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Service and regulatory announcements

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Service and regulatory announcements
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Service and regulatory announcements with list of plant pests intercepted with imported plants and plant products
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Serv. regul. announc. - U. S., Plant Quar. Control Adm.
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United States -- Plant Quarantine and Control Administration
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Washington, D.C.
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U.S. G.P.O.
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16 v. : ; 23 cm.

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Plant quarantine -- Periodicals -- United States ( lcsh )
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serial ( sobekcm )
federal government publication ( marcgt )

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S.R.A.--P.Q.C.A. no. 96 (July/Sept. 1928)-S.R.A.--P.Q.C.A. no. 111 (Apr./June 1932).
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Title from caption.
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United States Department of Agriculture, Plant Quarantine and Control Administration.

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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This item is a work of the U.S. federal government and not subject to copyright pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §105.
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030288967 ( ALEPH )
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sn 86014227 ( LCCN )
0888-7608 ( ISSN )
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351 ( ddc )

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Service and regulatory announcements
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Service and regulatory announcements

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S. R. A.-P. Q. C. A. No. 101. Issued June, 1930

United States Department of Agriculture

PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION



SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS
OCTOBER-DECEMBER, 1929



CONTENTS
Page
Record of current work, July1 to December 31, 1929 ----------------------------------------------- 182
Change in leadership of Plant Quarantine and Control Administration ------------------------ 182
The Mediterranean fruit fly -------------------------------------------------------------------- 182
Surveys to determine extent of infestation ------------------------------------------------- 182
Eradication measures ---------------------------------------------------------------------- 183
Quarantine regulations --------------------------------------------------------------------- 185
Quarantine enforcement ------------------------------------------------------------------- 18
Control of vehicular movement ------------------------------------------------------------ 187
Appropriations ----------------------------------------------------------------------------- 188
Prevention of spread of gipsy moth ------------------------------------------------------------- 189
New infestation found on Long Island ------- ----------------------------------------- 189
Gipsy moth defoliation in New England again serious ------------------------------------- 189
Other activities ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- 189
Appropriations ------------------------------------------------------------------- 190
Satin moth spreads ----------------------------------------------------------------------- 190
Euro corn-borer-quarantine enforcement -------------------------------------------------- 191
Gnral status of infestation --------------------------------------------------- 191
Quarantine regulations revised ------------------------------------------------------------- 192
Inspection and certification of restricted articles ----------------------------------- 192
Control of vehicular traffic -------------- ------------------------------------------- 193
Appropriations ----------------------------------------------------------------------------- 194
Mea efruit-worm eradication --------------------------------------------------- 194
Infestation at Brownsville ------------------------------------------------------------------ 194
Amendment to Texas regulations ---------------------------------------------------------- 195
Quarantine enforcement -------------------------------------------------------------------- 195
J n beetle control ----. .. ..-------------------------------------------------------- 196
Spread during the summer of 1929 ---------------------------------------------------------- 196
Suppresivemeasures ---------------------------------------------------------------------- 197
I etion of farm products ----.................-- -------------------------------- 197
Nursery stock and soil certification -------------------------------------- (
Road patrol and transit inspection --------------------------------------------------------- 201
Appropriations ----------------------------------------------------------------------------- 202
Asiatic beetle and Asiatic garden beetle ------------------------------------------------------- 202
Surveys carried on throughout the summer months --------------------------------------- 202
Prevention of spread of pink bollworm --------------------------------------------------------- 202
Quarantine enforcement ------------------------------------------------ ---203
Appropriations -----------------. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 203
w4-----------------------------------------------------------204
T hurberia weevil----------------------------------------------------------------------- 204
arlatoria date scale eradication ------------------------------------------------------- 204
Appropriations ....-205
Prevention of spread of phony peach disease----- ---------------------------------------- 205
White-pine blster rust ------------------------------------------------------------------------- 207
Grain-rust control by means of barberry eradication ------------------------------------------- 207
Transit infection ------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 17
Quarantine and other official announcements ------------------------------------------------- 209
Announcements relating to European corn-borer quarantine (No. 43) --------------------------2 09
Revision of regulations --------------------------------------------------------------------- 209
Notice to general public through newspapers ------------------------------------215
Announcements relating to Japanese-beetle quarantine (No. 48) -------------------------- 216
Notice of public hearing to consider the advisaibility of extending the quarantine on account
of the Japanese beetle to the State of Rhode Island .. ------------------------------- 216
Announcements relating to Mediterranean fruit-fly quarantine (No. 6$) ----------------------- 217
Instructions to naval officers ------------------------------------------------217
Administrative intructions-------------------------------------------------217
Weekly in plae of semiweekly clean-up of groves an( g irdens in eradication area authorized (modification of regulations supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 68) (P. Q
C A .- 2 5 0 ) - - .- - - - - - - - - -. . . . . . . . . .. . . 2 1 7
Sterilization requirements modified as to are hitherto designated a infested (P. Q. C.
A.-251)-- ..----.--.--.------------------------.............217
Use of heat for sterilizing Florida g-apefruit authorized (P. Q. C. Ad-1.2) 218
Authorization of transportation of Florida host. fruits and Vegetables from the I)istrict
of Columbia to near-by points in Virginia (P. Q. C.A. 253). .. 219
Movement authorized of sterilized host fruits and vegetables from Florida to other
Southern and Western States (P. Q, C. A.-2M) .......... .. 22(1
-0---1 181







182 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [Oct.-Dec.,

Quarantine and other official announcements-Continued.
Announcements relating, etc.-Continued.
Administrative instructions-Continued. Page
Sterilization of oranges, tangerines, and satsumas by use of heat under Mediterranean
fruit-fly regulations (P. Q. C. A.--255) ---------------------------------------------- 221
Release of certain areas designated as infested under the Mediterranean fruit-fly-quarantine regulations (P. Q. C. A.-256) ---------------------------------------------------- 221
Instructions to inspectors re interstate shipments of celery from Florida (P. Q. C.
A.-25 ) ----------------------------------------------------------------------------- 222
Containers authorized for interstate movement of Florida host fruits and vegetables (P.
Q. C. A.-258) ------------------------------------------------------ ----- 222
Report of special committee to study status and needs of Mediterranean fruffi1 c am-paign__ 223
Conference of Federal and State officials called to discuss movement of Florida citrus fruit
under sterilization into southern and western markets during winter, -------------------- 225
Heat sterilization of citrus fruit ------------------------------------------------------------- 225
Announcement relating to nursery stock, plant, and seed quarantine (No. 37) ------------------ 227
Instructions to collectors of customs (T. D. 43579) --------------- --------------------------- 227
Plant quarantine-lily bulbs ------ 7 ---------------------------------------------------- 227
Announcements relating to phony-peach-disease quarantine (No. 67) ------ m -------------------- 228
Modification of phony-peach-disease-quarantine regulations -------------------------------- 228
Notice to general public through newspapers ------------------------------------- m'---- 229
Instructions to postmasters ---------- m --------------------------------------------- m---- 229
Announcements relating to pink-bollworm quarantine (No. 52) ------- m ------ m ------------ m----- 230
Modification of pink-bollworm quarantine ----------------------- m -------------- m ---------- 230
Notice to general public through newspapers ------ m ----------------------------------- 231
Instructions to postmasters ------------------------------ m ----- m --- m -------------------- 231
Revision of regulations -------------------------- m ------------------------------------------ 232
Notice'to general public through newspapers ------------------------ MM --------------- 237
Announcements relating to satin-moth quarantine (No. 53) ---------------------- m -------------- 237
Modification of satin-moth quarantine ------------------ m ------------- m -------------------- 237
Notice to general public through newspapers ---------- m --- m --- m ------------------------ 238
Instructions to postmasters --- m --------------------------------------------------------- 238
Terminal inspection of plants and plant products ---------------------------------------------- 239
Plants and plant products addressed to places in Mississippi ------- m --------------- % --------- 239
Convictions for violations of the plant quarantine act ------------------------------------------ 239
List of current quarantines and other restrictive orders and miscellaneous regulations ---- m ------ 241 Organization of the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration. ----------------------------- ?A7



RECORD -OF CURRENT WORK, JULY 1 TO DECEMBER 3L
1929

CHANGE IN LEADERSHIP OF PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION

C. L. Marlatt, who for more than a year has been filling the two positions of Chief of the Bureau of Entomology and Chief of the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration, retired at' his request from the latter position on November 30, 1929, in accordance with a plan which was authorized some two years ago.
Lee A. Strong, assistant director of agriculture of the State of California, and formerly connected with the United States Department of Agriculture as a specialist in plant-quarantine work, was appointed as his successor. Mr. Strong, who was selected some months previously from a list of eligibles certified by the Civil Service Commission, took up his new duties on December I.



THE MEDITERRANEAN FRUIT FLY

A rapid and decided improvement in the Mediterranean fruit-fly situation followed the intensive eradication measures carried out in Florida during the spring and summer. This work proved so effective that only one infested fruit was found between August 27 and the end of December.
This practical absence of reinfestation indicates that a continuation and intensification of the present methods of suppression can, reasonably be expected to result. in the complete extermination of the pest. While such eradication can not be considered to have already been accomplished, the fact that from 200 to 600 scouts employed by the department and large numbers of orchard owners and volunteers have been searching for infested fruit during this period shows that very pronounced progress has been made in this direction.
SURVEYS TO DETERMINE EXTENT OF INFESTATION

At the close of the last fiscal year the Mediterranean fruit fly had been found established in 15 Florida counties in addition to the discovery of several







1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 183

adult flies at Jacksonville, in Duval County. During July and August, 1929, Alachua, Citrus, Hernando, and Pasco Counties were added to this list and a field infestation was found in Duval County at a considerable distance southeast of Jacksonville. Since the middle of August the known extent of infestation has, however, remained constant.
Table 1 shows the number of Florida properties found and reported infested with the fruit fly from the date of discovery to the end of 1929. As indicated in the footnote to the table the number of properties is shown as of the date of definite determination of the material, with the result that in every case the report for the month at the head of the column includes the field collections of the last day or two of the previous month but does not ipclude the findings of the concluding days of the month named. This is especially significant with respect to August, during which month there were only 8 findings, the remaining 5 of the 13 listed having been found during the last two days of July.

TABLE 1.-Number of Florida properties found and reported infested with the
Mediterra"ean, fruit fly from the date of discovery to December 31, 1929

Apr. 6- Septem- Novem- DecemCountyA July August October Totar
June30 ber ber ber

Alachua------------ ..........-- 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1
Brevard .........-------------- 72 0 0 0 0 0 0 7Z
Citrus. --------------- 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1
Duval ---------------.............. 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1
Flagler ........---------------... 4 1 1 0 0 0 0 6
Hernando. ------------ 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 4
Hillsborough. --------- 17 13 1 0 0 0 0 31
Lake .......----------------- 88 7 1 0 0 0 0 96
Levy .-----------------.............. 1 6 0 0 0 0 0 7
Marion ........--------------.. 7 4 1 0 0 0 0 12
Orange---------------............... 400 0 0 0 0 1 0 401
Osceola......... ...------------- 27 2 0 0 0 0 0 29
Pasco .....--------------- 0 6 3 0 0 0 0 9
Pinellas -------------- 9 7 0 0 0 0 0 16
Polk .........--------------- 34 1 2 0 0 0 0 37
Putnam.............. -------------- 18 4 2 0 0 0 0 24
St.Johns -------------............. 8 1 1 0 0 0 0 10
Seminole-------------............. 97 0 0 0 0 0 0 97
Sumter.............. -------------- 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
Volusia. -------------- 144 1 0 0 0 0 0 145
Total............ ------------ 927 59 1 13 0 0 1 0 1,000

1 Properties in this summary and in Table 1 of S. R. A. No. 99 are listed as of the date of technical determination of the material rather than the date of collection. Five of the properties reported above under August relate to collections on July 30 and 31.
Surveys of other Southern States to determine the possibility of the establishment of infestation through shipments from Florida were continued. General headquarters were maintained at Atlanta, Ga., for this work, and large numbers of summer fruits were examined during the season in Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, New Mexico, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Texas, the fruit from several million trees being
inspected. These were largely peaches, plums, pears, apples, grapes, figs, and pomegranates. From 1 to 25 men were employed in each State on this work. In addition to the examination of tlh'e fruit in local groves, inspections were also made of shipments of Florida citrus fruit which had been shipped from that State prior to the discovery of the fruit fly and xhich was still to be found on the markets of the Southern States until midsummer. The results of all such surveys and inspections after the beginning of July were negative.
ERADICATION MEASURES
One of the most imnIportant features of the extermination program is the
destruction of host fruits and vegetables on infested properties and the area within 1 mile of infestations. The clean-up crews carried out this work inmndiately upon the d(liscovery of infestation on the premises. The continuing development of guavas and certain other sunumier fruits, the ocasional ripening of off-season citrus, and the ripening of Suriniam cherries and other fruits on wild lands made it necessary, however, to cover these areas repeatedly.








184 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION EOct-1Dec.$

By the end of December 409 acres had been covered in this manner eleven or twelve times and the amount of clean-up work done on the 120,157 acres of citrus in the infested areas was equivalent to cleaning-over 400,000 acres once, as will be seen from Table 2.

TAB3LE 2.-Appromiflute figures sZotn~g the pro gress of eradication mwaslvrea, April 6 to December 31, 1929

Apr. 6 No e
Item to Jul August Sep- October N- D- Total
June 30 tember vember cember


Citrus clean-up in infested areas: I
Total citrus acreage ------------------- -------- -------- -------- -------- -------- 120,157
Cleaned first time. ---- .acres-.- 120, 249 20, 164 ----------324 307 1,1410
Total cleaned and recleaned
1 to 12 times------ acres-.- 260, 308 70, 248 42, 526 40, 997 41, 365 3, 383 7,892 466,719
Citrus fruit destroyed
---------------- boxes--.. 578,500 3,391 3,658 11,896 9,542 855 705 608,547
Citrus clean-up outside of infested
areas:
Cleaned first time -------acres-- 0 0 0 0 31, 775 14, 790 8, 655 55,220
Total cleaned and recleaned 1
to 9 times ------------acres--. 0 0 0 0 31, 775 63,681 63, 329 158,785
Citrus fruit destroyed - -boxes--.. 0 0 0 0 3, 260 8,815, 8,927 21,002
INoncitrus clean-up in infested areas:
Total cultivated noncitrus acreage----------- ------- acres---------- -------- ------------------- -------- -------- 160,775
Cleaned first time -------do ---- 94, 527 57, 331 ---------2, 499 696 0 0 (2)
Total cleaned and recleaned 1 to
5 times-------------- acres.. 95, 985 88, 800 72, 913 52, 216 15, 504 0 0 325,418
Koncitrus fruit destroyed
------------------ boxes... 0 7,139 15,004 -3,682 760 .0 560 27,145
Vegetables destroyed-do-.-..-do--- 0 3, 488 22, 425 15, 104 9, 482 0 0 50, 499
Noncitrus clean-up outside of infested areas:
Cleaned first time -------acres-- 0 0 01 0 9, 609 95 39 9,743
Total cleaned and recleaned 1 to
3 times-------------- acres-.. 0 0 0 0 9,609 110 275 9,994
Clean-up of uncultivated lands in
infested areas:
Total acreage uncultivated
lands -------------------------------- -------- -------- -------- ---- ------------- 803,945
Cleaned first time. --- acres-- 0 145, 987 -------107,422 126, 298 197 0 (2)
Total cleaned and recleaned
1lto 5times --------acres-.. 0 192,511 372,510 .194,631 240,695 197 01,000,544
Clean-up of uncultivated lands outside of infested areas:
Cleaned first time------acres--.. 0 0 0 0 1,415 641 0 2, 056
Total cleaned and recleaned 1 to
3 times-------------- acres--. 0 0 0 0 1,415 999 0 2,414
Clean-up personnel, end of month:
Inspectors --------------------- 352 71 4 100 63 59 36 41.......-Foremen----------------------a 8258 397 '493 345 199 174 66----Laborers--------------------- 82, 172 3, 216 43, 658 2, 629 455 175 152----Spraying in eradication area:
Area sprayed, including infested
areas---------------- acres... 362, 665 367, 882 525, 381 599, 149 403, 488 84, 676 8, 050 2,351, 291
Materials used:
Sugar--------------- pounds.. 780, 203 367,470 285, 485 420, 480 368, 849 25, 20 -2, 325 2, 250,014
Molasses and sirup--gallons.. 53, 464 66, 096 85, 595 83, 122 67, 670 4,865 426 361, 238 Lead arsenate-------- pounds-. 89, 386 56, 318 19, 029 66, 653 55, 350 3,941 310 290, 987 Spraying personnel, end of monthInspectors---------------------~ 141 21 (4) 29 28 24, 18----Foremen---------------------- 359 881 (4) 1091 1001 25 1 -------Laborers ----------------------a 471 683 (4) 7191 4691 30 1----1 Infested areas include all areas or zones designated at any time as infested,!' whether or niot they had been released at the time of the report.
2 Total omitted, as records are incomplete.
3 As of June 30, 1929.
4 Spraying and clean-up personnel reported together for August.

Early in October the clean-up work was extended to that part 'of th e eradication area outside of but adjacent to the infested areas, and 55,220 acres of citrus, 9,743 acres of noncitrus, and 2,056 acres of uncultivated lands outside such infested areas had been cleaned up in this manner by the close of the calendar year.







1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 185

In order to eliminate the flies remaining in this district and to prevent their migrat ng elsewhere a poison-bait sirup was used in the groves and on uncultivated lands. This material was applied at frequent intervals, so that the total extent of the spraying, which was confined largely to the approximately 1,000,000 acres of citrus, noncitrus, and uncultivated land in the infested areas was equivalent to spraying 2,351,291 acres once. A total of 596 acres had been covered nineteen times and over 130,000 acres more than ten times.
The spraying and clean-up act vlties are summarized in Table 2. The fi-ures given in that table are only approximate, as the field staff was not sufficiently organized during the first weeks of this undertaking to avoid some duplications and similar discrepancies.
Early in July it became necessary to reconsider the entire eradication program. The tremendous increase in the infested area as determined from week to week made it apparent that to carry out the original program and particularly to provide for the removal of all host citrus fruits of the developing crop in the infested areas would involve enormous expenditures for labor, adm'nistration, and compensation of the growers. The change in policy resulting from this situation was described as follows by Doctor Marlatt at the hearing on the Agricultural Department appropriation bill for 1931 before the subcommittee of the House Committee on Appropriations:
The magnitude of the problem as thus developed, together with its nation-wide concern. led the Secretary of Agriculture to seek the advice, both as to the work as above outlin d and as to the possibility of eradication, of leading specialists selected from various parts of the country.
The committee thus appointed consisted of Vernon Kellogg, permanent secretary, National Research Council, Washington, D. C. ; I. A. Morgan, president, University of Tennessee: T. P. Cooper, dean, College of Agriculture, director of extension work, Lexinrton, Ky. ; Victor R. Gardner. director State experiment station and professor of horticulture, State College, East Lansing. Mich. T. J. Ieadlee, professor of entomology, Rutrs College, New Brunswick, State entomologist of New Jersey and entomologist of State experiment station; G. A. Dean, head, department of entommcy, State Aricultural <'olge. and entomologist, State experiment station. Manhattan, Kans. ; and H. J. Quayle. professor of entomology, University of California, and entomologist of citrus experiment station, Riverside.
These specialists submitted a report emphasizing their belief that eradication was not only practicable but an economic necessity. They further recommended the very considerable enlargement of the work now under way and the modification of regulations which. in their belief, would permit, under a system of sterilization and without risk of spreading the pest, the interstate movement of citrus fruits from areas which previously had been considered infested.
At the time of the visit of this committee to Florida the research unit of the Bureau of Entomology of the department cooperating with the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration had Just completed work which indicated the practicability of such control of the larva and eggs in the fruit either by refrigerating to 28' F. or by heating to 110'. The committee stated that such sterilization of whole fruit could, in their judgment, be accepted as a substitute for the destruction of the mature crop in the formerly infested areas and thus do away with the great cost ($6,300,000) already indicated for the rcmoval of all citrus and other fruit of the coming crop in such areas, as wll as the necessity for the reimbursement from the National Treasury to the growers of such fruit.
After careful consideration of thei report of these specialists, it was adopted, and tlhe regulations under the fruit-fly quarantine were revised, effective September 1, to carry out the revised and enlarged program,

QUARANTINE REGULATIONS

The fruit-fly-quarantine regulations in effect at the beginning of the fiscal year were slightly modified during July and ely y August to lihtein the restrictions on the movemIent of grapes and sour limes and to rIliove st rinl beans from the list of host fruits and vegetables.
This was followed on August 20 by a general revision of the quarantine and regulations to carry out the reolnIlndaIt ions of tihe committee of specialists, as stated. Subsequent to this revision, the regulations were modified or interpreted and amplified by a number of administrative instructions issued as circulars of the P. Q. C. A. series. Of these, 5 related to steriliation; 4 to destinations, diversions, and dates of shipment, and the containers in which products could be move; 2 to the designation of infested and radiation areas; 1 to the movement of celery ; and 1 to the clean-up methods on properties inside the eradication area. Such instructions are printed in full in the Service and Regulatory Announcements of tihe administ rat ion.
The most far-reaching of the Federal quarantine 11olifeations was the one issued on November 18. 192 .9, under which sterilized host fruits and certain vegetables were allowed to be shipped from Florida to the Southern and
Western States. From May 1T until November 20, 1929, inclusive, the move-







186 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [Oct.-Dec.,

ment of host fruits and vegetables from Florida (except sour limes produced in Dade and Monroe Counties) into, the following States and Territory by rail, express, mail, or other means, was prohibited: Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Georgia, Idaho, Louisiana, Mississippi, Nevada, New Mexico, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Washington, and the Territory of Porto Rico.
Under Administrative Instructions P. Q. C. A. 254, sterilized host fruits were authorized movement into the States named for the period from' November 21, 1929, to January 31, 1930, inclusive (this was later extended to February 28, 1930). Green tomatoes were also authorized movement into this southern and western area in the same order.
Supplementing the Federal regulations, an intrastate quarantine has been maintained by the State of Florida under the authority of the State plant board. Subsequent to the six editions of these State regulations reported in S. R. A. 99, eight additional modifications, revisions, and 'amendments have been, issued by that board or by Chairman P. K. Yonge, acting for it, dated July 15, August 12, September 16, October 14, November 16, November 20, December 3, and December 9, respectively.

QUARANTINE ENFORCEMENT
From the time the State and Federal Mediterranean fruit-fly quarantines were issued in April the quarantine organization has exercised super vision over all packing, storage, and processing plants in the entire State, to see that these plants were operated in a sanitary manner and in conformity with State and Federal quarantine requirements, to eliminate any possibility of fruit-fly infestation developing on the premises, and to assist the field scouts in the determination of any infestations which might be existing in the State. So far as possible, the packing plants also acted as units of certification, and the permits for intrastate and interstate movement were issued to them.
The inspection of plants of this kind was organized by districts, each inspeetor having a number of packing houses to supervise. The number of citruspacking houses reported in operation in the eradication area at the close of 1929 was 248, with a capacity for the year of 31,303,000 boxes. Outside of the eradication area there were operating under similar supervise ion 70 citruspacking houses, with a t-t,111 capacity of 10,486,000 boxes. There were also 138 vegetable-packing houses operating in the State and 20 fern-packing houses. By the end of December 17,361 different inspections had been made of these packing houses. There are in the State 146 cold storages with a total capacity of 811,129 boxes, and 320 inspections have been made of these cold storages. Processing and canning plants numbered 70, and 674 inspections were made of them. Four packing houses an d two canning plants were temporarily closed on inspectors' orders at various times during the 6-month period on account.of minor violations. All but one of these had been reopened by the end of December.
Sterilization by heat was carried on in the Florida packing plants, while the cold-sterilization method was operated by cold storages in that State and ,elsewhere. The latter was the first method authorized, but the plan of sterilizing by heat proved equally satisfactory from the standpoint of the department, and much less expensive, and, consequently, was afterwards employed to a greater extent. Heat sterilization was -used only within the State Pf Florida, and during the 6-month period 2,099 cars were so treated, 1,679 of these during the month of December.
Cold sterilization was carried out both in Florida and- by special arrangement in designated packing plants in the Northern States. Ten such northern plants sterilized one or more cars, but all of them had discontinued operation by the middle of December, except one at Detroit. During the 6-month period 95 c(ars were given the cold-sterilization treatment in Florida, and 126 were so treated in the North (Louisville, 5; Cincinnati.. 53; St. Louis, 4; Chicago, 28; Detroit, 32; Washington, D. C., 2; Jersey City, 1; and Philadelphia, 1.)
The quantities of material for which permits were issued for interstate and infrasttate shipments from Florida packing houses, cold storages, dealers', growers, and noncommercial shippers and the number of quarantine violations intercepted in transit at Jacksonville are shown in Tables 3 and 4.







1929) SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 187


TABLE 3.-Quantities of ho.t fruits, rcgetables, and nursery stock certified under
the Mediterranean fruit-fly quarantine, May 1 to Aulust 31, 1929


Product certified a 1t July August Total
June 30 uy Ags oa

Citrus fruits.......--------------------------------carloads-- 7, 237 30 5 7,272
Noncitrus fruits.....-..--...--------------------------do 22 8 0 30
Vegetables -------------------------------------------- do 864 12 1 877
Less than car-lot shipments of host fruits, vegetables, and nursery stock.... ....------------------------------boxes-. 42,202 3,428 3, 293 48, 923


TABLE 4.-Quantities of host fruits, vegetables, and nursery stock certified, and
violations intercepted, under the Mediterranean fruit-fly quarantine, Septenber 1 to December 31, 1929


Item Septem- October Novem- Decem- Total
ber ber ber

Certified material:
Interstate shipments in car lotsGrapefruit..- .....-------------------cars.. 569 1,892 1, 527 1, 334 5, 322
Oranges and tangerines- ...-----------do.... 5 288 2, 565 4,443 7, 301
Mixed....-..-.----------------------do.... 0 158 795 1,474 2, 427
Total........---------------------do.-... 574 2,338 4,887 7,251 15,050
Noncitrusfruits-....---------------do.... 0 2 0 0 2
Vegetables.-.- .....-------------------do.... 0 24 187 243 454
Sterilization of citrus byHeat method......-----------------do.... 0 44 376 1, 679 2,099
Cold method (Florida only).------- do -------------- 51 12 32 95
Intrastate shipments in car lotsGrapefruit.- ......-------------------do.... 0 90 51 94 235
Oranges.---.....---------------------do.... 0 0 0 19 19
Vegetables ------------------------ do.... 0 0 0 2 2
Intrastate shipments, highway movementCitrus---..-----------------------trucks-- 0 195 1, 263 1, 941 3, 399
Interstate shipments, less than car lots by expressCitrus .-..---------------- ------- boxes.. 801 1, 786 4,660 84, 4S3 91. 730
Noncitrus ------------------------- do ... 4, 641 1, 286 331 530 6., 7s3
Vegetables..-..---------------------do .. 153 2, 70i 11,013 26, 34 40,420
Ntirsery stock, plants with roots------- do ..-- 1, 633 7, 293 4,163 3,429 16, 51
Violations:
Shipments intercepted at Jacksonville and returned to shipper as violations of regulationsWithout permit --..---------------- boxes -. .--------- ---------- --------36 ...
Improper permit ----------------- do --------- ---------- ----------- 114 .---. -...
Not standard container -----------o ---- ---------- -------- --- ------ 4 -------Ripe tomatoes ------------------------ o .------ ---------- ---------- I
Concealed shipments ---------------- do --- ---------- ---------- ---------- 3 -------Express shipments to certain Southern States
for which no car-lot service was available
... ...-------------------------------- boxes ---------- ---------- ---------- 3 .........

September and October combined.

CONTROL OF VEHICULAR IlOVEMENT

Road stations have beei lfmaint-ailed Sinlce t1e first discovery of the infestation in Florida to prevent fruit of any kind fronI being carried out IIhI- 1. e
eradication area or interstate fronm any part ol Florid. The lines :[ which such patrols were maintained have beeni changed froIni I tnlio to tim1e as ni' points of infestation were discovered. After the quarantine revision of Septeiber 1 w s Iesu(, loW(veer, 110 new infestation wele funtId o'lidoe I !.e general eradication area and three qualia ie lines have since lh.'n been maintained and have remained stationary. Q)ie of these is at Ihe sulther boundary of the eradication ara extendling from lillaorough through IPolk
to southern Brevard Coity to govern Sout hibonid mnovemient into the -1hm beri
uninfected sections of Florida; a second extends along the northern it u :ary
of the eradication area from Citrus to Duval County, to control nothlouid







188 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [Oct.-Dec..

intrastate movement, and a third is located along the northern boundary ofFlorida. Inspection posts on the first two of these lines were maintained under the authority 'and direction of the State plant board, while the thirdwas operated under Federal authority and direction from headquarters at Atlanta.
On the Federal line controlling northbound interstate movement, 11 stationswere maintained in Alabama and 19 in Georgia. In addition, 7 automobilepatrols were employed to control movement on the less-traveled- roads. On. the north boundary of the eradication area from 20 to 24 such posts have been maintained and on the southern boundary from 11 to 15.
The number of vehicles inspected and the number found to be carrying artcles: moving in violation of quarantine are shown in Table 5. This table also indicates the number of violations intercepted in passengers' baggage on trains..

TABL.E 5.-Sum mary of inspect ion, urnder Med iterra-nea'n fruit-fly quaran tine, ofvehicles and baggage leaving the eradication area

Item Jul Ast Septem- October Novem- Decem- Total
y gS ber ber ber

Eradication area border patrol:
Vehicles inspected ---number 357, 962 i359, 214 394, 670 354,897 359, 248. 462, 503 2, 288,494Vehicles in which fruit was found
---------- ------- number-- 3,331 3,077 2,975 3,655 4,171 5,204 22,413.
Baggage inspected, highway
movement ----------- pieces -- 238, 196 215, 267 248, 193 239,658 252, 818 352,456 1, 546, 588Baggage in which fruit was found,
highway movement--pieces -- 887 6,70 767 798 691 1, 302 5, 115.
Baggage inspected, train movement----------------- pieces--. 99,349 102,273 103,030 112,034 111,079 139,344 667, 1W
Baggage in which fruit was found,
train movement ---------------- 531 449 395 450 567 903 3,295Georgia-Florida border patrol:
Vehicles inspected ---number- 53, 908 54,817 48,201 47,282 48, 150 51,988 304, 346
Vehicles in which fruit was found
-----------------number--. 2,279 2,808 2,060 1,836 1,849 1,987 12,819,
Alabama-Florida border patrol:
Vehicles inspected -------- o-- 71, 289 80, 883 60, 714 62,423 53, 037 59,840 388, 18&
Vehicles in which fruit was found
-----------------number-..- 955 1, 381 1, 105 1, 116 1, 036 1, 145 6, 739.


The regulations under which the destination carrier is required to clean at the unloading point cars used in the transportation of Florida host fruits and' vegetables were enforced largely at the important railroad diversion points. of Potomac Yards, Cincinnati, Louisville, St. Louis, Chicago, and Detroit. Supplementing this work, employees of the administration at Savannah and, Waycross, were able to inspect a considerable number of cars, some of which; had moved south through the switching points at which inspectors were not maintained. As a result of such inspections, 14 cars were intercepted. dirty in, October, 61 in November, and 340 in December. The number of interceptions-, in December, while small in comparison with the more than 8,000 cars movingduring that month, indicated such a degree of negligence on the part of railway emlolyees that conferences were held the last week of the month with, the operating officers of the leading railroads both of the northeastern terri tory and of the South, and methods were worked out to improve the situation.
Restrictions on reshipments from the territory northeast of and including Maryland and Pennsylvania to points south and west of -that area and from the Northern States in general to the South were enforced at transit-inspection points and by visiting the wholesale and retail grocery stores along the quarantine lines referred to. These requirements were on the whole very well observed, although the number of mien assigned to the enforcement of these restrictions was not large enough to prevent completely local transportation of small quantities of Florida host fruits andl vegetables from points just north and east of the dividing lines to near-by districts within the same trade territory.
APPROPRIATIONS
As stated in the Service and Regulatory Announcements for April-June, 1929, emergency funds of $50,000 were released by the State of Florida immediately upon discovery of the Mediterranean fruit fly and by transfer,







1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 189

$40,000 was promptly made available by the Department of Agriculture for preliminary work. This was followed by congressional action, making '4.250.000 immediately available for the control and eradication operations. An additional amount of $1,290,000 was further made available by joint resolution of Congress in December.

PREVENTION OF SPREAD OF GIPSY MOTH
NEW INFESTATION FOUND ON LONG ISLAND
Early in December, 1929, a gipsy-moth infestation was discovered at Roslyn. Long Island, N. Y. All available personnel was immediately transferred to that area to determine the limits of spread and to undertake the prompt eradication of the insect at that point.
The center of the infestation was in the village of North Roslyn near several nurseries. By shortly after the close of the year several thousand egg clusters had been found in this village and the territory embracing about 3 miles surrounding it. Eradication operations were complicated by the large amount of miscellaneous materials that were piled in the back yards. The inspection of this material and treating the egg clusters had been started by the end of December in cooperation with the conservation department of the State of New York.
Records of the past shipments of the nurseries concerned are being checked, but it is believed that such shipments have been confined largely to Long Island. Scouting will be undertaken around all points to which nursery stock has been consigned from this locality.
GIPSY-MOTH DEFOLIATION IN NEW ENGLAND AGAIN SERIOUS
The forest acreage defoliated in the Northeastern States again shows a substantial increase over the figures for the previous year. Over half a million acres suffered economic damage, more than half the leaves being stripped from the trees throughout two-thirds of the territory attacked. New Hampshire forests suffered most severely. The infestation in the vicinity of Milford. N. H., was so heavy that the inspector stationed there for the certification of stone and quarry products required special assistants, as an unusually large number of egg clusters, larvae, and pupae were found on material offered for shipment during the summer. All egg clusters were creosoted and all infestation entirely removed before certificates were issued. The data secured in a survey of the situation is summarized in Table 6.
TABLE 6.-Areas defoliated by the gipsy moth in 1929

1)efoliation
Total area
State attacked
1 to 50 per 50too o)per
cent cent
Acres Acres .crs
Maine -------------------------------------------------------- 7,962 7, 22,7) 15, 187
New Hamnpshire................................................... ------------------------------------------135, 72 305, 117 440, 45
Massachusetts--------------------------------------------..................................................... 27,391 67,I 9,0
Vernont.......................................................... ---------------------------------------------------- 0 1) 0
Connecticut..........................------------------------------------------------- o 0 0
Rhode Island...............................--------------------------------------- 23 0 23
Total ------------------------------------------------------ 171,107 3 0, 026 331, 133

OTHER ACTIVITIES
The outlook for early completion of tihe total erudientiol of the New Jersey gipsy-moth infestation cmitinues tvoralle. lThe oe wihrolk is c in
that section during the previous fiscal y ear has been at tacked a ior' usly by spraying andl by creosoting the eg masses I)utrin.g J1uly daily exami;tinls
were made at and a round the in tested lhilat ions in l'ise:iltaway Toinsil Middlesex County, with the result that 1 larv:e and 12 pupa e wcre found aInd destroyed. A wide belt around the infested lom:lity was shouted during the summer, but no further signs of the insect were found.
The barrier zone, a strip about 30 miles wide east of the IHudson River, is becoming more dillieult to maintain free fraon the gipsy moth as tie iii est ion
114048-30--2







190 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [Oct-Dec.,

east of the zone increases. Scouting in this strip for the season was started in July and by the close of the year gipsy-moth larva,, pupoe, or egg clusters had been found in the towns of New Marlboro, Sandisfield, Otis, Mount Washington, and Becket, Mass.; Canaan, Cornwall, North Canaan, Norfolk, Salisbury, Sharon, and Kent, Conn.; and Hillsdale, N. Y. The work in New York State was carried out by the State department of conservation.
Details of the inspection and certification work carried out in connection with quarantine enforcement during the last half of the calendar year 1929 are shown in Table 7.
TABLE 7.-Inspections under Federal gipsy-moth qaantine, July 1 to December 31, 192.9

Forest products Stone and quarry Nursery stock Other evergreens products

Month Ship- Ship- Lar- Ship- Ship- Lar- Ship- Ship- Ship- Shipments merits va merits ments vm or merits ments Egg merits ments Egg
in- in- PUOB in- in- egg in- in- masses in- in- masses
spected fested or egg spected fested masses spected fested spected fessed

July-------- 1,642 4 7 27,642 12 142 182 \ 0 0 386 0 0
August ----- 1,847 5 25 19,969 5 8 578 0 0 590 a0
September- 1,404 5 17 31,355 61 111 1,830 0 0 691 0 0
October----. 2,135 6 244 34,722 29 81 3,649 0 0 89& 0 0
November- 1, 741 2 9 30, 695 12 .42 1,,575 0 0 6,856 0 0
December- 2,346 0 0 15,039 4 6 1,902 0 0 8,229 0 0
Total--- 11, 115 22 1302 159, 422 123 2390 9, 716 0 0 17f 645 00

I Including siT egg clusters found in October and five in December on car stakes to be used with shipments of forest products.
2 N including egg clusters found on materials which were to be used in crating pieces of finished granite or on car stakes to be used in connection with shipments of granite as follows: 4 in August, 55 in September, 53 in October, 3 in November. and 2 in December.

In addition to the figures given in Table 7, inspectors of the State and Federal Departments of Agriculture in cooperation examined and certified a total of 624 shipments of nursery stock and farm products originating in the territory of New Jersey regulated under a gipsy-moth quarantine issued by that State. No infestation was discovered in these shipments.
As incidental features of the gipsy-moth-control operations surveys have been conducted to determine the present distribution of the satin moth, the browntail moth, and larch canker. The first named is discussed later. The browntail moth is not sufficiently abundant to cause serious injury except in certain sections in the eastern part of the infested territory. In the lightly infested sections this insect is not seriously abundant on account of the control measures practiced and the effective work of imported natural enemies, disease, and adverse climatic conditions. The satin moth now has a greater distribution than the brown-tail moth. As a result of the search for larch canker,a number of suspected specimens were referred to the Bureau of Plant industry for definite determination.
APPROPRIATIONS
The agricultural appropriation bill for the fiscal year 1931 which is, now ,pending carries an item for the control and prevention of spread of the gipsy and brown-tail moths of $647,500. This may be compared with the amount of $567,500 which is available for the current fiscal year, to which may be added a deficiency item of $100,000 if the pending first deficiency bill passes.


SATIN MOTH SPREADS
The administration, in connection with gipsy-moth-quararitine enforcement, made surveys during the summer to determine the present extent of satin-moth infestation in New England. The latter insect was found to have spread extensively, especially to the northward in Maine. In the Pacific Northwest it is still unkniown south of Lewis County, Wash.
The Federal quarantine prohibiting the interstate transportation of poplar and willow trees from the infested area was; accordingly amended on October







1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 191

31, adding 38 towns in Maine, 3 towns in New Hampshire, and 5 towns in Massachusetts, a total of 1,871 square miles, to the area designated as regulated to prevent the spread of this insect.


EUROPEAN CORN-BORER-QUARANTINE ENFORCEMENT
GENERAL STATUS OF INFESTATION
The European corn-borer population of parts of the infested area increased somewhat during 1929, but the general status of this pest remained about the same. Except for a few fields in northern Ohio, commercial damage was limited to small sections of eastern Massachusetts and Rhode Island.
Tbe spread to new regions through the flight of the moths continued at about the same rate as in previous years, the insect moving west in northern Indiana about 10 miles, and south in eastern Indiana, southern Ohio, and northern West Virginia to the width of from one to two counties. Throughout central Pennsylvania no change in the extent of infested territory was discovered, although in extreme eastern Pennsylvania, northern New Jersey, and western Connecticut the borers were found in a number of scattered townships in previously uninfested districts.
The 2-generation strain of the borer spread westward in Connecticut, central Massachusetts, and New Hampshire, and eastward in southern Maine to greater distances than before. Along the coast of Maine the borer was found about 100 miles farther east than heretofore, reaching the eastern edge of Hancock County.
Taking the Great Lakes area as a whole the highest average infestation thus far observed in any year was in 1927, when it reached an average of about 10 larvae per 100 plants. This was followed by a reduction in 1928 to an average of less than 7, and a slight increase in 1929 to slightly less than 8. For the purpose of comparison, it will be recalled that commercial damage begins w;th about 500 larvae per 100 plants. In the Michigan infested area the average number of larvM ner 100 Dlants was reduced from about 27 in 1927 to 11 in 1928 and 9 in 1929. In Ohio there has been a slight increase from about 4 in 1927 to 6 in 1928 and between 10 and 11 in 1929. In Pennsylvania the degree of infestaton wa s reduced from over 10 larvy: per 100 plants in 1927 to less than 1 in 1928 and 1929. In Indiana the infestation never reached an average of 1 larva per 100 plants. In western New York the greatest average infestation reported was in 1926, with 7 horers per 100 stalks. This was reduced in 1927 to less than 4 and increased to 5 in 1928 andi 6 in 1929. In eastern New York, where the infestation is of somewhat longer standing, the surveys showed over 29 larve lper 100 plants in 1927, which was reduced to somewhat over 14 in 1928 and 16 in 1929. still far below conmlmercial damage. In western New England surveys which were conducted in 1929 for the first time showed less than 1 borer per 100 stlalks in western Massachusetts and less than 4 in western Vermont.
In the 2-generation area in southeastern New England, wlhcre some (coinmercial loss is being experienced, the infestation surveys in cornstalks in urban gardens showed infestations on individual premi(ses ranging from 479 in East Providence to 936 in Newport. R. I., and from 191 in Lawrence to 1.)16 ill Newton, Mass. In the western half of Rhode Island and that part of M:assaehusetts west of the eastern boundary of Worcester County the degree of infestation is much less.
The figures given are hased on fairly intensive inspection s conducted each year in the latter part of the season to determie( the extent of inrawes or decreases in corn-borer infestation thfroulio ilie area:. five res,4 entative fields beillng chosen in the townships studied. and 500 plants being e(xamined in each of five fields in the township. ()wing lo the 't l Iht th Ie a is increasing in size, the figures given represent in pIart different toVnship<. To determine more nceuratlyI th e exltent 1to which the borers mav be decreasingll or increasing in those areas illn viie ilis ilnst has l)een present for a number of years, the results of this \work in ident1i(l to\wn' hi)m in successIve years may he compIared. IData from 431 townships surveyed in the Great Lakes area in 1928 and the same townships surveyed in 1.29 show a reduction in the number of borers per 100 plants in MAichi.an from 15."M to 13.99 and in western New York from 7.5 to 7.19. Slight incrce were
observed in Indiana from 0.34 to 0.98. in Ohio from 11.21 to 1.12. :nd in Pennsylvania from 1.03 to 1.89. The highest township infestation in .Mi(higl:1n







192 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [Oct.-De.,

reported in 1929 was Ash Township, Monroe County, With a borer population of 178 borers per 100 stalks. In Ohio the largest number found in -the survey was in Oregon Township, Lucas County, with 263 borers per 100 stalks. These two townships, together with Allen Township, Ottawa County, Ohio, where the degree of infestation is substantially the same, represent the nearest approach to commercial damage in the Great Lakes area.
Similar comparisons in eastern New York show an increase in the number of borers per 100 plants of from 18 in 1928 to 22 in 1929.
In the 2-generation area the direct comparison of 95 townships surveyed in 1928 with the same townships surveyed in 1929 show an increase in the number of borers per 100 plants from 9.95 to 35.08 in Connecticut, from 186.08 to 213.S4 in Massachusetts, and from 7.63 to 25.9 in New Hampshire, as well as decreas es from 4.9 to 3.39 in Maine and from 189.88 to 174.49 in Rhode Island. Thie highest average township infestation shown in the direct comparison reports was in Belmont Town, Middlesex County, Mass., where there were 983.33 borers per 100 stalks in 1929, as compared with 353.17 in 1928. Similar increase is noted in the town of Warwick, Kent County, R. I., where 746.1 borers per 100 plants were found in 1929, as compared with 503.56 in 1928. In a considerable number of cases in the 2-generation area, however, material decreases were noted, some of the most marked being in Barnstable and Dukes Counties, Mass., and Bristol County, R. I.
QUARANTINE REGULATIONS REVISED
On December 16, 1929, the corn-borer-quarantine regulations were revised to add a total of 655 townships to the regulated area, of which 209 were in the 2-generation and 446 in the 1-generation area. In addition seven townships in New Hampshire which were formerly in the 1-generation area were transferred to the 2-generation area.
At the same time changes were made in the requirements governing the interstate movement of the restricted articles under which the limitation on the quantity of cleaned shelled corn which could be shipped without certification or other restriction was placed* at 25 pounds to the shipment instead of 2 pounds, as before; free movement of sweet corn on the cob from New York 4City during May and June was authorized and the special restrictions applying to the entry of restricted articles Into the regulated areas in Maine was removed. The full rev.*6'.on will be found on a later page.

INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION OF RESTRICTED ARTICLES
The quantities of cleaned shelled corn, cut flowers, and plants certified in connection with the enforcement of the European corn-borer quarantine are shown in Tab *les 8 and 9. Ear corn originating in the regulated areas is not allowed to be moved to outside points. Shelled corn may be certified on the basis of the repeated inspection of the premises and of the equipment with which it is cleaned. The certification requirements on shelled corn are the same in both the 1-generation and 2-generation areas. The restrictions on the movement of cut flowers and certain plants are, however, limited to the 2-generation area, as indicated in Table 9.

TABLE 8.-Shelled corn certified under the European corn-borer quarantine, July 1 to Deccmbber 31, 1929

Central area 1Western area
Month
Corn for Seed corn Corn for Seed corn
feed feed

Bushels Pounds Bushels P oun ds
July --------------------------------------------------- 141,920 2,418 195,977 2,949
August------------------------------------------------- 247, 738 1,529 153, 136 66
September --------------------------------------------- 403,912 0 162,842 0
October------------------------------------------------ 345,611 0 107,977 18,311
November --------------------------------------------- 123,185 0 203,553 35,823
December ---------------------------------------------- 299,576 0 4,7,213 136,476
Total-------------------------------------------- 1, 561, 942 3, 947 1, 240,778 193, 625

1 That part of the 1-generation area east of the western border of Pennsylvania.







19291 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 193

TABLE 9.-Certification of cut flowers and plants in 2-generation area (eastern New England) July 1 to Decemaber 31, 1929

flowers Specimens collected
Cut flwr'Beans, celMonth and entire ery, beets,
plants cer- and rhu Egg
tiffed barb clusters Larvae Pupae Adults


Number Bushels
July ---------------------------------- 289,447 23,181 8 2,083 3 2
August ------------------------------- 2, 631, 056 9, 570 10 82 16 0
September --------------------------- 2, 061, 93 4, 621 4 1 591 2 0
October ------------------------------ 304, 372 2, 981 0 1 593 1 0
November --------------------------- 456,411 2,100 0 27 0 0
December ---------------------------- 253, 684 2,198 0 16 0
Total ------------------- 5, 996,933 44,651 22 3,392 22 2
I In addition to 178 larvae collected in September in green peppers consigned from Dighton, Mass., and.
Inpected at Portland, Me., and 480 larvae similarly collected in October.

CONTROL OF VEHICULAR TRAFFIC

Road stations were maintained at the principal roads on all boundaries of the regulated areas and also at the principal highways leading between the regulated areas of New Hampshire and Maine. These stations numbered 8 in Maine, 45 in Connecticut, 7 in New York, 25 in New Jersey, 20 in Pennsylvania, 3 in West Virginia, 49 in Ohio, 35 in Indiana, and 14 in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. In addition, inspectors were also stationed at 19 docks and ferries in Michigan. These stations were opened the latter part of July at the beginning of the sweet-corn season and were continued until about September 20, except that the stations in the vicinity of New York City were continued to the end of September and those in western Connecticut until October 12. Approximately 13,000,000 cars were stopped at these stations and large quantities of corn and other restricted articles were intercepted and confiscated. While it was impracticable to examine all the confiscated material, such casual inspection as it was possible to give resulted in the finding of 2,813 borers which would have been carried to outside areas if the road stations had not been maintained. The details, of the road-station work are given in Table 10.

TABLE l0.-Re8ult8 of road-station operation under European corn-borer quarantine, July 1 to December 31, 1929

Item July August September October Total

Eatern (2-generation) area:
Vehicles stopped ----------- number.- 259, 185 808, 248 668, 321 218, 353 1,954, 107
ConfiscationsEar corn -------------------- ears.. 4, 116 21,560 11,544 2, 700 39, 920
Corn (additional, including
shelled) ---------------- pounds.- 312 8 1,040 112 1,472
Cornstalks ----------------- do .... 0 0 300 0 300
Beans, Lima and string.. ..quarts_.. 11,322 2, 008 11,102 8 4, 440
Beets ----------- lots or bunches. 871 1, 511 517 4 2s 2, 927
Celery ---------------- bunches..- 487 757 28$ 700 2, 2
Rhubarb ---------- lots or stalks.. 220 183 396 84 88
Cosmos ---------------o.. o 158 1, 474 1,404 721 3, 757
Gladiolus ---------------- stalks._ 924 8, 409 5, 450 739 15, 522
Asters ---------------------- do .... 190 1,725 4, 04t6 1,347 7,3
Zinnias ----------------o.. .. 599 2, 298 2, 184 636 5, 717
Daias- ............. do .... 197 1,78; 3, 65f 2,695 333
Chrysanthemums --------o..- 2 120 22 156 31$
Hollyhocks -------------.. do- 65 6$ 8 39
Sudan gass ---------------- do.... 0 0 30 0 30
Mixed flowers ------------do.. 0 0 0
Borers found -------------- number.. '124 4 574 1, 189 130 2, 017
Central area: I
Vehicles stopped --------- number.. 746, 376 3, 204, 441 2, 65, 182 316, 96 6, 2, 9635
ConfiscationsEar corn -------------------ears.. 37, 69 116, 9, 36, 499 1,111 192, 264
Shetled corn -----------bushels.. 0 5. 9 3 0 8. .
Borers found -------------- number.. 17 90 107 7 227
In addition to 26 bags and 1 truckload of beans in July and 29 boxes in September.
In addition to one pupa in July and one egg muss in August.







194 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [Oct.-Dec.,

TABLE 10.-Results of road-station operation under European corn-borer quaran.tine, July 1 to December 31, 1929-Continued

Item Suly August September October Total

Western area:
Vehicles stopped ---------- number-.- 246, 230 2, 072, 446 1, 732, 583 12, 364 4,063, 623
ConfiscationsEar corn ----------------- ears-_. 2 16, 547 97, 333 44, 925 260 159, 065
Broomcorn ----------- bunches--. 0 3 411 6 0 417
Popcorn--------------- bushels--.. 0 3 22.3 0 25. 3
Shelled corn-------------- do -.. 0 167 7. 5 0 174.5
Sorghum --------------- stalks.-: 0 0 3 0 3
Borers found-------------- number.- 115 401 53 0 569
2 In addition to 7 sacks of husks and 1 bag of cobs in July.
3 In addition to 150 pounds (broomcorn) in August.

APPROPRIATIONS
The agricultural appropriation bill for the fiscal year 1931 as reported to the House of Representatives by the Committee on Appropriations on December 13, 1929, carries, on the recommendation of the department, an item of $1,000,000 for the control and prevention of spread of the European corn borer.
This amount may be compared with the item of $898,000 carried in the'agriceultural appropriation act for the fiscal year 1930 and $887,660 in the act for the year 1929. To these amounts there was added $50,000 which became immediately available for Work in the spring of 1929 under the proviso quoted on page 99 of the Service and Regulatory Announcements for October-DecemTher, 1928.

MEXICAN FRUIT-WORM ERADICATION
INFESTATION AT BROWNSVILLE,
While the Mexican fruit-worm infestation in, the western part of the-lower Rio Grande Valley fruit-growing district found in April, 1929, seems to have been completely eradicated, the insect was found to have reached Brownsville, in the eastern end of the cultivated area, on November 19, 1929. Subsequent inspections showed three premises involved-two on St. Charles Street and one on Levee Street. In all cases the infested fruit was growing on backyard trees on city lots. Subsequent thorough inspections were then made of all fruit growing in the city, but no other specimens were found.
As provided under the State and Federal quarantine regulations, an infested zone was promptly designated by a committee appointed by the Cameron County commissioners' court. The area so designated was somewhat less than a square mile in extent and was bounded by the Rio Grande River, Eleventh, Monroe, and West Fifth Streets, Brownsville. The fruit in this zone was immediately destroyed under State authority, all the property owners within the zone being officially notified of the necessity for so doing. The clean-up was completed within eight days after the infestation was first found, the fruit from the zone being bured under quicklime and 3 feet of soil. Of the Sourorange trees within the area, approximately 100,,were destroyed.
This Brownsville infestation apparently developed as a result of the spread' (f the Mexican fruit worm from an infestation in Matamoros, Mexico, immediately across the river from Brownsville. Infested fruit from the inter or of Mexico is reaching that city regularly and is on sale on the markets there. As a result of the clean-up measures in Matamnoros adopted in previous years, however, the fruit growing in the city itself has been largely free from infestation and the frult worm was not discovered to have become established there this season until September 8.
In coolpenction with the local representative for the Oficina para la Defensa Agricola, a complete survey of Matamoros was immediately started. This resulted in the (discovery of 509 Mexican frut worms in September, 392 in October, 208 in November, and 59 in December, these figures including trap collections.







1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 195

About 50 per cent of the fruit examined was found to be infested. On several of the premises all the early-ripening fruit was found to have been attacked and in a number of instances green fruits which had not yet begun to change color were found infested.
In cooperation with the Mexican Government a complete clean-up of the ripe and ripening fruit growing in Matamoros was begun on September 25. Host fruits of all kinds, including all varieties of citrus (except lemons and sour limes) were stripped from the trees, dumped in a pit, and covered with quicklime and 3 feet of dry soil. This work was completed on October 12. and during its progress 1,208 field boxes of fruit in all stages of development were gathered on 495 different premises. The trees were then baited with a poison sirup consisting of 8 pounds *of arsenate of lead, 10 pounds of blackstrap molasses, and 50 pounds of sugar in 200 gallons of water. This spray was repeated every 5 to 10 days after the infestation was discovered and was st.ll being used in both Brownsville and Matamoros at the end of December.
Knapsack sprayers were used for this purpose and from one-half to 11. pints of poison bait per tree were used. A total of 11,933 trees were so sprayed at Matamoros on each round of spraying.
AMENDMENT TO TEXAS REGULATIONS
The State Mexican fruit-worm regulations were amended on December 30. 1929, by the addition of regulation 3 (j) as follows:
Regulation 3 (j).-All fallen fruit or decaying fruit taken from any orchard must be destroyed by complete combustion by fire or by burying under at least 18 inches of soil. Likewise all decaying fruit or fruit debris accumulating at any premise must be destroyed in the same manner. Failure to comply with this regulation shall be considered a violation of this quarantine order and of the law authorizing the same.
QUARANTINE ENFORCEMENT
Progress continues to be made in the attempts to eliminate completely from the area all trees and shrubs of varieties which normally bear host fruits during the host-free period extending from March 1 to October 1, each season. During July 42 such alternate host trees were destroyed and 16 premises freed from such trees. Included in these figures are 9 guavas found in the Harlingen district in June and grubbed out in July, 15 sapotas found and destroyed at Weslaco; 4 more premises were freed from 5 such host trees in Auust1. 5 additional trees were removed from 3 premises in September. 26 trees fr(omin 11 premises in October. 11 trees from 5 premises in November. and 4 ,seedling"s from 4 premises in December. These figures are in addition to the sur oranges destroyed in the clean-up of the Brownsville infestation, sour oranges not being considered as summer-host trees.
Grove inspection as a basis for the certification of the 192-80 citrus rop was started about September 10. Owing to the unusually heIavy fall rains, the growers had some difficulty in complying with the reiuireentls that the groves must be kept free from weeds and fallen fruit. Fr 7 to 11 per cent of the growers were temporarily denied inspection cert ithiates each month because of failure to comply with these requirements.
Fruit moved from the valley in much easier v\-olume ihan during previous
years. Retail shipments totaled 2.52 ars between ,(-)tober 1 and the end of December, as compared with 7t0 ars during the same period iof the previous year. Packers' ind shipl)pers' permits were isIued to 1 t' permittees, and, in addition, district inspectors issued perits for the shilpmenIt of 4,41 sinle boxes moving by express and truck in (~ her, 1:1471 in November, anl 4 .ii in December. The latter figure, which represents th elent 1 f holiday shipmenIts, Illmay be coillpred \ ith thile record for Iecemler, 1928, vhen 1tif' single-box permllits were issued.
The road station at Enicino was maintained throughout thie entire summer. except for about three weeks in Sepiltembier, lbut was 11lt operated the full 24 hours until October 11. A second station wa< established easlt of Iijgranl(e city on October 27 to coiitrol movement over the road fro Mission to liogrande city, Itomina, and Laredo. This work is sunmnmarized in Table 11, in which thile passenger cars found to be carrying fruit without permiit are listed as interceptions. During thie 1-nmont!h period no trucks were found ca rt.\in contraband fruit.








196 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRAiTION [Oct.-Dee.,

TABLE 11.-Rc'sults of road-station operation under M1exican fruit-worm quaran,.
tine, July 1 to Deceimber 31, 1929

Encino station Riogrande city station
Month Vehicles IIntercep- Vehicles Intercepinspected tions inspected tions

July ---------------------------------------------- 9,504 58 0 0
August -------------------------------------------- 6,704 58 0 0
September (1-7, 27-30 only)---------------------------- 701 15 0 0
October-------------------------------------------- 6,284 355 1 395 21
November----------------------------------------- 6,617 443 2,794 201
December------------------------------------------ 8,149 805 3,485 244
Total---------------------------------------- 37,959J 1,734 6,674 466

The Riogrande city station was not started until Oct. 27.


JAPANESE-BEETLE CONTROL

SPREAD DURING THE SUMMER OF 1929

The scouting season of June, July, and August, :1929, showed continued spread of the Japanese beetle to numerous isolated localities both north and south of the areas heretofore infested. In New England adult beetles were collected in Willimantic, Conn., Boston, Mass., and Providence, R. I. The insect was found to have spread up the Hudson Valley in New York State as far as Kingston. To the northwest beetles were collected at Williamsport, Pa., Binghamton, N. Y., and in southern Pennsylvania as far west as Chambersburg. The beetles were also collected at a large number of Maryland points between the formerly known isolated infestations at Hagerstown, Baltimore, Cambridge, and Delmar, and 82 specimens were found at Cape Charles and Norfolk, Va. A summary of these findings is given in Table 12.

TABLE 12.-Summary of 1929 ftnd;ings of the Japanese beetle a~t localitie& outside
of mzain area regulated under Federal quarantine, July 1 to December 31,
1929, compared with ftn dings' at the same locations in previou& seasons

Beetles found Beetles found

Locality SesnSao esnLocality
Seaso Seaon SasonSeason Season Season 1927 1928 1929 1927 1928 1929


Connecticut: Maryland:
New London'12 .... 0 27 168 Hagerstown ----- 0 1 47
Willimantic I'--------------0 0 21 Brunswick 1 ---------------0 0 11
Hartford 1 2----------------0 12 890 Bel Air 1 -----------------0 0 15
Massachusetts: Aberdeen'------------ 0 0 16
Boston1 -------------- 4 11 180 Forest Green---------- 0 0 1
Springfield 1 2-------------0 6, 597 1,064 Hlavre de Grace I1-- 0 0 191
Rhode Island: Warwick I----------- 0 0 2
Providence' -------------0 0 181 Chestertown 1 ----- 0 0 7
New York: Rosedale I------------ 0 0 3
Kingston------------- 0 0 13 Parkville I--------------- 0 0 29
Newburg------------- 0 0 37 Halethorpe----------- 0 0 1
Beacon --------------- 0 0 58 Baltimore 12------------ 30 264 7, 185
Binghamton---------- 0 0 10 West Elkridge---- 0 0 2
Pennsylvania: Colgate 1 -----------------0 0 1,538
Sayre'1'2-.-............ 0 14 252 Dundalk I------------- 0 0 8
Athens --------------- 0 0 2 Sparrows Point --- 0 0 4
Williamsport 1 ---- 0 0 1, 393 Oxford I1------------------0 0 2
Montoursville ----- 0 0 1 Cambridge 1 2 -----------11 15 913
Lewistown 1 2-------------0 1 2 Federalsburg 1 --- 0 0 1
Duncannon----------- 0 0 10 Delmar 12---------------- 0 43 633
Gettysburg 1 ------------16 1 270 Virginia:
York I------------------- 1 0 10 Alexandria 1 23.... 0 72 3,940
Wrightsville---------- 0 0 1 Ballston 1 3--------------- 0 0 1
Chamhersburg ---- 0 0 2 Lyon Village 1 3 ---- 0 0 6
Delaware: Cape Charles 1 --- 0 0 68
Milford I -----------------0 4 45 Norfolk I -----------------0 0 14
Delmar 1 2-----------------0 19 1,034
District of Columbia:
Washington 1------------13 112 3, 180

1 Locality where traps were used in 1929.
2 Included in State quarantine.
3 Included in regulated area in revision of Federal quarantine effective Feb. 15, 1929.






