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Service and regulatory announcements

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Title:
Service and regulatory announcements
Added title page title:
Service and regulatory announcements with list of plant pests intercepted with imported plants and plant products
Abbreviated Title:
Serv. regul. announc. - U. S., Plant Quar. Control Adm.
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United States -- Plant Quarantine and Control Administration
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C.
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U.S. G.P.O.
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Quarterly
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English
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16 v. : ; 23 cm.

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Plant quarantine -- Periodicals -- United States ( lcsh )
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serial ( sobekcm )
federal government publication ( marcgt )

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Dates or Sequential Designation:
S.R.A.--P.Q.C.A. no. 96 (July/Sept. 1928)-S.R.A.--P.Q.C.A. no. 111 (Apr./June 1932).
General Note:
Title from caption.
Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Plant Quarantine and Control Administration.

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not subject to copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105.
Resource Identifier:
030288967 ( ALEPH )
12903606 ( OCLC )
sn 86014227 ( LCCN )
0888-7608 ( ISSN )
Classification:
351 ( ddc )

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Service and regulatory announcements
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Service and regulatory announcements

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S. R. A.-P. A.- . A. No. 100. Issued January, 1930.



UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION



SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS

July-September, 1929 x


CONTENTS
Page
Quarantine and other official announcements--............................--------....------------------.....------------ 131
Fruit and vegetable quarantine (No. 56)--------------..................---------------------------------------- 132
All chestnut and acorn imports placed under permit restrictions (press notice) ------------ 132
Notice of permit requirement for entry of chestnuts and acorns 'rom foreign countries...... 132
Instructions to collectors of customs (T. D. 43548)....-----------------------------.. 132
Japanese-beetle quarantine (No. 48).............-----------------------------------------------........... 133
Supplement No. 1 to instructions on the disinfection of nursery products for the Japanese
and Asiatic beetles (P. Q. C. A.-239)............-------- ---------------------------------.. 133
Farm products released from Japanese-beetle quarantine (press notice)------------------.............. 134
Removal of Japanese-beetle quarantine restrictions on the interstate movement of farm
products....----------------..............------------------------------------------------------------... 134
Mediterranean fruit-fly quarantine (No. 68) ..........................----------------------------------------- 135
Administrative instructions-shipment of grapes from cold-storage plants (P: Q. C. A.-238)_ 135 Specialists appointed to study fruit fly in Florida (press notice)----------.........-------------.. 135
Secretary Hyde suggests Florida citrus may be made safe for shipment (press notice) .....------136
Report on fruit-fly eradication made to Secretary Hyde ....---------------......-------------.... 136
Limes produced in Monroe and Dade Counties, Fla., may be sent into Southern and Western
States (press notice) -------.............------------------------------------------------------.................................. 139
Administrative instructions-removal of restrictions on destination of limes from Monroe
and Dade Counties. (P. Q. C. A.-240) -------..................-----------------------------........... .............. 139
Treasury Department order re observance of Mediterranean fruit-fly quarantine regulations. 140 Secretary Hyde and agriculture officials to visit Florida fruit-fly section (press notice) ------ 140 String beans released from fruit-fly quarantine (press notice) ..............-------------------------. 140
Navy Department order re observance of Mediterranean fruit fly quarantine regulations-. 141 Administrative instructions-removal of restrictions on string beans (P. Q. C. A.-242) --- 141 Mediterranean fruit-fly quarantine revised (press notice) ................................---------------------------- 141
Mediterranean fruit-fly quarantine revised (effective September 1, 1929).................----------------- 143
Notice to common carriers......-------------------....................----------------------------- 152
Notice to general public through newspapers..........--...-----------.....----.........------...........-----------.. 152
Instructions to postmasters......-------------------------------------------------- 153
Fruit fly to be studied in Mediterranean basin (press notice) -------- .----------------- 154
Movement, prior to October 1, of citrus fruit from Florida authorized (press notice)------........ 155
Administrative instructions-shipment of Florida citrus fruit prior to October 1 (P. Q. C.
A.-243)..... --------------------------------------------------------------- 158
Administrative instructions-diversion of Florida products at southern points (P. Q. C.
A.-244)-------------......................................-------------------....------------------------------------------- 158
Administrative instructions-modification of eradication area designated in Mediterranean
fruit-fly quarantine regulations (P. Q. C. A.-245)..................................-------------------------------- 158
Sterilization by cooling authorized for Florida fruit (press notice).......................---------------------- 159
Administrative instructions-sterilization of citrus fruits under Mediterranean fruit-fly
regulations (P. Q. C. A.-246)................................. -----------------------------------------------160
Information re sterilization outside of the State of Florida of citrus fruits under Mediterranean fruit-fly regulations (P. Q. C. A.-247)........------------------------------------..................................... 161
Mexican fruit-worm quarantine (No. 64) ..................................................------------------------------------------- 163
Citrus census of the lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas as of July 1, 1929---------------................--. 163
Nursery stock, plant, and seed quarantine (No. 37)............------..........------......-----------------.............--- 165
Conference on fruit stocks importations called for July 19 (press notice) ----------. . 165
Fruit stocks decision (press notice)........................................... -----------------------------------------167
Modifcation of nursery stock, plant, and seed quarantine regulations .......------------------- 16S
Instructions to collectors of customs (T. D. 43527)..................................------------------------------ 168
Explanation of provisions for entry of plants under quarantine 37 (P. Q. C. A.--249-revision
of I. B. 105) ...-------........... ......................- ........................ .. 169
Pink-bollworm quarantine (No. 52).........---.................------------------------------------------- 173
Pink-bollworm quarantine regulations amended to permit shipment of second-cut liters out
of quarantine area under certain safeguards (press notice) -.....------....-..------------------ 173
Modification of pink-bollworn quantine ---............. .............-----------------------------------... 174
Notice to common carriers.......................... .............----------------------------------------------- 17
Notice to general public through newspapers...............................---------------------------------- 175
Miscellaneous items...........- ---------------.....................................----------------------------------------- 17
Senate upholds plant quarantine act ........... -------........................-- ---.....176
Estonia added to countries which may ship potatoes to the United States..............-. 176
Convictions for violations of the plant quarantine act.....------ ..--- .------ ---.......---- 176
Organation of the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration..... --.. --------------- 179

1 In view of the rather complete record of current work given in the last two numbers of these announoments, a discussion of this work is omitted in the present number.
86951 *.. 1 131







132 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [July-Sept.,

QUARANTINE AND OTHER OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS

FRUIT AND VEGETABLE QUARANTINE (NO. 56)
ALL CHESTNUT AND ACORN IMPORTS PLACED UNDER PERMIT RESTRICTIONS
(Press notice)
AUGUST 1, 1929.
R. W. Dunlap, Acting Secretary of Agriculture, has issued an order, effective September 1, 1929, under which all chestnuts and acorns whatever their source must be imported under permit and inspection. A similar order has been in effect, but has applied only to acorns and chestnuts of European origin. The order is intended to prevent the entry of living larvae of the European codling moth, chestnut weevils, and other injurious insects.
Under the permit regulations all shipments of acorns and chestnuts will be inspected on arrival. If inspection reveals living injurious insects the shipment must be exported promptly unless provision has been made for disinfection of shipments under conditions approved by the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration of the department.
Prospective importers of acorns and chestnuts may obtain copies of the orders and requirements. by communicating with the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration, Washington, D. C.


NOTICE OF PERMIT REQUIREMENT FOR ENTRY OF CHESTNUTS AND ACORNS FROM FOREIGN COUNTRIES

It has been determined by the Secretary of Agriculture that the method of drying, curing, or processing chestnuts and acorns in Europe, Asia, Africa, Mexico, Central and South America, and other foreign countries and localities does not entirely eliminate risk from the entry with such products of injurious insects, including the European codling moth (Carpocapsa splendana) and species of chestnut weevils (Balaninus spp.). Notice is therefore hereby given that in accordance with the proviso to regulation 2 (as amended January 10, 1925) of the Rules and Regulations Supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 56, all species and varieties of chestnuts and acorns may be imported from any of the foreign countries or localities above mentioned, on and after September 1, 1929, only under permit and on compliance with the safeguards prescribed therein. This notice supersedes notices of September 22, 1926, and June 1, 1927. Done at the city of Washington this 29th day of July, 1929. Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
R. W. DUNLAP,
Acting Secretary of Agriculture.


INSTRUCTIONS TO COLLECTORS OF CUSTOMS

( T. D. 43548)

Plant quarantine

REGULATIONS BY THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE GOVERNING THE IMPORTATION OF
CHESTNUTS AND ACORNS FROM ALL FOREIGN COUNTRIES

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,
OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONER OF CUSTOMS, WVasington, D. C., August 31, 1929.
To Collectors of Customs and Others Concerned:
The appended regulations issued by the Secretary of Agriculture July 29, 1929, governing the importation of chestnuts and acorns from foreign countries, are published for the information and gilidance of customs officers and others concerned.
The Secretary of Agriculture states that these regulations supersede the regulations of September 22, 1926, (T. D. 41791), and June 1, 1927, (T. D.







1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEIETENTS 133

42304), and calls attention to the fact that they extend to all foreign countries and localities, a requirement which heretofore applied only to European countries.
F. X. A. EBLE.
Commissioner of Customs.
[Then follows the text of the regulations.]


JAPANESE-BEETLE QUARANTINE (NO. 48)
SUPPLEMENT NO. 1 TO INSTRUCTIONS ON THE DISINFECTION OF NURSERY
PRODUCTS FOR THE JAPANESE AND ASIATIC BEETLES
PQCA--239 JULY 8, 1929.
TREATMENT OF SoIL WITH LEAD ARSENATE

Supplementing the instructions issued to administration inspectors on April 16, 1929, (PQCA-224), the following treatments are authorized as a basis of certification under the provisions of Notice of Quarantine No. 48 [regulation 6, section B (3) and (4)1.
The evidence appears conclusive that lead arsenate applied as herein prescribed is effective in eliminating Japanese and Asiatic beetle infestation. No general recommendation can be given at this time, however, as to the plant varieties which can be grown without injury in soil so treated. Experimental work under way indicates that a large number of varieties can be grown successfully in such soil. In view of the limited number of experimental tests carried out on any one variety of plants, nurserymen who desire to substitute this method on their own premises in place of other measures heretofore employed, are to be advised that some hazard to the plants may be involved and that the department and its employees can not be responsible for any injury which may result.
A. 4.-TREATMENT OF POTTING SOIL WITH LEAD ARSENATE

Material.-Powdered acid lead arsenate.

Conditions of the soil.-The soil to be treated must be in a friable condition; wet soil can not be treated satisfactorily. The treatment is recom. mended only for soils which are slightly acid or neutral in reaction.
Terperature.--The soil after treatment must be maintained at a temperature of at least 600 F. for a period of eight weeks. If the treatment is applied during June or July the prevailing temperatures will meet this requirement.
Dosage.-Acid lead arsenate must be used at the rate of 2 pounds to each cubic yard of soil.
Application to soil.-The lead arsenate must be uniformly mixed with the soil. This may be accomplished either by hand shovelling or by the use of a machine mixer, such as a concrete mixer.
Period of treatment.-Eight weeks are necessary with the soil at a temperature of at least 600 F. to insure that all the grubs are killed. Prior to certification, the inspector must have determined that a soil temperature of not less than 60* has been maintained for a period of eight weeks.
Storage of soil.-The soil must be stored under conditions which will prevent reinfestation or contamination with untreated soil.

E.-LEAD ARSENATE FIELD TREATMENT

Material.-Powdered acid lead arsenate.
Condition of the soil.-The soil must be friable and in good tilth. The treatment is recommended only for soils which are slightly acid or neutral in reaction.
Season.-Where the treatment is to be used as a basis of certification between October 15 and the following June 15, the arsenate must, for the season of 1929, be applied before August 1. Because of differences in seasonal conditions it may, in other years, be necessary to modify the above dates.
Dosage.-Lead arsenate must be applied at the rate of 1.500 pounds to the acre, which is equivalent of 35 pounds to 1,000 square feet.







134 PLAN T QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [July-Sept.,

Application. (1) Plants growing in rows.--Cultivate the soil thoroughly, working it away from the plants, breaking out all middles, remove at least 2 inches of soil from about the base of the plants. The application may be broadcast or applied with a suitable fertilizer distributor or lime drill. It is essential that the application is uniform over the entire surface of the ground. The soil must then be cultivated so that the lead arsenate is uniformly mixed with the soil to a depth of at least 3 inches. The cultivator should be adjusted to throw the soil toward the rows and to obtain at least 3 inches of poisoned soil at the base of the plants. In order to secure the thorough distribution desired, the soil in the rows must be hoed by hand after cultivation.
(2) Individual plants.-The treatment of individual plants is essentially a hand operation. The soil must be treated in a manner to obtain the same conditions as are required for trees planted in rows. The area to be treated must never be less than 10 feet in diameter and must be at least 6 feet greater in diameter than the diameter of the soil ball to be removed with the tree.
Period of treatment.-Plants must not be dug for shipment before October 15.
C. L. MAR.ATT,
Chief, Plant Quarantine and Control Administration.


FARM PRODUCTS RELEASED FROM JAPANESE-BEETLE QUARANTINE
(Press notice)
SEPTEMBER 27, 1929.
All restrictions on the interstate movement of farm products in the area covered by the Japanese-beetle quarantine have been removed by the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration, according to an order issued by R. W. Dunlap, Acting Secretary of Agriculture. Restrictions on the movement interstate of cut flowers will remain in force until, and including, October 15. Restrictions on the movement of nursery, ornamental, and greenhouse stock are in force throughout the year and are not affected by this order.
It was possible to remove control of farm products because investigation by the Department of Agriculture had determined that the active period of the Japanese beetle in its relation to farm products has already ended, making safe marketing and interstate transportation without restriction. The removal of restrictions would have taken place normally on October 16, under the terms of the Japanese-beetle quarantine orders. The relaxation refers to this season only, and restrictions will not be removed next year, the department says, until investigators have determined that the danger period has come to an end.
"The restrictions on the movement of farm products which are terminated by this order," said Mr. Dunlap, are intended to be in force only during the period when the beetle is abundantly present and in active flight. There is no risk from the movement of such products after this period has terminated. The inspectors, however, are still finding beetles in cut flowers and the quarantine is maintained for them."


REMOVAL OF JAPANESE-BEETLE QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS ON THEV
INTERSTATE MOVEMENT OF FARM PRODUCTS
Having determined that the active period of the Japanese beetle in its relation to farm products has already ceased for the present season and that it is, therefore, safe to permit the unrestricted movement of the farm products listed in regulation 5 of the rules and regulations (seventh revision) supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 48 from the regulated area as defined in regulation 3 of said revised rules and regulations, it is ordered that all restrictions on the interstate movement of the articles referred to above are hereby removed on and after September 25, 1929. This order advances the termination of the restrictions as to farm products provided for in regulation
5 from October 16 to September 25, 1929, and applies to this season only. Done at the city of Washington this 23d day of September, 1929.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
R. W. DUNLAP,
Acting Secretary of Agriculture.






1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 135

NOTE: The restrictions on the movement of farm products which are terminated by this order are intended to be in force only during the period when the beetle is abundantly present and in active flight. It is recognized that there is no risk from the movement of such products after this period has terminated. During the past week the department's inspectors have found no beetles in farm products. The action taken, therefore, is merely to terminate the restrictions on the movement and thus stop the cost of administration at the earliest possible moment.
The inspectors are, however, still finding beetles in cut flowers. Due to the prevailing cool evenings, the beetles have a tendency to crawl down into the flowers for protection. Therefore, the restrictions on the interstate movement of cut flowers and other portions of plants will remain in full force and effect until October 15, inclusive.
Restrictions on the movement of nursery, ornamental and greenhouse stock and all other plants (except cut flowers and portions of plants without roots and incapable of propagation) are in force throughout the year and are not affected by this announcement.


MEDITERRANEAN FRUIT-FLY QUARANTINE (NO. 68)
ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS-SHIPMENT OF GRAPES FROM COLD-STORaGE PLANTS

[Modification of regulation 4, paragraph (5), and of P.Q.C.A.-233]
(Approved July 2, 1929; effective July 2, 1929)
PQCA-238 JULY 2, 1929.
Pending later amendment of the Mediterranean fruit-fly quarantine regulations (Notice of Quarantine No. 68), the following administrative instructions are issued:
Permits may be issued throughout the year for the shipment of grapes produced in protective zones and stored prior to July 1 in approved cold storage plants to move interstate only to the District of Columbia, including Potomac Yards in Virginia, and to destinations in the States of Maryland and Pennsylvania and States north and east thereof, when in the judgment of the inspector such movement does not involve risk of spreading the fruit fly, and conditioned further upon compliance with such precautions as to packing. storage and movement as shall be required by the inspector.
C. L. MArLTT,
Chief, Plant Quarantine and Control Administration.
Approved:
ARTHUR M. HYDE,
Secretary of Agriculture.


SPECIALISTS APPOINTED TO STUDY FRUIT FLY IN FLORIDA
(Press notice)
JULY 8, 1929.
The Secretary of Agriculture announces the appointment of certain specialists to study and report on the fruit fly in Florida. He points out that lie believes his department specialists are as competent to pass judgment on the pl)roblel as any others obtainable, but in view of the enormous exlpendilures now clearly shown to be needed to, continue the campaign of 'eriliition, antd t he nation-wide concern in tlie I)r(bleim, he feels that le should have tle hI)clit of the judgment of specialists outside ol the I1)epartlenlc t of Agriculture beh't able to render an opinion on the possibility of a successful conclusion of t he campaign. For this purpose the Secretary announces the appointment o1! tile following: Vernon Kellogg, Permanent Secretary, Na:ti ,rl nea' .eseclb (t ouricil, Washington, D. C.; I.. A. Morgan, President, University of Tennessee: T. I. Cooper, Dean, College of Agriculture, Director of Extension Work, .I0i t"aus, Kentucky; Victor R. Gardner, Director, State Experimental Station and I'r,fessor of Horticulture, State College, East Iansing, Michigan T. PI. Ilentlle,. Professor of Entomologey, Rutgers College, New Il unswiick, State EIltoi l ,ist







136 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINI STATION [July-Sept.,

of New Jersey and Entomologist of State Experiment Station; G. A. Dean, Head, Department of Entomology, State Agricultural College, and Entomologist, State Experiment Station, Manhattan, Kansas; and H. J. Quayle, Professor of Entomology, University of California, and Entomologist of Citrus Experiment Station, Riverside.
These specialists met in Washington, Monday, July 8. They will proceed to Florida to make an intensive study of the situation as a basis for a report on the possibility' of eradication and for any recommendations they may wish to make as to future policy.

SECRETARY HYDE SUGGESTS FLORIDA CITRUS MAY BE MADE SAFE FOR SHIPMENT
(Press notice)
JULY 19, 1929.
The Secretary of Agriculture stated July 18 that the research work which has been intensively prosecuted in Florida on methods of destruction of the Mediterranean fruit fly in fruit indicates the possibility that, by modification of existing practices in precooling and coloring, fruit may be made safe for shipment.
The Secretary also announced that there is reason to believe that the development of these methods as a supplement to the other suppressive measures now in force will make possible the movement of the citrus crop of this year without exposing additional areas to risk of infestation. He emphasized that, while this will involve a distinct modification of present restrictions on the movement of citrus fruit from all zones, and will avoid the general destruction of fruit in zone 1, it is believed that it will aid the eradication effort by the relief it will afford to the present acute economic situation, and by making it more possible for growers to continue full cooperation.
This action is recommended by the experts recently sent to Florida to study the situation and by C. L. Marlatt, Chief, Plant Quarantine and Control Administration. The experts are: Vernon Kellogg, Permanent Secretary, National Research Council, Washington, D. C.; H. A. Morgan, President, University of Tennessee; T. P. Cooper, Dean, College of Agriculture, Director of Extension Work, Lexington, Kentucky; Victor R. Gardner, Director, State Experiment Station and Professor of Horticulture, State College, East Lansing, Michigan; T. P. Headlee, Professor of Entomology, Rutgers College, New Brunswick, State Entomologist of New Jersey and Entomologist of State Experiment Station; G. A. Dean, Head, Department of Entomology, State Agricultural College, and Entomologist, State Experiment Station, Manhattan, Kansas; and H. J. Quayle, Professor of Entomology, University of California, and Entomologist of Citrus Experiment Station, Riverside.


REPORT ON FRUIT-FLY ERADICATION MADE TO SECRETARY HYDE
JULY 19, 1929.
Hon. ARTHUR M. HYDE,
Secretary of Agriculture,
Washington, D. C.
DEAR MR. SECRETARY: The committee of seven, appointed by you to make "careful studies of the present status and possibilities for eradication of the Mediterranean fruit fly, also to study the desirability of the maintenance or expansion of the present program, or alternative possibility of commercial control," reports as follows:
ECONOMIC BACKGROUND
The economic situation of Florida, the immediate future of the State, is definitely and intimately related to the policy which may be adopted in relation to the Mediterranean fruit fly. The region involved in the infestation is 34 per cent of the land area of Florida. It contains 72 per cent of the bearing citrus trees, and based upon a 3-year average, 80 per cent of the carload shipments of citrus fruit originates in this area. The annual income from the citrus. crop and from other host crops which may be affected by the fly is upward of $60,000,000. A capital investment for the same crops exceeding $300,000,000 is






1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 137

threatened. Industries dependent upon citrus fruit represent an annual income of approximately $52,000,000. Agriculture, of which the citrus and kindred industries represent the larger part, is the economic foundation of the State. From one quarter to one-third of the income accruing to the State, other than that pertaining to the tourist trade, may be attributed to agriculture. The permanence of the home and the adequate support of the families of 40 per cent of the rural farm population of Florida is threatened by the fly. The income for the State for the purpose of government is largely affected by the conditions of the citrus industry and its kindred commercial, transportation. and industrial development.
In the event the fruit fly should escape from Florida, infesting the regions of the South and West, capital values invested in properties producing susceptible fruits aggregating $1,800,000,000 and producing annual incomes of $240,000,000, are threatened. Infestation by the fly would bring chaos to many agricultural regions of the South and West. Their interest in the policy which may be adopted with relation to the fruit fly is even greater than that of Florida.
The consumers of the United States, likewise, are affected. An infestation of the Mediterranean fruit fly may affect the reduction of susceptible products by 25 or even 50 per cent. It is estimated that a reduction in the production of susceptible fruit by 20 per cent will increase the cost of fruit to the consumer by approximately 24 per cent. In addition the consumer is also directly interested by the fact that the industry or trade with which he may be connected will be affected by the spread of the fruit fly.
The cost of commercial control measures and of quarantines, should the fly escape to other regions, would involve an amount difficult to estimate, but undoubtedly greater than the sum required for eradication. This cost would fall upon the National Treasury, the States involved and upon numerous individuals.
This brief statement of the economic background evidences the national interests that are involved. The fact that the citrus industry of Florida furnishes approximately 40,000 cars of citrus fruit to the railroads is an indication of the widespread economic effect that general infestation would involve.

ERADICATION OR CONTROL

Basing its judgment on careful observation, the results of research, and the progress toward eradication that has been made in the past three months, the committee considers eradication practicable under present known conditions. This will require vigorous effort, large additions to present forces, fearless action, maintenance of the full cooperation of Florida citizens, and ample funds promptly available.
PLAN OF ERADICATION

You commissioned the committee to study the desirability of the maintenance or expansion of the present program and plan of eradication. Particular attention has been given to this program and plan of eradication as now operating. The committee recommends that the work of eradication be expanded. Such expansion, vigorous and immediate, is imperative to the success of the work.
The committee believes advisable a system of certification permitting the entry of susceptible fruits and vegetables into interstate commerce. Experimental evidence indicates that a system of processing whole fruit may be devised which is economically feasible and will insure freedom from the fly. Under such procedure: (1) Reimbursement to growers from the National Treasury is not required; (2) a sound economic background for the industry is restored, and (3) the full cooperation of growers and citizens of Florida is maintained.
An arrangement which assures that the products entering into interstate commerce are free from all stages of the fly, and which permits the growers to continue their business and industry is essential.
Attached hereto is a general statement of a program, that the committee considers necessary to carry out the work of eradication. It recognizes, however, that as time goes on modification may be necessary and it has confidence that such modifications should be determined by the law enforcement and research organization in charge of the work.






138 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [July-Sept.,

PROGRESS MADE IN ERADICATION

In spite of the fact that the area considered as infest ed has shown accessions, the progress toward eradication has been rapid. Centers of infestation have been so thoroughly cleaned, and sources of infestation removed, that in the infested zone it is difficult to find any of the stages of the Mediterranean fruit fly. At the beginning of the campaign flies were numerous, easily found, and existed in great numbers at points of infestation. Measurement of progress is difficult. But the committee has been impressed with the rapidity of the clean-up work, the effectiveness of the poison spray campaign, the progress of inspection and its increasing thoroughness. Upon every side there is found evidence of increasing efficiency, and conviction upon the part of those in charge that they are making progress. A description of the physical equipment and of the methods used in carrying on the eradication program would be interesting but appears unnecessary in this report.
Representatives of organizations, citizens, joint committee of the Florida Legislature, and the Plant Quarantine Board as well as members of the staff of the Federal and State organization cooperating in this work were examined by the committee. We were impressed by the solidarity of purpose.
No intimation was apparent of lack of confidence in a program of extermination. Desire was expressed to bring about eradication and willingness to continue the work until brought to a successful conclusion was evidenced by every individual or organization represented.
Respectfully submitted.
VERNON KELLOGG,
T. P. HEADLEE,
V. R. GARDNER,
H. J. QUAYLE,
T. P. COOPER,
G. A. DEAN,
H. A. MORGAN, Chairman,
Conmmittee.

REVISED PROGRAM OF WORK TO ERADICATE THE MEDITERRANEAN FRUIT FLY

(1) Inspection to determine spread.-Prompt provision should be made for inspection, adequate to determine the spread of the fly not only in Florida but possibly in other States. This will mean considerable enlargement of present inspection forces.
(2) Host fruits and vegetable certification.-Adequate provision should be made for the certification of all movement of host fruits or vegetables produced in any State or portion thereof invaded by the fruit fly.
(3) Removal of minor host plants.-As absolutely essential to the eradication object provision should be made under State regulation for the grubbing up or cutting down and removal-in other words complete elimination-of host plants of minor commercial importance the object being to maintain, for the protection of the principal crop in each area, a nonhost or starvation period during the interim of the maturing of such crop. It is understood that this is to replace any effort to eliminate the fruit from such alternate hosts from week to week as it ripens as impracticable both from the standpoint of accomplishment and of cost.
(4) Destruction of flies and puparia.-Citrus growers in infested areas should be required under State and Federal regulations to spray their groves at such periods as shall be required as necessary to destroy adult flies, and similarly, if practicable, soil treatment to destroy puparia.
(5) Shortening of cropping season.-To reduce as much as possible the opportunity of the insect to breed up in the major host crop of any area, the shipping season should he terminated as early as practicable. The shipping season in Florida for citrus normally extends from September to June or longer. By more adequate provision for holding of fruit in cold storage and by enlarging methods of processing fruit it should be possible to terminate by the first of March, the harvesting of the citrus crop, and similarly to shorten the period in the spring and early summer of other crops.
(6) Orchard and crop cleta-up.-As supplementing (5), provision should be made under State regulation for the prompt clean-up of orchards or other crops coincident with the close of the stated harvesting period. As corollary thereto all culls and discards should be promptly destroyed and drops should






19291 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 139

be removed at weekly intervals throughout the ripening and harvesting period.
(7) Safeguarding fruit, etc., for shipment.-Under the indietiOn of recent experimental work citrus fruit and possibly also other host fruits and vegetables may be treated or processed so as to make possible movement in commerce without risk of carrying infestation. This shall apply to the movement of all citrus fruit leaving infested States or districts after successful demonstration of its commercial practicability. Safeguarding movement of other host fruits and host vegetables should similarly be required upon determination of equivalent methods.
(8) Research work (s basis for control.-This field of work should be enlarged to meet all the needs of the eradication effort in Florida or elsewhere, and also to include studies of the fruit fly situation in other countries where this pest has become established.
(9) Port inspection.-To minimize risk of future introduction of the Mediterranean fruit fly or other serious pest, provision should be made for more adequate expansion of port inspection service.
NOTE.-This program provides (1) for the enlargement of work now under way; (2) for the elimination of the special restrictions on so-called infested zones, including the removal of fruit; and (3) as partial substitution for (2) the safeguarding by processing of fruit and other hosts, as indicated in paragraph (7) above. The success of this enlarged program is absolutely conditioned on the carrying out of these requirements under State regulations and with the full and complete cooperation of State officers and all associations and persons in interest.
With respect to the elimination of fruit removal hitherto provided for in both State and Federal regulations, it has become apparent that the removal of fruit now developing in such zones is impracticable if not impossible of accomplishment even under the expenditure of any possible or reasonable funds, and that therefore the continuation of the eradication program must be based on the development and intensifying of other methods of control.


LIMES PRODUCED IN MONROE AND DADE COUNTIES, FLA., MAY BE SENT INTO SOUTHERN AND WESTERN STATES
(Press notice)
JULY 23, 1929.
Limes produced in Monroe and Dade Counties, Fla., may, until further notice, be moved interstate throughout the United States under permit, according to administrative instructions issued to-day by the Secretary of Agriculture. The department states that the limitation heretofore in effect on the distribution of limes produced in these counties can safely be removed because intensite inspection in Dade, Monroe, and adjacent counties show no infestation of the Mediterranean fruit fly, and laboratory tests thus far indicate that while fruit flies may be forced to lay eggs in the sour limes grown in these counties, such eggs fail to develop and die without hatching.
This order is subject to cancellation if further developments necessitate such action.

ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS-REMOVAL OF RESTRICTIONS ON DESTINATION
OF LIMES FROM MONROE AND DADE COUNTIES
(Approved July 23, 1929 ; Effective July 23, 1929)
PQCA-240 JuLY 23, 1929.
The issuance of permits for the interstate movement of limes pr(iduced in Monroe and Dade C(ounties, Fla., into Southern and Western States will be resumed effective immediately, and will be continued until further notice. Pending later amenn(,ent of the Mediterranean fruit-fly quarantine regulations (Notice of Quarantine No. GS), all requirements under which such limes have been limited as to destination Issee PQCA-229, and regulation 2, Quarantine 68 (revised)] are hereby removed.
C. L. MAIl.Arr.,
Chief, Plant Quarantin and Control Admt in i.srati,.
Approved:
ARTHUR M. hYDE,
Secretary! of A agriculture.
86951-0----2







140 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [July-Sept.,

TREASURY DEPARTMENT ORDER RE OBSERVANCE OF MEDITERRANEAN FRUIT-FLY QUARANTINE REGULATIONS

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,
Washington, D. G., 23 July, 1929.
From: Commandant.
To: All Division Commanders,
Commander, Destroyer Force,
Commander, Cadet Practice Squadron, Commander, Bering Sea Patrol Force,
Commander, Florida East Coast Patrol Area.
Subject: Quarantine to prevent spread of Mediterranean fruit fly from Florida. Inclosure: 1. Copy of letter from Secretary of Agriculture, 20 July, 1929.
1. Your attention is invited to the inclosed copy of a letter, dated 20 July, 1929, from the Secretary of Agriculture, relative to the effort of the Department of Agriculture to prevent the spread of the Mediterranean fruit fly from Florida.
2. You will promptly issue instructions to the end that there shall not be brought on board any vessel of your command that touches, or is likely to touch, ports of the Gulf of Mexico, or of the Pacific coast, or the Atlantic ports of North Carolina, South Carolina, or Georgia, or ports of Florida or Porto Rico, any citrus or noncitrus fruit (except watermelons and pineapples) or any of the following kinds of vegetables, namely, peppers of all kinds, gourds, pumpkins, squashes, tomatoes, beans of all kinds (except cowpeas), or eggplants, when such articles have been produced in any part of the State of Florida.
F. C. BULuARD,
Commandant of the Coast Guard.


SECRETARY HYDE AND AGRICULTURE OFFICIALS TO VISIT FLORIDA FRUIT-FLY SECTION
(Press notice)
JULY 24, 1929.
Secretary of Agriculture Hyde, accompanied by W. G. Campbell, Director of Regulatory Work, and C. L. Marlatt, Chief of the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration, will spend Friday and Saturday of this week in Florida. They will arrive at Orlando on Friday morning and spend most of the day at that point getting in touch with the officials in charge of the work, including an examination of the research laboratory and work under way there. They will also examine the spraying and other equipment in use. Early in the afternoon, a general survey will be made of the immediate teri1tory about Orlando with the State officials and others, and will then go fo Winter Haven, inspecting the general citrus situation en route. At Winter Haven, there will be an evening meeting at which statements will be made by the Secretary and other department officials relative to the future program of work against the fruit fly. There will also be statements by Florida officials and possibly by the governor.
The party will probably return to Orlando for the night, but in any event Saturday will be spent inspecting the general citrus situation between Winter Haven and Orlando and Jacksonville. Secretary Hyde will leave Jacksonville by train Saturday evening for Baton Rouge, La., where he will address the Institute of Cooperation on Monday.


STRING BEANS RELEASED FROM FRUIT-FLY QUARANTINE (Press notice)
AUGUST 13, 1929.
String beans are released from regulation under the Mediterranean fruit-fly quarantine by administrative instructions issued August 12 by C. L. Marlatt, Chief of the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration, and approved by the Secretary of Agriculture. Doctor Marlatt explained that this relaxation of restrictions was possible in view of the absence of any record of Mediterranean fruit-fly infestation in string beans, and the failure, thus far, to force infestation experimentally." Restrictions are retained which affect Lima beans






1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 141

and broad (fava) beans. "No restrictions will, until further notice, be enforced under this quarantine with respect to string beans, cowpeas, or any kind of beans other than Lima or broad beans, either as to interstate movement or as to the planting, growing, or maintenance of such beans in infested or protective zones or elsewhere," the administrative instruction specified. The removal of the restriction became effective as soon as the order was issued.


ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS-REMOVAL OF RESTRICTIONS ON STRING BEANS
(Approved August 12, 1929; effective August 12, 1929) PQCA-242

Pending later amendment of the Mediterranean fruit-fly quarantine (Notice of Quarantine No. 68), the following administrative instructions are issued:
In view of the absence of any record of Mediterranean fruit-fly infestation in string beans, or in any kinds of beans other than Lima and broad beans, and the failure thus far to force infestation therein experimentally, the Mediterranean fruit-fly regulations are amended by substituting the words Lima and broad (fava) beans" in place of the words beans of all kinds (except cowpeas) where the latter term occurs in paragraph (h) of regulation 1 and para riaph
1 of regulation 5, as amended.
No restrictions will, until further notice, be enforced under this quarantine with respect to string beans, cowpeas or any kinds of beans other than Lima or broad beans, either as to interstate movement or the planting, growing or maintenance of such beans in infested or protective zones or elsewhere.
C. L. MARLATT,
Chief, Plant Quarantine and Control Administration.
Approved:
ARTHUR M. HYDE,
Secretary of Agriculture.


NAVY DEPARTMENT ORDER RE OBSERVANCE OF MEDITERRANEAN FRUIT-FLY QUARANTINE REGULATIONS

ELEVENTH NAVAL DISTRICT HEADQUARTERS, COMMUNICATION OFFICE,
AuLgust 13, 1929.
The following provisions general order 194 are effective immediately. In order to prevent the escape to an uninfested area of any fruit Ilies which might be taken on board, it is directed that all practical measures be taken to the effect that no vessels of the Navy which are likely to touch United States pIarts of the Gulf of Mexico or the Pacific Coast or ports of North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, or Porto Rico take on board Florida host fruits or vegetables for any purpose. This applies to articles which have been produced in Florida whether they are purchased in that State or elsewhere.
Host fruits and vegetables include all citrus and noncitrus fruits (except watermelons and pineapples), peppers of all kinds, gourds, pumpkins, squashes,. tomatoes, beans of all kinds (except cowpeas), and eggplants.
CHARLES FRANCIS ADAMS,
Secretary of the Na'ry.

MEDITERRANEAN FRUIT-FLY QUARANTINE REVISED
(Press notice)
AU(;I'ST 21, 192 .,
The Secretary of Agriculture issued to-day a general revision of the Mediterranean fruit-fly quarantine and regulations, cffetive September 1. giving the conditions under which Fl rida fruits, vegetables. nursery stock, and other restricted articles may he move( interstate during the coming shilping season.
Under these regulations provision is made for the movement in interstate emnmerce of all restricted fruits aln( vegetlblles other than those 1proldueeld in areas or on properties which may be determined as infested. All infested fruit is required to be promptly destroyed, but the destruction of hI(st fruits







142 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [July-Sept.,

and vegetables over considerable areas surrounding the infestation will be discontinued. This change of policy is made possible as a result both of the intensive eradication effort in Florida of the last four months and the determination of methods of sterilizing citrus and other host fruits which are believed to eliminate risk of carrying infestation. Such movement will be further safeguarded for the present by control of distribution. With the development of 'adequate facilities for the commercial application of these methods of sterilization it is expected that a broader field than that now authorized will be open for the marketing of Florida host fruits and vegetables.
In large measure the revision of the regulations follows the recommendations of the advisory committee of specialists appointed by the Secretary to investigate the fruit-fly situation in Florida. The committee's report, which was published on July 19, recommended the continuation and expansion of the eradication program and the authorization of shipment of the Florida citrus crop under methods of sterilization which recent research work by the department had indicated, in the belief of the committee, to be effective and economically feasible.
Two methods of sterilization are now available, namely, (1) the maintenance of a temperature of 1100 F. (inside the fruit) for eight hours under an air humidity of 90 per cent, and (2) precooling the fruit to a temperature of 28* (inside the fruit) for five hours and then holding it at 300 for five days. As to these methods, the department announces that while they have given every promise of being commercially practicable, the final judgment as to their complete availability must necessarily await the demonstration which can be made only when the crop now developing begins to be moved. In the meantime, the Department of Agriculture, in cooperation with all available agenciesgrower, packer, and carrier-is continuing the experimentation on a larger scale so that if possible the benefit of such control can be made more generally available before the heavy shipping season opens. It is appreciated also that it may not be possible for all packing houses or other establishments to make the changes and installations necessary for such sterilization by the beginning of the crop season.
Pending such determinations and adjustments, provision has been made in the regulations for movement of host fruits and vegetables under safeguards similar to those hitherto required, namely, restrictions as to destination areas. In general the restrictions provided for on the movement of host fruits and vegetables from Florida are as follows:
Sterilization is required as to all fruit produced within a mile of points at which infestation has been, or is hereafter, determined. Such sterilized fruit may be authorized movement anywhere in the United States other than into the States of Alabama, Arkansas, Arizona, California, Georgia, Idaho, Louisiana, Mississippi, Nevada, New Mexico, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, and Washington, or the Territory of Porto Rico.
Sterilized fruit produced in eradication areas (substantially equivalent to infested and protective zones as hitherto designated) may likewise be authorized to move under permit anywhere in the United States, other than -into the Southern and Western States and Territory named. Unsterilized fruit, other than as to any portion of the eradication area designated as infested, may be authorized movement only to the District of Columbia, including Potomac Yards in Virginia, and to destinations in the States of Maryland, Pennsylvania, and States north and east thereof, including shipments to foreign countries by way of any of such States.
It is anticipated that a strong effort will be made by organizations and persons in interest in Florida to give preference, in any aid which may be obtained from the Federal Farm Board or otherwise, for the financing of packinghouse adjustments necessary for such sterilization, in the first instance to areas in which infestation lhas at any time been determined, and thereafter in other portions of the eradication area or areas.
Host fruits produced in Florida outside of eradication areas may, whether sterilized or iunsterilized, l)e authorized movement anywhere in the United States other than into the Southern and Western States and the Territory of Porto Rico.
Thle eradication areas are designated as including the entire counties of Brevard, (litrus, Flagler, Hernando, Hillsborough, Lake, Marion, Orange, Pasco, Pinellas, Putnam, Seminole, Sumter, and Volusia, and parts of the counties of Alachiua, Bradford, Clay, Ducal, Levy, Osceola, Polk, and St. Johns.






