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Service and regulatory announcements

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Title:
Service and regulatory announcements
Added title page title:
Service and regulatory annoucements with list of plant pests intercepted with imported plants and plant products
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Plant Quarantine
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C.
Publisher:
U.S. G.P.O.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Quarterly
Language:
English
Physical Description:
8 v. : 23 cm.

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Subjects / Keywords:
Plant quarantine -- Periodicals -- United States ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )
federal government publication ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
S.R.A.--B.P.Q. no. 112 (July/Sept. 1932)-S.R.A.--B.P.Q. no. 119 (Apr./June 1934).
General Note:
Title from caption.
Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not subject to copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105.
Resource Identifier:
030288972 ( ALEPH )
12903553 ( OCLC )
sn 86033972 ( LCCN )

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Preceded by:
Service and regulatory announcements
Succeeded by:
Service and regulatory announcements

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STATE P1 State of Florida Department of Agriculture


DIVISION OF PLANT INDUSTRY







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S.R.A.* B.P.Q. Issued June 1934

United States Department of Agriculture Bureau of Plant Quarantine






SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 1933





These announcements are issued quarterly and constitute a permanent record of the work of the Bureau in the enforcement of the plant quarantine act of 1912 and certain related acts, including the text of quarantines and regulations thereunder, and the
more important circulars and decisions explanatory of, or bearing on, such quarantines and regulations






WITH LIST OF PLANT PESTS INTERCEPTED WITH IMPORTED PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS










vNRT








77












UNITED STATES
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE WASHINGTON: 1934


















F LA. ID EPT, AM.
DIV. OF PLA"~
INDUSTRY%
UBRARI


ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE
A. S. HOYT, Acting Chief.
B. CONNOR, Business Manager.
R. C. ALTHOUSB, Information Officer.


E. R. SASSCER, in Charge Foreign Plant Quarantines. S. B. FRACKER, in Charge Domestic Plant Quarantines. LoN A. HAWKINS, in Charge Technological Division. A. F. BURGESS, in Field Charge Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail Moth Quarantine
(Headquarters, Greenfield, Mass.).
L. H. WORTHLEY, in Field Charge Japanese Beetle Quarantine and European
Corn Borer Project (Headquarters, Harrisburg, Pa.).
R. E. McDONALD, in Field Charge Pink Bollworm and Thurberia Weevil Quarantines (Headquarters, San Antonio, Tex.).
B. L. BOYDEN, in Field Charge Date Scale Quarantine (Headquarters, Indio,
Calif.).
P. A. HOIDALE, in Field Charge Mexican Fruit Fly Quarantine (Headquarters,
Harlingen, Tex.).
II












TABLE OF CONTENTS

CONTENTS OF NO. 114 (JANUARY-MARCH 1933)
Page
Quarantine and other offi cial announcements -.. ... ... .. ... ..... ...... .. ... ..... ... ... .. 137
Announcements relating to European corn-borer quarantine (foreign) (no. 41) ---------------- 137
Quarantine on account of the European corn borer and other dangerous insects and plant
diseases with revised regulations --. ..-------.------------------------------------------ 137
Announcements relating to Japanese-beetle quarantine (no. 4S) ------------------------------- 141
Instructions to postmasters ....------------------------------------------------------- 141
Modification of Japanese-beetle quarantine regulations (amendment no. 1) ----------------112
Instructions to general )ublic through newspapers ------------------------------------ 142
Announcement relating to narcissus-bulb quarantine (no. 62) -------------------------------- 143
Narcissus inspection records for 1932 --------------------.------------------------------- 14:3
Announcements relating to packing materials quarant ine (no. 69) ----------------------------- 144
Packing materials quarantine no. 69 with regulations -- ---------------------------------- 144
Instructions to collectors of custorns (T. ). 46267) ------------.----------------------- 147
Announcements relating to )hony-p each disease quarantine (no. 67) ---------------.---------- 147
Phony-peach disease quarantine revoked ----------------------------------------- 117
Notice of lifting of quarant ine no. I67--ph ony-peach disease quarant ine.-.............. 14,
Instructions to postimasters-removal of quarantine on account of phony-peach disease- 14s
Announcements relating to pink-bollworm quarantine (no. 52) -----------------------I------- 149
Modification of pink-bollworm qluarantine regulations (amendment no. 1) ----------------- 149
Notice to general public through newspapers ------------------------------------------- 149
Instructions to postmasters ----------------------------------------------------------- 150
Announcement relating to plant safeguard regulations --------------------------------------- 150
Instructions to collectors of customs (T.I). 46211) ------------------------------------------ 150
Announcement relating to seed or paddy rice quarantine (no. 55) ---------- ------------------ 150
Revision of quarantine and regulations ---------------------------------------------------- 150
Announcement relating to white pine blister-rust quarantine (no. 63) ------------------------- 152
Instructions to posrmasters --------------------------------------------------------------- 152
Terminal inspection of plants and plant products --------------------------------------------- 153
Idaho discontinues terminal inspection ---------------------------------------------------- 153
Miscellaneous items -------------------------------------------------------------------------- 153
Plant quarantine restrictions, Republic of Brazil (P.Q.}.A.-294, supI)lement no. 1) ------- 153
Plant quarantine restrictions, Republic of Greece (B. P.Q.-347)------------------------- 154
Plant quarantine restrictions, Republic of Chile (B.P.Q.--4s) ---------------------------- 158
Plant quarantine restrictions, Commonwealth of Australia (P.Q.C.A.-299 revised, supplement no. 1) --------------.-------------------------------------------------------------- 164
Plant quarantine restrictions, (}uateinala P. Q.C.A.-314, supplement no. 2) --------------- 164
Plant quarantine restrictions, Sweden (P.Q.C.A.-321, supplement no. 1) ----------------- 164
Plant quarantine restrictions, Kingdom of Norway (B.P.Q.--350) ------------------------- 164
European corn borer-State regulations (B.P.Q.-346, revised Mar. 16, 1933) --------------- 167
Permits potato imports from Spain ------------------------------------------------------- 173
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act -------------------------------173
Organization of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine -------------------------------------------------- 175

CONTENTS OF NO. 115 (APRIL-JUNE 1933)

Quarantine and other official announcements ----------------------------------------------------- 177
Announcement relating to black stem rust quarantine (no. 38) -------------------------------- 177
Barberries and mahonias classified under black stem rust quarantine regulations (P.Q.C.A.320, revised, supplement no. 1) ---------------------------------------------------------- 177
Announcement relating to European corn-borer quarantine (foreign) (no. 41) ------------------ 178
Instructions to collectors of customs (T.D. 46335) ------------------------------------------ 178
Announcement relating to Japanese-beetle quarantine (no. 4S) ------------------------------- 178
Administrative instruct ions-comulercially packed apples under the Japanese-beetle quarantine regulations (B.P.Q.-352) ----------------------------------------------------------- 178
Announcement relating to narcissus-bulb quarantine (no. 62) --------------------------------- 178
Supplementary administrative instructions-narcissus treatment and pest suppression
(B.P.Q.-353) -------------------------------------------------------------------------- 178
Announcement relating to nursery stock, plant, and seed quarantine (no. 37) ------------------ 181
Instructions to collectors of customs (T.D. 46431) -------------------------------------181
Announcement relating to packing-materials quarantine (no. 69) ------------------------- ---- 182
Amendment no. I to notice of quarantine -------------------------------------------182
Announcement relating to seed- or l addy-rice quarantine (no. 55)---------------------------182
Instructions to collectors of customs (T.D. 46373) ------------------------------------- 182
Terminal inspection of plants and plant products --------------------------------------------- 183
Wyoming discontinues terminal inspection ------------------------------------------------ 183
Georgia discontinues terminal inspection -------------------------------------------------- 183
Puerto Rico inaugurates terminal inspection ----------------------------------------------- 183
Miscellaneous itetns ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- 184
Regulations governing the movement of plants and plant products through the mails
(B. P.Q.-351) ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- 184
Regulations governing the importation of plants and plant products into Italy (P.Q.C.A.289, supplement no. 1) -------------------------.-------------------------------------- 185
Summary of the plant-quarantine restrictions of the Republic of Germany (B.P.Q.-302)
(revised) ----------------------.------------------------------------------------------- 185
Plant-quarantine restrictions, Union of South Africa (P.Q.C.A.-297, Supplement no. 3) -. 193
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act ------------------------------- 193
Organization of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine -------------------------------------------------- 195
682:30-34 1






2 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE

CONTENTS OF NO. 116 (JULY-SEPTEMBER 1933)
Quarantine and other official announcements ----------------------------------------------------- 1
Announcements relating to Dutch elm disease -------------------.---------------------197
Secretary Wallace calls hearing Se 15 on Dutch elm disease --------------------197
Notice of public hearing to consider the advisability of prohibiting or restricting the entry of
elm and related species of trees and parts and products thereof from Europe ------------ 198
Announcements relating to fruit and vegetable quarantine (no. 56)_ ..................
Amendment no. 6 of regulations supplemental to notice of quarantine -------------------- 198
Instructions to collectors of customs (T.D. 46591) ------------------------------------- 2
Announcements relating to Japanese-beetle quarantine (no. 48) -----------------------------200
Japanese-beetle conference in Washington Octot er 24 ------------------------------------20
Fruits and vegetables may be shipped this fall without Japanese-beetle certificates on and
after September 15 ----------------------------------------------------------------------- 2
Removal of Japanese-beetle quarantine restrictions on the interstate movement of fruits
and vegetables ....------------------------------------------------------------------ 201
Announcement relating to Mexican fruit-fly quarantine (no. 64) ------------------------------- 201
Department authorizes lengthening of next shipping season for citrus fruit of lower Rio
Grande Valley --------------------------------------------------------------------------- 201
Announcements relating to nursery stock, plant, and seed quarantine (no. 37) ---------------202
Instructions to collectors of customs (T.D. 46590) ---------------------------------------202
Conditions governing the entry and treatment of narcissus-bulb importations (B.P.Q.-354).- 202 Strong calls conference on important plant quarantine -----------------------------------203
Notice of public conference to consider certain changes with respect to the administration
of nursery stock, plant, and seed quarantine no. 37 -------------------------------204
Announcements relating to pink bollworm quarantine (no. 52) ------------------------------204
Revision of re ulations -----------------------------------------------------204
Notice to general public through newspapers ------------------------------------------ 211
Campaign against pink bollworm started in cotton fields of South ------------------------- 212
Announcements relating to Thurberia-weevil quarantine (no. 61) ---------------------------- 212
Revision of regulations --------------------------------------------------------------------- 212
Notice to general public through newspapers -------------------------------- 218
Miscellaneous items ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- 218
Plant quarantine restrictions, New Zealand (P.Q.C.A.-306, supplement no. 1) ----------- 218
Plant quarantine restrictions, Jamaica, B.W.I. (B.P.Q.-355) ----------------------------- 219
Plant quarantine restrictions, Republic of Greece (B.P.Q.-347, supplement no. 1) --------- 221
Plant quarantine restrictions, Germany (B.P.Q.-302. revised, supplement no. 1) ----------223
Plant quarantine restrictions, British Honduras (P.Q.C.A.--314, supplement no. 3) -------- 224
Shipment of Mexican citrus fruits in bond through the United States (P.Q.C.A.-305,
revised) ------------------------.--------------------------------------------------------- 225
Lee A. Strong named Chief of Bureau of Entomology ------------------------------ 227
Fruit-!y survey in the West Indies, Brazil, Uruguay, Chile, and Peru -------------------- 227
Statement of Federal plant quarantines --------------------------------------------------- 241
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act ---------------------------------- 242
Organization of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine .------------------------------------------------244

CONTENTS OF NO. 117 (OCTOBER-DECEMBER 1933)
Quarantine and other official announcements ---------------------------------------------------245
Announcements relating to Dutch elm disease quarantine (no. 70) ---------------------------- 245
Notice of quarantine no. 70, with regulations ---------------------------------------------- 245
Instructions to collectors of customs (T.D. 46721) -------------------------------------- 248
Information for importers of elm burl logs under the Dutch elm disease quarantine no. 70
(B.P.Q.-356) ------------------------------------------------------------------------248
Announcements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (no. 48)----------------------------- 250
May extend beetle quarantine to Maine and West Virginia -----------------------------25
Notice of public hearing to consider the advisability of extending the quarantine on account
of the Japanese beetle to the States of Maine and West Virginia ------------------------- 250
Revision of Japanese beetle quarantine and regulations ------------------------------------ 251
Notice to general public through newspapers ------------------------------------------- 260
Announcements relating to pink bollworm quarantine (no. 52) -------------------------------- 261
Amendment to pink bollworm quarantine regulations ------------------------------------- 261
Notice to general public through newspapers ---------------------------------------262
Reviion of pink bollworm quarantine and regulations ------------------------------------ 263
Notice to general public through newspapers ----------------------------------------- 27
Instructions to postmasters ------------------------------------------------------------271
Announcements relating to rice quarantine (no. 55) ------------------------------------------ 271
Revision of quarantine and regulations ----------------------------------------------------271
Instructions to collectors of customs (T.D. 46809) ------------------------------------- 274
Announcements relating to Thurberia weevil quarantine (no. 61) ------------------------------ 275
Instructions to postmasters ---------------------------------------------------------------- 275
Miscellaneous items ....... ...............----------------------------------------------------- 275
Dutch elm disease conference October 26 ----------------------------------------- 275
Notice of conference to discuss Dutch elm disease situation in the United States- -------- 276 Plant-quarantine restrictions, Kingdom of Italy (P.Q.C.A.-289, supplement no. 2) -------- 276
Plant-quarantine restrictions, Kingdom of Belgium (P.Q.C.A.-315, supplement no. 1)-----276
Plant-quarantine restrictions, Republic of Brazil (P.Q.C.A.-294, supplement no. 2) -------277
Plant-quarantine restrictions, Republic of Argentina (B.P.Q.-357) ------------------------ 277
Plant-(uarintine restrictions, Republic of Mexico (P.Q.C.A.-284, supplement no. 7)-------288
Plant-quarantine restrictions, England and Wales (P.Q.C.A.-327, supplement no. 1) ------288
Plant-quarantine restrictions, Kingdom of Belgium (P.Q.C.A -315, supplement no. 2)----- 289
Official plant inspection service instituted in Hungary --------------------------------290
Penalties imposed for violations of the Piant Quarantine Act ---------- z ------------ ---------- 290
List of current quarantines and other restrictive orders and miscellaneous regulations---------- 292 Organization of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine ----------------------------------------------299
List of intercepted plant pests.
Index.

0





S.R.A.--B.P.Q. No. 114 IS1sn1~ 19;









United States Department of Agriculture

BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE



SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS

JANUARY-MARCH. 1933


CONTENTS Pg

Quarantine and other official announcements -------------------------------------------------- 137
Announcements relating to European corn-borer quarant ine (foreign) (no. 41)------------------ 137
Quarantine on account of the European corn borer and other dangerous insects and plant
diseases with revised regulations ---------------------------------------------------- 137
Announcements relating to Japanese-beetle quarantine (no. 4S) ------------------------------ 14t
Instructions to postmasters----------------------------------------------------------- 141
Modification of Japanese-heetle quarantine regulate ions (amendment no. 1)----------------- 142
Instructions to general public through newspapers- --------------------------------- 142
Announcement relating to narcissus-bulh quarantine (no. 62)---------------------------------143
Narcissus inspection records for 1932--------------------------------------------------- 143
Announcements relating to packing materials quarantine (no, 69)---------------------------- 144
Packing materials quarantine no. 69 with regulations------------------------------------ 144
Instructions to collectors of customs (T.D. 46267)------------------------------------ 147
Announcements relating to phony-peach disease quarantine (no. 67)-------------------------- 147
Phony-peach disease quarantine revoked----------------------------------------------- 147
Notice of lifting of quarantine no. 67--phony-peach disease quarantine--------------------- 148
Instructions to Ipostmiasters-remnoval of quarantine on account of phony-peach disease- 148
Announcements relating to 1ink-bollworm quarantine (no. 52) ------------------------------ 149)
Modification of pink-bollwormi quarantine regulations (amendment no. 1)------------------ 149
Notice to general public through newspapers--------------------------- ------------- 149
Instructions to postmasters------------------------------------------------------- 150
Announcement relating to plant safeguard regulations -------------------------------------- 150
Instructions to collectors of customs (T.D. 46211) --------------------------------------- 150
Announcement relating to seed or padIdy rice quarantine (no. 5,5) ---------------------------- 150
Revision of quarantine an(1 regulations ------------------------------------------------ 150
Announcement relating to white pine blister-rust quarantine (no. 63)------------------------- 152
Instructions to postmasters----------------------------------------------------------- 152
Terminal inspection of plants and plant products ------------------------------------------ 153
Idaho discontinues terminal inspection ------------------------------------------------ 153
Miscellaneous items -------------------------------------------------------------- ------- 153
Plant quarantine restrictions, Republic of Brazil (P.Q.C.A.-294, supplement no. 1) ---------15:3
Plant quarantine restrictions, Republic of Greece (B.P.Q.-347)-------------------------154
Plant quarantine restrictions, Republic of Chile (B.P.Q.-348)--------------------------- 15,S
Plant quarantine restrictions, Commonwealth of Australia (P.Q.C.A.-299 revised, supplement no. 1)------------------------------------------------------------------------- 164
Plant quarantine restrictions, Guatemala (P.Q.C.A.-314, supplement no. 2)--------------- 164
Plant quarantine restrictions, Sweden (P.Q.C .A.--321, supplement no. 1)------------------ 164
Plant quarantine restrictions, Kingdom of Norway (B.P.Q.-350)------------------------ 164
European corn borer-State regulations (B.P.Q.-346, revised MLar. 16, 1933)---------------- 167
Permits potato imports from Spain---------------------------------------------------- 173
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act -------------------------------- 173
Organization of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine ----------------------------------------------- 173



QUARANTINE AND OTHER OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO EUROPEAN CORN BORER QUARANTINE (FOREIGN) (NO. 41)

QUARANTINE ON ACCOUNT OF THE EUROPEAN CORN BORER AND OTHER DANGEROUS INSECTS AND PLANT DISEASES WITH REVISED REGULATIONS

INTRODUCTORY NOTE

In the 5 years which have elapsed since tile last revision of these regulations sufficient changes have taken place in tile general situation to justify a considerable modification of the restrictions so as to liberalize materially the conditions governing the entry into the United States of corn and the allied plants concerned.
174391-33-1 317





138 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE ~January-March,

Experience having demonstrated that articles made from cobs or other parts of the corn plant by methods involving any considerable degree of process or manufacture are unlikely to carry the European corn borer or other injurious pests, such articles are relieved of all restriction except that of being still subject to inspection. Under the new regulations the same status is accorded to corn silk, imported in considerable amounts for the manufacture of medicinal preparations.
In making provision for the entry of green corn on the cob in small lots for local use only, from adjacent areas of Canada, cognizance has been taken of the fact that the infested regions of both countries are practically coincident, and that Canada maintains a quarantine to prevent the spread of the European corn borer to the Provinces west of Ontario. It Is therefore considered that the few shipments concerned involve no appreciable risk.
Under the revised regulations commercial shipments of corn on the cob, green or mature, from the borer-free western Provinces of Canada, and shelled corn and seeds of the other plants covered by this quarantine from any part of Canada, are permitted entry under proper safeguards, which include permit, entry inspection, and a certificate of freedom from corn borer issued by the Canadian authorities. This certificate and entry inspection may be waived at the discretion of the department for shipments originating in borer-free areas.
According to the most recent information available to the department the European corn borer appears to be absent from the countries of the West Indies, Mexico, Central America, and South America, and importation is now permitted from these areas of corn on the cob, green or mature; in addition the presence of bits of cob or other fragments of the corn plant in Importations of shelled corn will be disregarded. Permit and other requirements of the regulations are still continued, however, as a protection against other pests.
The revised regulations now provide for mail importations of corn and the seeds of the other plants covered by this quarantine. Inasmuch as these are enterable in commercial quantity by freight or express, it would appear that under the safeguards provided entry by mail can justly be authorized in order to facilitate the import of the small quantities often needed for seed purposes.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.


NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 41, WITH REGULATIONS (SECOND REVISION)
(Effective June 1, 1926)
The fact has been determined by the Secretary of Agriculture, and notice is hereby given, that dangerous plant pests, including the so-called European corn borer (Pyrausta nubilalis Hubn.) and also other dangerous insects, as well as plant diseases not heretofore widely prevalent or distributed within and throughout the United States, exist, as to one or more of such pests, in Europe, Asia, Africa, Dominion of Canada, Mexico, Central and South America, and other foreign countries and localities, and may be introduced into this country through importations of the stalks or other parts of Indian corn or maize, broomcorn, and related plants.
Now, therefore, I, W. M. Jardine, Secretary of Agriculture, under the authority conferred by the act of Congress approved August 20, 1912, known as the plant quarantine act (37 Stat. 315), do hereby declare that it is necessary, in order to prevent the further introduction of the dangerous-plant pests mentioned above, to forbid, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental hereto, the importation into the United States from all foreign countries 'and localities of the stalk and all other parts, whether used for packing or other purposes, in the raw or unmanufactured state, of Indian corn or maize (Zea mwys L.), broomcorn, (Andropogon 8orghum var. technietss), sweet sorghums (Andropogon sorghum), grain sorghums (And ropogon s0rghumn), Sudan grass (Andropogon 8orghumt sudanensis), Johnson grass (Andr pogon halepensis), sugarcane (Sacharum offiinarum), including Japanese varieties, pearl millet (Pen nisetum glaucumb), napier grass (Pennisetum purpureum), teosinte (Euchlaena tuxurians), and jobs-tears (Coix lachrv/7aJobi).





1933] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 139

Hereafter, and until further notice, by virtue of said act of Congress approved August 20, 1912, the importation into the United States of the stalk and all other parts of the plants enumerated above from all foreign countries and localities except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental hereto, is prohibited.
Done at the city of Washington this 23d day of April, 1926.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[SEAL.] W. M. JARDINE,
Secretary of Agriculture.

REVISED RULES AND REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE OF QUARANTINE
NO. 41 (SECOND REVISION), GOVERNING THE IMPORTATION OF INDIAN CORN
OR MAIZE, BROOMCORN, AND SEEDS OF RELATED PLANTS
(Difective on and after March 1, 1933)
REGULATION 1. PLANT PRODUCTS PERMITTED ENTRY'
Except as restricted from certain countries and localities by special quarantines and other orders now in force,2 and by such as may hereaf ter be prom~ulgated, the following articles may be imported:
A. Subject only to the requirements of the first three paragraphs of regulation 5:
(1) Green corn on the cob, in small lots for local use only, from adjacent areas of Canada.
(2) Articles made of the stalks,. leaves, or cobs of corn, when prepared, manufactured, or processed in such manner that in the judgment of the inspector no pest risk is involved in their entry.
(3) Corn silk.
B. Upon compliance with these regulations:
(1) Broomcorn- for manufacturing purposes, brooms or similar articles made of broomcorn, clean shelled corn, and clean seed of the other plants covered by this quarantine.
(2) Corn on the cob, green or mature, from the provinces of Canada West of and including Manitoba,' and from Mexico, Central America, South America, the West Indies, the Bahamas, and Bermuda.
REGULATION 2. APPLICATION FOR PERMITS
Persons contemplating the importation of any of the articles specified in regulation 1, B, Shall first make application to the Bureau of Plant Quarantine for a permit, stating in the application the name and address of the exporter, the country and locality where grown*, the port of arrival, and the name and address of the importer in the United States to whom the permit should be sent. Unless otherwise stated in the permit, all permits will be valid from date Of Issuance until revoked.
, Applications for permits should be made in advance of the proposed shipments'; but if, through no fault of the importer, a shipment should arrive before a permit is received, the importation will be held in customs custody at the 'risk and expense of the importer for a period not exceeding 20 days pending the receipt of the -permit.
Applications may be made by telegraph, in which case the information required above must be given.
I Exeept as provided In regulation 6, these regulations do not authorize importations through the mails.
IThe entry of the following plants and plant products is prohibited or restricted b specific quarantines and other restrictive orders now In force. b
(a) Living canes of sugarcane, or cuttings or parts thereof, from all foreign countries. (Quarantine no. 15.)
(b) Seed and all other portions In the raw or unmanufactured state of Indian corn or maize (Zea mays L.), and the closely related plants, including all species of Teosinte (Euchlaena), jobs-tears (Coix), Polytoca, Chionulehne, and Selerachne, from south eastern ~Asia (including India, Siam, Indo-China, and Chfina),, Malayan Archipelago, Australia, New Zealand, -Oceania, Philippine Islands, Taiwan (Formosa), Japan, and adjacent islands. (Quarantine no. 24.)
$A quarantine is. maintained, by Canada to prevent spread of the European corn borer Irom the infested eastern areas to -the till uninfested Provinces west of Ontario.





140 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE LJanuary-March,

REGULATIO-N 3. ISSUAN CE OF PERMITS
On approval by the Secretary of Agriculture of such application a permit will be issued in quadruplicate.'
For broomicorn and brooms or similar articles made of broomeorn, permits will be issued for the ports of Boston and New York and such other ports as may from time to time be designated by the Bureau of Plant Quarantine.
For shelled corn and for seeds of the other plants listed in this quarantine permits will be is sued for ports where the Bureau of Plant Quarantine mainrains ain inspection service, and for such other ports as may be designated by the Bureau of Plant Quarantine.
For corn on the cob. green or mature, covered by regulation 1, B (2), permits will be issued for ports where the Bureau of Plant Quarantine maintains an inspection service and for such other ports as may be designated by the Bureau of Plant Quarantine.

REGULATION 4. No i'Ic oir AR~ivAL. By PE~mirrEE
Immediately upon arrival of the importation at the port of arrival the permittee shall submit in duplicate notice to the Secretary of Agriculture, through the collector of customs, on forms provided for that purpose, stating the number of the permit, date of entry, name of ship or vessel, railroad, or other carrier, the country and locality where grown, name of the foreign shipper, quantity or number of bales or other containers, and marks and
-numbers on containers, the port of arrival, and the name of the importer or broker at the port of arrival.

REGULATION 5. CONDITIONS OF ENTRY
The entry of the articles covered by regulation 1 is conditioned on their freedom from the European corn borer and other injurious insects and plant diseases, and upon their freedom from contamination with plant materials prohibited entry under other quarantines." All shipments of these articles shall be subject to inspection at the port of arrival by an inspector of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, in order to determine their freedom from such insects and diseases and from contaminating materials, and to such sterilization, grinding, or other necessary treatment as the inspector may prescribe. Should an importation be found on inspection to be so infested or infected or contaminated that, in the judgment of the inspector, it cannot be made safe by sterilization or other treatment, the entire shipment may be refused entry.
When entry under sterilization or other treatment is permitted, the import tation will be released to the permittee, upon the filing with the collector of customs of a bond in the amount of $5,000 or in an amount equal to the invoice value, if such value be less than $5,000, with approved sureties, the conditions of which shall be that the importation shall be sterilized or otherwise treated under the supervision of the inspector; that no bale or container thereof shall be broken, opened, or removed from the port of arrival unless and until a written notice is given to the collector by the inspector that the importation has been properly sterilized or treated; and that the importation shall be redelivered to the collector of customs within 30 days after its arrival.
Should af shipment requiring sterilization or other treatment under the provisions of this regulation arrive at a port where facilities for such sterilization or other treatment are not maintained, such shipment shall either be promptly shipped under safeguards and by routing prescribed by the inspector to an approved port where facilities for sterilization or other treatment are
available, or it shall be refused entry.
Other conditions of entry as applying to the certain classes of articles
enumerated in regulation 1 are given in the following paragraphs:
Broomecwn.-All importations of broomcorn shall be so baled as to prevent
breakage and scattering in connection with the necessary handling and sterilization; ,If in the judgment of the inspector they are not so baled, entry may

4 One copy of the permit will be furnished to the applicant, one copy will be mailed to
the collector of customs, and one to the inspector of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine at
the port of first arrival, and the fourth will be filed with the application.
5 Of particular interest is, the presence of cottonseed in shelled corn and the attendant
risk of such seed carrying the pink bollworm of Cotton.






19831 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 141

be refused. All importations of broomcorn shall be subject to such sterilization or other treatment as the inspector may require. Articles made of broomcorn.-Brooms or similar articles made of broomcorn shall be subject to sterilization unless their manufacture involves the substantial elimination of stems or such treatment of the included stems as in the judgment of the inspector shall preclude such articles from being the means of carriage of the European corn borer and of other injurious insects and plant diseases.
Shclled corn ant other s:ecds.-If shipments of shelled corn and seeds of the other plants from countries other than those named in regulation 1, B (2), are found upon inspection at the port of arrival to be appreciably fouled with cobs or other portions of the plants the inspector may require sterilization or other treatment or may refuse entry.
Corn from Canada. Shipments of corn from Canada shall be accompanied by an original certificate issued by a duly authorized official of the Canadian Department of Agriculture stating that the material in question covered by the certificate was thoroughly inspected by him or under his direction at the time of shipment and was found, or is believed to be, free from infestation with the European corn borer and other insect pests and plant diseases and free from admixtures of cobs or other portions of the plant: Provided, That such certification may be waived as to Provinces or districts on the presentation of evidence satisfactory to the United States Department of Agriculture that such Provinces or districts have not been reached by the corn borer, such waiver to become effective at any authorized entry port (see regulation 3) upon the receipt of notification of such waiver from the Department of Agriculture by the customs collector of that port.

REGULATION 6. IMPORTATIONS BY MAIL

In addition to entries by freight or express provided for in the preceding regulation, importations are permitted by mail of (1) mature corn on the cob from the countries specified in item 2, paragraph B, of regulation 1, and (2), clean shelled corn and clean seed of the other plants covered by this quarantine: Provided, That a permit has been issued for the importation: Provided further. That each shipment is accompanied from the foreign mailing point by a special mailing tag, which will direct the package to a Bureau of Plant Quarantine inspection station for inspection in accordance with regulation 5 before release to the mails for delivery to the importer. These special mailing tags will be furnished on request to the importer for transmission to his foreign shipper.
The above rules and regulations are hereby adopted and shall be effective on and after February 20, 1933, and shall supersede on and after said date the rules and regulations issued February 10, 1927, under Notice of Quarantine No. 41 (second revision), as amended July 5, 1927. Done at the city of Washington this 10th day of February, 1933.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[SEAL.] ARTHUR M. HYDE,
Secretary of Agriculture.

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE
(NO. 48)
INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS

POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POST\IAsTEIR GENERAL, Washington, D.C., March 30, 1933.
POSTMASTER:
My DEAR SIR: Your attention is invited to the enclosed copy of a revision of the Japanese beetle quarantine and regulations (quarantine order no. 48, United States Department of Agriculture), by which you will please be governed. See paragraph 1, section 595, P. L. and R.
Very truly yours,
C. B. EILENBERGER,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.






142 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [January-March,

MODIFICATION OF JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE REGULATIONS

INTRODUCTORY NOTE
The following amendment to the Japanese beetle quarantine regulations modifies the boundaries of the regulated area by removing therefrom certain territory in northwestern Pennsylvania and by adding an election district inallv-ertently omitted in Wicomico County, Md. The Pennsylvania territory removed is not infested so far as known and the action is taken at the request of the authorities of the State in order to provide a greater protective zone for the fruit-gro-wing district near the regulated area.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.


AMENDMENT NO. 1 TO THE RULES AND REGULATIONS (ELEVENTH. REVISION)
SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 48
(Approved Jan. 13, 1933; effective Jan. 23, 1933)

Under authority conferred b'y the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912 (3T Stat. 315), as amended by the act of Congress approved March 4, 1917 (39 Stat. 1134, 1165), it is ordered that those paragraphs of regulation 3 which relate to the States of Maryland and Pennsylvania in the rules and regulations (eleventh revision) supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 48, on account of the Japanese beetle, which were promulgated on December 22, 1932, be and the same are hereby amended to read as follows:
Alaryland.-Counties of Cecil, Kent, Queen Annes, Somerset, and Worcester; the city of Baltimore; the city of Cumberland and election districts nos. 4, 5, 6, 14, 22, and 23, in Allegany County; the city of Annapolis and election district no. 5, in Anne Arundiel County; election districts nos. 1, 2, 3, 9, 11, 12, 13, 14, and 15, in Baltimore County; election districts of Henderson (no. 1), Greensboro (no. 2), Denton (no. 3), and Ridgely (no. 7), in Caroline County; the city of Westminster, in Carroll County; election district of Cambridge (no. 7), in Dorches~ter County; election districts of Petersville (no. 12), and Brunswick (no. 25). in Frederick County; County of Har ford, except election district of Marshall (no. 4) ; election districts of Elkridge (no. 1), and Ellicott City (no. 2), in Howard County; election district and town of Laurel (no. 10), in Prince Georges County; towns of Easton and Oxford, in Talbot Cou~nty; election districts of Sharpsburg (no. 1), Williamsport (no. 2), Hagerstown (nos. 3, 17, 21, 22, 24, and 25), Leitersburg (no. 9), Sandy Hook (no. 11), and Halfway (no. 26), in Washington County; election districts of Pittsburg (no. 4), Parsons (no. 5), Dennis (no. 6), Trappe (no. 7), Nutters (no. 8), Salisbury (no. 9), Delmar (no. 11), Camden (no. 13), Willards (no. 14), and Fruitland (no. 16), In Wicomico County.
Pennsylvania.-The entire State, except Crawford, Erie, Forest, Mercer, Venango, and Warren Counties, Mercer Township in Butler County, and Ashland, Beaver, Elk, Richland (including boroughs of Foxburg. and St. Petersburg), Salem, and Washington Townships, in Clarion County.
This amendment shall be effective on and after January 23, 1933.
Done at the city of Washington, this 13th day of January 1933.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[SEAL.] ARTHtJE M. HYDE,
Secretary of Agriculture.
[Copies of foregoing amendment sent to all common carriers doing business In or through the quarantined area.]

INSTRUCTIONS To GENERAL PUBLio THROUGH NEWSPAPERS
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, BUREAU OF PLANT QUAW'LNTINE,
Washington, D.C., January 13, 1938.
N-otice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority conferred on himu by the plant quarantine act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended, has promulgated an amendment to the rules and re -gulations (eleventh revision) supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 48, on account






1933] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANN-OUNCEMLNTS 143


of the Japanese beetle, effective on and ,fter January 28, 1,93. Vhe amendment excludes from the regulated area as designated in the said revision
several counties and parts of counties in northwestern Pennsylvania, and adds to said regulated area one election district in eastern AIyIli id. (Copies of
the amendment may be obtained front the Bureau of Plant Qlltralitiille, Washington, D.C.
Ait'rji;I M\I. lywc,
Secretary of Agriculture.
[Published In the following newspapers" The Bulletin, Philadelphia, Pa., Jan. 21, 1933; the Sun, Baltimore, Md., Jan. 23, 1933.]


ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO NARCISSUS-BULB QUARANTINE (NO. 62)
B.P.Q.-349. FEBRUARY 17, 1938.

NARCISSUS INSPECTION RECORD FOR 1932

Tablt 1 livess a record of the narcissus plantings inspected during the calendar year 1932 under the Federal quarantine fr Ihe prevention of spread of bulb pests. The figures given are summarized front the reports sent to this Bureau by the nursery inspectors of the various States who act as FederA collaborators in making such inspections.

TABLE 1.-Inspection of narcissus and number of bulbs certified and treated,
1932 crop


Plantings Bulbs certified as Bulbs treated and
inspected Bulbs inspected uninfested certified
State
Poly- Daf- Polyan- Polyan- Polyanall- fo- ths Daffodils ths Daffodils ths Daffodils
thus dils

Alabam a ------------- 7 7 81,215 65, 824 70, 015 20, 131 .....................
Arkansas ------------- 2 4 42,000 57, 900 42,000 57,900 ----------............
California ----------- 181 143 15,045,951 8, 243, 860 5, 685, 148 1,530, 555 1,264, 750 1,037, 515
Connecticut ---------- ------ ------------ 25,000 ------------ 25,000 .....................
District of Columbia-. 1 9 24 65,840 ------------ 67 24 65,773
Florida ------------- 189 8 103,993,420 546,000 93,589,820 541,000 .....................
Georgia -------------- 17 24 722,650 1,772, 300 722, 650 1,,767, 800 ----------- 4,500
Illinois --------------- 1 5 100, 000 322, 000 100, 000 267, 300 ------ 48, 200
Indiana ------------------- 13 ------------ 204,000 ------------ 2,000 ----------- I
Kansas ------------------- 2-.------------ 42,100 ------------ 42, 10 ....................
Kentucky ------------------ ------------- 2,400 ------------- 2, 4001
L o u i s i a n a - - - - - - 9 5 7 9 5 8 6 3 1 2 1 8 0 2 0 9 4 7 6 1 6 2 7 5 9 7 5 - - - - - - - -
Maryland ------------ 1 2 26, 000 2, 310, 958 26, 000 2, 260, 9S8 ---------- 50,000
Michigan ------------ 1 33 25,000 4,845, 528 ------------2,700,528 ---------- 1,101,500
Minnesota ----------- ------1 ----------- 56,500 ------------ 56, 500
Mississippi-----------11 4 467,075 28,000 467,075 2S,000------------------Missouri -------------1 8 600 136,850 600 93,100 ----------- 33,000
New Jersey ---------------8------------ 1,379,950 ------------ 714,650 ----------- 665,300
New York .......... 13 97,200 8, 714, 020 ------------132,500 40,400 7,442,397
North Carolina ------- 14 35 623, 600 4,183, 200 363,600 2, 670, 700 1*3, 600 112, 800
Ohio ----------------- ----- ------------ 168,350 -------------74,650
Oregon --------------67 316 548, 290 22,915,21S 33,926 1,324, f; 40S,404 19, 116, 2,7
Pennsylvania -------- ------ 3------------ 6S0,400 -------------35, 00 -.. 645, 00
South Carolina ...... 39,907, 845 ------------ 39,907,S15
Tennessee ------------ 3 9 ,600 925,513 5,600 313,513 ---------- ---------Texas ---------------- 3 7,235, 275 3,620, 595 7, 235, 275 3,607,095 ------------ 13,500
Utah ---------------------- I ------------- 2,000 ------------- 2,000
Virginia --------------2 21 29, 565 13, 150, 435 10, 865 1,265, 550 1S, 750 455 995
Washington ----------30 166 277, 55, 315, 22 ............. 272, 11 51,28,416
Wisconsin ------------ ------ 1----------- 2,517,500 ------------ 17,500 -----------2,S5,000
Total ----------637 927 169, 815, 503 132, 507, 762 148, 736, 51 19,629, 551 2, liS, 109


Similar tables htve )een issued in previous years. that for 1931 being given on pages 14 and 1.5 of no. 110 of the Service and Regulatory Announcements of the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration.
The number of narcissus bulbs of all types reported as inspected in 19 2
totals 302,323,265. This is a reduction of over 70.000,000 1() hut from the






144 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [January-Marc,

previous year, the reduction extending to both the polyanthus and daffodil types of bulbs and to nearly all the leading bulb-growing States. The reduction in the number of polyanthus bulbs reported is, however, much greater than the number of daffodils. About 50 percent of the bulbs reported for 1932 are Paper Whites and other polyanthus varieties commonly grown in the South and about 44 percent are of the daffodil type produced in the Northern States. In this series of tables the only varieties.considered as of the polyanthus type are Paper White, Soliel d'Or, Chinese Sacred Lily, Grand Monarque, Aspasia, Elvira,. and a few unconmmnon varieties grown in small numbers. The figur es therefore differ to some extent from the census totals, since the Census Bureau accepted the reporting growers' division into "narcissus (polyanthus) and narcissus (all other) ", and many growers customarily include within the polyanthus group numerous important hardy poetaz varieties, such as Laurens. Koster.
The figures given in the table showing "bulbs certified ", whether on the basis of freedom from infestation, or on account of treatment, indicate supplies available for shipment so far as adequate inspection and freedom from pests are concerned. The greater proportion of such bulbs are, however, replanted by the growers on their own premises for the purpose of securing increase in future years. Growers estimate that only from 20 to 30 percent of the total number of bulbs inspected is available for interstate movement during any 1 year.
Infestations with eelworm (Tylenchus dipsaci) were reported in 1932 as to one or more plantings in each of the following States: California, Florida, Georgia, Maryland, Michigan, Missouri, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oregon, Tennessee, Virginia, and Washington. In addition to the records for the year 1932, this species had previously been reported on properties in Alabama, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Mississippi, Rhode Island, Utah, and Wisconsin. Some of these properties have not since been reported as inspected, and infestation may possibly still be persisting in them. Under administrative instructions issued on July 7. 1932, the standard hot-water treatment procedure is definitely prescribed only as to Tylechus infestations, while the finding of other parasitic forms of eelworms, without Tylencwhus, is referred to this Bureau for special consideration in each case.
Greater bulb flies were reported in California, Michigan, New York, North Carolina, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Virginia, and Washington. They have also been found in previous years in Illinois, Ohio, and Utah.
Lesser bulb flies (Eumerus spp.) were removed from consideration under the Federal narcissus bulb quarantine in an amendment which became effective on May 20, 1932. Accordingly, most of the State inspectors did not report as to the presence or absence of these 1sser flies in 1932.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.


ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO PACKING MATERIALS
QUARANTINE (NO. 69)
PACKING MATERIALS QUARANTINE NO. 69 WITH REGULATIONS

INTRODUCTORY NOTE
Various plant products used as packing material in connection with ordinary commercial shipments from abroad are known to constitute a distinct danger to the agricultural interests of this country on account of the insects and plant diseases which they may carry with them. For some years the packing materials used in connection with imports of nursery stock have been restricted because of this danger, and for like reason fruit and vegetable imports are required to be free from leaves and other plant parts.
The pest risk which may be involved in packing materials is well exemplified by rice straw. Rice-straw packing originating in the Orient has been found at a large number of ports of entry on over 100 occasions to be infested, sometimes heavily, with living stages of the Asiatic rice borer (Chilo simple), an insect recognized to be damaging in the regions where it occurs. In ddi tion to this and several other insects from which we are as yet fortunately free, 80 or 90 diseases are known to occur on rice abroad, none of which have





1933] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 145

yet reached our rice areas. It is well recognized that straw and hulls provide a dangerous channel of introduction for these rice pests.
Without disturbing the restrictions already in'existence under other quarantines, this quarantine aims to secure additional protection against foreign pests by prohibiting or restricting the use of certain packing materials considered on good grounds to involve danger of pest introduction when these materials are us6d as packing in connection with ordinary commercial shipments.
In addition to the rice straw and rice hulls mentioned, leaves of plants forest litter, and soil containing vegetable matter are potentially such dangerous carriers of plant pests that their use for -packing purposes is likewise prohibited. These materials, however, are so rarely used as packing, and safe substitutes are so universally available, that their exclusion is of entirely ne-jigible importance from the commercial standpoint.
The remaining items in the prohibited list (sugarcane, corn and related plants, cotton, and bamboo) are already covered by specifle quarantines and are included here merely that all packing materials may be dealt with together.
Concerning the restricted list it will be noted that the materials here included are required to be free from plant pests, and are made subject to inspection, the inspector being authorized to prescribe such treatment or disposition as may be necessary in the interests of safety.
A considerable number of widely used packing materials, such as excelsior, paper, sawdust, ground cork, charcoal, and various other materials, which, because of their nature or process of manufacture are unlikely to transport plant parasites, are not covered by this quarantine.
It is believed that under this quarantine the necessary protection has been provided with the least possible restraint or interference with commercial practices.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.


NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 69
(Approved Feb. 20, 1933; effective July 1, 1933)

1, Arthur M. Hyde, Secretary of Agriculture, in accordance with the requirements of the plant quarantine act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), have determined (1) that it is necessary to forbid the importation into the United States of certain plants and plant products hereinafter specified from the countries named when used as packing materials for other commodities, in order to prevent the introduction into the United States of plant diseases and injurious insects not heretofore widely prevalent or distributed within and throughout the United States, and (2) that the unrestricted importation of certain plants and plant products hereinafter specified from the countries named when used as packing materials may result in the entry into the United States of injurious plant diseases and insect pests.
Now, therefore, by virtue of the said act of August 20, 1912, the public hearing required thereby having been duly held, notice is hereby given as follows:
1. On and after July 1, 1933, the following plants and plant products, when used as packing materials, are prohibited entry into the United States from the countries and localities named:
(a) Rice straw, hulls, and chaff; from all countries.
(b) Corn and allied plants (maize, sorghum, broomcorn, Sudan grass, napier grass, jobs-tears, teosinte, Polytoca, Sclerachne, Chionachne) ; all parts, from all countries except Mexico, and the countries of Central America, the West Indies, and South America.
(c) Cotton and cotton products (lint, waste, seed cotton, cottonseed, and cottonseed hulls) ; from all countries.
(d) Su(nireane; all parts of the plant including bagasse, from all countries.
(e) Bamboo; leaves and small shoots, from all countries.
(f) Leaves of plants; from all countries.
(g) Forest litter; from all countries.
174391-33-2






146 BUREAU OF PLANT-' QUARANTINE [January-March,

(70 Soil containing an appreciable admixture of vegetable matter, from all countries, except such types of soil or earth as are authorized as safe for packing- by the rules and regulations promulgated supplemental to this quarantine.
2. Onl and after July 1, 1933, the following plants and plant products, when used as packing materials, will be permitted entry into the United States from the countries and localities named only in accordance with the rules and regulations promulgated supplemental to this quarantine.
(a) Cereal straw, chaff, and hulls, other than rice (such as emmer, spelt, oats, barley, and rye) ; from all countries.
(b) Corn and allied plants (maize, sorghum, broomicorn, Sudan grass, napier grass, jobs-tears, teosinte, Polytoca, Sclerachne, Chionachne) ; all parts, from Mexico and the countries of Central America, the West Indies, and South America.
(c) Willow twigs; from Europe.
(d) Grasses and hay and similar indefinite dried or cured masses of grasses, weeds, and herbaceous plants; from all countries.
(e) Soil containing an, appreciable admixture of vegetable matter, from all countries, which is authorized as safe for packing by the rules and regulations promulgated supplemental to this quarantine.
This quarantine shall leave in full force and effect all other quarantines and orders.
Done at the city of Washington, this 20th day of February, 1933.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[SEAL.] ARTHUR M. HYDE,
Secretary of Agric'ulture.

RULES AND REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 69
(Approved Feb. 20, 1933; effective July 1, 1933)

REGULATION 1. DEFINITIONS
(a) Packing materiali.-The expression packing material ", as used in this quarantine includes any of the plants or plant products enumerated, when these are associated with or accompany any commodity or shipment to serve for filling, wrapping, ties, lining, mats, moisture retention, protection, or for any other purpose; and the word packing ", as used in the expression packing materials shall include the presence of such materials within, in contact with, or accompanying such commodity or shipment.'
(b) Soil con tainting an appreciable admix~ture of vegetable matter, here brought under quarantine only because its content of decaying vegetation or plant remains carries a definite pest risk, is to be distinguished from soil of purely mineral or earthy composition, which is not covered by this quarantine.
(c) Ins pector.-An inspector of the United States Department of Agriculture.

REGULATION 2. FREEDOM FROM PESTS
All packing materials allowed entry under restriction shall be free from injurious insects and plant diseases.
REGULATION 3. ENTRY INSPEcTON
All packing materials shall be subject to inspection at time of entry.

RE-GULATION 4. DISPOSITION OF MATERIALS FOUND IN VIOLATION'
If the ispector shall find packing materials associated with or accompanying any commodity or shipment being imported, or to have been imported, in violation of this quarantine or of these regulations or shall, find them infested or infected with injurious insects or plant diseases, he may refuse entry to the shipment, or hie may seize and destroy or otherwise dispose of such packing material, or he may require it to be replaced, or sterilized,, or Otherwise treated.
6 Since it is the packing materials themselves which constitute the danger and not the manner of use, it is intended that the definition shall include their presence within or accompanying a shipment regardless of their function or relation to a shipment or the character of the shipment.





19331 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 147

REGULATION 5. TYPES OF SOIL AuTiaomzED FOP. PACKING
The following types of soil or earth are authorized as safe for packing:
(1) Peat, (2) Peat moss, and (3) Osmunda fiber.
The above rules and regulations shall be effective on and after July 1, 1933.
Done at the city of Washington, this 20th day of February, 1933.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[SEAL] ARTHUR M. HYDE,
Secretary of Agriculture.

INSTRUCTIONS TO COLLECTORS OF CUSTOMS
QUARANTINE wiTu REGULATIONS TO PREVENT THE INTRODUCTION INTO THE
UNITED STATES OF INSECTS AND DISEASES ASSOCIATED WITH PACKING MATERIALS OF PLANT NATURE (T. D. 46267)
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,
OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONER OF CUSTOMS, Washington, D.C., March 11, 1933.
To Collectors of Customs and Others Concerned:
The appended copy of Notice of Quarantine No. 69 with regulations (packing materials quarantine), Issued by the Secretary of Agriculture to become effective July 1, 1933, is published for the information and guidance of customs officers and others concerned.
FRANK Dow,
Acting Commissioner 'of Customs.
(Then follows the full text of the quarantine.)


ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO PHONY PEACH DISEASE QUARANTINE (NO. 67)
FEBRUARY 6, 1933.
PHONY PEACH DISEASE QUARANTINE REVOKED
(Press release)
Federal plant quarantine no. 67, issued in 1929 to prevent the spread of the phony peach disease, has been revoked, effective March 1, according to an announcement by the Secretary of Agriculture today. In the opinion of the Department, the further spread of this disease can be controlled more satisfactorily by improved and modified nursery-inspection methods in the various States than by the enforcement of the type of Federal quarantine regulations now in effect. The Department plans to cooperate with the State nursery inspectors in developing adequate inspection methods. Officials expect that the States will prepare this month to make the required inspections.
Lee A. Strong, Chief of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, says that when the quarantine was placed by the Department it was believed, as a result of surveys made in 1926, 1927, and 1928, that the disease was confined to the States of Georgia and Alabama, although it was known to have been present in Georgia for some 50 years. Surveys in 1929 and 1930 disclosed infections in Mississippi, Texas, Arkansas, Louisiana, Tennessee, North Carolina, and South Carolina. Surveys in 1931 revealed infections in Florida and Illinois. In all of these States, except Mississippi, Louisiana, and South Carolina, the infections were discovered only in limited areas and the quarantine was extended on November 30, 1931, to the entire States of Louisiana, Mississippi, and South Carolina, and to parts of the States of Arkansas, Florida, Illinois, North Carolina, Tennessee, and Texas, as well as to those parts of Alabama and Georgia which were not already under quarantine. Surveys in 1932 revealed a few infected trees in southern Oklahoma and in southeast Misssouri. Scattered infections were also discovered in 1932 in new localities in Arkansas, Illinois, and Texas.
The smallness of the area in which the disease was known to occur when the quarantine was first issued, together with the inauguration of an intensive eradication campaign by the Department in cooperation with the States, just!fled the original placing of the quarantine, in the opinion of Department






148 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Jau

officials. Since that time, however, the disease has been found through extensive areas, says Mr. Strong, although there are no outside of Georgia and Alabama where infection has been present a length of time to cause serious loss in commercial orchards. The fun available to the Department for quarantine activities have not been increa and funds for eradication activities have been reduced. The widely separated infections in some of the States concerned have made the enforcement of intrastate-quarantine regulations by these States impracticable, thereby complica the problem of maintaining Federal control of interstate shipments.
As its research work has developed, the Bureau of Plant Industry has bn increasingly impressed with the importance and potential seriousness of the phony-peach disease to the peach industry, and to the limit of its ability will endeavor to encourage prompt eradication activities wherever infec trees are found. For the immediate future, however, eradication must depend largely on the cooperative activities of the States.
Apparently the disease is transmitted from one tree to another only through the roots. Investigation by the Bureau of Plant Industry points so strongly to the iwach-root borer as the carrier of the disease that it seems reasonable to believe that it will be possible to reduce the danger of spreading the disease by preventing the movement of borer-infested trees from nurseries in ar infested by the each borer.
State inspection officials should undertake the critical inspection of nursery stock budded on peach, nectarine, apricot, or almond stock, either at digging time or at any other times that will insure that no borer-infested stock leave the nursery. This should give more effective protection than would be possible by continuation and extension of the present type of Federal quarantine. Moreover, the Federal quarantine is considered less essential to the present retarded program of phony-peach eradication that it was to the original plan of intensive and rapid eradication.
The revocation of the quarantine does not mean the abandonment of interest in this disease, says Mr. Strong. The Bureau of Plant Quarantine will plan to cooperate, insofar as funds and facilities permit, in the establishment and execution of uniform and efficient methods of inspection and certification of nursery stock as to freedom from borer injury.

NOTICE OF LIFTING OF QUARANTINE NO. 67-PHONY-PEACH DISEASE QUARANTINE
(Effective on and after Mar. 1, 1933)
I, Arthur M. Hyde, Secretary of Agriculture, under authority conferred by the Plant Quarantine Act, approved August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as by the act of Congress approved March 4, 1917 (39 Stat. 1134, 1165), do hereby remove and revoke the quarantine placed by Notice of Quarantine No. upon the entire States of Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, and South Carolina, and parts of the States of Arkansas, Florida, Illinois, North C Tennessee, and Texas, and do also hereby revoke the rules and regulations supplemental thereto, such removal and revocation to take effect on March 1, 1933.
Done in the District of Columbia, this 3d day of February, 1933.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[SEAL.] ARTHUR M. HYDE,
Secretary of Agriculture.
[Copies of above notice were sent to all common carriers doing business in or tbrough the quarantined area.I

INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS-REMOVAL OF QUARANTINE ON" ACUNT OF T PHONY PEACH DISEASE
POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL, Washington, D.C., March 16, 1933.
Quarantine Order No. 67 on account of the phony-peach disease, quaran the States of Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, and South Carolina, parts of the States of Arkansas, Florida, Illinois, North Carolina, Tenne and Texas, has been revoked.






SKAIZVICE ,\Nl) NEGUL.VI'ONY ANNOUNCENIENTS 149

Consequently, postimistors ill Ille 'Ire'l (111"I raill i Iled shmild Ill) II)II-er ('111'(wc(l tile regulations pl.()nllll ",l1vd lender 111,11 0rder. 0t, cmir"c' Hic requirellwilt.,."
of pant.-raph 2, sectimi -167, L Iws 111d Rc-1l1,11iow;. the
'ICCept'llice I'm in'lilill", of plailt 111,1teri'll fipr pr(q),11".111(lil, 11111'st he chs( l d.
( '. I E I I, 1, N [,,I,: I.(; v It,
Third Assi.,4(int Pwdiimstcr (Iciwiwl.


ANNOUNCEMENT'S RELATING To PINK-BOLLWORM QUARANTINE (N 0. 5 2)
MODIFICATION' OF PINK BOLLWORM QUARANTINE REGULATIONS
INIFIVOI)IJITMIX), X(Y1,11"

The followiii,,,rttiti( it(iiii(,itt modifie" till, Irc,!', re"111,11ed 1111der pillk-b(d1worill quanaiitine 1)y rch,,ishi- 1*1-mll re-41-icliml.1 p.111 ill
maillely, Lovill"', Winkler. AmIrews, Ecim-, 0-,mc, mid Uptim Cmuities entire, nild ill (0,the I'(willel-h- rcu'uLited p(irlioii ()I* Alidhmd ('minty. N4l piuk-lmllw(will hevil I'milill ill taily p"Irt: of' such rclej -cd tlvo slice 01'1 cr()p seasoll (_4 19131. Lvv A.
Cllicf Burc(Ill of 111(lilt Q11(trall tinc.


AMENDMENT NO. 1 TO REVISED RULES AND REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL 110 NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 52
.\J)prm'ed Fch. -7, effec-live F01). 28, 19:)3)
Under '1111 hority cwl1*cvr('d by the jdkllll (111,11%ildhif, 1cl td' Aug'usl 21) 11)12
(:)7 Sttt-. :'15) t-, mwnded hy Hie tci ()f Cwi-r(- s :ippr()ved A.janii 4, 1()17
(39 Stot. 1-1:'4. it is m-dercd 1h,11 rc-, lll,1tiwl :.)) ()t, the revkol 1-111es.
re "111"Iti(Ills slipplellw ilt:11 to lm t-ice of (pitll.,111tille il'). .521, w l "Ic-c(m ilt oll, the Ili 11 1 boilworiii, which wcre prml)(111"(1ted (m 000bor 99, he '111d the i",
llerelly callicilded to rezld

IZEG( NATION RECREATED

"Ictm-0,111(v with the pr()vi-,1)s fi) imlice W' no. -52 (ivvi sed), 11w
Secret-ary (if A -11 ('111111 re de'4"wtte ; ( -, iv-ul'ited zliv,1 4, 1'(w 111c jjurpw (, W* 1114-c r( ... ufiltioll". t1w fidhowill- cmlllti(-- and pw-i (It' c(millic", ill Ariz,111,1, 1"holli'l,
Mexico). illd Tex.1-'. illcIti(lill-," all]
p(ditic,11 slihdivisiom, withill t1li-ir lilllit- :
11, i (" j I (I (I rc (1. 1' 11 e (.1) 11111 ics 01, 0 )cili" ( ree 1! 1 ce. Alaricop.l.
Ftol-W(f (fr(w.-The cmillties ()]* M,14-1111,1, Bflker. 1')rl(11,(w(!, ( 'Allinjoi;l, and Union.
Xcir '11c.rim (low.-The ()f ('11,1ves, Edd.v, ()Wr(), 1)()11,1 lm,
Grold, :tIld llidni-().
Tcxo- (Irca.-The (d, Terrell, Pn-idio,
Ward, 011hw.:, Iln, lllldspcdl ljld EA] Pasio.
Thi-, 'llnelldilwilt- '-dwil h" effective ml 111(1 'lller Fchr!] lr.v
Dt lw it the city (d' W:ishill-tou, thi,, 271h (hy (d' Fehrutry. l!)*):,.
W itllc,'. s iliv 11,111d 'tild Ill(, "e ll (d, the t'llited "."I'lics 1)( p lrtllw jlt id, A _,riA L.
,1 ccl.ct(ovf of
[Cw oics (4 '11)(OvA, .11ilendmont wcl*l, doill hilsilles., ill (w
1111-ou-11 the (111:1r,1111illcd nlv l.j

.Noncj,_ ro C'i%-,xj--Atu Vi-mw Tiin()v(;ij

()v
BVIIE.W OF PLANT ()['A1.ANT1:\J:.
1V(1x1linyto;?. 10%, Ycbriml. 11 2t.
Notice is hereby giveii t1i'll Ille 'Secret'll'y (fl' A-ricult ure. under nut 1writy cmiferred on him by the plant quormitine zi(I (4 Aii-iist 20, 1IN2 (:-,7 Sktl. 345),
-is amended, has pi-miltil-ated '111 '1111endillent, tf, the rules 111(1 re-111(ttiolls sup-






150 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [January-March,

plemnental to Notice of Quarantine No. 52, on account of the pink bollworm, effective February 28, 1933. This amendment modifies the areas regulated under the pink-bollworm quarantine by releasing from restriction a part of the regulated area in Texas, namely, the entire countries of Loving, Winkler, Andrewvs, Ector, Crane, and Upton, and all of the formerly regulated portion of Midland County. Copies of said amendment may be obtained from the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, United States Department of Agriculture, Washington, D.C. C. IF. MARVIN,
Acting Secretary of AgriculZture.
liiuhuislied in the El Paso Post, El Paso, Tex., Mar. 6, 1933.]


INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS
POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL, Washington, D.C., March 29, 1988.
POSTMASTER.
My DEAR SIR: An amendment to the pink bollworm quarantine regulations has been announced by the United States Department of Agriculture, effective February 28, 1933. Under this amendment the areas regulated under the quarantine are modified by releasing from restriction the counties of Loving, Winkler, Andrews, Ector, Crane, Upton, and Midland in the State of Texas. A copy of the quarantine is enclosed and you will please be governed in accordance therewith.
Very truly yours,
C. B. EiL1NBEa~m,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.


ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO PLANT SAFEGUARD REGULATIONS
INSTRUCTIONS TO COLLECTORS OF CUSTOMS
RULES AND REGULATIONS GOVERNING (1) ENTRY FOR IMMEDIATE EXPORT, (2)
ENTRY FOR IMMEDIATE TRANSPORTATION AND EXPORTATION IN BOND, AND (3) SAFEGUARDING THE ARRIVAL AT A PORT WHERE ENTRY oR. LANDING IS NOT INTENDED OF PROHIBITED PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS, REVISED (T.D. 46211)
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,
OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONER OF CUSTOMS, Washington, D.C., February 24, 1983. To Collectors of Customs and Others Concerned:
The appended plant-safeguard regulations, issued by the Secretary of Agriculture, effective December 1, 1932, superseding all previous editions thereof, are published for the information and guidance of customs officers and others concerned. FRANK Dow,
Acting Commissioner of Customs.
(Then follows the full text of the regulations.)


ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO SEED OR PADDY RICE QUARANTINE (NO. 55)
REVISION OF QUARANTINE AND REGULATIONS
INTRODUCTORY NOTE
The following revision of the seed or paddy rice quarantine and regulations
-adds rice straw and rice hulls to the articles prohibited entry, amplifies the definition of seed or paddy rice, and makes provision for the importation of seed or paddy rice from Mexico by mail. LEA TOG


Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.





1933] SERVICE AND RIIGULATO11Y ANNOUNCEIMENTS 131

NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 55 (REVISED) (Approved Feb. 20, 1933; effective July 1, 193:)
The fact has been determined by the Secretary of Agriculture, a:id notice is hereby given, (1) that injurious fungous diseases of rice, including downy mildew (Sc/croq)ora ii(tcrocarp) leaf smutl (EuIlylouia oryzuc), blight (ospora orijztorum), and glume blotch (Mcluitomma gluniarum), as well as dangerous inspect pests, new to and not heretofore widely prevalent or distributed within and throughout the United States, exist, as to one or more of such diseases and pests, in Europe, Asio, Africa, centrall America, Soutlh America, and other foreign countries and localities, and may be introduced into this country through importations of seed or paddy rice, rice straw, and rice hulls, and (2) that the unrestricted importation of seed or paddy rice from the Republic of Mexico may result in the entry into the United States of the injurious plant diseases heretofore enumerated, as well as insect pests.
Now, therefore, I, Arthur M. Hyde, Secretary of Agriculture, under authority conferred by the act of Congress approved August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), do hereby declare that it is necessary, in order to prevent the introduction into the United States of the insect pests and plant diseases referred to, to forbid the importation into the United States of seed or paddy rice, rice straw, and rice hulls from the foreign countries and localities named, and from any other foreign country or locality: Provided, That seed or paddy rice may be imported from Mexico upon compliance with the provisions outlined in the rules and regulations supplemental hereto.
On and after July 1, 1933, and until further notice, by virtue of the said act of Congress, approved August 20, 1912, the importation of seed or paddy rice, rice straw, and rice hulls into the United States from any foreign country or locality is prohibited, with the exception that the importation of seed or pladdy rice into the United States from the Republic of Mexico may be permitted upon compliance with the rules and regulations supplemental hereto.
Done at the city of Washington, this 20th day of February 1933.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[SEAL.] ARTHIUR M. HYDE,
Secretary of Agriculture.

REVISED RULES AND REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE OF QUARANTINE
NO. 55, GOVERNING THE IMPORTATION INTO THE UNITED STATES OF SEED
OR PADDY RICE FROM MEXICO
REGULATION 1. DEFINITIONS
(a) Seed or paddy rice.-Unhusked rice in the form commonly used for seed purposes; these regulations do not apply to husked or polished rice imported for food purposes.
(b) Port of first arrival.-The first port within the United States where the shipment is (1) offered for consumption entry or (2) offered for entry for immediate transportation in bond.
(c) Inspector.-An inspector of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine of the United States Department of Agriculture.

A. IMPORTATIONS OTHERWISE THAN BY MAIL
REGULATION 2. APPLICATIONS FOR PEMI'IS FOR IMPORTATION OF SEED Olt PADDY RICE
Persons contemplating the importation of seed or paddy rice from Mexico shall first make application to the Bureau of Plant Quarantine for a permit, stating in the application the locality where grown, the port of first arrival, and the name and address of the importer in the United States to whom the permit should be sent.
Applications for permits should be made in advance of the proposed shipments; but if, through no fault of the importer, a shipment should arrive before a permit is received, the importation will be held in customs custody at the port of first arrival at the risk and expense of the importer for a period not exceeding 20 days, pending the receipt of the permit.
Application may be made by telegraph, in which case the information required above must be given.
A separate permit must be secured for each shipment.






152 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [January-March,

REGULATION 3. ISSUANCE OF PERMITS
On approval by the Secretary of Agriculture of an application for the importation of seed or paddy rice. a permit will be issued in quadruplicate; one copy will be furnished to the applicant, one copy will be mailed to the collector of customs, and one to the inspector of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine at the port of first arrival, and the fourth will be filed with the application.

REGULATION 4. NOTICE OF ARRIVAL BY PERMITTEE
Immediately upon the arrival of seed or paddy rice from Mexico, at the port of first arrival, the permittee or his agent shall submit a notice in duplicate to the Secretary of Agriculture, through the collector of customs, on forms provided for that purpose, stating the number of the permit, the quantity of seed or paddy rice included in the shipment, the locality where grown, the date of arrival, and if by rail, the name of the railroad company, the car numbers, and the terminal where the seed or paddy rice is to be unloaded, or if by boat, the name of the ship or vessel and the designation of the dock where the shipment is to be landed.

REGUiATION 5. INSPECTION AND DISINFECTION AT PORT OF FIRST ARRIVAL
All importations of seed or paddy rice from Mexico shall be subject, as a condition of entry, to such inspection or disinfection, or both, at the port of first arrival, as shall be required by the inspector, and to the delivery to the collector of customs by the inspector of a written notice that the seed or paddy rice has been inspected and found to be apparently free from plant diseases and insect pests.
Should any shipment of such seed or paddy rice be found to be so infested with insect pests or infected with plant diseases that, in the judgment of the inspector, it cannot be cleaned by disinfection or treatment, the entire shipment may be refused entry.
All charges for storage, cartage, and labor incident to inspection and disinfection, other than the services of the inspector, shall be paid by the importer.

B. IMPORTATIONS BY MAIL
REGULATION 6. IMPORTATIONS BY MAIL
Regulations 2 to 5 provide for importations otherwise than through the mails. Importations of seed or paddy rice may also be made from Mexico by mail, provided (1) that a permit lhas been issued for the importation in accordance with regulations 2 and 3, and (2) that each shipment is accompanied from the Mexican mailing point by a special mailing tag directing the package to a Bureau of Plant Quarantine inspection station for inspection and, if necessary, for treatment, before being released to the mails for delivery to the importer, unless entry is refused in accordance with the provisions of regulation 5. The special mailing tags will be furnished on request to the importer for transmission to his foreign shipper.
These revised rules and regulations shall be effective on and after July 1, 1933, and shall on that date supersede the rules ond regulations promulgated July 17, 1923.
Done at the city of Washington, this 20th day of February, 1933.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[SEAL.] ARTHUR M. HYDE,
Secretary of Agriculture.

ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO WHITE PINE BLISTER-RUST QUARANTINE (NO. 63)
INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS
REVISION OF WHITE-PINE BLISTER RUST QUARANTINE REGULATIONS
The regulations of Quarantine O)rder No. 63 of the United States Department of Agriculture on account of the white-pine blister rust governing the shipment of 5-leafed pines, currant, and gooseberry plants, appearing on pages 16 to 19, inclusive, of the August 1930, Supplement to the Postal Guide, have been





1933] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 153

amended. The list of States designated as infected witi white-p)ine blister rust has been extended to include Iowa, Maryland, Ohio, Virginia, and West Virginia, as well as the District of Columbia.
The embargo which Irohibite(d tihe shimlent of s1uch pines froum infected to noninfected States is removed, and the (Federal pine-shil)ping iiermits which heretofore authorized shilments only between infected States may no)w be used for shipments to noninfected States also.
At the same time the interstate movenmient itot( other infeled States of 5leafed pines grown in the lightly infected Stales is somewhat more restricted than heretofore, experience indicating that such p1ines should he raised in a Ribes-free environment in order to be considered safe from blister rust.
The embargo which has hitherto prohibited the movement of 5-leafed pines from points east of the Missouri Valley to the Western Stales is removed.
The interstate shipment of currant and gooseberry pda its is also simplified by the elimination of the provision that such plants if transported from the infected States were required to be both dormant and dipped in lime-sullphur solution. Hereafter such plants will not be required to be disinfected in lime-sulphur unless shipped with leaves or act ive buds.

SUMMARY
The infected States and District are designated( as (Coninecticut, Idaho, Iowa, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Miines(ota, Montana, New Hampshire New Jersey, New York. Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania. Rhode Island, Vermont, Virginia, Washingtin, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and tihe District of Columbia.
The careful attention of postmasters is invited to the following revise(l regulations of Quarantine Order No. 63 on account of the white-pine blister rust, effective January 1. 1933:
(Then follow in full text regulations 2, 3, and 7 and the appendix.)


TERMINAL INSPECTION OF PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS
IDAHO DISCONTINUES TERMINAL INSPECTION

POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD) ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL.
Washington. March 14, 1933.
POSTMASTER.
MY DEAR SIR: The director of the bureau of plant industry, Delpartment of Agriculture of Idaho, has advised that as the recent Legislature of Idaho made no appropriation for nursery-stock inspection, parcels of plants or plant products upon arrival at the post office of address may be delivered to the addressees without first being subjected to terminal inspection under section 596, Postal Laws and Regulations.
You will, therefore, please be governed accordingly in future.
Very truly yours,
C. B1. EILENBERGEIR.
Third Asisttant Postmister Gc nral.


MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS

P.Q.C.A.-294. Supplement No. 1. JA.NUARY 1, 1933.
PLANT QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF BRAZIL
MEASURES REGULATING TIHE IMPORTATION OF SELECTED SEED POTATOES
Decree No. 21734 of August 16, 1932, prescribes that:
ARTICLE 1. The importation of selected see(d-potato tubers, with exemption from customs imposts (in the terms of Art. 3, no. XIII-3, of Law No. 1616 of Dec. 30. 1906), is subject to previous authorizationii by the Ministry of Agriculture.
(a) This authorization will be granted only to growers or syndicates and agricultural cooperatives registered in the Service of Inspection and Agricul174391-33-3






154 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [January-March,

tural protection (Servigo de Inspecao e Fowento Agricolas) and to commeil firms regularly established and registered in Brazil for seed business.
(b) Importation shall be made only through ports or localities where there is a representative of the Biological Institute of Agricultural Protection (Instituto Biologico de Defesa Agricola) authorized to carry out phytosanitary inspection.
(c) The Ministry of Agriculture will publish the names of the authored ports or localities through which importation will be permitted.
ART. 2. Seed potatoes may be imported into Brazil only from countries where technical experimental establishments specializing in the culture of this plant exist, according to the criterion of the Servigo de Inspecao e Fomento Agricolas, in order to prevent the importation of inadequate varieties into regions for which the tubers are intended, and to prevent the introduction of injurious or exotic diseases, and the importation will be subject to all the provisions and instructions concerning phytosanitary protection, applying to the case the judgment of the superior counsel of agricultural protection instituted by article 90 of the regulations approved by Decree No. 15189 of December 21, 1921.
(a) The certificates of origin referred to in article 2 of the resolution of May 26, 1928, shall affirm that the tubers are from regions free from the parasites Ch rysophlyctis endobiotica, Spongospora subterranea, and Phthorimaea operculetla, and that the imported tubers are free from those and other parasites.
(b) In addition to this certificate, each shipment must be accompanied by a statement of the Minister of Agriculture of the producing country affirming that selected seed potatoes are concerned.
(c) If, upon inspection on arrival, the tubers indicate need of disinfection by immersion in insecticidal and fungicidal solutions, this precaution will be required at the expense of the importer.
ART. 3. Tubers which may be deemed by the Servigo de Inspecao e Fomento Agricolas unfit for planting may be used for consumption, provided that the competent sanitary authorities are not opposed, and that the importer pay the imposts required by law.
ART. 4. Tubers deemed by competent authorities unfit for planting or for food shall be destroyed under the supervision of the same at the expense of the importer.
ART. 5. Concerns the storage of imported seed potatoes.
ART. 6. Concerns the requirements to be met by the importer in applying for a permit to import seed potatoes.
Articles 7, 8, and 9 concern importers of seed potatoes.
LEm A. STRONG,
Chief of Bu.rea.

B.P.Q.-347. JANUARY 1, 1933.
PLANT QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF GREECE

This summary of the plant quarantine restrictions of the Republic of Greece has been prepared for the information of nurserymen, plant quarantine officials, and others interested in the exportation of plants and plant products to that country.
The summary was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant quarantine inspector of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, from his translations of the French texts of some of the Greek decrees, and from translations made by Paul Vogenitz, translator, Post Office Department, from the Greek texts of other decrees and laws. It was then reviewed by the chief, section of phytopathology, DirectionGeneral of Agriculture, Athens, Greece.
The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct and complete up to the time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used independently of, nor as a substitute for, the original texts and decrees, and it is not to be interpreted as legally authoritative. The decrees and laws themselves should be consulted for the exact texts.
LEm A. STRONG,
Chief of Bureau.
BAsIo LAWS
Law No. 214 of April 9-22, 1914, protective measures against phylloxera.
Law No. 217 of April 9-22, 1914, concerning the combat against plant diseases and the organization of the phytopathological service.





19331 SERVICE AND I 10'1 AT'H:Y N1"'INCEMENTS 155

IMPORTATION PROIITED

Grapevines or paris thereof ; phylloxera in any stage of developiieiil ; materials which have been used along grapoevinIes; auninial or plan11 r1fus: hunius and soils; any green plaiit or par8t It(reof. ilcllding -arden voeantibles ; madder and licorice; frot mny foreign counilt ry or from a1y ph.\ lloxeinnld region of Greece into nonphylloxerated or slispected regions of Greem to prl'veIlt he introduction of phylloxera. (Decree of Apr. 14, 1927, see 1. 155.)
Citrus fruits, jilo :Inly portion of G C cece except tie (nepartnte a Thrae and Macedonia, to prevelt t lie int rodul ia(in of lhe cale iinsect Ch ry.miu pliu (Decree of Feb. 27, 1931, see 1. 157.)
Cottonseed, into tle dejin tients of Tr ra ce aiud macedonia; unginned cotton into any part of Greece, to I)revenit the introdlictioln of 1he pink bollivorm of cotton (PcCtioph0ora( yoy.'fp&launders). (1)ecrce of Feb. 20, 191. see p 157.)
IIPORTATION RESTHICIlED
Cuttilgs awl uprooted scionS (except of thie -rapeVille exceptioiially iay be imported froilli forei.gIl CoUlliVies into 01lplylloxerated ( sUspected regiolis of Greece uiiler special order of the Ministry of Azri culture and subject to disinfection. (Art. 4. decree of Apr. 14, 1927, see p. 15(.)
Grlpev ines and pa rts thereof, etc.. fron any foreign country or region of Greece through I the port of Piraeus for speian! scientific institutions of Greece, when accompanied by a certificate of ori-in anid under a special order of the Ministry of Agriculture. (Art. 5, decree of Apr. 14, 1927. Cottoinseed may be uimported into Greece (except into the departments of Thrace and Macedonia) subject to disinfection and certification to I hat effect by competent authority of the country of origin. (Art. 1, degree of Feb. 20, 1931, see p. 157.)
Fresh vegetables. including potatoes. also 1hun!bs and unr oted cutt-inigs, except grapevine cuttings. from Egypt, Cyprus, England, Irelaind. Denimiark. Swedon, Norway, Belgium, Netherlaids. or Luxembourg, only when aec-ompanied by a certificate of origin issued by competent authority of the country of origin, and authenticated by the Greek consular official. (Art. H. decree of Apr. 14, 1927, see p. 156.)
Plant materials prohibited by article 1 of the decree of April 14, 1927, may be imported from any foreign country through the port of Piraeus for the special scientific institutions of Greece when accompanied by a certificate of origin, under a special order of the Ministry of Agriculture, subject to disinfection or other necessary measures. (Art. 5, decree of Apr. 14. 1927, see p. 156.)

IMPORTATION UNRESTRICTED
Article 2 of the decree of April 14, 1927, lists the products that. may be imported into any region of Greece from aliy foreign country without restriction (see p. 156.)
PHYLLOXERA RESTRICTIONs
[Decrue of Apr. 14, 1927]
ARTICLE 1. Prohibits the introduction into nonphylloxerated regions of Greece (regions free from phylloxera or suspected regions) from any foreign country (whether phylloxerated or not), as well as from phylloxerated regions of Greece, of any of the plants or plant products mentioned in article 1 of Law No. 214, namely:
(1) All varieties of grapevines, parts thereof, living or dead, including roots, stocks, cuttings, stumps. bark, leaves, grapes, lees. and in general. any fragment or refuse of grapevines, except dried grapes and grape seeds. Grape mare and wine must are not included in these provisions.
(2) Phylloxera pronymphs, nymphs, and eggs.
(3) Stakes. props. sheaves, and baskets which ha ve been used among grapevines.
(4) Animal or plant refuse or mixtures thereof.
(5) Humus and agricultural soils and any ballast composed of soil, as well as gravel and sand containing soil.
(6) Any green plant, as well as green cuttings. grafts. roots. rhiizomues, twigs, tubers, bulbs, branches, bark, rind, peelings, leaves, flowers, and fruits of garden vegetables (tomatoes, melons, cucumbers, etc.), as well as grapes.
(7) Madder and licorice (with the exceptions provid(ed for by Arts. 3 to 5).






156 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [January-March,

ART. 2. Provides for the importation into any region of Greece (whether phylloxerated or not), from any foreign country, of:
(a) Raisins, grape juice, musts, and wines.
(b) Any dry seeds (grains), such as wheat and other cereals, as well as legmininous and other similar seeds.
(c) Fresh fruit, such as apples, pears, oranges, lemons, bananas, etc., without twigs or leaves. These fruits do not include grapes. the importation of wldch is prohibited into nonphylloxerated or suspected regions if they are from foreign countries, or from phylloxerated or suspected regions of Greece. (For citrus fruits see decree of Feb. 27, 1931.)
(d) Dried fruits, such as walnuts, Indian walnuts, almonds, hazelnuts, chestnuts, figs, prunes, dates, pistachios, pine cones, beans, etc., if free from earth; also dried truffles, mushrooms, and peanuts, likewise free from earth.
(e) Dried medicinal plants.
(f) Dried plants, whether powdered or not, for tanning, such as pine, Oak, and acacia.
(g) Dried gallnuts in general, acorns and dried leaves for tanning, from sumac, rushes, etc.
(h) Dried straw and hay as stock feed, dried industrial grasses in general, whether manufactured or not, such as straw, rushes, esparto grass, broomcorn, and other similar materials, as well as dried leaves and flowers.
(i) Lumber in general, and dried woods, with or without bark.
(j) Agricultural and industrial products and by-products, such as preserved fruits, pressed oil-bearing seeds, olive pits, and the like, with the exception of pressed grape hulls.
(k) Dried and green sea plants, not mixed with earth or other plants; clean sand for any purpose, porcelain earth, soap earth, or any earth for industrial or metallurgical purposes.
ART. 3. Provides for the introduction of garden vegetables, bulbs, potatoes, cuttings without roots (except grapevine cuttings) from Egypt, Cyprus, England, Ireland, Denmark, Sweden, Norway, Belgium, Netherlands, or the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg, when accompanied by a certificate of origin issued by competent authority of the country of origin, the certificate to be authenticated by the Greek consular official at the place of purchase or at the port of embarkation. The certificate shall enumerate the kinds of products included in the shipment, their weight, their origin (country), and the fact that they are not from greenhouses or farms where grapevines have been cultivated. Cuttings must be packed without soil. Certificates from foreign countries must be prepared in French or be officially translated into French or Greek.
ART. 4. Provides, exceptionally, for the importation from foreign countries into nonphylloxerated or suspected regions of Greece, of cuttings and unrooted grafts free from soil, after request by the importer to the Ministry ef Agriculture, under the following conditions:
(a) By special order from the Ministry of Agriculture, in each case, to the domestic customs and postal authorities.
(b) Subject to previous disinfection at any of the customs or post offices authorized in article 7, in the manner prescribed in article 6, at the expense of the importer.
ART. 5. Provides for the importation from any foreign country or from any region of Greece (whether phylloxerated or not) of any of the articles mentioned in article 1 through the port of Pirseus, for the special scientific institutions of the States, subject to the following conditions:
(a) When accompanied by the certificate of origin prescribed by article 3 in the case of shipments from foreign countries, or by the certificate prescribed in article 8 if of domestic origin. Certificates from foreign countries must be prepared in French, or be officially translated into French or Greek.
(b) By special order of the Ministry of Agriculture (subject to the favorable opinion of the phytopathological board) to the domestic customs and health officials, requiring disinfection or other measures deemed necessary.
APT. 6. The disinfection of the materials mentioned in article 4 shall be effected, after separating the materials from their packing, by immersing them in water at a temperature of 530 C. for 5 minutes, and afterwards for a few seconds in a I percent solution of copper sulphate, then rinsing them in clean water and setting them in a shady place to dry. The packing material will be destroyed by burning or be thrown into the sea.





19:13 SERVICES AND) H111G ULATOR ANNMlNCy1l :~~ 157

ART. 7. The it1ithorized1 custom 01115 p1(lost oficos for Iho oe enrY a in dishlfec"tion or H ie a ri idIes, julentioned in article 4 are: T11e eistouizs o1114 evs al Pi raeus oil(d Patros. ilnd thle post offices at Pir'aeus, Athenls, aIl 1111 at rs, ill a'11,ordlliie Nwith the provisions of" 1hat article.
Awi'. S. 1)oiiiest ic restrid ionis.

REG ION S FREt,'E FROM 1P1IlY LA)OXElR A8

1 All ancient (1'reece, except (a1) the l1ovifl(ces of 1llaissal, Tyriiavw L a('id( Agyj.N~a in the Nome of Larissa ; ( b) thle I 518fld of AInolgos.
2. The island of (Crete.
3. Epirus, except the 1l:Iarcliy of Konltza.

REGIONS S LISPECTEl) OF P11 YLIA )XERA

1. The former coirmunes of G onna anid Olympus ill the l)fw)inlce of Tyrnavos.
2. The former (oniiiiiiijles of Nesson aiid Antiibelakia inl thle piwovi1nce of La,, r is sa.
3. Thle foriiiet comniiiiies of* Eury'Viiili o11( 1\85t h~liaiia ill thle l)OI1Cof A gyl a.
4. The regions of t ie( comninniji ics of Aiiiorgos. A l('mi,81( Ka iipta oil the island of Xniorg(1os, is Nvell as the follovilig- nei-ghborig islands:Ku fonlesia, I)0n01151, Schii 10115, 1 erakia, Mleriiaes. a imdKn s
5. The island of Lenmios.
). The part of Macedonia comprised between the boundaries of Epirus aind the Nomies of Trikka hi aind Larissa andl a line beginin-g from the southern part of Lake Kastoria, following the course of River Aliakom-ton as falr aIs the Convenit of St. Nikantor ( Zanipourdas) passig through the villages of La,-zacrades, Gl~ykovon, the in of Hadjig-ogos, then through the villages of Liii-iades, Selos. Skamnia, Karya,-, S8kotin)a, and finishing at the seacoa1st at Skai $ k otin als.
PH YLLOXERATEI) REGIONS

1. The whole of Thrace.
2. The whole of Macedonia, except the region indica-ted under G i-egiofls suspected of Phylloxera.
13 The province of KIt inAirs
4. The Noiies of Sanmos, ('hlios, Lesbos (except the isla iid ol ,enimios, Nvli; It has been lroclaillle suspected of phylloxera).
5. The former commune of Ai1gyialia on the island of Arnorgos.
6The former commune of Travos ill the p)rovincee of Tyriia.vos.
7. In the p~rovinlce of Larissa. the former communes of Larissa. Arienioi, Kronnou, Otichiston, Sykourion, afid Fakion. that is, the whole of the p~rovince, except the former conimunies of lNesson and knibhikia, wvhichi have been proclaimed suspected of phylloxera.
8. The former commune of 1)otion in the province of Agyia,1 (Decree, of Aug,1. 22, 1929.)

IM-PORTATION OF ('ITRus, FRUITS PROHIBITED EXCEPTr I To T HRACE ANI) MACEDONIA
The importation into Greece is prohibited ( except into the dleparM-flents of Macedonia anid TraceY) of hemns, oranges, amid ot-hiei citirus fruiits in order to prevent the introduction of the coccid Chrysomphalus. (Decree of Feb. 27, 1931.)

11ESTRICTiO-Ns oN TIllE IMPORtTATION OF COTTONN AN) C o1'TONSEED

ARTICLE 1. The importation of cottonseed into Greece is not, p~ermitted1 111 fss the seed has been (July disinfected. Tfhe (lisinlectioli imi1st be cel fied lby competent authorities of the country of origini. The cerificote in ust b~e visaied by the Greek cons5ul. ln the absence of such a certificate cot toiiseedl may not b)-cleared through the customs.
The imp)ortation of' ingrinied cottonl inlto GIreece is lbslhit ely prohlibitedl.
In order to hirevelit the iioduct iou of the p111k bollwormi of cotton (Pectinoph ora qo,' sypic11a Saunmders ) ito Trocl.;(e aind Ahicedloiiia the iniportation is prohibited into those Departments of cottonseed and unginned cotton,






158 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [January-March,'

not only from foreign countries, but also from any other Department of Greece, Exceptionally, the importation of cottonseed is permitted by scientific establishments for scientific purposes and after being subjected to proper disinfection. (Decree of Feb. 20, 1931.)
Within the term "duly disinfected" in article 1 may be included vacuum disinfection with carbon disulphide or hydrocyanic acid gas, provided that the disinfection is effected in accordance with the rules of the exporting country and is deemed efficacious. (Letter from the chief, section of phytopatholoy, Ministry of Agriculture of Greece to the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, Apr. 14, 1932.)
B.P.Q.-348. JANUARY 12, 1933.
PLANT QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF CHILE
This summary of the plant quarantine restrictions of the Republic of Chile has been prepared for the information of nurserymen, plant quarantine officials, and others interested in the exportation of plants and plant products to that country.
The summary was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant quarantine inspector of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, from his translations of the original text of Decree-Law No. 177, of December 31, 1924, on the application of provisions concerning the phytosanitary police (Decreto-ley sobre aplicaci6n de las disposiciones relativas a la Policia Sanitaria Vegetal); section 1 of Decree No. 105, of February 11, 1925, regulating Decree-Law No. 177 on phytosanitary police (Reglamento del decreto-ley sobre Policia Sanitaria Vegetal) ; and subsequent decrees promulgated by the Ministry of Agriculture and Industry of Chile (Ministerio de Agricultura e Industria), and reviewed by the Servicio de Sanidad Vegetal of that Ministry.
The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct and complete up to the time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used independently of, nor as a substitute for, the original texts of the decrees, and it is not to be interpreted as legally authoritative. The decrees themselves should be consulted for the exact text.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief of Bureau.
BAsIc LAw
The law of phytosanitary police, Decree-Law No. 177, of December 31, 1924, effective February 1, 1925, declares (art. 1) that weeds, injurious animals, and in general, diseases of cryptogamic or animal origin will be deemed plant pests and will be the objects of sanitary measures. Article 2 provides for the introduction of plants, cuttings, seeds, fruits, or any other plant product only, through authorized ports. Article 3 provides that such plants and plant products offered for importation shall be inspected in the customs by the phytosanitary service (Servicio de Sanidad Vegetal), and in case they are infected or are suspected of being infected any of the following measures may be ordered: Disinfection, quarantine, return to point of departure, confiscation, or destruction.
IMPORTATION PROHIBITED
Seeds, plants, or parts thereof, if infested by any of the diseases or insects
named in Decree No. 105, article 5, a and b. (See p. 160.)
Rooted grapevines from any source. (Decree No. 105, art. 5, d, and Decree
No. 2921, May 27, 1929. See p. 160.)
Peach trees from the United States. (Decree No. 105, art. 5, e.) Plants with soil. (Decree No. 105, art. 5, f. See p. 160.) Bulbs, tubers, or roots infested with injurious parasites. (Decree No. 105,
art. 5, g. See p. 160.)
Fresh plant products capable of introducing fruit flies. (Decree No. 105,
art. 5, h, and Decree No. 12, Sept. 4, 1930. See p. 160.)
Fruits infested with Aspidiotus perniciosus or Diaspis pentagona. (Decree
No. 105, art. 5, i. See p. 160.)
Corn on the cob and broomcorn. (Decree No. 2526, Aug. 28, 1928. See p. 161.) Potatoes. (Decree No. 130, Apr. 28, 1931. See p. 163.)





1933] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 159

IMPORTATION RIESTIRICTED
INSPECTION CERTIFICATE REQUIRE)
Seeds if not infested by any of the insects 1 nmed(l ill 'rli-le 5 (a1) 4 I)ecree
No. 105, February 11, 1925. (See p. 1%0.)
Plants or parts thereof if noti, in e'st(ed by anIy of tihe insects i1n aed(l in article
5 (b) of Decree No. 105, February 11, 1925. (See p1. 160.)
Bulbs, tubers, or roots free from parasites (heenied injurious. (Art. 5 (g)
of Decree No. 105, Feb. 11, 1925. See p. 160.)
Fresh fruits from the United States if free fromin the scale inseoits A.spidiotus
pernicioNus anl Diaspis p (ntagona, a( i iccoinmpanied by i certific te attesting origin in a district free froni Mediterranean fruit fly :and vis;aed by Chilean consul. (Decrees No. 105, art 5 (i), Feb. 11, 1925, and No 12,
Sept. 4, 1930. See pp. 160, 161, and following.)
Alfalfa, clover, and other forage seeds containing less than 200 seeds of
Cuscuta per kilogram. (Decree No. 105, art. 5 (j), Feb. 11, 1925. See p. 160.) Straw packing to be sterilize(d and certifie(l accordingly. ( Decree No. 2526,
Aug. 28, 1928. See p. 161.)
Oranges and Inangoes from IBralzil. (Decre No. 1971. July 12, 1928.
See p. 161.)
IMPORTATION UITNRESTRICTED OF REGULATED
Coffee, tea, yerba mate, rice, chicory, saffron, mushrooms, cilinnaminon, cloves,
cumin, peanuts, cacao, a n(l pimento: No inspoction0 certificate require(l. If importe(l in tin ctns may enter any port without inspection. If found infested with pests, subject to the general regulations of Decree No. 105.
(Decree No. 450. Aug. 6, 1926. See p. 161.)
Bananas, plantains, pineapples, dates, avocados, and Pa:nma ,'oconuts without
inspection through certain ports, but subject to inspection at other ports.
(Decree No. 560, Sept. 21, 1926. See p. 161.)

SITMMARY OF THE GENERAL l:RTULA'TIONS
(Decree No. 105, sec. 1, Feb. 11, 1925)
DECLARATION OF PLANT PESTS
ARTICLE 1. Plant diseases of cryptogaminic or aniiiial origin, as wvll as injurious animals and weeds, which can be regarded as plant pests, will be so declared by decree. The office of plihytopathological inspection service will indicate the procedure to be followed in each case.

AUTHORIZED PORTS OF ENTRY
ART. 2. Plants, including seeds, cuttings, bulbs, fruits, anld other plant products capable of introducing any agricultural pest into Chile may be imported only through the ports of Valp:a raiso, Talcahuano, and Los Andes; if imported by mail they may enter through the post oflices at those ports and at Santiago.
DECLARATION AND CERTIFICATE RbEQUIREI)
ART. 3. The importer in Chile shall furnish to tihe customs a written decla mation indicating:
(a) Name and address of importer:
(b) Purpose for which the material is intended;
(c) Country of origin;:
(4) Locality where the material will be planted or sown.
The declaration shall be accompanied(l by a health certificate issued( by the competent authority of the exporting country and visaed by the respective consul of Chile.

CONFISCATION OF PASSENGERS' UNLAWFUL BAGGAGE
ART. 4. Passengers who carry in their lggage any plants, see(lds, fruits, or other product subject to inspection shall declare them to the captain of the vessel. Customs inspectors shall confiscate all plant products whose clandestine imnportation is attempted.






160 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [January-March,

4 ?IMPORTATION PROHIBITED
ART. 5. The importation is prohibited of:
(a) Every kind of seed which reaches the country infested by any of the following-named insects: Sitotroga cerealella, Bruchus obtectus, B. quadrimaculatus, B. rufimnanus, B. ohinensis, B. signaticornis, B. lentis, and 8permophagus pectoralis.
(b) Plants or parts thereof upon which the following-named insects are shown to exist: Aspidiotus perniciosus, Diaspis pentagon, Euproctis o1hrysorrhoea, Porthetria dispar.
(c) Potatoes (Solanum tuberoswumn). (See Decree No. 130, Apr. 28, 1931.)
(d) Rooted grapevines, whatever their origin may be.
NoTrE.-Decree No. 2921, May 27, 1929, prohibits the importation of vine stocks from any country, but permission may be obtained, if conditions to be later established by the services of viticulture and oenology and of plant sanitary police (policia sanitaria vegetal) are observed, for the importation of vine stocks resistant to phylloxera. The customs will exercise special supervision to prevent the importation of plants from countries infested with phylloxera and will extend such supervision to the whole cargo (Diario Oficial, Santiago de Chile, June 11, 1929, from abstract in International Bulletin, Plant Protection III: Sept. 9, 1929, p. 135).
(e) Peach trees from the United States of America, since it is impossible to demonstrate (or establish) the existence of the diseases known as peach yellows, peach rosette, and little peach.
(f) Plants in pots or other containers with soil, from whatever source. To permit the entry of these plants they will have to be deprived of all their soil for inspection, after which their admission or rejection will be determined.
(g) Bulbs, tubers, or roots in which parasites deemed injurious are shown to exist, and whose existence has not been demonstrated in the country.
(h) Fruits which are believed capable of introducing insects commonly known as "fruit flies ": Rhagoletis pomonella, R. cingulata, C(ontarinia pyrivora, Epochra canadensis. Ortalis (Tephritis) cerasi, Geratitis capitata, Dacas oleae, Trypeta ludens, T. acidusa, Tephritis tryoni, and others. A decree shall determine the cases and the classes of fruits deemed to be comprehended in the prohibitions referred to in this section. (See Decree No. 12, Sept. 4, 1930.)
(i) Fruits in which the presence is determined of: Aspidiotus pernicious and Diaspis pentagon. (See Decree No. 12, Sept. 4, 1930.)
(j) Alfalfa, clover, or other seeds which contain more than 200 seeds of Cuscuta per kilogram. In cases where more than the greatest permitted percentage is found the importer must elect relading the seed upon the vessel or have it cleaned in an establishment equipped with adequate machinery. In the latter case the seed will be subject to the supervision of the phytopathological inspection service, and cannot be withdrawn, in whole or in part, without the written authority of the same service, provided that the percentage of Cuscuta, after the seed has been cleaned, is less than 200 seeds per kilogram. The residuum shall be destroyed by fire.
The enumeration of the diseases in the various sections of this article is not limited, and consequently others may be listed in subsequent orders.

DISPOSAL OF PROHIBITED MATERIAL
ART. 6. If the phytopathological inspection service discovers any of the conditions set forth in article 5, making it necessary to prohibit importation, the chief of that service is authorized to order the return to the point of departure or the destruction of the plants, seeds, cuttings, bulbs, or fruits which it is attempted to import.
ART. 7. Not applicable.

TREATMENT REQUIRED IF DEEMED NECESSARY
ART. 8. Plants, seeds, cuttings, bulbs, or fruits, the importation of which is not prohibited by article 5. may be subjected to the following procedures:
(a) Quarantine of suspected or infected consignments pending final decision.
(bi) Disinfection in the manner prescribed by the phytopathological inspection service.
All expenses thus incurred will be borne by the interested persons.





19331 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 161

SPECIAL QUARANTINES
COFFEE, TEA, YERBA MATE, RICE, CHICORY, SAFFRON, MUSHROOMS, CINNAMON,
CLOVES, CUMIN, PEANUTS, CACAO, AND PIMIENTO-INSPECTION CERTIFICATE NOT
REQUIRED
Since these products are exclusively for food purposes no inspection certificate is required.
They may be imported in tin cans through any port of Chile without inspection.
Rice, cumin, peanuts, and cacao may be imported without restriction through the ports of Arica, Iquique, Tecopilla, Antofagasta, and Taltal, but shipment thence to southern ports is prohibited.
These products may be imported thiroughi the ports of Coquimbo, Valparaiso, Talcahuano, Los Andes, and Corral, subject to inspection.
If any of these products are found to be infested with pests, whether or not those pests occur in Chile, they shall be subject to the general provisions of the respective law and regulations. (Decree No. 450, Aug. 6, 1926.)
Rice may enter Puerto Montt subject to inspection. (Decree No. 143, Mlar. 16, 1927.)
The southern limit of the zone fixed by Decree No. 450 for the unrestricted entry of rice, cumin, peanuts, cacao, etc., is the Department of Chanaral and the unrestricted reshipment of these products is permitted between the sports included in this zone. (Decree No. 1080, Apr. 25, 1928.)

BANANAS, PLANTAINS, PINEAPPLES, DATES, AVOCADOS, AND PANA-MA, COCONUTS1IPORTATION REGULATED
Free importation of those products is permitted through the ports of Arica, Iquique, Tecopilla, Antofagasta, Taltal, and Chianaral, and subject to, inspection through the ports of Coquimbo, Valparaiso, Talcahuano, Los Andes, and C'orral. (Decree No. 560, Sept. 21, 1926.)

ORANGES3 AND MANGOES FROM BRAZIL-ENTRY AUTHORIZED THROUGH PORTS OF THE CENTRAL ZONE
Shipments of these fruit's must b~e accompanied by certificates issued by the official plant quarantine service of Brazil, visaed by the Chilean consul, and subject to inspection on arrival. (Decree No. 1971, July 12, 1928.)

CORN IN THE EAR AND B3ROOMCOR N-IMPORTATION PROHIBITED
The importation is prohibited of corn in the ear, or parts thereof, and of broomcorn or sorgo intended for the manufacture of brooms, but shelled corn an~d sorgo seed, if thoroughly clean andl free from fragments of cobs and stalks, may be imported. (Decree No. 2526, Aug. 28, 1928.)

STRAW PACKING TO BE STERILIZED
No goods of whatever origin may be imported if packed in straw, grasses, or stems of any class of plants: Pro rhtcd, That wines or liquids in bottles with straw casings, may be imported if accompanied by official certificates. issued by competent officials of the country of origin, attesting that the straw casings have been sterilize(] with steam for at least 15 minutes at 1150 C., or disinfected ini a closed chamber from which the gas cannot escape, at a temperature of not less than 200, with a solution of formaldehyde. The solution shall contain at least 37 percent by weight of formaldehyde at the rate of 500 cc per 20 m3' of space.
Goods arriving without the above-mentioned certificate of disinfection shall be disinfected as prescribed, and all expenses incurred shall be charged against the person directly concerned. (Decree No. 2526, Aug. 28, 1928.)

IMPORTATION PROHIBITED OF FRESH PLANT PRODUCTS CAPABLE OF CARRYING FRUIT FLIES
The regulations promulgated by Decree No. 12, September 4, 1930, follow:
ARTICLE 1. The importation into Chile is prohibited of all fresh plant products, whatever their origins, which are capable of carrying -fruit flies. Especially






162 BURE-kU ()F PLANT QUARANTINE [January-March,

included In this prohibition are all kinds of fresh fruits, and the vegetables: Tomatoes, eggplants, squash, green. peas, and peppers.

ENTRY PERMITTED WHEN CERTIFIED AS ORIGINATING A DISTRICT FREE FROM
FRUIT FIJES
ART. 2. The following products are excepted from the above prohibition:
(a) Fresh fruits froin the State of California'; (b) bananas (including plantains), pineapples, coconuts, dates, avocados, watermelons, and cucumbers from Ecuador; (c) fruits indicated under (b) and vegetables from Peru and Brazil, on condition that they originate in a zone declared free from fruit fly by the plant quarantine authorities of the said countries; (d) fruits from Argentina, except the orange, on condition that they, likewise, proceed from a zone declared free from fruit fly by the plant quarantine authorities of that country.
ART. 3. The declaration that the fruits or other products are from a zone free from fruit fly shall be made in the certificate issued by the plant quarantine authorities of the country of origin, which certificate shall accompany the shipping papers or bill of lading, and which will indicate in each case the kind, quality, and origin of the products whose entry is permitted by this decree. This certificate shall be issued in duplicate and shall be visaed by the Chilean consul in the country of origin of the fruit. A copy of the said certificate shall accompany the shipping papers, and another shall be retained with the fruit while it remains on board.
ART. 4. The importation of the products excepted from the prohibition, indicated in (a), (b), (c), and (d) of article 2, are subject to the following conditions:
INSPECTION CERTIFICATE REQUIRED
(a) Through the ports of the zone included between Arica and the Chanaral entry is permitted, provided that the products are accompanied by the sanitary certificate which must come with each shipment and in which it is also stated that the consignment has been inspected at the port of embarkation by competent sanitary authority. The said certificate shall be visaed by the respective Chilean consul, in accordance with the provisions of article 3, and it will also be required that the certificate bear the approval of the inspector of the plant quarantine service of Arica, after inspection made on board by that official.

AUTHOWZED PORTS OF ENTRY
The insp ctlon made at Arica will serve to permit entry through ports where there are no inspectors of the 'Plant quarantine service; but in port's where there are officials of that service, entry will be permitted only after inspection has been made at the place where the products were unladen.
(b) The fruits and other products named in article 2 of the present decree may be entered through the port of Chanaral, provided that they are intended exclusively for consumption in the mining establishments of the region included between Pueblo Hundido, and the northern boundary.
(c) The products named in article 2, with the exception of avocados, watermelons, and cucumbers, may be entered south of Chanaral only through the ports of Coquimbo, Valparaiso,, Los Andes, San Antonio, Talcahuano, and Valdivia, after the inspection established by the law of the plant quarantine service and upon presentation of the certificate referred to in article 3.
ART. 5. The importation is authorized of fresh fruits and vegetables of whatever origin through the port of Magellanes without other requirement than the certificate prescribed by article 3, provided that those products are Intended for consumption in the Departments of 'Magellanes, Niatales, and Tierra del Fuego, their relading being definitely prohibited for the north of these departments.
ORANGES FROM ECUADOR,
ART. 6. The importation is permitted of oranges from Ecuador into the zone included between Arica and Taltal, provided that their origin from a fruitfly-free zone is attested by a certificate from the plant quarantine authority of the country of origin, in accordance with the provisions of article 3.
7 See caption Fresh Fruits from the United States, p. 163.





1933 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 163

OLIVES IN BRINE NOT RESTRICTED
ART. 7. Olives preserved in brine, from the Department of Arica, may be exported or reshil)ped without any restriction.

TRANSPORTATION WITHIN THiE EPUIUBLIG
ART. S. The following products of the Department of Arica: Fresh l ves, oranges, tomatoes, potatoes, eggplants, peppers, squash. watermeloii.s, melons, peas, chick peas and vegetables in general, mnay depart from the port of Arica, after inspection made in that port by olicials o(l the plant quiarantine service. and provided that they are not found to be infested witli the fruit 11iy.v, a"ld that they are intended solely for the zo(ne included between Arica a(tii Taltal, inclusive.
ART. 9. The products named in the preceding article, which are from Peru or Bolivia, and which have the right to depart from the port of Arica in virtue of effective treaties, shall comply with the requiremIents prescribed for Chilean products for the purpose of their exportation to the zone included between Arica and Taltal.
ART. 10. The products mentioned inll articles S 'nIld 9 shall be transported in motor launches engaged exclusively in service between Arica and Taltal; but this transportation may also be effected onil the regular steamship lines on condition that they unlade the entire products at Taltal, their reshipment by rail being prohibited to ports or localities situated south of Taltal.
ART. 11. Steamship companies are prohibited from transporting to any port of the country fresh fruits and the other products nmied in article 1 of the present decree, and the crew and passengers shall not be allowed to have or to embark those products; but the transportation of the products excepted from the prohibition in article 2 may be effected.
ART. 12. The railroad Longitudinal Norte shall observe the provisions of the preceding article for the transportation of fruit in trains.
ART. 13. Steamship companies, railroads, especially the lines entering the country, transportation companies, trucks, automobiles, etc., are obliged to make known to the passengers the provisions of the present decree and to require the declarations established in article 4 of the general regulations of the plant quarantine service. Infractions of this provision will be sanctioned in accordance with the provisions of article 12 of the said law.
ART. 14. Vessels that embark fresh fruits, vegetables, and other products whose importation is prohibited by article 1 shall not keepl) these products on board if they have to land at any port south of Taltal; but if those products should be intended exclusively ais food for their passengers and crews they may be retained on board, provided that they be kept in locked enclosures while the vessels remain in port. In no case may tomatoes, mangoes. cherimoyas. guavas, or other tropical fruits be kept on board. unless expressly excepted from the prohibition to enter, as ordered in the present decree.
An inspector of the plant quarantine service will confirm compliance with this provision and the vessel shall not be received if this requirement is not complied with.
ART. 15. Maritime and land transportation companies. merchants and private persons who contravene the provisions of the present decree will incur the sanctions established in article 12 of the law of the plant quarantine service.
ART. 16. Provisions dictated prior to this d(late, contrary to the present decree, are revoked.

FRESH FRUITS FROM THE UNITED STATES
Fresh fruits may be imported into Chile from any State of the United States, provided that each shipment is accompanied by a certificate issued by the competent American authorities, affirming that the fruit originated in a district free from the Mediterranean fruit fly (Ceratitis capitata ). the certificate to be visaed by a Chilean consul. (Minister of Agriculture of Chile through the American consul, Santiago, Chile, Oct. 28, 1930.)

IMPORTATION OF POTATOES PROIIIBITED
From the date of this decree the importation is prohibited of potatoes from foreign sources, to prevent the introduction of the wart diseasee (Chrysophlyctis endobiotica). (Decree No. 130, Apr. 28, 1931.)






164 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [January-March,

P.Q.C.A.-299, Revised, Supplement No. 1. FEBRUARY 17, 19.
PLANT QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS, COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA
HOPS PROHIBITED FROM COUNTRIES IN WHICH DOWNY MILDEW OR MOSAIC OOCUR
According to an abstract published in the International Bulletin of Plant Protection, VI: 12, December 1932, p. 206, the proclamation of March 27, 1930, (see P.Q.C.A.-299, revised, p. 4, caption Importation of Hops Prohibited) has been amended by proclamation No. 215. of May 5, 1932, to read as follows:
It is forbidden to import into Australia plants of the genus Hunmuls coming from any country whatever. Importation is authorized, however, of the flower parts known commercially as hops, provided that they come from a country where the downy mildew, P&eudoperonospora humuli, or the mosaic, are not known to occur." LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.


P.Q.C.A.-314, Supplement No. 2. FEBRUARY 17, 1933.
PLANT QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS, GUATEMALA
FLOWER AND VEGETABLE SEEDS SHIPPED BY MAIL-CERTIFICATION NOT REQUIRED
According to an abstract published in the International Bulletin of Plant Protection, VI: 12. December 1932, page 206, the decree of June 4, 1932, prescribes that the phytosanitary certificate established by the decree of August 29. 1919 (see p. 3. P.Q.C.A.-314, Guatemala). will no longer be required in the case of flower and vegetable seeds sent in small quantities by mail.
For every other consignment, including potatoes for food or seed, the consuls of Guatemala will require the presentation of phytosanitary certificates before the customary permit can be issued. LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.


P.Q.C.A.-321, Supplement No. 1. FBRUARY 17, 1933.
PLANT QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS, SWEDEN
EXEMPTIONS TO IMPORT POTATOES FROM THE UNITED STATES MAY BE GLkNTED
According to a notice published in Commerce Reports. January 14, 1933, page 28,. the State Plant Protection Institute has been authorized, under a Swedish Royal letter of November 18, 1932, to grant exemptions from the import prohibition on potatoes from America, as well as from the certification requirements applying to all imports of potatoes, and those affecting imports of certain living plants and parts of plants.
Such exemptions are only to be granted after test in each individual case, and under such conditions as the Institute nmay find necessary to impose.
Thlie above modities the decree of January 11, 1927 (see P.Q.C.A.-321, pp. 4 and 5). LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Plant Quardntine.


B.P.Q.-350. MARCH 1, 1933.
PLANT QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS, KINGDOM OF NORWAY

The following sumnary of the plant quarantine restrictions of the Kingdom of Norway has been prepared for the information of nurserymen, plant quarantine officials, and' others interested in the exportation of plants and plant products from the United States to that country.
This summary was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant quarantine inspector of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine. from translations made by Paul Vogenitz, Post Office Department, and Mr. Shaw. of the texts of Royal Resolutions promulgated under the law of July 21. 1916, to combat insect pests and plant diseases (Lov av 21 juli 1916 om bekjaempelse av skadeinsekter og
plantesygdomne), and reviewed by the Norwegian Department of Agriculture (Landbruksdepartementet, Oslo, Norway).





19,3:3] SERVICE AND 111'4GULATORY 165

The inforinatiou contiiiied ill t1jis circular is believed to be coi'iect, and complete 111) to lbe tilile of pi-epal.'Itioll, but, it is llot ilitelldcd to be us'ed independently oI', 11or as a Sllb stlitllto for, t1w orig-imil, lexts (A' t1w (1miraiiiiiie resolutions', '111d it-, is not to be ilitelpl-eted '1'; v '1111 bol-iill ive. 1,110 resolutiolis t1leinselves sliould be cowulted for t1w ox.t( I text.
Lj :j," A.
("Iticl, (Al* RIII-c(lit.
BASIC PLANT QUARANTINE LAW

Under the law oI' July 21, 1910, the Kiiil,- oI' _Nor\vtY is julboi1zo, d to I)i-()illulgate regulatiolls 0) c4)1llb'1t insect pests '111d I)I'llit disease.-4. wilen

1-MPORTATION 014' PLANTS, BuLBS, AND SFEDS NOT RESTRICTED
Except as indicated below, tliere ii-e uO plint (Iiiii-,mline restrictions ulwil, tll(, im portation ilito Nonva ot, 11111'sei' stock ot'llel. Id"llits, bull)", '111d Seeds grown ill aild expol-ted fl-oill tjl(' 1"llited states.

I-MPORTAT'10N PIMIJIBITI-1) OF G00SEBERRY I)LANTS AND GO08FIlEERIES

Goosehcri-y bwslie -4 ind fi.c.,41 Imly ll()t )w fillported 171-oill oll '
foreign couiiti'y inl4j t1w Deptitincio 14' :111d Fjonl'llw (w intf) Hie d'paj-tIlielits, fill-Ifier ]lot-tll. (RoY'11 decice o I ept. 'S" 11916.)

POTATOES NOT, ADMITT.i) Coll-NTMES IN WHIC11 I'0TAT0 NN'Awr EXISTS
Potatoes may be inipoi-ted into -NorwaA, oiilN* fI ],onl cf)TI1111-io" furnish satisfactoi-v evidence that potato Nvart, Chr!/. opltlycti.s cadobiotica (Syacltytriunt. ciWobioticimi), does not exist there aiid lias not existed tliere during the past 6 yezi rs. (Shice there are small local 8i-e,is inf(, cte(l with potato wart disease ill sevoi-t-d '8mtes of the United States tll(' impoi-lotion into Not-way of potatoes grown ill United 'States is pl-ollibited. Decisil)ll of t1le Norwegian Department of Agi'icullure per flie Royal Norwejail Le-ation, lettet- of F(J). 18, 1931.)
Each sihipineW of pofiitoes must be accolliptallied by 111 illspectioll cortiflo-.8tel attested by a Noi-wedaii (-onsul. affirining that tlie potatoes, are f ree f roin pot,,1to wart, the potato tuber moth, and the sugmr beet noniatode. Ea(1-b shipment is Subject to illspeetioll "it the customs port of clearance ill 'Noi-way. (Royal re..;oliitioii of Fob. 1* 1 925, as aniemled by fliose of Mar. 20, 1925. Jail. 13 in(] Oct. 5. 1928.)

