Q.C.A.-314, p. 1), and supersedes it.
Proclamation No. 18 prohibits absolutely the importation into the Colony of British Honduras, directly or indirectly, of the plant known as the banana plant and any other spies of the genus Musa from the West Indian Islands, Republics of Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Panama, the Con-






50 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Apr.-Jne

tinent of South America, Canary Islands, and West Africa, together with any articles or soil packed therewith, or any package, covering, or thing in which it may be packed, unless it is imported by the Department of Agriculture for experimental purposes, or under a license issued by the agricultural officer.
AVERY S. HOYT,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.


B.P.Q.--347, Supplement No. 2 MAY 7, 1934.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF GREECE
PHYLLOXERATED AND SUSPECTED REGIONS OF GREECE
(Decree of Jan. 10, 1934)
ONLY ARTICLE

I. The following regions are declared phylloxerated:
(1) The communes of Amorgos, Arkessini, and Katapola of the island of Amorgos, with the islets of Kato Koufonissia, Schinousa, and Irakleia, which are part of the commune of Katapola. The islets around the island of Amorgos: Denoussa, Kavos, Nikouria, Petalidi, Gravoussa, Dryma, Antikaros, Gougari, Fidoussa, Agrilos, Glaros, Prassoura, and Amorgopoula.
(2) The Province of Kalambaka of the Department of Trikkala.
(3) All the Province of Grevena.
(4) All the Province of Castoria.
(5) All the Province of Elasson.
II. The Provinces of Trikkala and Karditsa of the Department of Trikkala.
III. The place called Valta" of the village of Palama of the Province of Carditsa is declared infested with phylloxera.
AVERY S. HOYT,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.



B.P.Q.-355, Revised JUNE 15, 1934.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, JAMAICA, BRITISH WEST INDIES

The following summary of the plant-quarantine import restrictions of Jamaica, British West Indies, was prepared August 4, 1933, by the Director of Agriculture of that Colony, revised by him May 9, 1934, and is offered for the information of nurserymen, plant-quarantine officials, and others interested in the exportation of plants and plant products from the United States to Jamaica.
The information contained in this circular is offered as being correct and complete up to the time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used independently of, nor as a substitute for, the original texts of the orders and proclamations concerned, nor is it to be interpreted as legally authoritative.. The orders and proclamations should be consulted for the exact text.
AVERY S. HOYT.
Acting Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.







1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 51

SUMMARY OF THE PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS OF JAMAICA, BRITISH WEST INDIES


Proclamations, orders, etc., in force
Article
Instrument Date Provisions

Citrus:
Fruits.........---------------- Proclamation under Feb. 13, 1924 Prohibited from all countries.
law 23 of 1916.
Plants, buds, and grafts.. Order under law 10 June 18, 1925 Prohibited from all countries, but of 1925. Dec. 5, 1933 may be imported by Director of Agriculture at any time from any country.
Cotton, including any part of .....-do-----------............... June 18, 1925 Prohibited from all countries (exany plant of any species or cept Turks and Caicos Islands) variety of Goas#pium. except under special license from Director of Agriculture. Coconuts in the husk--------......... Proclamation under May 15, 1923 Prohibited from all countries.
law 23 of 1916.
Banana plants or parts thereof .....do---.............-------.. Apr. 3, 1917 Do.
or articles used as packing or covering for.
Tools or implements usually .....do----......-----.........----.....do........ Prohibited from Central America,
employed in the cultivation South America, and Trinidad. of bananas.
Earth or soil---- ----------- do-------------...... ..... do........ Prohibited from all countries.
Fruits and vegetables (except .....-do-...........-----....------.... Jan. 13, 1934 Prohibted except from countries
dried or processed) grains, specified in schedule (United seeds, potatoes, onion, or any Kingdom and Ireland, Canada, species of Allium. Bahamas, United States of America).
Permitted importations to be certified by a competent authority of the government of the country of origin as home grown, free from disease, and from a country where Mediterranean fruit fly does not exist.
Importer to give 7 days notice of arrival. On arrival subject to inspection, treatment, or destruction by officer authorized by the Director of Agriculture. Copra--------..............-------------.....do------------ Sept. 2,1933 Prohibited from all countries.
Plants or parts thereof, includ- Order under law 10 June 4, 1929 (1) From the United Kingdom may ing any soil, articles, cover- of 1925. be imported without permit. wings, or packages in which Entry permitted into port of they may be enclosed or Kingston only. On arrival must packed. be fumigated with hydrocyanic acid gas.
(2) From any country other than the United Kingdom permitted only if and when a written permit has been granted by the Director of Agriculture previous to importation.
Admission allowed into port of Kingston only. Goods must be consigned to the Director of Agriculture and on arrival will be subjected to such disinfection or fumigation as may be considered necessary.
-....---do.....------------ Apr. 26, 1930 The permit will take the form of a
label which must be forwarded by the importer to the supplier, who must attach it to the package containing the plants. Packages arriving without a permit attached are to be destroyed forthwith by post office or cus toms.
Agricultural tools or imple- -.....do-----------........ June 4,1929
ments of labor.
(a) New and unused ------ ---- ---------------------- Same as (1) and (2) above.
(b) Used-----...................................-------------------------------------... A permit as in (2) above is necessary before used tools and implements can be imported from any countty, including United Kingdom.






52 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Apr.-June

B.P.Q.-350, Supplement No. 1 JUNE 15, 1994.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, KINGDOM OF NORWAY

IMPORT RESTRICTIONS ON POTATOES

In view of the fact that the Royal Resolution of December 15, 1933, further amended that of February 13, 1925 (see B.P.Q.-350, p. 1), to take cognizance of the Colorado potato beetle, it was deemed desirable to furnish a more nearly complete text of the amended resolution.

RESOLUTION OF FEBRUARY 13, 1925, AS AMENDED

ARTICtm 1. Potatoes may be imported into Norway only on condition (a) That by a thorough and comprehensive field inspection, which the Department of Agriculture has found adequate, it was determined that neither wart disease (Synchytrium endobioticum) nor the Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata) occurs in the country in question, and that these parasites have not occurred there during the past 6 years ;1
(b) That the country of export concerned permits the importation of potatoes only from countries in which likewise it has been satisfactorily determined, as indicated in paragraph 1 (a), that neither potato wart nor Colorado beetle exists ;
(c) That each shipment is made directly from the country of export to the place of import and is accompanied by a certificate issued by an official phytopathological service of the exporting country, in accordance with article 9 of these regulations;
(d) That the potatoes are packed in sacks or boxes not previously used and that each sack or box is sealed with the seal of the phytopathological service concerned;
(e) That on arrival in Norway the potatoes are inspected by a Government inspector, who will certify to the customs that he has inspected them and found them to be free (if such be the case) from potato wart (Synchytrium endobioticum), the potato tuber worm (Gnorimoschema operculella), and the Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata), and that the potatoes also fulfill the requirements of the regulations for the importation of potatoes. The potatoes shall not be delivered by the customs until this certificate is submitted.
ARTS. 2 and 3. Concerning the employment of inspectors.
ART. 4. Anyone who intends to import potatoes must first obtain a permit from the Department of Agriculture (Landbruksdepartementet), Oslo, and must subsequently report each shipment to that Department; such a report must reach the Department at least 3 days before inspection is to be made.
ART. 5. Inspection is to be made at the place of customs clearance. Importers shall transport the potatoes to and from the place of inspection and provide the necessary labor during inspection.
ART. 6. At least 5 percent of the boxes or sacks shall be inspected.
ARTS. 7 and 8. Instructions to inspectors and fees for inspection.
ART. 9. The certificate of the foreign phytopathological service must be issued within 14 days of shipment. It must indicate the locality where the potatoes were grown and the names and addresses of shipper and consignee. It shall certify:
(a) That the potatoes were grown in the exporting country concerned and that the said country is free from wart disease and Colorado potato beetle;
(b) That the potatoes were grown in ground free from root nematodes (Reterodera rostochiensis var. solani) ;
(c) That shipment is made in new containers and that each sack or box bears the seal of the respective phytopathological service. The certificate shall be signed and bear the official title of the authorized official of that service and be visaed by a Norwegian consul.
A copy of the certificate shall at once be transmitted to the Department of Agriculture (Landbruksdepartementet), Oslo, Norway.

1 Since there are small localized areas infected with wart disease in several States In the United States, the importation into Norway of potatoes grown in this country Is prohibited (decision of the Norwegian Department of Agriculture per the Royal Norwegian Legation, letter of Feb. 18, 1931).

~iQ~~ li~IB





1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 53

ART. 10 Concerning small shipments from Sweden.
ART. 11. The Department may make exceptions in special cases. ART. 12. Penalties.
ART. 13. Effective immediately, until further notice; revokes the regulations of August 9, 1921.
AVERY S. HOYT,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.



P.Q.C.A.-310, Supplement No. 1 JUNE 15, 1934.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF PERU

PORTS OF ENTRY

According to the decree of August 12, 1931, the entry may be allowed, in particular cases, of living plants through other ports of the Republic than those previously authorized. For this purpose, the chief of the Service of Phytosanitary Seed and Plant Inspection and technical officials of agricultural stations and boards may attest the corresponding inspection.
Interested persons must apply in advance for the permit and pay the cost of the said inspection.
NoTE.-The above supplements the information under the caption PORTS OF ENTRY ", p. 3 of P.Q.C.A.-310.
AVERY S. HOYT,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.



P.Q.C.A.-306, Supplement No. 2 JUNE 25, 1934.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, NEW ZEALAND
TERRITORY OF WESTERN SAMOA

The secretary of the administration of western Samoa, in a communication dated April 11, 1934, to the American consul general, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia,' stated that in the matter of plant quarantines western Samoa is guided by the New Zealand customs acts and regulations, but certain local special regulations also apply to the entry of plants, etc., into that territory. These are the Board of Health Regulations No. 7, effective October 10, 1924, and the proclamation of September 9, 1933.

BOARD OF HEALTH REGULATIONS NO. 7 OF WESTERN SAMOA 2
(Effective Oct. 10, 1934)
HAY, STRAW, CHAFF, HUSKS USED AS PACKING TO BE BURNED ON ARRIVAL

ARTICLE 1. These regulations may be cited as the Board of Health Regulations No. 7.
ART. 2. In every case where goods of any kind are imported into Western Samoa, either direct or by way of any other country, from Great Britain, Ireland, or any part of the Continent of Europe, or from the States of Queensland or Western Australia, or from the United States of America, accompanied by hay, straw, chaff, or husks as packing or otherwise, the importer shall burn those materials with as little delay as possible, and in any case within 3 days of the commencement of unpacking of the goods.

2 Since these regulations apply to import restrictions and prohibitions of plant materials, including fresh fruits and vegetables, they are included as a matter of information, although they are precautionary measures against the introduction of foot-and-mouth disease into western Samoa. The certificates concerned must be issued by the Bureau of Animal Industry.





54 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Apr.-une

ART. 3. In no case shall any importer use or suffer to be used any such hay, straw, chaff, or husks for repacking the same goods or for packing any other goods.
IMPORTATION PROHIBITED OF OATS, BARLEY, MAIZE, HAY, STRAW, OHAFF, PLANTS
OR PORTIONS OF PLANTS, FRESH FRUITS AND VEGIJABL, AND ALL GRAIN AND
FARM PRODUCE FROM CALIFORNIA, OREGON, AND WASHINGTON
ART. 4. The importation from the United States of America into western Samoa, either direct or by way of any other country, of the following goods is absolutely prohibited: Oats, barley, maize, hay, straw, chaff, plants or portions of plants, all fresh fruits and vegetables, and all grain and farm produce: Provided, That in the case of all goods the importation of which is prohibited under this article, and not grown in any of the States of California, Oregon, and Washington, or directly handled or exposed within any of those States, otherwise than is necessary for through transportation to western Samoa, importation shall be permitted if the goods are accompanied by a certificate signed by a person appointed in that behalf by the government of the State concerned and countersigned by a responsible officer of the Federal Department of Agriculture certifying:
(a) The name of the State in which grown;
(b) That such State is, and has been for not less than 12 months, free from foot-and-mouth disease; and
(c) That the goods under certificate have not been directly handled or exposed within any of the States of California, Oregon, and Washington otherwise than is necessary for through transportation into western Samoa.

-CERTIFICATE OF ORIGIN REQUIRED WITH HAY, STRAW, CHAFF, OR HUSKS IMPORTED
FROM THE UNITED STATES AS PACKING MATERIAL

ArT. 5. The importation from the United States is also prohibited of all hay, straw, chaff, or husks used as packing material for goods of any kind unless accompanied by a certificate signed and countersigned as specified in .article 4, certifying such material to be the produce of a State other than the States of California, Oregon, and Washington, and that it has not been directly handled or exposed within any of these States otherwise than is necessary for through transportation to western Samoa.
ART. 6. The importation into western Samoa, either direct or by way of any other country, is prohibited of all oats, barley, maize, hay, straw, and chaff from Queensland and Western Australia; and, save with the prior consent of the Director of Agriculture, of all the aforesaid articles from any other State in the Commonwealth of Australia, other thaA Queensland and Western Australia.

PROCLAMATION OF THE ADMINISTRATOR, SEPTEMBER 9, 1933

CERTIFICATION OR FUMIGATION OF IMPORTED PLANT MATERIAL REQUIRED

ARTICLE 1. The importation is prohibited of any soil, plant matter, fruit, bags, native matting, tapa, or any similar article made from or the produce of the soil which is not accompanied by a certificate issued by a competent authority of the place of export affirming that it is free from pest or disease or that it has been fumigated immediately prior to export unless such article or thing shall first be fumigated at the fumigation station hereunder appointed.
ART. 2. Likewise prohibited is the importation of any soil, plant matter, fruit, bags, native matting, tapa, or any similar article made from or the produce of the soil, whether accompanied by a certificate as aforesaid or not, which has passed in transit through any place where in the opinion of the administrator it may be subject to infection by pest or disease, unless it shall first be fumigated at the fumigation station hereunder appointed.
ART. 3. Describes the building in Apia appointed as a fumigation station for the purposes of this proclamation.
ART. 4. Fixes the charges for fumigation.
AVERY S. HOYT,
Acting Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.






1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 55

P.Q.C.A.-299, Supplement No. 2 JUNE 28, 1934.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA
Proclamation No. 227 of April 18, 1934, amends that of June 5, 1924 (see P.Q.C.A.-299, p. 2), to read as follows:
The importation into Australia is prohibited of deciduous fruit trees or parts thereof (including the fruit and seeds), plants and parts of plants of the family Rosaceae (including the fruit and seeds), which were grown in any country in which pear blight or fire blight (Bacillus amylovorus) exists: Provided, That apples grown in New Zealand in districts in which fire blight does not exist, may be imported subject to the conditions prescribed in the regulations: Provided further, That the minister for health may permit the importation of ornamental plants or of new or special varieties of deciduous fruit trees or their fruit or seeds subject to any conditions which he may think fit to impose."
Under the same date the following regulations were promulgated concerning the certification of apples imported into the Commonwealth from New Zealand:
"REGuLATION 1. Any person desirous of landing apples imported from New Zealand shall, at the time of giving notice, also furnish with each consignment a certificate signed by a responsible officer of the Department of Agriculture of New Zealand, identifying the fruit, stating the quantity and the district in which the apples were grown, and certifying:
"(a) That the disease known as fire blight' (Bacillus amylovorus) does not exist in the said district, and
(b) That the apples were grown and packed in the said district for shipment from the port stated in the certificate.
REGULATION 2. Each case of the consignment shall be labeled or branded with the letters and figures under which the name of the grower and the district of production are registered with the Department of Agriculture of New Zealand, in addition to any other marks which may serve to identify the consignment."
AVERY S. HoYT,
Acting ChMief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.


PENALTIES IMPOSED FOR VIOLATIONS OF THE PLANT QUARANTINE ACT

According to reports received by the Bureau during the period April 1 to .July 1, 1934, penalties have recently been imposed by the proper Federal authorities for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act, as follows:
QUARANTINES AFFECTING MEXICAN PRODUCTS

In the case of the United States versus the persons listed below, for attempting to smuggle in contraband plant material, the penalties indicated were imposed by the United States customs officials at the following ports:

Name Port Contraband Penalty

B. C. Ball.................. Brownsville, Tex------....... 8 oranges.............................. $5
Victoria S. Varela----------................do-........---..........------ 5 plants---------------------------- 5
Maria M. de Perez--------.........---.....do.....-------------- 4 mangoes--------------------------............................. 5
Elenterio Rodriguez --------........--.....do-....-------------- I avocado seed and 1 orange----------........... 5
Leonora Guerra .... ....----------------- do ----------------- 13 plants_..--------------------------- 5
Mariano Moreno------...........-----..do---------------................... 4 mangoes -------------------------- 5
Francisca Garza------------.................do--------------- 1 avocado with seed..........------------------ 5
M. L. Barnes....-------------................ do--------------................... 4 mangoes__.-------------------------- 5
Lupe Baker...-------------........--..... do--.....------------ 3 mangoes...................------.....------------------- 5
J. M. Fonseca--------------...............do---.........------------ 1 avocado seed...........-------------------........-- 5
fMrs. D. C. Hogan ....---------- do ..--------------............... 1 mango--------------------------- 5
Refugio Hernandez---------.........-do-------------- 3 mangoes and 1 avocado with seed.... 5
Otto Markworth..----------... --do-...----..-------- 8 mangoes ......---------........---....------------......... 5
0. R. Hupp---------- ............---- do.......-------------............ 31 avocados with seed.---------------- 5
Maria T. Ugelda.......---------.... Calexico, Calif.......... 6 mangoes------.....................----- .......--------------- 2
Adolph Castro-..---------.......... Eagle Pass, Tex......... 2 avocados with seed----------.................-------- 1
'.Guada e Duran------- ----do.....------------- 1 mamey -------------------------- 1




4


56 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Apr.-June


Name Port Contraband Penalty

Eugenio Reyes Arriola ...... Eagle Pass, Tex-------......... 1 avocado............................. $1
Dallas F. Whaley ---------..........--.....do... .........---..-----------...... 24 avocados with seed-....----------------............. 1.2
Josefa Garza---------------..... ---do---------------................... 2 plants------------------------------i 1
Lorenzo Arlenz ------------..................do---------------................... 6 avocados with seed..------------------................ 1
I. Z. Lozano.....................-----------do................... 4 mangoes....--------------------------........................ 1
Rodrigo Perez ......------------........-.....do--------...................9 avocado seed- ...................... 1
Anastacio Garci............-----------do----......-----------............. 3 avocados and 1 mango............... 1
Santiago F. Rodriguez -----...... El Paso, Tex1............ I orange and 4 sweet limes---......----....
Rosa Reza de Hernandez ---...---.....do---.....--------.....-- 4 plants..........................2
C. R. Howard-------------...................do---------------................... 3 avocados with seed-----------------............... 1
Juana Perez---------------.....................do-....--------------3 fig plants----------.............------........-------- 1
Manuel Mena ------------------ do-------------- .....I avocado...............----------------...---- -- 1
Manuel V. Rodriguez........---------...do---------------................... 5 mangoes, 6 avocados, 1 sapote, 1 1
grapefruit, and 2 sweet limes.
Don Diaz -........-----........-----------do--------------- 256 apricots .........--------.........----------------. 1
Eugenio Quintia .....------.... Hidalgo, Tex .--------- 5 mangoes............ ....--------------------- 1
Felix Medina ...........-----------...----do.....-------------- 11 mangoes...--.................--------------- 5
Rafael Aranda-........--------.......----.... do---................------------... 5 avocados -.........-----------------------................. 5
Paul Califa........--------------..--...do--....---............... 2 avocados ...---..........------------..---------- 5.
Ignacio Ceja-------------................ Laredo, Tex ----------............ 2 mangoes-------.................---------.....----------... 1
Jose Garza ------------.................. ---- do----------------.......... --do.............................----------------------------E. Resendez ----------------do................... 10 oranges and 7 mangoes-------... --.......-- 1
R. D. Peck----------..........---------do..--...-------------.............. 7 mangoes and 7 avocados -----...-----........
P. Caussauli ............-------------- do---------------................... 36 avocados -------.............---------------........ 1
A. R. Marlanada---..........---------do................... 3 avocados and 3 mangoes ....-----------....... 1
J. G. Guajardo...--------------do....---------............. 2 avocados ..........--------......-----....---- I
D. Zapata----------------- do----................-------------.. 9 avocados .............--....---------------------.........
L. Walker-----------------.......................do---------------..................7 avocados ...................-------------------------- 1I
J. W. Davis ...----------- -----do--------------- 6 avocados...........................-------------------------- 1
Fred Mendez---------------do.................. 9 avocados-.........---....-----------.......-----.......... 1
Nicalosa Ramirez ....------------..do ---------------................. 2 plants-........-------....-----...------------- 1
Mrs. H. Hernandez--------........--.....do.................. 3 mangoes-------------------------- 1
Victor Sielski--------------do ----------------..................--.....do ----------------------...........................------- 1
P. Guerra ...-----------------do.................. ---------------9 mangoes and 2 mameys .-_ --------Taneisea R. de la Garza ----....---.....---do .................--------------- 1 mango ..-------------- ---------1
S. E. Garcia---------------.....................do ------------------......................do .....----------------------------Abraham Garcia------........---...--.....do................---------------.. 6 avocados ...--................--------------......
James Webb ......---------- -----do ........----------------.....do.......................------------------------.....---L
Genovena Parraldo----------do -------------...............-- 1 mango ......................---------------------Ricardo Lianas ------------..................do---------------.................. 3 mangoes .---------------...----------Glen White--....--------- ---do.................. 2 plants ..-- ..----------- ---------------... ....
R. Garcia Gomez----------..........--.....do.................. 3 avocados and 1 mango .-------------- 1
M. M. Garcia ------.................-- -----do....--------------- 2 mangoes --........------------------------1
Emma Vela---------------..................do---------------.................. 3 mangoes -------------------------Maria Valdez .....-------------- do.................. 2 mangoes --------------------------. 1
Augustine Pena.... ..... ----------- do.................. 4 avocados .......--...1---------------- ----Adolph Trego-------------...................do ..................------------------ .....do .....-----------....---------------- 1
Valente Velasquez do--------------- ................. 2 avocados -------------------------- 1
Jacobs Villarreal -----------.... do ..---------------.............. 10 mangoes ----------------------.. 1
J. Gonzalez ...............--------- -----do--------------- 2 avocados ------ -------------------- 1
Mrs. Otil Barrera----------..........--..do---------------.................. 2 mangoes_-------------------------- 1
Luis S. Martinez ----------- --- do---------------.................. 6 avocados --............-----.....--------------....1
Edward Clayborne--------...... --do ---------------8 avocados ....................--------------------------.1
0. E. Garza ....----------------do.................. 11 avocados and 1 sweet lime ........1---------P. Solis ......--------------... -----do ---------------.................. 7 avocados ..........-------...........------------------. 1
Miss A. Martinez ----------..........--...do ---------------.................. 2 avocados --------.............-----------.... 1
G. Sanchez ----------------......................do---------------.................. 5 avocados and 4 mangoes -------------1
Mateo Luna------------................ ----- do---------------..................5 avocados .....-----------------------.1
C. Trevino----------------....... ..... do ---------------1 mango ------------------------- 1
R. Caballero -------------... ..... --do --------------- 8 avocados -------------------------- 1
M. M. Trevino ...............------------do ----........-----------.......... 5 avocados ...----------- -----------S. P. Gonzalez ------------..............--..... do--.........-----------........ 13 avocados--..----------------------- 1
Arturo Guterrez...------------ do ---------------4 avocados---......---...-------------------W. M. Rodgers -----------............ --.....do_ -- ------------ 29 plants ...-----.... ----------------Mrs. Leo Zander --------- New Orleans, La........ ------12 orchid plants ..........----------------... 22.
Armando Villareal--------......... Rio Grande City, Tex 30 pounds broomcorn --------------........3.60
Roberta Garza_----------- Roma, Tex. ----------- 1 potted rose bush -----.........---------.. 5

T1 hese plants came from Brazil.


























ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE

A. S. HOYT, Acting Chief. B. CoNNoR, Business Manager. R. C. ALTHOUSE, Information officer.


E. R. SASSCER, iZ Charge Foreign Plant Quarantines. S. B. FRACKER, in Charge Domestic Plant Quarantines. LoN A. HAWKINS, in Charge Technological Diuision. A. F. BURGESS, in Field Charge Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail Moth Control
(Headquarters, Greevfield, Mass.).
L. H. WORTHLEY, in Field Charge Japanese Beetle and Gypsy Moth and
Brown-Tail Moth Quarantines and European Corn Borer Certification (Headquarters, Harrisburg, Pa.).
R. E. McDoNALD, in Field Charge Pink Bollworm and Thurberia Weevil Quarantines (Headquarters, San Antonio, Tex.). B. L. BOYDEN, in Field Charge Date Scale Quarantine (Headquarters, Indio,
Calif.).
P. A. HOIDALE, in Field Charge Mexican Fruit Fly Quarantine (Headquarters, Harlingen, Tex.).
57






















U. 5, GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1934


















































































I,





:S. R. A.-B. E. P. Q. No. 120 Issued January 1935.






United States Department of Agriculture

BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE



SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS

JULY-SEPTEMBER 1934


CONTENTS
Page
Quarantine and other official announcements...................----------..............----------------....................---------------- 59
Announcements relating to citrus canker quarantine (no. 19) ----------------------------- 59
Revision of quarantine__---- -------------------------------------------------- 59
Instructions to collectors of customs (T. D. 47254) ------------------------------------- 60
Announcements relating to fruit and vegetable quarantine (no. 56) --------------------------- 61
Sterilization of imported vinifera grapes by refrigeration (B. P. Q.-362, supplements nos. 1
and 2)............................ ----------------------------------------------------------------- 61
Announcements relating to gypsy moth and brown-tail moth quarantine (no. 45) -------------- 61
Revision of regulations -------- ---------------------------------------------- 61
Notice to general public through newspapers_ ----------------------------------- 69
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (no. 48) --------------------------------- 69
Japanese beetle control ends for season on fruit and vegetable shipments_ ----------------- 69
Removal of Japanese beetle quarantine restrictions on the interstate movement of fruits and
vegetables ...-----....-------------.. ................................................... 70
Instructions to postmasters_. ---__ --------------------------------------- 70
Announcement relating to Mexican fruit fly quarantine (no. 64)- ------_---------------------- 71
Administrative instructions-shipping season for Texas citrus fruit to begin September 26
(B. E. P. Q.-367) ------------------------- ---------------------------------------- 71
Announcement relating to nursery stock, plant, and seed quarantine (no. 37)-.---------------- 71
Notice to permittees and others interested-willow withes as plant ties prohibited on plants
for entry from Europe and Canada (B. E. P. Q.-365) ------------------------------------- 71
Announcements relating to pink bollworm quarantine (no. 52) ..--------------------------- 72
Modification of pink bollworm quarantine regulations (amendment no. 1) ---------------- 72
Notice to general public through newspapers----------------------------------- 74
Instructions to postmasters..........------------------------------------------------............................................... 74
Announcements relating to rice quarantine (no. 55) ----.------------------------------ 74
Rice quarantine amended (amendment no. 1) ------------------------------------------- 74
Instructions to collectors of customs (T. D. 47229).---. ------------------------------- 76
Announcements relating to sugarcane quarantine (no. 15) -------------------------------- 76
Sugarcane quarantine revised. .---- ---------------------------- ------------------ 76
Revision of quarantine -------------------------------- ---------------------- 76
Miscellaneous items ............---------...... -------------------------------------------------- 77
Plant-quarantine import restrictions,,Republic of Greece (B. P. Q-347, supplement no. 3) 77
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Jamaica, British West Indies (B. E. P. Q.-355, revised, supplement no. 1) ---------------------------------------------------78
Peru prohibits the exportation of propagating material of rotenone-producing plants (P. Q. C.
A.-310, supplement no. 2) ------------ .--------- ----------------------------- 78
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Cuba (P. Q. C. A.-283, revised, supplement no. 3) --------- ------------- ------------------------------------79
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Mexico (P. Q. C. A.-284, supplement no. 9) 79.
Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Germany (B. P. Q.-302, revised, supplement no. 2) 80 Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Czechoslovakia (B. E. P. Q.-366)-------- 80
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act --------------------------------- 89
-Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine ---------------------------- 92



QUARANTINE AND OTHER OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO CITRUS CANKER QUARANTINE (NO. 19)

REVISION OF NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 19 ON ACCOUNT OF CITRUS CANKER AND OTHER CITRUS DISEASES

INTRODUCTORY NOTE

Quarantine No. 19, on account of citrus canker and other citrus diseases, originally prohibited the importation of citrus nursery stock, including buds, scions, and seeds, from all foreign countries and localities, and this prohibition applied to all citrus plants and their relatives contained in the subfamily Citratae of the family Rutaceae. Information accumulated since this quarantine was first issued indicates that both citrus canker and the other important
99783-34-1 59





60 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Septcitrus diseases concerned are not likely to occur on any host outside of onetribe in this subfamily, viz., the tribe Citrinae. Establishment of an effectiveseed treatment has already led to a modification of this quarantine, effective July 1, 1932, whereby the prohibition against the importation of citrus seeds was removed, and the present revision now proposes to effect further modification by releasing also from prohibited status all species of the subfamily Citratae except those comprised in the one tribe, Citrinae. The genera thus released are : Atalantia, Aegle, Aeglopsis, Balsamocitrus, Chaetospermumn (Swinglca), Chalcas, Claucena (Clausena), Clausena, Echinocitrus, Feronia, Ferionella, Glycosmis, Hesperethusa, Lavanga, Limonia (Feronia), Luvnga (Lavanga), Merope, Merrilia, Micromelu, Murraya (Chalcas), Oxanthera, Pam burus, Paramignaya, Pleiospermium, Severinia, Swinglea, Triphasia, andWenzelia.
Both the citrus seeds and the various plant species thus removed from Quarantine No. 19 may hereafter be imported under the provisions of Quarantine No. 37, the Nursery Stock, Plant, and Seed Quarantine.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 19 (REVISED) (Approved Aug. 17, 1934; effective Sept. 1, 1934)
The fact has been determined by the Secretary of Agriculture that a dangerous disease of citrus plants, known as the citrus canker, and also other citrus diseases, new to and not heretofore widely prevalent or distributed within and throughout the United States, exist in Europe, Asia, Africa, South America, North America outside of the United States, and foreign oceanic countries and islands, and are coming to the United States with imported citrus nursery stock.
Now, therefore, I, Henry A. Wallace, Secretary of Agriculture, under authority conferred by the Plant Quarantine Act approved AuguSt 20, 1912, as amended, do hereby declare that it is necessary, in order to prevent the further introduction into the United States of citrus canker and other citrus diseases, to forbid the importation into the United States of all citrus nursery stock, including buds and scions, from the foreign countries and localities named.
On and after September 1, 1934, and until further notice, by virtue of said act of August 20, 1912, the importation from all foreign localities and countries of citrus nursery stock, including buds and .scions, except for experimental or scientific purposes by the Department of Agriculture, is prohibited.
The term "citrus as used herein shall be understood to include only plants belonging to the tribe Citrinae, subfamily Citratae, of the family Rutaceae, which tribe comprises the following genera: Citropsis, Citrus, Eremocitrus, .Fortunella, Microcitrus, Monanthocitrus, Pleurocitrus, and Poncirus.
This notice of quarantine revises and supersedes Notice of Quarantine No. 19, approved December 10, 1914, effective January 1, 1915, and a modification thereof approved June 22, 1932, effective July 1, 1932, and shall become effective on and after September 1, 1934.
Done at the city of Washington this 17th day of August 1934.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[SEAL] H. A. WALLACE,
Secretary of Agriculture.

INsTRUaTIONS TO COLLECTORS OF CUSTOMS
T. D. 34993, PUBLISHING NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 19, PROIIIBITING THE IMPORTATION OF CITRUS NURSERY STOCK, AS MODIFIED BY T. D. 45795, REVISE (T. D.
47254)
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,
OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONER OF CUSTOMS, Washington, D. C., September 13, 1934.
To Collectors of Customs and Others Concerned:
The appended copy of a revision of Notice of Quarantine No. 19, on account of the citrus canker and other citrus diseases, issued by the Secretary of






1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 61

Agriculture, effective September 1, 1934, is published for the information and guidance of collectors of customs and others concerned.
ELI FRANK, Jr.,
Acting Commissioner of Customs,
(Then follows the full text of the revised, quarantine.)


ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO FRUIT AND VEGETABLE QUARANTINE (NO. 56)

B. P. Q.-362, Supplement No. 1. JuLY 26, 1934.
STERILIZATION OF IMPORTED VINIFERA GRAPES BY REFRIGERATION

It now appears that occasional shipments of grapes may be offered for entry under the provision of B. P. Q.-362 during the late summer months. In view of this situation, as an added safeguard the entry, subject to sterilization of grapes from regions where the Mediterranean fruit fly is known to occur, will be limited to the period October 15 to March 15.
In this connection it should be emphasized that the only type of container which has been approved for the shipment of grapes originating in countries where the Mediterranean fruit fly occurs is a tight barrel or keg. To avoid any delay or rejection of fruit arriving in containers which have not been approved, all in interest should submit in advance of the shipping season, samples of the container to be used.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


B. P. Q.-362, Supplement No. 2. AUGUST 2, 1934.
STERILIZATION OF IMPORTED VINIFERA GRAPES BY REFRIGERATION

The purpose of the additional safeguards contained in Supplement No. 1 to B. P. Q.-362 was to limit the entry of grapes to the cooler months on the theory that there might be sufficient breakage of containers during the period when susceptible fruits would be available for oviposition by fruit flies should any escape during weather suitable for the development of the fly.
For the present shipping season grapes will be permitted entry from October 1 to April 15, a period when availability of susceptible fruits and temperature conditions are such as not to offer risk in the development of the fly should any escape from broken containers. Meanwhile breakage conditions will be observed and future shipping seasons will be restricted or not according to conditions found to obtain.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO GYPSY MOTH AND BROWN-TAIL MOTH QUARANTINE (NO. 45)
GYPSY MOTH AND BROWN-TAIL MOTH QUARANTINE (NO. 45)

REVISION OF REGULATIONS

INTRODUCTORY NOTE

The gypsy moth and brown-tail moth quarantine regulations are revised below in order to bring them up to date with respect to changes in the known distribution of these insects since the last revision of the regulations was adopted May 25, 1931. The revision reduces the size of the regulated area in Vermont, and designates as generally infested certain territory of Connecticut, Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont which has heretofore been classed as lightly infested. It also modifies the boundaries of the area desig-





62 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

nated as brown-tail moth infested in the States of Maine, Massachusetts, and New Hampshire, and adds parts of four counties in Vermont.
Additional changes of interest to shippers include the exemption of such woody plants as have been grown in the greenhouse throughout the year and are so labeled; the authorization of the shipment of Christmas trees from the generally infested area when grown as nursery stock in a cultivated nursery and certified under the nursery-stock provisions; the adding of empty cable reels to the list of restricted articles; and slight modifications in the procedure for the certification of car-lot shipments.

SUMMARY

The regulated area includes the entire State of Rhode Island and parts of the States of Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Vermont.
The restricted articles are as follows: (1) Coniferous trees, such as spruce, fir, hemlock, pine, juniper (cedar), and arborvitae (white cedar) without roots, known and described as Christmas trees ", and parts thereof, and parts of evergreen decorative plants, such as boxwood, holly, and laurel;
(2) forest-plant products, including logs, tanbark, posts, poles, car stakes, railroad ties, cordwood, empty cable reels, and lumber; (3) trees, shrubs, vines, and all plants having persistent woody stems, and parts thereof, excepting seeds and fruit; and (4) stone or quarry products. (Regulation 1.)
Under these regulations no restricted articles (as defined above) shall be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from the regulated areas to or through any point outside thereof, nor from the generally infested area to the lightly infested area, unless and until a certificate or permit shall have been issued therefor by an inspector. (Regulation 5.)
Christmas trees and evergreen boughs originating in the generally infested area are not allowed to be moved interstate to any point outside of that area, and no certificate or permit will be issued authorizing such movement unless such trees have been grown as nursery stock in a cultivated nursery and are certified under the provisions of regulation 6. (Regulation 5.)
Deciduous trees and such parts thereof as bear leaves are not allowed to be moved from the brown-tail moth infested area to outside points without a certificate or permit, except that a State nursery inspection certificate may be substituted for certain classes of movement within the gypsy moth regulated areas. (Regulation 5.)
Plants grown in the greenhouse throughout the year and cut flowers thereof may be shipped interstate without inspection and certification on condition that each box or package thereof is plainly labeled to show that the contents were greenhouse grown.
For the conditions governing inspection and certification, marking requirements and similar details, see regulations 6 to 12, inclusive.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 45
(Effective on and after July 1, 1920. Supersedes Notice of Quarantine No. 33, revised)

The fact has been determined by the Secretary of Agriculture, and notice is hereby given, that two injurious insects-the gypsy moth (Porthetria dispar) and the brown-tail moth (Euproctis chrysorrhoca)-not heretofore widely distributed within and throughout the United States, exist in parts of the following States, to wit: Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut.
Now, therefore, I, C. F. Marvin, Acting Secretary of Agriculture, under the authority conferred by section 8 of the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended by the act of Congress approved March 4, 1917 (39 Stat. 1134, 11f65), do hereby quarantine the States of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut, and by this Notice of Quarantine No. 45 do order that (1) coniferous trees, such as spruce, fir, hemlock, pine, juniper (cedar), and arborvitae (white cedar), known and described as Christmas- trees ", and parts thereof, and decorative plants, such as holly and laurel, known and described as Christmas greens or greenery "; (2) forestplant products, including logs, tanbark, posts, poles, car stakes, railroad ties,






1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 63

cordwood, and lumber; (3) field-grown florists' stock, trees, shrubs, vines, cuttings, and other plants and plant products, excepting fruit pits, seeds of fruit and ornamental trees and shrubs, field, vegetable, and flower seeds, bedding plants, and other herbaceous plants and roots; and (4) stone or quarry products, shall not be moved or allowed to move interstate from any of said States in manner or method or under conditions other than those prescribed in the rules and regulations supplemental hereto.
Done in the District of Columbia this 28th day of May 1920.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture. [SEAL] C. F. MARVIN,
Acting Secretary of Agriculture.


REVISED RULES AND REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 45
(Approved Sept. 27, 1934; effective Oct. 2, 1934)

REGULATION 1. DEFITIONS

For the purpose of these regulations the following words, names, and terms shall be construed, respectively, to mean:
(a) Gypsy motl.--The insect known as the gypsy moth (Porthetria dispar).
(b) Brown,-tail m oth.-The insect known as the brown-tail moth (Nygmia phaeorrhoea, formerly referred to as'Euproctis chrysorrhoea).
(c) Quarantined area.-Any State quarantined by the Secretary of Agriculture upon determination by him that either the gypsy moth or the brown-tail moth, or both, exist therein.
(d) Regulated area.-The entire area comprised of portions of the quarantined States now or hereafter designated by the Secretary of Agriculture as regulated to prevent the spread of the gypsy moth or brown-tail moth, or both. therefrom.
(e) Generally infested area.-The entire area comprised of portions of the quarantined States now or hereafter designated by the Secretary of Agriculture as generally infested with the gypsy moth.
(f) Lightly infested area.-The entire area comprised of portions of the quarantined States now or hereafter designated by the Secretary of Agriculture as lightly infested with the gypsy moth.
(g) BrOwn-tail moth infested area.-The entire area comprised of portions of the quarantined States now or hereafter designated by the Secretary of Agriculture as infested with the brown-tail moth.
(h) Restricted articles.-(1) Coniferous trees, such as spruce, fir, hemlock, pine, juniper (cedar), and arborvitae (white cedar) without roots, known and described as Christmas trees ", and parts thereof, and parts of evergreen decorative plants, such as boxwood, holly, and laurel; (2) forest-plant products, including logs, tanbark, posts, poles, car stakes, railroad ties, cordwood, empty cable reels, and lumber; (3) trees, shrubs, vines, and all plants having persistent woody stems, and parts thereof, excepting seeds and fruit; and (4) stone or quarry products.
(i) Moved or allowed to be moved interstate.-Shipped, offered for shipment to a common carrier, received for transportation or transported by a common carrier, or carried, transported, moved, or allowed to be moved from one State or Territory or District of the United States into or through any other State or Territory or District.
(j) Inspector.-An inspector of the United States Department of Agriculture.

REGULATION 2. LIMITATION OF RESTICTIONS TO REGULATED AREAS

Conditioned upon the State concerned providing for and enforcing such control measures with respect to the regulated areas as in the judgment of the Secretary of Agriculture shall be deemed adequate to prevent the spread of the gypsy moth and the brown-tail moth to other parts of the State, the restrictions provided in these regulations on the interstate movement of plants and plant products and other articles enumerated in said notice of quarantine will be limited to such movement from the areas in such State now or hereafter designated by the Secretary of Agriculture as regulated areas.






64 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

REGULATION 3. REGULATED AREAS; GENERAL AND LIGHTLY INFESTED An ; BROWN-TAIL MOTH INFESTED AREA

(1) REGULATED AREAS

The Secretary of Agriculture designates as regulated areas for the purpose of these regulations the States, counties, townships, towns, plantations, cities, and other political subdivisions listed below, including any cities, towns, boroughs, or other political subdivisions included within their limits.
Co n ect icut.-Coun ties of Hartford, Middlesex, New London, Tolland, and Windham; towns of Barkhamstead, Colebrook, Harwinton, New Hartford, Plymouth, Thomaston, Torrington, and Winchester, in Litchfield County; towns of Branford, Guilford, Madison, Meriden, North Branford, North Haven, Waterbury, and Wolcott, in New Haven County.
Maine.-Counties of Androscoggin, Cumberland, Kennebec, Knox, Lincoln, Sagadahoc, Waldo, and York; towns of Avon, Berlin, Carthage, Chesterville, Crockertown, Dallas Plantation, Farmington, Freeman, Industry, Jay, Jerusalem, Kingfield, Madrid, Mount Abraham, New Sharon, New Vineyard, Perkins, Phillips, Rangeley Plantation, Redington, Salem, Sandy River Plantation, Strong, Temple, Washington, Weld, and Wilton, and Townships D and E, in Franklin County; all of Hancock County except Plantations 3, 4, 35, and 41; all that part of Oxford County south and southeast of and including Magalloway Plantation and Richardsontown; towns of Alton, Argyle, Bradford, Bradley, Carmel, Charleston, Clifton, Corinna, Corinth, Dexter, Dixmont, Eddington, Etna, Exeter, Garland, Glenburn, Grand Falls Plantation, Greenbush, Greenfield, Hampden, Hermon, Holden, Hudson, Kenduskeag, Levant, Milford, Newburgh, Newport, Orono, Orrington, Plymouth, Stetson, Summit, and Veazie, and cities of Bangor, Brewer, and Old Town, in Penobscot County; towns of Abbott, Atkinson, Dover, Foxcroft, Guilford, Kingsbury Plantation, Parkman, Sangerville, and Wellington, in Piscataquis County; all that part of Somerset County south and southeast of and including Highland and Pleasant Ridge Plantations, town of Moscow, and Mayfield Plantation; towns of Beddington, Cherryfield, Columbia, Deblois, Harrington, Milbridge, and Steuben, and Plantations 18 and 24, in Washington County.
Massachusetts.-Counties of Barnstable, Bristol, Dukes, Essex, Hampden, Hampshire, Middlesex, Nantucket, Norfolk, Plymouth, Suffolk, and Worcester; all of Franklin County except the town of Monroe.
Newo Hampshire.-Counties of Belknap, Carroll, Cheshire, Grafton, Hillsboro, Merrimack, Rockingham, Strafford, and Sullivan; all that part of Coos County lying south of and including the towns of Columbia, Errol, Ervings Location, and Millsfield.
Rhode Island.-The entire State.
Vermont.-Counties of Caledonia, Orange, Windham, and Windsor; towns of Landgrove, Peru, Readsboro, Searsburg, and Winhall, in Bennington County; towns of Brunswick, Concord, East Haven, Ferdinand, Granby, Guildhall, Lunenburg, Maidstone, and Victory, in Essex County: towns of Elmore and Wolcott, in Lamoille County: towns of Chittenden, Clarendon, Ira, Mendon, Mount Holly, Mount Tabor, Pittsfield, Pittsford, Proctor, Rutland, Sherburne, Shrewsbury, Tinmouth, Wallingford, West Rutland, and the city of Rutland, in Rutland County; towns of Barre, Berlin, Cabot, Calais, East Montpelier, Marshfield, Middlesex, Montpelier, Moretown, Northfield, Plainfield, Roxbury, Waitsfield, Woodbury, and Worcester, in Washington County.

(2) DIVISION OF REGULATED AREA

For the purpose of regulating inspection and transportation, the territory designated above is divided into two classes of areas to be known as the generally infested" and lightly infested" areas respectively, and part of such regulated area is also designated as "brown-tail moth infested."

(3) Lightly infested area

The following States, counties, townships, towns, plantations, cities, and other political subdivisions, including any cities, towns, boroughs, or other political subdivisions included within their limits, are designated as the lightly infested area:






1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 60

CominctiCut.-County of Middlesex; towns of Avon, Berlin, tBristol, liurli igton, Farmnigton, MA1lrlboro, New I riIkin, Newvingion, P'lainville', Rocky Hill, Southingtlon, and West I arilford, in II' rit od (C'llty; towels of ('olel)rook, Harwinton, New Harlford, Plymouth, Ths()t)I oil, Torrington, mid Wichester, in Litchfiel (County; towns of Ih'al(ford, C(uilford, Ma dison, MIeriden, No)rth B'anford, North II aven, Waterbury, and( W (ott, in New IIav\'en countyy; towns of East Lyme, Lyme, and Old Lynme, in New lodon n (Coii y.
Mainec.-Townis of Avon. Ii rlin, C(arilge, (lChesterville,. (rok:ertown, D)allas Planta tion, Fai rmiigtlonl, Freenmal, Industry, .Jay, Jerusalem, Kin-field, Madrid, Mount Abraham, New Shron, New Vineya1rd, Perkins, P'hillipls. ItIneley Plantation, Redlington, Salem, Sandy River Phlantation, Stroin Tqemple, Washinigtoi), Weld, and \Vilton, :111(1 TowIIshipls D an(1 E, in Franklin (Comluty; owns of Amherst, Aurora, BufckSl)orI, I)(hlli n, Eastlhrook, Frankllin, Gouldshor, lancock, Laminiie, Mari vile, (rlald, Oso)(rn Pla) tait ion, Otis, P) obscot, Sorrento, Sullivan, Trel ton, Verona, Waltham, city of Ellsworih, lnd Itownships or I)plantations numbered 7, 8, 9, 10, 1ti, 22, 28, :2, 3, 34, :19, ad(1 4(0, in Hancock County: towns of ienton, ('linton, in(me, Unity I'latation, and Vienna, in Kennelec County : towns of Andover, B:atchelders Grant, Bethl)(1, Byron, C., ('. surplus, Dixfield, Fryeburg Acadeiy Grant, Gilead, Grafton, Hanover, Magalloway Plantation, Mexico, Milton Plantation, Newry, North Andover surplus, I'eru, Richlardsomitown, Riley Grant, Roxhury, Runf(rird, and TUpton, in ()xford ( 'ounty; towns of Alton, Argyle, Bradford, Bra(ley, Carimel, Charleston, Clifton, Corinna, Corinth, Dexter, Dixmont, Eddington, Etna, Exeter, Garland, Glenburn, Grand Falls IPlantation, (ireei)ush, Greentfield, Hampden, HIermon. HIolden, Hudson, Kenduskealg, Levant, Milford, Newburgh, Newport, Orono, Orrington, Plymouth, Stetson, Siulinmit, ahnd Veazie, and cities of Bangor, Brewer, and Old Town, in PIelnobscot County; towns of Abbott, Atkinson, Dover, Foxcroft, Guilford, Kingsbury Plantation, Parkman, Sangerville, and Wellington, in Piscataquis County; all that part of Somerset County south and southeast of and including Highland and Pleasant Ridge Plantations, town of Moscow, and Mayfield Plantation; towns of Brooks, Burldlam, Frankfort, Freedom, Jackson, Knox, Monroe, Montville, Morrill, Prospect, Searsmoi t, Searsport, Stockt on Springs, Swanville, Thorndike, Troy, Unity, Waldo, Winterport, and the city of BIelfast, in Waldo County; towns of Bedington, Cherrylield, Columhia, Deb lois, Harrington, Milbridge, and Steuben, and Plantations IS and 24, in Washington County.
Mussachuselts.-Towns of Charlemont, HaIwley, Heath, and Rowe, in Franklin County; towns of Chester and Tolland, in Hampden County; towns of Cumnington, Huntington, Middlefield, Plainfield, and Worthington, in Hanipshire County.
Nerr Hafmpshirc.-Town of Hart Location, in Carroll County: all that part of (Coos County lying south of and including the towels of Columbia, Errol, Ervings Location, and Millsield ; towns of Bathi, Bethlehem, Franconia, Lan(latff, Lislhon, Littleton, Lyman, and Monroe, in (Grafton County.
Rhode I.la nd.-Town of New Shorelhamn (I lock Island) in Newport County.
Vclr on t.--(ounties of Caledonia and Orange ; towns of Landgrove, Peru, Readsboro, Searsburg, and Winlhll, in Ie('1ington (Comity: towns of IBrunswick, Concord, East Haven, Ferdiiianl, Granby, Guildhall, Lunenburg, Maidstone, and Victory, in Essex county y ; towns of Elmnore and Wolcott, in Lamoille County ; towns of Chittenden, ('larendon ,endon, Mount Iolly Mount Tabor, Pittsfield, Pittsford, Proctor. Rutlaind, Slherb)urne. Shrewsbury, Tinniouthi, Wallinglfor(, West Ruland, and the city of Rutland, in Hutl::id (Couunty towns of Barre, lierlin, Cabot, C'alais, East 'Montlelier, IIarslhfield, Middllesex, Mo(intpelier, Moretown, Noirlthtlel(l, PIlainiel(l, IRoxbuiy, Wait stield, \Wooh(u1llar-y, and Worcester, in Washin'gitoni (C'()outy; towns (of Athens, ILrookline, I )over. ('rafton, IHalifax, Jamaic:. ,Londonderry, Mlarlhorn, New fam Somier.,set, Stratton, Townsliend, Waordshoro, Whit inj Wilm, ington, and Windhlain, il Win(illiamn (ounlty: all (f Windsor (County except the towns of Springlield, Weathersfiel(d, and Wi)nds()1r.

(I) Gencrutll!y infcstcd area

All Iparts of the regulated( area not designated as lightly infested in section
(3) hereof, shall comprise the generally infested area.






66 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept..

(5) Brown-tail moth infested area

The following counties, towns, and other political subdivisions, including any cities, boroughs, or other political subdivisions included within their limits, are also infested with the brown-tail moth and are hereby designated as the brown-tail moth infested area:
Ma ine.-Counties of Androscoggin, Cumberland, Kennebec, Knox, Lincoln, Sagadahoc, Waldo, and York; towns of Chesterville, Farmington, Industry, Jay, New Sharon, and Wilton, in Franklin County; towns of Bar Harbor, Bucksport, Orland, Surry, and Trenton, and the city of Ellsworth, in Hancock County, and all territory west and south of said towns in said county; towns of Albany, Bethel, Brownfield, Buckfield, Canton, Denmark, Dixfield, Fryeburg, Greenwood, Hartford, Hebron, Hiram, Lovell, Mason, Milton Plantation, Norway, Oxford, Paris, Peru, Porter, Rumford, Stoneham, Stow, Sumner, Sweden, Waterford, and Woodstock, in Oxford County; cities of Bangor and Brewer, and towns of Carmel, Dixmont, Etna, Hampden, Hermon, Newburgh,. Orrington, and Plymouth, in Penobscot County; and towns of Canaan, Fairfield, Mercer, Norridgewock, Pittsfield, Skowhegan, Smithfield. and Starks, in Somerset County.
Massachusetts.-Counties of Barnstable, Bristol, Dukes, Essex, Middlesex,. Nantucket, Norfolk, Plymouth, and Suffolk; towns of Ashburnham, Berlin, Blackstone, Bolton, Boylston, Clinton, Douglas, Fitchburg, Gardner, Grafton, Harvard, Holden, Hopedale, Lancaster, Leominster, Lunenberg, Mendon, Milford, Millbury, Millville, Northborough, Northbridge, Paxton, Princeton, Royalston,. Shrewsbury, Southboro, Sterling, Sutton, Templeton, Upton, Uxbridge, Webster, West Boylston, Westboro, Westminster, and Winchendon, and the city of Worcester, in Worcester County.
New Hampshire.-Counties of Belknap, Cheshire, Hillsboro, Merrimack, Rockingham, Strafford, and Sullivan; all of Carroll County, except the town of Jackson; all of Grafton County except the towns of Bethlehem and Littleton.
Vermont.-Towns of Barnet and Ryegate, in Caledonia County; towns of Bradford, Fairlee, Newbury, Thetford, and West Fairlee, in Orange County; towns of Brattleboro, Dummerston, Putney, Rockingham, Vernon, and Westminster, in Windham County; towns of Hartford, Hartland, Norwich, Springfield, Weathersfield, West Windsor, and Windsor, in Windsor County.

REGULATION 4. EXTENSION OR REDUCTION OF REGULATED AREAS

The regulated areas designated in regulation 3 may be extended or reduced as may be found advisable by the Secretary of Agriculture. Due notice of any extension or reduction and the areas affected thereby will be given in writing tothe transportation companies doing business in or through the States in which such areas are located and by publication in one or more newspapers selected by the Secretary of Agriculture within the States in which the areas affected are located.

REGULATION 5. CONTROL OF MOVEMENT OF RESTRIcTED ARTICLES

(1) Certification required.-Except as provided in paragraph (5) hereof, no restricted articles as defined in regulation 1 shall be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from the regulated areas to or through any point outside thereof, nor from the generally infested to the lightly infested area, unless and until a certificate or permit shall have been issued therefor by an inspector.
(2) Christmas trees a'nd evergreen boughs.--Coniferous trees, such as spruce, fir, hemlock, pine, juniper (cedar), and arborvitae (white cedar) without roots, known and described as Christmas trees", and parts thereof over 1 foot in length, originating in the generally infested area (unless grown as nursery stock in a cultivated nursery and certified under the provisions of regulation 6 hereof), shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate to any point outside of such area and no certificate or permit will be issued authorizing such movement. Such articles which have originated in the lightly infested area may be shipped interstate from the generally infested area under the inspection and certification prescribed in paragraph (1) hereof.
(3) Shiprnents from brown-tail moth infested area.-Except as provided in paragraph (5) hereof, no deciduous trees or shrubs, or such branches or other parts thereof as bear leaves, shall be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from the area designated as infested by the brown-tail moth to any point outI...





19341 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 67

side thereof unless and until a certifica te or permit shall have been issued therefor by an inspector, except that as to such movement wholly within the generally infested gypsy moth area or wholly within the lightly infested gypsy moth area, or from the lightly infested to the generally infested gypsy moth area, a valid State nursery-inspection certificate of the State from which the shipment is made may be substituted for such Federal certificate or permit.
(4) Shipments within regulated areas unrestricted.-Other than as prescribed in paragraph (3) hereof, and in regulation 9, no restrictions are placed by these regulations on the interstate movement of restricted articles wholly within the generally infested area or wholly within the lightly infested area or from the lightly infested area to the generally infested area.
(5) Cut flowers and greenhouse-grown plants.-In the case of woody plants which are grown in the greenhouse throughout the year, the plants themselves and the cut flowers thereof may be shipped interstate without inspection or certification under these regulations on condition that each box or package thereof is plainly labeled to show that the contents were greenhouse grown.
(6) Herbaceous plants unrestricted.-No restrictions are placed by these regulations on the interstate movement of strawberry plants, or of other herbaceous annual or perennial plants or parts thereof.

REGULATION 6. CONDITIONS GOVERNING THE ISSUANCE OF CERTIFICATES
(a) Application; assembly of articles for inspection.-Persons intending to move or allow to be moved restricted articles interstate shall make application therefor as far as possible in advance of the probable date of shipment. Applications must show the nature and quantity of the plants or plant products or stone or quarry products it is proposed to move, together with their exact location, and, if practicable, the contemplated date of shipment. Applicants for inspection will be required to assemble or indicate the articles to be shipped so that they can be readily examined by the inspector. If not so placed, inspection will be refused. Articles to be inspected must be free from ice and snow and in condition to make inspection easily practicable,
(b) Nursery-grown stock.-With respect to nursery-grown stock, Federal inspection and the issuance of Federal certificates authorizing the interstate movement of nursery products will be conditioned on the presentation of a valid State certificate stating that the nursery in question has been inspected by a State nursery inspector and certifying that it is apparently free from infestation with gypsy and brown-tail moths. Such State certification shall be renewed each year, shall be based on an inspection made as promptly as practicable after the egg-laying' period of the gypsy moth, and shall be valid for the purpose of Federal certification, until the following egg-hatching period, except that, pending reinspection, shipments may be inspected and certified for interstate movement on the basis of the State certification of the preceding year. Whenever any nursery or independent unit thereof in the regulated area, or any shipment therefrom, is reported by a State inspector to be appreciably infested with either the gypsy moth or the brown-tail moth, or whenever such infestation is determined by a Federal inspector on his examination of material offered for shipment, further certification for interstate movement from such nursery, or independent unit thereof, will be refused until such nursery has been freed from infestation and has been again inspected and certified by the State to be apparently clean. During the larval period of the gypsy moth all nursery stock shall be assembled for the examination of the Federal inspector, and if passed by him as free from any infestation, either by egg masses or wind-blown larvae, it may then be lined up and thoroughly sprayed under the direction of and in manner and method satisfactory to the said inspector, who will certify each shipment as having been thus inspected and treated.
(c) Native trees and shrubs.-With respect to living trees and plants not grown in nurseries, inspection and certification for interstate movement will be conditioned upon the presentation of a statement by the applicant indicating the exact source of such trees and plants, and in addition to such statement, if dug on land other than the property of the applicant, a permit from the owner of the said land authorizing such digging, provided such permit is required under the law of the State wherein the land is situated. If the inspection of the trees or plants intended for shipment discloses infestation with either the gypsy moth or brown-tail moth, certification will be refused as to the intended shipment and as to other similar shipments of trees or plants originating on the same property or in the same locality.
99783-34- 2





68 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

(d) Forest products and stone and quarry products.-Certificates of inspection authorizing the interstate movement of forest products and stone and quarry products may be issued under either of the following conditions: (1) When the articles to be shipped have actually been inspected and found free from infestation; or (2) when the articles have been disinfected under the supervision of an inspector in such a manner as to eliminate all risk of infestation. With respect to quarries, and with respect to yards or other places where forest products are assembled for shipment, as a condition of inspection and certification, the premises or surroundings of such places shall be cleaned up and kept free from gypsy moth infestation.
(e) Charges for storage, etc.-All charges for storage, cartage, and labor incident to inspection or disinfection other than the services of the inspectors shall be paid by the shipper.
(f) Use of certificeates.-Certificates of inspection will be issued only for plants and plant products and stone or quarry products which are free from Infestation by the gypsy moth and the brown-tail moth and have been so determined by an inspector. The use of such certificates in connection with plants and plant products and stone or quarry products which are not in compliance with these regulations is unlawful.

REGULATION 7. CONDITIONS GOVERNING THE ISSUANCE OF PERMITS WITHOUT INSPECTION
Permits authorizing the interstate movement of restricted articles may be issued (1) when such products have been grown, or manufactured, processed, and stored in such a manner that, in the judgment of the inspector, no infestation could be transmitted, and (2) when such products originate outside of the infested areas and, while within the infested area, have been stored and safeguarded in such a manner that, in the judgment of the inspector, no infestation could be transmitted. Permits will be issued only for plants and plant products and stone or quarry products which are not infested with the gypsy moth or brown-tail moth.

REGULATION 8. MARKING AND CERTIFICATION A CONDITION OF INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION
(a) Every car, vehicle, box, basket, or other container of the articles listed for which a certificate or permit is required by these regulations shall be plainly marked with the name and address of the consignor and the name and address of the consignee, and shall have securely attached to the outside thereof a valid certificate or permit issued in compliance with these regulations. In the case of lot shipments by freight, one certificate attached to one of the containers and another certificate attached to the waybill will be sufficient.
(b) In the case of bulk carload shipments by rail, the certificate shall accompany the waybill, conductor's manifest, memorandum, or bill of lading pertaining to such shipment, and in addition each car shall have securely attached to the outside thereof a placard showing the number of the certificate or certificates accompanying the waybill.
(c) In the case of shipment by road vehicle, the certificates shall accompany the vehicle.
(4) Certificates shall be surrendered to the consignee upon delivery of the shipment.

REGULATION 9. THOROUGH CLEANING REQUIRED OF CARS, BOATS, AND OTHER VEHICLES BEFORE MOVING INTERSTATE
Cars, boats, and other vehicles which have been used in transporting restricted articles within the regulated areas shall not be moved or allowed to move interstate until the same shall have been thoroughly swept out and cleaned by the carrier at the point of unloading or destination of all litter and rubbish from such regulated articles. No litter, rubbish, or refuse from any such restricted articles shall be moved or allowed to move interstate.

REGULATION 10. INSPECTION IN TRANSIT
Any car, vehicle, basket, box, or other container moved interstate or offered to a common carrier for shipment interstate, which contains or which the inspector has probable cause to believe contains either infested articles or articles





1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 69

the movement of which is prohibited or restricted by these regulations, shall be subject to inspection by an inspector at any time or place.

REGULATION 11, CANCELLATION OF CERTIFICATES AND PERMITS
Certificates and permits issued under these regulations may be withdrawn or canceled by the inspector and further certification refused, either for any failure of compliance with the conditions of these regulations or violation of them, or whenever in the judgment of the inspector the further use of such certificates might result in the dissemination of infestation.

REGULATION 12. SHIPMENTS BY THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
Articles subject to restriction in these regulations may be moved interstate by the United States Department of Agriculture for experimental or scientific purposes, on such conditions and under such safeguards as may be prescribed by the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine. The container of articles so moved shall bear, securely attached to the outside thereof, an identifying tag from the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine showing compliance with such conditions.
These revised rules and regulations shall be effective on and after October 2, 1934, and shall supersede the rules and regulations promulgated May 25, 1931.
Done at the city of Washington this 27th day of September 1934.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[SEAL] H. A. WALLACE,
Secretary of Agriculture.
iForegoing revised regulations sent to all common carriers doing business in or through the quarantined area.]

Nonce TO GENERAL PUBLIC THROUGH NEWSPAPERS

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE, Washington, D. C., September 27, 1934.
Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority of the act approved August 20, 1912, known as the plant quarantine act (37 Stat. 315), as amended by the act approved March 4, 1917 (39 Stat. 1134, 1165), has promulgated a revision of the rules and regulations supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 45, on account of the gypsy moth and brown-tail moth, effective October 2, 1934. The revision releases part of Vermont from the regulated area, modifies the boundaries of the areas designated as lightly infested, generally infested, and brown-tail moth infested in Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Vermont, adds empty cable reels to the list of restricted articles, exempts from restriction such woody plants as have been grown in the greenhouse throughout the year, and makes other changes in the regulations. Copies of the revision may be obtained from the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, Washington, D. C.
H. A. WALLACE.
Secretary of Agriculture.
[Published in the following newspapers: The Times, Hartford, Conn., Oct. 4, 1934; the Press-Herald, Portland, Maine, Oct. 5, 1934; the Post, Boston, Mass., Oct. 5. 1934; the Union, Manchester, N. H., Oct. 5, 1934; the Bulletin, Providence, R. I., Oct. 4, 1934; the Free Press, Burlington, Vt., Oct. 11, 1934.]


ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE (NO. 48)
JAPANESE BEETLE CONTROL ENDS FOR SEASON ON FRUIT AND VEGETABLE SHIPMENTS
(Press notice)
SEPTEMBER 15, 1934.
The Secretary of Agriculture announced today that restrictions on the movement of fruits and vegetables under the Japanese beetle quarantine regulations





70 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

will be removed for the season on and after Sunday, September 16. The restrictions on cut flowers, however, remain until October 15. Under the quarantine regulations, certificates showing freedom from Japanese beetle are required on shipments of certain kinds of fruits and vegetables until October 15. The effect of the order is to release the fruits and vegetables from that requirement a month earlier than is provided in the regulations themselves.
The inspection of fruits and vegetables is necessary only during the period when the adult beetles are abundantly present and in active flight. There is no risk that such products will carry the Japanese beetle after this active period. During the last few days the Department's inspectors have found no beetles in fruits and vegetables.
There is still danger, however, that the adult beetles may be transported in cut flowers. In cool fall evenings, the beetles have a tendency to crawl down into the flowers for protection. Therefore, the restrictions on the interstate movement of cut flowers and other portions of plants will remain in full force and effect until October 15, inclusive.
Restrictions on the movement of nursery, ornamental, and greenhouse stock and all other plants (except cut flowers and portions of plants without roots and incapable of propagation) are in force throughout the year and are not affected by this amendment.



REMOVAL OF JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS ON THE
INTERSTATE MOVEMENT OF FRUITS AND VEGETABLES

Since it has been determined that the active period of the Japanese beetle in its relation to fruits and vegetables has already ceased for the present season and that it is, therefore, safe to permit the unrestricted movement of the fruits and vegetables listed in regulation 5 of the rules and regulations (twelfth revision) supplemental Ito Notice of Quarantine No. 48 from the regulated area as defined in regulation 3 of said rules and regulations, it is ordered that all restrictions on the interstate movement of the articles referred to above are hereby removed on and after September 16, 1934. This order advances the termination of the restrictions as to fruits and vegetables provided for in regulation 5 from October 16 to September 16, 1934, and applies to this season only.
Done at the city of Washington this 15th day of September 1934.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[SEAL] H. A. WALLAGE.
Secretary of Agriculture.



INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS

POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL, Washington, September 18, 1934.
POSTMASTER :
MY DEAR SIR: The United States Department of Agriculture advises it has been determined that the active period of the Japanese beetle in its relation to fruits and vegetables has already ceased for the present season and that it is, therefore, safe to permit the unrestricted movement of fruits and vegetables listed in regulation 5, rules and regulations (12th revision) supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 48 on account of the Japanese beetle, from the regulated area as defined in article 3 of such rules and regulations.
Postmasters in the area regulated by the Japanese beetle quarantine may, therefore, accept until June 15, 1935, fully prepaid parcels of fruits and vegetables when properly packed without being accompanied with the certificate of inspection prescribed by that quarantine.
C. B. EILENBERGER,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.






19341 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 71

ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO MEXICAN FRUIT FLY QUARANTINE (NO. 64)
B. E. P. Q.-367 SEPTEMBER 21, 1934.
ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS-SHIPPING SEASON FOR TEXAS CITRUS FRUIT TO BEGIN SEPTEMBER 26
(Issued under regulation 7, section A, Federal Quarantine No. 64, as revised effective Sept. 1, 1932)
(Approved Sept. 21, 1934; effective Sept. 26, 1934)

The issuance of permits for the shipment of citrus fruit of the 1934 crop under the Federal Mexican fruit worm quarantine (Notice of Quarantine No. 64) from the counties of Willacy, Cameron, and Hidalgo, in Texas, is hereby authorized to begin on September 26, 1934, so far as that quarantine is concerned. The host-free period required by the Department of Agriculture to be enforced by the State of Texas under regulation 7 will for the year 1934 close on September 25.
The Department of Agriculture has evidence that such modification is desirable from the standpoint of Mexican fruit worm control and does not involve increase of risk of propagating that insect. All clean-up and other requirements concerning the production and distribution of Texas citrus fruit remain unchanged.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO NURSERY STOCK, PLANT, AND SEED QUARANTINE (NO. 37)

B. E. P. Q.-365
NOTICE TO PERMITTEES AND OTHERS INTERESTED
WILLOW WITHES AS PLANT TIES PROHIBITED ON PLANTS FOR ENTRY FROM EUROPE AND CANADA

(Approved Aug. 14, 1934; effective Oct. 1, 1934)

Willow withes taken from plants infected with the destructive watermark disease may readily disseminate that malady, since the bacterial organism concerned (Bacterium salicis Day and Pseudomonas saliciperda Lindeijer) may be carried within the tissues. The watermark disease thus far has been reported only from England and the Netherlands and, insofar as this Bureau has been able to ascertain, there are no restrictions in Europe on the movement of such infected material from the two countries concerned. It is obvious, therefore, that, on account of uncertainty as to the distribution of this disease and freedom of movement of the host material, the entry of willow withes from Europe may readily bring the watermark disease to this country. As a precaution against the introduction of this disease, Salix propagating stock from Europe has been restricted for some time to horticultural necessities; permittees and others in interest are now notified that as a further precaution willow withes used as ties or otherwise in connection with shipments of plant materials for propagation, from Europe, including the British Isles and Ireland, will not be admitted into the United States on and after October 1, 1934. Since European nursery stock is frequently reshipped here from the Dominion of Canada and since Canada imposes no restrictions against the entry of willow withes from Europe, shipments of plants from Canada, after October 1, 1934, must also be free from willow withes.
Accordingly, attention is directed to regulation 7 of Nursery Stock, Plant, and Seed Quarantine No. 37 which requires that "All packing materials employed in connection with importations of nursery stock and other plants and seeds are subject to approval as to such use." The use of willow withes in any manner as packing material for such plant material is disapproved. On and after October 1, 1934, all plant material for propagation from Europe and Canada






72 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept,

must he free from willow withes or it will be refused entry until such withes are removed. Shipments with such material present may be held in customs custody for a period not exceeding 40 days, during which period the permittee or his a gent, after making satisfactory arrangements, may remove and dispose of the witches under the supervision of, and in a manner satisfactory to, an inspector of the Department of Agriculture, after which the shipment may be handled in the usual way.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO PINK BOLLWORM QUARANTINE (NO. 52)
MODIFICATION OF PINK BOLLWORM QUARANTINE REGULATIONS

INTRODUCTORY NOTE

The following amendment modifies the area regulated under the pink boilworm quarantine regulations in Florida by bringing under restriction the counties of Jackson and Suwannee in that State. This change is due to the finding of a light but scattered infestation in those counties during the past few weeks. No other change is made in the regulated areas at this time.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


AMENDMENT NO. 1 TO REVISED RULES AND REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 52
(Approved Sept. 14, 1934; effective Sept. 19, 1934)

Under authority conferred by the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended by the act of Congress approved March 4, 1917 (39 Stat. 1134, 1165), it is ordered that regulation 3 of the revised rules and regulations supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 52, on account of the pink bollworm of cotton, which were promulgated on December 11, 1933, be and the same is hereby amended to read as follows:

REGULATION 3. REGULATED AREAS; HEAVILY AND LIGHTLY INFESTED AREAS

REGULATED AREAS

In accordance with the provisos to Notice of Quarantine No. 52 (revised), the Secretary of Agriculture designates as regulated areas, for the purpose of these regulations, the following counties in Arizona, Florida, Georgia, New Mexico, and Texas, including all cities, districts, towns, townships, and other political subdivisions within their limits:
Arizona area.-Counties of Cochise, Graham, and Greenlee.
Florida area.-Counties of Alachua, Baker, Bradford, Columbia, Gilchrist, Jackson, Madison, Suwannee, and Union.
Georgia area.--All of Berrien County except (a) the portion located northeast of the Alapaha River, and (b) the portion located south of a line drawn across the county just south of the railway station of Allenville along the south side of lots 323, 324, 325, 326, 327, 328, 329, 330, 331, and 332 of the tenth land district; that part of Cook County located north of a line starting on Little River at the bridge marked Kinard Bridge on the soil survey map of said county issued by the .Bureau of Chemistry and Soils, series 1928, no. 11; thence following the old Ty Ty-Nashville road southeast past Spring Hill Church through the village of Laconte; thence in an easterly direction along the road to Nashville past Grovania School to McDermott Bridge over the New River; all that part of Tift County located east of Little River.
New Mexico area.--Counties of Chaves, Dona Ana, Eddy, Grant, Hidalgo, Lea, Luna, Otero. and Roosevelt.
Texas area.-Counties of Brewster, Cochran, Culberson, El Paso, Gaines, Hockley, Hudspeth, Jeff Davis, Pecos, Presidio, Reeves, Terrell, Terry, Ward,






19341 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 73

and Yoakum; that part of Bailey Copnty lying south of the following-described boundary line: Beginning on the east line of said county where the county line intersects the northern boundary line of league 207; thence west following the northern boundary line of leagues 207, 203, 191, 188, 175, and 171 to the northwest corner of league 171; thence south on the western line of league 171 to the northeast corner of the W. H. L. survey; thence west along the northern boundary of the W. H. L. survey and the northern boundary of sections 68, 67, 66, 65, 64, 63, 62, 61, and 60 of block A of the M. B. & B. survey to the western boundary of said county; that part of Dawson County lying north and west of the following-described boundary line: Beginning on the western boundary line of said county at the northwest corner of section 113 of block M; thence in a northeasterly direction on the northern boundary line of sections 113, 90, 83, 72, 65, 54, 47, and 36 of block 1M to the northeast corner of section 36; thence in a northwesterly direction along the western boundary line of section 21 to the northwest corner of section 21; thence northeasterly along the northern boundary line of section 21 to the northeast corner of section 21; thence northwesterly along the western boundary lines of sections 27 and 30 in said block M to the northwest corner of section 30; thence southwesterly along the northern boundary line of section 29 of block M to the southwest corner of section 17, block C-41; thence north along the western boundary line of sections 17 and 16 of block C-41 to the Dawson County line; that part of Lamb County lying south of the following-described boundary line: Beginning on the east line of said county where the county line intersects the northern boundary line of section 9 of the R. M. Thomson survey; thence west following the northern boundary line of sections 9 and 10 of the R. M. Thomson survey and the northern boundary line of sections 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, and 1 of the T. A. Thompson survey and the northern boundary line of leagues 637, 636, and 635 to the southeast corner of league 239; thence north on the eastern boundary line of league 239 to the northeast corner of said league; thence west on the northern boundary line of leagues 239, 238, 233, 222, 218, and 207 to the western boundary line of said county.
HEAVILY INFESTED AREAS
Of the regulated areas, the following counties and parts of counties are hereby designated as heavily infested within the meaning of these regulations: Counties of Brewster, Culberson, Jeff Davis, Presidio, and Terrell, in the State of Texas, and all of Hudspeth County in the same State except that part of the northwest corner of said county lying north and west of a ridge of desert land extending from the banks of the Rio Grande northeasterly through the desert immediately west of the town of McNary, such ridge being an extension of the northwest boundary line of section 11, block 651/,.

LIGHTLY INFESTED AREAS
The following areas are designated as lightly infested: The counties of Cochise, Graham, and Greenlee in Arizona; 1 the counties of Alachua, Baker, Bradford, Columbia, Gilchrist, Jackson, Madison, Suwannee, and Union in Florida; the regulated parts of Berrien, Cook, and Tift Counties in Georgia; the counties of Chaves, Dona Ana, Eddy, Grant, Hidalgo, Lea, Luna, Otero, and Roosevelt in New Mexico; the entire counties of Cochran, El Paso, Gaines, Hockley, Pecos, Reeves, Terry, Ward, and Yoakum, the regulated parts of Bailey, Dawson, and Lamb Counties in Texas, and that part of the northwest corner of Hudspeth County, Tex., lying north and west of a ridge of desert land extending from the banks of the Rio Grande northeasterly through the desert immediately west of the town of McNary, such ridge being an extension of the northwest boundary line of section 11, block 651,2.
This amendment shall be effective on and after September 19, 1934.
Done at the city of Washington this 14th day of September 1934.
Witness my hand anid the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[SEAL] W. R. GREGG,
Acting Secretary of Agriculture.
[Copies of above amendment sent to all common carriers doing business in or through the regulated areas.]

1Part of the lightly infested area in Arizona is regulated on account of the Thurberia weevil under Quarantine No. 61, and shipments therefrom must comply with the requirements of that quarantine.






74 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

NOTICE TO GENERAL PUBLIC THROUGH NEWSPAPERS

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE, Washington, D. C., September 14, 1934.
Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority conferred on him by the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended, has promulgated an amendment to the revised rules and regulations supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 52, on account of the pink bollworm, effective on and after September 19, 1934. The amendment modifies the area regulated under those regulations by bringing under restriction the counties of Jackson and Suwannee in the State of Florida. Copies of the amendment may be obtained from the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, Washington, D. C.
W. R. GREGG,
Acting Secretary of Agriculture.
[Published in the Florida Times Union, Jacksonville, Fla., Oct. 4, 1934.]


INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS

POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL, Washington, September 26, 1934.
POSTMASTER:
MY DEAR SIR: Your attention is invited to the enclosed copy of Quarantine Order No. 52 of the United States Department of Agriculture on account of the pink bollworm, together with a copy of amendment no. 1 to revised rules and regulations thereunder, adding Jackson and Suwannee Counties in the State of Florida to the area quarantined in that State.
As your post office is within one of the above-mentioned counties, you are requested to be governed in accordance with the quarantine order and amendment thereto. See paragraph 1, section 595, Postal Laws and Regulations.
Very truly yours,
C. B. EILENBERGER,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.


ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO RICE QUARANTINE (NO. 55)
RICE QUARANTINE AMENDED
(Press notice)
JULY 30, 1934.
An amendment of the Rice Quarantine, No. 55, issued today and effective August 1, requires that foreign rice straw imported into this country must not be- compressed in the bales to a density of more than 30 pounds per cubic foot, the Secretary of Agriculture has announced. Rice straw, used in broom making, must be sterilized at the time of entry by a steam process. In highly compressed bales the heat penetrates the interior of the mass so slowly that the bale cannot be effectively sterilized in a reasonable time. Recent tests by the Division of Control Investigations of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine indicate that in bales of a density of less than 30 pounds, penetration of heat takes place rapidly enough to put effective treatment on a practical basis.

RICE QUARANTINE NO. 55
REVISION OF REGULATION 6
INTRODUCTORY NOTE

Owing to difficulties encountered in obtaining heat penetration within a reasonable time in highly compressed bales of imported rice straw, it has been





19341 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 75

found necessary to restrict entry of this material to bales, of such density as will permit practical and effective treatment. The present revision of regulation 6 is intended to incorporate this restriction, and to provide more definitely for routing shipments arriving at ports where no treating facilities are available to approved ports where such treatment can be given.
S. A. ROHWER,
Acting Chief, Bureatu of E tomology and Plant Quarantine.



AMENDMENT NO. 1 TO THE RULES AND REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 55
(Approved July 27, 1934; effective Aug. 1, 1934)

Under authority conferred by the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended, it is ordered that regulation 6, of the rules and regulations supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 55, on account of injurious insects and diseases of rice, as revised effective November 23, 1933, be, and the same is hereby, amended to read as follows:

REGULATION 0. INSPEiCTION AND, DISINFECTION AT PORT OF ARRIVAL

Paddy rice.-All importations of seed or paddy rice from Mexico shall be subject, as a condition of entry, to such inspection or disinfection, or both, at the port of arrival, as shall be required by the inspector, and to the delivery to the collector of customs by the inspector of a written notice that the seed or paddy rice has been inspected and found to be apparently free from plant diseases and insect pests or that the required treatment has been given. Should any shipment of such seed or paddy rice be found to be so infested with insect pests or infected with plant diseases that, in the judgment of the inspector, it cannot be cleaned by disinfection or other treatment, the entire shipment may be refused entry.
Rice straw and rice hulls.-As a condition of entry, rice straw and rice hulls shall be subject to inspection and to treatment at the port of arrival, under the supervision of the inspector, by methods and at plants approved by the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, and, as a further condition of entry, in order to permit effective treatment, the contents of packages or bales shall not be compressed to a density of more than 30 pounds per cubic foot. Rice straw and rice hulls will be admitted only at ports where adequate facilities are available for such treatment. The required treatment must be given within 20 days after arrival, but if any shipment of rice straw or rice hulls shall be found upon arrival to be dangerously infested or infected the inspector may direct immediate treatment under adequate safeguards; and, if the treatment and safeguards are not put into effect as directed, the shipment shall be removed from the country immediately or destroyed.
Unless, within 20 days after the date of arrival of a shipment at the port at which the formal entry was filed, the importation has received the required treatment, due notice of which shall be given to the collector of customs by the inspector, demand will be made by the collector for redelivery of the shipment into customs custody under the terms of the entry bond, and, if such redelivery is Dot made, the shipment shall be removed from the country or destroyed.
General.-All charges for storage, cartage, and labor incident to inspection
-nd disinfection, other than the services of the inspector, shall be paid by the I mporter.
All shipments shall be so baled, bagged, or iWrapped as to prevent scattering or wastage. If, in the judgment of the inspector, a shipment is not so bagged, baled, or wrapped, it shall be reconditioned at the expense of the permittee or entry may be refused.
This amendment shall be effective on and after August 1, 1934.
Done at the city of Washington this 27th day of July 1934.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[SEAL] H. A. WALLACE,
Secretary of Agriculture.
99783-34--3





76 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

INSTRUCTIONS TO COLLECTORS OF CUSTOMS

REVISED REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL TO RICE QUARANTINE No. 55, REVISED,
GOVERNING THE IMPORTATION OF SEED AND PADDY RICE, PUBLISHED IN T. D.
46809, AMENDED (T. D. 47229)
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,
OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONER OF CUSTOMS, Washington, D. C., August 21, 1934.
ITo Collectors of Customs and Others Concerned:
The appended copy of amendment no. 1 to the rules and regulations supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 55 (rice quarantine) issued by the Secretary of Agriculture, effective August 1, 1934, permitting the importation of rice straw and rice hulls, with treatment as a condition of entry, at approved ports, is published for the information and guidance of customs officers and others concerned.
FRANK Dow,
Acting Commissioner of Customs.
(Then follows the full text of the amendment.)



ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO SUGARCANE QUARANTINE (NO. 15)

SUGARCANE QUARANTINE REVISED
(Press notice)
SEPTEMBER 24, 1934.
A revision of Quarantine 15, which will regulate importation of bagasse, the fibrous refuse from sugarcane mills, was announced today by Secretary of Agriculture Henry A. Wallace. The revision, which becomes effective October 1, provides for the inrportation of specific lots of bagasse under conditions judged by the Department to be safe.
The original measure, put into effect June 6, 1914, shut out all living canes of sugarcane or cuttings thereof from all foreign countries, except such as were imported by the Department itself for use in its cane-improvement program. Such iinportations have been made with unusual care to avoid the introduction of numerous foreign insects and diseases, and a special quarantine greenhouse at the Arlington Farm is devoted entirely to making foreign cane varieties safe to distribute to our cane areas.
A recent increase in inquiries regarding the introduction of foreign bagasse has convinced the Department that the danger of pest introduction in this material, especially if distributed into cane-growing areas, is important enough to justify bringing lyagasse as well as other cane parts under control.



REVISION OF SUGARCANE QUARANTINE NO. 15 (FOREIGN)

INTRODUCTORY NOTE

The principal aim in this revision is to bring under the quarantine bagasse
-and other parts of the sugarcane plant in addition to living canes, for the reason that such materials are regarded as effective carriers of cane diseases, and the importation of foreign bagasse and other plant parts of sugarcane, especially into our cane-growing areas, would subject our cane cultures to a definite and unnecessary risk. The former exemption of Hawaii and Puerto Rico is not continued because it seems desirable to provide Federal authority .for control over foreign importations into these Territories.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.





19341 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 77

NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 15 (REVISED)
(Approved Sept. 20, 1934; effective Oct. 1, 1934)

I, W. R. Gregg, Acting Secretary of Agriculture, have determined that certain injurious insects and diseases of sugarcane, new to and not heretofore prevalent and widely distributed within and throughout the United States, exist in certain foreign countries, and that it is necessary, in order to prevent the introduction into the United States of these insects and diseases, to forbid the importation into the United States from all foreign countries and localities of canes of sugarcane, or parts thereof, sugarcane leaves, and bagasse.
On and after October 1, 1934, under authority conferred by the Plant Quarantine Act approved August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended, the importation into the United States of canes of sugarcane, or cuttings or parts thereof, sugarcane leaves, and bagasse, from all foreign countries and localities, is prohibited: Provided, That this prohibition shall not, apply to importations by the United States Department of Agriculture for scientific or experimental purposes, nor to importations of specific materials which the Department may authorize under permit on condition that they have been or are to be so treated, processed, or manufactured that, in the judgment of the Department, their entry will involve no pest risk.
This revision of Notice of Quarantine No. 15 shall be effective on and after October 1, 1934.
Done at the city of Washington this 20th day of September 1934.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[SEAL] W. R. GREGG, Acting Secretary of Agriculture.


MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS

B. P. Q.-347, Supplement No. 3 AUGusT 1, 1934.
PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF GREECE
PHYLLOXERATED AND SUSPECTED REGIONS OF GREECE
Supplement No. 2, of May 7, 1934, furnished a list of additional regions of the Republic of Greece which were declared phylloxerated by the decree of January 10, 1934. The chief of the section of phytopathology of the Greek Department of Agriculture has revised the list included in B. P. Q.-347 to include the list above referred to; therefore the following list supersedes both that of p. P. Q.-347 and its Supplement No. 2:

1. REGIONS FREE FROM PHYLLOXERA
(a) All ancient Greece, except the Provinces of Larissa, Tyrnavos, and Agyia in the Department of Larissa, the Department of Trikkala, and the island of Amorgos and all the small islands around it.
(b) The island of Crete.
(c) Epirus, except the Province of Konitza.

2. REGIONS SUSPECTED OF PHYLLOXERA
(a) The former communes (demes) of Gonnoi and Olympus in the Province of Tyrnavos.
(b) The former communes (demes) of Nesson and Ampelakia in the Province of Larissa.
(c) The former communes (demes) Eurymenai and Kasthenaia in the Province of Agyia.
(d) The Provinces of Karditsa and Trikkala in the Department of Trikkala (except the place called Valta in the village of Palama of the Province of Karditsa, which is declared infested with phylloxera).
(e) The island of Lemnos.





78 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

3. PHYLLOXERATED REGIONS
(a) The whole of Thrace.
(b) The whole of Macedonia, including the Provinces of Grevena, Kastoria, and Elasson, which up to the present have been regarded as suspected of phylloxera.
(c) The Province of Konitsa in Epirus.
( d) The Departments of Samos, Chios, Lesbos (except the island of Lemnos).
(e) The entire island of Amorgos, with the small islands Ano Koufonissia, Kato Koufonissia, Schinoussa, and Heraklia. The sma ll islands around the island of Amorgos: Denoussa Karos, Nikouria, Petalidi, Gravoussa, Dryma, Antikaros, Gougari, Fidoussa, Agrilos, Glaros, Prassoura, and Amorgopoula.
(f) The former commune (demne) of Tyrnavos in the Province of Tyrnavos.
(g) The entire Province of Larissa (except the former communes (demes) of Nesson and Ampelakia, which have been declared suspected of phylloxera).
(h) The former commune demee) of Dotiou in the Province of Agyia.
(i) The place called "Valta" in the village of Palama in the Province of Karditsa.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


B. E. P. Q.-355, Revised, Supplement No. 1 AUGUST 1, 1934.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, JAMAICA, BRITISH WEST INDIES

Jamaican proclamation of February 13, 1924, has been amended by that of June 19, 1934, as a result of which the first item of the summary should read as follows:

Proclamations, orders, etc., in force
Article
Instrument Date Provisions

Citrus fruits or any parts thereof, fresh or Proclamation under law Feb. 13, 1924 Prohibited from all dried, but not including candied fruit or 23 of 1916. June 19, 1934 countries. preparations in form of jam or marmalade.

LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


P. Q. C. A.-310, Supplement No. 2 SEPTEMBER 15, 1934.

PERU PROHIBITS THE EXPORTATION OF PROPAGATING MATERIAL OF ROTENONEPRODUCING PLANTS

To prevent the exploitation and exhaustion of rotenone-producing plants in Peru, the decree of April 14, 1933, prohibits the exportation from that country of cuttings, slips, seeds, or fresh roots of plants of the genera Apurimanta, Cracca, Jacquinia, Lonchocarpus, Serjania, and Tephrosia.
Exportation is permitted only of roots of those plants which contain a maximum of 10 percent of moisture; and that only until the Government of Peru shall have erected mills for the extraction of rotenone.
Persons who desire to export such dried roots must apply to the Direcci6n de Agricultura y Ganaderifa of the Ministerio de Fomento for a permit and certificate of chemical analysis.
The resolution of May 23, 1933, prescribes that dealers who export such roots shall send an average sample of 500 grams from each shipment to the technical section of the Direcci6n de Agricultura y Ganaderia for analysis, at the same time depositing a fee for the analysis.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.






19341 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 79

P. Q. C. A.-283, Revised, Supplement No. 3 SEPTEMBER 15, 1934.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF CUBA

DISINFECTION REQUIRED OF TOMATO AND PEPPER SEEDS

To prevent the introduction into Cuba of the bacterial spot or canker, Bacterium vesicatorium Doidge, the resolution of August 6, 1934, published August 15, 1934, in the Official Gazette, prescribes the disinfection of all seeds of tomato, Lycopersicum esculentum, and peppers, Capsicum spp., as a condition of entry. The text (in translation) of the resolution follows:
ARTICLE 1. The seeds of tomatoes and peppers, imported from any source, must be accompanied by a certificate from the country of origin, issued by official phytopathological authority, declaring that such seeds have been disinfected by immersion in a solution (aqueous) of bichloride of mercury, 1 to 3.000, for at least 5 minutes.
ART. 2. Tomato and pepper seeds not supported by such certification shall be subjected upon arrival to the said process of disinfection.
ART. 3. This quarantine provision shall become effective 30 days after publication in the Official Gazette.
LE, A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.



P. Q. C. A.-284, Supplement No. 9
SEPTEMBER 20, 1934.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF MEXICO

EXTERIOR QUARANTINE NO. 12-ALFALFA
(July 2, 1934; effective Aug. 18, 1934)

ARTICLE 1. In accordance with article 43 of the regulations of agricultural sanitary police (Policia Sanitaria Agricola) an absolute quarantine is established against plants of alfalfa, Medioago sativa, and their various parts (roots, stems, leaves, flowers, and seeds) in the fresh condition or as hay, which proceed from the following States of the American Union: Colorado, Idaho, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, and Wyoming, and a partial quarantine for the counties of California infested by the alfalfa weevil ((Phytonomus) Hypera postica Gyll.).
ART. 2. The fohowing conditions are established for the importation into Mexico of the articles mentioned from the State of California, U. S. A.:
(a) Importers must apply for and obtain, before shipment, a special
permit from the Direcci6n de Fomento Agricola.
-(b) Application for permit may be made by telegraph and shall indicate
the name and address of the exporter; locality where the alfalfa was grown; port of shipment and port of entry into Mexican territory; destination and name of importer; quantity of the product; date of application
and signature of applicant.
(c) Each permit issued will be numbered and the period of its validity
wil! be indicated therein.
(d) The product shall be accompanied by a phytosanitary certificate,
duly legalized, issued by the respective authorities of the State of California, U. S. A., and visaed by one of our consuls with jurisdiction in the place of origin of the product, declaring that the pest in question does not
exist there.
(e) Unloading or introduction will be permitted only at the following
frontier ports or customs offices:
On the northern frontier.-Mexicali and Tijuana, Baja California;
Nogales, Sonora; Ciudad Jaurez. Chihuahua;- Piedras Negras, Coahuila; Nuevo Laredo and Matamoros, Tamaulipas.
On the Pacific coast.-Santa Rosalia, Ensenada, and La Paz, Baja
California; Guaymas and Yvaros, Sonora; Topolobampo and Mazatlan, Sinaloa; Manzanillo, Colima; Acapulco, Guerrero; Salina Cruz, Oaxaca.