1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 143

Methods of sterilization for host vegetables have not yet leen worked out. Pending the development of satisfactory treatment for such vegtb;,les, helpers and Lima and broad beans produced in eradication areas ma:y e authorized movement only to the District of Columbia, Potomac Yards, Va., and to destinations in Maryland, Pennsylvania, and States north and east thereof. ToIatoes and eggplants produced anywhere in the State and peppers and Lima and broad beans produced outside eradication areas maly be authorized movement throughout the United States other than into the Soutileri ajnd Western States and Territory listed above.
As a condition for the authorization of interstate movement of Florida h,,st fruits and vegetables, the State is to require and enforce certain extermination measures prescribed in the regulations. These include the maintelailnce of a host-free period throughout the eradication areas extending for citrus and other host fruits from April 1 until October 1 each year and for host vegetables from June 15 to October 1 subject to such modification as may later he authorized. During the host-free period no host fruits or vegetables are to be permitted to grow or exist within the eradication area except as authorized in the regulations, and all wild and cultivated host plants which normally produce fruit or vegetables susceptible to infestation during the host-free period indlicated are to be eliminated. Of equal importance are the spraying and cleanup measures required throughout these areas on both commercial and noncommercial properties. All local handling and utilization agencies are to be operated and maintained under conditions satisfactory to the United States Department of Agriculture.
The restrictions hitherto in force prohibiting shipments of host fruits or vegetables by truck, automobile, or in bulk or the shipment of culls in any manner, and restricting the movement of soil, fruit-picking equipment and nursery stock, and the requirement of cleaning at the unloading point of railway cars, boats, and other vehicles used in transporting restricted articles are continued approximately as before.

MEDITERRANEAN FRUIT-FLY QUARANTINE

REVISION OF QUARANTINE AND REGULATIONS

(See map, pages 156, 157)
Notice of Quarantine No. 68 (Revised)
(Approved August 20, 1929; effective September 1, 1929)

I, Arthur M. Hyde, Secretary of Agriculture, having found that an infestation of the Mediterranean fruit fly (Ccrtatilis capilata Wied.), a dangerous inect pest new to and not heretofore widely prevalent or distributed w thin and throughout the United States, exists inl the State of Florida, in order to prevent the spread of such Mediterranean fruit fly by (1) the shipmicnt or movement of any of the articles, vehicles, and containers hereinafter mentioned from the State of Florida into the States of Alabama, Arkansas, Arizona, California, Georgia, Idaho, Louisiana, Mississippi, Nevada, Ne'w2 Mexico, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Carolina, Texas, Tennessee, Utah, and Washington, or into the Territory of Porto Rico; or the shipment or movement othlerwie than as permitted by regulations hereinafter referred to of articles, containers, and vehicles hereinafter mentioned from the State of Florida to States other than those mentioned above and the Territories and the District of Clumbia ;
(2) the shipment or movement otherwise than as permitted by regulations hereinafter referred to of articles, vehicles, and containers hereinafter mentioned from any other State which may become infested with said fly;: (3) tl shipment or movement into the States mentioned in subdivision (1), or into the Territory of Porto Rico, of such articles, vehicles, and containers originating in or moving from an infested State to authorized destinations in a noninfeited State, Territory, or the District of Columbia, have determined that, for the accomplishment of the purpose's set forth in (1) it is necessary to quarantine the State of Florida : and for the purposes of (2) :ndl (3) it is inces:iary. to quarantine each and every State in the continental United States and the District of Columbia.
Now, therefore, under authority conferred by section 8 of the plant quarantine act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended by the act of March -1. 1917 (39 Stat. 1134, 1165), having duly given the public hearing required






144 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [July-Sept.,

thereby, and to effectuate the purposes aforesaid, I do quarantine the State of Florida and each and every other State of the continental United State and the District of Columbia, effective on and after September 1, 1929.
For the purpose of this quarantine any State, Territory, or District of the United States in which the Mediterranean fruit fly is determined to be established will be designated as an infested State, Territory, or District; all other States, Territories, or Districts for the purpose of this quarantine will be designated as noninfested States, Territories, or Districts.

RESTRICTIONS APPLYING TO INFESTED STATES, TERRITORIES, OR THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
Hereafter, under the authority of said act of August 20, 1912, amended as aforesaid, (1) fruits, vegetables,, and garden and orchard products of all kinds and cotton bolls and seed cotton; (2) sand, soil earth, peat, compost, and manure; (3) railway cars, boats, and other vehicles and containers which have been or are being used in conveying fruits or vegetables; (4) fruit-picking equipment, and all other articles, including nursery stock, which have been associated with the production of or commerce in fruits or vegetables or have been or are contaminated with sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, or manure shall not be shipped, offered for shipment to a common carrier, received for transportation or transported by a common carrier, or carried, transported, moved, or allowed to be moved from any infested State into or through any other State or Territory or the District of Columbia in manner or method or under conditions other than those prescribed in the rules and regulations hereinafter made and in amendments thereto: Provided, That the restrictions of this quarantine and of the rules and regulations supplemental thereto may be limited to the areas in an infested State or Territory now, or which may hereafter be, designated by the Secretary of Agriculture as regulated areas, when in the judgment of the Secretary of Agriculture, such limitation shall be adequate to prevent the spread of the MVediterranean fruit fly' to other States, Territories, or the District of Columbia, and when the movement of the restricted articles intrastate from such regulated areas is so safeguarded as to prevent the spread of the Mediterranean fruit fly therefrom to other parts of the quarantined State or Territory and thence into interstate commerce.

RESTRICTIONS APPLYING TO NONINFESTED STATES, TERRITORIES, OR THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

Hereafter, the different classes of articles enumerated above, originating in and moving from an infested State, Territory, or the District of Columbia to authorized destinations in a noninfested State, Territory, or the District of Columbia, under the aforementioned rules and regulations, shall not be shipped, offered for shipment to a common carrier, or carried, transported, moved, or allowed to be moved from the said noninfested States, Territories, and Districts into or through any other State, or Territory, or District of the United States in manner or method or under conditions other than those prescribed in the rules and regulations hereinafter made and in amendments thereto.
Done at the city of Washington this 20th day of August, 1929.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[SEAL.]
ARTHUR M. HYDE,
Secretary of Agrioulture.

REVISED RULES AND REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 68
(Approved August 20, 1929; effective September 1, 1929)
REGULATION 1. DEFINITIONS

For the purpose of these regulations the following words, names, and terms shall be construed, respectively, to mean:

2 The interstate transportation of living Mediterranean fruit flies in any stage of development and for any purpose is prohibited under the provisions of the act approved Mar. 3, 1905, (33 Stat. 1269).






1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 145

(a) Fruit flies: The insects known as the Mediterranean fruit fly (Ceratitis capitata Wied.) in any stage of development.
(b) The terms "infested," "infestation," and the like relate to infestation with the Mediterranean fruit fly.
(c) Quarantined State: Any State, Territory, or District quarantined (1) on account of infestation by the Mediterranean fruit fly, or (2) for the purpose of enforcement of rules and regulations governing the redistribution or movement from such quarantined States of products originating in and moving from an infested State, Territory, or District, and governing agencies concerned in the initial movement of such products from an infested State.
(4) Infested State: Any State, Territory, or District determined to be infested with the Mediterranean fruit fly and so designated by the Secretary of Agriculture.
(e) Noninfested State: Any State, Territory, or District quarantined for the purpose of enforcement of rules and regulations governing the redistribution or movement from such quarantined States of products originating in and moving from an infested State, Territory, or District, and governing agencies concerned in the initial movement of such products from an infested State, and designated by the Secretary of Agriculture as noninfested.
(f) Regulated area:' Any area in a quarantined State or District which is now or which may hereafter be designated as such by the Secretary of Agriculture in accordance with the proviso to Notice of Quarantine No. 68, revised.
(g) Eradication area: Any area in an infested State in which an intensive eradication program is being carried out and which is so designated by the Secretary of Agriculture. (Includes areas hitherto designated and retained as infested and protective zones.)
(h) Infested area: Any area established and retained as an infested zone under the revised rules and regulations supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 68, effective May 10, 1929, and any other area which may later be determined as infested.
(i) Restricted articles: Fruits, vegetables, and garden and orchard products of all kinds, and cotton bolls and seed cotton; sand, soil, earth, peat, compost and manure; railway cars, boats and other vehicles and containers which have been or are being used in conveying fruits or vegetables; and fruit-picking equipment and all other articles including nursery stock which have been associated with the production of or commerce in fruits or vegetables or have been or are contaminated with sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, or manure.
(j) Host fruits and vegetables: Fruits, vegetables, and garden and orchard products of all kinds susceptible to infestation by the Mediterranean fruit fly, namely, (1) all wild and cultivated fruits, except watermelons, pineapples, strawberries, coconuts, and other nuts; (2) the following kinds of vegetables: Peppers of all kinds, tomatoes, Lima and broad (fava) beans, and eggplants; together with any other fruits or vegetables or other plant products which later may be (letermined as sus eptil)le and of which due notice will be given.
(k) Inspector: An inspector of the United States Department of Agriculture.

REGULATION 2. DESIGNATION OF INFESTED AND NONINFESTED STATES AND OF ERADICATION AREAS

(1) In Notice of Quarantine No. 68, revised, the State of Florida is designated as an infested State, and all other States, Territories, and Districts of the continental United States are designated as noninfested States, Territories, or Districts. (See Regulation 1, (c), (d), (e).)

3 In the regulations under quarantine 68 it has seemed undesirable to make any separation of the State of Florida into regulated and nonregulated areas on account of the uncertainty which necessarily existed as to the extent of spread of the Mediterranean fruit fly in that State. For administrative purposes, therefore, the entire State has been treated as a regulated area. The term radication are: as used in Florida indicates the portion of that Stat e--enlarged from time t tim tne-l eterined as infested. together with such additional area included as necessary for the eradication program. Very much more drastic restrictions on movement of products etc., have been enforced as to this area than as to the balance of the State. Should it be possible. when the fruit-ly situation in Florida has been clearly determined, to designate within certainty any portion of Florlda as free from infestation, such port ion of the State cult then be given the Ieefilt of the proviso to the notice of quarantine and freed from those restrictions which apply to an infested State.






146 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMIIINISTRATION [July-Sept.,

(2) The following counties and parts thereof in the State of Florida are, until further notice, designated as eradication areas:
The entire counties of Brevard, Citrus, Flagler, Hernando, Hillsborough, Lake, Marion, Orange, Pasco, Pinellas, Putnam, Seminole, Sumter, and Volusia; that part of Alachua County lying east of the east boundary of range 20 east, and that part of said county lying south of the south boundary of township 10 south; that part of Bradford County lying south of the south boundary of township 7 south; that part of Clay County lying east of the east boundary of range 24 east, and that part of said county lying south of the south boundary of township 7 south; that part of Duval County lying south of the south boundary of township 2 south and between the east boundaries of ranges 24 east and 28 east, respectively; that part of Levy County lying east of the east boundary of range 16 east, except that part lying south of the south boundary of township 14 south; that part of Osceola County lying north of the north boundary of township 31 south; all of Polk County except that part east of the east boundary of range 29 east and south of the south boundary of township 30 south; and all of St. John's County except township 3 south, range 29 east, and township 4 south, range 29 east.

REGULATION 3. CONDITIONS REQUIRED IN AN INFESTED STATE

The interstate movement of restricted articles from any.part of an infested State will be conditioned on the said State requiring and enforcing the following eradication measures in manner and by method satisfactory to the United States Department of Agriculture, namely:

SECTION A. CONDITIONS REQUIRED IN ERADICATION AREAS

(1) Host-free period.-A host-free period shall be maintained each year throughout the eradication areas for citrus and other host fruits beginning on April 1, and for host vegetables beginning June 15, and continuing until October 1, subject to such modification as to duration and dates of commencement and termination and as to articles to which it is applicable as may be authorized or required by the United States Department of Agriculture.4 During the host-free period, no host fruits or vegetables shall be permitted to grow or exist within or to be moved from the eradication areas except: (a) citrus fruit on the trees and host vegetables in such state of immaturity that in the judgment of the inspector they are not susceptible of infestation; and (b) host fruits and vegetables in storage or held for local utilization or consumption. (See par. 6.)
(2) Elimination of summer host plants.-As essential to the maintenance of the host-free period, an infested State shall require and enforce the elimination throughout eradication areas of all host plants, wild and cultivated, which normally produce fruit or vegetables susceptible to infestation during the host-free period.
(3) Spraying and clean-up on com eroial properties.-All properties-i. e., groves, orchards, truck gardens or other premises-on which host fruits or vegetables are produced commercially shall be operated and maintained in such manner as shall be satisfactory to the United States Department of Agriculture.
In addition to the maintenance of the host-free period, this shall include:
(a) For host fruits, such spraying as may be necessary in the judgment of the inspector to destroy adult fruit flies; the cleanup of drops and windfalls at semiweekly intervals during the ripening and harvesting period; the prompt disposal of crop remnants following harvest, and any other requirements necessary in the judgment of the inspector to effect eradication of the Mediterranean fruit fly. With respect to the disposal of crop remnants all such remnants, either on the tree or ground or in other places, shall be promptly collected and either destroyed or utilized in manner and by methods satisfactory to the Department of Agriculture-such action to be taken on the completion of commercial harvesting of any variety of host fruit irrespective of the termination date for the class of fruit concerned (citrus, etc.).
(b) For host vegetables, the semiweekly destruction pending harvest of all ripening vegetables or drops in the field which would not normally be harvested,

4 Any adjustment of the termination date with respect to limes, grapes, and possibly other fruits and vegetables, necessarily must be based on conditions with respect to the fruit fly which obtain in the district concerned at the period when such adjustment may become necessary.






1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY A-NNOUNCEIMENTS 147

and immediately after the movement of the commercial crop is completed (but in no case later than the commencement of the host-free period for vegetables), the elimination of plants and crop remnants-the disposition of ripening vegetables or drops and of crop remnants to be in manner and method satisfactory to the inspector.
(4) Spraying and clean-up other than on commercial propertics.-All noncommercial public and private premises, including improved and unimproved land, shall be maintained in such manner as shall be satisfactory to the United States Department of Agriculture. This shall include for all improved properties, either in towns or otherwise, so far as applicable to the property concerned, the enforcement of the requirements enumerated in paragraph 3 of this regulation. On uncared-for properties and on unimproved and wild land and areas bordering public highways, all host plants, wild and cultivated, shall be destroyed.
(5) Fruit and vegetable sterilization.-All host fruits and vegetables packed, sold, stored, or transported shall, under the supervision of and satisfactory to the inspector, be sterilized, either by heating, by refrigeration, or by other approved treatment in such manner and method as shall be prescribed by the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration: Proviled, That pending the determination with respect to the methods of sterilization herein indicated of any adjustments necessitated by varietal and seasonal conditions of fruits, or pending such packing house adjustments as may be necessary to take advantage of such sterilization, shipments may be authorized as follows:
(a) Host fruits produced in infested areas.-Sterilization shall be required as a condition of movement of fruit produced in areas which have at any time been determined as infested. Such sterilized fruit may be authorized movement anywhere in the United States other than into the States and Territory listed below in paragraph (b) (i).
(b) Host fruits produced in eradication areas othr than n infested areas.(i) Sterilized fruit produced in eradication areas may be authorized movement anywhere in the United States other than into the States and Territory listed below: Washington, Oregon. Idaho, California, Nevada, Utah, Arizona, New Mexico, Texas, Oklahoma. Arkansas, Louisiana, Tennessee Mise Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Porto Rico.
(ii) Unsterilized fruit produced in eradication areas other than in infested areas may be authorized movement only to the District of Columbia, including Potomac Yards in Virginia, and to destinations in the States of Maryland, Pennsylvania, and States north and east thereof, including shipments via any of such States to foreign countries.
(c) Host fruits produced elsewhere in an infested State.-Host fruits produced in an infested State outside of eradication areas may, until further notice be authorized movement anywhere in the United States other than into the States and Territory listed above in paragraph (b) (i). Until further notice. this restriction as to destination shall not apply to sour limes produced in Dade and Monroe Counties, Fla.
Provided further, That as to host vegetables, pending determination of adequate and satisfactory sterilization methods for such products, shipments may be authorized as follows :
(a) Peppers and lima and broad beans produced in eradication areas may e authorized movement only to the District of Columbia including Potomac Yards in Virginia, and to destinations in the States of MaIrylaln1d Pennsylvania. and States north and east thereof, including shipments via any of such States to foreign countries.
(b) Peppers and lima and broad beans produced outside of eradication areas. and tomatoes and eggplants produced anywhere in the State, may be authorized movement throughout the United States other than into the States and Territory listed under the foregoing proviso.

Pending the determinations indicated, it is not deemed advisable to authorize movement of Florida host fruits into any of the Southern and Western States listed in the administrative order of May 16, 1929, and still further protected in the revised quaranltine of June 7, 1929. It is expected that such determinations will make it possible to give a wider field for movement of sterilized fruit prior to the peak of the shipping season of 1929-30, and it is the intention of the department to require, as soon as practicable, the sterilization of all host fruits moving interstate from any part of an infested State.
*Pending the determination of methods of sterilization for vegetables and their installation, it is not deemed advisable to authorize movement of Florida host vegetables into any of the Southern and western States listed in administrative order of May , 1')9. and still further protected in the revised quarantine of June 7.
86951-30---3







148 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [July-Sept.,

(6) Control of local handling and utilization agencies.-All cold-storage and packing houses and other places, in which host fruits or vegetables are- packed, processed, manufactured, or otherwise utilized, or are held for shipment or for local sale, distribution or consumption, shall be maintained and operated as to conditions of storage and of handling and movement of restricted products as shall be satisfactory to the United States Department of Agriculture.
(7) Intrastate movement.-The intrastate movement of all restricted articles within an infested State shall be brought under such control as shall in the judgment of the United States Department of Agriculture be consistent with the eradication object of these regulations.
(8) Eradication of infestation.7--Upon the determination of an infestation in an established eradication area or in any portion of an infested State outside of such areas the following action shall be taken':
(a) If the infestation is in an eradication area, there shall be an immediate suspension of all operations on the infested properties and on all properties within 1 mile thereof, and an intensivs survey shall be made within and around the infested property or properties to determine the extent and degree of infestation. If the infestation is generally distributed throughout any property, the host fruits and, vegetables remaining in and, so far as obtainable, distributed or moved from the property, shall be promptly destroyed. If, by intensive inspection, the infestation is determined to be confined to a limited part of the property concerned, the host fruits or vegetables remaining in or which have been moved from such portion shall be destroyed. Subject to the determination that all risks can be fully safeguarded, the inspector may authorize the immediate utilization by processing (canning, freezing, etc.) of the host fruits and vegetables growing in or available from the uninfested portion of the property, conditioned on local availability of means for such processing. Similarly if the infestation is so limited that in the judgment of the inspector all risks can be eliminated by the sterilization elsewhere provided for in these regulations, sterilization and shipment may be authorized. Such authorization shall, however, be conditioned on the prompt clean-up and destruction of all host fruits and vegetables in the infested portion of the property or properties concerned, and compliance with any other safeguard as to handling and distribution required by the inspector. Following the determination of an infestation, an infested area shall be designated to include all the properties within 1 mile of such infestation, and, if necessitated by the proximity of the infestation to the margin of an eradication area, such latter area shall be extended to give a 10-mile safety zone around the infested property or properties.
(b) If the infestation is found outside of any established eradication area, the procedure indicated in (a) shall be followed with respect to infested properties and to the establishment of an infested area, and in addition thereto there shall be established an eradication area surrounding such properties to include the area within at least 10 miles of the outside boundary of said properties. Wherever proximity makes such action desirable or feasible, such eradication area may be joined to and made a part of existing eradication areas.
(9) Inspection.-A system of inspection satisfactory to the United States Department of Agriculture shall be carried on throughout an infested State for the prompt discovery of any infestation which may occur.

SECTION B. CONDITIONS REQUIRED OUTSIDE OF ERADICATION AREAS

(1) Of the restrictions enumerated under section A, paragraphs 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9 shall apply to parts of an infested State outside of eradication areas. Such outside areas shall, also, be subject to the requirements of reg~lations 4 to 14, inclusive.
(2) The harvesting and clean-up of commercial citrus plantings outside of eradication areas shall be completed throughout an infested State prior to April 1, and no movement from such areas will be permitted after that date

7 Determination of infestation in a quarantined State, Territory, or District not previously known to be infested by the Mediterranean fruit fly will necessitate the declaration by the Secretary of Agriculture of the fact of such infestation, and, in cooperation with the State, the clean-up of the infested properties and intensive surveys to determine extent of the infestation, followed by the institution of such eradication measures as the emergency justifies.






1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 149

except as to citrus fruit in cold storage (see sec. A, par. 6) and as may later be authorized for sour limes.8

REGULATION 4. CONTROL OF MOVEMENT OF HOST FRUITS AND VEGETABLES FROM AN INFESTED STATE9

(1) Nonhost fruits and vegetables unrestricted.-No restrictions are placed by these regulations on the interstate movement of fruits, vegetables, garden and orchard products other than products defined as "host fruits and vegetables" in paragraph (j) of regulation 1 or later amendments of the same.
(2) Manufactured and preserved articles.-No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of host fruits and vegetables which have been manufactured or preserved in such a manner that in the judgment of the inspector no infestation could be transmitted therewith.
(3) Imported host fruits and vegetables.-Host fruits and vegetables imported into the United States through the ports of an infested State under permits issued under the provisions of Notice of Quarantine No. 56, may be transported through an infested State to destinations outside thereof in the original containers without respect to these rules and regulations, conditioned upon the observance of such safeguards on the part of the shipper as may be required by the inspector to eliminate risk of spreading the Mediterranean fruit fly.
(4) Prohibited shipments.-Other than as provided in paragraphs 2 and 3 hereof, host fruits and vegetables shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from any part of an infested State by truck, automobile, or other road vehicle, nor by mail, nor in bulk, nor in any other manner than by rail or boat in compliance with paragraphs 5, 6, 7, and 8 hereof, nor shall tomatoes be moved interstate except when green.
(5) Rail shipments.-Other than as provided in paragraphs 2 and 3 hereof, no host fruits and vegetables shall be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from an infested State by rail except when packed in standard commercial containers and shipped in car lots in refrigerator or ventilated cars iced or screened in a manner satisfactory to the inspector, and all such interstate shipments while within an infested State shall comply with all the screening, icing, and similar measures enforced as to intrastate movement by the States concerned. This shall apply to both freight and express movement. These requirements shall not apply to movement under permit of sterilized host fruits and vegetables in dining cars, nor to shipments of host fruits and vegetables intended for interstate movement while such shipments are moving within an infested State in compliance with the requirements of that State.
(6) Boat shipments-Host fruits and vegetables produced in an infested State shall not be taken on board or transported on boats moving interstate except in compliance with such restrictions or safeguards as may be required by the United States Department of Agriculture.
(7) Permits.-Other than as provided in paragraphs 2 and 3 hereof, host fruits and vegetables shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from an infested State to or through any point outside thereof unless a permit shall have been issued therefor by the United States I apartmentt of Agriculture.
(8) Conditions governing the issuance of penr its.-The issuance of permits will be conditioned upon compliance on tihe part of both t he grower anid the shipper of the articles to bIe movlned with all the requirellents presclribed in regulation 3. Shippers or others intenlinlg to move or allow to be moved host fruits or vegetables shall make applications f1or a permit oil forms provided for that purpose, to the police of the Plant Qu(11:lra ntin e and ( control Admllinist ration, Orlando, Fla., as far as possible in adlvanie of thie prolbablle tate(tof shipment. Applications shall show tie nature and quantity o,f the articles it is proposed to move, together with the location at which they will he packed, the name and address of the applicant, and a list of all Ipreises 'from which host fruits and vegetables forI packing will he secured, toget(her with tIieir lonltions and the names and addresses of tlie ovnielrs and such a11ditillnnl infornmatiolt and agreements as may be etlmbolied in tie application form.

Noncitrus fruits and hust (vetables produced outsile of eradlictionI areas ma;ly Iw shippwd under Iwrmit throughout t he yer. See als~ fo4t not1e .
Other than the restrictions pIlcel o11 the iuntrasiranto lovelllt ent Of h1ost fruits :Tnd vegetables, no addit illlsl r;rquirtflr llenl llis ite i lliIN l'si I y i euti ons on I he portot of such articles from Florida ports direct to foreign countries.







150 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [July-Sept.,

REGULATION 5. RESTRICTIONS ON THE INTERSTATE MOVEMENT OF COTTON BOLLS
AND SEED COTTON FROM AN INFESTED STATE

(1) Cotton bolls and bollies shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from an infested State to or through any point outside thereof.
(2) Seed cotton produced in an eradication area shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from such area to or through any point outside thereof.
(3) Seed cotton produced in an infested State outside eradication areas shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from an infested State to or through any point outside thereof unless a permit shall have been issued therefor by the United States Department of Agriculture. Permits may be issued for such interstate movement of seed cotton to a gin in an adjoining State for the purpose of ginning, when in the judgment of the inspector such movement does not involve risk of spreading the Mediterranean fruit fly.

REGULATION 6. RESTRICTIONS ON THE INTERSTATE MOVEMENT OF SAND, SOIL
EARTH, PEAT, COMPOST, AND MANURE FROM AN INFESTED STATE

(1) Sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure of any kind, in bulk or in connection with other articles, shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from an eradication area to or through any point outside thereof: Provided, That this shall not apply to fuller's earth, kaolin clay, phosphatic sand, peat, or muck, and similar mined or dredged products, including sand, when in the judgment of the inspector such movement does not involve risk of spreading the Mediterranean fruit fly: Provided further, That this paragraph shall not apply to nursery stock with soil, moved in compliance with regulation 8.
(2) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, or manure from points in an infested State located outside of eradication areas.

REGULATION 7. RESTRICTIONS ON THE INTERSTATE MOVEMENT OF PICKING EQUIPMENT AND OTHER ARTICLES FROM AN INFESTED STATE

Fruit-picking equipment and other articles which have been associated with the production of or commerce in fruits and vegetables shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from an infested State to or through any point outside thereof unless a permit shall have been issued therefor by the United States Department of Agriculture. Permits may be issued for such interstate movement upon determination by the inspector that the said articles have been so cleaned or treated as to eliminate any danger of their carrying Mediterranean fruit fly.

REGULATION 8. NURSERY STOCK FROM AN INFESTED STATE

Nursery stock, including all kinds of plants and plant roots except portions of plants without roots or soil, shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from an infested State to or through any point outside thereof unless a permit shall have been issued therefor by the United States Department of Agriculture. Permits may be issued for such interstate movement upon determination by the inspector either (a) that the nursery in question is so situated and so protected as to eliminate the risk of soil infestation by larvae and pupae of the Mediterranean fruit fly, or (b) that the said articles have been so cleaned or treated as to eliminate any danger of their carrying the Mediterranean fruit fly, or (c) that the said articles have originated outside of any eradication area.

REGULATION 9. MARKING REQUIREMENTS

Each box, crate, or other container of the articles for which permits are required by these regulations shall be plainly marked with the name and address of the consignor and shall bear securely attached to the outside thereof the permit issued in compliance with these regulations. In the case of car lot and boat shipments permits shall also accompany the waybill covering such shipments. All conductor's manifests, memoranda, or bills of lading pertaining to such shipments shall be marked with the number of the permit, and with such instructions with respect to cleaning of said cars as shall be required.






1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 151

REGULATION 10. CLEANING OF RAILWAY CAls, BOATS, AND OTHER VEHICLES AND CONTAINERS

Railway cars, boats, and other vehicles and containers which have been used in transporting any restricted articles produced in or moved from an infested State shall not thereafter be moved or allowed to be moved interstate until they have been thoroughly cleaned and, if required by the inspector, disinfected, by the destination carrier at the point of unloading in manner and by method prescribed by the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration.

REGULATION 11. RESHIPMENT FROM NONINFESTED STATES OF HOST FRUITS AND
VEGETABLES ORIGINATING IN AN INFESTED STATE

(1) Host fruits and vegetables which have originated in and been moved from an infested State shall not thereafter be reshipped or otherwise transported into or between the States of Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Georgia, Idaho, Louisiana, Mississippi, Nevada, New Mexico, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, or Washington, or into the Territory of Porto Rico.
(2) Host fruits and vegetables which have originated in and been moved from an infested State into the area northeast of and including Potomac Yards, Va., the District of Columbia, and the States of Maryland and Pennsylvania, shall not thereafter be reshipped or otherwise transported to points in the United States outside the said northeastern area.
(3) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement from noninfested States of articles other than host fruits and vegetables and railway cars and other vehicles and containers, unless such articles have been moved from an infested State in violation of the rules and regulations supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 68 or any amendment thereto or revision thereof.

REGULATION 12. INSPECTION OF RESTRICTED ARTICLES IN TRANSIT

Any car, vehicle, basket, box, or other container moved or offered for movement interstate which contains or may contain articles the movement of which is prohibited or restricted by these regulations shall be subject to inspection by inspectors at any time or place.

REGULATION 13. CANCELLATION OF PERAMISTS

Permits issued under these regulations may be withdrawn or canceled by the inspector and further permits refused, either upon deterinination of infestation on the premises on which the articles concerned are or have bee ,located, or for any failure of compliance with the conditions of these regulations or violations of them, or of the permittee's agreement, or whenever in the judgment of the inspector the further use of such permits minglt result in thle dissemination of the Med(literranean fruit fly. After any such perImit is withdrawn or canceled, the further use of any permit tags issued thereunder is prohibited.

REGULATION 14. SHIPMENTS BY THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGICLTiRE

Articles subject to restriction in these regulations may be moved interstate by the United States Department of Agriculture for experimental or scientific purposes, on such conditions and under such safeguards as nmay he prescribed by the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration. The cornta iner of art ies so moved shall bear, securely attached to to the outside thereof, an identifying tag from the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration showing coiliance with such conditions.
These rules and regulations shall he effective on and after SeI)tember 1, 129, and shall on that date supersede all rules and regulations heretofore pIromulgated under Notice of Quanrantine No. 68 or any revision thereof.
Done at the city of Washington this 20th day of August, 1929.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States I)epartnnt of Agriculture.
[SEAL.] A1RTJ'R 1. IIY1F,
Secretary/ of 1 Igricult u re.







152 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [July-Sept.,

NOTICE TO COMMON CARRIERS
AUGUST 20, 1929.
SiR: You are requested to date and sign the blank receipt below, indicating your official title, and return this letter to the Secretary of Agriculture in the inclosed penalty envelope, which requires no postage.
Notice is hereby given to the transportation company you represent, as follows :
That the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority conferred on him by the plant quarantine act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315) as amended, has promulgated a revision of Notice of Quarantine No. 68, on account of the Mediterranean fruit fly, effective September 1, 1929, and has issued rules and regulations supplemental thereto. The revision of the regulations modifies the requirements under which restricted articles (1) may be shipped or otherwise transported from the State of Florida or (2) may be reshipped or transported interstate from other States, Territories and Districts of the United States. Restricted articles as listed in the quarantine are (1) fruits, vegetables, and garden and orchard products of all kinds, and cotton bolls and seed cotton, (2) sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure, (3) railway cars, boats, and other vehicles and containers which have been or are being used in conveying fruits or vegetables, (4) fruit-picking equipment and all other articles including nursery stock which have been associated with the production of or commerce in fruits or vegetables or have been or are contaminated with sand, soil, earth, peat, compost or manure.
The shipment or transportation of such articles in manner or method or under conditions other than those specified in the regulations supplemental thereto is prohibited.
A copy of the notice is inclosed herewith.
Very respectfully,
ARTHUR M. HYDE,
Secretary of Agriculture.
(Inclosures)

(Do not detach this receipt)

Received this notice and the Notice of Quarantine No. 68, revised, with rules and regulations mentioned therein this ------day of -----------, 1929.
(Signature)
(Title)
[Sent to all common carriers in the United States.]


NOTICE TO GENERAL PUBLIC THROUGH NEWSPAPERS
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY,
Washington, D. C., August 20, 1929.
Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority conferred on him by the plant quarantine act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended, has promulgated a revision of Notice of Quarantine No. 68, on account of the Mediterranean fruit fly, effective September 1, 1929, and of the rules and regulations supplemental thereto. The revision of the quarantine is limited to the inclusion of cotton bolls and seed cotton in the list of articles the movement of which is restricted. The revision of the regulations modifies the requirements under which restricted articles (1) may be shipped or otherwise transported from the State of Florida, or (2) may be reshipped or transported interstate from other States, Territories and Districts of the United States. Restricted articles as listed in the quarantine are (1) fruits, vegetables, and garden and orchard products of all kinds, and cotton bolls and seed cotton, (2) sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure, (3) railway cars, boats, and other vehicles and containers which have been or are being used in conveying fruits or vegetables, (4) fruit-picking equipment and all other articles including nursery stock which have been associated with the production of or commerce in fruits or vegetables or have been or are contaminated with sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, or manure. In the regulations the restrictions on garden and orchard







1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 153

products are limited to the following host fruits and vegetables: (1) All wild and cultivated fruits, except watermelons, pineapples, strawberries, cocoanuts and other nuts; (2) peppers of all kinds, tomatoes, Lima and broad (fava) beans, and eggplants; together with any other fruits or vegetables or other plant products which later may be determined as susceptible and of wh ch due notice will be given. The shipment or transportation of such articles in manner or method or under conditions other than those specified in the regulations supplemental thereto is prohibited. Copies of the said revised quarantine and of the rules and regulations supplemental thereto may be obtained from the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration, United States Department of Agriculture, Washington, D. C. Arthur M. Hyde, Secretary of Agriculture.
[Published in the following newspapers: The Birmingham News. Birmingham, Ala., August 29, 1929; the Arizona Republican. Phoenix, Ariz., August 31, 1929; Arkansas Gazette, Little Rock, Ark., September 1, 1929; San Francisco Examiner, San Francisco, Calif., September 1, 1929; the Denver Post, Denver, Colo., August 31. 1929; the Hartford Times, IHartford, Conn., August 29, 1929: the Evening Journal, Wilmington, Del., August 27, 1929; the Evening Star. Washington, D. C.. August 28. 1929; the Florida Times-Union, Jacksonville, Fla., September 1. 1929; the Atlanta Journal, Atlanta. Ga., August 29, 1929; Idaho Statesman, Boise, Idaho, Septeml r 1. 1929: the (Chicao Daily News, Chicago, Ill., August 20, 1929; the Indianapolis News, Indianapolis. Ind., August 29, 1929; the D Moines Register, Des Moines, Iowa. August 29. 1929 : the Wichita Eagle. Wichita, Kans., December 23. 1929 ; the Louisville Times, Louisville, Ky., August 30. 1929; the Times Picayune, New Orleans, La., August 30, 1929; Portland Press tHerald, PIortland, Me., August 30, 1929; the Sun, Baltimore. Md., August 28, 1929; the Boston IIerald, Boston, Mas., August 29, 1929; the Detroit News, Detroit. Mich., August 29. 1929; the Minneapolis Tribune, Minneapolis, Minn., August 29, 19291) Jacks oni Daily N ews, J.ackson, Miss., August 29. 1929; the Kansas City Journal-Post, Kansas City, 'Mo., August 29, 1920; the Great Falls Tribune, Great Falls, Mont., October 1, 1929; the World-HIerald. Omaha, Nebr., August 29, 1929; Reno Evening Gazette, Reno, Nev., August 31, 1929: the Manchester Union Leader, Manchester, N. II., August 29, 1929; Trenton Evening Times., Trenton, N. J., August 28, 1929; New Mexico State Tribune, Albuquerque, N. Mex., August 29, 1929; the World, New York, N. Y., September 1, 1929; the News and Observer, RIaleigh, N. C., September 1, 1929; Grand Forks Herald. Grand Forks. N. Dak., August 30. 1929; the Toledo Blade. Toledo, Ohio, August 29, 1929; the Oklahoma News, Oklahoma City, Okla., August 31, 1929 ; the Oregon Journal, Portland. Oreg.. August 30, 1929; the Philadelphia Inquirer, Philadelphia, Pa., September 1. 1929; the Evening Bulletin, Providence, R. I., August 28, 1929 : the State, Columbia, S. C., August 29. 1929; the Daily Argus-Leader, Sioux Falls, S. Dak., August 30, 1929; Nashville Tennessecan, Nashville, Tenn., August 29, 1929; Fort Worth Star-Telegram, Fort Worth, Tex., September 1, 1929; the Salt Lake Tribune, Salt Lake City, Utah, August 31, 1929; the Burlington Free Press, Burlington. Vt.. September 3. 1929; Richmond Times-Dispatch, Richmond, Va., August 28, 1929; the Seattle Times, Seattle, Wash., August 31, 1929; the Charleston Gazette, Charlesfon, W. Va., September 1, 1929; the Milwaukee Journal, Milwaukee, Wis., August 31, 1929; Wyoming State Tribune-Leader, Cheyenne, Wyo., August 30, 1929.]

INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS

REVISION OF MEI)lTERRANEAN FRiIT-FLY QIARANTINE

THIRDn ASSIs ANT PoSTMASTE (IENE:.I, Wa shin!/gtoln, ,ept mber ,l 112!!.
Under the provisions of Quarantine Order No. ;S of the I'llited States Iepartment of Agr.icultlure oil aouit of the Meditelralall fruit Ily, elective September 1, 1.921, the protlibitioii against tle slhilpllnIilt bIy rmail olf liursery stock from tilhe State of Florida has been removed. Acrd nglv po tulasters in the State of Florida may accept fi'r maiiling nursery sti ck w ixen na;ec lpanied with the required Federal permit as set ft 'rth inI tlie raised rules ani regulations supplemental to Quarantine Order No. 6S. The revised regulatiols read as follows:
"8. Nursery stock, including all kinds (of ilaiis and liaIt rtoots excel t
portions of plalts without roots or soil, shaall not le olve"l or allowed to be moved Pilterstate floll)l 11l infested Stle to or tIlioiUght at111y p'ilt Putitside thereof unless a permit slll lhave Iheln issue tr r tltie Ul iited States lurtnent of A1iculltill re. Ierlllits Il Ie issued folr sulch interstate 1movemllent Upo114 deterililat ill by the illnslctor eit lic (I) tlhat tithe nursery ill question is so sitnateld and so protected as tol elimite t le risk of soil infestation by larm\ anid pup o' thlte Mediterranean fruit 11y1, or (b) that the said articles have been so cleaned or treated ;as to el imitate any danger of their carrying th, Mediterraieali fruit 11\ or r I tIhat t ie
said articles have originated outside of anily crlit ion ar.11;1
"9. Each box, crate, or ottier container of tihe articles for w l ict ierimits
are required by these regulations shall Ie plainly market will tie nice and address of the consignor mld shall bear securely attached to tIle out-






154 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [July-Sept.,

side thereof the permit issued in compliance with these regulations. In the case of car lot and boat shipments permits shall also accompany the waybill covering such shipment. All conductor's manifests, memoranda, or bills of lading pertaining to such shipments shall be marked with the number of the permit, and with such instructions with respect to cleaning
of said cars as shall be required."
Information 'with respect to the issuance of Federal permits may be obtained from the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration, Orlando, Fla.
There has been no change in the prohibition against the acceptance for mailing of host fruits and vegetables and, therefore, such articles may not be accepted for mailing from the State of Florida.
Furthermore, the reshipment of host fruits and vegetables originating in Florida is likewise prohibited from post offices in other States, as set forth in regulation 11 of the revised regulations which reads as follows:
"11. (a) Host fruits and vegetables which have originated in and been
moved from an infested State shall not thereafter be reshipped or otherwise transported into or between the States of Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Georgia, Idaho, Louisiana, Mississippi, Nevada, New Mexico, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah,
or Washington, or into the Territory of Porto Rico.
(b) Host fruits and vegetables which have originated in and been
moved from an infested State into the area northeast of and including Potomac Yards, Va., the District of Columbia, and the States of Maryland and Pennsylvania shall not thereafter be reshipped or otherwise transported to points in the United States outside the said northeastern area.
(o) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement from noninfested States of articles other than host fruits and vegetables and railway cars and other vehicles and containers, unless such articles have been moved from an infested State in violation of the rules and regulations supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 68 or any amendment thereto
or revision thereof."
The term Host fruits and vegetables" embraces: Fruits, vegetables, and garden and orchard products of all kinds susceptible to infestation by the Mediterranean fruit fly, namely, (1) all wild and cultivated fruits, except watermelons, pineapples, strawberries, coconuts and other nuts; (2) the following kinds of vegetables: Peppers of all kinds, tomatoes, Lima and broad (fava) beans, and eggplants; together with any other fruits or vegetables or other plant products which later may be determined as susceptible and of which due notice will be given.
F. A. TILTON,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.