1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 197

On October 31, 1929, a hearing was held "to consider the advisability of revising the quarantine on account of this pest to include the State of Rhode Island within the quarantined area" and to discuss "any proposals in connection therewith which those in attendance at the hearing may desire to make." The hearing was largely attended by persons in interest and Lull statements of the various factors involved were presented. At the close of the year final action by the department was still pending.

SUPPRESSIVE MEASURES
A number of the outlying points of infestation referred to are being nade the subject of active suppressive measures to delay the (levelopinent of heavy infestations around the border of the regulated areas and to prevent t;uch localities from becoming centers of spread. The States concerned are financing the necessary soil treatments and spraying, while the Federal Government is assisting by supervising the work and by setting up traps.
In accordance with this policy, some 15,000 geraniol traps were used during the summer to attract the beetles at such points, and about two-thirds of the numbers of beetles shown in Table 12 were captured in such traps, most of the remainder being secured by scouts in the vicinity of the traps. As newly infested localities were found during the summer traps were set up in and surrounding them for the purpose of securing data as to the intensity of the infestation and of reducing as much as possible the numbers of the beetles.
'Soil treatments involving the use of arsenate of lead in grasslands where larval infestation was known or suspected are also being continued by the States concerned in cooperation with the Federal department. During the late summer and fall grassland was so treated at Binghamton, N. Y., Sayre and Athens, Pa., Hagerstown, Md., and Norfolk and Cape Charles, Va. The arsenical was in most cases employed at the rate of 214 pounds of arsenate of lead per acre, or 1 pound per 100 square feet. The lead arsenate dust was mixed with a carrier in the proportion of 4 pounds of sand and 2 pounds of tankage to 1 pound of the arsenical. This mixture was applied to the soil at the rate of 1,500 pounds per acre, except at Binghamton, where 3,000 pounds per acre were used, increasing the dosage to 425 pounds of lead arsenate per acre.
Details as to the treatments and costs are given in Table 13.

TABLE 13.-Soil treatment to control the Japanese beetle at isolated points of infestation, July to December 31, 19.29

Arsenate
Total of lead Total cost Work Work
Place Area material used
used (approxi- of work began ended
lately)

Square feet Pounds Pounds Dollars
Binghamton, N. Y -------------------- 257,300 18,000 2,571 K32.15 Oct. 1 Oct. 7
Sayre, Pa ----------------------------- 3,392,700 120,30 17,185 4, 87. 71 (ct. 9 Nov. 5
Athens, Pa ---------------------------- 454, 000 16, 900 2, 414 677. 14 Nov. 6 Nov. 7
Norfolk, Va --------------------------- 399,998 14, 00 2, 0 '848. 26 July 16 July 31
Hagerstown, Md.......---------------- 1,085, 713 38,000 5, 429 1,844. 64 Aug. 5 Aug. 23
Cape Charles, Va --------------------- 784, 080 27, 0 3, 857 1,358. 00 Aug. 4 )o.
Total --------------------------- 6,373, 791 234,200 i 33,456 10,397.90---------------1 In addition to the value of labor contributed by the Portsmouth Navy Yard.

INSPECTION OF FARM PRODUCTS

Restrictions on the movement of farm products from the Japanese-beetleregulated areas were enforced during ti summer from June 15 t,1 Septeniber 25. On the latter date the regulations a ffeetwing these art des were. renme\(d by the Secretary of Agriculture for the remainder of the season, as the adult beetles had by that time disapIeared to such an extent that they were no longer found infesting such products.
114048-30----3

4







1J9'8 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [Oct.-Dec.,

For the purpose of inspection and certification, specially constructed inspection platforms were set up at Scranton and Philadelphia, Pa.; New York, N. Y.; and Bridgeport and, New Haven, Conn. At 33 other points in the regulated areas farm-products-inspection headquarters were established where inspectors were provided with desk space or other needs at some convenient location readily accessible to market centers.
Due to the .presence of adult Japanese beetles in flight in unusual numbers during the daytime in the market and river-front districts of Philadelphia, it was necessary to curtail the inspect on service available at that city during several weeks of midsummer. Accordingly, from July 9 to August 14, inclusive, inspections were made there only from 8 p. in. to 10 a. mn. each day. Full 24-hour service was resumed on August 15.
The Japanese-beetle infestation in the vicinity of Hammonton, N. J., has now become general and special measures were necessary to prevent infestation from being carried from that district in blackberry shipments. Hammonton is a center for Black Diamond blackberries and a berry market is conducted daily in the town. Quantities of berries are shipped by freight to the various markets. of the East.
As the inspection of large shipments of berries under such conditions is impracticable, a fumigation house was constructed there by' the Hamnmonton Market Commission, and berries were fumigated with carbon d.*sulphide daily from August 1 to 20. Some 9,880 crates of blackberries were so treated and 174 Japanese beetles are known to have been killed, this number including only those found on the outside of the crates or on the floor after the crates were removed. The fumigation appeared to be entirely effective in destroying infestation and no injurious effect on the berries was observed.
The numbers of packages of fruits and vegetables and bales of hay and straw certified under the Japanese-beetle-quarantine regulations for movement to points outside the regulated areas during the 6-month period are shown in Table 14. Table 15 shows the number of Japanese beetles removed from such products at the inspection points.

TA3LE 14.-Quantities of farm products, cut flowers, soil, and simihtr products
certified under Japanese-beetle quarantine, Julyj 1 to December 31, .1929

Cut Sand, soil, Pet Compost Fruits and Hay and Month flowers I earth, etc. met anur vegetables 2 straw 2


Boxes Carloads Carloads Carloads Packages Bales
July ---------------------------------- 4,551 2,163 49 98 2,362,965 39,800
August ------------------------ ------ 5, 198 2, 829 31 253 2,440,336 12, 168
September--------------------------- 6, 132 2, 739 82 219 1, 407, 408 13, 165
October ----------------------------- 3,4,R9 2, 348 93 182 0 0
November ----------------------------- 0 1, 663 71 188 0 0
December ------------------------------ 0 1,036 34 244 0 0
Total -------------------------- 19, 320 12, 778 360 1, 184 6, 210, 709 '35, 133

1 The restrictions on cut flowers were in effect from June 15 to Oct. 15, inclusive.
2 The restrictions on farm products were in effect from June 15 to Sept. 24, inclusive.
3 In addition to 250 bales of sphagnum moss in July.







19291 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 199


TABLE 15.-j apantese beetles retCnoved from farm products and cut flowt(rs at
inspection points, June 15 to October 15, 1929, with comparative Stale totals
for 1928

Com
para
vege Mis- "\!is- live
Let- t cella- Ba- tCut Total State
Inspection point Corn Beans tuce withneous na- flow- bee- total
tops vege- nas fruits ers tes for
tables seaSOun
~1928


Connecticut:
New Haven inspection platform.... 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
Stamford inspection platform ....... 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 3
Total ---------------------------------------------------------- ------ 4 13
New York:
New York Central, West Street
platform.. ----------------------81 1 0 2 0 0 0 84
New York Central, Washington
Market platform.................. ----------------39 01 0 0 0 0 0 39
New York Central, Cansvoort and
West Fourteenth Street--- -------- 153 0 1 0 1 0 2 0 157
Yonkers --------------------------- 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
Total-------------------- ---..........................--- .....---... -------- -- ------21 147
New Jersey: 0
Newark inspection platform..---------....... 12 0 0 12 0 0 0 0 24
Hammonton berry market. ---------- 0 0 0 0 2 0 174 0 176
Total --------------------- ------ ---------------------------------- 200 4J
To a .. . .................... . .. .. ... 2 0 4J

Pennsylvania:
Philadelphia, Delaware River
Bridge inspection platform.... -------- 46 4 1 60 93 0 163 0 367
Philadelphia office .... ----------------- 8 0 0 1 0 0 0 5 11
Philadelphia Navy Yard .....----------- 124 0 6 4 9 6 8 0 17
Chester ......------------------------- 6 1 0 1 5 1 0 4 12' 26
Philadelphia, 1608 Ludlow Street.... 0 0 0 0 0 0 40 4S
Philadelphia, Twelfth and Race
Streets.................. .. ------------------------- 0 0 0 0 0 0 337 337
Harrisburg inspection platform...... 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 3
Norristown inspection at farms...... O 0 0 0 0 0 913 61 974
Scranton inspection platform......-------- 185 0 0 0 0 0 2561 0 441
Sunbury....................... ------------------------- 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ;
Total ----------- ------------- ------------- ---------------------- 2, 733 878
Delaware: I
Wilmington market I ..............---------------- 4 0 4 7 0 12 0 28
Milford........... ............... 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 5
Greenwood.......................... 6 0 0 0 1 0 5 0 12
T otal ............................. ..................- ------ ------ ------ ------ 4- 44
Maryland:
Perryville road inspection post. ------ 21 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 27
Conowingo road inspection post..... 11 1 0 0 4 0 14 12 42
Total-------------------------- ------------- ----- --- ---- --- -- ......- ..... 0
Total -------------------------- 703 9 8 84 122 7 1,564( 835 3, 332 1, 131
. . . . . . . . . . ... . ...

I In addition to 31 Japanese beetles removed from empty baskets moving into D)elaware from other parts of the infested area, such empty baskets being restricted under the Delaware State quarantine regulations.

NURSERY STOCK AND SOIL CERTIFICATION

Under the quarantine regulations, nursery iand greenhouse l)reIlise in the
Japanese-beetle-regulated areas are groupld i (nto three classes. The stock
from nurseries of class I (premises in (listric(ts in which neither grubs in the soil nor beetles have been found) may be certified with(ot further inspection
and without meeting the safeguards prescribed for classes II and Ill. (ontinued and repeated inspections are required on class 11 properties which aire







200 PLANT QUARANTINE, AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [Oct-Dec.,

located in infested districts but on which neither beetles nor grubs have been discovered. In class III nurseries the soil must either be removed or the soil ball treated or the plants must be grown in certified soil under screen.
At the close of the year nurseries classified under the Japanese-beetle-quarantine regulations were grouped as follows:
In Connecticut there were 90 premises of class I and 2 of class 11; none of class III.
In Delaware there were 29 premises of class 1, 18 of class II,' and 6 of class III.
In the District of Columbia there were no premises of class 1, 25 premises of class II, and 3 premises of class III.
In Maryland (Baltimore and vicinity) there were 7 premises of class 1, 59 premises of class 11, and 1 premise of class III.
In New Jersey there were 130 premises of class 1, 50 premises of class 11, and 53 premises of class III.
In New York there were 162 premises of class I, 77 premises of class II, and 2 premises of class III.
In Pennsylvania there were 71 premises of class I, 81 premises of class II, and 88 premises of class III.
In Virginia (Arlington County and Alexandria) there were 20 premises, all in class I..
The amount of nursery stock certified during the 6-month period and the number of plants treated with carbon disulphide or with hot water are shown in Table 16. The chemical treatment of soil and similar materials, whether
for shipment or for use in nurseries or greenhouses, is outlined in Table 17. In both tables treatments to comply with the requirements of Notice of Quarantine No. 66, on account of the Asiatic beetle and the Asiatic garden beetle. are included.

TABLE 16.-CertifIcation andi treatment of nursery stock under Japanese and
Asiatic beetle quarantines, July I to Deember 31, 1929


Plants certified
Plants cer- after chemical or
tifled with- thermal treat- Total
Month out chem- ment with- plants
ical orcetfd
thermalcetfd
treatment 0S2 Hot water


July ------------------------------------------------ 6,063,812 0 0 6,063,812
August-----7----------------------------------------- 6,425,271 0 0 6, 425, 271
September------------------------------ ------------- 3,407,10.3 354 0 3,407,457
October --------------------------------------------- 6,636,907 7,496 17,559 6,661,962
November ------------------------------------------- 5,321,077 630 8, 444 5,330,151
December ------------------------------------------- 4.183,471 0 0 4,183,471
Total ----------------------------------------- 32,037,641 8,480 26,003 32,072,124

I See footnotes to Table 17 for number plants treated with arsenate of lead for later certification.

TABLE 17.-Chemical1 treatment of articles (other than nursery stock) restricted
under the Japanese and Asiatic beetle quarantines, July 1 to December 31,11929

Steam Carbon disulphide1 lrenadeo HON
lead dust
Month ----___ ___Potting Pottin g Sand Leasf Surface Berries Surface Bananas
soil soil mold soil soil

ICubic Cubic Cubic Cubic Square
yards yards yards yards feet Crates Square feet Bunches
July---------------- 0 906 1,141 0 525 0 11,576,410 73,785
August------------- 0 167 1,839 107 7,436 9,880 2562,086 43,020
September ----- 17 1,355 1,445 61 13,321 0 33,329 0
October------------ 213 738 0 61 11,595 0 23, 705 0
November---------- 46 232 0 0 21,352 0 0 0
December----------- 27 37 0 0 0 0 0 0
Toa-------33 3,435 4,425 29 54,229 9,880 2,195,530 116,805

I On this area there were 320,341 growing plants for later certification. 2 On this area there were 198,102 growing plants for later certification.






1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 201

ROAD PATROL AND TRANSIT INSPECTION

Road stations were maintained at 33 inspection points on the principal highways leading out of the regulated area. On all roads where the volume of traffic was sufficient to warrant a 24-hour patrol was maintained. On less traveled roads inspectors were stationed during the hours of greatest travel, or the hours when inspectors were on duty were varied from day to day.
No complete record was kept of the number of cars passing the inspection posts except at the three stations in Delaware. At most points, however, it was estimated that less than 1 per cent of the cars were carrying uncertified articles in violation of the regulations.
Details of the interceptions for the entire summer and fall are given In Table 18.

TABLE 18.-Iterceptions8 at road stations operated to enforce the Japanese and
Asiatic beetle quarantine regulations, June 15 to December 31, 1929

Cars carCars pass- Cars car- rying unState ing all rying quar- certified
inspection antined quaranstations articles tined
articles

Connecticut-----------------------.................................-----------------------................ (1) 6,270 328
New York....... -----------------------------------------------(1) 5, 796 289
Pennsylvania.... --------------------------------------------- (1) 17, 272 11, 235
Delaware...................................... ---------------------------------------------------433, 664 11, 163 2, 520
Total.......................................................----------------------------------------------. (1) 40,501 14,372

1 No complete record.

In addition to the road-patrol work enforcement officers of the administration are stationed in leading mail, express, and freight stations to intercept packages moving by such means in violation of quarantine. A total of 30(
violations of the Japanese-beetle quarantine were thus intercepte(l during the 6-month period. Of the number given 198 represented violations also of the quarantine against the Asiatic beetle and the Asiatic garden beetle, whie 25 violations of the latter quarantine only were also intercepted.
A synopsis of the quarantine violations by months is given in Table 19. The figures include interceptions under both quarantines 4 and 66, but do ot
include road-station interceptions except in 39 instances where a violation had already occurred before the road vehicle was stopped.
Of the total of 333 violations of the two quarantines 204 were (letected by members of the Japanese-beetle staff and 129 were reported by other einployees and collaborators of the department.

TABLE 19.-Sumnmary of shipments of nursery stock (and( other rcstriced article s
intercepted in violation of the Japanese-beetle and Asiat-1ic-bectic quaranftines,
July 1 to Decemnber 31, 19.29

Total loving by- I)isposition
Total
v i o l a ...... .... . .. .. .. ..... . .. .. . ..
Month tions
Other-Allowted
inter- Mail Express t returned to I ro- Destreid eepted wise s

July-------------------------- 40 10 8 22 1 21 1
August-------................. 79 40 22 17 3 17
SepTenim ber....................---------------------.. 83 52 14 17 5 7 11
October ....................... 7 57 12 6 3 2 0
November..................... --------------------- 47 41 6 0 17 0 )
December---------------------- 9 5 2 2 u
Total---------------...... .333 .. .4 265 17 21







202 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [Oct.-Dee.,

APPROPRIATIONS.
The agricultural appropriation bill for the fiscal year 1931 carries -an item of $4 75,000 for the. control and prevention of spread of the Japanese and Asiatic beetles. This may be compared with an item of, $267,000 available for the current fiscal year, to which Congress may later add the amount of $188,000, included in the first deficiency b_*ll which is now pending..



ASIATIC BEETLE AND ASIATIC GARDEN BEETLE
The quarantine regulations issued to prevent the spread of the Asiatic beetle (Anomala or~ientalis) and the Asiatic, garden beetle (Aserica~ ca'stanea) on March 2, 1929, were enforced in conjunction with the work on the Japanese beetle project. The articles restricted under this quarantine are nursery and ornamental stock, sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure.
As most of the nurseries concerned were affected by both quarantines, a joint form of certificate was used. The work carried out in enforcing the two quarantines is combined in Tales 16, 17, and 18.
SURVEYS CARRIED ON THROUGHOUT THE SUMMER MONTHS
Findings outside the regulated areas included the discovery of two adult Asiatic beetles at Schenectady, N. Y., and seven larvTe of the same species at Bridgeport, Conn. The Asiatic garden beetle was found to be more widely scattered, larv~e being discovered at Cromwell, Manchester, Mansfield, New Canaan, and Southport, Conn.; Amawalk, Fishkill, and Kingston, N. Y.; and Milford and Winterthur, Del. One adult was also captured at New London, Conn.
At a hearing held on October -31, 1929, to consider various features of the quarantine on account of the Asiatic beetle and the Asiatic garden beetle certain evidence was presented indicating that the potential danger of these two insects to the United States might not justify the expenses of quarantine ad ministration and the losses resulting from the imposition of restrictions. The revocation of the quarantine was, therefore, proposed by a number in attendance. The desirability of taking this action was still under consideration at the close of the year.


PREVENTION OF SPREAD OF PINK BOLLWORM

On October 24, 1929, the pink bollworm was discovered in the Salt River Valley of Arizona. The first finding was in gin trash from two gins at Gilbert, but this was followed the next day, upon the inspection of fields in the vicinity, by the discovery of a general severe infestation in the locality. Surveys, which were be-gun immediately, eventually showed the infested area to comprise a district involving 40,000 acres of cotton and covering that part of the Salt River Valley east of Tempe.
The eradication measures which have been instituted include the prohibition of cotton production in the infested section and the carrying out of clean-up measures. The noncotton zone which has been established by the State contains 134,400 acres and extends 2 miles from the outermost points of known infestation. Within the noncotton zone there are about. 40,000 acres which, for the crop of 1929, were planted to cotton and about 45,000 acres which werq devoted to other cultivated crops. The noncotton zone is surroundedd by a protective or buffer zone which extends 3 miles beyond the noncotton zone. In this buffer zone restrictions are placed on the date when cotton can be planted. For the crop of 1930, Pima, or long-staple cotton, can not be planted before April 1. Acala and other of the 'shorter staple varieties can not be planted before April 1:5.
The menace this infestation presents to other cotton-producing regions in Ar'zona and California, as well as the danger of infestation to the main Cotton Belt of the East, prompted the department to request funds to undertake clear n-up of the cotton fields throughout the noncotton zone and in some parts







1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 203

of the buffer area.' It is also proposed to amend the act authorizing Federal participation in compensating farmers, for actual and necessary losses because of the enforced nonproduction of cotton, to provide full Federal coinmpensation for the crop of 1930, conditioned on the Federal Treasury being reimbursed for one-half of the amount paid. It is hopIed that 1n aq)iropriation for clean-up and the proposed arrangements for compensation for the crop of 1930 will enable the department to carry out its program and eradicate the pink bollworm from the Salt River Valley.
As a result of this discovery of the pink bollwvorm in central Arizona, special attention has been given to scouting the cotton plantings of the entire Southwest. By shortly after the close of the year all of the cotton-producing areas of Arizona and California had been covered. No infestation has been found in the latter State. In Arizona findings of the pink bollworm outside the Salt River Valley were limited to a small area near Sacaton and one specimen in the Safford Valley, no evidence of the persistence of the former infestations in Cochise and Greenlee Counties having been discovered as yet this season.
In the older part of the regulated area the insect has been found t)o be maintaining itself in Dona Ana County, N. Mex., and in Presidio. Brewster, El Paso, Hudspeth, and Reeves Counties. Tex. No infestations have been discovered this season in the Pecos Valley, N. Mex., or in the west-central Texas area, where the 1927-28 crop and, as to Ector County, the 1928-29 crop, showed a light infestation.
Scouting parties have meanwhile been making surveys in the main Cotton Belt to the east. Six crews of three men each were detailed to such work in eastern and central Texas and in Louisiana and two men are scouting the other Southern States, especially Mississippi, Alabama, and Georgia. The results of all such surveys continue to be negative.

QUARANTINE ENFORCEMENT
Restrictions on the movement of cotton products from the regulated areas include the requirements of compression and fumigation as conditions for the interstate or intrastate movement of cotton lint to uninfested sections and of the sterilization of cottonseed as a part of the continuous process of ginning. This work for the 6-month period is summarized in Table 20.

'TABLE 20.-Cotton ginned aind fumiatled in the pin k-bollworim-regulated areas, July 1 to December 31, 1929

Lint Fumi- Lint Iinters
Month Gins in gating fumi- il fumiginned Mills
plants gated mills gated

Nu mber Bales Nu mber Bales Nmn mber BIles July ----------------------------------- 0 0 6 765 0 411
August... -- -----------------------------........................ 139 446 4 29 20 1j3
September -------------------------------.... 139 32, 863 10 8. 314 1$
October ----------------------------....................... 139 89, 312 10 66, 261 20 2. 119
November----....--------------.....-------------.. 139 83, 207 10 74. 954 19 939
December..-------- ------------------..................... 204 61, 089 11 82, 612 25 1, 18
Total--------------------------...... --....... ......... 269, 917 .......... 232,968 .......... 5, 724


Road stations have been maintained at 13 or 14 points on the principal highways leading from the regulated areas. During the six months 10,Stil confiscations of various materials likely to carry the pink bollworm were made. A number of articles from the Big Bend area of Texas and the Salt River Valley of Arizona were found to contain living pink-bodlworm larv. The
road-station activities are sunmmnarizedl in Table 21.

1 A Joint resolution appropriating $587,51)00 for such clean-up passed Congress and was signedd by the President on Feb. 7, 130.








204 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [Oct-Dec.,

TABLE 21.-Summary of road-st ation work under the pink- botwo'rm and Thurberia-weevil quarantine,8, July 1 to Decemnber 31, 1929

Month IRoad Cars Confiscastations stopped tions

July ------------------------- ---------------------------------- 13 47,183 164
August--------------------------------------------------------- 13 58,030 443
September ---------------------------------------------------f 13 47,959' 723
October -------------------------------------------------------- 14 53,394 2,621
November ------------------------------------------------------ 14 57,319 3,670
December ------------------------------------------------------ 14 59, 610 3, 243
Total--------------------------------------------------- ----------- 323,495 110,864

1 Including 102 confiscations made at stations operated by the State of Arizona in cooperation with the U. S. Department of Agriculture.
APPROPRIATIONS

The pending agricultural appropriation bill for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1931, carries an item of $497,000 for the control and prevention of spread of the pink bollworm. This is approximately the same amount as was made available by the appropriation bill for the fiscal year 1930.


THURBERIA WEEVIL
The project for the prevention of spread of the Thurberia weevil is carried on as integral part of the pink-bollworm-quaraintine enforcement, activities, as these areas overlap and as the requirements. are substantially the same. During the current year (1929) there were no important changes in the general Thurberia-weevil situation. The pending agricultural appropriation bill for the fiscal year 1931 carries an item of $34,300 for the control and prevention of spread of this insect, the same sum as was, available for this project for the current year.

PARLATORIA DATE-SCALE ERADICATION

Except for the discovery of a Parlatoria date-scale infestation in the extreme southwestern section of the date-growing area of the Coachella Valley, there has been a continued improvement in the. scale-eradication situation. Fifteen infested palms were found and were treated or destroyed in the Phoenix district during the 6-month period, as compared with 32 during the previous half year; similarly in the Imperial Valley 53 infested palms were found, as compared with 112 during the first half of 1929 and 1,003 from July 1 to December 31, 1928. In the Yuma district, in which a limited amount of inspection of the ornamental palms has been continuing, three such palms were found infested and were treated or destroyed.
The new Coachella Valley outbreak involves primarily seven properties in the vicinity of the Martinez Indian Reservation about 6 miles west of Mecca. Some 307 infested palms were found on these 7 properties. Only 3 of these infested palms, however, showed any large amount of scale and the infestations on these were not deep seated. In all probability the infestation came about as a result of spread from a property found infested south of the Indian reservation in 1927. Sixty-three additional infested palms were found on 15 other properties in various parts of the date-growing area of the Coachella Valley, mostly in the vicinity of Indio.
The progress made in eradication in individual infested gardens has been very encouraging. Of the 21 properties on which infested palms were found in the Coachella Valley in 1927 the number of such infested trees discovered has been reduced from 892 in that year to 524 in 1928 and to only 95 in 1929.
In the Imp~erial Vale the scouting was finished and follow-up inspection carried on. There are few commercial Phantiin's in this area, most of the date palms being ornamental or abandoned seedlings distributed over a wide area.






1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 205

A decrease in the number of infested palms found is evident as the work progresses.
The work for the 6-month period is summarized in Table 22.

TABLE 22.-Palm inspections, date-scalc-eradication project, July 1 to December 31, 1929

Arizona California
Item
Phoenix Yuma dis- Coachella Imperial
district trict district Valley

Palm inspections.... .....................--------------------------------- 33, 045 2,044 158, 460 16, 468
Infested properties found ....... ----------------------------- 5 2 22 19
Infested palms found and treated I --------------------- 15 3 370 53
Palms located on reconnaissance survey ---------- -0 0 0 196
1 Including infestations found in December, 1929, and not treated or destroyed until January, 1930; but not including June findings of palms treated or destroyed in July.

APPROPRIATIONS

The agricultural appropriation bill for the fiscal year 1931 carries the amount of $65,000 for the control and prevention of spread of the Parlatoria date scale. This is a reduction of $21,700 under the Federal funds appropriated for that purpose for the current fiscal year.


PREVENTION OF SPREAD OF PHONY PEACH DISEASE

A new quarantine to prevent the spread of the phony peach disease was issued on April 30, 1929, becoming effective on June 1. Under this quarantine, which was established on the recommendation of the Bureau of Plant Industry, the interstate movement of peach and nectarine trees, peach nectarine roots, or any other kinds or varieties of trees or shrubs grafted or budded on peach or nectarine roots from the regulated areas of Georgia and Alabama was restricted. Simultaneously with the quarantine enforcement measures carried out by the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration, the Bureau of Plant Industry is undertaking the total eradication of this disease from the United States under an appropriation for that purpose.
Intensive eradication work was started by the bureau in the northern and northwestern part of Georgia with the intention of completely eliminating the phony peach disease from the outlying areas of infection at thie earliest possible date and extending the eradication work eventually to the old centers of infection in the State in and surrounding Peach, Bibb, Macon, and Houston Counties.
The work thus far has included a substantially complete survey of the commercial orchards in the counties included in tlie lightly infested area and it reveals only a small number of recent inifect ionis in these districts. The infected trees discovered have been or are being destroyed. The bureau plans to continue the eradication work, (1) by broadening the surveys to cover dooryard and roadside peach trees, and (2) by extending the territory inward toward the center of infection as the work progresses.
This disease is believed to have been present inii Georgia for 40 or 50 years, but it seems to have been limited to the vicinity of Marshaliville for a considerable period and did not become sufficiently established to cause alarm until 1915. By that time enough dwarfed treesv were observed in the Fort Valley area to cause one of the growers to bring the matter to the attention of the Bureau of Plant Industry. ID)uring the last few seasons the ilifection has been centered in Fort Valley, where over 99 per cent of the trees inll some of the orchards have been attacked. Although present at least to some extent in 90 per cent of the commercial peach orchards of Georgia. surveys thus far indicate its absence from other States, except to a limited degree in Alabanhmt and Mississippi.
114048-30----4







206 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [Oct.-Dec.,

The experimental work of the bureau has shown that this disease is an infectious condition of the root system which causes peach and''nectarine trees and other trees grafted or budded on peach or nectarine roots to become dwarfed and produce abnormally small and poorly flavored fruit. The infectious virus appears to be confined entirely to the root system, and no restrictions therefore are placed on the movement of -fruit or of scions, branches, and other parts of peach and nectarine trees without roots.
The important feature of the quarantine regulations is the requirement that the restricted articles are prohibited interstate movement from the regulated areas until after a permit has been issued therefor by the United States Department of Agriculture. Such permits are issued only to nurseries "within which and within 1 mile of which no infection of the phony peach disease has existed for at least two years prior to the proposed date of movement." With respect to shipments made prior to July 1, 1930, evidence based on a single seasons inspection has been accepted.
As first designated, the regulated areas consisted of 64 counties of central and western Georgia and 1 county of eastern Alabama. Surveys by the Bureau of Plant Industry during the summer revealed a number of recent infections in other areas, and the regulations were therefore amended, effective November 1, 1929, adding 19 more counties of Georgia and 6 of Alabama to the regulated territory and dividing it into two areas known as the generally infected and the lightly infected area, respectively. The movement of peach and nectarine trees and roots from the generally infected to the lightly infected area is under the same restrictioft as such movement from the regulated areas as a whole to outside points.
Partial or complete inspections were made within and around 19 -nurseries' in Georgia and 3 nurseries in Alabama. The premises And environs of 8 Georgia nurseries and 1 Alabama nursery appeared to be free from, phony peach-disease infection' and permits were issued to their proprietors. Similar permits have been issued to 1-1 dealers to handle healthy stock not grown by themselves. Infections were, however, determined within the prescribed limits of 9 other Georgia nurseries and 2 Alabama nurseries. The remaining 2 Georgia nurserymen during the -course of the inspection of their premises stated that they did not desire to ship interstate or intrastate to points outside the regulated area, and the inspections of their nurseries and environs were therefore not completed.
The complete inspection of a nursery and its environs entails a thorough canvass and detailed examination of an, area of at least 3.141 square miles, or 4;4,010 acres, and if si ,veral separate blocks of peach and nectarine trees are grown may involve a much larger district.
The number of peach trees, exclusive of commercial orchards, found within each prescribed area varied from 303 to about 3,000, respectively. These trees were found in small home orchards, singly or as groups in back yards, in the middle of cultivated fields, along ditch banks, and so, forth, and, in fact, in Libout every conceivable place. In one instance hundreds of seedlings, some 5 feet tall, were found among a growth of hardwood trees, apparently from seed washed there. In another case 6 definitely phony trees, part of an abandoned orchard, were found ift the edge of a grove of good-sized pines.
In order to enforce the requirements, interstate shipments of nursery. stock coming from the regulated areas were inspected in transit at Atlanta, Ga., Birmingham, Ala., and Nashville and Memphis, Tenn., during the fall and winter, and it is planned to continue such inspection untilthe close of the spring shipping season. This work resulted in the interception of five shipments at Atlanta and one at Birmingham moving in violation, of the phony-, peach-disease quarantine, all of which were turned back to the shippers. Inspectors at the points -named further assisted in the enforcement of other plant quarantines in turning back 59 shipments moving in violation of such other quarantines. Forty-one of these were articles shipped from Florida without compliance with the Mediterranean fruit-fly-quarantine regulations, an(I the remainder were shipments intercepted in violation of the narcissusbulb, white-pine-blister-rust, Mexican-fruit-worm, and Japanese-beetle quarantines.
The number of shipments inspected and the number of violations intercepted are included in the figures given later under the heading Transit inspection.".






1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 207

As indicated in the transit inspection report, the item for the prevention of spread of the phony peach disease in the pending appropriation bill for the fiscal year 1931 is $3,000 less than the similar item ($15,000) during the current year, the difference constituting a transfer to the transit-inspection fund.

WHITE-PINE BLISTER RUST

The shipment of 5-leafed pines from New England, New York, or Washington State into other infected States is conditioned on the trees being grown from seed under specified sanitation requirements for protection from the blister rust. Movement from infected to noninfected States is entirely prohibited. A number of applications for pine-shipping permits were received during the 6-month period from New England and New York nurserymen, and two such permits were issued, one to a nursery in Maine and the other to a New York applicant. The permit supplied to the nurseryman in Maine was issued on the basis of inspections made during the previous fiscal year. A permit had previously been issued to a Vermont nursery, these three constituting the total number in force at the present time. In addition a tract in Connecticut on which a nurseryman wishes to plant 5-leafed pines was tentatively approved.
A considerable proportion of white-pine-blister-rust quarantine enforcement funds is devoted to the inspection of nursery stock in transit. This work resulted in the interception of 40 violations of the blister-rust quarantine during the last six months of 1929. Fifteen of these were shipped by commercial nurserymen and the remaining 25 by persons not commercially interested in the transportation of nursery stock.
The appropriation item for blister-rust work in the pending agricultural appropriation bill amounts to $10,000. a reduction of $17.000 from the present figure. This reduction consists of funds transferred to the new project of transit inspection.

GRAIN-RUST CONTROL BY MEANS OF BARBERRY ERADICATION
According to the Bureau of Plant Industry, 551,685 barberry bushes. seedlings, and sprouts were destroyed in 1929 in the campaign to prevent black stem-rust epidemics in the grain-growing States. A grand total of 1.143,9099 such bushes, seedlings, and sprouts have been destroyed during the entire campaign, which began in the spring of 1918.
During the calendar year approximately 11 cou't s in Illinois. Michian. and Ohio were covered by the first survey, and approximately 1-1.5 counties in Colorado, Illinois, Minnesota, Mlontaina, Nebraska. North )ukota. ()hio. South Dakota, and Wisconsin were surveyed a second timnie. Resuirveys were c (i, 'et(ed in areas totaling approximately 12.5 counties, located inll the same State~. an, Indiana in addition.
The Plant Quarantine and Control Administration is responsible only for that phase of the barberry-eradication project which relates to the enf(,oreenlint of the Federal quarantine against the interstate movement of Herberis and Mahonia plants. No special apl)propriation to the administration is mad(e for this purpose. Two v violations of this (quarantinlle were intercepted by transit inspectors of the administration during the -umonth period.


TRANSIT INSPECTION
The inspection in transit of articles restricted under domestici-plat quarntines has been carried on (during the past season under ap1roriat on fo'r he control and prevention of spread of the white )pine blister rust, te p loy peach disease, the European orn orer, tie lediterranean fI'ruit ily. :(and thel Japanese beetle. The( number of different shipimets ilispecteId in (eca lit in with this work and the number of quarantine v inlat ions interi'el ed re show n in Tables 23 and 24.








208 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [Oct.-Dec.,

TABLE 23.-Shipmen-ts intercepted~ by transit iatpectors as violations of Fedteral

plant qua rantine&, July 1 to December 31, 19-29'

Corn- Non- Corn- Nonmercial Comn- mercial cornQuarantine ship- meca urnieship- mercial
pes ship- pes shippr pespers pers


No. 38, black stem rust------------ 0 2 No. 64C Mexican fruit worm 1--- 1
No. 43, E uropean corn borer ------ 3 91 No. 67, phony peach disease ---- 6 0
No. 45, gipsy moth and browntail 5 19 No. 68, Mediterranean fruit fly -- 65 13
moth. Violations of Nos. 48 and 66 ---- 39 57
No. 48, Japanese beetle------------ 2 18
No. 62. narcissus bulb ------------- 317 45 1453 1271
No. 63, white-pine blister rust.~. 15 25

iThe total number of quarantine violations shown here, 724, represent 703 different shipments; in addi tion to the double violations shown for quarantines No. 48 and No. 66, 16 others were violations of two. or more quarantines.

TABLE 24.-Skhipmen ts of nursery stock and other plants and plant pro ducts
checked by transit inspectors aa to compliance wit& plant quarantines, July 1
to December 31, 1929)


Station Parcel post Express Freight Total

Atlanta --------------------------------------------- 1,544 ~ 4,315 52 5,911
Birmingham----------------------------------------- 1,314 .2, 545 33 3,892
Chicago--------------------------------------------- 35,516 11,755 127 47,398
Cincinnati ------------------------------------------ 0 179 0 179
Cleveland------------------------------------------ 1,780 77 0 1,857
Indianapolis---------------------------------------- 269 20 0 289
Kansas City --------------------------------------- 8,896 9,992 360 19,248
Memphis------------------------------------------ 1,115 1,912 86 3,113
Nashville------------------------------------------ 1,774 3,980 430 6,184
New York ---------------------------------------- 171,713 1,909 0 173,622
Omaha -------------------------------------------- 3,171 394. 0 3,565
Portland ------------------------------------------ 5,265 4,877 2,056I 12,198
St. Louis-------------------------------------------- 0 55 0 55
St. Paul -------------------------------------------- 901 321 0 1,222
Seattle -------------------------------------------- 4,447 535 17 4,999
Spokane ------------------------------------------- 2,914 451 390 3,755
Washington, D. C ------------------------------------ 0 250 0 250
Total ----------------------------------------240, 619 43, 567 3, 551 j 287, 737


Under the pending agricultural appropriation bill for the fiscal year 1931
provision is made for the establishment of this work as a separate project and an item of $40,000 is carried for the purpose. Of this amount $20,000 constitutes an increase in available funds and the remainder ($20,000) is derived from a reducton of $17,000 in the white-pine-blister-rust appropriation and of $3,000 in the phony-peach-disease appropriatin.















QUARANTINE AND OTHER OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO EUROPEAN CORN-BORER
QUARANTINE (NO. 43)
REVISION OF REGULATIONS

INTRODUCTORY NOTE
This revision of the European corn-borer-quarantine regulations is necessitated by the spread of the borer during the past season. Thirty-eight townships in Connecticut, 30 townships in Massachusetts, 111 townships in Maine, 39 townships in New Hampshire, 102 townships in Vermont, 110 townships in Indiana, 7 townships in Pennsylvania, 195 townships in Ohio, and 23 townshil)ps in West Virginia, a total of 655 townships are now added to the regulated area, of which 209 are in the 2-generation area and 446 in the 1-generation area. In addition, 7 townships in New Hampshire which were formerly in the 1-generation area have been transferred to the 2-generation area.
Changes in the requirements governing the interstate movement of the restricted articles include (1) placing the limitation on the quantity of cleaned shelled corn which may be shipped without certification or other restriction at 25 pounds to the shipment instead of 2 pounds, as heretofore; (2) allowing free movement of sweet corn on the cob from New York City during the months of May and June, the period during which no sweet corn produced within the regulated areas reaches that city; and (3) removing the special restriction applying to Maine as to entry of the restricted articles from the regulated areas outside that State. L A. 8TN,
~LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Plant Quarantine a nd Control Administration.


NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 43 (SIxTH RELvISION)
(Effective on and after January 1, 1928. Amends and supersedes Quarantine No. 43, fifth revision, as amended)

I. W. M. Jardine, Secretary of Agriculture, have determined that it is necessary to quarantine the States of Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Maine, Rhode Island, Connecticut. Vermont, New York, New Jersey, Plennsylvaniia. \est Virginia, Ohio, Michigan, and([ Indiana to prevent the spread of the Eurpen corn borer (Pyrausta nubilalis IHubn.), a dangerous insect new to and not heretofore widely prevalent or distributed within and throughout the United States.
Now, therefore, under authority conferred by section 8 of the plant quarantine act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended by the act of Congress approved March 4. 1917 (39 Stat. 1134, 1165), and having duly given the public hearing required thereby, I do quarantine the said States of Massachusetts, New IHampshire, Maine, Rhode Island, Connecticut, Vermont, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Ohio, Michigan, and Indiana, effective on and after January 1, 1928. Hereafter, under the authority of said act of August 20, 1912, amended as aforesaid, corn and broomcorn (including all parts of the stalk), aill sorghums, Sudan grass, celery, green beans in the pod. beets with tops, rhubarb, oat and rye straw as such or when used as packin,.

1 Important: Shippcrs should note from regulation 5 that restrictions on the movement of corn, broonmcorn, sorghums, and Sudan grass apply throughout the regulated areas, but that ertificatlon of the other products named In the notice of quarantine is required only when they are to be move from the regulated areas of Masshusetts ~usternl sect ioni. New Hampshire, Maine, Rhode Island, Connecticut (eastern section), and from Flshers Island in Suffolk County. N. Y. Thi is in accord with the rvgulatioins hrtlotret in l)orce un e Notice of Quarantiue No. 43.
209







210 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [Oct.-Dec.,

cut flowers or entire plants of chrysanthemum, aster, cosmos, zinnia, hollyhock, and cut flowers or entire plants of gladiolus and dahlia, except the bulbs thereof without stems, shall not be shipped, offered for shipment to a common carrier, received for transportation or transported by a common carrier, _or carried, transported, moved, or allowed to be moved from the said States into or through any other State or Territory or District of the United States, in manner or method or under conditions other than those prescribed in the rules and regulations hereinafter made and amendments thereto: Provided, That the restrictions of this quarantine and of the rules and regulations supplemental thereto may, be limited to the areas in a quarantined State now, or Which may be hereafter, designated by the Secretary of Agriculture as regulated areas when, in the judgment of the Secretary of Agriculture, the enforcement of the aforesaid rules and regulations as to such regulated areas shall be adequate to prevent the spread of the European corn borer: Provided further, That such limitation shall be conditioned upon the said State providing for and enforcing such control measures with respect to such regulated areas' as, in the judg1.ment of the Secretary of Agriculture, shall be deemed adequate to prevent the spread of the European corn borer, therefrom to other parts ,of the State.
Done at the city of Washington, this 29th day of December, 1927.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[SEAL.] W. M. JARDINE,
Secretary of Agriculture.

REVISED RULES AND REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL To NOTncE OF QUARANTINE
No. 43 (SIXTH REviSION)
(Approved December 16, 1929; effective December 16, 1929)
REGULATION 1. DEFINITIONS.
For the purpose of these regulations the following words, names,. and terms shall be construed, respectively, to mean:
(a) Corn borer: The insect known as the European corn borer (Pyrau~tta nubilalis Hubna.).
(b) Quarantined area: Any State quarantined by the Secretary of Agriculture upon determination by him that the corn borer exists therein.
(c) Two-generation regulated are a: The entire area comprised of portions of the quarantined States now or hereafter designated by the Secretary of Agriculture as regulated to prevent the spread of the 2-generation strain of- the European corn borer therefrom.
(d) One-generation regulated area: The entire area comprised of portions of the quarantined States now or hereafter designated by the Secretary of Agriculture as regulated to prevent the spread of the 1-generation strain of the European corn borer therefrom.
(e) Inspector: An inspector of the United States Department of Agriculture. REGULATION 2. LIMITATION OF RESTRICTIONS TO REGULATED AREAS.
Conditioned upon the compliance on the part of the State concerned with the second proviso in notice of quarantine No. 43 (sixth revision), the restrictions provided in these regulations on the interstate movement of the. plants and plant products enumerated in said notice of quarantine will be limited to such products originating in or moving from the areas in such States now or hereafter designated by the Secretary of Agriculture as regulated areas.
REGULATION 3. REGULATED AREAS.
In accordance with the provisos to Notice of Quarantine No. 43 (sixth revision), the Secretary of Agriculture designates as regulated areas for the purpose of these regulations, the States, counties, townships, towns, and cities stated below, including any cities, towns, boroughs, or other political subdivisions included within their limits. Such regulated areas shall consist 'of the 2-generation regulated area and the 1-generation regulated area, respectively, as follows:






1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 211

TWO-GENERATION REGULATED AREA
Connecticut (eastern section) : Counties of Middlesex, New London, and Windham; and towns of Berlin, Glastonbury, Manchester, and Marlborough, in Hartford County; towns of Branford, Guilford, Madison, and Meriden, in New Haven County; and towns of Andover, Bolton, Columbia, Coventry, Hebron, Mansfield, Tolland, and Willington, in Tolland County.
Maine: Counties of Cumberland, Knox, Lincoln, Sagadahoc and York; and towns of Auburn, Durham, Lewiston, Lisbonii, Poland, and Webster, in Androscoggin County; towns of Gouldsborough, Sullivan, Hancock, Orland, Bucksport, and the city of Ellsworth, in Hancock County, and all territory south of said towns and city in said county; towns of Augusta, Chelsea, China. Farmingdale, Gardiner, Hallowell, Litchtield, Manchester, Pittston, Randolph, West Gardiner, and Windsor, in Kennebec County; towns of Brownfield, Denmark, Fryeburg, Hiram, and Porter, in Oxford County; and towns of Belfast, Belmont, Frankport, Islesborough, Liberty, Lincolinvlle, Montville, Morrill, Northport, Palermo, Prospect, Searsmont, Searsport, Stockton Springs, Swanville, and Waldo, in Waldo County.
Massachusetts (eastern section) : Counties of Barnstable, Bristol, Dukes, Essex, Middlesex, Nantucket, Norfolk, Plymouth, Suffolk, and Worcester.
New Hampshire: Counties of Belknap, Cheshire, Hillshoro, Merrimack, Rockingham, Strafford, and Sullivan; and towns of Brookfield, Conway, Eaton, Effingham, Freedom, Madison, Moultonboro, Ossipee, Sandwich. Ttauworth, Tuftonboro, Wakefield, and Wolfeboro, in Carroll County; and towns of Alexandria, Ashland, Bridgewater, Bristol, Campton, Canaan, Dorchester, Enfield, Grafton, Groton, Hanover, Haverhill, Hebron, Holderness, Lebanon, Lyme, Orange, Orford, Piermont, Plymouth, Rumney, a nd Wentworth, in Grafton County.
New York: Fishers Island, in Suffolk County.
Rhode Island: The entire State.

ONE-GENERATION REGULATED AREA
Connecticut (northern section) : Towns of Enfield and Suflield, in Hartford County; towns of North Canaan and Salisbury in Litchfild County; and town of Somers, in Tolland County.
Indiana: Counties of Adams, Allen, Blackford, De Kalb. Elkhart, Grant, Huntington, Jay, Kosciusko, Lagrange, La Porte, Marshall, Miami, Noble, Randolph, Starke, St. Joseph, Steuben, Wabash, Wayne. Wells, and Whitley; and townships of Center, ID)elaware, Hamilton, Harrison, Liberty, Monroe, Mouint Pleasant, Niles, Perry, Union, and Washington, in Delaware County; township of Posey in Fayette County; townships of Henry, Liberty, New Castle, Richland, and Rochester, in Fulton County; townships of Blue River, Dudley, Franklin. Henry, Liberty, Prairie, and Stoney ('reek, in Hcnry County; townships of Jackson, Liberty, and Union, in Holward (Cotunty; townships of Boone, Monroe, and Van Buren, in .1adison County; townships of Boone, .Jackson, Morgan, Pleasant, and Washington, in Porter County; and townshipl)s of Center, Hlarrison, and Union, in iUnon County.
Massachusetts (western section) : C(ounty of Berkshire; and towns of Ashfield, Bernardston, Buckland, ('harlemnont, C olrain, Conway, Deertield, Erving, Gill, Greenfield, Hawley, Heath, Leverett, Leyden. Monroe, Montague, Northfield, Orange, towe, Shelburne, Sunderland, Warwick, anid Whately, in Franklia County; towns of Agawnim, Blanford, hester. C'lhicopee. East Longmeadnw, Granville, Holyoke, Longimeadow, Ludlow, Mntgomery. Russell, Southwi.lk, Springfield, Tollan(d, Westfield, West Springliehl, and Wilbralhani. in Hampden County; and towns of (Chesterield. (unmnington, Easthampton. (nshon, Hadley, Hatfield, Huntington, Middleiehl. Northampton, Plainfield, Soutihampton, Westhamnipton, Williaimsburg, and Worthington, in Hamipshire ('ount. Michigan: The entire State.
New Jersey: Woodbridge, in Middlese.r County; and Bayonne. Jersey (,ity. Hohoken, Weelhawken, North IBergen, Union City. West New York, ;(t len i berg, and Secaucus, in Hudson County, be ig all that part of said county et of the Hackensack River and Newvark Bay. New York: The entire State (except Fl"islrs Island. in uffolk ( o nty. Ohio: Counties of Allen, Ashlalnd. Ashtabula, Athens. Auglaize,. Ilttnt. Carroll, Champaign, Clark, Clinton, Columhiana, Coshocton, Crawford, 4 n'a-







212 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [Oct-Dec.,

hoga, Darke, Defiance, Delaware, Erie, Fairfield, Fayette, Franklin, Fulton, Geauga, Greene, Guernsey, Hancock, Hardin, Harrison, Henry, Hocking, Holmes, Huron, Jefferson, Knox, Lake, Licking, Logan, Lorain, Lucas, Madison. Mahoning, Marion, Medina, Mercer, Miami, Monroe, Montgomery, Morgan, Morrow, Muskingum; Noble, Ottawa, Paulding, Perry, Pickaway, Portage, Preble, Putnam, Richland, Ross, Sandusky, Seneca, Shelby, Stark, Summit, Trumbull, Tuscarawas, Union, Van Wert, Warren, Washington, Wayne, Williams, Wood, and Wyandot; and townships of Lemon and Madison, in Butler County; townships of Dodson, Fairfield, Hamer, Liberty, Madison, New Market, Paint, Penn, and Union, in Highland County; townships of Milton and Washington, in Jackson County; and townships of Brown, Clinton, Eagle, Elk, Harrison, Jackson, Knox, Madison, Richland, Swan, and Vinton, in Vinton County.
Pennsylvania: Counties of Allegheny, Armstrong, Beaver, Blair, Bradford, Butler, Cambria, Cameron, Carbon, Centre, Clarion, Clearfield, Clinton, Columbia, Crawford, Elk, Erie, Forest, Greene, Indiana, Jefferson, Lackawanna, Lawrence, Luzerne, Lycoming, McKean, Mercer, Mifflin, Monroe, Montour, Pike, Potter, Sullivan, Susquehanna, Tioga, Union, Venango, Warren, Washington, Wayne, Westmoreland, and Wyoming; and townships of Bedford, Bloomfield, Broad Top, Colerain, East Providence, East St. Clair, Harrison, Hopewell, Juniata, Kimmel, King, Liberty, Lincoln, Monroe, Napier, Snake Spring, South Woodbury, Union, West Providence, West St. Clair, and Woodbury, in Bedford County; townships of Brownsville, Bullskin, Connellsville, Dunbar, Franklin, Georges, German, Jefferson, Lower Tyrone, Luzerne, Menallen, Nicholson, North Union, Perry, Redstone, Salt Lake, South Union, Springfield, Spring Hill, Stewart, Upper Tyrone, Washington, and Wharton, in Fayette County; townships of Barree, Brady, Carbon, Cass, Franklin, Henderson, Hopewell, Jackson, Juniata, Lincoln, Logan, Miller, Morris, Oneida, Penn, Porter, Shirley, Smithfield, Spruce Creek, Tod, Union, Walker, Warriorsmark, West, and Wood, in Huitingdon County; township of Upper Mount Bethel in Northampton County; townships of Coal, Delaware, East Cameron, East Chillisquaque, Gearhart, Lewis, Little Mahanoy, Lower Augusta, Mount Carmel, Point, Ralpho, Rockefeller, Rush, Shamokin, Turbot, Upper Augusta, West Cameron, West Chillisquaque, and Zerbe, in Northumberland County; townships of Butler, Delano, East Union, Kline, Mahanoy, North Union, Rush, Ryan, Union, and West Mahanoy, in Schuylkill County; and townships of Allegheny, Black, Brothersvailey, Conemaugh, Fairhope, Jefferson, Jenner, Larimer, Lincoln, Lower Turkeyfoot, Middlecreek, Milford, Northampton, Ogle, Paint, Quemahoning, Shade, Somerset, Stoneycreek, Summit, and Upper Turkeyfoot, in Somerset County.
Vermont: The entire State.
West Virginia: Counties of Brooke, Hancock, Marshall, Ohio, and Wetzel; and townships of Batelle, Cass, Clay, and Union, in Monongalia County; townships of Grant, Union, and Washington, in Pleasants County; townships of Ellsworth, Lincoln, and Union, in Tyler County; and townships of Parkersburg, Union, and Williamstown, in Wood County. REGULATION 4. EXTENSION OR REDUCTION OF REGULATED AREAS.
The regulated areas designated in regulation 3 may be extended or reduced as may be found advisable by the Secretary of Agriculture. Due notice of any extension or reduction and the areas affected thereby will be given in writing tc the transportation companies doing business in or through the States in which such areas are located, and by publication in newspapers selected by the Secretary of Agriculture within the States in which the areas affected are located.

REGULATION 5. CONTROL OF MOVEMENT OF RESTRICTED PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS.
Section A.-Restrictions on movement from 1-generation regulated area
(1) No cornstalks, ears, or other parts or debris of corn or broomcorn plants or sorghums or Sudan grass shall be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from the 1-genieration regulated area to or through any point outside thereof, unless a (ertiffiate or a permit shall have been issued therefor, except as provided in paragraphs (2) and (3) hereof.
(2) No corn on the cob or ears of corn originating within the 1-generation regulated area shall be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from such







19291 SERVICE AND REGULATORY AN-\NOUNCEME'NTS 213

orea to (,r through any point outside thereof. No corni oil thle cob orig-inai tilt outside the regulated areas and moved to thle I-generation, r'egulatedt areAt~i be moved or allowed to l)e moved interstate fromx such area to ori through a;,Ny point outside thereof unless a Permnit shall have beenl issued therefor 1'roc'h d Thait no restrictions are placed onl the miovemient of g4reeli corn'!I he (') n 1 .Newv York City (including the Boroughs of Br11oiix, Brooklyn, MalatxRichmond, and Queens) or fromn the regulated parts of -New *Jredurcill t11e months of May and JTune, and no piernit will be required brsUhimvviin during that period.
(30) -No shelled corn, or seed of broomcorn (,L ()f~rJiis,(r( ua
grass, shall be moved or allowed to Ite njioved intestae IPoi i lie ]I, hx:a! l reguatedare to or through anyl poinj~t out-side thereolI, unesthe 7-,w -dc-rn or s:eedl hbeen cleaned and unest certiticateorunitu lvzii ch
inoveme(nt htl have been issued thercior by the United,; S-ttes4 of!'rnin 3 Agricultur-e, exc-ept that no such certlilicate, or period khl b eqi with respect to st"ch mnovement (opakae or (-fle('dshle coiI 'ti7!,it'' ,,
pounds!-- or)le' to the;( shipment.
(4) N'Io retiiin re placed( on thit'atetioein rixIhe -aei
eraltionl regula11 tedt area to or throgh-1 "Anly pointil out side hle're.1, a!t zliy i 1lW ( the year, of celery, gr eenl beauls inl thle pod, beets with to"lI, iliubaitir, etaId rye straw as such or when used as, pack-l'ing-. nor cutIil Ilowersl (WFe epnit of chrys anthiemumn, aster, cosmos,zinaholhcldousa ddhia

Sect ion B.Rsrcwson hlocC,,ilCU fromji i?-gcwm ratioi rc!Inla H l I ai
(1) No cornstalks-. ears, or other-- pa,.rts or d6ltis of corn or })rooincorxn la
orI sorgh-1umis or Su1,an grass shall be ioe or allowed to be moved intiIters at from the( 2-generation regulated airea-f to or through any point out'-idethref
unesa certificate or a permit shall have beeniise therefor, ecp spo vidled inl paragraphs (2) and (3) hereof.
(2) No corn on the cob or ears of corn originating witlini the( 2-generatio regulated area shall be moved or allowed to be moved,( inters tate fnoxi -:ilt area to or through, any point outside thereof. -No corin onl the cob(I)iatn out,,ide the regulated areas and mnovedI to the 2-generation regu~ladae shatl be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from such area to or throlugh, aiiy point outside thereof unless a permit shall have been issued therefore .
(3) -No shelled corn, or seed of broomorn or of sorghumns or of Sudan gas shall be moved or allowed to le moved interstate from the2-neaonletlated area to or throu gh any point outside thereof, unless the saidI corn or. seed, has been cleaned and unless a certificate or permit authorizingr Such mHovemen0t shall have been issued therefor by the United States Depairtmlent of AgrIicuilture, except that no such certificate or permit shall be required within respwct to such movement of packages of cleaned shelled corn weighing 25 pounds or less to the shiipment.
(4) -No cut flowers or entire plants of chrysa :nthemum, aster, cosmos, zihhia, hiollyliock.,ahlia, or gladiolus shall be movedl or allowed to ble moved itr sta te from thle 2-generation regulated area to or throughI any point wutidle thereof unless a certificate or permit shall have bee(n issued thoeefor by' the 'United States Department of Agriculture. No restrictiolis are, howeve-r, placedl on the interstate movenient of bulbs and roots of dlahlia mnd glatdiolus \,vihmiL stems and no certificate or permit will be required for -tIch mo1velnemill.
(5) No celery, green beants in thle pod, beets,- with topsrhubab, (or iat1 oll rye straw, as, such or Nv'Ienl u'1ed as111 ~icig hale imive or (m- a( ll11c t b moved interstate fromil the 2-generio~n riit ied area, to) or thlrough.1 axiv pi iiiit ou~si(e thereof during the IJwei(?d from 'Julie I to lOeceinber "I. iiiclusive, 1hf1lle,; a certificate orI permilit sha,11ll hve been'I is.ue -Id thierefor 1 by* the United t le Department oft Agr-icuhtulre. No restl-et ions, '1-c placedl onl the t et*-8( :IHllO%(Invint of such aIrticles dur11ing" the period frmJanuar 1- 't to M.-o :1, iihiie arnd no certificate or permit will be reoluir-ed for1 such0 mloVelielit, durlinglL that1 Period.

(1) "No restriction's are placed onl thle intierstaite mo.vimnlt oif '11y of v(th le articles enumera-,ted when they shall ha'.vecei lfhu~c rd I es.o treated inl Such a manrthat inl the Judgmenlwit o f the ll( ic 1'n ifea could Ile transmitted.







214 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [Oct.-Dec.,

(2) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of any .of the articles enumerated moved from an area not under regulation through a regulated area when such movement is on a through bill of lading.
(3) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of the articles enumerated between points within the same regulated area, provided such articles do not pass through any point outside the regulated area in which they originated.
REGULATION 6. CONDITIONS GOVERNING THE ISSUANCE OF CERTIFICATES AND PERMITS.
(a) Applications; assembling articles for inspection: Persons intending to move or allow to be moved interstate plants and plant products for which certificates or permits are required by these regulations will make application therefor as far as possible in advance of the probable date of shipment. Applicants for inspection will be required to assemble the articles to, be inspected and so place them that they can be readily examined. If not so placed, inspection may be refused. All charges for storage, cartage, and labor incident to inspection other than the services of inspectors shall be paid by the shipper.
(b) Individual packages or car lots: Certificates of inspection authorizing the interstate movement of individual packages or car lots of the articles enumerated in Notice of Quarantine No. 43 (sixth revision) may be issued under either of the following conditions: (1) When the articles to be so moved have actually, been inspected and found free from infestation with the corn borer; (2) when the articles have been disinfected or treated under the supervision of an inspector in such a manner as to eliminate all risk of transmitting infestation.
(c) Uninfested premises: Certificates of inspection good for a period of 30 days from the date of inspection, authorizing the interstate movement of the articles enumerated, may be issued when the articles to be so moved have been grown on individual premises or in districts within a regulated area which have been determined by an inspector to be free from corn-borer infestation and to be maintained in such a condition of freedom from weeds and other extraneous vegetation as to prevent possibility of the appearance of the corn borer through such agencies.
(d) Dealers in shelled corn: Certificates may be issued any dealer in shelled corn, good for not to exceed 30 days from the date of inspection of his premises, in accordance with the following conditions: (1) That it shall* be determined by competent inspection that said dealer maintains equipment adequate to clean shelled corn so as to eliminate, cobs and debris capable of carrying the corn borer, that he operates said equipment under competent direction, and that he moves or allows to be moved interstate to points outside the regulated area only such corn as has been shelled and so cleaned; (2) that said dealer shall file with the United States Department of Agriculture a signed agreement that no corn will be moved or allowed to be moved by him or under his certificate interstate to points outside the regulated area unless and until such corn has been shelled and has been cleaned as herein required. Outstanding certificates may be withdrawn and further certification refused to any dealer who violates the said agreement or any of these rules and regulations.*
(e) Articles originating outside the regulated areas: Articles of which the interstate movement is restricted by these regulations which originate outside the rc-mbated areas may be shipped interstate from points within the regulated areas to points outside such areas under permit. Permits will be issued only for Jphmits and plant products which are not infested with the corn borer, and transportation companies sill niot accept or move interstate from within the regulated areas such plants and plant products originating outside such areas unless s each shipment is accompanied by a permit issued by the United States Department of Agriculture.
REGULATION 7. MAntKING REQUIREMENTS.
(a) Every car, box, bale, or other container of articles for which certificates or perit s are re. quired by these regulations shall be plafily marked with the minlII and address of: the cons,.ignor and the name andi address of the consignee, and shall bear atkache(I to the outside thereof the proper certificate or permit issued in complianc me with regulation 6 hereof.
(b) Tie certificates or permits in the case of carload and other bulk shipmenbts shall accompany the wayb~ills, conductors' manifests, memoranda, or bills of lading pertaining to such shipments.