SEFDS 0F PICKA AN-D PINUS TO BE 'STAINED
Seed of all Species of Ilico(i and Pinu. froiu forei-ii countHes except tliose of Pinus conibra. and 1'. -Obirim,. "11,111 be treated by the custoills Nvith a, stlillinlg solution before, release for impoi-ttitioll.
The Seeds must be packed ill sacks steiieile(l in i ed Vt(-ii1aiid,',k Fro (foreil ll seeds) oil eacli side of the Sacks, parallel to flie in letters-, 2 inelies
high, "lild the 11-hole inscription sluill he at least 20 iiielies Imig.
Oil small sicks the inscription inay fwciip tNvo lines or be iwido ill sm,111or letters ill olle lille. In Sucli n (.,Is(,, the ill'Irk lilies[ oc("Ilpy It le'I'st tilree fourths of t1w length of t1w sack. Sacks not pr()pevIy marked oil .Il'rivil will be so marked- by the eust-onis.
Before reletl se by Ole cil"toills, the seod.,; slizill be cobwed ill ill(' f(Illm-dill." ni.aiiner : At different ploce,; oil the. sn(,-k -,mail (pimitilies of :i s(ilutioil of eosill (S pgrai'll" eo sijl dissolved ill 1 lifer of 11collol) ,411.111 be illjooed witli ,I syrin-e: 150 ce ()I' solution must lq used foi- (,,wli 10 k (-)I' seed. Mtoyal decreo of -Mar. 13, 1914. )

CO-NDITION-8, GOVEICNING Till,- 1NIP01tTATION OF CLOVER AND ri\ioTuY SEED
In Coll liec t- i on Nvilli Ilw RoN-21 r(-,olution of Mit-cb -1. 1927. concornim, the provisions of t1w Law ot' June 27, 1924. Ole importation is prohibited of Seeds of red clover, w1iiie clovoi% alike. and tiiiiotli '. uidess i poi-init pre s(,,ribing the eoudition's of elit-l-v luis first beell oblaille(t fi-oill tll(, -Norwe-i"Ill Department of Agriculture O:.4o. Niwwn -) pi-escribing, Ole
conditions of entry.






166 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [iJanuary-March,

Until further notice these conditions are as follows:
Import permits will be issued only for red clover, alsike clover, and timothy seed grown in northern or central Sweden or Finland. If a sufficient quantity of these seeds cannot be obtained from these countries the question of admitting such seeds from other countries will be considered.
White-clover seed grown in northern or central Europe will be admitted.
Applications for import permits shall indicate the germinability and weed content of the seeds offered for entry.
To obtain such permits the seeds must meet the following requirements (table 2):

TAutx 2.-Germinability required aiid weed seed content allowed in imported clover and timotzy seed

Minimum Maximum
Kind of seed germina- weed conbility tent

Percent Percenst
Red clover ------------------------------------------------------------------ 90 0.50
Alsike----------------------------------------------------------------------- 90 .75
White clover -------------------------------------------------------- 90 -----Timothy ------------------------------------------------------------ 95 .75


The control station concerned will be advised by the department concerning the import permit and the reported percentages.
Samples will be taken by the customs service in accordance with the law of June 27, 1924.
The seeds will not be released until their origin has been established. (Proclamation of Dec. 16, 1930.)

SAMPLING OF SEEDS
The following regulations have been promulgated by the Norwegian Department of Agriculture (Landbruksdepartementet, Oslo, Norway) under the law of June 27, 1924, for the sampling of seeds:
SEcTON 1. In view of section 4 of the above-mentioned law, samples shall be taken by an official of the customs service or of the control station, or by another public sampler.
SEC. 2. Samples taken from imports of merchandise shall, if not taken by a public sampler, be drawn in the presence of two witnesses, who must declare that the samples were drawn in conformity with the provisions of sections
3 to 8.
SEC. 3. Samples are to be taken as soon as possible, and at the latest within 8 days of the receipt of the merchandise. In case of rain, care must be taken that no moisture reaches the samples. No samples are to be drawn from sacks which have become wet or damaged. Such sacks shall be set aside from the remainder of the lot, for eventual separate sampling.
SEC. 4. A sample shall, as far as possible, represent an average sample of the lot involved. One average sample may not, however, represent a lot of more than 10,000 kg of seed corn or other large grain for sowing, or 5,000 kg of seed of small grain. For larger shipments an average sample shall be taken for every 10,000 kg of large grains or 5,000 kg of seeds.
Smc. 5. Concerns the sampling of stock tonics and artificial fertilizers.

SEC. G; (1) SHIPME-NTS OF SEEDS IN SACKS
In shipments up to 10 sacks, small samples are drawn from top, middle, and bottom of each sack with the hands or a suitable instrument. In larger shipments, small samples are drawn in the same manner from every fifth sack, but from at least 10 sacks.
The small samples must be thoroughly mixed together on a dry, clean floor or in a suitable container.
Out of the average sample so obtained, two or more samples of the aforementioned size are to be taken for analysis. Any finer or thinner parts present easily fall to the bottom. That this shall occur also in the samples for analysis





S LRI'i AN KGVk~h:YAN.N0T7'NCF1 M EMS$ (

in the same proportion ( as it happens in the original alv(rae s iple must receive accurate attention.
The size of the sample for analysis should 1e: Speeies of russ. beets, carrots, at least 100(r: clover, turnips., kuhilrnbi, awl the like, at loust 15in; corn, peas, and other large seeds, at leat4 -500-.
The samples are placed in linen habas or strong double paper ha -s and are then sealed ind iiarked to show:
(a) The designation of the meorchan dise;
(b) The seller's unme (or, in (ase the sample is taken by the eustonis Qervire, the importer's nane) ;
(c) The size of the shipment and any special marks or numbers
(d) Place and dlate of saiplin;
(e) Name of simpler.
One sample is sent to the computeilt district contldo station : the other is retained or sent to the seller or importer, as the case may be.

(2) 'UNPACKED SHIPMENTS OF SEED
From different places and deptis in the shipment of seed at least 10 siall samples are drawn; these are blended and handled as inflicted in paragraph
(1).
If the seed is particularly damp and it is of importance to get a dependable record of the water content of the merchandise, a special (extra) sample must be sent in to determine the water content. This sample must he packed in a light container (glass, tin hox). Such a saiple is not suitable for determining the germinability, as this may have been inpaire(l en route.

IMPORTATION OF ELMS PROHIBITED

Until further notice 4raphium almi Schwarz will be regarded as a fungus which is dangerous to plants, shrubs, or trees.
The importation of plants of any species of the genus Ulmus is prohibited. (Royal resolution of Mar. 21, 1930.)

IMPORTATION OF FLOwER BULBS PROHIBITED
Until further notice, the importation of flower bulbs from foreign countries is prohibited unless permission is granted by the Department of Agriculture (Landbruksdepartementet, Oslo, Norway). (Royal resolution of Apr. .9, 1032)

IMPORTATION OF IloP PlANTS oR CUTTINaiS PROHIBITED
AiRTICLE 1. Until further notice, the fungus Pscudopcronospor h Un di shall be deemed dangerous to plants, shrubs, or trees.
ART. 2. The importation of living plants or cuttings of hops Hunt alus lupulus) shall be prohibited.
ART. 3. This resolution becomes effective immediately.
Exceptions may be granted by the Department of Agriculture under eonditions prescribed by that Depart ment. (Royal resolution of Feb. 3, 1933.4

MARCII 10. 1983.
B.P.Q.-346 (Revised Mar. 10, 1931; superseding I.P.Q.-346 issued Dec. 10,
1932. an1 supplemet no. 1).
EUROPEAN CORN BORER
STATE REGULATIONS
The rec-ulations outlined below are those issued by various States subsequent to the revocation of the Federal quarantine on account of tle European corn borer. The compilation is prepared in response to requests for such inforniation but is not intended to be used independently of or as a substitute for the quarantines and is not to be interpreted as leally authoritative. The quarantines themselves should be consulted for the exact wording of legal orders. It should be understood that the Bureau of Plant Quarantine of tho United States Department of Agriculture is not iii a p(sit in to LriVe explanatory information concerning State quarantines. Inlquiries as lo the interpretation of such restrictions, or requests for the full text of order> should be addressed






168 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [January-March,

to the appropriate official of the State concerned. (See list of State officials on page 170.) It is also possible that quarantine orders or revisions have been issued which have not reached the Department.

INFESTED STATES
All the States which have enacted quarantines place the regulations on the entry of the restricted articles from any part of the following States: Connecticut, Indiana, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, and West Virginia.
The Oklahoma quarantine includes Wisconsin among the States from which shipments of such articles are restricted.
The Tennessee quarantine includes Kentucky, Virginia, and Wisconsin, among the States from which shipments of such articles are restricted, and the California quarantine includes Kentucky, Maryland, Virginia, and Wisconsin.
The quarantines of Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, Nevada, Oklahoma, South Carolina, and Texas apply to the 13 above-listed States, and also to any other States in which the corn borer may be found.

STATES WHICH HAVE ENACTED QUARANTINE REGULATIONS
Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Washington, Wisconsin, and Wyoming.

SUMMARY OF QUARANTINE REGULATIONS
The orders in the following summary are divided ipto three groups, as the various States have issued different types of quarantine regulations.

GROUP 1. EMBARGO -NO CERTIFICATE
The State of Wyoming prohibits entirely the entry of the following articles from the infested States.
Restricted articles.-Cornstalks, corn on the cob, cobs or any other debris of corn, broomcorn, all sorghums and Sudan grass (except the clean shelled seeds of these plants), celery, beans in the pod, beets with tops, rhubarb, oat or rye straw as such or when used as packing, cut flowers or entire plants of chrysanthemums, asters, cosmos, zinnias, hollyhocks, and cut flowers or entire plants of gladioli and dahlias except the bulbs or corms "which are free from other plant growth whether grown or stored in the infested district."

GROUP 2. STATES ACCEPTING ONLY FEDERAL CERTIFICATES
Quarantines largely uniform have been issued by the following States which require Federal certificates for entry of the restricted articles: Arizona, California, Colorado, Georgia, Louisiana, Neveda,8 Oregon," and Utah.
Restriction.s.-Cornstalks, ears, cobs, or other parts or debris of corn and broomcorn plants, or sorghums and Sudan grass (except clean, shelled corn, broomcorn seed, sorghum seed, and Sudan-grass seed) are not certified by Federal inspectors for movement from the infested States. The Colorado quarantine provides, however, that they may enter that State without certification, when manufactured or processed in such a manner as to eliminate all risk of carrying the borer.
Lima beans in the pod, green-shell beans in the pod (of the variety known as Cranberry or Horticultural), beets with tops, rhubarb,9 cut flowers, or entire plants of chrysanthemums, asters, gladioli, and dahlias, except the bulbs or corms without stems, are accepted by States in group 2 when certified by a duly authorized Federal inspector to be free from the borer, and are contained in a car, box, or other container to which is attached a copy of said certificate. Articles named in this paragraph may be admitted into Colorado, however, either when so certified or when manufactured or processed.

8 Embargoes formerly placed by Arizona, California, Colorado.' Georgia, Louisiana, South Dakota, and Utah have been modified (see groups 2 and 3) and a similar modification ~is pending with respect to the Nevada regulations; in the case of Oregon arrangements have been made administratively to accept certification.
9The Louisiana quarantine does not include rhubarb.






1933] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANN OUN CEMENTS 169

GROUP 3. STATE CERTIFICATES ACCEPTED ON CERTAIN PRODUCfS
Regulative quarantines, largely uniform, have been issued by the following States: Arkansas, Florida, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Carolina, South I akota, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, Washington, and Wisconsin.
Restrictions.-Except as provi(led under subsections (1)-(3) below, the following articles are not admitted to the States in group 3 unless they have been manufactured or processed in such a manner as to eliminate all risk of carrying the European corn borer:
Class (a).-Cornstalks, ears, cobs. or other parts or debris of corn or bro'incorn plants, sorghums, and Sudan grass (except clean, shelled corn," broomcorn seed, sorghum seed, and Sudan-grass seed), which have originated in the infested States.
- Except as provided under subsections (8)-(7) below, the following articles are not admitted to the States in group 3 unless they have been manufactured or processed as provided above, or unless they have been inspected by a duly authorized State or Federal inspector and certified to be free from the European corn borer, and are (ontained in a car, box, or other container to which is attached a copy of said certificate.
Class (b).-Celery, beans in the pod, beets with tops, rhubarb, oat or rye straw as such or when used as packing, cut flowers or entire plants of chrysanthemums, asters, cosmos, zinnias, hollyhocks, and cut flowers or entire plants of gladioli and dahlias except the roots, bulbs, or corms thereof without stems, which have been grown or stored in the infested States. The South Dakota quarantine also places these requirements on spinach.
Exceptions.-(1) The South Dakota quarantine applies to "all parts of the plant" in the case of corn and broomcorn and makes no reference to the exemption of shelled corn or seeds.
(2) The States of Florida, Mississippi, South Dakota, Tennessee, and Texas accept articles of class (a) when certified as provided above or when manufactured or processed.
(3) The Illinois and Virginia quarantines place oat and rye straw in class
(a) instead of class (b). They also provide for the admittance of seed corn on the cob in small quantities for exhibition purposes under certificate, in the case of Illinois, that it has been subjected to a temperature of 150' F. for not less than 3 hours; and in the case of Virginia, that it has been processed in such a manner as to eliminate risk of carrying the European corn borer.
(4) Celery is omitted from the list of restricted articles under the quarantines of Florida, Kentucky, and Texas.
(5) Cosmos, zinnia, and hollyhock are omitted from the list of restricted articles under the quarantines of Florida, Mississippi, and Texas.
(6) Oat and rye straw is omitted from the list of restricted articles under the quarantines of Florida, Mississippi, and Texas.
(7) The South Carolina quarantine does not provide for the acceptance of articles of class (b) when manufactured or processed. They must be certified.

REGULATIONS VITH RESPECT TO CANADA
Shipments to Canada.-Shipments of cleaned shelled corn, either for seed or feed, and cleaned seed of broomcorn may enter Canada, if accompanied by a certificate of inspection, signed by an authorized Federal or State official, to the effect that the shipment in question is free from infestation with the European corn borer.
Shipments from Can ada.-Federal Quarantine No. 41 (revised) prohibits the importation into the United States from all foreign countries and localities of the stalk and all other parts, whether used for packing or other purposes, in the raw or unmanufactured state, of Indian corn or maize, broomcorn, sweet sorghums, grain sorghums, Sudan grass, Johnson grass, and certain other articles, except that permits may be issued by the Bureau of Plant Quarantine for the importation of broomcornn for manufacturing brooms or similar articles made of broomcorn, clean shelled corn, and clean seed of the other plants covered."
10 Not exempt under the South Dakota quarantine. See subsection (1).






170 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [January-Marchl,

A number of States include part or all of Canada in the area quarantined, but reference to such restrictions is not included herein as State restrictions on foreign commerce are considered unconstitutional.
For further information as to restrictions on shipments to Canada, apply to Department of Agriculture, Ottawa, Canada.
For further information as to shipments from Canada, apply to Bureau of Plant Quarantine, United States Department of Agriculture, Washington, D.C.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau~ of Plant Quarantine.
Refrren-ces-The State orders of the various groups have the following titles, and information concerning the orders may be secured from the officers named:
Arizona-State entomolog-ist, Phoenix, Ariz., Quarantine Order No. 12
and Amendment No. 1, effective January 17, 1933.
Arkansas-State plant board, Little Rock, Ark., Quarantine No. 11 and'
rule 64, effective January 16, 1933.
California-Chief quarantine officer, Sacramento, Calif., Quarantine Order
No. 15 (new series), effective March 10, 1933.
Colorado-State entomologist, Fort Collins, Colo., Quarantine Order No.
4 (second series) as amended, effective February 17, 1933.
Florida-State plant board of Florida, Gainesville, Fla., rule 32, effective
August 16, 1932.
Georgia-State entomologist, Atlanta, Ga., regulation 36 (revised), effe-ctive January 12, 1933.
Illinois-State department of agriculture, Springfield, Ill., a proclamation
by the governor, effective July 27, 1932.
Iowa-State entomologist, Ames, Iowa, Warning and Quarantine No. 3,
effective July 25, 1932.
Kansas-State entomological commission, Topeka, Kans., Quarantine No. 5,
effective August 5, 1932.
Kentucky-State entomologist, Lexington, Ky., Quarantine No. 1, effective
October 10, 1932.
Louisiana-State entomologist, Baton Rouge, La., European corn borer
quarantine (revised), effective January 16, 1933.
Mississippi-State plant board, State College, Miss., rule 49 (amended),
effective September 13, 1932.
Missouri-Plant commissioner, Jefferson City, Mo., Quarantine No. 3,
effective July 20, 1932.
Nebraska-State department of agriculture, Lincoln, Nebr., Quarantine
No. 2, effective July 29, 1932.
Nevada-State quarantine officer, Reno, Nev., a proclamation by the
governor, effective September 1, 1932. Modification proposed.
New Mexico-Head of biology, College of Agriculture & Mechanic Arts,
State College, N.Mex., Quarantine No. 9, effective September 22, 1932.
Oklahoma-State plant board, Oklahoma City, Okla., plant board Quarantine No. 9 (amended), effective September 14, 1932.
Oregon-Director of agriculture, Agricultural Building, Salem, Oreg., Quarantine Order No. 26 (new series), effective October 11, 1932.
South Carolina-State crop pest commission, Clemson College, S.C., Quarantine regulation on account of the European corn borer, effective October 1, 1932.
South Dakota-Secretary of agriculture, Pierre, S.Dak., Quarantine No. 2
(revised), effective March 7, 1933.
Tennessee-Commissioner of agriculture, Nashville, Tenn., Notice of Quarantine No. 6 (first revision), effective November 1, 1932.
Texas-Commissioner of agriculture, Austin, Tex., Emergency Quarantine
Proclamation No. 71, effective July 25, 1932.
Utah-Commissioner of agriculture, Salt Lake City, Utah, Quarantine No.
11 (amended), effective February 9, 1933.
Virginia-Commissioner of agriculture and immigration, Richmond, Va.,
Quarantine No. 2, effective January 26, 1933.
Wash ing,,,ton-Director of ag-ricultulre, Olympia, Wash., Quarantine No. 18
(njewsris) effective January 24. 193-3.
Wiscons;in-Statfe enttomiolog-ist, Madison. Wis., Quarantine No. 4 (fourth
revision), effective Aug.-ust 19, 1932.
Wyoming-Commissioner of agriculture, Cheyenne, Wyo., Quarantine Order
No. 5, effective November 1. 1932.









19331 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 171






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19331 SERVICE .\Nl) l1FGrI'I_\T()I'Y _\NN0l*N(*FMI NTS

PER'INTITS POTATO ENIPORTS FIMM SPAIN Wress lll)tiei l
2(o. 10:1".
Spaiii, iiicludiii,- Ilie v lla.,4 h(wil I() thw list ()I' colllltrie.-4
froul NvIlicIl 11my 1w sllippcd 14) 111( I-11iled Skiles. III(' 1-11iled St"It(I"s
Department. t)f A i gHcultur( 11,1s 1 "11 n.'I 11 ()f I Qual"tiltille
finds that Spaiji Im s mct :111 1 lie c(mditioii:-; (it' reu*ula I ion 2 1 if I 11( I"I I iolls Goverilill'-, tilc Impo-tatioll (11, 1,()IIIqws illt() t1w l*IliI(,(I 'Stotos. 'Spaill 11,1s 'llso) presented evidcm-c 111,11 'Splill 11)(1 IIIe ('allary ls](111(1 s (In, free fl'()Ili 1)(0,10) w ('111 111(1 w iler h1jurim is Il()t(II() dis( ,ise, '111d ius(wl pe.st NvIlicIl 11'(- to III(, ,u ates or ll()l %videly pve\-II(,1l1 ill t1lis ('1011111W -(Ill, 11ited St, Ill ( se(Ilw li( I Ile
bureau will issue. at*Wr Fohruary 1. perillits I'm. t1w (-Ill ry ()f p)tatocs gr()Nvll
iii Spain or in the (aimry I.slmids.


PENALTIES EMPOSED FOR VIOLATIONS OF THE PLANT QUARANTINE ACT

\cem-dillr to relmrt.,-4 re(-(Iived 1) v Ille bure'lli durill- tile period jailuary -1 to
3) pellaltic'.; 11:1N
Alireh ")I. (, heell illilwse(l bY tile pr()per Federal
authorities for viol'Itiolls of Ilic phmt quarantim, act, a,- f4)1Io\vs:

JAPAN ESE-BEETLE QUARANTINE
In the case (if the Uiiitcd St(itc- v. the Mercliam's (twof ]Ihici-- Trwtsport(iti(m Co.. ill tile filtel-4,1te trailspmtatioll of 3 lots of 'Ippic" fl.()Ill p)illts ill the re"11lated area to lmhits imtAde t1wreld" withmit ij) spcctioll '110 certificatioll. tile defendmit pleadefl. guilty aml Nvzt thwd 25 (,)n eacli ()f :1, (,( mits, aii(l
In the ca, (, (if the 1,111tcd st(ltcs v. Robcrt .1. (libbmis, M(milt 11(ffly. __N.J.. doitll- busilless Is "I'lle No,-;t, Pellil-lertmi. -N.J., ill t1le 111terst'.1tc, s'llipillellt
of 11111-sery stock from a lmillt in the rel,_,-ulate(l arei to I Imitit outsi(le tliere(d. withmit inspectioll "11)(1 certificatimi. the (lefemlaw plca(hd guiltY aii(l Nvzis placed oil prokitimi fm- 6 niontlis.

QUARANTINES AFFECTING MEXICAN PRODUCTS
In the ease of the United States versus the persolls listed 1)elovv, for attemptin- to smuggle W contrabaii(l. plaW material, the penalties indicated were imposed by the United Stite,; customs officials Zzlt the foll()Nving ports:

Name Port Contraband Penalty

Mr. Longmire ---------------- 1 Brownville, Tex -------------- 30 avocados with seed ------- $1)
Evaristo Yanez --------------- El Paso, Tex ---------- 4 gmavas ----------------------M rs. R. D. M artinez --------- Laredo, Tex ------------------------ 3 plants -----------------------




























ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE

LE A. STRONG, Chief of Bureau. A. S. HOYT, Assistant Chief. B. CONNOR, Business Manager. R. C. ALTHoUs, Informational Officer.


E. R. SASSc ER, in Charge Foreign Plant Quarantines. S. B. FRACKER, in Charge Domestic Plant Quarantines. LON A. HAWKINS, in Charge Technological Division. A. F. BURGESS, in Field Charge Gipsy Moth and Brown-Tail Moth Quarantine
(Headquarters, Greenfield, Mass.).
L. H. WORTHL=, in Field Charge European Corn Borer Project (Headquarters, Eastern Section, South Norwalk, Conn.; Western Section, Springfield, Ohio). L. H. WORTHLEY, in Field Charge Japanese Beetle Quarantine (Headquarters, South Norwalk, Conn.).
R. E. McDONALD, in Field Charge Pink Bolliworm and Thurberia Weevil Quarantines (Headquarters, San Antonio, Teo.). B. L. BOYDEN, in Field Charge Date Scale Quarantine (Headquarters, Indio,
Calif.).I
P. A. HOIALE, in Field Charge Mexican Fruit Warm Quarantine (Headquarters Harlingen, Teo.).
175




















U. S, GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1933








S.R.A.-B.P.Q. No. 115 Issued Septener l!J3.






United States Department of Agriculture

BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE



SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS
APRIL-JUNE 1933



CONTENTS
Page
Quarantine and other official announcements ------------------------------------------------------- 177
Announcement relating to black stem rust quarantine (no. 38) -------------------------------- 177
Barberries and mahonias classified under black stem rust quarantine regulations (P.Q.C.A.320, revised, supplement no. 1) -...... .. ....---------------------------------------------- 177
Announcement relating to European corn-borer quarantine (foreign) (no. 41) ---------------179
Instructions to collectors of customs (T.D. 46335) ------------------------------------------ 178
Announcement relating to Japanese-beetle quarantine (no. 48) -------------------------------- 178
Administrative instructions--commercially packed apples under the Japanese-beetle-quarantine regulations (B.P.Q.-352) ------------------------------------------------------------ 178
Announcement relating to narcissus-bulb quarantine (no. 62) ----------------------------------- 178
Supplementary administrative instructions-narcissus treatment and pest suppression
(B.P.Q.-353) ----------------------------------------------------------178
Announcement relating to nursery stock, plant, and seed quarantine (no. 37) ------------------ 181
Instructions to collectors of customs (T.D. 46431) ------------------------------------------ 18t
Announcement relating to packing materials quarantine (no. 69) ------------------------------ 182
Amendment no. ito notice of quarantine --------------------------------------- 182
Announcement relating to seed- or paddy-rice quarantine (no. 55) ----------------------------- 182'
Instructions to collectors of customs (T.D. 46373) ----------------------------------------- 182'
Terminal inspection of plants and plant products --------------------------------------------- 183'
Wyoming discontinues terminal inspection ------------------------------------------------ 183
Georgia discontinues terminal inspection --------------------------------------------------18 3
Puerto Rico inaugurates terminal inspection ----------------------------------------------- 183
Miscellaneous items -------------------------------------------------------------- 18
Regulations governing the movement of plants and plant products through the mails
(B.P.Q.-351) ---------------------------------------------------------- 184
Regulations governing the importation of plants and plant products into It~ily (P.Q.C.A.289, supplement no. 1) ------------------------------------------------------------------- 18&
Summary of the plant-quarantine restrictions of the Republic of Germany (B.P.Q.-302)
(revised) --------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 185
Plant-quarantine restrictions, Union of South Africa (P.Q.C.A.-297, supplement no. 3) 193
Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act --------------------------------- 193
Organization of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine -------------------------------------------------- 195QUARANTINE AND OTHER OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS
ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO BLACK STEM-RUST
QUARANTINE (NO. 38)

P.Q.C.A.-320 (revised), supplement no. 1. JUNE 1, 1933.

BARBERRIES AND MAHONIAS CLASSIFIED UNDER BLACK STEM RUST
QUARANTINE REGULATIONS

P.Q.C.A.-320, as revised August 15, 1932, is hereby modified by transferring Berberis gilgiana and B. san guina from group D to group B. The effect of
this change is td authorize permittees under this quarantine to produce and ship interstate these two additional species of Berberis to the 13 protected! States under their Federal permits.
LE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.
5516 3 1177





178 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE

ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO EUROPEAN CORN
QUARANTINE (FOREIGN) (NO. 41)
INSTRUCTIONS TO COLLECTORS OF CUSTOMS

REVISED RULES AND REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL To NOTICE OF QuA
41 (SECOND REVISION), GOVERNING THE IMPORTATION OF INDIAN CORN
BROOMcORN, AND SES OF Ri~rfriT PLANTS (T. D. 46335)

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,
OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONERS OF CUSTO 7ashington, D.C., Apri
To Collectors of Customs and Others Concerned:
The appended copy of Notice of Quarantine No. 41, with revised regu on account of the European corn borer and other dangerous insects and diseases, issued by the Secretary of Agriculture, which became effective Ma 1, 1933, and supersedes all previous decisions [editions] and amendments of quarantine, is published for the information and guidance of custo ofi and others concerned.
Act. ig Corntssioner of Custom
[Then follows the full text of the quarantine and revised regular

ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO JAPANESE-BEETLE QUARA

(NO. 48)

B.P.Q.--352 Ju 2
ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS-COMMERCIALLY PACKED APPLES E T
JAPANESE-BEETLE-QUARANTINE REGULATIONS
Under regulation 5 of the Japanese-beetle-quarantine regulations, cially packed shipments of apples in any quantity" are exempt from the cation requirements applying to other lots of apples of over 15 pounds to the shipment transported from the regulated areas to outside points.
In interpretiig this provision the term "commercially packed" will icld "(a) All apples in closed barrels, boxes, or baskets, of sizes and types arily used in the apple trade;
"(b) Apples in open packages when such apples have been graded n ac ance with the official standards for apples promulgated by the United Sta Department of Agriculture or in accordance with any official grades auth i by the State in which the apples were grown and when the containers marked with such grade. The so-called 'unclassified' grade is not, h v considered a grade within the meaning of this definition, and apples i pn packages so marked are not considered commercially packed."

Chief, Bureau of Plant Qua t


ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO NARCISSUS-BULB QUA
(NO. 62)

B.P.Q.-353 JuNF, 26,193
SUPPLEMENTARY ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS-NARCISSUS T AND PEST SUPPRESSION

The following instructions are issued to supplement circulars B.P.Q. B.P.Q.-338, and to interpret certain points on which question has arisen.
GENERAL STATEMENT
In general, the provisions of circular B.P.Q.-337 are mandatory throw In certain sections, however, such terms as "should" were used wherth recommendations were primarily for the protection of the grower-su i





1933] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 179

vice concerning care in the use of cyanide, and p)reve ntiilig injury to the bulbs by treating at the proper time of year. In cases where the administrative instructions use the term should inspectors are justified in making exceptions where such exceptions seem necessary and where the grower lhas a full realization of the dangers or disadvantages involved.

IN SPECTIONS

The authority of iispl)ectors to refuse to make eel\vorin insp)ecti(ons in w I(,dy fields relates to instances where the fields are so fille(l with weeds aini grass as to prevent the inspector from finding eelwormi infestations sat isfacto rily.
In cases where the grower or his employees are roguing the field or sorting out culls in dormant bulbs, in advance of the inspector, the rogues and culls are to be held for the inspector's examination if hlie desires. Such rogues and culls should be destroyed as promptly as possible after exanination. One method of accomplishing such destruction is burying the bulbs deeply and covering them with quicklime and then with soil.
Dormant inspection for eelworm is especially important wvlere certain stocks are under suspicion, but where the inspector has failed to lind eelworm infestation in tie field. Some of these conditions are:
(1) Where the lot of bulbs concerned was given hot-water treatment the previous year;
(2) Where the bulbs were produced by a grower whose premises have been known to be infested in previous years;
(3) Where the bulbs were produced in the vicinity of another variety in which infestation was discovered; or
(4) Where through purchase or otherwise the complete previous history of the stock concerned is unknown.
If the number of inspectors in a State or district is not Lirge enough to enable them to examine carefully 10 percent of every lot of dormant bulbs within the State or district, such dormant inIspection may be limited to bulbs of the four special classes named above.
Dormant inspection is not required where infestation has already been found in the same lot in the field, as such hulbs must be treated in any event.
The Bureau has been asked whether there are not some conditions under which the inspector is justified in dividing unusually large blocks of a single variety, requiring treatment of an infested portion, and, in the absence of visible eelworm infestation, certifying the remainder as free from infestation without treatment. Such division is justified only when there is definite evidence that the eelworm infestation (diiscovered in the infested portion of the block is both (a) extremely scarce. and (b) definitely of the current seasoil's origin. A current season infestation in one end of a block may result from the flow of irrigation water from an infested variety past the ends of the rows of a previously uninfested variety. Where such infestation is very slight, where the location is one on which bulbs had not previously been grown, and where reasonable care has been used to avoid carrying infestation during cultivation and at other times on tools and the clothing of laborers, the inspector is authorized to make provision for the d(ligging, separate handling, and treatment of the infested portion of the field. If no eehvworm is found onil dormant inspection in the apparently uninfested sections, permits may then be issued for the latter without requiring treatment.
In no case in which either the bull)s or the premises have been infested before---whether the bulbs were treated or nt--could such a division of a block he authorized. Experience has shown that in such cs:es the lid(linig of infestation is ordinarily due to a carry-over from 1)previ(us years, and the inspector, if finding one or more infested bulbs in the b(ck, is omIpel led to assume that such carry-over has taken plic(0 in a larger number ()f narcissus than actually show spikkels.

TREATMENTS FOR BULB FLIES

The construction details given for fumigation chambers are mandatory exceIpt that several different types of construction are indlicated and the growers may choose between them.
In addition to the warnings outlined in circular B.P.Q.-337. care must also be taken to avoid explosion. Such explosion has occurred where an electric






180 BUIREAUT OF PLANT QUARANTINE twl4

heater with open wiring was employed to bring up the tempeaur of1h fumigation chamber during treatment and where a relatively high concentrations of cyanide gas being generated from sulphuric acid and sodium cyndecm into direct contact with such wiring.
The commercial calcium cyanide prescribed in circular 337, in additon td, being of the "slow-evolving type ", has a content of 40 to 50) percent of pure calcium cyanide, and is of the so-called granular type."

VAPOR-HFMAT TEATMENIT FOR BULB ILUS

It has been demonstrated by the Bureau of Entomology of this Department that the vapor-heat treatment properly applied will destroy all immature stages of the greater bulb fly, Merodon equestris. Based upon data furnise by that Bureau, the following method of treatment is authorized if desired in lieu of the hot-water treatment or fumigation for this bulb fly:
Heating the bulbs contained in the tray in a chamber of approved design~ by means of conditioned air to a temperature of 110' F. at the approximate center of the bulb and holding them at that temperature for a period of 2 hours. The temperature to be determined by distance thermometers of an approved design in six or more locations in the treating chamber.
The treating apparatus must be so constructed that the temperature of the bulbs is raised evenly to 1100 F. with a variation of not more than 2' i the temperature in the air in different parts of the room at any time aftet it has been in operation 30 minutes. It must be equipped to maintain the temperature automatically after it reaches 1100, with a variation of not more than 1" from 110' in the load throughout the treating period of 2 hours. Tile equipment must have sufficient capacity to heat a full load of bulbs from 60* to 110* i 6 hours, and must be provided with facilities for maintaining the air circulated through the room saturated with water vapor without the presence of free, water in the air. A heater, so that warm. dry air can be circulated through the load after the sterilization Is completed, should be installed i the air, conditioner.
While the performance of equipment for applying this process and the distance thermometers for determining the temperature will be carefully checked, and the equipment approved only after it is shown that it will apply the treatment properly, the shippers will not be limited to any particular~ type.
The general requirements for furnishing the proper conditions for this treatment are a source of steam at approximately 15 pounds pressure, an airconditioner, consisting of a blower of sufficient, capacity, a conditioning chamber in which air, water, and steam can be mixed together to bring the air at the proper temperature to saturation,. together with an automatic control for maintaining constant temperature. The blower must be of sufficient capacity to force conditioned air at a temperature of 110' F. through the bulbs in large volume. At least four changes of'air per minute through the treating-~ chamber are necessary to provide the proper conditions for the treatment.
The distance thermometers must be accurate to within one half degree Fahrenheit and of the type that will make possible reading the temperature of the bulbs in any part of the treating chamber within one half degree Fahrenheit without opening the chamber. The bulbs of these thermometers must be of such design that they may be inserted into the narcissus bulbs and so, thait the temperature at the approximate center of the bulb can be obtained.. Distance thermometers calibrated for direct reading,- of the temperature in, degrees Fahrenheit may be found easier to use than other types. Temperature readings should be made ait 15-minute intervals and an accurate record of the temperatures maintained.
Specifications for equipment which has successfully met these requirement,and information as to where the parts may be secured, will be furnished to State inspectors on request, and interested growers or dealers may secure. such information through them. Possible disappointment or loss through the purchase of equipment which might later prove ineffective may thus be. avoided.
TREATMENTS FOR EELWORMS

Hot-water treatment is to be supervised by the inspector. In case of insufficient inspection personnel, an inspector may authorize the owner of the bulbs to proceed with treatment for limited periods in the inspector's absence, mak-





19331 SERVW(' AND BEGULATOItY A-N-NOU-NCEM ICN'1 S 181

ing the grower himself or one of his colnpetelit eip oyees responsible. Records are to be kept of the telilpera-tr ofi Othle NvatIer iti 15.-i iiiim DIeito1 rva Is duiringl( the entire peIriod of treatiiit, and when thle i iisj w( 1 I is 0)1 eijt stii record14 s are to be kept by the gfrowver or eIiloyee iii (I iar 1gv. I-';X(Q1 Nvhi .Fe a grower has been definitely atil Ir)iz&'( b y anl iii spcctoWI or proc( w I. tre fl e! it c' Ir i oe II out in the ilispect or' abs5enc(e is otA cohisHlred aIs fl Itilli iig Ihle i*4 (qui reijilts for the issuance of Federal p~ermHits.
In tbat pargr (hof I lie discuIssioni of bot-wa Ier I rmil iiielit, elil it led "Process in circ(ular 11.1.Q.-88i, it is stated Owht ho)t vat ci' Ireal mciii is required either if elworni infestation has, bken fol'nJd or if tbe iiispeetnrl hazs heeii una1,ble to determine to hisi full sUL islaictioii that the iaricssiis are free froni ecd1 worm1s.'' This hitter clause refers to (Uca5e.- NNllere the iisj wct or is an1t horized inl the instructions to assume infestation, a in the cas~e o)f weed(I fields, o)r istances where the grower or hiis employees are thleiniselves ri i~Zi ug the field,, for eelworni infestations in awlvance of the ispector, and other similarly authorized cases.

CHIANGE IN PRE5o.\i{ ING hiEQUIREMENT

InI the ca ise of bulbs NNhich have dried for m ore t han 3 weeks, circular 1.P.Q.-337 stated that 4'thiey should be soik1ed I'm i' 12 hoiirs in cold water before beinir treated." Tli.' advisory\ expression should w;Lsi used in plac e of making this a spvcilic requirement, as experiiiiental tests; of the effec:-t of suich presoaking on many varieties had not been completed. Presoakingl- for a 2-hour period has been used commercially, however, for several years in certain seetions. The former reconlmienidation is now miodified to4 providIe that such presoAing for 2 hours is a definite requirement in the case of bulbs which are to be treated after having dried for more than approximately 8 weeks.

FIELD SANITATION

In addition to the reconnlneni(lations of eicibir B.P.Q.-337, it is advantageous to dig all the healthy varieties antd blocks, first, anol to store them in a separate section of the shed. This a ids in pre'venting the spread of eeiwormis on tools and container,-. Trays of infested varieties should never be placed on the same rack above unlinfested lot--).
Except as modified or interpreted in this circular. the provisions of circulars B.P.Q.-337 and B.P.Q.-338 aire considered as bindig- (on inspectors as condition- (of certification for the iiterstate miovemient of narcissus bulbs3 under Federal plant quarantine no. 62.
LEEu A. STRONG,
Chief. flu; cal of Pluant Qiz ie


ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO NURSERY STOCK, PLANT, AND SEED QUARANTINE (NO. 37)
INSTRUCTIONS TO COLLECTORS OF CUSTOMS

T.D. 4,3980, PUBIASIIING A LIST OF -NAv-MES OF RF:PRn.ICxNTTIVIF, OF TiHE CANAD)IAN
I.)FPARTM\E-NT oF AGRICU'lT-UIE QCIALIFIEI) TO INSPECT AN!) CLIY PLANXTS
A'MENDED (T.D. 46431)1
iE.Asunty DE,-PAITMENT,
OFFrcF: OF THlE COMMISSIONER OF CUSTOMS.
11'(l. hifl!Itoii. D.C., Mai, 29, 1933.
To CollcctorN of Citstwii mid. Othcrs Cone' riwl:
The published list of )ticial represent t ivo.s of the Canadian Departmnent of Agriculture who are qualified and atitorized to inspect a~nd certify nursery stock, plants. tand sees for shipment from Canaida to tile I United States in accordance with the rules and regulations supplemental to quaria ntine no. 37 (U.S. Department of Agriculture), is amended by removing the name of C. S. Thompson and substituting the ime of AV. It. Lapp, wvho has, been designated as district inspector at the port of Windsor, Ontario.
FRANK Dow,
A uti ('orni; Nxiower of ('u.stoais.
1For complete list see S.R.A.-P.Q.C.A. No. 10)3, April-Juim 1930, p. 74.






182 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE

ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO PACKING-MA
QUARANTINE (NO. 69)
AMENDMENT NO. I TO NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 69

INTRODUCTORY NOTE

This amendment, which is made concurrent with the date on quarantine first becomes effective, has relation only to the list of materials, permitting exceptions to be made therefrom in the case of packing materials in which it is judged that the pest risk has been r eliminated by the method of preparation, process, or manufacture.
Av-ry S. oT
Acting Chief, Bureau of Plant Qua


AMENDMENT NO. 1 TO NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 6
[Approved June 28, 1933; effective July 1, 1933)

Under authority conferred by the Plant Quarantine Act approved 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315) as amended, it is ordered that section 1 -of of Quarantine No. 69, approved February 20, 1933, effective July 1, 193b and the same is hereby amended to read:
1. On and after July 1, 1933. the following plants and plant products, when used as packing materials, are prohibited entry into the United States fro the countries and localities named:
(a) Rice straw, hulls, and chaff; from all countries.
(b) Corn and allied plants (maize, sorghum, broomeorn, Sudan grass, pier grass, jobs-tears, teointe, Polytoca, Sclerachne, Chionachue); al parts, from all countries except Mexico, and the countries of Central West Indies, and South America.
(c) Cotton and cotton products (lint, waste, seed cotton, cott cottonseed hulls) ; from all countries.
(d) Sugarcane: all parts of the plant including bagasse, from all
(e) Bamboo; leaves and small shoots, from all countries.
(f) Leaves of plants; from all countries.
(g) Forest litter; from all countries.
(h) Soil containing an appreciable admixture of vegetable matter, from all countries, except such types of soil or earth as are authorized as safe for packing by the rules and regulations promulgated supplemental to this quarantine.
Exceptions to the above prohibitions may be authorized in the case of materials which have been so prepared, manufactured, or processed that in judgment of the inspector no pest risk is involved in their entry.
This amendment shall be effective on and after July 1, 1933.
Done at the city of Washington this 28th day of June 1933.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[SEAL] R. G. TuGWLL,
Acting Secretary of Agri future.


ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO SEED- OR PADDY-RICE
QUARANTINE (NO. 55)
INSTRUCTIONS TO COLLECTORS OF CUSTOMS
REVISION OF QUAR-ANTINE AND REGULATIONS COVUUNG IMPORTATION OFSM l
PADDY RICEm (T.D. 46373)
TRF-ASURY DEPARTMENT,
OMcE OF THE COMMISSIONER OF G Washingt on, D.C., May 2,1
To Collectors of Custons and Others Concerned:
The appended copy of Notice of Quarantine No. 55, revised (seed- or rice quarantine), with revised regulations, adding rice straw and rice hs





19331 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 183

the articles prohibited entry, amplifying the definition of seed or paddy rice, and making provision for the importation of seed or paddy rice from Mexico by mail, issued by the Secretary of Agriculture to become effective July 1, 1933, is published for the information and guidance of customs officials and others concerned.
FRANK Dow,
Acting Commissioncr of Customs.
[Then follows the full text of the revised quarantine and regulations.]


TERMINAL INSPECTION OF PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS
WYOMING DISCONTINUES TERMINAL INSPECTION

INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS

POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT, THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERA-L, Washington, April 10, 1933.
POSTMASTER.
My DEAR SIR: The State entomologist of Wyoming has advised that as the recent Legislature of Wyoming made no provision for nursery-stock inspection, parcels of plants and plant products upon arriving at the post office of address may be delivered to the addressee without first being subjected to terminal inspection under section 596, Postal Laws and Regulations.
You will, therefore, please be governed accordingly in future.
Very truly yours,
C. B. EILYNBERGER,
Third Assistant Postumrtter General.


GEORGIA DISCONTINUES TERMINAL INSPECTION

INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS
POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT, THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL, Washington, June 15, 1933.
POSTMASTER.
My DEAR SIR: The State entomologist of Georgia has requested that parcels of plants or plant products addressed for delivery in the State of Georgia be not sent for terminal inspection in future. Therefore, parcels of plants and plant products arriving at the office of address may be delivered to the addressee without first being subjected to terminal inspection under section 59K, Postal Laws and Regulations.
You will, therefore, please be governed accordingly in future.
Very truly yours,
C. B. EILENBERGER.
Third Assistant Postmaster Gencral.


PUERTO RICO INAUGURATES TERMINAL INSPECTION

INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS
POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT, THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL, Washington, May 16, 1933.
The island of Puerto Rico has established a place for terminal inspection under the provisions of the act of March 4, 1915, embodied in section 596, Postal Laws and Regulations, of the following plants and plant products:
All florists' stock, trees, shrubs, vines, cuttings, grafts, scions, buds, fruit
pits and other seeds of fruit and ornamental trees or shrubs, and other plants and plant products in the raw or unmanufactured state including
field, vegetable, and flower seeds; also cotton lint.





184 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTIlNE [AprU-JIump

All postmasters are, therefore, informed that packages containing an plant or plant products addressed to places in the island of Puerto Rico may be accepted for mailing only when plainly marked so that the contents may be readily ascertained by an inspection of the outside thereof. The law makes the failure so to mark such parcels an offense punishable by a fine of not more than $100.
Postmasters within the island of Puerto Rico shall be governed strictly by the provisions of paragraphs 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7, section 596, Postal Laws and Regulations, in the treatment of all packages addressed for delivery at their offices containing any of the plants or plant products above described as subject to terminal inspection.
Inspection service is maintained at San Juan only.
Owing to the perishable character of plants and plant products, the packages containing such matter must be given prompt attention.
Any failure of compliance with the foregoing' instructions or with the provisions of section 596, Postal Laws and Rtegulations, coming to the attention of any postmaster should be reported to the Third Assistant Postmaster General, Division of Classification.
C. B. EILENBERGE R,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.


MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS

B.P.Q.--351 (superseding H.B.-212) APRIL 12, 1933.
REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE MOVEMENT OF PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS THROUGH THE MAILS
The following regulations have been established by the Post Office Department, in conference with the Department of Agriculture, to govern the movement through the mails of the plant material named (Postal Guide 1932, pp. 17-19).
Plants and plant products, including all field-grown florists' stock, trees, shrubs, vines, cuttings, grafts, scions, buds, fruit pits and other seeds of fruit and ornamental trees or shrubs, and other plants and plant products for propagation, except field, vegetable, and flower seeds, bedding- plants, and other herbaceous plants, bulbs, and roots, may be admitted to the mails only when accompanied with a certificate from a State or Government inspector to the effect that the nursery or premises from which such stock is shipped has been inspected within a year and found free from injurious insects and plant diseases, and the parcel containing such stock is plainly marked to show the nature of the contents and the name and address of the sender (sec. L595 (2) 1, Postal Laws and Regulations).
Terminal inspection of plants and plant products addressed to Arizona, Arkansas, California, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, [Louisiana], M'Nississippi, Montana, Oklahoma, Oreg-on, Utah, and Washington is required. (See see. [596] Postal Laws and Regulations, and instructions in the supplements to Postal Guide.) All parcels addressed to the States named must be plainly marked on the outside to show the exact nature of their contents.
"4Plant qtiarantines.-When the United States Department of Agriculture, under authority of the Plant Quarantine Act, quarantines any State or area on account of a plant disease or insect infestation, the mailing of plants or plant products from such State or area is subject to the restrictions imposed by such order."
Full information regarding any or all plant quarantines may be secured by addressing the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, Washington, D.C. The correspondent should state the nature of the material which it is expected to move, aud the points from and to which it is to be sent.
LEE A. STRONG,
C,ef, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.




1933] SEI~VI('CE ANI) 1:EGULATOY ANNO()NCIEMENTS s 185

M1.NY 15. 1933.
P.Q.C.A.-289, supl)Iement no. 1
REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE IMPORTATION OF PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS INTO ITALY

IMPORTATION PROHIBITED) OF PLANTS AND FRUITS OF CACTI AND O)F PLANTS. AND PARTS THEREOF, OF CERTAIN (CONIERS

The Italian ministerial order of December 2(0, 1932. effectlive MA lrli 1. 19)3. prohibits lthe importation into, andI transit thr ilgLh. Italy, o)f It e following :
(a) Plants and fruits ofI cacti from any country whatever, on count of() tlhe danger of introducing insects, fungi, or bacteria injurious to prickly pear (Opuntia fieus indices .
(b) Plants and parts of plants of conifers of the genera Abies, Picca, Pinu. Pseudotsuga, and Tsuga.
The importation of plants and parts of plants belonging to other gene ra of conifers is permitted if the shipment is accompanied by a certifi,'ate issues hy the plant protection service of the country of origin in the Italian or French language, affirming that the said plants and parts thereof, and the locality in which they were grown, are free from injurious diseases and pests, and (especially from Rh abdoclin e pscudotsugae. The same certifi-ate must also indicate the origin of the goods and the names of the species included in 1lhe shipment, and all necessary data for identifying the slipmenlt.
LEE A. STRO.G,
Chief. Bureau of Plant Quarantine.


B.P.Q.-302, revised.
SUMMARY OF THE PLANT-QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS OF THE REPUBLIC OF GERMANY

A revision of circular P.Q.C.A.-302 bau become necessary because: the original San Jose scale decrees of the German Republic have been super(eded by the decree of November 3, 1931. and its regulatory order of November 26. 1931, restricting or l)rohibiting the importation of l)lants from the United States, among other countries, to prevent the introduction of San Jose scale. and providing for the entry of fresh fruits from the United! States if fund free from San Jose scale (A.'pidiotu. p)erniciosis) and from the apple maggot or fruit fly (Rhagoleti. pomoieilla).
This revised summary of the plant quarantine restrictions of the German Republic has been prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant quarantine inspector, Bureau of Plant Quarantine. from his translations of the oriinal texts, and reviewed by the German Ministry of Nourishment and Agriculture. fir the information of nurserymen, plant-quarantine officials, and others interested in the exportation of plants and plant products from the United Stat(es to Germany.
The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct and complete up to the time of preparation. but it is not intended to be used independently of, nor as a substitute for. T he original texts: and it is not to be interpreted as legally authoritative. The German texts should be consulted.
LEE A. STRONG.
Chief. Bureau of Plant Quaran li n .


SUMMARY OF THE PLANT-QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS OF THE REPUBLIC OF GERMANY

OBJECTS OF GERMAN PLANT-QUARANTINE DECREES

The plant quarantine restrictions of the Republic of Germany are designed to prevent the introduction into and distribution in Germany of phylloxera (Phylloxcera vastatrix), San Jose scale (A.spidiotus perniciosus), apple maggot
5516-33- 2






186 BUREAU OF PLANT QUAtANTINE [April-June

or fruit fly (Rhagoletis poniwnella), Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotra dcemlineata), potato wart (Chrysophlyctis endobiotica), the cherry y (agoletis cerasi), the carnation leaf roller (Tortrix pronubana), injurious diseases and pests of flower bulbs and tubers, of conifers and seeds of conifers, of plants and parts of plants of the genus LCn us, of the southern cottonwood (Populus [cainadensis] deltoides), and of Indian azaleas (Azalea indica).

IMPORTATION PROHIBITED

Grapevine stocks and all parts of the grapevine from any country, to prevent the introduction of phylloxera. (Decree of October 31, 1879, and subsequent orders; Reichsgesetzbl. p. 303, etc.) (See p. 187.)
Living dicotyledonous plants or parts thereof from the United States and certain other countries, to prevent the introduction of San Jose scale. (Decree of November 3, 1931, and circular of November 26, 1931; Reichsgesetzbl. 1: 74, 1931, p. 670, and Rundschreiben des RM.f.E.u.L. an Liinderregierungen vom 26 November 1931, II: 41, p. 258. Decree of July 8, 1932; Reichsgesetzbl. 1: 45, 1932, p. 331.) (See p. 188.)
Potatoes from the United States, to prevent the introduction of the Colorado potato beetle. (Decree of February 26, 1875, and subsequent orders; Reichsgesetzbl. 135, etc.) (See pp. 191 and 192.)
Potatoes, tomatoes, eggplants, strawberries, rooted vegetables, bulbs, tubers, rhizomes, and other subterranean parts of plants: peelings, and refuse of such products; and sacks, and other materials which have been used for packing or preserving such products. Importation and transit prohibited from France. (Decree of February 23, 1932; Reichsgesetzbl. I: 13, 1932, p. 91.) (See p. 191.)
Seeds of Scotch pine (Pinus sylvestris) and Norway spruce (Picea crcelsa) from any country, to prevent the introduction of diseases of those trees. (Decree of February 28, 1929; Reichsgesetzbl. I: 11, 1929, p. 76.) (See p. 189.)
Plants of the following genera from any country, to prevent the introduction of pests of those plants: Fir (AbieR). spruce (Picea), pine (Pinus), Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga), hemlock (Tsuga). (Decree of June 3, 1930; Reichsgesetzbl. I: 20, 1930, p. 188.) (See p. 190.)
Rooted carnations, cuttings, and cut flowers from any country, to prevent the introduction of the carnation leaf roller (Tortrix pronubana). (Decree of March 28, 1929; Reichsgesetzbl. 1929, 1: 15, p. 83.) Entry of carnation cut flowers prohibited from March 15 to November 30. of each year. (Decree of September 30, 1932; Reichsgesetzbl. I: 68. 1932, p. 492.) (See pp. 189 and 190.)
Rooted plants of the genus Ulnmus and the southern cottonwood (Populus [canadensis] deltoides), and parts thereof from any country, to prevent the introduction of pests and diseases of those plants. (Decree of February 2, 1932; Reichsgesetzbl. I: 10, 1932, p. 63.) (See p. 191.)

IMPORTATION RESTRICTED

Living plants and parts thereof, the importation of which is not prohibited by special decrees, as indicated above. Shipments of restricted plants and parts thereof are to be accompanied by phylloxera certificates and by certificates attesting the noninclusion of dicotyledonous plants (except cacti), of Ulmes spp., and of Populus [canadcasis] deltoides. Certificates must be prepared in the German language and in that of the country of origin. Every shipment will be subject to inspection for San Jose scale. (Decree of July 4, 1883, and subsequent orders; Reichsgesetzbl. 153, etc. Decree of November 3, 1931; Reiclsgesetzbl. I: 74, 1931. p. 670. Circular of November 26, 1931. Decree of February 2, 1932: lteichsgesetzbl. 1: 10, 1932, p. 63. Decree of July 8, 1932; Reichsgesetzbl. I: 45, 1932, p. 351.) (See pp 187, 188, and 191.)
Flowers, bulbs, corms, and tubers must be accompanied by a certificate attesting freedom from certain pests and diseases, and by the certificates prescribed for living plants and parts thereof. (Decree of July 7, 1930; Reichsgesetzhl. 1: 24, 1930, p. 204.) (See p. 190.)
Indian azaleas must be accompanied by a certificate attesting freedom from certain pests and diseases, and by the certificates prescribed for living plants and parts thereof. (Decree of November 9, 1932; Reichsgesetzbl. I: 75, 1932, p. 528.) (See p. 190.)
Fresh fruits may be imported in the original pack only and are subject to inspection for San Jose scale and the apple maggot or fruit fly on arrival at





193:11 SERVICE NN1) RkEGULATORY I'S 7

the port of entry. (De(-iee of November 3. 1: 74. 1(5111). 670. Circular Of Noveitilier 26, 1931. De(.-i-ee of JuI%- Rei('Ils-esetzbl.
1:45, 1032, 1). :151.) (See 1). IS S.)
Fresh cherries.-To prevent the iiitroductioit Of the chorr v truil fly (Rba w) Ictis ccra.0). Eoch shipineiA imist be, aco:,-onlpollied hY i ()f f
from that pest. il)ocreo Of Alwil 27, 192): 1. 192. 1). !)2 )
(IS of 1). 1 (4). 1)
Potato" Ir(-)Ill ()tlloi- thall tile 1-11ite'l slot(' 14) jwevl jll l1w illln'duction (it, the dise;lse. E(4-11 -:11ij)IIII'lit, Iw h %- ;:
certifi( ate of freedoin froiii poloto Nv;ti't. tft' Mii'ch T. R,-ich---esetzhl. I:(-;. 19:'0, p. :))4. 'See p. 192.
Fresh vegetabl('.- of :111 kiiAs' lei.iot parls (d p1,11ITS (*Xc(")j
Franc.e, whOse QlItl*y alld trall 4it are llot lwollihitvd hy ill-lick. I ()f tlli"- (bwl-( t (see list under llllpol'tati( ll Pridtibited) may be inilwrted friin March -I-) T Noveniber 14 of each year uii(.Ier certifie;ite of origin in iioiiiiifesteil Ltiit. (Dooreetif FebruavN-2:1, 1!1:')2. Roich ;tzesetzhl. 1:13. 1932, 1). 91.) (See 1).

I-MPORTATIO-N U-NRI-:STIU('TED

N'ubterrinean parts of pl,,ws, all kiiid. : of seeds, tropic;il fruits. cerc t! 4, 'liA ve-etables for food aiid other purpose' : dril"S '11A jiwI4 rizds for
-ind medicinal purposes from tho Vidtod except as prtiIiihited by otiIto
r(,-,, i i la t i o i is. Cii'cul;tr of Noveillh( 1- 26. 19:))L Runilsehreiheii RM.
11.1'. :Ill die H -41 11 : 412--)S. S e c 1). PPlIYI.I.OXERA Rl'-STRICTIO-NINTP0R'lATI()N PROHIBITED OF GRAPEVINES I3UT NOT OF GRAPES

In accordaiwe Nvith the of the Interii.--iti0iial Phylloxera Colivelltion of Berne, -Noveniber 3, 1\-Sl- '. the iinportati0ii hitti Goriii tiiy i pnihil)ite(l of gr,,tl)evine stocks awl all parts of the -,rapevlne. especially Of br"ill(Iles witli foliage.
Table grapes may be imported when packed, without (,'rapevine leave- ill boxes, cases, baskets, or well-headed barrels, easy to hispect.
Wiiie --rapes (ind grape inarc iiiay be inipol-te(l on]v w1wil 1)'wketl ill tightly closed barrels. (Decree of Oct. 31. 1879; Reiclis--esetzbl., 1). 303, n'id decree of July 4, 18SI), and subsequent orders : Reich s -esetzlh 1., 1). 153, etc.)

SITIPPER S DECLA.TZATIO-N A--ND PHYLLOXEIIA (-J-R-I-IYI('ATI: REQUIRED

SShipments of live plants and parts thereof. Other than -rapes, the enti, Of which is not prohibited by the San Jose scale an(I other sl-)(,ci;tl quarawbies. must be accompanied by a shipper's declaration and by a phylloxera certiticat issued by a coiopetent authority of the country of ori-in, as follows:
hipper's declarationn sh, 11
(1) Affiriii that the entire cont iits Of tile sllilll(,iit aiv t*rf)lll lli- e'tablishitiem.
(2) Iii(licate t1w re(-eiving p(-Ant iill the a(Nros 4 oI' the cow-1,-mee.
(3) Affirni that iio (,-rapevine,, are im-luded in the "llipillent.
(4) State -,N-liether t1w ,hiplilent collwills plalits with eartli oil tl-"
root.s.
(:-),) Lear tile "i"'fliature of the shippel..
The phylloxera cortificale shall affirm:
(1) That the points, are from -roulld "-('parart d froll) )IIN- -rapovill"
s bN at least 20 iiieters. or hy soijw ol)stacle o t, (I t'
stoel Y t tfi '-Z 01110(l Silfficient by couipetent autliority.
(2) That the -romid itself contaiiis no
(3 ) That the place has, not 1)( elj UsCId W;' a dopot t (w that plalit.
(4) That if stocks, iiife: ted witli phylloxera have beeii thero.
their radical extirpation lias been offeeted by rope"Ited toxic applic"'Itioll'-Z and by investi-ations for a period of 3 years. thus ijisurin- the coiiiplete
destruction Of tile insects aii(I root ..

(Decree Of July 4. ISS3. aiid subs(,quoia Orders. Reichsgosetzbl. 1). 153, eto.i





188 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [April-Juue

RESTRICTIONS TO PREVENT THE ]INTRODUCTION OF SAN JOSE SCALE AND APPLE MAGGOT

The original San Jose scale decree of February 5, 1898, prohibited the importation into Germany of all living plants or parts thereof from the United States, but the edi.rt of May 8, 1907, now superseded by the decree of November 3, 1931, and the circular of November 26, 1931, (Reiclisgesetzbl. 1: 74, 1931, p. 670, and Rundschreiben des RM.f.E.u.L. an die Liinderre-ierungen vom 26 November, 1931, 11: 41, p. 258), group plants into classes A, entry absolutely prohibited; B, importation conditional; and C, importation unrestricted; and they prescribe that fresh fruits may be imported only when found free from S an Jose scale and apple maggot.

SAN JOSE SCALE RESTRICTIONS ON PLANT IMPORTATION

To prevent the introduction of San Jose scale into the German Republic, article I of the decree of November 3, 1931, as amended by the order of July 8, 1932. prohibits the importation of living plants and.. fresh parts thereof from North America, Austria, Hungary, Australia, Tasmania, New Zealand, Hawaii, Japan, China, British India, Mesopotamia, and the Union of South Africa, except as provided in the circular of November 26, 1931.
This prohibition applies also to materials and containers which have been used for packing and storing such plants or parts of plants.
The regulations supplemental to the decree of November 3, 1931, as promulgated in the circular of November 26, 1931, group plants as follows:
(a) Importation absolutely prohibited -Living dicotyledonous trees and shrubs of all species (except cacti), also seedlings, as well as portions of plants, such as cuttings, scions, layers, etc. In this group are included all fruit trees and shrubs, as well as timber and ornamental trees and shrubs of every species. t
(b) Importation conditional.--Cacti, trees, shrubs, plants, and parts thereof, not included among the dicotyledons (except when prohibited by other regulations; for example, the importation of certain conifers, and of rooted carnations, carnation cuttings, and carnation cut flowers is prohibited), on condition that they be not packed with plants of group A and that a thorough inspection falls to establish infestation or suspicion of infestation with San Jose scale.
(c) Importation unrestricted.-Until further notice, all subterranean parts of plants, all kinds of seeds, tropical fruits, cereals, and vegetables for food and other purposes, drugs and raw materials for technical manufacturing purposes (except as prohibited by other regulations; for example, importation is prohibited of potatoes, diseased flower bulbs, and tubers).
Plants and parts of living plants, even in a withered state, are to be regarded as fresh, and are to be treated as living plants.
Shipments which include plants of different groups are placed in their entirety in the most restricted group.
With respect to plants falling within group A, the right is reserved, in single
and under special conditions, to except them from the prohibition of ,ntry when guaranty is furnished against the introduction of San Jose scale.
Living plants or parts thereof brought in by passengers as baggage or by hand are subject to the provisions of this decree.
Insofar as their entry is allowed, living plants and fresh parts thereof may be imported only through the customs ports of entry authorized for fruits.
Direct transit under customs supervision is permitted of living plants and fresh parts thereof, as well as of fresh fruits.
The fees for inspection are those established for root crops, namely, 0.01 relchsmark for each kilogram of net weight, with a minimum of I RM for any shipment.

FRESH FRUITS MUST BE FREE FR03L SAN JOSE SCALE AND THE APPLE MAGGOT

Article 2 of the decree of November 3, 1931, prescribes that, until further notice. fresh fruits and refuse of fresh fruits, originating in the countries mentioned, may be imported only through authorized customs ports, in the original pack, and on condition that an inspection at the port of arrival at the expense of the importer, shows them to be free from San Jose scale, and that consignments from the United States of America and from Canada are not





-19331 SERVICE AND PEGITLATORY -NNN0UNCF',MFNTS

,found to be, or suspected of being, athicked by f1w olq)le io.it1got, (it" frliit fly (Rhagoletis pomo)iella).
The Imperial Minister of Nourishiiient and Agriculture (,all lwrmit exceptiolls to the provisions of tile precediiig, p.tragraplis at)(I prescribe 11w iiovessiry safeguards.
Soutlwrn fruits, such is batima's, Aelliolls, Illatid'Irills, pilloapples,
and raisins are itot to be 1-c.I'll-de(I -,ls fruits for lbe I)IIrpost"s I)i* ill(' dcclw of November 3. 1931.
Dried fruits of ny kiiid, mid reflise of dried frilit, willwilt re-ard to Illo degree of drying, do not 17.111 Nvitbill the scope of fliese rel-,111,14ioll".
These provisions do not apply to frilit carried by P,) ,sf'llgors 'j-, Im-gn-o or by halld.
AUTHORIM) PORTS OF ENTRY

On the basis of ,irt,icle 2 of the order for proventill g- tho ilitrodtict-ioll of 8"11) Jose scale and the 670), it is hereby ordered:
ARTICLE 1. Frost fruit, :md fresli refuse of fruit froiii Noi-th Amorica, Au.stralia Austria, Tasiiiaiiii, New Zo -iland, Ilawaii, llumgory, f.waii, ('10na, Nle -()potanii'a, and ille 11"llion or Soutli Africa utitil fill-t1wr iiotico ond iw-ofar as their eiitrv is i:ot prohibited may be ilill)orted olil", t1w foilowilig
ports:
Prussia: Chief office-Stettiii (foreig.ii t ollinwnl,). Custom-,
offices-Aaclien M111111of Wevi- Ili-entlwinl, JWrheil, OV-, Cr,111cliblir-, Ellinierich Bahnhof, Groi-lau Balmhof, Stettin Freibezirk, Stnieleii, Lieban Bahnhof, Oderberg Balinhof, Mittelwalde Bilhijhof. Braiteli cusloins fllcf- Kaldeiikirchen Bahnhof. Steaiiiship laiidiiig-Eniniericli I aii(I If, Airl)orl-Borlin, Tempelhofer Feld.
Baden: Kehl.
Bayern: Chief custonis office-Lindau, c)ffices-Passau
Bahnhof, Kufstein, Tdihicheii Grossmarkth ,i Ile, SalzbllrMecklenburg- Sell werin : (!ustonis office-Warneiiiiiii6o.
Lubeck: Chief custoins office-Mbeck.
Bremen: Chief customs offlee-Bremerhaveii. Clusfoms otfices-Babilliof, Zollausschluss 1, and Zollaussehluss II in Bremeii, Zollausscliltiss in I'WemerMaven. Airport-Breineri.
Hamburg: All customs offices in Hambtirg and th-i, of Cuxhaven.
Sachsen: Customs offices-11ad Schandau for ship -oiiimerce, I >odeiibach, lReitzenhain, Tetschen, Warnsdorf, Weipert.
ART. 2. The provision,,, of irtiole I apply also to flie 4,1111, )f -i la it y I N I 1) 1 -s
and fresh parts thereof froin the comit-ries iiient-ioned, iw, of-ir is ilwir eiltry is exceptionally permitted. (Decree of Noveinber 7, 1931 ; Reiclisministerialbl. 50, 1931, 1). 80. Decree of 'May 14, Reicbsiiiinisteriall)]. 22, 19:12, 1). 256.
Decree of July 9. 19.32; Reicbsinh)'sterialb]. 31, 19-32, p. 44:3. Decree of October
2.9, 1932; Iteielismittisterialbl. 47, 1,932, p. (375.)

PMPORTATION OF, PINE AND 811"RUCE SEEDS PROMMTF, [)

The importation into Germany of pitie and sprtice seeds and of pille and spruce cones containing seeds (tariff no. 95) is prohibited zis of March 15, 1929. (Decree of February 28, 1929; Reichsgesetzblatt 1: 11, 1929 ', 1). 76.)
Amended by the decree of September 13, 1 )29 (Relchsgesetzbl. 1: 35, 1929, p. 147), to prohibit the importation into Geritiany of seeds, 1nid of colles containing r-eeds of the Scotch pine (Phols L.), mid of the Norway
spruce (Picea cxcclsa, Link) only: I roridcd That these seods may be imported into Gierinany in exceptional cases if the importer has obtained an import permit from the Germ(mi 'Miiiister of A.-riculture. filitil, fill-tiler notice, no permit is required to import the see(.1s of ()tiler species of pine or spruce (Pimis or Picea).
IMPORTATION OF CAIINATIONS PROHIBITED

To prevent the Introduction of the carn.-ition leaf roller, 7ortrix promil)"ua, the entry of rooted carnatioiis and earnatioii CllttiD-S is prohibited Ulltil further notice. The entry of cut flowers of earivitiom..; eltso is lm)llibite(l from March 15 to November 30 of each year.






190 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [April-Jun

The Federal Minister of Nourishment and Agriculture can permit excep tons to this prohibition.
The unrestricted transit through Germany of the above-named plants under customs supervision is permitted. (Order of March 28. 1929; ReichsgesetbL I:15. 1929. p. 83. Decree of September 30, 1932; Reichsgesetzbl. 1:68, 1932, p. 492.)
IMPORTATION OF FREsu CHERRIES RESTRICTED
The importation of fresh cherries attacked or suspected of being attacked by the maggot of the cherry fly (Rhagoletis cerasi L.) is prohibited until further notice. Shipments of this fruit must be accompanied by a certificate of origin issued by the communal authorities of the place of origin and by a sanitary certificate issued by a competent official of the plant protection service of the country of origin, vouching for the freedom of the fruit from the maggot of the cherry fruit fly. Shipments will b2 inspected at the port of entry. Transit shipment through Germany under customs supervision is permitted. (Decree of April 27, 1929, Reichsgesetzbl. I, 1929, p. 92.)
Importation must be made through authorized ports. (Decree of April 27, 1929; Deutscher Reichsanzeiger and Preussischer Staatsanzeiger. No. 104, May 6, 1929, and later orders.) *

IMPORTATION OF CONIFEROUS PLANTS RESTRICTED

The entry of coniferous plants of the following genera is prohibited until further notice: Abies (fir), Picea (spruce), Pinus (pine). .Pseudotuga, and Tsuga, or parts thereof.
The entry of other coniferous plants will not be allowed unless they are packed separately or mixed with each other, and unless the invoice is accompanied by a certificate issued by a competent official of the plant protection service of the country of origin, affirming, in the German language, that the shipment covered by the certificate has been thoroughly inspected by him and found free from plants of the above-mentioned genera or of parts thereof. The Minister of Nourishment and Agriculture can permit exceptions to this prohibition. Transit shipment under customs supervision is permitted. (Decree of June 3, 1930, Reichsgesetzblatt I, no. 20, 1930, p. 188.)
(The phrase "The entry of other coniferous plants will not be allowed unless they are packed separately or mixed with each other" is understood: to mean that coniferous plants, other than those named above, will not be permitted entry unless those of a single genus are packed by themselves, or unless those of several genera, other than those named above, are packed together. In other words, coniferous plants of the genera above named, and nonconiferous plants, may not be included in any shipment of coniferous plants offered for importation under the provisions of this decree.)

IMPORTATION oF FLowER BULBS AND CORMS RESTRICTED

The entry of flower bulbs and corms is not allowed, unless each shipment is accompanied by a certificate issued by a competent official of the plant protection service of the country of origin, affirming, in the German language, that the shipment has been thoroughly inspected by him and found free from the following plant diseases or insect pests: Yellow disease (Pseudomonas hyacinthN), Sclerotinia rot (Sclerotinia bulborum), black rot of bulbs (Sclerotium tuliparum), fire disease (Botrytis [parasitical tulipac), Penicillium rot (Penicillium sp.), eelworm disease of bulbs (Tylenchus [hyaoih.thi] dipsaci), greater and lesser narcissus flies (Merodon spp. and Eurnerus spp.), bulb mite (RhiZoglyphus echinopus).
Transit shipment through Germany under customs supervision is permitted. (Decree of July 7, 1930; Reichsgesetzblatt I, no. 24, 1930, p. 204.)

IMPORTATION OF AZALEA INDICA RESTRICTED

The entry of azaleas (Azalea indica) is not allowed, unless each shipment is accompanied by a certificate in the German language and in that of the country of origin, issued by a competent official of the plant protection service of the country of origin, attesting that the shipment has been thoroughly inspected by





193] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 191

him and found free from the following plant diseases or insect pests: Leaf scorch of azalea (Septoria azaleae), azalea gall (Exobasidium azaleae), azalea leaf miner (Gracilaria azaleella), azalea tortricid (Acalla schallerana).
Transit shipment through Germany under customs supervision is permitted. (Decree of November 9, 1932; Reichsgesetzbl. I: 75, 1932, p. 528.)
IMPORTATION OF ELM AND SOUTHERN COTTONWOOD PROHIBITED

The importation of rooted plants of the genus Ulmus and of the southern cottonwood (Populus [can adensis] doltoides), as well as of cuttings, scions, grafts, and other fresh parts of such plants, is prohibited until further notice.
The importation of other deciduous plants than those named in article 1, or cuttings, scions, grafts, and other fresh parts thereof, is permitted only when the consignment is accompanied by a certificate, in the German language and that of the country of origin, attesting that the shipment was inspected by him and that it does not contain plants or parts thereof above mentioned.
The Imperial Minister of Nourishment and Agriculture can grant exceptions to these provisions.
The direct transit of the above-mentioned plants and their parts is permitted under customs supervision. (Decree of February 2, 1932, Reichsgesetzbl. I: 10, 1932, p. 63.)

IMPORTATION FROM FRANCE PROHIBITED-POTATOES, TOMATOES, EGGPLANTS, STRAWBERRIES, ROOTED PLANTS OR VEGETABLES, TUrBERs, BULBS, RHIZOMES, AND OTHER
STrERRANEAN PARTS, OF PLANTS

ARTICLE 1. The importation and transit are prohibted from France of potatoes, tomatoes, eggplants, strawberries, rooted plants or vegetables (with or without soil), bulbs, tubers, rhizomes, and other subterranean parts of plants, and of peelings and other refuse of such products, as well as of sacks and other materials which have been used for packing or preserving those products.
ART. 2. The importation and transit from France of fresh vegetables, and other fresh plants for cooking, of all kinds, of fresh aerial parts of plants except fruits, whose importation and transit are not prohibited by article 1, are permitted from March 15 to November 14 of each year under the following conditions:
(a) If the products were grown at a distance of not less than 200 km from the limits of the territory infested by the Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlinata) ;
(b) If each shipment is accompanied by a phytosanitary certificate in the form prescribed issued by an expert of the plant protection service of the country of origin in German and in the language of that country. The certificate must affirm that the products comprising the shipment have been inspected by him and found free from the potato beetle, and that within a radius of 200 km from the locality in France in which they were grown the potato beetle has not hitherto been determined.
ART. 3. The Minister of Nourishment and Agriculture can make exceptions from the provisions of articles 1 and 2. (Decree of February 23, 1932; Reichsgesetzbl. I: 13, 1932, p. 91.)

COLORADO POTATO-BEETLE QUARANTINE-IMPORTATION OF POTATOES FROM THE UNITED STATES PROHIBITEDImportation from the United States into Germany is prohibited of potatoes, potato peelings, and other potato refuse, as well as of sacks and other containers which have been used for packing potatoes. This prohibition does not apply to potatoes carried on vessels as ships' stores. (Decree of February 26, 1875, to prevent the introduction of the Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata.)
The importation of dried potatoes also is prohibited. (Order of March 8, 1900.)
The importation of sweetpotatoes is not restricted. (Order of August 9, 1906.)
The importation and transit of living Colorado potato beetles, at any stage of their life history, are prohibited. The Minister of Nourishment and Agriculture can permit exceptions from this prohibition. (Decree of October 7, 1932; Reichsgesetzbl. I: 69, 1932, p. 496.)






192 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [April-4uw

POTATO-WART RESTRItONS

The entry of potatoes infected with. or suspected of being infected with the potato-wart disease (Synchytium endobiotiuum) across the customs frontiers of the German Republic is prohibited until further notice.
Until further notice, potatoes may be imported only through authorized cutoms districts of the German Republic and only under the following conditions:
(1) That the potatoes be forwarded in unused containers, or in bulk in cars, and that each container or car be sealed with a leaden seal of the official plant protection service of the country of origin.
(2) That each potato shipment be accompanied by a certificate in the German language and in that of the country of origin, issued by an expert of the official plant protection service of that country. Such certificate shall be valid fo only 20 days from the date of issuance and shall contain the statements: (a) That the shipment was examined by an expert of the official plant protection service and was found free from wart; (b) that the shipment originated in a farm not infected with the disease, and that within a radius of 2 kilometers from the field in which the potatoes were grown no such disease has been found; (c) in the case of packages, that the packing material has not been used before; (d) that the official seal has been attached to each package or car. and a statement of the inscription of the seal; and (e) a description of the shipment, indicating the kind of potatoes comprising the shipment, the locality in which the potatoes were harvested, the weight of the shipment. kind of packing, number of containers, distinguishing marks of packages if any, or the car number, name and address of consignee and of sender.
(3) That the said examination at the customs, at the expense of the interested person, reveals the fact that there is no ground for suspicion.
Certain exemptions from the provisions under paragraph 2 are granted for imports of potatoes, especially seed potatoes, from neighboring countries within limited distances from the German frontiers.
Direct transit shipments of potatoes under customs supervision are permitted. (Decree of March 7, 1930; Deutsch. Reichsanzeiger 57, March 8, 1930, p. 1.)

MODEL CERTIFICATE

The undersigned expert of the plant protection service hereby certifies:
(1) That the potatoes contained in the shipment described below have this day been examined and found free from potato wart (Synchytrium endobioti cur).
(2) That the potatoes originated in a farm uninfected with potato wart, and that potato wart has not been determined within a radius of 2 kilometers from the field in which they were grown.
(3) That the containers had not previously been used.
(4) That every package (every car) had been sealed by him with a lead seal furnished with the following description of the shipment:
Variety of potato
Locality where harvested
Weight. of shipment
Kind of packing
Number of packages
Distinguishing marks of packages
Car numbers
Name and address of consignee
Name and address of shipper

(Place and date)

[SEAL] Name and title of ofcial.

URSPRUNGS- UND GESL-NDHEITSZEUGNIS FUR KARTOFFELN

Der unterzeichnete Sachverstitndige des amtlichen Pflanzenschutzdienste bescheinigt hermit:
(1) Dass die in der unten beschriebenen Sendung enthaltenen Kartoffeln vom lhm am heutigen Tage untersucht und frei von Kartoffelkrebs (Synchytrium endobioticum) befunden worden sind;





19331] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 193

(2) Dass die Kartoffeln aus einem nicht mit Kartoffelkrebs verseuchten landwirtschaftlichen Betrieb stammen und dass innerhalb eines Umkreises von zwei Kilometern von dem Felde, auf dem die Kartoffeln gewachsen s nd, Kartoffelkrebs nicht festgestellt worden ist;
(3) Dass die fiir die Sendung verwendeten Umschliessungen unbenutzt sind; (4) Dass jedes Packstiick-jeder Wagen-von ihm mit einer Plombe mit folgender Aufschrift versehen worden ist;
Kartoffelsorte
Gemeinde, in der die Kartoffein geerntet worden sind
Gewicht der Sendung
Art der Verpackung Zahl der Packstiicke
Bezeichnung der Packstiicke
Nummer des Wagons
Name und Anschrift des Empfiingers
Name und Anschrift des Absenders

(Ort und Datum)
[Dienstsiegel]
Name des amtlichen Sachverstl.ndigen

Dienststellung des Sachverstilndigen


P.Q.C.A.-297, supplement no. 3 JUNE 15, 1933.
PLANT-QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS, UNION OF SOUTH AFRICA
The Governor General of the Union of South Africa, under date of December 2, 1932, in the terms of section 28 (b) of the agricultural pests act, 1911, as amended by the agricultural pests act further amendment act, 1924, made the following regulation no. 1576:
(1) All unmanufactured leaf tobacco introduced into the Union of South Africa must, unless specially exempted, be accompanied by a certificate issued by the Department of Agriculture of the country of origin, stating that after examination and to the best knowledge of the examining officer, the tobacco in question is free from infestation with Ephestia elutella.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.


PENALTIES IMPOSED FOR VIOLATIONS OF THE PLANT QUARANTINE ACT
According to reports received by the Bureau during the period April 1 to June 30, 1933, penalties have recently been imposed by the proper Federal authorities for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act, as follows:
JAPANESE-BEETLE QUARANTINE
In the case of the United States v. W. E. Jones & Co., Inc., Baltimore, Ud., in the interstate shipment of 355 baskets of apples from a point in the regulated area to a point outside thereof, without inspection and certification, the defendant pleaded guilty and was fined $20. (Plant quarantine case no. 474.)






194 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [ArlJn 93

QUARANTINES AFFECTING MEXICAN AND) CANADIAN POUT

In the case of the United States v. the persons listed below, for atmtn to smuggle in contraband plant material, the penalties indicated wer moe
by the United States customs officials at the following ports:


Name Port Contraband Ieat

Pedro Ramirez--------------- Brownsville, Te--- 2 mangoes --------------------- $
J. Martinez----------------- ----- do -------------- 6 avocados with seed ---------- 5
Guadalupe Hernandez ------- ----- do ------------- ----- do ---------------------------5
W. Molina ----------------- ----- do -------------- 3 mangoes--------------------------- 5
Amparo Materrey----------- ----- do -------------- 4 mangoes------------------------. 5
Fausto Gutierrez------------ ----- do--------------- 3 avocados with seed---------------5
F. .Lake----------------- ----- do -------------- Inmango----------------------------- 5
F. L.Britton --------------- ----- do -------------- 2mangoes--------------------------- 5
Eva Ortiz------------------ ----- do -------------- 3 xnangoes ---------------------------- 5
H. P. Eaton ----------------- Hidalgo, Tex --------- 4 avocados --------------------------- 1
F. Cardenas ----------------- Laredo, Tex ---------- 12 mangoes and 3 avocados------------- 5
Leon Salinas---------------- ----- do -------------- 36 avocados -------------------------- 5
Mrs. T. M'%cCusker----------- Blaine, Wash--------- Daisy and Scotchbroom roots ----H. Johnson----------------- ----- do -------------- 50rock plants------------------------- 5
Mrs. P. S. Dashnow--------- ----- do -------------- Iplant---------------------------2
Mtrs. R. V. Harris----------- ----- do -------------- 12 lily-of-the-valley roots--------------- 5






















ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE

LEE A. STRONG, Chief of Bureau. A. S. HOYT, Assistant Chief. B. CONNOR, Business Manager. R. C. ALTHOUSE, Information Oflicer.


E. R. SAS8CER, in Charge Foreign Plant Quarantines. S. B. FRAcxKERa, in Charge Dowmestic Plant Quarantines. LON A. HAWKINS, in Charge Technological Division. A. F. BURGESS, in Field Charge Gipsy Moth and Brown-Tail Moth Quarantine
(Headquarters, Greenfield, Mass.).
L. H. WORTHLEY, in Field Charge Japanese Beetle Quarantine and European
Corn Borer Project (Headquarters, Harrisburg, Pa.).
R. E. McDONALD, in Field Charge Pink Bollwormn and Thurberia Weevil Quarantines (Headquarters, San Antonio, Tex.).
B. L. BOYDEN, in Field Charge Date Scale Quarantine (Headquarters, Indio,
Calif.).
P. A. HOIDALE, in Field Charge Mexican Fruit Fly Quarantine (Headquarters, Harlingen, Tex.) .
195
























U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE; 1933









S...BPQ. No. 116 Issued December 1933.






United States Department of Agriculture

BUREAU OF PLANT QUARA~NINE



SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS

JULY-SEPTEMBER 1933



CONTENTS
Page
Quarantine and other official announcements------------------------------------------------ 197
-Announcements relating to Dutch elm disease-------------------------------------------- 197
Secretary Wallace calls hearing September 15 on Dutch elm disease --------------------- 197
Notice of public hearing to consider the advisability of prohibiting or restricting the entry of
elm and related species of trees and parts and products thereof from Europe ------------- 198
Announcements relating to fruit and vegetable quarantine (no. 56)-------------------------- 198
Amendment no. 6 of regulations supplemental to notice of quarantine---.----------------- 198
Instructions to collectors of customs (T.D. 46591) ---------------------------------- 200
Announcements relating to Japanese-beetle quarantine (no. 48)----------------------------- 200
Japanese-beetle conference in Washington October 24 ---------------------------------- 200
Fruits and vegetables may be shipped this fall without Japanese-beetle certificates on and
after September 1 -------------------------------------------------------------- 200
Removal of Japanese-beetle quarantine restrictions on the interstate movement of fruits
and vegetables..------------------ ------------- 201
Announcement relating to Mexican fruit-fly quarantine (no. 64) --------------------------- 201
Department authorizes leng-thening of next shipping season for citrus fruit of lower Rio
Grande Valley------------------------------------------------------------------ 201
Announcements: relating to nursery stock, plant, and seed quarantine (no. 37)---------------- 202
Instructions to collectors of customs (T.D. 4659C)-------------------------------------- 202
Conditions governing- the entry and treatment of narcissus-bulb importations (B .P. Q.-354) -202 Strong calls conference on important plant quarantine-------------------------------- 203
Notice of public conference to consider certain changes with respect to the administration
of nursery stock, plant, and seed quarantine no. 37 ---------------------------------- 204
Announcements relating to pink bollworm quarantine (no. 52) ----------------------------- 204
Revision of regulations ------------------------------------------------------------ 204
Notice to general public through newspapers-------------------------------------- 211
Campaign against pink bollworm started mn cotton fields of South----------------------- 212
Aninouncements relating to Thurberia-weevil quarantine (no. 61) --------------------------- 212
Revision of regulations----------------------------212
Notice to general public through newspapers-------------------------------------- 218
Miscellaneous itemis--------------------------------218
Plant quarantine restrictions, New Zealand (P.Q.C.A .-306, supplement no. 1)------------ 218
Plant quarantine restrictions, Jamaica, B.W.I. (PQ-3)------------219
Plant quarantine restrictions, Republic of Greece (B.P.Q.-347, supplement no. 1) --------- 221
Plant quarantine restrictions, Germany (B.P.Q.-302, revised, supplement no. 1) ---------- 223
Plant quarantine restrictions, British Honduras (P.Q.C.A.-314, supplement no. 3) -------- 224
Shipment of Mexican citrus fruits in bond through the -United States (P.Q.C.A.-305,
revied)-----------------------------------------------225
Lee A. Strong named Chi.ef of Bureau of Entomology --------------------------------- 227
Fruit-fly survey in the West Indies, Brazil, Uruguay, Chile, and Peru.-------------------- 227
Statement of Federal plant quarantines. ------------------------------------- 241
Organization of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine-------------------------------------------- 244




QUJARANTINE AND OTHER OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO DUTCH ELM DISEASE

SCEARY WALLACE CALLS HEARING SEPTEMBER 14 ON DUTCH ELM DISEASE

(Press notice)
AUGUST 30, 1933.
Secetryof Agriculture Wallace has announced that notice has been issued for a hearing, to be held in Washington, D.C., September 15, to consider whether
sesshould be taken to prevent further establishment of the Dutch elm diseas inthis country by placing under quarantine host materials likely to carry
this dies rmErope.
2344--33197






198 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

Although the source of the recent outbreak of this disease in the environs of New York is still unknown, officials say the Department of Agriculture cannot dlisregard the possibility that the elm-disease fungus may have been brought into that area in imported parts of diseased elm trees. Within recent weeks a few shipments of elm logs from Europe have arrived at Atlantic ports, and though for each of these lots safeguards have been provided, it is believed that the whole problem demands immediate attention. In view of the prompt efforts being taken to eradlicate the disease, the necessity for protecting the country against further introduction from abroad is regarded as important.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING TO CONSIDER THE ADVISABILITY OF PROHIBITING
OR RESTRICTING THE ENTRY OF ELM AND RELATED SPECIES OF TREES A.NP
PARTS AND PRODUCTS THEREOF FROM EUROPE

AUGUST 29, 1933.
The Secretary of Agriculture has information that there exists on the continent of Europe an injurious disease, known as the Dutch elm disease, due to the fungus Graphiboa lmhi Schwarz, and that this disease, not now widely prevalent within or throughout the United States, may be introduced into this country with importations, of plants, cuttings, seeds, logs, timber, lumber, or other wood products of all species of the family Ljlmaceae, among which elms (Ulmus gpp.) and zelkova or keyaki (Zelkova spp.) are known to be hosts of this fungus.
It appears necessary, therefore,, to consider the advisability of prohibiting or restricting the entry of any or all parts or products of plants belonging to species of the family Ulmaceae from the continent of Europe.
Notice is, therefore, hereby given that in accordance with the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912, as amended, a public hearing will be held before the Bureau of Plant Quarantine of the United States Department of Agriculture, in room 42-43 of the U~tifled 14tates National Museumn, Tenth Street and Constitution Avenue NW., Washington, D.C., at 10 a.m., September 15, 1933, in order that any person interested in the establishment of such prohibition or restriction may appear and be heard, either in person or by attorney.
H. A. WALLACE
Secretaryi of Agriculture.


ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO FRUIT AND VEGETABLE QUARANTINE (NO. 56)
AMENDMENT NO. S OF REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 56

Under authority conferred by the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended, it is ordered that regulation 2 of the Rules and Regulations Supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 56, which became effective November 1, 1923, as amended October 23, 1923, January 18, 1924, January 10, 1925, February 6, 1925, and July 15, 1932, be, and the game is hereby, further amended to read as follows:

REGuLATIOx 2. REsT~ic~rioNs o~v ExTmY OF FRUITS AND) VEGETABLES

All importations of fruits and vegetables must be free from plants or portions of plants, as defined in regulation 1 (b).
Dried, cured, or processed fruits and vegetables, including dried products, cured figs, dates, and raisins, etc., nuts and dry beans, peas, etc., may be inported without permit or other compliance with these regulations: Pro vid1ed, That any such articles may be made subject to entry only under permit and on compliance with the safeguards to be prescribed therein when it shall be determined by the Secretary of Agriculture that the condition of drying, curing, or processing to which they have been subjected may not entirely eliminate risk. Such determination with respect to any such articles shall1 become effective after due notice.
Except as restricted, as to certain countries and districts' by special quarantines and other orders now in force and by such restrictive orders as may

1See List of current quarantines and other restrictive orders and miscellaneous regulations, obtainable on request from the Bureau of Plant Quarantine.






19331 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 199

hereafter be promulgated, the following fruits may be imported from all countries under permit and on compliance with these regulations: Bananas, pineapples, lemons, and sour limes. Grapes of the European or vinifera type and any vegetable, except as restricted by special quarantine as indicated above, may be imported from any country under permit and on compliance with these regulations, at such ports as shall be authorized in the permits, on presentation of evidence satisfactory to the United States Department of Agriculture that such grapes and vegetables are not attacked in the country of origin by injurious insects, including fruit and melon flies (Trypetidae), or that their importation from definite areas or districts under approved safeguards prescribed in the permits can be authorized without risk.
The following additions and exceptions are authorized for the countries concerned to the fruits and vegetables listed in the preceding paragraph: Provided, That as to such additions and exceptions, the issuance of permits may be conditioned on presentation of evidence satisfactory to the United States Department of Agriculture that such fruits and vegetables are not attacked in the country of origin by injurious insects, including fruit flies and melon flies; or that their importation from definite areas or districts under approved safeguards prescribed in the permits can be authorized without risk:
Commonwealth of Australia-States of Victoria, South Australia, and Tasmania.-Upon compliance with these regulations and under such additional conditions and safeguards as may be prescribed in the permits, all fruits from
-the States of Victoria, South Australia, and Tasmania may be permitted entry at Seattle, Wash., and Portland, Oreg., and at such other, ports as may be specified in the permits.
New Zealand.-Upon compliance with these regulations fruits other than those listed in the second and third paragraphs of this regulation may be imported from New Zealand under such conditions and through such ports as may be designated in the permits.
J"an.-Upon compliance with the regulations under Quarantine No. 28, oranges of the mandarin class, including satsuma and tangerine varieties, may be imported from Japan through the port of Seattle and such other northern ports as may be specified in the permits.
Mexico.-Potatoes may be imported from Mexico upon compliance with the regulations issued under the order of December 22., 1913.
Argentina.-Upon compliance with these regulations, fruits other than those listed in the second and third paragraphs of this regulation may be imported from Argentina under such conditions and through such northern ports as may be designated in the permits.
Chile.-Upon compliance with these regulations, fruits other than those listed in the second and third paragraphs of this regulation may be imported from Chile under such conditions and through such northern ports as may be designated in the permits. Melons from Chile may be admitted at any port.
West Indiesa--Upon compliance with these regulations all citrus fruits from the West Indies may be permitted entry at New York and at such other ports as may be designated in the permits.
Jamaica.-Entry of pineapples from Jamaica is restricted to the port of New York or such other northern ports as may be specified in the permits.
Canada.-Fruits and vegetables grown in the Dominion of Canada may be imported into the United States from Canada free from any restrictions whatsoever tinder these regulations.
General.-In 'addition to the fruits, the entry of which is provided for in the preceding paragraphs of this regulation, such specialties as hothousegrown fruits or other special fruits, which can be accepted by the United States Department of Agriculture as free from risk of carrying injurious insects, including fruit flies (Trypetidae), may be imported under such conditions and through such ports as shall be designated in the permits.
This amendment shall be effective on and after August 1, 1933.
Done at the city of Washington this 25th day of July 1933.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[SEAL] R. G. TUGW=,
Acting Secretary of Agriculture.






200 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE t[Tuly-Sept.

INSTRUCTIONS TO COLLECTORS OF CUSTOMS

T.D. 39792, PUBLISHING TRE NOrICE OF QUARANTINE; No. 56, OF TE UNrr
STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, WITH REGULATIONS RELA.T[NG TO FRUIT
AND VEGETABLES, A-MENDED (T.D. 46591)

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,
OFFICE OF THE Co-M MIS SIONER OF CUSTOMS, Washington, D.C., Au~gust 14, 1933.
To Collectors of Cust oms and Others Concerned:
The appended copy of amendment no. 6 of regulations supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 56 (fruit and vegetable quarantine) issued by the Secretary of Agriculture, effective August 1, 1933, is published for the information and guidance of customs officers and others concerned.
FRANK DOW,
Acting Commissioner of C~ustoms.
(Then follows the full text of the amendment.)


ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO JAPANESE-BEETLE QUARANTINE (NO. 48)
JAPANESE-BEETLE CONFERENCE IN WASHINGTON, OCTOBER 24
(Press notice)
SEPTEEMBERL 12, 1933.
A conference to discuss this season's developments in the Japanese-beetle situation has been announced by Lee A. Strong, Chief of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, Department of Agriculture. It will meet in the auditorium of the Interior Department Building, Eighteenth and F Streets NW., Washington, D.C., on October 24, at 10 a.m. This is one of a series of annual conferences and anl interested in the Japanese-beetle-quarantine regulations or in1 possible changes in such regulations are invited to attend and to join in the discussion. SThis annual Japanese-beetle conference will be held on the day before a discussion scheduled recently by the Bureau to consider modifications in the plant importation regulations issued under Federal Quarantine No. 37. The consecutive dates were arranged for the convenience of nurserymen and others who are interested in both subjects.

FRUITS AND VEGETABLES MAY BE -SHIPPED THIS FALL WITHOUT JAPANESEBEETLE CERTIFICATES ON AND AFTER SEPTEMBER 15
(Press notice)
SEPTEMB3ER 13, 1933.
The Secretary of Agriculture announced today (Sept. 13) that restrictions
on the movement of fruits and vegetables under the Japanese-beetle-quarantine regulations will be removed for the season on and after Friday, September 15. The restrictions on cut flowers, however, remain until October 15. Under the quarantine regulations, certificates showing freedom from Japanese beetle are required on shipments of certain kinds of fruits and vegetables until October 15. The effect of the order is to release the fruits and vegetables from that requirement a month earlier than is provided in the regulations themselves.
The inspection of fruits and vegetables is necessary only during the period when the adult beetles are abundantly present and in active flight. There is no risk that such products will carry the Japanese beetle after this active period. During the last few days the Department's inspectors have found no beetles in fruits and vegetables.
There is still danger, however, that the adult beetles may be transported in cut flowers. Due to the prevailing cool evenings, the beetles have a tendency to crawl down into the flowers for protection. Therefore, the restrictions on the interstate movement of cut flowers and other portions of plants will remain in full force and effect until October 15, inclusive.





193] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 201

Restrictions on the movement of nursery, ornamental, and greenhouse stock and all other plants (except cut flowers and portions of plants without roots and incapable of propagation) are in force throughout t1he year and are not affected by this announcement.
REMOVAL OF JAPANESE-BEETLE QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS ON THE
INTERSTATE MOVEMENT OF FRUITS AND VEGETABLES

Since it has been deternkined that the active period of the Japanese beetle in its relation to fruits and vegetables has already ceased for the present season and that it is, therefore, safe to permit the unrestricted movement of the f ruits and vegetables listed in regulation 5 of the rules and regulations (eleventh revision) supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 48 f rom, the regulated area as defined in regulation 3 of said rules and regulations, it is ordered that all restrictions on the interstate movement of the articles referred to above are hereby removed on and after September 15, 1933. This order advances the termination of the restrictions as to fruits and vegetables provided for in regulation 5 from October 16 to September 15, 1933, and applies to this season only.
Done at the city of Washington this 13th day of September 1933.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[SEAL] H. A. WALLACE,
bSecretary .of Agriculture.


ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO MEXICAN FRUIT-FLY QUARANTINE (NO. 64)
DEPARTMENT AUTHORIZES LENGTHENING OF NEXT SHIPPING SEASON FOR
CITRUS FRUIT OF LOWER RIO GRANDE VALLEY
(Press notice)

The season for shipping citrus -fruit under the Mexican fruit-fly quarantine regulations from the Texas counties of Willacy, Cameron, and Hidalgo, has been extended to include April 30, 1934, according to an announcement today by Lee A. Strong, Chief of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine of the United States Department o~f Agriculture, following a conference in Harlingen, Tex., with J. M. Del Curto, State entomologist, Texas State Department of Agriculture. Extension of the shipping season makes the grove clean-up requirements by the end of the season even more imperative, and quarantine officials anticipate the same cooperation heretofore extended in this work by growers of the lower Rio Grande Valley.
INessrs. Strong and Del Curto point out that both the Federal Department and the State Department of Agriculture desire to assist in every possible manner in the movement of the Texas citrus crop. At the same time there must be full appreciation of the responsibility to prevent the building up of infestation and spread of fruit fly, and it is hoped and believed that the growers will at all times realize the importance of full compliance with the clean-up regulations. Discovery of any infestation of the Mexican fruit fly will necessarily require immediate eradication and precautionary clean-up measures in any area which may be involved, they point out.
As to the beginning of the shipping season this fall, there was an effective clean-up at the close of last shipping season; two applications, of spray have been made; the season seems somewhat advanced; and, therefore, to give the fulest possible marketing advantages and relying on the;, continued cooi)-ration of the growers in clean-up and other precautionary measures, so far as the fruit-fly regulations are concerned, fruit may be certified on and after September 1, 1933.
[Above press notice was released at Ha rlingen, Tex., July 31, 1933.]






202 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [July-sept.

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO NURSERY STOCK, PLANT, AND SEED QUARANTINE (NO. 37)
INSTRUCTIONS TO COLLECTORS OF CUSTOMS
T.D. 43980, As AMNE.NDED BY T.D. 46431, PUBLISHING A LISTr Oi NAMES OF REPRESENTATIVES OF THE C-'ANADIAN DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE QUALIFIED TO
1iNSPECT AND CERTIIFY P'LANTIS, FURTHER AmENDED (T.D. 46590)
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,
OFFICE OF THE CO-MMISSIONER OF CUSTOMS, Washington, D.C., August 14, 1983.
To Collectors of Customs and Others Concerned:
The published list of official representatives of the Canadian Department of Agriculture, who are qualified and authorized to inspect and certify plants, nursery stock, and seeds for shipment from Canada to the United States in accordance with the rules and regulations supplemental to Quarantine No. 37 (U.S. Department of Agriculture), is amended by removing the name of W. H. Lyne and substituting the name of H. F. Olds, who has been designated as inspector in charge at Vancouver, B.C.

FRANK Dow, Acting Commissioner of Customs.

B.P.Q.-354. AUGUST 15, 1933.
CONDITIONS GOVERNING THE ENTRY AND TREATMENT OF NARCISSUS-BULB IMPORTATIONS
Importations of narcissus bulbs are governed by the provisions of regulation 14 of Quarantine No. 37, the Nursery Stock, Plant, and Seed Quarantine. Each shipment of such bulbs must meet the conditions of entry as set forth in Quarantine No. 37 and in the special permit authorizing the shipment with respect to certification, marking, freedom from sand, soil, or earth, packing materials, inspection and disinfection, if necessary, for injurious insect pests and plant diseases, notice of arrival, etc. All such bulbs imported for propagation must be graded as to type and size before shipment from abroad, and the grades and the exact quantity of each indicated by varieties for each container on the true copy of the invoice required with each shipment~ Run-of-thefield or ungraded bulbs will be refused entry.
Heretofore, in addition to the general conditions of entry, a prescribed hotwater treatment has been given all imported narcissus bulbs as an additional condition of entry; hereafter such bulbs will be inspected at the port designated in the permit (provided that mail importations of narcissus bulbs will be inspected at Washington, D.C., only) and, if found to be apparently free from injurious plant pests, will be released for forwarding to the importer without treatment.
If infested with the greater bulb fly, Mero don equestris, the bulbs shall be treated in accordance with the requirements prevailing for the interstate movement of bulbs so infested. Such bulbs may be (1) fumigated by exposure to calcium cyanide (slow evolving type containing 40 to 50 percent of pure calcium cyanide) at the rate of 16 ounces per 100 cubic feet of space for 4 hours at a temperature of 600 F. or more in an air-tight chamber of approved construction; (2) as an alternative, exposed to hydrocyanic acid gas produced by the use of 7 ounces of sodium cyanide (50 percent cyanogen), 10:V: ounces of sulphuric acid (660 B.), and 14 ounces of water for 100 cubic feet of space under temperature and equipment conditions set forth above for the calcium cyanide fumigation; (3) ,they may also be treated by submersion in hot water held at a temperature of 1100 to 111.50 for the entire period of 1 hour in an approved tank; or (4) by heating the bulbs to a temperature of 11-0* by means of moist conditioned air and holding that temperature for 2 hours, using apparatus approved for this treatment.
If infested with the bulb eelworm, Tylenchus dipsaci, the bulbs shall be treated at a plant approved for use during the current season, under the supervision of a representative of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, by submersion for 3 hours in water held at a temperature of 1100 F., or higher, the approved maximum being 111.50. In the case of bulbs over 2 inches in diameter the treating period will be extended to 4 hours. In view of the fact





19331 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 203

that the effectiveness of this treatment is greatly increased if bulbs which have been dried for more than 3 weeks are presoaked in cold water for 2 hours, the use of this desirable modification of the treatment is recommended. The use of a disinfectant to check subsequent infections of diseases such as basal rot is optional with the permitted. The disinfectant may be used either In the hot water or as an after-dip.
Further information regarding the treatments will be furnished upon request.
Shipments requiring treatment shall be held intact at the place of treatment until the Bureau's representative arrives. In the event infestation is not general but occurs in only one or more clearly distinguishable units, only those infested units shall be required to be treated. All bulbs of the same variety from one shipper to the same addressee will be considered as belonging to the same unit unless evidence is presented to show that certain cases of the lot came from a separate, source in the country of origin and unless such cases are marked to indicate that fact. When 2 or more varieties are included in the same case, the entire case will be considered as I unit unless these varieties are completely separated from each other in tight containers which would prevent an intermingling of dirt and debris.
To prevent any unnecessary delay should treatment be required, the permittees should arrange in advance for facilities for giving any necessary treatments. Small lots of bulbs may be treated at the Inspection House of this Department in Washington, D.C.
A permitted may elect to refuse a shipment if found infested, in place of providing for the required treatment. If any permitted intends to follow that plan, he should notify this Bureau in advance of the arrival of the bulbs, stating whether such infested shipment is to be removed from the country at his expense or is to be abandoned for destruction.
LEE A. STRGNG,
Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.
NoT,.-Other publications having to do with this general subject are:
Quarantine No. 37. Nursery Stock, Plant, and Seed Quarantine.
Circular B.P.Q.-340. Explanation of Provisions for Entry of Plants under Qu,,jrantine 37.
Circular P.Q.C.A.-324. Use of Disinfectants in Hot-Water Treatment of Narcissus Bulbs.
Circular B.P.Q.-337. Treatment and Pest Suppression Measures in Narcissus Plantings.
Circular B.P.Q.-341. Segregation, Labeling, and Utilization Requirements of Plants Imported under Special Permit for Propagation.
Circular B.P.Q.-353. Supplementary Administrative Instructions. Narcissus Treatment and Pest Suppression.


STRONG CALLS CONFERENCE ON IMPORTANT PLANT QUARANTINE
(Press notice)
AUGUST 22, 1933.
Called to reexamine the underlying principles involved in the interpretation and enforcement of the Nursery Stock, Plant, and Seed Quarantine No. 37, a public conference will be held at 10 a.m. October 25 by the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, United States Department of Agriculture. In announcing the conference, Lee A. Strong, Chief of the Bureau, referred to his statement issued July 20 in which he reviewed the legislative and administrative history of this quarantine, and indicated that the Department now is ready to give serious consideration to modification and liberalization of this regulation. The conference will meet in the auditorium of the Interior Department Building in Washington.
In his statement a month ago Mr. Strong said: "After a careful and extended study of this whole problem, I find myself seriously questioning the need for, and the justice of, the procedure we are following. Inspection methods ha-ve been greatly improved and our scientific knowledge of foreign pests and diseases hai4 increased. I feel that greater confidence can be placed in the efficacy of inspection of plant material at the time of arrival." In the formal announcement of the conference Mr. Strong threw open the door for discussion of all questions pertaining to this quarantine and mentioned specific subjects for consideration.






204 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC CONFERENCE TO CONSIDER CERTAIN CHANGES WITH RESPECT
TO THE ADMINISTRATION OF NURSERY STOCK, PLANT, AND SEED QUARANTINE
NO. 37
AUGUST 21, 1933.
Notice is hereby given that a public conference will be held by the Bureau of Plant Quarantine in the auditorium of the Interior Department Building, Eig-hteenth anid F Streets, NW., Washington, D.C., at 10 a.m., October 25, 1933, at which consideration will be given to the advisability of modifying certain features with respect to the enforcement of the Nursery Stock, Plant, and Seed Quarantine No. 37.
As indicated in a statement issued July 20, 1933 it now seems advisable to reexamine the underlying principles involved in the interpretation and enforcement of the quarantine in question. At this conference it is specifically proposed to give consideration to the following subjects in reference to the importation of plants under permit: The elimination of consideration of the availability of plants in this country; limitation to be placed on the number of plants which may be imported by reason of facilities for adequate inspection; value of considering horticultural qualifications of the applicants in the issuance of permits; desirability of continuing to hold certain plants for 2 or more years before release; the advisability of providing for the inspection of imported plants at New York and certain other ports of entry rather than shipping them to Washington as at present; and such other pertinent items as may be brought up.
Any person interested in the changes under consideration may appear at this public conference and be heard either in person or by attorney.
L= A. STRONG, GCeJ of Busreau~.



ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO PINK BOLLWORM QUARANTINE (NO. 52)
REVISION OF REGULATIONS

INTRoDucToity NoTE

The following revision of the pink-bollworm-quarantine regulations makes no, addition to the areas formerly under regulation. The regulated areas are, however, now divided into heavily infested areas and lightly infested areas. The heavily infested areas consist of the counties of Brewster, Culberson, Jeff Davis, Presidio, Terrell, and a portion of Hudspeth in the State of Texas. The remaining counties in Texas, as well as those under regulation in Arizona, Florida, and New Mexico, are designated as lightly infested areas. The measures of control and prevention of spread of the pink bollworm remain substantially unchanged.
SUMMARY

The regulated areas under this revision include 5 counties of southern Arizona, 6 counties of north-central Florida, 7 counties of southern New Mexico, and 10 counties of western Texas. Of this area, 5 counties and part of an additional county of Texas are designated as heavily infested and the other areas as lightly infested. (See regulation 3.)
-No stalks, bolls, or other parts of either cultivated or wild cotton plants and no gin waste are allowed to be transported interstate from any regulated area and no permits, will be issued for such movement, except that the local transportation of gin waste between regulated areas is authorized after freezing weather starts. (See regulation 5.)
Seed cotton must not be transported interstate from any regulated area, except between contiguous regulated areas for ginning. (See regulation 6.)
Cottoniseed, cotton lint, cottonseed hulls, cake,. and meal, and bagging, wrappers, and containers which have been used for cotton products must not be transpIorted interstate from any regulated area except under permit. Cottonseed produced in the heavily infested area must not be moved interstate therefrom






1933] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 205

.and no permits will be issued for such movement. (For the conditions governing the issuance of permits, see regulations 7 to 12, and 15.)
Railway cars, boats, and other vehicles, farm household goods, farm equipinent, and other articles, must not be moved interstate from regulated areas unless free from contamination with cotton and cotton products. (See regulation 13.)
Permits are required to accompany the waybills covering shipments of re.stricted articles, or in the case of highway vehicles, they must accompany the vehicle. (See regulation 15.)
To secure permits, address the local inspector or the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, 521 Avenue A, San Antonio, Tex.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.


NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 52 (REVISED)
(Approved Oct. 26, 1932 ; effective* Oct. 29, 1932)

1, C. F. Marvin, Acting Secretary of Agriculture. have determined that it is necessary to quarantine the States of Arizona, Florida, New Mexico, and Texas to prevent the spread of the pink bollworm (Pect inophora go8sypielia Saunders), a dangerous insect new to and not heretofore widely prevalent or ,distributed within and throughout the United States.
Now, therefore, under the authority conferred by section 8 of the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315),,as amended by the act of 'Congress approved March 4, 1917 (39 Stat. 1134, 1165), and having duly given
-the public hearing as required thereby, I (10 quarantine the said States of Arizona, Florida, New Mexico, and Texas, effective on and after October 29, 1932. Hereafter, under the authority of said act of August 20, 1912, amended as aforesaid, (1) cotton, wild cotton, including all parts of either cotton or wild cotton plants, seed cotton, cotton lint, linters, and all other forms of unmanufactured cotton lint, gin waste, cottonseed, cottonseed hulls, cottonseed cake and meal; (2) bagging and other containers and wrappers of cotton and
-cotton products; (3) railway cars, boats, and other vehicles which have been used in conveying cotton or cotton products or which are fouled with such products; (4) hay and other farm products; and (5) farm household goods, farm equipment, and, if contaminated with cotton, any other articles, shall not be shipped, offered for shipment to a common carrier, received for transportation or transported by a common carrier, or carried, transported, moved, or allowed to be moved from the States of Arizona, Florida, New Mexico, or 'Te-xas into or through any other State or Territory or District of the United States in manner or method or under conditions other than those prescribed in the rules and regulations hereinafter made and amendments thereto: Provided, That the restrictions of this quarantine and of the rules and regulations supplemental thereto may be limited to the areas in a quarantined State now, o6r which may be hereafter, designated by the Secretary of Agriculture as reg-ulated areas when,' in the judgment of the Secretary of Agriculture, the .eniforcement of the aforesaid rules and regulations as to such regulated areas shall be adequate to prevent the spread of the pink bollworm: Provided further, That such limitation shall be conditioned upon .the said State providing for and enforcing such control measures with respect to such regulated areas as, ini the judgment of the Secretary of Agriculture, shall be deemed adequate to prevent the spread of the pink bollworm therefrom to other parts of the State.
Donle at the city of Washington this 26th day of October 1932.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of, Agriculture.
[SEAL] C. F. MARVIN,
Acting Secretary of Agriculture.
23445-33-2






206 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [uly-Sept

REVISED RULES AND REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 52
(Approved Sept. 19, 1933; effective Sept. 19, 1933)

REGULATION 1. DEFINITIoNS

For the purpose of these regulations the following words, names, and terms shall be construed, respectively, to mean:
(a) Pink bollworr.-The insect known as the pink bollworm of cotton (Peotinophora gossypiella Saunders), in any stage of development.
(b) Cotton and cotton products.-Cotton, wild cotton, including all parts of cotton or wild cotton plants (plants of any species of the genera Gossypiwn and Tlurberia); seed cotton; cotton lint and linters, including all forms of unmanufactured cotton lint and linters; gin waste; cottonseed; cottonseed hulls, cake, and meal.
(c) Lint.-All forms of unmanufactured fiber produced from seed cotton.
(d) Liinters.-All forms of unmanufactured fiber produced from cottonseed.
(e) Sterilized seed.-Cottonseed which has been sterilized as a part of the continuous process of ginning at a temperature of not less than 145' F. in an approved plant, under the supervision of an inspector, for such a period and in such manner and method as is authorized by the Bureau of Plant Quarantine.
(f) Inspector.-An inspector of the United States Department of Agriculture.
(g) Moved or allowed to be noved interstate.-Shipped, offered for shipment to a common carrier, received for transportation or transported by a common carrier, or carried, transported, moved, or allowed to be moved fom one State or Territory or District of the United States into or through any other State or Territory or District.

REGULATION 2. LIMITATION OF RESTRICTIONS TO REGULATED AREAs

Conditioned upon the compliance on the part of the State concerned with the provisos to Notice of Quarantine No. 52 (revised), the restrictions provided for in these regulations on the interstate movement of the articles enumerated in said notice of quarantine will be limited to such articles moving from the areas in such State now or hereafter designated by the Secretary of Agriculture as regulated areas: Provided, That restricted articles may be moved interstate without permit from an area not under regulation through a regulated area when such movement is on a through bill of lading.