FRUIT FLY TO BE STUDIED IN MEDITERRANEAN BASIN
(Press notice)
AUGUST 26, 1929.
The Department of Agriculture announces that a survey of the fruit-fly situation in the countries bordering the Mediterranean is to be undertaken immediately. H. J. Quayle, Professor of Entomology, University of California, and Entomologist of the Citrus Experiment Station at Riverside, has been selected for this work.
Mr. Quayle was recently drafted by the Secretary of Agriculture to be one ,of a special committee to make a study of the fruit-fly situation in Florida. He is especially equipped for this new detail on account of personal studies which he has made of the Mediterranean fruit-fly in different parts of the world, including a rather extended study in the Mediterranean region some sixteen years ago for this department, the results of which were published in a Department Bulletin of the Bureau of Entomology.
The present survey is made possible through the cooperation of Allison V. Armour, of New York, a wealthy patron of science and a collaborator of the department, who has for several years been giving substantial aid to various research projects, for the department and otherwise, by making available a vessel which he has had especially equipped for biological or other






19291 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 155

scientific and technical survey work. Mr. Armour, in making this proposal to C. L. Marlatt, Chief of the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration, stated that he wished to make this his contribution to the fruit-fly eradication campaign.
It was at once recognized that a boat so equipped for scientific study on board, of collected material, and affording means for prompt movement from place to place, was an exceptional opportunity to get very much needed information in a relatively short time. Mr. Quayle was promptly notified and accepted Mr. Armour's offer without hesitation. He has been appointed an agent of the department and the expedition will be essentially under the direction of the department and for its benefit. The cost of the expedition, with the exception of the salary of the research agent, will be defrayed by Mr. Armour in so far as the facilities of his boat can be utilized. To enable the acceptance by Mr. Quayle of this offer, his approaching sabbatical year has been advanced some months by the authorities of the University of California. Mr. Armour will accompany Mr. Quayle and participate in the work in every way possible. It is his intention to schedule all movements in the interest of the research object. This exploration, together with others of similar nature which Mr. Armour has hitherto facilitated, sets a most praiseworthy example of the diverting of a natural interest and means of gratifying it to useful research objects. The Utowana, Mr. Armour's especially equipped research vessel, left its home port, New London, Conn., Saturday, August 24, for Bermuda.
The program includes a brief study of the fruit-fly situation in the Bermuda Islands and continued at the Azores, with the main work, however, beginning with the important citrus area- on the Mediterranean coast of Spain centering at Valencia. Other Mediterranean countries will be taken up in succession with stops at important points as long as may be necessary to secure the desired information. It is expected that this stage of the work will occupy most of the balance of this year. During the winter months it is probable that Mr. Quayle will be authorized to carry his studies to South Africa to cover fruit-fly economics and behavior in that section during the fruit-harvesting months of January, February, and March. The program will conclude with a return to the Mediterranean section in April to complete during the spring and early summer months the seasonal record of the fly in that general region.
As a result of this work it is expected that information will be obtained as to the behavior of this insect under the climatic and other controlling factors obtaining in such countries, and also that accurate information will be secured as to the crop losses occasioned by this pest and as to the means of defense which are being employed to lessen such losses.


MOVEMENT, PRIOR TO OCTOBER 1, OF CITRUS FRUIT FROM FLORIDA AUTHORIZED
(Press notice)
AU;UST 8u, 1')
The Secretary of Agriculture to-day amended the regulations issued under the Mediterranean fruit-fly quarantine, authorizing the interstate movement,
prior to October 1, of marketable citrus fruit produced within the eradication area and also authorizing that citrus fruit within this area may, in lieu of destruction, remain on the trees to reach a marketablle stage of ripeness, conditioned on the determination by the inspector of tle absene of local risk of infestation. In making this announcement, the Secretary stated t1hat tlie shipment of any portion of the commercial citrus crop, as to any variety or district, promptly on such fruit reaching a stage of maturity permitting such movement may, in the absence of local risk of infestation, Ihe cnsistent with the eradication objects of the regulations.
The Secretary pointed out that the amnwndment affected only the er dicaion area. Under the terms of the new regulations, host fruits or ve etaldes lroduced outside of the eradication area may, subject to the restrictions as to issuance of permits and shipping destination, he moved throughout the year. The regulations, however, provide 1iIat the harvesting aiid clean-u of contmercial citrus plantings outside f tiIe eradication area shall b, c mipleted prior to April 1.
86951-30 -4





156 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [July-Sept.,


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158 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [July-Sept.,

ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS-SHIPMENT OF FLORIDA CITRUS FRUIT PRIOR TO OCTOBERMODIFICATION OF REGULATION 3, SECTION A (1), MEDITERRANEAN FRUIT-FLY QUARANTINE
(Approved August 30, 1929; effective September 1, 1929) PQCA--243
In as much as the shipment of any portion of the commercial citrus crop, as to any variety or district, promptly on its reaching a stage of maturity permitting such movement may, in the absence of local risk of infestation, be consistent with the eradication object of the regulations, inspectors, in lieu of the removal and destruction prior to October 1, of early ripening fruit, indicated in the regulations, are hereby authorized (1) to allow such fruit to remain on the trees to reach a marketable stage of ripeness in any citrus orchard in the eradication area, and (2) to issue permits for the shipment of such fruit prior to October 1, in compliance otherwise with the requirements of the Mediterranean fruit-fly regulations, when in their judgment such fruit, during the period involved, will be under no risk of infestation.
Except as provided above the requirement of regulation 3, section A (1), shall remain in full force and effect.
C. L. MARLATT,
Chief, Plant Quarantine and Control Administration.
Approved:
C. F. MARVIN,
Acting Secretary of Agriculture.


ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS-DIVERSION OF FLORIDA PRODUCTS AT SOUTHERN POINTS

INTERPRETATION OF REGULATION 3, SECTION' A (5), QUARANTINE NO. 68
(Approved September 7, 1929; effective September 7, 1929)

PQCA-244
Except as to unsterilized fruit produced in eradication areas, the destination limitations for car-lot shipments prescribed for Florida host fruits and vegetables in the Mediterranean fruit-fly quarantine regulations will be interpreted to allow the movement under the conditions prescribed in the regulations and to areas therein designated of such articles from Florida via the usual diversion points in the States of Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee for immediate diversion at such points to any point in the destination areas authorized in the quarantine regulations: Provided, That the waybills of all cars consigned to diversion points in the States named shall bear a notation reading as follows: This car must be diverted to destinations in States north of and including Virginia, Kentucky, Missouri, Kansas, and Colorado."
C. L. MARLATT,
Chief, Plant Quarantine and Control Administration.
Approved:
R. W. DUNLAP,
Acting Secretary of Agriculture.


ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS-MODIFICATION OF ERADICATION AIEA DESIGNATED IN MEDITERRANEAN FRUIT-FLY QUARANTINE REGULATIONS
(Approved September 16, 1929; effective September 17, 1929)

PQCA-245
Pending later amendment of the Mediterranean fruit fly quarantine regulations, the eradication area designated in section 2 of regulation 2, supplemental to Notice of Quarantine 68 (revised) is modified as to the southern boundary so as to release from the eradication area the southern tier of townships in Brevard and Osceola Counties, the two southern tiers of town-







1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANN OUNICE-MENTS 159

ships in Polk County, and that part south and west of the Little Manatee River of the two townships in the southwest corner of Hillsborough County. The amended section reads as follows:
(2) The following counties and parts thereof in the State of Florida
are, until further notice, designated as eradication areas:
The entire counties of Citrus, Flagler, Hernando, Lake, Marion, Orange,
Pasco, Pinellas, Putnam, Seminole, Suiter, and Volusia; that part of Alachua County lying east of the east boundary of range twenty (20) east, and that part of said county lying south of the south boundary of township ten (10) south; that part of Bradford County lying south of the south boundary of township seven (7) south; that part of Brevard County lying north of the north boundary of township thirty (30) south; that part of Clay County lying east of the east boundary of range twentyfour (24) east, and that part of said county lying south of the south boundary of township seven (7) south; that part of Dural County lying south of the south boundary of township two (2) south and between the east boundaries of ranges twenty-four (24) east and twenty-eight (2S) east respectively; all of Hillsborough County except that part of ranges eighteen (18) and nineteen (19) east lying south and west of the Little Manatee River in the southwestern portion of said county; that part of Levy County lying east of the east boundary of range sixteen (16) east except that part lying south of the south boundary of township fourteen (14) south; that part of Osceola County lying north of the north boundary of township thirty (30) south; that part of Polk County lying north of the north boundary of township thirty-one (31) south except that part lying east of the east boundary of range twenty-nine (29) east; and all of St. John's County except township three (3) south, range twenty-nine
(29) east, and township four (4) south, range twenty-nine (29) east.
C. L. MARLATT,
Chief, Plant Quarantine and Control Adim iistzration.
Approved :
R. W. DUNLAP,
Acting Secretary of Agriculture.


STERILIZATION BY COOLING AUTHORIZED FOR FLORIDA FRUIT (Press notice)
SEPTEMBER 21, 1929.
The Secretary of Agriculture has announced an enlargement of the provision for sterilization by refrigeration of citrus fruits moving interstate from Florida. This enlargement, effective September 20, consists in authorizing such sterilization to be carried out not only in Florida as hitherto but also under adequate safeguards in Northern States to which such fruit must ultimately move for consumption use.
Sterilization either by heating or cooling is required for citrus fruit moving from certain areas in Florida and also is the basis for enlarged market territory for fruit moving from other areas. These two opposite methods of sterilization, either by heating or by cooling, have resulted from investigations conducted by the United States Department of Agriculture in connection with the Mediterranean fruit fly eradication effort.
This work has shown (1) that a temperature of 28S F. for 5 hours followed by holding for about 5 days at 30', or (2) that a temperature of 11tl for 8 hours, are fatal to the eggs or larv of the Mediterranean fruit fly. 1'oth the maximum and mininium temperatures referred to can be obtained by modification of the existing practices in the handling of citrus fruits.
Tests on refrigeration have now been conducted on a sufliciently large scale to demonstrate that the required low temperature can be given without injury to the fruit and that this method is comnmercially practicable. The experimental tests with heat, while indicating the probable availability of tllis method, have not yet been conduced on a sufficiently large scale to fully dentonstrate commercial practicability but it is hoped that in the very near future sterilization by this method can receive the full endorsement of the delpartmlent.
The following method of sterilizing citrus fruit is authorized:
Cooling until the approximate center of the fruit reaches a temper:It re of 280 F. and holding the fruit at that temIlerature fie hours; then raisin the







160 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [July-Sept.r

temperature of the fruit not higher than 300 and holding until a total period of five days has elapsed from the time the temperature of the approximate center of the fruit reached 280.
To make it possible to take immediate or early advantage of the wider movement authorized under such treatment pending the development of adequate facilities within the eradication area and other parts of the State, such treatment is now authorized either in Florida, or, in designated cold storages approved by the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration in the District of Columbia or the States of Kentucky, Missouri, Ohio, Illinois, Massachusetts, New York, Pennsylvania, and such other Northern States as may later be approved. Fruit to be treated at localities outside of Florida must be graded, packed in standard commercial containers, and shipped under special permits issued by the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration. Such permits will authorize movement only under ice in refrigerated cars and to designated cold storages.
It should be understood that sterilization is not being considered as a means of authorizing movement of infested fruit. All infested fruit will be promptly destroyed. The requirement of sterilization therefore applies to areas believed to be entirely free from the pest with the object of eliminating any residual of risk, even after intensive inspection.


ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS-STERILIZATION OF CITRUS FRUITS UNDER
MEDITERRANEAN FRUIT-FLY REGULATIONS
(Approved September 19, 1929; effective September 20, 1929) PQCA--246
Notice of the revision of the Mediterranean fruit-fly quarantine, No. 68, effective September 1, 1929, requires in paragraph (5) of regulation 3, the sterilization of host fruits and vegetables produced within an infested State. It should be understood that sterilization is not being considered as a means of authorizing movement of infested fruit. All infested fruit will be promptly destroyed. The requirement of sterilization therefore applies to areas believed to be entirely free from the pest with the object of eliminating any residual of risk, even after intensive inspection. In issuing the revised regulations, it was realized that the general adoption of sterilization would involve time for the full commercial application of methods and for necessary adjustments. Pending such determinations and adjustments, provision has been made in the regulations for movement under certain destination limitations. The tests and demonstrations necessary to place sterilization on a sound commercial basis have been and are being pushed to the utmost and have reached such a stage of progress. as to make it possible to issue an order authorizing at least one type of sterilization, namely, by refrigeration. The purpose of this circular is to give such authorization and the necessary information relative to such refrigeration.
The probable availability of two methods of sterilization of fruits and vegetables had been worked out as a result of investigations conducted by the department between May and August. Th's work has shown (1) that a temperature of 280 F. for 5 hours followed by holding for about 5 days at 30, or (2) that a temperature of 1100 for 8 hours, are fatal to the eggs or larve of the Mediterranean fruit fly. Both the maximum and minimum temperatures referred to can be obtained by modification of the existing practices in the handling of citrus fruits.
Tests on refrigeration have now been conducted on a sufficiently large scale to demonstrate that the required low temperature can be given without injury to the fruit and that this method is commercially practicable. The experimental tests with heat, while indicating the probable availability of this method, have not yet been conducted on a sufficiently large scale to fully demonstrate commercial practicability but it is hoped that in the very near future sterilization by this method can receive the full endorsement of the department.
The following method of sterilizing citrus fruit is authorized:
Cooling until the approximate center of the fruit reaches a temperature of 28' F. and holding the fruit at that temperature 5 hours; then raising the temperature of the fruit not higher than 300 and holding until a total period of 5 days has elapsed from the time the temperature of the approximate center of the fruit reached 280.






1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 161

To make it possible to take immediate or early advantage of the wider movement authorized under such treatment pending the development of adequate facilities within the eradication area and other parts of the State, such treatment is now authorized either in Florida, or, in designated cold storages approved by the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration in the District of Columbia or the States of Kentucky, Missouri, Ohio, Illinois, Massachusetts, New York, Pennsylvania, and such other Northern States as may later be approved. Fruit to be treated at localities outside of Florida must be graded, packed in standard commercial containers and shipped under special permits issued by the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration. Such permits will authorize movement only under ice in refrigerated cars and to designated cold storages.
To provide necessary safeguards for movement to and handling at approved cold storages, those concerns designated to sterilize fruit at points outside the infested state will, prior to such designation, be required to file an application and complete a written agreement with the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration. The administration will approve only those plants which are adequately equipped to handle and sterilize the fruit and will maintain at designated plants outside of the State of Florida the same supervision which will be given to such storages within the said State.
No fruit which has been sent to designated storages for sterilization will be permitted to leave such cold storages except under permit issued by the inspector detailed to the plant concerned, and the issuance of such permits will he conditioned upon the sterilization of the fruit to the satisfaction of the inspector in manner and method authorized above.
Railroads are authorized to move fruit, under permits for such movement, issued to the shipper, from any part of an infested State to designated cold storages under the usual storage-in-transit provisions of the railroad tariffs, but shall not transport such fruit from the said plants until a permit has been issued as provided in the foregoing paragraphs.
C. L. MARLATT,
Chief, Plant Quarantine and Control Administration.
Approved:
R. W. DUNLAP,
Acting Secretary of Agriculture.


INFORMATION RE STERILIZATION OUTSIDE OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA OF CITRUS
FRUITS UNDER MEDITERRANEAN FRUIT-FLY REGULATIONS

SEPTEM BER 27, 1929.
PQCA-247
In an informal conference attended by Fraink A. Iornie. O(lin C. Mackay, I. C. Herschman, S. T. Price, Ralpl C. Stokell. and W. M. ()'Keefe. certain questions pertaining to details of sterilization of citrus fruits in transit. as provided by administrative instructions entitle(I Sterilizat ion of Clitris Fruits under Mediterranean Fruit-Fly Regulaions (P'Q(':A--24), \were presented and discussed. Thlle questions presellted by tlese repires.eltatives of thie co ld( storage industry makes it advis]alble to issue sul letlemlltal I inf(rinmtion concerning various details of handling siipliiments of fruits requiring sterilizati(in under cold storage.
The following information lihas been i)replared in ctllabor)atin with L. A. Hawkins of tile Bureau of Plant Industry:
The instructios f)r tle sterilizaltiin (of fruit. I Q('A---24 require tlhat fruit which is to be sterilized ouitsidIte (f the State 1e sliilql)(1 ul(er ice- -either standard refrigeration (or initial icing. This requirement means that thle teimperature of the fruit will, t4 some exteit, he re(l(ceid while en route t() cold storages designated fotr sterilization. It is prliabhle thlit the It(enmplera11tur1e tif such fruit oiin arrival at such storages will average l(t higher tihan 5()' F. At the beginning of the season, lihwever, it is ipossilc that the telt Iature of the fruit may he snewhat higher, Iut (lurijng the winter r Imontls tlhe tenltperature will undoubtelly he co nsi(lerably lower tha nI the average given ab1(ove. It seems probable, therefore o, that in the sterilizatio'(n t f the it'ruit it will be







162 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [July-Sept.,

necessary, in calculating the average amount of refrigeration required, to provide for lowering the temperature at least 220. There are 360 boxes of fruit to a car and each box weighs about 90 pounds. The specific heat of citrus fruit is usually considered to be 0.9.
Fruit should be moved directly from the car to the rooms in which it is to be sterilized. In order to get the most rapid cooling, fruit should be stacked in the room so as to allow good air circulation between the boxes. While no careful experimentation has been carried on, in the tests which have been run it has been possible to reach the required temperature when the boxes were stacked on the side in solid rows with air passages of 4 to 6 inches between the rows and with dunnage between the boxes. In some of these tests the fruit has been stacked four or five crates high and when overhead coils were used about as good results were obtained as when the fruit was in smaller stacks. Under some conditions--for example, where there is a rapid movement of air across the room-it might be well to stack boxes on end with air spaces between the stacks, thus permitting the air to penetrate into the pile.
With experimental lots, fruits stacked four high on the side with air spaces between each stack has been cooled down to a temperature of 280 F. in about 48 hours. These were small lots, however, containing in most cases not more than 20 to 40 boxes.
The treatment required in administrative instructions on sterilization provides that the fruit shall be cooled until the approximate center reaches 28* F. and that the fruit shall be held at that temperature for five hours. It provides for the raising of the temperature not higher than 300 and holding until a total period of five days has elapsed from the time the temperature of the approximate center of the fruit reaches 280. It is expected that during sterilization the change in the temperature of the fruit will be gradual. An abrupt change between 280 and 300 is not required.
The instructions on sterilization. provide that it will be done under the supervision of representatives of the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration. These inspectors should at all times be given access to fruit while in process of sterilization. They will supervise the movement of the fruit from the car to and from the sterilizing rooms. Following the satisfactory completion of sterilization in the manner prescribed in the administrative instructions, inspectors will issue permits which will authorize the further movement of the fruit and its distribution for sale.
Shipments of fruit for sterilization, either at receivng points or at designated cold storages where the storage-in-transit provisions apply, will begin moving very shortly. Some of the fruit which can be distributed only after sterilization is now mature and it is probable that fruit requiring sterilization will be moved in considerable volume by the second or third week in October. If fruit is sterilized by the cold storage method only, there will be approximately 15,000 cars of fruit requiring sterilization which, with the present facilities, can not be handled in the State of Florida. To comply with the present requirements of the Federal quarantine, all citrus fruit produced in any part of the State must be removed from the trees by April 1, 1930. Under the regulations the entire crop will have to, be handled in a period of approximately five and one-half months. Because of the necessity of removing the fruit prior to April 1, there will undoubtedly be considerable storage of fruit at the end of the season in order to meet spring and summer trade which has heretofore usually been supplied by fruit direct from the trees.
When storages have been designated, it seems reasonably certain that. the producers will make arrangements to handle by sterilization a regular volume of fruit through certain designated plants. This, however, is a matter for negotiation between the shippers and the cold storages.
Experimental lots of fruit, amounting to 5 or 6 carloads in all are under treatment at the present time, part in Florida and part in northern markets-New York and Washington. As soon as the tests have been completed and definite results obtained on the time necessary to reach the required minimum temperature and complete the treatment, such information will be made available. The subsequent statement will also include information as to the effect of the treatment on the fruit.
C. L. MARLATT,
Chief, Plant Quarantine and Control Administration.







1929] SERVICE A"N-D REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 163

MEXICAN FRUIT WORM QUARANTINE (NO. 64)

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,
PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION, 503 Rio Grande National Life Building, Harlingen, Texas, August 21, 1929.

CITRUS CENSUS OF THE LOWER RIO GRANDE VALLEY OF TEXAS AS OF JULY 1, 1929

In administering the provisions of the Mexican fruit-worm quarantine it has been found to be necessary to make a complete census of all citrus growing in the lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas. In response to requests from the citrus interests of this valley and of various agricultural agencies and inspectors of other States it is deemed desirable that this information be made available.
The census which follows has been taken by the various district inspectors for their respective districts. It is presented in two arrangements, by counties and by districts. The 11 districts as shown in Table 2 represents divisions of the territory which have been made for the convenience of administration. These divisions are designated by the names of the towns at which the inspectors in charge are located.
In explanation of the tables the following information is given:
Ages of trees.-In the tables the ages of trees are classified as 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5. Trees given under classification 0 were planted during, or at the beginning of, the growing season of 1928-29. Trees given under classification "1 were planted during, or at the beginning of, the growing season of 1927-28. The ages of trees designated as 2, 3, and 4, respectively, will be understood in the light of this explanation. Trees given under classification 5 are
5 years old or older.
Other citrus.-Under this classification are included kumquats, limes, mandarins, satsumas, sour oranges, tangelos, tangerines, lemons, etc.
IL. H. FORD,
Acting in Charge Mexican Fruit-Worm Eradication.

TABLE 1. Citrus census of the lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas as of July 1, 1929, by counties


Number of growing citrus trees of age stated
County and fruit
0 1 2 3 4 5 Total

Cameron:
Grapefruit.........----------.... 427, 293 2-3. 709 149, 153 111,027 106. 619 212. 343 1, 2t0. 144
Oranges ------.......---------..... 10, 211 88. 582 09, 300 63, 754 65, 2.1 9, 40 491, 7:3
Other citrus----------- 3, 000 1,20 2, 2.3 3, 2,8 4, 704 11, 136 2, 231
Total................ --------------- 53, 504 344, 111 220,736 178, 069 176, 574 322, 119 1,778. 113
Hidalgo:
A Grapefruit............. 877, 001 164i, 304, 889 181, 813 13, 36;3 272, 184 2, 419, 138
Oranges.............. --------------- 53, 474 184, 015 5 110,03 00 809 72, 571 94, r. 805 930
Other citrus.......... ----------- 10, 296 5, 284 3, 2'8 5, 272 5, 584 1i, 911 46, 645
Total ..............---------- 1. 140, 771 836. 187 418, 280 277, 894 214, 518 384, 063 3, 271, 713
Willacy:
Grapefruit.........----------.... 14, 809 15, 737 4, 190 4, 244 1, 680 2, 807 43, 4 7
Oranges.....-----------....... 7, 5 7, 7, 701 1, 707 2, 871 980 2, 13i 22, 94i
Other citrus-........----.. ------ 189 534 136 363 292 1, 2 2, 742
Total................ ------------ 22, 549 23, 972 6, 033 7, 478 2, 952 6, 171 69, 155
Total, all counties...
Grapefruit---------......... 1, 319, 103 916, 334 458, 232 )7, 0,4 244, 6;2 487, 334 3, 722. 749
Oranges ----------........... 367, 236 280, ? 8 181, 100 157, 434 138, 802 195, 744 1, 320. 614
Other citrus......-------- 13, 485 7, 638 5, 717 8, 923 10, 70 29, 275 75, 618
Grand total ... 1, 6999.824 1, 204, 270 645, 049 43, 441 394, 044 712, 353 5, 118, 981







164 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [July-Sept.,

TABLE 2.-Citrus census of the lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas as of July 1, 1929, by districts

Number of growing citrus trees of age stated
District and fruit 1 2 3 4 Total 0 1 2 3 4 5 Total
Mission:
Grapefruit-_------------ 259, 794 184, 714 59, 510 52, 823 32, 354 95, 261 634,456
Oranges--------------- 80, 873 36, 115 28, 472 25, 581 17, 072 28,454 216, 567
Other citrus__----------- 5, 595 2,107 1,399 1, 685 1, 724 10, 371 22,881
Total---------------- 346, 262 172, 936 89, 381 80,089 51, 150 134, 086 873,904
McAllen:
Grapefruit ------------- 89, 500 48, 992 29, 441 13, 879 8, 418 19, 725 209,955
Oranges. --------------- 31, 574 17,924 10,479 10, 632 6, 734 10, 795 88, 138
Other citrus..----------- 1, 021 22 131 210 248 473 2,105
Total......----------------...... 122, 095 66,938 40,051 24,721 15,400 30,993 300, 198
Pharr-Edinburg:
Grapefruit....------------- 152, 457 256, 750 117, 917 45, 356 30,913 41, 974 645,367
Oranges .....--------------- 43, 333 74, 816 39, 918 22, 445 16, 471 13, 046 210,029
Other citrus--__--- ------ 1, 014 948 453 577 721 797 4, 510
Total ---------------- 196, 804 332, 514 158, 288 68,378 48, 105 55, 817 859, 906
Donna:
Grapefruit ------------- 172, 306 84, 462 54, 938 43, 208 40, 466 30, 554 425, 934
Oranges ..---------------..... 49, 920 22, 763 15, 374 16, 558 15, 922 8,893 129, 430
Other citrus .------- --- 1, 557 932 426 833 837 620 5, 205
Total. -------------- 223,783 108,157 70,738 60, 599 57, 225 40, 067 560, 569
TWeslaco:
Grapefruit------------- 158, 411 91, 857 16, 481 12, 195 12, 049 47,307 338, 300
Oranges --------------....... 34, 682 24, 876 7,693 6,861 7, 902 18,990 101,094
Other citrus ..---------- 576 737 581 1, 399 831 2, 411 6, 535
Total ----------------193,669 117, 470 24,755 20, 455 20,872 68,708 445,929
Mercedes:
Grapefruit ------------- 44, 533 30, 113 26, 602 14, 352 12, 163 37, 363 165, 126
Oranges --------------- 13, 092 7, 521 8, 157 8, 732 8,380 14, 790 60,672
Other citrus- ---------- 533 508 308 568 1,223 2,239 5,409
Total_ ----------------- 58, 158 38, 172 35, 067 23, 652 21,766 54, 392 231,207
La Feria:
Grapefruit __ ------------- 91, 590 45, 139 37, 187 44, 613 52, 007 67,477 338,013
Oranges__ --------------- 25, 952 20, 296 17, 196 27, 129 37, 883 41, 520 169, 976
Other citrus---__--- ----- 323 370 523 139 1,447 2,535 5, 337
Total ---------------- 117,865 65,805 54,906 71,881 91,337 111,532 513,326
Raymondville:
Grapefruit ------------- 14, 809 15, 737 4, 190 4, 244 1, 680 2,807 43,467
Oranges --------------- 7,551 7,701 1,707 2,871 980 2,136 22,946
Other citrus ---------- 189 534 136 363 292 1, 228 2,742
Total ---------------- 22, 549 23, 972 6, 033 7, 478 2, 952 6, 171 69, 155
IHarlingen:
Grapefruit ------------ 138, 382 57, 416 58, 358 36, 049 26, 514 51, 298 368, 017
Oranges --------------- 37,226 16,302 20,849 18,625 14,332 30,315 137,649
Other citrus.. ----------- 586 344 534 402 998 2, 878 5,742
Total ----------------176,194 74,062 79,741 55,076 41,844 84,491 511,408
San Benito:
Grapefruit ------------- 155,775 96,320 37,386 17,287 14, 083 47,597 368,448
Oranges --------------- 32,068 39,285 22,162 10,942 8,318 15,525 128,300
Other citrus _----------- 1, 222 752 418 568 886 2,700 6,546
Total---------------- 189, 065 136, 357 59, 966 28, 797 23, 287 65, 822 503, 294
Brownsville:
Grapefruit.. ------------- 41, 546 54, 834 16, 222 13, 078 14, 015 45, 971 185, 666
Oranges..........---------------. 10, 965 12, 699 9, 093 7, 058 4, 718 11, 280 55, 813
Other citrus-----------........... 869 354 808 2, 179 1,373 3,023 8,606
Total ---------------- 53, 380 67, 887 26, 123 22, 315 20, 106 60, 274 250,085
Total, all districts:
Grapefruit....... 1,319,103 916,334 458,232 297,084 244, 662 487, 334 3,722,749 Oranges_ --------- 367, 236 280, 298 181, 100 157, 434 138, 802 195, 744 1,320, 614 Other citrus..... 13, 485 7, 638 5, 717 8, 923 10, 580 29, 275 75, 618
Grand total .... 1,699,824 1, 204, 270 645, 049 463, 441 394,044 712,353 5, 118, 981






1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 165

NURSERY STOCK, PLANT, AND SEED QUARANTINE (NO. 37)
CONFERENCE ON FRUIT-STOCKS IMPORTATIONS CALLED FOR JULY 19

To CONSIDER PLACING FURTHER RESTRICTIONS ON IMPORTATION OF FRUIT STOCKS,
PARTICULARLY IAHALEB CHERRY AND MIYROBALAN PLUM
(Press notice)
JULY 1, 1929.
The advisability of placing further restrictions on the importation of fruit stocks, including cuttings or any classes of them, will be considered at a conference called by the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration of the United States Department of Agriculture for July 19, 1929, at 10 o'clock. The meeting will be held at the offices of the administration at 1729 New York Avenue, Washington, D. C.
In explanation of the proposed conference, the department referred to its announcement of July 25, 1928, excluding apple, pear, quince, and mazzard cherry stocks, in which the following statement was made: "A With respect to the deferred action as to the items mahaleb cherry, myrobalan plum and rose stocks, if in the judgment of the department it should later seem possible to consider final action relative to these stocks, a conference will be called and, if the information presented should warrant the department in excluding such stocks, it is understood that the effective date of such exclusion will, if safety permits, be so fixed as to allow a reasonable period for adjustment, both in this country and abroad."
At this conference it is also proposed to give consideration to other fruit stocks, such as fig, nut, persimmon, etc., which have been imported in relatively small numbers.
Persons interested in rose stocks are advised that it is not the intention to consider at this time further restrictions on entry of these stocks and such consideration is postponed pending the outcome of investigations which are still in progress.
The pest risk incident to bulk importation of fruit stocks has been fully discussed in connection with previous conferences, the department stated.
Following is a statement by the Bureau of Plant Industry regarding production of mahaleb and myrobalan stocks in the United States:

PRODUCTION OF nAHALEB AND 'IYROBALAN STOCKS IN THIE UNITED STATES

The fruit stocks which, under present regulations, would be permitted entry after June 30, 1930, include cherry stocks excepting mazzard, and plum stocks. In the consideration of further amendments to Quarantine :37, nursery stock, plant, and seed quarantine, to exclude these stocks only two items-nahileb cherry and myrobalan plum-are imported in large quantities at present. Although other species of cherry and I)lum are brought in each year the quantities have been relatively small, consequently tile principal interest centers on mahaleb and myrobalan.
Mahaleb seedling importations, according to the records of the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration, from July 1. 1928, to .Ju1e 1. 19t29 (the 1928 crop), were 6,113,450. Importations of the 1927 crop were 6,037,900.
The mahalehb seedling crop growli in this country in 192 is estimated Iby the Bureau of Plant Industry at 1,_27;,i0. No comparable estimate was made for the 1927 crop. The domestic supply according to these figures represented only a little over 17 per cent of tie total for the 1 )2 crop. This production could he increased material if a demand for the seedllilngs was evident tothe growers who specialize ill this crop.
Most of the domestic mahalcl) seedlings are grown in certain valleys in tlihe Pacific States, also ill Kansas and ('olorado. Larger alnlillts c ld he grown in these areas already developed on a commercial scale.
The amounts estimated for It e 192 crop 1 I hese States a e e 540,000; Washington, 178,000; (:'alifrnia, 1 50.000: ('olorado, .,L:, 83, and Kansas, 175,000; or a total of 1,27;,510 for these five States.
A preliminary estimate for the 192 crop from all sect]i' s ttals 1.,;i ;11)0.
Except in these localities the roduin is ngliile at presel t' : commercial stanldpoinlt, but no reason is apparent why tlhey 'uil lo ,t Ie grown successfully in some other sect ions suitable fr nurs roIs. Tile






166 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [July-Sept.,

Bureau of Plant Industry has grown mahaleb seedlings each year for seven years in the vicinity of the District of Columbia that have compared favorably each year with imported stocks from commercial sources, in size and in the growth obtained after transplanting. Similar results have been secured at the Shafter, Calif., experiment station.
Most of the domestic mahaleb seedlings are grown from imported seed which has often failed to germinate well. This hazard can be reduced by better care of the seed during the interval between collection and planting, but perhaps the most effective way is that adopted by a few western growers who have planted orchards for seed. These seed bearing trees are now producing commercial quantities and the amount may be expected to increase during the next few years. Growers estimate that by 1930 the crop should be 2,000 pounds of seed which should produce 2,500,000 seedlings. These growers estimate that by the use of imported seed to supplement their own, that production could be increased to 7,000,000, provided they were assured of a demand. (This prospect for increased production is presented to indicate the growers' viewpoint, rather than as an estimate by the Bureau of Plant Industry.)
The performance of domestic mahaleb in the hands of nurserymen in different parts of the country has been variable. Reports of both good and poor results have been received from different sections each year. West of the Rocky Mountains a general preference exists for western-grown seedlings. In other sections where cherry is propagated in large quantities on mahaleb stocks the experience generally has not been so favorable.
An objection to domestic mahaleb seedlings which has been heard more often in the Eastern and Central States than in the West, is the uncertainty of obtaining good stands when the seedlings are transplanted in the nursery for budding. Losses in transplanting have been larger some years than others. For example, from the northwestern crop of 1926 reports of poor stands came from many nurserymen after transplanting in the spring of 1927. This crop. was probably injured by an exceptionally severe freeze in the early fall and the damage to the seedlings could not be detected until after they had been shipped to customers. On the other hand all the reports so far received this spring from the 1928 crop indicate satisfactory stands. Besides unseasonable freezes, losses may be traced to digging too early in the fall and improper storage conditions. More study is needed on this phase in order to bring the performance of mahaleb to the desired measure of dependability.
A second objection to domestic mahaleb arises from the low branching type of growth which some lots have shown. This defect makes extra labor for pruning and some trouble in setting the buds properly, but such stocks can usually be budded successfully. In the past two seasons, the sample lots of stocks received at the bureau's experiment nurseries have shown a smaller proportion of low branching seedlings than formerly. This defect is often found where a poor stand in the seed rows allows the individual plants room for low lateral growth and is usually less in evidence where the stand is normal.
Myrobalan is the principal stock used for plums in this country and the only one imported in large quantity, although several thousand St. Julian (Prunus insititia) are brought in each year. A considerable proportion of the total supply has been grown in this country for several years. Importations of the 1928 crop amounted to 916,700. The domestic crop for that year was estimated at 1,268,000. These seedlings were grown in the following States: Oregon, 425.000; California, 550,000; and Washington, 293,000; a total of 1,268,000. Probably smaller quantities were grown in other sections not reported.
Myrobalan seed germinates well and the seedlings are easily grown. A good supply of seed is available in certain sections of California, which is being utilized, although some myrobalan seed is imported.
The production of myrobalan seedlings could be increased readily to meet all needs. Little loss in transplanting is experienced and the domestic seedlings have usually proved satisfactory under ordinary methods of handling. Some lots have proved objectionable due to low branching but this defect can be avoided by proper culture in the seedling nursery. As in the case of mahaleb, low branching is often the result of a thin stand in the seedling rows.
St. Julian, which is highly regarded as a plum stock by some growers, has mostly been imported but it could be propagated without difficulty in the localities where other seedling stocks are grown.






1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEIME-TS 167

Several other plum stocks are used, including marianna and some of the native species, but all these are produced by American growers and are not imported.


FRUIT STOCKS DECISION

MAHALEB CHERRY, IMYROBALAN PLUM AND OTHER FRUIT STOCKS TO BE EXCLUDED AFTER JUNE 30, 1931

(Press notice)
JULY 30, 1929.
The Secretary of Agriculture announces that on and after July 1, 1931, by amendment to Quarantine 37, mahaleb cherry, myrobalan plum and other fruit stocks will be excluded from entry into the United States.
This decision is based on evidence presented at the fruit stocks conference held by the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration and the Federal Plant Quarantine Board, July 19, 1929. This conference was attended by officials and other representatives of the American Association of Nurserymen, the horticultural specialists of the Bureau of Plant Industry of the Department of Agriculture, and others in interest. The evidence presented as to mahaleb cherry, myrobalan plum and other fruit stocks indicated that the present availability of satisfactory American-grown stocks of these fruits was sufficient to justify the exclusion of these stocks after a reasonable period for adjustment of business contracts, etc., and thus terminate the very considerable and continuing risk of entry with such stocks of new and dangerous fruit pests.
It will be recalled that the conference of July 19, 1929, was in continuation of conferences on this general subject held June 29, 1925, and June 27, 1928, and that these earlier conferences were called at the suggestion of nurserymen and rose growers to consider the fixing of a possible date for the termination of further entry of foreign stocks. As a result of evidence presented at the conference of 1928 the Secretary of Agriculture announced (July 25, 1928) that on and after July 1, 1930, by amendment to Quarantine 37, apple, pear, quince and mazzard cherry stocks would he excluded from entry into the United States. Action with regard to mahaleb cherry, myrobalan plum and rose stocks was deferred for further study and determination of the question of availability of satisfactory home-grown stocks of these classes. In the announcement of July 25, 1928, the department stated:
With respect to the deferred action as to the items mahaleb cherry, myrobalan plum, and rose stocks, if in the judgment of the department it should later seem possible to consider final action relative to these stocks a conference will be called, and if the information presented should warrant the department in excluding such stocks it is understood that the effective date of such exclusion will, if safety permits, be so fixed as to allow a reasonable period for adjustment, both in this country and abroad."
With respect to mahaleb cherry and myrohalan plum stocks, the recommendation of the specialists of the Ilreau of Plant I(ndustry of the department is that a reasonable period for adjustment as regards seed supplies andl seedlings, both in this country and abroad, will be afforded by making the effective date of exclusion, as herein authorized, July 1, 1931.
The other fruit stocks covered in the notice of the conference of 1929 and included in the present order terminating their importation -July 1, 1931, include such stocks as fig, nut, persimmi1n, etc., which have been imported hitherto in relatively very small numbers a11nd wlich either can he made available in adequate quantities in this country or can, under the quarantine, be imported by the department fT r aniy necessary liort icultural purIose.
With respect to rose stocks, referred to in the quoted paragraph above, it was indicated in the annoulncemen1 ofi thlie conferlencce of July 19, 1929, that it was not the department's itnntion at that time to consider further restrictions on the entry of rose stcks and that such consideration would 1,e pstponed pending the outcome of investigations which are still in progress.
A fairly complete discussion of the pest risk \itlh the importali)on from foreign countries of fruit stocks was given in Iprevious announe(m(entIs, and need not here be repeated.