19291 SERVICE AND REGULATORY AXNNOUNCESIENTS 21

REGULATION 8. THOROUGH CLEANING REQUIRED OF CARS, BOATS. AND OTHER \ ~HICLES BEFORE MOVING INTERSTATE.
Cars, boats, and other vehicles which have been used in transporting within the regulated areas plant products covered by these regulations or any other articles which may hereafter be made subject thereto shall not be mnioved or allowed to move interstate unless the same shall have been thoroughly swept out and cleaned by the carrier at the point of unloading or destination of all litter and rubbish from such regulated articles. No litter, rubbish, or refuse from any such plants and plant products shall be moved or allowed to move interstate.
REGULATION 9. INSPECTION OF RESTRICTED ARTICLES IN TRANSIT.
Any car, vehicle, basket, box, or other container moved or offered for movement interstate which contains or may contain articles the movement of which is prohibited or restricted by these regulations shall be subject to inspection by inspectors at any time or place.
REGULATION 10. PENALTIES FOR VIOLATION OF THESE RULES AND REGULATIONS.
Permits and certificates issued by the United States Department of Agriculture as a condition of interstate movement of plants or plant products restricted by these rules and regulations may be withdrawn and further permits and certification may be refused to any shipper who violates any of said rules and regulations.
REGULATION 11. SHIPMENTS BY THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTlURE.
Articles subject to restriction in these regulations may be moved interstate by the United States Department of Agriculture for experimental or scientific purposes, on such conditions and under such safeguards as may be prescribed by the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration. The container of articles so moved shall bear, securely attached to the outside thereof. an identifyin t g from the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration showing compliance with such conditions.
These revised rules and regulations shall be effective on and after December 16, 1929, and shall supersede the rules and regulations promulgated December 29, 1927, as amended.
Done at the city of Washington this 16th day of December, 1929. Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Ac'iculture.
[SEAL.] ARTHR -M. HYDE.
Secretary of Ayriculture.
[Copies of the foregoinz quarantine were sent to all common carriers doing buines in or through the quarantined area.]


NOTICE TO GENERAL PUBLIC THROUGH NEWSPAPERS
Notice is hereby givenll that the Secroetary of Agriculture, ulldtier amliority conferred on him by the plant quarantine act 0 Algilst 0, 1912 87 t 1, as Il enled, 11as pnl' lligallted. effective 1)eceilbIer 1, 1929, :1 rt vision o i lil rules anid regulations supI ental'tl to Notice of Quaraltiine No. 4, oIn accoll:lt of the Eurolpean eorn borer. This revision iilcld ll eiil:rgeinii ll : the areas under regulation inll ('nnecticut, Massachusetts, Mailie, New llilnslhire. Vermont, Peollunsylvtia;. ()hi ea,West Virgii. :ld In(lial". ('laues in ie requilremell tls afectig thle illestlltate Il)\(illent of the ritlrici led arfies inclu(de (1) placing ile limit: o11 the quatiity of cleaned slielied c'ri w hit. llmay be shipped without 1ert1 i icll )r at h rstic i t in I package instead of 2 pollids I[ lieretofore ; '..) aIllowill fle'e 11 ell 'H **1 sweet coril o1i te cob fro1 N w York ('ly urili p Ihe 111i111 w o .i\:i :rIIIl June, the eriod luring wich 110 S\eet corn produced \vithiji tle r I1i:t 1*i are~as reaches that city" and t( 1 Ir(,Iil(ViIn. the sl ei'ial 1Ir+id i .Iiii l 1 ili Maiiie as to cultry Of rest ricte~l articles fn unl the r'eu tt cii rtle~ s ot ti' I :i tl State.







216 PLANT QUTARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [Oct-Dec.,

Copies of the said quarantine and of the revised rules and regulations may be obtained from the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration, United States Department of Agriculture, Washington, D. C.
ARTHUR M. HYDE,,
Secretary of Agriculture.

[Published i the following newspapers: Hartford Times, Hartford, Conn.,* January 17, 1930; Indianapolis News, Indianapolis, Ind., January 18, 1930; Portland Press Herald, Portland, Me., January 17, 1930; Boston Herald, Boston, Mass., January 17, 1930; Detroit News, Detroit, Mich., January 17, 1930; Manchester Union Leader, Manchester, N. H., January 17, 1930; Jersey Journal, Jersey City, N. J., January 16, 1930; the World, New York, N. Y., January 17, 1930; the Dispatch, Columbus, Ohio, January i7, 1930; the Press, Pittsburgh, Pa., January 17, 1930; Evening Bulletin, Providence, R. I., January 17, 1930; Burigo Free Press, Burlington, Vt., January 17, 1930; the News, Wheeling, IV. Va., January 17, 1930.]


ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO7 JAPANESE-BEETLE QUARANTIN'E (NO. 48)
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING TO CONSIDER THE ADVISABILITY OF EXTENDING
TH-TE QU.ARA-NTINE ON ACCOUNT OF THE JAPANESE BEETLE TO THE STATE
OF RHODE ISLAND
OcToBm 24, 1 929..
The Secretary of Agriculture has information that the Japanese beetle (Pop illia japonica Newrn.), a dangerous, insect new to and not heretofore widely prevalent or distributed within and throughout the United States, and which is already known to exist in portions of the States of Connecticut, Delaware, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and the District of Columbia, has recently been discovered also in the State of Rhode Island.
It appears necessary, therefore,- to consider the advisability of revising the quarantine on account of this pest to include the State of Rhode Island within the quarantined area, and of restricting or prohibiting the movement from that State, or any infested districts determined therLein, of (1) farm, garden, and orchard products of all kinds; (2) grain and forage crops of all kinds; (3) nursery, ornamental, and greenhouse stock, and all other plants; and (4) sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure.
-Notice is, therefore, hereby given that in accordance with the plant quar-antine act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended by the act of Congress, approved March 4, 1917 (39 Stat. 1134, 1165), a public hearing 'will' be held before the United States Department of Agriculture, Plant Quarantine and Control Administration, and Federal Plant Quarantine Board, at 1729 New York Avenue, Washington, D. C., at 10 a. mn. October 31, 1929, in order that any person interested in the proposed revision of the quarantine may appear and be heard either in person or by attorney.
R. W. D-UNLAP,
Acting Secretary of Agriculture.
In the press statement issued to accompany this notice of public hearing the following additional information was given:
During the past summer surveys and Japanese-beetle trapping have resulted in the determination of the establishment of the Japanese beetle in Providence, R. I., and at a number of points outside of the regulated areas in Connecticut, New York, Pennsylvania, and Maryland. In addition, beetles have been taken at Norfolk, Va., and Boston, Mass., both of which points are at a considerable distance from territory now under restriction.
Opportunity will be given at the hearing for a discussion of the territory included within the areas regulated on account of the Asiatic beetle and the Asiatic garden beetle, and for the presentation of any proposals in connection therewith which those in attendance at the hearing may desire to make.







1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 217

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO MEDITERRANEAN FRUIT-FLY QUARANTINE (NO. 68)

INSTRUCTIONS TO NAVAL OFFICERS

GENERAL ORDER NAVY I)ICARfMENT.
No. 194 Washington, D. C., Ocwlbcr 1. 19,29.
PREVENTION OF SPREAD oF E)TERNA FRUIT FLY
(1) In order to prevent the spread of the Mediterranean fruit fly, a daingeroug insect, new to and not heretofore widely prevalent within and~ thrl~le,hut the United States, the Secretary of Agriculture has issued regulations to qularantinec the State of Florida. Interstate movement of host fruits andvgeiesro Florida into 18 Southern and Western States aiid into the Terr'ltoly of P 'riio Rico is prohibited.
(2) In order to prevent the escape to an uninfested arett of tily fruit flies which might be taken on board, it is directed that all practicable measures be taken to the effect that no vessels of the Navy which are likely to touch United States ports of the Gulf of Alc xic() or the Pacific coast, or ports of North (Caro)lina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, or P'orto 10ico take oin board Florida host fruits or vegetables for any purpose. This applies to articles- which have been produced in Florida, whether they are purcliased in that State Or t. lsewhere.
(3) Host fruits and vegetables include all citrus and ilcltru'- fruits (t Xu'pt watermelons, strawberries. andl pineapples) also peppers of all kinds. oai(S Lima and broad beans, and eglns
C. 1". ADAMS, Secrcuary of 11w NIry.


P. Q. C. A.-250 ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS

WEEKLY iIN PLACE OF SEMIWNEEKLY CLEA-N-UP oF GLIOvES AND GARDENS IN IAICATION AREA~ AUTHOUIZED MODIFICATIONN OF' REGULATIONS SLI PLEMEVTAI. 'it
NOTICE oF QUARANTINE No. 6,S)
(Approved October 11, 1929; effective October 11, 192))
Pending-- later amendment of the Alediterranean fruit-fly qua rt ir( recvulations, section A ('3) of regulaticin 3 thr,,reof is hereby modified to provide for the,~ weekly (in place of semi weekl y) clean-up and (destruction of dr ips and wvindfalls of host fruits, andl of riipeidmi vegetables and dIropls inl the fields.
This order is subject to cancellation or further modlificat ion should til- it'(ucovery of infestations or other c onditi' ins mat-ke suc(h auction' necessary to de the eradication or prevent the slpi cad of the Alediterraiieani fruit- fly.

Cliicf, Plant Qitaxantinor and, Control A din iiii x t i :.
Approved:
C. F. kIAM-IN,
Actingf &erctury of A gricult urc.


P. Q. C. A.- 251 ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS

STEI~s~ZATION ktQIWE's OfF~ s To) AIAS IIITILE-1rO IW)SIG;N ITI) AS


(AppovedOctobler 12, 1929; vffectlve October 12, n9

[(1) Mlodli'cation of ia;gaJi 5) (o) (do Srctionl A of regiilkitio-A:1 13 uwler


Pending" later amencldmenolf ()*the eierna ri-lf.Iir i i'r~.u:
tiolls, paragraph 5 (a) of Se-4ction A4 of' regultion i aHIntI'nl to ':n Host fruits produced ill il festcd a rc'us Itirll.1 on sh llhe ri' r 1t ;i ''aI i 1! O movement of frult protuc(! ill ta~v h' aea n t illp, bet.1 4'I t I er 1i d r t' ~ l unless and until such areas an-, withi the approval of the l'lt Qaau eanli~u u







218 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [Oct.-Dec.,

Administration, released from such designation by the proper State board or officerof the State concerned. Such sterilized fruit may be authorized movement anywhere in the United States other than into the States and Territory listed below in paragraph (h) (i).
This modification consists in the provision now made for the release from such designation of areas which have been, or may be, designated.as infested. Such releasewill be made upon the determination bythe Plant Quarantine and Control Administration that, as a result of the enforcement, of control measures required under Quarantine 68, the Mediterranean fruit fly apparently has been eradicated as to such area or areas. Such release shall be further conditioned on the lapse of a period without reappearance of the fruit fly sufficient, in the judgment of the administration, to justify such action. The effect of such release will be to remove the requirement of sterilization when fruit. from;, such areas is to be moved to destinations northeast of Potomac Yards, Va., but all other requirements applying to eradication areas will be retained.

(2) Releases now authorized]
The State Plant Board of Florida is hereby authorized to release from such designation all areas heretofore determined or designated as infested, except as to areas within which infestations have been determined subsequent to July 31, 1929. Any areas released under this authorization shall be retained as part of the eradication area and as such shall continue subject to all the conditions applicable to such eradication area prescribed under Federal and State Mediterranean fruit-fly quarantines.
C. L. MARLATT,
Chief, Plant Quarantine and Control Administration. Approved:
ARTHUR M. HYDE,
Secretary of Agriculture.USE OF HEAT FOR STERILIZING FLORIDA GRAPEFRUIT AUTHORIZED

(Press notic6)
OCTOBER 23, 1929.
The use of heat sterilization for Florida grapefruit as a condition of interstate movement is authorized in connection with packing houses in that State in administrative instructions' amending the quarantine on account of the Mediterranean fruit fly issued to-day by the Secretary of Agriculture. * %*
It should be distinctly understood, the department says, that neither this nor any other method of sterilizing host fruits and vegetables from Florida, is being given to infested fruit or vegetables. All fruits or vegetables in infested blocks are excluded from commercial shipment or other movement and are promptly destroyed. Sterilization is merely an added precaution over orchard and packing-house inspection to eliminate any residual risk of spread of the pest. The authorization of this method of sterilizing grapefruit is released at this time in response to the earnest requests of the growers, packers, and shippers concerned.

P. Q. C. A.-252 ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS

STERILIZATION OF GRAPEFRUIT BY USE OF HEAT UNDER MEDITERRANEAN FRUIT-FLY REGULATIONS
(Approved October 23, 1929; effective October 23, 1929)
Administrative instructions (P. Q. C. A. 246) issued September 19, 1929, on the Sterilization of citrus fruits under Mediterranean fruit-fly regulations 11 authorized the sterilization of citrus fruits by the use of low temperatures. At the time these instructions were issued sufficient information was not available to authorize the use of heat for sterilizing citrus fruit. Investigations and tests on the commercial practicability of the use of heat as a means of sterilizing such fruit have been conducted as rapidly as possible., The commercial tests so far conducted have been confined to grapefruit, since, oppor-






1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS. 219

tunity has not permitted carrying on tests on carload lots of oranges. In connection with these tests a number of car lots of grapefruit sterilized by heat have been shipped and successfully marketed in eastern and midwestern cities. These shipments contained less than the usual amount of unsalable fruit and, together with the experiments conducted in Florida, seem to clearly indicate that it is commercially practicable to modify, for grapefruit, the coloring process to secure the temperature required to kill any eggs or larve of the Mediterranean fruit fly, the presence of which in any orchard may have escaped discovery in the intensive grove and packing-house inspections.
The following method of sterilizing grapefruit is, therefore, authorized:
Heating, in connection with the usual coloring process, the fruit to a temperature of 1100 F. or above (not to exceed 1150) in the approximate center of the fruit and holding the temperature of 1100 or above (not to exceed 1150) for a period of eight hours.
No specifications as to the exact methods and equipments for obtaining these conditions are prescribed. Available information clearly indicates that by the application of dry heat the required temperatures can not he reached without injury to the fruit. To prevent such injury it is necessary to maintain a very high humidity throughout the period of treatment. In the tests where successful performance was obtained, live steam as the source of heat was applied in such a way as to secure as nearly as possible a uniform distribution of steam-heated air so directed as not to discharge directly on the fruit. In these tests the coloring was followed by the application of the high temperature necessary for sterilization. The air temperature ranged from 1150 to 1160 F.. and the air was very moist so that the humidity was practically 100 per cent. The fruit was held in field boxes stacked four boxes high, with narrow aisles between, and without special means of separating the boxes in each stack
While the results of the experiments so far conducted have been successful. It should be emphasized that inexactness and carelessness in operation may result in injury to fruit. On the other hand. available information indicates that the fruit will not be injured at temperatures slightly higher than 110' F. In authorizing the movement of fruit sterilized in accordance with the above requirements it is to be understood that the department does not assume responsibility for fruit injury.
C. L. MARLATT.
Chief, Plant Quarantine and Control Administration.
Approved:
ARTnHUR M. HYDE,
Secretary of Agriculture.

NOVEMBER 12. 192).
P. Q. C. A.-253 ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS

AUTHORIZATION OF TRANSPORTATION OF FLORIDA HOST FRUITS AND VEGETABLES
FROM THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA TO NEAR-BY POINTS IN VIRGINIA

[Modification of paragraph 2, regulation 11, under Quarantine No. 68, revised
(Approved November 12, 1929; effective November 13, 1929)
Pending later amendment of the Mediterranean fruit fly quarantine regulations. paragraph 2 of regulation 11,. is modified to authorize the transportation of Florida host fruits and vegetables from the District of Columbia into Arlington and Fairfax Counties. Va., and into the city of Alexandria. Va.. provided that such movement into the area concerned shall consist wholly of small quantities for local utilization and consumption and that host fruits and vegetables so transported into that area shall not be reshiplped or oltherwise transported from the counties and city named into or through other parts of .the State of Virginia.
C. L. MARLA'.
Chief, Plant Quarantine and Control Administralin.
Approved:
R. W. DUNLAP.
Acting Secretary of Agriculture.







220 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [Oct.-Dec.,

P. Q. C. A.-254 ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS

MOVEMENT AUTHORIZED OF STERILIZED HOST FRuIT'S AN~D VEG~rABLEs FROM
FLORIDA TO OTHER SOUTHERN AND WESTERN' STATES
(Approved November 18, 1929; effective November 21, 1929)
[Modification of Section A (5) of regulation 3, under Quarantine -No. 68, revised]
PendIng later amendment of the Mediterranean fru t-fiy-quarantine regulations. Section A (5) of regulation 3 is amended to read:
(5) Fruit and vegetable sterilization: All host fruits and vegetables packed, Sold, stored, or transported shall, under the supervision of and satisfactory to the inspector, be sterilized, either by heating, by refrigeration, or by other approved treatment in such manner and method as shall be prescribed by the, Plant Quarantine and Control Administration.
Provided, That pending the determination with respect to the methods of sterilization herein indicated of any adjustments necessitated by varietal and seasonal conditions of fruits and vegetables, or pending such packing-house adjustments as may be necessary to take advantage of such sterilization, shipments may be authorized as follows:
(a) Host fruits produced in infested areas: Sterilization shall be required as a condition of movement of fruit produced in areas which have at any time been determined as infested, unless and until such areas are or have been, with the approval of the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration, released from such designation by the proper State board or officer of the State concerned. Sterilized fruit from unreleased infested areas may be authorized movement anywhere in the United States other than into the following States and Territory: Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Georgia, Idaho, Louisiana, Mississippi, Nevada, New Mexico, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Washington, and the Territory of Porto Rico.
(b) Sterilized host fruits produced within an infested State, other than as to designated infested areas, and shipped in containers each of which bears a label affixed to the outside thereof under authority of the United States Department of Agriculture certifying that the contained fruit has been sterilized, may be authorized interstate movement anywhere in the United States and shall have full diversion and storage-in-transit privileges except as follows:
(i) Host fruits may be authorized movement into the Southern and Western States na .med in paragraph (a) hereof only for the period from November 21, 1929, to January 31, 1980. inclusive (subject to later extension for one additional month if such extension in the judgment of the United States Department of Agriculture does not involve risk of spread of the Mediterranean fruit fly) ; and during that period host fruits which have been sterilized and are so labeled may be reshipped between such Southern and Western States.
(ii) Host fruits which have originated in and moved from an infested State into the area north of and including the States of Virg--inia, Kentucky, Missouri, Kansas, Colorado, Wyoming, and Montana shall not thereafter be reshipped or otherwise transported or offered for shipment into the Southern and Western States named in paragraph (a) hereof.
('iii) I-lost fruits originating within an infested State shall not be moved or allowed to be moved directly or indirectly into the Territory of Porto Rico.
(c) Unsterilized host fruits produced in eradication areas, other than in designated infested areas, may be authorized movement only (i) to the Distrct of Columba, including Potomac Yards in Virginia, and to destinations in the States of Maryland, Pennsylvania, and States north and east thereof, including shipment via any of such States to foreign countries, or (Hi) to designated cold storage for sterilization.
(d.) Unsterilized host fruits produced in an infested State outside of eradication areas may, until further notice, be authorized movement anywhere in the United State,,- other than into the States and Territory listed above in paragraph (a). Until further notice, this restriction as to destination shall not apply to sour limes produced in Dade and Monroe Counties, Fla. #
(e) Peppers and Lima and broad beans produced in eradication areas may be authorized movement only to the District of Columbia, including Potomac Yards in Virginia, and to destinations in the States of Maryland, Pennsylvania, and States north and east thereof, including shipments via any of such States to foreign countries.
([) Peppers and Lima anid broad beans produced outside of eradication areas may be authorized movement throughout the United States other than into the States and Territory listed in paragraph (a).






1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 221

(g) Tomatoes produced in eradication areas and shipped green may be authorized movement' throughout the United States other than into the States and Territory listed in paragraph (a). Tomatoes produced outside of eradication areas and shipped green may be authorized movement throughout the United States, except into the Territory of Porto Rico.
(A) Eggplants produced anywhere in an infested State may be authorized movement throughout the United States other than into the States and Territory listed in paragraph (a).
(i) Diversion privileges: The limitations on movement prescribed herein will be interpreted to allow the movement, under the conditions prescribed in the regulations, of host fruits and vegetables (except as to unsterilized fruit produced in eradication areas) from Florida via the usual diversion points in the States of Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee for immediate diversion at such points to any point in the de'tination areas authorized in the quarantine regulations: Provided, That the waybills of all cars containing host fruits and vegetables not authorized movement into the Southern and Western States named in paragraph (a) and consigned to diversion points in such States shall bear a notation reading as follows: "This car must be diverted to destinations in the States north of and including the States of Virginia, Kentucky, Missouri, Kansas, Colorado. Wyoming. and Montana."
Administrative Instructions P. Q. C. A. 244 are hereby canceled.
C. L. MARLATT.
Chief, Plant Quarantine and Con trol Adiinistration.
Approved:
R. W. DUNLAP,
Acting Secretary of Agriculture.


P. Q. C. A.-255 ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS

STERILIZATION OF ORANGES. TANGERINES, AND SATSUMAS BY USE OF HEAT INDER MEDITERRANEAN FRUIT-FLY REGULATIONS
(Approved November 27, 1929; effective November 27, 1929)
Administrative Instructions (P. Q. C. A. 252), issued October 23, 1929, authorized the use of heat for the steriliaztion of grapefruit moving interstate under the regulations on account cf the Mediterranean fruit fly. These in-tructions also indicated that this method of sterilization might, on the complletion of c:,mmercial tests, be extended to include oranges and related citrus fruits. Approximately 140 car lots of oranges. including some tlogerines and satsumas, have been successfully marketed after being sterilized b)y the heat method author ized for grapefruit. Sterilization by the use of heat as Ip((rescribed in Adninistrative Instructions. Circular P. Q. C. A. 252, is hereby authorized as a basis of the issuance of permits for the interstate movement of oranges, tangerines, and satsumas. The conditions included in the said Administrative Instructions shall, in all particulars, apply to the use of heat in treating oranges, tangerines, and satsumas.
C. L. MAu.Ver,
Chief, Plant Quarantine and Control Administration.
Appro()ved:
AnRTHUR M. HYDE,
Secretary of Agriculture.


P. Q. C. A.-256 ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS

RELEAsE OF CERTAIN AREAS I)ESIGNATED AS INFESTE) UNDER TIHE MIEDITERANANN FRUIT-FLY QUARANTINE REG LATION s
[Supplementing P. Q. C. A. 251 and paragraph 5 (a) of sect ion A of regulation 3 und(ler Quarantine No. 6l, revised]
( A approved Noveiwer :30, 1929; effective I)eceinber 2, 19 2')
In response to a re(luest reeived froI ihe Stat e lil i lI~,mrd of P lri4:1. Illci boad Is authorized to releIase from designaliion :1 inft'eslet ireas aI ] 1:' < eight illn num111111)er-iin which infestation was disc Averel Uqull l .111 ::1







222 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [Oct.-Dec.,

and up to and including August 27, 1929. This order has the effect of eliminating the requirement of sterilization with respect to fruit from such areas which is to be moved to destinations northeast of Potomac Yards, Va.
The infestation in these eight areas was very trivial. In only one instance, where two fruits were concerned, was more than one fruit infested. Under the rule, however) requiring the inclusion in the area designated as infested of at least 1 mile beyond the actually infested property for the purpose of clean-up, spraying, and subsequent controls, these areas now released represent from 3 to 5 square miles each, scattered in various parts of central Florida. In five of these areas the last infestation found was discovered during the first seven days of August, and in the other three of these locations the discoveries were made on August 13, 14, and 27, respectively. The latest of these infestations has therefore been subject to intensive clean-up and eradication measures for a period of three months since the fruit fly was discovered there, and all of them have substantially the same status as to eradication as the areas released from designation as infested in the order of October 12, 1929 (P. Q. C. A. 251).
All areas released under this and previous authorizations shall be retained as part of the "eradication area," and as such will be subject to all the conditions applicable to such eradication area prescribed under Federal and State Mediterranean fruit-fly quarantines.
C. L. MARIATT,
Chief, Plant Quarantine and Control Administration

P. Q. C. A.-257 DECEMBER 17, 1929.

INSTRUCTIONS TO INSPECTORS RE INTERSTATE SHIPMENTS OF CELERY FROM FLORID.A

The normal conditions under which celery is produced and packed for interstatement movement from Florida make it very unlikely that the small amount of soil which may adhere to the roots would contain pupT of the Mediterranean fruit fly. Regulation 6, Notice of Quarantine No. 68, on account of the Mediterranean fruit fly, under which the interstate movenk lit of sand, soil, and earth from the eradication area is restricted, is net to be interpreted as applying to celery with the usual small amount of soil attached to the roots and base of the plants. Interstate movement without washing is authorized, based' on the fact that the State Plant Board of Florida will not permit host fruits or vegetables to reach a stage of maturity when they would be susceptible to infestation on properties on which celery is produced for commercial shipment. Celery produced on properties within the eradication area on which host fruits or vegetables are allowed to develop to a stage in which they may be susceptible to attack by the fruit fly or on which, in the judgment of the inspector, other conditions are such as to make it impossible to eliminate the danger of fruit fly puparia occurring in the soil will, prior to interstate shipment, be wa-hed or treated in such a manner as to remove all soil.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Plant Quarantine mind Control Administration.


P. Q. C. A.-258 ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS
CONTAINERS AUTHORIZED FOR INTERSTATE MOVEMENT OF FP.RIDA HOST FRUITS
AND VEGETABLES

[Interpretation of regulation 4, paragraph 5, under Notice of Quarantine No. 681
(Approved December 26, 1929; effective December 26, 1929)

The req i reiient that host fruits and vegetables moved from an infested State shall be p:(ked in standard commercial containers is interpreted to authorize the shipment of such fruits or vegetables in any container which (a) has custormarily been used in the past for the commercial shipment of such fruits and vegetables, and (b) is of such a nature as clearly to indicate the fact that host fruits or vegetal)les are contained therein.
LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Plant Quarantine and Control Adm inistration.






1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 223

REPORT OF SPECIAL COMMITTEE TO STUDY STATUS AND NEEDS OF MEDITERRANEAN FRUIT-FLY CAMPAIGN
(Press notice)
OCTOBER 28, 1929.
The Secretary of Agriculture releases herewith a report of a special committee on the Mediterranean fruit-fly campaign in Florida. This committee was selected at the suggestion of the Secretary under the direction of William R. Wood, chairman of the Appropriations Committee of the House, to secure the latest information for the use of that committee. This report presents an additional, independent, and recent judgment of the work and its future needs. The personnel of this committee was as follows: W. O. Thompson, president emeritus of Ohio State University; W. C. Reed, commercial fruit grower of Vincennes, Ind.; W. P. Flint, chief entomologist of the Illinois Natural History Survey; W. H. Alderman, head of the department of horticulture, University of Minnesota; and J. J. Davis, head of the department of entomology, Purdue University.

WASHINGTON, D. C.. October 22, 192.9.
Hon. ARTHUR M. HYDE,
Secretary of Agriculture, Washington, D. C.
SIR: Your committee appointed to make a study of the Mediterranean fruit fly in Florida, with special reference to progress of the work the past three months, the possibilities of eradication, and the future needs so far as determined at the present time, reports as follows:
In order to be familiar with the problem, the committee spent the past week in Florida, during which time 1,300 miles through the infested and olutling areas were covered and many citizens of Florida interviewed.
We concur with the report of your committee of seven regarding the economic importance of the insect and the need for eradication. The Mediterranean fruit fly should be recognized as a potential pest of very great importance to the fruit industry of the Southern States; also the results to date clearly forecast the possibility of complete eradication in Florida and this goal should be vigorously sought. We commend the work of the research and con(ttrol forces, the former for the progress made in the short period since the discovery of the infestation April 6, 1929, with attractants, poison sprays. host-plant studies, and fruit sterilization : the 'U tter for the app aren't thorouhness ,and c ( mplet eness of the quarantine and eradication work. We likewise conend the cooperion of the growers and the sacrifices wh'ch they have made in destroyng hundreds of thousands of boxes of fruit in order to aid in the eradication. A study of the activities of the research and control forces and the expenditures to date show an economical and efficient use of the funds available.

PROrRESS OF ERAD\I(CATION AND NEFDS FOR THiE FITuiE

The research division has made fundamental studies whicl halil, had aw important bearing on the con(luct of the eradicatioln ol ratni of the pst six i Hiiths and which will have an increasing value f(,r ay future 1 rgramin of c(lifr(l o eradication. A study of wild fruits, including the period of matu riii and susceptibility to fly attack. has revealed fucts which will enable a cin mtinuation of the eradication program and eliiinatin---for the ,present, at :e:ast o(f WIlirk which would cost man Iy millions of dollars. The studied of cd : tl lieat sterilizing processes which will permilit unilterrupted shijInet of i'itru- fruits has been basic and seems to assure the development t of iethod which will not only eliminate the dner of spread l iut may improve the cl()r and rewace rots over previous commrcial mletllhods. The filldillng and it ilizat iol of :a 1 1tAl spray to destroy the flies was doubtless one of the chief factors in lrinch about the present apparent absence of infestatio. Evidences of tni:11ra ry injury by this spray to the citrus t and its fruit were atparent. e iDly in groves where the grower 111has eell 1111unae to finance proper ulpkeelp. bIut further stitlies now under way indicate the possibility of the development of a safe and equally effective spray. IBait traps are noow useful only ill (hletin infe' tionl-n important ue since the kmer owne attraitanIlt used! will at:Iftr'act ily 111ma1le flies. Contilnued stu(ldies may reveall an attracta:it to whi l i femi:les a< well as males will respond. These dlevelopiilit s revealm in artiIl Il:id, ad research along these and other lines are essential for the cr:llicat i renti ran







224. PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION Eoct.-D ec.,

which has been so effective during the first six months of the campaign. Astudy of the canning industry, with special reference to the utilization of byproducts and its bearing on fruit-fly control, would seem to be a very desirable addition to the research program. 01,
The eradication division involves many important features. From an infestation where hundreds of flies eguld be obtained with a few sweeps with a net and where infested fruit was common, to a point where all'methods of trapping fail to catch a single fly and where no fruit infestation can be located in spite of diligent and extensive search, is little less than marvelous. Weather conditions may have assisted in reducing the infestation, but a study of all the data clearly shows that the complete destruction of fruits in the infested zones and the thorough use of poison sprays have been largely responsible. That, infestations have not been found in adjoining States where much fruit was shipped previous to the discovery of the infestation, nor in the known infested area, are facts difficult to explain. That infestations will be found, at least in the original infested zones, before the end of June, 1930, seems almost certain. For this reason sufficient funds should be immediately available for stamping out incipient outbreaks should they appear. A continuation and enlargement of the inspection and scouting work is essential to discover any occurrences of the fly before they become conspicuous. Spraying should be continued in the vicinity'of citrus groves where injury to the trees and shrubs is not likely to result. The complete destruction of "drops" and the inauguration of a host-free period (approximately April 1 to September 1) by removal of the ,citrus and other susceptible fruits, such as* peach, pear, guava, and Surinam cherry, seems to be an importantt feature of the eradication program. Destruetion of abandoned groves is likewise important in the proposed program of eradication.
A very thorough study of wild native host fruits in 600 square miles of wild, natural growths, exclusive of abandoned groves. has failed to reveal a single infested fruit. For this reason, and until such findings are made, we believe a general elean-up in such areas unnecessary. This will materially reduce the cost of an efficient, eradication campaign.
An important part of the project is the quarantine which involves the possible spread of the fly by means of public carriers. This work has been admirably accomplished by the National Guard of Florida. The utilization of the State National Guard for the enforcement of quarantines has never before been attempted and the methods and effectiveness of this organization for quarantine duty where a single State is involved are heartily indorsed. the enforcement of garbage disposal, screening of fruit stands and fruit delivery wagons, is important from the standpoint of eradication and should continue as a phase of the quarantine under the supervision and control of the State National Guard.
Many who have objected to one or another phase of the fruit-fly project were interviewed, but after discussion and conference a distinct majority were'in favor of a continuation of the research and eradication work on a reasonable basis. It was apparent that the comparatively few who questioned the need Or efficiency of the work usually did so because they were uninformed on the significance of the Mediterranean fruit fly should it become established and beyond control, and on the immensity of a program of eradication. For these reasons we believe better methods of fully informing the public should be used and that an efficient program of education be inaugurated.
The appropriations already made, for the eradication program have been so effectively used that infestation is not now apparent. The failure to continue the program of eradication as a measure of precaution might threaten the effleiency of the work already a&omplished. In addition, an, emergency fund as a reserve might well be provided and made available only in case of new outbreaks in outside areas which would constitute emergencies.
The committee desires to express its appreciation for the detiveand willing cooperation on the part of the Federal, State, and county officials in the iliauguration and prosecution of the eradication program.
W. 0. THOMPSON
Chairman.
WILLIAM C. RFxDW. H. ALDEuMAN.
W. P. FLINT.
J. J. DAvis,
Secretary.






1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 225

CONFERENCE OF FEDERAL AND STATE OFFICIALS CALLED TO DISCUSS MOVEMENT OF FLORIDA CITRUS FRUIT UNDER STERILIZATION INTO SOUTHERN
AND WESTERN MARKETS DURING WINTER
(Press notice)
NOVEMBER 12, 1929.
The authorization of movement of Florida citrus fruit under sterilization into southern and western markets during the winter period is the subject of a conference announced to-day by the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration of the United States Department of Agriculture. The conference is to be held Saturday, November 16, at 10 a. m., at 1729 New York Avenue NW., Washington, D. C. An invitation is being extended by the Department of Agriculture to the appropriate officers of the States into which such fruit would move to attend such conference for the purpose of reviewing with the department's specialists the data which has led the department to the conviction that, under present conditions, and under the requirements of sterilization and control of movement, any risk of spread of the fruit fly is eliminated. The Plant Quarantine and Control Administration says that such movement was provided for in the revision of the fruit-fly quarantine of September 1, but its immediate application was deferred awaiting the demonstration of the commercial practicability of the methods of sterilization, and the development, in connection with the packing houses of Florida, of approved equipment for such sterilization adequate to warrant the enlargement of marketing privileges now being considered. Several hundred carloads of fruit have already been handled successfully under sterilization, and facilities are now available in Florida for the sterilization, by the heat method, of upwards of 50 carloads of fruit per day, and equipment for such treatment is being rapidly increased. Steriliztion by refrigeration is also available in Florida, but it is expected that the bulk of the movement will be under the heat treatment.
The Plant Quarantine and Control Administration says that under the requirements of the quarantine all orchards are kept under intensive inspection and that all fruit in any block or area in which infestation may be determined is to be promptly destroyed. Sterilization is therefore an additional safeguard applied to all fruit subject to the movement under consideration to eliminate any residual risk.
In the last two months and a half no infested fruit has been found in Florida nor have any fruit flies ben taken in the thousands of traps distributed for that purpose. Although this situation does not mean that the fruit fly hats been eliminated from Florida, it does mean that the success of the eradication (effort has been notable and the Department of Agriculture hopl)es that any ralppearaince will be of minor character and. under the intensive inspection which is being maintained, will be promptly discovered and cleaned up.


HEAT STERILIZATION OF CITRUS FRUIT

The requirements for sterilization by heat, as given in Plant Quaraintine :land Control Adminiistration Instructions No. 2)2. are as follows:
Heating, in connection with the usual coloring process, the fruit to a temperature of 110' F. or above (not to exceed 115) in the approximate center of the fruit and holding the temperature of 1100 or above (not to exceed 115o) for a period of eight hours.
It is obvious that to Imld fruit at this temperaiture for so long a peril)d requires careful attention (I a lid close r(egulatlion of the coniditili~ in 1lhe Vt W Is if the fruit is to remainill uninjured.
The essentials of sterilization without injury to the fruit are that the air in the room be saturated with water at all times a nd tha the fruit shouial not be heated to too, high a temllperature nor too long. Temperatures of 115 F. or above :ti e 1try i le t injure cilrl is fruit, a d wit l pr( per equipment its l 11 necessary to carry 1l1ie teiperature so hillgh at any t Tie. I h fruit "Q. 1t1 all be brought to a teneralure of 110 without raising the tempeira ture of any of it to more than 112 (f course, under some condtions ati wilh erint kinds of fruit, it has been possible to heat fruit to e ttel r's of 115 a"d even 1200, without injury, but these templratures are iangerois: atl il Iilstl cases will cause in jury.
Injury to Ithe fruit is usually evident in loss of oil frt 1 thie oil V,~iclhN of the rind, burning of the rinlld, injury around the stem of tlI fruit. att the general drying out and burnilied ap arace of the surface of the fruit. If lthe fruit is killed it inmay take on a water-somaked scalded ap) earane (, ilury t tllhe







226 PLANT Q-UARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [Oct-Dec.,

interior of the fruit is liable to occur as an off flavor, which makes the fruit distasteful.
Fruit should not be heated up too slowly. Long heating at temperature's around 1100 iF. injures the fruit, and much the same damage may occur to the fruit when it is held too long in the processing room, as occurs when it is heated to too high a temperature. Frequently, when fruit is heated a long time, the temperature of some of the fruit soon rises to around 1100, while fruit in other portions of the room is at considerably lower temperatures.. This may result in holding some of the fruit at temperatures of 1100 or 11.20 for as much as 15 to 18 hours before the treatment is completed with all the fruit. It is important. then, that not more than 12 hours should be required to bring the fruit up to the holdin g period, and 14 hours is about the longest period that should be allowed. Pringing the frult up to the holding period in 6 to, 8 hours, if this can be done without raising the air temperature too, high, is highly desirable.
In beating the fruit, it is practically essential that the air should be saturated with water vapor at all times. Air with even a slight moisture deficit is a drying air and liable to dry out the peel and wither the fruit. It is also much easier to heat the fruit up with moist air than it is with dry air, as moist air carries much more heat per unit volume and will not dry out the skin of the fruit. It. of course, requires a large amount of heat to bring a carload of frlhit from a temperature of 600 to 1100 F. It therefore requires a large volume of saturated air at the proper temperature to furnish the heat to the fruit. The saturated air should be supplied in a volume of 5,000 to 6,000 cubic feet of air per minute under low static head, and the equipment should be so constructed that the air is spread out all over the room so that the fruit, in all parts of the room will receive practically the same amount of heat in the same length of time and the fruit will be evenly heated and none overheated.
The air should be conditioned-; that is, brought to the proper temperature and humidity in the conditioning chamber before it is allowed to come in' contact with the fruit. Steam is the most convenient method of carrying heat to the room, and steam under low pressure has a temperature of 2120 to. 2400 F. If steam at these temperatures is allowed to come in direct contact with the fruit it is liable to, injure, it, and unless the steam is thoroughly mixed with water vapor so that it is all cooled down to a temperature of 1100 to. 1120 F., there is danger that some portions, of the mixture might be at a temperature sufficiently high to cause damage to the fruit. If, however, the air is saturated and conditioned before it is allowed to. enter the room and kept at a temperature not higher than 1100 or 1120, there is no. danger of damage to the surface of the fruit.
The importance of a large volume of air under pressure is obvious when it is considered that it must be forced down through stacks of field boxes. four high packed solidly throughout the room. If the volume of air and pressure are insufficient and the distribution throughout the room faulty, the fruit will not be heated evenly, and some of the fruit may reach 1100 F. hours before the fruit in other parts of the room is raised to this temperature. Inasmuch as this method of sterilization requires th.9t all the fruit be heated up to 1100 and held at that temperature for a period of 8 hours, it is obvious that if the fruit is not heated evenly some of the fruit may be held at that temperature for 10, 12. or, 14 hours. This uneven heating, due to poor distribution of heat throughout the room, or defects in the room itself, is one of the most prolific sources of injury.
In a well-equipped room, properly handled, it is possible to heat a carload of fruit;- that is, 400 field boxes, from 600 to 1100 F. and hold it at this temperature for eight hours with a variation of not more than 20 between the coldest and warmest fruit in the room at any one t-me. There is practically no danger of injury to grapefruit or oranges processed in this way. There may be, however, an off flavor in the fruit immediately after it is removed from the room. -After it has been cooled and held for a few days this off flavor disappears, so that with good frit -properly processed there is practcally no difference in flavor between processed andl unprocessed fruit from the same tree. This point has been established by a series of careful investigations of fruit from various localities, in different types of rooms. With the flat, insipid fruit which is commonly found in the eradication area, the processing properly done neither improves nor injures the flavor. The generally poor flavor of fruit from the eradication area is not (due to sterilization.
Hundreds of carloads of both grapefruit and oranges have been sterilized and marketed this season. There has been surprisingly little decay in the sterilized fruit, much less, as a rule, than in comparable cars of unsterilized







1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 227

fruit on the northeastern markets. The process also improves the color of early-season grapefruit which has been colored by ethylene or stove gas. The decrease in decay and the better color are, of course, distinct advantages in marketing the fruit.
Fruit which has been colored should not be processed immediately after coloring, but the gas should be blown out of the room and the fruit allowed to air for two or three hours before the heating is begun. If the coloring is d(lone in the processing room it is well to turn on the blowers without any heat and circulate the air thoroughly through the room until all gas fumes are removed. Th's may require several hours, but should be done before attempting to process by heat. This precaution is especially necessary in fruit colored with ethylene. If properly handled, colored grapefruit and oranges can be processed without danger of injury. With tangerines, however, there is considerable danger of injury if they are colored before processing. A number of lots of tree-colored tangerines have been sterilized successfully, however.
It should be remembered in the sterilization of citrus fruit by this method that the fruit should not go above 112' F. and not higher than 115o under any consideration. It should not require more than eight hours to bring the fruit up to 110*. and under no consideration should 't be allowed to stay In the room more than 22 hours. The air in the room should be saturated at all times during the processing.
LON A. HAWKING S,
Principal Ph ysiologibt.
ORLANDO, FLA., December 27, 1929.

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO NURSERY STOCK, PLANT, AND SEED QUARANTINE (NO. 37)
INSTRUCTIONS TO COLLECTORS OF CUSTOMS (T. D. 43579)

PLANT QUARANTINE-LILY BULBS
[Inspection and release by United States plant quarantine inspector at Vancouver, British Columbia, of shpments of lily bulbs to be imported into the
United States]
TREASURY DEPARTMENT,
OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONER OF CUSTOMS, Washington, 1). '
To Collectors of Custonis and Others Concerned:
The department is advised by the Plant Quarantine and Control A(dministration of the United States Department of Agriculture that arrangements have been made whereby a plant quarantine inspector stationed at Bellingham. Wash., will v'sit Vancouver, British Columbia, for the purpose of inspect ing and releasing consignments of lily bulbs (1. c. 1. or carload shipments covered by inward foreign manifests, certified by United States customs or consular officers) to be imported into the United States.
'iThe plant quarantine insl)ector will make notation on the corresl)onding 'nward foreign manifest to the effect that the shipment concerned has been inspected and released, and collectors of customs.at frontier ports are herehy instructed to accept such notations, in so far as the jurisdiction of the Plant Quarantine and Control Admin'stration is concerned, as authority for the ladmission thereof into the United(l States. Collectors of customs at ports 1of destination designated in the manifests should also accept such notatims as in(licating that the shipments have been released by the Plant Quarantine amnd Control Admin'stration.
Shipments of other plants or I)lant products subject to plant quarantime restrictions, as well as consiennents of lily bulbs not inspected anl released in accordance with the foregoing, will be admitted to entry only upon compliance with the requirements of article 512 of the Customs Ilegulations iof 192:11 and will be governed by the provi sions of articles 510 to 1( of the ('stams iegulalions.
F. X. A. 1':iII,
(9265ri-19.) oin mnissxioner of ('ut ms.
Approved October 2, 1929:
A. W. fMELLON.
Nccrctury of the Treasury.







228 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [Oct.-Dec.,

ANNOUNCEMiENTS RELATING TO PHONY-PEACH-DISEASE QUARANTINE (NO. 67)

MODIFICATION OF PHONY-PEACH-DISEASE-QUARANTINE REGULATIONS

INTRODUCTORY NOTE

The amendment which follows is necessitated by the discovery of a small number of phony-peach-disease infections in commercial orchards of Georgia and Alabama outside the areas previously brought under regulation to prevent the spread of this disease. Nineteen counties of Georgia and six of Alabama are added to the regulated area at this time.
The surveys of the Bureau of Plant Industry reveal only a limited number of recent infections in these districts. The infected trees discovered have been or are being destroyed as rapidly as found. In order to protect the zone in which the infection is slight and where intensive eradication operations are in progress, the department, under this amendment, is dividing the regulated areas into two sections, which will be known as the "generally infected area" and the "lightly infected area," respectively. The movement of peach nursery stock and other restricted articles from either area to outside points and from the generally infected area to the lightly infected area is prohibited except under permit. It is the expectation that as the surveys continue and the intensive eradication operations are undertaken closer to the center of infection, the lightly infected area can gradually be expanded to include the counties in which substantial progress is being made toward the eradication of the disease. At this time all the counties in which infection has been found for the first time during 1929 are being placed within the lightly infected area, except Chambers County, Ala., where the disease was found more prevalent than in the others, and Warren and McDuffie Counties, Ga., which are isolated from the other lightly infected counties and are contiguous to the generally infected territory. These three counties are accordingly being added to the generally infected area.
C. L. MARLATT,
Chief, Plant Quarantine and Control Administration,


AMENDMENT No. 1 TO RULES AND REULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE OF
QUARANTINE No. 67
(Approved October 30, 1929; effective November 1, 1929)

Under authority conferred by the plant quarantine act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended by the act of Congress approved March 4, 1917 (39 Stat. 1134, 1165), it is ordered that regulations 3 and 5 of the rules and regulations supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 67, on account of the phonypeach disease, which were promulgated April 30, 1929, be, and the- same are hereby, amended to read as follows:
REGULATION 3. REGULATED AREAS,.
(1) In accordance with the proviso to Notice of Quarantine No. 67, the Secretary of Agriculture designates as regulated areas the following counties, including all cities, towns, townships, and other political subdivisions within their limits:
Alabama: Counties of Calhoun, Chambers, Cherokee, Cleburne, DeKalb, Lee, and Tuscaloosa.
Georgia: Counties of Baker, Baldwin, Banks, Bartow, Barrow, Bibb, Bleckley, Butts, Calhoun, Carroll, Campbell, Chattahoochee, Chattooga, Cherokee, Clarke, Clayton, Cobb. Coweta, Crawford, Crisp, Dade, DeKalb, Dooly, Dougherty, Douglas, F'ayette, Floyd, Fulton, Greene, Gwinnett, Habersham, Hancock, Haralson, Iharris, Heard, Henry, Houston, Jackson, Jasper, Jones, Lamar, Laurens, Lee, Macon, Marion, McDufie, Meriwether, Milton, Mitchell, Monroe, Morgan, Muscogee, Newton, Oconee, Oglethorpe, Paulding, Peach, Pike, Polk, Pulaski, Putnam, Quitnian, Randolph, Rockdale, Schley, Spalding, Stewart, Sumter, Talbot, Taliaferro, Taylor, Terrell, Troup, Twiggs, Upson, Walker, Walton, Warren, Washington, Webster, Whitfield, Wilkinson, and Worth.







1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 229

(2) For the purpose of regulating inspection and transportation the counties designated above are divided into two areas to be known as the generally infected area and the lightly infected area, respectively.
(3) The following counties comprise the lightly infected area:
Alabama: Counties of Calhoun, Cherokee, Cleburne, DeKalb, and Tus,'loosa.
Georgia: Counties of Banks, Bartow, Campbell, Carroll, Chattooga, Cherokee. Cobb, Dade, Douglas, Floyd, Habersham, Haralson, Heard, Milton, Paulding. Polk, Walker, and Whitfield.
(4) All other counties in the regulated areas shall constitute the generally infected area.
REGULATION 5. CONTROL OF MOVEMENT OF PEACH TRFES AND OTHER RESTRICTED
ARTIOLES.
(1) No peach trees, peach roots, nectarine trees, nectarine roots, or ally kinds or varieties of trees or shrubs grafted or budded on peach or nectarine roots shall be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from the regulated areas to any point outside thereof nor from the generally infected area to the lightly infected area unless a permit shall have been issued therefor by the United States Department of Agriculture.
(2) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of peach or nectarine fruit, fruit pits, cuttings, scions, or other parts of peach or nectarine trees without roots.
(3) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of the articles enumerated from an area not under regulation through a regulated area when such movement is on a through bill of lading.
This amendment shall be effective on and after November 1, 1929.
Done at the city of Washington this 30th day of October, 1929.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[SEAL.] R. W. DUNLAP.
Acting Secrctury of Agriculture.
[Copies of the foregoing amendment were sent to all common carriers in Georgia and Alabama.]

INSTRUCTIONS TO GENERAL PUBLIC THROUGH NEWSPAPERS
Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, under aithority conferred on him by the plant quarantine act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended, has promulgated an amendment, effective November 1, 1929, to the rules and regulations supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 67, on account of the phony-peach disease. This amendment modifies regulations 3 and 5 by adding 19 counties in Georgia and 6 counties in Alabama to the areas designated as regulated, dividing the regulated areas into an eradication area and a generally infested area, respectively, and restricting the movement of peach-nursery stock and certain other articles from the latter area to the former and from either area to nonregulated territory. Copies of said amendment imay be obtained from the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration, D1epartment of Agriculture, Washington, D. C.
R. AV. I)UNLAP,
Acting Secretary of Agriculture.
[Published in the following newspapers: Birmingham News, Birmingham, Ala., Novenmber 7, 1929; Atlanta Journal, Atlanta, Ga., November 8, 1929.]


INSTRUC'TIONS 'TO POSTMASTERS
PosT ()P'rIe DEPART M EN T,
Ti iRn AsISTANT PosTM.sr n GENFR A.
Wash ilgton, Norcm ber 22. I I19.
POSTMASTER.
MY DEAR Sin: There is inclosedl for your informatiil'n anld guidance a copy of amendment No. I to the rules and regulations supplenieital to Noa i:'1 of Qua: rantine No. 67 on account of the phony-lach disease, together with a liuide mentary press notice, effective November 1, 1929.







230 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [Oct.-Dec.,

It will be noted that under regulation No. 5 no peach trees, peach roots, nectarine trees, nectarine roots of any kind or varieties of trees or shrubs grafted or budded on peach or nectarine roots shall be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from the regulated areas to any point outside thereof unless a permit shall have been issued therefor by the United States Department of Agriculture.
No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of peach or nectarine fruit, fruit pits, cuttings, scions, or other parts of peach or nectarine trees without roots.
Under the provisions of paragraph 1, section 467, Postal Laws and Regulation.s, parcels containing any of the prohibited trees, roots, or shrubs may not be a(icepted for mailing from any point in the area quarantined by the order unl ss the articles are accompanied with the required certificate of the United States Department of Agriculture.
Very truly yours,
F. A. TILTON,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO PINK-BOLLWORM QUARANTINE

(NO. 52)
MODIFICATION OF PINK-BOLLWORM QUARANTINE
INTRODUCTORY NOTE

The amendment which follows adds Maricopa and Pinal Counties, Ariz., to the area designated as regulated, and is occasioned by the recent discovery of a pink-bollworm infestation in the vicinity of Phoenix, Ariz. Five counties in Arizona are now within the quarantined area. No extension of the regulated areas wthin the States of Texas and New Mexico is involved.
C. L. MARLATT,
Chief, Plant Quiarantine anid Control Administration.
AMENDMENT NO. 5 TO RULES AND REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE O]
QUARANTINE NO. 52 (REVISED)
provedvd October 30, 1929; effective on and after October 31, 1929)
Under authority conferred by the plant quarantine act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended by the act of Congress approved March 4, 1917 (39 Stat. 1134, 1165), it is ordered that regulation 3 of the rules and regulations supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 52 (revised), on account of the pink bollworm, which were promulgated July 9, 1927, be, and the same is hereby, amended to read as follows:
REGULATION 3. REGULATED AREAS.
In accordance with the first proviso to Notice of Quarantine No. 52 (revised), the Secretary of Agriculture designates as regulated areas the following counties and parts of counties in Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona, including all cities, towns, townships, and other political subdivisions within their limits:
Texas area: The counties of Terrell, Presidio, Brewster, Pecos, Jeff Davis, Reeves, Ward, Loving, Culberson, Hudspeth, El Paso, Winkler, Andrews, Ector, Crane, Upton, Midland, Martin, Glasscock, and all those portions of Dawson, Borden, and Howard Counties lying south and west of the following described boundary lines: Beginning at the west boundary line of Dawson County at the southwest corner of section 114 of block M; thence in an easterly direction on the south line of sections 114, 89, 84, 71, 66, 53, 48, and 35 to the southeast corner of said section 35; thence northerly on the east line of section 35 to the northeast corner of said section; thence easterly on the south line of sections 2'8, 27, 26, and 25 of block M, and of section 27 of block C41 to the southeast corner of said section 27 of block C41; thence southerly 3 miles on the east line of sections 7, 6, and 1 of the D. L. Cunningham block 5 to the southwest corner of section 2 of the D. L. Cunningham block 5; thence easterly on the south line of sections 2 and 3 of the D. L. Cunningham block 5, and of sections 12 and 11 of the Georg.etown Railroad Co. block 35 to the southeast corner of section 11: of said block; thence southerly along the east line of sections 24 and 21 of the D. L. Cunningham block 4 to the southwest corner of section 22 of said block 4; thence easterly along the south line of section 22 of said block 4






1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 231

and section 1 of the Georgetown Railroad Co. block 34 to the southeast corner of said section 1; thence southerly on the east line of sections 6 and 7 of the J. Poitevent block 2 to the southeast corner of said section 7; thence easterly on the south line of section 8 of the J. Poitevent block 2 and of sections 9 and 10 of block 34, township 6 north, to the southeast corner of said section 10; thence northerly along the east line of said section 10 to the northeast corner of said section; thence easterly along the north line of section 11 of block 34, township 6 north of the northeast corner of said section; thence southerly along the east line of said section 11 to the southeast corner of said section; thence easterly on the south line of section 14 of block 34, township 6 north, to the southeast corner of said section; thence southeasterly along the meanderings of Dry Tobacco Canyon and the south fork of the Colorado River across the boundary line between Dawson and Borden Counties to a point in Borden County where the Big Spring-Gail public road crosses said river; thence in a southerly direction following the said Big Spring-Gail road to a point 1 mile south of Morris schoolhouse in Howard County, the same being at intersection of the Vincent road; thence south along fence to Morgan Creek; thence southeasterly along the meanderings of said Morgan Creek to the Howard-Mitchell County line; thence south along said county line to the southeast corner of Howard County.
New Mexico area: The counties of Chaves, Eddy, Otero, Dona Ana, Luna, Grant, and Hidalgo.
Arizona area: The counties of Cochise, Greenlee, Graham, Pinal. and Maricopa.
This amendment shall be effective on and after October 31, 1929, and shall cancel and supersede amendment No. 3 to the rules and regulations supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 52 as revised. .
Done at the city of Washington this 30th day of October, 1929.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[SEAL.] R. W. DUNLAP.
Acting Se&retary of Agriculture
[Copies of the foregoing amendment were sent to all common carriers in Arizona.]


NOTICE TO GENERAL PUBLIC THROUGH NEWSPAPERS

Ocroua 30, 1929.
Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority conferred on him by the plant quarantine act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended, has promulgated amendment No. 5 to the rules and regulations supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 52, as revised, on account of the pink bollwormni, effective October 31, 1929. This amendment modifies regulation 3 by adding the counties of Maricopa and Pinal, Ariz., to the areas designated as regulated.
Copies of said amendment may be obtained from the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration, Department of Agriculture, Washington, 1). C.
R. W. DUNL.\.
Acting cretary of A;griculture.
[Published in the Arizona Republican, Phoenix, Ariz., November 12, 1929.]


INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS

POST OFFICE I APARTMENTT,
THIl) ASsiSTANT PosMASTEn GENERAL, Washington. Vorcnlr 1. 19.
POSTMASTER.
MY DFAR SIR: There,is inclosed for your information and guid;lic a copy of Revised Quarantine No. 52 of the United States 1Departnwet of Agriculture, on account of the pink Lollwormi, effective on and after Octolber 31, 129. :ddiig the counties of Maricopa and Pinal, Ariz., to the quara tilled area. your lost office being located in one of these count.es.







232 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [ Oct.-Dec.,

It will be noted that the order absolutely prohibits the interstate movement from the regulated areas of the stalks, boils, and other parts of the cotton plant and gin waste.
The conditions governing the movement of seed cotton, cottonseed, cottonseed hulls, cottonseed cake, cottonseed meal, cotton lint, etc., are clearly set forth in regulation 5 ,of the order and all postmasters concerned will be governed ill accordance with the instructions contained therein.
Under the provisions of paragraph 1, section 467, P. L. and R., parcels containing any of the articles mentioned in the -preceding paragraph may not be accepted for mailing from any of the areas quarantined in the order unless the articles have been inspected, certified, and marked as required.
Very truly yours,
S. A. TIL TON,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.


REVISION OF REGULATIONS

INTRODUCTORY NOTE

The revision of the pink-bollworm-quarantine regulations which follows is issued for the purpose of incorporating the five amendments to the regulations which have been promulgated since the last revision was issued on July 9, :1927. An important change made at this time consists of authorizing regulation 5, section A, 2 (d), under certain safeguards, the issuance of permits for the interstate movement of samples and of compressed and baled lint or linters from the regulated areas of Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas, without fumigation, when such samples, lint, or linters have been produced in a county within which and within 5 miles of which no pink-bollworm infestation has been found for the two preceding crop seasons.' LEE A. STRONG,
Chief, Plant Quarantine and Control Administration.


NOTIlCE OF QTYTARANTiNE No. 52 (REvIsED)
(Effective on and after August 1, 1927)
I, Renick W. Dunlap, Acting Secretary of Agriculture, have determined that it is necessary to quarantine the States of Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona to prevent the spread of the pink bollworm (Pectinopitora gossypiella, Saunders), a dangerous, insect new to and not heretofore widely prevalent or distributed within and throughout the United States.
Now, therefore, under the authority conferred by section 8 of the plant quarantine act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended by the act of Congress approved March 4, 1917 (39 Stat. 1134, 1165), and having duly given the public hearing as required thereby, I do quarantine the said States of Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona, effective on and after August 1, 1927. Hereafter, under the authority of said act of August 20, 1912, amended as aforesaid, (1) cotton, including all parts of the plant, seed cotton, cotton lint, linters, and all other forms of unmanufactured cotton lint, gin waste, cottonseed, cottonseed hulls, cottonseed cake, and meal; (2) bagging and other containers and wrappers of cotton and cotton products; (3) railway cars, boats, and other vehicles which have been used in conveying cotton and cotton products or which are fouled with, such products; (4) hay and other farm products; andl (5) farm household goods, farm equipment, and, if contaminated with cotton, any other articles, shall not be shipped, offered for shipment to a common carrier, received for transportation or transported by a common carrier or carried, transported, moved, or allowed to be moved from the States of Texas, Ne* Mexico, or Arizona into or through any other State or, Territory or District of the United States in manner or method or under conditions other than those prescribed in the rules and regulations hereimafter made and amendments thereto: Provided, That the restrictions of this quarantine and of the rules and regulations supplemental thereto may be limited to the areas 'in a quarantined State now or which may be hereafter designated by the Secretary of Agriculture as regulated areas when, in the judgment of the ,Secretary of







1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMIENTS 233

Agriculture, the enforcement of the aforesaid rules and regulations as to such regulated areas shall be adequate to prevent the spread of the pink bollworm: Provided further, That such limitation shall be conditioned upon the said State providing for and enforcing such control measures with respect to such regulated areas as, in the judgment of the Secretary of Agriculture, shall he deemed adequate to prevent the spread of the pink bollworm therefrom to other parts of the State.
Done at the city of Washington this 9th day of July, 1927.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[SEAL.] RENICK W. DU,.LAP.
Acting Secretary of Agriculture.