80 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

ART. 3. Contravention of the provisions of the present quarantine will be deemed illegal transit, in accordance with article 74 of the regulations of Policia Savitaria Agricola already cited, and in accordance with article 75 of the same regulations the illegal transit will be punished by a fine of $10 to $1,000 both with respect to the consignee and the carrier of the merchandise, and by proceeding with the destruction of the latter without right of indemnity.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


B. P. Q.-302, Revised, Supplement No. 2 SEPTEMBER 20, 1934.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, GERMANY

SAN JOSE SCALE RESTRICTIONS

CITRUS FRUITS AND NUTS TO BE INSPECTED FOR SAN JOSE SCALE

The order of the German Federal Minister of Nourishment and Agriculture of March 27, 1934 (R. F. M., Mar. 27, 1934-Z 1101-246 II), as modified by those of April 9 (R. F. M., Apr. 9, 1934-Z 1101--275 II), and May 15, 1934 (R. F. M., May 15, 1934-Z 1101-364 II), prescribes that henceforth oranges, mandarins (tangerines), and lemons may be imported only on condition that an inspection of the shipment at the port of entry at the expense of the interested person does not determine infestation or suspicion of infestation with San Jose scale.
The above applies only to the products of those countries from which the importation of deciduous fruits is specially restricted to prevent the introduction of San Jose scale. Consequently the inspection of these citrus fruits from Italy and Spain is not necessary.
Importation of these fruits is permitted only through customs offices authorized for the entry of deciduous fruits.
The order of March 15, 1934 (R. F. M., Mar. 15, 1934-Z 1101-216 II), prescribes that walnuts and other nuts (hazel, Brazil, etc.), which, without green husks, are imported as commercial, dried merchandise, are not subject to inspection for San Jose scale, even when the separated remains of the outer husk still adhere to the nuts. On the other hand, occasional shipments of unripe and of mature nuts imported with husks still green must be inspected.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.


B. E. P. Q.-366
SEPTEMBER 20, 1934.

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF CZECHOSLOVAKIA

This summary of the plant-quarantine import restrictions of the Republic of Czechoslovakia has been prepared for the information of nurserymen, plantquarantine officials, and others interested in the exportation of plants and plant products to that country.
It was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant quarantine inspector of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, from his translation of the German text of Governmental decree no. 168, December 13, 1927, of the Republic of Czechoslovakia, on the administration of the tariff law, and reviewed by the Ministry of Agriculture of that Republic.
The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct and complete up to the time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used independently of, nor as a substitute for, the original text of the decree, and it is not to be interpreted as legally authoritative. The decree itself should be consulted for the exact text.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.






1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 81

PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF CZECHOSLOVAKIA
AUTHORIZING LAW

Law of July 2, 1924, concerning the protection of plant production.

CONCISE SUMMARY

IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

Clover: Refuse, chaff, etc., of all species.
Potatoes: Parts and refuse thereof, if infected or suspected of being infected with wart disease; also potatoes originating in countries contaminated by wart disease.
Grapevines and parts thereof, compost, used props and supports, live phylloxera and eggs, merchandise packed or enclosed in grape leaves or which contains parts of grapevines, as a precaution against the introduction of phylloxera.
Living plants, living parts, and fresh refuse thereof, and containers thereof from America, Africa, Australia, Austria, China, Hawaii, Hungary, Japan, and New Zealand as a precaution against the introduction of San Jose scale.

IMPORTATION RESTRICTED

Red clover and alfalfa seed: Importation and exportation subject to control by the seed control station, including the withdrawal and testing of samples.
Potatoes may be imported from countries where potato wart does not occur if accompanied by a phytosanitary certificate in prescribed form in the official language of Czechoslovakia and in the language of the exporting country, and subject to inspection on arrival.
Living plants (except grapevines) and parts thereof must be accompanied by a shipper's declaration and by a phylloxera certificate by competent authority if from a country where phylloxera is known to exist.
Fresh fruits: Importation from countries infested with San Jose scale permitted on condition that inspection on arrival does not reveal San Jose scale on the fruit or the containers.

IMPORTATION UNRESTRICTED

Cut flowers, seeds, bulbs, and tubers free from soil, grape seeds, and vegetables.

REGULATIONS UNDER DECREE NO. 168, OF DECEMBER 13, 1927

The plant quarantine import restrictions of the Republic of Czechoslovakia are assembled in part 2, section 4, governmental decree no. 168 of December 13, 1927, on the administration of the tariff law.
The regulations apply to all methods of forwarding plants, not only by public transportation organizations (mail, railroad, ship, airplane, etc.) and by road by means of vehicles, but also to that affected by persons crossing the customs frontier, and are grouped as follows:
A. Seeds.
B. Potatoes.
C. Other plants, their fruits and parts.
1. Precautionns against phylloxera.
2. Precautions against San Jose scale.

A. SEEDS

Exported and imported red clover and alfalfa seed subject to control

ARTICLE 1. Exported and imported red clover and alfalfa seed is subject to control by the seed control station of the land cultivation council of Bohemia, Prag; the Moravian Agricultural Land Research Institute, Briinn; and the Government Agricultural Institute, Bratislava and Kolice. The exported seed must be sealed or marked.






82 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-ept.

ART. 2. The importation of refuse, chaff, etc., of all species of clover seed is prohibited. The exportation of this refuse is subject to control by the institutes named in article 1.
ART. 3. The entry and exit customs offices, respectively, are required to take an average sample from every imported and exported shipment of red clover and alfalfa seed and of refuse, chaff, etc., and to send it, according to the location of the customs office, to the proper seed-control station.

B. POTATOES

Importation prohibited of potatoes infected with wart disease

ARTICLE 1. The importation of, and frontier traffic in, potatoes infected or suspected of being infected with wart disease, and the entry of parts and refuse of such potatoes, as well as of sacks, baskets, cases, and other containers, or of articles which have come in direct contact with infected or suspected ground or potatoes, is prohibited.

Importation prohibited of potatoes from wart-infected countries

ART. 2. The importation of, and frontier traffic in, potatoes from countries in which potato wart has been determined also is prohibited.
The Ministry of Agriculture, in cooperation with the Ministry of Industry, Commerce and Trade, is authorized to make exceptions to this prohibition in special cases.
ART. 3. Foreign potatoes which are transported in containers (not in bulk) may be imported only in new, unused containers.
ART. 4. The list of countries from which potatoes may be imported will be published annually in January and the offices will be informed.

Ports of entry for potatoes

ART. 5. The following frontier customs offices have been designated for the importation of potatoes: Bfieclav, Schattau, Cesk4 Velenice, Oberhaid, Eisenstein Markt, Furth i. W., Eger, Reitzenhain, Bodenbach, Tetschen, GeorgswaldeEbersbach, Zittau, Seidenberg, Halbstadt, Ziegenhals, Jiigerndorf, Troppau, Oderberg, Petrovice in Schlesien, Skaliti, Such&, Hora, Orlov, Medzilaborce, Uok, Jasina, Valea Visaului, Campolung la Tisa, Kiralyh.za, cop, Slovensk, Nov4 Msto, HidAsnemeti, Turna n. Bodvou, Tornala, Rimavska, Se, Filakovo, Sahy, ParkAn, KomArno, Bratislava-Petrzalka, and Marchegg.
Inspection certificate in prescribed form required

ART. 6. Shipments of foreign potatoes offered for importation must be accompanied by a phytopathological certificate printed in the language of the exporting country and in the official language of Czechoslovakia. These certificates must correspond to the prescribed model and must include:
(a) The official title of the phytopathological institute at the head of the certificate and the serial number.
(b) A declaration of the potato grower confirmed by the local authority as to the place where the potatoes were grown.
(c) The declaration of the official phytopathological station that the place where the potatoes were grown is not in a locality infected or suspected of being infected with wart disease, and that no wart has been determined within a radius of 15 km therefrom and that there is no suspicion of such infection.
(d) A declaration of the officials of the phytopathological station which:
(1) Insofar as potatoes intended for consumption, or for an industrial
process in the Republic of Czechoslovakia are concerned, includes a statement that they were inspected at the loading station and no infection or suspicion of wart was found and that these potatoes were either laden in his presence into a covered car which he provided with the seal of his institute, or were delivered for transportation by rail or mail as packages in new containers which he provided with the seal of his institute; furthermore, that he personally entered in the certificate the car number and the number of the seal or of the bill of lading, or of the postal declaration, and of the seals of the separate containers, respectively.





1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 83

(2) Insofar as potatoes intended for planting in the Republic of
Czechoslovakia are concerned, includes a statement that he inspected them in the field where grown before they were placed in containers, and that neither in the exported seed potatoes, nor in the remainder of the crop of that establishment did he find any infection or suspicion of infection of wart, and that new containers were used for the said I>tatoes, which containers he closed and provided with the seal of his institute; and that furthermore he personally entered in the certificate the number of the bill of lading or postal declaration and of the seal of the separate
containers.
(e) A clear impression of the date and locality stamp of the shipping station in the respective heading, which must correspond with that in the bill of lading.
ART. 7. The shipper must indicate on the bill of lading or upon the postal declaration form :
(a) The number of the phytopathological certificate and the title of the phytopathological station that issued the certificate.
(b) The fact that the certificate or declaration is enclosed.

Prescribed Potato Certificate

(Title and location of the official phytopathological station)

Phytopathological Certificate on Potato Wart (Synchytrium endobioticum)

1. Potato grower's declaration.
I declare that the potatoes intended for exportation to the Republic of Czechoslovakia were grown in--------------__ ,----------- in the district
(place of origin)
of ----------------------------- in_(country ,of origin)
Date ----------------(Signature of the potato grower, and stamp if possible.) (Stamp and signature of the local authority.)
2. Declaration of Official Phytopathological Station.
In the name of the above-mentioned phytopathological station I declare that the said district does not lie within a locality infected, or suspected of being infected, with potato wart, and that in the land register of this district no potato wait has hitherto been recorded within a radius of 15 km and that there was no suspicion of its occurrence.
Date
(Stamp of the station and signature of the director.)
3. Declaration of the inspector from the official phytopathological station on the inspection of the potatoes.
In the name of the (official title and location of the phytopathological station whose representative inspected the potatoes), I declare:

POTATOES FOR CONSUMPTION OR MANUFACTURING PURPOSES
That, on behalf of the Republic of Czechoslovakia, I inspected the potatoes intended for consumption (or for manufacturing purposes) in the loading station and have found no potato wart or suspicion thereof;

POTATOES IN BULK 2

That in my presence the potatoes were loaded into covered (or closed) car no. which I provided with seal no. of my station and that I personally entered the car number and the seal number in the certificate;

POTATOES IN CONTAINERS 2

That the potatoes were delivered in my presence to the railroad station or postal service in new containers,
2 Strike out (or omit) the part not concerned.





84 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

That I closed the containers and provided them with seals of my station, and that I personally entered in this certificate the car number, the seal number of each container, as well as the number of the bill of lading or the postal declaration ;
WITH SEED POTATOES

That, on behalf of the Republic of Czechoslovakia, I have inspected these potatoes in the district of (locality where grown) and have not found potato wart or suspicion thereof in the potatoes intended for exportation or in the potato crop on the same land;
That new containers were used, which I closed and sealed with the seal of my station;
That I personally entered the following numbers of the seal of the separate containers in the certificate.
(Stamp or seal of the station and signature of the official who made the inspection.) Distinct official date stamp of the shipping station; this must agree with the date stamp on the bill of lading.
(Stamp.)
Vzor.
(Nizev a misto oficielniho fytopathologickdho dstavu [stanice] jako zAhlavf.)
Cislo jednaci: _FYTOPATHOLOGICKE OSVEDENf o rakovin6 brambord (Synchytrium endobioticum).
(I. ProhldSeni pistitele bramborfi).
Prohlahuji, ie brambory urden6 pro vyvoz do republiky Ceskoslovensk6 byly vyp6stoviny v obci ----------- okrese ------------, ve stt ----------V -----------------dne
Razitko mistniho difadu a podpis: Podpis pistitele bramborfi,
pfipadn6 tMz' razitko:
(II. Prohltienf oficielniho fytopathologick6ho istavu [stanice]).
Za shora uvedenr fytopathologick:y 6stav (stanici) prohlahuji, Ae v:ye uvedeng obec neni v dzemi rakovinou zamoen6m, ani z rakoviny podezel6m a Ae v katastru tito obce a v obvodu 15 km nebyla dosud zjiftena rakovina bramborfi a ie neni t~i podezleni, ze by se rakovina brambori vyskytovala.
V -------------------- dne
Razftko (istavu (stanice) a podpis plednosty:
(III. Prohlaseni diiednika oficielniho fytopathologick6ho dstavu [stanice] o vykonand prohlidce bramborfi).
Za --------------------(uved' fiocielni nizev a sidlo fytopathologick6ho
dstavu [stanice], jehol org&n prohlidku bramborfi provddi) ------------------prohlasuji:
U BRAMBORfj KONSUMNiCH A PROMYSLOV'CH
Ze jsem konsumni 3 -, prfimyslov 3 brambory ureen6 do republiky Ceskoslovensk6 v naklidaci stanici ------------(uved' nizev nakladaci stanice) prohl6dl
a nezjistil rakoviny bramborfi, ani podezieni z t6to choroby,

BRAMBORY SYPANg 3
Ze brambory byly v md pfitomnosti nalofeny do kryt6ho vozu dislo ----kter' jsem opatfil uzaviraci plombou 6islo ------sv6ho dstavu (stanice), a .e jsem vlastnoru'n6 zapsal do tohoto osv6deenfi islo vozu a 6islo plomby vozu,

NAKLADOVA KUSY 3
Ze brambory byly v m6 pffitomnosti pod(ny k pfeprav6 ielezninf nebo poitovni jako nSkladov6 kusy v novfch obalech, ie jsem obaly uzavfel a opatfil
SNehodicif se budii krtnuto.





1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 85

uzavfracfmi plombami sv6ho dstavu (stanice) a ie jsem vlastnoru6n' zapsal do tohoto osv~de'enf Cislo vozu a Efsla uzavfracfch plomb jednotlivich obalii, a to a Cisla ndkladnfch listed nebo
pogtovnfch prfivodek, a to -----------------------------------------U BRAMBOR SADBOVfCH
2e jsem brambory urden6 jako sadbu do republiky (Ceskoslovensk6 prohl6dl v obci------------ (uved' nIzev obce uvedenyr ad I.) a nezjistil rakoviny bramborf
nebo podezieni z rakoviny ani na sadbi urden6 k vyvozu, ani na ostatni sklizni brambori t6hol hospodistvi,
2e bylo poulito novy'ch obali', kter6 jsem uzavel a opatfil plombami sv6ho dstavu (stanice),
Ze jsem vlastnoruin6 zapsal do tohoto osveddeni n sledujici isla plomb jednotlivfch obalfi--------------------------------------------------------Razitko istavu (stanice) a podpis diednika, kter' prohlidku provedl:

(IV. Zieteln6 diednf datumov6 razftko odesilaci stanice, kter6 music souhlasiti s datumovfm razitkem v ndkladnim list&): RAZfTKO.
Through international bill of lading required

ART. 8. Potatoes imported into the Republic of Czechoslovakia by rail must be accompanied by a through international bill of lading from the station at the place of origin to the intended station in Czechoslovakia. The importation of potatoes by sea or by watercourse will be permitted in particular cases by the Ministry of Agriculture, Commerce, and Trade under special conditions.

Inspection of imported potatoes required on arrival

ART. 9. Imported foreign potatoes must be subjected to a phytopathological inspection. The following institutions are charged with that work:
(a) Bohemia: The phytopathological institute of the Government Research Institution for Plant Production, Prag.
(b) Moravia: The phytopathological section of the Moravian Agricultural Land Research Institution, Briinn.
(c) Silesia: The phytopathological section of the Moravian Agricultural Land Research Institution, Briinn, through the intermediation of the Government Research Station, Troppau.
(d) Slovakia, except the Province of K6sice: The phytopathological institute of the Government Research Institution, Bratislava.
(e) The Province of K6sice and Podkarpatska Rus: The phytopathological institute of the Government Institution, K6sice.
ART. 10. As a rule inspection is to be effected at the entry station (art. 5); shipments up to 50 kg in weight may be entered and inspected at any customs office at the seat of the research institute.

Entry refused in absence of certificates
ART. 11. The customs office will reject shipments of foreign potatoes not provided with phytopathological certificates; furthermore, those which are excluded in accordance with article 1 and, insofar as the importation of potatoes was not expressly permitted, also those from the countries mentioned in article 2, and also, on the basis of recorded opinions of officials of the research institute, shipments which do not comply with the regulations. The rejection is to be noted on the bill of lading.

Restricted frontier traffic permitted without certificate

ART. 12. In frontier traffic persons having permanent residence in the Czechoslovak Republic may import from the countries referred to in article 4 the potato crop from their own (or rented) land, and persons whose permanent address is in a foreign country may import potatoes for planting in their own (or rented) ground in Czechoslovakia during the period established in the communities in question by the separate customs offices, without phytopathological certificate or inspection. However, interested Czechoslovakians





86 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

must present information to the customs offices concerning the area in which potatoes are grown, and interested foreigners concerning the area intended for planting.

Transit permitted under through international bill of lading

ART. 13. The transit of foreign potatoes is permitted under the condition that the transportation of the shipment be effected under a through international bill of lading from the foreign shipping station to the designated station in the foreign country in a sealed, well-closed, and undamaged car, or in sealed and undamaged containers.
ART. 14. The exportation of potatoes from a closed district to a foreign country is not permitted.

O. OTHER PLANTS, THEIR FRUITS AND PARTS

1. Precautions against phylloxera

Importation and transit prohibited

ARTICLE 1. In accordance with the International Phylloxera Convention, the following regulations are applicable to the forwarding of articles through which phylloxera may be introduced:
The importation or transit is prohibited of grapevines (stocks and cuttings with or without roots) ; grapevine wood (dry or fresh, whole pieces or fragments), and grapevine leaves; compost (plant refuse for manure) ; used props and supports; live phylloxera and eggs thereof; shipments of merchandise packed or enclosed in grapevine leaves or which contain parts of grapevines.
Exceptions.-The importation of grapevines (stocks and cuttings with or without roots), grapevine wood (dry or fresh, whole pieces or fragments), and grapevine leaves is excepted from the prohibition when they are packed in cases the covers of which are secured with screws, or are in entire carloads, under permit from the Ministry of Agriculture, under the conditions indicated in the permit, and when imported through the designated authorized customs offices.
Importation restricted

ART. 2. Shipper's declaration and phylloxera certificate required.-The importation or transit of plants, shrubs, trees, seedlings, cuttings, etc., from nurseries, gardens, and greenhouses (coldframes, orangeries, etc.), except grapevines, is permitted only through designated authorized customs offices and under the following conditions:
(a) The goods must be carefully packed, but in such a manner that they can be inspected.
(b) The shipment must be accompanied by the shipper's declaration which indicates:
1. That the contents of the shipment were grown in his establishment; 2. The place for which the shipment is intended and the name and
address of the consignee;
3. That the shipment contains no grapevines;
4. Whether the shipment contains plants with or without balls of earth.
(c) Each shipment must be accompanied by a certificate from the authority of the country of origin affirming:
1. That the plants are from ground separated from any grapevine stocks
by at least 20 m or by some obstacle to the roots deemed sufficient by
competent authority;
2. That the ground itself contains no grapevines;
3. That no grapevines have been stored there;
4. That if stocks infested with phylloxera have been grown there, their
radical extirpation has been effected by repeated toxic applications and investigations for a period of 3 years, thus insuring complete destruction
of insects and roots.
ART. 3. It is not required that shipments from countries that subscribe to the convention be accompanied by a certificate if they originate in establishments






1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 87

of which it has been published that they are under continuous official supervision and meet the requirements of the convention. The shipper's declaration and the official certificate may be printed on the back of the bill of lading.
ART. 4. On making entry of the shipment, the customs office will attach the shipper's declaration and the official certificate to the customs documents; however, if these are printed on the bill of lading the fact is to be noted in the customs report that they were presented and were observed on the bill of lading of the customs entry and were furnished with an imprint of the date stamp of the place. If the shipment is in transit, the customs office will leave the shipper's declaration and the official certificate with the transportation papers.
ART. 5. Mail shipments.-In traffic with phylloxera-infested countries the sender of mail shipments of plants may enclose a duplicate of the declaration and certificate in the shipment, whereby it may be cleared through the customs without delay in case the certificate may be lost in forwarding. The fact that the duplicate of the certificate is to be found in the shipment is to be noted on the postal declaration and on the wrapper.
ART. 6. Doubtful shipments.-In the case of well-founded doubts as to the cleanliness of the shipment, or if the customs officials have received special instructions concerning merchandise from a particular source, or for a prescribed period, the customs office will, in either case, allow the shipment to be inspected by an expert customs official or by an official specialist; if such a person is not available, the customs office will at once inform the Ministry of Agriculture (by telegraph if necessary) whereby it may issue instructions for precautionary measures. If the shipment is found in proper condition it will be dealt with officially by the customs office, otherwise the entire package will be burned and a report thereon will be made to the Ministry of Agriculture.
ART. 7. Transit shipments in bond.-Products of the soil whose transit is permitted only conditionally under the foregoing regulations, without reference to their origin, are allowed to proceed in transit if they are forwarded in bond.
ART. 8. The importation and transit of table grapes, wine grapes, and grape skins is permitted, through any customs port of entry authorized to admit them, under the following conditions:
(a) Table grapes must be packed in well-secured boxes, eases, baskets, or barrels, but in such a manner as to be easy to inspect; the shipment may not contain grape leaves or vines.
(b) Vinifera grapes (intended for wine making) may be entered only when crushed and packed in casks with a capacity of at least 5 hl; the casks must be so cleaned as to carry no particles of soil or grapevine. Vinifera grapes packed otherwise may not be imported.
(c) Wine-grape skins may be entered only in tightly closed cases or casks.
ART. 9. The importation or transit of cut flowers, seeds (including bulbs and rooted tubers, free from soil), grape seeds, vegetables, and fruits (deciduous), except grapes, is permitted through customs ports of entry authorized to admit them.
ART. 10. Hand baggage, conditions of entry.-Insofar as grapes or the products mentioned in article 9, potted flowers, or other plants (except the grapevine stocks, wood, and leaves the entry of which is not permitted by the provisions of article 1 (a)) are imported or carried' in transit as hand baggage, they may enter any customs port of entry. However, if doubt exists as to the cleanliness of such plants, they are to be handled as prescribed in article 2.
ART. 11. The importation of products mentioned in article 1, and products infested with phylloxera, as hand baggage (art. 10) is to be effected by the political authorities (Government police) without prejudice to the penalties, in accordance with the appropriate penalty provisions.
ART. 12. Uncertified shipments.-Shipments of the plants referred to in article 2 are to be cleared at customs ports of entry and mail shipments at authorized ports of entry. Foreign plant shipments which lack the prescribed certificates of origin are to be returned through the customs port of entry to the foreign frontier offices and mail shipments to the post office for export.
ART. 13. In all cases of the return by the customs office of a shipment suspected of phylloxera infestation, a report on the condition of the articles and on the reason for their return is to be made in the presence of the interested person or of his representative.





88 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

2. Precautions against San Jose scale

Living plants and parts thereof and their containers--Importation prohibited
from countries infested with San Jose scale

ARTICLE 1. The importation is prohibited of living plants, seedlings, cuttings, scions, and other separated parts of plants, as well as of fresh refuse of plants and articles which arrive in direct contact with the above-mentioned goods, also barrels, cases, sacks, and other containers of such merchandise, from Africa, America, Australia, Austria, China, Hawaii, Hungary, Japan, and New Zealand, because those countries are infested with San Jose scale (Aspidiotus perniciosus). The Ministry of Agriculture, in cooperation with the Ministry of Industry, Commerce and Trade and the Ministry of Finance, can extend this prohibition to the importation of the said products from other countries in which San Jose scale may appear. (As extended by the notice of Feb. 1, 1932.)
ART. 2. Exceptions from the prohibition of article 1 may be allowed in individual cases under special conditions imposed by the above-mentioned ministries.

Importation of fresh fruit permitted if free from San Jose scale

ART. 3. The importation of fresh fruit (deciduous) from countries, infested with San Jose scale is permitted on condition that San Jose scale is not found either on the fruit or in the containers comprising the shipment.

Inspection at frontier customs offices

ART. 4. The phytopathological inspection of shipments exceeding 20 kg gross weight must be effected exclusively at frontier customs offices expressly authorized for the entry of such shipments. Shipments not exceeding 20 kg in weight may also be entered at inland customs offices established at the seat of the research institutes. The cost of this inspection is to be borne by the importer.
ART. 5. Phytopathological inspection is to be effected at the following research institutes :
The phytopathological section of the Government Institute on Plant Production, Prag; the phytopathological section of the Moravian Agricultural Land Research Institute, Briinn; the phytopathological section of the Government Agricultural Research Institute, Bratislava; and the Government Agricultural Research Institute, Troppau.
ART. 6. The station or post office will immediately notify the competent research institute and the consignee at his expense by telegraph of the arrival of shipments of fruit.
ART. 7. The research institute will send out at once, or at the latest within 24 hours after receipt of the notice, its inspector to the customs office in order that the phytopathological inspection may be carried out in the presence of a customs official and a railroad or postal official, and also in every case, the consignee. According to the needs of the case, the inspector will withdraw 10 percent of the contents of the shipment at the expense of the interested person and will make a thorough inspection to determine whether or not the fruit or packing is infested with San Jose scale. The inspector is also authorized to withdraw a suitable quantity of fruit for further examination in the laboratory. After examination the fruit will be replaced in the shipment.

Rejection of shipments infested with San Jose scale

ART. 8. If it be determined by the inspection that the fruit is infested with San Jose scale, the customs office will refuse entry of the shipment on the basis of his written statement and will note the fact in the bill of lading or the postal declaration, as the case may be.
ART. 9. If the inspector has a reasonable suspicion that the shipment is infested with San Jose scale and must undertake a laboratory examination of a portion of the shipment, the customs office will refuse entry until the inspector has advised the said customs office that, as a result of the examina-






1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 89

tion, the shipment has been found unobjectionable by the research institute, which assents to the entry, the withdrawn sample being returned, and until the importer shows that he has paid the expenses and fees pertaining to the phytopathological examination.
ART. 10. The official of the research institute will make a written report of the results of the inspection, which will be completed by the customs official and in all cases by the consignee.
ART. 11. The official of the research institute will note on the customs documents and on the waybill the result of the inspection: No objection is made to customs entry or Entry may not be made, because ", adducing the reasons and affixing his signature and the stamp (seal) of the institute.
ART. 12. The customs office will immediately transmit the report to the Ministry of Agriculture; the inspector will present a carbon copy of the report to the research institute.

Transit of fruit permitted without inspection

ART. 13. The transit of fruit is permitted without phytopathological inspection on condition that the shipment is transported in an undamaged and wellclosed car or in uninjured and tight containers.


PENALTIES IMPOSED FOR VIOLATIONS OF THE PLANT QUARANTINE ACT

According to reports received by the Bureau during the period July 1 to September 30, 1934, penalties have recently been imposed by the proper Federal .authorities for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act, as follows:

JAPANESE BEETLE

In the case of the United States v. John H. Gibbas, Shadyside, Ohio, in the interstate transportation of approximately 7 bushels of peaches from a point in the regulated area to a point outside thereof, without inspection and certification, the defendant pleaded guilty and was fined $5. (Plant quarantine case no. 482.)

QUARANTINES AFFECTING MEXICAN AND CANADIAN PRODUCTS

In the case of the United States v. the persons listed below, for attempting to :smuggle in contraband plant material, the penalties indicated were imposed by the United States customs officials at the following ports:

Name Port Contraband Penalty

Weldon J. Bailey--------- Brownsville, Tex .... 4 mangoes................................------------------------------ $5
Pedro Murillo --------------do....------------ 1 mango..................................-------------------------------- 5
Mrs. I. E. Rodriquez ------.......--....do -------------........ --do ................................---------------------------------- 5
Matilde Jimenez---------............ do ------------ 3 mangoes--------------------------------- 5
Viola Duval ..----------------do..... ------------ 1 mango ---------------------------- ----- 5
J. A. Castillo---------------do....------------..........---... do ...............................---------------------------------- 5
Antonia de la Cruz.....---------... do .....--------- 2 mangoes ------------------------------ 5
Raul Cavazos--------------................. do .......------------ 3 mangoes ----------------------------- 5
Francis Hernandez --------............ do ------------ 3 mangoes and 2 pomegranates------------............. 5
Anita Champion----------...........--. do.....------------ 2 mangoes .--.......................------------------------------- 5
Antonia Rodriquez---------............ do ..............------------1 avocado with seed------------------------ 5
Louis Montes--.......-----------..... do ..............------------ 14 mangoes-..----------------------------- 5
Bonifacio Rodriquez -------........ --.....do------------............... 6 avocados with seed----------------------- 5
Candalario Samarripa ------.......... do------------............... 2 mangoes......------------------------------- 5
Ramona Morales ...-----------..do-----------.............. 3 plants --------------------------------- 5
A. C. Rodgers .....--------- -----do------------............. 3 oranges ............................-------------------------------- 5
Esteban Vasquez ---------...........--....-- do.....------------ 1 avocado with seed and 1 pomegranate...... 5
Carmen Salinas--.........-----....----.. do-.....-----------2 apples------------------------------------ 5
Antonio Alonso-----------.............--....do------------ 3 mangoes and 3 tuna fruits..... -------------- 5
Inez Lopez ..-----------------do------------............... 1 avocado seed................---------------------------- 5
Jose Nayola. ------------- Eagle Pass, Tex-..... 1 avocado and 3 avocado seeds......-------------- 1
Consuelo Flores ...------------..do------------.......... 5 plants.......--------------------------------- 1
Herlinda Calderon....... ----... do ------------ 4 avocados with seed and 3 pears ..----------- 1






90 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.


Name Port Contraband Penalty


Grabiel Soliz....------------ Eagle Pass, Tex..... 3 avocado seed and 2 plants and 1 avocado I
with seed.
Gaudelupe Sanchez......---------....do............... 3 avocados with seed----------------------....................... 1
Juana Ramirez .-----------.. ..... --do....... ------------ 1 mango--.....------------------------------- 1
Clemencia Arreyola--............---......-----do-----------.......... 1 potato---------------------------------.. 1
Mrs. Epifanio S. de Mota --.. ---.....do -------------- 8 plants -----------------------------------. 1
Jose A. Campos............ -El Paso, Tex-------........ 3 mangoes-------------------------------................... 1
J. M. Barnes---------------do------------............... 6 avocados....----------------------------......... 1
Saturino Saldana ..............------------do.....------------6 sapotes and 1 avocado_ -------------------- 1
Jose Rubio... .........--------------...---do------------ 29 plums------------ --------------------........... 1
Casimiro Molina.---------l Hidalgo, Tex-------........ 3 mangoes, 2 quinces, and 4 pomegranates..- 5
Marcelo Gonzalez ----------. -- do ------------ 10 avocados, 2 mangoes, and 1 pear ......... 5
Eudelio Flores ...------------..........--.....do------------ 3 apples. 7 pears, and 1 quince--------------.............. 5
Vicente Rocha...------------..........--.....do ..............------------ 2 avocado seeds---------------------............................ 2
Lenora Valdez ....----------- Laredo, Tex-------......... 4 avocados. ------------------------------- 1
John Williams .----------.........---.....do---------------.......... do ----------------------------------...................................... 1
Marie Hernandez ...----------- do......------------ 2 mangoes-------------------------------.................................. 1
Mrs. Leya Fernina--------...... ---do.....------------ 1 avocado--.....------------------------------........................... 1
Mrs. Z. Perez--------------....................do------------............... 4 avocados................................. 1
Maria Estrada ....-------------..............do ------------ 4 mangoes-------------------------------.................................. 1
Maria Bustas----------.........----.....do------------............... 1 plant ---------------------------------- 1
Mrs. A. Hernandez------.............---do------------............... 6 avocados_ -------------------------------1
Mrs. Lenera Perez ........-----------do ----------- 1 mango......---------------------------------.............................. 1
Juan Perez..----------------- do---....---------5 avocados-----..........-------......-------------------................. 1
Mrs. E. Castillo----------......--do......------------ 1 mango ...................................--------------------------------- 1
Miss G. Freed --------- do------------............... 2 mangoes_. ------------------------------- 1
Miss Anora Borrera--------........--.....do.............------------ 1 mango......---------------------------------1
Delores Martinez -----------do--.....----------3 avocados..-------------------------------.............................. 1
Mrs. M. E. Ramerez ..-----.....--.... ----do...-----..-------.. 1 mango.........--.......----------....--------------------............... 1
Mrs. C. Ojdade..-------------.... do-----.......---------- do...... 1---------------------------------Mrs. Olivia Garcia -----------do ......-- --------- 6 figs and 1 avocado seed. -------------- -1
Marcelino Martin.---------- do.... --- --------8 avocados__ ------------------------------Mrs. Sussie Pulido...........----------do....------------.......... 5 pomegranates---------------------------............................. 1
Jesus Jasoa .... -----------------do--.....---------- 2 mangoes.---- ----------------------- 1
Mrs. E. Ramos-----.......--------.......do.....------------ 1 mango...---....------------------------------1
Randall Nye...---- --------- do......------------ 8 avocados--__ ----------------------------Miss P. Mato .------------- do--....---------- 2 oranges................................... 1
Geronino Santos.. ----------.... do.....------------ 15 figs -----------------------------------Carlota Martin ......--------.. ---.......do------------ 1 mango..... 1--------------------------------Rosilin Martinez..---------- --...do.------------ 7 plants ------------------------------- 1
Miss J. Ramirez...-----------..............do.....------------ 3 pomegranates ................-------------------------- 1
Miss H. Juneza----------- ...... --do------------............... 2mangoes.......... ------------------------------B. Hernandez-----------...... ---do------------............... 5 avocados.....------------------...........................------------- 1
Miss H. Santos........------------do------------............... 10 plants--------------------------------................................... 1
Alejo Flores....------------..........---.....do............... 4 avocados---........--....-------------------------..................... 1
Louis Martinez..------... -----do------------ avocados ......------------..................-------....------...... 1
Pablo Torrez_..-------_--- ...--do--.....---------- 9 avocados ----------............--......-----------------........... 1
Mrs. W. W. Winslow....-------..--.....do.....------------ 1 mango _--------------------------------- 1
M. G. Hernandez......---------- ....do....------------ 3 plants ........--..........---------...............---------------------- 1
P. A. Villreal..... ---------------do------------3 avocados_.. -----------------------------Mrs. Juan Cuellar -----------..............do...----..------.. 2 avocados. -------------------------------1
Mrs. Felipe Garcia--------.........---..... do.....------------1 mango and 2 avocados ---------------- 1
Mrs. Evangeline Flores........-------do.....------------ 2 peaches...........................-------------------------------- 1
Maria Garcia--...-------- -----do---.....-------- 4 avocados --.......---.......----------.......-------......... 1
Mrs. M. Pacheco ----------- -do....------------ 2 avocados ...------....-----......-----.....-------..... 1
Eliso Chapa ..----------- -----do----......-------6 avocados -----------.................----------------.. 1
Gauro de Hayas ------------..... -do------------............... 25 figs, 17 peaches, 5 quinces, and 5 pomegranates. 1
Mrs. Isidora Sanches------.......---.....do ------------2 avocados --....-------......--------------------........ 1
Mrs. Isabel Maro----------...........--...do------------............... 2 peaches .................-------------------------------- 1
Blas C. Garza ----------.........---.....do------------............... 4 avocados........................ ------------------------------1
Miss Victorio Ramero--.........------do..........-----------..... 3 avocados...................... -----------------------------1
J. Gonzalez ...........---------------do.......------------ 2 apples and 1 pomegranate ....------------- 1
Miss E. Lopez------------.............. --.....do------------............... 2 pomegranates ---............------------------------ 1
Julio Durati ..............------------....----...do--.............---------- 1 pear and 1 apple ...................... -------------------------1
Ignacio Garcia-----...----... -----do------------.............. 1 mango ---------------------........................--------------... 1
Maria Barredo...... ----------do.........----------....-- 14 avocados........ ---.......-----......------------------........ 1
Paula Enrique ................--------------do------------............... 1 quince..........----..............-----------------------------............ 1
R. Teuoria .....------------.......--.. ---.....do.....------------ 9 avocados .....-------...............--------. ----------------. 1
Miss T. Villareal---------..........--.....do------------............... 2 quinces and 1 avocado ...---..---------------.. 1
Mrs. P. Gonzalez ...............-----------do.............------------2 pomegranates and 1 peach....----------------- 1
Mrs. M. Quesala.. ------------do-----..........-----.. 2 mangoes and 2 avocados------...........------....... 1
Juana Josso --...........--------------.....do---------.............. 2 avocados ----..............---....--.......------------------ 1
K. H. Walker-------------...................do.............------------2 mangoes-.........--------...---------------------E. Didier -----------------........................do------------5 avocados -------.......................----......----------------... 1
J. Villerreal .....-----------..... ----do.............. 3 avocados, 1 mango, 5 pomegranates, and 1
5 sweet limes.
Miss J. Urguisa -----------............--.....do.............. ------------12 avocados---.......................--..----....-------------..--------...
Mrs. A. Arzogarita--------.........---.....do------------.............. 2 mangoes----------..............................---------.... 1-----------Pascula Gonzalez ...............-----------do.............. 3 avocado seeds ---------.......................------------..... 1
Mrs. G. Resendez ------............--...--do------------1 mango and 5 avocados------..................-------.. 1
'Miss A. G. Vela-----------............--.....do------------.............. 2 avocados--------.........................-----------------........ 1
Miss A. Torres------------.............--.....do---............---------.. 2 plants-----------...................................---------------.






1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 91


Name Port Contraband Penalty


Francisco Pena_. ---------- Laredo, Tex-------....... 8 pomegranates, 8 quinces, and 4 pears..... 1
Raul Ibarra-------------................--.....do------------............. 1 quince............................--------------------------------- 1
Maria Ramos .....----------............do -----------.............. 4 avocados.............------------------------------- 1
Jesus Rodriquez -...----...............do------------.............. 1 mango---------------------------------.................................... 1
Alfred Seqobia-------------..do...------------.......... 11 avocados and 1 mango------------------................... 1
Delores Mejia------------...... --do. ------------ 4 avocados_------------------------------- 1
Mrs. A. Sauvignet---------- do..-------------............--..... do---------------------------------- 1
M. A. Morales ----------.............--- ....do------------2 apples and 3 quinces..........---------------------- 1
Miss I. Benavides ..... -.-.do ------------ 4 guavas.....-------------------------------- 1
Jess Hill --......... ..... .do ------------7 avocados-....------------------------------ 1
Juana Perez --------------.................... do------------ 5 mangoes..............----.......-------------------------- 1
Andrew Vasquez ..-----------... do ------------ 2 quinces-------------.............------------------- 1
D. Benavides------------............... .. do------------2 avocados...------------------------------- 1
M. G. Garcia---------------................... do ------------............5 avocados------------------------------- 1
Henry Cardenas-----------... ..... do ----------- 3 mangoes, 11 avocados, and 8 guavas...... 1
E. H. Krebs---------------.....................do------------ 2 mangoes------------------------------ 1
Solda Pelagn --------------....................do__------------ 3 pomegranates --------------------------- 1
Ines Iscoboda .................---------------do -.........--------..... 1 mango and 6 avocados--------------------.................... 1
Ciraco Linarez ............. .... do ------------ 7 guavas, 4 figs, and 5 avocados------------- 1
Juarez V. Rivera. i ....-.- do-__-----------__ 4 mangoes....................------------------------------- 1
Mrs. Antonio Serana -----.......--.... --do ---------- 1 mango..................................---------------------------------.. 1
Eloise Rodriquez -------------..... do --------. 3 mangoes----------.--------------------- 1
Mrs. Costelo Jimenez.....------.... do------------ 1 mango---------------------------------.................................... 1
Carlos Kerchmer ----------...........--.....do---.....---------......... 7 pomegranates and 1 avocado.......-------------- 1
Pedro Mendez-------------..............-.....do------------ 1 mango....-------------------------------- 1
Candelano Reyna ---------..........--.....do.............. ----------2 mangoes------------------------------- 1
Angla Morales--------------................... do-- --------- 8 quinces.....-------------------------------- 1
J. J. Howel...----------------do------------.............. 5 avocados --........................-----------------------------......... 1
Juanita Flores ..................--------------do------------.............. 2 avocados...------------------------------- 1
Maria Villreal ..--------- -----do------------ 4 peaches and 1 quince--------------------..................... 1
Lorenza Ramirez ...-----------..do ------------............. 1 plant.---------------------------------- 1
Miss N. M. de Ramirez----....---.....--do -------------..............--..... do---------------------------------- 1
Arturo Rodriquez.......... .....-----------do ----------- 8 avocados -------------------------------................................. 1
Juana Villarreal --------...........----. .....do------------ 16 quinces and 12 guavas------------------- 1
Jesus A. Esparza---------........... San Ysidro, Calif... 8 mangoes .------------------------------- 5
F. H. Barger.. ------------ Blaine, Wash------....... 6 rooted grape plants, 2 grafted apple stocks, 5
and 1 pine seedling.


















ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE

LEE A. STRONG, Chief.
S. A. ROHER, Assistant Chief.
AVERY S. HOYT, Assistant Chief. F. H. SPENCER, Business Manager. R. P. CURRIE, Editor.
MABEL COLCORD, Librarian.
J. A. A. YSLOP, in Charge, Division of Insect Pest Survey and Information. J. I. HAMBLETON, in Charge, Division of Bee Culture Investigations. D. L. VAN DINE, in Charge, Division of Fruit Insect Investigations. F. C. CRAIGHEAD, in Charge, Division of Forest Insect Investigations. W. H. WHITE, in Charge, Division of Truck Crop and Garden Insect Investigations.
P. N. ANNAND, in Charge, Division of Cereal and Forage Insect Investigations. R. W. HARNED, in Charge, Division of Cotton Insect Investigations. F. C. BISHOPP, in Charge, Division of Insects Affecting Man and Animals. C. H. HADLEY, in Charge, Division of Japanese and Asiatic Beetle Investigations. L. A. HAWKINS, in Charge, Division of Control Investigations. R. C. C. ROARK, in Charge, Division of Insecticides and Fungicides. HAROLD IIORRISON, in Charge, Division of Insect Identification. C. P. CLAUSEN, in Charge, Division of Foreign Parasite Introduction. S. B. FRACKER, in Charge, Division of Plant Disease Control. B. M. GADDIS, in Charge, Division of Domestic Plant Quarantines. E. R. SASSCER, in Charge, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines. A. F. BURGESS, in Field Charge, Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail Moth ControF
(headquarters, Greenfield, Mass.).
L. H. WORTHLEY, in Field Charge, Japanese Beetle and Gypsy Moth and BrownTail Moth Quarantines, European Corn Borer Certification, and Dutch Elm
Disease Eradication (headquarters, Harrisburg, Pa.).
R. E. McDONALD, in Field Charge, Pink Bolliworm. and Thurberia Weevil Quarantines (headquarters, San Antonio, Tex.).
B. L. BOYDEN, in Field Charge, Date Scale Quarantine (headquarters, Indio,
Calif.).
P. A. HOIDALE, in Field Charge, Mexican Fruit Fly Quarantine (headquarters,
Harlingen, Tex.).
92














U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1935




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State of FloridaDepartment of AgricultureDIVISION OF PLANTINDUSTRYLIBRARY

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S.R.A., B.E.P.Q. Issued September 1935United States Department of AgricultureBureau of Entomology and Plant QuarantineSERVICE ANDREGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS1934These announcements are issued quarterly and constitute a per-manent record of the work of the Bureau in the enforcementof the plant quarantine act of 1912 and certain related acts, includ-ing the text of quarantines and regulations thereunder, and themore important circulars and decisions explanatory of, orbearing on, such quarantines and regulationsWITH LIST OF PLANT PESTS INTERCEPTED WITH IMPORTEDPLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTSUNITED STATESGOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICEWASHINGTON: 193511324-35

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ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGYAND PLANT QUARANTINELEE A. STRONG, Chief.S. A. lo)IwIER, A ssistant Chief.AVERY ,S. H oYT, Asistant Chief.F. H1. SPENCER, Business Manager.it. 1'. Culzim, Editor..\IAREL Coicoiu), Librarian.J. A. HIYsiLv, in Charge, Division of Insect Pest Survey and Information.J. 1. IIAMBLEION, in Charge, Division of Bee Culture Investiga'ions.D. L. V.\ DINE, in Charge, Diuision of Fruit Jn':et Inrestigations.F. C. CRAmICHAD, in Charge, Division of Forest Inscet Investigations.W. 11. WHinE, in Charge, Dirision of Truck Crop and Garden Insect Investi-gations.P. N. ANNANU, in Charge, Division of Cereal and Forage Insect Investigations.R. W. I AnHw. in Charge, Division of Cotton Insect Inres:igations.F. C. Bisnopv, in C/iarge, Dirision of Insects Affecting Man and Aninials.C. 11. IlA)LEY, in Charge, Division of Japanese and Asiatic Beetle Investigations.L. A. HL\\1IN s, in Cliarge, Division of Control Inrestigations.I. C. Iaux, in Cia rye, Dirision of ISeCticid(cs ( nd Fungicides.HAROLDw MtmIsoN, in C/I(Irge. Diris ion of Inwsct Identification.C1. ( L\SEN, in Charge, Division of Foreign Parasite Introduction.S. B. PB.\(KF: in Charge, Division of Plani' Disease Control.B. M. G\uI1s, in Charge, Division of Domestic Plant Quarantines.E 1. SASSCER, in Charge, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines.A. 1. Bu;ss, in Field C/iarte, Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail Moth Control(1w(d1airters, Grecn field, Mass.).L. 11. WAuT.11LEY, i. t Field Ch(/irgc, JIapaeisc Beetle and Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail hoth Quarantin s, Europcan Corn Borer Certifica tion, (ind Dutch ElmDisease Eradication (hleaidquairters, 11iie Plains, N. Y.).I. E. o Aw. in Field C/ia rie. Pink Bollworin and Thiurberia Weevil Qutar-an tins (hIwdquairters, Sfan Antonio, Tex.).B. L. BUYIEN, in Fi(ld C/ t'rge, Date Scale Quarantine (headquarters, Indio,Ca lif.).1). A. h161DALE, in Field Charge, Mexican Fruit Fly Quarantine (headquarters,HrIngn TI)

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TABLE OF CONTENTSCONTENTS OF NO. 118 (JANUARY-MARCH 1934)PageQuarantine and other official announcements------------------------___--------1Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (no. 48)------------1Instructions to postmaters -----------------------------------_-------1Instructions to inspectors on the trca tment of nursery products, fruits,vcgeto bles, and soil for the Japanese lwetle (B. p. Q.-359)----------1Announcements relating to Mexican fruit-fly quarantine (no. 64)_-----------12Texas citrus shipping season ends April 5-----------------------------12Shipping season for Texas citrus fruit to end on April 5 (B. P. Q.-361)-12Announcement relating to narcissus-bulb quarantine (no. 62)_--------------12Narcissus inspection records for 1913 (B. P. Q.-358)-----------------12Terminal inspection of plants and plont products-------------------------15Arkansas discontinues terminal inspection---------------------------15Miscellaneous items-----------------------------------------------15Pll nt-quarantine import restrictions of the Republic of Cuba (P. Q. C. A.-283, suppleinent no. 2)----------_-----------------------------15Plant-quarantine import restrictions of the Netherlands (P. Q. C. A .-303,supplement no. 1)-------------_-------------------------------15Plant-quarantine export restrictions, Republic of Mexico (P. Q. C. A.-284,supplement no. 8)-------------------------------------_--------16Plant-quaro n tine import restrictions, Republic of Chile (B. P. Q.-348,supplements nos. 1 and 2)-------------------------------------16Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Island of Cyprus (B. P. Q.-360) 17Plant-quarantine import restrictions, British Honduras (P. Q. C. A.-314,supplement no. 4)------------------------------------------22European corn borer-State regulations (B. P. Q.-346, revised Mar('b 15,1934) ---__-_____--________---------------------------------__ _ _--------23Penalties imposed for viol tions of the Plant Quarantine Act--------------30Organization of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine-------------------------------31CONTENTS OF NO. 119 (APRIL-JUNE 1934)Quarantine and other official announcements-------------------------------33Announcement relating to black stem-rust quara iiiine (no. 3,)-------------3Revised list of barberries an( Mahonihfi1lS classified under black stem-rustquarantine regulations (P. Q. C. A.-120, second revision)-------------33Announcement relating to fruit and vegetable quarantine (no. 56)----------35Sterilization of imported vinifera .rames by refriceration (B. P. Q3.--i__ 85Announcement rtbhiting to Mexican fruit-fly quarantine (no. 644 ------------36Citrus census of the lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas as of April 1,1934 --------------------_--------__ ---------------------------AMiscellaiieous items------------------------------------------------------38Plant-pest and quarantine work in Agriculture Department merged 38P'lant-ou'ranotine import restrictions, Repiblie ot Argentina (B. P. ( .--)57,supplennt no. 1)------_---_---------------------------------39Plant-quraintine import restrictions, Philippine Islands (B. P. Q.-868 _-_ 40Plant-quarantine import restrictions, French mandate of Syria (B. P. (Q.-304) _-------___--------------------------------------4-------46Plant-quarantine import restrictions, British Honduras (P. Q. C. A.-314,s5pplf'ments no-5. 1, am] 7 __-__ 40Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Greece (B. P. Q.-347,supplement t no. 2)----------------------------------_----------50PIlnnt-oua irtntine import restrictions, J;Tmaica, British West Indies (B. P. Q.-355, revised)__-_----------------------------------------------50Pl0 nt-omu rl ntine import restrictions, Kin dom ,f N rway (B. 11. Q.-350,supplement no. 1)--------------_----_-----------------------520)nt(1 1 rat n' import restrictiios. Repulblic of Peru (11. Q. C. A.-310,supplement no. 1)_ _-_______-_-___ -___-----_-__ -53Plant quarn11 tinl iipt rt restrictions, New Z'aland (P. Q. C. A.--306. sup-plement no. 2)-----------------------------------------------53Plant-quarotine import restrictions. Commonwealth of Australia (P. Q.C. A.-299, supplement no. 2) _-_-_--___-----------------------55Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act__------___ 55Organization of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine_------------------------------57CONTENTS OF NO. 120 (JULY-SEPTEMBER 1934)Quarantine and other official announcements-------------------------_----------59Announcements relatin, to (itrus conker quarolnt ine (no. 19) -------------59Revision of quarantine _------------------------___ __-----------------.5(Instruct ions to collectors of customs (T. 1). 47254) -------------__ 60Announcements relating to fruit and vegetable quarantine (no. 56)-------61Sterilization of imported vinifera grapes by refrigeration (B. P. Q.-:862,sIu plem e ts 1 1 a 2) _ _ t ____ __ i I dAnnouncements relating to '"ypsy m)oth and brown-toil mnoth(i quantin no.45)-----------------------------------------------------------------61Revision of regulations------------------------------------------61Notice to general public through newspapers.--------------------691

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2 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINEQuarantine tid either (tuicial a Tiln oil ticemen ts-Cont tin Ued PageAnnolucnciiefnts relating to Japancse beetle quarantine (io. 48) ----_ 6VJa pa nese lheetle control ends for season on fruit and vegetable ship1mlents_ 69Reioval of Japanese beetle quarantine restrictions (ii the interstatemIlovlenIltit of fruits and vegetables------------------_-_------------70Instructions to postmasters -_-_-__-----_ _ 70Announcement relating to Mexican fruit-fly quarantine (no. G4)-------_---71Administrative instructions-shipping season for Texas citrus frult to be-gin September 26 1B. E. P. Q.-367)-_-----_--------------_------------71Announcemnit relating to nursery stock. plant. and seed quarantine (no. 37)_ 71Notice to permittees and others interested-willow withes as plant tiesprohibited on plants for entry from Europe and Canada (B. E. P. Q.-365)_ ----------------------------------------_-------------71Announcements relating to pink bollworm quarantine (no. 52)-------------72MNoditication of pink bollworm quarantine regulations (amendment no. 1)_ 72Notice to general public through newspapers---------------------74Instructions to postmasters--------------------------------------74A nouncemen ts relating to rice quarantine (no. 55)----------------------74Rice quarantine amended (amendment no. 1)-----------------------74Instructions to collectors (if customs (T. D. 47229--------------76Announcements relating to sugarcane quarantine (no. 151-------------------76Sugarcane quarantine revised--------------------------------------76Revision of quarantine_--------------------------------------------76Miscellaneous items-------------------_-------------------_-------77Plant-quarantine import restrictions. Republic of 3reece (B. P. Q.-347,supplement no. 31----------------------------------------------IPlant-quarantine import restrictions. Jamaica. Britizh West Indies(B. E. P. Q.-355. revised, supplement no. 1)-----------------------78Peru prohibits the exportation of propagating material of rotenone-producing plants iP. Q. C. A.-310. supplement no. 21--------------78Pla nt-quarantine import restrictions. Republic of Cuba (P. Q. C. A.-283,revised, supplement no. 3)----------------------------------------79Plant-quarantine import restrictions. Republic of Mexico (P. Q. C. A.-284, supplement no. 9) -----------------------------------------79Plant-quarantine import restrictions. Germany (B. P. Q.-302. revised.supplement no. 2) ------------------------------_ --------------80Plant-quarantine import restrictions. Republic of Czechoslovakia (B. E.P. Q.-366)-__-----------------------------_----------------80Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act--------------89Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine-------------92CONTENTS OF NO. 121 (OCTOBER-DECEMBER 1934)Quarantine and other official announcements---_----------------_-_---_------93Announcement relating to Dutch elm disease quarantine (no. 70)---------93Revision of quarantine ---------------------------------------------94Announcement relating to gypsy moth and brown-tail moth quarantine (no. 45) ------------------------------------------__ _ ----------------94Instructions to postmasters--------------------------------------------94Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (no. 48)_--------------95No extension of Japanese beetle regulated area this year-----------95Developments in the Japanese beetle situation during 1934-----------95Announcements relating to pink bollworm quarantine (no. 52) ----------98Modification of pink bollworm quarantine regulations (amendment no. 2)_ 98Notice to general public through newspapers--------------------100Instructions to postmasters_-----------------------------------100Announcement relating to sugarcane quarantine (foreign) (no. 15)---------101Instructions to collectors of customs (T. D. 47298)------------------101Announcements relating to sugarcane quarantine (domestic) (no. 161-------101Revi on of 0 1uar'antine_---------------------------------------------101Instructions to postmasters-------------------------------------102Announcement relating to sweetpotato quarantine (domestic) (no. 30)-----102Revision of quarantine-------------------------------------------102Miscelltn11us items---------------------------------------------_-__------103Calls tcfferonces to consider control of three plant pests--------------103Eracker and Gaddis to hied plant-pe-t-control division_----------------104Peri prohibittho exportation of propagating material of rotenone-pro-ducinir plants (P. 4). C. A.-310. supplement no. 3) -----------------104Phl hnt-quarn til0 eXoIt retrictions. Republic of Cuba f(P. Q. C. A.-283,revised. supplement no. 4)---------------------------------------105PIa nt-quaratlitine import restrictions. Republic of Poland (B. E. P. Q.-__--------------------------------105a nt-qa ra!tine import restrictions, Germany (1B. P. Q.-302. revised,1upplemient no. 3) ----------------------------------------------112Plant-iuairantitoe import restrictions. Republic of Czechoslovakia (B. E.P. Q.-3 6. -Huplem1ent TlO. 1)_------------------------------------112IPIant-q aranine import restrictions. British Mandate of Palestine.I. P. .7i _____ ---------------_----------113I'lant-qa'in t lit ine iitiport restrictions. Republic of Mexico (P. Q. C. A.-284,sltpplemett n(. 10)_ _ --__----------__--__-------------_ ------115Pliantios inimposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act------------116-*f current qmaan iit nd 0th1 r restrictive orders and miscellaneousrul-ations -------------------------------------117)r'anitirn of the nurean of Entomology and Plant Quarantine_--------------124C)

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S.R.A.-B.P.Q. No. 118 Issued May 1934United States Department of AgricultureBUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINESERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTSJANUARY-MARCH 1934CONTENTSPage Quarantine and other official announcements---------------------------------------------1Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (no. 48)---------------------------1Instructions to postmasters.-------.---------------------------------------------------1Instructions to inspectors on the treatment of nursery products, fruits, vegetables, and soil for the Japanese beetle (B.P.Q.-359)-------------------------------------------1Announcements relating to Mexican fruit-fly quarantine (no. 64)----------------------------12Texas citrus shipping season ends April 5-----------------------------------------------12Shipping season for Texas citrus fruit to end on April 5 (B.P.Q.-361)---------------------12Announcement relating to narcissus-bulb quarantine (no. 62)----------------------------12Narcissus inspection records for 1933 (B.P.Q.-258)---------------------------------12Terminal inspection of plants and plant products-------------------------------------------15Arkansas discontinues terminal inspection------.----------------------------------15Miscellaneous items---------------------------------------------------------------------15Plant-quarantine import restrictions of the Republic of Cuba (P.Q.C.A.-283, supplementno. 2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------15Plant-quarantine import restrictions of the Netherlands (P.Q.C.A.-303, supplement no. 1)-15Plant-quarantine export restrictions, Republic of Mexico (P.Q.C.A.-284, supplement no. 8)16Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Chile (B.P.Q.-348, supplements nos1 and 2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------16Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Island of Cyprus (B.P.Q.-360) ---------------------17Plant-quarantine import restrictions, British Honduras (P.Q.C.A.-314, supplement no. 4).22European corn borer-State regulations (B.P.Q.-346, revised Mar. 15, 1934)-.-------------23Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act-----.-------------------------30Organization of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine-------------------------------------------------31QUARANTINE AND OTHER OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTSANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE(NO. 48)INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERSPOST OFFICE DEPARTMENT,THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,Washington, February 20, 1934.POSTMAsTER:MY DEAR SIR: Your attention is invited to the enclosed copy of the twelfthrevision of the Japanese beetle quarantine and regulations (Quarantine OrderNo. 48, U.S. Department of Agriculture), by which you will please be governed.The important changes and features are indicated in the Introductory Note andSummary. See paragraph 1, section 595, Postal Laws and Regulations.Very truly yours,C. B. EILENBERGER,Third Assistant Postmaster General.B.P.Q.-359 MARCH 14, 1934.INSTRUCTIONS TO INSPECTORS ON THE TREATMENT OF NURSERY PRODUCTS,FRUITS, VEGETABLES, AND SOIL FOR THE JAPANESE BEETLEExisting disinfection and fumigation methods authorized for elimination of theJapanese beetle from nursery stock and other plant materials, as well as fromsand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure, have been revised and consolidated54156--34----1

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BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-Mar.in these instrticlons. Methods outlined here are to be enployed as a basis of(jarf tine Crt inflation under regulations 6 and 7 of Quarantine No. 48, Revised.Issuance of these instructions cancels the methods of treatment prescribedin P.Q.C.A.--224, P.Q.C.A.-239, P.Q.C.A.-265, P.Q.C.A.-307, P.Q.C.A.-317,P.Q.C.A.-322, P.Q.C.A.-333, and B.P.Q.-339.A. S. HOYT,Acting Chief of Bureau.TABLE OF CONTENTSPage1. Treatment of soil in the absence of plants------------------------------------------------------2A Pottin soil--------------------------------------------------------------------------------21. Carbon disulphide----------------------------------------------------------------------22. Naphthalene---------------------------------------------------------------------------33. Steam ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------34. Lead arsenate-------------------------------------------------------------------------3B. Sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure shipments.---------------------------------41. Carload treatment requirements, June 15 to October 15, inclusive----------------------42. Carload treatment requirements, October 16 to June 14, inclusive----------------------4C. Soil in and around plots, coldframes, hotbeds, etc--.-----------------------------------41. Lead arsenate--.---------------------------------------------------------------42. Carbon disulphide---------------------------------------------------------------------53. Carbon disulphide emulsion----------------------------------------------------54. Naphthalene---------------------------------------------------------------------------62. Treatment of soil about the roots of plants------------------------------------------------------6A. Removing infestation by shaking, or washing with water.-------------------------------6B. Treatment with hot water--------.------------------------------------------------6C. Carbon disulphide dip-----------------------------------------------------------71). Carbon disulphide emulsion, field treatment-----.---------------------------------7E. Lead arsenate, field treatments---------------------------------------------------103. Miscellaneous treatments-------------------------------------------------------------10A. Fumigation of bananas in refrigerator cars with liquid hydrocyanic acid-------------------10B. Fumigation of bananas in refrigerator cars with calcium cyanide-------------------------11C. Fumigation of berries with carbon disulphide------.----------------------------------111). Fumigation of berries with ethylene oxide-----.----.---------------------------------111. TREATMENT OF SOIL IN THE ABSENCE OF PLANTSA. Potting soilPotting soil may be treated by the use of carbon disulphide, naphthalene, heattreatment, or lead arsenate. All of these treatments are effective and do notimpair soil fertility when applied as recommended.A. 1. Fumigation of potting soil with carbon disulphideMaterial.-A technical, C.P., or U.S.P. grade of carbon disulphide should beused to fumigate soil in which plants are to be grown. Caution: Carbon disul-phide is a dangerous chemical. The vapor is inflammable and explosive whenmixed with air at concentrations ranging from 1 to 50 parts of carbon disulphideto 99 to 50 parts of air. At these concentrations any spark is liable to cause anexplosion. At a temperature of 297* F. it may take fire spontaneously, and itmay ignite spontaneously in the presence of certain metals, particularly copper,at considerably lower temperatures. It should be kept away from fire, and fromhot objects such as electric light bulbs, heating coils, steam pipes, etc. Lightedcigars, cigarettes, or pipes should never be brought into the same room. These facts must be brought to the attention of a responsible person at the nurserybefore the fumigation is applied to the soil.Equipment.-The fumigation must be done in a tight box or bin, which may bemade of metal, wood, concrete, brick, stone, or other material, providing the top,sides, and bottom are gas proof. It should be of a size adapted to the quantityof soil to be treated.Condition of soil.-Soil of any type may be fumigated with carbon disulphide,providing the soil is friable and is thrown loosely into the box. It should be dryor only moist. Wet soil must never be fumigated.Temnperature.-The effectiveness of fumigation with carbon disulphide depends, to a large extent, upon the temperature of the soil. The higher the temperaturethe more readily the vapor diffuses through the soil, and the more easily theinintatinre stages of the beetle are killed by its action. The temperature must beat least 45 F. when the treatment is applied and it must not fall below 400during the course of the treatment; otherwise, it will be necessary to fumigatethe soil again to insure destruction of the immature stages of the beetle.Dosage.-Carbon disulphide must be used at the rate of 350 cubic centimeters1 polind) to 1 cubic yard of soil.

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19341 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 3application to soil.-Any quantityy of soil may be fumigated, providing thecarbon disuilphide is distributed uniformly throighout. One method is to funi-gate the soil while the box is being filled. Place 18 inches of soil loosely in thebox. Inject carbon disulphide at the rate of 176 cubic centimeters for eachsquare yard of surface, distributing the material uniformly in holes 2 inches deepand 18 inches apart, 44 cubic centimeters to each hole. Fill the holes with soilimmediately after the liquid is injected. When the first 18 inches of soil hasbeen treated, put in 18 inches more, and fumigate it the same as the first. Thisca(i be repeated until the container is filled.Another method is to fumigate the soil after the box has been filled. Thisis done by making holes from the surface to the different levels, so that the carbondisulphide can be applied in the same positions as by the other method. Theliquid, in this case, must be poured into the deep holes through a tube, or injectedto insure its reaching the proper level.Period of fumigation.-The container must be sealed, and left undisturbedfor at least 48 hours.Storage of soil.-The soil must be stored under such conditions as will preventreinfestation.A. 2. Fumigation of potting soil with naphthaleneMaterial.-Flake naphthalene free from tar must be used for fumigation.Caution.-Naphthalene will burn. It must be kept away from fire.Equipment.-It is not necessary to have a special fumigation box in which tofumigate soil with naphthalene.Condition of soil.-Dry or moist soil of any type may be fumigated withnaphthalene. Wet soil cannot be fumigated satisfactorily.Temperature.-The effectiveness of the treatment depends to a large extentupon the temperature of the soil. The higher the temperature the more effectiveis the fumigation. The temperature must never be allowed to fall below 50' F.Dosage.-Five pounds of flake naphthalene must be used to a cubic yard of soil.Mixing.-The success of the fumigation depends to a large extent upon thethoroughness with which the flakes are mixed with the soil. Spread the flakeson the soil and mix thoroughly by shoveling over at least three times.Period of fumigation.-Soil must be left undisturbed for a week after fumigation.Storage of soil.-The soil must be stored under such conditions as will preventreinfestation.A. 3. Treatment of potting soil with steamEquipment.-It is necessary to have a boiler that will generate an amplesupply of steam, and equipment for properly dispersing the steam throughoutthe soil.Condition of soil.-Soil of any type may be treated with steam, providing it isfriable.Teimperature.-The soil must be heated throughout to a temperature of 130' F.Period of treatment.-The soil temperature must be maintained at 1300 F. for30 minutes after it has reached this temperature throughout the mass.Storage of soil.-After treatment with steam, soil must be so stored and handledas to prevent reinfestation.A. 4. Treatment of potting soil with lead arsenateMaterial.-Powdered acid lead arsenate. Condition of soil.-The soil to be treated must be in a friable condition. Wetsoil cannot be treated satisfactorily. The treatment is recommended only forsoils which are slightly acid or neutral in reaction.Season.-Lead arsenate must be applied before August 1. When plants pottedin soil treated as prescribed are carried over until the following year, they maybe again eligible for certification between October 1 and the following June 15 ofthe second year if, on August 1 of the second year, analyses show the soil to con-tain lead arsenate at the rate of 2 pounds per cubic yard. This treatment cannotbe relied upon to eliminate the infestation in the soil if applied in the fall or inthe spring when the larvae are fully developed. It is im-portant to have poisonin the soil at the time the eggs are hatching.Dosage.-Acid lead arsenate must be used at the rate of 2 pounds to each cubicyard of soil.Application to soil.-The lead arsenate must be uniformly mixed with the soil.This may be accomplished either by hand shoveling or by the use of a machine

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4 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-Mar.mixer, such a, a concrete mixer. Plants must be free from soil when potted insoil treated ini this man ner.M riod of treatwt -t.-Plaitts freed from soil and potted in soil treated in theabove imanier by August 1, may be certified for shipment between the followingOctober I and the subsequent June 15.flauding of treated soil.-When plants, potted in lead-arsenate-treated soil,ar plunged in beds or set in frames exposed to possible infestation, the soil oflhese beds or frames must previously have been treated with lead arsenate at therat e of 1,500 pounds per acre.B. Sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure shipments1{egiulation 7, quarantine no. 48, authorizes certification of sand, soil, earth,pea, compost, and manure, providing it has been treated under the supervisionof and in manner and by method satisfactory to the inspector. If the carbondi Ilip~lide method is used, follow the detailed instructions given for the fumiga-tion of potting soil with carbon disulphide (1, A. 1). The only other methodwhich may be used is steam, in which case the instructions for steam treatmentshould be followed (1, A. 3).Top soil or other materials from within 12 inches of the soil surface, to receivecertification, must be treated throughout the year.Pit sand, from infested areas, must be treated during the period June 15 andOctober 15, inclusive, since infestation is likely to occur between the time ofremoval from the pits and loading in the cars.B. 1. Carload treatment requirements, June 15 to October 15, inclusiveType of car.-Tight box cars must be used during this period. Open cars maybe used providing they are protected from reinfestation while within the regulatedarea.Door.,.--The doorways of box cars must be boarded up and covered with heavypaper tip to a point beyond the height of the sand or soil in the car.Depth of soil or sancd.-The sand or soil must not be loaded in the car to such adepth as would restrict the overhead working space and hamper the work of theme performing the fumigation.Keeping doors closed.-Certified cars must have doors closed and fastened whileofl route within the regulated area.B. 2. Carload treatment requirements, October 16 to June 14, inclusiveType of car.-Open freight cars may be used during this period of the year,but they must be of steel gondola type. In cars with dump bottoms, planks must,e laid across the bottoms and these covered with heavy paper to cover theopenings. Where this is necessary, the inspector must give his approval beforeI he sand or soil is loaded.DT pth of soil or sand.-The soil or sand must not be piled above the level of theHe> of the car.Cove rinq trith canvas.-When open cars are used canvases or heavy paper musthe used for covering the surface as it is fumigated. These canvases or coversmust be free from holes and a foot or more wider than the width of the car.Where several pieces of covers are used they must be large enough to allow foroverlapping of at least a foot where they meet. The covers must be fasteneddowun at the sides of the car and weighted on the surfaces, particularly where theyoverlap.C. Soil in and around plots, coldframes, hotbeds, etc.Soil in and surrounding plots, coldframes, hotbeds, etc., which is used forpluiging pots or heeling-in plants, must be disinfected by treatment with leadarseniate as precribed in section C. 1. Under special conditions or specifica vt horization from the inspector, fumigation with carbon disulphide, carbond~i-ulphide emulsion, or naphthalene may be substituted for the temporaryeliiniiation of infestation.C. 1. Treatment with lead arsenateMate ria!-Powdered acid lead arsenate.C'odi/ion of soil.-The soil must be friable and in good tilth.asoni.-Tfreatment must be applied before August 1 if the land is to be usedth it at amnn.

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1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 5Dosage.-Lead arsenate must be applied at the rate of 1,500 pounds to eachacre, or 35 pounds to each 1,000 square feet. For sllbsequernt re-treatments,lead arsenate must be applied in sufficient quantity to restore the original Coil-centration of 1,500 pounds of the insecticide per acre. The quaiitity to be addedin the re-treatment will be determined by analyses.AIpplication.-The lead arsenate may be applied with a suitable distributoror broadcast by hand. The lead arsenate must be thoroughly mixed and inicor-porated with the upper 3 inches of soil.Period of treatment.-As lead arsenate is a stomach poison which has to beeaten by the larvae, it may take several weeks before all the idfestation is elimti-inated. Do not plant, heel in, or plunge plants in soil thus treated uitil afterOctober 1.Safety zone.--In addition to the area desired to be certified, there shall betreated a 3-foot strip of land around the entire plot, coldfraie, hot bed, etfc.No plants may be certified from this strip. In the case of coldfranes, hotheds,etc., extending into the ground to a depth of 12 inches or more, thuis preveitinglarval movement into the frame, no such safety zone is required.ilarking.-Nursermnien shall be required to furnish suitable stakes at least4 inches square and at least 30 inches long to be placed on t lie boundaries ofcertified plots. Proper designations will be stenciled on the stakes by theDepartment. In the case of coldfranies, hotbeds, etc., having fixed bounda-ries, proper designation will be made on such coldframes, hotbeds, etc., and nostakes will be required.C. 2. Fumigation with carbon disulphideMaterial.-A technical, U.S.P., or C.P. grade of carbon disuilphide should beused. Carbon disulphide is explosive. Observe the precautions mentioned in1, A. 1.Equipment.-A tarpaulin or other gasproof cover must be provided to coverthe soil after fumigation.Condition of soil.-Soil of any type may be treated providing it is friable.Wet soil must not be treated.Temperature.-The temperature of the soil 6 inches below the surface must beat least 45 F. when the fumigation is applied. If the temperature falls below40' before the fumigation is complete, the treatment must be repeated.Weather conditions.-The ideal conditions for fumigation are a warm, humid atmosphere without wind.Season.-The fumigation must not be applied when adult beetles are present.An exception may be made in the case of plots that are protected from beetles.Dosage.-Carbon disulphide must be used at the rate of 6 pounds, or 2,100cubic centimeters, to 100 square feet of soil surface.Application.-Carbon disulphide must be uniformly distributed over thesurface of the soil. Apply it in holes 12 inches apart and 1 to 2 inches deep,putting 21 cubic centimeters in each hole. Fill each hole with soil immediatelyafter the liquid is ploured in. Complete the fumigation as quickly as possible,covering each section with tarpaulin as soon as it is fumigated.Period of fumigation.-The soil must remain covered for at least 48 hours.Safety zone.-Same as that prescribed in 1, C. 1.Marking.-Same as that prescribed in 1, C. 1.C. 3. Treatment with carbon disulphide emulsionMaterial.-Carbon disulphide emulsion consists of a dilution of the stock solution known as "50 percent miscible carbon disulphide." The stock solutionis composed of equal parts of carbon disulphide and castor-oil soap emulsifier.The castor-oil soap emulsifier must be prepared according to the directions pub-lished in the Journal of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry, volume 20, pages849-850, August 1928.The component materials, carbon disulphide and castor-oil soap emulsion, aresupplied in separate containers-the carbon distUlphide in one container and theemulsified castor-oil soap in another. Equal parts of each by volune niust beused in preparing the stock solution or miscible carbon disulplhide. The stock solution when diluted with water forms carbon disulphide emulsion.The miscible carbon disulphide should be prepared in the field as it is u1sed.It should not be prepared in quantity before use.Caution.-Miscible carbon disulphide and carbon disulphide emulsion are ill-flammable. Observe the precautions mentioned in 1, A. 1.

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BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE (Jan.-Mar.Equipment.--Twent y-four-gage galvanized-iron collars 10 inches wide and notmore than 4 feet square are needed for applying the emulsion. Suitable tanks,barrels, or tubs for preparing the solution must be provided. Condition of soil.-Any type of soil, providing it is friable, may be treated bythis method. Wet soil cannot be treated satisfactorily. The surface must belevel and not disturbed by recent cultivation. The drainage conditions of thesoil are important. The solution must not disappear from the surface in less than10 minutes, and must be absorbed by the soil within 5 hours. Temnperature.-The temperature of the soil 6 inches below the surface must beat least 45' F. when the treatment is applied. If the temperature falls below 40'before the treatment is finished, the soil must be treated again.Season.-Treatment must not be applied when adult beetles are present. Anexception may be made in the case of plots that are protected from beetles.Dosaqe.-The dilution depends on the soil temperature; follow table 2 of see-tion 2, D. Use 29' gallons of the dilute emulsion to each square foot of soil, asin table 4 of section 2, D.Application.-Level the surface of the ground, removing weeds and debris.Force a galvanized-iron collar 3 inches into the soil, and firm the soil against themetal. Place another collar next to the first, and so on. When enough collarsare in place, pour the dilute carbon disulphide into the basins formed within thecollars. As soon as the liquid has disappeared from the surface, the collar maybe lifted and set in another position.Period of treatment .-The soil must not be disturbed for 48 hours after treatment.Safety zone.-Same as that prescribed in 1, C. 1._Iarking.-Samne as that prescribed in 1, C. 1.C. 4. Fumigation with naphthaleneMlaterial.-Flake naphthalene free from tar. Caution: Fire should be keptaway from naphthalene.Condition of soil.-Any type of soil may be treated with naphthalene provideditjis friable and in good tilth. Wet soil must not be treated.Season.-The treatment must not be applied when adult beetles are present.An exception may be made in the case of plots that are protected from beetles.Temperature.-To be effective the temperature of the soil at a depth of 6 inchesmust not be less than 50' F. for a week after fumigation.Dosage.-Naphthalene must be used at the rate of 2,000 pounds per acre, orapproximately 46 pounds per 1,000 square feet.Application.-The naphthalene must be uniformly distributed over the surface,worked in, and thoroughly and uniformly mixed with the soil to a depth of 3inches.Period of fumigation.-The land must not be disturbed for 1 week after fumi-gation.Safety 2one.-Same as that prescribed in 1, C. 1.Marking.-Same as that prescribed in 1, C. 1.2. TREATMENT OF SOIL ABOUT THE ROOTS OF PLANTSA. Removing infestation by shaking, or washing with waterThe roots of some plants can be made entirely free from soil, either by shakingor washing.Washing all soil from the roots of the plants with water is probably one of themost simple methods for removing the infestation from certain varieties of plants.The method has certain disadvantages in that it is dependent for its effectivenessalmost entirely upon the vigilance and the determination of the inspector in mak-ing sure that all soil is washed from the roots and that no tangled mass of rootsor cavity hides a larva.Condition of pint.s.-The plants should be in a dormant or semidormant con-dition. Only such root masses as can be thoroughly examined and the absence ofinfestation verified should be certified under this procedure. Plants must beprotected from possible reinfestation.B. Treatment with hot waterEquipment.-It is necessary to have a water tank equipped with a suitableheating devicee, and a system for circulating the water in order to maintain auiiform temperature.Condition of plants.-Plants are usually most resistant to hot water when theyare dormant, a11( most susceptible when they are growing vigorously. It is

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1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS itherefore recommended that treatment be applied only when the plants aredormant or seinidormant.Temperature.-The water must be maintained at a temperature of 112' F. forthe entire period of treatment. If the temperature falls below 111.5' the infes-tation may not be destroyed; if it rises above 112.5' the plants may be injured.Period of treatmert.-The treatment must he continued for 70 mniinutes after theroot masses are heated throughout to 112' F.Preparation for treat ment.-Bef ore being tendered for treatimlent, plants shallhave all excess soil removed and the roots pruned. Large clumps should bedivided as much as possible without injuring the roots.Small plants and root stocks may be packed loosely in wire baskets or in othercontainers providing water can circulate through the masses. Large plants mustbe placed individually in the water.Before the plants are imnmersed, thermometers must be inserted with the muer-cury bulbs in the center of at least three of the largest clumps, baskets, or rootmasses, and placed at each end of the tank and in the center. In addition, threethermometers, with the mercury bulbs in the water, must be placed in the sanerelative positions as the thermometers in the root masses.Application.-The roots must be immersed completely. Temperature readingsshould be recorded on form no. 91. These temperatures should be taken at each end of the tank and in the center with individual thermometers.Care of plants after treatment.-The treatment by hot water is complete whenthe plants are removed from the tank. The way plants are handled after treat-ment may seriously affect subsequent growth. Tubers should be dry when packedfor shipment. Plants should be cooled slowly to room temperatures. Plantsshould not be removed from the hot water and heeled in cold soil. Pot the plants,or set them in the ground as soon as possible after cooling to room temperature.They should be protected against reinfestation.C. Carbon disulphide dipMaterial.-Use 50 percent miscible carbon disulphide. Fully described in1, C. 3.Caution.-Observe the precautions mentioned in 1, A. 1.Eqaipment.--Metal or wooden tanks or tubs in which the plants can be treatedat a temperature of 70' F. should be provided.Condition of plants.-Dilute carbon disulphide emulsion is least injurious toroots when they are dormant or semidormant. Treatment should be applied duringthe dormant period of the variety to be treated.Temperature.-The temperature of the dilute emulsion must be maintained atapproximately 70' F. If the temperature falls below 65' the treatment may notbe effective; if it rises above 70' the plants may be injured.Dosage.-Miscible carbon disulphide (50 percent) must be mixed with water atthe rate of 45 cubic centimeters to 10 gallons.Period of treatment.-The roots must be immersed for 24 hours.Preparation of treating bath.-Determine the capacity of the container and use45 cubic centimeters of miscible carbon disulphide for each 10 gallons of water.There are 231 cubic inches in a gallon. Pour into tank and stir until mixed, whichoperation should be done just before using. Do not mix with a mechanical agitatoror stir too violently.Preparation of plants.-This treatment is not effective when the soil about theroots is too wet or when the diameter of the soil ball is more than 6 inches. Thetemperature of the plants should be at least 60' F. at the beginning of the treat-ment.Application.-The roots must be immersed completely.Care of plants after treatment.-The treatment is complete when the plants areremoved from the solution. The suggestions regarding handling of plants aftertreatment with hot water should be followed. Plants should be protected fromreinfestation.D. Carbon disulphide em ulsion, field treat mentThe basis of certification of field nursery plants treated with miscible carbondisulphide shall be: (1) That the concentrated stock solution shall be freshly mixed carbon disulphide and castor-oil soap in the proper concentration. (2) Thatall five conditions, subsequently mentioned, governing the application of thetreatment have been met.Material.-Use 50 percent miscible carbon disulphide. (See 1, C. 3.)

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S BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-Mar.Caiutioni.-Observe the precautions mentioned in 1, A. 1.Season.-This treatment must not be used when adult beetles are present.Equipinent.-Strips of 24-gage galvanized iron, 10 inches wide and of the properlength, are required. (See table 1.)TABLE 1.-Size of collarDiameter of ball to be dug Diameter Length of Diameter of ball to be dug Diameter Length of(inches) of collar collar (inches) of collar collar Inches Feet Inches Feet12 or less--------------------18 5 24 ---------------------------36 1014---------------------------21 6% 25-27--------------.-.---. 39 111.---------------------------27 8 28-30 ------------------------42 1220---------------------------30 9 33---------------------------45 1322 ---------------------------33 9Y 36-------------------------48 14Condition of plants.-Dilute carbon disulphide is least injurious to roots whenthe plants are dormant or semidormant, and treatment should be applied at thattime.Dosage.-The dilution depends upon the probable temperature of the soilduring the 48 hours following application, and must be determined by the TreatingDivision in accordance with table 2.TABLE 2.-Dilution scheduleMiscible carbon di-Minimum soil temperature 6 inches below the surface (* F.) sulphide per10 gallonsof waterCcSchedule no. 1-40-50.-. . ..------------------------------------------------------------68Schedule no. 2-50-60 .--. .------------------------------------------------------------57Schedule no. 3-60-70 .. .. ....------------------------------------------------------------45The concentration of the emulsion must not be greater than is necessary, asthis may injure the plants.The dosages which must be applied under different conditions are given intable 3 or table 4.TABLE 3.-Dosage for circular collarsMiscible carbon disulMiscible carbon disul-phide phideDiameter of colWater SchedSchedSchedDiameter of colWater SchedSchedSched-lar (inches) ule ule ule lar (inches) ule ule uleno. 1no. 2no. 3no. 1no. 2no. 3-40-500 50-600 60-700 40-500 50-60* 60-700F. F. F. F. F. F.Gallons Cc Cc Cc Gallons Cc Cc Cc12 ---------------2.0 14 11 9 33---------------15.0 102 85 6815.---------------3.0 20 17 14 36---------------17.5 119 99 8018 -----------.-4.5 31 26 20 39---------------21.0 143 119 9521 ---------------6. 0 41 34 27 42--------------24.0 164 136 10824.---------------0 55 45 36 45---------------27.5 187 156 12527---------------10.0 68 57 45 48 -------------31.5 215 179 14330---------------12.0 82 68 54

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1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 9TABLE 4.-Dosage for square collarsMiscible carbon disulMiscible carbon disul-phide phideLength of side of Water SchedSchedSchedLength offside of Water SchedSchedSched-collar (inches) ule ule ule collar (inches) ule ule uleno. 1no. 2no. 3no. 1no. 2no. 3-40-50* 50-60* 60-700 40-50c 50-600 60-704F. F. F. F. F. F.Gallons' Cc |C cc Gallons Cc Cc Cc12---------------2.5 17 14 11 33---------------19.0 129 108 8615.---------------4.0 27 23 18 36.--------------22.5 153 128 10218.---------------5.5 37 31 25 39.---------.-. 26.0 177 148 11821---------------7.5 51 43 34 42.-.--.-------. 30. 5 208 173 13924---------------10.0 1 6 57 45 45.-------------35.0 238 199 15927.--------------12.5 85 71 57 48----------------40.0 272 1 227 16230 ---------------15.5 106 88 70Temperature of soil.-Begin treating in the spring when the minimum soil tem-perature at a depth of 6 inches remains above 400 F., using schedule no. 1. Whenthe minimum soil temperature at this depth remains above 50 decrease the con-centration to meet schedule no. 2. When the minimum soil temperature remainsabove 60' decrease the concentration to meet schedule no. 3. In the autumn, asthe minimum temperature of the soil decreases, it is necessary to increase theschedule in the opposite order. Treatment must be discontinued when theminimum soil temperature at the 6-inch depth is below 40'.For treatment to be successful, the temperature of the soil during the 48-hour period of the treatment should never fall below the minimum temperature for theschedule used.Preparation of plant for treatment.-Remove all weeds and debris from the soilabout the plant. Tie low-hanging branches so they will not dip into the solution.Level the soil. After the size of the soil ball to be lifted has been determined,place a galvanized-iron collar about the plant and force it 3 inches into the soil.The size of the collar to be used is shown in table 1. Firm the soil carefully on eachside of the metal.Application.-Meas ure the diameter of the collar, find from table 3 or table 4the number of gallons of water and the cubic centimeters of miscible carbondisulphide required; and mix well. Pour into the collar, avoiding splashing orunnecessary disturbance of the soil. If the solution is poured on a spade it willhelp considerably.Period of treatment.-The soil must not be disturbed for 48 hours, but the plantmust be dug between 2 and 5 days after treatment.Handling after treatment.-The plant may be dug and handled according to theusual nursery practice, except that the ball must be of a diameter which corre-sponds to the diameter of the collar mentioned in table 1.Conditions under which the carb,.n disulphide treatment may be applied(1) The minimum soil temperature 6 inches below the surface in the nurserymust be 400 F. or higher for the 48-hour period immediately following the appli-cation of the carbon disulphide emulsion.(2) The surface of the soil around the base of the plant to be treated must belevel and the treatment must not be applied where the ground has a slope of morethan 1 inch in 10 inches.(3) The collars must be carefully placed in strict accordance with the directionsin order to assure that no seepage occurs. Especial care must be taken on plowedand stony land to prevent loss of the solution.(4) A record must be made of the time of penetration of the solution on eachplant treated. If the solution disappears from the surface in less than 10 minutesor requires more than 5 hours, the treatment will not be successful.(5) An examination must be made during the treatment and after the solutionhas disappeared to determine the uniformity of penetration. Uniform penetrationmust be obtained.54156-34-2

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10 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-Mar.E. Lead arsenate, field treatments-Iat rial.-Powdered acid lead arsenate.Codltion of soil.-The soil must be friable. The treatment is recommended onlyfor soils that are slightly acid or neutral in reaction.,'euison.--When the treatment is to be used as a basis for certification betweenSepteiher 20 re-treatment) or October 1 (initial treatment) and the followingJune 15, the treatment must be completed by July 1. Because of differences ofSeta I ial conditions it may, in other years, be necessary to modify these dates.Dosage.-For initial treatments lead arsenate must be applied at the rate of1,500 pouiids per acre, which is equivalent to approxilnately 35 pounds per 1,000square feet.For stibsequent re-treatments, lead arsenate must be applied in sufficientquiantity to restore the original concentration of 1,500 pounds of the insecticideper acre. The quantity to be added in the re-treatment will be determined byanalyses,.A1);lication. (1) Plants growing in rows.-The ground must be in good tilth.Lead arsenate may be applied by either of the following methods: (a) The leadarsienate may be broadcast or applied with a suitable distributor. At least 2inches of soil from the ridge between the plants in the row and from about thebase of the plants must be removed into the space between the rows of plants.() At least 2 inches of soil from the ridge between the plants in the row and fromabout the base of the plants must be removed into the space between the rows ofplants. The lead arsenate may then be broadcast or applied with a suitable dis-tributor. After either procedure has been completed, cultivate at least threetimes, adjusting the cultivator for the third operation so that the soil will bethrown toward the rows of plants to obtain at least 3 inches of poisoned soilabout the base of all plants.(2" Individual plants. -The treatment of individual plants is essentially a handoperation. The soil must be treated in a manner to obtain the same conditionsas are required for trees planted in rows. The area to be treated must never beless than 10 feet in diameter and must be at least 6 feet greater in diameter thanthe diameter of the soil ball to be removed with the tree.Safe ty zone.-In addition to the area desired to be certified there shall betreated a 3-foot strip of land around the entire plot, coldframe, hotbed, etc. Noplants may be certified from this strip.Marking.-Nurserymen shall he required to furnish suitable stakes at least 4inches square and at least 30 inches long to be placed on the boundaries of certifiedplots. Proper designations will be stenciled on the stakes by the Department.In the case of coldframes, hotbeds, etc., having fixed boundaries, proper designa-tion will be made on such coldframes, hotbeds, etc., and no stakes will be required.3. MISCELLANEOUS TREATMENTSA. Fumigation of bananas in refrigerator cars with liquid hydrocyanic acidMoa rial.-Liquid hydrocyanic acid.('a tou.-Iydrocyanic acid gas is very poisonous and because of the readinesswith which it is liberated, care should be exercised during the entire process offunigatioit not to breathe the fumes. Gas masks must be used when applyingthe liquid.Equip1m)Int.-Two metal trays having an area of about 2 square feet, equippedto be suspended about 24 inches below the hatch openings. Two tin cups with acapacity of 3 ounces each. Four screens made of cotton netting on light woodenframes which will fit tightly in hatch openings.(~uniltion of car.-Only refrigerator cars in good condition should be used toinsure against leaks.Temp jra/ire.-The temperature inside the car during the period of fumigationiist be at least 75' F.Dosaq .Six ounces of hydrocyanic acid per car.A1plication.--The doors should be closed tightly and the ice drip plugged. Remove one insilat ing plug from each ice bunker and suspend a tray therein.Place on tray a tin cup of 3-ounce capacity with string attached to handle andlong enough to fasten at the top of the bunker. Fill each cup with 3 ounces ofliquid hydrocyanie acid and pour into trays by tipping with string. Replace plugand close hatch covering I ightly.Ph riod of fumigation.-The car must be kept sealed for a period of 2 hours afterthe liquid hydrocyanic acid has been applied.

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1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 11Handling after futnigation.-Reiove pan and cup from ice bunkers. replaceplug with screen, leaving hatches open for aeration. Remove plugs from icedrips. Doors must be kept closed or satisfactorily screened to prevent reinfesta-tion.B. Fumoigation of bananas in refrigerator cars with calcium cyanideMaterial.-Calcium cyanide (88 percent).Caution.-Observe the same precautions as outlined for liquid hvdrocyanicacid treatment (3, A).Equipment.-Two trays of light wooden construction, 6 to 8 feet long, 2 feetwide, and about 2 inches deep. Sufficient building paper to cover the trays andhatch openings. Four screens made of cotton netting on light wooden frameswhich will fit tightly in hatch openings.Condition of car.-Only refrigerator cars in good condition should be used loinsure against leaks.Ternperature.-The temperature inside the car during the period of fumigationmust be at least 750 F.Dosage.-Three pounds of calcium cyanide per car.Application.-Remove plugs from the ice bunkers and insert screens. Covethe hatch openings with paper and close the hatches tightly on the paper. Plugice drip openings. Cover the trays with paper and apply 1. pounds of calciumcyanide as uniformly as possible in each of the trays and place them on the loadin the doorway of the car. Close door tightly.Period of fumigation.--The car must be kept sealed for a period of 1/ hoursafter the calcium cyanide has been applied.Handling after fumigation.-Remove trays and dispose of residue. Openscreened hatches for aeration. Remove plugs from ice drips. Doors must bekept closed or satisfactorily screened to prevent reinfestation.C. Fumigation of berries with carbon dis'lphideMaterial.-A technical, C.P., or U.S.P. grade of carbon disulphide should 1eused to fumigate berries.Ca tion.-Observe the precautions mentioned in 1, A. 1.Equ pient.-It is necessary to have a gastight room, equipped with a hot-water heating system to volatilize the carbon disulphide over copper coils, andfars to keep the air-and-gas mixture in circulation. A supply of heat should heavailable to keep the room at the required temperature on cool days.Teirnperature.-The water in the coil used for vaporizing the gas must be atleast 148' F. and should not exceed 1800. The room must he at a temperatureof S0 or above, during the period of fumigation.Dosaqe.-Carbon disulphide must he applied at the rate of 1 poumA per 100cubic feet of space in the room, including the space occupied by the herries.Period of fumnigation.-The berries must be exposed t -the gas for a period of2 hours.Application.-Crates m-ay be stacked in layers, separated by slats allowingample space between crates for circulation of the gas. The temperature of theroom should be taken before and after fumigation. When the' water in theboiler has reached the proper temperature, close all doors. Start water circu-lating through coils of vaporizing pan and turn on the fans. Pour the requiredamount of carbon disulphide through the funnel outside, into the vaporizing pan,and make sure valve is closed. Keep the water circulating through the coilsof vaporizing pan for 60 minutes after carbon disulphide has been applied. Keepdoors closed for 2 hours. Aerate the house before allowing anyone to enter.D. Funtigation of berries with ethylene oxideMate rial.-Ethylene oxide in cylinder.Equipmient.-It is necessary to have a gastight room.Tern pera! ure.-The temperature of the fruit and the ruom during the funiga-tion shall be 75' F. or above.Dosage.-Ethylene oxide must be applied at the rate of 2 pounds per 1,000cubic feet of space, including the space occupied by the berries.Period of fumigation.-The berries must be exposed to the gas for a period of2 hours.Application.-Crates may be stacked in layers, separated by slats allowingample space between the crates for circulation of the gas. Means should beavailable for the introduction of the gas into the room in the required amounts.