168 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [July-Sept.,

MODIFICATION OF NURSERY STOCK, PLANT, AND SEED QUARANTINE REGULATIONS
AMENDMENT NO. 1 OF REVISED RULES AND REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 37
(Effective on and after August 1, 1929)

Under authority conferred by the plant quarantine act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended by the act of Congress approved March 4, 1917 (39 Stat. 1134, 1165), it is ordered that regulation No. 3 of the revised rules and regulations supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 37 governing the importation of nursery stock, plants, and seeds into the United States, which became effective November 1, 1928, be, and the same is hereby, amended to read as follows:
REGULATION 3.-NURSERY STOCK AND OTHER PLANTS AND SEEDS FOR WHICH PERMIT IS REQUIRED
The following nursery stock and other plants and seeds, not including, however, those named in Appendix A, which are governed by special quarantines and other restrictive orders now in force, nor such as may hereafter be made the subject of special quarantines, may be imported from countries which maintain inspection (see Appendix B), under permit upon compliance with these regulations:
(1) Bulbs of the following genera: Lilium (lily), Convallaria (lily of the valley), Hyacinthus (hyacinth), Tulipa (tulip), and Crocus; and, until further notice, Chionodoxa (glory-of-the-snow), Galanthus (snowdrop), Scilla (squill), Fritillaria imperialis (crown imperial), Fritillaria meleagris (guinea-henflower), Muscari (grape hyacinth), Ixia, and Eranthis (winter aconite).
(2) Stocks, cuttings, scions, and buds of fruits for propagation; except that stocks of apple, pear, quice, and mazzard cherry may not be imported under permit or otherwise after June 30, 1930; other fruit stocks, including mahaleb cherry and myrobalan plum, may not be imported under permit or otherwise after June 30, 1931.
(3) Rose stocks for propagation, including Manetti, Multiflora, Brier Rose, and Rosa rugosa.
(4) Nuts, including palm seeds for propagation.
(5) Seeds of fruit, forest, ornamental, and shade trees, seeds of deciduous and evergreen ornamental shrubs, and seeds of hardy perennial plants; except that mango seeds may not be imported under permit or otherwise.
Importations of nursery stock and other plants and seeds specified in this regulation, from countries not maintaining inspection, may be made under permit upon compliance with these regulations in limited quantities for experimental purposes only, but this limitation shall not apply to tree seeds.
This amendment shall be effective on and after August 1, 1929.
Done at the city of Washington this 29th day of July, 1929.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
R. W. DUNLAP,,
Acting Secretary of Agrioulture.


INSTRUCTIONS TO. COLLECTORS OF CUSTOMS

(T. D. 43527)

Plant quarantine

AMENDMENT OF REGULATION 3, QUARANTINE 37, BY THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE

(See T. D. 42973, Sept. 26, 1928)

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,
OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONER OF CUSTOMS, Washington, D. C. August 13, 1929.
To Collectors of Customs and Others Concerned:
The appended copy of amendment No. 1 of the revised rules and regulations supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 37, issued by the Secretary of Agri-






1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 169

culture, is published for the information and guidance of customs officers and others concerned.
F. X. A. EBLE,
Cowmisioner of Customs.
[Then follows the text of the amendment.]


EXPLANATION OF PROVISIONS FOR ENTRY OF PLANTS UNDER QUARANTINE 37

SEPTEMBER 28, 1929.
PQCA-249
(Revision of HB--105)"
Before taking up the specific subject of this circular it seems desirable to indicate briefly the necessity for the restrictions under Quarantine 37 on the entry of plants.

NECESSITY FOR RESTRICTING THE ENTRY OF PLANTS

Imported nursery stock and other plants and seeds have been the source of the introduction of some 90 per cent of the insect pests and plant diseases which have come to us from other countries and which now occasion losses to our agriculture and forestry of approximately one billion dollars annually. Hitherto such material has often come with the roots embedded in earth, and practically always it is promptly taken to the field or greenhouse where other plants are growing, thus furnishing the best possible conditions for the local establishment of any insect pests or plant diseases which may be carried by the plants or in soil about their roots.
A practical test over a seven-year period of the possibility of safeguarding plant imports by inspection and disinfection plainly indicated the inadequacy of this method and the conclusion was forced that the only possible means of effectively lessening the introduction of new plant enemies is the policy of exclusion of all plants not absolutely essential to the agricultural and forestry needs of the United States. Carrying out this policy, Quarantine 37 restricts the entry of most nursery stock and other ornamentals to certain purposes which are believed to be necessary to the development of American horticulture. Unlimited entry is permitted of certain classes of plants which are believed to be most free from the risk of carriage of new pests, such as seeds, certain classes of bulbs, and cuttings, scions, and buds of fruits; and also, as representing what is believed to be a temporary horticultural necessity, fruit and rose stocks. The entry of all other plants is restricted, but, to enable America to keep abreast with the horticultural progress of the world, any such restricted plants which are either new or unavailable in the United States may be imported for propagation or for any experimental, educational, or scientific purpose. The comparatively limited entry necessary for such purposes is being safeguarded by a thoroughness of inspection and, if necessary, by treatment or holding in quarantine-safeguards which are impractieable of application to unlimited commercial or other importations. The provisions for the entry of both the restricted and the unrestricted classes of plants are explained in this circular.

PROVISIONS FOR THE ENTRY OF PLANTS UNDER QUARANTINE 37

Under regulation 2 of the quarantine unrestricted entry is possible, without permit, of field, vegetable, and flower seeds, and of plant products imported for medicinal, food, or manufacturing purposes.
Regulation 3 provides for the unlimited entry, under permit and with provision for inspection, and, if necessary, disinfection, of seeds of trees and ornamental shrubs and hardy perennial plants, certain classes of hulbs. and cu'ttings, scions, and buds of fruits; and also, as representing what is believed to be a temporary horticultural necessity, fruit and rose stocks.
Regulation 14 makes provision for the entry, under special permit, of limited quantities of any plant not included under regulations 2, 3. and 15 for the

10The only important revision is a restatement of the conditions for introduction for any necessary experimental, educational, or scientific purpose (p. 171).






170 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [July-Sept.,

purpose of keeping the country supplied with new varieties and necessary propagating stock, or for any necessary experimental, educational, or scientific purpose.
Regulation 15 recognizes the intimate trade relations between the United States and Canada and Mexico and provides, under permit and necessary safeguards, for the importation of certain classes of plants the entry of which from other foreign countries is restricted.
The few exceptions to entry of plants thus provided for are those involved under specific quarantines, as, for example, the prohibition of entry of Ribes and Grossularia from certain countries, and generally of citrus, bamboo, banana plants, etc., but any of the plants prohibited under such quarantines may be imported, under permit and adequate safeguards, by the United States Department of Agriculture for any necessary experimental, scientific, or introduction purpose.

PROVISION FOR THE ENTRY UNDER REGULATION 14 OF THE RESTRICTED PLANTS

DEFINITIONS OF TERMS

As used in regulation 14, the terms new varieties," necessary propagating stock," and limited quantities are defined in regulation 1 under the quarantine as follows:
New varieties.-A new variety is understood to mean a novelty, i. e., a new plant, variety, strain, type, or form, either recognized by the trade as such or so listed or described in catalogues, trade journals, or other publications, or duly and properly certified as such by the originator or introducer.
Necessary propagating stock.-Stock of old or standard varieties not available in this country and imported for the multiplication of the plants in question as a nursery or florist enterprise as distinguished from importations for the immediate or ultimate sale of the stocks actually imported.
Limited quantities.-As used in regulation 14, "limited quantities" is understood to mean such quantities as will supply any reasonable need for the establishment of commercial reproduction plantings, or as may be necessary for the experimental, educational, or scientific purpose intended.

IMPORTATIONS UNDER REGULATION 14 LIMITED TO DEFINITE PURPOSES

In furtherance of the object of Quarantine 37-i. e., to limit the number and volume of importations of plants as the only effective means of excluding new plant enemies-entry under regulation 14 of the restricted classes of plants is limited to certain purposes or uses which are believed to be necessary for the development of American horticulture. These purposes are (1) to make provision for the propagation in the United States of the plants concerned, and (2) for any necessary experimental, educational, or scientific work.

INTRODUCTIONS FOR PROPAGATION

Any new variety of plant or any old or standard variety not commercially available in this country may be imported by any person who will agree to, propagate and increase the imported stock and thus render a public service by making the plants concerned more generally available. Under this agreement plants imported will be required to be kept and utilized solely for propagation, and are not subject to release except when either the natural or artificial method of propagation involves the complete merging of the imported stock into the increase. The conditions governing the release of the increase from such plants are explained in Circular HB-194, a copy of which will be furnished upon request. Prior to such release no sale of the increase from the imported stock will be permitted.
There is no limitation under regulation 14 as to the number of permits for different plants or classes of plants which an individual may request, but prior to the issuance of the permits the varieties applied for will all be passed upon by specialists of the department, for the information of the administration both as to the necessity for the particular importation and as to the quantity adequate for the purpose intended. Plants thus imported will be restricted to the youngest and smallest plants, or to the portions of plants, that can accomplish the purpose of the importation.






1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 171

For inspecting and otherwise safeguarding shipments. and to enforce the other conditions of entry, all importations under regulation 14 must be made through the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration of the Department of Agriculture, but for the use of the individual importer. With the funds available, the department is able to maintain technically trained inspection forces to supervise such entry at two ports only, Washington, D. C., and San Francisco, Calif., and entry of special permit material is therefore limited to these ports. Where safety permits, inspection may be authorized at destination in the case of public institutions, including experiment stations, botanic gardens, arboretums, etc.; and for special classes of plants (such as narcissus bulbs) where disinfection is a condition of entry and provision for such disinfection satisfactory to the department has been made at the point of destination.
The bond formerly required by the Department of Agriculture in connection with special permits has been replaced by a personal liability agreement embodied in the form of application for special permits, which form must be signed by the applicant and duly witnessed. The amount of the liability will be based on the invoice value of the imported stock, but in no case is to exceed $5,000. This substitution eliminates the expense which a bond usually involves.

INTRODUCTIONS FOR ANY NECESSARY EXPERIMENTAL, EDUCATIONAL, OR SCIENTIFIC PURPOSE

To meet necessary experimental. educational, or scientific needs provision is made under regulation 14 for importations (a) by botanic gardens, agricultural colleges, experiment stations, and other similar public institutions; (b) by any person who is widely or nationally known as a specialist in or as maintaining a fairly complete study or experimental collection of some special class of plants, as roses, dahlias, etc.; (c) by any person who is maintaining a notable general collection of plants of the nature of a botanic garden or arboretum which is freely open to the public and which serves a distinct educational purpose; or (d) to meet the needs of experimental or research work.

IMPORTATIONS BY PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS

As indicated in paragraph 18 (a), special permits will be issued to botanic gardens, agricultural colleges, experiment stations, and other similar public institutions to meet any necessary educational, experimental, or scientitic need, such as additions to collections or as a basis for any experimental or research work.

IMPORTATIONS BY A.ATElEuS ANI) OTIft:iS

The limitations to public service purposes indicated in paragraph 1S (b, c, and d), on the issuance of permits to amateurs and others are believed to be necessary. Otherwise we would have little restriction on the number and volume of plant importations and correspoi dingly little protection against entry of new pests, but it is realized that it is highly desirable to recognize an important, but fairly limited, class of amateurs and others who will perform a public service of real value with the plants imported.
Any person who believes that his collection or proposed work entitles him to a special permit under any of the provisions intlic:lted in pIragraph 18 will, as a basis for the issuance of a permit, be required to furnish the following information :
(a) Statement of the object of the iml)ortation (b, e,. or d of paragraph 18) giving full information concerning thle lnatre ()of the special or general collection or of the proposed experimental or research work, and if the latter, a statement of anIy other related ex erimental or research work by the applicant.
(b) Names and addresses of persons who are familiar \with the collection or work of the applicant.
All such requests for special permits from l:tIltelrs and others, together with y inosements reeived(, are sulbllitted to th1e 1'ur0eau1 of :lalt I1ndustry of this departillent for extlliiao ll :1iit reolllleld:ation aI( (th st.ttus of the applicant is further (leterMniel by inforumt ion olt ained( b1 the dlp:rt ment from all available sources.
In this manner the Plant Quarant ad ('nutrl Admilititi.111 i's cndeavoring to securleand ile aa wit \\ respect to 1111 apl)tlint \\lilt ( m:y convince nilyrone of the reasonlalle ness of th le actio taken.







172 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [July-Sept.,

In the event that the authorized agencies, commercial or other, do not bring in varieties of plants which enthusiastic plant lovers may wish, the department has made special provision for the entry through its Office of Foreign Plant Introduction for ultimate public distribution of any neglected or overlooked new varieties. It may be noted that through the office mentioned the Department of Agriculture has developed a large organization to discover by exploration and to import plants for food, ornamental, or other useful purposes from all quarters of the world.

SUMMARY OF PROVISIONS FOR ENTRY OF RESTRICTED PLANTS

To recapitulate, the existing provisions for the entry of new or unavailable plants under regulation 14 include (1) importations for propagation; (2) importations by botanic gardens, experiment stations, and other public institutions; (3) importations by amateurs and others who are recognized as maintaining collections or conducting experiments which have an important public service quality; and (4) importations through the Office of Foreign Plant Introduction of the Department of Agriculture.
The provisions indicated in this circular for the entry of restricted plants are open to anyone for the purposes and under the conditions indicated. To meet the needs of persons wanting any of the restricted plants for their own gardens or for the adornment of their own estates-in other words, for purely personal use as distinguished from some definite public service-the department has endeavored, through the means discussed in this circular, to make, under methods which involve the least risk to the horticulture and agriculture of the country, all types of plants, new or old, available from home sources.

PROCEDURE FOR MAKING IMPORTATIONS UNDER REGULATION 14

Application blank.-The Plant Quarantine and Control Administration will supply, on request, a form of application for special permit to import nursery stock and other plants and seeds under the provisions of regulation 14. This application, under Conditions of Entry," explains the conditions of packing, inspection, and clearance through the customhouse. It also embodies various agreements which must be subscribed to by the importer to safeguard the importation, including the liability agreement which replaces the bond formerly required. The application must be filled out as to all the informational data called for and signed and forwarded to the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration. The applicant should indicate whether the importation is intended (1) for propagation (paragraphs 14-17), or (2) for a public institution (paragraphs 18-20), or (3) for a public-service purpose by an amateur or other (paragraphs 18, 20-24).
Permit and shipping tags.-With the issuance of the permit, the applicant will be furnished with shipping instructions and shipping tags to be forwarded with his order to the exporter. With the exception of trans-Pacific shipments for western destinations, such shipping tags will be addressed to the United States Department of Agriculture, Plant Quarantine and Control Administration, Washington, D. C., but will be indorsed with the permit number and name of the importer. Trans-Pacific shipments for all western points entering through the port of San Francisco may be given inspection and clearance at that port in the same manner as at Washington.
Delivery to administration.-Material coming to Washington must be turned over to the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration by the importer or his authorized agent, and in the specially equipped inspection houses and under expert care as to the welfare of the plants it will be carefully examined by the administration's inspectors. If the shipment is found to comply with the conditions of entry, and to be free from dangerous insects or diseases, it will be immediately repacked and forwarded, charges collect, to the importer.
Shipments for clearance at San Francisco will be similarly handled by the agents of the administration, Ferry Building, San Francisco.
Disinfection.-Disinfection will be authorized for slight infestation, but should the material be found to be so infected or infested with either diseases or insects that it can not be adequately disinfected it will either be destroyed or, when desired, permission may be granted for its exportation.
Storage and repacking.-So far as possible the administration will undertake to provide for storage and repacking. Should importers request, however, permit covering the importation of larger quantities of propagating or other






1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 173

stock under regulation 14 than can be housed and cared for in the inspection house of this department, and should such request be approved, the importers may be required to provide local storage in Washington for such material during the period of detention for examination and, if necessary, disinfection, including opening of containers and repacking.
Charges.-The department will make no charge for inspection and supervision, but the importer will be required to meet all entry, transportation, disinfection, and handling charges, drayage, etc.; and for this purpose should make arrangements with responsible agencies at port of arrival for forwarding in bond to Washington, D. C., and in Washington for all local charges as indicated.
Mail shipments.-Permission for importation through the mails of special permit material under regulation 14 will hereafter be authorized on request when warranted by the nature and amount of the proposed shipment. Such authority, if approved, will be indicated on the permit, and tags for such mail shipments will be furnished. These tags will be addressed to the United States Department of Agriculture, Plant Quarantine and Control Administration, either at Washington, D. C., or at the Ferry Building, San Francisco, Calif., and will carry the number of the permit authorizing the importation, and when attached to the package will authorize the foreign postmaster to accept it for shipment. By special arrangement with the United States Post Office Department, such mail shipments, after inspection, may be forwarded to the importer without payment of additional postage. The requirements in the case of mail shipments are somewhat simplified. By arrangement with the customs service such shipments are permitted to come in customs bond directly to the Department of Agriculture, either at the Washington or at the San Francisco
office of the administration, obviating any brokerage service for forwarding from port of first arrival. The importer will have to provide merely for customs clearance either at Washington or at San Francisco.
C. L. lARLATT,
Chlief, Plant Quarantine a.nd Control Administration.


PINK BOLLWORM QUARANTINE (NO. 52)
PINK-BOLLWORM QUARANTINE REGULATIONS AMENDED TO PERMIT SHIPMENT OF
SECOND-CUT LINTERS OUT OF QUARANTINE AREA UNDER CERTAIN SAFEGUARDS
(Press notice)
OCTOBER 2, 19209.
Secretary Arthur M. Hyde of the United States Department of Agriculture announced on October 2 that the regulations under the pink-bollworm quarantine have been amended to modify the conditions under which cottonseed oil mills may ship second-cut linters originating in the area regulated on account of the pink-bollwiorm.
In 1928 the Department of Agriculture found that the oil mills located in the counties in west-central Texas involved in the pink-)ollworm outbreak which was discovered in that area at that time, were inadequate in number and size to crush the cottonseed produced in the area. Accordingly, provision was made for the authorization of oil mi lls located outside of but in the vicinity of regulated areas, to crush cottonseed originating in such areas upon determination by the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration that reasonable necessity existed for such action. The linters cut from such seed were required to be returned to the regulated area for compression and fumigation. Since that plan was worked out, investigations have indicated that by the use of a special type of equipment, the second-cut linters can be passed through rollers under such pressure that all cottonseed with any larvae which might be contained therein Nwill be so crushed as to prevent any infestation.
The new amendment, effective Octobler 1, 1929, authorizes the issuance of permits for the interstate movement of second-cut liters passed through the new type of roller equipment vwhen the proper safeguards against conttamination are provided. This authorization does not apply to first-cut linters which must be returned to the regulated area for compression and fumigation as heretofore.
The department points out that thle second-cut linters to which this amendment relates are not only pressed within the rollers sufficiently to crush any







174 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [July-Sept.,

cottonseed which may be contained therein, but that the seed itself is already given a heat treatment at the gins before it is shipped to the oil mill concerned. It is felt, therefore, says the department, that the present action does not involve risk of spread of pink-bollworm to points outside the regulated areas.

MODIFICATION OF PINK-BOLLWORM QUARANTINE

INTRODUCTORY NOTE

The amendment which follows modifies the pink-bollworm quarantine regulations with respect to the conditions under which second-cut linters originating in the area regulated may be shipped from oil mills. Provision is made for the issuance of permits for the interstate shipment of second-cut linters passed through a new type of roller equipment when the proper safeguards against contamination are provided. Regulation 5 (f) has been somewhat recast as to arrangement and wording.
C. L. MABLATT,
Chief, Plant Quarantine and Control Admnistration.


AMENDMENT NO. 4 TO RULES AND REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO.' 52 (REVISED)
(Approved September 30, 1929; effective October 1, 1929)

Under authority conferred by the plant quarantine act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended by the act of Congress approved March 4, 1917 (39 Stat. 1134, 1165), it is ordered that section (f), regulation 5, of the rules and regulations supplemental to notice of quarantine No. 52 (revised) on account of the pink-bollworm, which were promulgated July 9, 1927, be, and the same is hereby, amended to read as follows:
(f) Cotton lint (except samples) may be authorized movement only when baled. Such baled cotton lint and such samples shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from a regulated area except under permit. Permits for such movement will be granted on the furnishing of evidence satisfactory to the inspector, (1) that such cotton lint (except samples) has been compressed to a density of not less than 22 pounds to the cubic foot, and (2) that such cotton lint or samples have been disinfected under the direction of, and in a manner satisfactory to, the inspector. Cotton linters, delint, or grabbots, produced by any oil mill located outside the regulated areas but authorized under paragraph (c) hereof to crush cottonseed originating therein shall be returned to the regulated areas for compression and disinfection and shall not be moved therefrom except in compliance with this paragraph: Provided, That permits may be issued for the interstate movement of second-cut linters direct from the premises of such approved oil mills conditioned (1) on the passing of such linters through special roller equipment in such a manner that in the judgment of the inspector all cottonseed and larvae therein would be crushed, and (2) on the protection of such linters after such treatment adequate in the judgment of the inspector to protect them from any possibility of contamination.
Uncompressed and undisinfected cotton lint may be moved interstate under permit 1 between regulated areas under such safeguards as shall be required by the inspector when such movement is not through any point outside any regulated area.
Baled cotton lint grown outside of but concentrated within a regulated area may be moved interstate under permit out of such regulated area on the furn All of the Arizona areas defined in regulation 3, except Safford and Duncan Valleys, are infested not only with the pink-bollworm but also with the Thurberia weevil and are included within the area designated as regulated area in the Thurberia-weevil quarantine. (See Notice of Quarantine No. 61-revised). Under that quarantine seed cotton, cottonseed, and cottonseed hulls are prohibited interstate movement from the Thurberia-weevil regulated area and no permits will be issued for such movement. Permits for the interstate movement of uncompressed and undisinfected cotton lint from that area will not be issued.






19291 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 175

nishing of evidence, satisfactory to the inspector, that such lint has been handled in a manner to safeguard it from possible contamination with the pink bollworm.
This amendment shall be effective on and after October 1, 1929.
Done at the city of Washington this 30th day of September, 1929.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[SEAL.] R. W. DUNLAP,
Acting Secretary of Agriculture.



NOTICE TO COMMON CARRIERS
SEPTEMBER 30, 1929.
SIR: You are requested to date and sign the blank receipt below, indicating your official title, and return this letter to the Secretary of Agriculture in the inclosed penalty envelope, which requires no postage.
Notice is hereby given to the transportation company you represent, as follows:
That the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority of the act approved August 20, 1912, known as the plant quarantine act (37 Stat. 315), as amended by the act of Congress approved March 4, 1917 (39 Stat. 1134, 1165), has, by amendment No. 4 to the Rules and Regulations Supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 52 (revised), on account of the pink bollworm, given notice that Section (f) of Regulation 5 has been amended, effective on and after October 1, 1929, to read as per copy inclosed.
Very respectfully,
R. W. DUNLAP,
Acting Secretary of Agriculture.
(Inclosures.)

(Do not detach this receipt)

Received this notice and the copy of amendment 4 to the Rules and Regulations Supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 52 (revised) mentioned therein this -----day of ----------- 1929.
(Signature)
----------- w -- -- m - --m ----------(Title)
[Sent to all common carriers in the States of Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona.]


NOTICE TO GENERAL PUBIC THROUGH NEWSPAPERS

SEPTEMBER 30, 1929.
Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority conferred on him by the plant quarantine act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended, has promulgated an amendment, effective October 1, 1929, to the Rules and Regulations Supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 52 (revised) on account of the pink bollworm. This alnendment modifies the conditions umner which oil mills will he authorized to ship secolnd-cut linters originating in the area regulated on account of this pest and authorizes the issu8ncle of I enmits for the interstate movement of such linters when passed through a new type of roller equipment under proper safeguards against contamination. Copies of said amen nt may he obtained from the Plant Quarailni and C (l ("Itrl Administration, United States Department of Agriculture, Washingi, 1). C.
R. WV. DUNLAP.
Acting Secretary of .1 gricll tr'.
[Published in the following newspapers: The Arizona Rtepublican. PIhoenix, Ari., ()ctober 20. 19220; New Mexico State Tribune, Albuquerque, N. M., O(ctob'r 1S, 19l2ti; Forr Worth Star-Telegram, Fort Worth, Texas, Octuber 18, 192).1







176 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [July-Sept.,

MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS
SENATE UPHOLDS PLANT QUARANTINE ACT
The following amendment to the plant quarantine act of August 20, 1912, was proposed in the Senate Committee revision, September 4, 1929, of the tariff bill (H. R. 2667, committee print, page 290) :
(d) Plant quarantine.-The plant quarantine act, approved August 20, 1912, as amended, shall not be construed to authorize the Secretary of Agriculture to forbid the importation of any nursery stock or other plants, or fruits, vegetables, roots, bulbs, seeds, or other plant products unless such plants or plant products are infected with disease or infested with injurious insects, new to or not theretofore widely prevalent or distributed within and throughout the United States, or unless the Secretary of Agriculture has reason to believe that such plants or plant products are so infected or infested.
Owing to the impossibility of determining the freedom of plants from insect pests and diseases by inspection merely, the effect of this amendment would have been to render the present sections of the act relating to foreign importation of little or no value for the purpose of excluding pests. It would have made possible general and unlimited importations of plants in bulk or otherwise, including culls and rejects, and to open the gates to importations of fruits and vegetables now excluded from many countries for valid sanitary reasons, and would have permitted the same type of entry of pests as gained foothold in the United States prior to 1912, such as the European corn borer, Japanese beetle, Oriental fruit worm, chestnut blight, citrus canker, etc.; in other words, it would very probably have caused the loss, as a result of a single year's importations, of the benefits which have resulted from 17 years of enforcement of the act in the prevention, with few exceptions, of entry of new and dangerous pests with imported plants and plant products.
For Senate discussion of the proposed amendment, see Congrssional Record for September 12, 1929, pp. 3703-3706; September 14, 1929, pp. 3757-3758; September 17, 1929, p. 3837, and September 18, 1929, pp. 3861-3868. On the date last named the proposed amendment, after an extended discussion, was dropped by general consent; in other words, without vote.


ESTONIA ADDED TO COUNTRIES WHICH MAY SHIP POTATOES TO THE UNITED STATES

Evidence has recently been submitted to the Department of Agriculture that Estonia has met all of the general conditions set forth in Regulation 2 of the Regulations Governing the Importation of Potatoes into the United States, including the establishment of the fact that it is free from the potato wart and other injurious potato diseases and insect pests new to or not widely prevalent or distributed within and throughout the United States. On and after August 2, 1929, until further notice, permits will therefore be issued for the entry of potatoes grown in Estonia.

CONVICTIONS FOR VIOLATIONS OF THE PLANT QUARANTINE ACT

The following convictions for violations of the plant quarantine act were reported to the administration during the period July 1 to September 30, 1929:
WHITE-PINE BLISTER-RUST QUARANTINE
In the case of the United States v. The Portland Seed Co., Portland, Oreg., in the interstate shipment of 10 currant and 10 gooseberry plants from a State designated as infected, which plants were neither dipped, dormant, nor defoliated, the defendant pleaded guilty and was fined $10. (Plant Quarantine Case No. 364.)
In the case of the United States v. The D. Hill Nursery Co., Dundee, Ill., in the interstate shipment of 100 white pines in violation of the regulations, the defendant pleaded guilty and was fined $25 and costs. (Plant Quarantine Case No. 353.)
In the case of the United States v. The Federal Nurseries, Rochester, N. Y., in the interstate shipment of four Perfection currant plants in violation of






1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 177

the regulations, the defendant pleaded guilty and was fined $25. (Plant Quarantine Case No. 271.)
In the case of the United States v. The Richmond Nurseries, Richmond Beach, Wash., in the interstate shipment of 24 currant plants in violation of the regulations, the defendant pleaded guilty and was fined $10 and costs. (Plant Quarantine Case No. 344.)
QUARANTINES AFFECTING MEXICAN PRODUCTS

In the case of the United States v. Mr. Laurents, Brownsville, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in 10 avocados from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. S. B. Duke, Brownsville, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in five avocados from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. A. Kennedy, Brownsville, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in one mango from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Val Martinez, Eagle Pass, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in 11 avocados from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Enrique Zaragoza Cadena, Eagle Pass, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in six avocados from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Felipe Castillo, El Paso, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in two mangoes from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Conception Carreon, El Paso, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in five avocados with seed from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. T. H. Giron, jr., El Paso, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in one avocado with seed from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Ynez Zabala, El Paso, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in two mangoes from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Dr. Rodolfo Z. Pereyra, El Paso, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in 10 mangoes from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Jesus Morales, El Paso, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in four mangoes from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. H. A. Elison, El Paso, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in two avocados from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. B. F. Martinez, Hidalgo, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in one mamey and three mangoes from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Mrs. E. C. Villareal, Hidalgo, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in three avocado seeds from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. A. A. Samanao, Hidalgo, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in five avocados from Mexico, the defendant Nwas fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. E. M. Martinez, Laredo, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in eight mangoes from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. S. B. Duke, Brownsville, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in five avocados from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. MN. S. Turner, El Paso, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in four avocados from Mexico, the (defendlant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Enrique Ramirez, El Paso, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in one mango and one avocado from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Julio Guerra, Itoma, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in five avocados from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. R. E. Rameriz, Brownsville, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in 72 aguacates from Mexico. the defendant was lined $5.
In the case of the United States r. Tertrude O)rnelas. El Paso, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in one avocado from Mexico, the defendant was lined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Maximilln ('hacon de DIurte, El Paso, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in 6 peaches and 11 pears from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States r. Esther Corona, El LPaso, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in 15 plants from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Lozano Lopez, El Paso, Tex. in attempl)ting to smuggle in one bag of pears fronl Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Maria Luna, El Paso, Tex., In attempting to smuggle in three plums from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.






178 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [July-Sept.,

In the case of the United States v. Emelia Corona, El Paso, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in three pears from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Dr. W. M. McGee, Hidalgo, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in 36 avocados from Mexico, the defendant was fined $20.
In the case of the United States v. L. E. Riley, Laredo, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in six avocados from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Rafael Ibarra, jr., Nogales, Ariz., in attempting to smuggle in 84 mangoes from Mexico, the defendant was fined $10.
In the case of the United States v. El Paso, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in one avocado from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the'United States v. Alfred Pena, Eagle Pass, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in 18 avocados from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Gilberto Covarrubias, Eagle Pass, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in 12 avocados from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. John L. Alfonso, El Paso, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in 3 mangoes, 2 mameys, and 20 plums from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Nieves Garcia, El Paso, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in two aguacates with seed from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Esequil Monarez, El Paso, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in one mango from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Cirasco Hurtado, El Paso, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in six plums from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Miguel Barrega, El Paso, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in 3 peaches and 18 pears from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Rafaela Loya, El Paso, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in one pear and one peach from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Apoliniro Reyes, El Paso, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in two apples from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Hermelinda Hernandez, El Paso, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in two mangoes from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Ambrosia S. de Corral, El Paso, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in 55 figs from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Guatavo Briones, El Paso, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in four apples from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Concepcion Hernandez, El Paso, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in one mango from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Maria Diaz Corral, El Paso, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in three pears from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Gilberto Acosta, El Paso, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in s.x mangoes from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States tv. Jose Zubieta, El Paso, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in one mango from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Jose Ignacio Banuelos, El Paso, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in two peaches and one avocado from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Marcos Fabela Vda. de Ugalde, El Paso, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in five pears from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Antonio Zapata, Eagle Pass, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in 16 pomegranates and 14 peaches from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Francisco Angeles, El Paso, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in three pears from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Dolores Scobell, El Paso, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in two pears from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Alfonso Mercado, El Paso, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in two mangoes from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Alberto Mota, El Paso, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in three oranges from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Octavano Martinez, El Paso, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in four avocados from Mexico, the defendant was deported
In the case of the United States v. Finemen Garza, El aPso, Tex., in attemptirg to smuggle in 12 avocados from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.






1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 179

In the case of the United States v. Maria B. Ovalle, El Paso, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in one mango from Mexico, the defendant was fined S.
In the case of the United States v. Manuel Amador, El Paso, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in eight guavas from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Emeliano Sanchez, El Pas,, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in seven peaches and one orange from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Marcelino Gallegos, El Paso, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in six avocados with seed from Mlexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. E. Gonzalez, Hidalgo, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in eight pomegranates and three pears from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. J. W. Stanford, Hidalgo, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in nine avocado seeds from Mexico, the defendant was fined $3.
In the case of the United States v. D. Vosquez, Hidalgo, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in one pear and one pomegranate from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Paulino Vega, Hidalgo, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in two quinces and one avocado from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Isobel Puente, Laredo, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in two avocados, one quince, and one peach from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. L. Moreles, Laredo, Tex., in attempting to smuggle in 100 avocados from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.
In the case of the United States v. Leopoldo Rodriguez, Nogales, Ariz., in attempting to smuggle in 385 quinces from Mexico, the.defendant was fined $25.

ORGANIZATION OF THE PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION
C. L. MALtRLATT, Chief of Administration. S. A. ROHWER, Assistant Chief.
B. CoxNNo, Business Manager.
R. C. ALTHOUSE, Inform national Officer. C. A. LOCKE, Executive Assistant.
H. T. C(RONIN, Administrative Assistant. E. R. SASSCER, in Charge Foreign Plant Quarantines. S. B. FRACKER, in Charge Domestic Plant Quarantines. A. F. BURGESS, in Field Charge Gipsy Moth and Brown-Tail Moth Quarantine
(Headquarters, Melrose Highlands, Mass.).
L. H. WORTHLEY, in Field Charge European Corn Borer Quaraitine (Headquarters, Eastern Section, Boston, Mass.; Western Section, Toledo, Ohio).
C. H. HADLEY, in Field Charge Japanese Beetle Quarantine ( Headquarters,
Camden, N. J.).
R. E. MCDONALD, in Field Charge Pink Bollworm antd Thurberia WeeVil Quaran.tine8 (Headquarters, San Antonio, Te.r.).
B. L. BOYDEN, in Field Charge Date Scale Quarantine (Headquarters, Indio, Calif.).
M. H. FonD, Acting in Field Charge Mexican Fruit Worm Quarantine ( Hcadquarters, Harlingen, Te.r.).
WaMON NEWELL, in Field Charge Mediterranean Fruit Fly Quarantine in Florida, (Headquarters, Orlando, Fla.).
A. C. BAKERi, Bureau of Entomology, in Field Charge lirvestigational Work, Mediterranean Fruit Fly Quarantine (Hteadquarters, Orlando, Fa.).
P. A. HOIDALE, in Field Charge Mediterrane(an Fruit Fl!1 Quarantine lnforctment and Inspection Work in States other than Florida ( Ieadquarters,
Atlanta, Ga.).
ADVISORY FEDERAL PLANT QUARANTINE BOARD
C. L. MARLATT, Chairman.
J. E. GRAF, Bureau of Entomology, em ber. R. A. OAKLEY, Bureau of Plant Indulst ry, Ieimbhr. M. B. WAITE, Bureau of Plant Industry, Member.
Forest "erv ice. iem ber.
11 5 GO VU NM :NT PmnI m *11




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

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3 1262 09230 9326




Full Text

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S. R. A.-P. Q. C. A. No. 100. IKsued Januvar 1030,UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTUREPLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATIONSERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTSJuly-September, 1929CONTENTSQuaran tine and other offcial announcenlents.--------------. -------------------------------131Fruit and vegetable quarantine (No. 5) ------------------------------------------------------132All chestnut and acorn imports placed under permit restrictions (press notice -------------132Notice of permit requirement for entry of chestnuts and acorns 'rom foreign cou!tries. 132Instructio)ns to collectors ,f cUStoms (T. D. 4354)---------------------------------132Japanese-beetle quarantine (No. 4*)_---------------------------------------------------------133Supplement No. 1 to instructions on the disinfection of nursery products f(,r the Japaneseand Asiatic beetles (P. Q. C. A.-23).--.---------------------------------------133Farm products released from Japanese-beetle quarantine (pres noticet--------------------134Removal of Japanese-beetle quarantine restrictions oil the iLterstate novenent 4f farmproducts------------------------------------------------------------------131Mediterranean fruit-Ily quarantine No. .---------------------------------------------------135A Uministrarive inst ruviion:s -shipmen~t of grapes from: col d-stcrade huts:1 P .y. .A .---.p -135Specialists appointed to Stily fruit fly in Flori ja (press notice) --------------------------135Secretary Hyde sugseets Florida citrus may be :nade safe for shipment ( press not ice -----136Report on fruit-fly eradication iade to Secretary 1 -yd---------------------------------136Limes proince~i in Monroe and Dalde Couties, Fla., may be sent into Souther:i an z I \ecrnStates (pre s notice, -------------------------------------------------------------.------13jA dnilistrative instr ctions-renl val of restrictions on destination of lirues fruin oA1lroeand Dade Counties. il:. Q. C. A.-24U.-----------------------------------------------139'! reasury Depart:meit orlerre l)b ervaine < f Meliterr:u:ean fruit-fly juarr: tiie re.ulat p:s 140Secretary Hyd1e and ariculture oll ial to visit FloridIa fruit-ily section Irs :a tice .140String beans release l frorn fruit-fly quarantine xfress notice).------------------------------. oNavy Department order re obsrrvancc :.f Alediterranean fruit fly quarantine regtidations-_ 1 IAdministrative hnttrUcti ns-reIoval of restrictiws on stri::g bean (1'. Q .C. -24. -. 11Mediterranean fruit-ly quarantine revised kpre's notice. ..---------------------------------111Mediterranean fruit-flY quarantine revived \ellective Septemlber 1, 191 .----------------------1;3Notice to coinion carriers---------------------------.--------------------------------152Notice to general public through newspapers----------------------------------------. 12instructions to postmasters----------.--------------------------------------------------153Fruit fly to be studied in Mediterranean basin (press notice).----------------.---------1,51Movement, prior to October 1, of citrus fruit from Florida authorized (press not ice) ---------155Administrative instructions-shipment of Florida citrus fruit prior to uctober 1 (P'. Q C.A,-243)-------------------------------------------------------------------------15SAdministrative instructions -diversion of Florida products at southern points 1 q C.A.244)---------------------------------------------------------------------15 Aruninistrative insirueiiois-modificaiion of er:ilication area designated in Ailrrarecnfruit-Bly quarantine regulations (1). Q. (. A. 24) -------------------------------------15Sterilization by cooling authorized for Florida fruit press notice)-------153Administrative instructio.s-.sterilization of citrus fruits under \edi err a i fnit -Bregulations (P. Q. (. A.246).---.-.------.---.--------1C0Information re sterilization outside of the State of Florida of citrus fruits ni iMAcliier -nean fruit-fly regulations (1'. Q. .A.247) ----------------------------161lexican fruit-worn quartnT inc N o. 64) ----. .-------------------------------------163Citrus census of the lower Hio (irande Valley of Tex:s as of Julv 1, 1 163Nursery stock, plant, and seed iurantine (No. 37) -------------------------------------------165Conference on fruit stocks inportatlious called for July 19 press notice 165Fruit stocks decision (press notie) ..-..167Modification of muiserx stock, plaint. and seed u: r:LtiTie reguat ionsI (NInstruct ions to colIecturs oif cmuions of II. 11. ltv))-----------------.161ink-bollworii quaranine i No. :o) I T;link-ollu olin quarant me regialat lun., : e d to Jelntl ssiinio111of quirant ie :ale under certain if.ejiaris (fry-. Iol WV).lodifieat ion of pink-bollworm qwiaralm 17 iNOt ice to Comimon cairriers.N ot Ice to genvral ipubli through 1.9sl persSi el eo it ells-Ii'entile ultholls p nit quarantine act 6Fstonia added to countries which may shp potatoes to the U oited -tat -1 :o.ionvictiiots for violations of the plant quiarn In li' cl 16Org nizat ion of the Plant Qtua tiratt inc .111tl IA lilil'l ni t ion ------7 leI In view oi the rather complete re c.rd of -on r tri. 1 -I hlv'O-ient , a dlicusesson of tfhis u or: i urnwied in i -iv eat no n

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132 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [July-Sept.,QUARANTINE AND OTHER OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTSFRUIT AND VEGETABLE QUARANTINE (NO. 56)ALL CHESTNUT AND ACORN IMPORTS PLACED UNDER PERMIT RESTRICTIONS(Press notice)AUGUST 1, 1929.R. W. Dunlap, Acting Secretary of Agriculture. has issued an order, effectiveSeptember 1, 1929, under which all chestnuts and acorns whatever their sourcemust be imported under permit and inspection. A similar order has beenin effect, but has applied only to acorns and chestnuts of European origin. Thecrder is intended to prevent the entry of living larvae of the European codlingmoth, chestnut weevils, and other injurious insects.Under the permit regulations all shipments of acorns and chestnuts willbe inspected on arrival. If inspection reveals living injurious insects theshipment must be exported promptly unless provision has been made for disin-fection of shipments under conditions approved by the Plant Quarantine andControl Administration of the department.Prospective importers of acorns and chestnuts may obtain copies of the ordersand requirements by communicating with the Plant Quarantine and ControlAdministration, Washington, D. C.NOTICE OF PERMIT REQUIREMENT FOR ENTRY OF CHESTNUTS AND ACORNSFROM FOREIGN COUNTRIESIt has been determined by the Secretary of Agriculture that the method ofdrying, curing, or processing chestnuts and acorns in Europe, Asia, Africa,Mexico, Central and South America, and other foreign countries and localitiesdoes not entirely eliminate risk from the entry with such products of injuriousinsects, including the European codling moth (Carpocapsa splendana) andspecies of chestnut weevils (Balaninus spp.). Notice is therefore hereby given that in accordance with the proviso to regu-lation 2 (as amended January 10, 1925) of the Rules and Regulations Supple-mental to Notice of Quarantine No. 56, all species and varieties of chestnutsand acorns may be imported from any of the foreign countries or localitiesabove mentioned, on and after September 1, 1929, only under permit and oncompliance with the safeguards prescribed therein.This notice supersedes notices of September 22, 1926, and June 1, 1927.Done at the city of Washington this 29th day of July, 1929.Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agri-culture.R. W. DUNLAP,Acting Secretary of Agriculture.INSTRUCTIONS TO COLLECTORS OF CUSTOMS(T. D. 43548)Plant quarantincREGULATIONS BY THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE GOVERNING THE IMPORTATION OFCHESTNUTS AND ACORNS FROM ALL FOREIGN COUNTRIESTREA SURY DEPARTMENT,OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONER OF CUSTOMS,W1ahiinton, D. C., Augist 31, 1929.To Collectors of Customs and Others Concernied:The appended reguilations issued by the Secretary of Agriculture July 29,1929, governing the imporlation of chestnuts and acorns from foreign countries,are published for the information and guidance of cust oms officers and othersCMI C01,11d.Thie Secretary of Agriculture slates that these regulations supersede theregulaoioiis of September 22, 1926, (T. D. 41791), and June 1, 1927, (T. D.