REGULATION 3. REGULATED AREAS; HEAVILY AND LIGHTLY INFEsTED AREAs

REGUTATED AREAS
In accordance with the provisos to Notice of Quarantine No. 52 (revised), the Secretary of Agriculture designates as regulated areas, for the purpose of these regulations, the following counties in Arizona, Florida, New Mexico, and Texas, including all cities, towns, townships, and other political subdivisions within their limits:
Arizona area.-The counties of Cochise, Graham, Greenlee, Maricopa, and Pinal.
Florida area.-The counties of Alachua, Baker, Bradford, Columbia, Gilchrist, and Union.
New Mcxiro area.-The counties of Chaves, Dona Ana, Eddy, Grant, Hidalgo, Luna, and Otero.
Texas area.-The counties of Brewster, Culberson, El Paso, Hudspeth, Jeff Davis, Pecos, Presidio, Reeves, Terrell, and Ward.

Heavily Infested Areas
Of the regulated areas, the following counties and parts of counties are hereby designated as heavily infested within the meaning of these regulations: The counties of Brewster, Culberson, Jeff Davis, Presidio, and Terrell, in the State of Texas, and all of Hudspeth iCounty in the same State except that part of the northwest corner of said county lying north and west of a ridge of desert land extending from the banks of the Rio Grande northeasterly through the desert immediately west of the town of McNary, such ridge being an extension of the northwest boundary line of section 11, block 65 .






19331 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 207

Lightly Infested Areas

The following areas are designated as lightly Infested: The counties of Cochise, Graham, Greenlee, Maricopa, and Pinal, in Arizona2 ; the counties of Alachua, Baker, Bradford, Columbia, Gilchrist, and Union, in Florida; the counties of Chaves, Dona Ana, Eddy, Grant, Hidalgo, Luna, and Otero, In New Mexico; the entire counties of El Paso, Pecos, Reeves, and Ward, in Texas, and that part of the northwest corner of Hudspeth County, Tex., lying north and west of a ridge of desert land extending from the banks of the Rio Grande northeasterly through the desert immediately west of the town of McNary, such ridge being an extension of the northwest boundary line of section 11, block 65/2.

REouL.ArIoN 4.' EXTENSION OR REDUcTIoN oF REw1JLxr1D AImAs

The regulated areas designated in regulation 3 may be extended or reduced as may be found advisable by the Secretary of Agriculture. Due notice of any extension or reduction and the areas affected thereby will be given in writing to the transportation companies doing business in or through the State in which such areas are located, and by publication in newspapers selected by the Secretary of Agriculture within the States in which the areas affected are located.

REGULATION 5. STALKS, BOLLS, GIN WASTE, ETC.

Stalks, bolls, and other parts of cotton or wild cotton plants (plants of any species of the genera Gossypiumr or Thurberia), and gin waste shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from a regulated area, except that gin waste may be moved interstate without permit from a gin in a lightly infested area ato farms in another regulated area within the contiguous ginning territory thereof, on condition that in the judgment of the inspector such movement would not, owing to the arrival of f reeling weather, increase the risk of spread of the pink bollworm.

REGULATION 6. SEED COTTON

seed cotton (including grabbots) shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from regulated areas to nonregulated territory, but, for the purpose of ginning, seed cotton may be moved8a interstate without permit from a lightly infested area to a contiguous regulated area.

REGULATION 7. COTTON SEED

HEAVILY INFESTED AREAS

Cottonseed produced within a heavily infested area shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from that area, and no permit will be issued for such movement.
IGHTLY INFESTED AREAS

Cottonseed produced in a lightly infested area shall not be moved or allowed Io be moved interstate therefrom unless a permit shall have been issued therefor by the United States Department of Agriculture.
Permits may be issued for the interstate movement of sterilized seed produced in a lightly infested area on condition that it either is to be moved to another regulated area without passing through any territory not regulated under this quarantine or, under the Federal quarantine on account of the Thurberia weevil; or is a sample to be moved to an approved laboratory in nonregulated territory for analysis; or is a sample to be moved for some other approved purpose.
2 Part of the lightly infested area in Arizona is regulated on account of the Thurberla weevil under Quarantine No. 61, and shipments therefrom must comply with the requirements of that quarantine.
3 Except from the area In Arizona regulated on account of the Thurberla weevil (Quarantine No. 61).






208 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

Permits may also be issued for the interstate movement of sterile seed produced in a lightly infested area to an authorized oil mill in nonregulated territory for crushing; as one of the conditions for such authorization, oil mills in nonregulated territory must agree to maintain such safeguards against the spread of infestation, and to comply with such restrictions on the subsequenit movement of the linters and other products manufactured from the seed concerned as majy he required by the Bureau of Plant Quarantine.
Permits may be issued for the interstate movement of seed from lightly infested areas to any destination on condition that it has been given a special heat treatment at 1450 F. maintained under approved conditions for a period of at least 1 hour and subsequently has been protected from contamination, or has been given such other treatment as may later be approved by the Bureau of Plant Quarantine.
In cases where, in the judgment of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, the carrying out of the treatments required in this regulation becomes impracticable owing to the lack of satisfactory facilities or for some other sound reason, permits may be issued for the interstate movement of cottonseed from lightly infested areais on such conditions as may be prescribed by that Bureau.

OOTTONSEED PRODUCED OUTSIDE THE REGULATED APEAS

Cottonseed produced outside of but brought within a regulated area may be moved interstate from such area under permit on condition that while in the area the seed has been protected from contamination in a manner satisfactory to the inspector.
RE GULATioN 8. LINT AND SAMPLES

Lint and samples thereof shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from a regulated area unless a permit shall. have been issued therefor by the United States Department of Agriculture.
Permits may be issued for the interstate movement of lint or samples thereof, produced in a regulated area, on condition that the said lint was produced in a gin operated, as to seed sterilization and the prevention of contamination, to the satisfaction of the inspector, and on compliance with the following additional requirements which shall be carried out under the supervision of an inspector and in manner and by method approved by the Bureau of Plant Quarantine:
Baled lint produced in a heavily infested area (regardless of destination) must be given both vacuum fumigation and either compression or roller treatment. unless and until the said Bureau shall approve some other treatment or treatments for the purpose; baled lint produced in a lightly infested area to be moved to nonregulated territory must be either fumigated under vacuum, or compressed, or roller treated, or given such other treatment as may later be approved by the said Bureau; baled lint and samples thereof produced in a lightly infested area may be moved interstate under permit to another regulated area without fumigation or other treatment on condition that the material will not pass through any cotton-growing territory outside the areas regulated under this quarantine or the Federal quarantine on account of the Thurberia weevil; samples (except when moved as above from a lightly infested area to another regulated area), whether produced in a lightly infested or heavily infested area, must be either fumigated, inspected, or otherwise trea ted as, may be required by the inspector.
Permits may be issued for the interstate movement of baled lint or samples thereof grown outside of but brought within a regulated area and to be moved therefrom, on the furnishing of evidence satisfactory to the inspector that the said materials have been protected from contamination.
In cases where, in the judgment of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, the carrying out of the treatments required in this regulation becomes impracticable owing to the lack of satisfactory facilities or for some other sound reason, permiits may be issued for the interstate movement of lint from the regulated area--s on such conditions as may he prescribed by that Bureau.
4 Exempt from the area in Arizona regulated on account of the Thurberla weevl (Quarantine No. 61).





1933] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 209

REGULATION 9. LINTERS AND SAMPLES
Linters and samples thereof shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from a regulated area unless a permit shall have been issued therefor by the United States Department of Agriculture.
Permits may be issued for the interstate movement of linters or sainpleg thereof, produced in a regulated area on condition that said linters were produced from sterilized seed and protected from contamination to the satisfaction of the inspector, and on compliance with the following additional requirements which shall be carried out under the supervision of an inspector and in manner and by method approved by the Bureau of Plant Quarantine:
Baled linters produced in a heavily infested area (regardless of destination) must be either fumigated under vacuum, or roller treated, or given such other treatment as may later be approved by the said Bureau; baled linters produced in a lightly infested area to be shipped to nonregulated territory must be either fumigated under vacuum, or compressed, or roller treated, or given. such other treatment as may later be approved by the said Bureau; baled winters and samples thereof produced in a lightly infested area may be shipped interstate under permit to another regulated area without fumigation or other treatment on condition that the material will not pass through any cottongrowing territory outside the areas regulated under this quarantine or the Federal quarantine on account of the Thurberia, weevil; samples (except when moved as above from a lightly infestedtarea to another regulated area), whether produced in a lightly infested or heavily infested area, must be either fumigated, inspected, or otherwise treated as may be required by the inspector.
Permits may be issued for the interstate movement of baled linters or samples thereof grown outside of but brought within a regulated area and to be moved therefrom on the furnishing of evidence satisfactory to the inspector that such materials have been protected from contamination.
In cases where, in the judgment of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, the Carrying out of the treatments required in this regulation becomes impracticable owing to the lack of satisfactory facilities or for some other sound reason, permits may be issued for the interstate movement of linters from the regulated areas on such conditions as may be prescribed by that Bureau.

REGULATION 10. MILL. WASTE, UNBALED LINT AND LINTERS, AND OTHER FoRu'ms OF UNMANULFAOTJRED LINT AND LINTERS

No form of cotton lint or linters shall be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from a regulated area unless a permit shall have been issued therefor by the United -States Department of Agriculture, except that no permit is required for the interstate transportation of materials which have been woven or spun from cotton lint or linters and are uncontaminated with other cotton or cotton products, nor for the interstate transportation of mattresses, pillows, cushions, or upholstery, which have been commercially manufactured in compliance with the pink-bollworm regulations of the State concerned and in which any unwoven lint or linters used are completely enclosed in the finished product. / Permits may be issued authorizing the interstate movement from a regulated area of mill waste and of all other forms of unmanufactured cotton lint or winters for which permits are required under these regulations and which are not specifically covered in regulations 8 and 9, on condition that the material h~as been fumigated and compressed or roller treated,'or has been given such other treatment or handling as will, in the judgment of the Bureau, eliminate risk of spread of the pink bollworm.

REGULATION 11. COTTON SEED H~ULLS. CAKE, AND MEAL

No cottonseed hulls, cake, or meal shall be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from a regulated area unless a permit shall have been issued therefor by the United States Department of Agriculture.
Permits may be issued for the interstate movement from a heavily infested area to any destination of cottonseed hulls obtained from sterilized cottonseed

11 Except from the area In Arizona regulated on account of the Thurberia weevil (Quarantine No. 61).






210 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

and subsequently protected from contamination to the satisfaction of the inspector on condition that they are given such additional treatment as may be required by the inspector. Permits may be issued for the interstate movement from a lightly infested area" of cottonseed hulls produced from sterilized cottonseed and subsequently protected from contamination to the satisfaction of the inspector on condition that they are either to be moved to another regulated area without passing through any territory not regulated under this quarantine or under the Federal quarantine on account of the Thurberia, weevil, or are to be moved to nonregulated territory and have been given such additional treatment as may be required by the inspector.
Permits may be issued for the interstate movement from a regulated area to any destination of cottonseed cake a-nd meal produced either f rom sterilized cottonseed or from cottonseed obtained from iionregulated territory, on condition that the cake and meal have been protected against subsequent contamination with cottonseed to the satisfaction of the inspector.

REGULATION 12. BAGGING AND OTHER WRAPPERS AND Co.-NTAINERs

Bagging and other wrappers and containers which have been used in connection with or which are contaminated with cotton or cotton products, shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from a regulated area unless a permit shall have been issued therefor by the United States Department of Agriculture. Permits may be issued on condition that such bagging or other wrappers or containers have been cleaned or treated to the satisfaction of the inspector.

REGVLATiON 13. CARS, BOATS, VEHICLES, HOUSEHOLD GOODS, AND EQUIPMENT

Railway cars, boats, and other vehicles which have been used in conveying cotton or cotton products or which are fouled with such products, and farm household goods, farm equipment, and other articles, if contaminated with cotton or cotton products, shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from a regulated area until they have been thoroughly cleaned or treated to the satisfaction of the inspector. No permit is required for the movements allowed under this regulation.

REGULATION 14. HAY AND OTHER FARM PRODUCTS; COTTONSED OIL

Hay and other farm products the interstate movement of which has not been specifically restricted or provided for elsewhere in these regulations, and cottonseed oil, may be moved interstate without permit or other restriction until further notice.

REGULAIION 15. GENERAL PERMIT PROVISIONS; MARKING AND LABELING; STRAGE, CARTAGE, AND LABOR COSTS

To obtain permits under these regulations, application should be made either to the nearest local inspector, or to the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, 521 Avenue A, San Antonio, Tex.
Permits may specify a destination point or a limited destination area for the shipment, and, in that event, the material concerned shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate, directly or indirectly, to destinations other than those specified in such permit.
Copies of the permits required Under these regulations shall be attached to the articles or to the wvaybills or other shipping papers which accompany the shipment. lit the case of movement by a road vehicle, copies of the permit shall accompany the vehicle. The products or articles so moved shall bear such marking and labeling as may be necessary, in the judgment of the inspector, to identify the material.
All charges for storage, cartage, and labor, incident to inspection, other than the services of inspectors, shall be paid by the shipper.
6Except from the area in Arizona regulated on account of the Thurberla weevil (Quarantine No. 61).





1933] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 211

REGULATION 16. SHIPMENTS BY TILE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT oi' AGRICULTURE
Products and articles subject to restriction in these regulations may be moved interstate by the United States Depairtmenit of Agriculture for experimental or scientific purposes, on sucli conditions~ and under such safeguards as may be prescribed b~y the Burieau of Plant Quarantine. The container of articles so moved shall bear, securely attaced to the outside thereof, an identifying tag from the Bureau of Plant Quarantine showing compliance with such conditions.
These rules and regulations shall. be effective on and after September 10f, 1933, and shall supersede on that (late the rules and regullations iSSUed under Notice of Quarantine No. 52 (revised), on October 20, 1932, as amended to date.
Done at the city of Washington this 19th day of September 1933. Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture. C. F. MARVIN,
[SEFAL] Acting Secretary of Agriculture.

[Copies of foregoing revision sent to all common carriers doing business in or through the regulated area.]I



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NOTICE To GENERAL PUBLIC THROUGH NEWSPAPERS
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE,
Washington, D.C., Scptemtber 19, 1933.
Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority conferred on- him by the plant quarantine act of Augufst 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315),I as amended, has promulgated a revision of the rules and regulations to Notice of Quarantine No. 52 (revised), on account of the pink bollworm, effective September 19, 1933. Under this revision the regulated areas include 5 counties of southern Arizona, 6 counties of north-central Florida, 7 counties of southern New Mexico, and 10 counties of western Texas. Various changes with regard to the handling and issuance of permits, of interest to growers and shippers of cotton and cotton products, have been made in the revision. Copies of said revision may be obtained from the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, United States Department of Agriculture, Washington, D.C. C. F. MARVIN,
Acting Secretary of Agriculture.
[Published In the following newspapers: The Republican Phoenix, Ariz., Sept. 26, 1933; the Florida Times-Union, Jacksonville, Fla., Sept. 26, 19A3; the New Mexico State Tribune, Albuquerque, N.Mex., Sept. 26, 1933; the El Paso Post, El Paso, Tex., Sept. 25, 1933.]






212 BUREAU OF PLANET QUARANTINE (July-Sept,.

CAMPAIGN AGAINST PINK BOLLWORM STARTED IN COTTON FIELDS OF SOUTH
(Press notice)
SEPTEMBER, 25, 1933.
The Unitedl States Department of Agriculture today concentrated its facilities for inspecting cottonl-gin trash in the area around Enigmia, Ga., where plant quarantine inspectors last week found pink bollwormns during a routine inspection of gin trash. An intensive inspection of adjacent fields is also under way. Prompt extermination measures will be taken against any additional infestation discovered.
This is the first time in 12 years that the pink bollwornm has appeared in the main Cotton Belt of the United States, says Lee A. Strong, Chief of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine. Clean cultivation of the fields and sterilization of the seed are among the control measures advocated by the Department. Af ter the cotton is picked every bit of cotton plant and debris in an infested field must be pulled but, raked up, and-burned. The seeds, in which the bollworm. passes part of its life cycle, must be sterilized. In this way infestations have been stamped out over thousands of square miles in several cotton-growing States.
Annual inspections of gin trash disclose any incipient infestation of pink bollworms, Mr. Strong says, and make it possible to take proper control measuires before the insect can build up a large population. A light infestation wa~s discovered by such an examination last year in Florida, lie adds, and, as a result of the control measures immediately taken, no infestation has been found there this year.

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO THURBERIA-WEEVIL QUARANTINE (NO. 61)
REVISION OF REGULATIONS

INTRODucToRY NOTE

The following revision of the Thurberia-weevil-quarantine regulations is issued to authorize the use of various improved treatments and other safeguards that have been developed by the Department in recent years. The changes in every case provide for the issuance of permits for interstate shipments on conditions with which it will be simpler andI less expensive to comply than'those, previously required, or under which a wider market for cotton products is authorized.
Changes include provisions under which cottonseed given a special heat treatment of 1450 F. for 1 hour is authorized shipment under permit to any destination; baled cotton lint may be either fumigated under vacuum, or compressed, or roller treated, instead of having to be both compressed and fumigated 'as heretofore; and cottonseed hulls may be shipped to nonreglulated territory on the application of such special treatment as may be required by the inspector.

SUMMARY

The regulated areas under this quarantine include Cochise and Santa Cruz Counties, and parts of Graham, Pima, and Pinal Counties in Arizona. (See reg-ulation 3.)
No Thurberia plants or parts thereof shall be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from any point in Arizona, and no permit will be issued for such movement. (See regulation 5.)
No seed cotton, stalks, bolls, or other parts of the cotton plant; or gin waste, shall be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from a regulated area, and no permit will be issued for such movement. (Regulation 5.)
Cotton lint, linters, cottonseed, cottonseed hiulls, cake, and meal, and bagging, wrappers aind containers which have been used for cotton products must not be transported interstate from the regulated area except under permit. (For conditions governing the issuance of permits see regulations 6 to 11 and 14.)
Railwvay cars, boats, and other vehicles, farm household goods, farm equipmient, and other articles must not be moved interstate from a regulated area





1931 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 213

unless free from contamination with cotton and cotton products. (See regulation 12.)
Permits are required to accompany the waybills covering shipments of restricted articles, or in the case of highway vehicles they must accompany the vehicle.
To secure permits apply to the nearest local inspector or address the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, 521 Avenue A, San Antonio, Tex.
LEE A. STRONG.
Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.


NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 61 (REVISED)
(Effective on and after Aug. 1, 1927)

I, Renick V. Dunlap, Acting Secretary of Ag:i culture, have determinedly that it is necessary to quarantine the State of Arizona to prevent the spread of the Thurberia weevil (Anthonom us grandis thurberi(rc Pierce), a dangerous insect not heretofore widely prevalent or distributed within and throughout the United States.
Now, therefore, under the authority conferred by section 8 of the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended by the act of Congress approved March 4. 1917 (39 Stat. 1134, 1165), and having duly given the public hearing as required thereby, I do quarantine the said State of Arizona, effective on and after August 1, 1927. Hereafter, under the authority of said act of August 20, 1912. amended as aforesaid (1) Thurberia, including all parts of the plant; (2) cotton, including all parts of the plant, seed cotton, cotton lint, winters, and all other forms of unmanufactured cotton lint, gin waste, cottonseed, cottonseed hulls, cottouseed cake and meal; (3) bagging and other containers and wrappers of cotton and cotton products; (4) railway cars, boats, and other vehicles which have been used in conveying cotton and cotton products or which are fouled with such products: (5) hay and other farm products; and (6) farm household goods, farm equipment, and, if contaminated with cotton, any other articles, shall not be shipped, offered for shipment to a conmmnon carrier, received for transportation or transported by a common carrier, or carried, transported, moved, or allowed to be moved from the State of Arizona into or, through any other State or Territory or District of the United States in manner .or.method or under conditions -other than those prescribed i'n the rules and regulations hereinafter made and amendments thereto: Provided, That the restrictions of this quarantine and of the rules and regulations supplemental thereto may be limited to the areas in the State of Ar'zona now, or which may be hereafter, designated by the Secretary of Agriculture as regulated areas when, in the judgment of the Secretary of Agriculture, the enforcement of the aforesaid rules and regulations as to such regulated areas shall be adequate to prevent thq spread of the Thurberia weevil: Provided further. That such limitation shall be conditioned upon the said State providing for and enforcing such control measures with respect to such regulated areas as in the judgment of the Secretary of Agriculture shall be deemed adequate to prevent the spread of the Thurberia weevil therefrom to other l)parts of the State. ,
Done at the city of WIVashington this 9th day of July 1927.
Witness my land and the seal of the United States Departmient of Agriculture.
[SEAL] RENICK W. DUNLAP,
Acting ecretary of Agi-'icult '.


REVISED RULES AND REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 61
S(Approved Sept. 30, 1933; effective Oct. 2, 1933)

REGULATION 1. DEFiNITIONS
For' the piuriose 6f these regulations the following words, names, and terms shall be construed, respecti ely, to mean:
23445-33--3






214 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

(a) Tliurbcria weecil.-The insect known as the Thurberia weevil (Antlioonlus yrandis thurberiae Pieice), in any stage of development.
i b) Cotton and cotton products.-Cotton, wild cotton, including all parts of cotton or wild cotton plants (plants of any species of the genera Gossyphim and Tlburbcria) ; seed cotton; cotton lint and linters, including all forms of unmanufactured cotton lint and linters; gin waste; cottonseed; cottonseed hulls, cake, and meal.
(c) Lint.-All forms of unmanufactured fiber produced from seed cotton.
(d) Lint crs. .All forms of unmnanufactured fiber produced from cottonseed.
(C) Sterilized seed.-Cottonseed which has been sterilized as a part of the continues process of ginning at a temperature of not less than 145' F. in an approved plant, under the supervision of an inspector, for such a period and in such manner and method as is authorized by the Bureau of Plant Quarantine.
([) Inspector.-An inspector of the United States Department of Agriculture.
(g) Mored or allowed to be moved interstate.-Shipped, offered for shipment to a common carrier, received for transportation or transported by a common carrier, or carried, transported, moved, or allowed to be moved from one State or Territory or District of the United States into or through any other State or Territory or District.

REGULATION 2. LImITATION OF RESTRICTIONS TO REGULATED AREAS

Conditioned upon the compliance on the part of the State of Arizona with the provisos in Notice of Quarantine No. 61 (revised), the restrictions provided for in these regulations on the interstate movement of the articles enumerated in said notice of quarantine, except as to Thurberia (see regulation 5), will be limited to such articles when moving from the areas in the State of Arizona now or hereafter designated by the Secretary of Agriculture as regulated areas: Provided, That, except as to Thurberia (see regulation 5), the atricles enumerated in said notice of quarantine may move interstate from an area not under regulation through a regulated area when such movement is on a through bill of lading.
REGULATION 3. REGULATED AEA

In accordance with the provisos to Notice of Quarantine No. 61 (revised) the Secretary of Agriculture designates as regulated area the counties, or portions thereof, of Graham, Cochise, Santa Cruz, Pima, and Pinal, of the State of Arizona, embraced within the following-described boundary line, including all cities, towns, townships, and other political subdivisions within their limits:
Beginning at the most southeasterly corner of Greenlee County; thence westerly along the most southerly line of said county to the most southwesterly corner of said county; thence northwesterly along the county line of Greenlee and Graham Counties to the point where the township line between township 10 south and township 11 south as surveyed, or as would be if surveyed, intersects, or would intersect, the county line between Graham and Greenlee Counties; thence west along the said township line between township 10 south and township 11 south as surveyed, or as would be if surveyed, to the point where the said township line intersects, or would intersect, the line between the townships in range 23 east and range 24 east; thence north along the township line between the townships in range 23 east and range 24 east as surveyed, or as would be if surveyed, to the point where the said township line intersects, or would intersect. the township line between township 6 south and township 7 south; thence west along the said township line between township 6 south and township 7 south as surveyed, or as would be if surveyed, to the point where the said township line intersects, or would intersect, the line between the townships in range 8 east and range 9 east; thence south along the township line between the townships in range 8 east and range 9 east as surveyed, or as would be if surveyed, to the point where the said township line intersects, or would intersect, the township line between township 8 south and township 9 south; thence west along the township line between township 8 south and township 9 south as surveyed, or as would be if surveyed, to the point where the said township line intersects,. or would intersTect, the line between the townships in range 5 east and range 6 east; thence south along the township line between the townships in range 5 east and range 6 east as surveyed, or as would be if surveyed, to the point where the said township line intersects, or would intersect, the boundary line between Pima County and the Republic of Mexico; thence southeasterly and easterly





19331 SERVICE AND REGUL.&TORY ANKOUNCBMBNTS 215

along the boundary line between the State of Arizona a nd the Republic of Mexico to the point where the said boundary line interwts the boundary line between the States of New Mexico and Arizona; thence northerly along the boundary line between the States of New Mexico and Arizona to the point of beginning. .
All townships, township lines, and ranges referred to in the above-described area are of the Gila and Salt River base and meridian.

REGULATION 4. EXTENSION OR REDUCTION OF REGULATED AREAS

The regulated areas may be extended or reduced as may be found advisable by the Secretary of Agriculture. Due notice of any extension or reducidon and Lhe areas affected thereby will be given in writing to the transportation companies doing business in, or through the State of Arizona and by publication in one or more newspapers selected by the Secretary of Agriculture within the said State.
REGULATION 5. PROHIBITED MOVEMENT

No Thurberia plants or parts thereof shall be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from any point in Arizona, and no permit will be issued for such movement.
No seed cotton, grabbots, or stalks, bolls, or other parts of the cotton plant, or gin waste shall be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from a regulated area, and no permit will be issued for such movement.

REGULATION 6. COTTONSEED

Cottonseed shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from a regulated area unless a permit shall have been issued therefor by the United States Department of Agriculture.
Permits may be issued for such movement of samples of sterilized seed to an approved laboratory in nonregulated territory for analysis, or of samples to be moved for some other approved purpose.
Permits may also be issued for the interstate movement of sterilized seed to an authorized oil mill in nonregulated territory for crushing; as one of the conditions for such authorization, oil mills in such nonregulated territory must agree to maintain such safeguards against the spread of infestation and to comply with such restrictions on the subsequent movement of the linters and other product manufactured from the seed concerned as may be required by the Bureau of Plant Quarantine.
Permits may be issued for the interstate movement of seed to any destination on condition that the seed has been given a special heat treatment at 145' F. maintained under approved condition's for a period of 1 hour and subsequently has been protected from contamination, or has been given such other treatment as may later be approved by the Bureau of Plant Quarantine.
In cases where, in the judgment of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, the carrying out of the treatments required in this regulation becomes impracticable owing to the lack of satisfactory facilities or for some other sound reason, permits may be issued for the interstate movement of cottonseed from a regulated area on such conditions as may be prescribed by thdt Bureau.
Cottonseed produced outside of but brought within a regulated area -may be moved interstate from such area under permit on c6nditionthat while in the area the seed has been protected from contamination in a manner satisfactory to the inspector.
REGULATION 7. LINT AND SAMPLES

Lint and samples thereof shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from a regulated area unless a permit has been issued therefor by the United States Department of Agriculture. Permits may be issued for such movement of lint or samples thereof produced in a regulated area on condition that the lint was produced in a gin operated as to seed sterilization and the prevention of contamination to the satisfaction of the inspector, and upon compliance with the following additional requirements which shall be carried out under the supervision of an inspector and in manner and by method approved by the Bureau of Plant Quarantine:






216 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Spt..

Baled lint must be either vacuum fumigated, or compressed, or roller tratd or given such other treatment or treatments as may later be approved by the said Bureau; samples must be either fumigated, inspected, or otherwise treated as may be required by the inspector.
Permits may be issued for thie interstate movement of baled lint and samples thereof grown outside of but brought within a regulated area -and to be moved therefrom on the furnishing of evidence satisfactory to the inspector that the siaid materials have been protected from contamination.
In cases where, in the judg-ment of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, the carrying out of the treatments required in this regulation becomes impracticable owing to the lack of satisfactory facilities or for some other sound reason, pernits may be issued for the interstate, movement Of lint from a regulated area on Such conditions as may be prescribed by that Bureau.

REGULATION 8. L'iNTZRS AND SAMPLE

Linters and samples thereof shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from a regulated area unless a permit shall have been issued therefor by the United States Department of Agriculture.
Permits may be issued for the interstate movement of linters and samples thereof produced in a regulated area on condition that they were produced from sterilized seed and protected from contamination to the satisfaction of the inspector, and on compliance with the following additional requirements which shall be carried out under the Supervision of an, inspector and in manner and by method approved by the Bureau of Plant Quarantine:
Baled linters must be either vacuum fumigated, or compressed, or roller treated, or given such other treatment as may later be approved by the said Bureau; samples must be either fumigated, inspected, or otherwise treated as may be required by the inspector.
Permits may be issued for the interstate movement of baled linters and samples thereof grown outside of but brought within a regulated area and to be moved therefrom on the furnishing of evidence satisfactory to the inspector that such materials have been protected from contamination.
In cases where, in the judgment of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, the carrying out of the treatments required in this regulation becomes impracticable owing to the lack of satisfactory facilities or for some other sound reason, permits may be issued for the interstate movement of linters from the regulated areas on such conditions as may be prescribed by that Bureau.

REGULATION 9. MILLWAST19, U:\BALED LINT AND LINTERS, AND OTHER, FORMS OF UNMANUF-ACTURED LINT AND Li-NTERS

No form of cotton lint or winters shall be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from a regulated area unless a permit shall have been issued therefor by the United States Department of Agriculture, except that no permit 1.- required for the interstate transportation of materials which have been woven or spun from cotton lint or linters and are uncontaminated with other cotton or cotton products, nor for the interstate transportation of mattresses, pillows, cushions, or upholstery, which have been commercially manufactured in compliance with the Thurberia, weevil regulations of the State concerned and in which any unwoven lint or linters used are completely enclosed in the finished product.
Permits may be issued authorizing the interstate movement from a regulated area of inillwaste and of all other forms of unmianufactured cotton lint or linters for which permits are required under these regulations ;1nd which are not specificallyI covered in regulations 7 andI 8. on condition that the material has been fumigated and compressed or roller treated, or has been given such other treatment or handling(' ;i-s will, in thie judgmnent of the Bureau, eliminate risk of spread of the Thurheria weevil.

REGULATION 10. CyrirON~SEE HULLS, CAKE, ANDI) MEAL

No cottonseed hulls, cake, or meal shall be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from a regulated area unless a permit shall have been issued therefor by the United States Department of Agriculture.
Permits may be issued for the interstate movement from a regulated area to any deCstinitionl Of cottonseed hulls obtained from sterilized cottonseed on





1933] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 217

condition that they have been protected from subsequent contamination to the satisfaction of the inspector and have been given such additional treatment as may be required by the inspector.
Permits may be issued for the interstate movement from a regulated area to any destination of cotton seed cake and meal produced either from sterilized cottonseed or from cottonseed obtained from nonregulated territory, on condition that the cake and meal have been protected against subsequent contamination with cottonseed to the satisfaction of the Inspector.
REGULATION 11.,BAGGING, WRAPPERS, AND CONTAINERS

Bagging and other wrappers and containers which have been used in connection with or which are cont aminated with cotton or 'cotton products, shall not be moved or allowed to be moved'interstate from the regulated area unless a permit shall have been issued therefor by the United States, Department of Agriculture. Permits may be issued on condition that such bagging or other wrappers or containers have been cleaned or treated to the satisfaction of the inspector.

REGuLATiioN 12. CARS, BOATS, VEjHIcLES, HOUSEHOLD GOODS AND EQUIPMENT

Railway cars, boats, and other v ehicles which have been used in conveying cotton or cotton products or which are fouled with, such products, and farm household goods, farm equipment, and other a 'rticles, if contaminated with cotton or cotton products, shall not be moved or allowved to be moved interstate from the regulated area until they have been thoroughly cleaned or treated to the satisfaction of the inspector. No permit is required for the movements allowed under this regulation.

REGULATION 13. HAY AND OTHER FARMI PRODUCTS; AND COTTONSEED OIL

Hay and other farm products the interstate movement of which has not been specifically restricted or provided for elsewhere in these regulations, and cottonseed oil, may be 'moved interstate without permit or other restriction until further notice.

REGULATION 14. GENERAL PERMIT PROVISIONS; MARKING AND LABELING; COSTS OF, TREATMENTS, -ETC.

To obtain permits under these regulations application should be made to the nearest local inspector or to the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, 521 Avenue A, San Antonio, Tex.
Permits may specify a destination point or a limited destination area for the shipment and, -in that event, the material concerned shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate, directly or indirectly, to destinations other than those specified in such permit.
In case Thurberia-weevil infestation within any part of the regulated area becomes so general or so heavy in the future that, in the judgment of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine the safeguards or treatments prescribed herein are insufficient to prevent the spread of the weevil therefrom, permits for the interstate movement of restricted articles produced or stored in such generally or heavily infested part of the area may either be refused or may be withheld until such additional treatments or safeguards have been applied as may be necessary, in the judgment of the Bureau, to prevent the spread of the Thurberia weevil.
Copies of the permits required under these regulations shall be attached to the articles or to the waybills or other shipping papers which accompany the shipment. In the case of movement by a road vehicle, copies of the permit shall accompany the vehicle. The products or articles so moved shall bear such marking and labeling as may be necessary, in the judgment of the inspector, to identify the material.
All charges for storage, cartage, and labor, incident to inspection, other than the services of the inspector, shall be paid by the shipper.






218 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

REGULATION 15. SHIPMENTS BY THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICUL

Products and articles subject to restriction in these regulations may be moved interstate by the United States Department of Agriculture for expertmental or scientific purposes, on such conditions and under such safeguards as may be prescribed by the Bureau of Plant Quarantine. The container of articles so moved shall bear, securely attached to the outside thereof, an identifying tag from the Bureau of Plant Quarantine showing compliance with such conditions.
These rules and regulations shall be effective on and after October 2, 1933, and shall supersede on that date the rules and regulations issued under Notice of Quarantine No. 61 (revised), on July 9, 1927, as amended to date.
Done at the city of Washington this 30th day of September 1933.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[SEAL] H. A. WALLACE,
Secretary of Agriculture.

[Copies of foregoing revised regulations sent to all common carriers doing business in or through the regulated area.]


NoTIcE TO GENERAL PUBLIC THROUGH NEWSPAPERS

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE,
Wakisngton, D.C., September 30, 1933.
Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority conferred on him by the plant quarantine act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended, has promulgated a revision of the rules and regulations supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 61, on account of the Thurberia weevil, effective October 2, 1933. Under the revision the regulated areas include Cochise and Santa Cruz Counties, and parts of Grahaml, Pima, and Pinal Counties in Arizona. The revision authorizes the use of various improved treatments and other safeguards that have been developed by the department in recent years, and makes various other changes with regard to treatment and transportation, of interest to growers and shippers of cotton and cotton products. Copies of said revision may be obtained from the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, United States Department of Agriculture, Washington, D.C.
I. A. WALLAoE,
Secretary of Agriculture.
[Published in the Arizona Republican, Phoenix, Ariz., Oct. 10, 1933.]


MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS

P.Q.C.A.-306, Supplement No. 1. AUGUST 25, 1933.

PLANT QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS, NEW ZEALAND

New Zealand Gazette No. 50, July 13, 1933, publishes Notice No. Ag. 3131, amending regulations under the Orchard and Garden Diseases Act, 1928, in regard to the importation of fruits or plants into New Zealand.
This notice amends regulation 6 and the inspector's certificate of the sixth schedule, and reads as follows:
REGULATIONS

1. Notwithstanding anything to the contrary in the principal regulations insofar as they relate to the admission of fruit, the introduction into New Zealand of any fruit from any country in which Mediterranean or, West Austtalian fruit fly (Hatterophora capitata, described also as Ceratitis capit t), is known to exist, is absolutely prohibited.
2. Every shipment of fruit which by the principal regulations and these regulations may be introduced into New Zealand shall, in addition to the






1933] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 219

certificates required by the principal regulations to accompany such fruit to New Zealand, be accompanied by a certificate signed by an officer of the Department of Agriculture or other department performing the functions or duties relating to horticulture in the country where such fruit was grown, certifying that Mediterranean or West Australian fruit fly (1111t croph ora capitate, described also as Ceratitis capitata), does not exist in the country where such fruit was grown: Providcd, Thlat the aforesaid certificate may be combined with the appropriate certificate required by the principal regulations to accompany fruit the introduction of which is permitted under the principal regulations -and these regulations, and if so combined may be in or t o the effect of the form set out in the schedule hereto.

SCHEDULE

The Orchard and Garden Diseases Act, 1928 (New Zealand)

Inspector's additional certificate to accompany fruit to New Zealand

I hereby certify that Mediterranean or West Australian fruit fly (Halterophora c'apitata, described also as Ceratiti capitata), does not exist in the country where the above-mentioned fruit was grown,

Dated at ,this day of -, 193Signature -- - - - - -

Official designation--------Address-- - - - - -

AVERY S. HOYT,
Acting Chief of Bureau.

B.P.Q.-355.
SEPTE-MBER 7, 1933.

PLANT QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS, JAMAICA, BRITISH WEST INDIES

The following summary of the plant quarantine restrictions of Jamaica, British West Indies, was prepared August 4, 1933, by the acting director of agriculture of that Colony and is offered for the information of nurserymen, plant quarantine officials, and others interested in the exportation of plants and plant products from the United States.
The information contained in this circular is offered as being correct and complete up to the time of preparation, but it is not intended to b)e usedl independently of, nor as a substitute for, the original texts of the orders and proclamations concerned, nor is it to be interpreted as legally authoritative. The orders and proclamations should be consulted for the exact texts.
LEE. A. STRONGG,
Chief of Bureau.







220 BUYRAU OF PLANT~ QUARANTINE uyrsA

SUMMARY OF THE PLANT-QUARANTINE RESTITIOS OF J A
WEST INDIES


Proclamations, orders, etc., in~ force Feb., 1932I
Aricle I f :9
Instrument DaePoiin.


Citrus:
Fruits--............... Proclamation under Feb. 13, 1924.., Prohibied rs.
law 23 of 1916.
Plants, buds, and grafts- Order under law 10 of June 18, 1925- -t-.
1925.
Cotton, including any part ----do ---------- ------ ;.-do ---------P Prohibited from all countries
of any plant of any species (except Turks and Caicos
or variety y of Gossypium. Islands) except under special
license from Diector of Agri culture.
Coconuts in the husk ------Proclamation under May 15, 1923 ----Prohibited from all countries.
law 23 of 1916. ,'d
Banana plants or parts do-------------Apr. 3, 1917 Do.
thereof or articles used as
packing or covering for.
Tools or implements usually -----do---- h------------ Prohibitdr Oe or
employed ini the cultiva South Ani~d rTifi'
tion of bananas.
Earth or soil -------------------.do --------------------- do ---------- Prohibited from allcountries
Fruits and vegetables (ex- -----.do ------------ (1) July 9, 1929__ Prohibited from all countries
cept dried or processed, (2) May 27, 1930. except United' States- of
grains, seeds, potatoes, America, Canada, United
onions, or any species of Kingdom, and Ireland. A
Allium). certificate that the products
are home grown is requiem from the named countries.
Order under law 10of June 4, 1929 ----- (1) From the United King1925. dom may be imported without permit. Entry permitted into port of Kingston only. On arrival must be fumigated with hydrocyani acid gas.
(2) From any country other than the United Kingdom permitted only if and when a written permit has been granted by the Dire Agriculture previous
Plants or parts thereof, in- portation.
eluding any soil, articles, Admission allowed into port o
coverings, or packages i Kings o G must
which they may be en- be.c...ig.. .to teeCDirecdot
closed or packed. of Agriculture and on arrival
will e betd osc dis. : binfecto orfuiaon s

maybe considee deesa
d o ----------- Apr. 26,1930-----The permit willtaketht.
of a, laibel which mutbefr




)permit ttahedm are be destroyed forthiwit yips

Agricultural tools or imple- A permit as in (2) aove is
mnents of labor: fOrder under law 10 of June 4, 1929-----i necessary before ue ol
(a) New and unused - 1925. J and implements can b m
(b) Used ---------------- ported from any country, inLeluding United K





19331]. SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 221

B.P.Q.-347, Supplement No. 1.
SEPTEMBER 30, 1933.
PLANT QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF GREECE

RESICTIONS ON THE IMPORTATION AND TRANSIT OF POTATOES
(Decree of Mar. 29, 1933)

ARTICLE 1

(1) The importation into, and transit through Greece, of potatoes and parts thereof, as well as of sacks and other containers, which may have served for their transportation and storage, from countries infested by the coleopteron, Dorypora decemlineata, or the fungus, Jynchytrium endobioticum, are prohibited.
(2) The importation into, and transit through Greece, of potatoes from countries other than those which are affected by the prohibition of the preceding paragraph, are authorized under the following conditions:
(a) When potatoes are offered for entry in containers, the containers (sacks, baskets, cases, etc.) must be new and never have served for the transportation of potatoes, and must be sealed by the plant protection service of the country of origin.
If the potatoes are transported by rail, the cars must be c!osed and sealed as above.
(b) Each shipment of potatoes must be accompanied by two copies of certificates of health and origin prepared according to the model under article 5, in the language of the country of origin and in French, or officially translated into Greek. One copy will remain in the customhouse at which consumption or in transit entry is made, and the other will accompany the shipment.
The late of the certificates shall net precede the (late of shipment by more than 20 days.
The foreign authority issuing the certificate must at once mail the original to the phytopathologicaj section, Ministry of Agriculture, Athens, Greece.
For importations of potatoes by rail the two copies of the certificate of health and origin must be attached to the waybill.
If a shipment includes several cars, each car must be accompanied by two copies of a crtificate issued for each car separately.
(3) The importation of potatoes from countries that are free from Doryphora and Sync'ytrium, but which have traversed countries in which that insect and that fungus exist, is authorized on condition that the potatoes are well packed and are sealed by th6 official service of plant, protection of the country of origin.
If the potatoes are transported by rail, the formalities required by the preceding paragraph are to be applied.
(4) The frontier customs offices, in the case of transportation by rail, or the ports, in the case of ocean transportation, will prohibit the entry and transit of potatoes, parts thereof, their containers, etc., if the shipments do not absolutely comply with the conditions provided by the present decree.
(5) The entry into, and transit through Greece, of potatoes, must be effected only through the customhouse of Eidomeni, and through the ports of Piraeus, Saloniki, and Patras.
(6) For the present, the countries considered as attacked by Doryphora are France (except its colonies and Corsica), the United States, and Canada.
(7) The following countries are attacked by Synchytrium: Austria, Belgium, Czechoslovakia, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Great Britain, Ireland, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Sw4eden, and Swi.tzerland.

ARTICLE 2

The entry of living plants, and living parts thereof, bulbs, rhizomes, tubers (other than potatoes), insofar as they do not fall under the prohibitions prescribed by measures in force against Phylloxera, is authorized only when each shipment of the said products is accompanied by an official certificate of the country of origin, affirming that the products shipped are free from Doryphora and that that insect does not exist where the products were grown, nor within a distance of 100 kilometers therefrom.






222 BUREAU OF PLA-NT QUARANTINE [July-sept

ARTICLE 3

The importation of potatoes intended for planting is permitted, whatever their origin, under the following conditions:
(1) A permit must have been obtained in advance from the Ministry of Agriculture.
(2) The potatoes shall be in containers.
(3) The containers shall be absolutely new.
(4) Each container shall be sealed by the official plant protection service of the country of origin.
(5) Each shipment shall be accompanied by a certificate of health and origin in conformity with the conditions set forth in article 1 of this decree, and also a declaration of the firm whence the seed potatoes came, affirming in addition to the identifying marks of the shipment, the variety of potatoes. and a statement that they are suitable for planting.
ARTICLE 4

The Minister of Agriculture reserves the right to have the potatoes and the products mentioned in article 2 inspected when offered for entry, by officials designated for that purpose, even in cases where all the provisions of this decree have been complied with.
If that inspection shows the potatoes to be carriers of Doryphora decemlineata, or Phthorinaea operculella or of Synchytrium eutobiotim.m, those products will be reexported within 15 days at the expense of the importer, or subjected to disinfection, likewise at the expense of the importer, to the extent that such a measure is deemed sufficient, and that means for disinfecting are available at the port of entry; or, finally, they will be destroyed, still at the cost of the importer, without right of indemnity.
The destruction shall take place immediately, if the detention of the potatoes is deemed dangerous or after a perior of 15 days. For destruction, the formalities of article 2 of law No. 217 are to be followed.
ARTICLE 5

The model of the certificate of health and origin mentioned in this decree will be the following (see model appended).
The present decree becomes effective one month after date of publication in the Official Journal (No. 81 of Mar. 29, 1933).

MODEL OF CERTIFICATE OF HEALTH AND ORIGIN MODT LE DU CERTIFICAT SANITAIRE I DORIGINE

Indication of Country
Indication du pays

Official Plant Protection Service
Service Officiel de Protection des Vdgftaux

Order No .......
No. d'ordre---I, the undersigned (full name, address, and official title of agent authorized to issue the certificate) certify, in conformity with the results of the supervision of the cultures of origin and inspection of the products in the shipment. that the plants or parts of plants contained in the shipment described below are judged free from injurious diseases and insect pests, and especially from those hereafter named:
Le soussign6 (nom, prlnom. et quality officielle et adresse de l'agent autoris6 A la d~livrance des certificats) certifie, conforniment aux r~sultats de la surveillance des cultures dorigine, et de l'inspection des produits c6ntenus dans l'exp6dition, que les v6getaux ou parties des v~g6taux contenus dans l'envoi dtcrit ci-dessous sont jug, s indemnes de maladies et ennemies dangereux, et notamment de ceux fnum6r~s ci-apr~s:





1933] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 223

Doryphora decenlineata, Phthorinaea operculella, and Syichytrium enuobioticu m

Description of Shipment
Description de l'envoi

Number, weight, and kind of container.
Nombre, poids, et nature des colis.

Marks of containers.
Marque des colis.

Description of plants and indication of place where growl.
Description des v'gstaux et indication du lieu de culture.

Name in fall and address of shipper.
Nom, pr6nom et adresse de r'exp6diteur.

Place and date of issuance of certificate.
Lieu et date de d6livrance du certificat.

[SEAL] [SCEAU] Signature:
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief of Bureau.


B.P.Q.-302, Revised, Supplement No. 1. SEPTEMBER 30, 1933.
PLANT QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS, GERMANY

The decree of November 3, 1931, to prevent the introduction of San Jose scale and the apple fruit fly, was amplified by that of April 20, 1933, by adding a new paragraph to article 1. Therefore the following paragraph should be inserted between the second and third paragraphs under the caption San Jose Scale Restrictions on Plant Importation on page 5 of Circular B.P.Q-302, revised:
"The Imperial Minister of Nourishment and Agriculture, in agreement with the Minister of Finance, can determine that the importation of living plants, and fresh parts thereof, from countries other than those named in paragraph 1, in connection with which the occurrence of San Jose scale is suspected, shall be restricted to certain customs ports of entry and be subject to the condition that, as a result of the required inspection of the shipment at the port of entry, no San Jose scale, or suspicion thereof, be established; he can also extend the provisions of paragraphs 1 and 2 to other countries in which the presence of San Jose scale has been established."
Furthermore, the following paragraph should be inserted between paragraphs I and 2 under the caption "Fresh Fruits must be Free from San Jose Scale and the Apple Maggot" on page 7 of the same circular:
"The Imperial Minister of Nourishment and Agriculture, in agreement with the Minister of Finance, can determine that the importation of fresh fruit and refuse of fresh fruit from countries other than those named in paragraph 1, in connection with which San Jose scale is suspected, shall be restricted to certain ports of entry, and be subject to the condition that, as a result of the required inspection of the shipment at the port of entry, no San Jose scale, or suspicion thereof, be established; he can also extend the provisions of paragraph 1 to other countries in which the presence of San Jose scale has been established."
The decree of November 1931, has also been supplemented by that of June 11, 1933 (Reichsgeset l. 1: 79, July 14, 1933, p. 468), to restrict the importation into Germany of living plants and fresh parts thereof from Rumania, Bulgaria, Greece, Poland, and Yugoslavia. The text of that decree follows:
ARiicLE 1. (a) The importation of living plants and fresh parts thereof from Rumania across the frontiers of the German Republic is prohibited until






224 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.

further notice. The same applies to wraps and articles of any kind that have been used for packing or storing such plants or plant parts.
(b) Fresh fruit and refuse of fresh fruit from Rumania, until further notice, may be imported only through the customs ports named in article 3, only in the original packages, and only under the condition that an inspection, made at the port of entry at the cost of the interested person, reveals no infestation or suspicion of infestation with San Jose scale.
ART. 2. Living plants and fresh parts thereof, as well as fresh fruit and refuse of fresh fruit from Bulgaria. Greece, Yugoslavia, Poland, and Czechoslovakia may be imported only through the customs ports named in article 3, and only on condition that an inspection, made at the port of entry at the cost of the interested person, reveals no infestation or suspicion of infestation with San Jose scale.
ART. 3. The products named in articles 1 and 2, insofar as their importation is not prohibited, until further notice, may be imported only through the following customs ports of entry:
Prussia:
Chief customs office: Stettin Auslandsverkehr.
Customs offices: Beuthen Q. S. Bahnhof, Deutsch-Eylau Bahnhof,
Fraustadt Bahnhof, Kreuz Bahnhof, Libau Bahnhof, Mittelwalde Bahnhof, Neu-Bentschen, Oderberg Bahnhof, Seidenberg Bahnhof, Stettin Freibezirk, Tilsit Bahnhof, Tilsit Memelbriicke, Trachenberg
Bahnhof, Ziegenhals Bahnhof.
Branch customs offices: Berlin-Tempelhof airport, Breslau Grossmarkthalle, and Eydtkuhnen Land.
Bavaria:
Chief customs offices: Lindau and Simbach.
Customs offices: Asch Bahnhof, Eger Bahnhof, Kufstein, Miinchen
Grossmarkthalle, Passau Bahnhof, and Salzburg. Saxony:
Customs offices: Bad Schandau for steamship traffic, Bodenbach, Reitzenhain, Tetschen, Boitersreuth, Warnsdorf, and Weipert. Hamburg:
Combined customs offices in Hamburg, and the customs office of Curhaven.
ART. 4. The provisions of article 3 apply also to the importation of living plants and fresh parts thereof from Rumania when importation is exceptionally permitted.
ART. 5. The provisions of section 2 of article 2, sections 3 and 4 of the decree of November 3, 1931, to prevent the introduction of San Jose scale and the apple fruit fly are applicable.
LEE A. STRONG, Chief Of Bureau.


P.Q.C.A.-314, Supplement No. 3. SEPTmmBEB 30, 1933.
PLANT QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS, BRITISH HONDURAS
The text of Proclamation No. 21, of August 1, 1933, prohibiting the importation of tobacco seeds into British Honduras, is as follows:
"Whereas it is expedient for the protection of the tobacco industry to prohibit the iniportation into this colony of tobacco seeds:
"I, Henry Guy Pilling, officer administering the Government, in exercise of the powers vested in me by the Plant Protection Ordinance-Chapter 71 of the Consolidated Laws, 1924-as amended by the Plant Protection !(Amendment) Ordinance, 1928 (No. 21 of 1928), and otherwise, and with the advice of the Executive Council, do hereby order and proclaim that from the fifth day of August 1933, all importations of tobacco seeds are prohibited except under license issued by the Agricultural Officer and which shall prescribe such treatment of the seeds by the Department of Agriculture as the Agricultural Officer may deem necessary."
LE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.






1933] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 225

P.Q.C.A.-305, Revised. SEPTEMBE 11, 1933.
SHIPMENT OF MEXICAN CITRUS FRUITS IN BOND THROUGH THE UNITED STATES

The importation for consumption purposes of citrus fruits (exclusive of lemons and sour limes) and certain other fruits from Mexico, is prohibited by Notice of Quarantine No. 5, and Amendment No. 1 thereto, issued under the authority of the Federal Plant Quarantine Act, to prevent the entry into the United States of an injurious insect known as the Mexican fruit fly (Trypeta ludens) .'
With respect to articles prohibited entry in this and other similar quarantines promulgated for the purpose of excluding plant pests, provision has been made for the entry, under permit, either for immediate exportation or for immediate transportation and exportation in bond, of such articles, when uch action can be taken without risk to the fruit or other cultures of the United States. Thee provisions are embodied in the revision of plant safeguard regulations promulgated by the Secretary of Agriculture October 4, 1932, and effective December 1, 1932.
CONDITIONS GoEv.NING RAIL SHIPMENT IN BOND OF CITRUS FRUIT PRODUCED IN THE STATE OF SONORA, MExICO
(1) Permits will be issued to authorize the entry for immediate transportation and exportation in bond of Mexican citrus fruit produced in the State of Sonora alone, under conditions which will be incorporated in the permits.
(2) The exporter of citrus fruit or his forwarding agent in the United States must first procure from the Bureau of Plant Quarantine a permit to authorize the routing of the shipment via a certain port of the United States. A separate permit will be required for each port of entry and country of destination, but each permit will be an open permit continuing until revoked and valid over all the designated routes.
(3) Such movement will be limited to entry through the ports of Nogales and Naco, Ariz., and movement through the United States by designated routes to Canada, or back into Mexico at ports not farther east than El Paso.
(4) As a condition of such movement the fruit must be shipped in bond under United States customs seal in refrigerator cars, and may not be transhipped en route.
(5) Prior to entry the permittee or his forwarding agent must submit to the collector 6f customs at the port of entry a notice, in duplicate, on forms provided for the purpose, indicating the initials and number of the railroad car, the particular authorized route over which it is proposed that the car shall move, and the port of exit on the Canadian or Mexican border through which the car ANill pass out of the United States.
(6) Before entry each car must be disinfected in such manner as shall be required by the inspector of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine.
(7) After the shipment has reached destination and been discharged either in Canada or Mexico. the car conveying it, as a condition of return to the United States, must be carefully swept and freed from all boxes, fruit, or other rubbish by the railroad company involved.
Failure to comply with any of the above requirements may cause the cancelation of the permit.
RAILROAD ROUTES AUT HGRIZED FOR THE MOVEMENT OF SONORAN CITRUS FRUIT
DIRECTLY FROM MEXICO TO CANADA OR BACK INTO MEXICO

From Sonora, Mexico, to Canada in Bond Through the United States
Direct routing is authorized of citrus fruits from the State of Sonora, Mexico, through Nogales or Naco, Ariz., eastward to El Paso, Tex., thence to Canada via any routing which does not pass west of the direct rail routes through Salt Lake City, Utah, and Portland, Oreg., or southeast of the direct rail routes through San Antonio, Tex., and St. Louis, Mo. (See map.)

I The Federal Plant Quarantine Act of Aug. 20, 1912, as amended, provides either for regulation or prohibition of the entry of plants and plant products when such action shall be necessary to prevent the introduction into the United States of injurious insects and plant diseases. Under this authority citrus fruit from Mexico, including oranges. grapefruit, and sweet limes, and also mangoes, sapodillas (Achras sapota), peaches. guavas, and plums are prohibited entry into the United States on account of the Mexican fruit fly (Trypeta ludens).






226 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [JuySpt

Fromt Sonora, MIexico, i bond through tihe United States back into Mexico

Poto Inr Port of exit
iotof eUntryVi from Port of reentry into
itatedi United Mexico
StatesStates

Nogales, Ariz-- Southern Pacific & _Nacozari R.R-------------DPouglas.... Agua Prieta, Sonora.
Do --------Southern Pacific & Mexico Northwestern R.R__ El Paso_. Ciudad Juarez, Cihuahua.
Naco, Ariz------ Southern Pacific & Nacozari R.R------------- Douglas_. Agua Prieta, Sonora.
Do --------Southern Pacific, Mexico Northwestern, or E] Paso---.. Ciudad Juarez, ChiNational R.R. of Mexico, hauhua.
Douglas, Ariz------- do --------------------------------------do--- do_ Do.

CONDITIONS GOVERNING MOVEMENT IN BOND TO CANADA OF MEXICAN CITRUS FRUIT THROUGH NORTH ATLANTIC PORTS
In addition to the rail movement from the Mexican border ports of citrus fruit produced in the State of Sonora, Mexico, under the conditions set forth above, citrus fruit from any part of Mexico coming to the port of New York or other approved northern Atlantic ports by ocean transit during the period October 15 to March 15, if apparently free from infestation, as determined by inspection at the approved port of entry, may be permitted entry at such Ports for immediate transportation and exportation in bond to Canada in accordance with the Revised Plant Safeguard Regulations, promulgated by the Secretary of Agriculture October 4, 1932, and effective December 1, 1932. (See par. 2 of this circular.)
A separate permit is required for each shipment of this character and application should be made in advance: Provided, That a continuing permit, valid until revoked, maay be issued upon application when it is shown that shipments will be made throughout each season. If all required information is not available in advance of the arrival of any shipment for which a separate permit is required, the forwarding agent at New York may file an application at the New York office of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, room 844, Federal Building, Christopher Street, New York, on the arrival of such a consignment at that port.
After the shipment has reached destination and been discharged in Canada, the car conveying it, as a condition of return to the United States, must be carefully swept and freed from all boxes, fruit, or other rubbish by the railroad company involved.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief of Busreau.


-
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FIUE2-irc otn from Sooa 'Seicoi to Caad byayriradwtih
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19331 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 227

LEE A. STRONG NAMED CHIEF OF BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY
(Press notie)

SEPTEMBERt 29, 1933.
Lee A. Strong, who for the past 4 years has been chief of the Bureau of
Plant Quarantine, wvill become chief of the Bureau of Entomology on October 1, Secretary Wallace announced today.
The work of these twvo bureaus is closely related. The Bureau of Entomology
is a research institution, charged with investigations and demonstrations for the promotion of economic entomology ; it seeks the best means of destroying injurious insects and the development of beneficial ones. The Bureau of Plant Quarantine is responsible for the enforcement of quarantines promulgated to prevent the entry or dissemination of dangerous p~lanlt pests new to or not widely distributed within the United States; it is also responsible for carrying onl, in cooperation with the States, necessary work to prevent the spread or to eradicate pests that may have gained local foothold. Mr. Strong's transfer to the position of Chief of Entomology will reestablish a close working arrangement between the two bureaus that previously existed until the control and research work were definitely separated on July 1, 1928. Even after that, the Chief of Entomology continued also as chief of the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration until Mr. Strong came to the Department on December 1, 1929.
Mr. Strong succeeds C. L. Marlatt, who is retiring after nearly 45 years oif service with the Federal Government. Avery S. Hoyt, now assistant chief, will become Acting Chief of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine. However, Mr. Strong will complete several important projects he has started in the quarantine work after his transfer takes place; he will, for example, conduct the hearing which has been called for October 25 to consider a possible revision of Quarantine 37.
Mr. Strong's legal residence is in California where he served as assistant director of agriculture just before coming to the United States Department of Agriculture. He was formerly connected with the Federal Department as a specialist in plant-quarantine work.


FRUIT-FLY SURVEY IN THE WEST INDIES, BRAZIL, URUGUAY, CHILE, AND PERU
/ SEPTEmBERm 30, 1933.
This field survey, which was made with the consent and cooperation of the officials of the West Indies, Brazil, Uruguay, Chile, and Peru, had for its purpose two objectives: (1) To determine whether, in the administration of the fruit and vegetable quarantine (Quarantine No. 56), fruits and vegetables produced in those countries which did not represent pest risk were being denied entry into the United States; and (2) to determine whether fruits and vegetables
-which were being admitted into the United States from the countries named were subject to attack by fruit flies or other injurious insects. Arrangements for this survey were made through the State Department, whose relwesentatives in the countries concerned assisted materially in perfecting plans for the investigation. The success attained was in no small measure due to the helpful cooperation rendered by the government officials of the countries visited.
Because of their fruit-fly experience, Max Kisliuk,' Jr., and C. E. Cooley, plant quarantine inspectors of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, were selected to make this survey. Much valuable information was secured, not only with respect to fruit flies but other pests which attack fruits and vegetables in the countries concerned. A total of 2,171 collections were made. Of this number 2.,.153 represented insects and 18 plant diseases. The insect and plant-disease id(ent ifications included in this summary were made by the specialists of the Bureaus of Entomology and Plant Industry. The following summary of the results secured has been prepared by Messrs. Kisliuk and Cooley.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Bureau of Plantt Quaranti.






228 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [July-ept

BRITISH BAHAMA ISLANDS

The survey of this group, May 28-30, 1931, was for various reasons limited to the section immediately surrounding the city of Nassau and the Blue Hill region, both on the island of New Providence. Due to previous hurricanes and other agricu tural difficulties, there was but little of fruit and vegetables to be seen. scarcel.v more than 100 fruits of the mango being encountered durin the entire time spent on this island. Most of the fruits consumed were grown on the neighboring islands and in certain of the West Indies, viz, Cuba, Jamaica, Haiti, etc.
The only trypetid found on the island of New Providence as result of thi survey was the papaya fruit fly, Toxotrypana curvicauda Gerst. Fifty percent of the ppayas examined were found to be infested with the larvae of this fruit fly, and several adults were taken.
Among economic insects other than fruit fly observed on the island, the most injurious were the citrus black fly, Aleurocanthus oglumi Ashby, and the curculionid, Pachnaeus (?) psittacus Olivier, on nearly all citrus plants. The scale insects, Coccus hesperidum L. and C. viridis Green, were also quite d(lestructive to citrus foliage. The latter insect was also found to be damaging about 12 percent of the leaves of guava. Okra was attacked by Nezara ridla L. Cornstalks and ears of corn were riddled with borings by Heliothis obsolete Fab. and Laphygma sp., and the leaves of corn were being fed upon by the Mollusca. Capolis varians, and the Coreidae, Phthia picta Drury, Pigeopea pods were heavily infested with H. obsoleta, as well as a species of Fundea, and 10 percent of the sapodilas from the neighboring island of Eleuthera had scales of Aspidiotus lataniae Sign. Squash was being bored into by a species of Diaphania, while cabbage was fed upon by Plutella maculipenis Curt and M1urgantia kistrionica Hahn, etc.

JAMAICA, BRITISH WEST INDIES

Heavy rains during the period of the survey of Jamaica, June 2-20, 1931, made it difficult to reach many districts, but the following places were visited: King ston and its immediate vicinity, Hope Gardens, Spanish Town, Papine, Constance Springs. Cinchona Gardens, Pleasant Hill, Temple Hall, Castleton, Linstead, Moneague. St. Anns Bay, Dry Harbour, Falmouth, Montego Bay, Phoenix, Caladupa, Ginger Hill, Lacovia, Santa Cruz, Mandeville, Williamsield, Perus, May Pen. Hartlands, Chapelton, Williamsfred, and Manchester Pastures.
Examinations were made of all fruits and vegetables found to be in a susceptible stage of maturity in the field and in the various public markets visited. The following fruits were encountered: Bananas, plantains, papayas, mangoes, soursops, tangerines, limes, guavas, oranges, grapefruit, rose apples, sour oranges, pineapples, breadfruit, star-apples, purple hog plums, immature avocados, cashew fruits, and akee (Blighia sapida). Vegetables seen were cucumbers, tomatoes, chayotes, okra. peppers, eggplants, beets, turnips, sweetpotatoes, yams. green peas, string beans, pumpkins, onions, scallops, carrots, potatoes, cabbages, and lima beans.
The following fruit-fly infestations were found: 226 larvae of Anastrepha sp. in mangoes, purple hog plums, guavas, rose apples, and sapodillas, and 38 adults of Anastrephla sp. were successfully reared from larvae taken in mangoes and( purple hog plums. Four adults of Anastrepha sp. were collected on the leaves of cooa and mango at Hope Gardens, and 70 adults of A natrepha acidu.a Walk., on the leaves of bitter almond, akee. cocoa, mango, and purple hog plums were also taken at that place. At Cinchona. 3 adults and 2 puparia of an apparently unusual trypetid were taken on the leaves and buds of a sweetpotato vinie. Ipomoea jnamaiceniis.
Among the more noteworthy injurious insects other than fruit fly taken in Jamaia were the following: The citrus black fly, Aleurocanthus lmi on citrus foliage and on tmhat of surinam-cherry, the latter also being found attacked by a species of Pmeudoparlatoria. Prepod4es vittatus L. and Padtnaeu citri Mrshl. were also found to be especially injurious to citrus plants. Bephrata cubensis Ashm. was found in seeds of custard-apples. Larvae of a species of Olethreutidae were found in guavas, and toiba swartzii Thunb. was devouring the leaves and stems of the sweetpotato. Lachnopus aurifer White was taken on the foliage of mango. Crotalaria. and many other plants. The pink ollworm. Pectinophora gossypiella Saund., was found in cotton bols, and




Full Text

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SA99u 55

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State of FloridaDepartment of AgricultureDIVISION OF PLANTINDUSTRYLIBRARY

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Digitized by the Internet Archivein 2013http ://archive~org/detai ls/service33u nit

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S.R.A., B.P.Q. Issued June 1934United States Department of AgricultureBureau of Plant QuarantineSERVICE ANDREGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS1933These announcements are issued quarterly and constitute a per-manent record of the work of the Bureau in the enforcementof the plant quarantine act of 1912 and certain related acts, includ-ing the text of quarantines and regulations thereunder, and themore important circulars and decisions explanatory of, orbearing on, such quarantines and regulationsWITH LIST OF PLANT PESTS INTERCEPTED WITH IMPORTEDPLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTSUNITED ST[A TESGOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICEWAS'i1NGTOWN: 1934

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ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINEA. S. HOYT, Acting Chief.B. CONNOR, Business Manager.R. C. ALTHOUSE, Information Officer.E. R. SAsSCER, in Charge Foreign Plant Quarantines.S. B. FRACKER, in Charge Domestic Plant Quarantines.LON A. HAWKINS, in Charge Technological Division.A. F. BURGESS, in Field Charge Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail Moth Quarantine(Headquarters, Greenfleld, Mass.).L. H. WORTHLEY, in Field Charge Japanese Beetle Quarantine and EuropeanCorn Borer Project (Headquarters, Harrisburg, Pa.).R. E. MCDONALD, in Field Charge Pink Bollworm and Thurberia Weevil Quaran-tines (Headquarters, San Antonio, Tex.).B. L. BOYDEN, in Field Charge Date Scale Quarantine (Headquarters, Indio,Calif.).P. A. HOIDALE, in Field Charge Mexican Fruit Fly Quarantine (Headquarters,Harlingen, Tex.).It

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BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINECONTENTS OF NO. 116 (JULY-SEPTEMBER 1933) PageQu(raninc and other official announcements.-.----------------------------------------------197An nouncemnts relating to 1)utch elm disease-----------------------------------------197Secretary Wallace calls hearing September 15 on Dutch elm disease---------------------197Not ice of public hearing to consider the advisability of prohibiting or restricting the entry ofelm and related species of trees and parts and products thereof from Europe.------------198Announcements relating to fruit and vegetable quarantine (no. 56) -------------------------198Amendment no. 6 of regulations supplemental to notice of quarantine ---------------.----198Instructions to collectors of customs (T.1). 46591 )------------------------------------200Announcements relatinit to Japanese-beetle quarantine (no. 48).-----------------------------200Japtnese-beetle conference in Washington Octol er 24----------------------------------200Fruits and vegetables may be shipped this fall without Japanese-beetle certificates on andafter September 15-----------------------------------------------------------200Removal of Japanese-beetle quarantine restrictions on the interstate movement of fruitsand vegetables --------------------------------------------------------------------201Announcement relating to Mexican fruit-fly quarantine (no. 64)----------------------------2011)epartment authorizes lengthenin;: of next shipping season for citrus fruit of lower Riotirande Valley --------------------------------------------------------------------201Announcements relating to nursery stock, plant, and seed quarantine (no. 37) ----------------202lnstruceions to collectors of customs (T.D. 46590) ------------------------------------202Conditions governing the entry and treatment ofnarcissus-bulb importations(B.P.Q.-354). 202Stronr (ails conference on important plant quarantine------------------------------203Notice of public conference to consider certain changes with respect to the administrationof nursery stock, plant, and seed quarantine no. 37.----------------------------------204Announcements relating to pink bollworm quarantine (no. 52)--.--------------------------204Revision of regulations--------------------------------------------------------204Notice to general public through newspapers------------------------------------211::mpai:n against pink bollworm started in cotton fields of South.-------------------------212AnOuncements relating to Thurberia-weevil quarantine (no. 61)--------------------------212Revision of regulations--------------------------------------------------------212Notice to general public through newspapers------------------------------------218Miscellaneous items --.-------------------. -------------------------------------218Plant quarantine restrictions, New Zealand (P.Q.C.A.-306, supplement no. 1).----------218Plant quarantine restrictions, Jamaica. B.W.I. (B.P.Q.-355)----------------------------219Plant quarantine restrictions, Republic of Greece (B.P.Q.-347, supplement no. 1).--------221Plant quarantine restrictions, Germany (B.P.Q.-302, revised, supplement no. 1)---------223Plant quarantine restrictions, British Honduras (P.Q.C.A.-314, supplement no. 3).-------224Shipment of Mexican citrus fruits in bond through the United States (P.Q.C.A.-305,revised) -----------------------------------------------------------------225I.ce A. Strong named Chief of Bureau of Entomology---------------------------------227Fruit-i'y survey in the West Tndies, Brazil, Uruguay, Chile, and Peru------.--------------227Statement of Federal plant quarantines------------------------------------------------241Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act------------------------------242Or:aiz:a-ion of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine.-.-----.-----------------------------------244CONTENTS OF NO. 117 (OCTOBER-DECEMBER 1933)Q ar -ntine and other official announcements---------------------------------------------------245Announcements relating to Dutch elm disease quarantine (no. 70)----.----------------------245Notice of quarantine no. 70, with reviulazions--------------------------------------245Instructions to collectors of customs (T.D. 46721)--------------------------------------248Information for importers of elm burl logs under the Dutch elm disease quarantine no. 70--PQ--3)------------------------------------------------------------------248An:oincements relating to Japanese beetle quarantine (no. 48)-------------------------------250My extend beetle quarantine to Maine and West Virginia-------------------------------250Nt ice of public hearing to consider the advisability of extending the quarantine on accountof the Japanese beetle to the States of Maine and West Virginia-----------------------250Revision of Japanese beetle quarantine and regulations. ---------------251Nct iCC to general public through newspapers------------------------------------260A namcment s relaring to pink bollwormn quarantine (no. 52) ----------------------------261Amendment to pink bollworm quarantine regulations-.--------------------------------261\ot ce to general public through newspapers-------------.----------------------262.e TIon of :ink bollworm quarantine and regulations--------------------------------263Not _e e to general public through newsuapers-.-----------------------------------271l:irueios to postmasters .-. -------------------------------------------271A'nno:ncat relating to rice quarantine (no. 551-------------------------------------------271; viIn of qu:rantine and regulations--------------------------------------------271I a' rtt ions to rollictors of customs (T.D. 46S09) ---------------------------------274n:ncen' reiina to Thurberia weevil quarantine (no. 61)---------------------------275nirurius r, p maters------------------------------------------------------275--u ite -.-----------------------------------------------------------------------275Inu lm "jIM se-e conference 0)etober 2----------------------------------------------------275Not in of con rence to discuss D)utch elm disease situation in the United States ------.2762 mtuorar. :n rcstricl ionS, Kinadom of Italy (P.Q.C.A.-29, supplement no. 2)-------276Plat o-' ra litme restrictions, Kindom of Belgium (P.Q.C .A 315 supplement no. 1)-.--276P1 ri -a a mno retIrict ionse. lepubAic of Brazil (P.Q.C.A.-2 14, supplement no. 2) ------277i f ;:in reitricton<, Republic of Argentina (B.-P.Q.5)----------------277S7a r 1 m'ne rest rict ions, le, ublie of Mexico (P.Q. C. A.-, supplemeot no. 7) -----288ua a' Mc restrt'ionn. dnlm i and o Waes (P.Q.C.A.-3 ,. supplenient no. 1)-----288t -.ntne rcst rid ions, Kingdom iOf Belium (P.Q.C.A 3l5 supplement no. 2)-.--269n p1 l in on service i etitrtcd in linary .---------------------------------290d for violations of the Plnt Quarantine Act---------------------------290en n:r nt :.n ot her restrictiVc orders and miscellaneous retulations------29211r'r of the Bureau of Plant Quaran:in--.--------------------------------.---.---------299II o i~hrejt'.djalt 'et

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United States Department of Agriculture1WUIEAU OF PLANT QI.ARANTIN1ESERVICE AND REGUlATORY ANNOUNCEMENTSJANUARY-MARCH, 1933CONTENTSQ uarantine aijil eitherr iillIc~il ------iI----l-I--A nnomi l ' IIem i T reltiif' t i !K r11ir ii cirn-Irer (I ir int I iiw fircili i (fi. ----Qw~irmrI ile Ml :1(, il t of Ic It uripein uarn hirer ;iI iit her ilinu Irmis ji-Icc t m I l tfia 'se s Ii r t u rt-,i1:iIiiis -------Aiihirio iem nt> re:lii e il .J:Ilpinese-ieetle fluiranhtine 1n 16 iI s uc n s t o p--------illli t ie :i it >n of JI ir i 'sect le u: -i ral i i i r( Y il t ii i i rIiI 1 c n I H2Ili l u ili lii eiicr-ul 1iili e i iniil i l -i:----142Arunlnecnent relm in itirmio>nll uiirnine rno tU m 62)N>:rcii-.flui-l HiIllntS relht ild 1i0 tlO -l f li-cis i iiwra n i fi . ( ;) 17P'hiaiy-peacli ulisiSqt i4r1mtine revokeil 147Notice of liftinof lua:rmiitine J. 67 pholly-peac h disece iilarutninc --In1 truc tions tii poI ntist ers re ii val iIf 'il:irant ine on accuiint of phin v-pec h (IL-ciS I eAnnounit-ln ents relulinii to pink-hollworin (Iiimuantine 0i>. 52) 1 4Molification of piik-hollworm qiiaralit ine regulations ('mrncdiminl no. I) 1 -4Nolltice to general public through ncwspiapers 11Instruct ions to post :isters . ---Announcement relating to plaint sife-uard reglltions --Instructions to collect ors of custom s (T. 16211)-----150Announcement relat in2 to seel or pobly rice 1150arait n (no 5 .5-Revision of quiarantine and regulations -----IAnnouncement relatina to while pine blister-rust quarantine (no. 6:3) 152Instructions to postmasters 1 2Tertinail inspection of plants and p:int proilucts -1dlaho discontinues terminal inspection --M iscellaneous itemn s ---.-I.-.----Plant quarantine rest rict ions, Republic of Brazil (P.Q. ( A< 294, supp elmc-nt no. 1 -15:Pl nt Penalties inplose l for violations of the Plant Quaraintine Act -----------------------------1Organization of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine -------------------------13QUARANTINE AND OTHER OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTSANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO EUROPEAN CORN BORERQUARANTINE (FOREIGN) (NO. 41)QUARANTINE ON ACCOUNT OF THE EUROPEAN CORN BORER AND OTHER DANGEROUS INSECTS AND PLANT DISEASES WITH REVISED REGULATIONSINTRODFCToRY NOTEIn the 5 yearVs which ha ve elipsed s ine tle last rvisitn 'If these re]-lations suffiient e1i Iges have taken pla(e in t he general situation to justifya cmsiderihle miodi tictimn of the restriction, s as to liberalize i ateria 11 ythe condition g Veri' g the ent ry int i the United States of corn and the alliedplants concerned.174391-33 1 V37

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138 BUREAU OF PLANT QUAI1ANTINE [January-March,Experience having demonstrated that articles made from cobs or otherparts of the corn plant by methods involving any considerable degree of processor manufacture are unlikely to carry the European corn borer or other injuriouspests. such articles are relieved of all restriction except that of being stillsubject to inspection. Under the new regulations the same status is accordedto corn silk, imported in considerable amounts for the manufacture of medicinalpreparations.In making provision for the entry of green corn on the cob in small lotsfor local use only, from adjacent areas of Canada, cognizance has been takenof the fact that the infested regions of both countries are practically coinci-dent, and that Canada maintains a quarantine to prevent the spread of theEuropean corn borer to the Provinces west of Ontario. It is therefore consid-ered that the few shipments concerned involve no appreciable risk.Under the revised regulations commercial shipments of corn on the cob,green or mature, from the borer-free western Provinces of Canada, and shelled corn and seeds of the other plants covered by this quarantine from any part ofCanada, are permitted entry under proper safeguards, which include permit, entry inspection, and a certificate of freedom from corn borer issued by theCanadian authorities. This certificate and entry inspection may be waivedat the discretion of the department for shipments originating in borer-freeareas.According to the most recent information available to the department theEuropean corn borer appears to be absent from the countries of the WestIndies, Mexico, Central America, and South America, and importation isnow permitted from these areas of corn on the ecb, green or mature; inaddition the presence of bits of cob or other fragments of the corn plant inimportations of shelled corn will be disregarded. Permit and other require-ments of the regulations are still continued, however, as a protection againstother pests.The revised regulations now provide for mail importations of corn and theseeds of the other plants covered by this quarantine. Inasmuch as these are enterable in commercial quantity by freight or express, it would appear thatunder the safeguards provided entry by mail can justly be authorized in orderto facilitate the import of the small quantities often needed for seed purposes.LEE A. STRONG,Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 41, WITH REGULATIONS (SECOND REVISION)(Effective June 1, 1926)The fact has been determined by the Secretary of Agriculture, and noticeis liereby given, that dangerous plant pests, including the so-called Europeancorn borer (Pyrausta nubilalis Hubn.), and also other dangerous insects, aswell as plant diseases not heretofore widely prevalent or distributed withinand throughout the United States, exist, as to one or more of such pests, inEurope, Asia. Africa, Dominion of Canada, Mexico, Central and South America,and other foreign countries and localities, and may be introduced into thiscountry through importations of the stalks or other parts of Indian corn ormaize, broomcorn, and related plants.Now, therefore, I, W. M. Jardine, Secretary of Agriculture, under theauthority conferred by the act of Congress approved August 20, 1912, knownas the plant quarantine act (37 Stat. 315), do hereby declare that it is neces-sary. in order to prevent the further introduction of the dangerous-plant pestsmOntionede above, to forbid, except as provided in the rules and regulationssupplemental hereto, the importation into the United States from all foreigncountries and localities of the stalk and all other parts, whether used forpacking or other purposes, in the raw or unmanufactured state, of Indian cornor maize (Zca falys L.), broomcorn (Andropogon sorghum var. technicus),SW(et so rghums ( Andropogon sorghum), grain sorghums (Andropogon sor-yhum), Sudan grass (A ndropogon sorghun sudanensis), Johnson grass (Andro-pogon halepensis), sugareane (acclharum offleinarum), including Japanesevarieties, pearl millet ( Pen nisetum glaucum), napier grass (Pennisetuwpurpureuim), teosinte (Euchlacna luxurians), and jobs-tears (Coix lachryma-Jobi).

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1933] SERVICE AND IEGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 139Hereafter, and until further notice, by virtue of said act of Congress ap-proved August 20, 1912, the importation into the United States of the stalkand all other parts of the plants enumerated above from all foreign countriesand localities except as provided in the rules and regulations supplementalhereto, is prohibited.Done at the city of Washington this 23d day of April, 1926.Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agri-culture.[SEAL.] W. M. JARDINE,Secretary of Agriculture.REVISED RULES AND REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE OF QUARANTINENO. 41 (SECOND REVISION), GOVERNING THE IMPORTATION OF INDIAN CORNOR MAIZE, BROOMCORN, AND SEEDS OF RELATED PLANTS(Dffective on and after March 1, 1933)REGULATION 1. PLANT PRODUCTS PERMITTED ENTRY'Except as restricted from certain countries and localities by special quaran-tines and other orders now in force,2 and by such as may hereafter be promulgated, the following articles may be imported:A. Subject only to the requirements of the first three paragraphs ofregulation 5:(1) Green corn on the cob, in small lots for local use only, from adjacentareas of Canada.(2) Articles made of the stalks, leaves, or cobs of corn, when prepared, manufactured, or processed in such manner that in the judgment of the inspec-tor no pest risk is involved in their entry.(3) Corn silk.B. Upon compliance with these regulations:(1) Broomcorn for manufacturing purposes, brooms or similar articles madeof broomcorn, clean shelled corn, and clean seed of the other plants coveredby this quarantine.(2) Corn on the cob, green or mature, from the provinces of Canada westof and including Manitoba,3 and from Mexico, Central America. South America,the West Indies, the Bahamas, and Bermuda.REGULATIoN 2. APPLICATION FOR PERMITSPersons contemplating the importation of any of the articles specified inregulation 1, B, shall first make application to the Bureau of Plant Quarantinefor a permit, stating in the application the name and address of the exporter,the country and locality where grown, the port of arrival, and the name andaddress of the importer in the United States to whom the permit should he sent.Unless otherwise stated in the permit, all permits will be valid from (late ofissuance until revoked.Applications for permits should he made in advance of the proposed ship-ments; but if. through no fault of the importer, a shipment should arrivebefore a permit is received, the importation will be held in customs custodyat the risk and expense of the importer for a period not exceeding 20 (T1yspending the receipt of the permit.Applications may he made by telegraph, in which case the informationrequired above must be given.1 Except as provided in regulation 6, these regulations do not authorize importationsthrough the malls.2 The entry of the following plants and plant products is prohibited or restricted byspecific quarantines and other restrictive orders now in force.(a) Living canes of sugarcane, or cuttings or parts thereof, from all foreign countries.(Quarantine no. 15.)(b) Seed and all other portions in the raw or unmanufactured state of Indian corn ormaize (Zea mays L.), and the closely related plants, including all species of Teosinte(Euchlaena), jobs-tears (Coix), Polytoca. Chionachne, and Re7erachne. from southeasternAsia (including India, Siam, Indo-China, and China), Malavan Archipelago, Au:traliaNew Zealand, Oceania, Philippine Islands, Taiwan (Formosa),. Japan, and adjacent iands.(Quarantine no. 24.)8 A quarantine is maintained by Canada to prevent spread of the European corn borerfrom the infested eastern areas to the still uninfected Provinces west of Ontario.

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140 BUREAU OF PLANT QUAILANTINE [January -March,RIEGULATION 0. ISSUANCE OF PERMITS>11 approval by the S.rXtary of Agriculture of sucli application a permitwill be issued ill tuadruplicateFor broom I4corin am! b)roonis or similar articles made of broomcorn, permitsvilt ho, i-;uie.d ktor lie 1wrts of Boston and New York and such other ports asmay 'r'1m tine to tiie be designated by the Bureau of Plant Quarantine.1 tr seltled coril alad for seeds of the other plants listed in this quarantineptermits will he isued for ports where the Bureau of Plant Quarantine main-SigS ani i spee'tio service, and for such other ports as may be designated bythe Btureau of Plant Quarantine.For corn in til1e cob. "reeii or nature. covered by regulation 1. B (2), peminitswill be issUed for ports where the Bureau of Plant Quarantine maintains aninspection service and for such other ports as may be designated by the Bureauof Plant Quarantine.REGULATION 4. NOTICE OF ARRIVAL BY PERMITTEEImmediately upon arrival of the importation at the port of arrival thepermittee shall submit in duplicate notice to the Secretary of Agriculture,through the collector of customs, on forms provided for that purpose, statingthe number of the permit. date of entry, name of ship or vessel, railroad, orother carrier. the country and lovality where grown. name of the foreignshilper. quantity or number of bales or other containers, and marks andnumbers oil containers, the port of arrival, and the name of the importer orbroker at the port of arrival.REGULATION 5. CONDITIONS OF ENTRYThe entry of the articles covered by regulation 1 is conditioned on theirfreedoni from the European corn borer and other injurious insects and plantdi!ea ses. nd upon their freedom from contamination with plant materials pro-hibited entry under other quarantines.5 All shipments of these articles shall besubject to inspection at the port of arrival by an inspector of the Bureau ofPlant Quarantine, in order to determine their freedom from such insects anddiseases al from contaminating materials, and to such sterilization, grinding.or other necessary treatment as the inspector may prescribe. Should animportaition be found on inspection to be so infested or infected or contaminated that. in the judgment of the inspector, it cannot be made safe by sterilizationor other treatment, the entire shipment may be refused entry.When entry under sterilization or other treatment is permitted, the impor-tation will be released to the permittee, upon the filing with the collector ofcustoms of a bond in the amount of $5.000 or in an amount equal to the invoicevalue, if such value be less than $5,000, with approved sureties, the conditionsof which shall be that the importation shall be sterilized or otherwise treatedunder the sultervision of the inspector; that no bale or container thereof shallle broken, opened. or removed from the port of arrival unless and until awritten notice is given to the collector by the inspector that the importationhas been properly sterilized or treated ; and that the importation shall be rede-livered to thji' collector of customs within 30 days after its arrival.Should a shipment requiring sterilization or other treatment under theprovisions of this regulation arrive at a port where facilities for such steriliza-tion Or otlier treatment are not maintained, such shipment shall either beproiptly shipped under safeguards and by routing prescribed by the inspectorto an aiplproNed port where facilities for sterilization or other treatment areavailable, or it shall be refused entry.Other conditions of entry as applying to the certain classes of articlesenumerated in regulation 1 are given in the following paragraphs:Broomworn.-All importations of brooncorn shall be so baled as to preventbreakage and scattering in connection with the necessary handling and sterili-zation ; if in the judgment of the inspector they are not so baled, entry may4 (On copy of the permit will be furnished to the applicant, one copy will be mailed tothe collector of customs, and one to the inspector of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine atthe port of first arrival, and the fourth will be filed with the application.5 (if p1art i('ular iiterest is the presence of cottonseed in shelled corn and the attendantrisk of such sef-I carrying the pink bollworm of cotton.

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19331 SERVI('E AND PEGVLATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 141be refused. All i inporta tiols of broom(orn shi1 be subject to sulch 'I(erilizatiolior other treatment as the inIspector mny require.Articles, made of lfr (01'frn.-BrOim< or similar articles fnI e of broI mornshall be subject to sterilization unle-s tlhir manufieture i1V lyes le -ubstail-tial elimination of stems or such treatment of the included sieni ;v in thejudgment of the inspector shAlI preclude such articles froi beiiinthe mieanisof carriage of the Eurnpenn c
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142 BUREAU OF PLANT QUAI}ANTINE [January-March,MODIFICATION OF JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE REGULATIONSINTRODUCTORY NOTEThe following aIezdnent to the Japanese beetle quarantine regulationsmodifies the boundaries of the regulated area by removing therefrom certainterritory in northwest rn Pennsylvania and by adding an election district inafl-vertently omitted in Wicomico County, Md. The Pennsylvania territory re-moved is not infested so far as known and the action is taken at the requestof tihe autliorities of the State in order to provide a greater protective zonefor the fruit-growing district near the regulated area.LEE A. STRONG,Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.AMENDMENT NO. 1 TO THE RULES AND REGULATIONS (ELEVENTH REVISION)SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 48(Approved Jan. 13, 1933; effective Jan. 23, 1933)Under authority conferred by the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912(37 Stat. 315), as amended by the act of Congress approved March 4, 1917(39 Stat. 1134, 1165), it is ordered that those paragraphs of regulation 3 whichrelate to the States of Maryland and Pennsylvania in the rules and regulations(eleventh revision) supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 48, on account ofthe .Japanese beetle, which were promulgated on December 22, 1932, be and thesame are hereby amended to read as follows:Mrryl!(d.-Counties of Cecil, Kent, Queen Annes, Somerset, and Worcester;the city of Baltimore; the city of Cumberland and election districts nos. 4, 5, 6,14, 22, and 23, in Allegany County; the city of Annapolis and election districtno. 5, in Anne Arundel County; election districts nos. 1. 2, 3, 9, 11, 12, 13, 14, and15, in Baltimore County; election districts of Henderson (no. 1), Greensboro(no. 2), Denton (no. 3), and Ridgely (no. 7), in Caroline County; the city ofWestminster, in Carroll County; election district of Cambridge (no. 7), inDorch c.ter County; election districts of Petersville (no. 12), and Brunswick(no. 25). in Frederick County; County of Harford, except election district ofMarshall (no. 4) ; election districts of Elkridge (no. 1), and Ellicott City (no.2), in Howard County; election district and town of Laurel (no. 10), inPrince Georges County; towns of Easton and Oxford, in Talbot County; elec-tion districts of Sharpsburg (no. 1), Williamsport (no. 2), Hagerstown (nos. 3,17, 21, 22, 24, and 25), Leitersburg (no. 9), Sandy Hook (no. 11), and Halfway(no. 26), in Was~hington County; election districts of Pittsburg (no. 4), Parsons(no. 5), Dennis (no. 6), Trappe (no. 7), Nutters (no. 8), Salisbury (no. 9),Delmar (no. 11), Camden (no. 13), Willards (no. 14), and Fruitland (no. 16),in Wicomico County.P('nnsylrania.-The entire State, except Crawford, Erie, Forest, Mercer,Venango, and Warren Counties, Mercer Township in Butler County, and Ash-land, Beaver, Elk, Richliand (including boroughs of Foxburg and St. Peters-burg), Salem, and Washington Townships, in Clarion County.This amendment shall be effective on and after January 23, 1933.Done at the city of Washington, this 13th day of January 1933.Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.[SEAL.] ARTHUR M. HYDE,Secretary of Agriculture.[C'opks of foregoing amendment sent to all common carriers doing business In orthr nugh the quara ntinl(A area.]I.NsTRUCTIONS TO GENERAL PUBLIc THROUGH NEWSPAPERSUNITED ST.A;TEs DEPARTM ENT OF AGRICULTURE,BU11EAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE,Washington, D.C., January 13, 1933.Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, under authorityconiferred OH him by the pl. mnt quarantinee aet of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315),as amended, has pronulgated an amendment to the rules and regulations(eleventh revision) supplemefltial to Nolice of Quara ntite No. 48, on account

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19:1):j4 SEIAZVIE AND 1EUTI AN4NaET 13of the Japanese beVtle, elective on n1111 O'Wr , u11u;ry 28, 13Ik Th i1m1(i16-mient exclude l( from th regu ol _ ited 111 il ii I ti i 11 1fi, hisscl'v( nll ecilunlies aind part',-, (4 (1.()nti 4 ill 1ru d I dto ,-aid rIroaed a onle (lect ion i stii n ten Aas it is oOwe 1mnwen fm eobdtainef frwim t19hure (d, "Iln i)1kra1hilwasinlAt m. D.C.A T m 1 I wnSccc la ryo o f A 11i Il/ il/'cJ Published in the following rwwsmpe Irw: The Bulletii, PlliiLl tplia, Pa" JI 21,182:; ; the Sun, Baltimoro, Md., Jan. 2: 19 5.]ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO NARCISSUS-8WLH QUARANTINE(NO. 62)J.1 Q.-349. F'LVAiY 17, 8:NARCISSUS INSPECTION RECORD FOR 1932Tail' I 2ives ~1a rlcor of Ilih ni('s 1 oIlIL i-Itwetl din Ihe oat , u493, 42i 3, 000 9---,-20 54--1--G eor a -17 21 722, (50 1,772, :10) 722,1 650 i,7-7,,0 --4,00illios--------------100, 000 322, i0 100, 000 2 :0, -------4 200Inin--------------------------201, 000 -----------------2.00-Kanas 2-----------2, 142, 4-----------2, 10-Kent ucky -----------------------------2,400 -------------2, -Louisiana -7-T20, 20 176, 16M aryland ------------1 2, 000 310, 9 000 000Mi -i--n --------------1 2, 000 5, 52l ,o 1132 -------------2, 7M inns,,rta ,-----------r--0) 0, 10 f o, ------Missi --ipp-,------------4) 7, 0-75 2, 000 167, 07-------New. Jersey --. 1, :igl u If 00o 711, 1New York--------97, 200 711 I ------------n a 7North (arflin1 0 , 0 4, n , ') 2 ToC G0 , j7'hi----------1 , 0-----------re n--------------f i 290 22, it;, 21, 1-----------6"0, oPEt~~i at.------------.-------1>) ) ------------1-South C-----39, (_0 7, 1 ---T------r.a--------x 7 , 675 3 , 7 uU 9 9 Vi 145 ' .7 lo, 1 -,.-----7---------------------------7 ,T i ------------Similar t3ls have ben provi' vr. 01:1t 1,r I !:" w aint -Iveoil ]) , s ' 1nu d 1.5 ()f Im. 110 f Ill( S(,rvi(,o 1m14 -killry an o nc meof the Plait Quaruinitinle ant (Cointrol Am1inistratit ;i.Thies nIumber of' narf-i
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144 BUREAU 4: )F PLANT QUARANTINE [January-1arch,.revi y \ear. the reduction extending h) both the polyanthus and daffodilvpe (4 1iil hibs a8(d to ieiaily a11 the lea din: biilb-grmvili States. Tie reductionin tle number of polyantlis bulbs reported is. however, much greater thanthe ii nii hwr of daffodil .Albiut 56 percent of the bulbs reported for 1932 areIaper Wlites ani other polyaithus varieties commoilly grovii iii the South,ald aliout -14 percoli are (4 the (1ffodil type I'odticed ill the Northeri States.In Iliis series of tfabiles tihe only va nietieS.considered a of the polyallthus typeare l'api r White. Soliel (1 011. Chinese Sacred Lily. (Grand 1onarque, Aspa sia,El'vir and a Iev 1ieoilcoinoll varieties grown iii small mihiiers. The fIi"ui'estherefore (Iiffter to Smile extellt from tilie eeiisus totals. since the ( 'ensus]Ilureall acuptei iele repm-rt illt -rowv.e's division ilto " narcissus (polyalithus)and na rcisns Tall othel') ;1, and mamy growers customarily include withinthe polyalat hiun' group ullimerous impmrtant hardy poetaz varieties, such asLa uirenl Kier.The ti2 re' iv ilh tile table showiin " huls certified ". whether oin theba-is of fireedoi from ilfestation. or 11 acc(ounlt of treatlilelt. inldicate suppliesa vaiial Ie for shipmilenlt so fari as adequate inspectionl and freedom from pestsare c'Iil(e'lIled. The greater proportion of such bulls are, however. replantedlv the (rmwers in their owN premises for the purpose of securilig increase infitulire yeals. 4:rowers estimate that onily from 2) to 30 percent of the totallililliler of bulbs inspected is available for interstate movement during any 1year.lInfe"4ations with eelw'orn (Tyl enchius dips(ui) were reported in 1932 asto on1e or lio'1 plantiings ill each of the following States: California, Florida,4 eor.ia. MIaryland. Mlichigan. Mlissouri, New Jersey, New York. North (-'ar-oliiia. Ohio. Oregon, Tennessee, Virginia, and Washington. In addition to therecl s for the year 1932. this species had previously been reported on prop-erties in Alabiama. Illiiiois, Indiana. Kansas. Kentucky, Mississippi, Rhodeb-land. Utah. aid Wisconsin. Some of these properties have not since beenreported as inspected. and infestation may possibly still be persisting intheimi. Vnder administrative instructions issued on July 7. 1932, the standardhot-water treatment procedure is definitely prescribed only as to Tylenh usinife"tatiois,. while the tiiidiiig of other parasitic forms of eelworms, withoutTyclch us. is referred to this Bureau for special consideration in each case.Greater hulh flies were reported in 'alifornia, 'Michigan. New York, NorthCartolini .0()rego(n, l'enlllsylvania, Rhode Island, Virginia, and Washington. Theyhave also heeni found in previous years in Illinois. Ohio, and Utah.Lesser bulb flies ii merits spp.) \were removed from consideration underthe Federal 11,1i'cisslls bull) quarantine ill 1111 amendment which became effee-tive on May 20. 1912. Accordingly, most of the State inspectors did notrelot as to the presence or absence( e of these lesser flies in 1932.LEE A. STRONG,Chi(f, Bureau of Pjinit Qiiarantine.ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO PACKING MATERIALS QUARANTINE (NO. 69)PACKING MATERIALS QUARANTINE NO. 69 WITH REGULATIONSINTRODUCTORY NOTEarnills plailt prmii dcts iisedi as packiiig liaterial ill connection vith ordinarycolnhiiercial shipiei its froi abroad are known to coiistitute a distinct dangerto the a:riclit rural interests of this (,otiiitiry Oil oii ucouit of the insects and plantdiM'ases which they imy cary with them. For some years the packing mate-rial> used ill cm iou wit ih imports of imursery stock have been restrictedheca u'e of is
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19331 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTs 145yet reached our rice areas. It is well recognized that straw ainid hulls providea dangerous channel of introduction for these rice pests.Without disturbing the restrictions already in existeice under other quar-antines, this (uaranltine aims to secure additional protect ion against foreignpests by prohibiting or restricting the use of certain packinr materials con-sidered on good grounds to involve danger of pest iit roduct ion when thesematerials are used as packing in coinnection with ordinaiary commercialshiplmenlts.In addition to the rice straw and rice hulls mentioned, leaves of plants,forest litter, and soil containing vegetable matter are potentially such dainger-ous carriers of phuit pests that their use for packing purposes is likewise prohibited. These materials, however, are so rarely used as packing. and s~afesubstitutes are so universally available, that their exclusion is of entirelynegligible importance from the commercial standpoint.The remaining items in the prohibited list sugarcanene, corn and related plants, cotton, and bamlboo) are already covered by specific quarantines andare included here merely that all packing materials may be dealt withtogether.Concerning the restricted list it will be noted that the materials hereincluded are required to be free from plant pests, and are made subject toinspection. the inspectJor being authiorized to p)resCribe such treatment ordisposition as may be necessary in the interests of sa fety.A considerable number of widely used packing materials, such as excelsior, paper, sawdust, ground cork. charcoal, anl various other materials, which,because of their nature or process of manufacture are unlikely to transportplant parasites, are not covered by this quarantine.It is believed that under this quarantine the necessary protection has beenprovided with the least possible restraint or interference with commercialpractices.LEE A. STRONG,Chief, Burcau of Plant Quarantine.NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 69(Approved Feb. 20, 1923; effective July 1, 1933)I, Arthur M. Hyde, Secretary of Agriculture, in accordaunce with the require-mients of the plant quarantine act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), havedetermined (1) that it is necessary to forbid the importation into the UnitedStates of certain plants and plant products hereinafter specified from thecountries named when used as packing materials for other commodities, inorder to prevent the introduction into the United States of plant diseasesand injurious insects not heretofore widely prevalent or distributed within and throughout the United States, and (2) that the unrestricted importation ofcertain plants and plant products hereinafter specified from the countriesnamed when used as packing materials may result in the entry into the UnitedStates of injurious plant diseases and insect pests.Now, therefore, by virtue of the said act of August 20, 1912, the publichearing required thereby having been duly held, notice is hereby given asfollows:1. On and after July 1, 1933. the following plants and plant products. when used as packing materials, are prohibited entry into the United States fromthe countries and localities named:(a) Rice straw, hulls, and chaff ; from all countries.(b) Corn and allied plants (maize, sorghum, broomncorn, Sudan grass, napiergrass, jobs-tears. teosinte, Polytoca, Selerachne, Clhioiiachne) ; all pa rts, fromall countries except Mexico, and the countries of Central America, the WestIndies, and South America.(c) Cotton and cotton products (lint, waste. seed cotton, cottonseed, andcottonseed hulls) ; from all countries.(d) Sugarcane; all parts of the plant including bagasse, from all countries.(e) Bamboo ; leaves and simuall shoots, from all countries.(f) Leaves of plants; from all countries.(g) Forest litter ; froni all countries.174391-33 2

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146 BUEAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [January-March,(h ) Soil containing an atppreciable admixture of vegetable matter, from all(cUniun r excej)t such types of soil or earth as are authorized as safe forJackilg by the rules and regulations promulgated supplemental to this quar-ant Inc.2. On and after July 1, 1933, the following plants and plant products, whenused as packing materials, will be permitted entry into the United States fromthew yuntries and localities named only in accordance with the rules andre-ulai ions promulgated supplemental to this quarantine.a i Cereal straw, chaff, and hulls, other than rice (such as emmer, spelt,outs. harley, and rye) ; from all countries.(b i) Corn and allied plants (maize, sorghum, broomcorn, Sudan grass,napier grass, jobs-tears, teosinte, Polytoca, Sclerachne, Chionachne) ; all parts,from Mexico and the countries of Central America, the West Indies, and SouthAmierica.(c) Willow twigs; from Europe.(d) Grasses and hay and similar indefinite dried or cured masses of grasses,weeds. and herbaceous plants; from all countries.( C) Soil containing an appreciable admixture of vegetable matter, from all countries, which is authorized as safe for packing by the rules and regulationspromnulgated supplemental to this quarantine.This quarantine shall leave in full force and effect all other quarantinesand orders.Done at the city of Washington, this 20th day of February, 1933.Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agri-culture.[SEAL.] ARTHUR M. HYDE,Secretary of Agriculture.RULES AND REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 69(Approved Feb. 20, 1933 ; effective July 1, 1933)REGULATION 1. DEFINITIONS(a) Packing materials.-The expression " packing material ", as used in thisquarantine includes any of the plants or plant products enumerated, when theseare associated with or accompany any commodity or shipment to serve forfilling, wrapping, ties, lining, mats, moisture retention, protection, or for anyother purpose; and the word "packing ", as used in the expression "packingmaterials " shall include the presence of such materials within, in contact with,or accompanying such commodity or shipment.'(b) Soil containing an appreciable admixture of vegetable matter, herebrought under quarantine only because its content of decaying vegetation orplant remains carries a definite pest risk, is to be distinguished from soil ofpurely mineral or earthy composition, which is not covered by this quarantine.(C) Iniccto.-An inspector of the United States Department of Agriculture.REGULATION 2. FREEDOM FROM PESTSAll packing materials allowed entry under restriction shall be free frominjurious insects and plant diseases.REGULATION 3. ENTRY INSPECTIONAll packing naterials shall be subject to inspection at time of entry.RE (ULATION 4. DISPOSITION OF MATERIALS FOUND IN VIOLATION'If the inspector shall find packing materials associated with or accompanying any colnnodity or shipment being imported, or to have been imported, in viola-tion 4l this quarantine or of these regulations or shall find them infested orinfected with injurious insects or plant diseases, he may refuse entry to theshipment, orl he may seize and destroy or otherwise dispose of such packing ma-terial, or he may require it to be replaced, or sterilized, or otherwise treated.e Since it is the packing materials titimselves which constitute the danger and not thenoaHI&r of uS. it l' inlielld that the definition shall include their presence within oraccomflying a 8hijiwnt regardlss of their function or relation to a shipment or thecharactr of the shipment.

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19331 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 147REGULATION 5. TYPES OF SOIL AUTHORIZED FOR PACKINGThe following types of soil or earth are authorized as safe for packing:(1) Peat, (2) peat moss, and (3) Osmunda fiber.The above rules and regulations shall be effective on and after July 1, 1933.Done at the city of Washington, this 20th day of February, 1933.Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.[SEAL] ARTHUR M. HYDE,Secretary of Agriculture.INSTRUCTIONS TO COLLECTORS OF CUSTOMSQUARANTINE WITH REGULATIONS TO PREVENT THE INTRODUCTION INTO THEUNITED STATES OF INSECTS AND DISEASES ASSOCIATED WITH PACKING MATE-RIALS OF PLANT NATURE (T. D. 46267)TREASURY DEPARTMENT,OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONER OF CUSTOMS,Washington, D.C., March 11, 1933.To Collectors of Customs and Others Concerned:The appended copy of Notice of Quarantine No. 69 with regulations (packingmaterials quarantine), issued by the Secretary of Agriculture to becomeeffective July 1, 1933, is published for the information and guidance of customsofficers and others concerned.FRANK Dow,Acting Commissioner 'of Customs.(Then follows the full text of the quarantine.)ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO PHONY PEACH DISEASEQUARANTINE (NO. 67)FEBRUARY 6, 1933.PHONY PEACH DISEASE QUARANTINE REVOKED(Press release)Federal plant quarantine no. 67, issued in 1929 to prevent the spread ofthe phony peach disease, has been revoked, effective March 1, according to anannouncement by the Secretary of Agriculture today. In the opinion of theDepartment, the further spread of this disease can be controlled more satisfac-torily by improved and modified nursery-inspection methods in the various States than by the enforcement of the type of Federal quarantine regu-lations now in effect. The Department plans to cooperate with the Statenursery inspectors in developing adequate inspection methods. Officialsexpect that the States will prepare this month to make the required inspections.Lee A. Strong, Chief of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, says that when thequarantine was placed by the Department it was believed, as a result ofsurveys made in 1926, 1927, and 1928, that the disease was confined to the States of Georgia and Alabama, although it was known to have been presentin Georgia for some 50 years. Surveys in 1929 and 1930 disclosed infectionsin Mississippi, Texas, Arkansas, Louisiana, Tennessee, North Carolina, andSouth Carolina. Surveys in 1931 revealed infections in Florida and Illinois.In all of these States, except Mississippi, Louisiana, and South Carolina, theinfections were discovered only in limited areas and the quarantine wasextended on November 30, 1931, to the entire States of Louisiana, Mississippi,and South Carolina, and to parts of the States of Arkansas, Florida, Illinois,North Carolina, Tennessee, and Texas, as well as to those parts of Alabamaand Georgia which were not already under quarantine. Surveys in 1932revealed a few infected trees in southern Oklahoma and in southeast Miss-souri. Scattered infections were also discovered in 1932 in new localitiesin Arkansas, Illinois, and Texas.The smallness of the area in which the disease was known to occur whenthe quarantine was first issued, together with the inauguration of an intensiveeradication campaign by the Department in cooperation with the States, justi-fied the original placing of the quarantine, in the opinion of Department

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148 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [January-March,iliria is. Since t hat time, however. the disease has been found scatteringlySroughI eXtensive areas, says )8r. Stron,'-, although there are no locationsJilt ()f (Gorgia atid Alabmlla where infection has been plresenlt a sutlicientlnth'11 t1 of tinie to ca use serious loss in commercial orchards. The fundsaviilable to the 1)(ti prtilbot for quarantine activities have not been increased:i1i fund's for era ti fiction activities have been reduced. The widely separatedinfections ill souie of the States concerned have made the enforcement of int ra-staIe-quaranitile re "it nations by those States imlpraeticable, thereby complicatingthle problemi of maintaining Federal control of interstate sliipnents.As its reseirca h work lias developed, the Bureau of Plant Industry has beenincrea i i-ly imilprcssed wi thi the importance and potential seriousness of thepJlioy-peU'ch disease to the peach industry, and to the limit of its abilitywill evnleavor to etic oiui'age prompt eradi.ationt activities wherever infectedtroes are found. For the immediate future, however, eradication must dependha rLely mi the cooperative activities of the States.Apl al-rotly the disease i tr'alis111tted Irom one tree to another only throughOle riots. investigation bl the B1ureau of Plant Industry points so stronglyto t he I" ach-root Ib'orer as the carrier of the disease that it seems reasonableto believe that it will be possible to reduce the danger of spreading the diseaseby prevelti -ihe movement of horer-infeste(h trees from nurseries in areasI tested by the peiaci hwrer.St :to, inspection otficials should undertake the critical inspection of nurserystork budde(I oni peachl. nectarine, apricot, or almond stock, either at digginginm 1 , at lii other times that will insure tliat no borer-infested stock leavestlie riiir.erv. This should give more effective protection than would be possible1Y co itintuhation and extension of the present typo of Federal quarantine.Ml( rQo oVel. tile Federal quarantine is considered less essential to the presentret lrled p'igraim of phiony-peaich eradication that it was to the original plhinof intelisive antd rapi(l eradication.Thi& revJation of the quarantine does not niean the abandonment of interestil 1his disease. says Mr. Strong. The Bureau of Plant Quarantine will planti J operatee. insofar as funds and facilities permit, in the establishment and execution Jf uniform and efficient methods of inspection and certification ofnursery stock as to freedom from borer injury.NOTICE OF LIFTING OF QUARANTINE NO. 67-PHONY-PEACH DISEASEQUARANTINE(Effective on and after Mar. 1, 1933)I. Arthur 'M. Hyde, Secretary of Agriculture, under authority conferred bytle Plant Quarantine Act, approved August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amendedby the act of C(ongress approved 'March 4, 1917 (39 Stat. 1134, 1165), do herebyr* move and revoke the quarantine placed by Notice of Quarantine No. 67upot the entire States of Alabama. Georgia, Louisiana, 'Mississippi, and South('arolina. and pIarts of the States of Arkansas, Florida, Illinois, North Carolina,Tennessee, and Texas. and (1o also hereby revoke the rules and regulations5tuppllnelital t hereto, Snell removal and revocation to take effect on 'March1. 1933.I)one in tlie Distrite of Columbia. this 3d day of February, 1933.Wit ness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.sEAL I ARTHUR 'M. HYt)E,sccrctary )of :4griculturc.CIs ( (f lbovc lutkic wvere sent to -Ill commnion carriers doing Iusiness in or throughIhe #jaIrauin hdJ armi .]INsT(VCTIONS To PoTM AsTELs--REMo\AL (21UARANTINE ON ACCOUNT OF THEIoNY PEACI ItsEAsEPOST OFFICE DEPARTMENT,TluiP ASsISTANT IosTMAsTER GENERAL.Washtington, D.C., M(1a(rch 16, 193-.Qua rantiinc )rder No. 67 on ac (Iufi f tile photty-pieach disease, quarantiningthe Stat vs of Alliaamia, Georgia , Louisiana, M ississippi, and South Carolina, and parts ot! the States of Arkansas, Florid:i, Illinois, North Carolina, Tennessee,amnd Texas, has been revoked.

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19:::IH Ail\1 A N01) 1110; PI D \T IN A N V H ' N( T :0 N T I A )'m in equltlly, lmsl lw lswer, ill IIle ' arI (11101.,1Illi I d shreI It Ii14 11 .I ' i I ii I I hI I I I I 41 I II II Ij l I r"HI H l q 2IIbIN 14 l" A m t I wF :kidlhlm ii 'Timi .:\ I piniv H lw min il)Icsil li( In llaIH'('l fit)II1 ill :illy Imirt "Vf sil(ld ni rdtwdwiii siho' till 1-'t'iseamon Ilf 19:0.rI;'Ii~~~~~ i; u / ii / (MiLVull IAMENDMENT NO. I TO REVISED I AN> RENlULATNS SUN PLEVINTAL TONOTI V QU AR ANINE NO. 52I-id r liIh l~ iy m e 11 1 F A I li :: : 1 1 Awna il 151, I 2:;;A l 41 ; I t hi '1 , n ,. 1t n2 m i in ."11 4 h I 1517(KWh 1N .11, , 1165). it is w " I\n k i'il 4441 i I "t C t ih i -( r I III ! ;;:ve;i1uh ilIi i(o'ill i kl i ll I I ( ' il , (if (lis tli n T o 101
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150 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [January-March,pliieiitul to Notice of Quarantine No. 52, on account of the pink bollworm,c1fctFive February 28, 1933. This amendment modifies the areas regulatedundar the pink-bollworm quarantine by releasing from restriction a part of theregulated area in Texas, namely, the entire counties of Loving, Winkler,Andrews, Ector, Crane, and Upton, and all of the formerly regulated portion ofMidland County. Copies of said amendment may be obtained from the Bureauof Plant Quarantine, United States Department of Agriculture, Washington,Drc. C. F. MARVIN,Acting Secretary of Agriculture.I 'ublishod in Oh El Paso Post, El Paso, Tex., Mar. 6, 1933.]INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERSPOST OFFICE DEPARTMENT,THIRD AssISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,Washington, D.C., March 29, 1933.PoSTMASTE I.MY DEAR SIR: An amendment to the pink bollworm quarantine regulations hasbeen announced by the United States Department of Agriculture, effective Febru-ary 28, 1933. Under this amendment the areas regulated under the quarantineare modified by releasing from restriction the counties of Loving, Winkler, An-drews, Ector, Crane, Upton, and Midland in the State of Texas.A copy of the quarantine is enclosed and you will please be governed in ac-cordance therewith.Very truly yours,C. B. EILENBERGER,Third Assistant Postmaster General.ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO PLANT SAFEGUARD REGULATIONSINSTRUCTIONS TO COLLECTORS OF CUSTOMSRULES AND REGULATIONS GOVERNING (1) ENTRY FOR IMMEDIATE EXPORT, (2)ENTRY FoR IMMEDIATE TRANSPORTATION AND EXPORTATION IN BOND, AND (3)SAFEGUARDING THE ARRIVAL AT A PORT WHERE ENTRY OR LANDING IS NOTINTENDED OF PROHIBITED PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS, REVISED (T.D. 46211)TREASURY DEPARTMENT,OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONER OF CUSTOMS,Washington, D.C., February 24, 1933.To Collectors of Customs and Others Concerned:The appended plant-safeguard regulations, issued by the Secretary of Agri-culture, effective December 1, 1932, superseding all previous editions thereof,are published for the information and guidance of customs officers and othersconcerned. FRANK Dow,Acting Commissioner of Customs.(Then follows the full text of the regulations.)ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO SEED OR PADDY RICE QUARANTINE (NO. 55)REVISION OF QUARANTINE AND REGULATIONSINTRODUCTORY NOTEThe following revision of the seed or paddy rice quarantine and regulationsadds rice straw and rice hulls to the articles prohibited entry, amplifies thedefinition of seed or paddy rice, and nimkes provision for the importation of seedor paddy rice from Mexico by mail.LEE A. STRONG,Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.