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12 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE (Jan.-Mar. Ca ition.-This fumigation has been effective in destroying the Japanese beetleand no injury has been noted in raspberries, blackberries, and dewberries fumi-gated experimentally by this method. Some injury has been observed in blue-berries fumigated with ethylene oxide in the concentrations required to destroyall the beetles.ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO MEXICAN FRUIT FLY QUARANTINE(NO. 64)TEXAS CITRUS SHIPPING SEASON ENDS APRIL 5(Press Notice)MARCH 26, 1934.Shipment of citrus fruit from the lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas will cease for the season on April 5, 1934, Avery S. Hoyt, the Acting Chief of the Bureau ofPlant Quarantine, announced today. Under the Mexican fruit worm quarantineregulations, a period of from 6 to 7 months without any fruit on the trees is main-tained in Cameron, Hidalgo, and Willacy Counties, in Texas, in order to prevent the establishment of the Mexican fruit fly, which occurs in Mexico and reachesthe Texas citrus orchards from time to time.Each year the State of Texas requires all fruits susceptible to attack by theMexican fruit fly to be removed from the trees by the end of the shipping season.The closing date is fixed by the Federal and State Departments of Agricultureafter consultation. J. M. DelCurto, entomologist of the Texas State Depart-ment of Agriculture, concurs in the present order closing the shipping season onApril 5, says Mr. Hoyt.SHIPPING SEASON FOR TEXAS CITRUS FRUIT TO END ON APRIL 5(Approved Mar. 24, 1934; effective Apr. 5, 1934)B.P.Q.-361 MARCH 24, 1934.Announcement is made that the shipping season for citrus fruit under theFederal Mexican fruit worm quarantine (Notice of Quarantine No. 64) from thecounties of Cameron, Hidalgo, and Willacy, in Texas, will close for the season onApril 5, 1934. The host-free period required under the regulations to be enforcedby the State of Texas will for the year 1934 begin on April 6.Under the provisions of the quarantine it is required that prior to the beginningof the host-free period each year all citrus fruit except lemons and sour limes shallbe removed from the trees for shipment, storage, or sale, and all other host fruitsshall be destroyed either following removal from the trees or by destruction of thetrees themselves. Permits will not be issued for the interstate shipment of citrusfruits after the close of April 5 except as to such fruits shipped from approvedstorage.This order modifies an announcement made by the Department on July 31,1933, when the current shipping season was extended to include April 30, 1934.The modification is necessary owing to the discovery of Mexican fruit flies withinthe regulated area during the past several weeks and the importance of institutingthe host-free period without delay in order to avoid the establishment of infesta-tionis in the groves. The findings consist thus far entirely of the capture of adultflies in traps. No infested fruit has been discovered this season, but the presenceof such flies either may indicate an undiscovered infestation or may threaten to result in the local establishment of the pest. The present action is taken to avoidthat danger.AVERY S. HOYT,Acting Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantihe.ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO NARCISSUS-BULB QUARANTINE(NO. 62)NARCISSUS INSPECTION RECORDS FOR 1933B P.Q. 358. MARCH 15, 1934.The following able (table 5) gives a record of the narcissus plantings inspectedduring the calendar year 1933 under the Federal quarantine for the prevention ofspread of bl)1) pests. The figures given are stinnuarized from the reports sent tothis Bureau by the nursery inspectors of the various States who act as Federalcollaborators in making such inspections.

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1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 13Similar tables have been issued in previous years, that for 1932 being given onpages 143 and 144 of no. 114 of the Service and Regulatory Announcements of theBureau of Plant Quarantine.The number of narcissus bulbs of all types reported as inspected in 1933 totals305,875,898. This is an increase of about 1 percent over the number reported the previous year. About 59 percent of the bulbs reported for 1933 are PaperWhites and other polyanthus varieties commonly grown iii the South, an increase over 1932; and about 41 percent are of the daffodil type produced in the NorthernStates, a decrease from 1932. In this series of tables the only varieties consideredas of the polyanthus type are Paper White, Soliel d'Or, Chinese Sacred Lily,Grand Monarque, Aspacia, Elvira, and a few uncommon varieties grown in smallnumbers. The figures therefore differ to some extent from the census totals,since the Census Bureau accepted the reporting growers' division into "narcissus(polvanthus)" and "narcissus (all other)" and many growers customarily includewithin the polyanthus group numerous important hardy Poetaz varieties, such asLaurens Koster.The figures given in the table showing " bulbs certified'", whether on the basisof freedom from infestation or on account of treatment, indicate supplies availablefor shipment so far as adequate inspection and freedom from pests are concerned.The greater proportion of such bulbs are, however, replanted by the growers ontheir own premises for the purpose of securing increase in future years. Growersestimate that only from 20 to 30 percent of the total number of bulbs inspectedis available for interstate movement during any one year.Infestations with the bulb eelworm (Anguillulina dipsaci, formerly calledTylenchus dipsaci) were reported in 1933 as to one or more plantings in each of thefollowing States: California, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Maryland, Michigan,Missouri, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oregon, Tennessee,Virginia, and Washington. In addition to the records for the year 1933, thisspecies had previously been reported on properties in Alabama, Indiana, Kansas,Kentucky, Mississippi, Rhode Island, Utah, and Wisconsin. Some of theseproperties have not since been reported as inspected, and infestation may possibly still be persisting in some of them. Greater bulb flies were reported in California, Michigan, New York, NorthCarolina, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, and Washington. They have also beenfound in previous years in Illinois, Rhode Island, Utah, and Virginia.AVERY S. HOYT,Acting Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.

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TA LE 11, E 5.Ispection of Itarcissus and n ber of bulbs certified and treated, 1933 cropPlantings inspected Bul~s inspected lilbs certified as uninfected Bulbs fumigated and Bulbs hot-water treated andcertified ' certified IPolyanthus Datodil Polyanthus Daffodil lPolyaInthus Daff odil Polyanthus Daffodil Polyanthus DaffodilAla-ama -------7 1 248,000 1,000 200,000 1,000 --Arkanisas -1 1 500 400 500 400 ~ --C li forni i: t47 144 9, 944, 319 7, 68 1, 5(10 3, 902, 205 :1, 776, 630 103, 603 153,650 1,468,466 276,440Con net i cut -------1 2 15,000 100,000 15,00() 100,000 -----J jljr ia of ( h ---102 1 5,048 169, 191 --395 ---------------------------4,20)Florid a 02 1 124,454,000 10, 000 122, 903, 500 10,000 ------------------Georia -14 15 393,200 1,241,400 393, 200 941 400 -----------------------------------------300000Illinois -------------------------------1 10 10,000 2, 148,916 10,000 805, (100 -----------------------------------------69000Indiana -----------------3 ---------49,050 -------------49,050Kansa-s -------------------------------1 3 800 11,396 800 11,396 ------------------~------------------------Louisiana ------65 49 979, 504 82,6(75 887, 504 66, 6175 ~--------------Maryland ------------------------------------8 -----------1,243, 632 -------------727,732XIichigIan ---------------------------------------30 -------------3,524,908 -------------1,852,600 -------------44,000 --------------318,300Minnesota -------------------------4 -------------94,000 -------------75,000-----------------------------------------Mississippi ---------------5 10 253,012 22,084 253,012 22,084 ------------------~ ------------------------Missouri --------------------------------------8--------------955,400 -------------905,400 ---------------------------------------50,000'New Jersey'.-------------------------------------11---------------1,242,950---------------802,450 ---------------------------------------440,500 _-New York-----------------------------4 19 46,500 10,562,882 1,000 613,275 500 4,666,317 38,000 3,393,459North Carolina----------------------12 32 962,557 6,918,213 438,600 1,869,718 --------28,000 338,717 ------------Ohio-4------.--.-._---4-,---------------------,--4O hir --------------------4 --------44-00-------1 3, 00---38--292--224,368-----113,000 -(7Oreon -----------------------------------38 292 224,368 24,997,320 197,013 10,626,082 8,214 3,657,642 27,405 4,605,310 ;Pennsylvaoth----------------------2 ------------221,000 ------------211,000 ------------10,000-----------------------uth ('arolina e------------------------6 1 41,510,400 3,750 41,510,400 3,750-----------------------------------------Tennessee----8 -----------1,215,550 -------------412,550 --------------------------------------------------Texas ----2 2 749,000 485,000 749,000 485,000 -----------------~-----------------------Utalh ---2 -------------11,000 -------------11,000Virginia---------1 32 21,800 11,097,413 16,000 1,424, 165----------------------------5,800 391,700 ZWshington -15 151 313,536 51,496,164 249,725 31,319,824 39,475 9,867,219 -------------3 098, 000\isconsin ----------------13,500 ---------13,500Total ----422 847 180,131,544 125,744,354 171,727,459 57,250,676 151,992 18,426,828 1,878,388 13,412,809I In some eases the treat nent shown was precautionary, and it therefore does not necessarily represent infestation in the stock concerned. This is especially true in the case offutmigahion in \ew Y ork, Oregon, and Washington, where that measure constitutes routine practice. Most or all of the bulbs shown under the column headed "bulbs certified asuirinfested, in those States were eligible for such certification but were planted back by the grower; while all the bulbs sold and shipped were fumigated whether bulb flies werefound or not

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1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 15TERMINAL INSPECTION OF PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTSARKANSAS DISCONTINUES TERMINAL INSPECTIONINSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERSPOST OFFICE DEPARTMENT,THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,Washington, March 30, 1934.POSTMASTER:My DEAR SIR: The chief plant inspector of Arkansas has advised that theState of Arkansas desires to discontinue the terminal inspection of nursery stock and all other plants. Therefore, parcels of such matter arriving at the office ofaddress may be delivered to the addressees without first being subjected to termi-nal inspection under section 596, Postal Laws and Regulations. Please begoverned accordingly in future.Very truly yours,C. B. EILENBERGER,Third Assistant Postmaster General.MISCELLANEOUS ITEMSP.Q.C.A.-283, Supplement No. 2 JANUARY 25, 1934.PLANT QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS OF THE REPUBLIC OF CUBAFRUITS AND OTHER PLANT PRODUCTS, CERTIFICATION OF TRANSSHIPPED ORRESHIPPED CONSIGNMENTSThe Cuban decree of May 28, 1933, prescribes:1. That consignments of fruits and other plant products transshipped orreshipped to Cuba, whose entry into that country is permitted under a certificateof origin, shall bear the original certification of the country of origin, or in lieuthereof, a copy of the same certified by the chief of the plant inspection service ofthe port where reshipment is effected, and the copy shall be visaed by the Cubanconsul at that port.2. Fruits and other plant products, the containers, wraps, or labels of whichindicate that they are from countries from which certificate of origin is required,must bear the said certification or a certified copy of the same, even when issuedas of other origin.AVERY S. HOYT,Acting Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.P.Q.C.A.-303, Supplement No. 1 FEBRUARY 19, 1934.PLANT QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS OF THE NETHERLANDSIMPORT AND TRANSIT RESTRICTIONS ON POTATOESThe law of July 7, 1932, prohibits the importation and transit of potatoes andfresh vegetables from countries designated by the Minister of Agriculture of theNetherlands. It also prohibits the importation and transit of fresh vegetablesfrom such countries during the period March 15 to October 14, inclusive, unlesseach shipment is accompanied by a written declaration of the phytopathologicalauthorities of the country of origin, affirming that the fresh vegetables are notinfested with the Colorado beetle, and that they were grown in and proceed froma locality where that beetle does not occur, and so far as known, does not occurwithin a distance of 200 kilometers.The Minister of Agriculture may grant exemption from the foregoing provisionsunder certain conditions.Order No. 11319 of the same date designates France as a country from whichthe importation and transit of potatoes are prohibited. Consequently, the aboveprovisions at present apply only to potatoes and fresh vegetables from France.AVERY S. HOYT,Acting Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.

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16 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-Mar.P.Q.C.A.-284, Supplement No. 8 FEBRUARY 28, 1934.PLANT QUARANTINE EXPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF MEXICOEXPORTATION OF CERTAIN CACTI PROHIBITEDThe decision of the Mexican Secretaria de Agricultura y Fomento of December20, 1933, supplements the regulations of June 28, 1930 (see Supplement No. 6 toP.Q.C.A.-284) by prohibiting the collection of the following-named cacti forexportation from Mexico:Ariwcarpus fissuratius, A. kotschoubeyanus, A. retusius, A. trigonus, Astrophytumca pricornis, A. m yriostigna, Cephalocereus senilis, Coryphantha (Neonammillaria)poselgeriana, C. (Neomamnillaria) valida, Echinocactus grusoni, E. horizonthalon-lus, Echinocereus conglomeratus, E. delaeti, E. pectinatus, E. rigidissimus, Leuch-tenbergia principis, Lophoph ora williansi, Neomammin llaria candida, N. chino-cephala, X. elegans, X. grahami, N. lenta, A. leona, N. micromeris, N. parkinsoni,X. rhodantha, Neolloydia (Echinocactus) beguini, Obregonia denegri, Opuntiacereiformis, 0. inicrodasys, Pach ycereus chrysoiallus, Pelecyphora aselliformis,Solisia pectinata, Thelocactus (Echinocactus) bicolor-tricolor, T. (Echinocactus)bicolor-bolain sis, and T. heterochromnus.AVERY S. HOYT,Acting Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.B.P.Q.-34S, Supplement No. 1 MARCH 14, 1934.PLANT QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF CHILEChilean decree no. 4 of January 4, 1934, extends the prohibitions of article 5of decree no. 105 of February 11, 1925 (see B.P.Q.-348, p. 3) to wheat intendedor milling. The text of decree no. 4 follows:ARTICLE 1. Only wheat intended for milling which is absolutely free from theAngoumois grain moth, Sitotroga cerealella, may be admitted into Chilean terri-torv.ART. 2. Each shipment must be accompanied by a certificate issued by com-petent authorities of the exporting country, visaed by the respective Chileanconsul, affirming that the region in which the wheat was grown is free from theinsect mentioned in article 1.ART. 3. Shipments of wheat and their containers proceeding from regions wherethis insect exists shall be fumigated or treated with heat before shipment in such amanner as to insure the total destruction of insects which may infest the wheat.ART. 4. A single proof of the presence of live insects in the shipment offeredfor importation will be sufficient cause for the Servicio de Sanidad Vegetal toprevent its unlading.ART. 5. Sacks containing wheat shall be strong enough to withstand the ordi-nary operations of lading and unlading without being torn.ART. 6. Wheat imported for seed purposes shall be subject to the general pro-visions of the regulations governing the importation of seeds.ART. 7. Violations of the foregoing provisions will be subject to the sanctionsof decree no. 177 of December 31, 1924.AVERY S. HOYT,Acting Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.B.P.Q.-348, Supplement No. 2 MARCH 15, 1934.PLANT QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF CHILEREGULATIONS TO PREVENT THE INTRODUCTION OF COTTONSEED PESTSThe following is the text, in translation, of decree no. 671, of October 30, 1933:AwRTICLE 1. The importation is permitted only of cottonseed contained in sacks. The sacks shall be of material sufficiently strong to prevent their being stretchedopen or torn during the trip. Unlading of torn sacks will not be permitted.AnT. 2. Cottonseed from regions where the pink bollworm exists shall befunigated or treated by heat before embarkation, which fact shall be accreditedby a certificate issued by a competent official authority of the exporting countryand vsacd by the respective Chilean consul.

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1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 17ART. 3. If it be determined that the seeds on arriving in the country carry liveinsects, the shipment shall be treated in accordance with the provisions of article3 of the law of plant sanitary police. (See B.P.Q. -348, Basic Law, p. 1.)ART. 4. Fumigation or treatment vill not be required prior to the embarkationof cottonseed from countries in which pink bollworn does not exist; these beingsubject to the general provisions of the regtlationis on the importation of seeds.ART. 5. Cottonseed from countries in which Disdercus ruficollis exists imust comein sacks and the importers shall be required to transport their, immediately aftertheir discharge, to hermetically closed warehouses, all the windows of which shallbe completely protected by fine wire screens.ART. 6. If it be determined by the service of plant health that live insectsinfest the seeds, the fumigation of the shipment shall be required in the ware-house in which the seed was placed.ART. 7. When it is desired to import cottonseed for planting, application mxitstbe made to the service of plant health for the respective authorization. Thatservice will investigate the origin of the seed, which will remain at the disposalof the said service pending verification of its sanitary condition. This procedure having been completed, it will be delivered to the interested person.AVERY S. HOYT,Acting Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.B.P.Q.-360 MARCH 14, 1934.PLANT QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, ISLAND OF CYPRUSThis summary of the plant quarantine import restrictions of Cyprus has beenprepared for the information of nurserymen, plant quarantine officials, and othersinterested in the exportation of plants and plant products to that island.The summary was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant quarantine inspectorof this Bureau, from orders of the Governor in Council, No. 1054, of May 13,1925; No. 1305, of May 20, 1929; and No. 1421, of April 23, 1931.The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct and com-plete up to the time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used independentlyof, nor as a substitute for, the original texts of the decrees, and it is not to beinterpreted as legally authoritative. The decrees themselves should be consultedfor the exact text.AVERY S. HOYT,Acting Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.BASIC LAwsCustoms and Excise Regulation laws, 1879 to (no. 3) 1930; Diseases of PlantPrevention law, 1893; Customs Excise and Revenue law, 1899; PhylloxeraPrevention law, 1890.CONCISE SUMMARYImportation prohibitedPotatoes for consumption. (Order-in-Council No. 1305, May 20, 1929.)Hay or straw, save under permit from the Director of Agriculture.Grasses, leaves, or other vegetable matter, used as packing, from any placenot mentioned in article 1, Order-in-Council No. 1421, April 23, 1931, exceptas manufactured wrappers of dry straw, which may be admitted.Grapevines, including fresh or dry parts thereof, but excluding raisins andcurrants, except under special permission of the Governor. (Order-in-CouncilNo. 1421, Apr. 23, 1931.)Importation restrictedCottonseed, seed cotton, raw cotton, any living or dry parts of cotton plants,and packing material used in the transportation or storage thereof: Must beaccompanied by a shipper's declaration of origin and shall be disinfected onarrival or placed in quarantine. (Order-in-Council No. 1054 of May 13, 1925.)Potatoes for seed purposes: Shipper's declaration and inspection certificateof competent authority in the country of origin, affirming freedom from potatotuber worm, wart disease, and Colorado potato beetle. (Order-in-Council No.1303 of May 20, 1929.)

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18 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE (Jan.-Mar.Bananas and tomatoes from Palestine: Certificate of competent authority inprescribed form attesting fumigation.Fresh fruits and vegetables in the raw state.Trees and plants, and every living part thereof, including seeds.Flowers, cut or otherwise.Dried plants and flowers.Staves which have been used as grapevine props or for similar purposes.Binding that has been used for grapevines or other plants.Earth and gravel, leaf and garden mold. Animal and vegetable manures, except guano, bone meal and other fossil orchemically prepared manures: Must be imported directly from any place namedin article 1 and must be accompanied by a certificate of competent authority inthe form prescribed in article 2 (1) (a). (Order-in-Council No. 1421 of Apr. 23,1931.)Importation unrestrictedCereals and all dry seeds, except cottonseed, free from husk, straw, and earth;acorns and valonia.Almonds, walnuts, chestnuts, and other nuts, including ground nuts, free fromouter husks, leaves, stalks, and branches.Preserves, crystallized fruits, bottled and canned fruits, and vegetables hermetically sealed in proper receptacles.Flour and meal of all kinds and preparations thereof.Tamarind; saponaria wood.Vegetables desiccated by artificial heat and inclosed in packages.Dry and aromatic plants used for medicinal purposes and for dyeing, if freefrom earth.Dried fruits and vegetables; carobs, if free from earth. (Order-in-Council No.1421 of Apr. 23, 1931.)RESTRICTIONS ON THE IMPORTATION OF COTTON(Order-in-Council No. 1054 of May 13, 1925)ARTICLE 1. This order is cited as the Importation of Cotton Order, 1925.ART. 2. (a) Raw cotton, cottonseed, seed cotton, any living or dry part of thecotton plant, and packing material which has or is suspected of having been usedin the transportation or storage thereof, may be imported into Cyprus directly orindirectly from the American Continent (including Canada, the United States,South America, and The West Indies), China, Cochin-China, Greece, India, Turkestan, Turkey, Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, and any country notpossessing a government entomological service, under the following conditions:(1) Through the port of Famagusta only;(2) When accompanied by a shipper's declaration in the following form:I, the undersigned, , member of the firm of , consigner ofcases of , each containing , and marked , to be shipped byS.S. , from (port of departure) , to (port of arrival) , dohereby declare that the herein referred to was all grown at (locality),in the district of , in (country).(Signature)Declared at , this -day of -, before me.(Name and title of officer administering oath)(3) Forthwith on importation they are disinfected in such a manner as theDirector of Agriculture shall prescribe: Provided, That in lieu of disinfection theDirector of Agriculture may order that such articles be placed in quarantine insuch place and for such period as he shall deem fit;(1) If such articles have been imported from a country other than those abovementioned:(1) Importation takes place through the port of Famagusta;(2) Each shipment must he accompanied by a shipper's declaration in the formset forth above.A wr.3. Provides for an importer's notice of arrival for any article it is desiredto import under the provisions of article 2 (a).A T4. .An v article offered for importation under the provisions of article 2(a) shall be completely inclosed within stout packing material. The packageshall be clearly lohieled on the oitsid(e with identification marks, the name of thearticle contained, and the couni ry of origin, and such packages shall be opened

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19341 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 19only in the presence of the official and in the place appointed by the Director ofAgriculture.ART. 5. All expenses incurred in connection with the foregoing matters, in-cluding cost of disinfection or quarantine and cost of transport to and from theplace of disinfection or quarantine, shall be at the charge of the importer, and inno case shall compensation be payable to the importer in respect to any loss ordamage consequent on any action taken by the Director of Agriculture in accord-ance with the provisions of this order.RESTRICTIONS ON THE IMPORTATION OF POTATOES(Order-in-Council No. 1305 of May 20, 1929)Only seed potatoes may be imported into CyprusARTICLE 1. Potatoes for seed purposes only may be imported into Cyprus.Their importation may be made through the ports of Famagusta, Larnaca,Limassol, or Paphos only, and in such quantities and from such countries only as shall be specially authorized beforehand in writing by the Director of Agricul-ture. The potatoes shall be imported direct from the country of origin: Provided,That they may be transshipped if they remain in customs charge while at thetransshipping port.ART. 2. All potatoes imported for seed purposes must be the produce of cropsinspected while growing by inspectors of the Department of Agriculture or equiva-lent authority of the country in which they were grown, and must have beenfound by these inspectors to be not less than 97 percent pure.ART. 3. No bag of potatoes imported for seed purposes shall contain more thanone hundredweight (112 pounds).Shipper's declaration and inspection certificates requiredART. 4. Every consignment of potatoes for seed purposes shall be accompaniedby the following documents:(a) A shipper's declaration in the following form: Address:I, the undersigned, , member of the firm of , consignors ofcases/bags containing a total of net weight of potatoes for seed purposesand marked , to be shipped per S.S. , from (port of departure), to (port of arrival) , do hereby declare that:(1) These potatoes were grown by ,of , at(2) They are of the variety(3) Their size and grade is(4) The number of the certificate or inspection report issued by a duly author-ized inspector of the Department of Agriculture or equivalent authority of thecountry in which they were grown, following the inspection of the crop duringgrowth is(5) These potatoes were not grown in land infested with potato tuber worm(Phthorimaea) Gnorimoschema operculella, Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsadecemlineata), or infected with wart disease (Synchytrium endobioticum).(Signature)Declared at , this -day of , 19-, before me.(Name and title of officer administering oath)(b) A certificate from the department of Agriculture or other equivalent author-itV of the country from which the potatoes are imported, certifying at a date notmore than 30 days before the time of dispatch of the consignment that the diseases referred to therein have not been known to exist, so far as it is aware, within5 miles of the place or places in which the potatoes are declared to have beengrown.(c) A certificate from the source indicated in (b) certifying that the consign-ment has been inspected and found to be in good condition and free from diseasesand insect pests.Inspection on arrival requiredART. 5. Every consignment of potatoes for seed purposes shall be subject toinspection by the Director of Agriculture or by an inspecting officer acting in hisbehalf.

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20 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan -Mar.Disposal of infected shipnentsAwr. 6. If oni such inspection as in article 5 the potatoes are found to be notfree from disease or should the inspector have reason to suspect them of being diseased they may at the discretion of the Director of Agriculture be ordered to beeither:(1) Destroyed by the importer or his agent under the supervision of the in-spector; or (2) subjected to such process of disinfection or treatment as theinspector may prescribe, the expenses of such process being paid by the importer;or (3) reexported.Provided always that in no case shall compensation be payable to the importerin respect of any loss or damage consequent on any action taken by the Directorof Agriculture or any inspecting officer in accordance with the provisions of thisclause.ART. 7. If a consignment of potatoes for seed purposes does not conform to theconditions of articles 2 and 3, or is unaccompanied by the documents required inarticle 4 hereof, or if such documents do not conform to the shipper's declarationprescribed by this order, the consignment shall be dealt with as if it had beeninspected as provided for in article 5 and found to be not free from disease.ART. 8. Concerns the sale of imported seed potatoes.ART. 9. Revokes previous potato orders.ART. 10. Makes the effective date of the order May 27, 1929.RESTRICTIONS ON THE IMPORTATION OF PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS(Order-in-Council No. 1421 of Apr. 23, 1931)Products and countries of originARTICLE 1. Fresh fruits and vegetables in the raw state; trees and plants, andliving parts thereof includingg seeds, save those specially excepted); all flowers,cut or otherwise; all dried plants and flowers; staves that have been used asgrapevine props or for similar purposes; all binding that has been used for grape-vines or other plants; earth and gravel, leaf and garden mold; animal andvegetable manures, except guano, bone dust and other fossil or chemically pre-pared manures, may be imported from: Great Britain, Northern Ireland, Irish Free State, Belgium, Denmark, Holland, Norway, Sweden, and any other countrypossessing a government phytopathological service, subject to prior permissionfrom the Director of Agriculture.ART. 2. (1) The plants and plant products mentioned in article 1 may beimported into Cyprus from the countries named in that article under the followingconditions:Inspection certificate required(a) Each consignment of such plants and plant products shall be accompaniedby a certificate in the form set forth below, a copy whereof shall be delivered tothe Director of Agriculture 7 days before the arrival of the consignment to whichthe certificate refers. A certificate in the same form shall be attached to theoutside of any mail package of such plants and plant products.Prescribed inspection certificateThis is to certify that the plants included in the consignment/package describedbelow were thoroughly inspected by me, a duly authorized official of the Govern-ment of (name of country) on (date) , and were found orbelieved by me to be healthy and free from plant diseases and insect pests,especially from the following:Insects: (Aleurodes) Dialeurodes citri, citrus whitefly; Anthonoinus grandis, bollweevil; Aspidiotus perniciosus, San Jose scale; Chionaspis furfura, scurfy scale;Chrysomphalus aonidum, Florida red scale; Conotrachelus nenuphar, plum cur-culio; (Cydia) Grapholitha molesta, oriental fruit moth; (Diaspis) Aulacaspispentagona, white peach scale; Epochra canadensis, currant fruit fly; Eriosomalanigerun, woolly apple aphid; IIeliothis obsoleta, corn ear worm; JIeterocordylusmalinus; Icerya aegyptiaca; I Icerya purchasi, cottony-cushion scale; Iridomyrmexhumilis, Argentine ant; Lepidosaphes beckii, purple scale; L. gloverli, Glover'sscale; L. ulmi, oyster-shell scale; Leptinotarsa decenlineata, Colorado potatobeetle; Lygidea inendax, apple redbug; 1lalacosoma americana, eastern tent cater-pillar; 31. disstria, forest tent caterpillar; Phylloxera (vastatrix) vitifoliae, grapeI Not recorded as occurring in the United States.

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1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 21phylloxera; Prodenia litura; 1 Pseudococcus comstocki; Rhagoletis cerasi, 1 Europeancherry fruit fly; R. cingulata, cherry fruit fly; le. fausta, black cherry fruit fly;R. pomonella, apple maggot; and Saissetia oleae, black scale.Fungi: Bacillus amylovorus, fire blight; Bacterium tumefaciens, crown gall;Endothia parasitica, chestnut blight; Plasmopara (Peronoplasmopara) hurnult,hop downy mildew; Plowrightia morbosa, black knot; Synchytrium endobioticum,potato wart; Urocystis cepulae, onion smut.Signature----------------------------Title --------------------------------Date -------------------------------------------------------Number and description of packages-----------------------------Distinguishing marks -----------------------------------------Nature of contents -------------------------------------------Grown at ---------------------------------------------------Name and address of exporter----------------------------------Name and address of consignee ---------------------------------Name of vessel -----------------------------------------------Date of shipment -------------------------------Port of shipment ---------------------------------------------Port of landing in Cyprus.-------------------------------------Approximate date of landing -----------------------------------Inspection required(b) They shall be subject to inspection by any official of the AgriculturalDepartment duly authorized in that behalf by the Director of Agriculture.(c) They shall be subject to any treatment which the inspector may require.Notice of arrival required(2) Importers of such goods, articles, or merchandise shall inform the Directorof Agriculture in writing of the arrival or the expected arrival of any suchmaterials.Packing(3) Such materials shall be completely inclosed within stout packing material,which shall be clearly labeled on the outside with the identification marks andthe name of the goods, articles, or merchandise therein contned, and shall beopened only in the presence of an officer of the Agricultural Department dulyauthorized in that behalf by the Director of Agriculture.Expenses charged to importer(4) All expenses incurred with the foregoing matters, including cost of transportto and from the place of disinfection, shall be at the charge of and payable bythe importer of the goods.No compensation for damage(5) No action shall be and no compensation will be payable in respect of anyloss or damage consequent upon any action taken by the Director of Agricultureor any authorized official, in accordance with the provisions of this order.Tomatoes and bananas from PalestineART. 3. Tomato and banana fruit may be imported from Palestine into Cyprusunder the following conditions only:(a) They shall be imported directly from Palestine.(b) Each consignment shall be accompanied by a certificate from the com-petent authority of the country of origin in prescribed form, certifying that theconsignment has been fumigated and stating the kind and quantity of chemicalsused, the duration of treatment, the space occupied during treatment, andwhether the treatment was carried out under single or double fumigation sheets,in an airtight chamber or in a vacuum apparatus.ART. 4. The importation of hay or straw other than hay or straw importedunder the provisions of the Importation of Fodderpacking Order, 1926, is pro-hibited, save under permit from the Director of Agriculture.1 Not recorded as occurring in the United States.

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22 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE (Jan.-Mar.ART. 5. Grasses, leaves, or other vegetable matter used as packing for goodsimported from any place not mentioned in article 1 shall be destroyed at the cus-tomhouse at the port of arrival, except when such packing is in the form ofmanufactured wrappers of dry straw, which may be admitted.Iiportation of grapevines prohibitedART. 6. The importation of the grapevine, including the fresh or dry partsthereof, but excluding raisins and currants, is prohibited unless the special per-mission of the Governor is first obtained.Unrestricted productsART. 7. Nothing contained in this order shall be deemed to prohibit the importa-tion of the following: Wheat, barley, and other cereals, and all dry seeds (exceptcottonseed) properly cleaned from the husk, straw, and earth; acorns, valonia;almonds, walnuts, chestnuts, and other nuts, including ground nuts, free from theouter husks, leaves, stalks, and branches; preserves, crystallized fruits; bottledand canned fruits and vegetables hermetically sealed in proper receptacles; flourand meal of all kinds, and every preparation thereof; tamarind, saponaria wood;vegetables desiccated by artificial heat and enclosed in packages; dry and aro-inatic plants used for medicinal purposes and for dyeing, if free from earth;dried fruits and vegetables, provided the proper officer of customs is satisfiedthat they are bona fide dried fruit and vegetables, and subject to inspection byany officer of the Agricultural Department and to any treatment at the expenseand risk of the importer which may be required by such officer; carobs, if freefrom earth.ART. 8. No articles, goods, or merchandise, the importation of which is in anyway prohibited or restricted under the provisions of this order, shall be allowedto be imported from any place or country from which the importation of sucharticles, goods, or merchandise is not prohibited or restricted, unless the properofficer of customs is satisfied that such articles, goods, or merchandise do notoriginate in any place or country from which the importation of the same isprohibited or restricted, and that the other requirements of the order have beencomplied with in respect of such articles, goods, or merchandise.ART. 9. Nothing contained in this order shall prevent the importation by theDirector of Agriculture on behalf of the Government of any articles, goods, ormerchandise dealt with under this order for the purposes of experimental cultiva-tion or scientific investigation.P.Q.C.A.-314, Supplement No. 4 MARCH 20, 1934.PLANT QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, BRITISH HONDURASProclamation no. 19, of July 21, 1932, superseding proclamation no. 3, ofMay 27, 1931 (see Supplement No. 1 to P.Q.C.A.-314), and effective July 23,1932, declares:The importation prohibited into British Honduras from)n all sources exceptCanada, the United Kingdonm. and Ireland, and the United States of America, offruits (except green bananas, nuts, and dried or processed fruits); and vegetables(except potatoes, onions, canned or processed vegetables, grains, seeds, driedbeans, and peas).Each shipment of fruits and vegetables from Canada and from the UnitedKingdni and Ireland shall be accompanied by a certificate affirming that theproducts are of home origin.Fruits (except bananas and plantains) grown in Jamaica may be imported only when each shipment is accompanied by a certificate of origin and inspection issuedby the agricultural officer.Plants packed or growing in soil (except citrus plants) may be imported onlywhen a certificate of introduction is granted by the agricultural officer afterinspection and, if necessary, fumigation.All such plants and plant products, offered for entry into the Colony, which donot comply with the above regulations, shall be destroyed by the Government.This proclamation shall not apply to materials required by the AgriculturalDepartment.AVERY S. HOYT,Acting Chif, B1oreau of Plant Quarantine.

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1934, SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 23B.P.Q.-346 (Revised Mar. 15, 1934) MARCH 15, 1934.EUROPEAN CORN BORERSTATE REGULATIONSThe following is a sunnary of the current quarantines relating Io the Europeancorn borer, of which notices have reached this Bureau from the various States.Since the suninary was revised in March 1933 new regulations ()1 hie part ofIndiana, Michigan, and Ohio, and revisions (f former regulations on the part ofIllinois, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, and Wisc )nsin have been issued, whichplace no requirements on vegetables and floral plants shipped from Indiana,Michigan, and Ohio. The regulations of these eight States, with the exceptions ofKansas and Nebraska, also exempt from any requirements, during a part of theyear, green corn and certain floral plants from any of the infested States. Thepart-year exemption also applies to beans, beets, and rhubarb in the regulationsof Indiana, Michigan, and Ohio. A recent revision of the Utah quarantineplaces a complete embargo on the restricted articles from the infested States,and a quarantine by Idaho dated February 15, 1933, has reached this Bureau,which provides for acceptance of State certification of such articles.This compilation is not intended to be used independently of or as a substitutefor the quarantines and is not to be interpreted as legally authoritative. Itshould also be understood that the Bureau is not in a position to give explanatoryinformation concerning State quarantines. Inquiries as to the interpretation ofsuch restrictions, or requests for the full text of orders, should be addressed to the appropriate official of the State concerned. (See list of State officials on p. 29.)To secure a Federal certificate required under regulations of certain States asshown in the sumnmarv, inspection may he arranged by addressing the Bureau ofPlant Quarantine, 2101 North Sixth Street, Harrisburg, Pa. For the Statecertificate, address the plant quarantine officer or State nursery inspector ofyour own State.Wherever the term "certificate " is used in the following summary, it refers to a special certificate showing that the articles have been inspected and found freefrom the European corn borer. A general State nursery inspection certificatedoes not fulfill the requirements with respect to these quarantines.SUMMARY OF REGULATIONSMethod of use.-In using the following summary it is suggested that theshipper mark in the second column (with a colored pencil or otherwise) the Statefrom which he ships, wherever it occurs in the column. Also in colinn 3 thegroup number of the articles he expects to ship wherever he finds they are entered.Column 4 shows whether a State or Federal certificate may be used, and thenature of other restrictions or exemptions. For example, it *will be seen that aConnecticut florist shipping cut flowers of gladiolus must attach a certificate of theUnited States Department of Agriculture for shipments to Arizona, California,Colorado, Georgia, Louisiana, Nevada, and Oregon; that a State certificate isacceptable for shipments to a number of other States; that a part-year exemptionfrom any certification or other requirement is provided in shipments to Indiana,Michigan, and Ohio; and that these flowers are not admissible to Utah or Wyo-ming from the quarantined States under any condition.The kinds of articles restricted varv somewhat and they are accordinglyarranged in groups in a list given at the top of each page. The-designation of theclasses of beans covered, however, shows so much diversity among the differentState orders that the exact phraseology is given in the third column after eachState name.

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24 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan.-Mar.Restricted articlesGroup 1.--Corn, broomicorn, sorghums, Sudan grass; (debris, cobs, and parts of plants in this group exceptclean shelled corn and seeds).Group 2.-Aster, chrysanthemum, gladiolus, dahlia (cut flowers or entire plants except bulbs or tuberswithout stems); beans in the pod (see below); beets with tops, rhubarb.Group 3.-Celery.Group 4.-Oat and rye straw; cosmos, zinnia, hollyhock (cut flowers or entire plants).Group 5.-Spinach. (Only South Dakota places requirements with respect to spinach. See p. 27.)To (States which From (quarantined Restricted articles (see Nature of requirementshave enactedStts-aoegop)Ntrofrqimnsquarantines)States)above groups)Arizona--------Connecticut, Michigan, Groups 1 and 2. Kinds of Federal certificate required.Ohio, Indiana, New beans under regulation:Hampshire, Pennsyl" Lima beans in the pod;vania, Maine, New green shell beans in theJersey, Rhode Island, pod (of the varietyMassachusetts, New known as Cranberry orYork, Vermont, West Horticultural)."Virginia.Arkansas.-------Connecticut, Michigan, Group 1. -----------------Entirely prohibited.Ohio, Indiana, NewHampshire, Pennsyl-vania.Maine, New Jersey, Groups 2, 3, and 4. Kinds State or Federal certificateRhode Island, Massaof beans under regularequired.chusetts, New York, tion:"Beans in the pod."Vermont, West Virginia.California------Connecticut, Michigan, Group 1-.--------------Federal certificate required,Rhode Island, Indiana, which must show disin-New Hampshire, Virfection.ginia, Kentucky, New Jersey, Vermont, Mary-land, New York, WestVirginia.Maine, Ohio, Wisconsin, Group 2. Kinds of beans Federal certificate required,Massachusetts, Pennunder regulation: "Lima showing disinfection orsylvania. beans in the pod, green inspection.shell beans in the pod ofthe variety known asCranberry or Horticul-tural."Colorado -------Connecticut, New HampGroups 1 and 2. Kinds of Federal certificate required.shire, Rhode Island, beans under regulation:Indiana, New Jersey, " Lima beans in the pod,Vermont, Maine, New green shell beans in theYork, West Virginia, pod of the variety knownMassachusetts. Ohio, as 'Cranberry or Horti-Michigan, and Penncultural'."sylvania.Florida--------Connecticut, Michigan, Groupsland2. Kir.dsof State or Federal certificateOhio, Indiana, New beans under regulation: required. Hampshire, Pennsylva"Green and lima beansnia, Maine, New Jersey, in the pod."Rhode Island, Massa-chusetts, New York,Vermont, West Virginia,and others becoming in-fested.Georgia--------Connecticut, Michigan, Groups 1 and 2. Kinds of Federal certificate required.Ohio, Indiana, New beans under regulation:Hampshire, Pennsylva" Lima beans in the pod,nia, Maine, New Jersey, green shell beans in theRhode Island, Massapod (of the varietychusetts, New York, known as 'Cranberry orVerniont, West Virginia, Horticultural')."and others becoming in-fested.Idaho.---------Connecticut, New HampGroups 1, 2, 3, and 4. State or Federal certificateshire, Rhode Island, Kinds of beans under required. Ear corn in smallIndiana, New Jersey, regulation: "Lima beans quantities for exhibitionVirginia, Maine, New in the pod, green shell purposes is admitted ifYork, Vermont, Massabeans in the pod." treated with heat and sochusetts, Ohio, West certified. Virginia, Michigan,Pennsylvania, and Wis-consin.Illinois---------Connecticut, Michigan, Group 1.----------------Entirely prohibited exceptOhio, Indiana, New that green corn may beIIanpshire, Pennsylvashipped without a certifi-nia, Maine, New Jersey, cate or other requirements,Rhode Island, Massafrom Jan. 1 to June 14.chusetts, New York,Vermont, and West Vir-ginia.

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1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 25Restricted articles-ContinuedTo (States which From (quarantined Restricted articles (see Nature of requirementshave enactedStts-aoegop)Ntrofrqimnsquarantines)States)above groups)Illinois.-------Connecticut, New HampGroup 2. Kinds of beans State or Federal certificateshire, Pennsylvania, under regulation: "Lima required except that cutMaine, New Jersey, beans in the pod, green flowers or plants (withoutRhode Island, Massashell beans in the pod." old stems) of chrysanthe-chusetts, New York, mum, aster, and dahliaVermont, and West Virmay be shipped without aginia. certificate or other require-ments, from Jan. 1 toApr. 30.Group 1--------------Entirely prohibited exceptIndiana--------Connecticut, New Hampthat green corn may beshire, Pennsylvania, shipped without restrictionMaine, New Jersey, from Jan. I to June 1.Rhode Island, MassaGroup 2. Kinds of beans State or Federal certificatechusetts, New York, under regulation: "Lima required except that youngVirginia, and Vermont. beans in the pod, green chrysanthemum, a s t e r,, shell beans in the pod.", dahlia, cut flowers of glad-iolus without old stalk, andbeans, beets, and rhubarbmay be shipped without acertificate or other require-ments, from Jan. 1 toJune 1.Iowa----------.Connecticut, Michigan,Ohio, Indiana, New Group 1----------------Entirely prohibited.Hampshire, PennsylvaGroups 2, 3, and 4. Kinds State or Federal certificatenia, Maine, New Jersey, of beans under regularequired.Rhode Island, Massation: " Beans in thechusetts, New York, pod.' Vermont, and West Vir-ginia.Connecticut, Michigan, Group 1----------------Entirely prohibited.Ohio, Indiana, NewHampshire, Pennsylva-nia, Maine, New Jersey,Rhode Island, Massa-chusetts, New York,Vermont, and West Vir-Kansas ----------ginia.Connecticut, New HampGroup 2. Kinds of beans State or Federal certificateshire, Pennsylvania, under regulation: "Lima required.Maine, New Jersey, beans in the pod, greenRhode Island, Massashell beans in the pod."chusetts, New York,Vermont, and West Vir-ginia.Kentucky------Connecticut, Michigan,Ohio, Indiana, NewHampshire, PennsylvaGroup 1--------------Entirely prohibited.nia, Maine, New Jersey, Groups 2 and 4. Kinds of State or Federal certificateRhode Island, Massa( beans under regulation: required.chusetts, New York, "Beans in the pod."Vermont, and West Vir-ginia.Louisiana------Connecticut, Michigan, Groups I and 2. Kinds of Federal certificate required,Ohio, Indiana, New beans under regulation: except that rhubarb is ex-Hampshire, Pennsylva" Lima beans in the pod; empt from certification ornia, Maine, New Jersey, green shell beans in the other requirement.Rhode Island, Massapod (varieties variously chusetts, New York, known as Cranberry orVermont, West Virginia, Horticultural shelland others becoming beans)."infested.Group 1-----------------Entirely prohibited exceptthat green corn may beshipped without a certifi-cate or other restrictionMichigan------Connecticut, New HampGroup 2. Kinds of beans from Jan. 1 to June 1.shire, Pennsylvania, Grupder reuin: "Limea State or Federal certificateMaine, New Jersey, under regulation: e Lima required except that youngRhode Island, Massabeans i the pod, green chrysanthemum, aster,chusetts, New York, shell beans in the pod."2 dahlia, cut flowers of gladi-Virginia, Vermont. olus without any old stalk,and beans, beets, and rhu-barb may be shipped with-out a certificate or otherrequirement from Jan. 1 toJune 1.I This term includes varieties variously known as " Cranberry or Horticultural shell beans" but does not include dry beans, shelled lima or other beans, or string or wax beans.3 This term includes varieties known as "Cranberry or Horticultural shell beans" but does notinclude dry beans, shelled lima or other beans, or string or wax beans.

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26 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Jan -Mar.Restricted articles-ContinuedTo which From (quarantined Restricted articles (see Nature of requirementsave enacted ates)above groups)quarantines)-Mississippi.-Connecticut, Michigan, Groups 1, 2, and 3. Kinds State or Federal certificateOhio, Indiana, New of beans under regularequired. Hampshire, Pennsylvation: "Green and limania, Ntaine, New Jersey, beans in the pod."Rhode Island, Massa-chusetts, New York,Vermont,West Virginia,and others becominginfested.Connecticut, -Michigan, Group I--------------Entirely prohibited exceptOhio, Indiana, New that green corn may beHampshire, Pennsylvashipped from Jan. 1 to Junenia, Maine, New Jersey, 14 without a certificate orRhode Island, -Massaother requirement.chusetts, New York,Vermont, West Virginia.Missouri--------Connecticut. New HampGroup 2. Kinds of beans State or Federal certificateshire, Pennsylvania, under regulation: "Lima required except that cutMfaine, New Jersey, beans in the pod, green flowers or plants (withoutRhode Island, Massashell beans in the pod." old stems) of chrysanthe-chusetts. New York, mum, aster, and dahliaVermont, West Virginia. may be shipped without acertificate or other require-ment from Jan. 1 to Apr.30.Connecticut, Michigan, Group 1--------------Entirely prohibited.Ohio, Indiana, NewHampshire, Pennsylva-nia, Maine, New Jersey,Rhode Island, Massa-chusetts, New York,Nebraska.-------.Vermont, West Virginia.Connecticut. New HampGroup 2. Kinds of beans State or Federal certificateshire, Pennsylvania, under regulation: " Lima required.Maine, New Jersey, beans in the pod, greenRhode Island, Massashell beans in the pod."chusetts, New York,Vermont, West Virginia.Nevada----------Connecticut, Michigan, Group 1.----------.---Entirely prohibited.hpshire, Pennsya Group 2. Kinds of beans Federal certificate required.nHampsire, Pewnnsy,under regulation: "Limania, Maine, New Jersey, beans in the pod, greenRhode Island, Massa-chusetts New York shell beans in the podcsermo, Newt Yrka, (of the variety knownVermont, West Virginia, as Cranberry or Horti-and others becoming cslCral)."infesed. .cultural)."infested.New Mexico.-.Connecticut, Michigan,Ohio, Indiana, New Group 1. --------------Entirely prohibited.Hampshire, PennsylvaGroups 2, 3, and 4. Kinds State or Federal certificatenia, Maine, New Jersey, of beans under regularequired.Rhode Island, Massation: "Beans in thechusetts, New York, pod."Vermont, West Virginia.Group --1.--------------Entirely prohibited exceptthat green corn may beshipped without a certificate or other restrictionfrom Jan. 1 to June 1.Ohio.---------. Connecticut, New HampGroup 2. Kinds of beans State or Federal certificateshire, Pennsylvania, under regulation: "Lima required except that youngMaine, New Jersey, beans in the pod, green chrysanthemum, aster,Rhode Island, Massashell beans in the pod."3 dahlia, cut flowers of gladi-chusetts, N ew \ork, olus without any old stalk,\ irgimia, \ ermontand beans, beets, and rhu-barb may be shipped with-out a certificate or otherrequirement from Jan. 1 toJune 1.Oklahoma-------Connecticut, New Hamp-shire, Rhode Island,Indiana, New Jersey, Group 1 .-------------Entirely prohibited.\ermont, Maine, New Groups 2, 3, and 4. Kinds State or Federal certificateMassachusetts, Olio, of beans under regularequired.,Michigan, tion: "Beans in theWisconsin, Mihgn ,Pd.Pennsylvania, andothers becoming in-fested.I See footnote 2.

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1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 27Restricted articles-ContinuedTo (States which From (quarantined Restricted articles (see Nature of requirementshave enacted ite)abvgrusNtrofrqrmnsquarantines)States)ahove groups)Oregon---------Connecticut, Michigan, Group 1------------------Entirely prohibited.Ohio, Indiana, New Group 2. Kinds of beans Federal certificate required.Hampshire, Pennsylvaunder regulation: " Limaaie, Nensy, beans in the pod, greennia, M an, iiesey, shell beans in the pod Rhode Island, Massa(of the variety known aschusetts, New York, Cranberry or Horticul-Vermont, West Virginia. tural)."South Carolina--Connecticut, Michigan,Ohio, Indiana, NewHampshire, PeunsylvaGroup 1 -.--------------Entirely prohibited.nia, Maine, New Jersey, Groups 2, 3, and 4. Kinds State or Federal certificateRhode Island, Massaof beans under regularequired.chusetts, New York, tion: "Beans in theVermont, West Virginia, pod."and others becominginfested.South Dakota. Connecticut, Michigan, Groups 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5. Do.4Ohio, Indiana, New Kinds of beans underHampshire, Pennsylvaregulation: "Greennia, Maine, New Jersey, beans in the pod."Rhode Island, Massa-chusetts, New York,Vermont, West Virginia.Tennessee------Connecticut, Michigan, Groups 1, 2, 3, and 4. Do.Pennsylvania, Indiana, Kinds of beans underNew Hampshire, Rhode regulation: "LimaIsland, Kentucky, New beans in the pod, greenJersey, Virginia, Maine, shell beans in the pod."New York, Vermont,Massachusetts, Ohio,West Virginia, Wiscon-sin.Texas----------Connecticut, Michigan, Groups 1 and 2. Kinds of Do.Ohio, Indiana, New beans under regulation:Hampshire, Pennsylva" Lima beans in the pod,nia, Maine, New Jersey, green shell beans in theRhode Island, Massapod (of the variety vari-chusetts, New York, ously known as Cran-Vermont, West Virginia, berry or Horticultural)."and others becoming in-fested.Utah ---------Connecticut, Michigan, Groups I and 2. Kinds of Entirely prohibited.Ohio, Indiana, New beans restricted: " Lima Hampshire, Pennsylvabeans in the pod, greennia, Maine, New Jersey, shell beans in the pod Rhode Island, Massa(of the variety known aschusetts, New York, Cranberry or Horticul-Vermont, West Virginia. tural)."Group 1 --------------Entirely prohibited exceptVirginia-------Connecticut, Michigan, that small quantities of earOhio, Indiana, New corn are admissible for ex-Hampshire, Pennsylvahibition purposes when nia, Maine, New Jersey, treated with heat and soRhode Island, Massacertified.chusetsaNew Yasrk, Groups 2, 3, and 4. Kinds State or Federal certificatechusetts, New Yrk, of beans under regularequired except that oatVermont, West \ irginia. tion: "Green beans in and rye straw is entirelythe pod." prohibited.Washington -----Connecticut, Michigan,Ohio, Indiana, New Group I-----------------Entirely prohibited.Hampshire, PennsylvaGroups 2, 3, and 4. Kinds State or Federal certificatenia, Maine, New Jersey, of beans under regularequired.Rhode Island, Massation: "Beans in thechusetts, New York, pod."Vermont, West Virginia.Connecticut, Michigan, Group I ----------------Entirely prohibited exceptOhio, Indiana, New that green corn may beHampshire, Pennsylvashipped from Jan. 1 to Junenia, Maine, New Jersey, 14 without a certificate orRhode Island, Massaother requirement.chusetts, New York,Vermont, West Virginia.isconsin -------Connecticut, New HampGroup 2. Kinds of beans State or Federal certificateshire, Pennsylvania, under regulation: "Lima required except that cutMaine, New Jersey, beans in the pod, green flowers or plants (withoutRhode Island, Massashell beans in the pod." old stems) of chrysanthe-chusetts, New York, mum, aster, and dahliaVermont, West Virginia. may be shipped without acertificate or other require-ment from Jan. I to Apr. 30.'Shelled corn and seeds of plants in group 1 require certification under South Dakota regulations.

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28 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE (Jan.-Mar.Restricted arlicles-ContiniuedTo Fromi esuarantined Restricted articles (see Nature of requirementsquArannesStates)above groups)Wyoming --------Connecticut, -Miehigan, Groups 1, 2, 3, and 4. Entirely prohibitedOhio, Indiana, New Kinds of beans restrict-Hampshire, Pennsvlvaed: " Beans in the pod." nia, Maine, New Jersey,Rhode Island, Massa-cnusetts, New York,Vermont, West Virginia.Processed Uricles exemptArticles which are processed or manufactured in such manner as to eliminateall (lanLer of carrying the corn borer are exempt from certification or other re-(uirenwent under the regulations of most of the States. The following States,however, make no exception to processed articles in the certification requirementsor embargoes: Arizona, California, Georgia, Louisiana, Nevada, Oregon, SouthCarolina articles in group 1 are exempt when processed or manufactured; thosein groups 2, 3, and 4 are not so exempt), Utah, and Wyoming.REGULATIONS WITH RESPECT TO CANADASHIPMENTS TO CANADA(Canadian regulation 10 [foreign] sixth revision, effective July 21, 1931)" The importation into the Dominion of Canada of the following plaiit orplant products from the areas hereinafter described is prohibited except under the-conditions specified under Section II.Section I-(a Corn and broom corn, including all parts of the plant, all sorghuns andsudan grass from the following states of the United States of America: Connecti-cut, Indiana, Maine, 'Massachusetts, Michigan, New Hampshire, New Jersey,New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, and West Virginia;( Jn During the period June 1 to December 31. cut flowers and entire plants ofchrysanthemum, aster, cosmos, zinnia, hollyhock and cut flowers or entire plantsof gladiolus and dahlia except the corms and roots thereof without stems, oat andrye straw as such or when used for packing, celery, green beans in the pod, beetswith tops, and rhubarb, from the states of Connecticut, Maine, -Massachusetts,New Hampshire, and Rhode Island.Provided, however, the products listed above may be imported into Canadathrough the above mentioned states, from any other state of the United States,when shipped on a through bill of lading or when accompanied by a certificatesigned by an authorized official of the United States Department of Agricultureor a State Department of Agriculture giving the name of the state in which the products originated.Section II -(a; Broom corn for manufacturing, clean shelled corn either for seed or feedpurposes, and clean seed of broom corn, may be imported from the States listed insubsection (a; of Section I provided such shipments are accompanied by a certi-ficate of inspection, issued by an authorized officer of the United States Depart-iment of Agriculture, or by an authorized State official, which states that the ship-ment is free from infestation hy the European corn borer.(1)) ThIe products named above in Subsection (1) of Section I may be importedfrom the States mentioned within the dates specified, provided they are accom-panied by a certificate of inspection issued by an authorized officer of the UnitedStates Department of Agriculttire, which states that the shipment is free frominfestation by the Eiropean corn borer. (No certificate is required for theseproducts between January 1 and May 31.)(c) This regulation shall not apply to the plants or plant products enumerate(dwhen they shall have been manufactured or processed in such a manner as toeliminate all risk of carriage of the European corn borer."

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19343 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 29SHIPMENTS FROM CANADAFederal Quarantine no. 41 (revised) prohibits the importation into the UnitedStates from all foreign countries and localities of the stalk and all other parts,whether used for packing or other purposes, in the raw or unmanufactured state,of Indian corn or maize, broomcorn, sweet sorghums, grain sorghums, Sudangrass, Johnson grass, and certain other articles, with the following exceptions:1. Entry allowed without permit of (a) green corn on the cob, in small lots forlocal use only, from areas in Canada adjacent to the United States; and (b) manu-factured articles made of the stalks, leaves, or cobs of corn. 2. Entry allowedunder permit of (a) broomcorn for manufacturing purposes; (b) brooms or similararticles made of broomcorn; (c) clean shelled corn and clean seed of the otherplants covered by Quarantine no. 41; and (d) corn on the cob from Provinces ofCanada west of and including Manitoba.A number of States include part or all of Canada in the area quarantined, butreference to such restrictions is not included herein as State restrictions on foreign commerce are considered unconstitutional.For further information as to restrictions on shipments to Canada, apply toDepartment of Agriculture, Ottawa, Canada.For further information as to shipments from Canada, apply to Bureau of PlantQuarantine, United States Department of Agriculture, Washington, D.C.AVERY S. HOYT,Acting Chief of Bureau.REFERENCESThe addresses of officers or organizations of the various States which haveplaced corn borer quarantines, and the designations of the quarantine orders, aregiven below.Arizona-State entomologist, Phoenix, Ariz., Quarantine Order No. 12 and Amendment No. 1, effective January 17, 1933.Arkansas-State Plant Board, Little Rock, Ark., Quarantine No. 11 and RuleNo. 65, amended effective February 3, 1934.California-Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine, Sacramento, Calif., QuarantineOrder No. 15 (new series), effective March 10, 1933.Colorado-State entomologist, Fort Collins, Colo., Quarantine Order No. 4(second series) as amended effective February 17, 1933.Florida-State plant board, Gainesville, Fla., Rule 32 (revised), effective August16, 1932,Georgia-State entomologist, Atlanta, Ga., Regulation 36 (revised), effectiveJanuary 12, 1933.Idaho-Bureau of Plant Industry, Boise, Idaho, Order No. 2 and AmendmentNo. 1, effective February 15, 1933.Illinois-State department of agriculture, Springfield, Ill., A Proclamation bythe Governor, effective May 1, 1933.Indiana-State entomologist, Indianapolis, Ind., Quarantine No. 1, effective May 12, 1933.Iowa-State entomologist, Ames, Iowa, Warning and Quarantine No. 3, effectiveJuly 25, 1932.Kansas-State entomological commission, Topeka, Kans., Quarantine No. 5(revised), effective July 1, 1933.Kentucky-Commissioner of Agriculture, Lexington, Ky., Quarantine No. 1,effective October 10, 1932.Louisiana-State entomologist, Baton Rouge, La., European Corn Borer Quar-antine (revised), effective January 16, 1933.Michigan-Bureau of agricultural industry, Lansing, Mich., Quarantine No. 534,effective June 20, 1933.Mississippi-State plant board, State College, Miss., Rule 49, amended Septem-ber 13, 1932.Missouri-Plant officer, department of agriculture, Jefferson City, Mo., Quar-antine No. 3, effective July 10, 1933.Nebraska-State department of agriculture and inspection, Lincoln, Nebr.,Quarantine No. 2 (first revision), effective January 15, 1934.Nevada-Division of Plant Industry, Reno, Nev., a proclamation by the Govern-or, effective September 1, 1932. (A modification is pending, we are informed,to permit Federal certification of articles in group 2.)

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30 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE (Jan.a-ar.New Mexic H ad of b ij~l y, college f agritilt tire and imechanic arts, StateCollO, X \l1e.,arantme N,,. 9, effective Septembd1er 22, 1932.Ohio-D)i visin (4 plant industry, Columbus, Ohio, Regulation on account ofEiro&anIi c r orer, effective July 7, 1933.Oklaloi ia -talte Plant Board, Oklahoma City, Okla., Plant Board QuarantineNo. 9, amuded effective Septeniber 14, 1932.Oregon-1 -Director of agriculture, Agricultural Building, Salem, Oreg., QuarantineOrder No. 26 (new series), effective October 11, 1932. (Arrangements havebeen made, administratively, we are informed, to accept Federal certificationof articles in group 2.)South Carolinta-State crop pest coinnission, Clemson College, S.C., Quarantineregulation on account of the European Corn Borer, effective October 1, 1932.South Dakota-Secretary of agriculture, Pierre, S.Dak., Quarantine No. 2revised, effective March 7, 1933.Tennessee--Comniissioner of agriculture, Nashville, Tenmi., Notice of QuarantineNo. 6 (first revision), effective November 1, 1932.Texas--Commissioner of agriculture, Austin, Tex., Emergency QuarantineProclamiation No. 71, effective July 25, 1932.Utah--Conniissioner of agriculture, Salt Lake City, Utah, Quarantine No. 6-A,issued August 5, 1933.Virginia-Commissioner of agriculture and immigration, Richmond, Va., Quar-antine No. 2, effective January 26, 1933.Washington--Director of agriculture, Olympia, Wash., Quarantine No. 18 (newseries, effective July 11, 1933.Wisconsin-State entomologist, Madison, Wis., Quarantine No. 4 (fifth revision), effective June 16, 1933.Wyoming -Commissioner of Agriculture, Cheyenne, Wyo., Quarantine OrderNo. 5, effective November 1, 1932.PENALTIES IMPOSED FOR VIOLATIONS OF THE PLANT QUARANTINE ACTAccording to reports received by the Bureau during the period January 1 toMarch 31, 1934, penalties have recently been imposed by the proper Federalauthorities for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act, as follows:QUARANTINES AFFECTING MEXICAN PRODUCTSIn the case of the United States versus the persons listed below, for attemptingto smuggle in contraband plant material, the penalties indicated were imposedby the United States customs officials at the following ports:Name Port Contraband Pen-altyCharles L. Evans.-.----------------Nogales, Ariz--------6 cactus plants.-------------$25B. V. Jones ---.-.----------.----.-. Brownsville, Tex------3 oranges .-------------------5Martin Hernandez.--------------------do.-.--------------1 mango.-.----------------Felicetos Gonzales.-------------------do.--------------2 oranges.-------------------5Mrs. Guadalupe 0. Von Hattem.---------do .--------------1 orange..---------------5Jose A. del Castillo .--------------------. .do...--------------2 apples -------------------5Felix Tellez...---------------------El Paso, Tex---------2 oranges----------.--. .1Maximiana Hernandez Vda Gaitan-----.--. do .--------------1 avocado and 1 guava-------IC. G. Palacios. .-------------------Laredo, Tex---------2 mangoes -------------------1Agarito Rocha -.----------------------do. .--------------3 avocados.------------------1Leabardo Quevera.-------------------...do .--------------7 avocados.------------------1Juan Hernandez.---------------------do.---------------22 guavas, 2 sapotes, and 2 1mamey seeds.F. G. Gissler. ..---------------------.--do.--------------2 avocados.------------------1Jose Ramos -------------------------.____do.--------------5 plants ---------------------1Maria Garcia.-----------------------do.--------------2 orange trees -----------------1

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ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF PLANTQUTARANTINEA. S. H I Oi/, cing Chicf.B. Coxxn, Busness MoOnager.IC AUro( )USE, Information ollicr.E. .'A SSC ET, in Charp, Forrigno t (uan'inii.S. I". FR\CKEI, in Charqge Dooestic l'lan1 QuroiVeilus.LoN A. HAWKINS, in Clharge Trc!hnologicul Division.A. F. B Uw ss, in Field Chart! " uiGc sy (ohLl and Bro wn-Til Moth (Cni[rol aquarter, Grecnfield, ass.L. 11. Wu)rInLE , 11 il Field, Chlaret' Jopanwsc Beebt anid Giti(rPS Moth and Bro(n-Tail ()oth ( QUranll/in('s and Eu ropan Coro Bor(r ProjeC! , I e[u( artcnr, llarri4-burqg, Pa.).N. E. Mc 1) NALI), Field Chare Pink Boll worm aid T 'Phua rbcria W ccvil Q)ar-antilws lHeadquar-ters, Sall .Anltonio, TC.1'.).1. 1L. BOYE N, in 1("ld ha rg' Dale Scalc ()arantine (fcadquarters, Indlio,Calif.P. A. 11)ALE, in Field Charge xicao Frai ly Q uOlarant ine (Headqu(I/(arlers,Hlarlingen, Tex.31U S GOVERNMENT P NT' , 'Fi E 134

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1a

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S.R.A.-B.P.Q. No. 119 Issued September 1934UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTUREBUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINESERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTSAPRIL-JUNE 1934CONTENTSPageQuarantine and other official announcements ----------------------------------------------33Announcement relating to black stem-rust quarantine (no. 38)----------------------------33Revised list of barberries and Mahonias classified under black stem-rust quarantine regu-lations (P.Q.C.A.-320, second revision) -----------------------------------------------33Announcement relating to fruit and vegetable quarantine (no. 56)-------------------------------35Sterilization of imported vinifera grapes by refrigeration (B.P.Q.-362)---------------------35Announcement relating to Mexican fruit-fly quarantine (no. 64) --------------------------------36Citrus census of the lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas as of April 1, 1934------------------36M iscellaneous items---------------------------------------------------------------------------38Plant-pest and quarantine work in Agriculture Department merged-----------------------38Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Argentina (B. P. Q.-357, supplement no. 1) 39Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Philippine Islands (B.P.Q.-363)----------------------40Plant-quarantine import restrictions, French mandate of Syria (B.P. Q.-364)----------------46Plant-quarantine import restrictions, British Honduras (P.Q.C.A.-314, supplements nos. 5,6, and 7)-------------------------------------------------------------------------------49Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Greece (B. P.Q.-347, supplement no. 2)----50Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Jamaica, British West Indies (B.P.Q.-355, revised)---50Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Kingdom of Norway (B. P. Q.-350, supplement no. 1)-52Plant-quarantine impo:t restrictions, Republic of Peru (P.Q.C.A.-310, supplement no. 1).--53Plant-quarantine import restrictions, New Zealand (P.Q.C.A.-306, supplement no. 2)-----53Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Commonwealth of Australia (P.Q.C.A.-299, supple-ment no. 2)-----------------------------------------------------------------------------55Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act-----------------------------------55Organization of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine----------------------------------------------------57QUARANTINE AND OTHER OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTSANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO BLACK STEM-RUST QUARANTINE(NO. 38)P.Q.C.A.-320 (Second Revision) MAY 15, 134.REVISED LIST OF BARBERRIES AND MAHONIAS CLASSIFIED UNDER BLACKSTEM-RUST QUARANTINE REGULATIONSIn the following revision of the classification of Berberis and Alahonia underQuarantine No. 38, Berberis gilgiana and B. sanguinea, which were formerly inthe doubtful list (group D), have been transferred to the list of resistant species(group B). This change is based on experimental work carried on by theBureau of Plant Industry which has shown that these two species are highlyresistant to black stem-rust infection. Another change consists in the additionof Berberis buxifolia pygmea to group D, evidence having developed that thisvariety of buxifolia may possibly prove to be susceptible to rust attack. Thisand other species and varieties listed in group D will be transferred to theirproper places in groups B and C as soon as sufficient experimental data areavailable.The rules and regulations supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 38,revised, provide that no plants, cuttings, stocks, scions, buds, fruits, seeds, orother plant parts capable of propagation, of the genera Bcrberis, Mahonia, or80185-341 33

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34 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Apr.-JuneMa~hobcrbcri8, " shall be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from anyState of the continental United States or from the District of Columbia intoany of the protected States, namely, Colorado, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan,Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, Wisconsin,and Wyoming, nor front any one of said protected States into any other protected State, unless a permit shall have been issued therefor by the UnitedStates Department of Agriculture, except that no restrictions are placed bythese regulations on the interstate movement of Japanese barberry (Berberisthunbergii) or any of its horticultural varieties." [Regulation 2 (a).]The protected States referred to below under groups B, C, and D, are the 13barberry-eradication States named in regulation 2 (a), quoted above.AvERY S. HOYT,Acting Chi f, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.A.--BERBERIS THUNBERGII AND ITS RUST-IM MUNE HORTICULTURAL VARIETIESPermits are not required for any interstate movement of Berberis thunbergiior of the rust-immune varieties thereof under the regulations of the black stem-rust quarantine, revised. The varieties so far as tested by the Department areas follows: Berbcris thunbergii, B. thlunbergii atropurpurea, B. thlunbergiimiaximnociczii, B. thiunbergii ininor, B, thiunbergii pluriflora, and B. thunbergiipluriflora erecta.B.-BERBERIS AND MAHONIA SPECIES OR VARIETIES SUFFICIENTLY RESISTANT TOBLACK STEM RUST FOR SHIPMENT INTO PROTECTED STATESPermits are required under the regulations of the black stem-rust quarantinefor interstate movement of the following species or varieties into the protectedStates and for such movement from any protected State into any otherprotected State:Berberis acm ulans, B. aquifolini ( Mahonia), B. beaniana, B. buxifolia, (ex-cept var. pygmea), B. candidula, B. chenaultii (hybrid), B. circumserrata,B. concinna, B. darw'inii, B. dictyophylla var. albicaulils, B. diversifolia, B.edgeworth iana, B. gagnepainii, B. juliana, B. koreana, B. nervosa (Malhonia),B. ottawensis (hybrid), B. potanini, B. reopens (Mahonia), B. sargentiana, B.stenophylla (hybrid), B. triacanthophora, B. verruculosa, B. gilgiana, and B.sanguinca.C.-BERBERIS, MAHONIA, AND MAHOBERBERIS SPECIES OR VARIETIES WHICH ARESUSCEPTIBLE TO ATTACK OF BLACK STEM RUSTInterstate shipments of the following species or varieties must not be made into the protected States or from any protected State to any other protectedState and permits will not be issued for such movement:Berberis acuinnata, B. aetcniis, B. aggregata, B. aggregata prattil, B.alesuthiensis, B. altaica, B. amarcusis, B. amurcn.<8 japonica, B. angulosa,B. .aristata, B. arrensis, B. asiatica, B. atropurpurea. B. atrocarpa. B. bealei(japonica) (Maihonia), B. bergmanii ana, B. brachiybotrydi. B. brach ybotrys,B. brachypoda, 1. bretschneiderii, B. brcripaniculata, B. (anadenisis, B. caro-liniana, B. chineniN, B. coriaria. B. coryi, B. crataegia, B. cretica. B. declinata,B. declinata oxyphylla (hybrid), B. diaphana, B. dicbliana, B. dulcis nana, B.durobriroi.is (hybrid), B. emarginata (hybrid), B. inargin ata britzensis(hybrid), B. fen dleri, B. fischcri, B. franci.ci-fcrdinaudi. B. frenontii (Ma-honia), B. fapchioidecs, B. Ii cH matoearpa ( Maliona ), B. liybrida serrata, B.ilicifolia, B. integerrimia, B. japon ca (bcalci) ( Mahonia). B. kntightii (Xan-thoxylon), B. kochancanl, B. lcrix. B. la.riflora. B. lcililin i, B. lucida, B. lycium(B. eleganvisima) , 1. macrophIYllia. B. miieclian ii, B. mOrrisoncnsis (Mahoiia),B. nepalclisis ( AMatOl ia), B. neuberti ( Mah oberberiN), B. nevinii (MahonIa),B. notabiliN. B. oblonfia, B. poirctij ii. poirctii lwtil'olia. H. poluantha., B. prattii,B. prorivciaIb var. serrata, B. priuinooa'. B. regclia1a, B. rugidicans, B. serotina,B. 8ibirica, B. sicboldii. B. Osinciii.N, H. .oulicmiau B. Sa ' filia, B. subcaulialata,B. s aseyi ( Mahonia), B. th ibe tia, B. trifoliolat a ( 1ahon a ), B. unibrilata,B. i-an 1cwtii, B. rernac, B. riridis, B. rvilaris, B. rulg(onis alba, B. vulgaris

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19343 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 3aHCpcrmna, B. vulgari alropurpur(a, B. rulgaris euurgin'tu, B. rugaris [ru-toviolacCa, B. valgaris japOnica, B. lulrIS autca, B. Uulgyrri macrocarpa, B.vulgaris miti,, B. vulgtris nigra, B. 'rulyaris j)triurco, B. vulgaris .anuJiUolenta,B. vulgaris spathulata, B. vulgaris sheyallc, B. vil(iri sucata, B. rulgariviolacca, B. wilsonae, and B. xanthoxylon (knightii).D.-SPECIES OR VARIETIES OF BERBERIS OR MAIJONIA FOR WhICH REACTION TOBLACK STEM-RUST ATTACK HAS NOT BEEN DETERMINEDInterstate shipments of the following species or varieties iiiust not be maieinto the protected States or from any protected State to any other protectedState. Permits will not be issued for such movement this season pending finaldetermination of the reaction of such species or varieties to black stem-rustattack.Berberis acicularis, B. buxifolia pygmne, B. califoriica, B. dicftyophilla, B.dulcis ( buxifolia), B. hcnryana, B. hetcropo(a, B. hookcri, B. iniuins, B. parvi-folia, B. pinnata = fa.scicuiaris (Mahonia), B. thunberyii X julianmuc (hybrid),B. tischleri, B. vircscens, B. icilsonac Autunm Cheer, B. iilsonac ireflame,B. wilsonae Firefly, and B. wilsonae Sparkler.ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO FRUIT AND VEGETABLE QUARANTINE (NO. 56)B.P.Q.-362.STERILIZATION OF IMPORTED VINIFERA GRAPES BY REFRIGERATION(Approved Apr. 19, 1934; effective 'May 1, 1934)Regulation 6 of the Fruit and Vegetable Quarantine (Quarantine No. 56),as amended effective August 1, 1933, reads in part, as follows:"All importations of fruits and vegetables shall be subject as a conditionof entry to such inspection or disinfection, or both, as shall be reqllire(l bythe inspector of the Department of Agriculture."Recent experimental work by the Bureau of Entomology of the UnitedStates Department of Agriculture has proved that all stages of the Mediter-ranean fruit fly in fruit will be destroyed if the fruit is subjected to the fol-lowing treatment:" Cooling until the approximate center of the fruit in the package reachesa temperature of 30*-31* F. and holding the fruit at that temperature for15 days."Storage tests with some varieties of vinifera grapes, grown in the UnitedStates, have shown that the treatment can be applied to this fruit without danger of injuring it provided the requirements of the treatment as to teniperi-ture are carefully followed.On the basis of the evidence secured provision is made for the entry, underpermit and sterilization, of grapes of the vinifera type from regions in whi-ehthe Mediterranean fruit fly occurs, at the port of New York and such othernorthern ports as may he subsequently approved, under the following con-ditions:(1) The grapes must be packed in tight barrels or kegs or other approved con-tainers so constructed as to prevent the escape from the container pendingsterilization of any stages of the Mediterranean fruit fly, should they be present.Any broken containers wherever found must be immediately repacke 1 und('rthe supervision of an inspector of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine or the con-tents shall be innediately destroyed in a manner satisfactory to the inspector.(2) Within 24 hours from the time of unlading, the grapes shall be deliveredfor treatment to an approved sterilization plant.To provide necessary safeguards for movement to and handling at approvedsterilization plants, those concerns designated to sterilize fruit are requiredto file an application and complete a written agreement with the Bureau ofPlant Quarantine. The Bureau will approve only those plants which are adie-quately equipped to handle and sterilize the fruit.

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36 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Apr.-JuneSterilization will be done under the supervision of plant quarantine inspec-tors of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine. These inspectors shall at all timesbe given access to fruit while in process of sterilization. They will supervisethe movement of the fruit from the docks to and from the sterilization rooms.Shipmienit1s offered for entry may be allowed to leave customs custody underredelivery bonl for sterilization. Final release of the shipment by the col-lector of culstois and eancelation of the bond will be effected after the in-spector of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine has notified the collector of cus-toms that the required treatment has been given.In authorizing the entry of fruit into the United States, sterilized in accord-ance with the above requirements, it should be emphasized that inexactnessand carelessness in applying the treatment may result in injury to the fruit,but, in event of resulting injury, neither the Department of Agriculture norits employees will be responsible.E. R. SASSCER,Acting Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO MEXICAN FRUIT-FLYQUARANTINE (NO. 64)UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE,503 Rio GRANDE NATIONAL LIFE BUILDING,Harlingen, Tex., June 30, 1934.CITRUS CENSUS OF THE LOWER RIO GRANDE VALLEY OF TEXAS AS OF APRIL 1, 1934In administering the provisions of the Mexican fruit-fly quarantine it is necessary to know from year to year the number of citrus trees planted in thelower Rio Grande Valley of Texas. In response to requests from the citrusinterests of this valley and of various other interested persons, this informa-tion is made available to the public.A complete recheck of all groves was made necessary this year on accountof the mortality among the trees as a result of the storm of September 1933.Included in these census figures are a total of 176,812 citrus trees which areconsidered noncommercial.The census is presented in two arrangements, by counties and by districts.The 12 districts as shown in table 2 represent divisions of the territory whichhave been made for the convenience of administration. These divisions aredesignated by the names of the towns in which suboffices of the Mexican fruit-fly project are located.In explanation of the tables the following information is given:Ages of trees: In the tables the ages of trees are classified as 0, 1, 2, 3, 4,and 5. Trees given under classification 0 were planted during the period from April 1, 1933, to March 31, 1934. Trees given under classification 1 wereplanted from April 1, 1932, to March 31, 1933. Trees given under classification2 were planted from July 1, 1931, to June 30, 1932. The ages of trees desig-nated as 3 and 4, respectively, will be understood in the light of this explana-tion. Trees given under classification 5 were planted previous to June 30, 19M.Other citrus: Under this classification are included kumquats, limes, man-darins, satsumas, sour oranges, tangelos, lemons, etc.

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1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 37TABLE 1.-Citrus census of the lower Rio Grande Vaey of Texas as of Apr. 1,1934, by countiesNumber of growing citrus trees of age-County and fruit0 1 2 3 4 5 TotalHidalgo:Grapefruit------------198, 605 286, 671 567, 057 521, 988 501, 534 2, 104, 595 4, 180, 450Orange-.--------------63, 449 73, 798 105, 365 72, 452 117, 705 776, 003 1, 208, 772Other citrus.----------8,617 6,053 5,073 2,990 6,875 70, 630 100, 238Total-------------270, 671 366, 522 677, 495 597, 430 626, 114 2,951,228 5, 489, 460Cameron:Grapefruit-------------62,046 98, 275 334, 711 195, 358 177, 745 985, 216 1,853, 351Orange---------------19, 355 29, 843 42, 560 30, 674 44, 859 417, 254 584, 545Other citrus-.---------545 1, 500 2, 089 1, 292 5, 080 50, 361 60, 867Total--------------81,946 129,618 379,360 227,324 227,684 1,452,831 2,498,763Willacy:Grapefruit-------------15, 751 16, 947 47, 659 16, 200 13, 016 37, 431 147, 004Orange----------------7,105 6, 747 16, 235 4, 369 3, 764 18, 419 56, 639,Other citrus.----------1, 417 1, 438 3, 120 433 742 2, 195 9, 34Total---------------24,273 25,132 67,014 21,002 17, 522 58,045 212,988Total, all counties:Grapefruit------------276, 402 401, 893 949, 427 733, 546 692, 295 3, 127, 242 6, 180, 805Orange -----------89,909 110.388 164,160 107,495 166,328 1, 211, 676 1,849,956Other citrus-----------10,579 8,1991 10,282 4,715 12,697 123,186 170,450Grand total---------376, 890 521, 272 1, 123, 869 845, 756 871, 320 4, 462, 104 8, 201, 211TABLE 2.-Citrus census of the lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas as of Apr. 1,1934, by districtsNumber of growing citrus trees of age-District and fruit0 1 2 3 4 5 TotalMission:Grapefruit-------------41, 375 40, 058 155, 352 153, 046 150, 271 564, 758 1,104, 860Orange----------------8,312 9,627 44,551 31,431 41,309 205,641 340,871Other citrus-----------2, 299 1, 181 1, 975 844 2, 017 22, 613 30,929Total---------------51,986 50,866 201,878 185,321 193,597 793,012 1,476,660McAllen:Grapefruit-------------22, 466 15, 813 68, 562 59, 583 95, 497 214, 934 476, 855Orange----------------8,285 5,248 11,597 7,499 21,368 83,485 137,482Other citrus -----------1, 418 245 792 452 2, 197 8, 275 13, 379Total--------------32, 169 21,306 80, 951 67, 534 119, 062 306, 694 627, 716Edinburg:Grapefruit------------58, 027 82, 193 189, 549 177, 661 111, 683 474, 734 1,093,847Orange----------------28,905 13,769 16,625 7,309 21,460 138,510 226,578Other citrus-----------1,457 150 529 340 186 4,363 7,025Total----------------88,389 96,112 206,703 185,310 133, 329 617,607 1,327,450Pharr-San Juan-Alamo:Grapefruit-------------18, 910 62, 992 45, 494 37, 832 46, 985 285, 309 497, 522Orange ----------------4,591 25,620 16,979 6,565 12,698 102,913 169,366Other citrus---.------179 825 1, 077 410 818 10, 274 13, 583Total-------.-------23, 680 89, 437 63, 550 44, 807 60, 501 398, 496 680, 471Donna:Grapefruit-------------27, 488 23, 458 27, 745 18, 438 34, 670 178, 400 310, 199Orange----------------4,377 4,728 6,323 9,163 10,842 113,362 148,795Other citrus -----------749 589 95 138 106 7,858 9,535Total---------------32, 614 28, 775 34, 163 27,739 45, 618 299, 620 468, 529

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38 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Apr.-JuneTABLE 2.--itru s of the lower Rio Grande Yallen of Tcxas as of Apr. 1,1931', by districts-CantinuedNumber of growing citrus trees of age-District and fruit0 1 2 3 4 5 TotalWeslaco:Grapefruit-------------16,012 28,302 44,314 42,443 44,062 243,883 419,016Orange----------------5,171 8,512 4,312 3,545 6,338 76,184 104,062Other citrus------------2,385 2,882 481 514 377 7,009 13,648Total---------------23, 56S 39, 696 49, 107 46, 502 50, 777 327, 076 536, 726Mercedes:Grapefruit-------------14, 327 33,855 36,041 32,985 18,366 142,577 278,151Orange----------------3,808 6,294 4,978 6,940 3,690 55,908 81,618Other citrus -----------130 181 124 292 1,174 10,238 12,139Total----------------18, 265 40, 330 41, 143 40, 217 2.3, 230 208, 723 371,908La Feria:Grapefruit-------------28,571 33,473 99,846 24,973 27,859 287,704 502,426Orange----------------6,233 6,727 10,047 4,987 5,843 132,428 166,265Other citrus.-----------184 119 435 184 943 9,024 10,889Total ---------------34, 988 40,319 110,328 30,144 34, 645 429,156 67n, 580Raymondville:Grapefruit -------------15,751 16,947 47,659 16,200 13,016 37,431 147,004Orange ---------------7,105 6,747 16,235 4,369 3,764 18,419 56,639Other citrus -----------1,417 1,438 3,120 433 742 2,195 9,345Total ----------------24,273 25, 132 67,014 21,002 17,522 58,045 212,988Harlingen:Grapefruit-------------8,252 38,437 82,025 50,029 35,044 256,076 469,863Orange----------------2,501 10,773 10,277 9,228 11,456 117,519 161,754Other citrus -----------137 1,157 918 410 995 10,836 14,453Total---------------10,890 50,367 93,220 59,667 47,495 384,431 646,070San Benito:Grapefruit.-------------21,788 19.998 134,327 96,925 88,702 289,892 651,632Orange----------------7,058 8,211 17,402 13,585 19,445 111,630 177,331Other citrus -----------158 176 697 651 1,673 12,365 15,720Total---------------29,004 28,385 152,426 111,161 109,820 413,887 844,683Brownsville:Grapefruit-------------3,435 6,367 18,513 23,431 26,140 151,544 229,430Orange----------------3,563 4,132 4,834 2,874 8,115 55,677 79,195Other citrus------------66 48 39 47 1,469 18,136 19,805Total ----------------7,064 10, 547 23, 386 26, 352 35, 724 225,357 328,430Total, all districts:Grapefruit ------------276, 402 401,893 949, 427 733, 546 692, 295 3,127,242 6, 180,805Orange ----------------89, 909 110, 388 164,160 107,495 166,328 1,211,676 1,849,956Other citrus.-----------10, 579 8, 991 10, 282 4, 715 12, 697 123, 186 170,450Grand total ---------376, 890 521, 272 1,123, 869 845, 756 871, 320 4, 462, 104 8, 201,211MISCELLANEOUS ITEMSJUNE 26, 1934.PLANT PEST AND QUARANTINE WORK IN AGRICULTURE DEPARTMENT MERGED(Press notice)Two major units of the United States Department of Agriculture, the Bureauof Elntonology and the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, have been merged intoone, to he known as the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, Secre-tary of Agriclture Henry A. A\ llace announced today. The new organizationtakes over from the Bureau of Plant Industry the activities on the control anderadication of five important plant diseases.

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1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 39This consolidation, which goes into effect, July 1, Secretary WilhCwe pointsout, will permit greater economy of administration in the Departiment's searchfor better methods of insect control and in the regulatory work necessaryto prevent the spread of plant pests and diseases. It also insures better co-ordination and imore effective direction of the various parallel lines of researchmid control activities.Lee A. Strong, Chief of the Bureau of PLant Quarantine from December 1,1929, to October 1, 1933, and since then (Thief of the Bureau of Entomology,has been appointed Chief of the new bureau. S. A. Rohiwer, now assistantchief of the Bureau of Entomology, and Avery S. Hoyt, now assistant chiefof the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, will be assistant chiefs of the new bureau.F. H1. Spencer will be business uuanuager. Karl F. Kellerman, formerly associatechief of the Bureau of Plant Industry, will have charge of the division devotedto tlie eradication a nd control of citrus canker, phony peach disease, Dutchelm disease, white pine blister rust, and the stem rust of grains.Research in the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine will coverstudies on the life history and habits of beneficial as well as injurious insects,with a view to developing practical methods for destroying injurious insectsand promoting the increase and spread of those found beneficial.The regulatory work, under the authority of the Federal Plant QuarantineAct, will include the enforcement of quarantines and restrictive measures toprevent the entry into, or the spread within, the United States of dangerousplant diseases and insect pests.Under the new arrangement the different lines of work on related subjects,whether regulatory or research, are brought together in a single unit. Thework of collection, introduction, and clearing through quarantine of foreignparasites for the control of injurious insect pests established in the UnitedStates has been placed in a single division under the direction of C. P. Clausen. The fundamental investigations to develop control methods by the use ofinsecticides, attractants, and repellents have been brought together in theDivision of Control Investigations, under Lon A. Hawkins. The Division ofHousehold and Stored Product Insects, in the Bureau of Entomology, as such,has been discontinued, and the work assigned to other divisions. Studies oninsects attacking stored products have been transferred to the divisions con-cerned with the insects that infest the same crops in the field. For example,investigations on dried fruit insects will be conducted by the Division of FruitInsects. As the insects found in stored products are often hangovers fromfield infestations, such an arrangement is designed to further simplify andexpedite the new Bureau's work. The investigations on household insects formerly assigned to this division have been transferred to the Division ofInsects Affecting Man and Animals, under the direction of F. C. Bishopp, whohas long been in charge of that division. All informational work has beenbrought together with the Insect Pest Survey and placed in the Division ofInsect Pest Survey and Information, under the leadership of J. A. Hyslop.The other research divisions of the Bureau of Entomology, the regulatorydivisions of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, and the field stations of bothbureaus will remain about as they were.B.P.Q.-357, Supplement No. 1 APRIL 25, 1934.PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF ARGENTINAThe decree of February 20, 1934, revokes that of May 11, 1927, which pro-hibited the importation of corn (Zea malls) and broomcorn (Andropogon sor-ghum var. technicus) into that country. The text, in translation, follows:ARTICLE 1. The decree of May 11, 1927 (see par. 1, p. 8, B.P.Q.-357), wherebythe importation of corn and broomcorn was prohibited, is hereby revoked, andthe portion (par. 2, p. 8, B.P.Q.-357) relating to the disinfection which was required for other seeds mentioned in that decree, becomes ineffective.ART. 2. The importation is authorized of corn and sorghum only (Johnsongrass, Andropogon halepensis, being excluded), if clean and free from any plantrefuse, it being necessary when that condition is not fulfilled to disinfect theshipment with hydrocyanic acid gas, carbon disulphide, or other similar prod-

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40 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Apr.-Juneuets applied in vacuo for the period and with the dosage established in thisconnection by the Health Office of Plant and Seed Importation and Exportation(Oticina Sanitaria de Importaci6n y Exportacifn de Plantas y Semillas).ART. 3. The importation is prohibited of plants, or parts of plants, of corn,especially the ear, tassel, stalk, green husk, etc., as well as of broomcorn strawintended for manufacturing purposes, or as raw material for packing agricul-tural implements and various other articles. The introduction is likewise pro-hibited of feed from plants belonging to other species of Andropogon, Saccharum,Pennisetum, and Coir, as well as fresh vegetables and flower stems of gladioli and dahlias from countries in which Pyrausta nubilalis exists and whose prod-ucts may serve as vehicles for the distribution of the corn borer.ART. 4. The introduction is permitted of shipments of the seeds referred to Inarticle 1 of this decree through ports authorized for that purpose, but if thoseports do not satisfy the provisions of the last part of article 2 entry is tem4porarily restricted to the port of Buenos Aires, the authorization finally beingextended to the ports of La Plata, Bahia Blanca, Rosario, Santa Fe, and thecustoms at Mendoza, as soon as equipments for vacuum disinfection are installedin those ports.E. R. SAsSCER,Acting Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.B.P.Q.-363 MAY 1, 1934.PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, PHILIPPINE ISLANDSThe following summary of the plant-quarantine-import restrictions of thePhilippine Islands has been prepared for the information of nurserymen, plantquarantine officials, and others interested in the exportation of plants andplant products from the United States to those islands.The summary was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant quarantine inspectorof the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, from the texts of the following adminis-trative orders of the Philippine Bureau of Plant Industry: No. 10, approvedApril 25, 1932; no. 11, approved July 14, 1932, and no. 12, approved June 14,1933, as well as administrative orders no. 56, approved August 21, 1928, andno. 57, approved October 10, 1928, of the old Bureau of Agriculture, andreviewed by the Director of Plant Industry, Manila, P.I.The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct andcomplete up to the time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used independently of, nor as a substitute for, the original texts of those adminis-trative orders, and it is not to be interpreted as legally authoritative. Theorders themselves should be consulted for the exact texts.E. R. SAssCER,Acting Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.BASIC LAWAct No. 3027 of March 8, 1922, entitled: An Act to protect the agriculturalindustries of the Philippine Islands from injurious plant pests and diseasesexisting in foreign countries and further to regulate the domestic movementof plant materials in order to minimize the injury from pests and diseasesalready introduced.CONCISE SUMMARYIMPORTATION PROHIBITED BY SPECIAL QUARANTINESPlant materials of all plants of the genera and species: Agave cantula,maguey ; Musa spp., banana family; Agave sisalana, sisal ; Nicotiana tabacum,tobacco ; Ananas (cornosus) sativUs, pineapple ; Saccharuin officinarumn, sugar-cane; Cocos nucifera, coconut; Oryza sativw, rice; Bambusa sp., bamboo;Citrus varieties, known commercially as the Chinese yellow and red kids;except under permit, in limited quantity, for experimental purposes in accord-ance with paragraphs 2 and 10 of Administrative Order No. 10 of March 19,1932. (Administrative Order No. 11, approved July 14, 1932.)Fresh fruits from countries infested with the Mediterranean fruit fly(Ceratitis capitata), namely: Algeria, Argentina, Azores, Bermuda, Brazil,

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1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 41British East Africa, Canary Islands, Cape Colony, Cape Verde Islands, Congo,Dahomey, Delagoa Bay, Egypt, France, Greece, Hawaii, Italy, Madagascar,Madeira, Malta, Mauritius, Natal, New South Wales, New Zealand, Nigeria,Palestine, Queensland, Rhodesia, Sicily, Spain, Syria, Tasmania, Tripoli, Tunis,Turkey, Uganda, Victoria, and Western Australia, may be imported only inlimited quantities for experimental purposes and under special permit. (Ad-ministrative Order No. 12, approved June 14, 1933.)Fresh fruits from Texas, U.S.A., and from Mexico: Importation prohibitedto prevent the introduction of the Mexican fruit fly or Morelos orange worm,Anastrepha ludens. Provision is made, however, for the importation of smallquantities of those fruits to procure better varieties and new propagatingstock. or specimens for experimental purposes in accordance with article 2 ofAdministrative Order No. 10, through the Bureau of Plant Industry, Manila.(Administrative Order No. 56, approved Aug. 21, 1928.)Mimosa invisa: Importation prohibited of plants in the natural state capableof propagation, except to procure new propagating stock for experimental pur-poses under the proVisions of section 2 of Administrative Order No. 10 ofMarch 19, 1932. (Administrative Order No. 57, approved Oct. 10, 1928.)IMPORTATION RESTRICTED-I.M PORT PERM IT AND INSPECTION CERTIFICATE REQUIREDFruits, vegetables, cereals, and other plant products intended for food pur-poses, or properly dried and poisoned botanical specimens, may be importedunder the provisions of articles 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, and 13 of Administrative OrderNo. 10. (See art 14 of that order.)Plant materials for propagation not governed by special quarantines areadmitted after inspection upon arrival if found free from injurious insects andplant diseases, under the general provisions of article 9 of Administrative OrderNo. 10.REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE IMPORTATION OF PLANT MATERIALS INTO THEPHILIPPINE ISLANDS(Administrative Order No. 10, approved Apr. 25, 1932)DefinitionsARTICLE 1. (a) " Person " is construed as singular or plural and applies toand includes corporations, societies, associations, firms, companies, and otherlegal entities.(b) " Plant materials " includes living plants, rhizomes, fruits, seeds, cuttings,bulbs, and corms, grafts, leaves, roots, scions, and fruit pits, and such otherparts of plants as are capable of propagation or of harboring plant pests anddiseases.(c) " Country " shall refer to and include independent political units orsovereign nations, territories, colonies, and political or territorial subdivisions.Plant materials for which a permit is requiredART. 2. Plant material governed by special quarantine orders may be importedfrom countries which maintain inspection in limited quantity under permit fromthe Director of Agriculture for the purpose. of keeping the country suppliedwith new varieties and necessary propagating stock, and from countries whichdo not maintain inspection in limited quantities for experimental purposes only,subject to such conditions as the Director of Plant Industry may impose, incompliance also with the particular administrative orders governing them re-spectively and with these regulations. Manila is the authorized port of entryfor such importations.Application for import permitART. 3. All persons who intend to import plant materials must apply to theDirector of the Bureau of Plant Industry in advance of the shipment.ART. 4. On approval by the Director of Plant Industry of an application toimport plant materials under quarantine, a permit shall be issued, but beforeissuing a permit the Director may require the importer to file a bond in twicethe invoice cost of the plants imported.80185-34-2

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42 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Apr.-JuneNotices of arrical and shipment requiredARTs. 5 and 6. Require the permittee to furnish in duplicate a notice ofarrival and a notice of shipment on the prescribed forms.Perinits may be revoked for riolationsART. 7. Permits may be revoked and further permits may be refused for theimportation of the products of any grower or exporter of any foreign countrywho has violated Act No. 3027, or any rules or rgeulations promulgated there-under ; or for the importation of the products of any country where inspectionis considered by the Bureau of Plant Industry, as a result of its examinationsof importations therefrom, to have been merely perfunctory, or because of thefailure of the perinittee to comply with the regulations, or if, in the judgmentof the Director, the interests of the public and the service so require.Conditions of entryForeign certificate of inspection requiredART. 8. Importations of fruits, vegetables, seeds, and other plant materialsfrom foreign countries must be accompanied by certificates of inspection issuedby the proper government authority of the country of origin, stating that thematerials are free from injurious insects and plant diseases. Where the gov-ernment maintains a plant-quarantine or plant-inspection service, the certifi-cates of inspection required by this order shall be certificates of inspection ofplant materials issued by the chief or director of the plant-quarantine or plant-inspection service of the country or place of origin or his duly authorized rep-resentatives. In countries or places the governments of which do not main-tain plant-quarantine or plant-inspection service, the certificates of inspectionmust have been accomplished by the exporter or shipper concerned, duly sub-scribed and sworn to by him before a person legally authorized to administeroaths in the country of origin; in this case the certificate must include a state-ment to the effect that the plant materials did not originate in a place whereinjurious insects or plant diseases were prevalent; that they have not been kept or stored in places infested by injurious insects or infected by plant diseases;and that whatever treatment is required by the Director of Plant Industryprior to shipment has been effected. The presentation of such certificates shall not preclude inspection on arrival if an inspection is deemed necessary.Inspection upon arrivalART. 9. All persons who intend to import plant materials must submit to theBureau of Plant Industry an application for inspection of incoming plants onor before the arrival of such shipment. All such plant materials shall be in-spected upon arrival for injurious insects and plant diseases. All plants whichare found to be free from injurious insects and plant diseases shall be certifiedand tagged or stamped. Such plants after having been so tagged or stampedshall then be allowed to enter. Plant materials which are found to be infestedby injurious insects or infected with diseases shall be returned to the point oforigin or destroyed, at the option of the importer and at his expense.NoTE.-Plant materials not governed by special quarantine orders and whichare imported for propagation purposes are allowed entry into the Philippinesafter the proper inspection and certification has been made by the plant quar-antine inspectors of the Bureau of Plant Industry and they have been foundfree from any injurious insects and plant diseases, provided such plants orplant materials are not weeds or are not likely to become weeds. Such plantmaterials come under the general provisions of article 9 of this order. (Letterof the Director of Plant Industry of May 2, 1933.)Disinfection or fumigationART. 10. Plant materials imported under article 2 shall, at the expense andresponsibility of the importer, be subject, as a condition of entry, to such dis-infection or fumigation as may he required, and may be quarantined in placesdesignated by the Director of Plant Industry until evidence is available thatno injurious insects or plant diseases are present on such plants.