REVISED RULES AN D REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE OF QUARANTINE No. 52
(Approved December 26, 1929; effective January 1, 1930)
REGITLATION 1. DEFINITIONS.
For the purpose of these regulations the following words, names, and terms shall be construed, respectively, to mean:
(a) Pink bollworm: The insect known as the pink bollworm of cotton (PCctinophora gossypiella Saunders).
(b) Regulated areas: Areas in a quarantined State which are now or which may hereafter be designated as such by the Secretary of Agriculture in accordance with the provisos to Notice of Quarantine No. 52 (revised).
(c) Cotton and other articles: All the articles enumerated as brought under restriction as to interstate movement in Notice of Quarantine No. 52 (revised).
(d) Cotton lint: Cotton lint, linters, and all other forms of unmanufactured cotton fiber, including samples of cotton lint and linters.
(e) Inspector: An inspector of the United States Department of Agriculture. REGULATION 2. LIMITATION OF RESTRICTIONS TO REGULATED AREAS.
Conditioned upon the compliance on the part of the State concerned with the second proviso in Notice of Quarantine No. 52 (revised), the restrictions provided for in these regulations on the interstate movement of the articles enumerated in said notice of quarantine will be limited to such articles moving from the areas in such State now or hereafter designated by the Secretary of Agriculture as regulated areas: Prorided, That the articles enumerated in said notice of quarantine may move interstate from an area not under regulation through a regulated area when such movement is on a through bill of lading. REGULATION 3. REGULATED AREAS.
In accordance with the first proviso to Notice of Quarantine No. 52 (revised), the Secretary of Agriculture designates as regulated areas the following counties and parts of counties in Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona, including all cities, towns, townships, and other political subdivisions within their limits:
Texas area: The counties of Terrell, Presidio, Brewster, Pecos, JeYff Davis, Reeves, Ward, Loving, Culberson, Hudspeth, El Paso, Winkler, Andrews, Et( or, Crane, Upton, Midland, Martin, Glasseock, and all those portions of i)avson, Borden, and Howard Counties lying south and west of the following-described boundary lines: Beginning at the west boundary line of Dawson County at the southwest corner of section 114 of block M; thence in an easterly direction on the south line of sections 114, 89. 84, 71, 66, 51, 48. and 35 to the southeast corner of said section 35; thence northerly on the east line of section 35 to the northeast corner of said section; thence easterly on the south line of sections 2S, 27. 26. and 2*5 of block M, and of section 27 of block C41 to the southeast corner of said section 27 of block C41:; thence southerly 3 miles on the east line of sections 7, G6, and 1 of the D. L. Cunningham block 5 to the southwest corner of section 2 of the D. L. Cunningham block 5: thence easterly on the south line of sect ions 2 nd 3 of the D. L. Cunningham block 5, and of sections 12 and 11 of the Georgeto\wn Railroad Co. block 35 to the southeast corner of section 11 of said block: thence southerly along the east line of sections 24 and 21 of the ). L. (Ciunningham block 4 to the southwest corner of section 22 of said block 4:; thence easterly along the south line of section 22 of said block 4 and action 1 of the Georgetown Railroad Co. block 34 to the southeast corner of said section 1:







234 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [Oct.-Dec.,

thence southerly on the east line of -sections 6 and 7 of the J. Poitevent block 2 to the southeast corner of said section 7; thence easterly on the South line of Section 8 of the J. Poitevent block 2 and of sections 9 and 10 of block 34, township 6 north, to the southeast corner of said section 10; thence northerly along the east line of said section 10 to the northeast corner of said section; thence easte~ly along the north line of section 11 of block 34, township 6 north, to the northeast corner of said section; thence southerly along the east line ,of said section 11 to the southeast corner of said section; thence easterly on 'the south line of section 14 of block 34, township 6 north, to the southeast corner of said section; thence southeasterly along the meanderings of Dry Tobacco Canyon and the south fork of the Colorado River across the. boundary line between Dawson and Borden Counties to a point in Borden 'County where the Big Spring-Gail public road* crosses said river; thence in a southerly direction following the said Big Spring-Gail road to a point 1 mile south of Morris schoolhouse in Howard County, the same being at intersection of the Vincent IRoad; thence south along fence to Morgan Creek; thence southeasterly along the meanderings of said Morgan Creek to the Howard-Mitchell County line; thence south along said county line to the southeast corner of Howard County.
New Mexico area: The counties of Chaves, Eddy, Otero,. Dona Ana, Luna, ,Grant, and Hidalgo.
Arizona area: The counties of Cochise, Greenlee,. Graham, Pinal, and Mari,copa.
REGULATION 4. ExTE~sioN OR REDUCTION OF REGiULATED) AREAS.
The regulated areas designated in regulation 3 may be extended or reduced as may be found advisable by the Secretary of Agriculture. Due notice of any extension or reduction and the areas affected thereby will be given in writing to the transportation companies doing business in or through the State in which such areas are located and by publication in newspapers selected by the Secretary of Agriculture within the States in which the areas affected are located.
JREGULATIONW 5. CONTROL OF MOVEMENT OF COTTON AND) OTHER ARTICLES.
Section A. Cotton. lint
(1) Permits required: Cotton lint shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from a regulated area to or through any point outside thereof unless a permit shall have been issued therefor by the United States Department of Agriculture.
(2) Conditions governing the issuance of permits: Permits authorizing the interstate movement of bales of cotton lint and of samples from a regulated ,area may be issued upon compliance with any one of paragraphs lettered (a) to (g) inclusive:
(a) That the material to be moved consists of baled lint or linters which have been compressed to a density of 22 pounds to, the cubic foot and fumigated under vacuum under the direction of and in a manner satisfactory to the inspector; or
(b) That the material to be moved consists of samples fumigated under the
-direction of and in a manner satisfactory to the inspector; or 4
(c) That the material to be moved consists of second-cut or mill-run linters (-as distinguished from first-cut linters) which have been ginned from sterilized seed and have been passed through special roller equipment in such a manner that, in the judgment of the inspector, all cottonseed and larvw therein
-would be crushed. After passing through the roller equipment such linters are to be so protected as. in the judgment of the inspector, to prevent any possibility of contamination and if, owing to conditions of infestation in the vicinity, such protection is, in the ~judgment of the inspector, impracticable, permits may lbe -withheld until -after compression and fumigation as provided under paragraph (a) 'hereof.
(d) That the material consists either of samples or of baled and compressed ,(see [paragraph (a) ) lint or linters, produced and ginned in a county within which and within 5 miles of which (i) no pink bollwormn infestation has been found during the same crop season nor during the two preceding crop seasons,
(ii) no infested seed cotton is known to have been ginned during such period,
-and (iii) all cottonseed produced therein has been sterilized in a cottonseedheating machine -approvedl by and operated in a manner satisfactory to the inspector. Fumigation shall, however, also be required for the interstate movement from such counties or regulated parts thereof to points outside the regulated areas of motes, grabbots, flues, picker waste, and all forms of unmanufactured :cotton fiber other than sampIles and commercial baled lint and linters.







1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 235

The crop season within the meaning of this paragraph shall be interpreted as extending from June 1 of one year to May 31 of the following year.
(e) Cotton lint, delint, samples, and grabbots produced by any oil mill located outside the regulated areas but authorized under paragraph (5) below to crush cottonseed originating therein shall be returned to the regulated areas for such compression and fumigation as may be required under previous paragraphs of this section and shall not be moved therefrom except in compliance with all applicable requirements of this section.
(f) Uncompressed and undisinfected cotton lint may be moved interstate under permit2 between regulated areas under such safeguards as shall be required by the inspector when such movement is not through any point outside any regulated area.
(g) Baled cotton lint grown outside of but brought within a regulated area may be moved interstate under permit out of such regulated area on the furnishing of evidence, satisfactory to the inspector, that such lint has been handled in a manner to safeguard it from possible contamihation with the pink bollworm.

Section B. Miscellaneous cotton products and other restricted articles
(3) Stalks, bolls, and other parts of the cotton plant and gin waste shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from regulated areas.
(4) Seed cotton shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from regulated areas, except that for the purpose of ginning such seed cotton may be moved 3 interstate without permit between two contiguous regulated areas. Cottonseed and cotton lint ginned from seed cotton so moved may be returned without permit to point of origin.
(5) Cottonseed shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from regulated areas into or through any point outside such areas: Provided, That upon determination by the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration that reasonable necessity exists for such action, oil mills located outside of but in the vicinity of the regulated areas may be authorized to crush cottonseed originatting in said areas, upon compliance with such conditions as shall, in the judgment of said administration, eliminate any risk of spread of the pink bollworm. Such authorized mills shall be operated in manner and by method satisfactory to and under the supervision of the administration. In case of such authorization, permits may be issued for the interstate movement from the regulated areas or portions thereof to such authorized mills for crushing of cottonseed which hlias been sterilized in a cottonseed-heating machine approved by and operated in a manner satisfactory to the inspector. Permits may also be issued for the interstate movement of such sterilized cottonseed between regulated areas when such movement is not through any point outside any regulated area.
(6) Cottonseed hulls shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from regulated areas into or through any point outside such areas. Cottonseed hulls may be moved interstate under permit' between regulated areas when such movement is not through any point outside any regulated area on the furnishing of evidence, satisfactory to the inspector, that the cottonseed from which the hulls were obtained was sterilized as required in paragraph (5) of this regulation.
(7) Cottonseed cake and cottonseed meal shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from a regulated area except under permit. Permits will be granted on the furnishing of evidence satisfactory to tile insl.s'ct,r, ( ) that the cottonseed (from a regulated area) used in the production lof lhe cke .11d meal offered for movement was .terilized as required inll Itrugraph (55 of his regulation; (ii) that in tlhe process of and subsequent to the Im:inun'tfacU re of such cake and meal safeguards have been taken against their Icmisilel contamination with raw co(ttonse(1ed : and (iii) that the containers or wrappers of such cake and meal have met the requirements hereinafter si forth in p:a: graph (8) of this regulation.
(8) Bagging and ohillr wrappers and contaillners which lhve bet uilel in connection with or which 11a re col1ta1illinated w'it Ial I, sled t II, >P~ nt ll 1 t'aled,

'Certain of the Arizona areas defined in reguliation 3: are infested nut only with the pink bollworm but also with the Thurbherina weevil and are included within thi :Ir+ (lesiated as regulated area under the T'hurheri-weevil iuarantine. (See Notice of Quarantine No. 61 (rvised).) Under that quarantine seed cotton, cottoned, nd t ttiont.I'd hulls are prohibited interstate movement from the Thurberi weevil re-ultd : rea and no permits will be issued for such movement. Permits for the interstate, mnivinwnt of uncompressed and undisinfected cotton lint from that area will not be iLsued.
See footnote 2.







236 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [Oct.-Deei.,

cottonseed hulls, cottonseed, cake and meal, or cotton lint shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from a regulated area except under permit. Permits will not be granted until suchbag ing or other wrappers or containers have been cleaned or disinfected to the satisfaction of the inspector.
(9) Railway cars, boats, and other vehicles which have been used in conveying eottoi'a and cotton products, or which are fouled with such products, farm household goods, farm equipment, and, if contaminated with cotton, other articles shall not be moved or, allowed to be moved interstate from a regulated area until the same have been thoroughly cleaned or disinfected at the point of origin or shipment to the satisfaction of the inspector.
(10) Hay and other farm products the interstate movement of which has not been specifically provided for elsewhere in this regulation may be moved interstate without restriction until further notice. REGULATION 6. MARKING AND LABELING.
-Cotton and other articles the interstate movement of which is permitted under regulation 5 shall be subject to such marking and labeling as may be required by the inspector. Copies of the permit required by regulation 5 must be attached to the waybills, conductors' manifests, memoranda, or bills of lading covering such shipments. In the ease of cotton lint, and bagging and other wrappers and containers, the bales or other, parcels of such materials shall be plainly m rked with the name and address of the shipper and the naine and address of the consignee, or such other, marking as shall be sufficient in the judgment of the inSpector to identify the material. Containers of cottonseed hulls, cake, and meal will not be required to be marked, but copies of the permit must be attached tG the waybills, conductors' manifests, memoranda, or bills of lading covering such shipments.
REGULATION 7. CONDITIONS GOVERNING INSPECTION AND ISSUANCE OF PERMITS.
Persons intending to move or allow to be moved cotton Or other articles for which permits are required by these regulations shall make application therefor on forms provided for the purpose as far as possible in advance of the probable date of shipment. Applications should show the origin, nature, and quantity of the articles which it is proposed to move, together with their, exact location, and, if practicable, the contemplated date of shipment. All charges for storage, cartage, and labor incident to inspection, other than the services of inspectors, shall be paid by the shipper. Applications for inspection and issuance of permits must contain the names mid- addresses of the consignors and consignees and should be made to the office of the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration, San Antonio, Tex., or to such other offices as may be later established, and of which due notice shall have been given. REGULATION 8. COMPLIANCE WITH THESE REGULATIONS A CONDITION OF ACCEPTANCE FOR INTERSTATE MOVEMENT OF THE RESTRICTED ARTICLES BY COMMON
CARRIERS.
Transportation companies and other common carriers shall*not accept or move interstate any of the articles covered by this quarantine other than in compliance with these regulations.
REGULATION 9. SHIPMENTS BY THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTUBE.
Articles subject to restriction in these regulations may be moved interstate by the United States Department of Agriculture for experimental or scientific purposes, on such conditions and under such safeguards a's may be prescribed by the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration. The container of articles so moved shall bear, securely attached to the outside thereof, an identifying tag from the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration showing compliance with such conditions.
These rules and regulations shall be effective on and after January 1,, 1930t and shall supersede on that date the rules and regulations issued under Notice of Quarantine No. 52 (revised), effective on and after August 1, 1927, as amended to date.
Done at the city of Washington this 26th day of December, 1929.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department, of Agriculture.
[SEAL.) R. W. DUNLAP,
Acting Secretary of Agriculture.
[Copies of above revision were sent to all common carriers in the States of Texas,, New Mexico, and Arizona.]







1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 237

NOTICE TO GENERAL PUBLIC TIIROUGH NEWSPAPERS
Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture. under authority conferred on him by the plant quarantine act of August 20. 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended, has promulgated a revision of the rules and regulations supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 52, on account of the pink bollworm, effective January 1, 1930. An important change made at this time consists of authorizing, under certain safeguards, the issuance of permits for the interstate movement of cotton "samples" and of compressed and baled lint or linters from the regulated areas of Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas, without fumigation, when such samples, lint, or linters have been produced in a county within which and within 5 miles of which no pink-bollworm infestation has been found for the two preceding crop seasons.
Copies of the said quarantine and of the revised rules and regulations may be obtained from the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration, United States Department of Agriculture, Washington, D. C.
R. W. DUNLAP,
Acting Secretary of Agriculture.
[Published in the following newspapers: The Arizona Republican, Phoenix, Ariz., January 15. 1930; El Paso Herald, El Paso, Tex., May 14, 1930; the Record, Roswell, N. Mex.. May 14, 1930.]

ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO SATIN-MOTH QUARANTINE
(NO. 53)
MODIFICATION OF SATIN-MOTH QUARANTINE INTRODUCTORY NOTE
The amendment which follows adds to the area designated as regulated 38 towns in Maine, 3 towns in New Hampshire, and 5 towns in Massachusetts, making a total of 46 towns, comprising approximately 1,871 square miles. The effect of the amendment is to prohibit the interstate movement of poplar and willow trees and parts thereof capable of propagation from this additional territory to outside points.
C. L. MARLArr.,
Chief, Plant Quarantine and Control Administration.
AMENDMENT NO. 1 TO REVISED RULES AND REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 53 (REVISED)
(Approved October 31, 1929; effective on and after November 1, 1929)
Under authority conferred by th1 plant quarantine act of August 20. 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended by the act of Congress approved March 4, 1917 (39 Stat. 1134, 1165), it is ordered that regulation 3 of the revised rules and regulations supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 53 (revised), on ac( ount ,f th satin moth, which were promulgated November 21, 1928, be, and the same is hereby, amended to read as follows:
REGULATION 3. REGULATED AREAS.
In accordance with the proviso to Notice of Quarantine No. 53. as revived. the Secretary of Agriculture designates as regulated area for the purpose of these regulations the States, counties, townships, towns, an1d cities listI heI w, including any cities, towns, boroughs, or other political subdivisions included within their limits:
Connecticut: Counties of New London, Tolland, and WindllIam: towns of IEast Hartford, East Windsor, Enfihl. Glstonhulry. IIlrtford. Mlan.hesttr. M1rlborough, South Windsor, and Sulield, in Hurtford County; anl tiws of East Haddam, East Hamnpton, and iortlid, in Mlidhilccx ('ount!/).
Maine: Counties of Androscoggin. Curbdrland. Knox. Lin.pIlnI. Sn:ullie, Waldo, and York; town of Jay,i in rankliu Con/ /: towns of 1:t r l la tbr, Trenton, and Otis, and the city of Ellsworth, in Hn iock ( ,ount1. ad all lt'rritory west and south of said towns ad city in said couS1y h l: nlw i en /! of Kennebec, except the towns of RIne and Venia ; towns of Alblany. Irdi illd, Buckfield, Canton, Denmark. Fryveurg, Greenwood. lIri ford, Ilbrn. inir, Lovell, Norway, Oxford, Paris, Porter, Stonehain, SI w, Sunner, Swede, W: Irford, and Woodstock, in Oxford County; towns of Alto. Arye. 1:r:dfi rd, Bradley, Burlington, city of Bangor, city of Brower, city of )lit IN,. (': rn Clifton, Corinth, Dixinont, Eddington. Edinlhurg, Enfleld. Elna, Ci nburi. renbush, HIamIpden, Hermon, Iolden, Howland, Iludsion Ken',usken:ig, Uer n e,







238 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [Oct.-Dec,

Levant, Lincoln, Lowell, Mattamiscontis, Maxfield, Milford, Newburgh, Newport, Orono, Orrington, Passadumkeag, Plymouth, Stetson, Summit Plantation, and Veazie, in Penobscot County; towns of Medford, Milo, and Orneville, in Piscataquis County; and towns of Canaan, Detroit, Fairfield, Pittsfield, and Skowhegan, in Somerset County.
Massachusetts: Counties of Barnstable, Bristol, Dukes, Essex, Middlesex, Nantucket, Norfolk, Plymouth, Suffolk, and Worcester; towns of Bernardston, Buckland, Charlemont, Colrain, Conway, Deerfield, Erving, Gill, Greenfield, Heath, Leverett, Leyden, Montague, New Salem, Northfield, Orange, Shelburne, Shutesbury, Sunderland, Warwick, Wendell, and Whately, in Franklin County; towns of Agawam, Brimfield, Chicopee, East Longmeadow, Hampden, Holland, Holyoke, Longmeadow, Ludlow, Monson, Montgomery, Palmer, Russell, Southwick, Springfield, Wales, Westfield, West Springfield, and Wilbraham, in Hampden County; and towns of Amherst, Belchertown, Easthampton, Enfield, Granby,, Greenwich, Hadley, Hatfield, NorthamPton, Pelham, Prescott, South Hadley,. Southampton, Ware, and Williamsburg, in Hampshire County.
New Hampshire: Counties of Belknap, Cheshire, Hillsboro, Merrimack, Rockingham, and Stratford; towns of Albany, Bartlett, Brookfield, Chatham, Conway, Eaton, Effingham, Freedom, Madison, Moultonboro, Ossipee, Sandwich, Tamworth, Tuftonboro, Wakefield. and Wolfeboro, in Carroll County; towns of Alexandria, Ashland, Bridgewater, Bristol, Campton, Hebron, Holderness, Plymouth, and Rumney, in Gra fton County; and towns of Acworth, Charlestown, Goshen, Langdon, Lempster, Springfield, Sunapee, Unity, and Washington, in Sullivan County.
Rhode Island: The entire State.
Vermont: Towns of Brattleboro, Dummerston, Guilford, Putney, Rockingham, Vernon, and Westminster, in Windham County; and town of Springfield, in Windsor County.
Washington: Counties of Clallam, Clarke. Cowlitz, Grays Harbor, Island,. Jefferson, King, Kitsap, Lewis, Mason, Pacific, Pierce, San Juan, Skagit, Skamania, Snohomish, Thurston, Wahkiakum, and Whatcom.
This amendment shall be effective on and after November 1, 1929.
Done at the city of Washington, this 31st day of October, 1929.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.
[SEAL.] ARTHUR M. HynE,
Secretary of Agriculture.
[Copies of foregoing amendment were sent to all common carriers in Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut.]


NO'TICE TO GENERAL PUBLIC THROUGH NEWSPAPERS
Notice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, under authority conferred on him by the plant quarantine act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended, has promulgated an amendment to the revised rules and regulations supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 53 (revised), on account of the satin moth, effective November 1, 1929. This amendment adds 38 towns in Maine, 3 towns in New Hampshire, and 5 towns in Massachusetts to the area designated as regulated in regulation 3 thereof. Copies of said amendment may be obtained from the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration, United States Department of Agriculture, Washington, D. C. ARTHUR, M. HYDE,
Secretary of Agriculture..
[Published in the following newspapers: The Manchester Union Leader, Manchester; N. H., November 9, 1929; the Boston Herald, Boston, Mass., November 11, 1929; Portland Press Herald, Portland, Me., November 9, 1929.]


INSTRUCTIONS TO POSTMASTERS
POST' OFFIcE DEPARTMENT,
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER, GENERAL, Washington, November 26, 192g.
POSTMASTER.
My DEnR SiR: There is inclosed for your information and guidance a copy of amendment No. 1 to Revised Rules and Regulations Supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 53 (revised), on account of the satin moth, the purpose of which is to extend the quarantined areas in the States of Maine, Massachusetts, and New Hampshire.






1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY AN"NOUNCEM ENTS 239

Quarantine Order No. 53 prohibits the movement from any point in the regulated areas into or through any point outside thereof of poplar and willow trees and parts thereof capable of propagation.
Very truly yours,
F. A. TILTON,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.


TERMINAL INSPECTION OF PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS
PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS ADDRESSED TO PLACES IN MISSISSIPPI
THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER GENERAL, Washington, December 18, 1929.
Postmasters in the State of Mississippi are informed that provision has been made for the terminal inspection of plants and plant products at Aberdeen, Columbus, Greenwood, and McComb, Miss., so that the complete list of such terminal inspection points in Mississippi is as follows: A. and M. College. Gulfport. Ocean Spring.
Aberdeen. Holly Springs. Pascagoula.
Biloxi. Houston. Poplarville.
Brookhaven. Jackson. Senatobia.
Cleveland. Laurel. Starkville.
Columbus. Incedale. Tupelo.
Corinth. McComb. Vicksburg.
Durant. Meridian. West Jackson.
Greenwood. Moss Point. Wiggins.
Grenada. Natchez. Yazo City.
Upon receiving the required postage as prescribed by paragraph 3. section 46S, Postal Laws and Regulations. parcels containing plants and plant products subject to terminal inspection should be sent to the inspection point nearest the office of address.
F. A. TILTON,
Third Assistant Postmaster General.


CONVICTIONS FOR VIOLATIONS OF THE PLANT QUARANTINE ACT

The following convictions for violatins of the plant quarantine act were reported to the administration (luring the period October 1 to )eceiber 81, 1929:
WHITE-PINE BLISTER-RUST QUARANTINE
In the case of the United States v. The Gurney Seed & Nursery Co. ( Inc.), Yankton, S. Dak., in the interstate shipment of 4 Ribc n irunm an l :I redcurrant and 4 gooseberry plants in violation of the regulations, the defenaut pleaded guilty and was fined $25. (Plant Quarantin(e ('ase No. -:9.1
In the case of the United States v. The Gurney Seed & Nursery ('. Il.,
Yankton, S. Dak., in the interstate shipment of six cult tivated red-currant plants in violation of the regulations, the defendant pleaded guilty and N\as fined $35 and costs. (Plant Quarantine Case No. 382.) In the case of the United States r. The Earle Ferris Nursery ('o.. IInipion. Iowa, in the interstate shipment of eight white pines iii i 1lciin ilf tlie reulations, the defiiendant Ipleaded glity and was iued 835 a id 'st (P lait Quarantine Case No. 372.)
In the case of the 1United States r. The IlMo nt Arb r Nurseries Shtunenliah, Iowa, in the illnterstate shipment of gooseberry d 15 t li ii vit lation of the regulations, the defendat i'leaded guilty :ta ld \waIs tim l 10 :ilnd costs. (Plant Q(uarantine (1ase No. 8.)
In the ease of the I'nited States r. T'1 Shetdun ab Nurseris. Slieiaml,,ah. Iowa, in thle interstate shipment of 10) gooseerry plams iI il'l:*lin f ii regulations, the deflend:ant pleaded guilty and was linedl .l-1) 1 l I t. iPlant Quarantine Case No. 36.)
In the ease of the United Strtes P. The lerry Seed ( '.. ('hiri ida. 1,1\va. ii the interstate shipment of 26 (urranlt ndtl 1 gooseurry Ilau ii v iol:tis t the regulations. he (efenaln plleade'd guilty and was iinetd .l a nial c*-(Plant Quarantine Case No. 36:7.)







240 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [Oct-,IJ~c.

EUROPEAN CORN-BORER QUARANTINE
In the case of the United States v. The New York Centr~al Railroad Co., in the interstate transportation of 25 bags (2,500 pounds) of shelled popcorn to a point outside the quarantined area, without inspection and certification, the defendant pleaded guilty and was fined $50. (Plant Quarantine Case No. 375.)

JAPANESE-BEETLE QUARANTINE
In the case of the United States 'v. John Scoblick, Archbald, Pa., in the inter-state transportation of approximately 48 crates of blackberries and 129 baskets of tomatoes from Carbondale, Pa., to a point outside the quarantined area, without inspection and certification, the defendant pleaded guilty and was lined $100. (Plant Quarantine Case No. 380.)

MEDITERRANEAN FRUIT FLY AND MELON. FLY QUARANTINE
In the case of the United States v. Young Yuen Yin, Honolulu, Hawaii, in the shipment by express via the S. S. Manukai of 28 mangoes and 4 avocados, without inspection and certification, to the National DollarStores, San Fran,cisco, Calif., the defendant pleaded guilty and was fined $25, with a suspended sentence and probation for one year. (Plant Quarantine Case No. 376.)
In the case of the United States v. Margaret M. Chung, Honolulu, Hawaii, in the mail shipment via the S. S. Matoilo of two, avocados, without inspection and
-certification, to Mrs. Daisy Smith, Grand Rapids, Mich., the defendant pleaded
-guilty, sentence was suspended for one year, and the defendant placed on probation for a like period. (Plant Quarantine Case No. 378).
In the case of the United States v. Robert Matoba,,a pantryman on the S. S. Va lawaii, of the Los Angeles Steamship Co., in bringing to the mainland from Honolulu, Hawaii, 24 mangoes and 2 papayas, without inspection and certification, the defendant was sentenced to 90 days in jail.
SWEETPOTATO AND YAM QUARANTINE (DOMESTIC)
In the case of the United States v. Tong Yee Wai, an employee of the Sun Chung Leong Co., of Honolulu, Hawaii, in the shipment to the mainland, on
-the S. S. Man oa, leaving Honolulu on November 12, 1929, of a quantity of yams concealed in two crates of taro, the defendant pleaded guilty, sentence was
-suspended, and he was placed on probation for one year. The defendant was, severely reprimanded by the court and given to understand that another occur'rence of a similar offense would result in his imprisonment.
QUARANTINES AFFECTING MEXICAN PRODUCTS
In the case of the United States versus the persons listed below for attempting to smuggle in contraband plant material the penalties indicated were imposed by the United States customs officials.

Name Address Contraband Penalty

Mrs. Carmen Martinez -------- Naco, Ariz ----------- 8 sweet limes ------------------------- $5
Tomas Garcia --------------- Nogales, Ariz--------- 10 peaches, 11 pomegranates, 8 sweet 5
limes, 9,guavas.
Frank A. Krupp ------------ ----- do -------------- 35 quinces ---------------------------- 5
F. Sandoval ---------------- ----- do -------------- 8 quinces, 6 pomegranates-------------- 5
Severino Valera -------------- Brownsville, Tex------ 12 avocados, with seed---------------- 5
S. 0. Betters and lack Ogbie-__-----do ------------- ----- do ------------------------------ 5
W. G1. D~avis---------------- ----- do -------------- 6 avocados, with seed----------------- 5
Roman Guerro-------------- ----- do--------------_ 4 avocados, with seed----------------- 5
Sr. Santiago Robles---------- ----- do -------------- 20 pounds sweetpotatoes --------------- 15
H. Gonzales ----------------- Eagle Pass, Tex------- 12 guavas, 7 avocados ------------------ 5
Anastaclo Martinez----------- --- do -------------- 3 oranges ----------- ---------------- 5
Julian Naranjo---------------El 'Paso, Tex --------- 3 avocados --------------------------- 5
Conception Cerda de Alcazar-------- do -------------- 2 pears ------------------------------ 5
Tom Quin and Martha Quin-------- do -------------- 2 apples, 1 orange---------------------- 5
Ysabel Cordona------------- ----- do -------------- 3 plants----------------------------- 5
Antonia 0. Rodriguez ------- ----- do -------------- 9 pieces sugarcane --------------------- 5
A. Ahern--------------------iidalgo, Tex --------- 2 avocados --------------------------- 5
Julian rercario ------------- ----- do -------------- 4 avocados --------------------------- 5
Juan Pena------------------ ----- do -------------- 14 avocados--------------------------- 5
Henry Guerro --------------- Laredo, Tex ---------- 7 quinces---------------------------- 5
G,~ Trejo ------------------- ----- do -------------- 7 avocados--------------------------- 5
0. S. Berera ---------------- ----- do -------------- 2 avocados, 2 mangoes----------------- 5
Jose M. Sanchez_----------- ----- do -------------- 39 avocados, 11 plants ----------------- 10
E. A. Diaz------------------ ----- do -------------- 1 plant, 26 figs, 8 peaches, 5 pomegran- 5
ates, 35 pears.
B. Saldovar----------------- ----- do -------------- 5 plants, 1 avocado, 1 cherimoya ----












LIST OF CURRENT QUARAN'I"INES AND OTHER RESTRICTIVE
ORDERS AND MISCELLANEOUS REGULATIONS

[The domestic and foreign quarantines and other restrictive orders sunmi:irize(i hen in are issued under the authority of the plant quarartirie act of August 2o. 11412. a-:-, aillelliled. The Mexican border re zul.itions and the export eei tiflcation rei;ulations are i isued uuder specific acts of Congress.)
QUARANTINE ORDERS
The nunibers; a-s:,,i_-ned to these quarantines ino-licate merely the chronolo i ca I order of issuance of both domestic and foreign quarantine-s in one minierical series. The quarantine numbers missing in this list are quarantiiie ; which have either been superseded or revoked. For eonvenienee of refercilce these quarantines are here classitie(I as domestic and foreign.

DomEsTic QUARANMNES
Date pa Im s.---Quaran tine No. 6: Prohibits, except as-, provided in the rtil( and regulations sum)leinental thereto. the interstate movement of date palin, and date-palm offshoot from Riverside Comity, Calif., east of tho 1wrnardino meridian: liniwrial Coutit -, Calif.: Yuma. 'Maricopt. mid llilttitl Comities, Ariz.: and WO)b County, Tex., oil accoiiiit of the Parlatoria scllo iP(11-latoria, blanc7iardl) and the Phoenicoeoccu ,. -scale (P1i0(;iic()coccjis J11(11.10(ill.
Hawaiiaiz fruits a)id rirgetables.-Quariantine No. 13, revised: PI.()W11)it<. except as provided ill the rules and regulations supplemental thereto, the iii0vement from the Territory of Hawaii into or throu-li any other Territory. Stme, or District of the United State,:--, of all fruits and vegetables, ill tile iuaturzil 41r raw state. on oce(lunt of the 'MediterrIanean fruit fly Weratiffs calatabi) and the melon flY (Dacu, eiicarblfac).
Sut/are(me.-Quarantiiie No. 16: Prohibits the movement frt)m tlio Territories of Hawaii and Porto Rico into or through any other Territor -. S1.1te, or District of the United States of living canes of stigareane. or or parts
thereof. oil iceoiint of certain injurious inseet,'4 and fullgou- t1keacss.
wcctpotato a)id i/am.-Quarantine No. 3U: Prohibits the in()veniclit frwt i the Territories of Hawaii and Porto Rico into or tlii-()ii(-,h anv ot1wr Terriiory. State, or District of the United State., of all varieties of yanis (II)o "ioca bafat(ii,, m4l Dioxcorc(f of tlt(I I'(11, Which
the same areintended. oil account of Hie sNveetpillato weevil (("Wav and the sNveetpotato scarabee (Eu, ;ccpc,, batatac).
Banatia pla0,, .-Qu.ir.intitie No. t12: the 111"Vellielit fr(ini flit, T( rr*torie.,4 of Hawaii and Porto Rico into or tlirou gli my ot1wr Tcrriwr -. ()r
District of the Vnito,,d Sttte,4 (if ally Species or variety of h,111,111:1 plalit- ( 11,i\'I spp.). regardto,; ; of th(, for wliich t1w siiiw are llltt : ded. ('11 'wc-11111 itif two injurious Nveovils (1111(lbdococmb obscill Its ;IIId Ih tf1wfixill" lif ;wpt, rit, 1.
Black-Wein ru.,4.-Quarmitille -No. :1S, fl,4 '111wildcd: Prtlllihil< the 111,1\k1lit'lit interstate to aiii- pohit (av.- ido of tLe quarantitied OW ('(1111111011 11:11*berr (W rbcris ritl!lm,10 ind it:,; b(Irticilitur.0 Nvi ll I- ck,11:1111
other specie-. of Berlieris -11!(l M;III(Illi'l, (III '4ecmilit (it' Ihe 111,wk-l '111 YU-1 lit w heat, oats, llarlcy. alld w ilil 111(l (.111tiv"Itt'(1
Ellropcmi C01"d b01cr,--Qu,,ir1IIItjn(, -No. 4,". revi- ed: Prollihit<, t'\i*('I)T :1-- I'll, vided ill the 'Illd re.-Iikltilol:. Sill )I ilolllew l I llw rcto. 111k, I1k1Vi1:1k'111 il 'It I'
state to 11111, poillt wit Zinnia. hoHN-11m .k. :111d 4,111 1111\\-el- or ('111irk, 41, (1:ihl
except the tllercl)f witlimit td'
froill Irca-, ill M ;1111e. N ew 11;1111p:- llire' 11 -(,(,1 i
C olillecticlit (e.istt'rll sectioll), :111d 1*1,(Illl 1'''Ir-Y'
N Y.; and (2) cm-n w id I)r()om (*M1I (illi-111dill'-, :1'1 p lr:, 4 111 ,ill sor-Im ins, -ill(] Su(I.m tilt, tit, VtTilitilit. N",\\ lit
Fi-shers Lslmd). and fr(oll iiif(- Wil i:1
O ve"Ieril sect ion). i(*Ilt (1w rt liet'll scct i(III), P4 1. 11 \:I
ollio, Indiana, and We',4 Virl-illia.







242 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [Oct.-e.,

Gipsy moth and brown-tail moth.-Quarantine No. 45: Prohibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto, the movement interstate to any point outside of the infested area, or from points in the generally infested area to points in the lightly infested area, of stone or quarry products, and of the plants and the plant products listed therein. The quarantine covers all the New England States.
Hawaiian and Porto Rican cotton, cottonseed, and cottonseed products.Quarantine No. 47: Prohibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto, the movement of cotton, cottonseed, and cottonseed products from the Territories of Hawaii and Porto Rico into or through any other Territory, State, or District of the United States on account of the pink bollworm (Pectinophora gossypiella) and the cotton blister mite (Eriophyes .gossypii), respectively.
Japanese beetle.-Quarantine No. 48, revised: (1) Prohibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto, the interstate movement of farm, garden, and orchard products of all kinds and grain and forage crops of all kinds from the generally infested area to or through any point outside thereof, and (2) prohibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto, the interstate movement of nursery, ornamental, :and greenhouse stock and all other plants and sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, .and manure from the generally infested area to the lightly infested areas, or from either the generally infested area or the lightly infested areas to or through any point outside thereof. The generally infested area includes the State of New Jersey and parts of the States of Connecticut, Delaware, Maryland, New York, and Pennsylvania; the lightly infested areas include the 'District of Columbia and parts of the States of Connecticut, Delaware, Mary'land, Massachusetts, New York, and Pennsylvania.
United States quarantined to protect Hawaii.-Quarantine No. 51: Prohibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto, the movement from the United States to the Territory of Hawaii, as ships' stores or as baggage or effects of passengers or crews, of sugarcane, corn, cotton, alfalfa, :and the fruits of the avocado and papaya in the natural or raw state, on account of injurious insects, especially the sugarcane borer (Diatraea saccharalis Fab.), the alfalfa weevil (Hypera postica Gyll.), the cotton-boll weevil (Anthonomus gran dis Boh.), the papaya fruit fly (Toxotrypana curvicauda Guerst.), and certain insect enemies of the fruit of the avocado.
Pink bollworrn.-Quarantine No. 52, revised: Prohibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto, the interstate movement from the regulated areas of Texas, Arizona, and New Mexico of (1) cotton, including
-all parts of the plant, seed cotton, cotton lint, linters, and all other forms of unmanufactured cotton lint, gin waste, cottonseed, cottonseed hulls, cottonseed cake and meal; (2) bagging and other containers and wrappers of cotton and cotton products; (3) railway cars, boats, and other vehicles which have been used in conveying cotton and cotton products or which are fouled with such products; (4) hay and other farm products; and (5) farm household goods, farm equipment, and if contaminated with cotton, any other articles.
Satin moth.-Quarantine No. 53, revised: Prohibits the interstate movement to points outside of the regulated areas in Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, and Washington of all species or varieties of poplar and willow trees or parts thereof capable of propagation.
Porto Riicaa fruits and vcgetables.-Quarantine No. 58: Prohibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto, the movement from the Territory of Porto Rico into or through any other Territory, State, or District of the United States of all fruits and vegetables in the raw or unprocessed state, on account of injurious insects, including the West Indian fruit fly (Anastrepha fratercudus Wied.) and the bean-pod borer (Maruca testulalis Geyer).
Sad, A-oil, or earth, with plants from Hawaii and Porto Rico.-Quarantine No. 60: Prohibits the movement from the Territories of Hawaii and Porto Rico into or through any other Territory, State, or District of the United States of sand (other than clean ocean sand), soil, or earth, around the roots of plants, to prevent the spread of white grubs, the Japanese rose beetle, and termites or white ants.
Thurberia weeil.-Quarantine No. 61, revised: Prohibits the interstate movement of Thurberia, including all parts of the plant, from any point in Arizona. .and pr~lhibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental






1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEIENTS 243

thereto, the interstate movement from the regulated area of Arizona of (1) cotton, including all parts of the plant, seed cotton, cotton lint, liters, and all other forms of unmanufactured cotton lint, gin waste, cottonseed, cottonseed hulls, and cottonseed cake and meal; (2) bagging and other containers and wrappers of cotton and cotton products; (3) railway cars, boats, and other vehicles which have been used in conveying cotton and cotton products, or which are fouled with such products; (4) hay and other farm products; and
(5) farm household goods, farm equipment, and, if contaminated with cotton, any other articles.
Narcissus bulbs.-Quarantine No. 62: Prohibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto, the interstate movement from every State in the continental United States and the District of Columbia of narcissus bulbs, on account of certain injurious bulb pests, including the greater bulb fly (Merodon equestris Fab.), the lesser bulb fly (Eumenrus strigatus Fallen), and the bulb eelworm (Tylenchus dipsaci Kuehn).
White-pine blister rust.-Quarantine No. 63: Prohibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto, the interstate movement from every State in the continental United Sates and the District of Columbia of fiveleaf pines (Pinus) or currant and gooseberry plants (Ribes and Grossularia, including cultivated or wild or ornamental sorts).
Mexican fruit worm.-Quarantine No. 64: Prohibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto, the interstate movement from the regulated area of Texas of fruits of all varieties.
Woodgate rust.-Quarantine No. 65: Prohibits the interstate movement from the regulated area in the State of New York of trees, branches, limbs, or twigs of Scotch pine (Pinus sylvestris), Canary Island pine (P. canarien.sis). Slash pine (P. caribaea), Japanese red pine (P. densiflora). Corsican pine (P. nigra poiretiana), Stone pine (P. pinea), Western yellow pine (P. ponderosa). Monterey pine (P. radiata), Loblolly pine (P. taeda), or Jersey pine (P. virginiana), or of any variety thereof, or of any species or variety of hard pine hereafter found to be susceptible to the Woodgate rust.
Asiatic beetle and Asiatic garden beetle.-Quarantine No. 66: Prohibits, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto, the interstate movement from the State of New Jersey and from the regulated areas of Connecticut, New York, Pennsylvania, and Virginia, and the District of Columbia of (1) nursery, ornamental, and greenhouse stock, and all other plants, and (2) sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure.
Phoney peach disease.-Quarantine No. 67: Prohibits. except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto, the interstate movement from the regulated areas of Georgia and Alabama of peach trees, peach roots, nectarine trees, nectarine roots, and all kinds and varieties of trees or shrubs grafted or budded on peach or nectarine roots.
Mediterranean fruit fly.-Quarantine No. 65, revised: Prohiblits. except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto, the inter,4tate movement from the regulated arem in the State of Florida of (1) fruits, veat:bles. and garden and orchard products of all kinds, and cotton bolls and seed ctton:
(2) sand. soil, earth, peat, compost. and manure; (3) railway (-rs. bats. land other vehicles and containers which have been or are being ue' in convoying fruits or vegetables: and (4) fruit-picking equipment, and all oth er :artiles, including nursery stock, which have been aso(iated with the production of or commerce in fruits or vegetables or have been or are contminated with s:nd, soil, earth, peat, compote. or manure. This quarantine abo prohibit fvcept as provided in the rules andl reuuntions supplemental thierto. the r hitnt or transportation from any o ther Sta:te or Territory or the Di riot of C, lnihi:i of the articlefi enumeratled originating in and1 movingly front the reul: t 1d :lrc in the State of Florida.
FORFIGN QUARANTINES

Potatoes.-Quarantine No. 3: Fiorhids the import a tion of ptati i fren Ne~wfoundland: the islands of St. PIierre and Miquelon; greatt Brit:in, i eniing England, Scotland, Wales. and Ireland: Germany: :in l Auv ria llun~a ry. on account of the disease known as potato wart (Synch ilriu i o,,Vbi0 e al.
fMex.ican fruits.--Quarantine No. 5, as amended: Fo-hrbids the il, it:ii ,ni of oranges, sweet lines, grapefruit. Inangoes, achras sapotes, pea ,hes, unn:iin. :and plums from the Rlepublic of Mexico, on account of the Mexi(:an fruil Ily ( Trypeta uiden).)







244 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [Oct.-Oec.,

lWh ite-pine blister rust.-Quarantine No. 7, as amended: Forbids the importation from each and every country of Europe and Asia, and from the Dominion of Canada and Newfoundland, of all fiveleaf pines and all species and varieties of the genera Ribes and Grossularia.
Pink bollworrn.-Quarantine No. 8, as amended: Forbids the importation from any foreign locality and country, excepting only the locality of the Imperial Valley, in the State of Lower California, Mexico, of cottonseed (including seed cotton) of all species and varieties, and cottonseed hulls. Seed cotton, cottonseed, and cottonseed hulls from the Imperial Valley may be entered under permit and regulation.
Seeds of avocado or alligator pear.-Quarantine No. 12: Forbids the importation from Mexico and the countries of Central America of the seed of the avocado or alligator pear on account of the avocado weevil (He ifpus lauri).
Sugarcane.-Quarantine No. 15: Forbids the importation from all foreign countries of living canes of sugarcane, or cuttings or parts thereof, on account of certain injurious insects and fungous diseases. There are no Federal restrictions on the entry of such materials into Hawaii and Porto Rico.
Citrus nursery stock.-Quarantine No. 19: Forbids the importation from all foreign localities and countries of all citrus nursery stock, including buds, scions, and seeds, on account of the citrus canker and other dangerous citrus diseases. The term "citrus," as used in this quarantine, includes all plants belonging to the subfamily or tribe Citratae.
European pines.-Quarantine No. 20: Forbids, on account of the European pine-shoot moth (Evetriac buoliana), the. importation from all European countries and localities of all pines not already excluded by Quarantine No. 7.
Indian corn or maize and related plants.-Quarantine No. 24, as amended: Forbids the importation from southeastern Asia (including India, Siam, IndoChina, and China), Malayan Archipelago, Australia, New Zealand, Oceania, Philippine Islands, Formosa, Japan, and adjacent islands, in the raw or unmanufactured state, of seed and all other portions of Indian corn or maize (Zea mays L.) and the closely related plants, including all species of Teosinte (Euchlaena), Job's-tears (Coix), Polytoca, Chionachne, and Sclerachne, on account of the downy mildews and Physoderma diseases of Indian corn, except that Indian corn or maize may be imported under permit and upon compliance with the conditions prescribed in the regulations of the Secretary of Agriculture.
Citrus fruits.-Quarantine No. 28: Forbids the importation from eastern and southeastern Asia (including India, Siam, Indo-China, and China), the Malayan Archipelago, the Philippine Islands, Oceania (except Australia, Tasmania, and New Zealand), Japan (including Formosa and other islands adjacent to Japan), and the Union of South Africa, of all species and varieties of citrus fruits, on account of the citrus canker, except that oranges of the mandarin class (including satsuma and tangerine varieties) may be imported under permit and upon compliance with the conditions prescribed in the regulations of the Secretary of Agriculture.
Sweetpotato and yam.-Quarantine No. 29: Forbids the importation for any purpose of any variety of sweetpotatoes and yams (Ipomoea batata'R and Dioscorea spp.) from all foreign countries and localities, on account of the sweetpotato weevils (Cylas spp.) and the sweetpotato scarabee (Eascepe& batatae).
Banana plants.-Quarantine No. 31: Forbids the importation for any purpose of any species or variety of banana plants (Musa spp.), or portions thereof, from all foreign countries and localities, on account of the bananaroot borer (Cosmopolites sordidus). This quarantine places no restrictions on the importation of the fruit of the banana. (For restrictions on the entry of the fruit of the banana, see Quarantine 56.)
Bamboo.-Quarantine No. 34: Forbids the importation for any purpose of any variety of bamboo seed, plants, or cuttings thereof capable of propagation, including all genera and species of the tribe Bambuseae, from all foreign countries and localities, on account of dangerous plant diseases, including the bamboo smut (Ustilago shiraiana). This quarantine order does not apply to bamboo timber consisting of the mature dried culms or canes which are imported for fishing rods, furniture making, or other purposes, or to any kind of article manufactured from bamboo, or to bamboo shoots cooked or otherwise preserved.
Nursery stock, plants, and seeds.-Quarantine No. 37: Forbids, except as provided in the regulations supplemental thereto, the importation -of nursery






1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 245

stock and other plants and seeds from all foreign countries and localities on account of certain injurious insects and fungous diseases. Under this quarantine the following plant products and seeds may be imported without restriction when free from sand, soil, or earth, unless covered by special quarantine or other restrictive orders: Plant products capable of propagation, imported for medicinal, food, or manufacturing purposes, and field, vegetable, and flower seeds. Cut flowers from the Dominion of Canada are also allowed entry without permit. The entry of the following nursery stock and other plants and seeds is permitted under permit:
(1) Bulbs of the following genera: Lilium (lily), Convallaria (lily of the valley), Hyacinthus (hyacinth), Tulipa (tulip), and Crocus; and, until further notice, Chionodoxa (glory-of-the-snow), Galanthus (snowdrop), Scilla (squill), Fritillaria imperialis (crown imperial), F. meleagris (guinea-hen flower), Muscari (grape hyacinth), Ixia, and Eranthis (winter aconite).
(2) Stocks, cuttings, scions, and buds of fruits for propagation; except that stocks of apple, pear, quince, and Mazzard cherry may not be imported under permit or otherwise after June 30, 1930. Other fruit stocks, including Mahaleb cherry and Myrobalan plum, may not be, imported under permit or otherwise after June 30, 1931.
(3) Rose stocks for propagation, including Manetti, Multiflora, Brier Rose, and Rosa Rugosa.
(4) Nuts, including palm seeds for propagation.
(5) Seeds of fruit, forest, ornamental, and shade trees; seeds of deciduous and evergreen ornamental shrubs; and seeds of hardy perennial plants; except that mango seeds may not be imported under permit or otherwise.
Provision is also made for the issuance of special permits under safeguards to be prescribed in such permits for the entry in limited quantities of nursery stock and other plants and seeds not covered in the preceding lists for the purpose of keeping the country supplied with new varieties and necessary propagating stock.
European corn borer.-Quarantine No. 41, revised: Forbids, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto, the importation from all foreign countries and localities of the stalk and all other parts, whether used for packing or other purposes, in the raw or unmanufactured state, of Indian corn or maize, broomcorn, sweet sorghums, grain sorghums, Sudan grass, Johnson grass, sugarcane, pearl millet, napier grass, teosinte, and Job's-tears, on account of the European corn borer (Pyrausta nubilalis) and other dangerous insects and plant diseases.
Stocks, cuttings, solons, and buds of fruits.-Quarantine No. 44: Forbids, except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto, the importation of stocks, cuttings, scions, and buds of fruits from Asia, Japan, Philippine Islands, and Oceania (including Australia and New Zealand), on account of dangerous plant diseases, including Japanese apple cankers, blister blight, and rusts, and injurious insect pests, including the oriental fruit moth, the pear fruit borer, the apple moth, etc.
Seed or paddy rice.-Quarantine No. 55: Forbids, except from the Republic of Mexico upon compliance with the conditions prescribed in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto, the importation of seed or paddy rice frim all foreign countries and localities, on account of injurious fungous diseases of rice, including downy mildew (Sclerospora nmarocarpa), leaf smut ( ,At'ilowti oryzae), blight (Oospora oryztorum), and glume blotch (Melanonmna glumarum), as well as dangerous insect pests.
Fruits and re etables.-Quarantine No. 56, as amended: Forbids. except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto, the imlUprtation of fruits and vegetables not already the subject of special quarantines or other restrictive orders, and of plants or portions of plants used as packing material in connection with shipments of such fruits anId vegtlalle1, from an f1 1 m countries and(l localities other than the Dominion of Canada, on a cunit of injurious insects, including fruit and melon flies (Tryipt idue). Includes and supersedes Quarantine No. 49 on account of the citrus black fly.
Flag smut.-Quarantine No. 59: Forbids the importation of all species and varieties of wheat (Triticurn spp.) and wheat prod(lucts. unless so milll or so processed as to have destroyed all flag-smut spores, from India. Japan, China, Australia, Union of South Africa, Italy, and Spain.







246 PLANT Q-UARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [Oct.-Dec.,

OTHER RESTRICTIVE ORDERS

The regulation of the entry of nursery stock from foreign countries into the United States was specifically provided for in the plant quarantine act. The act further provides for the similar regulation of an y other class of plants. or plant products when the need therefor shall be determined. The -entry of the plants and plant products listed below has been brought under such regulation:
Nursery stock.-The conditions governing the entry of nursery stock and other plants and seeds from all foreign countries and localities are.indicated above under Foreign quarantines." (See Quarantine No. 37, revised.)
Potatoes.-The importation of potatoes is forbidden altogether from the countries enumerated in the potato quarantine. Potatoes may be admitted from other foreign countries under permit and in accordance with the provisions of the regulations issued under order of December 22, 1913, bringing the entry of potatoes under restriction on account of injurious potato diseases and insect pests. Importation of potatoes is now authorized from the following countries: The Dominion of Canada, Bermuda, and Cuba; also from the States of Chihuahua and Sonora and the Imperial Valley of Lower California, Mexico. The regulations issued under this order have been amended so as to permit, free of any restrictions whatsoever under the plant quarantine actthe importation of potatoes from any foreign country into the Territories of Porto Rico and Hawaii for local use only and from the Dominion of Canada into the United States or any of its Territories or Districts.
Avocado, or alligator.pear.-The order of February 27, 1914, and the regula-, tions issued thereunder restrict the importation from Mexico and the countries of Central America of the fruits of the avocado, or alligator pear, on account of the avocado weevil. Entry is permitted through the part of New York only, and is limited to the large, thick-skinned variety of the avocado. The importation of the small, purple, thin-skinned variety of the fruit of the avocado and of avocado-nursery stock under 18 months of age is forbidden.
Cotton.-The order of April 27, 1915, and the regulations issued thereunder restrict the importation of cotton from all foreign countries, and localities, on account of injurious insects, including the pink bollworm. These regulations apply in part to cotton grown in and imported from the Imperial Valley, in the State of Lower California, Mexico.
Cottonseed products.-The order of June 23, 1917, and the regulations issued thereunder restrict the importation of cottonseed cake, meal, and all other cottonseed products, except oil, from all foreign countries, and a second order of June 23, 1917, and the regulations issued thereunder restrict the importation of cottonseed oil from Mexico on account of injurious insects, including the pink bollworm.
Rules and regulations governing (1) entry for immediate export, (2) entry for immediate transportation and. exportation in bond, and. (3) safeguarding the arrival at a port where entry or landing is not intended of prohibited plants and plant products.-These rules and regulations, as revised August 1, 1920, govern the unloading and transfer of cargoes and transportation in bond when it is determined that such entry can be made without involving risk to the plant cultures of the United States, and also provide for the safeguarding at a port or within the territorial waters of the United States where entry or landing is not intended of any prohibited or restricted plants and plant products.
Rules and regulations governing the movement of plants and plant products into and out of the) District of Columbia.-These rules and regulations were promulgated August 26, 1920, under the amendment to the plant quarantine act of May 31 of that year and were revised March 29, 1929. They provide for the regulation of the movement of plants and plant products, including nursery stock, from or into, the District of Columbia and for the control pf injurious plant diseases and insect pests within the said District.
MISCELLANEOUS REGULATIONS
Rules and regulation& prohibiting the movement of cotton and cottonseed, from Mexico into the United States, and governing the entry into the United States of railway cars and other vehicles, freight, express, baggage, or other materials from Mexico at border points.-These rules and regulations, promulgated June 23, 1917, pursuant to authority given in the appropriation act for the United Sta tes Department of Agriculture for thefiscal year 1918, 'and since repeated annually, are designed to prevent the entry of the pink bollworm of






1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 247

cotton which is known to exist w-dely in Mexico. They provide for the exa.mination of passengers' baggage, for the disinfection of railway cars, freight, express, and other shipments, and for the cleaning of domniestic cars handling Mexican freight. All fees collected for cleaning and disinfecting railway cars are deposited in the United States Treasury as miscellaneous receipts.
The inspectors concerned in the enforcement of these regulations at border points are charged also with enforcement of restrictions on the entry of plants and plant products under various foreign plant quarantines.
Rules and regulations of the Secretary of Agriculture governing the inspection and certification of plants and plant products offered for export to meet the sanitary requirements of foreign countries.-These rules and regulations were promulgated August 9, 1926, pursuant to authority given in the appropriation act for the United States Department of Agriculture for the fiscal year 1927. They provide for the inspection and certification of fruits, vegetables, nursery stock, and other plants and plant products intended for export to countries requiring such certification. All fees collected for this service are deposited in the United States Treasury as miscellaneous receipts.


ORGANIZATION OF THE PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION

LEE A. STRONG, Chief of Administration. S. A. RoHwIa, Assistant Chief.
B. CONNoR, Business Manager.
R. C. ALTHOUSE, Infornmatiomal Officer. C. A. LOCKE, Executive Assistant.
H. T. CRONIN, Administrative Assistant. E. R. SAssoE, in Charge Foreign Plant Quarantines. S. B. FRACKER, in Charge Domestic Plant Quarantines. A. F. BuRGEss, in Field Charge Gipsy Moth and Brown-Tail Moth Quarantine
(Headquarters, Melrose Highlands, Mass.).
L. H. WORTHLEY, in Field Charge European Corn Borer Quarantine (Headquarters, Easter Section, Boston, Mass.; Western Section, Toledo, Ohio).
C. H. HADLEY, in Field Charge Japanese Beetle Quarantine (Headqiuarters,
Camden, N. J.)
R. E. McDoNALI, in Field Charge Pink Bolliwon m and Thurberia Weevil Quarantines (Headquarters, San Antonio, Tex.).
B. L. BoYDEN, in Field Charge Date Scale Quarantine (Headquarters, Indio,
Calif.).
M. H. FoRu, Acting in Field Charge Mexican Fruit Wormn Quarantine (Headquarters, Harlingen, Tex. ).
WILMoN NEWELL, in Field Charge Mediterranean Fruit Fly Quarantine in Florida (Headquarters, Orlando, Fla.). A. C. BAKER, Bureau of Entonology, in Field Charge Investigatioal Work,
Mediterranean Fruit Fly Quarantine (Headqiarters, Orlando, Fla.)
P. A. HOIDALE, in Field Charge Mediterranean Fruit Flyi Quarantine Enforcement and Inspection Work i States other than Florida (Hleadquarters, Atlanta, Ga.).
ADVISORY FEDERAL PLANT QUARANTINE BOARD

LEE A. STRONG, Chairman.
J. E. GRAF, Bureau of Entomology, Member. R. A. OAKLEY, Bureau of Plant hIndustry, Menmber. M. B. WATrrE, Bureaut of Plant Industry, Memtber.
,Forest Service, Member.