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1931] SE\ ICE AND 1 I'l\IV .\:1N J\lENT jCI1NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 55 RIA 1ED)(Approv'd Fb. 20, iI28 ; i f1'iiv'e Jufly 1, 1 )The fart l11s woen detelrllined by the Sllolicry ,1 A\ i ui1ure : nOt 4 i -h e ' Iby g iven , (1 ) 1 ha t i ljliv iou s 'll I g d i as (f'a ()I, ric , i1 1 i w d o N ymiildew (6/Urosport1 JJIrt)'f// ), 14 '81 >1mu11 11;, m /If/WH ( Iip , lii h i ( -spora ory.-ItorioU), and glumine blo1 (3/uummima /l(Uiru) , q/ w \, nt of th(einjurious plaut dis (11 5(,s liereli 44re enum1irated , s well (1s ilisect posts.Now, therefore, I, Arthur M. Hyde, Secrotariy of Aglriculltlllr, 11114ler authlior ityconferred by the act of Congress approved August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 015), dolher-cby declare that it is necessary, in order to prevent the introduction ito theunited States of the insect pests and(1 pll I&t diseases referred to, to rbi N heimporlt'ition ito the United States of seed or paddy rice, rice stii'av. and rice1h11s 1Vr411m tile foreign coluitries nd localities naimned, and filr)i illy othIlerforei gI ' country or I ocality: Provided, TIhat so'd or paddy ri (' 11may be inm-porte I Crol M\exico upon compliance with the pirovisions outlined in the rulesand regulations Supplemental hereto.On and after July 1, 1933, and until further notice, Iby virtiw 4,f (T14 sid 1 actof Congress, approved August 20, 1912, tihe importation of seed or a1(y rice,riice sIraw, an1d rice hulls into the United Stat 's froin any foreigi coiuitry orlocality is prolhibited, With thie exception that the illiport.1tion of 1ed (r 01 (l(DINrice into the Unite(1 States from the Republic of Mexico my 1" e'lmilletupon colplidanlce with the rules and regulations supplenental 1wi'1o.Done at the city of Washigt on. this 20th day of February 19,2.Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Deparinilt 4)1Agriculture.[SEAL.] ARTHUR Al. IyNDE.Sccrctaryl of Alvriclturc.REVISED RULES AND REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE OF QUARANTINENO. 55, GOVERNING THE IMPORTATION INTO THE UNITED STATES OF SEEDOR PADDY RICE FROM MEXICOREGULATION 1. DEFINITIONS(a) Sced or paddy rice.-Unhusked rice in the form conimlonly used forseed purposes; these regulations do not apply to husked or polished riceimported for food purposes.(b) Port of first arrival.--The first port within the United Stntes wherethe shipment is (1) offered for consum-i1ption entry 441 (2) offered for1 entryfor immediate transportation in bond.(c) Inspc(or.-An inspect or of the I ureau of Plant Qna rant ine of theUnited States Department of Agriculture.A. IMPOIRTATIONS OTHERWISE THAN BY MAILlIrGUAr.TIoN 2. APPLICATIoNS FOR PEWNMITS FOR IM IPORTATION OF SEv (4t PAI IDYRICEPersons contemplating the importation of seed oi. p;lddy rice frm 1Iexicoshall first minke appli(ation to the I ur'e08u of Plant Quaranin e for ( permilit,stating in the application the locality where grown, the port of iirst arrival,and the name and address of the importer in the United States to whoi thepermit should be sent.Applications for permits should be 111ade in adIva nce of tile p)po';sel ship-ments; but if, through no fault of the importer, a shipmeiit shoul ( a rrivebefore a permit is received, the importation will be held in c'l toms11 cuiitodvat the port of first arrival at the risk and expense of the importer for 8 periodnot exceeding 20 days, pending the receipt of the permit.Application may be made by telegraph, in which case tle iniforllatil41 requiredabove must be given.A separiite permit must be socur-ed for each shipment.

PAGE 24

'61 o a9Li 8dpitix1 110 _11i.11ld111 0I 'Iilloml(ls( , ()(:; VIH 041N )III~.Il. '8111 it) dj4lldI(III8 O(11 jJI 70T1J00 81. 1)hij.1(V) liljA\ % "11 .14) ).1 I(0 .1 11.iJVsualsvwIsoCI 01 SIN011X.DIISNI(Q9 *oxK) ~MJM~VISAH-UHLIS1H HNId HLLIHAXi 01. ITKINVrLU LK'41C)KA 0VKX:d 111J1 ./0Ul);JL).po II tL A1111 . , 1 1 .1 ,m p~ I.\ I I!J. ",)1 11101118 10 IW 0 1I)A IM[1l I I* I()I nJ .1,.[);11! p11 It, tto OA )1 J11)J V18111f III'A\ [I 1 pIM "'01 I.[ I I AII1101U~t1j). )8108i~ ll (~ Illb\k 041m J)-)41W III p481144.1 S1 U. juo >.l11'.4jI l10114 04 IO1AI[O[) Jos11,1 Pl 114 04l ()I d~~ polsq )J0j0([ '41[01111:0,111 .1f)1 K18s'I1) .10.)4! 'P li II tlf1 1 1 1 Ii q 011 .1l) -1)011881 1 [ ul )IIIIm a ' 41111 11 v t' .I1) 1.11,0.111l PI'oI1 (OiOVII)IOII 1 -)l Ap(I" v O .1 q 1111 -71 ).X IS J 1 > lqo v I 111111-11viUI di11.7I1i0.1114 11P1j4 OA\.4110 J1u141 [odu1{.If) Opi-w .1i I' (1 7.111 ~>~JO14.JOduIJ0ll alp lqivl ,I( 111,11s *.1o44OdSIJ 0114 j JO )A.S 0111 111.l11 .101110 .I Io I I), --Ulsipl PUll 1,OT40dtIH 01 4UIOI4UI ioql pm," 4U4.1B0 lv3d0s .1t.4 s4Uimp [IN:-jIIOIudilq8 0.11110a '%)It 4110111 11.11 .10 11014.1-118us j I )OTIVO)b) 14( ~IlU11 -~4 I) 411 !Oqj 110 4110ttuoptic a1j. 111 *11U11 pd1411 4iIdt 111A1m0401 .1(081 JT j.)81IJ111 AX~pas ujl s aq 04 putho a '.)p 04. ppv 111 1 poo8 Ip118 jo4101118A!I 11)lRso110811) 4U111 10.4lIJ 00.1 i4101P1d 04 oj pulto. plit p0~ S 101 SM 00 41.10111ll o4.10.kp Ol 011 41)(11401 104 .IA 1 4 d4041 0114 AH 8111048W)f 0( I{l) .1)11411JO 1.10d a114 41' '114(1 oq .10 j1O4J~ITSip) .10 uimod~m 11 IJS III 'XA41ilo p0 110111111104-6 811 'pof(111 aq 1111118 o.4ix0I\ 1110.1 0 )l Appld .10 pot),Jo s11) wlB, 1.too1111 ltV,'IVAIdu ILSHII al. .1110(1 INzon,0L4.sMIsiq (I>v OL?41'.MLV.nH-p0)pT111 all 04I st 411011111111 0114 4A011.W311401 0114 40 L~111;4TI-iS0I a~i4l Pill 108ass 10 tlio ( 144 1111s"1 olp Jo ot f0 11 _)(( MI .11 .1()'palopljul )(I 04. s1 04.1 pI1)d .1o poas, 0114 OJO{Ak 1111111.104 ''Il 1)II 1S-10(.111H11111.IUD0 a114 4St11B(111104 puo.111}.1 )Il4 jo 0111111 0t111 1!.1 Sol 4! phl jBAd. 114 p 0411 01'UX.~011A **l') 114110111d11f8 0114 it. po~pflP11! 041 Ipjd .100 OSX44unf) 01j4 '41m111( 0114 Jo .Iq)llflu 0114 1up4s oso0dand( 41111 toj) 1)0piA.1d~ 8111.11)4110 '8111048W) 4() a.440j104 o 01JIiio.11}4 0.1114jfl4L11.104 Jo *o1B4.0 o 1 0.10411-ildnpuP ).)poT101. 11 411UqU8 111,111S sl4 ill .1o 00441m1.10d a11p i11s.A114111 4j) 1,11)11314 411 0.)1X,)VIt~a 111. p 04 pIm'd .10 100 JO 1l!Ai.1.11B 0114 110u111 AI0JIt)0TIIII 1.4.111VI-1 (I MI 'VA1111y AO 4)I10K .joiiAI4*U014l101ddVl 0111 1111MX P0141 'a 111m~ 111.1110 0111 1)111 IBAI.1.B .jo 411d al[p111 01111111.1(11) 41111(1 41) uBo.IIMI 0114 10( ao11)od40118111 011 Ott 0101)11 811411)101001100 i141 0o4 1)01111111q 0111 AX.doo) 0111) '41 141j4 011Io 1)0118111.111J 0( IflAmA 11Io))a110 04114v14fl1pvb tit poII s aq118 jj11 iAX41.1011 V1 '00p .l XI1)B .1o) I)00', 41) l111.1,1)1-Li oipl .14 ItoI qB1.-)l Bd 1" lm, 0.11 mll L~ .10) .\.1 )S~ 1110140 0114 .\1 j1.1).1l 11 1()S11Jfl3;to4 :4,4 iv.18j * : N01.LV'IAI-):c11'1~1PT-J.l~1' 11J.\IA) .1 'd.0 VIJ

PAGE 25

-1rI.viI'iy IMI, B 11o1 .V)'4(;IT 4 J IAI8 1 III S,)87.)1~ AiIjlUd~)d00 j, f Iviw nU t4i1Upill,~.jI~!4L > ~ ~ X14 S ill po'lill'.1 r ")4 11 11 lUZ1) iflt,,1Ij (1)-[7 8 ji) A 18)1V 1 ul ( H1 I A' {M L 110 H'1i1 Nj JIl VD I.d, I 1)1 L IJO t A 10!A1Mft 01 4 1 t I I "--')(yill 919t pN) o IW'. --1 ' ;iV.08l~~ l{J 11) 8h4)dilttl 81110181k) ulu.1j111~11(I>I1.)X0 1111A\ jo 1u1 11 Ul.fl011IT-i1 0111 t H'I3JJH,tu} )1j!d-)s'd 'Z :; '(,1 1811"Ii1 Jo ft-4:ti; 44' od K dS'0VA'"l OAi u us wi)Al1:11I AO) _x l)'jN.UI0dLw1 1 LL !PH11931I81 1837IZVHH 40 DI1HAJ3I 'SNOIIJIHIS3II HNI1NL',V1UV2 INV'Id'S/ I;' I*(jl )III(I/. fill.,'~* V; V~' Itit Oil ',m*.L)if) '11!m nl~~ im ~-1 h38 ,I ttn fl 11)1pd-;1 1111IMIJOI. 0)I P l)j'I18 n.U11 J'8j 14 1T Nj!Ak SOOdS'S. p)) Il (){I'1 11.)'lAi10l4 011 A Bi 1:111 ~ J() 0,JJ 01[)' Jill 1 IVAI.1.IB 110(111 S10I1.)iBII1411 1)I yJ) mll11 IBIVfl' l1.dd1.I IJj 1)0-.IA])B 8114 411)J JO .ll~d.~JO 1d11.IBd 11iJ11!1p1 il llJO TIliidJ1l ~Ill JO .1"100JI10 LL I1 011 1 1s, 'T v,1 1 AN maL{18 lJi LLSIS INOI131dSNI rIVNI1WH1 SWfNTLNOJSIG OHVGISj13fLIGOd INV IJ (INV SiNvWId do NOILIE4dSNI 1VNIKZIHUL-Th1 ).-xpio.J i7fill\41)l pill" p4 pul'i1\lI *Z -m )18B1111>04 Jxo 11t)1 it~J} m lloj .i1. ,)LT44) l.QI l Ifl 1 p mll 1 1' I p' B11iP11 S8d[ j 1 \\ l Iip.1di 0 '114 )U!.u 1, N' I1*8sprlAl Aa 1 A14l .sB')o j IM 11118 881pu1 .l1Utill iL -o iI fit Oltld1i8j () 01 id llldJm ol1 4 l11 HIM % s"Jimpt 1pdis .)1o .111ol -11()l 1114)8!.I j18T .(11 ii 1 4 ) ij 111 i 1 4)P 11' p 14)A1l () pm XM M )H jql-it[ '4 01 101 j).(111 Il(.~ j! spIJIHd 11o4118 11"111 li44!si'M1d )Il j o 114!JBIIIIII1l. olj()-p s t s'lt'i pil. 04 i mutl p )su I lld j" -' j yd su ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 01 JO JS"' S ossu asagiuj~p naax ljod tllI iII pi lj l ou o>1 o ul lU7u 141 .loilt.4 I TTi11 d ul s OILL*IL\0111" 18spi I loajl I 14J Ai; 0I i a11P80ill N 1 jy 41 8 1A4O)1 jj 0IQjj18r1, fir 0 1 !1 P Iol' 111 l.J d lp18 I~''It111 14) 11 .d) 14) 111i!111.A .)d)J-dlt04 p u mdj oup gau joluaulps ogpa p .01gawa sollpt op op .IN Io)lp 4118 l144l.H)AIl01Al (1N01V11 01 011 Odl1 111 td[i\l8.41 B 18 hI ).hlJ 1! d4H JS' I, I~.i1,A)1 .44118.41 11 ljI li ojii18 i1)4 i 1 \ I \ lll 11 JOB1 '4 (.I! I .\ I i t4) s1114)14 1118j4.17Z.11 i 1 4)4)Idd,Ij.)1 IjM 8111. 71111) 8.l)l 11.11 ),)"1 Off I Ifli I)O AM4110.1 -,'I 1 8 f.4.dl~l4144 44l)Jl! 1u.I ~4ii4 4 p11 .Il 111d41lip oll I poww11!14U4 1jdiljA\ 4)h1111") .4111ISOM P"{0 8O 114!.1i8A 1(1J( P,)'l 1 SB j01dM 811 '11 11S T N r" W 'INf1(NNV UWLV'LH)',1 INV 11CL4A7IS8

PAGE 26

154 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [January-March,tural protection (Servi:o de Inspecao e Fouiento Agricolas) and to commercialfirms regularly established and registered in, Brazil for seed business.kb) Importation shall be made only through ports or localities where thereis a representative of the Biological Institute of Agricultural Protection (Insti-tuto Biologico de Defesa Agricola) authorized to carry out phytosanitary in-spection.(c) The MNinistry of Agriculture will publish tbe names of the authorizedports or localities through which importation will be permitted.ART. 2. Seed potatoes may be imported into Brazil only from countries wheretechnical experimental establishments specializing in the culture of this plantexist, according to the criterion of the Servigo de Inspecao e Foinento Agricolas,in order to prevent the importation of inadequate varieties into regions for whichthe tubers are intended, and to prevent the introduction of injurious or exoticdiseases, and the importation will be subject to all the provisions and instrue-tions concerning phytosanitary protection. applying to the case the judgmentof the superior counsel of agricultural protection instituted by article 90 ofthe regulations approved by Decree No. 15189 of December 21, 1921.oa) The certificates of origin referred to in article 2 of the resolution oEMay 2d, 1928, shali aflirm that the tubers are from regions free from theparasites Clor w1ophl ctis endobiotica, Spongospora subterranea, and Phthor-imtaca operculd1la, and that the imported tubers are free from those and otherparasites.(1)) In addition to this certificate, each shipment must be accompanied bya statement of the Minister of Agriculture of the producing country affirmingthat selected seed potatoes are concerned.(c) If, upon inspection on arrival, the tubers indicate need of disinfectionby immersion in insecticidal and fungicidal solutions, this precaution will berequired at the expense of the importer.AIT. 3. Tubers which may be deemed by the Servico de Inspecao e FomentoAgricolts unfit for planting may be used for consumption, provided that thecompetent -,anitary authorities are not opposed, and that the importer paysthe imposts required by law.Air. 4. Tubers deemed by competent authorities unfit for planting or forfood shall be destroyed under the supervision of the same at the expense ofthe importer.ART. 5. Concerns the storage of imported seed potatoes.ART. (. Concerns the requirements to be met by the importer in applying for a permit to import seed potatoes.Articles 7, 8, and 9 concern importers of seed potatoes.LEE A. STRONG,Chief of Bureau.B.P.Q.-347. JANUARY 1, 1933.PLANT QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF GREECEThis sunmary of the plant quarantine restrictions of the Republic of Greecehas been prepared for the information of nurserymen, plant quarantine of-ficials, and others interested in the exportation of plants and plant productsto that country.The smimary was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant quarantine inspectorof the 1lureau of Plant Quarantine, from his translations of the French textsof some of the Greek decrees, and from translations made by Paul Vogenitz,translator, 1'ost Office Department, from the Greek texts of other decrees andlaws. It was then reviewed by the chief, section of phytopathology, Direction-General of Ariculture, Athens, Greece.The inform; tion contained in this circular is believed to be correct andcomplete up to the tine of preparation, but it is not intended to be usedindependently of, nor as a substitute for, the original texts and decrees, andit is not to be interpreted as legally authoritative. The decrees and lawsthemselves should be consulted for the exact texts.LEE A. STRONG,Chief of Bureau.BAsic LAWSLaw No. 214 of April 9-22, 1914, protective measures against phylloxera.Law No. 217 of April 9-22, 1914, concerning the combat against plant diseasesand the organization of the phytopathological service.

PAGE 27

198:;] 8khVJ E AN 1J 'Y' F' [' Ir-i'ls which lmvt bic(. wse(d alnlgwevns:a ind o p n ru o h i,and soiIS; n y n 4 l t ( l1 1) 1w I t iin ri iIiI: it 1 11an1d hIs w ic : t rmi l m Y 1 1 i Z ww tll4 ill, 41 rio il l t,\ 4h1'1 1411G rIece illx() W, 14141 id, 24 l441 I I -I r')4I1uk in 4f phy11 4Xer. (D 'rr i of Al'. 1., 1927, '4 P. 155.)Citrus 111isi )t "ill\io f en xc p !ilm < e r i n1i)k,1'en ( df Feb. 27, 191, >44 .1.Coto sedhu la de arme s of" Thralkce llii MAkwf 6 n!11 mu i i e1 m enlitto ally p r of l 14c4 , Il 114ii 4 It 1214tr4 nt ,i, 4'4 1 '2 i!kco~o t Peio/hr foy22/ ()ndrs 1,re P(&.3611. 157.)SNI 1 11 I( RITi II C El111114 un !nk 4 i 11 (41 1:1 ( ,(,I4 1 f141d11! I I l 'v l k 1 xccl o iJ' (l4 1 1' 1: 1 1 w~ 4l44 4 111 I 'l14' wo1;! 1 (,1A 11 I il '1 I H~ ~ , Ij Ill 1T ! IIi 444 c'-" r;! iI ('f 'rGr(ceo 1iiii k iwil r I orde r il24I1, M .i I4,try 4 ri \r 1 1 iI n, l11i 4)J'1 '.1 d; Is 41 (roe(reg-i(0ns five ifromi phylloxerl or suspected regiions-) from -(ny f'1oign c(Juntry(whether phlyllXr1l 'or not ), as well n"1 from phylloxer"Oed (iti(ns ' Gr te,of any of the plants o1 plmt prodi1 ts menti1onel4 ill 1'rtid'l( 1 of LwN N4). 214,namely :(1) All varietie s of gr jevIe , p]llrts tlereof, living or (l(elld, ilw114diliz r ts,Stock", cittin1g., stumtil11. hark, eve. rapes. leeS. 114d in 2e11r11 'ny fra2miielnt or ref'we of r 2 evile, except (hied Lerawe'I ( r11 p K4'. Gr:4e mwr'eaind wine iust arte 1ot i-ludod in these provisiionls.(2) Phylloxera pronymplls, nymiphs, atnd eggs,8431 Stlk' pops. Shieltv4'S. 14141 "Is, \'nid bkotl which 1111t14w g1144vin1e'.(4 1 Animal 4r plat r14f4'IS(' or mixtures the(ref.(5 Huns a d )gricl r 1 oils a d111(1 "Illy hl411 st com41pti4se(1 (i1' il 1 1s wellas gravel 1nd saw( containing soil.W)) Any green plamint, 11-' well n, green014 cuttin11s. r8. ,lotl hiz'l. twi-s,tubers, bulbs, brniicIS, bark, rind, peeling gs, lea es, Ilowers, ml 4) 4f -a rdenve.etibles (to11atoo ,'. mloIn( s, (cl umb111 r(s, etc.), aS w\ll 1\ 1 r(7) Madder and licorice (with th4 exceptions provided 1'or y Arts 2 to 5).

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156 BUREAU OF PLAN T QUARANTINE [January-March,ART. 2. ProVides for tile importation into any region of Greece (whetherphylloxerated or not), from any foreign country, of:(a) Raisins, grape juice, musts, and wines.(b) Any dry seeds (grains), such as wheat and other cereals, as well asleguiniiious and other similar seeds.(c) Fresh fruits, such as apples, pears, oranges, lemons, bananas, etc., with-out twigs or leaves. These fruits do not include grapes. the importation ofwhilich is prohibited into nonphylloxerated or suspected regions if they are fromforeign countries, or from phylloxerated or suspected regions of Greece. (For citrus fruits see decree of Feb. 27, 19:1.)(d) Dried fruit;, sucihl as walnuts, Indiafln wvlnuts, almonds, hazelnuts, chest-nuts, figs, prunes, dates, pistachios, pine cones, bea ns, etc., if free from earth;also dried trufles, mushiroonis, and peanuts, likewise free from earth.(c) Dried medicinal plants.(f) Dried plants, whether powdered or not, for tanning. such as pine, oak,and a(ia.(q) Dried gailnuts in general, acorns and dried leaves for tanning, fromsumac iishs, etc.() )Dried str aw and hay as stock feed, dried industrial grasses in general,whether manufactured or not, such as straw, rushes, esparto grass, broomcorn,and other similar r materials, as well as dried leaves and flowers.(i) Lumber in general, and dried woods, with or without bark.(j) Agricultural and industrial products and by-products, such as preservedfruits, pressed oil-bearing seeds, olive pits, and the like, with the exception ofpressed grape hulls.(k ) D ried mid green sea plants, not mixed with earth or other plants; cleansmall for any purpose, porcelain earth, so,1) earth, or any earth for industrialor mietall urgictl purposes.ArT. 3. Provides for the introduction of garden vegetables, bulbs, potatoes,cuttings without roots (except grapevine cuttings) from Egypt, Cyprus, Eng-land, Ireland, DIenmark, Sweden, Norway, Belgium, Netherlands, or the GrandDuchy of Luxembourg, when accompanied by a certificate of origin issued bycompetent authority of the country of origin, the certificate to be authenticatedby the Greek consular official at the place of purchase or at the port of em-barkation. The certificate shall enumerate the kinds of products included inthe shipment, their weight, their origin (country), and the fact that they arenot from greenhouses or farms where grapevines have been cultivated. Cut-tings must be packed without soil. Certificates from foreign countries must beprepared in French or be officially translated into French or Greek.ArT. 4. Provides, exceptionally, for the importation from foreign countriesinto ioiphiylloxerated or suspected regions of Greece, of cuttings and unrootedgrafts free from soil, after request by the importer to the Ministry of Agri-culture. under the following conditions:i ) By special order from the Ministry of Agriculture, in each case, to thedomestic customs and postal authorities.(b) Subject to previous disinfection at any of the customs or post officesautliorized in article 7, in the manner prescribed in article 0, at the expenseof tlhe importer.AiR. 5. Provides for the importation from any foreign country or from anyregion of Greece (whether piyiloxerated or not) of any of the articles men-tiolied ill article I thlroughl the port of Pirmus, for the special scientific institu-tions of Ile States, subject to the following conditions:(0,) When ae colpanied by the certificate of origin prescribed by article 3in tile case of siipiiielits from foreign countries, or by the certificate prescribedin article s it of diomestic origin. Certificates from foreigli countries must beprepa red in French, or be officially translated into French or Greek.1i) .v special order of' the Ministry of Agriculture (subject to tile favorableopinion of tile pIN ytopathological board) to the domestic customs and healthofficials, requiring g disinfection or other measures deemed necessary.Airr. 6. The disinfection of tile materials mentioned in article 4 shall beeffected. aft e separatiig tile materials from their packing, by immersingtheI ill wa ter It a tIcniperature of 5:3 c. for 5 minutes, and afterwards fora few secoills in a 1 percent solution of copper sulphate, then rinsing themin cica i wa!' and setig t hem in a shady place to dry. The packing ma-terial will be destroyedd by burning or be thrown into the sea.

PAGE 29

1,10,14o,) $ 4o4lII47UI11 putl: P)8141011(4W IJO S11U.1IT 1 JdO( 0S1 J QI1T V1l011TOdl s'TI1U1 o U~oll ld ollo I 1{ il l l.11.4 .n1 J1) o O P1 IllTf~t 4W 1-11i jl0 4!4iJ1 1.13. .4 jj) O A 1114 ) n34jJ jo 3! 011 ) 411.)1 o SP O I 14.441 14. tl 0 0 ! -1)11 !l 111) 1 1~ ), 11 ) i t{J ") o.' 1 I l) J o11 lilt"j 11 i.i' I ll lo d lo T0('-~A1 -11111\ H 4 44 )J Au1 041 44, pol.o$ ulli N44ll 8'K4411)P4l po4,'IT I, ~1' I j I( 1 I. .4 ifl )IT SI1I4I4 8 11' jI)4 ) ) I I I t 1 IJ .I U 1 11 J)1t I I.)A111 O}.13[4Au J l I $11. I , 14. N:4 1. 141 $4 vI )i 1: 1 '4411I *$! I :T ~ I~1 I)1 I~I4).u~~ 'l~ {44441 L 1 11 ~ 1J0 1) 1 (.X4 !V 1 .~). sti pp lU O411 -0( 111:4.IAI H lij 110 0 ( -J4OJ .1444 4J\:f\ 4 ITT41 A'il *s.14 1 1 t I 441$44 , 4 )11111) Ad111,4l j p l , $ .31l)TJ*$, *S.1 ) II II Ido) ,)) o (11[ ). d 41I .00J 4$A{1 0 11 t 10)3111 .10 111 H. o .(.I)t. I,4 j4$$*4 4( l ){ ool>li 4411 *114Ill 114 1 "114 T11144>jA 1 111.1( 110(111 .XsL Jops I paol-ol411111(4, p1 1T1.11)14 .8)l~~l 4o.1ILI j4 )Ili -14181 1j Hlo~v pu I 1\ o!\ l) -)11fW114) .L.311144 .3111 'j" P'S4)lA[4 Mu It1~I1 t4l)()I) lq.M4jAl1 o1~)'j, 0011A) ld ED o (I I l xpT)A tI ltilo J ILO 011-1j m1NJ purt l 3 4 )(I-) aio tjo oll i0 unlo O ol ap,pr nup pu o g u aoxoll p t p)uo po"-I P1IIlP)I I I 'o nA\ I 11 4Io' 1 $4 ; t44I 11 I'sI I $4 l,),) Xo) I 1 1 8. Is,,), 1 1, 11 j ( Y ) So 'N.o I.ST1\ i)X j1L tl (IT181 1S8414)i~0.1 ,, 16yt4I ''I $~jJ~j IIP 11j 11pA 1 1[ 1,,)X,) JO1).44\ ~[){\ ''II LA 148 JoLVIIAXO'1'011J-H1 s 41"op 1:,i $4 I 8 (.V4 I.4f osoJtI 111 o I .1if18I1I[ I)1 p)~"1.111 O 411.111 'sop(')48 ' 4 .f81A04$4oL)1Il4~4 I'l 1q~).[1 11l .1' 41 Im { v 1 pIIOAU I ) I8.I([),01.1 41 a4 8 4 1 1.4. III:MI I M 1 I N),1 4, $4111: 14>81. p 411 4 14. $48314''! .11"d4; 8)1 Up l i p-.11 1 O O 1144 .o1 t 1 p o', 1. ) 1.1 1t1 .) j1l,0[m4 .tW Tip mol4411 1jpl l1\ AMU\ 10I4O18! 0l1 L MAl4l lL , ; Ili 1l [ 1!4i">[1!11)il(l ) j1!101110 11A J" S 0111111111(" *810 1 (>J II LP4 A !.44U1;I I i jI I I I \.41. pi I') I7141 I $0 I.4 1S11 111111 (), 14 41 0 1 A1l$4~ .41 A)4JO 4 0, 14A 4.l I111j81\ 1t44l1V8 !U1)1 mil".441. j $44 S04 1111111,) .1.441.144.1 011,11V i lx V I A I I<( Al ( I "a fa u Y-,I 1 ,Io lVz 11~o) W\ Vlaa l [ j1 Iq jdoapxa snodl*,)1,).1.) 814Ioa m go p)Isa li (q) , Insspw.1"I jO IT( 6m"N tit l vp~~~~~~~~~~ 1A 1,, j I Ini Iupeij a on p( duaMnlt)Jas LV44 A. 1 4A 4 \ Ii, I 41 4A 11 (1 8 1 :11 .:1 ..H(I ):I It54 4A 81.1 AJ, $) .4,441 ,\4 4,44 .44) 1I sIIlllj )' [I I 41( I 14 8 .411441 , ,1,k411 4$ I)4A t mSv/i 110 Io [ J1 AIT: I I 1' I I'I ( 1 1: S([ '.I1 1 ) 11: a). l po l{o 1011 4 $44 1411 l 11 ZI8 47a, 14 ,144 -:.1 I I1 I4/ 8 ' 1v44'0 pill *$4) .411 4 ')ma$ 1 1 Aill4\44 1111I 114M)4:IJI8C414A[ 11( L LV! 1 1)$4) ll ( I A0,V A I( 1[:11A!:S

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158 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [January-March,hut -iily tr lim Ioreign countries, but also from any other Department of Greece,Exceptionally, the importation of cottonseed is I)ermitted by scientific establish-mlients for scientific purposes and after being subjected to proper disinfection.(f.Decree of Feb. 20, 1931.)Within the term "duly disinfected " in article 1 may be included vacuumdisitifectijon with orron disulphide or hydrocyanic acid gas, provided thatthe disinfection is effected in accordance with the rules of the exporting countryand is deemed ellicacious. (Letter from the chiei, section of phytopathology,Ministry of A-riculture of Greece to the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, Apr.14, 1932.)B.P.Q.--34 .JANUxnY 12, 1933.PLANT QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF CHILEThis summary of the plant quarantinee restrictions of the Republic of Chilehas beeii prepared for tihe in furina tion of nurserymen, plant quarantine officials,and others intereted in the exportation of plants and plant products to thatcountry.The sunnary was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant quarantine inspectorof the Bureau of Plant Quarantine. from hi4 translations of the original textof Decree-Law No. 177, of December 31, 1924, on the application of provisionsconcerning the phytosanitary police (Decreto-ley sobre aplicaci6n de las dis-posiciones relativas a la Policia Sanitaria Vegetal) ; section 1 of DecreeNo. 103, of February 11, 1925, regulating Decree-Law No. 177 on phytosanitarypolice (Reglamento del decreto-ley sobre Policia Sanitaria Vegetal) ; andsubsequent decrees promulgated by the Ministry of Agriculture and Industryof Chile (Ministerio de Agricultura e Industria), and reviewed by the Serviciode Sanidad Vegetal of that Ministry.The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct andcomplete up to the time of preparation. but it is not intended to be used inde-pendently of, nor as a substitute for, the original texts of the decrees, and itis not to 1e interpreted as legally authoritative. The decrees themselves shouldbe consulted for the exact text.LEE A. STRONG,Chief of Bureau.BAsic LAWThe law of phytosanitary police, Decree-Law No. 177, of December 31, 1924,effective February 1, 1925, declares (art. 1) that weeds, injurious animals, andin general. diseases of cryptogamic or animal origin will be deemed plant pestsand will be the objects of sanitary measures. Article 2 provides for the intro-duction of plants, cuttings, seeds, fruits, or any other plant product onlythrouh authorized ports. Article 3 provides that such plants and plant prod-ucts offered for importation shall be inspected in the customs by the phytosan-itary service (Servicio de Sanidad Vegetal), and in case they are infected orare suspected of being infected any of the following measures may be ordered:Disinfection, quarantine, return to point of departure, confiscation, or de-strwu-tioni.IMPORTATION PROHIBITEDSeeds, plants, or parts thereof, if infested by any of the diseases or insectsnamed in Decree No. 105, article 5, a and b. (See p. 160.)Rooted grapevines from (any source. (Decree No. 105, art. 5, d, and DecreeNo. 2921, May 27, 1929. See p. 160.)Peach trees Irom the Viited States. (Decree No. 105. art. 5, e.)Plants with soil. (Decree No. 105, art. 5, f. See p. 160.)Bulbs, tubers, or roots infested with injurious parasites. (Decree No. 105,art. 5, g. See p. 160.)Fresh plant p r)duct capable of introducing fruit flies. (Decree No. 105,art. 5, 1,. and Decre No. 12. Sept. 4, 1930. See p. 160.)Fruits invested with Aspidiotlu.s prhliciOm11S or Diaspi, pentagon. (DecreeNo. 105. art. 5, i. See p. 160.)Corn on the cob and broomcorn. (Decree No. 2526, Aug. 28, 1928. See p. 161.)Potatoes. (Decree No. 130. Apr. 28, 1931. See p. 163.)

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30V~~~~~,' tllp.Jlo til 1)(1N17,NSSVdal IJ O~dNO-0t )IIIlh ) 1 1 1 1 1 l oi o~ u ~ i 1 ) u ~otls l i l s l ' p s s , ) A0114 o U1U"4du) ai{ 04 IthfjI OH 1 11 l s TIO1loodX i 044 4;Xtjitls 4n pUad aJosit ~l I ,10V!) I :Vi LAll: .K SU::,r 1 KHSV AO IOUl[\X .(0 1: t~ao ['), pLjsXI 1'> iu l j 4 1111 (11od 6) o(4 1{ J ll , 1 1V1U[l1i10 l(fl1( )d >o j I 44 A j i{J p)I '03.1pa X Kit [tfuT l l p9 SJ~a( au~plSU pa al mq otpl , iqaa 011SjIruS10 \ 4,1 ,41 'L D1j5111I [11U11 A11111 Itijol sj'o 4 1. S0.)I~joIS is 0 t )(1 4 q po-J01 4.0 9 10 Il 0 d mij!11 , i0M\l ' S I jaw ' 41. 8 l)d 1.JI t J] 4( olj 11 o 4.i Qm1 p d !) , Mo dU-11 )1)t1 v pine oriulj :.o{ )(U JO11 Ol. ( O 4 ()JiL jI j() Jldt"i'1 1 1A It 111 1 , 0111.1 s lo I OI I sI Ii. 0 o0 os '0l4pl w4UI "s I 'II U I' I -111vd~ .x.~o-I1 i I~1Z (1 ~ ~ 1 ~ Pk)o \It I j)A jf, 0(1jJ 01 D)ITJI 11-))( A(! 1j 01 )T1IP)[ '% i{ ii J80L)8i1)3 03((f o Mdd0ods 1m% 1h)1 1d~ 1UO' 0(1 s0 )ft jurpi S'I p, 4 m -)J( Iuo J 0 J al S i il HS I I 1 \ V' l 1, j' 7 1 jVI)A(Q'I (l ,IJ Q , LV s ' 1 0''9 d 0,) *gZ6; TZ '4tT10S 4U9( ) dg7)-IJ'IU(lo d 0'i $1. Ito JI I.d 181 oI jo4dHIll1, Iti(1 ,J,1o4( 1IJO J.1do) t11fl144ijl (vlo dsi)0 l1-111 ~~h1141:1Wodt 1 011L\ pm!oo Kut'op .Is4J11i* A lth st1i mpop (II 11 Ii. o ulf -1 dII4 .11 PlttiJ J1d 11J4>ous~mI I m 4 \ 4 10 110 10:0 4,) '111 SI !,)til [l p 'jII ul.(1I111\mi1!Y.Tpill" '101"0.". "S11'tj l-oI L11111i\'4~ f I:A I: Aj it1( I1'ZI. 1oioj iW) .I) * I). :;' I 1 1!) 1 1 J 0) 11 %ooI, *(1 [d;( t7) 00.11'TV0 ( l0 JV'N ).1dS'j",~(~( (oif) tici AM I I I., ; po ) '1fS),O 0AV,'I) .01. 1 00f '2~T 4 %)0lI.)(oj ) qIJl' IV'.4jI Jll II J o11:If mI,.0811 411 Jo .p1 *\(f j4 'IIII J441 10 *u4.Io si 'to .1(4 o1t,'~' ~lO' (J j0 II'I 4 il m4.10 il > 40 i d .1! \S0 1! 10)!Ir Aol J l.) j s0Jlimi TjJ 8 Ij)tilll oi) ?,'js1 otmii j TT o:o NOt~~~i v ""llol.1111,111 lA P Hl)0 11I41.1 ool sl m. \0ILV10 IM j)(11(o( a oo,, ~CIX il I< \ ;(; A fr Sw\ 'A 111fo 9?IH , 00INI~ Jo eIjI~~

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160 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [January-March,IMPORTATION PROHIBITEDART. 5. The importation is prohibited of:(a) Every kind of seed which reaches the country infested by any of thefollowing-named insects: sitotroga ccrualella, Bruchus obtcctus, B. quadrinia-ulatut8, B. rufinanius, B. chiw tisifUS, B. signaticornis, B. lenti,., and Spermophaguspectoralix.(bi Piants or parts thereof upon which the followiing-naned insects areshown to exist: Aspidiotus perniciosus, Diaspis pent1gmia, Euproctis chrysor-rhoca, POrthetria dispUr.(c) Potatoes (Solanum tubcrosaui). (See Decree No. 130, Apr. 28, 1931.)(d) Rooted grapevines, whatever their origin may be.NoTE.-Decree No. 2921, 'May 27, 1929, prohibits the importation of vinestocks from any country, but permission may be obtained, if conditions to belitter established by the services of viticulture and oenology and of plantsanitary police (policia sanitaria vegetal) are observed, for the importationot vine stocks resistant to phylloxera. The customs will exercise specialsupervision to prevent the importation of plants from countries infested withphylloxera and will extend such supervision to the whole cargo (Diario Oficial'Santia~go d ("bile. June 11, 1929, from abstract in International Bulletin,Plant Protection III : Sept. 9. 1929, p. 135).(c) Peach trees front the United States of America, since it is impossible to demonstrate ( or establish) the existence of the diseases known as peachyellows, peach rosette. and little peach.(f) Plants in pots or other containers with soil, from whatever source. Topermit the entry of these plants they will have to be deprived of all theirsoi! for inspection, after which their admission or rejection will be determined.(g) Bulbs, tubers. or roots in which parasites deemed injurious are shownto exist, and whose existence has not been demonstrated in the country.(10 Fruits which are believed capable of introducing insects commonlyknown as " fruit flies ": Rhagoletis pontonella, R. cingulata., Contarinia pyrivora,Epochra ca nadensis. Ortaliq (Tephritis) ceragi, Ceratitis capitata, Dacu oleae,Trypeta 1udens. T. acidusa. Tcphritis tryoni. and others. A decree shall deter-mine the cases and the classes of fruits deemed to be comprehended in theprohibitions referred to in this section. (See Decree No. 12, Sept. 4. 1930.)(i) Fruits in which the presence is determined of: Aspidiotus perniciosusand Diaspi, pentagona. (See Decree No. 12, Sept. 4, 1930.)(J) Alfalfa. clover, or other seeds which contain more than 200 seeds ofCunOuta per kilogram. In cases where more than the greatest permitted per-centage is found the importer must elect relading the seed upon the vessel orhave it cleaned in an establishment equipped with adequate machinery. In thelatter case the seed will be subject to the supervision of the phytopathologicalinspection service. and cannot be withdrawn, in whole or in part, without thewritten authority of the same service, provided that the percentage of Cuseut*a,after tLe seed has been cleaned, is less than 200 seeds per kilogram. The re-siduum shall he destroyed by fire.The enumeration of the diseases in the various sections of this article is notiimitcd. and consequently others may be listed in subsequent orders.DISPOSAL OF PROHIBITI) MATERIALART. C. If the phytopathological inspection service discovers any of the con-ditionls set forth in article 5. making it necessary to prohibit importation, thecliief of that service is authorized to order the return to the point of departureor tle destruction :f the plants. seeds, cuttings, bulbs, or fruits which it isattenipted to import.Air. 7. Not applicable.TREATMENT REQUIRED IF DEEMFD NECESSARYART. 5. Plants. seeds, cuttings, bulbs, or fruits, the importation of which isnot prohibit od by article 5. may be subjected to the following procedures(a) Quar ant ine of ssuspected or infected consignments pending final decision.()i I)isinfection in the manner prescribed by the phytopathological inspec-tion service.All expeis-es ts lilincu-rred will be borne by the interested persons.

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19331 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 161SPECIAL QUARANTINESCOFFEE, TEA, YERHA MATE. RICE. ('11 ICORY. SAFFRON, MUSHROOMS, CINNAMON,CLOVES, CUMIN, PEANUTS, CAC(Ao, AND PIMENTO--INSPECTION CERTIFICATE NOTREQUIREDSince these products are exclusively for food purposes 110 in.151ection certiti-cate is required.They may be imported in tin cans through any port of ('hile without inl-spection.Rice, 1111in, peafluts, and cacao may he imported without restriction throughthe ports of Arica, Iquique, Tecopilbi, Autofagasta, and Taltal, but shipmentthence to southern ports is prohibited.These products may be imported through the ports of Coquimbo, Valparaiso,Talcahuano. Los Andes, and Corral, subject to inspection.If any of these products are found to be infested with pests, whether or not those pests occur in Chile, they shall be subject to the general provisions of therespective law and regulations. (Decree No. 450, Aug. 6, 1926.)Rice may enter Puerto Montt subject to inspection. (DIecree No. 143, Mair.16, 1927.)The southern limit of the zone fixed by Decree No. 450 for the unrestrictedentry of rice, cumin, peanuts, cacao, etc., is the Department of Chiaiiaral zindthe iunrestricted res1iipmeitt of these prodIucls is permitted between IIIi ortsincluded in this Zone. (Decree No. 1)80, Apr. 25, 1928.)BANANAS, PLANTAINS, PINEAPPLES, DATES. AVOCADOS, AND PANAMA ((O)NUVTS-IMPORTATION REG U LATEFree importation of those products is permitted through the pmrts of Arica.Iquique. TecopIilla, Antofagasta, Tatal. and (Cianaral, and subject to inspectionthrough the ports of (oquimibo, vaiparaiso, .rialcahuano, Los Andes, 81a(d CorraTll.(Decree No. 560, Sept. 21, 1926.)ORANGES AND MANGOES FROM BRAZIL-ENTRY AUTHORIZED THBOUGIH PORTS OF THECENTRAL ZONEShipments of these fruits must be accoiipalijed by certificates issued by theofficial plant quaraitine service of Brazil, visaed by the (hilean consul, and subject to inspection oil arrival. (Decree No. 1971, July 12. 1928.)CORN IN THE EAR AND BROOMCORN-IMPoRTATION PROHIBITED)The importation is prohlibited of corn in the ear, or parts thereof, and ofbroomcorn or sor-o intended for the manufacture of broomns, but shelled c(rllanid sorgo seed. if thorouighily cloai a11(1 free from iragnits of cobs andstalks, may be imported. (Decree No. 252G, Aug. 28, 1928.)STHAW PACKING TO BE STERILIZEDNo goods of wlilaever rigiii may be imported if packed in straw, grasses. orstems of ally class of plants: Proridcdl That willes or liqlli(ls ill )t1 tles witlistraw casings, may be imported if acompanied by official certificates. issuliby competent officials of the country of origin. attesting that tie straw ca'4iishave been sterilized With steam for at least 15 minutes at 1150 C., or (disii-1ected in a closed chamber from which the gas cannot escape. at I temperallureof not less than 200, \,ith a solution of formaldehyde. The solution shall con-tain at lea3 37 percent by weight of formaldehyde at the rate of 500 cc per 20 mlof spa(-e.Goods arrivilng without the above-ment ioned certificate of disinfection shallbe disinfected as prescribed, and all expenses incurred shall be char-ed againstthe person directly concerned. (Decree No. 2526, Aug. 28, 1928.)IMPORTATION PROHIBITED OF FfiESH PLANT PRODUCTS CAPABLE OF CARRYING FRU~rFLIESThe regulations promulgated by Decree No. 12, September 4, 1930, follow:ARTICLE 1. The importation into Chile is prohibited of all fresh plant prod-ucts, whatever their origin, which are capable of carrying fruit flies. Especially

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162 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [January-March,included in this prohibition are nll kinds of fresh fruits, and the vegetables:Toma ocs. eggplants. squash, green peas and peppers.ENT1Y PERMITTED WHEN CERTIFIED AS ORIGINATING IN A DISTRICT FREE FROMFRUIT FLIESAnT. 2. The following products are excepted from the above prohibition:(a) Fresh fruits from the State of California 7; (b) bananas (including plan-tains), pineapples, coconuts, dates, avocados, w atermeloiis, and cucumbers fromEcuador ; (c) fruits indicated under ( b) and vegetables from Peru and Brazil,on condition that they originate in a zone declared free from fruit fly by theplant quarantine authorities of the said countries; (d) fruits from Argentina,except the orange. on condition that they, likewise, proceed from a zone declaredfree from fruit tly by the plant quarantine authorities of that country.AnT. 3. The declaration that the fruits or other products are from a zonefree from fruit fly shall be made in the certificate issued by the plant quarantine authorities of the country of origin, which certificate shall accompany theshipping papers or bill of lading. and which will indicate in each case the kind,quality, and origin of the products whose entry is permitted by this decree.This certificate shall be issued in duplicate and shall be visaed by the Chileanconsul in the country of origin of the fruit. A copy of the said certificate shallaccompany the shipping papers, and another shall be retained with the fruitwhile it remains on board.AnT. 4. The importation of the products excepted from the prohibition, in-dicated in (a), (b), (c), and (d) of article 2, are subject to the followingconditions:INSPECTION CERTIFICATE REQUIRED(a) Through the ports of the zone included between Arica and the Chanaralentry is permitted, provided that the products are accompanied by the sanitarycertificate which must come with each shipment and in which it is also statedthat the consignment has been inspected at the port of embarkation by compe-tent sanitary authority. The said certificate shall be visaed by the respectiveChilean consul, in accordance with the provisions of article 3. and it will also berequired that the certificate bear the approval of the inspector of the plantquarantine service of Arica, after inspection made on board by that official.AUTHORIZED PORTS OF ENTRYThe inspection made at Arica will serve to permit entry through ports wherethere are no inspectors of the plant quarantine service; but in port's where thereare officials of that service, entry will be permitted only after inspection has beenmade at the place where the products were unladen.(b) The fruits and other products named in article 2 of the present decreemay be entered through the port of Chanaral, provided that they are intendedexclusively for consumption in the mining establishments of the region in-cluded lietween Pueblo Hundido and the northern boundary.(c) The products named in article 2, with the exception of avocados, water-melons, and cucumbers, may be entered south of Chanaral only through theports of Coquimbo, Valparaiso, Los Andes, San Antonio, Talcahuano, andValdivia, after the inspection established by the law of the plant quarantineservice and upon presentation of the certificate referred to in article 3.ART. 5. The importation is authorized of fresh fruits and vegetables ofwhatever origin through the port of Magellanes without other requirementthan the certificate prescribed by article 3, provided that those products areintended for consumption in the Departments of Magellanes. Natales, andTierra del Fuego, their relading being definitely prohibited for the north ofthese departments.ORANGES FROM ECUADORAnT. 6. The importation is permitted of oranges from Ecuador into the zoneincluded between Arica and Taltal, provided that their origin from a fruit-fly-free zone is attested by a certificate from the plant quarantine authorityof the country of origin, in accordance with the provisions of article 3.7 $e option Fnrsh Fruit , from the I nited States, p. 163.

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0>~>1 A )A'~1 3 110 'sz44. 1111N: vka 1'_ ooxWAOA( 0 *Ilos. UZ1 .IQ1)IIIi u i J O T:I ( . V I I .0 t 0II1 .1,%,.I ov tl444 .I0 0:G ,s '1( ow ') {nsl t{p It{nt 411 al { ) 7 N,[ u01Oki I l j () '1 U "o A fl o It.I j i t [1i'. t Ilo I { ) v X ITOjdl AdXoq l i p 111U~ {nif I q uj id aJ N!!/UJd)a ) jiJiIJII 4 .{11d A141 ltliJ 'dd.4n, > V { IL V { I { 1 .1J Oill UII ZtItiI.11J111" ' 1 [ 11l i LtT 4tI04dq lTOOtt; pq o ni p v Xq poduon "'I 4tiol m sits 01 piq 1 41111 1u Aq l IpS' 1 W41 1I 01 1 Ol"'I 1 ilaln o j dIltL) 01111 pd pomltti ) ( mI .Jiua m '{i ui[)3ONUAM 01' -0donni4 lod -,do.j d 14 U Ad It I(),) 1 ) P I t I I > I Iu 1. 1 It lh)4 I 1u 1 s tm1l0 k A .j *! LL Ji1yp1Ag 0 dL z 1111 181l1 4 m4 Ax 11:4 Ji om L -Wd't '154 P, I Imil pO03[01 o.1o1z1 [8 I 11 )u A13oj Ido , 1X811i7 ) ' X ul-IsTd d -,upp ) I t it41 1 %1 1 ,11 0 l nI?8 1 oW 1) 11u dAi,10 odoj13 1 d11 3 051 Tp oI mj) AoI Ot d, i sti -4 i Si 11m1 ilV.Ibdlt m m ol111) t I 11 1-) J)1 to0)1 l id tS4lI 1-~.J NA 8 I 1SA Ipy Pl di 1 0 1 L 1 11( itpO S 114 I'li iA 1 l q, 1 iDS ) A ",I 13 1 11 31 liI' .)1 IIA 115A ,I I 5v11)J13' *0 S[4i I l V4 'd iAd )I It'ot01 : I I 1 111 it .)jii 0I 4 -, oUi S1 18[ V1O. J I) I44I I I j I , I I~ it p 1)1 1,111 ) 11114J18.11 I4 I 4dI )0I114s i)o. I0IDA[Jot IAd I it lOSO IA4'l 'I: 0p41 (-) oko wq lu S olm P j! painn41 71Idllwo {q : Io pl -113 11 t sonurad 0,l1T J fT L uIV-,,)1[, -"11 1 ) 110118 Iti ll d >i 1I4 01111 001 1 )1d141 i i ISAy1 [ la dONm'1d 111:1 U (i\J 811111 tl, [P U* I VI~a S fJ1 N 'jEVyM13 30jd4 O Iusj4 J ISU 1 1 I Jot I1pflp II 00 )t1 0 101 ) 41 '0\4[r )1 1411 .1 J l'Viislld )III A J 1 1)\ 4O GuI,)III H L 'L 11 111 )Tp I I!110 I! -P1 J XI CIIO 01 JL i4i iljJ 1Ii 1 k) ~'K 1001 1[413140110 04 041ll1 Ai 81 111110)14 j8411 1411 ll0idV(I ml 1)4)(411 [dlii n~h ~ 0~ ~1 ~1 114 11111' ',. ;.,J idi 1 ,( )4 11114 11 14 51V'.( l1li~ill ~ ~ Ti j0do01441 4 [ 1 1111 14 1) 0 j1! pmll ."A1J til.!IA 1 ) 118 .'V1Aco) 114~ .1:u~i. ~ 11 LXX 4i I j 111 III 114/ 411T( 1 14! S)Iju4J4 NI pOIj 4i1,111! ,U 1 AOJ I 111xot 111_ 1 i ~ ~ 'Il .1 4 4113 } 1 41B A { 1 1111 1401)11 \4 ) 141114>1~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~[II K 14 '' 1411181{)NII 1AlMII ,1IlOJAjil lS( TIOOl114 810Ti [[ ol ,jj) 0181. .111 ]) '. -lT TI 1 JO LI.1 liill 411011450 '), 118i -o1144ll INN .011110 .*4 4 1 11 411141 1118:11 14 C 8 1111 'CI %111422 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 41 1p 'I I\d '1 it p\,~ V81\ 2V >41N .1l(1.KV A V

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164 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [January-March,Pi.Q.'.A.--2. 1Reviid, Supplement No. 1. FEBRUARY 17, 1933.PLANT QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS, COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIAHoP" PROHIBITED FROM COUNTRIES IN WHICH DOWNY MILDEW OR MOSAIC OCCURAcc ordin., to an ablistract published in the International Bulletin of PlantI'r-Ireer ion. VI :12. ileitmlber 1932. p. 206. the proelanIatiou of March 27, 1f30,(see I'.Q.C.A.-29. revised, 1. 4. caption Importation of Illps Prohibited) hasbeel a mel uled bv proclamat ioln iNo. 215. of May 5. 1932. to read as follow's:It is forbidden to import into Australia plants of the genu11 1uiul.s com-ing from aly country whatever. Importation is authorized. however. of theflooier parts (own coillierciially hts )l. provided that they ('0i1W from a(ount ry where the d iwny Imtildew, Pseudoperonuqporu h umuli, or the mosaic, arenot knownl to occlur. LEE A. STRONG,Chicf. Nurcau of Plunt Quarantine.P.Q. A.-:i4. Supplement No. 2. FEBRUARY 17, 1933.PLANT QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS, GUATEMALAFLoWEU AN) VE(IETABLE s'EE)S SHIPPED BY MAIL-CERTIFICATION NOT REQUIREDAeorin to an al bstract published ill the Ilt erna tional Bulletin of PlantPrOte tiin, VI: 12. Deremlber 1932. page 206. the decree of June 4, 1932, pre-scrib es thiat the ph ytosanitarv certificate established by the ilei'ree of August". 191, s p. :. P.Q.C.A.-914. Guatemala ). will no longer be required int Ie cait of Iiw a ind ve o table seeds sent in smll quantities ly mail.For every other c'u1sligmln1ellt, including potatoes for food or seed, the consulsif { (iia i tenamla will re' juire the presentation iof phytisanitary (ertitlates beforethe ('ilstoillv permit can be issued,. LEE A. STRONG.C h i c, Burcuia oj Plant Quwra ntine.P .(' A -221. Snpplement No. 1. FiRARY 17, 19::.PLANT QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS, SWEDENENTMoP1 To IMP )VAT I'(PTATOEIS FROM THE UNITED STATES MAY BE GRANTEDAccm-fliw to n ; notice published ill Commrincte Reolwrts. J1 nuary 14. 11'83.ii, 2. e state Plant PrIotecliton Institute has beeni authorized, under aSwcdih ltwoya ILieer of November 1. 1932, to ranti exeniptions from the im-pwlr pr1Ilhi bi on polatoe> from Americt. as well as from the (eri'tificationrtipi I nwI I applying to all imports of potatoes. and those affecting ilporlts1 tit' 1ivihi .lnts and parts of plants.Such excmpiioIlls ale wily lo be granted after test in each individual case,an li ndi'; >w ric iaions as the lhstitute mNay till,[ necessa to imlpoe.Timi :lbve imiodilits the decree o .lannary 11. 1V27 see P.Q.(.A.-821, PP. 4ani 01). LE: A. SToNG,Chief, B1ure! U of Plant Q lHi;'auntine.IM I 1, 1933.PLANT QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS, KINGDOM OF NORWAYThe fi iwing thuimary of the I lant quarantine restrict ii s of the Kingdomof Nlrway baN b ielarei fol the illformija tion of nurserymIn. plant (uar-antine ulhi'al .and otie iiiiet'ested inl the exploratio1 of plants and piilit! 1rom the I oited Slates to that, country.ThiN >nmia ry las pr11: r r 'b Iy II; a i'r'y B. SI im w, plait (ua rant ie insjietorf the Buro' , 'd PlaII QIuaanile, f'm translate os iade by Paul Vogeaitz,lol'St )tliie 111partl;nIl, and Mi'. Shaw. of the texts of Royal Resolutions pro-mtl(ad Ilw (er hw ()I* July 21. 1916. to combat ilisect Pests and plantIs Lov av 21 juli 1916 4m liekjaeiipelse av skadeinsekter ogjila~t.sygdii e a. and reviewed by the Norwegian )Department of Agriculture( Lausdbruksieparlemeitet. slo. Norway).

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1E211 sL\L .\VN 1A' A N H I, A A N NO 1' N (' 'I L NTS 165T hle ill 1()fIllll Iitll" 1-illillilledI ill Ilhicirl lluir I,, holit'\ 'd! If)ll t 1wlEi ' U1*411 44le 111) 4'5il i(' lill ' ()d hlI i'-4 'jI'(',11ill i Is 1414 1 il )l 4') 44 1 4 '! 11 1(illd 'I)4'1i(1 ily v (4 , 1i4r is ;I sillhstillllo 4f4, l1w1 (I11il11 IW'xl 41 I' fill II ili1(,S()1iuI 14I1(15 11111 I i 1 i u ml 1I4 14 i w ii (il I 10 (4 ) IS IO I;l Il.\ l 1i i lii \'. T h11oi-'ssliiii;] Iit i i s'I s s 5I1114i I & 4 11h1e14'II s.]i II Il' s'N*i'l 'o\lIs I i 44H,,I 'jo 1(r 1h, l ic L \v f .JIIIy *' I, ;, I Illm K ill. (d, N ('I,% ; I Js "I h ri e Ill lI *, td -i1l1lg ; 14' r4g2 tl1 i il s I4 I ' )lI I I Is I lI I fll i ji ii li 'I ''. I I i t. I Y.I\P() STATION OF PLANTS, B'i ', I) Si Ni i ()Tj 1 I'.STI(TI"E'Xcept a"5 jlldic'lwI I)4' w, 111er 114' 11() ll (111 41 1 r:!ll IllS' 14'SI il if)4 s 111slHI illi if A'lsIi(4i 111() NiliI Y d IF Il;l 1 IT Iit \N, <) li'. \N14 1 , i ;44S 111 1 l ISgl( W il ill id0 (-xp w~l tw i t'lI)II Illo I llIt(d 'S I ; It(;444 >4'4( bu'' his -ifll 114>1 4,4'44l 'l1'1 -I 1ilN 11441 1w ilill)4 1ifd ;ll m v11 f144 I'S i '1L ll i ri hIii 144 i' 1 'Irl ilw ill <'4 1 S 2.1i :1111 1 41Ill IH'. l1 Iii I1 ' ,I I 111 TAlill 's 1'I rlle!i AI( i1'. ( F1 )Yl l 44(wi' 'f il l. I I 1 .1IP1TA1 11 s ut' 11 I TT11 sF' 11 1> (TAIlsll W1ll's lT Wv11 Exi"I"TSP olzl m , Iifl , lwie llipm lli illitil N > W uw 'b I/-fi/11j 1 ( /IISI ( / e l im I ) , dhw'4 loos l's' > 1 1(' I I4 11111 s Xii e(Ii }l 81 t\r(' Elill4 111 ' p .ill (.''; wse 1111 ' Iro 1 l1 8ll 4ll ' illl cld' i th ilss >1'\\ \v uldli o(lso Ill 14~rd i I S f 1w0 lV llileI Std tho illlilmrf lli< l illli() \Ill'\\ I v (0Jpott 14(5 1'(IW ill i 1 (' i S I I(s's is 1l'1 l ii 4i1ei L I)s'isi'j4 411 4 I I w' N 1 '\\ 111Dep'ltil llollt ()t A riclll ire Ipor t i R0)/01 N()ww(.iulli Le-,;l itll, 10t-11 f'I 6 Fekl), P198 1.)Elt'1 dipS i wll 1 4 it 1>14)0: 1 14411 II 11 ( 41115llied ly ll itlsi 'clioll >4 IWl t N',a I t esf I b1Y I N l t ll olil nlifivlllill.till t 1we l fu <' 0 0 $ 0 r111)(4,11llo w li l, llw 1)0114 1 1 l 1wb r 111,01}1. 'IlldI thle s~ll r hoel Iweill l lmIO. E h 0 shlip-lelt w ill j(' 1 4, i I I Jwctti~ l f II :t till' (.1s mirlll p i!t id, (l drll ill f(rei sll'i <>4 lirie ec l i11 s s>fPilll ' c mbr'I 11111 1'. sibiric(I., s111l hse tr ;i'ld isv Ililt' witSh41S aill i 511il11l11sullitll 11 1 414' i ls Is41 1)r 4(1 11114411litd.Thot s40 (Is 1111151 1w pst(k'I ill 8I&ckS Si('1e(ileil i) rt'il -I'llllmlls h 1.) r1'-('1 ll Ssi'Sds I SI I4ll ' l le ,. 1114'()f ill s .111 o, I l1l I' li, iill letl ers * I lwhIeshligdlOl~ '11A h wlw~le ilscriptlifl ll he M 101 Is'-0Illclw< 10)11".(O n S";u l Sl ks the0 Ill-wr i tin Wl111 vM~ l hW4) lilwes 4'. 1ilc 11' 11 li I the111 4\' Ill Is';SI thn of411i'111 (d, 1he le'1lg ll 441 111e SII-k. Siwk-s 11441 lsi 'l4u4ly wii rkt's 4>11 il ITIV ll \t Sil llulrk 11 e )l lv\ I lIe c 1 41115is.S 1' 11 i't2 1e " I so 4IY Il I I I sl '11 11115 1 1' Se14 S'1 II l e l ( I 14I I I I 1 l i I111 ' l 11 A t i t',5lro l ll c4XS I llI 1w 'S4111k 441l il (1111 l l iI 192. 4'4 1 1 1111i. i'llill(1o< i s r lu I -c )l dis".; lv('( ill I lil( r 'A' :I!c()h l I sh;I I I e I i, j a W h ls ,\'ri s I ls s, s-I cc114 ' hW s ill 11141 ill 9 s24 d lilt 11j4 1 14 1) li 4 s'sl 4 Is(I1 i'soo f M 'I r. I 's 1 14.''oNDTioN s If()\ pn-N G Tl \1P( )RTATMO OF ( 'A) VEl, A N IJ T IIM >i Y i EED-'--li'l (I414111 ii> l w i 41wiil l ly i lI I1 i1 4i i 1ifit'4[ 14r11 1 .11' Ns1' o e i i I i,4 '1 I toOrisill, > thle ],IN\ <>( Juie 2T 1!f2-1, ill iiii]Mwrlfitimi is lprollillit(,1 (it' Ss((0l 1 i >O, n dw hllie imvst isj e il Tillwtillly \, les :I porlili ]l s r lIltl II cum ( I i Ifif I ( f' clitr v II liu fi'st I f,('I d I <> i i io l 1 11 )11 ll N > ww (-_il I I I )(,1 ': -mlelf ( if A ricill IIre ;2 lI -l ksl S (I ] ';1r! f'Ie llellt , Iit. <>E y > Q e Ii 1 1 I((1ditiolls of entry .

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166 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [January--March,ULitil further notice these conditions are as follows:Import permits will be issued only for red clover, alsike clover, and timothyscotd grown in northern or central Sweden or Finland. If a sufficient quantity01, these seed's cannot be obtained from these countries the question ofadniti liug such seeds from other countries will be considered.White-clover seed grown in northern or central Europe will be admitted.Applications for iniport permits shall indicate the germinability and weedcontent of the seeds offered for entry.To obtain such permits the seeds must meet the following requirements(table 2):TABLE 2.-GCrmiinability rcqliirud aHd weed seed contCnt allowed in importedclovCr and timothy sCedMinimum MaximumKind of seed germinaweed con-bility tentPercent PercentRed clover. .----------------------------------------------------------------90 0.50Alsike...-------------------------------------------------------------------90 .75White clover.--------------------------------------------------------------90 -.-.--.Timothy. ..-----------------------------------------------------------------95 .75The control station concerned will be advised by the department concerningthe import permit and the reported percentages.Samples will be taken by the customs service in accordance with the lawof June 27, 1924.The seeds will not be released until their origin has been established.(Proclamation of Dec. 16, 1930.)SAMPLING OF SEEDSThe following regulations have been promulgated by the Norwegian Depart-ment of Agriculture (Landbruksdepartementet, Oslo, Norway) under the lawof June 27, 1924, for the sampling of seeds:SECTION 1. In view of section 4 of the above-mentioned law, samples shallbe taken by an official of the customs service or of the control station, or byaitotlher public sampler.SiC. 2. Samples taken from imports of merchandise shall, if not taken by apublic sampler, be drawn in the presence of two witnesses, who must declarethat the samples were drawn in conformity with the provisions of sections3 to 8.SEC. 3. Samples are to be taken as soon as possible, and at the latest within 8(lays of the receipt of the merchandise. In case of rain, care must be takenthat no moisture reaches the samples. No samples are to be drawn from sacks which have become wet or damaged. Such sacks shall be set aside from theremainder of the lot, for eventual separate sampling.SEC. 4. A sample shall, as far as possible, represent an average sample ofthe lot involved. One average sample may not, however, represent a lot ofmore than 10,000 kg of seed corn or other large grain for sowing, or 5,000 kgof seed of small grain. For larger shipments an average sample shall be takenfor every 10000 kg of large grains or 5,000 kg of seeds.SEC. 5. Concerns the sampling of stock tonics and artificial fertilizers.SEC. 0 (1) :SHIPMENTS OF SEEDS IN SACKSIt shipments up to 10 sacks, small samples are drawn from top, middle,and bottom of each sack with the hands or a suitable instrument. In largershipments, small samples are drawn in the same manner from every fifth sack,but from at least 10 sacks.The small samples mist be thoroughly mixed together on a dry clean flooror in a suitable container.Out of the average sample so obtained, two or more samples of the afore-mentioned size are to be taken for analysis. Any finer or thinner parts presenteasily fall to the bottom. That this shall occur also in the samples for analysis

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inl the samI I I e r to I I (I I4 it I:pp( ' I Ii I )i( m411 (1 i e I 1(( I I 1 11 I I 1 I t t IThI i ;ze (d t he St lil )1( r w ity Ih~ h 11 w te a e I ar -ls, nt I ea I ; -I t ,: ch~e j ur ip Io ia Iia ro Ik I Ie o nT I I I M' I(' 114 e2 I Ii ]ill .1 14 V-11thell i W thI r 1424 1I14a '1 T Ie ill i1f the, ill, d1 41is 5 111( ) T h iii e ' s4 1 !:) i 4 (w .it ";I e t 2 111>1 i l i -It ' l l y 1 h -It-n ,the im tie'' Ir's i \\1 il 11 ,(cI II size ()f lil shimenl(11t1 'tl 41 il m 11(wr I 4m ' l n; ( P) P a2v ant I : 11 (, ' 1 4 Ii I:l 11 i I I tl -i( NI INImw of sapl er.One sam le itt thw 1:1ltnt dere coti l~ statill:l h oret i ne 11 I-lr -e i I lt to t' r () I. 1r i i t 1 41 Ih Iic m Ii IbINPACKEA SIIMNsOF s FA1)From liffere i t pht14 1!1uphii thi Owmi S hiv,:ntz (I ill lt leKt 1 ']) 42 ' 1llsamples ar"' dr1 awn 1 t h i I h 11 b i ld ild h ! ;, in I td ill4 (r41 1;IldIIt the seod is p r nt ii .1e 4 1: t1 yi (1:! 111 11 o iloet'f J i porta;1, 11,,( , a d1'4 1('4 1a1I'i41%e( Id Of th e wa;It r cot,( I t ('11 th e mel(rcl IIn I is(, l -pf ia .xtr; ) Ia pmull-t l;1 sent ill to d IermiS h110 W1t> ( i ont by Ti' 1'4'll1 i,1 A2 I11k1in a o.lis e ltaill r (Allss, tilt 1) .S1 11 :t, uj pkil k 11<'It 4 l A < ,r 2 .ter-ii gl tlie germ 1m Il I i y, WI' a thI Iis \11y1 11; 1 V ( 1W Ib n imI in IIl 1.11Until further n1i eG]'h4(1'14 ' lixii 42111 will It rci" ar e 1 i I'm sWhich is 511 eri s to ) 1rubs, ()r 1re.S.The importation of plants of any species of the leWus Uhlm pribi )I(Rk'oyltl resolutionI of Aar. 21, 13.1O l4l'?TATD)N ()F Y1 .1WE)4' PRO111 ITEDUntil further notice, the impor-tation of flower b lsfrom f(Ioin Il nis I)rdhibited Inlss e11is-ionl is granltedw by tho Departru-ilenit of ziitr(e, ,Norw y). (RoyLd r,,-lution (f Allr'. :-",RESi( li ('t, X i> N'ij -1:1IAAIe V. Un il 11er Io I t iv. fIe Ild I I I ~ i o / ' 112 d el1 al ul lto pl;1lits, O~ F Tlr I lld
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168 BUREAU OF PLAN' QUARANTINE [ January-.March,to tie ;ipproj uliate olicial of tle State colicernled. (See list of State officialsdu pazie 170.) It is also po sible t hat quarantine orders or revisions have beeni-sued which have 1ot reached the Depart iient.IN FEsTED STATESAll the States which have eiucted qua rantines place the regulations on theentry of the rest rict ed arliclefrom aly part of the following g States: Con-necticut, lIdiania, Alaine, Massachuset ts, Alichigan, New Hampshire, New Jersey,New York. (1hio. l'euisylvania. lhode Island, Vermont. and West Virginia.The ()klahomia quarati ile includes Wisconsin alnolig ithe States from whichsliiients of such articles are restricted.The Tennessee (laraltine iiicludes Kentucky, Virginia, am l Wisconsin,among the States from which shipments of such articles are restricted, and theCalifornia qua rant ie includes Kentucky, Maryland, Virgiuia. and Wisconsin.The quarantines of Arkansas, Florida, G&eor-ia. Louisiana. Mississippi, Ne-va di. (klalhomia, Soulth ('arolima, and Texas apply to the 13 above-listed States,an1d also to any other States ill which the corn borer may be found.STATEs WHICH HAVE ENACTED QUAR\NTINE HEGuLATiONSArizona, Airkaiisas, California, Colorado, Florida, G'eorgia, Illinois, Iowa,Kai-as. Kentucky, Louisiaia, Mississippi, Alissouri. Nebraska, Nevada, NewAlexico. O)klahonm. 0iia reon, South Carolina, South Dakota. Tennessee. Texas,Utah, Virginia, Washington, Wisconsin, and Wyomini.SUMMARY OF QUARANTINE REGULATIONSThe orders in the following sumimary are divided ipto three groups. as thevario Us States have issued different types of quarantine regulations.GROUP 1. EMBARGO -No CERTIFICATEThe State of Wyoming prohibits entirely the entry of the following articlesfrom the infested States.Re.strictcd articlc.-(ornstalks, corn on the cob, cobs or any other debrisof corn, broomeorn, all sorghums anl Sudan grass (except the clean shelledseeds of these planlts i, celery, beans in the pod. beets with tops, rhubarb, oator rye straw as such or when used as packing, cut flowers or entire plantsof chrysanthenmums, asters, cosmos, zinnias, hollyhocks, and cut flowers orentire plants of gladioli and dahlias except the bulbs or corms "*which arefree froim other plant growth whether grown or stored iin the infested district."GRoI P 2. STATES ACCEPTING ONLY FEDERAL CERTt FICATESQuarantines largely uniform have been issued by the following States whichrequire Federal certificates for entry of the restricted articles: Arizona, Cali-fornia , Colorado, Georgia, Louisiana, Neveda.' Oregon," and Utah.Nctrwctionu.-Cornsta lks, ears, cobhs, or either pmrts or debris of corn andbromcorui plats, or sorghums and Sudan grass (except clean, shelled corn,h,4bo orn see1, sorghum seed, aid Sudan-grass seed) are not certified byFedelena inspectors for movement from the infested States. The Coloradoqljit8ranuti ne provides. however, that they may enter that State without cer-tificatioll, whenlill .manutactured or processed in such a manner as to eliminateall r'sk of ca rryinig the borer.Lima hieanus in the (1pod, green-shell heons in the pod (of the variety known8 'raiiberry or Ilorticultiural), beets with tops. rhubarb." cut flowers, oretire plaits of clrysaitlemus, asters, gladioli, and daihlias, except the bulbsur cornis Without stems. are accepted by States in group 2 when certified by8 d1 y aut horized Federal inspector to be free from the borer, and are coil-taimed in ; car, box, or other coitaiiner to which is attached a copy of saidcertificate. Articles nlaiied in this ragra ph may be admitted into Colorado,h1i4wever. itlier whei so certitied 01r when maiuifactured or proce".sed.mbr formlriy p!e-d hiv .ri/o .Californica. Colorado. G r Louisiana, South:I1 Iot. i 111 V 1 h hav i Ihn iM i led wo grwq us 2 and :' and a i milar modifica tion is'nuing wim h 1 1 li tii Nl vada rtgu I ions: in the ca of ()regoin arrangements hivi' b ' imid ;idtiwi ist1r"t ivuly t 8'eV )t ClpItill(ation.' T e I l i8 l ,U 1% u a t il d10 s t inl) Inde rhubarb.

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19313] SERVICE AND IIGULATORY AN NotUNC' ENTS 169GROUP P .ATE Ein ATis ACCEPTED) ON t3ti \I N PIROWL TsRegulative (jtlr,1'ntilies, largely untiorii, have beein is'suied by the followingStates: Arkaisas. Fl'rida, Illinois, Iowa. Ka:niisa. Kentutcky. Mi -issippi, A\is-sollri, iNebraisk.1, New Mexico, Oklalhomla, Souith ('arIolil(I, Suth i )nktI, Teli-lessee, Texas, Virgiiia, Wshiniitoi, and Wis'ons.ll.R(strjctinN.lxp'I't as prao vided uiidele slb-eciolis (1 j -heblow\, the fDI-liwing articles a 1'eO ad(mliitd o 1 lie 1 1(, ' es ill gr3u 3 Iunle l hey havebeen manutllfact-Ired (W Pro(Ctessced ill such (I m11:nn1er 1; t4) climillIte all rikk ()f-'arryinig thle EUro010e1n Cmorn hmrer:ClNs (I ).'urIstaIlks ears. (-,I, O' ( wher IuIrts or debris olf cr1 'wroii-corn plants, so'ghumIs, ai1d Sudan grns*s ( except (cln, shelled crn1i" brwm-co1n1 seed. sorg hum1 seed, atal Suwhin-hrass '&l) , whimb have origliatel in 1heinfested States.Except as provided ider subsections (8)-(T) below, the following' artiele4are nit a dmitted to the States in group 3 less tHicy ha ve 1eei ma ufactril etlor processed as provided abIove, or unless they have been inlspiected y a dulyauthorized State (ir Feder l inspector and certi iedt to be firee fro(m tie Euro-pean corn borer, and are c(ntailned ill a catr', bwx. or othlier cntinillier tO whichis attached a ctipy of said certificate.Class (b).-Celery, beIanls ill the pod. beets with t(ps, rhiillbarb, oIlt ()r ryestraw as such Ow il 11 sed as packillg. 'ut 11wers i ntlie plalits of chrys-anthenimums, asters, 's011os, zinnias, hollyhocks. and cut flowers 01 entire plantsof gladioli and d(ahlias except the roots, bulbs., ()r col'rms thereof without stems,which have beei grown 'or stored in the in fested Stat es. The South Dtakotaquarantine also places these Iohlireiiients on spinach.Erceptions.-( 1) The South DIt)kta quIilatinie atpplies to "* all parts ofthe plant " ill tile case (of corn and broomcorn ad makes no reference ti theexemption of' shelle ( corn or seeds.(2) The States of Florida. Mississippi, South Dakota, Tennessee. and Texasaccept articles of class (a) when certified as provided above or when imanufac-tured m. processed.(3) The Illinois 1(d Vinrgini (jiarlintines place (at anid rye straw in chIass(u ) instead of class ( b). They also provide for the admhittaince of seed cornon the cob inl small quantities for exhibition puirlPses tinder certificate. illthe case of Illinois. that it has been subjected to a temlperature (3f 15W F. fornot less than 3 hours and in the case of Vir.inia, tImt it has been processedin such a manner as to eliminate risk of carrying the Eu ropeanl corn borer.(4) Celery is omitted fromii tihe list of restrited articles under the quiraIn-tines of Florida. Kentucky, and Texas.(5) Csmos, zinnia. and hllyhock are omitted from the list of restricted articles under the quarantines of Florida, Mississippi, and Texas.(6) Oat and rye straw is oimiitted from tile list of restricted articles underthe quarantines of Florida. Mississippi. and Texas.(T) The South Caroliiia tjuarautine does not provide for tie acceptanwe ofarticles of class (b) when miaiufactuved o1 processed. They must be certified.REGVLATIONs WITH REPECT TO CAN ADAhpmlent to Cana. -Shipients of cleaned shelled corn, either for seed orfeed. and clealled seed of broolrorii imay ente-r Canada. if accompanied by acertificate of inspectionl. signed by an authorized Federal or State otficial, tothe effect that the shilneiit in question is free from intfestation with theEuropean corn borer.sh ipmcnits from Caoiada .--Federal Quarantine -No. 41 (revised) prolilitsthe importa tion into the Unlitetl States from all foreign c31ntries and localitiesof the stalk aInd all either 138rts, whether used for patkinig (31r other purptCses,in the raw r uninamiulactired state, of Indian corn, (r maize, Ii roomcorn,sweet sorghuims, grain sorghums, Sudan grass,. Johnson grass, amd certain otherarticles, except that permits iiay be issued by tie Bureau ()f Plant Quarantinefor the import tioi of " br l woio 3' 1(31' 11181m 1 anu 1ct11r ing 1 b ro1mw 1' similar arti-cles made of biconicor-n. clean shelled cil, a1d cleaii soled t f the Otiher plantscovered."'Not exempt under the South Dakota quarantine. See subsection (1).

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170 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [January-March,A number of States include part or all of Canada in the area quarantined,but reference to such restrictions is not included herein as State restrictionson foreign commerce are considered unconstitutional. For further information as to restrictions on shipments to Canada, applyto Department of Agriculture, Ottawa, Canada.For further information as to shipments from Canada, apply to Bureau ofPlant Quarantine, United States Department of Agriculture, Washington, D.C.LEE A. STRONG,Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.References.-The State orders of the various groups have the following titles,and information concerning the orders may be secured from the officers named:Arizona-State entomologist, Phoenix, Ariz., Quarantine Order No. 12and Amendment No. 1, effective January 17, 1933.Arkansas-State phint board, Little Rock, Ark., Quarantine No. 11 andrule 64. effective January 16, 1933.California-Chief quarantine officer, Sacramento, Calif., Quarantine OrderNo. 15 (new series), effective March 10, 1933.Colorado-State entomologist, Fort Collins, Colo., Quarantine Order No.4 (second series) as amended, effective February 17, 1933.Florida-State plant board of Florida, Gainesville, Fla., rule 32, effectiveAugust 16, 1932.Georgia-State entomologist, Atlanta, Ga., regulation 36 (revised), effec-tive January 12, 1933.Illinois-State department of agriculture, Springfield, Ill., a proclamationby the governor, effective July 27, 1932.Iowa-State entomologist, Ames, Iowa, Warning and Quarantine No. 3,effective July 25, 1932.Kansas-State entomological commission, Topeka, Kans., Quarantine No. 5,effective August 5, 1932.Kentucky-State entomologist, Lexington, Ky., Quarantine No. 1, effectiveOctober 10, 1932.Louisiana-State entomologist, Baton Rouge, La., European corn borerquarantine (revised), effective January 16, 1933.Mississippi-State plant board, State College, Miss., rule 49 (amended),effective September 13, 1932.Missouri-Plant commissioner, Jefferson City, Mo., Quarantine No. 3,effective July 20, 1932.Nebraska-State department of agriculture, Lincoln, Nebr., QuarantineNo. 2, effective July 29, 1932.Nevada-State quarantine officer, Reno, Nev., a proclamation by thegovernor, effective September 1, 1932. Modification proposed.New Mexico-Head of biology, College of Agriculture & Mechanic Arts,State College, N.Mex., Quarantine No. 9, effective September 22, 1932.Oklahoma-State plant board, Oklahoma City, Okla., plant board Quar-antine No. 9 (amended), effective September 14, 1932.Oregon-Director of agriculture, Agricultural Building, Salem, Oreg., Quar-antine Order No. 26 (new series), effective October 11, 1932.South Carolina-State crop pest commission, Clemson College, S.C., Quar-antine regulation on account of the European corn borer, effective Oc-tober 1, 1932.South Dakota-Secretary of agriculture, Pierre, S.Dak., Quarantine No. 2(revised), effective March 7, 1933.Teninessee-Commissioner of agriculture, Nashville, Tenn., Notice of Quar-antine No. 6 (first revision), effective November 1, 1932.Texas-Commissioner of agriculture, Austin, Tex., Emergency QuarantineProclamation No. 71, effective July 25, 1932.Utah-( commissioner of agriculture, Salt Lake City, Utah, Quarantine No.11 ( amended), effective February 9, 1933.Virin ia-Commissioner of agriculture and immigration, Richmond, Va.,Quarintine No. 2. effective January 26. 19'23.a shjin oniire tr iof -i-ricilire. O1ympia. Wash., Quarantine No. 18( ww se ,i'). Ilf 0 active Ja na ry 24. 1933.W\iseoI-.in-> 1e t eitoinnomiist. Ma dison. Wis., Quoirantine No. 4 (fourthrevIio 'i. e f''ective Au eust 19. 1982.WY oI iln-C-l'Iommissioner of a -rieul ture, Cheyenne, Wyo., Quarantine OrderNo. 5, effective November 1. 1932.

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TABLE 3.-Synopsis of State regulations on account of the European corn borer, March 16, 1933Restrictions onFromConnecticut,Indiana,Maine, Mas-sachusetts,State of destiCornstalks, ears, plants of Lima beans, green-shell beans, Michigan,aton dGroup Order corn, broomcorn, sorbeets with tops, rhubarb, cut Celery, string and wax New HampOther Statesnation glums, Sudan grass (exflowers and plants of chrysanbeans, cosmos, zinnia, shire, New later foundcept shelled corn,' broomthemums and aster, cut flowers hollyhock. oat and rye Jersey, New infutedcorn seed, sorghum seed, and plants of gladioli and straw, spinach York, Ohio,and Sudan-grass seed) dahlia except corms or roots Pennsylva-nia, RhodeIsland, Ver-mont, WestVirginiaArizona-----------2 Quarantine no. 12-------Embargo-------------------Federal certificate required---None ----------------Covered------Not covered. cArkansas ---------3 Quarantine no. 11, rule 64Processing required --------Certificate or processing required Certificate or processing ----_do -------Covered.required.California--------2 Quarantine no. 15 (new Embargo------------------_ Federalcertificate required-----None--------------------------do--------(3)series). ;Colorado---------2 Quarantine no. 4, second Processing required--------Processing or Federal certificate -----(10------------------------o--------Not covered.series, required.Florida-----------3 Rule 32.--.--------------Certificate or processing reCertificate or processing required.---_do------------------------o--------Covered.quired. tGeorgia-----------2 Regulation 36, revised----Embargo-------------------Federal certificate required----------do-------------------------do--------Do.Illinois-----------3 Proclamation.-----------Processing or heat required Certificate or processing requiredCertificate or processing -----do -------Not covered.(see text). required AIowa -------------3 Quarantine no. 3--------Processing required-----------do.------------------------o---------------------do--------Do.Kansas-----------3 Quarantine no. 5.---------------do--------------------do----------------------(o------------------do--------Do.Kentucky--------3 Quarantine no. I---.----------do -------------------------do -------------------Certificate or processing -do--------Do.required except that cel-erv not restricted.Louisiana---------2 Not numbered---------Embargo------------------Federal certificate required (rhuNone ---------------------do------Covered.barb not restricted).Mississippi-------3 Rule 49----------------Certificate or processing reCertificate or processing required Certificate or processing -----do ----------Do.quired. required for celery. Norestriction on others.Missouri-----------3 Quarantine no. 3--------Processing required--------------do----------------------Certificate or processing --do--Not covered.required.Nebraska----------3 Quarantine no. 2 do ----------------------d-----do---------------------------do ------------------------Do.Shelled corn and seeds are not exempt under the South Dakota quarantine.2 Only South lDakota includes spinach in the restricted articles.The California quarantine lists Kentucky, Maryland, Virginia, and Wisconsin as infested, but does not cover " States hereafter becoming infested'.4 For special Illinois restrictions on oat and rye straw, see text.

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TABL .E .-h N!iopsis of S(aIc regdUations on accoi1nt of thc EU ropean corn borer, AlarcI 16, 1933 ContiniedIRest rid ions onFrom( onneelicut,7v itle, .\Mas-saclimset I s,Statof Cornstalks, ears, plants of Lin hia leis, green-shell beans, .\ichigan,it lll (I Ioip ( Order corn, broomcorn, sorheels w illi tops, rhubarl, cut Celer, string amd wiax New H pllmherghinis, Sudan grass (exflowers aid plants of chrysanheanis, cosooS, zinnia, shire, New later fun iscept shelled corn, broomI hemumsann aster, flowers hollyhock, oat and ry c J erse :, N foundcorn sed, sorghrum seed, and plants of gladioli and straw, spinach York, Ohio, iand Sudan-grass seed) dalilia except corms or roots I'eylisXva-nI&, (hodek'land, Ver-Iltoit, WXXestVirginiaNev a Ia 2 Proclamat ion .Emibargo Federal certificate required None Covered CoveredNew lexicon 3 Quarantine no. 9 -Processing requiredCertificate or processing reutiredCert ificate or processing (to Not cov ered.requiredOklihoma 3 (1o (to (1(-----10 do CovereI.Oregon 2 Quarant ine Order no. 26 Emiargo .Federal cert ificat e required_ None do Not covered.(new series).South Carolina 3 le-lilation 1 (1 --Processing required Certificat e required -Cert ificate required (1o, overed.South Dakota 3 Quarant ine no. 2, revised ('ert ificat e or processing reCertificate or processing requi red Cert ificate or processing do Do. ~quired. required.Te nnessee 3 Quarant ine no. 6, revised -o --(--. do . -(1 do. ----do ()Texas 3 Emergency Quarant inc jlo (10 None. do Covered.Proclamat ion 71.Utah 2 Quarant ine no. I amended. Embargo .Federal ceri iticat e required do do Not covered.Virginia 3 Qtiarant ine no. 2 Processing required (see, Cerliticate (r processing reql red (ert ificate or processing do 1o.text ). required.Washington 3 Qilarant ie no. 18 (new Processing required .-o .-(1 .----(do Do.series). required.Wisconsin 3 Quarant ine no. 4, revised o do -(1-(10 o -Do.W yoning I Quarant itie no. 5 -embargo --Embargo Embargo -do I Do.5 The Oklahoma quarantine lists Wisconisin as an infested State and covers "any other State hereafter becoming infested ".6 The Tennessee quarantine lists Kent ucky, Virginia, and Wisconsin as infested States, but does not cover "States hereafter becoming infested ". Tennessee also limits restric-tions on beans5 to lima and shell beans.7 For special Virginia restrict ions on oat and rye straw, see text.

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iici\NI'r ) 11i1T )RTS \ Sr,-P LT PERMITS POTATO SPORTS ION1 SPAIH L.\p'4il. A 4 in l 4 144 1h 14' n l\14 14\n la h it' 1 114i11d 11141hiies 1441' \in~u~sI;1 5 !441 1 1 ILInI 10:1 l iI4' 81 1ii tI ii l ;l theH'1 441 111 1 w h ich114 4/ ;/l( N \ il ' I I 1 ' I41 41 I// it, I l Jd4141i 14 I t S4i:i14 haI ih1 1 14 I I 441 1 "141I1111 ' si 1 1 i 1444111 l 1114 1I e'4 14 18 1' 411 41 " 1.( v (II IIII.\Ir 1441 l 4 1 1 i 11 11 4 J-w 14 1 t I 11414 ( '41 U i I 141 Irill Sl ilill 411 14 1 l44:11411 t I I I I Irly Isi> .PENALTIES IMPOSED FOR VIOLATIONS OF THE PLANT QUARANTINE ACT.\ o i li i i > el i t o i e l o ,~ v h 11wea 111i1 il liw rif'l J;111111 ,y v ';Ircth C>, 441 11'll jl'41 \t1 etl'SI I1 lil lin\ 1 v 11w114)5eh1 1Vthes inleul S1:h I fs < 11w 411111> 8 ttile a<1, a 1 j44lh 1\\h:JAPA'NESE-BEETLE QUARANTINEIll the P're he I o irf l N fc v. the ll/reli i t/ I / x ' I/ xpi I-' ti r'C(,,., l I~4)tIir ----------1rtlxi1',Il' 'I''\ (0, ~ I ' t\1 '1 4~ pxkl it]1l't., i h i*(,ast 14) p iii ut s -~ i t i t )C. wi hI I <)I It i lb In 1,-: n Hn (' i l )1 :1 11( 1 1fleaell 44 v84' 111d':V4, 1 ll\ 4W1 2n lI" h i n40 c ill md,Ill th1 1). care it' thw I ./rtc s\ v. / /( r /.J. ji.yld I lgl>]Us-i less as Tl I l i' we t I 'embI w )I , N.J., i i tIw h i il~ t a hI p] 1w II01 1of 11 1 V rs 11( l ll frmll 'I p o>i11 ill Ille re, :Ihiwd a e 1 1)6 1 w li t >nt ide f o v fwith<>w il lsli;ectiwl Mnd Ietfe t
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4

PAGE 47

ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINELEE A. STRONG, Chief of Bureau.A. S. HOYT, Assistant Chief.B. CONNOR, Business Manager.R. C. ALTHOUSE, Informational Officer.E. R. SASSCER, in Charge Foreign Plant Quarantines.S. B. FRACKER, in Charge Domestic Plant Quarantines.LON A. HAWKINS, in Charge Technological Division.A. F. BURGESS, in Field Charge Gipsy Moth and Brown-Tail Moth Quarantine(Headquarters, Greenfield, Mass.).L. H. WORTHLEY, in Field Charge European Corn Borer Project ( Headquarters,Eastern Section, South Norwalk, Conn.; Western Section, Springield, Ohio).L. H. WORTHLEY, in Field Charge Japanese Bcetle Quarantine (Headquarters,South Norwalk, Conn.).R. E. MCDONALD, in Field Charge Pink Bollhworm and Thurberia Weevil Quar-antines (Headquarters, San Antonio, Tex.).B. L. BOYDEN, in Field Charge Date Scale Quarantine ( Headquarters, Indio,Calif.).P. A. HOIDALE, in Field Charge Mexican Fruit Worm Quarantine (Head quartersHarlingen, Tex.).175U. S GOVERNMENT PilNTING OFFICE 19 3

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S.R.A.-B.P.Q. No. 115 I :Siied S) cm er 1inbvrUnited States Department of AgricultureBUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINESERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTSAPRIL-JUNE 1933CONTENTSPageQuarantine and other official announcements ----------------------------------------------------177Announcement relating to black stern rust quarantine (no. 38) _-.-----------------------------177Barberries and mahonias classified under black stein rust quarantine regulations (P.Q.C.A.-320, revised, supplement no. 1)------------------------------------------------177Announcement relating to European corn-borer quarantine (foreign) (no. 41) -----------------178Instructions to collectors of customs (T.D. 46335) -----------------------------------178Announcement relating to Japanese-beetle quarantine (no. 48) -----------------------------178Administrative instructions--commercially packed apples under the Japanese-beetle-quaran-tine regulations (B.P.Q.-352).----------------------------------------------------178Announcementrelating to narcissus-bulb quarantine (no. 62) -------------------------------178Supplementary administrative instructions-narcissus treatment and pest suppression(B.P.Q.-353) --------------------------------------------------------------178Announcement relating to nursery stock, plant, and seed quarantine (no. 37) ------------------181Instructions to collectors of customs (T.D. 46431)------------------------------------181Announcement relating to packing materials quarantine (no. 69) ----------------------------182'Amendment no. 1 to notice of quarantine ------------------------------------------182Announcement relating to seedor paddy-rice quarantine (no. 55) ---------------------------182Instructions to collectors of customs (T.D. 46373) -------------------------------------182Terminal inspection of plants and plant products ----------------------------------------183Wyoming discontinues terminal inspection ------------------------------------------13Georgia discontinues terminal inspection -------------------------------------------183Puerto Rico inaugurates terminal inspection ----------------------------------------183Miscellaneous items ------------------------------------------------------------------184Regulations governing the movement of plants and plant products through the mails(B.P.Q.-351)-------------------------------------------------------------184Regulations governing the importation of plants and plant products into Itply (P.Q.C.A.-289, supplement no. 1) -------------------------------------------------185Summary of the plant-quarantine restrictions of the Republic of Germany (B. P.Q.--302)(revised)--------_--------------------------------------------------------------185Plant-quarantine restrictions, Union of South Africa (P.Q.C.A.-297, supplement no. 3) 193Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act ------------------------------193Organization of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine-------------------------------------195QUARANTINE AND OTHER OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTSANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO BLACK STEM-RUSTQUARANTINE (NO. 38)P.Q.C.A.-320 (revised), supplement no. 1. ,JUNE 1, 1933,BARBERRIES AND MAHONIAS CLASSIFIED UNDER BLACK STEM RUSTQUARANTINE REGULATIONSP.Q.C.A.-320. as revised August 15, 1932, is hereby modified by tr-nsfterigBerberis gilgiaia and B. motguinca from group D to group B. The effect orthis change is to authorize permnittees under this quarantine to produce andship interstate these two additionA1 species of Berberis to the 13 protectedStates under their Federal permits.LEE A. STRONG,Ch ief, Bureau of Plant Quaranitine.551 2 ----1 177

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178 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE LApril-JuneANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO EUROPEAN CORN-BORERQUARANTINE (FOREIGN) (NO. 41)INSTRUCTIONS TO COLLECTORS OF CUSTOMSREVISED RULES AND REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE OF QUARANTINE No.41 (SECOND REVISION), GOVERNING THE IMPORTATION OF INDIAN CORN Olt MAIZE,1RoOMC0R-N, AND SEEDS OF RELATED PLANTS (T. 1). 4W335)TREASURY DEPARTMENT.OFFICE OF THE ('oMMIsSIONER OF (CTsTOMs,lashington, 1).C., April 21, 1933.To Collectors of Customos and Othcrs Concerned:The appended copy of Notice of Quarantine No. 41. with revised regulations,o0l accouhit of the European corn borer and other dangerous insects and plantdiseases, issued by the Secretary of Agriculture. which became effective March1, 1933, and supersedes all previous decisions [editions]I and amendments of thisquarantine, is published for the information and guidance of customs officialsand others concerned.FRANK Dow,Acting Commtnis-soner of Customs.[Then follows the full text of the quarantine and revised regulations.]ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO JAPANESE-BEETLE QUARANTINE(NO. 48)B. P.Q.-352 JUNE 26, 1933.ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS-COMMERCIALLY PACKED APPLES UNDER THEJAPANESE-BEETLE-QUARANTINE REGULATIONSUInder regulation 5 of the Japanese-beetle-quarantine regulations, "commer-cially packed shipments of apples in any quantity " are exempt from the certifi-cation requirements applying to other lots of apples of over 15 pounds to theshipment transported from the regulated areas to outside points.In iiterpreting this provision the term " commercially packed " will include:(a) All apples in closed barrels, boxes, or baskets, of sizes and types custom-arily used in the apple trade;(b) A-ples in open packages when such apples have been graded in accord-ance with the official standards for apples promulgated by the United StatesDepartment of Agriculture or in accordance with any official grades authorizedby the State in whilch the apples were grown and when the containers aremarked with suh11 grade. The so-called *unclassified' grade is not, however,considered a grade within the mieaning of this definition. and apples in openpackages so marked are not considered commercially packed."LEE A. STRONG,Chief, Bureau of P!ant Quarantine.ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO NARCISSUS-BULB QUARANTINE(NO. 62)B.P.Q.--353 JUNE 26, 1933.SUPPLEMENTARY ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS-NARCISSUS TREATMENTAND PEST SUPPRESSIONThe following instructions are issued to supplement circulars I3.P.Q.-337 and B.P.Q.-338, and to interpret certain points on which question has arisen.GENERAL STATEMENTIn general, the provisions of circular B.P.Q.-337 are mandatory throughout.In certn iI secio s, however, such terms as "should " were used where therecommnendations were primarily for the protection of the grower-such as ad-

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1933] SERVI('E AND imGUIATfli ANlN-U NAI iN lvice colicerling care ill tle use ofyanii , 111d preV nIig iOwjury t tle bulb-by triea t ing at tile pril)poplt I lmne of y'ea r. Il l ses whire te a:iminist rat ive in-structiolls wse the Wtirm shiuilil -ilSlpeclt rs alin just tou ill tim ki: except ilswhlei( sucli exceptions s eitS Swcwuhs lry:111i( where the grwi h. a 11I ie(aliza-tioi of tilte agers m. disadvatlages ilvolVed.I NSI'L'IioNsThe authiorit \ of iiispe'tis to V tlr l i J l' itll< It! ' Ifields relates t) ilstlallces where tile fioldS are So illod with wee I'111 ia1 .sto prevent lie inspector fr-om findinltg eehwoi ill est'tiOS stisfatily.In 01155 where the 41rmver or1 his employees a re rogiin l t ii l' l r l(' iout C(Ulls ill dorlm'llalt bulbs, ill advn1v' of the illspector, 11o aule am!Lenikare to be held for the inspietor's exm1iltatiom it 'e dsiies. SIh r111 mlculls sihoilt be destroyed 1 prOiIptly as possible after eXIlll ini tion. 01wmethod of accomplisiIIg suichi (( St r ucuti)I i buIryilg Ile bulbs tleoli'v Intdcovering them with quicklime ind then with ii.Dormt ant inspectionl flr celwormli1 is especially im;ptijrl;tmnt whore ucr aillstciwks are under suspici;n)l, but where the inspector l11s failed Ito lii110 eel\ worminifesI 1 toll il t he ield. Some oF l it ese cot diti jim are:(1) Where the lot of bulbs Concerned was giVen bot-wNt r tr eat ment theprevious year;(2) Where the l)ulbs Were produced l)y a grower whose preilises have beenknown to be iinfested int previous years ;(3) Where the bulbs were produced in the vicinity of inotlietvariety inwhich infestation Was discovered ; or(4) Where through purchase or otherwise the complete previous story ofthe stock concerned is uiiklowit.If the liumbe'r of inspeoos ill a State rI. district i It Iav'e 1o)utI t)enalde them to examine c-reftilly\ I 'r t uf eve1y lot 14 111mntiI hillb:Swithin the State or district, su(h dorni~ntt iispeotiion may be limtito ho 1ih sof the fuur' s eoil classes I ntamed alwvit.Dormant inispectionl is not requirUtl where iifektt:11iln lhs alrely bweli fIouiulin the same liit il the field, as sII huibs imst )e treated ill ;n event.The Buireau has been asked whet her t horf a c Init snn cenii ilts Idlinerwhich the ilispector is juistiied In diviig iiusually lar-e blocks of a sinl-levariety, requiring trvatmiont of 11 inl&f'eI il rtil ai, in tli a!iselee ofvisible eelworm itnfest tioil, c(wtifyin i th telilder as fr h fom infllLatinwithout Ireatient. Such divi:-in i' jul-iified (1111 , hell thttte is ('liljite evi-dence thAt the eelwtll infesttlioll i>veI in the illfestei pi'tiou of teblock is both (a ) ex -triely sctree, i ( f l defiitely of the 'urttnt sOi'inJil. A clrrelnt 50o1 infestttia l ill ow citd tif I a liwek m1y result fruminthe flow uf irrl gatin \v;lt i t all il nste vri 'ty lst I1lie ollfs of ith Itowsof a previously Hiniifested variety. Where such ilifeslatiou is voFy slight, wherethe locations is one oil which lbs 11,1d nIit previoisly bueun \rowI, '111(1 wleirereasonable care has buen used to avoid on rryii iufestatiti tlurij oltivtionand at other times tnl tools anli the t(o1hin i hflibretrs, the jil>Jttr2 11 ali-thorized to make plrOvIsiOn for the tlie:jid, etrlto a1nldlinl .tri:etmntt uthe infested portion of the field. If It( elwt rmtt is f(ii1i)d ol d(h llltm it ills!ut' iollin the apparently uiinfesteii sections, petlits may the be issued for the latterwithout requiring treatment.In no case ill whi('h either the biilhus ow tt priumises lmve 1ietll inifist'lqbefore--whether Ole bulbs ver tea 1 oil i ot-oul su-t 14 1 divisil Ii i ablo-k be authorized. Experiei e i tas shwn i'hil ie sihl 0:1es 1itt ildin(0uinlfest0atIion is mrdiniarflY (We to) 1 iarr.-)vl fr m lvrvioils vcar , :111d thoinspector, it findinl oot r lle in fest1 ulbu in ihe 1lik, " coipetld toas ,4m1l thwt sm1 r-vrha 1e le i agra nhro acsuthan actually show spikkels.Ttli'>TMVN VE ti I.IFssThe 'Onstruction -aili s l ,iVu 1uur tmi1lutio t 1mbr a n11hIry mxi'tthat seve'a 1 different types t f (on ulstrul ion Fe o iltdic iti Ind i 1 tNow 1:mchoose litwee them.Ill addition to ile w ainlini1 s iuLlliilntd ill cic ull' B.P.Q. ):T., c111 m11als(ube taken to avoid explosihm. Such expli lu nfl 111' tuc(urrelr i where :111 u h '

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180 BUREAU OF PLANT QUAJIANTINE [Aprl-Juneheater with open wiring was employed to bring up the temperature of thefumigation chamber during treatments and where a relatively high concentrationof cyanide gas being generated from sulphuric acid and sodium cyanide cameinto direct contact with such wiring.The commercial calcium cyanide prescribed in circular 337, in addition to being of the " slow-evolving type ". has a content of 40 to 50 percent of purecalcium cyanide, and is of the so-called " granular type."VAPOR-HEAT TREATMENT FR BULB FLIESIt has been demonstrated by the Bureau of Entomology of this Departmentthat the vapor-heat treatment properly applied will destroy all immaturestages of the greater bulb fly, Merodan equestris. Based upon data furnishedby that Bureau, the following method of treatment is authorized if desired inlieu of the hot-water treatment or fumigation for this bulb fly:Heating the bulbs contained in the tray in a chamber of approved designby means of conditioned air to a temperature of 110* F. at the approximatecenter of the bulb and holding them at that temperature for a period of 2 hours.The temperature to be determined by distance thermometers of an approveddesign in six or more locations in the treating chamber.The treating apparatus must be so constructed that the temperature of thebulbs is raised evenly to 110' F. with a variation of not more than 2* in thetemperature in the air in different parts of the room at any time after it hasbeen in operation 30 minutes. It must be equipped to maintain the temperatureautomatically after it reaches 1100, with a variation of not more than V* from1100 in the load throughout the treating period of 2 hours. The equipmentmust have sufficient capacity to heat a full load of bulbs from 60* to 110* in6 hours, and must be provided with facilities for maintaining the air circulatedthrough the room saturated with water vapor without the presence of freewater in the air. A heater, so that warm. dry air can be circulated throughthe load after the sterilization is completed, should be installed in the airconditioner.While the performance of equipment for applying this process and the dis-tance thermometers for determining the temperature will be carefully checked,and the equipment approved only after it is shown that it will apply thetreatment properly, the shippers will not be limited to any particular type.The general requirements for furnishing the proper conditions for this treat-ment are a source of steam at approximately 15 pounds pressure, an airconditioner, consisting of a blower of sufficient capacity. a conditioning cham-ber in which air, water, and steam can be mixed together to bring the air atthe proper temperature to saturation, together with an automatic controlfor maintaining constant temperature. The blower must be of sufficient ca-pacity to force conditioned air at a temperature of 1100 F. through the bulbsin large volume. At least four changes of air per minute through the treatingchamber are necessary to provide the proper conditions for the treatment.The distance thermometers must be accurate to within one half degreeFahrenheit and of the type that will make possible reading the temperatureof the bulbs in any part of the treating chamber within one half degree Fahren-heit without opening the chamber. The bulbs of these thermometers mustbe of such design that they may be inserted into the narcissus bulbs and sothait the temperature at the approximate center of the bulb can be obtained.Distance thermometers calibrated for direct reading of the temperature indegrees Fahrenheit may be found easier to use than other types. Temperaturereafngs should be made at 15-minute intervals and an accurate record ofthe temperatures maintained.Specifica tions for equip ment which has successfully met these requirements,and information as to where the parts may be secured, will be furnishedto State ispectors on request, and interested growers or dealers may securesuch information through them. Possible disappointment or loss throughthe purchase of equipment which might later prove ineffective may thus beaVoided.TREATMENTS FOR EELwOHMsHot-water treatment is to be supervised by the inspector. In case of insuffi-cient inspection personnel. an inspector may authorize the owner of the bulbsto proceed with treatment for limited periods in the inspector's absence, mak-

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'NI(4.) >j4 ./ >Hf(iN.\ >l( ) (fij .IVA(' IAP4(jjd Y X { J')1>.1 ( lO]Si U11 .O111/> x iMd .qIiU.Ob,41-iI3I2~Po 1 ) t m o, ?(.7ISI 1 3 )3-Josfttld Jk) J.Io ol IV.11 1) P( 117 ) )) 9 J 'l *XI \4 d I P, 0 m.11 1 1d ([j , I t 1 30 I \ [' ) k (I po p I Io I I I I S I I0V 14 to u lH7 IV Topillli 1: 1 1 41 1 % J ( 1f % N)1i1:1). )v.1TT solI Al! 1.1)' tUTU ")1III (o r 1 4d714 il T 1U01 PAJIULII ).L1 spoo \\ .1.111 * 11Wt iIdJ0III P) T)IIP' U {S1 PM [ t t 01 S.bid ) 'U)' ) X) .'. '.1/() l)Jl~ 1#OpT( ~ .I .1, >J ItSy >i U Il D~HH ilp G UI{ {{>11% L 1:-''t J' 1Kb 0 P 4141 11IMVI~VXV ) 'lT 1 ~84~K'.t1 lx .!8'1.1A j-1 ' tI \1 X AU N .i'{ \ N II I 'L4 h)iIV 'KJ> S IS-I) b 0 SH01[1MIO.) 01 SNIJIII OH1SNIU\V >LK V11q I9(. 111)1,01(i1~LL'L IULNi0NUI14T4{ ) SIii 8.14 1. 4418111n 114 ut~l pIhij fbApi-. \\ S .) -l -01 FUI mr{ .jut JV4IM9 \ 4 4j 4i i18.11 1111111. )A011 1 11111 11 { .O1 0j lj(Tjliii 1 U l d 1 IbI41110 1 t8lbusi 8i iIlA J )4.jI! JU{H 11 8X TM 8 ,1 U Jill). IIi Jul44d HO(IB.I H,'ll~ulJaU.\ 11{ uIl poo01 1ol .1 () po3p t s6{ v j({1,),) -Iii 1)4SS4)1)} J I[l ll .1b) .I .4)l 11 .41-1 vsij 1 .)> I .\) 11 .i 1l11111 .)lll .1111) I 11M1 0'0 H sUI{1J2;ti~~~~~~~~~~~~~~u J4 .j. 11 v I.4 ii.11.4X)811'111 (Il,11114.IM .)IfI.)41 111.IIU\ Abd[.\\ HI *, I JT 10.1 ti d {1 1 0 (13 0 % 01{ i {)1 I){ I ([pt aJ)I A\ '1~ins'11 >11144 1 0 'I j .1 l 1 ,1 > J041 1\1.4} ) jtI 101) f 104 .11 01.lIJ ' .\ x : 1 4 1 .' 1. OMl , iUll I{.4 I) \ 84)11141 H) .411. .4q 1l ajUTptl, ji:({104 (o A TII )I A% 1. )S \8 4 I VI8 1 .10111 ojj4 k V 11.4 li J \' .().j '.,A)kN \o,4 \10( -o'l p\o pod(1N l L~{8dnf8TI-F J44144I 111A. U 11 .1A. 1 -p lpm).11 *.84 jou418 4) I 0T,i~.1,1A j) hWl 1 1 ) 1 411 11XI U ~ ).~.143 'i'~I .4) 21 i I 4.1 > .411 411. 4 14.44r'1 14)1 liT.4). pu114 '1l11lui.11 *11) I40!.I,)4 .1.11pla' olp)

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182 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [April-JuneANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO PACKING-MATERIALSQUARANTINE (NO. 69)AMENDMENT NO. 1 TO NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 69INTODUUcTORY NOTEThis amendment. which is made concurrent with the date on which thequarani ine first ieicomes effective. has relation only to the list of prohibitedmaterials, 1 ermitting exceptions to be made therefrom in the case of specificpacking materials in -which it is judged that the pest risk has be&n reduced orelimni na ted by the method of preparation. process. or manufacture.AvNiR S. HOYT.Acting Chief. Jitreau of Plant Quarantine.AMENDMENT NO. 1 TO NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 69[Approvd Tune 2. 193': effective July 1, 19331Uider authority conferred by the Plant Quarantine Act approved August20. 1912 (37 Stat. 315) as amended, it is ordered that section 1 of Noticeof Quarantine No. 6.9, approved February 20, 1933. effective July 1, 1933. beand the same is hereby amended to read:1. On and after July 1. 1933. the following plants and plant products, whenused as packing materials. are prohibited entry into the United States fromthe countries and localities named:( a) Rice straw, hulls, and chaff: from all countries.(b) Corn and allied plants (maize, sorghum, broomcorn, Sudan grass,n;ipier grass. j bs-rears. teosinte, Polytoca, Sclerachne, Chionachne) : all parts,from all countries except Mexico. and the countries of Central America, theWest Indies, and South America.(c) Cotton and cotton products (lint. waste, seed cotton, cottonseed, andcottonseed hulls) ; from all countries.(d) Sugarcane: all parts of the plant including bagasse, from all countries.(c) Bamboo: leaves and small shoots. from all countries.(f) Leaves of plants: from all countries.(g) Fore-t litter: from all countries.(It i Soil containin,. an appreciable admixture of vegetable matter, from allcountries, except su h types of soil or earth as are authorized as safe for packingby the rules and re glations promulgated supplemental to this quarantine.Ex eptions to the above prohibitions may be authorized in the case of specificmaterials which have been so prepared. manufa-tured. or processed that in thejudgment of the inspector no pest risk is involved in their entry.This amendment siall be effective on and after July 1. 1933.Dune at the city of Washington this 28th day of June 1933.Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.[SEAL] R. G. TUGWEL,Acting Secretary of Agriculture.ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO SEEDOR PADDY-RICEQUARANTINE (NO. 55)INSTRUCTIONS TO COLLECTORS OF CUSTOMSREvISION OF QUARANTINE AND REGULArIONS COVERING IMPORTATION OF SEED ORPADDY RIcE (T.D. 46373)TRF-ASURY DEPARTMENT,OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONER OF CUSToMS.Washington, D.C., May 2, 1933.To Collcclor of Customs (md Others Concerned:The apiwi)ded copy of Notice of Quarantine No. 55, revised (seedor paddy-rice (1uarmithii. with revised regulations, adding rice straw and riLe bulls to

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1933] SERVICE AND 1EGULATOEY ANNOUNCEMENTS 183the articles prohibited entry. a nm11plifying the delinitionl of seal or paddy rii 'e, andmaking provision for the importation of so(1r a (bldy r cu fromn Mexico bymtllil, issued by the Secretary of Agriculture to become eff(tt(ive July 1, 11)33, ispublished for the information and gui(lance of customs ofticizi Sanid oilwr.s con-cerned.FRANK DOw,Ac(tig Connii -.'ion'r (,f Clstons.[Then follows the full text of the revised quairaitiie nd rignd I oil.]TERMINAL INSPECTION OF PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTSWYOMING DISCONTINUES TERMINAL INSPECTIONINSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMAST.RSPos'T OFFICE DEPAR T MENT,TillaD ASSISTANT POSTMASTVER GENERAL,11(1a1hinyton, April 10, 193?.POSTMASTER.MY DEAR SIR: The State entomologlst of Wyoming has advised that as therecent Legislature of Wyomiiiig malde 1o )rovisionl fr forsry-stk nspecOn,parcels of plants and plant prod cts upon alrriving at the post office of addressmay be delivered to the addressee without first being sul)Jected to terminalinspection under section 596, Postal Laws and Regulations.You will, therefore, please be governed accordingly in future.Very truly yours,C. B. EILFNBERGFR.Th ird A.'it.a ut P''stm, Ioter Griiero7.GEORGIA DISCONTINUES TERMINAL INSPECTIONINSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERsPOST OFFICE DEPARTMENT,THIRD ASSISTANT POsT MASTER GENERAL.l1uashington, JUhoc 15, 1933.POsTMASTER.My DEAR SIR: The State entomologist of Georgia has requested tht paYrOCesof plants or plant products addressed for delivery in the State of Georgia benot sent for terminal inspection in future. Therefore, paircels of plants andplant products arriving at the office of address may be delivered to theaddressee without first being subjected to terminal inspection under section 596,Postal Laws and Regulations.You will. therefore. please be governed accordingly in future.Very truly yours,C. B. EILENBEIRGYR.Tb ir! Assisluant Postnwstcr Gcine-a!.PUERTO RICO INAUGURATES TERMINAL INSPECTIONINSTRUCTIONS To POSTMASTERSPOST OFFICE DEPARTMENT,THIRD ASsI STANT POSTMASTER GENERAL,WasinWtyoo, May 16, 1933.The island of Puerto Rico has established a place for terminal inspectionunder the provisions of the act of March 4, 1915, embodied in section 596,Postal Laws and Regulations, of the following plants and plant products:All florists' stock, trees, shrubs, vines, cuttings, grafts, scions, buds, fruitpits and other seeds of fruit and ornamental trees or shrubs, and otherplants and plant products in the raw or uninanufactured state includingfield, vegetable, and flower seeds: also cotton lint.