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1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 43Plant materials must be free from sand, soil, or earthART. 11. All plant materials offered for entry must be free from Sand, soil, orearth, and all plant roots, rhizomes, tubers, etc., must be washed to thoroughlyfree them from such sand, soil, or earth and must be so certified by the dulyauthorized inspector of the country of origin or by the shipper or exporter, asprescribed by article 8: Provided, That sand, soil, or earth may be employed forthe packing of bulbs and corms when such material has been sterilized or other-wise safeguarded by methods prescribed by the Bureau of Plant Industry andso certified by the authorized inspector of the country of origin or by the ex-porter or shipper, in accordance with article 8. The use of such sand, soil,or earth for packing materials other than bulbs and corms is not authorized.Approved packing materialsART. 12. All packing materials used with importations of nursery stock andother plants and seeds shall be subject to approval by the Bureau of PlantIndustry and must not previously have been used as packing or otherwise inconnection with living plants, and, except for bulbs and corms, must be freefrom sand, soil, or earth, and must be certified as meeting these conditions bythe authorized inspector or by the exporter or shipper, in accordance witharticle 8.ART. 13. Any container of plant materials held for inspection, etc., shall haveattached to it a quarantine sign.Plant materials for which a permit is not requiredART. 14. Fruits, vegetables, cereals, and other plant products intended forfood purposes, or properly dried and poisoned botanical specimens, when freefrom sand, soil, or earth, and when not governed by special quarantine orders,may be imported, but subject to the conditions prescribed by articles 8, 9, 10,11, 12, and 13 of this order.Authorized ports of entryART. 15. The inspection of incoming plant material shall be made at the portsof Manila, Cebu, Iloilo, Zamboanga, Legaspi, Davao, and Jolo. Plant materialsshall not be admitted at any other port.Importationt by mailART. 16. Plant materials entering by mail shall be inspected by the plantquarantine officials upon notification of the presence of such materials at thepost office. Such materials shall he subject to the same inspection as imate-rials entering through the customhouse.ART. 17. Deals with fees for fumigation (r disinfection.Certification for (XJ)or'tART. 18. Application should be made to the Director of Plant Industry forthe inspection of plant materials for export.ART. 19. Provides for the issuance of inspection certificates for plant materialsintended for exportation.ARTS. 20, 21, and 22. Penalties, repealing provision and effective date (May1, 1932).PROHIBITED PLANT MATERIALS(Administrative Order No. 11, approved July 14, 1932)ARTICLE 1. The importation is strictly prohibited of plant materials of allplants of the genus Musa ; coconut, Cocos nucifera ; sugarcane, Saccharumoficinarum; rice, Oryza sativa ; pineapple, Ananas contosus ; bamboo, Bainmbusaspp.; tobacco, Nicotiaina tabacum; Citrus varieties conmercially known as theChinese yellow and red kids ; maguey, Agare cantula; and sisal, Agave sisalana:Provided, That a limited quantity of plant materials of such plants may beimported, in accordance with articles 2 and 10 of Administrative Order No. 10,upon proper application to the Director of Plant Industry and under permit

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44 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Apr.-Junefrom the said official, through the port of Manila. They shall also be subjectto such other conditions, requirement, or treatment as the Director of PlantIndustry may prescribe.ART. 2. Definition of " plant materials " (see definitions).Awrs. 3 and 4. Treatment of contraband, and penalties.ArT. 5. Revocations and effective date (Aug. 1, 1932).IMPORTATION PROHIBITED OF FRUITS AND VEGETABLES FROM COUNTRIES INFESTEDWITH MEDITERRANEAN FRUIT FLY(Administrative Order No. 12, approved June 14, 1933)ARTICLE 1. The importation, bringing, or introduction of fruits and vegetables of the species listed hereunder from countries and places known to be actuallyinfested with the lediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata, namely, Algeria,Argentina, Azores, Bermuda, Brazil, British East Africa, Canary Islands, CapeColony, Cape Verde Islands, Congo, Dahomey, Delagoa Bay, Egypt, France,Greece, Iawaii, Italy, MIadagascar, MNadeira, Malta, Mauritius, Natal, NewSouth Wales, New Zealand, Nigeria, Palestine, Queensland, Rhodesia, Sicily,Spain, Syria, Tasmania, Tripoli, Tunis, Turkey, Uganda, Victoria, and WesternAustralia, is strictly prohibited: Provided, That a limited quantity of suchfruits and vegetables may, in accordance with articles 2 and 10 of Administra-tive Order No. 10, upon proper application made to the Director of PlantIndustry, be imported through the port of Manila from countries or placesherein enumerated which maintain plant-quarantine and inspection service, forthe purpose of obtaining seeds or planting materials to keep the PhilippineIslands supplied with new varieties and necessary propagating stock.The same fruits and vegetables may also be imported in limited quantitiesunder quarantine, from countries or places herein enumerated not maintainingplant-quarantine ind inspection service, provided they are to be used for experi-mental purposes only, subject to such conditions as the Director may impose.The fruits and vegetables, or the seeds or planting materials obtained from them,imported for the purposes mentioned in this article, shall be held or planted,as the case may be, under quarantine in an isolation station by the Director forclose observation and shall be released only when evidence is available showingthat no injurious insects and plant diseases are present on, in, or amongst suchfruits and vegetables, or seeds, seedlings, or plant materials derived therefrom.They shall also be subject to such other conditions, requirement, or treatmentas the Director may prescribe.PROHIBITED FRUITS AND VEGETABLESAchras sapota, sapodilla.Amnygdalus (Prunus) persica, peach.Amygdalus (Prunus) pers ica nectarina, nectarine.Annona muricata. soursop.Areniga saccharifera, sugar palm.Artocarpus inciSa. breadfruit.Averrhoa carambola, carambola.Calophyllum iinophyllum, ball kamani.CapsiCil i spp., peppers.Carica papaya, papaya.Carica qiiercifolia, dwarf papaya.Carissa (arduina) bispinosa, carissa.Casimiroa eduHis, white sapote.cetrum sp., Chinese inkberry.Chrysophylhum cainito, star-apple.Chri yophyllum oliviforme, satin-leaf chrysophyllun.Citrus japon ica, Japanese orange.(Citru.s) Fortunella japoni'ca, kumquat.Citrus nobilis, var. deliciosa, tangerine and mandarin.Citrus limfjonia, lemon.Citrus (d'cumana) grandis, grapefruit, pomelo, shaddock.Clausena wampi, wampi.Coffea spp., coffee.Cy(lonia oblonGfla. quince.Diospyros (decundra) ebewan, persimmon.

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19341 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 45Eriobotrya japonica, loquat.Eugenia (brasiliensis) dombeyi, Brazilian plum or Spanish cherry.Eugenia jambos, rose apple.Eugenia (micheli) uniflora, Surinam-cherry, Frenic cherry.Ficus carica, fig.Garcinia manqostanw, ma ngosteen.Garcinia xanthoch ymus, mangosteen.Gossypiumn spp., cultivated cotton.Jumbosa inalacceniis, mountain apple.Latania loddige.i, palm.Litch i ch inensis, lychee or lichee nut.Lycopuersicuvtn esciilentum, tomato.Malut spp., apple.Mangifera ibdica, mango.Mimuops elen ffi, elengi tree or Spanish cherry.Murraea or Murraya cxotica, mockorange or orange-jasmine.Musa sp., banana.orwnhia enargin ata, noronhia.Oclirosia elliptica, ochrosia.Opuntia vulyaril, pricklypear.Passiflora caerulea, passion vine.Persea (gratis.&imla) americana, avocado.Phoenix dactylifera, date palm.Priunus arm-eniaca, apricot.Prunus spp., plums.Psidium cattleianumn, strawberry guava.Psidium guajava, sweet, red, and white lemon guavas.Psidium guajava porniferuim, common guava.Psidiumr quajava pyriferum, waiawi.Punica granatum, pomegranate.Pyrus communis, pear.Santalum freycinetianuin, sandalwood.Solanun melongena, eggplant.Spondias (du-lcis) cytherca.Terminalia chebula, Natal plum.Term inalia catappa, tropical almond or winged kamaiii.Theretia nereifolia, bestill, yellow oleander.Vitis la brusca, fox grape.Contraband plant products icill be seizedART. 2. All or any fruits and vegetables of the species listed herein importedfrom the countries and phices named in article 1. in contravention of theprovisions of this order, shall be seized by the plant quarantine inspectors ofthe Bureau of Plant Industry and shall be immediately returned to the countryor place of origin or completely destroyed accordingt to the decision of theDirector of Plant Industry, at the expense of the importer.ART. 3. Penalties.ART. 4. Revokes orders, rules, and regulations which are inconsistent with thepresent order.ART. 5. The effective date of this order is July 1, 1933.FRESH FRUITS FROM TEXAS, U.S.A., AND MEXICO, IMPORTATION PROHIBITED TOPREVENT THE INTRODUCTION OF ANASTREPHA LUDENS(Administrative Order No. 56, approved Aug. 21, 1928)An insect pest known as the Morelos orange worm or Mexican fruit fly,Anastrepha ludens, is known to exist in the State of Texas, U.S.A., and inMexico, where it attacks fruits, especially oranges, limes, ma goes, pea(:l s,guavas, chicos, and plums; this pest does not exist in the Philippine Islandsconsequently:ARTICLE 1. The importation of fruits from the State of Texas, U.S.A., mdMexico is hereby prohibited : Proirided, That the importation through the portof Manila of small quantities of such fruits may be permitted in order toprocure better varieties, new propagating stock. or spvcimens for experimiinenmlpurposes, in accordance with section 2 of Administrative Order No. 29 (now

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46 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Apr.-Junearticle 2 of Administrative Order No. 10). Such importation must be madethrough the Director of Agriculture (now Director of Plant Industry), subjectto the provisions of Administrative Order No. 29 (now no. 10), and to thecon(liion that the imported stock must be held in quarantine in an isolationstation until it is evident that no plant diseases or injurious insects are presenton such plant materials.Ajrr. 2. Any importation of fruits from these places made in contravention ofthe proVisions of this order will be seized by the plant quarantine inspectorsduly authorized by the Director of Plant Industry, and will be either imme-diately returned to the country or place of origin or completely destroyed,according to the decision of the Director of Plant Industry or his duly author-ized agents. The cost of the return, or destruction of said plant materialsshall be borne by the importer.ART. 3. PenaltieS.ART. 4. Effective date of this order, August 21, 1928.IMPORTATION OF MIMOSA INVISA PROHIBITED(Administrative Order No. 57, approved Oct. 10, 1928)Under certain conditions Mimosa invisa Mart. is a noxious and very harmfulweed to agriculture. Consequently:ARTICLE 1. The importation of the seed of Mimosa invisa or of any part ofthe said plant in the raw or natural state capable of propagation is strictlyprohibited: Provided, That the importation through the port of Manila of theseed or parts of the said plant may be permitted in order to procure newpropagating stock, or specimens for experimental purposes, in accordancewith article 2 of Administrative Order No. 10 of this Bureau. Such impor-tation must be made through the Director of Plant Industry, subject to theprovisions of the said Administrative Order No. 10, and to the conditions thatthe imported stock must be held in quarantine in an isolation station until itis evident that no plant diseases or injurious insects are present on such plantmaterials, and that the propagation of said imported stock must be madeunder such directions as may be prescribed by the Director.ART. 2. Any importation of the seed of Mimosa invisa or any part of thesaid plant in the raw or natural state capable of propagation, made in con-travention of the provisions of this order, will be seized by the plant quarantineinspectors duly authorized by the Director of Plant Industry, and will beeither immediately returned to the country of origin or completely destroyed,according to the decision of the Director of Plant Industry or his duly author-ized agents. The cost of the return or destruction of the said plant materialsshall be borne by the importer.ARTS. 3 and 4. Pertain to domestic restrictions.ART. 5. Prescribes penalties.B.P.Q.-064 MAY 5, 1934.PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, FRENCH MANDATE OF SYRIAThis summary of the plant-quaratine import restrictions of the French mandate of Syria has been prepared for the information of nurserymen,plant-quarantine officials, and others interested in the exportation of plantsand plant products to that country.The summary was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant-quarantine inspectorof t he Bureau of Plant Quarantine, from his translation of the French textof the order of the French High Commission of Syria, No. 248, of April 19,198)4.The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct andcomplete up to the time of its preparation, but it is not intended to be usedindependently of, nor as a substitute for, the original text of the order, and itis not to be interpreted as legally authoritative. The order should be con-;UIted for tle exact text.AvERY S. HOYT,Acting Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.

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1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 47CONCISE SUMMARYIMPORTATION RESTRICTEDPlants or parts of plants, including scions, cuttings, cut flowers, leaves, fruits,vegetables, bulbs, tubers, rliizoimes, and seeds. Each shipment offered for entry must be accompanied by a phytosanita ry certificate issued in the country oforigin.IMPORTATION UNRESTRICTEDPlants and parts of plants intended exclusively for food and for industrialand medicinal purposes, but when their use is in doubt they shall be deemedrestricted products.ORDI OF THE FRENCH HIGH COMMISSION, No. 248, OF APRIL 19, 1926GENERAL REGULATIONSMovements of plant material restrictedARTICLE 1. Subject to the provisions of the present order are:(a) Importation into the States under French mandate;(b) Commerce between these same States;(c) Exportation from these States;(d) Transit through the territories under French mandate.Restricted plant material(1) Plants or parts of plants, including scions, cuttings, bulbs, tubers,rhizomes, seeds, cut flowers, leaves, fruits, and vegetables;(2) Material of any kind used for the packing and transport of the productsmentioned in the preceding paragraph.Unrestricted plant materialART. 2. Plants and parts of plants intended exclusively for food, manufactur-ing, and medicinal purposes are not subject to the present regulations.However, in case of doubt as to the real purpose of the plants and parts ofplants, or if, although intended for footi, or for manufacturing or medicinalpurposes, their introduction into or distribution through the country constitutesa danger to agriculture, the present regulations will be applied to them bydecision of the High Commissioner upon the request of the heads of the Statesconcerned and upon the advice of the president of the Consultative EpiphyteCommission.ART. 3. The High Commissioner may prohibit the importation and transit ofthese products by special orders issued upon the proposal of the SecretaryGeneral of the High Commissariat on the advice of the president of the Con-sultative Epiphyte Commission.ART. 4. Commerce in the products mentioned in paragraphs 1 and 2 ofarticle 1 shall be the object of provisions made by each State.Customs ports of entryART. 5. Subject to the provisions mentioned in the following article, the rightto import into the territories under mandate the products mentioned in para-graphs 1 and 2 of article 1 is limited to customs offices on maritime and landfrontiers which will provide the technical personnel and material necessary toinsure the control of importation and, when required, the disinfection of theimported products.An agreement between the inspection-general of customs of Syria andLebanon and the State concerned will regulate the conditions under which theproducts to be disinfected will be transported from the point of importationto the State disinfecting station and their delivery to the importers after,disinfection.ART. 6. Requests for the opening of customs offices for the entry of the prod-ucts mentioned in paragraphs 1 and 2 of article 1 shall be addressed by the heads

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48 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Apr.-June-of the States concerned to the High Commissioner, who will promulgate adecree on the proposal of the Secretary-General of the High Commissariat uponthe advice of the inspector-general of customs of Syria and Lebanon and of thepresident of the Consultative Epiphyte Commission.According to the technical means and materials that the localities in whichthe customs offices whose opening for importation is requested will provide,import authorizations may be extended to all the products mentioned in para-graphs 1 and 2 of article 1, or be limited to certain of those products and to.certain botanical species.ART. 7. In each State, in order to facilitate for the agricultural service thecontrol of the products mentioned in paragraphs 1 and 2 of article 1, the customsservice shall notify the former service without delay of the address of the de-pository of the import declarations pertaining to those products.Inspection certificate requiredART. 8. Products offered for importation must be accompanied by a phyto-pathological inspection certificate adopted in the country of origin affirming thatthe products are free from any parasite known to be injurious to crops.This certificate, after being visaed by the customs service and registered bythe director of agriculture of the State in which the port of entry is located,.will accompany the imported products to their final destination.Disposal of noncertified productsART. 9. Products unaccompanied by a phytopathological inspection certificatewill be inspected by the local Direction of Agriculture on their arrival at theport of entry.They may be admitted if found free from parasites; disinfected if necessary;shipped to a port having facilities for disinfecting if the port of entry does notfurnish those facilities; or returned to the country of origin or destroyed, atthe choice of the importer, if disinfection cannot be carried out.Destruction will be effected by the customs service within 6 days from thedate the importer was notified by the customs service, if he had not made hisdecision known.PackingART. 10. Imported products must be so packed as to facilitate inspection anddisinfection.Each package shall be provided with a tag attached conspicuously indicating: Full name and address of the exporter; locality of origin of the products;character, variety, and quantity of the products contained in the package; andname and address of the importer.The opening of the packages, and disinfection, reshipment, or destruction ofthe products will be made at the expense and risk of the importer.ART. 11. The examination of products imported without certificate will in-volve a report, in duplicate, which will be prepared by the agent charged with the inspection.This report, which will contain the information necessary for the identifica-tion of the products examined, will state the outcome of the examination andthe resultant operations.ART. 12. If the entry of the inspected products is permitted, the duplicate ofthe report will accompany the products to their final destination.No one may transport in territory under French mandate imported plants orparts of plants which are not accompanied by a phytopathological certificate orby the inspection report mentioned in the preceding article.The Consultative Epiphyte Commission may satisfy itself, upon the arrivalof the imported products at destination, that they are free from parasites.ARTs. 13 to 19. Interstate traffic.TransitART. 20. The transit of the plants and parts of plants mentioned in para-graphs 1 and 2 of article 1 through the territory of States under French mandateis subject to the regulations concerning the importation of those plants andparts thereof.

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1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 49ARTS. 21 to 23. Penalties.ART. 24. The Secretary-General of the High Commissariat, the president ofthe State of Syria, the governors of the States of Great Lebanon and of Alaoui-tes are charged each in that which concerns him, with the execution of the present decree.P.Q.C.A.-314, Supplement No. 5 MAY 7, 1934.PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, BRITISH HONDURASProclamation No. 6, of February 13, 1934, revokes Proclamation No. 1, ofFebruary 5, 1929, and supersedes it. Proclamation No. 6 prescribes:An absolute prohibition of importation into the Colony, directly or indirectly,of citrus plants, including plants of grapefruit, orange, lemon, lime, andtangerine trees, save and except under the following conditions:"(a) All orders shall be placed through the Department of Agriculture and the selection of the nursery from which any plants are obtained shallbe made by and be in the discretion of the agricultural officer."(b) Trees shall be fumigated on arrival if considered necessary by theagricultural officer. "(c) Trees in each consignment shall be planted out in one block and shallbe open to inspection at any time by officers of the Department of Agriculture."(d) Within 3 years after planting any tree as aforesaid, if in the opinionof the agricultural officer it is necessary to destroy any tree or to spray thesame in any particular manner due to the presence of harmful diseasebelieved to have been introduced on such tree, the owner thereof shall, onbeing required to do so in writing by the agricultural officer, carry out athis own expense any such instructions as aforesaid. The owner shall beprecluded from claiming any damage or compensation arising through anydestruction or treatment of any plant as aforesaid."(e) All materials used in the packing of any trees, as well as any containerin which the same may have been conveyed, shall be destroyed by fire afterthe plants have been received on the farm on which they are to be set out."AvERY S. HOYT,Acting Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.B.P.Q.-314, Supplement No. 6 MAY 15, 1934.PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, BRITISH HONDURASIMPORTATION OF COCONUT PALMS PROHIBITEDProclamation No. 25, August 14, 1933, effective August 19, 1933, prohibits all importations into the Colony, directly or indirectly, of any part or portionof the coconut palm (Cocos nucifera), including plants, leaves, leaflets, andunhusked fruits (but not including the husked nut of commerce), exceptby the Department of Agriculture for the purpose of experimental work under-taken by that Department.AVERY S. HOYT,Acting Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.P.Q.C.A.-314, Supplement No. 7 JUNE 15, 1934.PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, BRITISH HONDURASProclamation No. 18, of May 4, 1934, revokes Proclamation No. 5 of Novem-ber 27, 1920 (see P.Q.C.A.-314, p. 1), and supersedes it.Proclamation No. 18 prohibits absolutely the importation into the Colony ofBritish Honduras, directly or indirectly, of the plant known as the bananaplant and any other species of the genus Musa from the West Indian Islands,Republics of Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Panama, the Con-

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50 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Apr.-Junetinent of South An!eriea, ( 'anary Islands. and West Africa, together with anyarticles or soil packed therewithi, or any package, covering, or thing in whichit may be packed, unless it is imported by the Department of Agriculture for experimental purposes. or under a license issued by the agricultural officer.AVERY S. HOYT,Acting Chief. Bureau of Plant Quarantine.B.P.Q.-347, Supplement No. 2 MAY 7, 1934.PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF GREECEPHYLLOXERATED AND SUSPECTED REGIONS OF GREECE(Decree of Jan. 10, 1934)ONLY ARTICLEI. The following regions are declared phylloxerated:(1) The communes of Amorgos, Arkessini, and Katapola of the island ofAmorgos, with the islets of Kato Koufonissia, Schinousa, and Irakleia, whichare part of the commune of Katapola. The islets around the island ofAmorgos: Denoussa, Kavos, Nikouria, Petalidi, Gravoussa, Dryma, Antikaros,Gougari, Fidoussa, Agrilos, Glaros, Prassoura, and Amorgopoula.(2) The Province of Kalambaka of the Department of Trikkala.(3) All the Province of Grevena.(4) All the Province of Castoria.(5) All the Province of Elasson.II. The Provinces of Trikkala and Karditsa of the Department of Trik-kala.III. The place called " Valta " of the village of Palama of the Provinceof Carditsa is declared infested with phylloxera.AvERY S. HOYT,Acting Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.B.P.Q.-355, Revised JUNE 15, 1934.PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, JAMAICA, BRITISH WEST INDIESThe following summary of the plant-quarantine import restrictions of Jama-ica, British West Indies, was prepared August 4, 1933, by the Director of Agriculture of that Colony, revised by him May 9, 1934, and is offered for theinformation of nurserymen, plant-quarantine officials, and others interestedin the exportation of plants and plant products from the United States toJamaica.The information contained in this circular is offered as being correct andcomplete up to the time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used in-dependently of, nor as a substitute for, the original texts of the orders and proclamations concerned, nor is it to be interpreted as legally authoritative.The orders and proclamations should be consulted for the exact text.AvEnY S. HOYT.Acting Chief, Burea u of Plant Qilarantine.

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1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 51SUMMARY OF THE PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS OF JAMAICA,BRITISH WEST INDIESProclamations, orders, etc., in forceArticleInstrument Date ProvisionsCitrus:Fruits-----.-----------Proclamation under Feb. 13, 1924 Prohibited from all countries.law 23 of 1916.Plants, buds, and grafts-. Order under law 10 June 18, 1925 Prohibited from all countries, butof 1925. Dec. 5,1933 may be imported by Director ofAgriculture at any time from any country. Cotton, including any part of ----do.-----------June 18,1925 Prohibited from all countries (ex-any plant of any species or cept Turks and Caicos Islands)variety of Go8sypium. except under special license fromDirector of Agriculture.Coconuts in the husk-------Proclamation under May 15, 1923 Prohibited from all countries.law 23 of 1916.Banana plants or parts thereof -----do-.-----------Apr. 3, 1917 Do.or articles used as packing orcovering for.Tools or implements usually --.-do.---------------do-----Prohibited from Central America,employed in the cultivation South America, and Trinidad.of bananas.Earth or soil -------------------d-----do-------------do-------Prohibited from all countries.Fruits and vegetables (except -----do-------------Jan. 13,1934 Prohibted except from countriesdried or processed) grains, specified in schedule (Unitedseeds, potatoes, onion, or any Kingdom and Ireland, Canada,species of AIlium. Bahamas, United States ofAmerica).Permitted importations to be cer-tified by a competent authorityof the government of the countryof origin as home grown, free from disease, and from a countrywhere Mediterranean fruit flydoes not exist.Importer to give 7 days notice ofarrival. On arrival subject toinspection, treatment, or destruc-tion by officer authorized by theDirector of Agriculture.Copra--------------------do------------Sept. 2,1933 Prohibited from all countries.Plants or parts thereof, includOrder under law 10 June 4, 1929 (1) From the United Kingdom maying any soil, articles, coverof 1925. be imported without permit.ings, or packages in which Entry permitted into port ofthey may be enclosed or Kingston only. On arrival mustpacked. be fumigated with hydrocyanicacid gas.(2) From any country other thanthe United Kingdom permittedonly if and when a written permithas been granted by the Directorof Agriculture previous to impor-tation.Admission allowed into port ofKingston only. Goods must beconsigned to the Director ofAgriculture and on arrival willbe subjected to such disinfectionor fumigation as may be con-sidered necessary.-----do.-.-----------Apr. 26,1930 The permit will take the form of alabel which must be forwarded by the importer to the supplier,who must attach it to the pack-age containing the plants.Packages arriving without a per-mit attached are to be destroyedforthwith by post office or customs.Agricultural tools or imple-----do------------June 4,1929ments of labor.(a) New and unused----------------------------------------Same as (1) and (2) above.(b) Used-----------------------------------------------------A permit as in (2) above is neces-sary before used tools and imple-ments can be imported from anycounty, including United King-dom.

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52 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Apr.-,TuneB.P.Q.-350, Supplement No. 1 JUNE 15, 1934.PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, KINGDOM OF NORWAYIMPORT RESTRICTIONS ON POTATOESIn view of the fact that the Royal Resolution of December 15, 1933, furtheramended that of February 13, 1925 (see B.P.Q.-350, p. 1), to take cognizanceof the Colorado potato beetle, it was deemed desirable to furnish a morenearly complete text of the amended resolution.RESOLUTION OF FEBRUARY 13, 1925, AS AMENDEDARTICLE 1. Potatoes may be imported into Norway only on condition: (a) That by a thorough and comprehensive field inspection, which theDepartment of Agriculture has found adequate, it was determined that neitherwart disease (Synch ytrium endobioticum) nor the Colorado potato beetle(Leptinotarsa decemlincata) occurs in the country in question, and that theseparasites have not occurred there during the past 6 years;'(b) That the country of export concerned permits the importation of potatoesonly from countries in which likewise it has been satisfactorily determined,as indicated in paragraph 1 (a), that neither potato wart nor Colorado beetleexists ;(c) That each shipment is made directly from the country of export to theplace of import and is accompanied by a certificate issued by an official phyto-pathological service of the exporting country, in accordance with article 9 ofthese regulations;(d) That the potatoes are packed in sacks or boxes not previously usedand that each sack or box is sealed with the seal of the phytopathologicalservice concerned;(e) That on arrival in Norway the potatoes are inspected by a Government inspector, who will certify to the customs that he has inspected them and found them to be free (if such be the case) from potato wart (Synchytriumendobioticum), the potato tuber worm (Gnorimoschema operculella), and theColorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa dccemlineata), and that the potatoesalso fulfill the requirements of the regulations for the importation of potatoes.The potatoes shall not be delivered by the customs until this certificate issubmitted.ARTS. 2 and 3. Concerning the employment of inspectors.ART. 4. Anyone who intends to import potatoes must first obtain a permitfrom the Department of Agriculture (Landbruksdepartementet), Oslo, andmust subsequently report each shipment to that Department; such a reportmust reach the Department at least 3 days before inspection is to be made.ART. 5. Inspection is to be made at the place of customs clearance. Importersshall transport the potatoes to and from the place of inspection and providethe necessary labor during inspection.ART. 6. At least 5 percent of the boxes or sacks shall be inspected.ARTS. 7 and 8. Instructions to inspectors and fees for inspection.ART. 9. The certificate of the foreign phytopathological service must be issuedwithin 14 days of shipment. It must indicate the locality where the potatoeswere grown and the names and addresses of shipper and consignee. It shallcertify :(a) That the potatoes were grown in the exporting country concerned andthat the said country is free from wart disease and Colorado potato beetle;(b) That the potatoes were grown in ground free from root nematodes(Heterodera rostochiensis var. solani) ;(c) That shipment is made in new containers and that each sack or boxbears the seal of the respective phytopathological service. The certificate shallbe signed and bear the official title of the authorized official of that service andbe visaed by a Norwegian consul.A copy of the certificate shall at once be transmitted to the Department ofAgriculture (Lan dbruksdepartementet), Oslo, Norway.I Since there are small localized areas infected with wart disease in several States Inthe United States, the importation into Norway of potatoes grown in this country Isprohibited (decision of the Norwegian Department of Agriculture per the Royal Nor-wegian Legation, letter of Feb. 18, 1931).

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1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 53ART. 10 Concerning small shipments from Sweden.ART. 11. The Department may make exceptions in special cases.ART. 12. Penalties.ART. 13. Effective immediately, until further notice ; revokes the regulationsof August 9, 1921.AvERY S. HOYT,Acting Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.P.Q.C.A.-310, Supplement No. 1 JuNE; 13, 1934.PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF PERUPORTS OF ENTRYAccording to the decree of August 12, 1931, the entry may be allowed. inparticular cases, of living plants through other ports of the Republic thanthose previously authorized. For this purpose, the chief of the Service ofPhytosanitary Seed and Plant Inspection and technical officials of agriculturalstations and boards may attest the corresponding inspection.Interested persons must apply in advance for the permit and pay the cost ofthe said inspection.NoTE.-The above supplements the information under the caption " PORTSOF ENTRY ", p. 3 of P.Q.C.A.-310.AvERY S. HOYT,Acting Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.P.Q.C.A.-306, Supplement No. 2 JUNE 23, 1934.PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, NEW ZEALANDTERRITORY OF WESTERN SAMOAThe secretary of the administration of western Samoa, in a communicationdated April 11, 1934, to the American consul general, Sydney, New South Wales,Australia, stated that in the matter of plant quarantines western Samoa isguided by the New Zealand customs acts and regulations, but certain localspecial regulations also apply to the entry of plants, etc., into that territory.These are the Board of Health Regulations No. 7, effective October 10, 1924, andthe proclamation of September 9, 1933.BOARD OF HEALTH REGULATIONS No. 7 OF WESTERN SAMOA 2(Effective Oct. 10, 1934)HAY, STRAW, CHAFF, HUSKS USED AS PACKING TO BE BURNED ON ARRIVALARTICLE 1. These regulations may be cited as the Board of Health Regula-tions No. 7.ART. 2. In every case where goods of any kind are imported into westernSamoa, either direct or by way of any other country, from Great Britain,Ireland, or any part of the Continent of Europe, or from the States of Queens-land or Western Australia, or from the United States of America, accompaniedby hay, straw, chaff, or husks as packing or otherwise, the importer shall burnthose materials with as little delay as possible, and in any case within 3 days ofthe commencement of unpacking of the goods.2 Since these regulations apply to import restrictions and prohibitions of plant mate-rials, including fresh fruits and vegetables, they are included as a matter of information,although they are precautionary measures against the introduction of foot-and-mouthdisease into western Samoa. The certificates concerned must be issued by the Bureauof Animal Industry.

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54 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Apr.-JuneART. 3. In no case shall any importer use or suffer to be used any such hay,straw, chaff, or husks for repacking the same goods or for packing any othergoods.IM POWL'ATN PROHIBITED OF OATS, BARLEY, MAIZE, HAY, STRAW, CHAFF, PLANTSOR PORTIONS OF PLANTS, FRESH FRUITS AND VEGETABLES, AND ALL GRAIN ANDFARM PRODUCE FROM CALIFORNIA, OREGON, AND WASHINGTONART. 4. The importation from the United States of America into westernSamoa, either direct or by way of any other country, of the following goods isabsolutely prohibited: Oats, barley, maize, hay, straw, chaff, plants or portionsof plants, all fresh fruits and vegetables, and all grain and farm produce:Prorided, That in the case of all goods the importation of which is prohibitedunder this article, and not grown in any of the States of California, Oregon,and Washington, or directly handled or exposed within any of those States,otherwise than is necessary for through transportation to western Samoa,importation shall be permitted if the goods are accompanied by a certificatesigned by a person appointed in that behalf by the government of the Stateconcerned and countersigned by a responsible officer of the Federal Departmentof Agriculture certifying:(a) The name of the State in which grown;(b) That such State is, and has been for not less than 12 months, free fromfoot-and-mouth disease; and(c) That the goods under certificate have not been directly handled orexposed within any of the States of California, Oregon, and Washingtonotherwise than is necessary for through transportation into western Samoa.CERTIFICATE OF ORIGIN REQUIRED WITH HAY, STRAW, CHAFF, OR HUSKS IMPORTEDFROM THE UNITED STATES AS PACKING MATERIALART. 5. The importation from the United States is also prohibited of allhay, straw, chaff, or husks used as packing material for goods of any kindunless accompanied by a certificate signed and countersigned as specified inarticle 4, certifying such material to be the produce of a State other than theStates of California, Oregon, and Washington, and that it has not beendirectly handled or exposed within any of these States otherwise than isnecessary for through transportation to western Samoa.ART. 6. The importation into western Samoa, either direct or by way ofany other country, is prohibited of all oats, barley, maize, hay, straw, andchaff from Queensland and Western Australia; and, save with the prior con-sent of the Director of Agriculture, of all the aforesaid articles from any otherState in the Commonwealth of Australia, other than Queensland and WesternAustralia.PROCLAMATION OF THE ADMINISTRATOR, SEPTEMBER 9, 1933CERTIFICATION OR FUMIGATION OF IMPORTED PLANT MATERIAL REQUIREDARTICLE 1. The importation is prohibited of any soil, plant matter, fruit, bags,native matting, tapa, or any similar article made from or the produce of thesoil which is not accompanied by a certificate issued by a competent authorityof the place of export affirming that it is free from pest or disease or that ithas been fumigated immediately prior to export unless such article or thingshall first be fumigated at the fumigation station hereunder appointed.ART. 2. Likewise prohibited is the importation of any soil, plant matter,fruit, bags, native matting, tapa, or any similar article made from or the pro-duce of the soil, whether accompanied by a certificate as aforesaid or not,which has passed in trzinsit through any place where in the opinion of theadministrator it may be subject to infection by pest or disease, unless it shallfirst be fumiga ted at the fumigation station hereunder appointed.ART. 3. Describes the building in Apia appointed as a fumigation stationfor the purposes of this proclamation.ART. 4. Fixes the charges for fumigation.AvERY S. HOYT,Acting Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.

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19341 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 55P.Q.C.A.-299, Supplement No. 2 JUNE 28, 1934.PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIAProclamation No. 227 of April 18, 1934, amends that of June 5, 1924 (seeP.Q.C.A.-299, p. 2), to read as follows:"The importation into Australia is prohibited of deciduous fruit trees orparts thereof (including the fruit and seeds), plants and parts of plants of the family Rosaceae (including the fruit and seeds), which were grown in anycountry in which pear blight or fire blight (Bacillus amylovorus) exists: Pro-vided, That apples grown in New Zealand in districts in which fire blight doesnot exist, may be imported subject to the conditions prescribed in the regula-tions: Provided further, That the minister for health may permit the importa-tion of ornamental plants or of new or special varieties of deciduous fruittrees or their fruit or seeds subject to any conditions which he may think fitto impose."Under the same date the following regulations were promulgated concern-ing the certification of apples imported into the Commonwealth from NewZealand:"REGULATION 1. Any person desirous of landing apples imported from NewZealand shall, at the time of giving notice, also furnish with each consign-ment a certificate signed by a responsible officer of the Department of Agri-culture of New Zealand, identifying the fruit, stating the quantity and thedistrict in which the apples were grown, and certifying:"(a) That the disease known as 'fire blight' (Bacillus amylovorus) does notexist in the said district, and" (b) That the apples were grown and packed in the said district for ship-ment from the port stated in the certificate." REGULATION 2. Each case of the consignment shall be labeled or brandedwith the letters and figures under which the name of the grower and thedistrict of production are registered with the Department of Agriculture ofNew Zealand, in addition to any other marks which may serve to identifythe consignment."AVERY S. HOYT,Acting Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.PENALTIES IMPOSED FOR VIOLATIONS OF THE PLANTQUARANTINE ACTAccording to reports received by the Bureau during the period April 1 toJuly 1, 1934, penalties have recently been imposed by the proper Federalauthorities for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act, as follows:QUARANTINES AFFECTING MEXICAN PRODUCTSIn the case of the United States versus the persons listed below, for attempt-ing to smuggle in contraband plant material, the penalties indicated wereimposed by the United States customs officials at the following ports:Name Port Contraband PenaltyB. C. Ball.-------------Brownsville, Tex-----8 oranges. ..-------------------------$5Victoria S. Varela ----------.do.------------5 plants .---------------------------5Maria M. de Perez.----------do-.-------------4 mangoes.----------------------5Elenterio Rodriguez ----------do--------------1 avocado seed and 1 orange--------5Leonora Guerra.------------do --------------13 plants. .--------------------------5Mariano Moreno------------do--.------------4 mangoes .-------------------------5Francisca Garza------------do--------------1 avocado with seed------------------5M. L. Barnes--------------do-------------4 mangoes --------------------------5Lupe Baker----------------do-------------3 mangoes.---------------------J. M. Fonseca------------d---do--------------1 avocado seed------------------------5Mrs. D. C. Hogan----------do .--------------1 mango-----.-------------------------Refugio Hernandez ---------do.--------------3 mangoes and 1 avocado with seed--5Otto Markworth.------------do-----------------8 mangoes .-------------------------50. R. Hupp---------------do-------------31 avocados with seed -----------------5Maria T. Ugelda--------Calexico, Calif -.---6 mangoes.--.-.----.--.--2Adolph Castro----------Eagle Pass, Tex------2 avocados with seed-----------------1,Guadalupe Duran -----------.do. .--------------1 mamey ---------------------------1

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56 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Apr.-JuneName Port Contraband PenaltyEugcnio Reyes Arriola----Eagle Pass, Tex--------1 avocado ------------------------$1Dallas F. Whaley ----------.--do .--------------24 avocados with seed-.---------------1.20Josefaarza---------------do--------------2 plants ----------------------------ILorenzo Arlenz-------------do---------------6 avocados with seed -----------------11. Z. Lozano ----------------do.--------------4 mangoes.----.-.------.----Rodrigo Perez.-------------do-----------------9 avocado seed.-.---.--.--------Anastacio Garcia------------do. .--------------3 avocados and 1 mango---------------1Santiago F. Rodriguez -----El Paso, Tex---------1 orange and 4 sweet limes------------1Rosa Reza de Hernandez ------do.--------------4 plants----------------------------2C. R. Howard-------------do .--------------3 avocados with seed -----------------1Juana Perez ------------do .--------------3 fig plants------------------------1Manuel Mena-------------.do.--------.--------1 avocado. ..-------------------------1Manuel V. Rodriguez---------do.--------------5 mangoes, 6 avocados, 1 sapote, 1 1grapefruit, and 2 sweet limes.Don Diaz----------------do------.----------256 apricots.------------------------1Eugenio Quintilla--------Hidalgo, Tex---------5 mangoes -------------------------1Felix Medina ----.--.-.--.-.do.--------------11 mangoes ----------------5Rafael Aranda --------------do--------------5 avocados.------------------------5Paul Califa .----------------do. .--------------2 avocados--------------------------5Ignacio Ceja .------------Laredo, Tex.---------2 mangoes--------------------------1Jose Garza.-.-d.--------------do ---.-------------do ----------------------------IE. Resendez--------------do.-------------10 oranges and 7 mangoes -------------1R. D. Peck---------------do--------------7 mangoes and 7 avocados------------1P. Caussauli--.-----------do--------------36 avocados.------------------------1A. R. Marlanada.------------do.-.--------------3 avocados and 3 mangoes -------------1J. G. Guajardo.--------------do ..--------------2 avocados-------------------------ID. Zapata-----------------do--------------9 avocados.-------------------------1L. Walker.----------------do. .--------------7 avocados .-------------------------1J. W. Davis -------------. .-----do ..--------------6 avocados .-------------------------1Fred Mendez --------------.-----do.--------------9 avocados. .-------------------------1Nicalosa Ramirez ----------.do .--------------2 plants.----------------------------1Mrs. H. Hernandez --------.-.do.-.--------------3 mangoes.-------------------------1Victor Sielski ...---------------do --.-------------.-----.do ....-----------------------IP. Guerra -----------------do ..--------------9 mangoes and 2 mameys ------------ITaneisea R. de la Garza.----.---. do. ..--------------1 mango .--------------------------1S. E. Garcia -.-----------.-----do ..----------------do -----------------------------1Abraham Garcia -----------do -.--------------6 avocados .-------------------------1James Webb ----------..----.do ..-----------------do. ..----------------------------IGenovena Parraldo-----------do. .--------------1 mango .---------------------------1Ricardo Llanas.-..------------do .--------------3 mangoes.---------------------------IGlen White. .---------------do ..--------------2 plants-------.-------------------1R. Garcia Gomez----------.--. .do .--------------3 avocados and 1 mango-------------IM. M. Garcia ..-------------do ..--------------2 mangoes--.-------------------------1Emma Vela ..---------------do ..--------------3 mangoes-.-------------------------Maria Valdez -------------.do .--------------2 mangoes ---------------------------1Augustine Pena -------------do. .--------------4 avocados------------------------IAdolph Trego..-------------do.--.----------do --. ------------------------1Valente Velasquez---------.--. do .-------------2 avocados .-------------------------1Jacobs Villarreal.-------------do.--------------10 mangoes---------------------------1J. Gonzalez. .----------------.do .-------------2 avocados ..-------------------------1Mrs. Otil Barrera.-----------do .-------------2 mangoes. ..-----------------------1Luis S. Martinez.-----------. do--------------6 avocados .-------------------------1Edward Clayborne---------.--. do ..--------------8 avocados.-------------------------10. E. Garza---------------do ..--------------11 avocados and 1 sweet lime----------1P. Solis.-.------------------do .--------------7 avocados.-------------------------1Miss A. Martinez.------------do. .--------------2 avocados ..-----------------------1G. Sanchez. .----------------do ----------------. 5 avocados and 4 mangoes------------Mateo Luna.---------------do. .--------------5avocados.-------------------------1C. Trevino. .----------------do ..--------------1 mango .--------------------------1R. Caballero ----------.----.do ..--------------8 avocados ----------------------1M. M. Trevino...------------do. .--------------5 avocados .-------------------------IS. P. Gonzalez--.-------------do ..--------------13 avocados .----------------------1Arturo Guterrez .------------. do -.---.-.-4 avocados.------------------------1W. M. Rodgers -----------.--. do ..--------------29 plants . ..------------------------IMrs. Leo Zander--------New Orleans, La------12 orchid plants 1---------------------22.50Armando Villareal-------Rio Grande City, Tex. 30 pounds broomcorn ----------------3.60Roberta Garza-----------Roma, Tex----------1 potted rose bush.-------------------51 These plants came from Brazil.

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ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF PLANTQUARANTINEA. S. HOYT, ACting Chief.3. CoNNoi, Busincss manager.Bt. C. ALTHOUSE, Informa~tion offleer.E. I. SASSCER, in Chiarge Foreign Plant Quarantines.S. B. FRACKER, in Charyc Domestic Plant Quarantines.LoN A. HAWKINS, in Charge Technolotical Division.A. V. BURGERS. in Field Charge Gypsy Moth and Brow-n-Tail Moth ControlSHt(adquarters, Green field. Mass.)L. 1. WORTHLEY, in ield Charqe Jap(nese Beetle and Gpsy Moth andBroten-Tauit iloth Quarantines and EuropEan Corn Borer Certification (fHead-quarters, Harrisburg, Pa.).1. E. McDONALD, in Field Ch(irge Pink 1olliorm and Thurberia Weevil Quar-antinec; (Headquarters, San Antonio, Tex.).B. L. BOYDEN, in Field Charge Date Scale Quarantine (Hleadquartcrs, Indio,Calif.).P. A. HoIDALE. in Field Charge Mexican Fruit Fly Quarantine (Ileadquarters,H(rlingen, Tex.).57U S G EN 7ET PI:NTING OFF I:E !t34

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4 s

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S. R. A.-B. E. P. Q. No. 120 Issued January 1915.United States Department of AgricultureBUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINESERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTSJULY-SEPTEMBER 1934CONTENTSPageQuarantine and other official announcements---------------------------------------------------59Announcements relaitina to citrus canker quarantine (no. 19).-------------------------------59Revision of quarantine ----------------------------------------------------------59instructions to collectors of customs (T. 1). 47254)-----------------------------------60Announcements relating to fruit and vegetable quarantine (no. 56).--_----------------------------61Sterilization of imported \inifera grapes by refrigeration (B. P. Q.-362, supplements nos. 1and 2) _--_-----------------------__-----------------------------------61Announcements relating to gypsy moth and brown-tail moth quarantine (no. 45)--------------61Revision of regulations _--_-----_----------------------------------------------------------61Notice to general public through newspapers-------------------------------------69Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (no. 4S).-------------------------------69Japanese beetle control ends for season on fruit and vegetable shipments ------------------69Removal of Japanese beetle quarantine restrictions on the interstate movement of fruits andvegetables---------------------------------------------------------------------70Instructions to postmasters-----. .---------------------------------------70Announcement relating to Mexican fruit fly quarantine (no. 64)-------------------------------71Administrative instructions-shipping season for Texas citrus fruit to begin September 26(B. E. P. Q.-367) -----------------------------------------------------------------71Announcement relating to nursery stock, plant, and seed quarantine (no. 37)-.----------------71Notice to permittees an(l others interested-willow withes as plant ties prohibited on plantsfor entry from Europe and Canada (B. E. P. Q.-365).-----------------------------------71Announcements relating to pink bollworm quarantine (no. 52).------------------------------72Modification of pink bollworm quarantine regulations (amendment no. 1).-------------72Notice to general public through newspapers --------------------------------------74Instructions to postmasters ---------------------------------------------------74Announcements relating to rice quarantine (no. 55)---------------------------------74Rice quarantine amended (amendment no. 1)----------------.----------------------------74Instructions to collectors of customs (T. D. 47229)----------------------------------76Announcements relating to sugarcane quarantine (no. 15)----------------------------------76Sugarcane quarantine revised------------------------------------------------76Revision of quarantine----------------.-------------------------------------------------76Miscellaneous items------------------.--------._------------------------------------77Plant-quarantine import restrictions,,Republic of Greece (B. P. Q-347, supplement no. 3) 77Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Jamaica, British West Indies (B. E. P. Q.-355, re-vised, supplement no. 1)---------_-----------------------------------------------78Peru prohibits the exportation of propagating material of rotenone-producing plants (P. Q. C.A.-310, supplement no. 2)-----------------------------------------------------78Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Cuba (P. Q. C. A.-283, revised, supple-ment no. 3) ---------------------------------------------------------------------79Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Mexico (P. Q. C. A.-284, supplement no.9) 79.Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Germany (B. P. Q.-302, revised, supplement no. 2) -80Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Czechoslovakia (B. E. P. Q.-366)-------80Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act----------------------------------89Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine------------------------------92QUARANTINE AND OTHER OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTSANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO CITRUS CANKER QUARANTINE(NO. 19)REVISION OF NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 19 ON ACCOUNT OF CITRUS CANKERAND OTHER CITRUS DISEASESINTRODUCTORY NOTEQuarantine No. 19, on account of citrus canker and other citrus diseases,originally prohibited the importation of citrus nursery stock, including buds,scions, and seeds, from all foreign countries and localities, and this prohibitionapplied to all citrus plants and their relatives cmintained in the subfnu ilyCitratae of the family Rutaceae. Information accumulated since this quaran-tine was first issued indicates that both citrus canker and the other important90783-34--1 0

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60 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.Citrus diseases concerned are not likely to occur on any host outside of onetribe ill this subfamily, viz., the tribe Citrinae. Establishment of an effectiveseed treatment has already led to a modification of this quarantine, effectiveJuly 1, 1932, whereby the prohibition against the importation of citrus seedsWas removed. anl the present revision now proposes to effect further modifica-tion lby releasing also from prohibitcd status all species of the subfamilyCitratae except those comprised in the one tribe, Citrinae. The genera thusreleased are: Atalantia, A cylc, Acylopsis, Balsam ocitrIN, Chactosperiunm(Swiuh 1a), Chalca,,, Clauccnw (Claiwuna), Clauseina, Echiinocitrua., Feronia,Ft'rionclla, GlyCosmilis, 1Jcspcrcthusa, Lavanga, Linionia (Ecronia), Luvunga(Laranga.), Merope, Merrilia, Micromlci, Mu rraya (C(haleas), Oxanthera,Pamiburus, Param ignuya, Pleio8permium, Scucrin a, Swvinylca, Triphasia, andWenclZelia.Both the citrus seeds and the various plant species thus removed fromQuarantine No. 19 may hereafter be imported under the provisions of Quaran-tine No. 37, the Nursery Stock, Plant, and Seed Quarantine.LEE A. STRONG,Chicf, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 19 (REVISED)(Approved Aug. 17, 1934; effective Sept. 1, 1934)The fact has been determined by the Secretary of Agriculture that a dan-gerous disease of citrus plants, known as the citrus canker, and also other citrus diseases, new to and not heretofore widely prevalent or distributedwithin and throughout the United States, exist in Europe, Asia, Africa, South America, North America outside of the United States, and foreign oceaniccountries and islands, and are coming to the United States with importedcitrus nursery stock.Now, therefore, I, Henry A. Wallace, Secretary of Agriculture, under author-ity conferred by the Plant Quarantine Act approved August 20, 1912, asamended, do hereby declare that it is necessary, in order to prevent the furtherintroduction into the United States of citrus canker and other citrus diseases,to forbid the importation into the United States of all citrus nursery stock,including buds and scions, from the foreign countries and localities named.(n and after September 1, 1934, and until further notic?, by virtue of saidact of August 20, 1912, the importation from ail foreign localities and countriesof citrus nursery stock, including buds and ,scions, except for experimental orscientific purposes by the Department of Agriculture, is prohibited.The term " citrus " as used herein shall be understood to include only plantsbelonging to the tribe Citrinae, subfamily Citratae, of the family Rutaceae,which tribe comprises the following genera: Citropsis, Citrus, Eremocitrus,Fortuiclla, Microcitrus, Monauth ocitrus, Plcurocitrus, and Poncirus.This notice of quarantine revises and supersedes Notice of Quarantine No.19, approved December 10, 1914, effective January 1, 1915, and a modificationthereof approved June 22, 1932, effective July 1, 1932, and shall become effectiveon and after September 1, 1934.Done at the city of Washington this 17th day of August 1934.Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department ofA _riculture.[sEAL] H1. A. WALLACE,Secretary of Agriculture.INSTRUCTIONS TO (orLET-roR8 OF CUSTOMST. D. '4993, PUBLISHING NOTICEOF QUAR\NTINE NO. 19, PROHIBITING THE IM-PORTATION OF CITRUS N URIS'RY STOCK, AS MODIFIEI) nY T. D. 45705, REVIsED (T. D.47254)TiwAsv Dix 1I )LARTMENT,OFFICE: OF THE ( 0MMISsIONER O' (CUSToMS,Wahit oi, 1). C., Sept cInber 13, 1931.To Collectors of Castomis and Others ('oncerni'd:The aplienided cop)y of a revisi ion of Notice Of Q1uaranitille No. 19. on accountof tie citrus canker and other citrus diseases, issued by the Secretary of

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1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 61Agriculture, effective September 1, 1934, is published for the information andguidance of collectors of customs and others concerned.ELI FRANK, Jr.,A cting Cominssi. ioner of Castos,,(Then follows the full text of the revised quarantine.)ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO FRUIT AND VEGETABLEQUARANTINE (NO. 56)B. P. Q.-362, Supplement No. 1. JuLy 26, 1934.STERILIZATION OF IMPORTED VINIFERA GRAPES BY REFRIGERATIONIt now appears that occasional shipments of grapes may be offered for entryunder the provision of B. P. Q.-362 during the late summer nionths. In view ofthis situation, as an added safeguard the entry, subject to sterilization ofgrapes from regions where the Mediterranean fruit fly is known to occur, willbe limited to the period October 15 to March 15.In this connection it should be emphasized that the only type of containerwhich has been approved for the shipment of grapes originating in countrieswhere the Mediterranean fruit fly occurs is a tight barrel or keg. To avoidany delay or rejection of fruit arriving in containers which have not beenapproved, all in interest should submit in advance of the shipping season,samples of the container to be used.LEE A. STRONG,Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.B. P. Q.-362, Supplement No. 2. AUGUST 2,. 1934.STERILIZATION OF IMPORTED VINIFERA GRAPES BY REFRIGERATIONThe purpose of the additional safeguards contained in Supplement No. 1to B. P. Q.-362 was to limit the entry of grapes to the cooler months on thetheory that there might be sufficient breakage of containers during the periodwhen susceptible fruits would be available for oviposition by fruit flies shouldany escape during weather suitable for the development of the fly.For the present shipping season grapes will be permitted entry from O,tober1 to April 15, a period when availability of susceptible fruits and temperatureconditions are such as not to offer risk in the development of the fly shouldany escape from broken containers. Meanwhile breakagre conditions will beobserved and future shipping seasons will be restricted or not according toconditions found to obtain.LEE A. STRONG,Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO GYPSY MOTH AND BROWN-TAILMOTH QUARANTINE (NO. 45)GYPSY MOTH AND BROWN-TAIL MOTH QUARANTINE (NO. 45)REvisIoN OF REGULATIONSINTRODUCTORY NOTEThe gypsy moth and brown-tail moth quarantine regulations are revisedbelow in order to bring them up to date with respect to changes in the knowndistribution of these insects since the last revision of the regulations wasadopted May 25, 1931. The revision reduces the size of the regulated areain Vermont, and designates as generally infested certain territory of Con-necticut, Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont which has heretofore beenclassed as lightly infested. It also modifies the boundaries of the area desig-

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62 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.nated as brown-tail moth infested in the States of Maine, MAassachusetts, andNew lamp'hire, and adds parts of four counties in Vermont.Additioial changes of interest to shippers include the exemption of suchWoo plants as have been grown in the greenhouse throughout the year and are so labeled; the authorization of the shipment of Christmas trees fromIhe uenerallv infested area when grown as nursery stock in a cultivatednursery and certified under the nursery-stock provisions ; the adding of emptycable reels to the list of restricted articles; and slight modifications in theprocetlure for the certification of car-lot shipments.SUM MARYThe regulated area includes the entire State of Rhode Island and parts ofthe States of Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Vermont.The restricted articles are as follows: ( 1) Coniferous trees, such as spruce,fir, hemlock, pine, juniper (cedar), and arborvitae (white cedar) withoutroots. knou n and described as ' " Christmas trees ", and parts thereof, andparts of evergreen decorative plants, such as boxwood, holly, and laurel;(2) fore't-plant products, including logs, tanbark. posts, poles, car stakes,railroad ties, co'rdwood. empty cable reels, and lumber; (3) trees, shrubs, vines,and all plants having persistent woody stems, and parts thereof, exceptingseeds and fruit; and (4) stone or quarry products. (Regulation 1.)Under these reulations no restricted articles (as defined above) shall bemoved or allowed to be moved interstate from the regulated areas to orthrough any point outside thereof, nor from the generally infested area tothe lightly infested area, unless and until a certificate or permit shall havebeen issued thierefor by an inspector. (Regulation 5.)Christmas trees and evergreen boughs originating in the generally infestedarea are not allowed to be moved interstate to any point outside of thatarea, and no certificate or permit will be issued authorizing such movementunless such trees have been grown as nursery stock in a cultivated nurseryand are certified under the provisions of regulation 6. (Regulation 5.)Deciduous trees and such parts thereof as bear leaves are not allowed tobe moved from the brown-tail moth infested area to outside points withouta certificate or permit, except that a State nursery inspection certificatemay be substituted for certain classes of movement within the gypsy mothregulated areas. (Regulation 5.)Plants grown in the greenhouse throughout the year and cut flowers thereofmay be shipped interstate without inspection and certification on conditionthat each box or package thereof is plainly labeled to show that the contentswere greenhouse grown.For the conditions governing inspection and certification, marking require-ments and similar details, see regulations 6 to 12, inclusive.LE A. STRONG,Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 45(Effective on and after July 1, 1920. Supersedes Notice of Quarantine No. 33, revised)The fact has been determined by the Secretary of Agriculture, and notice ishereby given, that tw) injurious inlsects-thie gypsy moth (Porthetria dispar)"'Ind the brown-tail moth (Eu proctis chrysorrh oca) -not heretofore widely dis-tributed within and throughout the United States, exist in parts of the followingStates, to wit: Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island,an d Connect icut.Now, therefore. I, C. F. Marvin, Acting Secretary of Agriculture, under theant hority conferred by section S of the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912(:37 Stat. :315, as amended by the act of Congress approved March 4, 1917 (39Stat. 11:34. 111(;5), do hereby quarantine the States of maine, New Hiampshire,Vermont. Al'sachuset ts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut, and by this Notice ofQuarantine No. 45 do order that (1) coniferous trees. such as spruce, fir, hem-lock. pine, j on her ( cedar), and arborvitae whitee ce4!ar ), known and describedas " christinas trees -.and parts thereof, and decorative plants, such as holly,ind( laurel. known and1l described as " Christimas greens or greenery ; (2) forest-plalt product-4, including logs, tanbark, posts, poles, car stakes, railroad ties,

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19341 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 63cordwood, and lumber ; (3) field-grown florists' stock, trees, shrubs, vines, cut-tings, and other plants and plant products, excepting fruit pits, seeds of fruitand ornamental trees and shrubs, field, vegetable, and flower Seeds, l)eddiln gplants, and other herbaceous plants and roots; and (4) stone or quarry products,shall not be moved or allowed to move interstate from mny of saiP States inmanner or method or under conditions other than those prescribed in the rulesand regulations supplemental hereto.Done in the District of Colunibia this 28th day of May 192().Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department Of Agriculture.[SEC. F. _MARVI.AtStecrctarU Of Agricult .ofREVISED RULES AND REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE OF QUARANTINENO. 45(Approved Sept. 27, 1934; effective Oct. 2, 1934)REGULATION 1. DEFINITIoNSFor the purpose of these regulations the following words, names, and termsshall be construed. respectively, to mean:(a) Gypsy ioth.-The insect known as the gypsy moth (Porthetria di. par).(b) Brown-tail moth .-The insect known as the brown-tail moth (Xiyjmja,phaeorrhoea, formerly referred to as Euprowtis cir[Isorrih oc).(c) Quarantined area.-Any State quarantine(l by the Secretary of Agricul-ture upon determination by him that either the gypsy moth or the brown-tailmoth, or both, exist therein.(d) Regulated area.-The entire area comprised of portions of the quaran-tined States now or hereafter designated by the Secretary of Agriculture asregulated to prevent the spread of the gypsy moth or brown-tail moth, or both.therefrom.(e) Generally infestetl arca.-The entire area comprised of portions of thequarantined States now or hereafter designated by the Secretary of Agricultureas generally infested with the gypsy moth.(f) Lightly infested arca.--The entire area comprised of portions of thequarantined States now or hereafter designated by the Secretary of Agricultureas lightly infested with the gypsy moth.(g) Brown-tail moth infected arca.-The entire area comprised of portionsof the quarantined States now or hereafter designated by the Secretary (if Agri-culture as infested with the brown-tail moth.(h) Restricted articles.-(1) Coniferous trees, such as spruce, fir, hemlock, pine, juniper (cedar), and arborvitae (white cedar) without rol ts, known anddescribed as " Christmas trees ", and parts thereof, and parts of evergreen (leco-rative plants, such as boxwood, holly, and laurel; (2) forest-plant products.including logs, tanbark, posts, poles, car stakes, railroad ties, cordwood. emptycable reels, and lumber ; (3) trees, shrubs. vines, and all plants having persistentwoody stems, and parts thereof, excepting seeds, and fruit; and (4) stone orquarry products.(i) Moved or allowed to be moved interstate.-Shipped, offered for shipmentto a common carrier, received for transportation or transported by a commoncarrier, or carried, transported, moved, or allowed to be moved from one Stateor Territory or District of the United States into or through any other State orTerritory or District.(j) Inspector.-An inspector of the United States Department of Agriculture.REGULATION 2. LiMITATION OF RESTRICTIONS To REGULATED AREASConditioned upon the State concerned providing for and enforcing such con-trol measures with respect to the regulated areas as in the judgment of theSecretary of Agriculture shall be deemed adequate to prevent the spread of thegypsy moth and the brown-tail moth to other parts of the State, the restrictiolns provided in these regulations on the interstate movement of plants and plantproducts and other articles enumerated in said notice of quarantine will belimited to such movement from the areas in such State now or hereafter desig-nated by the Secretary of Agriculture as regulated areas.

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64 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.REGULATION 3. REGULATED ARFAs; GENERALLY AND LiGHTLY INFESTED AREAS;BROWN-TAIL MOTH INFEsTED AREA(1) REGULATED AREASThe Secretary of Agriculture designates as regulated areas for the purposeof tiese regu lations the States, counties, townships, towns, plantations, cities,and other political subdivisions listed below, including any cities, towns, bor-oui-is, or other political subdivisions included within their limits.Con net iCt.-Coullit ies of hartford, Middlesex, -New London, Tolland, andWindhiam:; towns of Barkhamstead, Colebrook, Ilarwinton, New Hartford, Plym-outh, Thomaston, Torrington, and Winchester, in Litchfield County ; towns of11ranford, (G uil ford, Madison, Meriden, North Branford, North Haven, Water-bury, ad Wolcott, in New Ilaveni County.1,a in c.-Couities of Androscoggin, Cumberland, Kennebec, Knox, Lincoln,Sagadahoc, Waldo, and York ; towns of Avon, Berlin, Carthage, Chesterville,Crockertown, Dallas Plantation, Farmington, Freeman, Industry, Jay, Jerusa-lem, Kingfield, Madrid, Mount Abraham, New Sharon, New Vineyard, Perkins,Phillips, hainieey Plantation, ltedington, Salem, Sandy River Plantation,Strong, Temple, Washington, Weld, and Wilton, and Townships D and E, inFranklin County: all of Hancock County except Plantations 3, 4, 35, and 41;all that part of Oxford County south and southeast of and including Magallo-way Plantation and Richardsontown ; towns of Alton, Argyle, Bradford, Brad-ley, Carmel, Charleston, Clifton, Corinna, Corinth, Dexter, Dixmont, Eddington,Etna, Exeter, Garland, Glenburn, Grand Falls Plantation, Greenbush, Green-field, Hampden, Hermon, Holden, Hudson, Kenduskeag, Levant, Milford, New-burgh, Newport, Orono, Orrington, Plymouth, Stetson, Summit, and Veazie,and cities of Bangor, Brewer, and Old Town, in Penobscot County ; towns ofAl)bbott, Atkinson, Dover, Foxeroft, Guilford, Kingsbury Plantation, Parkman,Sanigerville, and Wellington, in Piscataquis County ; all that part of SomersetCounty south and southeast of and including Highland and Pleasant RidgePlantations, town of Moscow, and Mayfield Plantation; towns of Beddington,Cherryfield, Columbia, Deblois, Harrington, Milbridge, and Steuben, and Planta-tions 18 a1(d 24, in Washington County.[a a ci asetts.--Counties of Barnstable, Bristol, Dukes, Essex, Hampden,Hampshire. Middlesex, Nantucket, Norfolk, Plymouth, Suffolk, and Worcester;all of Franklin County except the town of Monroe.Vc i'. Ila in psii ire.-Counties of Belknap, Carroll, Cheshire, Grafton, Hillsboro,Merrimack, Rockingham, Strafford, and Sullivan; all that part of Coos Countylying south of and including the towns of Columbia, Errol, Ervings Location,and Mu Isfield.Rhode 181lad.-The entire State.Vernont.-Counties of Caledonia, Orange, Windham, and Windsor; towns ofLandlgrove. Peru, Rcadsboro, Searsburg, and Winhall, in Bennington County ;towns of Brunswick, Concord, East Haven, Ferdinand, Granby, Guildhall,Lunenburg, Maidstone, and Victory, in Essex County: towns of Elmore andWolcott. in Lamoille County: towns of Chittenden, Clarendon, Ira, Mendon,Moint Holly, Mount Tabor, Pittsfield, Pittsford, Proctor, Rutland, Sherburne,Shrewshury, Tinmouth, Wallingford, West Rutland, and the city of Rutland, inRutlnd County : towns of Barre, Berlin, Cabot, Calais, East Montpelier, Marsh-field, M ildlcs.'x. Montpelier, Moretown, Northfield, Plainfield, Roxbury, Waits-field, Woodbury, and Worcester, in Washington County.(2) DIVISION OF REGULATED AREAFor t he purpose of regulating inspection and transportation, the territorydesign! ed wbove is divided into two classes of areas to be known as the " gen-emIlly inf ested " and "lightly infested " areas respectively, and part of suchregiai ted area is also designated as " brown-tail moth infested."(3) Ligh tly infested arcaThe following States, counties, townships, towns, plantations, cities, andother politiua] subdivisions, including any cities, towns. boroughs, or otherpolitical subdivisions included within their limits, are designated as the lightlyin fested area:

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SVAPVICE AND Im:vLATY AN'N'UVNCEAENT'SC( ln('e1 /l 4/. -( 'w41nt v Alid hIlsex:, tmvw Ii (d Avwl, wirlin, lIFist 1 1 Iii'! ni(4,1, V.1r11iingAt'l, 'W lrlboro4, Now 1,kritail, N( wing-tfm, 11:1ninvill-, I okyA wl v Ii ,S t ollinii 2 o , 4411 d \V \\est 11I F F4r1, in I I;41 14rd ('f yl 1 : w 44n 4 ' lebr Fi ,inii 4 n, New I rt ford, I'lviloi1I h, Thlm'Ii:sh H, T wri o11 n, :111(l W i win l s1'r,ill Litchli(Ad ('ounty: towns (d, X,11r,(-111< la ion ~ ri e .o t{1Ira i s I ANl eh I ,A :11, 4 I , A 11 W e' 1 , i4 w ( I( ; 11wnsPf j tLymeii 1 "IlW le' , "Ind Othl Yll.', Ili e I' (' 01111V.J112 in14 .-411 \ 1'4 w : Al h , 4rj , f114 T ( nW1,s 4 , ('8141ille, ' rlkl1rVw1 W li4sP'A Ii I t eti'sln , FArmin8 , iFreo , IhldutI r y , .1y, '-dl1m, K 1111. 4 h1 rid,54 41T4'1 4, Srll n, N re 1Sli'i14, N w \ 11 , 4 ' 4r1kId I'\ Ii, 141 4 W y1IPlanI tio> 1 , III in t nJ1> 1 11 rem, s , 4y Aii 1 I 2. ,Sll, t T:111 d4 * v WW(+114 W 4 1, ld W i 44, 4l id T s \ h, ip. i 144ni E, il r'lidi 4 (' ll v ; l4w 11ii ,\ mh'1r4, A r) 11, 1Ilhwn t,, I1E1112il, E\( t4l II k, r ki 1 , 4 F;I 11411:114 ' (k, AI12814m8 '' 1'Inli :1,41 i\14'\ 14441,I(141 441 (1 r '18 lai n 1111441, N \ I'.N ( 411 1,Soreno, uliv~lTrentnlimn, lt, citY Idf Elllswwrth, ,ndt lowNvi-\hips or plntin> P4 ii h Ij dIl , > , 4 ,\I , i1t, (I, 14, 1 .1:1114, : II 1 1 , 11( ( )41 , ( I I Ity*v t w 1 I I )II.n, ('I \n , I mII I 1 I'4v I I I> I I 14144A" V i i K I It I 4'fuI : I I e , H111 r1114 It I I 4I I ranII , I A IhI,' e .\ , ( l 4-l, I II I I Ie I In l I v 1) ,I I , I I , I 1 i !,Ili1114 , I II Itlull y 1,4III vI1 I t 1i '14 A x Ii>, A 2,ii I eI I I. I in ', N ewry N rthIAf I In r I 2441s', I :PIrI1 , I1 4 141 r I I i l, I * v( ('r:4' 4I II I ((' x1 I '4 111y,1 I 1 1 , t 1444I411I , 1 )x I', rd I Ii 1 4 \I 4>('4 4\n\ y t4 I A III ..\'I 1jy4 1, 1N '111,11 "414 14i\ f'rnI, 4i I ., I 1 4r 111,)"1'11 .'( 'i f , ( '1rinn , ) r intIhI , I \xI4r, I \ilxm , IfIIf E riI , EI I 414( i,E(i'411lt r, ~ I FII 1 44 41 1 Sb 4'11 r141'~lII F IS I 'VI I I f' I 1i' 11 n1 44 I1K i I I I N ltl I NI'XXII 14144 , '\ jil '1144 I~~ I 81 I sIi s' 1 '1: u k.1 IXa Nt, 4I i4 1, 4 NN wb h,N11 wp44 r1 , 4, I l , II, (4 11 1n , I Ih , St4) 4n. t t ii\, z11 12 :'. 1111 1ii (of I I IIt-(w.r, NN11 r. 'I Id 11 814( 1 T N, in 1'1 1 (4 I s 44 4 \141>'At k1iinson), Do ver, Fox(rn) It-. GuIi 1f, wrI, K i I -IIbIry I. I I I tIon, i()II 1:Pakm I), ISII I"or-villo, 'ti.l W'(llngt, Ill Pi4 tqis ('18lfty1 4ll 1. J1,0 NVI u', ()f s['l1,r81t C1' nikySmitI 0 '4U1tthoN I (0, will i(ncl ldin(8 el' 11,4 1110 41n1 Pillsa, I It I oI I IINtII> 4-tion's, town of Ylw-wmw, 111(1 Alzlyfiold P1,1ntatiln t I wnmv sof i wh 4k , Iu nuFrnikfort, Frcel om, J:1k on Kno(x, -AfI InIoe, A14 mt ville, A II, ,rri 11, Pro:sp w(t,sealr'Ilollf. arpo t Stm-kho S rils Sw"Inville, Thorl~ilike, Tr1,o ,v,UIn Ii t,Widie W ild(1rt, tnd Ihe ,i v( I in W lo (1'unty ; town of1 1'-i( I It44, ('I(herry41111>' >i , ( ld um i , ) hl i1is, 1111I i I n I I NI, AIib (I4 441a441)4I "Ind St ei1b 4n,'1114 Planftions. IS ');d 24, inl W ishingion (Comity.ICI'N'i112>4 A 4441)41 f11haru141 :1(, lK, Ifenh, m'11Ilw4e1 i Fl rankilIl C>o411nt4 v; 14 Se NwIls of(' o r 11411 T1 d 1'1 Iih l, i 1 I L 4 '441d!n I ( countyy ; 4ow4 1 'i I>fCumi(K.(mint'1 , I'11 1ti1n-ton, Middlefield, (1,'8i114>i , '111 W orthi1lnt11, ill MI li4p-shire COunty.NsI fr 14111 1(INtimN, i1l (44 rridl C1unt N1 : '1 1 11,1 p) rtof 111 ((s C 'ou1 ty hyIng south of '110 i,'cludi 4w '1w44144(' mi:,, EI 1,Ervn11 I L' 1tion, 1i M ills>11 ;, towilt 114f 11 ' 'th1', ' I w Ileh wI 1 .Fr514 1 n'' n IA,i ,i 11, 1 I,, I l l t 1'4 1 \' t lll i 1 Al4 r4, ill (;,r 1 f441i (u n 111111* .Phodc /";/11d.-T \vwn of, New 'ShI , eh i Im ( I Iowk T.I i I I i n .N ,\P(-rt' ( '011t Y.I 'r4 1 on .ol ies o 1 ' I '] i i 1 '11,I11d )r'! : Iw s Al 4 1 l , 11 u,'4411isl~illa 1 rI , 1 1 \ , 4 '(' (i'ilwi'l, ill II 41))1411 4'I4 1 1 ! : 11 41 w1 14 114 44v41-wick, C (c' 1 d. E st 4\N'Inv F4 4 rdi44. \ i, Gr by. (\ uildh1 il,441b r 8141'X\1 e, 11d Vic r , v i 41 11 411 1' l v o w1 1 Is '4I 1141> 4 ' lN d 1 A1 ' 14 I 1( If, i4IAll o l I II y ; tow lI of I e'I( !I,(' :Ie (' )111e )11, I1 rz , A 1 (1 , j1 ]4'. A4' lit Ill 1 0 ,M l ilnt T, hor, I 'it I -Ii c (, 1 i i fford, , r, d -r. I ' tI l 1, Sl h rm.h w b r ,Ti nm", a li gf r , 1tt thild, ml" Ile city (4 R 1111:111 , in I I I III ,:mAltle e ,3 o t eir 1 r t w .Nowthfit lH, IT l i d dh , lI (Ixh IIr , WV Ii si (' 1,W , 1 )h 1! , ;1n ro c str vn W1sh1d ('milty : ()I* o Allhens, I rol k-liIne, IN ~ r ( % I r ft m I. I Il1I 1I , x .h m m ih ;i, 1 >l 1; 1< 11, vtpia la , N cw\v ',t! ,,-mt Il, t i ton, T1 \vInshI c Id. W rd r, IW'h1n NV Ii Ii w-"h il, NVi I Iin t , InW inldha t !m IW .;1 V d ilalm l I In y : I ll Isl wid o ( 'ollit y e o t t e t w sS rinl;'ieh(L. N "IIl W e t er1.,.411 i. A\' W i 1:.;i G( 11crollY hl f< xld arra_\Il ptartsof Illo ro-IIllted '111, ' no e ig a e a ihty i fe td in wI( cr) )ee f, shl 1 c( )II I s h e 11 c r lly I i f s t cd Ire: .

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66 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.(5) Broiwn-tail ioth infested areaThe following counties, towns, and other political subdivisions, includingany cities, boroughs, or other political subdivisions included within their limits,are also infested with the brown-tail moth and are hereby designated as thebrown-tail moth infested area:Mainc.-Counties of Androsco-gin, Cumberland, Kennebec, Knox, Lincoln,Sagadahoc, Waldo, and York ; towns of Chesterville, Farmington, Industry,Jay, New Sharon, and Wilton, in Franklin County ; towns of Bar Harbor,Bucksport, Orland, Surry, and Trenton, and the city of Ellsworth, in HancockCounty, and all territory west and south of said towns in said county ; townsof Albany, Bethel, Browntield, Bucklield, Canton, Denmark, Dixtield, Frye-burg, Greenwood, Hartford, Hebron, Hiram, Lovell, lason, Milton Plantation,Norway, Oxford, Paris, Peru, Porter, Ituinford, Stoneham, Stow, Sumner,Sweden, Waterford, and Woodstock, in Oxford County ; cities of Bangor andBrewer, and towns of Carmel, Dixmont, Etna, Hampden, Herion, Newburgh,,Orrington, and Plymouth, in Penobscot County ; and towns of Canaan, Fair-field, Mercer, Norridgewock, Pittstield, Skowhegan, Smithfield. and Starks, inSomerset County.Ja .ach u.setts.-Counties of Barnstable, Bristol, Dukes, Essex, Middlesex,Nantucket, Norfolk, Plymouth, and Suffolk ; towns of Ashburnham, Berlin, Black-stone, Dolton, Boylston, Clinton, Douglas, Fitchburg, Gardner, Grafton, Harvard,Holden, IHopedale. Lancaster, Leomin ster. Lunenberg, 'Mendon, 1ilford, Mill-bury, -Millville, Northborough, Northbridge, Paxton, Princeton, Royalston,Shrewsbury, Southboro, Sterling, Sutton, Templeton, Upton, Uxbridge, Webster,West Boylston, Westboro, Westminster, and Winchendon, and the city of Worcester. in Worcester County.New Hampshire.-Counties of Belknap, Cheshire, Hillsboro, Merrimack, Rock-ingham, Strafford, and Sullivan; all of Carroll County, except the town of Jack-son; all of Grafton County except the towns of Bethlehem and Littleton.Vermont.-Towns of Barnet and Ryegate, in Caledonia County; towns ofBradford, Fairlee, Newbury, Thetford, and West Fairlee, in Orange County;towns of Brattleboro, Dummerston, Putney, Rockingham, Vernon, and West-minster, in Windham County; towns of Hartford, Hartland, Norwich, Spring-field, Weathersfield, West Windsor, and Windsor, in Windsor County.REGULATION 4. EXTENSION OP. REDUCTION OF REGULATED AREASThe regulated areas designated in regulation 3 may be extended or reduced asmay be found advisable by the Secretary of Agriculture. Due notice of any ex-tension or reduction and the areas affected thereby will be given in writing tothe transportation companies doing business in or through the States in whichsuch areas are located and by publication in one or more newspapers selected bythe Secretary of Agriculture within the States in which the areas affected arelocated.REGULATION 5. CONTROL OF MOVEMENT OF RESTRICTED ARTICLES(1) Ccrtification rcquired.-Except as provided in paragraph (5) hereof, norestricted articles as defined in regulation 1 shall be moved or allowed to bemoved interstate from the regulated areas to or through any point outsidethereof, nor from the generally infested to the lightly infested area, unless andunitilI a certificate or permit shall have been issued therefor by an inspector.(2) C(hristmas trc(s a iid cwryrc-e bouglhs.-Coniferous trees, such as spruce,fir, hemlock, pine, juniper (cedar), and arborvitae (white cedar) without roots,known and described as " Christmas trees ", and parts thereof over 1 foot inlength, originating in the generally infested area (unless grown as nursery stockin a cultivated nursery and certified under the provisions of regulation 6 hereof),shill not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate to any point outside of sucharea and 0no certificate or permit will be issued authorizing such movement.Such articles which have originated in the lightly infested area may be shippedinterstate from the generally infested area under the inspection and certificationprescribed in paragraph (1) hereof.(3) Shipments from brow-talil moth infested arca.-Except as provided inparagraph (5) hereof, no deciduous trees or shrubs, or such branches or otherparts thereof as bear leaves, shall be moved or allowed to be moved interstatefrom the area designated as infested by the brown-tail moth to any point out-

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1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 67side thereof unless and until a certificate or permit shall have been issued there-for by an inspector, except that as to such inovemilent wholly within the generally infested gypsy moth area or wholly within the lihitly infested gypsy moth area,or from the lightly infested to the generally infested gypsy moth area, a v1 lidState nursery-inspection certificate of I the State from which the shipment is madeway be substituted for such Federal certificate or permit.(4) Shipncits within regulated arca. mircstricted.-Otlier than as prescribedin paragrapli (3) hereof, and in regulation 9, no restrictions are placed by theseregulations on the interstate inovemelit of restricted articles wholly within thegenerally infested area or wholly within the lightly infested area or from thelightly infested area to the generally infested area.(5) Cut Ito wers and yrcecniousc-yroiun plantN.-In the case of woody plantswhich are grown in the greenhouse throughout the year, the plants themselvesand the cut fIlowers thereof miay be shipped interstate without inspection orcertification under these regulations on condition that each box or packagethereof is plainly labeled to show that the contents were greenhouse grown.(6) lHerbaceous pl(1nt iorc.strictcd.--No restrictions are placed by these reg-ulations on the interstate inovenient of strawberry plants, or of other herbaceousannual or perennial plants or parts thereof.REGULATION 6. CONDITIONS GOVERNING THE ISSUANCE OF CERTIFICATES(a) Application; assembly of articles for inspection.-Persons intending tomove or allow to be moved restricted articles interstate shall make applicationtherefor as far as possible in advance of the probable (late of shipment. Appli-cations must show the nature and quantity of the plants or plant products orstone or quarry products it is proposed to move, together with their exact loca-tion, and, if practicable, the contemplated (late of shipment. Applicants for in-spection will be required to assemble or indicate the articles to be shipped sothat they can be readily examined by the inspector. If not so placed, inspectionwill be refused. Articles to be inspected must be free from ice and snow and incondition to make inspection easily practicable,(b) Nursery-grown stock.-With respect to nursery-grown stock, Federal in-spection and the issuance of Federal certificates authorizing the interstate move-ment of nursery products will be conditioned on the presentation of a validState certiflcate stating that the nursery in question has been inspected by aState nursery inspector and certifying that it is apparently free from infestationwith gypsy and brown-tail moths. Such State certification shall be renewed eachyear, shall be based on an inspection made as promptly as practicable after theegg-laying period of the gypsy moth, and shall be valid for the purpose ofFederal certification, until the following egg-hatching period, except that, pend-ing reinspection, shipments may be inspected and certified for interstate move-ment on the basis of the State certification of the preceding year. Wheneverany nursery or independent unit thereof in the regulated area, or any shipmenttherefrom, is reported by a State inspector to be appreciably infested with eitherthe gypsy moth or the brown-tail moth, or whenever such infestation is deter-mined by a Federal inspector on his examination of material offered for ship-ment, further certification for interstate movement from such nursery, or inde-pendent unit thereof, will be refused until such nursery has been freed frominfestation and has been again inspected and certified by the State to be appar-ently clean. During the larval period of the gypsy moth all nursery stock shallbe assembled for the examination of the Federal inspector, and if passed by himas free from any infestation, either by egg masses or wind-blown larvae, it maythen be lined up and thoroughly sprayed under the direction of and in mannerand method satisfactory to the said inspector, who will certify each shipmentas having been thus inspected and treated.(c) Nativc trees and shrubs.-With respect to living trees and plants notgrown in nurseries, inspection and certification for interstate movement will beconditioned upon the presentation of a statement by the applicant indicatingthe exact source of such trees and plants, and in addition to such statement, ifdug on land other than the property of the applicant, a permit from the ownerof the said land authorizing such digging, provided such permit is required under the law of the State wherein the land is situated. If the inspection ofthe trees or plants intended for shipment discloses infestation with either thegypsy moth or brown-tail moth, certification will be refused as to the intended shipment and as to other similar shipments of trees or plants originating onthe same property or in the same locality.99783-34 2

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68 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.(d) Forest products and stonc and quarry' products.-Certificates of inspection a'uthorizing the interstate movement of forest products and stone andquarry products may be issued under either of the following conditions: (1)When tlie articles to be shipped have actually been inspected and found freefrom inifestation; or (2) when the articles have been disinfected under thesupervision of an inspector in such a manner as to eliminate all risk of infesta-tion. Willi respect to quarries, and with respect to yards or other places whereforest products are assembled for shipment, as a condition of inspection andcertification, the preiises or surroundings of such places shall be cleaned upand kept free from gypsy moth infestation.(c) Chtaryc. for storage, ctc.-All charges for storage, cartage, and laborincident to inspection or disinfection other than the services of the inspectorsshall be paid by the shipper.(f) TIse of ccrtificatcs.-Certificates of inspection will be issued only forplants and plant products and stone or quarry products which are free frominfestation by the gypsy moth and the brown-tail moth and have been so de-termined by an inspector. The use of such certificates in connection with plants and phnt products and stone or quarry products which are not in com-pliance with these regulations is unlawful.REGULATION 7. CONDITIONS GoVERNING THE ISSUANCE OF PERMITS WITHOUTINSPECTIONPermits authorizing the interstate movement of restricted articles may beissued (1) when such products have been grown, or manufactured, processed,and stored in such a manner that, in the judgment of the inspector, no infesta-tion could be transmitted, and (2) when such products originate outside of theinfested areas and, while within the infested area, have been stored and safe-guarded in such a manner that, in the judgment of the inspector, no infestationcould be transmitted. Permits will be issued only for plants and plant prod-ucts and stone or quarry products which are not infested with the gypsy mothor brown-tail moth.REGULATION 8. MARKING AND CERTIFICATION A CONDITION OF INTERSTATETRANSPORTATION(a) Every car, vehicle, box. basket, or other container of the articles listedfor which a certificate or permit is required by these regulations shall be plainlymarked with the name and address of the consignor and the name and addressof the consignee, and shall have securely attached to the outside thereof avalid certificate or permit issued in compliance with these regulations. In thecase of lot shipments by freight, one certificate attached to one of the con-tainers and another certificate attached to the waybill will be sufficient.(b) In the case of bulk carload shipments by rail, the certificate shall ac-company the waybill, conductor's manifest, memorandum, or bill of lading per-taining to such shipment, and in addition each car shall have securely attachedto the outside thereof a placard showing the number of the certificate or certi-ficates accompanying the waybill.(c) In the case of shipment by road vehicle, the certificates shall accompanythe vehicle.(d) Certificates shall be surrendered to the consignee upon delivery of theshipment.REGULATION 9. THOROUGH CLEANING REQUIRtED OF CARS, BOATS, AND OTHERVE111CLES BEFORE MOVING INTERSTATECars, boats, an(l other vehicles which have been used in transporting re-stricted arl icles within the regulated areas shall not be moved ir allowed tomove interstate until the same shall have been thoroughly swept out andcleaned by the carrier at the point of unloading or destination of all litter andrubbish from such regulated articles. No litter, rubbish, or refuse from anysuch restricted articles shall be moved or allowed to move interstate.REGULATION 10. INSPECTION IN TRANSITAny car, vehicle, basket, box, or other container moved interstate or offeredto a common carrier for shipment interstate, which contains or which the in-spector has probable cause to believe contains either infested articles or articles

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1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 69the movement of which is prohibited or restricted by these regulations, shall besubject to inspection by an inspector at any time or place.REGULATION 11, CANCELATION OF CERTIFICATES AND PERMITSCertificates and permits issued under these regulations may be withdrawn orcanceled by the inspector and further certification refused, either for any fail-ure of compliance with the conditions of these regulations or violation of them,or whenever in the judgment of the inspector the further use of such certificatesmight result in the dissemination of infestation.REGULATION 12. SHIPMENTS BY THE UNITED STATEs DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTwtEArticles subject to restriction in these regulations may be moved interstateby the United States Department of Agriculture for experimental or scientificpurposes, on such conditions and under such safeguards as may be prescribedby the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quz!rantine. The container of articlesso moved shall bear, securely attached to the outside thereof, an identifyingtag from the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine showing compliancewith such conditions.These revised rules and regulations shall be effective on and after October 2,1934, and shall supersede the rules and regulations promulgated May 25, 1981.Done at the city of Washington this 27th day of September 1934.Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agricul-ture.[SEAL] H1. A. WALLACE,Secretary of Agricltutre.lForegoing revised regulations sent to all econnon carriers doing hbusincs. in or throughthe quarantined area.]NOTICE TO GENERAL PUBLIC THRoUGH NEwSPAPERSUNITED STATEs DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,BUREAU oF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE.Wlahington, D. C., Scpteimber 27, 1934 .Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority ofthe act approved August 20, 1912, known as the plant quarantine act (87 Stat.315), as amended by the act approved Mareh 4, 1917 (89 'tat. 1184, 1165), haspromulgated a revision of the rules and regulations supplemental to Notice ofQuarantine No. 45, on account of the gypsy moth and brown-tail moth. effectiveOctober 2, 1934. The revision releases part of Vermont from the regulatedarea, modifies the boundaries of tlhe areas designated as ighrly iu:ested,generally infested, and brown-tail moth invested in Connecticut. Maine, Massa-chusetts, New Hampshire, and Vermont, adds enmity cable reels to the list ofrestricted articles, exempts from restriction such woody plants as have beengrown in the greenhouse throu,.thout the year, and makes other changes in theregulations. Copies of the revision may be obtained from the Bureau ofEntomology and Plant Quarantine, Washington, D. C.H. A. WALLACE,Secretary of Agriculture.[Published in the following newspapers : The Times, Hartford, Conn. Oct. 4. 1934the Press-Herald, Portland, Maine, Oct. 5. 1934 : the Post, Boston, Mass., Oct. 5. 1934;the Union, Manchester, N. H., Oct. 5, 1934 ; the Bulletin, Providence, R. I., Oct. 4, 1934;the Free Press, Burlington, Vt., Oct. 11, 19:34.]ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE(NO. 48)JAPANESE BEETLE CONTROL ENDS FOR SEASON ON FRUIT AND VEGETABLESHIPMENTS(Press notice)SEPTEMBER 15, 1934.The Secretary of Agriculture announced today that restrictions on the move-ment of fruits and vegetables under the Japanese beetle quarantine regulations

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70 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.will be renioved for the season on and after Sunday, September 16. The restric-tit lls on cut IIlwers. however, remain until October 15. Under the quarantinereu-1:t P ns. certilica tes showiing freedom from Japa;iese beetle are requiredon Thimnt s of certaili kinds of fruits and vegetables until October 15. Theeffect of the order is to release the fruits and vegetables from that requirementa month earlier ihan is provided in the regulations themselves.The i 11)0e((tionI of fruits and vegetables is necessary only during the periodwlen the adult beetles are abundantly present and in active flight. There is norisk that such products will carry the Japanese beetle after this active period.IDuriml, the last few days the Departmient's inspectors have found no beetles infruits d vegetables.There is still dancer, however, that the adult beetles may be transported incut flowers. In cool fall evenings, the beetles have a tendency to crawl downinto the lowers for protection. Therefore, the restrictions on the interstatemoveient of cut flowers and other portions of plants will remain in full forceand effect until October 15, inclusive.Restrictions on the movement of nursery, ornamental, and greenhouse stockand all other plants (except cut flowers and portions of plants without rootsand incapable of propagation) are in force throughout the year and are notaffected by this amendment.REMOVAL OF JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS ON THEINTERSTATE MOVEMENT OF FRUITS AND VEGETABLESSince it has been determined that the active period of the Japanese beetlein its relation to fruits and vegetables has already ceased for the presentseason and that it is, therefore, safe to permit the unrestricted movement of thefruits and vegetables listed in regulation 5 of the rules and regulations (twelfthrevision) supplemental lto Notice of Quarantine No. 48 from the regulatedarea as defiled in regulation 3 of said rules and regulations, it is ordered thatall restrictions on the interstate movement of the articles referred to aboveare hereby removed on and after September 16, 1934. This order advances thetermination of the restrictions as to fruits and vegetables provided for inregulation 5 from October 16 to September 16, 1934, and applies to this seasononly.Done at the city of Washington this 15th day of September 1934.Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agricul-ture.[SEAL] H. A. WALLACE,Secretary of Agriculture.INsTRUCTIONS TO POsTMAsTERSPOST OFFICE DEPARTMENT,THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,Wa.71ington, Septcmber 18, 1934.PosTMAsTIr'R:My I>waiz Sii: The United States Department of Agriculture advises ithas been (hetel mined that the active period of the Japanese beetle in itsrelai t P to fruits a 11(d vegetal des has already ceased for the present seasonand that it i., lerefore, safe to permit tile unrestricted movement of fruitsand vegetables listed in re-ulation 5. rules and re-ulations (12th revision )supPlenwiit a to Notice of Quarantine No. 48 on account of the Japanese beetle,from lite regulated area as defined in article 3 of such rules and regulations.P4)StmI T5 ill he area regtilated 1by the Japanese beetle quarantine may,t.lrefore, acedpt until June 15, 1935, fully proj'aid l parcels of fruits and vege-te alwhen properly packed wit 11mt being accompanied with the certificateof hispecti~O pre11)(cri)eil by that quarantine.C. B. EILENBERGER,Third Assistant Postmaster General.