U. 5 GOVERNMENT PRINTING 0YFICE 1930





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S. R. A.-P. Q. C. A. No. 101. Issued June, 1930United States Department of AgriculturePLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATIONSERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS OCTOBER-DECEMBER, 1929CONTENTSPageRecord of current work, July 1 to December 31, 1929--------------------------------------Change in leadership of Plant Quarantine and Control Administration----.---------------2The M editerranean fruit fly---. -.-------------------------------------------------]5SSurveys to determine extent of infestation-----------------------.---------------Eradication measures----------.----------------------------------------------------->3Quarantine regulations.-----------.------------------------------------------Quarantine enforcement ------.--------.-------------------------------------------6Control of vehicular movement--------------------------------------------------7Appropriations.----.-.-------------------------------------------------------------1SPrevention of spread of gipsy moth------.---.----------------------------------------9New infestation found on Long Island.-.--------------------.--------------------]Gipsy moth defoliation in New England again serious---------------------------1 4Other activities.-----_------------------------------------------------------------>9Appropriations.-----------------------. ---------------------------------------190Satin moth spreads------------.. .--------------------------------------------------1European corn-borer-quarantine enforcement-.--------------------------------------------191General status of infestation------------.-----------------------------------------191Quarantine regulations revised---.--.-----.--------------------------------------.192Inspection and certification of restricted articles------.-------------------------------192Control of vehicular traffic.-----------------------------------------------------193Appropriations-----.---.--.--------------------------------------------------------194Mexican fruit-worm eradication.--------------------.-------------------------------194Infestation at Brownsville -------------------------------------------------------9 14Amendment to Texas regulations.-.----------------------.---------------------195Quarantine enforcement .-----------------------------------------------------19Japanese-beetle control.----------------------------------------.-----------------.--. 1Spread during the summer of 1929----------.-----------.-.---------------I 1dSuppressive measures.----------------------------------------------------1Inspection of farm products --------------------------------. .---------------. 9Nursery stock and soil certification.-. .------------------------. -.----------------. jRoad patrol and transit inspection. ...----------------------------------------.0IAppropriations -----------------------------------------------------------------0Asiatic beetle and Asiatic garden beetle ------------------------------------------------uSurveys carried on throughout the summer months ------------------------------------)Prevent ion of spread of pink bollworm -------------------------------------------------Quarantine enforcement -----------------------------------------------------------Appropriations. -----------------------------------------------------Thurberia weevil. ----------------------------------------------------------Parlatoria date scale eradication --------------------------------------------4Appropriations-----------------------------------------------------------Prevention of spread of phony peach disease ----------------------------------------------20White-pine blister rust------------------------------------------------------207( raiin-rust cont rol by means of barberry radical ion ---------------------------------------207Transit inspection -------------------------------------------------------------------2Quarantine and other official announcements -------------------------------------------209Announcements relating to European corn-horer quarantine (No.c 4 3-'1Revision of regulations --------------------------------------------------------_. 2Notice to general public t rougli newspal ers.-.-------------------------------2Announcements relating to JIPane>e-beeftle q(iran ine (No. ,)216Notice of public hearing to consider the dvisabilit v of exteniding the iqariant ii on accountof the Japanese beetle to the State of Iiole ---nd 42Announcements relating to Mediterranean fruit-l1Y (Iii:irau! moe (No. ti'N-------------------2Instructions to navil offcers -------------------------------------Administrative instrue? ions-. -217Weekly in place of semiweekl\ clean-up of groves mni girdeth. ii eradic4 inr r iT lhor-ized (Io(Ificltion of regulat ions s1)ljIiinemet:,l to Notice of Qt irant in N o, I' QC. A.-250) , 21Sterilization requirements miodifiel as to :ireas hi lherto de igwtuil :s nfevt 1I t.(A.--251) ---217Use of heat for si erili zi ng Florid a grni lefri it ii Iti /Oril d ( ' .A 2 2 11Authorization of trnsu!orlat ion of Floriii lost fruits and vegci bes from thu 1 )m!rctof ('lumlbia to near-ty points in Virginia (P Q ( ',.1 2 -219Movement autiorized of stvrilizel hos fruits ni \ uege mleu fron Flor tierSouthern and Westurn States (1'. Q( .A -251) --220114 048,:It 118

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182 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [Oct.-Dec.,Quarantine and other official announcements-Continued.Announcements relating, etc.-Continued.Administrative instructions-Continued. PageSterilization of oranges, tangerines, and satsumas by use of heat under Mediterraneanfruii-fly regulations (P. Q. C. A.--255).----------------------------------------221Release of certain areas designated as infested under the Mediterranean fruit-fly-quaran-tine regulations (P. Q. C. A.-256) -.--.-------------------------------------------221Instructions to inspectors re interstate shipments of celery from Florida (P. Q. C.A.-257).-.--------------------------------------------------------------------------222Containers authorized for interstate movement of Florida host fruits and vegetables (P.Q. C. A.-258)---------------------------------------------------------222Report of special committee to study status and needs of Mediterranean fruit-fly campaign_. 223Conference of Federal and State officials called to discuss movement of Florida citrus fruitunder sterilization into southern and western markets during winter.-.------------------225Heat sterilization of citrus fruit ----.--------------------------------------------------225Announcement relating to nursery stock, plant, and seed quarantine (No. 37).----------------227Instructions to collectors of customs (T. D. 43579) ._ _. .-----------------------------------227Plant quarantine-lily bulbs -------------------------------------------------227Announcements relating to phony-peach-disease quarantine (No. 67) .-----------------------228Modification of phony-peach-disease-quarantine regulations ...---------------------------228Notice to general public through newspapers _. ..-----------------------------------229Instructions to postmasters-------------------------------------------------229Announcements relating to pink-bollworm quarantine (No. 52). ...----------------------------230Modification of pink-bollworm quarantine------------._----------------------------230Notice to general public through newspapers .-----------------------------------231Instructions to postmasters_-____._--------------------------------------------------231Revision of regulations -. _. . . ..---------------------------------------------------------232Notice to general public through newspapers.------------------------------------237Announcements relating to satin-moth quarantine (No. 53) ..-------------------------------237Modification of satin-moth quarantine ... ...--------------------------------------------237Notice to general public through newspapers. ....------------------------------------238Instructions to postmasters -._.--------------------------------------------------238Terminal inspection of plants and plant products.---------------------------------------239Plants and plant products addressed to places in Mississippi.----------------. ..---.-------239Convictions for violations of the plant quarantine act. ..-----------------------------------239List of current quarantines and other restrictive orders and miscellaneous regulations----------241Organization of the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration _ ._-------------------------247RECORD OF CURRENT WORK, JULY 1 TO DECEMBER 31,1929CHANGE IN LEADERSHIP OF PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROLADMINISTRATIONC. L. Marlatt, who for more than a year has been filling the two positions ofChief of the Bureau of Entomology and Chief of the Plant Quarantine andControl Administration, retired at his request from the latter position onNovember 30, 1929, in accordance with a plan which was authorized some twoyears ago.Lee A. Strong, assistant director of agriculture of the State of California,and formerly connected with the United States Department of Agricultureas a specialist in plant-quarantine work, was appointed as his successor. Mr.Strong, who was selected some months previously from a list of eligibles certi-fied by the Civil Service Commission, took up his new duties on December 1.THE MEDITERRANEAN FRUIT FLYA rapid and decided improvement in the Mediterranean fruit-fly situationfollowed the intensive eradication measures carried out in Florida during thespring and summer. This work proved so effective that only one infested fruitwas found between August 27 and the end of December.rTh1lis practical absence of reinfestation indicates that a continuation andintensification of the present methods of suppression can reasonably be ex-pc(cted to result in the complete extermination of the pest. While such eradi-cation can not be considered to have already been accomplished, the fact thatfrom 200 to 00) scouts emUployed by the department and large numbers oforchard owners and vollinteers have been searching for infested fruit duringthis period shows that very pronounced progress has been made in this direc-tion.SURVEYS TO DETERMINE EXTENT OF INFESTATIONAt the close of the last fiscal year the Mediterranean fruit fly had beenfound established in 15 Florida counties in addition to the discovery of several

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1929] SERVICE AND REGIULATOLY ANNOUNCEMENT I 13adult flies at Jacksonville. in Duval County. DTurin. July and Auzgiut. 1029,Alachua. Citrus, H('rnanldo, and( Pasco CounlltieO were added to this list a4 afield infestation w8s found in Duval County at a Confsiderable dist;Iee outh-east of Jlwksonville. Sinie the middle of August the known extent of inf ta-tion La"s, however, remained Const ant.Table 1 shows the numl)er of Florida properties found and! reported vtY ewith the fruit fly fIoni the date of discovery to ith end (of 1979. As indlVatelin the foot note to the table the nunbler of propert-ies is shown as of the (ateof definite dt termination of thle material, with the result that in every cn(,t, thereport for tile month at the head of the columjiti inchI tides the field (1ller Pnsof the last day or two of the previous month but does not iticlude the fitilinsof the co-l(Iuding days of the month named. This is especially si-nilicwitwith res-lwt to Auust, during wlieh monthIi Ihiere wNero lly ( )imi , ilieremaitnilig 5 of the 13 listed having been found during the last two days of July.TABLE I.--umber of F1oridtr properties found an reported' infected with theMediterrancait fruit fly frrmlb the dale of dixeovery to Dlcme Ir J1, 1929County July August Septemr NovemDecent-June 30 er, Oetohe her herAlachua-------------0 1 0 0 0 0 0 IBrevard--------------.72 0 0 0 0 72Citrus --------------0 0 0 0 0 1uval.-------------------( 1 0 0 0 0 0 1Flagler--------------4 10 0 0 0 Ilernando------------0 4 0 0 0 0 0 4Hfillsborough .-.----. 17 13 1 0 0 0 0 31Lake --_--.--.----7 1 0 0 0 96Levy---------------.1 0 0 0 0 7M ar ion .-.-.-. 7 4 1 0 0 0 0 12Orange. --------------400 0 0 0 0 1 0 401Osceola ---.------. --27 2 0 0 o 0 0 29Pasco.---------------0 3 0 ) U U UPinellas -------------9 0 0 0 0 0 16Polk----------------34 1 2 0 0 0 0 37Putnam--------------4 2 0 0 0 0 24St. Johns. ------------1 1 U 0 0 0 10Seminole-------------9 0 0 0 0 0 97Sumter ----------1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1Volusia.----------. .144 1 U 0 0 0 0 145Total -----------927 59 1 13 0 0 1 0 1,U0O1 Properties in this sunmary and in Table I of :t. A. No. 99 are listeI as of tle of tei ( hifl deter-mination of the material rather thin tile <(ite of u~lleetion. FiVe of the proper ties reported aluo e underAugust relate to collections on July 30 an d 31.Surveys of ot ier Sout hii rn Stat es 0 det ermiine t ie possibility oOf l he est atb-lislinint of inifestation through shipments from Florida\ were cunt iilmt Ge-cral headquIrters were ma il1Iined at Atlanta, Ga., for this \work, a il hirgeiulbers (it sumimuiier fruits Were eximinied during i tie seiasol ii .\laamaArkaisas Georgi i. Louisiana, Missi >ippi. Ne Alexi .Nmr II (I'a roli ma. S t hiICarolina, Tennessee, and Texar, the rl-Iiit frumn several inillin mu ree i igilispectcl. ThaSe were hrgely peaihes, 1 plims, pears, apples, -rapes. Ii-s, and1)omnegra ia tes. Frm 1 to 25 wen \were eIIIpIloyed il ea St,1e ul t hllis work.Ill addition to the examit'liatio" oF Ille fruit ii lle:Il groVe'4, i4lpections werealso Made of shiipmeiits of Flriil cit rus fruit wxhidb lad lwoz slipped fruumithat State prior to tihle (lis(c)verv of the fruit Ily iid u1111hi wasI still to befound on tihe market -of the Solthiern States lihilI iimids1iiiiiiier. The resultsof all such surveys anl iispeet iouis after I lie begiimillg of July were eaiI e.ERADICATION MEASURESOne of the most iillirt ailt feat tIues of ilie 'xterminl.1t0on PriLram1i i'Iliedestruction of host fruit. 1111(d voge aible on in fest ed properlit ie 11d t he areavithin 1 mile of inilest*atiOIi>. Tlhe ('ai tip (i wS (arried out tlis. work iIIIIIe-diately upon the dis(verv of iif-stl lioll ( he Irimi'e. Tie tlit iluindevelopment of gulavas and eurlain oit'her sullmlner fruit , ie oe'ional ripo-ing of off-seasoi (.itrlti alld tile ripeiin ol Siiurii ce'rrie mld ot hir fruit,o01 Wild l-iiits imiade it ewessIry, however, I()o etr Ii'-e aai i 108t dlt.

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184 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [Oct.-Dec.,By the end of December 409 acres had been covered in this manner eleven ortwelve times and the amount of clean-up work done on the 120,157 acres ofcitrus in the infested areas was equivalent to cleaning over 400,000 acres once, aswill be seen from Table 2.TABLE 2.-A pproximate figures showing the progress of eradication measures,April 6 to December 31, 1929Apr. 6 Sep o eItem to July August teper October veNer cember TotalJune30Citrus clean-up in infested areas: 1Total citrus acreage---------------------------------------------------------120,157Cleaned first time. acres-. 120, 249 20, 164 -------324 307 1, 141 0 (2)Total cleaned and recleaned1 to 12 times------acres. 260, 308 70, 248 42, 526 40, 997 41, 365 3, 383 7, 892 466, 719Citrus fruit destroyed--------------boxes-578,500 3,391 3,658 11,896 9,542 855 705 608,547Citrus clean-up outside of infestedareas:Cleaned first time------acres-. 0 0 0 0 31, 7751 14, 790 8, 655 55, 220Total cleaned and recleaned 1to 9 times. .----------acres. 0 0 0 0 31, 775 63, 681 63, 329 158, 785Citrus fruit destroyed -. boxes-0 0 0 0 3, 260 8, 815 8, 927 21, 002Noncitrus clean-up in infested areas:Total cultivated noncitrus acre-age ------------.-----acres ----------.-----.---------------------------------160,775Cleaned first time -------do-. 94, 527 57, 331 -------2,499 696 0 0 (2)Total cleaned and recleaned 1 to5 times -------------acres. 95,985 88,800 72,913 52,216 15,504 0 0 325,418Noncitrus fruit destroyed. -.---------------boxes-. 0 7, 139 15, 004 -3,682 760 0 560 27,145Vegetables destroyed -----do. 0 3, 488 22, 425 15, 104 9, 482 0 0 50, 499Noncitrus clean-up outside of in-fested areas:Cleaned first time -----acres. 0 0 0 0 9, 609 95 39 9, 743Total cleaned and recleaned 1 to3 times -------------acres-0 0 0 0 9,609 110 275 9,994Clean-up of uncultivated lands ininfested areas:Total acreage uncultivatedlands---------------.--_-------.---------------.-------------------------------803,945Cleaned first time -acres-. 0 145, 987 ---.-. 107, 422 126, 298 197 0 (2)Total cleaned and recleanedI to 5 times -.---.--.acres-0 192, 511 372, 510 194, 631 240, 695 197 01,000,544Clean-up of uncultivated lands out-side of infested areas:Cleaned first time------acres-. 0 0 0 0 1,415 641 0 2,056Total cleaned and recleaned 1 to3 times-------------acres-0 0 0 0 1,415 999 0 2,414Clean-up personnel, end of month:Inspectors---------------------352 71 4100 63 59 36 41.Foremen.----------------------3 258 397 4 493 345 199 174 66Laborers--------------------32,172 3,216 4 3,658 2,629 455 175 152Spraying in eradication area:Area sprayed, including infestedareas ----------------. acres.362, 665 367, 882 525, 381 599, 149 403, 488 84, 676 8, 050 2,351, 291Materials used:Sugar .-------------pounds-. 780, 203 367, 470 285, 485 420, 480 368, 849 25, 202 2, 325 2, 250, 014Molasses and sirup.-.-. gallons-. 53, 464 66, 096 85, 595 83, 122 67, 670 4,865 426 361, 238Lead arsenate-------pounds__ 89,386 56,318 19,029 66,653 55,350 3,941 310 290,987Spraying personnel, end of month-Inspectors.---------------------3 14 21 (4) 29 28 24 18 .Foremen .----------------------3 59 88 (4) 109 100 25 1 ------Laborers_--------.--_----------.--3471 683 (4) 719 469 30 1.1 " Infested areas " include all areas or zones designated at any time as "infested," whether or not they hadbeen released at the time of the report.2 otail om itled, as records are incomplete.3 A s of .nire 30, 1929,4 Spraying :11i clean-Ulp personnel reported together for August.Early in Oclober the clean-up work was extended to that part of the eradi-('t on orea outs de of but adjacent to the infested areas, and 55,220 acres of(It rus, 9,7,13 acres of iroticitrus, and 2,056 acres of uncultivated lands outsidesuch iIfested areas had been cleaned up in this manner by the close of thecalendar year.

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1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 1S5In order to eliiminate the flioz remiailnil g in t!ir district and to lwevoin theirmigrat ng elsewhere a poisonbzit sir'up wits used ill tihie gtrlVs znid n IUlti-vated lands. This material wa s applied at frequent illterval, s( thlat tilte olextenit of the aspraying, which wa-s ' fined lagl to the a proxinatriy1,o0.Q { ares 0f citr .of U olIiitrt, ']11d Ii' ul iVated 1111d il l e ine I areaswas equivalent to sl trying 2.351.291 tcres onee. A total of 596 icres hadbeen c'ver'ed linleten Ii me_and over 18( Y '00 awres more th1ani telti miIe I .The siraying and clean-up nct V tiet are >umllriz( d in Table 2. Te fTluresgiven inl that table are only tipproximiate. 's -le field static wt'I not su1Iwietitorganized during the first weeks of this uidertuking to avoid some duplieat i'1 h:'l 'coilsiderd inf, -,-I.At thllo f ill f Ih ViSit Of this '0 1m tt0 tl FT l ridaI thi t r, a r i i of I] lt,"a ' ofEa)ml:I !" thlily liiar I t coo! wllI i. i ithIt t l it, I n .Imritl t\:in tIstratias stadj t mpea w rkw ih ndnted.S1 iii'I L (x t-hI]I pr1l'IeniII By'' \\f suIh 18n rii f1t 1, %.1,o ;1d 'rs I lkh friiit either 11 *y rofrig r i g To 2 F, or by lwt in tl1 0Tr 11 I1t'e e1 IaId sh t I , r iI\ Zt:il Ili( k I I t If wvIV-e fr II i * it chIjuI u ni t "1 ces fo-r n h (, dIieitruct'ion t k , thm l lli " i n-ii re crI i p I IlI I in' c I i' i -are' lj i d J I't(ItIlt d. wa w1 t\II I 141 I t I jIt i I II I i ll t(I V I I d L-m:1\ ; f ll f 1 t it ii anI Ith\ fruit ''f tm Ilf t11,1in \v, I1 WI w1hn siI ' t) I r 1 '-i-n -T' i]-tfroif ill'e NaI o n 1 TI q 1 g] %t u h i -;i I i uc\ -" Il IA I f , -:artful , ns der -!o ol tilt I' at P f1 0h 1'. 1P(, i:1 ,I it '011)1,11,d, :[I'd 1 11regulati ndor tht( fruil -!vy i irantr wvero rovi -( dkfec!e qu mb r1,o ,y oUtI,~t 8111 I I i II I Ii(1 ('11 Iht lI I i il' ' i 1 1T I IQUARANTINE REGULATION'SThe fruit-ivy-quaraintine rg lt n ill (,fi*ct lt tho b in i 'l, tlt'e fi-allye r ere :silih ly m11odifi(A du1ringJuly\ '1nd nearly Ailu11 it) Iille e rc-sI rict jons 4 il the mlovolmwil I fI ,rape 14 1111 11r limw, :1nd, to r ImIvI tr i I-:1 1ns fromIl the li , t ' lost frulils ma 114 vc;"( t blThi; wa followed ()i Au-ii-I 2f) 1; y~ va Fer l vi hm Ilf '}.'Waalt nrnd r gL 1,1t imn 1 Io (,;!rry tillt I I r Icon en : -mn 111 the 1o n i (1: 11 1 p 11 1n
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186 PLANT QULARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [Oct.-Dec.,ment of host fruits and vegetables from Florida (except sour limes producedin Dade and Monroe Counties) into the following States and Territory byrail, express, mail, or other means, was prohibited: Alabama, Arizona,Arkansas, California, Georgia, Idaho, Louisiana, Mississippi, Nevada, NewMexico. North Carolina, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas,Utah, Washington, and the Territory of Porto Rico.Under Administrative Instructions P. Q. C. A. 254, sterilized host fruitswere authorized movement into the States named for the period from November21, 1929, to January 31, 1930, inclusive (this was later extended to February28, 1930). Green tomatoes were also authorized movement into this southernand western area in the same order.Supplementing the Federal regulations, an intrastate quarantine has beenmaintained by the State of Florida under the authority of the State plantboard. Subsequent to the six editions of these State regulations reported inS. R. A. 99, eight additional modifications, revisions, and amendments havebeen issued by that board or by Chairman P. K. Yonge, acting for it, datedJuly 15, August 12, September 16, October 14, November 16, November 20,December 3, and December 9, respectively.QUARANTINE ENFORCEMENTFrom the time the State and Federal Mediterranean fruit-fly quarantineswere issued in April the quarantine organization has exercised supervisionover all packing, storage, and processing plants in the entire State, to see thatthese plants were operated in a sanitary manner and in conformity with Stateand Federal quarantine requirements, to eliminate any possibility of fruit-flyinfestation developing on the premises, and to assist the field scouts in thedetermination of any infestations which might be existing in the State. Sofar as possible, the packing plants also acted as units of certification, and thepermits for intrastate and interstate movement were issued to them.The inspection of plants of this kind was organized by districts, each in-spector having a number of packing houses to supervise. The number of citrus-packing houses reported in operation in the eradication area at the close of1929 was 248, with a capacity for the year of 31,303,000 boxes. Outside of theeradication area there were operating under similar supervision 70 citrus-packing houses, with a t tal capacity of 10,486,000 boxes. There were also 138vegetable-packing houses operating in the State and 20 fern-packing houses.By the end of December 17,361 different inspections had been made of thesepacking houses. There are in the State 146 cold storages with a total capacityof 811,129 boxes, and 320 inspections have been made of these cold storages.Processing and canning plants numbered 70, and 674 inspections were madeof them. Four packing houses and two canning plants were temporarily closedon inspectors' orders at various times during the 6-month period on account ofminor violations. All but one of these had been reopened by the end ofDecember.Sterilization by heat was carried on in the Florida packing plants, whilethe cold-sterilization method was operated by cold storages in that State andelsewhere. The latter was the first method authorized. but the plan ofsterilizing by heat proved equally satisfactory from the standpoint of the(l(pIlartmnwt, anli much less expensive, alld, consequently, was afterwards em-ployed to a greater extent. Heat steriliz7Atoio was used only within the State(f Florida, and during 1h1 6-month period 2,099 cars were so treated. 1,679 ofIhose (Iring the monIt of December.C( )(l sterilizaton was carried out b)th in Florida aid by special arrange-Inold in desigitatled packi ig phi vits in the Northern States. Ten such northernp)htl sterilized on1 0] more ears, but a01 of them had d isconitiued operation,b Ite iii (lle of Dec ember, except oiie at Detroit. During the 6-monthperio(l !5 (1rS were given t he cold-sterilization treatment in Florida. aid 126were ,o 4rieatled ii I the Nortih (Louisville, 5; Civiciiinaii. 53; St. Louis, 4;h ion g, 28; Detroil , 12; Washinlgion, D. C., 2; Jersey City, 1I; and Phit-2lejClphia, 1.)Thlle qualnifities o 1mniaterial for which perinits were issno(l for interstate andil ' Inst I e shi iimen1t1 froil Florida p)ackiiig lhoiises, cold storages. dealers,irowrs, :11id nioncoli'iliercial shippers mnd the nnimber of quarantine violationsitercepled(' ill trolisit at Jacksonville are shown ii Tables 3 and 4.

PAGE 7

1929] SERVICE AND IEGULATOBY ANNOUNCEMENTS 1 7T ABLE o.-Q Untttj) Of ho-t ftiiil. q' I lfs. awl ii url sl, e -,fk 1t i! l o dc4 rthe ilcditcrraw an fruit-fly jiUruntin , M(y 1 to Au/ust .)'1. 10Product certified May 1 o July Au'utJuieC 3i)Citrus fruits . ...---------------------------------carloads__ 7, 237 3( 5 :, 2:2Noncitrus fruits .---------------------------------.L. 22 "1,Vegetables -------------------------------------_do ---5t4 12 1Less than car-lot shipments of host fruits, vegetables, and nursery stock. .. ...--------------------------------boxes-. 42, 202 3, 42S 3, 2:3 4-, 923TABLE 4.-Quantitic, of host fi-Ots, twlatabheN, and quuin'r (tlok ,oitiicdU. an'tlviolations intercI>tc( , under the Meditrirancan fruit-fly quarantine, Inptem-ber 1 to Dcc'ntbcr 31, 1929Item SeptmOctober ber ber TotalCertified material:Interstate shipments in car lots-Grapefruit------------. --.-.-cars. 569 1, 92 1, 527 1,334 3,322Oranges and tangerines-------------. ._o. 22, 363 4, 443 7, 3u1Mixed. .--------------------------. .do-.0 15 9 1,4~4 2.427Total -------------------------do.-. 574 2, 33S 4, xxS 7, 251 15. 030Noncitrus fruits ...------------------.do.-0 2 0 0 2Vegetables. ..-----------------------.o. -0 24 1,7 243 431Sterilization of citrus by-Heat method-----------------------0.o -. 0 41 376 1,679 2Cold method (Florida only).---------do ------------1 51 12 32Intrastate shipments in car lots-Grapefruit--. .-----------------------.o. ..0 90 31 94Oranges.-.-------------------------t o 0 0 1Vegetables. .-----------------------. 1.o 0 0 2 2Intrastate shipments, highway movement-C itrus. .. ..------------------------trucks. 0 n> 1, 263 1, 911 3,Interstate shipments, less than car lots by ex-pressCit rus. .------------------------boxes. W01 1, 7t 4. l 54, t.3 '. .-'N onitrus -------------------------.(o 4, 611 1, 2 -4; -.Negctables .-----------------------.o --13 2, 706 1ltiI3 2', 1' it. 12UNtirsery stock, plants wit h roots----------to --1, 633 7, 29 4, it3 :, _9 1,Violation!u-:Shipment s interceteu at Jac(k-onvifle anld re-turned to -hip4tr as vioit i1n> of reguhltt iWitlhuut pvriiit.---.-.--.JiIlproiter pvrliiit---.--------------. ,t tarir cna------------------------------------------I---e tUIi:tt ----------------------('Nucealcd Itiint' e ' ------I T -------i----o-' -------'.--for11 wrt tie n, aa-o e e ,&1~t4Iicil1.th i w)cI A _ li &'l* \k i , Iiui .i ii\ V t I L, I I I , I Ieit eti mblr Ind Itiit I I I edCONTROL OF N'EI ICULAIR Itll"l 'EE T11r*ik-a ion are or illtetti at1, e( 1,r*ain ;111 1paIt (0 Vhorid -. Th jlne :[I vhi''1>lwlh pall-ols wvore, in1 ti1ild havoc beiien 4,h1tllfel frtoil iiini *w lillwpl,11:1 tOf ilifi stat iol w('r i e iele l l wr tt (jpitc:11il w IVN re i )1fl ilwr I was i -u11 , hwr, n e lit)aton 11,e Itilt d!woiiidary (d lth(, ainto rn xena frion lilh m I hneunifetedse(ds Flottida': 't ood xt(,1ds Vln henrlonhVudr1f1h ead*niol rt froml Citrlu, tot DilvAl 0munty 10a ia ~rh Am

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188 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [Oct.-Dec.,intrastate movement, and a third is located along the northern boundary ofFlorida. Inspection posts on the first two of these lines were maintained under the authority and direction of the State plant board, while the thirdwas operated under Federal authority and direction from headquarters atAtlanta.On the Federal line controlling northbound interstate movement, 11 stationswere maintained in Alabama and 19 in Georgia. In addition, 7 automobilepatrols were employed to control movement on the less-traveled roads. Onthe north boundary of the eradication area from 20 to 24 such posts havebeen maintained and on the southern boundary from 11 to 15.The number of vehicles inspected and the number found to be carrying artcles-moving in violation of quarantine are shown in Table 5. This table also indi-cates the number of violations intercepted in passengers' baggage on trains.TABLE 5.-Sumnary of inspection, under e(litcrrai ean fruit-fly qtarantine, ofvehicles and baggage leaving the eradication areaSeptemOctober NovemDecemTotalItem July August ber ber berEradication area border patrol:Vehicles inspected ---.--number357, 962 359, 214 394, 670 354, 897 1 359, 248 462, 503 2, 288, 494-Vehicles in which fruit was found IBaggage number3,331 3,077 2,975 3,655 4,171 5,204 22,413Baggage inspected, highwaymovement ----------pieces238, 196 215,267 248, 193 239,658 252,818 352, 456 1, 546,588Baggage in which fruit was found,highway movement-pieces_. 887 670 767 798 691 1,302 5,115Baggage inspected, train move-ment -----------------pieces i 99,349 102,273 103,030 112,034 111,079 139,344 667,109Baggage in which fruit was found,train movement----------------531 449 395 450 567 903 3,295Georgia-Florida border patrol:Vehicles inspected -number53, 908 54, 817 48, 201 47,2S2 48,150 51,988 304,346Vehicles in which fruit was found 4--------------number _ 2,279 2,808 2, 060 1,836 1,849 1,987 12,819Alabama-Florida border patrol:Vehicles inspected -------do. 71,289 80,883 60, 714 62,423 53,037 59,840 388,186Vehicles in which fruit was found---------------number955 1,381 1, 105 1, 116 1, 036 1, 145 6, 738,The regulations under which the destination carrier is required to clean atthe unloading point cars used in the transportation of Florida host fruits andvegetables were enforced largely at the important railroad diversion pointsof Potomac Yards, Cincinnati, Louisville, St. Louis, Chicago, and Detroit.Supplementing this work, employees of the administration at Savannah andWaycross, were able to inspect a considerable number of cars, some of whichhad moved south through the switching points at which inspectors were notmaintained. As a result of such inspections, 14 cars were intercepted dirty inOctober, 61 in November, an(l 340 in December. The number of interceptionsin December, while small in comparison with the more than 8,000 cars movingduring that month, indicated such a degree of neglgence Oil the part of rail-way employees that conferences were held the last veek of the month withthe opertinig ofIieers of the leading railroads both of the northeastern terri-tory a1d of the South. and llmethods were worked out to improve the situation.Restrictions Oil reshipments from the territory northeast of and includingMarlaInd and Pennsylvalnia to points south and west of that area and fromthe Northern Stotes in general to the South vere enforced at transit-inspectionpoints 111(1 by visiti ig the wholesale and retail grocery stores along the quar-alitinle li es referred to. These requiremenlts were on the whole very wellolbsorVV(l, I Ilt1 IouIgh Ihie nii nh11er of men assign0led to the enforceinent of theser's 11(1 inS ws 15 lolare enough to prevent completely local transp( rtation ofS111,11 (111,11tilies of Florida host fruits ainid vegetables front points just northa1d east of the dividing lies to near-by districts within the same traderteri toryv.APPROPRIATIONSAs stated in the Service and Regulatory Announcements for April-June,192, emergency funids of $50,000 were released by the State of Floridainiinediately ipon (hisCcvry of the Mediterranean fruit fly and by transfer,

PAGE 9

1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 1>9$40,000 was promptly made available Iby the Departi ment i0 A liuture fl rpreliminary work. This\was followed by colIres-ioial lcti4. it iki1 1_7000 inined lately available ftor the conltnl anl(d era ictti n IIIpratia-. Alladditional amount of S1,2(0,000 was flirt11her madle INvailal by j tint litu i iof Congress in 1)ecember.PREVENTION OF SPREAD OF GIPSY MOTHNEW INFESTATION FOUND ON LONG ISLANDEarly in December, 1929. a gipsy-not11 infestaition was discovered aI itht ly i.Long Island, N. Y. All available ,ersoni was immed iaely tranorred th i ttarea to determine the limits of spread and to uT l(ertake the prompt ertI itA.tion1of the insect at that point.The center of the infestation was in the vilbige of North R4slyi near severalnurseries. By shortly after the close of the year several thousanid g clustershad been found in this village and the territory cemb aracing a bout 3 milt ' sur-rounding it. Eradication operations were coniplicated by the large amou14n t ofmiscellaneous materials that were piled in the hack yard. The iispet ctimn ofthis material and treating the egg clusters had been started by tihe end ofDecember in cooperation with the conservation department of the State ofNew York.Records of the past shipments of the nurseries concerned are being checked,but it is believed that such shipijenIs have beeit cofiiied largely toiLn I~ n 1.Scouting will be U1dert aken around all points to which nursery stock has beenconsigned from this locality.GIPSY-MOTH DEFOLIATION IN NEW ENGLAND AGAIN SERIOUSThe forest acreage defoliated in the Nortliastern Srites i-ain Ii shows a sub-stantial increase over the figures for the previous year. Over lialf a millionacres suffered economic daminge. more than half the leaves beiine stripped fri lithe trees throughout two-thIirdIs of the I erritory attiack(4. N\w I i ia,\ivforests suffered most severely. The infestation in the v, ci lit y o )1 \1ilf(Iri. N. II.was so heavy that the inspect or st at ioIed there for 1i w certi li 'a io (of -.i tie a idquarry products required special assistant is. as an ui iu1ua lly Li r 1 andmr Ifegg clusters, larvie, aid pupie were founid on material offered fIrli ship tit dur-ing the sumniner. All egg ci 1 cster5 were ren rc5s(1ed at l( all inifkIstali'n ciltirdeyremoved before cert~licate t were issUed. The data secured in a sdrvcy of ihesituation is sunmnarized in Table 6.TABLE fi.lreun (Ifolial 4 ba flu' !/ThI moth Iu 19 !9(tcf~~~iiao~~coT bY aw tirs iioiState A dmssachusettsrVermper'Its -' -ii tI ----1 -1 --hode --s-------T1I' taL --------OTI IER ACTItVITIESThe (oul h k Io .a l (Wp eto 11wth toitll 'rtdil'tik, Vh J r( -Il() m th4)VeiI t i lt 41 timiiu I ' Vo'. Th t4 tk di(:l i ill~ t ec i )lt h~i g tIe 1)1.(\ iolllis;l e r li s wcn ll ;I t I9 \IG s|1111in ld 1) cre( tis i i i ll Iu I,-ss o I I wI 11ll e Il\ (1:1 i I t W iswer n*4)1111 1t nd ro m he i I I t .; l r in Ill I 'I :tn a Io :1\\:I,\Ifd(N-e x C ()1lji t \, w i I If I ]w n -111 ll l H ; k)1 l rN ;1, il IT ju lu \\1 12 11 :1 Cfw til :I IiSAimer, but N4 11rh sf her :11.4 of 1 he i in> lwT I w II liIlN.The barri r Z()1(, a sirip Sb um il : ilc widh clsl II the I II2N ', ihectominlmor)Ie ditlicult I ( m11a it ;Iill frcc fromil I h iplIos Is Ih Im Ii I:IonI111 -.3 -: -2

PAGE 10

190 PLANT Q-UARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [Oct.-Dec.,east of the zone increases. Scouting in this strip for the season was startedin July and by the close of the year gipsy-moth larvTe, pupm, or egg clusters hadbeen found in the towns of New Marlboro, Sandisfield, Otis, Mount Washington,and Becket, Mass. ; Canaan, Cornwall, North Canaan, Norfolk, Salisbury,Sharon, and Kent, Conn.; and Hillsdale, N. Y. The work in New York Statewas carried out by the State department of conservation.Details of the inspection and certification work carried out in connectionwith quarantine enforcement during the last half of the calendar year 1929are shown in Table 7.TABLE 7.-Inspections 'under Federal gipsy-moth quarantine, July 1 to Deceimber31, 1929Forest products Stone and quarry Nursery stock Other evergreensproductsMonth ShipShipLarShipShipLarShipShipShipShip-ments ments ments ments vm or ments ments Egg ments ments Eggininpup, ininegg ininmasses ininmassesspected fested suspected fested masses spected fested spected festedJuly------1,642 4 7 27,642 12 142 182 0 0 386 0 0August----1, 847 5 25 19, 969 5 8 578 0 0 590 0 0September1,404 5 17 31,355 61 111 1,830 0 0 691 0 0October---2,135 6 244 34, 722 29 81 3, 649 0 0 893 0 0November1,741 2 9 30, 695 12 42 1,575 0 0 6,856 0 0December. 2,346 0 0 15,039 4 6 1,902 0 0 8,229 0 0Total. 11,115 22 1302 159, 422 123 2390 9,716 0 0 17,645 0 01Not including six egg clusters found in October and five in December on car stakes to be used withshipments of forest products.2 Not including egg clusters found on materials which were to be used in crating pieces of finished gran-ite or on car stakes to be used in connection with shipments of granite as follows: 4 in August, 55 in Sep-tember, 53 in October, 3 in November. and 2 in December.In addition to the figures given in Table 7, inspectors of the State and Fed-eral Departments of Agriculture in cooperation examined and certified a totalof 624 shipments of nursery stock and farm products originating in the terri-tory of New Jersey regulated under a gipsy-moth quarantine issued by thatState. No infestation was discovered in these shipments.As inci(lental features of the gipsy-moth-control operations surveys have beenconducted to determine the present distribution of the satin moth, the brown-tail moth, and larch canker. The first named is discussed later. The brown-tail moth is not sufficiently abundant to cause serious injury except in certainsections in the eastern part of the infested territory. In the lightly infestedsections this insect is not seriously abundant on account of the control meas-ures practiced and the effective work of imported natural enemies, disease,and adverse climatic conditions. The satin moth now has a greater distribu-tion than the brown-tail moth. As a result of the search for larch canker,a number of suspected specimens were referred to the Bureau of Plant industryfor definite determination.APPROPRIATIONSThe agricultural appropriation bill for the fiscal year 1931 which is nowpeindig carries an item for the control and prevention of spread of the gipsyand brown-tail moths of $647,500. This may be compared with the amountof $567,500 which is available for the current fiscal year, to which may beadded a deficielncy item of $100,000 if the pending first deficiency bill passes.SATIN MOTH SPREADSThe at(11n1111ist ration, in connection vith gipsy-mlotli-qilarantile enforcement,Made surVeys during he summer to determine the presellt extent of si till-moth1ii eslatl io n ill Nw Eigad. ThI(e liter inise(ct was found to have spreadextisitvely, especially 0 Iie north ward iin Maine. In the Pacific Northwestit is still tiuikuiowi south of Lewis County, Wash. The Fo leral qua ra Iiie prohibiting the interstate transportation of poplarand willow trees from the infested area was accordingly amended on October

PAGE 11

1 I i t" I I IIa I t '.AIIIt\ dl 1 11I I NoIfa I I i II 441 ) it l AIi "I I l:j Iaa[ i ;J 1j If I. I s.L 1 SI sU 1S 1m I Si 1 1 1 p>I\ I O' 11,0l"Mp 1" .!1Aq MUuij > I IU I AlSl 11.1w tl 4.) ).II41 *I II 1 I Iia I I I 1' 0 '.,z I II I IIAF Ulx11F 01 P I).)1I1)M)1 tt " I I U I I I I I IJ A Il) IpK-aOIp> x Ilog I { I jploU g.10211411 l~ll IA,)1t1 I 1 "I141 4 0Ji')1 .IJA ) o A )%1.1S ) 11J 'i 1II( I, .1)4 .114 2 I iA I L I>A Ih 1,OIft t1) JU>iI~i~ A 4oI 1~ Oaf 1i*Q A\F .I.d-O \ I 51qI 1})J .1 1 1 !j I I II M I7 1)A I)AIU l)I.I n 1:) 11 1O414F~U Ln F I o ,u1:ps I u'-I t; 1 ai I IJl1 M S' 2 (I f I II IfaiatL .1 al 0." .A l :.\\ 1 i O 11! 1o 12 j i9 s u U t)sdt~I HI *a(; 1 I.' IJ {) I~A I~ .~1 I~; 11 , )~ Ia I I I SI I V ) XJ0 O'U H LO FOuj fi.t 0IfIl p --I' uwaL Ii I TUI 04 g7,ag T Hi2 >14 t 1 J.I 1 dl9Jp[ SV A\ 511:41 l .UA 111 )JIOI s ).FfII )m I II .A01111 tI.1 U II ).N;.~i~~ 1 1 lIj I s IT II I II I II l .14 1 0A1 19)1 I , ) Ill~j I 1 \ 5T !102 Bill UjI U 1 ,), F F) ' { 1 ! 91 V. 4,1 l 9I AX 11;O U1 .) JO sot d 0 s1{ I tOllo, 0."Il sin P TH [. Iu (Ij Illn uo'll ID)!q 11.1n o l 'Oqj TIT1 o4~;L IJT 114) 1 u U I P 4kuF.J .s BAk 1,1 S .L tSwi T a put. -,.P OT11 )j TO ,.)11' It( U 11l .1, )J( M-)If~ I~6 H I SU 1M .IUOAl II I I T l0(1 JOJ 811144jHI1 p1 1 TITA I o' )t I a O{ O A S 0 U O MO TS IYJ I 4U.1O 0111 i II Up~l14 l [I 1)11141 'S4\ ,tO. ( NJ 0 1 01 'All JO I 011 OX A TO1V 10.IS11%J UIl ITT)U4[p~~~~ ~ ~ ~ s' 'sllT -s IIa "~u Is-' auoa e npgnaI( ) 1U ,1 [0 1 I1 .NftI S H IT I , ) 1' lIT '0.1Q [IS() I~u IJ M.-)\], 1) 1 U 1 ,, m .-N Io -T .1)( l ap uu ~ f Jo )-,Iu" I -v fir, p? IO ,U 0 Ja 18 11 n Aoq U0111. IISIAO -10(11 JO O .1(I!U HIPI l ,OX 50.( 11 11.)oIU),It? 111 F jl 11111 { 111O 0 tj i -s 0 ll IDlo .101 1 J ITIPIA.X II 0 JIO 11" 111'~J.A k S0 A-I ~4)l FIU 11 ) til f l08 UP pI U.011 Hi.\ 14J0 11 'll0p111io. J 1Jftlalq -,U1 .1o.11.O~141OI II >.A' ~~i(),I tiz 08111 fit 1 X' J)AI)l TfOA~d iS 1111111 8jJ O .1.noqe:1i:Ib'lhl 1100 ~1J OUT OTT J T1IJ0111 ~lit[ 'v4 'UO130S Stil oI p 10.la (o tlsr,1111'1?1 0FtJ~ )11U 01Sfh.) fNU~i 11l.1 1.Ip0j 511014 TIMI 1 18 0 14 PO 3IJHI SjU 00I?-111 l. P0.1110.1 S1!J11 0144C JO~ O1 !1V JO 1IOU 0(11ldl IOd J cq-JO ,)( 1111.If1011Titjmu.qs100 wms 1,11 111 JO potill1{4111A.l 11PW-11.1 Nl AV'21')) OI.UlP, 0144 04 JO111 I .iOIX-0 011 T t Jt l1 '54405f SlJ1O.)UUII ~I. )pFmjjT 1~.IHII W)C H 1l.4~ 0111U III S1AO 04 N11111)U 'pw')ii aqj p s-ixmd jo ituoivqnod~ uxvo-jo: uLMAU3I a -)Ill

PAGE 12

192 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [Oct.-Dec.,reported in 1929 was Ash Township, Monroe County, with a borer populationef ITS borers per 100 stalks. In Ohio the largest number found in the surveywas in Oregon Township, Lucas County, with 263 borers per 100 stalks. Thesetwo townships, together with Allen Township, Ottawa County, Ohio, where thedegree of infestation is substantially the same, represent the nearest approachto commercial damage in the Great Lakes area.Similar comparisons in eastern New York show an increase in the number ofborers per 100 plants of from 18 in 1928 to 22 in 1929.In the 2-generation area the direct comparison of 95 townships surveyed in1928 with the same townships surveyed in 1929 show an increase in the numberof borers per 100 plants from 9.95 to 35.08 in Connecticut, from 186.08 to 213.S4in Massachusetts, and from 7.63 to 25.9 in New Hampshire, as well as decreasesfrom 4.9 to 3.39 in Maine and from 189.88 to 174.49 in Rhode Island. The highest average township infestation shown in the direct comparison reportswas in Belmont Town, Middlesex County, Mass., where there were 983.33borers per 100 stalks in 1929, as compared with 353.17 in 1928. Similar increaseis noted in the town of Warwick, Kent County, R. I., where 746.1 borers per100 plants were found in 1929, as compared with 503.56 in 1928. In a con-siderable number of cases in the 2-generation area, however, material decreases were noted, some of the most marked being in Barnstable and Dukes Counties,Mass., and Bristol County, R. I.QUARANTINE REGULATIONS REVISEDOn December 16, 1929, the corn-borer-quarantine regulations were revised toadd a total of 655 townships to the regulated area, of which 209 were in the2-generation and 446 in the 1-generation area. In addition seven townships inNew Hampshire which were formerly in the 1-generation area were transferredto the 2-generation area.At the same time changes were made in the requirements governing theinterstate movement of the restricted articles under which the limitation onthe quantity of cleaned shelled corn which could be shipped without certifica-tion or other restriction was placed at 25 pounds to the shipment instead of 2pounds, as before; free movement of sweet corn on the cob from New YorkCity during May and June was authorized and the special restrictions applyingto the entry of restricted articles into the regulated areas in Maine wasremoved. The full revl ._on will be found on a later page.INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION OF RESTRICTED ARTICLESThe quantities of cleaned shelled corn, cut flowers, and plants certified inconnection with the enforcement of the European corn-borer quarantine areshown in Tables 8 and 9. Ear corn originating in the regulated areas is notallowed to be moved to outside points. Shelled corn may be certified on thebasis of the repeated inspection of the premises and of the equipment withwhich it is cleaned. The certification requirements on shelled corn are thesame in both the 1-generation and 2-generation areas. The restrictions on themovement of cut flowers and certain plants are, however, limited to the 2-gen-eration area, as indicated in Table 9.TABLE 8.-Shelled corn certified under the European corn-borcr quarantine,July 1 to Decew bcr 131, 1929Central area 1 Western areaMonthCorn for Seed corn Cor for Seed cornfeed feedBlushels Pounds Bushels PoundsJuly ------------------------------------------------------141, 920 2, 418 195, 977 2,949A s 247, 738 1, 529 153, 136 66Seplember ------------------------------------------------403,912 0 162,842 0(oeoher ------------------------------------------------345, 611 0 107,977 18,311November ------------------------------------------------123, 185 203, 553 35,823Decinmher ------------------------------------------------299, 576 0 417, 293 136,476T'ot al --------------------------------------------1, 561, 942 3,947 1,240,778 193, 6251 That part of the 1-goneration area east of the western border of Pennsylvania.

PAGE 13

1929] SERVICE AND REGULATOPY ANNOVNCE\ENTS 19BTABLE 9.-Certification Of cut flocirvi and o lan U. in ?-p tiwctoit U i'( a (iUN' rnNec Engla d (i) 4l Y t o Dcc b'' .], V)2!)Cut flowers Beans, cel-and entire ery, beets,Month plants curanid riuFgtified barb rs arvANumber BushrlsJulu l----.-------------------------2S9, 417 23,l'1 8 2, 08 3 2August ---------------------------. 2, 631, 0); 9, 570 10 52 1, 0September---------------------------2,(61, : 4, 621 4 15 91 0October.-----------------------------304, 372 2 '1m U I 93 1 0November.-------------------------456,411 2.100 0 27 ( 0December.--------------------------253, 654 2, 1 9S 0 lo 0 0Total---.----------------------. 5, 996, 933 44, 651 22 3, 392 22 21 In addition to 178 larvacollected in September in green peppers conigned from Dightoin, _Mass.,inspected at Portland, Me., and 460 larx oe similarly collected in uttoubr.CONTROL OF VEHICULAR TRAFFICRoad stations were maintained at the principal roads o1 all boundariesof the regulated areas and also at the principal highIwaijys lead in1 bei weenthe regulated areas of New Hampshire and1 M.aine. These stat ions niiniberII8 in Maine, 45 in Comiecticut, 7 ill -New York, 25 iin New Jersey, 20 il 'etal-sylvania, 3 in West Virginia, 49 in Ohio, 35 in iidiana, and 14 ill ihe UpperPeniinsula of -Michigan. In atd1ition, inspectors were also sultionedI at 19docks and ferries in Michigan. These stations were opened the latter part ofJuly at the begilnninig of the sweet-coril season afl(l were Continuel until aboltSeptember 20, except that the stations in the vicinity of New York (1ityv werecontimied to the eim( of Septeiber 'a11 those in western Counectiuet untOctober 12. Approximately I3 ,U.0.000 cars were stopped at these s'i 0 1 a1(1large quantities of corn atnd other restricted articles were imtercliteld a 1(confiscated. While it vas impracticible to examille all the eoullise ted Jim-terial, such casual inspection as it was possible to give resulteol in the lindinlof 2.813 borers whi l woi ld have been carried to otside areas ii le ro adstations had not been Ilaintained. The detailss of the road-station work aregiven in Table 10.TABLE 10.-RC8ul1t8 of roa(d-st(I I in op>ra I ion Hunder L'u ropOIn Corn-borcr quarai i-tine, July 1 to I c'iber 31, 1929Ite r July August Se p!ber October TotalEastern (2-generation) area:-epicles StOlp)d-----------nunber2.59, 185 80, 24S G6o, 321 21s,353 1, 954, 107Confiscations-Ear corn--------------------ear 4, I 21,6'1, "11 11, 2, 70) 39, 920('orn (additional, i i c I u i gshelled --------------oPi11dl 312 1, 1 10 112 1, 72('ornstaiks.----------------. do 0 0 mto UI'cms, inla and string. guirt .I 1,:322 2, 0Wi i, I02 44, IIeets. .-------.loTs or billchra' .7 1 1, :1 ;,1 7 2' 2,('elery----------------. . .-.e4h7 757 2'. oo 2,2 21tihubrb----------lots or sid :11 2201 1.13 r,6('I0.1110 .--------------------. ..1,474 1, 1) 721 3.7(il 11olus----------------lks 924 5, 109 5, 1 .I5,A sters .--------------------. do I lu 1, 7 4. 01(, 1, 3 1-,Zinnias---------------. ..d, .5o 2,295 2 i2, 1; itD I Ilis -------------------. .io; 1,7 , 2, 5,3Collyhocks.-----------.d .-690 1 3Sudan gras.---------------. o . 0 su N i\-ixed -lowe. --------------do 0 00liorers found.-----------.----um er_. 4 121 ' 571 1. hst) I. ulCentral area:Vehicles stopped.-.nunier .74% 376 3,201,11 21 mf2 3I' '6r 2 OrCon tscat ions-F:1r corn.---.---.-. -ar 37,r; wIr 16, A 199 1 1 Il lrSlwtled cort.-.-.-. ibuIh'. -9 A 0 'sBorers found ---------------. .ni 17 9r Iii ,-In addition to 26 bags nmd I truckload of beais ill JuL and 2' lxe i vep'rmber.l in addition to one pupa in July and one egg mass in ligUst.

PAGE 14

194 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [Oct.-Dec.,TABLE 10.-Results of road-station operation under European corn-borer quaran-tine, JulU 1 to December 31, 1929-ContinuedItem July August September October TotalWestern area: Vehicles stopped --------number.246, 230 2, 072, 446 1, 732, 583 12, 364 4, 063, 623Confiscations-Ear corn ---._.-.--.---. ----.ears-. 2 16,547 97,333 44,925 260 159,065Broomcorn-----------. .bunches_. 0 3 411 6 0 417Popcorn--------------. ..bushels. 0 3 22.3 0 25.3Shelled corn-------------. .do.-. 0 167 7.5 0 174.5Sorghum-----------------stalks0 0 3 0 3Borers found-------------. ..number. 115 401 53 0 5692 In addition to 7 sacks of husks and 1 bag of cobs in July.3 In addition to 150 pounds (broomcorn) in August.APPROPRIATIONSThe agricultural appropriation bill for the fiscal year 1931 as reported to theHouse of Representatives by the Committee on Appropriations on December13, 1929, carries, on the recommendation of the department, an item of $1,000,000for the control and prevention of spread of the European corn borer.This amount may be compared with the item of $898,000 carried in the agri-,cultural appropriation act for the fiscal year 1930 and $887,660 in the act forthe year 1929. To these amounts there was added $50,000 which becameimmediately available for work in the spring of 1929 under the proviso quotedon page 99 of the Service and Regulatory Announcements for October-Decem-ber, 1928.MEXICAN FRUIT-WORM ERADICATIONINFESTATION AT BROWNSVILLEWhile the Mexican fruit-worm infestation in the western part of the-lowerRio Grande Valley fruit-growing district found in April, 1929, seems to havebeen completely eradicated, the insect was found to have reached Brownsville,in the eastern end of the, cultivated area, on November 19, 1929. Subsequentinspections showed three premises involved-two on St. Charles Street andone on Levee Street. In all cases the infested fruit was growing on back-yard trees on city lots. Subsequent thorough inspections were then made ofall fruit growing in the city, but no other specimens were found.As provided under the State and Federal quarantine regulations, an infestedzone was promptly designated by a committee appointed by the CameronCounty commissioners' court. The area so designated was somewhat less thana square mile in extent and was bounded by the Rio Grande River, Eleventh,Monroe, and West Fifth Streets, Brownsville. The fruit 'n this zone wasinimediately destroyed under State authority, all the property owners withinthe zone being officially notified of the necessity for so doing. The clean-upwas Comipleted within eight days after the infestation was first found, the fruitfrom the zone being bur ed under quicklime and 3 feet of soil. Of the sour-orange trees within the area, approximately 100 were destroyed.Tis Brownsville infestation appa rently developed as a result of the spread(f the Mexican fruit worm from ai infestation in Matamoros, Mexico, imme-(lint y across the river from Brownsville. Infested fruit from the inter orof Mexico is reaching that city regularly and is on sale on the markets there.As a result of tie cl(am-ll) urs in Ma tamoros adopted ill previous years,however, the fruit growing in tlhe city itself has been largely free from infesta-tionl a11(1 thIe frl( i:1 worm wals not discovered to have become establi shed therethis season iintil September 8.Il cok)' r1tion Witli thlie local representative for the. Oficina para la DefensaA gricoa, a e imlete survey ol Ma ta Ioros was iinniedia(ely stia rted. This re-silt led ill t he discovery of 509 Mexican fru t worms ill September, 392 in October,20S inl INovember, a:d 59 in December, these figures including trap collections.6

PAGE 15

1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCE-MENTS 19About 50 per cent of the fruit examined was found to be infested. 01 verof the iremises all the early-ripeiiing fruit was found to have been a ackvd andin a number of instances green fruits which had not yet Ieguu to ihange cul rwere found infested.In cooperation with the 'Mexican Goverment a complete cLan-up f t he t ripand ripening fruit growing in Mutanii tros was legun on Septembur '2J. Hlo'tfruits of all kinds. includinall varieties f citruS (except P mins and s urlimes) were striped from the trees. dunmpe in a pit. and cN verd w q luick-lime and 3 feet of dry ,oil. This work wvas coi mupluted on O. 'c 1-b r 12. anidduring its prog-ress 1.20S ield boxes of fruit ill all >iages of deve ,lI t Wer egathered on 405 different preinis-es. Thui trees were then hiii to wi. a Is nsirup oMnistinOf ; pounds of arsenate of lead, 10 poundl-i of Ilacksirapmolasses, and 50 pitunds of sigar in 200 ga (it> f wN ter. This jpy wa re-peatled every 5 to 10 days after the infestation was discovered and wa4 N ta Slbeing used in both Brownsville and Mzltamoros at tle end of Dec ml r.Knapsack sprayers were u."ed for this piurplt ue atuI from , nf t1 11pints of poison bait per tree were used. A total of 11.833 treos were o raedat Matamnoros on eaci round of spraying.AMENDMENT TO TEXAS REGULATIONSThe State -Mexican fruit-worm regulations were amended on Decembe 'yr 30.1929, by the addition of regulation 3 (j) as follows:Regulation 3 (ji.-All fallen fruit or decaying fruit taken from any orhard :nust bedestroyed by complete combustion by tire or by burying undrr at 1111-ises in October. 11 trees frin 5 premisein Novemier. tl,! i I e i frim1 4jJremliSes iin 1 emb .These lii'rN are in ad il n to t slltur "t 11destroyed ill tile c(l111t of t1 BrOwnvihle infe(1fitl, tlur Oil I Niotbeing considered as ,utlmer-hmst trees.Grove illspctioll 1' a lasis for the ccrliieabtit! u tile 1.rI (1,0u1. upwas started about Septeblher ]Ik )wili l' e toU)tialiy 1-1(4a .the owVers llad solie difliculty iII co-iiLi ith 11ie , i' Vt 1 u's 1I1 cgro\eS li1t le kept tree f'-ill weoehds tiluI Ial* hI t'lti1. I Iti Iof the growers were temporarily denied illIpeton curcl lw l i elihbecause or failure to colithl\ \ itihee reii tetinu nt NFri'iit llvtved froml tihe val hlt ill miiuch l (i r \ ol ' N i m rigT t I.v: I 1y'eairs. ltaiI slifui tls i lah'dII 2S I tI c t III I t , r 1 11d 1 u nt ocit ollb , ( as )io ier 2l7 ed will i ( it l I 1i'r lilt, 1 1ii I in l i lt I 1grardI l iIacll irs* a ' sitilipers' Il ttitl Ir l JN '11tt Vi/i nI ' ' .0*,' ii iISO~~~~~~~~~es~~"litin 'Ille s l ll'le l ie i e ,il i 'l e i i 1 a dN,iwv lel i th e la eV e ut r a'1111 Ill N1 v r i t it 'I U\ u i (tI I\ .t i'11-111s. 111,1Y lho cWill);Irk 4 \\ illi the rTetn'id Ctier I l.\ oasiluteIrc]eporllit werIi i tplei.1'o ht rIaoa d Imuita l at Flil o w Ii'lii l l ,')I l in ' t-4rh1o1urs 11n1il 0clloer 11. A sec()nd 1ta i" -Las :1abis e )Hl t ,igrtity (oil 0 0 (olber 27 to) cslw 4) o l lilive11ii'nt ov r th it -:-Ii 1 tit Nes is"I"llido vity, Rtifil, Illtl lalIred(), Thlis Wl i-, un1ii'l:ir li.' T.11,11 11, i'lwhichi fill palsscll;-, r I'mift lid 14) ho ia r ii r i ilul leeilll -r lsl:is internvptiolls. 1)11ringL tho C'm11(n'l p-ro n'14) e e ca n ary ncnraloalldi fI'l-it.

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196 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [Oct.-Dec.,TABLE 11.-Results of road-station operation under Mexican fruit-worm quaran-tine, July 1 to December 31, 1929Encino station Riogrande city stationMonth Vehicles IntercepVehicles InterceD-inspected tions inspected tionsJul ------------------------------------------------9,504 58 0 0August---------------------------------------------6,704 58 0 0September (1-7, 27-30 only)---------------------------701 15 0 0October----------------------------------------------6,284 355 1395 21November -------------------------------------------6,617 443 2,794 201December------------------------------------------8,149 805 3,485 244Total--.---------------------------------------37,959 1,734 6,674 4661 The Riogrande city station was not started until Oct. 27.JAPANESE-BEETLE CONTROLSPREAD DURING THE SUMMER OF 1929The scouting season of June, July, and August, 1929, showed continuedspread of the Japanese beetle to numerous isolated localities both north andsouth of the areas heretofore infested. In New England adult beetles werecollected in Willimantic, Conn., Boston, Mass., and Providence, R. I. The insectwas found to have spread up the Hudson Valley in New York State as far asKingston. To the northwest beetles were collected at Williamsport, Pa., Bing-hzimton. N. Y., and in southern Pennsylvania as far west as Chambersburg.The beetles were also collected at a large number of Maryland points betweenthe formerly known isolated infestations at Hagerstown, Baltimore, Cam-bridge, and Delmar, and 82 specimens were found at Cape Charles and Norfolk, Va. A summary of these findings is given in Table 12.TABLE 12.-Summary of 1929 findings of the Japanese beetle at localities outsideof main area regulated under Federal quarantine, July 1 to December 31,1929, compared with findings at the same locations in previous seasonsBeetles found Beetles foundLocality LocalitySeason Season Season Season Season Season1927 1928 1929 1927 1928 1929Connecticut: Maryland:New London 12 ----0 27 168 Hagerstown 12 .0 1 47Willimantic 1--------0 0 21 Brunswick 1----------0 0 11Hartford 1 2_ --_ _ _.-----0 12 890 Bel Air '------------0 0 15Massachusetts: Aberdeen I-----.------0 0 16Boston _----------4 11 180 Forest Green--------0 0 1Springfield 1 2-------. .----0 6,597 1,064 Havre de Grace 1.----0 0 191Rhode Island: Warwick ..----------0 0 2Providence 1--------0 0 181 Chestertown 1 -----.0 0 7New York: Rosedale 1-----------0 0 3Kingston-------------0 0 13 Parkville -----------0 0 29Newburg------------0 0 37 Halethorpe---.------0 0 1Beacon--------------0 0 58 Baltimore 12-------30 264 7,185Binghamton--------0 0 10 West Elkridge -----0 0 2Pennsylvania: Colgate I------------0 0 1,538Sayre ' -.-----------0 14 252 Dundalk I----------0 0 8Athens--------------0 0 2 Sparrows Point -. 0 0 4Williamsport I -.--0 0 1, 393 Oxford I'---------------0 0 2NM ont oursville-----0 0 1 Cambridge 1 2. _. .11 15 913Lewistown .1 2 Federalsburg ' 0 0 1Duncannoi---------0 0 10 Delmar 1 2.-----.--. 0 43 633Gettysburg 1 ---------16 1 270 Virginia:York I ------------------_----1 10 Alexandria 1 2 3. 0 72 3,940Wrightsville---------0 0 1 Ballston 1 3-___ ___ 0 0 1ChamTbersburg ----0 0 2 Lyon Village 3 ----0 0 6Delaware: Cape Charles 1-----0 0 68M ilford '------------0 4 45 Norfolk '------------0 0 14Delmar 1 2-.-.-.-.-. 19 1,034District of ('olum bia:Washingtoji .--13 112 3, 1801 T ocality were traps were iised in 1929.2 1 included in State (jilaraitine.3 Included in regulated area in revision of Federal quarantine effective Feb. 15, 1929.