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184 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [April-JuneAll post masters are, therefore, informed that packages containing any plantsor plant pOdiictS addressed to places ill the island of Puerto Rico may beaccepted for mailing only when plainly marked so that the contents may bereadily ascertained by an inspection of the outside thereof. The law makesthe failure so to mark such parcels an offense punishable by a line of not morethan $100.Postmasters withiin the island of Puerto Rico siall be -overned strictly bythe prmvisions of 'aragraplis 3. 4. 5, 6, and 7, section 51, Postal Laws andRegiltations, in tile treatment of all packages address. l for delivery at theirotlices containing any of the plants or lilant pirodtucts above described as subjectto terminal il s5 icetiol.Inspection service is maintained at San Juan only.Owing to the perishable character of plants and plant products, the packagescontaining such matter must te given prompt attention.Any failure of compliance with the foregoing instructions or with the provi-sions of section 596, Postal Laws and Regulations, coming to the attention ofany postinaster should be reported to the Third Assistant Postmaster General,Division of Classification.C. 13. E1:LENBERGE,Third Assi.taint Posima.tcr General.MISCELLANEOUS ITEMSB.P.Q.-351 (superseding H.B.-212) APRIL 12, 1933.REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE MOVEMENT OF PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTSTHROUGH THE MAILSThe following regulations have been estabhlish d by rie PosOffice Depart-mient, in conference with the Department of Agriculture, to govern the move-ment through the mails of the plant material named (Postal Guide 1932,pp. 17-19).Plants and plant products, including all field-grown florists' stock, trees,shrnis, vines, cuttings. grafts. scions, buds. iruit pits and other seeds offruit and ornamental trees or shrubs, and other plants and plant products forpropagation, except field, vegetable, and flower seeds, bedding plants, and otherherbaceous plants. bulbs, and roots, may be admitted to the mails only whenaccompanied with a certificate from a State or Government inspector to theeffect that the nursery or premises from which such stock is shipped has beeninspected within a year and found free from injurious insects and plantdiseases., and the parcel containing such stock is plainly marked to show thenature of the contents and the name and address of the sender (see. [395 (2)],Postal Laws and Regulations).Terminal inspection of plants and plant products addressed to Arizona,Arkansas. California, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho,[Louisiana]. 3Mississiqii. Montana, Oklahoma, Oregon, Utah. and Washingtonis required. (See sec. [591] Postal Laws and Regulations, and instructions inthe supplenients to Postal Guide.) All parcels addressed to the States namedmust be plainly marked on the outside to show the exact n;' ture of theircontents." Plant qitra ntines.--When the United States Department of Agriculture,under authority of the Plant Quarantine Act, quarantines any State or area onaccount of a plant disease or insect infestation, the mailing of plants or plantproducts from such State or area is subject to the restrictions inmposed by suchorder."Full information regarding any or all plant quarantines may be secured byaddressiIng lie Bureau of Plant Quarantine, Washington. D.C. The correspond-ent should state the nature of the material which it is expected to move, andthe points from and to which it is to be sent.LEE A. STRoNG,Chief, Bttreau of Plaitt Quarantine.

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o;~u~ I~d ( lis ! a?i.d '1lIo!p~ds' ) aNu.)s oz~fo ILL ,x -yjoi/Dja Lhuxoj/Iiq(VUJOXOIIAIjd JO Ilvujdj U1iIo4lfil.14s1j) pUII 0)41 i1U'4A)LJtud1 )Ili plodAo)dd uipauLfls)p Oat" .{ JV1UUIOD Jo tI 4 ij JO Suol 14sdJ d 1U UIU Ji 8[d ILLSHH{JIU AN: Iix.VUVAO-L. x1'i :ao [ iiAIhAXYWVII3{)DJO JUIIIA0aL J il( O IKOIJJ i1IJ ,A1 Oi I iVd J-.0 U JOU WOd NI 1i[ lll1I1L8 I i it 1 4ot I I[1UU jLJIi ) ( i -1 4 111 1U, i-,1.) Vl1 JtVI O d IIu J tULjP it" sptlit Ot j'jt j [Ll)tMI fLi 4 J l .-4\ vld Alu ,IdO i1 [o 11,Ui1.{U UX11'10) A.{1SiM{ Vi 1 pj0 'wI l ) I UIAl p ,)m UA\It 1 [)IN-u.Ol OT[I iS I \.Uoj 41 )td J ll d s l:l O ijhjfl4.bA fliI ~ )l LijJ4 SIP. l.)MI1 'o.1 1144 ui u11 411d1 )I[,' p) Ad 81111115t4lAd s>t1L) I') If)d *111jo1) It'l) AU 4!llJj.1 1 t piU fNtVOlJ f lu Nfl/o!V!Id 4 0{8.S ottl1 Il:. ploNJIll I 8 441[jO 1 11o .L UI >I4 1I.1~ t d .I 4 J Al4) ~ *LOD ~Jl4 J 1! ) A~~i: ~ l~> ,~~J! 115 Jo 1 .o ~ L -11 .lloil u4 .l *SliJ 1(iO ) .dj4U 110'514 18 ~ i11.1 -)III Ul(oJj S-Il8i" pO O1144o111 .11l mIT! II1V(),t .14) O1il-la.1-Isoa [1; L.104 fl11o '1A11' '\ '10 AA )U11AO1 JO 00t100[ All j4p ~ ~ h, Op~t oi(I{ l~g k) f IURb )I-11 JO S'00,1-0[0 1 d{US OSO IU U~tJANYMIDa-10t') I i Ad() afil AO S.N11AILLSHJi LHXI KVHVA-10-.LN'1d Hil AO AHVVIVI4A J[h)SIAO. -dmoi i lit 1 114 JHO[)i .14 8 14:) iilS U U '41tlo 1 lltsIli{ p piltui Sop.flis 0{ J.) -.o)11TUt )(1 1)111 Ju 002 Jt 0111 p) d op )l1Oi t.jII" oIIIU> JDL 1))//0p~l Ji'iM)P/I, I)4j 1\0lV T)ldVU)1AS 1041 OM '.O)Ill 14 14 Ill [p) ll, *p121) 1,qj pull j) s,1111:1 [11 p l8 )II llt t J 1 44 JTiII 1Illi H17,)!DJ ) 0114 144 011 A1 04)SJ.8Od p ld ju8 lt Ollf A4)t I I I "( I I I p)111w i> III.l I I I i011{8 s 4111 j! p 4.14)I111 s I (l!j111).lP.\114X I. )8.II L\I ILpH NOl Jo y )o{ ' JU) p1 1 S41.j1 1 (q)J( ) i ll I.IO I-).4I) -S I I ' i? I,((' lo m I IAloS ~ ~ I' AO "4'M Il I J , ')3 !'1 V J)\E S[~:

PAGE 58

186 BUREAU OF PLANT QUAlRANTINE [April-Juneor fruit fly (/ihugoleti8 pomotella), Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa de-ml ,i (1ta ), put-a Wart ( ChryiophlyctiN cndobiotica), the cherry fly (Rhago-lix c, rUisi), the carnation leaf roller (Tortrix pronubana), injurious diseasesand 'ests of lower bulb, and tubers. of conifers and seeds of conifers, of plantsand parts of plants of the : I lill I.s, of the southern co tetiwood (IpuluN[camwid nisx dfltoid ,1 a1nd of liati azaeas 1:/al( indicu .IMPORTATION PROHIBITEDGrapevine stock, and all parts of the grapevine from any country, to preventthe introduction of phylloxera. (Decree of October 31, 1879, and subsequentorders; Reichisgesetzbl. p. 303, etc.) (See p. 187.)Living dictyledonous plants or parts thereof from the United States andcertain other countries, to prevent the introduction of San Jose scale. (Decreeof November 3, 1931, and circular of November 26, 1931; Reichsgesetzbl. I: 74,1931, p. 6i7, and Rundschreiben des ItMf.E.u.L. an Linderregierungen vom 26November 1931, II: 41, p. 258. Decree of July 8, 1932; Reichsgesetzbl. I: 45,1932, p. 351.; See p. 18.I'otatees from the United States, to prevent the introduction of the Coloradopotato beetle. (Decree of February 26, 1875, and subsequent orders; Reichs-.e1 bl .1:85. Ictc.) I See 11P. 191 and 192.)Potatoes, tomatoes, eggplants, strawberries, rooted vegetables, bulbs, tubers,rhizi lmies. and other subterlranaii parts of giants: peelings, and refuse ofsncli products: and sacks, and other materials which have been used for pack-inor preserving such products. Importation and transit prohibited fromFrance. (Decree of February 23, 1932: Reichsgesetzbl. I:13, 1932, p. 91.)(See p. 191.)Seeds of Scotch pine (Pix -sl /rrstris) and Norway spruce (.i co (Io.rccl:a Ifrom any Country, to prevent the introduction of diseases of those trees.i Decree of Februiry 28. 1929: Reichsgesetzbl. I: 11, 1929, p. 76.) (See p. 189.)Plants of the following genera from any country, to prevent the introductionof jwsts of those jilant, : Fir A bic., ). spruce ( Pice, ), pine I Pin u s. Dotiuasfir ; P'.widot.ug1 w), hemlock ( Tiupa ). (Decree of June 3. 1930; eichsgesetzbl.I : 20. 19'0. p. 188.) (See p. 190.)Rooted carnations, cnttin:s. and cut flowers from any country. to prevent theintroilnction of the carnation leaf roller Tortri.r prO,,u1ualbo). (Decree ofAlarch 28, 1929; Reichisgesetzbl. 1929, I: 15. p. 83.) Entry of carnation cutilewers prohibited from March 15 to Noveiber 20. of each year. ()ecree ofSeptember 30. 1932: Reichsgesetzbl. I: 68, 1932. p. 492.) (See pp. 189 and 190.)Rooted plants of the genus Vim Ua nd the southern cottonwood (Populus[canidcji.01 dcltoidcs ). and parts thereof fromti any country. to prevent theiitroduction of post. and diseases of those plants. (Decree of February 2.1932 : Reichsgesetzbl. I: 10. 1932, p. 63.) (See p. 191.)IMPORTATION RESTRICTEDLiving plants and parts thereof. the importati(,in of which is not prohibitedI)y special decrees, as indicated above. Shilmients of restricted plants andparts thereof are to be a-companied by phylloxera certificates and by certificatesattestihi the noni1lusion of dicotyledonous plants except cacti ). of Vim 44ssm'. and of Pop U li/N [c n(ladclnsi8 dltoidr. ('crtificate4 imust 1e prepared inthe Geriaji anaiage and in thit of the coutry of origin. Every shipment willbe subject to inspection for San Jose scale. I Decree of July 4, 1 3. and subse-juent orders: leichseesetzbil. 1 58. etc. Decree of November 3. 1931 : Reichs-gesetzbl. I : 74, 19:1. p. 7I. 'ircular of Novenber 26. 19:1. Decree of Febru-ary 2. 198:2: 1 eicbsgesetzbl. I: 1';. 1932. p. 68. I)ecree of July 8. 1932;Reiohsgeseizbl. I : 45. 1982, p. 351.) (See pp 187. 188. and 191.)Flowers, u,0111b.h ('1ms1, anid tubers must be ae0iJmp an Iied by a certificate:ttesii n freedoi fI 10 certain pests and diseases, and by tIle certificates pre-scril Ied for livinii plants and parts thereof. (I)ecree of July 7, 1930; Beiclis-gewet zb'I. I: 24, 1930, p. 204. , ( See p. 190.)India aztleas must be accompanied by a certificate attesting freedom fromcerla in pests and diseases, and by the certificates prescribed for living plantsand pa rts thereof. (Decree of November 9, 1982: Reichsgesetzbl. I: 75. 1932,p. 52$. I ( See p. 190.)Fresh fruits may be imported in the original pack only and are subject toinspection for San Joe" seale a ind the apple magot or fruit fly on arrival at

PAGE 59

the ltIrt of V1tr , v. 1 1 > 1,II ; 'i. r 1: 1lI j fil. lf t W N .il I I .P I'I'l I TY fIf9 ti'sl s hd i ll l 111< 1)I ; iw l li lfd 1"~' l ]' l 11 ' ]if rA I'Ihi i't Ti 1 2 1! (11 1 114 41 4'i 1 111 '' i1"t 111 1' 1lA A 1 01 1 11 .T\11e'l't 14'11f Nm'wh Uti 1 14 r 441 4i fi' \' (i \ bhrl'!''ilSlli rT '''1Il4114 ]); ll i jd, I r I' k i lii 1M.4le g li' i\' 1 W 11 ' oii 2 11 114 4 11 21'4 111"}P]YJATXF'1 I R -T I T Ewihi4'1 i i f ft0 l \ 101 i\, >811 \ i' 1 I V tiUlt of Be nenmfu i ,I nI -or 8. SI n1' 111 44fw ; 1141 i IT1 11 1 tii n)f a ''1 With t : il N 441' 114 ill1t' A l i'llLIrI of 14 1l4l4> l4ill o .r 1181, N ~ lwli ,7' '114 l '-1 l it ill' ]'4 I': 1 iii O'rl1 i sTable grpsmay I,(, imporu"e1 whon pakewithwut rpin aliG~s, C1898 INIllt .O well-hiadled linrrel, e ( t it s)eelo~ed larrDf .( roe0 of Df. 3 1 1 T R Jlsestl, z. 0 .of !Ill.% 4. aSfnd ;uhseflll('nt, (11"er<:le elg s t Il,].1 3 l .SHIPPER '(-TiLlI<>N A\ND I'HlYLTA)EL 11 111)\E :E HE11hipmenlt"; of live planlts, 1n !1 li)arts thereof, I'ther 111:111 ap 110,enwhich i-; not prolihiied b)y the
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188 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [April-JuneRESTRICTIONS TO PREVENT THE INTRODUCTION OF SAN JOsE SCALE AND APPLEMAGGOTThe original San Jose scale decree of February 5., 1898, prohibited the impor-tation into Germany of all living plants or parts thereof from the United States,but the edivt of May 8, 1907, now superseded by the decree of November 3,1931, and the circular of November 26, 1931. (Reichsgesetzbl. I: 74, 1931, p.67O. and Rundschreiben des RM.f.E.u.L. an (lie Lijuderregicrungen vom 26November. 1931, Il: 41. p. 258). group plants into classes A. entry absolutelyprohibited; B, importation conditional; and C, importation unrestricted; andthey prescribe that fresh fruits may be imported only when found free fromSan Jose scale and apple maggot.SAN JOSE SCALE RESTRICTIONS ON PLANT IMPORTATIONTo prevent the introduction of San Jose scale into the German Republic,article 1 of the decree of November 3, 1931, as amended by the order of July 8,1932. prohibits the importation of living plants and fresh parts thereof fromNorth America, Austria. Hungary, Australia, Tasmania, New Zealand, Hawaii,Japan, China, British India, Mesopotamia, and the Union of South Africa,except as provided in the circular of November 26, 1931.This prohibition applies also to materials and containers which have beenused for packing and storing such plants or parts of plants.The regulations supplemental to the decree of November 3, 1931, as promul-gated in the circular of November 26, 1931, group plants as follows:(a) Importation absolutely prohibited.--Living dicotyledonous trees andshrubs of all species (except cacti), also seedlings, as well as portions ofplants. su'h as cuttings, scions, layers, etc. In this group are included allfruit trees and shrubs, as well as timber and ornamental trees and shrubs ofevery species.(b) Importation conditional.-Cacti, trees, shrubs, plants, and parts thereof,not included among the dicotyledons (except when prohibited by other regula-tions; for example, the importation of certain conifers, and of rooted carna-tions, carnation cuttings, and carnation cut flowers is prohibited), on conditionthat they be not packed with plants of group A and that a thorough inspectionfails to establish infestation or suspicion of infestation with San Jose scale.(c) Importation unrestricted.-Until further notice, all subterranean parts ofplants, all kinds of seeds, tropical fruits, cereals, and vegetables for food andother purposes, drugs and raw materials for technical manufacturing pur-poses (except as prohibited by other regulations; for example, importation isprohibited of potatoes. diseased flower bulbs, and tubers).Plants and parts of living plants, even in a withered state, are to be regardedas fresh, and are to be treated as living plants.Shipments which include plants of different groups are placed in theirentirety in the most restricted group.With respect to plants falling within group A, the right is reserved, in single:ases and under special conditions, to except them from the prohibition of,ntry when guaranty is furnished against the introduction of San Jose scale.Living plants or parts thereof brought in by passengers as baggage or byhand are subject to the provisions of this decree.Insofar as their entry is allowed, living plants and fresh parts thereof maybe imported only through the customs ports of entry authorized for fruits.Direct transit under customs supervision is permitted of living plants andfresh parts thereof. as well as of fresh fruits.The fees for inspection are those established for root crops, namely, 0.01reichsnmark for each kilogram of net weight, with a minimum of 1 RM for anyshipment.FRESIT FRUITS MUST BE FREE FROM SAN JOSE SCALE AND THE APPLE MAGGOTArticle 2 of the decree of November 3, 1931, prescribes that, until furthernotice, fresh fruits and refuse of fresh fruits, originating in the countriesmentioned, may be imported only through authorized customs ports, in theoriginal pack, and on condition that an inspection at the port of arrival at theexpense of the importer, shows them to be free from San Jose scale, and thatconsignments from the United States of America and from Canada are not

PAGE 61

unglpl' a JO (j((: .10(jlua.\o : oI :[ Tpal. a8ZMoli P lpi pi"d s os It:l i j((m .I s'.1omo 1 .) p)~ L. .Ijtaj *))lo I.0-lllj 1!11.1141 4 4i pol ipl sl 811(41i:111 . I8im .IA1 4j 4) JIM)!~1 d JO )1 .Ild01f'UPIIO (.W4 .I.I.((I, '.104110.1 jt"1 II! IIIIV;'1 Jo 114~)1 .1tl1po LjTI )~III 41I M(~.I 0j,4,14 411111 1 P 14111 :4 >1 1 011 111 '41! 11 Vd U. X["BV, AO : 1, , 1,1 4X. 'Ii o'li II) I vl.4 *4j '1; ; i i L I i )I P I o, ( 4 .1 oI rp mu111 nL s4 I.Pi)(Jo' 0011[ 11 JOTIAPJ\7 H4 )i1: 111I(.& i 4 413!.1P 8 1 11 11,! 0It III 4)8)1).) 4 .lofI4.1o(Itui1:1. III,, Imf~j( I ( 'A(1'1. 'di. P killt -I!C V O IIM'K ~ d')X 1II .14 KUI.L U0_111TG (171 L Ilo.(o". 10 oooo ")II pa ld s 30q popilouty71,1,1(a i os7:81L [ *v I* I (;z-,m ; L X 1',tlt4 .)),I Top Ip 'v;' 77 ou MdlI 7 -V tA PIi o si;-.l:.) v *IP-.n A 'miu(t *,'11pt: olli p)l lIi'i.) spo 0L pi.L 0l4 A 1 1. d JO4 .1 1 11 .101) -1111,.4 II0 1ljI0141.4yT 8T1>41 Pi 121LA 1:14 ll I I 1 8 1 4] A I'( d P f .4.4 Ij AO J4 844 418A4).o l If * ~dI 34 41 j)11 11 :I':)t J I 84i I4 8110 .) ; -'l' 'd.) 0I.Up 1 1 I( '1l. 1 P 11 ! 8 1 ' JO 0.10/ 0I(I1 '1 l 1 1:p681xiun i a a an aam sa anna up tulo'l. j0,Q0IIg s .umnf pa; ill"Iu~ I 11 o 0,4 ()sjr Pk , d f OP 11 a u .10 Stls '[osl d O[ 1% \TMIMI ) p P J -ut.' ' 1i 8 00 111( 48110 ) 34 i,) tIlyttvIU m4 4 V1 10 11 \t-'t 11 ,,SlJll I 8110)11 I)II '1 ISA\ 48~ 1b11L)IN"l.)dI10ifTo ly j -so') I n \ I pf, 'muloo 'Ia o o a a a y sai 1 11111.8 'di! I1 , J1f.1 1180 )it 1d.1 \it om ISlN '41l1t~ul II. J It'" p1 m 1 4 1 1 -i' piJ 1ols1 v -Ill ) :I X J( I:tpp idj 11.)piB(IA g t o ' t {(L I plt o( m Iq Inu Iu I~ (I I.I-1.1( J II)41p:1 IlI ~1 'Il' 11!%I ll.4 IP j!01 i4Il~ll .WIl IIlh f 11 11 111l~ * .oT 3.U44[jMo J4j1q: iI4,r 'l.4l, IjS ,1z.uJ liii o J 'M I ' J441111 JO11, 44 1 J 1 1~l!\4 ~ ,l I 2 tJ~. I{ ~ lf b .44 I AP II 1!1 j I 4 Vlml I 81 lJb .1 LdIij 4:44 4 11 A 8 14(ll1. 4 " I Jo p1l:4 81:N l4 L8 '. s 1 j P 1110':I, ): NN I Nii 1uj i111 1 l , 422 I'll .1 1 o ' ~ 1o s 1' -I Pu po11R( 4) [4 4 Jd81 .10 su 01 pUL1

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190 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [April-JuneThe F'ederal Miiister of N.u rishiment and Agricult tre can permit excep-tions to this prohibition.The unrestricted transit through Germany of the above-named plants undercustoms supervision is permitted. (Order of March 28. 1929; Reiehsgesetzbl.1 :15. 111129. 1. 83. Do(&rce of September 30, 12: R eichsgesetzbl. I : 1932,p. 492.)IMPh ROTATION OF FRESH CIIHRRT:S RESTRICTEDThe imp ortation of fresh cherries attacked or suspected of being attackedby the iiaggot of the cherry fly (Rlayoietis cerasi L.) is prohibited until fur-ther notice. Shipments of this fruit must be accompanied by a certificate oforigin issued by the communal authorities of the place of origin and by asaiiitary certificate issued by a competent official of the plait protectionservice of the country of origin. vouchibig for the freedom of the fruit fromthe maggot of the cherry fruit fly. Shipments will b' inspected at the port ofentry. Tratisit shi ment through Germany under customs supervision is per-nit ted. (Decree of April 27, 1929, Reichsgesetzbl. I, 1929, p. 92.)Importation must be made through authorized ports. (Decree of April 27,1929; Deutscher Reichsanzeiger and Preussischer Staats.anzeiger. No. 104,May 6, 1929, and later orders.)IMPORTATION OF CONIFEROUS PLANTS RESTRICTEDThe entry of coniferous plants of the following genera is prohibited untilfurther notice: A bics (fir), Pic(a (spruce), Pinus (pin!), 1seiudolI!ug. andTsuga, or parts thereof.The entry of other coniferous plants will not be allowed unless they arepacked separately or mixed with each other, and unless the invoice is accom-lpanied by a certificate issued by a competent official of the plant protectionservice of the country of origin, affirming, in the German language, that theshipment covered by the certificate has been thoroughly inspected by him andfound free from plants of the above-mentioned genera or of parts thereof. TheMinister of Nourishment and Agriculture can permit exceptions to this prohi-bition. Transit shipment under customs supervision is permitted. (Decree ofJune 3, 1930, Reichsgesetzblatt I, no. 20, 1930, p. 18S.)(The phrase " The entry of other coniferous plants will not be allowed unlessthey are packed separately or mixed with each other " is understood to meanthat coniferous plants, other than those named above, will not be permittedentry unless those of a single genus are packed by themselves, or unless thoseof several genera, other than those named above, are packed together. Inother words, coniferous plants of the genera above named, and nonconiferou.splants, may not be included in any shipment of coniferous plants offered forIiipo )rta tion under the provisions of this decree.)IMPORTATION OF FLOWER BULBS AND CORMS RESTRICTEDThe entry of flower bulbs and corms is not allowed, unless each shipmentis accompanied by a certificate issued by a competent official of the plantprotection service of the country of origin, affirming, in the German language,that the shipment has been thoroughly inspected by him and found free fromthe following plant diseases or insect pests: Yellow disease (Pseudomonas hya-cinthi'). Sclerotinia rot (Sclerotinia bulborum), black rot of bulbs (Sclerotiumtuliparum .tire disease (Botrytis [parasilica] tulipac), Penicillium rot (Peni-cillium sp.). eelworin disease of bulbs ( T'ylench us [lhyaci l hi ] dipsaci ), greaterand lesser narcissus flies (Jlcrodon spp. and Eutncruw spp.), bulb mite (Rhizo-glyphus hi n .puS).Transit slip'ment through Germany under customs supervisIon is permitted.(Decree of July 7, 19:30; Reichsgesetzblatt I, no. 24, 1930, p. 204.)IMPORTATION OF AZALEA INDICA RESTRICTEDTlhe eritry of azaleas (Azalea indica) is not allowed, unless each shipment isaccompaiied by a certificate in the German language and in that of the countryof origin, issued by a competent official of the plant protection service of thecountry of origin. at testing that the shipment has been thoroughly inspected by

PAGE 63

1933] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 191him and found free from the following plant diseases or insect pests: Leafscorch of azalea (Septoria azaleae), azalea gall (Exhobasidium aza lute), azalea leaf miner (Gracilaria azaleclla), azalea tortricid (Acalla schalleruna).Transit shipment through Germany under customs supervision is permitted.(Decree of November 9, 1932; Reichsgesetzbl. I: 75, 1932, p. 528.)IMPORTATION OF ELM AND SOUThERN COTTfONwoOD PRoMiBITEDThe importation of rooted plants of the genus Vim .' ald of the ;i(utlherncottonwood (Popuus [cauadensis] dcltoidc,), as well US of (uttinI5. scions,grafts, and other fresh parts of such plants, is prohibited uitil furnilr notice.The importation of other deciduous plants than those iianied in article 1, or cuttings, scions, grafts, and other fresh parts thereof, is permitted only whenthe consignment is accompanied by a certificate, in the German lonuage andthat of the country of origin, attesting that the shipmlleiit was 'ispected by himand that it does not contain plants or parts iiereof above mieionik d.The Imperial Minister of Nourishment and Agriculture ci in grant exceptonsto these provisions.The direct transit of the above-mentioned plants and their parts is permittedunder customs supervision. (Decree of February 2, 1932, Reichsgesetzbl. I: 10,1932, p. 63.)IMPORTATION FROM FR XNCE PROIIIBITED--POTAToEs, ToMATOES, EGOPLANTS, STRAW-BERRIES, ROOTED PLANTS OR VEGETABLES. TUiHEs. Bui.LS, RHIZOiES, ANiD OTHERSUBTERRANEAN PARTS OF PLANTSARTICLE 1. The importation and transit are prohibted from Frarnce of potatoes,tomatoes, eggplants, strawberries, rooted plants or vegetables (with or without soil), bulbs, tubers, rhizomes, and other subterranean parts of plants, and of peelings and other refuse of such products, as well as of sacks and other ma-terials which have been used for packing or preserving those products.AnT. 2. The importation and transit from France of fresh vegetables. andother fresh plants for cooking, of all kinds, of fresh aerial parts of plants exceptfruits, whose importation and transit are not prohibited by article 1, are per-mitted from March 15 to November 14 of each year under the following con-ditions:(a) If the products were grown at a distance of not less than 200 ki fromthe limits of the territory infested by the Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsadecemlineata) ;(b) If each shipment is accompanied by a phytosanitary certificate in theform prescribed issued by an expert of the plant protection service of the country of origin in German and in the language of that country. The cer-tificate must affirm that the products comprising the shipment have been in-spected by him and found free from the potato beetle, and that within a radiusof 200 km from the locality in France in which they were grown the potatobeetle has not hitherto been determined.ART. 3. The Minister of Nourishment and Agriculture can make exceptionsfrom the provisions of articles 1 and 2. (Decree of February 23, 1932;Reichsgesetzbl. I: 13, 1932, p. 91.)COLORADO POTATo-BEETLE QU ARA NTINE--IMPRTATION OF POTATOES FROM THEUNrITED STATES PnemHIBITEDImportation from the United States into Germany is prohibited of potatoes,potato peelings, and other potato refuse, as well as of sacks and other containerswhich have been used for packing potatoes. This prohibition does not apply topotatoes carried on vessels as ships' stores. (Decree of February 26, 1875, toprevent the introduction of the Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decem-lineata.)The importation of dried potatoes also is prohibited. (Order of March 8,1900.)The importation of sweetpotatoes is not restricted. (Order of August 9.19c6.)The importation and transit of living Colorado potato beetles, at any stageof their life history, are prohibited. The Minister of Nourishment and Agri-culture can permit exceptions from this prohibition. (Decree of October 7,1932; Reichsgesetzbl. I: 69, 1932, p. 496W.)

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192 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [April--JunePOTATO-WART RESTRICTIONSThe entry of potatoes infected with. or suspected of being infected with thepotato-wart disease (S11y11 h ytrimli cndobioticl u ) across the customs frontiersof the Gerina II Republic is prohibited until further notice.Until further notice, potatoes may be imported only through authorized cus-toms districts of the German Republic and only under the following conditions:(1) That the potatoes he forwarded in unused containers, or in bulk in cars,and that each containi(r or car he sealed with a leaden seal of the official plantprotection service of the country of origin.2) Th::t each potato shipment be acefompanied by a certificate in the Germanlan-ua-e and in that of the country of origin, issued by an expert of the officialplant protection service of that country. Such certificate shall be valid foronly 20 days from the (late of issuance and shall contain the statements: (a)That the Ahipmntn was examined by an expert of the official plant protectionservice ad Nvas found free front wart; (b) that the shipment originated in afarm not infected with the disease, and that within a radius of 2 kilometersfrom the field in which the potatoes were grown no such disease has beenfound, e) in the case of packages, that the packing material has not beenused before; (d) that the official seal has been attached to each package orcar. and a statement of the inscription of the seal; and (e) a description ofthe shIipienit, indicating the kind of potatoes comprising the shipment, thelocality in N which the potatoes were harvested, the weight of the shipment,kind of packing, number of containers, distinguishing marks of packages if any,or the rar number. name and address of consignee and of sender.(3) That the said examination at the customs, at the expense of the inter-ested person, reveals the fact that there is no ground for suspicion.Certain exemptions from the provisions under paragraph 2 are granted forimports of potatoes, especially seed potatoes. from neighboring countries withinlimited di stances from the German frontiers.Direct transit shipments of potatoes under customs supervision are permitted.Deeree of Mardi 7. 1930; Deutsch. Reichsanzeiger 57, March 8, 1930, p. 1.)MODEL CERTIFICATEThio dunersigned expert of the plant protection service hereby certifies:(1) That the potatoes contained in the shipment described below have thisd11y been examined and found free from potato wart (Sy'!nciytrium cndobioti-(2) That the potatoes originated in a farm uninfected with n:-; wart,and th:it potato wart has not been determined within a radius of 2 kilometersfrom the field in which they were grown.(3) That the containers had not previously bken used.(4) That every package (every car) had been sealed by him with a leadseal furnished with the following description of the shipment:Variety of potatoLocatlity where harvestedWeight of shipmentKind of packingNumber of packagesDistinguishing marks of packagesCar numbersName and address of consigneeName and address of shipperL Nace and date)[SEAL] Name and title of official.VtisPRInNcSUND (:sUNDHEIT5ZEUGNTS FUR KARrOFFELNDer initerzeichnete Sachverstiindige des a mtlichen Ptlanzensclutzdienstesbeschieinigt liermnit:(1) Dass de in der unten beschriebenen Sendung enthaltenen Kartoffeln vomihm aInm heuti Pen Tage untersucht und frei von Kartoffelkrebs (SyvchytriuMe Wdoblioti iii befunden worden sind:

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1931 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 193(2) Dass die Kartoffeln aus einem nicht mit Kartoffelkrebs verseuchitenlandwirtschaftlichen Betrieb stammen und dass innerlialb ines Umkreises vonzwei Kilometern von dem Felde, auf dem die Kartoffeln gewachsen s nd, Kar-toffelkrebs nicht festgestellt worden ist;(3) Dass die fur die Sendung verwendeten Umschliessungen uinlenutzt sind;(4) Dass jedes Packstfick-jeder Wagen-von ihfla ait einer Plont)e aitfolgender Aufschrift versehen worden ist;KartolTelsorteGemeinde, in der die Kartoffeln geerntet worden sind Gewicht der SendungArt der Verpackung Zahl der Packstficke Bezeichnung der Packstficke Nummer des WagonsName und Anschrift des EmpfiingersName und Anschrift des Absenders(Ort und Datum)[Dienstsiegel] -Name des amtlicben SachverstindigenDien ststellung des SachverstiindigenP.Q.C.A.-297. supplement no. 3 JUNE 1F, pP32PLANT-QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS, UNION OF SOUTH AFRICAThe Governor General of the Union of South Africa, under date of December2, 1932, in the terms of section 28 (b) of the agricultural pests act, 1911, asamended by the agricultural pests act further amendment act, 1924, mde thefollowing regulation no. 1576:(1) All unmanufactured leaf tobacco introduced into the Union of SouthAfrica must, unless specially exempted, be accompanied by a certificate issuedby the Department of Agriculture of the country of origin. stating that afterexamination and to the best knowledge of the examining officer, the tobacco inquestion is free from infestation with Ephestia Clutella.LE A. STRONG.Chef, Bureau of Plant Quaranti.PENALTIES IMPOSED FOR VIOLATIONS OF THE PLANTQUARANTINE ACTAccording to reports received by the Bureau during the period April 1 toJune 30, 1933, penalties have recently been imposed by the proper Federalauthorities for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act, as follows:JAPANESE-BEETLE QUARANTINEIn the case of the United States v. W. E. Jones & Co. Inc., Baltimore, Md.,in the interstate shipment of 355 baskets of apples from a point in the regu-lated area to a point outside thereof, without inspection and certification, thedefendant pleaded guilty and was fined $20. (Plant quarantine case no. 474.)

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194 BUREAU OF PLANT QlUAI.\NTLNE [April-June 19331 QUARANTINES AFFECTING MEXICAN AND CANADIAN PRODUCTSIn the case of the United States v. the persons listed below, for attemptingto sinuggle in contraband plant material, the pvinalties indicated were imposedby the United States customs officials at the following ports:Name Port Contraband PenaltyPedro Ramirez --------------Brownsville, Tex 2 mangoes ---------------------------$5J. %rtinez --------------------do-------------avoc vdos with seed-----------------5Guadaluipe IHernandez -----------do ------------------o -------------------------------5.Molina---------------------do--------------3 mangoes.-.----------------------5Amparo M\aterrey -------------do -------------4 mangoes --------------------5Faust o Gutierrez ------do --------------3 avocidos with seed.---------------5F. W. Lke -------------------.--------------. o.---------------------------5F. L. Briion -------------------do --------------2 mangoes----------------------------5Eva Or tiz.--------------3 angifnOes ----------------------------5H. P. F:-on .-----------------ilgo, Fx .--------4 avocados.---------------------------IF. Cardenas-Laredo, Tex---------12 mangoes and 3 avocados-----------5Leon Salinas .-do ---------------36 avocados --------------------------5Mrs. T. McCusker ------------Blaine, Wash ---------Daisy and Scotchbroom roots.--------5H. JohnO.-------------------------------50 rock plants --.-------------------5Mrs. P. <. ashno---------do.---.1 plant.------------------------------2Mrs. R. V. Harris.---------------do.-------------12 lily-of-the-valley roots--------------5

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ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINELtE A. STPONG, Chief of BurCau.A. S. HOYT, Assistant Chief.B. CONNOR, BUS iflesMS Manager.R. C. ALTHOUSE, Information, Officer.E. R. SASSCER, in Cihare Foreign Plant Qiuranithe.jS. B. FRACKER, in Charge Dolnme.tic Plant Quarunt J. .LON A. HAWKINS, in Chare IY olofical DiN ii.A. F. BURGESS, in Field Charge Gipsy Moth and Browan-Tail Aoth, Quarantine(Headquarters, Greenfield, Mass.).L. H. WORTILEY, in Field Charge Japanese Beetle Quarantine and Europafau.Corn Borer Project (Headquarters, Harrisbury. Pa.).R. E. McDONALD, in Field Charge Pin/k Bollwornm and Thurberia Weevil Quar-antines (Hoadquarters, San Antonio. Tex.).B. L. BOYDEN, in Field Charge Date Scale Quarantine (Headquarters, lIdio,Calif.).P. A. JIGIDALE. in Field Charge Mexican Fruit Fly Quarantine (Headquarters,Harlingen, Tex.).195U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 1933

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S.R.A.-B.P.Q. No. 116 Issued December 1933.United States Department of AgricultureBUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINESERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTSJULY-SEPTEMBER 1933CONTENTSPageQuarantine and other official announcements------------------------------------------------------197Announcements relating to Dutch elm disease----------------------------------------197Secretary Wallace calls hearing September 15 on Dutch elm disease--------------------197Notice of public hearing to consider the advisability of prohibiting or restricting the entry ofelm and related species of trees and parts and products thereof from Europe-------------198Announcements relating to fruit and vegetable quarantine (no. 53)----------------------------198Amendment no. 6 of regulations supplemental to notice of quarantine---------------------193Instructions to collectors of customs (T.D. 45591)--------------------------------------200Announcements relating to Japanese-beetle quarantine (no. 48)-------------------------------200Japanese-beetle conference in Washington October 24--------------------------------------200Fruits and vegetables may be shipped this fall without Japanese-beetle certificates on andafter September 15 ---------------------------------------------------------------------200Removal of Japanese-beetle quarantine restrictions on the interstate movement of fruitsand vegetables---------------------------------------------------------------------------201Announcement relating to Mexican fruit-fly quarantine (no. 64)------------------------------201Department authorizes lengthening of next shipping season for citrus fruit of lower RioGrande Valley --------------------------------------------------------201Announcements relating to nursery stock, plant, and seed quarantine (no. 37)-----------------202Instructions to collectors of customs (T.D. 465-------------------------------------------202Conditions governing the entry and treatment of narcissus-bulb importations (B.P.Q.-354) 202Strong calls conference on important plant quarantine-------------------------------------. 203Notice of public conference to consider certain changes with respect to the administrationof nursery stock, plant, and seed quarantine no. 37-----------------------------------204Announcements relating to pink bollworm quarantine (no. 52) ------------------------------204Revision of regulations--------------------------------------------------------------------204Notice to general public through newspapers-----------------------------------------211Campaign against pink bollworm started in cotton fields of South-------------------------212Announcements relating to Thurberia-weevil quarantine (no. 61)------------------------------212Revision of regulations------------------------------------------------------------------212Notice to general public through newspapers------------------------------------------218Miscellaneous items.---------------------------------------------------------------------218Plant quarantine restrictions, New Zealand (P.Q.C.A.-306, supplement no. 1)-----------218Plant quarantine restrictions, Jamaica, B.W.I. (B.P.Q.-355-----------------------------219Plant quarantine restrictions, Republic of Greece (B.P.Q.-347, supplement no. 1)--------221Plant quarantine restrictions, Germany (B.P.Q.-302, revised, supplement no. 1) ---------223Plant quarantine restrictions, British Honduras (P.Q.C.A.-314, supplement no. 3)-------224Shipment of Mexican citrus fruits in bond through the United States (P.Q.C.A.-305,revised)----------------------------------------------------------------------------225Lee A. Strong named Chief of Bureau of Entomology----------------------------------227Fruit-fly survey in the West Indies, Brazil, Uruguay, Chile, and Peru.------------------227Statement of Federal plant quarantines------------------------------------------------241Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act----------------------------------242Organization of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine---------------------------------------244QUARANTINE AND OTHER OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTSANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO DUTCH ELM DISEASESECRETARY WALLACE CALLS HEARING SEPTEMBER 15 ON DUTCH ELM DISEASE(Press notice)AUGUST 30, 1933.Secretary of Agriculture Wallace has announced that notice has been issuedfor a hearing, to be held in Washington, D.C., September 15, to consider whethersteps should be taken to prevent further establishment of the Dutch elm di-sease in this country by placing under quarantine host materials likely to carrythis disease from Europe.23445-33 197

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198 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.Although the source of the recent outbreak of this disease in the environs ofNew York is still unknown, offiials say the Department of Agriculture cannotdi-r(gard the possibility that the elm-disease fungus may have been broughtinto that area in iimported parts of diseased elim trees. Within recent weeks.I few shipmlnents of elmil logs from Europe have arrived at Atlantic ports, andthough for each of these lots safeguards have been provided. it is believed thatthe whole pnhlem demands immediate attent ion. In view of the prompt effortsbeing taken to eradicate the disease, the necessity for protecting the countryagainst further introduction from abroad is regarded as important.NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING TO CONSIDER THE ADVISABILITY OF PROHIBITINGOR RESTRICTING THE ENTRY OF ELM AND RELATED SPECIES OF TREES ANDPARTS AND PRODUCTS THEREOF FROM EUROPEAUGUST 29, 1933.The Secretary of Agriculture has information that there exists on the con-tinent of Europe an injurious disease, known as the Dutch elm disease, dueto the fungus (Graphium ulnti Schwarz, and that this disease, not now widelyprevalent within or throughout the United States, may be introduced intothis country with importations of plants, cuttings, seeds, logs, timber, lumber, or other wood products of all species of the family Ulmaceae, among whichelms (Ulmus .pp.) and zelkova or keyaki (Zelkova spp.) are known to behosts of this fungus.It appears necessary, therefore, to consider the advisability of prohibitingor restricting the entry of any or all parts or products of plants belonging tospecies of the family Ulmaceae from the continent of Europe.Notice is, therefore, hereby given that, in accordance with the Plant Quar-antine Act of August 20, 1912, as amended, a public hearing will be held beforethe Bureau of Plant Quarantine of the United States Department of Agricul-ture, in room 42-43 of the Uilied States National Museum, Tenth Street andConstitution Avenue NW., Washington, D.C., at 10 a.m., September 15, 1933,in order that any person interested in the establishment of such prohibitionor restriction may appear and be heard, either in person or by attorney.H. A. WALLACE,Secretary of Agriculture.ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO FRUIT AND VEGETABLEQUARANTINE (NO. 56)AMENDMENT NO. 6 OF REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE OF QUARANTINENO. 56Under authority conferred by the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912(37 Stat. 315), as amended, it is ordered that regulation 2 of the Rules andRegulations Supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 56. which became effec-tive November 1, 1923, as amended October 23, 1923, January 18, 1924, January10, 1925, February 6, 1925, and July 15, 1932, be, and the same is hereby,further amended to read as follows:REGULATION 2. REsTRICTIONs ON ENTRY OF FRUITS AND VEGETABLESAll importations of fruits and vegetables must be free from plants or por-tions of plants. as defined in regulation 1 (b).Dried, cured, or processed fruits and vegetables, including dried products,cured figs, dates, and raisins. etc., nuts and dry beans, peas, etc., may be im-ported without permit or other compliance with these regulations: Provided, That any such articles may be made subject to entry only under permit andon compliance with the safeguards to be prescribed therein when it shall bedetermined by the Secretary of Agriculture that the condition of drying, cur-in, or processing to which they have been subjected may not entirely eliminaterisk. Such determination with respect to any such articles shall become effec-tive after due notice.Except as restricted, as to certain countries and districts' by special quaran-tines and other orders now in force and by such restrictive orders as mayI See List of current quarantines and other restrictive orders and miscellaneous regu-lations, obtainable on request from the Bureau of Plant Quarantine.

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1933] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 199hereafter be promulgated, the following fruits may be imported from allcountries under permit and on compliance with these regulations: Bananas,pineapples, lemons, and sour limes. Grapes of the European or vinifera typeand any vegetable, except as restricted by special quarantine as indicatedabove, may be imported from any country under permit and on compliancewith these regulations, at such ports as sliull be authorized in the permits, onpresentation of evidence satisfactory to the United States Department ofAgriculture that such grapes and vegetables are not attacked in the country oforigin by injurious insects, including fruit and melon flies (Trypetidae), orthat their importation from definite areas or districts under approved safe-guards prescribed in the permits can be authorized without risk.The following additions and exceptions are authorized for the countries con-cerned to the fruits and vegetables listed in the preceding paragraph: Provided,That as to such additions and exceptions, the issuance of permits may beconditioned on presentation of evidence satisfactory to the United States Depart-ment of Agriculture that such fruits and vegetables are not attacked in thecountry of origin by injurious insects, including fruit flies and melon flies; orthat their importation from definite areas or districts under approved safe-guards prescribed in the permits can be authorized without risk:Commonwealth of Australia-States of Victoria, South Australia, andTasm ania.-Upon compliance with these regulations and under such additionalconditions and safeguards as may be prescribed in the permits, all fruits fromthe States of Victoria, South Australia, and Tasmania may be permitted entryat Seattle, Wash., and Portland, Oreg., and at such other ports as may bespecified in the permits.New Zealand.-Upon compliance with these regulations fruits other thanthose listed in the second and third paragraphs of this regulation may be im-ported from New Zealand under such conditions and through such ports as maybe designated in the permits.Japan.-Upon compliance with the regulations under Quarantine No. 28,oranges of the mandarin class, including satsuma and tangerine varieties, maybe imported from Japan through the port of Seattle and such other northernports as may be specified in the permits.Mexico.-Potatoes may be imported from Mexico upon compliance with theregulations issued under the order of December 22, 1913.Argentina.-Upon compliance with these regulations, fruits other than thoselisted in the second and third paragraphs of this regulation may be importedfrom Argentina under such conditions and through such northern ports asmay be designated in the permits.Chile.-Upon compliance with these regulations, fruits other than those listedin the second and third paragraphs of this regulation may be imported fromChile under such conditions and through such northern ports 'as may bedesignated in the permits. Melons from Chile may be admitted at any port.West Indies.-Upon compliance with these regulations all citrus fruits fromthe West Indies may be permitted entry at New York and at such other portsas may be designated in the permits.Janutica.-Entry of pineapples from Jamaica is restricted to the port ofNew York or such other northern ports as may be specified in the permits.Canada.-Fruits and vegetables grown in the Dominion of Canada may beimported into the United States from Canada free from any restrictions what-soever under these regulations.General.-In addition to the fruits, the entry of which is provided for inthe preceding paragraphs of this regulation, such specialties as hothouse-grown fruits or other special fruits, which can be accepted by the United StatesDepartment of Agriculture as free from risk of carrying injurious insects,including fruit flies (Trypetidae), may be imported under such conditions andthrough such ports as shall be designated in the permits.This amendment shall be effective on and after August 1, 1933.Done at the city of Washington this 25th day of July 1933.Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.[sEAL] R. G. TUGWELL,Acting Secretary of Agriculture.

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200 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.INSTiIUCTIONS To COLLECTORS OF CUSTOMST.D. 39792, IUBLIsuING THE NOTICE OF QUARANTINE No. 56, OF THE UNITEDSTATES 1 )EPA1ni,:NT OF AiiC:LTI:,RE WITH REGULATIONS RELATING TO FRUITAND VEGETABLES, A EhNDED (T.D. 46591)TREASURY DEPARTMENT,OFFICE OF THE CON1.\ISSIONER OF CUSTOMS,lWshhinyton, D.C., Auiust 141, 1933.To Collectors of Customs and Others Concerned:The appended copy of amendment no. 6 of regulations supplemental toNotice of Quarantine No. 56 (fruit and vegetable quarantine) issued by theSecretary of Agriculture, effective August 1, 1933, is published for the informa,-tion and guidaice of customs officers and others concerned.FRANK Dow,Acting Coimnissioner of Custons.(Then follows the full text of the amendment.)ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO JAPANESE-BEETLEQUARANTINE (NO. 48)JAPANESE-BEETLE CONFERENCE IN WASHINGTON, OCTOBER 24(Press notice)SEPTEMBEa 12, 1933.A conference to discuss this season's developments in the Japanese-beetlesituation has been announced by Lee A. Strong, Chief of the Bureau of PlantQuarantine, Department of Agriculture. It will meet in the auditorium of theInterior Department Building, Eighteenth and F Streets NW., Washington, D.C.,on October 24, at 10 a.m. This is one of a series of annual conferences and allinterested in the Japanese-beetle-quarantine regulations or in possible changesin such regulations are invited to attend and to join in the discussion.This annual Japanese-beetle conference will be held on the day before a dis-cussion scheduled recently by the Bureau to consider modifications in the plantimportation regulations issued under Federal Quarantine No. 37. The consecu-tive dates were arranged for the convenience of nurserymen and others whoare interested in both subjects.FRUITS AND VEGETABLES MAY BE SHIPPED THIS FALL WITHOUT JAPANESE-BEETLE CERTIFICATES ON AND AFTER SEPTEMBER 15(Press notice)SEPTEMBER 13, 1933.The Secretary of Agriculture announced today (Sept. 13) that restrictionson the movement of fruits and vegetables under the Japanese-beetle-quarantine regulations will be removed for the season on and after Friday, September 15.The restrictions on cut flowers, however, remain until October 15. Under thequarantine regulations, certificates showing freedom from Japanese beetle arerequired on shipments of certain kinds of fruits and vegetables until October 15.The effect of the order is to release the fruits and vegetables from that require-ment a month earlier than is provided in the regulations themselves. The inspection of fruits and vegetables is necessary only during the periodwhen the adult beetles are abundantly present and in active flight. There isno risk that such products will carry the Japanese beetle after this active period.During the last few days the Department's inspectors have found no beetles infruits and vegetables.There is still danger, however, that the adult beetles may be transported incut flowers. Due to the prevailing cool evenings, the beetles have a tendencyto crawl down into the flowers for protection. Therefore, the restrictions onthe interstate movement of cut flowers and other portions of plants will remainin full force and effect until October 15, inclusive.

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1933] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 201Restrictions on the movement of nursery, ornamental, and greenhouse stockand all other plants (except cut flowers and portions of plants without rootsand incapable of propagation) are in force throughout Ohe year and are notaffected by this announcement.REMOVAL OF JAPANESE-BEETLE QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS ON THEINTERSTATE MOVEMENT OF FRUITS AND VEGETABLESSince it has been determined that the active period of the Japaiiese beetlein its relation to fruits and vegetables has already ceased for the presentseason and that it is, therefore, safe to permit the unrestricted movement of thefruits and vegetables listed in regulation 5 of the rules and regulations (elev-enth revision) supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. T from the regulatedarea as defined in regulation 3 of said rules and regulations, it is ordered thatall restrictions on the interstate movement of the articles referred to above arehereby removed on and after September 15, 1933. This order advances thetermination of the restrictions as to fruits and vegetables provided for inregulation 5 from October 16 to September 15, 1933, and applies to this seasononly.Done at the city of Washington this 13th day of September 1933.Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agricul-ture.[SEAL] H. A. WALLACE,Secretary of Agriculture.ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO MEXICAN FRUIT-FLYQUARANTINE (NO. 64)DEPARTMENT AUTHORIZES LENGTHENING OF NEXT SHIPPING SEASON FORCITRUS FRUIT OF LOWER RIO GRANDE VALLEY(Press notice)The season for shipping citrus *fruit under the Mexican fruit-fly quarantineregulations from the Texas counties of Willacy, Cameron, and Hidilgo, hasbeen extended to include April 30, 1934, according to an announcement todayby Lee A. Strong, Chief of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine of the United StatesDepartment of Agriculture, following a conference in Harlingen, Tex., withJ. M. Del Curto, State entomologist, Texas State Department of Agriculture.Extension of the shipping season makes the grove clean-up requirements by theend of the season even more imperative, and quarantine officials anticipate thesame cooperation heretofore extended in this work by gr-wers of the lowerRio Grande Valley.Messrs. Strong and Del Curto point out that both the Federal Departmentand the State Department of Agriculture desfri' to assi in every possiblemanner in the movement of the Texas citrus crop. At the sam: time theremust be full appreciation of the re.Sponsibility to prevent the building up ofinfestation and spread of fruit fly, and it is hoped and believed that the grow-ers vill at all times realize the importance of full compliance with the K-ean-upregulations. Discovery of any infestation of the Mexican fruit fly will iieces-sarily require inunediate eradication and precautionary clean-up measures inany area which may be involved. they point out.As to the beginning ot the shipping season this fill. there was an off etiveclean-up at the cl se of last shipping season ; two aqplication" of spray havebeen made; the season seems somewhat adva nced: anl. therefore, to 'ive liefullest possible marketing a(lvantigSe and relyin,.r on tho ( inued c o -'rl ionof the growers in clean-up and other precautionary measures, so far as thefruit-fly regulations aie concerned. 1itit may be cerii iid on aind a'ier Sep-tember 1, 1933.[Above press notice was released at ILrlingen, Tex., July 81, 1933.]

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202 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO NURSERY STOCK, PLANT, ANDSEED QUARANTINE (NO. 37)INSTRUCTIONS TO COLLECTORS OF CUSTOMST.D. 431980, ASo-ME:ND: iy T.D. 46431, PUBLISING A lis OFI N. u.m:s oF REPRE-SENTATIVEs OF TUE ('ANADIAN D DEPARTMENT OF AGiouTLTURE QUALIFIED TOINSPE CT AND (FfImFY PLANT 5, Fi4TI:n AMENOF.) (T.D. 46590)TREAJsuRS.Y DEPARTMENT,OFFIcE OF THE COM MISSIONER OF CUSTOMS,Wa.hington, D.C., A ugust 11, 1933.To Colictors of Custonms and Othcrs Concerned:The published list of oflicial representatives of the Canadian Department ofAgriculture, who are qualified and authorized to inspect and certify plants,nursery stock, and seeds for shipment from Canada to the United Statesin accordance with the rules and regulations supplemental to Quarantine No.37 (U.S. Department of Agriculture), is amended by removing the name ofW. 11. Lyne and substituting the name of 1-1. F. Olds, who has been designatedas inspector in charge at Vancouver, 1.C.FRANK Dow, Acting Commissioner of Customs.B.P.Q.-354. AUGUST 15, 1933.CONDITIONS GOVERNING THE ENTRY AND TREATMENT OF NARCISSUS-BULB IMPORTATIONSimportations of narcissus bulbs are governed by the provisions of regulation14 of Quarantine No. 37, the Nursery Stock, Plant, and Seed Quarantine. Eachshipment of such bulbs must meet the conditions of entry as set forth inQuarantine No. 37 and in the special permit authorizing the shipment withrespect to certification, marking, freedom from sand, soil, or earth, packingmaterials, inspection and disinfection, if necessary, for injurious insect pestsand plant diseases, notice of arrival, etc. All such bulbs imported for propagation must be graded as to type and size before shipment from abroad, andthe grades and the exact quantity of each indicated by varieties for each con-tainer oil the true copy of the invoice required with each shipmenlt. Run-of-the-field or ungraded bulbs will be refused entry.Heretofore, in addition to the general conditions of entry, a prescribed hot-water treatment has been given all imported narcissus bulbs as an additionalcondition of entry ; hereafter such bulbs will be inspected at the port designatedin the permit (provided that mail importations of narcissus bulbs will beinspected at Washington, D.C., only) and, if found to be apparently free frominjurious plant pests, will be released for forwarding to the importer withouttreatment.1I infested with the greater bulb fly, Merodon equestris, the bulbs shall betreated in accordance with the requirements prevailing for the interstatemovement of bulbs so infested. Such bulbs may be (1) fumigated by exposureto calcium cyanide (slow evolving type containing 40 to 50 percent of purecalcium cyani(le) at the rate of 16 ounces per 100 cubic feet of space for 4hours at a temperature of 60* F. or more in an air-tight chamber of approvedconstruction ; (2) as an alternative, exposed to hydrocyanic acid gas producedby the use of 7 ounces of sodium cyanide (50 percent cyanogen), 101 ouncesof sulphuric acid (60 B.), and 14 ounces of water for 100 cubic feet of spaceunder temperature and equipment conditions set forth above for the calciumcyanide fumigation ; (3) they may also be treated by submersion in hot waterheld at a temperature of 110' to 111.50 for the entire period of 1 hour in an approved tank; or (4) by heating the bulbs to a temperature of 1100 by meansof moist conditioned air and holding that temperature for 2 hours, usingapparatus approved for this treatment.If infested with the bulb eelworm, Tylenclius dipsaci, the bulbs shall betreated at a plant approved for use during the current season, under thesupervision of a representative of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, by submersion for 3 hours in water held at a temperature of 1100 F., or higher,the approved maximum being 111.5*. In the case of bulbs over 2 inches indiameter the treating period will be extended to 4 hours. In view of the fact

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19331 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 203that the effectiveness of this treatment is greatly increased if bulbs which havebeen dried for more than 3 weeks are presoaked in cold water for 2 hours,the use of this desirable modification of the treatment is recommended. Theuse of a disinfectant to check subsequent infections of diseases such as basalrot is optional with the permittee. The disinfectant may be used either inthe hot water or as an after-dip.Further information regarding the treatments will be furnished upon request.Shipments requiring treatment shall be held intact at the place of treatmentuntil the Bureau's representative arrives. In the event infestation is notgeneral but occurs in only one or more clearly distinguishalble units, only thoseinfested units shall be required to be treated. All bulbs of the same varietyfrom one shipper to the same addressee wvill be considered as belonging to thesame unit unless evidence is presented to show that certain cases of the lotcame from a separate source in the country of origin and unless such casesare marked to indicate that fact. When 2 or more varieties ,Ire includedin the same case, the entire case will be considered as 1 unit unless thesevarieties are completely separated from each other in tight containers which would prevent an intermingling of dirt and debris.To prevent any unnecessary delay should treat ment be required, the per-mittees should arrange in advaIce for facilities for giving any necessarytreatments. Small lots of bulbs iiay be treated at the Inspection House ofthis Department in Washington, D.C.A permittee may elect to refuse a shipment if found infested, in place ofproviding for the required treatment. If any permittee intends to follow thatplan, he should notify this Bureau in advance of the arrival of the bulbs,stating whether such infested shipment is to be removed from the country athis expense or is to be abandoned for destruction.LEE A. STRONG,Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantinc.NoTE.-Other publications Iiaving to do with this general subject are:Quarantine No. 37. Nursery Stock, Plant, and Seed Quarantine.Circular B.P.Q.-340. Explanation of Provisions for Entry of Plants underQuarantine 37.Circular P.Q.C.A.-324. Use of Disinfectants in Hot-Water Treatment ofNarcissus Bulbs.Circular B.P.Q.-337. Treatment and Pest Suppression Measures in Nar-cissus Plantings.Circular B.P.Q.-341. Segregation, Labeling, and Utilization Requirementsof Plants Imported under Special Permit for Propagation. Circular B.P.Q.-353. Supplementary Administrative Instructions. Nar-cissus Treatment and Pest Suppression.STRONG CALLS CONFERENCE ON IMPORTANT PLANT QUARANTINE(Press notice)AUGUST 22, 1933.Called to " reexamine the underlying principles involved in the interpreta-tion and enforcement " of the Nursery Stock, Plant, and Seed Quarantine No.37, a public conference will be held at 10 a.m. October 25 by the Bureau ofPlant Quarantine, United States Department of Agriculture. In announcingthe conference, Lee A. Strong, Chief of the Bureau, referred to his statementissued July 20 in which he reviewed the legislative and administrative historyof this quarantine, and indicated that the Department now is ready to giveserious consideration to modification and liberalization of this regulation. The conference will meet in the auditorium of the Interior Department Buildingin Washington.In his statement a month ago Mr. Strong said: "After a careful andextended study of this whole problem, I find myself seriously questioning theneed for, and the justice of, the procedure we are following. Inspectionmethods have been greatly improved and our scientific knowledge of foreignpests and diseases has increased. I feel that greater confidence can be placedin the efficacy of inspection of plant material at the time of arrival." In theformal announcement of the conference Mr. Strong threw open the door fordiscussion of all questions pertaining to this quarantine and mentioned specificsubjects for consideration.

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204 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.NOTICE OF PUBLIC CONFERENCE TO CONSIDER CERTAIN CHANGES WITH RESPECTTO THE ADMINISTRATION OF NURSERY STOCK, PLANT, AND SEED QUARANTINENO. 37AUGusT 21, 1933.Notice is hereby given that a public conference will be held by the Bureau ofPlant Quarantine in the auditorium of the Interior Department Building, Eighteenth and F Streets, NW., Washington, D.C., at 10 a.m., October 25,1A33, at which consideration will be given to the advisability of modifyingcertain features with respect to the enforcement of the Nursery Stock, Plant,and Seed Quarantine No. 37.As indicated in a statement issued July 20, 1933, it now seems advisable toreexamine the underlying principles involved in the interpretation and enforce-nent of the quarantine in question. At this conference it is specifically pro-posed to give consideration to the following subjects in reference to the im-portation of plants under permit: The elimination of consideration of theavailability of plants in this country ; limitation to be placed on the numberof plants which may be imported by reason of facilities for adequate inspection;value of considering horticultural qualifications of the applicants in the issn-ance of permits; desirability of continuing to hold certain plants for 2 ormore years before release; the advisability of providing for the inspection ofimported plants at New York and certain other ports of entry rather thanShipping them to Washington as at present; and such other pertinent itemsas may be brought up.Any person interested in the changes under consideration may appear atthis public conference and be heard either in person or by attorney.LEE A. STRONG, Chief of Bureau.ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO PINK BOLLWORM QUARANTINE(NO. 52)REVISION OF REGULATIONSIN1RODUCTORY NoTEThe following revision of the pink-bollworm-quarantine regulations makes noaddition to the areas formerly under regulation. The regulated areas are,however, now divided into heavily infested areas and lightly infested areas.The heavily infested areas consist of the counties of Brewster, Culberson, JeffDavis, Presidio, Terrell, and a portion of Hudspeth in the State of Texas. Theremaining counties in Texas, as well as those under regulation in Arizona,Florida, and New Mexico, are designated as lightly infested areas. The measuresof control and prevention of spread of the pink bollworni remain substantiallyuiichang4ed.SUM MARYThe regulated areas under this revision include 5 counties of southern Ari-zona, 6 counties of north-central Florida, 7 counties of southern New Mexico,and 10 counties of western Texas. Of this area, 5 counties and part of an addi-tioial county of Texas are designated as heavily infest ed and the other areas aslightly infested. (See regulation 3.)No stalks, bolls, or other parts of either cultivated or wild cotton plants andno -in waste are allowed to be transported interstate from any regulated area8nd no porniits will be i'.sued for such movement, except that the local trans-POrtation of ni waste between regulated areas is authorized after freezingwea other starts. (See regulation 5.)Seed cel ion must not be transported interstate from any regulated area,exempt b(t w\een (ontiuous regulated areas for ginning. (See regular tion 6.)Cot to See(d], cotton 1,nt, cottolSee(d hulls, cake, and meal, an( bag-ing, wrap-pers, and cont linerss which have been used for cotton products must not beI raiislported interstate from any regula ted area exceI)t under perilit. Cottonweedprodcneed in le heavily infested area must not be moved interstate therefrom

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19331 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 205and no permits will be issued for such movement. (For the conditions govern-ing the issuance of permits, see regulations 7 to 12, and 15.)Railway cars, boats, and other vehicles, farm household goods, farm equip-ment, and other articles, must not be moved interstate from regulated areasunless free from contamination with cotton anmd cottoli products. ( See regula-tion 13.)Permits are required to accompany the waybills covering shipments of re-stricted articles, or in the case of highway vehicles, they must accompany thevehicle. (See regulation 15.)To secure permits, address the local inspector or the Bureau of PlantQuarantine, 521 Avenue A, San Antonio, Tex.LEE A. STlo,Chief, Bureau of Plait Quaran tine.NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 52 (REVISED)(Approved Oct. 26, 1932; effective Oct. 29, 1932)I, C. F. Marvin, Acting Secretary of Agriculture. have determined that it isnecessary to quarantine the States of Arizona, Florida, New Mexico, andTexas to prevent the spread of the pink boliwormn (Pectinophora gossypiellaSaunders), a dangerous insect new to and not heretofore widely prevalent ordistributed within and throughout the United States.Now, therefore, under the authority conferred by section 8 of 1-lie PlantQuarantine Act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended by the act ofCongress approved March 4, 1917 (39 Stat. 1134, 1165), and having duly giventhe public hearing as required thereby, I do quarantine the said States ofArizona. Florida, New Mexico. and Texas, effective on and after October 29,1932. Hereafter, under the authority of said act of August 20, 1912, amendedas aforesaid, (1) cotton, wild cotton, including all parts of either cotton orwild cotton plants, seed cotton, cotton lint, liters, and all other forms ofmanufactured cotton lint, gin waste, cottoiiseed, cottonseed hulls, cottonseedcake and meal; (2) bagging and other containers and wrappers of cotton aidcotton products; (3) railway cars, boats, and other vehicles which have beenused in conveying cotton or cotton products or which are fouled with suchproducts; (4) hay and other farm products; and (5) farm household goods,farm equipment, and, if contaminated with cotton, any otlier articles, shall notbe shipped, offered for shipment to a common carrier, received for transporta-tion or transported by a common carrier, or carried, transported, moved, orallowed to be moved from the States of Arizona, Florida, New Mexico, orTexas into or through any other State or Territory or District of the UnitedStates in manner or method or under conditions other than those prescribedin the rules and regulations hereinafter made and amendments thereto: Pro-vided, That the restrictions of this quarantine and of the rules and regulationssupplemental thereto may be limited to the areas in a quarantined State now,or which may be hereafter, designated by the Secretary of Agrieulture asregulated areas when. in the judgment of the Secretary of Agriculture, theenforcement of the aforesaid rul's and regulations as to such regulated areasshall be adequate to prevent the spread of the pink bollworm: Proridutfurther, That such limitation shall be conditioned upon the said State providingfor and enforcing such control measures with respect to such regulated areasas, in the jud-glent of the Secretary of Agriculture, shall be deemed adequateto prevent the spread of the pink bollworm therefrom to other parts of theState.Done at the city of Washington this 26th day of October 1032.Witness my hand and the seal f the United States Department ofAgriculture.[SEAL] (. F. MABTvINActin!! Rccrc i rl0i of Agrioit(1re.23445-33--2

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206 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.REVISED RULES AND REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE OF QUARANTINENO. 52(Approved Sept. 19, 1933; effective Sept. 19, 1933)REGULATION 1. DEFINITIONSFor the purpose of these regulations the following words, names, and termsshall be construed, respectively, to mean:(a) Pink bollicormn.-The insect known as the pink bollworm of cotton (Pec-tinoiuhora yotwNypfiolla Saunders), in any stage of development.(b) Cotton and cotton products.-Cotton, wild cotton, including all parts ofcotton or wild cotton plants (plants of any species of the genera Gossyipium.and Thurberial: seed cotton: cotton lint and winters, including all forms ofunm1ia nufa etured cotton lint and linters: gin wiste; cottonseed; cottonseedhulls, cake, and meal.(c) Lint.-All forms of unmanufactured fiber produced from seed cotton.(d) Lintcrs.-All forms of unmanufactured fiber produced from cottonseed.(c) Sterilized seed.-Cottonseed which has been sterilized as a part of thecontinuous process of ginning at a temperature of not less than 145' F. in anapproved plant, under the supervision of an inspector, for such a period and insuch manner and method as is authorized by the Bureau of Plant Quarantine.(f) Inspeelor.-An inspector of the United States Department of Agriculture.(fy) Moved or alloired to be moved interstate.-Shipped. offered for shipmentto a common carrier, received for transportation or transported by a connoncarrier, or carried, transported, moved, or allowed to be moved fomn one Stateor Territory or District of the United States into or through any other State orTerritory or District.REGULATION 2. LIMITATION OF RESTRICTIONS TO REGULATED AREASConditioned upon the compliance on the part of the State concerned with theprovisos to Notice of Quarantine No. 52 (revised), the restrictions provided forin these regulations on the interstate movement of the articles enumerated insaid notice of quarantine will be limited to such articles moving from the areasin such State now or hereafter designated by the Secretary of Agriculture asregulated areas: Provided, That restricted articles may be moved interstatewithout permit from an area not under regulation through a regulated areawhen such movement is on a through bill of lading.REGULATION 3. REGULATED AREAS; HEAVILY AND LIGHTLY INFESTED AREASREGULATED AREASIn accordance with the provisos to Notice of Quarantine No. 52 (revised), theSecretary of Agriculture designates as regulated areas, for the purpose of thesere gulat ions, the following counties in Arizona, Florida, New Mexico, and Texas,including all cities, towns. townships, and other political subdivisions withintheir limits:rizon arca.-The counties of Cochise, Grahai. Greenlee, Ma ricopa, andPina l.Florida arca.-The counties of Alachua. Baker, Bradford, Columbia, Gilchrist,and Union.New i xico area.-The counties of Chaves, Dona Aia, Eddy, Grant, Hidalgo,Luna, and Oturo.Tc.a 1 arca.-The counties of Brewster, Culberson, El Paso, Hudspeth, JeffDavis, Pecos. Presidio, Reeves, Terrell, and Ward.Heavily Infested AreasOf the regulated areas, the following counties and parts of counties arehereby designated as heavily infested within the meaning of these regulations:The counties of Brewster, Culberson, Jeff Davis, Presidio, and Terrell, in the State of Texas, and all of Hudspeth County in the same State except that partof the northwest corner of said county lying north and west of a ridge of desertland extending from the banks of the Rio Grande northeasterly through thedesert immediately west of the town of McNary, such ridge being an extensionof the northwest boundary line of section 11, block 65%.

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19331 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 207Lightly Infested AreasThe following areas are designated as lightly infested: The counties ofCochise, Graham, Greenlee, Maricopa, and Pinal, in Arizona 2; the counties ofAlachua, Baker, Bradford, Columbia, Gilchrist, and Union, in Florida ; thecounties of Chaves, Dona Ana, Eddy, Grant, Hidalgo, Luna, and Otero, in New Mexico; the entire counties of El Paso, Pecos, Reeves, and Ward, in Texas, andthat part of the northwest corner of Hudspeth County, Tex., lying north andwest of a ridge of desert land extending from the banks of the Rio Grandenortheasterly through the desert immediately west of the town of McNary,such ridge being an extension of the northwest boundary line of section 11,block 65%.REGULATION 4. EXTENSION OR REDUCTION OF REGULATED AREASThe regulated areas designated in regulation 3 may be extended or reducedas may be found advisable by the Secretary of Agriculture. Due notice of anyextension or reduction and the areas affected thereby will be given in writingto the transportation companies doing business in or through the State in which such areas are located, and by publication in newspapers selected by the Secre-tary of Agriculture within the States in which the areas affected are located.REGULA'TION 5. STALKS, BOLLS, GIN WASTE, Erc.Stalks, bolls, and other parts of cotton or wild cotton plants (plants of anyspecies of the genera Gos.sypiua or Thurberia), owd gin waste shall not bemoved or allowed to be moved interstate from a regulated area, except thatgin waste may be moved interstate without permit from a gin in a lightlyinfested area ' to farms in another regulated area within the contiguous ginningterritory thereof, on condition that in the judgment of the inspector such move-ment would not, owing to the arrival of freezing weather, increase the riskof spread of the pink bollworm.REGUIA'riON 6. SEE) COTTONSeed cotton (including grabbots) s0all not be moved or allowed to be movedinterstate from regulated areas to nonregulated territory, but, for the purposeof ginning, seed cotton may be moved ' interstate without permit from a lightlyinfested area to a contiguous regulated area.REGULAT1ON 7. COTTONSEEDHEAVILY INFESTED AREASCottonseed produced within a heavily infested area shall not be moved orallowed to be moved interstate from that area, and no permit will be issuedfor such movement.LIGHTLY INFESTED AREASCottonseed produced in a liglitly infested aret shall wot he moved or allowedto be moved interstate therefrom unless a permit shall have 1eein is sued tihereforby the United States Department of Agriculture.Permits may be issued for the interstate movement of slerilized 'ee' pro-duced in a lightly infested area on condition that it either is to be moved toanother regulated area 3 without passing through any territory not relatedunder this quarantine or under the Federal quarantine on a-ccount of theThurberia weevil; or is a sample to be moved to an approved laboratory in non-regulated territory for analysis; or is a sample to be moved for some otherapproved purpose.2 Part of the lightly infested area in Arizona is regulated on account of the Thur-beria weevil under Quarantine No. 61, and shipments therefrom must comply with therequirements of that quarantine." Except from the area in Arizona regulated on account of the Thurberia weevil (Quar-antine No. 61).

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208 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.Permits may also be issued for the interstate movement of sterilized seedproduced in a lightly infested area to an authorized oil mill in nonregulatedterritory for erusbing; as one of the conditions for such authorization, oilmills in nonregulated territory must agree to maintain such safeguards againstthe spread of infestation, and to comply with such restrictions on the subse-quent movement of the linters and other products manufactured from the seedconcerned as may he required by the Bureau of Plant Quarantine.Permits may be issued for the interstate movement of seed from lightly in-fested areas to any destination on condition that it has been given a special heat-reatient at 145' F. mnaintained under approved conditions for a period of atleast 1 hour and subsequently has been protected from contamination, or hasbeen given such other treatment as may later be approved by the Bureau ofPlant Quarantine.In cases where, in the judgment of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, thecarrying out of the treatments required in this regulation becomes impracticableowing to the lack of satisfactory facilities or for some other sound reason, per-mits may be issued for the interstate movemelnt of cottonseed from lightlyinfested are;is on such conditions as may be prescribed by that Bureau.OTTONSEED PRODUCED OUTSIDE THE REGULATED AREASCottonseed produced outside of but brought within a regulated area may bemoved interstate from such area under permit on condition that while in thearea the seed has been protected from contamination in a manner satisfactoryto the inspector.REGULATION 8. LINT AND SAMPLESLint and samples thereof shall not be moved or allowed to be moved inter-state from a regulated area unless a permit shall have been issued thereforby the United States Department of Agriculture.Permits may be issued for the interstate movement of lint or samples thereof,produced in a regulated area, on condition that the said lint was produced in agin operated, as to seed sterilization and the prevention of contamination, to thesatisfaction of the inspector, and on compliance with the following additional re-quirements which shall be carried out under the supervision of an inspector andin manner and by method approved by the Bureau of Plant Quarantine:Baled lint produced in a heavily infested area (regardless of destination)must be given both vacuum fumigation and either compression or roller treat-mient. unless and until the said Bureau shall approve some other treatment ortreat mentV for the purpose; baled lint produced in a lightly infested area tobe moved to nonregulate1 territory must be either fumigated under vacuum,or compressed, or roller treated, or given such other treatment as may later beapproved by the said Bureau: baled lint and samples thereof produced in alightly infested area may be moved interstate under permit to another regu-lated area ' without fumigation or other treatment on condition that the ma-terial will not pass through any cotton-growing territory outside the areasrelated under this quarantine or the Federal quarantine on account of theThurberia weevil : samples (except when moved as above from a lightly in-fested area to another regulated area). whether produced in a lightly infestedor liea viiv in fested area, must be either fumigated, inspected, or otherwisetr ated as may be required by the inspector.Pervimits may be issue for the interstate movement of baled lint or samplesthereof crown outside of but brought within a regulated area and to be movedtherefrom, on Ihe furnishing of evidence satisiactory to the inspector that thesaid materials have been protected from contamination.In (1Ses where, in the judgment of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, theca"Tyiig (ut of the treatments required in this regulation becomes impracticableowin c to the lack of sati sfa(tory facilities or for some other sound reason,permit. may be issued for the interstate movement of lint from the regulatedarC o S-h (, conditions as may be prescribed by that Bureau.4 Exvt fom the area in Arizona regulated on account of the Thurberia weevil(Quaralitice No. G1).

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1933] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 209REGULATION 9. LINTERS AND SAMPLESLinters and samples thereof shall not be moved or allowed to be moved inter-state from a regulated area unless a permit shall have been issued thereforby the United States Department of Agriculture.Permits may be issued for the interstate movement of linters or samplenthereof, produced in a regulated area on condition that sail liters were pro-duced from sterilized seed and protected from contamination to the satisfactioiof the inspector, and on compliance with the following additional requirementswhich shall be carried out under the supervision of an inspector and in mannerand by method approved by the Bureau of Plant Quarantine:Baled linters produced in a heavily infested area (regardless of' destination) must be either fumigated under vacuum, or roller treated, or given such othertreatment as may later be approved by the said Bureau ; baled linters pro-duced in a lightly infested area to be shipped to nonregulated territory mustbe either fumigated under vacuum, or compressed, or roller treated, or given such other treatment as may later be approved by the said Bureau ; baledwinters and samples thereof produced in a lightly infested area may be shippedinterstate under permit to another regulated area ' without fumigation or othertreatment on condition that the material will not pass through any cottongrowing territory outside the areas regulated under this quarantine or the Federal quarantine on account of the Thurberia weevil; samples (except whenmoved as above from a lightly infested area to another regulated area), whetherproduced in a lightly infested or heavily infe-ted area, mut be e.thcr fumi-gated, inspected, or otherwise treated as may be required by tlh inspector.Permits may be issued for the interstate movement of baled linters orsamples thereof grown outside of but brought within a regulated area and to bemoved therefrom on the furnishing of evidence satisfactory to the inspectorthat such materials have been protected front contamination.In cases where, in the judgment of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, the carry-ing out of the treatments required in this regulation becomes impracticableowing to the lack of satisfactory facilities or for some other sound reason,permits may be issued for the interstate movement of winters from the regu-lated areas on such conditions as may be prescribed by that Bureau.REGULATION 10. MILL WASTE, UNBALED LINT AND LINTERS, AND OTHER Fo.rsOF UNMANUFACTURED LINT AND LiNTERsNo form of cotton lint or linters shall be moved or allowed to be moved inter-state from a regulated area unless a permit shall have been issued therefor bythe United States Department of Agriculture, except that no permit is requiredfor the interstate transportation of materials which have been woven or spunfrom cotton lint or winters and are uncontaminated with other cotton or cottonproducts, nor for the interstate transportation of mattresses, pillows, cushions,or upholstery, which have been commercially manufactured in compliance withthe pink-bollworm regulations of the State concerned and in which any unwovenlint or linters used are completely enclosed in the finished product.Permits may be issued authorizing the interstate movement from a regu-lated area of mill waste and of all other forms of unmanufactured cottonlint or linters for which permits are required under these regulations andwhich are not specifically covered in regulations 8 and 9, on condition thatthe material has been fumigated and compressed or roller treated, or has beengiven such other treatment or handling as will. in the judgment of the Bureau,eliminate risk of spread of the pink bollworm.REGULATION 11. COTTONSEED HULLS. CAKE, AND MEALNo cottonseed hulls, cake, or meal shall be moved or allowed to be movedinterstate from a regulated area unless a permit shall have been issued there-for by the United States Department of Agriculture.Permits may be issued for the interstate movement from a heavily infestedarea to any destination of cottonseed hulls obtained from sterilized cottonseed5 Except from the area in Arizona regulated on account of the Thurberia weevil (Quar-antine No. 61).

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210 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.and subsequently protected from contamination to the satisfaction of the in-spector on condition that they are given such additional treatment as may berequired by the inspector. Permits may be issued for the interstate move-ment from a lightly infested area " of cottonseed hulls produced from sterilizedcottonseed and subsequently protected from contamination to the satisfactionof the inspectors on condition that they a re either to be moved to anotherregulated area without 1)assilg through any territory not regulated under thisquranitille or under tihe Federal quarantine oil account of the Thurberiaweevil, or are to be moved to nonregulated territory and have been given suchadditional treatment as may be required by the inspector.Permits may be issued for the interstate movement from a regulated areato any destination of cottonseed cake and meal produced either from sterilizedcottonseled or from cottonseed obtained from nonregulated territory, on con-dition that the cake and meal have been protected a-ainst subsequent contami-nation with cottonseed to the satisfaction of the inspector.REGULATiON 12. BAGGING AND OTHER WRAPPERS AND CONTAINERSBagging and other wrappers and containers which have been used in con-nection with or which are contaminated with cotton or cotton products, hallnot be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from a regulated area unlessa permit shall have been issued tlierefor by the United States Department ofAgriculture. Permits may be issued on condition that such bagging or otherwrappers or containers have been cleaned or treated to the satisfaction of theinspector.REGULATION 13. CARS, BOATS, VEHICLES, HOUSEHOLD GOODS, AND EQUIPMENTIRailway cars, boats, and other vehicles which have been used in conveyingcotton or cotton products or which are fouled with such products, and farmhousehold goods, farm equipment, and other articles, if contaminated withcotton or cotton products, shall not be moved or allowed to be moved inter-state from a regulated area until they have been thoroughly cleaned or treatedto the satisfaction of the inspector. No permit is required for the movementsallowed under this regulation.REGULATION 14. HAY AND OTHER FARM PRODUCTS; COTTONSEED OILHay and other farm products the interstate movement of which has notbeen specifically restricted or provided for elsewhere in these regulations, andcottonseed oil, may be moved interstate without permit or other restrictionuntil further notice.REGULATION 15. GENERAL PERMIT PROVISIONS; MARKING AND LABELING; STORAGE,CARTAGE, AND LALoR COSTSTo obtain permits under these regulations, application should be madeeither to the nearest local inspector, or to the Bureau of Plant Quarantine,521 Avenue A, San Antonio, Tex.Permits may specify a destination point or a limited destination area forthe shipment, mnd, in that event, the material concerned shall not be movedor allowed to be "'oved interstate, directly or indirectly, to destinations otherthan those speci led in such permit.Copi 's of the permits required under these regulations shall be attachedto the articles or to the wa bills or ther shipping papers which accompanythe sihipienit. Ill Iihe case ol movement by a road vehicle, copies of the permitshall accompany the vehicle. The products or articles so moved shall bearsuch Iarking and labeling as may be necessary, in the judgment of theinspetrl , to identify the material.All (lharges 1or sior)gr , art age, nd labor, incidei to inspection, other thanthe srviccs of ifitspectors, shall be paid by the shipper.1 Except from the area in Arizona regulated on account of the Thurberia weevil (Quar-autine No. 61).

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19'3] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 211REGULATION 16. SHIPMENTS BY TBIE UNITED STATES EARI EINT OF AI((,UlTlUREProdit s anmd article.S subject to restrition ill ths re'guiitio1s 1may bemoved intershzate by the Il iteil States )ewIprtmIllelit (i! A ' -riculilire for experi-mental or sce ntitle purposes, oil ich '1SddId' aluier1 Stich Ni I1 Saegi ia rdsas imay be pres(ilbed by the Birooelt ii o! 1'lai t QIUaranltinl. T1lle coit ofarticles SO )iVe shaII bear, secirurly ailIwd to he outside 11;ereof, anidentifying tag froml tle BuI'&'aii of PI' Ilt Q1laraiitile slowing (wiipliaIlce withsuch OIi coitios.Iliese rules all(1 rC-tiOns 10all be effective 01 a111 aer Sei 'e10ber 19,19:#, an1(1 shal 1s upersede oil that datte the rules and r o i hliiios issued u1111derNotice of Quarantine No. 52 (revised), on October 26, 132, as ameimled todate.Done at the city of Washington this 19th day of September 198.Witness my hand and the seal of the Uiited States Departimient of Agri-culture. C. F. MARVIN,[SEAL] iCting secretary of Agriculture.[Copies of foregoing revision sent to all common carriers doing business in or throughthe regulated area.]-F -J %:A Z"G A.AREAS REGULATED UNDERPINK BOLLWORM QUARANTINEEFFECTIVE SEPTEMBER 19, 1933minin BOUNDARY OF REGULATED AREASF L A. HEAVILY INFESTED AREAFIGURE INOTICE TO GENERAL PUBLIC TiouGH NEWSPAPERSUNITED STATEs DEPART CNT o1 AGRICULTULE,IUBREAL OF PLANT QUAUAN TINE,lIUxi8iiiii/GJ, D.C., Sptn((l/ bcr -19, 1933.Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Airiculture, under outhorityconferred on him by the plant quarantine aCt of August 20, 1912 (17 Stat. I1T,as amended, has promulgated a revision of the rules and regulations to Noticeof Quarantine No. 52 (revised), on account of the pink bohlworn, effectiveSeptember 19, 1933. Under this revision tie regulated areas include ~5 couitiesof southern Arizona, 6 counties of north-citrl'i Florida, 7 couities of southernNew iMexico, and 10 counties of western Texas. Various changes with regardto the handling and issuance of permits, of interest to growers andl shippersof cotton and cotton products, have been made in the revision. copies s of said revision may he obtained from the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, United StatesDepartment of Agriculture, Washington, D.C-. c F. MARVIN,Acting Secretary of Agriculture.[Published in the following newspapers: The Republican Phoenix, Ariz., Sept. 26, 1913;the Florida Times-Union, Jacksonville, Fla., Sept. 26, 1913; the New Mexico State Tri-bune, Albuquerque, N.Mex., Sept. 26, 1933; the El Paso Post, El Paso, Tex., Sept. 25,19 33.j

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212 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [July-SeptCAMPAIGN AGAINST PINK BOLLWORM STARTED IN COTTON FIELDS OF SOUTH(Press notice)SEPTEMBER 25, 1933.The United States Dep:'rtment of Agriculture, today concentrated its facili-ties for inspecting cotton-gin trash in the area around Enigna. Ga., whereplant quarantine inspectors hist week found pink bollworms during a routineinspection of gin trash. Ali intensive inspection of adjaeni fields is also underway. Prompt extermination mieasiures \\ill be taken against any additionalinfestation discovered.This is the first timie in 12 years that the pink bollworm has appeared in thema in Cotton Belt of the United States, says Lee A. Strong, Chief of the Bureauof Plant Quarantine. Clean cultivation of the fields and steriliz ition of theseed are anontie control ineasures advocated by the Depairtment. Afterthe cotton is picked every bit of cotton plant and debris in an infested fieldmust be pulled -out, raked up, and burned. The seeds, in which the bollworinpasses part of its life cycle, must be sterilized. In this way infestations havebeen stamped out over thousands of square miles in several cotton-growingStates.Annual inspections of gin trash disclose any incipient infestation of pinkbollworms, Mr. Strong says, and make it possible to take proper control meas-ures before the insect can build up a large population. A light infest tion w.sdiscovered by such an examination last year in Florida, lie adds, and, as aresult of the control measures immediately taken, no infestation has been foundthere this year.ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO THURBERIA-WEEVILQUARANTINE (NO. 61)REVISION OF REGULATIONSINTRODUCTORY NOTEThe following revision of the Thurberia-weevil-quarantine regulations isis ued to authorize the use of various improved treatments and other safe-guards that have been developed by the Department in recent years. The cllanges in every case provide for the issuance of permits for interstate shipments on conditions with which it will be simpler and less expensive to coin-ply than those previously required, or under which a wider market for cottonproducts is authorized.Ch-mngos include provisions under which cottonseed given a special heat treat-mnent of 145' F. for 1 hour is authorized shipment under permit to any destina-tion: baled cotton lint may be either fumigated under vacuum, or compressed,or roller treated, instead of having to be both compressed and fumigated asheretofor ; nd cottonseed hulls may be shipped to nonregulated territory onthe applieition of such special treatment as may he required by the inspector.SUMMARYThe reuiated areas tinder this quarantine include Cochise and Santa CruzCounties, and parts of Graham, Pima, and Pinal Counties in Arizona. (Seeregulation 3.)No Thurberia plants or parts thereof shall be moved or allowed to be movedinterstate from any point in Arizona, and no permit will be issued for suchniovement. (See regulation 5.)No seed c cotton, stalks, bolls, or other parts of the cotton plant, or gin waste,shall be oved or allowed to be noved interstate front a regulated area, andho permit will be issued for such movement. (IRegulation 5.)Cotton lint, linters, cottonseed. cottonseed hulls, cake, and meal, and bagging,wrappers :nd containers which have been used for cotton products must not betransported interstate from the regulated area except under permit. (Forconditions governing the issuance of permits see regulations 6 to 11 and 14.)Railway cars, boats, and other vehicles, farmn household goods. farm equipnwnt, and other articles must not be moved interstate from a regulated area

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19331 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 21uIess free fr(I II (.OIta In a ilI I tio I I witI I ((tt() 11 1:( eQ t( I I 1 )1rd( 1 Uct 5. ( See reg Ia-tion 12.)1erImits are re(IlIired to :iccomnjiiliy p hI e wayl l ' Nvei I'I. shiiz111s ot IIe-!tricted artices, or ill the case of highlway vehicles thwIy must m(c'(ipaiy theve while.To secure permits apply to the iiearest local inspectmr m. ('ddl(es( s Ill(' Burealof Ilmit Quaraiitine, 521 Avo'iue A. Saii Aiitonio, Tex.LEE A. SiTRONG.chlief, Butrefu of Mlt Qumvroutillc.NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 61 (REVISED)(Effective on and after Aug. 1, 1927)I, Rei ick W. D11u 1181p, Acting Secretary d Ag: ('ifltmre., liave determiiil O1tit is nle(' essay to quar-alitille the State of Arizona to prevelit the spread( ol teThuiberia weevil (Anvlimnomlus gr(ndis hurbcri'i Pierce), a dauingirols ilnsectlot heretofore widely prevalent or dist ributed wi thin a id thi rouglnout lieUnited States.Now, therefore, under the authority coiferr-ed b1 y section 8 (1 the PhitQuarantine Act of August 24), 1912 (137 Stat. 315), as 8 iiiended by tlie a t ofCongress approved March 4. 1917 (39 Stat. 1134, 1165), awn having duly giventhe public hearing as required thereby, 1 (4) quanIiti ie the sail State ofArizona, effective on and after August 1, 1927. Hereafter, under the authorityof said act of August 20, 1912. amended as aiforesaid (1) Thurberia .includingall parts of the plant ; (2) cotton, including 811 parts ()f the piaiit, seed cotti,cotton lint, linters, and all other forms of unmanufactured cotton li t, ginwaste, cottonseed, cottonseed hulls, cottonseed cake and meal ; (3) bagging d11(other containers and wrappers of cotton and cotton products; (4) railway ('ars,boats, and other vehicles which have been used im conveying cotton auth cot tonproducts or which are fouled with such promducts: (5) hay and othefl'armproducts; and (6) farm household goods, farmi equipment. and, if cmitaiiiiatedwith cotton, any other articles, sha not be shipped, offered for shipmelit to aconlon carrier, receiveil for transportation or transported by a tmilllilOlcarrier, or carried, transported, moved, or allowed to be moved fr m 1 he Stateof Arizona into or through any other State or Territory o District of theUnited States in imauier or method or under coiditions other than those pre-scribed in the rules and regulations hereinafter made and amendments lhereto:Provided, That the restrictions of this quarantine and of the IrIles an1 ree2fla-tions supplemental thereto may be limited to the areas in the State ()f Ar'zoianow, or which may be hereafter, designated by the Secretary of Agriculture asregulated areas when, in the judgment of the Secretary of Agricultume. the enforcement of the aforesaid rules and regulations as tti such regulated areasshall be adequate to prevelit tie spread of the Thurberia weevil: 1P)ridcdffurther, That such limitation sa11 be cotidit oiued upon the said State prnovidi igfor and enforcing such control measures with respect t such regulated areasas in the judIgment of the Secretary of Agriculture shall be deelned adequateto prevent the spread of the Thurberia weevil therefr( inm to otier parts ofthe State.Done at the city of Washiiligton this 9th day of July 1927.Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Departimienit ()f Agrimcultu re.[SEAL] RENICK W. DUNLAP,Acting eetryof A4fricuituin.REVISED RULES AND REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE OF QUARANTINENO. 61A pproved Sept. 80, 1933 ; effective Oct. 2, 1932)REGULATION 1. DEFINITIONSFo' the purlo;se of these regu]ations tile folowvinig w'tird. ]]mmies, an1d ten'n sshall be construedd' , respectively, to mnan:2-445----33-3

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211 BUR EAU 0F PLAN T QU AIN T INE: [July-Sept.I'() Th be(ia l. vccil-The insect known as the Thurberia weevil (Ali-ihonmusrai di thUrib(riWe Pliecie). ill ally stage olc (oI)li1ellt.C ( ('/ion t in d colton prodi( r.-Cotton, wild cotton, iluluding all parts ofjoltlol or wild ccttoll plants i plants of any species of the genera GosN/pluhn andThirbcr ii: sced cttoin: cottoii lint aimd linters, including all forms of un-mnnuIacturca I c.()t toll lint an ld liters ; gin waste ; cot [oisced ; cottonseed hulls,cake, and mien .c ) Lint.-All forimls of uniaiifactmt red fiber produced from seed cotton.(d) Lintcrs.e All i'ovIns of uinianumfactured fiber produced from (Ottonseed.I C ) A\(rill (1d s( d.-Cott-onseed hviich has been sterilized as a part of theclit 0111o15 process of gililing at a teIiperature of not less thaii 1450 F. in anapproved plzi,1t, under 1 tle suipervisi oil of an inspector, fA r such a period and insu1ch ma nner and method as is authorized by the bureau of Plant Quarantine.( f) Iusixjccor.--An inspector of the United States Department of Agrieulture.( q i.l(orc1 or alloiwcd to be inoved interstat.-Shipped, offered for shipmentto a coIll111o1 carrier, received for transportation or transported by a commoncarrier, or carried, transported, moved, or allowed to be moved from one Stateor Territory or District of the United States into or through any other Stateor Territory or District.REGULATION 2. LIMITATION OF RESTRICTIONS To REGULATED AI1EAsC4 onditioined upon the compliance on the part of the State of Arizona with theprovisos in Notice of Quarantine No. 61 (revised), the restrictions providedlor in these regulations on the interstate movement of the articles enumeratedin said notice of quarantine, except as to Thurberia (see regulation 5), willbe limited to such articles when moving from the areas in the State of Arizonanow or hereafter designated by the Secretary of Agriculture as regulated areas:Provided, That, except as to Thurberia (see regulation 5), the atricles enu-merated in said notice of quarantine may move interstate from an area notunder regulation through a regulated area when such movement is on athrough bill of lading.REGULATION 3. REGULATED AREAIn accordance with the provisos to Notice of Quarantine No. 61 (revised) theSecretary of Agriculture designates as regulated area the counties, or portionsthereof, of Graham, Cochise, Santa Cruz, Pima, and Pinal, of the State ofArizona, embraced within the following-described boundary line, including allcities, towns, townships, and other political subdivisions within their limits:Beginning at the most southeasterly corner of Greenlee County; thence westerly along the most southerly line of said county to the most southwesterlycorner of said county ; thence northwesterly along the county line of Greenleeand Graham Counties to the point where the township line between township10 south and township 11 south as surveyed, or as would be if surveyed, inter-sects, or would intersect, the county line between Graham and Greenlee Coun-ties ; thence west along the said township line between township 10 south and township 11 south as surveyed, or as would be if surveyed, to the point where thesaid township line intersects. or would intersect, the line between the townshipsin raage 23 east and rainge 24 east: thence north along the township line between;tlhe townsiiips in range 28 east and range 24 east as surveyed, or as would be ifS rveyed, to t he moiint where the said township line intersects, or would intersect.Ile township line between township 6 south and township 7 south: thence westalog ie sait towmship line between township 6 south and township 7 south as'rveyed. or as would be if surveyed, 1(o the point where the said township 1incintersects, or would intersect, the line between the townships in range 8 east ainira nge 9 east ; thence south along the township line between the townships in rangeS east and range 9 east as surveyed, or as would be if surveyed, to the pointwhere the said township line intersects, or would intersect, the township line be-tweeli townliship 8 sooth amid township 9 south ; thence wvest along the township]in(. between township 8 south and township 9 south as surveyed, or as wouldbe if surveyed, to tile point where the said township line intersects, or wouldmitersect. I hi(* line between the townships in range 5 east and range ( eastfhwIco e 'onth along the tovnship line between the townships in range 5 easta111(t r-a Ige (; east as surveyed, or as would be if surveyed, to the point where theaid towishii line intersects, or would intersect, the boundary line betweenPiia C ty an 11il the Rejpublic of Mexico; thence southeasterly and easterly

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1933] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 215along the boundary line between the State of Arizona and the Republic of Mex-ico to the point where the said boundary line intersects the boundary line be-tween the States of New Mexico and Arizona ; thence northerly along theboundary line between the States of New Mexico and Arizona to the point ofbeginning.All townships, township lines, and ranges referred to in the above-describedarea are of the Gila and Salt River base and meridian.REGULATION 4. EXTENSION OR REDUCTION OF REGULATED AREASThe regulated areas may be extended or reduced as may be fouid advisableby the Secretary of Agriculture. Due notice of any extension or reduction andLhe areas affected thereby will be given in writing to the transportation compa-nies doing business in or through the State of Arizona and by publication inone or more newspapers selected by the Secretary of Agriculture within the saidState.REGULATION 5. PROHIBITED MOVEMENTNo Thurberia plants or parts thereof shall be moved or allowed to be movedinterstate from any point in Arizona, and no permit will be issued for such movement.No seed cotton, grabbots, or stalks, bolls, or other parts of the cotton plant,or gin waste shall be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from a regu-lated area, and no permit will be issued for such movement.REGULATION 6. COTTONSEEDCottonseed shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from aregulated area unless a permit shall have been issued therefor by the UnitedStates Department of Agriculture.Permits may be issued for such movement of samples of sterilized seed to anapproved laboratory in nonregulated territory for analysis, or of samples to bemoved for some other approved purpose.Permits may also be issued for the interstate movement of sterilized seedto an authorized oil mill in nonregulated territory for crushing; as one of theconditions for such authorization, oil mills in such nonregulated territory mustagree to maintain such safeguards against the spread of infestation and to comply with such restrictions on the subsequent movement of the linters and otherproducts manufactured from the seed concerned as may be required by the Bureau of Plant Quarantine.Permits may be issued for the interstate movement of seed to any destina-tion on condition that the seed has been given a special heat treatment at145* F. maintained under approved conditions for a period of 1 hour and sub-sequently has been protected from contamination, or has been given such othertreatment as may later be approved by the Bureau of Plant Quarantine. In cases where, in the judgment of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, thecarrying out of the treatments required in this regulation becomes impracti-cable owing to the lack of satisfactory facilities or for some other sound reason,permits may be issued for the interstate movement of cottonseed from a regu-lated area on such conditions as may be prescribed by that Bureau.Cottonseed produced outside of but brought within a regulated area may bemoved interstate from such area under permit on condition that while in thearea the seed has been protected from contamination in a manner satisfactoryto the inspector.REGULATION 7. LINT AND SAMPLESLint and samples thereof shall not be moved or allowed to be moved inter-state from a regulated area unless a permit has been issued therefor by theUnited States Department of Agriculture.Permits may be issued for such movement of lint or samples thereof producedin a regulated area on condition that the lint was produced in a gin operatedas to seed sterilization and the prevention of contamination to the satisfactionof the inspector, and upon compliance with the following additional require-ments which shall be carried out under the supervision of an inspector and inmanner and by method approved by the Bureau of Plant Quarantine:

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216 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.Baled lint must h) either vacuum funiigated, or compressed, or roller treated,or given such other treatment or treatments as may later be approved by thesaid Bureau ; samples must 1e either fumigated, inspected, or otherwise treatedits may be required by the inspector.Permits may he issued for the interstate imoveielit of baled lint and samplestlereof grown outside of but brought within a regulated area and to be movedtherefrom on the furiishing of evidence satisfactory to the inspector that thesaid materials have been protected from contamination.In cases where, in the judgment of the Bureau. of Plant Quarantine, thecarrying out of the treatments required in this regulation becomes impracticableowing to the lack of satisfactory facilities or for some other sound reason, per-hits may be issued for the interstate movement of lint from a regulated areaon such conditions as may he prescribed by that Bureau.RE;iGLATIoN 8. LINTERS AND SAMPLESLinters and samples thereof shall not be moved or allowed to be moved inter-state from a regulated area unless a permit shall have been issued therefor bythe United States Department of Agriculture.Permits may be issued for the interstate movement of linters and samplesI hereof produced in a regulated area on condition that they were produced fromsterilized seed and protected from contamination to the satisfaction of the in-spector, and on compliance with the following additional requirements whichshall be carried out under the supervision of an inspector and in manner andby method approved by the Bureau of Plant Quarantine:Baled winters must be either vacuum fumigated, or compressed, or rollertreated, or given such other treatment as may later ie approved by the saidBureau; samples must be either fumigated, inspected, or otherwise treated asmay be required by the inspector.Permits may be issued for the interstate moveijent of haled linters andsamples thereof grown outside of but brought within a regulated area and to be moved therefrom on the furnishing of evidence satisfactory to the inspector1 hat such materials have been protected from contamination.In cases where, in the judgment of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, thecarrying out of the treatments required in this regulation becomes impracti-able owing to the lack of satisfactory facilities or for some other sound reason, permits may be issued for the interstate movement of linters fromthe regulated areas on such conditions as may be prescribed by that Bureau.REGULATION 9. MILLwASTE. UNBALED LINT ANI) LINTERS, AND OTHER FORMs OFUNMANUFACTURED LINT A ND LINTEIsNo form of cotton lint or winters shall be moved or allowed to be movedinterstate from a regulated area unless a permit shall have been issuedtherefor by the United States Department of Agriculture, except that no permitis required for the interstate transportation of materials which have been wovenor spun from cotton lint or linters and are uncontaminated with other cottonor cotton products, nor for the interstate transportation of mattresses, pillows,cushions, or upholstery, which have been commercially manufactured in compli,nce with the Thurberia weevil regulations of the State concerned and inwhich any unwoven lint or linters used are completely enclosed in the finishedproduct.Permits may be issued authorizing the interstate movement from a regulatedare11 of milh-waste ad if all other forms of unImaIutifactured cottoii lint orliters for which permits are rettiired Uider these reguiatioits and which arenot specifically covered in reuaulations 7 iind 8. on condition n that the materialIha s been fumi ia ted and conipressed or roller treated, or has been given such44thier I reat iieit 41 llainiflnllg ;!will, ill the jt(Uid ient of tle Bureau. eliminate risk of spread of the Thureria weevil.REGULATION 10. CormoNsEED HULLs, CARF, AND M AL.xNo cottonseed hulls, cake, or meal -shall be moved or allowed to be movedinterstate from a regulated area unless a permit shill have beein issued thereforIby the Uinite I States I)epartment of Agriculture.Permits may le issued for tle interstate inovenmient from a regulated areat o any des tilat iol of (Ott oiseed hulls obtained from sterilized cottonseed on

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1933] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 217condition that they have been protected from subsequent contamination to thesatisfaction of the inspector and have been 'given such additional treatment asmay be required by the inspector.Permits may be issued for the interstate movement from a regulated areato any destination of cotton seed cake and meal produced either from sterilizedcottonseed or from cottonseed obtained from nonregulated territory, on conditionthat the cake and meal have been protected against subsequent contaminationwith cottonseed to the satisfaction of the inspector.REGULATION 11. BAGGING, WRAPPERS, AND CONTAINERSIla gging and other wrappers and containers which have been used in Coil-nection with or which are contaminated with cotton or cotton products, shallnot be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from the regulated area unlessa permit shall have been issued therefor by the United States Department ofAgriculture. Permits may be issued on condition that such bagging or otherwrappers or containers have been cleaned or treated to the satisfaction of theinspector.REGULATION 12. CAns, BOATS, VEHIcLEs, HOUSEHOLD GOODS AND EQUIPMENTRailway cars, boats, and other vehicles which have been used in conveyingcotton or cotton products or which are fouled with such products, and farmhousehold goods, farm equipment, and other articles, if contaminated with cotton or cotton products, shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstatefrom the regulated area until they have been thoroughly cleaned or treatedto the satisfaction of the inspector. No permit is required for the movementsallowed under this regulation.REGULATION 18. HAY AND OTHER FARM PRonUCTs; AND CoTToNsEED OILHay and other farm products the interstate movement of which has not beenspecifically restricted or provided for elsewhere in these regulations, and cottonseed oil, may be moved interstate without permit or other restrictionuntil further notice.REGULATION 14. GENERAL PERMIT PROVISIONS; MARKING AND LABELING ; COSTSOF TREAT ENTFS, ETC.To obtain permits under these regulations application should be made to thenearest local inspector or to the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, 521 Avenue A,San Antonio, Tex.Permits may specify a destination point or a limited destination area forthe shipment and, in that event, the material concerned shall not be movedor allowed to be moved interstate, directly or indirectly, to destinations otherthan those specified in such permit.In case Thurberia-weevil infestation within any part of the regulated areabecomes so general or so heavy in the future that, in the judgment of theBureau of Plant Quarantine the safeguards or treatments prescribed hereinare insufficient to prevent the spread of the weevil therefrom, permits for theinterstate movement of restricted articles produced or stored in such generallyor heavily infested part of the area may either be refused or may be withhelduntil such additional treatments or safeguards have been applied as may benecessary, in the judgment of the Bureau, to prevent the spread of the Thur-beria weevil.Copies of the permits required under these regulations shall be attached tothe articles or to the waybills or other shipping papers which accompany theshipment. In the case of movement by a road vehicle, copies of the permitshall accompany the vehicle. The products or articles so moved shall bearsuch marking and labeling as may be necessary, in the judgment of theinspector, to identify the material.All charges for storage, cartage, and labor, incident to inspection, other thanthe services of the inspector, shall be paid by the shipper.

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218 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.REGUI-FION 15. S11r1iM:NTs nY TUE V N ') STrvri':s DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTUREProducts and articles subject to restriction in these regulations may bemoved interstate by the United States Department of Agriculture for experi-mental (ir scientific purposes, on such conditions and under such safeguardsas may be prescribed by the Bureau of Plant Quarantine. The container ofarticles so moved shall bear, securely at tached to the outside thereof, anidentifying tag from the Bureau of Phiont Quarantine showing compliance withsuch condit ions.These rules and regulations shall be effective on and after October 2, 1933,and shall supersede on that date the rules and regulations issued under Noticeof Quarantine No. (11 (revised), on July 9. 1927, as amended to (late.Done at the city of Washington this 30th day of September 1933.Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.[SEAL] H. A. WALLACE,Secretary of Ayricit ture.[Copies of foregoing revised regulations sent to all common carriers doing businessin or through the regulated area.]NoTICE TO GENERAL PUBLIC THROUGH NF.wSPAPERSUNITE STATEs DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE,Wasllinlgton, D.C., September 30, 1933.Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, under authorityconferred on him by the plant quarantine act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315),as amended, has promulgated a revision of the rules and regulations supple-mental to Notice of Quarantine No. 61. on account of the Thurberia weevil,effective October 2, 1933. Under the revision the regulated areas includeCochise and Santa Cruz Counties, and parts of Graham, Pima, and PinalCounties in Arizona. The revision authorizes the use of various improvedtreatments and other safeguards that have been developlrd by the department inrecent years, and makes various other changes with regard to treatment andtransportation, of interest to growers and shippers of cotton and cotton prod-ucts. Copies of said revision may be obtained from the Bureau of PlantQuarantine, United States Department of Agriculture, Wa sihington, D.C.H. A. WALLACE,Secretary of Agriculture.[Published in the Arizona Republican, Phoenix, Ariz., Oct. 10, 1933.]MISCELLANEOUS ITEMSP.Q.C.A.-306, Supplement No. 1. AUGUST 25, 1933.PLANT QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS, NEW ZEALANDNew Zealand Gazette No. 50, July 13, 1933, publishes Notice No. Ag. 3131,amending regulations under the Orchard and Garden Diseases Act, 1928, inregard to the importation of fruits or plants into New Zealand.This notice amends regulation 6 and the inspector's certificate of the sixthschedule, and reads as follows:REGULATIONS1. Notwithstanding anything to the contrary in the principal regulationsinsofar as they relate to the admission of fruit, the introduction into NewZealand of any fruit from any country in which Mediterranean or West Aus-tfalian fruit fly ( Halieroph ora cUJpitata. described also as Ceratitis capitata),is known to exist, is absolutely prohibited.2. Every suip ment (f fruit which by the principal regulate bns and thesereuIlations may he introduced into New Zealand shall, in addition to the

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19311 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 219(.rtificates required by the princip'll regii nations to accolip1any such fruit toNew Zeallnd, 1( acconipalnied by a certificate signed by an oflicer of theI)ej1nrtment of A'griiculture or other department pcri-foriinthe functions orduties relating to horticulture in the country where such fruit was grown, cer-tifying that Mediterranca n or West Aust ra Iiim fruit fly (IP tcrop/iora capital(,described also as Ceratitis capitata), does not exist in the country where suchfruit was grown: Provided, That th(' 8 foresaid celtific8t m1l;ay bIe c('om1binedwith the appropriate certificate required by the principal r 'gula 'tions io accom-pany fruit the introduction of which is permitted under the principal regula-tions and these regulations, and if so combiiied may be ill or tio Ile effect ofthe form set out in the schedule hereto.SCHEI) LEThe Orchard and Garden Diseases Act, 1)28 (New Zealand)Inspector's additional certificate to accompany fruit to New ZealandI hereby certify that Mediterranean or West Australian fruit fly (Halter-ophora capitata, described also as Ceratitis capitata), does not exist in the'untry where the above-mentioned fruit was grown.Dated at , this day of , 193-.SignatureOfficial designationAddress_AvERY S. IoYr,Acting Chi(f of Biireau.B.P.Q.-353.SEPTEm El 7, 1933.PLANT QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS, JAMAICA, BRITISH WEST INDIESThe following summary of the plant quarantine restrictions of Jlamaica,British West Indies, was prepared August 4, 1933, by the acting director ofagriculture of that Colony and is offered for the information of nurserymen,plant quarantine officials, and others interested in the exportation of plants andplant products from the United States.The information contained in this circular is offered as beingu correct and com-plete up to the time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used independ-ently of, nor as a substitute for, the original texts of the orders and procla-mations concerned, nor is it to be interpreted as legally authoritative. Theorders and proclamations should be consulted for the exact texts.LEE A. STR8NG,Chic, of BlorceUti.

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220 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.SUMMARY OF THE PLANT-QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS OF JAMAICA, BRITISHWEST INDIESProclamations, orders, etc., in force Feb. 18, 1932ArticleInstrument Date ProvisionsCitrus:Fruits-----------------Proclamation under Feb. 13, 1924 ---Prohibited from all countries.law 23 of 1916.Plants, buds, and grafts Order under law 10 of June 18, 1925 Do.1925.Cuofton, inc(luding any part ---do-----------------do---------Prohibited from all countriesof any plant of Ily species (except Turks and Caicos or variety y of (wsypi m. Islands) except under speciallicense from Director of Agri-culture.Coconuts in the husk ------Proclamat ion under May 15, 1923 Prohibited from all countries.law 23 of 1916.Banana 11, is or partsi--do---------------Apr. 3, 1917Do.thereof or articles used aspacking or covering for.Tool or implements usually ---do------------------do---------Prohibited from Central oremployed in the cultivaSouth America or Trinidad.tion of bananas.Earth or soil---------------(0----------------do ---------Prohibited from all countries.Fruits and vegetables (ex--do----------------(1) July 9, 1929-Prohibited from all countriescept dried or processed, (2) May 27, 1930 except United States ofgrains, seeds, potatoes, America, Canada, Unitedonions. or any species of Kingdom, and Ireland. Acertificate that the productsare home grown is requiredfrom the named countries.'Order under law 10 of June 4, 1929-----(1) From the United King-1925. dom may be imported with-out permit. Entry per-mitted into port of Kingstononly. On arrival must befumigated with hydrocyanicacid gas.(2) From any country otherthan the United Kingdompermitted only if and when awritten permit has beengranted by the Director ofAgriculture previous to im-Plants or parts thereof, inportation.cluding any soil, articles, Admission allowed into port ofcoverings, or packages in Kingston only. Goods mustwhich they may be enbe consigned to the Directorclosed or packed. of Agriculture and on arrivalwill be subjected to such dis-infection or fumigation asmay be considered necessary.--do---------------Apr. 26, 1930----The permit will take the formof a label which must be for-warded by the importer tothe supplier, who must at-tach it to the package con-taining the plants.Packages arriving without apermit attached are to bedestroyed forthwith by postoffice or customs.Same as (1) and (2) above.Agricultural tools or ipleA permit as in (2) above ismrents of labor: J Order under law 10 of June necessary before used tools(a) New and unused1925. 4, 1929 implements can be im-(i) Used---------------ported from any country, in-cluding United Kingdom.