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19341 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 71ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO MEXICAN FRUIT FLYQUARANTINE (NO. 64)B. E. P. Q.-367 SEPTEMBER, 21, 1934.ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS-SHIPPING SEASON FOR TEXAS CITRUS FRUITTO BEGIN SEPTEMBER 26(Issued under regulation 7, section A, Federal Quarantine No. 64, as revised effectiveSept. 1, 1932)(Approved Sept. 21, 1.934; effective Sept. 26, 1934)The issuance of permits for the shipment of citrus fruit of the 1934 cropunder the Federal Mexican fruit worm quarantine (Notice of QuarantineNo. 64) from thi counties of Willacy, Cameron, and Hidalgo, in Texas, is hereby authorized to begin on September 26, 1934, so far as that quarantine isconcerned. The host-free period required by the Departmient of Agricultureto be enforced by the State of Texas under regulation 7 will for the year 1934close on September 25.The Department of Agriculture has evidence that such modification is de-sirable from the standpoint of Mexican fruit worm control and does not in-volve increase of risk of propagating that insect. All clean-up and otlierrequirements concerning the production and distribution of Texas citrus fruitremain unchanged.LEE A. STRONG,Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO NURSERY STOCK, PLANT, ANDSEED QUARANTINE (NO. 37)B. E. P. Q.-365NOTICE TO PERMITTEES AND OTHERS INTERESTEDWILLOW WITHES AS PLANT TIES PROHIBITED ON PLANTS FOR ENTRY FROM EUROPEAND CANADA(Approved Aug. 14, 1934; effective Oct. 1, 1934)Willow withes taken from plants infected with the destructive watermarkdisease may readily disseminate that malady, since the bacterial organismconcerned (Bacteriumn saiicis Day and Pseu(donl (has SaliCiperdU Lindeijer) maybe carried within the tissues. The watermark disease thus far has beenreported only from England and the Netherlands and, insofar as this Bureauhas been able to ascertain, there are no restrictions in Europe on the movementof such infected material from the two countries concerned. It is obvious,therefore, that, on account of uncertainty as to the distribution of this diseaseand freedom of movement of the host material, the entry of willow withes fromEurope may readily bring the watermark disease to this country. As a precau-tion against the introduction of this disease, Salix propagating stock fromEurope has been restricted for some time to horticultural necessities; per-mittees and others in interest are now notified that as a further precaut ionwillow withes used as ties or otherwise in connection with shipments of plantmaterials for propagation, from Eurol e, including the British Isles and Ireland,will not be admitted into the United States on and after October 1, 1934. SinceEuropean nursery stock is frequently reshipped here from the Dominion ofCaiada and since Canada iml)oses no restrictions against the entry of will wwithes from Europe, shipments of phInts from Canada, after October 1, 1934,must also be free from willow withes.Accordingly, attention is directed to regulation 7 of Nursery Stock, Plant,and Seed Quarantine No. 37 which requires that "All packing materials em-ployed in connection with importations of nursery stock and other plants andseeds are subject to approval as to such use." The use of willow withes in allymanner as packing material for such dlant material is disapI roved. ()n andafter October 1, 1934, all plant material for propagation from Eu rope aniid Canada

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72 l1U ' ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.must he free frunm willow wities or it will be refused entry until such withesare rul oved. Sihipmn uts with suich material present may be held in customscli.stoly fi 'r a 'eriod n)ot exceediini 40 days, (Iurinii wliich period the permitteeol ls awgent. after m11;1kiing satisfoclory arragremllen lis, may remove and disposeof Ie wit es \11 ier tlie supervision of, and in a inanner satisfactory to, anI ilJ ] wl u1 (f th, Ie:1 iment of Agriciilture, after wlihicli the shipment may behuniiIlIA ill tle 11su;il way.LEE A. STRONG,('hicf, Barca of Entoimology and Plant Qarantine.ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO PINK BOLLWORM QUARANTINE(NO. 52)MODIFICATION OF PINK BOLLWORM QUARANTINE REGULATIONSINTRODUCTORY NOTEThe lloi aiiieiniiiment modifies the area regulated under the pink boIl-wormII qua 1unine rnblti(ns in Floi-ida by bringin, under restriction the(-Uunmies of Jackson aiid Suwannee in that State. This change is due to thefindinof a li2ht Imit scattered infestation in those counties during the pastfew weeks. No ether change is made in the regulated areas at this time.LEE A. STRONG,Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.AMENDMENT NO. 1 TO REVISED RULES AND REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL TONOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 52(Approved Sept. 14, 1934; effective Sept. 19, 1934)Under' authority conferred by the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912("7 Stat. 815), as amended by the act of Congress approved March 4, 1917(39 Stat. 1184. 1165), it is ordered that regulation 3 of the revised rules andregulatiP ns supplemental to Notice Of Quarantine No. 52, on account of the pinkbollworm of cotton, wlich were promulgated on December 11, 1933, be and thesame is hereby amended to read as follows:REG1cmLATIoN 3. REGULATED AREAS ; HEAVILY AND LIGHTLY INFESTED AREASREGULATED AREASIn aceor(lanice with the provisos to Notice of Quarantine No. 52 (revised),tile Secretary of Agriculture designates as regulated areas, for the purpose ofthese rel-ulations. ilie following, counties in Arizona, Florida, Georgia, NewMexico, and Texrs, including all cities, districts, towns, townships, and otherpolitical sblbdivisions within their limits:Sri-o)ia qr(i .--( 'ounties of Cochiise, Graham. and Greenlee.I'lorila (1rca.-Counties of Alachua, Baker, Bradford, Columbia, Gilchrist,Jackson, Madison, Suwa:nee, and Union.Gcoryia orN (.-All (f Berrien County except (a) the portion located north-east of the Alapaha River, and ()) the portion located south of a line drawnacross the county just south of the railway station of Allenville along thesouth side of lots 321, 324, 325, 326, 327, 328, 329, 330, 331, and 332 of the tenthland district; that part of Cook County located north of a line starting onLittle River at the bridge marked Kinard Bridge on the soil survey map ofsaid eunlt y issued by the Bureau of Chemistry and Soils, series 1928, no. 11;thence following the old Ty Ty-Nashville road southeast past Spring HillChurch througlh the village of Laconte ; thence in an easterly direction alongthe ruad to Nashville past Grovaiuia School to McDermott Bridge over the NewRiver; all that part of Tift County located east of Little River.Acwe .1/J~eei arcu.-('ounties of Chaves, Dona Ana, Eddy, Grant, Hidalgo,L :a, Liwa, Otero. anld Roosevelt.Tcxa. (Irc(.-ounties of Brewster, Cochran, Culberson, El Paso, Gaines,Hockley, Iludspeth, Jeff Davis, Pecos, Presidio, Reeves, Terrell, Terry, Ward,

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1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 73and Yoakum; that ])art of Ilailey Couiity lying South of the following-describedboundary line: Beginning on the east line of said comity where the county lineintersects the northern boundry line of league 207 ; thence west followilig thenorthern boundary line of leagues 207, 203, 191, IS, 175, and 171 to the north-west corner of league 171; thence south oni the western line of league 171 tothe northeast curnler of the W. 11. L. survey; thence wst along the northernboundary of the W. 11. L. survey aid the northerji bouii(Ialry of sect1i0is (18, 37,66, 65, 64, 6, 62, (1, and 60 of block A of the A. B. & 1. survey to the westernbouidary of s8id county; that part of T)awson County lying iorth and westof the Ioll()wig-describd boundry line: Begiiinioil the west ern boundaryline of said el runty at the northwest cornier of section 118 of block M; theice ina Iiortleaisterly direction on Ilie northern bouidmry line of section 113, (0, 83,72, 35, 54, 47, and :10 of block M to the northeast corner of section 8:(; ;thenceiii a northwest erly direction along the western blouidary line of section 21 tothe northwest corner of sectimi 21 ; thence northeasterly along the northernbound(ary liiie of' section 21 to the northieast corner of sec-tion 21. t-hence north-westerly alomig tli Western boiuidar Mies of sections 27 aiid 30 in siidh blockTIl to the northwest collier of section 10: theice southwesterly along the north-ern bouiidary li'e of wet ion 29 of block M to the soul hwest corner of section 17,block C-41 thence north along 1the western )ofulhi8ry line of sections 17 and16 of block (G41 to the 11 awson ( Tiuny line; that lipart of Lamb (2ouiity lyingsouth of the o lowing-ier ihed omUi(lary line: beginning on the east line ofsaid county where the county line intersects the northern 1ondary line ofsection 9 of the R. M. Thomson survey; thence west following the northernouildary lile of sections 9 and 10 of the I. M. Thomson survey and thenorthern boundary line of sections (, 5, 4, 3, 2, anid 1 of the T. A. Thoimpsonsurvey and the northern boundary line of leagues 637, 636, and 035 to thesoutheast corner of league 230 ; thence north on the eastern boundary line ofleague 239 to the itortheast corner of said league; thence west on the northernbouidary line of leagues 239, 238, 23, 222, 218, and 207 to the western boundaryline of said county.HEAVILY INFESTED ARE.\SOf the regulated areas, the following counties and parts of counties are herebydesignated as heavily infested within the meaning of these regulations: Coun-ties of Brewster, Culberson, Jeff Davis, Presidio, aiid Terrell, in the State ofTexas, and all of Hudspeth County in the same State except that part of thenorthwest corner of said county lying north and west of a ridge of desert landextending from the banks of the Rio Grande northeasterly through the desertimmediately west of the town of McNary, such ridge being ain extension of thenorthwest boundary line of section 11, block 651.LIGHTLY INFESTED AREASThe following are!is are designated as lightly infested: The counties ofCochiise, Graham., and Greenlee in Arizona : the counties of Alachua. Baker, Bradford, Columbia. Gilchrist, Jackson, Madison, Suwaiinee, and Union inFlorida ; the regulated parts of Berrien, Cook, and Tift Counties in Georgia;the counties of Cl-aves. D)ona Ana, Eddy, Grant, ilidalgo, Lea, Luna, Otero, andRoosevelt in New Mexico:; the entire counties of Cochran, El Paso, Gaines,Ilockley, Pecos, Reeves, Terry, Walrd, and Yoakum, the regulated parts ofBai:ey, Dawson, and Lamb Counties in Texas, and that part of the nortliwestcorner of Hudspeth County, Tex., lying north and wvest of a ridge of desert landextenling from the hanks of the Rio Grande northeasterly through the desertimmediately west of the town of MeNary, such ridge beinan extension of thenorthwest boundary line of section 11, block (51.This amendment sliall be effective on and after September 19. 1934.Done at the city of Wash )ington this 14th day of Spftemer 1 -34.Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.[SEAL] W. I. Gi:cG,Acting Scrct(taJry of Alriculturc.[Copies of above amendment sent to all common carriers doing business in or throughthe regulated areas.]1 Part of the lighitly infested area in Arizona is regulated on account of the Thurberiaweevil under Qu:arantine No. 61, and shipments therefrom must comply with the require-ments of that quarantine.

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7 4 BiBUEAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.NoTicE To GEN ERAL PUBLIC Ti iiouII NEwVSPAPERSUNITED STATES 1 EPARTM ENT OF AGRICuLTuRE,BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PlANT Q(uARANTINE,Wa1igton, D. C., Scptember 14, 1934.Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority con-ferred on him by the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), asamended, has promulgated an aiendmiient to the revised rules and regulationssupplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 52, oil account of the pink bollworni,effective on and after September 11, 1934. The amendment modifies the arearegulated under those regulations by bringiii undcr restriction the counties ofJackson and Suwannee in the State of Florida. Copies of the amendment maybe obtained from the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, Washington,D. C.W. R. GREGG,Acting Secrctary of Agriculture.[Published in the Florida Times Union, Jacksonville, Fla., Oct. 4, 1934.]INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERSPOST OFFICE DEPARTMENT,THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,Wash ington, September 26, 1934.POSTMASTER:My DEAR SIR: Your attention is invited to the enclosed copy of QuarantineOrder No. 52 of the United States Department of Agriculture on account of thepink bollworm, together with a copy of amendment no. 1 to revised rules andregulations thereunder, adding Jackson and Suwannee Counties in the State ofFlorida to the area quarantined in that State.As your post office is within one of the above-mentioned counties, you arerequested to be governed in accordance with the quarantine order and amend-ment thereto. See paragraph 1, section 595, Postal Laws and Regulations.Very truly yours,C. B3. EILENBERGER,Third Assistant Postmaster General.ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO RICE QUARANTINE (NO. 55)RICE QUARANTINE AMENDED(Press notice)JULY 30, 1934.An amendment of the Rice Quarantine, No. 55, issued today and effectiveAugust 1, requires that foreign rice straw imported into this country must notheC compressed in the bales to a density of more than 80 pounds per culic foot,the Secretary of Agriculture has announced. Rice straw, used in broom making,must he sterilized at the time of entry by a steam process. In lighly com-presse bales the heat penetrates the interior of the mass so slowly that thebale cannot be effectively sterilized in a reasonable time. Recent tests by theDivision of Control Investigations of tie Bureau of Esntomology and Plant Quar-antine indicate that in hales of a density of less than 84 pounds, penetrationof heat takes place rapidly enough to l)ut effective treatment on a practicalbasis.RICE QUARANTINE NO. 55REvIsIoN OF REGULATION 6INTRODUCTORY NOTEOwing to difficulties encountered in obtaining, heat t penetration within areasonable time in highly conpressed bales of imported rice straw, it has been

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1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 75found necessary to restrict entry of this nmai erial to bales of su01 denlsity aswill permit practical 1ind cfective trea tim1181. The pireselnt revision of regula-tion 6 isintended to ilcorporale this resriction, nd to provide more definitelyfor rout ing shipitients arriving at ports wXh1(e1 n1 Itrtig facilities are availAbo:1 Ipproved ports whee'( such t ni-c" 1 ll lit (',11 1;e given.8. A. Roiiwrn,Actig Chlicf, B11r(,(11 of E nt olotly (11d P11litt Qua1 t1.1inw.AMENDMENT NO. 1 TO THE RULES AND REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICEOF QUARANTINE NO. 55(Approved July 27, 1934; effective Aug. 1, 1934)Under authority conferred by the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912(37 Stat. 315) , 8is am ended, it is ordered Imzat rIfgiultion G of the rules andregular tions sipplemental to Notice of Quaiantine No. 5.5, on :collnt of in-jurious insects and diiseases oi' rice, as revised effectivee Novemiber 24, 1}3, be,and the sa me is herel y. amended to read as follows:REGULATION 0. INSPECTION AND DISINFECTION AT PoRT' oF ARRiVALPaddy rice.-All importations of seed or paddy rice from Mexico shall besubject, as a condition of entry, to such insliection or disinfection. or both, atthe port of arrival, as shall be required by the inspector, and to the deliveryto the collector of customs by the inspector of a written notice that the seedor paddy rice has been inspected and fund to be 8iIpparently free from plantdiseases and insect pests or that the required treatment has been given. Shouldany shipment of such seed or paddy rice be found to be so infested with insectpests or infected with plant diseases that, in the judgment of the inspector, itcannot be cleaned by disinfection or other treatment, the entire shipment maybe refused entry.Rice straw and rice hulls.-As a condition of entry, rice straw and rice hullsshall be subject to inspection and to treatment at the port of arrival, underthe supervision of the inspector, by methods and at plants approved by theBureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, and, as a further condition ofentry, in order to permit effective treatment, the contents of packages or bales,shall not be compressed to a density of more than 30 pounds per cubic foot,Rice straw and rice hulls will be admitted only at ports where adequatefacilities are available for such treatment. The required treatment must begiven within 20 days after arrival, but if any shipment of rice straw or ricehulls shall be found upon arrival to be dangerously infested or infected theinspector may direct immediate treatment under adequate safeguards; and, ifthe treatment and safeguards are not put into effect as directed, the shipmentshall be removed from the country immediately or destroyed.Unless, within 20 days after the date of arrival of a shipment at the port atwhich the formal entry was filed, the importation has received the requiredtreatment, due notice of which shall be given to the collector of custoits bythe inspector, demand will be made by the collector for re(lelivery of the ship-ment into customs custody unoler the terms of the entry bond, and. if suchredelivery is not made, the shipment shall be removed from the country ordestroyed.General.-All charges for storage, cartage, an(d labor incident to inspection-nd disinfection, other than the services of the inspector, shall be paid by theJmporter.All shipments shall be so baled, bagged, or wrapped as to prevent scattering orwastage. If, in the judgment of the inspector, a shipment is not so bagged,baled, or wrapped, it shall be reconditioned at the expense of the permittee orentry may be refused.This amendment shall be effective on and after August 1, 1934.Done at the city of Washington this 27th day of July 1934.Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.[SEAL] I. A. WALLACE,Secretary of Agriculture.99783-34--3

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76 BU1 EA U OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [JUiy-Sept.INSTRUCTIONS TO (OLLECTORS OF CUSTOMSREVIsED I "EG ULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL TO RICE QUARANTINE No. 55, REVISED,GoVERNING THE IMPORTATION OF SEED AND PADDY RICE, PUBLISHED IN T. D.46809, AMENDED (T. D. 47229)TREAsURY DEPARTMENT,OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONER OF CUSTOMS,Wash ington, D. C., August 21, 1934.To Collctors of Customs, anid Othcrs Covccr'ied:The alpende(l Co})Y of amenditient 11]. 1, to Ihe rules and relations suI)ple-mental to Notice of Quarantine No. 55 (rice quarantine) issued by the Secre-tary of Agriculture. effective August 1, 1934. permitting the importation ofrice straw and rice hulls, with treatMent as a condition of entry, at approvedports, is J)ublisled for the information and guidance of customs officers andothers concerned.FiRANK Dow,Acting Commissioner of Customs. (Then follows the full text of the amendment.)ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO SUGARCANE QUARANTINE(NO. 15)SUGARCANE QUARANTINE REVISED(Press notice)SEPTEMBER 24, 1934.A revision of Quarantine 15, which will regulate importation of bagasse, thefibrous refuse fiom sugarcane mills, was anm;unced today by Secretary ofAgriculture Henry A. Wallace. The revision, which becomes effective October1. provides for the iniportation of >pecific lots of bagasse under conditionsjudged by the Depariment to be safe.T!e m) igiial nieasuve, I t into effect June G, 1I4, shut out all living canesof sugarcne er cuttings there 4 from all foreign countries, except such as wereimlported by the Dep)llrtiient it-elf for ' use in its cane-improvement program.Such i1vortations ha e been made with unusual care to avoid the introduc-tion of ;Iumerul-S fo reigli ilisects anid diseases, and a special quarantine green-Iihuse at the Arlington Fll nm is devoted entirely t making foreign cane varie-ties safe to distribute to our cane areas.A recent t increase iI iiquiries regtaing the intro(luction of foreign bagassehas convinced the )Department that the danger of Pest introduction in thisImlaterial, esieciailly ii distributed into canie-growing areas, is important enoughto justify bringing hiagasse as well as other cane parts under control.REVISION OF SUGARCANE QUARANTINE NO. 15 (FOREIGN)INTRODUCTORY NOTEThe Iri'ineipalm a im iii thiis revisifl is to bring under the quarantine bagasse11n10 other I arlts d .f the sugaale )ant in a(odition to livi ng caines, for thereasfn 111iat su1' un triaflI are rega rded as effective carriers of cane diseases,aimIi tlife importation of foreign bagasse and other pliant parts of sugarcane,especially in cur tre-grIwing area-, w uld m subject onur cae cultures to adetinile anid un cessary risk. The forimier exemition of Hawaii and PuertoRi co is 11 t cci!ue b1ecaUse it seems (lesicrble I() provide Federal authorityfor control over Ioreigni importati(ns into these Territories.LEE A. STRONG,(hif. flurau of Ehtomolo!Jy and Plant Quarantine.

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19343 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 77NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 15 (REVISED)(Approved Sept. 20, 1934 ; effective Oct. 1, 1934)I, W. R. Gregg, Acting Secretary of Agriculture, have determiiinled thatcertain injurious insects and diseases of sugarcane, new to and not heretoforeprevalent and widely distributed within and th rougliotit the United States,exist in certain foreign countries, aid that it is necessary, in order to preventthe introduction into the United States of these insects and diseases, to forbidthe importation into the United States from all foreign countries and localitiesof canes of sugarcane, or parts thereof, sugarcane leaves, and hagasse.On and after October 1, 1934, under authority conferred by the Plant Quaran-tine Act approved August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amend(led, the importation into the United States of canes of sugareane, or cuttings or parts thereof, sugar-cane leaves, and bagasse, from all foreign countries nnd localities, is prohibited :Provided, That this prohibition shall not aplply to importations by the UnitedStates Department of Agriculture for scientific or experimental purposes, norto importations of specific materials which the Department may authorize underpermit on condition that they have been or are to be so treated, process ol, ormanufactured that, in the judgment of the Department, their entry will involveno pest risk.This revision of Notice of Quarantine No. 15 shall be effective on and afterOctober 1, 1934.Done at the city of Washington this 20th day of September 1934.Witness my haiid and the seal of the United States Department of Agricul-ture.[SEAT] W. R. GREGG,Acting Scuretary of Agriculture.MISCELLANEOUS ITEMSB. P. Q.-347, Supplement No. 3 AUGUST 1, 1934.PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF GREECE PHYLLOXERATED AND SUSPECTED REGIONS OF GREECESupplement No. 2, of May 7, 1934, furnished a list of additional regions ofthe Republic of Greece which were declared phylloxerated by the decree ofJanuary 10, 1934. The chief of the section of phytopathology of the Greek De-partment of Agriculture has revised the list included in B. P. Q.-347 to includethe list above referred to ; therefore the following list superse(des both that of1P. P. Q.-347 and its Supplement No. 2:1. REGIONS FIREE FROM PHYLLOXERA(a) All ancient Greece, except the Provinces of Larissa, Tyrnavos, and Agyiain the Department of Larissa, the Deuartment of Trikkala. and the island ofAmorgos and all the small islands around it.(b) The island of Crete.(c) Epirus, except the Province of Konitza.2. REGIONS SUSPECTED OF PJYLLOXERA(a) The former communes (demes) of Gonnoi and Olympus in the Provinceof Tyrnavos.(b) The former communes (demes) of Nesson and Anipelakia in the Provinceof Larissa.(c) The former communes (denies) Eurymienai and Kasthenaia in theProvince of Agyia.(d) The Provinces of Karditsa and Trikkala in the Department of Trikkala(except the place called " Valta " in the village of Palama of the Provinceof Karditsa, which is declare(l infested with phylloxera).(e) The island of Lelinos.

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78 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QLTARANTINE [July-Sept.3. PHYLLOxEIZATI REGIONS(a) Tihe wiiole of Thrace.i The whole of Macedonia. including the Provinces of Grevenn, Kastoria,a1( El2as' n whi up to the present have been regarled as suspected ofpill\Ilox era.( c) Tih11 I'rovince of Konit sa ill Ej irus.((I) The I e I rt lIeIIts of SamIIos , Chios, Lesbos (exc(e )t ti te island( of Leiiinos)( ) The entire island of A orgos. with the small islands Ano Koufonissia,Kato Kou fonissia, Sc1iinoussa, aiid Hleraklia. The siill islands around theisland of Amiorgos: Denoussa Karos. Nikouria, Petalidi, ( rravoussa, Dryma,At ikarS, (Goug1ai. Fi(louss,-1, A,rilos1, (G;iaros, Prassoura. and Aiorgopoula.(f) The forietr cobmune ( de11) of Tyrnavos in Ohe Province of Tyrnavos.(vi) 'Tle entire P rovinwe of Larissa (except the iorme'r comnulles (de ;es) ofNes.soii and Amipelakia, which have been declared suspected of phylloxera).(1! ) The former coiniulle (deime) of Dotiou in the Province of Ayia.(i) The place called " Valta " in the village of Palnia in the Province ofKarditsa.LEE A. STRONG,Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.P. E. P. Q.-55, Revised, Supplement No. 1 AUGUsT 1, 1034.PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, JAMAICA, BRITISH WEST INDIESJamaican proclamation of February 13, 1024, has been amended by that ofJune 19, 1934, as a result of which the first item of the summary should read asfollowsProclamations, orders, etc., in forceArticleInstrument Date ProvisionsCitrus fruits or any parts thereof, fresh or Proclamation under law Feb. 13, 1924 Prohibited from alldried, but not including candied fruit or 23 of 1916. June 19, 1934 countries.preparations in form of jam or marma-lade.LEE A. STRONG,Chi ef, Bureau of Entornology and Plant Quarantine.P. Q. C. A.-310, Supplement No. 2 SEPTEMBER 15, 1934.PERU PROHIBITS THE EXPORTATION OF PROPAGATING MATERIAL OF ROTENONE-PRODUCING PLANTSTo prevent the exploitation and exhaustion of rotenone-producing plants inPerii, the decree of Aprit 14, 1933, prohibits the exportation from that countryof cuttings, slips. seeds. or fresh roots of plants of the genera Apurirnacia,Cracca, Jacqiuinia. Lonchocarpus. Serjania. and Tephrosia.Exportation is permitted only of roots of those plants which contain a Maxi-mumii of 10 percent of moisture: and that only until the Government of Perushall have erected mills for the extraction of rotenone.Persons who desiree to export such (dried roots must apply to the Direecion deAgricultura y Ganaderft of the Ministerio de Fomento for a permit and certiti-care of chemical analysis.The resolution of May 23, 1933, prescribes that dealers who export such rootsshall send an average sample of 500 grams from eflch shipment to the technicalsection of the DirecciOti de Agricultura y Ganaderia for analysis, at the sametime depositt ing a fee for the analysis.LEE A. STRONG,Chief, Burcau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.

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1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 79P. Q. C. A.-283, Revised, Supplement No. 3SEPTEMBER 15, 1934.PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF CUBADISINFECTION REQUIRED OF TOMATO AND PEL'PER SEEDSTo prevent the introduction into Cuba of the bacterial spot or canker, Bacte-rium vesicatoriuit Doidge, the resolution of August (1, 1934, published August15, 1934, in the Official Gazette, prescribes the disinfection of all seeds of tomato,Lycopersicub e8culcuturn, and peppers, Capsicum spp., as a condition of entry.The text (in translation) of the resolution follows:ARTICLE 1. The seeds of tomatoes and peppers, imported from any source, 1iiustbe accompanied by a certificate from the country of origin, issued by officialphytopathological authority, declaring that such seeds have been disinfected byimmersion in a solution (aqueous) of bichloride of mercury, 1 to 3,000, forat least 5 minutes.ART. 2. Tomato and pepper seeds not supported by such certification shall besubjected upon arrival to the said process of disinfection.AET. 3. This quarantine provision shall become effective 30 days after publica-tion in the Official Gazette.LEE A. STRONG,Chief, Burcau of Entomolbgy and Plant Quarantine.P. Q. C. A.-284, Supplement No. 9SEPTEMBER 20, 1934.PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF MEXICOEXTERIOR QUARANTINE NO. 12-ALFALFA(July 2, 1934; effective Aug. 18, 1934)ARTICLE 1. In accordance with article 43 of the regulations of agricultural sanitary police (Policia Sanitaria Agricola) an absolute quarantine is estab-lished against plants of alfalfa, Medicago sativa, and their various parts (roots,stems, leaves, flowers, and seeds) in the fresh condition or as hay, which pro-ceed from the following States of the American Union: Colorado, Idaho,Nevada, Oregon, Utah, and Wyoming, and a partial quarantine for the countiesof California infested by the alfalfa weevil ((Ph ytonom us) Hypera posticaGyll.).ART. 2. The folowing conditions are established for the importation intoMexico of the articles mentioned from the State of California, U. S. A.:(a) Importers must apply for and obtain, before shipment, a specialpermit from the Direcci6n de Fiomento Agricola.(b) Application for permit may be made by telegraph and shall indicatethe name and address of the exporter ; locality where the alfalfa wasgrown ; port of shipment and port of entry into Mexican territory ; destina-tion and name of importer ; quantity of the product ; date of applicationand signature of applicant.(C) Each permit issued will be numbered and the period of its validityvil be indicated therein.(d) The product shall be accompanied by a phytosanitary certificate,duly legalized, issued by the respective authorities of the State of Cali-fornia, U. S. A., and visaed by one of our consuls with jurisdiction in theplace of origin of the product, declaring that the pest in question does notexist there.(c) Unloading or introduction will be permitted only at the followingfrontier ports or customs offices:On the northern frontier.-Mexicali and Tijuana, Baja California;Nogales, Sonora ; Ciudad Jaurez. Chihuahua ;Piedras Negras, Coa-huila ; Nuevo Laredo and Matamoros, Tamaulipas.On the Pacific coast.-Santa Rosalha, Ensenada, and La Paz. BajaCalifornia ; Guaymas and Yvaros, Sonora ; Topolobampo and Mazatlan,Sinaloa; Maizanillo, Colima ; Acapulco, Guerrero; Salina Cruz, Oaxaca.

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80 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.ART. 8. Contravention of the provisions of the present quarantine will bedeemed illegal transit, in accordance with article 74 of the regulations ofPolicia Sauitaria Agricola already cited, and in accordance with article 75 ofthe same re-ulations the ille-al transit will be punished by a fine of $10 to$1.000 both with respect to the consignee and the carrier of the merchandise,and by proceeding with the destruction of the latter without right of indemnity.LEE A. STRONG,Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.B. P. Q.-802, Revised, Supplement No. 2SEPTEMBER 20, 1934.PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, GERMANYSAN JOSE SCALE RESTRICTIONSCITRUS FRUITS AND NUTS TO BE INSPECTED FOR SAN JOSE SCALEThe order of the German Federal Minister of Nourishment and Agricultureof March 27, 1934 (RI. F. M., Mar. 27, 1934-Z 1101-246 II), as modified bythose of April 9 (R. F. M., Apr. 9, 1934-Z 1101-275 II), and May 15, 1934(R. F. M., May 15, 1934-Z 1101-364 II), prescribes that henceforth oranges,mandarins (tangerines), and lemons may be imported only on condition thatan inspection of the shipment at the port of entry at the expense of the inter-ested person does not determine infestation or suspicion of infestation with SanJose scale.The above applies only to the products of those countries from which theimportation of deciduous fruits is specially restricted to prevent the introduc-tion of San Jose scale. Consequently the inspection of these citrus fruits fromItaly and Spain is not necessary.Importation of these fruits is permitted only through customs offices author-ized for the entry of deciduous fruits.The order of March 15, 1934 (R. F. M., Mar. 15, 1934-Z 1101-216 II),prescribes that walnuts and other nuts (hazel, Brazil, etc.), which, withoutgreen husks, are imported as commercial, dried merchandise. are not subjectto inspection for San Jose scale, even when the separated remains of the outerhusk still adhere to the nuts. On the other hand, occasional shipments ofunripe and of mature nuts imported with husks still green must be inspected.LEE A. STRONG,Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.B. E. P. Q.-366SEPTEMBER 20, 1934.PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF CZECHOSLOVAKIAThis summary of the plant-quarantine import restrictions of the Republicof Czechoslovakia has been prepared for the information of nurserymen, plant-quarantine officials, and others interested in the exportation of plants andplant products to that country.It was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant quarantine inspector of the Bu-reau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine, from his translation of the Germantext of Governmental decree no. 168, December 13, 1927, of the Republic ofCzechoslovakia, on the administration of the tariff law, and reviewed by theMinistry of Agriculture of that Republic.The information contained in this circulir is believed to be correct and com-plete up to the time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used inde-pendently of, nor as a substitute for, the original text of the decree, and itis not to be interpreted as legally authoritative. The decree itself should beconsulted for the exact text.LEE A. STRONG,Chief, Bureau of En onologU and Plant Quarantine.

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1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 81PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF CZECHOSLOVAKIAAUTHORIZING LAWLaw of July 2, 1924, concerning the protection of plant production.CONCISE SUMMARYIMPORTATION PROHIBITEDClover: Refuse, chaff, etc., of all species.Potatoes: Parts and refuse thereof, if infected or suspected of being infectedwith wart disease ; also potatoes originating in countries contaminated by wartdisease.Grapevines and parts thereof, compost, used props and supports, livephylloxera and eggs, merchandise packed or enclosed in grape leaves or whichcontains parts of grapevines, as a precaution against the introduction ofphylloxera.Living plants, living parts, and fresh refuse thereof, and containers thereoffrom America, Africa, Australia, Austria, China, lavaii, Hungary, Japan, andNew Zealand as a precaution against the introduction of San Jose scale.IMPORTATION RESTRICTEDRed clover and alfalfa seed: Importation and exportation subject to controlby the seed control station, including the withdrawal and testing of samples.Potatoes may be imported from countries where potato wart does not occurif accompanied by a phytosanitary certificate in prescribed form in the officiallanguage of Czechoslovakia and in the language of the exporting country,and subject to inspection on arrival.Living plants (except grapevines) and parts thereof must be accompanied bya shipper's declaration and by a phylloxera certificate by competent authority if from a country where phylloxera is known to exist.Fresh fruits: Importation from countries infested with San Jose scale per-mitted on condition that inspection on arrival does not reveal San Jose scaleon the fruit or the containers.IMPORTATION UNRESTRICTEDCut flowers, seeds, bulbs, and tubers free from soil, grape seeds, and vege-tables.REGULATIONS UNDER DECREE No. 168, OF DECEMBER 13, 1927The plant quarantine import restrictions of the Republic of Czechoslovakiaare assembled in part 2, section 4, governmental decree no. 168 of December 13, 1927, on the administration of the tariff law.The regulations apply to all methods of forwarding plants, not only by publictransportation organizations (mail, railroad, ship, airplane, etc.) and by roadby means of vehicles, but also to that affected by persons crossing the customsfrontier, and are grouped as follows:A. Seeds.B. Potatoes.C. Other plants, their fruits and parts.1. Precautionns against phylloxera.2. Precautions against San Jose scale.A. SEEDSExported and imported red clover and alfalfa seed subject to controlARTICLE 1. Exported and imported red clover and alfalfa seed is subjectto control by the seed control station of the land cultivation council of Bohemia,Prag; the Moravian Agricultural Land Research Institute, Briinn; and theGovernment Agricultural Institute, Bratislava and Ko~ice. The exported seedmust be sealed or marked.

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82 BUI'kEAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE (July-Sept.Awr. 2. The import-:ition of refuse, chaff, etc., of all species of clover seedis prolhibited. The exportition of this refuse is subject to control by theinstitutes na1111edI ill a article 1.ART. 3. The entry and exit customs offices, respectively, are required to takean average saniple from every imported and exported shipment of red cloverand alfalfa seed and of refuse, chaff, etc., and to send it, according to thelocation of the custolis ofiiee, to the proper seed-control station.B. POTATOESImportation pro71ibited of potatoes infected with wart diseaseARTICLE 1. The importation of, and frontier traffic in, potatoes infected orsuspected of being infected with wart disease, and the entry of parts andrefuse of such potatoes, as well as of sacks, baskets, cases, and other con-tainers, or of articles which have come in direct contact with infected orsuspected ground or potatoes, is prohibited.Importation prohibited of potatoes from wart-infected countriesART. 2. The importation of, and frontier traffic in, potatoes from countriesin which potato wart has been determined also is prohibited.The Ministry of Agriculture, in cooperation with the Ministry of Industry,Commerce and Trade, is authorized to make exceptions to this prohibition inspecial cases.ART. 3. Foreign potatoes which are transported in containers (not in bulk)may be imported only in new, unused containers.ART. 4. The list of countries from which potatoes may be imported will bepublished annually in January and the offices will be informed.Ports of entry for potatoesART. 5. The following frontier customs offices have been designated for theimportation of potatoes: Bi'eclav, Schattau, Ceske Velenice, Oberhaid, Eisen-stein Markt, Furth i. W., Eger, Reitzenhain, Bodenbach, Tetschen, Georgswalde-Ebersbach, Zittau, Seidenberg, Halbstadt, Ziegenhals, Jigerndorf, Troppau,Oderberg, Petrovice in Schlesien, Skalit6, Suchi, Hora, Orlov. Medzilaborce,Uzok, Jasina. Valea Visaului, Campolung la Tisa, Kiralyhidza, cop, Slovensk6,Novd Msto, Hidiisneimeti, Turna n. Bodvou, Tornala, Rimavska, See, Filakovo,Sahy, Parkinn, Komnirno, Bratislava-Petrzalka, and Marchegg.Inspection certificate in prescribed form requiredART. 6. Shipments of foreign potatoes offered for importation must be ac-companied by a pijytopathological certificate printed in the language of theexporting country and in the official language of Czechoslovakia. These cer-tificates must correspond to the prescribed model and must include:(a) The official title of the phytopathological institute at the head of thecertificate and the serial number.(b) A declaration of the potato grower confirmed by the local authorityas to the place where the potatoes were grown.(c) The declaration of the official phytopathological station that the placewhere the potatoes were Lrown is not in a locality infected or suspected ofbeing infected with wart disease, and that no wart has been determined withina Ia ius of 15 kmi therefroni and that there is no suspicion of such infection.(d) A declaration of the officials of the phytopathological station which:(1) Insofar as potatoes intended for consunIption, or for an industrialprocess; iln the Republic of Czechoslovakia are concerned, includes a state-ment that they were inspected at the loading station and no infection orsuspicion of wart was found and that these potatoes were either ladenin his presence into a covered car which he provided with the seal ofhis institute, or were delivered for transportation by rail or mail aspackages in new containers which he provided with the seal of his insti-tute; furtheriore, that he personally entered in the certificate the caruiziher and the number of the seal or of the bill of lading, or of thepostal declaration, and of the seals of the separate containers, respectively.

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1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 83(2) Insofar as potatoes inteiided for plaiiting in the I Repubiie ofCzechoslovakia are concerned, includes a statecnt thia t Ile itsipectedthen in the field where grown before tiyey were placed in container's, andthat neither in the exported seed potato s, nor in the remiiiider of thecrop of that establishiment did he fiiid aiiy infection or suspicion of infec-tion of wart, and that new coitaiiiers were use(d for tlite sail pta toes,which containers he closed and provided with Ole i seal (f his institute;and that furthermore he personally entered in the certifiv it e h 110e numberof the bill of lading or postal declaration and of tlie seal of te separatecontainers.(c) A clear inl)ression of the date and loeality stamp of the slipinqjag sl;t1ionin the respective heading, which must correspoid vith that in thlie I iill (0 huling.ART. 7. The shipper must indicate on the bill of lading or upon the postaldeclaration form :(a) The number of the piytopathological (ertificate and the title of thephytopathological station that issued the ('Crtificate.(b) The fact that the certificate or decla ration is euviosed.Prescribed Pot11o Certificatc(Title and location of the official phytopathological station)Phqtopathological Certificate on Potato Wart (* ylChytriUm Ciidobioticim )1. Potato grower's declaration.I declare that the potatoes intended for exportation to the Republic ofCzechoslovakia were grown in---------------------------, in the district(place of oriuin)of --------------------------------, in---------------------------(country of origin)Date------------------(Signature of the potato grower, and stamp if possible.)(Stamp and signature of the local authority.)2. Declaration of Official Phytopathological Station.In the name of the above-imentioned phytopathological station I declare thatthe said district does not lie within a locality infected. or suspected of beinginfected, with potato wart, and that in the land register of this district nopotato wart has hitherto been recorded within a radius of 15 km and thatthere was no suspicion of its occurrence.Date(Stamp of the station and signature of the director.)3. Declaration of the inspector from the official pliytopatLological station onthe inspection of the potatoes.In the name of the (official title and location of the phytopathological stationwhose representative inspected the potatoes), I declare:POTATOES FOR CONSUMPTION OR -\.NUFACTURING PURPOSESThat, on behalf of the Republic of Czechoslovakia. I inspected the potatoesintended for consumption (or for manunkcturing purposes) in the loading sta-tion and have found no potato wart or suspicion thereofPOTATOES IN BULK 2That in my presence the potatoes were loaded into covered (or closed) carno. which I provided with seal no. of my station and that I per-sonally entered the car number and the seal number in the certificatePOTATOES IN CONTAINERS -That the potatoes were delivered in my presence to the railroad station orpostal service in new containers,2 Strike out (or omit) the part not concerned.

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84 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.That I closed the containers and provided them with seals of my station, andthat I personally entered in this certificate the car number, the seal number ofeach container. as well as the number of the bill of lading or the postaldeclaration;WITH SEED POTATOESThat, on behalf of the Republic of Cztchoslovakia, I have inspected thesepotatoes in the district ov (locality where grown) and have not found potatowart or suspi-Icon there; iii the potatoes illtenled for exportation or in thepotato Crop on the salle ind;Tiatt new conitainers were used, which I closed and sealed with the seal ofmy station;That I personally entered the following numbers of the seal of the separatecontainers in the certificate.(Stamp or seal of the station and signatureof the official who made the inspection.)Distinct official (late stamp of the shipping station ; this must agree withthe date stamp on the bill of lading.(Stamp.)Vzor.(Nizev a misto oficielniho fvtopathologick6ho distavu [stanice] jako zthlavf.)Cislo jednaci:FYTOPATHOLOGICKE OSViD6ENIo rakovin6 brainborn' (Synchytrium endobioticum).(I. Prohhieni pestitele bramboru).Prohlazuji, ze brambory urnen6 pro vyvoz do republiky Ceskoslovensk6 bylyvypestovany v obei ----------_ _ _, okrese ------------,ve stit------------V--------------------_dneRazitko mistniho diiadu a podpis:Podlpis pestitele bramborni,pipadn t " razitko-(II. Prohl.eni oficielniho fvtopathologick6ho distavu [stanice]).Za shora uvedei
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1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 85uzaviracmi p~lmbai sv6ho Istavii (stanice) a 'e jsem vlastrioriin6 zapsal dotohoto osvedcenif Cislo vozu a 6isla itzaviracich plomb jednotlivych obalu, a toa 'isla mikladniceh list' nebo--------------------------------------a Csl Unkanc itinpo'toviifcli prtivodek, a to --------------------------------------------U BRAMBORU SADBOVYCHIZe jseni brambory urcene jako sadbu do repiibliky Ceskosloven~sko prohl(1l vobei -----------lived ' nAzev ohce avedeiiy ad L) a nezjistit rakoviny brambhorunebo podezicnf z rakoviny ani na sadb iirCenc' k vyvozo, aiu na ostatiii skliznibramboru t6hoz hospoddistvi,2e bylo pouzito novych obal', ktcrd jsem uzavrel a opatftil plombamilj sv6ho6staavu (stanice),Ze jsei vlastnorucnc zapsal do tolioto osved'eni Iimsledlljici 6isla plomb je(hdot-livych obal'i------------------------------------------------------------Razitko dlstavu (stanice) a podpis dirednika, ktery prolhlidku proved:(IV. Zfetend iiedni datiimov6 razitko odesilacf stanice, ktcr6 niusi souhiasiti sdatumovyi razftkem v naikladiifin list6:RAZITKO.Through intcrnatiunal bill of lading rcquircdART. 8. Potatoes imported into the Republic of Czechoslovakia by rail mustbe accompanied by a through int-rnationul bill of la(ling from the station atthe place of origin to the intended station in Czechoslovakia. The imlportationof potatoes by sea or by watercourse will be permitted in particulir cases bythe Ministry of Agriculture, Commerce, and Trade under special conditions.Inspection of imported potatoes required on arrivalART. 9. Imported foreign potatoes must be subjected to a phytopatliologicalinspection. The following institutions are charged with that work:(a) Bohemia : The phytopatliologicai institute of the Government ResearchInstitution for Plant Production, Prag.(b) Moravia: The phytopatlhological section of the Moravian AgriculturalLand Research Institution, Briinn.(c) Silesia: The phytopathological section of the Moravian AgriculturalLand Research Institution, Briiini, through the intermediation of the Govern-ment Resea rch Station, Troppau.(d) Slovakia, except the Province of K6sice: The phytopathological insti-tute of the Government Research Institution, Bratisila va.(e) The Province of Kosice and Podkarpatska Rus: The phytopathologicalinstitute of the Government Institution, Kosice.ART. 10. As a rule inspection is to be effected at the entry station (art. 5);shipments up to 50 kg in weiglit may be entered and inspected at any customsoffice at the seit of the research institute.Entry refused in absence of certificatesART. 11. The customs office will reject shipments of foreign potatoes not pro-vided with phytopathological certificates ; furthermore, those which are ex-cluded in accordance with article I and, insofar as the importation of potatoeswas not expressly permitted, also those from the countries mentioned in article2, and also, on the basis of recorded opinions of officials of the research insti-tute, shipments which do not comply with the regulations. The rejection is tobe noted on the bill of lading.Restricted frontier traffic periaitted without certificateART. 12. In frontier traffic persons having permanent residence in the Czecho-slovak Republic may import from the countries referred to in article 4 thepotato crop from their own (or rented) land, and persons whose permanentaddress is in a foreign country may import potatoes for planting in theirown (or rented) ground in Czechoslovakia during the period established inthe communities in question by the separate customs offices, without phyto-pathological certificate or inspection. However, interested Czechoslovakians

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86 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.must present information to the customs offices concerning the area in whichpotatoes are grown, and interested foreigners concerning the area intendedfor planting.Transit peritted under through international bill of ladingART. 13. The transit of foreign potatoes is permitted under the conditionthat the transportation of the shipment be effected under a through inter-national bill of lading from the foreign shipping station to the designatedstation in the foreign country in a sealed, well-closed, and undamaged car,or in sealed and undamaged containers.ART. 14. The exportation of potatoes from a closed district to a foreigncountry is not permitted.C. OTHER PLANTS, THEIR FRUITS AND PARTS1. Precautions against phylloxeraImportation and transit prohibitedARTICLE 1. In accordance with the International Phylloxera Convention, thefollowing regulations are applicable to the forwarding of articles through whichphylloxera may be introduced:The importation or transit is prohibited of grapevines (stocks and cuttings with or without roots) ; grapevine wood (dry or fresh, whole pieces or frag-ments), and grapevine leaves; compost (plant refuse for manure) ; used propsand supports; live phylloxera and eggs thereof; shipments of merchandisepacked or enclosed in grapevine leaves or which contain parts of grapevines.Exception s.-The importation of grapevines (stocks and cuttings with orwithout roots), grapevine wood (dry or fresh, whole pieces or fragments), and grapevine leaves is excepted from the prohibition when they are packed incases the covers of which are secured with screws, or are in entire carloads,under permit from the Ministry of Agriculture, under the conditions indicatedin the permit, and when imported through the designated authorized customsoffices.Importation restrictedAnT. 2. Shipper's declaration and phylloxera certificate rcquired.-The im-portation or transit of plants, shrubs, trees, seedlings, cuttings, etc., fromnurseries, gardens, and greenhouses (coldframes, orangeries, etc.), except grape-vines, is permitted only through designated authorized customs offices andunder the following conditions:(a) The goods must be carefully packed, but in such a manner that theycan be inspected.(b) The shipment must be accompanied by the shipper's declaration whichindicates:1. That the contents of the shipment were grown in his establishment;2. The place for which the shipment is intended and the name andaddress of the consignee;3. That the shipment contains no grapevines;4. Whether the shipment contains plants with or without balls of earth.(c) Each shipment must be accompanied by a certificate from the authorityof the country of origin affirming:1. That the plants are from ground separated from any grapevine stocksby at least 20 m or by some obstacle to the roots deemed sufficient byColl potent authority;2. That the ground itself contains no grapevines3. Tiat no grapevines have been stored there;4. That if stocks infested witIi phylloxera have been grown there, theirradical extiripation has been effected by repeated toxic applications andin vest igations for a period of 3 years, thus insuring complete destructionof ilisects and roots.ART. 8. It is not required that shipments from countries that subscribe to theconvention be accompanied by a certificate if they originate in establishments

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1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 87of which it has been published that they are under continuous official super-vision and meet the requirements of the convention. The shipper's declarationand the official certificate may be printed oi the back of the bill of lading.ART. 4. On making entry of the shipment, the customs office will attach theshipper's declaration and the official certificate to the customs documents; how-ever, if these are printed on the bill of lading the fact iq to be noted in thecustoms report that they were presented and were observed on the bill of ladingof the customs entry and were furnished with an imprint of the date stamp ofthe place. If the shipment is in transit, the customs office will leave the ship-per's declaration an( the official certificate with the transportation papers.ART. 5. Mail shipments.-In traffic with phylloxera-infested countries thesender of mail shipments of plants may enclose a duplicate of the declarationand certificate in the shipment, whereby it may be cleared through the customswithout delay in case the certificate may be lost in forwarding. The fact thatthe duplicate of the certificate is to be found in the shipment is to be noted onthe postal declaration and on the wrapper.ART. 6. Doubtful shipments.-In the case of well-founded doubts as to thecleanliness of the shipment, or if the customs officials have received specialinstructions concerning merchandise from a particular source, or for a pre-scribed period, the customs office will, in either case, allow the shipment tobe inspected by an expert customs official or by an official specialist; if sucha person is not available, the customs office will at once inform the Ministryof Agriculture (by telegraph if necessary) whereby it may issue instructionsfor precautionary measures. If the shipment is found in proper conditionit will be dealt with officially by the customs office, otherwise the entire pack-age will be burned and a report thereon will be made to the Ministry ofAgriculture.ART. 7. Transit shipments in bond.-Products of the soil whose transit ispermitted only conditionally under the foregoing regulations, without refer-ence to their origin, are allowed to proceed in transit if they are forwardedin bond.ART. 8. The importation and transit of table grapes, wine grapes, and grapeskins is permitted, through any customs port of entry authorized to admitthem, under the following conditions:(a) Table grapes must be packed in well-secured boxes, cases, baskets, orbarrels, but in such a manner as to be easy to inspect; the shipment maynot contain grape leaves or vines.(b) Vinifera grapes (intended for wine making) may be entered only whencrushed and packed in casks with a capacity of at least 5 hl; the casks mustbe so cleaned as to carry no particles of soil or grapevine. Vinifera grapespacked otherwise may not be imported.(c) Wine-grape skins may be entered only in tightly closed cases or casks.ART. 9. The importation or transit of cut flowers, seeds (including bulbsand rooted tubers, free from soil), grape seeds, vegetables, and fruits (decidu-ous), except grapes, is permitted through customs ports of entry authorizedto admit them.ART. 10. Hand baggage, conditions of entry.-Insofar as grapes or the productsmentioned in article 9, potted flowers, or other plants (except the grapevinestocks, wood, and leaves the entry of which is not permitted by the provisionsof article 1 (a)) are imported or carried in transit as hand baggage, they mayenter any customs port of entry. However, if doubt exists as to the cleanlinessof such plants, they are to be handled as prescribed in article 2.ART. 11. The importation of products mentioned in article 1, and products infested with phylloxera, as hand baggage (art. 10) is to be effected by thepolitical authorities (Government police) without prejudice to the penalties,in accordance with the appropriate penalty provisions.ART. 12. Uncertified shipments.-Shipments of the plants referred to in article2 are to be cleared at customs ports of entry and mail shipments at authorizedports of entry. Foreign plant shipments which lack the prescribed certificatesof origin are to be returned through the customs port of entry to the foreignfrontier offices and mail shipments to the post office for export.ART. 13. In all cases of the return by the customs office of a shipment suspected of phylloxera infestation, a report on the condition of the articles andon the reason for their return is to be made in the presence of the interestedperson or of his representative.

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88 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.2. Precautions against San Jose scaleLiving plants and parts thereof and their containers-Importation prohibitedfrom countries infested with San Jose scaleARTICLE 1. The importation is prohibited of living plants, seedlings, cuttings,scions, and other separated parts of plants, as well as of fresh refuse of plantsand articles which arrive in direct contact with the above-mentioned goods,also barrels, cases, sacks, and other containers of such merchandise, from Africa, America, Australia, Austria, China, Hawaii, Hungary, Japan, and New Zealand,because those countries are infested with San Jose scale (Aspidiotus pernicio-sus). The M1inistry of Agriculture, in cooperation with the Ministry of Industry,Commerce and Trade and the Ministry of Finance, can extend this prohibitionto the importation of the said products from other countries in which San Josescale may appear. (As extended by the notice of Feb. 1, 1932.)ART. 2. Exceptions from the prohibition of article 1 may be allowed in indi-vidual cases under special conditions imposed by the above-mentionedministries.Importation of fresh fruit permitted if free from San Jose scaleART. 3. The importation of fresh fruit (deciduous) from countries, infestedwith San Jose scale is permitted on condition that San Jose scale is not foundeither on the fruit or in the containers comprising the shipment.Inspection at frontier customs officesART. 4. The phytopathological inspection of shipments exceeding 20 kg grossweight must be effected exclusively at frontier customs offices expressly au-thorized for the entry of such shipments. Shipments not exceeding 20 kg inweight may also be entered at inland customs offices established at the seatof the research institutes. The cost of this inspection is to be borne by theimporter.ART. 5. Phytopathological inspection is to be effected at the following researchinstitutes:The phytopathological section of the Government Institute on Plant Produc-tion. Prag; the phytopathological section of the Moravian Agricultural LandResearch Institute, Briun; the phytopathological section of the GovernmentAgricultural Research Institute, Bratislava; and the Government AgriculturalResearch Institute, Troppau.ART. 6. The station or post office will immediately notify the competent re-search institute and the consignee at his expense by telegraph of the arrivalof shipments of fruit.ART. 7. The research institute will send out at once, or at the latest within24 hours after receipt of the notice, its inspector to the customs office in orderthat the phytopathological inspection may be carried out in the presence ofa customs official and a railroad or postal official, and also in every case, theconsignee. According to the needs of the case, the inspector will withdraw10 percent of the contents of the shipment at the expense of the interestedperson and will make a thorough inspection to determine whether or notthe fruit or packing is infested with San Jose scale. The inspector is alsoauthorized to withdraw a suitable quantity of fruit for further examinationin the laboratory. After examination the fruit will be replaced in theshipment.Rejection of shipments infested with San Jose scaleART. 8. If it be determined by the inspection that the fruit is infested withSan Jose scale, the customs office will refuse entry of the shipment on thebasis of his written statement and will note the fact in the bill of lading orthe postal declaration, as the case may be.ART. 9. If the inspector has a reasonable suspicion that the shipment is in-fested with San Jose scale and must undertake a laboratory examinationof a portion of the shipment. the customs office will refuse entry until theinspector has advised the said customs olice that, as a result of the examina-

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1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 89tion, the shipment has been found uiobjectionable by the research institute,which assents to the entry, the witlidrawn sample being returned, m id unilthe importer shows that lie has paid the expenses and fees pertaining to thephytopathological examination.ART. 10. The official of the research institute will miale a writteii report ofthe results of the inspection, which will be completed by the cusivims officialand in all cases by the consignee.ART. 11. The official of tlie research institute will note on the customs do(-e-ments and on the waybill the result of the inspection: " No objection is madeto customs entry " or " Entry may not be iade, becauseadducing the reasons and affixing his signature and the stamp (seal) of theinstitute.ART. 12. The customs office will iinmedliately transmit the report to theMinistry of Agriculture; the inspector wvill present a carbon copy of the reportto the research institute.Transit of fruit permitted without inspectionART. 13. The transit of fruit is permitted witliout pliytopathological inspec-tion on condition that the shipment is transported in an undamaged and well-closed car or in uninjured and tight containers.PENALTIES IMPOSED FOR VIOLATIONS OF THE PLANTQUARANTINE ACTAccording to reports received by the Bureau during the period July 1 toSeptember 30, 1934, penalties have recently been imposed by the proper Federalauthorities for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act, as follows:JAPANESE BEETLEIn the case of the United States v. Johin H-. Gibbas, Shadyside, Ohio, in theinterstate transportation of approximately 7 bushels of peaches from a pointin the regulated area to a point outside thereof, witliout inspection andcertification, the defendant pleaded guilty and was finedI $5. (Plant quarantinecase no. 482.)QUARANTINES AFFECTING MEXICAN AND CANADIAN PRODUCTSIn the case of the United States v. the persons listed below. for attempting tosmuggle in contraband plant material, the penalties indicated were imposed bythe United States customs officials at the following ports:Name Port Contraband PenaltyWeldon J. Bailey---------Brownsville, Tex.--4 mangoes.--------------------------------$5Pedro Murillo --------------(10. do -.----------1 mango -----------------------------------5Mrs. 1. E. Rodriquez ----------(0do----------------do .------------------------------------5Matilde Jimenez---------(10------------3 mangoes---------------------------------5Viola Duval.----------------.do------------1 mango -----------------------------------5J. A. Castillo---------------do---------------(10_.------------------------------------5Antonia de la Cruz ---------.---.do.------------2 mangoes---------------------------------5Raul ('avazos.-----------------do.------------3 mangoes--------------------------------5Francis Hernandez ---------.---(0.------------3 mangoes and 2 pomegranates-------------5Anita Champion -------------(o-0.------------2 mangoes---------------------------------5Antonia Rodriquez -----------(1-0. .------------1 avocado with seed.-----------------------5Louis Montes ---.-----------do-------------. .14 mangoes-. 5Bonifacio Rodriquez---------do------------( avocados with seed.------------------. .5Candalario Samarripa--------do------------2 mangoes-.--------------------------5Ramona Morales -----------.--.do. .------------3 plants-----------------------------------5A. C. Rodgers---------------(1 -0------------3 oranges.-----------------------------5Esteban Vasquez----------(--------------1 avocado with seed and 1 pomegranate -Carmen Salinas --------------do------------2 apples -----------------------------------5Antonio Alonso--------------do.------------3 mangoes and 3 tuna fruits---------------5Inez Lopez ------------------do--------------1 avocado seed.---------------------------5Jose Nayola-------------Eagle Pass, Tex----I avocado and 3 avocado seeds--------------1Consuelo Flores.------------.--. do ------------5 plants-----------------------------------1Herlinda Calderon-----------do------------4 avocados with seed and 3 pears.----------1

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90 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.Name Port Contraband PenaltyGrahiel :A.iz Eagle Pass, Tex. -3 avocado seed and 2 plants and 1 avocado 1with seed.audelpe nchez--------.0d-------.-----3 avocados with seed. ----------------------1JU: :.m-------------.--d.o.-------------1 ..-----------------------------------1('lenvi-A rrevla---. ---. ..do------------1 potato -----------------------------------1M ;s. E 1ifi) S. de MIota --do ------------plants.-----------------------------------1Jose A. (a-nps----------El Paso, Tex.------3 mangoes---------------------------------1J. M. Barnes -.---------. ------d ------------6 avocados.--------------------------------1S-r-n--adan-do--1-----------Isplsad1aoao-------------------1I& u mo ll m .-. ..00 ..6 sapotes and avocado. .....J ose R -ub.-------do------------29 plums ----------------------------------1C i::i Muin -----------idal1o, Tex------3mangoes, 2 quinces, and 4 pomegranates. 5Marelo < nzaicz----------o ------------10 avocados, 2 mangoes, and 1 pear.-.-5Eudell Flores-----------( 10----------.-.---3 apples. 7 pears, and I quince.-----------. .5Vicente I oc.-------------do.-------------2 avocado seeds.---------------------------2Le or-a \ --. Laredo, Tex-------4 avocados.--------------------------------1John ia:.-------------do ---------------0 .------------------------------------1Malie l rnan de7 -------. -----.do.-------------. .2 mangoes---------------------------------1Irs. Ltev Fernina ------------do.-------------1 avocado---------------------------------1Mrs. Z. Per.z ---------------do.------------4 avocados --------------------------------1M aria E st r -------------do------------4 mangoes---------------------------------IMaria Bust a----------------.(10.------------1 plant ------------------------------------1Irs. A. Hernandez .--.----.--do------------6 avocados.----------------------------1Mrs. Lenera Perez -------------do-------------1 mango-----------------------------------1Juan Perez ----------------(o0------------5 avocados---------------------------------M\rs. E. Castillo. --------.-. .--do.------------1 mango ------------------------------------Aiss G. Freed---------------do.------------2 mangoes ---------------------------------1 Miss Anora Brrrera --------o-0.------------1 mango -----------------------------------1Ilre, Mar-nnez ------------.do--------------3 avocados.-------------------------------1Mrs. M. E. 1amerez -------._(0------------1 mango-----------------------------------1M1rs. C. O ie.-.--------do ---------------.do ------------------------------------1Mrs. Olivia Garcia-------------do------------6 figs and 1 avocado seed---------------------1M arcelino MV artin.------. -. do---.------. 8 avocados.------------------1Mrs. Sussie Pulido -----------(10------------5 pomegranatesdo.s-------.--.--.---------. IJesus Jaso. -----------------( do------------2 mangoes------------------------------1Randall Ny -------------do------------8 avocados.----------------------------MRndall osve--------------do------------io---Svcds--------------------------------1Miss P. -Mato ----------------do------------2 oranges----------------------------------1Geronino Santos --------------do------------15 figs 1-------------------.---------ICarlota 'Martin -------------.--(0 -------------1 mango -----------------------------------1Rosilin 'Martinez------------do------------7 plants.-----------------------------------1Miss J. Ramirez ------------d---(1o_------------3 pomegranates_-------------------------1Miss H. Juneza--------------do------------2 mangoes------------------------------1B. Hernandez.--------------.--. do------------5 avocados.------------------------------1M iss H. Santos--------------do.------------10 plants.----------------------------------1Alejo Flores.------------------do.------------4 avocados--------------------------------1Louis artinez.---------------(10 ------------avocados.-------------------------------1Pablo Torrez ----------------do------------9 avocados.--------------------------------1Mrs. W. W. Winslow ---------(do ------------1 mango.------------------------------------MI. G. Hernandez --------------do------------3 plants -----------------------------------1P. A. Vilreal -----------do ------------3 avocados.-----------------------------1Mrs. Juan Cuellar ------------do------------2 avocados------------------------------1'Mrs. Felipe G arcia ------------do ------------1 mango and 2 avocados--------.-------------1Mrs. E vangeline Flores --(o ------------2 peaches----------------------------------1Maria arcia---------------do -------------4 avocados--------------------------------1Irs. 1. Pacheco -------------do------------2 avoca dos.--------------------------------1Eliso Chap ----------------(o------------6 avocados 1------------------------------Gauro de Iayas. ------------(o------------25 fivs, 17 peaches, 5 quinces, and 5 pome-granates. 1N Mrs. Isi ra Sanches -------d---0---2 avocados---------------------------------Mrs. Is : aro-------------do ----------------2 peaches--.---.--.-.---.--------. .1Bias C. G Jirz d----------------.-------------4 avocados------------.------.-----1.(ic 7ri( 1 mero-do ------------3 avocados--------------------------------1J, Gonz z.d--------------o------2 apples and 1 pomegranate-.------. ------1mis .I op-.---------o-------------2 poegranates-----------------------------1Juli Duri.--------------0 do -------------1 ear and 1 apple-.-.-----------------------1I*ndcIJ (r:ra ----do------.--.-. 1 manzco-.-.-.-----------------.----------i rred,-. ----.(0-.---14 avocados.-.--.--.----.----------------------1J aul nrque-------------do ------------1 quince-.---------------------------1.T oria -------------.-------------9 avocados-------------------------------I I la ------------(o -------------2 quines and avocado----------------------1Mrs. IP. G -onz:i-z -do -------------2 pouegranat es and 1 peach-------------11rs. M -Quesla --------------------2 anoes and 2 avocados --------------------1Juna Jos.--d-----------.----.(to------------2 avocados.-.-.-------.-----.------K. H. Wdkr.--------------o------------2 mangora.at.--------------------1E. D idier---------------( 10 ------------n 5 avocados-----.---.------------------1J. VillerrA.----------------.--.do------------3 avocados, 1 mango, 5 pomegranates, and 15 sweet limes.Miss J. ruisa------------.--.do------------12 avocados.----------------------------1M1rs. A. Arz arita---------.---.do ------------2 mangoes ---------------------------------1Pascula Gonz i.z -.-----.(. -------------3 avocado seeds.-------------------------1Mrs. 6. Resen z------------(do------------1 mango and 5 avocados -------------------1Miss A. 0. la --------------.(0 ------------2 avocados.--------------------------------1IMiss A. Torres---------------.do.------------2 plants.------------------------------------

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1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 91Name Port Contraband PenaltyFrancisco Pena .---------Laredo, Tex------8 pomegranates, 8 quinces, and 4 pears.--1Raul Ibarra---.---------.---. do.-----------1 quince --------------------------------1Maria Ramos --..-----------do .-----------4 avocados ------------------------------1Jesus Rodriquez-.---------do.-----------1 mango.--------------------------------1Alfred Seqobia ------------do.-----------11 avocados and 1 mango.------------------1Delores Mejia.-.-------------do.------------. .4 avocados.------.----.---.--.1Mrs. A. Sauvignet----------do ---------------do-------------.-.-.-.-. 1M. A. Morales -.-------------do-----------2 apples and 3 quinces.-----------------.--1Miss I. Benavides.--.do.-----------4 guavas -------------------------------1Jess Hill .do--.-.--.---7 avocados------.---.---. -------------1Juana Perez.---------------do -----------5 mangoes ------------------------------1Andrew Vasquez.----------. --. do-----------2 quinces -------------------------------1D. Benavides-----------. --.--do.-----------2 avocados.------------------------------1M. G. Garcia--------------do.-----------5 avocados .------------------------------1Henry Cardenas.-.------------do.------------. 3 mangoes, 11 avocados, and 8 guavas .1E. H. Krebs ---.---------. -----( dg ------------.2.man.oes ------------------------------1Solda Pelagn-----------.do-----------3 pomegranates.--------------------------1Ines Iscoboda-.-----------.do.------------. .1 mango and 6 avocados--------------------1Ciraco Linarez.-----------.--d .o.-----------7 auavas, 4 figs, and 5 avocados ._------------1Juarez V. Rivera.----------.-do.-----------4 mangoes---------. .---------------------1Mrs. Antonio Serana.-------.--. .do.-----------1 mango .--------------------------------1Eloise Rodriquez.-.-----------do-----------3 mangoes.------------------------------1Mrs. Costelo Jimenez--------. -do-----------1 mango.--------------------------------1Carlos Kerchmer ----------.do.-----------7 pomegranates and 1 avocado.-------------1Pedro Mendez .-------------do------------. .1 mango.-------.------------------------1Candelano Reyna -----------. ..do.-----------2 mangoes-.------------------------------1Angla Morales-----------do.-----------8 quinces ..-------------------------------1J. J. Howel.---------------do.------------. .5 avocados.------------------------------1Juanita Flores .-------------do------------. .2 avocados .------------------------------1Maria Villreal .---------.-----.do. ..-----------4 peaches and 1 quince.--------------------1Lorenza Ramirez.-.-----------do ------------. .1 plant. .---------------------------------1Miss N. M. de Ramirez-------do---------------do --------. .-------------------------1Arturo Rodriquez.-----------do.-----------8 avocados.------------------------------1Juana Villarreal.-----------. --. .do -----------16 quinces and 12 guavas.------------------1Jesus A. Esparza--------San Ysidro, Calif-8 mangoes. .------------------------------5F. H. Barger-----------Blaine, Wash-----6 rooted grape plants, 2 grafted apple stocks, 5and 1 pine seedling.

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ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY ANDPLANT QUARANTINELEE A. STRONG, Chief.S. A. lIoliwiR, Assistant Chief.AvERY S. HOYT, Assistant Chief.F. H. SPENCER, Business Manager.R. P. CURIE, Editor.MABEL COLCORD, Librarian.J. A. HysiLop, in Charge, Division of Insect Pest Survey and Information.J. I. HAMBLETON, in Charge, Division of Bee Culture Investigations.D. L. VAN DIN E, in Charge, Division of Fruit Insect Investigations.F. C. C RAIGIIEAD, in Charge, Division of Forest Insect Investigations.W. 1-. WITE, in Charge, Division of Truck Crop and Garden Insect Investiga-t iOils.P. N. A N AND, in Charge, Division of Cereal and Forage Insect Investigations.It. W. HARNED, in Charge, Division of Cotton Insect Investigations.F. C. BisHOPp, in Charge, Division of Insects Affecting Man and Animals.C. 11. HADLEY, in Charge, Dirision of Japanese and Asiatic Beetle Investigations.L. A. HAWKINS, in Charge, Division of Control Investigations..C. ItOABK, in Charge, Division of Insecticides and Fungicides.HAROLD MORRISON, in Charge, Division of Ins'ect Identification.C.1). ( 'LAUSEN, in Charge, Division of Foreign Parasite Introduction.S. B. FRACKER, in Charge, Division of Plant Disease Control.B. M. (ADDIS, in Charge, Division of Domestic Plant Quarantines.E. It. 8 ssCEi, in Charge, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines.A. F. BnUREss, in Field Charge, Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail Moth Control(headquarters, Greenfield, Mass.).L. H. WORT HLEY, in Field Charge, Japanese Beetle and Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail Moth Quarantines, European Corn Borer Certification, and Dutch ElmDisease Eradication (headquarters, Harrisburg, Pa.).R. E. McDONALD, in Field Charge, Pink Bollworn and Thurberia Weevil Quar-antines (headquarters, San Antonio, Tex.).B. L. BOYDEN, in Field Charge, Date Scale Quarantine (headquarters, Indio,Calif.).P. A. HOI)_ALE, in Field Charge, Mexican Fruit Fly Quarantine (headquarters,Jiarlingen, Tex.).92U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1935

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S. P. B. E. P. Q. N o. 12 1ImdMri19United States Department of AgricultureBUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINESERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTSOCTOBER-DECEMBER 19:34CONTENTSPage.arantine and other official announcements ----------------------------------------------93Announcement relating to Dutch elm disease quarantine (no. 70) ------------------------------93Revision of quarantine ----------------------------------------------------------94Announcement relating to gypsy moth and brown-tail moth quarantine (no. 4r) ---------------94Instructions to postmasters.----------------------------------------------------------------94Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (no. 4S)------------------------------J95No extension of Japanese beetle regulated area this year----------------------------------5Developments in the Japanese beetle situation during 1934-----------------------------95Announcements relating to pink bollworm quarantine (no. 52)-----------------------------98Modification of pink bollworm quarantine regulations (amendment no. 2)-----------------9SNotice to general public through newspapers------------------------------------1(0Instructions to postmasters.---------------------------------------------------------IAnnouncement relating to sugarcane quarantine (foreign) (no. 15)--------------------------101Instructions to collectors of customs (T. D. 47298) ------------------------------------101Announcements relating to sugarcane quarantine (domestic) (no. 16) -------------------------101Revision of quarantine ---------------------------------------------------------101Instructions to postmasters -------------------------------------------------102A announcement relating to sweetpotato quarantine (domestic) (no. 30)-----------------------102Revision of quarantine ---------------------------------------------------------102Miscellaneous items---------------------------------------------------------------103Calls conferences to consider control of three plant pests------------------------------103Fracker and Gaddis to head plant-pest-control divisions------------------------------104Peru prohibits the exportation of propagating material of rotenone-producing plants(P. Q. C. A.-310, supplement no. 3)---------------------------------------------104Plant-quarantine export restrictions, Republic of Cuba (P. Q. C. A.-283, revised, supple-ment no. 4) -.--_---.-.-----------------------------------------------------------------105Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Poland (B. E. P. Q.-368)---------------105Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Germany (B. P. Q.-302, revised, supplement no. 3)-112Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Czechoslovakia (B. E. P. Q.-366, supple-ment no. 1) .._-----------------------------------------------------------------112Plant-quarantine import restrictions, British Mandate of Palestine (B. E. P. Q.-370)-----113Plant-quarantine import restrictions, Republic of Mexico (P. Q. C. A.-2S4, supplement no10)------------------------------------------------------------------------115Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act------------------------------116List of current quarantines and other restrictive orders and miscellaneous regulations ---------117Organization of the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine.-------------------------------124QUARANTINE AND OTHER OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTSANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO DUTCH ELM DISEASEQUARANTINE (NO. 70)DUTCH ELM DISEASE QUARANTINENOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 7f,INTRODUCTORY NOTEProvision was originally made in this quarantine foi the impi rtation fromEurope of elm veneer logs if free from bark and woot-in 'esting inse(-ts. andwith a prescribed hot-water ti-eatment required before yob ise. It has beenfound, howx-ever, that the complete removal of all vestiges of bark, which alonewould eliminate both adult and larval stages of the s(-olytid bpetles known tobe instrumental in spreading the Dutch elm di ease, has not been offeic.tivelyaccomplished in the majority of slhipmolnts presented for entry under thisprov--ion. Both adult and larval stages of scolytids have been found in bark116,179-33--1 93

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94 r>Ul:EAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND P.ANT QUARAINTINE [oo' -De.roinimalits on tlhe-e elm burl lo s, even where bark removal evidently had beenattempted before shipment. Under these circumstances it seems hopeless toexpect! a bark removal comwiete enough to eliminate these carrier insects fromI l,(j dcap ic e es Of !mrled and twisted burls. and since the presence of suchinsects in any stage, in any number, at any port, is regarded as involving aGtiI ii dan-erI of further introduction of the Dutch elm disease, this quarantineLas been revisCi to exclude all elm veneer logs from European sources.LEE A. STRONG,Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine,NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 70 ON ACCOUNT OF THE DUTCH ELM DISEASE(REVISED)(Approved Dec. 20, 1934; effective Jan. 1, 1935)Having found that an injurious plant disease, known as the Dutch elmdisease, due to the fungus Graphium ulmi Schwarz, not heretofore widely preva-lent or distributed within and throu-hout the United States, exists in variouscomwtries of the continent of Europe, 1, Henry A. Wallace, Secretary of Agri-culture, pursuant to the provisions of the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20,1912 (37 Stat. 315). as amended, have determined that it is necessary to pro-hibit or restrict the importation into the United States from the continent ofEurope of certain plants and plant products hereinafter specified, in order toprevent the introduction into the United States of said disease.Now, therefore, by virtue of the said Plant Quarantine Act, the public hear-ing required thereby having been duly held, notice is hereby given as follows:The importation into the United States from the continent of Europe of thef ollowing articles is prohibited: (a) Seeds, leaves, plants, cuttings, and scionsof elm and related plants; (b) logs of elm and related plants; (c) lumber,timber, or veneer of such plants if bark is present on them; (d) crates. boxes,barrels, packing cases and other containers, and other articles manufactured inwhole or in part of the wood of elm or related plants, if the elm wood or woodof related plants is not free from bark.Exceptions to the above prohibitions may be authorized for entry underpermit under such conditions and regulations as the Secretary of Agriculturemay prescribe, or when the particular article or material has been or is to beso treated, prepared, or processed that, in the judgment of the Secretary ofAi culture. its unrestricted entry involves no risk of pest introduction.The expression " elm or related plants ", as used herein, means plants of allsp-ies and gi nera of the family Ulmaceae, including the genera Ulmus, Celtis,Zelkora, Amielocera, Aphananthe, Barbeya, Chaetachne, Chaetoptelea, Giron-niera, Holoptelea, Lozanella, Parasponia, Phyllostylon, Plancra, Pteroceltis,Trema. and all species thereof.This notice of quarantine revises and supersedes Notice of Quarantine No.70, effective October 21, 1933, and shall be effective on and after January 1,19 5.Doi e at the city of Wafiiington this 20th (lay of December 1934.Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.[SEAL] -I. A. WALLACE,Secretary of Agriculture.ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO GYPSY MOTH AND BROWN-TAILMOTH QUARANTINE (NO. 45)INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERSPosT OFFIcE DEPARTMENT,THIRD ASSISTANT POsTMAsTER GENERAL,Washiington, October 8, 1934.PosTMAsTER,My DEAR SIR: Your attention is invited to the enclosed copy of the latestrevision of Quarantine Order No. 45 of the United States Department of Agri-culture, on account of the gypsy moth and brown-tail moth.

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SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 93The principal changes in the local areas, etc., are indicated in the PressRelease and Introductory Note on page 1 of the quarantine order and you willplease be governed accordingly. See paragra 11h 1, section 595, Postal Laws andRegulations.Very truly yours,C. B. EILENBERGER,Third Assistant Postmnastcr General.ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE(NO. 48)NO EXTENSION OF JAPANESE BEETLE REGULATED AREA THIS YEAROCTO13ER 20, 1934.The following statement summarizes the results of the season's scouting to obtain timely information as to the distribution of the Japanese beetle. Thework of the season indicates that, with toe exception of three localities, thebeetle has not become established in aity place outside the present regulatedareas. The capture of a few beetles at certain points outside the regulatedarea does not mean that an infestation is established, and extension of thequarantine to cover such localities may safely be postponed, as ill previousyears. In the three places where infestation is established (St. Louis, Mo.,Indianapolis, Ind., and Charlottesville, Va.), extensive control programs areunder way which, with other safeguards, will be adequate to prevent spreadfrom these sections. There is, therefore, no need for the extension of the regu-lated area and no quarantine hearing will be held this year to consider exten-sion of the area or modification of the regulations. The statement will serve the same purpose as the report usually given at quarantine hearings by makingavailable to State quarantine officers and others the latest information as tothe distribution of this insect.LEE A. STRONG,Chicf, Bureau of Entonology, ani Plant Quarantine.DEVELOPMENTS IN THE JAPANESE BEETLE SITUATION DURING 1934The most outstanding first-record find of the Japanese beetle at a pointremote from the infested areas is that disclosed at St. Louis, Mo., wherebeetles were collected in such numbers as to indicate an established infesta-tion. Another first-record find consisted of 17 beetles caught at Indianapolis,Ind., in a residential section of the city al womo ditauce from a railroadline. This infestation probably resulted froimi illegal trafsloril uioi of infestedplant material. The infestation at Charlottesville. Va., can probably beaccounted for in the same way. Beetles were first found at Charlottesville in1932. This year 60 beetles were stripped in that city. The locations at which were trapped 6 beetles in Chicago, Ill., and 1 beetle in East St. Louis, Ill., pointto the probability of these having been transported from the heavily infestedsections of New Jersey or Pennsylvania via rail in refrigerator cars con-taining agricultural products not ordinarily subject to infestation. Funds were available only for trapping to determine spread in thoseStates immediately adjacent to known infested territory. Supplementing theState surveys in nonregulated territory in Maine, New York, Pennsylvania,Ohio, West Virginia, Virginia, and Maryland, traps were rpeated to eckpreviously determined infestations in Detroit, Mich., St. Louis. Mo., aid Green-ville, S. C., and to determine the presemlee of the insect in Chicag amd EastSt. Louis, Ill., and a few selected( cities in Indiana. The season's trail org 1O-gram began in Virginia on June 18. Trap distribution progressed north: rd,following the dates of probable beetle emergence. The latest traps set werethose placed in Maine. Except in cities where cont inued cat ches were bcingmade, most of the traps were lifted after a 30-day period of operation. Finallifting of the late-operated traps in Maine was acconiph shed by Sept ember 21.Prior to this season's use, the traps were recondit~uned and coa led withaluminum paint. Since this protective coating weatherevI munch bet ter 11hanthe green and white enamel comibination used previously, the traj s. at the end

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96 B1 U OF NTIM L)GY AND )LA N1' QVA1lANTINE [Oct.-Dec.of lhO> >2ason's work, wVeI stored ill -,Ii)i( l n8 coUinty-owned buildingsfr om which thiev ma v1 be ra dily di 'st ri ut d to uj it territory next season.C(rtllmen 1t of fmls ;llwed Ile ojerat on e only 31,000 of the project's Supplyof 1 treps.Ti 'St. Louis infestation is now known ti IaVe existed since 1982, but theseCt'i1 involved was not 1Ury ve 1 beIule p i eseice of the insect ill thecity was not reported to this Buveau mi; HiW! ii 19:14. Approxiimately2,io trups wele conceeIltrawed in ali likely iii' "e-, soctinls from June 19 toAugui:.1t 25 o! tiis year, with tiih, resultig, catue of 1.351 beetles. Fundsrecently llade ava i lable by executive order ': 118 \e ci ialed he Bureau to startiimediite application ( thorlOu1h1 control miArein all infested sectionsof St. L ouois. This work was begun on Septeib er 26 and is still in progress.AlpriExima itely 2.50 tois of lead arseniate 81re avaia ble for treating all of the117 inlested blocks at the rate of 1.000 pou!i !is pe r acre. This is the largest(-(cntrol program ever undert aLken at an isuhiit ite eStati n. Laborers to assistin al-)plying the spray are being supplied by the local relief administration.The city tire department is assistilg tn-oug: ihe lo;n of hose lines. State andcity officials are actively cooperating with the Bureau in this control work. Scouting of nursery and greenhiouse estblishminenits NvIthin a 10-mnile radius ofSt. Louis gave negative results. A S:ate (Iuaranltilne on the movement of hostmaterial l from infested sections will also be enforced.It is also anticipated that lead arsenate will be applied to the limited sections found infested in Indianapolis, Ind., and in Charlottesville, Va.When bee les were first found in Erie, Pa., in the summer of 1931, 170specimens were collected. Following the capture oi 282 beetles in 1932, allinfested sections were given heavy applications of arsenate of lead to renderthe soil t')xic to the beetle in the larval stage. In 1933, 167 beetles were caughtin the city, but only 10 were found in the previ< us y nested blocks. In asingle b ock where 200 beetles had been captured the previous year, only 6specimens were caught. As new infestations were deterniined outside the treated sections, additional poison was applied. This summer, with a still larger concentration of traps, only 114 bee les were captured. Forty-threeof this total were survivors of infestations d'seovercd in 1983 and first treatedin the fall of that year. The remainder represents spread not previ uslydetcrniined. The significant feature of he control work in Erie is that inten-sive tiraping in the older infested section of over 44 acres, where the soilhas been poisoned for a period of 2 ort more years. has disclosed only 3 beetlesemerging from the entire area. This al pairently progressive reduction inbeetle population in a residential district affomding favorable environiment forrapid nul iplication of the pest and difhleut conditions for thoroughly treatingevery square foot of soil in which the P'isect mlght overwinter, is veryencouraging from a control standpoint. ('ontinuing the intensive eradica-tion measures of previous years in Erie, the sections surrounding infestationsfound this year in unpolsoned areas were treated with lead arsenale at therate of 1,00 ) pounds per acre. This treatment, involving the application of thesoil insecticide to 6.6 acres, was accomilished between September 10 and 17,ininiediately after the traps were lifted for the season.Although Waterville, Maine, was in bided within the reguhited zone in anextocnsi' n of tern itory, effective as a result of the spread( deteriiloE(l in 1933,trapping w2 s repeated there a in this year to lea Iri whether the past winter'sred-1)breaking subzero weather had killed off the overwinterinig grub popula-tiori. Instead of 204 traps being operated for 80 days, as in 1933, this year 300trat -s were operated for 40 days; and, whereas last year 139 beetles wpretrapped. this year's capture increased to 299. Apparently the soil temperatureal o I diei o 6 inwhes or mere did not declijie sufficiently to affect larvalsurvival.Und-r a campaign initiated by the New Jersey St ate Board of Agriculture,310 Ia rgeized Japanese lheeile traps were sold to iiilividufals thr(lu]hout theState an t() other purcliasers in Norfolk a nid Richmnoil. Va., West Clrove andAllentown, Pa. Broinxville, N. Y., and Staiiford, (on. T'e type of trip solwas nae not available throngi conmnercial channels. By disposing of t hem atcost, the eouniiat tee wais a'e to retail the traps at $1.50 each.Df ilie fYl'it of the beetle in heavily iiifested sectioits occurred this yearapproxiniately 10 (lays to 2 weeks in advance of tlie insect's customary niaxi-rimni al)pearuince. By Jly 4. in densely infested sections of southern NewJersey, beetles had 1)alled oo early apples, tand browning of the foliage (f hadly

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1934 SEUVNICE AND IEG ULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 97devoured trees wvs plill!y evident fron a dis nec. By July 1, Ihe foliage ofmnoiy trees was (oimpl(0ly skOlt( iz M in tII' Shi li 80(1 '. Ecotle "I civiyreached its peaIk l'y the Iniidle '4 4uly. ofe ilialil iiumiibers afleir the fist WN\k in August.Tle 1lik1 m1n1e. ill whiht'l thu hectle hllledtial1 b ilt UP and (onl-ishes has not nat1er1i;i lized in soulitern New Jersey. T this i1av iy inieStedagr~iul~tlrl VarI i, 5'tionS tht for years have bNen sbi to( in t endive eet! edailnmge are still holdigit: their maxillilil puatiOS. F 3r 8 consecutive yearse-Irly ting a 'pp (e5 in cer-taill oichardos Ihave beeni rolered uillsalale liybeet e feeding. III theiu Pl i la elohlia n wIte r-fio it, (11s4trict ill 1)33, Oe exJJctedheavy flight of the adult did not ocur, indicting bat the insect was n tiewane in the business se'-ftion of the city. This sumflner tie insect restlumed itsheavy flight in the wharf and market districts, contradicting previous co, neliu-sions that the polIulation miiht have decrease(d pernwnently. This year's adultflight lasted for nearly 5 weeks, from July 11 to Auwust 18.Beetle feeding in (we bloek of 1.200 Yellow Traiisliairent apples locatc(1 insOUtherInf New Jersey was responsible for almost complete destructiOn of thecrop. In 1988, 3,C() bushels were harvested from ihe orchard. This yea r i hit36 bsh)els coul(I be picked. Other severe cowninercial damage was evidentthroughout the densely infested sections.Flotations of adult heetles in Delaware Bay, Raritan Bay, 811(d the AtlanticOcean were a-ain oI)served, but not to the same vxte(nt as occurred lnst year.The flotation from New Jersey to the Delaware shore on Delaware Bay wasmost pronounced in mid-July. Beetles were washed up on the l)eaches of LongIsland on August 10.Nursery and greenhouse scouting this season resulted in the finding, of adultbeetles on a larger number of theretofore uninfested premises than were deter-mined as infested in 1933. This season, infestations were found for the fisttime on 64 classified establshments, as compared with first-record finds on 3such premises the prec(eding summer. :Beetles have been found on the premisesof over 80 percent of the nearly 400 classified establishments in New JerseyThis condition is a result of natural spread of the insect and expansion of itsarea of continuous distribution by about 900 square mils. Among 2,32 nurs-eries and greenhouses new fu'filling the quarantine requirements for chls4ifi(ca-tion, 528 are infested and the owners are obliged to grow their stock underbeetle-proof conditions, and either to free it from soil or fumigate it beforeshipping to noninfested territory.As in 19,i3, g-een beaus were a ain shilpped in large quantities to droughtstricken midwesterni markets from the bean-grow ing sections in southern NewJersey, in Morrisville and Bustleton, Pa., surrounding Baltimore, Md., and onthe Eastern Shores of Maryland and Virginia. All beans shipped under certifi-cation from these areas were run through cylindrical inspection machines torid them of beetles. Thousands of beetles were thus prevented from moving tononinfested States.Evidence that adult beetles were flying into refrigerator cars whiie the carswere being loaded with certified beans, led to a temporary suspension of suchshipments from Cedarville, N. J., from July 12 to 16. Shipping was resumedafter beetle-proof enclosures had been constructed. under which inspected beanswere loaded directlyy into refrigerator cars. Prior to loading, each car wassearched for beetles, after which the side and ice bunker doors were kept closedor adequately screened.From the knowledge gained as a result of the season's observations of acci-dental adult infestation of iced and united refrigerator ears loaded in thea rea of heavy flight, the Bureau is in a position at !ho first sign of such afiight next season to impose effective protective measures to prevent the en-traice of the flying beetles into cars destined to distant markets.The results of this season's trapping activities included additional catchesin 5 cities in Maine; in 58 Maryland communities, both inside and Outside theregulated zone ; in Detroit, Mich., where a few beetles have been trapped eachyear since 1902 in 9 New York cities: in 6 localities in Ohio: at Erie, Pa.,where an infestation was first determined in 1931 ; in G cities in Virginia ; andat 7 points in West Vir-inia. Tm 1s et in Greenville. S C., in an effort to 1 ickup additional beetles at the site where 2 beetles were collected by hand. failedto catch any further specimens. Practically all of the few first-record infesta-tions found in these States consisted of a few beetles each. None of themclearly pointed to an established infestation. The remaining infestations werelargely survivors of known incipient infesta t-ions whieh successive years' trap-pings have shown not to have built up.