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1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 197On October 31. 1929. a hearing was held "to cni~ilder the adlviabilitv efrevising the quarantine oii accoulit W' this pest to iiiwlu(le the Staile of RoI' eIsland within the quarantined area" and to discuss "any proposals in eh-neetion therewith which those in attendaice at 1he hearing iay demiztvmake." The hearing was la r-rei v att elided by pers1 n> ill iltewrest a i .i 1u,1lstatements of the various factors i-vulv e' I were present ed. At the c t e ufthe year final action by the department u' as still pending.SUPPRESSIVE MEASURESA munber of the outlying points of infestation referred to are being mal'tdethe subject of active suppcessive measllres to I elay the dereliim f ieuvyinfestations around the border of the regulated areas and to prevet :-u(h'localities from becoming centers of spread. The States cunceried are finaneincthe necessary soil treatments and sprain. while the Federal (overnmnalit isassisting by supervising the work and by setting up traps.In accordance with this policy. some 1.5.000 geratiiol traps were used duringthe summer to attract the beetles tit such jpinit,. and about twti-thirdV (f 'uthnumbers of beetles shown in Table 12 were ('aptured in sluch traps, mioStof the remain(ler being secured by scouts in the vicinity y o the tl(181 Asnewly infested localities were found during* the suminer traps were :e' upin and surrounding them for the purpose of seeurinjig fllta as t4 the liten litvof the infestation and of reducing as timuch as pw ssible tle numbers (f (lebeetles.Soil treatments involving the use of anr.enate of lead in iasAaiids wherelarval infestation was kiiown ()r suspected are also bein Ii ntinted I)y ileStates conceriied in coperaionii with the Federal lepartimend. Durini lielate summer and fall grasslain i was so treated at Biinghiaiirln. N. Y. Savreand Atlens, Pa., IIagerstown. Md. awd Norfolk anld Cape (harles, Va. Thearsenical was it milost cases employed at the rate )f 214 p1 oundl" (f arenateof lead per acre, or 1 pmuid per 101) siu are feet. rhe lead arseiate dlu: wamixed with a carrier in the proportt1011 of 4 phiiunds of saml and 2 pouins oftankage to 1 pound of the ar;ejiical. This mixture wxi-s applied to the :uilat the rate of 1,5(O pminds per acl fe, except at l ii (Ii l e 3,%0 pwhen 'u100per acre were used, iicreasing the looage -425 pounds 4of leal arsenate pra (re.Details as to the treatments awl 1(sts are given in TabI le 1:1.TABLE 13.-Soil treatment to con trol th1L Jape'!"W beetle tit isolated poifI. ofinfctation, Julyl to Deccinbur )1. 1929Ar-nOT!'Total of ici1 'I \kPlace Area at crial i lused (atppr4)x1-lately)Square feet PJoun ml IPound,( D! IrsBin gha ton N t-----277, 1,,, t 1 2, 271 F32. 1 Oct. 1 (.t. 7Sayre, Pa ----------------------------3 i 2, 7 12t, 301 1 17. I5 4, 7d 7 c1 t .9 N ov IAthens, Pa ----------------------4, (Ili( I;, 90(1 2,414 6;u. 7 I Niov. 6 Nfv 7Norfolk, V'a -----3:j, 99 14, 0')44 2, (0f ' tK 20, July i Juty illagerstown, Md -1, (185 713 3\, ti" '7 429 1. 44, 4 Aug. Aug, 23C ape Charles, Va --, oo 2 0(H 3, 67 1, Z 0 \ ug 4 I )T otal -----------6' 3-3 -'If1 2:14, 2(j( 33. F56 10, 39-1 901 In addition to the value of l0lor contribtoied by the P"ortsmouth Naivy Yanrd.INSPECTION OF FARM PRODUCTSRestrictiois on i the movenenlt of fatIm products frmii the JaliNe huetle-regulatef areas were f'1iforced during t le "tliiiter f roil Juiie I,, 1i Sepiet her25. ( tii lie Litter date te regti lat im'Iti ti IIt liee' 1 irt i we e r'mt' I\c sby the Secretary of Agriclllt ure fr iF lle reliiluletr (if Ille nelsti. ;t l' a' itbeetles ihad by that time (li apparel If f'I] all ext elit 1th:1t Hwy wXite ]k)longer found infesting such products.11404 80 3

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198 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [Oct.-Dec.,For the purpose of inspection and certification, specially constructed inspec-tion platforms were set up at Scranton and Philadelphia, Pa.; New York,N. Y.; and Bridgeport and New Haven, Conn. At 33 other points in there'g-Iated areas farm-products-inspection headquarters were established whereinspectors were provided with desk space or other needs at some convenientlocation readily accessible to market centers.Due to the presence of adult Japanese beetles in flight in unusual numbersduring the daytime in the market and river-front districts of Philadelphia,it wus necessary to curtail the inspect on service available at that city duringseveral weeks of midsummer. Accordingly, from July 9 to August 14, inclusive,inspections were made there only from 8 p. in. to 10 a. m. each day. Full24-hour service was resumed on August 15.The Japanese-beetle infestation in the vicinity of Hammonton, N. J., hasnow become general and special measures were necessary to prevent infestationfrom being carried from that district in blackberry shipments. Hammontonis a center for Black Diamond blackberries and a berry market is conducteddaily in the town. Quantities of berries are shipped by freight to the variousmarkets, of the East.As the inspection of large shipments of berries under such conditions isimpracticable, a fumigation house was constructed there by the HamninontonMarket Commission, and berries were fumigated with carbon d'sulphidedaily from August 1 to 20. Some 9,880 crates of blackberries, were so treatedand 174 Japanese beetles are known to have been killed, this number includingonly those found on the outside of the crates or on the floor after the crateswere removed. The fumigation appeared to be entirely effective in destroyinginfestation and no injurious effect on the berries was observed.The numbers of packages of fruits and vegetables and bales of hay andstraw certified under the Japanese-beetle-quarantine regulations for movementto points outside the regulated areas during the 6-month period are shown inTable 14. Table 15 shows the number of Japanese beetles removed from suchproducts at the inspection points.TABLE 14.-Qiuantities of farm products. cut flowers, soil, and simihkr productscertified under Ja-panese-beetle quarantine, July 1 to December 31, 1929Cut Sand, soil, Peat Compost Fruits and Hay andMonth flowers 1 earth, etc. manure vegetables 2 straw 2Boxes Carloads Carloads Carloads Packages BalesJuly-------------------------------4,551 2,163 49 98 2,362,965 39,800August -.------------------------------5, 198 2, 829 31 253 2,440,336 12, 168September---------------------------6,132 2,739 82 219 1,407,408 13,165October-----------------------------3,49 2,348 93 182 0 0November.-----------------------------0 1,663 71 188 0 0December------------------------------0 1,036 34 244 0 0Total. ..-------------------------19,320 12,778 360 1,184 6, 210, 709 835,1331 The restrictions on cut flowers were in effect from June 15 to Oct. 15, inclusive.2 The restrictions on farm products were in effect from June 15 to Sept. 24, inclusive.3 In addition to 250 bales of sphagnum moss in July.

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1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 199TABLE 15.-Japancsc betlcs rcimoved frow failrm p;odacts and cat jl;tht rs itifNpection points, June 15 to Oc/&bcr 15, 192!), with colp(!ar icv S al totalsfor i92!LecellaHCut TatilInspection point Corn I tan> -uce ih -e a:-Itice tY xcge Tltops fee rs ru 1 ern tis oConnecticut:New IHaven inspection platform -1 0 1 A 0 0 0 1Stamford inspection platform -( 0 0 0 0 6 3 0 :Total 4 13New York:New York Central, West Streetplatforn--.-.81 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 s4New York Central, WashingtonMarket platform 39 0 0 0 ( 0 0 3New York Central, Cansvoort andWest Fourteentli Street13 1 1 0 1 0 2 0 17Yonkers ---------------------------1 0 0 0 0 0 1Total-------------------------------------------------------------------New Jersey:Newark inspection platform 12 G 0 12 0 0 4 21Hammonton berry market -----------0 0 0 0 0 174 o ITotal ----------------------------------------------------20Pennsylvania:Philadelphia, Delaware RiverBridge inspe lion platform l-----------46 4 1 60 o 163 " ;7Philadelphia office -------------------s 0 1 0 (1 A) 11Philadelphia Navy Yard ------------124 0 G 4 ; i I 0 1Chester---------------------------; 1 4) 1 5 1 0 12 2Philadelphia, 1608 Ludlow Street ---(1 0 0 4 ( 4 -40SPhiladelphia, Twelfth and RaceStreets.-------------------0 0 ( 0 0 0 :i17 ;i:Harrisburg inspection 14at form -0 0 0 0 0 0 :i o 3Norristown inspection at farms -0 0 0 0 0 0 91: C4 I 74Scranton inspection platform ---------1s5 0 0 0 0 0 27; 4 [1ISunbury ---------------------------0 0 0 0Total ----------------------------------------------------------71 s>Delaware:Wilmington market I-----------------4 1 0 4 7 1 2 0 25Milford ---------------------------0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0(ireenwv'ood -----------------------0 0 0 0 1 0 12Total------------------------------------------------i-Maryland:Perryville road inspection post21 0 0 0 0 0 4 0Conowingo road inspection post__1 1 ) A 0 1 0 1 2 42Total-----------------------------------------Total --------------------------------703 I 1s 122 7 i, 23 > 1. it I In addition to :;t Japanese Ie htle renioved from vipt b:islets ioviiig into 1)(LAwr frim other partsof the infested area, such enipty baskets being restricted under the Dheliwre S te ijuairali in regul'n>.NURSERY STOCK AND SOIL CERTIFICATIONUider th Ie (liu antin e r, -rfl-ulntims, Ursory .111d -rvohltlotoIe prcI4mis'-4 ill twJ:J)nese-l'etle-reguIa l 'areIs Nre gr tIp inlto th' clls.'ws. Th ' tfwkfrom itiirseries o class I (pii'C11se 111s il di>ricl'S ill which neiithr 24'rb in t hrsoil nor heetlvs hve bae' flotl ) 111.1V le l t idutd w i it frt liv ill''it iun11 4d w it hout m lteel iIIg o lie Sf retgIfltnS 1) Sucr iwI fur cla1-.s's II I nI I 11 ( 'Att ill ld a IId 1.(l ea I d i IIspoct ions : Ire rc4ie o s i prprte uhieb I )I -]I

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200 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [Oct-Dec.,located in infested districts but on which neither beetles nor grubs have beendiscovered. In class III nurseries the soil must either be removed or the soilball treated or the plants must be grown in certified soil under screen.At the close of the year nurseries classified under the Japanese-beetle-quarantine regulations were grouped as follows:In Connecticut there were 90 premises of class I and 2 of class II ; none of class III.In Delaware there were 29 premises of class I, 18 of class II, and 6 of class III.In the District of Columbia there were no premises of class I, 25 premises of class II,and 3 premises of class III.In Maryland (Baltimore and vicinity) there were 7 premises of class I, 59 premises ofclass II, and 1 premise of class III.In New Jersey there were 130 premises of class I, 50 premises of class II, and 53 premises of class III.In New York there were 162 premises of class I, 77 premises of class II, and 2 premisesof class III.In Pennsylvania there were 71 premises of class 1, 81 premises of class II, and 88 prem-ises of class III.In Virginia (Arlington County and Alexandria) there were 20 premises, all in class II.The amount of nursery stock certified during the 6-month period and thenumber of plants treated with carbon disulphide or with hot water are shownin Table 16. The chemical treatment of soil and similar materials, whether for shipment or for uise in nurseries or greenhouses. is outlined in Table 17.In both tables treatments to comply with the requirements of Notice of Quar-antine No. 66, on account of the Asiatic beetle and the Asiatic garden beetle.are included.TABLE 16.-Certiflcation and treatment of nursery stock under Japanese andAsiatic beetle qitarantines, July 1 to December 31, 1929Plants certified 1Plants cerafter chemical ortified withthermal treatTotalMonth out chemment with-Iical or patthermal certifiedtreatment CS2 Hot waterJuly_-----------------------------------------------6, 063,812 0 0 6,063,812Auzust--------------------------------------------6,425,271 0 0 6,425,271September -.-------------------------------------------3,407, 103 354 0 3,407.457October -.------------------------------------------------6,636,907 7,496 17,559 6,661,962November-------------------.--------------_ 5, 321 077 630 8,444 5,330, 151December -.-----------------------------------------4. 183, 471 0 0 4,183,471Total ------------------------------------------32,037,641 8,480 26,003 32,072,1241 See footnotes to Table 17 for number plants treated with arsenate of lead for later certification.TABLE 17.-Chemical treatmCnt of articles (other than nursery stock) restrictedunder the Japanese and Asiatic beetle quarantines, July 1 to December 31. 1929IArsenate of HCNSteam Carbon disulphide lea d s.MonthPotting Potting Sand Leaf Surface B Surface Bananassoil soil mold soil soilCubic Cubic Cubic Cubic Squareyards yards yards yards feet Crates Square feet BunchesJ UL ----------------0 906 1,141 0 525 0 '1, 576, 410 73,785August ------------0 167 1, 839 107 7, 436 9,880 2 562,086 43,020September 17 1, 355 1, 445 61 13, 321 0 33, 329 0Oct oher -------------213 738 0 61 11,595 0 23, 705 0Novenmher -46 232 0 0 21,352 0 0 0Decenher -----------27 37 0 0 0 0 0 0T ot al 303 3, 435 4, 425 229 54, 229 9, 880 2, 195, 530 116, 805I On Ihis area there were 320,341 growing plants for later certification.2On this area there were 198,102 growing plants for later certification.

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1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 201ROAD PATROL AND TRANSIT INSPECTIONRoad stations were maintained at 33 inspection points on the principal high-ways leading out of the regulated area. On all roads where the volume oftraffic was sufficient to warrant a 24-hour patrol was maintained. Oi lesstraveled roads inspectors were stationed during the hours of greatest t ravel,or the hours when inspectors were on duty were varied from day to (lay.No complete record was kept of the number of cars patssing the inspectionposts except at the three stations in Delaware. At most points, however. it wasestimated that less than 1 per cent of the cars were carrying uncertified arti-(les inl violation of the regulations.Details of the interceptions for the entire sumiiier and fall are *ivell InTable 18.TABLE 18.-Inteeeption8 at road station operated to enforce the Jupac.w andAsiatic beetle quarantine regulations, June 15 to Decem ber .31, 129C'ars earCars pass Cars carrin un-State ri i arcer ifedinspect ion :nilie uarstations ari cles iConnect icu t .-------------------------------------------------(1 6, 270New York .---------------------------------------------------5,Pennsvlvani .--.------------------------------------------------(1) 17, 272 1 2Delaware ----.---------------------------------------------------433, 664 -7 2. 2)Total .-.--------------------------------------------------() 4, 1 11.:2I No complete record.In addition to the road-patrol work enforcement officers of the adiniiii-tra-tion are stationed in leading mail, express, and freight stations io iiterc-ppackages moving by such means in violation of qilarantine. A 'Ital (f 8v violations of the Japanles-he-l'ei qun rantine were hii-u i!t e: ep CI; 1IhI-mnonth period. Of the number given 198 represelited violaiion> alSo [ 11wqilaralti e against tie Asi:iie beetle and tle A'-ia tic uan h \\ whhe 25violations of the latter quarantine only were aIso iltereepied.A synolisis of the q(uarantilie violations by moths i' given in Tabe H!. Tlufigures include mntereeptibus under bothii quaralni e1 :11)(1 ;( bt (o lwlincilide road-station interceptio luls except in 39 inl-klOlewerv iv a I l ealready occurred before the road vehicle was stopiel.(f the total of 33' violations of the two qua ranli iw204 wr vu uv;d bvmembers of the Japanese-hoetIe staff and 129 wxero ivpor t(l Iby Kur ciployees and collaborators of the department.T AmL 19.umuwry of sh1i,1 lits of nlur.Xcr!y stock aid oIhr rxil ir /(" irti lsint Tcptcd in riolaI on of thu .Iapanesua'ini .CIIW-fu 15 qtu r1 ,inJuly I to Dcen1b r ! 1929Moving bI NJut'-l 1(1 x 21AUgU-40 22 2-e m e a .2 IIO r 57 12I )cvemibcr '2 2

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202 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [Oct.-Dec.,APPROPRIATIONSThe agricultural appropriation bill for the fiscal year 1931 carries an itemof $473.000 for the control and prevention of spread of the Japanese andAsiatic beetles. This may be compared with an item of $267,000 availablefor the current fiscal year, to which Congress may later add the amount of$188,000, included in the first deficiency bIll which is now pending.ASIATIC BEETLE AND ASIATIC GARDEN BEETLEThe quarantine regulations issued to prevent the spread of the Asiatic beetle(Anwnla orienctalis) and the Asiatic garden beetle (Aserica cataiwa) onMarch 2, 1929, were enforced in conjunction with the work on the Japanesebeetle project. The articles restricted under this quarantine are nursery andornamental stock, sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure.As most of the nurseries concerned were affected by both quarantines, ajoint form of certificate was used. The work carried out in enforcing the twoquarantines is combined in Tables 16, 17, and 18.SURVEYS CARRIED ON THROUGHOUT THE SUMMER MONTHSFindings outside the regulated areas included the discovery of two adultAsiatic beetles at Schenectady, N. Y., and seven larvT of the same species atBridgeport, Conn. The Asiatic garden beetle was found to be more widelyscattered. larvT being discovered at Cromwell. Manchester, Mansfield, NewCanaan, and Southport, Conn.; Amawalk, Fishkill, and Kingston, N. Y.; andMilford and Winterthur, Del. One adult was also captured at New London,Conn.At a hearing held on October 31, 1929, to consider various features of thequarantine on account of the Asiatic beetle and the Asiatic garden beetle cer-tain evidence was presented indicating that the potential danger of these twoinsects to the United States might not justify the expenses of quarantineadministration and the losses resulting from the imposition of restrictions.The revocation of the quarantine was, therefore, proposed by a number inattendance. The desirability of taking this action was still under considerationat the close of the year.PREVENTION OF SPREAD OF PINK BOLLWORMOn October 24, 1929, the pink bollworm was discovered in the Salt RiverValley of Arizona. The first finding was in gin trash from two gins at Gil-bert, but this was followed the next day, upon the inspection of fields in thevicinity, by the discovery of a general severe infestation in the locality. Sur-veys, which were begun immediately, eventually showed the infested area to comprise a district involving 40,000 acres of cotton and covering that part ofthe Salt River Valley east of Tempe.The eradication measures which have been instituted include the prohibitionof cotton production in the infested section and the carrying out of clean-upmeasures. The noncotton zone which has been established by the State contains134,400 acres and extends 2 miles from the outermost points of knowninfestation. Within the noncotton zone there are about 40,000 acres which,for the crop of 1929, were planted to cotton and about 45,000 acres which werevotedtd to other cultivated crops. The noncotton zone is surrounded by aprotective or buffer zone which extends 3 miles beyond the noncotton zone.In this buffer zone restrictions are placed on the date when cotton can beplamt(d. For the crop of 1930. 1ima, or IOng-staple cotton, can not be plantedbefore April 1. Acala and other of the shorter staple varieties can not beplanted before April 15.The nenace this infestation presents to other cotton-producing regions inAr'zona aid ('aliforiia, (Is xvell as the danger of infestation to the main CottonBelt of the East, prompted the department to request funds to undertakeclei ti-up of the cotton fields throughout the noncotton zone and in some parts

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192e] SERVICE AND l:EGULATOUIY ANNOUNCEMENTS 203of the buffer area.' It is also p roqeS'ed to am neid Ole act aut iI Izinl 1' raparticipati ifn in compenating farmers. for actual and iee>sary Iicause if the enforced nonproduction of ci tton, to rvid full F(rial m-peiinsatioi for the crop of 1930. conditioned on the Feileral Treou ry bI Igreiiubm d or one-holf (i' the amnoni1t paid. It is lwped ail tii-priation for clean-up and ithe propu-ed arran;.:eients for cmineitiation foI r 111ecrop of 1930 will enable the department to carry out its pru*grm1nl and edivwtalethe iink bollworm from the Salt River Valley.As a result of this discovery tif the pink 1ollworm il celit rl Arizonila, pc Iattention has been given to s cOUtill the cotton plc ntings if tho enmire StIutII-west. By shortly after the close of the year all of the coitton-produlei1. ar'of Arizona and California had Ilecn covered. No infestati P n has ieen Imindlin the latter State. In Aiizon:a findings if the pink hmllwormu out ie Ihe SitRiver Valley were limited I ( a sniall a rea near Sacaiton a ine on(e-, ii 1nthe Safford Valley, no evidence of the persistence (f the former ifei a in-in Caciise aind Greenlee Ciunti es ha vi been (Iisci ivered as yet this s-u n.In the ohler 1 i f thI I regubu l 1 Th e i 11i'e< h lw bn fmealj1 1wfaint ining itself in DoIna Aai Col unt y. N. Mex. a nil in Prsidio. Brewster.El Paso, ludspeth. and Reeves Cointies. Tex. No infesita tionii s have bliei di-c( vered this season in the Peces Valley. N. Mex., or in the west-central Texasarea,. where the 1927-28 crop and, as to Ector County, the 192S-29 cr, q hovwda light infestation.scmOtingtparties have meanwhile been making surveys in the nin Ct tmBelt 0i the east. Six crews of three mn each wxtre delmiled 1i NVIh WI\ileastern anid central Texa, and in Louisiana aind two men are s oulin' lhoother Southern States. especially Missisippi. Alaboama. and Geiwgia. There'-ul ts (if all such sUirveys (' 111tcite to be noa tive.QUARANTINE ENFORCEMENTRestrictions oil the mlivemllent of cotton products from the re ulated areainclude the requi-emien ts of euonipressio n 111(1 fumiii ltion as coliditiot s fli itheinterstate or intrastate moveinent of cotton lint to uninfest Ied s.ctito* ai I ufthe sterilization of Cottonseed as a part of tlie continuous process oc gi in.This work for the (-nonth period is simmarized in Tabl e 20.T.1Ai E: 2 .--Cotton liml ,cd f mi i n t1,1d -boul worm -r U UIaiI arin fJuly 1 to ID l mbr 41, 1929FumiTint nerMonth Gn t aig fm----(11c---------------------------------Ii 1 12m,22A u gt11 i --------------116 ' 920Neber---------------i .1)ek' ------v--------------------------2u OINi ii 1 '2 1' l-------------------------mRoad stations baV een iiiilitailed at 13 or I I poi ts oil the piiihighways leading frujm thil' rt'gtIlated :rea'. D riwl the -ix mthlilt l'ICofiiscations of varimums ut trials likely to carrlyll thi( pink worm wice nuA mnuber (f ai icli's fromiI t ho J1i' Bedml areIa of TexasaItld I he Salt Niv IValley of A'izon wrm' ioji li intjIl Iiving piik-llwom larva'. Their(iHd-s18t imin act i'it leN 8Pr' '.izmiarizctd iin Tabile 21.A joint resolution ; rprliitl l f' r hi -0 1Agnd y tho P~residt-lt fn il oh T, n .

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204 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [Oct.-Dec.,TABLE 21.-Summa-ry of road-station work under the pink-bollworm and Thur-beria-weevil quarantines, July 1 to December 31, 1929Month Road Cars Confisca-stations stopped tionsJuly--. _ .....------------------------------------------------------. 13 47,183 164August --.-.-.---------------------------------------------------13 58,030 443September..-------------------------------------------------13 47,959 723October -.---------------------------------------------------14 53,394 2,621November -------------------------------------------------14 57, 319 3,670December. .-------------------------------------------14 59, 610 3, 243Total.--.-----------------------------------------------------323,495 110,8641 Including 102 confiscations made at stations operated by the State of Arizona in cooperation with theU. S. Department of Agriculture.APPROPRIATIONSThe pending agricultural appropriation bill for the fiscal year ending June30, 1931, carries an item of $497,000 for the control and prevention of spreadof the pink bollworm. This is approximately the same amount as was madeavailable by the appropriation bill for the fiscal year 1930.THURBERIA WEEVILThe project for the prevention of spread of the Thurberia weevil is carriedon as integral part of the pink-bollworm-quarantine enforcement activities asthese areas overlap and as the requirements are substantially the same. Dur-ing the current year (1929) there were no important changes in the generalThurberia-weevil situation. The pending agricultural appropriation bill forthe fiscal year 1931 carries an item of $34,300 for the control and preventionof spread of this insect, the same sum as was available for this project for the current year.PARLATORIA DATE-SCALE ERADICATIONExcept for the discovery of a Parlatoria date-scale infestation in the ex-treme southwestern section of the date-growing area of the Coachella Valley,there has been a continued improvement in the. scale-eradication situation. Fifteen infested palms were found and were treated or destroyed in the Phoe-nix district during the 6-month period, as compared with 32 during the previoushalf year; similarly in the Imperial Valley 53 infested palms were found, ascompared with 112 during the first half of 1929 and 1,003 from July 1 toDecember 31, 1928. In the Yuma district, in which a limited amount of in-spection of the ornamental palms has been continuing, three such palms werefound infested and were treated or destroyed.The new Coachella Valley outbreak involves primarily seven properties inthe vicinity of the Martinez Indian Reservation about 6 miles west of Mecca.Some 307 infested palms were found on these 7 properties. Only 3 of theseinfested palms, however, showed any large amount of scale and the infes-tations on these were not deep seated. In all probability the infestationcame about as a result of spread from a property found infested south of theIndian reservation in 1927. Sixty-three additional infested palms were foundon1 15 other properties in various parts of the date-growing area of theCoocliella Valley, mostly in the vicinity of Indio.JThe progress made in eradication in individual infested gardens has beenvery encour'aging. Of the 21 properties on which infested palms were foundin the Coachiea Valley in 1927 the number of such infested trees discoveredhas been reduced from 892 in that year to 524 in 1928 and to only 95 in 1929.Il the imperial Valley tle Scouting was finished and follow-up inspectionefl rried oil. There are fow conioercial plantings in this area, most of the datep1t lms being orlailental or abandoned SdOdlings (istributed over a wide area.

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206 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [Oct.-Dec.,The experimental work of the bureau has shown that this disease is aninfectious condition of the root system which causes peach and nectarinetrees and other trees grafted or budded on peach or nectarine roots to be-come dwarfed and produce abnormally small and poorly flavored fruit. Theinfectious virus appears to be confined entirely to the root system, and norestrictions therefore are placed on the movement of fruit or of scions,branches, and other parts of peach and nectarine trees without roots.The important feature of the quarantine regulations is the requirement thathe restricted articles are prohibited interstate movement from the regulatedareas until after a permit has been issued therefor by the United States De-partment of Agriculture. Such permits are issued only to nurseries "withinwhich and within 1 mile of which no infection of the phony peach disease has existed for at least two years prior to the proposed date of movement." With respect to shipments made prior to July 1, 1930, evidence based on a singleseason's inspection has been accepted.As first designated, the regulated areas consisted of 64 counties of centraland western Georgia and 1 county of eastern Alabama. Surveys by the Bureauof Plant Industry during the summer revealed a number of recent infectionsin other areas, and the regulations were therefore amended, effective November1, 1929, adding 19 more counties of Georgia and 6 of Alabama to the regulatedterritory and dividing it into two areas known as the generally infected andthe lightly infected area, respectively. The movement of peach and nectarinetrees and roots from the generally infected to the lightly infected area is underthe same restriction as such movement from the regulated areas as a wholeto outside points.Partial or complete inspections were made within and around 19 nurseriesin Georgia and 3 nurseries in Alabama. The premises and environs of 8Georgia nurseries and 1 Alabama nursery appeared to be free from phonypeach-disease infection and permits were issued to their proprietors. Similarpermits have been issued to 11 dealers to handle healthy stock not grown bythemselves. Infections were, however, determined within the prescribed limitsof 9 other Georgia nurseries and 2 Alabama nurseries. The remaining 2Georgia nurserymen during the course of the inspection of their premises statedthat they did not desire to ship interstate or intrastate to points outside theregulated area, and the inspections of their nurseries and environs were there-fore not completed.The complete inspection of a nursery and its environs entails a thorough canvass and detailed examination of an area of at least 3.14 square miles, or2,010 acres, and if several separate blocks of peach and nectarine trees aregrown may involve a much larger district.The number of peach trees, exclusive of commercial orchards, found withineach prescribed area varied from 303 to about 3,000, respectively. These treeswere found in small home orchards, singly or as groups in back yards, in themiddle of cultivated fields, along ditch banks, and so forth, and, in fact, in,!bout every conceivable place. In one instance hundreds of seedlings, some 5feet tall, were found among a growth of hardwood trees, apparently fromseed washed there. In another case 6 definitely phony trees, part of an aban-doned orchard, were found in the edge of a grove of good-sized pines.In order to enforce the requirements, interstate shipments of nursery stockcoining from the regulated areas were inspected in transit at Atlanta, Ga.,Birmingham, Ala., and Nashville and Memphis, Tenn., during the fall andwinter, and it is planned to continue such inspection until the close of thespring shipping season. This work resulted in the interception of five ship-nwents at Atlanta and one at Birmingham moving in violation of the phony-peaI-h-disease quarantine, all of which were turned back to the shippers.inspectors a F the points named further assisted in the enforcement of otherplaint quarantines in turning back 59 shipments moving ill violation of suchother qjuarantines. Forty-one of these were articles, shipped from FloridawitlhIiouf compi i1 lice with the Mediterranean fruit-fly-quarantine regulations,-lilt tle renlIialder were shipments intercepted in violation of the narcissus-lb,) white-jiic-biIster-rust, Mexican-fruit-worm, and Japanese-beetle quaran-lilies.The num1iiIbvir of shilpmients inspected and the number of violations intercepted-Ire included in the figures given later under the heading " Transit inspection."

PAGE 27

1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 207As indicated in the transit inspection report, the item for the prevent ion fspread of the phony peach disease in the pending appropriation bill for thefiscal year 1931 is $3,000 less than the similar item ($15,000) during tlhecurrent year, the difference constituting a transfer to the transil-inpectionfund.WHITE-PINE BLISTER RUSTThe shipment of 5-leafed pines from New England. New York, or WashingtonState into other infected States is conditioned on the trees being grown froiseed under specified sanitation requirements for protection front the blisterrust. Movement from infected to noninfected States is entirely prohibited. Anumber of applications for pine-shipping permits were received (lurin, the6-month period from New England and New York nurserymen, zind I wo siwehpermits were issued, one to a nursery in Maine and the other to a New Yorkapplicant. The permit supplied to the nurseryman in Maine was issued elthe basis of inspections made during the previous fiscal year. A permit latdpreviously been issued to a Vermont nursery, these three colstiluting thetotal number in force at the present time. In addition a tract in (''nmietenton wh'ch a nurseryman wishes to plant 5-leafed pines was tentatively tppruved.A considerable proportion of white-pine-blister-rust quarantine en foremtentfunds is devoted to the inspection of nursery stock in transit. This workresulted in the interception of 40 violatons of the blister-rust quarantineduring the last six months of 1929. Fifteen of these were shipped by om-mercial nurserymen and the remaining 25 by persons not comnerci a ly ii: er-ested in the transportation of nursery stock.The appropriation item for blister-rust work in the pending rienltura1appropriation bill amounts to $10.0(4, a redictiol (f $1 I7. 00 from lie pre pr tfigure. This reduction consists of funds tratisferred to the new project Iftransit inspection.GRAIN-RUST CONTROL BY MEANS OF BARBERRY ERADICATIONAccording to the Bureau of 1Plant Industry, 551,0'5 barberrv hushe -eedhungs, and sprlits Were destroyed in 1929 in the e ,mn' l pre ent hbYIkstemi-rust epidenlies in the 'rain-gruwing States. A 1rami utlal ol 1-. 1 l:90osuch bushes. seedlings, and sprouts Iiie been 1.stroyeo duiig the entir0 einnp ign, which begin in the slirinof 191 .DIurinl the c.tlendaI r yeor alprexi nwtey 11 ounl I in hit i. iebL::n,and Ohio were eOvered by tie first -urvev, tl a xi mtel d v I 1_ -(untiii i1(olorade, Illinois, Mijiesota. \biitaii Nebre1Ki.Niti Ii I'k-. )hiu. SiuthIht , I 1110 WO ere urvey d a sec1 idII I iime. l Ie e (I ets I I I i till artet s t he lin o ImqlrIxiii tJelI 12.5 c:)wilties. l i tt ii i i i N!The P1,1nt Q1uar1antinle tind CI)ntr.ol Adlhni!1 .-rntion i's rvpnibe l fforthat 1111mse of thbe ha h ryrde to irjc wvhel'tis too tht. ('nIf(WOr m ItMa ona hni. osjpccial ap rpito O lte miit tin i mal frthis puIrj)otse(. Twi ()iiuf lusit ul a Thjo s v '-Iv i)e w r1 i c pt Wed by.\tr2ny ijinspectors of tl t adin h istr tio l juin l he i t i -ri (d.The inspection i l tr2sit (. articles rvstrictcmntiles has been (ori l 11) wuin 11h1 111(,sn un e pp o rnto s foc()lh-r 1l M'll pr~ve illim l (11 spl.(-:11 (4f tit(' w it( 1 111c hyi , r 1us 1ik :1,11 ,Ipew1h disease, Ithe Elurope1n har b rer" 1, , he1 11dtrr n a trti I, ,n helJlpaInvs.; beetle. TIhe 111umber (4 diffcret shpm nt ispl inl t*Wnl -Ii-,wvith thlis wtork :111( the numb11er (If u rn n iha n ntre o ar nin Tables 21 tiid 21.

PAGE 28

208 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [Oct.-Dec.,TABLE 23.-Shipments intercepted by transit inspectors as violations of Federalplaflt quarantines, July 1 to December 31, 1929ComNonCornNon-Quarantine mecia aerial Quarantine s ma ipeers shippeers ship-pers persNo. 38, black stem rust ----------0 2 No. 64. Mexican fruit worm ----_1 1No. 43, European corn borer ---3 91 No. 67, phony peach disease-----6 0No. 45, gipsy moth and browntail 5 19 No. 68, Mediterranean fruit fly .-65 13moth. Violations of Nos. 48 and 66 -.--39 57No. 48, Japanese beetle-----------_---2 18No. 62. narcissus bulb.-----317 45 1453 1271No. 63, white-pine blister rust__ 15 251 The total number of quarantine violations shown here, 724, represent 70S different shipments; in addition to the double violations shown for quarantines No. 48 and No. 66, 16 others were violations of two ormore quarantines.TABLE 24.-Shipmi1ents of nursery stock and other plants and plant productschecked by transit inspectors as to compliance with plant quarantines, July 1to December 31, 1929Station Parcel post Express Freight TotalAtlanta ..-----------------------------------------1,544 4,315 52 5,911Birmingham. ..--------------------------------------1,314 2,545 33 3,892Chicago ------------. .------------------------------35,516 11,755 127 47,398Cincinnati --------------------------------------------0 179 0 179Cleveland. ..----------------------------------------1,780 77 0 1,857Indianapolis.-----------------------------------------269 20 0 289Kansas City -.--------------------------------------8,896 9,992 360 19,248Memphis .------------------------------------------1,115 1,912 86 3,113Nashville .-----------------------------------------1,774 3,980 430 6,184New York ---------------------------------------171,713 1,909 0 173,622Omaha -. .-------------------------------------------3, 171 394 0 3,565Portland ..------------------------------------------5,265 4,877 2,056 12, 198St. Louis _---------------------------------------------0 55 0 55St. Paul .._--------------------------------------------901 321 0 1, 222Seattle---------------------------------------------4,447 535 17 4,999Spokane ._.-------------------------------------------2,914 451 390 3,755Washington, D. C -------------------------------------0 250 0 250Total ..---------------------------------------240,619 43,567 3,551 287,737Under the pending agricultural appropriation bill for the fiscal year 1931provision is made for the establishment of this work as a separate project andan item of $40,000 is carried for the purpose. Of this amount $20,000 consti-tutes an increase in available funds and the remainder ($20,000) is derivedfrom a reducton of $17,000 in the white-pine-blister-rust appropriation and of$3,000 in the phony-peach-disease appropriation.

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QUARANTINE AND OTHER OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTSANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO EUROPEAN CORN-BORERQUARANTINE (NO. 43)REVISION OF REGULATIONSINTRODUCTORY NOTEThis revisiOi of the Europx)au corn-borer-quarantine regul;itio 4s i' neee'Zs-i-tated by the spread of the borer during the past season. Thirty-eiiht towi-ships in ConIectinut, 30 townships in Massachusetts. 111 towshilps in Maine.'f townships in New Ilampshire, 102 townlships in Verminoil, 110 towini1ips inIndia ia , 7 townsliips ill Penlsylvaniia, 195 townships in ()hio, 'i1l 2:' 1twil iin West Virgiria, a total of G55 townships are now tdled to tie regulat edarea, of wliich 209 are inl the '-generation area aii 44; in llIn 1 geiieratioarea. In additiori. 7 towliships in New Hampshire which were formerly in tie1-generation 8 lea 18ve beeii transferred to the 2-generation zrea.('lhanges in the requi regents governing the interstate movement of the re-stricted articles include (1) plaeiiig the limuita tio n on the (118111 iiy of 11(l: eilshelledI corn which 1118y bie sliippel wit llut certifiation Or I4tlwIer restri'ictio'nat 25 pounds to the shipmeit iilSt(ad of 2 poullds. as therefore: (2 -illhwingfree iovenient of sweet corn on the cob from New York ('ity urini the iillfl sof Mlay and June, the period during which no sweet corn pro(luil witlin theregulatied areas reaches I hat city ; and (3) reiiovinig Ilw speci I re" ri i ioia llyi g to Ma ine as to eiitry of tile restricted articles frmii tlhe re lilated areasoutside that siate.LEE A. STuoNG,Chitf, Plant Quarantine aiid Control Amdinistration.NoTICE OF QrAl \NTi NE No. 43 ( Si xii Ii visit)(Effectix'o on 1nd afttr Jti ry 1, 1928. Amends ind] superse1hi s Quarntile No. 4:", liftirevision, as amended)I. W. M. .Jardine, S'criti ry of Agriculture, have determied Illit it ik te'-sary to quarantiiie the States (if Massachusetts, New hamiipishiriPe. Maiii'. IModeIslaiid. ('onecticut, Voermioul New York, New Jt(e*V, P'eliiis\. \hali'. Wct'-vir-gilia, Ohlio. Miciia.l ari 1ndilla to provent1 ole spnl-d ofth llrpcorn borer (Pyr'it!/I U ii /ilatis Iiubl.), a danigertais insert ew t ad 11Wheretotore widely [Wevalenit or distribluted witliil antild tll-oluglho Ie l it iiilStates.Now, therefore, iulder aluthority conferred by set'imi S of the p1int qua rlit it:aet of Autrust 20, 1912 (17 Stat. 315), as aimletided by the :It' t t Ctmn n'e-,approved March 4. 1917 (.39 stat. 11i4. 1165), aid ha1iii0 tllv 1 ix en Ilhe 11 publiche:iriig required I ler(tby, I do quara ut ine Ihe said SI aes ni Mas'8lhus' .New Hampshire, Maine Rhode Islaind, (lomiet icn , Vermont. New YtPrk, NewJersey, Pennisylvaiiia. west Virginia, Ohio, Micligat. aid liliauiu. efiei ion and after Janmiry k 1. 1928. hereafter, iider thie althJiorPiyt Vti ' aid :1il u4August 20, 1912. imlided as afor('sIid, co'11 an d lItimetrni ( including -,Illparts oFI lie stalk), all sorgliiuii is, ,11(181 grass. celery. green lieai ill he pd,heels with tops, ritihbarb, oat and rye straw as such or wlieH used :i p iImportint: Shippcirs should note from r(,guilation 5 tli:t r'>trit lios At tie mo'vttm ntof cori. brOtmi rn. S u ms, ond Sua grass Ipply hi ht lth regul led 8r1 -,. hiltthat corlification of the other products inameit'd in thl not f u1raitiii iS reqqir Pi i i nywiht'n th y on 1e if be im11 jov' fron Ile r Ilttd :r'ts o' \l san bu 1:1r ii '1 \iNew Ilrmpshire, Mainle, Rlhottt' Island. Conn''cticiit (estrn sthmn , 8ni fr[m (i'hitIsilaid iin Sliffolk Coun y, N. '. This is iii accord wilit hi ri in b i iiru 1W ll',0under Notict of Quira tia' No. 43.209

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210 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [Oct.-Dec.,cut flowers or entire plants of chrysanthemum, aster, cosmos, zinnia, hollyhock,and cut flowers or entire plants of gladiolus and dahlia, except the bulbs thereof without stems, shall not be shipped, offered for shipment to a common carrier,received for transportation or transported by a common carrier, or carried,transported, moved, or allowed to be moved from the said States into or throughany other State or Territory or District of the United States, in manneror method or under conditions other than those prescribed in the rules andregulations here nafter made and amendments thereto: Provided, That therestrictions of this quarantine and of the rules and regulations supplementalthereto may be limited to the areas in a quarantined State now, or whichmay be hereafter, designated by the Secretary of Agriculture as regu-lated areas when, in the judgment of the Secretary of Agriculture, theenforcement of the aforesaid rules and regulations as to such regulated areasshall be adequate to prevent the spread of the European corn borer: Providedfurther, That such limitation shall be conditioned upon the said State providingfor and enforcing such control measures with respect to such regulated areasas, in the judgment of the Secretary of Agriculture, shall be deemed adequateto prevent the spread of the European corn borer therefrom to other partsof the State.Done at the city of Washington, this 29th day of December, 1927.Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agri-culture.[SEAL.] W. M. JARDINE,Secretary of Agriculture.REVISED RULES AND REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL To NoTIcE OF QUARANTINENo. 43 (SIXTH REVISION)(Approved December 16, 1929 ; effective December 16, 1929)REGULATION 1. DEFINITIONS.For the purpose of these regulations the following words, names, and termsshall be construed, respectively, to mean:(a) Corn borer: The insect known as the European corn borer (Pyraustanubilalis Hubn.).(b) Quarantined area: Any State quarantined by the Secretary of Agricul-ture upon determination by him that the corn borer exists therein.(c) Two-generation regulated area: The entire area comprised of portionsof the quarantined States now or hereafter designated by the Secretary ofAgriculture as regulated to prevent the spread of the 2-generation strainof the European corn borer therefrom.(d) One-generation regulated area: The entire area comprised of portionsof the quarantined States now or hereafter designated by the Secretary ofAgriculture as regulated to prevent the spread of the 1-generation strain ofthe European corn borer therefrom.(e) Inspector: An inspector of the United States Department of Agriculture.REGULATION 2. LIMITATION OF RESTRICTIONS TO REGULATED AREAS.Conditioned upon the compliance on the part of the State concerned with thesecond proviso in notice of quarantine No. 43 (sixth revision), the restrictionsprovided in these regulations on the interstate movement of the plants andplant products enumerated in said notice of quarantine will be limited to suchproducts originating in or moving from the areas in such States now orhereafter designated by the Secretary of Agriculture as regulated areas.REGULATION 3. REGULATED) AREAS.In accor(lance with the provisos to Notice of Quarantine No. 43 (sixthrevision), the Secretary of Agriculture designates as regulated areas for the purpose of these regulations, the States, counties, townships, towns, and citiesstated below, including any cities, towns, boroughs, or other political subdi-visions included within their limits. Such regulated areas shall consist of the2-generation. regulated area and the 1-generation regulated area, respectively,as follows:

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1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 211TWO-GENERATION REGULATED AREA(.1onnecticut (eastern section): Counties of Aliddlesex. New London, in_Windham; and towns of Berlin. Glastonbury, Manchester, and Ma rlbor'ugh,in Hartford County; towns of Branfordl, Guilford, Maladison, and M'eridn, inXer Hairen County; and towns of Andover, Bloltn, Coluimbia, Covcntry,Hebron, Manstield, Tolland, and Willington. in Tolland County.Maine: Counties of Cumiberland, Knox. Lincoln, Saadajioc and Yoik : andtowns of Auburn, Durham, Lewist in, Listo l, Pola n, 1110 Websler, in lu r'o-Coggin County; towns of Gouldsboroughl, Sul liva, Hancock, Orianl. 1',uck-port, and the city of Ellsworth, in Hancock (.ointy. andl all territory, st uth ofsaid towns and city in said county; towns of Augusta. ('helisa. (l'inl, Fmu-ingdale. Gaurdiner, Hallowell, Litehlild, Mahnchester, Pittston, I tanolph, WtGardiner, and Windsor, in Ken nebree Coun/y ; towns of 1rowniiielf. I inark.Fryeburg, Hiram, and Porter, in Oxfjord Coan ty; 8111d towVIs of Belfast, eieum ntFrankport, Islesborough, Liberty, Lincoltiv.lle, Iont ville, Morrill, Northport.Palermo, Prospect. Searsmont, Searsjoirt, Stockitin Spring<, Swanvi1le, nidWaldo, in Waldo County.Massachusetts (eastern section) : Counties of Brnistable, Bristol. Du1ke,Essex, Middlesex, Nantucket, Norfolk, Plymiouth, Suffolk, 1(nd Worceie r.New Haimpshire: Counties of Belknap, Cheshire, Iillboro, Merrim itk,Rockingham, Str-a ford, and Sullivan 1 a( towns ol Irookfield. 41w v,Eaton, Effingham, Freedom, Ma dison, Moult'onboo, (ssipee, Sawi(h. Tk.11-worth, Tuftonboro, Wakefieh I and Wolfeboro, in ('aroll (on /y; and ow NV ofAlexandria, Ashland, Bridgewater, Bristol, Campton, 'an1881, Dorchestor,Enfield, Grafton, G('roton, Hanover, Haverhill, Hebr n, llolderness, Lelbn)m ,Lyme, Orange, Orford, Pierniont, Plyinmuth, Itumney. 111(1 Wentworth, illGrafton County.New York: Fishers Island, in * xuffolk County.Rhode Island: The entire State.ONE-GENERATION BEMULATED AREAConnecticut (northern sect ion) : Towns ft Enfield an Suliohl, in fHartfordCounty; towns of North Caan and Salisbury in Lit/dbi/u/ Co11onty; and townof Somers, in Tolland Coun ly.Indiana: Count1ies ()f Adins, Allen, I lohicklor DI e Kall, Elkliart, Grant,Hutit iiingtoii, Jay, Kosciusko, LAgrange,l Ii 'Pte, IarN81 11, Miami. Noble, I 1-dolph, Starke, St. Joseph, Steuben. Wabash, Wayne. Wells. and Whitley: a1(townships of Center. I elaware, I1mili i, H8rri'in, Liberty. Mlonroe, MountPleasant, Niles, Perry, t 1ion ,811(1 Washinlt o, in I)1U? 0rure 11unly; townshlipof Ps ii "n Fay!1l/c Counly; to4wIshlips of I Idllry, Liberty, New Castle, tichlall.and RAtwhester, in u lton Count,; townships )t Blue ftiver, I)udley. Fr'anklii.Henry, Liberty, Prairie, 111(1 Stonley ('reek. ill //cnrq CounlI; tIiwsiI ps 'Jackson, Liberty, in(t tIU ion, ill lorIUUKl Cou, i; t iw1:sijlls f 84'(111t', (1 lolfrie,and Van Buren, in ill iOn Can/y townhiils 41f Biie, .Jackson, 1\IOr'2411,Pleasant, and Washilg ii. in /ort) r Colity;, 8101 tiwl151tsips l, 0 .1ter, llarri-Soil, al(1 lilioll, ii 1 ii io Count .Alassachusetlts westelt section i : ('otint v of Berkire: :lld towl1S of Ash-field, Bernardsto 1, BIuckla , (m .', ' iemoni , ('vnw y, 1Ieerfiel .Erving,Gill, ( Gr(i-ei(-I(, I,1 'ley, I Ieat II, I( Iv rt . yI Av IeI. )11Inri e, NIoIIt a IIe, Nort I-1ield, Or ge, Iowe. Shelburne, SuIlnd'leli~d, Wai'rwick, mnd Whiately, il 1'11n1-lia CounI; towns of Agawa 111h11flr, 4'hester. 4('hiled. East lA1m1d8Iw,Granville, Holyoke, Alo gime; w, Lidl iw, i tt gi mery. lti"ll , Si IIni \\ ick,Springfield, Ti hullin, XWestfield, West Sprilgfiebl, and X Wilbri';tlalit, ill lumpd( n Coa'u11; ad tiwlns of ('hosteorfiehl, (4'1Il intiI, Eusih1m1tul. ( 'hel.Hadley, Ha11field, I I(lit ill(t , M ilddhefiehl, North111mIp( (), 1lainfiild, ",4111hamiptoul, Westhampton, Williaunis"burg, and Worthinlol., ill ll/mpshr Co un/ll.Michigan: The entir' State.New Jersey: Wo(lOdri( eg4. ill .ii(Ilbr.N i C ounti and I:l \iiynll. Jery (v yHobokenW h w, 'llawho1 N orii Bergen, 1 in iun (it v. Wet Ntw Y irk, i it 'iiberg, and Secaucus, ill 111.soln Countu, l1 e 1 all that par (0, S: id couilly ('211o(f the 1 ackvnsackl Itiver and Ne(wark I P;y.New York: The entire State (except Iishors I-4811ul. ill >u/Iuolk ul.Ohio: Counties tif' Allen, Altlal( .A shtbt ill ha, AtlIens. A u.1 iz in unI.Carroll, Chuiitpaigii, C'lark .'linton, Coluillhinllia, 4 'o'Inictiun, (rn w d. 4

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212 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [Oet.-Dec.,hoga, Darke. Defiance, Delaware, Erie, Fairfield, Fayette, Franklin, Fulton,Geauga, Greene, Guernsey, Hancock, Hardin, Harrison, Henry, HockingHolmes, Huron, Jefferson, Knox, Lake, Licking, Logan, Lorain, Lucas, Madi-son. Malioning, Marion, Medina, Mercer, Miami, Monroe. Montgomery, Morgan,Morrow, Muskingum, Noble, Ottawa, Paulding, Perry, Pickaway, Portage,Preble. Putnam, Richland, Ross. Sandusky, Seneca, Shelby, Stark, Summit,Trumbull, Tuscarawas, Union, Van Wert, Warren, Washington, Wayne, Wil-liams. Wood, and Wyandot ; and townships of Lemon and Madison, in ButlerCounty; townships of Dodson, Fairfield, Hamer, Liberty, Madison, New Mar-ket, Paint, Penn, and Union, in Highland. County; townships of Milton andWashington, in Jackson County; and townships of Brown, Clinton, Eagle, Elk,Harrison, Jackson, Knox, Madison, Richland, Swan, and Vinton, in VintonCounty.Pennsylvania: Counties of Allegheny, Armstrong, Beaver, Blair, Bradford,Butler, Cambria, Cameron, Carbon, Centre, Clarion, Clearfield, Clinton, Co-lumbia, Crawford, Elk, Erie, Forest, Greene, Indiana, Jefferson, Lackawanna,Lawrence, Luzerne. Lycoming, McKean, Mercer. Mifflin, Monroe, Montour, Pike,Potter, Sullivan, Susquehanna. Tioga, Union, Venango, Warren, Washington,Wayne, Westmoreland, and Wyoming; and townships of Bedford, Bloomfield,Broad Top, Colerain, East Providence, East St. Clair, Harrison, Hopewell,Juniata, Kimmel, King, Liberty, Lincoln, Monroe, Napier, Snake Spring, SouthWoodbury, Union, West Providence, West St. Clair, and Woodbury, in Bed-ford Conty; townships of Brownsville, Bullskin, Connellsville, Dunbar, Frank-lin. Georges, German, Jefferson, Lower Tyrone, Luzerne, Menallen, Nicholson,North Union, Perry, Redstone, Salt Lake, South Union, Springfield, Spring Hill, Stewart, Upper Tyrone, Washington, and Wharton, in Fayette County; town-ships of Barree. Brady, Carbon, Cass, Franklin, Henderson, Hopewell, Jack-son, Juniata, Lincoln, Logan, Miller, Morris, Oneida, Penn, Porter, Shirley,Smithfield, Spruce Creek. Tod, Union, Walker, Warriorsmark, West, and Wood,in nuatinydon County; township of Upper Mount Bethel in NorthamptonCounty; townships of Coal, Delaware, East Cameron, East Chillisquaque, Gear-hart, Lewis, Little Mahanoy, Lower Augusta, Mount Carmel, Point, Ralpho,Rockefeller, Rush, Shamokin, Turbot, Upper Augusta, West Cameron, WestChillisquaque. and Zerbe, in North umberland County; townships of Butler,Delano, East Union, Kline, Mahanoy, North Union, Rush, Ryan, Union, andWest Mahanoy, in S&lmylkill Couity; and townships of Allegheny, Black,Brothersvalley, Conemaugh, Fairhope, Jefferson, Jenner, Larimer, Lincoln,Lower Turkeyfoot, Middlecreek, Milford, Northampton, Ogle, Paint, Quema-boning, Shade, Somerset, Stoneycreek, Summit, and Upper Turkeyfoot, inSomncrset County.Vermont: The entire State.West Virginia: Counties of Brooke, Hancock, Marshall, Ohio, and Wetzel;anti townships of flatelle, Cass, Clay, and Union, in Monougalia County; town-ships of Grant, Union, and Washington, in Plcasants County; townships ofEllsworth, Lincoln, and Union, in Tyler County: and townships of Parkers-burg, Union, and Williamstown, in Wood County.REGULATION 4. EXTENSION OR REDUCTION OF REGULATED AREAS.Thpe regulated areas designated in regulation 3 may be extended or reducedas8 niny be fIlund a(IVisable by the Secretary of Agriculture. Due notice of anyextension or reduction and the areas affected thereby will be given in writingto the transportation companies doing business in or through the States inwhich such areas are located, and by publication in newspapers selected bythe Secretary of Agriculture within the States in which the areas affected arelocated.REU(wL.i'oN 5. CONTU1OL OF MOVEMENT OF RESTRICTED PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS.Section A.-Rcstrictions on miovcmcn t from 1-generation regulated areat(1) No cornstalks, ears, or other parts or debris of corn or broomcorn plants(,I so'rghm111118 or Stin hiii grass shall be moved or allowed to be moved interstatefromi IN, -eeratioi reg"Iihited area to or through any point outside thereof,uli less I certifidtIe or a perilit shall ha\Ve been issued tierefor, except as pro-vi(led in par:graphs (2) and (3) hereof.(2) No corn on lie cob or ears of cor originating within the 1-generationregulated area shall he mioVed or allowed to be moved interstate from such

PAGE 33

.1 44:\ 14j \1l l :1' 4I'al jj pH al )4 I Tli, ll{ 4 '.it 4j. i 1 1j.118 J4) p lH.)414 l.>1 4 144 4.4,1O IIN,1 1 1.\ LI 1 1 { 4 A I 1A A uI .I IIII I)I II I1)(11 I 41 1 M(a' ) I Ib \ A' ' 4 11 Joj Ih:[ llI J 1[,.\\ .lIj I J 1I.9,4.14; ) o 1III' 'I I:V; 141111 I I 4111 IJJ r I4 I I If I11 I 1 81 Ni Jtj 1('v1~~~~ I~b If~4 Iut Ij4It 14 t4 W4,1 1421I.I 14) ,,) 41 .11 141J 1 q 11 IfS 6 ) .ijttu J 011 1 03{ lil{ J(4 411 1 .)11 .).\4l)111 1 .IIS 4)II il I \11111.11 lt[ 112HL M( p11.144 [ .)12.i i u l.) 2 >80111 1)1141i J)Ii a)j. 114.4 p I1~n1 tI f If .If )4 141 V4A\4 I .14 0 A44 I )4 1111.144 4.1)21 IulI ! G I W )[ , s 4 11 U1{.)1 I: 2 S J1{.\ Jt I I41 418 I111) m1).I 'Wb \ 1 1 'lx I\1 p I '.'\u({ .O 1111418 1 A p.44 JlO 110.).\) \ \ M C 11 01' ' .1:o 4'' .i Aj I' JO JTIO *lld. {f ( 42144. I4\ 10)I'l I I H I ll t N li t joA 1 all II din1A~ a 'jas I I I1 1 1 1 o11 I1411~ ,410 nS 4 U M .III,)Ox '41.1 '2; .4 1 ~ I ' 12 to1 I.X mi1d .1' p2.\ ')11 OA'! 11ti 4 '>1 j~I 1UA Ig I8011@ J~dd Ijl [.I'4 2, 4 Jo1 Off J111 p i1'i.11) 11101 41.1N s .14' ! , 4 po u1.2 4. )I I [ tojo4lol p 1 '4 11 ).){1{01) 0A I l 1 )11a~l ; pa S o i ll poilluz o. Ilg t S1,11I)I' \\j -10111 P )IM~jili Ie {l ,h .I ".4 % .*p ..1' \ .4 H 1 > :1 4 11 ' : .11.11 0 1111 t .o)!u m 4 11P)ad .10 PU Jo) It)~tum poo,I)pI ), I i I [ ) Jj 0 3 11! j O ()1 )a~ l t j 10)U [[kI1{ I A l Of0! \.1 liu \ I JO l 4.: III: l I4 { h)(I (211 , h11 .2.l 11n1 J 4I 0. J1 .10A f I i, I ) Kf 01, 11 .L\ I')f7 I 1 V ;P17I[[UiI 1 It 1 { UlliU Z JO ff). 1 O)J it 'u I pUiig llol)b a il U ydn p i .if Ipn p AuF kI~-a Tp : 110 fi m l Ijlll.m s m i:u) ot ! I 31[)lROU i I 0 , j193 I{ MlM UIa fl 1 Ii { '0 II oI , Til .1( U [~~1 ! At O-K 1)Gl ini)3 Hh isM h JdO00 WO mHI~ Iul{ IN f( og) 1.{ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 1 T iOo 0lj .10 pnaU 01l 3.01A01 1 t1 Iln la[ U JaT a Hl~jin p1 in )Ia I aI J(lo I9 Jffpa I~ Is I) om0', ), 11 1 0 -).1 1 1.; ('1p T oII ( I If p urgn a "to -, ililoi:T it! po p u m N -uag a~iOapdi UHn~ ill '0 O 1m22 ~ ~~ SIIDaNYEOVIOI GD 33133j J "-olin

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214 PLANT QUR\ITAN TINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [Oct.-Dec.,(2) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of any of thearticles enumerated moved from an area not under regulation through a regu-lated area when such movement is on a through bill of lading.(3) No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of the articlesenumnerated between points within the same regulated area, provided sucharticles do not pass through any point outside the regulated area in whichthey originated.REGULATION 6. CONDITIONS GOVERNING THE ISSUANCE OF CERTIFICATES AND PER-MITS.(a) Applications; assembling articles for inspection: Persons intending tomove or allow to be moved interstate plants and plant products for whichcertificates or permits are required by these regulations will make applicationtherefor as far as possible in advance of the probable date of shipment. Ap-plicants for inspection will be required to assemble the articles to be inspectedand so place them that they can be readily examined. If not so placed, in-spection may be refused. All charges for storage, cartage, and labor incidentto inspection other than the services of inspectors shall be paid by the shipper.(b) Individual packages or car lots: Certificates of inspection authorizingthe interstate movement of individual packages or car lots of the articlesenumerated in Notice of Quarantine No. 43 (sixth revision) may be issuedunder either of the following conditions: (1) When the articles to be so movedhave actually been inspected and found free from infestation with the cornborer; (2) when the articles have been disinfected or treated under the super-vision of an inspector in such a manner as to eliminate all risk of transmittinginfestation.(c) Uninfested premises: Certificates of inspection good for a period of 30days from the date of inspection, authorizing the interstate movement of the articles enumerated, may be issued when the articles to be so moved have beengrown on individual premises or in districts within a regulated area whichhave been determined by an inspector to be free from corn-borer infestationand to be maintained in such a condition of freedom from weeds and otherextraneous vegetation as to prevent possibility of the appearance of the cornborer through such agencies.(d) Dealers in shelled corn: Certificates may be issued any dealer in shelledcorn, good for not to exceed 30 (lays from the (late of inspection of his premises,in accordance with the following conditions: (1) That it shall be determinedby competent inspection that said dealer maintains equipment adequate to cleanshelled corn so as to eliminate cobs and debris capable of carrying the cornborer, that he operates said equipment under competent direction, anid that hemoves or allows to be moved interstate to points outside the regulated areaonly such corn as has been shelled and so cleaned ; (2) that said dealer shallfile with the Uiiited States Department of Agriculture a signed agreementthat no corn will be moved or allowed to be moved by him or under his certifi-cate illerstate to points outside the regulated area unless and until such cornhas been shelled and has been cleaned as herein required. Outstanding certifi-cates m1ay be withdrawn amd further certification refused to any dealer whoviolates the said ag-reciment or any of these rules and regulations.(c) Articles originating outside the regulated areas: Articles of which theintersi Hi o moveieint is restricted by these regulations which originate outsidei he renlbii L ed areas may be shipped interstate from points within the regulated'"'is to Poilots outside such areas under permit. Permits will be issued onlyFol' '1 1nd 1)1pl111 products which are not infesed with the corn borer, andtrInIp1rt)I On 'Om ni OS shall i ot acel)t or move interstate from within thero Iei2lalei r1 1-h plants a1i piant products ori-iI Iahtino outsi eI such areasc:.1ess d J iilllidet is acconil)maied by a permlit issued by the United StatesI pa'rmwint of Agriculture.I 'iGU VL.ATi1oN 7. MA \KUJNG REQUIlMENTS.(a) Every II, box, )).Ile, or olier coit iller0 :f ar) ies f whiih certificateso1) pI'mis a:e required by these regular 01io1 sli:ill be plainly marked with them1110 ln ad ISS of tlie cosignor and the 1,ue and address of the consignee,a111d 51011l ho("Ir 1:awlot ao the ouiside thereof lie proper certificate or permitisllo( ill colliancI deO\ witi r'egbii ation 1 hereof.(1) Th, (-rtifi(:los or milwltllll 5 iiI the c(ise of carload and other bulk ship-IIoWJ11 shi I 'miiy Ile waybilL, eoinductors' ianifests, memoranda, orbills of Iading pertoaining to such shipments.