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1 29] SERVICE AND I1EGULATOY ANNOUNCEMENTS 13342304), and calls attention to the fact that they extend to all foreign couiitrie>and localities, a requirement which heretofore applied only to Europ.'ptncountries.F. X. A. ELE.Comm issianer of Custom .[Then follows the text of the regulations.]JAPANESE-BEETLE QUARANTINE (NO. 48)SUPPLEMENT NO. 1 TO INSTRUCTIONS ON THE DISINFECTION OF NURSERYPRODUCTS FOR THE JAPANESE AND ASIATIC BEETLESPQCA-239 JULY S. 1929-TREATMENT OF SOIL WITH LEAD ARSENATESupplementing the instructions issued to administration inspectors on April16, 1929, (PQCA-224), the following treatments are authorized as a b if 4certification under the provisions of Notice of Quariantinle No. 4S Lregilati1n t:.section B (3) and (4)].Tile evidence appears conclusive i1at lead atrsen1ate applied as herein pre-scribed is effective in eliminating Japanese iid Asiatic b et.Ce infestath. Nogeneral recominendation can be given at this time, however, a> to the jlntvarieties which can be grown without injury in soil so treated. Experimentalwork under way indicates that a large number of varieties can be gro\ii S'e-cesfully in such soil. In view of the limited number of experimenntl Iestscarried out on any one variety of plants, nurserymen who desire to substitutethis method on their own premni> cs il 1lace of other measures heretofore em-ployed, are to be advised that some hazard to the plants may be involved andthat the department and its employees can not be responsible for any injurywhich may result.A. 4.-TREATMENT OF POTTiNi SOIL WITH LEAD ARsENATEMaterial.-Powdered acid lead arsenate.Conditions of the ,oll.-The soil to be treated must be in a friable conldi-tion; wet soil can not be treated satisfactorily. The treatment is recom-mended only for soils which are slightly acid or neutral in reaction.Tumpcrature.-The soil after treatment must be maintained at a tempera-ture of at least 60 F. for a period of eight wv'. ks. If the treatment is appliedduring June or July the prevailing temperatures will meet this requirement.Dosig.-Acid lead arsenate must be used at the rate of 2 pounds to eachcubic yard of soil.Application to soil.-The lead arsenate must be uniformly mixed withi thesoil. This may be accomplished either by hand shovelling or by the use of amachine mixer, such as a concrete mixer.Period of treatminit.-Eight weeks are necessary with the soil at a tempera-ture of at least 60* F. to insure that all the grubs are killed. Prior to certi-fication, the inspector must have deterinined that a soil temperature of notless thin 60* has been Iaint ained for a period of eight weeks.tftorage of 8oil.-The soil must he st lred under conditions which will preventreinfestation or contamination with untreated soil.E.-LEAD ARSENArE: FIELI) T'rEA'MEN TMaterial.-Powdered acid lead arsenate.Coalition of the soil.-The si1 must be frinble and in good tilth. The lre. Imeant is recommended only for soils which are slight ly acid or neut-Al inreaction.Season.-Where the trvatienit is to be used as a basis of certilicationl wtween October 15 and the following June 15, the arsenate must, for the 'vi-tnof 1929, be applied before August 1. Beca use of Ii ff(er17! ees in ea a o i-tions it may, in other years, be neeessarv to molify tle ilme datDosage.-Lead arsenate mnu'wt be applied t : le t ml J1.500 Iok(tL t' tleacre, which is equivalent of )5 poundt to Lo'10 fouore .e.

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134 PLAN T QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [July-Sept.,Application. (1) Plants growing in rows.-Cultivate the soil thoroughly,working it away from the plants, breaking out all middles. remove at least2 inches of soil from about the base of the plants. The application may bebroadcast or applied with a suitable fertilizer distributor or lime drill. It isessential that the application is uniform over the entire surface of the ground.The soil must then be cultivated so that the lead arsenate is uniformly mixedwith the soil to a depth of at least 3 inches. The cultivator should be adjustedto throw the soil toward the rows and to obtain at least 3 inches of poisonedsoil at the base of the plants. In order to secure the thorough distributiondesired. the soil in the rows must be hoed by hand after cultivation.(2) Individual plants.-The treatment of individual plants is essentially ahand operation. The soil must be treated in a manner to obtain the sameconditions as are required for trees planted in rows. The area to be treatedmust never be less than 10 feet in diameter and must be at least 6 feet greaterin diameter than the diameter of the soil ball to be removed with the tree.Period of treatment.-Plants must not be dug for shipment before October 15.C. L. MARLATT,CHief, Plant Quarantine and Control Administration.FARM PRODUCTS RELEASED FROM JAPANESE-BEETLE QUARANTINE(Press notice)SEPTEMBER 27, 1929. All restrictions on the interstate movement of farm products in the area covered by the Japanese-beetle quarantine have been removed by the PlantQuarantine and Control Administration, according to an order issued byR. W. Dunlap, Acting Secretary of Agriculture. Restrictions on the move-ment interstate of cut flowers will remain in force until, and including,October 15. Restrictions on the movement of nursery, ornamental, and green-house stock are in force throughout the year and are not affected by thisorder.It was possible to remove control of farm products because investigationby the Department of Agriculture had determined that the active period ofthe Japanese beetle in its relation to farm products has already ended, makingsafe marketing and interstate transportation without restriction. The removalof restrictions would have taken place normally on October 16, under the termsof the Japanese-beetle quarantine orders. The relaxation refers to thisseason only, and restrictions will not be removed next year, the departmentsays, until investigators have determined that the danger period has cometo an end."The restrictions on the movement of farm products which are terminatedby this order," said Mr. Dunlap, "are intended to be in force only duringthe period when the beetle is abundantly present and in active flight. Thereis no risk from the movement of such products after this period has ter-minated. The inspectors, however, are still finding beetles in cut flowers andthe quarantine is maintained for them."REMOVAL OF JAPANESE-BEETLE QUARANTINE RESTRICTIONS ON THE INTERSTATE MOVEMENT OF FARM PRODUCTSHaving determined that the active period of the Japanese beetle in itsrelation to farm products has already ceased for the present season and thatit Is, therefore, safe to permit the unrestricted movement of the farm productslisted in regulation 5 of the rules and regulations (seventh revision) supple-mental to Notice of Quarantine No. 48 from the regulated area as definedin regulation 3 of said revised rules and regulations, it is ordered that allrestrictions on the interstate movement of the articles referred to above arehereby removed on and after September 25, 1929. This order advances thetermination of the restrictions as to farm products provided for in regulation5 from October 10 to September 25, 1929, and applies to this season only.Done at the city of Washiigton this 23d day of September, 1929.Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agri-eulture.R. W. DUNLAP,Acting Secretary of Agriculture.

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1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 135NoTE: The restrictions Un tie lovemelt ul lerm pruduls whh are ter-miiiated by this order Ire intended to be ill f;rce ulY luri1 the pi jd whelnthe beetle is abun atly preselit and ill active flliht. It is recognized tatthere is no risk froin the movemenit of' Luch pr1uduts after this per ii lutsterminaI ed. Duiring the past week the dep1 rtmenit'*s in-I p) utors have foul(no beetles in farm products. The ad ction taken. there e. is merei to ter-miale the restrict ils oi t1he movemenit mli thus stop the cost of admiini ptr -tionl at tie earliest possible miloineiit.Tile inspectors are. Ii. evere. still finlin g betle' in cut flowers. Du tthe i irevailing U' ool evlings. the heetles have a t idlewy to crawl Iownl inltothe flowers for protection. Therefore, the restrictions on the interstate move-ment of cut flowers itand other portions of plaints will remain in full force andeffect uitil October 1;5, inclusive.Eestrictionis ('n the movement of nursery, ornifmieital and greenihoue 5toekan 1 l1 other plants (excej t cut flowers and portions of piits without rootsand incapable of propagationi lare in force throughiout the yeOir and are imtaffected by this anioulnicelmelit.MEDITERRANEAN FRUIT-FLY QUARANTINE (NO. 68)ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS-SHIPMENT OF GRAPES FROM COLD-STORGEPLANTS['Modification of regulation 4, paragraph (5), and of P.Q.CA.-288](Approved July 2, 1929 ; effective July 2, 1929)PQCA-2}8 Jmix 2, 1,21.Pending, later ameninent of ti IC Mediterraneim fruit-fly quaraninme regula-tions (-Notice (if Quarantine No. 658), tie following-, a dminisiralive instruictionIsare issued:Permits may he issued( thirough(t the year for the shipment of 2ra1es produced in protective zo1es and storl prior to July 1 ill lp1O ve o lstorage plants to move interstate only to tle Distrit of Columb11i18, inclidin mPotomac Yards il Virgiiia, and to destinlations in the states of rylind andPennsylvania and Statles north and east thereof, wheni ini the jildllell u theinspector such movemllent does not involve risk d spreading' the fruit fly. ;Illndconditioiied further upon eo iance witl suh precault ion s as 1o iackiig,storage and movement as shail lhe required by the iN eetor.C. L. Am rChief, Plant Quaran iinc !ild Colrol Adm ii,0,ltr1i-'.Approved:Awrtii I 3. Hlyii,Sccrctar/ of A!ri(ult111r.SPECIALISTS APPOINTED TO STUDY FRUIT FLY IN FLORIDA(Iress not ic)The Secretaiy of A;riiultrIIe .niIullileS the ai1piiIiII tt li vurta'i * ihistto stuy(I, a rej pi t ('11 I le 1runit 11Y ill l"hrir i .He 1in i ts )Ill Ilm it he bhis departmi Iient speci lists are a.1cimiwtenm to palss' jl1mlmenit I'll I 1e prblI'l mas anyv others oblainmhble, ))II ill view 44 the (10)ou 1x,1n1!()e tleale rl Veh4 Idow l ( it, h dl l ll .I illuw the 01 i8 .:11 1 iltheu1 , a l l Inatiie -I', I c(nIw ri il the rubl , he tit-it li w.1i I hlN l I hIxfiiiih* j 'gn n -fseilsso tie o h le a t e to re u r aable to I-ell1 r '111 (Iillii l ()It tile o~siIl t, I I''es fl cw whu I'm t-l* thecampaign. For this .pur )ose the So(,retIar-. ;iInoun1w(tho p on me to hfollo ing :V(,Irno, Kellit, , -,Ptrma n11 nt ,ert v, _Na t iion l Reenc an eCooper, Dean, Cidlhe 1fArcutr._ ietow III lIxnioWrl b oKenitucky: Vic-tir it. GadeDirvcior, Etat I peienI itonad i -fe-4sorm of Iforticiliture, Stale 0 I-('%e e E1. M2n in ,Aichil 1 : T. Plea hProfessor of Entl Iomwo qgy, lugr olgNwUosil taies i

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136 PLANT QUArANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [July-Sept.,of New Jersey and Entomologist of State Experiment Station; G. A. Dean, Head, Department of Entomology, State Agricultural College, and Entomolo-gist, State Experiment Station, Manhattan, Kansas; and H. J. Quayle, Pro-fessor of Entomology, University of California, and Entomologist of CitrusExperiment Station, Riverside.These specialists met in Washington, Monday, July 8. They will proceedto Florida to make an intensive study of the situation as a basis for a reporton the possibility of eradication and for any recommendations they may wish tomake as to future policy.SECRETARY HYDE SUGGESTS FLORIDA CITRUS MAY BE MADE SAFE FORSHIPMENT(Press notice)JULY 19, 1929.The Secretary of Agriculture stated July 18 that the research work whichhas been intensively prosecuted in Florida on methods of destruction of the Mediterranean fruit fly in fruit indicates the possibility that, by modificationof existing practices in precooling and coloring, fruit may be made safe forshipment.The Secretary also announced that there is reason to believe that the devel-opment of these methods as a supplement to the other suppressive measuresnow in force will make possible the movement of the citrus crop of this year without exposing additional areas to risk of infestation. He emphasized that,while this will involve a distinct modification of present restrictions on themovement of citrus fruit from all zones, and will avoid the general destruc-tion of fruit in zone 1, it is believed that it will aid the eradication effort bythe relief it will afford to the present acute economic situation, and by makingit more possible for growers to continue full cooperation.This action is recommended by the experts recently sent to Florida to studythe situation and by C. L. Marlatt, Chief, Plant Quarantine and Control Ad-ministration. The experts are: Vernon Kellogg, Permanent Secretary, NationalResearch Council, Washington, D. C.; H. A. Morgan, President, Universityof Tennessee; T. P. Cooper, Dean, College of Agriculture, Director of ExtensionWork, Lexington, Kentucky; Victor R. Gardner, Director, State ExperimentStation and Professor of Horticulture, State College, East Lansing, Michigan;T. P. Headlee, Professor of Entomology, Rutgers College, New Brunswick,State Entomologist of New Jersey and Entomologist of State Experiment Sta-tion; G. A. Dean, Head, Department of Entomology, State Agricultural College,and Entomologist, State Experiment Station, Manhattan, Kansas; and H. J.Quayle, Professor of Entomology, University of California. and Entomologistof Citrus Experiment Station, Riverside.REPORT ON FRUIT-FLY ERADICATION MADE TO SECRETARY HYDEJULY 19, 1929.Hon. ARTHUR M. HYDE,Secretary of Agriculture,Washington, D. C.DEAR MR. SECRETARY: The committee of seven, appointed by you to make" careful studies of the present status and possibilities for eradication of theMediterranean fruit fly, also to study the desirability of the maintenance orexpansion of the present program, or alternative possibility of commercial con-trol," reports as follows:ECoNOMIC BACKGROUNDThe economic situation of Florida, the immediate future of the State, isdefinitely and intimately related to the policy which may be adopted in rela-tioii to the Mediterranean fruit fly. The region involved in the infestation is34 per cent of the land area of Florida. It contains 72 per cent of the bearingcitrus trees, and based upon a 3-year average, 80 per cent of the carload shipments of citrus fruit originates in this area. The annual income from the citruscrop and from other host crops which may be affected by the fly is upward of$60,000,000. A capital investment for the same crops exceeding $300,000,000 is

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19291 SERVICE AND PEGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 137threatened. Industries dependent upon citrus fruit represent an annual incomeof approximately $52,000.000. Agriculture, of which the citrus and kindredindustries represent the larger part, is the economic foundation of the State.From one quarter to one-third of the income accruing to the State, other thanthat pertaining to the tourist trade, may be attributed to agriculture. Thepermanence of the home and the adequate support of the families of 40 percent of the rural farm population of Florida is threatened by the fly. Theincome for the State for the purpose of government is largely affected by theconditions of the citrus industry and its kindred commercial, transportation.and industrial development.III the event the fruit fly should escape from Florida, infesting the regionsof the South an(l West, capital values invested in properties producinlg sus-ceptible fruits aggregating $1,800,000,000 and producing annual i comes of$240,000,000, are threatened. Infestation by the fly would bring chaos to manyagricultural regions of the South and West. Their interest in the Policywhich may be adopted with relation to the fruit fly is even greater than thatof Florida.The consumers of the United States, likewise, are affected. An infestationof the Mediterranean fruit 1iY may affect t he reduction of susceptible productsby 25 or even 50 per cent. It is estimated that a reduction n in the pro(luctioiof susceptible fruit by 20 per cent will increase the cost of fruit to the con-sumer by approximately 24 per cent. In addition the consumer is alsodirectly interested by the fact that the industry or trade with which ihe iiybe comnected will be affected by the spread of the fruit fly.The cost of commercial control measures land of (quarantiies, shoiuild the flyescape to other regions, would involve ai 2mioiUnt diflicult to estimai te, butundloubtedly greater thin the sum required for erfldication. Ihliis cwst wll(lfall upon the National Treasury, the States involved antid upoln iiuelolwUsindividuals.This brief statement of the economic background evi lei es tihe m it i:nalinterests that are involved. The fact that the citrus' industry of Florida fur-nishes approximately 40.000 cars of citru< fruit t the railroads is an indication of the widesprel ecinmnomic effect tlat general infestation W()111It in \lvIye.ERADICATION OR CONTROLBasing its judgment 0n careful observation, the results of rese;rebh, ni1d theprogress toward eradication that has been made in the past tIlree m nthis, lecommittee considers eradication practicable under present known ciiditions.This will require vigorous efotrt, large a P liiionls to preselit force's, fearlessaction, mainteniance of Ile full cooperation of Florida citizens, nd anjle fuulspromptly available.PLAN OF ERA DTCATIONYou commissioned the committee to stiudv the desirahili ty of tile ma iintellanceor exp1nlsioll of the present pr)gurani aiid plan of eradicationi. Particularatnii nI)I has been giveli to this pr11grm nid plan of erdivation' as nlOWoperate Hg. The coiiiittee recolimlienP s that lie work of erliticitII he ex-pI I ed. Suhi expniusioii, vi-m rolls un1d inoiiel iite, is illlmperative to the siIces-sof tile work.The colmilit tee believes :Ilvisuble a ,vstem ()I ce* rtific'tion permitting theentry of susceptible 'riiits i veLetbes iito interte collillerce. Exeiri-ment :il evitlence inldictes that I systei of ressig while fruit ilay hedevised which is econt mnically le:zsibtie anld will insure freedom from the fly.Under such i1)rwedu re: (1) i eiihti [selieit to wers fr im the NitionaIlTilre') sulry is not required (2) suiiiid ectooIIic Iackgrni for Ile iiiduli tryis restored. in11 8 the 1ull emerit1ion of growers iald citizens of Lritai ismnintiiaiined.An arllemet whicil wssllres tlit the prilicts eierilnig into interst ateColnullerce are free lroii Ill s 4:ges (f tie i nY, '111l which perilits the growersto continue their business anI indlt rv is ev-senitial.Attached hereto is a generaI stIatelleint of a rgra, that the counlIIitteeconsiders Ilecess)rv to crry oit tlie work of eradiltioli. It rect gnizc e'. how-ever, that as tIue goes oI moditientlion my e ue11ssar rv iit it h:is ' ctlidenlwethat such modificat uiois should Ile uleteriiied by thtle law ellorceilelit 1research organization iii cliarge of tile work.

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138 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [Tuly-Sept.,PROGRESS MADE IN ERADICATIONIn spite of the fact that the area considered as infested has shown accessions,the progress toward eradication has been rapid. Centers of infestation havebeen so thoroughly cleaned. and sources of infestation removed, that in theinfested zone it is difficult to find any of the stages of the Mediterraneanfruit fly. At the beginning of the campaign flies were numerous, easily found,and existed in great numbers at points of infestation. Measurement of progressis difficult. But the committee has been impressed with the rapidity of theclean-up work, the effectiveness of the poison spray campaign. the progress ofinspection and its increasing thoroughness. Upon every side there is foundevidence of increasing efficiency, and conviction upon the part of those in chargethat they are making progress. A description of the physical equipment and of the methods used in carrying on the eradication program would be interest-ing but appears unnecessary in this report.Representatives of organizations. citizens, joint committee of the FloridaLegislature, and the Plant Quarantine Board as well as members of the staffof the Federal and State organization cooperating in this work were examinedby the committee. We were impressed by the solidarity of purpose.No intimation was apparent of lack of confidence in a program of extermi-nation. Desire was expressed to bring about eradication and willingness tocontinue the work until brought to a successful conclusion was evidencedby every individual or organization represented.Respectfully submitted.VERNON KELLOGG,T. P. HEADLEE.V. R. GARDNER,H. J. QUAYLE,T. P. COOPER.G. A. DEAN,H. A. MORGAN, Chairman.Committee.REvIsED PROGRAM OF WORK To ERADICATE THE MEDITERRANEAN FRUIT FLY(1) Inspection to (determ in e sprCead.-Prompt provision should be made forinspection, adequate to determine the spread of the fly not only in Floridabut possibly in other States. This will mean considerable enlargement ofpresent inspection forces.(2) Host fruits and vegetable certiflcation.-Adequate provision should bemade for the certification of all movement of host fruits or vegetables pro-duced in any State or portion thereof invaded by the fruit fly.(3) Removal of minor host plants.-As absolutely essential to the eradica-tion object provision should be made under State regulation for the grubbingup or cutting down and removal-in other words complete elimination-ofhost plants of minor commercial importance the object being to maintain, forthe protection of the principal crop in each area, a nonhost or starvationperiod during the interim of the maturing of such crop. It is understood thatthis is to replace any effort to eliminate the fruit from such alternate hostsfrom week to week as it ripens as impracticable both from the standpoint ofaccomplishment and of cost.(4) Destruction of flies and puparia.-Citrus growers in infested areasshould be required under State and Federal regulations to spray their grovesat such periods as shall be required as necessary to destroy adult flies, andsimilarly, if practicable, soil treatment to destroy puparia.(5) RIorteni y of cropping scaso.-To reduce as much as possible theopportunity of the insect to breed up in the major host crop of any area, theshlippilng season should h)e terminated as early as pricticbl le. The shippingseason in Florida for clicirus n rmai lly extends from Septeiber to June or longer.By more adequate provision for holding of fiuuit iin c d storvuge and by enlarg-iwl1 III(e] hods of proceed tll i-trit it siotil1 l )e possible tio t emi ate by the firstof Ma r-c. the harvesting f the citrtis crop, anid similar l1y to shorten the periodin th[ic sl)rillg and early summer of other crops.1;) #jrch 1 rd Um/ crop -ap.A S sUppI4leetlig (5) provision shouldbe ma( e under Stale rego for ll prompt clemn-lip of orchards or othercr i4 4nci ( h eit wt il thw clo, e 4 )(1 the st ted htairVestiiig period. As corollarythereto all culls aid discards should be promptly destroyed and drops should

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H ' ~ j1.100)) /lUP JIt! j fI'.(Iu/1() 11), /(U J *1 j,!''4-4~4 41 ,L H1~1l Ii 1111 'i~lI1 111 4.) i \\ 111 1,)It ()I "''11 p.X !IddJ () ) I)A P'ldIll~~.jj I n1Ij 11 i'o 011 11 , Il~ li 0 1 1 PJ)1IV i J"f .11 ',M P11 01(I 1,' d.i1,Ut IT,[ Il PJ0Ili (IA Iil " m m!( JIN( Of ) ISALL1N.O,) 13uY(I (INV 1-IO1INOW W01)14 S14wUi 140NOI11VNITSJUL NO) SXOLL.)IU.S3H AO 'IVAOWII-SNUIJ11AU1SXI HAI1VHJL18NI441UV'S il~li. ~S~1 Ili IA41D 8 1! ~ ;) M 1 *''''.%\011')1I) pill ( k4I)[).kop oJ III Xm 1.'i 7 110110i1[x\ 1 I81 1,Ij I I .1 IJ .17 l14 1. .14"' otlI Sul4) j(q 1)1 .*--J i .1 a1 Ud1 iMl s ijI 1h Olij0114"k 1U1:ti 11 )iI ,\lj .)1 11144. "j .b) i) Tl .r~~c ~1)V l 1!4)1)iO-1B~~l ii)011.1 11 40 J ) TIT 0.1)00101T-)j UT 1V111111[ olj 11"th ; 3J"' 110lI14.I1"dap 1 1jL)Jf1[1.4.I5yjo d~0b ailf Al Si~p-ol p011881 suo:10i4fj3811 0A~4PT1J.SU1 04 '0UJlJ0'j 4.fl4 0 : Ii ' pII ull ~ 's $111ill" I oil IU,,)T0I 04 irls()J ill! 1)1MflP aq( 80111[1'j(03TIOU SS&M)SaJXIS SMI2ISHAX UXV NZ13LLL1OS01-N0 J1NcIs 21 AYK1 'V'Id 'SaL-flO; 3GVU ai(I UNY HOZIOlv N1 U1311UOUd Sawl'i~4 14u 4. 44 81I11011 Jafj4' I JO) t1iJ 81d IVE 1 ITUIdTO0I ')111 H100(i I -a Iunm uu .i lb 4>pm Ot J4 J0 1Jf14 4 11T 11114).) 01i1 0.IUJrJd0H4 4 Vlt4 tpUl>pTifl il04 0 10UO .10 d~1~M i~Jo 0d1V411)11tl'04 0({ 0p11 OD AO 411111 Vidulini J1S:T S010 lon I 1)14 0A0P AOM jilt l 1. joTU 111-.1 01[i 4P) (j4 4110,1 11t1-C0 814 4 114t J!4 0jL01.I.1pa0 puI! l 14(1TIT .10 pdi ).( c04.101 j4 I tl!A)UO.1 4111.'1 0 -oU iPi Iittlio ) 114 o4 I0I-H l[I'>.1o.4111 III sflb ,.100It~~~l1I~11 >V41411.))8 0 ii 13SUhDLt4() 043 4 1101j1X10doo4 .) 0YJ1ottw0u.) pfw1 JIiJ a~j 14 lAk-l V 1131)44 45 101111 Si! 101 1I1 111)0.1 /38/1)1f -1 0 All(4) 3T)fU01I 1'AJ 13.)0 ) )S13 13~j( >1TI 41II 0)4 11 01'*,1U1 L p~44 .hilli813-jau1{ pub,[4 .11 41-LIJJ4u71 >0r Jo atli 31IlpnlilZ/3IV '1pd4N ;1 1 { I P~ 4> lb i 11 .I()4._)T.I1SrM0 jilidT 18))I 0114 J0) U014131 11111 Ij/O aill di4) 7) A3A0 11 \ .I AA\ 44) 4111.IlI10 .7-0 UaT '() ) sO [AM.(1 LTI.3u1 t!I1-ILD:)N2 -~ OW1. -)( .t1 U )J114)f toIII ka )1IO'11 40 11> .0ja 4o .lo :XJ 4J1n.ij Truai 1.1//3/3~ 0([ ' 1W11, 1314)I 114141 111411./ 3{ ' 8p)1 Of 1 331 4) )3XU81)14/3111 r)JUATnbo 40 11014-111 ~ ~ I Ja I /3 ' 13~~ S4 1 .4 81'S )))0(I .14 .42.1 i .?3U 8{4-.I2~~~~-A 11VI[ 4of 144) -13 A 1S 11111 11.4 81-11 ,0A 141111b'X41~~ q! s~ p i jjim sn -I42-I. I) P01 114 101~> T. 0"U h' / ~ / W l ~ .W ! S ( 1 -X,puu stlutuoo m atv Auoivrnom P.k.fi a I01tX1L15s I)O OL11(

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140 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [July-Sept.,TREASURY DEPARTMENT ORDER RE OBSERVANCE OF MEDITERRANEAN FRUIT-FLYQUARANTINE REGULATIONSTREASURY DEPARTMENT,Washington, D. C., 23 July, 1929.From: Commandant.To: All Division Commanders,Commander, Destroyer Force,Commander, Cadet Practice Squadron,Commander, Bering Sea Patrol Force,Commander, Florida East Coast Patrol Area.Subject: Quarantine to prevent spread of Mediterranean fruit fly from Florida. Inclosure: 1. Copy of letter from Secretary of Agriculture, 20 July, 1929.1. Your attention is invited to the inclosed copy of a letter, dated 20 July,1929, from the Secretary of Agriculture, relative to the effort of the Depart-ment of Agriculture to prevent the spread of the Mediterranean fruit fly fromFlorida.2. You will promptly issue instructions to the end that there shall not bebrought on board any vessel of your command that touches, or is likely totouch, ports of the Gulf of Mexico, or of the Pacific coast, or the Atlanticports of North Carolina, South Carolina, or Georgia, or ports of Florida orPorto Rico, any citrus or noncitrus fruit (except watermelons and pineapples)or any of the following kinds of vegetables, namely, peppers of all kinds,gourds, pumpkins, squashes, tomatoes, beans of all kinds (except cowpeas),or eggplants, when such articles have been produced in any part of the Stateof Florida.F. C. BILLARD,Commandant of the Coast Guard.SECRETARY HYDE AND AGRICULTURE OFFICIALS TO VISIT FLORIDA FRUIT-FLYSECTION(Press notice)JULY 24, 1929.Secretary of Agriculture Hyde, accompanied by W. G. Campbell, Directorof Regulatory Work, and C. L. Marlatt, Chief of the Plant Quarantine andControl Administration, will spend Friday and Saturday of this week inFlorida. They will arrive at Orlando on Friday morning and spend most ofthe day at that point getting in touch with the officials in charge of the work,including an examination of the research laboratory and work under way there.They will also examine the spraying and other equipment in use.Early in the afternoon, a general survey will be made of the immediate terri-tory about Orlando with the State officials and others, and will then go toWinter Haven, inspecting the general citrus situation en route. At WinterHaven, there will be an evening meeting at which statements will be made bythe Secretary and other department officials relative to the future program ofwork against the fruit fly. There will also be statements by Florida officialsand possibly by the governor.The party will probably return to Orlando for the night, but in any eventSaturday will be spent inspecting the general citrus situation between WinterHaven and Orlando and Jacksonville. Secretary Hyde will leave Jacksonvilleby train Saturday evening for Baton Rouge, La., where he will address theInstitute of Cooperation on Monday.STRING BEANS RELEASED FROM FRUIT-FLY QUARANTINE(Press notice)AUGUST 13, 1929.String beans are released from regulation under the Mediterranean fruit-flyquarantine by administrative instructions issued August 12 by C. L. Marlatt,Chief of the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration, and approved bythe Secretary of Agriculture. Doctor Marlatt explained that this relaxation ofrestrictions was possible " in view of the absence of any record of Mediterra-nean fruit-fly infestation in string beans, and the failure, thus far, to forceinfestation experimentally." Restrictions are retained which affect Lima beans

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1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMIENTS 141and broad (fava) beans. "No restrictions will, until further notice, be e: -forced under this quarantine with respect to string beans, cowpeas,. or any kintof beans other than Lima or broad beans, either as to inter-iate moveai(t (ras to the planting, growing, or maintenance of such bean> in inf )I e : ut pro-tective zones or elsewhere," the administrative instruction 'peiiac. The re-moval of the restriction became effective as soon as the order was is-ued.ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS-REMOVAL OF RESTRICTIONS ON STRING BEANS(Approved August 12, 1929; effective August 12, 1929)PQCA-242Pending later ainendment of the Medit erraInean fruit-fly (liin, StiCarolim, G orgia, Florida. or Ptrli Iict tak, (n I Io d Fl ida li t: 11itsoii vegetfaoes fr ally pU'pse. This applies to :rlicl(c wviich ha1 b ttct Jprt-duced inl Florida wvhiether hev are puircar-e(I in tlat State II Ilscwlire.HloI't fruits anl Ved etal) s ilclutde all ciiitrus ;iaid 1onriiict fr[it" (I iIexclItwvaterlinwi is alid pilleappkdes), poppwr~s (f all1 kindsz plrsgimipki!1S, sqlasls,.toimiatoes, beaus ()f ll kituds (except wpea) and eggplalt .erearyof // c Xary.MEDITERRANEAN FRUIT-FLY (UARANTINE REVISED(Press notice)The Secretary (If Agricult Ire is"utd t'-day a tIlcrnl r(0viil of Ahc .\Ili-the Ihiiditit 1 lt Lur hi I h tl ida i lc'e t ii Jit r 'l* i id I hirrestricted arti idas ma v o1w ll\cidt c t t uin t hr ttin thippin' it.Under these reuIilat lous prtovifim i, made "'r tle miVemllt in inlit rl o1merce of all restr-ictea lriiis frlt V titabhlt ith r lt hl L i 1;' Ir.iOareas 01' ()i properties whicb l ' v he det ermiined a>cT n i \ ii rfruit is required to be proml( it ly destro.yedl, but fit, t run tii tf 'i
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142 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [July-Sept.,and ve-etables over considerable areas surrounding the infestation will bediscontinued. This change of policy is made possible as a result both of theintensive eradication effort in Florida of the last four months and the deter-milnation of methods of sterilizing citrus and other host fruits which are be-lieved to eliminate risk of carrying infestation. Such movement will befurther safeguarded for the present by control of distribution. With thedevelopment of adequate facilities for the commercial application of thesemethods of sterilization it is expected that a broader field than that nowauthorized will be open for the marketing of Florida host fruits and vege-tables.In large measure the revision of the regulations follows the recommenda-tions of the advisory committee of specialists appointed by the Secretary toinvestigate the fruit-fly situation in Florida. The committee's report, whichw-s published on July 19, recommended the continuation and expansion ofthe eradication program and the authorization of shipment of the Floridacitrus crop under methods of sterilization which recent research work by thedepartment had indicated, in the belief of the committee, to be effective andeconomic-illy feasible.Two methods of sterilization are now available, namely. (1) the maintenanceof a temperature of 1100 F. (inside the fruit) for eight hours under an airhumidity of 90 per cent, and (2) precooling the fruit to a temperature of 280(inside the fruit) for five hours and then holding it at 300 for five days.As to these methods, the department announces that while they have givenevery promise of being commercially practicable, the final judgment as to theircomplete availability must necessarily await the demonstration which can bemade only when the crop now developing begins to be moved. .In the mean-time, the Department of Agriculture, in cooperation with all available agenciesgrower, packer, and carrier-is continuing the experimentation on a largerscale so that if possible the benefit of such control can be made more generallyavailable before the heavy shipping season opens. It is appreciated also thatit may not be possible for all packing houses or other establishments to makethe changes and installations necessary for such sterilization by the beginningof the crop season.Pending such determinations and adjustments, provision has been made in theregulations for movement of host fruits and vegetables under safeguards similarto those hitherto required, namely, restrictions as to destination areas. Ingeneral the restrictions provided for on the movement of host fruits and vege-tables from Florida are as follows:Sterilization is required as to all fruit produced within a mile of points atwhich infestation has been, or is hereafter, determined. Such sterilized fruitmay he authorized movement anywhere in the United States other than intothe States of Alabama, Arkansas, Arizona, California, Georgia, Idaho,Louisiana, Mississippi, Nevada, New Mexico, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Oregon,South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, and Washington, or the Territory ofPorto Rico.Sterilized fruit produced in eradication areas (substantially equivalent toinfested and protective zones as hitherto designated) may likewise be author-ized to move under permit anywhere in the United States, other than into theSouthern and Western States and Territory named. Unsterilized fruit, other than as to any portion of the eradication area designated as infested, may beitliorized movement only to the District of Columbia, including PotomacYn rds in Virginia, and to destinations in the States of Maryland, Pennsyl-vaiina, and States north and east thereof, including shipments to foreign coun-tries by way of any of such States.It is aiticip)ted that a strong effort will be made by organizations and per-sons inl interest in Florida to give preference. in any aid which may be obtainedfroi the Feierl FaHie Iord or otherwise, for the financing of packing-bonse adjustmiets necessary for such sterilization, in the first instance toVr';sI in wlicil infestations Ihs at any time been determined, and thereafter inthlwir puri'limns of 1lie erndication :irea or areas.Ii st fui1roiLce(l in F1 ri ia outside of eradication a reas may, whether,,teli lized (r Ill I)ninizl, B' utliorized movemeItnt anywhere in the UnitedSI at s ll th1:11 into the SoultIlernl anld Western States and( tie Territory of'o t t i1 ().Thw ici u ieis n de' listed I,, including the en11tire counties ofSr v .('itrus, F I a l er, II ernandt o, 1H lisboi (r)ugl 1, Lake, i\larion., Orange, Pasco,Piinelhas, I 'itilaii, SeImIIinmle, Sumter, n id Volusia, and parts of the counties ofAlachtu:i, Bradford, lay, Ducail, Levy, Osceola, Polk, and St. Johns.