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98 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct.-Dec.ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO PINK BOLLWORM QUARANTINE(NO. 52)MODIFICATION OF PIN K BOLLWORM QUARANTINE REGULATIONSENTRODUCTOY NOTEThe following amendment :eodifies the area regulated under the pink boll-worm quarantine re-ulatioiis 1)y bringinunder restriction the counties ofDixie, i-nailton, Lafayette, Levy, :nd T11ayl in ie 'te of I'lorida. and allof Eetor and Andrews Counies and part of Midland County in Texas. TheFlorida counties are brought undr regulation at this time because of the recentfinding of pink b'Ilwovm infestation in IHamilton and Levy Counties, and be-cause Dixie, Lafayette, and Taylor Counties are contaminated by reason ofginning seed cotton in the counties where infestation has been found. Theselatter counties (Dixie. Lalfute, ami Tay'o) have i gin-ing facilities. Thecounties iii Texas are added as a result of pink bollworim infestation beingfound in gin trash in Midland, Tex., involving part of Midland County, as wellas Ector and Andrews Countics.S. A. RouwER,Acting Clicf. Bureau (f Eu tonology and Plani:t Quarantine.AMENDMENT NO. 2 TO REVISED RULES AND REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL TONOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 52[Approved Oct. 24, 1934; effective Oct. 31, 1934]Under authority conferred by the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912(37 Stat. 315), as amended by the act of Congress approved March 4, 1917 (39Stat. 1134, 1165), it is ordered that regulation 3 of the revised rules and regu-lations supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 52, on account of the pinkbollworm of cotton, which were promulgated on December 11, 1933, be and thesame is hereby amended to read as follows:REGULATION 8. tEGULAThiE AREAS; HEAVILY AND LiGHTLY INFESTED AREASREGULATED AREASIn accordance with the provisos to Notice of Quarantine No. 52 (revised),the Secretary of Agriculture designates as regulated areas, for the purpose ofthese regulations, the followig counties in ArIzona, Florida, Georgia, NewMexico, and Texas, including all cities, districts, towns, townships, and otherpolitical subdivisions within their limits:Ari-ona arca.-Counties of Cochise, G ma i. and Gi eenlee.Florida area.-Counties of Alachna, Bilker, Bradford, Columbia, Dixie, Gil-christ, Hamilton, Jackson, Lafayette, Levy, Madison, Suwannee, Taylor, andUnion.Gcorflia arca.-All of Bcrrici County except (a) the portion located north-east of 1he AlapIN1 iver, and (1b) the lioltion lornitted south of a line drawnacross the county just south of the railway station of Allenville along thesouth side of lots 328, 324, 8-25, 320, 827, 828, 329, 830, 331, and 332 of the tenthland district; that pzart of Cool: County located north of a line starting onLittle River at tie bridge marked Kinard Bridge on the soil survey map ofsaill county issued by ihe Bureau of Cheiistry and Soils, series 1928, no. 11;thence loliowing the old Ty Ty-Nashville road southeast past Spring HillChurch through the village of Laconte; thence in an easterly direction alongthe road to Nashville past Grovania School to McDermott Bridge over the NewRiver ; all that part of Tift County located east of Little River.( 3 11cxrico arca.-Counties of Chaves, Doria Ana, Eddy, Grant, Hidalgo,Lea, Luna, Otero, andI Roosevelt.Texao a ra.--Coui t 1 of Aiidrews, Brewster, Cochran, Culberson, Ector,El Paso, Gaines, lockley, ludspetb, Jeff Davis, Pecos, Presidio, Reeves,Terrell, Terry, Ward, and Yoa n i; am; ihat part of bailey County lying south ofthe following-deshibed boundiry line : beginning on the east line of saidcounty where 1le county lilo ii 5e(1S th'( lrilhrn bouniiry line of league

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19,4 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 99207; thence west following the northern boundary line of leagues 207, 203,191, 188, 175, and 171 to the northwest corner of league 171; thence southon the western Iitcn of league 171 to the northeast corner of the W. 11. L. sur-vey; thence west along the northern boundary of the WN. It. L. sarveV andthe northern boundary of sections 68, 67, 66, 65, 04, 63, 62, 61, and 60 of! bloc kA of the M. B. & 13. survey to the western boundary of said county ; that partof DaLwson CoUinty lying north and west of the 101lIwi11ade5Cribed boundaryline: beg !ining on te western boundary line of said county at Ithe ) orltiwestcorner or section 113 of block M; thence ill a northeasteily direction on thenorthern boundary 1:ne of sections 118, (J0, 83, 72, 65, 51, 47, a n :,i; of block M1to the northeast corner of section 46 ; theme in a nort hwei sternly dimcod Wa ithe western boundary line of section 21 to the no,.1t ws'< er ( so_'ciioll 21;thence norieasterly along the northern boundary lii of -tiction 21 14) thenorth. corner of sec ion 21 ; thence northwesterly alinthe western ;(0Iinl-ary lines of sect ions ::7 and 80 in said block 2K to the nortlw coi iner ofsection 80. thence southwesterly along the northern boundary line of secti .1 29of llock lH to the soutlhwest corner of section 17, block C,-41 ; thence nol-thi ,i'ongthe western boundary line of sections 17 and 16 of block (-'-41 to the Dc. onCounty line; that part of Lamb County lying south of the following-describedlboundary line: beginning on the east line of said county wlwre the coumoline intersects the northern boundary line of' section ) ,' the 1%. Al. Thomnso!lsurvey; thence west following the northern bounda0 A line of sections 9 and10 of the It. M. Thomson survey and the northern boundary line of sections6, 5, 4, 3, 2, and 1 of the T. A. Thompson survey nnd the northern boundaryline of leagues (37, 636, and 635 to the southeast corner of league 239; thencenorth on the eastern boundary line of league 2:89 to the northeast corner ofsaid league; thence west on the northern boundary line of leagues 239, 238,233, 222, 218, and 207 to the western boundary line of said county; that part ofMidland County lying south and west of the following-described boundaryline, to wit: beginning at a point on the Midland-Martin County line, wherethe lines between sections 26 and 27, block 37, township 1 south, intersect saidline; thence in a southerly direction along the east line of sections 27, 3t,39, and 46 in said block ; continuing in a southerly direction on the west line ofsurveys nos. 2, 11, 14, 8)7, 58, 60, 1, and 2, of block 87, towaship 2 south, adistance of 8 miles to the northwest corner of survey no. 2, T. and P., block37, township 3 south; continuing in the same direction along the west line ofsurveys nos. 2, 11, 14, 2, 26, 35, 3S, and 47 of block 37, township 3 south, tothe southwest corner of said -survey no. 47; thence in an easterly directionon the south block line and section line of surveys nos. 47 and 4S of said blockto the intersection of the Midland and Glasseock County lihe.HEAVILY INFESTED AUEASOf the regulated areas, the following counties and parts of counties arehereby designated as heavily infested within the meaning of these regulations:Counties of Brewster, Culberson, Jeff Davis, Presidio, and Terrell, in the Stateof Texas, and all of Hudspeth County in the same State except that ptart ofthe northwest corner of said county lying north and west of a ridge of desertland extending from the banks of the Rio Grande northeasterly through thedesert immediately west of the town of i\IcNary, such ridge be;ig an extensionof the northwest boundary line of section 11, block 651,,.LIGHTLY INFESTED AREASThe following areas are designated as lightly infested: The counties ofCochise, Graham, and Greenlee in Arizona ; ' the counties of Alachua, Baker,Bradford, Columbia, Dixie, Gilchrist, Ihamilton, Jackson, Lafayette, Levy,Madison, Suwannee, Taylor, and Union in Florida; the regulated parts ofBerrien, Cook, and Tift Counties in Georgia ; the counties of Chaves, Dona Ana,Eddy, Grant, Hidalgo, Lea, Luna, Otero, and Roosevelt in New Mexico; theentire counties of Andrews, Cochran, Ector, El Paso, Gaines, Hockley, Pecos,Reeves, Terry, Ward, and Yoakum, the regulated parts of Bailey, Dawson,Part of the lightly infested area in Arizona is regulated on Ic mount of the T]urb(riaweevil under Quarantine No. 1, and shipments therefron nust conivl with he wrequire-merts of that quarantine.

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100 BUREAU (U' FNTL\IULOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE EIct Dec.Lamb, and Alidlad(' l otes in ie, \as.a that part of the northwest cornerof 1 ho sj'eth Cot ulnlty, T"ox., 1:,ii 1nior. h anid west Of a ridge of desert landext (iiRng Im thl h11aks 4 lhlo Craide northeasterly through the desertiinid'i"tcly weot tF * :tovin o< AloNary, such ridtge being an extension of theUo r-h est butjndary I no of setioni 11, block 15/.This a neid met imslat 11 shle efe I i ye on and after October 31, 1934, and on thatdale 1all caticel and suoersede on0nIment 1o. 1, issued on September 14, 1934.1 .otie at the citv oi, Washinigt ott this 24th day of October 1934.Witless Iny I and a:0 li e -oil of the United States Department of Agri-culture.W. R. GREGG,Acting Secretary of Agricultvre.[sEAL][Copies of foregoing1 amendment were sent to all common carriers doing busiwiss inor through the quazantwied areas.1NOTICE TO GLNEsTAL PUBLIc TInIouGi NEWSPAPERSUNITED STATES DEPARrMENT OF AGRICULTURE,i'UREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE,Washington, D. C., October 211, 1931.Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, under authorityconferred on him by the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315),as amended, has proimulgated amendment no. 2 to the revised rules and reg-ulations supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 52, on account of the pinkbollworn, effective on and after October "1, 1934. The amendment modifiesthe area regulated under those regulations by bringing under restriction thecounties of Dixie, Hamilton. Lafayette, Levy, and Taylor in the State ofFlorida, as well as the counties of Andrews and Ector and part of Midland County, Tex. Copies of the anidilment may be obtained from the Bureau ofEntomology and Plant Quarantine, Washington, D. C.W. R. GREGG,Acting Secretary of Agriculture.[Published in the following newspapers: Florida Times-Union, Jacksonville, Fla , Nov.10, 1934 ; Star Tel.gram, Fort Worth, Tex., Nov. 12, 1934.]INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERSPOST OFFICE DEPARTMENT,Tiiinu> AsSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,lVashington, D. C., November 3, 1934.PosIMASTER: Your attention is; invited to the enclosed copy of QuarantineOrdler No. 52 of th.i United States Department of Agricutltire on account of thepink boliwormn, together with a copy of amendment no. 2 to revised rules andregulations thereunder, adding Dixie, oltiliton, Lafayette, Lexy, anid TaylorCountk-os in the State of Florida and the counties of Andrews, Ector. andMidlnd in the Sfa:te of Texas to the area quarantined in those States.As your post office is within one of the above-mentioned counties, you arerequested to be governed in accordance with the quarantine order and amend-ment thereto. See paragraph 1. section 595, Postal Laws and Regulations.Very truly your 4,C. B. EILENnnER61,Third Assistant Postnmaster (nrql.

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SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 101ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO SUGARCANE QUARANTINE(FORlEAGN) (NO. 15)INSTRUCTIONS TO COLLECTORS F CU S TOMSQT'RANTINE No. 15, GovEnNilG THE 1IM'orTATION OF S1).lCANL, RLv's11-. ).14567 s(UPE1SEKEi (T. D. -7'z8)0iL IFICE 0F TNET ,Was .il[/t on , Ir ( , 0 Ub( 1G5, I .Y':.1t ;ollc/'rtor; of CiiutoimS id Othcr c(oncevneu:Te apjpendtd copy of a revision of sUgarcan Quaran im No. 5 ( ir i )issued by thw Secret ary of Agriculture, offectiv 8 ctober 1, I)34, reiingthe imprtaltion of bagasse and other plant parts of sugarcan e, is j ub<0lihfor fo rilOtn and gidi{Ia ice of cust ms ofheers and others coio'JAM!'> HI. Moyiv,Commissioner of Gush,.(Theii follows the full text of the revised quarantine.)ANN. OUTNCEMENTS RELATING TO SUGARCANE QUARANTINE(DOMESTIC) (NO. 16)REVISION OF SUGARCANE QUARANTINE NO. 16 (DOMESTIC)INTRODUCTORY NOTERevision of this quarant 11 is now desirable to bring, it into conformitywith the recently revised foreign sugarcane Quarantie Nw. 5, and thus toprovide control over the domestic movement of baga-sse amd other tugar(anematerials from Hawaii iad Ptuerto Rico by permitting such movement onlyunier conditions which the Department believes t, br safe.LEE A. STRONG,(Jitc of BJurca t.NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 16 kRFVIbED)(Approvod D 8c. 2, e 1; effective .3 n. I ivi1, M. L. Wilson, Acting Secvelary of A'rieu ure, have dettrmimed, andnotice is hereby given, that certain injurious insects and diseases of sugarcane,new to and ]ot heretofore wi(lely prevalent or distributed witli an d through-out the United States, exist in the Territories of Hawaii and Puerto Rico,and that, in order to prevent the i(tAOdction uf these insects anl diseasesinto any other Territory, State, or District ol' the Ullited States, it is necessaryto quarantine the said Territories of IHawaii and Puerto Rico.Now, therefore, under auitiority .hrred by the P!aiit Q : lit hi Act ofAugust 20, 1912 (17 Stat. :115), as amended, I do hereby quaranz inc the Ter-ritories of Hawzaii and Puerto Rico. 0ii and after JLn'uary 1, ]'', iV shallbe unlawful to move any canes of suganrcaie, or cuttitiis or parts thereof,or sugarcane leaves, or hagasse, from the Territories of Ilawaii and PuertoRico into or through any other Territory, State, or I)istrict of the UnitedStates: Prorided, That this prohibition shall not apply to the move ticii ofthe ma ein s mentioned by the United States Depa rtient of Agriculture forscientific or experimiiental purposes, nor to the imovemelit of specille materialswhich the Department may authorize under permit, on cmiticn that thieyhave been or are to be so treated, prlocessed, or manufactured that, in thejudlgrnent of the Department, their movement will involve no pest risk.

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102 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct.-Dec.This notice of quarantine revises and supersedes Notice of Quarantine No.16, effective June 6, 1914.Done at the city of Washigton this 81h day of December 1934.Wit ness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.[suAr.] M. L. WILSON,Acting Sccretary of Agriculture.INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERSPOST OFFICE DEPARTMENT,THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,W1ashington, D. C., December 21, 1934.POSTMA STER.MY DEAR SIR: Your attention is invited to the inclosed copy of the latestrevision of Sugarcane Quarantine No. 16 (Domestic). The changes in this revision are indicated in the introductory note on thefirst page thereof and you will please be governed accordingly. See paragraph1, section 595, Postal Laws and Regulations.Very truly yours,C. B. EILENBERGER,Third Assistant Postmaster Genera7.ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO SWEETPOTATO QUARANTINE(DOMESTIC) (NO. 30)SWEETPOTATO QUARANTINE (DOMESTIC)NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 30 (REvISED)INTRODUCTORY NOTESince the promulgation of the Sweetpotato and Yam Quarantine No. 30,effective January 1, 1918, this measure has not been changed. In the inter-vening period, however, many observations in Puerto Rico have disclosed nodefinite evidence that the yam (Dioscorea spp.) is subject to attack in thatisland by the insects Cylas formica-rius Fab. and Euscepes batatae Waterh., onaccount of which this quarantine was imposed, and it is believed that yamscan now be safely allowed entry from both Puerto Rico and Hawaii if ship-ment is made under inspection and certification by the plant quarantine in-spectors stationed in these Territories.The present revision of Notice of Quarantine No. 30, therefore, removes the prohibition against the movement of yams from Puerto Rico and Hawaii, andthe yams thus released will fall automatically under the restrictions otherwisegoverning the movement of fruits and vegetables from these islands.In this revision the commercial movement of sweetpotatoes is still pro-hibited from Hawaii and Puerto Rico. Another injurious insect, the sweet-potato stem borer (Omphisa anastomosalis Guen.), has been specifically listedas a reason for quarantine action, in addition to the sweetpotato sca raibee(Euscepes batatae Waterh.).LEE A. STRoNe,Chief, Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantiwv''NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 30 (REVISED)(A approved Oct. 4, 1934; effective Oct. 10, 1934)I, M. L. Wilson, Acting Secretary of Agriculture, having determined thatit is necessary to quarantine the Territories of Hawaii and Puerto Rico toprevent the spread therefrom of dangerous insect infestations not heretoforewidely prevalet oi distributed within and throughout the United Stafos. due

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1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 103to the sweetpotato scarabee (Euscepc sbatalac Waterli.) and the sweetpotatostem borer (Oinphisa anastoiosali, Guen. ), do hereby, under the authority ofthe Plant Quarantine Act of Aurust 20, 1912 (:27 Stat. :815), as amended,quarantine tile said Territories of I lawii nd lPiwrto Rico.Now, therefore, piursuant to the proN isions of the said Ulant Quarantine Act,it shall be unlawful to move or allow to 11 ( liio -e any v11 iety of sweetpotato(Iponwca batatas Poir.) froim the Territories of IlAfwaii anid P1uerto Rico intoor through any other Territory, State, or I)istrict of the United States, regard-less of the use for wlhieli the snie is intended, except as allthorize(l by the Department of Agriculture for experimental or scientific imrnss.This notice of quarantine is a revision of Notice of Quaiantine No. :10, ef-fective, January 1, 1918, and shall be effective oi and after October 10, 1934.Done at the city of Washington this 4th day of October 1914.Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agri-culture.[SEAL] M. L. WILsoN,Acting Secretary of Agriculture.MISCELLANEOUS ITEMSCALLS CONFERENCES TO CONSIDER CONTROL OF THREE PLANT PESTS(Press notice)OCToBER 8, 1934.Three public conferences to analyze and consider the status of three im-portant plant pests, the white pine blister rust, gypsy moth, and Dutch elmdisease, will be held in Washington, D. C., on December 3, 4, and 5, 1934,Lee A. Strong, Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and PJint Quarantine,announced today.These conferences will consider the present value of the control programs,their need and effectiveness, whether they should be continued, and the (le-sirability of making modifications or changes. In announcing these confer-ences Mr. Strong stated that they were for the purpose of bringing to publicattention all available facts and opinions concerning the pests and to ascer-tain public sentiment re-arding the control programs and the quarantinesenforced in connection with them. It is proposed to find out at these hearingsjust how much benefit has resulted from the efforts which have been madeand to determine whether the cost of continuing them is justified. Anyperson or group interested in these subjects-the modification of the controland eradication programs, the revocation of the quarantines on account of thewhite pine blister rust and the gypsy moth-may appear at the conferencesand be heard, either in person or by attorney.These conferences are scheduled to meet in the auditorium of the Depart-ment of Agriculture at 10 o'clock each morning on Monday, Tuesday, andWednesday, December 3, 4, and 5. The auditorium is located on the firstfloor, between wings 5 and 6, in the new Extensible Building. The entrance ison Independence Avenue (B Street) SW.The conference of December 3 is to consider the program of the work andthe quarantine on account of the white pine blister rust. The control workon white pine blister rust is now carried on in cooperation with 31 Statesand agencies administering public lands such as the Forest Service, NationalPark Service, and the Indian Service.The white pine blister rust was first introduced in the northeastern UnitedStates from Europe about 1898 and into Vancouver, British Columbia, in1910. It is recorded in New York in 1906 and on native pines in the North-eastern States in 1915. The first Federal appropriation for blister rust con-trol work was made in 1916. Since that time the Federal Government andStates have appropriated sums totaling more than $11,000,000 to combat thisdisease. It is particularly' destructive to white pine anil has as its alternatehost certain species of currants and gvoseierries.The conference of December 4 i8 to consider the present program for thecontrol and prevention of spread of the gypsy moth. The gypsy moth is wellestablished in parts of the New England States and recently extensive in-festations have been found in parts of Pcnnsylviniai. on Long Island, and in

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104 8UIEAU (i ENT(M LOGY AND PLANT QUABANT1INE $I DLc.New York City. The Penns~hania infest ation alone involves 95) square miles.For several years the DIepartmvnt, in cooperationwilh Ihe States, has main-taited :t barrier zon ,a the eastern bundary of New York State and thew\ es elr bhilry of New EeIii to prevent the westwa Ird spread of this1)tL. The very receipt occurrln(e (f the oritlurea k in Pennsylvania and NewYork City a,4 well as the infkm ta 1 il on L mg I:41,11d 11(1 ill New Jersey em-eipha sizes the need of reviewiig the present pr*ogrmIln to determine its effective-Ies. The conference W 1 : 1s) ,Jve considerat iII to the destruct iven;'ss ofthi insect anld t need (;I' preventing its spread by quaraintile action orc(Wtrl Iiie'sures.The conference on Deeembc -5 will lie to consider the present status of theDutch elm isenso. This (Iseaso was recent-Iy discoveicd in the vicinity ofNew York harbor. It h.s already destroyed large nuBmbers of elm trees inNew Jersey. New Yorkc, and Connecticut. A few trees have also been affectedby the disease at (ininnati nd Cleveland, (Ohio, and Riltinore, Md., whichhave been eliniinated and destroyed and it is hoped that the disease has beenel n ilma ted from these lvens.Inl addition to considering the programil of eradileating this disease considera-tion will also be given to the tiesirability and reed for promu'gating quarantineregulations to prevent its spread by means of elm or parts of elms which maybe moved from the infecte(l area as nursery stock. h g5, lumber, etc., andwhich might carry the disease.FRACKER AND GADDIS TO HEAD PLANT-PEST-CONTROL DIVISIONS(Press notice)OcroaER 15, 1934.S. B. Fracker was tolay designated leader of the Diviion of Plant DiseaseControl, and Bevy M. Ga1(is leader of the Division of Domestic Plant Quar-ant ines, announces Lee A. Stron.i, Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and PlantQua iantine, United States Department of Agriculture.Dr. Fracker has been in charge of the Division of Domestic Plant Quarantinesfor several years. Since Ihe ilness of the late Karl F. Kellerman, he has beenacting in charge of the Division of Plant Diseise Contro!, which deals withthe control and the prevention of spread of white pine blister rust and blackstem rut.Mr. Gaddis first became associated with the plant-quarantine work of theDen:' rtment in connection with the eradication of the Moditerranean fruit flyin Florida. Later he was associated with the work on the eradication of theMexican fruit fly conducted by the Department in Texas. Since last Marchhe has been associated with the control of grasshoi~pors and chinch bugs. andhad charge of the Minneapolis headquarters for these two control operations.P. Q. C. A.-10. Sulpplen;t No. 3 Ocro:a:n 10, 1934.PERU PROHIBITS THE EXPORTATION OF PROPAGATING MATERIAL OFROTENONE-PRODUCING PLANTSPmruvian Re'so1l iin',i N/. 23, of July 5. 193, modifies the resolution of May22, 1923, by frcs rihin 1:at dalers in ;i)l r 1ar hI1), lsc)O root's (including thegenera Ap;imfC I-, C'eca, Jac(jqini(i, Lonch ocarpuw, !crjanl;a, and Tcplhroia)Who miy (x'ort It 5id pro(ict l hfel'I)(' river port of I(pUitos are exemlptedfrom tl1 retuireni't of amIIa Iy s Sii mtil tbe inslallation in tiat port of a chemni-c8 11) 1 oratory. Con ;sequ ly tIhose roots miia y be exported subject only to theaiit(orlzaltion of the customs 8it I(1Ilitos.Ex rtrsr :Ire advised to ship the roots in the driest form possible..S. A. 1o IwEl,Arig h Chicf, ?UramU of EntomUology awhl Plmnit Quaranline.

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j S E IV1' AND) 111G T i.'W N V NO N2 N"N-WN_ 105P. Q. C. A.-2S3, Revised. Su 1 hmntj I). 4 j(e l4, 1N o3. 4PLANT-QUARANTINE EXPORT RESTRICTIONS OF THE REPUBLIC OF CUBAPINE s IT' E -MAAY NOVW EK Ex1 X'OU rll I e mArticle 1 of thw low o' Junte 20. prhlilbite (. fw ui a p10r", o -10 yea-s,tHie exportation from (*uba (it' pinapple Ileaves r iI (1 jndemanenly pro-hibited the cutting :nd exporting of tender fruit, thlaIt lid not fully imatured.The decree-taw, No. 4,52, of Anost 1, 134. iev0jl the prohibition agai nstthe exportation of pii plle leuviis or slips 8!I(l n wioldat-icle I to read asfollows:ARTIcLE 1. The cutting g and export ag of pil a pple:s that :1re not fullymatured are peritanilently prohibited.This decree-lhw also adds article 4 to the 18w of June 20, 192S, prescr-lb-ing that a proper authorization from the Secrotariy o) Agriiulture is neee9ssaryfor the exportation of piiea pple leav ls or slips and Ihat those prodICts shallbe inspected by the Departamento de Sanirlad Veg al (Offie of Pilnit Quar-lntine).S. A. IoIwEr ,Acting Chief, Buirc"u of EntowooiQI? (lad Plant Quarantine.B E. P. Q.-3G8. NovEMEn 1, 1934.PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF POLANDThis summary of the plant-quarantine iniport 'mlri rions of the Republic ofPoland has been prepi red for the inforination of nursQrymven, plant-quarantinethemils, and others interested in the exportation of plomts to that Republi.It was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, of this Bureau, from his translation ofthe German text of the decree of the Polish Minister of Finance of October 4,1933 (Dziennik Ustaw, I. P. No. 77/652 of Oct. 9, 198:3), and the notice ofthe Minister of Finance of Decembcr 1, 1933 ( Momitor Polski No. 291, Dec.20, 1983), an(l reviewed 1)y tbe Polish Ministry o1 Airieulture and AgrarianReform' (Ministerstwo Rolnc~twa i Reform Roljiych).The information con ained in this circular is belicived to be correct and com-plete up to the time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used inde-IenIdently c;f, nor as a substi iIte fw,% the 02i-iiil I tOXt of the decrecs, anl itis not to be interprete'i as legally authoritative. The fler'res themselvesshould be consulted for the exart texts.S. A. R(JIIwER,Acting Chite, Buireu of En tmolo!yi and(! Plant QuwraviIinc.PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF POLANDEsIc LAwsDecree of June 11, 1920, of the Minister of Fi nance mid of Coumniere a1n6Industry on Customs Tariff (Dzieniik Ustaw R. 1'. No. :51/314).Law of July 31, 1924, Regulating Customs Procedure (Dzicnnik Ustaw R. PNo. 80/777).CoNeIsE SUMMARYIM PORTATION PROIIIBITED1,e,!Is (Phascohlus humnas), "RT'an,_,oon ", and( allcmuu hrsCockleberry ( 1A nirlia ( Corna!HN ) [andien ):Potato lR-IVes, jwelinii s. ""10 refu ile from '1] sour .I )c'ro of (4,! 4. 1:3:.IMPO RJAT'( ITA'Il(N LSTiU(1TEr1Potatoe-, ilcludinig (' co )eedi p I (Is: The following (Ocumncilts irt Eg :(1) An import tilthorization to be 1)btain Ii by thi Polish importer:(2) An inspection certificate acc(I'O ing to the I: oi'P ' mO : h ffi-m ingfreedoni from potato wIrt, pow(ierv salh, (!(ol( i ato bet potatotuber \vril, ind pot Iato vll'lemitode.

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106 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct.-Dec.Shrubs, bushes, and parts thereof;Ornamnetals (rooted), their seedlings or cuttings; bulbs, tubers, and roots;Fresh fruits: Apple, apricot, cherry (.s our and sweet .pcach. pear, and plum;Fresh ve-.etaldes of all kinds, and their aerial or subterranean J)arts (exceptseeds and potatoes)Pens, beans. lentils, vetch, horseboatis, and fIwhl beans.Each shipment of the above-listed plants aInd plant products must be accom-panied by a phytosanitary certificate in duplicate in accordance with the pre-scribed model, afflirining freedom from the diseases and insect pests named inAppendix A, and the freedoni of the establishment in which they were grownfrom those diseases and pests; also a deel:Iration with shipments of rootedplants, bulbs, tubers, and roots that those products did not originate in wart-infected ground.Seeds of clover, alfalfa, sweetelover, timothy, etc., must be accompanied by acertificate affirming freedom from dodder (decree of Oct. 4, 1933, art. 5).GENERAL REGULATIONSDecree of the Polish Minister of Finance on customs procedure, October 4,1933 (Dziennik Ustaw R. P. No. 77/552, Oct. 9, 1933).IMPORTATION INTO POLISH TERRITORY PROHIBITEDSection 16, article 6 (a) prohibits importation into the customs territoryof the Republic of Poland on sanitary grounds:Beans of the varieties Pha8colus lunatus and Rangoon as well as anypoisonous kind of bean.And on other grounds:Cockleberry (berry of Anamirta (Cocculus) indicus)Potato leaves, peelings, and refuse without regard to the country of origin.IMPORTATION INTO POLISH TERRITORY RESTRICTEDSection 17 of this decree provides for the importation of goods under restric-tion, and division V of that section on the basis of plant protection.REsTRICTIONs ON THE IMPORTATION OF POTATOESIMPORT AUTHORIZATION REQUIREDARTICLE 1. The importation of potatoes of any variety, including seed pota-toes, will be permitted only under an authorization of the Minister of Financein cooperation with the Minister of Agriculture and Agrarian Reform, andonly through customs offices authorized for the entry of potatoes. Potatoesmust be imported in new, unused containers, sealed by the shipper, or inbulk in sealed closed railroad cars.PHYTOSANITARY CERTIFICATE REQUIREDARTICLE 1, continued. Each shipment must be accompanied by a certificate indupliente, in accordance with the prescribed model 3, issued by the officialphytopatIological service or the plant protection organization of the exportingcountry. T]'his certificate must affirm that the potatoes, as well as all thematerials used in packing them, are free from the following diseases and pestsand from egs and larvae of such pests, namely, potato wart (Synchytriumendobioticum ) ; powdery scab (Spongospora subterranca) ; Colorado potato bee-tl( ( (Doryphora) Leptinotarsa d ecimlincata ) ; potato tuber worm ( ( Phthori-maca Gfiorinoschcma opercul(lla) ; and the potato nematode (Heteroderaschachtii rostochicnus:is fur-thiemore. that the potatoes were grown in a local-ity determined as free from the aforesaid diseases and pests and at least 20 kmfrom the nearest place where potato wart has been determined, and 50 kin fromthe nearest place where the Colorado potato beetle was known to occur.

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SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 107Prescribed potato certificate(Ol\odel -3).ountry of originCERTIFICATE OF HEALTH AND ORIGIN FOt POTATOES( Valid 30 days from date of is.-ie)The undersigned (full name and official title) certifies thot the shipment ofpotatoes described below was inspected and:(1) Is free from the followinI'-aimed diseases amd pests, as well as froithe eggs and larvae of such pests: Wart disease (Syciytrium endobioticum)powdery scab (KS'pontgospora subtcrrav(a) ; Colorado potato beetle ( (I)ory-phora) Leptinotarsa deceinlincata) ; potato tuber worm ( (Phthorimaca) Gnori-ntoschema operculella) ; and the potato nematode (Ileterodera sehachtii rosto-chiensis)(2) Was grown in a locality free from the said diseases and pests and atleast 20 km from the nearest place where the wart disease has been determined,and 50 km from the nearest place where the Colorado beetle is known to occur;(3) Was shipped in new, unused containers, without packing;(4) Was shipped in containers provided with seals in a railroad car bearingthe inscription: (insert inscription) ;(5) All articles employed in packing (containing) the potatoes included inthe shipment are free from the diseases and pests (including eggs and larvae)named in paragraph (1).DESCRIPTION OF SHIPMENTWeight of shipmentNumber and kind of containersMarks on containers -Railroad car numbersVarietal names of potatoesAdministrative districtName and address of shipperName and address of consigneeDateSignature[SEAL]RESTRICTIONS ON THE IMPORTATION OF PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTs PHYTOSANITARY CERTIFICATE REQUIRED WITH PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTSARTICLE 2. The following-mentioned plant products may be imported throughthe customs offices authorized for that purpose on condition that each shipmentis provided with two copies of a certificate issued by the plant protectionservice of the exporting country in accordance with the prescribed model 16.RESTRICTED PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS(1) All shrubs and bushes, as well as their slips and cuttings;(2) Rooted ornamentals, their seedlings or cuttings; bulbs, tubers, and roots;(3) Fresh fruits: Apple, pear, plum, peach, apricot, sour and sweet cherry;(4) Fresh vegetables of all kinds, including their aerial and subterranean parts, but not including their seeds. This does not apply to potatoes, whichfall under article 1;(5) Seeds of peas, beans, lentils, vetch, horsebeans, and field beans.POTATO WART CERTIFICATION REQUIRED FOR ROOTED PLANTSARTICLE 3. It must appear from the certificates issued in accordance withthe prescribed model 16 that the contents of the shipment and all articlesserving as packing materials were inspected and found free from the dis-

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108 BUIZEAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE (),Deise i and jests (.and eggs ;lIal larvae of such pests) mentioned in appen-1 iX A 1 rlrmOrQ, t iar the iliove-mentiOned nursery products were grown-' i stablishlmenit free from these diseases tui1 pests. Oi the importationof slh 1, 1dh 8, 8nd rooted cuttings, as well a;s other rooted plants, or of sub-ItuI I8 ~~pl )It pi 1ts (bulbs, tubers, roots) with adhering soil or in reeeptacleswith sol. lhe ( certiflcate must contain a declaration that the plants were grown8n Iowalit VC tI' i1rlim wart disease (Synchy trium 'idoloioticum), and that thesoil contained in the shipment did not orionate in wart-infected ground.P:I:SCRIBED HE!TIFICATE FOR PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS(Model 16)Country of origin.No.CERItTIFICATE OF HEALTH AND ORIGIN FOR PLANTS(Valid 30 days from date of issue)The undersigned (full name and official title), certifies that the (descriptionof plants and plant products) included in this shipment, and all the articless< rving as packing thertfor, have been inspected and are:1) Free from the diseases and pests (including eggs and larvae of the lat-ter) named in appendix V (appendix A to this summary) to the decree ofOctober 4. 1933, on Customs Procedure (Dziennik Ustaw R. P. No. 77/552),amd were produced in an establishment free from those diseases and pests ; '(2) 2 The nursery products included in the shipment were produced in alocality free from wart disease (Synchytrium endobioticum) ; and(3) 2 The earth coeitained in the shipment originated in ground not infectedwith wart disease.DESCRIPTION OF THE SHIPMENTWeight of shimenit-----------------------------------------------Quanti ty and kind of containers --------------------------Marks on containe-Railro8d cAr numbers----------------------Auinistrative dist!iot-----------------------------------------------1Name and address of shipperName an(d address of cosinee--1hIIte --------------------------------------------------------------Sigit:ureExplantation of certification requirementsSince the di-aseS an1d( pests iianed in appendix A, with tho ,xcep1tiO11 oiDidymospItacria (Didyiella) applanata are widely distributed in the UnitedStates, tho Polihli oertifUa hti! -equirements apparently constitute a Iactical(' 01r!. ), dIsc(s:Ing he iiotter with the Polish Ministry of Agricultureand Agrariain Reformi. tihat Mmiistiy, u&r(late of April 1., 1934, stated that1:o embargoo is iltenlded.Wi l resect to the shipment concornedI, the certifit8te mnust certify freedomfroi he th isases and pests (Oincluinig eggs mnd larvae of the latter) namedin appenidix to the degree Octobor 4, 1933; but with respect to the freedom ofth establishment in which thi1 ) (LtnS olf le shipment were produer~d fromthI ese di ';eases anid pests, the requir-ement will be met by certifying that thepints or parts thereif contavineI in the shiiuent were grown inl an estab-lishMen r free Crom thos' d1 n-eases and pests mientioned in appendix V whichcould attack those platnl 4 or parts of hints as parasites and be introducedinto Polamd witlh their.As for roeot' pla ;)1s ai s;iterrmean parts of ihinls (bulbs, tubers, roots,et.) with e;: rh adhe!illg rm packed in receptacles with earth, the certificatesholll lso 8test thaI noe plt's or puirts of aits were growNu in a plaicefree from potato wart chytrin en dobioticum) and that th e soil c-2 trik' out I ]e claus thni t does not apply to the shipment.

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19341 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 109tained in the shipment does not couie froi la ud infected by pot to Wart.This does not mean that a special examiiation of the suil is e1qu1r(.l fortraces of the wart organism. An attestation by the official plant-protectionservice of the exporting country that the estfblishment (nursery, plantation,garden, etc.) in which this plant material was growii that the said service had not determine(l any case of wart disease in that establishien t, willsuffice.Certificates by competent Federal or State authority are acceptable to thePolish Ministry Of Agriculture and Agrarian Reform, but the certificatesshould be issued in the form prescribed (model 16).ENTRY OF PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS FROM FRONTIER LOCALITIESARTICLE 4. The potatoes, plants, seeds, and fruits named in articles 1 and2 which originate in agricultural districts intersected by the frontier andintended for the urgent needs of those districts may be imlported withoUtphytosanitary certificate and with the permit of the local Polish authorityof the general government only.CERTIFICATE REQUIRED WITH CLOVER SEEDSARTICLE 5. Seeds of cover (Trifolium), alfalfa (Medicago), sand clover(Anthyllis), swetclover (Melilotus), birdsfoot trefoil (Lotus corn iculatus),and timothy (Phleurn pratense) imported from foreign countries must beprovided with a certificate, in the following form, of the seed laboratory ofthe exporting country.Crrtifcate of purity for clover and related seeds(Model 4)The seed-testing station at (locality of station) hereby affirms that according to the examination of samples from the consignment described below,consisting of (quantity) sacks of seeds of clover, alfalfa, sand clover, sweet-clover, birdsfoot trefoil, and timothy , the containers of which are furnishedwith seals, are numbered, and bear the tag of the seed-testing station, theydid not yield a single seed of Cuscuta.At the same time, the seed-testing station declares that the examination waseffected under the following conditions: 100 g of seeds were withdrawn fromthree places, the upper, middle, and lower portion of each sack. Each of thesamples so withdrawn was separately examined. Not a single Cuscuta seedwas thereby found. If the examination showed the presence of Cuscuta inhalf or greater proportion of the samples, the whole of the consignment in-spected was deemed contaminated with Cuv.cuta. The sealing of the consi-n-ment was effected by the seed-testing station before the examination w.-as m(de.DESCRIPTION OF SHIPMENTMarks of the seedsGross weight of shipmentMarks of the inspected shipment and number of sacksFull name and a(ldress of shipperFull name and address of consigneeDateSignature of Director of Seed-Testing Station--------------------------[Seal of Seed-Testing StationiARTICLE 6. The list of stations authorized to issue certificates will be pub-lished in the Monitor Polski (appendix B).Tiportation of clover seeds only through authoricd portsAwrwi, 7. Seeds of clover, alfalfa, sand clover, sweetelover, birdsfoot trefoil,and timothy imported from abroad into Polish customs territory must be ef-fected through customs offices authorized for the importation of those seeds.The coloring of these seeds in the manner prescribed by the Minister of Financein cooperation with the Minister of Agriculture and Agrarian Reform at theexpense of tht, interested person is compulsory.116379-2---2

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110 BUIEAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct.-Dec.AnTICLE S. The description of the method of coloring the above-mentionedseeds (art. 7) will be published in the Monitor Polski.Article S has been supplemented by the notice of December 11, 1933, asfollows:Seeds of clover, alfalfa, sand clover, sweetelover, birdsfoot trefoil, and tim-othy, on clearance through customs offices authorized for the entry of these goods,are subject to comnpulsory coloring by means of a solution of eogini. The color-ing is effected by injecting into the interior of each sack of seeds a 0.9 percentsolution of Cosin in denatured alcohol in the proportion of 160 cm oi solutionper 100 kg of seed. The cost of coloring is borne by the importerINSPECTION CERTIFICATE AND CERTIFICATE OF FITNESS REQUIRED WITH IMPORTEDBEA N SARTICLE 9. Beans, except those prohibited by section 16, may be imported into the customs territory on the basis of the certificate in accordance with model 16and a certificate of fitness issued by the foreign official authorities or agricul-tural associations of a public-service character. The certificates of fitness mustfurnish the botanical names of the beans and affirm that they contain nopoisonous substances.In the absence of a certificate of fitness, a certificate issued by a Polish governmental food-testing station can be substituted, the certificate, of course,being issued after testing a sample sent to the station by the customs, underofficial seal.The transmittal and testing of samples are at the expense of the interestedperson.CERTIFICATES FOR FOOD IN TRANSITARTICLE 10. In connection with the transit of the potatoes, plants, seeds, andfruits named in articles 1 and 2, the certifleates prescribed therein are necessary.This requirement is not applicable when the goods are forwarded in closedsealed cars without transshipment or in tight uninjured containers.LANGUAGE OF CERTIFICATESARTICLE 11. The certificates mentioned in articles 1, 2, 3, and 5 must be issuedeither in the Polish language or in that of the exporting country. The customsoffice has the right to require a translation into Polish of a certificate in aforeign language.ARTICLE 12. The lists of customs offices authorized for the entry of the goodsnamed in articles 1, 2, 3, and 5 will be published in the Monitor Polski(appendix B).INSPECTION MAY BE REQUIRED AT PORT OF ENTRYARTICLE 13. The sanitary condition of the goods named in articles 1 and 2may be confirmed at customs offices by experts authorized by the Minister ofFinance in cooperation with the Minister of A-riculture and Agrarian Reformfor that purpose. In case diseases and pests are found in the said merchandise,it may not enter into free traffic.ARTICLE 14. The plants and plant products nined in articles 1 and 2 whichare not provided with the certificates of the official phytosanitary service orplant-protection service of the exporting country, may enter into free traffic ifthe interested person produces the certificate of a Polish plant-protectionservice. according to which the shipment in question is free from injurious plantdiseases and pests.ARTICLE 15. Seeds of clover, alfalfa, sand clover, sweetclover, birdsfoot trefoil,and timothy which are not provided with a certificate (model 4) of a foreignseed-testing station, may be released into free traffic on the basis of a certificateissued by one of the authorized Polish seed-control stations. The contents ofthe certificate must correspond to model 4.ARTICLE 10. Shipments of seeds of clover, alfalfa, sand clover, sweetelover,birdsjoot trefoil, and timothy which are provided with a certificate (model 4)issued by a foreign seed-testing station, may be inspected again at a customsoffice in Poland. If this inspection shows the seed to be contaIrinated withlodhr (C1U-Clu N) it may not be released into free traffle.

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1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 111ARTICLE 17. The regulations on the coloring and certification of the purityof seeds do not extend to commercial samples of a gross weight of 100 g or less.These may be imported without restriction.APPENIX A(Appendix V to the decree of Oct. 4, 1933)PLANT PESTS AND DISEASESThe certificate referred to in article 2 must affirin freedom of the respectiveshipments from the following-named pests and diseases:Plant diseases:Bacterium (Pseudomonas, Phytomonas) hyacinthi, yellow disease of hya-cinths.Bacterium tumefaciens, crown gall.Didym osphacria (Didymella) applanata.Plasmopara (Pseudoperonospora) hmauli, hop downy mildew.Septoria a.aleae, leaf spot of azalea and rhododendron. Virus diseases of hops.Insect pvcts:ASpidiotvs ostreaeformis, European fruit scale.Aspidiotus perniciosus, San Jose scale.(Doryphorh) Leptinotarsa decemnlincata, Colorado potato beetle.(Phthorimaca) Gnorimoschema operculella, potato tuber worm.Phylloxera (vastatrix) vitifoliae, grape phylloxera.Rhizoglyphus (cehinopus) hyacinthi, bulb mite.(Schizoncura) Friosoma lanigera, woolly apple aphid.All species of nematodes.Fruit flies of the genus Rhagoletis.All genera of the family Bruchidae.APPENDIx BAUTHORIZED CUSTOMS PORTS OF ENTRY(a) For potatoes and for the nursery products named in section 17, articles1, 2, and 3 of the decree of October 4, 1933:Bydgoszez, Cieszyn, Gdynia, Grajewo, Katowice, Krakow, Lwow, Lawoczne,Lodz, Podwoloczyska, Poznan, Rakowiece, Sniatyn-Zalucze, Stolpee, Tczew, To-run, Turmont, Warsaw, Wilno, ZIolbunow, Zebrzydowice, and in the territoryof Danzig Free City: Freihezirk, Hafenkanal, Weichselbahnhof, and Packhof.(b) For closer, alfalfa, and similar seeds named in section 17, article 5 ofthe decree of October 4, 1933:Bytom-Da browa, Gdynia, Lawoczne, Podwoloczyska, Sniatyn-Zalucze. Stolpce,Turmont. Zhaszyn, Zdolhunew. Zebrzydowice, and in the territory of DanzigFree City: Freibezirk, Hafenkanal, Weichselbahnhof, and Packhof.(c) The following-named plant-protection offices may issue certificates forshipments of plants and parts thereof named in (a) on importation from for-eign countries if such shipments are not accompanied by certificates:1. Districts of Woiwodschaften:Wilno and Nowogrodek.-Wilno Board of Agriculture, Wilno;Pomerella.-Pomerella Board of Agriculture, ul. Sienkiowicza No. 10, Torun;Poznan.-Great Polish Board of Agriculture, Mickiewicza No. 33, Poznan;Silesia.-Silesia Board of Agriculture, ul. Juljusza Ligonia No. 35, Katowice;Lodz.-Lodz Board of Agriculture, ill. Piotroweka 96, Lodz;Wolyn.-Wolynska Board of Agriculture, Mickiew icza 1, Luck;Warsaw.-Bialystock and Polesia, the Plant Protection Office T. 0. W., ul.Bagatella 3, Warsaw;Krakow and Kielce.-The Krakow Board of Agriculture, Krakow;Lwow, Stanislawow and Tarnopol.-The Botanico-Agricultural Research In-stitute, ul. Zvhlikiewicza 40, Lwow;Lublin.-Lublin Board of Agriculture, Lublin.

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112 01UEAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct-Dec.2. District of the Free City of Danzig:Tll( priinipal office for plant protection of the free city of Danzig of theagrieuli ural ins titute of the technical high school. Sandgrube 21, Danzig, or thePoomerelhi Board of Agriciuture.(d) The followingi-named domestic seed-testin stations are authorized toi'sl certiilic.tes of purity for seeds of iover, olfalfa, etc., indicated under (b)\0hen no foreign certificates are presentedThe seed-testing station of the Wilno Boardi of Agriculture, ul. Zakretow ,WilnoThe seed-testing station of the Silesia Board of Agriculture, Kraszewskiego15, Cieszyn;The secd-testhing station of the Pomerella Board of Agriculture, Sienkiewicza10, Torun:The seed-testing station of the G'reat Polish Board of Agriculture, Mickie-wieza 33, PoznanThe seed-testing station of the Wolynska Board of Agriculture, Mickiewicza1, Luck;The seed-testing station at the Industrial and Agricultural Museum, Krakow-skie Przedmll No. 64, Warsaw;The seed-testing station at the Agricultural Research Institute of the Jagiel-lonian University, Lobzowska No. 24, Krakow;The State Botanico-Agricultural Office, Zyblikiewicza 40, Lwow;The Pomerella Board of Agriculture, Torun, or the research and control sta-tion of the a-ricultural institute of the technical high schoo, Sandgrube 21,I nzig.Lists of the authorized foreign offices for the issuance of certificates of purityfor seeds of clover, alfalfa. etc., are published in the Monitor Polski no.176/521, 1926; and no. 227 526. 1929.B. P. Q.-302, revised, Supplement No. 3 NOAEMBER 21, 1934.PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, GERMANYSAN JOSE SCALE RESTRICTIONSAccording to a communication of the Federal Minister of Nourishment andAgriculture, of June 22, 1934, no. 11-2-678 II, the inspection of citrus fruit forSan J!oe scale is no longer restricted to oranges, mandarins. and lemons, but,since San Jose scale occurs also on other citrus fruits, such inspection willbe extended to all citrus fruits. (Anitl. Pfl. Best. VI: 5, Sept. 1, 1934, p. 87.)The above modifies Supplement No. 2 to B. P. Q.-302, revised.LEE A. STRONG,Chief. Bureau of Entnoloqy and Plant Quarantinc.B. E. P. Q.-366, Supplement No. 1 NOVEMBER 20, 1934.PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF CZECHOSLOVAKIAThe orier of October 13, 1933, Z 118,207/1933, of the Minister of Agricultureof the Repilb!e of Czevl hoslovakia, defines the term " living plants ". as used inl'1irticle 1 of sec(tionl II, Precautions Against San Jose Scale, page 14, B. E. P. Q.-366, as follows:". Living plnts' are to be regarded as all living plants or parts thereofwhi(-i fare physiologically living and not dry. Hence. such also are fresh clover,potatoes, beets, melons, pumpkins, onions, garlic, and other fresh vegetables,wine 4ral e-, fr-cr deciduous fruits, cut flowers, bulbs, tubers, scions, seedlings,shrus. fl1)d *d(ing plants. I1owever, the term is not applicable to seeds or"'r'':ilis. althoiighi they too represent living lmrts of plants. The inclusion ofsC( (Iunder the term might involve serious difficulty, since even seeds would be

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1P84J SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 113subjected to phytopathological inspection, which does not here accomplish thepurpose and would be burdensome to the grain and seed trade. T"he risk ofintroducing San Jose sc'le Ihroughl seeds is very smalll" (A111i .pfl. Bexst. VI:5. Sept. 1, 1934, p. 100.)LEE A. STRONG,('Ihtif. ftureau of Ettiom1 ology and Plant Q Uaran tine.P. E. P. Q.-"70 EcEMn 20. 1934.PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, BRITISH MANDATE OF PALESTINEThis summary of the plant-quarantine import retrict ions of the BritishMandate of Palestine has been prepared for the information of nurserymen.plant quarantine officials, and others interested in the exportation of' plantsand plant products to that country.The summary was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant quarantine inispectorof the Bureau of Entomology and Plami Quarantine, from the plant protectionorder of February 26, 1934, of the High Commissioner of Palestine, as amendetlby the plant protection orders of September 6 and 30, 1934.The information contained in this circular is l)elieved to be correct andcomplete lip to the time of its preparation, but it is not intended to be usedindependently of, nor as a substitute for. the original text of the order, andit is not to le interpreted as legally authoritative. The order itself should bNconsulted for the exact text.LEE A. STRONG.('1hef. Bureu of Enfomiolotjy and Plant Quarantine.PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, BRITISH MANDATE OF PALESTINEUpAsIC LEGISLATIONPLANT PROTECTION ORDINANCE, 1924The Plant Protection Order. No. 2, of February 26. 1934. of the High Coin-missioner of Palestine, effective September 8, 1934. was promulgated underthe authority of section 3 of the PVant Protection Ordinmnce, 1924.Tbis order cancels tl'ose of April 1. 1924, February 23, 1925, August 26,192G, March 8', 1927, October S. 1927, April 23. 1928. and January 30, 1931.CONGIsE SUMMARYImportation prohibit ed-See schedule 1.Importation restricted-See schedule II.REGULATIIoNS INDER PLANT PROTECTION ORDER, 1924ARTICLE 1. This order miiay be cited( as the Plant Protection Order (No. 2),1934.P'lanit, ichich aiy be importcdARTICLE 2. (1) All plants not included in the schedules to this order maybe imported into Palestine provideil that they are first inspected by a plantinspector at the place of entry into Palestine.limporiationl restrictedArTICLE 2. (2) All plants included in schedule I to this order may be ii-ported subject to the provisions of article 5 of this order. All plants included in sc-hedule II may be imported subject to the conditions set out in the sched-ule or by the written pcrmi,'son of the Dirctor of Agriculture and Forests inaccordance with article 5 of this order.Ilmporation of soil and maiarc prohibitedARTICLE 3. No organic imanure and soil may be imported into Palestine except special potting soil and manure. and soil froi Trans-Jordan: Provided, Thatthis prohibition shall not apply to nianufactured organic manures. guanos, and " poudrettes." (This article was revoked by the plant protection orderof Sept. 30, 1934.)

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114 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct.-Dec.Disposal of infected plantsARTICLE 4. All plants which on inspection are found to be infected with any virus, bacterial. fungiUs, or other disea se. or liarh bring any insect pest, whether or not they are accompanied by a free-of-disease certificate, may bedestroyed or reconsigned to their place of origin or be disinfected at thediscretion of a plant inspector. If reexport is ordered it shall be effected within7 days of the issuance of the order. If exportation is not effected within thespecified time the plaints may he destroyed. All expenses incurred in thedisinfect ion, dest ruetion, or reexportation shall be paid by the importer.Import tion of plants for special purposesARTICLE 5. All plants included in the schedules to this order, which are re-quired for experimental or scientific purposes, may be imported into Pales-tine provided that the written permission of the Director of Agriculture andForests to import such plants is obtained at least 7 days before the dateof importation. The Director of Agriculture and Forests may grant or refusepermission to import such plants and. if he grants such permission, may attachsuch conditions as to quarantine and importation as he may think fit.Certification of nursery stock requiredARTICLE 6. All plants intended for propagation and which are not includedin the schedules to this order may be imported if they are accompanied by acertificate signed by an officer of the phytopathological service of the countryof origin, stating that they are apparently free from disease or insect pests.(State or Federal certificates are acceptable. Letter of the Director ofAgriculture and Forests, Jerusalem, Oct. 30, 1934.)Authori-ecd ports of entryArTrIcLE 6, conitin iied. Importation of nursery stock shall be made onlythrough the ports of Jaffa and Haifa and the railway stations at Gaza andJerusalem.Im portation of plants froin Trans-Jordan not restrictedARTICLE 7. Plants that are the bona fide products of Trans-Jordan may beimported without restriction.ARTIcLE 8. This order shall take effect 6 months after the date of publicationin the Gazette. namely, September 8, 1934.SCHEDULE IImportation pJ-l'h ibitedThe importation of all plants in this schedule is prohibited: Provided, Thatthe prohibition does not apply to preserved, dried. or compressed fruits or tomango seeds which are the bona fide products of Egypt.Organic manure and soil, except special potting soil, and manure and soilfrom Trans-Jordan.Annon a spp., custard-apple. JManigifera spp., mango.CajanUs ipdieigeonpea. Mclia a.(zdarach, chinaherry.Carica papaya, papaya. Morus spp., mulberry.Citrus spp., other than citrus fruits 3MUio spp. banain.,rom Cyprus. Egypt, and Syria. Palms, including dates and (late palms.Ficus spp., fI. Pcrsca spp. avocado.Gossypinum spp., cotton, but n1ot includPsidium giihijara, guava.ing ginned cotton. Punica. graitum, pomegranate.ibiswus spp. hibiscus, rosemallow. Pyrius spp., pear.Jasminul spp., jasmine. Solaniui imlongenia, eggplant.Lycopecrs1um in vualen tu m, tomato.

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1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 115oSCHEDULE IIPhytosanitary certificate requiredThe importation of the plants named in this schedule is permitted, providedthat they are accompanied by a certificate affirming freedom from the under-mentioned pests or diseases. This certificate mnust be signed by an oftiher ofthe phytopathological service of the country of origin.Plants and plant products Plant pestsGrapevines (Vitis vinifera). Phylloxera.Citrus fruit from Cyprus, Egypt, and California red scale, ChrysoniphalusSyria. aurantii, and Florida red scale,All fruits and vegetables from Egypt. Chrysomphalus (ficus) aonidum.Apples and pears, whether nursery Florida red scale, Chrysontphalus (fic-stock or fruit, from United States us) aofidum and the coccid PIhena-of America, Canada, Australia, Huncoccus hirsutus.gary, or Rumania. San Jose scale, Aspidiotus perniciosus.Seed corn, Zca mays. Downy mildew, Sclerospora gramini-cola.Seed beans. Anthracnose, Colletotrichunt lindemu-thianum.Seed potatoes. Potato wart, Synchiytrilm endobioti-cuin; blackleg, Bacillus phytophtho-rus; powdery scab, Spongospora sub-terranea; potato tuber worm,(Pht horiinoea) Gnor imoscherna oper-culclla; Colorado potato beetle, Lep-tinotarsa decemilincata.Cabbage and cauliflower seed. Black rot, Bacillu8 ca ipestre(Pseudomonas camtpestris).Rose, apple, pear, and quince nursery Crown gall, Bacterium tumefaciens.stock.Fresh cherries. The trypetid Rhagoletis cerasi.Fresh peaches. Blight, Coryncum beijerinckii (Claste-rosporium carpophyllum ).Citrus nursery stock and budwood. Citrus canker, Bacillus (Pseudomo-nas) citri; and citrus scab, Spha-ce-loina (fawcetti) citri.Mango. Bacillus wmangiferae, the coccidsChrysomphalus (ficus) aonidui. C.personatus, and Pheniacoccus mangi-ferae, all species of Tiypetidae,Cryptorhynchus gravis, and C. man-giferae.Potatoes. Potato tuber worm, (Phth orinoca)(norim oschetiia operculcila and theColorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsadecin1ineata.Carobs. Florida red scale. Chryso mnphalus(thus) aoniduin and the coccid C.personatus.Ficus spp. Floridla red scale, Chrysomnphalus(ficus) aonidum; and the coccid C.persoiia tus.P. Q. C. A.-284, Supplement No. 10 DECEMBER 28, 1934.PLANT-QUARANTINE IMPORT RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF MEXICOSEEDS AND OTHER PLANT PRODUCTS FOR PROPAGATION-FUMIGATION REQUIRED ONENTRY INTO MEXICOA recent emergency measure of the Mexican Department of Agriculture pre-scribes that all seeds and other agricultural products intended for propagationexported to Mexico must be fumigated upon arrival in Mexico by officials ofthat department at the expense of the Mexican Government.

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116 L' hE O)F ExTOIMOIAGY ANID PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct.-Dec.It is stated 1ihiat thi'. is an emierzency measure which may be waived in thenear flinre when a shipi lent is accomnpanied hy an inspection cerniliaie aflirin-ing freelonil front injurious. pests.Ii a Iitter li ted Nove ber 7. 19D4, the director oi the phytosanitary divisionof the Alexivan Depart meiit of Agriculture states " flhat the emnergency measuresfor fuii'ating shnipments of seeds and other agricultural products not includedin our i Alexican ) quarantines ( such as cuttings, scions, hulbs. rhizonies, etc.)Iroi iorig counter 1.-1 intenhe fkr sowing :id propagation, do not entail anyobligation for the exporter lo carry out this operation, wliclh s in charge ofour :insi ,e eirs and is affected at the expenses of the Mexican Government."Lif, A. STRONG,Ciiif, Bure au of Ln})mology amn PlaVt Quarantine.PENALTIES IMPOSED FOR VIOLATIONS OF THE PLANT QUARANTINE ACTAccording to reports received by the Bureau during the period October I toDecember 31, 1934, penalties have recently been imposed by the proper Federalauthoritis for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act, as follows:GYPSY MOTH AND BROWN-TAIL MOTH QUARANTINEIn the case of the United States v. The Maine Central Railroad Co., in theinterstate transportation of approximately 17 cords of hardwood from a pointin the re2_ulated area to a point outside thereof, without inspection and certi-fication, the defendant pleaded guilty and was fined $25.In the case of the United Sta tcN v. Frcd E. Grant, Cherryfield, Maine, in theinterstate shipment of approximately 17 cords of hardwood from a point inthe regulated area to a point outside thereof, without inspection and certifi-cation, the defen(lant pleaded guilty and was fined $25.JAPANESE BEETLEIn the case of the Liitcd v1 t'; V. The Great Atlan tic & Pacfic Tea Co.-f Vcir Jcrsy, Newark, N. J., in the interstate tran portation of five lots ofhuckleberries from a point in the reguiate:l 1 0a: to a point out1s(le there'f, with-out insipect ion and certifi-4ation, the defendant uleaded guilty and was fined $125.In the case of the United S51iti x. v. J. Barrett Conner (Conwcr & Co.),Philadlelphla, Pa. in the interstate shiipment of one earlead of green stringbeans in the poll from a point in the regulated area to a point outside thereof,withsitt 1 jinetit 'n and certification, the defendant plead(led nolo contendereand( was fined s~o.In the case of the Uin itfd Statc( v. Tlic Pennsylraiia RPilroad Co. in theinterstate trinsportation of one carload of green string beans in the podfrom :i point in The reuWated area to a point outside thereof. without inspec-tion and d certifie;tion, the defendant pleaded nolo contendere and was fined$100.QUARANTINES AFFECTING MEXICAN PRODUCTSN me Port ContrabandI PenaltyJose Garz Brownsville, Tex 7 uavas -$5.coJesus R--2 quinces 5.00---loreI er----------2----------------------------5.0M 1ul ( rs d -I p-r.---------------------------------0Uran AnIr O. I plant aind several sna~l euttin s 5. 00UEl nzleo-------------------5.00(ic' .~j (iijl T' Jr----------------I nii o--------------------------1.0Mrs. John I. IHer do---------45 plnts, 1 eran e, and G apph?'s 1. 00Maria Re o O-----------m -------------00,nez Arranxu -o -2 apples 1.00Roberto Lo-a Calexieo C -4 pices sugar--ne -.00Felixc Medina. dao i1) pieces sugarc-ine -1 00

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19:4N SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 117Quarantines affecting Mexican products-ContiniuiidName Port Contraband PenaltyAntonio Arrenega --------Del i, Tex ------------15 oranges ---------------------------$1.00Beatrice Munoz ------------do ----------------4 avocados ------------------------------1.00H. C. Crawford -------------do ---------------avocados ------------------------------1.00Antonio Beltran---------------------------1 avocado .-------------------------------1.00Adela Moya -------------do2 avocados------1.00Lidia Villarreal -------------do ----------------I pomegranate and I quince -------------1.00Acinto Arrjo --------------do ----------------9 pomegranates 1.00Francisca Herrera -----------do ----------------1 -uin-e-1.00Bonifacio Escobido ---do -----------------3 avocados, 7 quinces, and 1 pomegranate 1. 00R. L. Henkemp do ----------------2 potatoes----------------------------1.00John Hotff. ---------------do ----------------1 avocado -----------------------------1.00Pedro Longoria ----------Eagle Pass, Tex --------39 avocados, 1. plants, and 20 stalks of 4.00sugarcane.Arturo Valdez------------o ---------------18 avocados -----------------------------1.60Cicila Pena ----------------do ----------------6 bulbs ---------------------------------1.00Luis Reyes ----------------do -----------------7 plants and 2 bulbs ---------------------1.00Regina R. Villareal ----------do ----------------4 bulbs, 3 guavas, and 2 avocado seed 1.00Josefina Navarro de RaEl Paso, Tex -----------3 potatoes -----------------------------1.00mirez.Jose Garcia --------------do ----------------5 guavas. -------------------------------1.00Ana Cortez de Santagate ---do ----------------4 oranges, 2 guavas, 2 apples, and 2 avocado 1. 00seed.E. D. Garza ------------Hidalgo, Tex -----------10 avocados ----------------------------5.00Cayetano Herrera----------do ----------------3 avocados and 1 orange -----------5.00Raul Villareal -----------Laredo, Tex -----------4 avocados ------------------------------1.00R. E. Laurel--------------do ----------------2 avocados ----------------------1.00Josifina Pena_--.--------------do ----------------4 avocados ------------------------------1.00F. Medina ----------------do ----------------8 avocados ------------------------------100J. A. Ramirez_-------------do ----------------3 guavas ------------------------------1.00Alfredo Gonzales ------------do ----------------1 avocado -----------------------------1.00Francisco Flores-----------do ----------------I plant ---------------------------------1.00Ofelia Vara ----------------do ----------------1 avocado and 1 guava --------------------1.00Elina Bautista -------------do ----------------1 pear ----------------------------------1.00Isabel Costro ------do ----------------5 avocados ------------------------------1.00Esparanza Sanchez-----do ----------------15 plants ------------------------------1.00Frederic Alardin -----------.-. do ----------------1 orange -------------------------------1.00Oliva Zarate---------------.do.-.---------------4 avocados ------------------------------1.00Mauricio Salazar ---------_ .do ----------------2 guavas -----------------------------1.00Mrs. A. J. Rivos ------------do ---------------4 peaches ---------------------------1.00Luis Garcia ------------. ----do-.--------------6 apples and 2 pears ----------------------1.00Andrez Garza.-------------do-.---------------I pomegranate and 18 avocados -----------1.00Maximeno Vigil--------_----do---------------4 quinces------------------------------1.00P. Cavanati ---------------do.---------------18 guavas and 1 apple ---------------------1.00Miss G. Lopez----------do---------------1 orange --------------------------------1.00Mrs. M. C. de Rodriquez .--do-.--------------13 avocados -----------------------------1.00Ester E. Ramirez----------do----------------3 avocados -----------------------------1.00A. Lincoln------------------do--------------------do --------------------------------1.00Mrs. M. Martinez --------do-----------------3 guavas ------------------------------1.00Mrs. Thomas Soto---------do----------------1 avocado and 30 tree seeds ----------------1.00M. B. Gonzales.------------do---------------2 cherimoyas --------------------1.00Miss G. Zutuche-----------do-----------------1 guava-------------------------------1.00Mrs. S. G. Hernondry.------do---------------5 avocados -----------------------1.00Mrs. 0. Eusebia -----------do----------------2 avocados ------------------------------1.00J. G. Martinez -------------do---------------1 cherimoya ----------------------1.00Francisco Badillo-----------do---------------3 oranges -------------------------------1.00Adelia Bruni---------------do--------------5 guavas and 2 cherimoyas----------1.00Lazaro Sotelo----------Presidio, Tex.---------35 pomegranates and 55 quinces 2.00Ramon Morales ---------Rio Grande City, Tex -44 pounds shelled corn and 18 oranges5.00LIST OF CURRENT QUARANTINES AND OTHER RESTRICTIVEORDERS AND MISCELLANEOUS REGULATIONS[The domestic and foreign quarantines and other restrictive orders summarized hereinare issued under the authority of the plant quarantine act of Aug. 20, 19i2, as amended.The Mexican border regulations and the export-certification regulations are issued underspecific acts of Coigress.]QUARANTINE ORDERSThe numbers assigned to these quarantines indicate merely the chronologicalorder of issuance of both domestic and foreign quarantines ill one numericalseries. The quarantine numbers missing in this 114 are quarantines which haveeither been superseded or revoked. For convenience of reference these quaran-tines are here classified as domestic and foreign, the domestic quarantines beingdivided into (1) those applying primarily to the continental United States, and(2) those applying primarily to shipments from and to the Territories of Hawaiiand Puerto Rico.

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118 BUJmAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct.-Dec.DOMESTIC PLANT QUARANTINESUARAN INJs APPLYING TO THE CONTINENTAL UNITED STATESDaic mini;.-Quaruantine No. 6, effective March 24, 1913, as amended ef-fectiye Devcnmber 1, 1982: Prohibits, except as provided in the rules andregulations iupplemental thereto, the interstate movement of date palms anddate-palm Wil-shIoots from Riverside County, Calif., east of the San Bernardinoieridi;1n : Imperial Couity, Calif; Yuma, Maricopa, and Pinal Counties, Ariz.;and Weh County, Tex., on account of the Parlatoria scale (Parlatoriablaiicharli).Bl!cK 8tcni ruat.-Quarantine No. 38, revised, effective August 1, 1931, asamended, effective February 20, 1935: Prohibits, except as provided in the rulesiid rtguiations supplemental thereto effective August 1, 1931, the movementinto amy of the protected States, namely, Colorado. Illinois, Indiana, Iowa,Michigan, Miniesota, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota,Wisconsin, and Wyoming, as vell as the movement from any one of said pro-ecteld States into any other protected State. of the comLoi barberry (11erberis-ruitJri.s). or other species of Berberis or Mahonia or parts thereof capable ofpropagation, on account of the black stem rust of grains. The regulations placeno restrictions on the interstate movement of Japanese barberry (B. thun-bergii) or any of its horticultural varieties, or of cuttings (without roots) ofMahonia shipped for decorative purposes. Gypsy moth and brown-tail moth.-Quarantine No. 45, effective July 1, 1920:Prohibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto,revised effective October 2, 1934, the movement interstate to any point outsideof the infested area, or from points in the generally infested area to points inthe lightly infested area, of stone or quarry products, and of the plants and theplant products listed therein. The quarantine covers Rhode Island and partsof the States of Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, andVermont.Japanese beetle.-Quarantine No. 48, revised, effective December 1. 1933: Pro-hibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto,effective December 1, 1933, the interstate movement of (1) fruits and vegetables;(2) nursery, ornamental, and greenhouse stock and other plants; and (3) sand,soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure, from the quarantined area to orthrough any point outside thereof. The quarantined area includes the entireStates of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, and Delaware,and the District of Columbia, and portions of the States of Maine, New Hamp-shire, Vermont, New York, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia, and WestVirginia.Pink bollworm.-Quarantine No. 52, revised, effective December 23, 1933:Prohibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto,effective De,'ember 23, 1933, and amended effective October 31, 1934, the inter-state movement from the regulated areas of Texas, New Mexico, Arizona,Florida, and Georgia, of (1) cotton, wild cotton, including all parts of eithercotton or wild cotton plants, seed cotton, cotton lint, linters, and all otherforms of unmanufactured cotton fiber, gin waste, cottonseed, cottonseed hulls,cottonseed cake and meal : (2) bagging and other containers and wrappers of cotton and Cotton products: (3) railway cars, oats. and other vehicles whichhave been used in conveying cotton or cotton products or which are fouled withsuch products; (4) hay and other farm products ; and (5) farm household goods,farmi eqiuipimlent. on, if cont aminaIred wil h cotetn, ali o ther alt-cies.8 /i) --.-\u::raitinc No. 5:, revised, eflective Jmiiiry 1, 1929: Pro-hibits, Nexcept wS provide( ili the rules and regulations supplemental thereto,revised ehfecrive December 1, 1981, the interstate movement to points outsideof tlie renuli led areas in Maine. New iiampshire. Vermont, Mass:chusetts,Rhode Island, 'on iiecticut, and Washington, of all species or varieties ofpoplar aw 1il'ow rcs or pa rts thereof caipable of propagation.Thirb ria ucri.-Quarantine No. 61, revised, effective August 1, 1927:Prohibits tlint 11t tte movement of Thmrbcria, including all 'parts of theplant, from any point in Arizona, and prohibits, except a proviodd in therules and re*nilations supplemental thereto, effective October 2, 1938, the inter-state m11ovellint froiii the regulated area of Arizona of (1) cotton, includingall parts of l ie plait, seed cotton, cotton lint, linters, and all other formsof unmanufactured cotton lint, gin waste, cottonseed, cottonseed hulls, and

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1934] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 119cottonseed cake and nwa i (2) bagging and other containers and wrappersof cotton and cotton products: (3) railwu y cas, lboal, anul other vehicleswhich have been used ill colINvey ig CoTton anl(d cotton products, or wllicb arefouled with such products: (4) hay and other farm product;: and (.5 farmhousehold goods, farm equ ipient, and. it containinited with cotton. a.ly otherarticles.Wh ite pine blist r rust.--Q(ia rantine No. (., effr tive ()obIe r 1, 1!12(;: Pro-hibits, except as provided in the rules and regui supplmienviwal thereto,revised effective Janu la ry 1. 19833, andI amieided effective Marchl 15, 1 5, theinterstate movement froin every State ill tle contingent l Unit 1 States and theDistrict of Colunmbia of five-leafed pine" (Pinus) or current and goosebirryplants (Ribcs and Gro.s-alria), including cultivated or wild or ornamentalsorts.Jexican fruit worn.-Quarantine No. 64, effective August 15, 1927 : Prohibits, except as provided in the rules aid regulations supplemental thereto,revised effective September 1, 1932, the interstate nmovement from the regu-lated area of Texas of fruits of all varieties.Woodgate rust.-Quarantine No. 65, effective November 1, 1928: Prohibit s.except as proved in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto, effective November 1, 1928, amended effective April 1, 1929, the interstate movementfrom the regulated area in the State of New York of trees, branches, limbs,or twigs of Scotch pine (Pinus sylvestris), Canary Island pine (P. canariensis),slash pine (P. caribaea), Japanese red pine (P. densiflora), Corsican pine (P.nigra poiretina), stone pine (P. pinca), western yellow pine (P. ponderosa),Monterey pine (P. radiata), loblolly pine (P. tacda), or Jersey pine (P. vir-giniana), or of any variety thereof, or of any species or variety of hard pinehereafter found to be susceptible to the Woodgate rust.Dutch elm discan.-Quarantine No. 71, effective February 25. 1935: Prohib-its, except as provided in thte rules and regulations supplemental thereto, effec-tive February 25. 1935. the intersta te movement fronm the regulated areas inthe States of New Jersey. New York, and Connecticut to or through any pointoutside thereof, of elm plants or parts thereof of all species of the genusUlmus, irrespective of whether nursery, forest, or privately grown, including(1) trees, plants, leaves, twigs, branches, bark, roots, trunks, cuttings, andscions of such plants; (2) logs or cordwood of such plants; and (3) lumber,crates, boxes, barrels, packing cases, and other containers manufactured inwhole or in part from such plants, unless the wood is entirely free from bark.QUARANTINES APPLYING TO THE TERRITORIES OF iIA\VAII AND PUERTO RICOHawaiian fruits and regetables.-Quarantine No. 13. revised, effective June 1,1917: Prohibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplementalthereto, revised, effective June 1, 1930, the movement from the Territory ofHawaii into or through any other Territory, State. or District of the UnitedStates of all fruits and vegetables in the natural or raw state, on account of theMediterranean fruit fly (Ceratitis capitata) and the melon fly (Dacus cucur-bitac).Sugarcane.-Quarantine No. 16, amended, effective January 1, 1935: Pro-hibits the movement from the Territories of Hawaii and Puerto Rico into orthrough any other Territory, State, or District of the United States of canesof sugarcane, or cuttings or parts thereof. su-arcane leaves, and bagasse, ex-cept under permit and subject to a prescribed treatment, on account of certaininjurious insects and fungous diseases.Srcetpotato and yam.-Quarantine No. 30, revised, effective October 10, 1934:Prohibits the movement from the Territories of Hawaii and Puerto Rico intoor through any other Territory, State, or District of the united States of allvarieties of swNeetputatoes (Iponicwa baftvirz Poir.). regardles> of the u forwhich the same is intended, on account of the sweetpotato stem borer (Oin-plhisa miastOmosalis Guei.) and the sweetpotato scarabee ( Eusecpcs batataeWaterh.).Banana plats.-Quarantine No. 92, effective April 1, 1911 : Prohibits themovement from the Territories of Hawaii and Puerto Rico into or through ,lyother Territory, State, or District of the United States of any species or va Lietyof banana plants (Musa spp.), regardless of the use for which the same isintended, on account of two injurious weevils (IRiabdocnemis obscures andMetamasius hem ipterus).

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120 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct.-Dec.Hatraiian (111d IPucrto Ricant colton, collon.ced, 4 cotto.('tNcUd products.-Quarantine No. 4T, effective August 15, 1920 I'rohibits, except as provided inthe rules a1d reu lations supplemental thieretg), effective August 15, 1920, them0vein it of cotton n, cottonseed, and cottonse'I prolucis froim the Territories)I Hawaii and Illuerto Rico into or through any other Territory, State, oirDistrict of the United S4i tes oil account of the pink 1ollvworin (Pectinophorao* /piclla) and the cotton-blister lite (porph ic' foNsypii), respectively.Vi'itcd State"; q iiUirantincul to 1pot('t fluUii -uaratie No. 51, effective October 1. 1921 : Prohibits, except as proviled in tIie riiies and regulationsShll demnenta thereto, effective October 1. 1921, the movement from the UnitedStates to the Terrltory of Hawaii, :s ships' Stores or as ba-&gage or effects ofPaI -sengers or crews, of sugareale, corn, cotton, alfal Ca, and the fruits of theadVi(1o and papaya in tile natural or raw state, on account of injurious in-sects. especially the stlgarcane borer (Dialtraca scciaralis Fab.), the alfalfaweevil (Hypcra po0810a Gy1.), the cotton-boll weevil (Aniithl01on1us gralndisJIMou.), the papaya fruit fly ( Toxotrypana curri un da Gerst.), and certain in-Sect enemies of the fruit of the avocado.Pucrto Rican fruits an(1 1cyt blec.-Quarantine No. 58, effective July 1, 1925:Prohibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental theretoamended effective January 1, 1988, the movement from the Territory of PuertoRico into or through any other Territory, State, or District of the United Statesof all fruits and vegetables in the raw or unprocessed state, oi account of in-jurious insects, including the West Indian fruit fly ( Anastrepha fraterculusWied.), and the bean-pod borer (J-aruca testulalis Geyer).Sand, soil, or carth, with plats from 1airtaii and fP icrto Rico.-QuarantineNo. 60, effective March 1, 1926: Prohibits the movement from the Territories ofHawaii and Puerto Rico into or through any other Territory, State, or Districtof the United States of sand (other than clean ocean sand), soil, or eartharound the roots of plants, to prevent the spread of white grubs, the Japaneserose beetle, and termites or white ants.FORER1N PLANT QUAnANTINESPotatoes.-Quarantine No. 3, effective September 20, 1912: Forbids the impor-tation of potatoes from Newfoundland ; the islands of St. Pierre and Miquelon ;Great Britain, including England, Scotland, Wales, and Ireland; Germany; andAustria-Hungary, on account of the disease known tis potato wart (Synchytri umendobioticnm).Mexican fruits.-Quarantine No. 5, effective January 15, 1913, as amendedeffective February 8. 1913: Forbids the importation of oranges, sweet limes,grapefruit, mangoes, achras sapotes. peaChes, guavas, and plums from theRepublic of Mexico, on account of the Mexican fruit fly (Trypeta ludens).White pine blister rust.-Quarantine No. 7, effective May 21, 1913, as amendedeffective March 16, 1916, and June 1, 1917: Forbids the importation from ewuhand every country of Europe and Asia, and from the Dominion of Canada andNewfoundland of all 5-leafed pines and all species and varieties of the generaRibes and Grossuilaria.Pink bollirormi.-Qua rantine No. 8, effective July 1. 1913. with revised regula-tions effective .1 uly 1, 1917: Forbids the importation from any foreign localityand country, excepting only the locality of the Imperial Valley in the State ofBaja California, Mexico, of eottonsled (including seed cotton) of all speciesand varieties and cottonseed hulls. Seed (ittoli, cottonseed, and cottonseedhulls froi the Imperial Valley way be entered under permit and regulation.Sceds of avocado or allitlator pcar.-Quarantine No. 12, effective February 27,1914: Forbids the importation from Mexico and the countries of CentralAmerira of the seeol of the avocado or alligator pear on account of the avocadoweevil (HeilipuN lauri).'ugarae.---Qua rantine No. 15, revised, effective October 1, 1934: Forbidsthe importation from all foreign countries and localities of canes of sugarcane,or cutiinrs Or pa rts thereof, sugareane leaves, and hagasse, except under permitanol subject to a prescribed treatment, on accont of certain injurious insectsand fungous diseases.Citrus u rl/ stoe.---Quarant ime No. 19, revised, effective September 1, 1934:Forbids tie import at iin from all foreign localities anf( countries of all citrusnursery sto<(k, including bu(s and scions, oH account of the citrus canker andother oangerouw citrus diseases. T he term " 'trus ". 8o used in this quarantine,includes all 0ulami1s belonging to the tribe Citrilavi.

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19341 SERVICE ANDI REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 121Euronpean pincs.-Quatraniiie No. 20, effective July 1, 1915: Forbids, onaccount of the Europea n pine-sh ot motli (E'tria huoliava), the importatiolnfrom all ElUopeanI countries and localities of all pines not already excludedby Qua rantine No. 7.Indian corn or aizc an related piants.-Quarantine No. 24, effective July 1,1016, as amended effective April 1, 1917, and April 23, 1917: Forbids the iipor-tation from soulitheast erI As a (iichudicng India, Simi, I iido-China, and (hiiia),Malayma Archipelago, Aulstrilia, New Zealand, Oceania, Philippine Islands, For-milosa, Ja pan, a1nd adjacent island, in the riw Or unmatinu1aciitured state, of seedand all other portions of ILdiai corn or maize (Zea ni ay; L.) a nd the closelyiclated planIs, including all species of Teosinte (Euchlaenau), Job's tears(Coix), Polytoca, Chiotnc] 1, and Sclerachne, on account of the downy mil-dews and Physoderma diseases of Indian corn, except that Indian corn or maiz,,may be imported under permint and upon compliance with the conditions pre-scribed in the regulations Of the Secretary of Agriculture.Citru fruits.-Quarantiiie No. 28, effective August 1, 1917: Forbids the impor-tation from eastern and s(uthea stern Asia (including India, Siam, Indo-Chia,and China), the MAIlayan Archipelago, the Philippine Islands, Oceania (exceptAustralia, Tasmania, and New Zealand), Japan (including Taiwan (Formosa),and other islands adjacent to Japan), and the Union of South Africa, of allspecies and varieties of citrus fruits, On11 account of the citrus canker, exceptthat oranges of the mandarin class (including satsuma and tangerine varieties)may be imported under permit nd upon compliance with the conditions, pre-scribed in the regulations of the Secretary of Agriculture.uwcectpotato and yam.--Quarantine No. 29, effective January 1, 1918: Forbidsthe importation for any purpose of any variety of sweetpotatoes and yams(Iponioea batatas a(d 1)ioscorca spp.), from all f4 rei gn countries and localities,on acccunIt of the sweetpotato weevils (Cylas spp.) and the sweetpotato scarabee(Euscepes batatac).Banana plants.-Quarantine No. 31, effective April 1, 1918: Forbids the impor-tation for any purpose of any species or variety of banana plants (Musa spp.),or portions thereof, from all foreign countries and localities, on account of thebanana-root borer (Cosmiopolites sordidus). This quarantine places no restric-tions on the importation of the fruit of the banana. (For restrictions on theentry of the fruit of the banana see Quarantine 56.)Barnboo.-Quarantine No. 34, effective October 1, 1918: Forbids the importa-tion for any purpose of any variety of bamboo seed, plants, or cuttings' thereofcapable of, propagation, including all genera and species of the tribe Bambuseae,from all foreign countries and localities, on account of dangerous plant diseases,including the bamboo smut (Ustilago shiraiana). This quarantine order doesnot apply to bamboo timber consisting of the mature dried culms or canes whichare imported for fishing rods, furniture making, or other purposes, or to anykind oif articles manufactured from bamboo, or to bamboo shoots cooked orotherwise preserved.Nursery stock, plants, and sceds.-Quarantine No. 37, effective June 1, 1919:Forbids, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto,revised effective December 22, 193, and amended effective January 4, 1935, theimportation of seeds, nursery stock, and other plants and plant products capableof propagation from all foreign countries and localities on account of certaininjurious insects and fungous diseases. Under this quarantine the followingplant products may be imported without restriction when free from sand, soil,or earth, unless covered by special quarantine or other restrictive orders: Plantproducts imported for medicinal, food, or manufacturing purposes, and field,vegetable, and flower seeds. Cut flowers from the Dominion of Canada arealso allowed entry without permit. The entry of the following nursery stockand other plants and seeds is permitted under permit:(1) Bulbs, corms, or root stocks (pips) of the following genera: Liliwm (lily),Convallaria (lily-of-the-valley), llyacinthus (hyacinth). Tulipa (tulip), andCrocus; and, until further notice, Chionodaxa (glory-of-the-snow), Galanthus(snowdrop), Scilla (squill), Fritillaria, Muscari (grape-hyacinlt h ), Iria, andEranthis (winter aconite) ; and, on and after December 15, 1936, Narcaisus(daffodil and jonquil).(2) Cuttings, scions, and buds of fruits or nuts: Provided, That cuttings,scions, and buds of fruits or nuts may be imported from Asia, Japan, PhilippineIslands, and Oceania (including Australia and New Zealand) under the provi-sions of regulation 14 only. (Stocks of fruits or nuts may not be imported,under permit or otherwise.)