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1_E R Elmll t, I, mallowed to move interstate u1iless the 5411m'' slvIll have beln Thorwl vout and clealledi by till Carrier it the puiil ( unloaIiii, o des1ti'iizti. 4q, a4litter alnd fubLish from such re 1ulated arj >ie. Nn litterruldiil. DV 1 U1 -efrom any such plants and plant priduct shalt be inf ved !r :l1o u to meinterstate.REGULATION 9. INSETI N or I I (TE Af 114LES lN T AN 4T.Ay ear, vohilce, Iq hsket. JB'X. or other tenlltainlCer IIovedI or o1 i'eIl I'Q mli-vDietit illterstale which (!i(tains or may contain artilc-es the m1iovcI(eit't h W "lI.IS prohlibiledI or re-,tricted by these -euain hall 1w subjet inlspoj iwl binIs)CttOIS at any time or place.REGULATION 10. PENALTIES FoR VIOLATION (F T BE-E I \ I ANDI NPermits anl certiflieittos issued by the Uiiited States I !Iar-et o; A l-tulle 4s j Condition of interstate mnoveilment ()11 plnts 11r llan 1 pr1tr-VtLy these rules and re-ulatiow s Illy he withdrawn 4111 111r ilr Jweritit 4Certification) may he r uedt,( ally shipper wlo) violztte 'MY 'it -aidl rttire ula ti Iit-.REGULATION 11. S11PMENTS BY THiE 1 NITDI ST \TI I ]W'IENF V X 1 'II AI 1 .Articles subject to restrictioll ill Ihese refIlationls naY le iheNTi Iit-the Unlilted Stat(es IDepar-tienlt of A (riulture bor experimweital ()r -Ipurposes, 11 such cf li tionls an 1d tillaler su1ch aet('1Uizrds as mi v k. p' EsT P 1' dby the Plant Quarantine id ntrolt Adlliliistr',ltiIn. The cOn1ii r i fso Loved "hitall bear. s'Ceirely attawhed to the utsiht .*m -jfroim the Plant Quaranitine aun ConilroI AI '1 imini -.l ration nnvi '< Iwiti such ca)ditio.ll.Thie(revised rules an1 re'.ultitn IllSh'-all be etToCtive 441 :m'] W 11 11i;. 1929. :11nd ' el -tat'IepirjmelV \('ilt ire.[r '4/w II. l' tilNO 1, 10 (ENEILZAA PU 'LI( THO GH N1ANsPAPFI'l,) i S4 1 1 h11-01Y ' :Jvo th t lit' Se1T.E ai1Y 101 A .-ricll .I\1't1 S hll l :ihim h v 111I 1ltl4Il I l .\t'! II f II;, 'iiti' 1i" Elnl-p114ll c ii lIj -. ll' Ae --Ig i ii. It1 u14ileI l'1d 'i 1 I 1111io ii ill 4411wci 1w a' t i1 1 l\' r oll 1, ' -l-iV I , '\\ \~ii n I Iclude I I ) pa 1ci4 I 4111 V im 01i 1 o 14 I ]W h ! I\ I t \ ' '71a1y h e ,lhipi wod 1 wil 11 c rli i' M (I W r r. 14V. 1 ISNe Yowl', 'I; vthole pie ]erif) in il W jd

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216 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [Oct.-Dec.,Copies of the said quarantine and of the revised rules and regulations may beobtained from the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration, United StatesDepartment of Agriculture, Washington, D. C.ARTHUR M. HYDE,Secretary of Agriculture.[Published in the following newspapers: Hartford Times, Hartford, Conn., January 17,1930: Indianapolis News, Indianapolis, Ind., January 18, 1930; Portland Press Herald,Portland, Me., January 17, 1930 ; Boston Herald, Boston. Mass., January 17, 1930 ; DetroitNews, Detroit, Mich., January 17, 1930; Manchester Union Leader, Manchester, N. H.,January 17, 1930 ; Jersey Journal, Jersey City, N. J., January 16, 1930; the World, New York, N. Y., January 17, 1930; the Dispatch. Columbus, Ohio, January 17, 1930; thePress, Pittsburgh, Pa., January 17, 1930 ; Evening Bulletin, Providence, R. I., January 17,9;30 ; Bur]ington Free Press, Burlington, Vt., January 17, 1930 ; the News, Wheeling,"V. Va., January 17, 1930.]ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO JAPANESE-BEETLE QUARAN-TINE (NO. 48)NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING TO CONSIDER THE ADVISABILITY OF EXTENDINGTiE QUARANTINE ON ACCOUNT OF THE JAPANESE BEETLE TO THE STATEOF RHODE ISLANDOCToBER 24? 1929.The Secretary of Agriculture has information that the Japanese beetle(Popillia japonica Newni.), a dangerous insect new to and not heretoforewidely prevalent or distributed within and throughout the United States, andwhich is already known to exist in portions of the States of Connecticut,Delaware, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania,V iinia, and the District of Columbia, has recently been discovered also inthe State of Rhode Island.It appears necessary, therefore,to consider the advisability of revising theouarantine on account of this pest to include the State of Rhode Islandwithin the quarantined area, and of restricting or prohibiting the movementfrom that State, or any infested districts determined therein, of (1) farm,garden, and orchard products of all kinds; (2) grain and forage crops of allkinds: (3) nursery, ornamental, and greenhouse stock, and all other plants;and (4) sand, soil, earth, peat, compost, and manure.Notice is, therefore, hereby given that in accordance with the plant quar-antine act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended by the act of Con-gress, approved March 4, 1917 (39 Stat. 1134, 1165), a public hearing will beheld before the United States Department of Agriculture, Plant Quarantineand Control Administration, and Federal Plant Quarantine Board, at 1729 NewYork Avenue, Washington, D. C., at 10 a. m. October 31, 1929, in order thatany person interested in the proposed revision of the quarantine may appearand be heard either in person or by attorney.R. W. DUNLAP,Acting Secretary of Agriculture.In the press statement issued to accompany this notice of public hearing thefollowing additional information was given: During the past summer surveys and Japanese-beetle trapping have resultedin the determination of the establishment of the Japanese beetle in Providence,R. I., and at a number of points outside of the regulated areas in Connecticut,New York, Pennsylvania, and Maryland. In addition, beetles have been takenat Norfolk, Va., and Boston, Mass., both of which points are at a considerabledistance from territory now under restriction.Opportunity will be given at the hearing for a discussion of the territoryincluded within the areas regulated on account of the Asiatic beetle and theAsiatic garden beetle, and for the presentation of any proposals in connectiontherewitlh which those in attendance at the hearing may desire to make.

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19291 SEItVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCE-ME1;NTS 2 17ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO MEDITERRANEAN FRIT-FLYQUARANTINE (NO. 68)INSTRUCTIONS TO NAVAL OFFICERSGENERAL ORDER N\\ Y I ):iME NTINo. 194 Wahntr1). C. 0c11(ohr/ J. 9PREVENTION O(I SPID oi\ M i A NLAN FitI1'! F(1) III order to prevent the spread oi the iMieditei'i'ai ernw11 1 fuit il itInsect, new to and lnot he'tokfor-e widely prevalent withii]A w1d 1hl' ii iiUnited States, the Secretaj y of Agriculture has issUel d reguoit1on eri !';t inethe State of Florida. Initer'state movelielit of host frulls 8116' v4gtl'b, ' 1dmFlorida into 18 Southern and W'stern S>ati's 811( ilil Ihe T1e11y P 1' 1!Rico is prolibitd.(2) li order to prevent' the esOw ate it 11o ill ini etd ;a lrwt (i :i i i 1 iiwhich might be taken on board. it is directed that 4lif pr1(itc tl+ me: uri hetaken to the effectt that no vessels of the Navy whi hi are likely 1tt 1-tlch 'LitStates ports of the Gulf )f illixico w tIhe I" -ilic ()It, ' polls of N0,1 (""ir-lina, South Carolina. Geti'rzia, Florida. or Pti 14-i0 ake OI I b();Ird Fl'trjdahost fruits or vegetables for any purpose. Thi applies to arlieltK which lav\been produced in Florida, whether l1c *hey are purchase ill I hat St(t e ri newhie\l'.(3) Host fruits and vegetables inicludl all eit jus :tiud liic trui : pV Vwatermelons. strawberries. and pilleapples), also peppers ol all killed I 44148Limia and broad beans, and egplant.I). s Sx~ecr,( tary of /th ( Nar4.P. Q. C. A.-25o ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONSWEEKLY IN PLACE OF SEMIWEEKLY OLE\N-UP oF GROviVs AND GARaLN> IN Li: W-CATION ARE Av io~izW AMoniilION (U IELA'IONS Si i'' M Ni 4)NOTICE OF QuARANTI.NI No. 41>(Approved October 11, 1929; effective Octol er 11, 19 )Pending later aniendmiliell of the leM ditlerrn'a 1 lr i-1 l i 'aral 'e r! , vtiolls, sectionl A ('3) Of reguWlI Iit 11 :1 Ill oo is heb Illmdif d Ito lolO):d( ( i ~i teweekly (ill place of semi weekly) t'lea 11-111) a111d dest rlctio (,4 1 iv '' 8n 11ifalls of host fruits. alld of 1ilewii1ig ve'1ah:4s d drops ill the fieltk.This order is subject to cineellation or furl her modificltiwl Ih'1411 i th l ' icover of infestation s or other c('11diti11s 11ke stIlich 1ctli 10 nee i I\ 1 lthe eradication or prevent te >IIead of itle Medirranean 1111 11.C'h i'f*, I'/a,,I (juarauiitI/eln ( on tr'l I dmi it raA pproved:C. F. AnvN,Acti/hy crPt( -ir of A yricUltiUr'.P. Q. C. A. 251 ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONSSTEn1.IzAT ION I~iixt r lIIN Ii s A\oiIiv it ins T Aita1 s liiI ii i I,1 1. I i, N A I' AI NI v, IS iv[)(Apprvei ('c't1' r 12, 1921) effective 1 4 rt 1* , 19 l1[(1) 'Modificitimn ( f pI fill .h (c ) id Sectiiin A (It* uh l 3 un eQwI1*;rIlijM' No, G rfevi-elPoinding" hator .11mi-e(nm it <>1, lhw Abdilerl,:111"Il ;riI 11) aNa antionls, paragrapht 5 ((1) (4 socl ion k (d* rve-1l,1t i1)jl a s h rHost. fruits proilcedt ill ilfestcd arcel : s r i 'm n sa lbmo1 VVIm(Int 04 frii t rm111cc! ill W J 1 It;.,' :I -h h w t a uxit,& ' 5 .:1111,,l ind ami u til slich ;1r1eas 11r,4 with thc lopIroV lI ()[' Ill, Pi nt Qtk 1% h 111

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218 PLANT QUATRANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [Oct.-Dec.,Administration, released from such designation by the proper State board or officer of theState concerned. Such sterilized fruit may be authorized movement anywhere in theUnited States other than into the States and Territory listed below in paragraph (b) (i).This modification consists in the provision now made for the release fromsuch designation of areas which have been, or may be, designated as infested.Such release will be made upon the determination by the Plant Quarantine andControl Administration that, as a result of the enforcement of control measuresrequired under Quarantine 68, the Mediterranean fruit fly apparently has beeneradicated as to such area or areas. Such release shall be further conditionedon the lapse of a period without reappearance of the fruit fly sufficient, in thejudgment of the administration, to justify such action. The effect of suchrelease will be to remove the requirement of sterilization when fruit from suchareas is to be moved to destinations northeast of Potomac Yards, Va., but allother requirements applying to eradication areas will be retained.[(2) Releases now authorized]The State Plant Board of Florida is hereby authorized to release from suchdesignation all areas heretofore determined or designated as infested, exceptas to areas within which infestations have been determined subsequent to July31, 1929. Any areas released under this authorization shall be retained aspart of the " eradication area " and as such shall continue subject to all theconditions applicable to such eradication area prescribed under Federal andState Mediterranean fruit-fly quarantines.C. L. MARLATT,Chief, Plant Quarantine and Control Adninistration.Approved :ARTHUR M. HYDE,Secretary of Agriculture.USE OF HEAT FOR STERILIZING FLORIDA GRAPEFRUIT AUTHORIZED(Press notice)OCTOBER 23, 1929.The use of heat sterilization for Florida grapefruit as a condition of inter-state movement is authorized in connection with packing houses in that Statein administrative instructions amending the quarantine on account of theMediterranean fruit fly issued to-day by the Secretary of Agriculture. * * ,*It should be distinctly understood, the department says, that neither this norany other method of sterilizing host fruits and vegetables from Florida, is beinggiven to infested fruit or vegetables. All fruits or vegetables in infestedbiecks are excluded from commercial shipment or other movement and arepromptly destroyed. Sterilization is merely an added precaution over orchardand packing-house inspection to eliminate any residual risk of spread of thepest. The authorization of this method of sterilizing grapefruit is releasedat this time in response to the earnest requests of the growers, packers, andshippers concerned.P. Q. C. A.-252 ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONSSTERILIZATION OF GRAPEFRUIT BY USE OF HEAT UNDER MEDITERRANEAN FRUIT'FLYREGULATIONS(Approved October 23, 1929 ; effective October 23, 1929)Administrative instructions (P. Q. C. A. 246) issued September 19, 1929, onthe " Sterilization of citrus fruits under Mediterranean fruit-fly regulations "authorized the sterilization of citrus fruits by the use of low temperatures.At the time these instructions were issued sufficient information was notavailable to authorize the use of heat for sterilizing citrus fruit. Investiga-tions and tests on the commercial practicability of the use of heat as a meansof sterilizing such fruit have been conducted as rapidly as possible. Thecommercial tests so far conducted have been confined to grapefruit, since oppor-

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1929] SEELVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 219tunity has not permitted carrying on tests on carload lots of oraiires. Inconnection with these tests a number of car lots of grapefruit sterilized byheat have been shipped and successfully marketed in eastern and miidu\v 'lrncities. These shipments contained less than the usual amount of ulaIlofruit and. together with the experiments conducted in Floihla. :eem Lo clearlyindicate that it is commercially practicable to modify, Ior gr1p1fruit. licoloring process to secure the temperature required to kill any eggs hi larvaeof the Mediterranean fruit fly, the preence of which iii any orchard may laiveescaped discovery in the intensive grove 1 1 iak:ng-houZe in'pict jiiThe following meth d of sterilizing grapefruit is, therefore. am her zedIIeatinu. in connection Nwith the usual coloring pre >. the fruit to a tempera UI1100 F. or above (not to exceed 115 in the appruxiniate eener o: thl fruii and h .inIthe tempoieature of 110or above (not to exceed 115) for I per iod of vigt VmrsNo specifications as to the exact methods and equipment for obtainiii-these conditions are prescribed. Available information clearly inlictes hatby the applicatiWn of dry heat the required temperatures ca il not he reahei Iwithout injury to the fruit. To prevent such injury it is nec'>sary to 11n1,6111a0.a very high humidity throughout the period of treatment. In IIe test wheresuccessful performance was obtained, live steam as the source of heoI v;1'.applied in such a way as to secure as nearly as possible a uniforin distr bout ionof steam-heated air so directed as not to discIiar-e directly on the fruit. linthese tests the coloring was followed by the application of the hih teniwriturenecessary for sterilization. The air temperature ranged from 11 50 to 116 F_-ind the air was very moist so that the humidity was practically 100 per ceiit.The fruit was held in field boxes stacke1 four boxes high. with narrow aisle-between. and without special means of separating the boxes , in each "iaokWhIle the results of the experi'iments so far conducted have been successful,it should be emphasized that inexaetness and carele-snes' in o01r ition ntyresult in injury to fruit. On the other hand. available information iiidie'tthat tle fruii will But lie injilureI at lempliQatures sli-Itlv hi-h1e'r 0ha1 1101'.In authorizinii the movement of fru*t sterilized in accordance with the ;hovereaIuiremiets it is to b1e ndierstod that the delpmrtmient di not asiumeresponsibility for fruit injury.C. LA. M\IntATTU.Chief. Plant Qiuarantinc and Control _1hinisdiwtion.Approved :ARTHUR M. IIYDE.&ecrtaIl of A /riculturc.Novv~iminE 12. 192.1. Q. C. A.-253 ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONSAUTHORIZATION OF TRANSPORTATION OF FLoRIDA h0osT FRUITs AN!)D \1UisFROM THE DISTRICT OF COLItM11LA TO NEAR-BY POINTS IN I'it1Ni\[Moditica imtion Of pragra 2. reglat ition 11, utler Qua :iraw hie No .revistd I(Approved November 12. 1929 ; effective November 13, 1929)Penldinlg later m111enm(l011t of the MeiliterrateanI fruit fly quaarri tile reo'.alations, paragraph 2 4)f regtllation 11. i', ijmdiliedl to autitirize Ithe Ir Ill o 0t11tlof Florid~a ]lost fruit.4 and vtget aldt'' froil the District of 'ilibi itiArlington and Fairfax Counties. VaI. and1141 indo I he citv of Alc\a iiiri:i. Va.providedl tlit such iovenelt inlo tl arta jonleornl "hli co11iit whollof small qualltities for lto :Il litiliza ion 1111l comli111pti n lol 11141 11h.t li (Ro" friand vegetables so trmansltet into that area shlIill hot le r'c hipp led )I ("ItRWise tr'alsportedl from the counties ant citY named into or tihrow1h' whirparts of .dhe State of Virginia.C. 1 -~ iTCh icf, PIaIn )urraIto and ('on treul Adin rat 'Approved:I. W. 1)NLAP,A I 0/l Sy rrttir yif 1 qri-unl uro.

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220 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [Oct.-Dec.,P. Q. C. A. -254 ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONSMOVEMENT AUTHORIZED OF STERILIZED HOST FRIUITS AND VEGETABLEs FROMFLORIDA TO OTHER SOUTHERN AND WESTERN STATES(Approved November 18, 1929 ; effective November 21, 1929)[Modificaticln of Section A (5) of regulation 3, under Quarantine No. 68,revised] Pending later amendment of the Mediterranean fru t-fly-quarantine regula-tiois, Section A (5) of regulation 3 is amended to read(5) Fruit and vegetable sterilization: All host fruits and vegetables packed,sold, stored. or transported shall. under the supervision of and satisfactory tothe inspector. be sterilized, either by heating, by refrigeration, or by otherapproved treatment in such manner and method as shall be prescribed by thePlant Quarantine and Control Administration.Provided, That pending the determination with respect to the methods ofsterilization herein indicated of any adjustments necessitated by varietal andseasonal conditions of fruits and vegetables, or pending such packing-houseadjustments as may be necessary to take advantage of such sterilization, ship-ments may be authorized as follows:(a) Host fruits produced in infested areas: Sterilization shall be required as a condition of movement of fruit produced in areas which have at any timebeen determined as infested, unless and until such areas are or have been, withthe approval of the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration, releasedfrom such resignationn by the proper State boar(l or officer of the State con-cerned. Sterilized fruit from unreleased infested areas may be authorizedmovement anywhere in the United States other than into the following Statesand Territory : Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Georgia, Idaho, Loui-siana, Mississippi, Nevada, New Mexico, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Oregon,South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Washington, and the Territory ofPorto Rico.(1b) Sterilized host fruits produced within aii infested State, other than asto designated infested areas, and shipped in containers each of which bearsa label affixed to the outside thereof under authority of the United StatesDepa rtment of Agriculture certifying that the contained fruit has been sterilized,may 1)e authorized interstate movement anywhere in the United States andshall have full diversion and storage-in-transit privileges except as follows:(i) Host fruits may be authorized movement into the Southern and Western Statesnamed in paragraph (a) hereof only for the period from November 21, 1929, to January31, 19:0, inclusive (subject to later extension for one additional month if such extensionin the judgment of the United States Department of Agriculture does not involve risk ofspread of the Mediterranean fruit fly) : and during that period host fruits which have beensterilized and are so labeled may be reshipped between such Southern and Western States.(ii) Host fruits which have originated in and moved from an infested State into thearea north of and including the States of Virginia, Kentucky, Missouri, Kansas, Colorado,Wyoming, and Montana shall not thereafter be reshipped or otherwise transported oroffered for shipment into the Southern and Western States named in paragraph (a) hereof.(iii) Host fruits originating within an infested State shall not be moved or allowed tobe moved directly or indirectly into the Territory of Porto Rico.(') Unsterilized host fruits produced in eradication areas, other than indesignated infested areas, may be authorized movement only (i) to the Distr:ctof Coluinb a. including Potomac Yards in Virginia, and to destinations in theStates of Maryland, Pennsylvania, and States north and east thereof, includingshipment via any of such States to foreign countries, or (ii) to designated coldstor,';Iges for sterilization.(d) Unsterilized host fruits produced in an infested State outside of eradica-tion areas may, until further notice, be authorized iovemnent anywhere in theUnited States other than into the States and Territory listed above in para-graph (a). Until further notice, this restriction as to destination shall notapily to sour limes produced in Dade and Monroe Counties, Fla.(c) Peppers and Linma and broad beans produced in eradication areas may beauthorized mnovemienlt only to the District of Columbia, including Potomac Yardsill virgin ia , a11d to destinations in the States of Maryland, PLennsylvania, amidStates nor It a imd east thereof, including shipments via any of such States toforeign countries.(/.) Ield an( Linim and broad he;ins produced out-side of eradication areasmay be a uthorized movement tlroughotit the United Slates other tha i intothe States and Territory listed in paragraph (a).

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19291 SERVIlCE AND R EGULATOBY ANNOUNCEMENTS 221(g) Tomatoes produced in eradication areas and shipped green inty 1w an-thorized movelijeint'throughout the United States other thaii into the Si tesand Territory listed in paragraph (a). Tomatoes produce( outside of eradica-tion areas and shipped green may be authoi-ized iiovenwelit throughout thlohUnited St ates. except into the Territory of Porto Rico.(h) Eggplants produced anywhere in an infested State may he) authoi-izediiioveii(ent throughout the Utnited States other than into ie Stat es all I Ter-ritory listed in paragraph (a).(i) Diversion privileges: The limitiations on moveml lent pireseribed hevrein willbe interpreted to allow the movement, uider the conditions preseribei I in 1liregulations, o host fruits and vegetables (except ato uisterilized fruit Prw-duced in eradication areas) from Florida via the usial diversion int inlthe States of Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi, Noith Carolina, South 'arit a.and Tennessee for immediate diversion at such points to any poi nt ill thbe de ti-nation areas authorized in the quarailtine regulations: Prorided. Tha lte wil v-bills of all ('a1r" conitaiiiing host fruits and vegetablles wit authrizd movemneitinto the Solitherin nd West ern States named iin para raj'iph (a) aiid i i '4id to diversion points ill such Sta te slall 1ear a 0o1ation rea Idini ' 8 l_ lw:" This oar must be diverted to de1 itiations in the Site nolth (if 'Id i cludinlia,the States of Virgniai, Keniucky, Missouri, Kanisas. Color do. Wy iniin. andMontana."Adlmini-trative Instructi cus P. Q. C. A. 244 are here!iy canceled.C. L. Alua.A tTvi.Chicf, IPlaut QUir(Hthnc ( nd Coatrol Admliiistratil On.Approved :R. W. DUNLAP,Acting Sercrtary of Ariculturc.1. .A.255 1 ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONSSTER1IZATION OF ORANGEN). TANGE INs. ANU SATSVIAS BY USE OF LEAST I IERMEDITERIANEAN FRUIr-FLY RD; uATIoNS(Opprovd November 27, 1929; effective November 27, 1929)Adminitistrative Itshructions (P. Q. (". A. 252. i)sed Ocoher 2:., D029, :muh'-ized tile use of heal for ile sIeliliztWioll of gre i f1111it iloVimig interSllte nih icrthe re-uilitions on (Iroui I li Mediterrawn"I fruit 11. Thise iii Ii ic t:lwo iliente flai thi Jihllod of teriliz:liuim mi-iht. till the oinleiin ul vIllm rCi1l osts. he ext(rd'd to illclude iraiiiges '11d rldi led citrl'l fit Aiti'r4 xi-mately 140 car lots o oriintes. iiciludinig uli 1;nceriil' aid >81tltl:, hwivebeen successful imiketed a ftr beiin sterilized by lie 1et melliod :11ulihorizedlor grijefrnt. Stleriliz:li ion by ihe use of heat 8s prescrileul il Allill-istralive liistui'ctioij .('iri r P. Q. C. A. 252. is horely m1 lroizeil a biiof tl is'umlc51i e 0, 1' thi ter-ale llovo t of orao;rf-,' tn rii'11id s'taiillas. The colzilitiolls iliclieid d ill thle s:iid Adnillisi rai ive lis i t w lshall, ill :ihl plrlicular>, ;;l'ly lo tle Ise of lheat ill t rea' ill iralla', al"lLerili'-,tallds fs m sC. L.1i rCh 'ie'f, Pliiiit Q(urel/ Iinte mil (Io ntrol :d in isti ion.IAppr(Ived :Awriof M-,A. I hym,.core(itarY of A qricull arc.P. Q. C. A256 ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONSRELEASE 01' CERTAIN ARFAS l1ESlGNATIA As INFE'sTIEl'-1) ti ll1 1 H1\N ENF"ia';T FI' QtAniNf Rvamn \[Supplomenlijniig P. Q. C. A. 251 '111(l r( if i-e ili A t ' t iition 1) uncloi Qiiuiailtit I c No. ;N r\' v d I(Apprv~ed Novtimbwv :ui, 1929; 0t0lt i 1 i , r m eir 2, 1In response to -I request received fr( i I Ihe St a l ' i i 1 1 rfl 0' I -11,1Iloar-d i.s. authorized to reea rom) fdosign11ati('I :Iintkte 0''.llieighth ill numlnl --ill \060(1l inlfest.1t itll Wa li'kvrui s latinW 1'11 I,' JW1 :

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222 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [Oct.-Dec.,and up to and including August 27, 1929. This order has the effect of elimi-nating the requirement of sterilization with respect to fruht from such areaswhich is to be moved to destinations northeast of Potomac Yards, Va.The infestation in these eight areas was very trivial. In only one instance,where two fruits were concerned, was more than one fruit infested. Under therule, however, requiring the inclusion in the area designated as infested of atleast 1 mile beyond the actually infested property for the purpose of clean-up,spraying, and subsequent controls, these areas now released represent from3 to 5 square miles each, scattered in various parts of central Florida. In fiveof these areas the last infestation found was discovered during the first sevendays of August, and in the other three of these locations the discoveries weremade on August 13, 14, and 27, respectively. The latest of these infestationshas therefore been subject to intensive clean-up and eradication measures fora period of three months since the fruit fly was discovered there, and all ofthem have substantially the same status as to eradication as the areas releasedfrom designation as infested in the order of October 12, 1929 (P. Q. C. A. 251).All areas released under this and previous authorizations shall be retainedas part of the "eradication area," and as such will be subject to all the condi-tions applicable to such eradication area prescribed under Federal and StateMediterranean fruit-fly quarantines.C. L. MARLATT,Chief, Plant Quarantine and Control Administration.P. Q. C. A.--257 DECEMBER 17, 1929.INSTRUCTIONS TO INSPECTORS RE INTERSTATE SHIPMENTS OF CELERY FROMFLORIDAThe normal conditions under which celery is produced and packed for inter-statement movement from Florida make it very unlikely that the small amountof soil which may adhere to the roots would contain pupo of the Mediterraneanfruit fly. Regulation 6, Notice of Quarantine No. 6,, on account of the Mediter-ranean fruit fly, under which the interstate mt v(nklt cf saad. sKI, and earthfrom the eradication aioa is restricted, is nmt to be interpreted as applyingto celery witi the usual small amount of soil attached to the roots and baseof the plants. interstate movement without washing is authorized, based' onthe fact that the State Plant Board of Florida will not peiinit host fruits orvi-elables to reach a stage of maturity when they would be susceptible to in-festation oil properties onl which celery is produced for colmmercial shipment.Celery produced on properties within the eradication area on which host fruitsor vegetables are allowed to develop to a stage in which they may be susceptible() atack by the fruit fly or in which, in the judgment of the inspector, otherconditions are such as to nake it impossible to eliminate the danger of fruitfly puparia occulring in the soil will, prior to interstate shipment, be washed ortreated in such a manner as to remove all soil.LiEE A. STRONG,Chicf, Plant Qiuarantinc a id Control Adin is/ration.1). Q. C. A.258 ADMINISTRATIVE INSTRUCTIONS(lo.N iviNiEiS AUrjolizF:n FOR INTERSTATE MOVEMENT 01,Fioiz [A Ilos FiuITsAND VEG6 ETAHLE SII11erpret lioll ()I' reg-illtion -1, piragiapli 5, under Notice of Quarantille No. 68)(A approved D ecember 26, 1929 ; effective D1ecember 26, 1929)Th11l requi remweil thit hst ifrits and vegetables moved frolm a infttested State.bil be aicked il , ialdlrd coiuleicial '01 cotliinerS is iltLerpreled to nut horizeIe Sli I llenlt of sn fruits or Veget 'lII S in any coutainier which (a) hashi'I'miily been used ill ilie past for tHie commirciil shipment of such fruits.d111 ved abes, :11a (h) is of suchi a oaturii clearly to illlicfeni the fact thathost I fruits or vO'Qf tidbes are contained t herein.Li: A. STRONG,Cli('f, Planid QIuarmtli/ a/i(1 Con(rol Adil 01istra(ion.

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1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 223REPORT OF SPECIAL COMMITTEE TO STUDY STATUS AND NEEDS OF MEDITER-RANEAN FRUIT-FLY CAMPAIGN(Press Dotice)OCToBER 2>. 1929.The Secretary of Agriculture releases herewith a reIrt of a special eom-mittee on the Mediterranean fruit-fly campaign in Florida. This (:oinittteewas selected at the suggestion of the Secretary under the direction of WillianR. Wood, chairman of the Appropriations Cotmmittee of tl House., ti se urethe latest information for the uwe of that connittee. Thi' rpirt (ree11 sLIadditional, independent, and recent ju(lgment of the work and its future leeds.The personnel of this committee was as follows: W. 0. Thminp'.on, pr-idelilemeritus of Ohio State University: W. C. Reed. commercial firiit ur3wer ofVincennes, Ind. ; W. 1'. Flint, chief entoniolegist of the Illinois Naliural Ili'-torySurvey; W. H. Alderman, head of the department of horticulture. 1-ijiversity ofMinnesota; and J. J. Davis. head of the department of ento1im1-.l. 1'urucUniversity.WASHINGTON, D. C. Olohr r 12, 192!.Hon. ARTHUR Al. HIYDF.Secretary of Agriculture, Washington, D. C.SIR: Your collimittee alppinted to make a study of the M lie iternm l fiu itfly in Florida, with special reference to progress of the wri-k i1 patihrmonths, the possibilities of eradication. and the future need>ofar 8s 4ilTlrmined at the present tIni(, report > as follows :In order to be familiar with the problem, the committee S pent tle pi -t weekin Flori(la. durin. which time 1.300 miles tlroug o the iifesied umi 1u1 yIngareas were (overed al1Hi 11m:111y citizens of Flor'ida inlterviewed.Wo concur with the rtomrt of Xliiur (011i1111itee of seven rezar'di13 ee+ .m1iliortalice of the 11 et and the need for cra(lication. The i\edi evrIneU1fruit tly should be re(o,( 4411izO(1 as a potential pe 't of very greni in2r 1121 1the fruit industry of the Seuthern States: akso the results to (18"(e lry fIr'-cast the possibility of coiiiplete r81ielt em ill Florida 'lnd lhi> a-'1 hIl'ibe vig.orou1sly solul1ht. We coiniciid the wveik fit the r'csenlhi and 4ITrel lree,the former for the pronrr" iuade ii the shrT 1 rod slier twn '1c very Th ioeinfe tilion April 0. 129. witi :iiraeialts. )8iA3n prays. 114t-wla'i fa r V *Prit stm'riiz;atin: 14 :1h14' 1e f Pu 883rVntI ihoroiLjIVs 81131 111m 413of the (jfinr int mfil liy',idicttiii wtork. W\\ likewi'' coI 314 11t :4 .e r I:olf Ihe 44 vor> an tl e ;tcoil e'-h. 1W i"l w hs inn 1 i c VI h1< K I sof thoulan(S of boxes of fr1 ill lrder I3 aid 1n 1 1Jr-diei i. A w i fthe ftctivilics ( f Ihe re r ' Ind eoltrol evces 1(1 t1e expeladil 111* 1'' te11ow -In 1co n11ica lI '.1110 0 1(i('l11 ufle ot 1 h li i uls aviill 3)e.IPRotaoGass ov E\iATe \N) NHEWS Fo1 T: i'ojzThe re'earch divlsieji ha> 11m41' la ndnniIi liiuie'. whiil lmvt\ Lw VI man I which ill haree Iai i ere3 1 i i I vII I 1 1 ' I (i V l i iil't ; I I3 3dII I I *eriica I Ion. A sItdy t wild trit'. i I& 141 ie I'( I l I I I l ;IKS Usepibih ity 144 fli :iti ek, H is Iv I I It f In t I w IiI I II e j i I I .Inwnof ithie Irad i( iio n .A S1r ' NNa , I i n 11(I 4: itr I 1 lm I Ir I :I I i Aii h wIN( '11141 c( 31 Io II I ill ns I I I I ha T 1 Is 4 f 3 I I Ist 1 1 lizi II Irmst ' w I I 14 !! a ni it ai J t IhI I 1 1 14I 1 II Ihas bein b4Si3' and -eemis To I1->s1(,11 iexi e .31aulw' 431 1~l uK [ e l110 (ily ('limilliaf 4) 1 (18 1f I 1(11 I43 I \ I 4lI'\4 vh3 I1 I I-( Ir 't over previ( I'u '31111I1 frna m111 4 ThI II4I1 i I i: InI I I I I1 0 1 t Isp' N. t 4 I 11ro v h4 I i13 w I S (1( h1131li 44 31 h I lL' 414: 1 1. 1r111b4 f I e 14'i 11 3'i 1U'I r 8 1b-.' ('4 in 1s '1 1 ili I f I 4 minjury Iby th sj 1r:y I N. itu tre Nvii r itw r p aem e Mi11) v I IT 1 4w I e-n 1W t1 tIl( e 3n IV4 w r I1)I }I Isiul ie' ne\wm under wnv I Ii(I icil f' I lIe Hovfiixi I T he I Iel] f1 It t1 I t)1(d r;(1al1 y I .viv& I .vy. 1ii Irai ar r, I n I 111 1 * I I 4 1' 1iK I t'I ionsa II important wm ice thlie k1 ' e'3 I I Iran la(' 'A U' VI ' yimiale flies. Con tin ed si1 f 1 u ie' ma1 r'venl I al rI' 1l11 'A I .h :well s I m1:1 leS will 4p113. T14SI l4V4l3 m4n33 13 'A l I 111 n3' b1i drcsear a' l :i I I those : 41 441 liher lin .ar'e I ia1 for31' 3 t r Ai l ' t 1 1 1r

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224 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [Oct.-Dec.,which has been so effective during the first six months of the campaign. Astudy of the canning industry, with special reference to the utilization of by-products and its bearing on fruit-fly control, would seem to be a very desirable addition to the research program.The eradication division involves many important features. From an in-festation where hundreds of flies eQuld be obtained with a few sweeps with anet and where infested fruit was common, to a point where all methods oftrapping fail to catch a single fly and where no fruit infestation can be locatedin spite of diligent and extensive search, is little less than marvelous. Weatherconditions may have assisted in reducing the infestation, but a study of all thedata clearly shows that the complete destruction of fruits in the infested zonesand the thorough use of poison sprays have been largely responsible. Thatinfestations have not been found in adjoining States where much fruit wasshipped previous to the discovery of the infestation, nor in the known infestedarea, are facts difficult to explain. That infestations will be found, at least inthe original infested zones, before the end of June, 1930, seems almost certain. For this reason sufficient funds should be immediately available for stampingout incipient outbreaks should they appear. A continuation and enlargementof the inspection and scouting work is essential to discover any occurrencesof the fly before they become conspicuous. Spraying should be continued inthe vicinity of citrus groves where injury to the trees and shrubs is notlikely to result. The complete destruction of " drops " and the inaugurationof a host-free period (approximately April 1 to September 1) by removal of thecitrus and other susceptible fruits, such as peach, pear, guava, and Surinamcherry, seems to be an mportant feature of the eradication program. Destruc-tion of abandoned groves is likewise important in the proposed program oferadication.A very thorough study of wild native host fruits in 600 square miles of wild,natural growths, exclusive of abandoned groves. has. failed to reveal a singleinfested fruit. For this reason, and until such findings are made, we believe ageneral clean-up in such areas unnecessary. This will materially reduce thecost of an efficient eradication campaign.An important part of the project is the quarantine which involves the possiblespread of the fly by means of public carriers. This work has been admirablyaccomplished by the National Guard of Florida. The utilization of the StateNational Guard for the enforcement of quarantines has never before beenattempted and the methods and effectiveness of this organization for quarantineduty where a single State is involved are heartily indorsed. The enforcementof garbage disposal, screening of fruit stands and fruit delivery wagons, isimportant from the standpoint of eradication and should continue as a phaseof the quarantine under the supervision and control of the State National Guard.Many who have objected to one or another phase of the fruit-fly project wereinterviewed, but after discussion and conference a distinct majority were infavor of a continuation of the research and eradication work on a reasonablebasis. It was apparent that the comparatively few who questioned the need orefficiency of the work usually did so because they were uninformed on the significance of the Mediterranean fruit fly should it become established and beyondcontrol. and on the immensity of a program of eradication. For these reasonswe believe better methods of fully informing the public should be used and thatan efficient program of education be inaugurated.The appropriations already made for the eradication program have been soeffectively used that infestation is not now apparent. The failure to continuethe program of eradication as a measure of precaution might threaten theefficiency of the work already accomplished. In addition, an emergency fundas a reserve might well be provided and made available only in case of newout bre iks in outside areas which would constitute emergencies.Tho conimniittee desires to express its appreciation for the active and willingcooperation on the part of the Federal, State, and county officials in the inaugu-ration and prosecution of the erodication program.W. 0. TiHoMPsoN,chairman.WILLIAM C. REED.W. H. ALDERMAN.W. P. FLINT.J. J. DAVIS,Secretary.

PAGE 45

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226 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [Oct.-Dec.,interior of the fruit is liable to occur as an off flavor, which makes the fruitdistasteful.Fruit should not be heated up too slowly. Long heating at temperaturesaround 110' F. injures the fruit, and much the same damage may occur to thefruit when it is held too long in the processing room, as occurs when it is heatedto too high a temperature. Frequently. when fruit is heated a long time, thetemperature of some of the fruit soon rises to around 1100, while fruit in otherportions of the room is at considerably lower temperatures. This may resultin holdingsome of the frwt at temperatures of 1100 or 1120 for as much as15 to 18 hours before the treatment is completed with all the fruit. It is im-portant. then, that not more than 12 hours should be required to bring the fruitup to the holding period, and 14 hours is about the longest period that should beallowed. Tringing the frvi4 up to the holding period in 6 to 8 hours, if this canbe done without raising the air temperature too high, is highly desirable.In beating the fruit it is practically essential that the air should be saturatedwith water vapor at all times. Air with even a slight moisture deficit is adrying air an(l liable to dry out the peel and wither the fruit. It is also mucheasier to heat the fruit up with moist air than it is with dry air, as moist aircarries much more heat per unit volume and will not dry out the skin of thefruit. It, of course, requires a large amount of heat to bring a carload of fruitfrom a temperature of 600 to 1100 F. It therefore requires a large volume ofsaturated air at the proper temperature to furnish the heat to the fruit. Thesaturated air should be supplied in a volume of 5.000 to 6,000 cubic feet of airper minute under low static head, and the equipment should be so constructedthat the air is spread out all over the room so that the fruit in all parts of theroom will receive practically the same amount of heat in the same length oftime and the fruit will be evenly heated and none overheated.The air should be conditioned-; that is, brought to the proper temperatureand humidity in the conditioning chamber before it is allowed to come incontact with the fruit. Steam is the most convenient method of carrying heatto the room, and steam under low pressure has a temperature of 2120 to 240* F. If steam at these temperatures is allowed to come in direct contact with thefruit it is liable to injure it, and unless the steam is thoroughly mixed withwater vapor so that it is all cooled down to a temperature of 1100 to 112 F.,there is danger that some portions of the mixture might be at a temperaturesufficiently hIgh to cause damage to the fruit. If, however, the air is saturatedand conditioned before it is allowed to enter the room and kept at a temperaturenot higher than 1100 or 1120, there is no danger of damage to the surface of thefruit.The importance of a large volume of air under pressure is obvious when it isconsidered that it must be forced down through stacks of field boxes four highpacked solidly throughout the room. If the volume of air and pressure areinsufficient and the distribution throughout the room faulty, the fruit will notbe heated evenly, and some of the fruit may reach 1100 F. hours before thefruit in other parts of the room is raised to this temperature. Inasmuch asthis method of sterilization requires that all the fruit he heated up to 110* andheld at that temperature for a period of 8 hours, it is obvious that if thefridi is not heated evenly some of the fruit may he held at that temperaturefor 10, 12, or 14 hours. This uneven heating, due to poor distribution of heatthroughout the room, or defects in the room itself, is one of the moc:t prolificsources of injury.Tn a well-equipped room, properly handled, it is possible to heat a carload offruit ; tha t is, 400 field boxes, from 60* to 1100 F. and hold it at this temperaturefor eight hours with a variation of not more than 20 between the coldest andwarmest fruit in the room at any one tme. There is practically no danger ofinjuirty to grapefruit or oranges processed in this way. There may be, however,an off fiNvoir in the frilit imniedintely after it is removed from the room. Afterit has bleebn cooled and held for a few days this off flavor disappears, so thatWiti (4oo(l fri t properly processe(l there is practically no difference in flavorbetween processed and n11)processe(l fruit from the same tree. This point hasbeen estab1)1li shed by a series of carefiil investigations of fruit from variousjoealities in different types of rooms. With the flat, nsipid fruit which iscomtimonly olmI( I in the erili citiion ara, the processing properly done neitherimlprovj-s nor injlir es the fi aor. The generally poor flavor of fruit from theera lieation nrea is (Io (11 to sterilizat on.IT undr1-e0(, ()f I' cirloads of' 1bothli grapefriit and oranges have been sterilizedan(1 miarkite ed this season. There has been surprisingly little decay in theSterilized fruit, 111uh less, as a rule, tihan ini comparable cars of unsterilized

PAGE 47

via nun >t/, K/ pt /9>/m)I l'it III() 1,(11'j 'V .Ail( 'Ao~blo( :P~ ~ > JI~lI~K11~.1 I ~ ~ ~)I I J[l.).IZ o 11)ll It 01M -1 1 ) ' l Ink mII III!,\\101-UJ 1" LIII 1I i. ip) , O ~ ill l 3!I1 8! 11131 11 (1MVPt1j)(I s(Illmmft p p )I ),\ i 'Stgy lo .1j,4.1 0 11 1j \ to 01 1 s p31 U 10 dIl8 I ' ) 18. ) :10 j1 X 0181: osi \' ) AII o )III I I Ips ~~ I301 i(toS, IIN31[ 01 ' III! 1 Imm t u i, 01 >(tjI I olui[ l 811 1x\(lV *JO 'U !(tu lli ) pm mipl l.> l"J011 p u l u a s ! 1 SI. ut (11, lit 'S'llm li'l o u pl. u )I o il11IU I I )I p l o. I I" l sp. -I 1 I)) I C I I I )o I Ij JIII I UOO( *(Il 111. L~o) $;1SVI AOls 0 1 03'Yo M1 p NL1JumXOi NA I )Ocl 114 L 8ILWL' K 0 1 t I J I1V.II'Il 1) a ja llq I .of N>31111 jI? II? j)3 J iA dad 1I 10j1{8 I .1 iit I'll ,I11 doj. p*8d110 ppIoB Alo8 j)(A\0.[ silmiiq pto.," })1li1 .1i01d~i 1 ) 011 ut -1~1~.U O ' II ( IIIl'11 JOi lq jo11 d )III a2[ oj '1l01 1 ' !L.II ,011 I)1t 8 ij j 0)14 .3 i[spP aIt po111 > al P1 1 4 p0 1i 1 $ .1J I lI t I (II O)I A X 01Wull8 -11u hA3Ax0 If 'p[.1p 11 d0 118 jh)ZI so .0) 1103 ..> 0 11 p ) I s' l4( .171 Ii )[jb.0j1811.) si Odl[4 .1Alp \ml 4I.1jja ,U H] 1\\j, a A4 tI JOj di) .uj011 olut po2 1111 )(I l j 'I ( [i ii 4.lu1j I o 1 8 0 11 O A\ .11 t 1 Omo\0nIl A II4 l itH JUI q 1l 4fal() M1 oq )st'pul u l.j 4lq 'uslf(IL, *nuii ("'opuai io SHiLHying 0j, sOuau1HLusSuN1 usaw>ou 'mou wtimulasa rm. K, 0o agr> lv on"' il I I p ). oq pltls 3l [041IU 0!ISd3 .1 (M IO 0 18 III~ ( 33 Ih 13j8 1IF!ItA "Il J1A 1s~ PU -.1 048 (Ill als(" I~ .\ 1 .1 310 Nji l~lhl It0 i10 ss)mlS ~UI W11.IA 14! ( XMj3 I )I oi 1tO 18A0J,1IIJO 1 0~0J1 O SA4014 101 O.10la 0>0 .( 1j 4).1U11I 101010.1 0 11 oqj 11 4tIS1f IXT1.ZI)mI)XX UiIDt IIV?3AA I () 1)'[),)AO~t1,M -iok IUIJ s",>lIt IJnlsv(. II I-I1.jj Il JoolJT'o.1t' p "). 1(n)10,-) ap uo o u Jpul" Stop ( oolon

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228 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [Oct.-Dec.,ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO PHONY-PEACH-DISEASE QUAR-ANTINE (NO. 67)MODIFICATION OF PHONY-PEACH-DISEASE-QUARANTINE REGULATIONSINTRODUCTORY NOTEThe amendment which follows is necessitated by the discovery of a smallnumber of phony-peach-disease infections in commercial orchards of Georgiaand Alabama outside the areas previously brought under regulation to preventthe spread of this disease. Nineteen counties of Georgia and six of Alabama areadded to the regulated area at this time. The surveys of the Bureau of Plant Industry reveal only a limited numberof recent infections in these districts. The infected trees discovered have beenor are being destroyed as rapidly as found. In order to protect the zone inwhich the infection is slight and where intensive eradication operations are inprogress, the department, under this amendment, is dividing the regulated areasinto two sections, which will be known as the " generally infected area " and the" lightly infected area," respectively. The movement of peach nursery stock andother restricted articles from either area to outside points and from thegenerally infected area to the lightly infected area is prohibited except underpermit. It is the expectation that as the surveys continue and the intensiveeradication operations are undertaken closer to the center of infection, thelightly infected area can gradually be expanded to include the counties in which substantial progress is being made toward the eradication of the disease.At this time all the counties in which infection has been found for the firsttime during 1929 are being placed within the lightly infected area, except Chain-bers County, Ala., where the disease was found more prevalent than in theothers, and Warren and MeDuffie Counties, Ga., which are isolated from theother lightly infected counties and are contiguous to the generally infectedterritory. These three counties are accordingly being added to the generallyinfected area.C. L. MARLATT,Chief, Plant Qi(rln)tinc and Control AdministrationAMENDMENT No. 1 TO RULES AND, REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL TO NoTICE OFQUARANTINE No. 67(Approved October 30, 1929 ; effective November 1, 1929)Under authority conferred by the plant quarantine act of August 20, 1912(37 Stat. 315), as amended by the act of Congress approved March 4, 1917 (39Stit. 1184, 1165), it is ordered that regulations 3 and 5 of the rules and regula-tions supplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 67, on account of the phony-peach disease, which were proinulg'ated April 30, 1929, be, and the same arehereby, amended to read as follows:REIULATION 3. REGULATED AREAS.(1) In accordance with the proviso to Notice of Quarantine No. 67, theSecret ry of Agriculture designates as regulated areas the follow ng counties.iiclud(fi ng all cities, towns, townshlips, and othlclr poli i10.1 subdivisiolis withintheir limits:Alab;nma: Counties of Calhoun, Chambers, Cherokee, Cleburne, I)eKalb, Lee,and TuS(aIoosI.G( oria: Coniies of ] bIker, B ldwin, BJanks, 8b0artow, Barrow, Bibb, Bleck-I y, I uftis, Calhoun, Carroll, Campbell, Chatt1a1loochee, Chattooga, Cherokee,CIrko, (Cayloil, (C141Ob4, (Cvoeta, Crlwford. Crisp, I)a do, DeKalb, DIooly, i)oughi-vrty, Iougls. lIyette, Floyd, Fulo , Greene, 6winiett, liabershamn, I1iwcoek,LaraIson, I[arris, HeiLrd, Henry, Houston, Jackson, Jasper, Jones, Lamar, Laur-(', Lee, Macon, MNI.1rion, Mcl )iliie, IXeriwether, Milton, Mitchell, Monroe, Mor-g in, M ("co(e, Newton, (c )nio, gIlethorn i, Paulding, Pl('ch, Pike, Polk,\ 1111, \ uun , Qaiting, *1doldho, Wloclid le, Schley, spahiiig, Stawdrt,Smnter Talbt, Tainferro, Tn ylor, Terrell, Troup, Twiggs, 'Upson, Walker,WaIlton, WV11rren, Vashtillgton, Wvebster, Whidtfield, Wilkinson, and Worth.

PAGE 49

d\ lV14I A\1i t) I IU ~iIsiX ~Jl1l.14X 4~hj ~1 Pt 11 I\ )I1(lU 14i0' *j4)\ N ~j~1 T ],.1( L4,II) S)~ IU1i)I(1 (JJN 0(1 1IT111' p.11 ~ ' \A0 .)1.u 111 04 I ~ .1 N14 40 I~ A :4441, 11'~ AA I14I I, J,1 s. o' I~O-LC; U~~~~~ Iii A~i I S, N'.I. lI 1 'sII I ~0)I0 'S 1,1'.~ld. 141 li)~ 1f)(4}H flJS'flIII 440 flu '9 'N (411 41V~1 ul() 44) .1. 1~ t" 4 11adulI1.)14141I1S lo S14!4tli). 101 p~i )Iqn 11JI 1~~ 1:18 2.A: 161111y '(). 4 111\ o) pul0 o)11110111m) j110141 (41{4 A floa 111111 11-1I4 d' \ (11om lou plus j.1i() " I JJ10 ))A I 14 tula i\ 4M 1 (U. oS POJ U J011410~i: )J I II 3I'-qU~sp4 : V 1) 111 U0 .1 11 utH UI10J1 H V 0111 "41."4M 44I 11 , 1) Ii~dO -plu .l4t4 ,x~ir {14.\ ~ II01 0111 (4(11 S41 (1I1 411 44 III4 put, I I )110 pli no II ')I1J~~~ ~ 41P II) 0ITI JO10IMl 1 1* 11 1 1>.\ 44 Xl) (411op 40 l ( (jo011;11'),o 114 '1( ' 1(N ["MI )0Y ITV I Iatl )j p.Il: 114d q 1 U1'lo od l s pu 101 s1410~ 'Aj1It 11p 1 JU It Vt1iVV)[140 1 1411 H uI {4,11A IJ0{)11; . 1lI4 11 Piqlh .IA)111 4J0 po1(41 110ol IITuJJ 'p., .Ilolm.4111: ' 11 .14)it.40.H , l') md1V11 .i 081814 141!111) Sq>ol -~ !IJ 4U,1 011-4(41 , IT1 , I'UAI, 113,04 1 '111 ) OJO~k 11 l pu0t i .1 U 11ioj 4118(ji jo (7to~10 '4Ifql.)((, J0 2111.)vp14J1" V1TI 4814 i~j .11 AI .44'L.(1 J II j)1'.w k 11(4(41 p )ilI o~ki{"0 10ri 0(1 0 .1111pTWOIP X)0(41K~ ~ ~~~~~~~M1M JO IT~ 0 T14). 11 h 1 J1 l114,l 1Mol 1,, ~110 s Itu 1110o 4111f qAWIII:11' [.)0p1 .ro l 1O I(44, I'l o I, T51.44111t P(4 OUI d4 104 T I 11" .1).t)OU 4 1ji-))t'11 1it.uO >'~ J() .11 0 4.1 8.4 (li0111 '5404.1p ).I)' s-.)4ipPoll i o0 (7')JO III ST14bd)1V1 0111 [. 47 l ( l p-4 T1of (4%41t I~t I~0~ rP)1 q(43fl(. s'T I 111 S~1U ..11140 pol\T (J l172 l )II{l.~ I I 41 t XO7 'OUIIibjof, ) 111.1011'), 1 1j f1a j f ot 44'),0 1 0l~fU)[.1o 'ild Uu()I OM)M 1111 0I U S4!101 I)OA014 0(1Tdtu 4 11UU01h) I~1\JO 4 1{j3 (qll)~111 Ii4.)AO 1l): It()14.048101 pppi U iod8 Po fjjm jfl 0 JO JOIIII S01 J~l4 do (~~~~J~~~~~~~x~~ :1,c:i i V ui'ioiuuv:(T~J8[&

PAGE 50

230 PLANT QuARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [Oct.-Dec.,Ii will be noted that under regulation No. 5 no peach trees, peach roots, nec-tarine treus. neevarine roots of any kind or varieties of trees or shrubs graftedor budde i 4i peaich or nectarine roots shall be moved or allowed to be movedinterstate from thn regulated areas to any point outside thereof unless a permitshall have been issued therefor by the United States Department of Agriculture.No restrictions are placed on the interstate movement of peach or nectarinefruit. fruit pits, cuttilgs, scions, or other parts of peach or nectarine treeswithout roots.Under the lrovisions of paragraph 1, section 467, Postal Laws and Regula-tio:. parcels containing any of the prohibited trees, roots. or shrubs may notbe 8 cepted for mailing from any point in the area quarantined by the orderuIl s the articles are accompanied with the required certineate of the UnitedStates Department of Agriculture.Very truly yours,F. A. TILTON.Third Assistant Postniaster General.ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO PINK-BOLLWORM QUARANTINE(NO. 52)MODIFICATION OF PINK-BOLLWORM QUARANTINEINTRODUCTORY NOTEThe amendment which follows adds Maricopa and Pinal Counties, Ariz., tothe area designated as regulated, and is occasioned by the recent discoveryof a pink-bollworm infestation in the vicinity of Phoenix. Ariz. Five countiesin Arizona are now within the quarantined area. No extension of the regu-lated areas wthin the States of Texas and New Mexico is involved.C. L. MARLATT,Chief. Phant Quraint inc and Control Administration.AMENDMENT NO. 5 TO RULES AND REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE OFQUARANTINE NO. 52 (REvISED)(Approved October 30, 1929 ; effective on and after October 31, 1929)Under authority conferred by the plant quarantine act of August 20, 1912(37 Stat. 315), as amended by the act of Congress approved March 4, 1917 (39Stat. 1134, 1165), it is ordered that regulation 3 of the rules and regulationssupplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 521 (revised), on account of the pinkbollworm, which were promulgated July 9, 1927, be, and the same is hereby,amended to read as follows:REGULATION 3. REGULATED AREAS.In accordance with the first proviso to Notice of Quarantine No. 52 (revised),the Secretary of Agriculture designates as regulated areas the followingcounties and parts of counties in Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona, includingall cities, t tow, townships, and other political subdivisions within their limits:Texas area: The counties of Terrell, Presidio, Brewster, Pecos, Jeff Davis,Reeves, Ward, Loving, Culberson, Hudspeth, El Paso, Winkler, Andrews, Ector,Crane, Upton, Midland, Martin, Glasscock, and all those portions of Dawson,Borden, and Hloward Counties lying south and west of the following describedboundtiry lines: Beginning at the west boundary line of Dawson County atthe soiithwest corner of section 114 of block M ; thence in an easterly directionon the souti line of sections 114, 89, 84, 71, 66, 53, 48, and 35 to the southeastcoriier of said section 35; thence northerly on the east line of section 35 to then1orthieast corner of said section ; thence easterly on the south line of sections' ,27, 26, and 25 of block M, and of section 27 of block C41 to the southeastcorner of said section 27 of block C41; thence southerly 3 miles on the eastline of sections 7. (, 1nd 1 of the 1). 1L. Cmuninghami blo(Ck 5 to the southwest(o1rnier of section 2 of the 1). L. Cunniiighai block 5; thence easterly on thesouih line of sections 2 and 3 of the 1). L. Cunninghaum block 5, and of sections12 and 11 of the (eor.etowNii Railroad Co. block 35 to the southeast corner ofsect i ('I 1 1 of said block: tience southerly along the east line of sections 24 and21 of Ihe D. L. Cunninghain block 4 to the southwest corner of section 22 ofsaid block 4; thence easterly along the south line of section 22 of said block 4

PAGE 51

19291 SERVICE AND REGULATOhY ANNOUNCEMENTS 231and section 1 of the Georgetown railroad Co. block 34 to the southeast curlwrof said section 1 ; thence southerly on the eust line of sections 6 andt 7 of theJ. Poitevent block 2 to the southeast corner of said sevtionl 7 ; thence ea:terlyon the south line of section 6 Of the J. Poitevent block 2 and of seelion> U mid10 of block 34. township 6 north, to the southeast corner of >aid let ion ;thence northerly along the east line of said section 10 to the northezt~ cornerof said section ; thence eiasterly along the north line of section 11 of ldock 34, township ( north of the northeast corner of said section ; thlenVe ',o-tiiielyalong the east line of said section 11 to the southeast coriler of said >cclonthence f asterly oil the s( uth line of section 14 of block 34, township C ioi h,to the southeast corner of said section; thence southeasterly along the mtawider-ings of Dry Tobacco Canyon and the south fork of the Colorado Eiiver v rossthe boundary line between Dawson and Borden Counties to ,I poiflt ill B( rden County where the Big Spring-Gail public road crosse' so1( river ; thiwwe .i asoutherly direction following the said Big Spring-Gail road t a oinl I milesouth of Morris schoolhouse in Howard County, the same beiii at iiteriect ionof the Vincent roadl: thence sotlh along femce to Morgan ( 'reek; iince sou-easterly along the mueanderinKs of said Morgan Creek to the IIow rd-MitchellCounty line ; thence south along said county line to the southeast vrler ofHoward County.New Mexico area: The counties of Chaves, Eddy, Otero. Dona An, Luna,Grant, and Hidalgo.Arizona area: The counties of Cochise, Greenlee. G3rialu, 1 1 81 a1dMaricopa.This amendment shall be effective on and after October 31, 1929. all (hallcancel and supersede amendment No. 3 to the rules and regulations suiiplie-mental to Notice of Quarantine No. 52 as revised.Done at the city of Washington this 30th day of October, 1929.Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agri-culture.[SEAL.] R. W. DUNtA,Acting Secretary of ApYrica taucCopious of th forvgoinig ameHdmt were sent to all common carriers in A riz on]NOTICE TO GENERAL PUBLIC ll TIRo'Gl NEWSPAPEiRS0'limhu ;;u, I 929.Notice is hereby given Ithat Hie Secretary of Ag2ricuiltiirc, underl ait im (rityconferred onl him by the plant quarantine act o i August 20. 11)12 *7 S t .:)15),as alended, has promulgalted amtiendImeiit No. 5 to tlie irule am d rea-ul:itions supplemental to Notice of Quara itt ine No. 52, as rev sId, on arconiti I ' t1cpink bollwori, effective October 31, 1929. This ameidinenit mod itios 1retitlation3 by adding the counties of Maricopa am11 Pinal, Ariz., to the arvaduiitcalas regulated.Copies of said amteidmenit may be obtained front tile I'Li iii Quar n:ile andControl Adniniistratioit, Departinenlt of Agriculture, WVahinigtoli, 1).Actiq Scr(-1*t'(rf1 of blyriclt urw[Publisli'd ill the Arizoia 1eiublican, Phoenix, Ariz., Novembwr 12, 1029,INSTITUTIONS TO POSTMAsTERSPOST 01111 ('F:nu Ir,-P T FNTHIRD ASSISTANT POSTNIASTFI (F\AAm,Wu'cxhiuiytou. \ oremjI / 1 !9PoSTMAsTER.MY DEAR Silt: Tliire, is closed for your iiitmormiatii d if Oil 8 11of Revised Quaramit in No. 52 of t ie Uiitued Si n tes I epirt i w 1 ' i l lr,oi1 acCoutit of 1he pink vollwo , effective( on a id tl(.r (ic totr 1 1 Pl .oui ltle counties of I riecipa and l'inial, Ariz., to tle lji;i al'w iilled 81 4 1office being local ted in one of t lese coun i .es.