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144 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CON TROL ADMINISTRATION [July-Sept.,thereby. and to effectuate the purposes aforesaid, I do quarantine the State ofFlorida and each and every other State of the continental United State and theDistrict of Columbia, effective on and after September 1, 1929.For the purpose of this quarantine any State, Territory, or District of theUnited States in which the Mediterranean fruit fly is determined to be established will be designated as an infested State, Territory, or District; all otherStates, Territories, or Districts for the purpose of this quarantine will bedesignated as noninfested States, Territories, or Districts.RESTRICTIONS APPLYING TO INFESTED STATES, TERRITORIES, OR THE DISTRICT OFCOLUMBIAHereafter, under the authority of said act of August 20, 1912, amended asaforesaid, (1) fruits, vegetables, and garden and orchard products of all kinds and cotton bolls and seed cotton; (2) sand, soil earth, peat, compost, andmanure; (3) railway cars, boats, and other vehicles and containers which havebeen or are being used in conveying fruits or vegetables; (4) fruit-pickingequipment, and all other articles, including nursery stock, which have beenassociated with the production of or commerce in fruits or vegetables or havebeen or are contaminated with sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, or manure shallnot be shipped, offered for shipment to a common carrier, received for trans-portation or transported by a common carrier, or carried, transported, moved, or allowed to be moved from any infested State into or through any other Stateor Territory or the District of Columbia in manner or method or under condi-tions other than those prescribed in the rules and regulations hereinafter madeand in amendments thereto: Providcd, That the restrictions of this quarantineand of the rules and regulations supplemental thereto may be limited to theareas in an infested State or Territory now, or which may hereafter be, desig-nated by the Secretary of Agriculture as regulated areas, when in the judgmentof the Secretary of Agriculture, such limitation shall be adequate to prevent thespread of the Mediterranean fruit fly 2 to other States, Territories, or theDistrict of Columbia, and when the movement of the restricted articles intra-state from such regulated areas is so safeguarded as to prevent the spread ofthe Mediterranean fruit fly therefrom to other parts of the quarantined Stateor Territory and thence into interstate commerce.RESTRICTIONS APPLYING TO NONINFESTED STATES, TERRITORIES, OR THEDISTRICT OF COLUMBIAHereafter, the different classes of articles enumerated above, originating inand moving from an infested State, Territory, or the District of Columbia toauthorized destinations in a noninfested State, Territory, or the District ofColumbia, under the aforementioned rules and regulations, shall not be shipped,offered for shipment to a common carrier, or carried, transported, moved, orallowed to be moved from the said noninfested States, Territories, and Districtsinto or through any other State, or Territory, or District of the United Statesin manner or method or under conditions other than those prescribed in therules and regulations hereinafter made and in amendments thereto.Done at the city of Washington this 20th day of August, 1929.Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agri-culture.[SEAL.]ARTHUR M. HYDE,Secretary of Agriculture.REVISED RULES AND REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE OF QUARANTINENO. 68(Approved August 20, 1929; effective September 1, 1929)REGULATION 1. DEFINITIONSFor the purpose of these regulations the following words, names, and termsshall be construed, respect ively, to mean :2 The intierstite transportation of living Mediterranean fruit flies in any stage of devel-opment and( for :in urpose is prohibited under the provisions of the act approved Mar. 3,1905, (33 Stat. 129)

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19291 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 145(a) Fruit flies: The insects known as the Mediterranean fruit fly (Ccratitiscapituta Wied.) in any stag-e of development.(b) The terms "infested," "infestation," aw( the like relate to infestationwith the Mediterranean fruit flv.(C) Quarantined State: Any State, Territory, or District quarantined (1) oilaccount of infestation by the Mediterranean fruit fly, or (2) for the purposeof enforcement of rules and regulations governing the redistribiutioln or imlove-ment from such quarantined States of products originating in and moving froman infested State, Territory, or District, and Loveriing agencies concerned inthe initial movement of such products from an infested State.(d) Infested State: Any State, Territory, or District determined to be in-fested with the Mediterranean fruit fly and so designated by the Secretary ofAgriculture.(e) Noninfc'ted State: Any State, Territory, or District quarantined fi Ir thepurpose of enforcement of rules and regulations governing the redistributionor movement front such quaraitined States of pro lucts originiating in andmoving from an infested State, TerritOr, or District, a nd govermiiagenciesconcerned in the initial movement of sUch lprodulcts frm an infested State, and designated by the Secretary of Agriculture as iioninfeste .(f) Regulated area:' Anv area ill a qua rant ined State or District which isnow or which ilay ihereifter I ei design: ed : s suci by te Secretary of Agri-culture in accordance with the proviso to Notice of Quarantine No. (, revised.(y) Eradication arc(: Any area ill an infested State ini whii In intensiveeradicatioll program is being carried mit an1id whici is so desig nllted by v theSecretary of Agriculture. (I i lu-les areas hitherto designated aid ret ainedas infested an1d protective zon '.)(h) Ihfested irca: Any area e'4tiblislhed aid retaiieied :r5 an inlfe te'4d ZX1n'eunder the revised rules antd rezulathns suipplemental to N itire of Quaraniti neNo. 68, effective May 10, 1929, and any other area whiicli may latter he deter-mined as infested.(i) h'csiricted a rticlc,': Fnriits, ye tables, and gardri atni orchard prod-ucts of all kinds, and cot ton boils and seed (4Iton ; stml. soil, 'arth, peat. e(Icm-post and manure; railway enrs, ho:is anld other velhicles aind centers whichhave 1eien or are being n sed in c nv ying fruits or veeI b1e ; and fruit-pickingequipment a10 all other a'ticles ijnchliditg IIU i'Sery sl1ek which haive heen Iso-ciated with the production of or coiile'ce ill frviits Veetables or I i ( e beenor are cOitamintated with snid, soil. ('tt, peat, cOmillost , r miturie.(j) host fruits and regetabllcN: Fruits, vegetables, an gaIen aInd orch:18 idproducts of all kinds sisceptille to in festalioll by tie '\lediterranlan frnitfly, namely, (1) all wild a81( culiva ted fruits, except wttcrmnebv, pine-ap8lies, strawbr1ies, (0o1 5, ( a 11 l Olher t11 s: (2) the H llowin imtIs of vege-tables: Peppers of all kinds, totOi es, Lima altd hrad f:va I le:s, andeggplants; together with atly bt l'ruits or ve41etbles or oter phlnt jrlhuhtswhich later may be (leterlmined as suisceptile ;1d of \\hlivbt due ntice will hegiven.(M) Inspc'tor: An inspectOr of t United States I Dep'ritmient (C A'hricul-tire.REGULATION 2. DEsIGNATION OF INFESTED AND NONINFE'STED STATES AND oF'ERADIATIoN AMEAS(1) In Not'ce of Quara tiinc No. G;, revised, the State of Florida is desig-nated as ai1 infested State, :1d all other Staites, Territories, ind Districts ofthe continental Uni ted State", are dle'si'nI ate d as ii101infested St ates, Teirritories,or Districts. (See Regulation 1, (c) , (d). (c).)3 In the regulations 1l(er I'i Irnti: W; it il 5S ' -n im d m tsirai, to mali ny sep111-tioii of the Statt' of Florida into re -utateii iand nonrcnilatid nicZs on necunt 0f tlhi'uncertainty lhici Je(ssaiilv 'xistIt : is It t' Ix t o spread of the .\I'ditirraniinfruit fly in that State. For : iiini 1rat Ii i iKrpOS, therefore .the nItire St I, ]':It Itreitvd as a regulated arn: .tw t -r i '< l(Ili 4l i!n area " is u. d in FlorI! Indieatethe il portion Of that S1t14, ellhirl it fr il inllt 1 lIla hl'oli1iliiled 'Is ilfesli i. TIinth'-With sltch additional area ilwilldedI as ier for the ertiietOil trogram. \imiuehmlore dr"Istic restrictions (in m1OyN't'lwit 4)1 lDtrt (ota et 1 h .forced as I0 -Irei I1h,I as to O W IIflel' Of II(ie St:Ili, S i !1 i it i'ition in Florida 1:s heen clieariy dlt i I. Ii ehri.:ite 1,if i certaillN'y aN ] Aut' 4M/orida as free frl-w ati l, il-h olr ill*> of o lse n .it !of the proviso) to the notice If (111:11 iii n.'01 ut r flrilm hl ristrU lb -lio X wh ic h Ito an infeste(i State.

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146 PLANT QTUAANTIXE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [July-Sept.,(2) The following counties and parts thereof in the State of Florida are,until further notice, designated as eradication areas:The entire counties of Brevard, Citrus, Flagler, Hernando, Hillsborough,Lake, Marion, Orange, Pasco., Pinellas, Putnam, Seminole, Sumter, and Volusia;that part of Alachua County lying east of the east boundary of range 20 east,and that part of said county lying south of the south boundary of township 10south; that part of Bradford County lying south of the south boundary of town-ship 7 south; that part of Clay County lying east of the east boundary of range24 east, and that part of said county lying south of the south boundary oftownship 7 south; that part of Duval County lying south of the south boundaryof township 2 south and between the east boundaries of ranges 24 east and 28east, respectively; that part of Levy County lying east of the east boundary ofrange 16 east, except that part lying south of the south boundary of township14 south; that part of Osceola County lying north of the north boundary oftownship 31 south; all of Polk County except that part east of the east boundaryof range 29 east and south of the south boundary of township 30 south; and allof St. John's County except township 3 south, range 29 east, and township 4south, range 29 east.REGULATION 3. CoNDITIONs REQUIRED IN AN INFESTED STATEThe interstate movement of restrIcted articles from any.part of an infestedState will be conditioned on the said State requiring and enforcing the follow-ing eradication measures in manner and by method satisfactory to the UnitedStates Department of Agriculture, namely:SECTION A. CONDITIONS REQUIRED IN ERADICATION AREAS(1) Host-free period.-A host-free period shall be maintained each year throughout the eradication areas for citrus and other host fruits beginning onApril 1, and for host vegetables beginning June 15, and continuing until October1, subject to such modification as to duration and dates of commencement andtermination and as to articles to which it is applicable as may be authorized orrequired by the United States Department of Agriculture.4 During the host-freeperiod, no host fruits or vegetables shall be permitted to grow or exist withinor to be moved from the eradication areas except: (a) citrus fruit on the treesand host vegetables in such state of immaturity that in the judgment of theinspector they are not susceptible of infestation; and (b) host fruits and vege-tables in storage or held for local utilization or consumption. (See par. 6.)(2) Elimination of summer host plants.-As essential to the maintenance ofthe liost-free period, an infested State shall require and enforce the eliminationthroughout eradication areas of all host plants, wild and cultivated, which nor-mally produce fruit or vegetables susceptible to infestation during the host-freeperiod.(3) Spraying and clean-up on commercial properties.-All properties-i. e.,groves, orchards, truck gardens or other premises-on which host fruits orvegetables are produced commercially shall be operated and maintained in suchmanner as shall be satisfactory to the United States Department of Agriculture.In addition to the maintenance of the host-free period, this shall include:(a) For host fruits, such spraying as may be necessary in the judgment ofthe inspector to destroy adult fruit flies; the cleanup of drops and windfalls atsiiniweekly intervals during the ripening and harvesting period ; the promptdisposal of crop remnants following harvest, and any other requirements neces-sary in the judgment of the inspector to effect eradication of the Mediterraneanfruit fly. With respect to the disposal of crop remnants all such remnants,either on the tree or ground or in other places, shall be promptly collected andeither destroyed or utilized in manner and by methods satisfactory to the De-partment of Agriculture-such action to be taken on the completion of commer-cial harvesting of any variety of host fruit irrespective of the termination datefor the class of fruit concerned (citrus, etc.).(b) For host vegctabl(8, the semiweekly destruction pending harvest of allripening veget bles or drops in the field which would not normally be harvested,I Any adjustniot of the termination (late with respect to limes, grapes, and possiblyother fruits and vegetables, necessarily must be based on conditions with respect to thefruil 1ly which obtain in the district concerned at the period when such adjustment maybecome necessary.

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19211 SLI'VICE AND LEGULATOLY ANNOUNCEMENTS 147and immediately after the movement of the commercial -o V ef< l:. .i::in no case later thaui the commecliement ol the hilt-IrU peiod 1,r Ve& a ,the elimination of plants and crup reinants-the di sosition st111't ii gtables or dro s and of c1op rmnanit1 to Ue ill eL Ad meL >l ta' to tto the inspector.(4) 7Spyi'U?) fnd Cla-Ufl (the'r tihanl On COierCia protP C".'.-Al) !ln-conm1ercial pulic and private premises, inludti:g imprOved anI ui-niprV.land, shall be maIntained in such manner as 4halI be stisfacturv to tr UidStates Depar'tmnt of Agiriulture. This shall include ifr a' imirOd jr pe -ties, either in tows or otherwise, so far as applicable to the Pr> orty r Ci ,the enforcement of the requirements eD nTeratJd I iarutgr111h 1 f ,lV r11 1gl-tion. On uDeared-flr properties and on uninmprOVe and wid land anI areasborder iL public highways, all hot -ts wild and cultiPat.,destroyed.(5) Fruit (wl f/(Ta '': *tt ,'/(t c.-All h-st fruits and vvg aIt> c ksol1, StOre.(L Or tranert>d sL1. uiLr tle SviplVIoi an v i :S o r1to the inspoct'r. ho stL ilizjd. either by heating, by refri::erat\o. 1 vapproved treatment iii suhi manner and method as shall be l described by thePlant (uaranrine and C nrol Administration Pro : .That indiis tl. dterminiiati, n with r, >pct to the mrntiss of sterilization herein indicate L of anyadjustments nee'irat-d by varietal and seasonal conditions of fruts. or pea.-ing such packing hou-e 8ti uiient as my be necessary tO 1akV adlv:,a:eof 'Kch >te rllizat ion1. '-hiplmc1t IbtI l I e aiuthn rize.d as fl allows:(U) fIOxt friu t rluccdi Z iuf(6td a ta s.-Steriizatioil shall be requiredas a condition I mov (ment of fruit produokei in ari awhich lMav , a :been detemiLnid a i'tie ed. Snh torilize I fruit may be a h r ztulment anywhere in tie united states othet Ilan itito the St at al Tcrrt. rylisted below in Ici 'a .>a i ()( bi Jlct ji'U::* j,rod C(r 4 a crud ca iou urn as otT; r i1en iu i / U o .( ) St ( ried frui t ', 1eed in a ientlon arcamay be Ill(rized n metanywhere in the UnI; STai r thn i to tle States :m t T e rrt V VI'bel w: Wasiiingtoi, O)regaf lualio. Ca .l i it. Ne Vaa, Ut , Aiei. N wAMexico. Texas, Oklzianmt. Avkani'a , Lo uisIaLn, Tenin se.MV 2 pp, A.abamia, Geor -gia. North Car>1imt. South Car linu. tn Pot Ri(U<) U ridf i' f uIt' t ir' uCkii in oiradictioi are: ' oti i than in i-areas may be autlor ied moi~Vfeet oh y to thle 1Distt 1 C I 11oa 1 n .l~tPotomac Yards in Virgainia, and tr dh 4tiat ins iim >l ta e. o. Ma dPennsylvania. and St at e' lkiwrth and ea ttes t) ftreign COUnt .(C) H~ost [Vruits~ /roetu'ed fe ('rcre UO(1 4nIn(f 4ei 8ta -II it i.u V ndIled in an instead State otfid t of lietion Urea m"L .itIl r' 1.be amthorizPed mo x 'e.nt a nowhere ini the 1 nit I S u". otbe r .e it 'hIStates and Territory listed ;Ibo\e n paraarapl (b i. I mii ier h .this rest ration as to de'tination P all Io0 a!ply to s-ut imii pro u.ed ii I Kand Monroe Countie Fia.Prorided furl/hf r, 'That :v to ho v getable, p et rm;n: iw ii aquate aid satisfatory st ri1zti n miitlwd fot u f rit hij m.tbe aut lhrized as foL 1vs:(a) Ptepp I:imA 1:i1;a and bro nl bean prout i a iin an a y Ia rtiorilld mto v m nt 0 l ti thI I-Ze fi t t amit I tm eYaids in Slrginia. an f t I miii in K' ' \I t': barylm1 'n .and SItte' inortli and t'a"I 11101r 1, iltluii"i ith mn via an> f 'su.'l >1tto frincutis(ii) P)ejqers oat limia and brtaa lbeans i' frodule aut le (f I tr1:11eni ar :Ia.-,ilnd hmrl n Ia ts Jf1nued :nywh \x i' th' SIate. nmyi ai Ow:1111 1MOVI'emienit thlirouth1iouit tlwo lit(ed SI s other thma into the State and Tri'i ylisted uhl(ld the P1i'O it i i.rienit (,f IIF1'jIri h'st !ruuiI' int1f flny f I h S fill r V nd Wiest\\fM rin St t0 listfd i I Itine of June 7, 1ti2I9 It is f'\Iffte I ha 1 s h Ttirmint 01 n w\i I a iL l1 'f .give i d w -I r Ihld for mmVf Wt f st r 11 f ruit pi r t t il. 0 thf P 1of 1e2 0: , and It IM th' IntfntIon of th f f It'urtm In tff I If n f1 pra t c 1the NtrliizatiOni of al1I host fruits muoving lnterstatt frfom any p.rt If .-n0te s1 t" Pending the d0trIn11l'tfion Of m1Oth off f 'sIt iliziti 1n fr -Agtah 1 If't1 i f"Intion, it is nut iIeemed advisible tf lutlhfizI/ mlove wn lIfIIf1 ft 1rd 1 -1t fetab in'any of the Southlfrn 11n0 %'1'-Irni StaItf Listef fi 1 81 ad iitrativ frfl ft May L 1 ' >'and still further' pro'(tec(tf InI th' reivls 4 tuaaif ntjin' f Jun i .S(@51-8t 8

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148 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [July-Sept.,(6) Control of local handling and utilization agencies.-All cold-storage andpacking houses and other places, in which host fruits or vegetables are packed,processed, manufactured, or otherwise utilized, or are held for shipment orfor local sale, distribution or consumption, shall be maintained and operated asto conditions of storage and of handling and movement of restricted products asshall be satisfactory to the United States Department of Agriculture.(7) Jntrastate m ovement.-The intrastate movement of all restricted articleswithin an infested State shall be brought under such control as shall in thejudgment of the United States Department of Agriculture be consistent with theeradication object of these regulations.(8) Eradication of infestation.'--Upon the determination of an infestationin an established eradication area or in any portion of an infested State outsideof such areas the following action shall be taken:(a) If the infestation is in an eradication area, there shall be an immediatesuspension of all operations on the infested properties and on all propertieswithin 1 mile thereof, and an intensivs survey shall be made within and aroundthe infested property or properties to determine the extent and degree ofinfestation. If the infestation is generally distributed throughout any prop-erty, the host fruits and vegetables remaining in and, so far as obtainable,distributed or moved from the property, shall be promptly destroyed. If, byintensive inspection, the infestation is determined to be confined to a limited.part of the property concerned, the host fruits or vegetables remaining in or which have been moved from such portion shall be destroyed. Subject to thedetermination that all risks can be fully safeguarded, the inspector mayauthorize the immediate utilization by processing (canning, freezing, etc.) ofthe host fruits and vegetables growing in or available from the uninfested portion of the property, conditioned on local availability of means for suchprocessing. Similarly if the infestation is so limited that in the judgment ofthe inspector all risks can be eliminated by the sterilization elsewhere pro-vided for in these regulations, sterilization and shipment may be authorized.Such authorization shall, however, be conditioned on the prompt clean-up anddestruction of all host fruits and vegetables in the infested portion of the property or properties concerned, and compliance with any other safeguard asto handling and distribution required by the inspector. Following the deter-mination of an infestation, an infested area shall be designated to include allthe properties within 1 mile of such infestation, and, if necessitated by theproximity of the infestation to the margin of an eradication area, such latterarea shall be extended to give a 10-mile safety zone around the infested prop-erty or properties.(b) If the infestation is found outside of any established eradication area,the procedure indicated in (a) shall be followed with respect to infested prop-erties and to the establishment of an infested area, and in addition theretothere shall be established an eradication area surrounding such properties to include the area within at least 10 miles of the outside boundary of said prop-erties. Wherever proximity makes such action desirable or feasible, sucheradication area may be joined to and made a part of existing eradicationareas.(9) Iwpcctio.-A system of inspection satisfactory to the United StatesDepartment of Agriculture shall be carried on throughout an infested State forthe prompt discovery of any infestation which may occur.SECTION B. CONDITIONS REQUIRED OUTSIDE OF ERADICATION AREAS(1) Of the restrictions enumerated under section A, paragraphs 5, 6, 7,8, and 9 shall apply to parts of an infested State outside of eradicationareas. Stehi outside areas shall, also, be subject to the requirements of regula-tliois 4 to 14, inclusive.(2) The r\vesting and clean-up of commercial citrus plantings outside oferadicatlion ar"Ihs siall be completed throughout am infested State prior toApril 1, auid )I( ioveient fromn such areas will be permitted after that date7 I)terninii ion of infestation in a quarantined State, Territory, or District not pre-viously kioin it o be infesi ed by tihe Mediterranean fruit fly will necessitate the declarationby 11w Socretary of' AgIriculture of the fiact of such infestation, aind, in cooperation with1he state, I le clean 111p of the infested properties aind intensive surveys to determineextenit: o1' tlhe infestation, followed by the institution of such eradication measures as theCIinergeii cy justilies.

PAGE 19

unnon "M aj 1,11 'sm 1na opp14 )du Ia a H)II A1 1 1 ' 41 till ji' t l Il ti ll S ) I 1 0 If.10Ar .1 'sII1 1 A 14 0 J ill I I I I A.: 1 S IU )l( 1 st I I p o *pi q m o 011 1 :111 , I .* 1 olb I 1 ,9'1 ,)I I 11ijW,' ta ~ I I I: a I. IiI Ia -A \ Ia I I I ia I If I: I jI I i )l ~ 1 1 1 1it J j I"au \ It I * ii a l a a i { s11 1 'O k l;td! jIa ! l[! F u a n u aII\\ I I A I j I a I I A\ I* I:u I I ! I II a :a *-IIaul J b l F lp .*1ta:*,i i II a ua a qt~ t uj li pr 4*ijj4 * .ij salqudia ri pUui' aJ H IA~ ~.t i 'F I' t sl .I i a !i ps 1 [V 1 1 tiot IJ Id \ 1(4 .1J1 ) I a $.I 'th ,1 I IIj II [ I I \\ h I IIa Iiun ,.) S\ ai ! I ) ' 7 1tao 1.l1ai 4 I A I II II I' I'ilt I'.~j S.'i.1L 144 A I l1 .4l1 .1 4 1 t)1 I d8I i 1 .I Im Iai a:[. I ii pmjIiAk 'A I IV I iSo I 1 .1 1( 1 1uip 1111'4 luis .a Ka\a a-.4 1lt ji 1.1p. ud ap1 1s 1 1 11 1 1'hp)pd I: U1.a10( 0 2 11 1 '11 1 1.l~ 1 14 d 1 /o(itfto I 14 1) 1 t .i 1 f, l1 I1) d 1 11 1 1 1j Ul18 dJiuopulp\' .11 a I I .1) it( I sd[4[I. IU 111 ok0 [, 1/>Io ld qb ' 1H4J ( mI j F 1 0 I s' Il 1 Iud.1 aj I i 1A dI U at111 .14 1 I11 Is'Ol PIIId nIta Bul I a \\ 21I1 'lli 41 V< j Iidl liajs lIS d I \ 10'napu L Fuli P 4 ~ 1A pliP I4l } 0 ~~/ U)Il P ) / /u. .S011timit)/d)Iu pl ( ~;(IT .7~10 1 1 !, Ii 1 11(1 1 11 1 pfll", G B40J1-~ .1(4 lqmu 1 Jo 0p1 ,rl 1 .1p11i Blp 11.11 pI' x s qd .1() p0.11TI.0 111 10.l u 0l (a () 11 .01 [ jippI 8 1. , -0 J 4 I A1 (powql Io {ow aq j n s s oly:4a -Op ills nl 4' ;m 03." 1 1 ilj, () .8 1 1 . -i l) JimJJO-'1 li pUo W7)Jn a o t j ( -) -T'1I11i801 jl JIM .4I)J0.10d11 .1w) J Bi 41 11,I([ 1 ""l~.1 JO) 1 f1 .) lmI ri iuloiiA TIT I-w-d1'3A 1 1 Il mmu 484)1 1 0 > .0~1i1' 84:flp 4.1(1 1jIl .1011 7I1 -l lp( T .IPI -Ji0pt'.lJ0ri1411" J0 '011ttimi0in A *t.1ij .Jp oi UiIAOII pa 4oj1i01 Il j 4)am -1)1 71I1j0.1 -) I 4 Sa lI)A M Oi (0 px gj aom poii l .t-1 Ji p uun, s,-[ I-I)7.,in pim ,lm j s o l ".m1oam oP 7. V >110171).11%im .Ti C-p1/di).d si3 1(1 :.)o jUi) ulNK (I).oj 4p11i:'l 111,111 8uIT nip j 10 )I O Ji4 J~ 11 IIITI0 j, 1 IJO 1 al931011i l()(11 p illm TPIU") *01014'jt 1111, s-)jim os*ii () 1i,-d-, Inoij08 .10 JOTJT{1411?'w N141 010 8111P( 111(1my Jl8 ) )ijo4~p~ J7!ll f.1. 1S (OXOwl I3J3DiOX, OZ I03U 1 (IXY -313 rG oil 6T.0

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150 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [July-Sept.,REGULATION 5. RESTRICTIONS ON THE INTERSTATE MOVEMENT OF COTTON BOLLSAND SEED COTTON FROM AN INFESTED STATE(1) Cotton bolls and bollies shall not be moved or allowed to be movedinterstate from an infested State to or through any point outside thereof.(2) Seed cotton produced in an eradication area shall not be moved or al-lowed to be moved interstate from such area to or through any point out-side thereof.(3) Seed cotton produced in an infested State outside eradication areas shallnot be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from an infested State to orthrough any point outside thereof unless a permit shall have been issued there-for by the United States Department of Agriculture. Permits may be issuedfor such interstate movement of seed cotton to a gin in an adjoining State forthe purpose of ginning, when in the judgment of the inspector such movementdoes not involve risk of spreading the Mediterranean fruit fly.IIEGULATION 6. RESTRICTIONS ON TlE INTERSTATE MOVEMENT OF SAND, SOIL,EARTH, PEAT, COMPoST, AND MANURE FROM AN INFESTED STATE(1) Sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure of any kind, in bulk orin connection with other articles, shall not be moved or allowed to be movedinterstate from an eradication area to or through any point outside thereof:Provided, That this shall not apply to fuller's earth, kaolin clay, phosphaticsand, peat, or muck. and similar mined or dredged products, including sand,when in the judgment of the inspector such movement does not involve riskof spreading the Mediterranean fruit fly: Provided further, That this paragraphshall not apply to nursery stock with soil, moved in compliance with regula-tion 8.(2) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of sand, soil, earth,peat, compost, or manure from points in an infested State located outsideof eradication areas.REGULATION 7. ItSTRICTIONS ON THE INTERSTATE MOVEMENT OF PICKING EQUIP-MENT AND OTHER ARTICLES FROM AN INFESTED STATEFruit-picking equipment and other articles which have been associated withthe production of or commerce in fruits and vegetables shall not be movedor allowed to be moved interstate from an infested State to or through anypoint outside thereof unless a permit shall have been issued therefor by theUnited States Department of Agriculture. Permits may be issued for suchinterstate movement upon determination by the inspector that the said articleshave been so cleaned or treated as to eliminate any danger of their carryingMediterranean fruit fly.REGULATION S. NURsERY STOCK FROM AN INFESTED STATENursery stock, including all kinds of plants and plant roots except portionsof plants without roots or soil, shall not be moved or allowed to be movedinterstate from an infested State to or through any point outside thereofun less a permit shall have been issued therefor by the United States Depart-ment of Agriculture. Permits maiy be issued for such interstate movement upondetermiination by the inspector either (a) that the nursery in question is sosituated and so protected as to eliminate the risk of soil infestation by larvaeand pupae of the Mediterranean fruit fly, or (b) that the said articles havebeen so cleaned or treated as to eliminate any danger of their carrying theMe literraneai fruit fly, or (c) that the said articles have originated outside ofany eradication area.REGULATION 9. MARKING REQUIREMENTSEach box, crate, or other container of the articles for which permits arere(plir(d by tHiese regulations shall be plainly marked with the name andadd press of lMe consignor and shall bear securely attached to the outside thereofthe permi it issuled in complia nce with these regulations. In the case of carlot anld boat slipimienits permits sliml also acconmpay the waybill covering suchsliipments. All con I nt or's maiifests, mieiorandIa, or bills of lading pertainingto such sh ipillen ts shall be marked witli the number of the permit, and withsuch instructions with respect to cleaning of said cars as shall be required.

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1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 151REGULATION 10. CLEANING OF IATLwAY { :s, 1>x A s RN OTHE L ViC >NTLINEhsRailvay ears, boats, and other vehicei-and I1ntin'rs whiw> .e beenused in transpirtin;g any restrictedl articles produ(Id ii m: m 1 frn an8infested State shall in t tlherea after he Ilov'd t (or all we ti Tuntil they have bell thor'olighly cleaned and, if re(quivrc bh tii iins em., dis-infected, by the destination carrier at tile Poinit of il oini I Ii 1.nr 1 i Adby method prescribed by the Plant Quarantine and C.o ntrAl A Iniai on.REGULATION 11. RESHlIPMENT FROM NONINFESTED STATES oF losT Fh s ANDVEGETABLES ORIGINATING 1 N AN INFESTI) >TATEIL(1) Host fruits and vegetal)les which have inii ned ;,,i l I mivedfrom anl infested Statle shall not tlhreafter be re'-shippeid or o wti'wi'e tported into or between the States of' Alaama, Arizi x, A i'& :a. C .I. r1IA,Georgia, Idaho, Lotiisia1a, MAi issippi, N lva a, New Ilexic. N rt1 ri na,Oklahoma, Oregon, Soith Ctirolina, Tentn-e-see, TeCXas, Utah, or Wa1i1n n, orinto the Territory ()f Portt) Rio.(2) 11ist fruits and vegetahbis which have oriinat'd in anld ben 11vedfrom an infested State into the area northeast o I d incluhi,. -, P omacYards, Va., the Disttrict o C'ulumrbita, :1mid Ole State4 (I Mary d vi d '1 Pen-sylvantia, shall not het'eretcr le re'4ipped u' otllerw\i"-i niit to Poi it'Sin the United States outside the said norhieastern area.(3) No restrictions are placed on the interstate mVemet 1r'' n .i.1Iv'dStates of articles other th,1 host flrIits and vcetabhls and railway aother vehicles and containers, unless such articles have bnen mn' V l 1'Om11 111inflsted State in violation of the rules and regulations supplinnt to Nof Quarantine No. (S or any amniiv1dmenmt thereto or reviin tI.REGULATION 12. INsPE>tiN oF ESTRicTED ARTIC :> iN I\N irAny car, vehicle, basket. box, or other conta in er m 4)1. ( Irn' iie Ilrmo-ment interstate whli(bl eottai"n 01 may contain artirls\ h' mew Il.I Iis prohibited or restricted hy tihf'se reu lat it (ns shall be sul ije 1 intpwctI n byinspectors at any t ime or place.IhGULT~irIoN 12. ( >NCELt.IAI oN ow IPi IM!Permits issued under heerel-ulation m y hJ' ve witi)(11-:wnt 1r eneb ytheinspector 'and fiur'lther IermIlits r' f*IelIfsed, either. upon i'lit'rmini i .-tionI on the mis' 41 which Ile art clt's coiinit' ed' l are tr iw n,or for any failut're o1* (ino ]lhiane with the c'nditi '. oI ti t i 1'violations (if theml, or ( f , t, perm11itte('s ag e m n ,o h n v r il Ilto j dmeitt of the il'spe(.1t'o r ' i ,he f r her iu'se of such w't'lmits Imiyl'hit !' I1 1 illse'11mi tionl of the M itra m i rtuit 11 * .Aftor '11Ny -Iwh p liooi with, avor canceled, the fiurt ho' u -I '1f ally j'rtint 1 4 i-slod t.emhceol I" hiV .IREGU;L~ATlON 14. Suii it>s tY THE ii I) >TAtts lt Nn !Articlekis ubetto ro tri(-tion ill h s eg hto s ma e n e inti rtoby the United States I )'inurtmInt of Agriclt Ire for 'pr Im n1t 1p r s sonl SUCh (,(nditiolls '11A 11 der 1u-h 111:1Yrd Ilk 111kIe 1(re Iby the Phint %puarantine :nid ('itlrul AmltiniiIration. The c mai ' r .W 1 r!so moved shall hew., "ecturely * a.:ttawhed to,1 th, (mt-ide Ohwl., I l mttih frm ll tile Phinit d ,alitti'e ali l u'nI di Ai nin i t i t 'vi .d Iwvith suchl cwondition'S.These rles oIl re-IIIllionl hal he effective (m :nd :IftfrS pem e , v9and "hall ()n ilmt date "Illwr-'de 111 rulf-, :111 revl,-, ions 11r01, r 1101nolgateld under Notice o Qu1lantinl No. IS or t\ F'y rvin iIDn at the cit y of Washillt on t It is 21t It lIIy o\ Allu I. 1Witness Iy hand and the 'otl' of the UnIllted Sit I fAgricul t ure.[sun]\A

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152 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [July-Sept.,NOTICE TO COMMON CARRIERSAUGUST 20, 1929.SIR: You are requested to date and sign the blank receipt below, indicatingyour official title, and return this letter to the Secretary of Agriculture in theenclosed penalty envelope, which requires no postage.Notice is hereby given to the transportation company you represent, asfollowsThat the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority conferred on him by theplant quarantine act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315) as amended, has promul-gated a revision of Notice of Quarantine No. 68, on account of the Mediterraneanfruit fly, effective September 1, 1929, and has issued rules and regulations sup-plemental thereto. The revision of the regulations modifies the requirementsunder which restricted articles (1) may be shipped or otherwise transportedfrom the State of Florida or (2) may be reshipped or transported interstatefrom other States, Territories and Districts of the United States. Restricted articles as listed in the quarantine are (1) fruits, vegetables, and garden andorchard products of all kinds, and cotton bolls and seed cotton, (2) sand, soil,earth, peat, compost, and manure, (3) railway cars, boats, and other vehiclesand containers which have been or are being used in conveying fruits or vege-tables. (4) fruit-picking equipment and all other articles including nursery stockwhich have been associated with the production of or commerce in fruits orvegetables or have been or are contaminated with sand, soil, earth, peat, com-post or manure.The shipment or transportation of such articles in manner or method or underconditions other than those specified in the regulations supplemental thereto isprohibited.A copy of the notice is inclosed herewith.Very respectfully,ARTHUR M. HYDE,Secretary of Agriculture.(Inclosures)(Do not detach this receipt)Received this notice and the Notice of Quarantine No. 68, revised, with rulesand regulations mentioned therein this -----day of -----------, 1929.(Signature) (Title) [Sent to all common carriers in the United States.]NOTICE TO GENERAL PUBLIC THROUGH NEWSPAPERSUNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY,Washington, D. C., August 20, 1929.Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority con-ferreI on him Iy the ilant quarantine act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), asamended, has promulgated a revision of Notice of Quarantine No. 68, on ac-count of the Mediterranean fruit fly, effective September 1, 1929, and of therules a1A regulations supplemental thereto. The revision of the quarantine islimited to file inclusion of cotton bolls and seed cotton in the list of articles themoveniciit of which is restricted. The revision of the regulations modifies thereqti remenits under which restricted articles (1) may be shipped or otherwisetanISiOrtd from the State of Florida, or (2) may be reshipped or transportedhiterstaite from ot her States, Territories and Districts of the United States. Restricted articles as listed in the quarantine are (1) fruits, vegetables, andgarden an1d orchard products of all kinds, and cotton bolls and seed cotton, (2)sa (, l, ("111l1, peat, coPilOst-, and niumure, (3) rilway cars, boats, and othervehicles a1d coit a liners \which have 1been or are being used in conveying fruits orvegef a blues, (4) frui-pickiig equipnment and all other articles including nurserystock vlhich have been associated with1 the production of or commerce in fruitsOr vegetables or have been or are contaminated with sand, soil, earth, peat, com-post, or manure. In the regulations the restrictions on garden and orchard

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192M)] SERVICE AND RIEGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTs 153products are limited to the foullowing host fruits and vegetablles: (1 All wildand cultivated fruits, except watermelons, pilneaipples, strawberries. ct weluand other nuts ; (2) peppers of all kinds, toniatoe. Lima and ritrad f favabeans, anl eggphants; together with ally other frit s or Ve(wtabas r ther p1Jltproducts which later may be determined as susceptible and of wh ch I due noticewill be given. The shipment or transportation of such articles in manner ormethod or uider conditions other tlian those specified in the regulation , supiIile-mental thereto is prohibited. Copes of the said revised quarantine and of thleinles and regulat lions supplemental thereto may be obtained from the PlantQuarantine and Control Admijnistration, United States Departnent of Agricul-ture. Washiin-ton, D. C. Artiui. M. Hyde, Secretary of Ag-ricult ure.[i1,'hlic'd in thI fullowin! newslaiw r : The W i-rinI::am News. Liriiin. if. .la.,Au'est 2!), 1929 wt .Ariz a RI ulllic:in., I'll nix, .\riz., Augll 81, 19:9. Arkan asG iazete. Litt, Ak \k. ,k'' ScplenIber 1. 192': Sai l rat-isco Excuiiimr, S : .Calif., Sept(nitI'io 1, 1919 lie i Dtlv'r 1')t. I f,)lvt r, l. Augst :1. 1'.29: II 118rt-forl Tint I Ilartirild. ( Jnn., A :n 11. 1!. : ibTiine.~-1niun, .La'k-Fville. 1la., Sep ilh V 1. 1 9, tile Atlant: .eujriial. l i;;i-Augm -t 11.1]29 : l~Ild ,1em :1 .ias lib~lho. Sel ti n I'l (r 1, 1 .: iw leeewt ., ('hiicai .Ill., A\laisi 29. 1 te : t n lmliaiapolis News, Inda uaiioli' .lit! u' 2119-9. e Ih( M.iit> ~ .iu , Y. I) .M(,iul~s. lm. lowa, .\]ii-si 29, C.2 : a Wi 1i: F;.W iX hi(itia. 2fS., 19-9il ti :i, .29 : till Louisville Ti'iiit'. Ltaist ill,, Ky., .\AILl : 192tile Tiin's L'icayum. New l';rle:'s. La., u. :; , l'"19 : P'trb1lan i '. -1t. rai 1'i I ul,,M ( , ..\u au t :20. 1929; ti ' I ini, It I in rl .1u(. M (I. AIiixs S. 1.9'D: it, .11 -2. Ifis-ton, Ma-s., Au si 29 129. I : ll: -iitr(i li t'. Dentr .A uich u., .\ .29, ti' Mle NInea oli Trbun , Aini npoisAlin.\u ust 29,192!,: .N ck-mi Danily Ne, .;\ snM is. .\Au it 21. 1929: ato 'ity, i ' rai 'e1. 1Anq: aI-i-qty ..\eu N:, AUsIvlM2'.the. Great W Tribune. oGrk N. Y .S-f ai i., 1, 11 O t( r I .11)29 thI. WIi li iv .1>1, .N. , ( -st '1 .1 929: hlltn I Eveinork l:'rt ll , Nov. A N.t i ::!, l 192 : ill.a .h .al:i 1 'te i i,. .' TrTtnitn EveniiuTAialt-. ia en 'J.i. A urist 8 , 1929 : -New i . i al. Tribii , .Allan-u i 8. 19x. .,:t l'l1,t1li9i. tIhe i Wirl. New Ym k, i N. Y. Sipj-tIllber 1, 192 e: the NE iian Bl >i. lrevi IN. C.et 1. 1921: ; riAl F\ rk1 te S o hl, (rlnlild Forks. N. l lk. .\u211 ::lt1l-_'itAl1I TLet, i oux. , TFall. Sol. I). I :,\uli 29, 1929 : Th Nt Okl ihom' 1 wt. va )ia 'lit.11..\uust 2:, 1929: I tie o .S0r a1", 'ort l1:1aii. Prt .\u rili Tex : It le'h 1,di-Ildin~ inIuir(-r, h 'h dt~l lp i i, ..I~unie , 192!f tlhe Eii-a Pll, I .lrt,)i-fleine,""I ill. sl.,o .\Ci d 9 0 t e S ue ' mildn. S. i , tneus 1),92 :Ti tiA rgu _,it-LD ler. Sioux I ills, S. lk., Al\u 1gust :,J). 19"9; Na lhvilh, n e n.NilT)em. .\ugu-st 29, 192!): F rt 'Worch Starl Ili. F()rt Wo'(rth, TeX._ p~ i r 119291: he S11 l Lake Trilune, Salt Lake Cily, Utah, Aualst :21. 1929': i l ;, I iinaieiFree 'ress, Biirliiiaton. Vt. Stp-tembtr :8, 1929: It liniond Tiiii -lis-atctl. lie1 1i,Va. .\iniist 2,. 1929: the S t Iti Tiles. Seatte. Wa-h. .\ii 't :11, 19 : Ih tCl:lr -tol Gaz'tte. l'hrle It. W. Va. S1tf)2i9i I. 1l : hie Milwaukee .ll hi 1:8,M w:i' .W'i-.,\ugu :t ),1, 1929 ; Wyomlilig St:le Tribume-Inadtr, i'h t tw ., .\u-ot t,1929, 1INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERSFindilr theo prsvi 4i111' (it Q11.1illl o )de o I j Jf t id 81 16 1lp tilhl ilt of Ag 'pIi Iitwlol tlil (ill(i t ti'> t ic M14I ti'm -ol .11211i 11\. I t i e,S ptolillb(I 1. l!/ t) "!iIit, ilwns Ilwe 'ljli lw1 il 1 1lY u l t rgstock fr ill h ' Sth aI t i F(iita VI a bell ttlt-i lVl iWi VI .\ t Vx -Inill lite Slit (i et hw d l l i I !'l l ' '-.t lt Ii I , a' Vt .-Iwl l a II a. iilav itlls t ill idf lll li a t 1n ruill is: h t. iN .0 j, 1,i i -: ir eII as Itlt tNS" I I 1 1,*t ti k, illt I ilit i t'i'a1e t i i I I 1 1 1 a:1 tillI I I I it -hI \ I I I I Ipol rti I It ol'I t I I I''\vI I tII I N t F( a4 it IN ri So' I I V it V w I It 1bo lt 1: Iit tli' Iitt I't I It I Id l4t ii"lt t I -ill t ' 1 1 :1s ri' (, I ' I i i t t W it' it i t ii I all t' Iti ii I till I I I:1 t If m i lv llw l l ti I tl d ol (fr11 ill d 1t 1:1 it Il 1, il)(If iq~ef i r N l lio-til l s s i :ie illi w f 1( Sit I pvg)l, I dif i ie r i l k | l s i l I s t t e i ] Gtf I Ii t0 ,> I~i \ I I Iu t1 g Ir li i \ (rol v 1 I t I I S I4 1 1l i 1i s 1 9 1 iHl t Ilti rlr I 1 r i