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122 BUREAU OF ENTOM'LOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct.-Dec.,3 lose stocks, including "Manetti, Rosa multiflora (brier ruse), and R.14) Nut-' including pali seeds for growing purposes: Proidct d, That suchluts or seedsliall be free from pull).(5 Seeds of fruit, forest. ornainental, and shade trees, seeds of deciduousud cverg'n ornielit a I shrubs. and seeds of hardy pereiinial plants: Pro-cid /. Th t u ;h 'eeds shall 1be free from ai ull: Pr)rld(d further, That eitruseeds may l' i iniorted only througli specified ports subject to disinfection asprovided in regulation 9: Provid(d farther, That itiango Seeds imay not be in:-ported under liermiit or otherwise, except from the count ries of North America.Central America, and South America. and the W\est Ilies.Imiportations from coUltries not maintaininw inspection of nursery stock,(ither 14ants and parts of plants, including seeds. the entry of which is permissi-hie under this regulation, may be nade under permit upon compliance withthese re'ulalions in limited quantities for public-service purPoses only, but thislimit ation shall not apply to tree seeds.European corf1 borcr.-Quarantine No. 41, revised. effective June 1, 1926:Forbids. excel)t as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto,revised effective MNarch 1, 1932, the importation from all foreign countries andlocalities of the stalk and all other parts, whether used for packing or other pur-1 ose, inl the raw or uinanufactured state, of Indian corn or maize, broomcorn,svw(et sorghunis, grain sorghun:. Sudan grnss, Johnson grass, sugarcane, pearimillet, napier grass, teosinte, and Job's tears. on account of the European corliborer ( Pyrausta n ubilalis) and other dangerous insects and plant diseases.kRic.-Quarantine No. 55, effective November 2:3, 1930: Forbids, except fr",mthe llepublic of lexico upon compliance with the conditions prescribed in theruleand regulations supplemental thereto, effective November 23, 1933, and amended effective August 1, 1934, the importation of seed or paddy rice from allforein countries and localities, and the importation of rice straw and ricehulls from all foreign countries and localities, on account of injurious fungousdiscives of rice, including downy mildew (S&lcrosJ)ora nacrocarpa), leaf smnut(Enityloina oryzuc), blight (Oospora oryztorumn), and glume blotch (Mela-iwmma glumna-uwn), as well Us (l;tilgeIrous insect pests.Fruits and vcgctablics.-Quarantine No. 50, effective November 1, 1923: For-bids, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto,amended effective August 1, 1933. the importation of fruits and vegetables notalready the subject of special quarantines or other restrictive orders, and ofplants or porltiOis of plants used as packing material in connection with ship-ments of such fruits and vegetables from all foreign countries and localities other thaii the Doinion of Canada, on account of injurious insects, includingfruit andi melon flies (Trypetidae). Includes and supersedes Quarantine No.49 on account of the citrus blackfly.Fiay *wiuit.-Quarantine No. 59, effective February 1, 1926: Forbids the im-portation of all species and varieties of wheat ( Triticumi spp.) and wheat prod-ucts, unless so milled or so processed as to have destroyed all flag-smut spores,from India, Japan, China, Australia, Union of South Africa. Italy, and Spain.Packing rnaterials.-Quarantine No. 69, effective July 1, 1933, as amendedeffective July 1, 1933: Forbids the entry from all foreign countries and locali-ties of the following materials when used as packing for other commodities,except in special cases where preparation, processing, or manufacture arejudged by an inspector of the United States Department of Agriculture to haveeliminated risk of carrying injurious inspects and plant diseases: Rice straw,hulls, and chaff; cotton and cotton products; sugarcane, including bagasse;bamboo leaves and small shoots; leaves of plants; forest litter ; and soil withan appreciable admixture of vegetable matter not therein provided for byregulation. All parts of corn and allied plants are likewise prohibited exceptfrom Mexico and the countries of Central America, the West Indies, and SouthAmerica. This quarantine also brings under restriction, involving Inspectionat vill by the Department but requiring no permit or certificate, the followingwhen used as packing: Cereal straw, chaff, and hulls (other than rice) ; cornand allied p11 'N fem Mexieo. (t'ltel exico, ie Wed Indies. and SouthAmeriea; willow twigs from Europe; grasses, hay, and similar plant mixtures,from all countries; and authorized soil packing materials from all countries.This quarantine does not cover such widely used packing materials as excelsior,paper, sawdust, ground cork, charcoal, and various other materials.Iutch ln di(asu.-Quarantiie No. 71), revised. effective Januory ~1 1935:Forbids the importation from Europe, on account of a disease due to the fungus

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1924J SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENT T 123Graphium ulmi, of seeds, leaves, plants, cuttings, and scions of (lm or relatedplants, defined to include all genera of the family Ulmaceae; logs of elm and related plants; lumber, timber, or veneer of such plants if bark is present onthem ; and crates, boxes, barrels, packing cases and other containers, and otherarticles manufactured in whole or in part from the wood of elm or relatedplants if not free from bark.OTHER RESTRICTIVE ORDERSThe regulation of the entry of nursery stock from foreign countries into theUnited States was specifically provided for in the Plant Quarantine Act. Theact further provides for the similar reg-i4ation of any other class of plants orplant products when the need therefor shall be determined. Th entry of theplants and plant products listed below has been brought under such reg-ulation.Nursery -stock.-The conditions governing the entry of nursery stock andother plants and seeds from all foreign countries anld localities are indicatedabove under " Foreign quarantines." (See Quarantine No. 37, revised.)Potatoes.-The importation of potatoes is forbiIdlen altogether fron thecountries enumerated in the potato quarantine. Potatoes may be admitted fromother foreign countries under permit and in accordance with the provisions ofthe regulations issued under order of December 22, 1912, bringing the entry ofj)otatos under restriction on account of injurious potwo diseases and insect,pests. Importation of potatoes is now authorized from the following countries:The Dominion of Canada, Bermuda, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Estonia, andSpain ; also from the States of Chihuahua and Sonora and the Imperial Valleyof Baja California, Mexico. The revised regulations issued under this order,effective March 1, 1922, were amended effective August 1, 1930, so as to permit,free of any restriction whatsoever under the Plant Quarantine Act, the importa-tion of potatoes from any foreign country into the Territory of Hawaii for localuse only, and from the Dominion of Canada into the United States or any of its Territories or Districts.Cotlo.-The order of April 27, 1915, and the rules and regulations issuedthereunder, revised effective February 24, 1923, amended effective May 1, 1924,and December 15, 1924, restrict the importation of cotton from all foreigncountries and localities, on account of injurious insects, including the pinkbollworm. These regulations apply in part to cotton grown in and importedfrom the Imperial Valley, in the State of Baja California, Mexico.Cottonseed products.-The order of June 23, 1917, and the rules and regula-tions issued thereunder, effective July 16, 1917, amended effective August 7, 1925,restrict the importation of cottonseed cake, meal, and all other cottonseedproducts, except oil, from all foreign countries; and a second order of June 23,1917, and the regulations issued thereunder, restrict the importation of cotton-seed oil from Mexico on account of injurious insects, including the pinkbollworm.Planit safeguard regulation s.-These rules and regulations, revised effectiveDecember 1, 1932, provide safeguards for the landing or unloading for transferand transportation and exportation in bond of restricted or prohibited plantsand plant products when it is determined that such entry can be made withoutinvolving risk to the plant cultures of the United States, and also provide forthe safeguarding of such plant material at a port or within the territorial limitsof the United States where entry or landing is not intended or where entry hasbeen refused.Rules and regulations governing the movement of plants and plant productsinto and out of the District of Columbia.-These rules and regulations, revisedeffective April 30, 1931, are promulgated under the amendment to the PlantQuarantine Act of May 31, 1020. They provide for the regulation of the move-ment of plants and plant products, including nursery stock, from or into theDistrict of Columbia and for the control of injurious plant diseases and insectpests within the said District.MISCELLANEOUS REGULATIONSRules and regulations prohibiting the novuemcet of cotton aUid cotton8(cw ' fromMexico into the United States, and goven ing the cntry into the Unih 4 $tates01 rail waj cawr' (n7d other rechiclcx, freight, cx.pr cs. l>JyH/aQC, OP ot/hf (r ( rialsfrom Me.ico (it border point. .-These rules and regulatilns, lromulgutcd June

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124 ; t B E A U OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUAR ANTINE I23, 1917, and amended elective Jantary 29, 1920, pursuant to authority (rivenill the aIpproPriation act for the LTiited Siates l)eparlmencIt of Agriculture forthe fiscal year 11.1 )], and since repeated a11ally, are designed to pIrevent theentry of' tht(e pink bollworim of cotton which is 1uown to exist widely in Mexico.They provide t'or thte examination of passen-ers' )aggage, for the disinfectionof railway ears, freight, express, anl o1her si'i men s, and for the cleaning ofdoinlestic car~s 11,1110Hin2 lexicmn 1rel-lht. All Cees collected for cleaning anddisinfecting railway cars are deposited in thie tUnited States Treasury as mis-cel hilncolls receipts.Tile inspectors concerned in the enforcement of thicse regulations at borderpoints zire (I charged aiso \\ithi enforcement of restrictii ns oil tile entry of plantsand phmnt products unol(er various foreign plant (jilarantilles.In sp)ct ion awl 'crti.ica0ion rCiulatiowsl 10 1'cct for(ifgnl sanitary require-men t.-These regu ions, revised effective August 1, 1931, were promulgatedpursUa nt I o authority given inl the approl)riation act for the United StatesDeparUment oi* Aghriculture for the fiscal year 1,27. They provide for the in-spection 11H certification of' fruits, veg(eta)les, nursery stock, and other plantsand plant p :oducts intended for export to countries requiring such certification.All fees collected for this service are deposited in the United States Treasuryas miscellaneous receipts.ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY ANDPLANT QUARANTINELEE A. STRONG, Chief.S. A. RoiiwE, Assistant Chief.AVERY S. hOYT, Assistant Chief.F. 11. SPENCER, Business Manager.R. P. CURRIE, Editor.MABEL CoLColD, Librarian.J. A. HYsLop, in Charge, Division of Insect Pest Survey and Information.J. I HAMBLETON, in Charge, Division of Bee Culture Investigations.D. L. VAN DINE, in Charge, Division of Fruit Insect Investigations.F. C. (RAIGHEAD, in Charge, Division of Forest In sect Investigations.W. 11. WHITE, in Charge, Division of Track Crop and Garden In-sect Investi-g!ations.P. N. ANNAND, in Charge, Division of Cereal and Forage Insect Investigations.R. W. HIARNED, in Charge, Division of Cotton Insect Investigations.F. C. BisHoPP, in Charge, Division of Insects Affecting Man and Animals.C. I1. HADLEY, in Charge, Division of Japanese and Asiatic Beetle Investigations.L. A. HAWKINs, in Charge, Division of Control Investigations.R. C. ROARK, in Charge, Division of Insecticides and Fungicides.HAROT D MoRRISON, in Charge, Division of Insect Idntification.C. P. CLXUSEN, in Charge, Division of Foreign Parasite Introduction.S. B. FRACKER, in Charge, Division of Plant Dicase Control.B. M. GADDIS, in Charge, Division of Domestic Plant Quarantines.E. R. S sscER, in Charge, Division of Foreign Plant Quarantines.A. F BvRGF:ss, in Field Charge, Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail Moth Control(headquarters, Greenfield, Mass.).L. 11. WowTT EY, in Field Charge, Japanese Beetle and Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail Moth Quarantines, European Corn, Borer Certification, and Dutch ElmDiease Eradication (headquarters, White Plains, AT. Y.).R. E. McDONALD, in Field Charge, Pink Bollrorm and Thurberia Weevil Quar-antines (headquarters, San Antonio, Tex.).B. L. POYIEN, in Field Charge, Date Scale Quarantine (headquarters, Indio.Calif.).P. A. IJOTDALE, in Field Charge, Mexican Fruit Fly Quarantine (headquarters.llarlingen, Tex.).U S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1935

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Bur. Et, & P. Q. Issued July 1935United States Department of AgricultureBUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINESERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTSLIST OF INTERCEPTED PLANT PESTS, 1934(List of Pests Recorded During the Period July 1, 1933, to June 30, 1934, In-clusive, as Interceited in, on, or with Plants and Plant Products EnteringUnited States Territory)INTRODUCTIONThis is the fortieth paper of a series inaued un ler various names and at more or less irregular intervals and li;tin:: intercept,(ud plant pests. The present listcovers the twenty-first year of the period sincC Ile wit were started and includesintercepted plant pests for which (leTerni atiois w ere received and indexed duringthe period specified, including those inteweptcd in, oii, or with plants and plantproducts (1) imported, (2) offered for bt refused entry, (3) held as ships' stores,etc., and hence not imported throigh Costoms, (I) (Jffered foi entry for iimediateexport or for immediate traiisportatioi and e.j)ortatlon in Loud, and (5) indomestic shipments reaching the mainland from H awaii and Pt:erto Rico.The list is compiled in the Waslington offee from files maintained here. Theinformation summarized was fu-nished by w orkers of the Bureau of Plant Quar-antine 1 and collaborators (State and customs officials) of the Bureau. Mostof the insect determinations are iade by specialists of the Bureau and Many ofthe plant-disease determinations by specialists of the Bureau of Plant Industry.The States of California and Flor(ida and the Territory of Hawaii maintain theirown staffs of specialists and make many of their own determinations. Frequentlythe intercepted material is in a stage that is not determinable or is too badly dam-aged or is inadequate for determination. Many times the only organisms recog-nized are innocuous. Such interceptions, numbering some thousands, are omittedfrom the list.As pointed out in previous lists of interception, statement as to the origin offruits and vegetables carried as ships' stores, as well as of plants used for decora-tive purposes and of plant material carried by passengers, cannot always be veri-fied, but every effort is made to give the origin of such plants and plant productsas accurately as possible.FRUIT FLIESThe following fruit flies were intercepted: 2lcidia sp. (pupa) in a celery leaffrom England; 2 Mexican fruit fly (Anas/repla iwdens) in lime, mango, orange, sourorange, and sweet lime from Mexico; Central American fruit fly (.4. striata) inguava from Mexico: Anastrcpha sp. in joho from American Virgin Islands, orangefrom Brazil, mango from Ecuador and ilaiti, sapodilla and sapote from Guate-mala, mango and star-apple from Honduras, hog plum, mango, and vi-apple fromJamaica, guava, mamey, mango, orange, peach, pear, pomegranate, quince, aindsapote from Mexico, cherimova and mango from Fanama, guava and mango fromPuerto Rico, grapefruit, nispero, and orange from Trinidad, and custard-applefrom the West Indies; melon fly (Bactrocera cucturbitae) in cucumber from Hawaii;Mediterranean fruit fly (Ccrasti, caplt(z) in apple, loquat, orange, and sorbeapple, and in sawdust packing armin d sorle al)5le, from Azores, coffee and mangofrom Hawaii, fig, sour orange, and tangerine from Italy, apple, grape, orange, andpeach, and (pupae) on shelf of fruit locker on which was the debris of grapes andapples from Spain; Ceraitis sp. in loquat from the Azores, orange from Brazil,peach from France, Opuntia sp. and tamzerine from Italy; olive fruit fly (Dacusoleae) in olive from Greece and in olive and in bag containing green olives fromItaly; Dacus sp. in olive and in package containing olives from Italy; applemaggot (Rhagoletis pomonella,) in apple from !Mexico; R. cerasi in dry sour cherry1 The Bureau of Plant Quarantine and the Bureau of Entonioo gy were consolidated, effective July 1,1934, to form the present Bureau of Entonology and Plant Quaran ine.2 For details of intercei)tions mentioned in the text see lists under the countries named.116442-5--1

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2 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [Junefrom Yugoslavia ; hqoltis sp. in sour clierry from Italy an( Yugoslavia, haw-tlorii froiii Mexico, and apple froi Nova Scotia; papaya fruit fly (ToxotrypanacoreICa wh in j)a)a-ya from the Bahamas, Cuba, and Pallaina; trypetid in orangefrom Bra.il, pricklypear from Italy, and pear and quince from Mexico.MISCELLANEOUS INSECTSLarvae of the vine moth (Polychrosis botrana) were intercepted in grapes fromItaly. The rhlio(lodendron whitetly (Diileurodes cittendeni) was taken on rhodo-dendirons from England. Cipollini from Morocco were infested with ExosomalusitaniCa (Chrvsonelidae). The Asiatic rice borer (Chilo simplex) arrived with rice straw from China and Japan. Apw n carduoriimn (Curculionidae) infestedglobDe artie)hokefrom Italy. Leptoglossus chilensis (Coreidae) was taken on grapesfrom Chile. O utorh nchius ericae (Curculionidae) arrived with heather from Ire-land and Scotland. The European corn borer (Pyrausta nubilalis) was interceptedin green corn and string bans front Japan.The pink bollworm (Pectinophora gossypiella) was intercepted in cotton bollsfrom Aaliwia, cottonseed from Lgypt, India, Mexico, and the Orient, seed cottonfrom China and Mexico, and (adult) i4 a pillow containing raw cotton fromBrazil. Epicaerus sp. (Curculionidae) was found in potatoes from Mexico.Kalotertas mialatensis (termite) infested wood used as a base for orchids from thePhilippines. Broomcorn from Italy was infested with the durra stem borer(Sesu m ia cretica ). Epilachna borealis distincta (Coccinellidae) arrived withbanana debris from Mexico. The bean pod borer (Maruca testulalis) was inter-cepted in a string bean from China and in lina beans from Cuba. Chionaspisyauonen2is Coccidae) was taken on oran e and tangerine from Japan. The coffeeberry borer (Stephanoderes ham pei) arrived in unroasted coffee from Brazil andSumnatr *a.Larvae of the tobacco wireworm (Agriotes lineatus) were intercepted on dahliaroots from Norway. Las;eyresia splendana (Olethreutidae) arrived in chestnutsfrom France, Japan, Portugal, Spain, Switzerland, and U. S. S. R. The turnip gallweevil (Ccitorhynch us ple trostignia) infested cauliflower from Belgium and turnipsfrom England and the Netherlands. Seed cotton from China was infested withOxycaren us h yolinipenn is (Lygaeidae). The West Indian sweetpotato weevil(Euscepes batatae) was taken in sweetpotatoes from Brazil, Jamaica, Mexico, andSt. Lucia. The citrus blackfly (Aleurocanth os wvoglumi) was intercepted on orangeleaves from the Bahamas and Jamaica. Bamboo canes from China were infestedwith IIarinolita ph yllostachi/is ( Eurytomidae). Psylliodes chrysocephala (Chry-somelidae) was intercepted in turnips from the Canal Zone, Denmark, England,and Norway, and in brussels sprouts from Denmark.Avacados from Mexico were infested with Conotrachelus aguacatae and C.perseae (Curculionida)e. The gladiolus thrips (Taeniothrips gladioli) was inter-cepted on gladiolus from Australia, Bermuda, Hawaii, and New Zealand. Thecofiee le-af miner (Letucoptera coffeella) was taken in coffee leaves from Costa Ricaand Guatemala. The Philippine orange moth (Prays citri) was intercepted in therind of a pomelo from the Philippines. Mangoes from Hawaii and the Philippineswere infested with the mango weevil (Sternoche/us mangiferae). Scolytus multi-striaus and S. scolytus (Scolytidae) were intercepted in elm logs from France.MISCELLANEOUS PLANT DISEASESThe Dutch elm disease (Ccratostomnella (Graphium) ulmi) with insect vectorswas intercepted in burl elm logs from France at several ports, thus indicating theprobable mnolde of entry of this serious disease. Citrus canker (Bacterium citri)was intercepted on Ci(rus spp. from China, Japan, and south India; Ceroteliumdcsiun on GoSsyp im sp. from the West Indies; Elsinoe piri on apple fromSwitzeramind; Entoospori u mu maculatuin on Raphiolepis delacourii from Argen-tina; Glocosporiun beyrodtii on VIanda sandcriana from the Philippines; G.sorauerianun on Codiacu im sp. from Japan; Gloncrella cingulata on Falsia japonicafrom Japan; Ilemnlcia sp. on Oncidium sp. from Dutch Guiana; Leptosphaeriaheterospora on Iris sp. from England; Macrophoma(?) aucubana and Mycos-phaerella sp. on Aucuba japonica from Japan; Pestalozzia neglecta on Euonymusobovatus variegatus from Japan; Phomna ci/ricarpa on fresh fruit of Citrus nobilisfrom China and C. sinensis junos from Japan; Phonopsis arecae on palm seedfrom Cuba; Physalospora eucalyptina on Eucalyptus sp. from Mexico; Septoriacitri on citrus fruits from Australia, Egypt, France, Greece, Italy, and Spain;S. pit/ospor on Pittosporuin sp. from Scotland; Sphaceloma fawcttii var. viscosaon orange from Brazil; Credo epidendri and U. nigropunctata on orchids fromCosta Rica; Uredo sp. on orchids from Columbia.

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1935] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 3Interceptions of n(maf odes includedlC1 .ainUilula ( Tqbe a ch v.a I (IipraC/ ( 1t io1shosts from Belgiumn, Dainzig, Denmark, England (icltidiiig Iris histrHi8d8 mQjornew host), France, Germ ny, If Jvy(?) , i\Ir0c" )CCU loW1(lit y, Net Herlaids, NewBrunswick, Norway, 1.i iofl of SoNviet S e :i 1 vt ho 1)1 j(\v , lcalii v, Scot aind,anld Sweden; .1. incrmniedia iii gin ger fr imi Chiia; 1. ;refr n08/ from Argeiiiiiia,Germany, and Japan; A. rolhustl in Iiosta sp. fr, m Italy; (A p/;lenchoidiesbicaud(atUs in EryngitinfoctidUm offere(i for export from Piuerto Rico to tliemainland and hence intercepti i)n not swnWi i in list "; A. pariZ ii as front Brazil,China, Danzig, England, Fraiice, Germiany, Italy, Jpan, Neiorla W1is, Norw ay,Scotland, Sweden, ali(1 Wales; c. 1(r'i' latus in ginger from Cliiiia and in yamkfrom Japan; .lphee'nchoahds sp. from Begimin, Japan, t.d Lithiutiit; ;1jhelcnehusavenac from England, Germany, 1unigary, Italy, Japan (in Puerto Pico in nwiterialoffered for export to 1118]i lau 1', U(1 SwOle I; i ola in i. S o. ii Io ('a sip. fromItaly, not a plant pa rasite ani hence 1101 in list), IlopllaimuUs bradys i n yam fromPuerto Rico; Paraphclcnchius a(mblyurs in yam from Japai; P. n ~a ;a in hla-cinth from the Netheriand.The interceptions of root-knot nemato(le (IIetcrodcra ;narionii) are i t shown iinthe main lisi hut included time following nbw hosts: IIy'Iranga optiloi(!s r mAzores; Antennaria diica toiicntosa, Con ob'ulUs 1inaks, Geai(Ina aCWalis,Geu n hybridu m, Lai hun orala aiba, a]id lea ph ih amnw u s cila a
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4 BUIREAII OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [JuneINSECTSAs;.IUIN K lUC (4-6), A. cyanoph'l/i (9-21), A. hederae (20-191), A.lab u jw' I 7 , .pCernZ.icOSW (4-9), .1ulucaspis pentagona (10-26), A. rosae(3-3 /( #i/ lumhni/u (10 34), Cc? ::tophis lutaniae (4-31), Ceroplastesflo ,tlch i 1, '11o aspi ci! i 4 2-28), C. c'onymi (4-16), ChrysomphalusGauon?. W u 6 645"), C. a urantii (25-375), C. d'ictlyospermi (20-176), Coccus elongatus 21V, C. hsperium (19-30), Diaspis bisduralii (17-106), D. bromeliae(141 , I). cchinocacti 3-8), D. cchinocacbi opuntiae (3-), Ephestia sp. (36-181),Et iu// 'inc'I ie ia 0-13, Gorimoschcma oprculdla (20-70), Ifeliothis obsoleta(-I ,'(1 , If. c , j.i u6--73), IL/liothrips iw morirhoidalis (10-16), IlemichionaspisCs]I!4! c 1 w, 11. lihirio (16-116), // wardia biclavis (6-31), Ischnaspis1o0 ir x (10-i , v 0irIusapi cs bcckii (65-1,395), L. gloverii (23-306), L. ulmi(13-29;, !Pu'lau/ri per'(1UwU (39-337), P. proteus (8-30), Pseudococcus aoonidum(9-26, P. brifs (20-242), P. citri (15-36), P. maritimus (13-31), P. nipae(9-11i i), oqi~ h us hyacinthi (10-45), NSse/iu hemisphaerica (19-43), S.ligra k-, .C c (11-27): Total of thesc insect interceptioiis, 6,205.DISEASESActiunit:y ."c'ibis (18-6(1S, A/tf'rnaria sp. (27-134), A.pelrgillus niger (41-22 1), 1 cil" ' 'warrus (28-221, Bacteriaeeae (48-679), 'aclerium i tumfaciens(13-72), Bc< :t!> up. (31-202), Cphalotheciun roseum (8-19), Cladosporiumherbal rum t -ladospu riu, m sp. (36-294), Collelotrichuim glocosporioides (21-109),C. liw+< fint wun i 9-20 ), Coniothyrium fuckelii (6-9), Diaporthe phascolorum(1-2), Fii-'c:iu sp. (63-1,347), Ieterodera marioni (15-52), Alacrosporium sp.(32-260 ) Onora pustu/an (14-50), Penicillium digitatum (28-91), P. expansum(20-45), '. i'i';cum (20-46, Pnicilliun sp. (71-1,269), Phomnopsis citri (39-213),Ph ito ph !hi ru ik f-stoa s (20-137), Rhizocto oia solani (51-765), Rhizopus nigricans(31--99), Iu~pu.a 9I. %91), Spondylo:Ulnadim atrovirens (41-549), Spongospord subterranaa 1-i-60 , uria inaequa/is (28-135), Verticiflium cinnabarina (27-109): Ttal of uhv'e disease interceptions, 7,988.Lis/, b;i cc ;ac st cOllected and reported from July 1, 1933, to June 30, 1934[All fingirls marked wiih an asterisk indicate State inspection]number of inter-ept ions in-i .r o m e of pest Host CollectedC s, m; us 1t ''prm. var. Pa.In.-----------------------------1 Ga.Si ( tAh yii --SalfU tuberou ---------------------1 Ala.NuWmjd.-.---. ---(Crotiliaria p. ---------------------------D. C.Di-se ii-P] ccin o ro'; --thyij s ()raitha'nalumn throi (chin1 Pa.-f, ~ A ~-~ -~e--rj~~ta (lh :aojut-------------1( ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ---2 '~U ---(ru~tr raa~-------------Pa~.kerichee).vr,'iot olr9 Coed ribiry ia~ l iitua). ---D C.' T I --------------r a aira (. -------------i e) -D. C d .----ilus -i------an--------D o.Dise sGanoderma~~~re Iiycor i (Irie Iucan (___JCalif.*nut tree).A'ILEO! N" \EII-! 1-'\ND SlAnasir i ' .(Trype:aiu .---------"pindirs 7ombln (j'bo).Do. *SThe 'm n H ii 'i a ' 1 fr ho following ha;ve ben itted: Artaas satire (pineapple), Brassica oleraceaCan 'H' I M I U, ( iap um 'n UII 1'ep r~'), LUCoper. im Culntmia fi (TomaTo), ha officinarum(su r,.e a , a) /q' fa~Iia ra l (aoto). Where the !isame ha occurs frIquently The common nane1) aIAe a -! :'r of 'he .A! hon ieul'ural voriy iomes have been omitted.

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1935] SERVICE AND ltEGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 5List, by countries, of pests collected and reporhtd from July .1, o, i) .un 30, RMI3,inctl si --Co ii till ted[All findings marked with an asterisk indicate State inspection}Number of itir-ci-p io)n s in----------C olle tedCountry of origin and name of pest Host -nhi--ANTIGUAInsects: asPectinophora gossyipiella (pink bollGossypiu in sp. (cotton boil)-1 -ass.worm).Rhizoglyph us sp. (mite)------------Zin giber officinale (ginger)-------1 --Do.Targioua harmti (Coccidae) ---------ioscora sp. (yam) --------------1 Do.Targionia sp. (Cocida) ------------Zingiber officinale (ginger)-----------Do.ARABIAInsects:Bruchidius sp. (Bruchidae) ---------Ssban ia sp. --------------------C --. --ARGENTINAInsects:Agrornyza sp. (Agromyzidae) -------Brassica rapa (turnip) 1 N. Y.Alphitophagus sp. (Tenebrionidae) In box of grapes --------------1----Do.Do -------------------------On packing material in box of _ Do.grapes.Anthomyiid ---------------. -Cu um i.' satirius (cucunber)_1 --I La.Aspidotus sp. (Coccida)---Cia sp-------------------------). C.Atuenius picinus (Scarabaeidae) In packing for grapes --------N. Y.Blapstinus panctulatius (TenebriOn packing material in box of ---------Do.onidae). grapes.Bostrychulus sp. (13ostrichidae) -----Vitis sp. (grape) 1 -----------Do.Camporotus sp. (ant) ------------On packing material in box of 1 ------------------Do.grapes.Carpocapsa sp. (Olethreutidae) -runus domestica (plum) ------I----D-----------I) o.Chrysomphalus dictyosperni var. Citrus liionia (lemon)------1 Do.(Coccidae).Do r-------------------------Lurus nobilis (Grecian laurel) -----------1 Do.Curculionid . sr---------------------Rrasca Iapa (turnip)-----------1 Pa.Do ------------------------Citrus grandis (grapefruit)-N. Y.Do -------------------------I soil around roots of Tabebuia 1 D. C.flarescens.Desmonieopa sp. (Agromyzidae) Solani tuberosu ----------------I N. Y.Diaphania sp. (Pyralidae) ----------Cicmis satrus (cucumber)---------2 La.Distraea sp. (Pyralidae)----------Holcs sorghum var. (broom2 N. Y.corn).Dysdercus sp. (Pyrrhocoridae)-----Gossypiumin sp. (cottonseed --D. C.and lint).Edessa sp. (Pcntatomidae)-----------!iim cepa (onion)---I Ala.Euxesta sp. (Ortalidae) -----------Sola nv tiu tosut. I La.Glischrochilus sp. (Nitidulidae)-.--Zta mays (corn) 1 Do.Ilylemnyi jaeilaptera (AnthomyiiVitis sp. (grape) --------------1N. Y.dae).Lore/us sp. (Tenebrionidae)-------Solanv n tubosum -iss.Oedaleothrip. sp. (thrips).----------A cacia fari sifna (sweet aca-D. C.cia).Orthezia sp. (Coccidae)-C tus sp -----------------------1 I Pa.Phycitinae ( Pyralidae)------------Chomiclia brasiliana --1). CPlodia sp. (Pyralidac) ---------------do ----------------------------------o.Do-------------------------Gat/arda uruquensis ---1 Do.hi zoglyphus sp. (mite)-----------A!/iu m ctpa (onion)Ala.Do ----------do--------------------------------------I Mass.Do ----------------------Ipomoca btatas (sweetpotto) -a.Do ----------------------Solanum tubrosum n AssSalax lacordairei (Tenebrionidae) In excelsior packing around -N. Y.grapes.Saulaspis graphica (Chrysomelidae) -----do .--1 -------------Do.Tetrane/hoidus sp. (mite)-----------Layunaria pairtrsot .-----------1------C.Tetranychus sp. (mite) -------------Solaninm tabrosuin -------------------------Wash.ToDs aspis sp. (Cercopidae).----------Vilis sp. (grape)---1 -N. Y.Diseases:Alternaria brassicae---------------Brassica oleracca capitala 1 L.Do --------------------------d-----.o-. -------------------1 'a.Anguillulina pratcnsis------------so/onm tuberos-u --1 Md.Botryosphaeria ribis--------------floiciana sp P n ----------------1 -----------I). (.Colt/otrichum p-----------------Capsicum annuu1 1 aDiplodia tubericola -----------------lpomnoea batatas (sweet Potato)1 ] )o.Entoiosporium maculatu ---------l Raphiole pis (acourii ----------1 -). C.Oleocellosis -----------------------rus nensis (orange) ----La.Phoma sp------------------Unidentified leaf -------------1 M--.

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6 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [JuneList, by CuntWric , of pes8 collected and reporl(dfrom July 1, 1b33, to June 30, 1934,[All findings mark d with an asterisk indicate State inspection]Number of inter-ceptions in-Country of oriin and name of post Host Collectedin-ARGiENTIN.%-ContinuedDiseasesContinued.S.------------------------1/lin saticum (garlic) -----------------------1 Pa.Sclerotiniq sclerotiora In ----------Dai~us carota (carrot) ---------------------1 Do.Scer tiIia s-.-----------------------lliunm ctpa (onion) --------------------------N Y.Do ---------------------------Capsicum annautr (pepper) --------------1 Mass.Do -----------------------------a s carol (carrot) 1 La.Do ---------------------------I)-----------------Tex.D --------------------------Lacteca satira (lettuce 1 Pa.Scr m -------------------Bissici rapa (turnip)-----------1 Do.Se ptoria ap, .---.A / id gravuolcns (celery) -1 -Do.Spha aInma fawett ii--------------Cirus limonia (lemon)----------I Tex.Sp cloIn; p --------------------------------------------------1 La.Do -------------------------itrus sinensis (orange) -----------------------1 N. Y.A UST R ALIAI nsect :Apach sp. (earwig) -------------Juglans sp. (walnut) ----------1 ----------------Calif.*Aspi: i, ! odre aeformis Coccidae) -Afalus sylvestris (apple) ----------------------2 Pa.Aspibhotas sp. (Cocciae -------------(10 ---------------------------------1 Md.Do ---------------------------do-----------------------------------1 N. Y.Blastobasid ---------------------acrozamiia sp --------------1 Calif.*Brach;pep/us sp. (Nitidulidae) ------Jug'ans sp. (walnut) ----------1 -Do.*Brontes austra'is (Cucujidae) --------do ----------------------2 ------------Va.Bryobia sp. (mite) ----------------Mais sylrestris (apple)----------------------1 Pa.Camnponotus sp. (ant) -------------Juglans sp. (walnut) ----------1 ----------------Calif.*Ceropria sp. (Tenebrionidae) -cer sp. (maple) -------------1 ----------------Md.Chrysoinphalus rossi (Coccida)----Dendrobium superbiens (orchid) 1 ----------------Hawaii.*Do ------------------------Strelitzia reginae (bird-of-para ---------1--------Do.*dise-flower).Cicadellid-----------------do ---------------------------------Do.*Coccotryps ,,aliperda (S1olv idav Palm--------------------------1-----------Calif.*Crptorhn(hinae ( 'urculi )ndac Jtuglans sp. (walnut) ---------------------------Va.Curculionid---------------------crsp. (maple) --------------1---------------Md.Do -------------------------ollisteion lanceolatus (lemon 1 ------------D. C.bottle-brush).Do Dn-------------------------Iedrobiun senile (orchid)-------1 ----H-------awaii.*Do J------------------------u-glans sp. (walnut) ----------1 --------------Calif.*Do -------------------d-----_----------------------4 -----Va.Elaphidion sp. (Cerambyeidae) --------do ------------------------------------Do.Elaterid -------------------------Alcicorniurn sp. (staghorn fern) 1 ---------Calif.*Do ------------------------Dendrobiun falcorostrum (or1-----------Hawaii.*chid).Do -J-------------Jglans sp. (walnut) ----------1 ----------------Calif.*Lepidosap& sp. (Coccidae) ---------pndrobbiin superbiens (or1 ----------------Hawaii.*ehlid)Melolonthinae (ar baeidae-In soiL _.-----------------1 -----------Calif.*Meracantha sp. (Tenebronidae)------lc r sp. (maple) -------------1 ---------------d.Mirii --------------------------uglans sp. (walnut) ---------1 Calif.*wcrobia p. ('orynetidae) --------_o ---------------------1 Va.Ni ti ulid ----------------o ----------------------2 Calif.*Orthorrhinus cy/inrdrirostris (Cur(1o ----------------------------------Do.*cakionidae)Pheido/e sp. (nt) ----------------cacia Sp -------------------------------Do.*)o .. -----------qlans sp. (walnut) ----------I Do.*Phsnaca.p W1). (Coccidae ---------Palm------------------------------7 Do.*Pilyeii li e P1y nflidae ------------Plu uunria sp. (frangipani)--------1 Do.*Plt/,ds m tt/raspilota (Tenebrionlcer sp. (maple) ------------I ---Md.PsIi diococcus sp. (Coccidae) ./cicornium sp. (staghorn fern) --1 Calif.*I ----------------------------acrozamnia sp --------------1 Do.*I)o ------------------------Pa Im -------------------------------1 Do.*Psyci id.--------------------------do --------------------.-Do.*Psyelid -----------------------oronia sp-.------.--.Hawaii.*Sap( rda sp. (('ernmhycicdae) ---------Iug ns sp. (walnut)---------a.dranis 'p. (iucujidae) --------------( ---------------------1 Calif.*.ponaiphora a us/ra/iana (earwig) ---, c(r sp. (maple) --.-.----2 Md.SDo. .-----------------------.Juglans sp. (walnut) ----------I Calif.*Do ------------------------Log------------------------1 Do.*Spongephora sp. (earwig).----------. ilans sp. (walnut) ----------1 DO,*1T,, iniothrips gladioli (gladiolus Gladiolus sp -----.-.-------.1 ---Do.*thrips)I

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1935] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 7List, by countries, of pests c'Hiected and reQported from July 1, 1933, to June 30, 1934,Inclusive-Cmotilmed[All findings marked with an asterisk indicate State inspection]Number of inter-(epji nl ill--ColiLctedCountry of origin and name of peit Host --AUSTRALIA-ContinuedInsects--Continued.Tenebrionid n--------------------D drobium falcorostrUm (or1-----------Hawaii.*(Alid).Do Jg-------------------------Jlans sp. (walnut)-1 Calif.*Ten broides sp. (Ostonidae) --------Botanical specimen----------------Do.*Do------------------------Keatia sp. (palm) ------------1 Do.*Tetranychid (mite) ---------------Citrus sp --------------------Do-----------------------In soi ----------------------1 ------o.Xyleborus morigerus (Scolytidae) Dendrobia m phalaenopsis sch roe1dri anm (orchidl).Diseases:Bacterium marginatumi -----Gladiolus sp .-----------1 --. C.--Bitter pit----------------------Ma!,s xylrestris (apple) ------------------1 Mass. Gloeosporiuin cinctum? ------------Dendrobil m sp. (orchid) -------1 ---------). C.Internal blackening --------------Solainm tuberosums--------------1 Mass.Oleocellosis-----------------Citrus sinensis (orange .------------t.Do---------------------------do--------------------------------1 --.Pestalozzia sp-------------------Dendrobiam sp1 ----------------I-. C.Puccinia graminis ----------------Triticum aestirum (wheat)-__ 2 --------Do.Russeting -I ua/us sylrestris (apple) -------1 IMass.Sclerotium gladioli.---------------Gladiolus sp---------------------2 -----D. C.Septoria citri----------------------Citrus lunonia (lemon)-----------------------1 Md.-Stemphylium sp----------------Dendrobairn sp---------------1 ----------------D. C.Ustilago avenae-----------------Aetna satira (oats)-.-------------1 -----------o.AUSTRIAInsects:Anthonomus rectirostris (CurculiPrunus aiurm (mazzard) ---------1 -----------Do.onidae).Do.-------------------------Prnus mahaleb (mahaleb 1---------Do.cherry).Do------------------------Prunes pads (European bird 1 ------Pa.cherry).Blastodacna sp. (Cosmopterygidae)_ Malus syleestris (apple) ----------D. C.Brachyrhinus porcatus (CurculionDahlia sp.----------------------------------Pa.idae).Pruchid-----------------------Cytisus hirsutus----------------1 ------------D. C.Bruchidiusvillosus (Bruchidae)-----Cytisus sessilifolius (sessile -------------Do.broon).1)o ---------------.--. I Cytisus supinus ------------Do.Do------------.-------I Laburnun algare (goldenchain) ----------------Pa.Chlorochroa juniperina (PentatomJuniperus sp. (juniper) -----------1 -----------Do.idlac).Coleophora sp. (Coleophoridae)---.Mais sp------------------1 -------------D. C.Curculio sp. (Curculionidae)-------Corylus colarna (tree hazelnut) 1 Pa.tGelechiid ------------_-----------Picea excelsa (Norway spruce) 1---------Do.Phyllotreta sp. (Chrysomelidae)-. In soil around dahlia tubers --------1-------Do.Diseases:Phoma sp--------------------------Syringa vulgaris flora alba-----1 ----Do.AZORESInsectsABlast ~sid ----------------. -----Eriobotrua japonica (loquat) ---.Cerait is capitata (Mediterraneau Citrus sinensis (orange)--------------------N. Y.fruit fly).fo------------------------Eriobotrya japonica------------------2 -------.1.o------------------------alus sylrestris (apple) -------------------N. Y.1)0------------------------Sorbus sp. (sorbe apple) -------1 Mass.Do--------------------------In sawdust packing around 1------Do.sore apple.Ceralitis sp. (Trypetidae)---------Eriobotrya japonica, -N. Y.Do--------------------------------.--! R. Chrysomphalus dictyospermi var. Citrus limonia (lemon)----------1-------Do.(Coccidae).Curculionid --------------------Malus sylvestris -----------------1-------N. Y.Fiorinia fioriniae (Coccidae)-------Camellia sp--------------------1 ------------Mass.o-----------------------------do----------------------------1 -------.I.Iridomyrmex humilis (Argentine ant) I Eriobotrya japonica 1--------. -Do.Do------------------------Fern ----------------------------------Do.Marmara sp. (Gracilariidae).-------aus syl --r-is __--------1 -------N. Y.Rhizoglyphus sp. (mite) -----------I olocasia esuntu (dasheen). 1 ---.-----Mass.

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8 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [JuneList, by coi.tries, uf pets cIleced _a, I rep'r:e 'fro July 1, 1933, to June 30, 1934,Lncl u'e-Conlt inued([All findings markt-d withi an asterisk indicate State inspection]Number of inter-ceptiuns in-CollectedCountry of origin and name of pest ILetC-nAZOREs-Cont inueldInsects-C ntinued.Sit jphilAs sp. --rculi nae----1us sy restris (a---le -1 N. Y.Targionia tromeliaie (Coccidae-------a nna sa'icus (pine ple) ---11 Mass..o----------------------------o .-----------------------------1 N. Y.Tene brionid--------------------PAm---------------------1-------R. LTinid------------------.-.B'gonia sp-.--.------------L--1 --Do.P-cc-nia sori.------------------Za cs corn ----------------------Pa.BAHAMASInsects-euroca nthus u mi (citrus blackCitru s sin7? (' range) 1-----Fla.*Aphis sp. (aphid-----------------). Ra sp --------------------------1 Do.*Aspiliatas coc(iphagus (Coecidae C'auarina equas'mfoiHa (AuS--1 Do.*ai-nh f' pine).Do--------------.Ccos -----------------------)---Do.*Do ---------------------C s reroua ao ccas ---------------Do.*Aspi/jotus destructor (Coccidae-----Cocos nuc4fra icoconul)------3------Do.*Do-------------------------.a.-----------------------1 --------Do.*Aspidiotus herculeanus (Coocidae) -Powinaa reg-a royal poincia1------Do.*naAsterlecanium pustulans (Coccidae) Aehras s-po-s-podilla)----.1 1 Do.*Do.---------------------------.-rim olander (oleander 1 1 Do.*Coccus sp. (Coccidae)--------------chras apo-a----------.------------1 Do.*Di'trata sacchara/is (sugarcane Saccharum ofIcinarum.---------------1 ----Do.borer). ~Eri aniti rain la (Tinedc------Poinciana rega -----------------Y.Ir : u-c--thrip ---.---Bou3 uet ------------------------Fla.*Fr: :ak/ H insaaris thri ------. Roe and sn ipdron -------Do.*i pidosaphis a/ba cci .nr--------Pon e/ia pu'chrrim (poin-1------Do.*Ortalid-----------------------.--Za -ayc-rn).---------1 Do.*Psdaonidia articu/atus ruous -n--a sqZa1msa ,suar-1 Do.*tscale) aIplc).Ps eudacoccus sp. (Coccidae).-.---gare indagator-m------------1 D. C.Do ----------------------------ara m ofcinau II.---------------------Fla.*Pyralid --srg-----------------------/ s i 'ar. (kafir-1 Do.*corn.Pyroderces sp. (Cosmopterygidae P-;ncia na regia------------------1 N. Y.Syrphi.-------. -----------------HLu sorghum; var. (kafir 1-------Fla.*corn).Targionia sacchari (Coccide-)---ochar oiinaru------------1 1 Do.*T -ineid-------------------------Pnciana rega (r yal pl'incia --1 N. Y.Tr ypara curricaudai (papaya Car-ca papaya (papay). 1---Fla.fruit ly).Diseases:KC/eto/richn fcatu.--------------------1--------Do.*Collettric .s _._ .: c en u --2D .G'ofcoprium;; m-.--.-._. aur I ---c 2 co-Do.*G/'i~oriii un' he/ -i----------(Ur a ulitfajime) -----------Do.*BAl .I 1 s)0InecI s:Diiitram a s-. (Pyralid'M---.----.-.-Saccharum ofiInarum--.-.-1 Mass.Ieta masus sru (lky can.---.o--------------------------1--------Do.weex illPseudaanidia articu/atus (rufous Ci/rus grandis (grapefruit) --------1 Do.Do-------------------------(j'i/rus snenmns 'orange) ------------1 Do.PSetIIudcoUs ('Cocida e--.------.-Iryoph1Y m sp -.------------1 -------Do..S'i/pi/as linuaris (tamrind pod Tamaindus i dca (tamarind) -------Do.Targionia hartii (Cociie)-.--.--Dioscor sp. yam)-.---.-1 3 ----------Do.Wism nni --a a-rop--ctata (an-I rm m sp 1-------Do.Diseases:Ca pnadiu i C-----Uauranfroz li1---Do.Mtelanconiu succhari-------------. . -aara m_ atcinara a. -----------Do.

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N351 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 9List, by countries, of pests collected and reported from July 1, 1933, to June 30, 1934,inclusive-Continued[All findings markd with an asterisk indicate State inspection]CollectedCountry of origin and name of pest Hostin-IZLBELGIUMInsects:Agrom yzid -----r-------N .Y .Do -----------------------------------.-------------------------------Aspi7it.s'a mac CoceLe---' drqi ae------------1----------D. C.) -----mv wn _ _------1 Do.-----------------------------------------Do.D o ------------------------------D o .D o -------\-D o.----------------------------N 1I ------------------1 -------------Do.Ceu.frhynihus prle 'ur bomir nip Bro ilc) a e u--1 M ss.goll weevi .flx erCaorhync sp. L( rc.ul.ni ...r.p .tur ---------1 N. Y.Chrysmphas prsonatus ce -r ------------------------------D.C.-o----------------------------i.-----------------1-------------Do.r -v (t ' a-------------2 ---------.iasps sp. Oiae-------------B h ----------------------D C.Do-------------------------u ----------------Do.E aeri ------------------------1 -io---------------------------1 Fla.*Gymna p--------C-cc-1 ). C.Iepidals -Hia-idw-----o 1------Pa.Listiostom:a sp. n ---lAI.1151 ---isp(A-h d p urn---------1 Ala.1---------------------------------------------1 aJ~ y i o u o ~ ~ p E l r e r h ----I r r f l .e------------------------1 o---o e-e -------1 Do.co~~ ----ss ilo Do..----------O-------D o .---r 7-----------------------------------------1 oa.-------u-------N .Y .Rhz~ OO m:-----------d:C2----------------------------------------------1 Pa.----------------------------T '~ __ -------N .N i//-----------------------_D o -----rP a.S-rphid-:r-1 Do.TJ'Sip---C-P> --h S ------1 Do.c SJ) e,0------------------B -------------.FLt li ----------------F !a .*G( ''1 sde r -ic L a.L ise ga -:asaia 0<11~ rarp .1'.m pfrre' Ceek 1 aG' ---C----or--i-----------------D--.n"------------------------------------------1 Tex.--------------------------------r ----------o Pa.Inrlb enn--------I7"' ----------------------------------1 Te.MO~.------------------------i ~ I 'e ------------------------------Da.uelem----------------------------o 'r~oo-------------------------1 DoTe.ihna /---------------------------brsc -rc. Co a--------------------1I Pa.h ----------------------A -a ( --------------1 Do.p ra br e ---------------------------Do.----10~1---------------------Illf -.-------------MuN c -A ' -U m -i----.-.-------------------.----------------------------------------2 a.-------------d----------------1 ----D oi---------------------h--h Da ar-------------------------1 a.1-------------------------Ci -r a------------------------------1------------------------LCp I-------------------1 N. Y.Scrti p-------------------( C i 1----r-----------Do.-------------------------PatID ----------------1 Do.Sptori 411--------------------------------------------4 Pa.Sphaerwhez humh----------------sp--------------------------. C.pid tu r---------------------.--------------3 3crtic jum albO-trum ---------------io n------------------------------D. C.Verti--i---s -----------. -a --i -ee1 A la.11442-35 2

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10 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [JuneList, by countries, of pests collected and reported from July 1, 1933, to June 30, 1934,inciusive-CmtiiUed[All findings markvd with an asterisk indicate State inspection]Number of inter-ceptions in-Country of origin and name of pest Host Collected'in--C 1 .MB ERMUDAInsects:Agronivzid -.---------------------Brassica oleracoa aceph ala (kale) 1 ----------N. Y.Ce roplastes sp. (Coccidae).---------Duranta repns ----------------------------Do.licliothis sp. (Noctuidae) ----------Pelargonium sp. (geranium)--------------Mass.Noctuid ---------------------Liliu n sp -----------------1----------Pa.Phenacoccus gossypii (Coccidae)-. Pelargonium sp. (geranium) ---------------Mass.Phenacoccus sp. (Coccidae) -----------do----------------------------1------Do.Phycitinae (Pvralidae)-----------Eriobotryajaponica (loquat)------------N. Y.-'rodenia sp. (Noctuidae) ---------Litium sI---------------------------1 -Do.Pulrinaria psidii (Coccidae).--------Duralta repens-------------------------Do.Rhizoglyphus sp. (mite)-----------Pelargonium sp. (geranium) ----------------Mass.Tacniothrips gladioli (gladiolus Gladiolus sp-------------------------1 ------Do.thrips).Tai niothrips sp. (thrips).----------amaryllis sp ---------------------------1 Do.Tetranychid (mite).---------------Ldui m sp -------------------1--.-----.----Calif.*Diseases: Colletotrichum sp -----------------Theobroma cacao (cacao)------------------Mass.Diplodia cacaoicola-------------------------do--------------------------1------Do.Phyllosticta sp--------------------Nerium oleander (oleander)---------------N. Y.Pythium sp--------------------Bryophyllum sp.-----------------1 ----------Pa.BRAZILInsects:Acanthoscelides sp. (Bruchidae)----Bean --.---------------------------------1 Mass.Acrolophus sp. (Acrolophidae) ------'Sotanuin tuberosu m.---------------------1 La.Aleurothrixusfloccosus (whitefly). Citrus sinensis (orange).-------------1 ---. 1 Do.Anastrepha sp. (Trypetidae) ---------do --.-------------------------------1 Md.Anthom yiid ---------------------Log _-------------------------1 --------------La.Aspidiotus (lestructor (Coccidae)----Cocos nucifera (coconut) --------------1 ---Pa.Aspidiotus tamarindi (Coccidae) ---Codiaeu in sp. (croton ---------------------1 Tex.Avpidiotus sp. (Coccidae)---------Citrus lirnonia (lemon) ------------------1 N. Y.Ataenius sp. (Scarabaeidae)-------Hardwood log ---------------1 ------------Va.Autographa sp. (Noctuidae)--------Brassica oleracea capitata ---------------1 N. Y.Brachyrhinus sulcatus (black vine Bean -------------------------------------1 Mass.weevil).Brentid ------------------------Hardwood log---------------1 ------------Va.Ceram bycid .--------------------Bertholletia nobilis (Brazil nut)------1 ------La.Ceratitis sp. (Trypetidae)---------Citrus sinensis (orange) ------------------1 Do.Coccus riridis (Coccidae) ----------------do --.----------------------------1 N. Y.Colopterus abdominalis (Nitidulidae) In package with potatoes--------1 ---------D. C.Curculionid .---------------------1ponoea batatas (sweetpotato) -------------1 N. Y.Do ..------------------------Solanum tuberosum (potato) ---------------1 Md.Do ---. .--d-------------------. .----do -------------------------------1 N. Y.Diatraea sp. (Pyraiidae)----------Zea mays (corn)-.--------------------------1 Do.Eucepes batatae (West Indian Ipomoea batatas (sweetpotato)-------------1 Md.sweet potato weevil).Do -.--.-. . d.-----------------------( do -------------------------------1 N. Y.Euxesta sp. (Ortalidae).-----------Citrus sinensis (orange).-------------1 ------La.Do ---------------------------Unidentified log--------------1. .------------Do.Heinichionaspis minor strachani Citrus sinensis (orange)------------------1 N. Y.((Coccid ue).HIistiostomua sp. (mite).-------------A liu in cepa (onion)----------------------1 Mass.,Mirid. .------------------------Swietenia sp. (mahogany)----1 ------------La.Murinmidius sp. (Murmidiidae).-----Unidentified log --------------1 I ------------Do.yc-tophilid.-------------------Solanum melongena (eggplant) -------------1 N. Y.Olethreutid.----------------------Citrus sinensis ..--------------------------1 Do. Orthezia insignis (greenhouse ortheBegonia sp ..--------------------------2 -. La.71a).Partatoria sp. (Coccidae) ----------Citrus sinensis--------------------1 1 2 Fla.*)__. .. ..----------------------.-do-------------------------------1 Mass.Do. .---------------------------(10.-.---------------------------------1 Pa.1)0. ..------------------------Citrus s )----------------------.----.----.---------1 Md.Pectinophora gossypiella (pink bollIn a pillow containing raw cot------1------La.wormi). ton.Pinnaspis /u>i (Coccidae) ----------Palm---------------------------------N. Y.Platydema picicorne (Tenebrionidae) Ilardwood log--------------1 ------------Va.Psalis (tnericanU earwigg) --------Cucurbita pepo (pumpkin) ---------1 La.Pseudaoniaiu dupler (camphor scale) Cod iaeu i sp. (croton ;--------1 Tex.Pseudaonidia trilobitiforutis (CocciMangifera indica (mango)-------------1 N. Yd ae). -Pseudococcus sp. (Coccidae)-------Solanurn medongena (eggplant)-.----.-.----.1 Do.

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1935] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 11List, by countries, of pests collected an3 report(l from July 1, 1933, to June 30, 1934,tflst e-Ckn.ue i[All findings marked with an asterisk indicate State inspection]Number of inter-ceptions in-Country of oriin and name of pest host -n--ollcedin-Bt .r'I r-ContinuedInsects-Continued.Pyraustinai ( lyrlidae) -----------Lycoprsicu esculentu 1 La.Do------------------------Unidentied log --------------I-------Do.Rhizoglyphwu sp. (mite ----------A'liumu c'pa (onion -Ala.Sciara sp. (Mycetophilidae) (i/-----C npIictn a--u---------------------------Solenopsis sp. (antCucrbit ppo (pupk------------------1 as.Do --------------------------Or-id ----------------1 ---La.S!ephanoderes hatupei (coffee berry Coffea sI)--------------1 N.Y.borer).Seiphanoderes sp. (Scolytidae) -----Cassia fistula (golden-shower)1 La.Do -----------------------zea mays (corn) --------------------1 --------Calif,*Temnnochila sp. (Ostomidae) --------Hardwood log ----------------I---------Va.Tenebrionid-------------------------__do ------------o-------------------1 I --Do.Tincbroidces sp. (Ostonidae) -----------do-------------------------Do.rfil~W~l-----------------------------------1 ---La.T ipulid _---------._-----L og _I aTrypetid-------------------------Citrus siaensis (orange). ----Md.Xyeborus affinis (Scolytidae) -------Srjania grandiflora -----------1---------N. Y.Xyleborus grcnadensis (Scolytidae) ---do---------------1---------------Do.Diseases:Aternaria bracssica--Brassia oarca t-____ ---I La.A phlench)Sides parietinus -------hyta i (ch yoe------Pa.Do -----------------------Daucus crot: (crrot ------------La.Capnodmiun citri-------------------Citrus nobilis deiciosa tanY.gerine).Colletotrichum lagenarium ----------Chayota edulis---------------1-----------Pa.Do ------------------------Cucurbita I.ima (s-uash-1 Do.Do C-------------------------icufbita pe)o (pumipkin).Colletotrichurn nigrun ------------Capsicun annuu -------------11 Do.Colletotrichurn sp ----------------Orchid----------------------Fla.Do ----------------do --------------_--_do1 --------N. Y.Corticium sp --------------------Allium satirum (garlic1 Ala.Diplodia cdcaoicota ----------------Persea a ntrican a--a (avocado) I La.Gloeosporiun linellicolu C---------iu arantifoi (liie)-------------1 Fla.*Ghocosporju m sp Orchid ---------------------------1 La.Mycosphaerella pinodes ------------Pisu im saticum (pea) ---------1 Do.Do ---------------------------do.-------------------------------1 N. Y.Oleocellosis --------------------Crus aurantifolia (lime)---I Pa.Do -------------------_----------------------------1 La.Do -------------------------Citrus nobilis deiciosa (tanger1 N. Y.Do -------------------------Citrus sinensis (orange) ------------------I Pa.Oospora citri-auran ---------------do --------------1 Do.Phoma sp----------------------Chayota cdulis (chayote) ----------i---------Do.Phyllosticta s .p ------------------Unidentifled leaf----------------1-------N. Y.Puccinia s])------------------------Allium satirumT (garlic)--------G -Md.Russeting.------------------.----Ialus sy/rustris (apple)------1 Tex.Do----------------------Solanui tuberosurn------------1 Do.Schizophyuuan coun unne----------Hardwood log ---------------1 Va.Scierotinia schrotiorurn-----------Daucus carota (carrot)-------------1 La.Sclerotinia sp--------------------Apium graveol( ns (celery) 1 Do.Do------------------------Capsicum annum------------------------1 Md.o -------------------------Chayota edulis (chayote) ---------------1 La.Do ---------------------------------0 -----------------------I M iss.Do------------------------Cucurhita pcpo (pumpkin) -1 Pa.Do------------------------D aucus caro/a (carrot) ----3 La.Do------------------------Pisumn satii-otn (pea) ----------1 Do.Do------------------------Raph anus atirus (radish) -------I1 Pa.Do------------------------Solanum tu rosui (potato) 1 La.Sclerotim sp-.-------------------Solanu7 sp. (tuber) I Y.Septobasidium sp-------------------Citrus sinnsix (range)---1 Pa.Sphaccloma faucttii--------------Citrus aura 4ifolia (lime)-1 Tex.Do------------------------Citrus liminu (sweet lime) ----Do.1)0------------------------Citrus limonia (lemon) 3 C:aif.*Do ----------------------------do------------------------. L a.Do-------------------------.-_do.------------------1 N. Y.Do-----------------------.----(0-----------------------------1 Tex.Do----------------------Citrus nobilis deliciosa (tanger--1 N. Y.ine).Do---------------------------Citrus sinensis (orange) ------La.Sphcetomna faucettii var. viscosa------do -------------------------1 Do.Do ------------------------do---------------------------I Md.

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12 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE fluneList, by countries, of pests collected and reported from July 1, 1933, to June 30, 1934,inclusive-C nt inued[All findings marked with an asterisk indicate State inspection]Number of inter-ceptions in-CollectedCountry of orfijm and name of pest Host in-BR Am--ontiineDiseases-C31 ntinuedni~uSPhacr 'v'ni: vr(r. ccsca Citrusunns. (orange) ---------------2 Md.-p-a---om r---------itr imonia (lemon) --------1 N.Y.D o~~ ~~ -ir ss i i ---------------La-------------------------------Do---------------------------(10 -----------------------2---__2 Md.Do ----------------------------o N. Y.--------_--------------d .D------------------1isp--------------------------------------1 j d.Stysn its-------------------S-anm t-berosm ----1 La.C~ns CTl sp. hl-------------Calif.*n -;oa sp. (Violei -------------Do.*-I-Frcar so. srwbrr)-.--------Do.*Jr~v. $a/ir dkscoffr pussy wilo'-1 Minn.j. ---------Cu lowers -------------------Calif.*I --------------------o-----------------------------------r-------s---------Iris sp -----------------------D. C.I ) ]sspC-----------------1 Dalif.*A --------------1 Do.*P om Lpltl __ Ii' .) (hji.-----------1 1--------DO.*r--------------Rum WaapihCU rhUbarb)1--ash.S ---------------------------S-----------1 Ca f.*T-tnei alxetig and sphagnum~ 1 DO.*--r-1~hf ---------------------n ix eutTl-n z 2 -n pagunI D .ls ii GUIANAIn eS :-----------------i-------P a .A"dr1 -Cri s' US ~ r~ pe i) Mass.i. i./H, u.n '---1lrur cur opi 1. Pa.S--------i -------------------------------'VLYtZ ---------------------------D.C.----------------------------------Do.Insee's:~ .'' K~'----anno oe~-----------1--------------Pa.Do -ssp. (ban-na .-----------------------S.C.C i--n-n(le-ris I Pa.Coiop.fKrsit 0d ui NiuZAa mu's ('irr 1 La.lida<'Curiii--------------Rctris sp------------1-------D. C.iru ' da mes (or-----------1 La.Im re ta o d .---------C e-------------------.--------------------D .--------------a -7 --n -L a.T ----------------------1 DoT;------------------------Do.--~ ~ n --------------_ Pa.J~km Do.---~ ------------------------------~ --------------------S C> e / p ' u i ni ]:d -C'-zi/'nq ruaaris (lheather) I Do.T u p er a r 0. ..---------------------------------------------------------------PaD.IU~lip -------ii' tir~i> A CC --ri ---rn -f-Lu(lime)1----.''''4-p -UC K IYK CrUCcocci s-':rht ixora'--------P m a i u mius Citruv grundi-' -aerut---Do.I is e -z:-2:' U,,''' -c Citr im,.Ut iia.; 1-__ _---1 Do.

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1935] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 13List, by countries, of pests collected and reported from tJly 1, 1933, to Jntc 30, 1934,inclusive-Continued[All findings marked with an asterisk indicate State iilspection]NunJher of intcr-ceptio jill--Country of origin and name of pest Host > I ee (C -:ICANADAInsects:Agriotes sp. (El-tiori 1en-----------In soil :rom'v roots of forn d, lass.ivy, :al (t 11 pi amfs.Cam1poniottisp. (ant ------p b ma" a .Cuepoatu.sp.(an------------~Ioa s. ~111n~---------------------------dDilach rius sp. (a phid) P--------------pimci n i wtesruce I-----------I ch.E Ilaterid -r-----------------u----\err----------1----------Emohytinae (sawfly ----tt-i -----nII4~o ~--------------rj:ilf oaurf-------------------I!LioligJs niiduis (Byrr d ae) --------i o zj. strawberry i-----------Lygws sp. (Miridae --------------Cit 1owe'.---------------Noctuid-----------------------In soil around rots of fern,ivyv, a1-1 c !( cU 1 'o fl FD---------------------------Ij' F x iue 1--------------IhDo __ --__ Pic ,l lre sa (NorV::V A) tce) M ifier : emrganr (Trtre--e -In packi ir -1 ----P1'hylumzi p. (Agrornyz ---Iei I ; E i h ------------Do -c. l i-----------o l er-)------------------DoP .r. ((erroi: rust fiN----D ti u -;r a (carrot) i ) .Rhizog1ephus sp. (mn t ------------------------------------------------------Sciora s;. (Myvio)Ihi -dae) -----soi arotn rows of forn----------Stricus sp. (Elateride :-------------In m-ni :owin roots o',v-v-In treeTetranvchid -----------------------z._. Da-h ----------------------Diseases:Alternari a brassica(e --------------------2----t--a cap --Bacterim nargiat -------------i f;-----------------------__C--a s T-----------------u ------------Glaudes~l ;w nrtspotr n------~It----------------1L(Ijdcn ----r/l ff~~ic-------------r~, --'-rler-------1----------------' ----TOl ' :f t"f 7------------------------.Peo ----------------uL (eet 1 a.P IdsamoIoher brunce---------Jnphuo iu 'izinus ( rA h-------------1 Va.Scl-rol-n-u -rotor --Ducus crt arr------------------------------------------4----------------------------------------1 Ln,Do---------------------(10------------------[S ------------------------------o: c p:-----------------I--------jeptoria -----------ronica -r-pa_ _---Vertic i la albo-atrum S" --------------------------------------I D. C.CANAL ZONEInsects:Aspadoi us COCetit, ip( (Coccidae Cco C ner -Co-Ou 1 --(' ---131 st-asid.In --auki with EunaO skee ___.-----C.CamponolIs ---u-l-uS (an) -fus stp. (anaa-----------1c(Impantus sp. (nt do ---i.------------------------2Cc utoh ynch s 1] .(C uri lion ide -13rasi0a rapa (turp) n---------------------1 N. Y.Chik. sj. (PvraliLae ----------------Bailoo ----------------------------------CaifCocctryps sp. (Sclidae) ---------fEenia sp -------------------1. C.Crematog(L4er sp. (ant) -------------Bamboo C---------------------------------alifCurculionid ----------------------I Pis I ------------1----------Discocphalu umilis (Pentatonidae Afsa so. baHln --------------------------!).*Elaterid----------------------------.-.-------------------------1-----------------o.irankliniella sp. (thrips -----------ISobrali panmrnsis (orchd--I --------i*I~ lohssp. (------d--) Pli.!m sa ivtit (pea) -----Calif.'Ips sp. ("-colvtidae) ----------------_1 sp. ebananai ----------i --------------Do).*Liothrips sp, (thripsDr-------------racont Oflon sinensis--). C.Loruas Sp, (Tcncbrioni'dae) ----------Usa .(anna) -------------1 ------La.Lyguy sp (MiriDa-----------------do --------------------1 --. ----fAetama'us sericus (silky cane -do--------------Do.wee iIlNOc (I i------------------------------(1--------------------Pyitna rda----papa ( ya-------------------------1 La--Iu imsatiru ()ei) -------f------------Pseudano nidi articulatus rufouss Citru i i (ra pefru--------.scale).Pseudisch n os)is al-n oi s 'occidae) Orcli -------------------------1 I --a.-Psylliodcs chrysac phult (Chrysomelrassica rapa (turmip) ---------------iolae l.Pyrali ..-----------------------Baiboo ------------------------------I Calif*Do------------------------DrizcoOt;'uq n sinensis -------------------. C-.Do-----------------------Tab'bmia gq-yacan----------1Stigmatods sp. -mite-_----------Aianas satirus (pineapple) -Do.*Telephanus setulosus (Cucujidae) -Musa sp. (bnana) ------1 -L.

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14 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [JuneList, b c nines, of gets collected and reported from July 1, 1933, to June 30,1934,inciusive--Cont inue1d[All findings ma rke(d with an asterisk indicate State inspection]Number of inter-ceptions in-Country of origzin and name of pest Hot Colleciedin-CANAL ZONE-C.ntinuedDiseases:Oleocell s--------------------Citrus sinensis (orange) ------------------Tex.Oospor ciri-rant---------------------do -------------------------1 Pa.S-ccharomyceaeeae-------------angifera indica (mango)---1 -------------Do.CANARY ISLANDSInsects:Gelehid---------------------Beta rulgaris (beet) ---------------------------1 La.Tineid,.---------------------------------do -------------1 Do.Tyroglyphid (mite)--------------Peat used as packing for pota1 P. R. toes.Piseases:A/ternaria brassicae---------------B rassica rapa (turnip) ---------1 Pa.Capnodiu ciri------------------Citrus sine nais orane) -.-1 Tex.A11crosporim tomato ------------Lycopersicurn exulentu n -------1 Pa.Oopora actis pasiica---------------do--------------------------------2 Do.Sclerotinia s.--. d-----------------do----.---------------------------1 Fla.*Scrotium SI ---------------------Phaseolus sp. (stringbean) -----------------1 Pa.CAPE OF (rOOD HOPEInsects:Franklinilla sp. (thrips) -----------Flower seed.-------------------1 -------------Calif.*Prociphilus sp. (aphi j ------------Ha worthia sp--------------1 D. C.Psvllid ----------------------------d--_-------------1----------Do.Trionymus sp. (Coccida.---------Apicra deltoidta -----------1-Do.CENTRAL AMERICAI nsects:Chrysomphalis perseat (Coccidae)-l Musa sp. (banana) ----1 Hawaii.*Co'cyra cephaonica (Pyralidael----Theobroma cacao (cacao --------1 -CalifCoscIneuta sp. (Acrididae ---------Mua sp. (banana) ------------Do.*Elateri-----------------------Guaiacum officinale (lignum1 -------Do.*vitae).Lai sp. (earwig) .do---------------------1 Do.*Mor lid------------------------do---------------------1 -----Do.*Tenerionid ------------------do----------------------1---Do.*Xyl/eorus sp. (Scolytidae)------------do---------------------1 Do.*CEYLONInsects:Coniopteryz sp. (Coniopterygidae) Citrus limonia (lemon)------1 Pa.G'lleriinae (Pyralidae)------------Po7netia eximia------------------1 D. C.Diseases:C oliefrfrichumn sp --.---------------Va nda caerulea (orchid).-----1 __ .-.-.-----D o.G/oeoporiuum sp----------------------do-----------------------1 -----------Do.Phylosticta sp.?-------------------iAmherstia nobilis.------------1 ------------Do.CHILEInsects:A.pidiotus sp. (Cocciae)----------Ma/s syrstris (apple)---1 ----------N. Y.B/apstinas punctu/atus (TenebrioCucuiis me/o (mein -----2-------------.Do.nidae,..------------------------On packing around melons---IDo.(ryptohypnus sp. (Elhterilae ------itis sp. (grape -------1 Do.urulini----------------olanum tubrosum--------------1 S. C.E,1resta sp. dOralid:ae--.-.-------1 1------------s( 1 -La.Gr--ophorusp. laer -1 n fr m-1------------. Y.Iphy sp. Tenebr--------------I----------Do.Lpoo chi iis a 'itis p. (gra pe) -------------------Do.lethreutil-----------------runu dostica (pu 1 Do.---is-sp. (rap-).-1 ----------Do.Si:
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49351 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 15List, by countries, of pests collected and reported from July 1, 1933, to June 30,1934,inclusive-Continued[AU findings marked with an asterisk indicate State inspection]Number of inter-ceptions in-CCountry of origin and name of pest Host Collected~ in-CHINAInsects:L Aegeriid------------------------Medicinal wood -----------------1 ---------Calif.*Agromyzid ------.---------------.Meconopsis sp-----------------1 ----------Hawaii.*Anisolabis marginalis (earwig)------langifera indica (mango)----1 -----------Do.*Anisolabis sp. (earwig) -------------Aglaonema sp----------------1 ------------D. C.Anobiid-----------------------On bark of dry wood---------------------Hawaii.*Anobiini (Anobiidae) -------------In rice straw packing for pic1 -------------La.tures.Aspidiotus sp. (Coccidae) ----------Casta nea tnollissima_-------------1 ---------D. C.Do-----------------------Castanea sp----------------------I ---------Do.Blapstinus sp. (Tenebrionidae) -----Oryza sativa (rice).--------------1 ----------Pa.Bostrichid--------------------Ginkgo biloba (maidenhair-tree) 1 ------------Calif.*Do ------------------------Herb--------------------------------------Do.*Bostrichini (Bostrichidae) --------Bamboo---------------------1 ------------N. Y.Bruchus sp. (Bruchidae)----------Albizziajalibrissin (silktree) ----------. ---Calif.*Buprestid---------------------Medicinal wood-----------------1 ----------Do.*Cecidomyiid ----------------------Meconopsis sp-------------------1 ---------Hawaii.*Chilo.simplex (Asiatic rice borer). Oryza sativa (rice)---------------1 ----------Pa.Do.-----------------------Rice straw used as packing---1 ------------Ill.Do.-----------.----------------do----------------------3 ------------La.Do----------------------------do------------------------------------Md.Do----------------------------do----------------------------1--------Pa.Chilo sp. (Pyralidae).-------------On case of bean cake-------_-1 ------------Calif.*Chionaspis sp. (Coccidae)---------Citrus grandis (pomelo)-------------2 ------Wash.Chrysomelini (Chrysomelidae)----Brassica juncea (leaf-mustard)------------1 Do.'Chrysomphalus sp. (Coccidae) -----Citrus grandis (pomelo)------------------1 La.Creontiades sp. (Miridae)---------Zingiber oficinale (ginger)------1----------------N. Y.,Curculio sp. (Curculionidae)-------Castanea sp. (chestnut)-------1 ------------D. C.Curculionid------------------.-----Ateconopsis sp------------------1 ---------Hawaii.*Cylas forinicarius (sweetpotatoIpomoea batatas (sweetpotato) -------2 1 Calif.*weevil). Do----------------------------.do. -.----------------------------------1 Va.Dinoderus minutus (Bostrichidae)-Bamboo-------------------1 ------------La.Do--------------------------do---------------------1 ------------N. Y.Fiorinia sp. (Coccidae)-----------Litchi chinensis (lychee)------3 ------------Oreg.Do---------------------------do----------------------1 ------------Pa.Porficula sp. (earwig)------------Eleocharis tuberosa (waternut) 1 ------------Calif.*Gryllodes sp. (Gryllidae)----------Pueraria thunbergiana (kudzu) 1 ------------MassJHarmolita phyllostachitis (EurytoBamboo cane ---------------1 ------------N. Y.midae).Homoeogryllusjaponicus (Gryllidae). Baggage.---------------------------1 ------CalifLophocateres pusillus (Siamese grain Gossypium sp. (seed cotton)1 ------------Oregbeetle).Do.--------.------------------Oryza sativa (rice) -------------1 --------------N. YLyonetiid-------------------------Medicinal wood-----------------1 ----------Calif.*Maruca testulalis (bean pod borer). Phaseolus sp. (string bean) ----------------1 Wash.Aferodon sp. (Syrphidae)--------Narcissus tazetta orientalis -1------Do.(Chinese sacred lily). Afinthea rugicollis (Lyctidae)------Herb ------------------------------------Calif.*Nikkoaspis sp. (Coccidae)----------Bamboo --------------------1 --------------Do.* Oecanthus sp. (Gryllidae)----------Aglaonema sp--------------1 ----------------D. C.Oxycarenus hyalinipennis (LygaeGossypium sp. (seed cotton)-1 -----------------Oreg.idae).Oxycarenus sp. (Lygaeidae)-----------do ---------------------1 Do.cPartatoria ziziphus (Coccidae)-----Citrus grandis (pomelo) --------1 ------------20 Calif.*o----------------------Ido-----------------------------------Md.Do.------------------------do ----------------------------------Wash.Pectinophora gossypiella (pink bollGossypium sp. (seed cotton) 1--------------Oreg.worm).Pheidole sp. (ant) -----------Fiber packing-----------------------1 --------Calif.*Prolabia arachidis (earwig)--------Eleocharis taberosa (waternut). 1 -----------------ass.Prolabia sp. (earwig)-------------Colocasia esculenta (taro) ------1 ----------------Calif.*Psammoecus sp. (Cucujidae)------Aglaonenia sp----------------2 -D. C.Pseudaonidia duplex (camphor scale) Citrus grandis (pomelo) --------1 -2 Calif.*Pseudococcus comstocki (Coccidae) Aglaonema costatum -----------1 --I. C.Pseudococcus sp. (Coccidae)--------Allaonea s ----Wash.Phizoglyphus sp. (mite)----------llan cpa (onion) -----------------2 Pa.Do.------------------------Colfwasia escolena (taro)--1Calif.*Do -----------------------Eleocharis tuberosa (waternut)5 Mass.Do --------------------------do.---_---------------3 N. Y.Do -----------------------Pueraria thunbergiana (kudzu)3 ----.-----Mass.Do.-------------------------Zingiber officinale (ginger)---1---.----.D .

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16 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [JuneList, by countries, of pests collected and reported from July 1, 1988, to June 30, 1934,inl7 usive-Contin ued[All findings markd with an asterisk indicate State inspection]Number of inter-ceptions in-Country of origin and name of pest hbost Collectedin-CHINA-ContinuedInsects-Continued.Rhizoglyphus sp. (mite).----------ZingTher oQficinatc (ginger) .----1-------------N. Y.Do -.-------------------------tdo----------------------1 ---------Wash.Sciara sp. (Mycetophilidae).--------olaonfma sp.---------------2 -------------.Mich.Do.------------------------Colocasia esculenta (ta ro)------------------Mass.Do ---------------------------.do ------------------------------------Wash.Trh ithrips sp. (thrips) -----------li in satica m (garlic -------------1 -------Do.Tinui sp. (Tineiae--------------_do ----------------------------1 -------Do.Tyroglyphid unite)---------------E ochris tuberosa waternut) 1I --------------Calhf.*Urophorua ha m S rts (kNitidulid ae)-_ -----------------------------------. Do.*Do.------------------------Legume--------------------1_ --_----Do.*Diseases:Acrotucittin bicWor---------------Bamboo--------------------1 N. Y.Alternaria bra .ac.--.------------Brassira oleracea capi.a0a (cab--1 Pa.bage.--iAngucillulina intermedia -----------Zingibtr of inale (ginger)----1 ---ass.Do---------------------------------------1------------------1 N. Y.Aphelenchoides paritinus.---------Eltcharis tuberosa (waternut) 1 -Do.Do ---------------------------Pfrarialhinu rrgiaina kudzu)y I Mas.Do ------------------------Zingibr icina iiger) --3 -------------Do.Do---------------------------------------------------------------N. Y.Aphetenchoides tenaicmudatas-------.-.--.-----------------------1 -----Mass.Do_---------------------------o -. -_ --------------1 ---------N. Y.Bacteria in citri------------------Citru a aurantifolia --------1Calif.*Do -----------------.--------Citrus raridis (pomelo) ------1 --------------Do.*Cephaleuros sp--------------------Litchi chineasis (lychee)------1 ------------Ore".Ceraitootiella adiposam.----------Elrochcri3 tubtroa Ovaternut)15 ---------------Mass.Do----------------------------(10-------------------------------------Mich.Do.--------------.---.--------. -._------------------------53 N. Y.Do-------------------------------.----------------1---------------Pa.Do -_.------------------------Zinitkrr officinale kingcr)------1-N. Y.Ceratoutomina >p--------------------------------------------2 ----------Do.Coll!tri sam 1)-------------------A cr a Sp----------------------3--------Wash.)o------------------------Cc :r-it , P po (pumpkin)--. --------------1 Do.Coniothyri rn -s-.------.-.----.-A oi --sp--------------------1 ------Do.Di pod-z sp.--.--------.------.---. Cloc'vxia ucuulenta (taro) ---1-----------.-----Mass.Epicc qIn sp. .-------------------Agla--l ma sp -----------------3 ------Wash.G lo o s p ori t i s )----------------d o-----------------3 -----D o .irti rosporium sp-----------------. -----do --------------------------1------Do.Internal blackening--------------Solanu in tubcrosuiI------------.----------1 Mass.if/aacrniumn swcchari.--------------. -acnaru, oficinarurm-----------1----Wash.ycosph la scho oprisi ---------Alium por ti n leek)---------------1 Pa.Myxomycetes-------------------Aglo .mna so ---------------1-------------Mich.Do.---------------.-Egume------------.-. . .. .N. Y.Phoma citricarpa C-----------------itrus nobilis --------_ 1------Wash..o. ..----------------------. Citrus siznnsis (orange)-------1 .----1 Calif.*Do-.----------------------------(----------------------1 -I.---_ Pa.Do ----------------------------------.---.-------------1 ------Wash. Phytophthnrc s ------------------LElmocharis tx berosa (waternut). 1 ------------N. Y.P-ysarucompressun.-----------lanneyna costatum ----------I ---------D. C.Rhiy-truiq s------------------I charis itube rosa--------------------------Mass.Sac1hairomyetaceae -----------------.--------------------1 -----.---.----.---N. Y.D .------------------------------/Oi2 (t Weetpota o) .-----------1 Va.Do -----------------------olnamI tuei ro-d In------------. ------1 Do.Sciieruinia sP -------------------tolocad a t olta (taro)-------1 -----------------N. Y.Do E.-------------------------iochris ubroa-----------2 ----------------Mass.o -------------------------------do --------------------3 -----------------N. Y.Do --------------------------egume ------------------1 ---------------Do.Do ------------------------Lit chine s yche------1---------------Oreg.Do .--------------Zigi.r ofcinaU (gingeri .-----1 ----------Mass.Do ----------------------------.do-----------------1 -------------N. Y.Scleroiun sp -s-------------------Cocsia ecuilenta (laro)-----3 ---Do.Do-----------------------EloristuiIerosa------------1 --------------Do.Do------------------inibr otficinale (ginger)-.2 -----------------Do.Sphacloma fucttii----------------Cru sinens (orange) ------1 Calif.*Spharon sp.----------------Ia -culnta----------1 Mass.Stachybry --iniber of!Cina tinger)-.----1---N. Y.tilum i narna mr---------------ric thunbrgana (kudzu. I Do.o-------r.----------------r W---------ash.TharSps pra a--------------E-ichas t1 ,oa waternut) -6 Mass.o. .------------------------do .-------------------40 N. Y.

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SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 17List, by countri v, of pcsts collected and reportd fron J 0y 1, 1 f, to Jo n, 931, 14,inclusivc-( nItiincdI All nii-ding marked with an asterisk indicated State iwpectio]iNim7i e r of inter-Iet i1' III-Cotintry of origini and nione of i)(st t.10 4CollcteCI I INA-Cont IitiiI edDi)iseascs {Continuod]Si' u/aria pyrina ---------gyrus communism (pear) -W ash.1erticilliu m sp Elocharis tuberosa ----ass.---do -2N Y.I ilml/ isp -M a 'so --Ziniber officinale (ginger) 4 N Y.Insects:Campoilot I, sp. (ant) Cat/teya l arsceuit zii 8andc----,raina (orchid).Do -Cuttiya Sp_ -Do.Cecij m Iiid ----------! a w arscewiczii sandtI Do.ri naChrysoim phaols sp. (Coccidae) ---Cat/th ya doaciana aurca ---1 Do.s .(ait) -Cumleya sp. (orchi -J)o.Iinloi-rs minntas (LosTrichidie)9 mb!flthoo .----)o.Ellrytomr Sp. (Eurytomlidale) -----ya Sp I D-------o.Noctuid_ -(O'ptw in sp. (cotton) CAlif.*Do _------------A/usa sp. (tO fna) -S.Ph i idolc sp. (nut ) -( ahya zaurscutticci sndeI -.C.Ps dainidia ar/icutatus (r t:ns Citrls hima (sweet hjit.) .i/us fsout/a.(s( eatt i1). C.Do Fern pal ig for plans -I -o.Iii cafflo with orchid plIs Do.sy.?inIs sp. jl\riiIc -Caf a sp -o.IpOrIum Sp C----lliva d aiina aUi rea J 0.I )o------------------------------i~l----------------------D).>/il I/a flarida -(ofeta sp----------------N. V.LrI do sp!'Ind miifri In sp. (orcl I iIDe~~~i Odno/o Smp tor(,h Do.)Do -ncidfim sp. (orchid ) -('O'TAk RICAcn: ia/liia sp .(Fulgori lie) Coffra sp ----------------.C am a punf tus a njlIats (:Il I Ba1inina debris -------------. C.Ca 1fponlmts sp. (anit) --do I -M'-ss.Do_ .------------------------D1o 1sa sp). (h~lian ----n---Calif.*CecidIon viL1 ---(uilaila u1i/s -MIi'\ h.(IDo --rhid -aCephaloli 'a pa uncticollis hrysomelisa sp. (nan Calif.*die).Cephalo/ei sp. (CryomeIdae do2 2 Do.*Chriso mpals di iyusperimi vmr. Gilielma uitilis --J Mich.(Loccide) .Cocelos sp. (Coccidae) )rabliil F-Cre'taoi/oast(r sp. (ant) -a_ sp. Wh ana ) 3 I S .Dialt urodci citri (cirns whitelL .Onciait in carfhagic nse (orI I'.ch itDiaspiv sp. )( iI-e) ----( iti ta a/ilis -ill.Dinwoiris fripltras (Pentitotmidae( Musa sp. (banin C-lif(CiIcocephala hi t atumilis ( Pen tat Itt/i----do 13 Do.*Dolichodtris ispinostis (at) -nana debris -t C.DM lusa sp. (h rtam I)Dolendich rlnl sp. omri t Banana dehris M.Geotrup sp. (Scarab cwidae) -----do --.Ilomaodis:'t sp. W('icadellidae) ('offr a SI) -_ N. Y.-7n em ia sp. ( Anwhoinviidhe) 11anana do ris_ ly 11 ,.L1 ptobyrsa p)/ /a ' i uzTi it id ae ( 'a U 1, ya doi l iii it a it rat L m d l .C .1 )Lritcopt ra cofl( i/la (cotee leaif ('o W f a s ------N. Y.miner).116442--35-3

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18 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [JuneList, by countries, of pests collected and reported from July 1, 1933, to June 30, 1984,inclusive-Continued[All findings marked with an asterisk indicate State inspection]Number of inter-ceptions in-Country of origin and name of pest Host Collectedto&. UCOSTA RICA-ContinuedInsects-Continued.Metarnasiusscriceus (silky cane weeBanana debris --------------2 .S. C.vil).Do---------------------------X lusa sp. (banana) -----------6 ----------------Calif.*Do-----------------------------do---------------------3 ------------N. Y.Metriona propinqua (ChrysomeliMusa sp. (banana)-----------1 ----------------Calif.*dae).Neoponera sp. (ant)------------------do----------------------1----------Do.*Odontornachus sp. (ant)-----------Orchid---------------------I--------------D. C.Pheidole a nastasii (ant).------------Trichopilia suavis (orchid) ---------1 -------Do.Pheidole sp. (ant)----------------In packing around orchids-------1 -Do.Pityophthorus sp. (Scolytidae)------Musa sp. (banana) ----------D --Calif.*Platamus debiiis (Cucujidae)-------Banana debris--------------1 -----------S. C.Ponera sp. (ant)------------------Orchid---------------------1----------D. C.Do----------------------------do--------------------------1----------La.Prenolepis sp. (ant)-------------------do----------------------I -------------D. C.Priapisnius sp. (Ventatomidae)----Banana debris--------------1 ---------------Mass.Pseudaonidia articulatus (rufous Citrus sinensis (orange)------------------1 Calif.*scale).Do----------------------------Cocos nucifera (coconut)------Do. *Pseudococcusu irgatas (Coccidae) (Coftea sp ------------------1---------------N. Y.Pseudococcus sp. (Coccidae)--------Orchid--------------------1 -------------D. C.Psychid -V--------------------------lusa sp. (banana)-----------1 La.Selenis sparsa (Noctuidae-------------do-----------------------1----------Calif.*Solenopsis sp. (ant)-.--------------Orchid--_------------------1 -----------1). C.Syntomid.------------------------Banana debris---------------1-------------S. C.Sysinas floridulus (Miridae)--------In packing around orchids1---------D. C.Telephanus setulosus (Cucujidae)--Orchid leaf---------------------1 ---------La.Tineid-----------------------------In packing around orchids------1 -----------D. C.Tytthomimus rofotcstaceus (CurcuBanana debris--------------2 -------------S. C.lionidae). Diseases:Capnodium citri--.----------------Citrus aura ntifoha (lime)--------------1 Do.Capnodium sp-------------------Orchid -_-----------------------D. C.Cephaleuros virescens----------------(10---------------------I-----------Fla.*Collefotrichuin sp--------------------do--.-------------------------------La.Jiplodia cacaoicola-----------------Theobroma cacao (cacao)--------------1 ------Mass.Gloeosporiumsp-----------------I Orchid (several genera) -------2 4 ----------D. C.Oil burning--------------------Cilrus aurantifolia (lime)-------------------1 S. C.Podonectria coccicola-------------Lepidosaphes beckii on orange--------------1 Fla.*Sterigmatoc stissp-----------------DioSpyrossp. (persimmon)-----I--------Mich.Tubercular iaceae----------------Manihot esculenta (cassava)-------1 ------D. C.Uredo epidendri------------------Epidendrum endressi (orchid)---1 -------.--Do.Uredo nigropunctata--------------Stanhopea oculata (orchid) -------1 -----Do.Insects-Aca nthoscelid-s sp. (Bruchidae) ----Lysilona latisiliqua----------------I -----D. C.Agromyzid---------------------Brassica sp. (mustard greens -N. Y.-------.------------------Phaseolus lunatus macrocarpus 1 -Do.(lima bean).Aliirodiciicardini(whiiefl)-----Psidin guajora (-uava) ---Fla.*.A-Iuroitrixushow rdi(wooliv whiteRosa sp-----------------------------------Do.*Alhcorhpuussp. (Curculionid-eZamia kick'ii-------.---------1 D. C.A nishuim i -srwig) --------c;persicum esculinhum-----I ------La.A spuidlu~ts csCocci(a A nnona Cheriml( (hcrinmoya)---------------I N. .Aspidmtu. d, Hracbor (('occidae) I-oa Sp------------------------Fla.*Asp~tIdIGi 'P. I( ci > -Syngonium auritumt ---------1). C.A t/rtrol Inm pus!tlans (Coc(ardenia florida (Cape-jas--1-Fla.*ei*Iw .in e).Ath'ri-na p.(Anthonyiidae) ------Li coj r, icnrn atih n -------1 ----------------La.AulacPpiJj major ('occidae) --------Si clneis----------------I --D. C.Laris p. Cureulinidae) ---------raica chm rs (pakchoi ---I Pa.(ablbage).Bephrata ciitcnsis (Eurytonidae) --A nnona cheriinola (cherinmoya) ---Tex.Do ---.--------" --------nnon muricata (soursop)-1 ----La.Brordcs sp. ( ucujilue}Banaa dbris ----------.----------2 Pa.-----------Musa si. (banana) ----------Do.Camponotus sp. Tan ---------------do-----------------------1 -Do.

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1935] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 19List, by countries, of pests collected and reported from July 1, 1933, to June 30, 19$4,inclusive--Continued[All findings marked with an asterisk indicate State inspection]Number of inter-ceptions in-Country of origin and name of pest Host Collectedz 0CUBA-ContinuedInsects-Continued.Cecidomyiid -------.-----.-Ananas sahwus (pineapple) --6 ------------La.Do-------------------------do---------------------1 -------------Mich.Ceratocombus sp. (CryptostemmatiBanana debris --------------------------Pa.dae).Ceutorhynchus sp. (Curculionidae). Brassica sp-----------------------------1 Do.Chrysauginae (Pyralidae) ---------Incased on inside of burlap bag ---------1 N. Y.containing calabash.Coccus viridis (Coccidae) ----------Citrus aurantifolia (lime)-----------------I Mass.Do---.------------------------Citrus sinensis (orange)----------1 ---------D. C.Do.------------------------Gardenia florida (Cape-jas------6 3 ---Fla.*mine).Do------------------------Lawsonia alba--.--------------------------Do.*Do--------------------------Psidium guqjava (guava)----------------I ___ Do,*Corcyra cephalonica (Pyralidae) ----Hibiscus esculentus (okra)-----1 ------------La.Crematogaster sp. (ant) -----------Ananas satirus (pineapple)-.-1 ------------Do,Crocidosema plebeiana (OletbreutiHibiscus esculentas (okra) ----2 ------------Do,dae).Crocidosema sp. (Olethreutidae).------do ---------------------3 ------------Do. Do -------------------------------do---------------------I -----------N. Y,Cryptotermes sp. (termite)--------Ananas satirus (pineapple).2 -------------La.Cucujid.--------------------------Banana debris. ---------------1--.----------Pa.Cyclocephala cubana (Scarabaeidae). On floor of car of pineapples___ 1 -----------N. Y,Cycloptilum anti/larym (Gryllidae) A nanas saticus---------------I ------------La. Cylasforrmicarius (sweetpotato weelpomoea batatas (sweetpotato) -------------1 Fla.*vil).Do ---------------------------.(10. ----------------------------------2 N. Y.Do-----------------------------do-------------------------------2 Pa.Do ---------------------------do---------------------------------I Tex.Do----.---------------------------do_------------------------------------2 Va.Diaphania sp. (Pyralidae) ---------Cucumis satirus (cucumber)1 ------------N. Y,Diatraca , saccharalis (sugarcane Saccharum officinarum (sugar1---------Flaborer). cane).Diatraea sp. (Pyralidae)-------------do --------------2-----------2--------La.Dinoderus minutus (Bostrichidae)-Ananas sativus (pineapple)---3 ----Do,Epuraea sp. (Nitidulidae).------------do ----------------------1 ----------------Do.EucatymnatuQtessellatus (Coccidae) Gardenia florida (Cape-------1 Fla*jasmine).Eucalymnatus sp. (Coccidae)-.-.-Annona cherimola (cherimoya) -------1 ------D.Eupodid (mite) -----------------Banana debris--------------I --------------Pa.Frankliniella cubensis (thrips).Rosa sp------------------------1-------Fla.*Frankliniela insularis (thrips)-----Gardenia florida-------------------------Do,*Gynaikothrips uzeli (thrips) --------Ficus indica --------------. ---I -----N. Y,iellula sp. (Pyralidae) -----------Brassica sp. (mustard) ---------1 -Do,iypothenemus sp. (Scoly.idae)----Musa sp. (banana) ------------------Pa.1ecrya purchasi (cottony-cushion Rosa sp----------------------------1 Fla.*scale).Kalotermes sp. (termite).----------Ananas satirug ----------------I--------------La.Labia curvicauda (earwig) ---------Banana debris-------1----------------Pa.Laspeyresia sp. (Olethreutidae)-__-_ Phascolus lunalus macrocarpus I N. Y,(lima bean).Maruca testula/is (bean pod borer)------do ------------.----------56--------------Do,Metamasius sericcus (silky cane -----do--------------------------------------Do,weevil).Alonanus concinnulus (Cucujidae). Ananas satirus---------------1 ----------------La.Do---_ --------------------Banana debris--------------7 -------------Pa.Do------------------------Musa sp. (banana)--.0-----3------Md.Do--------------------------do-----------------------I-------------Pa.Monanus sn. (Cucujidae) ---------Banana debris,------------------Do,Monocrepidius bifoveatus (ElateriA nanas saticus --------------I ---------------La. dae).Monocrepidius Fp. (Elateridae)---Capsicum annuum-----------I --------------N. Y,Monomorium minutum var. (ant) Musa sp. (banana)---------------------Pa.Nasutiterines ripperti (termite)----Coccoloba urifera (seagrape) -----------------1 Ala,Neoconocephalus affinis (TctiigoniAusa sp. (banana)-----------I -----------------Md, idae).Noctuid ----------------------Ananas satius--------------I ---------------La.Do-----------------------( -----------------------1 ----------------N. Y,Do------------------------rassica chinensis (pakehoi ---------------I Pa.cabbage).Do-----------------------Solanum inelongena (eggplant) 1 ----------------La.

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20 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [JuneList, by countries, of pests collected and reported from July 1, 1933, to June 30, 1934,inclusive-Continued[All findings marked with an asterisk indicate State inspection]Number of inter-ceptions in-W CollectedCountry of origin and name of pest Host in-CUBA-ContinuedInsects-Continued.Olethreutid.--------.--------------Phaseolus lunatus macrocarpus1 -----------N. Y.OGiarus sp. (Fulgoridae)-----------Ananas satirus-.------------I ------------La.Orthezia insignis (Coccidae)--------Pelargonium graveolens (rose -------1 ------Fla.*geranium).Phlyctaenia sp. (Pyralidae)--------Lycopersicum esculentum-----1 ------------La.Pbycitinae (Pyralidae)-----------Ananas sativus-------------6-----------Do.Do-.-.--.-------------------------do---------------------2 -------------N. Y.Do ---------------------------Banana debris-------------1 -----------Pa.Phyllotreta sp. (Chrysomelidae)---Ananas satirus--------------1 ------------La.Platynota sp. (Tortricidae)--------Capsicum annuum-----------1 ------------Do.Prodenia sp. (Noctuidae)----------Banana debris---------------1-------------Pa.1o ------.--------------------Lycopersicum esculentum-----2 -------------La.Protoputcinaria pyriformis (CocGardenia florida (Cape-jas3 ------------Fla.*cidae). mine). Do -.------------------------Jasminum sp. (jasmine).------------1-------Do.*Psas americana (earwig)----------Palm------------------------------------D. C.Psrudaonidia articulatus (rufous Citrus aurantifolia (lime)------------1 ------Fla.*sea'e)..D -----------------------Citrus grandis (grapefruit)----------1 ------Do.*D,-----.--------------------Citrus nobilis (King orange)--I -------------La.Do.---------------------------Gardenia florida (Cape-Jas-------------Fla.*mine).Do----------------------RoQa sp-.-------------------------1------Do.*Do.-------------------------Tamarindus indica (tamarind) ------1------La.Pseudischnaspis alicnus (Coccidae)A gave sisalana (sisal)--------------1 -----Fla.*Pscudococcu3 cirgatus (Coccidae).--hibiscus esculentus (okra)----2 ------------La.Pseudococcus sp. (Coccidae)-------A nanas satirus---------------2 -------------Do.o--------------------------Banana debris---------------1------------Pa.Do--------------------------Lycopersicum esculentum-----1 ------------La.Do-------------------------Alusa sp. (banana)-----------1 ------------Pa.Psychid-----------------------Hibiscus esculentus------------1 -------------La.Pyralinae (Pyralidae)--------------Mu.sa sp. (banana) -------------------------Pa.Pyraustinae (Pyralidae)----------A nanas satirus--------------1 ------------La.Do---------------------------Lycopersicum esculentum--.---1 ------------N. Y.Pyroderces sp. (Cosmopterygidae)-Ananas sativus-------------20 ------------La. Rhizoglyphus sp. (mite)------------Musa sp. (banana)-----------1 -------------Mass.Rhopalosiphumn sp. (aphid)--------Raphanus sativu3 (radish)-----------------1 Pa.Rhyncolue sp. (Curculionidae).-----Hevea sp.---------------------I ---------D. C.S:iara sp. (Mycetophilidae)-------Banana debris --------------1 --------------Pa.Silvnus sp. (Cucujidap)---------Ananas satirus--------------1 --------------La.Sitophlus sp. (Curculionidae)-----Tamarindus indica (tamarind)----1 -----------Fla.*Stephanoderes sp. (Scolytidae).-----Banana debris---------------1 ------------Pa.Do -------.-----------------Ficus sp--------------------1 .--------------La.Do---------------------------Poinciana regia (royal poin-------1-------Do.ciana).Tapinoma sp. (ant)--------------Musa sp. (banana)----.---1------------Fla.*Targionia bromeliae (Coccidae)-----Ananas satirus--------------1 ------------Mich.Do-----------------------------do---------------------1 -----------N. Y.Targionia hartii (Coceidae)--------Dioscorea sp. (yam).----.-------------1 -------Fla.*Telephanus minutus (Cucujidae)---Banana debris--------------I ------------Pa.Telephanus sp. (Cucujidae)----------do --------------------5 -------------Do.Do---------------------------Musa sp. (banana)-----------1 ------------Do.Tenebrionid--.----------------------do---------------------1 ------------Md.Tinea sp. (Tineidae)--------.----.Banana debris--------------2 ------------Pa.Do-----------------------Musa sp. (banana).---------2 ------------Md.Do----------------------Poinciana reqia---------------------1 ------La.Tineid----------------------Banana debris--------------6----------Pa.Tipulid---------------.------------do----------------------1 ------------Do.Tortricid.----------.------------Ananas sativus--------------4 ---------------La.Do------------------------Lycopersicum esculentum-----1 ------------N. Y.Do ----------.--------------Fiscus indica used as packing -1 ----------Do.for cut flowers.Toxotrypana curvicauda (papaya Carica papaya (papaya)-----------1 ------La.fruit fly).Trichothrips sp. (thrips)----------Banana debris---------------1 ------------Pa.Uleiota sp. (Cucujidae).---------------.do.----.----------------------------------Do.Wasmannia auropunctata (ant)----Ananassativus.-------------I------------La.Do-----------------------Banana debris.--.-----------2 -----------Pa.Zygothrips sp. (thrips)-------------Ananas sativus----------------------------1 Do.