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19331 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 221B.P.Q.-347, Supplemetit No. 1.SEPTEME IW] 0_, 30,PLANT QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF GREECERESTRICTIONS ON THE IMPORTATION AND TRANSIT OF POTATOES(Decree of Mar. 29, 19:8iARTICWLL I(1) The importation into, amd transit throu2$h Greece, of potatoes alnd partsthereof, as well as of sacks and other containers, vlIich may lmve served fortheir tra nsportation and storage, froi countries infested by t1 co I eopteroil,Doryphora decenmlincata, or the fungus, Sy'lnchytrium en(doiotijumfi, are pro-hibited.(2) The importation into, and trisit t r(ugh Greece, o polatoes fromcountries other than those which are affected by the prohibition of the precedingparagraph, are authorized under the following conditions:(a) When potatoes are offered for entry inl containers, the contailiers (sacks,baskets, cases, etc.) must Ibe new and never have served for the trainsportationof potatoes, and must I e sealed by the plant pr4 tectioln service of the countryof origin.If the potatoes are transported by rail, thel rs muimst le closed w1d sealedas a bove.(b) Each shipment of potatoes must 1be accompanied by two copies of certifi-cates of health and origin prepared according to the model under article 5, inthe language of the country of origin and ill French, or officially translated intoGrlek. ( ne copy will remain in the customhouse at which consumption or intrimsit entry is Imalde, and the other will accompany the shipment.The date of the certificates shall nct precede the (late of shipment by morethaii 20 days.The foreign authority is'1n jg the certilicate must at once mail the originalto the phytopathological section, Ministry of Agriculture, Athens, Greece.For importations of potatoes by rail tie two copies of the certificate of healthand origin must be attached to the waybill.If a shipment includes several cars, each car must be accompanied by twocopies of a (>'rtificate issued for each car separately.(3) The importation of potatoes from countries that are free from Doryphoraand Syuielhytrium, but which have traversed countries in which that insect andthat fungus exist, is authorized on condition that the potatoes are well packedand are sealed by th6 officials service of plant. protection of the country oforigin.If the potatoes are transported by rail, the formalities required by thepreceding paragraph are to be applied.(4) The frontier customs offices, in the case of transportation by rail, orthe ports, in the case of ocean transportation, will prohibit the entry andtransit of potatoes, parts thereof, their containers, etc., if the shipments do notabsolutely comply with the conditions provided by the present decree.(5) The entry into. mid r transit through Greece, of' potatoes, must be effectedonly through the customhouse of Eidomeni, and through the ports of Piracus,Saloniki, and Patras.(6) For the present, the countries considered as attacked by Doryphora areFrance (except its colonies and Corsica), the United States, and Canada.(7) The following countries are attacked by *ynchytrium: Austria, Belgium,Czechoslovakia, Deniark, Finland, France, Germany. Great Britain, Ireland,Netherlands, Norway. Poland, Sweden, and Switzer? and.ARTIcLE 2The entry of living plants, and living parts thereof. bulbs, rhizomes, tubers(other than potatoes), insofar as they do not fall under the prohibitions pre-scribed by inea sures in force against Phylloxera. is authorized only when eachshipment of the said products is accompanied by an official certificate of thecountry of origin, affirming that the products shipped are free from Doryphioraand that that insect does not exist where the products were grown, nor withina distance of 100 kilometers therefrom,

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222 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.ARTICLE 3The im11portation of I otatoes intended for planting is permitted, whatever theirori--iin, under ithe followinItg conditions:1) A 1wrmit must have been obtained in advance from the "Ministry ofAgriculture.(2) Ile l potatoes shall be in containers.(3) The containers shall be absolutely new.(4) Each contaiier l shall be sealed by the official plant protection serviceof the country of origin.(5) Each shipment shall be accompanied by a certificate of health andorigin in conformity with the conditions set forth in article 1 of this decree.and also a declaration of the firm whence the seed potatoes came. affirming.in addition to the identifying g marks of the shipment, the variety of potatoes.and a statement that they are suitable for planting.ARTICLE 4The Minister of Agriculture reserves the igLht to have the potatoes and theproducts mentioned in article 2 inspected when offered for entry, by officialsdesignated for that purpose, even in cases where all the provisions of thisdecree have been complied with.If that inspection shows the potatoes to be carriers of Doryphora decemline-ata, or Phthorimaea oJerculclla or of Synchytrium endobioticum, those prod-ucts will be reexported within 15 days at the expense of the importer, or sub-jected to disinfection, likewise at the expense of the importer, to the extentthat such a measure is deemed sufficient, and that means for disinfecting are available at the port of entry : or, finally, they will be destroyed, still at the costof the importer, without right of indemnity. The destruction shall take place immediately, if the detention of the potatoesis deemed dangerous or after a perior of 15 days. For destruction, the formali-ties of article 2 of law No. 217 are to be followed.ARTICLE 5The model of the certificate of health and origin mentioned in this decree will be the following (see model appended). The present decree becomes effective one month after date of publication inthe Official Journal (No. 81 of Mar. 29, 1933).MODEL OF CERTIFICATE OF HEALTH AND ORIGINMODELE DU CERTIFICAT SANITAIRE ET D'ORIGINEIndication of CountryIndication du paysOfficial Plant Protection Service Service Officiel de Protection des V6g6tauxOrder No.No. d'ordre.1. the undersigned (full name. address. and official title of agent authorizedto issue the certificate) certify, in conformity with the results of the super-vision of the cultures of origin and inspection of the products in the shipment,that the plants or parts of plants contained in the shipment described below-ire judged free from injurious diseases and insect pesIs. and especially fromthose h erea fter named:Le solssigi (min, Ir(noen, et. quality offhciel le et ;di(resse de l'agenit autorise,I la dolivrance des certific t1s) certifie .co iform(mient aux rCsultats de Ia sur-veil tne des ciiltures ('ori -i ne, et de I'hispection des iroduits contends di sI'exp edition, que les v6getaux on parties des veg6taux contenus dans 1'envoideerit ci-des5ous soiit jug'-. iidemies de maladies et e mifles danigereux, etInotanlinent de eux '6numbr(4-6s -pr:

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1933] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 223Doryphora decemlineata, Phthorim aca operculella, and HSyynchytriumendobioticumnDescription of ShipmentDescription de envoiNumber, weight, and kind of container.Nombre, poids, et nature des colis.Marks of containers.Marque des colis.Description of plants and indication of place where growii.Description des v6g6taux et indication du lieu de culture.Name in full and address of shipper.Nom, pr~nom et adresse de l'exp6diteur.Place and date of issuance of certificate.Lieu et date de d6livrance du certificat.[SEAL] [SCEAU] SignatureLEE A. STRONG,Chief of Bureau.B.P.Q.-302, Revised, Supplement No. 1. SEPTEMBER 30, 1933.PLANT QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS, GERMANYThe decree of November 3, 1931, to prevent the introduction of San Josescale and the apple fruit fly, was amplified by that of April 20, 1933, by addinga new paragraph to article 1. Therefore the following paragraph should beinserted between the second and third paragraphs under the caption " SanJose Scale Restrictions on Plant Importation " on page 5 of Circular B.P.Q-302,revised:" The Imperial Minister of Nourishment and Agriculture, in agreement withthe Minister of Finance, can determine that the importation of living plants,and fresh parts thereof, from countries other than those named in paragraph1, in connection with which the occurrence of San Jose scale is suspected, shallbe restricted to certain customs ports of entry and be subject to the conditionthat, as a result of the required inspection of the shipment at the port of entry,no San Jose scale, or suspicion thereof, be established; he can also extend theprovisions of paragraphs 1 and 2 to other countries in which the presence ofSan Jose scale has been established."Furthermore, the following paragraph should be inserted between paragraphs1 and 2 under the caption " Fresh Fruits must be Free from San Jose Scaleand the Apple Maggot " on page 7 of the same circular:" The Imperial Minister of Nourishment and Agriculture, in agreement withthe Minister of Finance, can determine that the importation of fresh fruit andrefuse of fresh fruit from countries other than those. named in paragraph 1,in connection with which San Jose scale is suspected, shall be restricted tocertain ports of entry, and be subject to the condition that, as a result of therequired inspection of the shipment at the port of entry, no San Jose scale, or suspicion thereof, be established ; he can also extend the provisions of para-graph 1 to other countries in which the presence, of San Jose scale has beenestablished."The decree of November 3, 1931. has also been supplemented by that ofJune 11, 1933 (Reichsgeset l. 1: 79, July 14, 1933, p. 468), to restrict the importation into Germany of living plants and fresh parts thereof fromRumania, Bulgaria, Greece, Poland, and Yugoslavia. The text of that decreefollows:ARTIcLE 1. (a) The importation of living plants and fresh parts thereoffrom Rumania across the frontiers of the German Republic is prohibited until

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224 BUREAU OF PLANT QVARANTINE [July-Sept.ftirtlier notice. Ihe same applies to wraps and articles of any kind that havebeen used for packing or storinig such plants or plant parts.(b ) Fresh fruit and refuse of fresh fruit from Runania. until furtherllotice. may be imported oifly throllrlh the customs ports named in article 3,oilyV iii the original packages, and only under the condition that an inspection,m1iade at the port of entry at the cost of the interested person, reveals noinifest ation or suspicioni of iiifestation with San Jose scale.ART. 2. Living plants and fresh parts thereof, as well as fresh fruit andreflise of fresh fruit from BIlgaria. Greece, Yugoslavia. Poland(, and Czechoslo-vakia may he hitported only through the customs ports named in article 3,aid oilly on condition that an inspection, made at the port of entry at the costof the interested person. reveals no inifestation or suspicion of infestation with.S:1n Jose scale.AR. 8. The products named in articles I and 2, insofar as their importationis hot prohibited, uitil further notice, may be imported only through thefollowing customs ports of entryPrussia :Chief customs office: Stettin Auslandsverkehr.customss otices: 11eithen Q. S. Balihnof. Deutseh-Eybtu Balnhof,Fraustadt Bahnhof, Kreuz Bahnhof. Libau Bahuhof, MittelwaldeBahnhof, Neu-Bentschen. Oderberg Bahnhof, Seidenberg Bahnhof,Stettin Freihezirk. Tilsit Bahnhof, Tilsit Memelbriicke, TrachenbergBahnhof, Ziegenfhals Bahiihof.Branch customs offices: Berlin-Temnpelhof airport. Breslau Grossmark-thalle, and Eydtkuhlnen Land.Bavaria:Chief customs offices: Lindau and Simbach. Customs offices: Asch Balnhof, Eger Bahnhof, Kufstein, MlunchenGrossmarkthalle, Passau Bahnliof, and Salzburg.S'Ixon1y'ustoms offices: Bad Schandau for steamship traffic. Bodenbach, Reitzenhain, Tetschen, Boitersreuth, Warnsdorf, and Weipert.Hamburg:Combined customs offices in Hamburg, and the customs office of Curhaven.ART. 4. The provisions of article 3 apply also to the importation of livingplants and fresh parts thereof from Rumania when importation is exceptionallypermitted.ART. 5. The provisions of section 2 of article 2, sections 3 and 4 of the decreeof November 3, 1931, to prevent the introduction of San Jose scale and theapple fruit fly are applicable.LiE A. STRONG, Chief of Biureall.P.Q.C.A.-314, Supplement No. 3. SEPTEMBER 30, 1933.PLANT QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS, BRITISH HONDURASThe text of Proclamation No. 21, of August 1, 1933, prohibiting the importa-tion of tobacco seeds into British Honduras, is as follows:" Whereas it is expedient for the protection of the tobacco industry toprohibit the iinportation into this colony of tobacco seeds:" , Henry Guy Pilling, officer administering the Government, in exercise ofthe powers vested in me by the Plant Protection Ordinance-Chapter 71 of theConsolidated Laws, 1924-as amended by the Plant Protection (Amendment)Ordinance, 1928 (No. 21 of 1928), and otherwise, and with the advice of theExecutive Council, do hereby order and proclaim that from the fifth day ofAutmust 1933, all importitions of tobacco seeds are prohibited except underlicense issued by the Agricultural Officer and which shall prescribe such treat-ment of the seeds by the Department of Agriculture as the Agricultural Officermay deem necessary."LEE A. STRONG,Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.

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19331 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 225P.Q.C.A.-305, Revised. SEPTEMBER 11, 1933.SHIPMENT OF MEXICAN CITRUS FRUITS IN BOND THROUGH THE UNITEDSTATESThe importation for consumption purposes of citrus fruits (exclusive 1flemons and sour limes) and certain other fruits from Mexico, is prohibited I yNotice of Quarantine No. 5, and Amendment No. 1 thereto, issued under theauthority of the Federal Plant Quarantine Act, to prevent the entry into theUnited States of an injurious insect known as the Mexican fruit fly (Tryp, taludens).With respect to articles prohibited entry in this and other similar quaraniti(spromulgated for the purpose of excluding plant pests. provision has been madefor the entry, under permit, either for immediate exportation or for imiediaitetransportation and exportation in bond, of such articles, when such action canbe taken without risk to the fruit or other cultures of the United States. Theseprovisions are embodied in the revision of plant safeguard regulatib ns imulgated by the Secretary of Agriculture October 4. 1932. and effective December1, 1932.CONDITIONS GOVERNING RAIL SHIPMENT IN BoND OF CITRUS FRUIT PRODUCED INTHE STATE OF SONORA, MEXICO(1) Permits will be issued to authorize the entry for immediate transporta-tion and exportation in bond of Mexican citrus fruit produced in the State ofSonora alone, under conditions which will be incorporated in the permits.(2) The exporter of citrus fruit or his forwarding agent in the United Statesmust first procure from the Bureau of Plant Quarantine a permit to authorizethe routing of the shipment via a certain port of the United States. A separatepermit will be required for each port of entry and country of destination. buteach permit will be an open permit continuing until revoked and valid over allthe designated routes.(3) Such movement will be limited to entry through the ports of Nogales andNaco, Ariz., and movement through the United States by designated routes toCanada, or back into Mexico at ports not farther east than El Paso.(4) As a condition of such movement the fruit must be shipped in blond underUnited States customs seal in refrigerator cars, and may not be transhipped enroute.(5) Prior to entry the permittee or his forwarding agent must submit to thecollector of customs at the port of entry a notice. in du-dicate. on forms pro-vided for the purpose, indicating the initials and number of the railroad car. theparticular authorized route over which it is proposed that the car shall move, adthe port of exit on the Canadian or Mexican mlrder through which the car willpass out of the United States.(6) Before entry each car must he disinfected in such manner as shull berequired by the inspector of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine.(7) After the shipment has reached destination and been discharged eitherin Canada or Mexico. the car conveying it. as a condition of return to theUnited States, must be carefully swept an(d freed from all boxes, fruit, trother rubbish by the railroad c mpany involved.Failure to comply with any of the above requirements may cause the cancela-tion of the permit.RAILROAD ROUTES AUTII(;RIZED FOR TIE MOVEMENT OF SONORAN CITRUS FRUITDIRECtLY FROM MEXICO TO CANADA CR BA(K INTO MEXICOFront &onoi-(i, Mexico. to ('an (ada in Bwod Throllotu thtc Uiited , tuttc,;Direct routing is authorized of citrus fruits frn m the State of Sonora. Mexico,through Nogales or Naco, Ariz., eastward to El Paso. Tex., thence to Canada viaany routing which does not pass west of the direct rail routes through 8altLake City, Utah, and Portland. Oreg., or southeast of the direct rail routesthrough San Antonio, Tex., and St. Louis, Mo. See map.)7 The Federal PIlant Quarantine Act of Aug. 20, 1912. as aimended, provides either fhrregulation Or prohibition of the entry of plants and plant products when such action shall be necessary to prevent tie introduction into the Inited States of injurious inseut'Tand phl nmtiss. Under this authority citrus fruit from Mexico. including orange,grapefruit. and sweet limes. and also inangoes. sapodillas (Arhra ,apotm!. 11;),guavas. and plums a1 prohibited entry into the United States on account of tieMexican fruit fly (/ Trypjta ludens .

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226 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.Fromi sonlora, lexico, in bon d thirouig/i the Unitd Sla tIs back into MexicoPortof etryport of exitPort of entry from Port of reentry intointo United frexi StaatestesNogales, Ariz._ Southern Pacific & Nacozari .R------------Douglas.-Aqua Prieta, Sonora.Do---------Southern Pacifie & Mexico Northwestern R.R_. El Paso.-. Ciudad Juarez, Chi-huahua.Naco. Ariz Southern Pacific & Nacozari R.R.-----------Douglas.-Agua Prieta, Sonora.Do --------Southern Pacific, Mexico Northwestern, or El Paso--. Ciudad Juarez, Chi-National R.R. of Mexico. hauhua.Douglas,. Ariz .0 ---------------------------------------do-.Do.CONDITIoNs GOVERNING, MOVEMENT IN BOND TO CANADA OF MEXICAN CITRUsFRUIT THROUGH NORTH ATLANTIC PORTSIn addition to the rail movement from the Mexican border ports of citrusfruit produced in the State of Sonora, Mexico, under the conditions set forthabove, citrus fruit from any part of Mexico coming to the port of New Yorkor other approved northern Atlantic ports by ocean transit during the periodOctober 15 to March 15, if apparently free from infestation, as determinedby inspection at the approved port of entry, may be permitted entry at suchports for immediate transportation and exportation in bond to Canada in accord-ance with the Revised Plant Safeguard Regulations, promulgated by the Sec-retary of Agriculture October 4, 1932, and effective December 1, 1932. (Seepar. 2 of this circular.)A separate permit is required for each shipment of this character and appli-cation should be made in advance: Provided, That a continuing permit, validuntil revoked, may be issued upon application when it is shown that shipmentswill be made throughout each season. If all required information is not avail-able in advance of the arrival of any shipment for which a separate permit is required, the forwarding agent at New York may file an application at the NewYork office of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, room 844, Federal Building,Christopher Street, New York, on the arrival of such a consignment at thatport. After the shipment has reached destination and been discharged in Canada,the car conveying it, as a condition of return to the United States, must becarefully swept and freed from all boxes, fruit, or other rubbish by the railroadcompany involved.LEE A. STRONG,Chief of Bureau.ax Iunhae eareis.I-------------------------------F'oUE2.--I irect rotihg ron 84mora 'Mexico, to Camada by anY railroad within theciiisl~uedarea.

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19331 SERVICE AND TEGULATORY AN-NOUNCEMENTS 227LEE A. STRONG NAMED ChiEF OF BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY(Pross noticeLee A. Strong, who for the past 4 years Iias lben1i elief of tlie I I ealu of Ilant Quarantine, will become chief of the Iriireaui of Entinomuology on Octo-I ler 1, Secrietary Wallace aninouiced today.The work of I hese two bureat1s is closely related. The I)u reau of EntI oiologyis a research institutions , charged w itl intvestigal]io is and (Icmoi0stratioiis f't;rthe promotion of ecololic entomology ; it seeks the chest means of (lest rowingiiji1rious insects ad the developmleiit of beneficial ones. The Bureau of P'hwt(Quarantine is responisible for the elitorcenienit of of tiarant i lies promulgate( toprevent the entry o disseilination of dangerous phuit pests new to or inotwvi(Iely distributed with il the United States; it is also responsible for ca rrvin g(Q, in cooperationi with the States, necessary work to prevent the spread orto cra(licate pests that may have gained local foothold.Mr. Strong's transfer to the position of Chief of Entomology will reestablishSclose working railigemient between the two bureaus that previously existed until the control alnd research work were definitely separated on July 1, 1928.Even after that, the Chief of Entomology continued also as chief of the PlantQuarantine and Control Administration until Mr. Strong came to the Depart-ment on December 1, 1929.Mr. Strong succeeds C. L. Marlatt, who is retiring after nearly 45 years)f service with the Federal Government. Avery S. Hoyt, now assistant chief,will become Acting Chief of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine. However, Mr.Strong will complete several important projects he has started in the quaran-tine work after his transfer takes place ; lie will, for example, conduct thehearing which has been called for October 25 to consider a possible revision4f Quarantine 37.Mr. Strong's legal residence is in California where he served as assistantdirector of agriculture just before coming to the United States Departmentof Agriculture. He was formerly connected with the Federal Department asa specialist in plant-quarantine work.FRUIT-FLY SURVEY IN THE WEST INDIES, BRAZIL, URUGUAY, CHILE, AND PERUSEPTEMBER 30, 1933.This field survey, which was made with the consent and cooperation of the'f4cials of the West Indies, Brazil, Uruguay, Chile, and Peru, had for its purposetwo objectives: (1) To determine whether, in the administration of the fruitand vegetable quarantine (Quarantine No. 56), fruits and vegetables producedin those countries which did not represent pest risk were being denied entryinto the United States; and (2) to determine whether fruits and vegetableswhich were being admitted into the United States from the countries namedwere subject to attack by fruit flies or other injurious insects. Arrangementsfor this survey were made through the St ate Department. whose representa-ives in the countries concerned assisted materially in perfecting plans for theinvestigation. The success attained was in no small measure due to the helpful'operation rendered by the government oticials of the countries visited. Because of their fruit-fly experience, Max Kisliuk, Jr., and C. E. ( 'ooley,plint quarantine inspectors of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, were selectedTo make this survey. Much valuable information was secured, not only with respect to fruit flies but other pests which attack fruits and vegetables in thee :untries concerned. A total of 2,171 collections were made. Of this number1 13 represented insects and 18 plant diseases. The insect and planit-diseas1identifications included in this summary were made by the specialists of theBureaus of Entomology and Plant ii dustry. The following summary of theresults secured has been prepared by Messrs. Kisliuk and Cooley.LEE A. STRONG,chieff .Bureau of I'lut Quarantine.

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228 BUIEAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.ITlimS 8AHA MA ISLANDSIle sIr-vey f this grmii% M.iY 2S3 :0. 193,1. was for various reasons limitedI( tlie section immietliately suVrr ldin, the city of Nassau and the Blue Hill re''ion. ho ii ot ilie ishind of ew Irovidence. D ue to previous hurricanes andother I:ri-:L ttl dmilicullies, there was but little of fruit and vegetables to beseel. s rl Ire tIhan I 100 fruits of the mango being encountered during theentire timue spent ol this islind. Most of the fruits consumed were grown onthe neighboring isi ans and in certain of the West Indies. viz, Cuba, Jamaica,Haiti, etc.The only trypetid found oil the island of New Providence as a result of thissurvey was the papaya fruit fly, To.rotrypani curricatida Gerst. Fifty percentof tle Impayas examined were found to be infested with the larvae of this fruit1ly, and -Ver8l adults were takeii.Aniol economic insects other than fruit fly observed on the island, thems1 jIlljrious were Ole citrus black fly, Alcurocan thus w'ngluni Ashby, andI he curcul ii on 11. /'achhlx (') psittacui. Olivier, on nearly all citrus plants.The scale iiise ts, (occu. hcpridun L. and C. riridis Green, were also quitedestructive to citrus foliage. The latter insect was also found to be damagingabout 1 per'1e1it of the leaves of guava. Okra was attacked by Nezara viridulaL. Corustalks and ears of corn wvere riddled with borings by Helioth is obsoletaFah. n Laphyya sp., and the leaves of corn were being fed upon by theA\Iollusc.i Capoli rarian., and the Coreidae, Ph th ia picta Drury. Pigeonpeapods were heavily infested with H. obsoleta, as well as a species of Fundclla,-Ini 10 percent of the sapodilas from the neighboring island of Eleuthera hadSC1le, of -.sp)idiotls lataniae Sign. Squash was being bored into by a species ofliaphan ia. while cabbage was fed upon by Plutella niaculipenuis Curt. and1/ary1l(ti(i histrioniita Hahn, etc.JAMAIcA, BRITISH AXsT INsDEsHeavy rains during the period of the survey of Jamaica, June 2-20, 1931, madeit difficult to reach many districts, but the following places were visited: King-ston and its immediate vicinity, Hope Gardens, Spanish Town, Papine, Con-stance Springs. Cincliona Gardens, Pleasant Hill, Temple Hall. Castleton, Lin-stead, Moiene. St. Anns Bay, Dry Harbour, Falmouth, Montego Bay, Phoenix,Caladupa, singer Hill, Lacovia, Santa Cruz, Mandeville, Williamsfield, Perus,May Pen, Hai rtlands, Chapelton, Williamsfred, and Manchester Pastures.Examinations were made of all fruits and( vegetables found to be in asusceptible sta-e of maturity in the field and in the various public marketsvisited. T' following fruits were encountered: Bananas, plantains, papayas,ma ngcs. sonrsop s, tangerines, limes, guavas, oranges, grapefruit, rose apples,s mr oranges. pineapples. breadfruit, star-apples. purple hog plums, immatureavocIdfls. casliew fruits, and akee (Blihia sapida). Vegetables seen were('l11] Iers. tomatoes, clayotes. I kra, peppers. eggplants, beets, turni)s, sweet-Pu ita toes, yoa ls, green peas, string beaus, pumpkins, on ions, scallops, carrots,Sot atu's. cages, and lima 1 heaus.The fidlowiuog fruit-fly infestations were found: 226 larvae of Anastepha sp.in man~a is. purple hi)i plum1S. guavas, rise apples. 1nd sapodillas, and 38adults of Aivatrcp/a q'.l were successfully reared from larvae taken in mangoesa d purple lhog pum)s. F' ur adults of Awi.stropha sp. were collected on theIea es t f Iv;ma l ma igo at I lope Gardens, and 70 adults of A nastrephaacidua WaLk. on Ile leaves of bitter almond, akee. cocoa mango, and purplehog p1i1mis were 1(1so taken at tit place. At ('incliona. .adults and 2 pupariaor: al I a ppIarentl y unusual trypetid wiere taken on th~e leaves and huds of asweetpolato vine. Ipomloca janlaicxecis.Amtlnu e more IIteworthy injurious iisects other tian fruit fly taken inJla amI ea were thIle follovin,: Tl) citrus black fly, Aleuroceinthiia 1oyliUmiwt citr s f( i ,e a Ind on thiiat of so1rinai-clierry, the latter al so being found attacked hy a v Iwcies iif PscUidoa)irlatori(t. Prepodrs iithits L. and P'h1(chniaeauci/ri \ihlu. were aisi found to he especially injlirious to citrus plants.L';Iphra/Ia (.1 bUP six Ashmi1. wvas found in seeds of cu'ta rd-aIpples. La rvae of aspecies of Oletlhreitidlae were found in gliavas, and ,'toiba rlrlrzii Tiiuib. wasdevon rintle leaves and stems of the sweet potato. Lachnopux a urifer Whitewas ;Itt tikel I Ilie foliage of mango. Crotalaria. atndi many other plants. Theph ik Iill w4 rmt. I i oph ora osypic/la Sa1111d., w.a s fouII (d in cotton hills, and

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1933] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 229the cotton stailier, Dy.Usdrcus an dre'a L., was taken on tis plalit as well ason some unknown liosts'. Viflty percent o the loves Ko pa aya were in-fested with Trialcurodcs a(!riU bilis Q., and larvae of a species of Tiiei ddac werealso 01found in this fruit. The leaves (Ii iiielon. olkr', a 11)(1, 111y unknown plantswere attacked by Pycnodr q(kdIn/ICu1(tu Uer. Twenty-pi perceiit ofthe leaves of rose apple were seriously affected by the following scale insects:Vin.'onia 4stcllifra Westw., Cocius aclminla a Sign., and C. Ianqifcrac Green.About the electric lilhit at the hotl were many well-kii wn pests sich asA oniUala sp., DinodcruN nin tus Fab., Xi b. boriUN confwo/ s 1ich., Cyclocepbhalasp., Ligyrus jurca(UN Fab., Strat fUs tiauI. l"ah., Protoparce jaaificcnsisBrowne, Xyloph lnes (crsI L., (tc.REPUBLIC OF HAITIHeavy rains and floods greatly hampered the work in the field and made itpractically impossible to reach outlying districts in Haiti it the time of thesurvey, June 19-July 10. 1931. Witi the aid of airplanes furnished by theUnited States Marine Corps, motor boats by the Garde d'laiti, and by hiringautomobiles and horses, however. the following districts were visited: Port auPrince and vicinity, Ptlior, Petionville, Kenscoff, Damien, Leogane, Miragoane,Jeremie, Marfranc, Aux Cayes, St. Marc, Cap Haitien, Linibe, Plaisance, andMilot.Host fruits and vegetables wei e unusually scarce at the time of this survey;nevertheless some of these in a susceptible stage of maturity were found in thefield and in the various public markets. Following is a list of those encoun-tered: Bananas, plantains, several varieties of nangoes, --uavas, hog plums,sapodillas, passion fruit, bitter oranges, a few sweet oranges, rose apples, akee,cashew fruits, bitter almonds, breadfruit, soie immature soursops as well asother Annonas, coffee berries, grapefruit, star-apples, peaches, grapes, apples,etc. Vegetables seen were tomatoes, peppers, eggplants, cucumil ers, lima andstring beans, chickpeas, squashes, etc.Larvae of Anastrepha spp. were taken in niawigoes, guavas, yellow hog plums, passion fruit (granadilla), and rose apples. Adults of Ahtnatrcp1H acidlUsa werereared from larvae taken in mangoes and yellow hog plums. Adults of A. sus-pensa Lw. were reared from the yellow hog plum and collected on leaves andfruit of mango, hog plum, and rose app'e, and adults of A. acidUsaN were takenon mango and hog plum. Larvae of the papaya fruit fly, Toxotrypana carri-cauda, were found in 50 percent of the papayas examined.Noteworthy among injurious insects other than fruit flies taken were thefollowing: Larvae of a species of Curculionidae in 5 percent of the sapodillas examined ; Beph rata cvbcinii8 in 5 percent of the seeds of sloursop ; larvae ofspecies of Stenovla, Olethreutidae, Blastobasidae, and Niothonica ocrllea Forbesin 20 percent of the genips. There was also found to be a loss of 20 percentof the bean plhInts due to attacks by NcZara viridula and Acro tc'rnui maryina-tumn Pal. B. Specimens of Diaprepcs quadriittaitus Olivier were t :iken on foliageof fig, geranium, and globe artichoke. Leptoylossus gonagra Fab. and L. stigmaHerbst were noted puncturing the fruit of guava, and Jioxa viridis Pal. B. wastaken while sucking the juice of mango.DOMINICAN REPUBLICRecent storms and excessive rains having flooded rivers and washed outmany bridges, it was necessary to confine the survey to the eastern part ofthe Dominican Republic. However, considerable territory was covered July12-21. 1931, along the southern coast and northl wedtward thv1r( IUJh the greatvalley of Santiago, including the following districts: Santo Domingo and v-icin-ity. Mella, San Isidro, Jaina, San Cristobal, Bani. Azua, Bonao, Rincon, La Vega,Moca, Santiago, and Pena. The storms had also seriously initerfered with thenormal development of the tropical fruit crops., particularly mimevs. whi ii worefound to be very scarce. Ordinarily this fruit would have been very abundantat this season of the year. Other fruits were also very scarce an(1 when en-countered proved to be far more immature than would have been the ease inder'normal climatic conditions.The following fruits in a susceptible stage of maturity were examined in tilefield and in the various public markets of the districts visited : Plantains,bananas, guavas, mangoes, yellow hog plums, sweet oranges, sour oranges,

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230 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.lines, soursops, papayas, pineapples, grapefruit, sapodillas, Barbados cherries,cashew fruits, cocoa, figs, jackfruit. bitter almonds, cherimoyas, custard-apples,pomlegIrailates, mamey apples, immature avocados, etc. Vegetables examinedwere okra, tomatoes, peppers, cgTplants, cucunibers, sweetpotatoes, yams, eas-a\a roots, etc.F'rom the above the following trypetids were taken : 91 larvae of Anastrephaspp. in tlie fruits of yellow hog pluins, iangoes, and guavas, 19 adults ofA nastrcphu acidusa being collected on the fruit and leaves of these same hosts.Fifty-four adults of Anastrepha suspense were taken from the fruit andleaves of mango, guava, and rose apple. the last-naiied host not bearing fruitat this tiie. one specimen of Aiiastrcpha iitegra was taken ou a leaf of roseapple. Three adults of the papaya fruit fly, Tototrypajna curricanda, werefound on the leaves of papaya and 10 of its larvae in papaya fruits. Onespecimen of ACrota(l ia tchi diii(a and six of Acrotaenia sp. were taken onleaves of guava. One adult of Blcpharow ura fulriollis V. d. W. was collectedon a leaf of cocoa. in addition to the foregoing, 7 Anastrepha suspensa and 5 A.acidusa reared from rose apple at Moca by Dr. Gomez-Menor were later for-warded by him to add to the collections.Among tlie more important injurious insects other than fruit flies taken werethe following: Larvae of a species of Apioiiinae in 50 percent of the fruit of aEu yenia sp. and larvae of a species of Curculionidae in 4 percent of the fruitof sapodilla. Lcptoylossus stigma was taken on bitter almond. L. gonagra andDyxsdccUs andlrcae were taken on cocoa foliage. Diaprepes abbreciatus and aLacbnopus sp. were swept front hog-plum leaves, etc..AIEUICAN VIRGIN iSLAND)The three pi-nmcipal islands of this group were visited July 31-August 6.1931. The authors surveyed St. Thomas jointly, after which they separated,Mr. Kisliuk visiting St. Croix and Mr. Cooley going to the island of St. John.St. Thomas and St. Croix having fairly good roads, were quite intensively sur-veyed. but the area covered on St. John was limited considerably due to lackof roads and difficulties of traveling by horseback and on foot.The following districts were visited on St. Thomas: The city of St. Thoimasand vicinity, Ma Folie, Canaan, Lovenlund, Peterson Hill, Tutu Bay, MosquitoBay, Crown Mountain. Pearl Bay, and Magens Bay. Sections visited on St.Croix were Christiansted and vicinity, Anna's Hope, Two Friends, OrangeGrove. ;nd Frederiksted. On St. John, the following places were visited: CruzBay, Adrian, Susannaburg, Denis Bay, Hogsnest Bay, and Casey Bay.There was a great scarcity of host fruits on all of these islands, St. Thomashaving more diversified varieties than the others. Among the principal fruitsexamined in the field and public markets at St. Thomas, Christiansted, andFrederiksted were the following: Bananas, mangoes, yellow hog plums, sourlimes. manjack. cocoa plums pomegrana tes, soursops, iflmature cherinoyas,avocados, sapodillas, breadfruit, etc. Vegetables seen were a few tomatoes,eggplants, peppers, okra, etc.During the course of the survey of these islands, fruit-fly infestations werefound at 6 different locations on St. Thomas and at 1 point on St. Croix.Three adults of Ainastrepha acidiusa were taken from three different hosts, viz.,mango, guava, and manjack (Cordia, sp.). Two hundred and three larvae ofAnastrepha sp. were taken iin yellow hog plums and mangoes.Among the more important injurious insects other than fruit flies takenwere the followin--: Th0e pink hollworm, Pcetiniophora. gosspic/la, in okra onthe island of St. John; Lachnopus curvipes on mango at St. Thomas; and thescale insects, Vinsonia stellifera and Coccus mangiferae on mango leaves onthe island of St. Cioix. Metainasius heiipterus, the West Indian cane weevil,was taken in an overripe sapodilla on the island of St. Croix.ST. KITTS AND NEvIs, BRITISH WEST INDIESThese islands are grouped together for convenience since they are but 2 milesor so apart. During the course of the survey (Aug. 7-12, 1981) of St. Kittsthe following fruit-growing centers were visited : L:mihe Is. Wijgfiebl ilanmor.Romneys, Monkey Hill, Stapleton, Greenhill. ai(l i as-e erre aw(l viciliity. O;tNevis the points visited were Banyans, Stoney (Trove. Wards, Ilaniilton. BrownPasture, Fothergills, Charlestown and vicilifly. Jc"s1)ops, ;aind Molilito Bay.

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1933] SERVICE AND RE(G ULATOPY ANNOUNCEMENTS 231The susceptible host fruits examined in Ohw field and in public iiiarket s onboth islan1d1 were as allows: Mangoes, breadfruit, sourso s, clammy clierries,seagrapes, pricklypeiis, yellow hog plumiis, iimn ture guavas, avocados, bitteralmonds, papayas, ma mey apples, passion fruit, limes, pomiegra nat es, cassava,cotton bolls, " inaga ", etc.A total of 72 adults of AvaSth:cplha ccidasi, 517 inimaiture si ccimnenls ofAnasrcpha sp., and16 1 adult Toi)I)1p(ia iiWOmplJlI reprveseilted te iindi'sof Trypletidae on both of these islands. The last-nmned S-pecis was 1 a keiion guava ; A. acidtNa was tihken on mango, hog pluii, guava, and inameyapple, and the larvae of Anastrcpha sp. were found iiifestiing tlie fruit ofmango and hog plum.Among the more important injurious insects other than fruit flies tukein werethe following: Larvae of a species of Gelecitiea in the blossom ends of tilefruit of pomegranate, and bagwornms, Oik icu8 sp., Ol t his host in Nevis;Carycdon fuscus Goeze and Corcyra celhaloIca. Stint. in lamarind pods in St.Kitts ; Lcptoglo.sus ,tigma on guava ; Nc.zar'a viridula on leguminious plants andcotton ; the pink bollworm, Pcctinohora fossypiella, in 30 percent of I lie cottonbolls seen; Alaban( (rgillacca, devouring from 50 to 100 percent of the cottonpllits; and swarmis of a migrating grisshopper, Scli itocrca sp., destroyingleguminous cover crops andi many other cultivated plants il St. Kitts.ANTIGUA, BRITISH WEST INDIESThe survey of Antigua, August 13--22, 1931, was earijed into practically everylocality and district on the island due to its splendid system of roads thatcircumscribe and cross the island in every direction. The principal sectionsvisited were as follows: St. John and vicinity. Belmont, Blenhils, Body Ponds,Sawcotts, Wallings, Fig Tree Hill, Cades Bay, Fryes, Willocks, Dark Valley,Christian Valley, Providence, Gunthorpes, Marble Hill, Sweets Village, Parhain,Bettys Hope, All Saints Village, Willoughby Bay, Bodkins, Liverta Village,Falmouth, English Harbor, and Shirley Heights.Very careful examination was made of the few host fruits and vegetables found in the field and at the public markets in St. John, as well as at fruitstands in the smaller villages on the island. Among them were the following:Yellow hog plums, mangoes, breadfruit, soursops, limes, papayas, bitter al-monds, genips, immature guavas, avocados, custard-apples, clammy cherries, pricklypears, fruits of Cordia sulcata, and manchineal. There were also toma-toes, eggplants, yams, yautias, okra, cucumbers, sweetpotatoes, etc. Althoughthe above represents a fairly representative variety of possible host fruits and vegetables, the particular amount of each of these was very small, due mostlikely to the terrific destruction of fruit trees by the 1928 hurricane and asevere drought during 1930 and 1931. Mangoes and guavas were most affectedby these climatic disturbances, which also most likely influenced the seasonalmaturing of the various hosts to such an extent that no fruit flies wereencountered in Antigua during this survey.Among other important injurious insects taken were the following:Dysdercus andreae on mango, Pulvinaria psidii on yellow hog plum, andLigyrus tunulosus at lights.GUADELOUPE, FRENCH WEST INDIESThe name " Guadeloupe " is generally given to a small group of the FrenchWest Indies, of which the two largest, viz, Guadeloupe ind Grand Terre, werevisited in the course of this survey August 23-September 4, 1931. These twoislands are separated by only a narrow channel of water, which is bridged forvehicular and pedestrian traffic. Many localities were visited on both islandsas follows: Pointe-a-Pitre and vicinity, Petit Bourg, Goyave, St. Marie, Capes-terre, Trios Rivieres, Basse-Terre, St. Cloud. Vieux Habitant, Bouillante., St.Rose, Lamentin, Les Abymes, St. Anne, St. Francois, Le Moule, etc.At the public markets in Pointe-a-Pitre and Basse-Terre as well as in thefields throughout the island all of the available tropical fruit was carefullyexamined. Mangoes were found to be very scarce although a few trees of thelate varieties were found. Other fruits examined were yellow hog plums, chiliplums, golden apples, guavas, breadfruit, bananas, plantains, soursops, cheri-moyas, sapodillas, papayas, coffee berries, pomegranates, immature sweet

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232 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.orani.es, and avocados. V' etahles seen were tomatoes, peppers, eggplants, okra,sweetpotatoes, yams, onions, cassava, palm hearts, etc.Eighty-eight larvae and two puparia of Anastrepha sp. were taken in yellowhog plums; and 12 larvae and 1 pupariumn of Anastrepha sp. in chili plums,but no adult trypetids were collected nor was there sufficient time to rearadults from the immature stages noted.Among the important injurious insects other than fruit flies taken in Guade-loupe were the following: P/ Ihia pieta damaging 10 percent of the tomatoes;NcZara viriidula on solanaceous foliage; larvae of Anthonomus sp. and Anarsiasp. in fruit of Eugen a sp.; Xylcborus confusus in guavas ; Leptoglossus go-Uagra, L. stigma, and Di(ijprjpcs (>brcriatus oin guava : 'Trach pdcres sucCinctus,on guava and mango: and Diabrotica ochrat (ia on yellow hog plum ; etc.MARTINIQUE, FRENCH WEST INDIESMartinique has a well-developed system of roads, which nade it possible toreach practically every section of the island (Aug. 27-Sept. 5. 1931), viz. Fortde France and vicinity, Tivoli, La Rodate, Colson, Deux Choux, St. James, St.Pierre, Morne Rouge. Ajoupe Bouillon, Lorain, Marigot. St. Marie, Trinite,Gros Morne, St. Joseph, Rol bert, Francois, Lamentin, Montte, Ducos, PetitBourg, St. Esprit, Vauclin, Marin, and Riv. Pilote.Mangoes were almost gone at the time of this survey and guavas not yetmature, the principal ripe fruit available in abundance being yellow hog plums.Other fruits examined were breadfruit, guavas, chili plums, bananas, plantains,cocoa, coffee berries, mamey apples, limes, passion fruit, cocoa plums, soursops,cherimoyas, sapodillas, golden apples, sour oranges, immature sweet oranges,and avocados. Ve,.etables seen were tomatoes, peppers, eggplants, okra,cucumbers, squashes, string beans, etc.As a result of examinations made in the field and at the public market inFort de France, it was found that Anastrepha sp. were present at 13 differentlocations on the island, reaching from Morne Rouge in the north to Rivre Pilotein the south. Three adults of A naxtrcpla acidtwa were collected on yellowhog plum and 112 larvae and 2 puparia of Anastrepha sp. were taken in the samehost.Among the important injurious insects other than fruit flies taken inMartinique was Diabrotica fucata on guava and mango.ST. LUcIA, BRITISH WEST INDIESThe splendid road which nearly encircles St. Lucia made it possible to visit( Sept. 5-1-4, 19:31) almost every village and hamlet on the island as follows:Pastries and vicinity. Chose Bay, Union, Gros Islet, Anse La Raye, D'Ennery,Micaud, Vieux Fort, Laborie, Choiseul, and Soufriere and vicinity.The most abundant ripe fruit found at this season was the yellow hog plum.The following fruits were also seen and examined: Bananas, plantains, limes.guavas, papayas, bitter aInonds, cherimoyas, breadfruit, sapodillas, Barbados(herries, soursops, ionL-oes, sour oran-es, golden apples, passion fruit, imma-ture avocados, ,tiitl sweet orai-ges. vegetabless seen were tomatoes, peppers,eggplants, okra, sweetpotatoes, yams, caba ges, onions, etc.Two Imnldred and sixty-eiht larvae and two puparia of A.na.strepha sp.were foiud in yellow hog phums and five adults of AIncatrepha (lidiisa weretaken on this host. Sixty-six adults of A. acidusa were also collected on theleaves of co.o, as well as 1 on Lauraeeae and 1 on lime. These infestationswere found at 13 different localities on the island.Among the important injurious insects other than fruit flies were the fol-lowing: A species of Anthonomus in 10 percent of the fruit of Eugenia sp.in which there were also found larvae of a species of Gelechiidae. Leptoglossusstirlma w;'s taken on yellow lio. plum, and about the electric li'ht in the hotelroom were many well-known injurious insects, suoh as Cyclocephala sp.,PJ1a(us i unicornis Serv., Cryptorhynchus sp., Herse cingulata Merian, etc.DoMrINICA, BRITIsH WEST INDIESDue to the extremely mountainous nature of Dominica and its heavy annualrainfall. ron ds were very scarce and those available found to be in very poorcondition. Field trips were made on September 14,21, 1931, however, to the

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1933] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 233following districts: Roseau and vicinity, 'Mount .Joy, Sylvania, Belfast, St.Joseph, the Layou River Valley, Point Michel, Geneva, and Grand Bay. Auto-mobiles were used as far as roald conditions would allow, but it was necessary totravel on foot to many of the fields.The yellow hog plum was the most abundant ripe fruit available, whileguavas were rapidly maturing. Other fruits seen and examined were bananas, plantains, limes, breadfruit, avocados, soursops, cherimovas, golden apples,mangoes, oranges, tangerines, shaddocks, grapefruit, java plums, sapodillas,pomeracs, papayas, akee, and carambolas. Vegetables seen were tomatoes,peppers, okra, dasheens, yams, sweetpotatoes, onions, etc.Examinations made in the field and at public markets revealed infestations ofAnastrepha sp. at nine different localities in Dominica. A total of 953 larvaeof Anastrepha sp. were found in guavas and yellow hog plums, and 191 adultsof Anastrepha acidusa were collected on guava, bitter almond, In lja laurina,mango, Acacia sp., and yellow hog plum. One adult of another fruit fly. viz,Acrotacnia sp., was also taken on guava.Among the important injurious insects other than fruit fly encountered werethe following: Larvae of a species of Olethreutidae and specimens of Platynotarostrna. Walk. in citrus fruits, Diprepcs (bbrciatUts and Lachnopus sp. oncitrus, and Bephrata maculicollis Cam. in seeds of soursop.BARBADOS, BRITISH WEST INDIESSplendid and abundant roads on the island of Barbados made it possible tocarry the survey (Sept. 23-Oct. 1, 1931) into its remotest corners and reachinginto every parish from St. Lucy, St. Peters, and St. Andrews in the north,through St. James, St. Tiomas, St. Joseph, St. Michael, and St. John in thecenter of the island, as well as Christ Church and St. Philip in the south.Host fruits and vegetables were more scarce in Barbados than in any of theother West Indian islands visited, and the survey w as greatly extended insearch of same. The yellow hog plum was the most abundant, but the followingwere also seen in small quantities: Chili plums, golden apples, breadfruit,clammy cherries, guavas, mangoes, immature avocados, soursops, cherimoyas,mamey apples, Barbados cherries, oranges, limes, grapefruit, shaddocks,bananas, and bitter almonds. Vegetables encountered were tomatoes, okra,peppers, cucumbers, squashes, eddoes, sweetpotatoes, yams, etc. Careful exami-nation of these products revealed no evidence of fruit-fly infestation.Noteworthy among the injurious insects other than fruit fly taken in Ba rbadoswere the following: Sitophilus lincari. Herbst in 15 percent of the tama rindseeds still in the pod Diaprepes abbrcriatus on cassava plants; larvae ofspecies of Plusiat and Anowis in 15 percent of the pods of black-eyed peas;larvae of a species of Tineidae in yams, 20 percent of which were also infestedwith the scale Taryionia hartii Ckll. ; larvae of a species of Noctuidae on okraplants and leaves showing a 50 percent loss, and such well-known injuriousinsects as Ligyrus tumulosus, Xylophancs tersa, etc., about the electric light inthe hotel.ST. VINCENT. BRITISH WEST INDIESThis island, being quite mountainous and heavily forested, provided muchpoorer roads and transportation facilities than most of the other West Indianislands. In spite of this handicap and torrential rains, however, the followingpoints were visited on October 1-6, 19.31 Wal lilahou, Bellisle, I ,irronal lie, Mt.Wynne, Rutland Vale Village. the Buccament Rih er Valley. Pembroke. Ques-tells, Kingstown and vicinity, Calliaqua. the Mlarriaqua River Valley, Akers,the Yamnbu River Valley, Sans Souci, (olonaire, Georgetown, Waterloo, OrangeHill, Overland Village, and Owia.There was a comparative scarcity of host fruits present at the timie of thissurvey. Guavas were the most abundant fruit found. and the following wereseen in sm ul quantities: Yellow hog pliumus, breadfruit, banaas. elierimnoyas,soursops, avocados, chili plums, golden apples, papayas, oranges, tan-erines,limes, bitter almonds, nutmeg fruits, two species of .Governor plunis. etc. Vegetables seen were tomiatoe,, peppers. okra, cuenialers, squashes. eddoes,sweetpot at ocs, yams. etc. With the exception of ,_iavas, limes, yellow hogplums, breadfruit, and bitter almonds, the hosts seen were very immature.Very careful examination of products in the public market at Kingstownas well as in the field revealed no evidence of fruit-fly at tak. A striking

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234 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.feature was the Cuormous amount of sooty-mold fungi covering the fruit, forest,shade, and ornamental trees and seriously affecting their growth and fruitproduced by them.Amiong the important injurious insects other than fruit fly taken in St.Vinceznt were the following: Xylcbcorus sacclari Ilopk., Luchnopus('i) orh)ra('prc' ( '? sp., ClcoymnUs sp., etc., in seeds of angelin ; Lcpidosaphes albaCkli. on stems of cassava ; larvae of species of Pyralidae and Tortricidae inCdsia sp: Lcptoglo.sus vexillatus Stal and species of Olethreutidae and Psy-chidae on guava; larvae of Lachnopis( ?) or Diaprepcs(?) and species of Blasto-bi ae in seeds of the Honduras mahogany ; larvae of Diaprepes('r) sp. inseeds of mango; the sctle insect, Targionia hartii oi 5 percent of the yams;Nc: ara ciridula on okra. At the electric light in the hotel room the followingwell-known pests were taken: Ligyrus tuntulosus, Cyclocephala vincentiae Arr.,XN ara viridula, Achrysotn suri nainum L., Lcpto.tylus testaccus Frol., Cryp-torhynchus sp., !ylophancs tcrsa, etc. In all parts of the island there was considerable damage being done to agriculture by the grasshoppers, Schistocercainipleta Walk. and S. pallens Thunbg., etc.TRINIDADA splendid network of highways made it possible from October 10 to Novem-ber 4, 1931, to survey almost every section of Trinidad, including the northernmountainous range and the southwestern peninsula as well as the easterncoastal plain. The following important sections were visited: Port of Spainand vicinity, Carenage, Teteron, Magueripe Bay, Diego Martin, Greenhill,Maraval, Santa Cruz, San Juan. St. Augustine, the Maracas Valley, the CauraValley. the Arina Valley, Valencia, Sangre Grande, 'Mitura, Balandra Bay,Toco, Freeport, Couva, MIontserrat, San Fernando, St. Madeleine. Hermitage,Union Hall, St. Marys, La Brea, Irois, Cedros, Chatham, Erin, Palo Seco,Siparia. Penal, Sadhoowa, J3asseterre, Princes Town, Williamsville, Mayo,Caparo Junction, Flanigan Town, Brasso, Tabaquite, Rio Claro. Plaisance,1ayaro, St. Joseph, Cold Mine, and Upper Cunape.This island had a larger quantity and greater variety of host fruits thanany of the other West Indian islands visited. Named in the order of theirabundance the following fruits were seen and examined : Bananas, plantains,limes, immature grapefruit and sweet oranges, cherimoyas, avocados, Governorplums. papayas, golden apples, chili plums, yellow hog, plums, guilvas, man-ees.sapodillas. mamey apples, Belle apples, barbadines, pods of three differentspecies of Ingiu, peachnuts, pomeraes, soursops, wild fl'-s. akee fruits, souroranges, bitter almonds, be'a fruit, nutmeg fruit, ete. Vegetables examilnedwere melons, squashes, cucumbers, okra, eggplants. toinatoes, peppers, pige< n-peas, potatoes, sweetpota toes, eddoes, yams, cabbages, wild cotton bolls, garlic,onions, etc.Infestations of fruit flies were found at 45 different locations, distributedover every section of Trinidad. Larvae of Anastrcpha spp. were taken in fruitof cattleya guavas, comnion gatvs, chili plums. ye low hog plums, Ingainvoul s. and saldills. Adults of Ai;astripdia sp. Wevre colle-ied on chliiPUms (Onria cylinilritach ya, guavus, and sapodillas, and some were rearedfroi larvae 'ut 01 chili plums and yellow hog plums. Adults of Ana.trcphast ii ta ScIt. were collected on guava s, oranges, Inga in goideN, and sapodillas,and reared front larvae out of guava .Adultn of An asthrpia 8crpcntina Wd. were taken on sapodillas as well as i eared from larvae taken in this sami1e host.Adults of A. frat(rcthlis Wd. were taken on guava, chili plum. and sapodilla.Adult specimens of A. cholca Wa'k. were collected on guava and sapodilla, andone adult of A. .ylricola Knab was taken on guava also. The trypetid, IHexa-c(ulta a l)IliN Lw., was taken on -uziva and sapotilla, A.(rotcnia sp. oilsapodilla, and BlcpharOwcura pocciloh oina Sch. on a species of Sola nun. Thepapaya fruit fly, Toxotrypawna curricauda Gerst., was found in and on papayas.Among the Iiore important injurious insects other than fiuuit Ilies found inTrinidad were the following : Lydaini sp. in and on fruits of Annona won tana;larvae of Pyralidae in dried fruit of balata, Rheedia, enlabash, -nd in pods ifInga hngoideN; larvae of Blastobasidae in dried balata ; Conotraclahlus dimi li-atus ( *) Champ. in 10 percent of the cattleya guavas and 20 percent of theguavas; Bephrata maiculicollis in 10 percent of the cherimoyas; Stenota,anonella Lepp. and other Stenorna spp. in 15 percent of the cherimoyas; aStenoma sp. in guava, I. setifera, and I. ingoides; Cicadella laudata Walk. on

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1933] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 235Cordia cylindristachya, cotton, and grapefruit: Dydcrcus f[r(ia(1i Btallou oncotton: Ceutorhynchus sp. in 50 percent of the fruit of Eu/enia sp.: Anthonomni?eugenii Cano (?) in 15 percent of the fruit of Euf/unia sp.: larvae of Cecido-myiidae in the fruit of fig and( I. inpfoides; larvae of Papilio sp. on le:ives ofgrapefruit ; Lcptoljossiv gonaflra on guavas and I. inqoude': L. stigiia( onguavas; larvae of a species of Drepanidae on leaves of yellow lio, phin: larvaeof species of Curculionidae in 20 percent of the fruit of I. ictifcra and in 15percent of that of I. ingoides: larvae of a species of Gracilariidae in pode .ftI. setifera; Stcirastoma brerc Sulz. on okra : Ancylostomia stercorca ( ') Zell.in 50 percent of the pigeonpea pods: larvae of Conotrac(hlus sp. in 2 percent ofthe sapodillas; and Tomaspis .wccharia Dist. on sugarcane, various ra s,on the collecting net, and in the automobile. About the electric liu in thehotel specimens were taken of Cyclocephala sp., Liy-o sp., etc.BRAZILThe authors arrived at Para, Brazil, by airplane from the island of Trinidadon November 5, 1931, and continued on to Rio de Janeiro by same, reaehiinathat point on November 8. After making a survey of the State of Rio IcJaneiro and the Federal District. a return trip was taken up the coast to Per-nambuco by steamer, after which the survey was carried down to tbe State ofBahia and back to Rio de Janeiro. The next State visited was that of MinasGeraes, which was reached by railroad. and after its completion and a returnto Rio de Janeiro the State of Sao Paulo was surveyed.During the period of the survey in Brazil (November 5, 1931-January 1,1932), fruit-fly infestations were found at 37 different locations. Three hun-dred and seventy-six adult fruit flies were collected on 30 different hosts: 1.698larvae were taken from 22 different hosts, and there were reared out of 601larvae taken from 11 of these different hosts 357 adults and 11 parasites.To simplify the recording c~f data gathered during these investigations. eachState in Brazil is treated separately.STATE OF RIO AND FEDERAL DISTRICT OF RIO DE JANETROThe localities visited November 8-29 in this section were as follows: Thecity of Rio de Janeiro and vicinity, Anchieta, Deodoro. Nilopolis, Nova Iguassu,Campo Grande, Jguassu, Petropolis. Correas, Bon Success, Nietheroy, SaoGoncalo, Alcantara, and Monte Formoso.Among the fruits examined in the field and at public markets were the fol-lowing: Natal and Pera oranges, sour oranues, limes, lemons. bananas, plantains,peachos, mangoes. surinam cherries. -enips, sapadillas. Governor plums, star-apples, grumichamas. jaboticaba. breadfruit, jackfruit. figs. papayva, goldenapples, mangosteens, immature grapefruit, navel oranges, guavas. avocados,Ann onas, rose apples. etc. Vegetables seen were watermelons, cucumbers.peppers, tomatoes. eggplants, squashes, pumpkins, turnips, carrots, potatoes,sweetpotatoes. yams, radishes, cabbages, etc.Fruit-fly infestations were found in each of the 14 localities visited as fol-lows: Larvae of Anastrepha spp. in six fruits, viz golden apple, grumichama,jahoticaba. peach, sapodilla, and surinam cherry, and adults of Anastrepha spp.on the fruit and foliage of grumichama. Pera orange. and sapodilla. Anastrephadistans was also taken on Pera orange. Larvae and adults of Ceratitis capitataWd. were found in and on Natal and Pera oranges, peaches, sour oranges, sourtangerines, and star-apples. Other fruit flies collected from fruits in this areaincluded adult specimens of Anastrepha grandis Macq. on 'xuava and Peraorange: A. serpentina Wd. on Natal orange and sapodilla and its larvae in thelatter fruit: A. fraterculus Wd. on guava and Natal orange: A. peruviana Tus.on Natal orange: A. distanw Hendel on guava and peach: Hcxachacta cxiiaWd. on sour tangerine, and Enaresta icxeicana VdW. on flowers of Cosmos. Some specimens of A. consobrina Lw. reared by local entomologists from passionfruit (Pa'siflora edutis) and A.
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236 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.grumichama and surinam cherries; larvae of Cryptorhynchini and Gnorinos-chma sp. in 20 percent of the jaboticaba; larvae of (ymiwndroswna auran-tiUM17(l Costa Lima in oranges, and the scales of Coccus perlatus Ckll. andi ei h iona.'q)i, aspidixtrac Sign. latus Ckil. on the foliage of orange; larvae ofCanotrachclu,' sp. in 1 percent of the peaches and in 5 to 10 percent of thesapodillas; larvae of Gnorinioscheia sp. in 60 percent of the peppers; and bothComn j)iothrips and Holopothirips spp. on pineapples, etc.STATE OF PFRNAMBUCOPernambuco was the most northerly and tropical State surveyed in Brazil.Field work was done from December 3 to S at Recife and vicinity, Jaboatao.Tapera. Morenos, an(1 Victoria and vicinity.Although it lies within the tropical zone, fruits and vegetables in this Statewere found to be comparatively scarce. The following fruits were seen in thefield and public markets visited: Pineapples. mangoes, a few navel and Valenciaoranges, sour oranges, limes, bananas, sapodillas, sapotas, passion fruits, guavas,coffee berries. cattleya guavas, sweet limes, cherimoyas, A nno.as, etc. Vege-talbles seen were ciumiers, peppers, tomatoes, eggplants, watermelons.squashes, yams. ;weetpotatoes, potaitoes, carrots, lettuce, etc. Most of the fruitseen was innature and scarce.Fruit-tly infestations were found in four different localities in Pernambuco.Adult specimens of Ainastrepha fraterculuN were taken on guavas: A. perurianaon poimerack: and Anastrepha sp. on guava and sour orange. One adult spect-men of Anastrepha serpentina was observed on the fruit of sapodilla, and anadult of Atrotacha 1ltipcmii W(l. collected on sour orange. Larvae ofAiavitrepha sp. were found in four different hosts as follows: Guava, pomerack,sapolilli. and sour orange.Among the important injurious insects other than fruit flies taken in thisState were the following: The pink bollworm, Pectinophora gossypiella in50 percent of the cotton bolls; larvae of Diaphania sp. in 15 percent of thecucumbers; larvae of a species of Stenonia in 20 percent of the guavas; thesingles wasp. Tririona ruficrus Latr., which was doing considerable damageto the fruit of orange; and Aleurothrixus floccosus Mask. and Coccus perlatusinfesting leaves of citrus. The larvae of G*m nandrosoma aurantianum wereboring into the fruit of sour orange and tangerine. Specimens of Leptoglossusgonagra were collected at the electric lights, etc.STATE OF ALAGOASA brief stop-oveir was made December 9 at the port of Maceio. Alagoas, wheresmall quantities of some of the following products were purchased and exam-ined: Pineapples, bananas, ora nges, limes, mangoes. passion fruits, sapodillas.lemons, watormeb lns. peppers. tomlatoes. potatoes, sweetpo toes, yams, carrots.squashes. string beans, etc. No indications of fruit fly were seen in these, but2 1 ereent of the sweet pe ppers were found infested with Gnorimnoschema sp.sTATE OF BAHIATlie following lwalities in flahia were visited De ember 10-13: Salvadorand vicinity, B(a Vita, Brotas. Matuta, Cabulla. and Sabeeiro.Fruits examiined in thel public markets and in the field iicluled bananas,a a iris. sour (ran es, Ia ngcrines, surinam cherries, pinezipples. mangoes,ca -hew fruits, sapdl ILaP pay, limes, uefli us, grmiiihamas. rinature naveloranges, avocados, guavas. Annonas, Psidium araca. rose apples, etc. Vege-tailes. scen were toimat oes. nppers, eggjdmis, (u Cbr, melow-illas, water-melons, okra, chayotes, squashes, potatoes, sweetpotatoes, and yams. Unfor-tuii ;it'ely th mc IaNvel oranii ecs In hye. whIi 11 is ' 1eir native iomilne, were too immatureat lhii seasm n 't 1n' very aittracive to fruit flies.Friiii-ilv wieeslt tios were fln it seven Oiffernt locations in Bahia.La rvae of An(i.trcpha sp. were taken in grumichamas, guavas, sour oranges,adlii 'irimi cmcrrics: adults uf lia.4rcplai sp. ollectel on grumichamia andsapudlla : an A //I(/ distUI (stfd ' sI (111' Or Ce and slrinam cherry. Adults4of .punia were I :kcin ol Lrumilfhma aI apo lilla, aid s10 e 51eCimenSof, -amc sai to hive been r Iare front the fruit oC abio w're given to theautiors. Adults (I A. pc U Iana were ci injected oil surinaia cht 'rries, and

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1933] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 237specimens of Acrotaenia latipennis taken on sapodilla and surinam cherries.Adults of Ceratitis capitata, said to have been reared from coffee berries inBahia, were also presented to the authors.Among the more important injurious insects other than fruit flies taken inthis State were larvae of Diapihania sp. in 10 percent of the cucumbers, andthe scale insects, Lepidosaphie8 bcckii Newin. and Pscadaonidia trilobitiformis'Green on the leaves of sour orange.STATE OF MINAS GERAESOnly one district in Minas Geraes was visited December 18-20, viz, Vicossa.The following fruits were examined: Peaches, pears, plums, surinam cherries,figs, guavas, navel and Valencia oranges, lemons, papayas, citrons, immaturequinces, grapefruit, apples, coffee berries, mangoes, Annonas, persimmons, andgrapes. Vegetables seen were watermelons, cucumbers, squashes, etc.Larvae of Trypetidae were found in guava, navel orange, peach, and surinamcherry. Adults of Anastrepha sp. were taken on peach, plum, and surinamcherry. Specimens of Anastrepha sp. which were reared from grapefruit andmango, also Anastrepha grandis reared from squash, and A. fraterrulas fromgrapefruit, were given to the authors. Adults of Ceratitis capitata were takenon peach, plum, and surinam cherry, larvae of same were found in plums, andsome adults of this fly, which had been reared from grapefruit and kumquat,were also presented to the authors.Among the injurious insects other than fruit flies found in this State wereadults of Passalus sp. at lights; the scales, Lepidosaphes beckii and Aleuro-Ihrixus floccosus, on orange leaves; and a cotton stainer, Dysdercus peruvianiusGuer., on plum.STATE OF SAO PAULOThe State of Sao Paulo was the last and most southerly one visited in Brazil,the following localities in same being covered December 23-31: The city ofSao Paulo and vicinity, Cotia, San Roque, Sorocaba, Juqueh, Louveira, Jundi-ahy, Campinas, Villa Americana, Santa Barbara, Piracicaba, Limeira, andSantos.There was more host material available in this State at the time of thissurvey than in any other part of the Brazilian Republic. Immense plantationsof coffee cover the rolling plateau land throughout the interior. Scatteredabout were also several commercial plantings of oranges, lemons, grapefruit,pears, peaches, apples, etc., in the immediate vicinity of the city of Sao Paulo.The following products were examined both in the field and at the publicmarkets visited: Bananas, plantains. Valencia and navel oranges, sour or-an~ges, grapefruit, lemons, limes, citrons, mangoes, guavas, pears, apples, quinces,peaches, plums, papayas, pricklypears, grapes, loquats, Barbados cherries,kei-apples, immature figs, persimmons, sapodillas, and cattleya guavas. Vege-tables seen were watermelons, tomatoes, peppers, eggplants, squashes, cucum-bers, sweetpotatoes. yams, yautias, etc.Fruit-fly infestations were found at 11 different localities in this State.Larvae of Trypetidae were found in apple, Barbados cherry, citrad, guava,kei-apple, peach, pear, plum, quince. and sapodilla, while larvae of A-1nat rephasp. were taken in apples and pears. Adults of Anastrcpha ista.s were col-lect(.d on apple, B arbados cherry, citrad, grape, guava, peach, persimmon, plum.and sapodilla. Anastrepha sp. was also collected en Barbados cherry. Adultsof A. serpentine were taken on guava and of A. yrandis on magnolia leaves, thelatter also being reared from hrvae taken out of watermelons. Adult speci-mens of A. peraria ia were taken on Natal and navei oranges, prrsimmofls, andplums. A(lults of A. disaiis were taken on pear, while A. puilctata Hendel wastaken on plurn and wild Solauimi. A. daciforin is Bezzi was collected On per-simmon and plum, and A. parallcla Wd. taken on sapodilla. Larvae of Ceratitisuipitata were taken in coffee berries and peaches, while adults of this specieswere collected on apple, Barbados cherry, fig, grape, navel and Valencia oracs,peach, plum, lnd sapodilla. A ults of TomIoplafgia sp. were taken on fi ! andquince : Ensina pererina Lw. on guava: i~er(ach~icta cxitaia on persimmon: andboth llcxrchactq sOcialis Wd. and Xainthiciura ins eta Lw. on pluni. Speci-mincs of the following were presented to the authors by local entomolo(iSts:Tomoplagia rudolphi Lutz and Co.ta Lima from Aza Peixe goll; A iastrcpha sp.

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238 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.and C(ratitis capitata from coffee berries, and both C. capitata and A. 8erpen-tina from sapodillas.Noteworthy among the injurious insects other than fruit flies taken in SaoPaulo were the following: letamnaius hcm iptcrus in the automobile; Anomalaunldulata Melsh. at electric lights ; Stcphanoderes hampei Ferr. in coffee berries;Conotrachelus sp. in guavas and on plums; the scale, Ceroplastes grandisHenipel, on leaves and stems of persimmon ; larvae of Diaphania sp. in squash,etc.URUtuIAYExcellent highways. particularly in the southern part of Uruguay, madeit possible to carry on field work in the Departmentos of MNontevideo, Canelones,Maldonado, San Jose. and Colonia from January 4 to 18, 1932. Among thelocalities visited in these were the following: Montevideo and vicinity, Pasode ]a Arenas, Manga, Penarol. Colon, Union. Independencia, Pantonoso, Pando,Atlantida, Mosquitos, Piriapolis, Repecho, San Carlos, Maldonado, Punta delEste, Isla Gorriti, Progreso, Canelones, San Lucia, San Jose, San Ecilda, Nueva Helvecia, Colonia Suizza, etc.Fruits and vegetables were scarce at the time of the survey in Uruguay.Early varieties of peaches had already been harvested and the late varietiesnot yet matured, apricots and most of the cherries were finished, and apples,pears, and quinces were still immature. The following fruits were examined:Plums, peaches, pears, cherries, apples, apricots, oranges, lemons, grapes, nec-tarines, pomegranates, quinces, figs, persimmons, and watermelons. Vegetablesseen were squashes, cucumbers, tomatoes, eggplants, peppers, green beans,potatoes, beets, carrots, turnips, cabbage. lettuce, radishes, etc. Sanitary con-ditions in the groves and vineyards were kept at an exceptionally high standardand clean cultivation was generally practiced, with very little of fallen fruitto be seen on the ground.Fruit-fly infestations were found at five different locations in Uruguay, fourof these being in the Departmento of Montevideo, while another was in theDepartmento of Colonia. A total of 34 larvae of Anastrepha sp. were taken outof three hosts, viz., peaches, plums, and apricots. Five adult specimens ofAnastrepha sp. were collected from the fruit and foliage of peach and plum,and one adult specimen of Ceratitis capitata was observed on the fruit of peach. In addition to the foregoing, the following also were taken: Adults ofParacantha culta Wd. on peach ; Camaromyia sp. on plum ; Tephritis lindigiHendel on pomegranate; and the ortalid of fruit-fly habits, Pterotaenia(Melicria) fasciata Wd., on peach. Adult specimens of Ceratitis capitatareared from oranges and peaches were presented to the authors by the ento-mologist. A. T. Peluffo.Among the injurious insects other than fruit flies taken in Uruguay werethe following: The codling moth, Carpocapsa ponmonclla L. in apples. peaches.pears. and plums: Gnorimoschema operculella in eggplants ; Compsocerus eques-tri.s Guer. on fig, peach, pear, and plum; Trachyderes thoracieus Oliv. on peachand pear: and the scale insects, Aspidiotus perniciosus Comst., and Lecaniumpersicae Fab. (?) on plum.REPUBLIC OF CHILEDue to its great length, Chile reaches from a tropical climate in its northernsection to a frigid glacier area in the extreme south. The country may bedivided into three general areas, viz, northern, central, and southern Chile,and the results obtained during this survey from January 25 to March 4, 1932,are recorded under those divisions, as follows:NORTHERN CHILEThe following localities in this section were visited: Arica and vicinity, theAzapa Valley, Antolagasta an(l vicinity. Calama, the valley of San Pedro deAtacama, and Toct'nao. I'he aridity and barrenness of this part of Chile wasvery marked, vegetation occurrinonly along the river bottoms and adjacentirrigated lands.Products examined were ripe grapes, figs, peaches, pears, pomegranates,mangoes, limes, immature olives, chili plums, pricklypears, guavas, oranges,In!a pods, quinces, chierimoyas, Lucuma fruits, apples, tomatoes, peppers,okra, etc.

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1933] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 239As a result of this survey in northern Chile 1,524 larvae and puparia ofAnastrepha sp. were taken in mangoes, peaches, and pears, mid 16 adultspecimens of Anastrepha peruviana collected on the leaves and fruit of 10different hosts as follows: Fig, grape, guava, mango, olive, orange, peach,pear, Solanum sp., and yellow hog plum. One specimen of Camaromyia bullansWd. was collected on apple; 16 of Tomnoplagia unifascia Hendel on olive andorange, and 1 of Tephritis fuca.ta F. on olive.Noteworthy among the injurious insects other than fruit flies taken in thispart of Chile were the larvae of a species of Blastobasidae in the fruit of fig,and larvae of species of Pyralidae and Epipaschiinae in many of the fruits offig, mango, peach, pepper, and quince.CENTRAL CHILEThis is by far the most important division of Chile, the largest fruit-growingfarms being located here. With the exception of the Huasco Valley, nearlyall of the other extensive fruit centers in this area were visited, as follows:Coquimbo, La Serena, the Elqui Valley including Vicuna and Rivadavia,Santiago and vicinity, San Bernardo, Santa Inez, Buin, Penaflor, Tobalaba,Colima, Lampa, Perejil, Quillota, Boco, Limache, San Francisco, Valparaisoand vicinity, Zorras, Salta, Quilpue, Villa Alemana, Marga Marga, Casa Blanca,La Cruz, etc. Fruits seen were peaches, nectarines, grapes, apples, pears,quinces, lemons, oranges, plums, apricots, limes, grapefruit, olives, mandarinoranges, cherries, figs, cherimoyas, both Honey Dew and watermelons, pome-granates, and papayas. Among the vegetables were potatoes, cucumbers, to-matoes, eggplants, squashes, pumpkins, peppers, carrots, cabbages, beets, corn,and sweetpotatoes. Adult specimens of Cawaromyia bullans were taken on the foliage of nectarineand potato, and of Trypanea (Urellia) abstersa Lw. on potato plant. Also the ortalid, Pterotaenia fascia'ta Wd., was taken on peach foliage, and is known tocause serious damage to cherries in Chile at times.Among the injurious insects other than fruit flies taken in central Chile werethe following : Epicauta pilmus Molina on alfalfa, peach, and potato ; Panto-morus godman i Cr. on alfalfa, cherimoya, cherry, grape, peach, potato, andstrawberry plants; Ca'rpocapsa pomonella in apples, apricots, nectarines, pears,peaches, quinces, and walnuts; Rhyephcnes humneralis Guer. on avocado twigs;larvae of a species of Olethreutidae in string beans; Plutella maculipennis Curt.on cabbage; Eriocanipoides limacina' Retz. on leaves of cherry and pear; Lep-toglossus chilensis Spin. on leaves and fruit of fig, nectarine, peach, and plum;Lophotus phaleratu8 Er. on limb or Lciwuma sp. ; Scolytus rugulosus Ratz. onfruit and twigs of medlar and peach ;I('liothrips haeiorrhoidalis Bouche onpersimmon leaves; Gnorimnoschcma tuberosella Busck in stems and tubers ofpotato ; Gnorimoschcma opcrculella on plants and in tubers of potato ; Heliothisobsolete in potato tubers and in soil near root of tomato plant; larvae of aspecies of Cossidae in stem of willow and lilac, etc.SOUTHERN CHILEA hurried trip was made February 26-29, into the apple aid pear district ofsouthern Chile in the Province of Bio-Bio, the sections of El Pino, Miraflores,and Angol being visited. The Instituto Agricola Bunster is located at the last-named place.It was found that apples and pears of good commercial varieties were pro-duced in fairly large quantities in this area and shipped to all parts of Chileas well as exported to other parts of South America and to Europe. The fol-lowing products were also examined here: Grapes, pears, peaches, nectarines,plums, tangerines, immature oranges, grapefruit, persimmons, olives, lemons,tomatoes, peppers, eggplants, green peas, etc.No evidence of fruit fly was seen in any of the foregoing examined, butD. S. Bullock, director of the Bunster Agricultural Institute, presented theauthors with specimens of Rhagolctis ochraspis Wd. which he had taken incodling-moth traps in this vicinity, and it was later learned that this fly doesconsiderable damage to tomatoes in Peru and is reported as also attackinggreen beans and peppers.Among other injurious insects taken were the larvae of Heliothis obsoleta inpeppers, etc.

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240 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.IiThe fruit-fly survey (Feb. -1t and Mar. 8-Apr. 6), in the Republic of Peruwas started inl the Tacna area in February 1132, when the neighboring dis-tricts of northern Chile were being surveyed, and taken up again on "March8 from Lima. In addition to the Tacna area in the southern part of Peru,the section from Ilo to the upper Moquegua Valley was covered in this partof the country, also the northern and central regions. This widespread field of operation was made possible by the excellent and economical airplane trans-portation available in Peru, and the fairly good system of roads extendingfrom the coast to the miountains in the central region surrounding Lima andCallao.Districts visited in the northern section were Chiclayo, Lambayeque, SanJose, Piientel, Monsefu, and Farrinafe. In central Peru those visited wereLinm and vicinity, Malanbo, Magdalena, Miraflores, Surco, the Rimac Valleywhich includes La Molina, Chosica, Santa Eulalia, etc., and the Chillon Valley.Points visited in southern Peru included the Tacna Valley from Piedra Blancato a sectioni below the town of Tacna, and the Mloquegua Valley, which in-cludes the sections of 'Moquegua, Estuguina, and Same'ua.Grapes and pineapples were the only fruits grown oil large extensive areasin the country, but there was quite a variety of tropical and subtropical fruitsgrown on small holdings. The following fruits were examined in the fieldsand public markets of Peru: Bananas, plantains, grapes, pineapples, coffeeberries, apples, pears, quinces, peaches, guavas, cherimoyas, figs, soursops,loquats, ponlegranates, mangoes, sapodillas, Lucuma fruits, avocados, roseapples, cattleya guavas, chili plums, Barbados cherries, Jamaica plums, apricots,oranges, lemons, limes, mamey apples, Inqa pols, papayas, passion fruit, andpalillos. Vegetables seen were melons, cucumbers, tomatoes, peppers, egg-plants, tree tomatoes, strimbeans, potatoes, sweetpotatoes, onions, beets,carrots, turnips, cauliflower, lettuce, cabbage, etc.Fruit-fly infestations were found at 19 differentt points, reaching from theDepartment of Lambayeque in the north to the Department of Tacna in thesouth inclusive. In the ltimac Valley near the city of Lima there was notedthe heaviest infestation encountered in the entire survey of South Americaand the West Indies.A total of 2,101 larvae and puparia of Anastrepha spp. were taken in the fol-lowing 17 hosts: Apple, Barbados cherry, cherimoya, guava, cattleya guava.purple hog plums. Inga fcuillci, ] ,quat. Lucuma sp., mango, olive, palillo, peach,pear, pomegranate. rose apple, and quince. One hundred and fifty-six adults of.i (streph a spp. u\ve collecte.l on 15 hosts as follows: Apple, avocado, banana,bird excreta, caracucha (?), cattleya guava, cherimoya, common guava, grape,Inga feuillei, loquat, mango, pear, rose apple, and quince. Anastrephia distantwas taken on pomegranate. In addition to these 87 adults of Anastrepha spp.were reared from larvae taken out of the following 7 fruits: Apple, Barbadoscherry. cherimuy a. g111va. mngo, peach, and quince.One hundred and twenty-five adults of A. serpentiva were collected on eighthosts as follows: Cherimoya, coffee, grape, guava, loquat, Lucuma sp., pear.and qu(ine, as well as on collectors' hands and clothing, some adults of thisspecies also being reared from larvae taken out of Lucuma sp.Two hundred and forty-two adults of A. peruviana were collected on 23 fruits,etc., as follows: Apple. avocado. l'ba iialos cherry, bitter almond. caractwha(?), elerinlma. cof'ee, fi, g rqpe. guava, purple lIog plum, loquat, Lucunia sp.,mrn ng o, m iorn inlg-gbhtry, olivo, or.!nge, palillo, peach. poar, pomegranate, roseapple, quince. and soursop ; also on collectors' hands atd clothing.Thirty-)nf)nmw Eiclh. in avocado seeds; larvae of species of Ole-threutidae in string beans and Inga feuillei; larvae of Diaphania sp. in caihua

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19331 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 241and cucumbers; larvae of species of Blastobasidle in Barbados cherries, cheri-moyas, grapes, Lucuma sp., anld ro se apple ; AvoiniN sp. on cotton bolls ; larvaeof species of Gracilariidiae in lBarbad(os cherries, I nya feqillei, Infyit sp., andquince; larvae of species of Pyralidie (Epipischiinme) ill I. f/uillci anl peaches;Pyralidae (LlPycitiniae) in I. fcuillci; IIe/iofhrip.N h(a(mtorrhoidadliN oii leaves ofpear ; Stepllnouwdcnr sp. near parigui!Ynsis Hlopk. on rose apple ; Euscepes bat-Wtae Waterhouse and Euparia sp. in sweet potatoes; larvae of a s1weies of noc-ulid, a Conotrac71lus sp., and Gnorimoschema lycopcr.-icella Busek, in tomatoes,etc.STATEMENT OF FEDERAL PLANT QUARANTINESThe following tabular statement of the quarantines issued under the PlantQuarantine Act of August 20, 1912, as amended, indicating those that have beensuperseded or revoked, has been issued for the information of Federal andState plant quarantine officials, librarians, and others. The practice of as-signing a new number to each revision of a quarantine, followed during thefirst few years of the enforcement of the act, has long since been discontinued.Quarantine Super-designation Formerly no.seded Revoked Subjectand number bynao.-F-1.----------------------------7 ------------White-pine blister rust.D-2.-----------------------------13 ------------Mediterranean fruit fly.F-3----.------------------------.--.-------------------Potato wart.D-4--------. ---------------------10 ------------Gypsy moth and brown-tail moth.F-5.--------.-.--------------.---------------Mexican fruits.D-6.---------.-.-------.-----------.-------------Date palms.F-7.----------1 ------------------White-pine blister rust.F-8--.-.--.-.---------------------------------------Pink bollworm.D-9 ----.---------------------------47 ------------Hawaiian and Puerto Rican cotton, etc.D-10-.--.----.4 17 ------------Gypsy moth and brown-tail moth.F-11----------. .---.-----------------Jan. 1, 1916 Powdery scab of potato.F-12--.--------------------.--------------------Seeds of avocado or alligator pear.D-13.-------2 ---.--------------Hawaiian fruits and vegetables.D_4-------------------------------Sept. 1, 1915 Powdery scab of potato.F-15--------------.------------------------Sugarcane.D-16----------.--.-------------.---------------------Do.D-17.------.---4, 10 22 --------------Gypsy moth and brown-tail moth.D-18-------.-----------------------Sept. 1, 1915 Powdery scab of potato.F-19-.---------------------------------------Citrus nursery stock.F-20.----------------------------------------European pines.F-21-----------------------------24 ------------Indian corn diseases.D-22 .------4,10,17 25 ------------Gypsy moth and brown-tail moth.D-23---.------------------------47 ------------Hawaiian and Puerto Rican cotton, etc.F-24 .---.21 ------------------Indian corn diseases.D-25-----.-----4, 10, 17,22 27 ------------Gypsy moth and brown-tail moth.D-26------------. ----. .-------------54 -------------White-pine blister rust.D-27.------------4, 10, 17, 22, 25 33 -------------Gyspy moth and brown-tail moth.F-28------------. ------------------------Citrus fruits.F-29----------------------------------------Sweetpotato and yam.D-30 --------------------------------------------Do.F-31------.--.---__--------.------------------------Banana plants.D-32. --------------------------------------Do.D-33 ------------4, 10, 17, 22, 25, 27 45 ------------Gypsy moth and brown-tail moth.F-34-------.----------------.-.-------------Bamboo.D-35.---------------------------40------------Japanese beetle.D-36 ----------------------------43 ------.------European corn borer.F-37----.-.---------------------------------------Nursery stock, plants, and seeds.D-38 ------.---------------------.-------------------Black stem rust.F-39-----------------------------59 ------------Flag smut.D-40. .----. 35 48 ------------Japanese beetle.F-41 -----------_----.----------------------------European corn borer.F-42-.---.-.--_-----------------41 Mar. 1,1927! Indian corn from Mexico.D-43 --.-.-.--36 -------July 15, 1932 European corn borer.F-44-.--.-.----------------------July 1, 1932 Stocks, cuttings, scions, and buds offruits from the Orient (brought underquarantine 37).D-45-----------. 4,10, 17,22,25,27,33 -----------------Gypsy moth and brown-tail moth.D-46.--.------------------------52 -------------. .Pink bollworm.D-47 -------.--. 23 -----------------Hawaiian and Puerto Rican cotton, etc.D-48----.-.--.35,40 -----.------------Japanese beetle.F-49.----------------------56 ------------Fruits and vegetables.1 Revocation of quarantine 42 covered in revision of regulations under quarantine 41, effective Mar. 1, 1927.D =Domestic quarantines.F =Foreign quarantines.

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242 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [July-Sept.Quarantine Super-designation Formerly no., seed Revoked Subjectand number byno.-D-50-----.--------------------------------July 23, 1921 Mexican bean beetle.D---------------------------------------------------------United States quarantined to protectHawaii.D---------------46 ---------------------Pink bollworm.-----------------------------------------------------Satin moth.D-54 26 63 --------------White-pine blister rust.F-55-------------------------------------------------------Seed or paddy rice.F-56---------------------------------------------Fruits and vegetables.F-57------------------------------July 1, 1928 Canadian Christmas trees.D-5 ----------------------Puerto Rican fruits and vegetables.F-59-------------39 --------------------Flag smut.D-60----------------------------------------------------Soil with plants from Hawaii and PuertoRico.D-61------------------------------------------------------Thurberia weevil.D-62----------------------------------------------------Narcissus bulbs.D-63-----------26, 54 ---------------------White-pine blister rust. D-64-----------------------------------------------------Mexican fruit worm.D-65-----------------------------------------------------Woodgate rust.D-66---------------------------------------Mar. 1, 1930 Asiatic beetle.D-67-------------------------------Mar. 1, 1933 Phony peach disease.D-6S-------------------------------Nov. 15,1930 Mediterranean fruit fly.F-69-----------------------------------------inmaealF-6 ----------------------------------------Plants and plant products used for packing material.F-70----------------------------------------------Dutch elm disease.D=Domestic quarantines. F=Foreign quarantines.PENALTIES IMPOSED FOR VIOLATIONS OF THE PLANTQUARANTINE ACTAccording to reports received by the Bureau during the period July 1 to September 30, 1933, penalties have recently been imposed by the proper Federalauthorities for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act, as follows:EUROPEAN CORN-BORER QUARANTINE (DOMESTIC)In the case of the United States v. The Delaware, Lackawanna & WesteMRailroad Co., in the interstate transportation of five lots of green corn on thecob in violation of the regulations, the defendant pleaded guilty and was fined$20 on each count, a total of $100 (plant quarantine case no. 414).JAPANESE-BEETLE QUARANTINEIn the case of the United States v. Henry Rudner, Rochester, N.Y., in theinterstate transportation by motor truck of approximately 70 bushels of applesfrom a point in the regulated area to a point outside thereof without inspec-tion and certification, the defen(lant pleaded guilty and was fined $50 (plantquarantine case no. 480).MEDITERRANEAN FRUIT FLY AND MELON FLY QUARANTINEIn the case of the United States v. F. Yamias, a member of the orchestra onthe steamship Sonoma, of the Matson Line, arriving at San Francisco fromAustralia via Honolulu, on May 11, 1932. for bringing in two mangoes, thedefendant pleaded guilty and was fined $10 (plant quarantine case no. 471).

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1933] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 243QUARANTINES AFFECTING MEXICAN AND CANADIAN PRODUCTSIn the case of the United States versus the persons listed 1 el w, for attenipt-ing to smuggle in contraband plant material, the i)(nalties indicated wereimposed by the United States customs ofi(ials at the follAving ports:Name Port Contraband PenaltyA. B. Cole ..-----------------Brownsville, Tex----3 mangoes.---------------------------$5Leonor Martinez-----------------(1o-------------4 avocados with seed -----------------65Aurora Montalvo .----------------(0do --------------5 avocados with seed, 3 pears----------5E. Claus-------------------------do-------------2 avocados with seed------------------5F. L. Mendo.-.------------------do.-------------3 mangoes----------------------------5Mrs. Earl Corder -------------.-----do.------------1 mango.---------------------------5E. E. Burke.--.-----------------do.------------6 avocados with seed-----------------5J. D. Tompkins..---------------do ---------------do-----------------------------5W. 0. Stovall-.----------------do.-------------. 3 pomegranates.----------------------5W. H. Crockett.---------------do.------------8 quinces, 1 mango.-------------------5Bigido Rodriquez --------------do.-.------------1 peach------------------------------5S. E. Bayless.------------------do.------------2 avocados with seed-----------------5Juana G. vde de Gerate---------do. ..------------1 mango.---------------------------5Oridio Farias-.------------------do.-----------6 mangoes--------------------------5Victoria Longoria.--------------do.------------3 guavas .---------------------------5I. D. Garza.-.--------------------do-------------1 quince------------------------------5Bernardo Garcia.-----------Laredo, Tex.--------20 avocados, 14 peaches---------------1D. L. Perrin.-----------------Blaine, Wash-------7 lily bulbs---------------------------5S A fine of $5 was assessed against Leonor Martinez, but as she was unable to pay it the immigrationauthorities suspended her local crossing card for 30 days.

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ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF PLANTQUARANTINEA. S. HOYT, Acting Chief.B. CONNOR, Business Manager.R. C. ALTHOUSE, Information Officer.E. R. SASSCER, in Charge Foreign Plant Quarantines.S. B. FRACKER, in Charge Domestic Plant Quarantines.LoN A. HAWKINS, in Charge Technological Dicision.A. F. BURGESS. in Field Charge Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail Moth Quarantine (Headquarters, Greenfield, Mass.).L. H. WORTHLEY, in Field C/iarge Japanese Beetle Quarantine and EuropeanCorn Borer Project (Headquarters, Harrisburg, Pa.).R. E. McDONALD, in Field Charge Pink Bolliworm and Thurberia Weevil Quar-antines (Headquarters, San Antonio, Tex.).B. L. BOYDEN, in Field Charge Date Scale Quarantine (Headquarters, Indio,Calif.).P. A. HOIDALE, in Field Charge Mexican Fruit Fly Quarantine (Headquarters,Harlingen, Tex.).244U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1933

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S.R.A.-B.P.Q. No. 117 Issued February 1934United States Department of AgricultureBUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINESERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTSOCTOBER-DECEMBER 1933CONTENTSPageQuarantine and other official announcements.---------.------.--------------------------------245Announcements relating to Dutch elm disease quarantine (no. 70).--------------------------245Notice of Quarantine No. 70, with regulations----------.-------------------------245Instructions to collectors of customs (T.D. 46721)-----------------------------248Information for importers of elm burl logs under the Dutch elm disease quarantine no. 70(B.P.Q.-356).---------.------.------------------------------------------------248Announcements relating-to Japanese beetle quarantine (no. 48). .. ..-------------------------250May extend beetle quarantine to Maine and West Virginia.-. ..-------------------------250Notice of public hearing to consider the advisability of extending the quarantine on accountof the Japanese beetle to the States of Maine and West Virginia --------------_ ------250Revision of Japanese beetle quarantine and regulations. -----------------------------251Notice to general public through newspapers--------------------------------260Announcements relating to pink bollworm quarantine (no. 52).------------.---------------261Amendment to pink bollworm quarantine regulations ------------------------------261Notice to general public through newspapers.----.-----------------------------262Revision of pink bollworm quarantine and regulations-----------------------------263Notice to general public through newspapers --_---------------------------------271Instructions to postmasters.--------------------.----------------------------271Announcements relating to rice quarantine (no. 55) -.----------------------------------271Revision of quarantine and regulations.--.-.---------------------------------------271Instructions to collectors of customs.---------------------------------------274Announcement relating to Thurberia weevil quarantine (no. 61) -------------------------275Instructions to postmasters.---.-.-------------------------------------------------275Miscellaneous items------------.-.-.-.-----------------------------------------------------275Dutch elm disease conference October 26--.---------------------------------------275Notice of conference to discuss Dutch elm disease situation in the United States.---------276Plant-quarantine restrictions, Kingdom of Italy (P.Q.C.A.-289, supplement no. 2).-.----276Plant-quarantine restrictions, Kingdom of Belgium (P.Q.C.A.-315, supplement no. 1). 276Plant-quarantine restrictions, Republic of Brazil (P.Q.C.A.-294, supplement no. 2)------277Plant-quarantine restrictions, Republic of Argentina (B.P.Q.-357)-------------------277Plant-quarantine restrictions, Republic of Mexico (P.Q.C.A.-284, supplement no. 7)-----288Plant-quarantine restrictions, England and Wales (P.Q.C.A.-327, supplement no. 1).-----288Plant-quarantine restrictions, Kingdom of Belgium (P.Q.C.A.-315, supplement no. 2)----289Official plant inspection service instituted in Hungary.-----------------------------290Penalties imposed for violations of the Plant Quarantine Act.-.--.---------------------------290List of current quarantines and other restrictive orders and miscellaneous regulations--------292Organization of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine ---------------------------------------298QUARANTINE AND OTHER OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTSANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO DUTCH ELM DISEASEQUARANTINE (NO. 70)NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 70, WITH REGULATIONSINTRODUCTORY NOTEThe recent finding of the fungus causing the Dutch elm disease in elm burllogs imported from Europe, and the presence in these logs in considerable numbers of known European insect carriers (Scolytus spp.) of the fungus arerecognized to involve grave danger of introducing this disease into furtherareas of this country. The situation with respect to these logs as well as to1 35312-34--l 245

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246 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct.-Dec.other avenues of introduction was discussed at some length at a public hearingon the subject on September 15, 1f)33. Fromn the information there presentedor gathered from other sources it appears necessary to take immediate stepsto protect this country from a disease which is kiowvn to have been alreadyseriously damaging to elms in Europe. The quarantine here promulgated aims to secure such protection by means adequate for the purpose but involvingas little interference with commerce as is thought to be consistent with safety. For the present it is considered that if elim burl logs for veneer purposesenter the country free from bark, so that the dangerous insect carriers referredto are eliminated, and if they are promptly subjected to heat treatment forwhich the usual lengthy hot-water steeping which such logs undergo in theveneer process may serve in part, their importation under restriction may besafely authorized. In regard to other materials derived from the wood ofelm and its relatives, such as lumber, timber, various types of containers, andmanufactured articles, it is considered that, if freedom from bark beetles is provided for by the re(luirenent that these materials must be free frombark, the danger that the Dutch elm disease fungus, if present, would escapefrom them by other means is relatively slight.It is recognized that a definite host relationship with the fungus has beenestablished for only a few genera of the family Ulnaceae, and that many ofthe genera included in this family are not indigenous to Europe. In the faceof much uncertainty inclusion in the quarantine of all genera in this familyseems to be the proper course pending more definite knowledge on the hostrange of the fungus.AVERY S. HoYT,Actiig Chief. Bureau of Plant Quarantine.NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 70, ON ACCOUNT OF THE DUTCH ELM DISEASE(Approved Oct. 21, 1933; effective Oct. 21, 1933)Having found that an injurious plant disease, known as the Dutch elmdisease, due to the fungus Graphium u/mi Schwarz, not heretofore widelyprevalent or distributed within and throughout the United States, exists invarious countries of the continent of Europe, I, Henry A. Wallace, Secretaryof Agriculture, pursuant to the provisions of the Plant Quarantine Act ofAugust 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended, have determined (1) that it isnecessary to forbid the importation into the United States from the continentof Europe of certain plants and plant products hereinafter specified, in orderto prevent the introduction into the United States of said disease, and (2)that the unrestricted importation from the said continent of Europe of certainother plants and plant products, hereinafter specified, may result in theintroduction into the United States of the said injurious disease.Now, therefore, by virtue of the said Plant Quarantine Act, the publichearing required thereby having been duly held, notice is hereby given asfollows:(1) The importation into the United States from the continent of Europe ofthe following articles is prohibited: (a) Seeds, leaves, plants, cuttings, andeions of elm or related plants; (b) logs, lumber, timber, or veneer of suchplants if bark is present on them; (c) crates, boxes, barrels, packing cases,and other containers and other articles manufactured in whole or in part fromthe wood of elm or related plants, if the elm wood or wood of related plants isnot free from bark.(2) The importatioin into the United States from the continent of Europe ofelm logs from which the bark has been removed is prohibited except inaccordance with the rules wi d regulations supplemental hereto.Exceptions to the above prohibitions may be authorized for entry under permit under such conlit ions and regulations as the Secretary of Agriculturemay prescribe, or when the particular article or material has been or is to beso treated, prepared, or processed that in the judgment of the Secretary ofAgriculture its unrestricted entry involves no risk of pest introduction.The expression "elm or related plant i", as used herein, means plants of allspecies and genera of t i e family Ulmaceae, including the genera Ulmus,Celtis, Zelkova, Ampelocera, Aphananthc, Barbeya, Chaetachnc, Chactoptelra,

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19331 SERVICE AND REGULATOlRY ANNO U NCEIAIE NTS 247Gironnicra, HI1olopiclea, LozarucIla, Pa(!rasp(Mi, Ph14 yllOsl y/OII, Plf U W, P1/ ('i-c(ltis, Trcma, and all species thereof.This quarantine shall become detective on and after O tober 21, 1913.Done at the city of Washington this 21st day of October 1933.Witness my hand and the seal of tle Uiiited Siiics DeI(aritmnti n 4Agriculture.[SEAL] I. A. WALLACE,Sarrival, the importer shall submit to the Secretary of Agriculture, through the collector of customs, on forms provided for the purpose, a notice in duplicatstating the number of the permit, quantity or weight of the shipment, the (lateof arrival, the name of the vessel, the dock or pier where the shipment willbe unloaded, anl the name of the broker or agent.REGULATION 3. FREiDOM FROM B\RK A N INSECTSEli logs must he free at time of importation frvm hak itml irm'nl w)Ood-infesting insects, an d shall be handled and stored so as to av idI infestationwith such insects until they have been treated as provi'led il r4 -ulaltiolt 4or removed from the country or destroyedREGULATION 4. TREATMENT A CONPITIoN OF ENTRYAs a condition of entry all imiportations of elm og i shall be given within20 days after arrival under the supervision of an inspector of the Dcipartmentof Agriculture, and before the removal of any waste or trimming, a treatmeniciufwith hot water or steai in such manner as to subject every part of theinterior of each log to a temperature of not less than 180 F. for at least 2hours, or by other approved treatment.Unless within 20 (lays after the date of arrival of a shipmilnent at the portat which the formal entry was filed, the importation has received the requiredtreatment, due notice of which shall be given to the collector of dflstoims bythe inspector, demand will be made by the collector for redelivery of the shiip-ment into customs custody under the terms of the entry bond, mid if such re-delivery is not made the shipment shall be removed from the country ordestroyed.REGULATION 5. INSPECTION AND SA'EGUAID PRovisloNsAll elm logs imported under the provisions of this quarantine shall be subject,to inspection by an inspector of the Department of Agriculture both at thetime of entry and at any time thereafter until disposed of, as provided inregulation 4. If the inspector shall find that because of the presence ofwood-infesting insects, or improper stoLeag p'iiding treatment, a definite riskof spreading the Dutchi elm disease or inscet. c-tcriers thereof exists, lie shall sonotify the permittee in writing, prescribing safeguards for reducing or eliminat-jng siuch risk. If thereafter the nrecribed s~lteguards are not put into effectas directed the logs or dangerous pails thereof may be seized, destroyed, orotherwise disposed of.

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248 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct.-Dec.The above rules and regulations shall be effective on and after October 21,1982.1)one at the city of Washington this 21st day of October 1933.Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.[sEALJ H. A. WALLACE,Secretary of Agriculture.INSTRUCTIONS TO COLLECTORS OF CUSTOMSDuicii ELM DisEASE QUARANTINF-NEW QUARANTINE DESIGNED TO PREVENTFURTHER INTRODUCTIONS INTO THE UNITED STATES OF THE DUTO ELMDIsic"xsE (T.D. 46721)TREASURY DEPARTMENT,OFFICE OF THE COMMISsIONER OF CUsTOMs,Washington, D.C., November 6, 1933.To Collectors of Customs and Others Concerned:The appended copy of Notice of Quarantine No. 70, with regulations, designedto exclude the Dutch elm disease from introduction into the United States,issued by the Secretary of Agriculture, effective October 21, 1933, is publishedfor the information and guidance of customs officers and others concerned.JAMEs H. MOYLE,Commissioner of Customs.(Ten follows the full text of the quarantine and regulations.)B.P.Q.-356. OCTOBER 24, 1933.INFORMATION FOR IMPORTERS OF ELM BURL LOGS UNDER THE DUTCH ELMDISEASE QUARANTINE NO. 70The Dutch elm disease quarantine aims to keep out of this country boththe causal fungus (Graphium ulmi) and the insects which are reported tospread it in Europe (Scolytus spp.). While this object could be attained mostsurely by shutting out entirely all plants and all wood of elm and its relatives,it has been decided that. if certain safeguards are taken, the entry of elmburl logs can still be permitted with safety. The quarantine states these safe-guards and provides that they shall be carried out under the supervision ofthe Bureau of Plant Quarantine. The essential features of this quarantine are here listed, with some explanation of the bearing of each on the problemof the safe entry of logs.FREEDOM OF LOGS FROM BARKShipments of these elm logs from Europe have recently been found so gen-erally infested with elm bark beetles that it is not considered safe to allowlogs with bark to enter the country, even if treatment could be given promptlyat the port of first arrival. In view of the efforts now under way to eradicatethe disease in this country it is not considered justifiable to take the risk ofescape of these beetles during the course of unloading and transportation toa treating plant. Consequently, logs arriving with the bark on will be refusedentry and must be removed from the country immediately or destroyed.FREEDOM OF LOGS FROM WOOD-INFESTING INSECTSIf the bark is removed in Europe there is apparently little danger that theelm bark beetles will be present when the logs arrive here. However, theDepartment feels obliged to assure itself that neither these beetles nor otherwood-boring insects are infesting these logs either at time of entry or atany time before the logs are treated.PROPER STORAGEFrom the quarantine point of view proper storage means holding the logsin a place where wood-infesting insects will not have ready access to them

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1933] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 249nor can escape from them to other logs, or to wood, bark, or ireel. Pilingsuch logs with other logs, or placing them on the ground in the opel, especiallyon or near barky waste, would not be considered good sh lr-ige because of the common occurrence of insects in such places.TREATMENT BEFORE TRIMMING OR WASTE IS REMVE[DIf the Dutch elm disease fungus is present in imported logs it is likely tooccur in the outer layers of the wood. Hence all untreated triminiiiiigs andwaste would be as dangerous as the logs themselves. Every iit of the importedmaterial should go through the treating process.TREATY ENTTreatment is intended to destroy completely the fungus in these logs, aswell as any insects which might be present. After such treatment the logs areno longer regarded as a source of danger and the Department will have nointerest in their subsequent disposition.It is believed that the fungus can be killed rather readily by exposure toa temperature of 1800 F. or over for at least 2 hours, so that any process which would guarantee this minimum for the interior parts of the log would beacceptable. Since it takes time for the heat to penetrate, the actual immersionperiod will have to allow for such penetration. Working formulas for treat-ment, adapted to fit in with veneer plant facilities and practices, will beworked out and approved as rapidly as possible.ENTRY UNDER BONDThis procedure is the only simple plan available under the Plant QuarantineAct whereby these elm logs can be allowed entry and yet make it possible for the Department to meet its responsibility by keeping them under control andsupervision at all times until they have undergone treatment. This proceduremay be regarded as the only safe alternative to an embargo.It will be noted that the redelivery bond furnished by the importer to thecollector of customs enables the importer to obtain custody of the logs fortreatment at a plant where suitable facilities are available for such treatment. If the importer chooses to have the logs treated at a port of first arrivalwhere either his own or other such facilities are available, the treatment can begiven there. But if he elects to have the treatment given at his own orother approved plant which is in the jurisdiction of an interior customs portof entry, the shipment may be sent I.T. to be released at that port underbond for treatment.CERTIFICATION OF TREATMENTWhether the treatment is given a shipment at the port of first arrival orat an interior point, an inspector will be provided by the Bureau of PlantQuarantine to certify that the treatment as required by the regulations hasbeen given. The inspector will so notify the collector of customs, whereupon thecollector will cancel the bond and complete the release of the shipment. Theregulations provide a 20-day period for treatment, but it is expected thatarrangements will be made in all cases for as prompt treatment as possibleafter arrival.PERMIT AND NOTICE OF ARRIVALAttention is called to the necessity of securing from the Bureau of PlantQuarantine, in advance, a permit for the importation of each shipment of elmlogs from Europe, and of submitting a notice of arrival for each shipment atthe time of entry. These documents constitute the legal means whereby underthe Plant Quarantine Act the importation may be made under the supervisionof the Department through the channels provided by the Bureau of Customs.AvERY S. HOYT,Acting CHief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.