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232 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [Oct.-Dec.,It will be noted that the order absolutely prohibits the interstate movementfrom the regulated areas of the stalks, bolls, and other parts of the cottonplant and gin waste.The conditions governing the movement of seed cotton, cottonseed, cottonseedhulls, cottonseed cake, cottonseed meal, cotton lint, etc., are clearly set forth inregulation 5 of the order and all postmasters concerned will be governed inaccordance with the instructions contained therein.Under the provisions of paragraph 1, section 467, P. L. and R., parcels con-taining any of the articles mentioned in the preceding paragraph may not beaccepted for mailing from any of the areas quarantined in the order unless thearticles have been inspected, certified, and marked as required.Very truly yours,S. A. TILTON,Third Assistant Postmaster General.REVISION OF REGULATIONSINTRODUCTORY NOTEThe revision of the pink-bollworm-quarantine regulations which follows isissued for the purpose of incorporating the five amendments to the regulationswhich have been promulgated since the last revision was issued on July 9,1927. An important change made at this time consists of authorizing regulation 5, section A, 2 (d), under certain safeguards, the issuance of permitsfor the interstate movement of " samples" and of compressed and baled lintor linters from the regulated areas of Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas, with-out fumigation, when such samples, lint, or linters have been produced in acounty within which and within 5 miles of which no pink-bollworm infestationhas been found for the two preceding crop seasons.LEE A. STRONG,Chief, Plant Quarantine and Control Admin istration.NoTICE OF QUARANTINE No. 52 (REVISED)(Effective on and after August 1, 1927)I, Renick W. Dunlap, Acting Secretary of Agriculture, have determined thatit is necessary to quarantine the States of Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona toprevent the spread of the pink bollworm (PectinopIora gossypiella Saunders), a dangerous insect new to and not heretofore widely prevalent or distributedwithin and throughout the United States.Now, therefore, under the authority conferred by section 8 of the plantquarantine act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315), as amended by the act ofCongress approved March 4, 1917 (39 Stat. 1134. 1165), and having duly giventhe public hearing as required thereby, I do quarantine the said States ofTexas, New Mexico, and Arizona, effective on and after August 1, 1927. Here-after, under the authority of said act of August 20, 1912, amended as afore-said, (1) cotton, including all parts of the plant, seed cotton, cotton lint,linters, and all other forms of unmanufactured cotton lint, gin waste, cotton-seed, cottonseed hulls, cottonseed cake, and meal; (2) bagging and other con-tainers and wrappers of cotton and cotton products ; (3) railway cars, boats,and other vehicles which have been used in conveying cotton and cotton prod-ucts or which are fouled with such products : (4) hay and other farm products;and (5) farim household goods, farm equipment, and, if contaminated with cot-ton, aiiy other articles, shall not be shipped, offered for shipment to a commoncarrier, received for transportation or transported by a common carrier or car-ried, transported, moved, or allowed to be moved from the States of Texas,New1 Mexico, or Arizona into or through any other State or Territory or Dis-Srict of the Uitited States in manner or method or under conditions otherthan those prescribed in the rules and regulations hereinafter made and amend-ments thereto: Provided, That the restrictions of this quarantine and of therules and regulations supplemental thereto may be limited to the areas in aquarantined State now or which may be hereafter designated by the Secretaryof Agriculture as regulated areas when, in the judgment of the Secretary of

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1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 233Agriculture, the enforcement of the aforesaid rules an reuli a -nregulated areas shall be adequate to prevent the :pread of the pink b llwvnn:Prov-ided fuirthicr, That such linlitation shall be conditiktned ujo l te > aproviding for and enfcrcin. such u:ontrol me, -ures with rcLect t -UreIlated areas as. in the judgm1knt of the Suuretarv ti A.ri Ulture. (ilfdeened adequate to prevent the spread of the pink tollwuorlI thrw tn'other parts of the State.Done at the city of Washin-ton this 9th day of July. W27.Witness my hand and the -eal of the United States Djepairmeniit if Agri-culture.[SEAL.1 RENICK N. DUN.r.Actig -Sc tiry of A!i Ict ute.REVISED RULES AND REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL TO NOTICE OF QVARANTlINENo. 5 2(Approved December 26, 1929: ; ffective January 1. 19210)REGULATION 1. DEFINITIONS.For the purlpose of the!e reaulations the following words. ne a s. Wnd itshall be cu.nstrued. reslipo 'tively, to mean:(a) Pink 1ollworm: The insect known as the pink bullworm of ctt n Pttinopliora qo&sy pit 17a Sauider-).( b) Regulated areas: Areas in a quarantined State which are now ir wvhchmay hereafter be desinated as -uch by the Secretary of A-riculture in ac ord-ance with the provisos to Notice of Quarantine No. 52 (revised).(e) Cotton and other articles: All the articles enuimel ated is brtught bi--rrestriction as to interstate movemelit in Notice of Quarantine No. 52 1r i-t' 1.(d) Cotton ilit: Cotton lint. linters. and all cther formns of unma ufartur'dcotton fiber, includinlr samples of cotton lint and winters.(c) Inspector: An inspector ef the United States Department of Ariculture.REGULATION 2. LIMITATION OF REST;RICTIONS To REGULATED ARZEAs.Conditione upon the compliance oii the part of lite State concerned with tlesecond proviso inl Notice of Quarantilii No. 52 (revised), therrvidled for ill these reliulatiolir' on the iiiterstate 1nt velent of tie att I lcs ciu-merated in said notice of quaratinlne will be liiited to uh artick-s nl vingfriiml the area s in such State now or hera tfter desi' _nati(d by the S'c Y ()fAgriciulture as reli lated areas: Pro id(d. That the article m ciinlraed il lti1'otice of (1ui ra nilltie may move interstate frOin an a re; !, it under atIithrough a regulated area wlt'il suell movemellt is on a through .i I of Idtl inb.REG ELATION 3. REGULATED AREAS.Ii accordance with the first proviso to Notice of Quarantine N ,. 52 i ek),the Secretary of Agriculture designate's as remuhited areas the followini1 nil-ties and parts of counties ill Tcxas. New Mexico, and Arizona., inlutdil allcities. towns, towes-hip". and other iwditical subdivi:ionis within their lililit:Texas area: The coilties of Terrell. 1'r-esidio. Brewsw
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234 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [Oct.-Dec.,thence southerly on the east line of sections 6 and 7 of the J. Poitevent block2 to the southeast corner of said section 7; thence easterly on the south lineof section 8 of the J. Poitevent block 2 and of sections 9 and 10 of block 34,township 6 north, to the southeast corner of said section 10; thence northerlyalong the east line of said section 10 to the northeast corner of said section;thence easterly along the north line of section 11 of block 34, township 6 north,to the northeast corner of said section; thence southerly along the east line of said section 11 to the southeast corner of said section; thence easterly onthe south line of section 14 of block 34, township 6 north, to the southeast cornerof said section; thence southeasterly along the meanderings of Dry TobaccoCanyon and the south fork of the Colorado River across the boundary linebetween Dawson and Borden Counties to a point in Borden County where theBig Spring-Gail public road crosses said river; thence in a southerly directionfollowing the said Big Spring-Gail road to a point 1 mile south of Morrisschoolhouse in Howard County, the same being at intersection of the VincentRoad; thence south along fence to Morgan Creek; thence southeasterly alongthe meanderings of said Morgan Creek to the Howard-Mitchell County line;thence south along said county line to the southeast corner of Howard County.New Mexico area: The counties of Chaves, Eddy, Otero, Dona Ana, Luna,Grant, and Hidalgo.Arizona area: The counties of Cochise, Greenlee, Graham, Pinal, and Mari-,copa.REGULATION 4. EXTENsION OR REDUCTION OF REGULATED AREAS.The regulated areas designated in regulation 3 may be extended or reduced asmay be found advisable by the Secretary of Agriculture. Due notice of anyextension or reduction and the areas affected thereby will be given in writingto the transportation companies doing business in or through the State in whichsuch areas are located and by publication in newspapers selected by the Secre-tary of Agriculture within the States in which the areas affected are located.-REGULATION 5. CONTROL OF MOVEMENT OF COTTON AND OTHER ARTICLES.Section A. Cotton lint(1) Permits required: Cotton lint shall not be moved or allowed to be movedinterstate from a regulated area to or through any point outside thereof unlessa permit shall have been issued therefor by the United States Department ofAgriculture.(2) Conditions governing the issuance of permits : Permits authorizing theinterstate movement of bales of cotton lint and of samples from a regulatedarea may be issued upon compliance with any one of paragraphs lettered (a)to (g1) inclusive:(a) That the material to be moved consists of baled lint or linters which havebeen compressed to a density of 22 pounds to the cubic foot and fumigated undervacuum under the direction of and in a manner satisfactory to the inspector ; or(b) That the material to be moved consists of samples fumigated under thedirectionn of and in a manner satisfactory to the inspector ; or(c) That the material to be moved consists of second-cut or mill-run linters(as distinuished from " first-cut " linters) which have been ginned from steri-lized seed anid have been passed through special roller equipment in such amanner that, in the judgment of the inspector, all cottonseed and larvT thereinw-\lv d b(e crushed. After passing through the roller equipment such winters areto be so protected as,. in the judgment of the inspector, to prevent any po;si-mility of contamination and if, owing to conditions of infestation in the vicinity.such protection i , ill the jud(gmelnt of the inspector, impracticable, permits mayhe withheld mutil after compression and fumigation as provided under para-graph (a) hereof.(d) That 1he ma1lterial consists either of samples or of baled and compressed(see i p ~ar a ((1) ) lii or Pliter, produced and giined ii a cotuity withinwhich and within 5 miles of which (i) no pink bollworm infestation has beenfo1n(d dingi'". the Smecroil (T ason nor during the two preceding crop seasons,(ii) nu inflested seed cotton is knlown to have been -innl(ed during such period,: and (iii) all cottionseed produced therein has been sterilized in a cottonseed-hientilng mliadline apinroved by and operated in a manner satisfactory to thei'specti r. FUi lga11tion shal, however, also be required for the interstate move-meat froii such onties or reglllated parts thereof to points outside the regu-laTi .1 a1-ea of limtes, grahbots, flues, picker waste, and all forms of unmanufactured cotton fiber other 1han soiiples and commercial baled lint and linters.

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1929] SERVICE AND RIEGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENT 235The crop season within the meaning of this paragraph shall be interim d asextending from June 1 of one year to May 31 of the following year.(e) Cotton lint, delint, samples, and grabbots produced by ainy oil iilI lo atedoutside the regulated areas but authorized under paragraph ~>) bhelNw to crulhcottonseed originating therein shall be returned to the regulated areas -< r hcompression and fumigation as may be required under Previous j~aragraJ uthis section and shall not be moved thereiroin exej ill coiilplianieki \VI I ailapplicable requirements of this section.(f) Uncompressed and undisinfected cotton lint may be moved inter latf un-der permit 2 between regulated areas under such safeguards as ALall 1Ibe requiredby the inspector when such movement is not through aly point out: ide auiy rgu-lated area.(g) Baled cotton lint grown outside of but brought within a regulated areamay be moved interstate under permit out of such reguiated area ol ile tir-nishing of evidence, satisfactory to the inspector, that sueI lint has been hii illin a manner to safeguard it from possible contamination with the pink bhal erI.Section B. Miwellaneous cotton products and other rctstrictcd articles(3) Stalks, bolls, and other pamIrs of the cotton plant aid gin waste 'l l( notbe moved or allowed to be moved interstate from regulated areas.(4) Seed cotton shall not le moved or allmved to be moved inters lati fr*Ilmregulated areas, except that for the purpose of ginning sucli seed el ln maybe moved interstate without permit between two contiguous regulatled aras.Cottonseed and cotton lint ginned from seed cotton so iioved llay be relurnedwithout permit to point of origin.(5) Cottonseed shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate fr*0omregulated areas into or through any point outside such areas Prorildd, Thatupon determination by the Plaiit Qiaraiti e andeC tl Adilinistratiol tlmtreasonable necessity exists for such action, oil mills local ted outside ef 1t41o inl thevicinity of the regulated areas may be authorizetI to crush colto nseed i'i iia I il,in said areas, upon comipliance with such conditions as shahl. il l( j uID1 Kmeii ofsaid administration, eliminate any risk of spread of ihe pi k 1l))1hv lwjrI. SIchauthorized mills shall be operated in mnanmler and by muueihod satTi4oetor leand under the supervision of the adnlinistratien. In ease eI sul,1 iairiz/Aliln.permits may be issued for the interstiate llovelnelit fromi ihe regul at dl arIi as Ilrportions thereof to such authorized inills for crush ing ii oftil d which 1,iibeen sterilizedI in a cottonsee I-heating niachine approved by ;Il i qwait d ill anlialilier salisfatory 1 1we inspector. Permits iay also be issued f
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236 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [Oct.-Dec.,cottonseed hulls, cottonseed cake and meal, or cotton lint shall not be movedor allowed to be moved interstate from a regulated area except under permit.Permits will not be granted until such bagging or other wrappers or containershave been cleaned or disinfected to the satisfaction of the inspector.(9) Lailway cars, boats, and other vehicles which have been used in con-veying cotton and cotton products, or which are fouled with such products, farmhousehold goods, farm equipment, and, if contaminated with cotton, otherarticles shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from a regulatedarea until the same have been thoroughly cleaned or disinfected at the point oforigin or shipment to the satisfaction of the inspector.(10) Hay and other farm products the interstate movement of which has notbeen specifically provided for elsewhere in this regulation may be moved inter-state without restriction until further notice.REGULATION 6. MARKING AND LABEIJNG.Cotton and other articles the interstate movement of which is permitted under regulation 5 shall be subject to such marking and labeling as may be requiredby the inspector. Copies of the permit required by regulation 5 must be attachedto the waybills, conductors' manifests, memoranda, or bills of lading coveringsuch shipments. In the case of cotton lint, and bagging and other wrappers andcontainers, the bales or other parcels of such materials shall be plainly markedwith the name and address of the shipper and the name and address of the con-signee, or such other marking as shall be sufficient in the judgment of the in-spector to identify the material. Containers of cottonseed hulls, cake, and mealwill not be required to be marked, but copies of the permit must be attached tothe waybills, conductors' manifests, memoranda, or bills of lading covering such.shipments.REGULATION 7. CONDITIONS GOVERNING INSPECTION AND ISSUANCE OF PERMITS.Persons intending to move or allow to be moved cotton or other articles forwhich permits are required by these regulations shall make application there-for on forms provided for the purpose as far as possible in advance of theprobable date of shipment. Applications should show the origin, nature, andquantity of the articles which it is proposed to move, together with their exactlocation, and, if practicable, the contemplated date of shipment. All chargesfor storage, cartage, and labor incident to inspection, other than the servicesof inspectors, shall be paid by the shipper. Applications for inspection andissuance of permits must contain the names and addresses of the consignors and consignees and should be made to the office of the Plant Quarantine andControl Administration, San Antonio, Tex., or to such other offices as may belater established, and of which due notice shall have been given.REGULATION 8. COMPLIANCE WITH THESE REGULATIONS A CONDITION OF ACCEPT-ANCE FOR INTERSTATE MOVEMENT OF THE RESTRICTED ARTICLES BY COMMONCARRIERS.Transportation companies and other common carriers shall not accept ormove interstate any of the articles covered by this quarantine other than incompliance with these regulations.REGULATION 9. SHIPMENTS BY THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICUL-TURE.Articles subject to restriction in these regulations may be moved interstateby the United States Department of Agriculture for experimental or scientificpurposes, on such conditions and under such safeguards as may be prescribedby the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration. The container of articlesso moved shall bear, securely attached to the outside thereof, an identifyingtag from the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration showing compliancewith such conditions.These rules and regulations shall be effective on and after January 1, 1930,and shall supersede on that date the rules and regulations issued under Noticeof Quarantine No. 52 (revised), effective on and after August 1, 1927, asamended to date.Done at the city of Washington this 26th day of December, 1929.Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agricul-ture.[SEAL.] R. W. DUNLAP,Acting Secretary of Agricutture.[Copies of above revision were sent to all common carriers In the States of Texas, NewMexico, and Arizona.]

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19291 SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 237NOTICE TO GENERAL PUBLIC THROVhI N EwAERSNotice is hereby given that the Secret ary 4 AgricuIture. of r nu'h riyconferred on him by the plant quarantine a-t of Auzust 20. 1912 87 S .15as amended, has pronulated a revi-ion of the rules and regulation Iu-,i e-imental to Notice of Quartmtine No. 52, on account of the piik hoilworm, I-tive January 1, 1930. An important changIe made at tli is time i ofauthorizing, under certain safeguards, the issuance of ,)lits for the inwr-state movement of cotton "samples" and of comi re' se(l iinld had1 lii ;rlinters from the regulated areas of Arizona, New Mi xico, and Texas, wi*,houtfumigation, when such samples , lint. or IinIters have been prducoe4 in a c unitywithin which and within 5 miles of which no pink-bollworm infesthtain Isbeen found for the two preceding crop seasons.Copies of the said quarantine and of the revised rules and regulations maybe obtained from the Plant Quarantine and Control Administratiii, VnitedStates Department of Agriculture, Washington, D. C.R. W. DUNLAP,Acting S(cretary of Agriclturc.[Published in the following newspapers: The Arizona Republican, Phoenix, Ariz., Janu-ary 15. 180; El Paso Herald, El Ta:o, Tex., May 14, 1930 ; the Record, Poswtl, N. Mox.May 14, 13s0.]ANNOUNCEMENTS RELATING TO SATIN-MOTH QUARANTINE(NO. 53)MODIFICATION OF SATIN-MOTH QUARANTINEINTRODUCTORY NOTEThe amendment which follows adds to the area designated as re'ulated 18towns in Maine, 3 towns in New Hampshire, and 5 towns in Ma1saclusetts,making a total of 40 towns, comprismg approximately 1.871 square iib. Theeffect of the alnendment is to prohibit the inteu-tzate movement of p" I;p)I r and willow trees and parts thereof capable of prot)agation from this add iti uialterritory to outside points.C. L. M\ILATT,Cluief, Plant Quarantine and Conitrol APlimlilistratiOl.AMENDMENT NO. 1 TO REVISED RULES AN) REGULATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL TO NoTICEOF QUARANTINE NO. 5; il:EVISED)(Approved October 81, 1929 ; (ffective on and after November 1, 192!)Under authority conferred by tlh plant quarant e wet of Aui iit 20. 1912(37 St-at. *15), as amltiled by the act of aongre>s )proved March i. 1l 7(Stat. 1184, 1105), it is olderetd 1hit reI:ulItioi 8 of 1he rivisid Iult :l rejic-tions supJhlenIital to Nolice of Q)lar:mntiIe No. 58 revks'd , vn fi l ul t I thisatin math11. which were prwuon-nled November 21. 192 -, l' aill Ihe wisehereby, ai' miled to rwaI as4 fl\vws:1% j_(t1.AT1N 3. RY ;l_1-,VJ' AmJS.In cc rdm cewill) Ihe provi '( lo Noljti t' (f Quarti ne l Ni. 1-rvi; hreguilatBl S tbe Slate>, e'ul t e'. wnii i , I owI. :11I elI e I -2 I .ll , 1 lwvithiin I heir limit *:C't :C uInl io.' 4 of N t ,w L:ntot. Todl bkiiul, Iid W itihim ]w pl t1111t4ord. Ea -, W.iitl 'Eiieldb \ f I l olhur y, iiM1t t , l-borollu h11i , S ''1 t 0 11 , W 1i )l '2flitrlk, Vri 1411 Cr)11w!1; IdIH at' u ,El , 11n111 \e irf i (a t, il I/id/il: r C iori 1I).Mail,: Counlli(" ()fAn rsn i. mb-b n n o in a blWa1fld), anfid Y()rk;: ttow\nI or ily, it/ \\/i t1n// 0,1', 1111 11ar ltaTran t' ', .11)'lgl gl 44i , vid 44e EHl ' 1\ t1, i\ //uthc el: Cain'01. m f :dl 1 ri_ tusry llt ailp ()i u hlr I id I Lown, :1 '' v i I Iu 1 y : I h: 1 i 1Kennebecexcet t h tl. IowNvl; ()I U-111 :''A Venl I. wn o ban .D a iLovell, -Nor~way, O)xf*ord(, P1,aris, piorter,. 'rnun I:w m ne sford, -mod WolodtOck, iii 0 r'rfdn ('otil it w s o h n rPradloy B rig oil, cily (d* 110n111 rW ('Ay ' vr w r ti f albClifton'1. Corinith, Dixim'1n1, Ethhington.' EOibrlEir-taa <; cMush, Hamp111)eni, HroIodn oln.Iusn ed-

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238 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [Oct.-Dec.,Levant, Lincoln, Lowell, Mattamiscontis, Maxfield, Milford, Newburgh, New-port, Orono, Orrington, Passadumkeag, Plymouth, Stetson, Summit Plantation,and Veazie, in Penobscot County; towns of Medford, Milo, and Orneville, inPiscataquis County; and towns of Canaan, Detroit, Fairfield, Pittsfield, andSkowhegan, in Somerset County.Massachusetts: Counties of Barnstable, Bristol, Dukes, Essex, Middlesex,Nantucket, Norfolk, Plymouth, Suffolk, and Worcester; towns of Bernardston,Buckland, Charlemont, Colrain, Conway, Deerfield, Erving, Gill, Greenfield,Heath, Leverett, Leyden, Montague, New Salem, Northfield, Orange, Shelburne,Shutesbury, Sunderland, Warwick, Wendell, and Whately, in Franklin County;towns of Agawam, Brimfield, Chicopee, East Longmeadow, Hampden. Holland,Holyoke, Longmeadow, Ludlow, Monson, Montgomery, Palmer, Russell, South-wick, Springfield, Wales, Westfield, West Springfield, and Wilbraham, in Hamp-den County; and towns of Amherst, Belchertown, Easthampton, Enfield, Granby,Greenwich, Hadley, Hatfield, Northampton. Pelham, Prescott, South Hadley,Southampton, Ware, and Williamsburg, in Hampshire County.New Hampshire: Counties of Belknap, Cheshire, Hillsboro, Merrimack, Rock-ingham, and Stratford; towns of Albany, Bartlett, Brookfield, Chatham, Con-way, Eaton, Effingham, Freedom, Madison. Moultonboro, Ossipee, Sandwich,Tamworth, Tuftonboro, Wakefield, and Wolfeboro. in Carroll County; towns ofAlexandria, Ashland, Bridgewater, Bristol, Campton. Hebron, Holderness,Plymouth, and Rumney, in Grafton County; and towns of Acworth, Charlestown,Goshen, Langdon, Lempster, Springfield, Sunapee, Unity, and Washington, inSullivan County.Rhode Island: The entire State.Vermont: Towns of Brattleboro, Duminerston, Guilford, Putney, Rockingham, Vernon, and Westminster, in Win dham County; and town of Springfield,in Windsor County.Washington: Counties of Clallam. Clarke, Cowlitz. Grays Harbor, Island,Jefferson, King, Kitsap, Lewis, Mason, Pacific, Pierce, San Juan, Skagit, Ska-mania, Snohomish, Thurston, Wahkiakum, and Whatcom.This amendment shall be effective on and after November 1, 1929.Done at the city of Washington, this 31st (lay of October, 1929.Witness my hand and the seal of the United States Department of Agriculture.[SEAL.] ARTHUR M. HYDE,Secretary of Agriculture.I Copies of foregoing amendment were sent to all common carriers in Maine, New Hamp--shire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut.]NOTIcE TO GENERAL PUmLiC THROUGH NEwSPAPERSNotice is hereby given that the Secretary of Agriculture, under authorityconferred on him by the plant quarantine act of August 20, 1912 (37 Stat. 315),.as amended, has promulgated an amendment to the revised rules and regulationssupplemental to Notice of Quarantine No. 53 (revised), on account of the satinmoth, effective November 1, 1929. This amendment adds 38 towns in Maine,3 towns in New Hampshire, and 5 towns in Massachusetts to the area designatedas regulated in regulation 3 thereof. Copies of said amendment may be obtained from the Plant Quarantine and Control Administration, United States,Department of Agriculture, Washington, D. C. ARTHUR M. HYDE,Sccretary of Agriculture.[Piblished in the following newspapers: The Manchester Union Leader, Manchester;N. If., November 9, 1929; the Boston Herald. Boston, Mass., November 11, 1929 ; PortlandPress Iferald, Portland, Me., November 9, 1929.1INSTRUCTIONS TO PosTMAsTERsPosT' OFicE DEPARTMENT,THin AssISTANT' POSTMASTER GENERAL,Washington, November 26, 1929.POSTMASTER.MY DEAR SIR: Trh]ee iS inclosed for your information and guidance a copy'of amendment No. 1 to Revised Rules and Regulations Supplemental to Noticeof Quarantine No. 53 (revised), on account of the satin moth, the purpose ofwhich is to extend the quarantined areas in the States of Maine, Massachusetts,and New Hlampsliire.

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1929] SERVICE AND BEGVLATORY AN N23NEMENTSQuarantine Order No. 53 prohibits the movement frcam any p-init in tll( rtlated areas into or through any miit oute c ithreuf ot rlar an willm Vtrees and parts thereof capable of propagation.Very truly yours,F. A. TI N,Third Assistunt Postm~n t(r Gniiral.TERMINAL INSPECTION OF PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTSPLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS ADDRESSED TO PLACES IN MISSISSIPPITimm ASSISTANT POSTMAsTE GENERALL.WHiuh in!too. Liccmt r 1w 9 9.Postmasters in the State ()f Alississippi are infornd that plr)vi-ji, Labeen made for the terminal inspection of plants and plant pr dm't s at AI-e'rdetn ,Columbus. Greenwood. and MComIib, 'Miss. so that the complete list of -111terminal inspection points in 'Mississippi is as follows:A. and M. College. Gulfport. Ocean Spring.Aberdeen. Holly Springs. P;It;ca-lola.Biloxi. Houston. Poplarville.Brookhaven. Jackson. Senatobia.Cleveland. Laurel. Starkville.Columbus. Incedale. Tul'l''.Corinth. Mr(imb. Virki urr.Durant. Meridian. West Jackson.Greenwood. Moss Point. Wiggins.Grenada. Natchez. Yazo City.IponI receiving the refuirtI postage as prescribed by par3araih 8. a r. Ille ' 40 'it Th\ a1 'nl Arv 'or i' hii lhe ':u-' '>ith f l' Iiitid Sitlte r. T'h' Shint tfh 1 Nw N 'low i, in (hot iI t' fstafte -ifmnt i f l ia ( n y 7r~gu~n If , l i rc-I l l liw jIlw l' c l&!1y a}Q larai i .a ('a NJt .l ).!In the 11w f h I'l'd Sltt-s 1% Thw4e,the int(r,,4,tc shipmtewt ()1 2(' cmn rami :m i 1*,1\ I-"ttlt(, reg~t1 i, ll",. 1114, dbe cII& IIII 1dcI d(6 -I :11 d c(Plant Q1uaranI inelk ('.I, Nf). :1;7)

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240 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [Oct.-,Dec.,EUROPEAN CORN-BORER QUARANTINEIn the case of the United States v. The New York Central Railroad Co., in theinterstate transportation of 25 bags (2,500 pounds) of shelled popcorn to apoint outside the quarantined area, without inspection and certification, thedefendant pleaded guilty and was fined $50. (Plant Quarantine Case No. 375.)JAPANESE-BEETLE QUARANTINEIn the case of the United States v. John Scoblick, Archbald, Pa., in the inter-state transportation of approximately 4S crates of blackberries and 129 basketsof tomatoes from Carbondale, Pa., to a point outside the quarantined area, without inspection and certification, the defendant pleaded guilty and wasfined $100. (Plant Quarantine Case No. 380.)MEDITERRANEAN FRUIT FLY AND MELON FLY QUARANTINEIn the case of the United States v. Young Yuen Yin, Honolulu, Hawaii, inthe shipment by express via the S. S. Manukai of 28 mangoes and 4 avocados,without inspection and certification, to the National Dollar Stores, San Fran-cisco, Calif., the defendant pleaded guilty and was fined $25, with a suspendedsentence and probation for one year. (Plant Quarantine Case No. 376.)In the case of the United States v. Margaret M. Chung, Honolulu, Hawaii, inthe mail shipment via the S. S. Malolo of two avocados, without inspection and certification, to Mrs. Daisy Smith, Grand Rapids, Mich., the defendant pleadedguilty, sentence was suspended for one year, and the defendant placed onprobation for a like period. (Plant Quarantine Case No. 378).In the case of the United States v. Robert Matoba, a pantryman on the S. S.Calawaii, of the Los Angeles Steamship Co., in bringing to the mainland fromHonolulu, Hawaii, 24 mangoes and 2 papayas, without inspection and certifica-tion, the defendant was sentenced to 90 days in jail.SWEETPOTATO AND YAM QUARANTINE (DOMESTIC)In the case of the United States v. Tong Yee Wai, an employee of the SunChung Leong Co., of Honolulu, Hawaii, in the shipment to the mainland, onthe S. S. Manoa, leaving Honolulu on November 12, 1929, of a quantity of yamsconcealed in two crates of taro, the defendant pleaded guilty, sentence wassuspended, and he was placed on probation for one year. The defendant wasseverely reprimanded by the court and given to understand that another occur-rence of a similar offense would result in his imprisonment.QUARANTINES AFFECTING MEXICAN PRODUCTSIn the case of the United States versus the persons listed below for attempt-ing to smuggle in contraband plant material the penalties indicated wereimposed by the United States customs officials.Name Address Contraband PenaltyMrs. Carmen Martinez -------Naco, Ariz----------8 sweet limes.-------------------------$5Tomas Garcia.---------------Nogales, Ariz--------10 peaches, 11 pomegranates, 8 sweet 5limes, 9 guavas.Frank A. Krupp ----------------do.--------------. .35 quinces ----------------------------5F. Sa ndov al --------------------do -------------8 quinces, 6 pomegranates------------5Severino Valera.--------------Brownsville, Tex-----12 avocados, with seed ---------------58. 0. Betters and Jack Ogbie do ------------. -----.do -------------------------------5W. G. Davis --------------------( 0--------------. .6 avocados, with seed ----------------5Roman GCuerro. -----------------. _-( 0.-------------4 avocados, with seed.----------------5Sr. Santiago R obles -------------____do --------------. 20 pounds sweetpotatoes--------------15It. Gonzales ---.----------Eagle Pass, Tex------12 guavas, 7 avocados -------------------5Awn astacio M artinez -(1-----do --------------3 oranges.---------------_-------------5Julian Naranjo ----------El Paso, Tex ---------3 avocados ----------------------------5Conception Cerda de Aleazar -------do ---------------2 pears.-----------------------------5T omi Qyiri an d Martha Quin ------.d o ----------------2 apples, 1 orange.---------------------5Ysalel Cord ona .---.-----------(0 -------------3 plants.------------------------------5A ntonia 0. Rodriguez ---.--_1 _ -.do-----------------9 pieces sugarcane-.--------------------5A. A her i__--._ -----------------iidalgo, Tex---------2 avocados---------------------------5IJulian Tronario ---.do.---------------4 avocados.----------------------------. 5Juan Pefia _(1---. -----.---.--_o ---------------14 avocados ---------------------------. 5h enr y Guerro -----------------Lared o, Tex ----------7 quinces-----------------------------5G. Tre o ------------------.-. ----do--------------. .7 avocados ---------------------------50. S. berera . ---.-. --. d.-.o.---------------. .2 avocados, 2 mangoes.----------------5Jose M Sanchez ..------------------.d--------------. .39 avocados, 11 plants----------------10E. A. Diaz ----------.------------(0---------------1 plant, 26 figs, 8 peaches, 5 pomegran5ates, 35 pears.B. Saldovar.---------------. do-------------5 plants, 1 avocado, 1 cherimoya. 5

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LIST OF CURRENT QUARANTINES AND OTHER RESTRICTIVEORDERS AND MISCELLANEOUS REGU-LATIONS[The domestic and foreign quarmntinos and ofthr rostrictive crd rs 5unhnYrized herinare issued under the authority of t het ilanr (;uarantinW act of Auu-t i'' 1o12. a mThe Mexican border regulations and the export certinlch tion rvua-ti U: re i'>1i undYspecific acts of Congress.]QUARANTINE ORDERSThe numiers ass i-ned to theoz qua rantiint indicate merely tllo hr>nI uulorder of issuance of both domestic tiid foreign qutiraniine ii 01 n' n rielalseries. The quarantine naunumer miiila!. ill this li't re qu;,anl.1 whllic\lhave either been supersede (Ir rev fkod. F'W e' 'Veito i -ie 'Vt 1ref tro e tquarantines are here classifieal as domnwtic and forein.1)oMES-.TIC Qr ' ANTINEsDate pa-ma.-Quaraitine No. 0: P rohibir-, exoeopt a prov* d 4 i ih rullkand regulations snlppleinental thereto, the iliter4tae wolfnoen 01 <> ailna,and daMte-palin offshoot.z from Riverside Cinty, (alif. east of ih I :ll' PLr-mardino meridian: Ini1 erial Counhity. Calif.: Yunin. Maricfpa. ad :l Colun-tie'-, Ariz.: and Wel) C(ouny. Tex. onI aeoouaat of The Parlaioria >wnho IPo-latOria blnchard i ) and the Pl l anicov'(tccu senle ( Pho o a 0 w urla P .Hawaiian fruits antid r/(a l( .-Quaran ii N. 1'. rvised: I 'c r i xcept as provided in the iruls and rngulajtiohs sui'4liental tlwroto. ll t, Vo-ment from the Territory of IHawaii into or through any otlwr Torriiory. >1a o.or District of the Unitod States of all fruits and vogetabW'N in Til t( ,rraw state, on oUnt of the \Vditerranleana fruit fly ( ratilis .(111 J ['Ii a Andthe me lan liv fI('a1(N cicUirlita ISauarean(.-Quarantine N'. 1: Prohilits the IMovomint i frnm th0 Trri-tories of Hawaii and Porto lti(o into or through any otl Torrior\. Si taot orDi trict of the United Stat's of living ries of s(Warcana. or vin i oV vartthoreof, on account of (ertin injurious l5t'iN and fniou. diNv .sirclitpotato and * aIm.-Quaranltine No. 80: ProlihilN tlw 'V.ma't ro:ithe Territories of Hawvttii anid Porto Rico int ow thar' on.h1 any ot i vr Terrilory.State, or Dist riot of the iiited Stat ( of all varieticof \woot in e1 myas I>o u haua.a allo I)Io.orra a. .1e.21 irdlvs11 h 0io IOr wt jIthe same are intended. oIl aceounit of I -litweet Pt ato weevil (C.' f<{ wm U' rand the sweet liotal seaai'aboe a I;luscopf b I-tacit).I ////aU(, ;la a Is.A lnaranlt ilt a, 8 '2: l 'r''i i'it Tli unk-vl v <1torie'of hawaii and P'orto Raico injo or Iliiouijh ai.Y olhir l(10Y rDistrict of the Ulited S (a)t I of any hpccie or var01 '! o iSmI.). rogardh'z of 114 1i e 1f'r Which ho ;anw aIl wtwo injurious wee vis ( h1rim 1doc/i I' ,s w(1'c , Its Ild 1/ lo. 'M si a NB/ac'-NO/ rs a.J--)uiaraunt No. :N. ta.u nanoUi: I 'ih terstiate 1,i any Ilt out -.idI' (f Il 1 1luarall ilard :Ut )i Ill(berry (ht rn rix al irt a : ia1 ilt s h:Iiiiltnual vl aother ( S ie' u 1 eris ni \ldal a .n :arIo n lilt, Illw~hlt'atr. anat. bIrl y. lye. alid !un y1 i al t a d iuE;'rI/ a (1 ('(fr( /ao p Qu: r~a lit iii, No. ;:: rr\ :. ! : 1 1 -vido i t ' l .:af rO wua 1 f Ilo ' u! 11r"'t 'stn; e to wy lf liot 10i l lo lao r \ n(\v es (rl sa' t kol ). C(olaoia i(.1ut I a or'Ut I rl i 'a aOhio. Im1dianat, and West Vir-ginitt.

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242 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [Oct.-Dec.,Gipsy moth and broiwn-tail moth.-Quarantine No. 45: Prohibits, except asprovided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto, the movement inter-state to any point outside of the infested area, or from points in the generallyinfested area to points in the lightly infested area, of stone or quarry products,and of the plants and the plant products listed therein. The quarantine coversall the New England States.Hawaiian and Porto Rican cotton, cottonseed, and cottonseed produts.-Quarantine No. 47: Prohibits, except as provided in the rules and regulationssupplemental thereto, the movement of cotton, cottonseed, and cottonseed prod-ucts from the Territories of Hawaii and Porto Rico into or through any otherTerritory. State, or District of the United States on account of the pink boll-worm (Pectinophora gossypiella) and the cotton blister mite (Erioph yesjos.sypii), respectively.Japanese beetle.-Quarantine No. 48, revised: (1) Prohibits, except as pro-vided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto, the interstate move-ment of farm, garden, and orchard products of all kinds and grain and foragecrops of all kinds from the generally infested area to or through any pointoutside thereof, and (2) prohibits, except as provided in the rules and regula-tions supplemental thereto, the interstate movement of nursery, ornamental,and greenhouse stock and all other plants and sand, soil, earth, peat, compost,and manure from the generally infested area to the lightly infested areas, orfrom either the generally infested area or the lightly infested areas to orthrough any point outside thereof. The generally infested area includes theState of New Jersey and parts of the States of Connecticut, Delaware, Mary-land, New York, and Pennsylvania; the lightly infested areas include theDistrict of Columbia and parts of the States of Connecticut, Delaware, Mary-land, Massachusetts, New York, and Pennsylvania.United States quarantined to protect Hawaii.-Quarantine No. 51: Prohibits,except as provided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto, the move-ment from the United States to the Territory of Hawaii, as ships' stores or asbaggage or effects of passengers or crews, of sugarcane, corn, cotton, alfalfa,and the fruits of the avocado and papaya in the natural or raw state, on ac-count of injurious insects, especially the sugarcane borer (Diatraca saccharalisFab.), the alfalfa weevil (Hypera postica Gyll.). the cotton-boll weevil (An-thononus grandis Boh.), the papaya fruit fly (Toxotrypana curricaudaGuerst.), and certain insect enemies of the fruit of the avocado.Pink bol/wor.-Quarantine No. 52, revised: Prohibits, except as provided inthe rules and regulations supplemental thereto, the interstate movement fromthe regulated areas of Texas, Arizona, and New Mexico of (1) cotton, includingall parts of the plant, seed cotton, cotton lint, linters, and all other forms ofunmanufactured cotton lint, gin waste, cottonseed. cottonseed bulls, cottonseedcake and meal; (2) bagging and other containers and wrappers of cotton andcotton products: (3) railway cars, boats, and other vehicles which have beenused in conveying cotton and cotton products or which are fouled with suchproducts : (4) hay and other farm products , and (5) farm household goods,farm equipment, and if contaminated with cotton, any other articles.x at in oth .-Quarantine No. 53, revised: Prohibits the interstate movementto points outside of the regulated areas in Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont,lassaclsetts, IRhode Island, Connect'cut, and Washington of all species orvalricties of poplar and willow trees or parts thereof capable of propagation.or/o Pica a frilits and [0(11(1les.-Quarantine No. 58: Prohibits, except asw-ovide(l ill tie rules an(d regulations si)pplemenital thereto. the movement from1w Ti'erri Trv of IPorto Rico into or through any other Territory, State, orDi Ilricl f Fhe I ied S ta tes of all fruits and vegetal es in the raw or un-rO1(*( ssei] sti10, In : 'eolml t of injur ious in sectsm iidii the West Iidian fruitfly ( is/rep/la /fr('rculus Wied.) and the bean-pod borer (Martica testulalisSaw(. soi], or tjlh, 11i!1 plants from Hairaii (d i'orto Rico.-QuarantineNo. 0: PVrolibils Ilhe llmovemnoit f om the Territories of Hawaii aiid PortoRI i n l or 1r 1( oi l a1n1y (41ir Terri tory, State. or District of the UnitedStates of Ii (ofle]I tili cloe oceani sand), soil, or earth, around the rootsof 1h)ii, 14 prevent 1he spread of white grubs, the Japanese rose beetle, andtermi tos or white ailts.Th urlri c 'cri/.--Q( ua raniiiniie No. 01, revised: Prohibits the interstate move-in( il of. ''lhurib )eri1, inll( iniiiig all arts of t il Ilant, f1om any point in Arizona.Alnd p hif s, except as provided ill the riles 1nd regulations supplemental

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1929] SERVICE AND IEGULATOiY ANNO9NMENT 24thliqreto, the interstate mo, Vmt ri'm th regui d a roa tf A r ijia 4 iicotton. including all paris of tlhe plant, seed cotol. cotton linii, lill .zrs' I lother ftrmils of tilliiu iufactu red ottoin lint. i waste. "Atllnl 1. -hulls, and cottonseed cake arni meal (2) wa.ri and uther cl-iula rs alwrVlppers ul coItoli and cotul i dts: 2; railwa1 cars. hV ns, aPI ulhervelhicxles which have beeli ue t ill colnveying. cotton ail cottol jprlldua > rwhich are fouled with such products; (4) hay and other fPtm prt V: :nid(5) larm Louselhold iLoods, fairm equipment, ani, if contaiaiiited with cut ln,ally other article-.iVar)(6~xu.s 1;ul s.--Quarantine No. 62: Prodihiit s, except t -jili i piherules and regulations suppleniental thereto. the inter'ac e 'am1 rm everyState ill the continental United Sta1es and the District of CoIlubiltija of PcIbulb, , oi aIcc)Unlt of certainl ilijuriublilb p>t s. 1'incildind iltie i rcaier iih fly(crodon equeitriS Fab.). the le4ser bull) fly (Eumcru striqatu, Falleii), anldithe bulb eelworm (Tylc'ch us dip'a'i Kuehn).White-pine blis'/uter.r.-Quarantinc No. 63: Prohibit. except a:i ' privi led inthe rules and regulations supplemental thereto, the interstate movem-eit fromevery State in the continental United Sates and the Ditrict f Colmbini offiveleaf pines (Pinus) or currant anl gooseberry plants (Ribus and Gro-u>laria.including ,ultivated or wild or ornamental sorts.Mexican fruit worm.-Quarantine No. 64: Prohibits, except af! providel inthe rules and regulations supplemiental thereto, the interstate movement fromthe regulated area of Texas of fruits of all varieties.Woodyate rust.-Quarantine No. 65: Prohibits the interstate movement frimthe reg-ulated area in the State of New York of trees, bra nclies, lims. ur Iowirof Scotch pine (Pinmi .Ylrestris). Canary Ishin(l pine (P. canaricu'ii. Slihpine (P. caribaea ), Japanese red pine (P. dcn.i.flora '. Corsican pine (P. ' -ripoiretiana ), Stone pine (P. pinca ), Western yellow pine (P. /pondcroa i, Mine-rey pine (P. radiata). Loblolly pine (P. tacda). or Jersey pine (P. ir;i, w:I.or of any variety thereof, (11' of any spe Cies or variety of hard pine hereafterfound to Ibe susCeptible to the Woodgate rust.A iatic bIc(tlc (nd Asiatic grd(n bectle.--Quarantine No. 06: Pdi'ibit--.except as provided in the rules and rulatiins su iipplmental thereto .Ilie iiiiter-state movement from the State of New Jersey and from the regulated irea-' ofConnecticut, New York, Pennsylvania, aIl Vir'inia and the Disti 1t 4f d 1C um-bia of (1) nursery. ornainiental. n1l (reenhwi i us'e 'tock, and ill piicr ' nittind (2) rand1(, soil, earth. poat. compost. anil ma nure.Ph,00oe I peach disea(w.-Q rati ie No. 07: Prohibits. exciopt a provi1P1 inthe riles and reanlftionis slpllemlcnt7al thereto. the initer''alte miVcni fimIle re'(m'tllted re:s of Georgia 11niil Alibama of peach tree .iawh 1' .nett.iirine trees, nectirine ro14. and all kind and varietiesof oee r i r'graftocl or hmlIdleu oln peahel (IIr neoarine roots-.Mf'itrrrancaj fruit flif.Qnrani inc No. G6 revie"d :Priihibit. i\ct noFlrovideid in lhe rule anl re11l ti 'l I Ie a I I lirc , U h I e i i -I I nI I t 1 m t, I Inh, 1 1,a in -rt i , : I I I' Fii , If \I) fr I -I v' 1lnd I b e Ind 111 1i r Ii 'I I u a f a k I li x da I I In(2) San:11d sei il, otrth .compost. 'nl Ia1mre; I rliwa I r lwi * 1(illr v h11 111n' :md cont'li r wh h N001 1 bw n ()I1'!rN 1ifl'PtIs "r vei'tI li 14: a (IF iii i lu~ iale-'pIn i eF~l 1nh nIai ( 1 n I frivi : I1 1 lil ie v Ml I iiil, T ll 'l II I I \ VOft l I IlIluen lr t fl 1, F Il~ la I li l r a ( ~thf 01atl I-: Frit l N .fH,S'(H 0ot 4 n Ll 11 iWNi. AV: : f,; I l I , I1 I A I. I:0 cria fr1% 111 r'Z In I I s Ie de : Ioorngsswetlies gapfrit mndesnerauctTms fri hlude J M Ng ,on n a i

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244 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [Oct.,Dec.,White-pine blister rust.-Quaran tine No. 7, as amended: Forbids the impor-tation from each and every country of Europe and Asia, and from the Dominionof Canada and Newfoundland, of all fiveleaf pines and all species and varietiesof the genera Ribes and Grossularia.Pink bollworm.-Quarantine No. 8, as amended: Forbids the importation fromany foreign locality and country, excepting only the locality of the ImperialValley, in the State of Lower California, Mexico, of cottonseed (including seedcotton) of all species and varieties, and cottonseed hulls. Seed cotton, cotton-seed, and cottonseed hulls from the Imperial Valley may be entered under permitand regulation.Seeds of avocado or alligator pear.-Quarantine No. 12: Forbids the impor-tation from Mexico and the countries of Central America of the seed of theavocado or alligator pear on account of the avocado weevil (Heilipus lauri).Sugarcane.-Quarantine No. 15: Forbids the importation from all foreigncountries of living canes of sugarcane, or cuttings or parts thereof, on accountof certain injurious insects and fungous diseases. There are no Federal restric-tions on the entry of such materials into Hawaii and Porto Rico.Citrus nursery stock.-Quarantine No. 19: Forbids the importation from allforeign localities and countries of all citrus nursery stock, including buds,scions, and seeds, on account of the citrus canker and other dangerous citrusdiseases. The term "citrus," as used in this quarantine, includes all plantsbelonging to the subfamily or tribe Citratae.European pines.-Quarantine No. 20: Forbids, on account of the Europeanpine-shoot moth (Evetria buoliana), the importation from all European coun-tries and localities of all pines not already excluded by Quarantine No. 7.Indian corn or maize and related plants.-Quarantine No. 24, as amended: Forbids the importation from southeastern Asia (including India, Siam, Indo-China, and China), Malayan Archipelago, Australia, New Zealand, Oceania,Philippine Islands, Formosa, Japan, and adjacent islands, in the raw or unman-ufactured state, of seed and all other portions of Indian corn or maize (Zeamays L.) and the closely related plants, including all species of Teosinte(Euchlaena), Job's-tears (Coix), Polytoca, Chionachne, and Sclerachne, onaccount of the downy mildews and Physoderma diseases of Indian corn, exceptthat Indian corn or maize may be imported under permit and upon com-pliance with the conditions prescribed in the regulations of the Secretary ofAgriculture.Citrus friuits.-Quarantine No. 28: Forbids the importation from eastern andsoutheastern Asia (including India, Siam, Indo-China, and China), theMalayan Archipelago, the Philippine Islands, Oceania (except Australia, Tas-mania, and New Zealand), Japan (including Formosa and other islands adja-cent to Japan), and the Union of South Africa, of all species and varieties ofcitrus fruits, on account of the citrus canker, except that oranges of themandarin class (including satsuma and tangerine varieties) may be importedunder permit and upon compliance with the conditions prescribed in the regu-lations of the Secretary of Agriculture.Sceetpotato and yon.-Quarantine No. 29: Forbids the importation forany purpose of any variety of sweetpotatoes and yams (Ipomoea batatas andDioscorca spp.) from all foreign countries and localities, on account of thesweetpotato weevils (Cylas spp.) and the sweetpotato scarabee (Euscepesbataae).B(nauna platnts.-Quarantine No. 31: Forbids the importation for any pur-pose of any species or variety of banana plants (Musa, spp.), or portionstheivol, from all foreign countries and localities, on account of the banana-root b(rer (Coomopolites sordidus). This quarantine places no restrictions onthe imtportation of the fruit of the banana. (For restrictions on the entry ofthe fru it of the banaaa, see Quarantine 56.)Bumhoo.-Qua rantne No. 34: Forbids the importation for any purpose ofany variety ()F balboo seed, plants, or cuttings thereof capable of propagation,including 1ll tenera and species of the tribe Bambnseae, from all foreign coun-fries aIn lo allies, on account of dangerous plant diseases, including thebamboo snm1t ( Ustilagjo shiraiana). This quarantine order does not apply tobamboo timber consisting of the mature dried culms or canes which are im-por'd for fishing 'rods, furniture making, or other purposes, or to any kind ofarticle manufactured from bamboo, or to bamboo shoots cooked or otherwisepreser'ved.Nursery stock, plan ts, and seeds.-Quarantine No. 37: Forbids, except asprovided in the regulations supplemental thereto, the importation .of nursery

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1929] SERVICE AND REGULATORY ANNOUNCEMENTS 245stock and other plants and seeds from all foreign countries and l"e"1itie onaccount of certain injurious in1secti ail fungous anidee. I' r this ( r n-tine the following plant products and seeds may he imported without restrierionwhen free from sand, soil, or earth, unless covered by special (uarantine orother restrictive orders: Plant products capable of propagation, imported ftrmedicinal, food, or manufacturing purposes. and field, vegetable, and flowerseeds. Cut flowers from the Dominion of Canada are also allowed entry with-out permit. The entry of the following nursery stock and other plants andseeds is permitted under permit:(1) Bulbs of the following genera: Lilium (lily), Convallaria (lily of thevalley), Hyacinthus (hyacinth), Tulipa (tulip) , and Creus and, until furthernotice, Chionodoxa (glory-of-the-snow), Galanthus (snowdrop), Scilla squilll),FritUlaria imp(rialiN (crown imlperinl'), F. iw h'agris (gu.wa-ien flower,,Muscari (grape hyacinth), Ixia, and Eranthis (winter aconite).(2) Stocks, cuttings, scions, and buds of fruits for propagation; except thatstocks of apple, pear, quince, andl Mazzard (herry may not he imported underpermit or otherwise after June 30, 1930. Other fruit stocks, including Maliaiebcherry and Myrobalan plum, may not be imported uni(ler permit or wt lrwiseafter June 30, 1931.(3) Rose stocks for propagation, including Manetti, Multiflora, Brier Rose,and Rosa Rugosa.(4) Nuts, including palm seeds for propagation.(5) Seeds of fruit, forest, ornamental, and shade trees; seeds of deciduuiuand evergreen ornamental shrubs; and seeds of hardy perennial plants; exceptthat mango seeds may not be imported under permit or otherwise. Provision is also made for the issuance ot special permits under safeguardsto be prescribed in such permits for the entry in limited quantities of nurserystock and other plants and seeds not covered in the preceding lists for the pur-pose of keeping the country supplied with new varieties and necessary propatat-ing stock.European corn. borer.-Quarantine No. 41, revised: Forbids, except as pro-vided in the rules and regulations supplemental thereto, the importation fromall foreign countries and localities of the stalk and all other parts, whether uieIdfor packing or other purposes, in the raw or unmanufactured state, of Iidiancorn or maize, broomcorn, sweet sorghums, grain sorghums, Sudan grra. J(Ihn-son grass, sugarcane, pearl millet, napier grass. teosinte, aind Ju's-lears, inaccount of the European corn borer (Pyrausta nubilulis) and other dangerousinsects and plant diseases.Stock., cuttings, scions, and buds of fruits.-Quarantine No. 44 Frbid,except as provided( in the iule(,s anid regulatiolls sipplleliital thereto, IIhe imni-portation of stocks, cuttings, scions, and ludas of fruits fromn Asia, *lpai, P'ilip-pine Islands, and Oceania (including Australia and New Zelaiid), in accimitof dangerous plant diseases, including Japanese apple cankers, blister hight,and rusts, and injurious insect pests, including the oriental fruit moth, tli. I p, trfruit borer, the apple mithi, ett.Scd or paddy rice.-Quarantine No. 55: Forids, except from the lZipibldicof Mexlico upon coliiianice with tile conditions prescribed in the rul s and I re-hatio ns1 supplelental thereto, the 11iport'tion 1 f seed ( or pinddy rice r11 :11foreign countries and iocalitivs, (in account of injurioul funtirous di -ofrice, including dowily miIdow ( W ' 4c/rospor! ,iIacrOc rw l, ]( I, 'mIiilit 1 E /1o1 , )w,ory ' ) blight (O)wpor( oryizorlm), and glume blotch ( tIanomm i alem -rum), as well as daii eIvrius insect pests.Fruib and fit reablI.-QlarniIte No. 5., as amienided: Forils', exc( tprovided in he rules and reit ulaitions silppleliental theriti t he imIp rai not fruits and vegetables not 8 already the subject ()I spci l l:iiar Tile' ()I' IT1irrestrictive orders, and of plaits or 1o)r1ions of plants usAed :ini mriiill connectionl with hipme t f siofut n eetabb4 (rIm flllll '111d,c{(iIu t ries and localities other thanii 01e I)oillioli of 'an1 , :1 ii Iinjuriouls ilsects, inchldiiig fruit and 11+elo flies (TryleI i ile ). Ii ltidIi :1111dsupersede Qua rant ine No. 49 oni account 14 Ole citr-iHaic li.filag s iulf.-Quaralit ine No. 59: Forbids he iliT :titi n i l :!1 N I a(dvarieties of wheat (Triticum spp.) ad whe'a Iroduits, unl'' uo mII 1 ir .processed as to have ilestr(iyeld all 4ag smut sp-11r11 s, fri 'imii iudia .J1111. Chn,Australia, Union of South Africa, Italy, aid Spain.

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246 PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROL ADMINISTRATION [Oct.-Dec.,OTHER RESTRICTIVE ORDERSThe regulation of the entry of nursery stock from foreign countries into theUnited States was specifically provided for in the plant quarantine act. Theact further provides for the similar regulation of any other class of plants orplant products when the need therefor shall be determined. The entry of theplants and plant products listed below has been brought under such regulation:Nursery stock.-The conditions governing the entry of nursery stock andother plants and seeds from all foreign countries and localities are indicatedabove under " Foreign quarantines." (See Quarantine No. 37, revised.)Potatoes.-The importation of potatoes is forbidden altogether from thecountries enumerated in the potato quarantine. Potatoes may be admitted fromother foreign countries under permit and in accordance with the provisions ofthe regulations issued under order of December 22, 1913, bringing the entry ofpotatoes under restriction on account of injurious potato diseases and insectpests. Importation of potatoes is now authorized from the following countries:The Dominion of Canada, Bermuda, and Cuba: also from the States of Chihua-hua and Sonora and the Imperial Valley of Lower California, Mexico. Theregulations issued under this order have been amended so as to permit, freeof any restrictions whatsoever under the plant quarantine act, the importationof potatoes from any foreign country into the Territories of Porto Rico and Hawaii for local use only and from the Dominion of Canada into the UnitedStates or any of its Territories or Districts.Avocado, or alligator pear.-The order of February 27, 1914, and the regulations issued thereunder restrict the importation from Mexico and the countriesof Central America of the fruits of the avocado, or alligator pear, on accountof the avocado weevil. Entry is permitted through the port of New York only,and is limited to the large, thick-skinned variety of the avocado. The impor-tation of the small, purple, thin-skinned variety of the fruit of the avocado andof avocado nursery stock under 18 months of age is forbidden.Cotton.-The order of April 27, 1915, and the regulations issued thereunderrestrict the importation of cotton from all foreign countries and localities, onaccount of injurious insects, including the pink bollworm. These regulationsapply in part to cotton grown in and imported from the Imperial Valley, in theState of Lower California, Mexico.Cottonseed products.-The order of June 23, 1917, and the regulations issuedthereunder restrict the importation of cottonseed cake. meal, and all othercottonseed products. except oil, from all foreign countries, and a second order ofJune 23, 1917, and the regulations issued thereunder restrict the importation ofcottonseed oil from Mexico on account of injurious insects, including the pinkbollworm.Rules and regulations governing (1) entry for nniediate export, (2) entryfor immediate tra nsportation and exportation in bond, and (3) safeguardingthe arrival at a port where entry or landing is not intended of prohibitedplants and plant products.-These rules and regulations, as revised August 1,1920, govern the unloading and transfer of cargoes and transportation in bondwhen it is determined that such entry can be made without involving risk tothe plant cultures of the United States, and also provide for the safeguardingat a port or within the territorial waters of the United States where entry orlanding is not intended of ainy prohibited or restricted plants and plant products.Rules and regulations governing the mo cement of plants and plant productsinto and out of theo District of Colunbia.-These rules and regulations werepromlulgated August 26, 1920, under the amendment to the plant quarantine actof May 31 of that year and were revised March 29, 1929. They provide for theregulation of the movement of plants and plant products, including nurserystock, from or into the District of Columbia and for the control of injuriousplant diseases and insect pests within the said District.MISCELLANEOUS REGULATIONSRulcs anid regulations prohibiting the movcnwnet of cotton and cottonseedfrom Mexico into the United A'tates, and governing the entry into the UnitedStates of rail(iay cars ind other vehicles, freight, express, baggage, or othermaterials from Mexico at border points.-These rules aInd regulations, promul-gated June 23, 1917, pursuant to authority given in the appropriation act forthe United States Department of Agriculture for the fiscal year 1918, and sincerepeated annually, are designed to prevent the entry of the pink bollworm of

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19291 SEIICE AND REGTLATORY ANYrU1NCEMIEXTS 2-icotton which is known to exis t wIdvelv in Mexico. They pr viile fir 11w mAnation of passenger bagage, for lie di ilfoetion ol raiwa' e.r1rLWexpress, and other shipmnent -. and for the eleai of deniiwti iw e ui LwMexican freiglit. All fees collected for cleaiiing i diinfewting ai ay earLare deposited in the United States Treasury as mi:cellai u' rec plt-.The inspectors concerned in the enforcieimnt of these regu1;tioiis t 1 tlerpoints are charged also with enforcement of restrictions oil the entry (A pu iulasand plant products under various foreign plant quranitiiie-.Rules aind regulate ions of /t( SecIary of Agriculturc yoW r n oti I flNt /cand certification of plants und 0la produce; offccd for Cxport to int 1111sall itary reqtUirVciueit. of foreign' coiiiuri .-Tlese rules anoid re1uba io a w erepromulgated August 9, 1926. pursuant to authority given in ie appainact for the United States Department of Agriculture for the yii etl y ar 1127.They provide for the inspection and certificatioi of fruits, vegetal'' iurwrystock, and other plants and plant products intended fOr exj !ort tu coultrrequiring such cetification. All fees collected for this service are deposited iithe United States Treasury as miscellaneous receipts.ORGANIZATION OF THE PLANT QUARANTINE AND CONTROLADMINISTRATIONLEE A. STRO0G, Chief of Adininistration.S. A. RoHwER, Assistant Chief.B. CoN.NoR, Business Manager.R. C. ALTHOUSE, InforinatiOnaT Officer.C. A. LOCKE, Executive Assistant.H. T. CRoNIN, Ad1ministra tiv Assistaint.E. R. SASSCER, in Chiarge Foreigu Plant Quarantincs.S. B. FRACKER, in Chfarge Domestic Plant Quaraintines.A. F. BURGEss, in Field Charge Gips! Mo/h and Broawn-Tail Moth Quarantnt(Headquarters, Meirose Highlan ds, Mass.).L. H. WORTHLEY, in Field Charge Europefu Corn Borer Q1uulraitine (R Htd-quarters, Eastern Section, Bosto, MaJ5s.; Wcstcrln >(f'ecion. Toldo, hioh .C. H. HADLEY, in Fiild Charge Japaiiese Be(le Quaran int iladtarH / ,Camuden, X. J.)R. E. McDONALD, in Field Chiargc Pink Bollicuri f nd Tliurbria W1fi'l Q(a -mitines (Headquarters, Sa Antonio. Tex.).B. L. BOYDEN, in, Ficld Charge Datc Scialc Quarxntine i ( leidquartcr .Indi ,Calif.).M. 11. FoRD, Acting in Field Chfirge Mxician. Fruit Worwn Quaranlitbic , Had-quafrtf'rs, hiarlingen, T(x.).VILMON NEWELL, in Fielft Chiarge Mdefit erraneilan Fruit Fly Qur(louatic (inFlorida ( Hladquarters, Orlanldo, Fl.).A. C. RAKER, Burcn Of inomology, iii FiId C hair In-cstiyatioal Work,Mediterranean Fruit Fly Quarantine ( Hleadquart rs. (iandu. Fa.)P. A. 1IOIDALE, in FiCIfI ('11lrf1C Jlcditrr'HaniIa(1 Fr Uit Fit QlumtlitutiH EnI 1w Imfint rind Inspcetion Work in Nfiltcs oflir t hum FloridU (11 Hi Iadqlirte rs,Atlanta, Ga.).ADVISORY FEDERAL PLANT QUARANTINE BOARDLm A. STRONG, ChaitUMal.J. E. GiRAF, Ilurciu of Entouology. M jmbir.R. A. OAKLEY, Bur'au Of Plant i181 itry, MCn bir.M. B. WAITE, BurITiU of Plant Indulst/Y. Memn Li r.ot t Scrvic, .m

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