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19351 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 21List, by countries, of pests collected and reported from July 1, 1933, to June 30, 1934,inclusive-Continued[All findings marked with an asterisk indicate State inspection]Number of inter-ceptions ill-Country of origin and name of pest Host Collectedin-CUBA-ContinuedD iseases:Albugo candida.----------------Brassica pekinensis (Chinese 2 ---------------N. Y.cabbage).Do------------------------Brassica sp. (mustard) -------1 --------------Do.Alternaria brassicae--------------Brassica chinensis (pakchoi 1 -----------------Do.cabbage).Do----------------------------(o ----------------------------------1 Pa.Alternaria solani----------------Lycopersicum esculentum-----------------1 N. Y.Bacterium maculicolum-----------Brassica sp----------------------------1 Pa.Bacterium phaseoli_---------------Phaseolus lunatus macrocarpus 7 -------------N. Y.(lima bean).Bacterium vesicatorium -----------Lycopersicum esculentum-----2 ------------La.Capnodium citri--------------------Citrus sinensis (orange)-------2 -------------Do.Do---------------------------(o---------------------------1 ---Pa.Capnodium sp------------------Saccharum officinarium----------------1 ---La.Do---------------------------(1----------------------------------2 ---Va.Cephaleuros tirescens-------------Citrus grandis (grepefruit)----------------1 La. Cephaleuros sp----------.---------Codiaeum sp. (croton)----------------1 ------N. Y.Cephalosporium lecanii------------. Eucalymnatus tessellatus on -------------Fla.*cherinoya.Cercospora beticola.---------------Beta cicla (Swiss chard)-----------------1 N. Y.Cercospora rosaecola-------------Rosa sp--------------------------------I Do.Cercospora sp----------------------Capsicum annuum.-----------1 --------------La.Do. -------------------------Rosa sp----------------------------1 ------N. Y.Cladosporium fulvum------------Lycopersicum escutentum-----1 ------------La.Colletotrichum agaves --------------Agave SI)---------------------1 -------------Pa.Colletotrichum falcatum -----------Saccharum officinarum----------1----------Fla.*Diplocarpon rosae------------------Rosa sp----------------------------1 -La.Diplodia natatensis--.-------------Palm------------------------1 ---------Fla.*Dothidiaceae.-.----_----------------Unknown leaf -----------------------------Pa.Elsinoe phaseoli -------------------Phaseolus lunatus macrocarpus 21 ------------N. Y.(lima bean).Gloeosporium limetticolum--.-------Citrus aurantifolia (lime).------------1 ------Fla.*Gloeosporium sp-----------------Euphorbia sp------------------1 -----------D. C.Do----------------------Ficus carica (fig) -----------------1 ---------Fla.*Do-------------------------Liistona rotundifolia (Java fan ---I ---------D. C.palni).Heiminthosporium sp--------------Oryza sativa (rice)---------------1 ---------Fla.*Macrosporium tomato--------------Lycopersicum esculentum-----1 ------------La.Do--------------------------------o----------------------------------1 N. Y.Melanconium sacchari------------Saccharum officinarum--------------2 ---La.Do----------------------------do-----------------------I ---Pa.Do---------------------------o-------------------------------3 ---Va.Meliola sp---------------------Holcus sorghum (sorghum).-------I ---------Fla.*Microcera sI)----------------------Lepidosaphes beckii on grape1 ------------La.fruit.Myriangium duriaei--------------Citrus sinensis (orange).-------1 -------------Do.Oidium sp-----.------------------Rosa sp---------------------------I ------Do.Oil burning--------------------Citrus aurantifolia (lime)--------------1 ---Pa.Oleocellosis-------------------------------do -----------------------------1 Do,Oospora lactis parasitica-----------Capsicum annuum-----------1 ------------La.Phoma destructiva.-.--------------Lycopersicum esculentum-----4 ------------Do.Phoma sp---------------------Vinca rosea (Madagascar peri----------Pa.winkle).Phomopsis arecae---.--------------Palm .---------------------------2 ---------D. C.Phonopsis vexans------------------Solanum melongena (eggplant) 1 -------------La.Phomnopsis sp-------------------Livistona rotundifolia (Java fan ---3 ----------L. C.palm).Phytophthora s)--------------------Cucurbita sp. (snake gourd)---1 --------N. Y.Puccinia purpurea.----------------Holcus sorghum sudanensis 1 --------------La.(Sudan grass).Scleritinia s--------------------Ipomoea batatas (sweetpotato) ----------------I Tex.Scierotium sp-------------------Lycopersicum esculentum----------------1 Pa.Sphaceloma fawcettii ------------Citrus aurantifolia (lime) ---------------------1 Ga.Sphaeropsis sp------------------Palm------------------------------------1 Pa.Sphaerostilbe coccophila-----------Citrus sinensis (orange)-----------------La.Stilbella flavida------------------Gardenia sp ------------------------1 ------N. Y.Thielaviopsis paradoxa------------Ananas sativus----------------------1 Pa.Do.-----------------------------10---------------------1 -----------La.Do-------------------------Saccharum officinarum ------------------Md.Do--------------------------do--------------------------------Pa.Do --------------------------do----------------------------.1 Va.

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22 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [JuneList, by copntries, of pists collected and reported from July 1, 1933, to June 30, 1934,icl osive--ContinnedIAll findin gs ma rkwd wthl an asterisk indi a te State iu 4pection]Number of inter-ceptions in-Country of origin and name of pest I iost CollectedCin-CYPRITsDiseases:Oleocellosis ----------------------Citrus limonia (lemon)---------------------1 Pa.Petrifaction ---------------------Solanum tuberosum------------------------1 Mass.CZECHOSLOVAKIAInsects:Acalypta sp. (Tingitidac)---------In packing around rose plants--1 -------------D. C.Adelid ---------------------------do --------------------------------Do.Apion seniculus (Curculionidae) ------do-------------------------1------------D).Apion sp. (Curculionidae) ----------do --------------------------------Calif.*Do _---------------------------Rosa sp------------------------1----------Do.*Brachyrhinus scaber (Curculionidae) In packing around rose plants --------------D. C.Cecidomyiid -_--------------------Vitis sp. (grape)--------------------1 --------Md.Cevtorhynchus atomus (CurculioIn packing around rose plants ---1 ------------D. C.nidae).Ceutorhynchus floralis (Curculio-----do----------------------1 -----------Do.nidae).Chactoenema hortensis (Chrysomeli--do -------------------------1-----------Do.dae). Chaetocnema sp. (Chrysonelidae) ------do --------------------------------Calif.*Chrysomelid -------------------Rosa sp-----------------------3 ------------Do.*Dryrnus syiraticus (Lygaeidae) -----In packing around rose plants---1 -------------D. C.Epuraea melina (Nitidulidae) --------do -------------------------1 -----------Do.Haplcthrips aculeatus (thrips)---------do------------------------1 -----------Do.Do ------_---------------Rosa sp ----------------------1 ------------Calif.*Hylemyia sp. (Ant homyiidae) -----In soil around roots of narcissus 1 ------------Pa.Lecaniun coryli (Coccidae) ---.----. alus sylvestris (apple) -----------I------------D. C.Limothrips denticornis (thrips)-----In packing around rose plants----1 -------------Do.L/qus sp. (.M irilaei ___------------Rosa s--------------------------------Calif.*Aleligethes umbrogis (Nitidulidae) In packing around rose plants1-----------D. C.Mdi;ethes sp. (Nitiduilidae) -----------do --------------------------1 ------------Calif.*Xewsteadia floccosa (Coccidae) -------do--------------------------1----------D. C.Pheidole sp. (ant) -----------------In moss used as packing ---------------Md.around grape cuttings.Phyllotreta atra (Chrysomelidae) --In packing around rose plants1-----------Calif.*Phyllotreia nemorum (Clirysomedo ----------------------------------Do.*lidae).Do ----------------------------------------------1 ---------D. C.Phytobius quaaritaberculatus (Cur-d----------------------1 -------------Do.culionlid'e).Psyllid ----------------------Euphorbia sp -----------------------------a.Pyraustinae (Pyralidae).----------In packing around rose plants1-----------D. C.Rhyparochromus chiragra (Lygaeido-------------------------1-----------Do.d!ie).Scolytid ---------_ ----Euphorbia sp. --------------------Pa.&-rophosoma rufipes (CurculioniIn packing around rose plants ------1-----------D. C.dae).Strophosorna sp. (Curelionidae)--1------------------------1 -----------Do.Tenebrionid _--------Rosa sp ----------------------1 ------------Calif.*Thaimnurgus euphorbiac (ScolytiEaphorbia sp ---------------------1 -------------Pa.dae).Diseases:Sep/aria sp --_.---------------------do -------------------------------Do.Stysanus sp ------------------------Rosa sp ------------------------------------D. C.Verticilium albo-utrum .-_-----Dahlia sp --------------------3-----------Do.DANZIGInsects:Sciara sp, (M ycetophilidae).-------Apiun graveolens (celery) -1 La.Diseases:Anguillulina dipmci ------------Solanum tuberosum --------------------------1 Do.Apheleichoides purielinis ----------do---------------------------1 Do.I)ENMARKInsects:Anthonomus rectirostris (CurculioniPrunus avium (mazzard)-------1-----------D. C.dae).Ceutorhyitchis sp --rasica rapa (turnip) ---------------------1 Pa.IIap/o/hrips aculeatus (thrips) lAia in porry in (leek) ----------------------1 Do.ilylemyia sp. (Anthomnyiidae) ------Brassica rapa .--------------------------------1 Do.Laspeyresia sp. (Olethreut idae) ----Picta sp. (spruce) ---------------I------------Mich.0ecophorid ---------------------Hay used as packing --------------I------------Minn.Olethreutid --------------------Julans sp. (walnut) I --I -----------Calif.*

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19351 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 23List, by countries, of pests collected and reported from July 1, 1933, to June 30, 1934,inclusive-Con tinted[All findings marked with an asterisk indicate State inspection]Niinber of inter-ceptions in---_ ----_ C o l l e c t e dCountry of origin and name of pest Host -Cl)DENMARK--ContinuedInsects-Continued.Psila rosae (carrot rust fly) Daucus carota (carrot) 1---Pa.Psylliodeschrysocephala (ChrysomeBrassica oleracea gemmifera ----j Do.lidae). (brussels sprouts).Do ------------------------Brassica rapa (turnip) ---2 Do.Sciara sp. (Mycetophilidae) -----Brassica campestris (rutabaga) ---------1 Do.Thrips tabaci pullus (thrips) --------Alfun porrum (leek)---------------2 Do.Urophorus humeralis (Nitidulidae) Brassica rapa -------------------I La.Diseases:Alternaria brassicae ---------------Brassica oleracea capitata---------3 Pa.Anauillulina dipsaci --------------Solanurn tuberosum ----------------------2 Do.Cercospora sp -------------------Hedera sp. (ivy)_--------------Wash.Cladosporium fulvum -------------Lycopersicum esculentum --------Pa.Puccinia sp------------------Allium porrum (leek) ------------1 Do.Saccharomycetaceae --------------Solanum tuberosum-------------------------1 La.Sclerotinia sclerotiorum ------------Daucus carota (carrot) ----------------Pa.Sclerotinia sp B--------------------rassica rapa (turnip) ---------------1 Do. Do -----------------------ucumis sativus (cucumber) ------1 Do.Do -----------------------aucus carota (carrot)---------1 Do.Do -----------------------Solanum tuberosum------------I Do.DOMINICAInsects:Pseudaonidia articulatus rufouss Citrus aurantifolia (lime).-. -----1 Mass.scale). Do ----------------------Citrus sinensis (orange) ---------1 Fla.*Do-_----------------------do_ --------------------------1 Mass.Pseudaonidia trilobififormis (Coceilangifera indica (mango) ----------Do.dae).Targionia hartii (Coccidae) ---------Dioscorea sp. (yam) ----------------N. Y.Diseases:Capnodium citricola ---------------Citrus sinensis-----------------1 Mass.Diplodia cacaoicola ----------------Citrus limonia (lemon) --------2 --Do.Oleocellosis--------------------Citrus sinensis---I Md.DOMINICAN REPUBLICInsects:Brenthus sp. (Brentidae) ----------Musa paradisiaca (plantain) ---P. R.Corcyra cephalonica (Pyralidae)---Theobroma cacao (cacao) Calif.*Diaphania sp. (Pyralidae) ----------Chayota edulis (chayote) -N. Y.Hemichionaspis minor strachani Cacurbita pepo (pumpkin) --1Do.(Coccidae).Metamasius sericeus (silky cane Musa sp. (banana) --P. R.weevil).Monanus concinnulus (Cucujidae) ------do-------------------Do.Pseudoparlatoria ostreata (Coccidae) Oncidium henckenii (orchid) -1 --D. C.Diseases:Cercospora sp --------------------Capsicuwn annuum -------------------1 Tex.Colletotrichum nigrurn-----.------------do-----------.---------------I Do.Diplodia cacaoicola---------------Cocos nucifera (coconut)------I-------N. Y.Gloeosporiurn sp ------------------Orchid -----------------------1---I ----------D. C.Melanconiurn sacehari------------Saccharum officinarum.---------I Va.Phoma destructwa ---------------Capsicum annuum-----------------------1 Tex.DUTCH GUIANAInsects:Pseudaonidia articulatus (rufous Citrus grandis (grapefruit) -----------------1 Ala.scale).Diseases:Hemileia sp.--------------------Oncidium sp. (orchid) ---------1 D. C.DUTCH WEST INDIESDiseases:Diplodia cacaoicola----------------Cocos nucifera (coconut)--------------------Md.EAST AFRICAInsects:Brachypeplus rubidus (Nitidulidae). Juglans nigra (black walnut) 3 -----------------Do.Crematogaster sp. (ant) --------------to ----------------------1 ------------Do.Silvanus sp. (Cucujidae)-----------------------------I-----------Do.Xyleborus a]inus (Scoly idae)---. .-----do.----------------------1 ------------Do.

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24 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [JuneList, by counlries, of pests collected and reported from July 1, 1933, to June 30, 1934,inciusive-Continued[All findings marked with an asterisk indicate State inspection]Number of inter-ceptions in-Country of origin and name of pest Host Collectedin-ECUADORInsects:AnasIrpOa sp. (Trypetidae)-------Xfaugifera indica (mango) 1 Wash.Aspidiotus palwae (Coccidae).------usa sp. (banana)-----------1 Ala.Ca mponotus sp. (ant ---------------do.----------------------2 Calif.*CBephatoeia sp. (Chrysomelidae) -banana debris--------------1 Ala. Do ------------------------Musa sp. (banana) -----------1 Calif.*Ceramidia sp. (Syntomidae).------------------.----------------1 Ala.Do -------------------------------do-----------------------3 Calif.*Cicadella sp. (Cicadellidae) -----_-----do.----------------------1 Do.*Crematogaster sp. (ant)------------Ananas sativus---------------1 -Do.*Do .----------------------------Musa sapientum (banana)-----1---------------Wash.Do------------------------Musa sp. (banana)-----------1 Calif.*Dinocoris tripterus (Pentatomidae) ------do----------_-----------1 Do.*Lethocerus camposi (Belostomatidae) --.-do.-.----------------------1 Wash.Metamasius sericeus (silky cane Banana debris--------------1 Do.weevil).Do.-------------------------Musa sp. (banana)-----------2 Ala.Do--------------------------do---------------------4 Calif.*Do----------------------------do.-----------------------1 Wash.Neoconocephalus sp. (Tettigoniidae)----do.----------------------1 Calif.*Pseudaonidia articulatus (rufous Citrus grandis (grapefruit) ----------------1 Ala.scale).Pseudococcus sp. (Coccidae).--------Musa sp. (banana).---------2 Do.Do---------------------------do.-----------------------1 Wash.Pyralid --_---------------------------do --------------.------1 Calif.*Stenoma sp. (Stenomidae) --------Persea americana (avocado)-----------------N. Y.Do-------------------------Persea sp. ------------------------------1 Wash.Stephanode res guatemalensis (ScolyMusa sp. (banana).----------1 Ala.tidae).Tineid.--------.---------------------. --do ----------------------------Calif.*Eo c PTInsects: Curculionid -----------------------Brassica rapa (turnip) .1 Pa.Fiorinia theae (Coccidae) ----------Citrus grandis (pomelo)--------------------1 Mass.Gelechiid--------------------Beta tulgaris (beet).-_ ---1 Pa.Lixus sp. (Curculionidae ------_-------do----------------------------------Do.Parlatoria ziziphus (Coccidae)-----Citrus grandis (pomelo)---1 Mass. Do --------------------------Citrus nobilis deliciosa (tanger---------------1 Pa.ine).Do ----------------_---------Citrus sinensis (orange) -----------------------1 Mass.Pectinophora gossypiella (pink bollGossypium sp. (cottonseed)-.-. ----------Illworm).Do.---------------------------do----------------------2 1 ----------N.Y.Prolabia arachidis (earwig)--.------Solanum tubeosum-.------------------------1 Mass.Pyraustinae (Pyralidae)----------Brassica rapa (turnip)-----------------------1 Pa.Rhizoglyphus sp. (mite ------------Aliun cepa (onion)-----------------------2 Do.o ------------------------Solanum tuberosum--------------------------1 N. Y.Do --------------do----------------------------------Pa.Do -----------------------Zingiber officinale (ginger) -------------------1 Mass.Sciara sp. (Mxycetophilidae) -------Solanum tuberosum -----------------1 Pa.Tetranychus sp. (mite).-------------Atlium porr um (leek) ------------------------1 Mass.Diseases:Internal blackening -----------Solanurn tuberosum ------------------1 Do.Oil burning.----_.----------Citrus sinensis (orange) -----------------------I Pa.Oleocellosis--------------------Citrus aurantifolia (lime) ----------------------1 Do.Do ..------------------------Citrus limonia (lemon) ---------------------3 Do.Sclerotinia sclerotioru .---.-------Daucus carota (carrot) ------------------------I Ga.Sclerotiuiia sp--------------------Citrus aurantifolia (lime) ---------_-----,---1 Mass.Sclerotin sp.-----------------------Brassica rapa (Iurnip) ------------------------Ala.Septoria citri -------------------Citrus limonia (lemon) ------------------1 Pa.Sphaceloma favcettii -------------Citrus aurantifolia (lime) ----------------------1 S. C.Do.-.------------------Citrus limonia-----------------------------I Pa.E NGLANDInsects:Acidia sp. (Trypetidac)-----------Apium graveolens (celery). --------------2 Do.Agromyzid --------------------Brassica oleracea acephala ----------------1 Mass.(kale).Do .------------------------Brassica oleracea capitata -----------------1 Pa.A spidiotus sp. (Coccidae) ----------Laurus nobilis (Grecian laurel) -----------1--Mass. Do --------------.------------Stapelia grandiflora--------------1 -----------D. C.

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1935] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 25List, by countries, of pests collected and reported from July 1, 1933, to June 30, 1934,inclusive-Continued[All findings marked with an asterisk indicate State inspection]Number of inter-ceptions in--CollectedCountry of origin and name of pest Host C in--ENGLAND-ContinuedInsects-Continued.Blastodacna sp. (Cosmopterygidae) Afalus sylvestris (apple)---------1 ----------D. C.Brachyrhinussp. (Curculionidae)--Around living plants------------1 ---------Pa.Cercopid ----------------------Sidalcea sp -----------------1--.-----D. C.Ceutorhynchus pleurostigma (turnip Brassica rapa (turnip)--------------------1 Ala.gall weevil).Do.----------------------------d-----do------------------------------1 M ass.Do----------------.---------------do.---. .------------------------------3 N. Y.Do------------------------------do--------------------------------2 Pa.Do-----------------------------do----------------------.---.--------1 Tex.Ceutorhynchus sulcicollis (Curculiod--------------------------------1 Pa.nidae).Ceutorhynchus sp. (Curculionidae)-. Brassica campestris (rutabaga) -----------------1 Md.Do.-------------------------Brassica oleracea capitata.---------------------2 Pa.Do ------------------------Brassica rapa-------------------------------1 Ala.Do ---------------------------do -----------------------------------4 La.Do ---------------------------do.----------------------------------4 Md.Do.----.------------------------do-----------------------------------5 Mass.Do-----------------------------do-----------------------------------8 N. Y.Do---------------------------do --------------------------------10 Pa.Do ---------------------------do -------------------------------2 Tex.Chloropid----------------------Daucus carota (carrot)-----------------------I La.Cicadellid-.--------------------Polypodium vulgare (poly 1-----------D. C.pody).Coccus sp. (Coccidae)------------Dendrobium phalaenopsis 2 ----------------Hawaii.*schroederianu m.Curculio sp. (Cui culionidae).-------Corylus maxima (cob nut)--------1 ------------D. C.Dialeurodes chittendeni (rhododenRhododendron loderi---------------------Wash.dron whitefly).Do--.-----------------------Rhododendron sp------------2 ------------D. C.Dryocoetes villosus (Scolytidae)-----Quercus sp. (oak) ------------2 ----------------N. Y.Emphytus cinctus (sawfly)--------Rosa chinensis manetti.--------2 ----------------Conn.*Do-----------------------------do---------------------1 ----------------ll.*Endrosis lacteella (Oecophoridae)---Anemone fulgens (flame ane1 ------------D. C.mone).Euxesta sp. (Ortalidae).------.Solanum tuberosum-------------------------1 Tex.Frankliniella pallida (thrips)-------Sempervirum spp--------------1 -----------D. C.Frankliniella tenuicornis (thrips) Hemerocallis forrestii -------------1 ----D-------o.1o ------------------------Hemerocallis mulleri-------------1 -----------Do.Geometrid---------------------Clematis orientalis --------------1 -----------Do.Gracilariid---------------------Quercus ilex (holly)-----------------------Do.Grullodes sigillalus (Gryllidae) -----Packing material for orchids. -1 ----------------awaii.Heliothis sp. (Noctuidae)----------Brassica oleracea capitate ----------------------1 Pa.Histiostoma sp. (mite)------------Brassica rapa (turnip) ------------------------1 Do.Do ------------------------alus sylvestrs (apple) -----------Mich.Do------------------------Solanurm tuberosum -------------------------1 La.Do---------------------------do ---------------------------------N. Y.Do ----------------------------do ---------------------------------2 Pa.Hylemyia sp. (Anthornyiidae)-----Brassica camnpestris (rutabaga) -----------------1 Md.1l/inoia sp. (aphid).---------_-----Caluna rulgaris (heather) 1 ------------Pa.Lecanium corni (European fruit Veronica bayliana --------------------------D. C.lecanium).Do ---------------------------Veronica bidi//ii--------------I --------------Do.Lepidosaphes tuberculata (Coccido)Cyinbidium sp. (orchid)-------2---------------Do.Liothrips vaneeckei (thrips)--------Lilium pyrenaicum --------------------------Do.Liparid-----------------------11ex sp. (holly) ------------------I------------Pa.Macrosiphum lulea (aphid).--------Orchid--------------------I ------D. C.Merodon sp. (Syrphidae) ---------Varcissus sp ------------------------------Pa.Mordellid ---------------------yrs Communis (ear) --------------Va.Mycetophilid------------------IIeliantheenum sp. (sunrose) 1---------------Calif.*Do ------------------------Moss packing ---------------1 ---------------Do.*Noctuid------------------------Allium porrumn (leek) ---------1-----1 Mass.o--.--.---------------------Brassica oleracea tolrytis (cauli--------------1 Do.flower).Do------------------------Brassica oleracea capniat ----------------------1 Do.Do--------------------------In box of Althaea cuttings--------1 ------------N. Y.Notodontid--------------------Pyrus communes (pear)---------I ----------Va.Oecophorid-------------.--------Quercus sp. (oak) ------------I----------N. Y.Do --------------------------Ulimus sp. (elm) -------------2 --------------La.116442-35----4

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26 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [JuneList, by countries, of pests collected and reported from July 1, 1933, to June 30, 1934,inclusive-Continued[All findings marked with an asterisk indicate State inspection]Number of inter-ceptions in-Country of origin and name of pest Host CollectedW in-ENGLAND-ContinuedInsects-Continued.Olethreutid ------------------Cytisus scoparius (Scotch 1 --------Pa.broom).Do-----------------------Prunuis incisa x sarqenti----------1----------D. C.Parallelodiplosis cattleyae (cattleya Cattleya mendeli (orchid)-----1 ------------Hawaii.*midge).Do. -------------------------Cattleya triumphant (orchid)--1 ------------Do.*Do------------------------Cattleya warscewiczii (orchid )-1 ------------Do.*Do-----------------------Laeliocattleya sp. (orchid) ----1 ------------Do.*Parthenothrips dracaenae (thrips)---Sobralia colmanae (orchid)-----1 ------------Do.*Pheidole sp. (ant)----------------Lactuca sativa (lettuce) -------------------1 Mass.Phorodon sp. (aphid) -------------Mentha sp. (mint) ---------------.--------1 Do.Pieris sp. (Pieridae)-------------Brassica oleracea botrytis (cauli-----------1 Pa.flower).Do------------------------Brassica oleracea capitata----. ------------2 Do.Ponera sp. (ant) -----------------Sobralia rantholeuca (orchid) -1 -------------Hawaii.*Pseudococcus gahani (citrophilus Clematis sp --------------------1 ---------D. C.nealybu-).Pseudococcus sp. (Coccidae) -------Orchid ---------------------1 ------------Do.Pseudopar/atoria parlatorioides (CocCypripedium sp. (orchid)-----I -------------Do.cidae).Psila rosae (carrot rust fly) --------Daucus carota (carrot) -------------------1 Pa.Psila sp. (Psilidae).---------------Apium graveolens (celery)------------------2 Do.Psylliodes chrysocephala (ChrysoBrassica rapa (turnip) --------------------2 La.melidaeDo-------------------------do ----------------------------------1 N. Y.Do--------------------------do ------------------------------------1 Pa.Pulrinaria floccifera (Coccidae)----Dendrobium nobile virginale 1 ----------------D. C.(orchid).Do------------------------Odontonia olga (orchid) --------1 ---------------Do.Putninaria sp. (Coccidae) ----------A nguloa ruckeri (rucker cradle1 -----------------Do.orchid).Do ------------------------Davidia involucrata ------------1 --------------ash.Pyraustinae (Pyralidae) -----------In box of Althaea cuttings--------1 ------------N. Y.Pyrophorinae (Elateridae) ---------Camellia reticulate --------------------------Calif.*Rhizoglyphus sp. (mite) ------------Allium cepa (onion) --------------------------1 Pa.Do-------------------Barbarea sp --------------------1 -----------Do.Do. ------------------------Brossica rapa (turnip) -----------------------Tex.Rhizophagas bipustulatus (RhizoQuercus sp. (oak) -------------1 ----------------N. Y.phagidae).Scatella sp. (Ephydridae) ----------Brassica oleracea capitate ----------------------1 Ala.Sciara sp. (Mycetophilidae) --------Brassica rapa------------------------------1 Pa.Do -------------------------Daucis carota (carrot) ------------------------1 Mass.Do ----------------------------do------------------------------------1 Pa.Do -------------------------Solanum tuberosum --------------------------2 N. Y.Scolopostet! us sp. (L ygaeidae) ------Sphagnum moss around holly 1---------------Do.plant.Silvanus Fp. (Cucujidac) -----------Robinia sp. (locust) -----------1 --------------La.Sitona lintata (Crctulionidae) -----Cytisus scoparius (Scotch 1 -------------Pa.broom).Syrphid ------------------------Brassica oleracea capitata ----------------------1 Mass.Do -----------------------do ----------------------------------1 Miss.Do ---------------------------do ----------------------------------3 Pa.Do -------------------------Mentha sp. (mint)-------------------------Mass.Syrphus sp. (Syrphidae) ---------Brassica oleracea capitata ----------------------2 Do.Taeniothrips cricae (thrips) ---------Calluna vulgaris (heather)--------1 ------------Pa.Thrips tabaci pullus (thrips) --------Aster sp-----------------------1 ------------D. C.Do ------------------------rassica oleracea capitata ----------------------1 Mass.Do------------------------IIrerocallis forrestii -------------1 ---------D. C.Do-----------------------Ienrocallis muleri --------------I --Do.Tinea sp. (Tineida) ---------------Quercussp. (oak) ----------------------------N. Y.Tipula sp. (Tipulidae) An------------g moss packing with 1 ------------D. C.aster plants.Do------------------------In soil around roots of prim1------------Mich.rose plant.Tipulid-----------------------Brassica oleracea capitata ---------------------I Ala.Tortricid ----------------------Rhododendron sp -------------1 ----------------D. C.Trialeurodes raporariorum (greenChrysanthemum sp -----------------1 Mass.houce whitefly).Do ------------------------Fuchsia sp.---------------------------Do.Typhlocyba sp. (Cicadellidae)-----fentha sp. (mint) -------------------------1 Do.Xestobium sp. (Anobiidae)--------Scilla sp------------------------1----.------Calif.*

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19351 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 27List, by countries, of pests collected and reported from July 1, 1933, to June 30, 1934,inclusive-Continued[All findings marked with an asterisk indica-te State inspection]Number of inter-ceptions in-~~ ~ --CollectedCountry of origin and name of pest HostENGLAND-ContinuedDiseases:Alternaria brassicae---------------Brassica oleracea capdtata---------------1 N. Y.Do--------------------------(do -------------------------------1 Pa.Alternaria dianthi ----------------Dianthus sp----------------1 -----D. C.Anguillulina dipsaci---------------Allium ce pa (onion)-------------------1 S. C.Do---------------------------Iris histrioides major-------------1 ------------D. C.Do-------------------------N.rissus sp-------------------2----------Do.Do----------------------------Solanum taherosum.-------------------1 Mrqss.Aphelenchoides parielinus----------Beta vulgaris (beet)------------------1 Md.Do----------------------------Brassica rapa (turnip)--------------1 Do.Do------------------------Daucus carota (cirrot).----------------------Pa.Do -------------------------Helianthemum alpestre (Alpine 1 ----------------Calif.*sunrose).Aphelenchus avenae--------------Allium cepa (onion)--------------1 Pa.Do--------------------------Brassica rapa (turnip)----------------------La.Do----------------------------Lulipa sp -----------------------1 ------------Mich.Bacterium campestre---------------Brassica oleracea capitata------------------3 Pa.Bacterium maculicolum------------Brassica oleracea botrytis (cauli -----------------1 Do.flower).Do----.-----------------------Brassica oleracea capitata---------------------1 Md.Colletotrichum hedericola-----------Hedera aurea maculata----------1 ------------D. C.Colletotrichum sp----------------Galanthus sp--------------------1 D-----------o.Do ------------------------Lilium monodelphum---------1 -----------Do.Didymellina iridis------------------Iris sp----------------------1------------Do.Diplocarpon rosae -----------------Rosa sp.---------------------------------N. Y.Erinose -----------------------Sorbus sp--------------------------Mich.Eurotium sp----------------------Brassica rapa (turnip)------------------------1 Ala.Exobasidium vaccinii -------------A zalea indica (Indica azalea)---------1 -------N. Y.Fumago vagans -----------------Laurus nobilis (Grecian laurel) -------------1 Mass.Gloeosporium sp.------------------Cumbidium sp. (orchid)------1---------------D. C.Hysterographium sp---------------Viburnum tinus lucidum-------1---------------Do.Internal blackening---------------Solanum tuberosum-------------------------1 Ga.Do----------------------------do------------------------------------1 La.Do----------------------------do----------------------------------1 Pa.Do----------------------------do----------------------------------I Tex.Leptothyrium pomi-----------------Aalus sylvestris (apple)--------------I Do.Leptosphaeria heterospora----------Iris sp---------------------1 ------------D. C.Oospora sp----------------------Daucus carota (carrot) ------------------------1 La.Pestalozzia sp------------------Canellia kelwingtonia ----------1---------------N. Y.Do---------------------------Rhododendron radicans ---------1 ---------------ash.Petrifaction----------------------Solanumtuberosum --------------------------1 Pa.Phyllachora sp---------------------Rosa sp------------------------1 ------------Md.Phyllosticta sp---------------------Arbutus unedo rubra -----------1---------------D. C.Phytophthora sp--------------------Daucus carota (carrot) ----------------1 Md. Plasmodiophora brassicae-----------Brassica rapa (turnip) -----------------------Pa.Do --------------------------------do ----------------------------------2 Tex.Puccinia porn ---------------------Allium vineale------------------1 ------------Ill.Puccinia sp-----------_-----------_Hordeum vulgare (barley) ---------------------I Md.Sclerotinia gladioli------------------Tritonia sp --------------------------------1). C.Sclerotinia sclerotiorum------------Daucus carota -----------------------------2 Ala.Do----------------------------do ------------------------------------I Miss.Do--------------------------o ------------------------------------7 Pa.Sclerotinia sP---------------------Allium cepa (onion) -------------------------1 Do.Do----------------------------Beta vulgaris (beet) -----------------------I Ala.Do----------------------------do_-------------------------------------I La.Do--------------------------do-----------------------------------1 Pa.Do ------------------------Brassica rapa (turnip) ------------------------i Fla.Do----------------------------do-----------------------------------2 Pa.Do-----------------------Qynara scolymus (globe arti ----------------1 Mass,choke).Do ------------------------Daucus carota (carrot) ------------------------I Ala.Do----------------------------(o-------------------------------------___.I Md.Do ----------------------------do ---------------------------------1 Miss.Do-------------------------------do ----------------------------1 Pa.Do----------------------------Solanum tuberosum --------------------------1 Ala.Sclerotium sP----------------------Brassica rapa-------------------------------1 Do.Do-------------------------Daucus carota---------------------------1 Pa.Selenophoma n. sp----------------Dendrobium ashworthiae -------1 ----------------D. C.Septoria apii---------------------Apium graveolens (celery) ----------------6 Pa.Septoria chrysanthemella------.----Chrysanthemum sp --------------I------------D. C.

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28 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [JuneList, by countries, of pests collected and reported from Jldy 1, 1933, to June 30, 1934,indclIsive-Con t iniued[All fndings mnarod w ;th an asterisk indicate State inspection]Number of inter-eptions in-Country of origin and name of pest Host Collectedin-bkENGLAND-C continuedDiseases-Continued.Septoria sp -------------------Primula acaulis (English prim--1 ---------Pa.rose).Splaeropsis s-------------------------Viburnum tinus lucidum------1 --------------D. C.Uromyces caryophyllinus-----------Dianthus sp-----------------1------------Do.Vermicularia liliacearum.----------Ilemerocallis sp. (day lily)-------1 ----------Do.Verticilliu m SP---------------------Allium cepa (onion)-------------------1 La.Do----------------------------Beta vulgaris (beet)----------------------1 Md.Do---------------------------Brassica rapa (turnip)--------------------1 S. C.Do----------------------------Solanum tuberosum.------------------------2 Tex.Fiji ISLANDSInserts:Coccotrypes sp. (Scolytidae)-------Phytelephas macrocarpa (ivory-----.1 ------Hawaii.*nut palm).FRANCEInsects:Ahaseerus sp. (Cucujidae)---------Zea mays (corn)----------------1 ---------Calif.*A1eyrodes brassicae (whitefly)-------Brassica oleracea capitata------------------2 Pa.Aleyrodes spiraeoides (whitefly)---------do-----------------------------------1 Do.Anthomyiid-----------------------Rosa chinensis manetti--------1 ------------N. Y.Arctiid----------------------------Utmus sp. (elm)-------------1 ------------Do.Athetis selini (Noctuidae)----------------do -----------------------1------------Do.Baris sp. (Curculionidae)----------Brassica rapa (turnip)-.------------------1 Do.Blasiodacna sp. (Cosmopterygidae) Mfalus sylrestris (apple)-------------2 ------Do.Brachyrhinus rugosostriatus (CurcuUlmus sp. (elm)-------------1 -------------Do.lionidae).Bruchidius sp. (Bruchidae)--------Desmodium elegans-------------I ---------D. C.Do--------------------------Desmodium pulchellum---------1 ---------Do.Do----------------------------Laburnum alpinum----------------I ---------Do.I)o--------------------------Trifolium alexandrinum-------1 ---------Do.Bruchus sp. (Bruchidae)-----------Cicer arietinum (chickpea)----1 --------------La.Cemiostona sp. (Lyoneiiidae)------Genista sp---------------------1 ---------D. C.Ceratitis sp. (Trypetidae;----------Amyqdalus persica (peach) ------------------1 N. Y.Ceutorhyncfui, sp. (Curculionidae)Brassica campestris (rutabaga)------------1 Md.Do---------------------------Brassica oleracea capitata-------------------1 Ala.Do------------------------------do-----------------------------------1 Pa.o ---------------------------Brassica rapa (turnip)-----------------------1 N. Y.Do--------------------------do---------------------------------4 Pa.Do ----------------------------do--------------------------------1 Tex.Chermid --------------------------Brassica oleracea capitata--------------------1 Pa.Cixius sp. (Fulgoridae)--------do --------------------------------1 Tex.Cccotripes dactyliperda (Seolytid-e) Ihoenix te nis--------------------1 ---------D. C.Coccotrypts thrinacis (Scolytidae) -Thrinax altissima----------------1 ------Do.Colydiid U------------------------U!nus sp. (elm)--------------1 -Md.Do --------------------------d ---------------7 --------------.Y.Do ------------------------------do ---------------------2 ----------------Va.Cclydiin (Colydiidae) -------------do ---------------------1 -----------Do.Cr poc;phalussp. (Chrvsomelidae do ---------------------1 ----------------Md.Ctsias ?erra (I)ermestidae) -----------do ----------------------2----------------Do.Do---------------------------do ---------------------1 ------------N. Y.Do-------------.----------___do---------------------1 ----------------Va.Curcutio sp. (Cureulionidae) -------Castanea sp. (chestnut)-------1 --------------Calif.*Do--------------------do. -----------------------1 ---------Mass.E rphytus cinctus (sawfly)--------Rosa chinensis manci --------.1 --------------Conn.*Epidiaspis piricola (Italian pear A mygdalus persica (peach)------1----------D. C.scale).Eunserus sp. (Syrphidoe)-.--------Lifium candidum (Madonna 1 -------------N. Y.lily).Forficula auricularia (European earUlmus sp. (elm) -------------1 -----------La.t.-----.---------------------do----------------------1-------------N. Y.Forficula auricularia forcipata (earLilium sp -------.----------.1 -----------.Do.wig).Do -------------------------Ulmus sp. (elm)-----------1 ------------Do.Geometrid-----.--------------------do--------------------------.-.---Do.Grapholitha sp. (Olethreutidae)-. A mygdalus persica (peach)-------------Do.Histiostoma sp. (mite)---.---------Iowrea belmoreana-------------1 ------Hawaii.*Do----.----------------------Lilium candidum (Madonna 1 ------------N. Y.lily).Do---------------------Solanum tuberosum---------------------1 Tex.

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19351 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 29List, by countries, of pests collected and reported from July 1, 1933, to June 80, 1984,inclusive-Contf tued[All findings marked with an asterisk indicate State inspection]Number of inter-ceptions in-CollectedCountry of origin vnd name of pest Host -n-FRANcE-ContinuedInsects-Continued.Hylemyia sp. (Anthomyiidae)-----Brassica rapa (turnip) ------------------------1 N. Y.Laspeyresia splendana (OlethreuCastanea sp. (chestnut) --------1 ----------------Calif.*tidae).Magdalis armiqera (Curculionidae). Ulmus sp. (elm)-------------2 ----------------Va.Magdalis sp. (Curculionidae)---------do-----------------------------------Md.Melanotus sp. (Elateridae).--------Lilium sp------------------I ---------------N. Y.Mononychus ireos (Curculionidae). Iris sp.------------------------1 -----------D. C.Noctuid------------------------Brassica oleracea botrytis (cau-----------------1 N. Y.liflower).Do------------------------Brassica oleracea capitata-------------------1 Do.Olethreutid.-.--------------------Stachys sieholdii-------------.1 ------------D. 0.Do. ...------------------------Ulmus sp. (elm)-------------1 ---------------Md.Do----------.-------------------do.----------------------1---------------Va.Parthenothrips dracaenae (thrips). Laeliocattleya britannia alba 1 ------------D. C.(orchid).Phytomyza sp. (Agromyzidae).-----lex sp. (holly) ------------------1---------Pa.Pieris sp. (Pieridae).--------------. .Brassica oleracea capitata ------------------1 N. Y.Do ---------------------------do-. ..-----------------------------------3 Pa,Do---------.--.---------------.do ----------------------------------1 Ter.Pionea sp. (Pyralidae) --------------.--. .do.-----------------------------------1 Ala.Pot yerqus rufescens (ant).------------.--. do. ..--------------------------------1 Tex.Pseudococcus sp. (Coccidae)-------Hoya lasiantha--------------.----1 ---------D. C.Pteleohius kraatzi (Scolytidae)------Ulmus sp. (elm)--------------1 --------------Md.Pyralinae (Pyralidae) ------------Syringa sp-------------------1-------------D. C.Pyrahs sp. (Pyralidne) -------------. Litium sp.-----------------I ------------N. Y.Pyraustinae (Pyralidae) ----------Ulmu sp. (elm).----.-------1 ------------Do.Saperda sp. (Cerambycidae) --------.---. .do.----------------------. .2 ------------Do.Sciara sp. (Mycetophilidae)-------Straw used as packing---------I------------Pa.Scolytid. ...-----------------------Ulmus sp. (elm).-------------1 ------------Va,Scolytus multistriatus (Scolytidae) -------do---------------------3 --------------Md.Do-.-.-.-.---------------.--do------. .---------------6 ------------N. Y.Do. ....---------------------------do-.--------------------1 -------------Va.Scolytus scolytus (Scolytidae) -------.---. .do ..---------------------1 ----------1-. La.Do. ...---------------------------do. ..---------------------9 -------------Md.Do.---------------------------do.-----.----------------13 -------------. N. Y.Do -------------------------------do ..---------------------8 ------------Va.Scolytus sp. (Scolytidae).------------.--._ .do-----------. .----------3 ------------N. Y.Do -------------------------. -.do--------------------.-2 ------------Va.Silvanini (Cucujidae).---------------do ----------------------1 ------------N. Y.Syrphid. ...-----------------------Brassica oleracca capitata-----------------1 Do.Tarsonemus sp. (mite).------------Ulmus sp. (elm) -------------1 --------------Do,Thripstabaci atricornis (thrips)-----Helianthus tuberosus (Jerusa------------1 Mass.lem artichoke).Thrips tabaci pullus (thrips)-------Allium porrum (leek)--------------------1 Pa.Tinea sp. (Tineidae).-------------Lilium sp.-------------------1 ---------------N. Y,Tined-----------------------Allium porrum-----------------------------1 Ala.Do --.------------------------Pyrus con munis (pear) --------1 ----------------Va.Tortricid . . _.-----------------------_ .alus sylvestris (apple) ----------------1 --------N. Y.Tribolium sp. (Tenebrionidae)-----Pistacia vera (pistache) ----------------------D. C.Trioza sp. (Chermidae).-----------Brassica oleracea capitata----------------1 Pa.Diseases:Alternaria brassicae--------------Brassica oleracea botrytis (cau--------------Md.lifiower).Do --. ..--------------------------do ---------------------------------1 PaDo. . ----.-. Brassica rapa (turni p) ------------------------1 D.Anguillulina dipsaci-------------Allium sativum (garlic) ----------------------1 La.Do ------------------------Hyacinthus sp---------------1 1-N. Y.o ------------------------Solanum tuberosum----------------------D--.Aphelenchoides parietinus.-----.-Allium cepa (onion)------------------.----Do. .------------------------Beta vulgaris (beet) ---------------------1 Pa.Bacterium campestre-------------Raphanus sativus (radish) ---------------------1 Do.Bacterium macuicolum-----------Brassica oteracca capitata ------------------Do.Botrytis cinerea--------------------do------------------------------------1 Do.Capnodium citri-----------------Citrus sinensis (orange).----------------------1 Tex.Ceratostom-11a ulini.-------------Urnis sp. (elm).-------------1 ---------------La.Do-------------------------do---------------------2 . .M d.Do --------------------------do ---------------------I.---------N. Y.Do ----.---. ---------do .----------------------3 --------. -Va.Diptocarpon rosae--.-.-.--.--Rosa sp. ..-----------------------1 I --N. Y.

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30 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [JuneList, by countries, of pests collected and reported from July 1, 1933, to June 30, 1934,inclusiv e-Continued[All findings marked with an asterisk indicate State inspection]Number of inter-ceptions in-Country of origin and name of pest Host CollectedFRANCE-ContinuedDiseases-Continued. Glonerella cingulata---------------. .alu3 sylvestris (apple)-----------1 ------N. Y.Do ---------------------------do-------------------------1 Tex.Internal brown streak -------------Solanum tuberosum---------------------1 Do.Monochaetia sp -------------------Paeonia sp. (peony) ------------1 ---------D. C.Do. .------------------------Vitis sp.------------------------1 ----------Do.Mycospharetla pinodes.------------Pisum sativum (pea)-----------1 ---------Do.Oidium sp -.---------------------Syringa sp. (lilac) --------------1 ---------N. Y.Pestalozzia quepi.---------------Camellia sp-----------------2 -------------D. C.Pestalozzia sp ---------------------Paeonia sp. (peony)----------1-------------Do.Pezizella lythri------------------Loropetalum chinensis.------1 -----------.Do.Do ---.------------------------PaOia sp. (peony)-------------1 -----------Do.Phoma pterophila----------------Frazinus excelsior pendulata---I -1 -------Do.Phoma sp. ..----------------------Beta vulqaris (beet).---------------------1 La.Phyllosticta solitaria --.--------------altus sylvestris (apple) --------------------1 Fla.*Phytophthora sp -.-----------------Brassica rapa (turnip).----------------------1 La.Plasmoajophora brassicae----------------do--------------------------------1 Pa.Russeting.----------------------Solanum tuberosum -------------------1 N. Y.Sclcrot> 'a cepi'orum -------------Allium sativum (garlic)---------------.---1 Ala.ScICrTinij'a sclerotioruin-----------Daucus cai ota (carrot) -----------------.-1 Do.Do --------------------------do--------------------------------1 Ga.Do ----------------------------do -------------------------------1 La. Do ----------------------------do------------------------------1 Pa.Do ---------------------------do -------------------------------1 Tex.Sclroiaia sp --------------------Allium cepa (onion)------------------------1 La. Do --------------------------Brassica rapa (turnip) ----------------------Pa.Do -------------------------Cynara scolyrnus (globe arti----------------2 Do.choke).Sclerotiunm sp --------------------Phaseolus sp. (string bean) 1 Mass.Septoriaz citri ---------------------Citrus sinensis (orange) ----------------------1 Tex.Septoria sp ---------------------Euonymus obovatus (running ---------Wash.euonymus),Credo sp -----------------------Allium porrum (leek) ------------------------1 N. Y.Do ---------------------------do ------------------------------------1 Pa.FRENCH INDO-CHINAInsects:Asoidiotus destructor (Coccidae)---Cocos nucifera (coconut) -----------------1 Calif.*GERMANYInsects:Aiuthomyiid ---------Solanum tuberosum (potato) -------------------1 Fla.*Aspidiotus abietis (Coccidae)-------Abies sp. (fir) -------------------1 ------------Pa.Aspidiotus sp. (Coccidae). ---------Alalus sylvestris (apple) ------------1 -------------Md.Brachyrhinus sulcatus (black vine In box containing ivy plants 1 -------------Pa.weevil). and soil.Brachyrhinius sp. (Curculionidae) Poinsettha pulcherrima (poin-1-----------Calif.*settia).Bruchidius villosus (l3ruchidae)Cytisus capitatus--.--------------1 --------D. C.Cecidomyiid --------------------In gall on willow twig used as 1 ----------------Calif.*packing for lily-of-the-valleypips.Do -------------------------Inula sp-----------------------1 Pa.Do ------------------------Picea sp. (spruce) ----------------1 -----Do.Ceatorhynchus sp. (Curculionidae) Brassica rapa (turnip) ------------------------1 N. Y.Do -----------------------o------------------------------I Tex.Chionuspis salicis (Coccidae --------Fraxinus monophylla ----------1-----------D. C.CoccUS sp. (Cocciac) -------------Lairus nobilis ((Irecian laurel)--------1 -------N. Y.Do Polygala chaiaebuxus --------1----D-----------.C.Corymbitcs arie'ns (Vl'teridae) -----Splanum tuberosum --------------------------1 N. Y.CramnbinHW (1Pyralidac)--Willow twig used as packing I ---------------Calif.for lily-of-the-valley pips.Crambus ,p. (LPyralidae) ----------Brassica oleracea capitata ---------------------1 Mass. Cryptoe-phialus sp. (Chrysoinelidae) ('astrnea -p. (chestnut) -----------1 ----Ill.Diqsjpis echinocacti cacti (Coccidae). Epiphyhlums sp---------------I----------D. C.Diorycdria sp. (I'yralidae) ----------Pines syIrfstris (Scotch pine)------1 ---------N. Y.Emporia sp. (PyrAiidae)-----('assia fistala (golden-shower) 1-----------Pa.Eriococcus sp. (Coccidac) ---------( reus chosicensis (cactus). ------Calif.*Do ---------------------------('ereus decumbens (cactus) ---------1-----------Do.*Do-_ (-'___-----------('ereus sextonianus (cactus) --------I-----------Do.*

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1935] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 31List, by countries, of pests collected and reported from July 1, 1933, to June 30, 1934,inclusive-Continued[All findings marked with an asterisk indicate State inspection]Number of inter-ceptions in-Country of origin and name of pest Host CollectedGERMANY-ContinuedInsectsContinued.Ernobius abietus (Anobiidae)------Picea excelsa (Norway spruce) 2 -----------Md.Do-------------------------Picea sp. (spruce)------------------------Mich.Euxesta sp. (Ortalidae)----------Solanum htberosum-------------------------I La.Frankliniella intonsa (thrips)------Picea sp. (spruce) --------------I-----------Pa.Histiostomia sp. (mite) -------------Solanum tuberosum-------------------------I Do.Iylenyia sp. (Anthonyiidae) -----Brassica rapa (turnip) -------------1 ------------N. Y.Laspeyresia strobilella (OlethreuIn box of apples-----------------1 -----------Md.tidae).Laspeyresia sp. (Olethreutidae)----Picea abies ------------------------------Do.Do ---_----------------------Picea sp. (spruce) -----------------------Pa.Lecanium sp. (Coccidae).----------Aesculus chinensis --------------------------D. C.Lepidosaphes sp. (Coccidae)-------------do------------------------1----------Do.Macrosiphurn kaltenbachii (aphid)-Lactuca sativa (lettuce) ------------------1 Mass.Noctuid -----------------------Brassica oleracea capitata ---------------------1 Do.Olethreutid ---------------------Willow twig used as packing ----------------Calif.*for lily-of-the-valley pips. Oligotrophus annulipes (CecidoFagus sp. (beech) --------------------------N. Y.myiidae).Ortalid-----------------------Solanurm tuberosu ---------------------------1 Tex.Phycitinae (Pyralidae) ------------Anthemis nobilis ----------------1 -----------Pa.Do -------------------------Berula erecta -----------------1 ----------------N. Y.Do ------------------------Inla sp --------------------------------Pa.Physokermes piceae (Coccidae) ------Abies sp. (fir) -------------------1-----------Do.Pieris sp. (Pieridae) -------------rassica oleracea botrytis (cau 1------------1 Ala.liilower).Pseudaonidia sp. (Coccidae) --------luphorbia sp i1 Calif.*Pseudococcus sp. (Coccidae) --------Brunfelsia sp ------------------------------N. Y.Do------------------------Epiphyllum phyllantoides ---------D. C.grandiflorum (cactus).Psila sp. (Psilidae) --------------Daucus carota (carrot) ------------------------1 N. Y.Ptinus seXpunctatus (Ptinidae) ------In bag with poplar seed -----------1 ------------D. C.Rhabdophaga sp. (Cecidomyiidae)y Salix discolor (pussy willow) ------------1 ____-Mass.Rhizoglyphus sp. (mite) -----------Allium cepa (onion)--------------------1 Ala.Do ---------------------------do ------------------------------------1 Pa.Do ---------------------------Solanum tuberosum ------1 ------Mich.Do ----------------------------do ------------------------------------1 Wash.Sciara sp. (Mycetophilidae) --------Allium cepa --------------------------------1 LaDo -------------------------Hyacinthus sp --------------------------N. Y.Syrphid ------------------------Picea excelsa (Norway spruce)1 -------------Pa.Taeniothrips ericae (thrips) ---------Wreath of heather and statice1 -------------Do.Taeniothrips firmus (thrips) --------Picea sp. (spruce) ---------------1 -----------Do.Tersonemus sp. (mite)----------Malus sylrestris (apple) --------1-----Mass.Thrips tabaci pultus (thrips) --------Aljim porrum (leek)------------1 Pa. Tinea sp. (Tineidae) --------------Lapageria rosea (red Chile1 D. C.bells).Tortricid---------------------Prunus domestica (plum)----------1--------Do.Trionymus sp. (Coccidae) ----------Echinocactus chrysacanthus 1 ------------Calif.*(cactus).Do-------------------------Rebutia sp. (cactus)--------------1 -----------Do.*Tyroglyphid (mite) --------------Poinsettia pulcherrima (poin1------------Do.*settia).Diseases:Anguillulina dipsaci --------------Solanurn tuberosum ---------------------5 Ala.Do ----------------------------do ------------------------------------2 Ga.Do ----------------------------do ------------------------------------3 La.Do ----------------------------do ------------------------------------1 Mass.Do ----------------------------do ------------------------------------1 N. Y. Do ----------------------------do ------------------------------------6 Pa.Do ----------------------------do ------------------------------------1 S. C.Do ----------------------------do ------------------------------------6 Tex.Do ----------------------------do 1 Va.Anguillutina pratensis ------------Convallaria majalis (lily-of-the2 -----------N. Y.valley).Aphelenchoides parietinus---------Allium cepa (onion)-------------------1 Ala.Do--------------------------Beta vulgaris (beet) -------------------------Pa.Do------------------------Convalaria majilis (lily-of-the2 ---------------N. Y.valley).Do----------------------------Solanum tuberosurn--.-------------------1 Ga.Do----------------------------do--------------------------------2 Md.

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32 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE JList, by countries, of pests collected and reported from July 1, 1933, to June 30, 1934,inclusive-ContinuedI[All findings marked with an asterisk indicate State inspection]Number of inter-ceptions in-Country of origin and name of pest Host M Collectedin-0 C1GERMANY-ContinuedDiseases-Continued.Aphelenchoides parietinus ---------Solanum tuberosum----------------------1 Pa.Do--------------------------do------------------------------1 Tex.Aphelenchus avenae--------------Convallaria majalis (lily-of-the1 -----------N. Y.valley).Bacterium maculicolum.-----------Brassica oleracea botrytis (cauli------------1 Md.flower).Bacterium sp ----------------Allium cepa (onion)-------------------1 Fla.*Colletotrichumn lagenarium---------Cucumis sativus (cucumber)-------------1 Pa.Cumminsiella sanguinea.-----------Mahonia sp--------------------1----------D. C.Cystospora sp--------------------Salix sp-------------------1 ------------Wash.Diaporthe umbrina.---------------Rosa sp-------------------1-------------D. C.Diplocarpon rosae ------.----------.-----.do -------------------------------1--------N. Y.Do.----------------------------do ------------------------2----------Pa.Helminthosporium sp------------Solanum tuberosum-----------------------1 Md.Hexamermis sp -----------------Daucus carota (carrot)---------------------1 N. Y.Hollow heart.-------------------Solanum tuberosum-------------------1 Ala.Leptosphaeria sp----------------Secale cereale (rye)---------------------1 Wash.Leptothyrium pomi.--------------la/us sylvestris (apple).---------------1 Pa. Metasphaeria sp------------.----Rosa sp---------------------1 --------------D. C.Monochaetia sp.------------------------do-----------------------1 -------------Do.Nectria sp.--------------------Brassica rapa (turnip)-------------------1 Miss.Petrifaction--------------------Solanum tuberosum.----------------------1 Tex.Phoma sp.---------------------Picea abies (Norway spruce)--___ I ---------Md.Phyllosticta solitaria.---------------. .-alus sylvestris---------------------------Do.Phytophihora sp.-----------------Daucus carota (carrot)---------.----------1 Ala.Puccinia arenariae ---------------Dianthus barbatus-.----------------1 ------N. Y.Puccinia graminis---------------Phragmites communis---------1 -----------D. C.Do.-----------------------Secale cereale (rye)--------------------1 Wash.Puccinia phragmitis--------------Phragmites communis---------1 -------------N. Y.Ramularia sp. ..-------------------Begonia sp --------. --------1-----------D. C.Sclerotinia sclerotiorum.-----------Apium graveolens (celery) ---------------1 Pa.Do -------------------------Daucus carota (carrot) -------------------1 Ala.Scierotinia sp.--------------------Beta vulgaris (beet).----.------.-.--------1 Pa.Do----------------------Brassica rapa (turnip)---------------------1 Ala.Do.----------------------Radicula armoracia (horse-------------1 Fla.* radish).Do --------------------------Solanum tuberosum .----------1 -----------Tex.Sclerotium sp--------------------Citrus limonia (lemon)---------------------1 Pa.Septoria apii-------------------Apium graveolens (celery)---------------I Do.Urocystis cepulae----------------Allium cepa (onion)---------------------1 Ga.Uromyces pisi. .------------------Lathyrus sp. (sweet pea)-----------1 ---------N. Y.Venturia pyrina.-.-----------------Pyrus communis (pear) ---------1 --------Md.Do--------------------------do --.----------------------2---------Mich.Verticillium albo-at rum-----------Dahlia sp.--------------------1 ---------D. C.GIBRALTARInsects:Rhizoglyphus sp. (mite) ------------Lactuca sativa (lettuce).------------------1 Mass.Syrphid. ...-----------------------Brassica oleracea capitata------------------1 Do.D0-------. ---------------Lactuca sativa (lettuce)---------------.----1 Do.Diseases:Cerospora apii ------------------Apium graveolens (celery) ----.-.---------1 Pa.Macrosporiu m tomato------------Lycopersicum esculentum ---------------1 Do.GRAND CAYMANInsects:Lepidosaphes alba (Coccidae)-------Manihot esculenta (cassava). 1------------D. C.GREAT BRITAINInsects:Pseudococcus sp. (Coccidac)--------Epiphyllum sp ------------------1 ---------D. C.Taeniothrips ericae (thrips).--------Calvna tulgaris (heat hcr) ------3 ---------Pa.Thrips flavus (thrips).-------------Chrysanthemum, aster, oxeye 1 ---------Do.daisy cuttings.Thrips tabaci atricornis (thrips) ---------.o.------------------------1 -------Do.

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1935j SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 33List, by countries, of pests collected and reported from July 1, 1933, to June 30, 1934,inclusive-Continued[All findings marked with an asterisk indicate State inspection]Number of inter-ccptions in-Country of origin and name of pest Host I Collectedin-GREECEInsects:Bruchidius biguttatus (Bruchidae). Cistus villosus------------------1 ---------Pa.Bruchus tristiculus (Bruchidae)-----Legume seed ------------------------------D. C.Curculionid--------------------Cistus villosus.------------------1 -------------Pa.Cynipid -----------------------------Sidertis euboea---------------1 ---------------N. Y.Dacus oleae (olive fruit fly)--------Olea europaea (olive)---------------2 -------Md.Myelois sp. (Pyralidae).-----------Ceratonia siliqua (St. Johns3 --------------N. Y. bread).Do _-.--------------------Juglans regia (English walnut) 1 ---------------Tex.Do -. .----------------------Robinia sp. (locust)--. 1 Va.Phycitinae (Pyralidae)-----------Malus sylvestris (apple). 1------N. Y.Diseases:Diess sp.?.--------------------Unknown stem --.--------Pa.Puccinia sp-.--------------------Allium sativum (garlic) -----------------3 Md.Do.---.-------------------------do ---------------------------1 N. Y.Sclerotium cepivorum-------------Alium cepa (onion)----------1---Do.Septoria citri.--------------------Citrus 8inensis (orange) --------------1 Do.GUADELOUPEInsects:Calendrinae (CurculioniIae)------Musa sp. (banana)------------------------P. R. Pheidole sp. (ant)----------------.--do.---------------------------1 -------Do.GUAMInsects:Aharerus sp. (Cucujidae).--------Areca catechu (betel pArk)-. -1 Calif.*Lc"ia sp. (earwig)---------------Tree seed.--------------------I----------Do.*Lepidosaphes sp. (Coccidae)-------Areca catechu-------------------.--. Do.*Phloeophthorus sp. (Scolytidae).--_ Hibiscus s. --------------------.---------.---Do.*Sciara sp. (Mycetophilidae) ------------do-.--------------------1 ------------Do.*GUATEMALAInsects:Adrarpeothrips alternates (thrips)-. Banana debris --------------1 --------------Pa.Agallia lingula (Cicadellidae)-------.---. do-----------------1 --1 -----------Do.Agallia sp. (Cicadellidae) -----------.--. .do .----------------1.---1 --------------Do.Anaedus sp. (Tenebrionidae)---------do-------------------2 --------------Md.Do --------------------------do------.----------------2--------------Pa.Do --.------------------------Musa sp. (banana) ------------1 -------------S. C.Anasa andresi (Coreidae).---------Banana debris ---------------1 -----------Do.Anastrepha sp. (Trypetidae).------Achras sapota (sapodilla)------------1 1 --La.Do ------------------------Lucuma mammosa (sapote) --------1 ------N. Y.Anechura varia (earwig)-----------Banana debris--------------1 --------------Md.Apion sp. (Curculionidae).-------.do --------------------1 ----------Pa.Aspidiotuv palmae (Coccidae).--------do-----------------------1 ------------Do.Berginus nigricolor (Lyctidae)-.------do ------------------1---------------------Do.Blastobasis sp. (Blastobasidae)------do--------------------1 ------------Do.Camponotus angulatuw (ant)---------do.-------------------1 ------------Md.Do ----------------------do .-------------------7 ------------Pa.Do ------.----.----------------do -------------------4 -----------S. C.Do ----.----------------------Musa sp (banana) -----------1 ------------M d.Do -----.-------------------------do --------------------.---.--. 1 ------Pa.Do ---. .-------------------------do.-----.---------------8 ------------S. C.Camponotus angulatus var. (ant) -------do--.---------------. 1-------------Do.Camponotus abdominalis var. (ant)-. Banana debris.---------------1 --------------Do.Camponotus sp ---------------------do --------------------5-------------Md.Do--. -------------------do---------.---------28 -------------Pa.Do-------------------.----do ..------------------17 -------------S. C.Do ------------------------Musa sp. (banana) ------------2 ------------Calif.*Do -----------------------do----------------1-------------------La.Do --_--------------------------. .do-----------------2---.2 ------------Md.Do _--.------------------------do _ ..------------------11 ------------S. C.Do ----------------------Tabebuia sp-----------------1 -------------La.Capaneus odiosus (Coreidae)------Banana debris--.--------1 -1 -----------Md.Do -----.-------------------do -------------------2--------------S. C.Do ----------------------Musa sp. (banana)----------2 -------------Do.Do ------------------------do-------.-------. -1------------Md.Carneocephala eagittifera (CicadelliBanana debris .-------------1-------------Pa.dae).116442-35----5

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34 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [JuneList, by countries, of pcsts collected and1 reported from July 1, 1933, to June 30,1934,.n:lusive-ContiniueI[All indings narkd w:th an asterisk indicate State inspection]Number of inter-ceptions in-Country of origin %ndi name of pest Host Collectedtk in--oGUATEALA-ContlnuedInsects-Continued.Catolethrus lon ulu (Curculionidae) Banana debris--------------2 ----------------Md.Do ---------------------------Musa sp. (banana) ----------1 ---------------Do.Do.---------------------------do ----------------------1--------------S. C.Catorama sp. (Anobiidae) ---------Cyclocarpa sp -----------------1 -------D. C.Catiophilus sp. (Curculionidae)-.-Banana debris -----------------------------Pa.Cerainidia musicoa (Syntomidae). do----------------------3--------------Do.Do ---------------------------do----------------------1------------S. C.C'eramidia sp. (Syntomidae)----------do ---------------------------------Md.Do---------------------------do----------------------1 -----------Pa.Chelymorphapubeces (Chrysomel---do---------------------1 ------------Do. idae).Chloropid ------------------------do ---------------------------------Do.Ciociiius dorsicitatus (Fulgoridae) ----do .---------------------1 Do.Colopteras latus (Nitidulidae)-------Ausa sp. (banana) ------------1 ------------S. C.Colopterus podicus (Nitidulidae). Banana debris-----------------------------Pa.Colopterus sp. (Nitidulidae) --------usa sp. (banana) -----------1----.---------Do.Coreid ------------------------Banana debris ---------------1--------------Do.Crematogas3ter brevispinosa var. (ant) ----do ------------------------------Do.Crematogaster parabiotca (ant )---------do_------------------2---------Do.Crenatojaster sp. (ant).----------------do ---------------------7 --------------Do.Do ---------------------------do ---------------_ -------------S. C.Do --------------------------Musa sp. (banana) --.--. _ I 1 Md.Do ---------------------------do ---------------------2 ------------S. C.Cryptothrips sp. (thrips)----------Banana debris ---------------1 ----------------Pa.Cucujid-----------------------Guaiacum officinale (lignum2 ----------------Calif.*vitae).Cyclptilum antillarurn (Gryllidae)-Banana debris------.--------1 ----------------S. C.Do _ _.------------------------Musa sp. (banana) ----------1 ---------------Do.Cyllopus barberi (Dryopidae).------Banana debris-----------------------------Pa.Delphacodes sp. (Delphacidae)--------do ----------------------1 ---------------Do.iabrtica sp. (Chrysomelidae .-------(10 ---------------------1 Do.Diaspis echinocacti cacti (Coccidae). Cactus -----------------------------2------Md.Diatraea ,saccharl:s (sugarcane Banana debris---------____ 1 ----------------Pa.borer).Disonycha sp. (Chrysornelidae)----Musa sp. (banana) ----------------------S. C.Dolichoderus bispinosus (ant)------Banana debris--------------3 ----------------Pa.Do --------------------------do ------------------------------------S. C.Do-------------------------Musa sp. (banana) ----------1 ---------------Do.Dolichoderus debilis (ant)----------Banana debris-------------.3 ----------------Pa.Dolichoderus sp. (ant) ---------------do ---------------------------------Do.Do----------------------------do ---------------------1 ----------------S. C.Do ---------------------------Mu a sp. (banana) ----------2 ---------------Do.Dolinma plana (Tenebrionidae).-Guaiacum officinale (lignum1 ------------Calif.*vitae).Edesi sp. (Pentatomidae)--------Banana debris ---------------1 Md.Elaterid .-.----------------------Guaiacum officinale ----------I -1 Calif,*Iinpoasca sp. (Cicadellidae) -------Banana debris.--------------2 Pa.Eneopteiinae (Gylidue) ------------do---------------------1 ---------------Do.IJ)iachna z irgata (Cuc-in---d--a 0---------------------1 --------------Do.E4tila sp. (Ceamhycidae) -----------0-----------------------------------Do.11 ury'phthaluuis lonygils (Pyrrho-----do ---------------------1 -Do.1ormica sp. (ant) ----------------Guaiacum officinale ----------1 Calif.*Geranoiuna sp. (' ipulilae ------Banana debris.---------------1 Pa.(;;poiai sp. (Cie~Acelidae)-------. ___do._.-.-. 1 -Do.--------------------M (0------------Is-------.-oIlaplothri7ps sp. (thi ips) ------------do ------------------------1 ---------------Do.llypnoidus quadriplagialus (Elater---------------------------1 -------------Do.idiae).Ilypthervnus sp. (Scolytidae) -.----do-----------------------2 ---------------Do.Iridoyresp. (ant---------------(10 -------------------------------Do.D o. .-. .----------. M usa sp. (banana).----.2 S. C .Kaloter(s ap. (termite).----------Banana debris.---------------1 ------------Pa.Laniinae e) rambycida ----------.Musa sp. (banana) ------------------.Do.Leucoptra C "fffIt (cotfee leaf Coffea s .------------------------1 -Do.mninlr ).Lcrchus trap( zidru (Tenebi ioniBanana debris--------------I --------------Md.o.-------------------------d --.-do --------------1-------. N. Y.Do --------------------------------------------------------------Pa.

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1935] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 35List, by countries, of pests collected and reported from July 1, 1933, to June 30, 1934,inclusive-Conti41ued[All findings marked with an asterisk indicate State inspection]Number of inter-ceptions in-Country of origin and name of pest Host C-llectedIn-GUATEMALA-ContinuedInsects-Continued.Lore/us trapeziderus (TenebrioniBanana debris--------------5 ----------------S. C.dae)Do --------------------------Musa sp. (banana)-----------6 ----------------Md.Do --------------------------do--------------------13 ----------------S. C.Lorelus sp. (Tenebrionidae)-------Banana debris ---------------1 ----------------Md.Do ---------------------------do---------------------5 ----------------Pa.Do-.------------------------Musa sp. (banana)------------1 ----------------La.Do -.---------------------------do ----1 -----------------Md.Do ..--------------------------do ----------------------1 --------------Pa.Do ..--------------------------do ----------------------3 ------------S. C.Lycaenid --.----------------------Banana debris---------------I --------------Pa.Marmara sp. (Gracilariidae).----------do ---------------------1 ----------------Do.Mecistorhinus sepulcratis (Penta-----do-----------------------1 ---------------Do.tomidae).Metamasius sericeus (silky cane wee.do ---------------------3-------------Do.vil).Do-------------------------do ---------------------3 ----------------S. C.Do.------------------------Musa sp. (banana).-------2 -----------------Calif.*Do------. -------------do ----------------------1 ----------------S. C.Metamasius sericeus carbonarius Banana debris--------------1 ----------------Md.(Curculionidae).Metriona erratica (Chrysomelidae) -----do --------------------1 -----------------Do.Mirid ----------------------------do---------------------1 ----------------Pa.Monar!hia monotropidia (Tingiti-----d(o---.-----------------5 ------------Do.dae).Alonanus concinnulus (Cucujidae) -----do---------------------8 ---------------Do.Do----------------------_ -----do -----------------------------------S. C.Do------------------------Musa sp. (banana) ------------2 -----------------Do.Monomorium sp. (ant)------------Banana debris --------------3 ----------------Pa.Mormidea sp. (Pentatomidae)---------do ------------------------------------Md..Myochrous melancholicus (ChrysoMusa sp. (banana)--------1 -----------------S. C.melidae).Neocattarus gracilis (Lygaeidae) ---Banana debris ---------------------------Pa.Neoponera unidentata (ant)----------do ----------------------3 -------------S. C.Do --------.------------------Musa sp. (banana) .--------1 -----------------Do.Neoponera sp. (ant) ------.--------Banana debris--------------9 -------------Pa.Do---------------------------do --------------------------------.----S. C.Do ------------------------Musa sp. (banana)----------1 ----------------Pa.Do--------------------------10 -------_---------------5 ----------------S. C.Neuroctenus litigiosus (Aradidae).--Guaiacum officinale (lignum1 ----------------Calif.*vitae).Opogona sp. (Tineidae) _-----------Banana debris -----------------------------Pa.Ozophora sp. (Lygaeidae)------------do-------------------------------------Do.Pachycondyla sp. (ant) --------.----------do----------------------1 ----------------S. C.Paratenetus sp. (Tenebrionidae) -do ----------------------------------Md.Do------------------------do---------------------------------Pa.Do -------------------------Musa sp. (banana)-----------1 -----------------Md.Parmenonta valida (Cerambycidae)Banana debris ---------------1 ----------------Pa.Pentatomid -----------------------do ---------------------1 ----------------Do.Phalangopsinae (Gryllidae)--------do ---------------------1 ---------------Do.Phaneropterinae (Tettigoniidae)____ Musa sp. (banana)-----------1 ----------------Oalif.*Pheidole anastasii (ant)----------Banana debris----------------8 --------------Pa.Pheidole flavens var. (ant) -------------do ------------------1--------------Do.Do _ ----------_-.-----Musa sp. (banana)--------------------------S. C..Pheidole sp. (ant)----------------Banana debris --------------3 ----------------Md.o ---------------------------do----------------------8--------------Pa.Do--------------------------do--------------------.1 ------------S. C.Do---------------------------Musa sp. (banana)-----------1--------------La.Do--------------------------o--.o ._ --------------1--------__ -Pa.Do--------------------------do--------------------14 ----------------S. C.Do-------------------------Palm -------------------------------1 Pa.Phloeothrips sp. (thrips) ----------Banana debris -------------1---------------Do.Phycitinae (Pyralidae)-----------Paultinia sp------------------1 -------D. C.Prenolepis sp. (ant)--------------Banana debris ------------I-----------Md.Do----------------------------do-------------------.--5 ------------Pa.Do--------------------------Musa sp. (banana) ------------4 ----------------S. C.Psalis americana (earwig)---------Banana debris--.-------------1 --------------Pa.Pseudaonidia articulatus (rufous Cocos nucifera (coconut) ------------2 1 Calif.*scale).Do------------------------Coffea sp----------------------------1---Do.*Do--------------------------Musa sp. (banana) ------------1 Md.

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36 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [JuneList, by cwitrics, of pests collected and reported from July 1, 1933, to June 30, 1934,inclusive--Continued[All findings marked with an asterisk indicate State inspection]Number of inter-ceptions in-Country of origin and name of pest Host Col ectedin-CCGUATEMALA-ContinuedInsects-Continued.Pseudococcus sp. (Coccidae).------Banana debris.--------------1 ---------------Pa.Pseudomnyrma flaridula (ant)-----Twig------------------------1 ---------------La.Pseudomyrma gracilis mexicana (ant) Banana debris---------------I--1 --Pa.Psychid.-----------------.------do--------------------------------La.Do -------. -----.-------do-.--------------------I ------------M d.Do---------------------------.-----do---------------------16 --.----------Pa.Do ---.---.-.-.-.--.--.--------do---------------------5 -------------S. C.Do.-.------------------------Musa sp. (banana)-----------1 ------------La.Do .do----. ----------d.---------------------2 ---------------Md.D o..-.-------.--.-.-----.-.--.-do ------.---------------------1 ------Pa.D .o. _. .---------------------------do---------------------3 ------------S. C.Pyralid--------------------------Banana debris.---------------1 -------------Pa.Do --.------------------------Musa sp. (banana)-----------1 -------------S. C.Pyroderces sp. (Cosmopterygidae). -Banana debris--------------1 ------------Pa.Pyrophorus sp. (Elateridae)-------Orchid------------------------1 ----------D. C.Rhinanisus sp. (Curculionidae) -----Musa sp. (banana) --------.------1 ------Pa.Schizoptera sp. (Schizopteridae)-._ Banana debris------------. ---. 1 -----.--. .--Do.Sciara sp. ( ycetophilidae)------. --do-------.-------------.--2 -.------------M d.Silvanus rulgaris (Cucujidae)---------do -----------------------3 --------------Pa.Sitranus sp. (Cucujidae).--------------do----------------------2 --------------Do.Do-------------------------Guaiacum officinale (lignumvi2 -------------Calif.* tae).Solenopsis sp. (ant).---------------Banana debris--------------3 ------------Pa.Do------------------------f Musa sp. (banana)------------2-----------S. C.Do---------------------------Palm----------------------------1 ---Pa.Do.------------------------Saccharum officinarum (sugar1 -------------Do.cane).Stenomimus sp. (Curculionidae). Banana debris --------------1 ------------Do.Stephanoderes guatemalensis (Scoly----do---------------------3 1 ------Do.tidae).Do .-----.---.---.--.---. -. I usa sp. (banana)-----------1 -------------La.Do ----------------------------do-----------------------------------Pa.Stephanoderes sp. (Scolytidae) -----Banana debris--------------2 ------------Do.Syntomid_-. .-----------------------do----------------------1 ----------------Md.Tapinoma sp. (ant.)----------------.--. do ---------------------3 --------------Pa.Do -.------------------------Xfusa sp. (banana) -----------1 ----------------S. C.Telephanus brontoides (Cucujidae)-Banana debris-------------1 -----------------Md.Do------------------.--.----do-------------------------------Pa.Do----------. ------------------do---.-------------------1---------------S. C.Do ------------------------Musa sp. (banana) -----------1 ----------------Do.Telephanuscostaricensis (Cucujidae) Banana debri ---------------2 ----------------Pa. Telepha n us setulosus (Cucujidae). Ananas sativus (pineapple)._1 ----------------Hawaii.*Do ..-------------------------Banana debris--------------6 -----------------Md.Do ---------------------------do---------------------1 -------------N. Y.Do. ...---------------------------do--------------------24 ----------------Pa.Do.-----------------------------do ----------------------5 S. C.Do.------------------------usa sp. (banana)------------7 -------------Md.Do -----.---------------------------do-----------------------------1 --------Pa.Do-------------------------do--------------------16 ----------------S.C.Telephanus sp (Cucujidae)--------Banana debris--------------1 -----------------d.Do.---------------------------.d.o---------------------1-----N. Y.Do..----------------------------do --.-----. -----7 Pa.Do. .---------------------------do-----------------------1 S. C...o.----------------. .--------Musa sp. (banana) ------------1 Pa.Do --------------------------o------------------------------------S. C.Thionia sp (Fuluoridae)----------Banana debris ------------------------------Pa.Tinei -------------------------Guaiacum officinale (lignum I---------------Calif.*vitae).Tonaspis sp. (Cereopidae).---------Banana debris). -Md.Tortricid -------------------------do ---------------------o.Do .---------------------------do .---------------------2 Pa.Tytthornirus rufolestactus (Curcu-----do ----------------.--.1.--------S. C Iion idae)Tyttho nimux sp. (Curculionidae)------0---------------------I---------------Do.Wasmrannta f uropunctata (ant)--------do----------------------3---------------Pa.Do -.------------------------Mu sp. (banana) ------------1 ----------------Md...o--------------------------do ---------------5------------S. C.XVleborus affinis (Scolytidae) ------Banana debris--------. 2 ----------------Pa.Xylehorus confu.u ? (Seolytidae). --o---.----------------------I 1 2 [.Zyqothrips sp. (thrips)-------------do. .--------------------. 1 o

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193Z] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 37List, by countries, of pests collected and reported from July 1, 1933, to June 30, 1934inclusive-Continued[All findings marked wvth an asterisk indicate State inspection]Number of inter-ceptions in-Country of origin and name of pest Host CollectedGUATEMALA-ContinuedDiseases:Ascomycetes. ...-----------------Musa sp. (banana) ----------I ------------Md.Coscinaria sp ---_-------------Unknown leaf--------------1-.----.----Do.Crepidotus sp_-.-----------------Musa sp. (banana)----------------------Pa.Diplodia sp -------------------Unknown leaf-------.--1--.-.-----------1 Md.Hypomyces terrestris?------------Musa sp. (banana).---.-------1 -----------Pa.Linchora sp---.--------------Ficus sp-----------------1 ------------Do.Marasmius sp -. _----------------Banana debris ..-------------I -------------Do.Myxomycetes .----------------Musa sp. (banana).---------1-------------Md.Do. ..-------------------------do-.-------------------4------------Pa.Do _---------------------Unknown leaf -.-------------1 ------------Do.Oleocellosis ---------------------Citrus aurantifolia (lime).----------------2 Do.Ospora citri-auranti ----------------do-----.-.-----------------------1 Do. Sclerotinia sp -.--------------------do -.---.----------------------..---1 Do.Septoria sp--------.--------------Unknown leaf.----.-----------1------------Do.Sphaeriaceae ...-----------------Musa sp. (banana) -----.--1----------Md.Thielariopsis paradoxa------------Ananas sativus (pineapple)-------------1 Pa.GUERNSE YDiseases:Oospora lactis parasitica.----------Lycopersicum esculentum----------------I Do.Sclerotinia gladioli..---------------Tritonia sp.---------.----------1 ---------D. C.HAITIInsects:Anastrepha sp. (Trypetidae).------Mangifera indica (mango) ---------1 .-N. Y.Coccus viridus (Coccidae)--------Coffea sp .------------------------------Fla.*Pseudaonidia articulatus rufouss Citrus sinensis (orange)---------.1 2 Do.*scale).Pseudococcus sp. (Coccidae) ------Dioscorea bulbifera (airpotato) 1 -----------D. C.Tinea sp, (Tineidae) -.------------Musa sp. (banana)----------1 ------------N. Y.Diseases:Diplocarpon rosae. ..---------------Rosa sp ---------------------------.-. 1 Do.Oleocellosis -.------------------Citrus sinensis (orange).-.----------------1 Tex.Thielaviopsis paradoxa------------Saccharum officinarum (sugar---.------Pa.cane).HAWAIIInsects.Asterolecaniumpustulans(Coccidae). Bougainvillea sp------------------1---------Calif.*Do .-.----------------------Hibiscus sp-------------------1 1 ------Do.*Do ..----------------------Tecomaria capensis (Cape1---------Do.*honeysuckle).Bactroceracucurbitae (melon fly)----Cucumis sativus (cucumber).-. ---1 .Do.*Bruchus sp. (Bruchidae)-----------Prosopis chilensis. ----------------I----------Do.*Do --------------------------------do.do----.------------------1-----------D. C.Caryedonrfuscus (Bruchidae)------Cascara saqrada (eascara) ----------1 1 ------Calif.*Do ..----------------------Tamarindus indica (tamarind) -----1 ------Do.*Cerambycid.------------------Aleurites moluccana (kukui --. 1 ---------Do.*nut).Do .-.---------------------Rosa w oodsi (Woods rose) ------.-------.-Do.*Ceratitis capitata (Mediterranean Coffea sp----.---------------------2 -.-. Do.*fruit fly).Do.---------------------Mangifera indica (mango) ----------1 1-. Do.*Ceroplastes rubens (Coccidae)-----Leaf lei-.------------------------1 Do.*Ceroplastes sp. (Coccidae)--------Palm.--------------------------.----Do.* Chelisoches morio (earwig)--------Ananas sativus (pineapple) ---2 ------1 .Do.*Coccus acuminatus (Coccidae).----Gardenia florida (Cape-jas-------2 ------Do.*mine).Coccus elongatus (Coccidae).-------Acalypha sp. (copperleaf)---------1 ------Do.*Do ---------------------Areca catechu (betel palm).4 ------------Do.*Do -----.-.--.---------------Codiaeurn sp. crotonn) -------1 ------3 ---. Do.*Do--.----.--------------Draccena sp-.-.--------------. ------1 _. Do.*Do --.---------------------Euphorbia sp-. .----------------1 ---------Do.*Do-.------------------Gardenia sp------------.---. .-------1 ------Do.*o0----------------------Hibiscus sp--------------------.1 1 ------Do.*Do---------------------Poinsettia pulcherrima (poin----------1 Do.*settia).Coccus viridis (Coccidae)---------Coffea sp.------------.----------1 Do.*Do-----------------------Tecomaria capensis (Cape.1--------Do.*honeysuckle).

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38 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT QUARANTINE [JuneList, by countries, of pests collected and reported from July 1, 1933, to June 30, 1934,inclusive-Continued[All findings marked with an asterisk indicate State inspection]Number of inter-ceptions in-Country of origin and name of pest Host Collectedin-0 d ZHAW AII-ContinuedInsects-Continued.Coccus sp. (Coccidae)-------------Cocos nucifera (coconut)--------------2 --------Calif.*Do.-------------------------Gardenia sp----------------------------1 --------Do.*Dinoderus miinutus (Bostrichidae)___ Bamboo-------------------------------Do.*Diocalandra taitensis (Tahitian cocoCocos nuczjera (coconut)------------------.Do.*nut weevil).Do-------------------------Ilihiscus sp------------------------1------Do.*Ercunetisflaristriata (sugarcane bud Ananas satirus (pineapple)---9 -------------Do.*worm).Do-----------------------.-A reca cotechu (betel palm)--I--------------Do *Do------------------------Cocos nucifera (coconut)------2 27 6 ---Do.*Ereunetis ninwzcula (Tineidae)---Ananas satirus (pineapple).3 -------------1 Do.*Ereunetis sp. (Tineidae).------------do---------------------2 1 2 ---Do.*Do -------------------------Cocos nucilera (coconut)------____ -1 --------Do.*Ilaplothrips gowrdeyi (thrips)------Ananas satirus (pineapple)---I -------------Do.*Do------------------------Cut flowers--------------------------------Do 'Do------------------------Flower lei---------------------1---------Do.*Lepidosaphes auriculata (Coccidae). Codiaeum sp. (croton)--------1 2 1 9 Do.*Lepidosaphes sp. (Coccidae)-------Gardenia sp------------------------------Do.*Minthea rugicollis (Lyctidae) ------Chinese herb-----------------1 ------------Do.*Mid ---------------------------Ananas sativus (pineapple) ---1 ----------Do.*Monomorium sp. (ant) --------------do---.-------------------------1------Do.*Noctuid-----------------------Flower lei------------------------------Do.*Opogona aurisquamosa (Tineidae). Aleurites moluccana (kukui ---1 ---------Do.*nut).Do -.------------------------Cocos nucifera (coconut)----------------1 ---Do.* Opogona sp. (Tineidae)----------Ananas sativus (pineapple).-3 ------------Do.*Ortalid ----------------------------Lycopersicum esculentum------------------1 Pa.Parlatoria mytilaspiformis (CocciCodiaeum sp. (croton)--------1 1 ---2 ---Calif.*dae).Phenacaspis sp. (Coccidae)--------Cocos nucifera (coconut)---------1 10 6 ---Do.*Do --------------------------Mangifera indica (mango)----------2 1 -Do.*Do ---------------------------Palm -------------------------------1 Do.*Phycitinae (Pryalidae)-----------Cascara sagrada (cascara)-----------1 -------Do.*Pheidole mactavishi (ant)-----------Cocos nucifera (coconut)------------1 ------Do.*Do ------------------------Flower lei-------------------------1 ------Do.*Psammoecus insularis (Cucujidae). Ananas satirus (pineapple)---1 --------------Do.*Pseudaonidia clavigera (Coccidae).Acalypha sp (copperleaf). -----------1 ------Do.*Do ------------------------Codiacum sp. (croton)-------------1 ------Do.*)o --------------------------Hibiscus sp------------------1 2 3 ------Do.*Pseudaonidia tesserata (Coccidae). __ Calliandra sp-------------------1 ---1 ------Do.*Do------------------------Hibiscus sp --------------------6 5 1 ---Do.*Pseudaonidia sp. (Coccidae)-------Gardenia sp-------------------------1 ------Do.*Pseudococcus kraunhiae (Coccidae). Codiaeum sp (croton) ----------------2 ---Do.*Do ------------------------Dracacna sp-------------------------1 ------Do.*Pseudococcus virgatus (Coccidae). Areca catechu (betel palm) ---6 ------------Do,*Do------------------------Codiaeum sp. (croton)--------_--------I Do.*Do ------------------------I Piper belle (betel pepper) -------1 -----------Do.*Pseudococcus sp. (Coccidae) -------Cocos nucifira (coconut)----------. 1 ------Do.*Do_------------------------Codiaeum sp. (croton)---------------1--------Do.*Pyralid-----------------------Ananas sativus (pineapple)---1 ------------Do.Rhizoglyphus sp. (mite)-----------Solanum tuberosum--------------1 ------Do.*Rhyncolus longulus (Curculionidae)Aleurites moluccana (kukui 1--------Do.*nut).Ript'rsia palnarum (Coccidac) ----Cocos nucifera (coconut)------4 ---32 13 .-Do.*Do.------------------------Palm------------------------------1 --------Do.*Stephanoderts sp .(Scolyt idae)------A---urites moluccana (kukui ---1 --------. Do.*nut).Sternochltus nangiferae (mango Mangifera indica (mango)----------10 1 1 Do.*weev il).Taeniothrips gladioli (gladiolus Gladiolus sp----------------------1 ------Do.*thrips).Tatniothrips hawaiiensis (thrips). Flower lei.---------.---------------1 1 ---Do.*Tarsonemid (mite).--------------Cocos nucifera (coconut) ---------------1 -Do.'Tetranychid (mit e)------------------(10.---------------------------1 ------Do.*Tyroglyphid (mite) ----------------------------------------2 1 ---)o.*Do-------.-------------------Codiacu m sp. (croton)--------------1 ---Do.*10 ._.---------------------Macadam ia sp ------------------1--------Do.* Do. .------------------------Polyanthes tuberosa (tuberose). ---1 ----------Do.*Urophorus humeralis (Nitidulidae)._ Anartas safivus (pineapple). 3 -------1 ---Do.*

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1935] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 39List, by countries, of pests collected and reported from J1uly 1, 1933, to J1 une 30, 1934,inclusive--Conti ile1d[All findings marked with an asterisk indicate Stae inspection]Number of inter-coptions, in-CollectedCountry of origin and name of pest host In_bI)HONDURASInsect s:Aeolus yucatanus (Elateridae) -------Musa sp. (banana) -----------I---------------La-A naedus sp. (Tenebrionidae)------Banana debris ------------.----Pa.Anastrepha sp. (Trypetidae) --------Chrysophyllum cainito (star 1 ---------La.apple).Do --------------------------Aangifera indica (mango) -------------1 Do.A nomala attenuata (Scarabacidae) -Banana debris -----------------Pa.Anthomiyid ------------do------------o -----------------------1).A.qpidiotus pal/mae (Coccidae) -------Musa sp. (banana) ------------1 Aa.A,'~da sp. (Ccia)--------do-----------------------I-------------IMd.Asiltus sp. (Coccidae) --d---MdA sterolecanium hambusae (Coccidae) Bamboo ---------------------------------La.A-sterolecanium sp. (Coccidae)-----Cocos nucifera (coconut) -------2 ---Do.A faenius cribrithorax (Scarabacidae)Banana debris --------------Pa.Ait/acizesnmutans (Cicadellidae)-------do ----------------------1 ----Do.Ca/'ndra sp. (Curculionidae) ------Musa sp. (banana) -------------------La.Cawponotus abdominalis stercoraBanana debris--2---------------S. C.rius (ant).Crmponotus angulatus (ant)----------o ----------------------I ---Pa.Do --------------------------Ahusa sp. (banana) ------------I S. C.Ca uponotus sp. (ant) ------------Banana debris ---------------2 ------------La.Do---------------------------do L Pa.Do ---------------------------o------0 ---------------2-------------Pa.Do.----.------------------------o----------------------2---------------S. C.o o------------------.-------Coccoloba uvifera (seagrape) -----------------2 Ala.Do -------------------------MAangifera indica (mango) -------------------1 Do.Do ------------------------Musa sp. (banana) ----------12 La.Do -----------------------------do-----------------2--2 ------S. C.Do------------------------(do ----------------------1 Tex.Ce mpodes sp. (Nitidulidae) ----------do --------------------I ------------Pa.Capaneus odiosus (Coreidae)-------Banana debris ------------La.Cecidonyiid ------------__ -------Musa sp. (banana) ---------------LDo.Cedilsa sp. (Fulgoridae) ----------Banana debris --------------I------------Pa.Cephaloleia sp. (Clirysomelidae) --------(o ----------------------I Do.Ceramidia sp. (Syntomidae) ------------------------------Do.I)o ------------------------usa sp. (banana)-La.o----------------------------(10 -------------------.-----------Coccqs acuminatus (Coccidae)-----Gardenia florida (Cape-jas------2 La.mine).Colaspis sp. (Chrysomelidae)------Banana debris ---------------I Pa.Colo/terus posticus (Nitidulidae).Musa paradisica (I)lantain) ---N. Y.Copters sp. (Nitidulidae)_-------Musa sp. (banana) ----------La.Coreid ----------------(o ---------------------I Do.Crematogastcr brrvispinosa var. (ant) -----do ------------------Do.Crematogastcr sp. (ant) ----------o--------------------------Do.Do .----------------------------( o --------------------S. C.Cryptarcha sp. (Nitidulidae) --------Banana debris ---------------1 Pa.Cryptorhopalum sp. (Dermestidae)-Musa sp. (banana) ------------1 La.Curculionid------------------_do------d.-----------------------)o.Cycloptilum contectum (Gryllidae) ------o----------------------_ S. C.Dialeurodes citri (citrus whitefly).Gardenia florida (Capejas---La.mine)Dietyophara tn-chyrhi'na (Fulgoridae) Banana debris------P.I7idelrus winv/us (Bostrichidae) ------do --1 -Do.I)raen/arephat/a lenticula (Cicadel-------1 ---------Do.fid",eC)PEitn inufamatartm (ant) ---------------do --ss.A ocaisco sp. ({'icadellidae) ---------------------------------Pa.Epipaschiinme (Pyralidae) ------------do ------------------La.Do (10Md.Galgupho pwnctifer (Cynidae) ------------------------------1 A la.Do ---------------------------doL.-----------------------------La.1)0d--------------------------do -------------------P--a..i.ameroji.' sp. (N itidulidae) -resentiq cu U calabashh rev --La.C'pona vi;/iorti (Cicadellidae) ------Banana debris --------------j----Pa.Gypona sp. (Cicadellidae)------------do ----------------litilipus sp. (Curculionidae)------Persea americana (avocado) 1 La.l/ypothtnemus sp. (Scolytidae) ------Banana debris ---------------2 ------Mass.Kaoterinus sp. (termite) ------------.--do -------------------1 --------Pa.Do ----------------Coccoloba vvifcra (seagnpe) ----2 Ala.Labia arcuata (earwig) ------------Asa s 1). (banana)---------,--------D o -----------------.---1 -d ------_.-----. ----. C---

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40 BUREAU OF ENTOMOLO