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250 BU1'EAU 01 PLANT QUAIZANTINE [Oet.-Dec.ANNOI. NtCEMENTS RELATING TO JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE(NO. 48)MAY EXTEND BEETLE QUARANTINE TO MAINE AND WEST VIRGINIA(Press notice)Ocrom;n 9, 1933.Scret a ry 4 A agriculture Wallace has announced a public hearing at Wash--ii (O t b'r 24, to consider lie advisability of extending the Japanese beetlepuarant inct the St aes of 'Maine and West Virginia. The hearing will bebefore le
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19331 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 251REVISION OF JAPANESE BEETLE QUARANTINE AND REGULATIONSINTRODUCTORY NOTEThe revis'-1oin of the Japanez( beetle q(Uarantine and regulatioiis which follows,bring 's parts of the States of Mainie "Ind West Vilgiinia 11ni er restriction an1dmodifies the boumlaries of the reiultc(( areas in Maryland, New Yo rk, and Virginia. A modification of tlie regulations of interest to shippers is theexemption from the certification requireient of groun(L. (lried, imiporte I peatin t'aukages of less than 5 pounds to tihe pactLige. [Regulation 7 A (1).]SUM MARYThese regulations, as now revised. prohibit the interstate shipment of greencorn on the cob, beans iii the pod, 1):iauas inl entire bunches or clusters of25 or more, apples, peacIhes, or berries frtm the regulated areas to or throughoutside points from June 15 to Outober 15. inclusive, unless a Fed' ral permitor certificate has buel sectred and is attached to the outside of the container.Peauhes in shipments of lss tian 15 pounds are exempt. All commerciallypacked apples are exeilpt, aid tlso sihipments of apples of less than 15 poundsto the shipment whether comimercially packed or not. For details and otherexceptions, see regulation 5.TI e regdulations also prohibit the interstate shipment of nursery, ornamental,and greenhouse stock and all other plants (including parts of plants and cutflowers), and sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure, from the regulatedareas to or through any outside point throughout the year unless a Federalpermit or certificate has been secured and is attached to the outside of thecontainer. For details and exceptions. see regulations 6 and 7.The regulated areas include the District of Columbia, the entire States ofConnecticut, Delaware, Massachusetts, New Jersey, and Rhode Island, andparts of the States of Maine, Maryland, New hampshire, New York, Penn-sylvania, Vermont, Virginia, and West Virginia. The boundaries are shown inregulation 3.For other conditions governing the interstate movement of the restricted articles and any vehicles and containers transporting them, see regulations 8to 13, inclusive.To secure permits and certificates, address the Bureau of Plant Quarantine,2101 North Sixth Street. larrisburg, Pa., or the nearest branch office listedin the appendix.AVERY S. HoYT,Acting Chicf, Bfurcavi of Plant Quarantine.NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 48 (TENTH REVISION)(Approved Nov. 23, 1983; effective Dec. 1, 1933)I, I. A. Wallace, Secretary of Agriculture, have determined that it is nee-essary to quarantine the States of Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Maryland,Mass;ehiusetts, New Hampshire. New .Jersey, New Yorik. leniislvii ia. Uliode11 a id, Vermont, Virginia. and West Virginia, and the District of Columbia, torevleit the spread of the Japanese beetle (Pojillia apon ica Newm .), a da(nL er-ons insect new to and not heretofore widely prevalent or distributed withinand 1i rounhout the United States.Now, therefore, under authority conferred by section 8 of the Plant Quaran-tine Act of August 20, 1912 (87 Stat. 315), as amended by the act of Congress approved March 4, 1917 (39 Stat. 11:14, 1165), and having duly given the publichearin -required thereby, I do quarantine the said States of Connecticut, Dela-ware. Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, Virginia, and West Virginia, andthe District of Columbia. effective on and after December 1, 1933. Hereafter,under the authority of said act of August 20, 1912, amended as aforesaid (1)fruits and vegetables ; (2) nursery. ornamental, and greenhouse stock, andother plants; and (3) sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure shall notbe shipped, offered for shipment to a common carrier, received for transporta-tion or transported by a common carrier, or carried, transported, moved, or

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252 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct.-Dec.allowed to be moved from any of said qua ranti ned States or District intoor through any ot her State or Territory or District of the United States inmanner or method or under conditions other than those prescribed in the rulesand regulations liereinatfter made and amendments thereto: Provided, That therestrictions of this quarantine and of the rules and regulations supplementalthereto may be limited to the areas in a quarantined State now, or which mayhereafter be, designated by the Secretary of Agriculture as regulated areaswhen, in the judmieiit of the Secretary of Agriculture, the enforcement of theaforesaid rules and regulations as to such regulated areas shall be adequateto prevent the spread of the Japanese beetle: Provided further, That such lim-itation shall be conditioned upon the said State providing for and enforcingsuch control measures with respect to such regulated areas as, in the judgmentof the Secretary of Agriculture, shall be deemed adequate to prevent the spreadof the Japanese beetle therefrom to other parts of the State.Done at the city of Washington this 23d day of November 1933.Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agricul-ture.[SEAL] H. A. WALLACE,Secretary of Agriculture.RULES AND REGULATIONS (TWELFTH REVISION) SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE OFQUARANTINE NO. 48(Approved Nov. 23, 1933; effective Dec. 1, 1933)REGULATION 1. DEFINITIONSFor the purpose of these regulations the following words, names, and terms shall be construed, respectively, to mean:(a) Japanese betle.-The insect known as the Japanese beetle (Popilliajaponica Newm.), in any stage of development.(b) The terms " infested", "infestation ", and the like, relate to infestationwith the Japanese beetle.(c) Quarantincd area.-Any State or District quarantined by the Secretaryof Agriculture to prevent the spread of the Japanese beetle.(d) Regulated area.-Any area in a quarantined State or District which isnow, or which may hereafter be, designated as such by the Secretary of Agri-culture in accordance with the provisos to Notice of Quarantine No. 48, asrevised.(e) Fruits and vegetables.-For the list of restricted fruits and vegetables,see regulation 5.(f) \urr ry and ornamental stock.-Nursery, ornamental, and greenhousestock, and all other plants, plant roots, cut flowers, or other portions of plants.(g) Sand, soil, (arth, peat, compost, and manure.-Sand, soil, earth, peat,compost, or manure of any kind and as to either bulk movement or in connectionwith farm products or nursery and ornamental stock.(i )(erti fid 'aIwl, soi/, car/flh, pcat, compost, and manure.-Sand, soil,earth, peat, compost, or manure determined by the inspector as uninfested andso certified.(i) Certified greenhouse.-A greenhouse or similar establishment which hascomplied to the satisfaction of the inspector with the conditions imposed inregular tion 6. This term may apply also to potting beds, heeling-in areas,hotbeds,. coldfranes, or similar plots or to storage houses. packN-g sheds, orstores treated or otherwise safeguarded in manner and method satisfactory tothe inspector.(j) Inspector.-An inspector of the United States Department of Agriculture.(k) Moved or allowc(l to be mored interstate.-Shipped, offered for shipmentto o common carrier, received for transportation or transported by a commoncarrier, or carried, transported, moved, or allowed to be moved from one Stateor Territory o(r Iistriot of the United Siates into or tIhroligh aIy other State orTerritory or District.REGULATION 2. LIMITATION OF RESTRICTIONS TO REGULATE AREASConditioned upon the compliance on the part of the State concerned with theprovisos to Notice of Quarantine No. 48 (tenth revision), the restrictionsprovided in these regulations on the interstate movement of plants and plant

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1933] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 253products and other articles enumerated in said notice of quarantine will belimited to such movement from the areas in such State now or hereafter desig-nated by the Secretary of Agriculture as regulated areis.REGULATION 3. REGULATED AREASIII accordance with the provisos to Notice of Quara I ine No. 4N ( tenth revision), the Secrethary of Agriculture desigiiates as regulate a reas for thepurpose of these regulations tie Stai tes, Disi imt, coniis, H wisbips, towns,cities, election districts, anJid m11Zgist r11ril (istrictS listed 1)( wl 'Aw, in clu in_ 111cities, towns, boroughs, or othicr political suv01 i \is s withiniI tir tim i[<:Connecticut.-The entire State.Dclaucare.-The entire Slate.District of Columbia.-The entire Districi.Maine.-ounty of York: towns of Cape Elizabet1 and Sorhorugh, ad thiecities of Portiand, Souilh Portland, 8n :d Westbro 'k, in C(urn iL -n4d Coiuoly; andthe city of Waterville, in Kcnnebce County.Aa rylaiid.-Conities i) Cfcii, Kent, Queen Ann( s, Somerset, til Worce'ster;the city of Baltimore; the city of Cumiberlaid, the town of Frosiburg, andelection districts nos. 4. 5, 6, 7, 11, 12, 14, 22, 23, 24, 20) 29, 31, and 32, inAllegany County; the city of Annapolis and election district no. 5, in AnneArundel County; election districts Iios. 1, 2, 3, 9, 11, 12, 13, 14, and 15, inBaltimore Coildy; election districts of Henderson (no. 1), Greensboro (no. 2),Denton (no. 3), and Ridgely (no. 7), in C(aroline Countty; the city of West-minster, in Carroll County; election district of Cambridge (no. 7), in Dorchester County; election districts of Petersville (no. 12), and Brunswick (no. 25), inFredericIo Colnty; county of Harford, except election district of Marshall(no. 4) ; election districts of Elkridge (no. 1), and Ellicott City (no. 2), inHoward County, and the right-of-way of U.S. Highway No. 1 through theelection district of Guilford (no. 6) in said county; election districts ofVansville (no. 1), and Laurel (no. 10), in Prince Georges County, and allthose parts of Prince Georges and Montgomery Countie.j located withinthe established boundaries of the so-called " Washington Suburban SanitaryDistrict " except those parts located east of the right-of-way of the Washington,Baltimore & Annapolis Railroad and of the southeastern boundary of theDistrict of Columbia; towns of Easton and Oxford, in Talbot County; electiondistricts of Sharpsburg (no. 1), Williamsport (no. 2), Hagerstown (nos. 3, 17,21, 22, 24, and 25), Leitersburg (no. 9), Sandy Hook (no. 11), and Halfway(no. 26),/in Washington Conity; election districts of Pittsburg ( no. 4), Parsons(no. 5), Dennis (no. 6), Trappe (no. 7), Nutters (no. 5), Salisbury (no. 9),Delmar (no. 11), Camlen (no. 13), Willards (no. 14), ual Fruitland (no. 16),in Wicomico Con nty.Massach usetts.-The entire State.New Halmnshire.-Counties of lelknap, Cheshire, Hillsboro, Merrimack, Rtock-ingham, Strafford, and Sullivan: towns of Brookfiel1, Eabd, Ellingham,Freedom, Madison, Moultonboro, Ossipee, Simdwich, Tamworth, Tnitonboro,Wakefield, and Wolfeboro, in CUirroll Cottnty,; towns of Alex untria. Ashland,Bridgewater, Bristol, Canaan, Dorchester, Enileld Graft ( , Giotn, Hanover,Hebron, Holderness, Lebanon, Lyiime, Oraneo, aind Plymouth, in Graft'n County.New Jersey.-The entire State.New York.-Counties of Albany, Bronx, I Broonie, Chemung, Ciinanm, C 'mm-bia, Cortlind, Delaware, Dutchess, Fulton, Greene, Kiiis, Madisun. Mont-gomery, Nassau, New York, OneiIa. Onondaga, Oran. 0 sego, Putam, Queens,Rensselaer, Richmond, Rockland, Saratoga, Schenectady, Schoharie, Suffolk,Sullivan, Tioga, Ulster, Washiii gton, an(l Westchester: towis f Rol hous andSalamanca, and the city of Salamanca, in C;attara /f.Con u :i; towns ofColumbia, Danube, Fairfield, Frankfort, German Fbi ts, Herkiiner. Litchfield,Little Falls, Manheim, Newport, Salisbury, Schuyler, Stark, Warren, andWinfield, and the city of Little Falls, in erkimcr Co nty: towis of Caton,Corning, and hiornby. and the city of Corning, in Stcuben Cun 1!!; towiNs ofLuzerne and Queensbury and the city of Glens Fals, in Warrou Cou tiy.Peisylvani".---The entire State, except Crawford, Erie, Forest, Mercer,Venango, and Warren Counties, Mercer Township in B//tler County. and Ash-land, Beaver, Elk, Richland (including boroughs of Foxburg and St. Peters-burg), Salem, and Washington Townships, in Clarion County.Rhlode Island.--The entire State.Vermon t.-Counties of Bennington, Rutland, Windham, and Windsor.35312-34-2

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254 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct.-Dec.iryini.-Count ics of Acconi. Arlingto. Elizabeth City, Norfolk, North-inpi on, and Stafford : muiagisterial districts of Falls Church, Lee. Mount Vernon,and Providence, ill J'airfux Couu ty; magisterial district of I'rookland, inIJico 0C10un1; magisterial district of Sleepy Hole, in Xuic)nIuid County;magisterial districts of Coles, Dumfries, a1nd Occoquan, in Prince WilliamCouty; Camp Stuart, in Warilick County; and the cities of Alexandria, Fredericksburg, Hampton, Newport News, Norfolk, Portsmouth, Richmond,South Norfolk, and Suffolk.Wet Tirginia.-Town of Keyser and district of Frankfort, in MineralCo ntyi.REGULATION 4. ExTENsION OR REDUCTION or REGULATED AREAsThe re_-ulated areas designiated in regulation 3 may be extended or reducedas may be found advisable by the Secretary of Agriculture. Due notice of anyextension or reduction and the areas affected thereby will be given in writingto the transportation companies doing business in or through the States inwhich such areas are located and by publication in one or more newspapersselected by the Secretary of Agriculture within the States in which the areasaffected are located.REGULATION 5. RESTRICTIONS ON THE MOVEMENT OF FRUITS AND VEGETABLESSECTION A. CoNTROL OF MOVEMENT(1) No green corn on the cob, beans in the pod, bananas in entire bunchesor in clusters of 25 or more, apples, peaches, blackberries, blueberries, huckle-berries, or raspberries shall be moved or allowed to be moved interstate fromany regulated area to or through any point outside thereof unless a certifi-eate or permit shall have been issued therefor, except as follows:(a ) -No restrictions are placed oil the interstate movement of fruits andvegetables between October 16 and June 14, inclusive.( b) -No certificate will be required for the interstate movement of fruitsand vegetables on a through bill of lading either from an area not under regu-lation through a regulated area to another nonregulated area, or from a regu-lated area through a nonregulated area to another regulated area, except that acertificate is required for interstate movement to Richmond, Va., or to the otherregulated parts of Ilenrico County, Va., or to Waterville, -Maine. No restric-tions are placed on the interstate movement of fruits and vegetables from thecity of Richmond, Va. or from other parts of Henrico County, Va., or fromWaterville, Maine. to points outside the regulated areas.(0 No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of fruits or vege-tables when They shall have been manufactured or processed in such amanner that in the judgment of the inspector no infestation could betransmitted.(d) -No restrictions are placed oil the interstate movement of any shipmentsof apples or peaches of less than 15 pounds to the shipment, or of commercially packed shipments of apples in any quantity, or of bananas other than in entirebunches or in clusters of 25 or more.(2) -No restrictions are placed on the interstate shipment from the regulatedareas of fruits and vegetables other than those mentioned above, except thatany such interstate shipments of fruits and vegetables may be inspected byinspectors at any time or place inside or outside the rcgtulated areas and whenactually found to involve danger of dissemination of Japanese beetle to un-infested lo calitics, measure' to elimiiina te infestation may 1e required as acondition of further tIra ispo rtation or delivery.sioN B. coNI0 >OF eEIFIJIONCertificates may be issued for tie interstate movement of fruits and vege-tablesto 1t01sH outside t he reghulait e areas between June 15 and( october 15, in-clsi ye in der ally one of the following conditions:(1) Whwi the iruits aid vegetables have actually been ilspected by theUnited Stat es Dpartment of Agriculture and found free from infestation.Tlhe nuir fi' ,1 iiispectionl points for suchl certiftica tiol will 1e limited andtheir loti n determined by slipping' nieeds and further conditioned on theestablishient at such points of provisiows satisfactory to the inspector for the

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1933] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 255handling and safeguarding of such shipments during insliection. Such ill-spection may be discontinued 1nd certification witliheld by the inspectorduring periods of general or unusual flight of the beetles.(2) When the fruits and vegetables have been handled or treated under tliesupervision of an inspector in manner and by method to free them froii anyinfestation.(3) When the fruits and vegetables have originated outside of the regulatedareas and are to ble reshipped directly from freight yards, transfer poins, orunloading docks witlhiu such areas, under provisions satisfactory I 0 ilml( ill-spector for the safeguarding of such shipments pending certification and re-shipment. Certificates on this basis will be issued witliout inspection onlyin cases where, in the judgment of the inspector, the shipments concerned havenot been exposed to infestation while within such freight yards, trnnsflurpoints, or unloading docks.(4) When the fruits and vegetables were grown in districts where the facthas been established to the satisfaction of the inspector that no infestati nexists and are to be shipped directly from the farms where grown to poiiitoutside the regulated areas.REGULkTION 6. RESTRICTTONS ON THE MOVEMENT OF NUR sERY AN) URNAMiNTALSTOCKSECTION A. CONTROL OF MOVEMENTNursery and ornamental stock shall not be moved or allowed to be movedinterstate from the regulated areas to or through any point outside thereol,unless a certificate or permit shall have been issued therefore by the inspector.except as follows:(1) True bulbs,' corms, and tubers, when dormant and free from soil. areexempt from the requirement of certification, except that this exemption doesnot apply to dahlia tubers.(2) No restrictions are placed on tile interstate movement of nursery andornamental stock imported from foreign countries when reshipped from theport of entry in the unopened original container and labeled as to each con-tainer with a copy certificate of the country from which it was exported, astatement of the general nature and quantity of the contents, the name andaddress of the consignee, and the country and locality where grown.(3) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement between Octobor16 and Jurie 14, inclusive, of cut flowers, and of portions of plants withoutroots and free from soil (such as branches and twigs of trees and shrubs.scions, Christmas trees, holly, laurel, sphagnum moss, and parts of subergeolaquatic plants without roots).(4) No certificate or permit will be required for the interstate movementof nursery and ornamental stock when transported by a common carrier on athrough bill of lading either from an area not under regulation throug-h a reui-lated area, or from a regulated area through a nonregulated area to anotherregulated area.SECTION B. CONDITIONS GOVETnNINGI THE ISISANCE OF AI ( TIATEJ \NI LIMITSFor the purpose of certification of nursery and oria mien tal stock, nlur'sories,greenhouses, and other premises concerned in the novemient of such stoek willbe classified as follows:(1) (.'ass .-Nurseries, greenhouses, mll( ot her premises concerned ih i hemovement of nursery and ornament al stock on or within appr-x5i te Ifeet of which no infestation has been found may be elassilied a H s 1. IVpicompliance with the requirements of subsection (6) of thlis seI ion. nu's-ryand ornamental stock may be certified by the inspector for shiliment froi suchpremises without further inspection, and withoiti met tin the safeuanris!I-rescribed as a condition of intrslate slhipmuenl (if l15 ori-i]atin innurseries or greenhiuses of class III.(2) Class III.-(a) Nurseries. greeniouses, aId other premises c ncernedin the movement of iursery and ornamental stock oil whi either gubs in1The interstate movement of narcissus bulbs is subj(,et to the ro~or etions contained inthe Rules and R.ulations Supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 02 (Narcissus BulbQuarantine).

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256 lUREAT OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct .-Dec.the soil or one M' More becties have been found, will h elassitied as class III.Such classiiicat ion also may be given to nurseries, etc., in localities knownto be generally infested where one or more beetles or grubs are found in theiiiitdiite proximity (wititi approximately 500 feet) of such nurseries, etc.,ai mil~cI property or piropertics. In the case of nursery properties, underNiele oxirship and management, but represented by parcels of land widelyIvirat d, sUch parcels bmy be i1ldeenlfntly classilled either as class IoI laps iii upon coIiq I snIc with sueI coid it ions and safeguards as shall erequired by the insetor. Similarly, iuit nursery properiie-, which wouldat herwise full in cia III, may be oq en t t subtlivision. for V 0e purpose ofit ing SUCh subdivisions in classes I or 11I, wien in The judgment of the-iiector such action is warrant ed by recent aniid sea I ity in fei ation limited toa portion of the nursery cui'erned : Proriduld, That the subdivision containinge i ,festation shall be clearly marked by boundaries of a permanent naturewhInch shall be approximately 500 feet beyond thpoint where the infestation(b) Upon compliance with subsections (3) and (6) of this section, nurseryand ernamieut1 stock may be certified by the inspector for shipment from suchprem~ies uder any one of the following conditions: (i) That the roots shallbe treated by means approved by the Bureau of Plant Quarantine in mannerand by method satisfactory to the inspector ; or (ii) in the case of plantsin which the root system is such that a thorough inspection may be made,that the soil shall be entirely removed from the stock by shaking or washing,or (iii) that it siall be shown by evidence satisfactory to the inspector thatthe plants concerned were produced in a certified greenhouse.(3) Greenhouses of class III may be certified upon compliance with all thehllowinu conditions with respect to the greenhouses themselves and to allla tiin beds, heeling-in areas, hotbeds, coldframes, and similar plots:a) Yeitilators, doors, and all other openings in greenhouses or coldframesol premises in class III shall be kept screened in manner satisfactory to theiivpector during the period of flight of the beetle, namely, south of the northernboundaries of Maryland and Delaware between June 1 and October 1, inclusive,, uiorthi thereof between June 15 and October 15, inclusive.(b) Prior to introduction into nurseries or greenhouses, sand, soil, earth,peat, compost, or manure taken from infested locations or which may have beenexposed to infestation, must be sterilized or fumigated under the directionand upervi ion of, and in manner and by method satisfactory to, the inspector.If -nch treated sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, or manure is not to be imme-dliately used in such greenhouses. it must be protected from possible infestationin manner and by method satisfactory to the inspector.ic) All potted plants placed in certified greenluouses of class III and allI -tte(l plants to be certified for interstate movement therefrom (i) shall bepotted in certified soil; (ii, shall. if grown outdoors south of the northernboundaries of Maryland and Delaware at any time between June 1 andUct)ber 1, inclusive, or north thereof at amy ine between Junle 15 andOctober 15, inclusive, be kept in screened frames while outdoors; (iii) shall,if gr( wn outdoors during any part of the year, be placed in beds in whichThe soil or other material shall have been treated in manner and by methodnjpproved by the Bureau of Plant Quarantine to eliminate infestation: and(ir) shall comply with such other safeguards as may be required by thein: pe_ t yr.(4> (I flowers and other parts of plants without roots or soil may be(ertiliel for movement either (a) when they have been inspected by aninspector and found free from infestation, or (b) when they have been grownin a gveenheuse of class I or in a certified greenhouse of class III and areTransported under sitch saoeuuards as will, in the judgment of the inspector,prevent infestation. (See also section A (3) of this regulation.)(5) Nursery and ornamental stock originating on or moved from unclassi-1pim( r OP aird ' nl t' ol 0 of the fol-lowing conli ions: (a) Thlt the soil shall 1w nt irelv removed from thet ock, or (b) that the roots shall be treated by means approved by the Bureauof l'lant Quarantine ill 1m18111101r '1n10 by m11(thod sati actor: to the inspectors,or (C) that it shall he shown by evidence satisfactory to the inspector thatthe accompanyingg soil was obtained at such points and under such conditionsthat in his judgment no infestation could exist therein.(6) Nurserymen. florists, dealers. and others, in order to maintain theirclanifled stat u4. (( ) shall restrict their purchases or receipts of nursery and

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1933] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 257ornamental stock, sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure within theregulated area to articles which have been certified under these regulations as to each such article and the said certificate shall accompany the articles whenmoved; (b) shall obtain approval of the inspector before such articles arereceived on their premises or moved from the open on their ownII premisesinto certified greenhouses; and (c) shall also report immediately in writingall purchases or receipts of such articles secured from within the regulatedarea. Nurserymen, florists, dealers, and others whose premises are classifiedas class III shall, in addition, report immediately on forms provided for thatpurpose all their sales or shipments of such articles both to points outsidethe regulated areas and to other classified nurseries or greenhouses within the regulated areas. Certification may be denied to any person who hasomitted to make the report or reports required by this regulation, and suchdenial of certification shall continue until the information so omitted has beensupplied.(7) Nursery and ornamentat stock imported from foreign countries and notreshipped front the port of entry in the unopened original container may becertified for niovenwnt under these regulations when such stock has beeninspected by an inspector and found free from infestation.(8) Nursery and ornamental stock originating outside the regulated areasand certified stock originating in classified nurseries or greenhouses may becertified for reshipment from premises other than those on which they orig-inated, under provisions satisfactory to the inspector for the safeguarding ofsuch stock from infestation at the point of reshipment and en route, and, whenfound advisable by the inspector, after reinspection and determination offreedom from infestation.REGULATION 7. RESTRICTIONS ON THE A!OvEMENT OF SAND, SoIL, EARTH, PEAT,COMPOST, AND MANURESECTION A. CONTROL OF MOVEMENTSand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure shall not be moved or allowedto be moved interstate from any point in the regulated areas to or throughany point outside thereof unless a certificate or permit shall have been issuedtherefor by the inspector, except as follows:(1) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of sand forconstruction purposes, nor of " bird gravel," " bird sand," or ground, dried,imported peat in packages of 5 pounds or less to the package.(2) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of sand, soil,earth, peat, compost, and manure imported from foreign countries when re-shipped from the port of entry in the unopened original container and labeledas to each container with the country of origin, and when the shipment isfurther protected in manner or method satisfactory to the inspector.(3) No certificate will be required for the interstate movement of sand, soil,earth, peat, compost, and manure when transported by a common carrier on athrough bill of lading either from an area not under regulation through aregulated area, or from a regulated area through a nonregulated area toanother regulated area.SECTION B. CONDITIONS OF CERTIFICATIONCertificates for the movement of sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, andmanure may be issued under any one of the following conditions:(1) When the articles to be moved have originated in districts included inthe regulated area, but in which neither beetles nor grubs in soil have beenfound.(2) When the material consists of fresh manure or of mined, dredged, or othersimilar materials, and it has been determined by an inspector that no infesta-tion could exist therein.(3) When the material has been removed, under the supervision of aninspector, from a depth of more than 12 inches below the surface of the groundand either (a) is to be moved between October 16 and June 14, inclusive, or(b) is loaded and shipped at points where it has been determined by an in-spector that no general infestation of adult beetles exists, or (c) when thecars and loading operations are protected by screening under the directionof and in manner and by method satisfactory to the inspector.

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258 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct.-Dec.(4) When lie material has been fumigated with carbon disulphide or other-wise treated under the supervision of and in manner and by method satisfactoryto the inspector. Such fumigation or treatment will be required as a con-ditiion of certification of all sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure,except >tuch as is loaded and shipped in compliance with paragraphs (1), (2),or io hereof.I iAT I N S. (ONDITIN S (oVERNING THE PROTECTION OF I ESTRICTED ARTICLEsFROM INFESTATION WHILE IN TRANSITl'ruits and vegetables, nursery and ornamental stock, and sand, soil, earth,peat, compost, and manure, moving interstate from or through the regulatedareas to pi luts outside thereof between June 15 and October 15, inclusive, shallat all times while they are in the regulated areas be screened, covered, orotherwisU protected in manner or method satisfactory to the inspector forstifegnarding the articles from infestation.Truck(s or Mher road vehicles transporting restricted articles may be sealedby the inispector at the point of inspection and all such seals shall remainintact as long as the vehicle is en route within the regulated area.REGULATIoN 9. MARKING AND CERTIFICATION A CONDITION OF INTERSTATETRANSPORTATION(a) Every ear, vehicle, box, basket, or other container of the articleslisted. the interstate movement of which is restricted in regulations 5, 6, and7, siail be plainly marked with the name and address of the consignor and the name and address of the consignee and shall have securely attached to theoutside thereof a valid certificate or permit issued in compliance with theseregulations. In the case of lot shipments by freight, one certificate attachedto one of the containers and another certificate attached to the waybill willbe sufficient.(b) In the case of bulk carload shipments by rail, the certificate shallaccompany the wayl ill, conductor's manifest, memorandum, or bill of ladingpertaining to such shipment and in addition each car shall have securelyattached to the outside thereof a placard showing the number of the cer-tificate or certificates accompanying the waybill.(c) In the case of shipment by road vehicle, the certificates shall accompanythe vehicle.(d) Certificates shall be surrendered to the consignee upon delivery ofthe shipment.RELATIONS 10. GENERAL CONDITIONS GOVERNING INsPECTION AND ISSUANCE OFCERTIFICATES AND PERMITS(i) Persons intending to move or allow to be moved interstate any of thearticles the movement of which is restricted in regulations 5, 6, and 7, shallmake application for inspection and certification as far as possible in advanceof the probable date of shipment, specifying in the application the articleand quantity to be shipped, method of shipment, name and address of theconsismor, and name and address of the consignee.(b) Applicants for inspection will be required to assemble the articles atsuch points as the inspector shall designate and so to place them that inspectionmay readily 1ie made; if not so placed, inspection may be refused. All chargesfir storage, cartage, and labor incident to inspection, other than the servicesof the inspector, shall be paifd by the shipper.(c) Certificates and permits shall be used in connection with the transporta-tioli of only those articles intended to be covered thereby.(d) Where the apparent absolute freedom from infest ation of any of thearticless enmerated cannot le determined by the inspector, certification willho refused.(c) Permits may be issue(l for the interstate movement of restricted articlesby t rurk or (it her road vehicle from a regulated area through a nonregulatedret to anoilth ir regulated area.REGULATION 11. CANCELATION OF CERTIFICATESCertificates issued under these regulations may be withdrawn or canceledby the inspector and further certification refused, either for any failure of

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1933] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 259compliance with the conditionsof these regu ltions or violation of them, orwhenever in the judgment of the inspector the further use of such certificatesmight result in the dissemination of infestation.REGULATION 12. INSPECTION IN TRA,\NSITAny car, vehicle. basket, box, or other container moved interstate or offeredto a common carrier for shipment interstate, which contains or which theinspector has probable cause to believe contains either infested articles orarticles the movement of which is prohibited or restricted by these regulations,shall be subject to inspection by an inspector at any time or place.REGULATION 13. THoROUGH CLEANING REQUIRED OF TRUCKS, WAGONS, CARS,BoATS, AND OTHER VEHICLES AND CONTAINERS BEFORE MOVING INTERSTATETrucks, wagons, cars, boats, and other vehicles and containers which havebeen used in transporting any article covered by these regulations within theregulated areas shall not thereafter be moved or allowed to be moved inter-state until they have been thoroughly swept and cleaned by the carrier at thepoint of unloading or destination.REGULATION 14. SIPIMENTS BY THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTUREArticles subject to restriction in these regulations may be moved interstateby the United States Department of Agriculture for experimental or scientificpurposes, on such conditions and under such safeguards as may be prescribedby the Bureau of Plant Quarantine. The container of articles so moved shallbear, securely attached to the outside thereof, an identifying tag from theBureau of Plant Quarantine showing compliance with such conditions.These revised rules and regulations shall be effective on and after December1, 1933, and shall supersede the rules and regulations promulgated December22, 1932, as amended.Done at the city of Washington this 20d dny of November 1933.Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agricul-ture.[SEAL] H. A. WALLACE,Secretary of Agriculture.APPENDIXPENALTIESThe Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended,provides that no person shall ship or offer for shipment to any common carrier,nor shall any common carrier receive for transportation or transport, norshall any person carry or transport from any quarantined State or Territoryor District of the United States, or from any quarantined portion thereof, intoor through any other State or Territory or District, any class of nursery stockor any other class of plants, fruits, vegetables, roots, bulbs, seeds * * * orany other article * * * specified in the notice of quarantine * * * inmanner or method or under conditions other than those prescribed by the Secretary of Agriculture. It also provides that any person who shall violateany of the provisions of this act, or who shall forge, counterfeit, alter, deface,or destroy any certificate provided for in this act or in the regulations of the Secretary of Agriculture shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and shallupon conviction thereof be punished by a ftine not exceeding $500, or by impris-onment not exceeding 1 year, or both such fine and imprisonment, in thediscretion of the court.STATE AND FEDERAL INSPECTIONCertain of the quarantined States have promulgated or are about to pro-mulgate quarantine regulations restricting intrastate movement supplementalto the Federal quarantine. These State regulations are enforced in coopera-tion with the Federal authorities. Copies of either the Federal or State quar-

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260 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct.-Dec.antine orders may be obtained by addressing the United States Departmentof Agriculture, 2101 North Sixth Street, Harrisburg, Pa.Subsidiary offices are maintained at the following locations:Fourth floor, Customhouse, Boston, Mass.Room 428 Post Office Building, Springfield, Mass.123 Huntington Street, P.O. Box 1106, New Haven, Conn.Room 840. (41 Washington Street, New York, N.Y.Room 332. Post Office Building, Syracuse, N.Y.P.O. Box 1, Trenton, or White Horse, N.J.171 Meadow Road, Box C, Rutherford, N.J.Main and High Streets, Glassboro, N.J.Frankford Arsenal. Philadelphia, Pa.126 North Prince Street, Lancaster, Pa.Rloi 200, Post Office Building, Greensburg, Pa.Post Office Building, Dover, Del.Rb n 8106 Post Office and Courthouse Building, Calvert and Fayette Streets,Baltimore, Md.County Agent's Office, Courthouse, Hlagerstoi W, Md.Room 213, Broad-Grace Areado Building. Richmond, Va.Room 50, 109 West Main Street, Norfolk, Va.Arain-mcients may be made for inspection and certification of shipmentsfrom tlit. District of Columbia by calling District (350, branch 2589, theJnflecetion House of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, Twelfth Street andConstitution Avenue, NW., Washington, D.C.GEN ERAL OFFICES OF STATES COOPERATINGDepartment of Entomology, Agricultural Experiment Station, New Haven,Conn.Board of Agriculture, Dover, Del.State HorticulurriA, Augusta. Maine.Department of Entomology, University of Maryland, College Park, Md.Division of Plant Pest Control, Department of Agriculture, Statehouse,Boston, Mass.Deputy Commissioner, Department of Agriculture, Durham, N.H.Bureau of Plant Industry, Department of Agriculture, Trenton, N.J.Bureau of Plant Industry, Department of Agriculture and Markets,Albany. N.Y.Bureau of Plant Industry, Department of Agriculture, Harrisburg, Pa.Bureau of Entomology, Department of Agriculture, Statehouse, Providence,R.J.Entomologist, Department of Agriculture, Montpelier, Vt.Division of Plant Industry, Department of Agriculture and Immigration,Richmond. Va.State Entomologist, Department of Agriculture, Morgantown, W.Va.NOTICE TO GENERAL PUBLIC THROUGH NEWSPAPERSUNITED STATEs DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE,Washington, D.C., November 25, 1933.Notice is hereby given that the Secret ary of Agriculture, under authorityconferred on him by the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315),as amended, has, by Notice of Quarantine No. 18 (tenth revision), effectiveDecember 1, 1933, quarantined the States of Connecticut, Delaware, Maine,Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, Virginiu, and West Virginia, and the Districtof Columbia, to prevent the spread of the Japanese beetle. This revision bringsparts of the States of Maine and West Virginia under restriction and modifiesthe boundaries of the regulated areas in Maryland, New York, and Virginia.Among other changes, it also provides for the exemption from the certificationrequirement of ground, dried, imported peat in packages of less than 5 pounds

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1933] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 261to the package. Copies of said quarantine and revised rules uid regulationsmay be obtained from the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, Department of Agri-culture, Washington, D.C.R. G. TUGWVELL,Acting Secretary of Agriclture,.[Published In the following newspapers: The Times, Hartford, Conn., Dec. 4, 1933;the Journal, Wilmington, Del., Dec. 2, 1933; the Star, Washington, D.C., Dec. 4, 1933;the Press-Herald, Portland, Maine, Dec. 4, 1933; the Sun, Baltimore, Md., Dec. 4, i b83;the Post, Boston, Mass., Dec. 4, 1933 ; the Union, Manchester, N.H., Dec. 4, 1933 ; theNews, Newark, N.J., Dec. 4, 1933; the New York World Telegram, New York, N.Y., Dec.4, 1933 ; the Bulletin, Providence, R.I., Dec. 4, 1933 ; the Bulletin, Philadelphia, Pa.,Dec. 2, 1933; the Free Press, Burlington, Vt., Dec. 4, 1933; the News Leader, Richmond,Va., Dec. 2, 1933; and the Gazette, Charleston, W.Va., Dec. 5, 1933.]6 =====BOUNDARIES OF REGULATED AREASFIGURE 1.--Boundaries of regulated areas under Japanese beetle quarantine effectiveDecember 1, 1933.[Copies of above revision were sen't to all common carriers doing business in or throughthe quarantined area.]ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO PINK BOLLWORM QUARANTINE(NO. 52)AMENDMENT TO PINK BOLLWORM QUARANTINE REGULATIONSINTRODUCTORY NOTEThis amendment is adopted for the purpose of adding Gaines County, Tex.,to the areas regulated to prevent the spread of the pink boworm, and ofdesignating that county as lightly infested.AvEN S. HOT,Acting Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.35312-34--3

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262 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct.-Dec.AMENDMENT NO. I TO REVISED RULES AND REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL TONOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 52[Approved Oct. 24, 19'33; effective on and after Oct. 24, 1933]Under authority monferred by the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912(37 Stat. :115), as amended by the act of Congress approved March 4, 1917:i! Stat. 11:14, 1165), it is ordered that regulation 3 of the revised rules andreLnla~tiO5 supplemienital to Not-ice of Quarantine No. 52, on account of thepink hollworm. which we re pronmulgated on September 19, 1933, be, and theSale is hereby amended to read as follows:IZEtaATION 8. ILGtATED AiEAS; HEAVILY AND LIGHTLY INFESTED AREASREGULATED AREASIn areconrwwo witI the provisos to Notice of Quarantine No. 52 (revised),the SecreItary of Agriculture designates as regulated areas, for the purpose ofthese re(-ulitions, the following counties in Arizona, Florida, New Mexico,a(1 Texas, icuiilding all cities, towns, townships, and other political sub-divisions within their limits:A rzioa arca.-The counties of Cochise, Graham, Greenlee, Maricopa, andPinal.Florida urea.-The counties of Alachua, Baker, Bradford, Columbia, Gilchrist,and Uiion.Nci i/exico area.-The counties of Chaves, Dona Ana, Eddy, Grant, Hidalgo,Luna, and Otero.TIcxP(s area.-The counties of Brewster, Culberson, El Paso, Gaines, Hudspeth,Jeff Davis, Pecos, Presidio, Reeves, Terrell, and Ward.Heavily infested areasOf the regulated areas, the following counties and parts of counties arehereby designated as heavily infested within the meaning of these regulations:The counties of Brewster, Culberson, Jeff Davis, Presidio, and Terrell, in theState of Texas. and all of Hudspeth County in the same State except that partof the nortlvest corner of said county lying north and west of a ridge ofdesert land extending from the banks of the Rio Grande northeasterly through the desert immediately west of the town of McNary, such ridge being an ex-tension of the northwest boundary line of section 11, block 65 .Lightly infested areasThe following areas are designated as lightly infested: The counties ofCochise, Graham, Greenlee, Maricopa. and Pinal, in Arizona; the countiesof Alachua, Baker, Bradford, Columbia, Gilehrist, and Union, in Florida ; thecounties of Chaves, YDoni Ana, Eddy, Grant, Hidalgo, Luna, and Otero. in NewMexia: tho entire counties of El Paso, Gaines, Pecos, Reeves, and Ward, inTexas, and thIt part of the northwest corner of Hudspeth County, Tex., lyingnorth anl west of a ridlge of desert land extending from the banks of the RioGrande northeasterly through the desert immediately west of the town ofAI(Narc , su h ridizo bein, ain extension of the northwest boundary line of section11. hhck G2Y51.lis amnendmnent sliall be effective on and after October 24, 1933.](ie at c * y of Wasbingtoii this 24th lday of October 193)3.Witness my 11a1d and the seal of the United States Department of Agricul-rture.SEAL H. A. WALLACE,Secretary of Agriculturc.[Copies of above :mnodment sent to all common carriers doing business in or throughthe quarantined ir('a.NOTICE TO GENERAL PuBLIc THROUGH NEwSPAPERSUNITED STATEs DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE,Washington, D.C., October 24, 1933.Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, under authorityconferreil on him by the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315),

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1933] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 263as amended, has promulgated amendment no. 1 to the revised rules andregulations supplemental to Notice of Quarzintine No. 52, oni account of thepink bollworm, elfective October 24, 1933. This amendment rcvises regulation3 by adding Gaines County, Tex., to the areas regulated to prevent the spreadof the pink bollworm and by designating that county as lightly infested.Copies of said amendment may be obtained from the Bureau of PlantQuarantine.H. A. WALLACE,Secretary of Agricullure.[Published in the El Paso Post, El Paso, Tex., Oct. 31, 1933.1REVISION OF PINK BOLLWORM QUARANTINE AND REGULATIONSINTRODUCTORY NOTEThe following revision of the pink bollworm quarantine and regulations isissued in order to bring under restriction parts of 3 counties in Georgia, toadd 4 entire counties and parts of 3 other counties in Texas, 1 county inFlorida, and 2 counties in New Mexico, to the regulated areas of those States,and to release the Salt River Valley of Arizona from restriction. Themeasures required for the control and prevention of spread of the pink boll-worm remain substantially unchanged. The revision incorporates an amend-ment issued on October 24, 1933.SUMMARYThe regulated areas under this revision include 3 counties of southern Ari-zona, 7 counties of north central Florida, parts of 3 counties of southernGeorgia, 9 counties of southern New Mexico, and 15 entire counties and partsof 3 additional counties of western Texas. Of this area, 5 counties and part ofanother in Texas are designated as heavily infested, and the other areas aslightly infested. (See regulation 3.)No stalks, bolls, or other parts of either cultivated or wild cotton plantsand no gin waste are allowed to be transported interstate from any regulated area and no permits will be issued for such movement, except that the localtransportation of gin waste between regulated areas is authorized after freezingweather starts. (See regulation 5.)Seed cotton must not be transported interstate from any regulated area,except between contiguous regulated areas for ginning. (See regulation 6.)Cottonseed, cotton lint, linters, cottonseed hulls, cake, and meal, and bag-ging, wrappers, and containers which have been used for cotton or cottonproducts must not be transported interstate from any regulated area exceptunder permit. Cottonseed produced in the heavily infested area must notbe moved interstate therefrom and no permits will be issued for such move-ment. (For the conditions governing the issuance of permits, see regulations7 to 12, and 15.)Railway cars, boats, and other vehicles, farm household goods, farm equipment, and other articles must not be moved interstate from regulated areasunless free from contamination with cotton and cotton products. (See reg-ulation 13.)Permits are required to accompany the waybills covering shipments ofrestricted articles, or in the case of highway vehicles, they must accompanythe vehicle. (See regulation 15.)To secure permits, address the local inspector or the Bureau of PlantQuarantine, 521 Avenue A, San Antonio, Tex.AvERY S. IIOYT,Acting Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantiue.NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 52 (REVISED)(Approved Dec. 11. 1933 ; effective Dec. 28, 1933)I, R. G. Tugwell, Acting Secretary of Agriculture, have determined thatit is necessary to quarantine the States of Arizona, Florida, Georgia, NewMexico, and Texas, to prevent the spread of the pink bollworm (Pcctinophora

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264 BUREAU OF PlANT QUARANTINE [Oct.-Dec.gOssypiclla Saunders), a dangerous insect new to and not heretofore widelyprevalent or distributed within and throughout the United States.Now, therefore, under the authority conferred by section S of the PlantQuarantine Act of August 20. 1912 (37 Stat. 315). as amended by the actof Congress approved March 4, 1917 (39 Stat. 1134, 1165), and having dulygiven the public hearing as required thereby, I do quarantine the said Statesof Arizona, Florida, Georgia, New Mexico, and Texas, effective on and afterDecember 23, 1933. Hereafter, under the authority of said act of August 20,1912, amended as aforesaid, (1) cotton, wild cotton, including all parts ofeither cotton or wild cotton plants, seed cotton, cotton lint, linters, and all otherforms of unmanufactured cotton liher, gin waste, cottonseed, cottonseed hulls,cottonseed cake, and meal; (2) ha inand other containers and wrappers ofcotton and cotton products: (3) railway cars, boats. and other vehicles whichhave been used in conveyinw cotton or cotton products or which arefouled with such products; (4) hay and other farm products; and (5) farmhousehold goods, farm equipment, and, if contaminated with cotton, any otherarticles, shall not be shipped, offered for shipment to a common carrier,received for transportation or transported by a common carrier, or carried,transported, moved or allowed to be moved from the States of Arizona, Florida,Georgia, New Mexico, or Texas. into or through any other State or Territoryor District of the United States in manner or method or under conditionsother than those prescribed in the rules and regulations hereinafter made andamendments thereto: Proqvided, That the restrictions of this quarantine andof the rules and regulations supplemental thereto may be limited to the areasin a quarantined State now, or which may be hereafter, designated by theSecretary of Agriculture as regulated areas when, in the judgment of theSecretary of Agriculture, the enforcement of the aforesaid rules and regulationsas to such regulated areas shall be adequate to prevent the spread of the pinkbollworm : Pro vided further, That such limitation shall be conditioned uponthe said State providing for and enforcing such control measures with respect tosuch regulated areas as in the judgment of the Secretary of Agriculture shallbe deemed adequate to prevent the spread of the pink bollworm therefromto other parts of the State.Done at the city of Washington this 11th day of December 1933.Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agricul-ture.[SEAL] R. G. TUGWELL,Acting Secretary of Agriculture.REVISED RULES AND REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE OF QUARANTINENO. 52(Approved Dec. 11, 1933; effective Dec. 23, 1933)REGULATION 1. DEFiNITIoNsFor the purpose of these regulations the following words, names, and termsshall be construed, respectively, to mean:(a) Pink bollrorm.-Thie insect known as the pink bollworm of cotton (Pec-tinophora !/oss?piella Saunders), in any stage of development.(b) Cotton and cotton products.-Cotton, wild cotton, including all partsof cotton or wild cotton plants (plants of any species of the genera Gossypiumnand Tliirberia.) ; seed cotton; cotton lint, and linters, including all forms ofuninanuiiactured cotton fiber ; gin waste ; cottonseed ; cottonseed hulls, cake,and meal.() 1) Liit.-All forms of unmanufactured fiber produced from seed cotton.(d) Liutrs.-All forms of unmanufactured fiber produced from cottonseed.(e) Sterilized seed.-Cottonseed which has been sterilized as a part of thecontinuous process of ginning at a temperature of not less than 145* F. in anapproved plant, under the supervision of an inspector, for such a period and insuch manner and method as is authorized by the Bureau of Plant Quarantine.Sf) Inwpcctor.-An inspector of lhe United States Department of Agriculture.(y Mored or alloired to be mored intcrstatc.-Shipped, offered for ship-ment to a common carrier, received for transportation or transported by a com-

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1933] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 265mon carrier, or carried, transported, moved, or allowed to be moved from oneState or Territory or District of the United States into or through any otherState or Territory or District.REGULATION 2. LIMITATION OF RESTRICTIONS To REGULAPED AREAsConditioned upon the compliance on the part of the State concernIed with the provisos to Notice of Quarantine No. 52 (revised), the restrictions providedfor in these regulations on the interstate movement of the articles enumeratedin said notice of quarantine will be limited to such articles moving from theareas in such State now or hereafter designated by the Secretary of Agricultureas regulated areas: Provided, That restricted articles may be moved interstatewithout permit from an area not under regulation through a regulated areawhen such movement is on a through bill of lading.REGULATION 3. REGULATED AREAs; HEAVILY AND LIGHTLY INFEsTED ARE \sREGULATED ABEASIn accordance with the provisos to Notice of Quarantine No. 52 (revised),the Secretary of Agriculture designates as regulated areas, for the purpose ofthese regulations, the following counties in Arizona, Florida, Georgia, NewMexico, and Texas, including all cities, districts, towns, townships, and otherpolitical subdivisions within their limits:Arizona area.-Counties of Cochise, Graham, and Greenlee.Florida areas.-Counties of Alachua, Baker, Bradford, Columbia, Gilchrist,Madison, and Union.Georgia area.-All of Berrien County except (a) the portion located northeast of the Alapaha River, and (b) the portion located south of a line drawnacross the county just south of the railway station of Allenville along thesouth side of lots 323, 324, 325, 326, 327, 328, 329, 330, 331, and 332 of theTenth Land District. That part of Cook County located north of a line startingon Little River at the bridge marked Kinard Bridge on the soil-survey map ofsaid county issued by the Bureau of Chemistry and Soils, Series 1928, No. 11;thence following the old Ty Ty-Nashville road southeast past Spring Hill Church through the village of Laconte; thence in an easterly direction alongthe road to Nashville past Grovania School to McDermott Bridge over the NewRiver; all that part of Tift County located east of Little River.New Mexico area.-Counties of Chaves, Dona Ana, Eddy, Grant, Hidalgo,Lea, Luna, Otero, and Roosevelt.Texas areas.-Counties of Brewster, Cochran, Culberson, El Paso, Gaines,Hockley, Hudspeth, Jeff Davis, Pecos, Presidio, Reeves, Terrell, Terry, Ward,and Yoakum. That part of Bailey County lying south of the following describedboundary line: beginning on the east line of said county where the county lineintersects the northern boundary line of league 207; thence west following thenorthern boundary line of leagues 207, 203, 191, 188, 175, and 171 to the north-west corner of league 171; thence south on the western line of league 171 to thenortheast corner of the W. H. L. survey ; thence west along the northern bound-ary of the W. H. L. survey and the northern boundary of sections 68, 67, 66, 65,64, 63, 62, 61, and 60 of block A of the M. B. and B. survey to the westernboundary of said county. That part of Dawson County lying north and westof the following described boundary line: beginning on the western boundaryline of said county at the northwest corner of section 113 of block M; thencein a northeasterly direction on the northern boundary line of sections 113, 90,83, 72, 65, 54, 47, and 36 of block M to the northeast corner of section 36;thence in a northwesterly direction along the western boundary line of section21 to the northwest corner of section 21; thence northeasterly along thenorthern boundary line of section 21 to the northeast corner of section 21;thence northwesterly along the western boundary lines of sections 27 and 30in said block M to the northwest corner of section 30; thence southwesterlyalong the northern boundary line of section 29 of block M to the southwestcorner of section 17, block C-41; thence north along the western boundary lineof section 17 and 16 of block C-41 to the Dawson County line. That part ofLamb Coun tyI lying south of the fellowing described boundary line: beginningon the east line of said county where the county line intersects the northernboundary line of section 9 of the R. M. Thomson survey; thence west following

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266 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct.-Dec.the northern boundary line of sections 9 and 10 of the R. M. Thomson surveyand the northern boundary line of sections 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, and 1 of the T. A.Thompson survey and the northern boundary line of leagues 637, 636, and 635to the southeast corner of league 239; thence north on the eastern boundary lineof league 239 to the northeast corner of said league; thence west on the north-ern boundary line of leagues 239,. 238, 233. 222, 218, and 207 to the westernboundary line of said county.Hearily infested arcasOf the regulated areas, the following counties and parts of counties arehereby designated as heavily infested within the meaning of these regulations:Counties of Brewster, Culberson, Jeff Davis, Presidio, and Terrell, in the Stateof Texas, and all of Iudspeth County in the same State except that part ofthe northwest corner of said county lying north and west of a ridge of desertland extending from the banks of the Rio Grande northeasterly through the desert immediately west of the town of MeNary, such ridge being an extensionof the northwest boundary line of section 11, block 65 .Lighi tlY infcsted areasThe following areas are designated as lightly infested: The counties ofCochise, Graham, and Greenlee, in Arizona; 2 the counties of Alachua, Baker,Bradford, Columbia, Gilchrist, Madison, and Union, in Florida ; the regulatedparts of Berrien, Cook, and Tift counties. in Georgia ; the counties of Chaves,Dona Ana, Eddy, Grant, Hidalgo, Lea, Luna, Otero, and Roosevelt, in NewMexico ; the entire counties of Cochran, El Paso, Gaines, Hockley, Pecos,Reeves, Terry, Ward, and Yoakum, the regulated parts of Bailey, Dawson, andLamb Counties, in Texas, and that part of the northwest corner of HudspethCounty, Tex., lying north and west of a ridge of desert land extending fromthe banks of the Rio Grande northeasterly through the desert immediatelywest of the town of McNary, such ridge being an extension of the northwestboundary line of section 11, block 651/2.REGULATION 4. EXTENSION OR REDUCTION OF REGULATED ArEASThe regulated areas designated in regulation 3 may be extended or reducedas may be found advisable by the Secretary of Agriculture. Due notice of anyextension or reduction and the areas affected thereby will be given in writingto the transportation companies doing business in or through the State in whichsuch areas are located, and by publication in newspapers selected by theSecretary of A-riculture within the States in which the areas affected arelocated.REGULATION 5. STALKs, BOLLS, GIN WASTE, ETC.Stalks, holls, and other parts of cotton or wild cotton plants (plants ofany species of the genera Gosypiuim or Thurberia), and gin waste shall notbe moved or allowed to be moved interstate from a regulated area, except thatgin waste may be moved interstate without permit from a gin in a lightlyinfested area 2 to farms in another regulated area within the contiguousginning territory thereof, on consideration that iii the judgment of the in-Spector such movement would not, owing to the arrival of freezing weather,increase the risk of spread of the pink bollworm.REWILATION (1. SEEDA: COTTONSeed ott(on ( including grabbots) shall not ih(e moved or allowed to be movedinterstate from regulated areas to nonregulated territory, but, for the purposeof ginning. seed cotton may be moved ' interstate without permit from a lightlyinfested area to a contiguous regulated area.2 Part of the lightly infested area in Arizona is regulated on account of the Thurberiaweevil under Quarantine No. 01, and shipments therefrom must comply with the require-ments of that quarantine.s Except from the area in Arizona regulated on account of the Thurberia weevil(Qua rantIne No. 01).

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1933] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 267REGULATION 7. CoTTONSEEnHEAVILY INFESTED AREASCottonseed produced within a heavily infested area shlil not he moved orallowed to be noved interstate from that area, and no perniit will be issuedfor such movement.LIGHTLY INFESTED AIWASCottonseed produced in a lightly infested area shall not )w mioveI or allowedto be moved interstate therefrom unless a permit shall have hecii issued thlereforby the United States Department of Agriculture.Permits may be issued for the interstate movement of sterilized seed producedin a lightly infested area on condition that it either is to be moved to anotherregulated area 3 without passing through any territory not regulated underthis quarantine or under the Federal quarantine on account o the Tulirberiaweevil ; or is a samnIple to be moved to an proved laboratory in nonreglilatedterritory for analysis ; or is :i sample to he moved for some other approvedpurpose.Permits imay also be issued for the interstate niovement (0 sterilized seedproduced in a lightly infested area to an authorized oil mill in nonrvIulatedterritory for crushing; as one of the conditions for such authorization, oilills in nonregulated territory must agree to maintain such sa fe-nards againstthe spread of infestation, and to comply with sulh restrictions' oi Ilie stubse-quent movement of the linters and otlier pr duets manufactureil from theseed concerned as may be required by the Bureau of Plant Quarantne.Permits may be issued for the interstate movement 4)f seed from lightlyinfested areas to any destination on condition that it habeen given a special heat treatment at 1450 F., maintained under approved conditions for a periodof at least 1 hour and subsequently has been protecte(l frli contamination orhas been given such other treatment as may later be approved by the Eureauof Plant Quarantine.In cases where, in the judgment of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, thec rrying out of the treatments required in this regulation becomes imprac-ticable owing to the lack of satisfactory facilities or for some other soundreason, permits may be issued for the interstate movement of cottonseed fromlightly infested areas on such conditions as may be prescribed by that Bureau.COTTONSEEI PRODUCED OUTSIDE THE REGULATED AREASCottonseed produced outside of but brought within a regulated area may bemoved interstate from such area under permit on condition fizt while in thearea the seed has been protected from contamination in a nionner satisfactoryto the inspector.REGULATION 8. LINT AND SAMPLESLint and samples thereof shall not be moved or allowed 1o be moved inter-state from a regulated a rea unless a Permit shall have b e issued therefor bythe United States Department of Agriculture.Permits may be issued for the interstate movement If lint or san.plesthereof, produced in a regulated area. on condition that flue s'aiid lint wasproduced in a gin (,perated, as to seed sterilization a1l tIIe prevenllion If con-tamination, to the satisfaction of the insj wctor, and on com ipliance with thefollowing additional requirements which shall be carried out under 1ohe super-vision of ':1n inspector and in manner and by method approved by the Bureauof Phint Quarantine:Baled int produced in a heavily infested area (regardless of destination)must be given both vacuum fumigation and either coilpresion or roller treat-inent, unless and until the said Bureau shall approve s01te other treatment ortreatments for the purpose; baled lint produced in a lightly infested area tobe moved to nonregulated territory must be either fumii ' nte(j under vacuum,or compressed. or roller treated, or given such other treatment as may later heapproved by the said Bureau; baled lint and samples thereof produced in alightly infested area may be moved interstate under permit to another regu-lated area' without fumigation or other treatment on condition that the mate-3 Except from the arta in Arizona regulatled on acollit of th e Thirberia weevil(Quarantine No. 61).4 See footnote 3.

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26S BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct.-Dec.rial will not pass through any cotton-growing territory outside the areas regu-lated under this quarantine or the Federal quarantine on account of theThurberia weevil; samples (except when moved as above from a lightly in-fested area to another regulated area), whether produced in a lightly infestedor heavily infe 4ted area, must be either fumigated, inspected, or otherwisetreated as may he required by the inspector.Permits may be issued for the interstate movement of baled lint or samplesthereof grown outside of but brought within a regulated area and to be movedtherefrom, oil the furnishing of evidence satisfactory to the inspector thatthe said materials have been protected from contamination.In cases where, in the judgment of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, the carry-ing out of the treatmients required in this regulation becomes impracticableowing to the lack of satisfactory facilities or for some other sound reason,permits may be issued for the interstate movement of lint from the regulatedareas on such conditions as may be prescribed by that Bureau.REGULATION 9. LINTERS ANI) SAMPLESLinters and samples thereof shall not be moved or allowed to be movedinterstate from a regulated area unless a permit shall have been issued therefor by the United States Department of Agriculture.Permits may be issued for the interstate movement of linters or samplesthereof, produced in a regulated area, on condition that said linters were pro-duced from sterilized seed and protected from contamination to the satisfactionof the inspector, and on compliance with the following additional requirementswhich shall be carried out under the supervision of an inspector and in mannerand by method approved by the Bureau of Plant Quarantine:Baled linters produced in a heavily infested area (regardless of destination)must be either fumigated under vacuum or roller treated, or given such othertreatment as may later be approved by the said Bureau; baled linters producedin a lightly infested area to be shipped to nonregulated territory must be eitherfumigated under vacuum, or compressed, or roller treated, or given such othertreatment as may later be approved by the said Bureau; baled linters andsamples thereof produced in a lightly infested area may be shipped interstateunder permit to another regulated area 5 without fumigation or other treatmenton condition that the material will not pass through any cotton-growing ter-ritory outside the areas regulated under this quarantine or the Federalquarantine on account of the Thurberia weevil; samples (except when movedas above from a lightly infested area to another regulated area), whetherproduced in a lightly infested or heavily infested area, must be either fumigated,inspected, or otherwise treated as may be required by the inspector.Permits may be issued for the interstate movement of baled linters orsamples thereof grown outside of but brought within a regulated area and to bemoved therefrom on the furnishing of evidence satisfactory to the inspectorthat such materials have been protected from contamination.In cases where, in the judgment of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, thecarrying out of the treatments required in this regulation becomes impracticable owing to the lack of satisfactory facilities or for some other soundreason, permits may be issued for the interstate movement of linters from theregulated areas oil such conditions as may be prescribed by that Bureau.REGULATION 10. MILL WASTE, UNBALED LINT AND LINTERS, AND OTHER FORMSOF UNMANUFACTURED LINT AND LINTERsNo formi of cotton liiit, linters, or fiber shall be moved or allowed to bemoved interstate froi a regulated area unless a permit shall have been issuedtherefor by the United States Department of Agriculture, except that no permitis required for the interstate transportation of materials which have been wovenor spun from cotton lint or winters and are uncontaminated with other cottonor cotton products, nor for the interstate transportation of mattresses, pillows,cush iois, r upholstery which have been coniinercially manufactured in com-pliance with the pink-bollworin regulations of the State concerned and in whichany unwoven lint or liters used are completely enclosed in the finishedproduct.5 See footnote 3.

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1 SERVICE AND BE(ULATOIRY ANNOUNCEMENTS 269Perimiit s imiy be issued utllOIizing the ilnterstiate ilmovemnilt fr(Pllm I reguai1tedarea of mill waste and of all other forms of uinmianufactured cotton fiber forwhich permits axe required uider these regulations an(d w\'hich ore not spcifi-('c-ally Vovered in regulations 8 and 9, on condition that the material has beenifuimig1 (ed :111d compressed i or roller treat ted, or has be ii given such other tret-iewit or handling as will, in the judgmenl 4)t 0 th Bureau, eliminate rikk ofspread ( f the pik bollw\ormi.REGULATION 11. COTTrONSKED ll1.1S. CAKE, AND MEALNo cottonseed hulls, cake, or meal shall be noved or allow-(l to be mtiovedinterstate from a regulated area unless a permiit shall have been issued tl 1reforby the United States I)epirtneit (Pf Agriculture.Permits may be issued for the interstate nmoveieit froni a heavily itifesiedarea to any destinaI'Itioll of ('4ttoiiseed hulls obtained froi sterilized cottfo1see(Ian1(1 subsequenitly pi4tected fromi cmotainiiiatiol to the satisfaction of t1e ill-spector on condition 1iat I they nre giveii such additional treatment as may erequired by the inspector. Permits may be issued for the interstate iiovenentfrom a lightly infested area 4of cottonseed hulls produced from sterilizedcottonseed '1a11 stIl bs ently protected fr Pill coiiamlilation Oil tile satisfy ction()f the inspector wl omidition that they are either to he Ioved to another regli-lated area without passilng through any territory not related under thisquarantine or under the Federal qurantine on :cCommt (f Ilie Thiurberiaweevil; or are to be moved to ionregulated territory im(1 118 ve Peen givensuch additional treatileiit is may be required by the ilis'pect(.Permits may lie iSsued for the interstate ilovemient fri mi a regulated I ar eato 11ny desti11ation (f ( ottollseed coke and mi prmuccP4 eiher frPil sterilizedCettoilseed ()I' front (Otmiseed (ibt1ind from1 I 14'oregul 1'te'1 territory 4)11 CO-dition that the cake and l a ive been pritetd against stibsequelit C(M-tamination with cottonseed to the satisfaction of ihIle inspector.RlactFY~LATION 12. 1B.\C; i N'G AND OTHR11 WRAIIE1:s AND ONTAlNERs'Bagging aiid ot1ihr wrppers 1md c(P1iners whlich vee beii 1sed in c4)nle-tion with ()r which 8re c0n ltaii 18 ted with ('(Pt toll (Phr ('4 tton pr(Oucts shall not beinoved or allowed to be imoved interstate fr(mi 8 regulaited ar'i less a perlinitshall have been issued therefore by the United States departmentt f Agrici lt tre,Permits iay be issued on condition that 1(uch bagginor therer wralppers (Pr ('()it-tainers have been cleaned or treated to the satisfact i4Pn 4 f the inspector.REGULATION 18. CAls, BOATS. VEHICLES, I oisit: m ( s, AN) EQUIPMENTRailway cars, boI4ts, '111d otherr vel icles wf1ic have 1beci I used in coveYingcotton or cotton products m. wlich ire fi )hled( with -ich prmdu1t11, and f11,111household goods, farm equIipment, anid p ther articles', if 4't on1 1 11 1 ed wit]) cot-tol or cotton products, sh111 nt be moved 4)1r 8ll()wed to he moved interstatefrom a regulated area until they have beel throughly a1(1 mP Ir heated tothe satisfaction (if the inspe(tor. No permiit is required I'mr tile 14m)1 4v(lelit shllowedl under this regulation.REGULATION 14. HAY AND OTHER FARM PRoiDCTS: Co'I"oFsED ILHay and other farmn prlducts the interstate Ilovellieit ()f whilich has not beenspecitically restricted or provided for elsewhere in these regular tions, (Il(d cot-tonseed oil, 118y he m11 ve(1 interstate with11olut peri it ()I(Ither restriction Utilfurther notice.REXTULATION 15. GENERAL PFRMIT PRovlSIoNS; MARKING ANP LABELING: SToRAGE,CARTAGE, AND LABOR COSTSTo obtain permits under these regiulaItions, application 11411s011 e mI 0Iade eitherto the nearest local inspector, (Pr to the Bureau of Plait Quarantine, 521Avenue A, San Antonio, Tex.Permits imay specify a destilatioll point ()Ir a limited destinations area for theshipment, 8n14, ill that event, the material ciaPcer ed shall not be moved or" See footnote 3.35312-.34-4

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270 IW1EAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct-Dec.allowed to be moved interstate, directly or indirectly, to (est inations other thanthose spe Illed in such permit.Copies ( )Ie t permIits re quired under these regulations s a l be attached tothe Irticlcs or to lie wayhills r otler shipping J apers which accompany thesliillil1t. Il the case ol} imlovemiienit by a road vehicle, copies of the permit shall 8tWTmlany le veihiclo. Ile products or articles so moved shall bearS1111 -iii ial libeling ;s ma> le necessary, 11 1ha judgment of the inspec-to fi Vnt i v lie 1a erial.All chartifI st r:ge. (arIl.e, ,n(l tahor, incident to inspection, other thanIlte leI iintector, shall le piAl by the slipper.Nn iji VAN 11 Si iNs IS 1Y TllE UNITEl) STATIC S 1EARTMEN OF AGRICULTUREPiduat ::Ind a idle" W)cbjct to restriction ill lhe',e regulations nay bemoved ici "siie Iv Ole united Siates Dpartneit of A rieulture for experi-NM E ex.e GAm-ness BOUNDARY OF REGULATED AREASF L A HEAVILY INFESTED AREAFmURE 2.-Areas regulated under pink bollworm quarantine effective December 23, 1933.mliintlal 1r scietilie ljlrpo scs, onIt S10 (' 18ditionls aInd un(ider such szfeuards as1a1y be prcribed Iby the jluream of Plant Quaraiwine. The container of arti-cles SO m vted ill bea r, securely attached to the outside thereof, an identifyingtai. from lhe Bureau of Plant Quarantiine showing comipliaiCe with suchconlditions .These rules aid regiltionis shali be effective on and after December 23,19 11. ans iall aperaede ()[ 11h1 date the revised rules and regulations issuednilder Nitie ()I Qlaaranltilie No. 52 (revised), on September 1V, 1933, as amendedto date.o0e at the ity of Woshjingon this 11th day of Deceiber 1933.Wit m111y h1n( and the seal of the United States Department of Agri-cuiture[ssAIt .G. TUcwEL,Acting 'Scrctary of Agriculture.[o 1i s (f rblve vision were sent to all common carriers doing business in or throughtile ramii 1.81 i arEa.]

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1933] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 271NOTICE To GENERAL PUBLIC THROUGH NEWSPAPERSUNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRi L'LTURE,BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE.Waslin gton, D.C., Deccnber 11, 1933.Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, under authorityconferred on him by the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912 (:7 Stat.315), as amended, has by Notice of Quarantine No. 52 (revised), effectiveDecember 23, 1933, quarantined the States of Arizona, Florida, Georgia, New.Al( xico. and Texas, to prevent the spread of the pink bollworin, anti has orderedthat (1) cotton, wild cotton, including all parts of either cotton or wildcotton plants, seed cotton, cotton lint, linters, and all other forms of unmanu-factured cotton fiber, gin waste, cottonseed, cottonseed hulls. cottonlee1d cakeand meal; (2) bagging and other containers and wrappers of cotton and cottonproducts; (3) railway cars, boats, and other vehicles which have been usedin conveying cotton or cotton products or which are fouled with such products;(4) hay and other farm product-: and (5 firm hmi ns'hni 44d aits. fitrm e 'uip-ment, and, if contaminated with cotton, any other articles, shall not he shipped,offered for shipment to a common carrier, received for transportation or trals-ported by a common carrier, or carried, transported, moved, or allowed tobe moved interstate from the said quarantined States in manner or methodor under conditions other than those prescribed in the rules and regulationssupplemental to said revised quarantine or in amendments thereto. The re-vision brings parts of the State of Georgia under restriction and modifies theboundaries of the regulated areas in Arizona, Florida, New Mexico, and Texas.Copies of said revised quarantine and rules and regulations may be obtainedfrom the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, Department of Agriculture, Wash-ington. D.C.R. G. TUGWELL,Acting Secretary of Agriculture.[Published in the following newspapers: The Republican, Phoenix. Ariz., Dee. 19,1933; the Times-Union, Jacksonville, Fla. Dec. 18. 1933; the Constitution, Atlqnta, Ga.,Dec. 18, 1933; the State Tribune, Albuquerque, N.Mex., Dee. 19, 1988; and the Star-Telegram, Fort Worth, Tex., Dec. 19, 1933.]INsTRUCTIONS TO POSTMATERsPOST OFFICE DEPARTMENT.THrhD AssIsTANT POsTMASTER GENERAL.Was71ington. D.C., Decem her 26. 1933.POSTMASTER:My DEAR SIR: Your attention is invited to the enclosed copy of the latestrevision of Quarantine Order No. 52 of the United States Department of Agri-culture on account of the pink bollworm.The changes in the regulated areas, etc. are in(licated in the " Introductorynote " and " Summary " on the first and second piages, and youn will please begoverned accordingly. See paragraph 1. section 595. Postal Laws and Regula-tions.Very truly yours,C. .EILENBERGER.Third A-ssi, tant Postmaster Geiwral.ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO RICE QUARANTINE (NO. 55)REVISION OF QUARANTINE AND REGULATIONSINTRODUCTORY NOTEIt has been determined that properly packed rice straw and rice hulls, if sub-jected to suitable steam or other approved treatment at the port of arrival, may

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272 11REAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct.-Dec.he allowed entry int this country with safety. The intent of this revision of theseed or paddy rice quarantine. hereafter to be known as the rice quarantine, andits acempanlying regulations. is to permit the iimlortation of rice straw andrice hulls. With t reatilent as a condition of entry. at approved ports where ade-ouate facilities for ,ucb treatment are available.AvERY S. HOYT,Acting C'hticf. BJurqau of Plant Qimrautine.NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 55 (REVISED)(Approved Nov. 2:, 1933; effective Nov. 23, 1933)The fact has been determined by the Secretary of Agriculture, and notice ishereby given. (1) that injurious fungous diseases of rice, including downymildew i clcroxpora lurocar l ). leaf smut (E0t11oina Orirtie), blight(Owxpora Or'iorumi, and glunme blotch (Melanomnla glulnarum), as well as(11lgerous insect pests, new to and not heretofore widely prevalent or distributedwithiti aind throughout the Inited States, exist, as to one or more of such dis-eases aI(1 pests, in Euroie, Asia, Africa, Central America, South America, andother foreign countries aun localities, and may be introduced into this countrythrough importations of seed or paddy rice, rice straw, and rice hulls, and (2)that the unrestricted importation of seed or paddy rice from the Republic ofMex'co and of rice straw and rice hulls from all foreign countries and localities11ay result in the entry into the United States of the injurious plant diseasesheretofore enumerated, as well as insect pests.Now. therefore. I. H. A. Wallace, Secretary of Agriculture, under authorityconferredd by the act of Congress approved August 20. 1912 (37 Stat. 315), asamended, do hereby declare that it is necessary, in order to prevent the intro-duction into the United States of the insect pests and plant diseases referredto. to forbid the importation into the United States of seed or paddy rice fromall foreign countries and localities except the Republic of Mexico, antl to re-strict the imfP(ortatiol f seed or paddy rice from the Republic of Mexico, andof rice straw (and rice hulls from all foreign countries and localities.Oui and a fter November 23, 1933, by virtue of the said act of Congress, theiiportation of seed or paddy rice into the United States from all foreigncountries and localities except the Republic of Mexico is prohibited, and theiniportation of seed or paddy rice from the Republic of Mexico and of ricestraw and rice hulls from all foreign countries and localities is forbidden exceptin accordance with the rules and regulations supplemental hereto.This revision shall become effective on and after November 23, 1933, andsh ill sul)ersede Notice of Quarantine No. 55 proiulgated February 20, 1933,effective Jnly 1, 19:3.Done at the city of Washington this 23d day of Novemnber 1933.Witness my ha i11 4 and the seal )f the UIiited States Depatinent ofAgrictltllrPe.[SEAL H. A. WALLACE,Sccrctary/ of Africultiure.REVISED RULES AND REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE OF QUARANTINENO. 55, THE RICE QUARANTINEREZGUTvIoN 1. DEFINITIONS(I Scd or piddy ricc.-idhiusked rice in the form commonly used forseed purposes these regulation, do not aplfy to husked or polished riceilmpoit ed for food purposes.(b) Por/ ti firs/ (rrir/ -The first )ort within the Unitedl States wherothe -Alijieilt is (1) offered fto conIsumil)tion entry or (2) offered for entry foriiniiediate triasportatiou ini 1ond.(c) Inspccfor.-Ai i1s1iector of the Buireau of Plant Quarantine of theUnited States Depari-timent of Agriculture.

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1933] SERVICE AND REGULATORY AN.NOU NCEM ENTS 273A. IMPORTATIONS OTHERWISE THAN BY MAILREGULATION 2. APPLICATION FOR PVRMIITApplication for a perinit to i import seeld or paddy rie frmni Mexico or ricestraw or rice liiills from any coutitry. may be nmae to tie Bureau of PlantQuarantine, indicating in t atlpplicatiol IIIle locality w Ihere tile desired n terialhas been grown. the Port of first arrival, and the name a d address of theimporter in the United States to wNlmi the perilit s1hwld hw -wint, if otlierthan the applicant.Applications for permit s silmild be inade in adva ice of tlie prfiwosed ship-ments; but if, through no fault of the importer, a Ahipment should. arrivebefore a permit is received, tile importation will be held in custom ustodyat the port of first arrival, at tile risk and expense of the importer. for aperiod not exceeding 20 days, pending tile receipt of the permit.Application may be ia de by tele(raplh, ill which case thle information requiredabove must be furnished.REGULATION 3. PowRTS OF ENTRYFor importations of seed or paddy rice from the Reliblic of Mexicil, per-mits will be issued for entry through Mexicani border p' orts an1 such(1 other portsas may later be approved by the Bureall of Plant Quaantinie.For importations of rice straw Ind rice hulls from aH f reiI cminltries.permits will be issied for entry at New Yoirk and Bostoii allot at such other ports as nay later be approved by the Burea ii of Plant Quarantine.Should a shipment. re(jtuiring treatment arrive at a port wilere fcilitits frinsuch treatment are not maintained, such shipment shall either be prompltlyshipped under safeguards and by rmilting prescribed by tile inispectmr to allapproved port where facilities for treatment are available, 4r it shall le refusedentry.REoGULATION 4. ISSUANCE OF PERMITSOn receipt of an application, a permit will be issued in quarll uplicate. oneCopy will be furnished to tle applicant. one copy will be Illailel to the ci illectorof customs, and (ll to the inspector Of the Bureau of Plant Quaraiitiie at tileport of first arrival adl the fourth will be filed with the applicatioll.REGULATION 5. NOTICE OF ARRIVAL BY PERMITTEEImmediately upon the arrival of a shilnenlt at the pi0rt of first a arrival. ilepermittee or his agent shall submit a notice in duplicate to the Secretary ofAgriculture, through the cileCtor if customs, on a form ilprovided for thatpurpose, stating the number ()f the permit. the quantity in the sihipnient, the locality where griw.n, the i(hte Of arrival, and, if by rail. the iame of ilierailroad company, the car llumlbers, and the terminal where the shipilent is tobe unloaded, or, if by boat. the ulame of the vessel and the desigiatiwln of tihedock where the shlilnent is to be landed.REGULATION 6. INSPECTION AND DISINFECTION AT P()IT OF FInsT ARRIVALPaddy ricc.-All inipmtatiols of seed I r pady rice frmI Mexic o shim111 besubject, as a condition Of entity, to sIu( i1lspection or I disiIfectionll, or 11bo1h,at the port of first arrival. as shall be required by the iinsj pector. and to thedelivery to the collector of custIms 1 by tile 11spector 4f a writteli 1(ti thtthe seed Or paddy rice has been inspected aInd fmind to be ainp;l relli y free frmlplant diseases and inisect pests or that the required trealtiienl has ieeji given.Should aliy shlipiient of such seei oIr pla(l(iy vice be found to Ile so inifested wiitinsect pests or infected with Ilila diseases 11ha t. ill Ihe j mdgmilent ()f tleinspector, it canliiot be cleared by disinfection or other treat ment, Ilie cint ireMhil pmllelnt may be reflusetd e t ry.Rice straw and ricc I lIN.-As a condition( of entry. rice siraw and rice hullsshall be subject to inspection and to treatment at the port of first arrival,under the supervision of the inspector, by ilethIods a lid at pIlant.s 1 Ippr Ived bythe Bureau of Plant Qua rantie. Rice st raxw and rice hills will he admi tte Ionly at ports where adequate facilities are available for such treatment. The

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74 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Get-Dec.required Iretment must be given within 20 days after arrival, but if anyshipment of rice straw or rice hulls shall be found upon arrival to be dan-gerously infested or infected the inspectors may direct immediate treatmentunder adequate safeguards; and if the treatment and safeguards are not putit(o effect as directed the shipment shall be removed from the countryiimmedi-lately or destroyed.Unles, within 20 days after the date of arrival of a shipment at the portat which the formal entry was filed, the importation has received the re-quired treatment, due nt ice of which shall be given to the collector of customs~y 1e inspector, demian will be made by the collector for retlelivery of theshipment into customs custody under the terms of-the entry bond, and, if such1edl ivry ii not na4,. the shipmiiie shall be remoed fromf the country orlestroyed.G naL.-All ,hzrges for storage, cartage, and labor incident to inspectionand (isinfection, other than the services of the inspector, shall be paid by theimporter.All sihipits Jt 1 shall be so baled, bagged. or wrapped as to prevent scattering01' wattage. If, in the judgment of the inspector, a shipment is not so bagged,ba'ed or wrapped. it shall be reconditioned at the expense of the permitted or entry may be refused.B. IMPORTATIONS BY MAILRlGULATION 7. IMPORTATIONS BY MAILRegulations 2 to G provide for importations otherwise than through themails. Importatioiis of seed or paddy rice from Mexico, and of rice straw andrice hulls from all foreign countries and localities, nmy be made by mail pro-vided (1') that a permit has been issued for the importation in accordance withregulations 2 aid 4 and (2) that each shipment is accompanied from the for-eign mailin. point by a special mailing tag directing the package to a Bureauof Plant Quarantine inspection station for inspection and, if necessary, fortreatment. before being released to the mails for delivery to the importer,unless entry is refused in accordance with the provisions of regulation 6. Thespcciil mailing tags will be furnished on request to the importer for trans-mii5onf in advance to his foreign shipper.These revised rules and regulations shall be effective on and after Novem-V r 2'; 1 and Shal on that date supersede the rules and regulations promul-t I February 20, 1933. effective July 1. 1933.Done at the city of Washington this 23d day of November 1983.Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department ofAgriculture.SEAL H1. A. WALLACE,Secretary of Agriculture.INSTRUk>TIONS 10 COLLECTORS OF CUSTOMSRIE (2UINTINE-REVISION OF QUARANTINE AND REGULATIONs, GOvERNING TIlEIMPORTATION OF SEED OR PADDY RICE (T.D. 4 0O9)TRE.\sURY DEPARTMENT,IE it OF THE ('ONIMISSIONER OF CUSTOMSS ,Was/hin toji, D.C. Dci0er 20, 33.T'o (75sue by the Scretarv of A aricuiiture. ('fleetive ' November 23, 1933,]!elrmii it tin tie imi riiatioln of ri-e straw aNn :ii e hull. with treatment as a(mnditiin I )IA at a pS pr'o I poi I, 1ublid for the information andguidaMe : cusnoms iuiicers and others concried.JAlfs I1. MXOYLE.Conioissioncr of Customs.[i I t a \ 11 full text of lie (liarantitie aiil regulations.]

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1I83] SERVICE AND IGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 275ANNOUNCEMENT RELATING TO THIURRERIA WVEEVILQUARANTINE (NO. 61)INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERSIos () I ,' I rM NT,T11IRD A SSLSTANT 's[TE(NlLWaH(!intOn, O'Hb I1 ii i.POSTMASTER:MY I4E'\R Sil: Yoll.r attention is ivil ied to tile eilosed colf. .i 2 iof the ruks aIn rOglatiOds I IN)uppm 11011t,11 to Not ice of Qualt i N. i onaccount of the Tuliriberia wecvil in Arizonu.Th c an es ill the r'uhton ro intie-wed ill 1hw inilmfil -I(ry 1":)1 a114you will ])leas (, 1 overined acc Ord i1ngly. 4Se paIgiaph 1, 'octin 1 Pr-tiLaws and Reutlations.Very truly yusC. B. El 1J:Nij',ThI'I Ol 'Ni. /un! I~~ ti \MISCELLANEOUS ITEMSDUTCH ELM DISEASE CONFERENCE OCTOBER 2(Prcess 1101iue)O)cTonian 14, 1022.A conference to di5('1uss Dutch elm disQ8se 5 roblems -'1i1 11 )n, l-h ncalled by Avery S. IHoyt, Aetinchief f of tin' Br11fPan Oil ( I' Q, fbe held in the auditorium of tlie Interior DellartMeint0 Bildin1. Eighte'nh andF Streets NW. at 10 a.m. Thursday oy.ct'ber 20.Mr. Hoyt explains that the Bureau of Plant Industry of tit Departrini t, incooperation with the Stats.z concerned, i 4 eiiaged in a viv r u a itt miipt tosuppress an outbreak of the disease ceitering in the netrt 11olita iistraround Newark and New York City. The outbreak has around wi41 int reitand those attending conference oh other insects and plant disoase -ubjent'called for October 24 and 25 will have a chance to review the Dutch ton di-oaseproblem. At the conference representatives of the Bureau of Plant liIi -vrywill present information as to the distribution :111d ec(ollollnoic illporlai ( f tliedisease, and members of the Biureau of Entomology staff will di:us tOw in cjpests, which are the only carriers thus far known.By October 8 approximately 500 trees infected with this disse ;ad V 01nreported in northern New Jersey, some 27 infected trees in s uthiasern NewYork, 1 in Connecticut, and 1 this year in Ohio, in addition to 7 fiundl in <>bin 1930 and 1931.The disease apparently is being spread locally by a bark'beet e kn wn 1-eitificaliy as Scolylus mult i4riat us. Tliat hwetle reached tli (-oun1t1y a citn-siderable number of years ago and has been found thus far to be esiiihbli;hedover a general area extending front the vicinity of Phi ila delphia, Pa., j() 4atorMassachusetts, said Mr. Hoyt in reviewing the situation.The evidence indicates that the (isease reached this country y ihe immtia-tion. of infected logs for use ill ven-er plants. A closely related inect whichis more commonly connected with the spread (I, the Ii e0s ir ro]e ha alsbeen found in these logs but is not known to be estal dish tod il thi notry.Restrictions on the further importation of such logs have 1een livi en! wni(ler -tion and the Bureau of Plant Quarantine will soon announce action which willbe taken with respect to such importations.The conference called for October 26 follows a general confei1c c w Li wasannounced soviet ine ago for October 25 to consider modificatits in the reirio-tions governing the importation of nursery st ock into the United St(a)t. OItOctober 24 a hearing will be held to give consideration to the extension of 'beJapanese beetle quarantine. The Bureau has arranl-cd this sries of confer-ences so that those interested in more than one of those threo sua l lattend the discussions of all three without additional travel.

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26 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct.-Dec.NOTICE OF CONFERENCE TO DISCUSS DUTCH ELM DISEASE SITUATION IN THEUNITED STATESOcmnEi 14, 1933.I view f tthe finding I. #f a considerable number of trees infected with theDutch elm I isea se (GUrapi nim i ) in the States Of New Jersey and NewYork a1id (1 the collect ion of one or more speciliens of the same disease in0 hio and 1oniIlecticut, it seems advisable that shade tree commissions, foresters, State planw (Iiuanitilie officers, and others ilterest1, be given an opportunityto distcss the status of the infection. the )pro-ress of suppressive activities,mieoms Of preventing the spread of the infection to other areas, and the pre-venltionP of its permanent estal ] ishment in the regions nov involved.A wringly I a conference to c( Isider these sulbjects is hereby called to meetat 1W a .m. 4 in ()ctober 26 in tie auditorium of the Interior DeparltmeiitBuilding. Eighteenth and F Streets NW. Washiniton, D.C. All those interestedill the pr tedt ion of the elm trees of the United States from the spread ofthis disease are invited to be present and joili in the disL'Ussioi.AvEiy S. HOYT,.Icting Chief of Bureau.p1.Q.C.A.-29. Supplement No. 2. NovEMBER 24, 1933.PLANT-QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS, KINGDOM OF ITALYPLANTS OF THE GENUS ULMUS-IMPRTATION ANI) TRANSIT PROHIBITEDThe Ministerial decree )rf Marchi 9. 1988, effective May 1, 1933, prescribesthat:The imlipor-t tion ;1ndil trinsit. from all foreiAin ciuitries. nf plants andi4pt rts of phtilts of the genus C lnmu, except the seeds, are prohibited, on account(4 the dhoger of inltroducing foreign scale insects (Coccidae). which are verylimrmnful tiP It al inn fruits.AvEny S. HOYT,Actiiny Cliief, Butir-aua of PIant Qwura tine..I.A. 15. Supplement No. 1. NOVEMBER 24, 1933.PLANT-QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS, KINGDOM OF BELGIUMINFESTED FRUITS PROHIIITEI) ENTRYA 4Tdivi ito the Miniisterial order of July 14, 1933, the iumportation intoI -e1giuimi is perniitte(l ()f fresh peaches. apricots, and nectarines from any5irec oiily when an iispect.on made by the Belgiu Plant Protection Service-t tile expeiise of the ipl Pter shows the shipment to be free from fruit flyLarvae (Try\ wti(hic) from caterpillars of the peach twig borer ( AnarsialinatIa), al of the oriental fruit moth (Grapholitha iolxfiti I =Laspeyre. aimtolcta=, =Cydia molct/ a1 I, as w(el 1 -I s from the harvte of the phuin or peacheurcuio ( onotrchel icoeliphiar) .AUTHORIZED PORTS OF ENTRYAliN wer., Brsel, areii-Aviation, Lidi. Erquelilines, E!sciehe, Moiitaleux,Mousclon. Montzen. an1d Quevy.DISPOSAl OF INFESTED SHIPMENTSSI hipmiient a rrivilii at tie ports of Erqpielinnes, Essehen. Montaleux,M\sirot, M IZen, a4d Quevy which are found to be infested with any of theaIbove-iia med pests are to be returned to the country of origin.ThoS( offered for entry at the ports of Antwerp, Brussels, Haren-Aviation,and Li&ge will be burned at the expense of the importer if found infested.AvERY S. HOYT,Acting Chief, Bureau of Plant Quaralvtine.

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1933] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 277-P.Q.C.A.-294, Supplement No. 2. NovEMBiE 24, 1933.PLANT-QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF BRAZILPORTS OF ENTRY FOR SEED POTATOESCircular No. 146, of December 30, 1932, of the Brazilian Minister of Finance(Diario Oficial No. 1 of January 2, 1933) states that the permission providedin article 1 of decree no. 21734 of August 16, 1932 (see P.Q.C.A.-294, Supple-ment No. 1) for the importation of seed potatoes will be granted by theagricultural inspectors of the States of Amazon, Para, Pernambuco, Bahia,Sao Paulo, Santa Catarina, Rio Grande do Sul, and Matto Grosso.AUTHORIZED PORTS OF ENTRYThe entry of seed potatoes may be effected only through the ports of ManuasBelem, Recife, Sao Salvador, Rio de Janeiro, Santos, Sao Francisco do Sul,Rio Grande, Porto Alegre, and Corumba, where there are provisions for super-vision by the Plant Protection Service, as required by paragraph 2 of article 1,of the decree above mentioned.AVEnY S. HOYT,Acting Chief, Bureiu of Plant QuarantinC.B.P.Q.-357. DIcEMBER 1, 1938.PLANT-QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF ARGENTINAThis summary of the plant quarantine import restrictions of the Republic ofArgentina has been prepared for the information of nurserymen, plant quar-antine officials, and others interested in the exportation of plants an(d plant:products to that country.The summary was prepared by Harry B. Shaw, plant quarantine inspector-of the Bureau of Plant Quarantine, from his translations of the original texts,of Argentine plant quarantine decrees, and reviewed by the Direcci6n deDefensa Agricola y Sanidad Vegetal, Ministerio de Agricultura, Buenos Aires,Argentina.The information contained in this circular is believed to be correct and com-Vplete up to the time of preparation, but it is not intended to be used independ-ently of, nor as a substitute for, the original texts of the decree, and it isnot to be interpreted as legally authoritative. The decrees themselves shouldbe consulted for the exact text.AvERY S. HOYT,Acting Chief, Hurca, of Plant Quarantine.AUTHIuoZING ACTLaw No. 4084, July 3, 1902, authorizes the Executive of tie Argentine Republicto permit the importation of plants and seeds through such ports as he maydesignate. Plants and seeds, prior to entry, are subject to inspection, and, whennecessary, to disinfection or destruction as established by the regulations.CONCISE SUMMARYIM PoRTA'rION PB' ITElBamboo plants or parts thereof, including all ,enera anm species tf the tribeBambuseae. (Decree of Mar. 31, 1919.)Corn (Zea mays), both grain and plant in any state, including that used forpacking merchandise. (Decree of May 11, 1927.)Broonteorn, including seed and dried plant for inflistrial purposes. (Decreeof May 11, 1927.)Bananas and plantains, plants andI shoots. (Ministerial Resolution of Aug.28, 1928.)

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278 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct.-Dee.Guara: Imp in 'ortatin of the fruit prohibited. (Decree of Mar. 9, 1931.Art. 9.)Cottoilxrd 4 the species UONNy/piU barladeuse and G. p1ritrianum: Intro-duotion into the territory ol Chac' not permitted. (Decree of July 28, 1931.)',ccd8 of Sudan graso, Sorgo (siveet sorghum), and any other species of*sorglhum which contain seeds of SorIlhun lalpeasw. Importation prohibited.(Decree of Mar. 7, 1932.)Gramineous and legam inous :ccds which fall below the established tolerancesof germinability and purity are prohibited entry. (Decree of 'Mar. 7, 1932.)Sceds of the yencra: M dicago, Trifoliunti. Astragalus, Lotus, MelilOtus, andLupinus if found infested with Brichophayus funebris or B. gibbitus, are pro-hibited entry. (Decrees of July 5, 1915 and TMar. 7, 1932, as amended by thatof July 29, 1932.)IMPORTATION RESTRICTEDLice Iulants, p(wt, thl cPUf, win (1e7.-Each consignment must be accompaniedby If shipper's declaration of origin and a phytosanitary certificate (inspectionCertificate issued by competent authority of the country of origin, and visaedby the Argeninw cuisul nearest the place of embarkation. Upon arrival at theport of entry in Argentina the consignment will be subject to inspection and toaction in accordance with the result of the inspection. (Decrees of Aug.23. 1902, -May G. 19":2, and July 7, 1933.)Suqfaremwu.-Each consignment to be accompanied by a certificate of originssued by competent authority of the country of origin and visaed by the-Ar.a-intine consul. If admitted, the cane shall be quarantined for observation.(I~ecre of 'Mar. 17. 1919.)Pota toes.-Each consignment shall be accompanied by a certificate of " healthyorigin " and of " health ", visaed by the Argentine consul (decree of July 12,192:1). and ny b imported subject to inspection and the restrictions prescribedin the geiieral regnlations unler the decree of August 23, 1902. (Decrees ofJuly 12, 1923. tanid Oct. 3, 1930.)8eeds of plants which may be attacked by the European corn borer (PyraustaJU >iluli) may be introduced only through the port of Buenos Aires, and mustbe fumigated with hydrocyanic acid gas in vacuum. (Decree of 'May 11, 1927.)Scefis for industrial purposes.-The Direction General of Agriculture andAgricultural Protection is authorized to permit the introduction of seeds intended for industrial purposes without the disinfection required by article 2 ofthe dcecre of _May 11, 1927. (Decree of 'Mar. 7, 1931.)Frc sh frui/s.-Each consignment must be accompanied by a phytosanitarycertificate isued by authorized technical officials of the country of origin andvisuby the Argentine consuL (Decrees of Mar. 9, 'May 19, and July 14,1931, Aprit 8, 19:2, Feb. 24 and July 7. 1933.)Ap>;ples antd pears fron Nr ZXcalu .-Importation authorized through Ionte-vidleo. (Decrec of Julne 30. 1931.)Cottonsecd.-Clean seed in soldered metal containers will be permitted fromany source up to 10 kilograms of each variety for experimental sowing by theDirection General of Agriculture and Agricultural Protection, subject to dis-infection in vacuo before shipment and upon arrival in Argentina. (Decreesof June 30 and July 28, 1931.)Gro inCoUS anl legiminous seeds may be imported if found within the es-tablished tolerancees of germinability and purity. (Decree of 'Mar. 7, 1932. as1muended by that of July 29, 1932.)IMPORTATION OF PLANTS. SEEDS, AND FRUITS-GENERAL REGULATIONSTIhe lol iI ugul aI is wre Irom ulga i 1ted by the d ecr e f August 23, 1902:AUTHORIZED PORTS OF ENTRYAwricii 1. Plon/s: Buenos Aires. (Decree of Aug. 23, 1902.) The portsindicated below were authorized by silbsequent decrees as indicated:Ptn/Is: Bahia Blnica. (Decree of Aug. 31, 1911.)Plant prodlwut. from Chile via Cordillert : Rosario. (Decree of Oct. 30, 1926.)Plans of the qcnu. Citrus: Corrientes. (Decree of Apr. 30, 1907.)SeedN: Buenos Aires, Bahia Blanca, and Rosario. (Decree of July 5, 1915.)Foreign s1ed for sowing on the experimental farins of the faculty of agricul-ture, livestock, and related industries: Corrientes. (Decree of Jan. 26, 1922.)

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1933] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 279Fresh fruits: Buenos Aires and Rosario. Consignments imported throughMendoza, Posadas, and La Quiaca will be cleared at Buenos Aires. (Decree of Mar. 9,1931.)Apples and pears from New Zcalaind.: Montevideo. (Decree of June 30, 1931.)Potatoes: Buenos Aires. (Decree of July 12, 1923.)Rice: Pasos de los Libres. (Decree of June 23, 1922.)IMPORT PERMITS REQUIREDART. 2. Any person in Argentina who desires to import live plants, partsthereof, or seeds must apply to the Oficina de Sanidad Vegetal for a permit,furnishing the following information:(a) Name and address of importer.(b) Name of plant or seed.(c) Origin of the same, supported by the declaration of the seller and a certificate of competent auth ority.(d) Means by which the consignment will be imported (steamer, railroad,etc.).(e) Purpose for which imported (planting, sale, sowing, consumption).(f) When possible, the locality where it will be planted or sown.TREATMENT OF INFECTED OR SUSPECTED PLANTSART. 3. All plants, or parts thereof, which proceed from countries where anyinfection injurious to the agricultural interests of Argentina exists, or intowhich the introduction of plants may not have been regulated, shall beconsidered suspicious, and as such be subjected to the treatment and disinfec-tion deemed necessary by the Oficina de Sanidad Vegetal.ART. 4. All plants, or parts thereof, found to be attacked by any readilycommunicable injurious infection shall be refused entry or destroyed by fireif they cannot be effectively disinfected. Destruction shall not give rise toindemnification. If exportation is decided upon it must be effected immediatelyby the person concerned.CONDITIONS OF RELEASE FOR ENTRY INSPECTION CERTIFICATE REQUIREDART. 5. Plants or parts thereof which are not deemed suspicious and whichare not attacked by injurious diseases, or which are accompanied by healthcertificates issued by competent authority of the country of origin and visaedby the Argentine consul nearest to the place of origin, shall be admitted afterthe usual inspection.The decree of May 6, 1932, as amended by that of July 7, 1933, prescribesthat every consignment of plants or parts thereof intended for propagation orfor consumption shall be accompanied by an inspection certificate issued bycompetent authority of the exporting country and visaed by the Argentineconsul nearest to the port of embarkation. in order to be admitted into Argen-tina, but this requirement does not exempt such consignments from the inspec-tion, quarantine, rejection, and other provisions of law no. 4084 and itsregulatory decrees.ART. 6. For the present, plants from countries infested with phylloxera andSan Jose scale are declared to be of suspicious origin for the purpose of article3. Protective measures will he prescribed for other infections if deemednecessary.ART. 7. Plants and parts thereof. which in accordance with article 3 aredeclared suspicious, are divided into the following categories for treatment:(a) Live plants and cuttings (b) bulbs. tubers, and roots; (c) fruits andvegetables; (d) seeds.ART. 8. For treatment, live plants are divided into two groups: (1) Plantswith earth ; (2) plants without earth. Plants with earth will have their aerialparts disinfected: the subterranean parts and the soil will be treated withinsecticides. Plants without earth, and cuttings, will be completely disin-fected in all their parts by innersion or by exposure for a sufficient time tothe action of disinfectant fumes.ART. 9. Bulbs and turions (young scaly shoots, pips) must be deprived ofall their dead membranes (skin) and appendages, as well as of the adheringsoil, and be subjected to a disinfectant wash before being admitted. Tubers and roots will be admitted if found to be sound and free from soil, otherwisethey shall undergo a disinfectant wash or fumigation before being admitted.

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280 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct.-Dec.FRUITS AND VEGETABLESART. 10. This article is superseded by the decree of March 9, 1981, as amended,which regulates the importation of fruits and vetretables into Argentina.SEEDS SUBJECT '10 INSPECTIONART. 11. Seeds admitted into Argentina in great or small quantities alsoshall be inspected by the Phytopathologi-al Service (Oficina de Sanidad Vege-tal), which will permit unrestricted entry, require disinfection, or absolutelyrefuse entry in accordance with the results of the inspection in each case todetermine the character of the impurities they contain. (Decrees of July 5,1915; Mar. 7, 1932; and July 29, 1132.)ARTS. 12 and 13. Concern applications for import permits for plants andseeds.ART. 14. The inspection, and the disinfection which may have been required,having been accomplished, a certificate will be issued to the applicant to enablehim to withdraw his plants or a portion of them.Awrs. 15 and 16. Concern the disposal of smuggled plants, etc.INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATIONThe inspection and certification of plants or parts of plants offered for entry into the Argentine Republic, whether for propagation or consumption, isprescribed by the decree of May 6, 1932, as amended by that of July 7, 1933,as follows:ARTICLE 1. Every consignment of plants, or parts of plants, intended forpropagation or consumption, with the exception of the classes of productslisted below, shall be accompanied by a phyto-sanitary certificate issued bycompetent authority of the exporting country and visaed by the Argentine con-sul nearest the place of embarkation, in order to be admitted into the country.The following classes of products are exempt from the presentation of thesaid certificate:(a) Those which have been subjected to a process of industrialization (otherthan cooking) : Provided, That they come in suitable containers (prunes, dates,figs, and similar cured or dried products) ; (b) those which arrive for imme-diate roasting (coffee, cocoa, and similar products) ; (c) products that resultfrom milling (various flours, mill feeds, split or rolled grains, and similarproducts) ; (d) products intended for the cultivation of orchids and other anal-ogous purposes, as well as those intended for pharmaceutical uses (dryfibers, mosses, medicinal plants, and similar products) ; (C) those which arriveby international parcel post.ART. 2. The requirement of the preceding article does not exempt any con-signment of plants or their parts from the sanitary inspection, quarantine,rejection, or other requirements of law 4084 and its regulatory decrees, with theexception of the classes of products indicated in continuation, which shall, atthe same time, be exempt from the general quarantine inspection, since, arriv-ing in the condition specified, they cannot be carriers of pests:(a) Those which come in a suitably preserved condition (sirup, brine, andother similar products) ; (b) those which have been subjected to a process ofcooking and arrive in hermetically closed containers (peas, asparagus, tomatoes, and similar products).NoTE.-It is understood that certification is required of rice and similarcereals, and of raisins and nuts, as well as of plants and parts thereof.ART. 3. The text of the phytosanitary certificate may be that established as astandard in the International Convention for Plant Protection, Rome, 1929, orone of similar content, and it must indicate at least, the name of the exporterand of the consignee, class of product, place, and date of issuance of the cer-tiflcate.The certilicate ad opted as a standard in the International Convention forPlant Protection is as follows:(crtifica/e of iwnpeclion and originThe undersigned, (full name. official title, and address of agent authorized toissue the certificate), certifies, in conformity with the results of the inspection

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1933] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 281(1)' of the cultures of origin ; (2)' of the products included in the shipment,that the plants, or parts of plants, (Jescribed below are deemed free from dan-gerous diseases and pests, and especially from those hereafter enumerated.Description of shipmentNumber, weight, and kind of container.Marks on the container.Description of the plants, or parts of plants.Locality where grown.Full name and address of shipper.Full name and address of consignee.Place and date of issuance of certificate.PLANTS BROUGHT IN BY PASSENGERSPlants brought in by passengers will be subject to the general sanitary provi-sions set forth in the decree of August 23, 1902. (Decree of Aug. 13, 1917.)BAMBOO PROIIIBITED ENTRYThe introduction of plants and culms of bamboo of all genera and speciesincluded in the tribe Bambuseae is prohibited, to prevent the introduction ofbamboo smut (Ustilago shiraiana). (Decree of Mar. 31, 1919.)IMPORTATION OF CORN (ZEA MAYS) PROHIBITEDThe importation of any variety of maize is prohibited not only of the grain,but of the plant in any state, including that used as packing; and also the im-portation of broomcorn, either the seed or the dried plant for industrial uses,grown in any part of the world.Seeds of plants which may be attacked by the European corn borer (Pyraustarubilalis) may be imported only through the port of Buenos Aires. Although these seeds may be apparently in good sanitary condition, they must be sub-jected to a thorough disinfection in a vacuum for a minimum of 4 hours withthe strongest possible quantity of hydrocyanic acid gas.The list of plants attacked by the European corn borer is as follows:Plants severely attackedHemp (Cannabis sativa) DahliaHops (Hu ulus japonicus) SorghumRhubarb (Rheum rhaponticum) Millet (Echinochloa crusgalli cdulis)Plants frequently attackedBarley (Hordeum vulgare) Sunflower (Helianthus annu us)Beans (Phascolus spp.) Cowpeas (Vigna sinensis)Beets (Beta vularis crassa) Peppers (Capsicum annuum.)Celery (Apian yrareolens) Buckwheat (Fagopyrum, vu/gare)Chrysanthemum Artichokes, Jerusalem (HclianthusCotton (Gossypium hirsu imin) otuberosus)Potatoes (Solanum tuberosumn) Oats (Avena sativa)(not seed potatoes) Tomatoes (Lycopursicum esculentuma)Spinach (Spinacia oleracea)(Decree of May 11, 1927)The Direccion General de Agricultura y Defensa Agricola is authorized topermit the introduction of seeds intended for industrialization (manufacturingpurposes), exempting them from the disinfection in vacuum prescribed by7 Strike out the clause not required by the importing country.$ The indication of the names of plant diseases and pests enumerated in the officiallist of the importing country, and against which that country especially desires to protectitself, will be completed by the indication of any other special condition contingentlyrequired by the said country.

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282 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct.-Dec.article 2 of the decree of May 11, 1927. Such seeds shall unfailingly beproce'sssod in the establishment of the importinig firm under the direct super-visionI of I the Phytosanitary Olice of Importation and Exportation of Plantsand Seeds ( Oicina Sanitaria de imnportacidn y Exportaci6n de Plantas ySeiilhis), which shall in each case insiire the complete industrialization of theshipments to prevent the germs with which they nmay be attacked from beingdistributed in the cultures of the country. (Decree of Mar. 7, 1931.)BANANAS AND PLANTAINS PROHiBITEI) ENTRYThe introduction of plants and shoots of bananas and plantains into Argen-tina is prohibited as a precaution against the introduction of the fungusFu8eriumi cubcn c and other diseases of the banana. (Decree of Aug. 28, 1928.)REGULATIONS GOVERNING IMPORTATION OF FRESH FRUITSARTICLE 1. Every consignment of fresh fruits imported into the countryshall be accompanied by a phytosanitary certificate (inspection certificate),without which it will not be admitted. By phytosanitary certificate is under-stood that issued by technical officials authorized by the government of thecountry of origin, in which it is affirmed that the fruits are found to be appar-ently free from parasites, and which indicates the kind of fruit and name ofthe variety, the locality where grown (Province, State, etc.), the point of ship-ment, the vessel on which transported, the name of the consignee or of therepresentative of the forwarding agent in the port of destination (port ofarrival in Argentina), and the date of issuance of the certificate. This certifi-cate must be visaed by the respective Argentine consular official at the port ofshipment or at the nearest point.ART. 2. The importation of fruit in bulk is prohibited, with the exception ofbananas. The packing shall be done in the port of origin and the containers shall be of the standard types adopted by the fruit exporting countries.Apples, pears, oranges, mandarins, and lemons shall be wrapped in im-permeable paper of silky texture (oiled manila or sulphite or similar paper)on which the name or mark of the producer and the country of origin shallbe printed. The containers shall be marked to indicate the character of thecontents, class or variety, net weight or number of units, name and address ofthe grower, and the country of origin. (See exception in favor of barreledapples, decree of Feb. 24, 1933.)ART. 3. Consig-nments of fruits introduced into the country will be inspectedat the ports of arrival in accordance with the regulations under Law No. 4084.If inspection of the fruit reveals ample reason for suspecting them to be in-fested with any of the parasites indicated in article 4, the consignment will beplaced in quarantine, for such period as is deemed necessary by the Phyto-sanitary Office of Plant and Seed Importation (Oticina Sanitaria de Impor-taci6n y Exportaci6n de l'laPitas y Semillas), in localities indicated by theimporters, and which in the opinion of the office in question meets the re-quired conditions. If, as a result of the investigation carried on during thequarantine period, the existence of the parasites mentioned in article 4 is notestablished, the consignment will be released to the interested person.Awl. 4. In the event that any of the following parasites are found in a ship-ment, the en tire consiginment will be incinerated without right of indemnity,and the cost of transportation to the incinerator shall be borne by the importer.List ofi parasitesApple blotch, PhyIl1osticta solitaria; citrus tanker, Bacterium citri; Brownrot, Pythiacystis citrophthora; soft rot, ThiclaViOpIiS paradoLa; Mediterraneanfruit fly, Ceratitis capitata; apple curculio, (Anthonomus) Tachypterellusqua drigibb1s; an apple fruit miner, Ena rmonia prunirora; apple maggot, Rha-golctis pornoncilia; apl)le weeviI, Pseudanthonomils crataei; plum curculio,Conotrachclus nenuphar; orange tortrix, Toririx citraina; orange holcocera,Holcoccra iccryacella; orange platynota, Platynotla tiniwana; Arizona navelorange wvorm, M/ycloi8 vttipar8.ART. 5. Fruits fUnid to be attacked by other parasites known to be injurious,not included in the preceding article, will be rejected, and in case they cannotbe reshipped, they will be incinerated as provided in article 4.ART. 0. The importation of fruits mnay be effected only through the ports ofBuenos Aires and Rosario. Consignments imported through Mendoza, Posadas,

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1933] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 283and La Quiaca will be cleared at 1-lueis Aires or R iO. The customs willseal the cars on entry into Argentine territory. This proceduire will remainieffective until quarantine and disinfection services have been organized at thefrontier.ART. 7. This article originally provided for Ihe entry of the fruits amiedtherein during certain periods of each year, but it was revoked by t he decree ofApril 8, 1932, thus, in effect, providing for 1tle ijtrodu(t ion of fruits, 1(tvegetables at any period of the year.ART. 8. The importation of guavas is prohibited.ART. 9. Every consignment of apples and pears iii)ported miust be I ransportedin refrigeration chambers. (Decree of Mar. 9, 1981.)The importation is permitted of apples and pears iii bu-itel baskets or inbarrels of standard type. The paper wraps for these fruits shall he stamped(or printed) with the mark or name of the, packers or exporters. (Decrees ofMay 19, and July 14, 1931, and Feb. 24, 1933, exempting barrele(l fromthe United States from the requirement of paper wrappers.)The weight or volume of the contents shall le declared in the metric sytemon each container. (Decree of Sept. 18, 1931.)Paper wrappers not required for barreled apples from the United StalcsDecree No. 17614, of February 24, 1938, modifies that of Malirch , 1931. byexempting barreled apples exported from the United Stit's to Argeoitinia frontthe requirement of a waterproof tissue-paper wrapper for each apple.ARTICLE 1. Article 2 of the decree of March 9, 1931, i'.i modified, iii so far asit refers to the requirement of wrapping in waterproof stamped tissue papereach North American apple introduced into Argentina in barrels.ART. 2. Barreled apples which it is desired to introduce illto Argentina mustbe accompanied by an inspections certificate issue(l by competent authority ofthe respective State, and by a second certificate issued by experts of the UnitedStates Department of Agriculture. These certificates must be presented to theArgentine consul nearest to the point of embarkation for authenticaItion of thesignatures.ART. 3. Ten percent of the containers of every shipment of apples not exceed-ing 500 barrels, and 8 percent of the containers in excess of 500 barrels, shall beopened, without exception, for the customary inspection, at a place indicated bythe Oficina Sanitaria de Importaci6n y ExportaciOn de Plantas y Somillas.ART. 4. The inspection certiticates shall make special mention of the diseasesand pests indicated in regulation 4 of the decree of March 9, 1931.ART. 5. The only ports authorized for the entry of fruits under the provisionsof this decree are Buenos Aires, Rosario, and La Plata.A)ples and pears from New ZcuilawlSubject to the provisions of article 9 of the decree of March 9, 1931, theimportation is authorized of consignments of apples ai(I pears from NewZealand, transshipped at Montevideo to vessels of the Compania Ar mgentiia deNavigaci6n Ltd. (Decree of Junie 30, 1931.)RESTRICTIONS ON COTTONSEEDThe importation of cottonseed is permitted from amy source under thefollowing conditions:1. Only clean seed, free from winters and adhering fiber, may be imported.2. Containers shall be metal, completely soldered.3. Before shipment each consignmient shall be disinfected iii vacuum and shallbe accompanied by a certificate to that effect, issued by authorized technicalofficials of the government of the country of origin, and visaed by the respectiveArgentine consul.4. The seed shall be disinfected in vacuum again oii arrival in Argentina.(Decree of June 30, 1931.)5. The quantity is limited to 10 kilograms of each variety and the seedmay be imported only for experimental sowing under the supervision of theDirection General of Agriculture and Agricultural Protection.6. The introduction into the Province of Chaco of cottonseed of varieties ofthe species Gossypium barbadense and G. peruvianuni will not be permitted.7. When it is desired to introduce cottonseed of long staple varieties, uplandtype (intermediate), for planting in Chaco, in addition to the provisions of the

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284 BUTEAU OF PLANT QUARANTiNE [Oct.-Dec.decree of June 30, 1931. a certificate of origin is required indicating the name-of the variety and place of production. The Direction General will decide-whether or not it is proper to permit its introduction for such purpose. (Decreeof July 28, 1931.)REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE IMPORTATION OF POTATOESCertificates requiredEach consignment of potatoes imported into Argentina from a foreign countryshall be accompanied by a certificate of sanitary origin and by a phyto-sanitary certificate (inspection certificate).These certificates shall be issued by specialists authorized by the govern-ment of the country of origin.The certificate of sanitary origin shall certify that the planting or groundin which the potatoes were grown is in good sanitary condition and shallindicate the date of digging, the quantity or weight of the potatoes representedby the certificate, and the name of the grower and of the consignee.The plytosanitary certificate shall affirm that the potatoes are found appar-ently free from pests and diseases; indicate the quantity or weight, marks,name of the vessel on which shipped, the name of the consignee or representa-tive of the shipper, the country of destination, and the date of issue. Theinspection upon which the certificate is based shall not be made until at least1 month has elapsed after the date of the certificate of sanitary origin.The above-mentioned certificates shall be visaed by an Argentine consul, and the potatoes shall be inspected at the port of arrival in Argentina.If inspection shows the potatoes to be in good sanitary condition their entrywill be permitted, but if as a result of the inspection not exceeding 10 percentof ie tubers are found to be attacked by any pest or by any disease of aninfectious character, a selection and separation of the tubers will be effected,infected tublers being destroyed and the remainder (isinfected, at the expenseof the importer.If the percentage of infected tubers is greater than 10, the importer may electto have them reladen or to have them incinerated at his own expense within3 days of notifleation.Any shipment of potatoes which arrives infested with a parasite which doesnot exist in Argentina will be rejected and the importer must immediatelyrelade it or have it incinerated.The only authorized port of entry for potatoes is Buenos Aires. Consignmentsof potatoes not accompanied by the required certificates will not be admitted.(Decree of July 12, 1923.)Shipments of potatoes offered for entry into Argentina will be subject to theinspection and other procedure prescribed in the general regulations under lawno. 4084, as set forth in the decree of August 23, 1902. (Decree of Oct. 3,1930.)SUGARCANEARTICLE 1. Every shipment of sugarcane plants or cuttings offered for intro-(liuctioll into Arentin., besides meeting the general conditions, shall be ac-companied by a ctrtilicate of origin issued by competent authority and visaedby 1he Argentine consul in the country of origin. If not bearing the said certi-fieate, the shipment shall be rejected by the sanitary authorities.AunT. 2. Besides the above-mnentioned certificate, and, with or without it, everyshipmeient of sugar rca ne plants which reaches Argentina for importation shallbe subjected to a quaralitine during which the sanitary observations and opera-tions which the technical offices deem necessary shall be carried out, toguarantee the purposes upon which this resolution is based, namely, to preventthe introduction of pests and diseases of the sugarcane. (Decree of Mar.17, 1919.)IMl'Ol)TATION OF PLANTS OF YERBA MATE PROHIBITED INTO THE PROVINCE OF TUCUMANThe Governor of the Province of Tucuman, by the decree of June 12, 1929,prohibited the importation into that Province of Paraguay tea (yerba mate,Ilex paragueiisis) of any variety from any source. The importation of the seedsof this plant will be carried out by the agricultural experiment station ofTucuman, subject to disinfection with a 2-percent caustic potash solution for12 hours.