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154 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [July-Sept.,side thereof the permit issued in compliance with these regulations. In the case of car lot and boat shipments permits shall also accompany thewaybill covering such shipment. All conductor's manifests, memoranda, orbills of lading pertaining to such shipments shall be marked with thenumber of the permit, and with such instructions with respect to cleaningof said cars as shall be required."Information 'with respect to the issuance of Federal permits may be ob-tained from the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration, Orlando, Fla.There has been no change in the prohibition against the acceptance for mail-ing of host fruits and vegetables and, therefore, such articles may not be ac-cepted for mailing from the State of Florida.Furthermore, the reshipment of host fruits and vegetables originating inFlorida is likewise prohibited from post offices in other States, as set forth inregulation 11 of the revised regulations which reads as follows:"11. (a) Host fruits and vegetables which have originated in and beenmoved from an infested State shall not thereafter be reshipped or other-wise transported into or between the States of Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas,California, Georgia, Idaho, Louisiana, Mississippi, Nevada, New Mexico,North Carolina, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah,or Washington, or into the Territory of Porto Rico.(b) Host fruits and vegetables which have originated in and been moved from an infested State into the area northeast of and includingPotomac Yards, Va., the District of Columbia, and the States of Marylandand Pennsylvania shall not thereafter be reshipped or otherwise trans-ported to points in the United States outside the said northeastern area." (c) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement from non-infested States of articles other than host fruits and vegetables and rail-way cars and other vehicles and containers, unless such articles have beenmoved from an infested State in violation of the rules and regulationssupplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 68 or any amendment theretoor revision thereof."The term "IHost fruits and vegetables" embraces: Fruits, vegetables, andgarden and orchard products of all kinds susceptible to infestation by theMediterranean fruit fly, namely, (1) all wild and cultivated fruits, exceptwatermelons, pineapples, strawberries, coconuts and other nuts; (2) the follow-ing kinds of vegetables: Peppers of all kinds, tomatoes, Lima and broad (fava)beans, and eggplants; together with any other fruits or vegetables or otherplant products which later may be determined as susceptible and of which duenotice will be given.F. A. TILTON,Third Assistant Postm aster Gen eral.FRUIT FLY TO BE STUDIED IN MEDITERRANEAN BASIN(Press notice)AuGuST 26, 1929.The Department of Agriculture announces that a survey of the fruit-flysituation in the countries bordering the Mediterranean is to be undertakenimmediately. H. J. Quayle, Professor of Entomology, University of California,and Entoniologist of the Citrus Experiment Station at Riverside, has beenselected for this work.Mr. Quayle was recently drafted by the Secretary of Agriculture to be oneof a special committee to make a study of the fruit-fly situation in Florida.He is especially equipped for this new detail on account of personal studieswhich lie has made of the Mediterranean fruit-fly in different parts of theworld, mcinuding a rather extended study in the Mediterranean region somesixteen years 1go for this department, the results of which were published ina Department Bulletin of the Bureau of Entomology.The present survey is made possible through the cooperation of AllisonV. A rmour, of New York, a wealthy patron of science and a collaborator ofthe department, who has for several years been giving substantial aid tovarioUs research projects, for the department and otherwise, by makingavailable a vessel which he has had especially equipped for biological or other

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19291 S ETIICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 153scientific and technical survey work. Mr. Armour, in making this proposalto C. L. Marlatt. Chief of the Plant Quarantine and Control Athninistration,stated that he wished to make this his contribution to the fruity rIoa lication campaign.It was at once recognized that a boat so equippIed fool'i lU siudly onboard, of collected material, and affording meais for prom 't nio\-eint frontplace to place, was an exceptional opportUnfity to get very ih neede infor-mation in a relatively short time. Mr. Quayle w.s promptly iotiliel andaccepted Mr. Armour's offer without hesitation. Ile has b eeIn appointed anagent of the department and the expedition will be es-eintially under thedirection of the department and for its benefit. The cost of the expedition.with the exception of the salary of the research agent, will be defrayed byMr. Armour in so far as the facilities of his boat can be utilized. To enablethe acceptance by 'Mr. Quayle of this offer, his approaehin -sbhatical yearhas been advanced some months by the authorities of the liiversay f (ali-fornia. MNr. Armour will accompany MNr. Quayle and particiaize in the workin every way possible. It is his intention to sehelule all lnooeients in theinterest of the research object. This exploration, together with others ofsimilar nature which 'Mr. Armour has hitherto facilitated, s(ts a must prl ise-worthy example of the diverting of a natural interest anil means of gratifyingit to useful research objects. The Utowana, Mr. Armour's especially equippedresearch vessel, left its home port, New London, Conn., Saturday, August 24,for Bermuda.The program includes a brief study of the fruit-fly situation in the BermudaIslands and continued at the Azores, with the main work, however. beginilingwith the important citrus area on the Mlediterranean coast of Spain enterinmrat Valencia. Other MIediterranean countries will bei ;tken ip) in successionwith stops at important points as long as may be nece'ISry to cre tle-desired inforination. It is expected that this stage of thc0 work will occupymost of the balance of this year. During the winter months it is probable tlhtMr. Quayle will be authorized to carry his studies to South Afri<:a to coverfruit-fly economics and behavior in that section during, the fruit-ha rest ingmonths of January, February, and March. The program will e, mcmltide wit h areturn to the Mediterranean section in April to complete during the spring antearly summer months the seasonal recond of the Ily in thin -eerz1aI re-ion.As a result of this work it is expected that infor tiuio wil he ob;t1 inedas to the behavior of this insect under hie climiatic ailotir t ei' c t .(m lill,",factors obtaining in such countries, and also that accurate iiim'>r atiu will besecured as to the crop losses occasioned by this post miiid t!) t-', :'.,:Ils ofdefense which are being employed to lessen such losses.MOVEMENT, PRIOR TO OCTOBER 1, OF CITRUS FRUIT FROM FLORIDA AUTIIORIZEIJ(Press notice)The Secretuiry of .Ariculttire to-day allell(ed lie regt"tiin i 'uir mel'the Mediterranean fruil-fy tflr:irIlllile, Iut ho'riZin2 Ilie iitem'"ute m1\eI:e:prior to Ootober 1. of ilarketlle cilrns fruit prodmuced w\ ithIinl ;1 rai&narea n1d(1 also aUtlhml1iZi822 tilmt (itri'is l'ilit \Ni-h1i tli ;l11ea Il y ill liel ofdestructioii, remain on tle tIroes to reali a mar iel8hleN -a' ( "f meNS,Coldit ioned on tile deterninitiol b11y (fe inlmemr 'P 1he Abie riikof infiestatiom. li inikiiiL this 11ooucemeiI, 1he Seea t 4ed 11118 thOshipmeilnt of any portiolt of 111e conlimierei'l citiU5 eIP , act \ ialet cVdistrict, promptly oni still ii reuling : stuge 01 mat IiiI rwrml In m a -whMi m't(1 111 m5il( ay, ill tile abselnlch (1f oc; l k if infest: 1tm .] N w 'i t K hthe ormdication objects oF the rgltosTh'le secretary * 1willed owt thlat ilh( '1m1olwhnollt aflecltl()11 l i, fq ordik'Iiilareia. UllNdr the( terms of thte nw\ltos hs risorvrbe r dticold oiulsiide of ihe (iradic'Itionl '1r-c: mliy, siub)ject to Ilio e ie l sisstlIi(m e ofI t ml t *n shitfl in d1s4 ifli tiii, he utmm edI !r mt ii I1 e\The regulation, however, provide 11:at ithie lu r esti a i Alt '111 i t-ml1r'ciu l citrtuis plntinlugs m)iitside m Ile erIu lie ti n art: hhu N I! Iplet uprior to April 1.5119514O -4

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156 PLANT Q-UARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION > [July-S'Pt.,A0NNN'N'Xuq -:Z-m NN S-kN'Up cL --*K~4 7

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t .j r r11LL., M N AU TIo S o 20 30 40 50 E-E -I ARIAI--L E ) LA'--tG-HOLPIES! jACKS NA A 4 tTGv U H-_4-'TAI0600ICI63xxt xx IX U N XXV n XXVI AvIi XXI xx x XX XI XXX6561The entire State of Florida Is under regulation to prevent the spread of the Mediterranean fruit fly. The shaded portion represents the eradication area in which much more intensive control measures are enforced

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158 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [July-Sept.,ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS-SHIPMENT OF FLORIDA CITRUS FRUIT PRIORTO OCTOBER--MODIFICATION OF REGULATION 3, SECTION A (1), MEDITERRANEAN FRUIT-FLYQUARANTINE(Approved August 30, 1929; effective September 1, 1929)PQCA-243In as much as the shipment of any portion of the commercial citrus crop,as to any variety or district, promptly on its reaching a stage of maturitypermitting such movement may, in the absence of local risk of infestation, beconsistent with the eradication object of the regulations, inspectors, in lieuof the removal and destruction prior to October 1, of early ripening fruit,indicated in the regulations, are hereby authorized (1) to allow such fruitto remain on the trees to reach a marketable stage of ripeness in any citrusorchard in the eradication area, and (2) to issue permits for the shipmentof such fruit prior to October 1, in compliance otherwise with the requirementsof the Mediterranean fruit-fly regulations, when in their judgment such fruit,during the period involved, will be under no risk of infestation.Except as provided above the requirement of-regulation 3, section A (1), shallremain in full force and effect.C. L. MARLATT,Chief, Plant Quarantine and Control Administration.Approved:C. F. MARVIN,Acting Secretary of Agriculture.ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS-DIVERSION OF FLORIDA PRODUCTS ATSOUTHERN POINTSINTERPRETATION OF REGULATION, 3, SECTION A (5), QUARANTINE No. (38(Approved September 7, 1929; effective September 7, 1929)PQCA-244Except as to unsterilized fruit produced in eradication areas, the destinationlimitations for car-lot shipments prescribed for Florida host fruits and vege-tables in the Mediterranean fruit-fly quarantine regulations will be inter-preted to allow the movement under the conditions prescribed in the regula-tions and to areas therein designated of such articles from Florida via theusual diversion points in the States of Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi, NorthCarolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee for immediate diversion at suchpoints to any point in the destination areas authorized in the quarantine regu-lations: Provided, That the waybills of all cars consigned to diversion pointsiii the States named shall bear a notation reading as follows: " This car mustbe diverted to destinations in States north of and including Virginia, Ken-tucky, Missouri, Kansas, and Colorado."C. L. MARLATT,Chief, Plant Quarantine and Control Administration.Approved:R. W. DUNLAP,Acting Secretary of Agriculture.ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS-MODIFICATION OF ERADICATION A1fEA DESIGNATED IN MEDITERRANEAN FRUIT-FLY QUARANTINE REGULATIONS(Approved September 16, 1929; effective September 17, 1929)IPQCA-245Pending later amendment of the Mediterranean fruit fly quarantine regula-tiolis, the eradicationi area designlated ill section 2 of regulation 2, supple-mental to Notice of Quarantine 68 (revised) is modified as to the southernboundary so as to release from the eradication area the southern tier oftownships in Brevard and Osceola Counties, the two southern tiers of town-

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1929] SEi:VICE AND IEGULATOI, ANNiUNCEMENYz 139ships in Polk Couity, and that part siuth a1 west of the Little .*,n',eRiver of the two townshilps in the southwest corner of Hillhbrough C'unty.The amended section reads as follows :(2) The following counties and parts thereof in the State of Floridaare, until further notice, dlesignated as er'i icntiufn area-:The entire counties of Citrus, lag', Heriiandlo, Lzke, MAli, ruige,Pasco. Pinieltlas, Put na. Seiini ole. Sumter, and VIlui ; that part (fA lachua countyy lying east of tile enst hi idry of ra!ge twenty (21)east, and that part of said county lying south of the south oiundary oftownilp ten (10) south; tlt part 1f 1 radford County yin'gs sit ofthe south bouni'ry of township seven ( south : that part of wvardCounty ly1i 1orti of the north ioundar' f township thi tv )uth;that part of Clay Cf'ounty iving eavt if th .e east bouniidar, 4 rae twenty-four (24) east, and that part of sa ii c-iuntv ying ioth of the souvlhboundary of towiishiip seven (7) south h:at part of 1Uval >iunty Iyingsouth of the soitli lioundary of towi-'lIdp two (2) soUth ini hvtween theeast Lound:ries of rangIes tweity-fur ,'24) eztt nd twenty-eight ('')east respectively ; all of Hillsiborough CXuny except that part of nuigeseighteen (1) anl llineteel (1) east lyi g saUth1 and wt f4 the LitIleManatee River in tile suutihwetern -orti n of sai i oun : that lart ufLevy County Iying east of tile est t iouni'arv ii ron.e .xt ll -:stexcept that Part lyig siuthi of t-he -uth liiuIair Vf It onhi i reen(14) south ; that pIIrt )f ()sceoia countyy 1ying 1or ti IIf the n I 1 a)m yof townlsIip thirty (80 southl: that part of Polk Cioillty yig! lir:htile iorith boundi ary (if towNlship thirty-onie (01 ) South except h l-j:t partlying east uf the east )unItlary of ra'ge twelay-nile (2l ) east anl allof' St. John's C(outy except tovnlhiip three (8 s01h. rn1iang twenty-11nile(29) east, and township four (4) south, range twenty-nine i2. east,C. L. i\Aia.Chicf, Plant Qurantiue an Conitrol -d1(i in'!u'trfio!.AppiJ1ooved:R. W. DUNLAP,Actbig Scercary of A1ricutiture.STERILIZATION BY COOLING AUTHORIZED FOR FLORIDA FRUIT(P1ress notice)The Secretary of Agriculture s niucei Ill r ,1,1' therfor sterilization by refrigeration of SitrlS I.itl muin inFlorida. This enlariemienit, effective September' 2t, 1'il't> n an)0l'tZlgsuchi st(erilizationi to be carried out nlot onlly ill Florida zis Lithert but*1under adequate safegutards in Northeri Stntes to hi hii stwh flinit mt ulti-mately m ove fIr coin-tium ption ise.st 'riliz'ation either lI lientinu o)1. cilinz is i'reqiiit i i ot' citrul1s IruIt ill(oviigfromti cer'tainl areas in Floridall an also i i1 the b:i-' ilr l'.h i l m klt tar-tolry for fruit llvinifrm lnher ar'i. Thj. tw ojpjite methrds othe' n nil-ization, oih r byN h(win Ir Y cmdlng, l1:lV( \-1td fom ivsiato sen(ltled by the United Stltes Dupamtniut ()f Aat'r'ult ille lin c-itiewtii with tileM dtra an fruiit 1 y erl.dicati(In el ,i rt.This work hIs sli wi ( 1 ) a t mjllerture i. 20 F. fI ' l(W. oilby hddimil for ahiout 5 J.day s :1t 2,W, (w ('2) tiha t a tepiritiur (0 110 1(r Shours, are fatal to the i' or lr\va of th1 e 1iloiliterm'nt,'w 1rit Boil ithem 1a$ximl m 11111 mi inuj i liltiperatiirv rI'l fI irrid to " l he oblx yi mowi'lei* -to (I of tile ex tins t e practi ies ill the i , ofll 'in Iitr ie rilit iet o1, rofri-eration h amve 'iNw bail udlctedi l a l llicientlyl I.rx s il-to dem11onstratte tlit Che reqtlired lo~w k-l! .r; ture (",Il ''0 -AV01 NNill u .L1jur1Yto tile fruit anld that thli" 1110h1is 10(ecily pr cia le. Th* (,xpw i-mntal"l tests withl 1wat. whilf, il-lic'tinlg the ( roabl vlllabliy fhimethod)(, hlave nlot yet bcten c('Idulc d (.1 a sul.1tik ie u rg ,-w ll to 1,111y ,v-ollStIrate columerci11 pnacticability l lii it is 1hiil d t l ni, in 'he \ o 11c:1t ttlsterilization by this metilm calt receive the uli Imlortciaiut f th u art-m1enl t.Tile fol hoi n .Ilim e th o a stcril111 i citr l's ir li i e i iCoodlng 1until the( zippr()xinuite , ''lter df1 -h ifrtit reawlws I iep r t r f28 F. anIId IhIo I(Ii IIg thIIe frIu Ii t a It thIIIt, ,1 mp tIIIIr e fi ve hour th1 w I hS11

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160 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [July-Sept.,temperature of the fruit not higher than 300 and holding until a total periodof five days has elapsed from the time the temperature of the approximatecenter of the fruit reached 280.To make it possible to take immediate or early advantage of the widermovement authorized under such treatment pending the development of ade-quate facilities within the eradication area and other parts of the State, suchtreatment is now authorized either in Florida, or, in designated cold storagesapproved by the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration in the Districtof Columbia or the States of Kentucky, Missouri, Ohio, Illinois, Massachusetts,New York, Pennsylvania. and such other Northern States as may later be approved. Fruit to be treated at localities outside of Florida must be graded,packed in standard commercial containers, and shipped under special permitsissued by the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration. Such permitswill authorize movement only under ice in refrigerated cars and to designatedcold storages.It should be understood that sterilization is not being considered as a meansof authorizing movement of infested fruit. All infested fruit will be promptlydestroyed. The requirement of sterilization therefore applies to areas believedto be entirely free from the pest with the object of eliminating any residual ofrisk, even after intensive inspection.ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS-STERILIZATION OF CITRUS FRUITS UNDERMEDITERRANEAN FRUIT-FLY REGULATIONS(Approved September 19, 1929 ; effective September 20, 1929)PQCA-246Notice of the revision of the Mediterranean fruit-fly quarantine, No. 68, ef-fective September 1, 1929, requires in paragraph (5) of regulation 3, the sterili-zation of host fruits and vegetables produced within an infested State. Itshould be understood that sterilization is not being considered as a means ofauthorizing movement of infested fruit. All infested fruit will be promptly de-stroyed. The requirement of sterilization therefore applies to areas believed tobe entirely free from the pest with the object of eliminating any residual ofrisk, even after intensive inspection. In issuing the revised regulations, it wasrealized that the general adoption of sterilization would involve time for thefull commercial application of methods and for necessary adjustments. Pendingsuch determinations and adjustments, provision has been made in the regula-tions for movement under certain destination limitations. The tests and demon-strations necessary to place sterilization on a sound commercial basis have beenand are being pushed to the utmost and have reached such a stage of progressas to make it possible to issue an order authorizing at least one type of steriliza-tion, namely, by refrigeration. The purpose of this circular is to give suchauthorization and the necessary information relative to such refrigeration.The probable availability of two methods of sterilization of fruits and vege-tables had been worked out as a result of investigations conducted by the de-partment between May and August. Thls work has shown (1) that a tempera-ture of 280 F. for 5 hours followed by holding for about 5 days at 300, or (2)that a temperature of 1100 for 8 hours, are fatal to the eggs or larve of theMediterranean fruit fly. Both the maximum and minimum temperatures re-ferred to can be obtained by modification of the existing practices in the han-dling of citrus fruits.Tests on refrigeration have now been conducted on a sufflently large scaleto demonstrate that the required low temperature can be given without injuryto 1le fruit and that this method is commercially practicable. The experi-mental tests with heat, while indicating the probable availability of this method,have not yet been conducted on a sufficiently large scale to fully demonstrateconiti-iail practicability but it is hoped that in the very near future steriliza-tion by this method can receive the full endorsement of the department.The following method of sterilizing citrus fruit is authorized:Cooling until the approximate center of the fruit reaches a temperature of280 F. anid holding2 Ihe fruit at that temperature 5 hours ; then raising thetemperature of the fr lit not higher than 300 and holding until a total period of5 days is elaipsed from the time the temperature of the approximate centerof lie fruit reached 280.

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1929] SERVICE AND PEGULATOIY ANNOUNCEMENTS 161To make it possible to take immediate or early advantage of the wider move-ment authorized under such treatment pending the development of adequatefacilities within the eradication area and other parts of the State, such treat-ment is now authorized either in Floridat. or. in designiated cold storage ap-proved by the Plant Quarantine and Control Adininistration in the District ofColum1bia or tle States (it Kefitucky. oli uri, Ohlio, Ilhliinis, M\lassachllsetts,New York, Pennsylvania, and such other Northern States as may later be ap-proved. Fruit to be treated at localities outside of Florida must be graded, packed in standard commercial containers and shipped under special permitsissued by the Plant Q(uaraiitiie and ('oitrol Admninisiration. Such perniit> willauthorize movement only under ice in retrierated cars and to designated coldstorages.To provide necessary safegniards for movement to and handling at approvedcold storages, those concelrns desiliia ted to sterilize fruit at point s out i lde theinfested state will. prior to such designation, be requi re(i to file an iiatinaid coinplete a N *Itt1 Igreenient with tlie 1'la nt Quarantine anid Coutrol Ad-ministration. The adlninistration will 8j)prov(' ouily tli(he plauits whiichi areadequately e(ilipped to handle and sterilize tle Iriuit and will miainiiainl at designated points outside of 11 State (f Flori(la the samie suiervi'. iin vhichwill be given to stili stores withiin the said State.No fruit which has been sent it) designated storage for sterilization will bepermit ted to leave such cold stI(lrn'es except unlder permit issued by the e'.ie4trdetailed to the plaint coneerid and the isairce of such permit "' will re f odit'oned upon the sterilization of tlie fruit to the satisfiaction of Ole inspectorin manner w(d method authorized above.Railroa(1s are authorized to move fruit. under permits for such movement,issued to the shipper, from any part of an infested State to desigiiated coldstorages under the usual storaue-in-transit provisions of the railroad I arift's, butshall riot transport such fruit from the sa id plants until a permit has been is-sued as provided in the foregoing paragraphs.C. L. ILuAwj.xr.C(ief, Ptait Qfu rantine and Control Adminis tration.Approved:I. W. DUNLAP.Acting SeCreta/ry of Agriculture.INFORMATION RE STERILIZATION OUTSIDE OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA OF CITRUSFRUITS UNDER MEDITERRANEAN FRUIT-FLY REGULATIONSSEi'iTExiiE.] 27. 1 29.Ill al ift1 rI4: l nfrW n i 84 te1 Vbyl I v Fr k AI 1 ci I , (Wll C .1 kl y,.l 14 .l HlL n I .T. 14 4t'iico, 1 ah4 '( ' 1t ' i1 1 a1 W .M ..c rktAlquiestiojj,, perttiniii 1() ()1'l o slcriliz:Itiffn of citrul f is ill n si, aproTih ed bYii'.* i nl 't Ile itnstr-1u tioi s e ti hlh. PSterliz A tio2 I ('iic I l-u itswhic dis to I .''I.1 Th '*I Al i 14 Irc en e*I byc >8'. '.h >1 r iree I a 41 ni Li' V4 t i ,'brstorlale do th f itkIwill 1d '-'. 1114' e it'! .h' 1Ig I' '41 i V i 1l 14 114'-ctorage .tTh folit 8 ii f Iat '.111 >14 4rj b xx ir1 a ra -41 )Illa b i t di L. A.Hlawkins ()I thw Bilreau 1f il'h P1,111rT hel( inlst rullc ill] L for'11 t hei st rilizll to i ll* o fru .I)CA \ '11. e u r th r iwif b is to ie s ' cxv hat l Ill t1 i 1w sH il4 lw b Un11 i ih -rper;atu're off 1 th i il it will, t 1 '.141'! .t, 4' r w ile t illr t-) colst 54.'4igC ls, pl-i'ilt' Ii r 1 4l rili i .I ti 11 prtb'bli/ o t t i Illp1e ()I,At thie be,,ininii of* the seinho a r, is p sI bhlw-',e ie p nu rof tho fru'lit 111,y be 111w1th gh rb t (ui II tilt wxilttr mo th t e nperatureo will 1ndob)IteiflY heo * vbl l l tha tile -vrg iven hmIt see s p ob b.e t eefm , 11Wt in th st ilizaltion 1 f i t h e 1,1il it l 11 li

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162 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [July-Sept.,necessary, in calculating the average amount of refrigeration required, to pro-vide for lowering the temperature at least 220. There are 360 boxes of fruitto a car and each box weighs about 90 pounds. The specific heat of citrusfruit is usually considered to be 0.9.Fruit should be moved directly from the car to the rooms in which it is tobe sterilized. I In order to get the most rapid cooling, fruit should be stackedin the room so as to allow good air circulation between the boxes. Whileno careful experimentation has been carried on, in the tests which have beenrun it has been possible to reach the required temperature when the boxes were stacked on the side in solid rows with air passages of 4 to 6 inches between therows and with dunnage between the boxes. In some of these tests the fruithas been stacked four or five crates high and when overhead coils were used about as good results were obtained as when the fruit was in smaller stacks.Under some conditions-for example, where there is a rapid movement of airacross the room-it might be well to stack boxes on end with air spaces betweenthe stacks, thus permitting the air to penetrate into the pile.With experimental lots, fruits stacked four high on the side with air spaces between each stack has been cooled down to a temperature of 2S* F. in about48 hours. These were small lots, however, containing in most cases not morethan 20 to 40 boxes.The treatment required in administrative instructions on sterilization pro-vides that the fruit shall be cooled until the approximate center reaches 28' F.and that the fruit shall be held at that temperature for five hours. It providesfor the raising of the temperature not higher than 300 and holding until atotal period of five days has elapsed from the time the temperature of theapproximate center of the fruit reaches 280. It is expected that during steri-lization the change in the temperature of the fruit will be gradual. An abruptchange between 280 and 300 is not required.The instructions on sterilization provide that it will be done under the super-vision of representatives of the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration.These inspectors should at all times be given access to fruit while in processof sterilization. They will supervise the movement of the fruit from the carto and from the sterilizing rooms. Following the satisfactory completion ofsterilization in the manner prescribed in the administrative instructions, in-spectors will issue permits which will authorize the further movement of thefruit and its distribution for sale.Shipments of fruit for sterilization. either at receiving points or at designatedcold storages where the storage-in-transit provisions apply, will begin movingvery shortly. Some of the fruit which can be distributed only after steriliza-tion is now mature and it is probable that fruit requiring sterilization will bemoved in considerable volume by the second or third week in October. If fruitis sterilized by the cold storage method only, there will be approximately15,000 cars of fruit requiring sterilization which, with the present facilities,can not be handled in the State of Florida. To comply with the presentrequirements of the Federal quarantine, all citrus fruit produced in any partof tie State must be removed from the trees by Aril 1. 1930. Under theregulations the entire crop will have to be handled in a period of approximatelyfive and one-half months. Because of the necessity of removing the fruit priorto April 1. there will undoubtedly be considerable storage of fruit at the endof the season in order to meet spring and summer trade which has heretoforeusually been suIpplied by fruit direct fromi the trees.Wden storages have been desig1ated, it seems reasoniably certain that thepro(lcers will make arranlgem1ients to liandle by sterilization a regular volumeof frui it through certa in desigited pllants. This, however, is a matter forneg itia Iion betVeln the sh ippers and the cold storages.Experimiten ral lots of fruit, ammounting to 5 or G ca rloods in all are undertreatment at the present time, part in Florida and l)art in northern mar-Lets-New York and Washington. As soon as the tests have been completedanid dleinite results obtaineld on the t ime necessary to reach the required mini-mum temhpoerIa ture and complete the treatment, such information will be made available. The subsequent sateient will also include information as to theeffect of the treatment on the fruit.C. L. MARLATT,Chief, Plant Quaranitinc mnd Con trol Administration.

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164 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [July-Sept.,TABLE 2.-Citrus CCsUS of the lower Rio Grande Valley of Texa-s as.of July 1,1929, by districtsNumber of growing citrus trees of age statedDistrict and fruit 21 0 1 2 3 4 5 TotalMission:Grapefruit------------259, 794 1 164, 714 59, 510 52, 823 32, 354 95, 261 634,456Oranges_-------------80, 873 36, 115 28, 472 25, 581 17, 072 28, 454 216, 567Other citrus ----------5, 595 2,107 1,399 1,685 1,724 10,371 22,881Total.--------.-------346, 262 172, 936 89, 381 80, 089 51, 150 134, 086 873, 904McAllen:Grapefruit------------89, 500 48, 992 29, 441 13, 879 8, 418 19, 725 209, 955Oranges--------------31, 574 17, 924 10, 479 10, 632 6, 734 10,795 88, 138Other citrus.----------1,021 22 131 210 248 473 2,105Total---------------122,095 66,938 40,051 24,721 15,400 30,993 300,198Pharr-Edinburg: Grapefruit----------152, 457 256, 750 117, 917 45,356 Z0,913 41,974 645,367Oranges-----------43,333 74,816 39,918 22,445 16,471 13,046 210,029Other citrus---------1,014 948 453 577 721 797 4,510Total ---------------196,804 332,514 158,288 68,378 48,105 55,817 859,906Donna:Grapefruit-_ --172, 306 84, 462 54, 938 43, 208 40, 466 30, 554 425, 934Oranges -----------49, 920 22, 763 15, 374 16, 558 15, 922 8, 893 129, 430Other citrus.--.------1,557 932 426 833 837 620 5,205223, 783 108, 157 70, 738 60, 599 57,225 40,06,Total 57,--225-40,-067 560, 569Weslaco:Grapefruit --.-.--.1 158,411 91, 857 16, 481 12, 195 12, 049 47, 307 338, 300Oranges -----------34, 682 24, 876 7, 693 6, 861 7, 992 18, 990 101,094Other citrus ------------576 737 581 1,399 831 2,411 6,535Total---------------193, 669 117, 470 24, 755 1 20,455 20, 872 68, 708 445,929Mercedes:Grapefruit-_ ---44, 533 30, 113 26, 602 14, 352 12, 163 37, 363 165, 126Oranges---------------.13, 092 7,521 8, 157 8,732 8,380 14, 790 60, 672Other citrus -----------533 5o8 308 568 1,223 2, 239 5,409Total ---------.--58, 158 38, 172 35, 067 23, 652 21, 766 54, 392 231, 207La Feria:Grapefruit------------91, 590 45, 139 37, 187 44, 613 52, 007 67, 477 338, 013Oranges--------------25, 952 20, 296 17, 196 27, 129 37,883 41,520 169,976Other citrus----------323 370 523 139 1, 447 2, 535 5, 337Total.---------------117,865 65,805 54,906 71,881 91,337 111,532 513,326Raymondville:Grapefruit_ 14, 809 15, 737 4, 190 4, 244 1,680 2, 807 43, 467Oranges ---_ ------7,551 7,701 1,707 2, 871 980 2, 136 22, 946Other citrus ---------------189 534 136 363 292 1,228 2,742Total ----------------22, 549 23, 972 6,033 7,478 2,952 6, 171 69, 155Harlingen:Grapefruit-----------138, 382 57, 416 58, 358 36, 049 26, 514 51, 298 368, 017Oranges -----------37,226 16,302 20,849 18, 625 14,332 30,315 137,649Other citrus.----------586 344 534 402 998 2,878 5,742Total ---------____ 1 176, 194 74, 062 79, 741 55, 076 41, 844 84, 491 511, 408San Benito:Grapefruit--.---------155, 775 96, 320 37, 386 17, 287 14, 083 47, 597 368, 448Otnges --------------32, 068 39, 285 22, 162 10, 942 8, 318 15, 525 128, 300M ier citrus _ 1,222 1 752 418 568 886 2,700 6,546To1a ------------189, 065 136, 357 59, 966 28, 797 23, 287 65, 822 503, 294Br ow n sv i lIe:G r -a-pe-fruit--41, 546 54, 834 16, 222 13, 078 14, 015 45, 971 185, 6660ran ges --------------10, 965 12, 699 9,093 7,058 4, 718 11,280 55, 813Other citris-----------869 354 808 2,179 1,373 3,023 8,606Total --------------53,380 67,887 26, 123 22, 315 20, 106 60, 274 250, 085Tot ii, all d istricts:i rapefruit -------1, 319, 103 916, :134 458, 232 297, 084 214, 662 487, 334 3, 722, 749Oranges ---------367, 236 280, 298 181, 100 157, 434 138, 802 195, 744 1, 320, 614O t her i t rus ---. 13, 185 7, 638 5, 717 8, 923 10, 580 29, 275 75, 618Gran( I fetal 1, 699, 821 1, 204, 270 1 645, 049 463,441 394, 044 712, 353 5, 118, 981

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166 PLANT QUJArANTINE AND CONTrOL ADMINISTRATION [July-Sept.,Bureau of Plant Industry has grown mahaleb seedlings each year for sevenyears in the vicinity of the District of Columbia that have compared favorablyeach year with imported stocks from commercial sources, in size and in the-growth obtained after transplanting. Similar results have been secured atthe Shafter, Calif., experiment station.Most of the domestic mahaleb seedlings are grown from imported seed whichhas often failed to germinate well. This hazard can be reduced by better careof the seed during the interval between collection and planting, but perhaps the most effective way is that adopted by a few western growers who haveplanted orchards for seed. These seed bearing trees are now producing com-mercial quantities and the amount may be expected to increase during the nextfew years. Growers estimate that by 1930 the crop should be 2,000 poundsof seed which should produce 2,500,000 seedlings. These growers estimate thatby the use of imported seed to supplement their own, that production couldbe increased to 7,000,000, provided they were assured of a demand. (Thisprospect for increased production is presented to indicate the growers' view-point, rather than as an estimate by the Bureau of Plant Industry.)The performance of domestic mahaleb in the hands of nurserymen in differ-ent parts of the country has been variable. Reports of both good and poorresults have been received from different sections each year. West of theRocky Mountains a general preference exists for western-grown seedlings. In other sections where cherry is propagated in large quantities on mahalebstocks the experience generally has not been so favorable.An objection to domestic mahaleb seedlings which has been heard more oftenin the Eastern and Central States than in the West, is the uncertainty ofobtaining good stands when the seedlings are transplanted in the nursery forbudding. Losses in transplanting have been larger some years than others.For example, from the northwestern crop of 1926 reports of poor stands camefrom many nurserymen after transplanting in the spring of 1927. This cropwas probably injured by an exceptionally severe freeze in the early fall andthe damage to the seedlings could not be detected until after they had beenshipped to customers. On the other hand all the reports so far received thisspring from the 1928 crop indicate satisfactory stands. Besides unseasonablefreezes, losses may be traced to digging too early in the fall and improperstorage conditions. More study is needed on this phase in order to bring theperformance of mahaleb to the desired measure of dependability.A second objection to domestic mahaleb arises from the low branching typeof growth which some lots have shown. This defect makes extra labor forpruning and some trouble in setting the buds properly, but such stocks canusually be budded successfully. In the past two seasons, the sample lots ofstocks received at the bureau's experiment nurseries have shown a smallerproportion of low branching seedlings than formerly. This defect is often found where a poor stand in the seed rows allows the individual plants roomfor low lateral growth and is usually less in evidence where the stand isnormal.Myrobalan is the principal stock used for plums in this country and the-only one imported in large quantity, although several thousand St. Julian(Prunus insititia) are brought in each year. A considerable proportion of the total supply has been grown in this country for several years. Importa-tions of the 1928 crop amounted to 916,700. The domestic crop for that yearwas estimated at 1,2G8,000. These seedlings were grown in the followingStates: Oregon, 425.000; California, 550,000; and Washington, 293,000; a totalof 1,268,000. Probably smaller quantities were grown in other sections notreported.Myrohalan seed germinates well and the seedlings are easily grown. Agood supply of seed is available in certain sections of California, which isbeing ut iilized, although some myrobalan seed is imported.The produIc(tion of mflyrobalan seedlings could be increased readily to meetall lleeds. Little loss in transplanting is experienced and the domestic seed-lings have usually proved satisfactory under ordinary methods of handling.Some lots have proved objectionable due to low braiching but this defect can,e avoided by prol)er culture in the seedling nursery. As in the case ofmahnaileb, low branching is often the result of a thin stand in the seedling rows.St. .Juilian, whichl is highly regarded as a plum stock by some growers, hasmostly beeii imlported but it could be propagated without difficulty in thelocalities where other seedling stocks are grown.