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19331 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 285RESTRICTIONS ON THE IMPORTATION OF LEGUMINOUS AND GRAMINEOUS SEEDSThe decree of July 5, 1915, provides for the sampling of leguminous andgramineous seeds offered for ('1 try into Ile Ar til iilmepii, tam1t for theissuance of certificates of analysis based upon lamiples witlidrawn from i(eaohshipment.The same decree provides for the cleaning of shipments of such seeds whichfall below the )rescrilbIed tolerances of germinability and purity amd prescribesthat seeds which, after beini cleaned, still remain 1lwow the establi ishedtolerances, shall be reembarked or destroyed without right of iiidenity.The decree of March 7, 1932, supplements that of July 5, 1915, by nmi B ifyvin Kand extending the scOp) of the hiter. T of the of the decree of .Jlv 1.,,1915, as amended by that of March 7, 1932, follows:ARTICLES 1. 2, and 3. Revoked by the (elr(w of Mlurch 7, 1932.ART. 4. (7ertifiates of analysis of alfalf seed rolatinig to the establishedtolerances will be issued :(aI) Not certifying more i an the con(litions found " withill the tOliranc'sand it for sowing ", iii cases where tOle alfalfa seed Ilocs not con alin moreCuscuta ", and " other harmful seeds ", or lower " cultural value " than istolerated (see art. :) o; the (1O(ree of Mar. 7, 1932), neverthele being able toindicate the peret , a_ f germination in order to illustrate better to theintereste(l er.on.(b) When alfalfa seeds exeed one of the established tolnriicw heyey will beindica tetl as "h le d the limits of toleration " .(c) The '" nuie of Cut t seeds ". percentage of " ot her I , armful s(s "germinabiiity ", or freedom from Cu-cu.N/a or other harmiful seds, and" aspossessing the guarantee d cultural value will be certified ; it will also beindicated whether or not they are fit for sowing in accordance with tlie toler-ances established by article 3 of the (lecre of March 7, 1932, when alfalfa seedis offered for sale under guaranty of "absolute purity ", or with the minimalpurity by specifying in tern>of " Cuscuta " or " other harmful ses '' andc nlturil value " not inferior 0 the guaranty and within the etablislied toler-ances, for which the corresponding sample must be delivered to the Direcci6nGeneral de Agricultura y Defensa Agricola, sealel and signed by 1he vendorand purchaser or interested person, by witnessewho represent or accept theparties, or by officials of the Department of Agriculture, whose testimony shallaccompany the sample, as likewise a copy of the guaranty, which shall befiled in the said division in cases in which it is necessary to mediate asarbitrator.AnT. 5. The ports authorized for the importation of alfalfa seed are Bu'enosAires, Rosario. and Bahia Blanca.ART. G. The ports authorized for the importation of seeds are those indi-cated in the preceding article. This applies to all classes of >eeds.ART. 7. An application will be presented by the importer or his representativefor each importation of seeds; the application shall indicate the origin, thename of the exporting firm. kind and quantity by weight, numbers and marksof the containers of the seed, name of vessel on which it will arrive, port ofarrival, name and address of consignee. The application, accompanied by thecertificates of origin, health, and disinfection which the shipments bear, willbe delivered to the Oficina Sanitaria de Iniportaci6n de Plantas in the port ofentry, or in the absence of such an office, to an official of the Direcci6n deDefensa Agrfcola y Sanidad Vegetal, who is in charge of importation and ex-portation, and in case one has not been designated, to the collector of customsat the said port. who will proceed to draw samples; sending them direct to the"DivisiOn de Fomento" of the said Direcci6n, with the corresponding docu-ments, for analysis and the issuance of the certificate, and in which. upon theorigin of the sample from the corresponding shipment being attested, the dockor pier and the depository in which it is found, will be indicated in order thatthe transmittal of the certificate of analysis may be made direct to the chiefof the latter, from which will be decided whether or not the importation willbe permitted.ART. 8. In cases where certificates of analysis of shipments of alfalfa seedto be imported shall indicate a " Cuscata content " and " cultural value ", greaterand less, respectively, than the tolerances (established by art. 3 of the decree of Mar. 7, 1932), the importers or duly authorized representatives may electthe relading, destruction without indemnity, or an attempt to clean the seed(decuscutage), and the winnowing in a warehouse or depository authorized

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286 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct.-Dec.by the Ministry for those operations, in order to try to obtain the toleratedpercentages, for which purpose the entry for clearance through the customsand the treatment of the corresponding seed will be permitted under the custodyof the customs officials and for the account of the importer.I during the operations, whatever the result may be, the residuum will beburned as produced without giving rise to any indemnity : since the interestedperson or his duly authorized representative has resorted to this privilege, hewill have abandoned his rights in the application which had to be made forcleaning.If. as a result of the cleaning or winnowing, tolerances are obtained which:iuthorize importation, a dlelivery order will be issued to the authorizeddepository for the release of the shipment, the cleaned shipment thus beingdefinitely admitted. and a record will be left in the corresponding file of theoperations and aniwlyses effected, etc.In the event that the attempts to clean do not yield the results sought, theinterested person will be notified of the results of the analysis and a relading or-der will be issued through the customs authorities, unless destruction is author-ized in writing by the Oficina Sanitaria de Importaci6n de Plantas y Semillas,in which case, besides the record in the file, the office mentioned will issue to thea-uthorized depository a certificate of release for destruction.If, after the lapse of 15 days from the date of notification of the interestedperson, none of the procedures above indicated has been followed, it will be doemed that he has abandoned his rights and the office mentioned will proceed tode>troy the seed by burning and will make affidavit accordingly.ART. 9. The entry and the relading of shipments of alfalfa seeds for cleaning,discussed in the pre(cding article, will he authorized through the port of BuenosAires only.ART. 10. (As amended by art. 4 of the decree of Mar. 10, 1926) : The introduc-tion into the country of seeds of toothed bur clover, Medicago (dentiaulata)hispida, and spotted bur clover, M. (waculata) arabica, is prohibited.The text of the decree of March 7, 1932, which amends and supplements thatof July 15, 1915. follows:ARTICLE 1. Subject to the provisions of law no. 4084, the importation of seedsof forage plants is prohibited. as detailed in article 2, when from the physico-botanical analysis, which will be made in each case by the Direction of Agricul-tural and Animal Industry Laboratory and Research (Direcci6n de Laboratorioe Investigaciones Agricolo-Ganaderas), it is deduced that they are adulterated orof inferior quality for sowing, in accordance with the present regulations.Air. 2. The Direction of Agriculture (Direcci6n de Agricultura), in accordancewith the provisions established by the decree of July 15, 1915, which is main-tained insofar as it is not opposed to the present decree, will proceed with thewithdrawal of samples from shipments of seeds of leguminous and gramineousforage plants which are imported:Legumes: Anthyllis vulneraria, sand clover; Hedysarum coronarium, Frenchhoneysuckle; Lotus corniculatus, birdsfoot trefoil; Lotus uliginosus, British boglotus; Medi cago lupulina, yellow trefoil; Medicago sativa, alfalfa; Melilotusalba, white sweetclover ; Melilotus alba var. annua, Hubam clover ; Orndthopussativus, serradella; Onobrychis viciaefolia, sainfoin; Trifolium alexandrinum,Alexandrian clover; Trifolium fragiferum, strawberry clover; Trifolium hy-bridum, alsike clover ; Trifolium incarnatum, crimson clover ; Trifolium pra-tense, red clover; Trifolinm repens, white clover.Grasses: Agrostis (alba) palustris, redtop; Alopecurus pratensis, meadowfoxtail; ArrhenatheruL olatius, tall oatgrass; Aven a spp., oats; Bronusinermis, common bromegrass; Bromus unioloides, rescue grass; Chloris gayana,Rhodes grass; Capriola (Cynodon) dactylon, Bermuda grass; Cynosurus cris-ta/us, crested dogfail; Dactylis glomerata, orchard grass; Eragrostis abyssinica,teff ; Festuca pratcnsis, meadow fescue; Festuca ovina, sheep's fescue; Festucarubra, red fescue ; Horcdcum vulgare, barley ; Lolium (italicum) multiflorum,Italian ryegrass; Lolium perenine, perennial ryegrass; Pan icum miliaccum,broomcorn millet ; Phalaris stcnoptera, Peruvian winter grass ; Phiunt pratense,timothy; Poa pralensis, Kentucky bluegrass; Poa tririalis, rough bluegrass;Secale cereale, rye ; Ch actochloa (Sotaria) italica, millet ; Hlu1us sorghum(vulgaro) var. siccharatis, sorgo (sweet sorghum) ; Holcus sorghum (vidgare)var. sudunen siN, Sudan grass.ART. 3. Leguminous seeds will be examined for their real value, cultural orfor use, and the content of foreign seeds, proceeding to reject every shipmentin which the following conditions are found

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1938] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 287(a) When the cultural value of alfalfa seed is less than 85 percent, with apurity of 98 percent.(b) When seeds of white clover, red clover, crimson clover, alsike clover,strawberry clover, Alexandrian clover, yellow trefoil, French hoieysuckle, and sand clover, have a cultural value of less than 75 percent.(c) When the cultural value of seeds of white sweetclover, lubam clover,and serradella, is less than 70 percent.(d) When the cultural value of birdsfoot trefoil, British bog lotus, andsainfoin is less than G0 percent.(e) When leguminous seeds of any species contain more than 10 Cusctaiaseeds per kilogram of seed.(f) When they contain more than one half of 1 percent by weight of weedseeds, considering as such those corresponding to all species of uncultivatedplants, or attest that the seeds have been subjected to a mechanical treatmentto modify their appearance or their constitution.ART. 4. The seeds of gramineous forage plants mentioned in article 2 vill besubjected to a determination of their germinability and content of foreignseed, proceeding to reject those found in the following conditions:(g) *When the seeds of oats, barley, rye, timothy, and teff have a germiiabilityof less than 80 percent.(h) When the seeds of rescue grass, orchard grass, meadow fescue grass,redtop, ryegrass, broomcorn millet, sorgo (sweet sorghum) , and Sudan grasshave a germinability of less than 70 percent.i) When the seed of tall oatgrass, common broiegirass, crested dogtailgrass, sheep's fescue grass, Peruvian winter grass, and rough bluegrass have agerminability of less than 60 percent.(j) When the seeds of meadow foxtail, Bermuda grass, red fescue grass, andKentucky bluegrass have a germinability lower than 50 percent.(k) When Rhodes grass contains less than 500,000 germs per kilogram ofseeds.ART. 5. All gramineous seeds which contain more than 1 percent, by weight,of weed seeds, will be rejected; also when they contain more than 3 percent,by weight, of seeds of other cultivated species of plants, their importation isstill prohibited, even in the case of special mixtures, as forage or for turf.Mixtures of Loliun perenne with L. italicum and those of different speciesof the genus Poa, are excepted from these provisions.ART. 6. The importation of seeds of Sudan grass and sorgo (sweet sorghum)and of any other species of sorghum which contain fruits of Sorghun halpense,is prohibited.ART. 7. No shipment of alfalfa seed may be introduced into the countryunless at least 1 percent of the contents of each container be colored as follows:(1) Alfalfa seed from European countries by an alcoholic solution of crystalviolet (1/2 percent).(2) Alfalfa seeds from other countries or regions shall be colored with malachite green (1 percent).(3) The coloring materials, which may be those above indicated, or otherswhich produce equal coloration to those established, shall be applied in such amanner that the colored seeds are distributed as uniformly as possiblethroughout the package.ART. 8. Each combined sample taken for analysis in accordance with theprovisions of these regulations shall represent not more than 200 sacks orcontainers of the same mark and shall be withdrawn by taking partia) samplesin the following proportions:(1) When the shipment comprises a single lot of 5 containers or less,a sample will be taken from each container to form the combined sample.(2) In shipments comprising a lot of more than 5 containers and less than30 a sample will be taken from every second container, but never fewer than5 containers shall be sampled.(3) When the shipment comprises a lot exceeding 30 containers and notmore than 50, samples will be taken from every third container, but thecombined sample shall never be drawn from fewer than 15 containers.(4) If the lot exceeds 50 containers samples shall be taken from 30 percentof them.(5) When a shipment comprises various lots, samples will be drawn frUmeach lot separately in the manner indicated in sections 1, 2, 3. and 4.ART. 9. Three combined samples thus formed will be taken ; one for theDirecci6n de Laboratorios e Investigaciones Agricolo-Ganaderas del Ministerio

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288 'REAU OF PLANT QUAIANl\ 1N E [Oct.-Dec.de Agricultura ; the second for the Oficitnia Sanitaria de la Direcci6n deAricititiura: the third will be retained by the interested person, the samplesbeillg seld in the preence of the hitter or his representative.AitT. 10. Legumiiious seeds of the following genera : Medicago, Trifolium,Astraga/ax. Lotus, i1lilolus, and Lupiuus, with all their species, subspecies,varieties, aid hybrids, which may be attacked by the parasites Bruchophagusfnicbris and B. gibbuN shall coie packed in double sacks and be disinfectedin vacuo before shipment and shil be accompanied by the correspondingcertificate of disinfection, issued by technical officials of the country oforitiin and visaed by the Argentine consul in that count ry.AlrT. 11 (A' llijti lid by lie l Ief ( of Jul. 2. 1932) : Ill the event that thePrstun ie of Brchoph / t fUn A briN or B. t/ibl)1IIs is I t eil ill shipments of thesed menti ioned ill1 te precediling article in the larval, iynymdih. or adult stage,tliey will be at elnce i eembilczrked. their entry into the country not beingped'rimlil ed.,A-. 4. Sujppleimeiit No, 7. DECE-MBER 20. 1933.PLANT-QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS, REPUBLIC OF MEXICORESTRIcTONS ON T1E IMPORTATION OF WHEAT TO PREVENT THE INTRODUCTION OFFLAG-SM U T AND TARE-ALL DISEASES OF WHEATArticle 1 of the presidential decree of July 23, 1931 (see P.Q.C.A.-284,uhpl0Imet No. 5), provides thit " tle Department of Agriculture and PublicWorks is authorized to dictate special provisions which may protect theiiatioiil agriculture against invasion by the said agricultural diseases, indicat-ing for that purpose, in lists that will be pIubli'shd in the Official Journal ofthe Federation, the countries or localities which, as being affected, should besuijected to special provisions."Iii the absence of any statement of the special provisions above referred to,inquiry through the Office of Agricultural Protection of the above-namedDeparilltment elicits the inforlvitiOl that-"To permiit the iltrodwltion into our country ( Mexico) of the seed (wheat)proceeding from the places Hamled in the resolution cited (July 30, 1931, seePI.Q.C.A.-284, Supplement No. 5) a permit from this Department is required,and also a certificate signed by the sanitary authorities of the country oforigin, visaed by our consul, which shall accompany the merchandise. Thecertificate shall affirm that in the locality where it was grown the wheat wasnut infected by the diseases referred to."AvE1Y S. HOYT.Acting Chief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.P.Q.C.A.-827. Snlement No. 1. DEcEMBER 20, 1933.PLANT QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS, ENGLAND AND WALESIMPORTATION PROHIBITE F1) ALL SP'1IES OF ULM 0US, ABIES, LARIX, PICEA, PINUS,PSEUIoTSUGA, SEQOTA, THUJA, AND TSUGAThe rit b I i immi'ation of Elm Trees and Conifers (prohibition) order ofOctober 24, 193: effective December 1, 1933, prescribes that:For the prevention of the introduction of diseases and pests inijuriouls toelm trees and forest trees, the landing in England or Wales from any othercountry than Scotland, Northern Ireland, the Irish Free State, the Isle of Man,or the Chlianel Islands, of aiiy liviiig plant of aniy of the genera mentionedin tho schedule to this order is hereby prohibited.The word " plant " includes tree and shrub, and the roots, layers, cuttings,and other parts of a plant.RESTRICTION ON IMPORTATION OF PLANTSThe certificates prescribed in article 4 of the Importation of .Plants Order of1933 (see pp. 3 and 4 of Memorandum to Inspectors in Charge of July 13, 1933,Plant Quarantine Restrictions of England and Wales Revised) shall, except in

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1933] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 289the case of a consignment consisting wholly of potatoes. include a statement tothe effect that the consignment does not contain any plant of any of the generamentioned in the said schedule. If the plants mentioned in the said schedule are landed in England or Walesin contravention of this order, they shall forthwith be destroyed or reexportedat the expense of the importer, unless they are otherwise disposed of inaccordance with the terms of a license issued by the Minister of Agri-ultureand Fisheries or by an inspector, and any person failing to comply with theterms of a license granted under this article shall be lible to a penliv notexceeding 10 pounds, or, in respect to a second or subsequent offen e, to apenalty not exceeding 50 pounds.Scheu dtleAll species of the genus tlius .The following genera of the Order Pinaceae viz, Abies, Larix, Picea, Pinus,hxctadotsuga, Sequoia, Tliuja, and Tsua.AVERY S. HOYT,A cting Chiief, Bureau of Plant Quarantine.P.Q.C.A.-315, Supplement No. 2. DECEMBER 20, 1933.PLANT QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS, KINGDOM OF BELGIUMIMPoRTATIoN o1 IEsIH CHERI REGULATEDThe decree of the Belgian Minister of Agriculture of May 14, 1032, prescribesthat:1. The importation of fresh cherries into Belgium from France, Germany, andItaly is permitted only when an inspection iade at the expense of theimporter by the Belgian phytopathological authorities shows the shipment tobe free from the cherry fruit fly, Rhayolctis cerasi.2. Importation may be effected only through the customs offices of Erque-linnes, Montaleux (Mouscron), Montzen, Antwerp (office no. 4), and Brussels(offices nos. 1 and 3).Shipments arriving at Erquelinnes, Montaleux (Mouscron), and Montzenfound to be infested with Rhagolc ti .c rva.i will be sent back. Those foundat Antwerp and Brussels to be infested with this, pest will be burned at theexpense of the importer.IMPORTATION PROHIBITED OF POTATOES, EGGPLANTS, AND TOMATOES FRoM FRANCEThe order of the Belgian Minister of Agriculture of April 18, 1032, prohibitsthe importation into Belgium of potato tubers or plants, and of fruits orplants of eggplants and( tomatoes originating or proci elinfrom Fra nce, butadlmits those products from other countries when each shipment is accom-panied by a certiflvate affirming that the products were grown in a localityfree from the Colorado beetle, Leptinotar-a (1'-( -in' a.The regtihttions, promulgated under the above order on the >ame dateprescribe that:The importation of these products from countries other than France ispermitted -only when a certificate issued by the official plant protection serviceof the country of o rigin is, presented at the cristoms 111. e, naning the countryof origin of the products, and expressly affirming that they were grown inand proceed from a locality more than 20 kilometers (istant from aiiy culture attacked by the Colorado beetle, Leptinolaia decendia aiata, and potato wart,Synchytriium endobioticum.Thc regulation concerning the distance from foci of infestation with Coloradobeetle is compulsory. With respect to foci of potato wart, the importationof potato tubers is permitted when their p fe 1 origin is less than 20kilometers, but not less than 500 meter, tlioefren. on condition that thecertificate in question, in which the circumstances are established, also certifiesthat the shipment was inspected by the above-mentioned plant protectionservice and was found free. from potato wart.According to the case, two certificates may be pre-ented-one In Coloradobeetle, and the other on potato wart.The reentry of shipments of this kind also is subject to inspection by theBelgian Phytopathological Service.

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290 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct.-Dec.A1TlIORIZED PoRTS OF ENRYIlmportItionl of shipments of these products may be effected by water onlythrough the customs ports of Antwerp, Bruges, Brussels, Ghent, Liege, Ostend,and Zeebrugge.ShipmenTs not accompanied by the prescribed certificates will be reladen,unless an inspection made by the special Belgian Phytopathological Service.it tle expense of the importers shows them to be free from Colorado beetle.AvERY S. HOYT,Acting Chticf, Burcau of Plant Quarantine.OCToBER 2. 1933.INSPECTOR IN CH ARGE:OFFICIAL PLANT INSPECTION SERVICE INSTITUTED IN HUNGARYThrough decree no. 49,000/1932 VII-3, of August 18, 1932. the HungarianMini-ter of Agriculture instituted a national organization of plant protection,including provisions for the inspection and certification of plants for exporta-tion. A list of officials authorized to sign such certificates accompanied thedecree. In view of the above, this office recognizes Hungary as a country thatmaintains inspection and the name of that country will be included in the listunder appelix B to Quarantine No. 37 in the next revision of that quarantine.The names and official status of the Hungarian officials who are authorizedto sign inspection certificates follow:Kern IIeriiiain, director of agricultural experimental research.I )ak6 Gab6r, director of agricultural experimental research.Dr. Kidoesa Gyula, first associate director of agricultural experimentalresearch.Csete 1i ndor, second associate director of agricultural experimental research.Dr. Snintha LUtszlo, second associate director of agricultural experimentalresearch.Gyorffy Jenii, second associate director of agricultural experimental research.Ger6 ZolItn, second associate director of agricultural experimental research.Sztehl( Iertalaii, inspector of viticulture anl viniculture.Dr. VC-ghelyi Lajos, associate, agricultural experimental research.Kiw pnoty Gyula, inspector-general of horticulture.Dr. Krenner J6zsef Andor, assistant, agricultural experimental research.IFj. Tab; ijdi Ki hiam, a sistant, agricultural experimental research.Koni I sy Gyirgy, technical assistant.Dr. Szelinyi (usztv. technical assistant.Dr. Barra Isivan, technical assistant.Dr. Csorba Zoltiln, technical assistant.I linfuer Knuliim, technical assistant.E. R. SASSCER,In Charge. Division of Foreign Plant Quaran ines.PENALTIES IMPOSED FOR VIOLATIONS OF THE PLANTQUARANTINE ACTAco1dig I reports received Iby the Bureau during the period October 1to Dcceiber 1, 1988, peiia ties have recently been imposed by the properF"ed4ra i aithrities for violations of t1ie Plailt Quarantine Act, as follows:JAPANESE-BEETLE QUARANTINEiin tw i aite l / d ut .v. L. F. Stotit, Cliarluttvsyille, Va., in theinterstate 1ran portati n of 3 p itted ferins and 1 Imlncli of cut flowers from apoints il t iie r1 r("a to a puinit outside thereof, without inlspectioii andcertificrtinn, the (lefeldfl int pleaded uilty and was filed $10.

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1933] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 291QUARANTINES AFFECTING MEXICAN AND CANADIAN PRODUCTSIn the case of the United States versus the pers(Ons listed below, fur attempt-ing to smugl in contraband plant material, the penalties indicated wereimposed by the United States customs officials at the following ports:Name Port Contraband PenaltyClotilde Escamilla-----------Brownsville, Tex---------2 oranges--------------------------$.00C. Ramirez------------------------do--------------------3 avocados with seed---------------I 5.00Robert Garcia----------------(0-----------------2 guavas--------------------------. .00Eduardo A. Martinez-------Calexico, Tex------------6 pieces sugarcane-------------------1 1.00Casimiro Espinoza---------Eagle Pass, Tex---------7 avocados--------------------------.70Domingo Perez------------Iildalgo, Tex------------3 avocados with seed----------------1.00Mrs. A. Pohl--------------Blaine, Wash.-----------2 dozen carnation plants ----------5.00

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LIST OF CURRENT QUARANTINES AND OTHER RESTRICTIVEORDERS AND MISCELLANEOUS REGULATIONS'Th c Iestic nd lureign qua rzi ine and i ir -rstricivi ir 'rs s m i n i zn d Irinare issued under th( authority of the plant quarantine act of Aug. 20, 1912, as amended.The Mexiennnrd'er rmzulations and the export-certification regulations are issued undersp C ritic cts o i 2n r >s.1QUARANTINE ORDERSThe n umbers a signed l tesv a es inidiu te mierely the chroiiologicalorder o0 isSulice of I'oth, domestic and Ioreign quarantines ill one numericalseries. The qua rant ine numbers missing in this list are qua'rantines which haveeither bet superseded or revoked. For convenience of reference these quaran-tines are here classified as domestic anl foreign, the domestic quarantines beingdivided into (1) those applying primarily to the c ntinental United States, and(2) those applying primarily to shipments from and to the Territories of Hawaiiand Puerto Rico.DOMESTIC PLANT QUARANTINESQUARANTINES APPLYING TO THE CONTINENTAL UNITED STATESDate palms.-Quarantine No. G, effective March 24, 1913, as amended ef-fective December 1, 1932: Prohibits, except as provided in the rules andregulations supplemental thereto, the interstate movement of date palms anddate-palm offshoots from Riversid. County, Calif., east of the San Bernardinomeridian ; Imperial County, Calif.: Yumna, Maricopa, and Pinal Counties, Ariz.;anl Webb County, Tex., on account of the Parlatoria scale (Parlatoriablanchardi).Black-stc'm rust.-Quarantine No. 38, revised, effective August 1, 1931: Pro-hibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental theretoeffective August 1. 1981, the immeemnr into any of the protected States, naiely,Colorado, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa. Michigan. Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska,North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, Wisconsin, and Wyoming, as well athemovenhent fiom any one of said protected States into any other protected State,f the o mmon barberry (Berberis vuigaris), or other species of Berberis oriJaho iUh or parts thereof capable of propagation, on account of the black-stemrust of grains.(/.t!JIy'moth and brown-tail moth.-Quarantine No. 45, effective July 1, 1920:Prohibits, except ,s provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thercto,r vised effetivo June 1, 1981, the movement interstate to any point outside ofthe infested area, or from points in the generally infested area to points in thelightly invested area, of stone or quirry products, and of the plants and theplant products listed therein. The quarantine covers Rhode Island and partsof the States of Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, andVermont.Japanese betl.-Quarantine No. 4q, revised, effective January 1, 1933: Pro-hIbits, except us pi ovit ld in the rules a n I regubin supplemental thereto,ef ctive Decemite' 1, 19:1, the interstate movement of (1) fruits and vegetables;(2) nursery, ornaimen al, and greenhouse stock and other plants ; and (3) sand,soil, earth, peat, compo, and manure, from the quarantined areas to orthrough any point ou ,i I thereoL The quarantined area includes the entireSta tes of Massachusetts, Rhode Islind, Connecticut, New Jersey, and Delaware,and the Distrnet of Columbia, and portions of the States of Maine, New lamp-shIre, Aermnt, New York, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia, and West Virginia.Pbl: 1 lwil/ll.-Quarantine No. 52, revised, effective December 23, 103:Prohibits, except 5s provided in the rules and regulations supplenental thereto,effective December 23, 1988, the interstate movement from the regulated areasof Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, Florida, and Georgia, of (1) cotton, wildcot ton, inelut ling all parts of either cotton or wild cotton plants, seed cotton,:otton lit, lint ers, and all other forms of umnianu factured cotton fiber, gin292

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1933] SERIVIClE AND l1 (I UL 1ATOUY ANNOUNCED ENTS 293waste, cottonseed, cottonseed bulls, cottonseed cake and meal; (2) baggingand other containers and wrappers of cotton and co ton proIut s; (3) railwaycars, boats, and ot-her vehicles which have becn used in conveying Cotton orcotton products or which are fouled with such pro( Wes; (4) iay and otherfarm products; and (5) farn household goods, fain equipment, and, if con-taminated with cotton, any other articles.St tin moth.-Quarainiiiie _No. 53, revised, effectie January 1, 1029: Pro-hibits, except as provided it, the rules and regulations suippctieit al thereto,revised effective 1 eceember 1, 1931, the interstate movement to points outsideof the regulated areas in Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Ailas-aclhusetts,Rhode Island, Connecticut, and Washington, of all species or varieties ofpoplar and willow trees or parts thereof capable of propagation.Thurbcria weevil.-Quarantine No. 61, revised, effective August 1, 1q27:Prohibits the interstate movement of Thurberia, including all parts of the plant, from any point in Arizona, and prohibits, except as provided in therules and regulations supplemental thereto, effective October 2, 1933, the inter-state movement from the regulated area of Arizona of (1) cotton, includingall parts of the plant, seed Cotton, cotton lint, linters, and all other formsof unmanufactured cotton lint, gin waste, cottonseed, cottonseed hulls, andcottonseed cake and meal; (2) bagging and other containers and wrappersof cotton and cotton products; (3) railway cars, boats, and other vehicleswhich have been used in conveying cotton and cotton products, or which arefouled with such products ; (4) hay and other farmi products; id (5) farmhousehold goods, farm equipment, and, if contaminated with cotton, any otherarticles.Narcissus bulbs.-Quarantine No. 62, effective July 15, 1926: Prohibits,except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto, revisedeffective May 15, 1928, and amended effective June 20, 1932, the interstatemovement from every State in the continental United States and the Districtof Columbia of narcissus bulbs, on account of certain injurious bulb pests,including the greater bulb fly (Merodon equestris Fab.), the lesser bulb fly(Eumerus strigatus Fallen), and the bulb eelworm (Tylenchus dipsaci Kuehn).White-pine blister rust.-Quarantine No. 63, effective October 1, 1926: Pro-hibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto,revised effective January 1, 1933, the interstate movement from every Statein the continental United States and the District of Columbia of 5-leafed pines(Pin us) or currant and gooseberTy plants (Ribes and Grossularia) includingcultivated or wild or ornaental sorts.Mexican fruit Itrrn.-Quarantine No. 64, effective August 15, 1927: Pro-hibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto,revised effective September 1, 1932, the interstate movement from the regu-lated area of Texas of fruits of all varieties.Woodgate rust.-Quarantine No. 65, effective November 1, 1'28: Prohibits,except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental twereto, effectiveNovember 1, 1928, amended effective April 1, 1920, l minter-tale movementfrom the regulated area in the State of New York of trees, branches, limbs,or twigs of Scotch pine (Pinus sylvestris), Canary Islaild pine (P. canariecsis),Slash pine (P. caribaca), Japanese red pine (P. dcnsi/loru), Corsican pine (P.nigra poiretiana), Sone pine (P. pinea), Western yeIlow pine (P. pidcroNU ),Monterey pine (P. radiata.), Loblolly pine (P. tacda), or Jersey pine (P. vir-giniana), or of any variety thereof, or of any species or variety of hard pinehereafter found to be susceptible to the Woodgalte rust.QUARANTINEs APPLYING TO THE TERRITORIES OF HAWAII AND PuERTO RICOHawraiian fruits and vegetal[cs.-Quarantine No. 13, revised, effective June 1,1917: Prohibits, except as provided in the rulesand regulations supplemental thereto, revised, effective June 1, 1930, the movement from the Territory ofHawaii into or through any other Territory, State, or District of the UnitedStates of all fruits and vegetables in the natural or raw state, on account of theMediterranean fruit fly (Ceratitis capitata) and the melon fly (Dacus cucur-btae).Sugarcane.-Quarantine No. 16, effective June 6, 1914: Prohibits the move-raent from the Territories of Hawaii and Puerto Rico into or through any otherTerritory, State, or District of the United States of living canes of sugarcane, or

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294 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct.-Dec.cuttings or parts thereof, on account of certain injurious insects and fungustiseztses.Su'cctpotriti and yanin.-Quarantine No. 30. effective January 1, 1918: Prohibitsthe movement fromn the Territories of IIavaii and Puerto Rico into or throughaiy other Territory, State, or District of the United States of all varieties ofsweet potatue> and yams (Ipomioca batatas and Dio.Corca spp.), regardless of theuse fori wi Rh the same are intended, on account of the sweetpotato weevil(C llas f:111icarius) and the sweetpotato scarabee ( Eusccpes ) atac).Ba'iana plaN-Qnarninc No. 32, effective April 1, 1918: Prohibits themn 'veient from tile Territories of Hawaii and Puerto Rico into or through anyother Territory, State. or District of the United States of any spedIes or varietyof b anana plants (Jiusa spp.), regardless of the use for which the same aremiteuded, on account of two injurious weevils (Rhabdocneintis ob.scurus andk1am 'siu Vrin iitcrus).Hawaiian anil Pucrto Rican cotton, cottonseed, and cottonseed products.-Quarantine No. 47, effective August 15, 1920: Prohibits, except as provided inthe rules anl regulations supplemental thereto, effective August 15, 1920, theImovelient of cotton. cottonseed, and cottonseed products from the Territoriesof Hawaii and Puerto Rico into or through any other Territory, State, orDistrict of the United States on account of the pink bollworm (Pectinophoraiyo.7piclla) and the cotton-blister mite (Eriophyes gossypii), respectively.U,, lited States quarantined to protect Ha waii.-Quarantine No. 51, effective October 1, 1921: Prohibits, except as provided in the rules and regulationssupplemental thereto, effective October 1, 1921, the movement from the UnitedStates to the Territory of Hawaii, as ships' stores or as baggage or effects ofpassengers or crews, of sugarcane, corn, cotton, alfalfa, and the fruits of theavocado and papaya in the natural or raw state. on account of injurious in-sects, especially the sugarcane borer (Diatraca saceharalis Fab.), the alfalfaweevil (HIypera postica Gyll.), the cotton-boll weevil (Anthonornus grandisBloh.), the papaya fruit fly (Toxotrypana curricauda Guerst.), and certain in-sect enemies of the fruit of the avocado.Puerto Rican fruits and regetables.-Quarantine No. 58, effective July 1, 1925:Prohibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto,amended effective January 1. 1933, the movement from the Territory of PuertoRico into or through any other Territory, State, or District of the United Statesof all fruits and vegetables in the raw or unprocessed state, on account of in-jurious inl5ct. including the West Indian fruit fly (Anastrepha fraterculusWied.), amd the bean-pod borer (Maruca testulalis Geyer).Sand, soil. or
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1933] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 295Seeds of avocado or alligator pear.-Qiirantine No. 12, effective February 27,1914: Forbids the importation from Mexico and the count ries of Central Aimerieaof the seed of the avocado or alligator pear on account of the avocado weevil(Heilipus iwuri).Sugarcane.-Quarantine No. 15, effective June G, 1914: Forbids the importa-tion from all foreign countries of living canes of sugarcane, or cuttings or pa rtsthereof, on account of certain injurious insects aind fungous diseases. There areno Federal restrictions on the entry of such materials into lIlawaii alid PuertoRico.Citrus nursery stock.-Quarantine No. 19, effective January 1, 4915, as mo(lifiedeffective July 1, 1932: Forbids the importation from all foreign localities andcountries of all citrus nursery stock, including buds and scions, on countt ofthe citrus canker and other dangerous citrus diseases. The leim " citrus," asused in this quarantine, includes all plants belonging to the subfamily or tribeCitratae.European pines.-Quarantine No. 20, effective July 1, 1915: Forbids, on ac-count of the E11uropean pine-shoot moth (Eretria buolian ), Ole importatiol fromHall European countries and localities of all pines not already exclude(l byQuarantine No. 7.Indian corn or maize and related plants.-Quarantine No. 24, effective July 1,1916, as amended effective April 1, 1917, and April 23, 1917: Forbids the impor-tation from southeastern Asia (including India, Siam, Indo-China, and China),Malayan Archipelago, Australia, New Zealand, Oceania, Philippine Islands, For-mosa, Japan, and adjacent islands, in the raw or unmainufietured state, of seedand all other portions of Indian corn or maize (Zea )nays L.) and the closelyrelated plants, including all species of Te:,siiite (Euclhlaena), Job's tears(Coix), Polytoca, Chionachne, and Sclerachne, on account of the downy nil-dews and Physoderma diseases of Indian corn, except that Indian corn or maizemay be imported under permit and upon compliance with the conditions pre-scribed in the regulations of the Secretary of Agriculture.Citrus fruits.-Quarantine No. 28, effective August 1, 1917: Forbids the impor-tation from eastern and southeastern Asia (including India, Siam, Indo-China,and China), the Malayan Archipelago, the Philippine Islands, Oceania (exceptAustralia, Tasmania, aWl New Zealand), Japan (including Taiwan (Formosa),and other islands adjacent to Japan), and the Union of South Africa, of allspecies and varieties of citrus fruits, on account of the citrus canker, exceptthat oranges of the mandarin class (including satsuma and tangerine varieties)may be imported under permit and upon compliance with the conditions pre-scribed in the regulations of the Secretary of Agriculture.Sweetpotato and yant.-Quarantine No. 29, effective January 1, 1918: Forbidsthe importation for any purpose of any variety of sweetpotatoes and yams(Ipovnoca batatas and Dioscorca spp.) from all foreign countries and localities,on account of the sweetpotato weevils (Cylas spp.) and the sweetpotato scarabee(Euscepcs batatac).Banana plants.-Quarantine No. 31, effective April 1, 1918: Forbids the impor-tation for any purpose of any species or variety of banana plants (Mua spp.I,or portions thereof, from all foreign countries and0 localities, on account of thebanana-root borer (Cosmopolitcs sordidi. ). This quaraint ine places no rest ric-tions on the importation of the fruit of the banana. (For restrictions on theentry of the fruit of the banana see Quarantine 56.)Banboo.-Quarantine No. 34, effective October 1. 1918: Forbids the iniporta-tion for any purpose of any variety of bamboo seed, plants, or cuttings thereofcapable of propagation, including all genera aind species of the tribe Bamiibuseae,froni all foreign countries and localities, on account of dangerous ploat disea'e,including the bamboo smut (Ustilago shiraianu). This quarantine order doesuIot apply to bamboo timber consisting of the mature dried culins or canes whichare imported for fishing rods, furniture making, or other purposes, or to anykind of articles manufactured from bamboo. or to lanmboo shoots cooked orotherwise preserve(].Nursery stock, plants, and secds.-Quarantine No. 8"7, effective June 1. 1919:Forbids, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto,revised effective December 22, 1930, and amended effective July 1, 19832, theimportation of seeds, nursery stock, and other plants and plaint products capableof propagation from all foreign countries and localities on account of certaininjurious insects and fungous diseases. Under this quarantine the followingplant products may be imported without restriction when free from sand. soil,or earth, unless covered by special quarantine or other restrictive or(lers: Plant

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296 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct.-Dec.prdUct s imported for medicinal, food, or manufacturing purposes, and field,vei't ble, ani 1iower seeds. Cut flowers from the Dominiion of Canada areaI;o 8 llowted entry without permit. The entry of the following nursery stockand other plants uwd seeds is permitted under permit:(1) Blulbs, corims, or root stocks (pips) of the following genera: Lilium (lily),('onmutillarvia (lily-of-the-valley), 1Iyacinthu8 (hyacinth), Tulipa (tulip), andcrocuN ; and, until further notice, Cliionodoxa (glory-of-the-snow), GalanthusIsnowdrop), Scilla (squill), Fritillaria, Miuwari (grape-hyacinth), Ixia, andEraiilii 18 (WNinter aconite).(2) Cuttings, scions, al buds of fruits or nuts: Prorided, That cuttings,scions, and buds of fruits or nuts may be imported from Asia, Japan, PhilippineIslands, and Oceania (including Australia and New Zealand) under the provi-51011 of regulation 1.4 only. (Stocks of fruits or nuts may not be imported,under permit or otherwise.)(3) Rose stocks. including Manetti, Rosa multiflora (brier rose), and R.rugosa.(4) Nuts, including palm seeds for growing purposes: Provided, That suchnuts or seeds shall be free from pulp.(5) Seeds of fruit, forest, ornamental, and shade trees, seeds of deciduousand evergreen ornamental shrubs, and seeds of hardy perennial plants: Provided,That such seeds shall be free from pull): Provided further, That citrus seedsmay be imported only through specified ports subject to disinfection as providedin regulation 9: Prorided further, That mango seeds may not be imported underpermit or otherwise, except from the countries of North America, CentralAmerica, and South America, and the West Indies, and that elm (Ulmus spp.)seeds may not be imported from Europe under permit or otherwise.Importations from countries not maintaining inspection of nursery stock,other plants and parts of plants, including seeds, the entry of which is permissi-ble under this regulation, may be made under permit upon compliance with these regulations in limited quantities for public-service purposes only, but thislimitation shall not apply to tree seeds.European corn borer.-Quarantine No. 41, revised, effective June 1, 1926:Forbids, except as provide(] in the rules and regulations supplemental theret,revised effective March 1, 1933, the importation from all foreign countries andlocalities of the stalk and all other parts, whether used for packing or other pur-poses, in the raw or unmanufactured state, of Indian corn or maize, broomcorn,sweet sorghums, grain sorghuims, Sudan grass, Johnson grass, sugarcane, pearlmillet, napier grass, teosinte, and Job's tears, on account of the European cornborer (Pyrausta nmbilalis) and other' dangerous insects and plant diseases.Rice.-Quarantine No. 55, effective November 23, 1933: Forbids, except fromthe Republic of Mexico upon compliance with the conditions prescribed in the rules and regulations supplenental thereto, effective November 23, 1933, the im-portation of seed or paddy rice from all foreign countries and localities, andthe importat ion of rice s4 raw and rice hulls from all foreign countries and local-ities, on a count of injurious fungus diseases of rice, including downy mildew(Selerospora macrocwrflI), leaf smut (En tyloma ory ae), blight ((ospora oryz-torIm ) , and glumle blotch ( M lationI ma glum ara ill), as well as dangerous ini1pests.Frui/ s a(d .U !((blc.-Quarantine No. 56, effectiN-e November 1, 1923: For-hidS. except Is provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto,amended effective August 1, 1933, the imnporiation of fruits and vegetables notalrca dy the subject of special quarantines or other restrictive orders., a nd ofplainIts or portion is of plantts used i as packing material in connection with ship-ments of such fruits and vegetables from all foreign countries and localitiesother than the Dominion of ('anada, on account of injurious insects, includingfruit and melon flies (Trypet idae). Includes and supersedes Quarantine No.49 on account of the citrus black fly.F/ag snmat.-Quarantine No. 509, effective February 1, 1926: Forbids the imi-port ation ol all si cies and vafrities of wheat (Trilieaim spp.) and wheat prod-ucts, unless so imilled o! so pro( esse(l as to have destroyed all flag-smut spores,from India, Japan, Chinfl, Australia, Union of South Africa, Italy, and Spain.Packing mntirials.-(uurantine No. 69, effective July 1, 1933: Forbids theentry from all foreign countries and localities of the following materials whenused as packing for other commodities, except in special cases where prepara-ion, process ii;g, or manufacture are Judged by an inspector of the UnitedStates Departnient of Agriculture to have eliminated risk of carrying inju-

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1933] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEM1 ENTS 297rious insects and plant diseases: Rice straw, hulls, aid chaff ; cotton Indlcotton products; sugarcane, including bag.t sse ; buimboo leaves aind small shoots;leaves of plants; forest litter; and soil vith ain appreciable adiixture ofvegetable matter not Iierein proVi le(0 ) r' , regirlat ii n. Alt ptrts of coirii alallied plants are likewise prohibited except froim Mexico and the countries ofCentral America, the West Indies, and South America. This luarIrantihie alsobrings under restriction, involving inspection at will by the Departmni t butrequiring no permit or certificate, the following when usel as packiig: ('erealstraw, chaff, and hulls (other than rice) ; corn and allied plints from Mexico,Central America, the West indies, and South America; willow twigs fromEurope; grasses, hay, an( similar plant mixtures, from all count ries; andauthorized soil packing materials from all countries. This qtiarantiduie <100snot cover such widely used packing materials as excelsior, paper, sawdust,ground cork, chirtoalI, and variotis other materials.Dutch cbm disca,8.--Quarantine No. 70, effective October 21, 198: Forbidsthe importation from Europe, on account of a disease due to the fungus(Graphiou u/li, ()f seeds, leaves, plaits, cuttings, a d seniaus of elmi rrelated plants, defined to include all genera of the family Ulnaceae; Igs,lumber, timber, or veneer of such plants it" hark is present oi tihem ; and crates,boxes, barrels, packing cases, and other containers and other articles manu-factured in whole or in part from the wood of elm or related plants if notfree from bark. The quarantine likewise provides for the importation underpermit of elm logs from Europe if free from bark and insects, to be treated byheat at the time of entry and otherwise safeguarded.OTHER RESTRICTIVE ORDERSThe regulation of the entry of nursery stock from foreign countries into theUnited States was specifically provided for in the Plant Quarantine Act. Theact further provides for the similar regulation of any other class of plants orplant products when the need therefor shall be determined. The entry of theplants and plant products listed below has been brought under such regulation:Nursery stock.--The conditions governing the entry of nursery stock andother plants and seeds from all foreign countries and localities are indicatedabove under " Foreign quarantines." (See Quarantine No. 37, revised.)Potatocs.-The importation of potatoes is forbidden altogether from thecountries enumerated in the potato quarantine. Potatoes may 1)e admitted froitother foreign countries under permit and in accordance with the provisions ofthe regulations issued under order of December 22, 1913, bringing the entry ofpotatoes under restriction on account of injurious potato diseases and insectpests. Importation of potatoes is now authorized from the following countries:The Dominion of Canada, Bermuda, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Estonia, andSpain; also from the States of Chihuahua and Sonora and the Imperial Valleyof Lower California, Mexico. The revised regulations issued under this order,effective March 1, 1922, were amended effective August 1, 1930, so as to permit,free of any restriction whatsoever under the plant quarantine act, the importa-tion of potatoes from any foreign country into the Territory of Hawaii for localuse only, and from the Dominion of Canada into the United States or any of itsTerritories or Districts.Cotton.-The order of April 27, 1915, and the rules and regulations issuedthereunder, revised effective February 24, 1923, amended effective May 1, 1924,and December 15, 1924, restrict the importation of cotton from all foreigncountries and localities, on account of injurious insects, including the pinkbollworm. These regulations apply in part to cotton grown in and importedfrom the Imperial Valley, in the State of Lower California, Mexico.Cottonseed products.-The order of June 23, 1917, and the rules and regula-tions issued thereunder, effective July 16, 1917, amended effective August 7, 1925,restrict the importation of cottonseed cake, meal, and all other cottonseedproducts, except oil, from all foreign countries; and a second order of June 23, 1917, and the regulations issued thereunder, restrict the importation of cotton-seed oil from Mexico on account of injurious insects, including the pinkbollworm.Plant safeguard regulations.-These rules and regulations, revised effectiveDecember 1, 1932, provide safeguards for the landing or unloading for transferand transportation and exportation in bon(d of restricted or prohibited plantsand plant products when it is determined that such entry can be made without

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298 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINE [Oct.-Dc.involving risk to the plant cultures of the United States, and also provide forthe oafeLUlrding 01 such plant material at a port or within the territorial limitsof the United States where entry or landing is not intended or where entry hasbeii refused.R11 s and regulation governing (hr mnoremnnt of plants and plant productsinto and out of thi Di8trict of Coluni bia.-These rules and regulations, revisedeffective April ,0. 1931. are p)ronmulgated under the amendment to the plantquarantine act of May 31, VK. They provide for the regulation of the move-lIIent of plants and plant products, including nursery stock, from or into the)ist net of Columbiia and for the control of injurious plant diseases and insectpost within the said District.MISCELLANEOUS REGULATIONSRUlcU Ind i(' 111( ltionw prohilbiting thl oin Oemcnt of cotton and cottonseed from3/x Wo hito the U1Iitd Jl C tate.s, and gorrninf the entry into the United Statesof railiru U cmrs mnd othc r u hicles, freight, express, baggage, or other materialsfrom Mt xico at border point ts.-These rules and regulations, promulgated June21. 11917. and amended effective January 29, 1920, pursuant to authority givenin the appropriation act for the United States Department of Agriculture forthe iscal year 191S. and since repeated annually, are designed to prevent theentry of the pink bollworm of cotton which is known to exist widely inMexico. They provide for the examination of passengers' baggage, for thedisinfection of railway cars, freight, express, and other shipments, and for thecleaning of domestic cars handling Mexican freight. All fees collected foicleanin, and disinfecting railway cars are deposited in the United StatesTre Sur a miscellaneous receipts.The inspectors concerned in the enforcement of these regulations at borderpoints are charged also with enforcement of restrictions on the entry of plantsand plant products under various foreign plant quarantines.In Npfction and certification regulations to meet foreign sanitary require-mc n/s,.-The e re-ulations, revised effective August 1, 1931, were promulgatedpursuant to authority -iven i the alipropriation act fTr the United StatesDepartment of Agriculture for the fiscal year 1927. They provide for the in-spection aind certification of fruits, vegetables, nursery stock, and other plants8t!l pl1l1t piioducts intended for export to countries requiring such certification.All fees collected for this service are deposited in the United States Treasuryas iiscellaneolls receipts.

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ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF PLANTQUARANTINEA. S. HOYT, Acting Chief.B. CONNOR, Business Manager.R. C. ALTHousE, Information Officer.E. R. SASSCER, in Charge Foreign Plant Quarantines.S. B. FRACKEE, in Charge Domestic Plant Quarantines.LON A. HAWKINS, in Charge Technological Division.A. F. BURGESS, in Field Charge Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail Moth Quarantine(Headquarters, Green field, Mass.).L. H. WORTHLEY, in Field Charge Japanese Beetle Quarantine and EuropeanCorn Borer Project (Headquarters, Harrisburg, Pa.).R. E. McDONALD, itt Field Charge Pink Bollworm and Thurberia Weevil Quar-an tines (Headquarters, San Antonio, Tex.).B. L. BOYDEN, in Field Charge Date Scale Quarantine (Headquarters, Indio,Calif.).P. A. HOIDALE, in Field Charge Mexican Fruit Fly Quarantine (Headquarters,Harlingen, Tex.).299U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1934

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S.R.A.-B.P.Q. Index, 1933 issued May 1934United States Department of AgricultureBUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINEINDEX TO SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS,1933PageAmerican Virgin Islands, fruit-fly survey---------------------------------------------------------230'Antigua, British West Indies, fruit-fly survey---------------------------------------------231Apples, commercially packed, definition of (B.P.Q.-352). See Japanese beetle quarantine.Argentina, summary of plant-quarantine restrictions (B.P.Q.-357)---------------------------277-288Australia, summary of plant-quarantine restrictions (P.Q.C.A.-299,. revised, supplement no. l. 164Barberry. See Black stem rust quarantine.Barbados, British West Indies, fruit-fly survey--------------------------------------------233Belgium, summary of plant-quarantine restrictions (P.Q.C.A.-315, supplements nos. I and 2)---276, 2S9Black stem rust quarantine (no. 38):Barberries and mahonias classified under black stein rust quarantine regulations (P.Q.C.A.-320revised, supplement no. 1)--------------------------------------------------------177Brazil:Fruit-fly survey--------------------------------------------------------------------------235Summary of plant-quarantine restrictions (P.Q.C.A.--294, supplements nos. I and 2 --------153, 277British Bahama Islands, fruit-fly survey-------------------------------------------------228British Honduras, summary of plant-quarantine restrictions (P.Q.C.A.-314, supplement no. 3).---224Broomcorn, conditions governing entry-----------------------------------------------139-141Bulb flies, inspections and treatments for. See Narcissus bulb quarantine.Bureau of Plant Quarantine, organization of ----------------------------------175, 195, 244, 299Canary Islands, permits for potato imports authorized----------------------------------------173Chile:Fruit-fly survey----------------------------------------------------------------------238Summary of plant-quarantine restrictions (B.P.Q.-348) ------------------------------------1'-163Collectors of customs, instructions to. See Treasury decisions.Common carriers, notice to:Japanese beetle quarantine-----------------------------------------------------142,261Phony peach disease quarantine---------------------------------------------------------------148Pink bollworm quarantine------------------------------------------------149, 211, 262, 270Thurberia weevil quarantine------------------------------------------------------218Conferences, public, notice of:Dutch elm disease------------. ----------------------------------------------275Japanese beetle_-------------------_---------_-------------------------------Nursery stock, plant, and seed quarantine------------------------2----------------------203Corn on the cob, green or mature, conditions governing entry-----------------------------139-141Dominica, British West Indies. fruit-fly survey ----------------------232Dominican Republic, fruit-fly survey ----------------------------------------------------229Dutch elm disease:Conference to discuss situation in the United States, public, notice of -----------------------275Hearing to consider advisability of prohibiting or restricting the entry of elm and related speciesof trees and parts and products thereof from Europe, public, notice of ----------------------197Dutch elm disease quarantine (no. 70):Elm burl logs, conditions governing entry (B.P.Q.-356)-----------------------------------24Notice of quarantine and regulations----------------------------------------------245-248Collectors of customs, instructions to (T.D. 46721)-----------------------------------248Eelworms, treatments for. See Narcissus bulb quarantine.Elm logs from Europe, conditions governing entry. See Dutch elm disease quarantine.England and Wales, summary of plant quarantine restrictions (P.Q.C.A.-327, supplement no. I 2SSEuropean corn borer:Revised regulations supplemental to quarantine no. 41, effective March 1, 1933 ------------137-141Collectors of customs, instructions to (T.D. 46:335) -----------------------------------17State regulations, synopsis of B.P.Q,-34f, revised March 16, 1933)--------------------72Fruit and vegetable quarantine (no. 56):Regulation 2 revised (amendment no. 6)--------------------------------------------19Collectors of customs, instructions to (T.D. 46591)----------------------------------200Fruit-fly survey in the West Indies, Brazil, Vruguay, Chile, and Peru----------------------227-241General public, notice to:Japanese beetle quarantine.---------------------------------------------------142, 29Pink bollworm quarantine ----------------------------------------------------------14(, 211, 262 271Thurberia weevil quarantine-------------------------------------------------------------------218Georgia discontinues terminal inspection of plants and plant products------------------------------183Germany, summary of plant-quarantine restrictions (B.P.Q.-302, revised, and supplement no. 1)185-193,223Greece, summary of plant-quarantine restrictions (B.P.Q.-347 and supplement no. 1)__ 154-15S,221-223Guadeloupe, French West Indies, fruit-fly survey-------------------------------------------------231Guatemala, summary of plant-quarantine restrictions (P.Q.C.A.-314, supplement no. 2)----------164Haiti, fruit-fly survey----------------------------------------------------------------------------229Hearings. public, notice of:Dutch elm disease---------------------------------------------------------------197Japanese beetle---. --------.------------------------------------------------------------54151-34

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2 BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINEPageHungary, offlcial plant-inspection service instituted by .-. -.-. -----------------.290Idaho discontinues terminal inspection of plants and plant products ------------------------153Italy, sunnary of plant-quarantine restrictions (P.Q.C.A.-289, supplements nos. 1 and 2)------185, 276Jamiaica, British West Indies:Fruit-fly survey---------------.------------------------------------------228Summary of plant-quarantine restrictions (B.P.Q.-355) -------------------------------------219Japanese beetle quarant ine (no. 48):Apples, commercially packed, definition of (B.P.Q.-352) ..---------------------------------178Conference to discuss season's developments in Japanese beetle situation, public, notice of----200Fruits and vegetables, removal of restrictions on interstate shipments of -.--------------------200Hearing to consider ad vis~jhilit y of extending the quarantine to the States of Maine and West Vir-ginia, public, notice of -----------------------------------------------------------250Modification of rules and regulations (eleventh revision) effective January 2:3, 1933 (amendmentno. 1)------------------------------------------------------------------------142Common carriers, notice to -------------------------------------------------------142General public, notice to.-------------------------------------------------------142Postmasters, instructions to ------------------------------------------------------141Revised quarantine and regulations effective Dec. 1, 1933 -------------------------------251-260Common carriers, notice to -------------------------------------------------------261General public, notice to ---------------------------------------------------------260Logs, elm burl, conditions governing entry. Sec Dutch elm disease quaarantine.Mahonia. Sc Black stem rust quarantine.Martinique, French West Indies, fruit-fly survey -------------------------------------------232Mexican citrus fruits, shipment in bond through the United States (P.Q.C.A.-305, revised) --------225Mexican fruit fly quarantine (no. 64):Shipping season for citrus fruit of lower Rio Grande Valley lengthened ----------------------201Mexico, summary of plnt-quarantine restrictions (P.Q.C.A.-284, supplement no. 7) ---------------288Narcissus bulb importations, treatments for. See Nursery stock, plant, and seed quarantine.Narcissus bulb quarantine (0no. 62):Inspect on records for 1932 (B.P.Q.-349)--------------------------------------------143treatment andi pest suppression measures, supplementary administrative instructions (B.P.Q.-3,3 -----------------------------------------------------------------178-181Bulb flies, treatments for -------------------------------------------------------179Eelworms, treatments for --------------------------------------------------------180Inspections ------------------------------------------------------------------179Nevis, British West Indlies, fruit-fly survey ------------------------------------------------230New Ze:iland, summary of plant-qu irantine restrictions (P.Q.C A._-)W,, supplement no. 1) ---------218Norway, summary of plant-quarantine restrictions (B.P.Q.-350 ----------------------------164-167Nursery stock, plant, and seed quira niine (no. 37):Collectors of customs, instructions to, re Canadian inspector (T.D. 46431 and 46590) --------181, 202Conference to reexamine the underlying principles involved in the interpretation and enforce-mnent of quarantine, public, notice of ------------------------------------------------203Narcissus bulb importations, conditions governing entry and treatment (B P.Q -354) ----------202Organization of Bureau of Plant Quarantine --------------------------------------175, 195, 244,299Packing materials quarantine (no. 69):Modification of quarantine (amendment no. 1) ------------------------------------------182Notice of quarantine and regulations -----------------------------------------------144-147Collectors of customs, instructions to (T.D. 46267 ------------------------------------147Peru, fruit-fly survey ------------------------------------------------------------------240Phony peach
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SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 3Seed or paddy rice quarantine (no. 55): PageRevised quarantine and regulations effective July 1, 1933---------------------------150-152Collectors of customs, instructions to (T.D. 46373). . . ..--------------------------------182Revised quarantine and regulations effective November 23, 1933.-. ..---------------------271-274Collectors of customs, instructions to (T.D. 46809)-.--------------------------------274Spain, permits for potato imports authorized -.----.-.--------------------------------------------173Strong, Lee A., named chief of Bureau of Entomology-.--.-----------------------------------227Sweden, summary of plant-quarantine restrictions (P.Q.C.A.-321, supplement no. 1).------------164Terminal inspection of plants and plant products:Georgia discontinues inspection --.--.-.-------------------------------------------------183Idaho discontinues inspection--------------------------------------------------153Puerto Rico inaugurates inspection.---------------------------------------------------------183Wyoming discontinues inspection _--.-.-.------------------------------------------------183Thurberia weevil quarantine (no. 61):Revised regulations ---------------------------------------------------.----------------212-218Common carriers, notice to ---------.---.-------------------------------------------------218General public, notice to----.-.---------------------------------------------------218Postmasters, instructions to.---------------------------------------------------------------275Treasury decisions:Dutch elm disease quarantine (T.D. 46721).-. ...----------------------------------------248European corn borer quarantine, revised regulations (T.D. 46335) . ..-----------------------178Fruit and vegetable quarantine, modification of regulations (T.D. 46591). .------------------200Packing materials quarantine (T.D. 46267).-----.--.----------------------------------------147Plant safeguard regulations, revision of (T.D. 46211).-.-.---------------------------------150Seed or paddy rice quarantine, revision of (T.D. 46373 and T. D. 46809)..----------------182, 274Trinidad, fruit-fly survey.-.--.----.--.-----------------------------------------------------------234Union of South Africa, summary of plant-quarantine restrictions (P.Q.C.A.-297, supplement no. 3). 193Uruguay, fruit-fly survey_--.------.-. ..--------------------------------------------------------238Violations of Plant Quarantine Act, penalties for:Canadian plant-products quarantines ----------.-.--------------------------------------194,243,291European corn borer quarantine (domestic) --.---. ..----------------------------------------242Japanese beetle quarantine-_---------------------------------------173, 193, 242, 290Mediterranean fruit fly and melon fly quarantine.---------------------------------------242Mexican plant-products quarantines-----------------------------------173, 194, 243, 291White-pine blister rust quarantine (no. 63):Postmasters, instructions to.-----.--------.--------------------------------------------------15Wyoming discontinues terminal inspection of plants and plant products. ..-------------------Is0

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n.-mn.

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United States Department of AgricultureBureau of Plant QuarantineCUMULATIVE INDEX TOSERVICE AND REGULATORYANNOUNCEMENTSNOS. 1 TO 117 INCLUSIVE1914-33BUREAU OF PLANT QUARANTINECOMPILED BYHORACE S. DEANPlant Quarantine Inspector, Division of Foreign Plant QuarantinesBureau of Plant QuarantineISSUED JUNE 1934UNITED STATESGOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICEWASHINGTON: 1934

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ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU OF PLANTQUARANTINEA. S. HOYT. Acing ChiefB. CoNNorI, Business ma nagerR. C. ALTIoUSE, lnforion. Offie-rE. R. SAsscER, in charge Foreign Plant Quarantines.S. B. FRACKER, in Charge Domestic Plant Quarantines.LoN A. HAWKINS, ia charge TeChnlOgieal i)iiisiOn.A. F. BURGESSi iFicl( Charge Gypsy Moth and Brown-Tail Moth Controt(Headquartctrs, Greenfield, Mass.).L. 11. WORTHLEY, in Field Charge Japanese Beetle and Gypsy Moth and Bron-Tail Moth Quarantines and European Cora Borer Certification (Headquarters, Harrisburg, Pa.).R. E. MCDONALD, in Field Charge Pink Bollworm and Thiurberia Weenil Quar-awtines (1Headquarters, San Antonio, Tex.).B. L. BoYDE, in Field Charge Date Scale Quarantine (Headquarters, Indio,Calif.).P. A. HOiDALE. in, Field Charge Mexican Fruit Fly Quarantine (Headquarters,iarlingen, Tex.).II

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CUMULATIVE INDEX TO SERVICE ANDREGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTSNos. 1 to 117, inclusive (1914-33), Bureau of Plant QuarantineCompiled by. HORACE S. DEAN, plant quarmn tine inspector, Diviioan of ForeignPlant Quarantines, Bureau of Plant QuarantineFOREWORDThe Service and Regulatory Announcements were first published monthly andare now issued quarterly. They constitute a permanent record of the work ofthe Bureau in the enforcement of the Plant Quarantine Act of 1912 and certainrelated acts, including the text of quarantines and regulations thereunder, andthe more important circulars explanatory of, or bearing on, such quarantinesand regulations.While practically the whole mass of official information relating to Federal quarantine activities during this 20-year period appears in these announcementsin conciSe form, reference to individual items is often uncertain, difficult, andtedious, it is usually necessary in such a search to consult several yearly indexes,and if the reference runs into the earlier years it is found that the indexesthen issued are not so complete as those of more recent (late. Consequently thiscompilation of a cumulative index aims to fill a long-felt need by providing aquick and complete means of reference to every article in the series from everyangle of approach likely to be needed. Care has been taken to include correct citations of titles and dates, so that the index contains several lists valuableill themselves beCause of their comipleteness. It will be iound, for example, thateachi quarantine is accompanied by a complete list of its amendments and regulations.In a few cases references to items which were not published in the S.R.A.series are included. These comprise quarantine notices issued before publica-tion of the series was begun, several notices of revisions and amendments whichwere not published in the S.R.A. record, and various numbered circulars ofminor nature. An effort has been made to include every stray item of this kindso as to make the index as comprehensive as possible.Any one using this index wili usually find it more expedient to refer imme-diately to the major quarantine topic concerned ; e.g., should he wish to findreference to ,m obsolete circular letter dealing with charges for the disinfectionof imported cotton at commercial fumigation plants, he should refer to Cottonregulat ions, an(d the information desired would be located under disinfection." H.B.". " P.Q.C.A.", and " B.P.Q." are used as designations for circulars inthe numbered series published by the Federal Horticultural Board, Plant Quar-;imtine and C>iitrol Administration, and Bureau of Plant Quarantine, respec-tively. " S.R.A." has been used in the index as an abbreviation for Servicea rd te 'ula tory Announcements: other abbreviations fo1nd ii the index areconventional. The pagination of the S.R.A. is on an annual basis and, in theindex, the numbers following the years refer to pages.INDEX(Januiry 1914-Decmber 1932Year and pageAchras sapotes. 'ec Mexican fruit fly quarantine no. 5; Mexica r !. uik worniquarantine no. 64.Acoris. foreign. See Fruit and veg< tle quarantine no. 56.Adorctus utnbrouw. &S c Hawaiihan and Puerto Rican quar8Intie Ci overiig s"nd,etc., no. 60.Advisory Federal Plant Quarantino Boa-d. organization of_ -------------------1928-93,144 ; 1929-48, 130. 179. 247 ; 1930--31, 88, 132, 199 ; 1931-38, 89, 135,171; 19:2-25. 50, 93. 135.1

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2 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTSAglaonema. See Nursery stock, plant, and seed quarantine no. 37. Year and pageAirplane. See Pink bollworm, domestic.Aleurocan ths i wolumi. Ae Citrus black fly quarantine no. 49.Alfal:a. k'ec Uni ted States quarantine d to protect Hawaii, quarantine no. 51.Alligator pear. Ser Avocado fruit and nursery stock regulations; Avocado fruitorder ; Avocado seed quarantine no. 12.Almeria grapes, See Fruit and vegetable quarantine no. 56, grapes. American Association for the Advancement of Science, Federal HorticulturalBoard participation in imeting of, at Toronto--------------------------1921-108American Association of Nurserymen, Federal Horticultural Board participationin meeting of. at Chicago----------------------------------------------1921-10Anad4rcpha fratercunlus. See Fruit and vegetable quarantine of Puerto Ricono. 5".Anastrcpha ludens. Sec Mexican fruit worm quarantine no. 64.Annual letter of in format ion :No. '4, statement regarding----------------------------------------1921-10No. .7-----------------------------------------------------------1923-175N'. :;---------------------------------------------1925, following page 114No. 9-----------------------------------------------1926, following page 140No. 40-----------------------------------------------------------1 27-16'5No. 41_------------------------------------------------------------1928-157See also Lizst of pests intercepted during.Anomala 'rientalis. See Asiatic beetle and Asiatic garden beetle quarantineno. 66.Anthonomius !grandis. See United States quarantined to protect Hawaii, quaran-tine no. ;51.Anthonornus grandi, thurberiae. See Thurberia weevil quarantine no. 61.Antigua :nursery stock inspection-----------------------1914-51 ; 1915-59; 1916-54, 103pest survey, fruit fly------------------------------------------1933-227, 231Aonidia duplx. See Camphor scale.Argentina :fruit fly suvey----------------------------------------1925-43; 1927-17, 58grapes from. Sce Fruit and vegetable quarantine no. 56. grapes.summary of plant quarantine restrictions (B.P.Q.-357, Dec. 1, 1933)-----1933-277Ar;zoia :pink bollworm. See Pink bollworm, domestic.terminal inipection---------------------1915-78, 79, 98, 99; 1917-138; 1928-17Thurberia weevil. See Thurberia weevil quarantine no. 61.Arkansas, terminal inspection_-------1919-87; 1925-18; 1926-132; 1931-122; 1932-13Asorica castanea. trc As ntic beetle and Asiatic garden beetle quarantine no. 66.Asiatic beetle and Asiatic (.arden beetle quarantine no. 6G:administrative instructions: elinination of screening requirement with respect to potted plantsunder the Asiatic beetle and the Asiatic garden beetle qurantine(P.Q.C.A.-259.effective Jan. 8. 1930)--------------------------1930-irelative to enforcement of regulation 5, quarantine no. 66 on accountof the Asiatic beetle and the Asiatic garden beetle. (P.Q.C.A.-221,Mlar. 2. 1929)------------------------------------------------1929-161neral statements-------------------------------------1928-i1O ; 1929-3. 202instructions to inspectors on the disinfection of nursery products for theJapanese and Asiatic beetles. (P.Q.C.A.-224. Apr. 16, 1929)----------1929-63supplement no. 1 (P.Q.C.A.-239, July 8, 1929)-------------------1929-133lifted. notice of, effective March 1, 1930------------------------------1930-2instructions to postmasters--------------------------------------1930-8general statement_----------------------------------------------1930-45notce of. effective March 15. 1929------------------------------------1929-10instructions to postmasters--------------------------------------1929-62press notice----------------------------------------------------1929-8to common carriers---------------------------------------------1929-17to general public----_--------------------------------------------1929-17proposed, hearing, notice of---------------------------------------1928-119press notice---------------------------------------------------192S-118report, press notice--------------------------------------------1928-135violations. See Violations.Association of Secretaries and Commissioners of Agriculture, Federal Horticul-tural Board participation in meeting of, at Chicago----------------------1921-108Atlantic coast ports. danger of introduction of pink bollworm from foreign shipscoaling -------------------------------------------------------------1918-123Aust ralia :nursery stock inspection --------------------1914-51, 87 ; 1915-59 ; 1916-54. 103pink bollworm infestation, report of--------------------------------1923-105potatoes from. See Potato regulations.summary of plant quarantine restrictions (P.Q.C.A.-299, Nov. 11, 1930) -_ 1930-182 revised. February 8. 19:2-----------------------------------Not in S.R.A.Supplement no. 1. February 17, 1933--------------------------1933-164Avocado fruit and nursery stock regulations (Regulations governing the importa-tion of avocado fruit and nursery stock into the United States, under the pro-visions of the order of the Secretary of Agriculture issued Feb. 27. 1914) :importations under, form of report-----------------------1914 (S.R.A. No. 2)-Slifted. notice of, effective July 1, 1932--------------------------------1932-27Treasury Decision No. 45792-------------------------------------1932-90notice of, effective February 27, 1914--------------------1914 (S.R.A. No. I )-2superseded by Nursery stock, plant, snd seed quarantine no. 37 and Fruitand vegetable quarantine no. 56, effective July 1, 1932----------------1932-27violations. See Violations.See also Avocado fruit order.

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INDEX 3Year and pageAvocado fruit order (Order covering admission of the avocado or alligator pearunder restrictions) :Colombian fruits, entry at northern ports-----------------------------1924-20Cuban fruits, entry at southern ports, press notice---------------------1824-97lifted, notice of, effective July 1 1932-------------------------------1932-27Treasury Decision No. 45792------------------------------------1932-90Mexican fruits :seeded, entry for local use--------------------------------------1922-131warning to passengers-------------------------------------------1918-82notice of, effective March 15, 1914-----------------------1914 (S.R.A. No. 1)-5superseded by Fruit and vegetable quarantine no. 56, effective July 1, 1932_. 1932-27violations. See Violations, avocado fruit and nursery stock regulations.See also Avocado fruit and nursery stock regulations.Avocado seed quarantine no. 12:notice of, effective February 27, 1914-------------------1914 (S.R.A. No. 1)-5seeds, from Mexico, warning to passengers_-----------------------------1918-82violations. See Violations.Azalea. See Nursery stock, plant, and seed quarantine no. 37.Bacterium citri. See Citrus fruit quarantine no. 28 ; Citrus nursery stockquarantine no. 19.Baggage declarationunder Fruit and vegetable quarantine of Puerto Rico_-------------------1925-50under Mediterranean fruit fly and melon fly quarantine------------------1917-26Bagging. See Cotton regulations, wrappers.Bahama Islands:nursery stock inspection ----------------------------1914-87; 1915-59; 1916-103pest survey, fruit fly -------------------------------------------1933-227, 228Ballast. ships':possible means of introducing noxious insects ---------------------------1919-3report of investigation, press notice -----------------------------------1919-37Bamboo quarantine no. 34 :notice of, effective October 1, 1918 -------------------------------------1918-82Treasury Decision No. 37765 --------------------------------------1918-93proposed, hearing, notice of -------------------------------------------1918-65reference to --------------------------------------------------------1918-80violations. See Violations.Bamboo smut. See Bamboo quarantine no. 34.Banana fruit. See Fruit and vegetable quarantine no. 56; Japanese beetle quar-antines ; Mediterranean fruit fly and melon fly quarantine no. 13; Mediter-ranean fruit fly quarantine no. 68.Banana plant quarantines:domestic, quarantine no. 32:notice of, effective April 1, 1918----------------------------------1918-34instructions to postmasters-----------------------1918-34: 1924-126proposed, hearing, notice of-----------------------------------1918-16, 17press notice -----------------------------------------------1918-18foreign, quarantine no. 81:notice of, effective April 1, 1918---------------------------------1918-33Treasury Decision No. 37564--------------------------------1918-47proposed. hearing. notice of_----------------------------------1918-16,17press notice------------------------------------------------1918-18violations. See Violations.warning to passengers from Mexico-------------------------------1918-82Banana root borer :outbreak in Florida-----------------------------------------------1918-2, 16See al.o Banana plant quarantines, foreign.Barbados :nursery stock inspection-----------------------1914-51 ; 1915-59 ; 1916-54. 103pest survey. fruit fly--------------------------------------------193:-227, 233Barberry. See Black stem rust quarantine no. 38.Bean pod borer, investigation in Cuba------------------------------------1925-103Beans:string. Pee Mediterranean fruit fly quarantine no. 68, lima and broad beans.See Fruit and vegetable quarantine no. 56.Beetle. See under common name.Belgium :nursery stock inspection------------------------1914-51 : 1915-59 ; 1916-54, 103summary of plant quarantine restrictions :H.B.-151. May 15, 1922_ _____ ----___--_ _ _ _ 1922-36P.Q.C.A.-315, July 9, 1931--------------------------------------1931--123supplement no. 1, November 24, 1933 -----------------------1988-276supplement no. 2. December 20, 1933 ------------------------1932-289Berberis. See Black stem rust quarantine no. 38, barberry.Bermuda. nursery stock inspection -------------------1914-51 : 1915-59 ; 1916-54, 103Berries, fumigation with ethylene oxide for Japanese beetle (P.Q.C.A.-316, effec-tive July 14, 1931)--------------------------------------------------1931-101Black stem rust quarantine no. 38:barberry :classification of (P.Q.C.A.-320. July 29, 1931)---------------------1931-92 revised, August 15, 1932------------------------------------1932-52supplement no. 1, June 1, 1933-------------------------1933-177eradication :cooperation of nurserymen requested (H.B.-94, Apr. 4, 1918)-_--1918-42pledge card not to ship barberry-----------------------------1918-43statements concerning ---------------------1921-7: 1928-5 ; 1929-8. 207Japanese, not a host of black stem rust (H.B.-94, Apr. 4, 1918)------1918-42extension proposed, hearing, notice of.---------------------------------1931-41press notice-------------------------------------------_----1931-40report of, press notice------------------------------------------1921-41

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4 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTSBlack stem rust qtara inw no. 8--;'on Year and page general st.ilenwienis-------------------------------1921-7; 1928-5; 1929-8,207Mahonia, clas.ihcation of ( P.Q.C.A.-320, July 29, 1931) -----------------1931-92revised. August 15, 1932--_------.---__--------_----_19:2-52suppiment no. 1, June 1, 1933------------------------------19,3-177notice of, ef7ectiv, May 1. 1919--------------------------------------1919--58instrrutioijs to postmasters--------------------------------------1919-71press noti (c_-----------------------------------------------------1919-58amendment no. 1, effective January 1. 1923----------------------1922-1261rQSs notice-----------------------------------------------1922-127revised, effective August 1, 1931------------------------------_ 19:1-42instructions to postmasters_----------------------------------19:1-93press notice------------------------------------------------1931-42to commoij c:irriers-----------------------------------------1931-45to general public-------------------------------------------1931-46proposed, hearing, notice of----------------------------------------_1919-10violations. Sce Violations.Blister rust. Sce Whitc pine blister ust.Bollworm, pink. N Pink tbollwori.B.P.Q.'s. See Circulars. I .',P.O.C.A.'s, B.P.Q.'s.Brazil :nursery stock inspection_-------------------------------------------1930-111pest survey, fruit y ---------------------------------------------1933-227, 235pink bollworm, report of severe damage by----------------------------1918-28summary of plant quartintme restrictions (P.Q.C.A.-294, Sept. 22. 1930)__ 1930-124press notice----------------------------------------------------1930-122supplement no. 1, January 1. 1933-------------------------------1933-153supplement no. 2. November 24, 1933-----------------------------1933-277British Guiana, nursery stock inspection -------------1914-51 ; 1915-59; 1916-54, 103British Honduras :pcst survey, fruit fly------------------------------------------------1926-10summary of plant quarantine restrictions (P.Q.C.A.-314, June 22, 1931)___ 1931-75 supplomont no. 1. August 25, 1931-------------------------------1931-126supplelknt no 8. September 30, 1933---------------------------1933-224Broomcorn. S c European corn borer, foreign.Brown-tail moth. &e ;ypsy moth and brown-tail moth.Bulbs. See JapaneM betle quarantines ; Narcissus bulb.quarantine no. 62;Nursery stock, -lant. and seed quarantine no. 3.7.Bureau of Plant Quarantine, organization of ____ 1932-93, 135; 1933-175, 195, 244, 299Burlap. See Cotton rog ulations, wrappers.Cactus, restrictions on exportation from Mexico (P.Q.C.A.-284, .upplement no. 6,Feb. 1, 1932)-------------------------------------------------------1932-24Calcium cyanide fumigation for bulb fly control. See Narcissus bulb quarantineno. 62, disinfection.California Association of Nurserymen, Federal Horticultural Board participationin meeting of, at Los neles_--------------------------------------1921-108California Avocado Association, Federal Horticultural Board participation inmeeting of, at Los Ang"les __----------------------1921-108California, terminal inspection-------------------------------------------1915-37,"8. 77. 79. 98. 99; 1916-86; 1918-6; 192l-86. 160 ; 1922-188; 1924-21;1925-52 : 1ir26-18 ; 1930-85 ; 1931-122 ; 1932--43, 12:;.Camphor scale :infestation in New Orleins, La--------------------------------------1921-103quarantine prLposed, bearing, notice of_-------------------------------1922-127press notice-----------------------------------------------------1922-127report of, press noice-------------------------------------------1922-128situation ---------------------------------------------------------1923-118Canada :nursery stockinspect ;__------------------------------------------------------1914-51,87: 1915-59; 1916-54, 103; 1917-111; 1930-74; 1933-181, 202return of American stock from, conditions_------------------------1914-19potatoes from. &e Potato quarantine no. 11 ; Potato regulations ; Potatowart.summary of quarantin' on account of European co)rn borer_------------1919-121Canadian Christmas tre s and greens quarantine no. 57announcement, preliminary-------------------------------------------1924-21Christmas tree situation re pests------------------------------------1923-142lifted, notice of, effective July 1. 1928-------------_--------------------1928-29press notce -----------------------------------------------------1928-29Treasury Decion No. 42921 --------------------------------------1928-69notice of, effective July 1, 1924--------------------------------------1924-65press notice ----------------------------------------------------1924-66Treasury Dciion No. 40331------------------------------------1924-99proposed, hn ring notice of----------------------------------------1923-142press 1-ot-------------------------------------------------1923-143See also Gpsv nioth and brown-tail moth.Canadian officials qualified in inspect and certify plants for shipment to theUnited States (Treasury Decision No. 43980)_---------------------------1930-74amended list, Treasury Decision No. 46431 ; Treasury Decision No.46590------------------------------------------------------1933-181, 202Canary Islands, post survey, fruit fly------------------------------------1927-144Cantaloups. Sec Mediterranean fruit fly quarantine no. G6.Cars, refrigerator, cleaning of. See Mediterranean fruit fly quarantine no. 68,refrigerator cars.Celery. See Mediterranean fruit fly quarantine no. 68.

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INDEX a 5Central Anierica: Year and pagepost survey, fruit fly, report of------------_-_---__-------1924-20 summary of plant quarantine restrictions (P.Q.C.A.-314, June 22, 1931)--_ 1931-75supplement no. 1. August 25, 1931-------------------------------1931-126suJpplement no. 2, February 17, 1933_-----------------------------1 9 I364suipippleient no. 3, September 30, 1933-----------------------------1933-224Cratitis calyitata. See Mediterraneai fruit fly and melon fly quarantine no. 13; Mediterranean fruit fly quarantine no. 68.Certification :for export. Sce Export regulations.qualified, system of, established January 31, 1916 (H.l.-31%, Jan. 31,191(i)_---------------------------------------------------------------1916-12See also unde r thc various quarantine subjects.Ceylon. summary of plant quarantine restrictions (11.B.-192, July 17, 1925)_ 1925-74Chaff, as packing material for nurs-.ry stock, authorized (H1.B.-132, revised,June 8, 1921)--------------------------------------------------------1921-52Channel Islaids, summary of plant quarantine restrictions (P.Q.C.A.-327,Nov. 80, 1931) ----------------------------------------------------------1931-159-Charcoal, as packing material for nursery stock, authorized (II.B.-132, revised,June 8, 1921)-------------------------------------------------------1921-52Charleston, S.C., added to field stations of the Federal Horticultural Board, press notice--_-___------------------------------------------------------------1923-91Chestnut bark disease:quarantine proposed, hearing, notice of--------------------------------1915-25report ot-----------------------------------------------------1915-39, 57Chestnuts, foreign. Sce Fruit and vegetable quarantine no. 56, nuts.Chile:pest survey, fruit fly, report of---------------------------1925-43 ; 1933-227, 238summary of plant quarantine restrict ions (B.P.Q.-348, Jan. 12. 1933) 193--158Chinese sacred lily. See Nursery stock, plant, and seed quarantine no. 37,narcissus.Chionachne. See Corn diseases quarantinee no. 24.Christmas trees. &ee Canadian Christmas trees and greens quarantine no. 57Gypsy moth and brown-tail moth. Cipollini. See Fruit and vegetable quarantine no. 56.-Circulars, IH.B.'s, P.Q.C.A.'s, B.P.Q.'s :11. B.-1, January 18, 1915. Pink bollworm situation and possible action ofthe Department of Agriculture to prevent establishment in the UnitedStates-------------------------------------------------------Not in S.R.A.H.B.-2, January 27, 1915. Instructions to inspectors relative to reship-ments, interstate, of imported nursery stock------------------------1915-4 H.B.-3, January 29, 1915. Common scab bars Canadian potatoes-------1915-6H.B.-4, February 9, 1915. Instructions to inspectors relative to Europeanpine shoot moth----------------_____--_-------------------------------1915-7H.B.-5, February 11, 1915. Instructions governing port of entry, inspection,and certification of Canadian potatoes----------------------------Not in S.R.A.H.B.-C, February 11, 1915. Instructions governing reinspection and cer-tification of seed potatoes -------------------------------------Not in S.R.A.I.B.-7, February 26, 1915. Model State plant quarantine law-----Not in S.R.A.H.B.-8, April 10, 1915. Notice of public conference' to consider proposedrules and regulations to govern importation and use of cotton lint --1915-22H.B.-,9 May 12. 1915. Discussion of potato powdery scab regulations_ 1915-35H.B.-10, July 15. 1915. Requirement to patch torn bales waived ; explana-tion of modification of regulation 6 of cotton regulations-------------1915-53H.B.-11, July 24. 1915. Requirement for furnishing car numbers on noticesof shipment of imported cotton waive(_-----------------------------1915-54H.B.-12, August 5, 1915. Requirement for furnishing bale numbers in shortshipments of cotton waived---------------------------------__--------1915-56H.B.-13. August 24, 1915. Cotton licenses revoked----------------Not in S.R.A.H-T.B.-14, September 15, 1915. List of cotton licensees------------Not in S.R.A.H.B.-15, September 15. 1915. Cotton licenses revoked--------------Not in S.R.A.H.B.-16, October 14, 1915. Instructions relative to reporting reshipments ofimported cotton---------------------------------------------------1915-81I.B.--17, October 15, 1915. Instructions regarding burning of picker waste_ 1915-81H.B.-I8, October 18. 1915. A method of fumigating baled cotton-------1915-82H.B.-19, October 15, 1915. Supplementary list of licensees authorized topurchase and use foreign cotton_---------------------------------Not in S.R.A.H.B.-20, November 15, 1915. Cotton licenses revoked-------------Not in S.R.A.II.B.-21, November 15, 1915. Instructions regarding the screening and safe-guarding of warehouses and rooms in which cotton is handled in theprocess of opening and cleaning---------------------------------------1915-881.B.-22, November 16, 1915. Safoguarding of foreign cotton in storage andprocess of manufacture to be enforeed------------------------------1915-8911.B.-23, November 17, 1915. Regarding the sealing of windows of roomswhere imported cotton is stored or handled in process of opening andleaning-------------------------------------------------------Not in S.R.A.H.B.-24. November 24, 1915. Memorandum for employees of the Federalhorticultural Board. Refer all unusual questions to the Board-__ Not in S.R.A.11.B.-25. Novemnber 30, 1915. Entry of foreign lint cotton through the mailsprohibited ----------------------------------------------------------1915-8911.B.-26, December 8, 1915. Egyptian cotton samples in violation in mail -accepted during December if routed to Washington for inspectiolNot in S.R.A.H.B.-27, December 9, 1915. Safeguarding of cotton sampling roomsNot in S.R.A.H.B.-28, December 11, 1915. Perimittee's notice of shipment of importedcotton--------------------------------------------------------------1915-98H.B.-29. December 21, 1915. Cotton licenses revoked--------------Not in S.R.A.H.B.80, January 3, 19163. Second supplementary list of licensees author-ized to purchase and use foreign cotto ------------------_-------Not in S.R.A.

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6 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTSCirculars, H.B.'s, P.Q.C.A.'s, B.P.Q.'s-Continued. Year and pageH.B.-31, January 15, 1916. Instructions to potato permittees as to diseasetolerance --------------------------------------------------------1916-11H.B.-31%/, January 31, 1916. Qualified certification of plants distributed bythe Department of Agriculture-------------------------------------1916-12H.B.-32, February 4, 1916. Cotton waste subject to all the provisions of theregulations governing the importation of cotton into the United States 1916-15H.B.-33, February 5, 1916. Changes made in revising cotton regulationsNot in S.R.A.I.B.-34, February 7, 1916. Conditions under which samples of foreigncotton may be stored and distributed-------------------------------1916-17H.B.-35, February 9, 1916. Information required of cotton licensees-----1916-18H.B.-36, February 29, 1916. Cotton licenses revoked---------------Not in S.R.A.H.B.-37, March 4, 1916. Conditions under which waste from foreign cottonmay be worked over or reclaimed----------------------------------1916-32H.B.-38, March 8, 1916. Revised method of submitting notices of arrivaland shipment of imported cotton-----------------------------------1916-33H.B.-39, March 14, 1916. Cotton licenses revoked-----------------Not in S.R.A.Il.B.-40, March 15, 1916. Notice of receipt of imported cotton requiredfrom licensee-----------------------------------------------------1916-34H.B.-41, March 22, 1916. In lieu of quarantine, eastern nurserymen asked not to ship white pine. gooseberry, or currant stock into the Rocky Moun-tain and western white pine forest areas--------------------------1916-36H.B.-42, March 22, 1916. Directions for the disinfection of imported cotton.(Superseded by H.B.-164)-----------------------------------------1916-38 Supplement, March 22, 1920 ---------------------------------Not in S.R.A.H.B.-43, March 24, 1916. Revision of mailing list-----------------Not in S.R.A.H.B.-44, March 25, 1916. Cotton licenses revoked-----------------Not in S.R.A.H.B.-45, March 29, 1916. Shipment of cotton to foreign countries via theUnited States----------------------------------------------------1916-40H.B.-46, April 5, 1916. Third supplementary list of licensees authorized topurchase and use foreign cotton-------------------------------Not in S.R.A.H.B.-47, April 6. 1916. Cotton licenses revoked------------------Not in S.R.A.H.B.-48, April 26, 1916. Grades of waste from imported cotton which maybe distributed, upon approval, without restriction--------------------1916-5AH.B.-49, May 12, 1916. Cotton quarantine of the Egyptian Government_ 1916-62H.B.-50, May 23, 1916. Licenses authorizing the purchase, use, or storageof imported cotton, in effect on May 22, 1916--------------------Not in S.R.A.H.B.-51, June 1, 1916. Permits authorizing the importation, and licensesauthorizing the purchase and use, of imported cotton after July 1,1916--------------------------------------------------------Not in S.R.A.H.B.-52. June 15, 1916. Cotton not subject to disinfection must be coveredwith wrappings which have not previously been used to cover cotton.Importation of burlap or other fabrics which have been used for wrapping cotton subject to restriction-----------------------------------1916-79H.B.-53, June 19, 1916. Results of inspection of Christmas trees andgreens, nursery stock, forest products, and quarry products shipped fromthe territory quarantined on account of the gypsy moth------------1916-76H.B.-54, June 26, 1916. Regulation 13 amended to provide for the returnunder certain conditions to the United States of cotton grown In theUnited States, or of foreign cotton which has been disinfected in the United States and sent abroad-------------------------------------1916-80H.B.-55, July 1. 1916. Extension of bonding period beyond the 40 days pro-vided in regulation 7 for the disinfection of imported cotton authorized. 1916-85H.B.-56. July 3. 1916. Postponement of the effective date of amendmentno. 5 to the rules and regulations governing the importation of cottoninto the United States_--------------------------------------------1916-86H.B.-57. July 18, 1916. Licensees authorized to purchase and use, trafficin. or store imported cotton on and after July 1, 1916------------Not in S.R.A.H.B.-58, August 8, 1916. Licensee's notice of receipt of imported cotton_ Not in S.R.A.H.B.-59, August 22, 1916. Call for report of imported cotton on handAugust 21, 1916 ----------------------------------------------Not in S.R.A.H.B.-60. August 28. 1916. Notice of revocation of licenses_---------Not in S.R.A.H.B.-61. September 13. 1916. Notice of revocation of licenses-------Not in S.R.A.H.B.-62. September 14, 1916. Revocation of amendment no. 4 to the rulesand regulations governing the importation of cotton into the UnitedStates-------------------------------------------------------Not in S.R.A.H.B.-63, September 21, 1916. Rcquost that original customs entry numbercovering importation of cotton or cotton waste be indicated on all notices1916-124H.B.-64. September 22, 1916. Foreign cotton and cotton waste enteredthrough the port of New York must be disinfected at that port-----1916-124H.B.-65. October 3, 1916. Notice of revocation of licenses---------Not in S.R.A.H.B.-66. October 7. 1916. First supplementary list of licensees authorizedto purchase and use, traffic in. or store imported cotton-----------Not in S.R.A.H.B.-67, October 28. 1.916. Wrapping of cotton not subject to disinfectionas a condition of importation subject to restrictions. Importation ofburlap and other fabrics which have been used for wrapping cotton sub-ject to restrictions----------------------------------------------1916-134H.B.-68, November 18, 1916. Notice of revocation of licenses-------Not in S.R.A.H.B.-69, November 20, 1916. Report of storage of imported cotton pendingdisinfection or distribution---------------------------------------1916-144H.B.-70, November 21, 1916. Copy certificates prescribed in amendmentsnos. 7 and 8 to the cotton regulations may be omitted---------------1916-145H.B.-71, November 24, 1916. Authorization dated July 1, 1916, for exten-sion of bonding period beyond the 40 days provided in regulation 7 for thedisinfection of imported cotton rescinded---------------------------1916-145H.B.-72, November 27, 1916. Conditions of entry of Canadian potatoes into the United States------------------------------------------------1916-147

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INDEX 7Circulars, H.B.'s, P.Q.C.A.'s, B.P.Q.'s-Continued. Year and pageH.B.-73, December 14, 1916. Potatoes imported from Canada must beaccompanied by shipper's certificate of soundness--------------------1916-154H.B.-74, January 2, 1917. Warning to cotton permittees and licensees rela-tive to shipments of imported cotton to nonlicensees_-----------------1917-1H.B.-75, January 4, 1917. Second supplementary list of licensees author-ized to purchase and use, traffic in, or store imported cotton-------Not in S.R.A.H.B.-76, January 29, 1917. Distribution to nonlicensees of disinfected sam-ples of imported cotton---------------------------------------Not in S.R.A.H.B.-77, February 6, 1917. Correspondence of branch offices of theBoard-------------------------------------------------------Not in S.R.A.H.B.-78, February 8, 1917. Disposal of leakage or wastage from foreigncotton-----------------------------------------------------------1917-8H.B.-79, February 20, 1917. Importation of burlap or other fabric whichhas been used for wrapping cotton---------------------------------1917-10H.B.-80, February 20, 1917. Such baling as will prevent wastage requiredof Mexican cotton------------------------------------------------1917-9H.B.-81, March 17, 1917. Section 8 of Plant Quarantine Act amended--1917-30H.B.-82, March 29, 1917. Permittees responsible for fumigation of cotton1917-32H.B.-83, April 2, 1917. Entry ports for foreign cotton, cotton waste,used burlap, etc---------------------------------------------------1917-37H.B.-84, April 10, 1917. Entry procedure under the rules and regulationsgoverning the importation of cotton into the United States-----------1917-39H.B.-85, April 6, 1917. Cotton fumigation plants must be licensed-----1917-38H.B.-86, April 4, 1917. Third supplementary list of licensees authorizedto purchase and use, traffic in, or store imported cotton---------Not In S.R.A.H.B.-87, July 2, 1917. Licensees authorized to purchase and use, traffic in,or store imported cotton, revised to June 28, 1917 ---------------Not in S.R.A.H.B.-88, August 28, 1917. Notice of revocation of licenses_---------Not in S.R.A.H.B.-89, September 24, 1917. First supplementary list of licensees author-ized to purchase and use. traffic in, or store imported cotton------Not in S.R.A.H.B.-90, September 27, 1917. Imported cotton samples should be listed onship's manifest as " cotton samples " and should be packed separately--1917-112H.B.-91, December 10, 1917. Notice of revocation and amendment oflicenses--------------------------------------------------Not in S.R.A.H.B.-92, January 2, 1918. Instructions for Mexican border inspectorsNot in S.R.A.H.B.-93, January 7, 1918. Second supplementary list of licensees author-ized to purchase and use, traffic in, or store imported cotton-------Not in S.R.A.H.B.-94, April 4, 1918. Cooperation of nurserymen requested in eradicacation of common barberry to aid in the control of wheat stem rust----1918-42H.B.-95, April 8, 1918. Third supplementary list of licensees authorizedto purchase and use, traffic in, or store imported cotton-----------Not in S.R.A.H.B.-96, April 19, 1918. Charges for disinfection of imported cotton--_1918-46H.B.-97, June 10, 1918. Licensees authorized to purchase ,!nd use, traffic in,or store imported cotton, revised to June 7, 1918---------------Not in S.R.A.H.B.-98, July 9, 1918. Revision of cotton mailing list-------------Not in S.R.A.H.B.-99, October 6, 1918. First supplementary list of licensees authorizedto purchase and use, traffic in, or store imported cotton---------Not in S.R.A.H.B.-100, October 23, 1918. Notice of revocation of license_-------Not in S.R.A.H.B.-101, January 2, 1919. Second supplementary list of licensees author-ized to purchase and use. traffic in, or store imported cotton-----Not in S.R.A.H.B.-102. February 28, 1919. Brown-tail moth and gypsy moth coming inwith French stock-careful inspection of all imported stock necessary--1919-23H.B.-103, March 19, 1919. Licensees authorized to purchase and use. traffic in, or store imported cotton, revised to March 19, 1919_-----Not in S.R.A.H.B.-104, March 25, 1919. All outstanding permits for importation ofnursery stock revoked May 31, 1919-------------------------------1919-35H.B.-105, April 10. 1919. Explanation of provisions for entry of pinntnovelties and propagating stock under quarantine no. 37. (Supersededby P.Q.C.A.-249) -------------------------------------------------1919-33revised July 28, 1919------------------------------------------1919-82supplement October 7, 1919. New varieties for personal use____ 1919-105 revised July 1, 1920___-------------------------------------Not in S.R.A.revised January 1, 1922. Title: Explanation of provisions for entryof plant novelties and propagating stock under regulation 14.quarantine 37-----------------------------------------------1921-168revised February 26, 1923---------------------------------1923-18revised March 31, 1923------------------------------------1923-22 revised April 10, 1926------------------------------------1926-31H.B.-106, April 10, 1919. Instructions for sterilization of sand, soil, orearth used for packing bulbs imported under notice of quarantineno. 37----------------------------------------------------------Not in S.R.A.revised November 8, 1920-----------------------------------Not in S.R.A.H.B.-107, May 15, 1919. Notices required by regulations 10 and 11 ofquarantine no. 37, for stock entered at Boston, New York, Philadelphia,New Orleans, San Francisco, or Seattle------------------------Not in S.R.A.H.B.-108, May 16, 1919. Notices required by regulations 10 and 11 ofquarantine no. 37, for stock entered at ports other than Boston, NewYork. Philadelphia, New Orleans. San Francisco, or Seattle-------Not in S.R.AH.B.-109, July 14, 1919. Lily-of-the-valley clumps must be free from sand,soil, or earth----------------------------------------------------1919-82H.B.-110, September 5, 1919. Fumigation of railway cars and other ve-hicles and freight, express, baggage, and other materials from MexicoNot in S.R.A.H.B.-111, September 15, 1919. (Explanation of form 207-3)--------Not in S.R.A.H.B.-112, September 16, 1919. Fumigation of railway cars and othervehicles and freight, express, baggage, and other materials from Moxico1919-109H.B.-113, October 1, 1919. Licensees authorized to purchase and use,traffic in, or store Imported cotton, revised to November 1, 1920---Not in S.R.A.48191-34---2

PAGE 186

8 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTSCirculars, iI.B.'s, P.Q.C.A.'s, B.P.Q.'s-Continued. Year and pageIl.B.-114, October 27, 1919. Shipment of nursery stock in bond toforeign countries ------------------------------------------------1919-108II.B.-11>, November 15, 1919. Entry under regulation 14 for imme-diate transportation and exportation in bond of plants with earthprohibited -1.__9__ -____ou_-__ -_-___-____-----------1919-123.November 21, 1919. Seedlings or lining out stock of orna-mentals not permitted entry under quarantine no. 37---------------1919-124II.B.-.117, October 31, 1919. Instructions relative to inspection and entryof plants under regulation 3, quarantine no. 37---------------------1919-103II.B.-11S, January 16, 1920. Reduction of fumigation charge on Texas-Mexican borde-------------------------------------------------Not in S.R.AlI.B.119, January 6, 1920. First supplementary list of licensees authorizedto purchase and use. traffic in, or .store imported cotton-------------Not in S.R.A.II.B.-120, February 28, 1920. Grinding or sterilization of corn as a con-dition of entry from Mexico under quarantine no. 42-----------------1920-16II.B.-121, 'March 8, 1920. Conversion of certain classes of burlap intopaper as satisfying the disinfection requirements of regulation 14, cottonregulations -------------------------------------------------1920-39revised October 1, 1923. Title : Conversion of certain classes of bur-lap into paper or other approved treatment as the equivalent of thedisinfection required by regulation 11, cotton regulations----------1923-136II.B.-122, April 1, 1920. Second supplementary list of licensees authorizedto purchase and use, traffic in, or store imported cotton----------Not in S.R.A.H.B.-123, April 19, 1920. Bad condition of French fruit stocks---------1920-36ILB.-124, 'May 20, 1920. Licensees authorized to deal in or convert intopaper certain classes of burlap which may be converted into paper as satis-fying the disinfection requirements of regulation 14 of the cotton regula-lions---------------------------------------------------------Not in S.R.A.II.B.-12>, September 1, 1920. Licensees authorized to purchase and use,traffic in, or store imported cotton, revised to September 1, 1920-.-Not in S.R.A.addition, September 25, 1920---------------------------------Not in S.R.A,I.B.-12s, November 1, 1920. Licensees authorized to purchase and use,traffic in, or store imported cotton, revised to November 1, 1920--Not in S.R.A.H.B.-127, January 21, 1921. Licensees authorized to deal in or convertinto paper certain classes of burlap which may be converted into paperas satisfying the disinfection requirements of regulation 14 of the cottonregulations ------___----------------------------------------Not in S.R.A.H.B.-125, February 8, 1921. Nests of brown-tail moth and white tree pieridarriving on French fruit seedlings-careful inspection of all French stocknecessary--------------------------------------------------------1921-43H.I.-129, February 14, 1921. First supplementary list of licensees author-ized to purchase and use, traffic in, or store imported cotton-------Not in S.R.A.II.B.-180, February 25, 1921. Restrictions on entry of foreign plantswidely misunderstood-------------------------------------_----1921-44H.B.-131, February 28, 1921. 'Misinterpretation possible of inspection atport of entry-----------------------------------------------------1921-52-I.B.-132, M\arch 10, 1921. Sterile packing material for packing bulbs au-thorized------------------------------------------------------Not in S.R.Arevised June 8, 1921. Title : Packing material for nursery stock, plants,and ,eeds_----------------------------------------------------1921-52H.B.-133, March 11, 1921. Imported plants must be inspected at time ofpacking and washed free from earth.--------------------------------1921-53H.B.-134, March 23, 1921. Notices of shipment of nursery stock made acondition of entry----------------------------------------------1921-54H.B.-135. April 11, 1921. Uncertified imported cotton waste, and burlap orother fabric which has been used, or of the kinds ordinarily used, forwrapping col ton must be held pending the securing of required certificateor must be disinfected as condition of release------------------------1921-84H.B.-136, 'May 4, 1921. Quarantine 37 to be strictly enforced as to plantsbrought by travelers or others--------------------------------------1921-55rvised April 15, 1927. Title : Emergency permits for entry of plantsand plant products brought by travelers or others----------------1927-86I.B.-137, May 4, 1921. Reasons for rejection of miscellaneous plant impor-tations-----------_ __--------------------------------------1921-56H.B.-1"8, May 16, 1921. Special permits for the year 1921-1922. (July1, 1921, to June 30, 1922)------------------------------------Not in S.R.A.H.B.-189, June 14, 1921. A violation of quarantine no. 37 --------------1921-57IJ.B.-140, June 22, 1921. Control status of the gypsy moth in the UnitedStates. Washington conference------------------------------------1921-61II.B.-141, January 1, 1922. Mail entry of imports under regulation 14,quarantine 37, hereafter pormitted---------------------------------1921-172revised May 11, 1923. Title : Reotrictions on importations through triemails of plants and seeds--------------------------------------1923-78revise'( ] Fc bruary 11, 1925-----------------------------------1925-15I.B.-142, January 3, 1922. Release of cotton samples after fumigation_-_ 1922-68II.B.-143, February 15, 1922. A quarantine bugaboo laid to rest--------1922-231.-.-144, February 27, 1922. Importation under regulation 2, quarantine37. of " plant products" in a live state, other than the classes specificallyenunwrated, are subject to restriction_------------------------------1922-25II.B.-145, March 1, 1922. Is quarantine 37 a plant embargo?-----------1922-26Il.K.-146. March 1, 1922. Licensees authorized to purchase and use, trafficin, or store imported cotton, revised to March 1, 1922------------Not in S.R.A.ll.R.-147. April 13, 1922. Shipment of Mexican citrus fruit in bondthrough the United States. (Superseded by P.Q.C.A.-"05)------------1922-94supplement no. 1, July 21, 1922_--------------------------------1922-129suppnement no. 2, October 17, 1922 (supersedes supplement no. 1)_ Not In S.R.A.supplement no. 3, November 15, 1923 (supersedes supplements nos. .1 and 2------------------------------------1923-168revised FebFuary 1, 1926-----------------------------------------1926-19

PAGE 187

INDEX 9Circulars, H.B.'s, P.Q.C.A.'s, B.P.Q.'s-Continued. Year and pageH.B.-148, April 21, 1922. Blister rust quarantine violations--policy ofthe Department---------------------------------------------------1922-69H.B.-149, May 12, 1922. Violation of plant quarantine no. 37----------1922-29H.B.-150, May 12, 1922. Brief notes on pests intercepted on foreign plantsoffered for entry--------------------------------------------------1922-29H.B.-151, May 15, 1922. European restrictions on the entry of plantsfrom America----------------------------------------------------1922-36H.B.-152, June 30, 1922. Record of the endorsement of quarantine 37Not in S.R.A.H.B.-153, July 22, 1922. The selective features of quarantine 37---------1922-103H.B.-154, July 22, 1922. List of circulars explanatory of quarantine 37___ 1922-106.H.B.-155, July 21, 1922. Reinstatement of Peter Hopman & Sons___.-__ 1922-107H.B.-156, July 26, 1922. Issuance of permits under regulation 3, quar-antine 37 ----------------------------------------------------1922-107H.B.-157, August 9, 1922. Rose stocks for propagating purposes------1922-107Hl.B.-158, August 11, 1922. Importation of stocks of Rhododendron, Azalea,and Japanese maple------------------------------------------------1922-108I.B.-159, November 24, 1922. Samples of raw or unmanufactured cottonmay be imported by parcel post when addressed to the Federal Hlorticul-tural Board, United States Department of Agriculture---------------1922-130 revised December 31. 1923------------------------------_-----------1923-140H.B.-160, January 8, 1923. Conditions which must be ilet in plant exportsto England and Wales (Superseded by P.Q.C.A.-327)_-----------------1923-46H.B.-161, February 6, 1923. Directions for the disinfection of broomcorn-_ 1923-28revised November 26. 1923 -------------------------------------1923-15511.B.--12, February 15, 1923. Federal Plant Quarantine Act-purpose andIlod covered------------------------------------------------------1923-48revised March 1, 1926. Title : Federal Plant Quarantine Act of August20, 1912-purpose and powers of the Act-----------------------1926-22H.B.-163. February 23, 1923. Mill use of fumigated cotton substantiallywithout risk----------------------------------------------------1923-37HI.B.-164, March 1, 1923. Hydrocyanic-acid gas fumigation of cotton andcotton wrappings as condition of entry_-------------------------------1923-371H.B.-165, March 31, 1923. Personal liability agreement to replace bond,quarantine 37 -----------------------------------------------------1923-17lI.B.-166, April 11, 1923. Personal liability agreement replaces bond.Discussion of circular H1B-105, revised-------------------------Not in S.R.A.H.B.-1G7, April 11, 1923. Control of movement of nurs-ry stock underJapanese beetle quarantine------------------------------------------1923-831.l3.-16S, May 10, 1923. Except as to Boston, entry of browimcorn restrictedto the months of November to March, inclusive-----------------------1923-86H.B.-169, July 17. 1923. Restrictions on entry of plants into the Irish FreeState. (Superseded by P.Q.C.A.-327)_------------------------------1923-121IH.B.-170. October "0, 1923. Permittees warned against importation oroverripe or damaged lemons. Similar warning as to other fruits and asto ve:etables_------------------------------------------------------1923-158H-.B.-171. November 20, 1923. Fruits and vegetables permitted entry underquarantine 56---_--------------_-----------------------------------1923-158revised November 17, 1924-------------------------------__ _---Not in S.R.A.revised June 6, 1925-------------------------------------------1925-44H.B.-172. November 22. 1923. Broomcorn must be adequately baled ------1923-154H.B.--1 73, December 28, 1923. Warning against the inclusion of bulbs theentry of which is not provided for under regulation 3 of quarantine 37,in shipments of bulbs under that regulation-------------------------192.-144H.B.-174. December 28, 1923. Conditions governing inspection and certifica-tion of nursery stock for interstate movement under regulation 7. asamended, quarantine no. 45, on account of the gypsy moth and brown-tailmoth. (Supplemented by I.B.-182 ; superseded by P.Q.C.A.-384,) -----1923-144H.B.-175, December 28 1923. A means of (xpediting prosecution for viola-tions of the Plant Quarantine Act. (Superseded by P.Q.C.A.-292)----1923-167H.B.-176, January 25. 1924. Licensees authorized to dial in ()r convertcertain classes of burlap into paper or other approved treatment as theequivalent of the disinfection required by regulation 11 of the cottonregulations----------------------------------------------------Not in S.R.A.revised February 2. 1925-------------------------------------Not in S.R.A.revised January 27. 1926-------------------------------------Not in S.R.A.revised February 26, 1927----------------------------------Not in S.R.A.revived January 18, 1928------------------------------------Not in SJR.A.revised January 30, 1929---------------------__--_ _ --_--Not in S v.A.H.B.-177, February 7, 1924. Potato wart-->tatement of policy-----------192-92-.B.-178, February 18, 1924. Control of move nt 4,f nurseryv stock underJapanese beetle quarantine. (Supplemented by H.-180)_-------------1924--10H.B.-179. February 26. 1924. Report of a conference on ihe restritimnson the movement of nursery stock under the gypsy-moth quarantine.(Supplemented by f.B.-182; superseded by P.Q.C.A.-334) -_-_-------1924-811.1.-1SO, March 3. 1924. Conditions of certification and fWlu V'menit fromnurseries of first. second, and third classes as desi(nat'd in H.-178.(Supplements H.B.-178)---------------------------------------------1924-13H.1.-181. March 18,. 1924. Entry of heavily infested broomern 1 ot tobe tolerated _----_--__--------------------------------------------1924--15H.B.-182, May 3, 1924. Restrictions on movement of nursery stock duringlarval period of gypsy moth. (Supplements H.B.'s 174 and 179) -------1924-35H.11.-18",. May 8. 1924. Restrictions on th" entry of (At flowers anddecorative plant material-------------------------------------------1924-64H.1.-i84, July 1, 1924. Supplementary list of liccns is a othorized to dea"in or convert certain classes of burlap into paper fr i her ap poved Ie~ ,t-ment as the equivalent of the disinfe tion require(l by regulation 11 'fthe cotton regulations-------------------------------------------Not in S.R.A.H.B.--185, September 2, 1924. Nursery stock shipments must be free tromlisand, soil, or earth. Warning re nursery stock shipments --------------1921 96

PAGE 188

10 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTSCirculars, lI.B.'s, P.Q.C.A.'s, B.P.Q.'s-Continued. Year and pageH.B.-186, October 1, 1924. Second supplementary list of licensees author-ized to deal in or convert certain classes of burlap into paper or otherapproved treatment as the equivalent of the disinfection required byregulation 11 of the cotton regulations--------------------------Not in S.R.A.H.B.-187, November 20, 1924. All nursery stock and other plants forpropagation must be freed from sand, soil, or earth as a condition ofentry. (Supplements II.B.-185)----------------------------------1924-119II.B.-188, April 6, 1925. Certain classes of bulbs to be restricted as toentry January 1, 1926---------------------------------------------1925-33H.B.-189, April 23, 1925. Restrictions on the entry of potatoes into theCzechoslovak Republic---------------------------------------------192 -54Il.B.-190, June 27, 1925. Fruit and rose stocks versus pest risks-----Not in S.R.A.l.B.-191, July 11, 1925. Conversion or treatment of certain classes ofundisinfected burlap within 60 days from date of receipt no longerrequired---------------------------------------------------------1925-69H.B.-192, July 17, 1925. Special certification requirement of Ceylon gov-erning shipment of plants-----------------------------------------1925-74LI.B.-193. March 10, 1926. Conditions governing entry of narcissus bulbsunder reulation 14. quarantine 37-----------------------------------1926-8II.B.-194, Aprid 21. 1926. Utilization of plants imported for propagation1926-30revised Ma rch 15. 1927------------------------------------------1927-11revised Juily 28, 1927 -------------------------------------------1927-111H.B.-195, May 4, 1926. Disinfection of narcissus bulbs_----------------1926-36Ill-B,.-196. Sepieimber 10, 1926. Restrictions governing the entry of cipollini_ 1926-81II.B-197, January 15, 1927. Narcissus importations in 1927-----------1927-101I.B.-198, February 5, 1927. Notice to narcissus bulb permittees of 1926-_ 1927-481LB.-199, March 9, 1927. Regulations governing the importation of plantsand plant products into Denmark. (Superseded by P.Q.C.A.-304)-------1927-51IL.B.-200, March 9, 1927. Certitikation of domestic narcissus bulbs acondition of interstate shipment-------------------------------------1927-48II.B.-201. March 21. 1927. Segregation and charting requirement of plantsimported under special permit for propagation. (Superseded by P.Q.C.A.'s-285 and ,"d --) -----------------------------------------------1927-15revised November 14. 1927--------------------------------------1927-1481J.B.-202. April 15, 1927. Entry of narcissus bulbs for propagation in th"fall of 1927------------------------------------------------------1927-811I.1.-203, April 25, 11927. Inspection and certification of domestic narcissusbulb. -------------------------------------------------------------1927-80H.-204. May 28, 1927. Violation of quarantines 37 and 60 --------_ 1927-83H.B.-205. May :1. 1927. Conditions governing the entry of chestnuts, wal-nuts. filberts. cobants, and acorns from Europe during the shipping season1927-28 ---------------------------------------------------------1927-59H.B.-206, July 9, 1927. Pereboom case adjusted------------------------1927-118l.B.-207, August 1, 1927. Supplemental notice re grading of narcissushulbs-------------------------------------------------------------1927-116IIl.-208. Octob-r 6, 1927. Treatment of chestnuts in Italy prior to ship-innt to the United States----------------------------------------1927-141IIB.-209. October 29, 1927. Action deferred with respect to certain isolatedJipan< se-l'eotb infestations ------------------------------1927-14TII ,.-210, November 14, 1927. Flowers may be cut from fleld-growit nar-cissus bulbs imported under special permit----------------------------1927-148I.1.-211, Fe'bruary 18, 1928. Conditions ,overning the entry of plants andplane products into Mexico. (Superseded by P.Q.C'.A.-284)------------1928-18supplemenit no. 1. May 10, 1928----------------------------------1928-51lI.B.--212. 'March 16. 1928. Regulations governing the movement of plantsand plant products through the mails. (Supers, ded by B.P.Q.--351)----1928-18revise-d May 1, 1929-------------------------------------------Not in S.R.A.II.P.-21, :April 10, 1928. Entry of narcissus bulbs for propagation in thefall of 1928------------------------------------------------------1928-451I,1.-214. June 15, 1928. Cotton price forecasts prohibited_--_-----------1928-5211.1I;,-215. .u:w 1 1. 192S. Conditions g (v ,rnin,,, the entry of Europeanh, stnuts. s1Jppine season 192-2" ----------------------------------19"8-II.B.-21G. June 30. 1928. Condition !s vov(ning entry of bananas---------1928-(On J1 oly 1. 1928, the Federal Horticultural Board became the Plant Quar-:int n( aid Control Administrition ; accordingly circulars of this seriesissued aftor that (late were designated as P.Q.C.A.'s.)P.Q.C.A.-217. July 12, 1928. Calciumn-cyanide fumigation for bulb-fly con-trol a eriz. (Suptrseded by B.Q.------7)-----------------------192S-79rsdy28, ---,---------------------1028-79P.Q.A .-2 18, Jil 24, 1928. Restrictions re orchid permits. Suporsedtdby l.Q.XA. 278) -----------------------------------------------1928-84revis-d October ', 192S--------------------------------------------1928-121I.Q 1 .1 Jamitv 25, 1929. N ice to nurs''rymen ship,'ing currant crgoo.m berry )1 no or fiv(leaf pins-------------------------------------1929-18-.',22(0, I'bruiry 21, 1929. Administrative instructions relative toenlo.>*'ieft or rn it6ion (, quarantine 48 (1sixlh revision), on a1(coun1tof the Japnse ljeile_------------------------------------------------1929'J$L'.Q.C .\ 221. ciieel ix e March 15, 1929. Adminiistrat ive instrnucriotas relative1 en forcemont )f re-alation 5., quarantile no. 66, On account of theAsiatic ito i 1 and Ihe Asiatic garden beetle--------------------------1929-16P.Q.C.A.-222, March 28, 1929. Flowers may be cut from field-grown bulbousiris import d under special permit------------------------------------19 9-4P.Q.C.A.-223, April 10, 1929. Entry of narcissus bulbs for propagation inthe fill of 1929 ------------------------------------------------1929-118P.Q.C.A.-224, April 16, 1929. Instructions to inspectors on the disinfectionof nii rsery product s for the Ja n4eSd and Asiatic beetles-----------1929-63

PAGE 189

INDEX 11Circulars, H.B.'s, P.Q.C.A.'s, B.P.Q.'s-Continued. Year and pageP.Q.C.A.-225, April 16, 1929. Recorded hosts of Geratitis capitataNot in S.R.A.P.Q.C.A.-226, May 8, 1929. Cleaning refrigerator cars under Mediterraneanfruit fly quarantine-----------------------------------------------1929-90P.Q.C.A.-227, May 10, 1929. Iow to recognize the Mediterranean fruitfly---------------------------------------------------------Not in S.R.A.(Pertinent portion published as part of P.Q.C.A.-230)--------------1929-105P.Q.C.A.-228, effective May 11, 1929. Administrative instructions relativeto enforcement of Mediterranean fruit-fly quarantine----------------1929-100P.Q.C.A.-229, effective May 16, 1929. Administrative instructions. Floridafruit and vegetable shipments limited as to destination. (Modified byP.Q.C.A.-240)---------------------------------------------------1929-101P.Q.C.A.-230, May 20, 1929. War against the Mediterranean fruit fly --_ 1929-101P.Q.C.A.-231, May 22, 1929. Refrigeration of infested fruit not an adequatesafeguard against spread of fruit fly------------------------------1929-105P.Q.C.A.-232, effective May 23, 1929. Administrative instructions. Inter-state movement of imported fruits and vegetables via Florida ports_--1929-109P.Q.C.A.-233, effective May 23, 1929. Administrative instructions. Periodof shipment of noncitrus fruits and host vegetables from protectivezones in Florida extended for season of 1929. (Modified by P.Q.C.A.-238) -----------------------------------------------------------1929-109P.Q.C.A.-234, effective June 4, 1929. Administrative instructions. Shipment of nursery stock by mail from Florida prohibited. Extension ofcitrus-fruit shipping season from newly established protective zones---1929-111P.Q.C.A.-235, June 5, 1929. Re Mediterranean fruit fly-orchard andpacking-house sanitation urged for all fruit sections-----------------1929-112P.Q.C.A.-236, effective June 14. 1929. Administrative instructions. Exten-sion of shipping period for Florida eggplants and peppers-----------1929-116P.Q.C.A.-237, effective June 27, 1929. Administrative instructions. Re-moval of restrictions on cowpeas_----------------------------------1929-117P.Q.C.A.-238, effective July 2, 1929. Administrative instructions. Ship-ment of grapes from cold-storage plants. (Modifies P.Q.C.A.-233)___ 1929-135P.Q.C.A.-239, July 8, 1929. Supplement no. 1 to instructions on thedisinfection of nursery products for the Japanese and Asiatic beetles.(Superseded by B.P.Q.-339)_-------------------------------------1929-133P.Q.C.A.-240 effective July 23, 1929. Administrative instructions. Removal of restrictions on destination of limes from Monroe and Dade Counties.(Modifies P.Q.C.A.-229) ------------------------------------------1929-139P.Q.C.A.-241, July 29, 1929. Conditions governing the entry of chestnutsand acorns from all countries and localities, shipping season 1929-30.(Snperseded by B.P.Q.-344)-----------------------------------Not in S.R.A.P.Q.C.A.-242, effective August 12, 1929. Administrative instructions. Re-moval of restrictions on string beans---------------------------