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168 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [July-Sept.,MODIFICATION OF NURSERY STOCK, PLANT, AND SEED QUARANTINEREGULATIONSAMENDMENT No. 1 OF REVISED RULES AND REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL TONOTICE OF QUARANTINE No. 37(Effective on and after August 1, 1929)Under authority conferred by the plant quarantine act of August 20, 1912 (37Stat. 315), as amended by the act of Congress approved March 4, 1917 (39 Stat.1134, 1165), it is ordered that regulation No. 3 of the revised rules and regula-tions supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 37 governing the importation ofnursery stock, plants, and seeds into the United States, which became effectiveNovember 1, 1928, be, and the same is hereby, amended to read as follows:REGULATION 3.-NURSERY STOCK AND OTHER PLANTS AND SEEDS FOR WHICH PERMITIS REQUIREDThe following nursery stock and other plants and seeds, not including, how-ever, those named in Appendix A, which are governed by special quarantinesand other restrictive orders now in force, nor such as may hereafter be made thesubject of special quarantines, may be imported from countries which maintaininspection (see Appendix B), under permit upon compliance with these regula-tions:(1) Bulbs of the following genera: Lilium (lily), Convallaria (lily of thevalley), Hyacinthus (hyacinth), Tulipa (tulip), and Crocus; and, until furthernotice, Chionodoxa (glory-of-the-snow), Galanthus (snowdrop), Scilla (squill),Fritillaria imperialis (crown imperial), Fritillaria meleagris (guinea-hen-flower), Muscari (grape hyacinth), Ixia, and Eranthis (winter aconite).(2) Stocks, cuttings, scions, and buds of fruits for propagation; except thatstocks of apple, pear, quice, and mazzard cherry may not be imported underpermit or otherwise after June 30, 1930; other fruit stocks, including mahalebcherry and myrobalan plum, may not be imported under permit or otherwiseafter June 30, 1931. (3) Rose stocks for propagation, including Manetti, Multiflora, Brier Rose,and Rosa rugosa.(4) Nuts, including palm seeds for propagation.(5) Seeds of fruit, forest, ornamental, and shade trees, seeds of deciduousand evergreen ornamental shrubs, and seeds of hardy perennial plants; exceptthat mango seeds may not be imported under permit or otherwise.Importations of nursery stock and other plants and seeds specified in thisregulation, from countries not maintaining inspection, may be made underpermit upon compliance with these regulations in limited quantities for experi-mental purposes only, but this limitation shall not apply to tree seeds.This amendment shall be effective on and after August 1, 1929.Done at the city of Washington this 29th day of July, 1929.Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agri-culture.R. W. DUNLAP,,Acting Secretary of Agriculture.INSTRUCTIONS TO COLLECTORS OF CUSTOMS(T. D. 43527)Plant quarantineAMENDMENT OF REGULATION 3, QUARANTINE 37, BY THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE(See T. D. 42973, Sept. 26, 1928)TREASURY DEPARTMENT,OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONER OF CUSTOMS,Washington, D. C. August 13, 1929.To Collectors of Customs and Others Concerned:The appended copy of amendment No. 1 of the revised rules and regulationssupplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 37, issued by the Secretary of Agri-

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1929] :SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 169culture, is published for the information and guidance of customs officers andothers concerned.F. X. A. EBLE,Commissioner of Customs.[Then follows the text of the amendment.]EXPLANATION OF PROVISIONS FOR ENTRY OF PLANTS UNDER QUARANTINE 37SETEm vL , 1929.PQCA-249(Revision of H1B-105)1'Before taking up the specific subject of this circi r it Si 'ellms deir ble toindicate briefly the necessity for the restrictions under Quai'rantine 17 in theentry of plants.NCELsSITY FOR RESTRICTING THE ENTRY or P_\N-TsImported nursery stock and other plants and seeds have been the source ofthe introduction of some 90 per cent of the insect pests and plant diseases whichhayve come to us from other countries an(l whic h iniw oIt)in ()I sl ,ragriculture and forestry of approximately one billion dollars ainna ll y. Hith-erlo such material has often come with the roots embedd(l li eartl, andpractically always it is promptly taken to tahe field or greenho iise wlwre otlerplants are growing. thus furnishing the best possible condition inl for Ith(' loralestablishment of any insect pests or plant diseases wI l 1ay Ibe c'lrri. bythe plants or in soil about their roots.A practical test over a seven-year period of the pi ssihility if )afegnardigplant imports by inspection and disinfection plainly indicated lie inileiuaeyof this metho(l and the conclusion was forced that the only po0'sible means ifeffectively lesseninltile introuctiOnl of new plant enemies is ti e plicyfexcluision of all plants not absoluifely essential to the a rioenI ltura1 l mii fomre trvHeeds of the United States. Carrying out this policy, Quarantine 87 redtrictsthe entry o'f most nnrzer 'v sti ck and otlher orna ment.als to m'1i 8,0r1osswliich are believed to be necessary to the development of Amer cin Iamricul tutire.Unlimited entry is permitted of certain classes of plants wh icli are 1 hlieveito be most free from the risk of carriage of new pests. such s seeds, certainclasses of bulbs, and cuttings, scions, and buds of fruits: and alzo, a repre-senting what is believed to le a temporary horticultural neee ssi, frit' :inrose stocks. The entry of all other plants is restricted, but, ti) envllIe Alm'ricato keep abreast with the liorticilltlin8 I progress of the wi irld. :m slim '1 rm l l) riciti'iplants which are eitlwr now or unavailable ill the United Svitue 1 m )y h iii-ported for propagatiiin or for any experimeint:l, eZucati-7al ir s'itificpurpose. The compai ratively limited entry necess:iry for s11011 IpIuriosm i; beinvigsafeguarded by a thioro mugihness of inspection nd. if e y, ). ' v reaitnintor holding in uarantine-safeguards vhich are imprictirblde of aIl Ic t imnto linlimited comlIlerci.il or other illiportatiols. The lri'i' fr lii enltyof both the restricted and the unrestricted classes of 'ants Ire mxpiine1 inthis circular.Pnovisioxs VOL THlE EN'1Y oI PLANTs UNDnR Q'1 nil 27Under regulation 2 of the qiiarantilie uirestricted entry is' 1-z-si witli'mitpermit, of field, vegetflble, avid flower seeds, fliid of plant product S inimorted fmmrledicinal, food, or ma i i iring iur) s's.ltegula tion 8 provide ; f'r tile nill lii'mi d ntiitry, (nder perml it :11inl with provi-sioin for inspect ion, anId, it' necessary , disinfection. of seed" (if 1 re" 2n l mIn:I-mental slirlIbs al 1ii hardy Iierelili:1h 1ihaits, certain ()1i'-e i' 1miba1 4m l-tinlgs, scions, and h1ds of fruits: and also. as repr'esetli in what iV 1mliovtmdto be a temporary horticultiural necessity, fruit aid ro-e stock s.Regulation 14 makes prov ismin fw. lie eltry, ulimhelr Sp eminlI m'i i ii 0 'litilodqualitities of ally hi11t not ifiluide&I in r 'egullit im 2 ,7i 1 for the1n nThe only importaInt reis ioni ,s n r r Item ioTit ptin' '-T fr11 .a~ny necessary ('xpie'iim 'itai, m'mjhiaimonat, or scim'ntii ;ll (itpsm , I 171)

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170 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [July-Sept.purpose oi keeping the country supplied with new varieties and necessaryprop2ating stock, or for any necessary experimental, educational. or scientific purpose.Reg-ulation 15 recognizes the intimate trade relations between the UnitedStates and Canada and Mexico and provides, under permit and necessary safe-guard-s, for the importation of certain classes of plants the entry of whichfrom other foreign countries is restricted.The few exceptions to entry of plants thus provided for are those involvedunder specific quarantines, as, for example, the prohibition of entry of Ribesand Grossularia from certain countries, and generally of citrus, bamboo,banana plants, etc. but any of the plants prohibited under such quarantinesmay be imported, under permit and adequate safeguards, by the United StatesDepartment of Agriculture for any necessary experimental, scientific, or intro-duction purpose.PROVISION FOR THE ENTRY UNDER RIEGITLATION 14 OF THE RESTRICTED PLANTSDEFINITIONS OF TERMSAs used in regulation 14, the terms " new varieties," " necessary propagatingstock," and " limited quantities " are defined in regulation 1 under the quaran-tine as follows:New varieties.-A new variety is understood to mean a novelty, i. e., a newplant, variety, strain, type, or form, either recognized by the trade as such orso listed or described in catalogues, trade journals, or other publications, orduly and properly certified as such by the originator or introducer.Necessary propagation stock.-Stock of old or standard varieties not avail-able in this country and imported for the multiplication of the plants inquestion as a nursery or florist enterprise as distinguished from importationsfor the immediate or ultimate sale of the stocks actually imported.Limited quanititics.--As used in regulation 14, " limited quantities " is under-stood to mean such quantities as will supply any reasonable need for theestablishment of commercial reproduction plantings, or as may be necessary forthe experimental, educational, or scientific purpose intended.IMPORTATIONS UNDER REGULATE ) N 14 LiuMITED To DEFINITE PURPoSEsIn furtherance of the object of Quarantine 37-i. e., to limit the number andvolume of importations of plants as the only effective means of excludingnew plant enemies--entry under regulation 14 of the restricted classes ofplants is limited to certain purposes or uses which are believed to be necessaryfor the development of American horticulture. These purposes are (1) to make provision for the propagation in the United States of the plants concerned,and (2) for any necessary experimental, educational, or scientific work.INTRODUCTIONS FOR PROPAGATIONAny new variety of plant or any old or standzird variety not commerciallyavailable in this country may be imported by any person who will agree topropagate and increase the imported stock and thus render a public serviceby making the plants concerned more generally available. Under this agree-ment plants ipliorted will be required to be kept and utilized solely for pro-pagation, and are not sub 'ject to release except when either the natural orartificil ietliod of propagation involves the comlplete merging of the importedstock iito the increase. The conditions governing the release of the increasefrI im sucl p lits are explinied in Circular Il4, a copy of which will beflu nis hed u 14nt re nuest. Prior to sucli release to szile of the increase from theiiport( I slock will be permitted.Thero is no limitation under regulation 14 as to the number of permits fordifferent plants or classes of plants which an individual may request, but priorto the issuance of the permits the varieties applied for will all be passed uponby specialists of the department, for the information of the administration bothis lo 1Ie 11ce(ssity for the particular importation and as to the quantity ade-uflite for the purpose intended. Plants thus imported will be restricted to the youngest anid smallest plants, or to the portions of plants, that can accomplishthe purpose of the importation.

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, ii t: a I * I I. 1' ) 011J O4)I ! 0l1it)A I100)I I I '.I4 I 1 1 1 iS 1. ). 1.1 0 1(11: 1! 1! 1: Ill 114 t.1Ij 11, ItI I I,.' )A I It i~ Ia I 1a Iia I I I: I I4 i s 11)I1ou lt.I ) ip X I I If tow -'II Its til ,. ;lj 1 \\ 1:1 11 : iI(.j >.1tl U L1J\\1i , , F s3 k a 1 4j it\-11 s I 'x (I ' 04j IjI \P 11. 1 :, J A k 1 1 )(4 .1 s M .11.4 l.4 \ 1.1l,~. .It 4 l j440( 1.1 )1 jo l10 TIM )')i lO-).1 ~~1 3 I .)IM j 1: 'A A ~LIIN4j .4 a I .11 Il~ Ill4 )I IM414 ) Il I I4 .11.1 to IF fO.1.4~ ~~~~ .4 [.44 '[ I I~ ')l1I.I I jIT I 21I1l4414. i I.4)1 i I 1111 j IjI I I A\ .I II J i s I .14 .11 j .I UIF 11),.IoIi I II I I~I I4 I I It) 1i )I1 S) I iF I)1 1 % q I I:. I4 Ii I~s4 p I > Iu,Ih I41 4 j \ I: 1. .f 1111 ai I 1.l.) 1 i! I)1)(I 1.,o4' 'Fl' I4 Iui F 1 j1 1111 Fj 1)iII I ) If I IX OI I I U 0 1 A\o I X.1of t p I 1.)Y1 1 't', , \ I A1 *)aL 1il \ 111!I -" Ft I I I I1 4 s IIi .A J.41 1 I I I XI I 4 A.(I l II II0. 111 -I t( 001 0 It I-.I i I I i I1 AK1,04IY4.1I. PIL P 0 1 1 1 4111[ J--II m ll o 1u * 1 Itj4j It .10L 1111111 041 l 4 1' 11 .1 0~ F 0! F I I I IT(),X *\\ 0A\ &-XTAU 01 I 1 )001 1S u110( 1 1 A I) ).I I~ S, >A I 14 111 Il I. II i I11 I ) F I 1osI11.1o41 ju () 1UIS x)tn s 1oI[j 1144 I) 1)111",~ ~ a L j1:1-::1~ IT I3 ) L.tj ' 3-0F.14 *).)A.13 *o! PiI(I F411 14! 111 3l 1i 1 -1 ([NJ ' L\T IVX k1 1': I,\',1 dTIPA I: 1LM I 1110)111 uot1X,) K011. .Thj s.,iI4 r To .Iu l110 1.)IF(43 o I 10 1i )F I pp1, 1 I: J.tP011 1i 1 Ihl -I t L * A *11 iod FI.()a FI 1!)I U)l I [ 1iU IxU I, Io) ' Y P) I : J.U~01 .1 IL l~ Ii~aX 40 1!O 111 104.1 M[ (p ;i)( ITT. I LIS111111 ~ ~ ~ ul 13la.P., 1~1f UUIQB JO 3.IlWII1H 1) 4suj Jo ui}3aI0.)uu.0([F:U'L .~ 111 VI II 1 (L1-)1 .X M I I ) L it, s,0~fi)~3S. 1 '1U71 aULIlIIUIL .I fl 111 o5j va!.TkiS o I L 141II\4(i [ j AFIIUIUI lI oil *otuA ol (P)A 11o)t.13(11sv xl(J11 J0i4111I>! Ti.BtA o l jlla T -To10! O .1ju i 01 oW s51Itfl44 J') 411I-i.1341\) -1371 )1107:t111 I,1:1 l 1 ITTO ,I I S 1 upIs( 4 I >11 I .j. i odll l .1 1) 114!IIfiIm .j I,[ ll iF4U*o*)14A1 .10 l j04 1 .(I )IVI) 3111 311111 -"I ' Iol ff~ (U .101111 OQOIp'h)~4X~) )001 1: T4 1 il1( 14o~~ )a14 11 t101 VlfI 114 0 LA 1 0(l )AI )1 ) 11 11 jl (~ JIL3j) A 4 Isu 1 11-1 11 ( 1 pi IVII' ~ i1Im ) jII I I Is .1 IJ 1,11) 111 1 ~L J 11I,0 11 S1 R -'! ,'I I11l 4t1113371 -~1111-i I )111 01,T -tS 1 )1TIM 1 I I 1101((1 0111iii~ .upod 144!A&1Taq I 5 .1-Nlu. t ~ ~ .0 llm111( jI',)( 41 Ii 535 0 J1 )T[ V 1 .1O) 11i10 343J~ ~sI~v>I1.~j I LIZ UIOU p i >Umi4P4S 4UUh.34X 20 pIjf[31It 5l0)J 1111 sjjI~ud JO o-Sii' q1I7)11 li I ' -LI ]'.X 1 It ji> otI -013(1 t1 *siiiii1iv A43 3 I~F 011o >l!T Iu o.1i1 Td4311 1 > I "V.1 lit I l'Ill 11113 1l i 171 1 1 O XiojtI 14 1T Sa It) I~ ) '!I[(X1 I II T j)1 t~7 j()T j 1l 111>I ' 81.10 OAVI II ;4 I~U I 5AIdl 0I533,1'' 1 1 1 , jlsII j~I I t. III-, U)1111{.lI31 (I~il~I T,) *)IL S 11 I1.B(3l 341q41~~,)TTT d , TU l 1) ': 31 ' -i~1IY ( 111) 111 11 1 i i I ) a1i(djo os114 ~ll{I) I111 *' 1 1 11 p jl ' 1 1 2 tit ait Tli) I '(ti.Im s']III A S.\.1l[3 34 >10.41, 4 Jl1111101 O )11 (1DS;* Tli .' UII I po-1112 IY3IiTlTiMt (Qly 11201S 3 1\13141 S I T0 1JI:13( 1 ii .14.

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172 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [July-Sept.,In the event that the authorized agencies, commercial or other, do not bringin varieties of plants which enthusiastic plant lovers may wish, the depart-ment has made special provision for the entry through its Office of ForeignPlant Introduction for ultimate public distribution of any neglected or over-looked new varieties. It may be noted that through the office mentioned theDepartment of Agriculture has developed a large organization to discover byexploration and to import plants for food, ornamental, or other useful purposesfrom all quarters of the world.SUMMARY OF PROVISIONS FOR ENTRY OF RESTRICTED PLANTSTo recapitulate, the existing provisions for the entry of new or unavailableplants under regulation 14 include (1) importations for propagation; (2) im-portations by botanic gardens, experiment stations, and other public institu-tions; (3) importations by amateurs and others who are recognized as main-taining collections or conducting experiments which have an important publicservice quality; and (4) importations through the Office of Foreign PlantIntroduction of the Department of Agriculture.The provisions indicated in this circular for the entry of restricted plantsare open to anyone for the purposes and under the conditions indicated. Tomeet the needs of persons wanting any of the restricted plants for their owngardens or for the adornment of their own estates-in other words, for purelypersonal use as distinguished from some definite public service-the depart-ment has endeavored, through the means discussed in this circular, to make,under methods which involve the least risk to the horticulture and agricultureof the country, all types of plants, new or old, available from home sources.PROCEDURE FOR MAKING IMPORTATIONS UNDER REGULATION 14Application blank.-The Plant Quarantine and Control Administration willsupply, on request, a form of application for special permit to import nurserystock and other plants and seeds under the provisions of regulation 14. Thisapplication, under " Conditions of Entry," explains the conditions of packing,inspection, and( clearance through the customhouse. It also embodies variousagreements which must be subscribed to by the importer to safeguard theimportation, including the liability agreement which replaces the bond for-merly required. The application must be filled out as to all the informationaldata called for and signed and forwarded to the Plant Quarantine and Con-trol Administration. The applicant should indicate whether the importation isintended (1) for propagation (paragraphs 14-17), or (2) for a public institu-tion (paragraphs 18-20), or (3) for a public-service purpose by an amateuror other (paragraphs 18, 20-24).Perinit and shipping tags.-With the issuance of the permit, the applicantwill be furnished with shipping instructions and shipping tags to be forwardedwith his order to the exporter. With the exception of trans-Pacific shipmentsfor western destinations, such shipping tags will be addressed to the UnitedStates Department of Agriculture, Plant Quarantine and Control Administra-tion, Washington, D. C., but will be indorsed with the permit number and nameof the importer. Trans-Pacific shipments for all western points enteringthrough the port of San Francisco may be given inspection and clearance atthat port in the same manner as at Washington.Delivery 10 admoinitraion.--Material coming to Washington must be turnedover to the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration by the importer orhis autliorize(l agent, and in the specially equipped inspection houses and underexpert care as to the welfare of the plants it will be carefully examined bythe administration's inspectors. If the shipment is found to comply with thecoilitions of entry, and to be free from dangerous insects or diseases, it willbe immediately repacked and forwarded, charges collect, to the importer.Shipments for clearance at San Francisco will be similarly handled by theagents 44 1he administration, Ferry Building, San Francisco.Disin/cctio.-]Disinfection will be autorized for slight infestation, butshould the material be found to be so infected or infested with either diseases orinsects that it can not be adequately disinfected it will either be destroyed or,when desired, permission may be granted for its exportation.Storage and repacking.-So far as possible the administration will undertaketo provide for storage and repacking. Should importers request, however,permit covering the importation of larger quantities of propagating or other

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174 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [July-Sept.,cottonseed which may be contained therein, but that the seed itself is alreadygiven a heat treatment at the gins before it is shipped to the oil mill con-cerned. It is felt, therefore, says the department, that the present action doesnot involve risk of spread of pink-bollworm to points outside the regulatedareas.MODIFICATION OF PINK-BOLLWORM QUARANTINEINTRODUCTORY NOTEThe amendment which follows modifies the pink-bollworm quarantine regu-lations with respect to the conditions under which second-cut linters originatingin the area regulated may be shipped from oil mills. Provision is made forthe issuance of permits for the interstate shipment of second-cut linters passedthrough a new type of roller equipment when the proper safeguards againstcontamination are provided. Regulation 5 (f) has been somewhat recast as toarrangement and wording.C. L. MARLATT,Chief, Plant Quarantine and Control Administration.AMENDMENT No. 4 TO RULES AND REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL To NOTICE OFQUARANTINE No.'52 (REvISED)(Approved September 30, 1929; effective October 1, 1929)Under authority conferred by the plant quarantine act of August 20, 1912(37 Stat. 315), as amended by the act of Congress approved March 4, 1917 (39Stat. 1134, 1165), it is ordered that section (f), regulation 5, of the rules and regulations supplemental to notice of quarantine No. 52 (revised) on accountof the pink-bollworm, which were promulgated July 9, 1927, be, and the same is hereby, amended to read as follows:(f) Cotton lint (except samples) may be authorized movement only whenbaled. Such baled cotton lint and such samples shall not be moved or allowedto be moved interstate from a regulated area except under permit. Permits for such movement will be granted on the furnishing of evidence satisfactoryto the inspector, (1) that such cotton lint (except samples) has been com-pressed to a density of not less than 22 pounds to the cubic foot, and (2) thatsuch cotton lint or samples have been disinfected under the direction of, and ina manner satisfactory to, the inspector. Cotton linters, delint, or grabbots,produced by any oil mill located outside the regulated areas but authorizedunder paragraph (c) hereof to crush cottonseed originating therein shall bereturned to the regulated areas for compression and disinfection and shallnot be moved therefrom except in compliance with this paragraph: Provided,That permits may be issued for the interstate movement of second-cut lintersdirect from the premises of such approved oil mills conditioned (1) on thepassing of such linters through special roller equipment in such a manner thatin the judgment of the inspector all cottonseed and larvae therein would becrushed, and (2) on the protection of such linters after such treatment ade-quate in the judgment of the inspector to protect them from any possibility ofcontamination.Uncompressed and undisinfected cotton lint may be moved interstate underpermit" between regulated areas under such safeguards as shall be requiredby the inspector when such movement is not through any point outside any regulated area.Baled cotton lint grown outside of but concentrated within a regulated areamay be moved interstate under permit out of such regulated area on the fur-" All of the Arizona areas defined in regulation 3, except Safford and Duncan Valleys,are infested not only with the pink-bollWorm but also with the Thurberia weevil and areincluded within the area designated as regulated area in the Thurberia-weevil quarantine.(See Notice of Quarintine No. 61-revised). Under that quarantine seed cotton, cotton-Seed, anud cottoflse ed bulls are prohibited interstate movement from the Thurberia-weevilregulaed area and no permits vvill be issued for such movement. Permits for the inter-state Imiovemueot of un compressed amd undisiflected cotton lint from that area will notbe issued.

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1929] sERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 175nishing of evidence, satisfactory to the inspector, that such lint has been hand-led in a manner to safeguard it from possible contamination with the pinkbollworm.This amendment shall be effective on and after October 1, 1929.Done at the city of Washington this 30th day of September, 1923.Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agricul-ture.[SEAL.] R. W. DUNLAP,Ac!itg Secretary of Ayriculthure.NOTICE TO COMMON CARRIERSSEPTEMBER 30, 1929.Sm: You are requested to date and sign the blank receipt below, indicatingyour official title, and return this letter to the Secretary of Agriculture inthe inclosed penalty envelope, which requires no postage.Notice is hereby given to the transportation company you represent, asfollows:That the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority of the act approvedAugust 20, 1912, known as the plant quarantine act (37 Stat. 315), as amendedby the act of Congress approved March 4, 1917 (39 Stat. 1134, 1105), has, byamendment No. 4 to the Rules and ReguLitions Supplemental to Notice ofQuarantine No. 52 (revised), on account of the pink bollworm, given noticethat Section (f) of Regulation 5 has lbeen amended, effective on and afterOctober 1, 1929, to read as per copy inclosed.Very respectfully,actingg f'Ccrctu"rI of .4lyrieu0tUrc.( Ilnclosures.)(Do not detach this receipt)Received his notice and the copy of amendment 4 to the Rules aml Rieauia-tions Supplemental to Notice of Quarantiiie No. 52 (revised) mentimied hereinthis------day of-.-----------, 1929.(SilgnaturO)(Title)[Sent to all common carriers in the States of Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona.]NOTICE TO GENERAL PUBLIC THROUGH NEWSPAPERSSEPTEMBER 30, 1929.Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority con-ferred on him by the plant quarantine act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315). asamended, has promulgated an amnendiment, effective October 1, 1929, to the Rulesand Regulations Supplomental to Not ice ()I* Qiaralithi No. 52 ( revi( i OIaccount of 1h piiik hollworlml. Thi amendment modifies the codit i Nll 1nd1which oil mil v ill be auithoriz(d 1() ip secmid-cut lilltr or id a in narea regul:11tcd oin arco unt (1, this c,-t :I j11)d autihl'rizes the UNl:1cc I mI.for the interstate movemniIt of such liliters when passed t hIrough a new typof roller equipment under proper safeguards against contamination. C( opir ofsaid m111 iment niay bc obi a rimnm t he hlea tulrii1,11 ( d i i , (1irI \ministration, Ullited stItes D eparmciient of Agricultur. W hiniion. 1), 1
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176 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [July-Sept.,MISCELLANEOUS ITEMSSENATE UPHOLDS PLANT QUARANTINE ACTThe following amendment to the plant quarantine act of August 20, 1912, wasproposed in the Senate Committee revision, September 4, 1929, of the tariff bill(H. R. 2667, committee print, page 290) :(d) Plant quarantine.-The plant quarantine act, approved August 20, 1912,as amended, shall not be construed to authorize the Secretary of Agriculture toforbid the importation of any nursery stock or other plants, or fruits, vege-tables, roots, bulbs, seeds, or other plant products unless such plants or plantproducts are infected with disease or infested with injurious insects, new to ornot theretofore widely prevalent or distributed within and throughout theUnited States, or unless the Secretary of Agriculture has reason to believe thatsuch plants or plant products are so infected or infested.Owing to the impossibility of determining the freedom of plants from insectpests and diseases by inspection merely, the effect of this amendment wouldhave been to render the present sections of the act relating to foreign importa-tion of little or no value for the purpose of excluding pests. It would havemade possible general and unlimited importations of plants in bulk or other-wise, including culls and rejects, and to open the gates to importations of fruitsand vegetables now excluded from many countries for valid sanitary reasons, and would have permitted the same type of entry of pests as gained foothold inthe United States prior to 1912, such as the European corn borer, Japanesebeetle, Oriental fruit worm, chestnut blight, citrus canker, etc.; in other words,it would very probably have caused the loss, as a result of a single year's im-portations, of the benefits which have resulted from 17 years of enforcement ofthe act in the prevention, with few exceptions, of entry of new and dangerouspests with imported plants and plant products.For Senate discussion of the proposed amendment, see Congrssional Recordfor September 12, 1929, pp. 3703-3706; September 14, 1929, pp. 3757-3758; Sep-tember 17, 1929, p. 3837, and September 18, 1929, pp. 3861-3868. On the datelast named the proposed amendment, after an extended discussion, was droppedby general consent; in other words, without vote.ESTONIA ADDED TO COUNTRIES WHICH MAY SHIP POTATOES TO THEUNITED STATESEvidence has recently been submitted to the Department of Agriculture thatEstonia has met all of the general conditions set forth in Regulation 2 of theRegulations Governing the Importation of Potatoes into the United States, in-cluding the establishment of the fact that it is free from the potato wart andother injurious potato diseases and insect pests new to or not widely prevalentor distributed within and throughout the United States. On and after August2, 1929, until further notice, permits will therefore be issued for the entryof potatoes grown in Estonia.CONVICTIONS FOR VIOLATIONS OF THE PLANT QUARANTINE ACTThe following convictions for violations of the plant quarantine act werereported to the adminiistration during the period July 1 to September 30, 1929:WHITE-PINE BLISTER-RUST QUARANTINEIn the case of the United States v. The Portland Seed Co., Portland, Oreg.,in the interstate shipment of 10 currant and 10 gooseberry plants from aState designated as infected, which plants were neither dipped, dormant, nordefoliated, the defendant pleaded guilty and was fined $10. (Plant QuarantineCase No. 364.)In the case of the United States v. The D. Hill Nursery Co., Dundee, Ill., in the interstate shipment of 100 white pines in violation of the regulations,the (lefen(lant pleaded guilty and was fined $25 and costs. (Plant QuarantineCase No. 353.)In the case of the United States v. The Federal Nurseries, Rochester, N. Y.,in the interstate shipment of four Perfection currant plants in violation of

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1929] SERVICE AND LEG ULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 177the regulations, the defendant pleaded guilty and was fined S25. (PlantQuarantine Case No. 271.)In the case of the United States v. The Richmond Nurseries, RichmondBeach, Wash., in the interstate shipment of 24 currant plants in violation ofthe regulations, the defendant pleaded guilty and was fined 510 and eosts.(Plant Quarantine Case No. 344.)QUARANTINES AFFECTING MEXICAN PRODUCTSIn the case of tie United States r. Mr. Laurents, Brownsville, Tex., inattempting to smule in 10 avocados from Mexico, the defendant was lined $5.In the case of the United States v. S. 11. Duke, Brownsville, Tex., in attempt-ing to smuggle in five avocados from Mexico, the defendant was fined 5.In the case of' the United States r. A. Kennedy. Brownsville, Tex., in attempt-ing to smuggle in one um n o from MNexico, the defendant was fined $5.In the case of the United States r. Val Martinez, Eagle Pass, Tex., in ittempt-ing to smuggle in 11 avocados from Mlexico. the defenl(ant was fined 85.In the case of the United States r. Enrique Zaragoza Cadena. Eagle Pass,Tex., in attempting to smuggle in six avocados from Mexico, the lefondant wasfined $5.In the case of the United States r. Felipe Castinlo, El Paso, Tex., in ai apt-ing to smuggle in two mangoes from Alexico, the defendant wa'. fninvd 5.In tile case of the United States v. Conception ('arreon, El Pa , Tex., inattempting to smuggle in five avocados within seed frvoim Mlexico, tihe d elnhidantwas fined S5.In the case of the United States r. T. IH. Girion, jr., El Paso. Tex. in atiempt-ig to smuLe in one avtado vitih seed from Mfexico, the lee ndtNN mwasfined $5.In tlie case of the Ulnited States r. Ynez Zahala, El Pas(), Tex., in attemptingto smuggle in two nioes from MIexico, the defendant was fined S5.In the case of the United States ?-. IDr. RodoIdfo Z. Perevra , El PIas , Tex.,in attempting to 4mugJle in 10 manoes from Mexico. the lefen'llt was lined $5.In the case of the United States v. Jesus lmirales, El Pas) , Tex., il atemt-ing to smuggle in otmr Iwtwantes from Mexico, the defendant was fined 95.In the ease of the United States c. H. A. Eli son, EI Pasi, Tex., in attemptincto smuggle in twI avocado s frim nMexioi , the defendant wai filled S.I l the case of the United States r. B. F. iartiiez. Hidalgi(. Tx., in at1m1t-ing to smuggle in one imamev and three nIalIoes from lexicon .the dcfeidantwas fined $5.In the case of the Inited States r. Mrs. E. ('. Villtareal. 1idaLgo. Tex., inattem q pting to smuggle in three aviwado seeds frI mi Alexi (, tlie defendant waslined 5.In the case of the United States v. A. A. Samainiao, TIidal -,o. Tex., in at-teIpting to smiuggle ill five av(wnd(os t'om MQexico, the defendait waf lined .In thi case of the Unitl Stales r. E. .Martinez, Laredo. Tex., in ttemipt-iug to smuggle ill eigilt manLe5 from Mexico, the defniint w\l filled >.II the CISe of till Uli d States 1. S. I,,. Diuk) , )1e. r n\\ vifle, TeX. in att mi t-inl to smilgLle ill Iiv( 04i' os fr'im Mexic(, 1he defilenda was \l N:t5 1111 I .In thit 'as of the Iiled States r. MI. S. TrllIner. L I'u : ,1Tx., in attlmt-ing to smuggle ill fimr aIvtwldw'l-om Al exic4, the Nleteli t wa fin S.II t1h0 C(ase OF the Ullited States r. Enriqun Uami'e, E l'ao. T'X., iii :it-temlpting to smuggle i lne m11"go and onei a vmado trm Alexico, th defendantwas lined :5.In tle case ofl thie Illited States .J jo lmerra .Iwiii:i, Tlex. it) :IT mpin gto sIugle in live avocado') lr*mn AMexico. I le flnlef ant w\ ;ived >o.In I he case ol I4 e O tIit'd tatns r. .IE. Z:ininriz, I'w ile, Te \_, ill at-tempting to smugLe in d2 antes 1)rom Aliicfi. the dli'ht o1:i iit \vas t ed I.,In the cIso) oI thie united Slates r*. T f-rtrde 'irnelI'. lu-a '. Trx. il at-tempt ill" tt m)g in wnc lvoe rmtd Me ic, hedwiman wvas t1il 1 7)IIn Ol ce C14 (4 the( UnlitedI Skill's r. AxIimlinla ('hawon deate l aTex., ill attempting to Smug112Lle ill G pcac hi anld 11 ip:ir frtm \i' ' the lo-fendant \va s filled $5.In thie (aste (0, tI h IUlited Sta 's 1. Esthl'r 'Or , EP P' m. P l T , ili ii tem ting to smluggl'e in I idait r'mi Mex-5 l thi. II ndXt 1 w11 lned cIn the case of thI Ilited States r. I mzan l oj'z, El Pa, Tcx, il V-IimIt-ing to situggle ill one bag of pears Ir.I Vxeic., tI dth'uud:tr aFned 1In the case or the UAited States r. Maria Lana, El Paso, T'x., i\_ :t rmt-ing to smuggle il thlree plums from Mexic( , te defendalit was lined S.

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178 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION (July-Sept.,In the case of the United States v. Emelia Corona, El Paso, Tex., in at-tempting to smuggle in three pears from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.In the case of the United States v. Dr. W. M. McGee, Hidalgo, Tex., in at-tempting to smuggle in 36 avocados from Mexico, the defendant was fined $20.In the case of the United States v. L. E. Riley, Laredo, Tex., in attemptingto smuggle in six avocados from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.In the case of the United States v. Rafael Ibarra, jr., Nogales, Ariz., in at-tempting to smuggle in 84 mangoes from Mexico, the defendant was fined $10.In the case of the United States v. , El Paso, Tex., in attempt-ing to smuggle in one avocado from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.In the case of the'United States v. Alfred Pena, Eagle Pass, Tex., in attempt-ing to smuggle in 18 avocados from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.In the case of the United States v. Gilberto Covarrubias, Eagle Pass, Tex., inattempting to smuggle in 12 avocados from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.In the case of the United States v. John L. Alfonso, El Paso, Tex., in at-tempting to smuggle in 3 mangoes., 2 mameys, and 20 plums from Mexico, thedefendant was fined $5.In the case of the United States v. Nieves Garcia, El Paso, Tex., in attempt-ing to smuggle in two aguacates with seed from Mexico, the defendant wasfined $5.In the case of the United States v. Esequil Monarez, El Paso, Tex., in at-tempting to smuggle in one mango from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.In the case of the United States v. Cirasco Hurtado, El Paso, Tex., in at-tempting to smuggle in six plums from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.In the case of the United States v. Miguel Barrega, El Paso, Tex., in at-tempting to smuggle in 3 peaches and 18 pears from Mexico, the defendant wasfined $5.In the case of the United States v. Rafaela Loya, El Paso, Tex., in attemptingto smuggle in one pear and one peach from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.In the case of the United States v. Apoliniro Reyes, El Paso, Tex., in attempt-ing to smuggle in two apples from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.In the case of the United States v. Hermelinda Hernandez, El Paso, Tex., inattempting to smuggle in two mangoes from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.In the case of the United States v. Ambrosia S. de Corral, El Paso, Tex., inattempting to smuggle in 55 figs from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.In the case of the United States v. Guatavo Briones, El Paso, Tex., in attempt-ing to smuggle in four apples from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.In the case of the United States v. Concepcion Hernandez, El Paso, Tex., inattempting to smuggle in one mango from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.In the case of the United States v. Maria Diaz Corral, El Paso, Tex., in at-tempting to smuggle in three pears from Mexico. the defendant was fined $5.In the case of the United States v. Gilberto Acosta, El Paso, Tex., in attempt-ing to smuggle in sx mangoes from Mex'co, the defendant was fined $5.In the case of the United States i1. Jose Zubieta, El Paso, Tex., in attemptingto smuggle in one mango from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.In the case of the United States v. Jose Ignacio Banuelos, El Paso, Tex., inattempting to smuggle in two peaches and one avocado from Mexico, the de-fendant was fined $5.In the case of the United States v. Marcos Fabela Vda. de Ugalde, El Paso,Tex., in attempting to smuggle in five pears from Mexico, the defendant wasfined $5.In the case of the United States v. Antonio Zapata, Eagle Pass, Tex., in at-tempting to smuggle in 16 pomegranates and 14 peaches from Mexico, the de-fendant was fined $5.In the case of the United States v. Francisco Angeles, El Paso, Tex., in at-tenpting to smuggle in three pears from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.In the case of the United States v. Dolores Scobell, El Paso, Tex., in attempt-ing to smu-gle Wi two pears from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.In the case of' tle United States v. Alfonso Mercado, El Paso, Tex., in at-tempt inig to sm iggle in iw( mangoes from M(Xi(co, tile defendant was fined $5.In the case of the Uifted States v. Alberto Mota, El Paso, Tex., in attemptingto smiig-le in lhree oranages from Mexico, the defendant was filed $5.In I1he c-ise of Ilie United States v. Octavano Martinez, El Paso, Tex., in at-Seiptinig to smuggle ini Iour avoeOs from Mexico, the defendant was deported.Il the cUSO (o tle d id (( Siaes p. Vin'men Garza, El aPso, Tex., in attempt-ing Io )muggle in 12 avo I*dos from Mexico, the defendant was fined $5.

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1929] SEI:VICE AND ,EGULATOIY ANNOUNCE3LENTS 179III the c s-e f the UIIite] Srt;ts r. Mauia B. ( oule. E) lt T .,. Item I) tiiig smulH:mu e ini (11ie maig froli 2AIe iv , thl 0 vfiwt 1wa1 1 .fIn thfi case of the Unitc Stts r. Ma 1An tdor. E, i u , Tex. iin ttempting to sr glluu.e in ("lt guavias fnmIII \M'-iY .Cie 'ei t wfi!Ad 5In thie cise t the I nited States r. Emli.lio Sunfhez, E. iu., T1., inattemptingg io siugg!e inl >even Ithe a d )ie 41rIt m i l x:u , the de-fenldnrt was fined 55.Ini the ca(se of the United Stats r.reini Galle -. E. Vt-' T(-, inattempting re smuggle in six av t(Idwitl -eie fImi 'exif, t>e ulf'M tjtwas fined $5.In tho Case (f the ited S:ttes 1. E.Gol i lz. Hibidlgf, TTx. i t lleipt-ing to smugule in eight pOmegates arid thee pears frim ieV i\ , ti de-fendant was fined( 5.In the case of thi United States r. .1. W. StTof:_d ii ,, Tex., fi l 1mt-ing to muggle in nine avocado seeds fMr \Ixifo, he f (1 tint 1(s ,ined 5.Ill the (.,se of ilte United Sti tes r. I). Vosquez, Hidal'TeI. Tin, -ieltil"to smil.u.gle ill one poar and (Iln p Irite from Mefxic., the de0*'nit w-afined S5.Ill the citse of the United StaIos r. PauliB \ega, Hlidai , T x. i. ;tttempt-ing to smug.le in two quilnes and t)ne avoca(i) frorm Mexic, the detemuit wu-fined 85.In tiCen ce of ti'e Ulite States v. Iso)el Putiite. Laredfo, Tex., inl atteti gto smuggle in two avocados, one quince, and ite peach from Mexif o, the Ie-fendant was fined $5.In the ease of the Ulnited Stutes r. L. \oreles. I-Lred, TeX., ill :ittemitptinlegto smuggle in 100 a I vocadt s from Mlexi o), tlihe defe IdaIi t va4 fined .5.In thlie Oie of the United States r. Leopoldo Rdrihuez. Ny 1 al es, Ariz. inattempting to smuggle in 385 qiiinees fr( m M(xico. the.defentamt wav fin* e I25.ORGANIZATION OF THE PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROLADMINISTRATIONC. L M~mrTChil of Adiiiraltiont.B. Co.x's, Bsn /nyrIt. C. AvsI, Iiiformiati#'aul (/7ivc'.C. A. LocKI:, Excn/iue A.i's/vi .H. T. A (1(':, ini tr I/*( t Ii t tfE. It. Sas~,in Chmryc Ponrci!/n Pla"nt Qllarantinecs.S. B. I/A 1I, I ( Ch are Dom .ic Pl,1nt ()if u ant / in ('x.A. F. Bun(;Ess, in Field Ch(airge Gilmy Moth (1nd Broirn-Tail Moth Quairan tine( Ifeadquarters, MclrrOsc lIyl lf1dmx, lIsi. )1. I. WinTLEY, in 'i1ld Charo' //?jroi(il Corn JIorc)r Qarnti/If I/ 1id-q u rt1r(l s, E( (rn Y'e'ionl , Loston , .lst .; Westi, s ction, T/lof f ( h, j .C. H. HADLEY, in Field ('harge Japfllnee Thc le (,) u/fltr/nittine ( lI fca i! o/ ,-/Irs,Camden, N. .1.).R. E. MCDOINALI>, iln Field Chrye Pink collicorm (uu Tbhur/n 'ria W11r c u -a(ntiics ( HIc(id(uar cr ;, ,Sin Ani io, T i. r.).B. L. FBoYInl;-, in Ficld Chmrylc D(Itc Scalec Quarwilliti ( Iceud<;uurl1tcr' bndio,Calif. ).M. 11. Fou, A(cIing in Ficld CIrac 1!cic('li' Fruit Worm Qufrln/I f IieI'qimurtcr,. H1urlintgn, Tcx.).W1LMON NEWELL, l. 11 Fi( Id Chumryc 311cditcrr(Ilanea Fruit Fly Quaranitillf illFlorida. ( i1cadIlar/vrs, ( lndoI vi, I f1.).A. C. B.\Ius , I urc( of I /toillo /f , i 'it 1 (,'hvrv I// v''4if/ti fn/ rl I .l1cditelrranan Friit Fy Oarviinv I li' va fiuur/fr ((01u /f). I /1P. A. Ioiim\i.i , in Fi 1d Chair' , odii rrunvun Fr1ic/ 11 crrlllcfIi I frimIent and Inspectionl Work in /titis othcr thfa I (vi l Hrter1Atlanta., Ga.).ADVISORY FEDERAL PLANT (,ARANTINE HOARDC. L. MA lAiTTi, (hvirmun.J. E. ( hlum, I,'arcom of 'finomoltov .1/ IV m'!fc.IN. A. ( LIY, IiricvIa of /'/(ll/ /11vdisvi /r'i, 1/ m/lI. IR. WVArL. I~lvurca oP/f lt /Insdvar, 4 /m/n---,Forcs't SN rri .1i/v /fr.

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